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Sample records for affect cardiac function

  1. The expression of CG9940 affects the adaptation of cardiac function, mobility, and lifespan to exercise in aging Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wen, Deng-Tai; Zheng, Lan; Ni, Liu; Wang, Hui; Feng, Yue; Zhang, Min

    2016-10-01

    The CG9940 gene, which encodes the NAD(+) synthase protein in Drosophila, is conserved in human, zebra fish, and mosquito. NAD(+) synthase is a homodimer, which catalyzes the final step in de novo nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) biosynthesis, an amide transfer from either ammonia or glutamine to nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NaAD). Both the CG9940 and exercise are closely relative to NAD(+) level, and NAD(+) plays important roles not only in energy metabolism and mitochondrial functions but also in aging. In our study, the expression of CG9940 was changed by UAS/GAL4 system in Drosophila. Flies were trained by a training device. Cardiac function was analyzed by M-mode traces, climbing index was measured through negative geotaxis assay, and lifespan was measured via lifespan assays. The important new findings from our present study included the following: (1) the expression of the CG9940 could affect cardiac function, mobility, and lifespan in Drosophila. Over-expression of the CG9940 gene had positive effects on Drosophila, such as enhanced aging cardiac output, reduced heart failure, delayed age-related mobility decline, and prolonged lifespan, but lower-expression of the CG9940 had negative effects on them. (2) Different expressions of the CG9940 resulted in different influences on the adaptation of cardiac function, mobility, and lifespan to exercise in aging Drosophila. Both normal-expression and over-expression of the CG9940 resulted in positive influences on the adaptation of cardiac functions, mobility, and lifespan to exercise in aging Drosophila such as exercise slowed age-related decline of cardiac function, mobility and extent of lifespan in these flies, while lower-expression of the CG9940 led to negative impacts on the adaptation of mobility and lifespan to exercise in Drosophila. PMID:27448710

  2. Affect intensity and cardiac arousal.

    PubMed

    Blascovich, J; Brennan, K; Tomaka, J; Kelsey, R M; Hughes, P; Coad, M L; Adlin, R

    1992-07-01

    Relationships between affect intensity and basal, evoked, and perceived cardiac arousal were investigated in 3 experiments. Affect intensity was assessed using Larsen and Diener's (1987) Affect Intensity Measure (AIM). Cardiac arousal was evoked with exercise in the 1st study and with mental arithmetic in the 2nd and 3rd. Perceived cardiac arousal was measured under optimal conditions using a standard heartbeat discrimination procedure. Women as a group scored higher on the AIM. Affect intensity was unrelated to basal or evoked cardiac arousal and was negatively related to perceived cardiac arousal in all 3 studies. Data suggest that affect intensity, although unrelated to actual physiological arousal, is negatively related to the accuracy with which individuals perceive their own arousal. Results are discussed within the context of an expanded arousal-regulation model (Blascovich, 1990). PMID:1494983

  3. Alcohol exposure during late gestation adversely affects myocardial development with implications for postnatal cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Goh, Joanna M; Bensley, Jonathan G; Kenna, Kelly; Sozo, Foula; Bocking, Alan D; Brien, James; Walker, David; Harding, Richard; Black, M Jane

    2011-02-01

    Prenatal exposure to high levels of ethanol is associated with cardiac malformations, but the effects of lower levels of exposure on the heart are unclear. Our aim was to investigate the effects of daily exposure to ethanol during late gestation, when cardiomyocytes are undergoing maturation, on the developing myocardium. Pregnant ewes were infused with either ethanol (0.75 g/kg) or saline for 1 h each day from gestational days 95 to 133 (term ∼145 days); tissues were collected at 134 days. In sheep, cardiomyocytes mature during late gestation as in humans. Within the left ventricle (LV), cardiomyocyte number was determined using unbiased stereology and cardiomyocyte size and nuclearity determined using confocal microscopy. Collagen deposition was quantified using image analysis. Genes relating to cardiomyocyte proliferation and apoptosis were examined using quantitative real-time PCR. Fetal plasma ethanol concentration reached 0.11 g/dL after EtOH infusions. Ethanol exposure induced significant increases in relative heart weight, relative LV wall volume, and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area. Ethanol exposure advanced LV maturation in that the proportion of binucleated cardiomyocytes increased by 12%, and the number of mononucleated cardiomyocytes was decreased by a similar amount. Apoptotic gene expression increased in the ethanol-exposed hearts, although there were no significant differences between groups in total cardiomyocyte number or interstitial collagen. Daily exposure to a moderate dose of ethanol in late gestation accelerates the maturation of cardiomyocytes and increases cardiomyocyte and LV tissue volume in the fetal heart. These effects on cardiomyocyte growth may program for long-term cardiac vulnerability. PMID:21076018

  4. Biomechanics of Cardiac Function.

    PubMed

    Voorhees, Andrew P; Han, Hai-Chao

    2015-10-01

    The heart pumps blood to maintain circulation and ensure the delivery of oxygenated blood to all the organs of the body. Mechanics play a critical role in governing and regulating heart function under both normal and pathological conditions. Biological processes and mechanical stress are coupled together in regulating myocyte function and extracellular matrix structure thus controlling heart function. Here, we offer a brief introduction to the biomechanics of left ventricular function and then summarize recent progress in the study of the effects of mechanical stress on ventricular wall remodeling and cardiac function as well as the effects of wall mechanical properties on cardiac function in normal and dysfunctional hearts. Various mechanical models to determine wall stress and cardiac function in normal and diseased hearts with both systolic and diastolic dysfunction are discussed. The results of these studies have enhanced our understanding of the biomechanical mechanism in the development and remodeling of normal and dysfunctional hearts. Biomechanics provide a tool to understand the mechanism of left ventricular remodeling in diastolic and systolic dysfunction and guidance in designing and developing new treatments. PMID:26426462

  5. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-01-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  6. Symmetry of cardiac function assessment.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xu-Fang; Ma, Amy X

    2016-09-01

    Both right and left ventricles are developed from two adjacent segments of the primary heart tube. Though they are different with regard to shape and power, they mirror each other in terms of behavior. This is the first level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Both cardiac muscle contraction and relaxation are active. This constructs the second level of symmetry in cardiac function assessment. Combination of the two levels will help to find some hidden indexes or approaches to evaluate cardiac function. In this article, four major indexes from echocardiography were analyzed under this principal, another seventeen indexes or measurement approaches came out of the shadow, which is very helpful in the assessment of cardiac function, especially for the right cardiac function and diastolic cardiac function. PMID:27582768

  7. Increasing tetrahydrobiopterin in cardiomyocytes adversely affects cardiac redox state and mitochondrial function independently of changes in NO production.

    PubMed

    Sethumadhavan, Savitha; Whitsett, Jennifer; Bennett, Brian; Ionova, Irina A; Pieper, Galen M; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette

    2016-04-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) represents a potential strategy for the treatment of cardiac remodeling, fibrosis and/or diastolic dysfunction. The effects of oral treatment with BH4 (Sapropterin™ or Kuvan™) are however dose-limiting with high dose negating functional improvements. Cardiomyocyte-specific overexpression of GTP cyclohydrolase I (mGCH) increases BH4 several-fold in the heart. Using this model, we aimed to establish the cardiomyocyte-specific responses to high levels of BH4. Quantification of BH4 and BH2 in mGCH transgenic hearts showed age-based variations in BH4:BH2 ratios. Hearts of mice (<6 months) have lower BH4:BH2 ratios than hearts of older mice while both GTPCH activity and tissue ascorbate levels were higher in hearts of young than older mice. No evident changes in nitric oxide (NO) production assessed by nitrite and endogenous iron-nitrosyl complexes were detected in any of the age groups. Increased BH4 production in cardiomyocytes resulted in a significant loss of mitochondrial function. Diminished oxygen consumption and reserve capacity was verified in mitochondria isolated from hearts of 12-month old compared to 3-month old mice, even though at 12 months an improved BH4:BH2 ratio is established. Accumulation of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and decreased glutathione levels were found in the mGCH hearts and isolated mitochondria. Taken together, our results indicate that the ratio of BH4:BH2 does not predict changes in neither NO levels nor cellular redox state in the heart. The BH4 oxidation essentially limits the capacity of cardiomyocytes to reduce oxidant stress. Cardiomyocyte with chronically high levels of BH4 show a significant decline in redox state and mitochondrial function. PMID:26826575

  8. Cognitive and Functional Consequence of Cardiac Arrest.

    PubMed

    Perez, Claudia A; Samudra, Niyatee; Aiyagari, Venkatesh

    2016-08-01

    Cardiac arrest is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Better-quality bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation training, cardiocerebral resuscitation principles, and intensive post-resuscitation hospital care have improved survival. However, cognitive and functional impairment after cardiac arrest remain areas of concern. Research focus has shifted beyond prognostication in the immediate post-arrest period to identification of mechanisms for long-term brain injury and implementation of promising protocols to reduce neuronal injury. These include therapeutic temperature management (TTM), as well as pharmacologic and psychological interventions which also improve overall neurological function. Comprehensive assessment of cognitive function post-arrest is hampered by heterogeneous measures among studies. However, the domains of attention, long-term memory, spatial memory, and executive function appear to be affected. As more patients survive cardiac arrest for longer periods of time, there needs to be a greater focus on interventions that can enhance cognitive and psychosocial function post-arrest. PMID:27311306

  9. Treatment of affective disorders in cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Mavrides, Nicole; Nemeroff, Charles B.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) commonly have syndromal major depression, and depression has been associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Prevalence of depression is between 17% and 47% in CVD patients. Pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic interventions have long been studied, and in general are safe and somewhat efficacious in decreasing depressive symptoms in patients with CVD. The impact on cardiac outcomes remains unclear. The evidence from randomized controlled clinical trials indicates that antidepressants, especially selective serotonin uptake inhibitors, are overwhelmingly safe, and likely to be effective in the treatment of depression in patients with CVD. This review describes the prevalence of depression in patients with CVD, the physiological links between depression and CVD, the treatment options for affective disorders, and the clinical trials that demonstrate efficacy and safety of antidepressant medications and psychotherapy in this patient population. Great progress has been made in understanding potential mediators between major depressive disorder and CVD—both health behaviors and shared biological risks such as inflammation. PMID:26246788

  10. Cardiac ferroportin regulates cellular iron homeostasis and is important for cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Lakhal-Littleton, Samira; Wolna, Magda; Carr, Carolyn A.; Miller, Jack J. J.; Christian, Helen C.; Ball, Vicky; Santos, Ana; Diaz, Rebeca; Biggs, Daniel; Stillion, Richard; Holdship, Philip; Clarke, Kieran; Davies, Benjamin; Robbins, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Iron is essential to the cell. Both iron deficiency and overload impinge negatively on cardiac health. Thus, effective iron homeostasis is important for cardiac function. Ferroportin (FPN), the only known mammalian iron-exporting protein, plays an essential role in iron homeostasis at the systemic level. It increases systemic iron availability by releasing iron from the cells of the duodenum, spleen, and liver, the sites of iron absorption, recycling, and storage respectively. However, FPN is also found in tissues with no known role in systemic iron handling, such as the heart, where its function remains unknown. To explore this function, we generated mice with a cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Fpn. We show that these animals have severely impaired cardiac function, with a median survival of 22 wk, despite otherwise unaltered systemic iron status. We then compared their phenotype with that of ubiquitous hepcidin knockouts, a recognized model of the iron-loading disease hemochromatosis. The phenotype of the hepcidin knockouts was far milder, with normal survival up to 12 mo, despite far greater iron loading in the hearts. Histological examination demonstrated that, although cardiac iron accumulates within the cardiomyocytes of Fpn knockouts, it accumulates predominantly in other cell types in the hepcidin knockouts. We conclude, first, that cardiomyocyte FPN is essential for intracellular iron homeostasis and, second, that the site of deposition of iron within the heart determines the severity with which it affects cardiac function. Both findings have significant implications for the assessment and treatment of cardiac complications of iron dysregulation. PMID:25713362

  11. Cardiac ferroportin regulates cellular iron homeostasis and is important for cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Lakhal-Littleton, Samira; Wolna, Magda; Carr, Carolyn A; Miller, Jack J J; Christian, Helen C; Ball, Vicky; Santos, Ana; Diaz, Rebeca; Biggs, Daniel; Stillion, Richard; Holdship, Philip; Larner, Fiona; Tyler, Damian J; Clarke, Kieran; Davies, Benjamin; Robbins, Peter A

    2015-03-10

    Iron is essential to the cell. Both iron deficiency and overload impinge negatively on cardiac health. Thus, effective iron homeostasis is important for cardiac function. Ferroportin (FPN), the only known mammalian iron-exporting protein, plays an essential role in iron homeostasis at the systemic level. It increases systemic iron availability by releasing iron from the cells of the duodenum, spleen, and liver, the sites of iron absorption, recycling, and storage respectively. However, FPN is also found in tissues with no known role in systemic iron handling, such as the heart, where its function remains unknown. To explore this function, we generated mice with a cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Fpn. We show that these animals have severely impaired cardiac function, with a median survival of 22 wk, despite otherwise unaltered systemic iron status. We then compared their phenotype with that of ubiquitous hepcidin knockouts, a recognized model of the iron-loading disease hemochromatosis. The phenotype of the hepcidin knockouts was far milder, with normal survival up to 12 mo, despite far greater iron loading in the hearts. Histological examination demonstrated that, although cardiac iron accumulates within the cardiomyocytes of Fpn knockouts, it accumulates predominantly in other cell types in the hepcidin knockouts. We conclude, first, that cardiomyocyte FPN is essential for intracellular iron homeostasis and, second, that the site of deposition of iron within the heart determines the severity with which it affects cardiac function. Both findings have significant implications for the assessment and treatment of cardiac complications of iron dysregulation. PMID:25713362

  12. Mathematical Models of Cardiac Pacemaking Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pan; Lines, Glenn T.; Maleckar, Mary M.; Tveito, Aslak

    2013-10-01

    Over the past half century, there has been intense and fruitful interaction between experimental and computational investigations of cardiac function. This interaction has, for example, led to deep understanding of cardiac excitation-contraction coupling; how it works, as well as how it fails. However, many lines of inquiry remain unresolved, among them the initiation of each heartbeat. The sinoatrial node, a cluster of specialized pacemaking cells in the right atrium of the heart, spontaneously generates an electro-chemical wave that spreads through the atria and through the cardiac conduction system to the ventricles, initiating the contraction of cardiac muscle essential for pumping blood to the body. Despite the fundamental importance of this primary pacemaker, this process is still not fully understood, and ionic mechanisms underlying cardiac pacemaking function are currently under heated debate. Several mathematical models of sinoatrial node cell membrane electrophysiology have been constructed as based on different experimental data sets and hypotheses. As could be expected, these differing models offer diverse predictions about cardiac pacemaking activities. This paper aims to present the current state of debate over the origins of the pacemaking function of the sinoatrial node. Here, we will specifically review the state-of-the-art of cardiac pacemaker modeling, with a special emphasis on current discrepancies, limitations, and future challenges.

  13. Cardiac Na Channels: Structure to Function.

    PubMed

    DeMarco, K R; Clancy, C E

    2016-01-01

    Heart rhythms arise from electrical activity generated by precisely timed opening and closing of ion channels in individual cardiac myocytes. Opening of the primary cardiac voltage-gated sodium (NaV1.5) channel initiates cellular depolarization and the propagation of an electrical action potential that promotes coordinated contraction of the heart. The regularity of these contractile waves is critically important since it drives the primary function of the heart: to act as a pump that delivers blood to the brain and vital organs. When electrical activity goes awry during a cardiac arrhythmia, the pump does not function, the brain does not receive oxygenated blood, and death ensues. Perturbations to NaV1.5 may alter the structure, and hence the function, of the ion channel and are associated downstream with a wide variety of cardiac conduction pathologies, such as arrhythmias. PMID:27586288

  14. Cardiac Rehabilitation: Improving Function and Reducing Risk.

    PubMed

    Servey, Jessica T; Stephens, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac rehabilitation is a comprehensive multidisciplinary program individually tailored to the needs of patients with cardiovascular disease. The overall goals focus on improving daily function and reducing cardiovascular risk factors. Cardiac rehabilitation includes interventions aimed at lowering blood pressure and improving lipid and diabetes mellitus control, with tobacco cessation, behavioral counseling, and graded physical activity. The physical activity component typically involves 36 sessions over 12 weeks, during which patients participate in supervised exercise under cardiac monitoring. There are also intensive programs that include up to 72 sessions lasting up to 18 weeks, although these programs are not widely available. Additional components of cardiac rehabilitation include counseling on nutrition, screening for and managing depression, and assuring up-to-date immunizations. Cardiac rehabilitation is covered by Medicare and recommended for patients following myocardial infarction, bypass surgery, and stent placement, and for patients with heart failure, stable angina, and several other conditions. Despite proven benefits in mortality rates, depression, functional capacity, and medication adherence, rates of referral for cardiac rehabilitation are suboptimal. Groups less likely to be referred are older adults, women, patients who do not speak English, and persons living in areas where cardiac rehabilitation is not locally available. Additionally, primary care physicians refer patients less often than cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons. PMID:27386722

  15. The functional effect of dilated cardiomyopathy mutation (R144W) in mouse cardiac troponin T is differently affected by α- and β-myosin heavy chain isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Gollapudi, Sampath K.; Tardiff, Jil C.

    2015-01-01

    Given the differential impact of α- and β-myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoforms on how troponin T (TnT) modulates contractile dynamics, we hypothesized that the effects of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) mutations in TnT would be altered differently by α- and β-MHC. We characterized dynamic contractile features of normal (α-MHC) and transgenic (β-MHC) mouse cardiac muscle fibers reconstituted with a mouse TnT analog (TnTR144W) of the human DCM R141W mutation. TnTR144W did not alter maximal tension but attenuated myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity (pCa50) to a similar extent in α- and β-MHC fibers. TnTR144W attenuated the speed of cross-bridge (XB) distortion dynamics (c) by 24% and the speed of XB recruitment dynamics (b) by 17% in α-MHC fibers; however, both b and c remained unaltered in β-MHC fibers. Likewise, TnTR144W attenuated the rates of XB detachment (g) and tension redevelopment (ktr) only in α-MHC fibers. TnTR144W also decreased the impact of strained XBs on the recruitment of new XBs (γ) by 30% only in α-MHC fibers. Because c, b, g, ktr, and γ are strongly influenced by thin filament-based cooperative mechanisms, we conclude that the TnTR144W- and β-MHC-mediated changes in the thin filament interact to produce a less severe functional phenotype, compared with that brought about by TnTR144W and α-MHC. These observations provide a basis for lower mortality rates of humans (β-MHC) harboring the TnTR141W mutant compared with transgenic mouse studies. Our findings strongly suggest that some caution is necessary when extrapolating data from transgenic mouse studies to human hearts. PMID:25681424

  16. Galectin-3, Cardiac Function, and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Meijers, Wouter C; López-Andrés, Natalia; de Boer, Rudolf A

    2016-08-01

    This Correspondence relates to the article by Frunza et al (Myocardial Galectin-3 Expression Is Associated with Remodeling of the Pressure-Overloaded Heart and May Delay the Hypertrophic Response without Affecting Survival, Dysfunction, and Cardiac Fibrosis. Am J Pathol 2016, 186:1114-1127). PMID:27461364

  17. Functional cardiac imaging: positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mullani, N.A.; Gould, K.L.

    1984-02-01

    Dynamic cardiovascular imaging plays a vital role in the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac disease by providing information about the function of the heart. During the past 30 years, cardiovascular imaging has evolved from the simple chest x-ray and fluoroscopy to such sophisticated techniques as invasive cardiac angiography and cinearteriography and, more recently, to noninvasive cardiac CT scanning, nuclear magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography, which reflect more complex physiologic functions. As research tools, CT, NMR, and PET provide quantitative information on global as well as regional ventricular function, coronary artery stenosis, myocardial perfusion, glucose and fatty acid metabolism, or oxygen utilization, with little discomfort or risk to the patient. As imaging modalities become more sophisticated and more oriented toward clinical application, the prospect of routinely obtaining such functional information about the heart is becoming realistic. However, these advances are double-edged in that the interpretation of functional data is more complex than that of the anatomic imaging familiar to most physicians. They will require an enhanced understanding of the physiologic and biochemical processes, as well as of the instrumentation and techniques for analyzing the data. Of the new imaging modalities that provide functional information about the heart, PET is the most useful because it quantitates the regional distribution of radionuclides in vivo. Clinical applications, interpretation of data, and the impact of PET on our understanding of cardiac pathophysiology are discussed. 5 figures.

  18. Interplay between cardiac function and heart development.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Delgado, Laura; Mercader, Nadia

    2016-07-01

    Mechanotransduction refers to the conversion of mechanical forces into biochemical or electrical signals that initiate structural and functional remodeling in cells and tissues. The heart is a kinetic organ whose form changes considerably during development and disease. This requires cardiomyocytes to be mechanically durable and able to mount coordinated responses to a variety of environmental signals on different time scales, including cardiac pressure loading and electrical and hemodynamic forces. During physiological growth, myocytes, endocardial and epicardial cells have to adaptively remodel to these mechanical forces. Here we review some of the recent advances in the understanding of how mechanical forces influence cardiac development, with a focus on fluid flow forces. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26952935

  19. Regulation of cardiac metabolism and function by lipogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Bednarski, Tomasz; Pyrkowska, Aleksandra; Opasińska, Agnieszka; Dobrzyń, Paweł

    2016-01-01

    The heart has a limited capacity for lipogenesis and de novo lipid synthesis. However, expression of lipogenic genes in cardiomyocytes is unexpectedly high. Recent studies showed that lipogenic genes are important factors regulating cardiac metabolism and function. Long chain fatty acids are a major source of ATP required for proper heart function, and under aerobic conditions, the heart derives 60-90% of the energy necessary for contractile function from fatty acid oxidation. On the other hand, cardiac lipid over-accumulation (e.g. ceramides, diacylglycerols) leads to heart dysfunction. Downregulation of the lipogenic genes' expression (e.g. sterol regulatory element binding protein 1, stearoyl-CoA desaturase, acetyl-CoA kwacarboxylase) decreased heart steatosis and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, improving systolic and diastolic function of the left ventricle. Lipogenic factors also regulate fatty acids and glucose utilization in the heart, underlining their important role in maintaining energetic homeostasis in pathological states. Fatty acid synthase, the enzyme catalyzing fatty acids de novo synthesis, affects cardiac calcium signaling through regulation of L-type calcium channel activity. Thus, a growing body of evidence suggests that the role of lipogenic genes in cardiomyocytes may be distinct from other tissues. Here, we review recent advances made in understanding the role of lipogenic genes in the control of heart metabolism and its involvement in the pathogenesis of lipotoxic cardiomyopathy. PMID:27333934

  20. Exercise improves cardiac autonomic function in obesity and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Voulgari, Christina; Pagoni, Stamatina; Vinik, Aaron; Poirier, Paul

    2013-05-01

    Physical activity is a key element in the prevention and management of obesity and diabetes. Regular physical activity efficiently supports diet-induced weight loss, improves glycemic control, and can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes diagnosis. Furthermore, physical activity positively affects lipid profile, blood pressure, reduces the rate of cardiovascular events and associated mortality, and restores the quality of life in type 2 diabetes. However, recent studies have documented that a high percentage of the cardiovascular benefits of exercise cannot be attributed solely to enhanced cardiovascular risk factor modulation. Obesity in concert with diabetes is characterized by sympathetic overactivity and the progressive loss of cardiac parasympathetic influx. These are manifested via different pathogenetic mechanisms, including hyperinsulinemia, visceral obesity, subclinical inflammation and increased thrombosis. Cardiac autonomic neuropathy is an underestimated risk factor for the increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality associated with obesity and diabetes. The same is true for the role of physical exercise in the restoration of the heart cardioprotective autonomic modulation in these individuals. This review addresses the interplay of cardiac autonomic function in obesity and diabetes, and focuses on the importance of exercise in improving cardiac autonomic dysfunction. PMID:23084034

  1. Functional cardiac imaging by random access microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Crocini, Claudia; Coppini, Raffaele; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Pavone, Francesco S.; Sacconi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the development of voltage sensitive dyes and Ca2+ sensors in combination with innovative microscopy techniques allowed researchers to perform functional measurements with an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. At the moment, one of the shortcomings of available technologies is their incapability of imaging multiple fast phenomena while controlling the biological determinants involved. In the near future, ultrafast deflectors can be used to rapidly scan laser beams across the sample, performing optical measurements of action potential and Ca2+ release from multiple sites within cardiac cells and tissues. The same scanning modality could also be used to control local Ca2+ release and membrane electrical activity by activation of caged compounds and light-gated ion channels. With this approach, local Ca2+ or voltage perturbations could be induced, simulating arrhythmogenic events, and their impact on physiological cell activity could be explored. The development of this optical methodology will provide fundamental insights in cardiac disease, boosting new therapeutic strategies, and, more generally, it will represent a new approach for the investigation of the physiology of excitable cells. PMID:25368580

  2. Influence of vascular function and pulsatile hemodynamics on cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Bell, Vanessa; Mitchell, Gary F

    2015-09-01

    Interactions between cardiac and vascular structure and function normally are optimized to ensure delivery of cardiac output with modest pulsatile hemodynamic overhead. Aortic stiffening with age or disease impairs optimal ventricular-vascular coupling, increases pulsatile load, and contributes to left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, reduced systolic function, and impaired diastolic relaxation. Aortic pulse pressure and timing of peak systolic pressure are well-known measures of hemodynamic ventricular-vascular interaction. Recent work has elucidated the importance of direct, mechanical coupling between the aorta and the heart. LV systolic contraction results in displacement of aortic and mitral annuli, thereby producing longitudinal stretch in the ascending aorta and left atrium, respectively. Force associated with longitudinal stretch increases systolic load on the LV. However, the resulting energy stored in the elastic elements of the proximal aorta during systole facilitates early diastolic LV recoil and rapid filling. This review discusses current views on hemodynamics and mechanics of ventricular-vascular coupling. PMID:26164466

  3. Measuring mitochondrial function in intact cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dedkova, Elena N.; Blatter, Lothar A.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are involved in cellular functions that go beyond the traditional role of these organelles as the power plants of the cell. Mitochondria have been implicated in several human diseases, including cardiac dysfunction, and play a role in the aging process. Many aspects of our knowledge of mitochondria stem from studies performed on the isolated organelle. Their relative inaccessibility imposes experimental difficulties to study mitochondria in their natural environment – the cytosol of intact cells – and has hampered a comprehensive understanding of the plethora of mitochondrial functions. Here we review currently available methods to study mitochondrial function in intact cardiomyocytes. These methods primarily use different flavors of fluorescent dyes and genetically encoded fluorescent proteins in conjunction with high-resolution imaging techniques. We review methods to study mitochondrial morphology, mitochondrial membrane potential, Ca2+ and Na+ signaling, mitochondrial pH regulation, redox state and ROS production, NO signaling, oxygen consumption, ATP generation and the activity of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. Where appropriate we complement this review on intact myocytes with seminal studies that were performed on isolated mitochondria, permeabilized cells, and in whole hearts. PMID:21964191

  4. Bioengineered FSTL1 Patches Restore Cardiac Function Following Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Alteköester, Ann-Kristin; Harvey, Richard P

    2015-12-01

    Improving the limited ability of the heart to regenerate after infarction is crucial. Researchers now demonstrate that delivery of follistatin-like 1 (FSTL1) into injured hearts via collagen patches stimulates cardiomyocyte proliferation and cardiac functional recovery. These findings highlight the epicardium as a source of novel regenerative factors and biomimetic nanomaterials in cardiac translational medicine. PMID:26596868

  5. Effect of prolonged space flight on cardiac function and dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, W. L.; Epstein, S. E.; Griffith, J. M.; Goldstein, R. E.; Redwood, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    By taking advantage of the capabilities of echocardiography to measure noninvasively left ventricular volume, stroke volume, and ejection fraction, and of the fact that the astronauts were routinely subjected to lower body negative pressure (whereby cardiac filling is progressively decreased), it was possible to construct classic ventricular function curves noninvasively, thereby obviating the difficulties encountered in comparing cardiac function at different end-diastolic volumes preflight and postflight. In this manner, the effect of an 84-day period of weightlessness on cardiac structure and function was evaluated in the Skylab 4 astronauts.

  6. Recovery of brain function after cardiac arrest, case report and review.

    PubMed

    Nekoui, A; Tresierra, del Carmen Escalante; Abdolmohammadi, S; Charbonneau, S; Blaise, G

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral hypoxia during cardiac arrest is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in survival victims. To reduce cerebral damage, studies focus on finding effective treatments during the resuscitation period. Our report focuses on a 36-year-old police officer who had had two cardiac arrests (one at home and one at the hospital). After acute treatment, his cardiac and brain functions recovered impressively. Neuropsychological results were normal except for mild anomia. He also reported some retrograde memory loss. Surprisingly, he also reported an improvement in a very specific capacity, his episodic memory. We here review the possible causes and mechanisms that may have affected his memory abilities. PMID:27363214

  7. Interoception across Modalities: On the Relationship between Cardiac Awareness and the Sensitivity for Gastric Functions

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Beate M.; Muth, Eric R.; Pollatos, Olga; Herbert, Cornelia

    2012-01-01

    The individual sensitivity for ones internal bodily signals (“interoceptive awareness”) has been shown to be of relevance for a broad range of cognitive and affective functions. Interoceptive awareness has been primarily assessed via measuring the sensitivity for ones cardiac signals (“cardiac awareness”) which can be non-invasively measured by heartbeat perception tasks. It is an open question whether cardiac awareness is related to the sensitivity for other bodily, visceral functions. This study investigated the relationship between cardiac awareness and the sensitivity for gastric functions in healthy female persons by using non-invasive methods. Heartbeat perception as a measure for cardiac awareness was assessed by a heartbeat tracking task and gastric sensitivity was assessed by a water load test. Gastric myoelectrical activity was measured by electrogastrography (EGG) and subjective feelings of fullness, valence, arousal and nausea were assessed. The results show that cardiac awareness was inversely correlated with ingested water volume and with normogastric activity after water load. However, persons with good and poor cardiac awareness did not differ in their subjective ratings of fullness, nausea and affective feelings after drinking. This suggests that good heartbeat perceivers ingested less water because they subjectively felt more intense signals of fullness during this lower amount of water intake compared to poor heartbeat perceivers who ingested more water until feeling the same signs of fullness. These findings demonstrate that cardiac awareness is related to greater sensitivity for gastric functions, suggesting that there is a general sensitivity for interoceptive processes across the gastric and cardiac modality. PMID:22606278

  8. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Regulates Cardiac Function and Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kliment, Corrine R; Suliman, Hagir B; Tobolewski, Jacob M; Reynolds, Crystal M; Day, Brian J; Zhu, Xiaodong; McTiernan, Charles F; McGaffin, Kenneth R; Piantadosi, Claude A; Oury, Tim D

    2009-01-01

    Aims Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) is an antioxidant that protects the heart from ischemia and the lung from inflammation and fibrosis. The role of cardiac EC-SOD under normal conditions and injury remains unclear. Cardiac toxicity, a common side effect of doxorubicin, involves oxidative stress. We hypothesize that EC-SOD is critical for normal cardiac function and protects the heart from oxidant-induced fibrosis and loss of function. Methods C57BL/6 and EC-SOD-null mice were treated with doxorubicin, 15 mg/kg (i.p.). After 15 days, echocardiography was used to assess cardiac function. Left ventricle (LV) tissue was used to assess fibrosis and inflammation by staining, western blot, and hydroxyproline analysis. Results At baseline EC-SOD-null mice have LV wall thinning and increases in LV end diastolic dimensions compared to wild type mice, but have normal cardiac function. After doxorubicin, EC-SOD-null mice have decreases in fractional shortening not apparent in WT mice. Lack of EC-SOD also leads to increases in myocardial apoptosis and significantly more LV fibrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration. Administration of the metalloporphyrin AEOL 10150 abrogates the loss of cardiac function, and potentially fibrosis, associated with doxorubicin treatment in both wild type and EC-SOD KO mice. Conclusions EC-SOD is critical for normal cardiac morphology and protects the heart from oxidant-induced fibrosis, apoptosis and loss of function. The antioxidant metalloporphyrin, AEOL 10150 effectively protects cardiac function from doxorubicin-induced oxidative stress, in vivo. These findings identify targets for the use of antioxidant agents in oxidant-induced cardiac fibrosis. PMID:19695260

  9. Cardiac function adaptations in hibernating grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis).

    PubMed

    Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T

    2010-03-01

    Research on the cardiovascular physiology of hibernating mammals may provide insight into evolutionary adaptations; however, anesthesia used to handle wild animals may affect the cardiovascular parameters of interest. To overcome these potential biases, we investigated the functional cardiac phenotype of the hibernating grizzly bear (Ursus arctos horribilis) during the active, transitional and hibernating phases over a 4 year period in conscious rather than anesthetized bears. The bears were captive born and serially studied from the age of 5 months to 4 years. Heart rate was significantly different from active (82.6 +/- 7.7 beats/min) to hibernating states (17.8 +/- 2.8 beats/min). There was no difference from the active to the hibernating state in diastolic and stroke volume parameters or in left atrial area. Left ventricular volume:mass was significantly increased during hibernation indicating decreased ventricular mass. Ejection fraction of the left ventricle was not different between active and hibernating states. In contrast, total left atrial emptying fraction was significantly reduced during hibernation (17.8 +/- 2.8%) as compared to the active state (40.8 +/- 1.9%). Reduced atrial chamber function was also supported by reduced atrial contraction blood flow velocities and atrial contraction ejection fraction during hibernation; 7.1 +/- 2.8% as compared to 20.7 +/- 3% during the active state. Changes in the diastolic cardiac filling cycle, especially atrial chamber contribution to ventricular filling, appear to be the most prominent macroscopic functional change during hibernation. Thus, we propose that these changes in atrial chamber function constitute a major adaptation during hibernation which allows the myocardium to conserve energy, avoid chamber dilation and remain healthy during a period of extremely low heart rates. These findings will aid in rational approaches to identifying underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:19940994

  10. Clinical significance of automatic warning function of cardiac remote monitoring systems in preventing acute cardiac episodes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shou-Qiang; Xing, Shan-Shan; Gao, Hai-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In addition to ambulatory Holter electrocardiographic recording and transtelephonic electrocardiographic monitoring (TTM), a cardiac remote monitoring system can provide an automatic warning function through the general packet radio service (GPRS) network, enabling earlier diagnosis, treatment and improved outcome of cardiac diseases. The purpose of this study was to estimate its clinical significance in preventing acute cardiac episodes. Methods: Using 2 leads (V1 and V5 leads) and the automatic warning mode, 7160 patients were tested with a cardiac remote monitoring system from October 2004 to September 2007. If malignant arrhythmias or obvious ST-T changes appeared in the electrocardiogram records was automatically transferred to the monitoring center, the patient and his family members were informed, and the corresponding precautionary or therapeutic measures were implemented immediately. Results: In our study, 274 cases of malignant arrhythmia, including sinus standstill and ventricular tachycardia, and 43 cases of obvious ST-segment elevation were detected and treated. Because of early detection, there was no death or deformity. Conclusions: A cardiac remote monitoring system providing an automatic warning function can play an important role in preventing acute cardiac episodes. PMID:25674124

  11. Factors affecting postoperative blood loss in children undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Faraoni, David; Van der Linden, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that the influence of cyanotic disease on postoperative blood loss is closely related to age in children undergoing cardiac surgery. Here, we demonstrate that the presence of a cyanotic disease is associated with increased postoperative blood loss in children aged 1 to 6 months. Children with cyanotic disease and aged<1 month who received fresh frozen plasma during cardiopulmonary bypass had less postoperative blood loss and higher maximal clot firmness on FIBTEM than cyanotic children from all other groups. Additional studies are needed to define optimal pathophysiology-based management in children undergoing cardiac surgery. PMID:24512988

  12. Assessment of cardiac function in mice lacking the mitochondrial calcium uniporter.

    PubMed

    Holmström, Kira M; Pan, Xin; Liu, Julia C; Menazza, Sara; Liu, Jie; Nguyen, Tiffany T; Pan, Haihui; Parks, Randi J; Anderson, Stasia; Noguchi, Audrey; Springer, Danielle; Murphy, Elizabeth; Finkel, Toren

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondrial calcium is thought to play an important role in the regulation of cardiac bioenergetics and function. The entry of calcium into the mitochondrial matrix requires that the divalent cation pass through the inner mitochondrial membrane via a specialized pore known as the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU). Here, we use mice deficient of MCU expression to rigorously assess the role of mitochondrial calcium in cardiac function. Mitochondria isolated from MCU(-/-) mice have reduced matrix calcium levels, impaired calcium uptake and a defect in calcium-stimulated respiration. Nonetheless, we find that the absence of MCU expression does not affect basal cardiac function at either 12 or 20months of age. Moreover, the physiological response of MCU(-/-) mice to isoproterenol challenge or transverse aortic constriction appears similar to control mice. Thus, while mitochondria derived from MCU(-/-) mice have markedly impaired mitochondrial calcium handling, the hearts of these animals surprisingly appear to function relatively normally under basal conditions and during stress. PMID:26057074

  13. Proteasome inhibition slightly improves cardiac function in mice with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Schlossarek, Saskia; Singh, Sonia R.; Geertz, Birgit; Schulz, Herbert; Reischmann, Silke; Hübner, Norbert; Carrier, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    A growing line of evidence indicates a dysfunctional ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in cardiac diseases. Anti-hypertrophic effects and improved cardiac function have been reported after treatment with proteasome inhibitors in experimental models of cardiac hypertrophy. Here we tested whether proteasome inhibition could also reverse the disease phenotype in a genetically-modified mouse model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), which carries a mutation in Mybpc3, encoding the myofilament protein cardiac myosin-binding protein C. At 7 weeks of age, homozygous mutant mice (KI) have 39% higher left ventricular mass-to-body-weight ratio and 29% lower fractional area shortening (FAS) than wild-type (WT) mice. Both groups were treated with epoxomicin (0.5 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 1 week via osmotic minipumps. Epoxomicin inhibited the chymotrypsin-like activity by ~50% in both groups. All parameters of cardiac hypertrophy (including the fetal gene program) were not affected by epoxomicin treatment in both groups. In contrast, FAS was 12% and 35% higher in epoxomicin-treated than vehicle-treated WT and KI mice, respectively. To identify which genes or pathways could be involved in this positive effect, we performed a transcriptome analysis in KI and WT neonatal cardiac myocytes, treated or not with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 (1 μM, 24 h). This revealed 103 genes (four-fold difference; 5% FDR) which are commonly regulated in both KI and WT cardiac myocytes. Thus, even in genetically-modified mice with manifest HCM, proteasome inhibition showed beneficial effects, at least with regard to cardiac function. Targeting the UPS in cardiac diseases remains therefore a therapeutic option. PMID:25566086

  14. Analysis of cardiac function by MRI and stereology.

    PubMed

    Roberts, N; Cruz-Orive, L M; Bourne, M; Herfkens, R J; Karwoski, R A; Whitehouse, G H

    1997-07-01

    Design-based stereology and phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were combined to monitor changes in the volume of the four chambers of the human heart during the cardiac cycle. The data set consisted of 18 adjacent slices (or 'scanning levels') of 0.5 cm thickness, perpendicular to the long axis of the body, and encompassing the whole heart of a healthy volunteer. At each scanning level, a cardiac gated MR image was obtained at each of 16 equally spaced time frames within the cardiac cycle. Given stationarity with respect to time, absence of image artefacts and appropriate definition of chamber boundaries, for each time frame unbiased estimates of total blood volume in the relevant heart chambers were efficiently obtained using the Cavalieri method and point counting. Combined with a proper MRI acquisition, modern stereological methods constitute an efficient and reliable tool to quantify cardiac function noninvasively. PMID:9263438

  15. Using exercise to measure and modify cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Platt, Colin; Houstis, Nicholas; Rosenzweig, Anthony

    2015-02-01

    Exercise is the archetype of physiologic demands placed on the cardiovascular system. Acute responses provide an informative assessment of cardiovascular function and fitness, while repeated exercise promotes cardiovascular health and evokes important molecular, structural, and functional changes contributing to its effects in primary and secondary prevention. Here we examine the use of exercise in murine models, both as a phenotypic assay and as a provocative intervention. We first review the advantages and limitations of exercise testing for assessing cardiac function, then highlight the cardiac structural and cellular changes elicited by chronic exercise and key molecular pathways that mediate these effects. PMID:25651177

  16. Losartan decreases cardiac muscle fibrosis and improves cardiac function in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Spurney, Christopher F; Sali, Arpana; Guerron, Alfredo D; Iantorno, Micaela; Yu, Qing; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Rayavarapu, Sree; van der Meulen, Jack; Hoffman, Eric P; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2011-03-01

    Recent studies showed that chronic administration of losartan, an angiotensin II type I receptor antagonist, improved skeletal muscle function in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. In this study, C57BL/10ScSn-Dmd(mdx)/J female mice were either untreated or treated with losartan (n = 15) in the drinking water at a dose of 600 mg/L over a 6-month period. Cardiac function was assessed via in vivo high frequency echocardiography and skeletal muscle function was assessed using grip strength testing, Digiscan monitoring, Rotarod timing, and in vitro force testing. Fibrosis was assessed using picrosirius red staining and Image J analysis. Gene expression was evaluated using real-time polymerized chain reaction (RT-PCR). Percentage shortening fraction was significantly decreased in untreated (26.9% ± 3.5%) mice compared to losartan-treated (32.2% ± 4.2%; P < .01) mice. Systolic blood pressure was significantly reduced in losartan-treated mice (56 ± 6 vs 69 ± 7 mm Hg; P < .0005). Percentage cardiac fibrosis was significantly reduced in losartan-treated hearts (P < .05) along with diaphragm (P < .01), extensor digitorum longus (P < .05), and gastrocnemius (P < .05) muscles compared to untreated mdx mice. There were no significant differences in skeletal muscle function between treated and untreated groups. Chronic treatment with losartan decreases cardiac and skeletal muscle fibrosis and improves cardiac systolic function in dystrophin-deficient mdx mice. PMID:21304057

  17. Cardiac Function in Young and Old Little Mice

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Anilkumar K.; Amador-Noguez, Daniel; Darlington, Gretchen J.; Scholz, Beth A.; Michael, Lloyd H.; Hartley, Craig J.; Entman, Mark L.; Taffet, George E.

    2009-01-01

    We studied cardiac function in young and old, wild-type (WT), and longer-living Little mice using cardiac flow velocities, echocardiographic measurements, and left ventricular (LV) pressure (P) to determine if enhanced reserves were in part responsible for longevity in these mice. Resting/baseline cardiac function, as measured by velocities, LV dimensions, +dP/dtmax, and −dP/dtmax, was significantly lower in young Little mice versus young WT mice. Fractional shortening (FS) increased significantly, and neither +dP/dtmax nor −dP/dtmax declined with age in Little mice. In contrast, old WT mice had no change in FS but had significantly lower +dP/dtmax and −dP/dtmax versus young WT mice. Significant decreases were observed in the velocity indices of old Little mice versus old WT mice, but other parameters were unchanged. The magnitude of dobutamine stress response remained unchanged with age in Little mice, while that in WT mice decreased. These data suggest that while resting cardiac function in Little mice versus WT mice is lower at young age, it is relatively unaltered with aging. Additionally, cardiac function in response to stress was maintained with age in Little mice but not in their WT counterparts. Thus, some mouse models of increased longevity may not be associated with enhanced reserves. PMID:18166681

  18. Exercise training does not affect anthracycline antitumor efficacy while attenuating cardiac dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Parry, Traci L; Hayward, Reid

    2015-09-15

    Highly effective anthracyclines, like doxorubicin (DOX), have limited clinical use due to protracted cardiotoxic effects. While exercise is known to be cardioprotective, it is unclear whether exercise compromises chemotherapy treatment efficacy. To determine the effect of exercise training on DOX antitumor efficacy as well as DOX-induced cardiotoxicity, female Fisher 344 rats were randomly assigned to sedentary + saline (SED+SAL), SED+DOX, wheel run exercise training + SAL (WR+SAL), or WR+DOX. On week 11, animals were inoculated with 1×10(6) MatBIII tumor cells. Once tumors reached ∼1 cm in diameter, animals were treated with 12 mg/kg of DOX or SAL. Animals were killed 1, 3, or 5 days following treatment. Tumor growth and cardiac function were measured at each interval. DOX accumulation and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) expression were quantified in tumor and heart tissue. No significant difference (P > 0.05) existed between DOX-treated SED and WR groups for tumor measurements. Exercise preserved cardiac function up to 5 days following DOX treatment. Exercise reduced ventricular DOX accumulation and upregulated ventricular MPR1 and MPR2. In contrast, no differences were observed in DOX accumulation or MRP expression in tumors of SED and WR animals. Endurance exercise had no effect on DOX antitumor efficacy as evidenced by a definitive DOX-induced reduction in tumor growth in both the SED and WR groups. Although exercise did not affect the antitumor efficacy of DOX, it still provided protection against cardiac dysfunction. These effects may be mediated by the degree of DOX tissue accumulation secondary to the regulation of MRP expression. PMID:26246505

  19. Functional Outcomes: One Year after a Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Ketki D.; Rittenberger, Jon C.; Holm, Margo B.; Callaway, Clifton W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The study aim was to characterize the time-course of recovery in impairments, activity limitations, participation restrictions, disability, and quality of life during the first year after cardiac arrest. Secondarily, the study described the associations between the instruments used to measure each of these domains. Methods. Measures of global disability (Cerebral Performance Category, CPC, Modified Rankin Scale, mRS), quality of life, activity limitations, participation restrictions, and affective and cognitive impairments were administered to 29 participants 1, 6, and 12 months after cardiac arrest. Results. Global measures of disability indicated recovery between one month and one year after cardiac arrest (mean CPC: 2.1 versus 1.69,  P < 0.05; mean mRS: 2.55 versus 1.83, P < 0.05). While global measures of disability were moderately associated with participation, they were poorly associated with other measures. The cohort endorsed depressive symptomatology throughout the year but did not have detectable cognitive impairment. Conclusions. Recovery from cardiac arrest is multifaceted and recovery continues for months depending upon the measures being used. Measures of global disability, reintegration into the community, and quality of life yield different information. Future clinical trials should include a combination of measures to yield the most complete representation of recovery after cardiac arrest. PMID:26421282

  20. Influence of chronic kidney disease on cardiac structure and function.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Kunihiro; Ballew, Shoshana H; Coresh, Josef

    2015-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), the presence of kidney dysfunction and/or damage, is a worldwide public health issue. Although CKD is independently associated with various subtypes of cardiovascular diseases, a recent international collaborative meta-analysis demonstrates that CKD is particularly strongly associated with heart failure, suggesting its critical impact on cardiac structure and function. Although numerous studies have investigated the association of CKD and cardiac structure and function, these studies substantially vary regarding source populations and methodology (e.g., measures of CKD and/or parameters of cardiac structure and function), making it difficult to reach universal conclusions. Nevertheless, in this review, we comprehensively examine relevant studies, discuss potential mechanisms linking CKD to alteration of cardiac structure and function, and demonstrate clinical implications as well as potential future research directions. We exclusively focus on studies investigating both CKD measures, kidney function (i.e., glomerular filtration rate [GFR], creatinine clearance, or levels of filtration markers), and kidney damage represented by albuminuria, since current international clinical guidelines of CKD recommend staging CKD and assessing its clinical risk based on both GFR and albuminuria. PMID:26194332

  1. EPAC expression and function in cardiac fibroblasts and myofibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Olmedo, Ivonne; Muñoz, Claudia; Guzmán, Nancy; Catalán, Mabel; Vivar, Raúl; Ayala, Pedro; Humeres, Claudio; Aránguiz, Pablo; García, Lorena; Velarde, Victoria; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2013-10-15

    In the heart, cardiac fibroblasts (CF) and cardiac myofibroblasts (CMF) are the main cells responsible for wound healing after cardiac insult. Exchange protein activated by cAMP (EPAC) is a downstream effector of cAMP, and it has been not completely studied on CF. Moreover, in CMF, which are the main cells responsible for cardiac healing, EPAC expression and function are unknown. We evaluated in both CF and CMF the effect of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) on EPAC-1 expression. We also studied the EPAC involvement on collagen synthesis, adhesion, migration and collagen gel contraction. Method: Rat neonatal CF and CMF were treated with TGF-β1 at different times and concentrations. EPAC-1 protein levels and Rap1 activation were measured by western blot and pull down assay respectively. EPAC cellular functions were determined by adhesion, migration and collagen gel contraction assay; and collagen expression was determined by western blot. Results: TGF-β1 through Smad and JNK significantly reduced EPAC-1 expression in CF, while in CMF this cytokine increased EPAC-1 expression through ERK1/2, JNK, p38, AKT and Smad3. EPAC activation was able to induce higher Rap1-GTP levels in CMF than in CF. EPAC and PKA, both cAMP effectors, promoted CF and CMF adhesion on fibronectin, as well as CF migration; however, this effect was not observed in CMF. EPAC but not PKA activation mediated collagen gel contraction in CF, while in CMF both PKA and EPAC mediated collagen gel contraction. Finally, the EPAC and PKA activation reduced collagen synthesis in CF and CMF. Conclusion: TGF-β1 differentially regulates the expression of EPAC in CF and CMF; and EPAC regulates differentially CF and CMF functions associated with cardiac remodeling. - Highlights: • TGF-β1 regulates EPAC-1 expression in cardiac fibroblast and myofibroblast. • Rap-1GTP levels are higher in cardiac myofibroblast than fibroblast. • EPAC-1 controls adhesion, migration and collagen synthesis in cardiac

  2. Acupuncture effects on cardiac functions measured by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in a feline model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Hsou; Shih, Chen-Haw; Kaphle, Krishna; Wu, Leang-Shin; Tseng, Weng-Yih; Chiu, Jen-Hwey; Lee, Tzu-Chi; Wu, Ying-Ling

    2010-06-01

    The usefulness of acupuncture (AP) as a complementary and/or alternative therapy in animals is well established but more research is needed on its clinical efficacy relative to conventional therapy, and on the underlying mechanisms of the effects of AP. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI), an important tool in monitoring cardiovascular diseases, provides a reliable method to monitor the effects of AP on the cardiovascular system. This controlled experiment monitored the effect electro-acupuncture (EA) at bilateral acupoint Neiguan (PC6) on recovery time after ketamine/xylazine cocktail anesthesia in healthy cats. The CMRI data established the basic feline cardiac function index (CFI), including cardiac output and major vessel velocity. To evaluate the effect of EA on the functions of the autonomic nervous and cardiovascular systems, heart rate, respiration rate, electrocardiogram and pulse rate were also measured. Ketamine/xylazine cocktail anesthesia caused a transient hypertension in the cats; EA inhibited this anesthetic-induced hypertension and shortened the post-anesthesia recovery time. Our data support existing knowledge on the cardiovascular benefits of EA at PC6, and also provide strong evidence for the combination of anesthesia and EA to shorten post-anesthesia recovery time and counter the negative effects of anesthetics on cardiac physiology. PMID:18955311

  3. Microdomain heterogeneity in 3D affects the mechanics of neonatal cardiac myocyte contraction.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Matthew W; Budyn, Elisa; Desai, Tejal A; Samarel, Allen M; Russell, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac muscle cells are known to adapt to their physical surroundings, optimizing intracellular organization and contractile function for a given culture environment. A previously developed in vitro model system has shown that the inclusion of discrete microscale domains (or microrods) in three dimensions (3D) can alter long-term growth responses of neonatal ventricular myocytes. The aim of this work was to understand how cellular contact with such a domain affects various mechanical changes involved in cardiac muscle cell remodeling. Myocytes were maintained in 3D gels over 5 days in the presence or absence of 100-μm-long microrods, and the effect of this local heterogeneity on cell behavior was analyzed via several imaging techniques. Microrod abutment resulted in approximately twofold increases in the maximum displacement of spontaneously beating myocytes, as based on confocal microscopy scans of the gel xy-plane or the myocyte long axis. In addition, microrods caused significant increases in the proportion of aligned myofibrils (≤20° deviation from long axis) in fixed myocytes. Microrod-related differences in axial contraction could be abrogated by long-term interruption of certain signals of the RhoA-/Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) or protein kinase C (PKC) pathway. Furthermore, microrod-induced increases in myocyte size and protein content were prevented by ROCK inhibition. In all, the data suggest that microdomain heterogeneity in 3D appears to promote the development of axially aligned contractile machinery in muscle cells, an observation that may have relevance to a number of cardiac tissue engineering interventions. PMID:22407215

  4. Microdomain heterogeneity in 3D affects the mechanics of neonatal cardiac myocyte contraction

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Matthew W.; Budyn, Elisa; Desai, Tejal A.; Samarel, Allen M.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac muscle cells are known to adapt to their physical surroundings, optimizing intracellular organization and contractile function for a given culture environment. A previously developed in vitro model system has shown that the inclusion of discrete microscale domains (or microrods) in three dimensions (3D) can alter long-term growth responses of neonatal ventricular myocytes. The aim of this work was to understand how cellular contact with such a domain affects various mechanical changes involved in cardiac muscle cell remodeling. Myocytes were maintained in 3D gels over 5 days in the presence or absence of 100 – μm-long microrods, and the effect of this local heterogeneity on cell behavior was analyzed via several imaging techniques. Microrod abutment resulted in approximately twofold increases in the maximum displacement of spontaneously beating myocytes, as based on confocal microscopy scans of the gel xy-plane or the myocyte long axis. In addition, microrods caused significant increases in the proportion of aligned myofibrils (≤20° deviation from long axis) in fixed myocytes. Microrod-related differences in axial contraction could be abrogated by long-term interruption of certain signals of the RhoA-/Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) or protein kinase C (PKC) pathway. Furthermore, microrod-induced increases in myocyte size and protein content were prevented by ROCK inhibition. In all, the data suggest that microdomain heterogeneity in 3D appears to promote the development of axially aligned contractile machinery in muscle cells, an observation that may have relevance to a number of cardiac tissue engineering interventions. PMID:22407215

  5. ROS Regulate Cardiac Function via a Distinct Paracrine Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hui-Ying; Wang, Weidong; Chen, Jianming; Ocorr, Karen; Bodmer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can act cell autonomously and in a paracrine manner by diffusing into nearby cells. Here, we reveal a ROS-mediated paracrine signaling mechanism that does not require entry of ROS into target cells. We found that under physiological conditions, nonmyocytic pericardial cells (PCs) of the Drosophila heart contain elevated levels of ROS compared to the neighboring cardiomyocytes (CMs). We show that ROS in PCs act in a paracrine manner to regulate normal cardiac function, not by diffusing into the CMs to exert their function, but by eliciting a downstream D-MKK3-D-p38 MAPK signaling cascade in PCs that acts on the CMs to regulate their function. We find that ROS-D-p38 signaling in PCs during development is also important for establishing normal adult cardiac function. Our results provide evidence for a previously unrecognized role of ROS in mediating PC/CM interactions that significantly modulates heart function. PMID:24656823

  6. LINC complex proteins in cardiac structure, function, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Stroud, Matthew J; Banerjee, Indroneal; Lowe, Jennifer; Chen, Ju

    2014-01-01

    The LINC (LInker of Nucleoskeleton and Cytoskeleton) complex, composed of proteins within the inner and the outer nuclear membranes, connects the nuclear lamina to the cytoskeleton. The importance of this complex has been highlighted by the discovery of mutations in genes encoding LINC complex proteins, which are causative for skeletal or cardiac myopathies. Herein, this review summarizes structure, function, and interactions of major components of the LINC complex, highlights how mutations in these proteins may lead to cardiac disease, and outlines future challenges in the field. PMID:24481844

  7. Secondary Sphere Formation Enhances the Functionality of Cardiac Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun-Jai; Lee, Ho-Jae; Youn, Seock-Won; Koh, Seok-Jin; Won, Joo-Yun; Chung, Yeon-Ju; Cho, Hyun-Ju; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Sae-Won; Lee, Eun Ju; Kwon, Yoo-Wook; Lee, Hae-Young; Lee, Sang Hun; Ho, Won-Kyung; Park, Young-Bae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Loss of cardiomyocytes impairs cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI). Recent studies suggest that cardiac stem/progenitor cells could repair the damaged heart. However, cardiac progenitor cells are difficult to maintain in terms of purity and multipotency when propagated in two-dimensional culture systems. Here, we investigated a new strategy that enhances potency and enriches progenitor cells. We applied the repeated sphere formation strategy (cardiac explant → primary cardiosphere (CS) formation → sphere-derived cells (SDCs) in adherent culture condition → secondary CS formation by three-dimensional culture). Cells in secondary CS showed higher differentiation potentials than SDCs. When transplanted into the infarcted myocardium, secondary CSs engrafted robustly, improved left ventricular (LV) dysfunction, and reduced infarct sizes more than SDCs did. In addition to the cardiovascular differentiation of transplanted secondary CSs, robust vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) synthesis and secretion enhanced neovascularization in the infarcted myocardium. Microarray pathway analysis and blocking experiments using E-selectin knock-out hearts, specific chemicals, and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) for each pathway revealed that E-selectin was indispensable to sphere initiation and ERK/Sp1/VEGF autoparacrine loop was responsible for sphere maturation. These results provide a simple strategy for enhancing cellular potency for cardiac repair. Furthermore, this strategy may be implemented to other types of stem/progenitor cell-based therapy. PMID:22713697

  8. Controlling the Structural and Functional Anisotropy of Engineered Cardiac Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bursac, N

    2014-01-01

    The ability to control the degree of structural and functional anisotropy in 3D engineered cardiac tissues would have high utility for both in vitro studies of cardiac muscle physiology and pathology as well as potential tissue engineering therapies for myocardial infarction. Here, we applied a high aspect ratio soft lithography technique to generate network-like tissue patches seeded with neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Fabricating longer elliptical pores within the patch networks increased the overall cardiomyocyte and extracellular matrix (ECM) alignment within the patch. Improved uniformity of cell and matrix alignment yielded an increase in anisotropy of action potential propagation and faster longitudinal conduction velocity (LCV). Cardiac tissue patches with a higher degree of cardiomyocyte alignment and electrical anisotropy also demonstrated greater isometric twitch forces. After two weeks of culture, specific measures of electrical and contractile function (LCV = 26.8 ± 0.8 cm/s, specific twitch force = 8.9 ± 1.1 mN/mm2 for the longest pores studied) were comparable to those of neonatal rat myocardium. We have thus described methodology for engineering of highly functional 3D engineered cardiac tissues with controllable degree of anisotropy. PMID:24717534

  9. Evaluation of ventricular function with gated cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Osbakken, M; Yuschok, T

    1986-01-01

    To determine the feasibility of using planar images obtained with gated cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to evaluate ventricular contractile function, cardiac chamber volume (V), and ejection fraction (EF) were calculated using MR images obtained in five previously catheterized patients. Patients were imaged with a .15-Tesla 55-cm bore magnet using the ECG to gate the images. Spin echo pulse sequences (30/500, TE/TR) were used to produce images in the transverse (T), coronal (C), and sagittal (S) planes at end diastole (ED) and end systole (ES). Slice thickness was 1.5 cm, with 2-mm resolution. A calibration grid was imaged in each plane to determine correction factors. Cardiac chamber areas were determined via planimetry. An area-length-volume algorithm was used to obtain EDV and ESV. Three combinations of biplane images in ES and ED were used (T/C, T/S, C/S). Volume data were used to calculate EF. Contrast ventriculogram volumes tended to be greater than MRI volumes, but EFs were similar with both techniques. In conclusion, gated cardiac MR images can be used to evaluate the ventricular function parameters of volume and ejection fraction. PMID:3731263

  10. Assessment of pulmonary function tests in cardiac patients.

    PubMed

    El-Sobkey, Salwa B; Gomaa, Magdi

    2011-04-01

    This study was aimed to assess the pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in cardiac patients; with ischemic or rheumatic heart diseases as well as in patients who underwent coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) or valvular procedures. For the forty eligible participants, the pulmonary function was measured using the spirometry test before and after the cardiac surgery. Data collection sheet was used for the patient's demographic and intra-operative information. Cardiac diseases and surgeries had restrictive negative impact on PFTs. Before surgery, vital capacity (VC), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1), ratio between FEV1 and FVC, and maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) recorded lower values for rheumatic patients than ischemic patients (P values were 0.01, 0.005, 0.0001, 0.031, and 0.035, respectively). Moreover, patients who underwent valvular surgery had lower PFTs than patients who underwent CABG with significant differences for VC, FVC, FEV1, and MVV tests (P values were 0.043, 0.011, 0.040, and 0.020, respectively). No definite causative factor appeared to be responsible for those results although mechanical deficiency and incisional chest pain caused by cardiac surgery are doubtful. More comprehensive investigation is required to resolve the case. PMID:23960642

  11. Propofol Induction's Effect on Cardiac Function

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-31

    This Study Was Focused to Evaluate Feasibility of Doppler Tissue Monitoring During the Induction Anesthesia,; and Evaluate Routine Propofol Induction's Effect on Myocardial Tissue Motion, Using Non-invasive Doppler Tissue and 2D Speckle Tracking Imaging.; This is the First Study, to Our Knowledge, Which Has Evaluated the Possible Impact of Propofol Induction on LV Function.

  12. Accelerated MRI for the assessment of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Axel, Leon; Otazo, Ricardo

    2016-07-01

    Heart disease is a worldwide public health problem; assessment of cardiac function is an important part of the diagnosis and management of heart disease. MRI of the heart can provide clinically useful information on cardiac function, although it is still not routinely used in clinical practice, in part because of limited imaging speed. New accelerated methods for performing cardiovascular MRI (CMR) have the potential to provide both increased imaging speed and robustness to CMR, as well as access to increased functional information. In this review, we will briefly discuss the main methods currently employed to accelerate CMR methods, such as parallel imaging, k-t undersampling and compressed sensing, as well as new approaches that extend the idea of compressed sensing and exploit sparsity to provide richer information of potential use in clinical practice. PMID:27033471

  13. Functional engineered human cardiac patches prepared from nature's platform improve heart function after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingjie; Yang, Hui; Bai, Aobing; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xiuya; Wang, Xinhong; Mao, Yishen; Lu, Chao; Qian, Ruizhe; Guo, Feng; Ding, Tianling; Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Sifeng; Zhang, Jianyi; Liu, Chen; Sun, Ning

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of induced pluripotent stem cells and directed differentiation techniques, it is now feasible to derive individual-specific cardiac cells for human heart tissue engineering. Here we report the generation of functional engineered human cardiac patches using human induced pluripotent stem cells-derived cardiac cells and decellularized natural heart ECM as scaffolds. The engineered human cardiac patches can be tailored to any desired size and shape and exhibited normal contractile and electrical physiology in vitro. Further, when patching on the infarct area, these patches improved heart function of rats with acute myocardial infarction in vivo. These engineered human cardiac patches can be of great value for normal and disease-specific heart tissue engineering, drug screening, and meet the demands for individual-specific heart tissues for personalized regenerative therapy of myocardial damages in the future. PMID:27509303

  14. Placebo Sleep Affects Cognitive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draganich, Christina; Erdal, Kristi

    2014-01-01

    The placebo effect is any outcome that is not attributed to a specific treatment but rather to an individual's mindset (Benson & Friedman, 1996). This phenomenon can extend beyond its typical use in pharmaceutical drugs to involve aspects of everyday life, such as the effect of sleep on cognitive functioning. In 2 studies examining whether…

  15. Implantation of cardiac progenitor cells using self-assembling peptide improves cardiac function after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Masakuni; Liu, Mei-Lan; Nagai, Toshio; Iwanaga, Koji; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Takahashi, Toshinao; Kanda, Masato; Kondo, Naomichi; Wang, Pin; Naito, Atsuhiko T; Komuro, Issei

    2010-12-01

    Implantation of various types of cells into the heart has been reported to be effective for heart failure, however, it is unknown what kinds of cells are most suitable for myocardial repair. To examine which types of cells are most effective, we injected cell-Puramatrix™ (PM) complex into the border area and overlaid the cell-PM patch on the myocardial infarction (MI) area. We compared cardiac morphology and function at 2 weeks after transplantation. Among clonal stem cell antigen-1 positive cardiac progenitors with PM (cSca-1/PM), bone marrow mononuclear cells with PM (BM/PM), skeletal myoblasts with PM (SM/PM), adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal cells with PM (AMC/PM), PM alone (PM), and non-treated MI group (MI), the infarct area of cSca-1/PM was smaller than that of BM/PM, SM/PM, PM and MI. cSca-1/PM and AMC/PM attenuated ventricular enlargement and restored cardiac function in comparison with MI. Capillary density in the infarct area of cSca-1/PM was higher than that of other five groups. The percentage of TUNEL positive cardiomyocytes in the infarct area of cSca-1/PM was lower than that of MI and PM. cSca-1 secreted VEGF and some of them differentiated into cardiomyocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. These results suggest that transplantation of cSca-1/PM most effectively prevents cardiac remodeling and dysfunction through angiogenesis, inhibition of apoptosis and myocardial regeneration. PMID:20869968

  16. Pulling on my heartstrings: mechanotransduction in cardiac development and function

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Margaret E.; Tzima, Ellie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review Endothelial cells line the surface of the cardiovascular system and display a large degree of heterogeneity due to developmental origin and location. Despite this heterogeneity, all endothelial cells are exposed to wall shear stress (WSS) imparted by the frictional force of flowing blood, which plays an important role in determining the endothelial cell phenotype. Although the effects of WSS have been greatly studied in vascular endothelial cells, less is known about the role of WSS in regulating cardiac function and cardiac endothelial cells. Recent findings Recent advances in genetic and imaging technologies have enabled a more thorough investigation of cardiac hemodynamics. Using developmental models, shear stress sensing by endocardial endothelial cells has been shown to play an integral role in proper cardiac development including morphogenesis and formation of the conduction system. In the adult, less is known about hemodynamics and endocardial endothelial cells, but a clear role for WSS in the development of coronary and valvular disease is increasingly appreciated. Summary Future research will further elucidate a role for WSS in the developing and adult heart, and understanding this dynamic relationship may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cardiomyopathies. PMID:26906028

  17. Analysis of 2-d ultrasound cardiac strain imaging using joint probability density functions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chi; Varghese, Tomy

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasound frame rates play a key role for accurate cardiac deformation tracking. Insufficient frame rates lead to an increase in signal de-correlation artifacts resulting in erroneous displacement and strain estimation. Joint probability density distributions generated from estimated axial strain and its associated signal-to-noise ratio provide a useful approach to assess the minimum frame rate requirements. Previous reports have demonstrated that bi-modal distributions in the joint probability density indicate inaccurate strain estimation over a cardiac cycle. In this study, we utilize similar analysis to evaluate a 2-D multi-level displacement tracking and strain estimation algorithm for cardiac strain imaging. The effect of different frame rates, final kernel dimensions and a comparison of radio frequency and envelope based processing are evaluated using echo signals derived from a 3-D finite element cardiac model and five healthy volunteers. Cardiac simulation model analysis demonstrates that the minimum frame rates required to obtain accurate joint probability distributions for the signal-to-noise ratio and strain, for a final kernel dimension of 1 λ by 3 A-lines, was around 42 Hz for radio frequency signals. On the other hand, even a frame rate of 250 Hz with envelope signals did not replicate the ideal joint probability distribution. For the volunteer study, clinical data was acquired only at a 34 Hz frame rate, which appears to be sufficient for radio frequency analysis. We also show that an increase in the final kernel dimensions significantly affect the strain probability distribution and joint probability density function generated, with a smaller effect on the variation in the accumulated mean strain estimated over a cardiac cycle. Our results demonstrate that radio frequency frame rates currently achievable on clinical cardiac ultrasound systems are sufficient for accurate analysis of the strain probability distribution, when a multi-level 2-D

  18. Subclinical hypothyroidism effects on cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Niafar, M; Toufan, M; Ghafoori, S; Aghamohammadzadeh, N

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate heart function in subclinical hypothyroid women in comparison with healthy subjects, a prospective study was performed on newly detected subclinical hypothyroid women presenting to endocrinology clinic of Tabriz Sina Hospital from October 2007 to February 2008. Thirty five women with Subclinical Hypothyroidism (SH) in case group were matched with 35 healthy euthyroid women in control group. All patients in both groups were studied by two dimensional echocardiography and Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI) in Tabriz Shahid Madani Hospital. The FT4 and TSH levels were measured. Comparison of TDI results in Right Ventricle (RV) showed the significantly lower mean T(v) excursion in case group with no significant difference in other parameters. In Left Ventricle (LV), the mean A(m), A(v) and E(v)/E(m) were significantly higher and E/A was lower in the case group, but there was no significant difference in other parameters. No RV diastolic dysfunction was documented in both groups. There was no case with LV systolic dysfunction in both groups. There were 21 (60%) patients with LV diastolic dysfunction in the case group comparing with 11 (31.4%) cases in the control group (p = 0.016, OR = 0.306). Frequency of LV diastolic dysfunction was significantly higher in the case group in patients aged > or = 40 years (94.1% vs. 53.3%; p = 0.013). There was no case of pericardial effusion in the studied population. According to our results, SH may cause LV diastolic dysfunction. Likewise, minor RV systolic dysfunction might be seen in these patients. PMID:19943461

  19. Cardiac Structure and Function in Cushing's Syndrome: A Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Charles; Salenave, Sylvie; Kachenoura, Nadjia; Raissouni, Zainab; Macron, Laurent; Guignat, Laurence; Jublanc, Christel; Azarine, Arshid; Brailly, Sylvie; Young, Jacques; Mousseaux, Elie; Chanson, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with Cushing's syndrome have left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and dysfunction on echocardiography, but echo-based measurements may have limited accuracy in obese patients. No data are available on right ventricular (RV) and left atrial (LA) size and function in these patients. Objectives: The objective of the study was to evaluate LV, RV, and LA structure and function in patients with Cushing's syndrome by means of cardiac magnetic resonance, currently the reference modality in assessment of cardiac geometry and function. Methods: Eighteen patients with active Cushing's syndrome and 18 volunteers matched for age, sex, and body mass index were studied by cardiac magnetic resonance. The imaging was repeated in the patients 6 months (range 2–12 mo) after the treatment of hypercortisolism. Results: Compared with controls, patients with Cushing's syndrome had lower LV, RV, and LA ejection fractions (P < .001 for all) and increased end-diastolic LV segmental thickness (P < .001). Treatment of hypercortisolism was associated with an improvement in ventricular and atrial systolic performance, as reflected by a 15% increase in the LV ejection fraction (P = .029), a 45% increase in the LA ejection fraction (P < .001), and an 11% increase in the RV ejection fraction (P = NS). After treatment, the LV mass index and end-diastolic LV mass to volume ratio decreased by 17% (P < .001) and 10% (P = .002), respectively. None of the patients had late gadolinium myocardial enhancement. Conclusion: Cushing's syndrome is associated with subclinical biventricular and LA systolic dysfunctions that are reversible after treatment. Despite skeletal muscle atrophy, Cushing's syndrome patients have an increased LV mass, reversible upon correction of hypercortisolism. PMID:25093618

  20. Cardiac autonomic function and oesophageal acid sensitivity in patients with non-cardiac chest pain

    PubMed Central

    Tougas, G; Spaziani, R; Hollerbach, S; Djuric, V; Pang, C; Upton, A; Fallen, E; Kamath, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Acid reflux can elicit non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP), possibly through altered visceral sensory or autonomic function. The interactions between symptoms, autonomic function, and acid exposure are poorly understood.
AIM—To examine autonomic function in NCCP patients during exposure to oesophageal acid infusion.
SUBJECTS AND METHODS—Autonomic activity was assessed using power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (PSHRV), before and during oesophageal acidification (0.1 N HCl), in 28 NCCP patients (40.5 (10) years; 13 females) and in 10 matched healthy controls. Measured PSHRV indices included high frequency (HF) (0.15-0.5 Hz) and low frequency (LF) (0.06-0.15 Hz) power to assess vagal and sympathetic activity, respectively.
RESULTS—A total of 19/28 patients had angina-like symptoms elicited by acid. There were no significant manometric changes observed in either acid sensitive or insensitive patients. Acid sensitive patients had a higher baseline heart rate (82.9 (3.1) v 66.7 (3.5) beats/min; p<0.005) and lower baseline vagal activity (HF normalised area: 31.1 (1.9)% v 38.9 (2.3)%; p< 0.03) than acid insensitive patients. During acid infusion, vagal cardiac outflow increased (p<0.03) in acid sensitive but not in acid insensitive patients.
CONCLUSIONS—Patients with angina-like pain during acid infusion have decreased resting vagal activity. The symptoms elicited by perception of acid are further associated with a simultaneous increase in vagal activity in keeping with a vagally mediated pseudoaffective response.


Keywords: reflux disease; non-cardiac chest pain; acid reflux; autonomic nervous system; vagal response; sympathetic activity; heart rate variability; power spectrum analysis PMID:11600476

  1. Cardiac-specific miRNA in cardiogenesis, heart function, and cardiac pathology (with focus on myocardial infarction).

    PubMed

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac miRNAs (miR-1, miR133a, miR-208a/b, and miR-499) are abundantly expressed in the myocardium. They play a central role in cardiogenesis, heart function and pathology. While miR-1 and miR-133a predominantly control early stages of cardiogenesis supporting commitment of cardiac-specific muscle lineage from embryonic stem cells and mesodermal precursors, miR-208 and miR-499 are involved in the late cardiogenic stages mediating differentiation of cardioblasts to cardiomyocytes and fast/slow muscle fiber specification. In the heart, miR-1/133a control cardiac conductance and automaticity by regulating all phases of the cardiac action potential. miR-208/499 located in introns of the heavy chain myosin genes regulate expression of sarcomeric contractile proteins. In cardiac pathology including myocardial infarction (MI), expression of cardiac miRNAs is markedly altered that leads to deleterious effects associated with heart wounding, arrhythmia, increased apoptosis, fibrosis, hypertrophy, and tissue remodeling. In acute MI, circulating levels of cardiac miRNAs are significantly elevated making them to be a promising diagnostic marker for early diagnosis of acute MI. Great cardiospecific capacity of these miRNAs is very helpful for enhancing regenerative properties and survival of stem cell and cardiac progenitor transplants and for reprogramming of mature non-cardiac cells to cardiomyocytes. PMID:27056419

  2. The Insular Cortex and the Regulation of Cardiac Function.

    PubMed

    Oppenheimer, Stephen; Cechetto, David

    2016-04-01

    Cortical representation of the heart challenges the orthodox view that cardiac regulation is confined to stereotyped, preprogrammed and rigid responses to exteroceptive or interoceptive environmental stimuli. The insula has been the region most studied in this regard; the results of clinical, experimental, and functional radiological studies show a complex interweave of activity with patterns dynamically varying regarding lateralization and antero-posterior distribution of responsive insular regions. Either acting alone or together with other cortical areas including the anterior cingulate, medial prefrontal, and orbito-frontal cortices as part of a concerted network, the insula can imbue perceptions with autonomic color providing emotional salience, and aiding in learning and behavioral decision choice. In these functions, cardiovascular input and the right anterior insula appear to play an important, if not pivotal role. At a more basic level, the insula gauges cardiovascular responses to exteroceptive and interoceptive stimuli, taking into account memory, cognitive, and reflexive constructs thereby ensuring appropriate survival responses and maintaining emotional and physiological homeostasis. When acquired derangements to the insula occur after stroke, during a seizure or from abnormal central processing of interoceptive or exteroceptive environmental cues as in psychiatric disorders, serious consequences can arise including cardiac electrophysiological, structural and contractile dysfunction and sudden cardiac death. PMID:27065176

  3. Electrophysiological Modeling of Cardiac Ventricular Function: From Cell to Organ

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, R. L.; Scollan, D. F.; Holmes, A.; Yung, C. K.; Zhang, J.; Jafri, M. S.

