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Sample records for affect cell shape

  1. Arabidopsis FH1 Formin Affects Cotyledon Pavement Cell Shape by Modulating Cytoskeleton Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rosero, Amparo; Oulehlová, Denisa; Stillerová, Lenka; Schiebertová, Petra; Grunt, Michal; Žárský, Viktor; Cvrčková, Fatima

    2016-03-01

    Plant cell morphogenesis involves concerted rearrangements of microtubules and actin microfilaments. We previously reported that FH1, the main Arabidopsis thaliana housekeeping Class I membrane-anchored formin, contributes to actin dynamics and microtubule stability in rhizodermis cells. Here we examine the effects of mutations affecting FH1 (At3g25500) on cell morphogenesis and above-ground organ development in seedlings, as well as on cytoskeletal organization and dynamics, using a combination of confocal and variable angle epifluorescence microscopy with a pharmacological approach. Homozygous fh1 mutants exhibited cotyledon epinasty and had larger cotyledon pavement cells with more pronounced lobes than the wild type. The pavement cell shape alterations were enhanced by expression of the fluorescent microtubule marker GFP-microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4). Mutant cotyledon pavement cells exhibited reduced density and increased stability of microfilament bundles, as well as enhanced dynamics of microtubules. Analogous results were also obtained upon treatments with the formin inhibitor SMIFH2 (small molecule inhibitor of formin homology 2 domains). Pavement cell shape in wild-type (wt) and fh1 plants in some situations exhibited a differential response towards anti-cytoskeletal drugs, especially the microtubule disruptor oryzalin. Our observations indicate that FH1 participates in the control of microtubule dynamics, possibly via its effects on actin, subsequently influencing cell morphogenesis and macroscopic organ development. PMID:26738547

  2. Mutations at the Smo Genetic Locus Affect the Shape of Diverse Cell Types in the Rice Blast Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Hamer, J. E.; Valent, B.; Chumley, F. G.

    1989-01-01

    Teflon film surfaces are highly conducive to the formation of infection structures (appressoria) in the plant pathogenic fungus, Magnaporthe grisea. We have utilized Teflon films to screen and select for mutants of M. grisea that are defective in appressorium formation. This approach and several others yielded a group of 14 mutants with a similar phenotype. All the mutant strains make abnormally shaped conidia and appressoria. When two mutant strains are crossed, abnormally shaped asci are formed. Ascus shape is normal when a mutant strain is crossed with a wild-type strain. Despite dramatic alterations in cell shape these strains otherwise grow, form conidia, undergo meiosis, and infect plants normally. This mutant phenotype, which we have termed Smo(-), for abnormal spore morphology, segregates in simple Mendelian fashion in crosses with wild-type strains. Some ascospore lethality is associated with smo mutations. In genetic crosses between mutants, smo mutations fail to recombine and do not demonstrate complementation of the abnormal ascus shape phenotype. We conclude that the smo mutations are alleles of a single genetic locus and are recessive with regard to the the ascus shape defect. Mutations at the SMO locus also permit germinating M. grisea conidia to differentiate appressoria on surfaces that are not normally conducive to infection structure formation. A number of spontaneous smo mutations have been recovered. The frequent occurrence of this mutation suggests that the SMO locus may be highly mutable. PMID:17246498

  3. The Min system as a general cell geometry detection mechanism: branch lengths in Y-shaped Escherichia coli cells affect Min oscillation patterns and division dynamics.

    PubMed

    Varma, Archana; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Young, Kevin D

    2008-03-01

    In Escherichia coli, division site placement is regulated by the dynamic behavior of the MinCDE proteins, which oscillate from pole to pole and confine septation to the centers of normal rod-shaped cells. Some current mathematical models explain these oscillations by considering interactions among the Min proteins without recourse to additional localization signals. So far, such models have been applied only to regularly shaped bacteria, but here we test these models further by employing aberrantly shaped E. coli cells as miniature reactors. The locations of MinCDE proteins fused to derivatives of green fluorescent protein were monitored in branched cells with at least three conspicuous poles. MinCDE most often moved from one branch to another in an invariant order, following a nonreversing clockwise or counterclockwise direction over the time periods observed. In cells with two short branches or nubs, the proteins oscillated symmetrically from one end to the other. The locations of FtsZ rings were consistent with a broad MinC-free zone near the branch junctions, and Min rings exhibited the surprising behavior of moving quickly from one possible position to another. Using a reaction-diffusion model that reproduces the observed MinCD oscillations in rod-shaped and round E. coli, we predict that the oscillation patterns in branched cells are a natural response of Min behavior in cellular geometries having different relative branch lengths. The results provide further evidence that Min protein oscillations act as a general cell geometry detection mechanism that can locate poles even in branched cells. PMID:18178745

  4. Collagen Substrate Stiffness Anisotropy Affects Cellular Elongation, Nuclear Shape, and Stem Cell Fate toward Anisotropic Tissue Lineage.

    PubMed

    Islam, Anowarul; Younesi, Mousa; Mbimba, Thomas; Akkus, Ozan

    2016-09-01

    Rigidity of substrates plays an important role in stem cell fate. Studies are commonly carried out on isotropically stiff substrate or substrates with unidirectional stiffness gradients. However, many native tissues are anisotropically stiff and it is unknown whether controlled presentation of stiff and compliant material axes on the same substrate governs cytoskeletal and nuclear morphology, as well as stem cell differentiation. In this study, electrocompacted collagen sheets are stretched to varying degrees to tune the stiffness anisotropy (SA) in the range of 1 to 8, resulting in stiff and compliant material axes orthogonal to each other. The cytoskeletal aspect ratio increased with increasing SA by about fourfold. Such elongation was absent on cellulose acetate replicas of aligned collagen surfaces indicating that the elongation was not driven by surface topography. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) seeded on varying anisotropy sheets displayed a dose-dependent upregulation of tendon-related markers such as Mohawk and Scleraxis. After 21 d of culture, highly anisotropic sheets induced greater levels of production of type-I, type-III collagen, and thrombospondin-4. Therefore, SA has direct effects on MSC differentiation. These findings may also have ramifications of stem cell fate on other anisotropically stiff tissues, such as skeletal/cardiac muscles, ligaments, and bone. PMID:27377355

  5. The Shape of Motile Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mogilner, Alex; Keren, Kinneret

    2010-01-01

    Motile cells — fan-like keratocytes, hand-shaped nerve growth cones, polygonal fibroblasts, to name but a few — come in different shapes and sizes. We discuss the origins of this diversity as well as what shape tells us about the physics and biochemistry underlying cell movement. We start with geometric rules describing cell-edge kinetics that govern cell shape, followed by a discussion of the underlying biophysics; we consider actin treadmilling, actin–myosin contraction, cell-membrane deformations, adhesion, and the complex interactions between these modules, as well as their regulation by microtubules and Rho GTPases. Focusing on several different cell types, including keratocytes and fibroblasts, we discuss how dynamic cell morphology emerges from the interplay between the different motility modules and the environment. PMID:19906578

  6. Lateral organization of membranes and cell shapes.

    PubMed Central

    Markin, V S

    1981-01-01

    The relations among membrane structure, mechanical properties, and cell shape have been investigated. The fluid mosaic membrane models used contains several components that move freely in the membrane plane. These components interact with each other and determine properties of the membrane such as curvature and elasticity. A free energy equation is postulated for such a multicomponent membrane and the condition of free energy minimum is used to obtain differential equations relating the distribution of membrane components and the local membrane curvature. The force that moves membrane components along the membrane in a variable curvature field is calculated. A change in the intramembrane interactions can bring about phase separation or particle clustering. This, in turn, may strongly affect the local curvature. The numerical solution of the set of equations for the two dimensional case allows determination of the cell shape and the component distribution along the membrane. The model has been applied to describe certain erythrocytes shape transformations. PMID:7284547

  7. The Shape Bias Is Affected by Differing Similarity among Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tek, Saime; Jaffery, Gul; Swensen, Lauren; Fein, Deborah; Naigles, Letitia R.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that visual properties of objects can affect shape-based categorization in a novel-name extension task; however, we still do not know how a relationship between visual properties of objects affects judgments in a novel-name extension task. We examined effects of increased visual similarity among the target and…

  8. Emergent Properties of Patch Shapes Affect Edge Permeability to Animals

    PubMed Central

    Nams, Vilis O.

    2011-01-01

    Animal travel between habitat patches affects populations, communities and ecosystems. There are three levels of organization of edge properties, and each of these can affect animals. At the lowest level are the different habitats on each side of an edge, then there is the edge itself, and finally, at the highest level of organization, is the geometry or structure of the edge. This study used computer simulations to (1) find out whether effects of edge shapes on animal behavior can arise as emergent properties solely due to reactions to edges in general, without the animals reacting to the shapes of the edges, and to (2) generate predictions to allow field and experimental studies to test mechanisms of edge shape response. Individual animals were modeled traveling inside a habitat patch that had different kinds of edge shapes (convex, concave and straight). When animals responded edges of patches, this created an emergent property of responding to the shape of the edge. The response was mostly to absolute width of the shapes, and not the narrowness of them. When animals were attracted to edges, then they tended to collect in convexities and disperse from concavities, and the opposite happened when animals avoided edges. Most of the responses occurred within a distance of 40% of the perceptual range from the tip of the shapes. Predictions were produced for directionality at various locations and combinations of treatments, to be used for testing edge behavior mechanisms. These results suggest that edge shapes tend to either concentrate or disperse animals, simply because the animals are either attracted to or avoid edges, with an effect as great as 3 times the normal density. Thus edge shape could affect processes like pollination, seed predation and dispersal and predator abundance. PMID:21747965

  9. Shape dynamics of growing cell walls.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Scherer, Norbert F; Dinner, Aaron R

    2016-04-14

    We introduce a general theoretical framework to study the shape dynamics of actively growing and remodeling surfaces. Using this framework we develop a physical model for growing bacterial cell walls and study the interplay of cell shape with the dynamics of growth and constriction. The model allows us to derive constraints on cell wall mechanical energy based on the observed dynamics of cell shape. We predict that exponential growth in cell size requires a constant amount of cell wall energy to be dissipated per unit volume. We use the model to understand and contrast growth in bacteria with different shapes such as spherical, ellipsoidal, cylindrical and toroidal morphologies. Coupling growth to cell wall constriction, we predict a discontinuous shape transformation, from partial constriction to cell division, as a function of the chemical potential driving cell wall synthesis. Our model for cell wall energy and shape dynamics relates growth kinetics with cell geometry, and provides a unified framework to describe the interplay between shape, growth and division in bacterial cells. PMID:26953519

  10. Plant cell shape: modulators and measurements

    PubMed Central

    Ivakov, Alexander; Persson, Staffan

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell shape, seen as an integrative output, is of considerable interest in various fields, such as cell wall research, cytoskeleton dynamics and biomechanics. In this review we summarize the current state of knowledge on cell shape formation in plants focusing on shape of simple cylindrical cells, as well as in complex multipolar cells such as leaf pavement cells and trichomes. We summarize established concepts as well as recent additions to the understanding of how cells construct cell walls of a given shape and the underlying processes. These processes include cell wall synthesis, activity of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons, in particular their regulation by microtubule associated proteins, actin-related proteins, GTP'ases and their effectors, as well as the recently-elucidated roles of plant hormone signaling and vesicular membrane trafficking. We discuss some of the challenges in cell shape research with a particular emphasis on quantitative imaging and statistical analysis of shape in 2D and 3D, as well as novel developments in this area. Finally, we review recent examples of the use of novel imaging techniques and how they have contributed to our understanding of cell shape formation. PMID:24312104

