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Sample records for affect cardiovascular function

  1. Modest maternal caffeine exposure affects developing embryonic cardiovascular function and growth.

    PubMed

    Momoi, Nobuo; Tinney, Joseph P; Liu, Li J; Elshershari, Huda; Hoffmann, Paul J; Ralphe, John C; Keller, Bradley B; Tobita, Kimimasa

    2008-05-01

    Caffeine consumption during pregnancy is reported to increase the risk of in utero growth restriction and spontaneous abortion. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that modest maternal caffeine exposure affects in utero developing embryonic cardiovascular (CV) function and growth without altering maternal hemodynamics. Caffeine (10 mg.kg(-1).day(-1) subcutaneous) was administered daily to pregnant CD-1 mice from embryonic days (EDs) 9.5 to 18.5 of a 21-day gestation. We assessed maternal and embryonic CV function at baseline and at peak maternal serum caffeine concentration using high-resolution echocardiography on EDs 9.5, 11.5, 13.5, and 18.5. Maternal caffeine exposure did not influence maternal body weight gain, maternal CV function, or embryo resorption. However, crown-rump length and body weight were reduced in maternal caffeine treated embryos by ED 18.5 (P < 0.05). At peak maternal serum caffeine concentration, embryonic carotid artery, dorsal aorta, and umbilical artery flows transiently decreased from baseline at ED 11.5 (P < 0.05). By ED 13.5, embryonic aortic and umbilical artery flows were insensitive to the peak maternal caffeine concentration; however, the carotid artery flow remained affected. By ED 18.5, baseline embryonic carotid artery flow increased and descending aortic flow decreased versus non-caffeine-exposed embryos. Maternal treatment with the adenosine A(2A) receptor inhibitor reproduced the embryonic hemodynamic effects of maternal caffeine exposure. Adenosine A(2A) receptor gene expression levels of ED 11.5 embryo and ED 18.5 uterus were decreased. Results suggest that modest maternal caffeine exposure has adverse effects on developing embryonic CV function and growth, possibly mediated via adenosine A(2A) receptor blockade.

  2. Clocks and cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    McLoughlin, Sarah C.; Haines, Philip; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks in central and peripheral tissues enable the temporal synchronization and organization of molecular and physiological processes of rhythmic animals, allowing optimum functioning of cells and organisms at the most appropriate time of day. Disruption of circadian rhythms, from external or internal forces, leads to widespread biological disruption and is postulated to underlie many human conditions, such as the incidence and timing of cardiovascular disease. Here, we describe in vivo and in vitro methodology relevant to studying the role of circadian rhythms in cardiovascular function and dysfunction PMID:25707279

  3. How mitochondrial dysfunction affects zebrafish development and cardiovascular function: an in vivo model for testing mitochondria-targeted drugs

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Brígida R; Santos, Miguel M; Fonseca-Silva, Anabela; Valentão, Patrícia; Andrade, Paula B; Oliveira, Jorge M A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Mitochondria are a drug target in mitochondrial dysfunction diseases and in antiparasitic chemotherapy. While zebrafish is increasingly used as a biomedical model, its potential for mitochondrial research remains relatively unexplored. Here, we perform the first systematic analysis of how mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitors affect zebrafish development and cardiovascular function, and assess multiple quinones, including ubiquinone mimetics idebenone and decylubiquinone, and the antimalarial atovaquone. Experimental Approach Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were chronically and acutely exposed to mitochondrial inhibitors and quinone analogues. Concentration-response curves, developmental and cardiovascular phenotyping were performed together with sequence analysis of inhibitor-binding mitochondrial subunits in zebrafish versus mouse, human and parasites. Phenotype rescuing was assessed in co-exposure assays. Key Results Complex I and II inhibitors induced developmental abnormalities, but their submaximal toxicity was not additive, suggesting active alternative pathways for complex III feeding. Complex III inhibitors evoked a direct normal-to-dead transition. ATP synthase inhibition arrested gastrulation. Menadione induced hypochromic anaemia when transiently present following primitive erythropoiesis. Atovaquone was over 1000-fold less lethal in zebrafish than reported for Plasmodium falciparum, and its toxicity partly rescued by the ubiquinone precursor 4-hydroxybenzoate. Idebenone and decylubiquinone delayed rotenone- but not myxothiazol- or antimycin-evoked cardiac dysfunction. Conclusion and Implications This study characterizes pharmacologically induced mitochondrial dysfunction phenotypes in zebrafish, laying the foundation for comparison with future studies addressing mitochondrial dysfunction in this model organism. It has relevant implications for interpreting zebrafish disease models linked to complex I/II inhibition. Further

  4. Cardiovascular Function in Pulmonary Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Visca, Dina; Aiello, Marina; Chetta, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic cardiovascular disease, such as coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias, have a strong influence on each other, and systemic inflammation has been considered as the main linkage between them. On the other hand, airflow limitation may markedly affect lung mechanics in terms of static and dynamic hyperinflation, especially in pulmonary emphysema, and they can in turn influence cardiac performance as well. Skeletal mass depletion, which is a common feature in COPD especially in pulmonary emphysema patients, may have also a role in cardiovascular function of these patients, irrespective of lung damage. We reviewed the emerging evidence that highlights the role of lung mechanics and muscle mass impairment on ventricular volumes, stroke volume, and stroke work at rest and on exercise in the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Patients with emphysema may differ among COPD population even in terms of cardiovascular function. PMID:24369007

  5. Cardiovascular function in pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Visca, Dina; Aiello, Marina; Chetta, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic cardiovascular disease, such as coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias, have a strong influence on each other, and systemic inflammation has been considered as the main linkage between them. On the other hand, airflow limitation may markedly affect lung mechanics in terms of static and dynamic hyperinflation, especially in pulmonary emphysema, and they can in turn influence cardiac performance as well. Skeletal mass depletion, which is a common feature in COPD especially in pulmonary emphysema patients, may have also a role in cardiovascular function of these patients, irrespective of lung damage. We reviewed the emerging evidence that highlights the role of lung mechanics and muscle mass impairment on ventricular volumes, stroke volume, and stroke work at rest and on exercise in the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Patients with emphysema may differ among COPD population even in terms of cardiovascular function.

  6. Promethazine affects autonomic cardiovascular mechanisms minimally

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, T. E.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1997-01-01

    Promethazine hydrochloride, Phenergan, is a phenothiazine derivative with antihistaminic (H1), sedative, antiemetic, anticholinergic, and antimotion sickness properties. These properties have made promethazine a candidate for use in environments such as microgravity, which provoke emesis and motion sickness. Recently, we evaluated carotid baroreceptor-cardiac reflex responses during two Space Shuttle missions 18 to 20 hr after the 50 mg intramuscular administration of promethazine. Because the effects of promethazine on autonomic cardiovascular mechanisms in general and baroreflex function in particular were not known, we were unable to exclude a possible influence of promethazine on our results. Our purpose was to determine the ground-based effects of promethazine on autonomic cardiovascular control. Because of promethazine's antihistaminic and anticholinergic properties, we expected that a 50-mg intramuscular injection of promethazine would affect sympathetically and vagally mediated cardiovascular mechanisms. Eight healthy young subjects, five men and three women, were studied at rest in recumbency. All reported drowsiness as a result of the promethazine injection; most also reported nervous excitation, dry mouth, and fatigue. Three subjects had significant reactions: two reported excessive anxiety and one reported dizziness. Measurements were performed immediately prior to injection and 3.1 +/- 0.1 and 19.5 +/- 0.4 hr postinjection. We found no significant effect of promethazine on resting mean R-R interval, arterial pressure, R-R interval power spectra, carotid baroreflex function, and venous plasma catecholamine levels.

  7. Cardiovascular and affective recovery from anticipatory threat

    PubMed Central

    Waugh, Christian E.; Panage, Sommer; Mendes, Wendy Berry; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2010-01-01

    Anticipating a stressor elicits robust cardiovascular and affective responses. Despite the possibility that recovery from these responses may have implications for physical and mental well-being, little research has examined this issue. In this study, participants either gave a public speech or anticipated giving a speech. Compared with speech-givers, participants who anticipated giving a speech, on average, exhibited similar cardiovascular recovery (decreased heart rate [HR] and increased respiratory sinus arrhythmia [RSA]), and reported lower negative affect during recovery. Only in the anticipation condition, however, were cardiovascular recovery and affective recovery associated: poor affective recovery predicted incomplete HR recovery and decreased RSA. These are the first data to compare explicitly recovery from anticipation of a stressor with recovery from the stressor itself. These findings suggest that failing to recover from anticipation has unique physiological costs that, in turn, may contribute to mental and physical illness. PMID:20096747

  8. [Practicality of cardiovascular risk functions].

    PubMed

    Marrugat, Jaume; Elosua, Roberto; Icaza, Gloria; Morales-Salinas, Alberto; Dégano, Irene R

    2016-12-13

    Cardiovascular diseases prevention strategies require refinement because their incidence decreases very slowly. Risk functions were developed by including classical cardiovascular risk factors (age, sex, smoking, diabetes, blood pressure, and basic lipid profile) in cohorts followed more than 10 years. They are reasonably precise for population screening of, principally, coronary artery disease risk, required in all cardiovascular primary prevention clinical guidelines. Coronary artery disease risk functions classify patients in risk strata to concentrate the maximum therapeutic and life style effort in the highest risk groups, in which the number needed to treat and cost-effectiveness are optimal. By communicating the relative risk and vascular age to patients, increased motivation to comply with the proposed drug and life-style modifications can be achieved. Approximately 20% of the population 35 to 74 years old has an intermediate risk that requires reclassification into high or low risk because they concentrate 35% of population coronary artery disease events. Several biomarkers (biochemical, genetic or imaging) are being tested to improve coronary artery disease risk functions precision. Computerized systems of health facilities should incorporate, automated risk calculation in order to support the preventive task of health care providers.

  9. [Optimization of cardiovascular function by peptide bio-regulators].

    PubMed

    Cherkashin, V A; Semin, G F; Veretenko, A A

    2002-01-01

    Effects of peptide bioregulators (thymaline, epithalamine, cortexine) on systemic hemodynamics in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular affections were studied. Assessment of functional stability and quality of cardiovascular system regulation was made according to methodological principles of automatic regulation theory. Peptide bioregulators showed high effectiveness in the above patients who markedly improved their hemodynamic parameters.

  10. Androgen actions on endothelium functions and cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jing-Jing; Wen, Juan; Jiang, Wei-Hong; Lin, Jian; Hong, Yuan; Zhu, Yuan-Shan

    2016-01-01

    The roles of androgens on cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology are controversial as both beneficial and detrimental effects have been reported. Although the reasons for this discrepancy are unclear, multiple factors such as genetic and epigenetic variation, sex-specificity, hormone interactions, drug preparation and route of administration may contribute. Recently, growing evidence suggests that androgens exhibit beneficial effects on cardiovascular function though the mechanism remains to be elucidated. Endothelial cells (ECs) which line the interior surface of blood vessels are distributed throughout the circulatory system, and play a crucial role in cardiovascular function. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) are considered an indispensable element for the reconstitution and maintenance of an intact endothelial layer. Endothelial dysfunction is regarded as an initiating step in development of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. The modulation of endothelial functions by androgens through either genomic or nongenomic signal pathways is one possible mechanism by which androgens act on the cardiovascular system. Obtaining insight into the mechanisms by which androgens affect EC and EPC functions will allow us to determine whether androgens possess beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. This in turn may be critical in the prevention and therapy of cardiovascular diseases. This article seeks to review recent progress in androgen regulation of endothelial function, the sex-specificity of androgen actions, and its clinical applications in the cardiovascular system. PMID:27168746

  11. Multiple dietary supplements do not affect metabolic and cardiovascular health

    PubMed Central

    Holloszy, John O.; Fontana, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Dietary supplements are widely used for health purposes. However, little is known about the metabolic and cardiovascular effects of combinations of popular over-the-counter supplements, each of which has been shown to have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and pro-longevity properties in cell culture or animal studies. This study was a 6-month randomized, single-blind controlled trial, in which 56 non-obese (BMI 21.0-29.9 kg/m2) men and women, aged 38 to 55 yr, were assigned to a dietary supplement (SUP) group or control (CON) group, with a 6-month follow-up. The SUP group took 10 dietary supplements each day (100 mg of resveratrol, a complex of 800 mg each of green, black, and white tea extract, 250 mg of pomegranate extract, 650 mg of quercetin, 500 mg of acetyl-l-carnitine, 600 mg of lipoic acid, 900 mg of curcumin, 1 g of sesamin, 1.7 g of cinnamon bark extract, and 1.0 g fish oil). Both the SUP and CON groups took a daily multivitamin/mineral supplement. The main outcome measures were arterial stiffness, endothelial function, biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress, and cardiometabolic risk factors. Twenty-four weeks of daily supplementation with 10 dietary supplements did not affect arterial stiffness or endothelial function in nonobese individuals. These compounds also did not alter body fat measured by DEXA, blood pressure, plasma lipids, glucose, insulin, IGF-1, and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress. In summary, supplementation with a combination of popular dietary supplements has no cardiovascular or metabolic effects in non-obese relatively healthy individuals. PMID:24659610

  12. Cardiovascular function in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A. E.; Charles, J. B.; Bungo, M. W.; Leach-Huntoon, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    Postflight orthostatic intolerance and cardiac hemodynamics associated with manned space flight have been investigated on seven STS missions. Orthostatic heart rates appear to be influenced by the mission duration. The rates increase during the first 7-10 days of flight and recover partially after that. Fluid loading is used as a countermeasure to the postflight orthostatic intolerance. The carotid baroreceptor function shows only slight responsiveness to orthostatic stimulation. Plots of the baroreceptor function are presented. It is concluded that an early adaptation to the space flight conditions involves a fluid shift and that the subsequent alterations in the neutral controlling mechanisms contribute to the orthoststic intolerance.

  13. Cardiovascular function in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, A. E.; Charles, J. B.; Bungo, M. W.; Leach-Huntoon, C. S.; Nicgossian, A. E.

    1991-01-01

    Changes in orthostatic heart rate have been noted universally in Soviet and U.S. crewmembers post space flight. The magnitude of these changes appears to be influenced by mission duration, with increasing orthostatic intolerance for the first 7-10 days of flight and then a partial recovery in the orthostatic heart rate response. Fluid loading has been used as a countermeasure to this postflight orthostatic intolerance. Previous reports have documented the effectiveness of this technique, but it has also been noted that the effectiveness of volume expansion diminishes as flight duration exceeds one week. The response of carotid baroreceptor function was investigated utilizing a commercially available neck collar which could apply positive and negative pressure to effect receptor stimulation. Bedrest studies had validated the usefulness and validity of the device. In these studies it was shown that carotid baroreceptor function curves demonstrated less responsiveness to orthostatic stimulation than control individuals. Twelve Space Shuttle crewmembers were examined pre- and postflight from flights lasting from 4-5 days. Plots of baroreceptor function were constructed and plotted as change in R-R interval vs. carotid distending pressure (an orthostatic stimulus). Typical sigmoidal curves were obtained. Postflight the resting heart rate was higher (smaller R-R interval) and the range of R-R value and the slope of the carotid sigmoidal response were both depressed. These changes were not significant immediately postflight (L + O), but did become significant by the second day postflight (L + 2), and remained suppressed for several days thereafter. It is hypothesized that the early adaptation to space flight involves a central fluid shift during the initial days of flight, but subsequent alterations in neural controlling mechanisms (such as carotid baroreceptor function) contribute to orthostatic intolerance.

  14. Breast-feeding and maternal cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Mezzacappa, E S; Kelsey, R M; Myers, M M; Katkin, E S

    2001-11-01

    Two studies examined the effects of breast-feeding on maternal cardiovascular function. In the first experiment, groups of breast-feeding and bottle-feeding women were compared on preejection period (PEP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), and total peripheral resistance (TPR) recorded for 1-min periods before and during standard laboratory stressors. Compared with bottle-feeders, breast-feeders had higher CO throughout the session, and greater decreases in CO and increases in TPR during cold pressor. In the second experiment, HR and blood pressure (BP) were compared before and after one breast-feeding and one bottle-feeding session in a within-subjects design. Both feeding methods increased BP but decreased HR, and systolic BP was higher for the breast-feeding than the bottle-feeding condition. Both studies support the notion that breast-feeding alters maternal cardiovascular function, possibly through the actions of oxytocin.

  15. Cardiovascular and affective outcomes of active gaming: using the nintendo wii as a cardiovascular training tool.

    PubMed

    Naugle, Keith E; Naugle, Kelly M; Wikstrom, Erik A

    2014-02-01

    Active-video gaming is purported to produce similar cardiovascular responses as aerobic fitness activities. This study compared the emotional and cardiovascular effects of Wii games with those of traditional exercise in college-aged adults with different exercise backgrounds. Specifically, the percentage of heart rate reserve, rate of perceived exertion (RPE), level of enjoyment, and Positive and Negative Affect Schedule scores were compared between subjects who reported exercising frequently at high intensities (high-intensity exerciser group: age = 20.18 years [0.87]; Height = 165.23 cm [9.97]; Mass = 62.37 kg [11.61]), N = 11 and those who exercise more often at lower intensities (low-intensity exercisers group: age = 20.72 years [1.19]; Height = 164.39 cm [8.05]; Mass = 68.04 kg [10.71]), N = 11. The subjects completed six 20-minute exercises sessions: treadmill walking, stationary cycling, and Wii's Tennis, Boxing, Cycling, and Step. The low-intensity exerciser group achieved a greater percentage of heart rate reserve (a) during traditional exercise compared with that during Wii boxing, (b) playing Wii boxing compared with that for Wii tennis, and (c) playing Wii boxing compared with that when the high-intensity exercisers group played any Wii games (p < 0.05). The RPE was greater for boxing and cycling compared with that for tennis and step (p < 0.05). Ratings of enjoyment and the increase in positive emotion were greater for boxing and for tennis compared with those for traditional exercises (p < 0.05). Results suggest that Wii boxing shows the greatest potential as a cardiovascular fitness tool among the Wii games, particularly for individuals who typically exercise at lower intensities.

  16. The critical role of Akt in cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Abeyrathna, Prasanna; Su, Yunchao

    2015-11-01

    Akt kinase, a member of AGC kinases, is important in many cellular functions including proliferation, migration, cell growth and metabolism. There are three known Akt isoforms which play critical and diverse roles in the cardiovascular system. Akt activity is regulated by its upstream regulatory pathways at transcriptional and post-translational levels. Beta-catenin/Tcf-4, GLI1 and Stat-3 are some of few known transcriptional regulators of AKT gene. Threonine 308 and serine 473 are the two critical phosphorylation sites of Akt1. Translocation of Akt to the cell membrane facilitates PDK1 phosphorylation of the threonine site. The serine site is phosphorylated by mTORC2. Ack1, Src, PTK6, TBK1, IKBKE and IKKε are some of the non-canonical pathways which affect the Akt activity. Protein-protein interactions of Akt to actin and Hsp90 increase the Akt activity while Akt binding to other proteins such as CTMP and TRB3 reduces the Akt activity. The action of Akt on its downstream targets determines its function in cardiovascular processes such as cell survival, growth, proliferation, angiogenesis, vasorelaxation, and cell metabolism. Akt promotes cell survival via caspase-9, YAP, Bcl-2, and Bcl-x activities. Inhibition of FoxO proteins by Akt also increases cell survival by transcriptional mechanisms. Akt stimulates cell growth and proliferation through mTORC1. Akt also increases VEGF secretion and mediates eNOS phosphorylation, vasorelaxation and angiogenesis. Akt can increase cellular metabolism through its downstream targets GSK3 and GLUT4. The alterations of Akt signaling play an important role in many cardiovascular pathological processes such as atherosclerosis, cardiac hypertrophy, and vascular remodeling. Several Akt inhibitors have been developed and tested as anti-tumor agents. They could be potential novel therapeutics for the cardiovascular diseases.

  17. Autonomic and endocrine control of cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    Gordan, Richard; Gwathmey, Judith K; Xie, Lai-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The function of the heart is to contract and pump oxygenated blood to the body and deoxygenated blood to the lungs. To achieve this goal, a normal human heart must beat regularly and continuously for one’s entire life. Heartbeats originate from the rhythmic pacing discharge from the sinoatrial (SA) node within the heart itself. In the absence of extrinsic neural or hormonal influences, the SA node pacing rate would be about 100 beats per minute. Heart rate and cardiac output, however, must vary in response to the needs of the body’s cells for oxygen and nutrients under varying conditions. In order to respond rapidly to the changing requirements of the body’s tissues, the heart rate and contractility are regulated by the nervous system, hormones, and other factors. Here we review how the cardiovascular system is controlled and influenced by not only a unique intrinsic system, but is also heavily influenced by the autonomic nervous system as well as the endocrine system. PMID:25914789

  18. Cardiovascular disease and cognitive function in maintenance hemodialysis patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cognitive impairment are common in dialysis patients. Given the proposed role of microvascular disease on cognitive function, particularly cognitive domains that incorporate executive functions, we hypothesized that prevalent systemic CVD would be associated with wor...

  19. Cardiovascular function following reduced aerobic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raven, P. B.; Welch-O'Connor, R. M.; Shi, X.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that a sustained reduction of physical activity (deconditioning) would alter the cardiovascular regulatory function. METHODS: Nineteen young, healthy volunteers participated in physical deconditioning for a period of 8 wk. Before (pre) and following (post) physical deconditioning, the responses of heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure (MAP, measured by Finapres), central venous pressure (CVP), stroke volume (SV, Doppler), and forearm blood flow (FBF, plethysmography) were determined during lower body negative pressure (LBNP). The carotid baroreflex (CBR) function was assessed using a train of pulsatile neck pressure (NP) and suction, and the aortic baroreflex control of HR was assessed during steady-state phenylephrine (PE) infusion superimposed by LBNP and NP to counteract the PE increased CVP and carotid sinus pressure, respectively. RESULTS: Active physical deconditioning significantly decreased maximal oxygen uptake (-7%) and LBNP tolerance (-13%) without a change in baseline hemodynamics. Plasma volume (-3% at P = 0.135), determined by Evans Blue dilution, and blood volume (-4% at P = 0.107) were not significantly altered. During LBNP -20 to -50 torr, there was a significantly greater drop of SV per unit decrease in CVP in the post- (14.7 +/- 1.6%/mm Hg) than predeconditioning (11.2 +/- 0.7%/mm Hg) test accompanied by a greater tachycardia. Deconditioning increased the aortic baroreflex sensitivity (pre vs post: -0.61 +/- 0.12 vs -0.84 +/- 0.14 bpm.mm-1 Hg, P = 0.009) and the slope of forearm vascular resistance (calculated from [MAP-CVP]/FBF) to CVP (-2.75 +/- 0.26 vs -4.94 +/- 0.97 PRU/mm Hg, P = 0.086). However, neither the CBR-HR (-0.28 +/- 0.03 VS -0.39 +/- 0.10 bpm.mm-1 Hg) nor the CBR-MAP (-0.37 +/- 0.16 vs -0.25 +/- 0.07 mm Hg/mm Hg) gains were statistically different between pre- and postdeconditioning. CONCLUSIONS: We concluded that the functional modification of the cardiac pressure

  20. Superparamagnetic iron oxide polyacrylic acid coated γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles do not affect kidney function but cause acute effect on the cardiovascular function in healthy mice

    SciTech Connect

    Iversen, Nina K.; Frische, Sebastian; Thomsen, Karen; Laustsen, Christoffer; Pedersen, Michael; Hansen, Pernille B.L.; Bie, Peter; Fresnais, Jérome; Berret, Jean-Francois; Baatrup, Erik; Wang, Tobias

    2013-01-15

    This study describes the distribution of intravenously injected polyacrylic acid (PAA) coated γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} NPs (10 mg kg{sup −1}) at the organ, cellular and subcellular levels in healthy BALB/cJ mice and in parallel addresses the effects of NP injection on kidney function, blood pressure and vascular contractility. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed accumulation of NPs in the liver within 1 h after intravenous infusion, accommodated by intracellular uptake in endothelial and Kupffer cells with subsequent intracellular uptake in renal cells, particularly the cytoplasm of the proximal tubule, in podocytes and mesangial cells. The renofunctional effects of NPs were evaluated by arterial acid–base status and measurements of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) after instrumentation with chronically indwelling catheters. Arterial pH was 7.46 ± 0.02 and 7.41 ± 0.02 in mice 0.5 h after injections of saline or NP, and did not change over the next 12 h. In addition, the injections of NP did not affect arterial PCO{sub 2} or [HCO{sub 3}{sup −}] either. Twenty-four and 96 h after NP injections, the GFR averaged 0.35 ± 0.04 and 0.35 ± 0.01 ml min{sup −1} g{sup −1}, respectively, values which were statistically comparable with controls (0.29 ± 0.02 and 0.33 ± 0.1 ml{sup –1} min{sup –1} 25 g{sup –1}). Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) decreased 12–24 h after NP injections (111.1 ± 11.5 vs 123.0 ± 6.1 min{sup −1}) associated with a decreased contractility of small mesenteric arteries revealed by myography to characterize endothelial function. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that accumulation of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles does not affect kidney function in healthy mice but temporarily decreases blood pressure. -- Highlights: ► PAA coated γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were injected intravenously into healthy mice. ► We examine the distribution and physiological effects of

  1. Metal ions affecting the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Massimo; Mutti, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Some metals, such as copper and manganese, are essential to life and play irreplaceable roles in, e.g., the functioning of important enzyme systems. Other metals are xenobiotics, i.e., they have no useful role in human physiology and, even worse, as in the case of lead, may be toxic even at trace levels of exposure. Even those metals that are essential, however, have the potential to turn harmful at very high levels of exposure, a reflection of a very basic tenet of toxicology--"the dose makes the poison." Toxic metal exposure may lead to serious risks to human health. As a result of the extensive use of toxic metals and their compounds in industry and consumer products, these agents have been widely disseminated in the environment. Because metals are not biodegradable, they can persist in the environment and produce a variety of adverse effects. Exposure to metals can lead to damage in a variety of organ systems and, in some cases, metals also have the potential to be carcinogenic. Even though the importance of metals as environmental health hazards is now widely appreciated, the specific mechanisms by which metals produce their adverse effects have yet to be fully elucidated. The unifying factor in determining toxicity and carcinogenicity for most metals is the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Metal-mediated formation of free radicals causes various modifications to nucleic acids, enhanced lipid peroxidation, and altered calcium and sulfhydryl homeostasis. Whilst copper, chromium, and cobalt undergo redox-cycling reactions, for metals such as cadmium and nickel the primary route for their toxicity is depletion of glutathione and bonding to sulfhydryl groups of proteins. This chapter attempts to show that the toxic effects of different metallic compounds may be manifested in the pulmonary and cardiovascular systems. The knowledge of health effects due to metal exposure is necessary for practising physicians, and should be assessed by inquiring

  2. ULTRAFINE CARBON PARTICLE (UFCP) INHALATION AFFECTS CARDIOVASCULAR PERFORMANCE IN HYPERTENSIVE RATS (SHR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhaled UfCP affect cardiovascular performance in healthy rats (Harder et al. Inhal Toxicol 2005; 17:29-42) without apparent pulmonary damage. To assess whether geriatric cardiovascular compromised rats are more susceptible to UfCP effects, male adult (6months) and geriatric (13m...

  3. Airway reflexes, autonomic function, and cardiovascular responses.

    PubMed Central

    Widdicombe, J; Lee, L Y

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we review the cardiovascular responses to the inhalation of irritants and pollutants. Many sensory receptors in the respiratory system, from nose to alveoli, respond to these irritants and set up powerful reflex changes, including those in the cardiovascular system. Systemic hypotension or hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, bradycardia, tachycardia, and dysrhythmias have all been described previously. Most of the experiments have been acute and have been performed on anesthetized experimental animals. Experiments on humans suggest we have similar sensory systems and reflex responses. However, we must use caution when applying the animal results to humans. Most animal experiments, unlike those with humans, have been performed using general anesthesia, with irritants administered in high concentrations, and often to a restricted part of the respiratory tract. Species differences in the response to irritants are well established. We must be even more careful when applying the results of acute experiments in animals to the pathophysiologic changes observed in prolonged exposure to environmental pollution in humans. PMID:11544167

  4. Trait and state positive affect and cardiovascular recovery from experimental academic stress.

    PubMed

    Papousek, Ilona; Nauschnegg, Karin; Paechter, Manuela; Lackner, Helmut K; Goswami, Nandu; Schulter, Günter

    2010-02-01

    As compared to negative affect, only a small number of studies have examined influences of positive affect on cardiovascular stress responses, of which only a few were concerned with cardiovascular recovery. In this study, heart rate, low- and high-frequency heart rate variability, blood pressure, and levels of subjectively experienced stress were obtained in 65 students before, during and after exposure to academic stress in an ecologically valid setting. Higher trait positive affect was associated with more complete cardiovascular and subjective post-stress recovery. This effect was independent of negative affect and of affective state during anticipation of the stressor. In contrast, a more positive affective state during anticipation of the challenge was related to poor post-stress recovery. The findings suggest that a temporally stable positive affect disposition may be related to adaptive responses, whereas positive emotional states in the context of stressful events can also contribute to prolonged post-stress recovery.

  5. CARNITINE HOMEOSTASIS, MITOCHONDRIAL FUNCTION, AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shruti; Black, Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    Carnitines are involved in mitochondrial transport of fatty acids and are of critical importance for maintaining normal mitochondrial function. This review summarizes recent experimental and clinical studies showing that mitochondrial dysfunction secondary to a disruption of carnitine homeostasis may play a role in decreased NO signaling and the development of endothelial dysfunction. Future challenges include development of agents that can positively modulate L-carnitine homeostasis which may have high therapeutic potential. PMID:20648231

  6. Cardiovascular

    NASA Video Gallery

    Overview of Cardiovascular research which addresses risks of space flight, including adaptive changes to the cephalad fluid shift (such as reduced circulating blood volume), potential for heart rhy...

  7. Elevated depressive affect is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes among African Americans with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Michael J; Kimmel, Paul L; Greene, Tom; Gassman, Jennifer J; Wang, Xuelei; Brooks, Deborah H; Charleston, Jeanne; Dowie, Donna; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Cooper, Lisa A; Bruce, Marino A; Kusek, John W; Norris, Keith C; Lash, James P

    2011-09-01

    This study was designed to examine the impact of elevated depressive affect on health outcomes among participants with hypertensive chronic kidney disease in the African-American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) Cohort Study. Elevated depressive affect was defined by Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) thresholds of 11 or more, above 14, and by 5-Unit increments in the score. Cox regression analyses were used to relate cardiovascular death/hospitalization, doubling of serum creatinine/end-stage renal disease, overall hospitalization, and all-cause death to depressive affect evaluated at baseline, the most recent annual visit (time-varying), or average from baseline to the most recent visit (cumulative). Among 628 participants at baseline, 42% had BDI-II scores of 11 or more and 26% had a score above 14. During a 5-year follow-up, the cumulative incidence of cardiovascular death/hospitalization was significantly greater for participants with baseline BDI-II scores of 11 or more compared with those with scores <11. The baseline, time-varying, and cumulative elevated depressive affect were each associated with a significant higher risk of cardiovascular death/hospitalization, especially with a time-varying BDI-II score over 14 (adjusted HR 1.63) but not with the other outcomes. Thus, elevated depressive affect is associated with unfavorable cardiovascular outcomes in African Americans with hypertensive chronic kidney disease.

  8. Regulation of sympathetic nervous system function after cardiovascular deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasser, E. M.; Moffitt, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Humans subjected to prolonged periods of bed rest or microgravity undergo deconditioning of the cardiovascular system, characterized by resting tachycardia, reduced exercise capability, and a predisposition for orthostatic intolerance. These changes in cardiovascular function are likely due to a combination of factors, including changes in control of body fluid balance or cardiac alterations resulting in inadequate maintenance of stroke volume, altered arterial or venous vascular function, reduced activation of cardiovascular hormones, and diminished autonomic reflex function. There is evidence indicating a role for each of these mechanisms. Diminished reflex activation of the sympathetic nervous system and subsequent vasoconstriction appear to play an important role. Studies utilizing the hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rat, an animal model of deconditioning, evaluated the potential role of altered arterial baroreflex control of the sympathetic nervous system. These studies indicate that HU results in blunted baroreflex-mediated activation of both renal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity in response to a hypotensive stimulus. HU rats are less able to maintain arterial pressure during hemorrhage, suggesting that diminished ability to increase sympathetic activity has functional consequences for the animal. Reflex control of vasopressin secretion appears to be enhanced following HU. Blunted baroreflex-mediated sympathoexcitation appears to involve altered central nervous system function. Baroreceptor afferent activity in response to changes in arterial pressure is unaltered in HU rats. However, increases in efferent sympathetic nerve activity for a given decrease in afferent input are blunted after HU. This altered central nervous system processing of baroreceptor inputs appears to involve an effect at the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Specifically, it appears that tonic GABAA-mediated inhibition of the RVLM is enhanced after HU. Augmented inhibition apparently

  9. Cardiovascular function in male and female JCR:LA-cp rats: Effect of high fat/high sucrose diet.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Ian; Soler, Amanda; Joseph, Gregory; Hutcheson, Brenda; Bradford, Chastity; Zhang, Frank; Potter, Barry J; Proctor, Spencer D; Rocic, Petra

    2017-01-13

    30% of the world population is diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. High fat/high sucrose diet (HF/HS, Western diet) correlates with metabolic syndrome prevalence. We characterized effects of the HF/HS diet on vascular (arterial stiffness, vasoreactivity, coronary collateral development) and cardiac (echocardiography) function, oxidative stress and inflammation in a rat model of metabolic syndrome (JCR). Furthermore, we determined whether male vs. female animals were affected differentially by the Western diet. Cardiovascular function in JCR male rats was impaired vs. normal rats (SD). HF/HS diet compromised cardiovascular (dys)function in JCR but not in SD male rats. In contrast, cardiovascular function was minimally impaired in JCR females on normal chow. However, cardiovascular function in JCR females on the HF/HS diet deteriorated to levels comparable to JCR males on the HF/HS diet. Similarly, oxidative stress was markedly increased in male but not female JCR rats on normal chow, but was equally exacerbated by the HF/HS diet in male and female JCR rats. These results indicate that the Western diet enhances oxidative stress and cardiovascular dysfunction in metabolic syndrome and eliminates the protective effect of female sex on cardiovascular function, implying that both males and females with metabolic syndrome are at equal risk for cardiovascular disease.

  10. The Cardiovascular Function Profile and Physical Fitness in Overweight Subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megawati, E. R.; Lubis, L. D.; Harahap, F. Y.

    2017-03-01

    Obesity in children and young adult is associated with cardiovascular risk in short term and long term. The aim of this study was to describe the profile of the cardiovascular functions parameters and physical fitness in overweight. This is an analytical observational study with cross sectional approach. The samples of this study were 85 randomly selected subjects aged 18 to 24 years with normoweight and body mass index <40. The parameters measures were body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), waist-hip ratio (WHR), cardiovascular function parameters (resting pulse, blood pressure, and peak flow meter) and physical fitness parameters (VO2max dengan McArdle step test). The mean BMI was 24,53±4,929. The WC and WHR mean were 86,7±14,10 cms and 0,89±0,073 cm respectively. The mean of resting pulses were higher in normoweight subject (p=0,0209). The mean systole were lower in normoweight subject (p=0,0026). No differences VO2 max between groups (p=0,3888). The peak flow meter was higher in normoweight (p=0,0274). The result of this study indicate that heart rate, systole and peak flow meter are signifantly different between groups. The heart rate and the peak flow meter in the overweight subjects were lower meanwhile the systole blood pressure was higher compared to normoweight subjects.

  11. Obesity, Cardiovascular Fitness, and Inhibition Function: An Electrophysiological Study.

    PubMed

    Song, Tai-Fen; Chi, Lin; Chu, Chien-Heng; Chen, Feng-Tzu; Zhou, Chenglin; Chang, Yu-Kai

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how obesity and cardiovascular fitness are associated with the inhibition aspect of executive function from behavioral and electrophysiological perspectives. One hundred college students, aged 18-25 years, were categorized into four groups of equal size on the basis of body mass index and cardiovascular fitness: a normal-weight and high-fitness (NH) group, an obese-weight and high-fitness (OH) group, a normal-weight and low-fitness (NL) group, and an obese-weight and low-fitness (OL) group. Behavioral measures of response time and number of errors, as well as event-related potential measures of P3 and N1, were assessed during the Stroop Task. The results revealed that, in general, the NH group exhibited shorter response times and larger P3 amplitudes relative to the NL and OL groups, wherein the OL group exhibited the longest response time in the incongruent condition. No group differences in N1 indices were also revealed. These findings suggest that the status of being both normal weight and having high cardiovascular fitness is associated with better behavioral and later stages of electrophysiological indices of cognitive function.

  12. Obesity, Cardiovascular Fitness, and Inhibition Function: An Electrophysiological Study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Tai-Fen; Chi, Lin; Chu, Chien-Heng; Chen, Feng-Tzu; Zhou, Chenglin; Chang, Yu-Kai

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine how obesity and cardiovascular fitness are associated with the inhibition aspect of executive function from behavioral and electrophysiological perspectives. One hundred college students, aged 18–25 years, were categorized into four groups of equal size on the basis of body mass index and cardiovascular fitness: a normal-weight and high-fitness (NH) group, an obese-weight and high-fitness (OH) group, a normal-weight and low-fitness (NL) group, and an obese-weight and low-fitness (OL) group. Behavioral measures of response time and number of errors, as well as event-related potential measures of P3 and N1, were assessed during the Stroop Task. The results revealed that, in general, the NH group exhibited shorter response times and larger P3 amplitudes relative to the NL and OL groups, wherein the OL group exhibited the longest response time in the incongruent condition. No group differences in N1 indices were also revealed. These findings suggest that the status of being both normal weight and having high cardiovascular fitness is associated with better behavioral and later stages of electrophysiological indices of cognitive function. PMID:27512383

  13. NMR techniques in the study of cardiovascular structure and functions

    SciTech Connect

    Osbakken, M.; Haselgrove, J.

    1987-01-01

    The chapter titles of this book are: Introduction to NMR Techniques;Theory of NMR Probe Design;Overview of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Study the Cardiovascular System;Vascular Anatomy and Physiology Studied with NMR Techniques;Assessment of Myocardial Ischemia and Infarction by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging;The Use of MRI in Congenital Heart Disease;Cardiomyopathies and Myocarditis Studied with NMR Techniques;Determination of Myocardial Mechanical Function with Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques;Determination of Flow Using NMR Techniques;The Use of Contrast Agents in Cardiac MRI;Can Cardiovascular Disease Be Effectively Evaluated with NMR Spectroscopy. NMR Studies of ATP Synthesis Reactions in the Isolated Heart;Studies of Intermediary Metabolism in the Heart by 13C NMR Spectroscopy;23Na and 39K NMR Spectroscopic Studies of the Intact Beating Heart;and Evaluation of Skeletal Muscle Metabolism in Patients with Congestive Heart Failure Using Phosphorus Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

  14. Cardiovascular Deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charles, John B.; Fritsch-Yelle, Janice M.; Whitson, Peggy A.; Wood, Margie L.; Brown, Troy E.; Fortner, G. William

    1999-01-01

    Spaceflight causes adaptive changes in cardiovascular function that may deleteriously affect crew health and safety. Over the last three decades, symptoms of cardiovascular changes have ranged from postflight orthostatic tachycardia and decreased exercise capacity to serious cardiac rhythm disturbances during extravehicular activities (EVA). The most documented symptom of cardiovascular dysfunction, postflight orthostatic intolerance, has affected a significant percentage of U.S. Space Shuttle astronauts. Problems of cardiovascular dysfunction associated with spaceflight are a concern to NASA. This has been particularly true during Shuttle flights where the primary concern is the crew's physical health, including the pilot's ability to land the Orbiter, and the crew's ability to quickly egress and move to safety should a dangerous condition arise. The study of astronauts during Shuttle activities is inherently more difficult than most human research. Consequently, sample sizes have been small and results have lacked consistency. Before the Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project (EDOMP), there was a lack of normative data on changes in cardiovascular parameters during and after spaceflight. The EDOMP for the first time allowed studies on a large enough number of subjects to overcome some of these problems. There were three primary goals of the Cardiovascular EDOMP studies. The first was to establish, through descriptive studies, a normative data base of cardiovascular changes attributable to spaceflight. The second goal was to determine mechanisms of cardiovascular changes resulting from spaceflight (particularly orthostatic hypotension and cardiac rhythm disturbances). The third was to evaluate possible countermeasures. The Cardiovascular EDOMP studies involved parallel descriptive, mechanistic, and countermeasure evaluations.

  15. Placebo Sleep Affects Cognitive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draganich, Christina; Erdal, Kristi

    2014-01-01

    The placebo effect is any outcome that is not attributed to a specific treatment but rather to an individual's mindset (Benson & Friedman, 1996). This phenomenon can extend beyond its typical use in pharmaceutical drugs to involve aspects of everyday life, such as the effect of sleep on cognitive functioning. In 2 studies examining whether…

  16. Cardiovascular Deconditioning in Humans: Alteration in Cardiovascular Regulation and Function During Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Richard

    1999-01-01

    Alterations in cardiovascular regulation and function that occur during and after space flight have been reported. These alterations are manifested, for example, by reduced orthostatic tolerance upon reentry to the earth's gravity from space. However, the precise physiologic mechanisms responsible for these alterations remain to be fully elucidated. Perhaps, as a result, effective countermeasures have yet to be developed. In this project we apply a powerful, new method - cardiovascular system identification (CSI) - for the study of the effects of space flight on the cardiovascular system so that effective countermeasures can be developed. CSI involves the mathematical analysis of second-to-second fluctuations in non-invasively measured heart rate, arterial blood pressure (ABP), and instantaneous lung volume (ILV - respiratory activity) in order to characterize quantitatively the physiologic mechanisms responsible for the couplings between these signals. Through the characterization of all the physiologic mechanisms coupling these signals, CSI provides a model of the closed-loop cardiovascular regulatory state in an individual subject. The model includes quantitative descriptions of the heart rate baroreflex, autonomic function, as well as other important physiologic mechanisms. We are in the process of incorporating beat-to-beat fluctuations of stroke volume into the CSI technique in order to quantify additional physiologic mechanisms such as those involved in control of peripheral vascular resistance and alterations in cardiac contractility. We apply CSI in conjunction with the two general protocols of the Human Studies Core project. The first protocol involves ground-based, human head down tilt bed rest to simulate microgravity and acute stressors - upright tilt, standing and bicycle exercise - to provide orthostatic and exercise challenges. The second protocol is intended to be the same as the first but with the addition of sleep deprivation to determine whether

  17. Subclinical hypothyroidism affects mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Kvetny, J; Wilms, L; Pedersen, P L; Larsen, J

    2010-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine mitochondrial function in cells from persons with subclinical hypothyroidism and euthyroid controls. The participating persons were examined clinically and had basal oxygen consumption (VO(2)) determined. The concentrations of thyroid hormones and thyrotropine stimulating hormone were determined, and mitochondrial function in isolated mononuclear blood cells was examined by enzymatic methods [citrate synthase activity (CS)] and by flow cytometry (mitochondrial membrane potential by TMRM fluorescence and mitochondrial mass by MTG fluorescence). The ratio of T(4)/T(3) was lowered in subclinical hypothyroidism patients compared to controls (2.5+/-0.5 vs. 2.9+/-0.4, p=0.005). VO(2) was increased in persons with subclinical hypothyroidism compared to controls (adolescents: 134+/-27 ml O(2)/min*m(2) vs. 119+/-27 ml O(2)/min*m(2), p=0.006, adults: 139+/-14 ml O(2)/min*m(2) vs. 121+/-17 ml O(2)/min*m(2), p=0.001). The mitochondrial function, represented by citrate synthase activity, MTG, and TMRM fluorescence were all increased (CS in subclinical hypothyroidism vs. controls: 0.074+/-0.044 nmol/mg*min vs. 0.056+/-0.021 nmol/mg*min, p=0.005; MTG fluorescence in subclinical hypothyroidism vs. controls: 7,482+/-1,733 a.u. vs. 6,391+/-2,171 a.u., p=0.027; TMRM fluorescence in subclinical hypothyroidism vs. controls: 13,449+/-3,807 a.u. vs. 11,733+/-4,473 a.u, p=0.04). Our results indicate an increased mitochondrial stimulation, eventually caused by increased deiodination of T(4) to intracellular bioactive iodothyronines in adults and adolescents with subclinical hypothyroidism.

  18. Cyclohexanone contamination from extracorporeal circuits impairs cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Thompson-Torgerson, Caitlin S; Champion, Hunter C; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Harris, Z Leah; Shoukas, Artin A

    2009-06-01

    Extracorporeal circulation provides critical life support in the face of cardiopulmonary or renal failure, but it also introduces a host of unique morbidities characterized by edema formation, cardiac insufficiency, autonomic dysfunction, and altered vasomotor function. We tested the hypothesis that cyclohexanone (CHX), a solvent used in production of extracorporeal circuits and intravenous (IV) bags, leaches into the contained fluids and can replicate these clinical morbidities. Crystalloid fluid samples from circuits and IV bags were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to provide a range of clinical CHX exposure levels, revealing CHX contamination of sampled fluids (9.63-3,694 microg/l). In vivo rat studies were conducted (n = 49) to investigate the effects of a bolus IV infusion of CHX vs. saline alone on cardiovascular function, baroreflex responsiveness, and edema formation. Cardiovascular function was evaluated by cardiac output, heart rate, stroke volume, vascular resistance, arterial pressure, and ventricular contractility. Baroreflex function was assessed by mean femoral arterial pressure responses to bilateral carotid occlusion. Edema formation was assessed by the ratio of wet to dry organ weights for lungs, liver, kidneys, and skin. CHX infusion led to systemic hypotension; pulmonary hypertension; depressed contractility, heart rate, stroke volume, and cardiac output; and elevated vascular resistance (P < 0.05). Mean arterial pressure responsiveness to carotid occlusion was dampened after CHX infusion (from +17.25 +/- 1.8 to +5.61 +/- 3.2 mmHg; P < 0.05). CHX infusion led to significantly higher wet-to-dry weight ratios vs. saline only (3.8 +/- 0.06 vs. 3.5 +/- 0.05; P < 0.05). CHX can reproduce clinical cardiovascular, neurological, and edema morbidities associated with extracorporeal circulatory treatment.

  19. Cyclohexanone contamination from extracorporeal circuits impairs cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    Thompson-Torgerson, Caitlin S.; Champion, Hunter C.; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Harris, Z. Leah; Shoukas, Artin A.

    2009-01-01

    Extracorporeal circulation provides critical life support in the face of cardiopulmonary or renal failure, but it also introduces a host of unique morbidities characterized by edema formation, cardiac insufficiency, autonomic dysfunction, and altered vasomotor function. We tested the hypothesis that cyclohexanone (CHX), a solvent used in production of extracorporeal circuits and intravenous (IV) bags, leaches into the contained fluids and can replicate these clinical morbidities. Crystalloid fluid samples from circuits and IV bags were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to provide a range of clinical CHX exposure levels, revealing CHX contamination of sampled fluids (9.63–3,694 μg/l). In vivo rat studies were conducted (n = 49) to investigate the effects of a bolus IV infusion of CHX vs. saline alone on cardiovascular function, baroreflex responsiveness, and edema formation. Cardiovascular function was evaluated by cardiac output, heart rate, stroke volume, vascular resistance, arterial pressure, and ventricular contractility. Baroreflex function was assessed by mean femoral arterial pressure responses to bilateral carotid occlusion. Edema formation was assessed by the ratio of wet to dry organ weights for lungs, liver, kidneys, and skin. CHX infusion led to systemic hypotension; pulmonary hypertension; depressed contractility, heart rate, stroke volume, and cardiac output; and elevated vascular resistance (P < 0.05). Mean arterial pressure responsiveness to carotid occlusion was dampened after CHX infusion (from +17.25 ± 1.8 to +5.61 ± 3.2 mmHg; P < 0.05). CHX infusion led to significantly higher wet-to-dry weight ratios vs. saline only (3.8 ± 0.06 vs. 3.5 ± 0.05; P < 0.05). CHX can reproduce clinical cardiovascular, neurological, and edema morbidities associated with extracorporeal circulatory treatment. PMID:19411286

  20. Alterations in Cardiovascular Regulation and Function During Long-Term Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Richard J.

    1999-01-01

    The Cardiovascular Alterations Team is conducting studies of hemodynamic regulation and susceptibility to arrhythmias resulting from sixteen days of simulated microgravity exposure. In these studies very intensive measurements are made during a short duration of bed rest. In this collaborative effort are making many of the same measurements, however much less frequently, on subjects who are exposed to a much longer duration of simulated microgravity. Alterations in cardiovascular regulation and function that occur during and after space flight have been reported. These alterations are manifested, for example, by reduced orthostatic tolerance upon reentry to the earth's gravity from space. However, the precise physiologic mechanisms responsible for these alterations remain to be fully elucidated. Perhaps, as a result, effective countermeasures have yet to be developed. In addition, numerous reports from the past 30 years suggest that the incidence of ventricular arrhythmias among astronauts is increased during space flight. However, the effects of space flight and the associated physiologic stresses on cardiac conduction processes are not known, and an increase in cardiac susceptibility to arrhythmias has never been quantified. In this project we are applying the most powerful technologies available to determine, in a ground-based study of long duration space flight, the mechanisms by which space flight affects cardiovascular function, and then on the basis of an understanding of these mechanisms to develop rational and specific countermeasures. To this end we are conducting a collaborative project with the Bone Demineralization/Calcium Metabolism Team of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI). The Bone Team is conducting bed rest studies in human subjects lasting 17 weeks, which provides a unique opportunity to study the effects of long duration microgravity exposure on the human cardiovascular system. We are applying a number of powerful new

  1. L-Leucine and NO-mediated cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Wu, Zhenlong; Meininger, Cynthia J; Wu, Guoyao

    2015-03-01

    Reduced availability of nitric oxide (NO) in the vasculature is a major factor contributing to the impaired action of insulin on blood flow and, therefore, insulin resistance in obese and diabetic subjects. Available evidence shows that vascular insulin resistance plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in developed nations. Interestingly, increased concentrations of L-leucine in the plasma occur in obese humans and other animals with vascular dysfunction. Among branched-chain amino acids, L-leucine is unique in inhibiting NO synthesis from L-arginine in endothelial cells and may modulate cardiovascular homeostasis in insulin resistance. Results of recent studies indicate that L-leucine is an activator of glutamine:fructose-6-phosphate aminotransferase (GFAT), which is the first and a rate-controlling enzyme in the synthesis of glucosamine (an inhibitor of endothelial NO synthesis). Through stimulating the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway and thus protein synthesis, L-leucine may enhance GFAT protein expression, thereby inhibiting NO synthesis in endothelial cells. We propose that reducing circulating levels of L-leucine or endothelial GFAT activity may provide a potentially novel strategy for preventing and/or treating cardiovascular disease in obese and diabetic subjects. Such means may include dietary supplementation with either α-ketoglutarate to enhance the catabolism of L-leucine in the small intestine and other tissues or with N-ethyl-L-glutamine to inhibit GFAT activity in endothelial cells. Preventing leucine-induced activation of GFAT by nutritional supplements or pharmaceutical drugs may contribute to improved cardiovascular function by enhancing vascular NO synthesis.

  2. Effect of Sustained Human Centrifugation on Autonomic Cardiovascular and Vestibular Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Wood, Scott J.; Brown, Troy E.; Benavides, Edgar W.; Harm, Deborah L.; Rupert, A. H.

    2002-01-01

    Repeated exposure to +Gz enhances human baroreflex responsiveness and improves tolerance to cardiovascular stress. However, both sustained exposure to +Gx and changes in otolith function resulting from the gravitational changes of space flight and parabolic flight may adversely affect autonomic cardiovascular function and orthostatic tolerance. HYPOTHESES: Baroreflex function and orthostatic tolerance are acutely improved by a single sustained (30 min) exposure to +3Gz but not +3Gx. Moreover, after 30 min of +3Gx, any changes that occur in autonomic cardiovascular function will relate commensurately to changes in otolith function. METHODS: Twenty-two healthy human subjects were first exposed to 5 min of +3 Gz centrifugation and then subsequently up to a total of30 min of either +3Gz (n = 15) or +3Gx (n = 7) centrifugation. Tests of autonomic cardiovascular function both before and after both types of centrifugation included: (a) power spectral determinations of beat-to-beat R-R intervals and arterial pressures; (b) carotid-cardiac baroreflex tests; ( c) Valsalva tests; and (d) 30-min head-up tilt (HUT) tests. Otolith function was assessed during centrifugation by the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex and both before and after centrifugation by measurements of ocular counter-rolling and dynamic posturography. RESULTS: All four +3Gz subjects who were intolerant to HUT before centrifugation became tolerant to HUT after centrifugation. The operational point of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex and the Valsalva-related baroreflex were also enhanced in the +3Gz group but not in the +3Gx group. No significant vestibular-autonomic relationships were detected, other than a significant vestibular-cerebrovascular interaction reported previously. CONCLUSIONS: A single, sustained exposure to +3 Gz centrifugation acutely improves baroreflex function and orthostatic tolerance whereas a similar exposure to +3 Gx centrifugation appears to have less effect.

  3. Thyroid functional disease: an under-recognized cardiovascular risk factor in kidney disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Connie M.; Brent, Gregory A.; Kovesdy, Csaba P.; Soldin, Offie P.; Nguyen, Danh; Budoff, Matthew J.; Brunelli, Steven M.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid functional disease, and in particular hypothyroidism, is highly prevalent among chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. In the general population, hypothyroidism is associated with impaired cardiac contractility, endothelial dysfunction, atherosclerosis and possibly higher cardiovascular mortality. It has been hypothesized that hypothyroidism is an under-recognized, modifiable risk factor for the enormous burden of cardiovascular disease and death in CKD and ESRD, but this has been difficult to test due to the challenge of accurate thyroid functional assessment in uremia. Low thyroid hormone levels (i.e. triiodothyronine) have been associated with adverse cardiovascular sequelae in CKD and ESRD patients, but these metrics are confounded by malnutrition, inflammation and comorbid states, and hence may signify nonthyroidal illness (i.e. thyroid functional test derangements associated with underlying ill health in the absence of thyroid pathology). Thyrotropin is considered a sensitive and specific thyroid function measure that may more accurately classify hypothyroidism, but few studies have examined the clinical significance of thyrotropin-defined hypothyroidism in CKD and ESRD. Of even greater uncertainty are the risks and benefits of thyroid hormone replacement, which bear a narrow therapeutic-to-toxic window and are frequently prescribed to CKD and ESRD patients. In this review, we discuss mechanisms by which hypothyroidism adversely affects cardiovascular health; examine the prognostic implications of hypothyroidism, thyroid hormone alterations and exogenous thyroid hormone replacement in CKD and ESRD; and identify areas of uncertainty related to the interplay between hypothyroidism, cardiovascular disease and kidney disease requiring further investigation. PMID:24574542

  4. Cardiovascular function and basics of physiology in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Aubert, André E; Beckers, Frank; Verheyden, Bart

    2005-04-01

    Space exploration is a dream of mankind. However, this intriguing environment is not without risks. Life, and the human body, has developed all over evolution in the constant presence of gravity, especially from the moment on when living creatures left the ocean. When this gravitational force is no longer acting on the body, drastic changes occur. Some of these changes occur immediately, others progress only slowly. In the past 40 years of human space flight (first orbital flight by Yuri Gagarin on 12 April, 1961) several hazards for the human body have been identified. Bone mineral density is lost, muscle atrophy and cardiovascular deconditioning occur; pulmonary function, fluid regulating systems of the body, the sensory and the balance system are all disturbed by the lack of gravity. These changes in human physiology have to be reversed again when astronauts return to earth. This can cause adaptation problems, especially after long-duration space flights. Also the reaction of human physiology to radiation in space poses a huge risk at this moment. In this review the accent will be on cardiovascular function in space: how normal function is modified to reach a new equilibrium in space after short- and long-duration exposure to microgravity. In order to make long-duration space flight possible the mechanisms of this physiological adaptation must be understood to full extent. Only with this knowledge, effective countermeasures can be developed.

  5. Infant feeding patterns are associated with cardiovascular structures and function in childhood.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Layla L; Langhout, Marianne A; Taal, H Rob; Franco, Oscar H; Raat, Hein; Hofman, Albert; van Osch-Gevers, Lennie; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2013-12-01

    Nutrition in infancy seems to be associated with cardiovascular disease and its risk factors in adulthood. These associations may be explained by cardiovascular developmental adaptations in childhood in response to specific infant feeding patterns. The aim of this study was to assess whether duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding and timing of introduction of solid foods affect cardiovascular development in childhood. In a population-based prospective cohort study from fetal life onward, information about duration and exclusivity of breastfeeding and timing of introduction of solid foods was obtained from delivery reports and questionnaires. Blood pressure, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV), left atrial diameter (LAD), aortic root diameter (AOD), left ventricular (LV) mass, and fractional shortening (FS) were measured at a median age of 6.0 y (95% range: 5.6-7.4 y). Analyses were based on 5003 children. Age at introduction of solid foods was negatively associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure at the age of 6 y. Compared with children who had ever been breast-fed, never-breast-fed children had a higher carotid-femoral PWV (β: 0.13 m/s; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.24 m/s), a smaller LAD (β: -0.29 mm; 95% CI: -0.55, -0.03 mm), and less LV mass (β:-1.46 g; 95% CI: -2.41, -0.52 g) at the age of 6 y. Among breast-fed children, duration and exclusivity were not associated with cardiovascular structures or function. Breastfeeding pattern and age at introduction of solid foods were not associated with AOD or FS. Feeding patterns in infancy may influence cardiovascular development in childhood. Further research is required to replicate these findings and to investigate whether these changes contribute to an increased risk of cardiovascular disease in later life.

  6. Age-associated changes in cardiovascular structure and function: a fertile milieu for future disease.

    PubMed

    Fleg, Jerome L; Strait, James

    2012-09-01

    Important changes occur in the cardiovascular system with advancing age, even in apparently healthy individuals. Thickening and stiffening of the large arteries develop due to collagen and calcium deposition and loss of elastic fibers in the medial layer. These arterial changes cause systolic blood pressure to rise with age, while diastolic blood pressure generally declines after the sixth decade. In the left ventricle, modest concentric wall thickening occurs due to cellular hypertrophy, but cavity size does not change. Although left ventricular systolic function is preserved across the age span, early diastolic filling rate declines 30-50% between the third and ninth decades. Conversely, an age-associated increase in late diastolic filling due to atrial contraction preserves end-diastolic volume. Aerobic exercise capacity declines approximately 10% per decade in cross-sectional studies; in longitudinal studies, however, this decline is accelerated in the elderly. Reductions in peak heart rate and peripheral oxygen utilization but not stroke volume appear to mediate the age-associated decline in aerobic capacity. Deficits in both cardiac β-adrenergic receptor density and in the efficiency of postsynaptic β-adrenergic signaling contribute significantly to the reduced cardiovascular performance during exercise in older adults. Although these cardiovascular aging changes are considered "normative", they lower the threshold for the development of cardiovascular disease, which affects the majority of older adults.

  7. What is the Ultimate Goal in Neural Regulation of Cardiovascular Function?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prakash, E. S.; Madanmohan; Pal, Gopal Krushna

    2004-01-01

    We used the following multiple-choice question after a series of lectures in cardiovascular physiology in the first year of an undergraduate medical curriculum (n = 66) to assess whether students had understood the neural regulation of cardiovascular function. In health, neural cardiovascular mechanisms are geared toward maintaining A) cardiac…

  8. Fetal in vivo continuous cardiovascular function during chronic hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Allison, B. J.; Brain, K. L.; Niu, Y.; Kane, A. D.; Herrera, E. A.; Thakor, A. S.; Botting, K. J.; Cross, C. M.; Itani, N.; Skeffington, K. L.; Beck, C.

    2016-01-01

    Key points The in vivo fetal cardiovascular defence to chronic hypoxia has remained by and large an enigma because no technology has been available to induce significant and prolonged fetal hypoxia whilst recording longitudinal changes in fetal regional blood flow as the hypoxic pregnancy is developing.We introduce a new technique able to maintain chronically instrumented maternal and fetal sheep preparations under isobaric chronic hypoxia for most of gestation, beyond levels that can be achieved by high altitude and of relevance in magnitude to the human intrauterine growth‐restricted fetus.This technology permits wireless recording in free‐moving animals of longitudinal maternal and fetal cardiovascular function, including beat‐to‐beat alterations in pressure and blood flow signals in regional circulations.The relevance and utility of the technique is presented by testing the hypotheses that the fetal circulatory brain sparing response persists during chronic fetal hypoxia and that an increase in reactive oxygen species in the fetal circulation is an involved mechanism. Abstract Although the fetal cardiovascular defence to acute hypoxia and the physiology underlying it have been established for decades, how the fetal cardiovascular system responds to chronic hypoxia has been comparatively understudied. We designed and created isobaric hypoxic chambers able to maintain pregnant sheep for prolonged periods of gestation under controlled significant (10% O2) hypoxia, yielding fetal mean PaO2 levels (11.5 ± 0.6 mmHg) similar to those measured in human fetuses of hypoxic pregnancy. We also created a wireless data acquisition system able to record fetal blood flow signals in addition to fetal blood pressure and heart rate from free moving ewes as the hypoxic pregnancy is developing. We determined in vivo longitudinal changes in fetal cardiovascular function including parallel measurement of fetal carotid and femoral blood flow and oxygen and glucose delivery

  9. Kidney function and cognitive health in older adults: the Cardiovascular Health Study.

    PubMed

    Darsie, Brendan; Shlipak, Michael G; Sarnak, Mark J; Katz, Ronit; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Odden, Michelle C

    2014-07-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated the importance of kidney function in healthy aging. We examined the association between kidney function and change in cognitive function in 3,907 participants in the Cardiovascular Health Study who were recruited from 4 US communities and studied from 1992 to 1999. Kidney function was measured by cystatin C-based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFRcys). Cognitive function was assessed using the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination and the Digit Symbol Substitution Test, which were administered up to 7 times during annual visits. There was an association between eGFRcys and change in cognitive function after adjustment for confounders; persons with an eGFRcys of less than 60 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) had a 0.64 (95% confidence interval: 0.51, 0.77) points/year faster decline in Modified Mini-Mental State Examination score and a 0.42 (95% confidence interval: 0.28, 0.56) points/year faster decline in Digit Symbol Substitution Test score compared with persons with an eGFRcys of 90 or more mL/minute/1.73 m(2). Additional adjustment for intermediate cardiovascular events modestly affected these associations. Participants with an eGFRcys of less than 60 mL/minute/1.73 m(2) had fewer cognitive impairment-free life-years on average compared with those with eGFRcys of 90 or more mL/minute/1.73 m(2), independent of confounders and mediating cardiovascular events (mean difference = -0.44, 95% confidence interval: -0.62, -0.26). Older adults with lower kidney function are at higher risk of worsening cognitive function.

  10. Are lipid-dependent indicators of cardiovascular risk affected by renal transplantation?

    PubMed

    Schena, A; Di Paolo, S; Morrone, L F; Resta, F; Stallone, G; Schena, F P

    2000-04-01

    Hyperlipoproteinemia has been reported to frequently occur in kidney transplanted patients, thus possibly explaining, at least in part, the increased incidence of cardiovascular disease in this population. To evaluate the impact of renal transplantation (Tx), and related immunosuppressive therapy, on plasma lipoprotein and Lp(a) profile, we selected a cohort of kidney transplanted patients (36 M/14 F; age 33.8 + 12.0 yr, range 13-62) lacking significant causes of hyperlipidemia. All patients received a triple immunosuppressive regimen and showed a stable renal function after Tx (plasma creatinine: 1.36 +/- 0.35 mg/dL). One year after Tx, we found a significant increase of total cholesterol (TC), LDL, HDL, ApoB and ApoA-I (p < 0.005), while plasma triglyceride levels remained unmodified. Lp(a) plasma levels after Tx were within the normal range and displayed a significant inverse relationship with apo(a) size. Noteworthy, LDL/HDL ratio and ApoB/ ApoA-I ratio in kidney transplanted patients were almost superimposable with those of normal controls. Specifically, LDL/HDL ratio significantly decreased in 64% of patients after Tx, due to a prevalent increase of HDL, and was associated with a moderate amelioration of plasma TG. In a multiple linear regression model, post-Tx HDL level was significantly related to recipient's age, gender, BMI and cyclosporine (CyA) trough levels (Adj-R2 = 0.35, p = 0.0002), with gender and CyA trough levels being the better predictors of HDL. In conclusion, immunosuppressive regimens, in themselves, do not appear to significantly increase the atherogenic risk related to lipoproteins. Rather, other factors can affect the lipoprotein profile and its vascular effects in renal transplant recipients.

  11. Effects of chronic exposure to arsenate on the cardiovascular function of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Carmignani, M; Boscolo, P; Iannaccone, A

    1983-01-01

    Cardiovascular function was studied in anaesthetised male rats which received 50 micrograms/ml of arsenic (as sodium arsenate) in deionised drinking water for 320 days. High urinary excretion of arsenic was found at the end of treatment and the metal accumulated considerably in the kidneys and liver, which both presented slight alterations. No histopathological modifications were evident in other organs. Base line blood pressure, cardiac inotropism, and chronotropism and cardiovascular reactivity to noradrenaline, acetylcholine, angiotensin II, bradykinin, histamine, and serotonin did not differ in exposed or in control animals. In the exposed group, however, there was potentiation of the effects of vascular beta-adrenoceptor stimulation and a reduction in the vascular responsiveness to angiotensin I. Chronic arsenic exposure did not affect the baroreflex sensitivity but was able to induce sympathetic hyperactivity or hypersensitivity, or both, possibly associated with an antivagal action. Our results might help to explain the cardiovascular alterations seen in people chronically exposed to high concentrations of arsenic. PMID:6871116

  12. Damaging effects of hyperglycemia on cardiovascular function: spotlight on glucose metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Mapanga, Rudo F; Essop, M Faadiel

    2016-01-15

    The incidence of cardiovascular complications associated with hyperglycemia is a growing global health problem. This review discusses the link between hyperglycemia and cardiovascular diseases onset, focusing on the role of recently emerging downstream mediators, namely, oxidative stress and glucose metabolic pathway perturbations. The role of hyperglycemia-mediated activation of nonoxidative glucose pathways (NOGPs) [i.e., the polyol pathway, hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, advanced glycation end products (AGEs), and protein kinase C] in this process is extensively reviewed. The proposal is made that there is a unique interplay between NOGPs and a downstream convergence of detrimental effects that especially affect cardiac endothelial cells, thereby contributing to contractile dysfunction. In this process the AGE pathway emerges as a crucial mediator of hyperglycemia-mediated detrimental effects. In addition, a vicious metabolic cycle is established whereby hyperglycemia-induced NOGPs further fuel their own activation by generating even more oxidative stress, thereby exacerbating damaging effects on cardiac function. Thus NOGP inhibition, and particularly that of the AGE pathway, emerges as a novel therapeutic intervention for the treatment of cardiovascular complications such as acute myocardial infarction in the presence hyperglycemia.

  13. Validation of Cardiovascular Parameters During NASA's Functional Task Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzeno, N. M.; Stenger, M. B.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Platts, Steven H.

    2008-01-01

    Microgravity-induced physiological changes, including cardiovascular deconditioning may impair crewmembers f capabilities during exploration missions on the Moon and Mars. The Functional Task Test (FTT), which will be used to assess task performance in short and long duration astronauts, consists of 7 functional tests to evaluate crewmembers f ability to perform activities to be conducted in a partial-gravity environment or following an emergency landing on Earth. The Recovery from Fall/Stand Test (RFST) tests both the subject fs ability to get up from a prone position and orthostatic intolerance. PURPOSE: Crewmembers have never become presyncopal in the first 3 min of quiet stand, yet it is unknown whether 3 min is long enough to cause similar heart rate fluctuations to a 5-min stand. The purpose of this study was to validate and test the reliability of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis of a 3-min quiet stand. METHODS: To determine the validity of using 3 vs. 5-min of standing to assess HRV, 7 healthy subjects remained in a prone position for 2 min, stood up quickly and stood quietly for 6 min. ECG and continuous blood pressure data were recorded. Mean R-R interval and spectral HRV were measured in minutes 0-3 and 0-5 following the heart rate transient due to standing. Significant differences between the segments were determined by a paired t-test. To determine the reliability of the 3-min stand test, 13 healthy subjects completed 3 trials of the complete FTT on separate days, including the RFST with a 3-min stand test. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on the HRV measures. RESULTS: Spectral HRV measures reflecting autonomic activity were not different (p>0.05) during the 0-3 and 0-5 min segment (mean R-R interval: 738+/-74 ms, 728+/-69 ms; low frequency to high frequency ratio: 6.5+/-2.2, 7.7+/-2.7; normalized high frequency: 0.19+/-0.03, 0.18+/-0.04). The average coefficient of variation for mean R-R interval, systolic and diastolic blood pressures

  14. Validation of Cardiovascular Parameters during NASA's Functional Task Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzeno, N. M.; Stenger, M. B.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Platts, S. H.

    2009-01-01

    Microgravity exposure causes physiological deconditioning and impairs crewmember task performance. The Functional Task Test (FTT) is designed to correlate these physiological changes to performance in a series of operationally-relevant tasks. One of these, the Recovery from Fall/Stand Test (RFST), tests both the ability to recover from a prone position and cardiovascular responses to orthostasis. PURPOSE: Three minutes were chosen for the duration of this test, yet it is unknown if this is long enough to induce cardiovascular responses similar to the operational 5 min stand test. The purpose of this study was to determine the validity and reliability of heart rate variability (HRV) analysis of a 3 min stand and to examine the effect of spaceflight on these measures. METHODS: To determine the validity of using 3 vs. 5 min of standing to assess HRV, ECG was collected from 7 healthy subjects who participated in a 6 min RFST. Mean R-R interval (RR) and spectral HRV were measured in minutes 0-3 and 0-5 following the heart rate transient due to standing. Significant differences between the segments were determined by a paired t-test. To determine the reliability of the 3-min stand test, 13 healthy subjects completed 3 trials of the FTT on separate days, including the RFST with a 3 min stand. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on the HRV measures. One crewmember completed the FTT before a 14-day mission, on landing day (R+0) and one (R+1) day after returning to Earth. RESULTS VALIDITY: HRV measures reflecting autonomic activity were not significantly different during the 0-3 and 0-5 min segments. RELIABILITY: The average coefficient of variation for RR, systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressures during the RFST were less than 8% for the 3 sessions. ANOVA results yielded a greater inter-subject variability (p<0.006) than inter-session variability (p>0.05) for HRV in the RFST. SPACEFLIGHT: Lower RR and higher SBP were observed on R+0 in rest and stand. On R+1

  15. Functional Task Test: 2. Spaceflight-Induced Cardiovascular Change and Recovery During NASA's Functional Task Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Tiffany; Arzeno, Natalia M.; Stenger, Michael; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.; Platts, Steven H.

    2011-01-01

    The overall objective of the functional task test (FTT) is to correlate spaceflight-induced physiological adaptations with changes in performance of high priority exploration mission-critical tasks. This presentation will focus on the recovery from fall/stand test (RFST), which measures the cardiovascular response to the transition from the prone posture (simulated fall) to standing in normal gravity, as well as heart rate (HR) during 11 functional tasks. As such, this test describes some aspects of spaceflight-induced cardiovascular deconditioning and the course of recovery in Space Shuttle and International Space Station (ISS) astronauts. The sensorimotor and neuromuscular components of the FTT are described in two separate abstracts: Functional Task Test 1 and 3.

  16. Can lifestyle modification affect men’s erectile function?

    PubMed Central

    Hehemann, Marah C.