    2005-01-01

    Three topics of importance to modeling the integrative function of the heart are reviewed. The first is modeling of the ventricular myocyte. Emphasis is placed on excitation-contraction coupling and intracellular Ca2+ handling, and the interpretation of experimental data regarding interval-force relationships. Second, data on use of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance (DTMR) imaging for measuring the anatomical structure of the cardiac ventricles are presented. A method for the semi-automated reconstruction of the ventricles using a combination of gradient recalled acquisition in the steady state (GRASS) and DTMR images is described. Third, we describe how these anatomically and biophysically based models of the cardiac ventricles can be implemented on parallel computers. PMID:11701509

  4. Mesodermal iPSC–derived progenitor cells functionally regenerate cardiac and skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Swinnen, Melissa; Giacomazzi, Giorgia; Camps, Jordi; Barthélemy, Ines; Ceccarelli, Gabriele; Caluwé, Ellen; Grosemans, Hanne; Thorrez, Lieven; Pelizzo, Gloria; Muijtjens, Manja; Verfaillie, Catherine M.; Blot, Stephane; Janssens, Stefan; Sampaolesi, Maurilio

    2015-01-01

    Conditions such as muscular dystrophies (MDs) that affect both cardiac and skeletal muscles would benefit from therapeutic strategies that enable regeneration of both of these striated muscle types. Protocols have been developed to promote induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to differentiate toward cardiac or skeletal muscle; however, there are currently no strategies to simultaneously target both muscle types. Tissues exhibit specific epigenetic alterations; therefore, source-related lineage biases have the potential to improve iPSC-driven multilineage differentiation. Here, we determined that differential myogenic propensity influences the commitment of isogenic iPSCs and a specifically isolated pool of mesodermal iPSC-derived progenitors (MiPs) toward the striated muscle lineages. Differential myogenic propensity did not influence pluripotency, but did selectively enhance chimerism of MiP-derived tissue in both fetal and adult skeletal muscle. When injected into dystrophic mice, MiPs engrafted and repaired both skeletal and cardiac muscle, reducing functional defects. Similarly, engraftment into dystrophic mice of canine MiPs from dystrophic dogs that had undergone TALEN-mediated correction of the MD-associated mutation also resulted in functional striatal muscle regeneration. Moreover, human MiPs exhibited the same capacity for the dual differentiation observed in murine and canine MiPs. The findings of this study suggest that MiPs should be further explored for combined therapy of cardiac and skeletal muscles. PMID:26571398

  5. Disruption of ROCK1 gene attenuates cardiac dilation and improves contractile function in pathological cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Jianjian; Zhang, Yi-Wei; Summers, Lelia J.; Dorn, Gerald W.; Wei, Lei

    2009-01-01

    Summary The development of left ventricular cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in response to increased hemodynamic load and neurohormonal stress is initially a compensatory response. However, persistent stress eventually leads to dilated heart failure, which is a common cause of heart failure in human hypertensive and valvular heart disease. We have recently reported that Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase 1 (ROCK1) homozygous knockout mice exhibited reduced cardiac fibrosis and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, while displaying a preserved compensatory hypertrophic response to pressure overload. In this study, we have tested the effects of ROCK1 deficiency on cardiac hypertrophy, dilation, and dysfunction. We have shown that ROCK1 deletion attenuated left ventricular dilation and contractile dysfunction, but not hypertrophy, in a transgenic model of Gαq overexpression-induced hypertrophy which represents a well-characterized and highly relevant genetic mouse model of pathological hypertrophy. Although the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy was not affected, ROCK1 deletion in Gαq mice resulted in a concentric hypertrophic phenotype associated with reduced induction of hypertrophic markers indicating that ROCK1 deletion could favorably modify hypertrophy without inhibiting it. Furthermore, ROCK1 deletion also improved contractile response to β-adrenergic stimulation in Gαq transgenic mice. Consistent with this observation, ROCK1 deletion prevented down-regulation of type V/VI adenylyl cyclase expression, which is associated with the impaired β-adrenergic signaling in Gαq mice. The present study establishes for the first time a role for ROCK1 in cardiac dilation and contractile dysfunction. PMID:18178218

  6. Positron emission tomographic imaging of cardiac sympathetic innervation and function

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, D.S.; Chang, P.C.; Eisenhofer, G.; Miletich, R.; Finn, R.; Bacher, J.; Kirk, K.L.; Bacharach, S.; Kopin, I.J. )

    1990-05-01

    Sites of uptake, storage, and metabolism of ({sup 18}F)fluorodopamine and excretion of ({sup 18}F)fluorodopamine and its metabolites were visualized using positron emission tomographic (PET) scanning after intravenous injection of the tracer into anesthetized dogs. Radioactivity was concentrated in the renal pelvis, heart, liver, spleen, salivary glands, and gall bladder. Uptake of 18F by the heart resulted in striking delineation of the left ventricular myocardium. Pretreatment with desipramine markedly decreased cardiac positron emission, consistent with dependence of the heart on neuronal uptake (uptake-1) for removal of circulating catecholamines. In reserpinized animals, cardiac positron emission was absent within 30 minutes after injection of ({sup 18}F)-6-fluorodopamine, demonstrating that the emission in untreated animals was from radioactive labeling of the sympathetic storage vesicles. Decreased positron emission from denervated salivary glands confirmed that the tracer was concentrated in sympathetic neurons. Radioactivity in the gall bladder and urinary system depicted the hepatic and renal excretion of the tracer and its metabolites. Administration of tyramine or nitroprusside increased and ganglionic blockade with trimethaphan decreased the rate of loss of myocardial radioactivity. The results show that PET scanning after administration of ({sup 18}F)fluorodopamine can be used to visualize sites of sympathetic innervation, follow the metabolism and renal and hepatic excretion of catecholamines, and examine cardiac sympathetic function.

  7. Proangiogenic scaffolds as functional templates for cardiac tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Madden, Lauran R.; Mortisen, Derek J.; Sussman, Eric M.; Dupras, Sarah K.; Fugate, James A.; Cuy, Janet L.; Hauch, Kip D.; Laflamme, Michael A.; Murry, Charles E.; Ratner, Buddy D.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate here a cardiac tissue-engineering strategy addressing multicellular organization, integration into host myocardium, and directional cues to reconstruct the functional architecture of heart muscle. Microtemplating is used to shape poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid) hydrogel into a tissue-engineering scaffold with architectures driving heart tissue integration. The construct contains parallel channels to organize cardiomyocyte bundles, supported by micrometer-sized, spherical, interconnected pores that enhance angiogenesis while reducing scarring. Surface-modified scaffolds were seeded with human ES cell-derived cardiomyocytes and cultured in vitro. Cardiomyocytes survived and proliferated for 2 wk in scaffolds, reaching adult heart densities. Cardiac implantation of acellular scaffolds with pore diameters of 30–40 μm showed angiogenesis and reduced fibrotic response, coinciding with a shift in macrophage phenotype toward the M2 state. This work establishes a foundation for spatially controlled cardiac tissue engineering by providing discrete compartments for cardiomyocytes and stroma in a scaffold that enhances vascularization and integration while controlling the inflammatory response. PMID:20696917

  8. Engineered hybrid cardiac patches with multifunctional electronics for online monitoring and regulation of tissue function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feiner, Ron; Engel, Leeya; Fleischer, Sharon; Malki, Maayan; Gal, Idan; Shapira, Assaf; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Dvir, Tal

    2016-06-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering approaches to treat myocardial infarction, cardiac cells are seeded within three-dimensional porous scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. However, current cardiac patches do not allow for online monitoring and reporting of engineered-tissue performance, and do not interfere to deliver signals for patch activation or to enable its integration with the host. Here, we report an engineered cardiac patch that integrates cardiac cells with flexible, freestanding electronics and a 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The patch exhibited robust electronic properties, enabling the recording of cellular electrical activities and the on-demand provision of electrical stimulation for synchronizing cell contraction. We also show that electroactive polymers containing biological factors can be deposited on designated electrodes to release drugs in the patch microenvironment on demand. We expect that the integration of complex electronics within cardiac patches will eventually provide therapeutic control and regulation of cardiac function.

  9. Treadmill performance and cardiac function in selected patients with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKirnan, M.D.; Sullivan, M.; Jensen, D.; Froelicher, V.F.

    1984-02-01

    To investigate the cardiac determinants of treadmill performance in patients able to exercise to volitional fatigue, 88 patients with coronary heart disease free of angina pectoris were tested. The exercise tests included supine bicycle radionuclide ventriculography, thallium scintigraphy and treadmill testing with expired gas analysis. The number of abnormal Q wave locations, ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, cardiac output, exercise-induced ST segment depression and thallium scar and ischemia scores were the cardiac variables considered. Rest and exercise ejection fractions were highly correlated to thallium scar score (r . -0.72 to -0.75, p less than 0.001), but not to maximal oxygen consumption (r . 0.19 to 0.25, p less than 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the variability in predicting treadmill time or estimated maximal oxygen consumption was explained by treadmill test-induced change in heart rate (39%), thallium ischemia score (12%) and cardiac output at rest (4%). The change in heart rate induced by the treadmill test explained only 27% of the variability in measured maximal oxygen consumption. Myocardial damage predicted ejection fraction at rest and the ability to increase heart rate with treadmill exercise appeared as an essential component of exercise capacity. Exercise capacity was only minimally affected by asymptomatic ischemia and was relatively independent of ventricular function.

  10. Cardiac effects of 3-iodothyronamine: a new aminergic system modulating cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Chiellini, Grazia; Frascarelli, Sabina; Ghelardoni, Sandra; Carnicelli, Vittoria; Tobias, Sandra C; DeBarber, Andrea; Brogioni, Simona; Ronca-Testoni, Simonetta; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Grandy, David K; Scanlan, Thomas S; Zucchi, Riccardo

    2007-05-01

    3-Iodothyronamine T1AM is a novel endogenous thyroid hormone derivative that activates the G protein-coupled receptor known as trace anime-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). In the isolated working rat heart and in rat cardiomyocytes, T1AM produced a reversible, dose-dependent negative inotropic effect (e.g., 27+/-5, 51+/-3, and 65+/-2% decrease in cardiac output at 19, 25, and 38 microM concentration, respectively). An independent negative chronotropic effect was also observed. The hemodynamic effects of T1AM were remarkably increased in the presence of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein, whereas they were attenuated in the presence of the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate. No effect was produced by inhibitors of protein kinase A, protein kinase C, calcium-calmodulin kinase II, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase, or MAP kinases. Tissue cAMP levels were unchanged. In rat ventricular tissue, Western blot experiments with antiphosphotyrosine antibodies showed reduced phosphorylation of microsomal and cytosolic proteins after perfusion with synthetic T1AM; reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction experiments revealed the presence of transcripts for at least 5 TAAR subtypes; specific and saturable binding of [125I]T1AM was observed, with a dissociation constant in the low micromolar range (5 microM); and endogenous T1AM was detectable by tandem mass spectrometry. In conclusion, our findings provide evidence for the existence of a novel aminergic system modulating cardiac function. PMID:17284482

  11. Highly Elastic Micropatterned Hydrogel for Engineering Functional Cardiac Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Annabi, Nasim; Tsang, Kelly; Mithieux, Suzanne M.; Nikkhah, Mehdi; Ameri, Afshin

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure is a major international health issue. Myocardial mass loss and lack of contractility are precursors to heart failure. Surgical demand for effective myocardial repair is tempered by a paucity of appropriate biological materials. These materials should conveniently replicate natural human tissue components, convey persistent elasticity, promote cell attachment, growth and conformability to direct cell orientation and functional performance. Here, microfabrication techniques are applied to recombinant human tropoelastin, the resilience-imparting protein found in all elastic human tissues, to generate photocrosslinked biological materials containing well-defined micropatterns. These highly elastic substrates are then used to engineer biomimetic cardiac tissue constructs. The micropatterned hydrogels, produced through photocrosslinking of methacrylated tropoelastin (MeTro), promote the attachment, spreading, alignment, function, and intercellular communication of cardiomyocytes by providing an elastic mechanical support that mimics their dynamic mechanical properties in vivo. The fabricated MeTro hydrogels also support the synchronous beating of cardiomyocytes in response to electrical field stimulation. These novel engineered micropatterned elastic gels are designed to be amenable to 3D modular assembly and establish a versatile, adaptable foundation for the modeling and regeneration of functional cardiac tissue with potential for application to other elastic tissues. PMID:24319406

  12. Effect of prolonged space flight on cardiac function and dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, W. L.; Epstein, S. E.; Griffith, J. M.; Goldstein, R. E.; Redwood, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    Echocardiographic studies were performed preflight 5 days before launch and on recovery day and 1, 2, 4, 11, 31 and 68 days postflight. From these echocardiograms measurements were made. From these primary measurements, left ventricular end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, stroke volume, and mass were derived using the accepted assumptions. Findings in the Scientist Pilot and Pilot resemble those seen in trained distance runners. Wall thickness measurements were normal in all three crewmembers preflight. Postflight basal studies were unchanged in the Commander on recovery day through 68 days postflight in both the Scientist Pilot and Pilot, however, the left ventricular end-diastolic volume, stroke volume, and mass were decreased slightly. Left ventricular function curves were constructed for the Commander and Pilot by plotting stroke volume versus end-diastolic volume. In both astronauts, preflight and postflight data fell on the same straight line demonstrating that no deterioration in cardiac function had occurred. These data indicate that the cardiovascular system adapts well to prolonged weightlessness and suggest that alterations in cardiac dimensions and function are unlikely to limit man's future in space.

  13. Cardiac autonomic functions in children with familial Mediterranean fever.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Murat; Kır, Mustafa; Makay, Balahan; Keskinoğlu, Pembe; Bora, Elçin; Ünsal, Erbil; Ünal, Nurettin

    2016-05-01

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common inherited autoinflammatory disease in the world. The long-term effects of subclinical inflammation in FMF are not well recognized. Some studies have suggested that FMF is associated with cardiac autonomic dysfunction in adult FMF patients. The objective of this study was to investigate the cardiac autonomic functions in pediatric FMF patients by using several autonomic tests. Thirty-five patients with FMF and 35 healthy controls were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Demographic data, disease-specific data, and orthostatic symptoms were recorded. In all participants, 12-lead electrocardiography (ECG), 24 h ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring, transthoracic echocardiography, treadmill exercise test, and head upright tilt-table (HUTT) test were performed. The heart rate recovery (HRR) indices of the two groups were similar. Also, chronotropic response was similar in both groups. The time-domain parameters of heart rate variability (HRV) were similar in both groups, except mean RR (p = 0.024). Frequencies of ventricular and supraventricular ectopic stimuli were similar in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in average QT and average corrected QT interval length, average QT interval dispersion, and average QT corrected dispersion. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the ratio of clinical dysautonomic reactions on HUTT. However, we observed a significantly higher rate of dysautonomic reactions on HUTT in patients with exertional leg pain than that in patients without (p = 0.013). When the fractal dimension of time curves were compared, FMF patients exhibited significantly lower diastolic blood pressure parameters than controls in response to HUTT. Cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction in children with FMF is not prominent. Particularly, patients with exertional leg pain are more prone to have dysautonomic features

  14. Cardiac Affection in Type 1 Diabetic Patients in Relation to Omentin

    PubMed Central

    Dayem, Soha M. Abd El; Battah, Ahmed A.; Shehaby, Amal El

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate cardiac affection in type 1 diabetes in relation to Omentin. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Sixty two diabetics and 30 volunteer of the same age and sex were included as a control group. Blood sample was taken for assessment of omentin and oxidized low density lipoprotein (OxLDL), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1) and lipid profile. Urine sample was taken for assessment of albumin/creatinine ratio. 24 hour holter was also done. T-test, simple correlation followed by stepwise multiple regression analysis was used for analysis of data. RESULTS: Parameters of 24 hour holter were significantly lower in diabetics. Omentin was significantly lower, while OxLDL were significantly higher than controls. RMSSD, ST deviation and OxLDL were the parameters related to omentin by stepwise multiple regression analysis in diabetics. CONCLUSION: Diabetic patients had a cardiac autonomic neuropathy. A significant reduction of omentin and elevation OxLDL imply that they influence glucose metabolism in type 1 diabetes. Omentin had a significant relation to 24 hr holter which may reflect its role in cardiac affection. Omentin and OxLDL had a role in renal affection.

  15. Sleep Disordered Breathing: Hypertension and Cardiac Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Querejeta Roca, Gabriela; Shah, Amil M

    2015-12-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common form of sleep disordered breathing and has a relatively high prevalence in the general population. The frequency and severity of OSA is associated with age, male sex, and obesity, and OSA has been linked to cardiovascular complications and death. Importantly, OSA has a strong association with both prevalent and incidental hypertension and has a particularly high prevalence in patients with resistant hypertension. In these patients, CPAP and other OSA-directed treatments have been proposed as therapy to help control blood pressure (BP), especially in patients who have not attained optimal BP control despite maximum pharmacological therapy. OSA has also been associated with alterations in cardiac structure and function, although most studies are small and highly limited in study design. Existing data suggest an association between OSA greater left ventricle (LV) mass and hypertrophy that appears independent of confounders including hypertension and obesity. Although less clear and more controversial, OSA severity has been linked to LV systolic and diastolic function, pulmonary hypertension, and right ventricular hypertrophy. Further studies are needed to confirm the potential causal role of OSA in these observed associations with cardiac abnormalities. PMID:26493391

  16. Associations between Kidney Function and Subclinical Cardiac Abnormalities in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chi-yuan; Li, Yongmei; Mishra, Rakesh K.; Keane, Martin; Rosas, Sylvia E.; Dries, Daniel; Xie, Dawei; Chen, Jing; He, Jiang; Anderson, Amanda; Go, Alan S.; Shlipak, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Heart failure is a common consequence of CKD, and it portends high risk for mortality. However, among patients without known heart failure, the associations of different stages of estimated GFR (eGFR) with changes in cardiac structure and function are not well described. Here, we performed a cross-sectional analysis to study these associations among 3487 participants of the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study. We estimated GFR using cystatin C. The prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) assessed by echocardiography was 32%, 48%, 57%, and 75% for eGFR categories ≥60, 45–59, 30–44, and <30 ml/min per 1.73 m2, respectively. In fully adjusted multivariable analyses, subjects with eGFR levels of <30 ml/min per 1.73 m2 had twofold higher odds of LVH (OR=2.20, 95% CI=1.40–3.40; P<0.001) relative to subjects with eGFR≥60 ml/min per 1.73 m2. This reduction in kidney function also significantly associated with abnormal LV geometry but not diastolic or systolic dysfunction. An eGFR of 30–44 ml/min per 1.73 m2 also significantly associated with LVH and abnormal LV geometry compared with eGFR≥60 ml/min per 1.73 m2. In summary, in this large CKD cohort, reduced kidney function associated with abnormal cardiac structure. We did not detect significant associations between kidney function and systolic or diastolic function after adjusting for potential confounding variables. PMID:22935481

  17. Assessment of Cardiac Autonomic Functions in Medical Students With Type D Personality

    PubMed Central

    Panwar, R. Abhilasha Singh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Type D personality experiences joint occurrence of Negative Affectivity and Social Inhibition. It is an emerging risk factor for cardiovascular disease, with prevalence being 18-53% among cardiac patients. Type D personality people have exaggerated cardiovascular activity mediated by increased sympathetic drive and decreased vagal control of the heart which leads to enhanced risk of hypertension and is an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease. Aim To compare the cardiac autonomic function of Type D and non-Type D students. To compare cardiac autonomic functions among male and female students and students with and without family history of hypertension and coronary artery disease among Type D. To find the most affected test among Type D students. Materials and Methods Thirty Type D and 30 non- Type D medical students were identified by DS14. The Parasympathetic cardiac autonomic tests done assessed Heart Rate response to valsalva manoeuvre, immediate heart rate response to standing and heart rate variation during deep breathing. Sympathetic tests assessed BP response to standing and Sustained Hand Grip. The heart rate and R-R interval measurement were got from lead II of ECG recordings on Polyrite D. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software. Unpaired student’s t-test was used and p-value <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results Type D students showed slightly decreased parasympathetic activity and increased sympathetic activity when compared to non-Type D students even though there was no statistically significant difference between them. There is a statistically significant decrease in valsalva ratio among females (p<0.01) when compared to males. There is a statistically significant decrease in 30:15 ratio and BP response to handgrip (p<0.05) among students with family history of hypertension and coronary artery disease when compared with students with no family history of coronary artery disease. Valsalva

  18. Functional Cardiac Lipolysis in Mice Critically Depends on Comparative Gene Identification-58*

    PubMed Central

    Zierler, Kathrin A.; Jaeger, Doris; Pollak, Nina M.; Eder, Sandra; Rechberger, Gerald N.; Radner, Franz P. W.; Woelkart, Gerald; Kolb, Dagmar; Schmidt, Albrecht; Kumari, Manju; Preiss-Landl, Karina; Pieske, Burkert; Mayer, Bernd; Zimmermann, Robert; Lass, Achim; Zechner, Rudolf; Haemmerle, Guenter

    2013-01-01

    Efficient catabolism of cellular triacylglycerol (TG) stores requires the TG hydrolytic activity of adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL). The presence of comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) strongly increased ATGL-mediated TG catabolism in cell culture experiments. Mutations in the genes coding for ATGL or CGI-58 in humans cause neutral lipid storage disease characterized by TG accumulation in multiple tissues. ATGL gene mutations cause a severe phenotype especially in cardiac muscle leading to cardiomyopathy that can be lethal. In contrast, CGI-58 gene mutations provoke severe ichthyosis and hepatosteatosis in humans and mice, whereas the role of CGI-58 in muscle energy metabolism is less understood. Here we show that mice lacking CGI-58 exclusively in muscle (CGI-58KOM) developed severe cardiac steatosis and cardiomyopathy linked to impaired TG catabolism and mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. The marked increase in ATGL protein levels in cardiac muscle of CGI-58KOM mice was unable to compensate the lack of CGI-58. The addition of recombinant CGI-58 to cardiac lysates of CGI-58KOM mice completely reconstituted TG hydrolytic activities. In skeletal muscle, the lack of CGI-58 similarly provoked TG accumulation. The addition of recombinant CGI-58 increased TG hydrolytic activities in control and CGI-58KOM tissue lysates, elucidating the limiting role of CGI-58 in skeletal muscle TG catabolism. Finally, muscle CGI-58 deficiency affected whole body energy homeostasis, which is caused by impaired muscle TG catabolism and increased cardiac glucose uptake. In summary, this study demonstrates that functional muscle lipolysis depends on both CGI-58 and ATGL. PMID:23413028

  19. Factors Affecting the Occurrence of Out-of-Hospital Sudden Cardiac Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Bartkiewicz, Wiesław; Sowizdraniuk, Jarosław; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective. This paper aims to discover the risk factors for sudden cardiac arrest (out-of-hospital sudden cardiac arrest (OHSCA)) which significantly affect the decision about prioritizing emergency interventions before dispatching medical emergency teams, risk of deterioration of the patient's condition at the scene, and emergency procedures. Methods. A retrospective study taking into account the international classification of diseases ICD-10 based on an analysis of medical records of Emergency Medical Service in Wroclaw (Poland). Results. The main risk factor of OHSCA is coexistence of external cause leading to illness or death (ICD Group V-10) as well as the occurrence of diseases from the group of endocrine disorders (group E), in particular diabetes. The increase in the risk of OHSCA incidence is affected by nervous system diseases (group G), especially epilepsy of various etiologies, respiratory diseases (group J), mainly COPD, and bronchial asthma or mental and behavioral disorders (group F), with particular emphasis on the drugs issue. The procedure for receiving calls for Emergency Notification Centre does not take into account clinical risk factors for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Conclusion. Having knowledge of OHSCA risk factors can increase the efficiency of rescue operations from rapid assessment and provision of appropriate medical team, through effective performance of medical emergency treatment and prevention of SCA or finally reducing the costs. PMID:25705520

  20. Dietary interaction of high fat and marginal copper deficiency on cardiac contractile function

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High fat and copper deficient diets impair heart function leading to cardio hypertrophy, increased lipid droplet volume and compromised contractile function, resembling liptoxic cardiac dysfunction. However, the combined effect of the two on cardiac function is unknown. The purpose or objective of t...

  1. The Transfer Functions of Cardiac Tissue during Stochastic Pacing

    PubMed Central

    de Lange, Enno; Kucera, Jan P.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The restitution properties of cardiac action potential duration (APD) and conduction velocity (CV) are important factors in arrhythmogenesis. They determine alternans, wavebreak, and the patterns of reentrant arrhythmias. We developed a novel approach to characterize restitution using transfer functions. Transfer functions relate an input and an output quantity in terms of gain and phase shift in the complex frequency domain. We derived an analytical expression for the transfer function of interbeat intervals (IBIs) during conduction from one site (input) to another site downstream (output). Transfer functions can be efficiently obtained using a stochastic pacing protocol. Using simulations of conduction and extracellular mapping of strands of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes, we show that transfer functions permit the quantification of APD and CV restitution slopes when it is difficult to measure APD directly. We find that the normally positive CV restitution slope attenuates IBI variations. In contrast, a negative CV restitution slope (induced by decreasing extracellular [K+]) amplifies IBI variations with a maximum at the frequency of alternans. Hence, it potentiates alternans and renders conduction unstable, even in the absence of APD restitution. Thus, stochastic pacing and transfer function analysis represent a powerful strategy to evaluate restitution and the stability of conduction. PMID:19134481

  2. Homeobox Protein Hop Functions in the Adult Cardiac Conduction System

    PubMed Central

    Ismat, Fraz A.; Zhang, Maozhen; Kook, Hyun; Huang, Bin; Zhou, Rong; Ferrari, Victor A.; Epstein, Jonathan A.; Patel, Vickas V.

    2006-01-01

    Hop is an unusual homeobox gene expressed in the embryonic and adult heart. Hop acts downstream of Nkx2–5 during development, and Nkx2–5 mutations are associated with cardiac conduction system (CCS) defects. Inactivation of Hop in the mouse is lethal in half of the expected null embryos. Here, we show that Hop is expressed strongly in the adult CCS. Hop−/− adult mice display conduction defects below the atrioventricular node (AVN) as determined by invasive electrophysiological testing. These defects are associated with decreased expression of connexin40. Our results suggest that Hop functions in the adult CCS and demonstrate conservation of molecular hierarchies between embryonic myocardium and the specialized conduction tissue of the mature heart. PMID:15790958

  3. Cardiac Atrophy and Diastolic Dysfunction During and After Long Duration Spaceflight: Functional Consequences for Orthostatic Intolerance, Exercise Capability and Risk for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Benjamin D.; Bungo, Michael W.; Platts, Steven H.; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Johnston, Smith L.

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac Atrophy and Diastolic Dysfunction During and After Long Duration Spaceflight: Functional Consequences for Orthostatic Intolerance, Exercise Capability and Risk for Cardiac Arrhythmias (Integrated Cardiovascular) will quantify the extent of long-duration space flightassociated cardiac atrophy (deterioration) on the International Space Station crewmembers.

  4. Primary Cardiac Lymphoma: Diagnosis and the Impact of Chemotherapy on Cardiac Structure and Function.

    PubMed

    Pagé, Maude; Grasso, Agata E; Carpenter, John-Paul; Sheppard, Mary N; Karwatowski, Stefan P; Mohiaddin, Raad H

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of primary cardiac lymphoma presenting as myopericarditis and rapidly deteriorating into biventricular heart failure and ventricular arrhythmias. Computed tomography and cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging showed extensive myocardial infiltration with typical patterns on tissue characterization CMR images, raising clinical suspicion. Diagnosis was confirmed by myocardial histologic examination. Marked regression of tumor burden was apparent after 6 cycles of anthracycline-based chemotherapy. This case illustrates that a high degree of suspicion for this rare entity is mandated to institute timely treatment. Rapid tumor lysis may induce life-threatening acute cardiac decompensation that requires intensive monitoring and support therapy. PMID:26755242

  5. Molecular mechanism regulating myosin and cardiac functions by ELC.

    PubMed

    Lossie, Janine; Köhncke, Clemens; Mahmoodzadeh, Shokoufeh; Steffen, Walter; Canepari, Monica; Maffei, Manuela; Taube, Martin; Larchevêque, Oriane; Baumert, Philipp; Haase, Hannelore; Bottinelli, Roberto; Regitz-Zagrosek, Vera; Morano, Ingo

    2014-07-18

    The essential myosin light chain (ELC) is involved in modulation of force generation of myosin motors and cardiac contraction, while its mechanism of action remains elusive. We hypothesized that ELC could modulate myosin stiffness which subsequently determines its force production and cardiac contraction. Therefore, we generated heterologous transgenic mouse (TgM) strains with cardiomyocyte-specific expression of ELC with human ventricular ELC (hVLC-1; TgM(hVLC-1)) or E56G-mutated hVLC-1 (hVLC-1(E56G); TgM(E56G)). hVLC-1 or hVLC-1(E56G) expression in TgM was around 39% and 41%, respectively of total VLC-1. Laser trap and in vitro motility assays showed that stiffness and actin sliding velocity of myosin with hVLC-1 prepared from TgM(hVLC-1) (1.67 pN/nm and 2.3 μm/s, respectively) were significantly higher than myosin with hVLC-1(E56G) prepared from TgM(E56G) (1.25 pN/nm and 1.7 μm/s, respectively) or myosin with mouse VLC-1 (mVLC-1) prepared from C57/BL6 (1.41 pN/nm and 1.5 μm/s, respectively). Maximal left ventricular pressure development of isolated perfused hearts in vitro prepared from TgM(hVLC-1) (80.0 mmHg) were significantly higher than hearts from TgM(E56G) (66.2 mmHg) or C57/BL6 (59.3±3.9 mmHg). These findings show that ELCs decreased myosin stiffness, in vitro motility, and thereby cardiac functions in the order hVLC-1>hVLC-1(E56G)≈mVLC-1. They also suggest a molecular pathomechanism of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy caused by hVLC-1 mutations. PMID:24911555

  6. Physiologically inspired cardiac scaffolds for tailored in vivo function and heart regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Nicholas J; Coulombe, Kareen L K

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering is well suited for the treatment of cardiac disease due to the limited regenerative capacity of native cardiac tissue and the loss of function associated with endemic cardiac pathologies, such as myocardial infarction and congenital heart defects. However, the physiological complexity of the myocardium imposes extensive requirements on tissue therapies intended for these applications. In recent years, the field of cardiac tissue engineering has been characterized by great innovation and diversity in the fabrication of engineered tissue scaffolds for cardiac repair and regeneration to address these problems. From early approaches that attempted only to deliver cardiac cells in a hydrogel vessel, significant progress has been made in understanding the role of each major component of cardiac living tissue constructs (namely cells, scaffolds, and signaling mechanisms) as they relate to mechanical, biological, and electrical in vivo performance. This improved insight, accompanied by modern material science techniques, allows for the informed development of complex scaffold materials that are optimally designed for cardiac applications. This review provides a background on cardiac physiology as it relates to critical cardiac scaffold characteristics, the degree to which common cardiac scaffold materials fulfill these criteria, and finally an overview of recent in vivo studies that have employed this type of approach. PMID:25970645

  7. Normalization of Naxos plakoglobin levels restores cardiac function in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Stroud, Matthew J; Zhang, Jianlin; Fang, Xi; Ouyang, Kunfu; Kimura, Kensuke; Mu, Yongxin; Dalton, Nancy D; Gu, Yusu; Bradford, William H; Peterson, Kirk L; Cheng, Hongqiang; Zhou, Xinmin; Chen, Ju

    2015-04-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is associated with mutations in genes encoding intercalated disc proteins and ultimately results in sudden cardiac death. A subset of patients with AC have the autosomal recessive cardiocutaneous disorder Naxos disease, which is caused by a 2-base pair deletion in the plakoglobin-encoding gene JUP that results in a truncated protein with reduced expression. In mice, cardiomyocyte-specific plakoglobin deficiency recapitulates many aspects of human AC, and overexpression of the truncated Naxos-associated plakoglobin also results in an AC-like phenotype; therefore, it is unclear whether Naxos disease results from loss or gain of function consequent to the plakoglobin mutation. Here, we generated 2 knockin mouse models in which endogenous Jup was engineered to express the Naxos-associated form of plakoglobin. In one model, Naxos plakoglobin bypassed the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay pathway, resulting in normal levels of the truncated plakoglobin. Moreover, restoration of Naxos plakoglobin to WT levels resulted in normal heart function. Together, these data indicate that a gain of function in the truncated form of the protein does not underlie the clinical phenotype of patients with Naxos disease and instead suggest that insufficiency of the truncated Naxos plakoglobin accounts for disease manifestation. Moreover, these results suggest that increasing levels of truncated or WT plakoglobin has potential as a therapeutic approach to Naxos disease. PMID:25705887

  8. Changes of Cardiac Function During Ultradistance Trail Running.

    PubMed

    Jouffroy, Romain; Caille, Vincent; Perrot, Stéphane; Vieillard-Baron, Antoine; Dubourg, Olivier; Mansencal, Nicolas

    2015-10-15

    Previous studies have noted reversible cardiac dysfunction during marathon races, but few data are available concerning ultradistance trail running. The aim of this study was to assess echocardiographic parameters during ultradistance trail running. We performed an observational study in 66 participants to the 80-km Ecotrail of Paris Ile de France. All subjects had echocardiographic examinations before the race and on arrival, and 28 of them underwent serial echocardiographic examinations during the race (21 and 53 km). A single experienced physician performed all echocardiographic examinations, and the same protocol was always used (conventional 2-dimensional and Doppler left ventricular parameters and longitudinal strain). All echocardiographic parameters of left ventricular (LV) systolic function were significantly decreased on arrival (p ≤0.002). A significant reduction of LV systolic function was observed in 48% of study subjects on arrival. No significant modification was observed at 21 or at 53 km, and only global longitudinal strain was significantly decreased (p = 0.0008). At arrival, mitral E/A ratio and average mitral tissue Doppler imaging e' wave were significantly decreased (p = 0.0001 and p = 0.0004, respectively), but these changes were observed from 21 km. In conclusion, ultradistance trail running can lead to abnormalities of LV systolic and diastolic functions in amateur runners. Diastolic dysfunction arises earlier than systolic dysfunction. Left ventricular systolic dysfunction occurred in 48% of the study subjects and was detected early by assessment of longitudinal strain. PMID:26294134

  9. The time-of-day of myocardial infarction onset affects healing through oscillations in cardiac neutrophil recruitment.

    PubMed

    Schloss, Maximilian J; Horckmans, Michael; Nitz, Katrin; Duchene, Johan; Drechsler, Maik; Bidzhekov, Kiril; Scheiermann, Christoph; Weber, Christian; Soehnlein, Oliver; Steffens, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is the leading cause of death in Western countries. Epidemiological studies show acute MI to be more prevalent in the morning and to be associated with a poorer outcome in terms of mortality and recovery. The mechanisms behind this association are not fully understood. Here, we report that circadian oscillations of neutrophil recruitment to the heart determine infarct size, healing, and cardiac function after MI Preferential cardiac neutrophil recruitment during the active phase (Zeitgeber time, ZT13) was paralleled by enhanced myeloid progenitor production, increased circulating numbers of CXCR2(hi) neutrophils as well as upregulated cardiac adhesion molecule and chemokine expression. MI at ZT13 resulted in significantly higher cardiac neutrophil infiltration compared to ZT5, which was inhibited by CXCR2 antagonism or neutrophil-specific CXCR2 knockout. Limiting exaggerated neutrophilic inflammation at this time point significantly reduced the infarct size and improved cardiac function. PMID:27226028

  10. Inhalation of Simulated Smog Affects Cardiac Function in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: The health effects of individual criteria air pollutants have been well investigated. Little is known about health effects of inhaled multi-pollutant mixtures that more realistically represent environmental exposures. The present study was designed to evaluate the card...

  11. How mental stress affects endothelial function.

    PubMed

    Toda, Noboru; Nakanishi-Toda, Megumi

    2011-12-01

    Mental stress is an important factor contributing to recognized mechanisms underlying cardiovascular events. Among these, stress-related endothelial dysfunction is an early risk factor that predicts future development of severe cardiovascular disorders. Acute mental stress by a variety of tests impairs endothelial function in humans, although the opposite results have been reported by some investigators. Chronic stress always deteriorates endothelial function in humans and experimental animals. Stress hormones, such as glucocorticoids and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and endothelin-1 liberated in response to mental stress participate in endothelial dysfunction possibly via downregulation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression, eNOS inactivation, decreased nitric oxide (NO) actions, and increased NO degradation, together with vasoconstriction counteracting against NO-induced vasodilatation. Catecholamines do not directly affect endothelial function but impair its function when blood pressure elevation by the amines is sustained. Endogenous opioids favorably affect endothelial function, which counteract deteriorating effects of other stress hormones and mediators. Inhibition of cortisol and endothelin-1 production, prevention of pro-inflammatory mediator accumulation, hypnotics, mirthful laughter, humor orientation, and lifestyle modification would contribute to the prevention and treatment for stress-related endothelial dysfunction and future serious cardiovascular disease. PMID:21947555

  12. Regular Football Practice Improves Autonomic Cardiac Function in Male Children

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Luis; Oliveira, Jose; Soares-Miranda, Luisa; Rebelo, Antonio; Brito, Joao

    2015-01-01

    Background: The role of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) in the cardiovascular regulation is of primal importance. Since it has been associated with adverse conditions such as cardiac arrhythmias, sudden death, sleep disorders, hypertension and obesity. Objectives: The present study aimed to investigate the impact of recreational football practice on the autonomic cardiac function of male children, as measured by heart rate variability. Patients and Methods: Forty-seven male children aged 9 - 12 years were selected according to their engagement with football oriented practice outside school context. The children were divided into a football group (FG; n = 22) and a control group (CG; n = 25). The FG had regular football practices, with 2 weekly training sessions and occasional weekend matches. The CG was not engaged with any physical activity other than complementary school-based physical education classes. Data from physical activity, physical fitness, and heart rate variability measured in time and frequency domains were obtained. Results: The anthropometric and body composition characteristics were similar in both groups (P > 0.05). The groups were also similar in time spent daily on moderate-to-vigorous physical activities (FG vs. CG: 114 ± 64 vs. 87 ± 55 minutes; P > 0.05). However, the FG performed better (P < 0.05) in Yo-Yo intermittent endurance test (1394 ± 558 vs. 778 ± 408 m) and 15-m sprint test (3.06 ± 0.17 vs. 3.20 ± 0.23 s). Also, the FG presented enhanced autonomic function. Significant differences were detected (P < 0.05) between groups for low frequency normalized units (38.0 ± 15.2 vs. 47.3 ± 14.2 n.u (normalized units)), high frequency normalized units (62.1 ± 15.2 vs. 52.8 ± 14.2 n.u.), and LF:HF ratio (0.7 ± 0.4 vs. 1.1 ± 0.6 ms2). Conclusions: Children engaged with regular football practice presented enhanced physical fitness and autonomic function, by increasing vagal tone at rest. PMID:26448848

  13. Cardiac Autonomic Function in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Cheng-Yu; Kung, Woon-Man; Chou, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Yao-Chin; Tai, Hsu-Chih; Wei, James Cheng-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease involing spine and enthesis. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the autonomic nervous system (ANS) function and the association between ANS and the functional status or disease activity in AS. The study included 42 AS patients, all fulfilling the modified New York criteria. All the patients are totally symptom free for ANS involvement and had normal neurological findings. These AS patients and 230 healthy volunteers receive analysis of 5 minutes heart rate variability (HRV) in lying posture. In addition, disease activity and functional status of these AS patients are assessed by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Global Score (BAS-G). Both groups were age and sex-matched. Although the HRV analysis indicates that the peaks of total power (TP, 0–0.5 Hz) and high-frequency power (HF, 0.15–0.40 Hz) are similar in both groups, the activities of low-frequency power (LF, 0.04–0.15 Hz), LF in normalized units (LF%), and the ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF) in AS patients are obviously lower than healthy controls. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein revealed negative relationship with HF. The AS patients without peripheral joint disease have higher LF, TP, variance, LF%, and HF than the patients with peripheral joint disease. The AS patients without uvetis have higher HF than the patients with uvetis. The total scores of BASDI, BASFI, and BAS-G do not show any association to HRV parameters. AS patients have significantly abnormal cardiac autonomic regulation. This is closely related with some inflammatory activities. Reduced autonomic function may be one of the factors of high cardiovascular risk in AS patients. PMID:27227940

  14. Sinus node function in first three weeks after cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Mackintosh, A F; Carmichael, D J; Wren, C; Cory-Pearce, R; English, T A

    1982-01-01

    Donor sinus node function was studied in 10 patients from day 4 to day 24 after cardiac transplantation. Cycle length, atrial arrhythmias, corrected sinus node recovery time, and estimated sinoatrial conduction time were recorded daily. Five patients had at least two sets of results suggesting sinus node dysfunction (group A) while five patients had no such abnormalities (group B). The prognosis in group A was poor, with four of the five patients dying within four months of the operation; one unexpected death from arrhythmias was recorded by ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring. All five patients in group B survived for at least eight months. In nine patients sinus node function varied from day to day, with corrected sinus node recovery time reaching a peak at 11 to 18 days after operation. The longest corrected sinus node recovery time was 11 160 ms. Neither the differences between the patients, nor the day to day variation, could be explained solely by the degree of rejection as assessed by biopsy or by the ischaemia time of the heart during procurement. Sinus node dysfunction soon after transplantation is associated with a poorer prognosis and might be the terminal event in some cases. Images PMID:6756446

  15. Cardiac Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors: Novel Aspects of Expression, Signaling Mechanisms, Physiologic Function, and Clinical Importance

    PubMed Central

    O’Connell, Timothy D.; Jensen, Brian C.; Baker, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors (AR) are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that have a crucial role in cardiac physiology in health and disease. Alpha1-ARs signal through Gαq, and signaling through Gq, for example, by endothelin and angiotensin receptors, is thought to be detrimental to the heart. In contrast, cardiac alpha1-ARs mediate important protective and adaptive functions in the heart, although alpha1-ARs are only a minor fraction of total cardiac ARs. Cardiac alpha1-ARs activate pleiotropic downstream signaling to prevent pathologic remodeling in heart failure. Mechanisms defined in animal and cell models include activation of adaptive hypertrophy, prevention of cardiac myocyte death, augmentation of contractility, and induction of ischemic preconditioning. Surprisingly, at the molecular level, alpha1-ARs localize to and signal at the nucleus in cardiac myocytes, and, unlike most GPCRs, activate “inside-out” signaling to cause cardioprotection. Contrary to past opinion, human cardiac alpha1-AR expression is similar to that in the mouse, where alpha1-AR effects are seen most convincingly in knockout models. Human clinical studies show that alpha1-blockade worsens heart failure in hypertension and does not improve outcomes in heart failure, implying a cardioprotective role for human alpha1-ARs. In summary, these findings identify novel functional and mechanistic aspects of cardiac alpha1-AR function and suggest that activation of cardiac alpha1-AR might be a viable therapeutic strategy in heart failure. PMID:24368739

  16. Reduced Right Ventricular Function Predicts Long-Term Cardiac Re-Hospitalization after Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, Yulia; Chan, Jacqueline; Iskandir, Marina; Gulkarov, Iosif; Tortolani, Anthony; Brener, Sorin J.; Sacchi, Terrence J.; Heitner, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Background The significance of right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF), independent of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), following isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and valve procedures remains unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the significance of abnormal RVEF by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR), independent of LVEF in predicting outcomes of patients undergoing isolated CABG and valve surgery. Methods From 2007 to 2009, 109 consecutive patients (mean age, 66 years; 38% female) were referred for pre-operative CMR. Abnormal RVEF and LVEF were considered <35% and <45%, respectively. Elective primary procedures include CABG (56%) and valve (44%). Thirty-day outcomes were perioperative complications, length of stay, cardiac re-hospitalizations and early mortaility; long-term (> 30 days) outcomes included, cardiac re-hospitalization, worsening congestive heart failure and mortality. Mean clinical follow up was 14 months. Findings Forty-eight patients had reduced RVEF (mean 25%) and 61 patients had normal RVEF (mean 50%) (p<0.001). Fifty-four patients had reduced LVEF (mean 30%) and 55 patients had normal LVEF (mean 59%) (p<0.001). Patients with reduced RVEF had a higher incidence of long-term cardiac re-hospitalization vs. patients with normal RVEF (31% vs.13%, p<0.05). Abnormal RVEF was a predictor for long-term cardiac re-hospitalization (HR 3.01 [CI 1.5-7.9], p<0.03). Reduced LVEF did not influence long-term cardiac re-hospitalization. Conclusion Abnormal RVEF is a stronger predictor for long-term cardiac re-hospitalization than abnormal LVEF in patients undergoing isolated CABG and valve procedures. PMID:26197273

  17. The Role of Cardiac Troponin T Quantity and Function in Cardiac Development and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Ferhaan; Banerjee, Sanjay K.; Lage, Michele L.; Huang, Xueyin N.; Smith, Stephen H.; Saba, Samir; Rager, Jennifer; Conner, David A.; Janczewski, Andrzej M.; Tobita, Kimimasa; Tinney, Joseph P.; Moskowitz, Ivan P.; Perez-Atayde, Antonio R.; Keller, Bradley B.; Mathier, Michael A.; Shroff, Sanjeev G.; Seidman, Christine E.; Seidman, J. G.

    2008-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic (HCM) and dilated (DCM) cardiomyopathies result from sarcomeric protein mutations, including cardiac troponin T (cTnT, TNNT2). We determined whether TNNT2 mutations cause cardiomyopathies by altering cTnT function or quantity; whether the severity of DCM is related to the ratio of mutant to wildtype cTnT; whether Ca2+ desensitization occurs in DCM; and whether absence of cTnT impairs early embryonic cardiogenesis. Methods and Findings We ablated Tnnt2 to produce heterozygous Tnnt2+/− mice, and crossbreeding produced homozygous null Tnnt2−/− embryos. We also generated transgenic mice overexpressing wildtype (TGWT) or DCM mutant (TGK210Δ) Tnnt2. Crossbreeding produced mice lacking one allele of Tnnt2, but carrying wildtype (Tnnt2+/−/TGWT) or mutant (Tnnt2+/−/TGK210Δ) transgenes. Tnnt2+/− mice relative to wildtype had significantly reduced transcript (0.82±0.06[SD] vs. 1.00±0.12 arbitrary units; p = 0.025), but not protein (1.01±0.20 vs. 1.00±0.13 arbitrary units; p = 0.44). Tnnt2+/− mice had normal hearts (histology, mass, left ventricular end diastolic diameter [LVEDD], fractional shortening [FS]). Moreover, whereas Tnnt2+/−/TGK210Δ mice had severe DCM, TGK210Δ mice had only mild DCM (FS 18±4 vs. 29±7%; p<0.01). The difference in severity of DCM may be attributable to a greater ratio of mutant to wildtype Tnnt2 transcript in Tnnt2+/−/TGK210Δ relative to TGK210Δ mice (2.42±0.08, p = 0.03). Tnnt2+/−/TGK210Δ muscle showed Ca2+ desensitization (pCa50 = 5.34±0.08 vs. 5.58±0.03 at sarcomere length 1.9 µm, p<0.01), but no difference in maximum force generation. Day 9.5 Tnnt2−/− embryos had normally looped hearts, but thin ventricular walls, large pericardial effusions, noncontractile hearts, and severely disorganized sarcomeres. Conclusions Absence of one Tnnt2 allele leads to a mild deficit in transcript but not protein, leading to a normal cardiac phenotype. DCM results from abnormal

  18. Altered mechanical state in the embryonic heart results in time-dependent decreases in cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Brennan; Bark, David; Van Herck, Ilse; Garrity, Deborah; Dasi, Lakshmi Prasad

    2015-11-01

    Proper blood flow patterns are critical for normal cardiac morphogenesis, a process that occurs rapidly in order to support further development of all tissue and organs. Previously, intracardiac fluid forces have been shown to play a critical role in cardiac morphogenesis. Altered blood flow in early development can result in an array of cardiac defects including ventricular septal defects, valve malformations, and impaired cardiac looping. However, given the dynamic and highly transient nature of cardiac morphogenesis, time dependency of the mechanical environment as an epigenetic factor in relation to intracardiac forces must be significant. Here, we show that abnormal cardiac loading adversely influences cardiac morphology only during certain time windows, thus confirming that mechanical factors are a time-dependent epigenetic factor. To illustrate this, groups of zebrafish embryos were spaced at 6-h increments from 24 to 48 h post-fertilization (hpf) in which embryos were centrifuged to generate a noninvasive alteration of cardiac preload in addition to an overall hypergravity environment. We found that earlier and later treatment groups responded with altered morphology and function, while the group with altered preload from 30 to 36 hpf had no effect. These results demonstrate the inherently time-dependent nature of epigenetic factors as pertaining to intracardiac forces and external mechanical factors. Further, it underscores the highly coupled nature of programmed biology and mechanical forces during cardiac morphogenesis. Future studies with respect to surgical correction during cardiac morphogenesis must consider timing to optimize therapeutic impact. PMID:25976479

  19. Estrogen treatment affects brain functioning after menopause.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Ulrike; Hausmann, Markus

    2011-12-01

    Sex hormones have powerful neuromodulatory effects on functional brain organization and cognitive functioning. This paper reviews findings from studies investigating the influence of sex hormones in postmenopausal women with and without hormone therapy (HT). Functional brain organization was investigated using different behavioural tasks in postmenopausal women using either estrogen therapy or combined estrogen plus gestagen therapy and age- and IQ-matched postmenopausal women not taking HT. The results revealed HT-related modulations in specific aspects of functional brain organization including functional cerebral asymmetries and interhemispheric interaction. In contrast to younger women during the menstrual cycle, however, it seems that HT, and especially estrogen therapy, after menopause affects intrahemispheric processing rather than interhemispheric interaction. This might be explained by a faster and more pronounced age-related decline in intrahemispheric relative to interhemispheric functioning, which might be associated with higher sensitivity to HT. Taken together, the findings suggest that the female brain retains its plasticity even after reproductive age and remains susceptible to the effects of sex hormones throughout the lifetime, which might help to discover new clinical approaches in the hormonal treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders. PMID:22120942

  20. Invasive surgery reduces infarct size and preserves cardiac function in a porcine model of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    van Hout, Gerardus PJ; Teuben, Michel PJ; Heeres, Marjolein; de Maat, Steven; de Jong, Renate; Maas, Coen; Kouwenberg, Lisanne HJA; Koenderman, Leo; van Solinge, Wouter W; de Jager, Saskia CA; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Hoefer, Imo E

    2015-01-01

    Reperfusion injury following myocardial infarction (MI) increases infarct size (IS) and deteriorates cardiac function. Cardioprotective strategies in large animal MI models often failed in clinical trials, suggesting translational failure. Experimentally, MI is induced artificially and the effect of the experimental procedures may influence outcome and thus clinical applicability. The aim of this study was to investigate if invasive surgery, as in the common open chest MI model affects IS and cardiac function. Twenty female landrace pigs were subjected to MI by transluminal balloon occlusion. In 10 of 20 pigs, balloon occlusion was preceded by invasive surgery (medial sternotomy). After 72 hrs, pigs were subjected to echocardiography and Evans blue/triphenyl tetrazoliumchloride double staining to determine IS and area at risk. Quantification of IS showed a significant IS reduction in the open chest group compared to the closed chest group (IS versus area at risk: 50.9 ± 5.4% versus 69.9 ± 3.4%, P = 0.007). End systolic LV volume and LV ejection fraction measured by echocardiography at follow-up differed significantly between both groups (51 ± 5 ml versus 65 ± 3 ml, P = 0.033; 47.5 ± 2.6% versus 38.8 ± 1.2%, P = 0.005). The inflammatory response in the damaged myocardium did not differ between groups. This study indicates that invasive surgery reduces IS and preserves cardiac function in a porcine MI model. Future studies need to elucidate the effect of infarct induction technique on the efficacy of pharmacological therapies in large animal cardioprotection studies. PMID:26282710

  1. Automatic facial responses to affective stimuli in high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Mathersul, Danielle; McDonald, Skye; Rushby, Jacqueline A

    2013-01-17

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) demonstrate atypical behavioural responses to affective stimuli, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Investigating automatic responses to these stimuli may help elucidate these mechanisms. 18 high-functioning adults with ASDs and 18 typically developing controls viewed 54 extreme pleasant (erotica), extreme unpleasant (mutilations), and non-social neutral images from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS). Two-thirds of images received an acoustic startle probe 3s post-picture onset. Facial electromyography (EMG) activity (orbicularis, zygomaticus, corrugator), skin conductance (SCR) and cardiac responses were recorded. The adults with ASDs demonstrated typical affective startle modulation and automatic facial EMG responses but atypical autonomic (SCRs and cardiac) responses, suggesting a failure to orient to, or a deliberate effort to disconnect from, socially relevant stimuli (erotica, mutilations). These results have implications for neural systems known to underlie affective processes, including the orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala. PMID:23142408

  2. New developments in paediatric cardiac functional ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    de Korte, Chris L; Nillesen, Maartje M; Saris, Anne E C M; Lopata, Richard G P; Thijssen, Johan M; Kapusta, Livia

    2014-07-01

    Ultrasound imaging can be used to estimate the morphology as well as the motion and deformation of tissues. If the interrogated tissue is actively deforming, this deformation is directly related to its function and quantification of this deformation is normally referred as 'strain imaging'. Tissue can also be deformed by applying an internal or external force and the resulting, induced deformation is a function of the mechanical tissue characteristics. In combination with the load applied, these strain maps can be used to estimate or reconstruct the mechanical properties of tissue. This technique was named 'elastography' by Ophir et al. in 1991. Elastography can be used for atherosclerotic plaque characterisation, while the contractility of the heart or skeletal muscles can be assessed with strain imaging. Rather than using the conventional video format (DICOM) image information, radio frequency (RF)-based ultrasound methods enable estimation of the deformation at higher resolution and with higher precision than commercial methods using Doppler (tissue Doppler imaging) or video image data (2D speckle tracking methods). However, the improvement in accuracy is mainly achieved when measuring strain along the ultrasound beam direction, so it has to be considered a 1D technique. Recently, this method has been extended to multiple directions and precision further improved by using spatial compounding of data acquired at multiple beam steered angles. Using similar techniques, the blood velocity and flow can be determined. RF-based techniques are also beneficial for automated segmentation of the ventricular cavities. In this paper, new developments in different techniques of quantifying cardiac function by strain imaging, automated segmentation, and methods of performing blood flow imaging are reviewed and their application in paediatric cardiology is discussed. PMID:27277901

  3. Plasma-functionalized electrospun matrix for biograft development and cardiac function stabilization.

    PubMed

    Guex, A G; Frobert, A; Valentin, J; Fortunato, G; Hegemann, D; Cook, S; Carrel, T P; Tevaearai, H T; Giraud, M N

    2014-07-01

    Cardiac tissue engineering approaches can deliver large numbers of cells to the damaged myocardium and have thus increasingly been considered as a possible curative treatment to counteract the high prevalence of progressive heart failure after myocardial infarction (MI). Optimal scaffold architecture and mechanical and chemical properties, as well as immune- and bio-compatibility, need to be addressed. We demonstrated that radio-frequency plasma surface functionalized electrospun poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) fibres provide a suitable matrix for bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) cardiac implantation. Using a rat model of chronic MI, we showed that MSC-seeded plasma-coated PCL grafts stabilized cardiac function and attenuated dilatation. Significant relative decreases of 13% of the ejection fraction (EF) and 15% of the fractional shortening (FS) were observed in sham treated animals; respective decreases of 20% and 25% were measured 4 weeks after acellular patch implantation, whereas a steadied function was observed 4 weeks after MSC-patch implantation (relative decreases of 6% for both EF and FS). PMID:24531014

  4. Qishen Yiqi Drop Pill improves cardiac function after myocardial ischemia

    PubMed Central

    JianXin, Chen; Xue, Xu; ZhongFeng, Li; Kuo, Gao; FeiLong, Zhang; ZhiHong, Li; Xian, Wang; HongCai, Shang

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial ischemia (MI) is one of the leading causes of death, while Qishen Yiqi Drop Pill (QYDP) is a representative traditional Chinese medicine to treat this disease. Unveiling the pharmacological mechanism of QYDP will provide a great opportunity to promote the development of novel drugs to treat MI. 64 male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were divided into four groups: MI model group, sham operation group, QYDP treatment group and Fosinopril treatment group. Echocardiography results showed that QYDP exhibited significantly larger LV end-diastolic dimension (LVEDd) and LV end-systolic dimension (LVEDs), compared with the MI model group, indicating the improved cardiac function by QYDP. 1H-NMR based metabonomics further identify 9 significantly changed metabolites in the QYDP treatment group, and the QYDP-related proteins based on the protein-metabolite interaction networks and the corresponding pathways were explored, involving the pyruvate metabolism pathway, the retinol metabolism pathway, the tyrosine metabolism pathway and the purine metabolism pathway, suggesting that QYDP was closely associated with blood circulation. ELISA tests were further employed to identify NO synthase (iNOS) and cathepsin K (CTSK) in the networks. For the first time, our work combined experimental and computational methods to study the mechanism of the formula of traditional Chinese medicine. PMID:27075394

  5. Cardiac cytoarchitecture - why the "hardware" is important for heart function!

    PubMed

    Ehler, Elisabeth

    2016-07-01

    Cells that constitute fully differentiated tissues are characterised by an architecture that makes them perfectly suited for the job they have to do. This is especially obvious for cardiomyocytes, which have an extremely regular shape and display a paracrystalline arrangement of their cytoplasmic components. This article will focus on the two major cytoskeletal multiprotein complexes that are found in cardiomyocytes, the myofibrils, which are responsible for contraction and the intercalated disc, which mediates mechanical and electrochemical contact between individual cardiomyocytes. Recent studies have revealed that these two sites are also crucial in sensing excessive mechanical strain. Signalling processes will be triggered that## lead to changes in gene expression and eventually lead to an altered cardiac cytoarchitecture in the diseased heart, which results in a compromised function. Thus, understanding these changes and the signals that lead to them is crucial to design treatment strategies that can attenuate these processes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26577135

  6. Anti-rat soluble IL-6 receptor antibody down-regulates cardiac IL-6 and improves cardiac function following trauma-hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaolong; Hu, Shunhua; Choudhry, Mashkoor A; Rue, Loring W; Bland, Kirby I; Chaudry, Irshad H

    2007-03-01

    Although anti-IL-6-mAb down-regulates cardiac IL-6 and attenuates IL-6-mediated cardiac dysfunction following trauma-hemorrhage, it is not known whether blockade of IL-6 receptor will down-regulate cardiac IL-6 and improve cardiac function under those conditions. Six groups of male adult rats (275-325 g) were used: sham/trauma-hemorrhage+vehicle, sham/trauma-hemorrhage+IgG, sham/trauma-hemorrhage+anti-rat sIL-6R. Rats underwent trauma-hemorrhage (removal of 60% of the circulating blood volume and fluid resuscitation after 90 min). Vehicle (V), normal goat IgG or anti-rat sIL-6R (16.7 microg/kg BW) was administered intra-peritoneally in the middle of resuscitation. Two hours later, cardiac function was measured by ICG dilution technique; blood samples collected, cardiomyocytes isolated, and cardiomyocyte nuclei were then extracted. Cardiac IL-6, IL-6R, gp130, IkappaB-alpha/P-IkappaB-alpha, NF-kappaB, and ICAM-1 expressions were measured by immunoblotting. Plasma IL-6 and cardiomyocyte NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity were determined by ELISA. In additional animals, heart harvested and cardiac MPO activity and CINC-1 and -3 were also measured. In another group of rats, cardiac function was measure by microspheres at 24 h following trauma-hemorrhage. Cardiac function was depressed and cardiac IL-6, P-IkappaB-alpha, NF-kappaB and its DNA-binding activity, ICAM-1, MPO activity, and CINC-1 and -3 were markedly increased after trauma-hemorrhage. Moreover, cardiac dysfunction was evident even 24 h after trauma-hemorrhage. Administration of sIL-6R following trauma-hemorrhage: (1) improved cardiac output at 2 h and 24 h (p<0.05); (2) down-regulated both cardiac IL-6 and IL-6R (p<0.05); and (3) attenuated cardiac P-IkappaB-alpha, NF-kappaB, NF-kappaB DNA-binding activity, ICAM-1, CINC-1, -3, and MPO activity (p<0.05). IgG did not significantly influence the above parameters. Thus, IL-6-mediated up-regulation of cardiac NF-kappaB, ICAM-1, CINC-1, -3, and MPO activity likely

  7. Cardiac Metabolic Pathways Affected in the Mouse Model of Barth Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan; Powers, Corey; Madala, Satish K.; Greis, Kenneth D.; Haffey, Wendy D.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Purevjav, Enkhsaikhan; Javadov, Sabzali; Strauss, Arnold W.; Khuchua, Zaza

    2015-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a mitochondrial phospholipid essential for electron transport chain (ETC) integrity. CL-deficiency in humans is caused by mutations in the tafazzin (Taz) gene and results in a multisystem pediatric disorder, Barth syndrome (BTHS). It has been reported that tafazzin deficiency destabilizes mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and affects supercomplex assembly. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of Taz-knockdown on the mitochondrial proteomic landscape and metabolic processes, such as stability of respiratory chain supercomplexes and their interactions with fatty acid oxidation enzymes in cardiac muscle. Proteomic analysis demonstrated reduction of several polypeptides of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, including Rieske and cytochrome c1 subunits of complex III, NADH dehydrogenase alpha subunit 5 of complex I and the catalytic core-forming subunit of F0F1-ATP synthase. Taz gene knockdown resulted in upregulation of enzymes of folate and amino acid metabolic pathways in heart mitochondria, demonstrating that Taz-deficiency causes substantive metabolic remodeling in cardiac muscle. Mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes are destabilized in CL-depleted mitochondria from Taz knockdown hearts resulting in disruption of the interactions between ETC and the fatty acid oxidation enzymes, very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, potentially affecting the metabolic channeling of reducing equivalents between these two metabolic pathways. Mitochondria-bound myoglobin was significantly reduced in Taz-knockdown hearts, potentially disrupting intracellular oxygen delivery to the oxidative phosphorylation system. Our results identify the critical pathways affected by the Taz-deficiency in mitochondria and establish a future framework for development of therapeutic options for BTHS. PMID:26030409

  8. Cardiac metabolic pathways affected in the mouse model of barth syndrome.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan; Powers, Corey; Madala, Satish K; Greis, Kenneth D; Haffey, Wendy D; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Purevjav, Enkhsaikhan; Javadov, Sabzali; Strauss, Arnold W; Khuchua, Zaza

    2015-01-01

    Cardiolipin (CL) is a mitochondrial phospholipid essential for electron transport chain (ETC) integrity. CL-deficiency in humans is caused by mutations in the tafazzin (Taz) gene and results in a multisystem pediatric disorder, Barth syndrome (BTHS). It has been reported that tafazzin deficiency destabilizes mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes and affects supercomplex assembly. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of Taz-knockdown on the mitochondrial proteomic landscape and metabolic processes, such as stability of respiratory chain supercomplexes and their interactions with fatty acid oxidation enzymes in cardiac muscle. Proteomic analysis demonstrated reduction of several polypeptides of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, including Rieske and cytochrome c1 subunits of complex III, NADH dehydrogenase alpha subunit 5 of complex I and the catalytic core-forming subunit of F0F1-ATP synthase. Taz gene knockdown resulted in upregulation of enzymes of folate and amino acid metabolic pathways in heart mitochondria, demonstrating that Taz-deficiency causes substantive metabolic remodeling in cardiac muscle. Mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes are destabilized in CL-depleted mitochondria from Taz knockdown hearts resulting in disruption of the interactions between ETC and the fatty acid oxidation enzymes, very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase and long-chain 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase, potentially affecting the metabolic channeling of reducing equivalents between these two metabolic pathways. Mitochondria-bound myoglobin was significantly reduced in Taz-knockdown hearts, potentially disrupting intracellular oxygen delivery to the oxidative phosphorylation system. Our results identify the critical pathways affected by the Taz-deficiency in mitochondria and establish a future framework for development of therapeutic options for BTHS. PMID:26030409

  9. Foetal bovine serum-derived exosomes affect yield and phenotype of human cardiac progenitor cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Francesco; Ionta, Vittoria; Rossi, Fabrizio; Miraldi, Fabio; Messina, Elisa; Giacomello, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) represent a powerful tool in cardiac regenerative medicine. Pre-clinical studies suggest that most of the beneficial effects promoted by the injected cells are due to their paracrine activity exerted on endogenous cells and tissue. Exosomes are candidate mediators of this paracrine effects. According to their potential, many researchers have focused on characterizing exosomes derived from specific cell types, but, up until now, only few studies have analyzed the possible in vitro effects of bovine serum-derived exosomes on cell proliferation or differentiation. Methods: The aim of this study was to analyse, from a qualitative and quantitative point of view, the in vitro effects of bovine serum exosomes on human CPCs cultured either as cardiospheres or as monolayers of cardiosphere-forming cells. Results: Effects on proliferation, yield and molecular patterning were detected. We show, for the first time, that exogenous bovine exosomes support the proliferation and migration of human cardiosphere-forming cells, and that their depletion affects cardiospheres formation, in terms of size, yield and extra-cellular matrix production. Conclusion: These results stress the importance of considering differential biological effects of exogenous cell culture supplements on the final phenotype of primary human cell cultures.

  10. Effect of Transverse Aortic Constriction on Cardiac Structure, Function and Gene Expression in Pregnant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Songstad, Nils Thomas; Johansen, David; How, Ole-Jacob; Kaaresen, Per Ivar; Ytrehus, Kirsti; Acharya, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    Background There is an increased risk of heart failure and pulmonary edema in pregnancies complicated by hypertensive disorders. However, in a previous study we found that pregnancy protects against fibrosis and preserves angiogenesis in a rat model of angiotensin II induced cardiac hypertrophy. In this study we test the hypothesis that pregnancy protects against negative effects of increased afterload. Methods Pregnant (gestational day 5.5–8.5) and non-pregnant Wistar rats were randomized to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or sham surgery. After 14.2±0.14 days echocardiography was performed. Aortic blood pressure and left ventricular (LV) pressure-volume loops were obtained using a conductance catheter. LV collagen content and cardiomyocyte circumference were measured. Myocardial gene expression was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Heart weight was increased by TAC (p<0.001) but not by pregnancy. Cardiac myocyte circumference was larger in pregnant compared to non-pregnant rats independent of TAC (p = 0.01), however TAC per se did not affect this parameter. Collagen content in LV myocardium was not affected by pregnancy or TAC. TAC increased stroke work more in pregnant rats (34.1±2.4 vs 17.5±2.4 mmHg/mL, p<0.001) than in non-pregnant (28.2±1.7 vs 20.9±1.5 mmHg/mL, p = 0.06). However, it did not lead to overt heart failure in any group. In pregnant rats, α-MHC gene expression was reduced by TAC. Increased in the expression of β-MHC gene was higher in pregnant (5-fold) compared to non-pregnant rats (2-fold) after TAC (p = 0.001). Nine out of the 19 genes related to cardiac remodeling were affected by pregnancy independent of TAC. Conclusions This study did not support the hypothesis that pregnancy is cardioprotective against the negative effects of increased afterload. Some differences in cardiac structure, function and gene expression between pregnant and non-pregnant rats following TAC indicated that afterload

  11. Design and formulation of functional pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Thavandiran, Nimalan; Dubois, Nicole; Mikryukov, Alexander; Massé, Stéphane; Beca, Bogdan; Simmons, Craig A.; Deshpande, Vikram S.; McGarry, J. Patrick; Chen, Christopher S.; Nanthakumar, Kumaraswamy; Keller, Gordon M.; Radisic, Milica; Zandstra, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Access to robust and information-rich human cardiac tissue models would accelerate drug-based strategies for treating heart disease. Despite significant effort, the generation of high-fidelity adult-like human cardiac tissue analogs remains challenging. We used computational modeling of tissue contraction and assembly mechanics in conjunction with microfabricated constraints to guide the design of aligned and functional 3D human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived cardiac microtissues that we term cardiac microwires (CMWs). Miniaturization of the platform circumvented the need for tissue vascularization and enabled higher-throughput image-based analysis of CMW drug responsiveness. CMW tissue properties could be tuned using electromechanical stimuli and cell composition. Specifically, controlling self-assembly of 3D tissues in aligned collagen, and pacing with point stimulation electrodes, were found to promote cardiac maturation-associated gene expression and in vivo-like electrical signal propagation. Furthermore, screening a range of hPSC-derived cardiac cell ratios identified that 75% NKX2 Homeobox 5 (NKX2-5)+ cardiomyocytes and 25% Cluster of Differentiation 90 OR (CD90)+ nonmyocytes optimized tissue remodeling dynamics and yielded enhanced structural and functional properties. Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the optimized platform in a tachycardic model of arrhythmogenesis, an aspect of cardiac electrophysiology not previously recapitulated in 3D in vitro hPSC-derived cardiac microtissue models. The design criteria identified with our CMW platform should accelerate the development of predictive in vitro assays of human heart tissue function. PMID:24255110

  12. Disruption of the nonneuronal tph1 gene demonstrates the importance of peripheral serotonin in cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Francine; Thévenot, Etienne; Fligny, Cécile; Fromes, Yves; Darmon, Michèle; Ripoche, Marie-Anne; Bayard, Elisa; Hanoun, Naima; Saurini, Françoise; Lechat, Philippe; Dandolo, Luisa; Hamon, Michel; Mallet, Jacques; Vodjdani, Guilan

    2003-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) controls a wide range of biological functions. In the brain, its implication as a neurotransmitter and in the control of behavioral traits has been largely documented. At the periphery, its modulatory role in physiological processes, such as the cardiovascular function, is still poorly understood. The rate-limiting enzyme of 5-HT synthesis, tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH), is encoded by two genes, the well characterized tph1 gene and a recently identified tph2 gene. In this article, based on the study of a mutant mouse in which the tph1 gene has been inactivated by replacement with the β-galactosidase gene, we establish that the neuronal tph2 is expressed in neurons of the raphe nuclei and of the myenteric plexus, whereas the nonneuronal tph1, as detected by β-galactosidase expression, is in the pineal gland and the enterochromaffin cells. Anatomic examination of the mutant mice revealed larger heart sizes than in wild-type mice. Histological investigation indicates that the primary structure of the heart muscle is not affected. Hemodynamic analyses demonstrate abnormal cardiac activity, which ultimately leads to heart failure of the mutant animals. This report links loss of tph1 gene expression, and thus of peripheral 5-HT, to a cardiac dysfunction phenotype. The tph1-/- mutant may be valuable for investigating cardiovascular dysfunction observed in heart failure in humans. PMID:14597720

  13. Estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) and ERRγ are essential coordinators of cardiac metabolism and function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; McDonald, Caitlin; Petrenko, Nataliya B; Leblanc, Mathias; Wang, Tao; Giguere, Vincent; Evans, Ronald M; Patel, Vickas V; Pei, Liming

    2015-04-01

    Almost all cellular functions are powered by a continuous energy supply derived from cellular metabolism. However, it is little understood how cellular energy production is coordinated with diverse energy-consuming cellular functions. Here, using the cardiac muscle system, we demonstrate that nuclear receptors estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) and ERRγ are essential transcriptional coordinators of cardiac energy production and consumption. On the one hand, ERRα and ERRγ together are vital for intact cardiomyocyte metabolism by directly controlling expression of genes important for mitochondrial functions and dynamics. On the other hand, ERRα and ERRγ influence major cardiomyocyte energy consumption functions through direct transcriptional regulation of key contraction, calcium homeostasis, and conduction genes. Mice lacking both ERRα and cardiac ERRγ develop severe bradycardia, lethal cardiomyopathy, and heart failure featuring metabolic, contractile, and conduction dysfunctions. These results illustrate that the ERR transcriptional pathway is essential to couple cellular energy metabolism with energy consumption processes in order to maintain normal cardiac function. PMID:25624346

  14. Estrogen-Related Receptor α (ERRα) and ERRγ Are Essential Coordinators of Cardiac Metabolism and Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; McDonald, Caitlin; Petrenko, Nataliya B.; Leblanc, Mathias; Wang, Tao; Giguere, Vincent; Evans, Ronald M.; Patel, Vickas V.