  11. Focal Length Affects Depicted Shape and Perception of Facial Images

    PubMed Central

    Třebický, Vít; Fialová, Jitka; Kleisner, Karel; Havlíček, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Static photographs are currently the most often employed stimuli in research on social perception. The method of photograph acquisition might affect the depicted subject’s facial appearance and thus also the impression of such stimuli. An important factor influencing the resulting photograph is focal length, as different focal lengths produce various levels of image distortion. Here we tested whether different focal lengths (50, 85, 105 mm) affect depicted shape and perception of female and male faces. We collected three portrait photographs of 45 (22 females, 23 males) participants under standardized conditions and camera setting varying only in the focal length. Subsequently, the three photographs from each individual were shown on screen in a randomized order using a 3-alternative forced-choice paradigm. The images were judged for attractiveness, dominance, and femininity/masculinity by 369 raters (193 females, 176 males). Facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR) was measured from each photograph and overall facial shape was analysed employing geometric morphometric methods (GMM). Our results showed that photographs taken with 50 mm focal length were rated as significantly less feminine/masculine, attractive, and dominant compared to the images taken with longer focal lengths. Further, shorter focal lengths produced faces with smaller fWHR. Subsequent GMM revealed focal length significantly affected overall facial shape of the photographed subjects. Thus methodology of photograph acquisition, focal length in this case, can significantly affect results of studies using photographic stimuli perhaps due to different levels of perspective distortion that influence shapes and proportions of morphological traits. PMID:26894832

  12. Focal Length Affects Depicted Shape and Perception of Facial Images.

    PubMed

    Třebický, Vít; Fialová, Jitka; Kleisner, Karel; Havlíček, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Static photographs are currently the most often employed stimuli in research on social perception. The method of photograph acquisition might affect the depicted subject's facial appearance and thus also the impression of such stimuli. An important factor influencing the resulting photograph is focal length, as different focal lengths produce various levels of image distortion. Here we tested whether different focal lengths (50, 85, 105 mm) affect depicted shape and perception of female and male faces. We collected three portrait photographs of 45 (22 females, 23 males) participants under standardized conditions and camera setting varying only in the focal length. Subsequently, the three photographs from each individual were shown on screen in a randomized order using a 3-alternative forced-choice paradigm. The images were judged for attractiveness, dominance, and femininity/masculinity by 369 raters (193 females, 176 males). Facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR) was measured from each photograph and overall facial shape was analysed employing geometric morphometric methods (GMM). Our results showed that photographs taken with 50 mm focal length were rated as significantly less feminine/masculine, attractive, and dominant compared to the images taken with longer focal lengths. Further, shorter focal lengths produced faces with smaller fWHR. Subsequent GMM revealed focal length significantly affected overall facial shape of the photographed subjects. Thus methodology of photograph acquisition, focal length in this case, can significantly affect results of studies using photographic stimuli perhaps due to different levels of perspective distortion that influence shapes and proportions of morphological traits. PMID:26894832

  13. Mechanism of shape determination in motile cells

    PubMed Central

    Keren, Kinneret; Pincus, Zachary; Allen, Greg M.; Barnhart, Erin L.; Marriott, Gerard; Mogilner, Alex; Theriot, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    The shape of motile cells is determined by many dynamic processes spanning several orders of magnitude in space and time, from local polymerization of actin monomers at subsecond timescales to global, cell-scale geometry that may persist for hours. Understanding the mechanism of shape determination in cells has proved to be extremely challenging due to the numerous components involved and the complexity of their interactions. Here we harness the natural phenotypic variability in a large population of motile epithelial keratocytes from fish (Hypsophrys nicaraguensis) to reveal mechanisms of shape determination. We find that the cells inhabit a low-dimensional, highly correlated spectrum of possible functional states. We further show that a model of actin network treadmilling in an inextensible membrane bag can quantitatively recapitulate this spectrum and predict both cell shape and speed. Our model provides a simple biochemical and biophysical basis for the observed morphology and behaviour of motile cells. PMID:18497816

  14. Simulated lidar waveforms for understanding factors affecting waveform shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Angela M.; Olsen, Richard C.

    2011-06-01

    Full-waveform LIDAR is a technology which enables the analysis of the 3-D structure and arrangement of objects. An in-depth understanding of the factors that affect the shape of the full-waveform signal is required in order to extract as much information as possible from the signal. A simple model of LIDAR propagation has been created which simulates the interaction of LIDAR energy with objects in a scene. A 2-dimensional model tree allows controlled manipulation of the geometric arrangement of branches and leaves with varying spectral properties. Results suggest complex interactions of the LIDAR energy with the tree canopy, including the occurrence of multiple bounces for energy reaching the ground under the canopy. Idealized sensor instrument response functions incorporated in the simulation illustrate a large impact on waveform shape. A waveform recording laser rangefinder has been built which will allow validation or model results; preliminary collection results are presented here.

  15. Modeling the Shapes of Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garimella, Umadevi I.; Robertson, Belinda M.

    2015-01-01

    A solid understanding of the structure and function of cells can help establish the foundation for learning advanced concepts in the biological sciences. The concept of the cell is introduced in middle school life science courses and is continued at the undergraduate level in college (NRC 2012; Reece et al. 2014). Cells are introduced to students…

  16. Membrane tension feedback on shape and motility of eukaryotic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Benjamin; Aranson, Igor S.; Ziebert, Falko

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of a phase field model of a single cell crawling on a substrate, we investigate how the properties of the cell membrane affect the shape and motility of the cell. Since the membrane influences the cell dynamics on multiple levels and provides a nontrivial feedback, we consider the following fundamental interactions: (i) the reduction of the actin polymerization rate by membrane tension; (ii) area conservation of the cell's two-dimensional cross-section vs. conservation of the circumference (i.e. membrane inextensibility); and (iii) the contribution from the membrane's bending energy to the shape and integrity of the cell. As in experiments, we investigate two pertinent observables - the cell's velocity and its aspect ratio. We find that the most important effect is the feedback of membrane tension on the actin polymerization. Bending rigidity has only minor effects, visible mostly in dynamic reshaping events, as exemplified by collisions of the cell with an obstacle.

  17. Orchestrating immune responses: How size, shape and rigidity affect the immunogenicity of particulate vaccines.

    PubMed

    Benne, Naomi; van Duijn, Janine; Kuiper, Johan; Jiskoot, Wim; Slütter, Bram

    2016-07-28

    Particulate carrier systems are promising drug delivery vehicles for subunit vaccination as they can enhance and direct the type of T cell response. In order to develop vaccines with optimal immunogenicity, a thorough understanding of parameters that could affect the strength and quality of immune responses is required. Pathogens have different dimensions and stimulate the immune system in a specific way. It is therefore not surprising that physicochemical characteristics of particulate vaccines, such as particle size, shape, and rigidity, affect multiple processes that impact their immunogenicity. Among these processes are the uptake of the particles from the site of administration, passage through lymphoid tissue and the uptake, antigen processing and activation of antigen-presenting cells. Herein, we systematically review the role of the size, shape and rigidity of particulate vaccines in enhancing and skewing T cell response and attempted to provide a "roadmap" for rational vaccine design. PMID:27221070

  18. How cell death shapes cancer

    PubMed Central

    Labi, V; Erlacher, M

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis has been established as a mechanism of anti-cancer defense. Members of the BCL-2 family are critical mediators of apoptotic cell death in health and disease, often found to be deregulated in cancer and believed to lead to the survival of malignant clones. However, over the years, a number of studies pointed out that a model in which cell death resistance unambiguously acts as a barrier against malignant disease might be too simple. This is based on paradoxical observations made in tumor patients as well as mouse models indicating that apoptosis can indeed drive tumor formation, at least under certain circumstances. One possible explanation for this phenomenon is that apoptosis can promote proliferation critically needed to compensate for cell loss, for example, upon therapy, and to restore tissue homeostasis. However, this, at the same time, can promote tumor development by allowing expansion of selected clones. Usually, tissue resident stem/progenitor cells are a major source for repopulation, some of them potentially carrying (age-, injury- or therapy-induced) genetic aberrations deleterious for the host. Thereby, apoptosis might drive genomic instability by facilitating the emergence of pathologic clones during phases of proliferation and subsequent replication stress-associated DNA damage. Tumorigenesis initiated by repeated cell attrition and repopulation, as confirmed in different genetic models, has parallels in human cancers, exemplified in therapy-induced secondary malignancies and myelodysplastic syndromes in patients with congenital bone marrow failure syndromes. Here, we aim to review evidence in support of the oncogenic role of stress-induced apoptosis. PMID:25741600

  19. Physics of cell elasticity, shape and adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safran, S. A.; Gov, N.; Nicolas, A.; Schwarz, U. S.; Tlusty, T.

    2005-07-01

    We review recent theoretical work that analyzes experimental measurements of the shape, fluctuations and adhesion properties of biological cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of the cytoskeleton and cell elasticity and we contrast the shape and adhesion of elastic cells with fluid-filled vesicles. In red blood cells (RBC), the cytoskeleton consists of a two-dimensional network of spectrin proteins. Our analysis of the wavevector and frequency dependence of the fluctuation spectrum of RBC indicates that the spectrin network acts as a confining potential that reduces the fluctuations of the lipid bilayer membrane. However, since the cytoskeleton is only sparsely connected to the bilayer, one cannot regard the composite cytoskeleton-membrane as a polymerized object with a shear modulus. The sensitivity of RBC fluctuations and shapes to ATP concentration may reflect topological defects induced in the cytoskeleton network by ATP. The shapes of cells that adhere to a substrate are strongly determined by the cytoskeletal elasticity that can be varied experimentally by drugs that depolymerize the cytoskeleton. This leads to a tension-driven retraction of the cell body and a pearling instability of the resulting ray-like protrusions. Recent experiments have shown that adhering cells exert polarized forces on substrates. The interactions of such “force dipoles” in either bulk gels or on surfaces can be used to predict the nature of self-assembly of cell aggregates and may be important in the formation of artificial tissues. Finally, we note that cell adhesion strongly depends on the forces exerted on the adhesion sites by the tension of the cytoskeleton. The size and shape of the adhesion regions are strongly modified as the tension is varied and we present an elastic model that relates this tension to deformations that induce the recruitment of new molecules to the adhesion region. In all these examples, cell shape and adhesion differ from vesicle shape and

  20. Cell shape regulation through mechanosensory feedback control

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Krithika; Luo, Tianzhi; Robinson, Douglas N.; Iglesias, Pablo A.

    2015-01-01

    Cells undergo controlled changes in morphology in response to intracellular and extracellular signals. These changes require a means for sensing and interpreting the signalling cues, for generating the forces that act on the cell's physical material, and a control system to regulate this process. Experiments on Dictyostelium amoebae have shown that force-generating proteins can localize in response to external mechanical perturbations. This mechanosensing, and the ensuing mechanical feedback, plays an important role in minimizing the effect of mechanical disturbances in the course of changes in cell shape, especially during cell division, and likely in other contexts, such as during three-dimensional migration. Owing to the complexity of the feedback system, which couples mechanical and biochemical signals involved in shape regulation, theoretical approaches can guide further investigation by providing insights that are difficult to decipher experimentally. Here, we present a computational model that explains the different mechanosensory and mechanoresponsive behaviours observed in Dictyostelium cells. The model features a multiscale description of myosin II bipolar thick filament assembly that includes cooperative and force-dependent myosin–actin binding, and identifies the feedback mechanisms hidden in the observed mechanoresponsive behaviours of Dictyostelium cells during micropipette aspiration experiments. These feedbacks provide a mechanistic explanation of cellular retraction and hence cell shape regulation. PMID:26224568

  1. Cell shape regulation through mechanosensory feedback control.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Krithika; Luo, Tianzhi; Robinson, Douglas N; Iglesias, Pablo A

    2015-08-01

    Cells undergo controlled changes in morphology in response to intracellular and extracellular signals. These changes require a means for sensing and interpreting the signalling cues, for generating the forces that act on the cell's physical material, and a control system to regulate this process. Experiments on Dictyostelium amoebae have shown that force-generating proteins can localize in response to external mechanical perturbations. This mechanosensing, and the ensuing mechanical feedback, plays an important role in minimizing the effect of mechanical disturbances in the course of changes in cell shape, especially during cell division, and likely in other contexts, such as during three-dimensional migration. Owing to the complexity of the feedback system, which couples mechanical and biochemical signals involved in shape regulation, theoretical approaches can guide further investigation by providing insights that are difficult to decipher experimentally. Here, we present a computational model that explains the different mechanosensory and mechanoresponsive behaviours observed in Dictyostelium cells. The model features a multiscale description of myosin II bipolar thick filament assembly that includes cooperative and force-dependent myosin-actin binding, and identifies the feedback mechanisms hidden in the observed mechanoresponsive behaviours of Dictyostelium cells during micropipette aspiration experiments. These feedbacks provide a mechanistic explanation of cellular retraction and hence cell shape regulation. PMID:26224568

  2. Moving Cell Boundaries Drive Nuclear Shaping during Cell Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yuan; Lovett, David; Zhang, Qiao; Neelam, Srujana; Kuchibhotla, Ram Anirudh; Zhu, Ruijun; Gundersen, Gregg G.; Lele, Tanmay P.; Dickinson, Richard B.