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition affecting millions of men worldwide. The pathophysiology and epidemiologic links between ED and risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) are well-established. Lifestyle modifications such as smoking cessation, weight reduction, dietary modification, physical activity, and psychological stress reduction have been increasingly recognized as foundational to the prevention and treatment of ED. The aim of this review is to outline behavioral choices which may increase ones risk of developing ED, to present relevant studies addressing lifestyle factors correlated with ED, and to highlight proposed mechanisms for intervention aimed at improving erectile function in men with ED. These recommendations can provide a framework for counseling patients with ED about lifestyle modification. PMID:27141445

  17. Positive affect and health-related neuroendocrine, cardiovascular, and inflammatory processes.

    PubMed

    Steptoe, Andrew; Wardle, Jane; Marmot, Michael

    2005-05-03

    Negative affective states such as depression are associated with premature mortality and increased risk of coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and disability. It has been suggested that positive affective states are protective, but the pathways through which such effects might be mediated are poorly understood. Here we show that positive affect in middle-aged men and women is associated with reduced neuroendocrine, inflammatory, and cardiovascular activity. Positive affect was assessed by aggregating momentary experience samples of happiness over a working day and was inversely related to cortisol output over the day, independently of age, gender, socioeconomic position, body mass, and smoking. Similar patterns were observed on a leisure day. Happiness was also inversely related to heart rate assessed by using ambulatory monitoring methods over the day. Participants underwent mental stress testing in the laboratory, where plasma fibrinogen stress responses were smaller in happier individuals. These effects were independent of psychological distress, supporting the notion that positive well-being is directly related to health-relevant biological processes.

  18. The Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test: Validity and Relationship with Cardiovascular Stress-Responses.

    PubMed

    van der Ploeg, Melanie M; Brosschot, Jos F; Thayer, Julian F; Verkuil, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Self-report, i.e., explicit, measures of affect cannot fully explain the cardiovascular (CV) responses to stressors. Measuring affect beyond self-report, i.e., using implicit measures, could add to our understanding of stress-related CV activity. The Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test (IPANAT) was administered in two studies to test its ecological validity and relation with CV responses and self-report measures of affect. In Study 1 students (N = 34) viewed four film clips inducing anger, happiness, fear, or no emotion, and completed the IPANAT and the Positive And Negative Affect Scale at baseline and after each clip. Implicit negative affect (INA) was higher and implicit positive affect (IPA) was lower after the anger inducing clip and vice versa after the happiness inducing clip. In Study 2 students performed a stressful math task with (n = 14) or without anger harassment (n = 15) and completed the IPANAT and a Visual Analog Scale as an explicit measure afterwards. Systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) blood pressure, heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), and total peripheral resistance (TPR) were recorded throughout. SBP and DBP were higher and TPR was lower in the harassment condition during the task with a prolonged effect on SBP and DBP during recovery. As expected, explicit negative affect (ENA) was higher and explicit positive affect (EPA) lower after harassment, but ENA and EPA were not related to CV activity. Although neither INA nor IPA differed between the tasks, during both tasks higher INA was related to higher SBP, lower HRV and lower TPR and to slower recovery of DBP after both tasks. Low IPA was related to slower recovery of SBP and DBP after the tasks. Implicit affect was not related to recovery of HR, HRV, and TPR. In conclusion, the IPANAT seems to respond to film clip-induced negative and positive affect and was related to CV activity during and after stressful tasks. These findings support the theory that implicitly measured affect

  19. The Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test: Validity and Relationship with Cardiovascular Stress-Responses

    PubMed Central

    van der Ploeg, Melanie M.; Brosschot, Jos F.; Thayer, Julian F.; Verkuil, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Self-report, i.e., explicit, measures of affect cannot fully explain the cardiovascular (CV) responses to stressors. Measuring affect beyond self-report, i.e., using implicit measures, could add to our understanding of stress-related CV activity. The Implicit Positive and Negative Affect Test (IPANAT) was administered in two studies to test its ecological validity and relation with CV responses and self-report measures of affect. In Study 1 students (N = 34) viewed four film clips inducing anger, happiness, fear, or no emotion, and completed the IPANAT and the Positive And Negative Affect Scale at baseline and after each clip. Implicit negative affect (INA) was higher and implicit positive affect (IPA) was lower after the anger inducing clip and vice versa after the happiness inducing clip. In Study 2 students performed a stressful math task with (n = 14) or without anger harassment (n = 15) and completed the IPANAT and a Visual Analog Scale as an explicit measure afterwards. Systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP) blood pressure, heart rate (HR), heart rate variability (HRV), and total peripheral resistance (TPR) were recorded throughout. SBP and DBP were higher and TPR was lower in the harassment condition during the task with a prolonged effect on SBP and DBP during recovery. As expected, explicit negative affect (ENA) was higher and explicit positive affect (EPA) lower after harassment, but ENA and EPA were not related to CV activity. Although neither INA nor IPA differed between the tasks, during both tasks higher INA was related to higher SBP, lower HRV and lower TPR and to slower recovery of DBP after both tasks. Low IPA was related to slower recovery of SBP and DBP after the tasks. Implicit affect was not related to recovery of HR, HRV, and TPR. In conclusion, the IPANAT seems to respond to film clip-induced negative and positive affect and was related to CV activity during and after stressful tasks. These findings support the theory that implicitly measured affect

  20. Lagrangian methods for blood damage estimation in cardiovascular devices--How numerical implementation affects the results.

    PubMed

    Marom, Gil; Bluestein, Danny

    2016-01-01

    This paper evaluated the influence of various numerical implementation assumptions on predicting blood damage in cardiovascular devices using Lagrangian methods with Eulerian computational fluid dynamics. The implementation assumptions that were tested included various seeding patterns, stochastic walk model, and simplified trajectory calculations with pathlines. Post processing implementation options that were evaluated included single passage and repeated passages stress accumulation and time averaging. This study demonstrated that the implementation assumptions can significantly affect the resulting stress accumulation, i.e., the blood damage model predictions. Careful considerations should be taken in the use of Lagrangian models. Ultimately, the appropriate assumptions should be considered based the physics of the specific case and sensitivity analysis, similar to the ones presented here, should be employed.

  1. Lagrangian methods for blood damage estimation in cardiovascular devices - How numerical implementation affects the results

    PubMed Central

    Marom, Gil; Bluestein, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Summary This paper evaluated the influence of various numerical implementation assumptions on predicting blood damage in cardiovascular devices using Lagrangian methods with Eulerian computational fluid dynamics. The implementation assumptions that were tested included various seeding patterns, stochastic walk model, and simplified trajectory calculations with pathlines. Post processing implementation options that were evaluated included single passage and repeated passages stress accumulation and time averaging. This study demonstrated that the implementation assumptions can significantly affect the resulting stress accumulation, i.e., the blood damage model predictions. Careful considerations should be taken in the use of Lagrangian models. Ultimately, the appropriate assumptions should be considered based the physics of the specific case and sensitivity analysis, similar to the ones presented here, should be employed. PMID:26679833

  2. Pathologic function and therapeutic potential of exosomes in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Ailawadi, Shaina; Wang, Xiaohong; Gu, Haitao; Fan, Guo-Chang

    2015-01-01

    The heart is a very complex conglomeration of organized interactions between various different cell types that all aid in facilitating myocardial function through contractility, sufficient perfusion, and cell-to-cell reception. In order to make sure that all features of the heart work effectively, it is imperative to have a well-controlled communication system among the different types of cells. One of the most important ways that the heart regulates itself is by the use of extracellular vesicles, more specifically, exosomes. Exosomes are types of nano-vesicles, naturally released from living cells. They are believed to play a critical role in intercellular communication through the means of certain mechanisms including direct cell-to-cell contact, long-range signals as well as electrical and extracellular chemical molecules. Exosomes contain many unique features like surface proteins/receptors, lipids, mRNAs, microRNAs, transcription factors and other proteins. Recent studies indicate that the exosomal contents are highly regulated by various stress and disease conditions, in turn reflective of the parent cell status. At present, exosomes are well appreciated to be involved in the process of tumor and infection disease. However, the research on cardiac exosomes is just emerging. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the pathologic effects of exosomes on cardiac remodeling under stress and disease conditions, including cardiac hypertrophy, peripartum cardiomyopathy, diabetic cardiomyopathy and sepsis-induced cardiovascular dysfunction. In addition, the cardio-protective effects of stress-preconditioned exosomes and stem cell-derived exosomes are also summarized. Finally, we discuss how to epigenetically reprogram exosome contents in host cells which makes them beneficial for the heart.

  3. Training improves walking capacity and cardiovascular function in arteritis.

    PubMed

    Lima, Aluísio H R de A; Lins-Filho, Ozéas L; Soares, Antonio H G; Batista, Rafael M F; Ritti-Dias, Raphael M

    2014-06-01

    Patients with arteritis have a high risk of mortality from cardiovascular disorders. However, whether these patients benefit from an intervention involving exercise remains unclear. In this study, we assessed the effects of an unsupervised exercise program on walking capacity, quality of life, and cardiovascular parameters of a patient with arteritis. A 33-year-old man reporting symptoms of claudication during walking was studied. Imaging tests revealed severe atherosclerosis and arteritis was diagnosed. Five weekly sessions of walking for 16 weeks increased claudication distance and total walking distance, produced improvements in six out of the eight health-related quality-of-life domains, decreased systolic blood pressure, and changed cardiac autonomic modulation toward parasympathetic modulation. This case report showed that unsupervised exercise training improved walking capacity, quality of life, and cardiovascular parameters in a patient with arteritis.

  4. Impact of Polyphenol Antioxidants on Cycling Performance and Cardiovascular Function

    PubMed Central

    Trinity, Joel D.; Pahnke, Matthew D.; Trombold, Justin R.; Coyle, Edward F.

    2014-01-01

    This investigation sought to determine if supplementation with polyphenol antioxidant (PA) improves exercise performance in the heat (31.5 °C, 55% RH) by altering the cardiovascular and thermoregulatory responses to exercise. Twelve endurance trained athletes ingested PA or placebo (PLAC) for 7 days. Consecutive days of exercise testing were performed at the end of the supplementation periods. Cardiovascular and thermoregulatory measures were made during exercise. Performance, as measured by a 10 min time trial (TT) following 50 min of moderate intensity cycling, was not different between treatments (PLAC: 292 ± 33 W and PA: 279 ± 38 W, p = 0.12). Gross efficiency, blood lactate, maximal neuromuscular power, and ratings of perceived exertion were also not different between treatments. Similarly, performance on the second day of testing, as assessed by time to fatigue at maximal oxygen consumption, was not different between treatments (PLAC; 377 ± 117 s vs. PA; 364 ± 128 s, p = 0.61). Cardiovascular and thermoregulatory responses to exercise were not different between treatments on either day of exercise testing. Polyphenol antioxidant supplementation had no impact on exercise performance and did not alter the cardiovascular or thermoregulatory responses to exercise in the heat. PMID:24667134

  5. Spectrofluorimetric methods of stability-indicating assay of certain drugs affecting the cardiovascular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, B. A.; Mohamed, M. F.; Youssef, N. F.

    2011-01-01

    Two stability-indicating spectrofluorimetric methods have been developed for the determination of ezetimibe and olmesartan medoxomil, drugs affecting the cardiovascular system, and validated in the presence of their degradation products. The first method, for ezetimibe, is based on an oxidative coupling reaction of ezetimibe with 3-methylbenzothiazolin-2-one hydrazone hydrochloride in the presence of cerium (IV) ammonium sulfate in an acidic medium. The quenching effect of ezetimibe on the fluorescence of excess cerous ions is measured at the emission wavelength, λem, of 345 nm with the excitation wavelength, λex, of 296 nm. Factors affecting the reaction were carefully studied and optimized. The second method, for olmesartan medoxomil, is based on measuring the native fluorescence intensity of olmesartan medoxomil in methanol at λem = 360 nm with λex = 286 nm. Regression plots revealed good linear relationships in the assay limits of 10-120 and 8-112 g/ml for ezetimibe and olmesartan medoxomil, respectively. The validity of the methods was assessed according to the United States Pharmacopeya guidelines. Statistical analysis of the results exposed good Student's t-test and F-ratio values. The introduced methods were successfully applied to the analysis of ezetimibe and olmesartan medoxomil in drug substances and drug products as well as in the presence of their degradation products.

  6. Cardiovascular pharmacogenetics.

    PubMed

    Myburgh, Renier; Hochfeld, Warren E; Dodgen, Tyren M; Ker, James; Pepper, Michael S

    2012-03-01

    Human genetic variation in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as more complex structural variations such as insertions, deletions and copy number variants, is partially responsible for the clinical variation seen in response to pharmacotherapeutic drugs. This affects the likelihood of experiencing adverse drug reactions and also of achieving therapeutic success. In this paper, we review key studies in cardiovascular pharmacogenetics that reveal genetic variations underlying the outcomes of drug treatment in cardiovascular disease. Examples of genetic associations with drug efficacy and toxicity are described, including the roles of genetic variability in pharmacokinetics (e.g. drug metabolizing enzymes) and pharmacodynamics (e.g. drug targets). These findings have functional implications that could lead to the development of genetic tests aimed at minimizing drug toxicity and optimizing drug efficacy in cardiovascular medicine.

  7. Cardiovascular function during sustained +G/z/ stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, H. H.; Sandler, H.; Stone, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    The development of aerospace systems capable of very high levels of positive vertical accelerators stress has created a need for a better understanding of the cardiovascular responses to acceleration. Using a canine model, the heart and cardiovascular system were instrumented to continuously measure coronary blood flow, cardiac output, left ventricular and aortic root pressure, and oxygen saturation in the aorta, coronary sinus, and right ventricle. The animals were exposed to acceleration profiles up to +6 G, 120 s at peak G; a seatback angle of 45 deg was simulated in some experiments. Radiopaque contrast medium was injected to visualize the left ventricular chamber, coronary vasculature, aorta, and branches of the aorta. The results suggest mechanisms responsible for arrhythmias which may occur, and subendocardial hemorrhage which has been reported in other animals.

  8. Cardiovascular risks and brain function: a functional magnetic resonance imaging study of executive function in older adults.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yi-Fang; Eldreth, Dana; Erickson, Kirk I; Varma, Vijay; Harris, Gregory; Fried, Linda P; Rebok, George W; Tanner, Elizabeth K; Carlson, Michelle C

    2014-06-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes, and hyperlipidemia are associated with cognitive impairment and risk of dementia in older adults. However, the mechanisms linking them are not clear. This study aims to investigate the association between aggregate CV risk, assessed by the Framingham general cardiovascular risk profile, and functional brain activation in a group of community-dwelling older adults. Sixty participants (mean age: 64.6 years) from the Brain Health Study, a nested study of the Baltimore Experience Corps Trial, underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging using the Flanker task. We found that participants with higher CV risk had greater task-related activation in the left inferior parietal region, and this increased activation was associated with poorer task performance. Our results provide insights into the neural systems underlying the relationship between CV risk and executive function. Increased activation of the inferior parietal region may offer a pathway through which CV risk increases risk for cognitive impairment.

  9. Dietary polyphenols regulate endothelial function and prevent cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Kazuo; Tagami, Motoki; Yamori, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction strongly induces development of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Epidemiologic studies demonstrated a preventative effect of dietary polyphenols toward cardiovascular disease. In studies using cultured vascular ECs, polyphenols were recognized to regulate nitric oxide and endothelin-1 (ET-1) production. Furthermore, epigallocatechin-3-gallate inhibited the expression of adhesion molecules by a signaling pathway that is similar to that of high-density lipoprotein and involves induction of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II, liver kinase B, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase expression. The effects of polyphenols on ECs include antioxidant activity and enhancement of the expression of several protective proteins, including endothelial nitric oxide synthase and paraoxonase 1. However, the observed effects of dietary polyphenols in vitro do not always translate to an in vivo setting. As such, there are many questions concerning their physiological mode of action. In this review, we discuss research on the effect of dietary polyphenols on cardiovascular disease and their protective effect on EC dysfunction.

  10. The impact of non-severe burn injury on cardiac function and long-term cardiovascular pathology

    PubMed Central

    O’Halloran, Emily; Shah, Amit; Dembo, Lawrence; Hool, Livia; Viola, Helena; Grey, Christine; Boyd, James; O’Neill, Tomas; Wood, Fiona; Duke, Janine; Fear, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Severe burn injury significantly affects cardiovascular function for up to 3 years. However, whether this leads to long-term pathology is unknown. The impact of non-severe burn injury, which accounts for over 80% of admissions in developed countries, has not been investigated. Using a rodent model of non-severe burn injury with subsequent echocardiography we showed significantly increased left ventricular end systolic diameter (LVESD) and ventricular wall thickness at up to 3 months post-injury. Use of propranolol abrogated the changes in cardiac measures observed. Subsequently we investigated changes in a patient cohort with non-severe injury. Echocardiography measured at baseline and at 3 months post-injury showed increased LVESD at 3 months and significantly decreased posterior wall diameter. Finally, 32 years of Western Australian hospital records were used to investigate the incidence of cardiovascular disease admissions after burn injury. People who had experienced a burn had increased hospital admissions and length of stay for cardiovascular diseases when compared to a matched uninjured cohort. This study presents animal, patient and population data that strongly suggest non-severe burn injury has significant effects on cardiovascular function and long-term morbidity in some burn patients. Identification of patients at risk will promote better intervention and outcomes for burn patients. PMID:27694999

  11. The impact of non-severe burn injury on cardiac function and long-term cardiovascular pathology.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Emily; Shah, Amit; Dembo, Lawrence; Hool, Livia; Viola, Helena; Grey, Christine; Boyd, James; O'Neill, Tomas; Wood, Fiona; Duke, Janine; Fear, Mark

    2016-10-03

    Severe burn injury significantly affects cardiovascular function for up to 3 years. However, whether this leads to long-term pathology is unknown. The impact of non-severe burn injury, which accounts for over 80% of admissions in developed countries, has not been investigated. Using a rodent model of non-severe burn injury with subsequent echocardiography we showed significantly increased left ventricular end systolic diameter (LVESD) and ventricular wall thickness at up to 3 months post-injury. Use of propranolol abrogated the changes in cardiac measures observed. Subsequently we investigated changes in a patient cohort with non-severe injury. Echocardiography measured at baseline and at 3 months post-injury showed increased LVESD at 3 months and significantly decreased posterior wall diameter. Finally, 32 years of Western Australian hospital records were used to investigate the incidence of cardiovascular disease admissions after burn injury. People who had experienced a burn had increased hospital admissions and length of stay for cardiovascular diseases when compared to a matched uninjured cohort. This study presents animal, patient and population data that strongly suggest non-severe burn injury has significant effects on cardiovascular function and long-term morbidity in some burn patients. Identification of patients at risk will promote better intervention and outcomes for burn patients.

  12. Effect of Voluntary Ethanol Consumption Combined with Testosterone Treatment on Cardiovascular Function in Rats: Influence of Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Engi, Sheila A.; Planeta, Cleopatra S.; Crestani, Carlos C.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of voluntary ethanol consumption combined with testosterone treatment on cardiovascular function in rats. Moreover, we investigated the influence of exercise training on these effects. To this end, male rats were submitted to low-intensity training on a treadmill or kept sedentary while concurrently being treated with ethanol for 6 weeks. For voluntary ethanol intake, rats were given access to two bottles, one containing ethanol and other containing water, three 24-hour sessions per week. In the last two weeks (weeks 5 and 6), animals underwent testosterone treatment concurrently with exercise training and exposure to ethanol. Ethanol consumption was not affected by either testosterone treatment or exercise training. Also, drug treatments did not influence the treadmill performance improvement evoked by training. However, testosterone alone, but not in combination with ethanol, reduced resting heart rate. Moreover, combined treatment with testosterone and ethanol reduced the pressor response to the selective α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. Treatment with either testosterone or ethanol alone also affected baroreflex activity and enhanced depressor response to acetylcholine, but these effects were inhibited when drugs were coadministrated. Exercise training restored most cardiovascular effects evoked by drug treatments. Furthermore, both drugs administrated alone increased pressor response to phenylephrine in trained animals. Also, drug treatments inhibited the beneficial effects of training on baroreflex function. In conclusion, the present results suggest a potential interaction between toxic effects of testosterone and ethanol on cardiovascular function. Data also indicate that exercise training is an important factor influencing the effects of these substances. PMID:26760038

  13. Pressure and coverage effects of sporting compression garments on cardiovascular function, thermoregulatory function, and exercise performance.

    PubMed

    MacRae, Braid A; Laing, Raechel M; Niven, Brian E; Cotter, James D

    2012-05-01

    Sporting compression garments (CG) are used widely during exercise despite little evidence of benefits. The purpose of this study was to investigate coverage and pressure effects of full-body CG on cardiovascular and thermoregulatory function at rest and during prolonged exercise, and on exercise performance. Twelve recreationally trained male cyclists [mean (SD) age, 26 (7) years; VO(2 max), 53 (8) mL kg(-1) min(-1)] completed three sessions (counterbalanced order), wearing either correctly-sized CG (CSG; 11-15 mmHg), over-sized CG (OSG; 8-13 mmHg), or gym shorts (CONT). Test sessions were conducted in temperate conditions [24 (1)°C, 60 (4)% relative humidity; ~2 m s(-1) air velocity during exercise], consisting of resting on a chair then on a cycle ergometer, before 60-min fixed-load cycling at ~65% VO(2 max) and a 6-km time trial. Wearing CG (CSG or OSG) did not mitigate cardiovascular strain during mild orthostatic stress at rest (p = 0.20-0.93 for garment effects). During exercise, cardiac output was ~5% higher in the CG conditions (p < 0.05), which appears to be accounted for via non-significant higher end-exercise heart rate (~4-7%, p = 0.30; p = 0.06 for greater heart rate drift in CSG); other cardiovascular variables, including stroke volume, were similar among conditions (p = 0.23-0.91). Covered-skin temperature was higher in CG conditions (p < 0.001) but core (oesophageal) temperature was not (p = 0.79). Time-trial performance (mean power, time taken) was similar with or without CG (p = 0.24-0.44). In conclusion, any demonstrable physiological or psychophysical effects of full-body CG were mild and seemingly reflective more of surface coverage than pressure. No benefit was evident for exercise performance.

  14. Ergothioneine Antioxidant Function: From Chemistry to Cardiovascular Therapeutic Potential.

    PubMed

    Servillo, Luigi; DʼOnofrio, Nunzia; Balestrieri, Maria Luisa

    2017-04-01

    Ergothioneine (ESH), the betaine of 2-mercapto-L-histidine, is a water-soluble naturally occurring amino acid with antioxidant properties. ESH accumulates in several human and animal tissues up to millimolar concentration through its high affinity transporter, namely the organic cation transporter 1 (OCTN1). ESH, first isolated from the ergot fungus (Claviceps purpurea), is synthesized only by Actinomycetales and non-yeast-like fungi. Plants absorb ESH via symbiotic associations between their roots and soil fungi, whereas mammals acquire it solely from dietary sources. Numerous evidence demonstrated the antioxidant and cytoprotective effects of ESH, including protection against cardiovascular diseases, chronic inflammatory conditions, ultraviolet radiation damages, and neuronal injuries. Although more than a century after its discovery has gone by, our understanding on the in vivo ESH mechanism is limited and this compound still intrigues researchers. However, recent evidence about differences in chemical redox behavior between ESH and alkylthiols, such as cysteine and glutathione, has opened new perspectives on the role of ESH during oxidative damage. In this short review, we discuss the role of ESH in the complex machinery of the cellular antioxidant defense focusing on the current knowledge on its chemical mechanism of action in the protection against cardiovascular disease.

  15. The cardiovascular risk marker asymmetrical dimethylarginine is not affected by venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Haider, Dominik G; Bucek, Robert A; Reiter, Markus; Minar, Erich; Hron, Gregor; Kyrle, Paul A; Mittermayer, Friedrich; Wolzt, Michael

    2006-07-01

    Asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA) is an endogenous inhibitor of endothelial nitric oxide synthase, causes vasoconstriction, impairs cardiac function, and may predict cardiovascular risk. The prognostic value of plasma ADMA concentrations in acute vascular situations may be confounded by concomitant factors such as clot formation. In an effort to address the effect of hemostatic system activation, the authors have measured plasma concentrations of ADMA, its stereoisomer symmetrical dimethylarginine (SDMA), and L-arginine in 74 patients with suspected deep vein thrombosis (DVT). DVT was confirmed by sonography or venography in 39 subjects. There was no difference of L-arginine, ADMA, or SDMA (all P > 0.05) between subjects with or without DVT. ADMA correlated with SDMA, L-arginine, and plasma creatinine (all P < 0.05) but not with age, body mass index, D-dimer, thrombus extension, or history of symptoms. Venous thrombembolism does not influence circulating ADMA concentrations. The lack of association between ADMA and DVT argues against a contribution of endogenous NO synthase inhibition in hemostatic systemic activation.

  16. Effects of fentanyl on isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration and cardiovascular function in mechanically ventilated goats.

    PubMed

    Dzikiti, T B; Stegmann, G F; Dzikiti, L N; Hellebrekers, L J

    2011-04-23

    The effects of fentanyl on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of isoflurane and cardiovascular function in mechanically ventilated goats were evaluated using six healthy goats (three does and three wethers). Following induction of general anaesthesia with isoflurane delivered via a mask, endotracheal intubation was performed and anaesthesia was maintained with isoflurane. The baseline MAC of isoflurane (that is, the lowest alveolar concentration required to prevent gross purposeful movement) in response to clamping a claw with a vulsellum forceps was determined. Immediately after baseline isoflurane MAC determination, the goats received, on separate occasions, one of three fentanyl treatments, administered intravenously: a bolus of 0.005 mg/kg followed by constant rate infusion (CRI) of 0.005 mg/kg/hour (treatment LFENT), a bolus of 0.015 mg/kg followed by CRI of 0.015 mg/kg/hour (treatment MFENT) or a bolus of 0.03 mg/kg followed by CRI of 0.03 mg/kg/hour (treatment HFENT). Isoflurane MAC was redetermined during the fentanyl CRI treatments. Cardiopulmonary parameters were monitored. A four-week washout period was allowed between treatments. The observed baseline isoflurane MAC was 1.32 (1.29 to 1.36) per cent. Isoflurane MAC decreased to 0.98 (0.92 to 1.01) per cent, 0.75 (0.69 to 0.79) per cent and 0.58 (0.51 to 0.65) per cent following LFENT, MFENT and HFENT respectively. Cardiovascular function was not adversely affected. The quality of recovery from general anaesthesia was good, although exaggerated tail-wagging was observed in some goats following MFENT and HFENT.

  17. Hyperinsulinemia adversely affects lung structure and function.

    PubMed

    Singh, Suchita; Bodas, Manish; Bhatraju, Naveen K; Pattnaik, Bijay; Gheware, Atish; Parameswaran, Praveen Kolumam; Thompson, Michael; Freeman, Michelle; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan; Gosens, Reinoud; Ghosh, Balaram; Pabelick, Christina; Linneberg, Allan; Prakash, Y S; Agrawal, Anurag

    2016-05-01

    There is limited knowledge regarding the consequences of hyperinsulinemia on the lung. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity, insulin resistance, and epidemiological associations with asthma, this is a critical lacuna, more so with inhaled insulin on the horizon. Here, we demonstrate that insulin can adversely affect respiratory health. Insulin treatment (1 μg/ml) significantly (P < 0.05) increased the proliferation of primary human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells and induced collagen release. Additionally, ASM cells showed a significant increase in calcium response and mitochondrial respiration upon insulin exposure. Mice administered intranasal insulin showed increased collagen deposition in the lungs as well as a significant increase in airway hyperresponsiveness. PI3K/Akt mediated activation of β-catenin, a positive regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and fibrosis, was observed in the lungs of insulin-treated mice and lung cells. Our data suggests that hyperinsulinemia may have adverse effects on airway structure and function. Insulin-induced activation of β-catenin in lung tissue and the contractile effects on ASM cells may be causally related to the development of asthma-like phenotype.

  18. Relation of endothelial function to cardiovascular risk in women with sedentary occupations and without known cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, Margaret F; Carlow, Andrea; Desai, Aditi; Blum, Arnon; Rodrigo, Maria; Patibandla, Sushmitha; Zalos, Gloria; Smith, Kevin; Schenke, William H; Csako, Gyorgy; Waclawiw, Myron A; Cannon, Richard O

    2008-08-01

    Our purpose was to determine predictors of endothelial function and potential association with cardiovascular risk in women with sedentary occupations, in whom obesity-associated risk factors may contribute to excess morbidity and mortality. Ninety consecutive women (age range 22 to 63 years, 22 overweight (body mass index [BMI] > or =25 to 29.9 kg/m(2)) and 42 obese (BMI > or = 30 kg/m(2)), had vital signs, lipids, insulin, glucose, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and sex hormones measured. Endothelial function was determined using brachial artery flow-mediated dilation after 5 minutes of forearm ischemia. Treadmill stress testing was performed with gas exchange analysis at peak exercise (peak oxygen consumption [Vo(2)]) to assess cardiorespiratory fitness. Brachial artery reactivity was negatively associated with Framingham risk score (r = -0.3542, p = 0.0007). Univariate predictors of endothelial function included peak Vo(2) (r = 0.4483, p <0.0001), age (r = -0.3420, p = 0.0010), BMI (r = -0.3065, p = 0.0035), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (r = -0.2220, p = 0.0400). Using multiple linear regression analysis with stepwise modeling, peak Vo(2) (p = 0.0003) was the best independent predictor of brachial artery reactivity, with age as the only other variable reaching statistical significance (p = 0.0436) in this model. In conclusion, endothelial function was significantly associated with cardiovascular risk in women with sedentary occupations, who were commonly overweight or obese. Even in the absence of routine exercise, cardiorespiratory fitness, rather than conventional risk factors or body mass, is the dominant predictor of endothelial function and suggests a modifiable approach to risk.

  19. Plant Protein and Animal Proteins: Do They Differentially Affect Cardiovascular Disease Risk?12

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Chesney K; Skulas-Ray, Ann C; Champagne, Catherine M; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2015-01-01

    Proteins from plant-based compared with animal-based food sources may have different effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Numerous epidemiologic and intervention studies have evaluated their respective health benefits; however, it is difficult to isolate the role of plant or animal protein on CVD risk. This review evaluates the current evidence from observational and intervention studies, focusing on the specific protein-providing foods and populations studied. Dietary protein is derived from many food sources, and each provides a different composite of nonprotein compounds that can also affect CVD risk factors. Increasing the consumption of protein-rich foods also typically results in lower intakes of other nutrients, which may simultaneously influence outcomes. Given these complexities, blanket statements about plant or animal protein may be too general, and greater consideration of the specific protein food sources and the background diet is required. The potential mechanisms responsible for any specific effects of plant and animal protein are similarly multifaceted and include the amino acid content of particular foods, contributions from other nonprotein compounds provided concomitantly by the whole food, and interactions with the gut microbiome. Evidence to date is inconclusive, and additional studies are needed to further advance our understanding of the complexity of plant protein vs. animal protein comparisons. Nonetheless, current evidence supports the idea that CVD risk can be reduced by a dietary pattern that provides more plant sources of protein compared with the typical American diet and also includes animal-based protein foods that are unprocessed and low in saturated fat. PMID:26567196

  20. Plant protein and animal proteins: do they differentially affect cardiovascular disease risk?

    PubMed

    Richter, Chesney K; Skulas-Ray, Ann C; Champagne, Catherine M; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2015-11-01

    Proteins from plant-based compared with animal-based food sources may have different effects on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Numerous epidemiologic and intervention studies have evaluated their respective health benefits; however, it is difficult to isolate the role of plant or animal protein on CVD risk. This review evaluates the current evidence from observational and intervention studies, focusing on the specific protein-providing foods and populations studied. Dietary protein is derived from many food sources, and each provides a different composite of nonprotein compounds that can also affect CVD risk factors. Increasing the consumption of protein-rich foods also typically results in lower intakes of other nutrients, which may simultaneously influence outcomes. Given these complexities, blanket statements about plant or animal protein may be too general, and greater consideration of the specific protein food sources and the background diet is required. The potential mechanisms responsible for any specific effects of plant and animal protein are similarly multifaceted and include the amino acid content of particular foods, contributions from other nonprotein compounds provided concomitantly by the whole food, and interactions with the gut microbiome. Evidence to date is inconclusive, and additional studies are needed to further advance our understanding of the complexity of plant protein vs. animal protein comparisons. Nonetheless, current evidence supports the idea that CVD risk can be reduced by a dietary pattern that provides more plant sources of protein compared with the typical American diet and also includes animal-based protein foods that are unprocessed and low in saturated fat.

  1. Review of existing experimental approaches for the clinical evaluation of the benefits of plant food supplements on cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Meoni, Paolo; Restani, Patrizia; Mancama, Dalu T

    2013-06-01

    We conducted a survey of the National Centre for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) PubMed database to identify methods most commonly used for the evaluation of the effect of plant food supplements on the cardiovascular system and their relevance to the regulatory status of these products. Particularly, our search strategy was aimed at the selection of studies concerning the clinical evaluation of the beneficial effects of the most commonly studied plant food supplements acting on the cardiovascular system. Following the screening of 3839 papers for inclusion criteria, 48 published reports were retained for this review. Most studies included in this review used a double blind controlled design, and evaluated the effect of plant food supplements on individuals affected by a disease of the cardiovascular system. The majority of the studies were found to be of low methodological quality on the Jadad scale, mainly because of inadequate reporting of adverse events and of patient withdrawals. In comparison, measures used for the evaluation of benefits included mostly cardiovascular risk factors as recommended in international guidelines and in accordance with principles laid down for the evaluation of health claims in food. The risk factors most frequently evaluated belonged to the category of "lipid function and levels", "heart function" and "blood pressure". For the absolute majority of the studies, the study period did not exceed one month. This review highlights critical factors to be considered in the design of studies evaluating the health effects of plant food supplements on the cardiovascular system. Between others, the inclusion of healthy individuals, better reporting and description of the characteristics of the product used could improve the quality and relevance of these studies.

  2. Endothelial function in a cardiovascular risk population with borderline ankle–brachial index

    PubMed Central

    Syvänen, Kari; Korhonen, Päivi; Partanen, Auli; Aarnio, Pertti

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The diagnosis of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) can be made by measuring the ankle–brachial index (ABI). Traditionally ABI values > 1.00–1.40 have been considered normal and ABI ≤ 0.90 defines PAD. Recent studies, however, have shown that individuals with ABI values between 0.90–1.00 are also at risk of cardiovascular events. We studied this cardiovascular risk population subgroup in order to determine their endothelial function using peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT). Methods: We selected 66 individuals with cardiovascular risk and borderline ABI. They all had hypertension, newly diagnosed glucose disorder, metabolic syndrome, obesity, or a ten year risk of cardiovascular disease death of 5% or more according to the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation System (SCORE). Subjects with previously diagnosed diabetes or cardiovascular disease were excluded. Endothelial function was assessed by measuring the reactive hyperemia index (RHI) from fingertips using an Endo-PAT device. Results: The mean ABI was 0.95 and mean RHI 2.11. Endothelial dysfunction, defined as RHI < 1.67, was detected in 15/66 (23%) of the subjects. There were no statistically significant differences in RHI values between subjects with different cardiovascular risk factors. The only exception was that subjects with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) had slightly lower RHI values (mean RHI 1.91) than subjects without IFG (mean RHI 2.24) (P = 0.02). Conclusions: In a cardiovascular risk population with borderline ABI nearly every fourth subject had endothelial dysfunction, indicating an elevated risk of cardiovascular events. This might point out a subgroup of individuals in need of more aggressive treatment for their risk factors. PMID:21415923

  3. Spaceflight-Induced Cardiovascular Changes and Recovery During NASA's Functional Task Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzeno, N. M.; Stenger, M. B.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Platts, S. H.

    2010-01-01

    Microgravity-induced physiological changes could impair a crewmember s performance upon return to a gravity environment. The Functional Task Test (FTT) is designed to correlate these physiological changes to performance in mission-critical tasks. The Recovery from Fall/Stand Test (RFST) simulates one such task, measuring the ability to recover from a prone position and the cardiovascular response to orthostasis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate spaceflight-induced cardiovascular changes during the FTT. METHODS: Five astronauts participated in the FTT before 10-15 day missions, on landing day (R+0), and one (R+1), six (R+6) and thirty (R+30) days after landing. The RFST consisted of a 2-minute prone rest followed by a 3-minute stand during which heart rate (HR, Holter) and continuous blood pressure (BP, Finometer) were measured. Spectral heart rate variability (HRV) was calculated during the RFST to approximate autonomic function. Statistical analysis was performed with two-factor repeated measures ANOVA. RESULTS: During RFST, HR was higher on R+0 than preflight (p<0.004). This increase in HR persisted on R+1 and R+6 during the stand portion of RFST (p<0.026). BP was well-regulated on all test days. Parasympathetic activity was diminished on R+0 (p=0.035). Sympathovagal balance tended to be affected by spaceflight (main effect, p=0.072), appearing to be slightly elevated during postflight RFST except on R+30. Additionally, analysis of HR during the functional tasks yielded a higher HR on R+0 than preflight during 8 of 11 tasks analyzed, where all tasks had HR return to preflight values by R+30 (p<0.05). CONCLUSION: Spaceflight causes an increase in HR, decrease in parasympathetic activity, and increase in sympathovagal balance, which we confirmed during RFST. These spaceflight-induced changes seen in the RFST, along with the increased postflight HR in most functional tasks, can be used to assess functional performance after short-duration spaceflight.

  4. Does calcium intake affect cardiovascular risk factors and/or events?

    PubMed

    Torres, Márcia Regina Simas Gonçalves; Sanjuliani, Antonio Felipe

    2012-07-01

    Dietary intervention is an important approach in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. Over the last decade, some studies have suggested that a calcium-rich diet could help to control body weight, with anti-obesity effects. The potential mechanism underlying the impact of calcium on body fat has been investigated, but it is not fully understood. Recent evidence has also suggested that a calcium-rich diet could have beneficial effects on other cardiovascular risk factors, such as insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertension and inflammatory states. In a series of studies, it was observed that a high intake of milk and/or dairy products (the main sources of dietary calcium) is associated with a reduction in the relative risk of cardiovascular disease. However, a few studies suggest that supplemental calcium (mainly calcium carbonate or citrate) may be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This review will discuss the available evidence regarding the relationship between calcium intake (dietary and supplemental) and different cardiovascular risk factors and/or events.

  5. Executive Cognitive Functioning and Cardiovascular Autonomic Regulation in a Population-Based Sample of Working Adults

    PubMed Central

    Stenfors, Cecilia U. D.; Hanson, Linda M.; Theorell, Töres; Osika, Walter S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Executive cognitive functioning is essential in private and working life and is sensitive to stress and aging. Cardiovascular (CV) health factors are related to cognitive decline and dementia, but there is relatively few studies of the role of CV autonomic regulation, a key component in stress responses and risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and executive processes. An emerging pattern of results from previous studies suggest that different executive processes may be differentially associated with CV autonomic regulation. The aim was thus to study the associations between multiple measures of CV autonomic regulation and measures of different executive cognitive processes. Method: Participants were 119 healthy working adults (79% women), from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health. Electrocardiogram was sampled for analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) measures, including the Standard Deviation of NN, here heart beats (SDNN), root of the mean squares of successive differences (RMSSD), high frequency (HF) power band from spectral analyses, and QT variability index (QTVI), a measure of myocardial repolarization patterns. Executive cognitive functioning was measured by seven neuropsychological tests. The relationships between CV autonomic regulation measures and executive cognitive measures were tested with bivariate and partial correlational analyses, controlling for demographic variables, and mental health symptoms. Results: Higher SDNN and RMSSD and lower QTVI were significantly associated with better performance on cognitive tests tapping inhibition, updating, shifting, and psychomotor speed. After adjustments for demographic factors however (age being the greatest confounder), only QTVI was clearly associated with these executive tests. No such associations were seen for working memory capacity. Conclusion: Poorer CV autonomic regulation in terms of lower SDNN and RMSSD and higher QTVI was associated with poorer executive

  6. Executive Cognitive Functioning and Cardiovascular Autonomic Regulation in a Population-Based Sample of Working Adults.

    PubMed

    Stenfors, Cecilia U D; Hanson, Linda M; Theorell, Töres; Osika, Walter S

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Executive cognitive functioning is essential in private and working life and is sensitive to stress and aging. Cardiovascular (CV) health factors are related to cognitive decline and dementia, but there is relatively few studies of the role of CV autonomic regulation, a key component in stress responses and risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and executive processes. An emerging pattern of results from previous studies suggest that different executive processes may be differentially associated with CV autonomic regulation. The aim was thus to study the associations between multiple measures of CV autonomic regulation and measures of different executive cognitive processes. Method: Participants were 119 healthy working adults (79% women), from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health. Electrocardiogram was sampled for analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) measures, including the Standard Deviation of NN, here heart beats (SDNN), root of the mean squares of successive differences (RMSSD), high frequency (HF) power band from spectral analyses, and QT variability index (QTVI), a measure of myocardial repolarization patterns. Executive cognitive functioning was measured by seven neuropsychological tests. The relationships between CV autonomic regulation measures and executive cognitive measures were tested with bivariate and partial correlational analyses, controlling for demographic variables, and mental health symptoms. Results: Higher SDNN and RMSSD and lower QTVI were significantly associated with better performance on cognitive tests tapping inhibition, updating, shifting, and psychomotor speed. After adjustments for demographic factors however (age being the greatest confounder), only QTVI was clearly associated with these executive tests. No such associations were seen for working memory capacity. Conclusion: Poorer CV autonomic regulation in terms of lower SDNN and RMSSD and higher QTVI was associated with poorer executive

  7. Cardiovascular safety risk assessment for new candidate drugs from functional and pathological data: Conference report.

    PubMed

    Klein, Stephanie K; Redfern, Will S

    2015-01-01

    This is a report on a 2-day joint meeting between the British Society of Toxicological Pathology (BSTP) and the Safety Pharmacology Society (SPS) held in the UK in November 2013. Drug induced adverse effects on the cardiovascular system are associated with the attrition of more marketed and candidate drugs than any other safety issue. The objectives of this meeting were to foster inter-disciplinary approaches to address cardiovascular risk assessment, improve understanding of the respective disciplines, and increase awareness of new technologies. These aims were achieved. This well attended meeting covered both 'purely functional' cardiovascular adverse effects of drugs (e.g., electrophysiological and haemodynamic changes) as well as adverse effects encompassing both functional and pathological changes. Most of the presentations focused on nonclinical safety data, with information on translation to human where known. To reflect the content of the presentations we have cited key references and review articles.

  8. Does iron deficiency anemia affect olfactory function?

    PubMed

    Dinc, Mehmet Emre; Dalgic, Abdullah; Ulusoy, Seckin; Dizdar, Denizhan; Develioglu, Omer; Topak, Murat

    2016-07-01

    Conclusion This study found a negative effect of IDA on olfactory function. IDA leads to a reduction in olfactory function, and decreases in hemoglobin levels result in further reduction in olfactory function. Objective This study examined the effects of iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) on olfactory function. Method The study enrolled 50 IDA patients and 50 healthy subjects. Olfactory function was evaluated using the Sniffin' Sticks olfactory test. The diagnosis of IDA was made according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Results Patients with IDA had a significantly lower threshold, discrimination, and identification (TDI) value, and a lower threshold compared with the control group. However, there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of smell selectivity values.

  9. Small-molecule WNK inhibition regulates cardiovascular and renal function.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ken; Park, Hyi-Man; Rigel, Dean F; DiPetrillo, Keith; Whalen, Erin J; Anisowicz, Anthony; Beil, Michael; Berstler, James; Brocklehurst, Cara Emily; Burdick, Debra A; Caplan, Shari L; Capparelli, Michael P; Chen, Guanjing; Chen, Wei; Dale, Bethany; Deng, Lin; Fu, Fumin; Hamamatsu, Norio; Harasaki, Kouki; Herr, Tracey; Hoffmann, Peter; Hu, Qi-Ying; Huang, Waan-Jeng; Idamakanti, Neeraja; Imase, Hidetomo; Iwaki, Yuki; Jain, Monish; Jeyaseelan, Jey; Kato, Mitsunori; Kaushik, Virendar K; Kohls, Darcy; Kunjathoor, Vidya; LaSala, Daniel; Lee, Jongchan; Liu, Jing; Luo, Yang; Ma, Fupeng; Mo, Ruowei; Mowbray, Sarah; Mogi, Muneto; Ossola, Flavio; Pandey, Pramod; Patel, Sejal J; Raghavan, Swetha; Salem, Bahaa; Shanado, Yuka H; Trakshel, Gary M; Turner, Gordon; Wakai, Hiromichi; Wang, Chunhua; Weldon, Stephen; Wielicki, Jennifer B; Xie, Xiaoling; Xu, Lingfei; Yagi, Yukiko I; Yasoshima, Kayo; Yin, Jianning; Yowe, David; Zhang, Ji-Hu; Zheng, Gang; Monovich, Lauren

    2016-11-01

    The With-No-Lysine (K) (WNK) kinases play a critical role in blood pressure regulation and body fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. Herein, we introduce the first orally bioavailable pan-WNK-kinase inhibitor, WNK463, that exploits unique structural features of the WNK kinases for both affinity and kinase selectivity. In rodent models of hypertension, WNK463 affects blood pressure and body fluid and electro-lyte homeostasis, consistent with WNK-kinase-associated physiology and pathophysiology.

  10. The Association between Cardiovascular Disease and Cochlear Function in Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torre, Peter, III; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Klein, Barbara E.K.; Klein, Ronald; Nondahl, David M.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the relation between self-reported cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cochlear function in older adults. The Epidemiology of Hearing Loss Study (EHLS) is an ongoing population-based study of hearing loss and its risk factors in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin. As part of the EHLS questionnaire, participants were…

  11. Functional foods for dyslipidaemia and cardiovascular risk prevention.

    PubMed

    Sirtori, Cesare R; Galli, Claudio; Anderson, James W; Sirtori, Elena; Arnoldi, Anna

    2009-12-01

    A food can be regarded as 'functional' if it can demonstrate a beneficial efficacy on one or more target functions in the body in a convincing way. Beyond adequate nutritional qualities, functional foods should either improve the state of health and wellbeing and/or reduce the risk of disease. Functional foods that are marketed with claims of heart disease reduction focus primarily on the major risk factors, i.e. cholesterol, diabetes and hypertension. Some of the most innovative products are designed to be enriched with 'protective' ingredients, believed to reduce risk. They may contain, for example, soluble fibre (from oat and psyllium), useful both for lowering cholesterol and blood pressure, or fructans, effective in diabetes. Phytosterols and stanols lower LDL-cholesterol in a dose-dependent manner. Soya protein is more hypocholesterolaemic in subjects with very high initial cholesterol and recent data indicate also favourable activities in the metabolic syndrome. n-3 Fatty acids appear to exert significant hypotriacylglycerolaemic effects, possibly partly responsible for their preventive activity. Dark chocolate is gaining much attention for its multifunctional activities, useful both for the prevention of dyslipidaemia as well as hypertension. Finally, consensus opinions about tea and coffee have not emerged yet, and the benefits of vitamin E, garlic, fenugreek and policosanols in the management of dyslipidaemia and prevention of arterial disease are still controversial.

  12. Seaweeds as Preventive Agents for Cardiovascular Diseases: From Nutrients to Functional Foods

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Susana M.; Pereira, Olívia R.; Seca, Ana M. L.; Pinto, Diana C. G. A.; Silva, Artur M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Being naturally enriched in key nutrients and in various health-promoting compounds, seaweeds represent promising candidates for the design of functional foods. Soluble dietary fibers, peptides, phlorotannins, lipids and minerals are macroalgae’s major compounds that can hold potential in high-value food products derived from macroalgae, including those directed to the cardiovascular-health promotion. This manuscript revises available reported data focusing the role of diet supplementation of macroalgae, or extracts enriched in bioactive compounds from macroalgae origin, in targeting modifiable markers of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), like dyslipidemia, oxidative stress, vascular inflammation, hypertension, hypercoagulability and activation of the sympathetic and renin-angiotensin systems, among others. At last, the review also describes several products that have been formulated with the use of whole macroalgae or extracts, along with their claimed cardiovascular-associated benefits. PMID:26569268

  13. Ultrasound strain imaging for quantification of tissue function: cardiovascular applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Korte, Chris L.; Lopata, Richard G. P.; Hansen, Hendrik H. G.

    2013-03-01

    With ultrasound imaging, the motion and deformation of tissue can be measured. Tissue can be deformed by applying a force on it and the resulting deformation is a function of its mechanical properties. Quantification of this resulting tissue deformation to assess the mechanical properties of tissue is called elastography. If the tissue under interrogation is actively deforming, the deformation is directly related to its function and quantification of this deformation is normally referred as `strain imaging'. Elastography can be used for atherosclerotic plaques characterization, while the contractility of the heart or skeletal muscles can be assessed with strain imaging. We developed radio frequency (RF) based ultrasound methods to assess the deformation at higher resolution and with higher accuracy than commercial methods using conventional image data (Tissue Doppler Imaging and 2D speckle tracking methods). However, the improvement in accuracy is mainly achieved when measuring strain along the ultrasound beam direction, so 1D. We further extended this method to multiple directions and further improved precision by using compounding of data acquired at multiple beam steered angles. In arteries, the presence of vulnerable plaques may lead to acute events like stroke and myocardial infarction. Consequently, timely detection of these plaques is of great diagnostic value. Non-invasive ultrasound strain compounding is currently being evaluated as a diagnostic tool to identify the vulnerability of plaques. In the heart, we determined the strain locally and at high resolution resulting in a local assessment in contrary to conventional global functional parameters like cardiac output or shortening fraction.

  14. Cardiac structure and function in humans: a new cardiovascular physiology laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Song, Su; Burleson, Paul D.; Passo, Stanley; Messina, Edward J.; Levine, Norman; Thompson, Carl I.; Belloni, Francis L.; Recchia, Fabio A.; Ojaimi, Caroline; Kaley, Gabor

    2009-01-01

    As the traditional cardiovascular control laboratory has disappeared from the first-year medical school curriculum, we have recognized the need to develop another “hands-on” experience as a vehicle for wide-ranging discussions of cardiovascular control mechanisms. Using an echocardiograph, an automatic blood pressure cuff, and a reclining bicycle, we developed protocols to illustrate the changes in cardiac and vascular function that occur with changes in posture, venous return, and graded exercise. We use medical student volunteers and a professional echocardiographer to generate and acquire data, respectively. In small-group sessions, we developed an interactive approach to discuss the data and to make a large number of calculations from a limited number of measurements. The sequence of cardiac events and cardiac structure in vivo were illustrated with the volunteers lying down, standing, and then with their legs raised passively above the heart to increase venous return. Volunteers were then asked to peddle the bicycle to achieve steady-state heart rates of 110 and 150 beats/min. Data were collected in all these states, and calculations were performed and used as the basis of a small-group discussion to illustrate physiological principles. Information related to a surprisingly large number of cardiovascular control mechanisms was derived, and its relevance to cardiovascular dysfunction was explored. This communication describes our experience in developing a new cardiovascular control laboratory to reinforce didactic material presented in lectures and small-group sessions. PMID:19745049

  15. Effects of Aerobic Dance on Physical Work Capacity, Cardiovascular Function and Body Composition of Middle-Age Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowdy, Deborah B.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This study proposed to determine the effects of aerobics on physical work capacity, cardiovascular function and body composition of 28 women aged 25 to 44 years. Measurements taken after a conditioning program showed significant changes in work capacity and cardiovascular function for the conditioned group but no change in body composition.…

  16. Cardiovascular function is better in veteran football players than age-matched untrained elderly healthy men.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J F; Andersen, T R; Andersen, L J; Randers, M B; Hornstrup, T; Hansen, P R; Bangsbo, J; Krustrup, P

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether lifelong football training may improve cardiovascular function, physical fitness, and body composition. Our subjects were 17 male veteran football players (VPG; 68.1 ± 2.1 years) and 26 healthy age-matched untrained men who served as a control group (CG; 68.2 ± 3.2 years). Examinations included measurements of cardiac function, microvascular endothelial function [reactive hyperemic index (RHI)], maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max), and body composition. In VPG, left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic volume was 20% larger (P < 0.01) and LV ejection fraction was higher (P < 0.001). Tissue Doppler imaging revealed an augmented LV longitudinal displacement, i.e., LV shortening of 21% (P < 0.001) and longitudinal 2D strain was 12% higher (P < 0.05), in VPG. In VPG, resting heart rate was lower (6 bpm, P < 0.05), and VO2max was higher (18%, P < 0.05). In addition, RHI was 21% higher (P < 0.05) in VPG. VPG also had lower body mass index (P < 0.05), body fat percentage, total body fat mass, android fat percentage, and gynoid fat percentage (all P < 0.01). Lifelong participation in football training is associated with better LV systolic function, physical fitness, microvascular function, and a healthier body composition. Overall, VPG have better cardiovascular function compared with CG, which may reduce their cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  17. Evolutionary diversification in stickleback affects ecosystem functioning.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Luke J; Matthews, Blake; Des Roches, Simone; Chase, Jonathan M; Shurin, Jonathan B; Schluter, Dolph

    2009-04-30

    Explaining the ecological causes of evolutionary diversification is a major focus of biology, but surprisingly little has been said about the effects of evolutionary diversification on ecosystems. The number of species in an ecosystem and their traits are key predictors of many ecosystem-level processes, such as rates of productivity, biomass sequestration and decomposition. Here we demonstrate short-term ecosystem-level effects of adaptive radiation in the threespine stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) over the past 10,000 years. These fish have undergone recent parallel diversification in several lakes in coastal British Columbia, resulting in the formation of two specialized species (benthic and limnetic) from a generalist ancestor. Using a mesocosm experiment, we demonstrate that this diversification has strong effects on ecosystems, affecting prey community structure, total primary production, and the nature of dissolved organic materials that regulate the spectral properties of light transmission in the system. However, these ecosystem effects do not simply increase in their relative strength with increasing specialization and species richness; instead, they reflect the complex and indirect consequences of ecosystem engineering by sticklebacks. It is well known that ecological factors influence adaptive radiation. We demonstrate that adaptive radiation, even over short timescales, can have profound effects on ecosystems.

  18. Cardiovascular disease biomarkers on cognitive function in older adults: Joint effects of cardiovascular disease biomarkers and cognitive function on mortality risk.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Crush, Elizabeth; Joyner, Chelsea

    2017-01-01

    Previous research demonstrates an inverse association between age and cardiovascular disease (CVD) biomarkers with cognitive function; however, little is known about the combined associations of CVD risk factors and cognitive function with all-cause mortality in an older adult population, which was the purpose of this study. Data from the 1999-2002 NHANES were used (N=2,097; 60+yrs), with mortality follow-up through 2011. Evaluated individual biomarkers included mean arterial pressure (MAP), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP), HDL-C, total cholesterol (TC), A1C, and measured body mass index (BMI). Cognitive function was assessed using the Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST). Further, 4 groups were created based on CVD risk and cognitive function. Group 1: high cognitive function and low CVD risk; Group 2: high cognitive function and high CVD risk; Group 3: low cognitive function and low CVD risk; Group 4: low cognitive function and high CVD risk. An inverse relationship was observed where those with more CVD risk factors had a lower (worse) cognitive function score. Compared to those in Group 1, only those in Group 3 and 4 had an increase mortality risk.

  19. Postprandial lipaemia does not affect resting haemodynamic responses but does influence cardiovascular reactivity to dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Rontoyanni, Victoria G; Chowienczyk, Philip J; Sanders, Thomas A B

    2010-09-01

    Postprandial lipaemia impairs endothelial function, possibly by changes in oxidative stress, but whether this affects cardiac output and/or systemic vascular resistance (SVR) at rest and in response to dynamic exercise remains uncertain. The present study set out to investigate the effects of a high-fat meal (HFM) v. a low-fat, high-carbohydrate meal (HCM) on cardiac output and SVR. A HFM (50 g fat) and an isoenergetic HCM (5 g fat) were randomly fed to thirty healthy adults using a crossover design. Cardiac output, heart rate and blood pressure (BP) were measured, and stroke volume and SVR were calculated over a 3 h rest following the meal, during exercise 3 h postprandially and for 45 min post-exercise. Blood samples were collected at fasting, 3 h postprandially and immediately post-exercise. Plasma TAG increased by 63.8 % 3 h following the HFM, and NEFA fell by 94.1% 3 h after the HCM. There was a 9.8% rise in plasma 8-isoprostane-F2alpha concentration following the HFM, and a 6.2% fall following the HCM. Cardiac output increased postprandially, but the difference between meals at rest or exercise was not statistically significant. The HFM resulted in a 3.2 mmHg (95% CI 0.7, 5.7) smaller increase in exercise mean arterial BP compared with the HCM due to a greater fall in exercise SVR. Postprandial lipaemia induced by a HFM does not affect cardiac output and/or SVR at rest, but it blunts the increase in BP during exercise.

  20. Endothelial Function and Carotid Intimal Medial Thickness in Asymptomatic Subjects With and Without Cardiovascular Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Ananthakrishna, Rajiv; Shankarappa, Ravindranath K; Rangan, Kapil; Chandrasekaran, Dhanalakshmi; Nanjappa, Manjunath C

    2012-01-01

    Background The study was performed to assess endothelial function and carotid intimal-medial thickness (IMT) in asymptomatic patients, with and without risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Methods A cross sectional survey of asymptomatic patients, aged 21 - 60 years, with and without risk factors for cardiovascular disease was recruited from the outpatient department of Cardiology. Endothelial function was evaluated by flow mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery and carotid IMT was determined using a high resolution B mode ultrasonography system. Results A total of 104 patients were included in the study. The mean carotid IMT was 0.67 ± 0.05 mm in the group without risk factors and 0.78 ± 0.12 mm in the group with risk factors (P value < 0.05). Endothelial dysfunction (ED) and increased carotid IMT were more significant in the group with risk factors (P value < 0.001). Age, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure, body mass index and HbA1c had a significant correlation with both IMT and FMD response. A higher proportion of subjects with diabetes mellitus (87%), metabolic syndrome (86%) and family history of premature coronary artery disease (78%) had ED. In subjects with normal coronary angiogram, 71% had abnormal FMD response and 36% had increased carotid IMT. Conclusion In asymptomatic subjects, risk factors for cardiovascular disease are significantly associated with objective evidence of ED and increased carotid IMT. FMD response and carotid IMT values are likely to yield additional information beyond traditional risk factors for classifying patients in regard to the likelihood of cardiovascular event. Therapeutic measures with the aim of improving endothelial function and reducing carotid IMT may reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease.

  1. Identification and functional characterization of NODAL rare variants in heterotaxy and isolated cardiovascular malformations

    PubMed Central

    Mohapatra, Bhagyalaxmi; Casey, Brett; Li, Hua; Ho-Dawson, Trang; Smith, Liana; Fernbach, Susan D.; Molinari, Laura; Niesh, Stephen R.; Jefferies, John Lynn; Craigen, William J.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Belmont, John W.; Ware, Stephanie M.

    2009-01-01

    NODAL and its signaling pathway are known to play a key role in specification and patterning of vertebrate embryos. Mutations in several genes encoding components of the NODAL signaling pathway have previously been implicated in the pathogenesis of human left–right (LR) patterning defects. Therefore, NODAL, a member of TGF-β superfamily of developmental regulators, is a strong candidate to be functionally involved in congenital LR axis patterning defects or heterotaxy. Here we have investigated whether variants in NODAL are present in patients with heterotaxy and/or isolated cardiovascular malformations (CVM) thought to be caused by abnormal heart tube looping. Analysis of a large cohort of cases (n = 269) affected with either classic heterotaxy or looping CVM revealed four different missense variants, one in-frame insertion/deletion and two conserved splice site variants in 14 unrelated subjects (14/269, 5.2%). Although similar with regard to other associated defects, individuals with the NODAL mutations had a significantly higher occurrence of pulmonary valve atresia (P = 0.001) compared with cases without a detectable NODAL mutation. Functional analyses demonstrate that the missense variant forms of NODAL exhibit significant impairment of signaling as measured by decreased Cripto (TDGF-1) co-receptor-mediated activation of artificial reporters. Expression of these NODAL proteins also led to reduced induction of Smad2 phosphorylation and impaired Smad2 nuclear import. Taken together, these results support a role for mutations and rare deleterious variants in NODAL as a cause for sporadic human LR patterning defects. PMID:19064609

  2. Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals in the Primary Prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Alissa, Eman M.; Ferns, Gordon A.

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is now the leading cause of death globally and is a growing health concern. Dietary factors are important in the pathogenesis of CVD and may to a large degree determine CVD risk, but have been less extensively investigated. Functional foods are those that are thought to have physiological benefits and/or reduce the risk of chronic disease beyond their basic nutritional functions. The food industry has started to market products labelled as “functional foods.” Although many review articles have focused on individual dietary variables as determinants of CVD that can be modified to reduce the risk of CVD, the aim of this current paper was to examine the impact of functional foods in relation to the development and progression of CVD. Epidemiologic studies have demonstrated the association between certain dietary patterns and cardiovascular health. Research into the cardio-protective potential of their dietary components might support the development of functional foods and nutraceuticals. This paper will also compare the effect of individual bioactive dietary compounds with the effect of some dietary patterns in terms of their cardiovascular protection. PMID:22570771

  3. Ocular and cardiovascular autonomic function in diabetic patients with varying severity of retinopathy.

    PubMed

    Datta, Shivaji; Biswas, N R; Saxena, Rohit; Deepak, K K; Menon, Vimla; Garg, S P; Tandon, Radhika

    2005-04-01

    The study was conducted to assess the ocular and cardiovascular autonomic function in diabetic patients with varying severity of diabetic retinopathy. Ocular and cardiovascular autonomic function tests were performed in 30 patients with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (10 in each group of proliferative retinopathy, non-proliferative retinopathy and no retinopathy) of more than 5 years duration and 10 normal controls. Ocular autonomic function tests were done by measuring pupil cycle time and denervation hypersensitivity with 0.125% pilocarpine and 0.5% phenylephrine. Cardiovascular autonomic function was measured by a battery of standard tests. Denervation hypersensitivity to 0.125% pilocarpine and to 0.5% phenylephrine and pupil cycle time showed statistically significant differences (P value < 0.001) between controls and patients with proliferative retinopathy (PDR) and also between no retinopathy and PDR (P < 0.001). Systemic autonomic function tests namely expiration--inspiration ratio, difference in heart rate, 30th beat and 15th beat ratio in head up tilt and difference in diastolic blood pressure in head up tilt test also showed significant difference (P < 0.01) between controls and all 3 groups of diabetics. There was statistically significant difference found in para-sympathetic ocular autonomic dysfunction between NPDR and controls. Ocular and systemic autonomic dysfunctions are related to the severity of diabetic retinopathy.

  4. Correlation of macro and micro cardiovascular function during weightlessness and simulated weightlessness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, P. M.; Marshburn, T. H.; Smith, T. L.; Osborne, S. W.; Lynch, C. D.; Moultsby, S. J.

    The investigation of cardiovascular function necessarily involves a consideration of the exchange of substances at the capillary. If cardiovascular function is compromised or in any way altered during exposure to zero gravity in space, then it stands to reason that microvascular function is also modified. We have shown that an increase in cardiac output similar to that reported during simulated weightlessness is associated with a doubling of the number of post-capillary venules and a reduction in the number of arterioles by 35%. If the weightlessness of space travel produces similar changes in cardiopulmonary volume and cardiac output, a reasonable expectation is that astronauts will undergo venous neovascularization. We have developed an animal model in which to correlate microvascular and systemic cardiovascular function. The microcirculatory preparation consists of a lightweight, thermoneutral chamber implanted around intact skeletal muscle on the back of a rat. Using this technique, the preformed microvasculature of the cutaneous maximus muscle may be observed in the conscious, unanesthetized animal. Microcirculatory variables which may be obtained include venular and arteriolar numbers, lengths and diameters, single vessel flow velocities, vasomotion, capillary hematocrit anastomoses and orders of branching. Systemic hemodynamic monitoring of cardiac output by electromagnetic flowmetry, and arterial and venous pressures allows correlation of macro- and microcirculatory changes at the same time, in the same animal. Observed and calculated hemodynamic variables also include pulse pressure, heart rate, stroke volume, total peripheral resistance, aortic compliance, minute work, peak aortic flow velocity and systolic time interval. In this manner, an integrated assessment of total cardiovascular function may be obtained in the same animal without the complicating influence of anesthetics.

  5. Correlation of macro and micro cardiovascular function during weightlessness and simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchins, P. M.; Marshburn, T. H.; Smith, T. L.; Osborne, S. W.; Lynch, C. D.; Moultsby, S. J.

    1988-01-01

    The investigation of cardiovascular function necessarily involves a consideration of the exchange of substances at the capillary. If cardiovascular function is compromised or in any way altered during exposure to zero gravity in space, then it stands to reason that microvascular function is also modified. We have shown that an increase in cardiac output similar to that reported during simulated weightlessness is associated with a doubling of the number of post-capillary venules and a reduction in the number of arterioles by 35%. If the weightlessness of space travel produces similar changes in cardiopulmonary volume and cardiac output, a reasonable expectation is that astronauts will undergo venous neovascularization. We have developed an animal model in which to correlate microvascular and systemic cardiovascular function. The microcirculatory preparation consists of a lightweight, thermo-neutral chamber implanted around intact skeletal muscle on the back of a rat. Using this technique, the performed microvasculature of the cutaneous maximus muscle may be observed in the conscious, unanesthetized animal. Microcirculatory variables which may be obtained include venular and arteriolar numbers, lengths and diameters, single vessel flow velocities, vasomotion, capillary hematocrit anastomoses and orders of branching. Systemic hemodynamic monitoring of cardiac output by electromagnetic flowmetry, and arterial and venous pressures allows correlation of macro- and microcirculatory changes at the same time, in the same animal. Observed and calculated hemodynamic variables also include pulse pressure, heart rate, stroke volume, total peripheral resistance, aortic compliance, minute work, peak aortic flow velocity and systolic time interval. In this manner, an integrated assessment of total cardiovascular function may be obtained in the same animal without the complicating influence of anesthetics.

  6. Some peculiar effects of NO-synthase inhibition on the structure and function of cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Kristek, Frantisek

    2011-09-01

    Long-term increase of blood pressure represents one of the most important risk factors triggering many cardiovascular diseases, and via counter-regulatory mechanisms it is itself modulated by them. Adequate perfusion of the respective areas with nutrients requires appropriate production of vasodilatory and vasoconstrictory agents. Disharmony among them has an important impact on mechanical properties of the arteries, resulting in pathological alterations in the cardiovascular system. Defective production of the vasodilatory agent nitric oxide (NO) has a pronounced effect on this delicate balance and can evoke functional and structural changes in the cardiovascular system leading to hypertension. This review is focused mainly on changes in the cardiovascular system of newborn and adult Wistar rats after long-term administration of two different types of NO-synthase inhibitors: nonspecific inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methylester and specific inhibitor of neuronal NO-synthase 7-nitroindazole. A possible supplementation of decreased endogenous NO production by NO donors is discussed. Particular attention is given to the complex interplay among blood pressure, arterial geometry, including arterial wall thickness, cross-sectional area, inner diameter, and individual components of the arterial wall, as extracellular matrix, endothelial and smooth muscle cell trophicity. Some methodological remarks for determination of the arterial geometry are also presented. Better understanding of the interrelationship among the factors involved can help in explaining more accurately differences in functional manifestations of vessels in various types of hypertension. The review indicates that the current concept of NO production, effect of NO deficiency, substitution of the missing NO in failing NO production in the cardiovascular system appears to be oversimplified.

  7. Do sudden air temperature and pressure changes affect cardiovascular morbidity and mortality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavcová, E.; Davídkovová, H.; Kyselý, J.

    2012-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that sudden changes in weather (usually represented by air temperature and/or pressure) are associated with increases in daily mortality. Little is understood about physiological mechanisms responsible for the impacts of weather changes on mortality, and whether similar patterns appear for morbidity as well. Relatively little is known also about differences in the magnitude of the mortality response in provincial regions and in cities, where the impacts may be exacerbated by air pollution effects and/or heat island. The present study examines the effects of sudden air temperature and pressure changes on morbidity (represented by hospital admissions) and mortality due to cardiovascular diseases in the population of the Czech Republic (approx. 10 million inhabitants) and separately in the city of Prague (1.2 million inhabitants). The events are selected from data covering 1994-2009 using the methodology introduced by Plavcová and Kyselý (2010), and they are compared with the datasets on hospital admissions and daily mortality (both standardized to account for long-term changes and the seasonal and weekly cycles). Relative deviations of morbidity/mortality from the baseline were averaged over the selected events for days D-2 (2 days before a change) up to D+7 (7 days after), and their statistical significance was tested by means of the Monte Carlo method. The study aims at (i) identifying those weather changes associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity/mortality, separately in summer and winter, (ii) comparing the effects of weather changes on morbidity and mortality, (iii) identifying whether urban population of Prague is more/less vulnerable in comparison to the population of the whole Czech Republic, (iv) comparing the effects for different cardiovascular diseases (ischaemic heart diseases, ICD-10 codes I20-I25; cerebrovascular diseases, I60-I69; hypertension, I10; atherosclerosis, I70) and individual population groups (by age

  8. Raw Water Consumption Does Not Affect All-Cause or Cardiovascular Mortality: A Secondary Analysis.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Rohit S; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Arora, Rohit R

    Previous studies have examined water quality and its association with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. However, there is a lack of data regarding association between the amount of water consumption and risk of mortality. We used the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) database and its subsequent follow-up data. Only patients older than 45 years who reported amount of average water consumption and for whom follow-up mortality data were available were included in the study. Patients were stratified into following groups of average daily raw water consumption: (1) no water consumption, (2) ≤2 cups, (3) >2 to ≤ 4 cups, (4) >4 to ≤6 cups, (5) >6 to ≤8 cups, and (6) ≥8 cups. End points studied were all-cause mortality, ischemia-related mortality, congestive heart failure-related mortality, and stroke-related mortality. Baseline characteristics were compared using t tests and Mann-Whitney U tests. Odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and P values were calculated for univariate analysis using >6 cups to ≤8 cups of water a day group as reference. Multivariate analysis was then performed adjusting for various factors. P values of less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. A total of 7666 patients were ultimately included in the study. Multivariate analysis demonstrated no significant differences in all-cause, ischemia-related, heart failure-related, or stroke-related mortality among various raw water intake groups when compared with the reference group. The significance noted for all-cause mortality in >2 glasses to ≤4 glasses a day group in the univariate analysis was not seen with multivariate analysis (odds ratio: 0.747; 95% confidence interval: 0.437-1.276; P = 0.285). Daily raw water consumption does not seem to impact all-cause mortality or cause-specific cardiovascular mortality.