    2015-01-01

    Almost all cellular functions are powered by a continuous energy supply derived from cellular metabolism. However, it is little understood how cellular energy production is coordinated with diverse energy-consuming cellular functions. Here, using the cardiac muscle system, we demonstrate that nuclear receptors estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) and ERRγ are essential transcriptional coordinators of cardiac energy production and consumption. On the one hand, ERRα and ERRγ together are vital for intact cardiomyocyte metabolism by directly controlling expression of genes important for mitochondrial functions and dynamics. On the other hand, ERRα and ERRγ influence major cardiomyocyte energy consumption functions through direct transcriptional regulation of key contraction, calcium homeostasis, and conduction genes. Mice lacking both ERRα and cardiac ERRγ develop severe bradycardia, lethal cardiomyopathy, and heart failure featuring metabolic, contractile, and conduction dysfunctions. These results illustrate that the ERR transcriptional pathway is essential to couple cellular energy metabolism with energy consumption processes in order to maintain normal cardiac function. PMID:25624346

  15. Emotion Risk-Factor in Patients With Cardiac Diseases: The Role of Cognitive Emotion Regulation Strategies, Positive Affect and Negative Affect (A Case-Control Study)

    PubMed Central

    Bahremand, Mostafa; Alikhani, Mostafa; Zakiei, Ali; Janjani, Parisa; Aghaei, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    Application of psychological interventions is essential in classic treatments for patient with cardiac diseases. The present study compared cognitive emotion regulation strategies, positive affect, and negative affect for cardiac patients with healthy subjects. This study was a case-control study. Fifty subjects were selected using convenient sampling method from cardiac (coronary artery disease) patients presenting in Imam Ali medical center of Kermanshah, Iran in the spring 2013. Fifty subjects accompanied the patients to the medical center, selected as control group, did not have any history of cardiac diseases. For collecting data, the cognitive emotion regulation questionnaire and positive and negative affect scales were used. For data analysis, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was applied using the SPSS statistical software (ver. 19.0). In all cognitive emotion regulation strategies, there was a significant difference between the two groups. A significant difference was also detected regarding positive affect between the two groups, but no significant difference was found regarding negative affect. We found as a result that, having poor emotion regulation strategies is a risk factor for developing heart diseases. PMID:26234976

  16. Functional Relevance of Coronary Artery Disease by Cardiac Magnetic Resonance and Cardiac Computed Tomography: Myocardial Perfusion and Fractional Flow Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Andreini, Daniele; Bertella, Erika; Mushtaq, Saima; Guaricci, Andrea Igoren; Pepi, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality and it is responsible for an increasing resource burden. The identification of patients at high risk for adverse events is crucial to select those who will receive the greatest benefit from revascularization. To this aim, several non-invasive functional imaging modalities are usually used as gatekeeper to invasive coronary angiography, but the diagnostic yield of elective invasive coronary angiography remains unfortunately low. Stress myocardial perfusion imaging by cardiac magnetic resonance (stress-CMR) has emerged as an accurate technique for diagnosis and prognostic stratification of the patients with known or suspected CAD thanks to high spatial and temporal resolution, absence of ionizing radiation, and the multiparametric value including the assessment of cardiac anatomy, function, and viability. On the other side, cardiac computed tomography (CCT) has emerged as unique technique providing coronary arteries anatomy and more recently, due to the introduction of stress-CCT and noninvasive fractional flow reserve (FFR-CT), functional relevance of CAD in a single shot scan. The current review evaluates the technical aspects and clinical experience of stress-CMR and CCT in the evaluation of functional relevance of CAD discussing the strength and weakness of each approach. PMID:25692133

  17. The effect of age on the relationship between cardiac and vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Houghton, David; Jones, Thomas W.; Cassidy, Sophie; Siervo, Mario; MacGowan, Guy A.; Trenell, Michael I.; Jakovljevic, Djordje G.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related changes in cardiac and vascular function are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. The aim of the present study was to define the effect of age on the relationship between cardiac and vascular function. Haemodynamic and gas exchange measurements were performed at rest and peak exercise in healthy individuals. Augmentation index was measured at rest. Cardiac power output, a measure of overall cardiac function, was calculated as the product of cardiac output and mean arterial blood pressure. Augmentation index was significantly higher in older than younger participants (27.7 ± 10.1 vs. 2.5 ± 10.1%, P < 0.01). Older people demonstrated significantly higher stroke volume and mean arterial blood pressure (P < 0.05), but lower heart rate (145 ± 13 vs. 172 ± 10 beats/min, P < 0.01) and peak oxygen consumption (22.5 ± 5.2 vs. 41.2 ± 8.4 ml/kg/min, P < 0.01). There was a significant negative relationship between augmentation index and peak exercise cardiac power output (r = −0.73, P = 0.02) and cardiac output (r = −0.69, P = 0.03) in older participants. Older people maintain maximal cardiac function due to increased stroke volume. Vascular function is a strong predictor of overall cardiac function in older but in not younger people. PMID:26590322

  18. Targeting pleiotropic signaling pathways to control adult cardiac stem cell fate and function

    PubMed Central

    Pagliari, Stefania; Jelinek, Jakub; Grassi, Gabriele; Forte, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    The identification of different pools of cardiac progenitor cells resident in the adult mammalian heart opened a new era in heart regeneration as a means to restore the loss of functional cardiac tissue and overcome the limited availability of donor organs. Indeed, resident stem cells are believed to participate to tissue homeostasis and renewal in healthy and damaged myocardium although their actual contribution to these processes remain unclear. The poor outcome in terms of cardiac regeneration following tissue damage point out at the need for a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling CPC behavior and fate determination before new therapeutic strategies can be developed. The regulation of cardiac resident stem cell fate and function is likely to result from the interplay between pleiotropic signaling pathways as well as tissue- and cell-specific regulators. Such a modular interaction—which has already been described in the nucleus of a number of different cells where transcriptional complexes form to activate specific gene programs—would account for the unique responses of cardiac progenitors to general and tissue-specific stimuli. The study of the molecular determinants involved in cardiac stem/progenitor cell regulatory mechanisms may shed light on the processes of cardiac homeostasis in health and disease and thus provide clues on the actual feasibility of cardiac cell therapy through tissue-specific progenitors. PMID:25071583

  19. Effects of interleukin-37 on cardiac function after myocardial infarction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Daoying; Wang, Aiqin; Jiang, Fengqin; Hu, Junhong; Zhang, Xiuzhou

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interleukin-37 (IL-37) is a new discovered member of the interleukin family and plays anti-inflammatory effect in some inflammatory disease. A recent study found that IL-37 elevated significantly in peripheral blood of patients with acute myocardial infarction. We aimed to explore the effect IL-37 on cardiac function after mice myocardial infarction (MI) and its mechanism. Methods: Acute MI mouse model was established and divided into three groups: sham group, MI group and IL-37 treatment group. MPO expression was detected by immunohistochemistry; NF-κB signaling pathway was tested by Western blot; and cardiac function was measured by echocardiography. Results: Compared with MI mice, IL-37 treatment showed an obvious decrease of MPO expression, suppression of p-p65 expression, and improved cardiac function by decreasing left ventricular shortening fraction (LVFS). Conclusion: IL-37 may improve MI mice cardiac function via inhibition of inflammatory NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26191225

  20. Can lifestyle modification affect men's erectile function?

    PubMed

    Hehemann, Marah C; Kashanian, James A

    2016-04-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition affecting millions of men worldwide. The pathophysiology and epidemiologic links between ED and risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) are well-established. Lifestyle modifications such as smoking cessation, weight reduction, dietary modification, physical activity, and psychological stress reduction have been increasingly recognized as foundational to the prevention and treatment of ED. The aim of this review is to outline behavioral choices which may increase ones risk of developing ED, to present relevant studies addressing lifestyle factors correlated with ED, and to highlight proposed mechanisms for intervention aimed at improving erectile function in men with ED. These recommendations can provide a framework for counseling patients with ED about lifestyle modification. PMID:27141445

  1. Aerobic exercise training reduces cardiac function in adult male offspring exposed to prenatal hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Laura M; Kirschenman, Raven; Quon, Anita; Morton, Jude S; Shah, Amin; Davidge, Sandra T

    2015-09-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) has been associated with increased susceptibility to myocardial ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Exercise is an effective preventive intervention for cardiovascular diseases; however, it may be detrimental in conditions of compromised health. The aim of this study was to determine whether exercise training can improve cardiac performance after I/R injury in IUGR offspring. We used a hypoxia-induced IUGR model by exposing pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats to 21% oxygen (control) or hypoxic (11% oxygen; IUGR) conditions from gestational day 15 to 21. At 10 wk of age, offspring were randomized to a sedentary group or to a 6-wk exercise protocol. Transthoracic echocardiography assessments were performed after 6 wk. Twenty-four hours after the last bout of exercise, ex vivo cardiac function was determined using a working heart preparation. With exercise training, there was improved baseline cardiac performance in male control offspring but a reduced baseline cardiac performance in male IUGR exercised offspring (P < 0.05). In male offspring, exercise decreased superoxide generation in control offspring, while in IUGR offspring, it had the polar opposite effect (interaction P ≤ 0.05). There was no effect of IUGR or exercise on cardiac function in female offspring. In conclusion, in male IUGR offspring, exercise may be a secondary stressor on cardiac function. A reduction in cardiac performance along with an increase in superoxide production in response to exercise was observed in this susceptible group. PMID:26157059

  2. Nanowires and Electrical Stimulation Synergistically Improve Functions of hiPSC Cardiac Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Richards, Dylan J; Tan, Yu; Coyle, Robert; Li, Yang; Xu, Ruoyu; Yeung, Nelson; Parker, Arran; Menick, Donald R; Tian, Bozhi; Mei, Ying

    2016-07-13

    The advancement of human induced pluripotent stem-cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hiPSC-CM) technology has shown promising potential to provide a patient-specific, regenerative cell therapy strategy to treat cardiovascular disease. Despite the progress, the unspecific, underdeveloped phenotype of hiPSC-CMs has shown arrhythmogenic risk and limited functional improvements after transplantation. To address this, tissue engineering strategies have utilized both exogenous and endogenous stimuli to accelerate the development of hiPSC-CMs. Exogenous electrical stimulation provides a biomimetic pacemaker-like stimuli that has been shown to advance the electrical properties of tissue engineered cardiac constructs. Recently, we demonstrated that the incorporation of electrically conductive silicon nanowires to hiPSC cardiac spheroids led to advanced structural and functional development of hiPSC-CMs by improving the endogenous electrical microenvironment. Here, we reasoned that the enhanced endogenous electrical microenvironment of nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids would synergize with exogenous electrical stimulation to further advance the functional development of nanowired hiPSC cardiac spheroids. For the first time, we report that the combination of nanowires and electrical stimulation enhanced cell-cell junction formation, improved development of contractile machinery, and led to a significant decrease in the spontaneous beat rate of hiPSC cardiac spheroids. The advancements made here address critical challenges for the use of hiPSC-CMs in cardiac developmental and translational research and provide an advanced cell delivery vehicle for the next generation of cardiac repair. PMID:27328393

  3. Rationally engineered Troponin C modulates in vivo cardiac function and performance in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Shettigar, Vikram; Zhang, Bo; Little, Sean C; Salhi, Hussam E; Hansen, Brian J; Li, Ning; Zhang, Jianchao; Roof, Steve R; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Brunello, Lucia; Lerch, Jessica K; Weisleder, Noah; Fedorov, Vadim V; Accornero, Federica; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A; Gyorke, Sandor; Janssen, Paul M L; Biesiadecki, Brandon J; Ziolo, Mark T; Davis, Jonathan P

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for heart disease, the leading cause of death in the world, has progressed little for several decades. Here we develop a protein engineering approach to directly tune in vivo cardiac contractility by tailoring the ability of the heart to respond to the Ca(2+) signal. Promisingly, our smartly formulated Ca(2+)-sensitizing TnC (L48Q) enhances heart function without any adverse effects that are commonly observed with positive inotropes. In a myocardial infarction (MI) model of heart failure, expression of TnC L48Q before the MI preserves cardiac function and performance. Moreover, expression of TnC L48Q after the MI therapeutically enhances cardiac function and performance, without compromising survival. We demonstrate engineering TnC can specifically and precisely modulate cardiac contractility that when combined with gene therapy can be employed as a therapeutic strategy for heart disease. PMID:26908229

  4. Rationally engineered Troponin C modulates in vivo cardiac function and performance in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Shettigar, Vikram; Zhang, Bo; Little, Sean C.; Salhi, Hussam E.; Hansen, Brian J.; Li, Ning; Zhang, Jianchao; Roof, Steve R.; Ho, Hsiang-Ting; Brunello, Lucia; Lerch, Jessica K.; Weisleder, Noah; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Accornero, Federica; Rafael-Fortney, Jill A.; Gyorke, Sandor; Janssen, Paul M. L.; Biesiadecki, Brandon J.; Ziolo, Mark T.; Davis, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for heart disease, the leading cause of death in the world, has progressed little for several decades. Here we develop a protein engineering approach to directly tune in vivo cardiac contractility by tailoring the ability of the heart to respond to the Ca2+ signal. Promisingly, our smartly formulated Ca2+-sensitizing TnC (L48Q) enhances heart function without any adverse effects that are commonly observed with positive inotropes. In a myocardial infarction (MI) model of heart failure, expression of TnC L48Q before the MI preserves cardiac function and performance. Moreover, expression of TnC L48Q after the MI therapeutically enhances cardiac function and performance, without compromising survival. We demonstrate engineering TnC can specifically and precisely modulate cardiac contractility that when combined with gene therapy can be employed as a therapeutic strategy for heart disease. PMID:26908229

  5. A portable cadmium telluride multidetector probe for cardiac function monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arntz, Y.; Chambron, J.; Dumitresco, B.; Eclancher, B.; Prat, V.

    1999-06-01

    A new nuclear stethoscope based on a matrix of small CdTe semiconductor detectors has been developed for studying the cardiac performance by gamma ventriculography at the equilibrium, in rest and stress conditions, in the early and recovery phases of the coronary disease and to follow the long-term therapy. The light-weight probe consists of an array of 64 detectors 5×5×2 mm grouped in 16 independent units in a lead shielded aluminum box including 16 preamplifiers. The probe is connected to an electronic box containing DC power supply, 16 channel amplifiers, discriminators and counters, two analog-triggering ECG channels, and interface to a PC. The left ventricle activity is, preferentially, detected by using a low-resolution matching convergent collimator. A physical evaluation of the probe has been performed, both with static tests and dynamically with a hydraulic home-built model of beating heart ventricle paced by a rhythm simulator. The sum of the 16 detectors activity provided a radiocardiogram (RCG) which well depicted the filling and ejection of the cardiac beats, allowing to compare the clinically relevant parameters of the cardiac performance, proportional variables of the stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF) and ventricular flow-rate with the known absolute values programmed on the model. The portable system is now in operation for clinical assessment of cardiac patients.

  6. Exercise Type Affects Cardiac Vagal Autonomic Recovery After a Resistance Training Session.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Xián; Iglesias-Soler, Eliseo; Fariñas-Rodríguez, Juán; Fernández-Del-Olmo, Miguel; Kingsley, J Derek

    2016-09-01

    Mayo, X, Iglesias-Soler, E, Fariñas-Rodríguez, J, Fernández-del-Olmo, M, and Kingsley, JD. Exercise type affects cardiac vagal autonomic recovery after a resistance training session. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2565-2573, 2016-Resistance training sessions involving different exercises and set configurations may affect the acute cardiovascular recovery pattern. We explored the interaction between exercise type and set configuration on the postexercise cardiovagal withdrawal measured by heart rate variability and their hypotensive effect. Thirteen healthy participants (10 repetitions maximum [RM] bench press: 56 ± 10 kg; parallel squat: 91 ± 13 kg) performed 6 sessions corresponding to 2 exercises (Bench press vs. Parallel squat), 2 set configurations (Failure session vs. Interrepetition rest session), and a Control session of each exercise. Load (10RM), volume (5 sets), and rest (720 seconds) were equated between exercises and set configurations. Parallel squat produced higher reductions in cardiovagal recovery vs. Bench press (p = 0.001). These differences were dependent on the set configuration, with lower values in Parallel squat vs. Bench press for Interrepetition rest session (1.816 ± 0.711 vs. 2.399 ± 0.739 Ln HF/IRR × 10, p = 0.002), but not for Failure session (1.647 ± 0.904 vs. 1.808 ± 0.703 Ln HF/IRR × 10, p > 0.05). Set configuration affected the cardiovagal recovery, with lower values in Failure session in comparison with Interrepetition rest (p = 0.027) and Control session (p = 0.022). Postexercise hypotension was not dependent on the exercise type (p > 0.05) but was dependent on the set configuration, with lower values of systolic (p = 0.004) and diastolic (p = 0.011) blood pressure after the Failure session but not after an Interrepetition rest session in comparison with the Control session (p > 0.05). These results suggest that the exercise type and an Interrepetition rest design could blunt the decrease of cardiac vagal activity after

  7. Tetralogy of Fallot Cardiac Function Evaluation and Intelligent Diagnosis Based on Dual-Source Computed Tomography Cardiac Images.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ken; Rongqian, Yang; Li, Lihua; Xie, Zi; Ou, Shanxing; Chen, Yuke; Dou, Jianhong

    2016-05-01

    Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) is the most common complex congenital heart disease (CHD) of the cyanotic type. Studies on ventricular functions have received an increasing amount of attention as the development of diagnosis and treatment technology for CHD continues to advance. Reasonable options for imaging examination and accurate assessment of preoperative and postoperative left ventricular functions of TOF patients are important in improving the cure rate of TOF radical operation, therapeutic evaluation, and judgment prognosis. Therefore, with the aid of dual-source computed tomography (DSCT), cardiac images with high temporal resolution and high definition, we measured the left ventricular time-volume curve using image data and calculating the left ventricular function parameters to conduct the preliminary evaluation on TOF patients. To comprehensively evaluate the cardiac function, the segmental ventricular wall function parameters were measured, and the measurement results were mapped to a bull's eye diagram to realize the standardization of segmental ventricular wall function evaluation. Finally, we introduced a new clustering method based on auto-regression model parameters and combined this method with Euclidean distance measurements to establish an intelligent diagnosis of TOF. The results of this experiment show that the TOF evaluation and the intelligent diagnostic methods proposed in this article are feasible. PMID:26496001

  8. Acute-phase proteins, oxidative stress biomarkers, proinflammatory cytokines, and cardiac troponin in Arabian mares affected with pyometra.

    PubMed

    El-Bahr, S M; El-Deeb, W M

    2016-09-01

    New biomarkers are essential for diagnosis of pyometra in mares. In this context, 12 subfertile Arabian mares suffered from pyometra were admitted to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital. The basis for diagnosis of pyometra was positive findings of clinical examination and rectal palpation. Blood samples were collected from diseased animals and from five Arabian healthy mares, which were considered as control group. Acute-phase proteins (APP), oxidative stress biomarkers, proinflammatory cytokines, and cardiac troponin I were estimated in the harvested sera of both groups. Clinical examination revealed purulent yellowish fluid discharged from vagina of affected animals and rectal palpation of the reproductive tract revealed uterine distention. The biochemical analysis of the serum revealed significant increase in cardiac troponin I, creatin kinase, alkaline phosphatase, malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukins 6, prostaglandin F2α, haptoglobin, and serum amyloid A and significant decrease in reduced glutathione, superoxide dismutase (SOD), total antioxidant capacity, and nitric oxide (NO) of mares affected with pyometra compare to control. Cardiac troponin I was positively correlated with aspartate aminotransferase, creatin kinase, malondialdehyde, alkaline phosphatase, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukins 6, prostaglandin F2α, haptoglobin and serum amyloid A and negatively correlated with glutathione, superoxide dismutase, total antioxidant capacity and nitric oxide in serum of mares affected with pyometra. Moreover, there was high positive correlation between proinflammatory cytokines and APP in serum of mares affected with pyometra. The present study suggests cardiac troponin I together with APP, proinflammatory cytokines, and oxidative stress parameters as biomarkers for pyometra in Arabian mares. PMID:27177966

  9. Impact of an environmental relevant concentration of 17α-ethinylestradiol on the cardiac function of bullfrog tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Salla, Raquel F; Gamero, Fernando U; Rissoli, Rafael Z; Dal-Medico, Samuel E; Castanho, Luciano Mendes; Carvalho, Cleoni dos Santos; Silva-Zacarin, Elaine C M; Kalinin, Ana L; Abdalla, Fabio C; Costa, Monica J

    2016-02-01

    This study evaluated if a concentration of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2 - 10 ng L(-1) for 96 h) normally found in Brazilian surface waters exerts any impact on cardiac function of bullfrog tadpoles (25 Gosner stage), Lithobates catesbeianus. During exposure, the animals' activity level (AL -% of active individuals) was monitored twice a day. Then, the in loco heart rate (f(H) - bpm) was determined, as well as the relative ventricular mass (RVM - % of body mass). Afterwards, cardiac ventricles were mounted for isometric force recordings (CS - mN mm(-2)), and determination of the cardiac pumping capacity (CPC - mN mm(-2) min(-1)). EE2 did not affect tadpoles' AL, although it resulted in a tachycardia in animals exposed to EE2 (f(H) = 66 bpm) when compared to controls (f(H) = 52 bpm), suggesting that EE2 acts directly on the cardiac muscle of tadpoles, rather than being a result of an increased cardiac demand due to a higher activity level (i.e., avoidance response). Additionally, EE2 exerted a positive inotropic response, which resulted in a higher CPC, which occurred independently of an increase in the number of myofibrils of EE2-exposed animals, since RVM remained similar between experimental groups. Thus, the increase on cardiac demand induced by the exposure to EE2 elevates considerably the animal energy expenditure, diverting a large amount of energy that tadpoles could use for their growth and development. These alterations can make amphibians more susceptible to predators and reduce the likelihood to reach reproductive stage. PMID:26539711

  10. Scaffold Proteins Regulating Extracellular Regulated Kinase Function in Cardiac Hypertrophy and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yan; Sheikh, Farah

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK)-extracellular regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) pathway is a central downstream signaling pathway that is activated in cardiac muscle cells during mechanical and agonist-mediated hypertrophy. Studies in genetic mouse models deficient in ERK-associated MAPK components pathway have further reinforced a direct role for this pathway in stress-induced cardiac hypertrophy and disease. However, more recent studies have highlighted that these signaling pathways may exert their regulatory functions in a more compartmentalized manner in cardiac muscle. Emerging data has uncovered specific MAPK scaffolding proteins that tether MAPK/ERK signaling specifically at the sarcomere and plasma membrane in cardiac muscle and show that deficiencies in these scaffolding proteins alter ERK activity and phosphorylation, which are then critical in altering the cardiac myocyte response to stress-induced hypertrophy and disease progression. In this review, we provide insights on ERK-associated scaffolding proteins regulating cardiac myofilament function and their impact on cardiac hypertrophy and disease. PMID:26973524

  11. Therapeutic Inhibition of miR-208a Improves Cardiac Function and Survival During Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Rusty L.; Hullinger, Thomas G.; Semus, Hillary M.; Dickinson, Brent A.; Seto, Anita G.; Lynch, Joshua M.; Stack, Christianna; Latimer, Paul A.; Olson, Eric N.; van Rooij, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Background Diastolic dysfunction in response to hypertrophy is a major clinical syndrome with few therapeutic options. MicroRNAs act as negative regulators of gene expression by inhibiting translation or promoting degradation of target mRNAs. Previously, we reported that genetic deletion of the cardiac-specific miR-208a prevents pathological cardiac remodeling and upregulation of Myh7 in response to pressure overload. Whether this miRNA might contribute to diastolic dysfunction or other forms of heart disease is currently unknown. Methods and Results Here, we show that systemic delivery of an antisense oligonucleotide induces potent and sustained silencing of miR-208a in the heart. Therapeutic inhibition of miR-208a by subcutaneous delivery of antimiR-208a during hypertension-induced heart failure in Dahl hypertensive rats dose-dependently prevents pathological myosin switching and cardiac remodeling while improving cardiac function, overall health, and survival. Transcriptional profiling indicates that antimiR-208a evokes prominent effects on cardiac gene expression; plasma analysis indicates significant changes in circulating levels of miRNAs on antimiR-208a treatment. Conclusions These studies indicate the potential of oligonucleotide-based therapies for modulating cardiac miRNAs and validate miR-208 as a potent therapeutic target for the modulation of cardiac function and remodeling during heart disease progression. PMID:21900086

  12. Stress ventricular function test in conscious, nonthoracotomised dogs to assess cardiac drug efficacy.

    PubMed

    French, W J; Averill, W; Ung, S; Laks, M M

    1985-01-01

    The measurement of left ventricular (LV) function is frequently performed in unconscious or thoracotomised animals in the resting state; these conditions may seriously affect the basal haemodynamic state. To assess myocardial function in conscious animals, a technique was developed to place a catheter across the atrial septum into the left ventricle without a thoracotomy. A stress ventricular function test (SVFT) was performed by raising the systemic blood pressure with methoxamine in the conscious dog. In order to demonstrate the effectiveness of the SVFT in the detection of a decrease in ventricular function, a SVFT was performed before and after the acute infusion of verapamil to determine resting and reserve LV function. A slope relating systolic aortic pressure to the LV end-diastolic pressure was obtained in 10 dogs using a low dose (0.005) and in four dogs a high dose (0.01 microgram X kg-1 X min-1) verapamil (V). The mean slope before V was 3.6 +/- 1.2 and after 2.0 +/- 0.92 (p less than 0.001). The day-to-day variability of the SVFT was less than 22% (coefficient of variability). The SVFT is a sensitive, reproducible method to assess resting and increased or decreased myocardial contractility and is useful in selecting appropriate doses of cardiac drugs to determine their effect on the myocardium during acute and chronic infusion studies in the conscious, nonthoracotomised dog. PMID:3986853

  13. Hyperinsulinemia adversely affects lung structure and function.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suchita; Bodas, Manish; Bhatraju, Naveen K; Pattnaik, Bijay; Gheware, Atish; Parameswaran, Praveen Kolumam; Thompson, Michael; Freeman, Michelle; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Gosens, Reinoud; Ghosh, Balaram; Pabelick, Christina; Linneberg, Allan; Prakash, Y S; Agrawal, Anurag

    2016-05-01

    There is limited knowledge regarding the consequences of hyperinsulinemia on the lung. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance, and epidemiological associations with asthma, this is a critical lacuna, more so with inhaled insulin on the horizon. Here, we demonstrate that insulin can adversely affect respiratory health. Insulin treatment (1 μg/ml) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the proliferation of primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and induced collagen release. Additionally, ASM cells showed a significant increase in calcium response and mitochondrial respiration upon insulin exposure. Mice administered intranasal insulin showed increased collagen deposition in the lungs as well as a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. PI3K/Akt mediated activation of β-catenin, a positive regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis, was observed in the lungs of insulin-treated mice and lung cells. Our data suggests that hyperinsulinemia may have adverse effects on airway structure and function. Insulin-induced activation of β-catenin in lung tissue and the contractile effects on ASM cells may be causally related to the development of asthma-like phenotype. PMID:26919895

  14. Effect of Depression and Sertraline Treatment on Cardiac Function in Female Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Groban, Leanne; Kitzman, Dalane W.; Register, Thomas C.; Shively, Carol A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Depression is a proposed risk factor for heart failure based largely on epidemiological data; little experimental data is available addressing this hypothesis. Methods Depression was evaluated in relation to cardiac structural and functional phenotypes assessed by transthoracic echocardiography in 42 adult female cynomolgus monkeys that consumed a Western-like diet for 3 years. Half of the monkeys were treated with the SSRI sertraline HCl for 18 months and depressive behavior was assessed for 12 months prior to echocardiography. Results Depressed monkeys (the 19/42 with depressive behavior rates above the mean rate) had higher HRs (171±4.1 vs 152±6.1), and smaller BSA (0.13±0.003 vs 0.15±0.004). Cardiac measures showed lower LV end systolic dimension (0.75±0.05 vs 0.89±0.04), LV systolic (0.76±0.08 vs 1.2±0.11) and diastolic (2.4±0.23 vs 3.4±0.26) volumes, and left atrial volumes (1.15±0.14 vs 1.75±0.12) in depressed versus nondepressed monkeys (p’s <0.05). Doppler profiles of depressed monkeys indicated greater myocardial relaxation (higher e′ and higher e′/a′ ratio) and lower filling pressures (lower E/e′) compared to nondepressed monkeys (p’s<0.05). Although treatment with sertraline reduced HR (150±5.8 vs 171±4.8) and modestly increased chamber dimensions (left ventricular end systolic dimension: 0.91±0.05 vs 0.74±0.03; left ventricular end diastolic dimension, BSA adjusted 1.69±0.05 vs 1.47±0.06) (p’s<0.05), it did not overtly affect systolic or diastolic function (p’s >0.10). Conclusions These data suggest that behavioral depression in female primates is accompanied by differences in cardiac function, although not in ways classically associated with subclinical heart failure. SSRIs show promise in supporting heart function by reducing HR and perhaps improving LV filling, however further investigation is needed to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:24470133

  15. Functional Analysis of the Engineered Cardiac Tissue Grown on Recombinant Spidroin Fiber Meshes

    PubMed Central

    Teplenin, Alexander; Krasheninnikova, Anna; Agladze, Nadezhda; Sidoruk, Konstantin; Agapova, Olga; Agapov, Igor; Bogush, Vladimir; Agladze, Konstantin

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the ability of the recombinant spidroin to serve as a substrate for the cardiac tissue engineering. For this purpose, isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were seeded on the electrospun spidroin fiber matrices and cultured to form the confluent cardiac monolayers. Besides the adhesion assay and immunostaining analysis, we tested the ability of the cultured cardiomyocytes to form a functional cardiac syncytium by studying excitation propagation in the cultured tissue with the aid of optical mapping. It was demonstrated that recombinant spidroin fiber meshes are directly suitable for the adherence and growth of the cardiomyocytes without additional coating with the attachment factors, such as fibronectin. PMID:25799394

  16. Systematic Characterization of the Murine Mitochondrial Proteome Using Functionally Validated Cardiac Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Xiaohai; Mueller, Michael; Wang, Yueju; Zong, Chenggong; Deng, Ning; Vondriska, Thomas M.; Liem, David A.; Yang, Jeong-In; Korge, Paavo; Honda, Henry; Weiss, James N.; Apweiler, Rolf; Ping, Peipei

    2009-01-01

    Mitochondria play essential roles in cardiac pathophysiology and the murine model has been extensively used to investigate cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, we characterized murine cardiac mitochondria using an LC/MS/MS approach. We extracted and purified cardiac mitochondria; validated their functionality to ensure the final preparation contains necessary components to sustain their normal function; and subjected these validated organelles to LC/MS/MS-based protein identification. A total of 940 distinct proteins were identified from murine cardiac mitochondria, among which, 480 proteins were not previously identified by major proteomic profiling studies. The 940 proteins consist of functional clusters known to support oxidative phosphorylation, metabolism and biogenesis. In addition, there are several other clusters--including proteolysis, protein folding, and reduction/oxidation signaling-which ostensibly represent previously under-appreciated tasks of cardiac mitochondria. Moreover, many identified proteins were found to occupy other subcellular locations, including cytoplasm, ER, and golgi, in addition to their presence in the mitochondria. These results provide a comprehensive picture of the murine cardiac mitochondrial proteome and underscore tissue- and species-specification. Moreover, the use of functionally intact mitochondria insures that the proteomic observations in this organelle are relevant to its normal biology and facilitates decoding the interplay between mitochondria and other organelles. PMID:18348319

  17. Effects of Kaempferia parviflora Wall. Ex. Baker and sildenafil citrate on cGMP level, cardiac function, and intracellular Ca2+ regulation in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Weerateerangkul, Punate; Palee, Siripong; Chinda, Kroekkiat; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2012-09-01

    Although Kaempferia parviflora extract (KPE) and its flavonoids have positive effects on the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, its mechanisms on the heart are still unclear. Because our previous studies demonstrated that KPE decreased defibrillation efficacy in swine similar to that of sildenafil citrate, the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, it is possible that KPE may affect the cardiac NO signaling pathway. In the present study, the effects of KPE and sildenafil citrate on cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) level, modulation of cardiac function, and Ca transients in ventricular myocytes were investigated. In a rat model, cardiac cGMP level, cardiac function, and Ca transients were measured before and after treatment with KPE and sildenafil citrate. KPE significantly increased the cGMP level and decreased cardiac function and Ca transient. These effects were similar to those found in the sildenafil citrate-treated group. Furthermore, the nonspecific NOS inhibitor could abolish the effects of KPE and sildenafil citrate on Ca transient. KPE has positive effect on NO signaling in the heart, resulting in an increased cGMP level, similar to that of sildenafil citrate. This effect was found to influence the physiology of normal heart via the attenuation of cardiac function and the reduction of Ca transient in ventricular myocytes. PMID:22691878

  18. Cellular and Functional Imaging of Cardiac Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yijen L.; Ye, Qing

    2011-01-01

    Heart transplantation is now an established treatment for patients suffering from end-stage heart diseases. With the advances in immunosuppressive treatment, the survival rate for transplant patients has improved greatly. However, allograft rejection, both acute and chronic, after heart transplantation is still a limitation leading to morbidity and mortality. The current clinical gold standard for screening rejection is endomyocardial biopsy (EMB), which is not only invasive, but also error-prone, due to the limited sample size and the site location of sampling. It would be highly desirable to have reliable and noninvasive alternatives for EMB in monitoring cardiac allograft rejection. The objective of this review is to highlight how cardiovascular imaging can contribute to noninvasively detecting and to evaluating both acute and chronic allograft rejection after heart transplantation, in particular, cardiovascular MRI (CMRI); and how CMRI can assess both immune cell infiltration at the rejecting organ, and the cardiac dysfunctions resulting from allograft rejection. PMID:21359095

  19. Nitrite reductase function of deoxymyoglobin: oxygen sensor and regulator of cardiac energetics and function.

    PubMed

    Rassaf, Tienush; Flögel, Ulrich; Drexhage, Christine; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike; Kelm, Malte; Schrader, Jürgen

    2007-06-22

    Although the primary function of myoglobin (Mb) has been considered to be cellular oxygen storage and supply, recent studies have suggested to classify Mb as a multifunctional allosteric enzyme. In the heart, Mb acts as a potent scavenger of nitric oxide (NO) and contributes to the attenuation of oxidative damage. Here we report that a dynamic cycle exists in which a decrease in tissue oxygen tension drives the conversion of Mb from being an NO scavenger in normoxia to an NO producer in hypoxia. The NO generated by reaction of deoxygenated Mb with nitrite is functionally relevant and leads to a downregulation of cardiac energy status, which was not observed in mice lacking Mb. As a consequence, myocardial oxygen consumption is reduced and cardiac contractility is dampened in wild-type mice. We propose that this pathway represents a novel homeostatic mechanism by which a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand in muscle is translated into the fractional increase of deoxygenated Mb exhibiting enhanced nitrite reductase activity. Thus, Mb may act as an oxygen sensor which through NO can adjust muscle energetics to limited oxygen supply. PMID:17495223

  20. Engineered hybrid cardiac patches with multifunctional electronics for online monitoring and regulation of tissue function.

    PubMed

    Feiner, Ron; Engel, Leeya; Fleischer, Sharon; Malki, Maayan; Gal, Idan; Shapira, Assaf; Shacham-Diamand, Yosi; Dvir, Tal

    2016-06-01

    In cardiac tissue engineering approaches to treat myocardial infarction, cardiac cells are seeded within three-dimensional porous scaffolds to create functional cardiac patches. However, current cardiac patches do not allow for online monitoring and reporting of engineered-tissue performance, and do not interfere to deliver signals for patch activation or to enable its integration with the host. Here, we report an engineered cardiac patch that integrates cardiac cells with flexible, freestanding electronics and a 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The patch exhibited robust electronic properties, enabling the recording of cellular electrical activities and the on-demand provision of electrical stimulation for synchronizing cell contraction. We also show that electroactive polymers containing biological factors can be deposited on designated electrodes to release drugs in the patch microenvironment on demand. We expect that the integration of complex electronics within cardiac patches will eventually provide therapeutic control and regulation of cardiac function. PMID:26974408

  1. Cardiac function and rejection following transplantation of the heart

    SciTech Connect

    Schober, O.; Schuler, S.; Gratz, K.; Warnecke, H.; Lang, W.; Hetzer, R.; Creutzig, H.

    1985-05-01

    It was the purpose of the study to evaluate the noninvasive detection of rejection following cardiac transplantation. Multigated cardiac blood pool imaging (MUGA) at rest with assessment of ejection fraction (EF) and regional wall motion was determined prospectively in 14 patients with 180 studies (follow up 5.1 +- 3.2 months) following orthotopic cardiac transplantation. The results were compared with histological examination of a percutaneous endocardial biopsy specimen (EMB) from the right ventricle. Diagnosis of rejection by EF measurement was defined by a decrease of 10% if EF < 70%, and 15% if EF > 70%. In 152 studies a normal MUGA study correlated with none rejection as defined by EMB. In 14 of 22 studies with moderate or severe rejection decrease of EF followed the rejection with a delay of 5 days. Septal wall motion abnormalities were typical. In 6 studies an abnormal temporal course of EF was not related to a similar finding in EMB. A sensitivity of 69% and a specifity of 96% can be estimated in the investigated group, in which all patients survived during the period of the study. It is concluded that rejection can be excluded by noninvasive MUGA (specifity 96%) and that MUGA is predictive of rejection (sensitivity 67%) mostly with a delay of 5 days.

  2. Hindlimb unweighting affects rat vascular capacitance function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunbar, S. L.; Tamhidi, L.; Berkowitz, D. E.; Shoukas, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    Microgravity is associated with an impaired stroke volume and, therefore, cardiac output response to orthostatic stress. We hypothesized that a decreased venous filling pressure due to increased venous compliance may be an important contributing factor in this response. We used a constant flow, constant right atrial pressure cardiopulmonary bypass procedure to measure total systemic vascular compliance (C(T)), arterial compliance (C(A)), and venous compliance (C(V)) in seven control and seven 21-day hindlimb unweighted (HLU) rats. These compliance values were calculated under baseline conditions and during an infusion of 0.2 microg*kg(-1)*min(-1) norepinephrine (NE). The change in reservoir volume, which reflects changes in unstressed vascular volume (DeltaV(0)) that occurred upon infusion of NE, was also measured. C(T) and C(V) were larger in HLU rats both at baseline and during the NE infusion (P < 0.05). Infusion of NE decreased C(T) and C(V) by 20% in both HLU and control rats (P < 0.01). C(A) was also significantly decreased in both groups of rats by NE (P < 0.01), but values of C(A) were similar between HLU and control rats both at baseline and during the NE infusion. Additionally, the NE-induced DeltaV(0) was attenuated by 53% in HLU rats compared with control rats (P < 0.05). The larger C(V) and attenuated DeltaV(0) in HLU rats could contribute to a decreased filling pressure during orthostasis and thus may partially underlie the mechanism leading to the exaggerated fall in stroke volume and cardiac output seen in astronauts during an orthostatic stress after exposure to microgravity.

  3. Clinically Approved Iron Chelators Influence Zebrafish Mortality, Hatching Morphology and Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Jasmine L.; Hatef, Azadeh; Imran ul-haq, Muhammad; Nair, Neelima; Unniappan, Suraj; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N.

    2014-01-01

    Iron chelation therapy using iron (III) specific chelators such as desferrioxamine (DFO, Desferal), deferasirox (Exjade or ICL-670), and deferiprone (Ferriprox or L1) are the current standard of care for the treatment of iron overload. Although each chelator is capable of promoting some degree of iron excretion, these chelators are also associated with a wide range of well documented toxicities. However, there is currently very limited data available on their effects in developing embryos. In this study, we took advantage of the rapid development and transparency of the zebrafish embryo, Danio rerio to assess and compare the toxicity of iron chelators. All three iron chelators described above were delivered to zebrafish embryos by direct soaking and their effects on mortality, hatching and developmental morphology were monitored for 96 hpf. To determine whether toxicity was specific to embryos, we examined the effects of chelator exposure via intra peritoneal injection on the cardiac function and gene expression in adult zebrafish. Chelators varied significantly in their effects on embryo mortality, hatching and morphology. While none of the embryos or adults exposed to DFO were negatively affected, ICL -treated embryos and adults differed significantly from controls, and L1 exerted toxic effects in embryos alone. ICL-670 significantly increased the mortality of embryos treated with doses of 0.25 mM or higher and also affected embryo morphology, causing curvature of larvae treated with concentrations above 0.5 mM. ICL-670 exposure (10 µL of 0.1 mM injection) also significantly increased the heart rate and cardiac output of adult zebrafish. While L1 exposure did not cause toxicity in adults, it did cause morphological defects in embryos at 0.5 mM. This study provides first evidence on iron chelator toxicity in early development and will help to guide our approach on better understanding the mechanism of iron chelator toxicity. PMID:25329065

  4. Obesity alters molecular and functional cardiac responses to ischemia/reperfusion and glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonism.

    PubMed

    Sassoon, Daniel J; Goodwill, Adam G; Noblet, Jillian N; Conteh, Abass M; Herring, B Paul; McClintick, Jeanette N; Tune, Johnathan D; Mather, Kieren J

    2016-07-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that obesity alters the cardiac response to ischemia/reperfusion and/or glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation, and that these differences are associated with alterations in the obese cardiac proteome and microRNA (miRNA) transcriptome. Ossabaw swine were fed normal chow or obesogenic diet for 6 months. Cardiac function was assessed at baseline, during a 30-minutes coronary occlusion, and during 2 hours of reperfusion in anesthetized swine treated with saline or exendin-4 for 24 hours. Cardiac biopsies were obtained from normal and ischemia/reperfusion territories. Fat-fed animals were heavier, and exhibited hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertriglyceridemia. Plasma troponin-I concentration (index of myocardial injury) was increased following ischemia/reperfusion and decreased by exendin-4 treatment in both groups. Ischemia/reperfusion produced reductions in systolic pressure and stroke volume in lean swine. These indices were higher in obese hearts at baseline and relatively maintained throughout ischemia/reperfusion. Exendin-4 administration increased systolic pressure in lean swine but did not affect the blood pressure in obese swine. End-diastolic volume was reduced by exendin-4 following ischemia/reperfusion in obese swine. These divergent physiologic responses were associated with obesity-related differences in proteins related to myocardial structure/function (e.g. titin) and calcium handling (e.g. SERCA2a, histidine-rich Ca(2+) binding protein). Alterations in expression of cardiac miRs in obese hearts included miR-15, miR-27, miR-130, miR-181, and let-7. Taken together, these observations validate this discovery approach and reveal novel associations that suggest previously undiscovered mechanisms contributing to the effects of obesity on the heart and contributing to the actions of GLP-1 following ischemia/reperfusion. PMID:27234258

  5. Systolic time intervals: a review of the method in the non-invasive investigation of cardiac function in health, disease and clinical pharmacology.

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, S.; Turner, P.

    1983-01-01

    Measurement of systolic time intervals is a valuable, non-invasive procedure to assess left ventricular performance, particularly when influenced by drugs. In this review, we discuss various factors affecting systolic time intervals, the therapeutic implications of the technique and its place among other non-invasive tests of cardiac function. PMID:6353394

  6. EFFECTS OF PARTICULATE MATTER (PM) ON CARDIAC CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although epidemiology studies, clinical studies, and animal studies indicate that particulate matter (PM) can affect cardiac function, there is no real understanding of the underlying cellular, biochemical, and molecular processes response for PM-induced cardiac dysfunction. It i...

  7. Orphan nuclear receptor Nur77 affects cardiomyocyte calcium homeostasis and adverse cardiac remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Medzikovic, Lejla; Schumacher, Cees A.; Verkerk, Arie O.; van Deel, Elza D.; Wolswinkel, Rianne; van der Made, Ingeborg; Bleeker, Natascha; Cakici, Daniella; van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M. G.; Meggouh, Farid; Creemers, Esther E.; Ann Remme, Carol; Baartscheer, Antonius; de Winter, Robbert J.; de Vries, Carlie J. M.; Arkenbout, E. Karin; de Waard, Vivian

    2015-01-01

    Distinct stressors may induce heart failure. As compensation, β-adrenergic stimulation enhances myocardial contractility by elevating cardiomyocyte intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). However, chronic β-adrenergic stimulation promotes adverse cardiac remodelling. Cardiac expression of nuclear receptor Nur77 is enhanced by β-adrenergic stimulation, but its role in cardiac remodelling is still unclear. We show high and rapid Nur77 upregulation in cardiomyocytes stimulated with β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol. Nur77 knockdown in culture resulted in hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. Ventricular cardiomyocytes from Nur77-deficient (Nur77-KO) mice exhibited elevated diastolic and systolic [Ca2+]i and prolonged action potentials compared to wild type (WT). In vivo, these differences resulted in larger cardiomyocytes, increased expression of hypertrophic genes, and more cardiac fibrosis in Nur77-KO mice upon chronic isoproterenol stimulation. In line with the observed elevated [Ca2+]i, Ca2+-activated phosphatase calcineurin was more active in Nur77-KO mice compared to WT. In contrast, after cardiac pressure overload by aortic constriction, Nur77-KO mice exhibited attenuated remodelling compared to WT. Concluding, Nur77-deficiency results in significantly altered cardiac Ca2+ homeostasis and distinct remodelling outcome depending on the type of insult. Detailed knowledge on the role of Nur77 in maintaining cardiomyocyte Ca2+ homeostasis and the dual role Nur77 plays in cardiac remodelling will aid in developing personalized therapies against heart failure. PMID:26486271

  8. Functional phosphorylation sites in cardiac myofilament proteins are evolutionarily conserved in skeletal myofilament proteins.

    PubMed

    Gross, Sean M; Lehman, Steven L

    2016-06-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating cardiac contractile function, but phosphorylation is not thought to play a regulatory role in skeletal muscle. To examine how myofilament phosphorylation arose in the human heart, we analyzed the amino acid sequences of 25 cardiac phosphorylation sites in animals ranging from fruit flies to humans. These analyses indicated that of the 25 human phosphorylation sites examined, 11 have been conserved across vertebrates and four have been sporadically present in vertebrates. Furthermore, all 11 of the cardiac sites found across vertebrates were present in skeletal muscle isoforms, along with three sites that were sporadically present. Based on the conservation of amino acid sequences between cardiac and skeletal contractile proteins, we tested for phosphorylation in mammalian skeletal muscle using several biochemical techniques and found evidence that multiple myofilament proteins were phosphorylated. Several of these phosphorylation sites were validated using mass spectrometry, including one site that is present in slow- and fast-twitch troponin I (TnI), but was lost in cardiac TnI. Thus, several myofilament phosphorylation sites present in the human heart likely arose in invertebrate muscle, have been evolutionarily conserved in skeletal muscle, and potentially have functional effects in both skeletal and cardiac muscle. PMID:26993364

  9. Acceleration of crossbridge kinetics by protein kinase A phosphorylation of cardiac myosin binding protein C modulates cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Tong, Carl W; Stelzer, Julian E; Greaser, Marion L; Powers, Patricia A; Moss, Richard L

    2008-10-24

    Normal cardiac function requires dynamic modulation of contraction. beta1-adrenergic-induced protein kinase (PK)A phosphorylation of cardiac myosin binding protein (cMyBP)-C may regulate crossbridge kinetics to modulate contraction. We tested this idea with mechanical measurements and echocardiography in a mouse model lacking 3 PKA sites on cMyBP-C, ie, cMyBP-C(t3SA). We developed the model by transgenic expression of mutant cMyBP-C with Ser-to-Ala mutations on the cMyBP-C knockout background. Western blots, immunofluorescence, and in vitro phosphorylation combined to show that non-PKA-phosphorylatable cMyBP-C expressed at 74% compared to normal wild-type (WT) and was correctly positioned in the sarcomeres. Similar expression of WT cMyBP-C at 72% served as control, ie, cMyBP-C(tWT). Skinned myocardium responded to stretch with an immediate increase in force, followed by a transient relaxation of force and finally a delayed development of force, ie, stretch activation. The rate constants of relaxation, k(rel) (s-1), and delayed force development, k(df) (s-1), in the stretch activation response are indicators of crossbridge cycling kinetics. cMyBP-C(t3SA) myocardium had baseline k(rel) and k(df) similar to WT myocardium, but, unlike WT, k(rel) and k(df) were not accelerated by PKA treatment. Reduced dobutamine augmentation of systolic function in cMyBP-C(t3SA) hearts during echocardiography corroborated the stretch activation findings. Furthermore, cMyBP-C(t3SA) hearts exhibited basal echocardiographic findings of systolic dysfunction, diastolic dysfunction, and hypertrophy. Conversely, cMyBP-C(tWT) hearts performed similar to WT. Thus, PKA phosphorylation of cMyBP-C accelerates crossbridge kinetics and loss of this regulation leads to cardiac dysfunction. PMID:18802026

  10. Metabolomics-assisted proteomics identifies succinylation and SIRT5 as important regulators of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Sadhukhan, Sushabhan; Liu, Xiaojing; Ryu, Dongryeol; Nelson, Ornella D; Stupinski, John A; Li, Zhi; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Sheng; Weiss, Robert S; Locasale, Jason W; Auwerx, Johan; Lin, Hening

    2016-04-19

    Cellular metabolites, such as acyl-CoA, can modify proteins, leading to protein posttranslational modifications (PTMs). One such PTM is lysine succinylation, which is regulated by sirtuin 5 (SIRT5). Although numerous proteins are modified by lysine succinylation, the physiological significance of lysine succinylation and SIRT5 remains elusive. Here, by profiling acyl-CoA molecules in various mouse tissues, we have discovered that different tissues have different acyl-CoA profiles and that succinyl-CoA is the most abundant acyl-CoA molecule in the heart. This interesting observation has prompted us to examine protein lysine succinylation in different mouse tissues in the presence and absence of SIRT5. Protein lysine succinylation predominantly accumulates in the heart whenSirt5is deleted. Using proteomic studies, we have identified many cardiac proteins regulated by SIRT5. Our data suggest that ECHA, a protein involved in fatty acid oxidation, is a major enzyme that is regulated by SIRT5 and affects heart function.Sirt5knockout (KO) mice have lower ECHA activity, increased long-chain acyl-CoAs, and decreased ATP in the heart under fasting conditions.Sirt5KO mice develop hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, as evident from the increased heart weight relative to body weight, as well as reduced shortening and ejection fractions. These findings establish that regulating heart metabolism and function is a major physiological function of lysine succinylation and SIRT5. PMID:27051063

  11. Measurement of cardiac function using pressure–volume conductance catheter technique in mice and rats

    PubMed Central

    Pacher, Pál; Nagayama, Takahiro; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Bátkai, Sándor; Kass, David A

    2008-01-01

    Ventricular pressure–volume relationships have become well established as the most rigorous and comprehensive ways to assess intact heart function. Thanks to advances in miniature sensor technology, this approach has been successfully translated to small rodents, allowing for detailed characterization of cardiovascular function in genetically engineered mice, testing effects of pharmacotherapies and studying disease conditions. This method is unique for providing measures of left ventricular (LV) performance that are more specific to the heart and less affected by vascular loading conditions. Here we present descriptions and movies for procedures employing this method (anesthesia, intubation and surgical techniques, calibrations). We also provide examples of hemodynamics measurements obtained from normal mice/rats, and from animals with cardiac hypertrophy/heart failure, and describe values for various useful load-dependent and load-independent indexes of LV function obtained using different types of anesthesia. The completion of the protocol takes 1–4 h (depending on the experimental design/end points). PMID:18772869

  12. Functional interaction between charged nanoparticles and cardiac tissue: a new paradigm for cardiac arrhythmia?

    PubMed Central

    Ruenraroengsak, Pakatip; Shevchuk, Andrew I; Korchev, Yuri E; Lab, Max J; Tetley, Teresa D; Gorelik, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate the effect of surface charge of therapeutic nanoparticles on sarcolemmal ionic homeostasis and the initiation of arrhythmias. Materials & methods Cultured neonatal rat myocytes were exposed to 50 nm-charged polystyrene latex nanoparticles and examined using a combination of hopping probe scanning ion conductance microscopy, optical recording of action potential characteristics and patch clamp. Results Positively charged, amine-modified polystyrene latex nanoparticles showed cytotoxic effects and induced large-scale damage to cardiomyocyte membranes leading to calcium alternans and cell death. By contrast, negatively charged, carboxyl-modified polystyrene latex nanoparticles (NegNPs) were not overtly cytotoxic but triggered formation of 50–250-nm nanopores in the membrane. Cells exposed to NegNPs revealed pro-arrhythmic events, such as delayed afterdepolarizations, reduction in conduction velocity and pathological increment of action potential duration together with an increase in ionic current throughout the membrane, carried by the nanopores. Conclusion The utilization of charged nanoparticles is a novel concept for targeting cardiac excitability. However, this unique nanoscopic investigation reveals an altered electrophysiological substrate, which sensitized the heart cells towards arrhythmias. PMID:23140503

  13. Older Adults in Cardiac Rehabilitation: A New Strategy for Enhancing Physical Function.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rejeski, W. Jack; Foy, Capri Gabrielle; Brawley, Lawrence R.; Brubaker, Peter H.; Focht, Brian C.; Norris, James L., III; Smith, Marci L.

    2002-01-01

    Contrasted the effect of a group-mediated cognitive- behavioral intervention (GMCB) versus traditional cardiac rehabilitation (CRP) upon changes in objective and self-reported physical function of older adults after 3 months of exercise therapy. Both groups improved significantly. Adults with lower function at the outset of the intervention…

  14. Effect of Obesity on Cardiac Function in Children and Adolescents: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Thomas W.

    2007-01-01

    Increases in cardiac mass, ventricular dimensions, and stroke volume are typically observed in obese adults, accompanied by evidence of diminished ventricular systolic and diastolic function. Given sufficient severity and duration of excessive body fat, signs of overt congestive heart failure may ensue (cardiomyopathy of obesity). This review of cardiac findings in obese children and adolescents indicates similar anatomic features as well as early subclinical findings of ventricular dysfunction. However, cardiac functional reserve (cardiovascular fitness) appears to be preserved even in those with morbid levels of obesity. Key pointsExcessive body fat increases the work output of the heart.Longstanding increases in heart work result in abnormalities of heart function.Early findings of such changes can be observed in adolescents with severe obesity. PMID:24149418

  15. IK1 heterogeneity affects genesis and stability of spiral waves in cardiac myocyte monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Sekar, Rajesh B.; Kizana, Eddy; Cho, Hee C.; Molitoris, Jared M.; Hesketh, Geoffrey G.; Eaton, Brett P.; Marbán, Eduardo; Tung, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have postulated an important role for the inwardly rectifying potassium current (IK1) in controlling the dynamics of electrophysiological spiral waves responsible for ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation. In this study, we developed a novel tissue model of cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) with uniform or heterogeneous Kir2.1 expression achieved by lentiviral transfer to elucidate the role of IK1 in cardiac arrhythmogenesis. Kir2.1-overexpressed NRVMs showed increased IK1 density, hyperpolarized resting membrane potential and increased action potential upstroke velocity compared with GFP-transduced NRVMs. Opposite results were observed in Kir2.1-suppressed NRVMs. Optical mapping of uniformly Kir2.1 gene-modified monolayers showed altered conduction velocity (CV) and action potential duration (APD) compared with non-transduced and empty vector-transduced monolayers, but functional reentrant waves could not be induced. In monolayers with an island of altered Kir2.1 expression, CV and APD of the locally transduced and non-transduced regions were similar to those of the uniformly transduced and non-transduced monolayers, respectively, and functional reentrant waves could be induced. The waves were anchored to islands of Kir2.1 overexpression and remained stable, but dropped in frequency and meandered away from islands of Kir2.1 suppression. In monolayers with an inverse pattern of IK1 heterogeneity, stable high frequency spiral waves were present with IK1 overexpression, whereas lower frequency, meandering spiral waves were observed with IK1 suppression. Our study provides direct evidence for the contribution of IK1 heterogeneity and level to the genesis and stability of spiral waves and highlights the potential importance of IK1 as an anti-arrhythmia target. PMID:19122180

  16. Spatial Variation and Resuscitation Process Affecting Survival after Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests (OHCA)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chien-Chou; Chen, Chao-Wen; Ho, Chi-Kung; Liu, I-Chuan; Lin, Bo-Cheng; Chan, Ta-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Background Ambulance response times and resuscitation efforts are critical predictors of the survival rate after out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCA). On the other hand, rural-urban differences in the OHCA survival rates are an important public health issue. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the January 2011–December 2013 OHCA registry data of Kaohsiung City, Taiwan. With particular focus on geospatial variables, we aimed to unveil risk factors predicting the overall OHCA survival until hospital admission. Spatial analysis, network analysis, and the Kriging method by using geographic information systems were applied to analyze spatial variations and calculate the transport distance. Logistic regression was used to identify the risk factors for OHCA survival. Results Among the 4,957 patients, the overall OHCA survival to hospital admission was 16.5%. In the multivariate analysis, female sex (adjusted odds ratio:, AOR, 1.24 [1.06–1.45]), events in public areas (AOR: 1.30 [1.05–1.61]), exposure to automated external defibrillator (AED) shock (AOR: 1.70 [1.30–2.23]), use of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) (AOR: 1.35 [1.16–1.58]), non-trauma patients (AOR: 1.41 [1.04–1.90]), ambulance bypassed the closest hospital (AOR: 1.28 [1.07–1.53]), and OHCA within the high population density areas (AOR: 1.89 [1.55–2.32]) were positively associated with improved OHCA survival. By contrast, a prolonged total emergency medical services (EMS) time interval was negatively associated with OHCA survival (AOR: 0.98 [0.96–0.99]). Conclusions Resuscitative efforts, such as AED or LMA use, and a short total EMS time interval improved OHCA outcomes in emergency departments. The spatial heterogeneity of emergency medical resources between rural and urban areas might affect survival rate. PMID:26659851

  17. Evaluation of Neurodevelopment and Factors Affecting it in Children With Acyanotic Congenital Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ozmen, Ayten; Terlemez, Semiha; Tunaoglu, Fatma Sedef; Soysal, Sebnem; Pektas, Ayhan; Cilsal, Erman; Koca, Ulker; Kula, Serdar; Deniz Oguz, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    Background: The rate of congenital heart disease is 0.8% in all live births. The majority of this, however, is acyanotic congenital heart disease. The survival rate of children with cardiac disease has increased with the developments provided in recent years and their lifetime is extended. Objectives: This study aims to evaluate neurodevelopment of children with uncomplicated acyanotic congenital heart disease in preschool period and determine the factors affecting their neurodevelopmental process. Patients and Methods: 132 children with acyanotic congenital heart disease aged 6 - 72 months were involved in the study. Mental development and intelligence levels of patients under 2 years old were assessed by using Bayley Development Scale-III, and Stanford Binet Intelligence test was employed for patients over 2 years old. Denver Developmental Screening Test II was applied to all patients for their personal-social, fine motor, gross motor and language development. Results: The average age of patients (67 girls, 65 boys) included in the study was 35.2 ± 19.6 months. It was determined that there were subnormal mental level in 13 (10%) patients and at least one specific developmental disorder in 33 (25%) patients. Bayley Mental Development Scale score of patients who had received incubator care in perinatal period was found significantly low (88 ± 4.2) compared to those with no incubator care (93.17 ± 8.5) (P = 0.028). Low educational level of father was established to be linked with low mental development scores at the age of 2 and following that age (P < 0.05). Iron deficiency anemia was discovered to be related to low psychometric test scores at every age (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Neurodevelopmental problems in children with acyanotic congenital heart disease were found higher compared to those in society. Mental development and intelligence levels of patients were determined to be closely associated with receiving incubator care, father’s educational level and

  18. Does iron deficiency anemia affect olfactory function?

    PubMed

    Dinc, Mehmet Emre; Dalgic, Abdullah; Ulusoy, Seckin; Dizdar, Denizhan; Develioglu, Omer; Topak, Murat

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion This study found a negative effect of IDA on olfactory function. IDA leads to a reduction in olfactory function, and decreases in hemoglobin levels result in further reduction in olfactory function. Objective This study examined the effects of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) on olfactory function. Method The study enrolled 50 IDA patients and 50 healthy subjects. Olfactory function was evaluated using the Sniffin' Sticks olfactory test. The diagnosis of IDA was made according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Results Patients with IDA had a significantly lower threshold, discrimination, and identification (TDI) value, and a lower threshold compared with the control group. However, there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of smell selectivity values. PMID:26963317

  19. Vagus Nerve Stimulation Improves Cardiac Function by Preventing Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Obese-Insulin Resistant Rats

    PubMed Central

    Samniang, Bencharunan; Shinlapawittayatorn, Krekwit; Chunchai, Titikorn; Pongkan, Wanpitak; Kumfu, Sirinart; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C.; KenKnight, Bruce H.; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-01-01

    Long-term high-fat diet (HFD) consumption leads to not only obese-insulin resistance, but also impaired left ventricular (LV) function. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) has been shown to exert cardioprotection. However, its effects on the heart and metabolic parameters under obese-insulin resistant condition is not known. We determined the effects of VNS on metabolic parameters, heart rate variability (HRV) and LV function in obese-insulin resistant rats. Male Wistar rats were fed with HFD for 12 weeks, and were randomly divided into sham and VNS groups. VNS was applied for the next 12 weeks. Echocardiography, blood pressure and HRV were examined. Blood samples were collected for metabolic parameters. At the end, the heart was removed for determination of apoptosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, and cardiac mitochondrial function. VNS for 12 weeks significantly decreased plasma insulin, HOMA index, total cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL and visceral fat. Serum adiponectin was significantly increased in the VNS group. VNS also significantly decreased blood pressure, improved HRV and LV function, decreased cardiac MDA, TNF-α and Bax levels, and improved cardiac mitochondrial function. VNS improves metabolic and hemodynamic parameters, and the LV function via its ability against apoptosis, inflammation and oxidative stress, and preserved cardiac mitochondrial function in obese-insulin resistant rats. PMID:26830020

  20. Short-Term Effects of Transjugular Intrahepatic Shunt on Cardiac Function Assessed by Cardiac MRI: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Kovacs, A.; Schepke, M.; Heller, J.; Schild, H. H.; Flacke, S.

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess short-term effects of transjugular intrahepatic shunt (TIPS) on cardiac function with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with liver cirrhosis. Eleven patients (six males and five females) with intractable esophageal varices or refractory ascites were imaged with MRI at 1.5 T prior to, within 24 h after, and 4-6 months after TIPS creation (n = 5). Invasive pressures were registered during TIPS creation. MRI consisted of a stack of contiguous slices as well as phase contrast images at all four valve planes and perpendicular to the portal vein. Imaging data were analyzed through time-volume curves and first derivatives. The portoatrial pressure gradient decreased from 19.8 {+-} 2.3 to 6.6 {+-} 2.3, accompanied by a nearly two fold increase in central pressures and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure immediately after TIPS creation. Left and right end diastolic volumes and stroke volumes increased by 11, 13, and 24%, respectively (p < 0.001), but dropped back to baseline at follow-up. End systolic volumes remained unchanged. E/A ratios remained within normal range. During follow-up the left ventricular mass was larger than baseline values in all patients, with an average increase of 7.9 g (p < 0.001). In conclusion, the increased volume load shunted to the heart after TIPS creation transiently exceeded the preload reserve of the right and left ventricle, leading to significantly increased pulmonary wedge pressures and persistent enlargement of the left and right atria. Normalization of cardiac dimensions was observed after months together with mild left ventricular hypertrophy.

  1. Cardiac myocyte follistatin-like 1 functions to attenuate hypertrophy following pressure overload.

    PubMed

    Shimano, Masayuki; Ouchi, Noriyuki; Nakamura, Kazuto; van Wijk, Bram; Ohashi, Koji; Asaumi, Yasuhide; Higuchi, Akiko; Pimentel, David R; Sam, Flora; Murohara, Toyoaki; van den Hoff, Maurice J B; Walsh, Kenneth

    2011-10-25

    Factors secreted by the heart, referred to as "cardiokines," have diverse actions in the maintenance of cardiac homeostasis and remodeling. Follistatin-like 1 (Fstl1) is a secreted glycoprotein expressed in the adult heart and is induced in response to injurious conditions that promote myocardial hypertrophy and heart failure. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of cardiac Fstl1 in the remodeling response to pressure overload. Cardiac myocyte-specific Fstl1-KO mice were constructed and subjected to pressure overload induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). Although Fstl1-KO mice displayed no detectable baseline phenotype, TAC led to enhanced cardiac hypertrophic growth and a pronounced loss in ventricular performance by 4 wk compared with control mice. Conversely, mice that acutely or chronically overexpressed Fstl1 were resistant to pressure overload-induced hypertrophy and cardiac failure. Fstl1-deficient mice displayed a reduction in TAC-induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in heart, whereas Fstl1 overexpression led to increased myocardial AMPK activation under these conditions. In cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes, administration of Fstl1 promoted AMPK activation and antagonized phenylephrine-induced hypertrophy. Inhibition of AMPK attenuated the antihypertrophic effect of Fstl1 treatment. These results document that cardiac Fstl1 functions as an autocrine/paracrine regulatory factor that antagonizes myocyte hypertrophic growth and the loss of ventricular performance in response to pressure overload, possibly through a mechanism involving the activation of the AMPK signaling axis. PMID:21987816

  2. Gravity Reception and Cardiac Function in the Spider

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finck, A.

    1985-01-01

    The following features of the arachnid gravity system were studied. (1) the absolute threshold to hyper-gz is quite low indicating fine proprioreceptive properties of the lyriform organ, the Gz/vibration detector; (2) the neurogenic heart of the spider is a good dependent variable for assessing its behavior to Gz and other stimuli which produce mechanical effects on the exoskeleton; (3) Not only is the cardiac response useful but it is now understood to be an integral part of the system which compensates for the consequences of gravity in the spider (an hydraulic leg extension); and (4) a theoretical model was proposed in which a mechanical amplifier, the leg lever, converts a weak force (at the tarsus) to a strong force (at the patella), capable of compressing the exoskeleton and consequently the lyriform receptor.

  3. Inhibition of AMPK accentuates prolonged caloric restriction-induced change in cardiac contractile function through disruption of compensatory autophagy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qijun; Zhao, Kun; Han, Xuefeng; Huff, Anna F; Cui, Qin; Babcock, Sara A; Yu, Shiqiang; Zhang, Yingmei

    2015-02-01

    Prolonged caloric restriction often results in alteration in heart geometry and function although the underlying mechanism remains poorly defined. Autophagy, a conserved pathway for bulk degradation of intracellular proteins and organelles, preserves energy and nutrient in the face of caloric insufficiency. This study was designed to examine the role of AMPK in prolonged caloric restriction-induced change in cardiac homeostasis and the underlying mechanism(s) involved with a focus on autophagy. Wild-type (WT) and AMPK kinase dead (KD) mice were caloric restricted (by 40%) for 30 weeks. Echocardiographic, cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca²⁺ properties, autophagy and autophagy regulatory proteins were evaluated. Caloric restriction compromised echocardiographic indices (decreased ventricular mass, left ventricular diameters, and cardiac output), cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca²⁺ properties associated with upregulated autophagy (Beclin-1, Atg5 and LC3BII-to-LC3BI ratio), increased autophagy adaptor protein p62, elevated phosphorylation of AMPK and TSC1/2, depressed phosphorylation of mTOR and ULK1. Although AMPK inhibition did not affect cardiac mechanical function, autophagy and autophagy signaling proteins, it significantly accentuated caloric restriction-induced changes in myocardial contractile function and intracellular Ca²⁺ handling. Interestingly, AMPK inhibition reversed caloric restriction-induced changes in autophagy and autophagy signaling. AMPK inhibition led to dampened levels of Beclin-1, Atg 5 and LC3B ratio along with suppressed phosphorylation of AMPK and TSC1/2 as well as elevated phosphorylation of mTOR and ULK1. Taken together, these data suggest an indispensible role for AMPK in the maintenance of cardiac homeostasis under prolonged caloric restriction-induced pathological changes possibly through autophagy regulation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Autophagy and protein quality control in

  4. Galnt1 Is Required for Normal Heart Valve Development and Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Tian, E; Stevens, Sharon R.; Guan, Yu; Springer, Danielle A.; Anderson, Stasia A.; Starost, Matthew F.; Patel, Vyomesh; Ten Hagen, Kelly G.; Tabak, Lawrence A.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart valve defects in humans occur in approximately 2% of live births and are a major source of compromised cardiac function. In this study we demonstrate that normal heart valve development and cardiac function are dependent upon Galnt1, the gene that encodes a member of the family of glycosyltransferases (GalNAc-Ts) responsible for the initiation of mucin-type O-glycosylation. In the adult mouse, compromised cardiac function that mimics human congenital heart disease, including aortic and pulmonary valve stenosis and regurgitation; altered ejection fraction; and cardiac dilation, was observed in Galnt1 null animals. The underlying phenotype is aberrant valve formation caused by increased cell proliferation within the outflow tract cushion of developing hearts, which is first detected at developmental stage E11.5. Developing valves from Galnt1 deficient animals displayed reduced levels of the proteases ADAMTS1 and ADAMTS5, decreased cleavage of the proteoglycan versican and increased levels of other extracellular matrix proteins. We also observed increased BMP and MAPK signaling. Taken together, the ablation of Galnt1 appears to disrupt the formation/remodeling of the extracellular matrix and alters conserved signaling pathways that regulate cell proliferation. Our study provides insight into the role of this conserved protein modification in cardiac valve development and may represent a new model for idiopathic valve disease. PMID:25615642

  5. The modulation of cardiac progenitor cell function by hydrogel-dependent Notch1activation

    PubMed Central

    Boopathy, Archana V.; Che, Pao Lin; Somasuntharam, Inthirai; Fiore, Vincent F.; Cabigas, E. Bernadette; Ban, Kiwon; Brown, Milton E.; Narui, Yoshie; Barker, Thomas H.; Yoon, Young-sup; Salaita, Khalid; García, Andrés J.; Davis, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Myocardial infarction is the leading cause of death worldwide and phase I clinical trials utilizing cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) have shown promising outcomes. Notch1 signaling plays a critical role in cardiac development and in the survival, cardiogenic lineage commitment, and differentiation of cardiac stem/progenitor cells. In this study, we functionalized self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogels with a peptide mimic of the Notch1 ligand Jagged1 (RJ) to evaluate the therapeutic benefit of CPC delivery in the hydrogels in a rat model of myocardial infarction. The behavior of CPCs cultured in the 3D hydrogels in vitro including gene expression, proliferation, and growth factor production was evaluated. Interestingly, we observed Notch1 activation to be dependent on hydrogel polymer density/stiffness with synergistic increase in presence of RJ. Our results show that RJ mediated Notch1 activation depending on hydrogel concentration differentially regulated cardiogenic gene expression, proliferation, and growth factor production in CPCs in vitro. In rats subjected to experimental myocardial infarction, improvement in acute retention and cardiac function was observed following cell therapy in RJ hydrogels compared to unmodified or scrambled peptide containing hydrogels. This study demonstrates the potential therapeutic benefit of functionalizing SAP hydrogels with RJ for CPC based cardiac repair. PMID:24974008

  6. Angiotensin II Stimulation of Cardiac Hypertrophy and Functional Decompensation in Osteoprotegerin-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Tsuruda, Toshihiro; Sekita-Hatakeyama, Yoko; Hao, Yilin; Sakamoto, Sumiharu; Kurogi, Syuji; Nakamura, Midori; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Funamoto, Taro; Sekimoto, Tomohisa; Hatakeyama, Kinta; Chosa, Etsuo; Kato, Johji; Asada, Yujiro; Kitamura, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    Circulating and myocardial expressions of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κb ligand and osteoprotegerin are activated in heart failure; however, it remains to be determined their pathophysiological roles on left ventricular structure and function in interaction with renin-angiotensin system. We conducted experiments using 8-week-old osteoprotegerin(-/-)mice and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κb ligand-transgenic mice to assess whether they affect the angiotensin II-induced left ventricular remodeling. Subcutaneous infusion of angiotensin II to osteoprotegerin(-/-)mice progressed the eccentric hypertrophy, resulting in left ventricular systolic dysfunction for 28 days, and this was comparable with wild-type mice, showing concentric hypertrophy, irrespective of equivalent elevation of systolic blood pressure. The structural alteration was associated with reduced interstitial fibrosis, decreased procollagen α1 and syndecan-1 expressions, and the increased number of apoptotic cells in the left ventricle, compared with wild-type mice. In contrast, angiotensin II infusion to the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κb ligand-transgenic mice revealed the concentric hypertrophy with preserved systolic contractile function. Intraperitoneal administration of human recombinant osteoprotegerin, but not subcutaneous injection of anti-receptor activator of nuclear factor-κb ligand antibody, to the angiotensin II-infused osteoprotegerin(-/-)mice for 28 days ameliorated the progression of heart failure without affecting systolic blood pressure. These results underscore the biological activity of osteoprotegerin in preserving myocardial structure and function during the angiotensin II-induced cardiac hypertrophy, independent of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κb ligand activity. In addition, the antiapoptotic and profibrotic actions of osteoprotegerin that emerged from our data might be involved in the mechanisms. PMID:27001297

  7. How the 2008 stock market crash and seasons affect total and cardiac deaths in Los Angeles County.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Bryan Glen; Pezzullo, John Christopher; McDonald, Scott Andrew; Poole, William Kenneth; Kloner, Robert Alan

    2012-05-15

    Various stressors trigger cardiac death. The objective was to investigate a possible relation between a stock market crash and cardiac death in a large population within the United States. We obtained daily stock market data (Dow Jones Industrial Average Index), death certificate data for daily deaths in Los Angeles County (LA), and annual LA population estimates for 2005 through 2008. The 4 years death rate curves (2005 through 2008) were averaged into a single curve to illustrate annual trends. Data were "deseasonalized" by subtracting from the daily observed value the average value for that day of year. There was marked seasonal variation in total and cardiac death rates. Even in the mild LA climate, death rates were higher in winter versus summer including total death (+17%), circulatory death (+24%), coronary heart disease death (+28%), and myocardial infarction death (+38%) rates (p <0.0001 for each). Absolute coronary heart disease death rates have decreased since 1985. After accounting for seasonal variation, the large stock market crash in October 2008 did not affect death rates in LA. Death rates remained at or below seasonal averages during the stock market crash. In conclusion, after correcting for seasonal variation, the stock market crash in October 2008 was not associated with an increase in total or cardiac death in LA. Annual coronary heart disease death rates continue to decrease. However, seasonal variation (specifically winter) remains a trigger for death and coronary heart disease death even in LA where winters are mild. PMID:22381159

  8. Engineering the heart: Evaluation of conductive nanomaterials for improving implant integration and cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin; Chen, Jun; Sun, Hongyu; Qiu, Xiaozhong; Mou, Yongchao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yuwei; Li, Xia; Han, Yao; Duan, Cuimi; Tang, Rongyu; Wang, Chunlan; Zhong, Wen; Liu, Jie; Luo, Ying; (Mengqiu) Xing, Malcolm; Wang, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, carbon nanotubes together with other types of conductive materials have been used to enhance the viability and function of cardiomyocytes in vitro. Here we demonstrated a paradigm to construct ECTs for cardiac repair using conductive nanomaterials. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were incorporated into gelatin hydrogel scaffolds to construct three-dimensional ECTs. We found that SWNTs could provide cellular microenvironment in vitro favorable for cardiac contraction and the expression of electrochemical associated proteins. Upon implantation into the infarct hearts in rats, ECTs structurally integrated with the host myocardium, with different types of cells observed to mutually invade into implants and host tissues. The functional measurements showed that SWNTs were essential to improve the performance of ECTs in inhibiting pathological deterioration of myocardium. This work suggested that conductive nanomaterials hold therapeutic potential in engineering cardiac tissues to repair myocardial infarction. PMID:24429673

  9. Engineering the heart: Evaluation of conductive nanomaterials for improving implant integration and cardiac function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin; Chen, Jun; Sun, Hongyu; Qiu, Xiaozhong; Mou, Yongchao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yuwei; Li, Xia; Han, Yao; Duan, Cuimi; Tang, Rongyu; Wang, Chunlan; Zhong, Wen; Liu, Jie; Luo, Ying; (Mengqiu) Xing, Malcolm; Wang, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, carbon nanotubes together with other types of conductive materials have been used to enhance the viability and function of cardiomyocytes in vitro. Here we demonstrated a paradigm to construct ECTs for cardiac repair using conductive nanomaterials. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were incorporated into gelatin hydrogel scaffolds to construct three-dimensional ECTs. We found that SWNTs could provide cellular microenvironment in vitro favorable for cardiac contraction and the expression of electrochemical associated proteins. Upon implantation into the infarct hearts in rats, ECTs structurally integrated with the host myocardium, with different types of cells observed to mutually invade into implants and host tissues. The functional measurements showed that SWNTs were essential to improve the performance of ECTs in inhibiting pathological deterioration of myocardium. This work suggested that conductive nanomaterials hold therapeutic potential in engineering cardiac tissues to repair myocardial infarction.

  10. Time Course of Atrophic Remodeling: Effects of Exercise on Cardiac Morpology and Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, J. M.; Martin, D.; Caine, T.; Matz, T.; Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.

    2014-01-01

    Early and consistent evaluation of cardiac morphology and function throughout an atrophic stimulus is critically important for the design and optimization of interventions. Exercise training is one intervention that has been shown to confer favorable improvements in LV mass and function during unloading. However, the format and intensity of exercise required to induce optimal cardiac improvements has not been investigated. PURPOSE: This randomized, controlled trial was designed to 1) comprehensively characterize the time course of unloading-induced morpho-functional remodeling, and 2) examine the effects of high intensity exercise training on cardiac structural and functional parameters during unloading. METHODS: Twenty six subjects completed 70 days of head down tilt bed rest (HDBR): 17 were randomized to exercise training (ExBR) and 9 remained sedentary. Exercise consisted of integrated high intensity, continuous, and resistance exercise. We assessed cardiac morphology (left ventricular mass; LVM) and function (speckle-tracking assessment of longitudinal, radial, and circumferential strain and twist) before (BR-2), during (BR7,21,31,70), and following (BR+0, +3) HDBR. Cardiorespiratory fitness (VO2max) was evaluated before (BR- 3), during (BR4,25,46,68) and following (BR+0) HDBR. RESULTS: Sedentary HDBR resulted in a progressive decline in LVM, longitudinal, radial, and circumferential strain, and an increase in twist. ExBR mitigated decreases in LVM and function. Change in twist was significantly related to change in VO2max (R=0.68, p<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Alterations in cardiac morphology and function begin early during unloading. High-intensity exercise attenuates atrophic morphological and functional remodeling.