    2015-01-01

    The nucleus has a smooth, regular appearance in normal cells, and its shape is greatly altered in human pathologies. Yet, how the cell establishes nuclear shape is not well understood. We imaged the dynamics of nuclear shaping in NIH3T3 fibroblasts. Nuclei translated toward the substratum and began flattening during the early stages of cell spreading. Initially, nuclear height and width correlated with the degree of cell spreading, but over time, reached steady-state values even as the cell continued to spread. Actomyosin activity, actomyosin bundles, microtubules, and intermediate filaments, as well as the LINC complex, were all dispensable for nuclear flattening as long as the cell could spread. Inhibition of actin polymerization as well as myosin light chain kinase with the drug ML7 limited both the initial spreading of cells and flattening of nuclei, and for well-spread cells, inhibition of myosin-II ATPase with the drug blebbistatin decreased cell spreading with associated nuclear rounding. Together, these results show that cell spreading is necessary and sufficient to drive nuclear flattening under a wide range of conditions, including in the presence or absence of myosin activity. To explain this observation, we propose a computational model for nuclear and cell mechanics that shows how frictional transmission of stress from the moving cell boundaries to the nuclear surface shapes the nucleus during early cell spreading. Our results point to a surprisingly simple mechanical system in cells for establishing nuclear shapes. PMID:26287620

  3. Atomic Force Microscopy Based Cell Shape Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adia-Nimuwa, Usienemfon; Mujdat Tiryaki, Volkan; Hartz, Steven; Xie, Kan; Ayres, Virginia

    2013-03-01

    Stellation is a measure of cell physiology and pathology for several cell groups including neural, liver and pancreatic cells. In the present work, we compare the results of a conventional two-dimensional shape index study of both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescent microscopy images with the results obtained using a new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index similar to sphericity index. The stellation of astrocytes is investigated on nanofibrillar scaffolds composed of electrospun polyamide nanofibers that has demonstrated promise for central nervous system (CNS) repair. Recent work by our group has given us the ability to clearly segment the cells from nanofibrillar scaffolds in AFM images. The clear-featured AFM images indicated that the astrocyte processes were longer than previously identified at 24h. It was furthermore shown that cell spreading could vary significantly as a function of environmental parameters, and that AFM images could record these variations. The new three-dimensional AFM-based shape index incorporates the new information: longer stellate processes and cell spreading. The support of NSF PHY-095776 is acknowledged.

  4. Mucosal dendritic cells shape mucosal immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sun-Young; Ko, Hyun-Jeong; Kweon, Mi-Na

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key modulators that shape the immune system. In mucosal tissues, DCs act as surveillance systems to sense infection and also function as professional antigen-presenting cells that stimulate the differentiation of naive T and B cells. On the basis of their molecular expression, DCs can be divided into several subsets with unique functions. In this review, we focus on intestinal DC subsets and their function in bridging the innate signaling and adaptive immune systems to maintain the homeostasis of the intestinal immune environment. We also review the current strategies for manipulating mucosal DCs for the development of efficient mucosal vaccines to protect against infectious diseases. PMID:24626170

  5. Shape recognition of microbial cells by colloidal cell imprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Paunov, Vesselin N.

    2013-08-01

    We have engineered a class of colloids which can recognize the shape and size of targeted microbial cells and selectively bind to their surfaces. These imprinted colloid particles, which we called ``colloid antibodies'', were fabricated by partial fragmentation of silica shells obtained by templating the targeted microbial cells. We successfully demonstrated the shape and size recognition between such colloidal imprints and matching microbial cells. High percentage of binding events of colloidal imprints with the size matching target particles was achieved. We demonstrated selective binding of colloidal imprints to target microbial cells in a binary mixture of cells of different shapes and sizes, which also resulted in high binding selectivity. We explored the role of the electrostatic interactions between the target cells and their colloid imprints by pre-coating both of them with polyelectrolytes. Selective binding occurred predominantly in the case of opposite surface charges of the colloid cell imprint and the targeted cells. The mechanism of the recognition is based on the amplification of the surface adhesion in the case of shape and size match due to the increased contact area between the target cell and the colloidal imprint. We also tested the selective binding for colloid imprints of particles of fixed shape and varying sizes. The concept of cell recognition by colloid imprints could be used for development of colloid antibodies for shape-selective binding of microbes. Such colloid antibodies could be additionally functionalized with surface groups to enhance their binding efficiency to cells of specific shape and deliver a drug payload directly to their surface or allow them to be manipulated using external fields. They could benefit the pharmaceutical industry in developing selective antimicrobial therapies and formulations.

  6. Factors Affecting the Shape of Current-Potential Curves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maloy, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    Voltammetry, the fundamental electrochemical experiment, is the measurement of the current which flows at an electrode as a function of the potential applied to the electrode. Such an experiment is discussed, focusing on factors which influence the shape of the current potential curve. (JN)

  7. The Effect of Shape Memory on Red Blood Cell Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiting; Shi, Lingling; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Glowinski, Roland

    2013-11-01

    An elastic spring model is applied to study the effect of the shape memory on the motion of red blood cell in flows. In shear flow, shape memory also plays an important role to obtain all three motions: tumbling, swinging, and tank-treading. In Poiseuille flow, cell has an equilibrium shape as a slipper or parachute depending on capillary number. To ensure the tank-treading motion while in slippery shape, a modified model is proposed by introducing a shape memory coefficient which describes the degree of shape memory in cells. The effect of the coefficient on the cell motion of red blood cell will be presented.

  8. Backrest Shape Affects Head-Neck Alignment and Seated Pressure.

    PubMed

    Ukita, Atsuki; Nishimura, Shigeo; Kishigami, Hirotoshi; Hatta, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Unstable back support against gravity results in a forward head posture and contributes to buttocks pressure ulcers. However, the association between these health problems and a wheelchair backrest is unclear. Our newly developed wheelchair (N-WC) supports the back of the pelvis and thorax from obliquely underneath. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of different backrest shapes on head-neck alignment and seated pressure. Data from 28 healthy subjects were analyzed. Outcome measures were head-neck alignment angles, support angles of the backrest, and pressure distributions on the supporting surfaces. Compared with a typical wheelchair that has a flat backrest, the seat pressure decreased and the center of pressure was located in the middle of both the seat and backrest in the N-WC. Moreover, the head-neck alignment when seated in the N-WC was upright. These results highlight the importance of the shape of the wheelchair backrest. PMID:26288886

  9. Joint modeling of cell and nuclear shape variation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Gregory R.; Buck, Taraz E.; Sullivan, Devin P.; Rohde, Gustavo K.; Murphy, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Modeling cell shape variation is critical to our understanding of cell biology. Previous work has demonstrated the utility of nonrigid image registration methods for the construction of nonparametric nuclear shape models in which pairwise deformation distances are measured between all shapes and are embedded into a low-dimensional shape space. Using these methods, we explore the relationship between cell shape and nuclear shape. We find that these are frequently dependent on each other and use this as the motivation for the development of combined cell and nuclear shape space models, extending nonparametric cell representations to multiple-component three-dimensional cellular shapes and identifying modes of joint shape variation. We learn a first-order dynamics model to predict cell and nuclear shapes, given shapes at a previous time point. We use this to determine the effects of endogenous protein tags or drugs on the shape dynamics of cell lines and show that tagged C1QBP reduces the correlation between cell and nuclear shape. To reduce the computational cost of learning these models, we demonstrate the ability to reconstruct shape spaces using a fraction of computed pairwise distances. The open-source tools provide a powerful basis for future studies of the molecular basis of cell organization. PMID:26354424

  10. Cell sorting using efficient light shaping approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bañas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Villangca, Mark; Glückstad, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    Early detection of diseases can save lives. Hence, there is emphasis in sorting rare disease-indicating cells within small dilute quantities such as in the confines of lab-on-a-chip devices. In our work, we use optical forces to isolate red blood cells detected by machine vision. This approach is gentler, less invasive and more economical compared to conventional FACS systems. As cells are less responsive to plastic or glass beads commonly used in the optical manipulation literature, and since laser safety would be an issue in clinical use, we develop efficient approaches in utilizing lasers and light modulation devices. The Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method that can be used for efficiently illuminating spatial light modulators or creating well-defined contiguous optical traps is supplemented by diffractive techniques capable of integrating the available light and creating 2D or 3D beam distributions aimed at the positions of the detected cells. Furthermore, the beam shaping freedom provided by GPC can allow optimizations in the beam's propagation and its interaction with the catapulted cells.

  11. Cell Autonomous Shape Changes in Germband Retraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Holley; Kim, Elliott; Gish, Robert; Hutson, M. Shane

    2012-02-01

    Germband retraction involves the cohesive movement and regulated cellular mechanics of two tissues on the surface of fruit fly embryos, the germband and the amnioserosa. The germband initially forms a `U' shape, curling from the ventral surface, around the posterior of the embryo, and onto the dorsal surface; the amnioserosa lies between the arms of this `U'. Retraction straightens the germband and leaves it only on the ventral side. During retraction, the germband becomes clearly segmented with deep furrows between segments, and its cells elongate towards the amnioserosa, along what becomes the dorsal-ventral axis. To determine the importance of these changes for the overall movement of the tissues, we observed embryos that did not complete germband retraction due to targeted laser ablation of half the amnioserosa. Without the chemical and mechanical influence of the amnioserosa, germband furrows still formed and germband cells still elongated; however, this elongation was misaligned compared to unablated embryos. Thus, furrow formation and cell elongation in the germband are autonomous, but insufficient to drive proper tissue motion. These results suggest that part of the necessary role of the amnioserosa is proper orientation of germband cell elongation.

  12. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  13. How Follicular Dendritic Cells Shape the B-Cell Antigenome

    PubMed Central

    Kranich, Jan; Krautler, Nike Julia

    2016-01-01

    Follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) are stromal cells residing in primary follicles and in germinal centers of secondary and tertiary lymphoid organs (SLOs and TLOs). There, they play a crucial role in B-cell activation and affinity maturation of antibodies. FDCs have the unique capacity to bind and retain native antigen in B-cell follicles for long periods of time. Therefore, FDCs shape the B-cell antigenome (the sum of all B-cell antigens) in SLOs and TLOs. In this review, we discuss recent findings that explain how this stromal cell type can arise in almost any tissue during TLO formation and, furthermore, focus on the mechanisms of antigen capture and retention involved in the generation of long-lasting antigen depots displayed on FDCs. PMID:27446069

  14. Cell shape regulates global histone acetylation in human mammaryepithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Le Beyec, Johanne; Xu, Ren; Lee, Sun-Young; Nelson, Celeste M.; Rizki, Aylin; Alcaraz, Jordi; Bissell, Mina J.

    2007-02-28

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cell morphology and gene expression in vivo; these relationships are maintained in three-dimensional (3D) cultures of mammary epithelial cells. In the presence of laminin-rich ECM (lrECM), mammary epithelial cells round up and undergo global histone deacetylation, a process critical for their functional differentiation. However, it remains unclear whether lrECM-dependent cell rounding and global histone deacetylation are indeed part of a common physical-biochemical pathway. Using 3D cultures as well as nonadhesive and micropatterned substrata, here we showed that the cell 'rounding' caused by lrECM was sufficient to induce deacetylation of histones H3 and H4 in the absence of biochemical cues. Microarray and confocal analysis demonstrated that this deacetylation in 3D culture is associated with a global increase in chromatin condensation and a reduction in gene expression. Whereas cells cultured on plastic substrata formed prominent stress fibers, cells grown in 3D lrECM or on micropatterns lacked these structures. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D phenocopied the lrECM-induced cell rounding and histone deacetylation. These results reveal a novel link between ECM-controlled cell shape and chromatin structure, and suggest that this link is mediated by changes in the actin cytoskeleton.