  9. The effects of botanical dietary supplements on cardiovascular, cognitive and metabolic function in males and females

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Scott; Peng, Ning; Prasain, Jeevan K.; Wyss, J. Michael

    2009-01-01

    The onset of menopause marks a pivotal time in which the incidence of hypertension and cardiovascular disease begins to increase dramatically in women. Prior to menopause, the incidence of these diseases is significantly lower than in similarly aged men, but following menopause the rates rise rapidly until paralleling that in men. The loss of endogenous estrogen at menopause has traditionally been thought to be the primary factor involved in these changes and resulted in the widespread use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to reduce cardiovascular risk factors and decrease the affective symptoms of menopause. However, the adverse effects of HRT reported in recent large-scale trials (e.g., the Women’s Health Initiative) have greatly decreased the use of HRT by postmenopausal women. Many women are seeking alternatives to HRT, including the use of dietary supplements that have a long history of use in traditional medicine, particularly in Asia. Examples of frequently used botanicals are soy, black cohosh, red clover, grape derivatives, St. John’s wort, Ginko biloba and Echinacea. While many of these botanicals appear to ameliorate some postmenopausal symptoms (i.e., bone loss, hot flushes/flashes and night sweats), none of the tested botanicals has proven as effective as HRT in decreasing the affective disorders of menopause. Further, despite the increasing usage of botanical supplements, their efficacy and safety have not been well documented by critical research studies. This review summarizes recent findings related to the utility of botanicals for menopause-related cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, specifically hypertension, diabetes, progressive cognitive decline and hyperlipidemia. While great caution should be exercised in the translation of animal findings to the human, these studies, along with those of others, suggest that some commonly used botanical supplements may be useful adjuvants for providing protection to women (and men) against

  10. Insensitivity of cardiovascular function to low power cm-/mm-microwaves.

    PubMed

    Kantz, J; Müller, J; Hadeler, K P; Landstorfer, F M; Lang, F

    2005-06-01

    A previous study failed to disclose an effect of short (15 min) exposure to low level energy microwaves (3 microW/cm2) emitted by a commercially available automobile radar system (77 GHz) for adaptive cruise control (ACC) on cardiovascular function. The present study explored whether a 15 min exposure to higher level energy microwaves of frequencies varying from 5.8 to 110 GHz influences cardiovascular function. To this end heart rate, skin temperature (thermocouple), skin conductance (Ag/AgCl electrodes), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (automatic cuff) were recorded in 50 test persons before, during and after a 15 min exposure to a sequential pattern of microwaves varying from 5.8 to 110 GHz (59.7 microW/cm2). After an equilibration period of 30 min the first group of test persons and after additional 30 min the second group of test persons were exposed. The study has been performed in a strict double blind design. While significant effects on the measured parameters were observed depending on time ("calming" effect), no significant difference was observed between exposure and sham exposure to microwaves. In view of the small scatter of the data the present study rules out physiologically relevant effects of moderate energy (59.7 microW/cm2) microwaves varying from 5.8 to 110 GHz on cardiovascular function.

  11. Acceleration of cardiovascular-biological age by amphetamine exposure is a power function of chronological age

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Amanda; Hulse, Gary Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    Background Amphetamine abuse is becoming more widespread internationally. The possibility that its many cardiovascular complications are associated with a prematurely aged cardiovascular system, and indeed biological organism systemically, has not been addressed. Methods Radial arterial pulse tonometry was performed using the SphygmoCor system (Sydney). 55 amphetamine exposed patients were compared with 107 tobacco smokers, 483 non-smokers and 68 methadone patients (total=713 patients) from 2006 to 2011. A cardiovascular-biological age (VA) was determined. Results The age of the patient groups was 30.03±0.51–40.45±1.15 years. This was controlled for with linear regression. The sex ratio was the same in all groups. 94% of amphetamine exposed patients had used amphetamine in the previous week. When the (log) VA was regressed against the chronological age (CA) and a substance-type group in both cross-sectional and longitudinal models, models quadratic in CA were superior to linear models (both p<0.02). When log VA/CA was regressed in a mixed effects model against time, body mass index, CA and drug type, the cubic model was superior to the linear model (p=0.001). Interactions between CA, (CA)2 and (CA)3 on the one hand and exposure type were significant from p=0.0120. The effects of amphetamine exposure persisted after adjustment for all known cardiovascular risk factors (p<0.0001). Conclusions These results show that subacute exposure to amphetamines is associated with an advancement of cardiovascular-organismal age both over age and over time, and is robust to adjustment. That this is associated with power functions of age implies a feed-forward positively reinforcing exacerbation of the underlying ageing process. PMID:28243315

  12. Association between Birth Characteristics and Cardiovascular Autonomic Function at Mid-Life

    PubMed Central

    Perkiömäki, Nelli; Auvinen, Juha; Tulppo, Mikko P.; Hautala, Arto J.; Perkiömäki, Juha; Karhunen, Ville; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Puukka, Katri; Ruokonen, Aimo; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Huikuri, Heikki V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Low birth weight is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases in adulthood. As abnormal cardiac autonomic function is a common feature in cardiovascular diseases, we tested the hypothesis that low birth weight may also be associated with poorer cardiac autonomic function in middle-aged subjects. Methods At the age of 46, the subjects of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 were invited to examinations including questionnaires about health status and life style and measurement of vagally-mediated heart rate variability (rMSSD) from R-R intervals (RRi) and spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in both seated and standing positions. Maternal parameters had been collected in 1965–1966 since the 16th gestational week and birth variables immediately after delivery. For rMSSD, 1,799 men and 2,279 women without cardiorespiratory diseases and diabetes were included and 902 men and 1,020 women for BRS. The analyses were adjusted for maternal (age, anthropometry, socioeconomics, parity, gestational smoking) and adult variables (life style, anthropometry, blood pressure, glycemic and lipid status) potentially confounding the relationship between birth weight and autonomic function. Results In men, birth weight correlated negatively with seated (r = -0.058, p = 0.014) and standing rMSSD (r = -0.090, p<0.001), as well as with standing BRS (r = -0.092, p = 0.006). These observations were verified using relevant birth weight categories (<2,500 g; 2,500–3,999 g; ≥4,000 g). In women, birth weight was positively correlated with seated BRS (r = 0.081, p = 0.010), but none of the other measures of cardiovascular autonomic function. These correlations remained significant after adjustment for potential confounders (p<0.05 for all). Conclusions In men, higher birth weight was independently associated with poorer cardiac autonomic function at mid-life. Same association was not observed in women. Our findings suggest that higher, not lower, birth

  13. mTORC1 inhibitors rapamycin and metformin affect cardiovascular markers differentially in ZDF rats.

    PubMed

    Nistala, Ravi; Raja, Ahmad; Pulakat, Lakshmi

    2017-03-01

    Mammalian target for rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a common target for the action of immunosuppressant macrolide rapamycin and glucose-lowering metformin. Inhibition of mTORC1 can exert both beneficial and detrimental effects in different pathologies. Here, we investigated the differential effects of rapamycin (1.2 mg/kg per day delivered subcutaneously for 6 weeks) and metformin (300 mg/kg per day delivered orally for 11 weeks) treatments on male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats that mimic the cardiorenal pathology of type 2 diabetic patients and progress to insulin insufficiency. Rapamycin and metformin improved proteinuria, and rapamycin also reduced urinary gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) indicating improvement of tubular health. Metformin reduced food and water intake, and urinary sodium and potassium, whereas rapamycin increased urinary sodium. Metformin reduced plasma alkaline phosphatase, but induced transaminitis as evidenced by significant increases in plasma AST and ALT. Metformin also induced hyperinsulinemia, but did not suppress fasting plasma glucose after ZDF rats reached 17 weeks of age, and worsened lipid profile. Rapamycin also induced mild transaminitis. Additionally, both rapamycin and metformin increased plasma uric acid and creatinine, biomarkers for cardiovascular and renal disease. These observations define how rapamycin and metformin differentially modulate metabolic profiles that regulate cardiorenal pathology in conditions of severe type 2 diabetes.

  14. Glyphosate-based herbicides potently affect cardiovascular system in mammals: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gress, Steeve; Lemoine, Sandrine; Séralini, Gilles-Eric; Puddu, Paolo Emilio

    2015-04-01

    In glyphosate (G)-based herbicides (GBHs), the declared active principle G is mixed with several adjuvants that help it to penetrate the plants' cell membranes and its stabilization and liposolubility. Its utilization is growing with genetically modified organisms engineered to tolerate GBH. Millions of farmers suffer poisoning and death in developing countries, and occupational exposures and suicide make GBH toxicity a worldwide concern. As GBH is found in human plasma, widespread hospital facilities for measuring it should be encouraged. Plasma determination is an essential prerequisite for risk assessment in GBH intoxication. Only when standard ECGs were performed, at least one abnormal ECG was detected in the large majority of cases after intoxication. QTc prolongation and arrhythmias along with first-degree atrioventricular block were observed after GBH intoxication. Thus, life-threatening arrhythmias might be the cause of death in GBH intoxication. Cardiac cellular effects of GBH were reviewed along with few case reports in men and scanty larger studies. We observed in two mammalian species (rats and rabbits) direct cardiac electrophysiological changes, conduction blocks and arrhythmias among GBH-mediated effects. Plasmatic (and urine) level determinations of G and electrocardiographic Holter monitoring seem warranted to ascertain whether cardiovascular risk among agro-alimentary workers might be defined.

  15. Controversy of hormone treatment and cardiovascular function: need for strengthened collaborations between preclinical and clinical scientists.

    PubMed

    Miller, Virginia M; Shuster, Lynne T; Hayes, Sharonne N

    2003-10-01

    Over the last five years, there have been several major randomized clinical trials assessing the use of hormone therapy as an adjunct treatment for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Results of these trials have called into question existing dogma from epidemiological and basic science studies that estrogen provides protection against development of cardiovascular disease. When studies are evaluated for design, type and duration of hormone treatment, and outcomes, directions for future research become apparent. Improved hormone formulations and selective estrogen receptor modulators that help to maintain vascular function and limit progression of cardiovascular occlusive disease need to be developed. This will depend upon improved understanding of: (i) the distribution and regulation of estrogen receptors in vascular tissue, (ii) genomic interactions of estrogens and progestins, (iii) association of the estrogen receptor and other genetic polymorphisms with particular vascular functions, and (iv) better definition of timing and dosing for therapeutic intervention. The mechanisms of interactions between coagulation proteins, inflammatory cytokines, platelets and the vessel wall should be defined so that the thrombotic risk for an individual woman can be identified and reduced, and progression of chronic disease processes associated with loss of ovarian hormones can be slowed.

  16. Effect of 30-min +3 Gz centrifugation on vestibular and autonomic cardiovascular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlegel, Todd T.; Wood, Scott J.; Brown, Troy E.; Harm, Deborah L.; Rupert, A. H.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Repeated exposure to increased +Gz enhances human baroreflex responsiveness and improves tolerance to cardiovascular stress. However, it is not known whether such enhancements might also result from a single, more prolonged exposure to increased +Gz. Our study was designed to investigate whether baroreflex function and orthostatic tolerance are acutely improved by a single prolonged exposure to +3 Gz, and moreover, whether changes in autonomic cardiovascular function resulting from exposure to increased +Gz are correlated with changes in otolith function. METHODS: We exposed 15 healthy human subjects to +3 Gz centrifugation for up to 30 min or until symptoms of incipient G-induced loss of consciousness (G-LOC) ensued. Tests of autonomic cardiovascular function both before and after centrifugation included: 1) power spectral determinations of beat-to-beat R-R intervals and arterial pressures; 2) carotid-cardiac baroreflex tests; 3) Valsalva tests; and 4) 30-min head-up tilt tests. Otolith function was assessed during centrifugation by the linear vestibulo-ocular reflex and both before and after centrifugation by measurements of ocular counter-rolling and dynamic posturography. RESULTS: Of the 15 subjects who underwent prolonged +3 Gz, 4 were intolerant to 30 min of head-up tilt before centrifugation but became tolerant to such tilt after centrifugation. The Valsalva-related baroreflex as well as a measure of the carotid-cardiac baroreflex were also enhanced after centrifugation. No significant vestibular-autonomic relationships were detected beyond a vestibular-cerebrovascular interaction reported earlier in a subset of seven participants. CONCLUSIONS: A single prolonged exposure to +3 Gz centrifugation acutely improves baroreflex function and orthostatic tolerance.

  17. [Functional state of cardiovascular system by progressive absences--epilepsy and its treatment].

    PubMed

    Mamalyga, M L

    2014-05-01

    Age-dependent increase of seizure activity at absence epilepsy exacerbates hemodynamic and autonomic regulation of heart rate. Cardiac dysfunction is accompanied by an increasing duration of intervals repolarization left ventricular QTc, which causes the risk of life-threatening arrhythmias, increases the threat of sudden cardiac death. Anticonvulsant drug therapy provides an opportunity to improve the functional state of the cardiovascular system, if not exceeded a certain level of seizure activity of the brain. This possibility remains as long as the progressive seizure activity isn't reaches a certain level. Later anticonvulsant drug therapy reduces seizure activity of the brain, but does not improve the functional state of heart.

  18. Exercise-induced changes in cardiovascular function after stroke: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ada; Krassioukov, Andrei V; Madden, Kenneth M; Mohammadi, Azam; Tsang, Michael YC; Tsang, Teresa SM

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Cardiovascular co-morbidities are prevalent after stroke, with heart disease, hypertension and impaired glucose tolerance present in the majority of cases. Exercise has the potential to mediate cardiovascular risk factors commonly present in people with stroke. This single-blinded randomized controlled trial compared the effects of high versus low intensity exercise on fitness, cardiovascular risk factors, and cardiac function after stroke. Methods Fifty participants (age 50–80y, >1y post-stroke) were randomized to a high-intensity Aerobic Exercise (AE) or low-intensity non-aerobic Balance/Flexibility (BF) program (6 months, 3 60-minute sessions/week). Outcomes assessed by VO2peak (primary outcome), arterial stiffness, ambulatory capacity, hemodynamics and cardiac function using echocardiography, and lipid, glucose and homocysteine levels. Assessors were blinded to group allocation. Results Twenty-three (92%) of 25 AE group participants (withdrawals unrelated to the intervention) and all BF group participants completed the program. One BF group participant experienced 2 non-injurious falls during class. No other adverse events occurred. There were no changes in VO2peak in either group (AE 16.9±7 to 17.4±7 ml•kg−1•min−1 vs. BF 16.9±6 to 16.6±5 ml•kg−1•min−1, P=0.45), but AE group demonstrated greater improvement in right atrial emptying fraction (AE 30±22 to 37±22% vs. BF 35±20 to 31±20%, P=0.04). Both groups demonstrated improvements in lipid profiles, glucose and homocysteine levels, and ambulatory capacity (P<0.04). Conclusions This was the first study to examine the effects of aerobic exercise after stroke on cardiovascular hemodynamics. High-intensity exercise improved right-sided function and early myocardial relaxation. Low-intensity exercise may also benefit plasma lipid, glucose and inflammatory markers, and ambulatory capacity. This study is an important step towards understanding mechanisms by which exercise

  19. Effects of acute and chronic systemic methamphetamine on respiratory, cardiovascular and metabolic function, and cardiorespiratory reflexes

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Sarah F.; Wearne, Travis A.; Cornish, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Methamphetamine (METH) abuse is escalating worldwide, with the most common cause of death resulting from cardiovascular failure and hyperthermia; however, the underlying physiological mechanisms are poorly understood.Systemic administration of METH in anaesthetised rats reduced the effectiveness of some protective cardiorespiratory reflexes, increased central respiratory activity independently of metabolic function, and increased heart rate, metabolism and respiration in a pattern indicating that non‐shivering thermogenesis contributes to the well‐described hyperthermia.In animals that showed METH‐induced behavioural sensitisation following chronic METH treatment, no changes were evident in baseline cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic measures and the METH‐evoked effects in these parameters were similar to those seen in saline‐treated or drug naïve animals.Physiological effects evoked by METH were retained but were neither facilitated nor depressed following chronic treatment with METH.These data highlight and identify potential mechanisms for targeted intervention in patients vulnerable to METH overdose. Abstract Methamphetamine (METH) is known to promote cardiovascular failure or life‐threatening hyperthermia; however, there is still limited understanding of the mechanisms responsible for evoking the physiological changes. In this study, we systematically determined the effects on both autonomic and respiratory outflows, as well as reflex function, following acute and repeated administration of METH, which enhances behavioural responses. Arterial pressure, heart rate, phrenic nerve discharge amplitude and frequency, lumbar and splanchnic sympathetic nerve discharge, interscapular brown adipose tissue and core temperatures, and expired CO2 were measured in urethane‐anaesthetised male Sprague‐Dawley rats. Novel findings include potent increases in central inspiratory drive and frequency that are not dependent on METH

  20. Effect of taurine and potential interactions with caffeine on cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Stephen W; Shimada, Kayoko; Jong, Chian Ju; Ito, Takashi; Azuma, Junichi; Takahashi, Kyoko

    2014-05-01

    The major impetus behind the rise in energy drink popularity among adults is their ability to heighten mental alertness, improve physical performance and supply energy. However, accompanying the exponential growth in energy drink usage have been recent case reports and analyses from the National Poison Data System, raising questions regarding the safety of energy drinks. Most of the safety concerns have centered on the effect of energy drinks on cardiovascular and central nervous system function. Although the effects of caffeine excess have been widely studied, little information is available on potential interactions between the other active ingredients of energy drinks and caffeine. One of the active ingredients often mentioned as a candidate for interactions with caffeine is the beta-amino acid, taurine. Although taurine is considered a conditionally essential nutrient for humans and is thought to play a key role in several human diseases, clinical studies evaluating the effects of taurine are limited. However, based on this review regarding possible interactions between caffeine and taurine, we conclude that taurine should neutralize several untoward effects of caffeine excess. In agreement with this conclusion, the European Union's Scientific Committee on Food published a report in March 2003 summarizing its investigation into potential interactions of the ingredients in energy drinks. At the cardiovascular level, they concluded that "if there are any interactions between caffeine and taurine, taurine might reduce the cardiovascular effects of caffeine." Although these interactions remain to be further examined in humans, the physiological functions of taurine appear to be inconsistent with the adverse cardiovascular symptoms associated with excessive consumption of caffeine-taurine containing beverages.

  1. A Cross-Sectional Study of Ageing and Cardiovascular Function over the Baboon Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Kristen R.; Pears, Suzanne; Heffernan, Scott J.; Makris, Angela; Hennessy, Annemarie; Lind, Joanne M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ageing is associated with changes at the molecular and cellular level that can alter cardiovascular function and ultimately lead to disease. The baboon is an ideal model for studying ageing due to the similarities in genetic, anatomical, physiological and biochemical characteristics with humans. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the changes in cardiovascular profile of baboons over the course of their lifespan. Methods Data were collected from 109 healthy baboons (Papio hamadryas) at the Australian National Baboon Colony. A linear regression model, adjusting for sex, was used to analyse the association between age and markers of ageing with P < 0.01 considered significant. Results Male (n = 49, 1.5–28.5 years) and female (n = 60, 1.8–24.6 years) baboons were included in the study. Age was significantly correlated with systolic (R2 = 0.23, P < 0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (R2 = 0.44, P < 0.001), with blood pressure increasing with age. Age was also highly correlated with core augmentation index (R2 = 0.17, P < 0.001) and core pulse pressure (R2 = 0.30, P < 0.001). Creatinine and urea were significantly higher in older animals compared to young animals (P < 0.001 for both). Older animals (>12 years) had significantly shorter telomeres when compared to younger (<3 years) baboons (P = 0.001). Conclusion This study is the first to demonstrate that cardiovascular function alters with age in the baboon. This research identifies similarities within cardiovascular parameters between humans and baboon even though the length of life differs between the two species. PMID:27427971

  2. [Cardiovascular responses to resistance exercise are affected by workload and intervals between sets.

    PubMed

    Castinheiras-Neto, Antonio Gil; Costa-Filho, Irineu Rodrigues da; Farinatti, Paulo Tarso Veras

    2010-09-03

    BACKGROUND: The control of cardiovascular responses during resistance exercise (RE) is important for patient safety. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the influence of repetition maximum (RM) and rest interval between sets (RI) on heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP) and rate-pressure product (RPP) during RE. METHODS: Twenty healthy subjects (26 +/- 5 years of age) underwent RE protocols involving three sets of leg press (6 and 12 RM) and RI proportional to the contraction time (1:3 and 1:5). The HR was checked on a continuous basis by using a cardiotachometer and the SBP was checked at the end of the sets, via a protocol validated by the auscultatory method. RESULTS: The HR was influenced by the workload (p = 0.008) and sets (p < 0.001), but not by the RI (p = 0.087). The SBP suffered from the isolated effect of the number of sets (p < 0.001) and RI (p = 0.017), but not from the workload (p = 0.95). The RPP rose in direct proportion to the workload (p = 0.036) and sets (p < 0.001), but in inverse proportion to the RI (p = 0.006). In 6 RM protocols, the variation in the HR was higher for RI = 1:3 (Delta = 11.2 +/- 1.1 bpm) than for RI = 1:5 (Delta = 4.5 +/- 0.2 bpm; p = 0.002), but there was no difference for 12 RM (Delta 1:3 = 21.1 +/- 2.2 bpm; Delta 1:5 = 18.9 +/- 2.0 bpm, p = 0.83). The RI influenced the variation in SBP in all loads (6 RM - Delta 1:3 = 10.6 +/- 0.9 mmHg, Delta 1:5 = 6.6 +/- 0.7 mmHg; p = 0.02 and 12 RM - Delta 1:3 = 15.2 +/- 1.1 mmHg, Delta 1:5 = 8.4 +/- 0.7 mmHg; p = 0.04). The RPP rose in proportion to the workload (p = 0.036) and to the sets (p < 0.001), but in inverse proportion to the RI (p = 0.006). With RI = 1:3, there was difference in RPP for 6 RM (Delta = 2,892 +/- 189 mmHg.bpm) and 12 RM (Delta = 4,587 +/- 300 mmHg.bpm; p = 0.018), but not with RI = 1:5 (6 RM: Delta = 1,224 +/- 141 mmHg.bpm, 12 RM: Delta = 2,332 +/- 194 mmHg.bpm; p = 0.58). CONCLUSION: Regardless of the workload, an increased RI was associated with lower

  3. A ketogenic diet favorably affects serum biomarkers for cardiovascular disease in normal-weight men.

    PubMed

    Sharman, Matthew J; Kraemer, William J; Love, Dawn M; Avery, Neva G; Gómez, Ana L; Scheett, Timothy P; Volek, Jeff S

    2002-07-01

    Very low-carbohydrate (ketogenic) diets are popular yet little is known regarding the effects on serum biomarkers for cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study examined the effects of a 6-wk ketogenic diet on fasting and postprandial serum biomarkers in 20 normal-weight, normolipidemic men. Twelve men switched from their habitual diet (17% protein, 47% carbohydrate and 32% fat) to a ketogenic diet (30% protein, 8% carbohydrate and 61% fat) and eight control subjects consumed their habitual diet for 6 wk. Fasting blood lipids, insulin, LDL particle size, oxidized LDL and postprandial triacylglycerol (TAG) and insulin responses to a fat-rich meal were determined before and after treatment. There were significant decreases in fasting serum TAG (-33%), postprandial lipemia after a fat-rich meal (-29%), and fasting serum insulin concentrations (-34%) after men consumed the ketogenic diet. Fasting serum total and LDL cholesterol and oxidized LDL were unaffected and HDL cholesterol tended to increase with the ketogenic diet (+11.5%; P = 0.066). In subjects with a predominance of small LDL particles pattern B, there were significant increases in mean and peak LDL particle diameter and the percentage of LDL-1 after the ketogenic diet. There were no significant changes in blood lipids in the control group. To our knowledge this is the first study to document the effects of a ketogenic diet on fasting and postprandial CVD biomarkers independent of weight loss. The results suggest that a short-term ketogenic diet does not have a deleterious effect on CVD risk profile and may improve the lipid disorders characteristic of atherogenic dyslipidemia.

  4. Exercise training and artery function in humans: nonresponse and its relationship to cardiovascular risk factors.

    PubMed

    Green, Daniel J; Eijsvogels, Thijs; Bouts, Yvette M; Maiorana, Andrew J; Naylor, Louise H; Scholten, Ralph R; Spaanderman, Marc E A; Pugh, Christopher J A; Sprung, Victoria S; Schreuder, Tim; Jones, Helen; Cable, Tim; Hopman, Maria T E; Thijssen, Dick H J

    2014-08-15

    The objectives of our study were to examine 1) the proportion of responders and nonresponders to exercise training in terms of vascular function; 2) a priori factors related to exercise training-induced changes in conduit artery function, and 3) the contribution of traditional cardiovascular risk factors to exercise-induced changes in artery function. We pooled data from our laboratories involving 182 subjects who underwent supervised, large-muscle group, endurance-type exercise training interventions with pre-/posttraining measures of flow-mediated dilation (FMD%) to assess artery function. All studies adopted an identical FMD protocol (5-min ischemia, distal cuff inflation), contemporary echo-Doppler methodology, and observer-independent automated analysis. Linear regression analysis was used to identify factors contributing to changes in FMD%. We found that cardiopulmonary fitness improved, and weight, body mass index (BMI), cholesterol, and mean arterial pressure (MAP) decreased after training, while FMD% increased in 76% of subjects (P < 0.001). Training-induced increase in FMD% was predicted by lower body weight (β = -0.212), lower baseline FMD% (β = -0.469), lower training frequency (β = -0.256), and longer training duration (β = 0.367) (combined: P < 0.001, r = 0.63). With the exception of a modest correlation with total cholesterol (r = -0.243, P < 0.01), changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors were not significantly related to changes in FMD% (P > 0.05). In conclusion, we found that, while some subjects do not demonstrate increases following exercise training, improvement in FMD% is present in those with lower pretraining body weight and endothelial function. Moreover, exercise training-induced change in FMD% did not correlate with changes in traditional cardiovascular risk factors, indicating that some cardioprotective effects of exercise training are independent of improvement in risk factors.

  5. Role of Membrane Lipids in the Regulation of Erythrocytic Oxygen-Transport Function in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Revin, Victor V.; Revina, Elvira S.; Martynova, Maria I.; Seikina, Angelina I.; Revina, Nadezhda V.; Imarova, Oksana G.; Solomadin, Ilia N.; Tychkov, Alexander Yu.; Zhelev, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    The composition and condition of membrane lipids, the morphology of erythrocytes, and hemoglobin distribution were explored with the help of laser interference microscopy (LIM) and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) have significant changes in the composition of their phospholipids and the fatty acids of membrane lipids. Furthermore, the microviscosity of the membranes and morphology of the erythrocytes are altered causing disordered oxygen transport by hemoglobin. Basic therapy carried out with the use of antiaggregants, statins, antianginals, beta-blockers, and calcium antagonists does not help to recover the morphofunctional properties of erythrocytes. Based on the results the authors assume that, for the relief of the ischemic crisis and further therapeutic treatment, it is necessary to include, in addition to cardiovascular disease medicines, medication that increases the ability of erythrocytes' hemoglobin to transport oxygen to the tissues. We assume that the use of LIM and Raman spectroscopy is advisable for early diagnosis of changes in the structure and functional state of erythrocytes when cardiovascular diseases develop. PMID:27872848

  6. Pulmonary function tests in type 1 diabetes adolescents with diabetic cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Ďurdík, Peter; Vojtková, Jarmila; Michnová, Zuzana; Turčan, Tomáš; Šujanská, Anna; Kuchta, Milan; Čiljaková, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Chronic diabetic complications may afflict all organ tissues including cardiovascular and respiratory system. The aim of the study was to establish if the presence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) was associated with impaired pulmonary function tests in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D). 46 adolescents with T1D and 25 healthy subjects at the age 15-19years were enrolled to the study. Basic anthropometric data, diabetes onset and duration, plasma glucose and A1c were established. Pulmonary function tests were measured by spirometry and the presence of CAN was examined by heart rate variability. Adolescents with T1D had significantly lower pulmonary function test parameters - FVC (p<0.01), FEV1 (p<0.01), MMEF (p<0.05) and PEFR (p<0.05) compared to the control subjects. In diabetic group, patients with CAN (CAN+, n=19) had significantly lower FVC (p<0.05), FEV1 (p<0.05) and PEFR (p<0.05) compared to patients without CAN (CAN-, n=27). All spirometric parameters were significantly lower in CAN+ subjects compared to healthy controls; however, no significant difference was found in these parameters between CAN- subjects and healthy controls. Spirometric parameters (FVC, FEV1) significantly positively correlated with diabetes onset and body mass index; and negatively correlated with diabetes duration and resting heart rate. Our results indicate that CAN may be associated with reduced pulmonary functions in adolescents with T1D.

  7. How Does Maternal Employment Affect Children's Socioemotional Functioning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Gigi

    2015-01-01

    The maternal employment becomes an irreversible trend across the globe. The effect of maternal employment on children's socioemotional functioning is so pervasive that it warrants special attention to investigate into the issue. A trajectory of analytical framework of how maternal employment affects children's socioemotional functioning originates…

  8. Maternal Cardiovascular Function in Normal Pregnancy: Evidence of Maladaptation to Chronic Volume Overload.

    PubMed

    Melchiorre, Karen; Sharma, Rajan; Khalil, Asma; Thilaganathan, Baskaran

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate cardiac functional status in pregnancy using a comprehensive approach taking into account the simultaneous changes in loading and geometry, as well as maternal age and anthropometric indices. This was a prospective cross-sectional study of 559 nulliparous pregnant women assessed at 4 time points during pregnancy and at 1 year postpartum. All women underwent conventional echocardiography and tissue Doppler velocities and strain rate analysis at multiple cardiac sites. Mean arterial pressure and total vascular resistance index significantly decreased (both P<0.001) during the first 2 trimesters of pregnancy and increased thereafter. Stroke volume index and cardiac index showed the opposite trend compared with mean arterial pressure and total vascular resistance index (both P<0.05). Myocardial and ventricular function were significantly enhanced in the first 2 trimesters but progressively declined thereafter. By the end of pregnancy, significant chamber diastolic dysfunction and impaired myocardial relaxation was evident in 17.9% and 28.4% of women, respectively, whereas myocardial contractility was preserved. There was full recovery of cardiac function at 1 year postpartum. Cardiovascular changes during pregnancy are thought to represent a physiological adaptation to volume overload. The findings of a drop in stroke volume index, impaired myocardial relaxation with diastolic dysfunction, and a tendency toward eccentric remodeling in a significant proportion of cases at term are suggestive of cardiovascular maladaptation to the volume-overloaded state in some apparently normal pregnancies. These unexpected cardiovascular findings have important implications for the management of both normal and pathological pregnancy states.

  9. Effects of cacao liquor polyphenols on cardiovascular and autonomic nervous functions in hypercholesterolaemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Akita, Megumi; Kuwahara, Masayoshi; Itoh, Fumi; Nakano, Yoshihisa; Osakabe, Naomi; Kurosawa, Tohru; Tsubone, Hirokazu

    2008-12-01

    Many epidemiological studies have shown that polyphenols can reduce the risk of mortality from cardiovascular diseases. This study tested the hypothesis that cacao liquor polyphenols have the properties to restore the cardiovascular and autonomic nervous function in an animal model of familial hypercholesterolaemia. Male Kurosawa and Kusanagi-hypercholesterolaemic rabbits were housed in individual cages in a room where a 12-hr light:dark cycle (lights-on at 8:00 and lights-off at 20:00) was maintained. At 3 months of age, they were divided into two groups (standard diet and cacao liquor polyphenol) and the animals received 100 g of the respective diets per day and were provided with tap water ad libitum. Heart rate and blood pressure were measured by a telemetry system. To clarify the autonomic nervous function, power spectral analysis of heart rate variability, baroreflex sensitivity and autonomic nervous tone were measured. After 6 months of dietary administration of cacao liquor polyphenols, heart rate and blood pressure were lowered but plasma lipid concentrations were unchanged. The area of atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta in the cacao liquor polyphenol group was significantly smaller than that in the standard diet group. The high-frequency power of heart rate variability in the rabbits in the standard diet group was significantly decreased with ageing, but that in the cacao liquor polyphenol group was not different between short-term and long-term treatment. Moreover, cacao liquor polyphenols preserved parasympathetic nervous tone, although that in the standard diet group was significantly decreased with ageing. We conclude that cacao liquor polyphenols may play an important role to protect cardiovascular and autonomic nervous functions.

  10. Modeling and Simulation Approaches for Cardiovascular Function and Their Role in Safety Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Collins, TA; Bergenholm, L; Abdulla, T; Yates, JWT; Evans, N; Chappell, MJ; Mettetal, JT

    2015-01-01

    Systems pharmacology modeling and pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis of drug-induced effects on cardiovascular (CV) function plays a crucial role in understanding the safety risk of new drugs. The aim of this review is to outline the current modeling and simulation (M&S) approaches to describe and translate drug-induced CV effects, with an emphasis on how this impacts drug safety assessment. Current limitations are highlighted and recommendations are made for future effort in this vital area of drug research. PMID:26225237

  11. Human auditory evoked potentials in the assessment of brain function during major cardiovascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Rosendo A

    2004-06-01

    Focal neurologic and intellectual deficits or memory problems are relatively frequent after cardiac surgery. These complications have been associated with cerebral hypoperfusion, embolization, and inflammation that occur during or after surgery. Auditory evoked potentials, a neurophysiologic technique that evaluates the function of neural structures from the auditory nerve to the cortex, provide useful information about the functional status of the brain during major cardiovascular procedures. Skepticism regarding the presence of artifacts or difficulty in their interpretation has outweighed considerations of its potential utility and noninvasiveness. This paper reviews the evidence of their potential applications in several aspects of the management of cardiac surgery patients. The sensitivity of auditory evoked potentials to the effects of changes in brain temperature makes them useful for monitoring cerebral hypothermia and rewarming during cardiopulmonary bypass. The close relationship between evoked potential waveforms and specific anatomic structures facilitates the assessment of the functional integrity of the central nervous system in cardiac surgery patients. This feature may also be relevant in the management of critical patients under sedation and coma or in the evaluation of their prognosis during critical care. Their objectivity, reproducibility, and relative insensitivity to learning effects make auditory evoked potentials attractive for the cognitive assessment of cardiac surgery patients. From a clinical perspective, auditory evoked potentials represent an additional window for the study of underlying cerebral processes in healthy and diseased patients. From a research standpoint, this technology offers opportunities for a better understanding of the particular cerebral deficits associated with patients who are undergoing major cardiovascular procedures.

  12. Alterations in vascular function in primary aldosteronism: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Mark, P B; Boyle, S; Zimmerli, L U; McQuarrie, E P; Delles, C; Freel, E M

    2014-02-01

    Excess aldosterone is associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Aldosterone has a permissive effect on vascular fibrosis. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) allows study of vascular function by measuring aortic distensibility. We compared aortic distensibility in primary aldosteronism (PA), essential hypertension (EH) and normal controls and explored the relationship between aortic distensibility and pulse wave velocity (PWV). We studied PA (n=14) and EH (n=33) subjects and age-matched healthy controls (n=17) with CMR, including measurement of aortic distensibility, and measured PWV using applanation tonometry. At recruitment, PA and EH patients had similar blood pressure and left ventricular mass. Subjects with PA had significantly lower aortic distensibility and higher PWV compared with EH and healthy controls. These changes were independent of other factors associated with reduced aortic distensibility, including ageing. There was a significant relationship between increasing aortic stiffness and age in keeping with physical and vascular ageing. As expected, aortic distensibility and PWV were closely correlated. These results demonstrate that PA patients display increased arterial stiffness compared with EH, independent of vascular ageing. The implication is that aldosterone invokes functional impairment of arterial function. The long-term implications of arterial stiffening in aldosterone excess require further study.

  13. [Factors affecting the control of blood pressure and lipid levels in patients with cardiovascular disease: the PREseAP Study].

    PubMed

    Orozco-Beltrán, Domingo; Brotons, Carlos; Moral, Irene; Soriano, Nuria; Del Valle, María A; Rodríguez, Ana I; Pepió, Josep M; Pastor, Ana

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this observational study was to identify factors influencing the control of blood pressure (i.e., <140/90 mmHg, or <130/80 mmHg in diabetic patients) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level (<100 mg/dL) in 1223 patients with cardiovascular disease. Overall, 70.2% of patients were men, and their mean age was 66.4 years. Blood pressure was poorly controlled in 50.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 46.9%-54.8%) and the LDL cholesterol level was poorly controlled in 60.1% (95% CI, 56.3%-63.9%). Determinants of poor blood pressure control were diabetes, hypertension, no previous diagnosis of heart failure, previous diagnosis of peripheral artery disease or stroke, obesity, and no lipid-lowering treatment. Determinants of poor LDL cholesterol control were no lipid-lowering treatment, no previous diagnosis of ischemic heart disease, no antihypertensive treatment, and dyslipidemia. The factors affecting blood pressure control were different from those affecting LDL cholesterol control, an observation that should be taken into account when implementing treatment recommendations for achieving therapeutic objectives in secondary prevention.

  14. Effects of Obesity on Cardiovascular Hemodynamics, Cardiac Morphology, and Ventricular Function.

    PubMed

    Alpert, Martin A; Omran, Jad; Bostick, Brian P

    2016-12-01

    Obesity produces a variety of hemodynamic alterations that may cause changes in cardiac morphology which predispose to left and right ventricular dysfunction. Various neurohormonal and metabolic alterations commonly associated with obesity may contribute to these abnormalities of cardiac structure and function. These changes in cardiovascular hemodynamics, cardiac morphology, and ventricular function may, in severely obese patients, predispose to heart failure, even in the absence of other forms of heart disease (obesity cardiomyopathy). In normotensive obese patients, cardiac involvement is commonly characterized by elevated cardiac output, low peripheral vascular resistance, and increased left ventricular (LV) end-diastolic pressure. Sleep-disordered breathing may lead to pulmonary arterial hypertension and, in association with left heart failure, may contribute to elevation of right heart pressures. These alterations, in association with various neurohormonal and metabolic abnormalities, may produce LV hypertrophy; impaired LV diastolic function; and less commonly, LV systolic dysfunction. Many of these alterations are reversible with substantial voluntary weight loss.

  15. Caffeine and central noradrenaline: effects on mood, cognitive performance, eye movements and cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew; Brice, Carolyn; Nash, Jon; Rich, Neil; Nutt, David J

    2003-09-01

    There have been numerous studies on the effects of caffeine on behaviour and cardiovascular function. It is now important to clarify the mechanisms that underlie such effects, and the main objective of the present study was to investigate whether changes in central noradrenaline underlie some of the behavioural and cardiovascular effects of caffeine. This was examined using a clonidine challenge paradigm. Twenty-four healthy volunteers were assigned to one of four conditions: (i) clonidine/caffeine; (ii) clonidine/placebo; (iii) placebo/caffeine: (iv) placebo/placebo. Baseline measurements of mood, cognitive performance, saccadic eye movements and cardiovascular function were recorded. Subsequently, volunteers were given either clonidine (200 microg) or placebo and consumed coffee containing caffeine (1.5 mg/kg) or placebo. The test battery was then repeated 30 min, 150 min and 270 min later. A second cup of coffee (with the same amount of caffeine as the first) was consumed 120 min after the first cup. The results showed that clonidine reduced alertness, impaired many aspects of performance and slowed saccadic eye movements; caffeine removed many of these impairments. Both clonidine and caffeine influenced blood pressure (clonidine reduced it, caffeine raised it) but the effects appeared to be independent, suggesting that separate mechanisms were involved. In addition, there were some behavioural effects of caffeine that were independent of the clonidine effect (e.g. effects on speed of encoding of new information) and these may reflect other neurotransmitter systems (e.g cholinergic effects). Overall, the results suggest that caffeine counteracts reductions in the turnover of central noradrenaline. This mechanism may underlie the beneficial effects of caffeine seen in low alertness states.

  16. Effect of Red Bull energy drink on cardiovascular and renal function.

    PubMed

    Ragsdale, Frances R; Gronli, Tyler D; Batool, Narjes; Haight, Nicole; Mehaffey, April; McMahon, Erin C; Nalli, Thomas W; Mannello, Carla M; Sell, Crystal J; McCann, Patrick J; Kastello, Gary M; Hooks, Tisha; Wilson, Ted

    2010-04-01

    Energy drink consumption has been anecdotally linked to the development of adverse cardiovascular effects in consumers, although clinical trials to support this link are lacking. The effects of Red Bull energy drink on cardiovascular and neurologic functions were examined in college-aged students enrolled at Winona State University. In a double-blind experiment where normal calorie and low calorie Red Bull were compared to normal and low calorie placebos, no changes in overall cardiovascular function nor blood glucose (mg/dL) were recorded in any participant (n = 68) throughout a 2-h test period. However, in the second experiment, nine male and twelve female participants subjected to a cold pressor test (CPT) before and after Red Bull consumption showed a significant increase in blood sugar levels pre- and post Red Bull consumption. There was a significant increase in diastolic blood pressure of the male volunteers immediately after submersion of the hand in the 5 degrees C water for the CPT. Under the influence of Red Bull, the increase in diastolic pressure for the male participants during the CPT was negated. There were no significant changes in the blood pressure of the female participants for the CPT with or without Red Bull. Finally, the CPT was used to evaluate pain threshold and pain tolerance before and after Red Bull consumption. Red Bull consumption was associated with a significant increase in pain tolerance in all participants. These findings suggest that Red Bull consumption ameliorates changes in blood pressure during stressful experiences and increases the participants' pain tolerance.

  17. Mitochondria DNA mutations cause sex-dependent development of hypertension and alterations in cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Golob, Mark J; Tian, Lian; Wang, Zhijie; Zimmerman, Todd A; Caneba, Christine A; Hacker, Timothy A; Song, Guoqing; Chesler, Naomi C

    2015-02-05

    Aging is associated with conduit artery stiffening that is a risk factor for and can precede hypertension and ventricular dysfunction. Increases in mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) frequency have been correlated with aging. Mice with a mutation in the encoding domain (D257A) of a proof-reading deficient version of mtDNA polymerase-γ (POLG) have musculoskeletal features of premature aging and a shortened lifespan. However, few studies using these mice have investigated the effects of mtDNA mutations on cardiovascular function. We hypothesized that the proof-reading deficient mtDNA POLG leads to arterial stiffening, hypertension, and ventricular hypertrophy. Ten to twelve month-old D257A mice (n=13) and age- and sex-matched wild-type controls (n=13) were catheterized for hemodynamic and ventricular function measurements. Left common carotid arteries (LCCA) were harvested for mechanical tests followed by histology. Male D257A mice had pulmonary and systemic hypertension, arterial stiffening, larger LCCA diameter (701±45 vs. 597±60μm), shorter LCCA axial length (8.96±0.56 vs. 10.10±0.80mm), and reduced hematocrit (29.1±6.1 vs. 41.3±8.1; all p<0.05). Male and female D257A mice had biventricular hypertrophy (p<0.05). Female D257A mice did not have significant increases in pressure or arterial stiffening, suggesting that the mechanisms of hypertension or arterial stiffening from mtDNA mutations differ based on sex. Our results lend insight into the mechanisms of age-related cardiovascular disease and may point to novel treatment strategies to address cardiovascular mortality in the elderly.

  18. Neonatal hyperleptinaemia programmes adrenal medullary function in adult rats: effects on cardiovascular parameters.

    PubMed

    Trevenzoli, I H; Valle, M M R; Machado, F B; Garcia, R M G; Passos, M C F; Lisboa, P C; Moura, E G

    2007-04-15

    Epidemiological studies have shown a strong correlation between stressful events (nutritional, hormonal or environmental) in early life and development of adult diseases such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular failure. It is known that gestation and lactation are crucial periods for healthy growth in mammals and that the sympathoadrenal system is markedly influenced by environmental conditions during these periods. We previously demonstrated that neonatal hyperleptinaemia in rats programmes higher body weight, higher food intake and hypothalamic leptin resistance in adulthood. Using this model of programming, we investigated adrenal medullary function and effects on cardiovascular parameters in male rats in adulthood. Leptin treatment during the first 10 days of lactation (8 microg 100 g(-1) day(-1), s.c.) resulted in lower body weight (6.5%, P < 0.05), hyperleptinaemia (10-fold, P < 0.05) and higher catecholamine content in adrenal glands (18.5%, P < 0.05) on the last day of treatment. In adulthood (150 days), the rats presented higher body weight (5%, P < 0.05), adrenal catecholamine content (3-fold, P < 0.05), tyrosine hydroxylase expression (35%, P < 0.05) and basal and caffeine-stimulated catecholamine release (53% and 100%, respectively, P < 0.05). Systolic blood pressure and heart rate were also higher in adult rats (7% and 6%, respectively, P < 0.05). Our results show that hyperleptinaemia in early life increases adrenal medullary function in adulthood and that this may alter cardiovascular parameters. Thus, we suggest that imprinting factors which increase leptin and catecholamine levels during the neonatal period could be involved in development of adult chronic diseases.

  19. Cardiovascular and affective consequences of ruminating on a performance stressor depend on mode of thought.

    PubMed

    Zoccola, Peggy M; Rabideau, Erin M; Figueroa, Wilson S; Woody, Alex

    2014-08-01

    Psychological detachment from work is important for facilitating recovery. This can be threatened by rumination, or thinking about the day's stressors. Rumination may lead to distress, fatigue and extended activation of stress-related systems, but findings are not unequivocal. Level of construal (abstract or concrete) and type of mentation (imagery or verbal thought) used during stressor-focused rumination may shape physiological and affective responses and impact recovery. This study tested whether blood pressure (BP) and anxiety responses to stressor-focused rumination differ by mentation type and construal level. Healthy undergraduates (n = 136) performed a speech stressor and then completed a rumination task in one of four randomly assigned conditions: concrete imagery, abstract imagery, concrete verbal thought or abstract verbal thought. Anxiety and continuous BP were assessed. Concrete rumination led to greater BP, whereas rumination with abstract construals led to lower BP. Furthermore, participants in the abstract conditions had greater increases in anxiety following stressor-focused rumination than in the concrete conditions. Results suggest that the immediate physiological and psychological consequences of stressor-focused rumination depend upon mode of thought.

  20. Effects of High Dietary HEME Iron and Radiation on Cardiovascular Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westby, Christian M.; Brown, A. K.; Platts, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    The radiation related health risks to astronauts is of particular concern to NASA. Data support that exposure to radiation is associated with a number of disorders including a heightened risk for cardiovascular diseases. Independent of radiation, altered nutrient status (e.g. high dietary iron) also increases ones risk for cardiovascular disease. However, it is unknown whether exposure to radiation in combination with high dietary iron further increases ones cardiovascular risk. The intent of our proposal is to generate compulsory data examining the combined effect of radiation exposure and iron overload on sensitivity to radiation injury to address HRP risks: 1) Risk Factor of Inadequate Nutrition; 2) Risk of Cardiac Rhythm Problems; and 3) Risk of Degenerative Tissue or other Health Effects from Space Radiation. Towards our goal we propose two distinct pilot studies using the following specific aims: Vascular Aim 1: To determine the short-term consequences of the independent and combined effects of exposure to gamma radiation and elevated body iron stores on measures of endothelial function and cell viability and integrity. We hypothesize that animals that have high body iron stores and are exposed to gamma radiation will show a greater reduction in endothelial dependent nitric oxid production and larger pathological changes in endothelial integrity than animals that have only 1 of those treatments (either high iron stores or exposure to gamma radiation). Vascular Aim 2: Identify and compare the effects of gamma radiation and elevated body iron stores on the genetic and epigenetic regulation of proteins associated with endothelial cell function. We hypothesize that modifications of epigenetic control and posttranslational expression of proteins associated with endothelial cell function will be differentially altered in rats with high body iron stores and exposed to gamma radiation compared to rats with only 1 type of treatment. Cardiac Aim 1: To determine the

  1. Cardiovascular and autonomic nervous functions during acclimatization to hypoxia in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Tomohiro; Tsubone, Hirokazu; Hori, Masatoshi; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Kuwahara, Masayoshi

    2005-02-07

    The time courses of changes in cardiovascular and autonomic nervous functions during acclimatization to hypoxia were studied in conscious Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were kept under a 12:12-h light-dark cycle and exposed to hypoxia (1 atm, 10% O2). Implanted telemetry transmitters were used to record blood pressure (BP). Changes in heart rate (HR) and BP were monitored over a 21-day period, and variations before and during hypoxia were analyzed using the wavelet transform method. The HR, high-frequency power of HR variability (HR-HF) and low-frequency power of BP variability (BP-LF) were all significantly increased after 1 h of hypoxia, whereas the LF/HF ratio of HR variability did not change. After this initial increase, both HR and the BP-LF were found to decrease. On the first day of hypoxia, HR and BP-LF values were significantly lower than those of the control rats, whereas the HR-HF was higher. Subsequently, these values altered so that they were similar to the control after 14 days of hypoxia. In addition, the amplitude of diurnal variation in HR was reduced during hypoxia. These results suggest that a sequence of dynamic interactions between sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous activities might have important roles in the regulation of cardiovascular function during acclimatization to hypoxia.

  2. Histamine H3 receptors--general characterization and their function in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Malinowska, B; Godlewski, G; Schlicker, E

    1998-06-01

    The histamine H3 receptor was initially identified as a presynaptic autoreceptor controlling histamine release and synthesis in the brain. It belongs to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors. The existence of the H3 receptor which has not yet been cloned was definitely established by the design of highly potent and selective agonists (R-(-)-alpha-methylhistamine, imetit) and antagonists (thioperamide, clobenpropit). These receptors also occur as heteroreceptors both in the central nervous system and on peripheral neurons of the gastrointestinal and bronchial tract, where they regulate the release of a variety of neurotransmitters. In the cardiovascular system, histamine H3 receptors are mainly located presynaptically on the postganglionic sympathetic nerve fibers innervating the blood vessels and the heart. Their activation leads to the inhibition of noradrenaline release and consequently to the reduction of the neurogenic vasopressor and cardiostimulatory responses. The presence of such receptors has been shown both in vitro (human, pig, guinea-pig, rabbit, rat isolated tissues) and in vivo (rat, guinea-pig). The vascular and cardiac presynaptic H3 receptors may be activated by endogenous histamine. The vascular H3 receptors appear to be operative in hypertension and interact with presynaptic alpha 2-adrenoceptors. Postsynaptic vasodilatatory H3 receptors have been detected in several vascular beds as well. H3 receptor ligands affect basal cardiovascular parameters in conscious and anesthetized guinea-pigs but not rats. Presynaptic H3 receptors may play a role in the pathophysiology of headache and cardiac ischemia.

  3. Resting state functional connectivity within the cingulate cortex jointly predicts agreeableness and stressor-evoked cardiovascular reactivity.

    PubMed

    Ryan, John P; Sheu, Lei K; Gianaros, Peter J

    2011-03-01

    Exaggerated cardiovascular reactivity to stress is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Further, individual differences in stressor-evoked cardiovascular reactivity covary with the functionality of corticolimbic brain systems, particularly areas of the cingulate cortex. What remains unclear, however, is how individual differences in personality traits interact with cingulate functionality in the prediction of stressor-evoked cardiovascular reactivity. Accordingly, we tested the associations between (i) a particular personality trait, Agreeableness, which is associated with emotional reactions to conflict, (ii) resting state functional connectivity within the cingulate cortex, and (iii) stressor-evoked blood pressure (BP) reactivity. Participants (N=39, 19 men, aged 20-37 years) completed a resting functional connectivity MRI protocol, followed by two standardized stressor tasks that engaged conflict processing and evoked BP reactivity. Agreeableness covaried positively with BP reactivity across individuals. Moreover, connectivity analyses demonstrated that a more positive functional connectivity between the posterior cingulate (BA31) and the perigenual anterior cingulate (BA32) covaried positively with Agreeableness and with BP reactivity. Finally, statistical mediation analyses demonstrated that BA31-BA32 connectivity mediated the covariation between Agreeableness and BP reactivity. Functional connectivity within the cingulate appears to link Agreeableness and a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, stressor-evoked BP reactivity.

  4. Initial Sensorimotor and Cardiovascular Data Acquired from Soyuz Landings: Establishing a Functional Performance Recovery Time Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.; Kofman, I. S.; Tomilovskaya, E. S.; Cerisano, J. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Stenger, M. B.; Platts, S. H.; Rukavishnikov, I. V.; Fomina, E. V.; Lee, S. M. C.; Wood, S. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Feiveson, A. H.; Fisher, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Testing of crew responses following long-duration flights has not been previously possible until a minimum of more than 24 hours after landing. As a result, it has not been possible to determine the trend of the early recovery process, nor has it been possible to accurately assess the full impact of the decrements associated with long-duration flight. To overcome these limitations, both the Russian and U.S. programs have implemented joint testing at the Soyuz landing site. This International Space Station research effort has been identified as the functional Field Test, and represents data collect on NASA, Russian, European Space Agency, and Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency crews. RESEARCH The primary goal of this research is to determine functional abilities associated with long-duration space flight crews beginning as soon after landing as possible on the day of landing (typically within 1 to 1.5 hours). This goal has both sensorimotor and cardiovascular elements. To date, a total of 15 subjects have participated in a 'pilot' version of the full 'field test'. The full version of the 'field test' will assess functional sensorimotor measurements included hand/eye coordination, standing from a seated position (sit-to-stand), walking normally without falling, measurement of dynamic visual acuity, discriminating different forces generated with the hands (both strength and ability to judge just noticeable differences of force), standing from a prone position, coordinated walking involving tandem heel-to-toe placement (tested with eyes both closed and open), walking normally while avoiding obstacles of differing heights, and determining postural ataxia while standing (measurement of quiet stance). Sensorimotor performance has been obtained using video records, and data from body worn inertial sensors. The cardiovascular portion of the investigation has measured blood pressure and heart rate during a timed stand test in conjunction with postural ataxia

  5. Serotonin and Dopamine: Unifying Affective, Activational, and Decision Functions

    PubMed Central

    Cools, Roshan; Nakamura, Kae; Daw, Nathaniel D

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin, like dopamine (DA), has long been implicated in adaptive behavior, including decision making and reinforcement learning. However, although the two neuromodulators are tightly related and have a similar degree of functional importance, compared with DA, we have a much less specific understanding about the mechanisms by which serotonin affects behavior. Here, we draw on recent work on computational models of dopaminergic function to suggest a framework by which many of the seemingly diverse functions associated with both DA and serotonin—comprising both affective and activational ones, as well as a number of other functions not overtly related to either—can be seen as consequences of a single root mechanism. PMID:20736991

  6. A meta-analysis of non-invasive brain stimulation and autonomic functioning: Implications for brain-heart pathways to cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Makovac, Elena; Thayer, Julian F; Ottaviani, Cristina

    2017-03-01

    Given the intrinsic connection between the brain and the heart, a recent body of research emerged with the aim to influence cardiovascular system functioning by non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) methods such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation. Despite the implications of cardiovascular activity modulation for therapeutic purposes, such effects of NIBS have not yet been quantified. The aim of this study was to meta-analyze studies on NIBS effects on blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR) and its variability (HRV). PubMed and Scopus databases were searched for English language studies conducted in humans. Twenty-nine studies were eligible for the analyses. Pooled effect sizes (Hedges' g) were compared. Random effect models were used. NIBS was effective in reducing HR (g=0.17) and enhancing HRV (g=0.30). A marginal effect emerged for BP (g=0.21). Significant moderators were the stimulation technique and the site of stimulation. Results show that NIBS affects cardiovascular and autonomic nervous system activity, confirming a potential pathogenic brain-heart pathway to cardiovascular disease.

  7. Diet and Gut Microbial Function in Metabolic and Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Katie A.; Bennett, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past decade, the gut microbiome has emerged as a novel and largely untapped source of variability for metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk, including diabetes. Animal and human studies support several possible pathways through which the gut microbiome may impact health, including the production of health-related metabolites from dietary sources. Diet is considered important to shaping the gut microbiota; in addition, gut microbiota influence the metabolism of many dietary components. In the present paper, we address the distinction between compositional and functional analysis of the gut microbiota. We focus on literature that highlights the value of moving beyond surveys of microbial composition to measuring gut microbial functioning to delineate mechanisms related to the interplay between diet and gut microbiota in cardiometabolic health. PMID:27541295

  8. Countermeasures for Maintenance of Cardiovascular and Muscle Function in Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    In this session, Session FA2, the discussion focuses on the following topics: Effects of Repeated Long Duration +2Gz Load on Man's Cardiovascular Function; Certain Approaches to the Development of On-Board Automated Training System; Cardiac, Arterial, and Venous Adaptation to Og during 6 Month MIR-Spaceflights with and without "Thigh Cuffs" (93-95); Space Cycle(TM) Induced Physiologic Responses; Muscular Deconditioning During Long-term Spaceflight Exercise Recommendations to Optimize Crew Performance; Structure And Function of Knee Extensors After Long-Duration Spaceflight in Man, Effects of Countermeasure Exercise Training; Force and power characteristics of an exercise ergometer designed for use in space; and The simulating of overgravity conditions for astronauts' motor apparatus at the conditions of the training for orbital flights.

  9. The different role of sex hormones on female cardiovascular physiology and function: not only oestrogens.

    PubMed

    Salerni, Sara; Di Francescomarino, Samanta; Cadeddu, Christian; Acquistapace, Flavio; Maffei, Silvia; Gallina, Sabina

    2015-06-01

    Human response to different physiologic stimuli and cardiovascular (CV) adaptation to various pathologies seem to be gender specific. Sex-steroid hormones have been postulated as the major contributors towards these sex-related differences. This review will discuss current evidence on gender differences in CV function and remodelling, and will present the different role of the principal sex-steroid hormones on female heart. Starting from a review of sex hormones synthesis, receptors and CV signalling, we will summarize the current knowledge concerning the role of sex hormones on the regulation of our daily activities throughout the life, via the modulation of autonomic nervous system, excitation-contraction coupling pathway and ion channels activity. Many unresolved questions remain even if oestrogen effects on myocardial remodelling and function have been extensively studied. So this work will focus attention also on the controversial and complex relationship existing between androgens, progesterone and female heart.

  10. Diet and Gut Microbial Function in Metabolic and Cardiovascular Disease Risk.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Katie A; Bennett, Brian J

    2016-10-01

    Over the past decade, the gut microbiome has emerged as a novel and largely unexplored source of variability for metabolic and cardiovascular disease risk, including diabetes. Animal and human studies support several possible pathways through which the gut microbiome may impact health, including the production of health-related metabolites from dietary sources. Diet is considered important to shaping the gut microbiota; in addition, gut microbiota influence the metabolism of many dietary components. In the present paper, we address the distinction between compositional and functional analysis of the gut microbiota. We focus on literature that highlights the value of moving beyond surveys of microbial composition to measuring gut microbial functioning to delineate mechanisms related to the interplay between diet and gut microbiota in cardiometabolic health.

  11. Central obesity and insulin resistance in the cardiometabolic syndrome: pathways to preclinical cardiovascular structure and function.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Johanna R; Hurwitz, Barry E; Llabre, Maria M; Skyler, Jay S; Goldberg, Ronald B; Marks, Jennifer B; Bilsker, Martin S; Schneiderman, Neil

    2009-01-01

    The cardiometabolic syndrome (CMS) has been an organizing conceptual framework for subclinical cardiovascular pathophysiology. Using cross-sectional data from 338 healthy men and women aged 18 to 55 years, the study examined the role of central adiposity and insulin sensitivity and assessed potential relationships with other metabolic indices (insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, fibrinolysis, lipidemia, endothelial function, and inflammation) and measures of cardiac structure and function (cardiac mass, compliance and contractility, myocardial oxygen demand, and blood pressure). Structural equation modeling analyses, which controlled for sex, age, and race, demonstrated good fit to the data. The derived relationships provided a physiologically consistent model of CMS, with an initiating role for central adiposity and insulin resistance. The model accounted for 30% and 82% of the variance in diastolic blood pressure and myocardial oxygen demand, respectively. The findings suggest predominant pathways through which subclinical metabolic processes may exert pathogenic impact on the heart and vasculature.

  12. [The relevance of a decline in renal function for risk of renal failure, cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality].

    PubMed

    Bots, Michiel L; Blankestijn, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that the presence of impaired renal function is associated with an increased risk of end-stage renal disease, cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality. Irrespective of the starting level of renal function, a decline in renal function over two years is a relevant and strong risk factor for end-stage renal disease, cardiovascular death and all-cause mortality. Even a decline of 20 to 30 per cent is associated with to a considerable increased risk and requires further attention.

  13. Comparison of cardiovascular function during the early hours of bed rest and space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathers, C. M.; Charles, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the cardiovascular responses of six healthy male subjects to 6 hours in a 5 degrees head-down bed rest model of weightlessness, and compares these responses to those obtained when subjects were positioned in head-up tilts of 10 degrees, 20 degrees, and 42 degrees, simulating 1/6, 1/3, and 2/3 G, respectively. Thoracic fluid index, cardiac output, stroke volume, and peak flow were measured using impedance cardiography. Cardiac dimensions and volumes were determined from two-dimensional guided M-mode echocardiograms in the left lateral decubitus position at 0, 2, 4, and 6 hours. Cardiovascular response to a stand test were compared before and after bed rest. The impedance values were related to tilt angle for the first 2 hours of tilt; however, after 3 hours, at all four angles, values began to converge, indicating that cardiovascular homeostatic mechanisms seek a common adapted state, regardless of effective gravity level (tilt angle) up to 2/3 G. Echocardiography revealed that left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic volume, stroke volume, ejection fraction, heart rate, and cardiac output had returned to control values by hour 6 for all tilt angles. The lack of a significant immediate change in left ventricular end-diastolic volume, despite decrements in stroke volume (P < .05) and heart rate (not significant), indicates that multiple factors may play a role in the adaptation to simulated hypogravity. The echocardiography data indicated that no angle of tilt, whether head-down or head-up for 4 to 6 hours, mimicked exactly the changes in cardiovascular function recorded after 4 to 6 hours of space flight. Changes in left ventricular end-diastolic volume during space flight and tilt may be similar, but follow a different time course. Nevertheless, head-down tilt at 5 degrees for 6 hours mimics some (stroke volume, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, mean arterial blood pressure, and total resistance), but not all, of the changes occurring

  14. Functional foods for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases: cholesterol and beyond.

    PubMed

    Rudkowska, Iwona; Jones, Peter J H

    2007-05-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of death and disability in many developed countries. The purpose of this literature review is to establish a recommendation for the intake of functional food ingredients in a healthy diet--such as plant sterols (PSs) in low-fat and functional matrices, fatty acid composition and other nutrients of tree nuts and flavonoids in dark chocolate--for the prevention and treatment of CVD. These three specific functional foods are explored in this review, since there is a higher potential for their increased consumption by the population to prevent CVD. First, PS have been added to various nontraditional matrices, such as low-fat products and functional oils, which have shown cholesterol-lowering effects in most clinical trials. Secondly, a growing number of clinical studies indicate that the beneficial effect of tree nuts may not only be due to their fatty acid composition but to other key nutrients, which may provide supplementary health benefits, such as endothelial cell function, as well as decreasing total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Lastly, flavonoids in dark chocolate may protect LDL-C particles from undergoing oxidative modification. However, some gaps in our knowledge need to be filled before firm recommendations can be made for habitual dark chocolate consumption. Overall, these functional foods should be considered as an addition to current lipid-lowering recommendations for improving CVD risk.

  15. Effects of ketamine-xylazine intravenous bolus injection on cardiovascular function in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Baumgartner, Christine; Bollerhey, Melanie; Ebner, Johanna; Laacke-Singer, Lién; Schuster, Tibor; Erhardt, Wolf

    2010-01-01

    The direct effects of ketamine-xylazine (KET-XYL) on vascular function have not been investigated in rabbits. The short-term cardiovascular effects of intravenous (IV) KET-XYL bolus injection, therefore, should be investigated using vascular ultrasonography. In this prospective experimental study, KET-XYL anesthesia was induced IV in 9 female New Zealand White rabbits before 3 defined test bolus injections of KET-XYL were given IV. Before and for 10 min after each KET-XYL injection vascular and hemodynamic variables were recorded at the left common carotid artery (ACC) after the 1st injection, and at the abdominal aorta (AA) after the 2nd injection. Echocardiography was performed after the 3rd injection to investigate changes in cardiac parameters. Ketamine-xylazine IV caused a significant increase in vessel diameter at the ACC and AA. Average volumetric flow significantly decreased at the ACC and pulsatility index significantly decreased at the AA. Fractional shortening (FS) and heart rate significantly decreased, while mean arterial blood pressure initially increased. Bolus injections of KET-XYL IV produced a transient vasodilatation at the ACC and AA. Despite central vasodilatation, bradycardia, and decrease of FS and average volumetric flow (VFave), mean arterial blood pressure did not significantly decrease indicating well-preserved cardiovascular compensatory mechanism after the ratio and doses of KET-XYL IV bolus injections used in this study. PMID:20885844

  16. Neuropeptides in cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    1984-12-01

    Neuropeptides can affect cardiovascular function in various ways. They can serve as cotransmitters in the autonomic nervous system; for example, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is released with acetylcholine and neuropeptide Y with norepinephrine from postganglionic neurons. Substance P and, presumably, other peptides can can affect cardiovascular function when released near blood vessels by antidromically conducted impulses in branches of stimulated sensory neurons. In the central nervous system, many different neuropeptides appear to function as transmitters or contransmittes in the neural pathways that regulate the cardiovascular system. In addition neuropeptides such as vasopressin and angiotensin II also circulate as hormones that are involved in cardiovascular control. Large doses of exogenous vasopressin are required to increase blood pressure in normal animals because the increase in total peripheral resistance produced by the hormones is accompanied by a decrease in cardiac output. However, studies with synthetic peptides that selectively antagonize the vasopressor action of vasopressin indicate that circulating vasopressin is important in maintaining blood pressure when animals are hypovolemic due to dehydration, haemorrhage or adrenocortical insufficiency. VIP dilates blood vessels and stimulates renin secretion by a direct action on the juxtaglomerular cells. Renin secretion is stimulated when the concentration of VIP in plasma exceeds 75 pmol/litre, and higher values are seen in a number of conditions. Neostigmine, a drug which increases the secretion of endogenous VIP, also increases renin secretion, and this increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Thus, VIP may be a physiologically significant renin stimulating hormone.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Development of cardiovascular function in the marine gastropod Littorina obtusata (Linnaeus).

    PubMed

    Bitterli, Tabitha S; Rundle, Simon D; Spicer, John I

    2012-07-01

    The molluscan cardiovascular system typically incorporates a transient extracardiac structure, the larval heart, early in development, but the functional importance of this structure is unclear. We documented the ontogeny and regulatory ability of the larval heart in relation to two other circulatory structures, the true heart and the velum, in the intertidal gastropod Littorina obtusata. There was a mismatch between the appearance of the larval heart and the velum. Velar lobes appeared early in development (day 4), but the larval heart did not begin beating until day 13. The beating of the larval heart reached a maximum on day 17 and then decreased until the structure itself disappeared (day 24). The true heart began to beat on day 17. Its rate of beating increased as that of the larval heart decreased, possibly suggesting a gradual shift from a larval heart-driven to a true heart-driven circulation. The true heart was not sensitive to acutely declining P(O(2)) shortly after it began to beat, but increased in activity in response to acutely declining P(O(2)) by day 21. Larval heart responses were similar to those of the true heart, with early insensitivity to declining P(O(2)) (day 13) followed by a response by day 15. Increased velum-driven rotational activity under acutely declining P(O(2)) was greatest in early developmental stages. Together, these findings point to cardiovascular function in L. obtusata larvae being the result of a complex interaction between velum, larval and true heart activities, with the functions of the three structures coinciding but their relative importance changing throughout larval development.

  18. THE MITOCHONDRIAL PARADIGM FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY AND CELLULAR FUNCTION: A COMPLEMENTARY CONCEPT TO MENDELIAN GENETICS

    PubMed Central

    Kryzwanski, David M.; Moellering, Douglas; Fetterman, Jessica L.; Dunham-Snary, Kimberly J.; Sammy, Melissa J.; Ballinger, Scott W.

    2013-01-01

    While there is general agreement that cardiovascular disease (CVD) development is influenced by a combination of genetic, environmental, and behavioral contributors, the actual mechanistic basis of how these factors initiate or promote CVD development in some individuals while others with identical risk profiles do not, is not clearly understood. This review considers the potential role for mitochondrial genetics and function in determining CVD susceptibility from the standpoint that the original features that molded cellular function were based upon mitochondrial-nuclear relationships established millions of years ago and were likely refined during prehistoric environmental selection events that today, are largely absent. Consequently, contemporary risk factors that influence our susceptibility to a variety of age-related diseases, including CVD were probably not part of the dynamics that defined the processes of mitochondrial – nuclear interaction, and thus, cell function. In this regard, the selective conditions that contributed to cellular functionality and evolution should be given more consideration when interpreting and designing experimental data and strategies. Finally, future studies that probe beyond epidemiologic associations are required. These studies will serve as the initial steps for addressing the provocative concept that contemporary human disease susceptibility is the result of selection events for mitochondrial function that increased chances for prehistoric human survival and reproductive success. PMID:21647091

  19. [The role of uncertainty in the conditioned-reflex learning behavior for selected cardiovascular functions].

    PubMed

    Mechedowa, A J; Hecht, K; Treptow, K; Hecht, T

    1976-01-01

    As a contribution to quantitative analysis of exogenous stress action, the role of probability learning (probability stress, probability affirmation) for selected cardio-vascular functions was studied in 25 albino rats and 8 dogs. It has been shown in the rats learning with probability stress that a dependence exists between stress probability, on the one hand, and conditional-reflectory processes and systolic blood pressure rise, on the other, that is, the pathogenic action of probability stress increases from a probability of p = 1.0 to p = 0.5. An analogous picture was found with the probability affirmation being applied in dogs. While a probability affirmation with p = 1.0 promoted adaptational processes, a value of p = 0.5 led to experimental neurosis, tachycardia and ECG alterations. The results obtained are discussed in context with the information entropy and information theory of emotions.

  20. Endothelial function impairment in chronic venous insufficiency: effect of some cardiovascular protectant agents.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Omar F; Ranero, Alejandra; Hong, Enrique; Vidrio, Horacio

    In segments of human varicose veins, endothelial function was assessed by measuring relaxation induced by acetylcholine in noradrenaline-precontracted preparations. In addition, concentration-response curves to acetylcholine were obtained before and after incubation with the arterial endothelium protectant agents captopril, losartan, troglitazone, pravastatin, or simvastatin. The antivaricose agent escin was also tested. Mean acetylcholine-induced relaxation of varicose venous rings was about 13%, approximately one third of that reported for control saphenous veins. Concentration-response curves to acetylcholine were ''u'' shaped, the result of endothelium-mediated relaxation at low concentrations, superseded by subsequent smooth muscle contractile responses. Relaxation was enhanced by the endothelium-protecting agents and by escin, troglitazone being the least, and simvastatin the most effective. It was concluded that endothelial dysfunction is present in varicose veins, that this anomaly can be reverted by cardiovascular protecting agents, and that it can play a role in the pathogenesis and treatment of chronic venous insufficiency.