  11. Adipose stem cell sheets improved cardiac function in the rat myocardial infarction, but did not alter cardiac contractile responses to β-adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Otsuki, Yuki; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Harada, Shingo; Yamamoto, Yasutaka; Ogino, Kazuhide; Morikawa, Kumi; Ninomiya, Haruaki; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Hisatome, Ichiro; Nishimura, Motonobu

    2015-01-01

    Adipose stem cells (ASCs) are a source of regenerative cells available for autologous transplantation to hearts. We compared protective actions of ASC sheets on rat myocardial infarction (MI) in comparison with those of skeletal myoblast cell sheets. Their effects on infarcted hearts were evaluated by biological, histochemical as well as physiological analyses. ASC sheets secreted higher concentrations of angiogenic factors (HGF, VEGF, and bFGF; P < 0.05) under normoxic and hypoxic conditions than those of myoblast cell sheets, associated with reduction of cell apoptosis (P < 0.05). Like myoblast cell sheets, ASC sheets improved cardiac function (P < 0.05) and decreased the plasma level of ANP (P < 0.05) in MI hearts. ASC sheets restored cardiac remodeling characterized by fibrosis, cardiac hypertrophy and impaired angiogenesis (P < 0.05), which was associated with increases in angiogenic factors (P < 0.05). In isolated perfused rat hearts, ASC sheets improved both systolic and diastolic functions, which was comparable to cardiac functions of myoblast cell sheets, while both cell sheets failed to restore cardiac contractile response to either isoproterenol, pimobendan or dibutyryl cAMP. These results indicated that ASC sheets improved cardiac function and remodeling of MI hearts mediated by their paracrine action and this improvement was comparable to those by myoblast cell sheets. PMID:25749147

  12. Ethanol exposure alters early cardiac function in the looping heart: a mechanism for congenital heart defects?

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Peterson, Lindsy M.; Mai, Katherine; McHale, Quinn; Jenkins, Michael W.; Linask, Kersti K.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Watanabe, Michiko

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol-induced congenital heart defects are frequently among the most life threatening and require surgical correction in newborns. The etiology of these defects, collectively known as fetal alcohol syndrome, has been the focus of much study, particularly involving cellular and molecular mechanisms. Few studies have addressed the influential role of altered cardiac function in early embryogenesis because of a lack of tools with the capability to assay tiny beating hearts. To overcome this gap in our understanding, we used optical coherence tomography (OCT), a nondestructive imaging modality capable of micrometer-scale resolution imaging, to rapidly and accurately map cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics in real time under physiological conditions. In this study, we exposed avian embryos to a single dose of alcohol/ethanol at gastrulation when the embryo is sensitive to the induction of birth defects. Late-stage hearts were analyzed using standard histological analysis with a focus on the atrio-ventricular valves. Early cardiac function was assayed using Doppler OCT, and structural analysis of the cardiac cushions was performed using OCT imaging. Our results indicated that ethanol-exposed embryos developed late-stage valvuloseptal defects. At early stages, they exhibited increased regurgitant flow and developed smaller atrio-ventricular cardiac cushions, compared with controls (uninjected and saline-injected embryos). The embryos also exhibited abnormal flexion/torsion of the body. Our evidence suggests that ethanol-induced alterations in early cardiac function have the potential to contribute to late-stage valve and septal defects, thus demonstrating that functional parameters may serve as early and sensitive gauges of cardiac normalcy and abnormalities. PMID:24271490

  13. Ethanol exposure alters early cardiac function in the looping heart: a mechanism for congenital heart defects?

    PubMed

    Karunamuni, Ganga; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Peterson, Lindsy M; Mai, Katherine; McHale, Quinn; Jenkins, Michael W; Linask, Kersti K; Rollins, Andrew M; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-02-01

    Alcohol-induced congenital heart defects are frequently among the most life threatening and require surgical correction in newborns. The etiology of these defects, collectively known as fetal alcohol syndrome, has been the focus of much study, particularly involving cellular and molecular mechanisms. Few studies have addressed the influential role of altered cardiac function in early embryogenesis because of a lack of tools with the capability to assay tiny beating hearts. To overcome this gap in our understanding, we used optical coherence tomography (OCT), a nondestructive imaging modality capable of micrometer-scale resolution imaging, to rapidly and accurately map cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics in real time under physiological conditions. In this study, we exposed avian embryos to a single dose of alcohol/ethanol at gastrulation when the embryo is sensitive to the induction of birth defects. Late-stage hearts were analyzed using standard histological analysis with a focus on the atrio-ventricular valves. Early cardiac function was assayed using Doppler OCT, and structural analysis of the cardiac cushions was performed using OCT imaging. Our results indicated that ethanol-exposed embryos developed late-stage valvuloseptal defects. At early stages, they exhibited increased regurgitant flow and developed smaller atrio-ventricular cardiac cushions, compared with controls (uninjected and saline-injected embryos). The embryos also exhibited abnormal flexion/torsion of the body. Our evidence suggests that ethanol-induced alterations in early cardiac function have the potential to contribute to late-stage valve and septal defects, thus demonstrating that functional parameters may serve as early and sensitive gauges of cardiac normalcy and abnormalities. PMID:24271490

  14. A review of heart chamber segmentation for structural and functional analysis using cardiac magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Peng, Peng; Lekadir, Karim; Gooya, Ali; Shao, Ling; Petersen, Steffen E; Frangi, Alejandro F

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has become a key imaging modality in clinical cardiology practice due to its unique capabilities for non-invasive imaging of the cardiac chambers and great vessels. A wide range of CMR sequences have been developed to assess various aspects of cardiac structure and function, and significant advances have also been made in terms of imaging quality and acquisition times. A lot of research has been dedicated to the development of global and regional quantitative CMR indices that help the distinction between health and pathology. The goal of this review paper is to discuss the structural and functional CMR indices that have been proposed thus far for clinical assessment of the cardiac chambers. We include indices definitions, the requirements for the calculations, exemplar applications in cardiovascular diseases, and the corresponding normal ranges. Furthermore, we review the most recent state-of-the art techniques for the automatic segmentation of the cardiac boundaries, which are necessary for the calculation of the CMR indices. Finally, we provide a detailed discussion of the existing literature and of the future challenges that need to be addressed to enable a more robust and comprehensive assessment of the cardiac chambers in clinical practice. PMID:26811173

  15. In vivo imaging of cardiac development and function in zebrafish using light sheet microscopy.

    PubMed

    Weber, Michael; Huisken, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Detailed studies of heart development and function are crucial for our understanding of cardiac failures and pave the way for better diagnostics and treatment. However, the constant motion and close incorporation into the cardiovascular system prevent in vivo studies of the living, unperturbed heart. The complementary strengths of the zebrafish model and light sheet microscopy provide a useful platform to fill this gap. High-resolution images of the embryonic vertebrate heart are now recorded from within the living animal: deep inside the unperturbed heart we can follow cardiac contractions and measure action potentials and calcium transients. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the entire beating heart with cellular resolution give new insights into its ever-changing morphology and facilitate studies into how individual cells form the complex cardiac network. In addition, cardiac dynamics and robustness are now examined with targeted optical manipulation. Overall, the combination of zebrafish and light sheet microscopy represents a promising addition for cardiac research and opens the door to a better understanding of heart function and development. PMID:26700795

  16. Redox Control of Cardiac Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Nitin T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been associated with various human diseases, and considerable attention has been paid to investigate their physiological effects. Various ROS are synthesized in the mitochondria and accumulate in the cytoplasm if the cellular antioxidant defense mechanism fails. The critical balance of this ROS synthesis and antioxidant defense systems is termed the redox system of the cell. Various cardiovascular diseases have also been affected by redox to different degrees. ROS have been indicated as both detrimental and protective, via different cellular pathways, for cardiac myocyte functions, electrophysiology, and pharmacology. Mostly, the ROS functions depend on the type and amount of ROS synthesized. While the literature clearly indicates ROS effects on cardiac contractility, their effects on cardiac excitability are relatively under appreciated. Cardiac excitability depends on the functions of various cardiac sarcolemal or mitochondrial ion channels carrying various depolarizing or repolarizing currents that also maintain cellular ionic homeostasis. ROS alter the functions of these ion channels to various degrees to determine excitability by affecting the cellular resting potential and the morphology of the cardiac action potential. Thus, redox balance regulates cardiac excitability, and under pathological regulation, may alter action potential propagation to cause arrhythmia. Understanding how redox affects cellular excitability may lead to potential prophylaxis or treatment for various arrhythmias. This review will focus on the studies of redox and cardiac excitation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 432–468. PMID:22897788

  17. Clinical investigation: thyroid function test abnormalities in cardiac arrest associated with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Iltumur, Kenan; Olmez, Gonul; Arıturk, Zuhal; Taskesen, Tuncay; Toprak, Nizamettin

    2005-01-01

    Introduction It is known that thyroid homeostasis is altered during the acute phase of cardiac arrest. However, it is not clear under what conditions, how and for how long these alterations occur. In the present study we examined thyroid function tests (TFTs) in the acute phase of cardiac arrest caused by acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and at the end of the first 2 months after the event. Method Fifty patients with cardiac arrest induced by ACS and 31 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) who did not require cardioversion or cardiopulmonary resuscitation were enrolled in the study, as were 40 healthy volunteers. The patients were divided into three groups based on duration of cardiac arrest (<5 min, 5–10 min and >10 min). Blood samples were collected for thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), tri-iodothyronine (T3), free T3, thyroxine (T4), free T4, troponin-I and creatine kinase-MB measurements. The blood samples for TFTs were taken at 72 hours and at 2 months after the acute event in the cardiac arrest and AMI groups, but only once in the control group. Results The T3 and free T3 levels at 72 hours in the cardiac arrest group were significantly lower than in both the AMI and control groups (P < 0.0001). On the other hand, there were no significant differences between T4, free T4 and TSH levels between the three groups (P > 0.05). At the 2-month evaluation, a dramatic improvement was observed in T3 and free T3 levels in the cardiac arrest group (P < 0.0001). In those patients whose cardiac arrest duration was in excess of 10 min, levels of T3, free T3, T4 and TSH were significantly lower than those in patients whose cardiac arrest duration was under 5 min (P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.005 and P < 0.05, respectively). Conclusion TFTs are significantly altered in cardiac arrest induced by ACS. Changes in TFTs are even more pronounced in patients with longer periods of resuscitation. The changes in the surviving patients were characterized by euthyroid sick

  18. Cardiac Morphology and Function, and Blood Gas Transport in Aquaporin-1 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Al-Samir, Samer; Wang, Yong; Meissner, Joachim D.; Gros, Gerolf; Endeward, Volker

    2016-01-01

    We have studied cardiac and respiratory functions of aquaporin-1-deficient mice by the Pressure-Volume-loop technique and by blood gas analysis. In addition, the morphological properties of the animals' hearts were analyzed. In anesthesia under maximal dobutamine stimulation, the mice exhibit a moderately elevated heart rate of < 600 min−1 and an O2 consumption of ~0.6 ml/min/g, which is about twice the basal rate. In this state, which is similar to the resting state of the conscious animal, all cardiac functions including stroke volume and cardiac output exhibited resting values and were identical between deficient and wildtype animals. Likewise, pulmonary and peripheral exchange of O2 and CO2 were normal. In contrast, several morphological parameters of the heart tissue of deficient mice were altered: (1) left ventricular wall thickness was reduced by 12%, (2) left ventricular mass, normalized to tibia length, was reduced by 10–20%, (3) cardiac muscle fiber cross sectional area was decreased by 17%, and (4) capillary density was diminished by 10%. As the P-V-loop technique yielded normal end-diastolic and end-systolic left ventricular volumes, the deficient hearts are characterized by thin ventricular walls in combination with normal intraventricular volumes. The aquaporin-1-deficient heart thus seems to be at a disadvantage compared to the wild-type heart by a reduced left-ventricular wall thickness and an increased diffusion distance between blood capillaries and muscle mitochondria. While under the present quasi-resting conditions these morphological alterations have no consequences for cardiac function, we expect that the deficient hearts will show a reduced maximal cardiac output. PMID:27252655

  19. Engineering a growth factor embedded nanofiber matrix niche to promote vascularization for functional cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Rajesh; Kumaraswamy, Priyadharshini; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2016-08-01

    The major loss of tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) after myocardial ischemia is a serious burden that gradually leads to heart failure. Due to lack of available treatment methods to restore the cardiac function, various research strategies have come up to treat the ischemic myocardium. However these have met with limited success due to the complexity of the cardiac tissue, which exhibits a nanofibrous collagenous matrix with spatio-temporal localization of a combination of growth factors. To mimic the topographical and chemical cues of the natural cardiac tissue, we have fabricated a growth factor embedded nanofibrous scaffold through electrospinning. In our previous work, we have reported a nanofibrous matrix made of PLCL and PEOz with an average diameter of 500 nm. The scaffold properties were specifically characterized in vitro for cardio-compatibility. In the present study, we have loaded dual growth factors VEGF and bFGF in the nanofiber matrix and investigated its suitability for cardiac tissue engineering. The encapsulation and release of dual growth factors from the matrix were studied using XPS and ELISA. Bioactivity of the loaded growth factors towards proliferation and migration of endothelial cells (HUVECs) was evaluated through MTS and Boyden chamber assays respectively. The efficiency of growth factors on the nanofibrous matrix to activate signaling molecules was studied in HUVECs through gene expression analysis. Preclinical evaluation of the growth factor embedded nanofibrous patch in a rabbit acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model was studied and cardiac function assessment was made through ECG and echocardiography. The evidence for angiogenesis in the patch secured regions was analyzed through histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Our results confirm the effectiveness of growth factor embedded nanofiber matrix in restoration of cardiac function after ischemia when compared to conventional patch material thereby exhibiting promise as a

  20. Teaching Cardiac Autonomic Function Dynamics Employing the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) Maneuver

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junqueira, Luiz Fernando, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    In this report, a brief history of the Valsalva (Valsalva-Weber) maneuver is outlined, followed by an explanation on the use of this approach for the evaluation of cardiac autonomic function based on underlying heart rate changes. The most important methodological and interpretative aspects of the Valsalva-Weber maneuver are critically updated,…

  1. In utero dimethadione exposure causes postnatal disruption in cardiac structure and function in the rat.

    PubMed

    Aasa, Kristiina L; Purssell, Elizabeth; Adams, Michael A; Ozolinš, Terence R S

    2014-12-01

    In utero exposure of rat embryos to dimethadione (DMO), the N-demethylated teratogenic metabolite of the anticonvulsant trimethadione, induces a high incidence of cardiac heart defects including ventricular septal defects (VSDs). The same exposure regimen also leads to in utero cardiac functional deficits, including bradycardia, dysrhythmia, and a reduction in cardiac output (CO) and ejection fraction that persist until parturition (10 days after the final dose). Despite a high rate of spontaneous postnatal VSD closure, we hypothesize that functional sequelae will persist into adulthood. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were administered six 300 mg/kg doses of DMO, one every 12 h in mid-pregnancy beginning on the evening of gestation day 8. Postnatal cardiac function was assessed in control (CTL) and DMO-exposed offspring using radiotelemetry and ultrasound at 3 and 11 months of age, respectively. Adult rats exposed to DMO in utero had an increased incidence of arrhythmia, elevated blood pressure and CO, greater left ventricular volume and elevated locomotor activity versus CTL. The mean arterial pressure of DMO-exposed rats was more sensitive to changes in dietary salt load compared with CTL. Importantly, most treated rats had functional deficits in the absence of a persistent structural defect. It was concluded that in utero DMO exposure causes cardiovascular deficits that persist into postnatal life in the rat, despite absence of visible structural anomalies. We speculate this is not unique to DMO, suggesting possible health implications for infants with unrecognized gestational chemical exposures. PMID:25239635

  2. EFFECTS OF PRENATAL NITROFEN EXPOSURE ON CARDIAC STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The herbicide nitrofen was administered to pregnant Fischer-344 and Sprague-Dawley rats on days 10-13 of gestation (po., 20 or 40 mg/kg daily) and its effects on cardiac structure and function were investigated in the offspring. In the 21-day fetuses, nitrofen did not influence i...

  3. An innovative approach to evaluate a cardiac function based on surface measurement.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, M; Shiraishi, Y; Sekine, K; Yambe, T; Saijo, Y; Park, Y; Ando, H; Matsumoto, T; Takeda, S; Iwasaki, K; Umezu, M

    2005-01-01

    Major function of the heart is to pump blood flow up to all tissues or organs in the body, and it is generally recognized that cardiac function under various diseased conditions are mainly represented by a relationship between blood flow and pressure inside of the heart. In this report, an original proposal of evaluation method on cardiac function is introduced through a simultaneous measurement of various points of cardiac muscular surface. An optical three-dimensional location sensor was employed to measure a displacement change of anatomically specific points on heart surface. Then, changes in strain in each regional surface area were quantitatively obtained. This result indicated similar tendency obtained from echocardiogram. It was also indicated that there was a difference in displacements and phrases between control and arrhythmia. Moreover, strain change in regional area was coincident with a contraction of natural heart. It was found that an attempt to superimpose the data of strain change onto the video images of natural heart was extremely helpful to understand a cardiac function visually. PMID:17282050

  4. Functionally conservative substitutions at cardiac troponin I S43/45.

    PubMed

    Lang, Sarah E; Stevenson, Tamara K; Xu, Dongyang; O'Connell, Ryan; Westfall, Margaret V

    2016-07-01

    A phospho-null Ala substitution at protein kinase C (PKC)-targeted cardiac troponin I (cTnI) S43/45 reduces myocyte and cardiac contractile function. The goal of the current study was to test whether cTnIS43/45N is an alternative, functionally conservative substitution in cardiac myocytes. Partial and more extensive endogenous cTnI replacement was similar at 2 and 4 days after gene transfer, respectively, for epitope-tagged cTnI and cTnIS43/45N. This replacement did not significantly change thin filament stoichiometry. In functional studies, there were no significant changes in the amplitude and/or rates of contractile shortening and re-lengthening after this partial (2 days) and extensive (4 days) replacement with cTnIS43/45N. The cTnIS43/45N substitution also was not associated with adaptive changes in the myocyte Ca(2+) transient or in phosphorylation of the protein kinase A and C-targeted cTnIS23/24 site. These results provide evidence that cTnIS43/45N is a functionally conservative substitution, and may be appropriate for use as a phospho-null in rodent models designed for studies on PKC modulation of cardiac performance. PMID:26869200

  5. Parametric shape representation by a deformable NURBS model for cardiac functional measurements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng Yong; Guan, Qiu

    2011-03-01

    This paper proposes a method of parametric representation and functional measurement of 3-D cardiac shapes in a deformable nonuniform rational B-splines (NURBS) model. This representation makes it very easy to automatically evaluate the functional parameters and myocardial kinetics of the heart, since quantitative analysis can be followed in a simple way. In the model, local deformation and motion on the cardiac shape are expressed in adjustable parameters. Especially, an effective integral algorithm is used for volumetric measurement of a NURBS shape since the volume is the most basic parameter in cardiac functional analysis. This method promises the numerical computation to be very convenient, efficient, and accurate, in comparison with traditional methods. Practical experiments are carried out, and results show that the algorithm can get satisfactory measurement accuracy and efficiency. The parametric NURBS model in cylindrical coordinates is not only very suitable to fit the anatomical surfaces of a cardiac shape, but also easy for geometric transformation and nonrigid registration, and able to represent local dynamics and kinetics, and thus, can easily be applied for quantitative and functional analysis of the heart. PMID:20952325

  6. Cardiac Autonomic Function during Submaximal Treadmill Exercise in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendonca, Goncalo V.; Pereira, Fernando D.; Fernhall, Bo

    2011-01-01

    This study determined whether the cardiac autonomic function of adults with Down syndrome (DS) differs from that of nondisabled persons during submaximal dynamic exercise. Thirteen participants with DS and 12 nondisabled individuals performed maximal and submaximal treadmill tests with metabolic and heart rate (HR) measurements. Spectral analysis…

  7. Molecular Modulation of Actomyosin Function by Cardiac Myosin-Binding Protein C

    PubMed Central

    Previs, Michael J.; Michalek, Arthur J.; Warshaw, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac myosin-binding protein C is a key regulator of cardiac contractility and is capable of both activating the thin filament to initiate actomyosin motion generation and governing maximal sliding velocities. While MyBP-C’s C-terminus localizes the molecule within the sarcomere the N-terminus appears to confer regulatory function by binding to the myosin motor domain and/or actin. Literature pertaining to how MyBP-C binding to the myosin motor domain and or actin leads to MyBP-C’s dual modulatory roles that can impact actomyosin interactions are discussed. PMID:24407948

  8. Autonomic control of cardiac function and myocardial oxygen consumption during hypoxic hypoxia.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, H. H.; Stone, H. L.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation in 19 conscious dogs of the importance of the sympathetic nervous system in the coronary and cardiac response to altitude (hypoxic) hypoxia. Beta-adrenergic blockade was used to minimize the cardiac effect associated with sympathetic receptors. It is shown that the autonomic nervous system, and particularly the sympathetic nervous system, is responsible for the increase in ventricular function and myocardial oxygen consumption that occurs during hypoxia. Minimizing this response through appropriate conditioning and training may improve the operating efficiency of the heart and reduce the hazard of hypoxia and other environmental stresses, such as acceleration, which are encountered in advanced aircraft systems.

  9. Age-related changes in tissue macrophages precede cardiac functional impairment.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Alexander R; Godwin, James W; Chandran, Anjana; Hersey, Lucy; Ilinykh, Alexei; Debuque, Ryan; Wang, Lina; Rosenthal, Nadia A

    2014-05-01

    Cardiac tissue macrophages (cTMs) are abundant in the murine heart but the extent to which the cTM phenotype changes with age is unknown. This study characterizes aging-dependent phenotypic changes in cTM subsets. Using theCx3cr1(GFP/+) mouse reporter line where GFP marks cTMs, and the tissue macrophage marker Mrc1, we show that two major cardiac tissue macrophage subsets, Mrc1-GFP(hi) and Mrc1+GFP(hi) cTMs, are present in the young (<10 week old) mouse heart, and a third subset, Mrc1+GFP(lo), comprises ~50% of total Mrc1+ cTMs from 30 weeks of age. Immunostaining and functional assays show that Mrc1+ cTMs are the principal myeloid sentinels in the mouse heart and that they retain proliferative capacity throughout life. Gene expression profiles of the two Mrc1+ subsets also reveal that Mrc1+GFP(lo) cTMs have a decreased number of immune response genes (Cx3cr1, Lpar6, CD9, Cxcr4, Itga6 and Tgfβr1), and an increased number of fibrogenic genes (Ltc4s, Retnla, Fgfr1, Mmp9 and Ccl24), consistent with a potential role for cTMs in cardiac fibrosis. These findings identify early age-dependent gene expression changes in cTMs, with significant implications for cardiac tissue injury responses and aging-associated cardiac fibrosis. PMID:24861132

  10. Maturation status of sarcomere structure and function in human iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Bedada, Fikru B; Wheelwright, Matthew; Metzger, Joseph M

    2016-07-01

    Human heart failure due to myocardial infarction is a major health concern. The paucity of organs for transplantation limits curative approaches for the diseased and failing adult heart. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac myocytes (hiPSC-CMs) have the potential to provide a long-term, viable, regenerative-medicine alternative. Significant progress has been made with regard to efficient cardiac myocyte generation from hiPSCs. However, directing hiPSC-CMs to acquire the physiological structure, gene expression profile and function akin to mature cardiac tissue remains a major obstacle. Thus, hiPSC-CMs have several hurdles to overcome before they find their way into translational medicine. In this review, we address the progress that has been made, the void in knowledge and the challenges that remain. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26578113

  11. [Anesthetic management for laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in a patient with impaired ventricular function caused by cardiac sarcoidosis].

    PubMed

    Nagata, Hirofumi; Sato, Yoshiharu; Oouchi, Sueko; Wakimoto, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Ko; Suzuki, Kenji

    2012-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that laparoscopic surgery can reduce surgical trauma and postoperative pain, allowing earlier recovery and hospital discharge. However, because patients with severe cardiac depression may not tolerate the adverse respiratory and cardiovascular effects of pneumoperitoneum with a head-up or head-down tilt position, laparoscopic surgery has been avoided in these patients. The present case with low ventricular function (ejection fraction=23-27%) due to cardiac sarcoidosis could successfully undergo laparoscopic sigmoidectomy by using pulmonary artery catheterization. Therefore, laparoscopic surgery can be performed in patients with cardiac dysfunction if the cardiopulmonary responses caused by pneumoperitoneum with a head-up or head-down tilt are sufficiently considered and adverse hemodynamic responses appropriately detected and treated through invasive monitoring techniques such as pulmonary artery catheterization and/or transesophageal echocardiography. PMID:22991812

  12. Cardiac Myosin Binding Protein C Phosphorylation Affects Cross-Bridge Cycle's Elementary Steps in a Site-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Kawai, Masakata

    2014-01-01

    Based on our recent finding that cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C) phosphorylation affects muscle contractility in a site-specific manner, we further studied the force per cross-bridge and the kinetic constants of the elementary steps in the six-state cross-bridge model in cMyBP-C mutated transgenic mice for better understanding of the influence of cMyBP-C phosphorylation on contractile functions. Papillary muscle fibres were dissected from cMyBP-C mutated mice of ADA (Ala273-Asp282-Ala302), DAD (Asp273-Ala282-Asp302), SAS (Ser273-Ala282-Ser302), and t/t (cMyBP-C null) genotypes, and the results were compared to transgenic mice expressing wide-type (WT) cMyBP-C. Sinusoidal analyses were performed with serial concentrations of ATP, phosphate (Pi), and ADP. Both t/t and DAD mutants significantly reduced active tension, force per cross-bridge, apparent rate constant (2πc), and the rate constant of cross-bridge detachment. In contrast to the weakened ATP binding and enhanced Pi and ADP release steps in t/t mice, DAD mice showed a decreased ADP release without affecting the ATP binding and the Pi release. ADA showed decreased ADP release, and slightly increased ATP binding and cross-bridge detachment steps, whereas SAS diminished the ATP binding step and accelerated the ADP release step. t/t has the broadest effects with changes in most elementary steps of the cross-bridge cycle, DAD mimics t/t to a large extent, and ADA and SAS predominantly affect the nucleotide binding steps. We conclude that the reduced tension production in DAD and t/t is the result of reduced force per cross-bridge, instead of the less number of strongly attached cross-bridges. We further conclude that cMyBP-C is an allosteric activator of myosin to increase cross-bridge force, and its phosphorylation status modulates the force, which is regulated by variety of protein kinases. PMID:25420047

  13. Advancing functional engineered cardiac tissues toward a preclinical model of human myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Irene C.; Karakikes, Ioannis; Serrao, Gregory W.; Backeris, Peter; Lee, Jia-Jye; Xie, Chaoqin; Senyei, Grant; Gordon, Ronald E.; Li, Ronald A.; Akar, Fadi G.; Hajjar, Roger J.; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Costa, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac experimental biology and translational research would benefit from an in vitro surrogate for human heart muscle. This study investigated structural and functional properties and interventional responses of human engineered cardiac tissues (hECTs) compared to human myocardium. Human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs, >90% troponin-positive) were mixed with collagen and cultured on force-sensing elastomer devices. hECTs resembled trabecular muscle and beat spontaneously (1.18±0.48 Hz). Microstructural features and mRNA expression of cardiac-specific genes (α-MHC, SERCA2a, and ACTC1) were comparable to human myocardium. Optical mapping revealed cardiac refractoriness with loss of 1:1 capture above 3 Hz, and cycle length dependence of the action potential duration, recapitulating key features of cardiac electrophysiology. hECTs reconstituted the Frank-Starling mechanism, generating an average maximum twitch stress of 660 μN/mm2 at Lmax, approaching values in newborn human myocardium. Dose-response curves followed exponential pharmacodynamics models for calcium chloride (EC50 1.8 mM) and verapamil (IC50 0.61 μM); isoproterenol elicited a positive chronotropic but negligible inotropic response, suggesting sarcoplasmic reticulum immaturity. hECTs were amenable to gene transfer, demonstrated by successful transduction with Ad.GFP. Such 3-D hECTs recapitulate an early developmental stage of human myocardium and promise to offer an alternative preclinical model for cardiology research.—Turnbull, I. C., Karakikes, I., Serrao, G. W., Backeris, P., Lee, J.-J., Xie, C., Senyei, G., Gordon, R. E., Li, R. A., Akar, F. G., Hajjar, R. J., Hulot, J.-S., Costa, K. D. Advancing functional engineered cardiac tissues toward a preclinical model of human myocardium. PMID:24174427

  14. Remote ischemic preconditioning improves post resuscitation cerebral function via overexpressing neuroglobin after cardiac arrest in rats.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ran; Yu, Tao; Lin, Jia-Li; Ren, Guang-Dong; Li, Yi; Liao, Xiao-Xing; Huang, Zi-Tong; Jiang, Chong-Hui

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of remote ischemic preconditioning on post resuscitation cerebral function in a rat model of cardiac arrest and resuscitation. The animals were randomized into six groups: 1) sham operation, 2) lateral ventricle injection and sham operation, 3) cardiac arrest induced by ventricular fibrillation, 4) lateral ventricle injection and cardiac arrest, 5) remote ischemic preconditioning initiated 90min before induction of ventricular fibrillation, and 6) lateral ventricle injection and remote ischemic preconditioning before cardiac arrest. Reagent of Lateral ventricle injection is neuroglobin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides which initiated 24h before sham operation, cardiac arrest or remote ischemic preconditioning. Remote ischemic preconditioning was induced by four cycles of 5min of limb ischemia, followed by 5min of reperfusion. Ventricular fibrillation was induced by current and lasted for 6min. Defibrillation was attempted after 6min of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The animals were then monitored for 2h and observed for an additionally maximum 70h. Post resuscitation cerebral function was evaluated by neurologic deficit score at 72h after return of spontaneous circulation. Results showed that remote ischemic preconditioning increased neurologic deficit scores. To investigate the neuroprotective effects of remote ischemic preconditioning, we observed neuronal injury at 48 and 72h after return of spontaneous circulation and found that remote ischemic preconditioning significantly decreased the occurrence of neuronal apoptosis and necrosis. To further comprehend mechanism of neuroprotection induced by remote ischemic preconditioning, we found expression of neuroglobin at 24h after return of spontaneous circulation was enhanced. Furthermore, administration of neuroglobin antisense oligodeoxynucleotides before induction of remote ischemic preconditioning showed that the level of neuroglobin was decreased then partly abrogated

  15. Heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation enhances cardiac function and longevity.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Zachary A; Hsieh, Jo-Lin; Li, Andrew; Wang, William; Bhatt, Dhelni T; Lee, Angela; Kim, Sae Yeon; Fan, David; Shah, Veevek; Siddiqui, Emaad; Ragam, Radhika; Park, Kristen; Ardeshna, Dev; Park, Kunwoo; Wu, Rachel; Parikh, Hardik; Parikh, Ayush; Lin, Yuh-Ru; Park, Yongkyu

    2015-09-01

    Downregulation of Rpd3, a homologue of mammalian Histone Deacetylase 1 (HDAC1), extends lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster. Once revealed that long-lived fruit flies exhibit limited cardiac decline, we investigated whether Rpd3 downregulation would improve stress resistance and/or lifespan when targeted in the heart. Contested against three different stressors (oxidation, starvation and heat), heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation significantly enhanced stress resistance in flies. However, these higher levels of resistance were not observed when Rpd3 downregulation was targeted in other tissues or when other long-lived flies were tested in the heart-specific manner. Interestingly, the expressions of anti-aging genes such as sod2, foxo and Thor, were systemically increased as a consequence of heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation. Showing higher resistance to oxidative stress, the heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation concurrently exhibited improved cardiac functions, demonstrating an increased heart rate, decreased heart failure and accelerated heart recovery. Conversely, Rpd3 upregulation in cardiac tissue reduced systemic resistance against heat stress with decreased heart function, also specifying phosphorylated Rpd3 levels as a significant modulator. Continual downregulation of Rpd3 throughout aging increased lifespan, implicating that Rpd3 deacetylase in the heart plays a significant role in cardiac function and longevity to systemically modulate the fly's response to the environment. PMID:26399365

  16. [Research of Left Ventricle Function Analysis Using Real-time Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging].

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; He, Yan; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Yin

    2015-12-01

    Real-time free breathing cardiac cine imaging is a reproducible method with shorter acquisition time and without breath-hold for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. However, the detection of end-diastole and end-systole frames of real-time free breathing cardiac cine imaging for left ventricle function analysis is commonly completed by visual identification, which is time-consuming and laborious. In order to save processing time, we propose a method for semi-automatic identification of end-diastole and end-systole frames. The method fits respiratory motion signal and acquires the expiration phase, end-diastole and end-systole frames by cross correlation coefficient. The procedure successfully worked on ten healthy volunteers and validated by the analysis of left ventricle function compared to the standard breath-hold steady-state free precession cardiac cine imaging without any significant statistical differences. The results demonstrated that the present method could correctly detect end-diastole and end-systole frames. In the future, this technique may be used for rapid left ventricle function analysis in clinic. PMID:27079101

  17. Pulsed electromagnetic field improves cardiac function in response to myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Chang-Ning; Huang, Jing-Juan; Shi, Yi-Qin; Cheng, Xian-Wu; Li, Hao-Yun; Zhou, Lin; Guo, Xin-Gui; Li, Rui-Lin; Lu, Wei; Zhu, Yi-Zhun; Duan, Jun-Li

    2014-01-01

    Extracorporeal pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) has been shown the ability to improve regeneration in various ischemic episodes. Here, we examined whether PEMF therapy facilitate cardiac recovery in rat myocardial infarction (MI), and the cellular/molecular mechanisms underlying PEMF-related therapy was further investigated. The MI rats were exposed to active PEMF for 4 cycles per day (8 minutes/cycle, 30 ± 3 Hz, 5 mT) after MI induction. The data demonstrated that PEMF treatment significantly inhibited cardiac apoptosis and improved cardiac systolic function. Moreover, PEMF treatment increased capillary density, the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxic inducible factor-1α in infarct border zone. Furthermore, the number and function of circulating endothelial progenitor cells were advanced in PEMF treating rats. In vitro, PEMF induced the degree of human umbilical venous endothelial cells tubulization and increased soluble pro-angiogenic factor secretion (VEGF and nitric oxide). In conclusion, PEMF therapy preserves cardiac systolic function, inhibits apoptosis and trigger postnatal neovascularization in ischemic myocardium. PMID:24936220

  18. Pulsed electromagnetic field improves cardiac function in response to myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Hao, Chang-Ning; Huang, Jing-Juan; Shi, Yi-Qin; Cheng, Xian-Wu; Li, Hao-Yun; Zhou, Lin; Guo, Xin-Gui; Li, Rui-Lin; Lu, Wei; Zhu, Yi-Zhun; Duan, Jun-Li

    2014-01-01

    Extracorporeal pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) has been shown the ability to improve regeneration in various ischemic episodes. Here, we examined whether PEMF therapy facilitate cardiac recovery in rat myocardial infarction (MI), and the cellular/molecular mechanisms underlying PEMF-related therapy was further investigated. The MI rats were exposed to active PEMF for 4 cycles per day (8 minutes/cycle, 30 ± 3 Hz, 5 mT) after MI induction. The data demonstrated that PEMF treatment significantly inhibited cardiac apoptosis and improved cardiac systolic function. Moreover, PEMF treatment increased capillary density, the levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxic inducible factor-1α in infarct border zone. Furthermore, the number and function of circulating endothelial progenitor cells were advanced in PEMF treating rats. In vitro, PEMF induced the degree of human umbilical venous endothelial cells tubulization and increased soluble pro-angiogenic factor secretion (VEGF and nitric oxide). In conclusion, PEMF therapy preserves cardiac systolic function, inhibits apoptosis and trigger postnatal neovascularization in ischemic myocardium. PMID:24936220

  19. Diosmin pretreatment improves cardiac function and suppresses oxidative stress in rat heart after ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Senthamizhselvan, Oomaidurai; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Silambarasan, Thangarasu; Raja, Boobalan

    2014-08-01

    Reperfusion of ischemic tissue leads to the generation of oxygen derived free radicals which plays an important role in cellular damage. Objective of the current study is to evaluate the cardio-protective and antioxidant effect of diosmin on ischemia-reperfusion related cardiac dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Diosmin (50 and 100 mg/kg body weight (bw)) was given every day to the rats orally throughout the experimental period. Ischemia/reperfusion protocol was carried out ex vivo using langendorff perfusion method and the cardiac functional recovery was assessed in terms of percentage rate pressure product. Coronary effluents of LDH and CK-MB activities, antioxidant enzyme activities, lipid peroxidation products, activity of TCA cycle enzymes were evaluated. Moreover, in vitro superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical scavenging potential of diosmin was also quantified. Finally, quantitative real-time PCR was used for assessing Bcl-2 mRNA expression in heart. Cardiac functional recovery was impaired after reperfusion compared with continuously perfused heart. It was significantly prevented by diosmin treatment. Impaired antioxidant enzyme activities and elevated lipid peroxidation products level were also significantly suppressed. The activity of TCA cycle enzymes was protected against reperfusion stress. Down regulated Bcl-2 was also significantly increased. This study concluded that diosmin pretreatment prevents all the impaired patterns including cardiac function, oxidative stress and apoptosis associated with reperfusion in control heart by its antioxidant role. PMID:24769512

  20. RNA splicing regulated by RBFOX1 is essential for cardiac function in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Frese, Karen S; Meder, Benjamin; Keller, Andreas; Just, Steffen; Haas, Jan; Vogel, Britta; Fischer, Simon; Backes, Christina; Matzas, Mark; Köhler, Doreen; Benes, Vladimir; Katus, Hugo A; Rottbauer, Wolfgang

    2015-08-15

    Alternative splicing is one of the major mechanisms through which the proteomic and functional diversity of eukaryotes is achieved. However, the complex nature of the splicing machinery, its associated splicing regulators and the functional implications of alternatively spliced transcripts are only poorly understood. Here, we investigated the functional role of the splicing regulator rbfox1 in vivo using the zebrafish as a model system. We found that loss of rbfox1 led to progressive cardiac contractile dysfunction and heart failure. By using deep-transcriptome sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR, we show that depletion of rbfox1 in zebrafish results in an altered isoform expression of several crucial target genes, such as actn3a and hug. This study underlines that tightly regulated splicing is necessary for unconstrained cardiac function and renders the splicing regulator rbfox1 an interesting target for investigation in human heart failure and cardiomyopathy. PMID:26116573

  1. RNA splicing regulated by RBFOX1 is essential for cardiac function in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Frese, Karen S.; Meder, Benjamin; Keller, Andreas; Just, Steffen; Haas, Jan; Vogel, Britta; Fischer, Simon; Backes, Christina; Matzas, Mark; Köhler, Doreen; Benes, Vladimir; Katus, Hugo A.; Rottbauer, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Alternative splicing is one of the major mechanisms through which the proteomic and functional diversity of eukaryotes is achieved. However, the complex nature of the splicing machinery, its associated splicing regulators and the functional implications of alternatively spliced transcripts are only poorly understood. Here, we investigated the functional role of the splicing regulator rbfox1 in vivo using the zebrafish as a model system. We found that loss of rbfox1 led to progressive cardiac contractile dysfunction and heart failure. By using deep-transcriptome sequencing and quantitative real-time PCR, we show that depletion of rbfox1 in zebrafish results in an altered isoform expression of several crucial target genes, such as actn3a and hug. This study underlines that tightly regulated splicing is necessary for unconstrained cardiac function and renders the splicing regulator rbfox1 an interesting target for investigation in human heart failure and cardiomyopathy. PMID:26116573

  2. The functional significance of the last 5 residues of the C-terminus of cardiac troponin I.

    PubMed

    Gilda, Jennifer E; Xu, Qian; Martinez, Margaret E; Nguyen, Susan T; Chase, P Bryant; Gomes, Aldrin V

    2016-07-01

    The C-terminal region of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) is known to be important in cardiac function, as removal of the last 17 C-terminal residues of human cTnI has been associated with myocardial stunning. To investigate the C-terminal region of cTnI, three C-terminal deletion mutations in human cTnI were generated: Δ1 (deletion of residue 210), Δ3 (deletion of residues 208-210), and Δ5 (deletion of residues 206-210). Mammalian two-hybrid studies showed that the interactions between cTnI mutants and cardiac troponin C (cTnC) or cardiac troponin T (cTnT) were impaired in Δ3 and Δ5 mutants when compared to wild-type cTnI. Troponin complexes containing 2-[4'-(iodoacetamido) anilino] naphthalene-6-sulfonic acid (IAANS) labeled cTnC showed that the troponin complex containing cTnI Δ5 had a small increase in Ca(2+) affinity (P < 0.05); while the cTnI Δ1- and Δ3 troponin complexes showed no difference in Ca(2+) affinity when compared to wild-type troponin. In vitro motility assays showed that all truncation mutants had increased Ca(2+) dependent motility relative to wild-type cTnI. These results suggest that the last 5 C-terminal residues of cTnI influence the binding of cTnI with cTnC and cTnT and affect the Ca(2+) dependence of filament sliding, and demonstrate the importance of this region of cTnI. PMID:26919894

  3. Rapid D-Affine Biventricular Cardiac Function with Polar Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Kathleen; Cowan, Brett; Suinesiaputra, Avan; Occleshaw, Christopher; Young, Alistair

    2014-01-01

    Although many solutions have been proposed for left ventricular functional analysis of the heart, right and left (bi-) ventricular function has been problematic due to the complex geometry and large motions. Biventricular function is particularly important in congenital heart disease, the most common type of birth defects. We describe a rapid interactive analysis tool for biventricular function which incorporates 1) a 3D+ time finite element model of biventricular geometry, 2) a fast prediction step which estimates an initial geometry in a polar coordinate system, and 3) a Cartesian update which penalizes deviations from affine transformations (D-Affine) from a prior. Solution times were very rapid, enabling interaction in real time using guide point modeling. The method was applied to 13 patients with congenital heart disease and compared with the clinical gold standard of manual tracing. Results between the methods showed good correlation (R2 > 0.9) and good precision (volume<17ml; mass<11g) for both chambers. PMID:25485422

  4. Cardiac expression of a mini-dystrophin that normalizes skeletal muscle force only partially restores heart function in aged Mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Bostick, Brian; Yue, Yongping; Long, Chun; Marschalk, Nate; Fine, Deborah M; Chen, Jing; Duan, Dongsheng

    2009-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) affects both skeletal and cardiac muscle. It is currently unclear whether the strategies developed for skeletal muscle can ameliorate cardiomyopathy. Synthetic mini-/micro-dystrophin genes have yielded impressive skeletal muscle protection in animal models. The 6-kb DeltaH2-R19 minigene is particularly promising because it completely restores skeletal muscle force to wild-type levels. Here, we examined whether expressing this minigene in the heart, but not skeletal muscle, could normalize cardiac function in the mdx model of DMD cardiomyopathy. Transgenic mdx mice were generated to express the DeltaH2-R19 minigene under the control of the alpha-myosin heavy-chain promoter. Heart structure and function were examined in adult and very old mice. The DeltaH2-R19 minigene enhanced cardiomyocyte sarcolemmal strength and prevented myocardial fibrosis. It also restored the dobutamine response and enhanced treadmill performance. Surprisingly, heart-restricted DeltaH2-R19 minigene expression did not completely normalize electrocardiogram and hemodynamic abnormalities. Overall, systolic function and ejection fraction were restored to normal levels but stroke volume and cardiac output remained suboptimal. Our results demonstrate that the skeletal muscle-proven DeltaH2-R19 minigene can correct cardiac histopathology but cannot fully normalize heart function. Novel strategies must be developed to completely restore heart function in DMD. PMID:19066599

  5. Cardiac Ultrasonography in the critical care setting: a practical approach to asses cardiac function and preload for the "non-cardiologist".

    PubMed

    Vermeiren, Guy L J; Malbrain, Manu L N G; Walpot, Jeroen M J B

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac ultrasonography has become an indispensible tool in the management of hemodynamically unstable critically ill patients. Some consider it as the modern stethoscope. Echocardiography is non-invasive and safe while the modern portable devices allow to be used at the bedside in order to provide fast, specific and vital information regarding the hemodynamic status, as well as the function, structure and anatomy of the heart. In this review, we will give an overview of cardiac function in general followed by an assessment of left ventricular function using echocardiography with calculation of cardiac output, left ventricular ejection fraction (EF), fractional shortening, fractional area contraction, M mode EF, 2D planimetry and 3D volumetry. We will briefly discuss mitral annulus post systolic excursion (MAPSE), calculation of dP/dt, speckle tracking or eyeballing to estimate EF for the experienced user. In a following section, we will discuss how to assess cardiac preload and diastolic function in 4 simple steps. The first step is the assessment of systolic function. The next step assesses the left atrium. The third step evaluates the diastolic flow patterns and E/e' ratio. The final step integrates the information of the previous steps. Echocardiography is also the perfect tool to evaluate right ventricular function with tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion (TAPSE), tissue Doppler imaging, together with inferior vena cava dimensions and systolic pulmonary artery pressure and right ventricular systolic pressure measurement. Finally, methods to assess fluid responsiveness with echocardiography are discussed with the inferior vena cava collapsibility index and the variation on left ventricle outflow tract peak velocity and velocity time integral. Cardiac ultrasonography is an indispensible tool for the critical care physician to assess cardiac preload, afterload and contractile function in hemodynamically unstable patients in order to fine-tune treatment

  6. Resveratrol attenuated estrogen-deficient-induced cardiac dysfunction: role of AMPK, SIRT1, and mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zijun; Jing, Hongjiang; Gan, Lu; Li, Hua; Luo, Bingde

    2016-01-01

    Large epidemiological studies suggest that there are important differences in the incidence and severity of a wide variety of cardiac diseases, between premenopausal and menopausal women. Recently, it has been demonstrated that resveratrol may has similar function as estrogen. However, whether resveratrol replacement could mimic estrogen to protect heart in ovariectomized mice remains completely unknown. Firstly, the present study has used OVX/CAL model to investigate the effect of RSV on ischemic heart. Echocardiography analysis revealed that RSV administration significantly improved cardiac contractile function in estrogen-deficient mice. RSV also significantly reduced CK and LDH release, and heart infarct size in OVX/CAL group. Secondly, mitochondrial functions, including MRC activities, MDA level, and mitochondrial swelling, were evaluated in OVX mice. It was found that supplementation with RSV could restore mitochondrial function dampened by OVX. Thirdly, these protective functions mediated by RSV were mainly attributed to the enhancement of SIRT1/AMPK activity. In summary, the results support a potential role of resveratrol in the protection of cardiac functions under estrogen depletion status. PMID:27398147

  7. Functional Interaction Between Foxd3 and Pax3 in Cardiac Neural Crest Development

    PubMed Central

    Nelms, Brian L.; Pfaltzgraff, Elise R.; Labosky, Patricia A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The transcription factors Foxd3 and Pax3 are important early regulators of neural crest (NC) progenitor cell properties. Homozygous mutations of Pax3 or a homozygous NC-specific deletion of Foxd3 cause marked defects in most NC derivatives, but neither loss of both Foxd3 alleles nor loss of one Pax3 allele alone greatly affects overall development of cardiac NC derivatives. In contrast, compound mutant embryos homozygous for a NC-specific Foxd3 mutation and heterozygous for Pax3 have fully penetrant persistent truncus arteriosus, severe thymus hypoplasia, and midgestation lethality. Foxd3; Pax3 compound mutant embryos have increased cell death in the neural folds and a drastic early reduction of NC cells, with an almost complete absence of NC caudal to the first pharyngeal arch. The genetic interaction between these genes implicates gene dosage-sensitive roles for Foxd3 and Pax3 in cardiac NC progenitors. Foxd3 and Pax3 act together to affect survival and maintenance of cardiac NC progenitors, and loss of these progenitors catastrophically affects key aspects of later cardiovascular development. PMID:21254333

  8. Interparental Relationship Dynamics and Cardiac Vagal Functioning in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Alice M.; Ablow, Jennifer C.; Measelle, Jeffrey R.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined associations between interparental relationship dynamics and vagus system functioning in infancy. The functioning of the vagus system, part of the parasympathetic nervous system, indexes emotional reactivity and regulation. Interparental avoidance and dyadic adjustment constitute the focus of this study in order to bring attention to relationship dynamics not subsumed under overt conflict. Infants’ baseline vagal tone and change in vagal tone in response to a novel toy were assessed at five months in a sample of high-risk mother-infant dyads (n = 77). Maternal report of interparental avoidance demonstrated an association with infants’ baseline vagal tone, while interparental dyadic adjustment was associated with change in infants’ vagal tone from baseline to the novel toy. Infant gender moderated these associations. Maternal sensitivity did not mediate interparental relationship dynamics and infants’ vagal functioning. Results are discussed in the context of emotional security theory. PMID:20727595

  9. Hand2 ensures an appropriate environment for cardiac fusion by limiting Fibronectin function.

    PubMed

    Garavito-Aguilar, Zayra V; Riley, Heather E; Yelon, Deborah

    2010-10-01

    Heart formation requires the fusion of bilateral cardiomyocyte populations as they move towards the embryonic midline. The bHLH transcription factor Hand2 is essential for cardiac fusion; however, the effector genes that execute this function of Hand2 are unknown. Here, we provide in zebrafish the first evidence for a downstream component of the Hand2 pathway that mediates cardiac morphogenesis. Although hand2 is expressed in cardiomyocytes, mosaic analysis demonstrates that it plays a non-autonomous role in regulating cardiomyocyte movement. Gene expression profiles reveal heightened expression of fibronectin 1 (fn1) in hand2 mutant embryos. Reciprocally, overexpression of hand2 leads to decreased Fibronectin levels. Furthermore, reduction of fn1 function enables rescue of cardiac fusion in hand2 mutants: bilateral cardiomyocyte populations merge and exhibit improved tissue architecture, albeit without major changes in apicobasal polarity. Together, our data provide a novel example of a tissue creating a favorable environment for its morphogenesis: the Hand2 pathway establishes an appropriate environment for cardiac fusion through negative modulation of Fn1 levels. PMID:20724450

  10. LRRC10 is required to maintain cardiac function in response to pressure overload.

    PubMed

    Brody, Matthew J; Feng, Li; Grimes, Adrian C; Hacker, Timothy A; Olson, Timothy M; Kamp, Timothy J; Balijepalli, Ravi C; Lee, Youngsook

    2016-01-15

    We previously reported that the cardiomyocyte-specific leucine-rich repeat containing protein (LRRC)10 has critical functions in the mammalian heart. In the present study, we tested the role of LRRC10 in the response of the heart to biomechanical stress by performing transverse aortic constriction on Lrrc10-null (Lrrc10(-/-)) mice. Mild pressure overload induced severe cardiac dysfunction and ventricular dilation in Lrrc10(-/-) mice compared with control mice. In addition to dilation and cardiomyopathy, Lrrc10(-/-) mice showed a pronounced increase in heart weight with pressure overload stimulation and a more dramatic loss of cardiac ventricular performance, collectively suggesting that the absence of LRRC10 renders the heart more disease prone with greater hypertrophy and structural remodeling, although rates of cardiac fibrosis and myocyte dropout were not different from control mice. Lrrc10(-/-) cardiomyocytes also exhibited reduced contractility in response to β-adrenergic stimulation, consistent with loss of cardiac ventricular performance after pressure overload. We have previously shown that LRRC10 interacts with actin in the heart. Here, we show that His(150) of LRRC10 was required for an interaction with actin, and this interaction was reduced after pressure overload, suggesting an integral role for LRRC10 in the response of the heart to mechanical stress. Importantly, these experiments demonstrated that LRRC10 is required to maintain cardiac performance in response to pressure overload and suggest that dysregulated expression or mutation of LRRC10 may greatly sensitize human patients to more severe cardiac disease in conditions such as chronic hypertension or aortic stenosis. PMID:26608339

  11. Renal Perfusion Index Reflects Cardiac Systolic Function in Chronic Cardio-Renal Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lubas, Arkadiusz; Ryczek, Robert; Kade, Grzegorz; Niemczyk, Stanisław

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiac dysfunction can modify renal perfusion, which is crucial to maintain sufficient kidney tissue oxygenation. Renal cortex perfusion assessed by dynamic ultrasound method is related both to renal function and cardiac hemodynamics. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that Renal Perfusion Index (RPI) can more closely reflect cardiac hemodynamics and differentiate etiology of chronic cardio-renal syndrome. Material/Methods Twenty-four patients with hypertension and chronic kidney disease (CKD) at 2–4 stage (12 with hypertensive nephropathy and 12 with CKD prior to hypertension) were enrolled in the study. Blood tests, 24-h ABPM, echocardiography, and ultrasonography with estimation of Total renal Cortical Perfusion intensity and Renal Perfusion Index (RPI) were performed. Results In the group of all patients, RPI correlated with left ventricular stoke volume (LVSV), and cardiac index, but not with markers of renal function. In multiple stepwise regression analysis CKD-EPI(Cys-Cr) (b=−0.360), LVSV (b=0.924) and MAP (b=0.376) together independently influenced RPI (R2=0.74; p<0.0001). RPI<0.567 allowed for the identification of patients with chronic cardio-renal syndrome with sensitivity of 41.7% and specificity of 83.3%. Conclusions Renal perfusion index relates more strongly to cardiac output than to renal function, and could be helpful in recognizing chronic cardio-renal syndrome. Applicability of RPI in diagnosing early abnormalities in the cardio-renal axis requires further investigation. PMID:25881555

  12. Sudden Cardiac Arrest in Patients with Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function: A Clinical Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Sawhney, Navinder; Narayan, Sanjiv M.

    2009-01-01

    Stratifying the risk for sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) in individuals with preserved systolic function remains a pressing public health problem. Current guidelines for the implantation of cardiac defibrillators largely ignore patients with preserved systolic function, even though they account for the majority of cases. However, risk stratification for such individuals is increasingly feasible. Notably, most individuals who experience SCA have structural heart disease, even if undiagnosed. Thus, clinical risk scores have been developed to identify high risk. Moreover, there are now promising data that T-Wave Alternans (TWA), alone and in combination with other indices, effectively predicts SCA in this population. This article presents our current understanding of SCA due to ventricular arrhythmias in patients with preserved LV systolic function, and attempts to build a framework to predict risk in this population. PMID:19251226

  13. Functional 3-D cardiac co-culture model using bioactive chitosan nanofiber scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Ali; Collins, George; Yip, Derek; Cho, Cheul H

    2013-02-01

    The in vitro generation of a three-dimensional (3-D) myocardial tissue-like construct employing cells, biomaterials, and biomolecules is a promising strategy in cardiac tissue regeneration, drug testing, and tissue engineering applications. Despite significant progress in this field, current cardiac tissue models are not yet able to stably maintain functional characteristics of cardiomyocytes for long-term culture and therapeutic purposes. The objective of this study was to fabricate bioactive 3-D chitosan nanofiber scaffolds using an electrospinning technique and exploring its potential for long-term cardiac function in the 3-D co-culture model. Chitosan is a natural polysaccharide biomaterial that is biocompatible, biodegradable, non-toxic, and cost effective. Electrospun chitosan was utilized to provide structural scaffolding characterized by scale and architectural resemblance to the extracellular matrix (ECM) in vivo. The chitosan fibers were coated with fibronectin via adsorption in order to enhance cellular adhesion to the fibers and migration into the interfibrous milieu. Ventricular cardiomyocytes were harvested from neonatal rats and studied in various culture conditions (i.e., mono- and co-cultures) for their viability and function. Cellular morphology and functionality were examined using immunofluorescent staining for alpha-sarcomeric actin (SM-actin) and gap junction protein, Connexin-43 (Cx43). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and light microscopy were used to investigate cellular morphology, spatial organization, and contractions. Calcium indicator was used to monitor calcium ion flux of beating cardiomyocytes. The results demonstrate that the chitosan nanofibers retained their cylindrical morphology in long-term cell cultures and exhibited good cellular attachment and spreading in the presence of adhesion molecule, fibronectin. Cardiomyocyte mono-cultures resulted in loss of cardiomyocyte polarity and islands of non-coherent contractions. However

  14. Effect of hypokinesia on contractile function of cardiac muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyerson, F. Z.; Kapelko, V. I.; Trikhpoyeva, A. M.; Gorina, M. S.

    1980-01-01

    Rats were subjected to hypokinesia for two months and the contractile function of isolated papillary muscle was studied. Hypokinesia reduced significantly the isotonic contraction rate which depended on the ATPase activity of the myofibrils; it also reduced the rate and index of relaxation which depended on the functional capacity of the Ca(++) pump of the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The maximum force of isometric contraction determined by the quantity of actomyosin bridges in the myofibrils did not change after hypokinesia. This complex of changes is contrary to that observed in adaptation to exercise when the rate of isotonic contraction and relaxation increases while the force of isometric contraction does not change. The possible mechanism of this stability of the contractile force during adaptation and readaptation of the heart is discussed.

  15. Comparison of 4D-microSPECT and microCT for murine cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Befera, Nicholas T.; Badea, Cristian T.; Johnson, G. Allan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to compare a new generation of four-dimensional (4D) microSPECT with microCT for quantitative in vivo assessment of murine cardiac function. Procedures 4D isotropic cardiac images were acquired from normal C57BL/6 mice with either microSPECT at 350-micron resolution (n=6) or microCT at 88-micron resolution (n=6). One additional mouse with myocardial infarction (MI) was scanned with both modalities. Prior to imaging, mice were injected with either 99mTc -tetrofosmin for microSPECT, or a liposomal blood pool contrast agent for microCT. Segmentation of the left ventricle (LV) was performed using Vitrea (Vital Images) software, to derive global and regional function. Results Measures of global LV function between microSPECT and microCT groups were comparable (e.g. ejection fraction=71±6%-microSPECT and 68±4%-microCT). Regional functional indices (wall motion, wall thickening, regional ejection fraction) were also similar for the two modalities. In the mouse with MI, microSPECT identified a large perfusion defect that was not evident with microCT. Conclusions Despite lower spatial resolution, microSPECT was comparable to microCT in the quantitative evaluation of cardiac function. MicroSPECT offers an advantage over microCT in the ability to evaluate myocardial perfusion radiotracer distribution and function simultaneously. MicroSPECT should be considered as an alternative to microCT and MR for preclinical cardiac imaging in the mouse. PMID:24037175

  16. Beating heart on a chip: a novel microfluidic platform to generate functional 3D cardiac microtissues.

    PubMed

    Marsano, Anna; Conficconi, Chiara; Lemme, Marta; Occhetta, Paola; Gaudiello, Emanuele; Votta, Emiliano; Cerino, Giulia; Redaelli, Alberto; Rasponi, Marco

    2016-02-01

    In the past few years, microfluidic-based technology has developed microscale models recapitulating key physical and biological cues typical of the native myocardium. However, the application of controlled physiological uniaxial cyclic strains on a defined three-dimension cellular environment is not yet possible. Two-dimension mechanical stimulation was particularly investigated, neglecting the complex three-dimensional cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. For this purpose, we developed a heart-on-a-chip platform, which recapitulates the physiologic mechanical environment experienced by cells in the native myocardium. The device includes an array of hanging posts to confine cell-laden gels, and a pneumatic actuation system to induce homogeneous uniaxial cyclic strains to the 3D cell constructs during culture. The device was used to generate mature and highly functional micro-engineered cardiac tissues (μECTs), from both neonatal rat and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM), strongly suggesting the robustness of our engineered cardiac micro-niche. Our results demonstrated that the cyclic strain was effectively highly uniaxial and uniformly transferred to cells in culture. As compared to control, stimulated μECTs showed superior cardiac differentiation, as well as electrical and mechanical coupling, owing to a remarkable increase in junction complexes. Mechanical stimulation also promoted early spontaneous synchronous beating and better contractile capability in response to electric pacing. Pacing analyses of hiPSC-CM constructs upon controlled administration of isoprenaline showed further promising applications of our platform in drug discovery, delivery and toxicology fields. The proposed heart-on-a-chip device represents a relevant step forward in the field, providing a standard functional three-dimensional cardiac model to possibly predict signs of hypertrophic changes in cardiac phenotype by mechanical and biochemical co

  17. Functional TRPV2 and TRPV4 channels in human cardiac c-kit(+) progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Che, Hui; Xiao, Guo-Sheng; Sun, Hai-Ying; Wang, Yan; Li, Gui-Rong

    2016-06-01

    The cellular physiology and biology of human cardiac c-kit(+) progenitor cells has not been extensively characterized and remains an area of active research. This study investigates the functional expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) and possible roles for this ion channel in regulating proliferation and migration of human cardiac c-kit(+) progenitor cells. We found that genes coding for TRPV2 and TRPV4 channels and their proteins are significantly expressed in human c-kit(+) cardiac stem cells. Probenecid, an activator of TRPV2, induced an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(2+) i ), an effect that may be attenuated or abolished by the TRPV2 blocker ruthenium red. The TRPV4 channel activator 4α-phorbol 12-13-dicaprinate induced Ca(2+) i oscillations, which can be inhibited by the TRPV4 blocker RN-1734. The alteration of Ca(2+) i by probenecid or 4α-phorbol 12-13-dicprinate was dramatically inhibited in cells infected with TRPV2 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) or TRPV4 shRNA. Silencing TRPV2, but not TRPV4, significantly reduced cell proliferation by arresting cells at the G0/G1 boundary of the cell cycle. Cell migration was reduced by silencing TRPV2 or TRPV4. Western blot revealed that silencing TRPV2 decreased expression of cyclin D1, cyclin E, pERK1/2 and pAkt, whereas silencing TRPV4 only reduced pAkt expression. Our results demonstrate for the first time that functional TRPV2 and TRPV4 channels are abundantly expressed in human cardiac c-kit(+) progenitor cells. TRPV2 channels, but not TRPV4 channels, participate in regulating cell cycle progression; moreover, both TRPV2 and TRPV4 are involved in migration of human cardiac c-kit(+) progenitor cells. PMID:26865051

  18. Effect on the cardiac function of repeated LBNP during a 1-month head down tilt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbeille, Ph.; Lebouard, D.; Massabuau, M.; Pottier, J. M.; Patat, F.; Pourcelot, L.; Guell, A.

    Cardiovascular assessment by ultrasound methods was performed during two long duration (1 month) Head Down Tilt (HDT) on 6 healthy volunteers. On a first 1 month HDT session, 3 of the 6 subjects (A, B, C) had daily several lower body negative pressure tests (LBNP), whereas the 3 subjects remaining (D, E, F) rested without LBNP. On a second 1 month HDT session subjects D, E, and F had daily LBNP tests and the A, B and C subjects did not. The cardiac function was assessed by Echocardiography (B mode, TM mode). On all the "6 non LBNP" subjects the left ventricule diastolic volume (LVDV), the stroke volume (SV) and the cardiac output (CO) increase (+10%, -15%) after HDT then decrease and remain inferior (-5%, -5%) or equal to the basal value during the HDT. Immediately after the end of the HDT the heart rate (HR) increase (+10%, +30%) whereas the cardiac parameters decrease weakly (-5%, -10%) and normalize after 3 days of recovery. On the "6 LBNP" subjects the LVDV, SV and CO increase (+10%, +15%) after 1 h HDT as in the previous group then decrease but remain superior (+5%, +15%) or equal to the basal value. After the HDT session, the HR is markedly increased (+20%, +40%) the LVDV and SV decrease (-15%, -20%) whereas the CO increases or decreases depending on the amplitude of the HR variations. These parameters do not completely normalize after 3 days recovery. Repeated LBNP sessions have a significant effect on the cardiovascular function as it maintains all cardiac parameters above the basal value. The LBNP manoeuvre can be considered as an efficient countermeasure to prevent cardiac disadaptation induced by HDT position and probably microgravity.

  19. c-Myc alters substrate utilization and O-GlcNAc protein posttranslational modifications without altering cardiac function during early aortic constriction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ledee, Dolena; Smith, Lincoln; Bruce, Margaret; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A.; Olson, Aaron K.; Bertrand, Luc

    2015-08-12

    Pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy alters substrate metabolism. Prior work showed that myocardial inactivation of c-Myc (Myc) attenuated hypertrophy and decreased expression of metabolic genes after aortic constriction. Accordingly, we hypothesize that Myc regulates substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during pressure overload hypertrophy from transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and that these metabolic changes impact cardiac function and growth. To test this hypothesis, we subjected mice with cardiac specific, inducible Myc inactivation (MycKO-TAC) and non-transgenic littermates (Cont-TAC) to transverse aortic constriction (TAC; n=7/group). A separate group underwent sham surgery (Sham, n=5). After two weeks, function was measured in isolated workingmore » hearts along with substrate fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate with 13C labeled mixed fatty acids, lactate, ketone bodies and unlabeled glucose and insulin. Cardiac function was similar between groups after TAC although +dP/dT and -dP/dT trended towards improvement in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC. Compared to Sham, Cont-TAC had increased free fatty acid fractional contribution with a concurrent decrease in unlabeled (predominately glucose) contribution. The changes in free fatty acid and unlabeled fractional contributions were abrogated by Myc inactivation during TAC (MycKO-TAC). Additionally, protein posttranslational modification by O-GlcNAc was significantly greater in Cont-TAC versus both Sham and MycKO-TAC. Lastly, Myc alters substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during early pressure overload hypertrophy without negatively affecting cardiac function. Myc also affects protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc during hypertrophy.« less

  20. c-Myc alters substrate utilization and O-GlcNAc protein posttranslational modifications without altering cardiac function during early aortic constriction

    SciTech Connect

    Ledee, Dolena; Smith, Lincoln; Bruce, Margaret; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A.; Olson, Aaron K.; Bertrand, Luc

    2015-08-12

    Pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy alters substrate metabolism. Prior work showed that myocardial inactivation of c-Myc (Myc) attenuated hypertrophy and decreased expression of metabolic genes after aortic constriction. Accordingly, we hypothesize that Myc regulates substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during pressure overload hypertrophy from transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and that these metabolic changes impact cardiac function and growth. To test this hypothesis, we subjected mice with cardiac specific, inducible Myc inactivation (MycKO-TAC) and non-transgenic littermates (Cont-TAC) to transverse aortic constriction (TAC; n=7/group). A separate group underwent sham surgery (Sham, n=5). After two weeks, function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate with 13C labeled mixed fatty acids, lactate, ketone bodies and unlabeled glucose and insulin. Cardiac function was similar between groups after TAC although +dP/dT and -dP/dT trended towards improvement in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC. Compared to Sham, Cont-TAC had increased free fatty acid fractional contribution with a concurrent decrease in unlabeled (predominately glucose) contribution. The changes in free fatty acid and unlabeled fractional contributions were abrogated by Myc inactivation during TAC (MycKO-TAC). Additionally, protein posttranslational modification by O-GlcNAc was significantly greater in Cont-TAC versus both Sham and MycKO-TAC. Lastly, Myc alters substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during early pressure overload hypertrophy without negatively affecting cardiac function. Myc also affects protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc during hypertrophy.

  1. Motion corrected LV quantification based on 3D modelling for improved functional assessment in cardiac MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Y. M.; McLaughlin, R. A.; Chan, B. T.; Aziz, Y. F. Abdul; Chee, K. H.; Ung, N. M.; Tan, L. K.; Lai, K. W.; Ng, S.; Lim, E.

    2015-04-01

    Cine MRI is a clinical reference standard for the quantitative assessment of cardiac function, but reproducibility is confounded by motion artefacts. We explore the feasibility of a motion corrected 3D left ventricle (LV) quantification method, incorporating multislice image registration into the 3D model reconstruction, to improve reproducibility of 3D LV functional quantification. Multi-breath-hold short-axis and radial long-axis images were acquired from 10 patients and 10 healthy subjects. The proposed framework reduced misalignment between slices to subpixel accuracy (2.88 to 1.21 mm), and improved interstudy reproducibility for 5 important clinical functional measures, i.e. end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, ejection fraction, myocardial mass and 3D-sphericity index, as reflected in a reduction in the sample size required to detect statistically significant cardiac changes: a reduction of 21-66%. Our investigation on the optimum registration parameters, including both cardiac time frames and number of long-axis (LA) slices, suggested that a single time frame is adequate for motion correction whereas integrating more LA slices can improve registration and model reconstruction accuracy for improved functional quantification especially on datasets with severe motion artefacts.

  2. Systems analysis of the mechanisms of cardiac diastolic function changes after microgravity exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, Richard; Coleman, Thomas; Steven, Platts; Martin, David

    Detailed information concerning cardiac function was collected by two-dimensional and M-mode echocardiography at 10 days before flight and 3h after landing in astronauts returning from shuttle missions. A comparative analysis of this data suggests that cardiac diastolic function is reduced after microgravity exposure with little or no change in systolic function as measured by ejection fraction However, the mechanisms responsible for these adaptations have not been determined. In this study, an integrative computer model of human physiology that forms the framework for the Digital Astronaut Project (Guyton/Coleman/Summers Model) was used in a systems analysis of the echocardiographic data in the context of general cardiovascular physiologic functioning. The physiologic mechanisms involved in the observed changes were then determined by a dissection of model interrelationships. The systems analysis of possible physiologic mechanisms involved reveals that a loss of fluid from the myocardial interstitial space may lead to a stiffening of the myocardium and could potentially result in some of the cardiac diastolic dysfunction seen postflight. The cardiovascular dynamics may be different during spaceflight.

  3. Aldosterone and cortisol affect the risk of sudden cardiac death in haemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Drechsler, Christiane; Ritz, Eberhard; Tomaschitz, Andreas; Pilz, Stefan; Schönfeld, Stephan; Blouin, Katja; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Hammer, Fabian; Krane, Vera; März, Winfried; Allolio, Bruno; Fassnacht, Martin; Wanner, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Background Sudden cardiac death is common and accounts largely for the excess mortality of patients on maintenance dialysis. It is unknown whether aldosterone and cortisol increase the incidence of sudden cardiac death in dialysis patients. Methods and results We analysed data from 1255 diabetic haemodialysis patients participating in the German Diabetes and Dialysis Study (4D Study). Categories of aldosterone and cortisol were determined at baseline and patients were followed for a median of 4 years. By Cox regression analyses, hazard ratios (HRs) were determined for the effect of aldosterone, cortisol, and their combination on sudden death and other adjudicated cardiovascular outcomes. The mean age of the patients was 66 ± 8 years (54% male). Median aldosterone was <15 pg/mL (detection limit) and cortisol 16.8 µg/dL. Patients with aldosterone levels >200 pg/mL had a significantly higher risk of sudden death (HR: 1.69; 95% CI: 1.06–2.69) compared with those with an aldosterone <15 pg/mL. The combined presence of high aldosterone (>200 pg/mL) and high cortisol (>21.1 µg/dL) levels increased the risk of sudden death in striking contrast to patients with low aldosterone (<15 pg/mL) and low cortisol (<13.2 µg/dL) levels (HR: 2.86, 95% CI: 1.32–6.21). Furthermore, all-cause mortality was significantly increased in the patients with high levels of both hormones (HR: 1.62, 95% CI: 1.01–2.62). Conclusions The joint presence of high aldosterone and high cortisol levels is strongly associated with sudden cardiac death as well as all-cause mortality in haemodialysed type 2 diabetic patients. Whether a blockade of the mineralocorticoid receptor decreases the risk of sudden death in these patients must be examined in future trials. PMID:23211232

  4. Effects of active chronic cocaine use on cardiac sympathetic neuronal function assessed by carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine

    SciTech Connect

    Melon, P.G.; Boyd, C.J.; McVey, S. |

    1997-03-01

    Cardiac toxicity of cocaine has been linked to its inhibitory effect on norepinephrine reuptake by sympathetic nerve terminals of the heart. Carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine is a positron-emitting tracer that has been validated as a highly specific marker for norepinephrine transporter activity of the sympathetic nerve terminals and thus makes possible in vivo assessment of the effect of cocaine on norepinephrine reuptake and storage in the cardiac sympathetic nerve terminals. The aim of the study was to use the catecholamine analog {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine with PET to determine whether active chronic use of cocaine in women modifies the function of sympathetic nerve terminals of the heart. Six normal female volunteers and nine female active chronic cocaine users were studied. Cardiac regional {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine uptake and blood flow, as assessed with {sup 13}N-ammonia, were determined using semi-quantitative polar map analysis of myocardial tracer distribution. Carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine cardiac retention was quantified using dynamic data acquisition and kinetic analysis of blood and tissue activity. 27 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Functional and Morphological Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Mice Using a Cryogenic Quadrature Radiofrequency Coil

    PubMed Central

    Dieringer, Matthias Alexander; Els, Antje; Waiczies, Helmar; Waiczies, Sonia; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac morphology and function assessment by magnetic resonance imaging is of increasing interest for a variety of mouse models in pre-clinical cardiac research, such as myocardial infarction models or myocardial injury/remodeling in genetically or pharmacologically induced hypertension. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) constraints, however, limit image quality and blood myocardium delineation, which crucially depend on high spatial resolution. Significant gains in SNR with a cryogenically cooled RF probe have been shown for mouse brain MRI, yet the potential of applying cryogenic RF coils for cardiac MR (CMR) in mice is, as of yet, untapped. This study examines the feasibility and potential benefits of CMR in mice employing a 400 MHz cryogenic RF surface coil, compared with a conventional mouse heart coil array operating at room temperature. The cryogenic RF coil affords SNR gains of 3.0 to 5.0 versus the conventional approach and hence enables an enhanced spatial resolution. This markedly improved image quality – by better deliniation of myocardial borders and enhanced depiction of papillary muscles and trabeculae – and facilitated a more accurate cardiac chamber quantification, due to reduced intraobserver variability. In summary the use of a cryogenically cooled RF probe represents a valuable means of enhancing the capabilities of CMR of mice. PMID:22870323

  6. Simple RF design for human functional and morphological cardiac imaging at 7 tesla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versluis, M. J.; Tsekos, N.; Smith, N. B.; Webb, A. G.

    2009-09-01

    Morphological and functional cardiac MRI can potentially benefit greatly from the recent advent of commercial high-field (7 tesla and above) MRI systems. However, conventional hardware configurations at lower field using a body-coil for homogeneous transmission are not available at these field strengths. Sophisticated multiple-transmit-channel systems have been shown to be able to image the human heart at 7 tesla but such systems are currently not widely available. In this paper, we empirically optimize the design of a simple quadrature coil for cardiac imaging at 7 tesla. The size, geometry, and position have been chosen to produce a B1 field with no tissue-induced signal voids within the heart. Standard navigator echoes for gating were adapted for operation at the heart/lung interface, directly along the head-foot direction. Using this setup, conventional and high-resolution cine functional imaging have been successfully performed, as has morphological imaging of the right coronary artery.

  7. The structure and function of cardiac t-tubules in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Michael; Gorelik, Julia; Yacoub, Magdi H; Terracciano, Cesare M

    2011-09-22

    The transverse tubules (t-tubules) are invaginations of the cell membrane rich in several ion channels and other proteins devoted to the critical task of excitation-contraction coupling in cardiac muscle cells (cardiomyocytes). They are thought to promote the synchronous activation of the whole depth of the cell despite the fact that the signal to contract is relayed across the external membrane. However, recent work has shown that t-tubule structure and function are complex and tightly regulated in healthy cardiomyocytes. In this review, we outline the rapidly accumulating knowledge of its novel roles and discuss the emerging evidence of t-tubule dysfunction in cardiac disease, especially heart failure. Controversy surrounds the t-tubules' regulatory elements, and we draw attention to work that is defining these elements from the genetic and the physiological levels. More generally, this field illustrates the challenges in the dissection of the complex relationship between cellular structure and function. PMID:21697171

  8. Acute response and chronic stimulus for cardiac structural and functional adaptation in a professional boxer.

    PubMed

    Oxborough, David; George, Keith; Utomi, Victor; Lord, Rachel; Morton, James; Jones, Nigel; Somauroo, John

    2014-06-01

    The individual response to acute and chronic changes in cardiac structure and function to intense exercise training is not fully understood and therefore evidence in this setting may help to improve the timing and interpretation of pre-participation cardiac screening. The following case report highlights an acute increase in right ventricular (RV) size and a reduction in left ventricular (LV) basal radial function with concomitant increase at the mid-level in response to a week's increase in training volume in a professional boxer. These adaptations settle by the second week; however, chronic physiological adaptation occurs over a 12-week period. Electrocardiographic findings demonstrate an acute lateral T-wave inversion at 1 week, which revert to baseline for the duration of training. It appears that a change in training intensity and volume generates an acute response within the RV that acts as a stimulus for chronic adaptation in this professional boxer. PMID:25988031

  9. Social functioning and age across affective and non-affective psychoses

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Elizabeth A.; Öngür, Dost; Cohen, Bruce M.; Lewandowski, Kathryn E.

    2014-01-01

    Both non-affective and affective psychoses are associated with deficits in social functioning across the course of the illness. However, it is not clear how social functioning varies among diagnostic groups as a function of age. The current study examined the relationship between social functioning and age in schizophrenia (SZ), schizoaffective disorder (SZA), and psychotic bipolar disorder (PBD). We found that individuals with PBD had the highest functioning while individuals with SZ had the poorest. The functioning of individuals with SZA fell in between the other groups. We also found that older ages were associated with poorer functioning. Although there was not a significant diagnostic group by age interaction, visual inspection of our data suggests a subtly steeper trajectory of decline in PBD. These results indicate that a decline in social functioning with may be an important area of unmet need in treatment across psychotic disorders. PMID:25503785

  10. Cardiac function in muscular dystrophy associates with abdominal muscle pathology

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Brandon B.; Swaggart, Kayleigh A.; Kim, Gene; Watson, Sydeaka; McNally, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The muscular dystrophies target muscle groups differentially. In mouse models of muscular dystrophy, notably the mdx model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, the diaphragm muscle shows marked fibrosis and at an earlier age than other muscle groups, more reflective of the histopathology seen in human muscular dystrophy. Methods Using a mouse model of limb girdle muscular dystrophy, the Sgcg mouse, we compared muscle pathology across different muscle groups and heart. A cohort of nearly 200 Sgcg mice were studied using multiple measures of pathology including echocardiography, Evans blue dye uptake and hydroxyproline content in multiple muscle groups. Spearman rank correlations were determined among echocardiographic and pathological parameters. Findings The abdominal muscles were found to have more fibrosis than other muscle groups, including the diaphragm muscle. The abdominal muscles also had more Evans blue dye uptake than other muscle groups. The amount of diaphragm fibrosis was found to correlate positively with fibrosis in the left ventricle, and abdominal muscle fibrosis correlated with impaired left ventricular function. Fibrosis in the abdominal muscles negatively correlated with fibrosis in the diaphragm and right ventricles. Together these data reflect the recruitment of abdominal muscles as respiratory muscles in muscular dystrophy, a finding consistent with data from human patients. PMID:26029630

  11. Pravastatin ameliorates placental vascular defects, fetal growth, and cardiac function in a model of glucocorticoid excess.