  15. Crowded, cell-like environment induces shape changes in aspherical protein.

    PubMed

    Homouz, Dirar; Perham, Michael; Samiotakis, Antonios; Cheung, Margaret S; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2008-08-19

    How the crowded environment inside cells affects the structures of proteins with aspherical shapes is a vital question because many proteins and protein-protein complexes in vivo adopt anisotropic shapes. Here we address this question by combining computational and experimental studies of a football-shaped protein (i.e., Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE) in crowded, cell-like conditions. The results show that macromolecular crowding affects protein-folding dynamics as well as overall protein shape. In crowded milieus, distinct conformational changes in VlsE are accompanied by secondary structure alterations that lead to exposure of a hidden antigenic region. Our work demonstrates the malleability of "native" proteins and implies that crowding-induced shape changes may be important for protein function and malfunction in vivo. PMID:18697933

  16. Crowded, cell-like environment induces shape changes in aspherical protein

    PubMed Central

    Homouz, Dirar; Perham, Michael; Samiotakis, Antonios; Cheung, Margaret S.; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2008-01-01

    How the crowded environment inside cells affects the structures of proteins with aspherical shapes is a vital question because many proteins and protein–protein complexes in vivo adopt anisotropic shapes. Here we address this question by combining computational and experimental studies of a football-shaped protein (i.e., Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE) in crowded, cell-like conditions. The results show that macromolecular crowding affects protein-folding dynamics as well as overall protein shape. In crowded milieus, distinct conformational changes in VlsE are accompanied by secondary structure alterations that lead to exposure of a hidden antigenic region. Our work demonstrates the malleability of “native” proteins and implies that crowding-induced shape changes may be important for protein function and malfunction in vivo. PMID:18697933

  17. Crowded, cell-like environment induces shape changes in aspherical protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Margaret

    2009-03-01

    How the crowded environment inside cells affects the structures of proteins with aspherical shapes is a vital question because many proteins and protein--protein complexes in vivo adopt anisotropic shapes. Here we address this question by combining computational and experimental studies of a football-shaped protein (i.e. Borrelia burgdorferi VlsE) under crowded, cell-like conditions. The results show that macromolecular crowding affects protein-folding dynamics as well as overall protein shape. In crowded milieus, distinct conformational changes in VlsE are accompanied by secondary structure alterations that lead to exposure of a hidden antigenic region. Our work demonstrates the malleability of ``native'' proteins and implies that crowding-induced shape changes may be important for protein function and malfunction in vivo.

  18. Affective Priming by Simple Geometric Shapes: Evidence from Event-related Brain Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yinan; Zhang, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that simple geometric shapes may convey emotional meaning using various experimental paradigms. However, whether affective meaning of simple geometric shapes can be automatically activated and influence the evaluations of subsequent stimulus is still unclear. Thus the present study employed an affective priming paradigm to investigate whether and how two geometric shapes (circle vs. downward triangle) impact on the affective processing of subsequently presented faces (Experiment 1) and words (Experiment 2). At behavioral level, no significant effect of affective congruency was found. However, ERP results in Experiment 1 and 2 showed a typical effect of affective congruency. The LPP elicited by affectively incongruent trials was larger compared to congruent trials. Our results provide support for the notion that downward triangle is perceived as negative and circle as positive and their emotional meaning can be activated automatically and then exert an influence on the electrophysiological processing of subsequent stimuli. The lack of significant congruent effect in behavioral measures and the inversed N400 congruent effect might reveal that the affective meaning of geometric shapes is weak because they are just abstract threatening cues rather than real threat. In addition, because no male participants are included in the present study, our findings are limited to females. PMID:27379001

  19. Dynamic Force Balances and Cell Shape Changes during Cytokinesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sain, Anirban; Inamdar, Mandar M.; Jülicher, Frank

    2015-01-01

    During the division of animal cells, an actomyosin ring is formed in the cell cortex. The contraction of this ring induces shape changes of the cell and the formation of a cytokinesis furrow. In many cases, a cell-cell interface forms that separates the two new cells. Here we present a simple physical description of the cell shape changes and the dynamics of the interface closure, based on force balances involving active stresses and viscous friction. We discuss conditions in which the interface closure is either axially symmetric or asymmetric. We show that our model can account for the observed dynamics of ring contraction and interface closure in the C. elegans embryo.

  20. Staying in Shape: the Impact of Cell Shape on Bacterial Survival in Diverse Environments.

    PubMed

    Yang, Desirée C; Blair, Kris M; Salama, Nina R

    2016-03-01

    Bacteria display an abundance of cellular forms and can change shape during their life cycle. Many plausible models regarding the functional significance of cell morphology have emerged. A greater understanding of the genetic programs underpinning morphological variation in diverse bacterial groups, combined with assays of bacteria under conditions that mimic their varied natural environments, from flowing freshwater streams to diverse human body sites, provides new opportunities to probe the functional significance of cell shape. Here we explore shape diversity among bacteria, at the levels of cell geometry, size, and surface appendages (both placement and number), as it relates to survival in diverse environments. Cell shape in most bacteria is determined by the cell wall. A major challenge in this field has been deconvoluting the effects of differences in the chemical properties of the cell wall and the resulting cell shape perturbations on observed fitness changes. Still, such studies have begun to reveal the selective pressures that drive the diverse forms (or cell wall compositions) observed in mammalian pathogens and bacteria more generally, including efficient adherence to biotic and abiotic surfaces, survival under low-nutrient or stressful conditions, evasion of mammalian complement deposition, efficient dispersal through mucous barriers and tissues, and efficient nutrient acquisition. PMID:26864431

  1. Assembly of complex cell microenvironments using geometrically docked hydrogel shapes

    PubMed Central

    Eng, George; Lee, Benjamin W.; Parsa, Hesam; Chin, Curtis D.; Schneider, Jesse; Linkov, Gary; Sia, Samuel K.; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Cellular communities in living tissues act in concert to establish intricate microenvironments, with complexity difficult to recapitulate in vitro. We report a method for docking numerous cellularized hydrogel shapes (100–1,000 µm in size) into hydrogel templates to construct 3D cellular microenvironments. Each shape can be uniquely designed to contain customizable concentrations of cells and molecular species, and can be placed into any spatial configuration, providing extensive compositional and geometric tunability of shape-coded patterns using a highly biocompatible hydrogel material. Using precisely arranged hydrogel shapes, we investigated migratory patterns of human mesenchymal stem cells and endothelial cells. We then developed a finite element gradient model predicting chemotactic directions of cell migration in micropatterned cocultures that were validated by tracking ∼2,500 individual cell trajectories. This simple yet robust hydrogel platform provides a comprehensive approach to the assembly of 3D cell environments. PMID:23487790

  2. Flexible Octopus-Shaped Hydrogel Particles for Specific Cell Capture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lynna; An, Harry Z; Haghgooie, Ramin; Shank, Aaron T; Martel, Joseph M; Toner, Mehmet; Doyle, Patrick S

    2016-04-01

    Multiarm hydrogel microparticles with varying geometry are fabricated to specifically capture cells expressing epithelial cell adhesion molecule. Results show that particle shape influences cell-capture efficiency due to differences in surface area, hydrodynamic effects, and steric constraints. These findings can lead to improved particle design for cell separation and diagnostic applications. PMID:26929053

  3. Shape functions for velocity interpolation in general hexahedral cells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naff, R.L.; Russell, T.F.; Wilson, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    Numerical methods for grids with irregular cells require discrete shape functions to approximate the distribution of quantities across cells. For control-volume mixed finite-element (CVMFE) methods, vector shape functions approximate velocities and vector test functions enforce a discrete form of Darcy's law. In this paper, a new vector shape function is developed for use with irregular, hexahedral cells (trilinear images of cubes). It interpolates velocities and fluxes quadratically, because as shown here, the usual Piola-transformed shape functions, which interpolate linearly, cannot match uniform flow on general hexahedral cells. Truncation-error estimates for the shape function are demonstrated. CVMFE simulations of uniform and non-uniform flow with irregular meshes show first- and second-order convergence of fluxes in the L2 norm in the presence and absence of singularities, respectively.

  4. Withaferin a alters intermediate filament organization, cell shape and behavior.

    PubMed

    Grin, Boris; Mahammad, Saleemulla; Wedig, Tatjana; Cleland, Megan M; Tsai, Lester; Herrmann, Harald; Goldman, Robert D

    2012-01-01

    Withaferin A (WFA) is a steroidal lactone present in Withania somnifera which has been shown in vitro to bind to the intermediate filament protein, vimentin. Based upon its affinity for vimentin, it has been proposed that WFA can be used as an anti-tumor agent to target metastatic cells which up-regulate vimentin expression. We show that WFA treatment of human fibroblasts rapidly reorganizes vimentin intermediate filaments (VIF) into a perinuclear aggregate. This reorganization is dose dependent and is accompanied by a change in cell shape, decreased motility and an increase in vimentin phosphorylation at serine-38. Furthermore, vimentin lacking cysteine-328, the proposed WFA binding site, remains sensitive to WFA demonstrating that this site is not required for its cellular effects. Using analytical ultracentrifugation, viscometry, electron microscopy and sedimentation assays we show that WFA has no effect on VIF assembly in vitro. Furthermore, WFA is not specific for vimentin as it disrupts the cellular organization and induces perinuclear aggregates of several other IF networks comprised of peripherin, neurofilament-triplet protein, and keratin. In cells co-expressing keratin IF and VIF, the former are significantly less sensitive to WFA with respect to inducing perinuclear aggregates. The organization of microtubules and actin/microfilaments is also affected by WFA. Microtubules become wavier and sparser and the number of stress fibers appears to increase. Following 24 hrs of exposure to doses of WFA that alter VIF organization and motility, cells undergo apoptosis. Lower doses of the drug do not kill cells but cause them to senesce. In light of our findings that WFA affects multiple IF systems, which are expressed in many tissues of the body, caution is warranted in its use as an anti-cancer agent, since it may have debilitating organism-wide effects. PMID:22720028

  5. Unjamming and cell shape in the asthmatic airway epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jae Hun; Bi, Dapeng; Mitchel, Jennifer A.; Qazvini, Nader Taheri; Tantisira, Kelan; Park, Chan Young; McGill, Maureen; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Gweon, Bomi; Notbohm, Jacob; Steward, Robert, Jr.; Burger, Stephanie; Randell, Scott H.; Kho, Alvin T.; Tambe, Dhananjay T.; Hardin, Corey; Shore, Stephanie A.; Israel, Elliot; Weitz, David A.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Henske, Elizabeth P.; Weiss, Scott T.; Manning, M. Lisa; Butler, James P.; Drazen, Jeffrey M.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-10-01

    From coffee beans flowing in a chute to cells remodelling in a living tissue, a wide variety of close-packed collective systems--both inert and living--have the potential to jam. The collective can sometimes flow like a fluid or jam and rigidify like a solid. The unjammed-to-jammed transition remains poorly understood, however, and structural properties characterizing these phases remain unknown. Using primary human bronchial epithelial cells, we show that the jamming transition in asthma is linked to cell shape, thus establishing in that system a structural criterion for cell jamming. Surprisingly, the collapse of critical scaling predicts a counter-intuitive relationship between jamming, cell shape and cell-cell adhesive stresses that is borne out by direct experimental observations. Cell shape thus provides a rigorous structural signature for classification and investigation of bronchial epithelial layer jamming in asthma, and potentially in any process in disease or development in which epithelial dynamics play a prominent role.