  1. The emerging role of nitrite as an endogenous modulator and therapeutic agent of cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Tota, B; Quintieri, A M; Angelone, T

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the circulating anion nitrite (NO2-), the largest physiological reservoir of nitric oxide (NO) in the body, has revealed itself as a signalling molecule mediating numerous biological responses. Since it was estimated that as much as 70% of plasma nitrite originates from nitric oxide synthases (NOSs), mainly in the endothelium by endothelial NOS, nitrite is considered an index of NOSs activity. Exogenous sources, principally environmental pollutants and intake of vegetables, also contribute to this NO reserve. In mammalian blood, nitrite, present at nanomolar concentrations, can be reduced to bioactive NO along a physiological oxygen and pH gradient either non-enzymatically (acidic disproportionation) or by a number of enzymes including xanthine oxidoreductase, NOS, mitochondrial cytochromes and deoxygenated haemoglobin and myoglobin. The various NO-dependent nitrite-induced biological responses include hypoxic vasodilation, inhibition of mitochondrial respiration, cytoprotection following ischemia/reperfusion, and regulation of protein and gene expression. Since NO is a major paracrine-autocrine cardiovascular modulator and nitrite acts mainly as an endocrine store of NO, it is not surprising that NO2 - exerts important cardiovascular actions both under normal and physio-pathological conditions. In the interdisciplinary framework of the NO cycle concept, this review illustrates the actions exerted by nitrite on the cardiovascular system. Since the majority of the NO2 - -oriented studies focused on the systemic and regional control of blood flow both under physiological and ischemia/reperfusion conditions, we will firstly consider this issue. Secondly, the nitrite- induced effects on myocardial contractile and relaxation processes will be discussed, emphasizing the biomedical interest of nitrite as a new therapeutic agent. The importance of cardiac myoglobin as nitrite-reductase able to exert cardioprotection through a novel function, in addition to its

  2. Structural and functional left ventricular impairment in subjects with chronic spinal cord injury and no overt cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Driussi, Caterina; Ius, Arianna; Bizzarini, Emiliana; Antonini-Canterin, Francesco; d'Andrea, Antonello; Bossone, Eduardo; Vriz, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Context Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in subjects with long-term spinal cord injury (SCI). More specific recommendations for CVD prevention in this population are needed. Methods One hundred thirty male subjects (47 subjects with SCI and 83 able-bodied persons (ABPs), mean age 43.89 ± 1.9 and 45.44 ± 12.2 years; P = 0.48) underwent transthoracic echocardiography (TTE). The effects of age, weight, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and level of physical training on cardiac adaptations were evaluated through multiple regression analysis. Results In subjects with SCI, TTE revealed increased wall thickness (P < 0.05), lower E wave, E/A ratio and early diastolic myocardial relaxation velocity on Tissue Doppler Imaging (TDI) (P < 0.05) and higher systolic myocardial contraction velocity on TDI (0.10 ± 0.02 vs. 0.09 ± 0.02 m/seconds, P = 0.002) and peak systolic pressure to end-systolic volume ratio (3.62 ± 1.39 vs. 2.82 ± 0.90, P < 0.001) compared with ABPs. Aortic diameters were larger in subjects with SCI than ABPs. Differences remained statistically significant even after adjustment for age, weight, MAP, and level of physical training. Weight and age were found to be independent variables that substantially affected left ventricular structure and function in subjects with SCI. Conclusions Subjects with post-traumatic chronic SCI and no overt cardiovascular risk factors, exhibit initial left ventricular remodeling (as assessed by TTE) compared with ABPs. Lifestyle modifications, including regular physical exercise and weight control, should be implemented in all subjects with SCI, even at a very early stage, in order to reduce cardiovascular risk and prevent the development of CVD. PMID:24456485

  3. Erythropoietin-mediated protection in kidney transplantation: nonerythropoietic EPO derivatives improve function without increasing risk of cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    van Rijt, Willem G; van Goor, Harry; Ploeg, Rutger J; Leuvenink, Henri G D

    2014-03-01

    The protective, nonerythropoietic effects of erythropoietin (EPO) have become evident in preclinical models in renal ischaemia/reperfusion injury and kidney transplantation. However, four recently published clinical trials using high-dose EPO treatment following renal transplantation did not reveal any protective effect for short-term renal function and even reported an increased risk of thrombosis. This review focusses on the current status of protective pathways mediated by EPO, the safety concerns using high EPO dosage and discusses the discrepancies between pre-clinical and clinical studies. The protective effects are mediated by binding of EPO to a heteromeric receptor complex consisting of two β-common receptors and two EPO receptors. An important role for the activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase is proposed. EPO-mediated cytoprotection still has enormous potential. However, only nonerythropoietic EPO derivatives may induce protection without increasing the risk of cardiovascular events. In preclinical models, nonerythropoietic EPO derivatives, such as carbamoylated EPO and ARA290, have been tested. These EPO derivatives improve renal function and do not affect erythropoiesis. Therefore, nonerythropoietic EPO derivatives may be able to render EPO-mediated cytoprotection useful and beneficial for clinical transplantation.

  4. BMI and cardiovascular function in children and adolescents of Mauritius Island.

    PubMed

    Miles-Chan, Jennifer L; Joonas, Noorjehan; Joganah, Shashee; Larhubarbe, Jose; Schutz, Yves; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Dulloo, Abdul G

    2013-01-01

    Among countries which have undergone a rapid socio-economic and nutrition transition over the past few decades, the Indian Ocean island of Mauritius is among those with the greatest surge in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes and CVD. The aim of the present study was to characterise the BMI and cardiovascular functions of children and adolescents of this at-risk population. Data were collected through measurements of anthropometry, resting heart rate and blood pressure in a nationally representative sample (n 2489) of children (5-10 years) and adolescents (11-18 years), and analysed according to sex and ethnic identity: South Asian Hindus and Muslims (both of Indian ancestry), Creole (of varying degrees of African ancestry) and Chinese (of mainland China ancestry). Based on standards of the WHO or International Obesity Task Force, one in six of these young individuals exhibit a high BMI-for-age. Analysis by ethnicity revealed that Creole males and females show higher BMI-for-age but also lower heart rate (P < 0·001) even after adjustment for BMI. Additionally, Chinese males and females show higher systolic blood pressure (P < 0·01), independently of BMI. None of these ethnic differences could be related to household income, diet type (vegetarian v. non-vegetarian) or to fruit consumption. This study in children and adolescents of this multi-ethnic at-risk population for CVD reveal ethnic differences in BMI-for-age as well as consistent BMI-independent ethnic differences in heart rate and systolic blood pressure. These findings underscore the need to establish the BMI-fat % relationship across the various ethnic groups and for more detailed investigations about their differences in lifestyle and dietary habits that might explain their differential cardiovascular functions prior to adulthood.

  5. Older couples with and without cardiovascular disease: testing associations between and among affective communication, marital satisfaction, physical and mental health.

    PubMed

    Novak, Joshua R; Sandberg, Jonathan G; Harper, James M

    2014-06-01

    The American Heart Association (Go et al., 2013) estimated that about 2,150 Americans die each day from cardiovascular disease (CVD). For those 65 years of age or older, the total cost of heart related services in 2009 was $121.2 billion (Go et al., 2013). Many people live with the chronic conditions of cardiovascular disease (Petersen et al., 2005). Researchers have identified the genetic, medical, and lifestyle habits of those with CVD, yet there is a dearth of literature focusing on the relational/social aspects of cardiovascular disease and how such factors are associated with the risk, presentation, and maintenance of cardiovascular illness. Considering that men have a higher lifetime risk for developing CVD than women (51.7% to 39.2%; Roger et al., 2012), the purpose of this study was to compare various aspects of the couple relationship among and between couples with a husband who reports CVD and couples in which neither report CVD.

  6. Exposure for ultrafine carbon particles at levels below detectable pulmonary inflammation affects cardiovascular performance in spontaneously hypertensive rats*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Exposure to particulate matter is a risk factor for cardiopulmonary disease but the related molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Previously we studied cardiovascular responses in healthy WKY rats following inhalation exposure to ultrafine carbon particles (UfCPs...

  7. Lexical and Affective Prosody in Children with High Functioning Autism

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Ruth B.; Bemis, Rhyannon H.; Skwerer, Daniela Plesa; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We investigated perception and production of lexical stress and processing of affective prosody in adolescents with high functioning autism (HFA). We hypothesized preserved processing of lexical and affective prosody, but atypical lexical prosody production. Method 16 children with HFA and 15 typically developing (TD) peers participated in three experiments: 1. Perception of affective prosody, 2. Lexical stress perception, 3. Lexical stress production. In Experiment 1, participants labeled sad, happy, and neutral spoken sentences that were low-pass filtered, to eliminate verbal content. In Experiment 2 participants disambiguated word meanings based on lexical stress (HOTdog, vs. hotDOG). In Experiment 3 participants produced these words in a sentence completion task. Productions were analyzed using acoustic measures. Results Accuracy levels showed no group differences. Participants with HFA could determine affect from filtered sentences and disambiguate words based on lexical stress. They produced appropriately differentiated lexical stress patterns but demonstrated atypically long productions indicating reduced ability in natural prosody production. Conclusions Children with HFA were as capable as their TD peers in receptive tasks of lexical stress and affective prosody. Prosody productions were atypically long, despite accurate differentiation of lexical stress patterns. Future research should use larger samples and spontaneous vs. elicited productions. PMID:20530388

  8. Pre-Transplant Cardiovascular Risk Factors Affect Kidney Allograft Survival: A Multi-Center Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Pyo; Bae, Eunjin; Kang, Eunjeong; Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Kim, Yong-Jin; Oh, Yun Kyu; Kim, Yon Su; Kim, Young Hoon; Lim, Chun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Pre-transplant cardiovascular (CV) risk factors affect the development of CV events even after successful kidney transplantation (KT). However, the impact of pre-transplant CV risk factors on allograft failure (GF) has not been reported. Methods and Findings We analyzed the graft outcomes of 2,902 KT recipients who were enrolled in a multi-center cohort from 1997 to 2012. We calculated the pre-transplant CV risk scores based on the Framingham risk model using age, gender, total cholesterol level, smoking status, and history of hypertension. Vascular disease (a composite of ischemic heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, and cerebrovascular disease) was noted in 6.5% of the patients. During the median follow-up of 6.4 years, 286 (9.9%) patients had developed GF. In the multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazard model, pre-transplant vascular disease was associated with an increased risk of GF (HR 2.51; 95% CI 1.66–3.80). The HR for GF (comparing the highest with the lowest tertile regarding the pre-transplant CV risk scores) was 1.65 (95% CI 1.22–2.23). In the competing risk model, both pre-transplant vascular disease and CV risk score were independent risk factors for GF. Moreover, the addition of the CV risk score, the pre-transplant vascular disease, or both had a better predictability for GF compared to the traditional GF risk factors. Conclusions In conclusion, both vascular disease and pre-transplant CV risk score were independently associated with GF in this multi-center study. Pre-transplant CV risk assessments could be useful in predicting GF in KT recipients. PMID:27501048

  9. The effect of an NO donor, pentaerythrityl tetranitrate, on biochemical, functional, and morphological attributes of cardiovascular system of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Dovinová, Ima; Cacányiová, Sona; Fáberová, Viera; Kristek, Frantisek

    2009-03-01

    The status of nitric oxide (NO) in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) is unclear and its bioavailability may be affected by imbalance with reactive oxygen species. We studied cardiovascular effects of an NO donor, pentaerythrityl tetranitrate (PETN) in SHR. We used Wistar rats, SHR and SHR treated with PETN (200 mg/kg/day). After six weeks, myocardium and aorta from each group were taken for biochemical and iliac artery for functional and morphological study. Long-term administration of PETN to SHR increased cGMP level in platelets and did not affect blood pressure. In myocardium, the therapy resulted in a decrease in cardiac hypertrophy and MDA level, and the increased antioxidant enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). In aorta, PETN decreased the NO-synthase activity and had no affect on the enzyme activities of SOD and GPx or on MDA level. In the iliac artery, the endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine was slightly improved and the maximum vasoconstriction to noradrenaline was decreased. Wall thickness, cross-sectional area, inner diameter, and wall thickness/ inner diameter measured after perfusion fixation (120 mmHg) were not affected. The small effect of PETN on cardiovascular system suggests that NO deficiency is probably not the main cause of pathological alterations in SHR.

  10. Functional importance of T-type voltage-gated calcium channels in the cardiovascular and renal system: news from the world of knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Pernille B L

    2015-02-15

    Over the years, it has been discussed whether T-type calcium channels Cav3 play a role in the cardiovascular and renal system. T-type channels have been reported to play an important role in renal hemodynamics, contractility of resistance vessels, and pacemaker activity in the heart. However, the lack of highly specific blockers cast doubt on the conclusions. As new T-type channel antagonists are being designed, the roles of T-type channels in cardiovascular and renal pathology need to be elucidated before T-type blockers can be clinically useful. Two types of T-type channels, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2, are expressed in blood vessels, the kidney, and the heart. Studies with gene-deficient mice have provided a way to investigate the Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channels and their role in the cardiovascular system. This review discusses the results from these knockout mice. Evaluation of the literature leads to the conclusion that Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 channels have important, but different, functions in mice. T-type Cav3.1 channels affect heart rate, whereas Cav3.2 channels are involved in cardiac hypertrophy. In the vascular system, Cav3.2 activation leads to dilation of blood vessels, whereas Cav3.1 channels are mainly suggested to affect constriction. The Cav3.1 channel is also involved in neointima formation following vascular damage. In the kidney, Cav3.1 regulates plasma flow and Cav3.2 plays a role setting glomerular filtration rate. In conclusion, Cav3.1 and Cav3.2 are new therapeutic targets in several cardiovascular pathologies, but the use of T-type blockers should be specifically directed to the disease and to the channel subtype.

  11. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 is elevated in patients with COPD independent of metabolic and cardiovascular function

    PubMed Central

    Waschki, Benjamin; Watz, Henrik; Holz, Olaf; Magnussen, Helgo; Olejnicka, Beata; Welte, Tobias; Rabe, Klaus F; Janciauskiene, Sabina

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a major inhibitor of fibrinolysis, is associated with thrombosis, obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and premature aging, which all are coexisting conditions of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The role of PAI-1 in COPD with respect to metabolic and cardiovascular functions is unclear. Methods In this study, which was nested within a prospective cohort study, the serum levels of PAI-1 were cross-sectionally measured in 74 stable COPD patients (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] Stages I–IV) and 18 controls without lung disease. In addition, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, fasting plasma glucose, waist circumference, blood pressure, smoking status, high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), adiponectin, ankle–brachial index, N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, and history of comorbidities were also determined. Results The serum levels of PAI-1 were significantly higher in COPD patients than in controls, independent of a broad spectrum of possible confounders including metabolic and cardiovascular dysfunction. A multivariate regression analysis revealed triglyceride and hs-CRP levels to be the best predictors of PAI-1 within COPD. GOLD Stages II and III remained independently associated with higher PAI-1 levels in a final regression analysis. Conclusion The data from the present study showed that the serum levels of PAI-1 are higher in patients with COPD and that moderate-to-severe airflow limitation, hypertriglyceridemia, and systemic inflammation are independent predictors of an elevated PAI-1 level. PAI-1 may be a potential biomarker candidate for COPD-specific and extra-pulmonary manifestations. PMID:28356730

  12. Cardiovascular function, compliance, and connective tissue remodeling in the turtle, Trachemys scripta, following thermal acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Keen, Adam N.; Crossley, Dane A.

    2016-01-01

    Low temperature directly alters cardiovascular physiology in freshwater turtles, causing bradycardia, arterial hypotension, and a reduction in systemic blood pressure. At the same time, blood viscosity and systemic resistance increase, as does sensitivity to cardiac preload (e.g., via the Frank-Starling response). However, the long-term effects of these seasonal responses on the cardiovascular system are unclear. We acclimated red-eared slider turtles to a control temperature (25°C) or to chronic cold (5°C). To differentiate the direct effects of temperature from a cold-induced remodeling response, all measurements were conducted at the control temperature (25°C). In anesthetized turtles, cold acclimation reduced systemic resistance by 1.8-fold and increased systemic blood flow by 1.4-fold, resulting in a 2.3-fold higher right to left (R-L; net systemic) cardiac shunt flow and a 1.8-fold greater shunt fraction. Following a volume load by bolus injection of saline (calculated to increase stroke volume by 5-fold, ∼2.2% of total blood volume), systemic resistance was reduced while pulmonary blood flow and systemic pressure increased. An increased systemic blood flow meant the R-L cardiac shunt was further pronounced. In the isolated ventricle, passive stiffness was increased following cold acclimation with 4.2-fold greater collagen deposition in the myocardium. Histological sections of the major outflow arteries revealed a 1.4-fold higher elastin content in cold-acclimated animals. These results suggest that cold acclimation alters cardiac shunting patterns with an increased R-L shunt flow, achieved through reducing systemic resistance and increasing systemic blood flow. Furthermore, our data suggests that cold-induced cardiac remodeling may reduce the stress of high cardiac preload by increasing compliance of the vasculature and decreasing compliance of the ventricle. Together, these responses could compensate for reduced systolic function at low temperatures in

  13. Functional significance of preserved affect recognition in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Fiszdon, Joanna M.; Johannesen, Jason K.

    2009-01-01

    Affect recognition (AR) is a core component of social information processing, thus may be critical to understanding social behavior and functioning in broader aspects of daily living. Deficits in AR are well documented in schizophrenia, however, there is also evidence that many individuals with schizophrenia perform AR tasks at near-normal levels. In the current study, we sought to evaluate the functional significance of AR deficits in schizophrenia by comparing subgroups with normal-range and impaired AR performance on proxy and interviewer-rated measures of real-world functioning. Schizophrenia outpatients were classified as normal-range (N=17) and impaired (N=31) based on a logistic cut point in the sample distribution of BLERT scores, referenced to a normative sample of healthy control subjects (N=56). The derived schizophrenia subgroups were then compared on proxy (UCSD, UPSA, SSPA, MMAA) and interviewer-rated (QLS, ILSS) measures of functioning, as well as battery of neurocognitive tests. Initial analyses indicated superior MMAA and QLS performance in the near-normal AR subgroup. Covariate analyses indicated that group differences in neurocognition fully mediated the observed associations between AR and MMAA and attenuated the observed relationships between AR classification and QLS. These results support three main conclusions. First, AR, like many other domains of psychopathology studied in schizophrenia, is preserved in select subgroups. Second, there is a positive relationship between AR performance and functional outcome measures. Third, neurocognition appears to mediate the relationship between AR and measures of functioning. PMID:20202689

  14. Cardiovascular Pharmacology of Cannabinoids

    PubMed Central

    Pacher, P.; Bátkai, S.; Kunos, G.

    2008-01-01

    Cannabinoids and their synthetic and endogenous analogs affect a broad range of physiological functions, including cardiovascular variables, the most important component of their effect being profound hypotension. The mechanisms of the cardiovascular effects of cannabinoids in vivo are complex and may involve modulation of autonomic outflow in both the central and peripheral nervous systems as well as direct effects on the myocardium and vasculature. Although several lines of evidence indicate that the cardiovascular depressive effects of cannabinoids are mediated by peripherally localized CB1 receptors, recent studies provide strong support for the existence of as-yet-undefined endothelial and cardiac receptor(s) that mediate certain endocannabinoid-induced cardiovascular effects. The endogenous cannabinoid system has been recently implicated in the mechanism of hypotension associated with hemorrhagic, endotoxic, and cardiogenic shock, and advanced liver cirrhosis. Furthermore, cannabinoids have been considered as novel antihypertensive agents. A protective role of endocannabinoids in myocardial ischemia has also been documented. In this chapter, we summarize current information on the cardiovascular effects of cannabinoids and highlight the importance of these effects in a variety of pathophysiological conditions. PMID:16596789

  15. Psychosocial Work Characteristics Predict Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Health Functioning in Rural Women: The Wisconsin Rural Women's Health Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chikani, Vatsal; Reding, Douglas; Gunderson, Paul; McCarty, Catherine A.

    2005-01-01

    Background: The aim of the present study is to investigate the association between psychosocial work characteristics and health functioning and cardiovascular disease risk factors among rural women of central Wisconsin and compare psychosocial work characteristics between farm and nonfarm women. Methods: Stratified sampling was used to select a…

  16. Method and apparatus for monitoring dynamic cardiovascular function using n-dimensional representatives of critical functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westinskow, Dwayne (Inventor); Agutter, James (Inventor); Syroid, Noah (Inventor); Strayer, David (Inventor); Albert, Robert (Inventor); Wachter, S. Blake (Inventor); Drews, Frank (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method, system, apparatus and device for the monitoring, diagnosis and evaluation of the state of a dynamic pulmonary system is disclosed. This method and system provides the processing means for receiving sensed and/or simulated data, converting such data into a displayable object format and displaying such objects in a manner such that the interrelationships between the respective variables can be correlated and identified by a user. This invention provides for the rapid cognitive grasp of the overall state of a pulmonary critical function with respect to a dynamic system.

  17. Validation of Spectral Analysis as a Noninvasive Tool to Assess Autonomic Regulation of Cardiovascular Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knapp, Charles F.; Evans, Joyce M.

    1996-01-01

    A major focus of our program has been to develop a sensitive noninvasive procedure to quantify early weightlessness-induced changes in cardiovascular function or potential dysfunction. Forty studies of healthy young volunteers (10 men and 10 women, each studied twice) were conducted to determine changes in the sympatho-vagal balance of autonomic control of cardiovascular regulation during graded headward and footward blood volume shifts. Changes in sympatho-vagal balance were classified by changes in the mean levels and spectral content of cardiovascular variables and verified by changes in circulating levels of catecholamines and pancreatic polypeptide. Possible shifts in intra/extravascular fluid were assessed from changes in hematocrit and plasma mass density while changes in the stimulus to regulate plasma volume were determined from Plasma Renin Activity (PRA). Autonomic blockade was used to unmask the relative contribution of sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent influences in response to 10 min each of 0, 20 and 40 mmHg Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) and 15 and 30 mmHg Positive Pressure (LBPP). The combination of muscarinic blockade with graded LBNP and LBPP was used to evoke graded increases and decreases in sympathetic activity without parasympathetic contributions. The combination of beta blockade with graded LBNP and LBPP was used to produce graded increases and decreases in parasympathetic activity without beta sympathetic contributions. Finally, a combination of both beta and muscarinic blockades with LBNP and LBPP was used to determine the contribution from other, primarily alpha adrenergic, sources. Mean values, spectral analyses and time frequency analysis of R-R interval (HR), Arterial Pressure (AP), peripheral blood flow (RF), Stroke Volume (SV) and peripheral resistance (TPR) were performed for all phases of the study. Skin blood Flow (SF) was also measured in other studies and similarly analyzed. Spectra were examined for changes in

  18. Abnormal GABAergic function and negative affect in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Stephan F; Demeter, Elise; Phan, K Luan; Tso, Ivy F; Welsh, Robert C

    2014-03-01

    Deficits in the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system have been reported in postmortem studies of schizophrenia, and therapeutic interventions in schizophrenia often involve potentiation of GABA receptors (GABAR) to augment antipsychotic therapy and treat negative affect such as anxiety. To map GABAergic mechanisms associated with processing affect, we used a benzodiazepine challenge while subjects viewed salient visual stimuli. Fourteen stable, medicated schizophrenia/schizoaffective patients and 13 healthy comparison subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging using the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) technique while they viewed salient emotional images. Subjects received intravenous lorazepam (LRZ; 0.01 mg/kg) or saline in a single-blinded, cross-over design (two sessions separated by 1-3 weeks). A predicted group by drug interaction was noted in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC) as well as right superior frontal gyrus and left and right occipital regions, such that psychosis patients showed an increased BOLD signal to LRZ challenge, rather than the decreased signal exhibited by the comparison group. A main effect of reduced BOLD signal in bilateral occipital areas was noted across groups. Consistent with the role of the dmPFC in processing emotion, state negative affect positively correlated with the response to the LRZ challenge in the dmPFC for the patients and comparison subjects. The altered response to LRZ challenge is consistent with altered inhibition predicted by postmortem findings of altered GABAR in schizophrenia. These results also suggest that negative affect in schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder is associated-directly or indirectly-with GABAergic function on a continuum with normal behavior.

  19. Generation and Assessment of Functional Biomaterial Scaffolds for Applications in Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hinderer, Svenja; Brauchle, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Current clinically applicable tissue and organ replacement therapies are limited in the field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine. The available options do not regenerate damaged tissues and organs, and, in the majority of the cases, show insufficient restoration of tissue function. To date, anticoagulant drug‐free heart valve replacements or growing valves for pediatric patients, hemocompatible and thrombus‐free vascular substitutes that are smaller than 6 mm, and stem cell‐recruiting delivery systems that induce myocardial regeneration are still only visions of researchers and medical professionals worldwide and far from being the standard of clinical treatment. The design of functional off‐the‐shelf biomaterials as well as automatable and up‐scalable biomaterial processing methods are the focus of current research endeavors and of great interest for fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here, various approaches that aim to overcome the current limitations are reviewed, focusing on biomaterials design and generation methods for myocardium, heart valves, and blood vessels. Furthermore, novel contact‐ and marker‐free biomaterial and extracellular matrix assessment methods are highlighted. PMID:25778713

  20. Artificial Gravity with Ergometric Exercise Training Improves Cardiovascular Function in Ambulatory Men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xi-Qing; Zhu, Chao; Shang, Shu; Yao, Yong-Jie

    2008-06-01

    The necessity of preventing physiological deconditioning in astronauts exposed to long-term space flights is well known. Artificial gravity training via short-arm centrifugation as a countermeasure to microgravity has been considered for many years. However, an optimal duration, level and rate of exposure to artificial gravity have not yet been determined. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the cardiovascular effects of three weeks of intermittent artificial gravity with ergometric exercise training on normal ambulatory men. During 3 weeks experiment, eight healthy male subjects received alternate +1 to +2 Gz (at the foot) short-arm centrifuge training with 30 W ergometric exercise for 30 min per day. Cardiac function, heart rate variability, heart rate and blood pressure were measured before and after training. Stroke volume and total peripheral resistance increased significantly after 3 weeks training, compared with the pre-training baseline. Left ventricular ejection time (LVET) and ejection fraction increased significantly after 3 weeks training, while heart rate, the ratio of pre-ejection period to LVET, and the ratio of low frequency to high frequency power decreased significantly after 3 weeks training. These results suggest that three weeks short-arm centrifuge training with ergometric exercise could improve human cardiac systolic and pumping functions, and increase cardiac vagal modulation.

  1. Generation and Assessment of Functional Biomaterial Scaffolds for Applications in Cardiovascular Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, Svenja; Brauchle, Eva; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2015-11-18

    Current clinically applicable tissue and organ replacement therapies are limited in the field of cardiovascular regenerative medicine. The available options do not regenerate damaged tissues and organs, and, in the majority of the cases, show insufficient restoration of tissue function. To date, anticoagulant drug-free heart valve replacements or growing valves for pediatric patients, hemocompatible and thrombus-free vascular substitutes that are smaller than 6 mm, and stem cell-recruiting delivery systems that induce myocardial regeneration are still only visions of researchers and medical professionals worldwide and far from being the standard of clinical treatment. The design of functional off-the-shelf biomaterials as well as automatable and up-scalable biomaterial processing methods are the focus of current research endeavors and of great interest for fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Here, various approaches that aim to overcome the current limitations are reviewed, focusing on biomaterials design and generation methods for myocardium, heart valves, and blood vessels. Furthermore, novel contact- and marker-free biomaterial and extracellular matrix assessment methods are highlighted.

  2. Cardiac Structure and Function in Humans: A New Cardiovascular Physiology Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Su; Burleson, Paul D.; Passo, Stanley; Messina, Edward J.; Levine, Norman; Thompson, Carl I.; Belloni, Francis L.; Recchia, Fabio A.; Ojaimi, Caroline; Kaley, Gabor; Hintze, Thomas H.

    2009-01-01

    As the traditional cardiovascular control laboratory has disappeared from the first-year medical school curriculum, we have recognized the need to develop another "hands-on" experience as a vehicle for wide-ranging discussions of cardiovascular control mechanisms. Using an echocardiograph, an automatic blood pressure cuff, and a reclining bicycle,…

  3. Effect of high-intensity training on endothelial function in patients with cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kolmos, Mia; Krawcyk, Rikke Steen; Kruuse, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Exercise improves endothelial dysfunction, the key manifestation of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, and is recommended in both cardiovascular and cerebrovascular rehabilitation. Disagreement remains, however, on the role of intensity of exercise. The purpose of this review was to gather current knowledge on the effects of high-intensity training versus moderate-intensity continuous exercise on endothelial function in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular patients. Methods: A systematic review was performed in PubMed database, Embase and Cochrane libraries and on PEDro using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Studies were restricted to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular patients, and healthy subjects as general reference. Interventions comprised of high-intensity training alone, high-intensity training compared to moderate-intensity continuous exercise, or no training, with endothelial function as outcome measure. Endothelial function was measured either physiologically by flow-mediated dilatation and/or by systemic biomarkers. Data were analyzed descriptively due to non-comparability for a meta-analysis to be performed. Results: A total of 20 studies were included in the review. Although there was great heterogenecity in design, population and exercise protocols, all studies found high-intensity training to be safe. High-intensity training was equal to moderate-intensity continuous exercise through improvement in endothelial function in 15 of the 20 selected studies, as measured by flow-mediated dilatation, nitric oxide bioavailability and circulating biomarkers. Only a few studies examined high-intensity training in cerebrovascular patients, none with endothelial function as outcome. Conclusion: High-intensity training is promising as a time-efficient exercise strategy in cardiovascular rehabilitation, but data on endothelial effects in cerebrovascular rehabilitation are warranted. Agreement on a

  4. Vascular Health and Cognitive Function in Older Adults with Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Forman, Daniel E; Cohen, Ronald A; Hoth, Karin F; Haley, Andreana P; Poppas, Athena; Moser, David J; Gunstad, John; Paul, Robert H; Jefferson, Angela L; Tate, David F; Ono, Makoto; Wake, Nicole; Gerhard-Herman, Marie

    2008-02-01

    BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that changes in vascular flow dynamics resulting from age and cardiovascular disease (CVD) would correlate to neurocognitive capacities, even in adults screened to exclude dementia and neurological disease. We studied endothelial-dependent as well as endothelial-independent brachial responses in older adults with CVD to study the associations of vascular responses with cognition. Comprehensive neurocognitive testing was used to discern which specific cognitive domain(s) correlated to the vascular responses. METHODS: Eighty-eight independent, community-dwelling older adults (70.02+7.67 years) with mild to severe CVD were recruited. Enrollees were thoroughly screened to exclude neurological disease and dementia. Flow-mediated (endothelial-dependent) and nitroglycerin-mediated (endothelial-independent) brachial artery responses were assessed using 2-d ultrasound. Cognitive functioning was assessed using comprehensive neuropsychological testing. Linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the relationships between the endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent vascular flow dynamics and specific domains of neurocognitive function. RESULTS: Endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent brachial artery responses both correlated with neurocognitive testing indices. The strongest independent relationship was between endothelial function and measures of attention-executive functioning. CONCLUSIONS: Endothelial-dependent and endothelial-independent vascular responsiveness correlate with neurocognitive performance among older CVD patients, particularly in the attention-executive domain. While further study is needed to substantiate causal relationships, our data demonstrate that brachial responses serve as important markers of risk for common neurocognitive changes. Learning and behavior-modifying therapeutic strategies that compensate for such common, insidious neurocognitive limitations will likely improve caregiving efficacy.

  5. Sex and the Cardiovascular System: The Intriguing Tale of How Women and Men Regulate Cardiovascular Function Differently

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huxley, Virginia H.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to recognize and appreciate from a reproductive standpoint that males and females possess different attributes has been long standing. Only more recently have we begun to look more deeply into both the similarities and differences between men and women, as well as between boys and girls, with respect to the structure and function of…

  6. Alcohol exposure leads to unrecoverable cardiovascular defects along with edema and motor function changes in developing zebrafish larvae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xu; Gao, Aiai; Wang, Yanan; Chen, Man; Peng, Jun; Yan, Huaying; Zhao, Xin; Feng, Xizeng

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy can cause a series of developmental disorders in the fetus called FAS (fetal alcohol syndrome). In the present study we exposed zebrafish embryos to 1% and 2% alcohol and observed the morphology of heart and blood vessels during and after exposure to investigate motor function alterations, and damage and recovery to the cardiovascular system. The results showed that alcohol exposure could induce heart deformation, slower heart rate, and incomplete blood vessels and pericardium. After stopping exposure, larvae exposed to 1% alcohol could recover only in heart morphology, but larvae in 2% alcohol could not recover either morphology or function of cardiovascular system. The edema-like characteristics in the 2% alcohol group became more conspicuous afterwards, with destruction in the dorsal aorta, coarctation in segmental arteries and a decrease in motor function, implying more serious unrecoverable cardiovascular defects in the 2% group. The damaged blood vessels in the 2% alcohol group resulted in an alteration in permeability and a decrease of blood volume, which were the causes of edema in pathology. These findings contribute towards a better understanding of ethanol-induced cardiovascular abnormalities and co-syndrome in patients with FAS, and warns against excessive maternal alcohol consumption during pregnancy. PMID:27422904

  7. Can the hydrophilicity of functional monomers affect chemical interaction?

    PubMed

    Feitosa, V P; Ogliari, F A; Van Meerbeek, B; Watson, T F; Yoshihara, K; Ogliari, A O; Sinhoreti, M A; Correr, A B; Cama, G; Sauro, S

    2014-02-01

    The number of carbon atoms and/or ester/polyether groups in spacer chains may influence the interaction of functional monomers with calcium and dentin. The present study assessed the chemical interaction and bond strength of 5 standard-synthesized phosphoric-acid ester functional monomers with different spacer chain characteristics, by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), ATR-FTIR, thin-film x-ray diffraction (TF-XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and microtensile bond strength (μTBS). The tested functional monomers were 2-MEP (two-carbon spacer chain), 10-MDP (10-carbon), 12-MDDP (12-carbon), MTEP (more hydrophilic polyether spacer chain), and CAP-P (intermediate hydrophilicity ester spacer). The intensity of monomer-calcium salt formation measured by AAS differed in the order of 12-MDDP=10-MDP>CAP-P>MTEP>2-MEP. FTIR and SEM analyses of monomer-treated dentin surfaces showed resistance to rinsing for all monomer-dentin bonds, except with 2-MEP. TF-XRD confirmed the weaker interaction of 2-MEP. Highest µTBS was observed for 12-MDDP and 10-MDP. A shorter spacer chain (2-MEP) of phosphate functional monomers induced formation of unstable monomer-calcium salts, and lower chemical interaction and dentin bond strength. The presence of ester or ether groups within longer spacer carbon chains (CAP-P and MTEP) may affect the hydrophilicity, μTBS, and also the formation of monomer-calcium salts.

  8. How does temperature affect the function of tissue macrophages?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chen-Ting; Repasky, Elizabeth A.

    2011-03-01

    Macrophages create a major danger signal following injury or infection and upon activation release pro-inflammatory cytokines, which in turn help to generate febrile conditions. Thus, like other cells of the body, tissue macrophages are often exposed to naturally occurring elevations in tissue temperature during inflammation and fever. However, whether macrophages sense and respond to temperature changes in a specific manner which modulates their function is still not clear. In this brief review, we highlight recent studies which have analyzed the effects of temperatures on macrophage function, and summarize the possible underlying molecular mechanisms which have been identified. Mild, physiological range hyperthermia has been shown to have both pro- and anti-inflammatory roles in regulating macrophage inflammatory cytokine production and at the meeting presentation, we will show new data demonstrating that hyperthermia can indeed exert both positive and negative signals to macrophages. While some thermal effects are correlated with the induction of heat shock factors/heat shock proteins, overall it is not clear how mild hyperthermia can exert both pro- and anti-inflammatory functions. We also summarize data which shows that hyperthermia can affect other macrophage effector functions, including the anti-tumor cytotoxicity. Overall, these studies may help us to better understand the immunological role of tissue temperature and may provide important information needed to maximize the application of heat in the treatment of various diseases including cancer.

  9. Vascular function and cardiovascular risk factors in women with severe flushing.

    PubMed

    Sassarini, Jenifer; Lumsden, Mary Ann

    2015-04-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women of postmenopausal age worldwide. It is a relatively rare occurrence before the menopause and the increase in incidence coincides with the most common symptom associated with menopausal transition, hot flushing. Interest in cardiovascular disease post-menopause has largely focused on the effect of hormone therapy on risk of coronary events and stroke, with vasomotor symptoms considered merely a nuisance symptom, but recent work suggests that the presence of flushing may be a marker of underlying cardiovascular disease.

  10. Oxygen transport and cardiovascular function at extreme altitude: lessons from Operation Everest II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, J. R.; Reeves, J. T.; Groves, B. M.; Wagner, P. D.; Alexander, J. K.; Hultgren, H. N.; Cymerman, A.; Houston, C. S.

    1992-01-01

    Operation Everest II was designed to examine the physiological responses to gradual decompression simulating an ascent of Mt Everest (8,848 m) to an inspired PO2 of 43 mmHg. The principal studies conducted were cardiovascular, respiratory, muscular-skeletal and metabolic responses to exercise. Eight healthy males aged 21-31 years began the "ascent" and six successfully reached the "summit", where their resting arterial blood gases were PO2 = 30 mmHg and PCO2 = 11 mmHg, pH = 7.56. Their maximal oxygen uptake decreased from 3.98 +/- 0.2 L/min at sea level to 1.17 +/- 0.08 L/min at PIO2 43 mmHg. The principal factors responsible for oxygen transport from the atmosphere to tissues were (1) Alveolar ventilation--a four fold increase. (2) Diffusion from the alveolus to end capillary blood--unchanged. (3) Cardiac function (assessed by hemodynamics, echocardiography and electrocardiography)--normal--although maximum cardiac output and heart rate were reduced. (4) Oxygen extraction--maximal with PvO2 14.8 +/- 1 mmHg. With increasing altitude maximal blood and muscle lactate progressively declined although at any submaximal intensity blood and muscle lactate was higher at higher altitudes.

  11. Antigravity suit inflation: kidney function and cardiovascular and hormonal responses in men.

    PubMed

    Geelen, G; Kravik, S E; Hadj-Aissa, A; Leftheriotis, G; Vincent, M; Bizollon, C A; Sem-Jacobsen, C W; Greenleaf, J E; Gharib, C

    1989-02-01

    To investigate the effects of lower body positive pressure (LBPP) on kidney function while controlling certain cardiovascular and endocrine responses, seven men [35 +/- 2 (SE) yr] underwent 30 min of sitting and then 4.5 h of 70 degrees head-up tilt. An antigravity suit was applied (60 Torr legs, 30 Torr abdomen) during the last 3 h of tilt. A similar noninflation experiment was conducted where the suited subjects were tilted for 3.5 h. To provide adequate urine flow, the subjects were hydrated during the course of both experiments. Immediately after inflation, mean arterial pressure increased by 8 +/- 3 Torr and pulse rate decreased by 16 +/- 3 beats/min. Plasma renin activity and aldosterone were maximally suppressed (P less than 0.05) after 2.5 h of inflation. Plasma vasopressin decreased by 40-50% (P less than 0.05) and plasma sodium and potassium remained unchanged during both experiments. Glomerular filtration rate was not increased significantly by inflation, whereas inflation induced marked increases (P less than 0.05) in effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), urine flow, osmolar and free water clearances, and total and fractional sodium excretion. No such changes occurred during control. Thus, LBPP induces 1) a significant increase in ERPF and 2) significant changes in kidney excretory patterns similar to those observed during water immersion or the early phase of bed rest, situations that also result in central vascular volume expansion.

  12. Breakfast cereal and caffeinated coffee: effects on working memory, attention, mood, and cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Smith, A P; Clark, R; Gallagher, J

    1999-08-01

    This study examined the effects of breakfast cereal and caffeinated coffee on working memory, attention, mood, and cardiovascular function. One hundred and forty-four volunteers (72 male, 72 female, mean age 21 years) were assigned to one of the groups formed by combining breakfast (cereal versus no breakfast) and caffeine (caffeinated versus decaffeinated coffee) conditions. The volunteers completed a baseline session between 0800 and 0845 h. The breakfast/caffeine administration took place between 0845 and 0915 h. They then completed another test session (starting at 0945) and had a coffee break at 1045, followed by a final session starting at 1145. The results showed that those who consumed breakfast cereal had a more positive mood at the start of the test sessions, performed better on a spatial memory task, and felt calmer at the end of the test session than those in the no breakfast condition. Ingestion of caffeine had no effect on initial mood or working memory, but it did improve encoding of new information and counteracted the fatigue that developed over the test session. Caffeine increased blood pressure and pulse rate, whereas breakfast cereal consumption only had an effect on pulse. Overall, these results confirm previous findings on the effects of breakfast and caffeine, and demonstrate distinct profiles for two common examples of early-morning food and drink, breakfast cereal and caffeinated coffee.

  13. Cardiovascular autonomic function testing under non-standardised and standardised conditions in cardiovascular patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Keet, S W M; Bulte, C S E; Sivanathan, A; Verhees, L; Allaart, C P; Boer, C; Bouwman, R A

    2014-05-01

    Autonomic function tests require standardised test conditions. We compared testing under non-standardised and standardised conditions and investigated the agreement between heart and pulse rate variability in 30 subjects with diabetes mellitus. Deep breathing, Valsalva manoeuvre and quick standing tests showed non-standardised reproducibility intraclass correlations (95% CI) of 0.96 (0.82-0.99), 0.96 (0.81-0.99) and 0.75 (-0.98 to 0.94), respectively. Intraclass correlations for sustained handgrip and quick standing were poor. Heart and pulse rate variability showed high-frequency band intraclass correlations (95% CI) of 0.65 (-0.07 to 0.89) and 0.47 (-0.88 to 0.85) for the very low-frequency band, respectively, 0.68 (0.00-0.90) and 0.70 (-0.09 to 0.91) for the low-frequency band, and 0.86 (0.57-0.95) and 0.82 (0.39-0.95) for the high-frequency band. Reproducibility under standardised conditions was comparable. The mean difference (95% limits of agreement) between heart and pulse rate variability was 0.99 (0.80-1.22) for very low frequency, 1.03 (0.88-1.21) for low frequency and 1.35 (0.84-2.16) for high frequency, with a Spearman's correlation coefficient of 1.00, 0.99 and 0.98, respectively. We demonstrated a high agreement between heart and pulse rate variability and acceptable reproducibility with most autonomic function tests, heart and pulse rate variability.

  14. MicroRNAs affect dendritic cell function and phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Lesley A; Boardman, Dominic A; Tung, Sim L; Lechler, Robert; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) are small, non-coding RNA molecules that have been linked with immunity through regulating/modulating gene expression. A role for these molecules in T-cell and B-cell development and function has been well established. An increasing body of literature now highlights the importance of specific miRNA in dendritic cell (DC) development as well as their maturation process, antigen presentation capacity and cytokine release. Given the unique role of DC within the immune system, linking the innate and adaptive immune responses, understanding how specific miRNA affect DC function is of importance for understanding disease. In this review we summarize recent developments in miRNA and DC research, highlighting the requirement of miRNA in DC lineage commitment from bone marrow progenitors and for the development of subsets such as plasmacytoid DC and conventional DC. In addition, we discuss how infections and tumours modulate miRNA expression and consequently DC function. PMID:25244106

  15. Vitamin D and the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, L A; Witham, M D

    2013-08-01

    Vitamin D, a secosteroid hormone, affects multiple biological pathways via both genomic and nongenomic signalling. Several pathways have potential benefit to cardiovascular health, including effects on parathyroid hormone, the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, vascular endothelial growth factor and cytokine production, as well as direct effects on endothelial cell function and myocyte calcium influx. Observational data supports a link between low vitamin D metabolite levels and cardiovascular health. Cross-sectional data shows associations between low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and stroke, myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and heart failure. Longitudinal data also suggests a relationship with incident hypertension and new cardiovascular events. However, these associations are potentially confounded by reverse causality and by the effects that other cardiovascular risk factors have on vitamin D metabolite levels. Intervention studies to date suggest a modest antihypertensive effect of vitamin D, no effect on serum lipids, a small positive effect on insulin resistance and fasting glucose, and equivocal actions on arterial stiffness and endothelial function. Analysis of cardiovascular event data collected from osteoporosis trials does not currently show a clear signal for reduced cardiovascular events with vitamin D supplementation, but results may be confounded by the coadministration of calcium, and by the secondary nature of the analyses. Despite mechanistic and observational data that suggest a protective role for vitamin D in cardiovascular disease, intervention studies to date are less promising. Large trials using cardiovascular events as a primary outcome are needed before vitamin D can be recommended as a therapy for cardiovascular disease.

  16. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B Alex; Jetten, Anton M; Austin, Christopher P; Tice, Raymond R

    2013-05-25

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR.

  17. BIOAVAILABLE AIR PARTICULATE POLLUTION CONSTITUENTS DIRECTLY ALTER CARDIOVASCULAR FUNCTION EX VIVO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have reported associations between particulate air pollution exposure and cardiovascular (CV) effects within susceptible individuals. Particle characteristics and biological mechanisms responsible for these observations are not known. We examined whether s...

  18. Effects of isotonic and isometric exercises with mist sauna bathing on cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, and metabolic functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Satoshi; Kawahara, Yuko; Nishimura, Naoki; Nishimura, Rumiko; Sugenoya, Junichi; Miwa, Chihiro; Takada, Masumi

    2014-08-01

    To clarify the effects of isometric and isotonic exercise during mist sauna bathing on the cardiovascular function, thermoregulatory function, and metabolism, six healthy young men (22 ± 1 years old, height 173 ± 4 cm, weight 65.0 ± 5.0 kg) were exposed to a mist sauna for 10 min at a temperature of 40 °C, and relative humidity of 100 % while performing or not performing ˜30 W of isometric or isotonic exercise. The effect of the exercise was assessed by measuring tympanic temperature, heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, chest sweat rate, chest skin blood flow, and plasma catecholamine and cortisol, glucose, lactate, and free fatty acid levels. Repeated measures ANOVA showed no significant differences in blood pressure, skin blood flow, sweat rate, and total amount of sweating. Tympanic temperature increased more during isotonic exercise, and heart rate increase was more marked during isotonic exercise. The changes in lactate indicated that fatigue was not very great during isometric exercise. The glucose level indicated greater energy expenditure during isometric exercise. The free fatty acid and catecholamine levels indicated that isometric exercise did not result in very great energy expenditure and stress, respectively. The results for isotonic exercise of a decrease in lactate level and an increase in plasma free fatty acid level indicated that fatigue and energy expenditure were rather large while the perceived stress was comparatively low. We concluded that isotonic exercise may be a more desirable form of exercise during mist sauna bathing given the changes in glucose and free fatty acid levels.

  19. Effects of isotonic and isometric exercises with mist sauna bathing on cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, and metabolic functions.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Satoshi; Kawahara, Yuko; Nishimura, Naoki; Nishimura, Rumiko; Sugenoya, Junichi; Miwa, Chihiro; Takada, Masumi

    2014-08-01

    To clarify the effects of isometric and isotonic exercise during mist sauna bathing on the cardiovascular function, thermoregulatory function, and metabolism, six healthy young men (22 ± 1 years old, height 173 ± 4 cm, weight 65.0 ± 5.0 kg) were exposed to a mist sauna for 10 min at a temperature of 40 °C, and relative humidity of 100 % while performing or not performing ∼30 W of isometric or isotonic exercise. The effect of the exercise was assessed by measuring tympanic temperature, heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, chest sweat rate, chest skin blood flow, and plasma catecholamine and cortisol, glucose, lactate, and free fatty acid levels. Repeated measures ANOVA showed no significant differences in blood pressure, skin blood flow, sweat rate, and total amount of sweating. Tympanic temperature increased more during isotonic exercise, and heart rate increase was more marked during isotonic exercise. The changes in lactate indicated that fatigue was not very great during isometric exercise. The glucose level indicated greater energy expenditure during isometric exercise. The free fatty acid and catecholamine levels indicated that isometric exercise did not result in very great energy expenditure and stress, respectively. The results for isotonic exercise of a decrease in lactate level and an increase in plasma free fatty acid level indicated that fatigue and energy expenditure were rather large while the perceived stress was comparatively low. We concluded that isotonic exercise may be a more desirable form of exercise during mist sauna bathing given the changes in glucose and free fatty acid levels.

  20. Scorpion venom components that affect ion-channels function

    PubMed Central

    Quintero-Hernández, V.; Jiménez-Vargas, J.M.; Gurrola, G.B.; Valdivia, H.H.F.; Possani, L.D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The number and types of venom components that affect ion-channel function are reviewed. These are the most important venom components responsible for human intoxication, deserving medical attention, often requiring the use of specific anti-venoms. Special emphasis is given to peptides that recognize Na+-, K+- and Ca++-channels of excitable cells. Knowledge generated by direct isolation of peptides from venom and components deduced from cloned genes, whose amino acid sequences are deposited into databanks are now adays in the order of 1.5 thousands, out of an estimate biodiversity closed to 300,000. Here the diversity of components is briefly reviewed with mention to specific references. Structural characteristic are discussed with examples taken from published work. The principal mechanisms of action of the three different types of peptides are also reviewed. Na+-channel specific venom components usually are modifier of the open and closing kinetic mechanisms of the ion-channels, whereas peptides affecting K+-channels are normally pore blocking agents. The Ryanodine Ca++-channel specific peptides are known for causing sub-conducting stages of the channels conductance and some were shown to be able to internalize penetrating inside the muscle cells. PMID:23891887

  1. Functional roles affect diversity-succession relationships for boreal beetles.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Heloise; Johansson, Therese; Stenbacka, Fredrik; Hjältén, Joakim

    2013-01-01

    Species diversity commonly increases with succession and this relationship is an important justification for conserving large areas of old-growth habitats. However, species with different ecological roles respond differently to succession. We examined the relationship between a range of diversity measures and time since disturbance for boreal forest beetles collected over a 285 year forest chronosequence. We compared responses of "functional" groups related to threat status, dependence on dead wood habitats, diet and the type of trap in which they were collected (indicative of the breadth of ecologies of species). We examined fits of commonly used rank-abundance models for each age class and traditional and derived diversity indices. Rank abundance distributions were closest to the Zipf-Mandelbrot distribution, suggesting little role for competition in structuring most assemblages. Diversity measures for most functional groups increased with succession, but differences in slopes were common. Evenness declined with succession; more so for red-listed species than common species. Saproxylic species increased in diversity with succession while non-saproxylic species did not. Slopes for fungivores were steeper than other diet groups, while detritivores were not strongly affected by succession. Species trapped using emergence traps (log specialists) responded more weakly to succession than those trapped using flight intercept traps (representing a broader set of ecologies). Species associated with microhabitats that accumulate with succession (fungi and dead wood) thus showed the strongest diversity responses to succession. These clear differences between functional group responses to forest succession should be considered in planning landscapes for optimum conservation value, particularly functional resilience.

  2. Dehydration affects brain structure and function in healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kempton, Matthew J; Ettinger, Ulrich; Foster, Russell; Williams, Steven C R; Calvert, Gemma A; Hampshire, Adam; Zelaya, Fernando O; O'Gorman, Ruth L; McMorris, Terry; Owen, Adrian M; Smith, Marcus S

    2011-01-01

    It was recently observed that dehydration causes shrinkage of brain tissue and an associated increase in ventricular volume. Negative effects of dehydration on cognitive performance have been shown in some but not all studies, and it has also been reported that an increased perceived effort may be required following dehydration. However, the effects of dehydration on brain function are unknown. We investigated this question using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 10 healthy adolescents (mean age = 16.8, five females). Each subject completed a thermal exercise protocol and nonthermal exercise control condition in a cross-over repeated measures design. Subjects lost more weight via perspiration in the thermal exercise versus the control condition (P < 0.0001), and lateral ventricle enlargement correlated with the reduction in body mass (r = 0.77, P = 0.01). Dehydration following the thermal exercise protocol led to a significantly stronger increase in fronto-parietal blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) response during an executive function task (Tower of London) than the control condition, whereas cerebral perfusion during rest was not affected. The increase in BOLD response after dehydration was not paralleled by a change in cognitive performance, suggesting an inefficient use of brain metabolic activity following dehydration. This pattern indicates that participants exerted a higher level of neuronal activity in order to achieve the same performance level. Given the limited availability of brain metabolic resources, these findings suggest that prolonged states of reduced water intake may adversely impact executive functions such as planning and visuo-spatial processing.

  3. To what extent does urbanisation affect fragmented grassland functioning?

    PubMed

    van der Walt, L; Cilliers, S S; Kellner, K; Du Toit, M J; Tongway, D

    2015-03-15

    Urbanisation creates altered environments characterised by increased human habitation, impermeable surfaces, artificial structures, landscape fragmentation, habitat loss, resulting in different resource loss pathways. The vulnerable Rand Highveld Grassland vegetation unit in the Tlokwe Municipal area, South Africa, has been extensively affected and transformed by urbanisation, agriculture, and mining. Grassland fragments in urban areas are often considered to be less species rich and less functional than in the more untransformed or "natural" exurban environments, and are therefore seldom a priority for conservation. Furthermore, urban grassland fragments are often being more intensely managed than exurban areas, such as consistent mowing in open urban areas. Four urbanisation measures acting as indicators for patterns and processes associated with urban areas were calculated for matrix areas surrounding each selected grassland fragment to quantify the position of each grassland remnant along an urbanisation gradient. The grassland fragments were objectively classified into two classes of urbanisation, namely "exurban" and "urban" based on the urbanisation measure values. Grazing was recorded in some exurban grasslands and mowing in some urban grassland fragments. Unmanaged grassland fragments were present in both urban and exurban areas. Fine-scale biophysical landscape function was determined by executing the Landscape Function Analysis (LFA) method. LFA assesses fine-scale landscape patchiness (entailing resource conserving potential and erosion resistance) and 11 soil surface indicators to produce three main LFA parameters (stability, infiltration, and nutrient cycling), which indicates how well a system is functioning in terms of fine-scale biophysical soil processes and characteristics. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of urbanisation and associated management practices on fine-scale biophysical landscape function of urban and exurban

  4. The predictive value of arterial stiffness on major adverse cardiovascular events in individuals with mildly impaired renal function

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jie; Wang, Xiaona; Ye, Ping; Cao, Ruihua; Yang, Xu; Xiao, Wenkai; Zhang, Yun; Bai, Yongyi; Wu, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Despite growing evidence that arterial stiffness has important predictive value for cardiovascular disease in patients with advanced stages of chronic kidney disease, the predictive significance of arterial stiffness in individuals with mildly impaired renal function has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of arterial stiffness on cardiovascular disease in this specific population. Materials and methods We analyzed measurements of arterial stiffness (carotid–femoral pulse-wave velocity [cf-PWV]) and the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) in 1,499 subjects from a 4.8-year longitudinal study. Results A multivariate Cox proportional-hazard regression analysis showed that in individuals with normal renal function (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] ≥90 mL/min/1.73 m2), the baseline cf-PWV was not associated with occurrence of MACEs (hazard ratio 1.398, 95% confidence interval 0.748–2.613; P=0.293). In individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2), a higher baseline cf-PWV level was associated with a higher risk of MACEs (hazard ratio 2.334, 95% confidence interval 1.082–5.036; P=0.031). Conclusion Arterial stiffness is a moderate and independent predictive factor for MACEs in individuals with mildly impaired renal function (eGFR <90 mL/min/1.73 m2). PMID:27621605

  5. Does Ramadan Fasting Adversely Affect Cognitive Function in Young Females?

    PubMed Central

    Ghayour Najafabadi, Mahboubeh; Rahbar Nikoukar, Laya; Memari, Amir; Ekhtiari, Hamed; Beygi, Sara

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of Ramadan fasting on cognitive function in 17 female athletes. Data were obtained from participants of two fasting (n = 9) and nonfasting (n = 8) groups at three periods of the study (before Ramadan, at the third week in Ramadan, and after Ramadan). Digit span test (DST) and Stroop color test were employed to assess short-term memory and inhibition/cognitive flexibility at each time point. There were no significant changes for DST and Stroop task 1 in both groups, whereas Stroop task 2 and task 3 showed significant improvements in Ramadan condition (p < 0.05). Interference indices did not change significantly across the study except in post-Ramadan period of fasting group (p < 0.05). Group × week interaction was significant only for error numbers (p < 0.05). Athletes in nonfasting showed a significant decrease in number of errors in Ramadan compared to baseline (p < 0.05). The results suggest that Ramadan fasting may not adversely affect cognitive function in female athletes. PMID:26697263

  6. Functional Roles Affect Diversity-Succession Relationships for Boreal Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, Heloise; Johansson, Therese; Stenbacka, Fredrik; Hjältén, Joakim

    2013-01-01

    Species diversity commonly increases with succession and this relationship is an important justification for conserving large areas of old-growth habitats. However, species with different ecological roles respond differently to succession. We examined the relationship between a range of diversity measures and time since disturbance for boreal forest beetles collected over a 285 year forest chronosequence. We compared responses of “functional” groups related to threat status, dependence on dead wood habitats, diet and the type of trap in which they were collected (indicative of the breadth of ecologies of species). We examined fits of commonly used rank-abundance models for each age class and traditional and derived diversity indices. Rank abundance distributions were closest to the Zipf-Mandelbrot distribution, suggesting little role for competition in structuring most assemblages. Diversity measures for most functional groups increased with succession, but differences in slopes were common. Evenness declined with succession; more so for red-listed species than common species. Saproxylic species increased in diversity with succession while non-saproxylic species did not. Slopes for fungivores were steeper than other diet groups, while detritivores were not strongly affected by succession. Species trapped using emergence traps (log specialists) responded more weakly to succession than those trapped using flight intercept traps (representing a broader set of ecologies). Species associated with microhabitats that accumulate with succession (fungi and dead wood) thus showed the strongest diversity responses to succession. These clear differences between functional group responses to forest succession should be considered in planning landscapes for optimum conservation value, particularly functional resilience. PMID:23977350

  7. Does Bowel Preparation for Colonoscopy Affect Cognitive Function?

    PubMed Central

    Wadsworth, P.; Blackburne, H.; Dixon, L.; Dobbs, B.; Eglinton, T.; Ing, A.; Mulder, R.; Porter, R.J.; Wakeman, C.; Frizelle, F.A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Colonoscopy is a common procedure used in the diagnosis and treatment of a range of bowel disorders. Prior preparation involving potent laxatives is a necessary stage to ensure adequate visualization of the bowel wall. It is known that the sedatives given to most patients during the colonoscopy cause a temporary impairment in cognitive function; however, the potential for bowel preparation to affect cognitive function has not previously been investigated. To assess the effect of bowel preparation for colonoscopy on cognitive function. This was a prospective, nonrandomized controlled study of cognitive function in patients who had bowel preparation for colonoscopy compared with those having gastroscopy and therefore no bowel preparation. Cognitive function was assessed using the Modified Mini Mental State Examination (MMMSE) and selected tests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery. Individual test scores and changes between initial and subsequent tests were compared between the groups. Age, gender, and weight were also compared. Forty-three colonoscopy and 25 gastroscopy patients were recruited. The 2 groups were similar for age and gender; however, patients having gastroscopy were heavier. MMMSE scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 28.6 and 29.5 (P = 0.24) at baseline, 28.7 and 29.8 (P = 0.32) at test 2, 28.1 and 28.5 (P = 0.76) at test 3. Motor screening scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 349.3 and 354.1 (P = 0.97) at baseline, 307.5 and 199.7 (P = 0.06) at test 2, 212.0 and 183.2 (P = 0.33) at test 3. Spatial working memory scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 14.4 and 6.7 (P = 0.29) at baseline, 9.7 and 4.3 (P = 0.27) at test 2, 10 and 4.5 (P = 0.33) at test 3. Digit Symbol Substitution Test scores for colonoscopy and gastroscopy groups, respectively, were 36.3 and 37.8 (P = 0.84) at baseline, 36.4 and

  8. Clinical and Biochemical Markers of Cardiovascular Structure and Function in Women With the Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Velarde, Gladys P; Sherazi, Saadia; Kraemer, Dale F; Bravo-Jaimes, Katia; Butterfield, Ryan; Amico, Tonja; Steinmetz, Sherry D; Guzman, Maricela; Martin, Dale; Dodani, Sunita; Smith, Brian H

    2015-12-01

    The pathobiological impact of individual components of the metabolic syndrome (MS) on cardiac structural and functional parameters in women with isolated MS is not known. The objectives of this study were (1) to compare biochemical (prothrombotic, lipogenic, and inflammatory) and imaging (carotid intima-media thickening and basic cardiac structural measurements) markers in women with and without MS and (2) to examine if any of these markers associated or predicted cardiac structural differences between the 2 groups. This cross-sectional pilot study included 88 women with MS and 35 women without it. MS was defined according to the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Patients with diagnosis of diabetes were excluded. Compared with healthy subjects, women with MS had higher levels of intercellular adhesion molecule, myeloperoxidase, C-reactive protein, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, leptin, apolipoprotein-B, and lower levels of apolipoprotein-A1 (p <0.001 for all). They also had higher mean ventricular septum, posterior wall thickness, left ventricular (LV) mass, carotid intima-media thickness (p <0.001 for all), and left atrial diameter (p = 0.015). In multivariable regression models, waist circumference and systolic blood pressure (BP) were significant predictors of: ventricular septum (p = 0.005 and p = 0.001, respectively), posterior wall thickness (p = 0.008 and p = 0.040, respectively), and LV mass (p <0.001 and p = 0.013, respectively). Significant predictors for carotid intima-media thickness were systolic BP, glucose, and leptin (p <0.0001, p = 0.034, and p = 0.002, respectively). In conclusion, there are significant clinical, biochemical, and cardiovascular structural differences in women with isolated MS compared with those without. Waist circumference and systolic BP had the strongest association with cardiac structural differences in this group of women.

  9. Association of Serum Erythropoietin with Cardiovascular Events, Kidney Function Decline and Mortality: The Health ABC Study

    PubMed Central

    Garimella, Pranav S.; Katz, Ronit; Patel, Kushang V.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Parikh, Chirag R.; Ix, Joachim H.; Fried, Linda F.; Newman, Anne B.; Shlipak, Michael G.; Harris, Tamara B.; Sarnak, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that in patients with heart failure (HF), high serum erythropoietin is associated with risk of recurrent HF and mortality. Trials of erythropoietin stimulating agents in persons with kidney disease have also suggested an increased incidence of adverse clinical events. No studies have evaluated the association of endogenous erythropoietin levels with clinical outcomes in the community living older adults. Methods and Results Erythropoietin concentration was measured in 2,488 participants aged 70–79 years in the Health, Aging and Body Composition Study. Associations of erythropoietin with incident HF, coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke, mortality, and ≥30% decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were examined using Cox proportional hazards and logistic regression over 10.7 years of follow up. Mean (SD) age was 75 (3) years and median (quartile 1, quartile 3) erythropoietin was 12.3 (9.0, 17.2) mIU/mL. There were 503 incident HF events and each doubling of serum erythropoietin was associated with a 25% increased risk of incident HF 1.25 (95% CI 1.13, 1.48) after adjusting for demographics, prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD), CVD risk factors, kidney function and serum hemoglobin. There was no interaction of serum erythropoietin with chronic kidney disease or anemia (p>0.50). There were 330 incident CHD events, 161 strokes, 1,112 deaths and 698 outcomes of ≥ 30% decline in eGFR. Serum erythropoietin was not significantly associated with these outcomes. Conclusions Higher levels of endogenous erythropoietin are associated with incident HF in older adults. Studies need to elucidate the mechanisms through which endogenous erythropoietin levels associate with specific outcomes. PMID:26721912

  10. Effect of high-intensity interval training on cardiovascular function, VO2max, and muscular force.

    PubMed

    Astorino, Todd A; Allen, Ryan P; Roberson, Daniel W; Jurancich, Matt

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of short-term high-intensity interval training (HIIT) on cardiovascular function, cardiorespiratory fitness, and muscular force. Active, young (age and body fat = 25.3 ± 4.5 years and 14.3 ± 6.4%) men and women (N = 20) of a similar age, physical activity, and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) completed 6 sessions of HIIT consisting of repeated Wingate tests over a 2- to 3-week period. Subjects completed 4 Wingate tests on days 1 and 2, 5 on days 3 and 4, and 6 on days 5 and 6. A control group of 9 men and women (age and body fat = 22.8 ± 2.8 years and 15.2 ± 6.9%) completed all testing but did not perform HIIT. Changes in resting blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR), VO2max, body composition, oxygen (O2) pulse, peak, mean, and minimum power output, fatigue index, and voluntary force production of the knee flexors and extensors were examined pretraining and posttraining. Results showed significant (p < 0.05) improvements in VO2max, O2 pulse, and Wingate-derived power output with HIIT. The magnitude of improvement in VO2max was related to baseline VO2max (r = -0.44, p = 0.05) and fatigue index (r = 0.50, p < 0.05). No change (p > 0.05) in resting BP, HR, or force production was revealed. Data show that HIIT significantly enhanced VO2max and O2 pulse and power output in active men and women.

  11. Oral administration of veratric acid, a constituent of vegetables and fruits, prevents cardiovascular remodelling in hypertensive rats: a functional evaluation.

    PubMed

    Saravanakumar, Murugesan; Raja, Boobalan; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Silambarasan, Thangarasu; Prahalathan, Pichavaram; Kumar, Subramanian; Mishra, Santosh Kumar

    2015-11-14

    In our previous studies, veratric acid (VA) shows beneficial effect on hypertension and its associated dyslipidaemia. In continuation, this study was designed to investigate the effect of VA, one of the major benzoic acid derivatives from vegetables and fruits, on cardiovascular remodelling in hypertensive rats, primarily assessed by functional studies using Langendorff isolated heart system and organ bath system. Hypertension was induced in male albino Wistar rats by oral administration of N ω -nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME) (40 mg/kg body weight (b.w.)) in drinking water for 4 weeks. VA was orally administered at a dose of 40 mg/kg b.w. l-NAME-treated rats showed impaired cardiac ventricular and vascular function, evaluated by Langendorff isolated heart system and organ bath studies, respectively; a significant increase in the lipid peroxidation products such as thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances and lipid hydroperoxides in aorta; and a significant decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and levels of GSH, vitamin C and vitamin E in aorta. Fibrotic remodelling of the aorta and heart were assessed by Masson's Trichrome staining and Van Gieson's staining, respectively. In addition, l-NAME rats showed increased heart fibronectin expression assessed by immunohistochemical analysis. VA supplementation throughout the experimental period significantly normalised cardiovascular function, oxidative stress, antioxidant status and fibrotic remodelling of tissues. These results of the present study conclude that VA acts as a protective agent against hypertension-associated cardiovascular remodelling.

  12. Weight-loss changes PPAR expression, reduces atherosclerosis and improves cardiovascular function in obese insulin-resistant mice

    SciTech Connect

    Verreth, Wim; Verhamme, Peter; Pelat, Michael; Ganame, Javier; Bielicki, John K.; Mertens, Ann; Quarck, Rozenn; Benhabiles, Nora; Marguerie, Gerard; Mackness, Bharti; Mackness, Mike; Ninio, Ewa; Herregods, Marie-Christine; Balligand, Jean-Luc; Holvoet, Paul

    2003-09-01

    Weight-loss in obese insulin-resistant, but not in insulin-sensitive, persons reduces CHD risk. It is not known to what extent changes in the adipose gene expression profile are important for reducing CHD risk. We studied the effect of diet restriction-induced weight-loss on gene expression in adipose tissue, atherosclerosis and cardiovascular function in mice with combined leptin and LDL-receptor deficiency. Obesity, hypertriglyceridemia and insulin-resistance are associated with hypertension, impaired left ventricle function and accelerated atherosclerosis in those mice. Diet restriction during 12 weeks caused a 45% weight-loss and changes in the gene expression in adipose tissue of PPARa and PPAR? and of key genes regulating glucose transport and insulin sensitivity, lipid metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammation, most of which are under the transcriptional control of PPARs. These changes were associated with increased insulin-sensitivity, decreased hypertriglyceridemia, reduced mean 24-hour blood pressure and heart rate, restored circadian variations of blood pressure and heart rate, increased ejection fraction, and reduced atherosclerosis. Thus, induction of PPARa and PPAR? in adipose tissue is a key mechanism for reducing atherosclerosis and improving cardiovascular function resulting from weight-loss. Our observations point to the critical role of PPARs in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular features of the metabolic syndrome.

  13. Role and Function of MicroRNAs in Extracellular Vesicles in Cardiovascular Biology

    PubMed Central

    Pfeifer, Philipp; Werner, Nikos; Jansen, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Intercellular communication mediated by extracellular vesicles is crucial for preserving vascular integrity and in the development of cardiovascular disease. Extracellular vesicles consist of apoptotic bodies, microvesicles, and exosomes that can be found in almost every fluid compartment of the body like blood, saliva, and urine. In the recent years, a lot of reports came up suggesting that major cardiovascular and metabolic pathologies like atherogenesis, heart failure, or diabetes are highly influenced by transfer of microRNAs via extracellular vesicles leading to altered protein expression and phenotypes of recipient cells. The following review will summarize the fast developing field of intercellular signaling in cardiovascular biology by microRNA-containing extracellular vesicles. PMID:26558258

  14. Strategies and methods to study sex differences in cardiovascular structure and function: a guide for basic scientists

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease remains the primary cause of death worldwide. In the US, deaths due to cardiovascular disease for women exceed those of men. While cultural and psychosocial factors such as education, economic status, marital status and access to healthcare contribute to sex differences in adverse outcomes, physiological and molecular bases of differences between women and men that contribute to development of cardiovascular disease and response to therapy remain underexplored. Methods This article describes concepts, methods and procedures to assist in the design of animal and tissue/cell based studies of sex differences in cardiovascular structure, function and models of disease. Results To address knowledge gaps, study designs must incorporate appropriate experimental material including species/strain characteristics, sex and hormonal status. Determining whether a sex difference exists in a trait must take into account the reproductive status and history of the animal including those used for tissue (cell) harvest, such as the presence of gonadal steroids at the time of testing, during development or number of pregnancies. When selecting the type of experimental animal, additional consideration should be given to diet requirements (soy or plant based influencing consumption of phytoestrogen), lifespan, frequency of estrous cycle in females, and ability to investigate developmental or environmental components of disease modulation. Stress imposed by disruption of sleep/wake cycles, patterns of social interaction (or degree of social isolation), or handling may influence adrenal hormones that interact with pathways activated by the sex steroid hormones. Care must be given to selection of hormonal treatment and route of administration. Conclusions Accounting for sex in the design and interpretation of studies including pharmacological effects of drugs is essential to increase the foundation of basic knowledge upon which to build translational

  15. Functional cardiovascular reserve predicts survival pre-kidney and post-kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ting, Stephen M S; Iqbal, Hasan; Kanji, Hemali; Hamborg, Thomas; Aldridge, Nicolas; Krishnan, Nithya; Imray, Chris H E; Banerjee, Prithwish; Bland, Rosemary; Higgins, Robert; Zehnder, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Exercise intolerance is an important comorbidity in patients with CKD. Anaerobic threshold (AT) determines the upper limits of aerobic exercise and is a measure of cardiovascular reserve. This study investigated the prognostic capacity of AT on survival in patients with advanced CKD and the effect of kidney transplantation on survival in those with reduced cardiovascular reserve. Using cardiopulmonary exercise testing, cardiovascular reserve was evaluated in 240 patients who were waitlisted for kidney transplantation between 2008 and 2010, and patients were followed for ≤5 years. Survival time was the primary endpoint. Cumulative survival for the entire cohort was 72.6% (24 deaths), with cardiovascular events being the most common cause of death (54.2%). According to Kaplan-Meier estimates, patients with AT <40% of predicted peak VO2 had a significantly reduced 5-year cumulative overall survival rate compared with those with AT ≥40% (P<0.001). Regarding the cohort with AT <40%, patients who underwent kidney transplantation (6 deaths) had significantly better survival compared with nontransplanted patients (17 deaths) (hazard ratio, 4.48; 95% confidence interval, 1.78 to 11.38; P=0.002). Survival did not differ significantly among patients with AT ≥40%, with one death in the nontransplanted group and no deaths in the transplanted group. In summary, this is the first prospective study to demonstrate a significant association of AT, as the objective index of cardiovascular reserve, with survival in patients with advanced CKD. High-risk patients with reduced cardiovascular reserve had a better survival rate after receiving a kidney transplant.