    PubMed

    Wyrwoll, Caitlin S; Noble, June; Thomson, Adrian; Tesic, Dijana; Miller, Mark R; Rog-Zielinska, Eva A; Moran, Carmel M; Seckl, Jonathan R; Chapman, Karen E; Holmes, Megan C

    2016-05-31

    Fetoplacental glucocorticoid overexposure is a significant mechanism underlying fetal growth restriction and the programming of adverse health outcomes in the adult. Placental glucocorticoid inactivation by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2) plays a key role. We previously discovered that Hsd11b2(-/-) mice, lacking 11β-HSD2, show marked underdevelopment of the placental vasculature. We now explore the consequences for fetal cardiovascular development and whether this is reversible. We studied Hsd11b2(+/+), Hsd11b2(+/-), and Hsd11b2(-/-) littermates from heterozygous (Hsd11b(+/-)) matings at embryonic day (E)14.5 and E17.5, where all three genotypes were present to control for maternal effects. Using high-resolution ultrasound, we found that umbilical vein blood velocity in Hsd11b2(-/-) fetuses did not undergo the normal gestational increase seen in Hsd11b2(+/+) littermates. Similarly, the resistance index in the umbilical artery did not show the normal gestational decline. Surprisingly, given that 11β-HSD2 absence is predicted to initiate early maturation, the E/A wave ratio was reduced at E17.5 in Hsd11b2(-/-) fetuses, suggesting impaired cardiac function. Pravastatin administration from E6.5, which increases placental vascular endothelial growth factor A and, thus, vascularization, increased placental fetal capillary volume, ameliorated the aberrant umbilical cord velocity, normalized fetal weight, and improved the cardiac function of Hsd11b2(-/-) fetuses. This improved cardiac function occurred despite persisting indications of increased glucocorticoid exposure in the Hsd11b2(-/-) fetal heart. Thus, the pravastatin-induced enhancement of fetal capillaries within the placenta and the resultant hemodynamic changes correspond with restored fetal cardiac function. Statins may represent a useful therapeutic approach to intrauterine growth retardation due to placental vascular hypofunction. PMID:27185937

  12. Mechanography: a non-invasive technique for the evaluation of cardiac function in children

    PubMed Central

    Spitaels, Silja; Fouron, Jean-Claude; Davignon, André

    1972-01-01

    Experience in the pediatric age group with mechanography, an indirect method of cardiovascular investigation, is described with emphasis on the recording technique and on the analysis of the tracings. A few examples are presented with comments on the morphological aspects and the time characteristics of the pulse curves, showing how much information about cardiac disease and especially myocardial function in children may be obtained. PMID:4640813

  13. Effects of real and simulated weightlessness on the cardiac and peripheral vascular functions of humans: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui; Wang, Hanqing; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Weightlessness is an extreme environment that can cause a series of adaptive changes in the human body. Findings from real and simulated weightlessness indicate altered cardiovascular functions, such as reduction in left ventricular (LV) mass, cardiac arrhythmia, reduced vascular tone and so on. These alterations induced by weightlessness are detrimental to the health, safety and working performance of the astronauts, therefore it is important to study the effects of weightlessness on the cardiovascular functions of humans. The cardiovascular functional alterations caused by weightlessness (including long-term spaceflight and simulated weightlessness) are briefly reviewed in terms of the cardiac and peripheral vascular functions. The alterations include: changes of shape and mass of the heart; cardiac function alterations; the cardiac arrhythmia; lower body vascular regulation and upper body vascular regulation. A series of conclusions are reported, some of which are analyzed, and a few potential directions are presented. PMID:26224491

  14. Assessment of Cardiac Functions in Infants with Cow’s Milk Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Ece, İbrahim; Demirören, Kaan; Demir, Nihat; Uner, Abdurrahman; Balli, Sevket

    2014-01-01

    Background Cow’s milk allergy is the most common food allergy in children, with rates estimated at 1.9% to 4.9%. Clinical phenotypes of cow’s milk allergy are varied and involve 1 or more target organs, with the main targets being the skin, respiratory system, and gastrointestinal tract. To date, no studies have investigated detailed cardiac function in children with cow’s milk allergy. The current study aimed to investigate cardiac function in infants with cow’s milk allergy. Material/Methods We studied 42 infants with cow’s milk allergy and 30 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects. Cardiac functions were evaluated by M-mode, pulsed-wave, and tissue Doppler echocardiography. Results There were no significant differences in ejection fraction or mitral and tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion between the 2 groups. Pulsed-wave Doppler-derived E/A ratios in mitral and tricuspid valves were similar in both groups. Ea/Aa ratios in the left ventricle posterior wall and right ventricle free wall were lower in patients with cow’s milk allergy than in the control group. The E/Ea ratio in the left ventricle, isovolumic relaxation time, deceleration time, and right and left ventricular myocardial performance indices were higher in patients in the study group. Conclusions Our study identified reduced early diastolic tissue Doppler velocities in infants with cow’s milk allergy. PMID:25098395

  15. Endothelin-1 critically influences cardiac function via superoxide-MMP9 cascade

    PubMed Central

    Hathaway, Catherine K.; Grant, Ruriko; Hagaman, John R.; Hiller, Sylvia; Li, Feng; Xu, Longquan; Chang, Albert S.; Madden, Victoria J.; Bagnell, C. Robert; Rojas, Mauricio; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Wu, Bingruo; Zhou, Bin; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2015-01-01

    We have generated low-expressing and high-expressing endothelin-1 genes (L and H) and have bred mice with four levels of expression: L/L, ∼20%; L/+, ∼65%; +/+ (wild type), 100%; and H/+, ∼350%. The hypomorphic L allele can be spatiotemporally switched to the hypermorphic H allele by Cre-loxP recombination. Young adult L/L and L/+ mice have dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertension, and increased plasma volumes, together with increased ventricular superoxide levels, increased matrix metalloproteinase 9 (Mmp9) expression, and reduced ventricular stiffness. H/+ mice have decreased plasma volumes and significantly heavy stiff hearts. Global or cardiomyocyte-specific switching expression from L to H normalized the abnormalities already present in young adult L/L mice. An epithelial sodium channel antagonist normalized plasma volume and blood pressure, but only partially corrected the cardiomyopathy. A superoxide dismutase mimetic made superoxide levels subnormal, reduced Mmp9 overexpression, and substantially improved cardiac function. Genetic absence of Mmp9 also improved cardiac function, but increased superoxide remained. We conclude that endothelin-1 is critical for maintaining normal contractile function, for controlling superoxide and Mmp9 levels, and for ensuring that the myocardium has sufficient collagen to prevent overstretching. Even a modest (∼35%) decrease in endothelin-1 gene (Edn1) expression is sufficient to cause cardiac dysfunction. PMID:25848038

  16. A role for matrix stiffness in the regulation of cardiac side population cell function.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yiling; Bayomy, Ahmad F; Gomez, Marcus V; Bauer, Michael; Du, Ping; Yang, Yanfei; Zhang, Xin; Liao, Ronglih

    2015-05-01

    The mechanical properties of the local microenvironment may have important influence on the fate and function of adult tissue progenitor cells, altering the regenerative process. This is particularly critical following a myocardial infarction, in which the normal, compliant myocardial tissue is replaced with fibrotic, stiff scar tissue. In this study, we examined the effects of matrix stiffness on adult cardiac side population (CSP) progenitor cell behavior. Ovine and murine CSP cells were isolated and cultured on polydimethylsiloxane substrates, replicating the elastic moduli of normal and fibrotic myocardium. Proliferation capacity and cell cycling were increased in CSP cells cultured on the stiff substrate with an associated reduction in cardiomyogeneic differentiation and accelerated cell ageing. In addition, culture on stiff substrate stimulated upregulation of extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins gene expression in CSP cells. Collectively, we demonstrate that microenvironment properties, including matrix stiffness, play a critical role in regulating progenitor cell functions of endogenous resident CSP cells. Understanding the effects of the tissue microenvironment on resident cardiac progenitor cells is a critical step toward achieving functional cardiac regeneration. PMID:25724498

  17. A role for matrix stiffness in the regulation of cardiac side population cell function

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yiling; Bayomy, Ahmad F.; Gomez, Marcus V.; Bauer, Michael; Du, Ping; Yang, Yanfei; Zhang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the local microenvironment may have important influence on the fate and function of adult tissue progenitor cells, altering the regenerative process. This is particularly critical following a myocardial infarction, in which the normal, compliant myocardial tissue is replaced with fibrotic, stiff scar tissue. In this study, we examined the effects of matrix stiffness on adult cardiac side population (CSP) progenitor cell behavior. Ovine and murine CSP cells were isolated and cultured on polydimethylsiloxane substrates, replicating the elastic moduli of normal and fibrotic myocardium. Proliferation capacity and cell cycling were increased in CSP cells cultured on the stiff substrate with an associated reduction in cardiomyogeneic differentiation and accelerated cell ageing. In addition, culture on stiff substrate stimulated upregulation of extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins gene expression in CSP cells. Collectively, we demonstrate that microenvironment properties, including matrix stiffness, play a critical role in regulating progenitor cell functions of endogenous resident CSP cells. Understanding the effects of the tissue microenvironment on resident cardiac progenitor cells is a critical step toward achieving functional cardiac regeneration. PMID:25724498

  18. Cardiac function during breath-hold diving in humans: an echocardiographic study.

    PubMed

    Marabotti, C; Belardinelli, A; L'Abbate, A; Scalzini, A; Chiesa, F; Cialoni, D; Passera, M; Bedini, R

    2008-01-01

    Breath-hold diving induces, in marine mammals, a reduction of cardiac output due to a decrease of both heart rate and stroke volume. Cardiovascular changes in humans during breath-hold diving are only partially known due to the technical difficulty of studying fully immersed subjects. Recently, a submersible echocardiograph has been developed, allowing a feasible assessment of cardiac anatomy and function of subjects during diving. Aim of the study was to evaluate, by Doppler-echocardiography, the cardiovascular changes inducedby breath-hold diving in humans. Ten male subjects were studied by Doppler echocardiography in dry conditions and during breath-hold diving at 3 m depth. In addition 14 male subjects were studied, using the same protocol, before and during breath-hold diving at 10 m depth. At 3 m depth significant reductions in heart rate (-17%), stroke volume (-17%), cardiac output (-29%), left atrial dimensions, and deceleration time of early diastolic transmitral flow (DTE) were observed. At 10 m depth similar but more pronounced changes occurred. In particular, increase in early transmitral flow velocity became significant (+33%), while DTE decreased by 34%. At both depths dimensions of right cardiac chambers remained unchanged. Breath-hold diving at shallow depth induced, in humans, cardiovascular changes qualitatively similar to those observed in natural divers such as seals. The reduced dimensions of left atrium associated to a left ventricular diastolic pattern resembling that of restrictive/constrictive heart disease, suggest that the hemodynamic effects of diving could be explained, at least in part, by a constriction exerted on the heart by the reduced chest volume and the increased blood content of the lungs. Finally, the absence of dimensional changes in the right chambers suggests that most of the pulmonary blood shift occurred before cardiac imaging. PMID:18500072

  19. Isolation and expansion of functionally-competent cardiac progenitor cells directly from heart biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Darryl R; Kizana, Eddy; Terrovitis, John; Barth, Andreas S.; Zhang, Yiqiang; Smith, Rachel Ruckdeschel; Miake, Junichiro; Marbán, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    The adult heart contains reservoirs of progenitor cells that express embryonic and stem cell-related antigens. While these antigenically-purified cells are promising candidates for autologous cell therapy, clinical application is hampered by their limited abundance and tedious isolation methods. Methods that involve an intermediate cardiosphere-forming step have proven successful and are being tested clinically, but it is unclear whether the cardiosphere step is necessary. Accordingly, we investigated the molecular profile and functional benefit of cells that spontaneously emigrate from cardiac tissue in primary culture. Adult Wistar-Kyoto rat hearts were minced, digested and cultured as separate anatomical regions. Loosely-adherent cells that surround the plated tissue were harvested weekly for a total of five harvests. Genetic lineage tracing demonstrated that a small proportion of the direct outgrowth from cardiac samples originates from myocardial cells. This outgrowth contains sub-populations of cells expressing embryonic (SSEA-1) and stem cell-related antigens (c-Kit, abcg2) that varied with time in culture but not with the cardiac chamber of origin. This direct outgrowth, and its expanded progeny, underwent marked in vitro angiogenic/cardiogenic differentiation and cytokine secretion (IGF-1, VGEF). In vivo effects included long-term functional benefits as gauged by MRI following cell injection in a rat model of myocardial infarction. Outgrowth cells afforded equivalent functional benefits to cardiosphere-derived cells, which require more processing steps to manufacture. These results provide the basis for a simplified and efficient process to generate autologous cardiac progenitor cells (and mesenchymal supporting cells) to augment clinically-relevant approaches for myocardial repair. PMID:20211627

  20. Endonuclease G is a novel determinant of cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    McDermott-Roe, Chris; Ye, Junmei; Ahmed, Rizwan; Sun, Xi-Ming; Serafín, Anna; Ware, James; Bottolo, Leonardo; Muckett, Phil; Cañas, Xavier; Zhang, Jisheng; Rowe, Glenn C.; Buchan, Rachel; Lu, Han; Braithwaite, Adam; Mancini, Massimiliano; Hauton, David; Martí, Ramon; García-Arumí, Elena; Hubner, Norbert; Jacob, Howard; Serikawa, Tadao; Zidek, Vaclav; Papousek, Frantisek; Kolar, Frantisek; Cardona, Maria; Ruiz-Meana, Marisol; García-Dorado, David; Comella, Joan X; Felkin, Leanne E; Barton, Paul JR; Arany, Zoltan; Pravenec, Michal; Petretto, Enrico; Sanchis, Daniel; Cook, Stuart A.

    2011-01-01

    Left ventricular mass (LVM) is a highly heritable trait1 and an independent risk factor for all-cause mortality2. To date, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have not identified the genetic factors underlying LVM variation3 and the regulatory mechanisms for blood pressure (BP)-independent cardiac hypertrophy remain poorly understood4,5. Unbiased systems-genetics approaches in the rat6,7 now provide a powerful complementary tool to GWAS and we applied integrative genomics to dissect a highly replicated, BP-independent LVM locus on rat chromosome 3p. We identified endonuclease G (Endog), previously implicated in apoptosis8 but not hypertrophy, as the gene at the locus and demonstrated loss-of-function mutation in Endog associated with increased LVM and impaired cardiac function. Inhibition of Endog in cultured cardiomyocytes resulted in an increase in cell size and hypertrophic biomarkers in the absence of pro-hypertrophic stimulation. Genome-wide network analysis unexpectedly inferred ENDOG in fundamental mitochondrial processes unrelated to apoptosis. We showed direct regulation of ENDOG by ERRα and PGC1α, master regulators of mitochondrial and cardiac function9,10,11, interaction of ENDOG with the mitochondrial genome and ENDOG-mediated regulation of mitochondrial mass. At baseline, Endog deleted mouse heart had depleted mitochondria, mitochondrial dysfunction and elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was associated with enlarged and steatotic cardiomyocytes. Our studies establish further the link between mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS and heart disease and demonstrate a new role for Endog in maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:21979051

  1. The influence of isotonic exercise on cardiac hypertrophy in arterial hypertension: impact on cardiac function and on the capacity for aerobic work.

    PubMed

    Moreno Júnior, H; Cezareti, M L; Piçarro, I C; Barros Neto, T L; Kasinski, N; Martinez Filho, E E; Saragoça, M A

    1995-10-01

    Intense physical training through isotonic exercises has controversial effects in individuals with moderate to severe hypertension. In this study, normotensive Wistar rats and rats with renovascular hypertension (Goldblatt II) were subjected to intense physical exercise involving two 50-min swimming sessions per day for a period of 12 weeks. At the end of the study, we evaluated the effect of training on arterial pressure, the capacity for aerobic work and cardiac function. Our results demonstrate that intense physical training has no effect on the arterial blood pressure of normotensive rats or of animals with moderate renovascular hypertension. Hypertensive animals with cardiac hypertrophy require a greater period of training in order to attain the same capacity for aerobic work as normotensive rats. This difference may result from an inability of the former animals to increase cardiac compliance, thereby impeding more extensive usage of the Frank-Starling mechanism to subsequently increase the systolic cardiac performance. Cardiac hypertrophy induced by exercise did not summate with that induced by arterial hypertension. Physical exercise normalized the end-diastolic left ventricular pressure in hypertensive animals without any corresponding increase in the compliance of the chamber. The first derivative of left ventricular pulse pressure (+/- dP/dt) was greater in the hypertensive trained group than in the hypertensive sedentary rats. These observations suggest that a systolic dysfunction of the left ventricle involving an elevated residual volume secondary to arterial hypertension may be corrected by physical exercise such as swimming. PMID:7584822

  2. N-cadherin haploinsufficiency affects cardiac gap junctions and arrhythmic susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jifen; Levin, Mark D; Xiong, Yanming; Petrenko, Nataliya; Patel, Vickas V.; Radice, Glenn L.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac-specific deletion of the murine gene (Cdh2) encoding the cell adhesion molecule, N-cadherin, results in disassembly of the intercalated disc (ICD) structure and sudden arrhythmic death. Connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junctions are significantly reduced in the heart after depleting N-cadherin, therefore we hypothesized that animals expressing half the normal levels of N-cadherin would exhibit an intermediate phenotype. We examined the effect of N-cadherin haploinsufficiency on Cx43 expression and susceptibility to induced arrhythmias in mice either wild-type or heterozygous for the Cx43 (Gja1)-null allele. An increase in hypophosphorylated Cx43 accompanied by a modest decrease in total Cx43 protein levels was observed in the N-cadherin heterozygous mice. Consistent with these findings N-cadherin heterozygotes exhibited increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias compared to wild-type mice. Quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy revealed a reduction in size of large Cx43-containing plaques in the N-cadherin heterozygous animals compared to wild-type. Gap junctions were further decreased in number and size in the N-cad/Cx43 compound heterozygous mice with increased arrhythmic susceptibility compared to the single mutants. The scaffold protein, ZO-1, was reduced at the ICD in N-cadherin heterozygous cardiomyocytes providing a possible explanation for the reduction in Cx43 plaque size. These data provide further support for the intimate relationship between N-cadherin and Cx43 in the heart, and suggest that germline mutations in the human N-cadherin (Cdh2) gene may predispose patients to increased risk of cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:18201716

  3. Mathematical Models Based on Transfer Functions to Estimate Tissue Temperature During RF Cardiac Ablation in Real Time

    PubMed Central

    Alba-Martínez, Jose; Trujillo, Macarena; Blasco-Gimenez, Ramon; Berjano, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Radiofrequency cardiac ablation (RFCA) has been used to treat certain types of cardiac arrhythmias by producing a thermal lesion. Even though a tissue temperature higher than 50ºC is required to destroy the target, thermal mapping is not currently used during RFCA. Our aim was thus to develop mathematical models capable of estimating tissue temperature from tissue characteristics acquired or estimated at the beginning of the procedure (electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, specific heat and density) and the applied voltage at any time. Biological tissue was considered as a system with an input (applied voltage) and output (tissue temperature), and so the mathematical models were based on transfer functions relating these variables. We used theoretical models based on finite element method to verify the mathematical models. Firstly, we solved finite element models to identify the transfer functions between the temperature at a depth of 4 mm and a constant applied voltage using a 7Fr and 4 mm electrode. The results showed that the relationships can be expressed as first-order transfer functions. Changes in electrical conductivity only affected the static gain of the system, while specific heat variations produced a change in the dynamic system response. In contrast, variations in thermal conductivity modified both the static gain and the dynamic system response. Finally, to assess the performance of the transfer functions obtained, we conducted a new set of computer simulations using a controlled temperature protocol and considering the temperature dependence of the thermal and electrical conductivities, i.e. conditions closer to those found in clinical use. The results showed that the difference between the values estimated from transfer functions and the temperatures obtained from finite element models was less than 4ºC, which suggests that the proposed method could be used to estimate tissue temperature in real time. PMID:22715345

  4. How Does Maternal Employment Affect Children's Socioemotional Functioning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Gigi

    2015-01-01

    The maternal employment becomes an irreversible trend across the globe. The effect of maternal employment on children's socioemotional functioning is so pervasive that it warrants special attention to investigate into the issue. A trajectory of analytical framework of how maternal employment affects children's socioemotional functioning originates…

  5. Long-term abdominal adiposity activates several parameters of cardiac energy function.

    PubMed

    Mourmoura, Evangelia; Rigaudière, Jean-Paul; Couturier, Karine; Hininger, Isabelle; Laillet, Brigitte; Malpuech-Brugère, Corinne; Azarnoush, Kasra; Demaison, Luc

    2016-09-01

    Abdominal obesity increases the incidence of cardiac events but reduces mortality when one of these events occurs. The phenomenon called obesity paradox might be related to myocardial energetics. This study was aimed at determining whether long-term abdominal adiposity alters cardiac energy function. Two groups of male Wistar rats were fed a standard or a Western-type (WD) diet for 8 months. The ex vivo coronary reactivity and mechanical function as well as the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (mOxPhos) and hydrogen peroxide release (mH2O2r) were determined. Abdominal adiposity was augmented by the WD. This was also the case for the coronary reactivity to acetylcholine, but the rate pressure product remained roughly stable despite a reduction of the left ventricle-developed pressure partly compensated by a slight increase in heart rate. The prolonged WD administration resulted in an improvement of mOxPhos, but the mH2O2r was exaggerated which was confirmed in the whole cell by a reduced aconitase to fumarase ratio. This did not modify the plasma oxidative stress due to an increased plasma antioxidant status. In conclusion, long-term WD administration improved the cardiac fitness and might predispose the organism to the obesity paradox. Conversely, the increased mitochondrial mH2O2r can precipitate the heart toward cardiomyopathy if the WD is maintained for a longer duration. PMID:26255304

  6. Dysregulation of cardiac autonomic function in offspring exposed to alcohol during antenatal period.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Sajish; Abhishekh, Hulegar A; Murthy, Pratima; Raju, Trichur R; Sathyaprabha, Talakad N

    2015-10-01

    Several lines of investigations have shown the deleterious effect of an alcohol on the autonomic nervous system. Recent evidence shows that infants exposed to alcohol during the antenatal period displayed aberration in the cardiac autonomic function after the birth. However, there is dearth of literature on the long term influence of antenatal alcohol exposure. In this study we measured the cardiac autonomic functions in children who were exposed to alcohol in the antenatal period and compared them with non-exposed control children. Twenty eight children (age: 9±2 years) in the antenatal alcohol exposed group and age, gender matched 30 non exposed healthy volunteers as a control (age: 10±2 years) were recruited. Electrocardiogram was recorded in all subjects at rest in the supine position. HRV parameters were analyzed in the time and frequency domains using customized software. The average heart rate was similar between both the groups. There was no statistical significant difference in the time domain measures between the groups. However, the low frequency power, normalized units and low frequency to high frequency ratio were significantly higher in the antenatal alcohol exposed children compared to the controls. This suggests sympathetic predominance in children who were exposed to alcohol in the antenatal period. In this study we provide evidence for the deleterious long lasting effect of antenatal exposure of alcohol on cardiac autonomic regulation. Further prospective studies are needed to confirm the causal relationship between antenatal alcohol exposure and autonomic dysregulation. PMID:26211431

  7. Impact of aortocaval shunt flow on cardiac and renal function in unilateral nephrectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Cheng, Zhong; Zhang, Mingjing; Zhu, Pengfei; Gu, Ye

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported significantly enhanced cardiac remodeling post aortocaval fistula (AV) in unilateral nephrectomized (UNX) rats. However, the relationship between the size of the AV and the cardiorenal effects in UNX rats remains unknown. In the present study, AV was induced by 20, 18 and 16 gauge needles in UNX rats to see if larger shunt would definitely induce heavier cardiac and renal damage in UNX rats. Our results demonstrated that bigger shunt size is linked with proportional more significant cardiorenal remodeling and dysfunction in UNX rats. Expression of inflammatory biomarkers including CRP, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, TGF-β and MCP-1 in left kidney and heart was significantly increased in all UNX + AV groups compared to Sham rats. Inflammation might thus participate in the worsening cardiorenal functions and remodeling processes in this model. PMID:27279232

  8. Impact of aortocaval shunt flow on cardiac and renal function in unilateral nephrectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Cheng, Zhong; Zhang, Mingjing; Zhu, Pengfei; Gu, Ye

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported significantly enhanced cardiac remodeling post aortocaval fistula (AV) in unilateral nephrectomized (UNX) rats. However, the relationship between the size of the AV and the cardiorenal effects in UNX rats remains unknown. In the present study, AV was induced by 20, 18 and 16 gauge needles in UNX rats to see if larger shunt would definitely induce heavier cardiac and renal damage in UNX rats. Our results demonstrated that bigger shunt size is linked with proportional more significant cardiorenal remodeling and dysfunction in UNX rats. Expression of inflammatory biomarkers including CRP, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, TGF-β and MCP-1 in left kidney and heart was significantly increased in all UNX + AV groups compared to Sham rats. Inflammation might thus participate in the worsening cardiorenal functions and remodeling processes in this model. PMID:27279232

  9. Intravital imaging of cardiac function at the single-cell level

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Aaron D.; Vinegoni, Claudio; Sebas, Matt; Weissleder, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of cardiomyocyte biology is limited by the lack of methods to interrogate single-cell physiology in vivo. Here we show that contracting myocytes can indeed be imaged with optical microscopy at high temporal and spatial resolution in the beating murine heart, allowing visualization of individual sarcomeres and measurement of the single cardiomyocyte contractile cycle. Collectively, this has been enabled by efficient tissue stabilization, a prospective real-time cardiac gating approach, an image processing algorithm for motion-artifact-free imaging throughout the cardiac cycle, and a fluorescent membrane staining protocol. Quantification of cardiomyocyte contractile function in vivo opens many possibilities for investigating myocardial disease and therapeutic intervention at the cellular level. PMID:25053815

  10. Cardiac autonomic function measured by heart rate variability and turbulence in pre-hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Alim; Uenishi, Masahiro; Küçükdurmaz, Zekeriya; Matsumoto, Kazuo; Kato, Ritsushi; Hara, Motoki; Yazıcı, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Non-dipping blood pressure pattern was shown to be associated with increased cardiovascular events. In addition, cardiac autonomic dysfunction was found to be associated with non-dipper phenomenon. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the cardiac autonomic functions in dipper and non-dipper pre-hypertensive subjects. A total of 65 pre-hypertensive subjects were enrolled in this study. They were divided into two groups as non-dippers (40 subjects, 52% female) and dippers (25 subjects, 52.5% female). Cardiac autonomic functions of the two groups were compared with the aid of heart rate variability, heart rate turbulence (HRT), atrial premature contractions (APCs), ventricular premature contractions (VPCs), and mean heart rate (MHR). There was no significant difference between non-dippers and dippers in basal characteristics. The two parameters of HRT, turbulence onset and turbulence slope, were found to be significantly abnormal in non-dippers than in dippers (P < .011 and P < .002, respectively). Heart rate variability parameters, including SDNN, SDANN, RMSSD, and pNN50, were found to be similar in dipper and non-dipper pre-hypertensive subjects (P < .998, P < .453, P < .205, and P < .788, respectively). APCs, VPCs, and MHR were compared, and there were statistical differences between the groups (APCs 5.80 ± 4.55, 9.14 ± 7.33, P < .024; VPCs 8.48 ± 8.83, 13.23 ± 9.68, P < .044; and MHR 70.16 ± 11.08, 76.26 ± 11.31, P < .035; respectively). This study demonstrated a possible cardiac autonomic dysfunction in pre-hypertensive subjects with non-dipper pattern. This may be a basis for future studies related to pre-hypertension and non-dipping BP pattern. PMID:22676318

  11. Efficacy of cardiac resynchronization with defibrillator insertion in patients undergone coronary artery bypass graft: A cohort study of cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Karbasi-Afshar, Reza; Ramezani-Binabaj, Mahdi; Rezaee-Zavareh, Mohammad Saeid; Saburi, Amin; Ajudani, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a proven therapeutic method in selected patients with heart failure and systolic dysfunction which increases left ventricular function and patient survival. We designed a study that included patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), with and without CRT-defibrillator (CRT-D) inserting and then measured its effects on these two groups. Patients and Methods: Between 2010 and 2013, we conducted a prospective cohort study on 100 coronary artery disease patients where candidate for CABG. Then based on the receiving CRT-D, the patients were categorized in two groups; Group 1 (n = 48, with CRT-D insertion before CABG) and Group 2 (n = 52 without receiving CRT-D). Thereafter both of these groups were followed-up at 1–3 months after CABG for mortality, hospitalization, atrial fibrillation (AF), echocardiographic assessment, and New York Heart Association (NYHA) class level. Results: The mean age of participants in Group 1 (48 male) and in Group 2 (52 male) was 58 ± 13 and 57 ± 12 respectively. Difference between Groups 1 and 2 in cases of mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) changes and NYHA class level was significant (P > 0.05). Hospitalization (P = 0.008), mortality rate (P = 0.007), and AF were significantly different between these two groups. Conclusions: The results showed that the increase in LVEF and patient's improvement according to NYHA-class was significant in the first group, and readmission, mortality rate and AF was increased significantly in the second group. PMID:25566709

  12. Cardiac Sarcoidosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... is Cardiac Sarcoidosis? Sarcoidosis is a poorly understood disease that commonly affects the lungs. It can also involve the lymph nodes, liver, spleen, eyes, skin, bones, salivary glands and heart. ...

  13. Glucagon-like peptide-1 and the exenatide analogue AC3174 improve cardiac function, cardiac remodeling, and survival in rats with chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence suggests glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) exerts cardioprotective effects in animal models of myocardial infarction (MI). We hypothesized that chronic treatment with GLP-1 or the exenatide analog AC3174 would improve cardiac function, cardiac remodeling, insulin sensitivity, and exercise capacity (EC) in rats with MI-induced chronic heart failure (CHF) caused by coronary artery ligation. Methods Two weeks post-MI, male Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with GLP-1 (2.5 or 25 pmol/kg/min), AC3174 (1.7 or 5 pmol/kg/min) or vehicle via subcutaneous infusion for 11 weeks. Cardiac function and morphology were assessed by echocardiography during treatment. Metabolic, hemodynamic, exercise-capacity, and body composition measurements were made at study end. Results Compared with vehicle-treated rats with CHF, GLP-1 or AC3174 significantly improved cardiac function, including left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction, and end diastolic pressure. Cardiac dimensions also improved as evidenced by reduced LV end diastolic and systolic volumes and reduced left atrial volume. Vehicle-treated CHF rats exhibited fasting hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. In contrast, GLP-1 or AC3174 normalized fasting plasma insulin and glucose levels. GLP-1 or AC3174 also significantly reduced body fat and fluid mass and improved exercise capacity and respiratory efficiency. Four of 16 vehicle control CHF rats died during the study compared with 1 of 44 rats treated with GLP-1 or AC3174. The cellular mechanism by which GLP-1 or AC3174 exert cardioprotective effects appears unrelated to changes in GLUT1 or GLUT4 translocation or expression. Conclusions Chronic treatment with either GLP-1 or AC3174 showed promising cardioprotective effects in a rat model of CHF. Hence, GLP-1 receptor agonists may represent a novel approach for the treatment of patients with CHF or cardiovascular disease associated with type 2 diabetes. PMID:21080957

  14. Impact of aging on mitochondrial function in cardiac and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hepple, R T

    2016-09-01

    Both skeletal muscle and cardiac muscle are subject to marked structural and functional impairment with aging and these changes contribute to the reduced capacity for exercise as we age. Since mitochondria are involved in multiple aspects of cellular homeostasis including energetics, reactive oxygen species signaling, and regulation of intrinsic apoptotic pathways, defects in this organelle are frequently implicated in the deterioration of skeletal and cardiac muscle with aging. On this basis, the purpose of this review is to evaluate the evidence that aging causes dysfunction in mitochondria in striated muscle with a view towards drawing conclusions about the potential of these changes to contribute to the deterioration seen in striated muscle with aging. As will be shown, impairment in respiration and reactive oxygen species emission with aging are highly variable between studies and seem to be largely a consequence of physical inactivity. On the other hand, both skeletal and cardiac muscle mitochondria are more susceptible to permeability transition and this seems a likely cause of the increased recruitment of mitochondrial-mediated pathways of apoptosis seen in striated muscle. The review concludes by examining the role of degeneration of mitochondrial DNA versus impaired mitochondrial quality control mechanisms in the accumulation of mitochondria that are sensitized to permeability transition, whereby the latter mechanism is favored as the most likely cause. PMID:27033952

  15. Relationship of radionuclide indexes of cardiac function during interventions: volume loading, afterload stress, exercise, and pacing

    SciTech Connect

    Slutsky, R.A.

    1983-04-01

    We compared three radionuclide index of cardiac function: 1) the ejection fraction (EF), 2) the mean ejection rate (ER), and 3) the mean velocity of circumferential fiber shortening (MVCF) during volume loading, phenylephrine hydrochloride stress, exercise, and atrial pacing. All behaved in a similar (linear) fashion, allowing appropriate hemodynamic conclusions to be drawn using either index. During atrial pacing, the ejection fraction declined when velocity indexes increased, suggesting that the ejection fraction may not be a suitable index to characterize alterations in inotropic state during rapid alterations in heart rate, particular in the absence of angina pectoris. This may result from the reductions in cardiac volume for the duration of pacing, where the velocity index is preserved. In most circumstances excluding atrial pacing, ejection fraction during interventions is an adequate index of the change of myocardial contractile state. Overall, radionuclide angiography is an excellent technique to characterize acute hemodynamic interventions, with ejection fraction, in general, the simplest and most reliable of cardiac indexes during stress interventions.

  16. E2F3 plays an essential role in cardiac development and function

    PubMed Central

    King, Jennifer C.; Moskowitz, Ivan P. G.; Burgon, Patrick G.; Ahmad, Ferhaan; Stone, James R.; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Lees, Jacqueline A.

    2009-01-01

    The E2F transcription factors are key downstream targets of the retinoblastoma protein tumor suppressor. They are known to regulate the expression of genes that control fundamental biological processes including cellular proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. However, considerable questions remain about the precise roles of the individual E2F family members. This study shows that E2F3 is essential for normal cardiac development. E2F3-loss impairs the proliferative capacity of the embryonic myocardium and most E2f3−/− mice die in utero or perinatally with hypoplastic ventricular walls and/or severe atrial and ventricular septal defects. A small fraction of the E2f3−/− neonates have hearts that appear grossly normal and they initially survive. However, these animals develop ultrastructural defects in the cardiac muscle and ultimately die as a result of congestive heart failure. These data demonstrate a clear link between E2F3’s role in the proliferative capacity of the myocardium and cardiac function during both development and adulthood. PMID:19029823

  17. Effects of chronic hypoxia on cardiac function measured by pressure-volume catheter in fetal chickens

    PubMed Central

    Giraud, George D.; Espinoza, Herbert M.; Davis, Erica N.; Crossley, Dane A.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common component of many developmental insults and has been studied in early-stage chicken development. However, its impact on cardiac function and arterial-ventricular coupling in late-stage chickens is relatively unknown. To test the hypothesis that hypoxic incubation would reduce baseline cardiac function but protect the heart during acute hypoxia in late-stage chickens, white Leghorn eggs were incubated at 21% O2 or 15% O2. At 90% of incubation (19 days), hypoxic incubation caused growth restriction (−20%) and increased the LV-to-body ratio (+41%). Left ventricular (LV) pressure-volume loops were measured in anesthetized chickens in normoxia and acute hypoxia (10% O2). Hypoxic incubation lowered the maximal rate of pressure generation (ΔP/ΔtMax; −22%) and output (−57%), whereas increasing end-systolic elastance (ELV; +31%) and arterial elastance (EA; +122%) at similar heart rates to normoxic incubation. Both hypoxic incubation and acute hypoxia lengthened the half-time of relaxation (τ; +24%). Acute hypoxia reduced heart rate (−8%) and increased end-diastolic pressure (+35%). Hearts were collected for mRNA analysis. Hypoxic incubation was marked by decreased mRNA expression of sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2, Na+/Ca2+ exchanger 1, phospholamban, and ryanodine receptor. In summary, hypoxic incubation reduces LV function in the late-stage chicken by slowing pressure generation and relaxation, which may be driven by altered intracellular excitation-contraction coupling. Cardiac efficiency is greatly reduced after hypoxic incubation. In both incubation groups acute hypoxia reduced diastolic function. PMID:25652537

  18. Microvascular function, metabolic syndrome, and novel risk factor status in women with cardiac syndrome X.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Sachin T; Ferrell, William R; Petrie, John R; Scherbakova, Olga; Greer, Ian A; Cobbe, Stuart M; Sattar, Naveed

    2006-06-15

    To characterize microvascular function, candidate risk pathways, and metabolic syndrome prevalence in women with cardiac syndrome X, 52 nondiabetic women with angiographically normal epicardial arteries but >1 mm of planar ST depression during exercise testing (patients) and 24 healthy controls of similar age were recruited. In addition to fasting blood samples and anthropometric measurements, forearm cutaneous microvascular function after iontophoresis of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was assessed by laser Doppler imaging. Despite body mass index correction and a larger proportion on statin therapy, patients had high levels of insulin (p=0.016), triglycerides (p=0.018), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (p=0.021), von Willebrand factor (p=0.005), and leptin (p=0.005) and lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (p=0.042) compared with controls. Consistent with these data, 30% of patients but only 8% of controls fulfilled criteria for the metabolic syndrome as defined by the National Cholesterol Education Program (p=0.015). Endothelium-dependent and -independent microvascular functions were markedly impaired in patients (p<0.001), and the odds ratio for cardiac syndrome X was 7.38 (95% confidence interval 2.2 to 24.7) if the acetylcholine response was <8,710 flux units. In conclusion, women with cardiac syndrome X more commonly have metabolic syndrome and related adiposity, metabolic, and inflammatory derangements. They also have significantly impaired skin microvascular function as assessed by laser Doppler imaging, consistent with generalized vascular dysfunction, a finding with potential diagnostic implications. PMID:16765122

  19. Effect of Actual and Simulated Microgravity on Cardiac Mass and Function in the Rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chester H.; Vasques, Marilyn; Miller, Todd H.; Wilkerson, M. Keith; Delp, Michael D.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that exposure to actual or simulated microgravity induces cardiac atrophy in male Sprague-Dawley rats. For the microgravity study, rats were subdivided into four groups: Preflight (PF, n = 12); Flight (FL, n = 7); Flight Cage Simulation (SIM, n = 6), and Vivarium Control (VIV, n = 7). Animals in the FL group were exposed to 7 days of microgravity during the Spacelab 3 mission. Animals in the simulated microgravity study were subdivided into three groups: Control (CON, n = 20); 7 day hindlimb unloaded (7HU, n = 10); and 28 day unloaded (28HU, n = 19). In a subset of CON (n = 7) and 28HU (n = 6) rats, a catheter was advanced into the left ventricle to measure the rate of rise in ventricular pressure (+dP/dt) during standing as an estimate of cardiac contractility. After completion of their respective treatments, hearts were removed and weighed. Animals in the PF group were sacrificed 24 hr prior to launch while the FL group was sacrificed 11- 17 hr after landing. The SM and VIV groups were sacrificed 48 and 96 hr after the FL group, respectively. Heart mass was unchanged in adult animals exposed to 7 days of actual microgravity (PF 1.33 +/- .03 g; FL 1.32 +/- 0.02 g; SIM 1.28 +/- 0.04 g; VIV 1.35 +/- 0.04 g). Similarly, heart mass was unaltered with hinlimb unloading (CON 1.40 +/- 0.04 g; 7HU 1.35 +/- 0.06 g; 28HU 1.42 +/- 0.03 g). Hindlimb unloading also had no effect on myocardial contractility (CON 8055 +/- 385 mmHg/sec; 28HU 8545 +/- 755 mmHg/sec). These data suggest that cardiac atrophy does not occur following short-term exposure to microgravity, and that neither short- nor long-term simulated microgravity alter cardiac mass or function.

  20. Impaired heart rate regulation and depression of cardiac chronotropic and dromotropic function in polymicrobial sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, Donald B.; Ozment, Tammy R.; Wondergem, Robert; Li, Chuanfu; Williams, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The scope of cardiac pathophysiology in sepsis has not been fully defined. Accordingly, we evaluated the effects of sepsis on heart rate (HR), HR variability, and conduction parameters in a murine model of sepsis. Electrocardiograms were recorded non-invasively from conscious mice before and after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) or sham surgery. Responses of isolated atria to tyramine and isoproterenol were quantified to assess the functional state of sympathetic nerves and postjunctional sensitivity to adrenergic stimulation. CLP mice had lower HR compared to sham at 16-18 h post-surgery (Sham: 741±7 beats per min, CLP: 557±31 beats per min, n=6/group, P<0.001), and there was significant prolongation of the PR, QRS and QTc intervals. Slowing of HR and conduction developed within 4-6 h after CLP and were preceded by a decrease in HR variability. Treatment of CLP mice with isoproterenol (5 mg/kg, i.p.) at 25 h post-surgery failed to increase HR or decrease conduction intervals. The lack of in vivo response to isoproterenol cannot be attributed to hypothermia since robust chronotropic and inotropic responses to isoproterenol were evoked from isolated atria at 25 and 30° C. These findings demonstrate that impaired regulation of HR (i.e, reduced HR variability) develops before the onset of overt cardiac rate and conduction changes in septic mice. Subsequent time-dependent decreases in HR and cardiac conduction can be attributed to hypothermia and would contribute to decreased cardiac output and organ perfusion. Since isolated atria from septic mice showed normal responsiveness to adrenergic stimulation, we conclude that impaired effectiveness of isoproterenol in vivo can be attributed to reversible effects of systemic factors on adrenergic receptors and/or post-receptor signaling. PMID:25271380

  1. Cardiac function and myocardial perfusion immediately following maximal treadmill exercise inside the MRI room

    PubMed Central

    Jekic, Mihaela; Foster, Eric L; Ballinger, Michelle R; Raman, Subha V; Simonetti, Orlando P

    2008-01-01

    Treadmill exercise stress testing is an essential tool in the prevention, detection, and treatment of a broad spectrum of cardiovascular disease. After maximal exercise, cardiac images at peak stress are typically acquired using nuclear scintigraphy or echocardiography, both of which have inherent limitations. Although CMR offers superior image quality, the lack of MRI-compatible exercise and monitoring equipment has prevented the realization of treadmill exercise CMR. It is critical to commence imaging as quickly as possible after exercise to capture exercise-induced cardiac wall motion abnormalities. We modified a commercial treadmill such that it could be safely positioned inside the MRI room to minimize the distance between the treadmill and the scan table. We optimized the treadmill exercise CMR protocol in 20 healthy volunteers and successfully imaged cardiac function and myocardial perfusion at peak stress, followed by viability imaging at rest. Imaging commenced an average of 30 seconds after maximal exercise. Real-time cine of seven slices with no breath-hold and no ECG-gating was completed within 45 seconds of exercise, immediately followed by stress perfusion imaging of three short-axis slices which showed an average time to peak enhancement within 57 seconds of exercise. We observed a 3.1-fold increase in cardiac output and a myocardial perfusion reserve index of 1.9, which agree with reported values for healthy subjects at peak stress. This study successfully demonstrates in-room treadmill exercise CMR in healthy volunteers, but confirmation of feasibility in patients with heart disease is still needed. PMID:18272005

  2. Suppression of Induced microRNA-15b Prevents Rapid Loss of Cardiac Function in a Dicer Depleted Model of Cardiac Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gnyawali, Surya C.; Khanna, Savita; He, Guanglong; Pfeiffer, Douglas; Zweier, Jay L.; Sen, Chandan K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dicer endonuclease, critical for maturation of miRNAs, is depleted in certain forms of cardiomyopathy which results in differential expression of certain microRNAs. We sought to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the rapid loss of cardiac function following cardiac-specific Dicer depletion in adult mice. Results Conditional Dicer deletion in the adult murine myocardium demonstrated compromised heart function, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidant stress. Elevated miR-15b was observed as an early response to Dicer depletion and was found to silence Pim-1 kinase, a protein responsible for maintaining mitochondrial integrity and function. Anti-miRNA based suppression of induced miRNA-15b rescued the function of Dicer-depleted adult heart and attenuated hypertrophy. Conclusions Anti-miRNA based suppression of inducible miRNA-15b can prevent rapid loss of cardiac function in a Dicer-depleted adult heart and can be a key approach worthy of therapeutic consideration. PMID:23840532

  3. Dual transcriptional activator and repressor roles of TBX20 regulate adult cardiac structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Sakabe, Noboru J.; Aneas, Ivy; Shen, Tao; Shokri, Leila; Park, Soo-Young; Bulyk, Martha L.; Evans, Sylvia M.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.

    2012-01-01

    The ongoing requirement in adult heart for transcription factors with key roles in cardiac development is not well understood. We recently demonstrated that TBX20, a transcriptional regulator required for cardiac development, has key roles in the maintenance of functional and structural phenotypes in adult mouse heart. Conditional ablation of Tbx20 in adult cardiomyocytes leads to a rapid onset and progression of heart failure, with prominent conduction and contractility phenotypes that lead to death. Here we describe a more comprehensive molecular characterization of the functions of TBX20 in adult mouse heart. Coupling genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcriptome analyses (RNA-Seq), we identified a subset of genes that change expression in Tbx20 adult cardiomyocyte-specific knockout hearts which are direct downstream targets of TBX20. This analysis revealed a dual role for TBX20 as both a transcriptional activator and a repressor, and that each of these functions regulates genes with very specialized and distinct molecular roles. We also show how TBX20 binds to its targets genome-wide in a context-dependent manner, using various cohorts of co-factors to either promote or repress distinct genetic programs within adult heart. Our integrative approach has uncovered several novel aspects of TBX20 and T-box protein function within adult heart. Sequencing data accession number (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo): GSE30943. PMID:22328084

  4. Palmitoyl acyltransferase Aph2 in cardiac function and the development of cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tielin; Li, Jing; Zhao, Peiquan; Liu, Huijuan; Jia, Deyong; Jia, Hao; He, Lin; Cang, Yong; Boast, Sharon; Chen, Yi-Han; Thibault, Hélène; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Goff, Stephen P.; Li, Baojie

    2015-01-01

    Protein palmitoylation regulates many aspects of cell function and is carried out by acyl transferases that contain zf-DHHC motifs. The in vivo physiological function of protein palmitoylation is largely unknown. Here we generated mice deficient in the acyl transferase Aph2 (Ablphilin 2 or zf-DHHC16) and demonstrated an essential role for Aph2 in embryonic/postnatal survival, eye development, and heart development. Aph2−/− embryos and pups showed cardiomyopathy and cardiac defects including bradycardia. We identified phospholamban, a protein often associated with human cardiomyopathy, as an interacting partner and a substrate of Aph2. Aph2-mediated palmitoylation of phospholamban on cysteine 36 differentially alters its interaction with PKA and protein phosphatase 1 α, augmenting serine 16 phosphorylation, and regulates phospholamban pentamer formation. Aph2 deficiency results in phospholamban hypophosphorylation, a hyperinhibitory form. Ablation of phospholamban in Aph2−/− mice histologically and functionally alleviated the heart defects. These findings establish Aph2 as a critical in vivo regulator of cardiac function and reveal roles for protein palmitoylation in the development of other organs including eyes. PMID:26644582

  5. Palmitoyl acyltransferase Aph2 in cardiac function and the development of cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tielin; Li, Jing; Zhao, Peiquan; Liu, Huijuan; Jia, Deyong; Jia, Hao; He, Lin; Cang, Yong; Boast, Sharon; Chen, Yi-Han; Thibault, Hélène; Scherrer-Crosbie, Marielle; Goff, Stephen P; Li, Baojie

    2015-12-22

    Protein palmitoylation regulates many aspects of cell function and is carried out by acyl transferases that contain zf-DHHC motifs. The in vivo physiological function of protein palmitoylation is largely unknown. Here we generated mice deficient in the acyl transferase Aph2 (Ablphilin 2 or zf-DHHC16) and demonstrated an essential role for Aph2 in embryonic/postnatal survival, eye development, and heart development. Aph2(-/-) embryos and pups showed cardiomyopathy and cardiac defects including bradycardia. We identified phospholamban, a protein often associated with human cardiomyopathy, as an interacting partner and a substrate of Aph2. Aph2-mediated palmitoylation of phospholamban on cysteine 36 differentially alters its interaction with PKA and protein phosphatase 1 α, augmenting serine 16 phosphorylation, and regulates phospholamban pentamer formation. Aph2 deficiency results in phospholamban hypophosphorylation, a hyperinhibitory form. Ablation of phospholamban in Aph2(-/-) mice histologically and functionally alleviated the heart defects. These findings establish Aph2 as a critical in vivo regulator of cardiac function and reveal roles for protein palmitoylation in the development of other organs including eyes. PMID:26644582

  6. Ambient particulate matter affects cardiac recovery in a Langendorff ischemia model.

    PubMed

    Bagate, Karim; Meiring, James J; Gerlofs-Nijland, Miriam E; Cassee, Flemming R; Wiegand, Herbert; Osornio-Vargas, Alvaro; Borm, Paul J A

    2006-08-01

    Exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM) is associated with increased mortality and morbidity among subjects with cardiovascular impairment. We hypothesized that exposure of spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats to PM impairs the recovery of cardiovascular performance after coronary occlusion and reperfusion-ischemia. SH rats were exposed by intratracheal instillation to saline, standard urban PM (Ottawa dust EHC-93, 10 mg/kg body weight) or endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides LPS, 350 EU/animal) to induce a similar pulmonary inflammation. At 4 h postexposure, hearts were isolated and retrograde perfused in a Langendorff model. The experimental protocol included 35 min of coronary occlusion followed by 120 min of reperfusion, during which left ventricular developing pressure (LDVP), coronary flow (CF), and heart rate (HR) were measured. Baseline LVDP in particle-instilled SH rats was significantly decreased compared to saline-instilled animals. In addition, after ischemia the recovery of LDVP was much slower in rats pretreated with PM or LPS compared to saline instilled rats. The direct effects of the soluble PM fraction and the role of Zn2+ were also tested cardiomyocytes (H9C2 cells). Both particle-free filtrate and Zn2+ inhibited ATP or ionophore-stimulated calcium influx in cardiomyocytes. This inhibitory effect was related to an effect on calcium channels, as shown with Nifedipine. This study provides evidence that exposure to instillation of PM has reversible acute effects on the recovery of cardiac physiological parameters after ischemia. The effect may be caused by a direct action of soluble metals on calcium homeostasis in heart, but pulmonary inflammation may also play a significant role. PMID:16864554

  7. Differences between left and right ventricular chamber geometry affect cardiac vulnerability to electric shocks.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Blanca; Li, Li; Eason, James C; Efimov, Igor R; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2005-07-22

    Although effects of shock strength and waveform on cardiac vulnerability to electric shocks have been extensively documented, the contribution of ventricular anatomy to shock-induced polarization and postshock propagation and thus, to shock outcome, has never been quantified; this is caused by lack of experimental methodology capable of mapping 3-D electrical activity. The goal of this study was to use optical imaging experiments and 3-D bidomain simulations to investigate the role of structural differences between left and right ventricles in vulnerability to electric shocks in rabbit hearts. The ventricles were paced apically, and uniform-field, truncated-exponential, monophasic shocks of reversed polarity were applied over a range of coupling intervals (CIs) in experiment and model. Experiments and simulations revealed that reversing the direction of externally-applied field (RV- or LV- shocks) alters the shape of the vulnerability area (VA), the 2-D grid encompassing episodes of arrhythmia induction. For RV- shocks, VA was nearly rectangular indicating little dependence of postshock arrhythmogenesis on CI. For LV- shocks, the probability of arrhythmia induction was higher for longer than for shorter CIs. The 3-D simulations demonstrated that these effects stem from the fact that reversal of field direction results in relocation of the main postshock excitable area from LV wall (RV- shocks) to septum (LV- shocks). Furthermore, the effect of septal (but not LV) excitable area in postshock propagation was found to strongly depend on preshock state. Knowledge regarding the location of the main postshock excitable area within the 3-D ventricular volume could be important for improving defibrillation efficacy. PMID:15976315

  8. Serotonin and Dopamine: Unifying Affective, Activational, and Decision Functions

    PubMed Central

    Cools, Roshan; Nakamura, Kae; Daw, Nathaniel D

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin, like dopamine (DA), has long been implicated in adaptive behavior, including decision making and reinforcement learning. However, although the two neuromodulators are tightly related and have a similar degree of functional importance, compared with DA, we have a much less specific understanding about the mechanisms by which serotonin affects behavior. Here, we draw on recent work on computational models of dopaminergic function to suggest a framework by which many of the seemingly diverse functions associated with both DA and serotonin—comprising both affective and activational ones, as well as a number of other functions not overtly related to either—can be seen as consequences of a single root mechanism. PMID:20736991

  9. Combinatorial protein therapy of angiogenic and arteriogenic factors remarkably improves collaterogenesis and cardiac function in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Huixia; Xu, Xinsheng; Zhang, Mei; Cao, Renhai; Bråkenhielm, Ebba; Li, Changjiang; Lin, Huili; Yao, Guihua; Sun, Huiwen; Qi, Lihang; Tang, Mengxiong; Dai, Hongyan; Zhang, Yanen; Su, Runyi; Bi, Yanwen; Zhang, Yun; Cao, Yihai

    2007-01-01

    Establishment of functional and stable collaterals in the ischemic myocardium is crucial to restoring cardiac function after myocardial infarction. Here, we show that only dual delivery of a combination of angiogenic and arteriogenic factors to the ischemic myocardium could significantly reestablish stable collateral networks and improve myocardial perfusion and function. A combination of FGF-2 with PDGF-BB, two factors primarily targeting endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, remarkably promotes myocardial collateral growth and stabilizes the newly formed collateral networks, which significantly restore myocardial perfusion and function. Using various members of the PDGF family together with FGF-2 in an angiogenesis assay, we demonstrate that PDGFR-α is mainly involved in angiogenic synergism, whereas PDGFR-β mediates vessel stability signals. Our findings provide conceptual guidelines for the clinical development of proangiogenic/arteriogenic factors for the treatment of ischemic heart disease. PMID:17636133

  10. Oxygen supply and nitric oxide scavenging by myoglobin contribute to exercise endurance and cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Merx, Marc W; Gödecke, Axel; Flögel, Ulrich; Schrader, Jürgen

    2005-06-01

    Recent studies of myoglobin (Mb) knockout (myo-/-) mice have extended our understanding of Mb's diverse functions and have demonstrated a complex array of compensatory mechanisms. The present study was aimed at detailed analysis of cardiac function and exercise endurance in myo-/- mice and at providing evidence for Mb's functional relevance. Myo-/- isolated working hearts display decreased contractility (dP/dtmax 3883+/-351 vs. 4618+/-268 mmHg/sec, myo-/- vs. WT, P<0.005). Due to a shift in sympathetic/parasympathetic tone, heart rate is reduced in conscious myo mice-/- (615+/-33 vs. 645+/-27 bpm, myo-/- vs. WT, P<0.001). Oxygen consumption (VO2) under resting conditions (3082+/-413 vs. 4452+/-552 ml x kg(-1) x h(-1), myo-/- vs. WT, P<0.001) and exercise endurance, as determined by spiroergometry, are decreased (466+/-113 vs. 585+/-153 m, myo-/- vs. WT, P<0.01). Conscious myo-/- mice evaluated by echocardiography display lowered cardiac output (0.64+/-0.06 vs. 0.75+/-0.09 ml x min(-1) x g(-1), myo-/- vs. WT, P<0.001), impaired systolic shortening (60+/-3.5 vs. 65+/-4%, myo-/- vs. WT, P<0.001) and fail to respond to beta1-stimulation. Strikingly, the latter cardiac effects of Mb deficiency can be partially attenuated by NOS inhibition. Loss of Mb results in a distinct phenotype, even under resting conditions, and the importance of oxygen supply and nitric oxide scavenging by Mb is clearly demonstrated at the conscious animal level. PMID:15817640

  11. Molecular mechanisms of neuronal nitric oxide synthase in cardiac function and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin Hua; Jin, Chun Zi; Jang, Ji Hyun; Wang, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS or NOS1) is the major endogenous source of myocardial nitric oxide (NO), which facilitates cardiac relaxation and modulates contraction. In the healthy heart it regulates intracellular Ca2+, signalling pathways and oxidative homeostasis and is upregulated from early phases upon pathogenic insult. nNOS plays pivotal roles in protecting the myocardium from increased oxidative stress, systolic/diastolic dysfunction, adverse structural remodelling and arrhythmias in the failing heart. Here, we show that the downstream target proteins of nNOS and underlying post-transcriptional modifications are shifted during disease progression from Ca2+-handling proteins [e.g. PKA-dependent phospholamban phosphorylation (PLN-Ser16)] in the healthy heart to cGMP/PKG-dependent PLN-Ser16 with acute angiotensin II (Ang II) treatment. In early hypertension, nNOS-derived NO is involved in increases of cGMP/PKG-dependent troponin I (TnI-Ser23/24) and cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMBP-C-Ser273). However, nNOS-derived NO is shown to increase S-nitrosylation of various Ca2+-handling proteins in failing myocardium. The spatial compartmentation of nNOS and its translocation for diverse binding partners in the diseased heart or various nNOS splicing variants and regulation in response to pathological stress may be responsible for varied underlying mechanisms and functions. In this review, we endeavour to outline recent advances in knowledge of the molecular mechanisms mediating the functions of nNOS in the myocardium in both normal and diseased hearts. Insights into nNOS gene regulation in various tissues are discussed. Overall, nNOS is an important cardiac protector in the diseased heart. The dynamic localization and various mediating mechanisms of nNOS ensure that it is able to regulate functions effectively in the heart under stress. PMID:24756636

  12. Structural and functional aspects of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction

    PubMed Central

    Muthu, Priya; Wang, Li; Yuan, Chen-Ching; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Huang, Wenrui; Hernandez, Olga M.; Kawai, Masataka; Irving, Thomas C.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2011-01-01

    The myosin essential light chain (ELC) is a structural component of the actomyosin cross-bridge, but its function is poorly understood, especially the role of the cardiac specific N-terminal extension in modulating actomyosin interaction. Here, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the A57G (alanine to glycine) mutation in the cardiac ELC known to cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). The function of the ELC N-terminal extension was investigated with the Tg-Δ43 mouse model, whose myocardium expresses a truncated ELC. Low-angle X-ray diffraction studies on papillary muscle fibers in rigor revealed a decreased interfilament spacing (∼1.5 nm) and no alterations in cross-bridge mass distribution in Tg-A57G mice compared to Tg-WT, expressing the full-length nonmutated ELC. The truncation mutation showed a 1.3-fold increase in I1,1/I1,0, indicating a shift of cross-bridge mass from the thick filament backbone toward the thin filaments. Mechanical studies demonstrated increased stiffness in Tg-A57G muscle fibers compared to Tg-WT or Tg-Δ43. The equilibrium constant for the cross-bridge force generation step was smallest in Tg-Δ43. These results support an important role for the N-terminal ELC extension in prepositioning the cross-bridge for optimal force production. Subtle changes in the ELC sequence were sufficient to alter cross-bridge properties and lead to pathological phenotypes.—Muthu, P., Wang, L., Yuan, C.-C., Kazmierczak, K., Huang, W., Hernandez, O. M., Kawai, M., Irving, T. C., Szczesna-Cordary, D. Structural and functional aspects of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction. PMID:21885653

  13. Effects of glutamine treatment on myocardial damage and cardiac function in rats after severe burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hong; Zhang, Yong; Lv, Shang-jun; Wang, Lin; Liang, Guang-ping; Wan, Qian-xue; Peng, Xi

    2012-01-01

    Treatment with glutamine has been shown to reduce myocardial damage associated with ischemia/reperfusion injury. However, the cardioprotective effect of glutamine specifically after burn injury remains unclear. The present study explores the ability of glutamine to protect against myocardial damage in rats that have been severely burned. Seventy-two Wistar rats were randomly divided into three groups: normal controls (C), burned controls (B) and a glutamine-treated group (G). Groups B and G were subjected to full thickness burns comprising 30% of total body surface area. Group G was administered 1.5 g/ (kg•d) glutamine and group B was given the same dose of alanine via intragastric administration for 3 days. Levels of serum creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate transaminase (AST) and blood lactic acid were measured, as well as myocardial ATP and glutathione (GSH) contents. Cardiac function indices and histopathological changes were analyzed at 12, 24, 48 and 72 post-burn hours. In both burned groups, levels of serum CK, LDH, AST and blood lactic acid increased significantly, while myocardial ATP and GSH contents decreased. Compared with group B, CK, LDH, and AST levels were lower and blood lactic acid, myocardial ATP and GSH levels were higher in group G. Moreover, cardiac contractile function inhibition and myocardial histopathological damage were significantly reduced in group G compared to B. Taken together, these results show that glutamine supplementation protects myocardial structure and function after burn injury by improving energy metabolism and by promotedthe synthesis of ATP and GSH in cardiac myocytes. PMID:22977661

  14. [Research on Cardiac Structure and Function in the Overweight and Obese population and Influence Factors].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmei; Han, Lina; Huang, He; Yu, Yerong; Li, Jiangbo; Liu, Xiaoqin

    2016-02-01

    In this study we performed Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI), two-dimensional speckle tracking imaging (2D- STI) and three-dimensional speckle tracking imaging (3D-STI) on enrolled healthy, overweight and obese groups (34 subjects in each group), respectively, to analyze cardiac structure and its function. Compared with healthy group, global longitudinal strain (GLS), global circumferential strain (GCS), global area strain(GAS) and global radial strain (GRS) decreased progressively (P < 0.05). The ratio of early diastolic mitral inflow velocity to global early diastolic strain rate of left ventricle (E/e'sr) (r = 0.466, P < 0.001), GLS (r = 0.502, P < 0. 001), GCS (r = 0.426, P < 0.001), GAS (r = 0.535, P < 0.001) and GRS (r = -0.554, P < 0.001) were correlated with body mass index (BMI). E/e'sr (r = 0.37, P = 0.003), GLS (r = 0.455, P < 0.001), GCS (r = 0.282, P = 0.02), GAS (r = 0.412, P < 0.001) and GRS (r = -0.471, P < 0.001) were correlated with free fatty acid (FFA). Stepwise multiple linear regression revealed that BMI was independently correlated with E/e'sr, GLS, GCS, GAS and GRS. Waist to hip ratio (WHR) was independently correlated with GLS, GCS, GAS and GRS. FFA was independently correlated with E/e'sr (P < 0.05). The study showed that cardiac structure changed and impaired left ventricular global systolic and diastolic function in overweight and obes population. Moreover, BMI, WHR and FFA may be independent influence factors of cardiac function in overweight and obese population. PMID:27382752

  15. Reduction of Leukocyte Counts by Hydroxyurea Improves Cardiac Function in Rats with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guiyue; Yao, Yucai; Pan, Lingyun; Zhu, Wei; Yan, Suhua

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to decrease leukocytes counts by hydroxyurea (Hu) in an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) rat model and examine its effect on the inflammatory response of myocardial infarction and cardiac functions. Material/Methods AMI was successfully caused in 36 rats, and 12 control rats received sham operation. Rats in the AMI group were then randomly divided into Hu and vehicle group with 18 rats each. Rats in the Hu AMI group received Hu (200 mg/kg) intragastrically while vehicle AMI group received saline. Leukocytes counts, cardiac functions, myocardial tissue morphology, and levels of soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM), P-selectin and platelet activating factor (PAF) were measured and compared among the three groups four weeks after AMI induction. Results Leukocytes, neutrophils, and leukomonocyte counts in vehicle AMI rats were significantly higher than that of the normal control group (p<0.05). However, Hu treatment decreased their counts significantly (p<0.05). sICAM, P-selectin, and PAF level in vehicle AMI group were significantly higher than those of the normal group, and their level was also decreased by Hu treatment (p<0.05). Echocardiography analysis showed that Hu treatment increased left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and left ventricular fractional shortening (LVFS) compared to that of vehicle AMI group (p<0.05). Histopathological examination showed that Hu significantly reduced the swelling of the heart muscle fiber in necrotic foci and the number of inflammatory cells infiltrated into myocardial interstitium compared to vehicle AMI group. Conclusions Decrease leukocytes counts by Hu significantly reduced inflammatory reaction and improved cardiac functions in AMI rats. PMID:26675565

  16. Adipose-derived stromal cell therapy improves cardiac function after coronary occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Bagno, Luiza L S; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro S; Oliveira, Patrícia F; Cunha-Abreu, Márcia S; Rocha, Nazareth N; Kasai-Brunswick, Taís H; Lago, Vivian M; Goldenberg, Regina C S; Campos-de-Carvalho, Antonio C

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have identified adipose tissue as a new source of mesenchymal stem cells for therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the therapy with adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) in a rat model of healed myocardial infarction (MI). ASCs from inguinal subcutaneous adipose tissue of male Wistar rats were isolated by enzymatic digestion and filtration. Cells were then cultured until passage 3. Four weeks after ligation of the left coronary artery of female rats, a suspension of either 100 µl with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) + Matrigel + 2 × 10(6) ASCs labeled with Hoechst (n = 11) or 100 µl of PBS + Matrigel (n = 10) was injected along the borders of the ventricular wall scar tissue. A sham-operated group (n = 5) was submitted to the same surgical procedure except permanent ligation of left coronary artery. Cardiac performance was assessed by electro- and echocardiogram. Echo was performed prior to injections (baseline, BL) and 6 weeks after injections (follow-up, FU), and values after treatment were normalized by values obtained before treatment. Hemodynamic measurements were performed 6 weeks after injections. All infarcted animals exhibited cardiac function impairment. Ejection fraction (EF), shortening fractional area (SFA), and left ventricular akinesia (LVA) were similar between infarcted groups before treatment. Six weeks after therapy, ASC group showed significant improvement in all three ECHO indices in comparison to vehicle group. In anesthetized animals dp/dt(+) was also significantly higher in ASCs when compared to vehicle. In agreement with functional improvement, scar area was diminished in the ASC group. We conclude that ASCs improve cardiac function in infarcted rats when administered directly to the myocardium. PMID:22472303

  17. Rapamycin nanoparticles target defective autophagy in muscular dystrophy to enhance both strength and cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Bibee, Kristin P.; Cheng, Ya-Jian; Ching, James K.; Marsh, Jon N.; Li, Allison J.; Keeling, Richard M.; Connolly, Anne M.; Golumbek, Paul T.; Myerson, Jacob W.; Hu, Grace; Chen, Junjie; Shannon, William D.; Lanza, Gregory M.; Weihl, Conrad C.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy in boys progresses rapidly to severe impairment of muscle function and death in the second or third decade of life. Current supportive therapy with corticosteroids results in a modest increase in strength as a consequence of a general reduction in inflammation, albeit with potential untoward long-term side effects and ultimate failure of the agent to maintain strength. Here, we demonstrate that alternative approaches that rescue defective autophagy in mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, with the use of rapamycin-loaded nanoparticles induce a reproducible increase in both skeletal muscle strength and cardiac contractile performance that is not achievable with conventional oral rapamycin, even in pharmacological doses. This increase in physical performance occurs in both young and adult mice, and, surprisingly, even in aged wild-type mice, which sets the stage for consideration of systemic therapies to facilitate improved cell function by autophagic disposal of toxic byproducts of cell death and regeneration.—Bibee, K. P., Cheng, Y.-J., Ching, J. K., Marsh, J. N., Li, A. J., Keeling, R. M., Connolly, A. M., Golumbek, P. T., Myerson, J. W., Hu, G., Chen, J., Shannon, W. D., Lanza, G. M., Weihl, C. C., Wickline, S. A. Rapamycin nanoparticles target defective autophagy in muscular dystrophy to enhance both strength and cardiac function. PMID:24500923

  18. Improved Cardiac Function in Patients With Obstructive Jaundice After Internal Biliary Drainage

    PubMed Central

    Padillo, Javier; Puente, Jesús; Gómez, Manuel; Dios, Francisco; Naranjo, Antonio; Vallejo, Juan A.; Miño, Gonzalo; Pera, Carlos; Sitges-Serra, Antonio

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate myocardial function in patients with obstructive jaundice before and after internal biliary drainage. Summary Background Data Increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) have been found in patients with biliary obstruction. Methods Thirteen patients with newly diagnosed obstructive jaundice and no previous heart, lung, or renal disease were studied using a Swan-Ganz catheter. Hemodynamic measurements were taken before and 4 days after internal biliary drainage. Levels of ANP and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were obtained and liver function tests were also determined. Results Plasma levels of ANP and BNP were increased twofold to fourfold in the basal state and declined after biliary drainage. Independent variables predicting left ventricular systolic work were total bilirubin concentrations, duration of jaundice, and BNP. In addition, bilirubin concentrations correlated with pulmonary vascular resistance, mean arterial pulmonary pressure, and right ventricular systolic work. Internal biliary drainage resulted in an improvement in left ventricular systolic work. A correlation was found between decreasing ANP concentrations and increasing cardiac output. Conclusions Increased plasma levels of natriuretic peptides in patients with obstructive jaundice may reflect a subclinical myocardial dysfunction correlating with the degree of jaundice. After internal biliary drainage, there is a measurable improvement of cardiac function. PMID:11685028

  19. Antioxidant treatment improves neonatal survival and prevents impaired cardiac function at adulthood following neonatal glucocorticoid therapy.

    PubMed

    Niu, Youguo; Herrera, Emilio A; Evans, Rhys D; Giussani, Dino A

    2013-10-15

    Glucocorticoids are widely used to treat chronic lung disease in premature infants but their longer-term adverse effects on the cardiovascular system raise concerns. We reported that neonatal dexamethasone treatment in rats induced in the short term molecular indices of cardiac oxidative stress and cardiovascular tissue remodelling at weaning, and that neonatal combined antioxidant and dexamethasone treatment was protective at this time. In this study, we investigated whether such effects of neonatal dexamethasone have adverse consequences for NO bioavailability and cardiovascular function at adulthood, and whether neonatal combined antioxidant and dexamethasone treatment is protective in the adult. Newborn rat pups received daily i.p. injections of a human-relevant tapering dose of dexamethasone (D; n = 8; 0.5, 0.3, 0.1 μg g(-1)) or D with vitamins C and E (DCE; n = 8; 200 and 100 mg kg(-1), respectively) on postnatal days 1-3 (P1-3); vitamins were continued from P4 to P6. Controls received equal volumes of vehicle from P1 to P6 (C; n = 8). A fourth group received vitamins alone (CCE; n = 8). At P100, plasma NO metabolites (NOx) was measured and isolated hearts were assessed under both Working and Langendorff preparations. Relative to controls, neonatal dexamethasone therapy increased mortality by 18% (P < 0.05). Surviving D pups at adulthood had lower plasma NOx concentrations (10.6 ± 0.8 vs. 28.0 ± 1.5 μM), an increased relative left ventricular (LV) mass (70 ± 2 vs. 63 ± 1%), enhanced LV end-diastolic pressure (14 ± 2 vs. 8 ± 1 mmHg) and these hearts failed to adapt output with increased preload (cardiac output: 2.9 ± 2.0 vs. 10.6 ± 1.2 ml min(-1)) or afterload (cardiac output: -5.3 ± 2.0 vs.1.4 ± 1.2 ml min(-1)); all P < 0.05. Combined neonatal dexamethasone with antioxidant vitamins improved postnatal survival, restored plasma NOx and protected against cardiac dysfunction at adulthood. In conclusion, neonatal dexamethasone therapy promotes cardiac

  20. Simple Measures of Function and Symptoms in Hospitalized Heart Failure Patients Predict Short-Term Cardiac Event-Free Survival

    PubMed Central

    Cataldo, Janine; Mackin, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Background. Heart failure (HF) is a prevalent chronic condition where patients experience numerous uncomfortable symptoms, low functional status, and high mortality rates. Objective. To determine whether function and/or symptoms predict cardiac event-free survival in hospitalized HF patients within 90 days of hospital discharge. Methods. Inpatients (N = 32) had HF symptoms assessed with 4 yes/no questions. Function was determined with NYHA Classification, Katz Index of Activities of Daily Living (ADLs), and directly with the short physical performance battery (SPPB). Survival was analyzed with time to the first postdischarge cardiac event with events defined as cardiac rehospitalization, heart transplantation, or death. Results. Mean age was 58.2 ± 13.6 years. Patient reported ADL function was nearly independent (5.6 ± 1.1) while direct measure (SPPB) showed moderate functional limitation (6.4 ± 3.1). Within 90 days, 40.6% patients had a cardiac event. At discharge, each increase in NYHA Classification was associated with a 3.4-fold higher risk of cardiac events (95% CI 1.4–8.5). Patients reporting symptoms of dyspnea, fatigue, and orthopnea before discharge had a 4.0-fold, 9.7-fold, and 12.8-fold, respectively, greater risk of cardiac events (95% CI 1.2–13.2; 1.2–75.1; 1.7–99.7). Conclusions. Simple assessments of function and symptoms easily performed at discharge may predict short-term cardiac outcomes in hospitalized HF patients. PMID:24672717

  1. Acute effects of intravenous dronedarone on electrocardiograms, hemodynamics and cardiac functions in anesthetized dogs

    PubMed Central

    SAENGKLUB, Nakkawee; LIMPRASUTR, Vudhiporn; SAWANGKOON, Suwanakiet; BURANAKARL, Chollada; HAMLIN, Robert L.; KIJTAWORNRAT, Anusak

    2015-01-01

    Dronedarone is a class III antiarrhythmic that has been used for management of atrial fibrillation in humans, but limited information was found in dogs. The objective of this study was to determine the acute effects of escalating concentrations of dronedarone on electrocardiograms (ECG), hemodynamics and cardiac mechanics in healthy dogs. A total of 7 beagle dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane and instrumented to obtain lead II ECG, pressures at ascending aorta, right atrium, pulmonary artery and left ventricle, and left ventricular pressure-volume relationship. Five dogs were given vehicle and followed by escalating doses of dronedarone (0.5, 1.0 and 2.5 mg/kg, 15 min for each dose), and two dogs were used as a vehicle-treated control. All parameters were measured at 15 min after the end of each dose. The results showed that all parameters in vehicle-treated dogs were unaltered. Dronedarone at 2.5 mg/kg significantly lengthened PQ interval (P<0.01), reduced cardiac output (P<0.01) and increased systemic vascular resistance (P<0.01). Dronedarone produced negative inotropy assessed by significantly lowered end-systolic pressure-volume relationship, preload recruitable stroke work, contractility index and dP/dtmax. It also impaired diastolic function by significantly increased end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship, tau and dP/dtmin. These results suggested that acute effects of dronedarone produced negative dromotropy, inotropy and lusitropy in anesthetized dogs. Care should be taken when given dronedarone to dogs, especially when the patients have impaired cardiac function. PMID:26346474

  2. Acute effects of intravenous dronedarone on electrocardiograms, hemodynamics and cardiac functions in anesthetized dogs.