  6. Light-dependent governance of cell shape dimensions in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of cellular dimension is important for the function and survival of cells. Cellular dimensions, such as size and shape, are regulated throughout the life cycle of bacteria and can be adapted in response to environmental changes to fine-tune cellular fitness. Cell size and shape are generally coordinated with cell growth and division. Cytoskeletal regulation of cell shape and cell wall biosynthesis and/or deposition occurs in a range of organisms. Photosynthetic organisms, such as cyanobacteria, particularly exhibit light-dependent regulation of morphogenes and generation of reactive oxygen species and other signals that can impact cellular dimensions. Environmental signals initiate adjustments of cellular dimensions, which may be vitally important for optimizing resource acquisition and utilization or for coupling the cellular dimensions with the regulation of subcellular organization to maintain optimal metabolism. Although the involvement of cytoskeletal components in the regulation of cell shape is widely accepted, the signaling factors that regulate cytoskeletal and other distinct components involved in cell shape control, particularly in response to changes in external light cues, remain to be fully elucidated. In this review, factors impacting the inter-coordination of growth and division, the relationship between the regulation of cellular dimensions and central carbon metabolism, and consideration of the effects of specific environment signals, primarily light, on cell dimensions in cyanobacteria will be discussed. Current knowledge about the molecular bases of the light-dependent regulation of cellular dimensions and cell shape in cyanobacteria will be highlighted. PMID:26074902

  7. CetZ tubulin-like proteins control archaeal cell shape

    PubMed Central

    Duggin, Iain G.; Aylett, Christopher H. S.; Walsh, James C.; Michie, Katharine A.; Wang, Qing; Turnbull, Lynne; Dawson, Emma M.; Harry, Elizabeth J.; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.; Amos, Linda A.; Löwe, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Tubulin is a major component of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton, controlling cell shape, structure and dynamics, whereas its bacterial homolog FtsZ establishes the cytokinetic ring that constricts during cell division1,2. How such different roles of tubulin and FtsZ evolved is unknown. Archaea may hold clues as these organisms share characteristics with Eukarya and Bacteria3. Here we report the structure and function of proteins from a distinct family related to tubulin and FtsZ, named CetZ, which co-exists with FtsZ in many archaea. CetZ crystal structures showed the FtsZ/tubulin superfamily fold, and one crystal form contained sheets of protofilaments, suggesting a structural role. However, inactivation of the CetZs in Haloferax volcanii did not affect cell division. Instead, CetZ1 was required for differentiation of the irregular plate-shaped cells into a rod-shaped cell type that was essential for normal swimming motility. CetZ1 formed dynamic cytoskeletal structures in vivo, relating to its capacity to remodel the cell envelope and direct rod formation. CetZ2 was also implicated in H. volcanii cell shape control. Our findings expand the known roles of the FtsZ/tubulin superfamily to include archaeal cell shape dynamics, suggesting that a cytoskeletal role might predate eukaryotic cell evolution, and they support the premise that a major function of microbial rod-shape is to facilitate swimming. PMID:25533961

  8. No Stress! Relax! Mechanisms Governing Growth and Shape in Plant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Gea; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Cai, Giampiero

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms through which plant cells control growth and shape are the result of the coordinated action of many events, notably cell wall stress relaxation and turgor-driven expansion. The scalar nature of turgor pressure would drive plant cells to assume spherical shapes; however, this is not the case, as plant cells show an amazing variety of morphologies. Plant cell walls are dynamic structures that can display alterations in matrix polysaccharide composition and concentration, which ultimately affect the wall deformation rate. The wide varieties of plant cell shapes, spanning from elongated cylinders (as pollen tubes) and jigsaw puzzle-like epidermal cells, to very long fibres and branched stellate leaf trichomes, can be understood if the underlying mechanisms regulating wall biosynthesis and cytoskeletal dynamics are addressed. This review aims at gathering the available knowledge on the fundamental mechanisms regulating expansion, growth and shape in plant cells by putting a special emphasis on the cell wall-cytoskeleton system continuum. In particular, we discuss from a molecular point of view the growth mechanisms characterizing cell types with strikingly different geometries and describe their relationship with primary walls. The purpose, here, is to provide the reader with a comprehensive overview of the multitude of events through which plant cells manage to expand and control their final shapes. PMID:24663059

  9. Shape representation by a network of V4-like cells.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Thomas M; Finkel, Leif H

    2007-10-01

    Cells in extrastriate visual cortex have been reported to be selective for various configurations of local contour shape [Pasupathy, A., & Connor, C. E. (2001). Shape representation in area V4: Position-specific tuning for boundary conformation. The Journal of Neurophysiology, 86 (5), 2505-2519; Hegdé, J., & Van Essen, D. C. (2003). Strategies of shape representation in macaque visual area V2. Visual Neuroscience, 20 (3), 313-328]. Specifically, Pasupathy and Connor found that in area V4 most cells are strongly responsive to a particular local contour conformation located at a specific position on the object's boundary. We used a population of "V4-like cells"-units sensitive to multiple shape features modeled after V4 cell behavior-to generate representations of different shapes. Standard classification algorithms (earth mover's distance, support vector machines) applied to this population representation demonstrate high recognition accuracies classifying handwritten digits in the MNIST database and objects in the MPEG-7 Shape Silhouette database. We compare the performance of the V4-like unit representation to the "shape context" representation of Belongie et al. [Belongie, S., Malik, J., & Puzicha, J. (2002). Shape matching and object recognition using shape contexts. IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence, 24 (24), 509-522]. Results show roughly comparable recognition accuracies using the two representations when tested on portions of the MNIST database. We analyze the relative contributions of various V4-like feature sensitivities to recognition accuracy and robustness to noise - feature sensitivities include curvature magnitude, direction of curvature, global orientation of the contour segment, distance of the contour segment from object center, and modulatory effect of adjacent contour regions. Among these, local curvature appears to be the most informative variable for shape recognition. Our results support the hypothesis that V4

  10. Coupling changes in cell shape to chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Ramkumar, Nitya; Baum, Buzz

    2016-08-01

    Animal cells undergo dramatic changes in shape, mechanics and polarity as they progress through the different stages of cell division. These changes begin at mitotic entry, with cell-substrate adhesion remodelling, assembly of a cortical actomyosin network and osmotic swelling, which together enable cells to adopt a near spherical form even when growing in a crowded tissue environment. These shape changes, which probably aid spindle assembly and positioning, are then reversed at mitotic exit to restore the interphase cell morphology. Here, we discuss the dynamics, regulation and function of these processes, and how cell shape changes and sister chromatid segregation are coupled to ensure that the daughter cells generated through division receive their fair inheritance. PMID:27353479

  11. Tissue tectonics: morphogenetic strain rates, cell shape change and intercalation

    PubMed Central

    Blanchard, Guy B.; Kabla, Alexandre J.; Schultz, Nora L.; Butler, Lucy C.; Sanson, Benedicte; Gorfinkiel, Nicole; Mahadevan, L.; Adams, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic reshaping of tissues during morphogenesis results from a combination of individual cell behaviours and collective cell rearrangements. However, a comprehensive framework to unambiguously measure and link cell behaviour to tissue morphogenesis is lacking. Here we introduce such a kinematic framework, bridging cell and tissue behaviours at an intermediate, mesoscopic, level of cell clusters or domains. By measuring domain deformation in terms of the relative motion of cell positions and the evolution of their shapes, we characterize the basic invariant quantities that measure fundamental classes of cell behaviour, namely tensorial rates of cell shape change and cell intercalation. In doing so we introduce an explicit definition of cell intercalation as a continuous process. We demonstrate how spatiotemporal mapping of strain rates in three models of tissue morphogenesis leads to new insight into morphogenetic mechanisms. Our quantitative approach has broad relevance for the precise characterisation and comparison of morphogenetic phenotypes. PMID:19412170

  12. Manipulating cell shape by placing cells into micro-fabricated chambers.

    PubMed

    Chang, Fred; Atilgan, Erdinc; Burgess, David; Minc, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Cell shape is an important cellular parameter that influences the spatial organization and function of cells. However, it has often been challenging to study the effects of cell shape because of difficulties in experimentally controlling cell shape in a defined way. We describe here a method of physically manipulating sea urchin cells into specified shapes by inserting them into micro-fabricated chambers of different shapes. This method allows for generation of large systematic and quantitative data sets and may be adaptable for different cell types and contexts. PMID:24633802

  13. Insights into the Cell Shape Dynamics of Migrating Dictyostelium discoideum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Meghan; Homan, Tess; McCann, Colin; Parent, Carole; Fourkas, John; Losert, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    Dynamic cell shape is a highly visible manifestation of the interaction between the internal biochemical state of a cell and its external environment. We analyzed the dynamic cell shape of migrating cells using the model system Dictyostelium discoideum. Applying a snake algorithm to experimental movies, we extracted cell boundaries in each frame and followed local boundary motion over long time intervals. Using a local motion measure that corresponds to protrusive/retractive activity, we found that protrusions are intermittent and zig-zag, whereas retractions are more sustained and straight. Correlations of this local motion measure reveal that protrusions appear more localized than retractions. Using a local shape measure, curvature, we also found that small peaks in boundary curvature tend to originate at the front of cells and propagate backwards. We will review the possible cytoskeletal origin of these mechanical waves.

  14. Cell, Isoform, and Environment Factors Shape Gradients and Modulate Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, S. Laura; Cavnar, Stephen P.; Takayama, Shuichi; Luker, Gary D.; Linderman, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine gradient formation requires multiple processes that include ligand secretion and diffusion, receptor binding and internalization, and immobilization of ligand to surfaces. To understand how these events dynamically shape gradients and influence ensuing cell chemotaxis, we built a multi-scale hybrid agent-based model linking gradient formation, cell responses, and receptor-level information. The CXCL12/CXCR4/CXCR7 signaling axis is highly implicated in metastasis of many cancers. We model CXCL12 gradient formation as it is impacted by CXCR4 and CXCR7, with particular focus on the three most highly expressed isoforms of CXCL12. We trained and validated our model using data from an in vitro microfluidic source-sink device. Our simulations demonstrate how isoform differences on the molecular level affect gradient formation and cell responses. We determine that ligand properties specific to CXCL12 isoforms (binding to the migration surface and to CXCR4) significantly impact migration and explain differences in in vitro chemotaxis data. We extend our model to analyze CXCL12 gradient formation in a tumor environment and find that short distance, steep gradients characteristic of the CXCL12-γ isoform are effective at driving chemotaxis. We highlight the importance of CXCL12-γ in cancer cell migration: its high effective affinity for both extracellular surface sites and CXCR4 strongly promote CXCR4+ cell migration. CXCL12-γ is also more difficult to inhibit, and we predict that co-inhibition of CXCR4 and CXCR7 is necessary to effectively hinder CXCL12-γ-induced migration. These findings support the growing importance of understanding differences in protein isoforms, and in particular their implications for cancer treatment. PMID:25909600

  15. Force probing cell shape changes to molecular resolution.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Martin P; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hyman, Anthony A; Muller, Daniel J

    2011-08-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a force sensing nanoscopic tool that can be used to undertake a multiscale approach to understand the mechanisms that underlie cell shape change, ranging from the cellular to molecular scale. In this review paper, we discuss the use of AFM to characterize the dramatic shape changes of mitotic cells. AFM-based mechanical assays can be applied to measure the considerable rounding force and hydrostatic pressure generated by mitotic cells. A complementary AFM technique, single-molecule force spectroscopy, is able to quantify the interactions and mechanisms that functionally regulate individual proteins. Future developments of these nanomechanical methods, together with advances in light microscopy imaging and cell biological and genetic tools, should provide further insight into the biochemical, cellular and mechanical processes that govern mitosis and other cell shape change phenomena. PMID:21646023

  16. Shape anisotropy induces rotations in optically trapped red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bambardekar, Kapil; Dharmadhikari, Jayashree A.; Dharmadhikari, Aditya K.; Yamada, Toshihoro; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Kono, Hirohiko; Fujimura, Yuichi; Sharma, Shobhona; Mathur, Deepak

    2010-07-01

    A combined experimental and theoretical study is carried out to probe the rotational behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) in a single beam optical trap. We induce shape changes in RBCs by altering the properties of the suspension medium in which live cells float. We find that certain shape anisotropies result in the rotation of optically trapped cells. Indeed, even normal (healthy) RBCs can be made to rotate using linearly polarized trapping light by altering the osmotic stress the cells are subjected to. Hyperosmotic stress is found to induce shape anisotropies. We also probe the effect of the medium's viscosity on cell rotation. The observed rotations are modeled using a Langevin-type equation of motion that takes into account frictional forces that are generated as RBCs rotate in the medium. We observe good correlation between our measured data and calculated results.