  16. Maternal metabolic stress may affect oviduct gatekeeper function.

    PubMed

    Jordaens, Lies; Van Hoeck, Veerle; Maillo, Veronica; Gutierrez-Adan, Alfonso; Marei, Waleed Fawzy A; Vlaeminck, Bruno; Thys, Sofie; Sturmey, Roger G S; Bols, Peter; Leroy, Jo

    2017-03-03

    We hypothesized that elevated non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) modify in vitro bovine oviduct epithelial cell (BOEC) metabolism and barrier function. Hereto, BOECs were studied in a polarized system with 24h-treatments at day 9: 1) CONTROL (0µM NEFA + 0%EtOH), 2) SOLVENT CONTROL (0µM NEFA + 0.45%EtOH), 3) BASAL NEFA (720µM NEFA + 0.45%EtOH in the basal compartment), 4) APICAL NEFA (720µM NEFA + 0.45%EtOH in the apical compartment). FITC-albumin was used for monolayer permeability assessment, and related to Transepithelial Electric Resistance (TER). Fatty acid (FA), glucose, lactate and pyruvate concentrations were measured in spent medium. Intracellular lipid droplets (LD) and FA-uptake were studied using Bodipy 493/503 and immunolabelling of FA-transporters (FAT/CD36, FABP3 and caveolin1). BOEC-mRNA was retrieved for qRT-PCR. Results revealed that APICAL NEFA reduced relative TER-increase (46.85%) during treatment, and increased FITC-albumin flux (27.59%) compared to other treatments. In BASAL NEFA, FAs were transferred to the apical compartment as free FAs: mostly palmitic and oleic acid increased, respectively 56.0 % and 33.5% of initial FA-concentrations. APICAL NEFA allowed no FA-transfer, but induced LD-accumulation and upregulated FA-transporter expression (↑CD36, ↑FABP3, ↑CAV1-protein-expression). Gene expression in APICAL NEFA indicated increased anti-apoptotic (↑BCL2) and anti-oxidative (↑SOD1) capacity, upregulated lipid metabolism (↑CPT1, ↑ACSL1 and ↓ACACA), and FA-uptake (↑CAV1). All treatments had similar carbohydrate metabolism and oviduct function specific gene expression (=OVGP1, ESR1, FOXJ1). Overall, elevated NEFAs affected BOEC-metabolism and barrier function differently depending on NEFA-exposure side. Data substantiate the concept of the oviduct as a gatekeeper that may actively alter early embryonic developmental conditions.

  17. Oestrogen receptors in the central nervous system and evidence for their role in the control of cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Spary, Emma J; Maqbool, Azhar; Batten, Trevor F C

    2009-11-01

    Oestrogen is considered beneficial to cardiovascular health through protective effects not only on the heart and vasculature, but also on the autonomic nervous system via actions on oestrogen receptors. A plethora of evidence supports a role for the hormone within the central nervous system in modulating the pathways regulating cardiovascular function. A complex interaction of several brainstem, spinal and forebrain nuclei is required to receive, integrate and co-ordinate inputs that contribute appropriate autonomic reflex responses to changes in blood pressure and other cardiovascular parameters. Central effects of oestrogen and oestrogen receptors have already been demonstrated in many of these areas. In addition to the classical nuclear oestrogen receptors (ERalpha and ERbeta) a recently discovered G-protein coupled receptor, GPR30, has been shown to be a novel mediator of oestrogenic action. Many anatomical and molecular studies have described a considerable overlap in the regional expression of these receptors; however, the receptors do exhibit specific characteristics and subtype specific expression is found in many autonomic brain areas, for example ERbeta appears to predominate in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, whilst ERalpha is important in the nucleus of the solitary tract. This review provides an overview of the available information on the localisation of oestrogen receptor subtypes and their multitude of possible modulatory actions in different groups of neurochemically and functionally defined neurones in autonomic-related areas of the brain.

  18. Lentiviral vectors and cardiovascular diseases: a genetic tool for manipulating cardiomyocyte differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Di Pasquale, E; Latronico, M V G; Jotti, G S; Condorelli, G

    2012-06-01

    Engineered recombinant viral vectors are a powerful tool for vehiculating genetic information into mammalian cells. Because of their ability to infect both dividing and non-dividing cells with high efficiency, lentiviral vectors have gained particular interest for basic research and preclinical studies in the cardiovascular field. We review here the major applications for lentiviral-vector technology in the cardiovascular field: we will discuss their use in trailing gene expression during the induction of differentiation, in protocols for the isolation of cardiac cells and in the tracking of cardiac cells after transplantation in vivo; we will also describe lentivirally-mediated gene delivery uses, such as the induction of a phenotype of interest in a target cell or the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In addition, a section of the review will be dedicated to reprogramming approaches, focusing attention on the generation of pluripotent stem cells and on transdifferentiation, two emerging strategies for the production of cardiac myocytes from human cells and for the investigation of human diseases. Finally, in order to give a perspective on their future clinical use we will critically discuss advantages and disadvantages of lentivirus-based strategies for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Dietary supplementation of yucca (Yucca schidigera) affects ovine ovarian functions.

    PubMed

    Vlčková, Radoslava; Sopková, Drahomíra; Andrejčáková, Zuzana; Valocký, Igor; Kádasi, Attila; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Petrilla, Vladimír; Sirotkin, Alexander V

    2017-01-15

    Yucca (Yucca schidigera) is a popular medicinal plant due to its many positive effects on animal and human physiology, including their reproductive systems. To examine the effect of supplemental yucca feeding on sheep reproduction, including ovarian functions and their hormonal regulators, ewes were fed (or not fed, control) yucca powder (1.5 g/head/day, 30 days). Macromorphometric indexes of the oviduct, ovary, and ovarian folliculogenesis were measured. Reproductive hormone levels in the blood were measured using a radioimmunoassay. Granulosa cells were aspirated from the ovary, and their proliferation and apoptosis were detected using immunocytochemistry. To assess secretory activity and its response to gonadotropin, ovarian fragments of treated and control ewes were cultured with and without follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH; 0, 0.1, 1, 10, or 100 IU/mL), and the release of reproductive hormones into the culture medium was evaluated. Finally, to examine the direct action of yucca on the ovary, ovarian fragments from control ewes were cultured with and without yucca extract (1, 10, or 100 μg/mL), and the release of reproductive hormones was measured. Yucca supplementation significantly decreased the size of small antral follicles (2 to <5 mm in diameter), increased accumulation of the apoptosis marker bax, and decreased serum progesterone (P4) and estradiol (E2) levels. It inhibited the release of P4 (but not other hormones), to prevent the stimulatory action of FSH on P4 output and promoted insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) release by fragments cultured with FSH. However, yucca supplementation did not affect the size of larger follicles and number of follicles, volume and weight of ovaries, length and weight of oviducts, caspase 3 accumulation, cell proliferation, testosterone (T) or IGF-I serum levels, or T or E2 release by cultured ovarian fragments and their response to FSH. Yucca addition to culture medium inhibited P4 and IGF-I, but not T or E2

  20. An emerging trend in functional foods for the prevention of cardiovascular disease and diabetes: Marine algal polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Murray, Margaret; Dordevic, Aimee L; Ryan, Lisa; Bonham, Maxine P

    2016-11-11

    Marine macroalgae are gaining recognition among the scientific community as a significant source of functional food ingredients. Due to the harsh environments in which macroalgae survive, they produce unique bioactive compounds that are not found in terrestrial plants. Polyphenols are the predominant bioactive compound in brown algae and are accountable for the majority of its biological activity. Phlorotannins are a type of polyphenol that are unique to marine sources and have exhibited protective effects against hyperglycaemia, hyperlipidaemia, inflammation and oxidative stress, known risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetic complications, in cell culture, animal studies and some human studies. This review updates the information on marine polyphenols, with a particular focus on phlorotannins and their potential health benefits in relation to the prevention and treatment of risk factors for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

  1. Functional adaptation to oxidative stress by memory T cells: an analysis of the role in the cardiovascular disease process.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Maqsood M; Matata, Bashir M

    2008-11-21

    T cells participate in combating infection and critically determine the outcomes in any given disease process. Impaired immune response occurs in a number disease processes such as in cancer and atherosclerosis although the underlying mechanisms are still not fully understood. This article gives an up-to-date review of T cells development and functional adaptation to pathophysiological stimuli and participation in the cardiovascular disease process. In addition, we have discussed the signaling pathways controlled by the microenvironment that determine T cells function and resultant type of immune response. We have also discussed in detail how oxidative stress is a key component of the micro environmental interaction.

  2. Exposure to Concentrated Ambient Particles Does Not Affect Vascular Function in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Nicholas L.; Robinson, Simon D.; Fokkens, Paul H. B.; Leseman, Daan L. A. C.; Miller, Mark R.; Anderson, David; Freney, Evelyn J.; Heal, Mathew R.; Donovan, Robert J.; Blomberg, Anders; Sandström, Thomas; MacNee, William; Boon, Nicholas A.; Donaldson, Ken; Newby, David E.; Cassee, Flemming R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Exposure to fine particulate air pollution is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. We previously demonstrated that exposure to dilute diesel exhaust causes vascular dysfunction in humans. Objectives We conducted a study to determine whether exposure to ambient particulate matter causes vascular dysfunction. Methods Twelve male patients with stable coronary heart disease and 12 age-matched volunteers were exposed to concentrated ambient fine and ultrafine particles (CAPs) or filtered air for 2 hr using a randomized, double-blind cross-over study design. We measured peripheral vascular vasomotor and fibrinolytic function, and inflammatory variables—including circulating leukocytes, serum C-reactive protein, and exhaled breath 8-isoprostane and nitrotyrosine—6–8 hr after both exposures. Results Particulate concentrations (mean ± SE) in the exposure chamber (190 ± 37 μg/m3) were higher than ambient levels (31 ± 8 μg/m3) and levels in filtered air (0.5 ± 0.4 μg/m3; p < 0.001). Chemical analysis of CAPs identified low levels of elemental carbon. Exhaled breath 8-isoprostane concentrations increased after exposure to CAPs (16.9 ± 8.5 vs. 4.9 ± 1.2 pg/mL, p < 0.05), but markers of systemic inflammation were largely unchanged. Although there was a dose-dependent increase in blood flow and plasma tissue plasminogen activator release (p < 0.001 for all), CAPs exposure had no effect on vascular function in either group. Conclusions Despite achieving marked increases in particulate matter, exposure to CAPs—low in combustion-derived particles—did not affect vasomotor or fibrinolytic function in either middle-aged healthy volunteers or patients with coronary heart disease. These findings contrast with previous exposures to dilute diesel exhaust and highlight the importance of particle composition in determining the vascular effects of particulate matter in humans. PMID:18560524

  3. Mechanisms of greater cardiomyocyte functions on conductive nanoengineered composites for cardiovascular application

    PubMed Central

    Stout, David A; Yoo, Jennie; Santiago-Miranda, Adriana Noemi; Webster, Thomas J

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent advances in nanotechnology (materials with at least one dimension between 1 nm and 100 nm) have led to the use of nanomaterials in numerous medical device applications. Recently, nanomaterials have been used to create innovative biomaterials for cardiovascular applications. Specifically, carbon nanofibers (CNF) embedded in poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid) (PLGA) have been shown to promote cardiomyocyte growth compared with conventional polymer substrates, but the mechanisms involved in such events remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the basic mechanism of cell growth on these novel nanocomposites. Methods CNF were added to biodegradable PLGA (50:50 PGA:PLA weight ratio) to increase the conductivity, mechanical and cytocompatibility properties of pure PLGA. For this reason, different PLGA to CNF ratios (100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75, and 0:100 wt%) with different PLGA densities (0.1, 0.05, 0.025, and 0.0125 g/mL) were used, and their compatibility with cardiomyocytes was assessed. Results Throughout all the cytocompatibility experiments, cardiomyocytes were viable and expressed important biomarkers, including cardiac troponin T, connexin-43, and alpha-sarcomeric actin (α-SCA). Adhesion and proliferation experiments indicated that a PLGA density of 0.025 g/mL with a PLGA to CNF ratio of 75:25 and 50:50 (wt%) promoted the best overall cell growth, ie, a 55% increase in cardiomyocyte density after 120 hours compared with pure PLGA and a 75% increase compared with the control at the same time point for 50:50 (wt%). The PLGA:CNF materials were conductive, and their conductivity increased as greater amounts of CNF were added to pure PLGA, from 0 S · m−1 for pure PLGA (100:0 wt%) to 5.5 × 10−3 S · m−1 for pure CNF (0:100 wt%), as compared with natural heart tissue (ranging from 0.16 S · m−1 longitudinally to 0.005 S · m−1 transversely). Tensile tests showed that the addition of CNF increased the tensile strength to mimic that

  4. A study of cardiovascular function in Tsumura Suzuki obese diabetes, a new model mouse of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kawada, Tomie; Miyata, Shigeo; Shimada, Tsutomu; Sanzen, Yoshiki; Ito, Minami; Hemmi, Chieko; Iizuka, Seiichi; Suzuki, Wataru; Mihara, Kiyoshi; Aburada, Masaki; Nakazawa, Mikio

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a well known and important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, including heart failure. A new model of Type 2 diabetes, Tsumura Suzuki Obese Diabetes (TSOD) mice, was introduced recently into the research field of diabetes. The cardiac functions of TSOD mice were studied in comparison with Tsumura Suzuki Non Obesity (TSNO, non-diabetic control) mice, for the first time. In vivo cardiovascular functions were measured by echocardiography and cardiac catheterization at 7, 12 and 18 months old. TSOD mice had no deterioration of cardiac function despite the long-term persistence of severe obesity, hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and hyperlipidemia, including high density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol. No histopathological abnormalities were observed in the heart of TSOD mice, while several histological abnormalities were observed in the pancreas and kidney of TSOD mice. To investigate vascular endothelium function at 7 months old, intravenous injection of acetylcholine (ACh; 1, 3, 10 microg/kg)- and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 50 mg/kg)-induced mean blood pressure (BP) changes were used. ACh decreased whereas L-NAME increased BP, and no significant differences in BP changes were observed between TSOD and TSNO mice. Moreover, ACh-induced relaxation of the thoracic aortae isolated from TSOD and TSNO mice with intact endothelium were not significantly different. These findings suggest that vascular endothelial cells in TSOD mice are not impaired. It was clearly demonstrated that despite obvious diabetes, cardiac functions of TSOD mice were not impaired even at 18 months old.

  5. Functional neuroimaging of human vocalizations and affective speech.

    PubMed

    Frühholz, Sascha; Sander, David; Grandjean, Didier

    2014-12-01

    Neuroimaging studies have verified the important integrative role of the basal ganglia during affective vocalizations. They, however, also point to additional regions supporting vocal monitoring, auditory-motor feedback processing, and online adjustments of vocal motor responses. For the case of affective vocalizations, we suggest partly extending the model to fully consider the link between primate-general and human-specific neural components.

  6. Functions of 5-HT2A receptor and its antagonists in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Nagatomo, Takafumi; Rashid, Mamunur; Abul Muntasir, Habib; Komiyama, Tadazumi

    2004-10-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) receptors have conventionally been divided into seven subfamilies, most of which have several subtypes. Among them, 5-HT(2A) receptor is associated with the contraction of vascular smooth muscle, platelet aggregation and thrombus formation and coronary artery spasms. Accordingly, selective 5-HT(2A) antagonists may have potential in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Sarpogrelate, a selective 5-HT(2A) antagonist, has been introduced clinically as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of ischemic diseases associated with thrombosis. Molecular modeling studies also suggest that sarpogrelate is a 5-HT(2A) selective antagonist and is likely to have pharmacological effects beneficial in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. This review describes the above findings as well as the signaling linkages of the 5-HT(2A) receptors and the mode of agonist binding to 5-HT(2A) receptor using data derived from molecular modeling and site-directed mutagenesis.

  7. Impact of the human circadian system, exercise, and their interaction on cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Frank A J L; Hu, Kun; Evoniuk, Heather; Kelly, Erin E; Malhotra, Atul; Hilton, Michael F; Shea, Steven A

    2010-11-23

    The risk of adverse cardiovascular events peaks in the morning (≈9:00 AM) with a secondary peak in the evening (≈8:00 PM) and a trough at night. This pattern is generally believed to be caused by the day/night distribution of behavioral triggers, but it is unknown whether the endogenous circadian system contributes to these daily fluctuations. Thus, we tested the hypotheses that the circadian system modulates autonomic, hemodynamic, and hemostatic risk markers at rest, and that behavioral stressors have different effects when they occur at different internal circadian phases. Twelve healthy adults were each studied in a 240-h forced desynchrony protocol in dim light while standardized rest and exercise periods were uniformly distributed across the circadian cycle. At rest, there were large circadian variations in plasma cortisol (peak-to-trough ≈85% of mean, peaking at a circadian phase corresponding to ≈9:00 AM) and in circulating catecholamines (epinephrine, ≈70%; norepinephrine, ≈35%, peaking during the biological day). At ≈8:00 PM, there was a circadian peak in blood pressure and a trough in cardiac vagal modulation. Sympathetic variables were consistently lowest and vagal markers highest during the biological night. We detected no simple circadian effect on hemostasis, although platelet aggregability had two peaks: at ≈noon and ≈11:00 PM. There was circadian modulation of the cardiovascular reactivity to exercise, with greatest vagal withdrawal at ≈9:00 AM and peaks in catecholamine reactivity at ≈9:00 AM and ≈9:00 PM. Thus, the circadian system modulates numerous cardiovascular risk markers at rest as well as their reactivity to exercise, with resultant profiles that could potentially contribute to the day/night pattern of adverse cardiovascular events.

  8. Differential patterns of dynamic cardiovascular regulation as a function of task.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, B E; Nelesen, R A; Saab, P G; Nagel, J H; Spitzer, S B; Gellman, M D; McCabe, P M; Phillips, D J; Schneiderman, N

    1993-08-01

    In cardiovascular reactivity studies, interpretations of the processes supporting the blood pressure response may become problematic when systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, and heart rate all increase in response to a behavioral challenge. Therefore, in addition to evaluating these cardiovascular responses, this study examined cardiac output, total peripheral resistance and systolic time intervals derived from impedance cardiogram, electrocardiogram and phonocardiogram recordings during a speech stressor, a mirror tracing task, and a foot cold pressor test. All of the behavioral stressors elicited increases in blood pressure and heart rate, with the largest changes occurring during the overt speech. Based on the examination of the response patterns of the underlying hemodynamic variables it would appear that, in both men and women, the blood pressure increase during the speech preparation period was supported by increased cardiac output; the speech itself resulted in a mixed pattern of increased cardiac output and total peripheral resistance; whereas, the mirror tracing and cold pressor tasks produced increased total peripheral resistance. Although men and women produced similar response patterns to the behavioral challenges, sex differences in the estimates of myocardial contractility were observed during rest. These results provide evidence that different behavioral stressors can produce a distinct yet integrated pattern of responses, whose differences may be revealed, when impedance cardiography is used, to derive sufficient response measures for assessing dynamic cardiovascular processes.

  9. Frozen Soil Characteristics That Affect Land Mine Functioning.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-01

    ii Introduction .............................................. 1 Backgroun ...Table 3 also presents the results of the mine functioning perform- ance . The M12 mine requires between 1739 and 3287 N to function, as indicated by the

  10. An Encapsulated Juice Powder Concentrate Improves Markers of Pulmonary Function and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Heavy Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Bamonti, Fabrizia; Pellegatta, Marco; Novembrino, Cristina; Vigna, Luisella; De Giuseppe, Rachele; de Liso, Federica; Gregori, Dario; Noce, Cinzia Della; Patrini, Lorenzo; Schiraldi, Gianfranco; Bonara, Paola; Calvelli, Laura; Maiavacca, Rita; Cighetti, Giuliana

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Cigarette smoking is associated with reduced pulmonary function and increased risk factors for cardiovascular disease. This randomized placebo-controlled double-blind study evaluated the effects of two different combinations of mixed fruit and vegetable juice powder concentrate (Juice Plus+, NSA, Collierville, TN) on heavy smokers. Methods: At baseline (T0) and after 3 months’ supplementation (T1), pulmonary function parameters and cardiovascular risk factors—that is, plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) with related B vitamins and cysteine (tCys) concentrations—were assessed in 75 apparently healthy smokers (aged 49.2 ± 10.6 years, 20 cigarettes/d, duration > 10 years) randomized into 3 groups: placebo (P), fruit/vegetable (FV) and fruit/vegetable/berry (FVB). Results: T0: most smokers showed abnormalities in tHcy and tCys concentrations. T1: respiratory function was unchanged in P and slightly, but not significantly, improved in FV, whereas FVB showed a significant improvement in forced expiratory flow at 25% (FEF25; p < 0.0001 vs P and FV) and significant improvement in CO diffusion lung/alveolar volume (DLCO/VA). FV and FVB (50%) showed significant reduction in tHcy and tCys compared to T0 (p < 0.0001) and P (p < 0.0001). Conclusions: At T1, both supplemented groups, but to a greater extent the FVB group, showed improvements in some pulmonary parameters, cardiovascular risk factors, and folate status. The beneficial effects of Juice Plus+ supplementation could potentially help smokers, even if smoking cessation is advisable. PMID:24015696

  11. The role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in cellular function and protection in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Andrew; Aziz, Qadeer; Thomas, Alison

    2014-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K(ATP)) are widely distributed and present in a number of tissues including muscle, pancreatic beta cells and the brain. Their activity is regulated by adenine nucleotides, characteristically being activated by falling ATP and rising ADP levels. Thus, they link cellular metabolism with membrane excitability. Recent studies using genetically modified mice and genomic studies in patients have implicated K(ATP) channels in a number of physiological and pathological processes. In this review, we focus on their role in cellular function and protection particularly in the cardiovascular system.

  12. The Function of Rho-Associated Kinases ROCK1 and ROCK2 in the Pathogenesis of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Svenja; Ridley, Anne J.; Lutz, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Rho-associated kinases ROCK1 and ROCK2 are serine/threonine kinases that are downstream targets of the small GTPases RhoA, RhoB, and RhoC. ROCKs are involved in diverse cellular activities including actin cytoskeleton organization, cell adhesion and motility, proliferation and apoptosis, remodeling of the extracellular matrix and smooth muscle cell contraction. The role of ROCK1 and ROCK2 has long been considered to be similar; however, it is now clear that they do not always have the same functions. Moreover, depending on their subcellular localization, activation, and other environmental factors, ROCK signaling can have different effects on cellular function. With respect to the heart, findings in isoform-specific knockout mice argue for a role of ROCK1 and ROCK2 in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis and cardiac hypertrophy, respectively. Increased ROCK activity could play a pivotal role in processes leading to cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, angina pectoris, vasospastic angina, heart failure, and stroke, and thus ROCK activity is a potential new biomarker for heart disease. Pharmacological ROCK inhibition reduces the enhanced ROCK activity in patients, accompanied with a measurable improvement in medical condition. In this review, we focus on recent findings regarding ROCK signaling in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, with a special focus on differences between ROCK1 and ROCK2 function. PMID:26635606

  13. Effect of working hours on biological functions related to cardiovascular system among salesmen in a machinery manufacturing company.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, K; Sasaki, T; Oka, T; Hisanaga, N

    1998-10-01

    A field survey of 71 salesmen (22-60 years) in a machinery manufacturing company was conducted to investigate the effect of working hours on biological functions related to the cardiovascular system. The subjects were divided into four groups by age, and those in each age group were further divided into shorter (SWH) and longer (LWH) working hour subgroups by weekly working hours. Rates of complaints of subjective fatigue for LWH were significantly higher than those for SWH on the whole. Although the mean amplitude of respiratory sinus arrhythmia at rest decreased with age, no significant difference between SWH and LWH was found in this function. Systolic blood pressure for LWH was significantly higher than that for SWH in the 50-60 year group. The serum total cholesterol level for LWH was significantly lower than that for SWH in the 40-49 year group. Comparison of biological functions related to cardiovascular system was also made between fatigue complaint and no-complaint subgroups. Significant differences were found between the two subgroups: systolic blood pressure was higher and the total cholesterol level was lower in the fatigue complaint subgroups. Summarizing our results, it appeared that long working hours might increase systolic blood pressure and lower the total cholesterol level due to fatigue.

  14. Effects of potassium chloride and potassium bicarbonate on endothelial function, cardiovascular risk factors, and bone turnover in mild hypertensives.

    PubMed

    He, Feng J; Marciniak, Maciej; Carney, Christine; Markandu, Nirmala D; Anand, Vidya; Fraser, William D; Dalton, R Neil; Kaski, Juan C; MacGregor, Graham A

    2010-03-01

    To determine the effects of potassium supplementation on endothelial function, cardiovascular risk factors, and bone turnover and to compare potassium chloride with potassium bicarbonate, we carried out a 12-week randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial in 42 individuals with untreated mildly raised blood pressure. Urinary potassium was 77+/-16, 122+/-25, and 125+/-27 mmol/24 hours after 4 weeks on placebo, potassium chloride, and potassium bicarbonate, respectively. There were no significant differences in office blood pressure among the 3 treatment periods, and only 24-hour and daytime systolic blood pressures were slightly lower with potassium chloride. Compared with placebo, both potassium chloride and potassium bicarbonate significantly improved endothelial function as measured by brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation, increased arterial compliance as assessed by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity, decreased left ventricular mass, and improved left ventricular diastolic function. There was no significant difference between the 2 potassium salts in these measurements. The study also showed that potassium chloride reduced 24-hour urinary albumin and albumin:creatinine ratio, and potassium bicarbonate decreased 24-hour urinary calcium, calcium:creatinine ratio, and plasma C-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type 1 collagen significantly. These results demonstrated that an increase in potassium intake had beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system, and potassium bicarbonate may improve bone health. Importantly, these effects were found in individuals who already had a relatively low-salt and high-potassium intake.

  15. Concomitant gastroparesis negatively affects children with functional gallbladder disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether concomitant gastroparesis and biliary dyskinesia (BD) occur in children, and if so, to determine whether concomitant gastroparesis affects clinical outcome in children with BD. We conducted a retrospective chart review of children with BD (ejecti...

  16. [Cardiovascular pharmacogenomics].

    PubMed

    Scibona, Paula; Angriman, Federico; Simonovich, Ventura; Heller, Martina M; Belloso, Waldo H

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current medical practice takes into account information based on population studies and benefits observed in large populations or cohorts. However, individual patients present great differences in both toxicity and clinical efficacy that can be explained by variations in adherence, unknown drug to drug interactions and genetic variability. The latter seems to explain from 20% up to 95% of patient to patient variability. Treating patients with cardiovascular disorders faces the clinician with the challenge to include genomic analysis into daily practice. There are several examples within cardiovascular disease of treatments that can vary in toxicity or clinical usefulness based on genetic changes. One of the main factors affecting the efficacy of Clopidogrel is the phenotype associated with polymorphisms in the gene CYP 2C9. Furthermore, regarding oral anticoagulants, changes in CYP2C9 and VKORC1 play an important role in changing the clinical response to anticoagulation. When analyzing statin treatment, one of their main toxicities (myopathy) can be predicted by the SLCO1B1 polymorphism. The potential for prediction of toxicity and clinical efficacy from the use of genetic analysis warrants further studies aiming towards its inclusion in daily clinical practice.

  17. Age Differences in Affective and Cardiovascular Responses to a Negative Social Interaction: The Role of Goals, Appraisals, and Emotion Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luong, Gloria; Charles, Susan T.

    2014-01-01

    Older adults often report less affective reactivity to interpersonal tensions than younger individuals, but few studies have directly investigated mechanisms explaining this effect. The current study examined whether older adults' differential endorsement of goals, appraisals, and emotion regulation strategies (i.e., conflict…

  18. Anger, Anxiety, and Depression as Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease: The Problems and Implications of Overlapping Affective Dispositions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sul, Jerry; Bunde, James

    2005-01-01

    Several recent reviews (e.g., L. C. Gallo & K. Matthews, 2003; A. Rozanski, J. A. Blumenthal, & J. Kaplan, 1999; R. Rugulies, 2002) have identified 3 affective dispositions--depression, anxiety, and anger-hostility--as putative risk factors for coronary heart disease. There are, however, mixed and negative results. Following a critical summary of…

  19. Functional plasticity of the developing cardiovascular system: examples from different vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Pelster, Bernd; Gittenberger-de Groot, A C; Poelmann, R E; Rombough, Peter; Schwerte, Thorsten; Thompson, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    Technical advances that have made it possible to perform physiological measurements on very small organisms, including those in embryonic and larval stages, have resulted in the formation of the discipline of developmental physiology. The transparency and size of developing organisms in some areas permit insights into physiological processes that cannot be obtained with opaque, adult organisms. On the other hand, it is widely accepted that without eggs, there are no chickens, so physiological adaptations during early life are just as important to species survival as those manifested by adults. Physiological adaptations of early developmental stages, however, are not always the same as patterns known in adults; they often follow their own rules. The adaptability of early developmental stages demonstrates that development is not stereotyped and a phenotype is not just the result of genetic information and the expression of a certain series of genes. Environmental factors influence phenotype production, and this in turn results in flexibility and plasticity in physiological processes. This article comprises exemplary studies presented at the Fourth International Conference in Africa for Comparative Physiology and Biochemistry (Maasai Mara, Kenya, 2008). It includes a brief introduction into technical advances, discusses the developing cardiovascular system of various vertebrates, and demonstrates the flexibility and plasticity of early developmental stages. Fluid forces, oxygen availability, ionic homeostasis, and the chemical environment (including, e.g., hormone concentrations or cholesterol levels) all contribute to the shaping and performance of the cardiovascular system.

  20. Cardiovascular responses to exercise as functions of absolute and relative work load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, S. F.; Taylor, W. F.; Graham, R. M.; Pettinger, W. A.; Schutte, J. E.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    1983-01-01

    The roles of absolute and relative oxygen uptake (VO2 and percent of muscle group specific VO2-max) as determinants of the cardiovascular and ventilatory responses to exercise over a wide range of active muscle mass are investigated. Experiments were conducted using four types of dynamic exercise: one-arm curl, one-arm cranking, and one and two-leg cycling at four different relative work loads (25, 50, 75, and 100 percent of VO2-max) for the corresponding muscle group. Results show that VO2 during maximal one-arm curl, one-arm cranking, and one-leg cycling averaged 20, 50, and 75 percent, respectively, of that for maximal two-leg cycling. Cardiac output was determined to be linearly related to VO2 with a similar slope and intercept for each type of exercise, and the heart rate at a given percent VO2-max was higher with larger active muscle mass. It is concluded that the cardiovascular responses to exercise was determined to a large extent by the active muscle mass and the absolute oxygen uptake, with the principal feature appearing to be the tight linkage between systematic oxygen transport and utilization.

  1. Green tea inhibited the elimination of nephro-cardiovascular toxins and deteriorated the renal function in rats with renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yu-Hsuan; Sweet, Douglas H.; Lin, Shiuan-Pey; Yu, Chung-Ping; Lee Chao, Pei-Dawn; Hou, Yu-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major health problem worldwide. Indoxyl sulfate (IS) and p-cresyl sulfate (PCS) are highly protein-bound nephro-cardiovascular toxins, which are not efficiently removed through hemodialysis. The renal excretions of IS and PCS were mediated by organic anion transporters (OATs) such as OAT1 and OAT3. Green tea (GT) is a popular beverage containing plenty of catechins. Previous pharmacokinetic studies of teas have shown that the major molecules present in the bloodstream are the glucuronides/sulfates of tea catechins, which are putative substrates of OATs. Here we demonstrated that GT ingestion significantly elevated the systemic exposures of endogenous IS and PCS in rats with chronic renal failure (CRF). More importantly, GT also significantly increased the levels of serum creatinine (Cr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) in CRF rats. Mechanism studies indicated that the serum metabolites of GT (GTM) inhibited the uptake transporting functions of OAT1 and OAT3. In conclusion, GT inhibited the elimination of nephro-cardiovascular toxins such as IS and PCS, and deteriorated the renal function in CRF rats. PMID:26552961

  2. Long-term low dose dietary resveratrol supplement reduces cardiovascular structural and functional deterioration in chronic heart failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmet, Ismayil; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Lakatta, Edward G; Talan, Mark

    2017-03-01

    A short-term exposure to resveratrol at high dosages exerts a remarkable cardioprotective effect. Whether a long-term exposure to resveratrol at low dosages that can be obtained through consumption of a resveratrol-rich diet is beneficial to heart diseases is unknown. We tested the effects of a resveratrol-enriched diet on cardiovascular remodeling of chronic heart failure (CHF) in rats resulting from permanent ligation of left coronary artery. Two weeks after surgery, rats were started on either a resveratrol-enriched (R; 5 mg/kg per day; n = 23) or normal (Control; n = 23) diet for next 10 months. Serial echocardiography in Control showed a significant decline in LV ejection fraction, increases in LV end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes, and expansion in myocardial infarct from pre-treatment values. In R, compared with Control, there were substantial improvements in those parameters. End-point LV pressure-volume loop analysis showed a significantly improved LV systolic function and AV-coupling, an index of energy transfer efficacy between the heart and aortic tree, in R compared with Control (p < 0.05). Aortic pulse wave velocity, a measure of arterial stiffness, was significantly lower in R (389 ± 15 cm/s; p < 0.05) compared with Control (489 ± 38 cm/s). These results demonstrated that long-term dietary resveratrol supplement reduces cardiovascular structural and functional deterioration in CHF.

  3. Effects of nimesulide, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, on cardiovascular function in 2 rat models of diabetes.

    PubMed

    Leung, Joanne Y T; Pang, Catherine C Y

    2014-07-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has been found to be activated in diabetes. We investigated whether nimesulide (selective COX-2 inhibitor) alters cardiovascular responses to adrenaline in 2 rat models of diabetes. Wistar rats (5-week old) were continuously fed a normal or high-fructose diet (60% of caloric intake). At week 2, half of the rats in each diet regimen were given streptozotocin (STZ) (60 mg/kg, intravenously). At week 6, cardiovascular effects of adrenaline (6 and 16 × 10 mol·kg·min, intravenously) were measured in 4 groups of thiobutabarbital-anesthetized rats (control, fructose, STZ, and fructose-streptozotocin [F-STZ]) before and after the injection of nimesulide (3 mg/kg, intravenously). Both the STZ and F-STZ groups exhibited hyperglycemia and significantly (P < 0.05) reduced left ventricular contractility, mean arterial pressure, arterial and venous resistance, and mean circulatory filling pressure (index of venous tone) responses to adrenaline, relative to the control and fructose groups. Nimesulide did not affect responses in the control and fructose groups but increased the venous and, to a less extent, arterial constriction to adrenaline in both the groups of diabetic rats. The cardiac contractile responses, however, were not altered after nimesulide treatment. The results show that nimesulide partially restored arterial and venous constriction to adrenaline in rats with STZ- and F-STZ-induced diabetes.

  4. Continuous theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation affects brain functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Dan Cao; Yingjie Li; Ling Wei; Yingying Tang

    2016-08-01

    Prefrontal cortex (PFC) plays an important role in the emotional processing as well as in the functional brain network. Hyperactivity in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) would be found in anxious participants. However, it is still unclear what the role of PFC played in a resting functional network. Continuous theta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (cTBS) is an effective tool to create virtual lesions on brain regions. In this paper, we applied cTBS over right prefrontal area, and investigated the effects of cTBS on the brain activity for functional connectivity by the method of graph theory. We recorded 64-channels EEG on thirteen healthy participants in the resting condition and emotional tasks before and after 40 s of cTBS. This work focused on the effect of cTBS on cortical activities in the resting condition by calculating the coherence between EEG channels and building functional networks before and after cTBS in the delta, theta, alpha and beta bands. Results revealed that 1) The functional connectivity after cTBS was significantly increased compared with that before cTBS in delta, theta, alpha and beta bands in the resting condition; 2) The efficiency-cost reached the maximum before and after cTBS both with the cost about 0.3 in the bands above, which meant that the information transmission of functional brain network with this cost was highly efficient; 3) the clustering coefficient and path length after cTBS was significantly increased in delta, theta and beta bands. In conclusion, cTBS over PFC indeed enhanced the functional connectivity in the resting condition. In addition, the information transmission in the resting brain network was highly efficient with the cost about 0.3.

  5. Factors affecting the development of lung function in Tunisian children.

    PubMed

    Trabelsi, Y; Pariès, J; Harrabi, I; Zbidi, A; Tabka, Z; Richalet, J P; Buvry, A

    2008-01-01

    We undertook to evaluate the impacts of morphology at birth, physical activity, anthropometric, socioeconomic and environmental factors on lung function in healthy Tunisian children. Pulmonary function parameters were measured with a Minato portable spirometer in a randomized population of 756 healthy children (388 males and 368 females) aged between 6 and 16. The morphology at birth, the gestational age, the physical activity, the socioeconomic status, the type of habitation, and the environmental factors were all assessed by a standard questionnaire. Using univariate analysis, we found that: (1) morphometric parameters (height, weight, maximal inspiratory, and expiratory perimeter), as well as sex were highly associated with pulmonary function parameters; (2) Height at birth showed strong significant relations with FVC, FEV(1), and FEV(1)/FVC; (3) lung function parameters were influenced by physical training of our children, socioeconomic status, indoor pollution, and passive smoking; and (4) we did not observe any association between the gestational age and the weight at their birth and lung function parameters. Using a general linear model analysis, morphometric parameters, age, sex, type of heating, and maximal inspiratory and expiratory perimeters had significant relation with respiratory parameters. In our population of healthy Tunisian children, the main predictive factors of the pulmonary development were the morphological factors such as height, weight, maximal inspiratory, and expiratory thoracic perimeter, sex and age, and the environmental conditions such as type of heating but not morphology at birth, physical activity, or socioeconomic status.

  6. Drying process strongly affects probiotics viability and functionalities.

    PubMed

    Iaconelli, Cyril; Lemetais, Guillaume; Kechaou, Noura; Chain, Florian; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Langella, Philippe; Gervais, Patrick; Beney, Laurent

    2015-11-20

    Probiotic formulations are widely used and are proposed to have a variety of beneficial effects, depending on the probiotic strains present in the product. The impact of drying processes on the viability of probiotics is well documented. However, the impact of these processes on probiotics functionality remains unclear. In this work, we investigated variations in seven different bacterial markers after various desiccation processes. Markers were composed of four different viability evaluation (combining two growth abilities and two cytometric measurements) and in three in vitro functionalities: stimulation of IL-10 and IL-12 production by PBMCs (immunomodulation) and bacterial adhesion to hexadecane. We measured the impact of three drying processes (air-drying, freeze-drying and spray-drying), without the use of protective agents, on three types of probiotic bacteria: Bifidobacterium bifidum, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus zeae. Our results show that the bacteria respond differently to the three different drying processes, in terms of viability and functionality. Drying methods produce important variations in bacterial immunomodulation and hydrophobicity, which are correlated. We also show that adherence can be stimulated (air-drying) or inhibited (spray-drying) by drying processes. Results of a multivariate analysis show no direct correlation between bacterial survival and functionality, but do show a correlation between probiotic responses to desiccation-rewetting and the process used to dry the bacteria.

  7. Can Particulate Pollution Affect Lung Function in Healthy Adults?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accompanying editorial to paper from Harvard by Rice et al. entitled "Long-Term Exposure to Traffic Emissions and Fine Particulate Matter and Lung Function Decline in the Framingham Heart StudyBy almost any measure the Clean Air Act and its amendments has to be considered as one...

  8. Chemical Modifications that Affect Nutritional and Functional Properties of Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, T.; Kester, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses chemical alterations of selected amino acids resulting from environmental effects (photooxidations, pH extremes, thermally induced effects). Also dicusses use of intentional chemical derivatizations of various functional groups in amino acid residue side chains and how recombinant DNA techniques might be useful in structure/function…

  9. Current Approaches to Quantifying Tonic and Reflex Autonomic Outflows Controlling Cardiovascular Function in Humans and Experimental Animals.

    PubMed

    Salman, Ibrahim M

    2015-11-01

    The role of the autonomic nervous system in the pathophysiology of human and experimental models of cardiovascular disease is well established. In the recent years, there have been some rapid developments in the diagnostic approaches used to assess and monitor autonomic functions. Although most of these methods are devoted for research purposes in laboratory animals, many have still found their way to routine clinical practice. To name a few, direct long-term telemetry recording of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in rodents, single-unit SNA recording using microneurography in human subjects and spectral analysis of blood pressure and heart rate in both humans and animals have recently received an overwhelming attention. In this article, we therefore provide an overview of the methods and techniques used to assess tonic and reflex autonomic functions in humans and experimental animals, highlighting current advances available and procedure description, limitations and usefulness for diagnostic purposes.

  10. Gene expression profiling during intensive cardiovascular lifestyle modification: Relationships with vascular function and weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Blackburn, Heather L.; McErlean, Seóna; Jellema, Gera L.; van Laar, Ryan; Vernalis, Marina N.; Ellsworth, Darrell L.

    2015-01-01

    Heart disease and related sequelae are a leading cause of death and healthcare expenditure throughout the world. Although many patients opt for surgical interventions, lifestyle modification programs focusing on nutrition and exercise have shown substantial health benefits and are becoming increasing popular. We conducted a year-long lifestyle modification program to mediate cardiovascular risk through traditional risk factors and to investigate how molecular changes, if present, may contribute to long-term risk reduction. Here we describe the lifestyle intervention, including clinical and molecular data collected, and provide details of the experimental methods and quality control parameters for the gene expression data generated from participants and non-intervention controls. Our findings suggest successful and sustained modulation of gene expression through healthy lifestyle changes may have beneficial effects on vascular health that cannot be discerned from traditional risk factor profiles. The data are deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus, series GSE46097 and GSE66175. PMID:26484175

  11. Effects of alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist, terazosin, on cardiovascular functions in anaesthetised dogs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R; Ahuja, V M; Fahim, M

    2004-12-01

    Initially a dose-response curve of phenylephrine was constructed at dose strengths of 1-16 microg/kg in a cumulative manner. Phenylephrine caused a significant rise in the mean arterial pressure, left ventricular systolic pressure, left ventricular contractility, stroke volume and a significant decline in the heart rate. Terazosin was administered in three selected doses of 10, 100 and 300 microg/kg. Following each dose of terazosin, dose-response curve of phenylephrine was constructed. Terazosin, per se, decreased the basal mean arterial pressure, left ventricular systolic pressure, left ventricular contractility and stroke volume significantly in a dose dependent manner with an increase in the heart rate with no significant change in the cardiac output. The baroreflex sensitivity at all the three doses remained unchanged. In conclusion, the present findings support the view that terazosin reduces the blood pressure in a physiologically more favorable manner by maintaining the neural integrity of the cardiovascular system.

  12. Cardiovascular reactivity during public speaking as a function of personality variables.

    PubMed

    Fichera, L V; Andreassi, J L

    2000-09-01

    An experiment was conducted to assess the effects of a real-life stressor (public speaking) upon cardiovascular reactivity (CVR). Changes in blood pressure and heart rate from baseline to task were measured in a sample of 86 men and women. The purpose was to examine the effects of individual differences (Type A personality, hostility and gender) on CVR. Participants gave a 6-min oral presentation during which they were evaluated by their professor and with classmates as the audience. Results indicated that all participants had marked CVR during public speaking. There were differences in reactivity patterns between men and women, but personality did not play a role except for high hostile men. It is suggested that intense stressors may result in high levels of CVR independent of personality variables that moderate reactivity at lower levels of stress.

  13. Development of affective theory of mind across adolescence: disentangling the role of executive functions.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Nora C; Altgassen, Mareike; Phillips, Louise; Mahy, Caitlin E V; Kliegel, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Theory of mind, the ability to understand mental states, involves inferences about others' cognitive (cognitive theory of mind) and emotional (affective theory of mind) mental states. The current study explored the role of executive functions in developing affective theory of mind across adolescence. Affective theory of mind and three subcomponents of executive functions (inhibition, updating, and shifting) were measured. Affective theory of mind was positively related to age, and all three executive functions. Specifically, inhibition explained the largest amount of variance in age-related differences in affective theory of mind.

  14. Alginate Overproduction Affects Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Hentzer, Morten; Teitzel, Gail M.; Balzer, Grant J.; Heydorn, Arne; Molin, Søren; Givskov, Michael; Parsek, Matthew R.

    2001-01-01

    During the course of chronic cystic fibrosis (CF) infections, Pseudomonas aeruginosa undergoes a conversion to a mucoid phenotype, which is characterized by overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections involve surface-attached, highly antibiotic-resistant communities of microorganisms organized in biofilms. Although biofilm formation and the conversion to mucoidy are both important aspects of CF pathogenesis, the relationship between them is at the present unclear. In this study, we report that the overproduction of alginate affects biofilm development on an abiotic surface. Biofilms formed by an alginate-overproducing strain exhibit a highly structured architecture and are significantly more resistant to the antibiotic tobramycin than a biofilm formed by an isogenic nonmucoid strain. These results suggest that an important consequence of the conversion to mucoidy is an altered biofilm architecture that shows increasing resistance to antimicrobial treatments. PMID:11514525

  15. Nuclear cyclophilins affect spliceosome assembly and function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Adams, B M; Coates, Miranda N; Jackson, S RaElle; Jurica, Melissa S; Davis, Tara L

    2015-07-15

    Cyclophilins are ubiquitously expressed proteins that bind to prolines and can catalyse cis/trans isomerization of proline residues. There are 17 annotated members of the cyclophilin family in humans, ubiquitously expressed and localized variously to the cytoplasm, nucleus or mitochondria. Surprisingly, all eight of the nuclear localized cyclophilins are found associated with spliceosomal complexes. However, their particular functions within this context are unknown. We have therefore adapted three established assays for in vitro pre-mRNA splicing to probe the functional roles of nuclear cyclophilins in the context of the human spliceosome. We find that four of the eight spliceosom-associated cyclophilins exert strong effects on splicing in vitro. These effects are dose-dependent and, remarkably, uniquely characteristic of each cyclophilin. Using both qualitative and quantitative means, we show that at least half of the nuclear cyclophilins can act as regulatory factors of spliceosome function in vitro. The present work provides the first quantifiable evidence that nuclear cyclophilins are splicing factors and provides a novel approach for future work into small molecule-based modulation of pre-mRNA splicing.

  16. Prenatal Drug Exposure Affects Neonatal Brain Functional Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Salzwedel, Andrew P.; Vachet, Clement; Gerig, Guido; Lin, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal drug exposure, particularly prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE), incurs great public and scientific interest because of its associated neurodevelopmental consequences. However, the neural underpinnings of PCE remain essentially uncharted, and existing studies in school-aged children and adolescents are confounded greatly by postnatal environmental factors. In this study, leveraging a large neonate sample (N = 152) and non-invasive resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared human infants with PCE comorbid with other drugs (such as nicotine, alcohol, marijuana, and antidepressant) with infants with similar non-cocaine poly drug exposure and drug-free controls. We aimed to characterize the neural correlates of PCE based on functional connectivity measurements of the amygdala and insula at the earliest stage of development. Our results revealed common drug exposure-related connectivity disruptions within the amygdala–frontal, insula–frontal, and insula–sensorimotor circuits. Moreover, a cocaine-specific effect was detected within a subregion of the amygdala–frontal network. This pathway is thought to play an important role in arousal regulation, which has been shown to be irregular in PCE infants and adolescents. These novel results provide the earliest human-based functional delineations of the neural-developmental consequences of prenatal drug exposure and thus open a new window for the advancement of effective strategies aimed at early risk identification and intervention. PMID:25855194

  17. How optimization of potential functions affects protein folding.

    PubMed Central

    Hao, M H; Scheraga, H A

    1996-01-01

    The relationship between the optimization of the potential function and the foldability of theoretical protein models is studied based on investigations of a 27-mer cubic-lattice protein model and a more realistic lattice model for the protein crambin. In both the simple and the more complicated systems, optimization of the energy parameters achieves significant improvements in the statistical-mechanical characteristics of the systems and leads to foldable protein models in simulation experiments. The foldability of the protein models is characterized by their statistical-mechanical properties--e.g., by the density of states and by Monte Carlo folding simulations of the models. With optimized energy parameters, a high level of consistency exists among different interactions in the native structures of the protein models, as revealed by a correlation function between the optimized energy parameters and the native structure of the model proteins. The results of this work are relevant to the design of a general potential function for folding proteins by theoretical simulations. PMID:8643516

  18. Does caregiving stress affect cognitive function in older women?

    PubMed

    Lee, Sunmin; Kawachi, Ichiro; Grodstein, Francine

    2004-01-01

    Increasing numbers of women provide care to their ill spouses; however, no studies have examined possible effects of caregiving stress on cognitive function. We administered 6 tests of cognitive function to 13740 Nurses' Health Study participants aged 70-79 years. We collected information on caregiving and numerous potential confounding variables via biennial mailed questionnaires. After adjustment for potential confounders (age, education, mental health index, vitality index, use of antidepressants, and history of high blood pressure, diabetes, and heart disease), we found modest but significantly increased risks of low cognitive function on three of the cognitive tests among women who provided care to a disabled or ill spouse compared with women who did not provide any care. For example, on the TICS, a test of general cognition, the risk of a low score was 31% higher in women who provided care compared with women who did not (RR = 1.31, 95% CI 1.10, 1.56). We found a moderately increased risk of poor performance on several cognitive tests among women who provided care to their disabled or ill husbands.

  19. Microplastics Affect the Ecological Functioning of an Important Biogenic Habitat.

    PubMed

    Green, Dannielle Senga; Boots, Bas; O'Connor, Nessa E; Thompson, Richard

    2017-01-03

    Biological effects of microplastics on the health of bivalves have been demonstrated elsewhere, but ecological impacts on the biodiversity and ecosystem functioning of bivalve-dominated habitats are unknown. Thus, we exposed intact sediment cores containing European flat oysters (Ostrea edulis) or blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) in seawater to two different densities (2.5 or 25 μg L(-1)) of biodegradable or conventional microplastics in outdoor mesocosms. We hypothesized that filtration rates of the bivalves, inorganic nitrogen cycling, primary productivity of sediment dwelling microphytobenthos, and the structure of invertebrate benthic assemblages would be influenced by microplastics. After 50 days, filtration by M. edulis was significantly less when exposed to 25 μg L(-1) of either type of microplastics, but there were no effects on ecosystem functioning or the associated invertebrate assemblages. Contrastingly, filtration by O. edulis significantly increased when exposed to 2.5 or 25 μg L(-1) of microplastics, and porewater ammonium and biomass of benthic cyanobacteria decreased. Additionally the associated infaunal invertebrate assemblages differed, with significantly less polychaetes and more oligochaetes in treatments exposed to microplastics. These findings highlight the potential of microplastics to impact the functioning and structure of sedimentary habitats and show that such effects may depend on the dominant bivalve present.

  20. Nuclear cyclophilins affect spliceosome assembly and function in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Adams, B.M.; Coates, Miranda N.; Jackson, S. RaElle; Jurica, Melissa S.; Davis, Tara L.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclophilins are ubiquitously expressed proteins that bind to prolines and can catalyse cis/trans isomerization of proline residues. There are 17 annotated members of the cyclophilin family in humans, ubiquitously expressed and localized variously to the cytoplasm, nucleus or mitochondria. Surprisingly, all eight of the nuclear localized cyclophilins are found associated with spliceosomal complexes. However, their particular functions within this context are unknown. We have therefore adapted three established assays for in vitro pre-mRNA splicing to probe the functional roles of nuclear cyclophilins in the context of the human spliceosome. We find that four of the eight spliceosom-associated cyclophilins exert strong effects on splicing in vitro. These effects are dose-dependent and, remarkably, uniquely characteristic of each cyclophilin. Using both qualitative and quantitative means, we show that at least half of the nuclear cyclophilins can act as regulatory factors of spliceosome function in vitro. The present work provides the first quantifiable evidence that nuclear cyclophilins are splicing factors and provides a novel approach for future work into small molecule-based modulation of pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:25967372

  1. Cardiovascular function and treatment in β-thalassemia major: a consensus statement from the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Pennell, Dudley J; Udelson, James E; Arai, Andrew E; Bozkurt, Biykem; Cohen, Alan R; Galanello, Renzo; Hoffman, Timothy M; Kiernan, Michael S; Lerakis, Stamatios; Piga, Antonio; Porter, John B; Walker, John Malcolm; Wood, John

    2013-07-16

    This aim of this statement is to report an expert consensus on the diagnosis and treatment of cardiac dysfunction in β-thalassemia major (TM). This consensus statement does not cover other hemoglobinopathies, including thalassemia intermedia and sickle cell anemia, in which a different spectrum of cardiovascular complications is typical. There are considerable uncertainties in this field, with a few randomized controlled trials relating to treatment of chronic myocardial siderosis but none relating to treatment of acute heart failure. The principles of diagnosis and treatment of cardiac iron loading in TM are directly relevant to other iron-overload conditions, including in particular Diamond-Blackfan anemia, sideroblastic anemia, and hereditary hemochromatosis. Heart failure is the most common cause of death in TM and primarily results from cardiac iron accumulation. The diagnosis of ventricular dysfunction in TM patients differs from that in nonanemic patients because of the cardiovascular adaptation to chronic anemia in non-cardiac-loaded TM patients, which includes resting tachycardia, low blood pressure, enlarged end-diastolic volume, high ejection fraction, and high cardiac output. Chronic anemia also leads to background symptomatology such as dyspnea, which can mask the clinical diagnosis of cardiac dysfunction. Central to early identification of cardiac iron overload in TM is the estimation of cardiac iron by cardiac T2* magnetic resonance. Cardiac T2* <10 ms is the most important predictor of development of heart failure. Serum ferritin and liver iron concentration are not adequate surrogates for cardiac iron measurement. Assessment of cardiac function by noninvasive techniques can also be valuable clinically, but serial measurements to establish trends are usually required because interpretation of single absolute values is complicated by the abnormal cardiovascular hemodynamics in TM and measurement imprecision. Acute decompensated heart failure is a

  2. Visual function affects prosocial behaviors in older adults.

    PubMed

    Teoli, Dac A; Smith, Merideth D; Leys, Monique J; Jain, Priyanka; Odom, J Vernon

    2016-02-01

    Eye-related pathological conditions such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration commonly lead to decreased peripheral/central field, decreased visual acuity, and increased functional disability. We sought to answer if relationships exist between measures of visual function and reported prosocial behaviors in an older adult population with eye-related diagnoses. The sample consisted of adults, aged ≥ 60 years old, at an academic hospital's eye institute. Vision ranged from normal to severe impairment. Medical charts determined the visual acuities, ocular disease, duration of disease (DD), and visual fields (VF). Measures of giving help were via validated questionnaires on giving formal support (GFS) and giving informal support; measures of help received were perceived support (PS) and informal support received (ISR). ISR had subscales: tangible support (ISR-T), emotional support (ISR-E), and composite (ISR-C). Visual acuities of the better and worse seeing eyes were converted to LogMAR values. VF information converted to a 4-point rating scale of binocular field loss severity. DD was in years. Among 96 participants (mean age 73.28; range 60-94), stepwise regression indicated a relationship of visual variables to GFS (p < 0.05; Multiple R (2) = 0.1679 with acuity-better eye, VF rating, and DD), PS (p < 0.05; Multiple R (2) = 0.2254 with acuity-better eye), ISR-C (p < 0.05; Multiple R (2) = 0.041 with acuity-better eye), and ISR-T (p < 0.05; Multiple R (2) = 0.1421 with acuity-better eye). The findings suggest eye-related conditions can impact levels and perceptions of support exchanges. Our data reinforces the importance of visual function as an influence on prosocial behavior in older adults.

  3. The aged cardiovascular risk patient.

    PubMed

    Priebe, H J

    2000-11-01

    It is mostly acknowledged that 'normal' or 'healthy' ageing of the cardiovascular system is distinct from the increasing incidence and severity of cardiovascular disease with advancing age (e.g. hypertension, ischaemic heart disease and congestive heart failure). It is also recognized that chronological and biological age may differ considerably. Nevertheless, even in the absence of overt coexisting disease, advanced age is always accompanied by a general decline in organ function, and specifically by alterations in structure and function of the heart and vasculature that will ultimately affect cardiovascular performance. Actual biological age is thus the net result of the interaction between age-related and concomitant disease-associated changes in organ function. As cardiovascular performance at a given moment is the net result of interactions between heart rate, intrinsic contractility, diastolic and systolic function, ventricular afterload and coronary perfusion, it is important to be aware of the age-related changes in each of these variables, independent of disease, as they determine cardiac performance at rest and its response to stress in the elderly. The most relevant age-related changes in cardiovascular performance for perioperative management are the stiffened myocardium and vasculature, blunted beta-adrenoceptor responsiveness and impaired autonomic reflex control of heart rate. These changes are of little clinical relevance at rest, but may have considerable consequences during superimposed cardiovascular stress. Such stress can take the form of increased flow demand (as in exercise or postoperatively), demand for acute autonomic reflex control (as in change of posture) or severe disease (as during myocardial ischaemia, tachyarrhythmias or uncontrolled hypertension). It may interfere with diastolic relaxation (i.e. ventricular filling), systolic contraction (i.e. ventricular emptying) and vasomotor control (i.e. arterial pressure homeostasis). Three

  4. Affected functional networks associated with sentence production in classic galactosemia.

    PubMed

    Timmers, Inge; van den Hurk, Job; Hofman, Paul Am; Zimmermann, Luc Ji; Uludağ, Kâmil; Jansma, Bernadette M; Rubio-Gozalbo, M Estela

    2015-08-07

    Patients with the inherited metabolic disorder classic galactosemia have language production impairments in several planning stages. Here, we assessed potential deviations in recruitment and connectivity across brain areas responsible for language production that may explain these deficits. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study neural activity and connectivity while participants carried out a language production task. This study included 13 adolescent patients and 13 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Participants passively watched or actively described an animated visual scene using two conditions, varying in syntactic complexity (single words versus a sentence). Results showed that patients recruited additional and more extensive brain regions during sentence production. Both groups showed modulations with syntactic complexity in left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), a region associated with syntactic planning, and in right insula. In addition, patients showed a modulation with syntax in left superior temporal gyrus (STG), whereas the controls did not. Further, patients showed increased activity in right STG and right supplementary motor area (SMA). The functional connectivity data showed similar patterns, with more extensive connectivity with frontal and motor regions, and restricted and weaker connectivity with superior temporal regions. Patients also showed higher baseline cerebral blood flow (CBF) in right IFG and trends towards higher CBF in bilateral STG, SMA and the insula. Taken together, the data demonstrate that language abnormalities in classic galactosemia are associated with specific changes within the language network. These changes point towards impairments related to both syntactic planning and speech motor planning in these patients.

  5. Modeled Microgravity Affects Fibroblast Functions Related to Wound Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cialdai, Francesca; Vignali, Leonardo; Morbidelli, Lucia; Colciago, Alessandra; Celotti, Fabio; Santi, Alice; Caselli, Anna; Cirri, Paolo; Monici, Monica

    2017-02-01

    Wound healing is crucial for the survival of an organism. Therefore, in the perspective of space exploration missions, it is important to understand if and how microgravity conditions affect the behavior of the cell populations involved in wound healing and the evolution of the process. Since fibroblasts are the major players in tissue repair, this study was focused on the behavior of fibroblasts in microgravity conditions, modeled by a RCCS. Cell cytoskeleton was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy, the ability to migrate was assessed by microchemotaxis and scratch assay, and the expression of markers of fibroblast activation, angiogenesis, and inflammation was assessed by western blot. Results revealed that after cell exposure to modeled microgravity conditions, a thorough rearrangement of microtubules occurred and α-SMA bundles were replaced by a tight network of faulty and disorganized filaments. Exposure to modeled microgravity induced a decrease in α-SMA and E-CAD expressions. Also, the expression of the pro-angiogenic protein VEGF decreased, while that of the inflammatory signal COX-2 increased. Fibroblast ability to adhere, migrate, and respond to chemoattractants (PRP), closely related to cytoskeleton integrity and membrane junctions, was significantly impaired. Nevertheless, PRP was able to partially restore fibroblast migration.

  6. Modeled Microgravity Affects Fibroblast Functions Related to Wound Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cialdai, Francesca; Vignali, Leonardo; Morbidelli, Lucia; Colciago, Alessandra; Celotti, Fabio; Santi, Alice; Caselli, Anna; Cirri, Paolo; Monici, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Wound healing is crucial for the survival of an organism. Therefore, in the perspective of space exploration missions, it is important to understand if and how microgravity conditions affect the behavior of the cell populations involved in wound healing and the evolution of the process. Since fibroblasts are the major players in tissue repair, this study was focused on the behavior of fibroblasts in microgravity conditions, modeled by a RCCS. Cell cytoskeleton was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy, the ability to migrate was assessed by microchemotaxis and scratch assay, and the expression of markers of fibroblast activation, angiogenesis, and inflammation was assessed by western blot. Results revealed that after cell exposure to modeled microgravity conditions, a thorough rearrangement of microtubules occurred and α-SMA bundles were replaced by a tight network of faulty and disorganized filaments. Exposure to modeled microgravity induced a decrease in α-SMA and E-CAD expressions. Also, the expression of the pro-angiogenic protein VEGF decreased, while that of the inflammatory signal COX-2 increased. Fibroblast ability to adhere, migrate, and respond to chemoattractants (PRP), closely related to cytoskeleton integrity and membrane junctions, was significantly impaired. Nevertheless, PRP was able to partially restore fibroblast migration.

  7. New aspects of the role of histamine in cardiovascular function: identification, characterization, and potential pathophysiological importance of H3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Göthert, M; Garbarg, M; Hey, J A; Schlicker, E; Schwartz, J C; Levi, R

    1995-05-01

    As a result of intensive research during several decades, the distribution, function, and pathophysiological role of cardiovascular H1 and H2 receptors are well known, whereas reports on the occurrence and function of H3 receptors in blood vessels and the heart have not become available before the last 7 years (i.e., 4 years after the first description of these receptors in the central nervous system in 1983). The development of selective and potent H3 receptor agonists and antagonists was a prerequisite for convenient investigations of cardiovascular H3 receptors, which like H1 and H2 receptors are G-protein coupled but unlike them have not yet been cloned. Both in blood vessels and the heart, H3 receptors are located on noradrenergic nerve endings and upon stimulation mediate an inhibition of noradrenaline release. Whereas it remains to be clarified under which conditions the vascular H3 receptors may be stimulated by endogenous histamine, those in the heart become activated in the early phases of myocardial ischemia characterized by an increased histamine spillover. The H3 receptors in the central nervous system also appear to be of importance for the control of vascular function. Inhibitory presynaptic H3 receptors occur on trigeminal sensory C fibres supplying blood vessels in the dura mater. Release of neuropeptides from these fibres induces a neurogenic inflammation, which has been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of migraine. An interaction, involving presynaptic H3 receptors, between sensory C fibres and mast cells in close apposition to these fibres plays a role in the control of histamine synthesis in the dura mater.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Low level methylmercury exposure affects neuropsychological function in adults

    PubMed Central

    Yokoo, Edna M; Valente, Joaquim G; Grattan, Lynn; Schmidt, Sérgio Luís; Platt, Illeane; Silbergeld, Ellen K

    2003-01-01

    -dependent effect. Conclusions This study suggests that adults exposed to MeHg may be at risk for deficits in neurocognitive function. The functions disrupted in adults, namely attention, fine-motor function and verbal memory, are similar to some of those previously reported in children with prenatal exposures. PMID:12844364

  9. The effects of Zumba training on cardiovascular and neuromuscular function in female college students.

    PubMed

    Donath, Lars; Roth, Ralf; Hohn, Yannick; Zahner, Lukas; Faude, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the effects of Zumba training (group fitness based on salsa and aerobics) on endurance, trunk strength, balance, flexibility, jumping performance and quality of life (QoL) in female college students. Thirty female participants were randomly assigned (strata: age, BMI and physical activity) to an intervention (INT, n = 15: age: 21.0 ± 2.3 years; BMI: 21.8 ± 3.0 kg/m(2); physical activity (PA): 7.6 ± 4.6 h/week) or control group (CON, n = 14: age: 21.0 ± 2.8 years; BMI: 21.0 ± 2.1 kg/m(2); PA: 7.3 ± 3.6 h/week). Instructed Zumba training was provided twice a week for 8 weeks (training attendance: 100%). QoL was assessed using the WHO-QoL-BREF questionnaire. Endurance was measured with the 6-min walking test (6MWT). Trunk flexibility was assessed with the stand-and-reach-test and lower-extremity strength with the jump-and-reach-test. The star excursion balance test (SEBT) was employed to assess dynamic balance. Trunk strength endurance was examined using the Swiss global trunk strength test in prone and lateral (left, right) positions. All testings were performed before and after the training period. We observed large statistically significant between-group effects of total QoL score (INT: +9.8%, CON: +0.4%, p < 0.001; partial eta squared [Formula: see text]), 6MWT distance (INT: +21%, CON: -2%, p < 0.001, [Formula: see text]), trunk strength endurance (prone, INT: +48%, CON: +11%, p = 0.04, [Formula: see text]; lateral-left, INT: +71%, CON: +11%, p = 0.01, [Formula: see text], lateral-right, INT: +54%, CON: +11%, p = 0.01, [Formula: see text]) and dynamic balance (all eight reaching distances of the SEBT, INT: +11-26%, CON: +1.1-3.8%, 0.001 < p < 0.04, 0.14 < [Formula: see text]) with significantly larger improvements for INT. Flexibility and jump performance were not relevantly affected (p > 0.05). Instructed Zumba training can be applied to improve well-being, aerobic fitness and neuromuscular function in female college students.

  10. Can Cholesterol Metabolism Modulation Affect Brain Function and Behavior?

    PubMed

    Cartocci, Veronica; Servadio, Michela; Trezza, Viviana; Pallottini, Valentina

    2017-02-01

    Cholesterol is an important component for cell physiology. It regulates the fluidity of cell membranes and determines the physical and biochemical properties of proteins. In the central nervous system, cholesterol controls synapse formation and function and supports the saltatory conduction of action potential. In recent years, the role of cholesterol in the brain has caught the attention of several research groups since a breakdown of cholesterol metabolism has been associated with different neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases, and interestingly also with psychiatric conditions. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge about the connection between cholesterol dysregulation and various neurologic and psychiatric disorders based on clinical and preclinical studies. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 281-286, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Does vitamin C deficiency affect cognitive development and function?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Stine Normann; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-09-19

    Vitamin C is a pivotal antioxidant in the brain and has been reported to have numerous functions, including reactive oxygen species scavenging, neuromodulation, and involvement in angiogenesis. Absence of vitamin C in the brain has been shown to be detrimental to survival in newborn SVCT2(-/-) mice and perinatal deficiency have shown to reduce hippocampal volume and neuron number and cause decreased spatial cognition in guinea pigs, suggesting that maternal vitamin C deficiency could have severe consequences for the offspring. Furthermore, vitamin C deficiency has been proposed to play a role in age-related cognitive decline and in stroke risk and severity. The present review discusses the available literature on effects of vitamin C deficiency on the developing and aging brain with particular focus on in vivo experimentation and clinical studies.

  12. Enhanced serotonin transporter function during depression in seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Willeit, Matthäus; Sitte, Harald H; Thierry, Nikolaus; Michalek, Klaus; Praschak-Rieder, Nicole; Zill, Peter; Winkler, Dietmar; Brannath, Werner; Fischer, Michael B; Bondy, Brigitta; Kasper, Siegfried; Singer, Ernst A

    2008-06-01

    Decreased synaptic serotonin during depressive episodes is a central element of the monoamine hypothesis of depression. The serotonin transporter (5-HTT, SERT) is a key molecule for the control of synaptic serotonin levels. Here we aimed to detect state-related alterations in the efficiency of 5-HTT-mediated inward and outward transport in platelets of drug-free depressed patients suffering from seasonal affective disorder (SAD). 5-HTT turnover rate, a measure for the number of inward transport events per minute, and tyramine-induced, 5-HTT-mediated outward transport were assessed at baseline, after 4 weeks of bright light therapy, and in summer using a case-control design in a consecutive sample of 73 drug-free depressed patients with SAD and 70 nonseasonal healthy controls. Patients were drug-naive or medication-free for at least 6 months prior to study inclusion, females patients were studied in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. All participants were genotyped for a 5-HTT-promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) to assess the influence of this polymorphism on 5-HTT parameters. Efficiency of 5-HTT-mediated inward (p=0.014) and outward (p=0.003) transport was enhanced in depressed patients. Both measures normalized toward control levels after therapy and in natural summer remission. Changes in outward transport showed a clear correlation with treatment response (rho=0.421, p=0.001). Changes in inward transport were mediated by changes in 5-HTT transport efficiency rather than affinity or density. 5-HTTLPR was not associated with any of the 5-HTT parameters. In sum, we conclude that the 5-HTT is in a hyperfunctional state during depression in SAD and normalizes after light therapy and in natural summer remission.

  13. Prehispanic Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals in the Treatment of Dyslipidemia Associated to Cardiovascular Disease: a Mini-Review.

    PubMed

    Ríos-Hoyo, Alejandro; Romo-Araiza, Alejandra; Meneses-Mayo, Marcos; Guttiérrez-Salmeán, Gabriela

    2017-01-27

    Dyslipidemia is an important modifi able risk factor for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases, which are responsible for a large number of mortality and disability cases around the globe. Different strategies have been used within the treatment of dyslipidemia, including lifestyle modifi cations, pharmacologic therapy, as well as functional foods and nutraceuticals. Functional foods have been used worldwide since ancient times, particularly, the prehispanic civilizations utilized several as medicinal foods. In the current pandemic of dyslipidemia as well as the nutritional transition, particularly in Latin America, the use of native functional foods represents an attractive target for the treatment and/ or prevention of these conditions. In this mini-review, evidence regarding different functional foods such as cacao, amaranth, chia, nopal, spirulina, as well as their nutraceutical compounds, including fl avonoids, omega-3 PUFAs, fi ber, prebiotics, lovastatin, c-phycocyanin, among others, and their mechanism of action are presented and discussed. Although such foods certainly are considered as attractive potential agents to target dyslipidemia thus decrease the associated cardiometabolic risk, we conclude that for most of the presented functional foods there is currently not enough evidence to support its recommendation and every-day use.

  14. Neural and humoral controlling mechanisms of cardiovascular functions in man under weightlessness simulated by water immersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mano, T.; Iwase, S.; Saito, M.; Koga, K.; Abe, H.; Inamura, K.; Matsukawa, T.

    To clarify how neural and humoral mechanisms operate to control cardiovascular unctions in man under weightlessness, the response of sympathetic nerve activity was observed in healthy human subjects by means of microneurographic technique with the changes of several hemodynamic parameters and hormonal responses during thermoneutral head-out water immersion. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was markedly suppressed by head-out immersion, concomitantly with a reduction of the leg volume, an increase of the stroke volume and a reduction of total peripheral resistance. At the same time, plasma level of norepinephrine, vasopressive and antidiuretic hormones (ADH, aldosterone, renin activity, angiotensin I·II) were reduced, while vasodepressive and diuretic hormone (ANP) was markedly increased. The systemic blood pressure was maintained almost unchanged during head-out water immersion. The suppressive response of sympathetic nerve activity seemed to be age-dependent. This response was less prominent in the elderly than in young subjects. It is concluded that the suppressive response of muscle sympathetic activity plays an important role to maintain hemodynamic homeostasis under weightlessness to compensate for the cephalad fluid shift and the resultant increase of the stroke volume in cooperation with the hormonal responses.

  15. [Functional cardiovascular assessment in dentists performing local anesthesia in out-patient settings].

    PubMed

    Rabinovich, S A; Razumova, S N; Vasil'ev, Yu L

    2017-01-01

    The article presents the results of the cardiovascular changes assessment using electrocardiography (ECG) monitoring during local anesthesia in GP dentists. Selective ECG monitoring was carried out in 60 dentists aged 25-55 years (1 group - 25-34 y.o.; 2 group - 35-44 y.o.; 3 group - 45-55 y.o.) by means of portable «Valens» system. The study of stress index or the index of regulatory systems tension (IT) was conducted for 6 hours in the first day half within 1 working day. IT from 50 to 150 relative units was considered normal. In the first group IT peak was observed at the time of expectation of clinically relevant anesthesia in upper and lower jaw, while in the second and third groups it was associated with pain reaction in the course of treatment despite of clinical signs of anesthesia in the maxilla (IT=20±5.3 and 231±1.4, correspondingly) and mandible (IT=213±2.7 and 223±2.6, correspondingly). In all groups greater IT correlated more with mandible anesthesia events.