    PubMed

    Saengklub, Nakkawee; Limprasutr, Vudhiporn; Sawangkoon, Suwanakiet; Buranakarl, Chollada; Hamlin, Robert L; Kijtawornrat, Anusak

    2016-03-01

    Dronedarone is a class III antiarrhythmic that has been used for management of atrial fibrillation in humans, but limited information was found in dogs. The objective of this study was to determine the acute effects of escalating concentrations of dronedarone on electrocardiograms (ECG), hemodynamics and cardiac mechanics in healthy dogs. A total of 7 beagle dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane and instrumented to obtain lead II ECG, pressures at ascending aorta, right atrium, pulmonary artery and left ventricle, and left ventricular pressure-volume relationship. Five dogs were given vehicle and followed by escalating doses of dronedarone (0.5, 1.0 and 2.5 mg/kg, 15 min for each dose), and two dogs were used as a vehicle-treated control. All parameters were measured at 15 min after the end of each dose. The results showed that all parameters in vehicle-treated dogs were unaltered. Dronedarone at 2.5 mg/kg significantly lengthened PQ interval (P<0.01), reduced cardiac output (P<0.01) and increased systemic vascular resistance (P<0.01). Dronedarone produced negative inotropy assessed by significantly lowered end-systolic pressure-volume relationship, preload recruitable stroke work, contractility index and dP/dtmax. It also impaired diastolic function by significantly increased end-diastolic pressure-volume relationship, tau and dP/dtmin. These results suggested that acute effects of dronedarone produced negative dromotropy, inotropy and lusitropy in anesthetized dogs. Care should be taken when given dronedarone to dogs, especially when the patients have impaired cardiac function. PMID:26346474

  3. Anti-Thymocyte Globulin Induces Neoangiogenesis and Preserves Cardiac Function after Experimental Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenauer, Michael; Mildner, Michael; Werba, Gregor; Beer, Lucian; Hoetzenecker, Konrad; Baumgartner, Andrea; Hasun, Matthias; Nickl, Stefanie; Mitterbauer, Andreas; Zimmermann, Matthias; Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Podesser, Bruno Karl; Klepetko, Walter; Ankersmit, Hendrik Jan

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) followed by ventricular remodeling is the major cause of congestive heart failure and death in western world countries. Objective Of relevance are reports showing that infusion of apoptotic leucocytes or anti-lymphocyte serum after AMI reduces myocardial necrosis and preserves cardiac function. In order to corroborate this therapeutic mechanism, the utilization of an immunosuppressive agent with a comparable mechanism, such as anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) was evaluated in this study. Methods and Results AMI was induced in rats by ligation of the left anterior descending artery. Initially after the onset of ischemia, rabbit ATG (10 mg/rat) was injected intravenously. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed that ATG induced a pronounced release of pro-angiogenic and chemotactic factors. Moreover, paracrine factors released from ATG co-incubated cell cultures conferred a down-regulation of p53 in cardiac myocytes. Rats that were injected with ATG evidenced higher numbers of CD68+ macrophages in the ischemic myocardium. Animals injected with ATG evidenced less myocardial necrosis, showed a significant reduction of infarct dimension and an improvement of post-AMI remodeling after six weeks (infarct dimension 24.9% vs. 11.4%, p<0.01). Moreover, a higher vessel density in the peri-infarct region indicated a better collateralization in rats that were injected with ATG. Conclusions These data indicate that ATG, a therapeutic agent successfully applied in clinical transplant immunology, triggered cardioprotective effects after AMI that salvaged ischemic myocardium by down-regulation of p53. This might have raised the resistance against apoptotic cell death during ischemia. The combination of these mechanisms seems to be causative for improved cardiac function and less ventricular remodeling after experimental AMI. PMID:23284885

  4. Bimodal biophotonic imaging of the structure-function relationship in cardiac tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hucker, William J.; Ripplinger, Crystal M.; Fleming, Christine P.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2009-01-01

    The development of systems physiology is hampered by the limited ability to relate tissue structure and function in intact organs in vivo or in vitro. Here, we show the application of a bimodal biophotonic imaging approach that employs optical coherence tomography and fluorescent imaging to investigate the structure-function relationship at the tissue level in the heart. Reconstruction of cardiac excitation and structure was limited by the depth penetration of bimodal imaging to ∼2 mm in atrial tissue, and ∼1 mm in ventricular myocardium. The subcellular resolution of optical coherence tomography clearly demonstrated that microscopic fiber orientation governs the pattern of wave propagation in functionally characterized rabbit sinoatrial and atrioventricular nodal preparations and revealed structural heterogeneities contributing to ventricular arrhythmias. The combination of this bimodal biophotonic imaging approach with histology and/or immunohistochemistry can span multiple scales of resolution for the investigation of the molecular and structural determinants of intact tissue physiology. PMID:19021392

  5. Salvianolic acid B functioned as a competitive inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and efficiently prevented cardiac remodeling

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Infarct-induced left ventricular (LV) remodeling is a deleterious consequence after acute myocardial infarction (MI) which may further advance to congestive heart failure. Therefore, new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the effects of LV remodeling are urgently needed. Salvianolic acid B (SalB) from Salviae mitiorrhizae, which has been widely used in China for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, is a potential candidate for therapeutic intervention of LV remodeling targeting matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). Results Molecular modeling and LIGPLOT analysis revealed in silico docking of SalB at the catalytic site of MMP-9. Following this lead, we expressed truncated MMP-9 which contains only the catalytic domain, and used this active protein for in-gel gelatin zymography, enzymatic analysis, and SalB binding by Biacore. Data generated from these assays indicated that SalB functioned as a competitive inhibitor of MMP-9. In our rat model for cardiac remodeling, western blot, echocardiography, hemodynamic measurement and histopathological detection were used to detect the effects and mechanism of SalB on cardio-protection. Our results showed that in MI rat, SalB selectively inhibited MMP-9 activities without affecting MMP-9 expression while no effect of SalB was seen on MMP-2. Moreover, SalB treatment in MI rat could efficiently increase left ventricle wall thickness, improve heart contractility, and decrease heart fibrosis. Conclusions As a competitive inhibitor of MMP-9, SalB presents significant effects on preventing LV structural damage and preserving cardiac function. Further studies to develop SalB and its analogues for their potential for cardioprotection in clinic are warranted. PMID:20735854

  6. Effects of experimental cardiac volume loading on left atrial phasic function in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Osuga, Tatsuyuki; Nakamura, Kensuke; Morita, Tomoya; Nisa, Khoirun; Yokoyama, Nozomu; Sasaki, Noboru; Morishita, Keitaro; Ohta, Hiroshi; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To elucidate the relationship between acute volume overload and left atrial phasic function in healthy dogs. ANIMALS 6 healthy Beagles. PROCEDURES Dogs were anesthetized. A Swan-Ganz catheter was placed to measure mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP). Cardiac preload was increased by IV infusion with lactated Ringer solution at 150 mL/kg/h for 90 minutes. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed before (baseline) and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 minutes after volume loading began. At each echocardiographic assessment point, apical 4-chamber images were recorded and analyzed to derive time-left atrial area curves. Left atrial total (for reservoir function), passive (for conduit function), and active (for booster-pump function) fractional area changes were calculated from the curves. RESULTS Volume overload resulted in a significant increase from baseline in PCWP from 15 to 90 minutes after volume loading began. All fractional area changes at 15 to 90 minutes were significantly increased from baseline. In multiple regression analysis, quadratic regression models were better fitted to the relationships between PCWP and each of the total and active fractional area changes than were linear regression models. A linear regression model was better fitted to the relationship between PCWP and passive fractional area change. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that left atrial phasic function assessed on the basis of left atrial phasic areas was enhanced during experimental cardiac volume loading in healthy dogs. The effect of volume load should be considered when evaluating left atrial phasic function by indices derived from left atrial phasic sizes. PMID:27580106

  7. Can Functional Cardiac Age be Predicted from ECG in a Normal Healthy Population

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd; Starc, Vito; Leban, Manja; Sinigoj, Petra; Vrhovec, Milos

    2011-01-01

    In a normal healthy population, we desired to determine the most age-dependent conventional and advanced ECG parameters. We hypothesized that changes in several ECG parameters might correlate with age and together reliably characterize the functional age of the heart. Methods: An initial study population of 313 apparently healthy subjects was ultimately reduced to 148 subjects (74 men, 84 women, in the range from 10 to 75 years of age) after exclusion criteria. In all subjects, ECG recordings (resting 5-minute 12-lead high frequency ECG) were evaluated via custom software programs to calculate up to 85 different conventional and advanced ECG parameters including beat-to-beat QT and RR variability, waveform complexity, and signal-averaged, high-frequency and spatial/spatiotemporal ECG parameters. The prediction of functional age was evaluated by multiple linear regression analysis using the best 5 univariate predictors. Results: Ignoring what were ultimately small differences between males and females, the functional age was found to be predicted (R2= 0.69, P < 0.001) from a linear combination of 5 independent variables: QRS elevation in the frontal plane (p<0.001), a new repolarization parameter QTcorr (p<0.001), mean high frequency QRS amplitude (p=0.009), the variability parameter % VLF of RRV (p=0.021) and the P-wave width (p=0.10). Here, QTcorr represents the correlation between the calculated QT and the measured QT signal. Conclusions: In apparently healthy subjects with normal conventional ECGs, functional cardiac age can be estimated by multiple linear regression analysis of mostly advanced ECG results. Because some parameters in the regression formula, such as QTcorr, high frequency QRS amplitude and P-wave width also change with disease in the same direction as with increased age, increased functional age of the heart may reflect subtle age-related pathologies in cardiac electrical function that are usually hidden on conventional ECG.

  8. Central-peripheral neural network interactions evoked by vagus nerve stimulation: functional consequences on control of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Ardell, Jeffrey L; Rajendran, Pradeep S; Nier, Heath A; KenKnight, Bruce H; Armour, J Andrew

    2015-11-15

    Using vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), we sought to determine the contribution of vagal afferents to efferent control of cardiac function. In anesthetized dogs, the right and left cervical vagosympathetic trunks were stimulated in the intact state, following ipsilateral or contralateral vagus nerve transection (VNTx), and then following bilateral VNTx. Stimulations were performed at currents from 0.25 to 4.0 mA, frequencies from 2 to 30 Hz, and a 500-μs pulse width. Right or left VNS evoked significantly greater current- and frequency-dependent suppression of chronotropic, inotropic, and lusitropic function subsequent to sequential VNTx. Bradycardia threshold was defined as the current first required for a 5% decrease in heart rate. The threshold for the right vs. left vagus-induced bradycardia in the intact state (2.91 ± 0.18 and 3.47 ± 0.20 mA, respectively) decreased significantly with right VNTx (1.69 ± 0.17 mA for right and 3.04 ± 0.27 mA for left) and decreased further following bilateral VNTx (1.29 ± 0.16 mA for right and 1.74 ± 0.19 mA for left). Similar effects were observed following left VNTx. The thresholds for afferent-mediated effects on cardiac parameters were 0.62 ± 0.04 and 0.65 ± 0.06 mA with right and left VNS, respectively, and were reflected primarily as augmentation. Afferent-mediated tachycardias were maintained following β-blockade but were eliminated by VNTx. The increased effectiveness and decrease in bradycardia threshold with sequential VNTx suggest that 1) vagal afferents inhibit centrally mediated parasympathetic efferent outflow and 2) the ipsilateral and contralateral vagi exert a substantial buffering capacity. The intact threshold reflects the interaction between multiple levels of the cardiac neural hierarchy. PMID:26371171

  9. Interspecies Differences in Virus Uptake versus Cardiac Function of the Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Freiberg, Fabian; Sauter, Martina; Pinkert, Sandra; Govindarajan, Thirupugal; Kaldrack, Joanna; Thakkar, Meghna; Fechner, Henry; Klingel, Karin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a cell contact protein with an important role in virus uptake. Its extracellular immunoglobulin domains mediate the binding to coxsackievirus and adenovirus as well as homophilic and heterophilic interactions between cells. The cytoplasmic tail links CAR to the cytoskeleton and intracellular signaling cascades. In the heart, CAR is crucial for embryonic development, electrophysiology, and coxsackievirus B infection. Noncardiac functions are less well understood, in part due to the lack of suitable animal models. Here, we generated a transgenic mouse that rescued the otherwise embryonic-lethal CAR knockout (KO) phenotype by expressing chicken CAR exclusively in the heart. Using this rescue model, we addressed interspecies differences in coxsackievirus uptake and noncardiac functions of CAR. Survival of the noncardiac CAR KO (ncKO) mouse indicates an essential role for CAR in the developing heart but not in other tissues. In adult animals, cardiac activity was normal, suggesting that chicken CAR can replace the physiological functions of mouse CAR in the cardiomyocyte. However, chicken CAR did not mediate virus entry in vivo, so that hearts expressing chicken instead of mouse CAR were protected from infection and myocarditis. Comparison of sequence homology and modeling of the D1 domain indicate differences between mammalian and chicken CAR that relate to the sites important for virus binding but not those involved in homodimerization. Thus, CAR-directed anticoxsackievirus therapy with only minor adverse effects in noncardiac tissue could be further improved by selectively targeting the virus-host interaction while maintaining cardiac function. IMPORTANCE Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is one of the most common human pathogens causing myocarditis. Its receptor, the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), not only mediates virus uptake but also relates to cytoskeletal organization and intracellular signaling

  10. Comparative impact of AAV and enzyme replacement therapy on respiratory and cardiac function in adult Pompe mice

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Darin J; Soustek, Meghan S; Todd, Adrian Gary; Mah, Cathryn S; Cloutier, Denise A; Kelley, Jeffry S; Clement, Nathalie; Fuller, David D; Byrne, Barry J

    2015-01-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by a deficiency of the enzyme responsible for degradation of lysosomal glycogen (acid α-glucosidase (GAA)). Cardiac dysfunction and respiratory muscle weakness are primary features of this disorder. To attenuate the progressive and rapid accumulation of glycogen resulting in cardiorespiratory dysfunction, adult Gaa–/– mice were administered a single systemic injection of rAAV2/9-DES-hGAA (AAV9-DES) or bimonthly injections of recombinant human GAA (enzyme replacement therapy (ERT)). Assessment of cardiac function and morphology was measured 1 and 3 months after initiation of treatment while whole-body plethysmography and diaphragmatic contractile function was evaluated at 3 months post-treatment in all groups. Gaa–/– animals receiving either AAV9-DES or ERT demonstrated a significant improvement in cardiac function and diaphragmatic contractile function as compared to control animals. AAV9-DES treatment resulted in a significant reduction in cardiac dimension (end diastolic left ventricular mass/gram wet weight; EDMc) at 3 months postinjection. Neither AAV nor ERT therapy altered minute ventilation during quiet breathing (eupnea). However, breathing frequency and expiratory time were significantly improved in AAV9-DES animals. These results indicate systemic delivery of either strategy improves cardiac function but AAV9-DES alone improves respiratory parameters at 3 months post-treatment in a murine model of Pompe disease. PMID:26029718

  11. Diastolic abnormalities in systemic sclerosis: evidence for associated defective cardiac functional reserve.

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, G; Vitale, D F; Giunta, A; Maione, S; Gerundo, G; Arnese, M; Tirri, E; Pelaggi, N; Giacummo, A; Tirri, G; Condorelli, M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the pattern of diastolic abnormalities in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) and the relationship between impaired ventricular filling and systolic function. METHODS: Twenty four patients with SSc underwent M-mode and two dimensional echocardiography using echo-Doppler and gated blood pool cardiac angiography, both at rest and after exercise. RESULTS: An impaired diastolic relaxation of the left ventricle was detected in 10 of the 24 patients with SSc. Left ventricular ejection fraction at rest in these 10 patients with impaired ventricular filling did not differ from that in the remaining 14 patients, but eight of the 10 failed to increase their ejection fraction during exercise, compared with two of the 14 with normal ventricular filling (p = 0.003). CONCLUSION: Impaired relaxation of the left ventricle is a recently described feature of scleroderma heart disease. Diastolic dysfunction in SSc could depend on myocardial fibrosis or myocardial ischaemia, or both. It was found to be associated with a defective cardiac functional reserve. However, its prognostic significance remains to be clarified. PMID:8774164

  12. Morphological and Functional Evaluation of Quadricuspid Aortic Valves Using Cardiac Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Song, Inyoung; Park, Jung Ah; Choi, Bo Hwa; Shin, Je Kyoun; Chee, Hyun Keun; Kim, Jun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to identify the morphological and functional characteristics of quadricuspid aortic valves (QAV) on cardiac computed tomography (CCT). Materials and Methods We retrospectively enrolled 11 patients with QAV. All patients underwent CCT and transthoracic echocardiography (TTE), and 7 patients underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR). The presence and classification of QAV assessed by CCT was compared with that of TTE and intraoperative findings. The regurgitant orifice area (ROA) measured by CCT was compared with severity of aortic regurgitation (AR) by TTE and the regurgitant fraction (RF) by CMR. Results All of the patients had AR; 9 had pure AR, 1 had combined aortic stenosis and regurgitation, and 1 had combined subaortic stenosis and regurgitation. Two patients had a subaortic fibrotic membrane and 1 of them showed a subaortic stenosis. One QAV was misdiagnosed as tricuspid aortic valve on TTE. In accordance with the Hurwitz and Robert's classification, consensus was reached on the QAV classification between the CCT and TTE findings in 7 of 10 patients. The patients were classified as type A (n = 1), type B (n = 3), type C (n = 1), type D (n = 4), and type F (n = 2) on CCT. A very high correlation existed between ROA by CCT and RF by CMR (r = 0.99) but a good correlation existed between ROA by CCT and regurgitant severity by TTE (r = 0.62). Conclusion Cardiac computed tomography provides comprehensive anatomical and functional information about the QAV. PMID:27390538

  13. Exposure to occupational air pollution and cardiac function in workers of the Esfahan Steel Industry, Iran.

    PubMed

    Golshahi, Jafar; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Saqira, Mohammad; Zavar, Reihaneh; Sadeghifar, Mostafa; Roohafza, Hamidreza

    2016-06-01

    Air pollution is recognized as an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We investigated association of exposure to occupational air pollution and cardiac function in the workers of the steel industry. Fifty male workers of the agglomeration and coke-making parts of the Esfahan Steel Company were randomly selected (n = 50). Workers in the administrative parts were studied as controls (n = 50). Those with known history of hypertension, dyslipidemia, or diabetes, and active smokers were not included. Data of age, body mass index, employment duration, blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, and lipid profile were gathered. Echocardiography was performed to evaluate cardiac function. Left ventricular ejection fraction was lower in workers of the agglomeration/coke-making parts than in controls (mean difference = 5 to 5.5 %, P < 0.001). Mild right ventricular dilatation and grade I pulmonary hypertension were present in three (12 %) workers of the coke-making part, but none of the controls (P = 0.010). According to these results, occupational air pollution exposure in workers of the steel industry is associated with left heart systolic dysfunction. Possible right heart insults due to air pollution exposure warrant further investigations. PMID:26946505

  14. Physiologic abnormalities of cardiac function in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma

    SciTech Connect

    Follansbee, W.P.; Curtiss, E.I.; Medsger, T.A. Jr.; Steen, V.D.; Uretsky, B.F.; Owens, G.R.; Rodnan, G.P.

    1984-01-19

    To investigate cardiopulmonary function in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma, we studied 26 patients with maximal exercise and redistribution thallium scans, rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography, pulmonary-function testing, and chest roentgenography. Although only 6 patients had clinical evidence of cardiac involvement, 20 had abnormal thallium scans, including 10 with reversible exercise-induced defects and 18 with fixed defects (8 had both). Seven of the 10 patients who had exercise-induced defects and underwent cardiac catheterization had normal coronary angiograms. Mean resting left ventricular ejection fraction and mean resting right ventricular ejection fraction were lower in patients with post-exercise left ventricular thallium defect scores above the median (59 +/- 13 per cent vs. 69 +/- 6 per cent, and 36 +/- 12 per cent vs. 47 +/- 7 per cent, respectively). The authors conclude that in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of myocardial perfusion are common and appear to be due to a disturbance of the myocardial microcirculation. Both right and left ventricular dysfunction appear to be related to this circulatory disturbance, suggesting ischemically mediated injury.

  15. Cardiac function in an endothermic fish: cellular mechanisms for overcoming acute thermal challenges during diving.

    PubMed

    Shiels, H A; Galli, G L J; Block, B A

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the physiology of vertebrate thermal tolerance is critical for predicting how animals respond to climate change. Pacific bluefin tuna experience a wide range of ambient sea temperatures and occupy the largest geographical niche of all tunas. Their capacity to endure thermal challenge is due in part to enhanced expression and activity of key proteins involved in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, which improve cardiomyocyte function and whole animal performance during temperature change. To define the cellular mechanisms that enable bluefin tuna hearts to function during acute temperature change, we investigated the performance of freshly isolated ventricular myocytes using confocal microscopy and electrophysiology. We demonstrate that acute cooling and warming (between 8 and 28°C) modulates the excitability of the cardiomyocyte by altering the action potential (AP) duration and the amplitude and kinetics of the cellular Ca(2+) transient. We then explored the interactions between temperature, adrenergic stimulation and contraction frequency, and show that when these stressors are combined in a physiologically relevant way, they alter AP characteristics to stabilize excitation-contraction coupling across an acute 20°C temperature range. This allows the tuna heart to maintain consistent contraction and relaxation cycles during acute thermal challenges. We hypothesize that this cardiac capacity plays a key role in the bluefin tunas' niche expansion across a broad thermal and geographical range. PMID:25540278

  16. Strategies for the chemical and biological functionalization of scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering: a review

    PubMed Central

    Tallawi, Marwa; Rosellini, Elisabetta; Barbani, Niccoletta; Cascone, Maria Grazia; Rai, Ranjana; Saint-Pierre, Guillaume; Boccaccini, Aldo R.

    2015-01-01

    The development of biomaterials for cardiac tissue engineering (CTE) is challenging, primarily owing to the requirement of achieving a surface with favourable characteristics that enhances cell attachment and maturation. The biomaterial surface plays a crucial role as it forms the interface between the scaffold (or cardiac patch) and the cells. In the field of CTE, synthetic polymers (polyglycerol sebacate, polyethylene glycol, polyglycolic acid, poly-l-lactide, polyvinyl alcohol, polycaprolactone, polyurethanes and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)) have been proven to exhibit suitable biodegradable and mechanical properties. Despite the fact that they show the required biocompatible behaviour, most synthetic polymers exhibit poor cell attachment capability. These synthetic polymers are mostly hydrophobic and lack cell recognition sites, limiting their application. Therefore, biofunctionalization of these biomaterials to enhance cell attachment and cell material interaction is being widely investigated. There are numerous approaches for functionalizing a material, which can be classified as mechanical, physical, chemical and biological. In this review, recent studies reported in the literature to functionalize scaffolds in the context of CTE, are discussed. Surface, morphological, chemical and biological modifications are introduced and the results of novel promising strategies and techniques are discussed. PMID:26109634

  17. Strategies for the chemical and biological functionalization of scaffolds for cardiac tissue engineering: a review.

    PubMed

    Tallawi, Marwa; Rosellini, Elisabetta; Barbani, Niccoletta; Cascone, Maria Grazia; Rai, Ranjana; Saint-Pierre, Guillaume; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2015-07-01

    The development of biomaterials for cardiac tissue engineering (CTE) is challenging, primarily owing to the requirement of achieving a surface with favourable characteristics that enhances cell attachment and maturation. The biomaterial surface plays a crucial role as it forms the interface between the scaffold (or cardiac patch) and the cells. In the field of CTE, synthetic polymers (polyglycerol sebacate, polyethylene glycol, polyglycolic acid, poly-l-lactide, polyvinyl alcohol, polycaprolactone, polyurethanes and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)) have been proven to exhibit suitable biodegradable and mechanical properties. Despite the fact that they show the required biocompatible behaviour, most synthetic polymers exhibit poor cell attachment capability. These synthetic polymers are mostly hydrophobic and lack cell recognition sites, limiting their application. Therefore, biofunctionalization of these biomaterials to enhance cell attachment and cell material interaction is being widely investigated. There are numerous approaches for functionalizing a material, which can be classified as mechanical, physical, chemical and biological. In this review, recent studies reported in the literature to functionalize scaffolds in the context of CTE, are discussed. Surface, morphological, chemical and biological modifications are introduced and the results of novel promising strategies and techniques are discussed. PMID:26109634

  18. Pressor response to intravenous tyramine is a marker of cardiac, but not vascular, adrenergic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meck, Janice V.; Martin, David S.; D'Aunno, Dominick S.; Waters, Wendy W.

    2003-01-01

    Intravenous injections of the indirect sympathetic amine, tyramine, are used as a test of peripheral adrenergic function. The authors measured the time course of increases in ejection fraction, heart rate, systolic and diastolic pressure, popliteal artery flow, and greater saphenous vein diameter before and after an injection of 4.0 mg/m(2) body surface area of tyramine in normal human subjects. The tyramine caused moderate, significant increases in systolic pressure and significant decreases in total peripheral resistance. The earliest changes were a 30% increase in ejection fraction and a 16% increase in systolic pressure, followed by a 60% increase in popliteal artery flow and a later 11% increase in greater saphenous vein diameter. There were no changes in diastolic pressure or heart rate. These results suggest that pressor responses during tyramine injections are primarily due to an inotropic response that increases cardiac output and pressure and causes a reflex decrease in vascular resistance. Thus, tyramine pressor tests are a measure of cardiac, but not vascular, sympathetic function.

  19. Effect of fiber diameter on the assembly of functional 3D cardiac patches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleischer, Sharon; Miller, Jacob; Hurowitz, Haley; Shapira, Assaf; Dvir, Tal

    2015-07-01

    The cardiac ECM has a unique 3D structure responsible for tissue morphogenesis and strong contractions. It is divided into three fiber groups with specific roles and distinct dimensions; nanoscale endomysial fibers, perimysial fibers with a diameter of 1 μm, and epimysial fibers, which have a diameter of several micrometers. We report here on our work, where distinct 3D fibrous scaffolds, each of them recapitulating the dimension scales of a single fiber population in the heart matrix, were fabricated. We have assessed the mechanical properties of these scaffolds and the contribution of each fiber population to cardiomyocyte morphogenesis, tissue assembly and function. Our results show that the nanoscale fiber scaffolds were more elastic than the microscale scaffolds, however, cardiomyocytes cultured on microscale fiber scaffolds exhibited enhanced spreading and elongation, both on the single cell and on the engineered tissue levels. In addition, lower fibroblast proliferation rates were observed on these microscale topographies. Based on the collected data we have fabricated composite scaffolds containing micro and nanoscale fibers, promoting superior tissue morphogenesis without compromising tissue contraction. Cardiac tissues, engineered within these composite scaffolds exhibited superior function, including lower excitation threshold and stronger contraction forces than tissue engineered within the single-population fiber scaffolds.

  20. Cardiac function in an endothermic fish: cellular mechanisms for overcoming acute thermal challenges during diving

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, H. A.; Galli, G. L. J.; Block, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the physiology of vertebrate thermal tolerance is critical for predicting how animals respond to climate change. Pacific bluefin tuna experience a wide range of ambient sea temperatures and occupy the largest geographical niche of all tunas. Their capacity to endure thermal challenge is due in part to enhanced expression and activity of key proteins involved in cardiac excitation–contraction coupling, which improve cardiomyocyte function and whole animal performance during temperature change. To define the cellular mechanisms that enable bluefin tuna hearts to function during acute temperature change, we investigated the performance of freshly isolated ventricular myocytes using confocal microscopy and electrophysiology. We demonstrate that acute cooling and warming (between 8 and 28°C) modulates the excitability of the cardiomyocyte by altering the action potential (AP) duration and the amplitude and kinetics of the cellular Ca2+ transient. We then explored the interactions between temperature, adrenergic stimulation and contraction frequency, and show that when these stressors are combined in a physiologically relevant way, they alter AP characteristics to stabilize excitation–contraction coupling across an acute 20°C temperature range. This allows the tuna heart to maintain consistent contraction and relaxation cycles during acute thermal challenges. We hypothesize that this cardiac capacity plays a key role in the bluefin tunas' niche expansion across a broad thermal and geographical range. PMID:25540278

  1. Nitric oxide control of cardiac function: is neuronal nitric oxide synthase a key component?

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Claire E; Ashley, Euan A; Casadei, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been shown to regulate cardiac function, both in physiological conditions and in disease states. However, several aspects of NO signalling in the myocardium remain poorly understood. It is becoming increasingly apparent that the disparate functions ascribed to NO result from its generation by different isoforms of the NO synthase (NOS) enzyme, the varying subcellular localization and regulation of NOS isoforms and their effector proteins. Some apparently contrasting findings may have arisen from the use of non-isoform-specific inhibitors of NOS, and from the assumption that NO donors may be able to mimic the actions of endogenously produced NO. In recent years an at least partial explanation for some of the disagreements, although by no means all, may be found from studies that have focused on the role of the neuronal NOS (nNOS) isoform. These data have shown a key role for nNOS in the control of basal and adrenergically stimulated cardiac contractility and in the autonomic control of heart rate. Whether or not the role of nNOS carries implications for cardiovascular disease remains an intriguing possibility requiring future study. PMID:15306414

  2. Lifetime affect and midlife cognitive function: prospective birth cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Richards, M.; Barnett, J. H.; Xu, M. K.; Croudace, T. J.; Gaysina, D.; Kuh, D.; Jones, P. B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recurrent affective problems are predictive of cognitive impairment, but the timing and directionality, and the nature of the cognitive impairment, are unclear. Aims To test prospective associations between life-course affective symptoms and cognitive function in late middle age. Method A total of 1668 men and women were drawn from the Medical Research Council National Survey of Health and Development (the British 1946 birth cohort). Longitudinal affective symptoms spanning age 13-53 years served as predictors; outcomes consisted of self-reported memory problems at 60-64 years and decline in memory and information processing from age 53 to 60-64 years. Results Regression analyses revealed no clear pattern of association between longitudinal affective symptoms and decline in cognitive test scores, after adjusting for gender, childhood cognitive ability, education and midlife socioeconomic status. In contrast, affective symptoms were strongly, diffusely and independently associated with self-reported memory problems. Conclusions Affective symptoms are more clearly associated with self-reported memory problems in late midlife than with objectively measured cognitive performance. PMID:24357571

  3. Does Subacromial Osteolysis Affect Shoulder Function after Clavicle Hook Plating?

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Siwei; Gan, Minfeng; Sun, Han; Wu, Guizhong; Yang, Huilin; Zhou, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate whether subacromial osteolysis, one of the major complications of the clavicle hook plate procedure, affects shoulder function. Methods. We had performed a retrospective study of 72 patients diagnosed with a Neer II lateral clavicle fracture or Degree-III acromioclavicular joint dislocation in our hospital from July 2012 to December 2013. All these patients had undergone surgery with clavicle hook plate and were divided into two groups based on the occurrence of subacromial osteolysis. By using the Constant-Murley at the first follow-up visit after plates removal, we evaluated patients' shoulder function to judge if it has been affected by subacromial osteolysis. Results. We have analyzed clinical data for these 72 patients, which shows that there is no significant difference between group A (39 patients) and group B (33 patients) in age, gender, injury types or side, and shoulder function (the Constant-Murley scores are 93.38 ± 3.56 versus 94.24 ± 3.60, P > 0.05). Conclusion. The occurrence of subacromial osteolysis is not rare, and also it does not significantly affect shoulder function. PMID:27034937

  4. Electrocardiogram and cardiac function in a longitudinal study of copper deficiency in the Long-Evans rat

    SciTech Connect

    Zhiming Liao, Hamlin, R.; Medeiros, D.M. )

    1991-03-11

    Weanling Long-Evans rats were fed either copper-adequate or -restricted diets for varying periods of time up to 6 wk. Beginning at 2 wk after weaning, and weekly thereafter, 5 rats from each diet were evaluated for cardiac function and ECG activity and sacrificed. ECG traces revealed indications of cardiac failure at week 3 in rats fed the copper-restricted diet at which time concentric cardiac hypertrophy was evident. Prolonged P-R and Q-T intervals and greater QRS height and higher voltages were observed in copper-restricted rats. However, + and {minus} dP/dt max did not differ by diet copper treatment for any of the time intervals studied, nor was any notable difference in total left developed ventricular pressure apparent. These results suggest that the onset of cardiac dysfunction in copper deficiency is rapid, with both dysfunction and hypertrophy apparent within 3 weeks after copper restriction.

  5. Heme Oxygenase-1 Induction Improves Cardiac Function following Myocardial Ischemia by Reducing Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Issan, Yossi; Kornowski, Ran; Aravot, Dan; Shainberg, Asher; Laniado-Schwartzman, Michal; Sodhi, Komal; Abraham, Nader G.; Hochhauser, Edith

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress plays a key role in exacerbating diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a stress response protein, is cytoprotective, but its role in post myocardial infarction (MI) and diabetes is not fully characterized. We aimed to investigate the protection and the mechanisms of HO-1 induction in cardiomyocytes subjected to hypoxia and in diabetic mice subjected to LAD ligation. Methods In vitro: cultured cardiomyocytes were treated with cobalt-protoporphyrin (CoPP) and tin protoporphyrin (SnPP) prior to hypoxic stress. In vivo: CoPP treated streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were subjected to LAD ligation for 2/24 h. Cardiac function, histology, biochemical damage markers and signaling pathways were measured. Results HO-1 induction lowered release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine phospho kinase (CK), decreased propidium iodide staining, improved cell morphology and preserved mitochondrial membrane potential in cardiomyocytes. In diabetic mice, Fractional Shortening (FS) was lower than non-diabetic mice (35±1%vs.41±2, respectively p<0.05). CoPP-treated diabetic animals improved cardiac function (43±2% p<0.01), reduced CK, Troponin T levels and infarct size compared to non-treated diabetic mice (P<0.01, P<0.001, P<0.01 respectively). CoPP-enhanced HO-1 protein levels and reduced oxidative stress in diabetic animals, as indicated by the decrease in superoxide levels in cardiac tissues and plasma TNFα levels (p<0.05). The increased levels of HO-1 by CoPP treatment after LAD ligation led to a shift of the Bcl-2/bax ratio towards the antiapoptotic process (p<0.05). CoPP significantly increased the expression levels of pAKT and pGSK3β (p<0.05) in cardiomyocytes and in diabetic mice with MI. SnPP abolished CoPP's cardioprotective effects. Conclusions HO-1 induction plays a role in cardioprotection against hypoxic damage in cardiomyocytes and in reducing post ischemic cardiac damage in the diabetic heart as proved by

  6. New Aspects of HERG K+ Channel Function Depending upon Cardiac Spatial Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pen; Guan, Ping; Bai, Xiao-Lu; Song, Zhi-Ping

    2014-01-01

    HERG K+ channel, the genetic counterpart of rapid delayed rectifier K+ current in cardiac cells, is responsible for many cases of inherited and drug-induced long QT syndromes. HERG has unusual biophysical properties distinct from those of other K+ channels. While the conventional pulse protocols in patch-clamp studies have helped us elucidate these properties, their limitations in assessing HERG function have also been progressively noticed. We employed AP-clamp techniques using physiological action potential waveforms recorded from various regions of canine heart to study HERG function in HEK293 cells and identified several novel aspects of HERG function. We showed that under AP-clamp IHERG increased gradually with membrane repolarization, peaked at potentials around 20–30 mV more negative than revealed by pulse protocols and at action potential duration (APD) to 60%-70% full repolarization, and fell rapidly at the terminal phase of repolarization. We found that the rising phase of IHERG was conferred by removal of inactivation and the decaying phase resulted from a fall in driving force, which were all determined by the rate of membrane repolarization. We identified regional heterogeneity and transmural gradient of IHERG when quantified with the area covered by IHERG trace. In addition, we observed regional and transmural differences of IHERG in response to dofetilide blockade. Finally, we characterized the influence of HERG function by selective inhibition of other ion currents. Based on our results, we conclude that the distinct biophysical properties of HERG reported by AP-clamp confer its unique function in cardiac repolarization thereby in antiarrhythmia and arrhythmogenesis. PMID:24475014

  7. Distinct functional roles of cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations revealed by a 3D simulation model.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Asuka; Okada, Jun-Ichi; Washio, Takumi; Hisada, Toshiaki; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2015-06-01

    Experimental characterization of two cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations, namely, subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) and interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM), has been hampered by technical difficulties, and an alternative approach is eagerly awaited. We previously developed a three-dimensional computational cardiomyocyte model that integrates electrophysiology, metabolism, and mechanics with subcellular structure. In this study, we further developed our model to include intracellular oxygen diffusion, and determined whether mitochondrial localization or intrinsic properties cause functional variations. For this purpose, we created two models: one with equal SSM and IFM properties and one with IFM having higher activity levels. Using these two models to compare the SSM and IFM responses of [Ca(2+)], tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, [NADH], and mitochondrial inner membrane potential to abrupt changes in pacing frequency (0.25-2 Hz), we found that the reported functional differences between these subpopulations appear to be mostly related to local [Ca(2+)] heterogeneity, and variations in intrinsic properties only serve to augment these differences. We also examined the effect of hypoxia on mitochondrial function. Under normoxic conditions, intracellular oxygen is much higher throughout the cell than the half-saturation concentration for oxidative phosphorylation. However, under limited oxygen supply, oxygen is mostly exhausted in SSM, leaving the core region in an anoxic condition. Reflecting this heterogeneous oxygen environment, the inner membrane potential continues to decrease in IFM, whereas it is maintained to nearly normal levels in SSM, thereby ensuring ATP supply to this region. Our simulation results provide clues to understanding the origin of functional variations in two cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations and their differential roles in maintaining cardiomyocyte function as a whole. PMID:26039174

  8. Distinct Functional Roles of Cardiac Mitochondrial Subpopulations Revealed by a 3D Simulation Model

    PubMed Central

    Hatano, Asuka; Okada, Jun-ichi; Washio, Takumi; Hisada, Toshiaki; Sugiura, Seiryo

    2015-01-01

    Experimental characterization of two cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations, namely, subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) and interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM), has been hampered by technical difficulties, and an alternative approach is eagerly awaited. We previously developed a three-dimensional computational cardiomyocyte model that integrates electrophysiology, metabolism, and mechanics with subcellular structure. In this study, we further developed our model to include intracellular oxygen diffusion, and determined whether mitochondrial localization or intrinsic properties cause functional variations. For this purpose, we created two models: one with equal SSM and IFM properties and one with IFM having higher activity levels. Using these two models to compare the SSM and IFM responses of [Ca2+], tricarboxylic acid cycle activity, [NADH], and mitochondrial inner membrane potential to abrupt changes in pacing frequency (0.25–2 Hz), we found that the reported functional differences between these subpopulations appear to be mostly related to local [Ca2+] heterogeneity, and variations in intrinsic properties only serve to augment these differences. We also examined the effect of hypoxia on mitochondrial function. Under normoxic conditions, intracellular oxygen is much higher throughout the cell than the half-saturation concentration for oxidative phosphorylation. However, under limited oxygen supply, oxygen is mostly exhausted in SSM, leaving the core region in an anoxic condition. Reflecting this heterogeneous oxygen environment, the inner membrane potential continues to decrease in IFM, whereas it is maintained to nearly normal levels in SSM, thereby ensuring ATP supply to this region. Our simulation results provide clues to understanding the origin of functional variations in two cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations and their differential roles in maintaining cardiomyocyte function as a whole. PMID:26039174

  9. Cardiac rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... goal of cardiac rehab is to: Improve your cardiovascular function Improve your overall health and quality of ... E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  10. Allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells restore cardiac function in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy via trilineage differentiating capacity

    PubMed Central

    Quevedo, Henry C.; Hatzistergos, Konstantinos E.; Oskouei, Behzad N.; Feigenbaum, Gary S.; Rodriguez, Jose E.; Valdes, David; Pattany, Pradip M.; Zambrano, Juan P.; Hu, Qinghua; McNiece, Ian; Heldman, Alan W.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanism(s) underlying cardiac reparative effects of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) remain highly controversial. Here we tested the hypothesis that MSCs regenerate chronically infarcted myocardium through mechanisms comprising long-term engraftment and trilineage differentiation. Twelve weeks after myocardial infarction, female swine received catheter-based transendocardial injections of either placebo (n = 4) or male allogeneic MSCs (200 million; n = 6). Animals underwent serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and in vivo cell fate was determined by co-localization of Y-chromosome (Ypos) cells with markers of cardiac, vascular muscle, and endothelial lineages. MSCs engrafted in infarct and border zones and differentiated into cardiomyocytes as ascertained by co-localization with GATA-4, Nkx2.5, and α-sarcomeric actin. In addition, Ypos MSCs exhibited vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cell differentiation, contributing to large and small vessel formation. Infarct size was reduced from 19.3 ± 1.7% to 13.9 ± 2.0% (P < 0.001), and ejection fraction (EF) increased from 35.0 ± 1.7% to 41.3 ± 2.7% (P < 0.05) in MSC but not placebo pigs over 12 weeks. This was accompanied by increases in regional contractility and myocardial blood flow (MBF), particularly in the infarct border zone. Importantly, MSC engraftment correlated with functional recovery in contractility (R = 0.85, P < 0.05) and MBF (R = 0.76, P < 0.01). Together these findings demonstrate long-term MSC survival, engraftment, and trilineage differentiation following transplantation into chronically scarred myocardium. MSCs are an adult stem cell with the capacity for cardiomyogenesis and vasculogenesis which contribute, at least in part, to their ability to repair chronically scarred myocardium. PMID:19666564

  11. Control of cardiac muscle cell function by an endogenous nitric oxide signaling system.

    PubMed Central

    Balligand, J L; Kelly, R A; Marsden, P A; Smith, T W; Michel, T

    1993-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthesized from L-arginine is a ubiquitous intracellular chemical messenger and is involved in signal transduction in diverse mammalian cells, including vascular endothelium and neuronal tissues. The role of the NO-signaling pathway in the direct modulation of cardiac function is less well characterized. In this report, the effects of inhibitors of NO synthase (NOS) were examined in isolated neonatal and adult rat ventricular myocytes exposed to either muscarinic or adrenergic agonists. Carbachol (10 microM) caused a 91% inhibition of the spontaneous beating rate of cultured neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. N omega-monomethyl-L-arginine, an L-arginine analog that inhibits NOS, and methylene blue, an inhibitor of NO, blocked the negative chronotropic effect of carbachol but had no effect on the basal beating rate of these cells. The inhibition by N omega-monomethyl-L-arginine of the negative chronotropic effect of carbachol was reversed by adding excess L-arginine. The negative chronotropic effect of carbachol was also mimicked by analogs of cGMP, a second messenger implicated in mediating the action of NO in other cell types. Production of NO could be detected directly in carbachol-stimulated neonatal myocytes by using a reporter cell bioassay. The regulation of adrenergic responsiveness by the NO signaling system was also documented in studies of adult cardiac myocyte contractility. The NOS inhibitor N omega-nitro-L-arginine significantly increased the inotropic effect of the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol on electrically stimulated adult rat ventricular myocytes, whereas this inhibitor had no effect on basal contractility. Inhibition of NO production by N omega-monomethyl-L-arginine in these cells, as measured by reporter cell bioassay, was also reversible with excess L-arginine. Thus, the physiologic response of isolated neonatal and adult ventricular myocytes to both muscarinic cholinergic and beta-adrenergic stimulation is mediated, at

  12. Gestational exposure to diethylstilbestrol alters cardiac structure/function, protein expression and DNA methylation in adult male mice progeny.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Rami; Kasneci, Amanda; Mepham, Kathryn; Sebag, Igal A; Chalifour, Lorraine E

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant women, and thus their fetuses, are exposed to many endocrine disruptor compounds (EDCs). Fetal cardiomyocytes express sex hormone receptors making them potentially susceptible to re-programming by estrogenizing EDCs. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a proto-typical, non-steroidal estrogen. We hypothesized that changes in adult cardiac structure/function after gestational exposure to the test compound DES would be a proof in principle for the possibility of estrogenizing environmental EDCs to also alter the fetal heart. Vehicle (peanut oil) or DES (0.1, 1.0 and 10.0μg/kg/da.) was orally delivered to pregnant C57bl/6n dams on gestation days 11.5-14.5. At 3months, male progeny were left sedentary or were swim trained for 4weeks. Echocardiography of isoflurane anesthetized mice revealed similar cardiac structure/function in all sedentary mice, but evidence of systolic dysfunction and increased diastolic relaxation after swim training at higher DES doses. The calcium homeostasis proteins, SERCA2a, phospholamban, phospho-serine 16 phospholamban and calsequestrin 2, are important for cardiac contraction and relaxation. Immunoblot analyses of ventricle homogenates showed increased expression of SERCA2a and calsequestrin 2 in DES mice and greater molecular remodeling of these proteins and phospho-serine 16 phospholamban in swim trained DES mice. DES increased cardiac DNA methyltransferase 3a expression and DNA methylation in the CpG island within the calsequestrin 2 promoter in heart. Thus, gestational DES epigenetically altered ventricular DNA, altered cardiac function and expression, and reduced the ability of adult progeny to cardiac remodel when physically challenged. We conclude that gestational exposure to estrogenizing EDCs may impact cardiac structure/function in adult males. PMID:23142472

  13. Nanoscale cues regulate the structure and function of macroscopic cardiac tissue constructs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deok-Ho; Lipke, Elizabeth A.; Kim, Pilnam; Cheong, Raymond; Thompson, Susan; Delannoy, Michael; Suh, Kahp-Yang; Tung, Leslie; Levchenko, Andre

    2010-01-01

    Heart tissue possesses complex structural organization on multiple scales, from macro- to nano-, but nanoscale control of cardiac function has not been extensively analyzed. Inspired by ultrastructural analysis of the native tissue, we constructed a scalable, nanotopographically controlled model of myocardium mimicking the in vivo ventricular organization. Guided by nanoscale mechanical cues provided by the underlying hydrogel, the tissue constructs displayed anisotropic action potential propagation and contractility characteristic of the native tissue. Surprisingly, cell geometry, action potential conduction velocity, and the expression of a cell–cell coupling protein were exquisitely sensitive to differences in the substratum nanoscale features of the surrounding extracellular matrix. We propose that controlling cell–material interactions on the nanoscale can stipulate structure and function on the tissue level and yield novel insights into in vivo tissue physiology, while providing materials for tissue repair. PMID:20018748

  14. [Peculiarities of cardiac contractile function in patients with arterial hypertension depending on temperament and anxiety state].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the work was to elucidate the relationship between temperament and personal anxiety and between left ventricular myocardium hypertrophy, contractility and diastolic function in 671 men (mean age 54 +/- 1.8 yr) with newly diagnosed grade II arterial hypertension who took no antihypertensive drugs before the study. The tone of vegetative nervous system, serum levels of cortisol, aldosterone, thyroxin, and insulin were measured. EchoCG was used to determine left ventricular myocardium mass (LVMM), LVMM index, the ratio of transmitral blood flow at the beginning and end of diastole, left ventricular ejection and shortening fractions, end-systolic and diastolic size and volume. Phlegmatic and melancholic patients differed from cholerics and sanguinics in the predominance of parasympathetic influences, elevated blood aldosterone and insulin levels in combination with higher LVMM and LVMM index but lower left ventricular systolic and diastolic function. These characteristics were especially well apparent in anxious subjects comprising a risk group for cardiac insufficiency. PMID:22420192

  15. [Progress in research on function and mechanism of cardiac vascular system of taurine].

    PubMed

    Hua, Hao-ming; Ito, Takashi; Qiu, Zhi-gang; Azuma, Junichi

    2005-05-01

    The function for cardiac vascular system of taurine is extensive, and the mechanism is complicated. Taurine protects the cells from the cell injury caused by ischemia etc. Through repressing apoptosis, prevents endothelial dysfunction caused by hyperglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, smoking and homocysteine; suppresses the proliferation and calcification in vascular smooth muscle cells, promotes metabolization and excretion of cholesterol in the animal models of hyperlipemia, and confers the resistance to an oxidant, hypochlorous acid, produced by neutrophil on cells, and taurine chrolamine to inhibit activation of NF-kappaB, which might be associated with anti-atherosclerotic effect. Taurine mainly acts inside the cell. However, taurine transport system becomes aberrant in pathological myocardial and vascular tissue. In addition, taurine improves cardiovascular function in fructose-induced hypertension and an iron-overload murine animal models. PMID:16075725

  16. Functional coupling with cardiac muscle promotes maturation of hPSC-derived sympathetic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Yohan; Cho, Gun-Sik; Li, Zhe; Hong, Ingie; Zhu, Renjun; Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Yong Jun; Tampakakis, Emmanouil; Tung, Leslie; Huganir, Richard; Dong, Xinzhong; Kwon, Chulan; Lee, Gabsang

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neurons derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are powerful tools for studying human neural development and diseases. Robust functional coupling of hPSC-derived neurons with target tissues in vitro is essential for modeling intercellular physiology in a dish and to further translational studies, but has proven difficult to achieve. Here, we derive sympathetic neurons from hPSCs and show they can form physical and functional connections with cardiac muscle cells. Using multiple hPSC reporter lines, we recapitulated human autonomic neuron development in vitro and successfully isolated PHOX2B:eGFP+ neurons that exhibit sympathetic marker expression and electrophysiological properties, and norepinephrine secretion. Upon pharmacologic and optogenetic manipulation, PHOX:eGFP+ neurons controlled beating rates of cardiomyocytes, and the physical interactions between these cells increased neuronal maturation. This study provides a foundation for human sympathetic neuron specification and for hPSC-based neuronal control of organs in a dish. PMID:27320040

  17. ECG and Navigator-Free 4D Whole-Heart Coronary MRA for Simultaneous Visualization of Cardiac Anatomy and Function

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Jianing; Sharif, Behzad; Fan, Zhaoyang; Bi, Xiaoming; Arsanjani, Reza; Berman, Daniel S.; Li, Debiao

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a cardiac and respiratory self-gated 4D coronary MRA technique for simultaneous cardiac anatomy and function visualization. Methods A contrast-enhanced, ungated spoiled gradient echo sequence with self-gating (SG) and 3DPR trajectory was used for image acquisition. Data was retrospectively binned into different cardiac and respiratory phases based on information extracted from SG projections using principal component analysis. Each cardiac phase was reconstructed using a respiratory motion-corrected self-calibrating SENSE framework, and those belong to the quiescent period were retrospectively combined for coronary visualization. Healthy volunteer studies were conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the SG method, the accuracy of the left ventricle (LV) function parameters and the quality of coronary artery visualization. Results SG performed reliably for all subjects including one with poor ECG. The LV function parameters showed excellent agreement with those from a conventional cine protocol. For coronary imaging, the proposed method yielded comparable apparent SNR and coronary sharpness and lower apparent CNR on three subjects compared with an ECG and navigator-gated Cartesian protocol and an ECG-gated, respiratory motion-corrected 3DPR protocol. Conclusion A fully self-gated 4D whole-heart imaging technique was developed, potentially allowing cardiac anatomy and function assessment from a single measurement. PMID:25216287

  18. Novel MRI-derived quantitative biomarker for cardiac function applied to classifying ischemic cardiomyopathy within a Bayesian rule learning framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Prahlad G.; Morris, Lailonny; Staines, Mara; Lima, Joao; Lee, Daniel C.; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi

    2014-03-01

    Characterization of regional left ventricular (LV) function may have application in prognosticating timely response and informing choice therapy in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. The purpose of this study is to characterize LV function through a systematic analysis of 4D (3D + time) endocardial motion over the cardiac cycle in an effort to define objective, clinically useful metrics of pathological remodeling and declining cardiac performance, using standard cardiac MRI data for two distinct patient cohorts accessed from CardiacAtlas.org: a) MESA - a cohort of asymptomatic patients; and b) DETERMINE - a cohort of symptomatic patients with a history of ischemic heart disease (IHD) or myocardial infarction. The LV endocardium was segmented and a signed phase-to-phase Hausdorff distance (HD) was computed at 3D uniformly spaced points tracked on segmented endocardial surface contours, over the cardiac cycle. An LV-averaged index of phase-to-phase endocardial displacement (P2PD) time-histories was computed at each tracked point, using the HD computed between consecutive cardiac phases. Average and standard deviation in P2PD over the cardiac cycle was used to prepare characteristic curves for the asymptomatic and IHD cohort. A novel biomarker of RMS error between mean patient-specific characteristic P2PD over the cardiac cycle for each individual patient and the cumulative P2PD characteristic of a cohort of asymptomatic patients was established as the RMS-P2PD marker. The novel RMS-P2PD marker was tested as a cardiac function based feature for automatic patient classification using a Bayesian Rule Learning (BRL) framework. The RMS-P2PD biomarker indices were significantly different for the symptomatic patient and asymptomatic control cohorts (p<0.001). BRL accurately classified 83.8% of patients correctly from the patient and control populations, with leave-one-out cross validation, using standard indices of LV ejection fraction (LV-EF) and LV end-systolic volume

  19. Current perspectives on cardiac amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jian; Mishra, Shikha; Falk, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    Amyloidosis represents a group of diseases in which proteins undergo misfolding to form insoluble fibrils with subsequent tissue deposition. While almost all deposited amyloid fibers share a common nonbranched morphology, the affected end organs, clinical presentation, treatment strategies, and prognosis vary greatly among this group of diseases and are largely dependent on the specific amyloid precursor protein. To date, at least 27 precursor proteins have been identified to result in either local tissue or systemic amyloidosis, with nine of them manifesting in cardiac deposition and resulting in a syndrome termed “cardiac amyloidosis” or “amyloid cardiomyopathy.” Although cardiac amyloidosis has been traditionally considered to be a rare disorder, as clinical appreciation and understanding continues to grow, so too has the prevalence, suggesting that this disease may be greatly underdiagnosed. The most common form of cardiac amyloidosis is associated with circulating amyloidogenic monoclonal immunoglobulin light chain proteins. Other major cardiac amyloidoses result from a misfolding of products of mutated or wild-type transthyretin protein. While the various cardiac amyloidoses share a common functional consequence, namely, an infiltrative cardiomyopathy with restrictive pathophysiology leading to progressive heart failure, the underlying pathophysiology and clinical syndrome varies with each precursor protein. Herein, we aim to provide an up-to-date overview of cardiac amyloidosis from nomenclature to molecular mechanisms and treatment options, with a particular focus on amyloidogenic immunoglobulin light chain protein cardiac amyloidosis. PMID:22058156

  20. Endurance training prevents negative effects of the hypoxia mimetic dimethyloxalylglycine on cardiac and skeletal muscle function.

    PubMed

    Favier, Francois B; Britto, Florian A; Ponçon, Benjamin; Begue, Gwenaelle; Chabi, Beatrice; Reboul, Cyril; Meyer, Gregory; Py, Guillaume

    2016-02-15

    Hypoxic preconditioning is a promising strategy to prevent hypoxia-induced damages to several tissues. This effect is related to prior stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1α via inhibition of the prolyl-hydroxylases (PHDs), which are responsible for its degradation under normoxia. Although PHD inhibition has been shown to increase endurance performance in rodents, potential side effects of such a therapy have not been explored. Here, we investigated the effects of 1 wk of dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) treatment (150 mg/kg) on exercise capacity, as well as on cardiac and skeletal muscle function in sedentary and endurance-trained rats. DMOG improved maximal aerobic velocity and endurance in both sedentary and trained rats. This effect was associated with an increase in red blood cells without significant alteration of skeletal muscle contractile properties. In sedentary rats, DMOG treatment resulted in enhanced left ventricle (LV) weight together with impairment in diastolic function, LV relaxation, and pulse pressure. Moreover, DMOG decreased maximal oxygen uptake (state 3) of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscle. Importantly, endurance training reversed the negative effects of DMOG treatment on cardiac function and restored maximal mitochondrial oxygen uptake to the level of sedentary placebo-treated rats. In conclusion, we provide here evidence that the PHD inhibitor DMOG has detrimental influence on myocardial and mitochondrial function in healthy rats. However, one may suppose that the deleterious influence of PHD inhibition would be potentiated in patients with already poor physical condition. Therefore, the present results prompt us to take into consideration the potential side effects of PHD inhibitors when administrated to patients. PMID:26679609

  1. Cardiac resynchronization therapy and AV optimization increase myocardial oxygen consumption, but increase cardiac function more than proportionally☆

    PubMed Central

    Kyriacou, Andreas; Pabari, Punam A.; Mayet, Jamil; Peters, Nicholas S.; Davies, D. Wyn; Lim, P. Boon; Lefroy, David; Hughes, Alun D.; Kanagaratnam, Prapa; Francis, Darrel P.; I.Whinnett, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanoenergetic effects of atrioventricular delay optimization during biventricular pacing (“cardiac resynchronization therapy”, CRT) are unknown. Methods Eleven patients with heart failure and left bundle branch block (LBBB) underwent invasive measurements of left ventricular (LV) developed pressure, aortic flow velocity-time-integral (VTI) and myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2) at 4 pacing states: biventricular pacing (with VV 0 ms) at AVD 40 ms (AV-40), AVD 120 ms (AV-120, a common nominal AV delay), at their pre-identified individualised haemodynamic optimum (AV-Opt); and intrinsic conduction (LBBB). Results AV-120, relative to LBBB, increased LV developed pressure by a mean of 11(SEM 2)%, p = 0.001, and aortic VTI by 11(SEM 3)%, p = 0.002, but also increased MVO2 by 11(SEM 5)%, p = 0.04. AV-Opt further increased LV developed pressure by a mean of 2(SEM 1)%, p = 0.035 and aortic VTI by 4(SEM 1)%, p = 0.017. MVO2 trended further up by 7(SEM 5)%, p = 0.22. Mechanoenergetics at AV-40 were no different from LBBB. The 4 states lay on a straight line for Δexternal work (ΔLV developed pressure × Δaortic VTI) against ΔMVO2, with slope 1.80, significantly > 1 (p = 0.02). Conclusions Biventricular pacing and atrioventricular delay optimization increased external cardiac work done but also myocardial oxygen consumption. Nevertheless, the increase in cardiac work was ~ 80% greater than the increase in oxygen consumption, signifying an improvement in cardiac mechanoenergetics. Finally, the incremental effect of optimization on external work was approximately one-third beyond that of nominal AV pacing, along the same favourable efficiency trajectory, suggesting that AV delay dominates the biventricular pacing effect — which may therefore not be mainly “resynchronization”. PMID:24332598

  2. Cardiac rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, A A

    1984-02-01

    Exercise training is a major, and the most important, component of cardiac rehabilitation. Besides providing psychological benefits and promoting a "sense of well being," it elicits a number of adaptations in patients with ischemic heart disease. Among the clinically important adaptations are changes in the trained skeletal muscles and autonomic nervous system, resulting not only in increased maximum exercise capacity but also a slower heart rate and, at times, a lower systolic blood pressure during submaximal exercise. The reduction in the rate pressure product decreases myocardial O2 demand at any given submaximal exercise intensity and may thus alleviate myocardial ischemia and angina in patients with coronary artery disease. These adaptive responses occur even with a relatively modest exercise intensity. Although short-term exercise training of moderate intensity has not been reported to result in improvement in left ventricular performance, recent data suggest that exercise training of higher intensity and longer duration (12 months or longer) than has conventionally been used in cardiac rehabilitation programs may favorably affect the heart. This is characterized by improvements in left ventricular function, diminished electrocardiographic criteria of myocardial ischemia and increased stroke volume during exercise. Modest weight reduction accompanies regularly performed prolonged exercise training. It is important, however, to recognize that high-intensity exercise programs are suitable for only some patients with coronary artery disease who are stable and should be used only under strict medical supervision. PMID:6400004

  3. Factors affecting the quality of anticoagulation with warfarin: experience of one cardiac centre

    PubMed Central

    Ciurus, Tomasz; Cichocka-Radwan, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The risk of complications in anticoagulation therapy can be reduced by maximising the percentage of time spent by the patient in the optimal therapeutic range (TTR). However, little is known about the predictors of anticoagulation control. The aim of this paper was to assess the quality of anticoagulant therapy in patients on warfarin and to identify the factors affecting its deterioration. Material and methods We studied 149 patients who required anticoagulant therapy with warfarin due to non-valvular atrial fibrillation and/or venous thromboembolism. Each patient underwent proper training regarding the implemented treatment and remained under constant medical care. Results The mean age of the patients was 68.8 ± 12.6 years, and 59% were male. A total of 2460 international normalised ratio (INR) measurements were collected during the 18-month period. The mean TTR in the studied cohort was 76 ± 21%, and the median was 80%. The level at which high-quality anticoagulation was recorded for this study was based on TTR values above 80%. Seventy-five patients with TTR ≥ 80% were included in the stable anticoagulation group (TTR ≥ 80%); the remaining 74 patients constituted the unstable anticoagulation group (TTR < 80%). According to multivariate stepwise regression analysis, the independent variables increasing the risk of deterioration of anticoagulation quality were: arterial hypertension (OR 2.74 [CI 95%: 1.06-7.10]; p = 0.038), amiodarone therapy (OR 4.22 [CI 95%: 1.30-13.70]; p = 0.017), and obesity (OR 1.11 [CI 95%: 1.02-1.21]; p = 0.013). Conclusions The presence of obesity, hypertension, or amiodarone therapy decreases the quality of anticoagulation with warfarin. High quality of anticoagulation can be achieved through proper monitoring and education of patients. PMID:26855650

  4. Effects of cigarette smoking on cardiac autonomic function during dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Goncalo V; Pereira, Fernando D; Fernhall, Bo

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the acute effect of cigarette smoking on cardiac autonomic function in young adult smokers during dynamic exercise. Fourteen healthy young smokers (21.4 ± 3.4 years) performed peak and submaximal exercise protocols under control and smoking conditions. Resting and submaximal beat-to-beat R-R series were recorded and spectrally decomposed using the fast Fourier transformation. Smoking resulted in a significant decrease in work time, VO(2peak) and peak O(2) pulse (P < 0.05). Heart rate increased at rest and during submaximal exercise after smoking (P < 0.05). The raw high frequency and low frequency power were significantly reduced by smoking, both at rest and during exercise (P < 0.05). The low to high frequency ratio was higher after smoking (P < 0.05). The normalised low frequency power was also significantly increased by smoking, but only at rest (P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that the tachycardic effect elicited by smoking is accompanied by acute changes in heart rate spectral components both at rest and during exercise. Therefore, the cardiac autonomic control is altered by smoking not only at rest, but also during exercise, resulting in reduced vagal modulation and increased sympathetic dominance. PMID:21547834

  5. miR-300 mediates Bmi1 function and regulates differentiation in primitive cardiac progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, F M; Tomé, M; Bernal, J A; Bernad, A

    2015-01-01

    B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 (Bmi1) is a polycomb-family transcriptional factor critical for self-renewal in many adult stem cells and human neoplasia. We sought to identify microRNAs regulated by Bmi1 that could play a role in multipotent cardiac progenitor cell (CPC) decisions. We found that miR-300, a poorly characterized microRNA mapping in the Dlk1-Dio3 microRNA cluster, was positively regulated by Bmi1 in CPCs. Forced expression of miR-300 in CPCs promoted an improved stemness signature with a significant increase in Oct4 levels, a reduction in senescence progression and an enhanced proliferative status via p19 activation and inhibition of p16 accumulation. Endothelial and cardiogenic differentiation were clearly compromised by sustained miR-300 expression. Additionally, RNA and protein analysis revealed a significant reduction in key cardiac transcription factors, including Nkx2.5 and Tbx5. Collectively, these results suggest that some functions attributed to Bmi1 are due to induction of miR-300, which decreases the cardiogenic differentiation potential of multipotent CPCs in vitro and promotes self-renewal. PMID:26512961

  6. miR-300 mediates Bmi1 function and regulates differentiation in primitive cardiac progenitors.

    PubMed

    Cruz, F M; Tomé, M; Bernal, J A; Bernad, A

    2015-01-01

    B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 (Bmi1) is a polycomb-family transcriptional factor critical for self-renewal in many adult stem cells and human neoplasia. We sought to identify microRNAs regulated by Bmi1 that could play a role in multipotent cardiac progenitor cell (CPC) decisions. We found that miR-300, a poorly characterized microRNA mapping in the Dlk1-Dio3 microRNA cluster, was positively regulated by Bmi1 in CPCs. Forced expression of miR-300 in CPCs promoted an improved stemness signature with a significant increase in Oct4 levels, a reduction in senescence progression and an enhanced proliferative status via p19 activation and inhibition of p16 accumulation. Endothelial and cardiogenic differentiation were clearly compromised by sustained miR-300 expression. Additionally, RNA and protein analysis revealed a significant reduction in key cardiac transcription factors, including Nkx2.5 and Tbx5. Collectively, these results suggest that some functions attributed to Bmi1 are due to induction of miR-300, which decreases the cardiogenic differentiation potential of multipotent CPCs in vitro and promotes self-renewal. PMID:26512961

  7. A G-CSF functionalized scaffold for stem cells seeding: a differentiating device for cardiac purposes.

    PubMed

    Spadaccio, Cristiano; Rainer, Alberto; Trombetta, Marcella; Centola, Matteo; Lusini, Mario; Chello, Massimo; Covino, Elvio; De Marco, Federico; Coccia, Raffaella; Toyoda, Yoshiya; Genovese, Jorge A

    2011-05-01

    Myocardial infarction and its consequences represent one of the most demanding challenges in cell therapy and regenerative medicine. Transfer of skeletal myoblasts into decompensated hearts has been performed through intramyocardial injection. However, the achievements of both cardiomyocyte differentiation and precise integration of the injected cells into the myocardial wall, in order to augment synchronized contractility and avoid potentially life-threatening alterations in the electrical conduction of the heart, still remain a major target to be pursued. Recently, granulocytes colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) fuelled the interest of researchers for its direct effect on cardiomyocytes, inhibiting both apoptosis and remodelling in the failing heart and protecting from ventricular arrhythmias through the up-regulation of connexin 43 (Cx43). We propose a tissue engineering approach concerning the fabrication of an electrospun cardiac graft functionalized with G-CSF, in order to provide the correct signalling sequence to orientate myoblast differentiation and exert important systemic and local effects, positively modulating the infarction microenvironment. Poly-(L-lactide) electrospun scaffolds were seeded with C2C12 murine skeletal myoblast for 48 hrs. Biological assays demonstrated the induction of Cx43 expression along with morphostructural changes resulting in cell elongation and appearance of cellular junctions resembling the usual cardiomyocyte arrangement at the ultrastructural level. The possibility of fabricating extracellular matrix-mimicking scaffolds able to promote myoblast pre-commitment towards myocardiocyte lineage and mitigate the hazardous environment of the damaged myocardium represents an interesting strategy in cardiac tissue engineering. PMID:20518852

  8. Cardiac left ventricular function before and during early thyroxine treatment in severe hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, R; Müller, C; Midtbø, K; Haug, E; Nakken, K F; Hertzenberg, L; Kjørstad, K E

    1991-12-01

    In some patients with severe hypothyroidism, thyroxine replacement therapy precipitates or aggravates angina pectoris, whereas in other patients angina pectoris is ameliorated or even cured. Cardiac function in eight severely hypothyroid patients was studied by means of radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) at rest and during supine bicycle exercise before thyroxine treatment, and repeated during treatment before and after administration of 160 mg of oral verapamil. There was an exercise-induced fall in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) in two patients before therapy, and in two additional subjects after 17 d on suboptimal doses of thyroxine. Verapamil attenuated the fall and induced a significant increase in LVEF during exercise (P less than 0.014). No abnormal regional cardiac wall movement (RWM) was observed. After 2 months of thyroxine treatment, LVEF increased significantly during exercise both before and after verapamil (P less than 0.012 and P less than 0.005). These findings are indicative of reversible coronary artery dysfunction. We recommend that, if feasible, thyroxine should be supplemented with verapamil during the early phase of treatment. PMID:1748858

  9. Cardiac vagal control and children’s adaptive functioning: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Paulo; Derefinko, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Polyvagal theory has influenced research on the role of cardiac vagal control, indexed by respiratory sinus arrhythmia withdrawal (RSA-W) during challenging states, in children’s self-regulation. However, it remains unclear how well RSA-W predicts adaptive functioning (AF) outcomes and whether certain caveats of measuring RSA (e.g., respiration) significantly impact these associations. A meta-analysis of 44 studies (n = 4,996 children) revealed small effect sizes such that greater levels of RSA-W were related to fewer externalizing, internalizing, and cognitive/academic problems. In contrast, RSA-W was differentially related to children’s social problems according to sample type (community vs. clinical/at-risk). The relations between RSA-W and children’s AF outcomes were stronger among studies that co-varied baseline RSA and in Caucasian children (no effect was found for respiration). Children from clinical/at-risk samples displayed lower levels of baseline RSA and RSA-W compared to children from community samples. Theoretical/practical implications for the study of cardiac vagal control are discussed. PMID:23648264

  10. Model-based imaging of cardiac electrical function in human atria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modre, Robert; Tilg, Bernhard; Fischer, Gerald; Hanser, Friedrich; Messnarz, Bernd; Schocke, Michael F. H.; Kremser, Christian; Hintringer, Florian; Roithinger, Franz

    2003-05-01

    Noninvasive imaging of electrical function in the human atria is attained by the combination of data from electrocardiographic (ECG) mapping and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An anatomical computer model of the individual patient is the basis for our computer-aided diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias. Three patients suffering from Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, from paroxymal atrial fibrillation, and from atrial flutter underwent an electrophysiological study. After successful treatment of the cardiac arrhythmia with invasive catheter technique, pacing protocols with stimuli at several anatomical sites (coronary sinus, left and right pulmonary vein, posterior site of the right atrium, right atrial appendage) were performed. Reconstructed activation time (AT) maps were validated with catheter-based electroanatomical data, with invasively determined pacing sites, and with pacing at anatomical markers. The individual complex anatomical model of the atria of each patient in combination with a high-quality mesh optimization enables accurate AT imaging, resulting in a localization error for the estimated pacing sites within 1 cm. Our findings may have implications for imaging of atrial activity in patients with focal arrhythmias.

  11. The effect of gravitational acceleration on cardiac diastolic function: a biofluid mechanical perspective with initial results.

    PubMed

    Pantalos, George M; Bennett, Thomas E; Sharp, M Keith; Woodruff, Stewart J; O'Leary, Sean D; Gillars, Kevin J; Schurfranz, Thomas; Everett, Scott D; Lemon, Mark; Schwartz, John

    2005-08-01

    Echocardiographic measurements of astronaut cardiac function have documented an initial increase, followed by a progressive reduction in both left ventricular end-diastolic volume index and stroke volume with entry into microgravity (micro-G). The investigators hypothesize that the observed reduction in cardiac filling may, in part, be due to the absence of a gravitational acceleration dependent, intraventricular hydrostatic pressure difference in micro-G that exists in the ventricle in normal gravity (1-G) due to its size and anatomic orientation. This acceleration-dependent pressure difference, DeltaP(LV), between the base and the apex of the heart for the upright posture can be estimated to be 6660 dynes/cm(2) ( approximately 5 mm Hg) on Earth. DeltaP(LV) promotes cardiac diastolic filling on Earth, but is absent in micro-G. If the proposed hypothesis is correct, cardiac pumping performance would be diminished in micro-G. To test this hypothesis, ventricular function experiments were conducted in the 1-G environment using an artificial ventricle pumping on a mock circulation system with the longitudinal axis anatomically oriented for the upright posture at 45 degrees to the horizon. Additional measurements were made with the ventricle horizontally oriented to null DeltaP(LV)along the apex-base axis of the heart as would be the case for the supine posture, but resulting in a lesser hydrostatic pressure difference along the minor (anterior-posterior) axis. Comparative experiments were also conducted in the micro-G environment of orbital space flight on board the Space Shuttle. This paper reviews the use of an automated cardiovascular simulator flown on STS-85 and STS-95 as a Get Away Special payload to test this hypothesis. The simulator consisted of a pneumatically actuated, artificial ventricle connected to a closed-loop, fluid circuit with adjustable compliance and resistance elements to create physiologic pressure and flow conditions. Ventricular

  12. A Tocotrienol-Enriched Formulation Protects against Radiation-Induced Changes in Cardiac Mitochondria without Modifying Late Cardiac Function or Structure

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Krager, Kimberly J; Sharma, Sunil K.; Moros, Eduardo G.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Pavliv, Oleksandra; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Boerma, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a common and sometimes severe late side effect of radiation therapy for intrathoracic and chest wall tumors. We have previously shown that local heart irradiation in a rat model caused prolonged changes in mitochondrial respiration and increased susceptibility to mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening. Because tocotrienols are known to protect against oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, in this study, we examined the effects of tocotrienols on radiation-induced alterations in mitochondria, and structural and functional manifestations of RIHD. Male Sprague-Dawley rats received image-guided localized X irradiation to the heart to a total dose of 21 Gy. Twenty-four hours before irradiation, rats received a tocotrienol-enriched formulation or vehicle by oral gavage. Mitochondrial function and mitochondrial membrane parameters were studied at 2 weeks and 28 weeks after irradiation. In addition, cardiac function and histology were examined at 28 weeks. A single oral dose of the tocotrienol-enriched formulation preserved Bax/Bcl2 ratios and prevented mPTP opening and radiation-induced alterations in succinate-driven mitochondrial respiration. Nevertheless, the late effects of local heart irradiation pertaining to myocardial function and structure were not modified. Our studies suggest that a single dose of tocotrienols protects against radiation-induced mitochondrial changes, but these effects are not sufficient against long-term alterations in cardiac function or remodeling. PMID:25710576

  13. Myocardial Galectin-3 Expression Is Associated with Remodeling of the Pressure-Overloaded Heart and May Delay the Hypertrophic Response without Affecting Survival, Dysfunction, and Cardiac Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Frunza, Olga; Russo, Ilaria; Saxena, Amit; Shinde, Arti V; Humeres, Claudio; Hanif, Waqas; Rai, Vikrant; Su, Ya; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2016-05-01

    The β-galactoside-binding animal lectin galectin-3 is predominantly expressed by activated macrophages and is a promising biomarker for patients with heart failure. Galectin-3 regulates inflammatory and fibrotic responses; however, its role in cardiac remodeling remains unclear. We hypothesized that galectin-3 may be up-regulated in the pressure-overloaded myocardium and regulate hypertrophy and fibrosis. In normal mouse myocardium, galectin-3 was constitutively expressed in macrophages and was localized in atrial but not ventricular cardiomyocytes. In a mouse model of transverse aortic constriction, galectin-3 expression was markedly up-regulated in the pressure-overloaded myocardium. Early up-regulation of galectin-3 was localized in subpopulations of macrophages and myofibroblasts; however, after 7 to 28 days of transverse aortic constriction, a subset of cardiomyocytes in fibrotic areas contained large amounts of galectin-3. In vitro, cytokine stimulation suppressed galectin-3 synthesis by macrophages and cardiac fibroblasts. Correlation studies revealed that cardiomyocyte- but not macrophage-specific galectin-3 localization was associated with adverse remodeling and dysfunction. Galectin-3 knockout mice exhibited accelerated cardiac hypertrophy after 7 days of pressure overload, whereas female galectin-3 knockouts had delayed dilation after 28 days of transverse aortic constriction. However, galectin-3 loss did not affect survival, systolic and diastolic dysfunction, cardiac fibrosis, and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in the pressure-overloaded heart. Despite its potential role as a prognostic biomarker, galectin-3 is not a critical modulator of cardiac fibrosis but may delay the hypertrophic response. PMID:26948424

  14. Cardiac Non-myocyte Cells Show Enhanced Pharmacological Function Suggestive of Contractile Maturity in Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocyte Microtissues.

    PubMed

    Ravenscroft, Stephanie M; Pointon, Amy; Williams, Awel W; Cross, Michael J; Sidaway, James E

    2016-07-01

    The immature phenotype of stem cell derived cardiomyocytes is a significant barrier to their use in translational medicine and pre-clinical in vitro drug toxicity and pharmacological analysis. Here we have assessed the contribution of non-myocyte cells on the contractile function of co-cultured human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) in spheroid microtissue format. Microtissues were formed using a scaffold free 96-well cell suspension method from hESC-CM cultured alone (CM microtissues) or in combination with human primary cardiac microvascular endothelial cells and cardiac fibroblasts (CMEF microtissues). Contractility was characterized with fluorescence and video-based edge detection. CMEF microtissues displayed greater Ca(2+ )transient amplitudes, enhanced spontaneous contraction rate and remarkably enhanced contractile function in response to both positive and negative inotropic drugs, suggesting a more mature contractile phenotype than CM microtissues. In addition, for several drugs the enhanced contractile response was not apparent when endothelial cell or fibroblasts from a non-cardiac tissue were used as the ancillary cells. Further evidence of maturity for CMEF microtissues was shown with increased expression of genes that encode proteins critical in cardiac Ca(2+ )handling (S100A1), sarcomere assembly (telethonin/TCAP) and β-adrenergic receptor signalling. Our data shows that compared with single cell-type cardiomyocyte in vitro models, CMEF microtissues are superior at predicting the inotropic effects of drugs, demonstrating the critical contribution of cardiac non-myocyte cells in mediating functional cardiotoxicity. PMID:27125969

  15. Cardiac Non-myocyte Cells Show Enhanced Pharmacological Function Suggestive of Contractile Maturity in Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocyte Microtissues

    PubMed Central

    Ravenscroft, Stephanie M.; Pointon, Amy; Williams, Awel W.; Cross, Michael J.; Sidaway, James E.