  17. Cortical Flow-Driven Shapes of Nonadherent Cells.

    PubMed

    Callan-Jones, A C; Ruprecht, V; Wieser, S; Heisenberg, C P; Voituriez, R

    2016-01-15

    Nonadherent polarized cells have been observed to have a pearlike, elongated shape. Using a minimal model that describes the cell cortex as a thin layer of contractile active gel, we show that the anisotropy of active stresses, controlled by cortical viscosity and filament ordering, can account for this morphology. The predicted shapes can be determined from the flow pattern only; they prove to be independent of the mechanism at the origin of the cortical flow, and are only weakly sensitive to the cytoplasmic rheology. In the case of actin flows resulting from a contractile instability, we propose a phase diagram of three-dimensional cell shapes that encompasses nonpolarized spherical, elongated, as well as oblate shapes, all of which have been observed in experiment. PMID:26824569

  18. Complex relationship between TCTP, microtubules and actin microfilaments regulates cell shape in normal and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Bazile, Franck; Pascal, Aude; Arnal, Isabelle; Le Clainche, Christophe; Chesnel, Franck; Kubiak, Jacek Z.

    2009-01-01

    Translationally Controlled Tumor-associated Protein (TCTP) is a ubiquitous and highly conserved protein implicated in cancers. Here we demonstrate that interactions of TCTP with microtubules (MTs) are functionally important but indirect, and we reveal novel interaction of TCTP with the actin cytoskeleton. Firstly, immunofluorescence in Xenopus XL2 cells revealed cytoplasmic fibers stained with TCTP but not with tubulin antibodies, as well as MT-free of TCTP. Furthermore, TCTP localized to a subset of actin-rich fibers in migrating cells. Secondly XlTCTP did not affect in vitro assembly/disassembly of MTs, and lacked MT binding affinity both in pull-down assays and in cell-free extracts. Although TCTP also failed to bind to purified F-actin, it associated with microfilaments in cell-free extracts. Thirdly, TCTP concentrated in mitotic spindle did not colocalize with MTs, and was easily dissociated from these structures except at the poles. Finally, RNAi knockdown of TCTP in XL2 and HeLa cells provoked drastic, MT-dependent, shape change. These data show that although TCTP interacts with MTs it does not behave as classic MT Associated Protein (MAP). Our evidence for an association of TCTP with F-actin structures, and for an involvement in cell shape regulation, implicates this protein in integrating cytoskeletal interations both in interphase and mitosis providing a new avenue to fully understand the role of TCTP. PMID:19168579

  19. Influence of Helical Cell Shape on Motility of Helicobacter Pylori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardcastle, Joseph; Martinez, Laura; Salama, Nina; Bansil, Rama; Boston University Collaboration; University of Washington Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria's body shape plays an important role in motility by effecting chemotaxis, swimming mechanisms, and swimming speed. A prime example of this is the bacteria Helicobacter Pylori;whose helical shape has long been believed to provide an advantage in penetrating the viscous mucus layer protecting the stomach lining, its niche environment. To explore this we have performed bacteria tracking experiments of both wild-type bacteria along with mutants, which have a straight rod shape. A wide distribution of speeds was found. This distribution reflects both a result of temporal variation in speed and different shape morphologies in the bacterial population. Our results show that body shape plays less role in a simple fluid. However, in a more viscous solution the helical shape results in increased swimming speeds. In addition, we use experimentally obtained cell shape measurements to model the hydrodynamic influence of cell shape on swimming speed using resistive force theory. The results agree with the experiment, especially when we fold in the temporal distribution. Interestingly, our results suggest distinct wild-type subpopulations with varying number of half helices can lead to different swimming speeds. NSF PHY

  20. Imaging Cell Shape Change in Living Drosophila Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Figard, Lauren; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2011-01-01

    The developing Drosophila melanogaster embryo undergoes a number of cell shape changes that are highly amenable to live confocal imaging. Cell shape changes in the fly are analogous to those in higher organisms, and they drive tissue morphogenesis. So, in many cases, their study has direct implications for understanding human disease (Table 1)1-5. On the sub-cellular scale, these cell shape changes are the product of activities ranging from gene expression to signal transduction, cell polarity, cytoskeletal remodeling and membrane trafficking. Thus, the Drosophila embryo provides not only the context to evaluate cell shape changes as they relate to tissue morphogenesis, but also offers a completely physiological environment to study the sub-cellular activities that shape cells. The protocol described here is designed to image a specific cell shape change called cellularization. Cellularization is a process of dramatic plasma membrane growth, and it ultimately converts the syncytial embryo into the cellular blastoderm. That is, at interphase of mitotic cycle 14, the plasma membrane simultaneously invaginates around each of ~6000 cortically anchored nuclei to generate a sheet of primary epithelial cells. Counter to previous suggestions, cellularization is not driven by Myosin-2 contractility6, but is instead fueled largely by exocytosis of membrane from internal stores7. Thus, cellularization is an excellent system for studying membrane trafficking during cell shape changes that require plasma membrane invagination or expansion, such as cytokinesis or transverse-tubule (T-tubule) morphogenesis in muscle. Note that this protocol is easily applied to the imaging of other cell shape changes in the fly embryo, and only requires slight adaptations such as changing the stage of embryo collection, or using "embryo glue" to mount the embryo in a specific orientation (Table 1)8-19. In all cases, the workflow is basically the same (Figure 1). Standard methods for cloning and

  1. Imaging cell shape change in living Drosophila embryos.

    PubMed

    Figard, Lauren; Sokac, Anna Marie

    2011-01-01

    The developing Drosophila melanogaster embryo undergoes a number of cell shape changes that are highly amenable to live confocal imaging. Cell shape changes in the fly are analogous to those in higher organisms, and they drive tissue morphogenesis. So, in many cases, their study has direct implications for understanding human disease (Table 1)(1-5). On the sub-cellular scale, these cell shape changes are the product of activities ranging from gene expression to signal transduction, cell polarity, cytoskeletal remodeling and membrane trafficking. Thus, the Drosophila embryo provides not only the context to evaluate cell shape changes as they relate to tissue morphogenesis, but also offers a completely physiological environment to study the sub-cellular activities that shape cells. The protocol described here is designed to image a specific cell shape change called cellularization. Cellularization is a process of dramatic plasma membrane growth, and it ultimately converts the syncytial embryo into the cellular blastoderm. That is, at interphase of mitotic cycle 14, the plasma membrane simultaneously invaginates around each of ~6000 cortically anchored nuclei to generate a sheet of primary epithelial cells. Counter to previous suggestions, cellularization is not driven by Myosin-2 contractility(6), but is instead fueled largely by exocytosis of membrane from internal stores(7). Thus, cellularization is an excellent system for studying membrane trafficking during cell shape changes that require plasma membrane invagination or expansion, such as cytokinesis or transverse-tubule (T-tubule) morphogenesis in muscle. Note that this protocol is easily applied to the imaging of other cell shape changes in the fly embryo, and only requires slight adaptations such as changing the stage of embryo collection, or using "embryo glue" to mount the embryo in a specific orientation (Table 1)(8-19). In all cases, the workflow is basically the same (Figure 1). Standard methods for

  2. Oriented cell division affects the global stress and cell packing geometry of a monolayer under stretch.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Yang; Zheng, Zhaoliang

    2016-02-01

    Cell division plays a vital role in tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, and the division plane is crucial for cell fate. For isolated cells, extensive studies show that the orientation of divisions is sensitive to cell shape and the direction of extrinsic mechanical forces. However, it is poorly understood that how the cell divides within a cell monolayer and how the local stress change, due to the division, affects the global stress of epithelial monolayers. Here, we use the vertex dynamics models to investigate the effects of division orientation on the configurations and mechanics of a cell monolayer under stretch. We examine three scenarios of the divisions: dividing along the stretch axis, dividing along the geometric long axis of cells, and dividing at a random angle. It is found that the division along the long cell axis can induce the minimal energy difference, and the global stress of the monolayer after stretch releases more rapidly in this case. Moreover, the long-axis division can result in more random cell orientations and more isotropic cell shapes within the monolayer, comparing with other two cases. This study helps understand the division orientation of cells within a monolayer under mechanical stimuli, and may shed light on linking individual cell׳s behaviors to the global mechanics and patterns of tissues. PMID:26774292

  3. Interplay of model ingredients affecting aggregate shape plasticity in diffusion-limited aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte-Neto, P.; Stošić, T.; Stošić, B.; Lessa, R.; Milošević, M. V.

    2014-07-01

    We analyze the combined effect of three ingredients of an aggregation model—surface tension, particle flow and particle source—representing typical characteristics of many aggregation growth processes in nature. Through extensive numerical experiments and for different underlying lattice structures we demonstrate that the location of incoming particles and their preferential direction of flow can significantly affect the resulting general shape of the aggregate, while the surface tension controls the surface roughness. Combining all three ingredients increases the aggregate shape plasticity, yielding a wider spectrum of shapes as compared to earlier works that analyzed these ingredients separately. Our results indicate that the considered combination of effects is fundamental for modeling the polymorphic growth of a wide variety of structures in confined geometries and/or in the presence of external fields, such as rocks, crystals, corals, and biominerals.

  4. Interplay of model ingredients affecting aggregate shape plasticity in diffusion-limited aggregation.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Neto, P; Stošić, T; Stošić, B; Lessa, R; Milošević, M V

    2014-07-01

    We analyze the combined effect of three ingredients of an aggregation model--surface tension, particle flow and particle source--representing typical characteristics of many aggregation growth processes in nature. Through extensive numerical experiments and for different underlying lattice structures we demonstrate that the location of incoming particles and their preferential direction of flow can significantly affect the resulting general shape of the aggregate, while the surface tension controls the surface roughness. Combining all three ingredients increases the aggregate shape plasticity, yielding a wider spectrum of shapes as compared to earlier works that analyzed these ingredients separately. Our results indicate that the considered combination of effects is fundamental for modeling the polymorphic growth of a wide variety of structures in confined geometries and/or in the presence of external fields, such as rocks, crystals, corals, and biominerals. PMID:25122308

  5. Factors affecting the location and shape of face seal leak sites on half-mask respirators.

    PubMed

    Oestenstad, Riedar Kent; Bartolucci, Alfred A

    2010-06-01

    While there have been a number of studies on the effect of leak site and shape on the magnitude of measured leakage through respirator face seals, there have been very few studies to identify the location and size of these leaks. In a previous study we used a method of identifying the location and shape of respirator leaks on a half-mask respirator by the deposition of a fluorescent tracer during a fit test, and testing for their association with facial dimensions. The purpose of this study was to apply that methodology to conduct multiple fit tests to determine if gender, respirator brand, repeated fit tests, and test exercises affected the location and shape of face seal leak sites. Categorical analysis found that none of these factors had a significant effect on the location and shape of leaks. General linear model analysis found some significant effects of the study factors on leaks, but facial dimensions had a greater effect, and there were significant differences between facial dimensions of subjects with a leak and those without. Significant differences in leak site distributions between this and the previous study may have been due to differences in facial dimensions and racial/ethnic composition. Twice as many diffuse leaks as point leaks were observed in both studies, indicating that slit-like leaks would be most appropriate on mannequins used in laboratory respirator leakage studies, and in respirator flow and penetration models. That the study factors had no significant effects in the categorical analysis, significant effects for facial dimensions were found in the linear analysis, and leak site distribution differences between this and our previous study may have been affected by differences in facial dimensions, indicate that, in addition to size, the shape of an individual's face may be an important determinant of leak sites on a half-mask respirator. This would have implications for the design of respirator facepieces and in the selection of

  6. Cell-substrate impedance fluctuations of single amoeboid cells encode cell-shape and adhesion dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonhardt, Helmar; Gerhardt, Matthias; Höppner, Nadine; Krüger, Kirsten; Tarantola, Marco; Beta, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    We show systematic electrical impedance measurements of single motile cells on microelectrodes. Wild-type cells and mutant strains were studied that differ in their cell-substrate adhesion strength. We recorded the projected cell area by time-lapse microscopy and observed irregular oscillations of the cell shape. These oscillations were correlated with long-term variations in the impedance signal. Superposed to these long-term trends, we observed fluctuations in the impedance signal. Their magnitude clearly correlated with the adhesion strength, suggesting that strongly adherent cells display more dynamic cell-substrate interactions.