  16. Sympathetic neurons are a powerful driver of myocyte function in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Hege E.; Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Paterson, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Many therapeutic interventions in disease states of heightened cardiac sympathetic activity are targeted to the myocytes. However, emerging clinical data highlights a dominant role in disease progression by the neurons themselves. Here we describe a novel experimental model of the peripheral neuro-cardiac axis to study the neuron’s ability to drive a myocyte cAMP phenotype. We employed a co-culture of neonatal ventricular myocytes and sympathetic stellate neurons from normal (WKY) and pro-hypertensive (SHR) rats that are sympathetically hyper-responsive and measured nicotine evoked cAMP responses in the myocytes using a fourth generation FRET cAMP sensor. We demonstrated the dominant role of neurons in driving the myocyte ß-adrenergic phenotype, where SHR cultures elicited heightened myocyte cAMP responses during neural activation. Moreover, cross-culturing healthy neurons onto diseased myocytes rescued the diseased cAMP response of the myocyte. Conversely, healthy myocytes developed a diseased cAMP response if diseased neurons were introduced. Our results provide evidence for a dominant role played by the neuron in driving the adrenergic phenotype seen in cardiovascular disease. We also highlight the potential of using healthy neurons to turn down the gain of neurotransmission, akin to a smart pre-synaptic ß-blocker. PMID:27966588

  17. Exosomes and Cardiovascular Protection.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Sean M; Takov, Kaloyan; Yellon, Derek M

    2017-02-01

    Most, if not all, cells of the cardiovascular system secrete small, lipid bilayer vesicles called exosomes. Despite technical challenges in their purification and analysis, exosomes from various sources have been shown to be powerfully cardioprotective. Indeed, it is possible that much of the so-called "paracrine" benefit in cardiovascular function obtained by stem cell therapy can be replicated by the injection of exosomes produced by stem cells. However, exosomes purified from plasma appear to be just as capable of activating cardioprotective pathways. We discuss the potential roles of endogenous exosomes in the cardiovascular system, how this is perturbed in cardiovascular disease, and evaluate their potential as therapeutic agents to protect the heart.

  18. Changes in cardiovascular function induced by verapamil in healthy subjects and in patients with ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Vincenzi, M; Morlino, T; Allegri, P; Barbieri, E; Cappelletti, F; De Lio, U; Ometto, R; Maiolino, P

    1981-01-01

    Alterations in cardiovascular function induced by the acute intravenous administration of verapamil (5 or 10 mg) in 52 patients (29 with ischemic heart disease and 23 without heart disease) were evaluated with use of invasive techniques (right and left heart catheterization, left ventricular cineangiography, and coronary arteriography). The most significant changes were represented by a decrease in systemic vascular resistance and systemic arterial pressure, and an increase in heart rate and cardiac output. Contractility indexes were not depressed in either group, and altered ventricular wall motion tended to improve to a slightly smaller degree than in patients treated with nitroglycerin. The use of verapamil in patients with ischemic heart disease appears to be safe, and concern about the negative inotropic influences in humans no longer seems justified.

  19. Neurology of Affective Prosody and Its Functional-Anatomic Organization in Right Hemisphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Elliott D.; Monnot, Marilee

    2008-01-01

    Unlike the aphasic syndromes, the organization of affective prosody in brain has remained controversial because affective-prosodic deficits may occur after left or right brain damage. However, different patterns of deficits are observed following left and right brain damage that suggest affective prosody is a dominant and lateralized function of…

  20. Familial Clustering of Executive Functioning in Affected Sibling Pair Families with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaats-Willemse, Dorine; Swaab-Barneveld, Hanna; De Sonneville, Leo; Buitelaar, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate familial clustering of executive functioning (i.e., response inhibition, fine visuomotor functioning, and attentional control) in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-affected sibling pairs. Method: Fifty-two affected sibling pairs aged 6 to 18 years and diagnosed with ADHD according to DSM-IV performed the…

  1. SR-BI as target in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease - A comprehensive appraisal of the cellular functions of SR-BI in physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Menno

    2017-03-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is considered an anti-atherogenic lipoprotein species due to its role in reverse cholesterol transport. HDL delivers cholesterol esters to the liver through selective uptake by scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). In line with the protective role for HDL in the context of cardiovascular disease, studies in mice and recently also in humans have shown that a disruption of normal SR-BI function predisposes subjects to the development of atherosclerotic lesions and cardiovascular disease. Although SR-BI function has been studied primarily in the liver, it should be acknowledged that the SR-BI protein is expressed in multiple tissues and cell types across the body, albeit at varying levels between the different tissues. Given that SR-BI is widely expressed throughout the body, multiple cell types and tissues can theoretically contribute to the atheroprotective effect of SR-BI. In this review the different functions of SR-BI in normal physiology are highlighted and the (potential) consequences of cell type-specific disruption of SR-BI function for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease susceptibility discussed. It appears that hepatocyte and platelet SR-BI inhibit respectively the development of atherosclerotic lesions and thrombosis, suggesting that SR-BI located on these cell compartments should be regarded as being a protective factor in the context of cardiovascular disease. The relative contribution of SR-BI present on endothelial cells, steroidogenic cells, adipocytes and macrophages to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease remains less clear, although proper SR-BI function in these cells does appear to influence multiple processes that impact on cardiovascular disease susceptibility.

  2. Simulation of Left Atrial Function Using a Multi-Scale Model of the Cardiovascular System

    PubMed Central

    Pironet, Antoine; Dauby, Pierre C.; Paeme, Sabine; Kosta, Sarah; Chase, J. Geoffrey; Desaive, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    During a full cardiac cycle, the left atrium successively behaves as a reservoir, a conduit and a pump. This complex behavior makes it unrealistic to apply the time-varying elastance theory to characterize the left atrium, first, because this theory has known limitations, and second, because it is still uncertain whether the load independence hypothesis holds. In this study, we aim to bypass this uncertainty by relying on another kind of mathematical model of the cardiac chambers. In the present work, we describe both the left atrium and the left ventricle with a multi-scale model. The multi-scale property of this model comes from the fact that pressure inside a cardiac chamber is derived from a model of the sarcomere behavior. Macroscopic model parameters are identified from reference dog hemodynamic data. The multi-scale model of the cardiovascular system including the left atrium is then simulated to show that the physiological roles of the left atrium are correctly reproduced. This include a biphasic pressure wave and an eight-shaped pressure-volume loop. We also test the validity of our model in non basal conditions by reproducing a preload reduction experiment by inferior vena cava occlusion with the model. We compute the variation of eight indices before and after this experiment and obtain the same variation as experimentally observed for seven out of the eight indices. In summary, the multi-scale mathematical model presented in this work is able to correctly account for the three roles of the left atrium and also exhibits a realistic left atrial pressure-volume loop. Furthermore, the model has been previously presented and validated for the left ventricle. This makes it a proper alternative to the time-varying elastance theory if the focus is set on precisely representing the left atrial and left ventricular behaviors. PMID:23755183

  3. Stainless steel surface functionalization for immobilization of antibody fragments for cardiovascular applications.

    PubMed

    Foerster, A; Hołowacz, I; Sunil Kumar, G B; Anandakumar, S; Wall, J G; Wawrzyńska, M; Paprocka, M; Kantor, A; Kraskiewicz, H; Olsztyńska-Janus, S; Hinder, S J; Bialy, D; Podbielska, H; Kopaczyńska, M

    2016-04-01

    Stainless steel 316 L material is commonly used for the production of coronary and peripheral vessel stents. Effective biofunctionalization is a key to improving the performance and safety of the stents after implantation. This paper reports the method for the immobilization of recombinant antibody fragments (scFv) on stainless steel 316 L to facilitate human endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) growth and thus improve cell viability of the implanted stents for cardiovascular applications. The modification of stent surface was conducted in three steps. First the stent surface was coated with titania based coating to increase the density of hydroxyl groups for successful silanization. Then silanization with 3 aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTS) was performed to provide the surface with amine groups which presence was verified using FTIR, XPS, and fluorescence microscopy. The maximum density of amine groups (4.8*10(-5) mol/cm(2)) on the surface was reached after reaction taking place in ethanol for 1 h at 60 °C and 0.04M APTS. On such prepared surface the glycosylated scFv were subsequently successfully immobilized. The influence of oxidation of scFv glycan moieties and the temperature on scFv coating were investigated. The fluorescence and confocal microscopy study indicated that the densest and most uniformly coated surface with scFv was obtained at 37 °C after oxidation of glycan chain. The results demonstrate that the scFv cannot be efficiently immobilized without prior aminosilanization of the surface. The effect of the chemical modification on the cell viability of EPC line 55.1 (HucPEC-55.1) was performed indicating that the modifications to the 316 L stainless steel are non-toxic to EPCs.

  4. Impairments in central cardiovascular function contribute to attenuated reflex vasodilation in aged skin.

    PubMed

    Greaney, Jody L; Stanhewicz, Anna E; Proctor, David N; Alexander, Lacy M; Kenney, W Larry

    2015-12-15

    During supine passive heating, increases in skin blood flow (SkBF) and cardiac output (Qc) are both blunted in older adults. The aim here was to determine the effect of acutely correcting the peripheral vasodilatory capacity of aged skin on the integrated cardiovascular responses to passive heating. A secondary aim was to examine the SkBF-Qc relation during hyperthermia in the presence (upright posture) and absence (dynamic exercise) of challenges to central venous pressure. We hypothesized that greater increases in SkBF would be accompanied by greater increases in Qc. Eleven healthy older adults (69 ± 3 yr) underwent supine passive heating (0.8°C rise in core temperature; water-perfused suit) after ingesting sapropterin (BH4, a nitric oxide synthase cofactor; 10 mg/kg) or placebo (randomized double-blind crossover design). Twelve young (24 ± 1 yr) subjects served as a comparison group. SkBF (laser-Doppler flowmetry) and Qc (open-circuit acetylene wash-in) were measured during supine heating, heating + upright posture, and heating + dynamic exercise. Throughout supine and upright heating, sapropterin fully restored the SkBF response of older adults to that of young adults but Qc remained blunted. During heat + upright posture, SkBF failed to decrease in untreated older subjects. There were no age- or treatment-related differences in SkBF-Qc during dynamic exercise. The principal finding of this study was that the blunted Qc response to passive heat stress is directly related to age as opposed to the blunted peripheral vasodilatory capacity of aged skin. Furthermore, peripheral impairments to SkBF in the aged may contribute to inapposite responses during challenges to central venous pressure during hyperthermia.

  5. Validity of an adaptation of the Framingham cardiovascular risk function: the VERIFICA study

    PubMed Central

    Marrugat, Jaume; Subirana, Isaac; Comín, Eva; Cabezas, Carmen; Vila, Joan; Elosua, Roberto; Nam, Byung‐Ho; Ramos, Rafel; Sala, Joan; Solanas, Pascual; Cordón, Ferran; Gené‐Badia, Joan; D'Agostino, Ralph B

    2007-01-01

    Background To assess the reliability and accuracy of the Framingham coronary heart disease (CHD) risk function adapted by the Registre Gironí del Cor (REGICOR) investigators in Spain. Methods A 5‐year follow‐up study was completed in 5732 participants aged 35–74 years. The adaptation consisted of using in the function the average population risk factor prevalence and the cumulative incidence observed in Spain instead of those from Framingham in a Cox proportional hazards model. Reliability and accuracy in estimating the observed cumulative incidence were tested with the area under the curve comparison and goodness‐of‐fit test, respectively. Results The Kaplan–Meier CHD cumulative incidence during the follow‐up was 4.0% in men and 1.7% in women. The original Framingham function and the REGICOR adapted estimates were 10.4% and 4.8%, and 3.6% and 2.0%, respectively. The REGICOR‐adapted function's estimate did not differ from the observed cumulated incidence (goodness of fit in men, p = 0.078, in women, p = 0.256), whereas all the original Framingham function estimates differed significantly (p<0.001). Reliabilities of the original Framingham function and of the best Cox model fit with the study data were similar in men (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve 0.68 and 0.69, respectively, p = 0.273), whereas the best Cox model fitted better in women (0.73 and 0.81, respectively, p<0.001). Conclusion The Framingham function adapted to local population characteristics accurately and reliably predicted the 5‐year CHD risk for patients aged 35–74 years, in contrast with the original function, which consistently overestimated the actual risk. PMID:17183014

  6. Peptides derived from the prohormone proNPQ/spexin are potent central modulators of cardiovascular and renal function and nociception

    PubMed Central

    Toll, Lawrence; Khroyan, Taline V.; Sonmez, Kemal; Ozawa, Akihiko; Lindberg, Iris; McLaughlin, Jay P.; Eans, Shainnel O.; Shahien, Amir A.; Kapusta, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Computational methods have led two groups to predict the endogenous presence of a highly conserved, amidated, 14-aa neuropeptide called either spexin or NPQ. NPQ/spexin is part of a larger prohormone that contains 3 sets of RR residues, suggesting that it could yield more than one bioactive peptide; however, no in vivo activity has been demonstrated for any peptide processed from this precursor. Here we demonstrate biological activity for two peptides present within proNPQ/spexin. NPQ/spexin (NWTPQAMLYLKGAQ-NH2) and NPQ 53-70 (FISDQSRRKDLSDRPLPE) have differing renal and cardiovascular effects when administered intracerebroventricularly or intravenously into rats. Intracerebroventricular injection of NPQ/spexin produced a 13 ± 2 mmHg increase in mean arterial pressure, a 38 ± 8 bpm decrease in heart rate, and a profound decrease in urine flow rate. Intracerebroventricular administration of NPQ 53-70 produced a 26 ± 9 bpm decrease in heart rate with no change in mean arterial pressure, and a marked increase in urine flow rate. Intraventricular NPQ/spexin and NPQ 53-70 also produced antinociceptive activity in the warm water tail withdrawal assay in mice (ED50<30 and 10 nmol for NPQ/spexin and NPQ 53-70, respectively). We conclude that newly identified peptides derived from the NPQ/spexin precursor contribute to CNS-mediated control of arterial blood pressure and salt and water balance and modulate nociceptive responses.—Toll, L., Khroyan, T. V., Sonmez, K., Ozawa, A., Lindberg, I., McLaughlin, J. P., Eans, S. O., Shahien, A. A., Kapusta, D. R. Peptides derived from the prohormone proNPQ/spexin are potent central modulators of cardiovascular and renal function and nociception. PMID:22038051

  7. Endothelial function after 10 days of bed rest in individuals at risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Mette P; Højbjerre, Lise; Alibegovic, Amra C; Nielsen, Lars B; Stallknecht, Bente; Vaag, Allan A; Dela, Flemming

    2011-10-01

    Physical inactivity is considered to be deleterious to vascular health, and in particular in first-degree relatives to patients with type 2 diabetes (FDR) and persons born with low birth weight (LBW), who may later in life develop cardiovascular disease. A period of imposed physical inactivity could unmask this risk. We hypothesized that the impact of physical inactivity on endothelial function would be more marked in subjects at increased risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (LBW and FDR) compared with a matched control group (CON), all of whom were recruited via advertisements and via the Danish Birth Registry. Twenty LBW, 20 CON and 13 FDR were studied before and after 10 days of bed rest. Forearm blood flow (FBF) was measured by venous occlusion plethysmography during brachial intra-arterial infusion of acetylcholine or adenosine at baseline and with superimposed hyperinsulinaemia. Markers of endothelial activation and inflammation were measured in plasma. Bed rest did not change the vasodilator responses to adenosine or acetylcholine alone in any group, but reduced vasodilator responses to adenosine or acetylcholine during hyperinsulinaemia in LBW. Bed rest impaired insulin-mediated vasodilatation in CON and LBW and increased endothelial activation markers in FDR and LBW but not in CON. Vasodilator responses were very low in FDR prior to bed rest, and did not decrease further during bed rest. Physical inactivity does not impair endothelium-dependent vasodilatation per se, but the vascular vasodilator effect of insulin diminished in CON and LBW after bed rest. In FDR, a further deterioration of FBF with inactivity is not possible.

  8. Isoform-specific regulation of mood behavior and pancreatic β cell and cardiovascular function by L-type Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Sinnegger-Brauns, Martina J.; Hetzenauer, Alfred; Huber, Irene G.; Renström, Erik; Wietzorrek, Georg; Berjukov, Stanislav; Cavalli, Maurizio; Walter, Doris; Koschak, Alexandra; Waldschütz, Ralph; Hering, Steffen; Bova, Sergio; Rorsman, Patrik; Pongs, Olaf; Singewald, Nicolas; Striessnig, Jörg

    2004-01-01

    Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs) are believed to underlie Ca2+ currents in brain, pancreatic β cells, and the cardiovascular system. In the CNS, neuronal LTCCs control excitation-transcription coupling and neuronal plasticity. However, the pharmacotherapeutic implications of CNS LTCC modulation are difficult to study because LTCC modulators cause card iovascular (activators and blockers) and neurotoxic (activators) effects. We selectively eliminated high dihydropyridine (DHP) sensitivity from Cav1.2 α1 subunits (Cav1.2DHP–/–) without affecting function and expression. This allowed separation of the DHP effects of Cav1.2 from those of Cav1.3 and other LTCCs. DHP effects on pancreatic β cell LTCC currents, insulin secretion, cardiac inotropy, and arterial smooth muscle contractility were lost in Cav1.2DHP–/– mice, which rules out a direct role of Cav1.3 for these physiological processes. Using Cav1.2DHP–/– mice, we established DHPs as mood-modifying agents: LTCC activator–induced neurotoxicity was abolished and disclosed a depression-like behavioral effect without affecting spontaneous locomotor activity. LTCC activator BayK 8644 (BayK) activated only a specific set of brain areas. In the ventral striatum, BayK-induced release of glutamate and 5-HT, but not dopamine and noradrenaline, was abolished. This animal model provides a useful tool to elucidate whether Cav1.3-selective channel modulation represents a novel pharmacological approach to modify CNS function without major peripheral effects. PMID:15146240

  9. Laser therapy in cardiovascular disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindge, David

    2009-02-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death worldwide. It is broadly defined to include anything which adversely affects the heart or blood vessels. One-third of Americans have one or more forms of it. By one estimate, average human life expectancy would increase by seven years if it were eliminated. The mainstream medical model seeks mostly to "manage" cardiovascular disease with pharmaceuticals or to surgically bypass or reopen blocked vessels via angioplasty. These methods have proven highly useful and saved countless lives. Yet drug therapy may be costly and ongoing, and it carries the risk of side effects while often doing little or nothing to improve underlying health concerns. Similarly, angioplasty or surgery are invasive methods which entail risk. Laser therapy1 regenerates tissue, stimulates biological function, reduces inflammation and alleviates pain. Its efficacy and safety have been increasingly well documented in cardiovascular disease of many kinds. In this article we will explore the effects of laser therapy in angina, atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, myocardial infarction, stroke and other conditions. The clinical application of various methods of laser therapy, including laserpuncture and transcutaneous, supravascular and intravenous irradiation of blood will be discussed. Implementing laser therapy in the treatment of cardiovascular disease offers the possibility of increasing the health and wellbeing of patients while reducing the costs and enhancing safety of medical care.

  10. HDL-S1P: cardiovascular functions, disease-associated alterations, and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Levkau, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid contained in High-density lipoproteins (HDL) and has drawn considerable attention in the lipoprotein field as numerous studies have demonstrated its contribution to several functions inherent to HDL. Some of them are partly and some entirely due to the S1P contained in HDL (HDL-S1P). Despite the presence of over 1000 different lipids in HDL, S1P stands out as it possesses its own cell surface receptors through which it exercises key physiological functions. Most of the S1P in human plasma is associated with HDL, and the amount of HDL-S1P influences the quality and quantity of HDL-dependent functions. The main binding partner of S1P in HDL is apolipoprotein M but others may also exist particularly under conditions of acute S1P elevations. HDL not only exercise functions through their S1P content but have also an impact on genuine S1P signaling by influencing S1P bioactivity and receptor presentation. HDL-S1P content is altered in human diseases such as atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. Low HDL-S1P has also been linked to impaired HDL functions associated with these disorders. Although the pathophysiological and molecular reasons for such disease-associated shifts in HDL-S1P are little understood, there have been successful approaches to circumvent their adverse implications by pharmacologically increasing HDL-S1P as means to improve HDL function. This mini-review will cover the current understanding of the contribution of HDL-S1P to physiological HDL function, its alteration in disease and ways for its restoration to correct HDL dysfunction.

  11. [The influence of structural and functional disorders in cardiovascular and renal systems and metabolic disturbances on perinatal outcomes in pregnant women with chronic arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Padyganova, A V; Chicherina, E N

    2014-01-01

    We studied the influence of structural and functional disorders in cardiovascular and renal system and metabolic disturbances on perinatal outcomes in pregnant women with chronic arterial hypertension. The study included 100 women with these pathologies and 30 patients with physiological pregnancy. Comprehensive evaluation of the cardiovascular system, metabolic status, and perinatal outcomes was undertaken. The results indicate that atherogenic dyslipidemia is significantly associated with the reduction of body mass while glomerular filtration rate, concentric and eccentric left ventricular hypertrophy with the decrease of both weight and height of the newborns.

  12. Reduction in Adiposity, β-Cell Function, Insulin Sensitivity, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors: A Prospective Study among Japanese with Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Maki; Morita, Akemi; Goto, Atsushi; Deura, Kijo; Sasaki, Satoshi; Aiba, Naomi; Shimbo, Takuro; Terauchi, Yasuo; Miyachi, Motohiko; Noda, Mitsuhiko; Watanabe, Shaw

    2013-01-01

    Background A reduction in adiposity may be associated with an improvement in insulin sensitivity and β-cell function as well as cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; however, few studies have investigated these associations in a longitudinal setting. Methods To investigate these associations over a 1-year period, we conducted an observational analysis of 196 Japanese subjects with obesity in the Saku Control Obesity Program. We investigated the relations between changes in adiposity (body mass index [BMI], waist circumference, subcutaneous fat area [SFAT], and visceral fat area [VFAT]) and changes in HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), insulin sensitivity index (ISI), the homeostasis model assessment β cell function (HOMA-β), lipids, and blood pressure. Results All adiposity changes were positively associated with HbA1c and FPG changes. Reductions in BMI and VFAT were associated with HOMA-β reduction. Reductions in all adiposity measures were associated with an improvement in the ISI. Changes in most adiposity measures were positively associated with changes in blood pressure and lipid levels, except for LDL. Conclusion The present findings provide additional supportive evidence indicating that a reduction in adiposity may lead to an improvement in insulin sensitivity and the reduction of CVD risk factors in obese individuals. PMID:23483954

  13. [Cardiovascular function dynamics in healthy Kazakhstan participants of an ecomedical investigation working in extreme conditions (emergency management personnel)].

    PubMed

    Eshmanova, A K; Akanov, A A; Kiyabaev, A M

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of the investigation was to study group dynamics of seasonal changes in the autonomous nervous and cardiovascular functions in essentially healthy males occupationally dealing with stressful situations (field personnel and firefighters of the Alma Ata Emergency Management Department (Kazakhstan). The investigation was based at the Kazakh National Medical University (Alma Ata) and conducted in conjunction and parallel with the MARS-500 project. Methodology embodied the pre-nosology approach pointed at identification of states in-between the norm and pathology. Results of the year-long investigation demonstrated seasonal variations in the functioning of normal organism that could be associated with occupational factors and "arduous duty", as it follows from the EMD operations summary (autonomous balance shifting toward prevalence of the sympathetic control due to the spring and summer "arduous duties" and the parasympathetic control in the peaceful situation during wintertime). These observations testify to the importance of dynamic health monitoring of normal people occupationally exposed to chronic psycho-emotional strain for pre-nosology diagnosis and timely preventive intervention.

  14. Predicting the accuracy of facial affect recognition: the interaction of child maltreatment and intellectual functioning.

    PubMed

    Shenk, Chad E; Putnam, Frank W; Noll, Jennie G

    2013-02-01

    Previous research demonstrates that both child maltreatment and intellectual performance contribute uniquely to the accurate identification of facial affect by children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to extend this research by examining whether child maltreatment affects the accuracy of facial recognition differently at varying levels of intellectual functioning. A sample of maltreated (n=50) and nonmaltreated (n=56) adolescent females, 14 to 19 years of age, was recruited to participate in this study. Participants completed demographic and study-related questionnaires and interviews to control for potential psychological and psychiatric confounds such as symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, negative affect, and difficulties in emotion regulation. Participants also completed an experimental paradigm that recorded responses to facial affect displays starting in a neutral expression and changing into a full expression of one of six emotions: happiness, sadness, anger, disgust, fear, or surprise. Hierarchical multiple regression assessed the incremental advantage of evaluating the interaction between child maltreatment and intellectual functioning. Results indicated that the interaction term accounted for a significant amount of additional variance in the accurate identification of facial affect after controlling for relevant covariates and main effects. Specifically, maltreated females with lower levels of intellectual functioning were least accurate in identifying facial affect displays, whereas those with higher levels of intellectual functioning performed as well as nonmaltreated females. These results suggest that maltreatment and intellectual functioning interact to predict the recognition of facial affect, with potential long-term consequences for the interpersonal functioning of maltreated females.

  15. Performance of the Framingham and SCORE cardiovascular risk prediction functions in a non-diabetic population of a Spanish health care centre: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Lourdes Cañón; Muro, Eloísa Cruces; Herrera, Natalio Díaz; Ochoa, Gerardo Fernández; Hueros, Juan Ignacio Calvo; Buitrago, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Objective To analyse the 10-year performance of the original Framingham coronary risk function and of the SCORE cardiovascular death risk function in a non-diabetic population of 40–65 years of age served by a Spanish healthcare centre. Also, to estimate the percentage of patients who are candidates for antihypertensive and lipid-lowering therapy. Design Longitudinal, observational study of a retrospective cohort followed up for 10 years. Setting Primary care health centre. Patients A total of 608 non-diabetic patients of 40–65 years of age (mean 52.8 years, 56.7% women), without evidence of cardiovascular disease were studied. Main outcome measures Coronary risk at 10 years from the time of their recruitment, using the tables based on the original Framingham function, and of their 10-year risk of fatal cardiovascular disease using the SCORE tables. Results The actual incidence rates of coronary and fatal cardiovascular events were 7.9% and 1.5%, respectively. The original Framingham equation over-predicted risk by 64%, while SCORE function over-predicted risk by 40%, but the SCORE model performed better than the Framingham one for discrimination and calibration statistics. The original Framingham function classified 18.3% of the population as high risk and SCORE 9.2%. The proportions of patients who would be candidates for lipid-lowering therapy were 31.0% and 23.8% according to the original Framingham and SCORE functions, respectively, and 36.8% and 31.2% for antihypertensive therapy. Conclusion The SCORE function showed better values than the original Framingham function for each of the discrimination and calibration statistics. The original Framingham function selected a greater percentage of candidates for antihypertensive and lipid-lowering therapy. PMID:20873973

  16. Urinary Retinol-Binding Protein: Relationship to Renal Function and Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Domingos, Maria Alice Muniz; Moreira, Silvia Regina; Gomez, Luz; Goulart, Alessandra; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade; Benseñor, Isabela; Titan, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    The role of urinary retinol-binding protein (RBP) as a biomarker of CKD in proximal tubular diseases, glomerulopathies and in transplantation is well established. However, whether urinary RBP is also a biomarker of renal damage and CKD progression in general CKD is not known. In this study, we evaluated the association of urinary RBP with renal function and cardiovascular risk factors in the baseline data of the Progredir Study, a CKD cohort in Sao Paulo, Brazil, comprising 454 participants with stages 3 and 4 CKD. In univariate analysis, urinary RBP was inversely related to estimated glomerular filtration rate (CKD-EPI eGFR) and several cardiovascular risk factors. After adjustments, however, only CKD-EPI eGFR, albuminuria, systolic blood pressure, anemia, acidosis, and left atrium diameter remained significantly related to urinary RBP. The inverse relationship of eGFR to urinary RBP (β-0.02 ± 95CI -0.02; -0.01, p<0.0001 for adjusted model) remained in all strata of albuminuria, even after adjustments: in normoalbuminuria (β-0.008 ± 95CI (-0.02; -0.001, p = 0.03), in microalbuminuria (β-0.02 ± 95CI (-0.03; -0.02, p<0,0001) and in macroalbuminuria (β-0.02 ± 95CI (-0.03; -0.01, p<0,0001). Lastly, urinary RBP was able to significantly increase the accuracy of a logistic regression model (adjusted for sex, age, SBP, diabetes and albuminuria) in diagnosing eGFR<35 ml/min/1.73m2 (AUC 0,77, 95%CI 0,72–0,81 versus AUC 0,71, 95%CI 0,65–0,75, respectively; p = 0,05). Our results suggest that urinary RBP is significantly associated to renal function in CKD in general, a finding that expands the interest in this biomarker beyond the context of proximal tubulopathies, glomerulopathies or transplantation. Urinary RBP should be further explored as a predictive marker of CKD progression. PMID:27655369

  17. Role of dorsolateral periaqueductal grey in the coordinated regulation of cardiovascular and respiratory function.

    PubMed

    Dampney, Roger A L; Furlong, Teri M; Horiuchi, Jouji; Iigaya, Kamon

    2013-04-01

    The midbrain periaqueductal grey (PAG) contains four longitudinal columns, referred to as the dorsomedial (dmPAG), dorsolateral (dlPAG), lateral (lPAG) and ventrolateral (vlPAG) subdivisions, which collectively have a pivotal role in integrating behavioural and physiological responses to external stressors as well as other functions. This review is focussed on the dlPAG, which is believed to be an important component of the central mechanisms that generate the defensive response to acute psychological stressors, such as the presence of a predator or other immediate threat. The anatomical connections of the dlPAG are highly specific and distinctly different from those of the other PAG subregions. The chemical properties of the dlPAG are also distinctly different from the other PAG subregions (e.g. there is a very high density of neurons that synthesize nitric oxide in the dlPAG but very few such neurons in the other PAG subregions). Recent functional studies have demonstrated that neurons in the dlPAG exert a powerful control over both sympathetic and respiratory activity, and that the pattern of the evoked respiratory changes is also distinctly different from those evoked from other PAG subregions. These studies also showed that the sympathetic and respiratory changes evoked from the dlPAG are highly correlated, suggesting the possibility that a common population of "command neurons" within this region may generate the sympathetic and respiratory changes that accompany defensive behavioural responses to acute psychological stressors. Finally, although the anatomical connections and functional properties of the dlPAG are distinctly different from the other PAG subregions, they have many similarities with adjacent parts of the superior colliculus, suggesting that the dlPAG and deep layers of the superior colliculus may be part of a common defence system in the midbrain.

  18. Antigravity suit inflation - Kidney function and cardiovascular and hormonal responses in men

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geelen, Ghislaine; Kravik, Stein E.; Hadj-Aissa, Aoumeur; Leftheriotis, Georges; Vincent, Madeleine

    1989-01-01

    The effect of the lower body positive pressure (LBPP) on kidney function in normal men was investigated in experiments in which the subjects underwent 30 min of sitting and then were subjected to 4.5 h of 70-deg head-up tilt. During the last 3 h of the tilt period, an antigravity suit (60 T legs, 30 T abdomen) was applied. The results showed that LBPP induces a significant increase in effective renal plasma flow and significant changes in the kidney excretory patterns, which were similar to those observed during a water immersion or the early phase of bed rest.

  19. Lexical and Affective Prosody in Children with High-Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Ruth B.; Bemis, Rhyannon H.; Skwerer, Daniela Plesa; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the perception and production of lexical stress and processing of affective prosody in adolescents with high-functioning autism (HFA). We hypothesized preserved processing of lexical and affective prosody but atypical lexical prosody production. Method: Sixteen children with HFA and 15 typically developing (TD) peers…

  20. Cardiovascular function in large to small hibernators: bears to ground squirrels.

    PubMed

    Nelson, O Lynne; Robbins, Charles T

    2015-04-01

    Mammalian hibernation has intrigued scientists due to extreme variations in normal seasonal physiological homeostasis. Numerous species manifest a hibernation phenotype although the characteristics of the hypometabolic state can be quite different. Ground squirrels (e.g., Sciuridae) are often considered the prototypical hibernator as individuals in this genus transition from an active, euthermic state (37 °C) to a nonresponsive hibernating state where torpid body temperature commonly falls to 3-5 °C. However, the hibernating state is not continuous as periodic warming and arousals occur. In contrast, the larger hibernators of genus Ursus are less hypothermic (body temperatures decline from approximately 37°-33 °C), are more reactive, and cyclical arousals do not occur. Both species dramatically reduce cardiac output during hibernation from the active state (bears ~75 % reduction in bears and ~97 % reduction in ground squirrels), and both species demonstrate hypokinetic atrial chamber activity. However, there are several important differences in cardiac function between the two groups during hibernation. Left ventricular diastolic filling volumes and stroke volumes do not differ in bears between seasons, but increased diastolic and stroke volumes during hibernation are important contributors to cardiac output in ground squirrels. Decreased cardiac muscle mass and increased ventricular stiffness have been found in bears, whereas ground squirrels have increased cardiac muscle mass and decreased ventricular stiffness during hibernation. Molecular pathways of cardiac muscle plasticity reveal differences between the species in the modification of sarcomeric proteins such as titin and α myosin heavy chain during hibernation. The differences in hibernation character are likely to account for the alternative cardiac phenotypes and functional strategies manifested by the two species. Molecular investigation coupled with better knowledge of seasonal physiological

  1. Role of creatine supplementation on exercise-induced cardiovascular function and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Daniel; Mason, Laura; Kilduff, Liam P; McEneny, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Many degenerative diseases are associated with increased oxidative stress. Creatine has the potential to act as an indirect and direct antioxidant; however, limited data exist to evaluate the antioxidant capabilities of creatine supplementation within in vivo human systems. This study aimed to investigate the effects of oral creatine supplementation on markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant defenses following exhaustive cycling exercise. Following preliminary testing and two additional familiarization sessions, 18 active males repeated two exhaustive incremental cycling trials (T1 and T2) separated by exactly 7 days. The subjects were assigned, in a double-blind manner, to receive either 20 g of creatine (Cr) or a placebo (P) for the 5 days preceding T2. Breath-by-breath respiratory data and heart rate were continually recorded throughout the exercise protocol and blood samples were obtained at rest (preexercise), at the end of exercise (postexercise), and the day following exercise (post24 h). Serum hypdroperoxide concentrations were elevated at postexercise by 17 ± 5% above preexercise values (p = 0.030). However, supplementation did not influence lipid peroxidation (serum hypdroperoxide concentrations), resistance of low density lipoprotein to oxidative stress (t1/2max LDL oxidation) and plasma concentrations of non-enzymatic antioxidants (retinol, α-carotene, β-carotene, α-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol, lycopene and vitamin C). Heart rate and oxygen uptake responses to exercise were not affected by supplementation. These findings suggest that short-term creatine supplementation does not enhance non-enzymatic antioxidant defence or protect against lipid peroxidation induced by exhaustive cycling in healthy males. PMID:20716911

  2. Effects of Adjuvant Systems on the cardiovascular and respiratory functions in telemetered conscious dogs and anaesthetised rats.

    PubMed

    Segal, Lawrence; Roger, Virginie; Williams, Colin; Destexhe, Eric; Garçon, Nathalie

    2015-10-01

    Adjuvants Systems (AS) containing immunostimulant combinations are used in human vaccines. Safety pharmacology studies evaluated the cardiorespiratory effects of AS in conscious telemetered dogs and in anaesthetised rats. Sixteen telemetered beagle dogs (4/group) received intramuscular injections of saline at Day 0, and one clinical dose of AS01, AS03, AS04 or AS15 at Day 7 (7× the equivalent human dose on a bodyweight basis). Bodyweights were measured through Day 14 and cardiorespiratory parameters and body temperature through 72 h post-treatment. Anaesthetised rats (4/group) received one intravenous injection of AS01, AS03 or AS15 at 1 mL/kg bodyweight (140× the equivalent human dosages), or saline. Cardiorespiratory parameters were measured for 120 min post-dose. In dogs, food consumption and mean bodyweight decreased with AS03, and mean body temperature slightly increased with AS01, AS03 and AS15, but were not considered to be adverse. Cardiovascular effects (a slight, reversible increase in mean heart rate and shortened mean RR/PR/QT-intervals) were observed with AS15. No relevant clinical effects or effects on QRS-complex/QTc-interval durations, arterial pressure or respiratory parameters were observed. In rats, there were no consistent treatment-related effects. Collectively, this suggests that AS01, AS03, AS04 and AS15 are not associated with potentially deleterious effects on ventricular repolarisation, atrio/intra-ventricular conductivities or respiratory functions.

  3. Quantitative analysis of structure and function of the cardiovascular system by roentgen-video-computer techniques.

    PubMed

    Heintzen, P H; Brennecke, R; Bürsch, J H; Hahne, H J; Lange, P E; Moldenhauer, K; Onnasch, D; Radtke, W

    1982-07-01

    A survey of the evolution of roentgen-video-computer techniques is given which was initiated by the development of videodensitometry by Wood and his associates. Following fundamental studies of the usefulness and limitations of x-ray equipment for quantitative measurements and the applicability of the Lambert-Beers law to x-ray absorption, videodensitometry has been used experimentally and clinically for various circulatory studies and has proved to be particularly valuable for the quantitation of aortic, pulmonic, and mitral valvular regurgitation. The second offspring of these techniques, so-called videometry, uses dimensional measurements from single and biplane angiocardiograms for the assessment of size, shape, and contraction pattern of the heart chambers. Volumes of the right and left ventricles can be determined clinically with a standard error of estimate below 10%. On the basis of these studies, normal values have been derived for all age groups, and they depict geometric changes of the growing heart. Cardiac index and ejection fractions proved to be age-independent biologic constants. Finally, methods for complete digital processing of video-image sequences in an off-line and real-time mode are described which allow digital image storage and documentation, dynamic background subtraction for contrast enhancement, and intravenous angiocardiography, in addition to functional imaging by parameter extraction from a matrix of pixel densitograms. Wall thickness and motion determinations, regional flow distribution measurements, and various image-composition techniques are also feasible.

  4. Digital thermal monitoring of vascular function: a novel tool to improve cardiovascular risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Gul, Khawar M; Ahmadi, Naser; Wang, Zhiying; Jamieson, Craig; Nasir, Khurram; Metcalfe, Ralph; Hecht, Harvey S; Hartley, Craig J; Naghavi, Morteza

    2009-05-01

    Digital thermal monitoring (DTM) of vascular function during cuff-occlusive reactive hyperemia relies on the premise that changes in fingertip temperature during and after an ischemic stimulus reflect changes in blood flow. To determine its utility in individuals with and without known coronary heart disease (CHD), 133 consecutive individuals (age 54 +/- 10 years, 50% male, 19 with known CHD) underwent DTM during and after 2 minutes of supra-systolic arm cuff inflation. Fingertip temperatures of the occluded and non-occluded fingertips were measured simultaneously. Post-cuff deflation temperature rebound (TR) was lower in the CHD patients and in those with an increased Framingham risk score (FRS) compared to the normal group. After adjustment for age, sex, and cardiac risk factors, TR was significantly lower in those with CHD compared to those without CHD (p < 0.05). This study demonstrates that vascular dysfunction measured by DTM is associated with CHD and an increased FRS, and could potentially be used to identify high-risk patients.

  5. Living alongside railway tracks: Long-term effects of nocturnal noise on sleep and cardiovascular reactivity as a function of age.

    PubMed

    Tassi, Patricia; Rohmer, Odile; Schimchowitsch, Sarah; Eschenlauer, Arnaud; Bonnefond, Anne; Margiocchi, Florence; Poisson, Franck; Muzet, Alain

    2010-10-01

    Very few studies were devoted to permanent effects of nocturnal railway noise on sleep and cardiovascular reactivity. We investigated the effects of nocturnal railway noise on sleep and cardiovascular response in young and middle-aged adults living for many years either near a railway track or in a quiet area. Forty subjects (50% males) divided into two age groups (juniors: 26.2+/-3.6 and seniors: 56.2+/-4.2) participated in this experiment. Half of them lived near a railway track (RW group: 2.6 to 19 years) and the other half in a quiet environment (QE group: 8.1 to 14.2 years). After an adaptation night, all subjects underwent two nights in the laboratory: one control night and one noisy night (30 by-passes of a freight train). Sleep and cardiovascular modifications were assessed in response to noise. Sleep fragmentation indices were lower in RW subjects compared to QE whatever their age. In response to noise, there was a higher cardiovascular response rate to noise in RW juniors and a lower cardiovascular response rate in RW seniors compared to their age-paired QE counterparts. In conclusion, permanent exposure to nocturnal railway noise leads to decreased sleep fragmentation and to cardiovascular habituation. It is suggested that during the initial period experienced by residents living near railway tracks, nocturnal railway noise could induce a sensitization process on the autonomic response to noise reflecting a startle/defense reflex due to its functional significance, which progressively turns to habituation in the long-term if no adverse effect is experienced.

  6. Excess pressure integral predicts cardiovascular events independent of other risk factors in the conduit artery functional evaluation substudy of Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial.

    PubMed

    Davies, Justin E; Lacy, Peter; Tillin, Therese; Collier, David; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Francis, Darrel P; Malaweera, Anura; Mayet, Jamil; Stanton, Alice; Williams, Bryan; Parker, Kim H; McG Thom, Simon A; Hughes, Alun D

    2014-07-01

    Excess pressure integral (XSPI), a new index of surplus work performed by the left ventricle, can be calculated from blood pressure waveforms and may indicate circulatory dysfunction. We investigated whether XSPI predicted future cardiovascular events and target organ damage in treated hypertensive individuals. Radial blood pressure waveforms were acquired by tonometry in 2069 individuals (aged, 63±8 years) in the Conduit Artery Functional Evaluation (CAFE) substudy of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT). Measurements of left ventricular mass index (n=862) and common carotid artery intima media thickness (n=923) were also performed. XSPI and the integral of reservoir pressure were lower in people treated with amlodipine±perindopril than in those treated with atenolol±bendroflumethiazide, although brachial systolic blood pressure was similar. A total of 134 cardiovascular events accrued during a median 3.4 years of follow-up; XSPI was a significant predictor of cardiovascular events after adjustment for age and sex, and this relationship was unaffected by adjustment for conventional cardiovascular risk factors or Framingham risk score. XSPI, central systolic blood pressure, central augmentation pressure, central pulse pressure, and integral of reservoir pressure were correlated with left ventricular mass index, but only XSPI, augmentation pressure, and central pulse pressure were associated positively with carotid artery intima media thickness. Associations between left ventricular mass index, XSPI, and integral of reservoir pressure and carotid artery intima media thickness and XSPI were unaffected by multivariable adjustment for other covariates. XSPI is a novel indicator of cardiovascular dysfunction and independently predicts cardiovascular events and targets organ damage in a prospective clinical trial.

  7. Negative affect predicts social functioning across schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: Findings from an integrated data analysis.

    PubMed

    Grove, Tyler B; Tso, Ivy F; Chun, Jinsoo; Mueller, Savanna A; Taylor, Stephan F; Ellingrod, Vicki L; McInnis, Melvin G; Deldin, Patricia J

    2016-09-30

    Most people with a serious mental illness experience significant functional impairment despite ongoing pharmacological treatment. Thus, in order to improve outcomes, a better understanding of functional predictors is needed. This study examined negative affect, a construct comprised of negative emotional experience, as a predictor of social functioning across serious mental illnesses. One hundred twenty-seven participants with schizophrenia, 113 with schizoaffective disorder, 22 with psychosis not otherwise specified, 58 with bipolar disorder, and 84 healthy controls (N=404) completed self-report negative affect measures. Elevated levels of negative affect were observed in clinical participants compared with healthy controls. For both clinical and healthy control participants, negative affect measures were significantly correlated with social functioning, and consistently explained significant amounts of variance in functioning. For clinical participants, this relationship persisted even after accounting for cognition and positive/negative symptoms. The findings suggest that negative affect is a strong predictor of outcome across these populations and treatment of serious mental illnesses should target elevated negative affect in addition to cognition and positive/negative symptoms.

  8. Positive Affect in the Midst of Distress: Implications for Role Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Moskowitz, Judith Tedlie; Shmueli-Blumberg, Dikla; Acree, Michael; Folkman, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Stress has been shown to deplete the self-regulation resources hypothesized to facilitate effective role functioning. However, recent research suggests that positive affect may help to replenish these vital self-regulation resources. Based on revised Stress and Coping theory and the Broaden-and-Build theory of positive emotion, three studies provide evidence of the potential adaptive function of positive affect in the performance of roles for participants experiencing stress. Participants were students (Study 1), caregivers of ill children (Study 2), and individuals recently diagnosed with HIV (Study 3). In cross sectional analyses, using role functioning as an indicator of self-regulation performance, we found that positive affect was significantly correlated with better self regulation performance, independent of the effects of negative affect. The effects were not as strong longitudinally, however, and there was little evidence of a reciprocal association between increases in positive affect and improvements in role functioning over time. The results provide some modest support for hypotheses stemming from the Broaden and Build model of positive emotion and revised Stress and Coping theory, both of which argue for unique adaptive functions of positive affect under stressful conditions. PMID:23175617

  9. Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease Associated microRNAs Are Dysregulated in Placental Tissues Affected with Gestational Hypertension, Preeclampsia and Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Hromadnikova, Ilona; Kotlabova, Katerina; Hympanova, Lucie; Krofta, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Aims To demonstrate that pregnancy-related complications are associated with alterations in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular microRNA expression. Gene expression of 32 microRNAs (miR-1-3p, miR-16-5p, miR-17-5p, miR-20a-5p, miR-20b-5p, miR-21-5p, miR-23a-3p, miR-24-3p, miR-26a-5p, miR-29a-3p, miR-33a-5p, miR-92a-3p, miR-100-5p, miR-103a-3p, miR-122-5p, miR-125b-5p, miR-126-3p, miR-130b-3p, miR-133a-3p, miR-143-3p, miR-145-5p, miR-146a-5p, miR-155-5p, miR-181a-5p, miR-195-5p, miR-199a-5p, miR-208a-3p, miR-210-3p, miR-221-3p, miR-342-3p, miR-499a-5p, and miR-574-3p) was assessed in placental tissues, compared between groups (35 gestational hypertension, 80 preeclampsia, 35 intrauterine growth restriction and 20 normal pregnancies) and correlated with the severity of the disease with respect to clinical signs, delivery date, and Doppler ultrasound parameters. Initially, selection and validation of endogenous controls for microRNA expression studies in placental tissues affected by pregnancy-related complications have been carried out. Results The expression profile of microRNAs was different between pregnancy-related complications and controls. The up-regulation of miR-499a-5p was a common phenomenon shared between gestational hypertension, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. Preeclamptic pregnancies delivering after 34 weeks of gestation and IUGR with abnormal values of flow rate in the umbilical artery demonstrated up-regulation of miR-1-3b. Preeclampsia and IUGR requiring termination of gestation before 34 weeks of gestation were associated with down-regulation of miR-26a-5p, miR-103a-3p and miR-145-5p. On the other hand, some of microRNAs (miR-16-5p, miR-100-5p, miR-122-5p, miR-125b-5p, miR-126-3p, miR-143-3p, miR-195-5p, miR-199a-5p, miR-221-3p, miR-342-3p, and miR-574-3p) were only down-regulated or showed a trend to down-regulation just in intrauterine growth restriction pregnancies requiring the delivery before 34 weeks of gestation. Conclusion

  10. Linking and Psychological Functioning in a Chinese Sample: The Multiple Mediation of Response to Positive Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Hongfei; Li, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the associations between linking, response to positive affect, and psychological functioning in Chinese college students. The results of conducting multiple mediation analyses indicated that emotion- and self-focused positive rumination mediated the relationship between linking and psychological functioning, whereas…

  11. Omega-3 fatty acids supplementation improves endothelial function and arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients with hypertriglyceridemia and high cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Marcela A; Medeiros, Fernanda; Trindade, Michelle; Cohen, Célia; Oigman, Wille; Neves, Mario Fritsch

    2017-01-01

    Association between hypertriglyceridemia and cardiovascular (CV) disease is still controversial. The purpose of this study was to compare omega-3 and ciprofibrate effects on the vascular structure and function in low and high CV risk hypertensive patients with hypertriglyceridemia. Twenty-nine adults with triglycerides 150-499 mg/dL were divided into low (<7.5%) and high (≥7.5%) CV risk, randomized to receive omega-3 fatty acids 1800 mg/d or ciprofibrate 100 mg/d for 12 weeks. Treatment was switched after 8-week washout. Clinical evaluation and vascular tests were assessed at baseline and after intervention. Peripheral (131 ± 3 to 125 ± 3 mm Hg, P < .05) and aortic (124 ± 3 to 118 ± 2 mg/dL, P < .05) systolic blood pressure were decreased by ciprofibrate in low-risk patients. In high-risk patients, pulse wave velocity was reduced (10.4 ± 0.4 to 9.4 ± 0.3 m/s, P < .05) and flow-mediated dilation was increased (11.1 ± 1.6 to 13.5 ± 1.2%, P < .05) by omega-3. In conclusion, omega-3 improved arterial stiffness and endothelial function, pointing out the beneficial effect of this therapy on vascular aging, in high-risk patients.

  12. Cardiovascular group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  13. The Functional Significance of Affect Recognition, Neurocognition, and Clinical Symptoms in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Sigmund

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The complex relationship and exact extent of the contribution of plausible indictors to social functional outcome in schizophrenia remain unclear. The present study aimed to explore the functional significance of clinical symptoms, neurocognition, and affect recognition simultaneously in schizophrenia. Methods The clinical symptoms, basic neurocognition, facial emotion recognition, and social functioning of 154 subjects, including 74 with schizophrenia and 80 nonclinical comparisons, were assessed. Results We observed that various subdomains of social functioning were extensively related to general intelligence, basic neurocognition, facial emotion recognition, and clinical symptoms, with different association patterns. Multivariate regression analyses revealed that years of education, age, sustained attention, working memory, and facial emotion recognition were significantly associated with global social functioning in schizophrenia. Conclusion Our findings suggest that affect recognition combined with nonsocial neurocognition demonstrated a crucial role in predicting global social function in schizophrenia. PMID:28099444

  14. Effects of exercise on cardiovascular performance in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Vigorito, Carlo; Giallauria, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Progressive aging induces several structural and functional alterations in the cardiovascular system, among whom particularly important are a reduced number of myocardial cells and increased interstitial collagen fibers, which result in impaired left ventricular diastolic function. Even in the absence of cardiovascular disease, aging is strongly associated to a age-related reduced maximal aerobic capacity. This is due to a variety of physiological changes both at central and at peripheral level. Physical activity (PA) appears in general to have a positive effect on several health outcomes in the elderly. This review aims to illustrate the beneficial effects of exercise on the physiologic decline of cardiovascular performance occurring with age. Furthermore, it will be stressed also the positive effect of physical activity in elderly patients affected by cardiovascular diseases, such as heart failure and hypertension, and multiple comorbidities which may significantly worse prognosis in this high risk population. PMID:24600400

  15. Effects of exercise on cardiovascular performance in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Vigorito, Carlo; Giallauria, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Progressive aging induces several structural and functional alterations in the cardiovascular system, among whom particularly important are a reduced number of myocardial cells and increased interstitial collagen fibers, which result in impaired left ventricular diastolic function. Even in the absence of cardiovascular disease, aging is strongly associated to a age-related reduced maximal aerobic capacity. This is due to a variety of physiological changes both at central and at peripheral level. Physical activity (PA) appears in general to have a positive effect on several health outcomes in the elderly. This review aims to illustrate the beneficial effects of exercise on the physiologic decline of cardiovascular performance occurring with age. Furthermore, it will be stressed also the positive effect of physical activity in elderly patients affected by cardiovascular diseases, such as heart failure and hypertension, and multiple comorbidities which may significantly worse prognosis in this high risk population.

  16. Protective effect of thymoquinone improves cardiovascular function, and attenuates oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis by mediating the PI3K/Akt pathway in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Liu, Hong-Yang; Jiang, Yi-Nong; Li, Nan

    2016-03-01

    Thymoquinone is the main active monomer extracted from black cumin and has anti‑inflammatory, antioxidant and anti‑apoptotic functions. However, the protective effects of thymoquinone on cardiovascular function in diabetes remain to be fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms underling the beneficial effects of thymoquinone on the cardiovascular function in streptozotocin‑induced diabetes mellitus (DM) rats. Supplement thymoquinone may recover the insulin levels and body weight, inhibit blood glucose levels and reduce the heart rate in DM‑induced rats. The results indicated that the heart, liver and lung to body weight ratios, in addition to the blood pressure levels, were similar for each experimental group. Treatment with thymoquinone significantly reduced oxidative stress damage, inhibited the increased endothelial nitric oxide synthase protein expression and suppressed the elevation of cyclooxygenase‑2 levels in DM‑induced rats. In addition, thymoquinone significantly suppressed the promotion of tumor necrosis factor‑α and interleukin‑6 levels in the DM‑induced rats. Furthermore, administration of thymoquinone significantly reduced caspase‑3 activity and the promotion of phosphorylated‑protein kinase B (Akt) protein expression levels in DM‑induced rats. These results suggest that the protective effect of thymoquinone improves cardiovascular function and attenuates oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis by mediating the phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase/Akt pathway in DM‑induced rats.

  17. Relationship of left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic function with cardiovascular and renal outcomes in African Americans with hypertensive chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Gail E; de Backer, Tine; Contreras, Gabriel; Wang, Xuelei; Kendrick, Cynthia; Greene, Tom; Appel, Lawrence J; Randall, Otelio S; Lea, Janice; Smogorzewski, Miroslaw; Vagaonescu, Tudor; Phillips, Robert A

    2013-09-01

    African Americans with hypertension are at high risk for adverse outcomes from cardiovascular and renal disease. Patients with stage 3 or greater chronic kidney disease have a high prevalence of left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. Our goal was to study prospectively the relationships of LV mass and diastolic function with subsequent cardiovascular and renal outcomes in the African American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension cohort study. Of 691 patients enrolled in the cohort, 578 had interpretable echocardiograms and complete relevant clinical data. Exposures were LV hypertrophy and diastolic parameters. Outcomes were cardiovascular events requiring hospitalization or causing death; a renal composite outcome of doubling of serum creatinine or end-stage renal disease (censoring death); and heart failure. We found strong independent relationships between LV hypertrophy and subsequent cardiovascular (hazard ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.27) events, but not renal outcomes. After adjustment for LV mass and clinical variables, lower systolic tissue Doppler velocities and diastolic parameters reflecting a less compliant LV (shorter deceleration time and abnormal E/A ratio) were significantly (P<0.05) associated with future heart failure events. This is the first study to show a strong relationship among LV hypertrophy, diastolic parameters, and adverse cardiac outcomes in African Americans with hypertension and chronic kidney disease. These echocardiographic risk factors may help identify high-risk patients with chronic kidney disease for aggressive therapeutic intervention.

  18. Correlations between brachial endothelial function and cardiovascular risk factors: a survey of 2,511 Chinese subjects

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping-Ting; Yuan, Hong; Wang, Ya-Qin; Cao, Xia; Wu, Liu-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Objective We examined the relationship of several cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF) to brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) in Chinese subjects. Methods This was a cross-sectional study. In 2,511 Chinese adults (age 46.86±9.52 years, 1,891 men and 620 women) recruited from people who underwent health screening at The Third Xiangya Hospital, patients’ CVRF [age, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), blood pressure (BP), cholesterol parameters, creatinine (Cr), uric acid (UA), glucose level and smoking] and prevalence of present disease (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, coronary heart disease and hyperlipidemia) were investigated. Results Multivariate analysis revealed that FMD negative correlated with age (β=–0.29, P<0.001), gender (β=–0.12, P<0.001), BMI (β=–0.12, P=0.001), WC (β=–0.10, P=0.011), systolic BP (SBP) (β=–0.12, P<0.001), fasting glucose (β=–0.04, P=0.009), total cholesterol (TC) (β=–0.04, P=0.014), smoking (β=–0.05, P=0.003), and baseline brachial artery diameter (β=–0.35, P<0.001). FMD decreased with increasing age in both genders. In women, FMD was higher than men and age-related decline in FMD was steepest after age 40; FMD was similar in men above 55 years old. Conclusions In Chinese subjects, FMD may be a usefully marker of CVRF. Age, gender, BMI, WC, SBP, fasting glucose, TC, smoking, and baseline brachial artery diameter were independent variables related to the impairment of FMD. The influence of CVRF on endothelial function is more in women than men. PMID:25364521

  19. The microvascular effects of insulin resistance and diabetes on cardiac structure, function, and perfusion: a cardiovascular magnetic resonance study

    PubMed Central

    Larghat, Abdulghani M.; Swoboda, Peter P.; Biglands, John D.; Kearney, Mark T.; Greenwood, John P.; Plein, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Aims Type 2 diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for the development of heart failure. To better understand the mechanism by which this occurs, we investigated cardiac structure, function, and perfusion in patients with and without diabetes. Methods and results Sixty-five patients with no stenosis >30% on invasive coronary angiography were categorized into diabetes (19) and non-diabetes (46) which was further categorized into prediabetes (30) and controls (16) according to the American Diabetes Association guidelines. Each patient underwent comprehensive cardiovascular magnetic resonance assessment. Left-ventricular (LV) mass, relative wall mass (RWM), Lagrangian circumferential strain, LV torsion, and myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) were calculated. LV mass was higher in diabetics than non-diabetics (112.8 ± 39.7 vs. 91.5 ± 21.3 g, P = 0.01) and in diabetics than prediabetics (112.8 ± 39.7 vs. 90.3 ± 18.7 g, P = 0.02). LV torsion angle was higher in diabetics than non-diabetics (9.65 ± 1.90 vs. 8.59 ± 1.91°, P = 0.047), and MPR was lower in diabetics than non-diabetics (2.10 ± 0.76 vs. 2.84 ± 1.25 mL/g/min, P = 0.01). There was significant correlation between MPR and early diastolic strain rate (r = −0.310, P = 0.01) and LV torsion (r = −0.306, P = 0.01). In multivariable linear regression analysis, non-diabetics waist–hip ratio, but not body mass index, had a significant association with RWM (Beta = 0.34, P = 0.02). Conclusion Patients with diabetes have increased LV mass, LV torsion, and decreased MPR. There is a significant association between decreased MPR and increased LV torsion suggesting a possible mechanistic link between microvascular disease and cardiac dysfunction in diabetes. PMID:25117473

  20. Effects of dobutamine hydrochloride on cardiovascular function in horses anesthetized with isoflurane with or without acepromazine maleate premedication.

    PubMed

    Schier, Mara F; Raisis, Anthea L; Secombe, Cristy J; Hosgood, Giselle; Musk, Gabrielle C; Lester, Guy D

    2016-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the effects of acepromazine maleate premedication on cardiovascular function before and after infusion of dobutamine hydrochloride for 30 minutes in isoflurane-anesthetized horses. ANIMALS 6 healthy adult horses. PROCEDURES Each horse was anesthetized once following premedication with acepromazine (0.02 mg/kg, IV) administered 30 minutes prior to anesthetic induction (ACP+ treatment) and once without premedication (ACP- treatment). Anesthesia was induced with IV administration of xylazine hydrochloride (0.8 mg/kg), ketamine hydrochloride (2.2 mg/kg), and diazepam (0.08 mg/kg). Horses were positioned in right lateral recumbency, and anesthesia was maintained via inhalation of isoflurane delivered in oxygen. End-tidal isoflurane concentration was adjusted to achieve a target mean arterial blood pressure of 60 mm Hg (interquartile range [25th to 75th percentile], 57 to 63 mm Hg) for at least 15 minutes. Cardiac index, oxygen delivery index, and femoral arterial blood flow indices were determined 60 minutes after anesthetic induction (baseline). Dobutamine was then infused to achieve a target mean arterial blood pressure of 80 mm Hg (interquartile range, 76 to 80 mm Hg). Data collection was repeated 30 minutes after the start of dobutamine infusion for comparison with baseline values. RESULTS Complete data sets were available from 5 of the 6 horses. Dobutamine administration resulted in significant increases in oxygen delivery and femoral arterial blood flow indices but no significant change in cardiac index for each treatment. However, at baseline or 30 minutes after the start of dobutamine infusion, findings for the ACP+ and ACP- treatments did not differ. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In isoflurane-anesthetized horses, dobutamine administration increased oxygen delivery and femoral arterial blood flow indices, but these changes were unaffected by premedication with acepromazine.

  1. Identifying Molecular Regulators of Neuronal Functions Affected in the Movement Disorder Dystonia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0301 TITLE: Identifying Molecular Regulators of Neuronal Functions Affected in the Movement Disorder...Affected in the Movement Disorder Dystonia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0301 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The movement disorder dystonia is characterized by involuntary muscle contractions in the limbs, hands, feet or neck. The aim

  2. Role of affective self-regulatory efficacy in diverse spheres of psychosocial functioning.

    PubMed

    Bandura, Albert; Caprara, Gian Vittorio; Barbaranelli, Claudio; Gerbino, Maria; Pastorelli, Concetta

    2003-01-01

    This prospective study with 464 older adolescents (14 to 19 years at Time 1; 16 to 21 years at Time 2) tested the structural paths of influence through which perceived self-efficacy for affect regulation operates in concert with perceived behavioral efficacy in governing diverse spheres of psychosocial functioning. Self-efficacy to regulate positive and negative affect is accompanied by high efficacy to manage one's academic development, to resist social pressures for antisocial activities, and to engage oneself with empathy in others' emotional experiences. Perceived self-efficacy for affect regulation essentially operated mediationally through the latter behavioral forms of self-efficacy rather than directly on prosocial behavior, delinquent conduct, and depression. Perceived empathic self-efficacy functioned as a generalized contributor to psychosocial functioning. It was accompanied by prosocial behavior and low involvement in delinquency but increased vulnerability to depression in adolescent females.

  3. Observing functional actions affects semantic processing of tools: evidence of a motor-to-semantic priming.

    PubMed

    De Bellis, Francesco; Ferrara, Antonia; Errico, Domenico; Panico, Francesco; Sagliano, Laura; Conson, Massimiliano; Trojano, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence shows that activation of motor information can favor identification of related tools, thus suggesting a strict link between motor and conceptual knowledge in cognitive representation of tools. However, the involvement of motor information in further semantic processing has not been elucidated. In three experiments, we aimed to ascertain whether motor information provided by observation of actions could affect processing of conceptual knowledge about tools. In Experiment 1, healthy participants judged whether pairs of tools evoking different functional handgrips had the same function. In Experiment 2 participants judged whether tools were paired with appropriate recipients. Finally, in Experiment 3 we again required functional judgments as in Experiment 1, but also included in the set of stimuli pairs of objects having different function and similar functional handgrips. In all experiments, pictures displaying either functional grasping (aimed to use tools) or structural grasping (just aimed to move tools independently from their use) were presented before each stimulus pair. The results demonstrated that, in comparison with structural grasping, observing functional grasping facilitates judgments about tools' function when objects did not imply the same functional manipulation (Experiment 1), whereas worsened such judgments when objects shared functional grasp (Experiment 3). Instead, action observation did not affect judgments concerning tool-recipient associations (Experiment 2). Our findings support a task-dependent influence of motor information on high-order conceptual tasks and provide further insights into how motor and conceptual processing about tools can interact.

  4. Viewing nature scenes positively affects recovery of autonomic function following acute-mental stress.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daniel K; Barton, Jo L; Gladwell, Valerie F

    2013-06-04

    A randomized crossover study explored whether viewing different scenes prior to a stressor altered autonomic function during the recovery from the stressor. The two scenes were (a) nature (composed of trees, grass, fields) or (b) built (composed of man-made, urban scenes lacking natural characteristics) environments. Autonomic function was assessed using noninvasive techniques of heart rate variability; in particular, time domain analyses evaluated parasympathetic activity, using root-mean-square of successive differences (RMSSD). During stress, secondary cardiovascular markers (heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure) showed significant increases from baseline which did not differ between the two viewing conditions. Parasympathetic activity, however, was significantly higher in recovery following the stressor in the viewing scenes of nature condition compared to viewing scenes depicting built environments (RMSSD; 50.0 ± 31.3 vs 34.8 ± 14.8 ms). Thus, viewing nature scenes prior to a stressor alters autonomic activity in the recovery period. The secondary aim was to examine autonomic function during viewing of the two scenes. Standard deviation of R-R intervals (SDRR), as change from baseline, during the first 5 min of viewing nature scenes was greater than during built scenes. Overall, this suggests that nature can elicit improvements in the recovery process following a stressor.

  5. Plant Species and Functional Group Combinations Affect Green Roof Ecosystem Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lundholm, Jeremy; MacIvor, J. Scott; MacDougall, Zachary; Ranalli, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Background Green roofs perform ecosystem services such as summer roof temperature reduction and stormwater capture that directly contribute to lower building energy use and potential economic savings. These services are in turn related to ecosystem functions performed by the vegetation layer such as radiation reflection and transpiration, but little work has examined the role of plant species composition and diversity in improving these functions. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a replicated modular extensive (shallow growing- medium) green roof system planted with monocultures or mixtures containing one, three or five life-forms, to quantify two ecosystem services: summer roof cooling and water capture. We also measured the related ecosystem properties/processes of albedo, evapotranspiration, and the mean and temporal variability of aboveground biomass over four months. Mixtures containing three or five life-form groups, simultaneously optimized several green roof ecosystem functions, outperforming monocultures and single life-form groups, but there was much variation in performance depending on which life-forms were present in the three life-form mixtures. Some mixtures outperformed the best monocultures for water capture, evapotranspiration, and an index combining both water capture and temperature reductions. Combinations of tall forbs, grasses and succulents simultaneously optimized a range of ecosystem performance measures, thus the main benefit of including all three groups was not to maximize any single process but to perform a variety of functions well. Conclusions/Significance Ecosystem services from green roofs can be improved by planting certain life-form groups in combination, directly contributing to climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies. The strong performance by certain mixtures of life-forms, especially tall forbs, grasses and succulents, warrants further investigation into niche complementarity or facilitation as mechanisms

  6. Genetic Polymorphisms Affect Mouse and Human Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Function

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao; Walter, Nicole A. R.; Harkness, John H.; Neve, Kim A.; Williams, Robert W.; Lu, Lu; Belknap, John K.; Eshleman, Amy J.; Phillips, Tamara J.; Janowsky, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) and neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites such as tyramine, octopamine, and β-phenethylamine stimulate the G protein-coupled trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). TAAR1 has been implicated in human conditions including obesity, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine, and addiction. Additionally TAAR1 is expressed on lymphocytes and astrocytes involved in inflammation and response to infection. In brain, TAAR1 stimulation reduces synaptic dopamine availability and alters glutamatergic function. TAAR1 is also expressed at low levels in heart, and may regulate cardiovascular tone. Taar1 knockout mice orally self-administer more MA than wild type and are insensitive to its aversive effects. DBA/2J (D2) mice express a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in Taar1 that does not respond to MA, and D2 mice are predisposed to high MA intake, compared to C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Here we demonstrate that endogenous agonists stimulate the recombinant B6 mouse TAAR1, but do not activate the D2 mouse receptor. Progeny of the B6XD2 (BxD) family of recombinant inbred (RI) strains have been used to characterize the genetic etiology of diseases, but contrary to expectations, BXDs derived 30–40 years ago express only the functional B6 Taar1 allele whereas some more recently derived BXD RI strains express the D2 allele. Data indicate that the D2 mutation arose subsequent to derivation of the original RIs. Finally, we demonstrate that SNPs in human TAAR1 alter its function, resulting in expressed, but functional, sub-functional and non-functional receptors. Our findings are important for identifying a predisposition to human diseases, as well as for developing personalized treatment options. PMID:27031617

  7. Affecting Rhomboid-3 Function Causes a Dilated Heart in Adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lin; Lee, Teresa; Lin, Na; Wolf, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila is a well recognized model of several human diseases, and recent investigations have demonstrated that Drosophila can be used as a model of human heart failure. Previously, we described that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used to rapidly examine the cardiac function in adult, awake flies. This technique provides images that are similar to echocardiography in humans, and therefore we postulated that this approach could be combined with the vast resources that are available in the fly community to identify new mutants that have abnormal heart function, a hallmark of certain cardiovascular diseases. Using OCT to examine the cardiac function in adult Drosophila from a set of molecularly-defined genomic deficiencies from the DrosDel and Exelixis collections, we identified an abnormally enlarged cardiac chamber in a series of deficiency mutants spanning the rhomboid 3 locus. Rhomboid 3 is a member of a highly conserved family of intramembrane serine proteases and processes Spitz, an epidermal growth factor (EGF)–like ligand. Using multiple approaches based on the examination of deficiency stocks, a series of mutants in the rhomboid-Spitz–EGF receptor pathway, and cardiac-specific transgenic rescue or dominant-negative repression of EGFR, we demonstrate that rhomboid 3 mediated activation of the EGF receptor pathway is necessary for proper adult cardiac function. The importance of EGF receptor signaling in the adult Drosophila heart underscores the concept that evolutionarily conserved signaling mechanisms are required to maintain normal myocardial function. Interestingly, prior work showing the inhibition of ErbB2, a member of the EGF receptor family, in transgenic knock-out mice or individuals that received herceptin chemotherapy is associated with the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. Our results, in conjunction with the demonstration that altered ErbB2 signaling underlies certain forms of mammalian cardiomyopathy, suggest that an

  8. Acute consumption of walnuts and walnut components differentially affect postprandial lipemia, endothelial function, oxidative stress, and cholesterol efflux in humans with mild hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Berryman, Claire E; Grieger, Jessica A; West, Sheila G; Chen, Chung-Yen O; Blumberg, Jeffrey B; Rothblat, George H; Sankaranarayanan, Sandhya; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2013-06-01

    Walnut consumption improves cardiovascular disease risk; however, to our knowledge, the contribution of individual walnut components has not been assessed. This study evaluated the acute consumption of whole walnuts (85 g), separated nut skins (5.6 g), de-fatted nutmeat (34 g), and nut oil (51 g) on postprandial lipemia, endothelial function, and oxidative stress. Cholesterol efflux (ex vivo) was assessed in the whole walnut treatment only. A randomized, 4-period, crossover trial was conducted in healthy overweight and obese adults (n = 15) with moderate hypercholesterolemia. There was a treatment × time point interaction for triglycerides (P < 0.01) and increased postprandial concentrations were observed for the oil and whole walnut treatments (P < 0.01). Walnut skins decreased the reactive hyperemia index (RHI) compared with baseline (P = 0.02) such that a difference persisted between the skin and oil treatments (P = 0.01). The Framingham RHI was maintained with the oil treatment compared with the skins and whole nut (P < 0.05). There was a treatment effect for the ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) (P < 0.01), and mean FRAP was greater with the oil and skin treatments compared with the nutmeat (P < 0.01). Cholesterol efflux increased by 3.3% following whole walnut consumption in J774 cells cultured with postprandial serum compared with fasting baseline (P = 0.02). Walnut oil favorably affected endothelial function and whole walnuts increased cholesterol efflux. These 2 novel mechanisms may explain in part the cardiovascular benefits of walnuts.

  9. [Sleep rhythm and cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Maemura, Koji

    2012-07-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common problem in general adult population. Recent evidence suggests the link between the occurrence of cardiovascular events and several sleep disturbances including sleep apnea syndrome, insomnia and periodic limb movements during sleep. Sleep duration may affect the cardiovascular outcome. Shift work also may increase the risk of ischemic heart disease. Normalization of sleep rhythm has a potential to be a therapeutic target of ischemic heart diseases, although further study is required to evaluate the preventive effect on cardiovascular events. Here we describe the current understandings regarding the roles of sleep disorders during the pathogenesis of cardiovascular events.

  10. Flash fire and slow burn: women's cardiovascular reactivity and recovery following hostile and benevolent sexism.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Kristen; Burgess, Kaleena D; Bosson, Jennifer K

    2015-04-01

    Women's cardiovascular responses to sexist treatment are documented, but researchers have yet to consider these responses separately as a function of sexism type (hostile vs. benevolent). This study demonstrates distinct effects of hostile and benevolent sexism for women's cardiovascular responses that indicate increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Female participants performed a demanding insight task after exposure to a male researcher who offered them a hostilely sexist, benevolently sexist, or nonsexist comment. Women displayed heightened cardiovascular reactivity (increases from baseline) during the task following hostile sexism, and they displayed impaired cardiovascular recovery (return to baseline after the task) following benevolent sexism. The effects seen in the hostile condition were mediated by self-reported anger. These findings indicate that women's affective responses to hostile and benevolent sexism differ but that exposure to both forms of sexism may have negative cardiovascular consequences.