    2016-01-01

    The immature phenotype of stem cell derived cardiomyocytes is a significant barrier to their use in translational medicine and pre-clinical in vitro drug toxicity and pharmacological analysis. Here we have assessed the contribution of non-myocyte cells on the contractile function of co-cultured human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) in spheroid microtissue format. Microtissues were formed using a scaffold free 96-well cell suspension method from hESC-CM cultured alone (CM microtissues) or in combination with human primary cardiac microvascular endothelial cells and cardiac fibroblasts (CMEF microtissues). Contractility was characterized with fluorescence and video-based edge detection. CMEF microtissues displayed greater Ca2+ transient amplitudes, enhanced spontaneous contraction rate and remarkably enhanced contractile function in response to both positive and negative inotropic drugs, suggesting a more mature contractile phenotype than CM microtissues. In addition, for several drugs the enhanced contractile response was not apparent when endothelial cell or fibroblasts from a non-cardiac tissue were used as the ancillary cells. Further evidence of maturity for CMEF microtissues was shown with increased expression of genes that encode proteins critical in cardiac Ca2+ handling (S100A1), sarcomere assembly (telethonin/TCAP) and β-adrenergic receptor signalling. Our data shows that compared with single cell-type cardiomyocyte in vitro models, CMEF microtissues are superior at predicting the inotropic effects of drugs, demonstrating the critical contribution of cardiac non-myocyte cells in mediating functional cardiotoxicity. PMID:27125969

  16. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (ogg1) maintains the function of cardiac progenitor cells during heart formation in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lifeng; Zhou, Yong; Yu, Shanhe; Ji, Guixiang; Liu, Wei; Gu, Aihua

    2013-11-15

    Genomic damage may devastate the potential of progenitor cells and consequently impair early organogenesis. We found that ogg1, a key enzyme initiating the base-excision repair, was enriched in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. So far, little is known about DNA repair in cardiogenesis. Here, we addressed the critical role of ogg1 in cardiogenesis for the first time. ogg1 mainly expressed in the anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM), the primary heart tube, and subsequently the embryonic myocardium by in situ hybridisation. Loss of ogg1 resulted in severe cardiac morphogenesis and functional abnormalities, including the short heart length, arrhythmia, decreased cardiomyocytes and nkx2.5{sup +} cardiac progenitor cells. Moreover, the increased apoptosis and repressed proliferation of progenitor cells caused by ogg1 deficiency might contribute to the heart phenotype. The microarray analysis showed that the expression of genes involved in embryonic heart tube morphogenesis and heart structure were significantly changed due to the lack of ogg1. Among those, foxh1 is an important partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage. Our work demonstrates the requirement of ogg1 in cardiac progenitors and heart development in zebrafish. These findings may be helpful for understanding the aetiology of congenital cardiac deficits. - Highlights: • A key DNA repair enzyme ogg1 is expressed in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. • We found that ogg1 is essential for normal cardiac morphogenesis in zebrafish. • The production of embryonic cardiomyocytes requires appropriate ogg1 expression. • Ogg1 critically regulated proliferation of cardiac progenitor cells in zebrafish. • foxh1 is a partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage.

  17. Met signaling in cardiomyocytes is required for normal cardiac function in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Arechederra, María; Carmona, Rita; González-Nuñez, María; Gutiérrez-Uzquiza, Alvaro; Bragado, Paloma; Cruz-González, Ignacio; Cano, Elena; Guerrero, Carmen; Sánchez, Aránzazu; López-Novoa, José Miguel; Schneider, Michael D; Maina, Flavio; Muñoz-Chápuli, Ramón; Porras, Almudena

    2013-12-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor, Met, are key determinants of distinct developmental processes. Although HGF exerts cardio-protective effects in a number of cardiac pathologies, it remains unknown whether HGF/Met signaling is essential for myocardial development and/or physiological function in adulthood. We therefore investigated the requirement of HGF/Met signaling in cardiomyocyte for embryonic and postnatal heart development and function by conditional inactivation of the Met receptor in cardiomyocytes using the Cre-α-MHC mouse line (referred to as α-MHCMet-KO). Although α-MHCMet-KO mice showed normal heart development and were viable and fertile, by 6 months of age, males developed cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, associated with interstitial fibrosis. A significant upregulation in markers of myocardial damage, such as β-MHC and ANF, was also observed. By the age of 9 months, α-MHCMet-KO males displayed systolic cardiac dysfunction. Mechanistically, we provide evidence of a severe imbalance in the antioxidant defenses in α-MHCMet-KO hearts involving a reduced expression and activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase, with consequent reactive oxygen species accumulation. Similar anomalies were observed in females, although with a slower kinetics. We also found that Met signaling down-regulation leads to an increase in TGF-β production and a decrease in p38MAPK activation, which may contribute to phenotypic alterations displayed in α-MHCMet-KO mice. Consistently, we show that HGF acts through p38α to upregulate antioxidant enzymes in cardiomyocytes. Our results highlight that HGF/Met signaling in cardiomyocytes plays a physiological cardio-protective role in adult mice by acting as an endogenous regulator of heart function through oxidative stress control. PMID:23994610

  18. Sustained delivery of VEGF from designer self-assembling peptides improves cardiac function after myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hai-dong; Cui, Guo-hong; Yang, Jia-jun; Wang, Cun; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Li-sheng; Jiang, Jun; Shao, Shui-jin

    2012-07-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The designer peptide LRKKLGKA could self-assemble into nanofibers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Injection of LRKKLGKA peptides could promote the sustained delivery of VEGF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Injection of VEGF with LRKKLGKA peptides lead to sufficient angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Injection of VEGF with LRKKLGKA peptides improves heart function. -- Abstract: Poor vascularization and insufficient oxygen supply are detrimental to the survival of residual cardiomyocytes or transplanted stem cells after myocardial infarction. To prolong and slow the release of angiogenic factors, which stimulate both angiogenesis and vasculogenesis, we constructed a novel self-assembling peptide by attaching the heparin-binding domain sequence LRKKLGKA to the self-assembling peptide RADA16. This designer self-assembling peptide self-assembled into nanofiber scaffolds under physiological conditions, as observed by atomic force microscopy. The injection of designer self-assembling peptides can efficiently provide the sustained delivery of VEGF for at least 1 month. At 4 weeks after transplantation, cardiac function was improved, and scar size and collagen deposition were markedly reduced in the group receiving VEGF with the LRKKLGKA scaffolds compared with groups receiving VEGF alone, LRKKLGKA scaffolds alone or VEGF with RADA16 scaffolds. The microvessel density in the VEGF with LRKKLGKA group was higher than that in the VEGF with RADA16 group. TUNEL and cleaved caspase-3 expression assays showed that the transplantation of VEGF with LRKKLGKA enhanced cell survival in the infarcted heart. These results present the tailor-made peptide scaffolds as a new generation of sustained-release biomimetic biomaterials and suggest that the use of angiogenic factors along with designer self-assembling peptides can lead to myocardial protection, sufficient angiogenesis, and improvement in cardiac function.

  19. Assessment of LV systolic function in atrial fibrillation using an index of preceding cardiac cycles.

    PubMed

    Tabata, T; Grimm, R A; Greenberg, N L; Agler, D A; Mowrey, K A; Wallick, D W; Zhang, Y; Zhuang, S; Mazgalev, T N; Thomas, J D

    2001-08-01

    The clinical assessment of left ventricular (LV) systolic function during atrial fibrillation (AF) is unreliable and difficult because of beat-to-beat variability. We evaluated an index for the estimation of LV systolic function in AF that is based on the relationship between the preceding (R-R1) and prepreceding (R-R2) R-R intervals. LV Doppler stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF), peak aortic flow rate (AoF) and the maximum value of the first derivative of the LV pressure curve (dP/dt(max)) were evaluated in 13 healthy open-chest dogs during triggered AF. All parameters showed a significantly strong positive linear relationship with the ratio of R-R1/R-R2 (r = 0.65, 0.74, 0.75, and 0.70 for SV, EF, AoF, and dP/dt(max), respectively). The calculated value of LV systolic parameters at R-R1/R-R2 = 1 in the linear regression line showed a good relationship and an agreement with the measured average value of the parameter over all cardiac cycles (SV, 12.1 vs. 12.8 ml; EF, 49.6 vs. 51.2%; AoF, 1.37 vs. 1.48 l/min; and dP/dt(max), 2,323 vs. 2,454 mmHg/s). Using the LV systolic parameters estimated at R-R1/R-R2 = 1 in the linear regression line allows the LV contractile function to be accurately and reproducibly evaluated during AF and obviates the less-reliable process of averaging multiple cardiac cycles. PMID:11454559

  20. The Relationship of Ectopic Lipid Accumulation to Cardiac and Vascular Function in Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ruberg, Frederick L.; Chen, Zhongjing; Hua, Ning; Bigornia, Sherman; Guo, Zifang; Hallock, Kevin; Jara, Hernan; LaValley, Michael; Phinikaridou, Alkystis; Qiao, Ye; Viereck, Jason; Apovian, Caroline M.; Hamilton, James A.

    2010-01-01

    Storage of lipid in ectopic depots outside of abdominal visceral and subcutaneous stores, including within the pericardium and liver, has been associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular risk. We sought to determine whether anatomically distinct ectopic depots were physiologically correlated and site-specific effects upon cardiovascular function could be identified. Obese subjects (n = 28) with metabolic syndrome but without known atherosclerotic disease and healthy controls (n = 18) underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) to quantify pericardial and periaortic lipid volumes, cardiac function, aortic compliance, and intrahepatic lipid content. Fasting plasma lipoproteins, glucose, insulin, and free-fatty acids were measured. Pericardial and intrahepatic (P < 0.01) and periaortic (P < 0.05) lipid volumes were increased in obese subjects vs. controls and were strongly and positively correlated (P ≤ 0.01) but independent of BMI (P = NS) among obese subjects. Intrahepatic lipid was associated with insulin resistance (P < 0.01) and triglycerides (P < 0.05), whereas pericardial and periaortic lipid were not (P = NS). Periaortic and pericardial lipid positively correlated to free-fatty acids (P ≤ 0.01) and negatively correlated to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (P < 0.05). Pericardial lipid negatively correlated to cardiac output (P = 0.03) and stroke volume (P = 0.01) but not to left ventricular ejection fraction (P = 0.46). None of the ectopic depots correlated to aortic compliance. In conclusion, ectopic storage of lipid in anatomically distinct depots appeared tightly correlated but independent of body size. Site-specific functional abnormalities were observed for pericardial but not periaortic lipid. These findings underscore the utility of MRI to assess individual differences in ectopic lipid that are not predictable from BMI. PMID:19875992

  1. Diastolic function and new-onset atrial fibrillation following cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Barbara, David W.; Rehfeldt, Kent H.; Pulido, Juan N.; Li, Zhuo; White, Roger D.; Schaff, Hartzell V.; Mauermann, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have reported predictors of new-onset postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) following cardiac surgery, which is associated with increased length of stay, cost of care, morbidity, and mortality. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between preoperative diastolic function and occurrence of new-onset POAF in patients undergoing a variety of cardiac surgeries at a single institution. Methods: Using data from a prospective study from November 2007 to January 2010, a retrospective review was conducted. The diastolic function of each patient was determined from preoperative transthoracic echocardiograms. Occurrence of new-onset POAF was prospectively noted for each patient in the original study. Demographic and operative characteristics of the study population were analyzed to determine predictors of POAF. Results: Of 223 patients, 91 (40.8%) experienced new-onset POAF. Univariate predictors of POAF included increasing age, male gender, operations involving mitral valve repair/replacement, nonsmoking, hypertension, increased intraoperative pulmonary artery pressure, grade I diastolic dysfunction, abnormal diastolic function of any grade, decreased medial e’, elevated medial E/e’, and increased left atrial volume. Multivariate predictors of POAF included increasing age, increased left atrial volume, and elevated initial intraoperative pulmonary artery pressure. Even after exclusion of patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy or those undergoing mitral valve operations, diastolic dysfunction was not a multivariate predictor of POAF. Conclusions: In the patient population studied here, preoperative diastolic dysfunction was not predictive of POAF. In addition to increasing age, initial intraoperative pulmonary artery systolic pressure and left atrial volume were both significant multivariate predictors of POAF. PMID:25566703

  2. Low-dose radiation affects cardiac physiology: gene networks and molecular signaling in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Matthew A; Sasi, Sharath P; Onufrak, Jillian; Natarajan, Mohan; Manickam, Krishnan; Schwab, John; Muralidharan, Sujatha; Peterson, Leif E; Alekseyev, Yuriy O; Yan, Xinhua; Goukassian, David A

    2015-12-01

    There are 160,000 cancer patients worldwide treated with particle radiotherapy (RT). With the advent of proton, and high (H) charge (Z) and energy (E) HZE ionizing particle RT, the cardiovascular diseases risk estimates are uncertain. In addition, future deep space exploratory-type missions will expose humans to unknown but low doses of particle irradiation (IR). We examined molecular responses using transcriptome profiling in left ventricular murine cardiomyocytes isolated from mice that were exposed to 90 cGy, 1 GeV proton ((1)H) and 15 cGy, 1 GeV/nucleon iron ((56)Fe) over 28 days after exposure. Unsupervised clustering analysis of gene expression segregated samples according to the IR response and time after exposure, with (56)Fe-IR showing the greatest level of gene modulation. (1)H-IR showed little differential transcript modulation. Network analysis categorized the major differentially expressed genes into cell cycle, oxidative responses, and transcriptional regulation functional groups. Transcriptional networks identified key nodes regulating expression. Validation of the signal transduction network by protein analysis and gel shift assay showed that particle IR clearly regulates a long-lived signaling mechanism for ERK1/2, p38 MAPK signaling and identified NFATc4, GATA4, STAT3, and NF-κB as regulators of the response at specific time points. These data suggest that the molecular responses and gene expression to (56)Fe-IR in cardiomyocytes are unique and long-lasting. Our study may have significant implications for the efforts of National Aeronautics and Space Administration to develop heart disease risk estimates for astronauts and for patients receiving conventional and particle RT via identification of specific HZE-IR molecular markers. PMID:26408534

  3. Aging Impairs Myocardial Fatty Acid and Ketone Oxidation and Modifies Cardiac Functional and Metabolic Responses to Insulin in Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hyyti, Outi M.; Ledee, Dolena; Ning, Xue-Han; Ge, Ming; Portman, Michael A.

    2010-07-02

    Aging presumably initiates shifts in substrate oxidation mediated in part by changes in insulin sensitivity. Similar shifts occur with cardiac hypertrophy and may contribute to contractile dysfunction. We tested the hypothesis that aging modifies substrate utilization and alters insulin sensitivity in mouse heart when provided multiple substrates. In vivo cardiac function was measured with microtipped pressure transducers in the left ventricle from control (4–6 mo) and aged (22–24 mo) mice. Cardiac function was also measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate and anaplerotic fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle (CAC) by using perfusate containing 13C-labeled free fatty acids (FFA), acetoacetate, lactate, and unlabeled glucose. Stroke volume and cardiac output were diminished in aged mice in vivo, but pressure development was preserved. Systolic and diastolic functions were maintained in aged isolated hearts. Insulin prompted an increase in systolic function in aged hearts, resulting in an increase in cardiac efficiency. FFA and ketone flux were present but were markedly impaired in aged hearts. These changes in myocardial substrate utilization corresponded to alterations in circulating lipids, thyroid hormone, and reductions in protein expression for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK)4. Insulin further suppressed FFA oxidation in the aged. Insulin stimulation of anaplerosis in control hearts was absent in the aged. The aged heart shows metabolic plasticity by accessing multiple substrates to maintain function. However, fatty acid oxidation capacity is limited. Impaired insulin-stimulated anaplerosis may contribute to elevated cardiac efficiency, but may also limit response to acute stress through depletion of CAC intermediates.

  4. Functional significance of preserved affect recognition in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Fiszdon, Joanna M.; Johannesen, Jason K.

    2009-01-01

    Affect recognition (AR) is a core component of social information processing, thus may be critical to understanding social behavior and functioning in broader aspects of daily living. Deficits in AR are well documented in schizophrenia, however, there is also evidence that many individuals with schizophrenia perform AR tasks at near-normal levels. In the current study, we sought to evaluate the functional significance of AR deficits in schizophrenia by comparing subgroups with normal-range and impaired AR performance on proxy and interviewer-rated measures of real-world functioning. Schizophrenia outpatients were classified as normal-range (N=17) and impaired (N=31) based on a logistic cut point in the sample distribution of BLERT scores, referenced to a normative sample of healthy control subjects (N=56). The derived schizophrenia subgroups were then compared on proxy (UCSD, UPSA, SSPA, MMAA) and interviewer-rated (QLS, ILSS) measures of functioning, as well as battery of neurocognitive tests. Initial analyses indicated superior MMAA and QLS performance in the near-normal AR subgroup. Covariate analyses indicated that group differences in neurocognition fully mediated the observed associations between AR and MMAA and attenuated the observed relationships between AR classification and QLS. These results support three main conclusions. First, AR, like many other domains of psychopathology studied in schizophrenia, is preserved in select subgroups. Second, there is a positive relationship between AR performance and functional outcome measures. Third, neurocognition appears to mediate the relationship between AR and measures of functioning. PMID:20202689

  5. Beyond ejection fraction: an integrative approach for assessment of cardiac structure and function in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Cikes, Maja; Solomon, Scott D

    2016-06-01

    Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) has been the central parameter used for diagnosis and management in patients with heart failure. A good predictor of adverse outcomes in heart failure when below ∼45%, LVEF is less useful as a marker of risk as it approaches normal. As a measure of cardiac function, ejection fraction has several important limitations. Calculated as the stroke volume divided by end-diastolic volume, the estimation of ejection fraction is generally based on geometric assumptions that allow for assessment of volumes based on linear or two-dimensional measurements. Left ventricular ejection fraction is both preload- and afterload-dependent, can change substantially based on loading conditions, is only moderately reproducible, and represents only a single measure of risk in patients with heart failure. Moreover, the relationship between ejection fraction and risk in patients with heart failure is modified by factors such as hypertension, diabetes, and renal function. A more complete evaluation and understanding of left ventricular function in patients with heart failure requires a more comprehensive assessment: we conceptualize an integrative approach that incorporates measures of left and right ventricular function, left ventricular geometry, left atrial size, and valvular function, as well as non-imaging factors (such as clinical parameters and biomarkers), providing a comprehensive and accurate prediction of risk in heart failure. PMID:26417058

  6. Gestational exposure to diethylstilbestrol alters cardiac structure/function, protein expression and DNA methylation in adult male mice progeny

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, Rami; Kasneci, Amanda; Mepham, Kathryn; Sebag, Igal A.; and others

    2013-01-01

    Pregnant women, and thus their fetuses, are exposed to many endocrine disruptor compounds (EDCs). Fetal cardiomyocytes express sex hormone receptors making them potentially susceptible to re-programming by estrogenizing EDCs. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a proto-typical, non-steroidal estrogen. We hypothesized that changes in adult cardiac structure/function after gestational exposure to the test compound DES would be a proof in principle for the possibility of estrogenizing environmental EDCs to also alter the fetal heart. Vehicle (peanut oil) or DES (0.1, 1.0 and 10.0 μg/kg/da.) was orally delivered to pregnant C57bl/6n dams on gestation days 11.5–14.5. At 3 months, male progeny were left sedentary or were swim trained for 4 weeks. Echocardiography of isoflurane anesthetized mice revealed similar cardiac structure/function in all sedentary mice, but evidence of systolic dysfunction and increased diastolic relaxation after swim training at higher DES doses. The calcium homeostasis proteins, SERCA2a, phospholamban, phospho-serine 16 phospholamban and calsequestrin 2, are important for cardiac contraction and relaxation. Immunoblot analyses of ventricle homogenates showed increased expression of SERCA2a and calsequestrin 2 in DES mice and greater molecular remodeling of these proteins and phospho-serine 16 phospholamban in swim trained DES mice. DES increased cardiac DNA methyltransferase 3a expression and DNA methylation in the CpG island within the calsequestrin 2 promoter in heart. Thus, gestational DES epigenetically altered ventricular DNA, altered cardiac function and expression, and reduced the ability of adult progeny to cardiac remodel when physically challenged. We conclude that gestational exposure to estrogenizing EDCs may impact cardiac structure/function in adult males. -- Highlights: ► Gestational DES changes cardiac SERCA2a and CASQ2 expression. ► Echocardiography identified systolic dysfunction and increased diastolic relaxation. ► DES

  7. Multipotent human stromal cells improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction in mice without long-term engraftment

    SciTech Connect

    Iso, Yoshitaka; Spees, Jeffrey L.; E-mail: Jeffrey.Spees@uvm.edu; Serrano, Claudia; Bakondi, Benjamin; Pochampally, Radhika; Song, Yao-Hua; Sobel, Burton E.; Delafontaine, Patrick; Prockop, Darwin J. . E-mail: dprocko@tulane.edu

    2007-03-16

    The aim of this study was to determine whether intravenously administered multipotent stromal cells from human bone marrow (hMSCs) can improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI) without long-term engraftment and therefore whether transitory paracrine effects or secreted factors are responsible for the benefit conferred. hMSCs were injected systemically into immunodeficient mice with acute MI. Cardiac function and fibrosis after MI in the hMSC-treated group were significantly improved compared with controls. However, despite the cardiac improvement, there was no evident hMSC engraftment in the heart 3 weeks after MI. Microarray assays and ELISAs demonstrated that multiple protective factors were expressed and secreted from the hMSCs in culture. Factors secreted by hMSCs prevented cell death of cultured cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells under conditions that mimicked tissue ischemia. The favorable effects of hMSCs appear to reflect the impact of secreted factors rather than engraftment, differentiation, or cell fusion.

  8. Real-time magnetic resonance imaging of cardiac function and flow—recent progress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuo; Joseph, Arun A.; Voit, Dirk; Schaetz, Sebastian; Merboldt, Klaus-Dietmar; Unterberg-Buchwald, Christina; Hennemuth, Anja; Lotz, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac structure, function and flow are most commonly studied by ultrasound, X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques. However, cardiovascular MRI is hitherto limited to electrocardiogram (ECG)-synchronized acquisitions and therefore often results in compromised quality for patients with arrhythmias or inabilities to comply with requested protocols—especially with breath-holding. Recent advances in the development of novel real-time MRI techniques now offer dynamic imaging of the heart and major vessels with high spatial and temporal resolution, so that examinations may be performed without the need for ECG synchronization and during free breathing. This article provides an overview of technical achievements, physiological validations, preliminary patient studies and translational aspects for a future clinical scenario of cardiovascular MRI in real time. PMID:25392819

  9. Factors affecting sexual function in menopause: A review article.

    PubMed

    Nazarpour, Soheila; Simbar, Masoumeh; Tehrani, Fahimeh Ramezani

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to systematically review the articles on factors affecting sexual function during menopause. Searching articles indexed in Pubmed, Science Direct, Iranmedex, EMBASE, Scopus, and Scientific Information Database databases, a total number of 42 studies published between 2003 and 2013 were selected. Age, estrogen deficiency, type of menopause, chronic medical problems, partner's sex problems, severity of menopause symptoms, dystocia history, and health status were the physical factors influencing sexual function of menopausal women. There were conflicting results regarding the amount of androgens, hormonal therapy, exercise/physical activity, and obstetric history. In the mental-emotional area, all studies confirmed the impact of depression and anxiety. Social factors, including smoking, alcohol consumption, the quality of relationship with husband, partner's loyalty, sexual knowledge, access to health care, a history of divorce or the death of a husband, living apart from a spouse, and a negative understanding of women's health were found to affect sexual function; however, there were conflicting results regarding the effects of education, occupation, socioeconomic status, marital duration, and frequency of sexual intercourse. PMID:27590367

  10. Cardiac autonomic function during sleep: effects of alcohol dependence and evidence of partial recovery with abstinence

    PubMed Central

    de Zambotti, Massimiliano; Willoughby, Adrian R.; Baker, Fiona C.; Sugarbaker, David S.; Colrain, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism is associated with the development of cardiac and peripheral autonomic nervous system (ANS) pathology. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which recovery in ANS function could be demonstrated over the first 4 months of abstinence. Fifteen alcoholics (7 women) were studied on three occasions: within a month of detoxification, at approximately 2 months post-detox, and at 4 months post-detox. Thirteen control subjects (6 women) were also studied on three occasions with inter-study intervals matching those of the alcoholics. Six alcoholics relapsed, 48.7 ± 27.9 days following the initial PSG session. ANS function was assessed in the first part of stable non-rapid eye movement sleep. Frequency-domain power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) produced variables including: heart rate (HR), total power (TP; an index representing total HR variability), High Frequency power (HFa; an index reflecting cardiac vagal modulation), HF proportion of total power (HFprop sympathovagal balance), and HF peak frequency (HFpf; an index reflecting respiration rate). Overall, high total and high frequency variability and low sympathovagal balance and myocardial contractility are considered as desired conditions to promote cardiovascular health. At initial assessment, alcoholics had a higher HR (p < 0.001) and respiratory rate (p < 0.01), and lower vagal activity (HFa; p < 0.01) than controls. Alcoholics showed evidence of recovery in HR (p = 0.039) and HFa (p = 0.031) with 4 months of abstinence. Alcoholics with higher TP at the initial visit showed a greater improvement in TP from the initial to the 4-month follow-up session (r = 0.75, p < 0.05). Alcoholics showed substantial recovery in HR and vagal modulation of HRV with 4 months of abstinence, with evidence that the extent of recovery in HRV may be partially determined by the extent of alcohol dependence-related insult to the cardiac ANS system. These data support other studies

  11. Cardiac autonomic function during sleep: effects of alcohol dependence and evidence of partial recovery with abstinence.

    PubMed

    de Zambotti, Massimiliano; Willoughby, Adrian R; Baker, Fiona C; Sugarbaker, David S; Colrain, Ian M

    2015-06-01

    Chronic alcoholism is associated with the development of cardiac and peripheral autonomic nervous system (ANS) pathology. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the extent to which recovery in ANS function could be demonstrated over the first 4 months of abstinence. Fifteen alcoholics (7 women) were studied on three occasions: within a month of detoxification, at approximately 2 months post-detox, and at 4 months post-detox. Thirteen control subjects (6 women) were also studied on three occasions with inter-study intervals matching those of the alcoholics. Six alcoholics relapsed, 48.7 ± 27.9 days following the initial PSG session. ANS function was assessed in the first part of stable non-rapid eye movement sleep. Frequency-domain power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) produced variables including: heart rate (HR), total power (TP; an index representing total HR variability), High Frequency power (HFa; an index reflecting cardiac vagal modulation), HF proportion of total power (HFprop sympathovagal balance), and HF peak frequency (HFpf; an index reflecting respiration rate). Overall, high total and high frequency variability and low sympathovagal balance and myocardial contractility are considered as desired conditions to promote cardiovascular health. At initial assessment, alcoholics had a higher HR (p < 0.001) and respiratory rate (p < 0.01), and lower vagal activity (HFa; p < 0.01) than controls. Alcoholics showed evidence of recovery in HR (p = 0.039) and HFa (p = 0.031) with 4 months of abstinence. Alcoholics with higher TP at the initial visit showed a greater improvement in TP from the initial to the 4 month follow-up session (r = 0.75, p < 0.05). Alcoholics showed substantial recovery in HR and vagal modulation of HRV with 4 months of abstinence, with evidence that the extent of recovery in HRV may be partially determined by the extent of alcohol dependence-related insult to the cardiac ANS system. These data support other studies

  12. Microbial composition affects the functioning of estuarine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Heather E; Martiny, Jennifer BH

    2013-01-01

    Although microorganisms largely drive many ecosystem processes, the relationship between microbial composition and their functioning remains unclear. To tease apart the effects of composition and the environment directly, microbial composition must be manipulated and maintained, ideally in a natural ecosystem. In this study, we aimed to test whether variability in microbial composition affects functional processes in a field setting, by reciprocally transplanting riverbed sediments between low- and high-salinity locations along the Nonesuch River (Maine, USA). We placed the sediments into microbial ‘cages' to prevent the migration of microorganisms, while allowing the sediments to experience the abiotic conditions of the surroundings. We performed two experiments, short- (1 week) and long-term (7 weeks) reciprocal transplants, after which we assayed a variety of functional processes in the cages. In both experiments, we examined the composition of bacteria generally (targeting the 16S rDNA gene) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) specifically (targeting the dsrAB gene) using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). In the short-term experiment, sediment processes (CO2 production, CH4 flux, nitrification and enzyme activities) depended on both the sediment's origin (reflecting differences in microbial composition between salt and freshwater sediments) and the surrounding environment. In the long-term experiment, general bacterial composition (but not SRB composition) shifted in response to their new environment, and this composition was significantly correlated with sediment functioning. Further, sediment origin had a diminished effect, relative to the short-term experiment, on sediment processes. Overall, this study provides direct evidence that microbial composition directly affects functional processes in these sediments. PMID:23235294

  13. Structural and functional aspects of the myosin essential light chain in cardiac muscle contraction

    SciTech Connect

    Muthu, Priya; Wang, Li; Yuan, Chen-Ching; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Huang, Wenrui; Hernandez, Olga M.; Kawai, Masataka; Irving, Thomas C.; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta

    2012-04-02

    The myosin essential light chain (ELC) is a structural component of the actomyosin cross-bridge, but its function is poorly understood, especially the role of the cardiac specific N-terminal extension in modulating actomyosin interaction. Here, we generated transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the A57G (alanine to glycine) mutation in the cardiac ELC known to cause familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). The function of the ELC N-terminal extension was investigated with the Tg-{Delta}43 mouse model, whose myocardium expresses a truncated ELC. Low-angle X-ray diffraction studies on papillary muscle fibers in rigor revealed a decreased interfilament spacing ({approx} 1.5 nm) and no alterations in cross-bridge mass distribution in Tg-A57G mice compared to Tg-WT, expressing the full-length nonmutated ELC. The truncation mutation showed a 1.3-fold increase in I{sub 1,1}/I{sub 1,0}, indicating a shift of cross-bridge mass from the thick filament backbone toward the thin filaments. Mechanical studies demonstrated increased stiffness in Tg-A57G muscle fibers compared to Tg-WT or Tg-{Delta}43. The equilibrium constant for the cross-bridge force generation step was smallest in Tg-{Delta}43. These results support an important role for the N-terminal ELC extension in prepositioning the cross-bridge for optimal force production. Subtle changes in the ELC sequence were sufficient to alter cross-bridge properties and lead to pathological phenotypes.

  14. Pretreatment with a combination of ligustrazine and berberine improves cardiac function in rats with coronary microembolization

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Ma, Xiao-juan; Guo, Chun-yu; Wang, Ming-ming; Kou, Na; Qu, Hua; Mao, Hui-min; Shi, Da-zhuo

    2016-01-01

    Aim: We have shown that a combination of ligustrazine and berberine produces more effective inhibition on platelet activation and inflammatory reactions in rat acute myocardial infarction compared with either agent alone. In this study we evaluated the beneficial effects of a combination of ligustrazine and berberine in a rat model of coronary microembolization (CME). Methods: SD rats were treated with ligustrazine, berberine, ligustrazine+berberine, or clopidogrel for 2 weeks. When the treatment completed, CME was induced by injection of sodium laurate into the left ventricular, while obstructing the ascending aorta. All rats were intubated for hemodynamic measurements. Blood samples were collected for biochemical analyses, flow cytometry, and ELISAs. Heart tissues were isolated for histopathology and subsequent protein analyses. Results: Pretreatment with the combination of ligustrazine (27 mg·kg−1·d−1) and berberine (90 mg·kg−1·d−1) significantly improved cardiac function, and decreased myocardial necrosis, inflammatory cell infiltration, microthrombosis and serum CK-MB levels in CME rats. In addition, this combination significantly decreased plasma ET-1 levels and von Willebrand factor, inhibited ADP-induced platelet activation, and reduced TNFα, IL-1β, ICAM-1 and RANTES levels in serum and heart tissues. The protective effects of this combination were more prominent than those of ligustrazine or berberine alone, but comparable to those of a positive control clopidogrel (6.75 mg·kg−1·d−1). Conclusion: The combination of ligustrazine and berberine significantly improved cardiac function in rat CME model via a mechanism involving antiplatelet and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:26924290

  15. Changes of cardiac structure and function in pediatric patients with high altitude pulmonary hypertension in Tibet.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ri-Li; Ma, Ru-yan; Bao, Hai-hua; Zhao, Xi-peng; Qi, Hai-ning

    2009-01-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the structural and functional cardiac changes in pediatric high altitude pulmonary hypertension (HAPH) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Doppler echocardiography (Echo). Ten patients with infantile HAPH (aged 12 to 24 months) and eight healthy age-matched children (control group) underwent MRI and Echo studies. All participants were born and living in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (3600 to 4600 m). The studies were performed at the Children's Hospital located in Xining, Qinghai (2260 m). The right and left ventricular end-systolic (RVEST and LVEST, respectively) and end-diastolic (RVEDT and LVEDT, respectively) wall thicknesses were calculated directly from the MRI scans. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) was measured using Echo. RVEST was significantly higher in the HAPH group than in the control group (6.8 +/- 0.6 and 3.7 +/- 0.5 mm, respectively; p < 0.001). RVEDT was significantly higher in the HAPH patients when compared with the control group (4.9 +/- 1.1 and 2.1 +/- 0.3 mm, respectively; p < 0.05). Mean PAP in the HAPH group was significantly higher than in the control group (66.8 +/- 6.7 and 33.8 +/- 3.6 mmHg, respectively; p < 0.001) and was positively correlated with RVEDT (r(2) = 0.562, p < 0.001). Right ventricular ejection fraction was significantly lower in the HAPH group when compared with the control group (29.8 +/- 11.8 and 55.5 +/- 9.9%, respectively; p < 0.001); however, left ventricular ejection fraction was similar in both groups. These results indicate that hypoxia-induced infantile HAPH leads to right ventricular hypertrophy in these patients. These structural cardiac changes may lead to right ventricular dysfunction and right heart failure; however, left ventricular function is preserved. PMID:19775214

  16. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Vinicius S; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  17. Disruption of Ah Receptor Signaling during Mouse Development Leads to Abnormal Cardiac Structure and Function in the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Vinicius S.; Fan, Yunxia; Kurita, Hisaka; Wang, Qin; Ko, Chia-I; Naticchioni, Mindi; Jiang, Min; Koch, Sheryl; Zhang, Xiang; Biesiada, Jacek; Medvedovic, Mario; Xia, Ying; Rubinstein, Jack; Puga, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) Theory proposes that the environment encountered during fetal life and infancy permanently shapes tissue physiology and homeostasis such that damage resulting from maternal stress, poor nutrition or exposure to environmental agents may be at the heart of adult onset disease. Interference with endogenous developmental functions of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), either by gene ablation or by exposure in utero to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), a potent AHR ligand, causes structural, molecular and functional cardiac abnormalities and altered heart physiology in mouse embryos. To test if embryonic effects progress into an adult phenotype, we investigated whether Ahr ablation or TCDD exposure in utero resulted in cardiac abnormalities in adult mice long after removal of the agent. Ten-months old adult Ahr-/- and in utero TCDD-exposed Ahr+/+ mice showed sexually dimorphic abnormal cardiovascular phenotypes characterized by echocardiographic findings of hypertrophy, ventricular dilation and increased heart weight, resting heart rate and systolic and mean blood pressure, and decreased exercise tolerance. Underlying these effects, genes in signaling networks related to cardiac hypertrophy and mitochondrial function were differentially expressed. Cardiac dysfunction in mouse embryos resulting from AHR signaling disruption seems to progress into abnormal cardiac structure and function that predispose adults to cardiac disease, but while embryonic dysfunction is equally robust in males and females, the adult abnormalities are more prevalent in females, with the highest severity in Ahr-/- females. The findings reported here underscore the conclusion that AHR signaling in the developing heart is one potential target of environmental factors associated with cardiovascular disease. PMID:26555816

  18. Asiatic acid inhibits left ventricular remodeling and improves cardiac function in a rat model of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    HUO, LIANYING; SHI, WENBING; CHONG, LING; WANG, JINLONG; ZHANG, KAI; LI, YUFENG

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular remodeling results in cardiac dysfunction and accounts for the majority of the morbidity and mortality following myocardial infarction (MI). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of asiatic acid (AA) on cardiac function and left ventricular remodeling in a rat model of MI and explore the underlying mechanisms. Rats were subjected to coronary artery ligation to model MI and orally treated with AA. After 4 weeks, cardiac function was assessed by echocardiography. Cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area was recorded, and the expression levels of a number of inflammatory cytokines were detected using ELISA. The degree of interstitial fibrosis was determined by evaluating the mRNA expression levels of collagen II and III. Western blot analysis was performed to detect the expression levels of total and phosphorylated p38 MAPK and ERK1/2, to investigate whether they are involved in the mechanism underlying the effect of AA on the heart. Rats subjected to MI displayed significantly impaired cardiac function compared with those subjected to a sham procedure, while this change was reversed by treatment with AA. Furthermore, AA markedly inhibited cardiac hypertrophy, reduced the mRNA expression levels of inflammatory cytokines and decreased interstitial fibrosis in the infarct border zone of MI model rats compared with those in vehicle-treated MI model rats. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 was blocked by AA in the MI rats but not in the sham rats. In summary, AA treatment preserved cardiac function and inhibited left ventricular remodeling, potentially by blocking the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 in the infarct border zone of the ischemic myocardium, indicating that AA may be a novel candidate for development as a therapy for MI. PMID:26889217

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum Resident Protein 44 (ERp44) Deficiency in Mice and Zebrafish Leads to Cardiac Developmental and Functional Defects

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ding‐Yan; Abbasi, Cynthia; El‐Rass, Suzan; Li, Jamie Yuanjun; Dawood, Fayez; Naito, Kotaro; Sharma, Parveen; Bousette, Nicolas; Singh, Shalini; Backx, Peter H.; Cox, Brian; Wen, Xiao‐Yan; Liu, Peter P.; Gramolini, Anthony O.

    2014-01-01

    Background Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) resident protein 44 (ERp44) is a member of the protein disulfide isomerase family, is induced during ER stress, and may be involved in regulating Ca2+ homeostasis. However, the role of ERp44 in cardiac development and function is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERp44 in cardiac development and function in mice, zebrafish, and embryonic stem cell (ESC)‐derived cardiomyocytes to determine the underlying role of ERp44. Methods and Results We generated and characterized ERp44−/− mice, ERp44 morphant zebrafish embryos, and ERp44−/− ESC‐derived cardiomyocytes. Deletion of ERp44 in mouse and zebrafish caused significant embryonic lethality, abnormal heart development, altered Ca2+ dynamics, reactive oxygen species generation, activated ER stress gene profiles, and apoptotic cell death. We also determined the cardiac phenotype in pressure overloaded, aortic‐banded ERp44+/− mice: enhanced ER stress activation and increased mortality, as well as diastolic cardiac dysfunction with a significantly lower fractional shortening. Confocal and LacZ histochemical staining showed a significant transmural gradient for ERp44 in the adult heart, in which high expression of ERp44 was observed in the outer subepicardial region of the myocardium. Conclusions ERp44 plays a critical role in embryonic heart development and is crucial in regulating cardiac cell Ca2+ signaling, ER stress, ROS‐induced oxidative stress, and activation of the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. PMID:25332179

  20. Patient specific identification of the cardiac driver function in a cardiovascular system model.

    PubMed

    Hann, C E; Revie, J; Stevenson, D; Heldmann, S; Desaive, T; Froissart, C B; Lambermont, B; Ghuysen, A; Kolh, P; Shaw, G M; Chase, J G

    2011-02-01

    The cardiac muscle activation or driver function, is a major determinant of cardiovascular dynamics, and is often approximated by the ratio of the left ventricle pressure to the left ventricle volume. In an intensive care unit, the left ventricle pressure is usually never measured, and the left ventricle volume is only measured occasionally by echocardiography, so is not available real-time. This paper develops a method for identifying the driver function based on correlates with geometrical features in the aortic pressure waveform. The method is included in an overall cardiovascular modelling approach, and is clinically validated on a porcine model of pulmonary embolism. For validation a comparison is done between the optimized parameters for a baseline model, which uses the direct measurements of the left ventricle pressure and volume, and the optimized parameters from the approximated driver function. The parameters do not significantly change between the two approaches thus showing that the patient specific approach to identifying the driver function is valid, and has potential clinically. PMID:20621383

  1. β-Adrenergic receptor desensitization in man: insight into post-exercise attenuation of cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Emma; Dawson, Ellen; Rasmussen, Peter; George, Keith; Secher, Niels H; Whyte, Greg; Shave, Rob

    2006-01-01

    Desensitization of the β-adrenoreceptors (β-AR) may contribute to a post-exercise reduction in left ventricular (LV) function. However, attenuation of the chronotropic and inotropic responses to a β-AR agonist may depend upon alterations in parasympathetic tone. Furthermore, changes in cardiac output Q˙ and LV diastolic function in response to a β-AR agonist, pre- to post-prolonged exercise, remain unclear. Seven trained males (mean ± s.d., age 27 ± 6 years) performed 4 h of ergometer rowing. Peak heart rate (HR) and LV systolic and diastolic functional responses to incremental isoproterenol (isoprenaline) infusion (2, 4 and 6 μg kg min−1) were assessed after vagal blockade (glycopyrrolate, 1.2 mg). LV systolic function was assessed by the pressure/volume ratio (systolic blood pressure/end systolic volume) and Q˙, whilst diastolic function was evaluated as peak early and late transmitral filling velocities. Following exercise, the pressure/volume ratio decreased by 25% (P < 0.05), whereas Q˙ was unchanged (P > 0.05). The early/late filling ratio was reduced by 36% after exercise, due to an elevation in late LV filling (P < 0.01). The increase in HR response to isoproterenol infusion was blunted post-exercise at both 4 and 6 μg kg min−1 (127 ± 7 and 132 ± 6 beats min−1) compared with pre-exercise (138 ± 8 and 141 ± 12 beats min−1, P < 0.05). Additionally, the pressure/volume ratio and Q˙ were blunted post-exercise in response to isoproterenol (P < 0.05). In contrast, diastolic function was similar before and after exercise during isoproterenol infusion (P > 0.05). Desensitization of the β-AR contributes to an attenuated left ventricular systolic but not diastolic function following prolonged exercise. PMID:16973702

  2. The Effects of Experimental Sleep Apnea on Cardiac and Respiratory Functions in 6 and 18 Month Old Dystrophic (mdx) Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fallavollita, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disease where over 90% of patients succumb to respiratory or cardiac failure. Sleep apnea and sleep disordered breathing (SDB) are noted in a plurality of DMD patients, and the resulting nocturnal episodic hypoxia (EH) cannot be ruled out as a contributing factor to cardiac and respiratory dysfunction. In this study, we investigated the impact of long-term episodic hypoxia, which mimics the cyclic hypoxia seen in sleep apnea, on cardiac and respiratory function in a murine model of DMD (mdx mice). Since the severity and prevalence of sleep apnea in DMD increases with age, we studied the impact of EH on young (6-month) and on older (18-month) mdx mice. Mice were either exposed for 12 weeks to EH (8 hours/day, 5 days/week) or to room air. We noted a significant increase in left ventricular (LV) dilatation (transthoracic echocardiography) on EH exposure in both age groups, but reduced LV contractility was seen only in 6-month old mice. With EH exposure, an increased fibrosis (hydroxyproline) was noted in both cardiac and diaphragm muscle in 18-month but not 6-month old mice. No significant change in relative diaphragm strength (in-vitro) was noted on EH exposure in 18-month old mice. In contrast, EH exposed 6-month old mice showed a significant increase in relative diaphragm strength. EH exposure did not result in any significant change in ventilatory parameters (barometric plethysmography) in awake 6-month old mdx mice. In contrast, 18-month old mdx mice showed considerable ventilatory dysfunction, consistent with reduced ventilatory reserve. Our findings highlight that sleep apnea impacts respiratory and cardiac function in muscular dystrophy, and that EH can have divergent effects on both systems. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive study to investigate the impact of EH on cardiac and respiratory function in mdx mice. PMID:26808526

  3. The Effects of Experimental Sleep Apnea on Cardiac and Respiratory Functions in 6 and 18 Month Old Dystrophic (mdx) Mice.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Milind R; Fallavollita, James A; Farkas, Gaspar A

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disease where over 90% of patients succumb to respiratory or cardiac failure. Sleep apnea and sleep disordered breathing (SDB) are noted in a plurality of DMD patients, and the resulting nocturnal episodic hypoxia (EH) cannot be ruled out as a contributing factor to cardiac and respiratory dysfunction. In this study, we investigated the impact of long-term episodic hypoxia, which mimics the cyclic hypoxia seen in sleep apnea, on cardiac and respiratory function in a murine model of DMD (mdx mice). Since the severity and prevalence of sleep apnea in DMD increases with age, we studied the impact of EH on young (6-month) and on older (18-month) mdx mice. Mice were either exposed for 12 weeks to EH (8 hours/day, 5 days/week) or to room air. We noted a significant increase in left ventricular (LV) dilatation (transthoracic echocardiography) on EH exposure in both age groups, but reduced LV contractility was seen only in 6-month old mice. With EH exposure, an increased fibrosis (hydroxyproline) was noted in both cardiac and diaphragm muscle in 18-month but not 6-month old mice. No significant change in relative diaphragm strength (in-vitro) was noted on EH exposure in 18-month old mice. In contrast, EH exposed 6-month old mice showed a significant increase in relative diaphragm strength. EH exposure did not result in any significant change in ventilatory parameters (barometric plethysmography) in awake 6-month old mdx mice. In contrast, 18-month old mdx mice showed considerable ventilatory dysfunction, consistent with reduced ventilatory reserve. Our findings highlight that sleep apnea impacts respiratory and cardiac function in muscular dystrophy, and that EH can have divergent effects on both systems. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive study to investigate the impact of EH on cardiac and respiratory function in mdx mice. PMID:26808526

  4. How does temperature affect the function of tissue macrophages?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Repasky, Elizabeth A.

    2011-03-01

    Macrophages create a major danger signal following injury or infection and upon activation release pro-inflammatory cytokines, which in turn help to generate febrile conditions. Thus, like other cells of the body, tissue macrophages are often exposed to naturally occurring elevations in tissue temperature during inflammation and fever. However, whether macrophages sense and respond to temperature changes in a specific manner which modulates their function is still not clear. In this brief review, we highlight recent studies which have analyzed the effects of temperatures on macrophage function, and summarize the possible underlying molecular mechanisms which have been identified. Mild, physiological range hyperthermia has been shown to have both pro- and anti-inflammatory roles in regulating macrophage inflammatory cytokine production and at the meeting presentation, we will show new data demonstrating that hyperthermia can indeed exert both positive and negative signals to macrophages. While some thermal effects are correlated with the induction of heat shock factors/heat shock proteins, overall it is not clear how mild hyperthermia can exert both pro- and anti-inflammatory functions. We also summarize data which shows that hyperthermia can affect other macrophage effector functions, including the anti-tumor cytotoxicity. Overall, these studies may help us to better understand the immunological role of tissue temperature and may provide important information needed to maximize the application of heat in the treatment of various diseases including cancer.

  5. Can the hydrophilicity of functional monomers affect chemical interaction?

    PubMed

    Feitosa, V P; Ogliari, F A; Van Meerbeek, B; Watson, T F; Yoshihara, K; Ogliari, A O; Sinhoreti, M A; Correr, A B; Cama, G; Sauro, S

    2014-02-01

    The number of carbon atoms and/or ester/polyether groups in spacer chains may influence the interaction of functional monomers with calcium and dentin. The present study assessed the chemical interaction and bond strength of 5 standard-synthesized phosphoric-acid ester functional monomers with different spacer chain characteristics, by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), ATR-FTIR, thin-film x-ray diffraction (TF-XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and microtensile bond strength (μTBS). The tested functional monomers were 2-MEP (two-carbon spacer chain), 10-MDP (10-carbon), 12-MDDP (12-carbon), MTEP (more hydrophilic polyether spacer chain), and CAP-P (intermediate hydrophilicity ester spacer). The intensity of monomer-calcium salt formation measured by AAS differed in the order of 12-MDDP=10-MDP>CAP-P>MTEP>2-MEP. FTIR and SEM analyses of monomer-treated dentin surfaces showed resistance to rinsing for all monomer-dentin bonds, except with 2-MEP. TF-XRD confirmed the weaker interaction of 2-MEP. Highest µTBS was observed for 12-MDDP and 10-MDP. A shorter spacer chain (2-MEP) of phosphate functional monomers induced formation of unstable monomer-calcium salts, and lower chemical interaction and dentin bond strength. The presence of ester or ether groups within longer spacer carbon chains (CAP-P and MTEP) may affect the hydrophilicity, μTBS, and also the formation of monomer-calcium salts. PMID:24284259

  6. Effects of Modified Parvalbumin EF-Hand Motifs on Cardiac Myocyte Contractile Function.

    PubMed

    Asp, Michelle L; Sjaastad, Frances V; Siddiqui, Jalal K; Davis, Jonathan P; Metzger, Joseph M

    2016-05-10

    +) waves. ParvE101D provides mechanistic insight into how changes in the Ca(2+)/Mg(2+) binding affinities of parvalbumin's EF-hand motif alter function of cardiac myocytes. These data are informative in developing new Ca(2+) buffering strategies for the failing heart. PMID:27166817

  7. Evaluation of cardiac functions of cirrhotic children using serum brain natriuretic peptide and tissue Doppler imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fattouh, Aya M; El-Shabrawi, Mortada H; Mahmoud, Enas H; Ahmed, Wafaa O

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy (CCM) is described as the presence of cardiac dysfunction in cirrhotic patients. In children with chronic liver disease, CCM has been very rarely investigated. The Aim of the Study: Is to evaluate the cardiac function of cirrhotic children to identify those with CCM. Patients and Methods: Fifty-two cirrhotic patients and 53 age and sex matched controls were assessed using serum brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), conventional echocardiography, and tissue Doppler imaging. Results: Patients’ mean ages were 7.66 ± 4.16 years (vs. 6.88 ± 3.04 years for the controls). The study included 27 males and 25 females (28 and 25 respectively for the controls). Patients had larger left atrium and right ventricle (RV) (P value 0.05) and increased LV posterior wall thickness than controls (P value 0.04). They had higher late atrial diastolic filling velocity (A) of tricuspid valve (TV) inflow (0.59 ± 0.17 vs. 0.5 ± 0.1 m/s, P < 0.001) and lower ratios between the early diastolic filling velocity (E) and A wave velocity (E/A) of both mitral valve and TV inflow (1.7 ± 0.35 vs. 1.87 ± 0.34 and 1.3 ± 0.3 vs. 1.5 ± 0.3, P < 0.005 and 0.0008, respectively). Patients had significantly longer isovolumic relaxation time of LV (45.5 ± 11.1 vs. 40.5 ± 7.7 ms P 0.008), higher late diastolic peak myocardial velocity (A’) (11.8 ± 3.6 vs. 9.5 ± 2.7 ms, P 0.0003) and systolic velocity (S’) of the RV (14.5 ± 2.7 vs. 13.2 ± 2.9, P 0.01) and significantly higher myocardial performance index of both LV and RV (P 0.001 and 0.01). BNP levels were significantly higher in cases than controls (5.25 ng/l vs. 3.75 ng/l, P < 0.04) and was correlated with the E wave velocity of the TV (r 0.004) and the E/E’ ratio of the RV (r 0.001). None of the clinical or laboratory data were correlated with the BNP level. Conclusion Cirrhotic children have cardiac dysfunction mainly in the form of diastolic dysfunction. There is a need that CCM be more accurately

  8. Assessment of cardiac function using myocardial perfusion imaging technique on SPECT with 99mTc sestamibi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gani, M. R. A.; Nazir, F.; Pawiro, S. A.; Soejoko, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Suspicion on coronary heart disease can be confirmed by observing the function of left ventricle cardiac muscle with Myocardial Perfusion Imaging techniques. The function perfusion itself is indicated by the uptake of radiopharmaceutical tracer. The 31 patients were studied undergoing the MPI examination on Gatot Soebroto Hospital using 99mTc-sestamibi radiopharmaceutical with stress and rest conditions. Stress was stimulated by physical exercise or pharmacological agent. After two hours, the patient did rest condition on the same day. The difference of uptake percentage between stress and rest conditions will be used to determine the malfunction of perfusion due to ischemic or infarct. Degradation of cardiac function was determined based on the image-based assessment of five segments of left ventricle cardiac. As a result, 8 (25.8%) patients had normal myocardial perfusion and 11 (35.5%) patients suspected for having partial ischemia. Total ischemia occurred to 8 (25.8%) patients with reversible and irreversible ischemia and the remaining 4 (12.9%) patients for partial infarct with characteristic the percentage of perfusion ≤50%. It is concluded that MPI technique of image-based assessment on uptake percentage difference between stress and rest conditions can be employed to predict abnormal perfusion as complementary information to diagnose the cardiac function.

  9. EFFECTS OF INSTILLATION OF RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH ON INDICES OF CARDIAC, PULMONARY, AND THERMOREGULATORY FUNCTION IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory


    EFFECTS OF INSTILLED RESIDUAL OIL FLY ASH (ROFA) ON INDICES OF CARDIAC, PULMONARY, AND THERMOREGULATORY FUNCTION IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE (SH) RATS. LB Wichers1, JP Nolan2, UP Kodavanti2, MCJ Schladweiler2, R Hauser3, DW Winsett2, DL Costa2, and WP Watkinson2. 1UNC Sch...

  10. Myocardial performance index is sensitive to changes in cardiac contractility, but is also affected by vascular load condition.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Kazunori; Kawada, Toru; Zheng, Can; Li, Meihua; Shishido, Toshiaki; Sugimachi, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Myocardial performance index (MPI), or Tei index, is measured by Doppler echocardiography in clinical practice. MPI has been shown to be useful in evaluating left ventricular (LV) performance and predicting prognosis in cardiac patients. However, the effects of LV load and contractile states on MPI remain to be thoroughly investigated. In 14 anesthetized dogs, we obtained LV pressure-volume relationship with use of sonomicrometry and catheter-tip manometry. MPI was determined from the time derivative of LV volume and pressure. LV end-systolic pressure-volume ratio (Ees'), effective arterial elastance (Ea) and LV end-diastolic volume (Ved) were used as indices of LV contractility, afterload and preload, respectively. Hemodynamic conditions were varied over wide ranges [heart rate (HR), 66-192 bpm; mean arterial pressure, 71-177 mmHg] by infusing cardiovascular agents, by inducing ischemic heart failure and by electrical atrial pacing. Multiple linear regression analysis of pooled data (66 data sets) indicated that MPI (0.6-1.8) significantly correlated with Ees' [1.5-17.5 mmHg · ml(-1), p<0.0001, standard partial regression coefficient (β) =-0.66], Ea (3.6-21.9 mmHg · ml(-1), p<0.001, β = 0.4) and Ved (11-100 ml, p<0.0001, β = -0.69). MPI directly correlated with the time constant of isovolumic relaxation (19-66 ms, p<0.05), but not with HR or LV diastolic-stiffness (all p>0.1). Theoretical analysis also indicated that MPI decreases following the increases in LV contractility and in preload, while it increases in response to an increase in LV afterload. We conclude that MPI sensitively detects changes in LV contractility. However, MPI is also affected by changes in LV afterload and preload. PMID:24109782

  11. Effect of R56865 on cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum function and its role as an antagonist of digoxin at the sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium release channel.

    PubMed Central

    McGarry, S J; Scheufler, E; Williams, A J

    1995-01-01

    1. The effect of R56865 (N-[1-[4-(4-fluorophenoxy)-butyl]-4-piperidinyl]-N-methyl-2- benzothiazolamine) on cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)-release channel function was investigated. The effect of R56865 on [3H]-ryanodine and [3H]-digoxin binding to SR vesicles and its effect on the ATP-stimulated 45Ca2+ uptake into SR vesicles was also studied. 2. R56865 (0.5-50 microM) had no effect on single-channel open probability (Po) when added to native cardiac SR Ca(2+)-release channels, incorporated into planar phospholipid bilayers, that had previously been activated by 10 microM Ca2+. The single-channel conductance (93 pS) and the Ca2+/Tris+ permeability ratio (12.5) were also unaffected by R56865. 3. R56865 failed to affect the rapid Ca(2+)-induced efflux of 45Ca2+ from cardiac SR vesicles. The initial efflux rate at an extravesicular [Ca2+] of 0.1 microM was 176 +/- 33 nmol 45Ca2+ mg-1 protein s-1 (n = 5). Addition of 0.5-50 microM R56865 to the efflux solution did not affect the initial efflux rate or the total amount of 45Ca2+ released from the vesicles. 4. The specific binding of [3H]-ryanodine to SR vesicles can be viewed as a marker for SR Ca(2+)-release channel activation. R56865 (0.05-50 microM) did not change the amount of specific [3H]-ryanodine bound at 10 microM activating Ca2+. Taken together these data (points 2, 3 and 4) suggest that R56865 does not affect the Ca2+ activation of the cardiac SR Ca(2+)-release channel. 5. R56865 (0.5-50 microM) decreased the ATP-stimulated uptake of 45Ca2+ into cardiac SR vesicles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7712023

  12. Antibodies to cardiac receptors.

    PubMed

    Boivin-Jahns, V; Schlipp, A; Hartmann, S; Panjwani, P; Klingel, K; Lohse, M J; Ertl, G; Jahns, R

    2012-12-01

    Inflammation of cardiac tissue is generally associated with an activation of the host's immune system. On the one hand, this activation is mandatory to protect the heart by fighting the invading microbial agents or toxins and by engaging myocardial reparation and healing processes. On the other hand, uncontrolled activation of the immune defense has the risk of an arousal of auto- or cross-reactive immune cells, which in some cases bring more harm than good. Dependent on the individual genetic predisposition, such heart-directed autoimmune reactions most likely occur as a result of myocyte apoptosis or necrosis and subsequent liberation of self-antigens previously hidden to the immune system. During the past two decades, evidence for a pathogenic relevance of autoimmunity in human heart disease has substantially increased. Conformational cardiac (auto)antibodies affecting cardiac function and, in particular, (auto)antibodies that target G protein-coupled cardiac membrane receptors are thought to play a key role in the development of heart failure. Clinical pilot studies even suggest that such antibodies negatively affect survival in heart failure patients. However, the true prevalence and clinical impact of many cardiac (auto)antibodies in human heart diseases are still unclear, as are the events triggering their formation, their titer course, and their patterns of clearance and/or persistence. The present article summarizes current knowledge in the field of cardiac receptor (auto)antibodies including recent efforts to address some of the aforementioned gaps of knowledge, thereby attempting to pave the way for novel, more specific therapeutic approaches. PMID:23183584

  13. Gain-of-function mutation in TASK-4 channels and severe cardiac conduction disorder

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Corinna; Rinné, Susanne; Zumhagen, Sven; Kiper, Aytug K; Silbernagel, Nicole; Netter, Michael F; Stallmeyer, Birgit; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Decher, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing a patient with progressive and severe cardiac conduction disorder combined with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF), we identified a splice site mutation in the sodium channel gene SCN5A. Due to the severe phenotype, we performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) and identified an additional mutation in the KCNK17 gene encoding the K2P potassium channel TASK-4. The heterozygous change (c.262G>A) resulted in the p.Gly88Arg mutation in the first extracellular pore loop. Mutant TASK-4 channels generated threefold increased currents, while surface expression was unchanged, indicating enhanced conductivity. When co-expressed with wild-type channels, the gain-of-function by G88R was conferred in a dominant-active manner. We demonstrate that KCNK17 is strongly expressed in human Purkinje cells and that overexpression of G88R leads to a hyperpolarization and strong slowing of the upstroke velocity of spontaneously beating HL-1 cells. Thus, we propose that a gain-of-function by TASK-4 in the conduction system might aggravate slowed conductivity by the loss of sodium channel function. Moreover, WES supports a second hit-hypothesis in severe arrhythmia cases and identified KCNK17 as a novel arrhythmia gene. PMID:24972929

  14. The Function of the MEF2 Family of Transcription Factors in Cardiac Development, Cardiogenomics, and Direct Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Cody A.; Naya, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Proper formation of the mammalian heart requires precise spatiotemporal transcriptional regulation of gene programs in cardiomyocytes. Sophisticated regulatory networks have evolved to not only integrate the activities of distinct transcription factors to control tissue-specific gene programs but also, in many instances, to incorporate multiple members within these transcription factor families to ensure accuracy and specificity in the system. Unsurprisingly, perturbations in this elaborate transcriptional circuitry can lead to severe cardiac abnormalities. Myocyte enhancer factor–2 (MEF2) transcription factor belongs to the evolutionarily conserved cardiac gene regulatory network. Given its central role in muscle gene regulation and its evolutionary conservation, MEF2 is considered one of only a few core cardiac transcription factors. In addition to its firmly established role as a differentiation factor, MEF2 regulates wide variety of, sometimes antagonistic, cellular processes such as cell survival and death. Vertebrate genomes encode multiple MEF2 family members thereby expanding the transcriptional potential of this core transcription factor in the heart. This review highlights the requirement of the MEF2 family and their orthologs in cardiac development in diverse animal model systems. Furthermore, we describe the recently characterized role of MEF2 in direct reprogramming and genome-wide cardiomyocyte gene regulation. A thorough understanding of the regulatory functions of the MEF2 family in cardiac development and cardiogenomics is required in order to develop effective therapeutic strategies to repair the diseased heart.

  15. Live dynamic OCT imaging of cardiac structure and function in mouse embryos with 43 Hz direct volumetric data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shang; Singh, Manmohan; Lopez, Andrew L.; Wu, Chen; Raghunathan, Raksha; Schill, Alexander; Li, Jiasong; Larin, Kirill V.; Larina, Irina V.

    2016-03-01

    Efficient phenotyping of cardiac dynamics in live mouse embryos has significant implications on understanding of early mammalian heart development and congenital cardiac defects. Recent studies established optical coherence tomography (OCT) as a powerful tool for live embryonic heart imaging in various animal models. However, current four-dimensional (4D) OCT imaging of the beating embryonic heart largely relies on gated data acquisition or postacquisition synchronization, which brings errors when cardiac cycles lack perfect periodicity and is time consuming and computationally expensive. Here, we report direct 4D OCT imaging of the structure and function of cardiac dynamics in live mouse embryos achieved by employing a Fourier domain mode-locking swept laser source that enables ~1.5 MHz A-line rate. Through utilizing both forward and backward scans of a resonant mirror, we obtained a ~6.4 kHz frame rate, which allows for a direct volumetric data acquisition speed of ~43 Hz, around 20 times of the early-stage mouse embryonic heart rate. Our experiments were performed on mouse embryos at embryonic day 9.5. Time-resolved 3D cardiodynamics clearly shows the heart structure in motion. We present analysis of cardiac wall movement and its velocity from the primitive atrium and ventricle. Our results suggest that the combination of ultrahigh-speed OCT imaging with live embryo culture could be a useful embryonic heart phenotyping approach for mouse mutants modeling human congenital heart diseases.

  16. Natakalim improves post-infarction left ventricular remodeling by restoring the coordinated balance between endothelial function and cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong-Min; Zhong, Ming-Li; Zhang, Yan-Fang; Cui, Wen-Yu; Long, Chao-Liang; Wang, Hai

    2014-11-01

    Endothelial dysfunction can lead to congestive heart failure and the activation of endothelial ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels may contribute to endothelial protection. Therefore, the present study was carried out to investigate the hypothesis that natakalim, a novel K(ATP) channel opener, ameliorates post-infarction left ventricular remodeling and failure by correcting endothelial dysfunction. The effects of myocardial infarction were assessed 8 weeks following left anterior descending coronary artery occlusion in male Wistar rats. Depressed blood pressure, cardiac dysfunction, evidence of left ventricular remodeling and congestive heart failure were observed in the rats with myocardial infarction. Treatment with natakalim at daily oral doses of 1, 3 or 9 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks prevented these changes. Natakalim also prevented the progression to cardiac failure, which was demonstrated by the increase in right ventricular weight/body weight (RVW/BW) and relative lung weight, signs of cardiac dysfunction, as well as the overexpression of atrial and brain natriuretic peptide mRNAs. Our results also demonstrated that natakalim enhanced the downregulation of endothelium-derived nitric oxide, attenuated the upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase-derived nitric oxide (NO), inhibited the upregulated endothelin system and corrected the imbalance between prostacyclin and thromboxane A(2). Overall, our findings suggest that natakalim prevents post-infarction hypertrophy and cardiac failure by restoring the coordinated balance between endothelial function and cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:25215478

  17. Trastuzumab Alters the Expression of Genes Essential for Cardiac Function and Induces Ultrastructural Changes of Cardiomyocytes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    ElZarrad, M. Khair; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Mohan, Nishant; Hao, Enkui; Dokmanovic, Milos; Hirsch, Dianne S.; Shen, Yi; Pacher, Pal; Wu, Wen Jin

    2013-01-01

    Treatment with trastuzumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against the extracellular domain of Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2), very successfully improves outcomes for women with HER2-positive breast cancer. However, trastuzumab treatment was recently linked to potentially irreversible serious cardiotoxicity, the mechanisms of which are largely elusive. This study reports that trastuzumab significantly alters the expression of myocardial genes essential for DNA repair, cardiac and mitochondrial functions, which is associated with impaired left ventricular performance in mice coupled with significant ultrastructural alterations in cardiomyocytes revealed by electron microscopy. Furthermore, trastuzumab treatment also promotes oxidative stress and apoptosis in myocardium of mice, and elevates serum levels of cardiac troponin-I (cTnI) and cardiac myosin light chain-1 (cMLC1). The elevated serum levels of cMLC1 in mice treated with trastuzumab highlights the potential that cMLC1 could be a useful biomarker for trastuzumab-induced cardiotoxicity. PMID:24255707

  18. Self-reported physical activity and lung function two months after cardiac surgery – a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Physical activity has well-established positive health-related effects. Sedentary behaviour has been associated with postoperative complications and mortality after cardiac surgery. Patients undergoing cardiac surgery often suffer from impaired lung function postoperatively. The association between physical activity and lung function in cardiac surgery patients has not previously been reported. Methods Patients undergoing cardiac surgery were followed up two months postoperatively. Physical activity was assessed on a four-category scale (sedentary, moderate activity, moderate regular exercise, and regular activity and exercise), modified from the Swedish National Institute of Public Health’s national survey. Formal lung function testing was performed preoperatively and two months postoperatively. Results The sample included 283 patients (82% male). Two months after surgery, the level of physical activity had increased (p < 0.001) in the whole sample. Patients who remained active or increased their level of physical activity had significantly better recovery of lung function than patients who remained sedentary or had decreased their level of activity postoperatively in terms of vital capacity (94 ± 11% of preoperative value vs. 91 ± 9%; p = 0.03), inspiratory capacity (94 ± 14% vs. 88 ± 19%; p = 0.008), and total lung capacity (96 ± 11% vs. 90 ± 11%; p = 0.01). Conclusions An increased level of physical activity, compared to preoperative level, was reported as early as two months after surgery. Our data shows that there could be a significant association between physical activity and recovery of lung function after cardiac surgery. The relationship between objectively measured physical activity and postoperative pulmonary recovery needs to be further examined to verify these results. PMID:24678691

  19. Plasmid-based transient human stromal cell-derived factor-1 gene transfer improves cardiac function in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, S; Miller, T J; Pastore, J M; Kiedrowski, M; Aras, R; Penn, M S

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that transient stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1) improved cardiac function when delivered via cell therapy in ischemic cardiomyopathy at a time remote from acute myocardial infarction (MI) rats. We hypothesized that non-viral gene transfer of naked plasmid DNA-expressing hSDF-1 could similarly improve cardiac function. To optimize plasmid delivery, we tested SDF-1 and luciferase plasmids driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter with (pCMVe) or without (pCMV) translational enhancers or α myosin heavy chain (pMHC) promoter in a rodent model of heart failure. In vivo expression of pCMVe was 10-fold greater than pCMV and pMHC expression and continued over 30 days. We directly injected rat hearts with SDF-1 plasmid 1 month after MI and assessed heart function. At 4 weeks after plasmid injection, we observed a 35.97 and 32.65% decline in fractional shortening (FS) in control (saline) animals and pMHC-hSDF1 animals, respectively, which was sustained to 8 weeks. In contrast, we observed a significant 24.97% increase in animals injected with the pCMVe-hSDF1 vector. Immunohistochemistry of cardiac tissue revealed a significant increase in vessel density in the hSDF-1-treated animals compared with control animals. Increasing SDF-1 expression promoted angiogenesis and improved cardiac function in rats with ischemic heart failure along with evidence of scar remodeling with a trend toward decreased myocardial fibrosis. These data demonstrate that stand-alone non-viral hSDF-1 gene transfer is a strategy for improving cardiac function in ischemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:21472007

  20. Waon therapy improves quality of life as well as cardiac function and exercise capacity in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sobajima, Mitsuo; Nozawa, Takashi; Fukui, Yasutaka; Ihori, Hiroyuki; Ohori, Takashi; Fujii, Nozomu; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Waon therapy (WT), which in Japanese means soothing warmth, is a repeated sauna therapy that improves cardiac and vascular endothelial function in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We investigated whether WT could improve the quality of life (QOL) of CHF patients in addition to improving cardiac function and exercise capacity.A total of 49 CHF patients (69 ± 14 years old) were treated with a 60°C far infrared-ray dry sauna bath for 15 minutes and then kept in a bed covered with blankets for 30 minutes once a day for 3 weeks. At baseline and 3 weeks after starting WT, cardiac function, 6-minute walk distance (6MWD), flow mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery, and SF36-QOL scores were determined.WT significantly improved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), 6MWD, and FMD (3.6 ± 2.3 to 5.1 ± 2.8%, P < 0.01). Moreover, WT significantly improved not only the physical (PC) but also mental component (MC) of the QOL scores. WT-induced improvement of PC was negatively correlated with changes in BNP (r = -0.327, P < 0.05), but MC improvement was not related directly to changes in BNP, LVEF, or 6MWD. WT-induced changes in MC were not parallel to PC improvement.WT improved QOL as well as cardiac function and exercise capacity in patients with CHF. Mental QOL improved independently of WT-induced improvement of cardiac function and exercise capacity. PMID:25740582

  1. Estrogen Therapy, Independent of Timing, Improves Cardiac Structure and Function in Oophorectomized mRen2.Lewis Rats

    PubMed Central

    Jessup, Jewell A.; Wang, Hao; MacNamara, Lindsay M.; Presley, Tennille D.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Alex F.; Groban, Leanne

    2013-01-01

    Objective mRen2.Lewis Rats exhibit exacerbated increases in blood pressure, left ventricular (LV) remodeling, and diastolic impairment following the loss of estrogens. In this same model, depletion of estrogens has marked effects on the cardiac biopterin profile concomitant with suppressed nitric oxide (NO) release. With respect to the establishment of overt systolic hypertension after oophorectomy (OVX), we assessed the effects of timing chronic 17 β-estradiol (E2) therapy on myocardial function, structure, and the cardiac NO system. Methods Oophrectomy (OVX; n=24) or sham-operation (Sham; n=13) was performed in 4-week-old, female mRen2.Lewis rats. Following randomization, OVX rats received E2 immediately (OVX + early E2; n=7), E2 at 11 weeks of age (OVX + late E2 N=8), or no E2 at all (OVX N=9). Results Early E2 was associated with lower body weight, less hypertension-related cardiac remodeling, and decreased LV filling pressure compared to OVX rats without E2 supplementation. Late E2 similarly attenuated the adverse effects of ovarian hormone loss on tissue-Doppler derived LV filling pressures and perivascular fibrosis, and significantly improved myocardial relaxation, or mitral annular velocity (e′). Early and late exposure to E2 decreased dihydrobiopterin, but only late E2 yielded significant increases in cardiac nitrite concentrations. Conclusions Although there were some similarities between early and late E2 treatment on preservation of diastolic function and cardiac structure after OVX, the lusitropic potential of E2 was most consistent with late supplementation. The cardioprotective effects of late E2 were independent of blood pressure and may have occurred through regulation of cardiac biopterins and NO production. PMID:23481117

  2. Quercetin Affects Erythropoiesis and Heart Mitochondrial Function in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Lina M; Salazar, Celia; Jensen, Erik; Ruiz, Paula A; Tiznado, William; Quintanilla, Rodrigo A; Barreto, Marlen; Elorza, Alvaro A

    2015-01-01

    Quercetin, a dietary flavonoid used as a food supplement, showed powerful antioxidant effects in different cellular models. However, recent in vitro and in vivo studies in mammals have suggested a prooxidant effect of quercetin and described an interaction with mitochondria causing an increase in O2 (∙-) production, a decrease in ATP levels, and impairment of respiratory chain in liver tissue. Therefore, because of its dual actions, we studied the effect of quercetin in vivo to analyze heart mitochondrial function and erythropoiesis. Mice were injected with 50 mg/kg of quercetin for 15 days. Treatment with quercetin decreased body weight, serum insulin, and ceruloplasmin levels as compared with untreated mice. Along with an impaired antioxidant capacity in plasma, quercetin-treated mice showed a significant delay on erythropoiesis progression. Heart mitochondrial function was also impaired displaying more protein oxidation and less activity for IV, respectively, than no-treated mice. In addition, a significant reduction in the protein expression levels of Mitofusin 2 and Voltage-Dependent Anion Carrier was observed. All these results suggest that quercetin affects erythropoiesis and mitochondrial function and then its potential use as a dietary supplement should be reexamined. PMID:26106459

  3. Cardiac-Restricted Expression of VCP/TER94 RNAi or Disease Alleles Perturbs Drosophila Heart Structure and Impairs Function

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Meera C.; Blice-Baum, Anna C.; Sang, Tzu-Kang; Cammarato, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Valosin-containing protein (VCP) is a highly conserved mechanoenzyme that helps maintain protein homeostasis in all cells and serves specialized functions in distinct cell types. In skeletal muscle, it is critical for myofibrillogenesis and atrophy. However, little is known about VCP's role(s) in the heart. Its functional diversity is determined by differential binding of distinct cofactors/adapters, which is likely disrupted during disease. VCP mutations cause multisystem proteinopathy (MSP), a pleiotropic degenerative disorder that involves inclusion body myopathy. MSP patients display progressive muscle weakness. They also exhibit cardiomyopathy and die from cardiac and respiratory failure, which are consistent with critical myocardial roles for the enzyme. Nonetheless, efficient models to interrogate VCP in cardiac muscle remain underdeveloped and poorly studied. Here, we investigated the significance of VCP and mutant VCP in the Drosophila heart. Cardiac-restricted RNAi-mediated knockdown of TER94, the Drosophila VCP homolog, severely perturbed myofibrillar organization and heart function in adult flies. Furthermore, expression of MSP disease-causing alleles engendered cardiomyopathy in adults and structural defects in embryonic hearts. Drosophila may therefore serve as a valuable model for examining role(s) of VCP in cardiogenesis and for identifying novel heart-specific VCP interactions, which when disrupted via mutation, contribute to or elicit cardiac pathology. PMID:27500162

  4. Combining wet and dry research: experience with model development for cardiac mechano-electric structure-function studies.