  7. Conformon-driven biopolymer shape changes in cell modeling.

    PubMed

    Ji, Sungchul; Ciobanu, Gabriel

    2003-07-01

    Conceptual models of the atom preceded the mathematical model of the hydrogen atom in physics in the second decade of the 20th century. The computer modeling of the living cell in the 21st century may follow a similar course of development. A conceptual model of the cell called the Bhopalator was formulated in the mid-1980s, along with its twin theories known as the conformon theory of molecular machines and the cell language theory of biopolymer interactions [Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 227 (1974) 211; BioSystems 44 (1997) 17; Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 870 (1999a) 411; BioSystems 54 (2000) 107; Semiotica 138 (1-4) (2002a) 15; Fundamenta Informaticae 49 (2002b) 147]. The conformon theory accounts for the reversible actions of individual biopolymers coupled to irreversible chemical reactions, while the cell language theory provides a theoretical framework for understanding the complex networks of dynamic interactions among biopolymers in the cell. These two theories are reviewed and further elaborated for the benefit of both computational biologists and computer scientists who are interested in modeling the living cell and its functions. One of the critical components of the mechanisms of cell communication and cell computing has been postulated to be space- and time-organized teleonomic (i.e. goal-directed) shape changes of biopolymers that are driven by exergonic (free energy-releasing) chemical reactions. The generalized Franck-Condon principle is suggested to be essential in resolving the apparent paradox arising when one attempts to couple endergonic (free energy-requiring) biopolymer shape changes to the exergonic chemical reactions that are catalyzed by biopolymer shape changes themselves. Conformons, defined as sequence-specific mechanical strains of biopolymers first invoked three decades ago to account for energy coupling in mitochondria, have been identified as shape changers, the agents that cause shape changes in biopolymers. Given a set of space- and time

  8. Intergenerational continuity of cell shape dynamics in Caulobacter crescentus

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Charles S.; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the intergenerational shape dynamics of single Caulobacter crescentus cells using a novel combination of imaging techniques and theoretical modeling. We determine the dynamics of cell pole-to-pole lengths, cross-sectional widths, and medial curvatures from high accuracy measurements of cell contours. Moreover, these shape parameters are determined for over 250 cells across approximately 10000 total generations, which affords high statistical precision. Our data and model show that constriction is initiated early in the cell cycle and that its dynamics are controlled by the time scale of exponential longitudinal growth. Based on our extensive and detailed growth and contour data, we develop a minimal mechanical model that quantitatively accounts for the cell shape dynamics and suggests that the asymmetric location of the division plane reflects the distinct mechanical properties of the stalked and swarmer poles. Furthermore, we find that the asymmetry in the division plane location is inherited from the previous generation. We interpret these results in terms of the current molecular understanding of shape, growth, and division of C. crescentus. PMID:25778096

  9. Intergenerational continuity of cell shape dynamics in Caulobacter crescentus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Charles S.; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Iyer-Biswas, Srividya; Crosson, Sean; Dinner, Aaron R.; Scherer, Norbert F.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the intergenerational shape dynamics of single Caulobacter crescentus cells using a novel combination of imaging techniques and theoretical modeling. We determine the dynamics of cell pole-to-pole lengths, cross-sectional widths, and medial curvatures from high accuracy measurements of cell contours. Moreover, these shape parameters are determined for over 250 cells across approximately 10000 total generations, which affords high statistical precision. Our data and model show that constriction is initiated early in the cell cycle and that its dynamics are controlled by the time scale of exponential longitudinal growth. Based on our extensive and detailed growth and contour data, we develop a minimal mechanical model that quantitatively accounts for the cell shape dynamics and suggests that the asymmetric location of the division plane reflects the distinct mechanical properties of the stalked and swarmer poles. Furthermore, we find that the asymmetry in the division plane location is inherited from the previous generation. We interpret these results in terms of the current molecular understanding of shape, growth, and division of C. crescentus.

  10. Surface shape affects the three-dimensional exploratory movements of nocturnal arboreal snakes.

    PubMed

    Jayne, Bruce C; Olberding, Jeffrey P; Athreya, Dilip; Riley, Michael A

    2012-12-01

    Movement and searching behaviors at diverse spatial scales are important for understanding how animals interact with their environment. Although the shapes of branches and the voids in arboreal habitats seem likely to affect searching behaviors, their influence is poorly understood. To gain insights into how both environmental structure and the attributes of an animal may affect movement and searching, we compared the three-dimensional exploratory movements of snakes in the dark on two simulated arboreal surfaces (disc and horizontal cylinder). Most of the exploratory movements of snakes in the dark were a small fraction of the distances they could reach while bridging gaps in the light. The snakes extended farther away from the edge of the supporting surface at the ends of the cylinder than from the sides of the cylinder or from any direction from the surface of the disc. The exploratory movements were not random, and the surface shape and three-dimensional directions had significant interactive effects on how the movements were structured in time. Thus, the physical capacity for reaching did not limit the area that was explored, but the shape of the supporting surface and the orientation relative to gravity did create biased searching patterns. PMID:23052853

  11. Wnt ligand/Frizzled 2 receptor signaling regulates tube shape and branch-point formation in the lung through control of epithelial cell shape

    PubMed Central

    Kadzik, Rachel S.; Cohen, Ethan David; Morley, Michael P.; Stewart, Kathleen M.; Lu, Min Min; Morrisey, Edward E.

    2014-01-01

    Changing the morphology of a simple epithelial tube to form a highly ramified branching network requires changes in cell behavior that lead to tissue-wide changes in organ shape. How epithelial cells in branched organs modulate their shape and behavior to promote bending and sculpting of the epithelial sheet is not well understood, and the mechanisms underlying this process remain obscure. We show that the Wnt receptor Frizzled 2 (Fzd2) is required for domain branch formation during the initial establishment of the respiratory tree. Live imaging and transcriptome analysis of lung-branching morphogenesis demonstrate that Fzd2 promotes changes in epithelial cell length and shape. These changes in cell morphology deform the developing epithelial tube to generate and maintain new domain branches. Fzd2 controls branch formation and the shape of the epithelial tube by regulating Rho signaling and by the localization of phospho-myosin light chain 2, in turn controlling the changes in the shape of epithelial cells during morphogenesis. This study demonstrates the importance of Wnt/Fzd2 signaling in promoting and maintaining changes in epithelial cell shape that affect development of a branching network. PMID:25114215

  12. Unjamming and cell shape in the asthmatic airway epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jae Hun; Bi, Dapeng; Mitchel, Jennifer A.; Qazvini, Nader Taheri; Tantisira, Kelan; Park, Chan Young; McGill, Maureen; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Gweon, Bomi; Notbohm, Jacob; Steward, Robert; Burger, Stephanie; Randell, Scott H.; Kho, Alvin T.; Tambe, Dhananjay T.; Hardin, Corey; Shore, Stephanie A.; Israel, Elliot; Weitz, David A.; Tschumperlin, Daniel J.; Henske, Elizabeth P.; Weiss, Scott T.; Lisa Manning, M.; Butler, James P.; Drazen, Jeffrey M.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    From coffee beans flowing in a chute to cells remodelling in a living tissue, a wide variety of close-packed collective systems— both inert and living—have the potential to jam. The collective can sometimes flow like a fluid or jam and rigidify like a solid. The unjammed-to-jammed transition remains poorly understood, however, and structural properties characterizing these phases remain unknown. Using primary human bronchial epithelial cells, we show that the jamming transition in asthma is linked to cell shape, thus establishing in that system a structural criterion for cell jamming. Surprisingly, the collapse of critical scaling predicts a counter-intuitive relationship between jamming, cell shape and cell–cell adhesive stresses that is borne out by direct experimental observations. Cell shape thus provides a rigorous structural signature for classification and investigation of bronchial epithelial layer jamming in asthma, and potentially in any process in disease or development in which epithelial dynamics play a prominent role. PMID:26237129

  13. Physical parameters affecting living cells in space.

    PubMed

    Langbein, D

    1986-01-01

    The question is posed: Why does a living cell react to the absence of gravity? What sensors may it have? Does it note pressure, sedimentation, convection, or other parameters? If somewhere in a liquid volume sodium ions are replaced by potassium ions, the density of the liquid changes locally: the heavier regions sink, the lighter regions rise. This may contribute to species transport, to the metabolism. Under microgravity this mechanism is strongly reduced. On the other hand, other reasons for convection like thermal and solutal interface convection are left. Do they affect species transport? Another important effect of gravity is the hydrostatic pressure. On the macroscopic side, the pressure between our head and feet changes by 0.35 atmospheres. On the microscopic level the hydrostatic pressure on the upper half of a cell membrane is lower than on the lower half. This, by affecting the ion transport through the membrane, may change the surrounding electric potential. It has been suggested to be one of the reasons for graviperception. Following the discussion of these and other effects possibly important in life sciences in space, an order of magnitude analysis of the residual accelerations tolerable during experiments in materials sciences is outlined. In the field of life sciences only rough estimates are available at present. PMID:11537842

  14. Testing for nonrandom shape similarity between sister cells using automated shape comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Monica; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2009-02-01

    Several reports in the biological literature have indicated that when a living cell divides, the two daughter cells have a tendency to be mirror images of each other in terms of their overall cell shape. This phenomenon would be consistent with inheritance of spatial organization from mother cell to daughters. However the published data rely on a small number of examples that were visually chosen, raising potential concerns about inadvertent selection bias. We propose to revisit this issue using automated quantitative shape comparison methods which would have no contribution from the observer and which would allow statistical testing of similarity in large numbers of cells. In this report we describe a first order approach to the problem using rigid curve matching. Using test images, we compare a pointwise correspondence based distance metric with a chamfer matching strategy and find that the latter provides better correspondence and smaller distances between aligned curves, especially when we allow nonrigid deformation of the outlines in addition to rotation.

  15. Dynamic multiprotein assemblies shape the spatial structure of cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Nussinov, Ruth; Jang, Hyunbum

    2014-01-01

    Cell signaling underlies critical cellular decisions. Coordination, efficiency as well as fail-safe mechanisms are key elements. How the cell ensures that these hallmarks are at play are important questions. Cell signaling is often viewed as taking place through discrete and cross-talking pathways; oftentimes these are modularized to emphasize distinct functions. While simple, convenient and clear, such models largely neglect the spatial structure of cell signaling; they also convey inter-modular (or inter-protein) spatial separation that may not exist. Here our thesis is that cell signaling is shaped by a network of multiprotein assemblies. While pre-organized, the assemblies and network are loose and dynamic. They contain transiently-associated multiprotein complexes which are often mediated by scaffolding proteins. They are also typically anchored in the membrane, and their continuum may span the cell. IQGAP1 scaffolding protein which binds proteins including Raf, calmodulin, Mek, Erk, actin, and tens more, with actin shaping B-cell (and likely other) membrane-anchored nanoclusters and allosterically polymerizing in dynamic cytoskeleton formation, and Raf anchoring in the membrane along with Ras, provides a striking example. The multivalent network of dynamic proteins and lipids, with specific interactions forming and breaking, can be viewed as endowing gel-like properties. Collectively, this reasons that efficient, productive and reliable cell signaling takes place primarily through transient, preorganized and cooperative protein-protein interactions spanning the cell rather than stochastic, diffusion-controlled processes. PMID:25046855

  16. Irradiation-induced changes in nuclear shape and cell cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Iwata, M.; Sasaki, H.; Kishino, Y.; Tsuboi, T.; Sugishita, T.; Hosokawa, T.

    1982-03-01

    Using human uterine cervical carcinoma cells transplanted in nude mice and mice leukemia L5178Y cells, changes in the cell cycle following irradiation were observed by flow cytometry (FCM), and changes in the cell nuclei during the course of irradiation were measured by FCM. Experiments in vivo as well as in vitro caused accumulation of cells in the G2 to M populations, resulting in the so-called G2 block phenomenon as revealed by FCM analysis of DNA distributions. The radiation-induced changes of nuclear shapes were dependent on abnormal mitoses, which occurred more frequently in the G2 to M phases. Therefore it is suggested that the G2 block phenomenon plays an important role in radiation-induced cell death because the process of cell death by irradiation has been shown to proceed via these abnormal mitoses.