  11. Self-conscious affects: their adaptive Functions and relationship to depressive mood.

    PubMed

    Uji, Masayo; Kitamura, Toshinori; Nagata, Toshiaki

    2011-01-01

    This study used a structural equation model to examine the influence of resilience on the four self-conscious affects (guilt-proneness, shame-proneness, externalization, and detachment) assessed in the Test of Self-Conscious Affect-3 (TOSCA-3) and their impact on depressive mood. Our subject population consisted of 447 Japanese university students. The first analysis explored which TOSCA-3 affects help an individual adapt to stressful situations. The concept of "resilience" was used as an indicator to evaluate the adaptive functions. We based this on the assumption that an individual with higher resilience is able to use more adaptive affects. In the second analysis, taking the above relationship between resilience and the self-conscious affects into consideration, we examined how those variables as well as a negative life event are related to depressive mood. To assess the resilience level and depressive mood, we adopted the Resilience Scale (RS) and Self-rating Depressive Scale (SDS), respectively. The first analysis showed that the more resilient an individual was, the more prone they were to "detachment" and the less "shame" they experienced. The level of resilience did not have a significant effect on "guilt" or "externalization." In the second analysis we found that "resilience" had a direct inverse effect on depressive mood that was also mediated by "shame" and "detachment." We discuss how the particular self-conscious affects comprising each adaptive function are related to depressive mood.

  12. Effects of High-Intensity Interval Training versus Continuous Training on Physical Fitness, Cardiovascular Function and Quality of Life in Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Benda, Nathalie M. M.; Seeger, Joost P. H.; Stevens, Guus G. C. F.; Hijmans-Kersten, Bregina T. P.; van Dijk, Arie P. J.; Bellersen, Louise; Lamfers, Evert J. P.; Hopman, Maria T. E.; Thijssen, Dick H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Physical fitness is an important prognostic factor in heart failure (HF). To improve fitness, different types of exercise have been explored, with recent focus on high-intensity interval training (HIT). We comprehensively compared effects of HIT versus continuous training (CT) in HF patients NYHA II-III on physical fitness, cardiovascular function and structure, and quality of life, and hypothesize that HIT leads to superior improvements compared to CT. Methods Twenty HF patients (male:female 19:1, 64±8 yrs, ejection fraction 38±6%) were allocated to 12-weeks of HIT (10*1-minute at 90% maximal workload—alternated by 2.5 minutes at 30% maximal workload) or CT (30 minutes at 60–75% of maximal workload). Before and after intervention, we examined physical fitness (incremental cycling test), cardiac function and structure (echocardiography), vascular function and structure (ultrasound) and quality of life (SF-36, Minnesota living with HF questionnaire (MLHFQ)). Results Training improved maximal workload, peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) related to the predicted VO2peak, oxygen uptake at the anaerobic threshold, and maximal oxygen pulse (all P<0.05), whilst no differences were present between HIT and CT (N.S.). We found no major changes in resting cardiovascular function and structure. SF-36 physical function score improved after training (P<0.05), whilst SF-36 total score and MLHFQ did not change after training (N.S.). Conclusion Training induced significant improvements in parameters of physical fitness, although no evidence for superiority of HIT over CT was demonstrated. No major effect of training was found on cardiovascular structure and function or quality of life in HF patients NYHA II-III. Trial Registration Nederlands Trial Register NTR3671 PMID:26517867

  13. Soy provides modest benefits on endothelial function without affecting inflammatory biomarkers in adults at cardiometabolic risk

    PubMed Central

    Reverri, Elizabeth J.; LaSalle, Colette D.; Franke, Adrian A.; Steinberg, Francene M.

    2015-01-01

    Scope Systemic inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and oxidative stress are involved in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Epidemiological evidence supports an association between whole soy food consumption and reduced risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The objective of this randomized, controlled, crossover study was to evaluate the effects of soy nut consumption on inflammatory biomarkers and endothelial function and to assess whether isoflavone metabolism to secondary products, equol and/or O-desmethylangolensin (ODMA), modifies these responses. Methods and Results n=17 adults at cardiometabolic risk were randomly assigned to the order of two snack interventions, soy nuts and macronutrient-matched control snack, for four weeks each, separated by a two week washout period. Outcome measures included biomarkers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and glycemic control (ELISA and clinical analyzers), endothelial function and arterial stiffness (peripheral arterial tonometry (PAT)), and isoflavone metabolites (LC-MS/MS). Results revealed that consuming soy nuts improved arterial stiffness as assessed by the augmentation index using PAT (P=0.03), despite lack of improvement in inflammatory biomarkers. Addition of equol and/ODMA production status as covariates did not significantly change these results. Conclusions Soy nuts when added to a usual diet for one month provide some benefit on arterial stiffness in adults at cardiometabolic risk. PMID:25351805

  14. Vitamin D and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Giovannucci, Edward

    2009-11-01

    Recent studies indicate that deficient vitamin D status may increase risk of both ischemic and nonischemic cardiovascular diseases independently of established cardiovascular risk factors. The role of vitamin D in potentially regulating many functions in the cardiovascular system is just beginning to be understood. Among the potentially relevant mechanisms for cardiovascular diseases, vitamin D may influence blood pressure through the renin-angiotensin system, parathyroid hormone levels, myocardial function, inflammation, and vascular calcification. Cardiovascular risk appears especially elevated at 25-hydroxy-vitamin D levels below 10 or 15 ng/mL, and optimal levels may be at least 30 ng/mL. Among individuals who are not receiving substantial exposure to sun, intakes of 1000 to 2000 IU may be needed to achieve levels of at least 30 ng/mL. Further study, including properly designed randomized control trials, is required to further establish the role of vitamin D on cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Handgrip Strength, Positive Affect, and Perceived Health Are Prospectively Associated with Fewer Functional Limitations among Centenarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franke, Warren D.; Margrett, Jennifer A.; Heinz, Melinda; Martin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the association between perceived health, fatigue, positive and negative affect, handgrip strength, objectively measured physical activity, body mass index, and self-reported functional limitations, assessed 6 months later, among 11 centenarians (age = 102 plus or minus 1). Activities of daily living, assessed 6 months prior to…

  16. Weight Reduction in Athletes May Adversely Affect the Phagocytic Function of Monocytes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kono, Ichiro; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Study of the monocyte phagocytic function in nine competitive athletes before and after a two-week weight reduction (through calorie restriction) program revealed that their pre-program phagocytic activity was higher than in sedentary controls but decreased significantly after the program. This suggests calorie restriction may affect the human…

  17. Metacognitive Awareness of Facial Affect in Higher-Functioning Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Camilla M.; Henderson, Heather A.; Newell, Lisa; Jaime, Mark; Mundy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Higher-functioning participants with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD) viewed a series of face stimuli, made decisions regarding the affect of each face, and indicated their confidence in each decision. Confidence significantly predicted accuracy across all participants, but this relation was stronger for participants with typical…

  18. Increased insulin-like growth factor-1 in relation to cardiovascular function in polycystic ovary syndrome: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Desai, Namrata Ajaykumar; Patel, Snehal S

    2015-10-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is very high and conventional risk factors only partially explain excessive risk of developing CVD in patients of PCOS. The pathophysiology of PCOS is very unique, and several hormonal and metabolic changes occur. Several observations suggest that serum IGF-1 levels decrease in insulin resistance, which results in IGF-1 deficiency. In patient of PCOS, close relationships have been demonstrated between insulin resistance and serum IGF-1 levels. Hyperinsulinemic insulin resistance results in a general augmentation of steroidogenesis and LH release in PCOS. The action of IGF-1 varies in different tissues possibly via autocrine or paracrine mechanisms. The increase or decrease in IGF-1 in different tissues results in differential outcomes. Several studies suggest that lowered circulating IGF-1 levels play important role in the initiation of the cardiac hypertrophic response which results in the risk of cardiovascular disease. While recent results suggests that individual with elevated IGF-1 is protected against cardiovascular disease. Thus IGF-1 shows versatile pleiotropic actions. This review provides a current perspective on increased level of IGF-1 in PCOS and also adds to the current controversy regarding the roles of IGF-1 in cardiovascular disease.

  19. Impairment of diastolic function in adult patients affected by osteogenesis imperfecta clinically asymptomatic for cardiac disease: casuality or causality?

    PubMed

    Migliaccio, Silvia; Barbaro, Giuseppe; Fornari, Rachele; Di Lorenzo, Gabriella; Celli, Mauro; Lubrano, Carla; Falcone, Stefania; Fabbrini, Elisa; Greco, Emanuela; Zambrano, Anna; Brama, Marina; Prossomariti, Giancarlo; Marzano, Sara; Marini, Mario; Conti, Francesco; D'Eufemia, Patrizia; Spera, Giovanni

    2009-01-09

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare inherited connective disorder causing increased bone fragility and low bone mass. OI includes severe bone fragility, impaired dentinogenesis, with less common alterations in the joints, blood vessels, heart valves, skin. Interestingly, description of left ventricular rupture, aortic dissection and heart valves incompetence has been previously described. Death may occur in OI patients for cardiac disease in asyntomatic subjects. Aim of our study has been to evaluate the presence of potential subclinical cardiac disorders and to characterize cardiac functional parameters by echocardiography in adults with OI in absence of cardiac symptoms. Forty patients (21 females and 19 males) affected by type I, III, IV OI and 40 control subjects (20 females and 20 males) were evaluated in the study. Patients and controls underwent clinical examination, screening for endocrine and metabolic disorders, 12-lead electrocardiogram and echocardiogram. In particular, all subjects were evaluated by two-dimensional echocardiography with continuous- and pulse-wave Doppler. Patients and controls belonged to NYHA class I and no significant electrocardiographic alteration was documented in both groups. Thirty-eight patients (95%) showed valvular regurgitation compared to one control subject (2.5%; P<0.001). As regards the diastolic function parameters, in OI patients E wave velocity was reduced by 23% (95% CI: 9% to 29%; P<0.001), E/A ratio was reduced by 17% (95% CI: 15% to 26%; P<0.001) while isovolumetric relaxation time (IRT) was increased by 47% (95% CI: 26% to 53%; P<0.001) and E wave deceleration time (DT) was increased by 18% (95% CI: 13% to 26%; P<0.001) compared to controls. In conclusion, our data indicate that adult patients affected by OI have an altered diastolic function in absence of other metabolic alterations. These diastolic echocardiographic parameters might worsen over time, especially if other cardiovascular risk factors (e

  20. The prodromal phase of obesity-related chronic kidney disease: early alterations in cardiovascular and renal function in obese children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Anke; Schaefer, Franz

    2013-11-01

    Childhood overweight and obesity is a relevant health condition with multi-organ involvement. Obesity shows significant tracking into adult life and is associated with an increased risk of serious adverse health outcomes both during childhood and later adulthood. The classical sequelae of obesity such as hypertension, metabolic syndrome and inflammation do develop at a paediatric age. Cardiovascular consequences, such as increased carotid intima-media thickness, and left ventricular hypertrophy, as well as functional alterations of the heart and arteries, are commonly traceable at an early age. Renal involvement can occur at a young age and is associated with a high probability of progressive chronic kidney disease. There is solid evidence suggesting that consequent treatment including both lifestyle changes and pharmacological therapy can reduce cardiovascular, metabolic and renal risks in obese children and adolescents.

  1. The effect of affective bibliotherapy on clients' functioning in group therapy.

    PubMed

    Shechtman, Zipora; Nir-Shfrir, Rivka

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The effect of affective group bibliotherapy (GB) was compared to affective group therapy (GT) on patients' functioning in therapy and their session impression. Three small groups totaling twenty-five in-patients in a hospital in Israel participated in the study. Clients concurrently participated in both group types, undergoing three sessions in each condition. In-therapy behaviors were assessed through the Client Behavior System (CBS; Hill & O'Brien, 1999). Results indicated that in the GB condition compared to the GT condition, clients showed less resistance, used simple responses less frequently, and expressed greater affective exploration. The Session Evaluation Questionnaire (SEQ; Stiles et al., 1994) was used to measure clients' impressions of the sessions. Results indicated that patients evaluated the two treatment conditions equally. Overall, the results support earlier findings, suggesting that affective bibliotherapy can be an effective method of treatment.

  2. Diabetes Mellitus, Arterial Wall, and Cardiovascular Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Kozakova, Michaela; Palombo, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is an independent risk factor for atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to develop heart disease or stroke than adults without diabetes. The two major features of diabetes, i.e., hyperglycemia and insulin-resistance, trigger arterial stiffening and increase the susceptibility of the arterial wall to atherosclerosis at any given age. These pathological changes in the arterial wall may provide a functional and structural background for cardiovascular events. The present paper provides a critical overview of the clinical evidence linking diabetes-related metabolic abnormalities to cardiovascular risk, debates the pathophysiologic mechanisms through which insulin resistance and hyperglycemia may affect the arterial wall, and discusses the associations between vascular biomarkers, metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular events. PMID:26861377

  3. The Caenorhabditis Elegans Unc-31 Gene Affects Multiple Nervous System-Controlled Functions

    PubMed Central

    Avery, L.; Bargmann, C. I.; Horvitz, H. R.

    1993-01-01

    We have devised a method for selecting Caenorhabditis elegans mutants that execute feeding motions in the absence of food. One mutation isolated in this way is an allele of the gene unc-31, first discovered by S. Brenner in 1974, because of its effects on locomotion. We find that strong unc-31 mutations cause defects in four functions controlled by the nervous system. Mutant worms are lethargic, feed constitutively, are defective in egg-laying and produce dauer larvae that fail to recover. We discuss two extreme models to explain this pleiotropy: either unc-31 affects one or a few neurons that coordinately control several different functions, or it affects many neurons that independently control different functions. PMID:8325482

  4. Factors affecting longitudinal functional decline and survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hazuki; Atsuta, Naoki; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Ito, Mizuki; Senda, Jo; Katsuno, Masahisa; Izumi, Yuishin; Morita, Mitsuya; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Taniguchi, Akira; Aiba, Ikuko; Abe, Koji; Mizoguchi, Kouichi; Oda, Masaya; Kano, Osamu; Okamoto, Koichi; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Imai, Takashi; Aoki, Masashi; Tsuji, Shoji; Nakano, Imaharu; Kaji, Ryuji; Sobue, Gen

    2015-06-01

    Our objective was to elucidate the clinical factors affecting functional decline and survival in Japanese amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. We constructed a multicenter prospective ALS cohort that included 451 sporadic ALS patients in the analysis. We longitudinally utilized the revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) as the functional scale, and determined the timing of introduction of a tracheostomy for positive-pressure ventilation and death. A joint modelling approach was employed to identify prognostic factors for functional decline and survival. Age at onset was a common prognostic factor for both functional decline and survival (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, respectively). Female gender (p = 0.019) and initial symptoms, including upper limb weakness (p = 0.010), lower limb weakness (p = 0.008) or bulbar symptoms (p = 0.005), were related to early functional decline, whereas neck weakness as an initial symptom (p = 0.018), non-use of riluzole (p = 0.030) and proximal dominant muscle weakness in the upper extremities (p = 0.01) were related to a shorter survival time. A decline in the ALSFRS-R score was correlated with a shortened survival time (p < 0.001). In conclusion, the factors affecting functional decline and survival in ALS were common in part but different to some extent. This difference has not been previously well recognized but is informative in clinical practice and for conducting trials.

  5. Small but Powerful: Top Predator Local Extinction Affects Ecosystem Structure and Function in an Intermittent Stream

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Verkaik, Iraima; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2015-01-01

    Top predator loss is a major global problem, with a current trend in biodiversity loss towards high trophic levels that modifies most ecosystems worldwide. Most research in this area is focused on large-bodied predators, despite the high extinction risk of small-bodied freshwater fish that often act as apex consumers. Consequently, it remains unknown if intermittent streams are affected by the consequences of top-predators’ extirpations. The aim of our research was to determine how this global problem affects intermittent streams and, in particular, if the loss of a small-bodied top predator (1) leads to a ‘mesopredator release’, affects primary consumers and changes whole community structures, and (2) triggers a cascade effect modifying the ecosystem function. To address these questions, we studied the top-down effects of a small endangered fish species, Barbus meridionalis (the Mediterranean barbel), conducting an enclosure/exclosure mesocosm experiment in an intermittent stream where B. meridionalis became locally extinct following a wildfire. We found that top predator absence led to ‘mesopredator release’, and also to ‘prey release’ despite intraguild predation, which contrasts with traditional food web theory. In addition, B. meridionalis extirpation changed whole macroinvertebrate community composition and increased total macroinvertebrate density. Regarding ecosystem function, periphyton primary production decreased in apex consumer absence. In this study, the apex consumer was functionally irreplaceable; its local extinction led to the loss of an important functional role that resulted in major changes to the ecosystem’s structure and function. This study evidences that intermittent streams can be affected by the consequences of apex consumers’ extinctions, and that the loss of small-bodied top predators can lead to large ecosystem changes. We recommend the reintroduction of small-bodied apex consumers to systems where they have been

  6. Small but powerful: top predator local extinction affects ecosystem structure and function in an intermittent stream.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Verkaik, Iraima; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2015-01-01

    Top predator loss is a major global problem, with a current trend in biodiversity loss towards high trophic levels that modifies most ecosystems worldwide. Most research in this area is focused on large-bodied predators, despite the high extinction risk of small-bodied freshwater fish that often act as apex consumers. Consequently, it remains unknown if intermittent streams are affected by the consequences of top-predators' extirpations. The aim of our research was to determine how this global problem affects intermittent streams and, in particular, if the loss of a small-bodied top predator (1) leads to a 'mesopredator release', affects primary consumers and changes whole community structures, and (2) triggers a cascade effect modifying the ecosystem function. To address these questions, we studied the top-down effects of a small endangered fish species, Barbus meridionalis (the Mediterranean barbel), conducting an enclosure/exclosure mesocosm experiment in an intermittent stream where B. meridionalis became locally extinct following a wildfire. We found that top predator absence led to 'mesopredator release', and also to 'prey release' despite intraguild predation, which contrasts with traditional food web theory. In addition, B. meridionalis extirpation changed whole macroinvertebrate community composition and increased total macroinvertebrate density. Regarding ecosystem function, periphyton primary production decreased in apex consumer absence. In this study, the apex consumer was functionally irreplaceable; its local extinction led to the loss of an important functional role that resulted in major changes to the ecosystem's structure and function. This study evidences that intermittent streams can be affected by the consequences of apex consumers' extinctions, and that the loss of small-bodied top predators can lead to large ecosystem changes. We recommend the reintroduction of small-bodied apex consumers to systems where they have been extirpated, to restore

  7. Affective and physiological sexual response patterns: the effects of instructions on sexually functional and dysfunctional men.

    PubMed

    Heiman, J R; Rowland, D L

    1983-01-01

    To more clearly characterize the patterns of cognitive-affective and physiological responses concomitant with male sexual dysfunction, the present study compared 14 sexually dysfunctional and 16 sexually functional men. All individuals listened to two sexually explicit tapes and engaged in a self-generated fantasy, while genital, heart rate and scaled cognitive affective responses were recorded. Two types of instructions, a performance demand set and a non-demand sensate focus set, preceded the erotic tapes in counterbalanced order. As predicted, dysfunctional men showed less genital tumescence to tapes preceded by the demand than the non-demand instructions. Contrary to expectation, functional men showed greater penile tumescence to the tapes preceded by demand instructions. Self-reported sexual arousal did not follow the penile tumescence pattern but instead indicated that the dysfunctional sample was significantly less subjectively aroused to the tapes and fantasy. There were other significant differences between the groups. Dysfunctional men showed greater general psychological distress, as measured by the SCL-90, including elevated somaticism, anxiety and depression scores. During the experimental session, dysfunctional men also evidenced greater awareness of a variety of physiological responses, as well as more negative and fewer positive cognitive-affective states. These data are discussed in terms of the interaction of affective and physiological responses, differences in contextual meanings of instructional sets given the presence of a dysfunction, and theoretical and clinical conceptualizations of male sexual functioning.

  8. Kidney Function and Cardiovascular Events in Postmenopausal Women: The Impact of Race and Ethnicity in the Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Arce, Cristina M.; Rhee, Jinnie J.; Cheung, Katharine L.; Hedlin, Haley; Kapphahn, Kristopher; Franceschini, Nora; Kalil, Roberto S.; Martin, Lisa W.; Qi, Lihong; Shara, Nawar M.; Desai, Manisha; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Kidney disease disproportionately affects minority populations including African Americans and Hispanics; therefore, understanding the relationship of kidney function to cardiovascular (CV) outcomes within different racial/ethnic groups is of considerable interest. We investigated the relationship between kidney function and CV events and assessed effect modification by race/ethnicity in the Women’s Health Initiative. Study Design Prospective cohort study Setting & Participants Baseline serum creatinine concentrations (assay traceable to isotope-dilution mass spectrometry standard) of 19,411 postmenopausal women aged 50–79 years who self-identified as either non-Hispanic white (n=8921), African American (n=7436), or Hispanic (n=3054) were used to calculate estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs). Predictors Categories of eGFR (exposure); race/ethnicity (effect modifier). Outcomes The primary outcome was the composite of three physician-adjudicated CV events: myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, or CV-related death. Measurements We evaluated the multivariable-adjusted associations between categories of eGFR and CV events using proportional hazards regression and formally tested for effect modification by race/ethnicity. Results Over a mean follow-up of 7.6 years, 1424 CV events (653 MI, 627 strokes, 297 CV-related deaths) were observed. The association between eGFR and CV events was curvilinear; however, the association of eGFR with CV outcomes differed by race (P=0.006). In stratified analyses, we observed that the U-shaped association was present in non-Hispanic whites, whereas African American participants had a rather curvilinear relationship with lower eGFR being associated with higher CV risk and higher eGFR with reduced CV risk. Analyses among Hispanic women were inconclusive owing to few Hispanic women having very low or high eGFR and very few events occurring in these categories. Limitations Lack of urinary albumin measurements; residual

  9. Longer term improvement in neurocognitive functioning and affective distress among methamphetamine users who achieve stable abstinence.

    PubMed

    Iudicello, Jennifer E; Woods, Steven P; Vigil, Ofilio; Scott, J Cobb; Cherner, Mariana; Heaton, Robert K; Atkinson, J Hampton; Grant, Igor

    2010-08-01

    Chronic use of methamphetamine (MA) is associated with neuropsychological dysfunction and affective distress. Some normalization of function has been reported after abstinence, but little in the way of data is available on the possible added benefits of long-term sobriety. To address this, we performed detailed neuropsychological and affective evaluations in 83 MA-dependent individuals at a baseline visit and following an average one-year interval period. Among the 83 MA-dependent participants, 25 remained abstinent, and 58 used MA at least once during the interval period. A total of 38 non-MA-addicted, demographically matched healthy comparison (i.e., HC) participants were also examined. At baseline, both MA-dependent participants who were able to maintain abstinence and those who were not performed significantly worse than the healthy comparison subjects on global neuropsychological functioning and were significantly more distressed. At the one-year follow-up, both the long-term abstainers and healthy comparison groups showed comparable global neuropsychological performance and affective distress levels, whereas the MA-dependent group who continued to use MA were worse than the comparison participants in terms of global neuropsychological functioning and affective distress. An interaction was observed between neuropsychological impairment at baseline, MA abstinence, and cognitive improvement, with abstinent MA-dependent participants who were neuropsychologically impaired at baseline demonstrating significantly and disproportionately greater improvement in processing speed and slightly greater improvement in motor abilities than the other participants. These results suggest partial recovery of neuropsychological functioning and improvement in affective distress upon sustained abstinence from MA that may extend beyond a year or more.

  10. An investigation on pharmacy functions and services affecting satisfaction of patients with prescriptions in community pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Hidehiko; Nakajima, Fumio; Tada, Yuichirou; Yoshikawa, Emi; Iwahashi, Yoshiki; Fujita, Kenji; Hayase, Yukitoshi

    2009-05-01

    Various functions expected by patient expects are needed with progress in the system for separation of dispensing and prescribing functions. In this investigation, the relationship between patient satisfaction and pharmacy function were analyzed quantitatively. A questionnaire survey was conducted in 178 community pharmacies. Questions on pharmacy functions and services totaled 87 items concerning information service, amenities, safety, personnel training, etc. The questionnaires for patients had five-grade scales and composed 11 items (observed variables). Based on the results, "the percentage of satisfied patients" was determined. Multivariate analysis was performed to investigate the relationship between patient satisfaction and pharmacy functions or services provided, to confirm patient's evaluation of the pharmacy, and how factors affected comprehensive satisfaction. In correlation analysis, "the number of pharmacists" and "comprehensive satisfaction" had a negative correlation. Other interesting results were obtained. As a results of factor analysis, three latent factors were obtained: the "human factor," "patients' convenience," and "environmental factor," Multiple regression analysis showed that the "human factor" affected "comprehensive satisfaction" the most. Various pharmacy functions and services influence patient satisfaction, and improvement in their quality increases patient satisfaction. This will result in the practice of patient-centered medicine.

  11. Functions and sources of perceived social support among children affected by HIV/AIDS in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guoxiang; Li, Xiaoming; Fang, Xiaoyi; Zhao, Junfeng; Hong, Yan; Lin, Xiuyun; Stanton, Bonita

    2011-06-01

    While the relationship between perceived social support (PSS) and psychosocial well-being has been well documented in the global literature, existing studies also suggest the existence of multiple domains in definition and measurement of PSS. The current study, utilizing data from 1299 rural children affected by HIV/AIDS in central China, examines the relative importance of PSS functional measures (informational/emotional, material/tangible, affectionate, and social interaction) and PSS structural measures (family/relatives, teachers, friends, and significant others) in predicting psychosocial outcomes including internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and educational resilience. Both functional and structural measures of PSS provided reliable measures of related but unique aspects of PSS. The findings of the current study confirmed the previous results that PSS is highly correlated with children's psychosocial well-being and such correlations vary by functions and sources of the PSS as well as different psychosocial outcomes. The findings in the current study suggested the roles of specific social support functions or resources may need to be assessed in relation to specific psychosocial outcome and the context of children's lives. The strong association between PSS and psychosocial outcomes underscores the importance of adequate social support to alleviate stressful life events and improve psychosocial well-being of children affected by HIV/AIDS. Meanwhile, the study findings call for gender and developmentally appropriate and situation-specific social support for children and families affected by HIV/AIDS.

  12. Functional connectivity in the resting brain as biological correlate of the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales.

    PubMed

    Deris, Nadja; Montag, Christian; Reuter, Martin; Weber, Bernd; Markett, Sebastian

    2017-02-15

    According to Jaak Panksepp's Affective Neuroscience Theory and the derived self-report measure, the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales (ANPS), differences in the responsiveness of primary emotional systems form the basis of human personality. In order to investigate neuronal correlates of personality, the underlying neuronal circuits of the primary emotional systems were analyzed in the present fMRI-study by associating the ANPS to functional connectivity in the resting brain. N=120 healthy participants were invited for the present study. The results were reinvestigated in an independent, smaller sample of N=52 participants. A seed-based whole brain approach was conducted with seed-regions bilaterally in the basolateral and superficial amygdalae. The selection of seed-regions was based on meta-analytic data on affective processing and the Juelich histological atlas. Multiple regression analyses on the functional connectivity maps revealed associations with the SADNESS-scale in both samples. Functional resting-state connectivity between the left basolateral amygdala and a cluster in the postcentral gyrus, and between the right basolateral amygdala and clusters in the superior parietal lobe and subgyral in the parietal lobe was associated with SADNESS. No other ANPS-scale revealed replicable results. The present findings give first insights into the neuronal basis of the SADNESS-scale of the ANPS and support the idea of underlying neuronal circuits. In combination with previous research on genetic associations of the ANPS functional resting-state connectivity is discussed as a possible endophenotype of personality.

  13. Transient middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion alters inducible NOS expression within the ventrolateral medulla and modulates cardiovascular function during static exercise.

    PubMed

    Ally, Ahmmed; Maher, Timothy J

    2011-09-01

    A major cause of stroke is cerebral ischemia in regions supplied by the middle cerebral artery (MCA). In this study, we hypothesized that compromised cardiovascular function during static exercise may involve altered expression of inducible NOS (iNOS) protein within the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM). We compared cardiovascular responses and iNOS protein expression within the left and right sides of both RVLM and CVLM in sham-operated rats and in rats with a 90 min left-sided MCA occlusion (MCAO) followed by 24 h of reperfusion. Increases in blood pressure during a static muscle contraction were attenuated in MCAO rats compared with sham-operated rats. Also, iNOS expression within the left RVLM was augmented compared with the right RVLM in MCAO rats and compared with both RVLM quadrants in sham-operated rats. In contrast, compared with sham-operated rats and the right CVLM of MCAO rats, iNOS expression was attenuated in the left CVLM in left-sided MCAO rats. These data suggest that the attenuation of pressor responses during static exercise in MCAO rats involves overexpression of iNOS within the ipsilateral RVLM and attenuation in iNOS within the ipsilateral CVLM. Differential expression of iNOS within the medulla plays a role in mediating cardiovascular responses during static exercise following stroke.

  14. Social-adaptive and psychological functioning of patients affected by Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Laney, Dawn Alyssia; Gruskin, Daniel J; Fernhoff, Paul M; Cubells, Joseph F; Ousley, Opal Y; Hipp, Heather; Mehta, Ami J

    2010-12-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A. In addition to the debilitating physical symptoms of FD, there are also under-recognized and poorly characterized psychiatric features. As a first step toward characterizing psychiatric features of FD, we administered the Achenbach adult self report questionnaire to 30 FD patients and the Achenbach adult behavior checklist questionnaire to 28 partners/parents/friends of FD patients. Data from at least one of the questionnaires were available on 33 subjects. Analysis focused on social-adaptive functioning in various aspects of daily life and on criteria related to the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders IV (DSM-IV). Adaptive functioning scale values, which primarily measure social and relationship functioning and occupational success, showed that eight FD patients (six female and two male) had mean adaptive functioning deficits as compared to population norms. Greater rates of depression (P < 0.01), anxiety (P = 0.05), depression and anxiety (P = 0.03), antisocial personality (P < 0.001), attention-deficit/hyperactivity (AD/H; P < 0.01), hyperactivity-impulsivity (P < 0.01), and aggressive behavior (P = 0.03) were associated with poorer adaptive functioning. Decreased social-adaptive functioning in this study was not statistically significantly associated to disease severity, pain, or level of vitality. This study shows for the first time that FD patients, particularly women, are affected by decreased social-adaptive functioning. Comprehensive treatment plans for FD should consider assessments and interventions to evaluate and improve social, occupational, and psychological functioning. Attention to the behavioral aspects of FD could lead to improved treatment outcome and improved quality of life. Individuals affected by Fabry disease exhibited social-adaptive functioning deficits that were significantly correlated with anxiety

  15. Clinical and cognitive factors affecting psychosocial functioning in remitted patients with bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Konstantakopoulos, G; Ioannidi, N; Typaldou, M; Sakkas, D; Oulis, P

    2016-01-01

    Impaired interpersonal, social, and occupational functioning is very often observed in patients with bipolar disorder, not only at the acute stages of the illness but in remission as well. This finding raises the question of multiple factors that might affect psychosocial functioning in bipolar patients, such as residual subsyndromal symptoms and neuropsychological deficits. Social cognition impairment, especially impaired Theory of Mind (ToM), might also play an important role in bipolar patients' every-day functioning, similarly to what was found in patients with schizophrenia. The present study aimed to investigate the potential effect of clinical and cognitive factors on the psychosocial functioning of patients with bipolar disorder during remission, assessing ToM along with a broad range of basic cognitive functions. Forty-nine patients with bipolar disorder type I in remission and 53 healthy participants were assessed in general intelligence, working memory, attention, speed processing, verbal learning and memory, and executive functions using a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests. The Faux Pas Recognition Test was used to assess ToM. The two groups were matched for gender, age and education level. The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HDRS), the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) were also administered to the patients. Every-day functioning was assessed with the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). In order to examine the contribution of many factors in psychosocial functioning, we used hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Bipolar patients presented significant impairment compared to healthy participants in all the basic cognitive functions tested with the exception of verbal memory. Moreover, patients had significant poorer performance than healthy controls in overall psyand cognitive ToM but not in affective ToM as measured by Faux Pas. Psychosocial functioning in patient group was

  16. Adolescent vulnerability to cardiovascular consequences of chronic emotional stress: Review and perspectives for future research.

    PubMed

    Crestani, Carlos C

    2017-03-01

    Emotional stress has been recognized as a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Adolescence has been proposed as a developmental period of vulnerability to stress. This idea has been mainly supported by experimental research in animals demonstrating a higher impact of chronic emotional stress in adolescents compared with adults. Adolescent vulnerability is also based on evidence that stress during this developmental period affects development, so that enduring changes are found in adult animals that experienced stress during adolescence. The purpose of the present review is to discuss experimental research in rodent models that investigated the impact of long-term exposure to stressful events during adolescence on cardiovascular function. The development of cardiovascular function and autonomic activity in rodents is initially reviewed. Then, a discussion of an adolescent vulnerability to cardiovascular effects of chronic stress is presented. From the reviewed literature, perspective for future research is proposed to better elucidate adolescent vulnerability to cardiovascular complications evoked by chronic emotional stress.

  17. Protein-protein interactions of the LIM-only protein FHL2 and functional implication of the interactions relevant in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Tran, M Khang; Kurakula, Kondababu; Koenis, Duco S; de Vries, Carlie J M

    2016-02-01

    FHL2 belongs to the LIM-domain only proteins and contains four and a half LIM domains, each of which are composed of two zinc finger structures. FHL2 exhibits specific interaction with proteins exhibiting diverse functions, including transmembrane receptors, transcription factors and transcription co-regulators, enzymes, and structural proteins. The function of these proteins is regulated by FHL2, which modulates intracellular signal transduction pathways involved in a plethora of cellular tasks. The present review summarizes the current knowledge on the protein interactome of FHL2 and provides an overview of the functional implication of these interactions in apoptosis, migration, and regulation of nuclear receptor function. FHL2 was originally identified in the heart and there is extensive literature available on the role of FHL2 in the cardiovascular system, which is also summarized in this review.

  18. The relationship between sleep-wake cycle and cognitive functioning in young people with affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Joanne S; Robillard, Rébecca; Lee, Rico S C; Hermens, Daniel F; Naismith, Sharon L; White, Django; Whitwell, Bradley; Scott, Elizabeth M; Hickie, Ian B

    2015-01-01

    Although early-stage affective disorders are associated with both cognitive dysfunction and sleep-wake disruptions, relationships between these factors have not been specifically examined in young adults. Sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances in those with affective disorders are considerably heterogeneous, and may not relate to cognitive dysfunction in a simple linear fashion. This study aimed to characterise profiles of sleep and circadian disturbance in young people with affective disorders and examine associations between these profiles and cognitive performance. Actigraphy monitoring was completed in 152 young people (16-30 years; 66% female) with primary diagnoses of affective disorders, and 69 healthy controls (18-30 years; 57% female). Patients also underwent detailed neuropsychological assessment. Actigraphy data were processed to estimate both sleep and circadian parameters. Overall neuropsychological performance in patients was poor on tasks relating to mental flexibility and visual memory. Two hierarchical cluster analyses identified three distinct patient groups based on sleep variables and three based on circadian variables. Sleep clusters included a 'long sleep' cluster, a 'disrupted sleep' cluster, and a 'delayed and disrupted sleep' cluster. Circadian clusters included a 'strong circadian' cluster, a 'weak circadian' cluster, and a 'delayed circadian' cluster. Medication use differed between clusters. The 'long sleep' cluster displayed significantly worse visual memory performance compared to the 'disrupted sleep' cluster. No other cognitive functions differed between clusters. These results highlight the heterogeneity of sleep and circadian profiles in young people with affective disorders, and provide preliminary evidence in support of a relationship between sleep and visual memory, which may be mediated by use of antipsychotic medication. These findings have implications for the personalisation of treatments and improvement of functioning in

  19. Testing two mechanisms by which rational and irrational beliefs may affect the functionality of inferences.

    PubMed

    Bond, F W; Dryden, W; Briscoe, R

    1999-12-01

    This article describes a role playing experiment that examined the sufficiency hypothesis of Rational Emotive Behaviour Therapy (REBT). This proposition states that it is sufficient for rational and irrational beliefs to refer to preferences and musts, respectively, if those beliefs are to affect the functionality of inferences (FI). Consistent with the REBT literature (e.g. Dryden, 1994; Dryden & Ellis, 1988; Palmer, Dryden, Ellis & Yapp, 1995) results from this experiment showed that rational and irrational beliefs, as defined by REBT, do affect FI. Specifically, results showed that people who hold a rational belief form inferences that are significantly more functional than those that are formed by people who hold an irrational belief. Contrary to REBT theory, the sufficiency hypothesis was not supported. Thus, results indicated that it is not sufficient for rational and irrational beliefs to refer to preferences and musts, respectively, if those beliefs are to affect the FI. It appears, then, that preferences and musts are not sufficient mechanisms by which rational and irrational beliefs, respectively, affect the FI. Psychotherapeutic implications of these findings are considered.

  20. Is Urinary NGAL Determination Useful for Monitoring Kidney Function and Assessment of Cardiovascular Disease? A 12-Month Observation of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Żyłka, Agnieszka; Gala-Błądzińska, Agnieszka; Kuźniewski, Marek; Kuśnierz-Cabala, Beata

    2016-01-01

    Background. Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) may start as glomerular or tubular damage. We assessed kidney function during one-year-long observation of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) after initiation of nephroprotective treatment, with emphasis on the changes in urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (uNGAL), and evaluated the association between tubular damage and cardiovascular complications of T2DM. Materials and Methods. Adult T2DM patients (55) were assessed initially and 30 patients after 1 year. Albumin and uNGAL and creatinine were measured in first morning urine. Albumin/creatinine (uACR) and uNGAL/creatinine (uNCR) ratios were calculated. Results. In logistic regression, both uACR above 30 mg/g and uNCR the median (21.3 μg/g) were associated with cardiovascular complications, independently of classical risk factors and diabetes duration. One year after initiation of treatment, a significant reduction in HbA1c was observed. BMI and lipid profiles did not change. Increase in serum creatinine and reduction in eGFR occurred, along with decrease in uNGAL and uNCR. Increasing uNCR and uACR were associated with higher control HbA1c. The increase in uNCR was more frequent in patients with hypertension. Conclusions. Better glycemic control in T2DM patients results in improved tubular function, as reflected by reduced uNCR and uNGAL. First morning urine uNGAL and uNCR may be useful to assess renal function and cardiovascular risk, along with albuminuria and eGFR. PMID:28050059

  1. Polyphenol-rich foods in the Mediterranean diet are associated with better cognitive function in elderly subjects at high cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Valls-Pedret, Cinta; Lamuela-Raventós, Rosa Maria; Medina-Remón, Alexander; Quintana, Melibea; Corella, Dolores; Pintó, Xavier; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Estruch, Ramon; Ros, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    Brain oxidative processes play a major role in age-related cognitive decline, thus consumption of antioxidant-rich foods might help preserve cognition. Our aim was to assess whether consumption of antioxidant-rich foods in the Mediterranean diet relates to cognitive function in the elderly. In asymptomatic subjects at high cardiovascular risk (n = 447; 52% women; age 55-80 y) enrolled in the PREDIMED study, a primary prevention dietary-intervention trial, we assessed food intake and cardiovascular risk profile, determined apolipoprotein E genotype, and used neuropsychological tests to evaluate cognitive function. We also measured urinary polyphenols as an objective biomarker of intake. Associations between energy-adjusted food consumption, urinary polyphenols, and cognitive scores were assessed by multiple linear regression models adjusted for potential confounders. Consumption of some foods was independently related to better cognitive function. The specific associations [regression coefficients (95% confidence intervals)] were: total olive oil with immediate verbal memory [0.755 (0.151-1.358)]; virgin olive oil and coffee with delayed verbal memory [0.163 (0.010-0.316) and 0.294 (0.055-0.534), respectively]; walnuts with working memory [1.191 (0.061-2.322)]; and wine with Mini-Mental State Examination scores [0.252 (0.006-0.496)]. Urinary polyphenols were associated with better scores in immediate verbal memory [1.208 (0.236-2.180)]. Increased consumption of antioxidant-rich foods in general and of polyphenols in particular is associated with better cognitive performance in elderly subjects at high cardiovascular risk. The results reinforce the notion that Mediterranean diet components might counteract age-related cognitive decline.

  2. Associations between early adrenarche, affective brain function and mental health in children.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Sarah; Simmons, Julian G; Byrne, Michelle L; Strikwerda-Brown, Cherie; Kerestes, Rebecca; Seal, Marc L; Olsson, Craig A; Dudgeon, Paul; Mundy, Lisa K; Patton, George C; Allen, Nicholas B

    2015-09-01

    Early timing of adrenarche, associated with relatively high levels of Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in children, has been associated with mental health and behavioral problems. However, little is known about effects of adreneracheal timing on brain function. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of early adrenarche (defined by high DHEA levels independent of age) on affective brain function and symptoms of psychopathology in late childhood (N = 83, 43 females, M age 9.53 years, s.d. 0.34 years). Results showed that higher DHEA levels were associated with decreased affect-related brain activity (i) in the mid-cingulate cortex in the whole sample, and (ii) in a number of cortical and subcortical regions in female but not male children. Higher DHEA levels were also associated with increased externalizing symptoms in females, an association that was partly mediated by posterior insula activation to happy facial expressions. These results suggest that timing of adrenarche is an important moderator of affect-related brain function, and that this may be one mechanism linking early adrenarche to psychopathology.

  3. Associations between early adrenarche, affective brain function and mental health in children

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, Sarah; Simmons, Julian G.; Byrne, Michelle L.; Strikwerda-Brown, Cherie; Kerestes, Rebecca; Seal, Marc L.; Olsson, Craig A.; Dudgeon, Paul; Mundy, Lisa K.; Patton, George C.

    2015-01-01

    Early timing of adrenarche, associated with relatively high levels of Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in children, has been associated with mental health and behavioral problems. However, little is known about effects of adreneracheal timing on brain function. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of early adrenarche (defined by high DHEA levels independent of age) on affective brain function and symptoms of psychopathology in late childhood (N = 83, 43 females, M age 9.53 years, s.d. 0.34 years). Results showed that higher DHEA levels were associated with decreased affect-related brain activity (i) in the mid-cingulate cortex in the whole sample, and (ii) in a number of cortical and subcortical regions in female but not male children. Higher DHEA levels were also associated with increased externalizing symptoms in females, an association that was partly mediated by posterior insula activation to happy facial expressions. These results suggest that timing of adrenarche is an important moderator of affect-related brain function, and that this may be one mechanism linking early adrenarche to psychopathology. PMID:25678548

  4. Verbal marking of affect by children with Asperger Syndrome and high functioning autism during spontaneous interactions with family members.

    PubMed

    Müller, Eve; Schuler, Adriana

    2006-11-01

    Verbal marking of affect by older children with Asperger Syndrome (AS) and high functioning autism (HFA) during spontaneous interactions is described. Discourse analysis of AS and HFA and typically developing children included frequency of affective utterances, affective initiations, affective labels and affective explanations, attribution of affective responses to self and others, and positive and negative markers of affect. Findings indicate that children with AS and HFA engaged in a higher proportion of affect marking and provided a higher proportion of affective explanations than typically developing children, yet were less likely to initiate affect marking sequences or talk about the affective responses of others. No significant differences were found between groups in terms of the marking of positive and negative affect.

  5. Photonics in cardiovascular medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Soest, Gijs; Regar, Evelyn; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.

    2015-10-01

    The use of photonics technology is bringing new capabilities and insights to cardiovascular medicine. Intracoronary imaging and sensing, laser ablation and optical pacing are just some of the functions being explored to help diagnose and treat conditions of the heart and arteries.

  6. Factors Affecting Recovery Time of Pulmonary Function in Hospitalized Patients With Acute Asthma Exacerbations

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo-Jung; Lee, Jaemoon; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Park, So-Young; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Kim, Tae-Bum; Moon, Hee-Bom

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prolonged recovery time of pulmonary function after an asthma exacerbation is a significant burden on asthmatics, and management of these patients needs to be improved. The aim of this study was to evaluate factors associated with a longer recovery time of pulmonary function among asthmatic patients hospitalized due to a severe asthma exacerbation. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 89 patients who were admitted for the management of acute asthma exacerbations. The recovery time of pulmonary function was defined as the time from the date each patient initially received treatment for asthma exacerbations to the date the patient reached his or her previous best FEV1% value. We investigated the influence of various clinical and laboratory factors on the recovery time. Results The median recovery time of the patients was 1.7 weeks. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that using regular inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) before an acute exacerbation of asthma and concurrent with viral infection at admission were associated with the prolonged recovery time of pulmonary function. Conclusions The prolonged recovery time of pulmonary function after a severe asthma exacerbation was not shown to be directly associated with poor adherence to ICS. Therefore the results indicate that an unknown subtype of asthma may be associated with the prolonged recovery of pulmonary function time after an acute exacerbation of asthma despite regular ICS use. Further prospective studies to investigate factors affecting the recovery time of pulmonary function after an asthma exacerbation are warranted. PMID:27582400

  7. Advancing cardiovascular tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Truskey, George A.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular tissue engineering offers the promise of biologically based repair of injured and damaged blood vessels, valves, and cardiac tissue. Major advances in cardiovascular tissue engineering over the past few years involve improved methods to promote the establishment and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), scaffolds from decellularized tissue that may produce more highly differentiated tissues and advance clinical translation, improved methods to promote vascularization, and novel in vitro microphysiological systems to model normal and diseased tissue function. iPSC technology holds great promise, but robust methods are needed to further promote differentiation. Differentiation can be further enhanced with chemical, electrical, or mechanical stimuli. PMID:27303643

  8. Nutrition as a part of healthy aging and reducing cardiovascular risk: improving functionality in later life using quality protein, with optimized timing and distribution.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Beryl M; Axford, Samantha

    2014-09-01

    Aging is associated with many physiological changes, which may in time lead to numerous pathophysiological outcomes, including adverse vascular events. For example, senescence of the immune system and cellular senescence both contribute to rising inflammation with age, potentially induced by the overall burden of comorbid illness, adipose tissue mass, diet, socioeconomic status, and physical activity. In turn, this chronic inflammation decreases physical and cognitive performance, and promotes sarcopenia and the syndrome of frailty. These events and others decrease the functionality of life as we age and include an increased risk of thrombosis and adverse cardiovascular outcomes. In this review, we aim to overview the aging process primarily as related to functional impairment, and provide evidence for the role of protein, and specifically differential quality protein, in particular whey protein, and timing and distribution of intake, to help reduce some of the morbid effects of aging, including reducing obesity, improving glycemic control, and improving vascular function.

  9. The protective function of personal growth initiative among a genocide-affected population in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Blackie, Laura E R; Jayawickreme, Eranda; Forgeard, Marie J C; Jayawickreme, Nuwan

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the extent to which individual differences in personal growth initiative (PGI) were associated with lower reports of functional impairment of daily activities among a genocide-affected population in Rwanda. PGI measures an individual's motivation to develop as a person and the extent to which he or she is active in setting goals that work toward achieving self-improvement. We found that PGI was negatively associated with functional impairment when controlling for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, and other demographic factors. Our results suggest that PGI may constitute an important mindset for facilitating adaptive functioning in the aftermath of adversity and in the midst of psychological distress, and as such they might have practical applications for the development of intervention programs.

  10. Developing fragility functions for the areas affected by the 2009 Samoa earthquake and tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokon, H.; Koshimura, S.; Imai, K.; Matsuoka, M.; Namegaya, Y.; Nishimura, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Fragility functions in terms of flow depth, flow velocity and hydrodynamic force are developed to evaluate structural vulnerability in the areas affected by the 2009 Samoa earthquake and tsunami. First, numerical simulations of tsunami propagation and inundation are conducted to reproduce the features of tsunami inundation. To validate the results, flow depths measured in field surveys and waveforms measured by Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) gauges are utilized. Next, building damage is investigated by visually interpreting changes between pre- and post-tsunami high-resolution satellite images. Finally, the data related to tsunami features and building damage are integrated using Geographic Information System (GIS), and tsunami fragility functions are developed based on the statistical analyses. From the developed fragility functions, we quantitatively understood the vulnerability of a coastal region in American Samoa characterized by steep terrains and ria coasts.

  11. Cardiovascular risk

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Rupert A

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a major, growing, worldwide problem. It is important that individuals at risk of developing cardiovascular disease can be effectively identified and appropriately stratified according to risk. This review examines what we understand by the term risk, traditional and novel risk factors, clinical scoring systems, and the use of risk for informing prescribing decisions. Many different cardiovascular risk factors have been identified. Established, traditional factors such as ageing are powerful predictors of adverse outcome, and in the case of hypertension and dyslipidaemia are the major targets for therapeutic intervention. Numerous novel biomarkers have also been described, such as inflammatory and genetic markers. These have yet to be shown to be of value in improving risk prediction, but may represent potential therapeutic targets and facilitate more targeted use of existing therapies. Risk factors have been incorporated into several cardiovascular disease prediction algorithms, such as the Framingham equation, SCORE and QRISK. These have relatively poor predictive power, and uncertainties remain with regards to aspects such as choice of equation, different risk thresholds and the roles of relative risk, lifetime risk and reversible factors in identifying and treating at-risk individuals. Nonetheless, such scores provide objective and transparent means of quantifying risk and their integration into therapeutic guidelines enables equitable and cost-effective distribution of health service resources and improves the consistency and quality of clinical decision making. PMID:22348281

  12. Cardiovascular Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), particularly CHD (coronary heart disease) and stroke, remain the leading causes of death of women in America and most developed countries. In recent years the rate of CVD has declined in men but not in women. This is contributed to by an under-recognition of women’s C...

  13. The Effect of Coffee and Quantity of Consumption on Specific Cardiovascular and All-Cause Mortality: Coffee Consumption Does Not Affect Mortality.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Rohit S; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Arora, Rohit R

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have examined whether or not an association exists between the consumption of caffeinated coffee to all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. This study aimed to delineate this association using population representative data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III. Patients were included in the study if all the following criteria were met: (1) follow-up mortality data were available, (2) age of at least 45 years, and (3) reported amount of average coffee consumption. A total of 8608 patients were included, with patients stratified into the following groups of average daily coffee consumption: (1) no coffee consumption, (2) less than 1 cup, (3) 1 cup a day, (4) 2-3 cups, (5) 4-5 cups, (6) more than 6 cups a day. Odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals, and P values were calculated for univariate analysis to compare the prevalence of all-cause mortality, ischemia-related mortality, congestive heart failure-related mortality, and stroke-related mortality, using the no coffee consumption group as reference. These were then adjusted for confounding factors for a multivariate analysis. P < 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Univariate analysis demonstrated an association between coffee consumption and mortality, although this became insignificant on multivariate analysis. Coffee consumption, thus, does not seem to impact all-cause mortality or specific cardiovascular mortality. These findings do differ from those of recently published studies. Coffee consumption of any quantity seems to be safe without any increased mortality risk. There may be some protective effects but additional data are needed to further delineate this.

  14. Arrival order among native plant functional groups does not affect invasibility of constructed dune communities.

    PubMed

    Mason, T J; French, K; Jolley, D

    2013-10-01

    Different arrival order scenarios of native functional groups to a site may influence both resource use during development and final community structure. Arrival order may then indirectly influence community resistance to invasion. We present a mesocosm experiment of constructed coastal dune communities that monitored biotic and abiotic responses to different arrival orders of native functional groups. Constructed communities were compared with unplanted mesocosms. We then simulated a single invasion event by bitou (Chrysanthemoides monilifera ssp. rotundata), a dominant exotic shrub of coastal communities. We evaluated the hypothesis that plantings with simultaneous representation of grass, herb and shrub functional groups at the beginning of the experiment would more completely sequester resources and limit invasion than staggered plantings. Staggered plantings in turn would offer greater resource use and invasion resistance than unplanted mesocosms. Contrary to our expectations, there were few effects of arrival order on abiotic variables for the duration of the experiment and arrival order was unimportant in final community invasibility. All planted mesocosms supported significantly more invader germinants and significantly less invader abundance than unplanted mesocosms. Native functional group plantings may have a nurse effect during the invader germination and establishment phase and a competitive function during the invader juvenile and adult phase. Arrival order per se did not affect resource use and community invasibility in our mesocosm experiment. While grass, herb and shrub functional group plantings will not prevent invasion success in restored communities, they may limit final invader biomass.

  15. Does increased physical activity in school affect children's executive function and aerobic fitness?

    PubMed

    Kvalø, S E; Bru, E; Brønnick, K; Dyrstad, S M

    2017-02-16

    This study seeks to explore whether increased PA in school affects children's executive function and aerobic fitness. The "Active school" study was a 10-month randomized controlled trial. The sample included 449 children (10-11 years old) in five intervention and four control schools. The weekly interventions were 2×45 minutes physically active academic lessons, 5×10 minutes physically active breaks, and 5×10 minutes physically active homework. Aerobic fitness was measured using a 10-minute interval running test. Executive function was tested using four cognitive tests (Stroop, verbal fluency, digit span, and Trail Making). A composite score for executive function was computed and used in analyses. Mixed ANCOVA repeated measures were performed to analyze changes in scores for aerobic fitness and executive function. Analysis showed a tendency for a time×group interaction on executive function, but the results were non-significant F(1, 344)=3.64, P=.057. There was no significant time×group interaction for aerobic fitness. Results indicate that increased physical activity in school might improve children's executive function, even without improvement in aerobic fitness, but a longer intervention period may be required to find significant effects.

  16. The association between the body composition and lifestyle affecting pulmonary function in Japanese workers.

    PubMed

    Inomoto, Atsushi; Fukuda, Rika; Deguchi Phn, Junko; Kato, Gohei; Kanzaki Rpt, Ryoko; Hiroshige Rpt, Keiichi; Nakamura, Kouichi; Rpt; Nakano Rpt, Keisuke; Toyonaga, Toshihiro

    2016-10-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify factors related to physical characteristics and lifestyle that affect pulmonary function. [Subjects and Methods] Ninety seven healthy male workers were recruited for this study, and basic information and details about lifestyle were collected. Body composition analyzer and visceral fat measuring device were conducted as measurements. Pulmonary function was measured using spirometer. A multiple stepwise linear regression analysis was performed with pulmonary function as the dependent variable. Variables with a significant association with pulmonary function on univariate analysis were imputed as independent variables. [Results] Height, fat free mass, upper extremity muscle mass, lower extremity muscle mass, and trunk muscle mass had significant positive correlations with FEV1 and FVC. Age, percentage of body fat, and visceral fat area were negatively correlated with FEV1 and FVC. Regarding the association between pulmonary function and lifestyle, a significant difference was found between the smoking index and the presence or absence of metabolic syndrome risk factors and both FEV1 and FVC. The multiple stepwise linear regression analysis with FEV1 as the dependent variable, adjusted for age and height, revealed that visceral fat area and fat free mass were significantly associated with FEV1. A similar analysis, FVC as the dependent variable identified visceral fat area. [Conclusion] FEV1 was independently associated with visceral fat area and fat free mass. FVC was independently associated with visceral fat area. These results may be valuable in preventing the decrease in respiratory function and, hence, in further preventing the onset of COPD.

  17. Incubation temperature affects the immune function of hatchling soft-shelled turtles, Pelodiscus sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Wei; Zhang, Wen; Du, Wei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Identifying how developmental temperature affects the immune system is critical for understanding how ectothermic animals defend against pathogens and their fitness in the changing world. However, reptiles have received little attention regarding this issue. We incubated eggs at three ecologically relevant temperatures to determine how incubation temperature affects the immune function of hatchling soft-shelled turtles, Pelodiscus sinensis. When exposed to bacterial infections, hatchlings from 24 °C had lower cumulative mortalities (55%, therefore, higher immunocompetence) than those from 28 °C (85%) or 32 °C (100%). Consistent with higher immunocompetence, hatchlings from low incubation temperature had higher IgM, IgD, and CD3γ expressions than their counterparts from the other two higher incubation temperatures. Conversely, the activity of immunity-related enzymes did not match the among-temperature difference in immune function. Specifically, enzyme activity was higher at intermediate temperatures (alkaline phosphatase) or was not affected by incubation temperature (acid phosphatase, lysozyme). Our study is the first to provide unequivocal evidence (at the molecular and organismal level) about the significant effect of incubation temperature on offspring immunity in reptiles. Our results also indicate that the reduced immunity induced by high developmental temperatures might increase the vulnerability of reptiles to the outbreak of diseases under global warming scenarios. PMID:26028216

  18. Incubation temperature affects the immune function of hatchling soft-shelled turtles, Pelodiscus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Dang, Wei; Zhang, Wen; Du, Wei-Guo

    2015-06-01

    Identifying how developmental temperature affects the immune system is critical for understanding how ectothermic animals defend against pathogens and their fitness in the changing world. However, reptiles have received little attention regarding this issue. We incubated eggs at three ecologically relevant temperatures to determine how incubation temperature affects the immune function of hatchling soft-shelled turtles, Pelodiscus sinensis. When exposed to bacterial infections, hatchlings from 24 °C had lower cumulative mortalities (55%, therefore, higher immunocompetence) than those from 28 °C (85%) or 32 °C (100%). Consistent with higher immunocompetence, hatchlings from low incubation temperature had higher IgM, IgD, and CD3γ expressions than their counterparts from the other two higher incubation temperatures. Conversely, the activity of immunity-related enzymes did not match the among-temperature difference in immune function. Specifically, enzyme activity was higher at intermediate temperatures (alkaline phosphatase) or was not affected by incubation temperature (acid phosphatase, lysozyme). Our study is the first to provide unequivocal evidence (at the molecular and organismal level) about the significant effect of incubation temperature on offspring immunity in reptiles. Our results also indicate that the reduced immunity induced by high developmental temperatures might increase the vulnerability of reptiles to the outbreak of diseases under global warming scenarios.

  19. Towards Tunable Consensus Clustering for Studying Functional Brain Connectivity During Affective Processing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Abu-Jamous, Basel; Brattico, Elvira; Nandi, Asoke K

    2017-03-01

    In the past decades, neuroimaging of humans has gained a position of status within neuroscience, and data-driven approaches and functional connectivity analyses of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data are increasingly favored to depict the complex architecture of human brains. However, the reliability of these findings is jeopardized by too many analysis methods and sometimes too few samples used, which leads to discord among researchers. We propose a tunable consensus clustering paradigm that aims at overcoming the clustering methods selection problem as well as reliability issues in neuroimaging by means of first applying several analysis methods (three in this study) on multiple datasets and then integrating the clustering results. To validate the method, we applied it to a complex fMRI experiment involving affective processing of hundreds of music clips. We found that brain structures related to visual, reward, and auditory processing have intrinsic spatial patterns of coherent neuroactivity during affective processing. The comparisons between the results obtained from our method and those from each individual clustering algorithm demonstrate that our paradigm has notable advantages over traditional single clustering algorithms in being able to evidence robust connectivity patterns even with complex neuroimaging data involving a variety of stimuli and affective evaluations of them. The consensus clustering method is implemented in the R package "UNCLES" available on http://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/UNCLES/index.html .

  20. Arsenic exposure and cardiovascular disorders: an overview.

    PubMed

    Balakumar, Pitchai; Kaur, Jagdeep

    2009-12-01

    The incidence of arsenic toxicity has been observed in various countries including Taiwan, Bangladesh, India, Argentina, Australia, Chile, China, Hungary, Peru, Thailand, Mexico and United States of America. Arsenic is a ubiquitous element present in drinking water, and its exposure is associated with various cardiovascular disorders. Arsenic exposure plays a key role in the pathogenesis of vascular endothelial dysfunction as it inactivates endothelial nitric oxide synthase, leading to reduction in the generation and bioavailability of nitric oxide. In addition, the chronic arsenic exposure induces high oxidative stress, which may affect the structure and function of cardiovascular system. Further, the arsenic exposure has been noted to induce atherosclerosis by increasing the platelet aggregation and reducing fibrinolysis. Moreover, arsenic exposure may cause arrhythmia by increasing the QT interval and accelerating the cellular calcium overload. The chronic exposure to arsenic upregulates the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule and vascular endothelial growth factor to induce cardiovascular pathogenesis. The present review critically discussed the detrimental role of arsenic in the cardiovascular system.

  1. Modulation of α power and functional connectivity during facial affect recognition.

    PubMed

    Popov, Tzvetan; Miller, Gregory A; Rockstroh, Brigitte; Weisz, Nathan

    2013-04-03

    Research has linked oscillatory activity in the α frequency range, particularly in sensorimotor cortex, to processing of social actions. Results further suggest involvement of sensorimotor α in the processing of facial expressions, including affect. The sensorimotor face area may be critical for perception of emotional face expression, but the role it plays is unclear. The present study sought to clarify how oscillatory brain activity contributes to or reflects processing of facial affect during changes in facial expression. Neuromagnetic oscillatory brain activity was monitored while 30 volunteers viewed videos of human faces that changed their expression from neutral to fearful, neutral, or happy expressions. Induced changes in α power during the different morphs, source analysis, and graph-theoretic metrics served to identify the role of α power modulation and cross-regional coupling by means of phase synchrony during facial affect recognition. Changes from neutral to emotional faces were associated with a 10-15 Hz power increase localized in bilateral sensorimotor areas, together with occipital power decrease, preceding reported emotional expression recognition. Graph-theoretic analysis revealed that, in the course of a trial, the balance between sensorimotor power increase and decrease was associated with decreased and increased transregional connectedness as measured by node degree. Results suggest that modulations in α power facilitate early registration, with sensorimotor cortex including the sensorimotor face area largely functionally decoupled and thereby protected from additional, disruptive input and that subsequent α power decrease together with increased connectedness of sensorimotor areas facilitates successful facial affect recognition.

  2. High Intensity Aerobic Exercise Training Improves Deficits of Cardiovascular Autonomic Function in a Rat Model of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus with Moderate Hyperglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Grisé, Kenneth N.; Olver, T. Dylan; McDonald, Matthew W.; Dey, Adwitia; Jiang, Mao; Lacefield, James C.; Shoemaker, J. Kevin; Noble, Earl G.; Melling, C. W. James

    2016-01-01

    Indices of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in experimental models of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) are often contrary to clinical data. Here, we investigated whether a relatable insulin-treated model of T1DM would induce deficits in cardiovascular (CV) autonomic function more reflective of clinical results and if exercise training could prevent those deficits. Sixty-four rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control (C), sedentary T1DM (D), control exercise (CX), or T1DM exercise (DX). Diabetes was induced via multiple low-dose injections of streptozotocin and blood glucose was maintained at moderate hyperglycemia (9–17 mM) through insulin supplementation. Exercise training consisted of daily treadmill running for 10 weeks. Compared to C, D had blunted baroreflex sensitivity, increased vascular sympathetic tone, increased serum neuropeptide Y (NPY), and decreased intrinsic heart rate. In contrast, DX differed from D in all measures of CAN (except NPY), including heart rate variability. These findings demonstrate that this T1DM model elicits deficits and exercise-mediated improvements to CV autonomic function which are reflective of clinical T1DM. PMID:26885531

  3. High Intensity Aerobic Exercise Training Improves Deficits of Cardiovascular Autonomic Function in a Rat Model of Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus with Moderate Hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Grisé, Kenneth N; Olver, T Dylan; McDonald, Matthew W; Dey, Adwitia; Jiang, Mao; Lacefield, James C; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Noble, Earl G; Melling, C W James

    2016-01-01

    Indices of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) in experimental models of Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) are often contrary to clinical data. Here, we investigated whether a relatable insulin-treated model of T1DM would induce deficits in cardiovascular (CV) autonomic function more reflective of clinical results and if exercise training could prevent those deficits. Sixty-four rats were divided into four groups: sedentary control (C), sedentary T1DM (D), control exercise (CX), or T1DM exercise (DX). Diabetes was induced via multiple low-dose injections of streptozotocin and blood glucose was maintained at moderate hyperglycemia (9-17 mM) through insulin supplementation. Exercise training consisted of daily treadmill running for 10 weeks. Compared to C, D had blunted baroreflex sensitivity, increased vascular sympathetic tone, increased serum neuropeptide Y (NPY), and decreased intrinsic heart rate. In contrast, DX differed from D in all measures of CAN (except NPY), including heart rate variability. These findings demonstrate that this T1DM model elicits deficits and exercise-mediated improvements to CV autonomic function which are reflective of clinical T1DM.

  4. Multiple Polymorphisms Affect Expression and Function of the Neuropeptide S Receptor (NPSR1)

    PubMed Central

    Anedda, Francesca; Zucchelli, Marco; Schepis, Danika; Hellquist, Anna; Corrado, Lucia; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Achour, Adnane; McInerney, Gerald; Bertorello, Alejandro; Lördal, Mikael; Befrits, Ragnar; Björk, Jan; Bresso, Francesca; Törkvist, Leif; Halfvarson, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    Background neuropeptide S (NPS) and its receptor NPSR1 act along the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to modulate anxiety, fear responses, nociception and inflammation. The importance of the NPS-NPSR1 signaling pathway is highlighted by the observation that, in humans, NPSR1 polymorphism associates with asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatoid arthritis, panic disorders, and intermediate phenotypes of functional gastrointestinal disorders. Because of the genetic complexity at the NPSR1 locus, however, true causative variations remain to be identified, together with their specific effects on receptor expression or function. To gain insight into the mechanisms leading to NPSR1 disease-predisposing effects, we performed a thorough functional characterization of all NPSR1 promoter and coding SNPs commonly occurring in Caucasians (minor allele frequency >0.02). Principal Findings we identified one promoter SNP (rs2530547 [−103]) that significantly affects luciferase expression in gene reporter assays and NPSR1 mRNA levels in human leukocytes. We also detected quantitative differences in NPS-induced genome-wide transcriptional profiles and CRE-dependent luciferase activities associated with three NPSR1 non-synonymous SNPs (rs324981 [Ile107Asn], rs34705969 [Cys197Phe], rs727162 [Arg241Ser]), with a coding variant exhibiting a loss-of-function phenotype (197Phe). Potential mechanistic explanations were sought with molecular modelling and bioinformatics, and a pilot study of 2230 IBD cases and controls provided initial support to the hypothesis that different cis-combinations of these functional SNPs variably affect disease risk. Significance these findings represent a first step to decipher NPSR1 locus complexity and its impact on several human conditions NPS antagonists have been recently described, and our results are of potential pharmacogenetic relevance. PMID:22216302

  5. Acidosis and correction of acidosis does not affect rFVIIa function in swine

    PubMed Central

    Darlington, Daniel N; Kheirabadi, Bijan S; Scherer, Michael R; Martini, Wenjun Z; Cap, Andrew P; Dubick, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hemorrhagic shock and trauma are associated with acidosis and altered coagulation. A fall in pH has been reported to attenuate the activity of recombinant activated Factor VII (rFVIIa) in vitro. However, it is not known if acidosis induced by hemorrhagic shock or infusion of HCl attenuates FVIIa activity in vivo. The purpose of this study was to determine if acidosis, induced by two methods, affects recombinant FVIIa (rFVIIa) activity in swine, and if correction of the pH restores rFVIIa activity to normal. Methods: Acidosis was induce in anesthetized swine in two separate models: 1) HCl infusion (n=10) and 2) hemorrhage/hypoventilation (n=8). Three groups per model were used: Control (pH7.4), Acidosis (arterial pH7.1) and Acidosis-Corrected (bicarbonate infusion to return pH from 7.1 to 7.4). Pigs were then injected with rFVIIa (90 μg/kg) or vehicle (saline) at target pH and arterial blood samples were taken for measurement of coagulation function, including Thromboelastography -TEG, Thrombin Generation, Activated Clotting Time, Prothrombin Time, activated Partial Thromboplastin Time, Fibrinogen Concentration and Platelet count before and 5min after injection of rFVIIa. Results: Acidosis led to a hypocoagulation as measured by almost all coagulation parameters in both models. Furthermore, the change in coagulation function produced after infusion of rFVIIa was not different between control, acidosis and acidosis-corrected groups for all coagulation parameters measured. Conclusion: Acidosis associated with hemorrhagic shock or HCl infusion led to a hypocoagulation that was not corrected with bicarbonate infusion. Furthermore, acidosis did not affect rFVIIa function, and correction of the acidosis with bicarbonate had no effect on rFVIIa function in these models. This suggests that in vivo acidosis did not diminish rFVIIa function. PMID:23272296

  6. Arrestins in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Lymperopoulos, Anastasios; Bathgate, Ashley

    2013-01-01

    Of the four mammalian arrestins, only the β-arrestins (βarrs; Arrestin2 and -3) are expressed throughout the cardiovascular system, where they regulate, as either desensitizers/internalizers or signal transducers, several G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) critical for cardiovascular homeostasis. The cardiovascular roles of βarrs have been delineated at an accelerated pace via a variety of techniques and tools, such as knockout mice, siRNA knockdown, artificial or naturally occurring polymorphic GPCRs, and availability of new βarr "biased" GPCR ligands. This chapter summarizes the current knowledge of cardiovascular arrestin physiology and pharmacology, addressing the individual cardiovascular receptors affected by βarrs in vivo, as well as the individual cell types, tissues, and organs of the cardiovascular system in which βarr effects are exerted; for example, cardiac myocyte or fibroblast, vascular smooth muscle, adrenal gland and platelet. In the broader scope of cardiovascular βarr pharmacology, a discussion of the βarr "bias" of certain cardiovascular GPCR ligands is also included.

  7. The Functional Effect of Teacher Positive and Neutral Affect on Task Performance of Students with Significant Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sungho; Singer, George H. S.; Gibson, Mary

    2005-01-01

    The study uses an alternating treatment design to evaluate the functional effect of teacher's affect on students' task performance. Tradition in special education holds that teachers should engage students using positive and enthusiastic affect for task presentations and praise. To test this assumption, we compared two affective conditions. Three…

  8. Ultra-endurance exercise induces stress and inflammation and affects circulating hematopoietic progenitor cell function.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, I; Kröpfl, J M; Fuchs, R; Pekovits, K; Mangge, H; Raggam, R B; Gruber, H-J; Prüller, F; Hofmann, P; Truschnig-Wilders, M; Obermayer-Pietsch, B; Haushofer, A C; Kessler, H H; Mächler, P

    2015-10-01

    Although amateur sports have become increasingly competitive within recent decades, there are as yet few studies on the possible health risks for athletes. This study aims to determine the impact of ultra-endurance exercise-induced stress on the number and function of circulating hematopoietic progenitor cells (CPCs) and hematological, inflammatory, clinical, metabolic, and stress parameters in moderately trained amateur athletes. Following ultra-endurance exercise, there were significant increases in leukocytes, platelets, interleukin-6, fibrinogen, tissue enzymes, blood lactate, serum cortisol, and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Ultra-endurance exercise did not influence the number of CPCs but resulted in a highly significant decline of CPC functionality after the competition. Furthermore, Epstein-Barr virus was seen to be reactivated in one of seven athletes. The link between exercise-induced stress and decline of CPC functionality is supported by a negative correlation between cortisol and CPC function. We conclude that ultra-endurance exercise induces metabolic stress and an inflammatory response that affects not only mature hematopoietic cells but also the function of the immature hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell fraction, which make up the immune system and provide for regeneration.