    PubMed

    Quinn, T Alexander; Kohl, Peter

    2013-03-15

    Since the development of the first mathematical cardiac cell model 50 years ago, computational modelling has become an increasingly powerful tool for the analysis of data and for the integration of information related to complex cardiac behaviour. Current models build on decades of iteration between experiment and theory, representing a collective understanding of cardiac function. All models, whether computational, experimental, or conceptual, are simplified representations of reality and, like tools in a toolbox, suitable for specific applications. Their range of applicability can be explored (and expanded) by iterative combination of 'wet' and 'dry' investigation, where experimental or clinical data are used to first build and then validate computational models (allowing integration of previous findings, quantitative assessment of conceptual models, and projection across relevant spatial and temporal scales), while computational simulations are utilized for plausibility assessment, hypotheses-generation, and prediction (thereby defining further experimental research targets). When implemented effectively, this combined wet/dry research approach can support the development of a more complete and cohesive understanding of integrated biological function. This review illustrates the utility of such an approach, based on recent examples of multi-scale studies of cardiac structure and mechano-electric function. PMID:23334215

  5. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B. Alex; Jetten, Anton M.; Austin, Christopher, P.; Tice, Raymond R.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR. PMID:23562765

  6. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B Alex; Jetten, Anton M; Austin, Christopher P; Tice, Raymond R

    2013-05-25

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR. PMID:23562765

  7. Cardiac Rehabilitation is Associated with Lasting Improvements in Cognitive Function in Older Adults with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective Heart failure (HF) is a known risk factor for cognitive impairment. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) may attenuate poor neurocognitive outcomes in HF via improved physical fitness—a significant promoter of cognitive function. However, no study has examined the possible acute and lasting benefits of CR on cognitive function in persons with HF. Methods and Results 52 patients with HF completed a 12-week Phase II CR program. All participants were administered neuropsychological testing and completed a brief physical fitness assessment at baseline, completion of CR (i.e. 12-weeks), and 12-month follow-up. Repeated measures analyses showed a significant time effect for both attention/executive function and memory (p < 0.05). Attention/executive function performance increased from baseline to 12-weeks and these gains remained up to 12-months; memory was unchanged from baseline to 12-weeks, but then improved between the 12-week and 12-month time points. Physical fitness improved from baseline to 12-weeks and these benefits were maintained 12-months later. Changes in physical fitness and cognitive function over time did not reach a statistically significant association, though poorer physical fitness was associated with decreased cognitive performance at the baseline and 12-month time points. Conclusions CR is associated with both acute and lasting cognitive benefits in patients with HF. Prospective studies with extended follow-ups are needed to clarify the mechanisms that underpin cognitive improvements following CR (e.g., improved cerebral perfusion) and whether CR can ultimately reduce risk for cognitive decline and conditions like Alzheimer’s disease in HF. PMID:25181916

  8. Cardiac Autonomic Function in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Wei, Cheng-Yu; Kung, Woon-Man; Chou, Yi-Sheng; Wang, Yao-Chin; Tai, Hsu-Chih; Wei, James Cheng-Chung

    2016-05-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease involing spine and enthesis. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the autonomic nervous system (ANS) function and the association between ANS and the functional status or disease activity in AS.The study included 42 AS patients, all fulfilling the modified New York criteria. All the patients are totally symptom free for ANS involvement and had normal neurological findings. These AS patients and 230 healthy volunteers receive analysis of 5 minutes heart rate variability (HRV) in lying posture. In addition, disease activity and functional status of these AS patients are assessed by Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), and Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Global Score (BAS-G).Both groups were age and sex-matched. Although the HRV analysis indicates that the peaks of total power (TP, 0-0.5 Hz) and high-frequency power (HF, 0.15-0.40 Hz) are similar in both groups, the activities of low-frequency power (LF, 0.04-0.15 Hz), LF in normalized units (LF%), and the ratio of LF to HF (LF/HF) in AS patients are obviously lower than healthy controls. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein revealed negative relationship with HF. The AS patients without peripheral joint disease have higher LF, TP, variance, LF%, and HF than the patients with peripheral joint disease. The AS patients without uvetis have higher HF than the patients with uvetis. The total scores of BASDI, BASFI, and BAS-G do not show any association to HRV parameters.AS patients have significantly abnormal cardiac autonomic regulation. This is closely related with some inflammatory activities. Reduced autonomic function may be one of the factors of high cardiovascular risk in AS patients. PMID:27227940

  9. Cardiac steatosis and left ventricular function in men with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ectopic accumulation of fat accompanies visceral obesity with detrimental effects. Lipid oversupply to cardiomyocytes leads to cardiac steatosis, and in animal studies lipotoxicity has been associated with impaired left ventricular (LV) function. In humans, studies have yielded inconclusive results. The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of epicardial, pericardial and myocardial fat depots on LV structure and function in male subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Methods A study population of 37 men with MetS and 38 men without MetS underwent cardiovascular magnetic resonance and proton magnetic spectroscopy at 1.5 T to assess LV function, epicardial and pericardial fat area and myocardial triglyceride (TG) content. Results All three fat deposits were greater in the MetS than in the control group (p <0.001). LV diastolic dysfunction was associated with MetS as measured by absolute (471 mL/s vs. 667 mL/s, p = 0.002) and normalized (3.37 s-1 vs. 3.75 s-1, p = 0.02) LV early diastolic peak filling rate and the ratio of early diastole (68% vs. 78%, p = 0.001). The amount of epicardial and pericardial fat correlated inversely with LV diastolic function. However, myocardial TG content was not independently associated with LV diastolic dysfunction. Conclusions In MetS, accumulation of epicardial and pericardial fat is linked to the severity of structural and functional alterations of the heart. The role of increased intramyocardial TG in MetS is more complex and merits further study. PMID:24228979

  10. Connecting Teratogen-Induced Congenital Heart Defects to Neural Crest Cells and Their Effect on Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Karunamuni, Ganga H.; Ma, Pei; Gu, Shi; Rollins, Andrew M.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-01-01

    Neural crest cells play many key roles in embryonic development, as demonstrated by the abnormalities that result from their specific absence or dysfunction. Unfortunately, these key cells are particularly sensitive to abnormalities in various intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as genetic deletions or ethanol-exposure that lead to morbidity and mortality for organisms. This review discusses the role identified for a segment of neural crest is in regulating the morphogenesis of the heart and associated great vessels. The paradox is that their derivatives constitute a small proportion of cells to the cardiovascular system. Findings supporting that these cells impact early cardiac function raises the interesting possibility that they indirectly control cardiovascular development at least partially through regulating function. Making connections between insults to the neural crest, cardiac function, and morphogenesis is more approachable with technological advances. Expanding our understanding of early functional consequences could be useful in improving diagnosis and testing therapies. PMID:25220155

  11. BIOCHEMICAL AND FUNCTIONAL ALTERATIONS IN RENAL AND CARDIAC DEVELOPMENT RESULTING FROM NEONATAL METHYLMERCURY TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Administration of methylmercury (1 or 2.5 mg/kg daily) to neonatal rats caused alterations in both cardiac and renal growth patterns. Heart weights were elevated in the preweaning period in association with hyperplasia (supranormal DNA content); after weaning, the cardiac overgro...

  12. Neuropsychological, Academic, and Adaptive Functioning in Children Who Survive In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest and Resuscitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Robin D.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This study of 25 children, ages 2-15, who survived a cardiac arrest while hospitalized, found that a majority of subjects exhibited low-average to deficient levels of performance on neuropsychologic, achievement, and adaptive behavior measures. Duration of cardiac arrest and a medical risk score were significantly correlated with decreased…

  13. Can lifestyle modification affect men’s erectile function?

    PubMed Central

    Hehemann, Marah C.

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition affecting millions of men worldwide. The pathophysiology and epidemiologic links between ED and risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) are well-established. Lifestyle modifications such as smoking cessation, weight reduction, dietary modification, physical activity, and psychological stress reduction have been increasingly recognized as foundational to the prevention and treatment of ED. The aim of this review is to outline behavioral choices which may increase ones risk of developing ED, to present relevant studies addressing lifestyle factors correlated with ED, and to highlight proposed mechanisms for intervention aimed at improving erectile function in men with ED. These recommendations can provide a framework for counseling patients with ED about lifestyle modification. PMID:27141445

  14. Assessing Late Cardiopulmonary Function in Patients with Repaired Tetralogy of Fallot Using Exercise Cardiopulmonary Function Test and Cardiac Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ming-Chun; Chen, Chun-An; Chiu, Hsin-Hui; Chen, Ssu-Yuan; Wang, Jou-Kou; Lin, Ming-Tai; Chiu, Shuenn-Nan; Lu, Chun-Wei; Huang, Shu-Chien; Wu, Mei-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with repaired tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) usually experience progressive right ventricle (RV) dysfunction due to pulmonary regurgitation (PR). This could further worsen the cardiopulmonary function. This study aimed to compare the changes in patient exercise cardiopulmonary test and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, and consider the implication of these changes. Methods Our study examined repaired TOF patients who underwent cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) to obtain maximal (peak oxygen consumption, peak VO2) and submaximal parameters (oxygen uptake efficiency plateau, oxygen uptake efficiency plateau (OUEP), and ratio of minute ventilation to carbon dioxide production, VE/VCO2 slope). Additionally, the hemodynamic status was assessed by using cardiac magnetic resonance. Criteria for exclusion included TOF patients with pulmonary atresia, atrioventricular septal defect, or absence of pulmonary valve syndrome. Results We enrolled 158 patients whose mean age at repair was 7.8 ± 9.1 years (range 0.1-49.2 years) and the mean patient age at CPET was 29.5 ± 12.2 years (range 7.0-57.0 years). Severe PR (PR fraction ≥ 40%) in 53 patients, moderate in 55, and mild (PR fraction < 20%) in 50 patients were noted. The mean RV end-diastolic volume index (RVEDVi) was 113 ± 35 ml/m2, with 7 patients observed to have a RVEDVi > 163 ml/m2. The mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was 63 ± 8%, left ventricular end-diastolic volume index (LVEDVi) was 65 ± 12 ml/m2, and LVESVi was 25 ± 14 ml/m2. CPET revealed significantly decreased peak VO2 (68.5 ± 14.4% of predicted), and fair OUEP (90.3 ± 14.1% of predicted) and VE/VCO2 slope (27.1 ± 5.3). PR fraction and age at repair were negatively correlated with maximal and submaximal exercise indicators (peak VO2 and OUEP). Left ventricular (LV) function and size were positively correlated with peak VO2 and OUEP. Conclusions The results of CPET showed that patients with repaired TOF had a low

  15. Functional Coupling with Cardiac Muscle Promotes Maturation of hPSC-Derived Sympathetic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yohan; Cho, Gun-Sik; Li, Zhe; Hong, Ingie; Zhu, Renjun; Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Yong Jun; Tampakakis, Emmanouil; Tung, Leslie; Huganir, Richard; Dong, Xinzhong; Kwon, Chulan; Lee, Gabsang

    2016-07-01

    Neurons derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are powerful tools for studying human neural development and diseases. Robust functional coupling of hPSC-derived neurons with target tissues in vitro is essential for modeling intercellular physiology in a dish and to further translational studies, but it has proven difficult to achieve. Here, we derive sympathetic neurons from hPSCs and show that they can form physical and functional connections with cardiac muscle cells. Using multiple hPSC reporter lines, we recapitulated human autonomic neuron development in vitro and successfully isolated PHOX2B::eGFP+ neurons that exhibit sympathetic marker expression and electrophysiological properties and norepinephrine secretion. Upon pharmacologic and optogenetic manipulation, PHOX2B::eGFP+ neurons controlled beating rates of cardiomyocytes, and the physical interactions between these cells increased neuronal maturation. This study provides a foundation for human sympathetic neuron specification and for hPSC-based neuronal control of organs in a dish. PMID:27320040

  16. Effect of Yoga on migraine: A comprehensive study using clinical profile and cardiac autonomic functions

    PubMed Central

    Kisan, Ravikiran; Sujan, MU; Adoor, Meghana; Rao, Raghavendra; Nalini, A; Kutty, Bindu M; Chindanda Murthy, BT; Raju, TR; Sathyaprabha, TN

    2014-01-01

    Context and Aims: Migraine is an episodic disabling headache requiring long-term management. Migraine management through Yoga therapy would reduce the medication cost with positive health benefits. Yoga has shown to improve the quality of life, reduce the episode of headache and medication. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of Yoga as an adjuvant therapy in migraine patients by assessing clinical outcome and autonomic functions tests. Subjects and Methods: Migraine patients were randomly given either conventional care (n = 30) or Yoga with conventional care (n = 30). Yoga group received Yoga practice session for 5 days a week for 6 weeks along with conventional care. Clinical assessment (frequency, intensity of headache and headache impact) and autonomic function test were done at baseline and at the end of the intervention. Results: Yoga with conventional care and convention care groups showed significant improvement in clinical variables, but it was better with Yoga therapy. Improvement in the vagal tone along with reduced sympathetic activity was observed in patients with migraine receiving Yoga as adjuvant therapy. Conclusions: Intervention showed significant clinical improvement in both groups. Headache frequency and intensity were reduced more in Yoga with conventional care than the conventional care group alone. Furthermore, Yoga therapy enhanced the vagal tone and decreased the sympathetic drive, hence improving the cardiac autonomic balance. Thus, Yoga therapy can be effectively incorporated as an adjuvant therapy in migraine patients. PMID:25035622

  17. Rapamycin Treatment of Healthy Pigs Subjected to Acute Myocardial Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Attenuates Cardiac Functions and Increases Myocardial Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Lassaletta, Antonio D; Elmadhun, Nassrene Y; Zanetti, Arthus V D; Feng, Jun; Anduaga, Javier; Gohh, Reginald Y.; Sellke, Frank W; Bianchi, Cesario

    2013-01-01

    Background The Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is a major regulator of cell immunity and metabolism. mTOR is a well-known suppressor of tissue rejection in organ transplants, however, it has other non-immune functions including in the cardiovascular system, where it is a regulator of heart hypertrophy and locally, in coated vascular stents, inhibits vascular wall cell growth and hence neointimal formation/restenosis. Because the mTOR pathway plays major roles in normal cell growth, metabolism and survival, we hypothesized that inhibiting it with rapamycin, prior to an acute myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), would confer cardioprotection by virtue of slowing down cardiac function and metabolism. Methods Yorkshire pigs received orally either placebo or 4 mg/day rapamycin for 7 days before the IRI. All animals underwent median sternotomy and the mid-left anterior descending coronary artery was occluded for 60 min followed by 120 min of reperfusion. Left ventricular pressure-volume data was collected throughout the operation. The ischemic and infarcted areas were determined by monastral blue and triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining, respectively and plasma cardiac troponin I concentration. mTOR kinase activities were monitored in remote cardiac tissue by western blotting with specific antibodies against specific substrates phosphorylating sites. Results Rapamycin pre-treatement impaired endothelial-dependent vasorelaxation, attenuated cardiac function during IRI, and increased myocardial necrosis. Western blotting confirmed effective inhibition of myocardial mTOR kinase activities. Conclusions Pre-treatment of healthy pigs with rapamycin prior to acute myocardial IRI is associated with decreased cardiac function and higher myocardial necrosis. PMID:24266948

  18. Inhibition of Let-7 microRNA attenuates myocardial remodeling and improves cardiac function postinfarction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tolonen, Anna-Maria; Magga, Johanna; Szabó, Zoltán; Viitala, Pirkko; Gao, Erhe; Moilanen, Anne-Mari; Ohukainen, Pauli; Vainio, Laura; Koch, Walter J; Kerkelä, Risto; Ruskoaho, Heikki; Serpi, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    The members of lethal-7 (Let-7) microRNA (miRNA) family are involved in regulation of cell differentiation and reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells. However, their function in the heart is not known. In this study, we examined the effect of inhibiting the function of Let-7c miRNA on the progression of postinfarction left ventricular (LV) remodeling in mice. Myocardial infarction was induced with permanent ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery with a 4-week follow-up period. Let-7c miRNA was inhibited with a specific antagomir administered intravenously. The inhibition of Let-7c miRNA downregulated the levels of mature Let-7c miRNA and its other closely related members of Let-7 family in the heart and resulted in increased expression of pluripotency-associated genes Oct4 and Sox2 in cardiac fibroblasts in vitro and in adult mouse heart in vivo. Importantly, Let-7c inhibitor prevented the deterioration of cardiac function postinfarction, as demonstrated by preserved LV ejection fraction and elevated cardiac output. Improvement in cardiac function by Let-7c inhibitor postinfarction was associated with decreased apoptosis, reduced fibrosis, and reduction in the number of discoidin domain receptor 2–positive fibroblasts, while the number of c-kit+ cardiac stem cells and Ki-67+ proliferating cells remained unaltered. In conclusion, inhibition of Let-7 miRNA may be beneficial for the prevention of postinfarction LV remodeling and progression of heart failure. PMID:25505600

  19. Unraveling the Expression Profiles of Long Noncoding RNAs in Rat Cardiac Hypertrophy and Functions of lncRNA BC088254 in Cardiac Hypertrophy Induced by Transverse Aortic Constriction.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoying; Zhang, Lei; Liang, Jiangjiu

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), although initially considered as genomic transcription noise, have been demonstrated to play pivotal roles in multiple biological processes and are increasingly recognized as contributors to the pathology of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, heart diseases, and inflammation. However, studies on the roles of lncRNAs in angiocardiopathy, particularly in cardiac hypertrophy, are still preliminary. In our study, differentially expressed lncRNAs in rat cardiac hypertrophy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) were identified by microarray analysis and validated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Briefly, we identified 6,969 lncRNAs, among which 80 lncRNAs were significantly upregulated and 172 lncRNAs were significantly downregulated. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to validate the differential expression of 5 lncRNAs in myocardial tissue RNA. Further, pathway analysis indicated that 25 pathways corresponded to upregulated transcripts and 20 pathways corresponded to downregulated transcripts. Third, by coexpression network analysis, we found a correlation between BC088254 and phb2 (prohibitin 2) and verified this expression by RT-PCR and Western blot. This is the first study to reveal differentially expressed lncRNAs in rat cardiac hypertrophy induced by TAC, indicating potential lncRNA mechanisms of action in myocardial hypertrophy. We also found that lncRNA BC088254 may have a certain role in myocardial hypertrophy induced by TAC and functional relevance between lncRNA BCO88254 and phb2, but the relationship between these two factors is unclear. PMID:26919297

  20. Scorpion venom components that affect ion-channels function

    PubMed Central

    Quintero-Hernández, V.; Jiménez-Vargas, J.M.; Gurrola, G.B.; Valdivia, H.H.F.; Possani, L.D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The number and types of venom components that affect ion-channel function are reviewed. These are the most important venom components responsible for human intoxication, deserving medical attention, often requiring the use of specific anti-venoms. Special emphasis is given to peptides that recognize Na+-, K+- and Ca++-channels of excitable cells. Knowledge generated by direct isolation of peptides from venom and components deduced from cloned genes, whose amino acid sequences are deposited into databanks are now adays in the order of 1.5 thousands, out of an estimate biodiversity closed to 300,000. Here the diversity of components is briefly reviewed with mention to specific references. Structural characteristic are discussed with examples taken from published work. The principal mechanisms of action of the three different types of peptides are also reviewed. Na+-channel specific venom components usually are modifier of the open and closing kinetic mechanisms of the ion-channels, whereas peptides affecting K+-channels are normally pore blocking agents. The Ryanodine Ca++-channel specific peptides are known for causing sub-conducting stages of the channels conductance and some were shown to be able to internalize penetrating inside the muscle cells. PMID:23891887

  1. Integrating Negative Affect Measures in a Measurement Model: Assessing the Function of Negative Affect as Interference to Self-Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magno, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the composition of negative affect and its function as inhibitory to thought processes such as self-regulation. Negative affect in the present study were composed of anxiety, worry, thought suppression, and fear of negative evaluation. These four factors were selected based on the criteria of negative affect by…

  2. Evaluation of Cardiac Mitochondrial Function by a Nuclear Imaging Technique using Technetium-99m-MIBI Uptake Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Shinro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Kinuya, Seigo

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria play an important role in energy production for the cell. The proper function of a myocardial cell largely depends on the functional capacity of the mitochondria. Therefore it is necessary to establish a novel and reliable method for a non-invasive assessment of mitochondrial function and metabolism in humans. Although originally designed for evaluating myocardial perfusion, 99mTc-MIBI can be also used to evaluate cardiac mitochondrial function. In a clinical study on ischemic heart disease, reverse redistribution of 99mTc-MIBI was evident after direct percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty. The presence of increased washout of 99mTc-MIBI was associated with the infarct-related artery and preserved left ventricular function. In non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, an increased washout rate of 99mTc-MIBI, which correlated inversely with left ventricular ejection fraction, was observed in patients with congestive heart failure. Increased 99mTc-MIBI washout was also observed in mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) and in doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. Noninvasive assessment of cardiac mitochondrial function could be greatly beneficial in monitoring possible cardiotoxic drug use and in the evaluation of cardiac damage in clinical medicine.

  3. To what extent does urbanisation affect fragmented grassland functioning?

    PubMed

    van der Walt, L; Cilliers, S S; Kellner, K; Du Toit, M J; Tongway, D

    2015-03-15

    Urbanisation creates altered environments characterised by increased human habitation, impermeable surfaces, artificial structures, landscape fragmentation, habitat loss, resulting in different resource loss pathways. The vulnerable Rand Highveld Grassland vegetation unit in the Tlokwe Municipal area, South Africa, has been extensively affected and transformed by urbanisation, agriculture, and mining. Grassland fragments in urban areas are often considered to be less species rich and less functional than in the more untransformed or "natural" exurban environments, and are therefore seldom a priority for conservation. Furthermore, urban grassland fragments are often being more intensely managed than exurban areas, such as consistent mowing in open urban areas. Four urbanisation measures acting as indicators for patterns and processes associated with urban areas were calculated for matrix areas surrounding each selected grassland fragment to quantify the position of each grassland remnant along an urbanisation gradient. The grassland fragments were objectively classified into two classes of urbanisation, namely "exurban" and "urban" based on the urbanisation measure values. Grazing was recorded in some exurban grasslands and mowing in some urban grassland fragments. Unmanaged grassland fragments were present in both urban and exurban areas. Fine-scale biophysical landscape function was determined by executing the Landscape Function Analysis (LFA) method. LFA assesses fine-scale landscape patchiness (entailing resource conserving potential and erosion resistance) and 11 soil surface indicators to produce three main LFA parameters (stability, infiltration, and nutrient cycling), which indicates how well a system is functioning in terms of fine-scale biophysical soil processes and characteristics. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of urbanisation and associated management practices on fine-scale biophysical landscape function of urban and exurban

  4. Echocardiographic evaluation of pulmonary venous blood flow and cardiac function changes during one-lung ventilation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Hyun; Kim, Namo; Kim, Hyun IL; Oh, Young Jun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The intra-pulmonary shunt induced by one-lung ventilation (OLV), is alleviated by increased pulmonary blood flow by gravitational redistribution and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. We investigated the changes of pulmonary venous blood flow (PVBF) and biventricular function during OLV with echocardiography. And the correlation between PVBF and intra-pulmonary shunt fraction (Qs/Qt) was evaluated. Methods: PVBF of the left upper pulmonary vein and cardiac function were measured with echocardiography in twenty-five patients who underwent elective thoracic surgery in left lateral decubitus. Qs/Qt and PaO2 were measured with blood gas analysis. Data was obtained at 10 min after two-lung ventilation in supine (TLV-S) and lateral decubitus position (TLV-L), and at 10, 20 and 30 min after OLV in lateral decubitus position (OLV-10, -20 and -30). Results: There were significant changes in PVBF among TLV-S, TLV-L and OLV-10 (959.5±280.8, 1416.9±489.7 and 1999.9±670.5 ml/min; P<0.05, respectively). There were not differences in PVBF, Qs/Qt and PaO2 among OLV-10, -20 and -30. There were an inverse correlation between percent change of PVBF and change of Qs/Qt (r2 = 0.5; P<0.0001) and positive correlations between the percent change of PVBF and change of PaO2 (r2 = 0.4; P<0.0001) during OLV over TLV-L. No significant changes in biventricular systolic and diastolic function were observed during positional change and OLV. Conclusions: A remarkable change of PVBF relevant to gravitational distribution and hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction was proved by echocardiography. And PVBF changes could represent the changes of Qs/Qt and PaO2 during OLV. However, biventricular function was not impaired during OLV. PMID:26550232

  5. Age-related changes to cardiac systolic and diastolic function during whole-body passive hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Rebekah A. I.; Sarma, Satyam; Schlader, Zachary J.; Pearson, James; Crandall, Craig G.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of ageing on hyperthermia-induced changes in cardiac function is unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that hyperthermia-induced changes in left ventricular systolic and diastolic function are attenuated in older adults when compared with young adults. Eight older (71 ± 5 years old) and eight young adults (29 ± 5 years old), matched for sex, physical activity and body mass index, underwent whole-body passive hyperthermia. Mean arterial pressure (Finometer Pro), heart rate, forearm vascular conductance (venous occlusion plethysmography) and echocardiographic indices of diastolic and systolic function were measured during a normothermic supine period and again after an increase in internal temperature of ~1.0 °C. Hyperthermia decreased mean arterial pressure and left ventricular end-diastolic volumes and increased heart rate to a similar extent in both groups (P > 0.05). Ageing did not alter the magnitude of hyperthermia-induced changes in indices of systolic (lateral mitral annular S′ velocity) or diastolic function (lateral mitral annular E′ velocity, peak early diastolic filling and isovolumic relaxation time; P > 0.05). However, with hyperthermia the global longitudinal systolic strain increased in the older group, but was unchanged in the young group (P = 0.03). Also, older adults were unable to augment late diastolic ventricular filling [i.e. E/A ratio and A/(A + E) ratio] during hyperthermia, unlike the young (P <0.05). These findings indicate that older adults depend on a greater systolic contribution (global longitudinal systolic strain) to meet hyperthermic demand and that the atrial contribution to diastolic filling was not further augmented in older adults when compared with young adults. PMID:25641368

  6. Acute Radiation Effects on Cardiac Function Detected by Strain Rate Imaging in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Erven, Katrien; Jurcut, Ruxandra; Weltens, Caroline; Giusca, Sorin; Ector, Joris; Wildiers, Hans; Van den Bogaert, Walter; Voigt, Jens-Uwe

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the occurrence of early radiation-induced changes in regional cardiac function using strain rate imaging (SRI) by tissue Doppler echocardiography. Methods and Materials: We included 20 left-sided and 10 right-sided breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) to the breast or chest wall. Standard echocardiography and SRI were performed before RT (baseline), immediately after RT (post-RT), and at 2 months follow-up (FUP) after RT. Regional strain (S) and strain rate (SR) values were obtained from all 18 left ventricular (LV) segments. Data were compared to the regional radiation dose. Results: A reduction in S was observed post-RT and at FUP in left-sided patients (S{sub post-RT}: -17.6 {+-} 1.5%, and S{sub FUP}: -17.4 {+-} 2.3%, vs. S{sub baseline}: -19.5 {+-} 2.1%, p < 0.001) but not in right-sided patients. Within the left-sided patient group, S and SR were significantly reduced after RT in apical LV segments (S{sub post-RT}: -15.3 {+-} 2.5%, and S{sub FUP}: -14.3 {+-} 3.7%, vs. S{sub baseline}: -19.3 {+-} 3.0%, p < 0.01; and SR{sub post-RT}: -1.06 {+-} 0.15 s {sup -1}, and SR{sub FUP}: -1.16 {+-} 0.28 s {sup -1}, vs. SR{sub baseline}: -1.29 {+-} 0.27s {sup -1}, p = 0.01), but not in mid- or basal segments. Furthermore, we observed that segments exposed to more than 3 Gy showed a significant decrease in S after RT (S{sub post-RT}: -16.1 {+-} 1.6%, and S{sub FUP}: -15.8 {+-} 3.4%, vs. S{sub baseline}: -18.9 {+-} 2.6%, p < 0.001). This could not be observed in segments receiving less than 3 Gy. Conclusions: SRI shows a dose-related regional decrease in myocardial function after RT. It might be a useful tool in the evaluation of modern RT techniques, with respect to cardiac toxicity.

  7. Functional cardiomyocytes derived from Isl1 cardiac progenitors via Bmp4 stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cagavi, Esra; Bartulos, Oscar; Suh, Carol Y; Sun, Baonan; Yue, Zhichao; Jiang, Zhengxin; Yue, Lixia; Qyang, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    As heart failure due to myocardial infarction remains a leading cause of morbidity worldwide, cell-based cardiac regenerative therapy using cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) could provide a potential treatment for the repair of injured myocardium. As adult CPCs may have limitations regarding tissue accessibility and proliferative ability, CPCs derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) could serve as an unlimited source of cells with high proliferative ability. As one of the CPCs that can be derived from embryonic stem cells, Isl1 expressing cardiac progenitor cells (Isl1-CPCs) may serve as a valuable source of cells for cardiac repair due to their high cardiac differentiation potential and authentic cardiac origin. In order to generate an unlimited number of Isl1-CPCs, we used a previously established an ESC line that allows for isolation of Isl1-CPCs by green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression that is directed by the mef2c gene, specifically expressed in the Isl1 domain of the anterior heart field. To improve the efficiency of cardiac differentiation of Isl1-CPCs, we studied the role of Bmp4 in cardiogenesis of Isl1-CPCs. We show an inductive role of Bmp directly on cardiac progenitors and its enhancement on early cardiac differentiation of CPCs. Upon induction of Bmp4 to Isl1-CPCs during differentiation, the cTnT+ cardiomyocyte population was enhanced 2.8±0.4 fold for Bmp4 treated CPC cultures compared to that detected for vehicle treated cultures. Both Bmp4 treated and untreated cardiomyocytes exhibit proper electrophysiological and calcium signaling properties. In addition, we observed a significant increase in Tbx5 and Tbx20 expression in differentiation cultures treated with Bmp4 compared to the untreated control, suggesting a link between Bmp4 and Tbx genes which may contribute to the enhanced cardiac differentiation in Bmp4 treated cultures. Collectively these findings suggest a cardiomyogenic role for Bmp4 directly on a pure population of Isl1 expressing

  8. Does Ramadan Fasting Adversely Affect Cognitive Function in Young Females?

    PubMed Central

    Ghayour Najafabadi, Mahboubeh; Rahbar Nikoukar, Laya; Memari, Amir; Ekhtiari, Hamed; Beygi, Sara

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of Ramadan fasting on cognitive function in 17 female athletes. Data were obtained from participants of two fasting (n = 9) and nonfasting (n = 8) groups at three periods of the study (before Ramadan, at the third week in Ramadan, and after Ramadan). Digit span test (DST) and Stroop color test were employed to assess short-term memory and inhibition/cognitive flexibility at each time point. There were no significant changes for DST and Stroop task 1 in both groups, whereas Stroop task 2 and task 3 showed significant improvements in Ramadan condition (p < 0.05). Interference indices did not change significantly across the study except in post-Ramadan period of fasting group (p < 0.05). Group × week interaction was significant only for error numbers (p < 0.05). Athletes in nonfasting showed a significant decrease in number of errors in Ramadan compared to baseline (p < 0.05). The results suggest that Ramadan fasting may not adversely affect cognitive function in female athletes. PMID:26697263

  9. Cardiac Arrest-Induced Global Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia during Development Affects Spontaneous Activity Organization in Rat Sensory and Motor Thalamocortical Circuits during Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Shoykhet, Michael; Middleton, Jason W.

    2016-01-01

    Normal maturation of sensory information processing in the cortex requires patterned synaptic activity during developmentally regulated critical periods. During early development, spontaneous synaptic activity establishes required patterns of synaptic input, and during later development it influences patterns of sensory experience-dependent neuronal firing. Thalamocortical neurons occupy a critical position in regulating the flow of patterned sensory information from the periphery to the cortex. Abnormal thalamocortical inputs may permanently affect the organization and function of cortical neuronal circuits, especially if they occur during a critical developmental window. We examined the effect of cardiac arrest (CA)-associated global brain hypoxia-ischemia in developing rats on spontaneous and evoked firing of somatosensory thalamocortical neurons and on large-scale correlations in the motor thalamocortical circuit. The mean spontaneous and sensory-evoked firing rate activity and variability were higher in CA injured rats. Furthermore, spontaneous and sensory-evoked activity and variability were correlated in uninjured rats, but not correlated in neurons from CA rats. Abnormal activity patterns of ventroposterior medial nucleus (VPm) neurons persisted into adulthood. Additionally, we found that neurons in the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN) in the basal ganglia had lower firing rates yet had higher variability and higher levels of burst firing after injury. Correlated levels of power in local field potentials (LFPs) between the EPN and the motor cortex (MCx) were also disrupted by injury. Our findings indicate that hypoxic-ischemic injury during development leads to abnormal spontaneous and sensory stimulus-evoked input patterns from thalamus to cortex. Abnormal thalamic inputs likely permanently and detrimentally affect the organization of cortical circuitry and processing of sensory information. Hypoxic-ischemic injury also leads to abnormal single neuron and

  10. Cardiac Arrest-Induced Global Brain Hypoxia-Ischemia during Development Affects Spontaneous Activity Organization in Rat Sensory and Motor Thalamocortical Circuits during Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Shoykhet, Michael; Middleton, Jason W

    2016-01-01

    Normal maturation of sensory information processing in the cortex requires patterned synaptic activity during developmentally regulated critical periods. During early development, spontaneous synaptic activity establishes required patterns of synaptic input, and during later development it influences patterns of sensory experience-dependent neuronal firing. Thalamocortical neurons occupy a critical position in regulating the flow of patterned sensory information from the periphery to the cortex. Abnormal thalamocortical inputs may permanently affect the organization and function of cortical neuronal circuits, especially if they occur during a critical developmental window. We examined the effect of cardiac arrest (CA)-associated global brain hypoxia-ischemia in developing rats on spontaneous and evoked firing of somatosensory thalamocortical neurons and on large-scale correlations in the motor thalamocortical circuit. The mean spontaneous and sensory-evoked firing rate activity and variability were higher in CA injured rats. Furthermore, spontaneous and sensory-evoked activity and variability were correlated in uninjured rats, but not correlated in neurons from CA rats. Abnormal activity patterns of ventroposterior medial nucleus (VPm) neurons persisted into adulthood. Additionally, we found that neurons in the entopeduncular nucleus (EPN) in the basal ganglia had lower firing rates yet had higher variability and higher levels of burst firing after injury. Correlated levels of power in local field potentials (LFPs) between the EPN and the motor cortex (MCx) were also disrupted by injury. Our findings indicate that hypoxic-ischemic injury during development leads to abnormal spontaneous and sensory stimulus-evoked input patterns from thalamus to cortex. Abnormal thalamic inputs likely permanently and detrimentally affect the organization of cortical circuitry and processing of sensory information. Hypoxic-ischemic injury also leads to abnormal single neuron and

  11. Grape polyphenols do not affect vascular function in healthy men.

    PubMed

    van Mierlo, Linda A J; Zock, Peter L; van der Knaap, Henk C M; Draijer, Richard

    2010-10-01

    Data suggest that polyphenol-rich products may improve endothelial function and other cardiovascular health risk factors. Grape and wine contain high amounts of polyphenols, but effects of these polyphenols have hardly been investigated in isolation in randomized controlled studies. Our objective in this study was to test the chronic effect of polyphenol-rich solids derived from either a wine grape mix or grape seed on flow-mediated dilation (FMD). Blood pressure and other vascular function measures, platelet function, and blood lipids were secondary outcomes. Thirty-five healthy males were randomized in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study consisting of three 2-wk intervention periods separated by 1-wk washout periods. The test products, containing 800 mg of polyphenols, were consumed as capsules. At the end of each intervention period, effects were measured after consumption of a low-fat breakfast (~751 kJ, 25% fat) and a high-fat lunch (~3136 kJ, 78% fat). After the low-fat breakfast, the treatments did not significantly affect FMD. The absolute difference after the wine grape solid treatment was -0.4% (95% CI = -1.8 to 0.9; P = 0.77) and after grape seed solids, 0.2% (95% CI = -1.2 to 1.5; P = 0.94) compared with after the placebo treatment. FMD effects after the high-fat lunch and effects on secondary outcomes also showed no consistent differences between both of the grape solids and placebo treatment. In conclusion, consumption of grape polyphenols has no major impact on FMD in healthy men. Future studies should address whether grape polyphenols can improve FMD and other cardiovascular health risk factors in populations with increased cardiovascular risk. PMID:20702747

  12. Functional importance of cardiac enhancer-associated noncoding RNAs in heart development and disease

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ounzain, Samir; Pezzuto, Iole; Micheletti, Rudi; Burdet, Frédéric; Sheta, Razan; Nemir, Mohamed; Gonzales, Christine; Sarre, Alexandre; Alexanian, Michael; Blow, Matthew J.; et al

    2014-08-19

    We report here that the key information processing units within gene regulatory networks are enhancers. Enhancer activity is associated with the production of tissue-specific noncoding RNAs, yet the existence of such transcripts during cardiac development has not been established. Using an integrated genomic approach, we demonstrate that fetal cardiac enhancers generate long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) during cardiac differentiation and morphogenesis. Enhancer expression correlates with the emergence of active enhancer chromatin states, the initiation of RNA polymerase II at enhancer loci and expression of target genes. Orthologous human sequences are also transcribed in fetal human hearts and cardiac progenitor cells. Throughmore » a systematic bioinformatic analysis, we identified and characterized, for the first time, a catalog of lncRNAs that are expressed during embryonic stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and associated with active cardiac enhancer sequences. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that many of these transcripts are polyadenylated, multi-exonic long noncoding RNAs. Moreover, knockdown of two enhancer-associated lncRNAs resulted in the specific downregulation of their predicted target genes. Interestingly, the reactivation of the fetal gene program, a hallmark of the stress response in the adult heart, is accompanied by increased expression of fetal cardiac enhancer transcripts. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that the activity of cardiac enhancers and expression of their target genes are associated with the production of enhancer-derived lncRNAs.« less

  13. Functional importance of cardiac enhancer-associated noncoding RNAs in heart development and disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ounzain, Samir; Pezzuto, Iole; Micheletti, Rudi; Burdet, Frédéric; Sheta, Razan; Nemir, Mohamed; Gonzales, Christine; Sarre, Alexandre; Alexanian, Michael; Blow, Matthew J.; May, Dalit; Johnson, Rory; Dauvillier, Jérôme; Pennacchio, Len A.; Pedrazzini, Thierry

    2014-08-19

    We report here that the key information processing units within gene regulatory networks are enhancers. Enhancer activity is associated with the production of tissue-specific noncoding RNAs, yet the existence of such transcripts during cardiac development has not been established. Using an integrated genomic approach, we demonstrate that fetal cardiac enhancers generate long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) during cardiac differentiation and morphogenesis. Enhancer expression correlates with the emergence of active enhancer chromatin states, the initiation of RNA polymerase II at enhancer loci and expression of target genes. Orthologous human sequences are also transcribed in fetal human hearts and cardiac progenitor cells. Through a systematic bioinformatic analysis, we identified and characterized, for the first time, a catalog of lncRNAs that are expressed during embryonic stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and associated with active cardiac enhancer sequences. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that many of these transcripts are polyadenylated, multi-exonic long noncoding RNAs. Moreover, knockdown of two enhancer-associated lncRNAs resulted in the specific downregulation of their predicted target genes. Interestingly, the reactivation of the fetal gene program, a hallmark of the stress response in the adult heart, is accompanied by increased expression of fetal cardiac enhancer transcripts. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that the activity of cardiac enhancers and expression of their target genes are associated with the production of enhancer-derived lncRNAs.

  14. Streptococcus pneumoniae Translocates into the Myocardium and Forms Unique Microlesions That Disrupt Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Armand O.; Mann, Beth; Gao, Geli; Hankins, Jane S.; Humann, Jessica; Giardina, Jonathan; Faverio, Paola; Restrepo, Marcos I.; Halade, Ganesh V.; Mortensen, Eric M.; Lindsey, Merry L.; Hanes, Martha; Happel, Kyle I.; Nelson, Steve; Bagby, Gregory J.; Lorent, Jose A.; Cardinal, Pablo; Granados, Rosario; Esteban, Andres; LeSaux, Claude J.; Tuomanen, Elaine I.; Orihuela, Carlos J.

    2014-01-01

    Hospitalization of the elderly for invasive pneumococcal disease is frequently accompanied by the occurrence of an adverse cardiac event; these are primarily new or worsened heart failure and cardiac arrhythmia. Herein, we describe previously unrecognized microscopic lesions (microlesions) formed within the myocardium of mice, rhesus macaques, and humans during bacteremic Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. In mice, invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) severity correlated with levels of serum troponin, a marker for cardiac damage, the development of aberrant cardiac electrophysiology, and the number and size of cardiac microlesions. Microlesions were prominent in the ventricles, vacuolar in appearance with extracellular pneumococci, and remarkable due to the absence of infiltrating immune cells. The pore-forming toxin pneumolysin was required for microlesion formation but Interleukin-1β was not detected at the microlesion site ruling out pneumolysin-mediated pyroptosis as a cause of cell death. Antibiotic treatment resulted in maturing of the lesions over one week with robust immune cell infiltration and collagen deposition suggestive of long-term cardiac scarring. Bacterial translocation into the heart tissue required the pneumococcal adhesin CbpA and the host ligands Laminin receptor (LR) and Platelet-activating factor receptor. Immunization of mice with a fusion construct of CbpA or the LR binding domain of CbpA with the pneumolysin toxoid L460D protected against microlesion formation. We conclude that microlesion formation may contribute to the acute and long-term adverse cardiac events seen in humans with IPD. PMID:25232870

  15. Does Bowel Preparation for Colonoscopy Affect Cognitive Function?

    PubMed Central

    Wadsworth, P.; Blackburne, H.; Dixon, L.; Dobbs, B.; Eglinton, T.; Ing, A.; Mulder, R.; Porter, R.J.; Wakeman, C.; Frizelle, F.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Colonoscopy is a common procedure used in the diagnosis and treatment of a range of bowel disorders. Prior preparation involving potent laxatives is a necessary stage to ensure adequate visualization of the bowel wall. It is known that the sedatives given to most patients during the colonoscopy cause a temporary impairment in cognitive function; however, the potential for bowel preparation to affect cognitive function has not previously been investigated. To assess the effect of bowel preparation for colonoscopy on cognitive function. This was a prospective, nonrandomized controlled study of cognitive function in patients who had bowel preparation for colonoscopy compared with those having gastroscopy and therefore no bowel preparation. Cognitive function was assessed using the Modified Mini Mental State Examination (MMMSE) and selected tests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. Individual test scores and changes between initial and subsequent tests were compared between the groups. Age, gender, and weight were also compared. Forty-three colonoscopy and 25 gastroscopy patients were recruited. The 2 groups were similar for age and gender; however, patients having gastroscopy were heavier. MMMSE scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 28.6 and 29.5 (P = 0.24) at baseline, 28.7 and 29.8 (P = 0.32) at test 2, 28.1 and 28.5 (P = 0.76) at test 3. Motor screening scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 349.3 and 354.1 (P = 0.97) at baseline, 307.5 and 199.7 (P = 0.06) at test 2, 212.0 and 183.2 (P = 0.33) at test 3. Spatial working memory scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 14.4 and 6.7 (P = 0.29) at baseline, 9.7 and 4.3 (P = 0.27) at test 2, 10 and 4.5 (P = 0.33) at test 3. Digit Symbol Substitution Test scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 36.3 and 37.8 (P = 0.84) at baseline, 36.4 and

  16. Does Bowel Preparation for Colonoscopy Affect Cognitive Function?

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, P; Blackburne, H; Dixon, L; Dobbs, B; Eglinton, T; Ing, A; Mulder, R; Porter, R J; Wakeman, C; Frizelle, F A

    2015-11-01

    Colonoscopy is a common procedure used in the diagnosis and treatment of a range of bowel disorders. Prior preparation involving potent laxatives is a necessary stage to ensure adequate visualization of the bowel wall. It is known that the sedatives given to most patients during the colonoscopy cause a temporary impairment in cognitive function; however, the potential for bowel preparation to affect cognitive function has not previously been investigated. To assess the effect of bowel preparation for colonoscopy on cognitive function. This was a prospective, nonrandomized controlled study of cognitive function in patients who had bowel preparation for colonoscopy compared with those having gastroscopy and therefore no bowel preparation. Cognitive function was assessed using the Modified Mini Mental State Examination (MMMSE) and selected tests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. Individual test scores and changes between initial and subsequent tests were compared between the groups. Age, gender, and weight were also compared. Forty-three colonoscopy and 25 gastroscopy patients were recruited. The 2 groups were similar for age and gender; however, patients having gastroscopy were heavier. MMMSE scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 28.6 and 29.5 (P = 0.24) at baseline, 28.7 and 29.8 (P = 0.32) at test 2, 28.1 and 28.5 (P = 0.76) at test 3. Motor screening scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 349.3 and 354.1 (P = 0.97) at baseline, 307.5 and 199.7 (P = 0.06) at test 2, 212.0 and 183.2 (P = 0.33) at test 3. Spatial working memory scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 14.4 and 6.7 (P = 0.29) at baseline, 9.7 and 4.3 (P = 0.27) at test 2, 10 and 4.5 (P = 0.33) at test 3. Digit Symbol Substitution Test scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 36.3 and 37.8 (P = 0.84) at baseline, 36.4 and 40.0 (P

  17. Injectable biodegradable hydrogels for embryonic stem cell transplantation: improved cardiac remodelling and function of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibin; Liu, Zhiqiang; Li, Dexue; Guo, Xuan; Kasper, F Kurtis; Duan, Cuimi; Zhou, Jin; Mikos, Antonios G; Wang, Changyong

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In this study, an injectable, biodegradable hydrogel composite of oligo[poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate] (OPF) was investigated as a carrier of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) for the treatment of myocardial infarction (MI). The OPF hydrogels were used to encapsulate mESCs. The cell differentiation in vitro over 14 days was determined via immunohistochemical examination. Then, mESCs encapsulated in OPF hydrogels were injected into the LV wall of a rat MI model. Detailed histological analysis and echocardiography were used to determine the structural and functional consequences after 4 weeks of transplantation. With ascorbic acid induction, mESCs could differentiate into cardiomyocytes and other cell types in all three lineages in the OPF hydrogel. After transplantation, both the 24-hr cell retention and 4-week graft size were significantly greater in the OPF + ESC group than that of the PBS + ESC group (P < 0.01). Four weeks after transplantation, OPF hydrogel alone significantly reduced the infarct size and collagen deposition and improved the cardiac function. The heart function and revascularization improved significantly, while the infarct size and fibrotic area decreased significantly in the OPF + ESC group compared with that of the PBS + ESC, OPF and PBS groups (P < 0.01). All treatments had significantly reduced MMP2 and MMP9 protein levels compared to the PBS control group, and the OPF + ESC group decreased most by Western blotting. Transplanted mESCs expressed cardiovascular markers. This study suggests the potential of a method for heart regeneration involving OPF hydrogels for stem cell encapsulation and transplantation. PMID:21838774

  18. Impaired Cerebrovascular Function in Coronary Artery Disease Patients and Recovery Following Cardiac Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Anazodo, Udunna C.; Shoemaker, J. K.; Suskin, Neville; Ssali, Tracy; Wang, Danny J. J.; St. Lawrence, Keith S.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) poses a risk to the cerebrovascular function of older adults and has been linked to impaired cognitive abilities. Using magnetic resonance perfusion imaging, we investigated changes in resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) to hypercapnia in 34 CAD patients and 21 age-matched controls. Gray matter volume (GMV) images were acquired and used as a confounding variable to separate changes in structure from function. Compared to healthy controls, CAD patients demonstrated reduced CBF in the superior frontal, anterior cingulate (AC), insular, pre- and post-central gyri, middle temporal, and superior temporal regions. Subsequent analysis of these regions demonstrated decreased CVR in the AC, insula, post-central and superior frontal regions. Except in the superior frontal and precentral regions, regional reductions in CBF and CVR were identified in brain areas where no detectable reductions in GMV were observed, demonstrating that these vascular changes were independent of brain atrophy. Because aerobic fitness training can improve brain function, potential changes in regional CBF were investigated in the CAD patients after completion of a 6-months exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation program. Increased CBF was observed in the bilateral AC, as well as recovery of CBF in the dorsal aspect of the right AC, where the magnitude of increased CBF was roughly equal to the reduction in CBF at baseline compared to controls. These exercise-related improvements in CBF in the AC is intriguing given the role of this area in cognitive processing and regulation of cardiovascular autonomic control. PMID:26779011

  19. Rbfox-regulated alternative splicing is critical for zebrafish cardiac and skeletal muscle function

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Thomas L.; Arribere, Joshua A.; Geurts, Paul A.; Exner, Cameron R. T.; McDonald, Kent L.; Dill, Kariena K.; Marr, Henry L.; Adkar, Shaunak S.; Garnett, Aaron T.; Amacher, Sharon L.; Conboy, John G.

    2012-01-01

    Rbfox RNA binding proteins are implicated as regulators of phylogenetically-conserved alternative splicing events important for muscle function. To investigate the function of rbfox genes, we used morpholino-mediated knockdown of muscle-expressed rbfox1l and rbfox2 in zebrafish embryos. Single and double morphant embryos exhibited changes in splicing of overlapping sets of bioinformatically-predicted rbfox target exons, many of which exhibit a muscle-enriched splicing pattern that is conserved in vertebrates. Thus, conservation of intronic Rbfox binding motifs is a good predictor of Rbfox-regulated alternative splicing. Morphology and development of single morphant embryos was strikingly normal; however, muscle development in double morphants was severely disrupted. Defects in cardiac muscle were marked by reduced heart rate and in skeletal muscle by complete paralysis. The predominance of wavy myofibers and abnormal thick and thin filaments in skeletal muscle revealed that myofibril assembly is defective and disorganized in double morphants. Ultra-structural analysis revealed that although sarcomeres with electron dense M- and Z-bands are present in muscle fibers of rbfox1l/rbox2 morphants, they are substantially reduced in number and alignment. Importantly, splicing changes and morphological defects were rescued by expression of morpholino-resistant rbfox cDNA. Additionally, a target-blocking MO complementary to a single UGCAUG motif adjacent to an rbfox target exon of fxr1 inhibited inclusion in a similar manner to rbfox knockdown, providing evidence that Rbfox regulates the splicing of target exons via direct binding to intronic regulatory motifs. We conclude that Rbfox proteins regulate an alternative splicing program essential for vertebrate heart and skeletal muscle function. PMID:21925157

  20. Rbfox-regulated alternative splicing is critical for zebrafish cardiac and skeletal muscle functions.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Thomas L; Arribere, Joshua A; Geurts, Paul A; Exner, Cameron R T; McDonald, Kent L; Dill, Kariena K; Marr, Henry L; Adkar, Shaunak S; Garnett, Aaron T; Amacher, Sharon L; Conboy, John G

    2011-11-15

    Rbfox RNA binding proteins are implicated as regulators of phylogenetically-conserved alternative splicing events important for muscle function. To investigate the function of rbfox genes, we used morpholino-mediated knockdown of muscle-expressed rbfox1l and rbfox2 in zebrafish embryos. Single and double morphant embryos exhibited changes in splicing of overlapping sets of bioinformatically-predicted rbfox target exons, many of which exhibit a muscle-enriched splicing pattern that is conserved in vertebrates. Thus, conservation of intronic Rbfox binding motifs is a good predictor of Rbfox-regulated alternative splicing. Morphology and development of single morphant embryos were strikingly normal; however, muscle development in double morphants was severely disrupted. Defects in cardiac muscle were marked by reduced heart rate and in skeletal muscle by complete paralysis. The predominance of wavy myofibers and abnormal thick and thin filaments in skeletal muscle revealed that myofibril assembly is defective and disorganized in double morphants. Ultra-structural analysis revealed that although sarcomeres with electron dense M- and Z-bands are present in muscle fibers of rbfox1l/rbox2 morphants, they are substantially reduced in number and alignment. Importantly, splicing changes and morphological defects were rescued by expression of morpholino-resistant rbfox cDNA. Additionally, a target-blocking MO complementary to a single UGCAUG motif adjacent to an rbfox target exon of fxr1 inhibited inclusion in a similar manner to rbfox knockdown, providing evidence that Rbfox regulates the splicing of target exons via direct binding to intronic regulatory motifs. We conclude that Rbfox proteins regulate an alternative splicing program essential for vertebrate heart and skeletal muscle functions. PMID:21925157

  1. Dynamics of PKA phosphorylation and gain of function in cardiac pacemaker cells: a computational model analysis.

    PubMed

    Behar, Joachim; Yaniv, Yael

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac pacemaker cell function is regulated by a coupled-clock system that integrates molecular cues on the cell-membrane surface (i.e., membrane clock) and on the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) (i.e., Ca(2+) clock). A recent study has shown that cotransfection of spontaneous beating cells (HEK293 cells and neonatal rat myocytes) with R524Q-mutant human hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated molecules (the dominant component of funny channels) increases the funny channel's sensitivity to cAMP and leads to a decrease in spontaneous action potential (AP) cycle length (i.e., tachycardia). We hypothesize that in rabbit pacemaker cells, the same behavior is expected, and because of the coupled-clock system, the resultant steady-state decrease in AP cycle length will embody contributions from both clocks: the initial decrease in the spontaneous AP beating interval, arising from increased sensitivity of the f-channel to cAMP, will be accompanied by an increase in the adenylyl cyclase (AC)-cAMP-PKA-dependent phosphorylation activity, which will further decrease this interval. To test our hypothesis, we used the recently developed Yaniv-Lakatta pacemaker cell numerical model. This model predicts the cAMP signaling dynamics, as well as the kinetics and magnitude of protein phosphorylation in both normal and mutant pacemaker cells. We found that R524Q-mutant pacemaker cells have a shorter AP firing rate than that of wild-type cells and that gain in pacemaker function is the net effect of the R514Q mutation on the functioning of the coupled-clock system. Specifically, our results directly support the hypothesis that changes in Ca(2+)-activated AC-cAMP-PKA signaling are involved in the development of tachycardia in R524Q-mutant pacemaker cells. PMID:26945074

  2. Cardiac autonomic functions and the emergence of violence in a highly realistic model of social conflict in humans

    PubMed Central

    Haller, Jozsef; Raczkevy-Deak, Gabriella; Gyimesine, Katalin P.; Szakmary, Andras; Farkas, Istvan; Vegh, Jozsef

    2014-01-01

    Among the multitude of factors that can transform human social interactions into violent conflicts, biological features received much attention in recent years as correlates of decision making and aggressiveness especially in critical situations. We present here a highly realistic new model of human aggression and violence, where genuine acts of aggression are readily performed and which at the same time allows the parallel recording of biological concomitants. Particularly, we studied police officers trained at the International Training Centre (Budapest, Hungary), who are prepared to perform operations under extreme conditions of stress. We found that aggressive arousal can transform a basically peaceful social encounter into a violent conflict. Autonomic recordings show that this change is accompanied by increased heart rates, which was associated earlier with reduced cognitive complexity of perceptions (“attentional myopia”) and promotes a bias toward hostile attributions and aggression. We also observed reduced heart rate variability in violent subjects, which is believed to signal a poor functioning of prefrontal-subcortical inhibitory circuits and reduces self-control. Importantly, these autonomic particularities were observed already at the beginning of social encounters i.e., before aggressive acts were initiated, suggesting that individual characteristics of the stress-response define the way in which social pressure affects social behavior, particularly the way in which this develops into violence. Taken together, these findings suggest that cardiac autonomic functions are valuable external symptoms of internal motivational states and decision making processes, and raise the possibility that behavior under social pressure can be predicted by the individual characteristics of stress responsiveness. PMID:25374519

  3. Effect of anemia on cardiac function, microvascular structure, and capillary hematocrit in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Rakusan, K; Cicutti, N; Kolar, F

    2001-03-01

    The effect of anemia on the coronary microcirculation was studied in young male rats. Chronic anemia resulted in increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and decreased functional reserve. Cardiac mass in anemic animals increased by 25%. Capillary and arteriolar densities in these hearts remained unchanged, indicating angiogenesis in this experimental situation (estimated aggregate capillary length in the left ventricle of anemic hearts was 3.06 km compared with 2.35 km in control hearts). Capillary hematocrit was decreased in chronic anemia less than systemic hematocrit: from 25 to 18% in anemia versus 45 to 28% in controls. Capillary hematocrit and red blood cell spacing were also studied after acute blood withdrawal. Here, capillary hematocrit was preserved even more: 22 versus 24% in systemic hematocrit. Finally, the same was studied in isolated hearts perfused with solutions of various hematocrits. After perfusion with low-hematocrit solution (14%), the capillary hematocrit (24%) was even higher than the perfusate hematocrit! In conclusion, we found evidence of angiogenesis in cardiomegaly induced by chronic anemia. Microvascular growth was accompanied by advantageous regulation of red blood cell spacing within these vessels. This was even more pronounced during acute hemodilution and in isolated perfused hearts. PMID:11179091

  4. Diltiazem restores cardiac output and improves renal function after hemorrhagic shock and crystalloid resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Wang, P; Ba, Z F; Meldrum, D R; Chaudry, I H

    1992-05-01

    Although calcium antagonists produce salutary effects after shock and ischemia, it is unknown whether such agents restore the depressed cardiac output (CO) and renal function in a nonheparinized model of trauma-hemorrhage and resuscitation. To study this, rats underwent a midline laparotomy (i.e., trauma induced) and were bled to and maintained at a mean arterial pressure of 40 mmHg until 40% of the maximum bleedout was returned in the form of Ringer lactate (RL). They were then resuscitated with four times the volume of shed blood with RL over 60 min. Diltiazem (400 micrograms/kg body wt) or an equal volume of saline was infused intravenously over 95 min. This infusion was started during the last 15 min of resuscitation. CO was determined by indocyanine green dilution. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was assessed with [3H]inulin clearance, and cortical microcirculation was examined by laser Doppler flowmetry. Results indicate that crystalloid resuscitation alone transiently restored but did not maintain CO after hemorrhage. Diltiazem infusion in conjunction with crystalloid resuscitation, however, restored and maintained CO and cortical microcirculation. Although GFR decreased in both groups, the values in diltiazem-treated animals were significantly higher than those in the sham-operated animals. Furthermore, diltiazem markedly decreased tissue water content. Thus diltiazem appears to be a promising adjunct in the treatment of hemorrhagic shock even in the absence of blood resuscitation. PMID:1590448

  5. TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-induced cardiac myofibroblasts are nonproliferating functional cells carrying DNA damages

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Victor V. Pelt, Jos F. van; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Van Duppen, Viktor J.; Vekemans, Katrien; Fagard, Robert H.; Lijnen, Paul J.

    2008-04-15

    TGF-{beta}{sub 1} induces differentiation and total inhibition of cardiac MyoFb cell division and DNA synthesis. These effects of TGF-{beta}{sub 1} are irreversible. Inhibition of MyoFb proliferation is accompanied with the expression of Smad1, Mad1, p15Ink4B and total inhibition of telomerase activity. Surprisingly, TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-activated MyoFbs are growth-arrested not only at G1-phase but also at S-phase of the cell cycle. Staining with TUNEL indicates that these cells carry DNA damages. However, the absolute majority of MyoFbs are non-apoptotic cells as established with two apoptosis-specific methods, flow cytometry and caspase-dependent cleavage of cytokeratin 18. Expression in MyoFbs of proliferative cell nuclear antigen even in the absence of serum confirms that these MyoFbs perform repair of DNA damages. These results suggest that TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-activated MyoFbs can be growth-arrested by two checkpoints, the G1/S checkpoint, which prevents cells from entering S-phase and the intra-S checkpoint, which is activated by encountering DNA damage during the S phase or by unrepaired damage that escapes the G1/S checkpoint. Despite carrying of the DNA damages TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-activated MyoFbs are highly functional cells producing lysyl oxidase and contracting the collagen matrix.

  6. Exercise capacity in the Bidirectional Glenn Physiology: coupling cardiac index, ventricular function and oxygen extraction ratio

    PubMed Central

    Vallecilla, Carolina; Khiabani, Reza H.; Trusty, Phillip; Sandoval, Néstor; Fogel, Mark; Briceño, Juan Carlos; Yoganathan, Ajit P.

    2015-01-01

    In Bi-directional Glenn (BDG) physiology, the superior systemic circulation and pulmonary circulation are in series. Consequently, only blood from the superior vena cava is oxygenated in the lungs. Oxygenated blood then travels to the ventricle where it is mixed with blood returning from the lower body. Therefore, incremental changes in oxygen extraction ratio (OER) could compromise exercise tolerance. In this study, the effect of exercise on the hemodynamic and ventricular performance of BDG physiology was investigated using clinical patient data as inputs for a lumped parameter model coupled with oxygenation equations. Changes in cardiac index, Qp/Qs, systemic pressure, oxygen extraction ratio and ventricular/vascular coupling ratio were calculated for three different exercise levels. The patient cohort (n=29) was sub-grouped by age and pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) at rest. It was observed that the changes in exercise tolerance are significant in both comparisons, but most significant when sub-grouped by PVR at rest. Results showed that patients over 2 years old with high PVR are above or close to the upper tolerable limit of OER (0.32) at baseline. Patients with high PVR at rest had very poor exercise tolerance while patients with low PVR at rest could tolerate low exercise conditions. In general, ventricular function of SV patients is too poor to increase CI and fulfill exercise requirements. The presented mathematical model provides a framework to estimate the hemodynamic performance of BDG patients at different exercise levels according to patient specific data. PMID:25913242

  7. Functional characterization of CaVα2δ mutations associated with sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Bourdin, Benoîte; Shakeri, Behzad; Tétreault, Marie-Philippe; Sauvé, Rémy; Lesage, Sylvie; Parent, Lucie

    2015-01-30

    L-type Ca(2+) channels play a critical role in cardiac rhythmicity. These ion channels are oligomeric complexes formed by the pore-forming CaVα1 with the auxiliary CaVβ and CaVα2δ subunits. CaVα2δ increases the peak current density and improves the voltage-dependent activation gating of CaV1.2 channels without increasing the surface expression of the CaVα1 subunit. The functional impact of genetic variants of CACNA2D1 (the gene encoding for CaVα2δ), associated with shorter repolarization QT intervals (the time interval between the Q and the T waves on the cardiac electrocardiogram), was investigated after recombinant expression of the full complement of L-type CaV1.2 subunits in human embryonic kidney 293 cells. By performing side-by-side high resolution flow cytometry assays and whole-cell patch clamp recordings, we revealed that the surface density of the CaVα2δ wild-type protein correlates with the peak current density. Furthermore, the cell surface density of CaVα2δ mutants S755T, Q917H, and S956T was not significantly different from the cell surface density of the CaVα2δ wild-type protein expressed under the same conditions. In contrast, the cell surface expression of CaVα2δ D550Y, CaVα2δ S709N, and the double mutant D550Y/Q917H was reduced, respectively, by ≈30-33% for the single mutants and by 60% for the latter. The cell surface density of D550Y/Q917H was more significantly impaired than protein stability, suggesting that surface trafficking of CaVα2δ was disrupted by the double mutation. Co-expression with D550Y/Q917H significantly decreased CaV1.2 currents as compared with results obtained with CaVα2δ wild type. It is concluded that D550Y/Q917H reduced inward Ca(2+) currents through a defect in the cell surface trafficking of CaVα2δ. Altogether, our results provide novel insight in the molecular mechanism underlying the modulation of CaV1.2 currents by CaVα2δ. PMID:25527503

  8. Toxoplasma gondii: Effects of diphenyl diselenide in experimental toxoplasmosis on biomarkers of cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Machado, Vanessa S; Bottari, Nathieli B; Baldissera, Matheus D; Isabel de Azevedo, Maria; Rech, Virginia C; Ianiski, Francine R; Vaucher, Rodrigo A; Mendes, Ricardo E; Camillo, Giovana; Vogel, Fernanda F; de la Rue, Mario L; Carmo, Guilherme M; Tonin, Alexandre A; Da Silva, Aleksandro S

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2 to treat mice experimentally infected by Toxoplasma gondii on seric biomarkers of cardiac function (creatine kinase, creatine kinase MB, troponin, and myoglobin), and lactate dehydrogenase, as well as to evaluate the enzymatic activity of creatine kinase (CK) and adenylate kinase (AK) in heart tissue. For the study, 40 female mice were divided into four groups of 10 animals each: the group A (uninfected and untreated), the group B (uninfected and treated), the group C (infected and untreated) and the group D (infected and treated). The inoculation was performed with 50 cysts of T. gondii (ME-49 strain). Mice from groups B and D were treated at days 1 and 20 post-infection (PI) with 5 μmol kg(-1) of (PhSe)2 subcutaneously. On day 30 PI, the mice were anesthetized and euthanized for blood and heart collection. As a result, it was observed a decrease in AK activity (P < 0.01) in the heart samples of groups C and D compared to the group A. Cardiac CK increased in the group C compared to the group A (P < 0.01). CK levels increased in infected mice (the group C) compared to other groups (A and D). Regarding CK-MB level, there was a decrease in the group D compared to the group B, without statistical difference compared to control groups (A and C). It was observed an increase on myoglobin in groups C and D, differently of troponin, which did not show statistical difference (P < 0.05) between groups. Mice from the group C showed an increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels compared to other groups (A, B, and D). Histopathological evaluation of heart samples revealed necrosis, hemorrhagic regions and inflammatory infiltrates in mice from the Group C, differently from the group D where animals showed only inflammatory infiltrates. Based on these results we conclude that the (PhSe)2 had a protective effect on the heart in experimental toxoplasmosis by modulating tissue and seric CK

  9. Hypertrophy, gene expression, and beating of neonatal cardiac myocytes are affected by microdomain heterogeneity in 3D

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Matthew W.; Sharma, Sadhana; Desai, Tejal A.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac myocytes are known to be influenced by the rigidity and topography of their physical microenvironment. It was hypothesized that 3D heterogeneity introduced by purely physical microdomains regulates cardiac myocyte size and contraction. This was tested in vitro using polymeric microstructures (G′=1.66 GPa) suspended with random orientation in 3D by a soft Matrigel matrix (G′=22.9 Pa). After 10 days of culture, the presence of 100 μm-long microstructures in 3D gels induced fold increases in neonatal rat ventricular myocyte size (1.61±0.06, p<0.01) and total protein/cell ratios (1.43± 0.08, p<0.05) that were comparable to those induced chemically by 50 μM phenylephrine treatment. Upon attachment to microstructures, individual myocytes also had larger cross-sectional areas (1.57±0.05, p<0.01) and higher average rates of spontaneous contraction (2.01±0.08, p<0.01) than unattached myocytes. Furthermore, the inclusion of microstructures in myocyte-seeded gels caused significant increases in the expression of beta-1 adrenergic receptor (β1-AR, 1.19±0.01), cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (CARP, 1.26±0.02), and sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase (SERCA2, 1.59±0.12, p<0.05), genes implicated in hypertrophy and contractile activity. Together, the results demonstrate that cardiac myocyte behavior can be controlled through local 3D microdomains alone. This approach of defining physical cues as independent features may help to advance the elemental design considerations for scaffolds in cardiac tissue engineering and therapeutic microdevices. PMID:20668947

  10. Inhalation of Photochemically Altered Urban Mixtures Depresses Cardiac Function in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Epidemiological studies have indicated an association between urban air pollution exposure and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The present study was designed to evaluate the cardiac effects of inhaled photochemical products in urban mixtures in a murine model. ...

  11. Effects of heme oxygenase-1 upregulation on blood pressure and cardiac function in an animal model of hypertensive myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tian-Meng; Li, Jian; Liu, Lin; Fan, Li; Li, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Yu-Tang; Abraham, Nader G; Cao, Jian

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we evaluate the effect of HO-1 upregulation on blood pressure and cardiac function in the new model of infarct spontaneous hypertensive rats (ISHR). Male spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHR) at 13 weeks (n = 40) and age-matched male Wistar (WT) rats (n = 20) were divided into six groups: WT (sham + normal saline (NS)), WT (sham + Co(III) Protoporphyrin IX Chloride (CoPP)), SHR (myocardial infarction (MI) + NS), SHR (MI + CoPP), SHR (MI + CoPP + Tin Mesoporphyrin IX Dichloride (SnMP)), SHR (sham + NS); CoPP 4.5 mg/kg, SnMP 15 mg/kg, for six weeks, one/week, i.p., n = 10/group. At the sixth week, echocardiography (UCG) and hemodynamics were performed. Then, blood samples and heart tissue were collected. Copp treatment in the SHR (MI + CoPP) group lowered blood pressure, decreased infarcted area, restored cardiac function (left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), left ventricular fraction shortening (LVFS), +dp/dt(max), (-dp/dt(max))/left ventricular systolic pressure (LVSP)), inhibited cardiac hypertrophy and ventricular enlargement (downregulating left ventricular end-systolic diameter (LVEDD), left ventricular end-systolic diameter (LVESD) and heart weight/body weight (HW/BW)), lowered serum CRP, IL-6 and Glu levels and increased serum TB, NO and PGI2 levels. Western blot and immunohistochemistry showed that HO-1 expression was elevated in the SHR (MI + CoPP) group, while co-administration with SnMP suppressed the benefit functions mentioned above. In conclusion, HO-1 upregulation can lower blood pressure and improve post-infarct cardiac function in the ISHR model. These functions may be involved in the inhibition of inflammation and the ventricular remodeling process and in the amelioration of glucose metabolism and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:23358254

  12. Deletion of interleukin-6 prevents cardiac inflammation, fibrosis and dysfunction without affecting blood pressure in angiotensin II-high salt-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    González, Germán E.; Rhaleb, Nour-Eddine; D’ambrosio, Martin A.; Nakagawa, Pablo; Liu, Yunhe; Leung, Pablo; Dai, Xiangguo; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Peterson, Edward L.; Carretero, Oscar A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Inflammation has been proposed as a key component in the development of hypertension and cardiac remodeling associated with different cardiovascular diseases. However, the role of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 in the chronic stage of hypertension is not well defined. Here, we tested the hypothesis that deletion of interleukin-6 protects against the development of hypertension, cardiac inflammation, fibrosis, remodeling and dysfunction induced by high salt diet and angiotensin II (Ang II). Methods Male C57BL/6J and interleukin-6-knock out (KO) mice were implanted with telemetry devices for blood pressure (BP) measurements, fed a 4% NaCl diet, and infused with either vehicle or Ang II (90 ng/min per mouse subcutaneously) for 8 weeks. We studied BP and cardiac function by echocardiography at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks. Results Myocyte cross-sectional area (MCSA), macrophage infiltration, and myocardial fibrosis were also assessed. BP increased similarly in both strains when treated with Ang II and high salt (Ang II-high salt); however, C57BL/6J mice developed a more severe decrease in left ventricle ejection fraction, fibrosis, and macrophage infiltration compared with interleukin-6-KO mice. No differences between strains were observed in MCSA, capillary density and MCSA to capillary density ratio. Conclusion In conclusion, absence of interleukin -6 did not alter the development of Ang II-high salt-induced hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy, but it prevented the development of cardiac dysfunction, myocardial inflammation, and fibrosis. This indicates that interleukin-6 plays an important role in hypertensive heart damage but not in the development of hypertension. PMID:25304471

  13. Influence of different anesthetic and analgesic methods on early cognitive function of elderly patients receiving non-cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Shuijun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To discuss over influence of two different anesthetic and analgesic methods on early cognitive function of elderly patients who received non-cardiac surgery. Methods: Two hundred and six elderly patients who underwent non-cardiac surgery were selected as research subjects. They were randomly divided into observation group (103 cases) and control group (103 cases). Patients in observation group were given combined spinal and epidural anesthesia and epidural analgesia, while patients in control group adopted general anesthesia and intravenous analgesia. Neurological function test was carried out one day before surgery and on the 7th day after surgery. Moreover, changes of postoperative pain degree, neuropsychological function and cognitive function were observed and compared. Results: On the 7th day after surgery, incidence of cognition impairment in observation group and control group was 48.50% (50/103 cases) and 44.70% (46/103 cases), and difference between groups had no statistical significance. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) Score of observation group was much lower than control group in the 12th, 24th and 48th h after surgery (p < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis suggested that, short education years and general surgery were independent risk factors for early cognition impairment. Conclusion: About 46.60% elderly patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery developed cognition impairment, but influence of different anesthetic and analgesic methods on incidence of postoperative cognition impairment of elderly patients had no significant difference. PMID:27182242

  14. Implications for Cardiac Function Following Rescue of the Dystrophic Diaphragm in a Mouse Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Betts, Corinne A; Saleh, Amer F; Carr, Carolyn A; Muses, Sofia; Wells, Kim E; Hammond, Suzan M; Godfrey, Caroline; McClorey, Graham; Woffindale, Caroline; Clarke, Kieran; Wells, Dominic J; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew J A

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by absence of the integral structural protein, dystrophin, which renders muscle fibres susceptible to injury and degeneration. This ultimately results in cardiorespiratory dysfunction, which is the predominant cause of death in DMD patients, and highlights the importance of therapeutic targeting of the cardiorespiratory system. While there is some evidence to suggest that restoring dystrophin in the diaphragm improves both respiratory and cardiac function, the role of the diaphragm is not well understood. Here using exon skipping oligonucleotides we predominantly restored dystrophin in the diaphragm and assessed cardiac function by MRI. This approach reduced diaphragmatic pathophysiology and markedly improved diaphragm function but did not improve cardiac function or pathophysiology, with or without exercise. Interestingly, exercise resulted in a reduction of dystrophin protein and exon skipping in the diaphragm. This suggests that treatment regimens may require modification in more active patients. In conclusion, whilst the diaphragm is an important respiratory muscle, it is likely that dystrophin needs to be restored in other tissues, including multiple accessory respiratory muscles, and of course the heart itself for appropriate therapeutic outcomes. This supports the requirement of a body-wide therapy to treat DMD. PMID:26113184

  15. Residential Proximity to Major Roadways Is Not Associated with Cardiac Function in African Americans: Results from the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Anne M.; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Wu, Wen-Chih; Hickson, DeMarc A.; Kamalesh, Masoor; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), including heart failure, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly among African Americans. Exposure to ambient air pollution, such as that produced by vehicular traffic, is believed to be associated with heart failure, possibly by impairing cardiac function. We evaluated the cross-sectional association between residential proximity to major roads, a marker of long-term exposure to traffic-related pollution, and echocardiographic indicators of left and pulmonary vascular function in African Americans enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS): left ventricular ejection fraction, E-wave velocity, isovolumic relaxation time, left atrial diameter index, and pulmonary artery systolic pressure. We examined these associations using multivariable linear or logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. Of 4866 participants at study enrollment, 106 lived <150 m, 159 lived 150–299 m, 1161 lived 300–999 m, and 3440 lived ≥1000 m from a major roadway. We did not observe any associations between residential distance to major roads and these markers of cardiac function. Results were similar with additional adjustment for diabetes and hypertension, when considering varying definitions of major roadways, or when limiting analyses to those free from cardiovascular disease at baseline. Overall, we observed little evidence that residential proximity to major roads was associated with cardiac function among African Americans. PMID:27304962

  16. Amino-Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes by Using a Factorial Design: Human Cardiac Troponin T Immunosensing Application

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Tatianny A.; Mattos, Alessandra B.; Silva, Bárbara V. M.; Dutra, Rosa F.

    2014-01-01

    A simple amino-functionalization method for carbon nanotubes and its application in an electrochemical immunosensor for detection of the human cardiac troponin T are described. Amino-functionalized carbon nanotubes allow oriented antibodies immobilization via their Fc regions, improving the performance of an immunosensor. Herein multiwalled carbon nanotubes were amino-functionalized by using the ethylenediamine reagent and assays were designed by fractional factorial study associated with Doehlert matrix. Structural modifications in the carbon nanotubes were confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. After amino-functionalization the carbon nanotubes were attached to screen-printed carbon electrode and a sandwich-type immunoassay was performed for measuring the cardiac troponin T. The electrochemical measurements were obtained through hydrogen peroxide reaction with peroxidase conjugated to the secondary antibody. Under optimal conditions, troponin T immunosensor was evaluated in serum samples, which showed a broad linear range (0.02 to 0.32 ng mL−1) and a low limit of detection, 0.016 ng mL−1. This amino platform can be properly used as clinical tool for cardiac troponin T detection in the acute myocardial infarction diagnosis. PMID:25133185

  17. Dual Delivery of Hepatocyte and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors via a Protease-Degradable Hydrogel Improves Cardiac Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Boopathy, Archana V.; Che, Pao-lin; Brown, Milton; García, Andrés J.; Davis, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) caused by ischemia and reperfusion (IR) is the most common cause of cardiac dysfunction due to local cell death and a temporally regulated inflammatory response. Current therapeutics are limited by delivery vehicles that do not address spatial and temporal aspects of healing. The aim of this study was to engineer biotherapeutic delivery materials to harness endogenous cell repair to enhance myocardial repair and function. We have previously engineered poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels to present cell adhesive motifs and deliver VEGF to promote vascularization in vivo. In the current study, bioactive hydrogels with a protease-degradable crosslinker were loaded with hepatocyte and vascular endothelial growth factors (HGF and VEGF, respectively) and delivered to the infarcted myocardium of rats. Release of both growth factors was accelerated in the presence of collagenase due to hydrogel degradation. When delivered to the border zones following ischemia-reperfusion injury, there was no acute effect on cardiac function as measured by echocardiography. Over time there was a significant increase in angiogenesis, stem cell recruitment, and a decrease in fibrosis in the dual growth factor delivery group that was significant compared with single growth factor therapy. This led to an improvement in chronic function as measured by both invasive hemodynamics and echocardiography. These data demonstrate that dual growth factor release of HGF and VEGF from a bioactive hydrogel has the capacity to significantly improve cardiac remodeling and function following IR injury. PMID:23226440

  18. Residential Proximity to Major Roadways Is Not Associated with Cardiac Function in African Americans: Results from the Jackson Heart Study.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Anne M; Wellenius, Gregory A; Wu, Wen-Chih; Hickson, DeMarc A; Kamalesh, Masoor; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), including heart failure, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly among African Americans. Exposure to ambient air pollution, such as that produced by vehicular traffic, is believed to be associated with heart failure, possibly by impairing cardiac function. We evaluated the cross-sectional association between residential proximity to major roads, a marker of long-term exposure to traffic-related pollution, and echocardiographic indicators of left and pulmonary vascular function in African Americans enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS): left ventricular ejection fraction, E-wave velocity, isovolumic relaxation time, left atrial diameter index, and pulmonary artery systolic pressure. We examined these associations using multivariable linear or logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. Of 4866 participants at study enrollment, 106 lived <150 m, 159 lived 150-299 m, 1161 lived 300-999 m, and 3440 lived ≥1000 m from a major roadway. We did not observe any associations between residential distance to major roads and these markers of cardiac function. Results were similar with additional adjustment for diabetes and hypertension, when considering varying definitions of major roadways, or when limiting analyses to those free from cardiovascular disease at baseline. Ov