  9. Cure Kinetics of Epoxy Nanocomposites Affected by MWCNTs Functionalization: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saeb, Mohammad Reza; Bakhshandeh, Ehsan; Khonakdar, Hossein Ali; Mäder, Edith; Scheffler, Christina; Heinrich, Gert

    2013-01-01

    The current paper provides an overview to emphasize the role of functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in manipulating cure kinetics of epoxy nanocomposites, which itself determines ultimate properties of the resulting compound. In this regard, the most commonly used functionalization schemes, that is, carboxylation and amidation, are thoroughly surveyed to highlight the role of functionalized nanotubes in controlling the rate of autocatalytic and vitrification kinetics. The current literature elucidates that the mechanism of curing in epoxy/MWCNTs nanocomposites remains almost unaffected by the functionalization of carbon nanotubes. On the other hand, early stage facilitation of autocatalytic reactions in the presence of MWCNTs bearing amine groups has been addressed by several researchers. When carboxylated nanotubes were used to modify MWCNTs, the rate of such reactions diminished as a consequence of heterogeneous dispersion within the epoxy matrix. At later stages of curing, however, the prolonged vitrification was seen to be dominant. Thus, the type of functional groups covalently located on the surface of MWCNTs directly affects the degree of polymer-nanotube interaction followed by enhancement of curing reaction. Our survey demonstrated that most widespread efforts ever made to represent multifarious surface-treated MWCNTs have not been directed towards preparation of epoxy nanocomposites, but they could result in property synergism. PMID:24348181

  10. Acute Consumption of Walnuts and Walnut Components Differentially Affect Postprandial Lipemia, Endothelial Function, Oxidative Stress, and Cholesterol Efflux in Humans with Mild Hypercholesterolemia1234

    PubMed Central

    Berryman, Claire E.; Grieger, Jessica A.; West, Sheila G.; Chen, Chung-Yen O.; Blumberg, Jeffrey B.; Rothblat, George H.; Sankaranarayanan, Sandhya; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.

    2013-01-01

    Walnut consumption improves cardiovascular disease risk; however, to our knowledge, the contribution of individual walnut components has not been assessed. This study evaluated the acute consumption of whole walnuts (85 g), separated nut skins (5.6 g), de-fatted nutmeat (34 g), and nut oil (51 g) on postprandial lipemia, endothelial function, and oxidative stress. Cholesterol efflux (ex vivo) was assessed in the whole walnut treatment only. A randomized, 4-period, crossover trial was conducted in healthy overweight and obese adults (n = 15) with moderate hypercholesterolemia. There was a treatment × time point interaction for triglycerides (P < 0.01) and increased postprandial concentrations were observed for the oil and whole walnut treatments (P < 0.01). Walnut skins decreased the reactive hyperemia index (RHI) compared with baseline (P = 0.02) such that a difference persisted between the skin and oil treatments (P = 0.01). The Framingham RHI was maintained with the oil treatment compared with the skins and whole nut (P < 0.05). There was a treatment effect for the ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) (P < 0.01), and mean FRAP was greater with the oil and skin treatments compared with the nutmeat (P < 0.01). Cholesterol efflux increased by 3.3% following whole walnut consumption in J774 cells cultured with postprandial serum compared with fasting baseline (P = 0.02). Walnut oil favorably affected endothelial function and whole walnuts increased cholesterol efflux. These 2 novel mechanisms may explain in part the cardiovascular benefits of walnuts. PMID:23616506

  11. Image-Based Computational Fluid Dynamics in Blood Vessel Models: Toward Developing a Prognostic Tool to Assess Cardiovascular Function Changes in Prolonged Space Flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatzimavroudis, George P.; Spirka, Thomas A.; Setser, Randolph M.; Myers, Jerry G.

    2004-01-01

    One of NASA's objectives is to be able to perform a complete, pre-flight, evaluation of cardiovascular changes in astronauts scheduled for prolonged space missions. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has shown promise as a method for estimating cardiovascular function during reduced gravity conditions. For this purpose, MRI can provide geometrical information, to reconstruct vessel geometries, and measure all spatial velocity components, providing location specific boundary conditions. The objective of this study was to investigate the reliability of MRI-based model reconstruction and measured boundary conditions for CFD simulations. An aortic arch model and a carotid bifurcation model were scanned in a 1.5T Siemens MRI scanner. Axial MRI acquisitions provided images for geometry reconstruction (slice thickness 3 and 5 mm; pixel size 1x1 and 0.5x0.5 square millimeters). Velocity acquisitions provided measured inlet boundary conditions and localized three-directional steady-flow velocity data (0.7-3.0 L/min). The vessel walls were isolated using NIH provided software (ImageJ) and lofted to form the geometric surface. Constructed and idealized geometries were imported into a commercial CFD code for meshing and simulation. Contour and vector plots of the velocity showed identical features between the MRI velocity data, the MRI-based CFD data, and the idealized-geometry CFD data, with less than 10% differences in the local velocity values. CFD results on models reconstructed from different MRI resolution settings showed insignificant differences (less than 5%). This study illustrated, quantitatively, that reliable CFD simulations can be performed with MRI reconstructed models and gives evidence that a future, subject-specific, computational evaluation of the cardiovascular system alteration during space travel is feasible.

  12. Ecosystem structure, function, and composition in rangelands are negatively affected by livestock grazing.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, David J; Poore, Alistair G B; Ruiz-Colmenero, Marta; Letnic, Mike; Soliveres, Santiago

    2016-06-01

    Reports of positive or neutral effects of grazing on plant species richness have prompted calls for livestock grazing to be used as a tool for managing land for conservation. Grazing effects, however, are likely to vary among different response variables, types, and intensity of grazing, and across abiotic conditions. We aimed to examine how grazing affects ecosystem structure, function, and composition. We compiled a database of 7615 records reporting an effect of grazing by sheep and cattle on 278 biotic and abiotic response variables for published studies across Australia. Using these data, we derived three ecosystem measures based on structure, function, and composition, which were compared against six contrasts of grazing pressure, ranging from low to heavy, two different herbivores (sheep, cattle), and across three different climatic zones. Grazing reduced structure (by 35%), function (24%), and composition (10%). Structure and function (but not composition) declined more when grazed by sheep and cattle together than sheep alone. Grazing reduced plant biomass (40%), animal richness (15%), and plant and animal abundance, and plant and litter cover (25%), but had no effect on plant richness nor soil function. The negative effects of grazing on plant biomass, plant cover, and soil function were more pronounced in drier environments. Grazing effects on plant and animal richness and composition were constant, or even declined, with increasing aridity. Our study represents a comprehensive continental assessment of the implications of grazing for managing Australian rangelands. Grazing effects were largely negative, even at very low levels of grazing. Overall, our results suggest that livestock grazing in Australia is unlikely to produce positive outcomes for ecosystem structure, function, and composition or even as a blanket conservation tool unless reduction in specific response variables is an explicit management objective.

  13. Aging. Aging-induced type I interferon response at the choroid plexus negatively affects brain function.

    PubMed

    Baruch, Kuti; Deczkowska, Aleksandra; David, Eyal; Castellano, Joseph M; Miller, Omer; Kertser, Alexander; Berkutzki, Tamara; Barnett-Itzhaki, Zohar; Bezalel, Dana; Wyss-Coray, Tony; Amit, Ido; Schwartz, Michal

    2014-10-03

    Aging-associated cognitive decline is affected by factors produced inside and outside the brain. By using multiorgan genome-wide analysis of aged mice, we found that the choroid plexus, an interface between the brain and the circulation, shows a type I interferon (IFN-I)-dependent gene expression profile that was also found in aged human brains. In aged mice, this response was induced by brain-derived signals, present in the cerebrospinal fluid. Blocking IFN-I signaling within the aged brain partially restored cognitive function and hippocampal neurogenesis and reestablished IFN-II-dependent choroid plexus activity, which is lost in aging. Our data identify a chronic aging-induced IFN-I signature, often associated with antiviral response, at the brain's choroid plexus and demonstrate its negative influence on brain function, thereby suggesting a target for ameliorating cognitive decline in aging.

  14. Ibrutinib treatment affects collagen and von Willebrand factor-dependent platelet functions.

    PubMed

    Levade, Marie; David, Elodie; Garcia, Cédric; Laurent, Pierre-Alexandre; Cadot, Sarah; Michallet, Anne-Sophie; Bordet, Jean-Claude; Tam, Constantine; Sié, Pierre; Ysebaert, Loïc; Payrastre, Bernard

    2014-12-18

    The oral Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor, ibrutinib, has recently demonstrated high efficiency in patients with relapsed B-cell malignancies. Occurrence of bleeding events has been reported in a subgroup of ibrutinib-treated patients. We demonstrate that ibrutinib selectively inhibits platelet signaling and functions downstream of the collagen receptor glycoprotein VI and strongly affects firm platelet adhesion on von Willebrand factor (VWF) under arterial flow. A longitudinal study of 14 patients indicated a correlation between occurrence of bleeding events and decreased platelet aggregation in response to collagen in platelet-rich plasma and firm adhesion on VWF under arterial flow. The addition of 50% untreated platelets was sufficient to efficiently reverse the effects of ibrutinib, and platelet functions recovered after treatment interruption as physiological platelet renewal occurred. These data have important clinical implications and provide a basis for hemostasis management during ibrutinib treatment.

  15. Glucocorticoids and the Cardiovascular System.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, Julie E

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids affect the developing and mature cardiovascular system in profound and, at times, contradictory ways. The glucocorticoid receptor is ubiquitous in most cell types and conserved across species, highlighting its importance in development and homeostasis. Despite the fact that the glucocorticoid receptor is widely expressed, tissue-specific effects of glucocorticoids may have pronounced effects on whole organism phenotypes. Here we will review the interactions between glucocorticoids and the cardiovascular system.

  16. Reactive oxygen species: players in the cardiovascular effects of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Tostes, Rita C; Carneiro, Fernando S; Carvalho, Maria Helena C; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2016-01-01

    Androgens are essential for the development and maintenance of male reproductive tissues and sexual function and for overall health and well being. Testosterone, the predominant and most important androgen, not only affects the male reproductive system, but also influences the activity of many other organs. In the cardiovascular system, the actions of testosterone are still controversial, its effects ranging from protective to deleterious. While early studies showed that testosterone replacement therapy exerted beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease, some recent safety studies point to a positive association between endogenous and supraphysiological levels of androgens/testosterone and cardiovascular disease risk. Among the possible mechanisms involved in the actions of testosterone on the cardiovascular system, indirect actions (changes in the lipid profile, insulin sensitivity, and hemostatic mechanisms, modulation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system), as well as direct actions (modulatory effects on proinflammatory enzymes, on the generation of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide bioavailability, and on vasoconstrictor signaling pathways) have been reported. This mini-review focuses on evidence indicating that testosterone has prooxidative actions that may contribute to its deleterious actions in the cardiovascular system. The controversial effects of testosterone on ROS generation and oxidant status, both prooxidant and antioxidant, in the cardiovascular system and in cells and tissues of other systems are reviewed.

  17. Reactive oxygen species: players in the cardiovascular effects of testosterone

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Fernando S.; Carvalho, Maria Helena C.; Reckelhoff, Jane F.

    2015-01-01

    Androgens are essential for the development and maintenance of male reproductive tissues and sexual function and for overall health and well being. Testosterone, the predominant and most important androgen, not only affects the male reproductive system, but also influences the activity of many other organs. In the cardiovascular system, the actions of testosterone are still controversial, its effects ranging from protective to deleterious. While early studies showed that testosterone replacement therapy exerted beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease, some recent safety studies point to a positive association between endogenous and supraphysiological levels of androgens/testosterone and cardiovascular disease risk. Among the possible mechanisms involved in the actions of testosterone on the cardiovascular system, indirect actions (changes in the lipid profile, insulin sensitivity, and hemostatic mechanisms, modulation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system), as well as direct actions (modulatory effects on proinflammatory enzymes, on the generation of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide bioavailability, and on vasoconstrictor signaling pathways) have been reported. This mini-review focuses on evidence indicating that testosterone has prooxidative actions that may contribute to its deleterious actions in the cardiovascular system. The controversial effects of testosterone on ROS generation and oxidant status, both prooxidant and antioxidant, in the cardiovascular system and in cells and tissues of other systems are reviewed. PMID:26538238

  18. Alcohol Affects Brain Functional Connectivity and its Coupling with Behavior: Greater Effects in Male Heavy Drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Shokri-Kojori, Ehsan; Tomasi, Dardo; Wiers, Corinde E.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2016-01-01

    Acute and chronic alcohol exposure significantly affect behavior but the underlying neurobiological mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here we used functional connectivity density (FCD) mapping to study alcohol-related changes in resting brain activity and their association with behavior. Heavy drinkers (HD; N=16; 16 males) and normal controls (NM; N=24; 14 males) were tested after placebo and after acute alcohol administration. Group comparisons showed that NM had higher FCD in visual and prefrontal cortices, default-mode network regions, and thalamus, while HD had higher FCD in cerebellum. Acute alcohol significantly increased FCD within the thalamus, impaired cognitive and motor functions, and affected self-reports of mood/drug effects in both groups. Partial least squares regression showed alcohol-induced changes in mood/drug effects were associated with changes in thalamic FCD in both groups. Disruptions in motor function were associated with increases in cerebellar FCD in NM and thalamus FCD in HD. Alcohol-induced declines in cognitive performance were associated with connectivity increases in visual cortex and thalamus in NM, but in HD, increases in precuneus FCD were associated with improved cognitive performance. Acute alcohol reduced “neurocognitive coupling”, the association between behavioral performance and FCD (indexing brain activity), an effect that was accentuated in HD compared to NM. Findings suggest that reduced cortical connectivity in HD contribute to decline in cognitive abilities associated with heavy alcohol consumption, whereas increased cerebellar connectivity in HD may have compensatory effects on behavioral performance. The results reveal how drinking history alters the association between brain functional connectivity density and individual differences in behavioral performance. PMID:27021821

  19. Minimal changes of thyroid axis activity influence brain functions in young females affected by subclinical hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Menicucci, D; Sebastiani, L; Comparini, A; Pingitore, A; Ghelarducci, B; L'Abbate, A; Iervasi, G; Gemignani, A

    2013-03-01

    There is evidence of an association between thyroid hormones (TH) alterations and mental dysfunctions related to procedural and working memory functions, but the physiological link between these domains is still under debate, also for the presence of age as a confounding factor. Thus, we investigated the TH tuning of cerebral functions in young females affected by the borderline condition of subclinical hypothyroidism (SH) and in euthyroid females of the same age. The experiment consisted in the characterization of the affective state and cognitive abilities of the subjects by means of specific neuropsychological questionnaires, and of brain activity (EEG) in resting state and during the passive viewing of emotional video-clips. We found that SH had i) increased anxiety for Physical Danger; ii) better scores for both Mental Control and no-working-memory-related functions; iii) association between anxiety for Physical Danger and fT4 levels. Thus, in young adults, SH increases inward attention and paradoxically improves some cognitive functions. In addition, self-assessed questionnaires showed that SH had a greater susceptibility to unpleasant emotional stimulation. As for EEG data, SH compared to controls showed: i) reduction of alpha activity and of gamma left lateralization in resting state; ii) increased, and lateralized to the right, beta2 activity during stimulations. Both results indicated that SH have higher levels of arousal and greater susceptibility to negative emotion than controls. In conclusion, our study indicates that minimal changes in TH levels produce subtle but well-defined mental changes, thus encouraging further studies for the prediction of pathology evolution.

  20. Factors affecting recovery of postoperative bowel function after pediatric laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Michelet, Daphnée; Andreu-Gallien, Juliette; Skhiri, Alia; Bonnard, Arnaud; Nivoche, Yves; Dahmani, Souhayl

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Laparoscopic pediatric surgery allows a rapid postoperative rehabilitation and hospital discharge. However, the optimal postoperative pain management preserving advantages of this surgical technique remains to be determined. This study aimed to identify factors affecting the postoperative recovery of bowel function after laparoscopic surgery in children. Material and Methods: A retrospective analysis of factors affecting recovery of bowel function in children and infants undergoing laparoscopic surgery between January 1, 2009 and September 30, 2009, was performed. Factors included were: Age, weight, extent of surgery (extensive, regional or local), chronic pain (sickle cell disease or chronic intestinal inflammatory disease), American Society of Anaesthesiologists status, postoperative analgesia (ketamine, morphine, nalbuphine, paracetamol, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], nefopam, regional analgesia) both in the Postanesthesia Care Unit and in the surgical ward; and surgical complications. Data analysis used classification and regression tree analysis (CART) with a 10-fold cross validation. Results: One hundred and sixty six patients were included in the analysis. Recovery of bowel function depended upon: The extent of surgery, the occurrence of postoperative surgical complications, the administration of postoperative morphine in the surgical ward, the coadministration of paracetamol and NSAIDs and/or nefopam in the surgical ward and the emergency character of the surgery. The CART method generated a decision tree with eight terminal nodes. The percentage of explained variability of the model and the cross validation were 58% and 49%, respectively. Conclusion: Multimodal analgesia using nonopioid analgesia that allows decreasing postoperative morphine consumption should be considered for the speed of bowel function recovery after laparoscopic pediatric surgery. PMID:27625488

  1. Functional Connectivity under Anticipation of Shock: Correlates of Trait Anxious Affect versus Induced Anxiety.

    PubMed

    Bijsterbosch, Janine; Smith, Stephen; Bishop, Sonia J

    2015-09-01

    Sustained anxiety about potential future negative events is an important feature of anxiety disorders. In this study, we used a novel anticipation of shock paradigm to investigate individual differences in functional connectivity during prolonged threat of shock. We examined the correlates of between-participant differences in trait anxious affect and induced anxiety, where the latter reflects changes in self-reported anxiety resulting from the shock manipulation. Dissociable effects of trait anxious affect and induced anxiety were observed. Participants with high scores on a latent dimension of anxious affect showed less increase in ventromedial pFC-amygdala connectivity between periods of safety and shock anticipation. Meanwhile, lower levels of induced anxiety were linked to greater augmentation of dorsolateral pFC-anterior insula connectivity during shock anticipation. These findings suggest that ventromedial pFC-amygdala and dorsolateral pFC-insula networks might both contribute to regulation of sustained fear responses, with their recruitment varying independently across participants. The former might reflect an evolutionarily old mechanism for reducing fear or anxiety, whereas the latter might reflect a complementary mechanism by which cognitive control can be implemented to diminish fear responses generated due to anticipation of aversive stimuli or events. These two circuits might provide complementary, alternate targets for exploration in future pharmacological and cognitive intervention studies.

  2. Thyroid, brain and mood modulation in affective disorder: insights from molecular research and functional brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Bauer, M; London, E D; Silverman, D H; Rasgon, N; Kirchheiner, J; Whybrow, P C

    2003-11-01

    The efficacy resulting from adjunctive use of supraphysiological doses of levothyroxine has emerged as a promising approach to therapy and prophylaxis for refractory mood disorders. Most patients with mood disorders who receive treatment with supraphysiological doses of levothyroxine have normal peripheral thyroid hormone levels, and also respond differently to the hormone and tolerate it better than healthy individuals and patients with primary thyroid diseases. Progress in molecular and functional brain imaging techniques has provided a new understanding of these phenomena, illuminating the relationship between thyroid function, mood modulation and behavior. Thyroid hormones are widely distributed in the brain and have a multitude of effects on the central nervous system. Notably many of the limbic system structures where thyroid hormone receptors are prevalent have been implicated in the pathogenesis of mood disorders. The influence of the thyroid system on neurotransmitters (particularly serotonin and norepinephrine), which putatively play a major role in the regulation of mood and behavior, may contribute to the mechanisms of mood modulation. Recent functional brain imaging studies using positron emission tomography (PET) with [ (18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose demonstrated that thyroid hormone treatment with levothyroxine affects regional brain metabolism in patients with hypothyroidism and bipolar disorder. Theses studies confirm that thyroid hormones are active in modulating metabolic function in the mature adult brain, and provide intriging neuroanatomic clues that may guide future research.

  3. Surface chemical functionalities affect the behavior of human adipose-derived stem cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xujie; Feng, Qingling; Bachhuka, Akash; Vasilev, Krasimir

    2013-04-01

    This study examines the effect of surface chemical functionalities on the behavior of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) in vitro. Plasma polymerized films rich in amine (sbnd NH2), carboxyl (sbnd COOH) and methyl (sbnd CH3), were generated on hydroxyapatite (HAp) substrates. The surface chemical functionalities were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The ability of different substrates to absorb proteins was evaluated. The results showed that substrates modified with hydrophilic functional group (sbnd COOH and sbnd NH2) can absorb more proteins than these modified with more hydrophobic functional group (sbnd CH3). The behavior of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) cultured on different substrates was investigated in vitro: cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) analysis was used to characterize cell proliferation, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) analysis was used to characterize cell morphology and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity analysis was used to account for differentiation. The results of this study demonstrated that the sbnd NH2 modified surfaces encourage osteogenic differentiation; the sbnd COOH modified surfaces promote cell adhesion and spreading and the sbnd CH3 modified surfaces have the lowest ability to induce osteogenic differentiation. These findings confirmed that the surface chemical states of biomaterials can affect the behavior of hASCs in vitro.

  4. No adverse affect after harvesting of free fibula osteoseptocutaneous flaps on gait function.

    PubMed

    Maurer-Ertl, Werner; Glehr, Mathias; Friesenbichler, Joerg; Sadoghi, Patrick; Wiedner, Maria; Haas, Franz; Leithner, Andreas; Windhager, Reinhard; Zwick, Ernst B

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze gait function and muscular strength on donor site after harvesting of a vascularized fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap. Nine patients with a mean follow-up of 33 months (range, 7-59) and a mean resection length of the middle portion of the fibula of 18.0 cm (range, 14.0-23.0) underwent an instrumented three-dimensional gait analysis to evaluate gait function. Furthermore, CYBEX II extremity system was used for muscular strength measurements. Subjective muscle strength measurements were performed according to Kendall et al. and were classified according to the British Medical Research Council. Intraindividual comparison between the operated and the nonoperated leg revealed no significant differences for gait function parameters (cadence, velocity, and stride length, P > 1.00) and for muscular strength measurements for flexion (knee: P = 0.93, ankle: P = 0.54) and extension (knee: P = 0.97, ankle: P= 0.21), respectively. In conclusion, intraindividual comparison of the operated and nonoperated sides after harvesting of the middle portion of the fibula for gaining a free fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap has no adverse affect on gait function or muscular flexion and extension strength on donor site at a mean follow-up of 33 months.

  5. Light availability affects stream biofilm bacterial community composition and function, but not diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Karoline; Besemer, Katharina; Burns, Nancy R.; Battin, Tom J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Changes in riparian vegetation or water turbidity and browning in streams alter the local light regime with potential implications for stream biofilms and ecosystem functioning. We experimented with biofilms in microcosms grown under a gradient of light intensities (range: 5–152 μmole photons s−1 m−2) and combined 454‐pyrosequencing and enzymatic activity assays to evaluate the effects of light on biofilm structure and function. We observed a shift in bacterial community composition along the light gradient, whereas there was no apparent change in alpha diversity. Multifunctionality, based on extracellular enzymes, was highest under high light conditions and decoupled from bacterial diversity. Phenol oxidase activity, involved in the degradation of polyphenolic compounds, was twice as high on average under the lowest compared with the highest light condition. This suggests a shift in reliance of microbial heterotrophs on biofilm phototroph‐derived organic matter under high light availability to more complex organic matter under low light. Furthermore, extracellular enzyme activities correlated with nutrient cycling and community respiration, supporting the link between biofilm structure–function and biogeochemical fluxes in streams. Our findings demonstrate that changes in light availability are likely to have significant impacts on biofilm structure and function, potentially affecting stream ecosystem processes. PMID:26013911

  6. Dynamic changes in brain activations and functional connectivity during affectively different tactile stimuli.

    PubMed

    Hua, Qing-Ping; Zeng, Xiang-Zhu; Liu, Jian-Yu; Wang, Jin-Yan; Guo, Jian-You; Luo, Fei

    2008-01-01

    In the present study, we compared brain activations produced by pleasant, neutral and unpleasant touch, to the anterior lateral surface of lower leg of human subjects. It was found that several brain regions, including the contralateral primary somatosensory area (SI), bilateral secondary somatosensory area (SII), as well as contralateral middle and posterior insula cortex were commonly activated under the three touch conditions. In addition, pleasant and unpleasant touch conditions shared a few brain regions including the contralateral posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and bilateral premotor cortex (PMC). Unpleasant touch specifically activated a set of pain-related brain regions such as contralateral supplementary motor area (SMA) and dorsal parts of bilateral anterior cingulated cortex, etc. Brain regions specifically activated by pleasant touch comprised bilateral lateral orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), intraparietal cortex and left dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Using a novel functional connectivity model based on graph theory, we showed that a series of brain regions related to affectively different touch had significant functional connectivity during the resting state. Furthermore, it was found that such a network can be modulated between affectively different touch conditions.

  7. Attachment style predicts affect, cognitive appraisals, and social functioning in daily life.

    PubMed

    Sheinbaum, Tamara; Kwapil, Thomas R; Ballespí, Sergi; Mitjavila, Mercè; Chun, Charlotte A; Silvia, Paul J; Barrantes-Vidal, Neus

    2015-01-01

    The way in which attachment styles are expressed in the moment as individuals navigate their real-life settings has remained an area largely untapped by attachment research. The present study examined how adult attachment styles are expressed in daily life using experience sampling methodology (ESM) in a sample of 206 Spanish young adults. Participants were administered the Attachment Style Interview (ASI) and received personal digital assistants that signaled them randomly eight times per day for 1 week to complete questionnaires about their current experiences and social context. As hypothesized, participants' momentary affective states, cognitive appraisals, and social functioning varied in meaningful ways as a function of their attachment style. Individuals with an anxious attachment, as compared with securely attached individuals, endorsed experiences that were congruent with hyperactivating tendencies, such as higher negative affect, stress, and perceived social rejection. By contrast, individuals with an avoidant attachment, relative to individuals with a secure attachment, endorsed experiences that were consistent with deactivating tendencies, such as decreased positive states and a decreased desire to be with others when alone. Furthermore, the expression of attachment styles in social contexts was shown to be dependent upon the subjective appraisal of the closeness of social contacts, and not merely upon the presence of social interactions. The findings support the ecological validity of the ASI and the person-by-situation character of attachment theory. Moreover, they highlight the utility of ESM for investigating how the predictions derived from attachment theory play out in the natural flow of real life.

  8. Catheterization of Intestinal Loops in Ruminants Does Not Adversely Affect Loop Function

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, G Douglas; Kastelic, John P; Uwiera, Richard R E

    2010-01-01

    Catheterized intestinal loops may be a valuable model to elucidate key components of the host response to various treatments within the small intestine of ruminants. We examined whether catheterizing ileal loops in sheep affected the overall health of animals and intestinal function, whether a bacterial treatment could be introduced into the loops through the catheters, and whether broad-spectrum antibiotics could sterilize the loops. Escherichia coli cells transformed to express the GFP gene were introduced readily into the loops through the catheters, and GFP E. coli cells were localized within the injected loops. Catheterized loops, interspaces, and intact ileum exhibited no abnormalities in tissue appearance or electrical resistance. Expression of the IFNγ, IL1α, IL4, IL6, IL12p40, IL18, TGFβ1, and TNFα cytokine genes did not differ significantly among the intact ileum, catheterized loops, and interspaces, nor did the expression of the gene for inducible nitric oxide synthase. Broad-spectrum antibiotics administered during surgery did not sterilize the loops or interspaces and did not substantively change the composition of the microbiota. However, antibiotics reduced the overall number of bacterial cells within the loop and the relative abundance of community constituents. We concluded that catheterization of intestinal loops did not adversely affect health or loop function in sheep. Furthermore, allowing animals to recover fully from surgery and to clear pharmaceuticals will remove any confounding effects due to these factors, making catheterized intestinal loops a feasible model for studying host responses in ruminants. PMID:21262134

  9. Climate change induced rainfall patterns affect wheat productivity and agroecosystem functioning dependent on soil types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabi Tataw, James; Baier, Fabian; Krottenthaler, Florian; Pachler, Bernadette; Schwaiger, Elisabeth; Whylidal, Stefan; Formayer, Herbert; Hösch, Johannes; Baumgarten, Andreas; Zaller, Johann G.

    2014-05-01

    Wheat is a crop of global importance supplying more than half of the world's population with carbohydrates. We examined, whether climate change induced rainfall patterns towards less frequent but heavier events alter wheat agroecosystem productivity and functioning under three different soil types. Therefore, in a full-factorial experiment Triticum aestivum L. was cultivated in 3 m2 lysimeter plots containing the soil types sandy calcaric phaeozem, gleyic phaeozem or calcic chernozem. Prognosticated rainfall patterns based on regionalised climate change model calculations were compared with current long-term rainfall patterns; each treatment combination was replicated three times. Future rainfall patterns significantly reduced wheat growth and yield, reduced the leaf area index, accelerated crop development, reduced arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonisation of roots, increased weed density and the stable carbon isotope signature (δ13C) of both old and young wheat leaves. Different soil types affected wheat growth and yield, ecosystem root production as well as weed abundance and biomass. The interaction between climate and soil type was significant only for the harvest index. Our results suggest that even slight changes in rainfall patterns can significantly affect the functioning of wheat agroecosystems. These rainfall effects seemed to be little influenced by soil types suggesting more general impacts of climate change across different soil types. Wheat production under future conditions will likely become more challenging as further concurrent climate change factors become prevalent.

  10. Attachment style predicts affect, cognitive appraisals, and social functioning in daily life

    PubMed Central

    Sheinbaum, Tamara; Kwapil, Thomas R.; Ballespí, Sergi; Mitjavila, Mercè; Chun, Charlotte A.; Silvia, Paul J.; Barrantes-Vidal, Neus

    2015-01-01

    The way in which attachment styles are expressed in the moment as individuals navigate their real-life settings has remained an area largely untapped by attachment research. The present study examined how adult attachment styles are expressed in daily life using experience sampling methodology (ESM) in a sample of 206 Spanish young adults. Participants were administered the Attachment Style Interview (ASI) and received personal digital assistants that signaled them randomly eight times per day for 1 week to complete questionnaires about their current experiences and social context. As hypothesized, participants’ momentary affective states, cognitive appraisals, and social functioning varied in meaningful ways as a function of their attachment style. Individuals with an anxious attachment, as compared with securely attached individuals, endorsed experiences that were congruent with hyperactivating tendencies, such as higher negative affect, stress, and perceived social rejection. By contrast, individuals with an avoidant attachment, relative to individuals with a secure attachment, endorsed experiences that were consistent with deactivating tendencies, such as decreased positive states and a decreased desire to be with others when alone. Furthermore, the expression of attachment styles in social contexts was shown to be dependent upon the subjective appraisal of the closeness of social contacts, and not merely upon the presence of social interactions. The findings support the ecological validity of the ASI and the person-by-situation character of attachment theory. Moreover, they highlight the utility of ESM for investigating how the predictions derived from attachment theory play out in the natural flow of real life. PMID:25852613

  11. The association between the body composition and lifestyle affecting pulmonary function in Japanese workers

    PubMed Central

    Inomoto, Atsushi; Fukuda, Rika; Deguchi, Junko; Kato, Gohei; Kanzaki, Ryoko; Hiroshige, Keiichi; Nakamura, Kouichi; Nakano, Keisuke; Toyonaga, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify factors related to physical characteristics and lifestyle that affect pulmonary function. [Subjects and Methods] Ninety seven healthy male workers were recruited for this study, and basic information and details about lifestyle were collected. Body composition analyzer and visceral fat measuring device were conducted as measurements. Pulmonary function was measured using spirometer. A multiple stepwise linear regression analysis was performed with pulmonary function as the dependent variable. Variables with a significant association with pulmonary function on univariate analysis were imputed as independent variables. [Results] Height, fat free mass, upper extremity muscle mass, lower extremity muscle mass, and trunk muscle mass had significant positive correlations with FEV1 and FVC. Age, percentage of body fat, and visceral fat area were negatively correlated with FEV1 and FVC. Regarding the association between pulmonary function and lifestyle, a significant difference was found between the smoking index and the presence or absence of metabolic syndrome risk factors and both FEV1 and FVC. The multiple stepwise linear regression analysis with FEV1 as the dependent variable, adjusted for age and height, revealed that visceral fat area and fat free mass were significantly associated with FEV1. A similar analysis, FVC as the dependent variable identified visceral fat area. [Conclusion] FEV1 was independently associated with visceral fat area and fat free mass. FVC was independently associated with visceral fat area. These results may be valuable in preventing the decrease in respiratory function and, hence, in further preventing the onset of COPD. PMID:27821955

  12. Breakfast staple types affect brain gray matter volume and cognitive function in healthy children.

    PubMed

    Taki, Yasuyuki; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sassa, Yuko; Takeuchi, Hikaru; Asano, Michiko; Asano, Kohei; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2010-12-08

    Childhood diet is important for brain development. Furthermore, the quality of breakfast is thought to affect the cognitive functioning of well-nourished children. To analyze the relationship among breakfast staple type, gray matter volume, and intelligence quotient (IQ) in 290 healthy children, we used magnetic resonance images and applied voxel-based morphometry. We divided subjects into rice, bread, and both groups according to their breakfast staple. We showed that the rice group had a significantly larger gray matter ratio (gray matter volume percentage divided by intracranial volume) and significantly larger regional gray matter volumes of several regions, including the left superior temporal gyrus. The bread group had significantly larger regional gray and white matter volumes of several regions, including the right frontoparietal region. The perceptual organization index (POI; IQ subcomponent) of the rice group was significantly higher than that of the bread group. All analyses were adjusted for age, gender, intracranial volume, socioeconomic status, average weekly frequency of having breakfast, and number of side dishes eaten for breakfast. Although several factors may have affected the results, one possible mechanism underlying the difference between the bread and the rice groups may be the difference in the glycemic index (GI) of these two substances; foods with a low GI are associated with less blood-glucose fluctuation than are those with a high GI. Our study suggests that breakfast staple type affects brain gray and white matter volumes and cognitive function in healthy children; therefore, a diet of optimal nutrition is important for brain maturation during childhood and adolescence.

  13. Compromised bone strength index in the hemiparetic distal tibia epiphysis among chronic stroke patients: the association with cardiovascular function, muscle atrophy, mobility, and spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Marco Y.C.; Ashe, Maureen C.; Eng, Janice J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To identify the determinants of the bone strength index (BSI) at the distal tibia in chronic stroke patients. Methods Sixty-three chronic stroke survivors underwent scanning of the distal tibia at the 4% site on both sides using peripheral quantitative computed tomography. The primary outcomes were trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) (mg/cm3), total BMD (mg/cm3), total bone area (mm2), and BSI (g2/cm4). Cardiovascular fitness, leg lean mass, gait velocity, and spasticity were also measured. Results Scans from 45 subjects were deemed to have acceptable quality and were included for subsequent analysis. The paretic side had significantly lower trabecular BMD, total BMD, and BSI than the non-paretic side (p<0.05). However, the total bone area demonstrated no significant side-to-side difference (p>0.05). After adjusting for relevant biological factors, peakoxygen consumption, leg muscle mass, gait velocity remained positively associated with tibial BSI on both sides (R2 change=6.9–14.2%), whereas spasticity of the paretic leg was negatively associated with tibial BSI on the same side (R2 change=4.8%). Conclusions Cardiovascular function, muscle atrophy, mobility, and spasticity are independently associated with BSI of the distal tibia epiphysis among chronic stroke patients. PMID:19882095

  14. Cardiovascular actions of lead and relationship to hypertension: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, S J; Barron, J T; Tow, J P

    1988-01-01

    Chronic and acute lead poisoning cause overt, clinical symptoms of cardiac and vascular damage with potentially lethal consequences. Morphological, biochemical, and functional derangements of the heart have all been described in patients following exposure to excessive lead levels. Disturbances in cardiac electrical and mechanical activity and postmortem evidence of morphological and biochemical derangements of the myocardium have all been reported following excessive exposure to lead in humans. In addition, signs of vascular degeneration, abnormal vascular smooth muscle function, and altered vessel compliance have been described in humans chronically and acutely exposed to toxic lead levels. Similar cardiovascular complications have been detected following excessive lead exposure in experimental animals. Myocarditis, electrocardiographic disturbances, heightened catecholamine arrhythmogenicity, altered myocardial contractile responsiveness to inotropic stimulation, degenerative structural and biochemical changes affecting the musculature of the heart and vasculature, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, atherosclerosis, and increased vascular reactivity to alpha-adrenergic agonists have been among the reported cardiovascular disturbances linked to lead poisoning. Less certain are the cardiovascular effects of subclinical lead poisoning. Although controversial, chronic low-level lead exposure has been linked to hypertension and other cardiovascular disturbances in both clinical and experimental studies. In general, it can be concluded that lead over a wide range of exposure intensities can induce significant changes in the function of the cardiovascular system. Evidence points to the involvement of multiple sites of action. Cardiac and vascular sites, as well as sites within the central nervous system, have all been implicated in the sequelae of cardiovascular effects. The exact pathogenic mechanisms that underlie the actions of lead in the cardiovascular system

  15. Realistic changes in seaweed biodiversity affect multiple ecosystem functions on a rocky shore.

    PubMed

    Bracken, Matthew E S; Williams, Susan L

    2013-09-01

    Given current threats to biodiversity, understanding the effects of diversity changes on the functions and services associated with intact ecosystems is of paramount importance. However, limited realism in most biodiversity studies makes it difficult to link the large and growing body of evidence for important functional consequences of biodiversity change to real-world losses of biodiversity. Here, we explored two methods of incorporating realism into biodiversity research: (1) the use of two-, five-, and eight-species assemblages that mimicked those that we observed in surveys of seaweed biodiversity patterns on a northern California (USA) rocky shore and the explicit comparison of those assemblages to random assemblages compiled from the same local species pool; and (2) the measurement of two fundamental ecosystem functions, nitrate uptake and photosynthesis, both of which contribute to growth of primary producers. Specifically, we measured nitrate uptake rates of seaweed assemblages as a function of initial nitrate concentrations and photosynthetic rates as a function of irradiance levels for both realistic and random assemblages of seaweeds. We only observed changes in ecosystem functioning along a richness gradient for realistic assemblages, and both maximum nitrate uptake rates (V(max)) and photosynthetic light use efficiency values (alpha(p) = P(max)/I(K)) were higher in realistic assemblages than in random assemblages. Furthermore, the parameter affected by changes in richness depended on the function being measured. Both V(max) and alpha(p) declined with increasing richness in nonrandom assemblages due to a combination of species identity effects (for V(max) and overyielding effects (for both V(max) and alpha(p)). In contrast, neither nitrate uptake efficiency values (alpha(N) = V(max)/K(s)), nor maximum photosynthetic rates (Pmax) changed along the gradient in seaweed species richness. Furthermore, overyielding was only evident in realistic assemblages

  16. Mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in diabetic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Chong, Zhao Zhong; Maiese, Kenneth

    2012-07-16

    Diabetes mellitus currently affects more than 170 million individuals worldwide and is expected to afflict another 200 million individuals in the next 30 years. Complications of diabetes as a result of oxidant stress affect multiple systems throughout the body, but involvement of the cardiovascular system may be one of the most severe in light of the impact upon cardiac and vascular function that can result in rapid morbidity and mortality for individuals. Given these concerns, the signaling pathways of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) offer exciting prospects for the development of novel therapies for the cardiovascular complications of diabetes. In the cardiovascular and metabolic systems, mTOR and its multi-protein complexes of TORC1 and TORC2 regulate insulin release and signaling, endothelial cell survival and growth, cardiomyocyte proliferation, resistance to β-cell injury, and cell longevity. Yet, mTOR can, at times, alter insulin signaling and lead to insulin resistance in the cardiovascular system during diabetes mellitus. It is therefore vital to understand the complex relationship mTOR and its downstream pathways hold during metabolic disease in order to develop novel strategies for the complications of diabetes mellitus in the cardiovascular system.

  17. Effects of krill oil on endothelial function and other cardiovascular risk factors in participants with type 2 diabetes, a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lobraico, Jessika M; DiLello, Lauren C; Butler, Amber D; Cordisco, Marie Elena; Petrini, Joann R; Ahmadi, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the effect of krill oil supplementation, a source of ω-3 fatty acids, on cardiovascular disease risk factors and blood glucose control among participants with type 2 diabetes. Research design and methods A randomized, double-blind controlled cross-over trial was employed. Outcomes assessed were: endothelial function, blood lipids, glucose, glycated hemoglobin, serum antioxidant level, C peptide, and calculated Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) scores. Participants were randomized to either krill oil or olive oil supplementation for 4 weeks, underwent a 2-week washout period, and then crossed to the other supplementation for 4 weeks. All participants were then offered an additional 17 weeks of krill supplementation. Testing occurred at 3 time points: baseline, after first supplementation, and after second supplementation. Testing also occurred after an optional 17 weeks of krill oil supplementation. Difference scores were calculated for each participant in both sequences (ie, differences in outcome measures in the first and second period of the sequence). The mean and SD of the scores in the 2 sequence groups were used to test for differences between treatment effects at a significance level of p<0.05. Results A total of 47 participants were included in the initial cross-over study. Participants who received krill oil for 4 weeks had an improvement in their endothelial function and a reduction in blood C peptide levels and HOMA scores as compared with the olive oil. A total of 34 participants completed the additional 17-week supplementation period. When compared with their respective baseline measures, these participants had a statistically significant improvement in endothelial function and blood high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Conclusions Krill oil may lead to moderate improvement of cardiovascular risks, specifically endothelial dysfunction and HDL in patients with type 2

  18. Earthworm-mycorrhiza interactions can affect the diversity, structure and functioning of establishing model grassland communities.

    PubMed

    Zaller, Johann G; Heigl, Florian; Grabmaier, Andrea; Lichtenegger, Claudia; Piller, Katja; Allabashi, Roza; Frank, Thomas; Drapela, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Both earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are important ecosystem engineers co-occurring in temperate grasslands. However, their combined impacts during grassland establishment are poorly understood and have never been studied. We used large mesocosms to study the effects of different functional groups of earthworms (i.e., vertically burrowing anecics vs. horizontally burrowing endogeics) and a mix of four AMF taxa on the establishment, diversity and productivity of plant communities after a simulated seed rain of 18 grassland species comprising grasses, non-leguminous forbs and legumes. Moreover, effects of earthworms and/or AMF on water infiltration and leaching of ammonium, nitrate and phosphate were determined after a simulated extreme rainfall event (40 l m(-2)). AMF colonisation of all three plant functional groups was altered by earthworms. Seedling emergence and diversity was reduced by anecic earthworms, however only when AMF were present. Plant density was decreased in AMF-free mesocosms when both anecic and endogeic earthworms were active; with AMF also anecics reduced plant density. Plant shoot and root biomass was only affected by earthworms in AMF-free mesocosms: shoot biomass increased due to the activity of either anecics or endogeics; root biomass increased only when anecics were active. Water infiltration increased when earthworms were present in the mesocosms but remained unaffected by AMF. Ammonium leaching was increased only when anecics or a mixed earthworm community was active but was unaffected by AMF; nitrate and phosphate leaching was neither affected by earthworms nor AMF. Ammonium leaching decreased with increasing plant density, nitrate leaching decreased with increasing plant diversity and density. In order to understand the underlying processes of these interactions further investigations possibly under field conditions using more diverse belowground communities are required. Nevertheless, this study demonstrates that

  19. Alcohol affects brain functional connectivity and its coupling with behavior: greater effects in male heavy drinkers.

    PubMed

    Shokri-Kojori, E; Tomasi, D; Wiers, C E; Wang, G-J; Volkow, N D

    2016-03-29

    Acute and chronic alcohol exposure significantly affect behavior but the underlying neurobiological mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we used functional connectivity density (FCD) mapping to study alcohol-related changes in resting brain activity and their association with behavior. Heavy drinkers (HD, N=16, 16 males) and normal controls (NM, N=24, 14 males) were tested after placebo and after acute alcohol administration. Group comparisons showed that NM had higher FCD in visual and prefrontal cortices, default mode network regions and thalamus, while HD had higher FCD in cerebellum. Acute alcohol significantly increased FCD within the thalamus, impaired cognitive and motor functions, and affected self-reports of mood/drug effects in both groups. Partial least squares regression showed that alcohol-induced changes in mood/drug effects were associated with changes in thalamic FCD in both groups. Disruptions in motor function were associated with increases in cerebellar FCD in NM and thalamus FCD in HD. Alcohol-induced declines in cognitive performance were associated with connectivity increases in visual cortex and thalamus in NM, but in HD, increases in precuneus FCD were associated with improved cognitive performance. Acute alcohol reduced 'neurocognitive coupling', the association between behavioral performance and FCD (indexing brain activity), an effect that was accentuated in HD compared with NM. Findings suggest that reduced cortical connectivity in HD contribute to decline in cognitive abilities associated with heavy alcohol consumption, whereas increased cerebellar connectivity in HD may have compensatory effects on behavioral performance. The results reveal how drinking history alters the association between brain FCD and individual differences in behavioral performance.Molecular Psychiatry advance online publication, 29 March 2016; doi:10.1038/mp.2016.25.

  20. Tumor-specific mutations in low-frequency genes affect their functional properties.

    PubMed

    Erdem-Eraslan, Lale; Heijsman, Daphne; de Wit, Maurice; Kremer, Andreas; Sacchetti, Andrea; van der Spek, Peter J; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A E; French, Pim J

    2015-05-01

    Causal genetic changes in oligodendrogliomas (OD) with 1p/19q co-deletion include mutations in IDH1, IDH2, CIC, FUBP1, TERT promoter and NOTCH1. However, it is generally assumed that more somatic mutations are required for tumorigenesis. This study aimed to establish whether genes mutated at low frequency can be involved in OD initiation and/or progression. We performed whole-genome sequencing on three anaplastic ODs with 1p/19q co-deletion. To estimate mutation frequency, we performed targeted resequencing on an additional 39 ODs. Whole-genome sequencing identified a total of 55 coding mutations (range 8-32 mutations per tumor), including known abnormalities in IDH1, IDH2, CIC and FUBP1. We also identified mutations in genes, most of which were previously not implicated in ODs. Targeted resequencing on 39 additional ODs confirmed that these genes are mutated at low frequency. Most of the mutations identified were predicted to have a deleterious functional effect. Functional analysis on a subset of these genes (e.g. NTN4 and MAGEH1) showed that the mutation affects the subcellular localization of the protein (n = 2/12). In addition, HOG cells stably expressing mutant GDI1 or XPO7 showed altered cell proliferation compared to those expressing wildtype constructs. Similarly, HOG cells expressing mutant SASH3 or GDI1 showed altered migration. The significantly higher rate of predicted deleterious mutations, the changes in subcellular localization and the effects on proliferation and/or migration indicate that many of these genes functionally may contribute to gliomagenesis and/or progression. These low-frequency genes and their affected pathways may provide new treatment targets for this tumor type.

  1. Differential effects of complement activation products c3a and c5a on cardiovascular function in hypertensive pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Lillegard, Kathryn E; Loeks-Johnson, Alex C; Opacich, Jonathan W; Peterson, Jenna M; Bauer, Ashley J; Elmquist, Barbara J; Regal, Ronald R; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Regal, Jean F

    2014-11-01

    Early-onset pre-eclampsia is characterized by decreased placental perfusion, new-onset hypertension, angiogenic imbalance, and endothelial dysfunction associated with excessive activation of the innate immune complement system. Although our previous studies demonstrated that inhibition of complement activation attenuates placental ischemia-induced hypertension using the rat reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) model, the important product(s) of complement activation has yet to be identified. We hypothesized that antagonism of receptors for complement activation products C3a and C5a would improve vascular function and attenuate RUPP hypertension. On gestational day (GD) 14, rats underwent sham surgery or vascular clip placement on ovarian arteries and abdominal aorta (RUPP). Rats were treated once daily with the C5a receptor antagonist (C5aRA), PMX51 (acetyl-F-[Orn-P-(D-Cha)-WR]), the C3a receptor antagonist (C3aRA), SB290157 (N(2)-[(2,2-diphenylethoxy)acetyl]-l-arginine), or vehicle from GD 14-18. Both the C3aRA and C5aRA attenuated placental ischemia-induced hypertension without affecting the decreased fetal weight or decreased concentration of free circulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) also present in this model. The C5aRA, but not the C3aRA, attenuated placental ischemia-induced increase in heart rate and impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation. The C3aRA abrogated the acute pressor response to C3a peptide injection, but it also unexpectedly attenuated the placental ischemia-induced increase in C3a, suggesting nonreceptor-mediated effects. Overall, these results indicate that both C3a and C5a are important products of complement activation that mediate the hypertension regardless of the reduction in free plasma VEGF. The mechanism by which C3a contributes to placental ischemia-induced hypertension appears to be distinct from that of C5a, and management of pregnancy-induced hypertension is likely to require a broad anti

  2. Soil microbial diversity and soil functioning affect competition among grasses in experimental microcosms.

    PubMed

    Bonkowski, Michael; Roy, Jacques

    2005-03-01

    A gradient of microbial diversity in soil was established by inoculating pasteurized soil with microbial populations of different complexity, which were obtained by a combination of soil fumigation and filtering techniques. Four different soil diversity treatments were planted with six different grass species either in monoculture or in polyculture to test how changes of general microbial functions, such as catabolic diversity and nutrient recycling efficiency would affect the performance of the plant communities. Relatively harsh soil treatments were necessary to elicit visible effects on major soil processes such as decomposition and nitrogen cycling due to the high redundancy and resilience of soil microbial communities. The strongest effects of soil diversity manipulations on plant growth occurred in polycultures where interspecific competition between plants was high. In polycultures, soil diversity reduction led to a gradual, linear decline in biomass production of one subordinate grass species (Bromus hordeaceus), which was compensated by increased growth of two intermediate competitors (Aegilops geniculata, B. madritensis). This negative covariance in growth of competing grass species smoothed the effects of soil diversity manipulations at the plant community level. As a result, total shoot biomass production remained constant. Apparently the effects of soil diversity manipulations were buffered because functional redundancy at both, the microbial and the plant community level complemented each other. The results further suggests that small trade-offs in plant fitness due to general functional shifts at the microbial level can be significant for the outcome of competition in plant communities and thus diversity at much larger scales.

  3. Proliferation of Purple Sulphur Bacteria at the Sediment Surface Affects Intertidal Mat Diversity and Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Hubas, Cédric; Jesus, Bruno; Ruivo, Mickael; Meziane, Tarik; Thiney, Najet; Davoult, Dominique; Spilmont, Nicolas; Paterson, David M.; Jeanthon, Christian

    2013-01-01

    There is a relative absence of studies dealing with mats of purple sulphur bacteria in the intertidal zone. These bacteria display an array of metabolic pathways that allow them to disperse and develop under a wide variety of conditions, making these mats important in terms of ecosystem processes and functions. Mass blooms of purple sulphur bacteria develop during summer on sediments in the intertidal zone especially on macroalgal deposits. The microbial composition of different types of mats differentially affected by the development of purple sulphur bacteria was examined, at low tide, using a set of biochemical markers (fatty acids, pigments) and composition was assessed against their influence on ecosystem functions (sediment cohesiveness, CO2 fixation). We demonstrated that proliferation of purple sulphur bacteria has a major impact on intertidal mats diversity and functions. Indeed, assemblages dominated by purple sulphur bacteria (Chromatiaceae) were efficient exopolymer producers and their biostabilisation potential was significant. In addition, the massive growth of purple sulphur bacteria resulted in a net CO2 degassing whereas diatom dominated biofilms represented a net CO2 sink. PMID:24340018

  4. Functional groups affect physical and biological properties of dextran-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guoming; Shen, Yu-I; Ho, Chia Chi; Kusuma, Sravanti; Gerecht, Sharon

    2010-06-01

    Modification of dextran backbone allows the development of a hydrogel with specific characteristics. To enhance their functionality for tissue-engineered scaffolds, a series of dextran-based macromers was synthesized by incorporating various functional groups, including allyl isocyanate (Dex-AI), ethylamine (Dex-AE), chloroacetic acid (Dex-AC), or maleic-anhydride (Dex-AM) into dextrans. The dextran-based biodegradable hybrid hydrogels are developed by integrating polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA). To explore the effect of different derivatives on hydrogel properties, three different ratios of Dex/PEGDA are examined: low (20/80), medium (40/60), and high (60/40). Differences in physical and biological properties of the hydrogels are found, including swelling, degradation rate, mechanics, crosslinking density, biocompatibility (in vitro and in vivo), and vascular endothelial growth factor release. The results also indicate that the incorporation of amine groups into dextran gives rise to hydrogels with better biocompatible and release properties. We, therefore, conclude that the incorporation of different functional groups affects the fundamental properties of a dextran-based hydrogel network, and that amine groups are preferred to generate hydrogels for biomedical use.

  5. Proliferation of purple sulphur bacteria at the sediment surface affects intertidal mat diversity and functionality.

    PubMed

    Hubas, Cédric; Jesus, Bruno; Ruivo, Mickael; Meziane, Tarik; Thiney, Najet; Davoult, Dominique; Spilmont, Nicolas; Paterson, David M; Jeanthon, Christian

    2013-01-01

    There is a relative absence of studies dealing with mats of purple sulphur bacteria in the intertidal zone. These bacteria display an array of metabolic pathways that allow them to disperse and develop under a wide variety of conditions, making these mats important in terms of ecosystem processes and functions. Mass blooms of purple sulphur bacteria develop during summer on sediments in the intertidal zone especially on macroalgal deposits. The microbial composition of different types of mats differentially affected by the development of purple sulphur bacteria was examined, at low tide, using a set of biochemical markers (fatty acids, pigments) and composition was assessed against their influence on ecosystem functions (sediment cohesiveness, CO2 fixation). We demonstrated that proliferation of purple sulphur bacteria has a major impact on intertidal mats diversity and functions. Indeed, assemblages dominated by purple sulphur bacteria (Chromatiaceae) were efficient exopolymer producers and their biostabilisation potential was significant. In addition, the massive growth of purple sulphur bacteria resulted in a net CO2 degassing whereas diatom dominated biofilms represented a net CO2 sink.

  6. Aesthetic and Functional Rehabilitation of the Primary Dentition Affected by Amelogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Marquezin, Maria Carolina Salomé; Zancopé, Bruna Raquel; Pacheco, Larissa Ferreira; Gavião, Maria Beatriz Duarte; Pascon, Fernanda Miori

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this case report was to describe the oral rehabilitation of a five-year-old boy patient diagnosed with amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) in the primary dentition. AI is a group of hereditary disorders that affects the enamel structure. The patient was brought to the dental clinic complaining of tooth hypersensitivity during meals. The medical history and clinical examination were used to arrive at the diagnosis of AI. The treatment was oral rehabilitation of the primary molars with stainless steel crowns and resin-filled celluloid forms. The main objectives of the selected treatment were to enhance the esthetics, restore masticatory function, and eliminate the teeth sensitivity. The child was monitored in the pediatric dentistry clinic at four-month intervals until the mixed dentition stage. Treatment not only restored function and esthetic, but also showed a positive psychological impact and thereby improved perceived quality of life. The preventive, psychological, and curative measures of a young child with AI were successful. This result can encourage the clinicians to seek a cost-effective technique such as stainless steel crowns, and resin-filled celluloid forms to reestablish the oral functions and improve the child's psychosocial development. PMID:25705526

  7. Cardiovascular fitness, cortical plasticity, and aging.

    PubMed

    Colcombe, Stanley J; Kramer, Arthur F; Erickson, Kirk I; Scalf, Paige; McAuley, Edward; Cohen, Neal J; Webb, Andrew; Jerome, Gerry J; Marquez, David X; Elavsky, Steriani

    2004-03-02

    Cardiovascular fitness is thought to offset declines in cognitive performance, but little is known about the cortical mechanisms that underlie these changes in humans. Research using animal models shows that aerobic training increases cortical capillary supplies, the number of synaptic connections, and the development of new neurons. The end result is a brain that is more efficient, plastic, and adaptive, which translates into better performance in aging animals. Here, in two separate experiments, we demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge, in humans that increases in cardiovascular fitness results in increased functioning of key aspects of the attentional network of the brain during a cognitively challenging task. Specifically, highly fit (Study 1) or aerobically trained (Study 2) persons show greater task-related activity in regions of the prefrontal and parietal cortices that are involved in spatial selection and inhibitory functioning, when compared with low-fit (Study 1) or nonaerobic control (Study 2) participants. Additionally, in both studies there exist groupwise differences in activation of the anterior cingulate cortex, which is thought to monitor for conflict in the attentional system, and signal the need for adaptation in the attentional network. These data suggest that increased cardiovascular fitness can affect improvements in the plasticity of the aging human brain, and may serve to reduce both biological and cognitive senescence in humans.

  8. Erectile dysfunction in the cardiovascular patient.

    PubMed

    Vlachopoulos, Charalambos; Jackson, Graham; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Montorsi, Piero

    2013-07-01

    Erectile dysfunction is common in the patient with cardiovascular disease. It is an important component of the quality of life and it also confers an independent risk for future cardiovascular events. The usual 3-year time period between the onset of erectile dysfunction symptoms and a cardiovascular event offers an opportunity for risk mitigation. Thus, sexual function should be incorporated into cardiovascular disease risk assessment for all men. A comprehensive approach to cardiovascular risk reduction (comprising of both lifestyle changes and pharmacological treatment) improves overall vascular health, including sexual function. Proper sexual counselling improves the quality of life and increases adherence to medication. This review explores the critical connection between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease and evaluates how this relationship may influence clinical practice. Algorithms for the management of patient with erectile dysfunction according to the risk for sexual activity and future cardiovascular events are proposed.

  9. Metacognitive Awareness of Facial Affect in Higher-Functioning Children and Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Heather A.; Newell, Lisa; Jaime, Mark; Mundy, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Higher-functioning participants with and without autism spectrum disorder (ASD) viewed a series of face stimuli, made decisions regarding the affect of each face, and indicated their confidence in each decision. Confidence significantly predicted accuracy across all participants, but this relation was stronger for participants with typical development than participants with ASD. In the hierarchical linear modeling analysis, there were no differences in face processing accuracy between participants with and without ASD, but participants with ASD were more confident in their decisions. These results suggest that individuals with ASD have metacognitive impairments and are overconfident in face processing. Additionally, greater metacognitive awareness was predictive of better face processing accuracy, suggesting that metacognition may be a pivotal skill to teach in interventions. PMID:26496991

  10. RNA INTERFERENCE AGAINST CFTR AFFECTS HL60-DERIVED NEUTROPHIL MICROBICIDAL FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Bonvillain, Ryan W.; Painter, Richard G.; Adams, Daniel E.; Viswanathan, Anand; Lanson, Nicholas A.; Wang, Guoshun

    2010-01-01

    Biosynthesis of hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a potent anti-microbial oxidant, in phagosomes is one of the chief mechanisms employed by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) to combat infections. This reaction, catalyzed by myeloperoxidase, requires chloride anion (Cl−) as a substrate. Thus, Cl− availability is a rate-limiting factor that affects neutrophil microbicidal function. Our previous research demonstrated that defective CFTR, a cAMP-activated chloride channel, present in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients leads to deficient chloride transport to neutrophil phagosomes and impaired bacterial killing (Painter et al., 2008 & 2010). To confirm this finding, here we used RNA interference against this chloride channel to abate CFTR expression in the neutrophil-like cells derived from HL60 cells, a promyelocytic leukemia cell line, with DMSO. The resultant CFTR deficiency in the phagocytes compromised their bactericidal capability, thereby recapitulating the phenotype seen in CF patient cells. The results provide further evidence suggesting that CFTR plays an important role in phagocytic host defense. PMID:20870018

  11. Stable complex formation between HIV Rev and the nucleosome assembly protein, NAP1, affects Rev function

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, Alan; Murley, Laura Lea; Gao Mian; Wong, Raymond; Clayton, Kiera; Brufatto, Nicole; Canadien, Veronica; Mamelak, Daniel; Chen, Tricia; Richards, Dawn; Zeghouf, Mahel; Greenblatt, Jack; Burks, Christian; Frappier, Lori

    2009-05-25

    The Rev protein of HIV-1 is essential for HIV-1 proliferation due to its role in exporting viral RNA from the nucleus. We used a modified version of tandem affinity purification (TAP) tagging to identify proteins interacting with HIV-1 Rev in human cells and discovered a prominent interaction between Rev and nucleosome assembly protein 1 (Nap1). This interaction was also observed by specific retention of Nap1 from human cell lysates on a Rev affinity column. Nap1 was found to bind Rev through the Rev arginine-rich domain and altered the oligomerization state of Rev in vitro. Overexpression of Nap1 stimulated the ability of Rev to export RNA, reduced the nucleolar localization of Rev, and affected Rev nuclear import rates. The results suggest that Nap-1 may influence Rev function by increasing the availability of Rev.

  12. Identification and Functional Characterization of GAA Mutations in Colombian Patients Affected by Pompe Disease.

    PubMed

    Niño, Mónica Yasmín; Mateus, Heidi Eliana; Fonseca, Dora Janeth; Kroos, Marian A; Ospina, Sandra Yaneth; Mejía, Juan Fernando; Uribe, Jesús Alfredo; Reuser, Arnold J J; Laissue, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease (PD) is a recessive metabolic disorder characterized by acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency, which results in lysosomal accumulation of glycogen in all tissues, especially in skeletal muscles. PD clinical course is mainly determined by the nature of the GAA mutations. Although ~400 distinct GAA sequence variations have been described, the genotype-phenotype correlation is not always evident.In this study, we describe the first clinical and genetic analysis of Colombian PD patients performed in 11 affected individuals. GAA open reading frame sequencing revealed eight distinct mutations related to PD etiology including two novel missense mutations, c.1106 T > C (p.Leu369Pro) and c.2236 T > C (p.Trp746Arg). In vitro functional studies showed that the structural changes conferred by both mutations did not inhibit the synthesis of the 110 kD GAA precursor form but affected the processing and intracellular transport of GAA. In addition, analysis of previously described variants located at this position (p.Trp746Gly, p.Trp746Cys, p.Trp746Ser, p.Trp746X) revealed new insights in the molecular basis of PD. Notably, we found that p.Trp746Cys mutation, which was previously described as a polymorphism as well as a causal mutation, displayed a mild deleterious effect. Interestingly and by chance, our study argues in favor of a remarkable Afro-American and European ancestry of the Colombian population. Taken together, our report provides valuable information on the PD genotype-phenotype correlation, which is expected to facilitate and improve genetic counseling of affected individuals and their families.

  13. Hypoxia transiently affects skeletal muscle hypertrophy in a functional overload model.

    PubMed

    Chaillou, Thomas; Koulmann, Nathalie; Simler, Nadine; Meunier, Adélie; Serrurier, Bernard; Chapot, Rachel; Peinnequin, Andre; Beaudry, Michèle; Bigard, Xavier

    2012-03-01

    Hypoxia induces a loss of skeletal muscle mass, but the signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that hypoxia could impair skeletal muscle hypertrophy induced by functional overload (Ov). To test this hypothesis, plantaris muscles were overloaded during 5, 12, and 56 days in female rats exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (5,500 m), and then, we examined the responses of specific signaling pathways involved in protein synthesis (Akt/mTOR) and breakdown (atrogenes). Hypoxia minimized the Ov-induced hypertrophy at days 5 and 12 but did not affect the hypertrophic response measured at day 56. Hypoxia early reduced the phosphorylation levels of mTOR and its downstream targets P70(S6K) and rpS6, but it did not affect the phosphorylation levels of Akt and 4E-BP1, in Ov muscles. The role played by specific inhibitors of mTOR, such as AMPK and hypoxia-induced factors (i.e., REDD1 and BNIP-3) was studied. REDD1 protein levels were reduced by overload and were not affected by hypoxia in Ov muscles, whereas AMPK was not activated by hypoxia. Although hypoxia significantly increased BNIP-3 mRNA levels at day 5, protein levels remained unaffected. The mRNA levels of the two atrogenes MURF1 and MAFbx were early increased by hypoxia in Ov muscles. In conclusion, hypoxia induced a transient alteration of muscle growth in this hypertrophic model, at least partly due to a specific impairment of the mTOR/P70(S6K) pathway, independently of Akt, by an undefined mechanism, and increased transcript levels for MURF1 and MAFbx that could contribute to stimulate the proteasomal proteolysis.

  14. Low-dose irradiation affects the functional behavior of oral microbiota in the context of mucositis.

    PubMed

    Vanhoecke, Barbara W A; De Ryck, Tine R G; De boel, Kevin; Wiles, Siouxsie; Boterberg, Tom; Van de Wiele, Tom; Swift, Simon

    2016-01-01

    The role of host-microbe interactions in the pathobiology of oral mucositis is still unclear; therefore, this study aimed to unravel the effect of irradiation on behavioral characteristics of oral microbial species in the context of mucositis. Using various experimental in vitro setups, the effects of irradiation on growth and biofilm formation of two Candida spp., Streptococcus salivarius and Klebsiella oxytoca in different culture conditions were evaluated. Irradiation did not affect growth of planktonic cells, but reduced the number of K. oxytoca cells in newly formed biofilms cultured in static conditions. Biofilm formation of K. oxytoca and Candida glabrata was affected by irradiation and depended on the culturing conditions. In the presence of mucins, these effects were lost, indicating the protective nature of mucins. Furthermore, the Galleria melonella model was used to study effects on microbial virulence. Irradiated K. oxytoca microbes were more virulent in G. melonella larvae compared to the nonirradiated ones. Our data indicate that low-dose irradiation can have an impact on functional characteristics of microbial species. Screening for pathogens like K. oxytoca in the context of mucosits could be useful to allow early detection and immediate intervention.

  15. Balance between macronutrients affects life span and functional senescence in fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, Oleh V; Gospodaryov, Dmytro V; Rovenko, Bohdana M; Glovyak, Andriy D; Yurkevych, Ihor S; Klyuba, Vira P; Shcherbij, Maria V; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2012-02-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that as the ratio of protein to carbohydrate (P:C) in the diet declines, life span increases in Drosophila. Here we explored how extremely low dietary ratios of protein to carbohydrate affected longevity and a selection of variables associated with functional senescence. An increase in P:C ratio from 1:57 to 1:20 shortened life span by increasing age-dependent mortality; whereas a further decline in P:C from 1:57 to 1:95 caused a modest decrease in life span. Female flies consuming the 1:20 and 1:38 diets laid more eggs than those consuming the lower P:C diets. Flies fed diets with higher ratios were more resistant to heat stress. Flies consuming the diets with lowest P:C ratios needed more time to restore activity after paralysis. Our study has therefore extended to very low P:C ratios available data demonstrating that dietary P:C ratio affects life span, fecundity and heat stress resistance, with fecundity and heat stress responses showing the opposite trend to life span.

  16. Oral health conditions affect functional and social activities of terminally-ill cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, D.J.; Epstein, J.B.; Yao, Y.; Wilkie, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Oral conditions are established complications in terminally-ill cancer patients. Yet despite significant morbidity, the characteristics and impact of oral conditions in these patients are poorly documented. The study objective was to characterize oral conditions in terminally-ill cancer patients to determine the presence, severity, and the functional and social impact of these oral conditions. Methods This was an observational clinical study including terminally-ill cancer patients (2.5–3 week life expectancy). Data were obtained via the Oral Problems Scale (OPS) that measures the presence of subjective xerostomia, orofacial pain, taste change, and the functional/social impact of oral conditions and a demographic questionnaire. A standardized oral examination was used to assess objective salivary hypofunction, fungal infection, mucosal erythema, and ulceration. Regression analysis and t test investigated the associations between measures. Results Of 104 participants, most were ≥50 years of age, female, and high-school educated; 45% were African American, 43% Caucasian, and 37% married. Oral conditions frequencies were: salivary hypofunction (98%), mucosal erythema (50%), ulceration (20%), fungal infection (36%), and other oral problems (46%). Xerostomia, taste change, and orofacial pain all had significant functional impact; p<.001, p=.042 and p<.001, respectively. Orofacial pain also had a significant social impact (p<.001). Patients with oral ulcerations had significantly more orofacial pain with a social impact than patients without ulcers (p=.003). Erythema was significantly associated with fungal infection and with mucosal ulceration (p<.001). Conclusions Oral conditions significantly affect functional and social activities in terminally-ill cancer patients. Identification and management of oral conditions in these patients should therefore be an important clinical consideration. PMID:24232310

  17. Macrofauna assemblage composition and soil moisture interact to affect soil ecosystem functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collison, E. J.; Riutta, T.; Slade, E. M.

    2013-02-01

    Changing climatic conditions and habitat fragmentation are predicted to alter the soil moisture conditions of temperate forests. It is not well understood how the soil macrofauna community will respond to changes in soil moisture, and how changes to species diversity and community composition may affect ecosystem functions, such as litter decomposition and soil fluxes. Moreover, few studies have considered the interactions between the abiotic and biotic factors that regulate soil processes. Here we attempt to disentangle the interactive effects of two of the main factors that regulate soil processes at small scales - moisture and macrofauna assemblage composition. The response of assemblages of three common temperate soil invertebrates (Glomeris marginata Villers, Porcellio scaber Latreille and Philoscia muscorum Scopoli) to two contrasting soil moisture levels was examined in a series of laboratory mesocosm experiments. The contribution of the invertebrates to the leaf litter mass loss of two common temperate tree species of contrasting litter quality (easily decomposing Fraxinus excelsior L. and recalcitrant Quercus robur L.) and to soil CO2 fluxes were measured. Both moisture conditions and litter type influenced the functioning of the invertebrate assemblages, which was greater in high moisture conditions compared with low moisture conditions and on good quality vs. recalcitrant litter. In high moisture conditions, all macrofauna assemblages functioned at equal rates, whereas in low moisture conditions there were pronounced differences in litter mass loss among the assemblages. This indicates that species identity and assemblage composition are more important when moisture is limited. We suggest that complementarity between macrofauna species may mitigate the reduced functioning of some species, highlighting the importance of maintaining macrofauna species richness.

  18. Disruption of the melanin-concentrating hormone receptor 1 (MCH1R) affects thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Chung, Shinjae; Liao, Xiao-Hui; Di Cosmo, Caterina; Van Sande, Jacqueline; Wang, Zhiwei; Refetoff, Samuel; Civelli, Olivier

    2012-12-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a peptide produced in the hypothalamus and the zona incerta that acts on one receptor, MCH receptor 1 (MCH1R), in rodents. The MCH system has been implicated in the regulation of several centrally directed physiological responses, including the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis. Yet a possible direct effect of the MCH system on thyroid function has not been explored in detail. We now show that MCH1R mRNA is expressed in thyroid follicular cells and that mice lacking MCH1R [MCH1R-knockout (KO)] exhibit reduced circulating iodothyronine (T(4), free T(4), T(3), and rT(3)) levels and high TRH and TSH when compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Because the TSH of MCH1R-KO mice displays a normal bioactivity, we hypothesize that their hypothyroidism may be caused by defective thyroid function. Yet expression levels of the genes important for thyroid hormones synthesis or secretion are not different between the MCH1R-KO and WT mice. However, the average thyroid follicle size of the MCH1R-KO mice is larger than that of WT mice and contained more free and total T(4) and T(3) than the WT glands, suggesting that they are sequestered in the glands. Indeed, when challenged with TSH, the thyroids of MCH1R-KO mice secrete lower amounts of T(4). Similarly, secretion of iodothyronines in the plasma upon (125)I administration is significantly reduced in MCH1R-KO mice. Therefore, the absence of MCH1R affects thyroid function by disrupting thyroid hormone secretion. To our knowledge, this study is the first to link the activity of the MCH system to the thyroid function.

  19. GLUT10 is required for the development of the cardiovascular system and the notochord and connects mitochondrial function to TGFβ signaling.

    PubMed

    Willaert, Andy; Khatri, Sandeep; Callewaert, Bert L; Coucke, Paul J; Crosby, Seth D; Lee, Joseph G H; Davis, Elaine C; Shiva, Sruti; Tsang, Michael; De Paepe, Anne; Urban, Zsolt

    2012-03-15

    Growth factor signal