  17. Non-ideal assembly of the driving unit affecting shape of load-displacement curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hu; Zhao, Hongwei

    2015-03-01

    The results of nanoindentation testing strongly rely on load-displacement curves, but an abnormal load-displacement curve with obvious inflection in the unloading portion was commonly observed in previously published papers and the reason is not clear. In this paper, possible reasons involved in a custom-made indentation instrument, such as sensors, control and assembly issues, are analyzed and discussed step by step. Experimental results indicate that non-ideal assembly of the precision driving unit strongly affects the shape of the load-displacement curve and its affecting mechanism is studied by theoretical analysis and finite element simulations. This paper reveals the reason leading to the abnormal load-displacement curve, which is helpful for debugging of indentation instruments and can enhance comparability of indentation results.

  18. Noise affects the shape of female preference functions for acoustic signals.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Michael S; Ronacher, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    The shape of female mate preference functions influences the speed and direction of sexual signal evolution. However, the expression of female preferences is modulated by interactions between environmental conditions and the female's sensory processing system. Noise is an especially relevant environmental condition because it interferes directly with the neural processing of signals. Although noise is therefore likely a significant force in the evolution of communication systems, little is known about its effects on preference function shape. In the grasshopper Chorthippus biguttulus, female preferences for male calling song characteristics are likely to be affected by noise because its auditory system is sensitive to fine temporal details of songs. We measured female preference functions for variation in male song characteristics in several levels of masking noise and found strong effects of noise on preference function shape. The overall responsiveness to signals in noise generally decreased. Preference strength increased for some signal characteristics and decreased for others, largely corresponding to expectations based on neurophysiological studies of acoustic signal processing. These results suggest that different signal characteristics will be favored under different noise conditions, and thus that signal evolution may proceed differently depending on the extent and temporal patterning of environmental noise. PMID:25546134

  19. Cell shape dynamics during the staphylococcal cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, João M.; Fernandes, Pedro B.; Vaz, Filipa; Pereira, Ana R.; Tavares, Andreia C.; Ferreira, Maria T.; Pereira, Pedro M.; Veiga, Helena; Kuru, Erkin; VanNieuwenhze, Michael S.; Brun, Yves V.; Filipe, Sérgio R.; Pinho, Mariana G.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an aggressive pathogen and a model organism to study cell division in sequential orthogonal planes in spherical bacteria. However, the small size of staphylococcal cells has impaired analysis of changes in morphology during the cell cycle. Here we use super-resolution microscopy and determine that S. aureus cells are not spherical throughout the cell cycle, but elongate during specific time windows, through peptidoglycan synthesis and remodelling. Both peptidoglycan hydrolysis and turgor pressure are required during division for reshaping the flat division septum into a curved surface. In this process, the septum generates less than one hemisphere of each daughter cell, a trait we show is common to other cocci. Therefore, cell surface scars of previous divisions do not divide the cells in quadrants, generating asymmetry in the daughter cells. Our results introduce a need to reassess the models for division plane selection in cocci. PMID:26278781

  20. Cell shape recognition by colloidal cell imprints: energy of the cell-imprint interaction.

    PubMed

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Paunov, Vesselin N

    2015-09-01

    The results presented in this study are aimed at the theoretical estimate of the interactions between a spherical microbial cell and the colloidal cell imprints in terms of the Derjaguin, Landau, Vervey, and Overbeek (DLVO) surface forces. We adapted the Derjaguin approximation to take into account the geometry factor in the colloidal interaction between a spherical target particle and a hemispherical shell at two different orientations with respect to each other. We took into account only classical DLVO surface forces, i.e., the van der Waals and the electric double layer forces, in the interaction of a spherical target cell and a hemispherical shell as a function of their size ratio, mutual orientation, distance between their surfaces, their respective surface potentials, and the ionic strength of the aqueous solution. We found that the calculated interaction energies are several orders higher when match and recognition between the target cell and the target cell imprint is achieved. Our analysis revealed that the recognition effect of the hemispherical shell towards the target microsphere comes from the greatly increased surface contact area when a full match of their size and shape is produced. When the interaction between the surfaces of the hemishell and the target cell is attractive, the recognition greatly amplifies the attraction and this increases the likelihood of them to bind strongly. However, if the surface interaction between the cell and the imprint is repulsive, the shape and size match makes this interaction even more repulsive and thus decreases the likelihood of binding. These results show that the surface chemistry of the target cells and their colloidal imprints is very important in controlling the outcome of the interaction, while the shape recognition only amplifies the interaction. In the case of nonmonotonous surface-to-surface interaction we discovered some interesting interplay between the effects of shape match and surface chemistry

  1. Cell shape recognition by colloidal cell imprints: Energy of the cell-imprint interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Paunov, Vesselin N.

    2015-09-01

    The results presented in this study are aimed at the theoretical estimate of the interactions between a spherical microbial cell and the colloidal cell imprints in terms of the Derjaguin, Landau, Vervey, and Overbeek (DLVO) surface forces. We adapted the Derjaguin approximation to take into account the geometry factor in the colloidal interaction between a spherical target particle and a hemispherical shell at two different orientations with respect to each other. We took into account only classical DLVO surface forces, i.e., the van der Waals and the electric double layer forces, in the interaction of a spherical target cell and a hemispherical shell as a function of their size ratio, mutual orientation, distance between their surfaces, their respective surface potentials, and the ionic strength of the aqueous solution. We found that the calculated interaction energies are several orders higher when match and recognition between the target cell and the target cell imprint is achieved. Our analysis revealed that the recognition effect of the hemispherical shell towards the target microsphere comes from the greatly increased surface contact area when a full match of their size and shape is produced. When the interaction between the surfaces of the hemishell and the target cell is attractive, the recognition greatly amplifies the attraction and this increases the likelihood of them to bind strongly. However, if the surface interaction between the cell and the imprint is repulsive, the shape and size match makes this interaction even more repulsive and thus decreases the likelihood of binding. These results show that the surface chemistry of the target cells and their colloidal imprints is very important in controlling the outcome of the interaction, while the shape recognition only amplifies the interaction. In the case of nonmonotonous surface-to-surface interaction we discovered some interesting interplay between the effects of shape match and surface chemistry

  2. A lateral signalling pathway coordinates shape volatility during cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Luga, Valbona; Armitage, Sarah K.; Musiol, Martin; Won, Amy; Yip, Christopher M.; Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Wrana, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental for both physiological and pathological processes. Migrating cells usually display high dynamics in morphology, which is orchestrated by an integrative array of signalling pathways. Here we identify a novel pathway, we term lateral signalling, comprised of the planar cell polarity (PCP) protein Pk1 and the RhoGAPs, Arhgap21/23. We show that the Pk1–Arhgap21/23 complex inhibits RhoA, is localized on the non-protrusive lateral membrane cortex and its disruption leads to the disorganization of the actomyosin network and altered focal adhesion dynamics. Pk1-mediated lateral signalling confines protrusive activity and is regulated by Smurf2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase in the PCP pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrate that dynamic interplay between lateral and protrusive signalling generates cyclical fluctuations in cell shape that we quantify here as shape volatility, which strongly correlates with migration speed. These studies uncover a previously unrecognized lateral signalling pathway that coordinates shape volatility during productive cell migration. PMID:27226243

  3. A lateral signalling pathway coordinates shape volatility during cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Luga, Valbona; Armitage, Sarah K; Musiol, Martin; Won, Amy; Yip, Christopher M; Plotnikov, Sergey V; Wrana, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental for both physiological and pathological processes. Migrating cells usually display high dynamics in morphology, which is orchestrated by an integrative array of signalling pathways. Here we identify a novel pathway, we term lateral signalling, comprised of the planar cell polarity (PCP) protein Pk1 and the RhoGAPs, Arhgap21/23. We show that the Pk1-Arhgap21/23 complex inhibits RhoA, is localized on the non-protrusive lateral membrane cortex and its disruption leads to the disorganization of the actomyosin network and altered focal adhesion dynamics. Pk1-mediated lateral signalling confines protrusive activity and is regulated by Smurf2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase in the PCP pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrate that dynamic interplay between lateral and protrusive signalling generates cyclical fluctuations in cell shape that we quantify here as shape volatility, which strongly correlates with migration speed. These studies uncover a previously unrecognized lateral signalling pathway that coordinates shape volatility during productive cell migration. PMID:27226243

  4. Volume Changes During Active Shape Fluctuations in Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Porta, Caterina A. M.; Taloni, Alessandro; Kardash, Elena; Salman, Oguz Umut; Truskinovsky, Lev; Zapperi, Stefano

    Cells modify their volume in response to changes in osmotic pressure but it is usually assumed that other active shape variations do not involve significant volume fluctuations. Here we report experiments demonstrating that water transport in and out of the cell is needed for the formation of blebs, commonly observed protrusions in the plasma membrane driven by cortex contraction. We develop and simulate a model of fluid-mediated membrane-cortex deformations and show that a permeable membrane is necessary for bleb formation which is otherwise impaired. Taken together, our experimental and theoretical results emphasize the subtle balance between hydrodynamics and elasticity in actively driven cell morphological changes.

  5. Volume Changes During Active Shape Fluctuations in Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taloni, Alessandro; Kardash, Elena; Salman, Oguz Umut; Truskinovsky, Lev; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A. M.

    2015-05-01

    Cells modify their volume in response to changes in osmotic pressure but it is usually assumed that other active shape variations do not involve significant volume fluctuations. Here we report experiments demonstrating that water transport in and out of the cell is needed for the formation of blebs, commonly observed protrusions in the plasma membrane driven by cortex contraction. We develop and simulate a model of fluid-mediated membrane-cortex deformations and show that a permeable membrane is necessary for bleb formation which is otherwise impaired. Taken together, our experimental and theoretical results emphasize the subtle balance between hydrodynamics and elasticity in actively driven cell morphological changes.

  6. The Neurobiology Shaping Affective Touch: Expectation, Motivation, and Meaning in the Multisensory Context

    PubMed Central

    Ellingsen, Dan-Mikael; Leknes, Siri; Løseth, Guro; Wessberg, Johan; Olausson, Håkan

    2016-01-01

    Inter-individual touch can be a desirable reward that can both relieve negative affect and evoke strong feelings of pleasure. However, if other sensory cues indicate it is undesirable to interact with the toucher, the affective experience of the same touch may be flipped to disgust. While a broad literature has addressed, on one hand the neurophysiological basis of ascending touch pathways, and on the other hand the central neurochemistry involved in touch behaviors, investigations of how external context and internal state shapes the hedonic value of touch have only recently emerged. Here, we review the psychological and neurobiological mechanisms responsible for the integration of tactile “bottom–up” stimuli and “top–down” information into affective touch experiences. We highlight the reciprocal influences between gentle touch and contextual information, and consider how, and at which levels of neural processing, top-down influences may modulate ascending touch signals. Finally, we discuss the central neurochemistry, specifically the μ-opioids and oxytocin systems, involved in affective touch processing, and how the functions of these neurotransmitters largely depend on the context and motivational state of the individual. PMID:26779092

  7. Microtubules contribute to maintain nucleus shape in epithelial cell monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremblay, Dominique; Andrzejewski, Lukasz; Pelling, Andrew

    2013-03-01

    INTRODUCTION: Tissue strains can result in significant nuclear deformations and may regulate gene expression. However, the precise role of the cytoskeleton in regulating nuclear mechanics remains poorly understood. Here, we investigate the nuclear deformability of Madin-Darky canine kidney cells (MDCK) under various stretching conditions to clarify the role of the microtubules and actin network on the mechanical behavior of the nucleus. METHODS: A custom-built cell-stretching device allowing for real time imaging of MDCK nuclei was used. Cells were seeded on a silicone membrane coated with rat-tail collagen I. A nuclear stain, Hoechst-33342, was used to image nuclei during stretching. We exposed cells to a compressive and non-compressive stretching strain field of 25%. Nocodazole and cytochalasin-D were used to depolymerize the microtubules and actin network. RESULTS: Nuclei in control cells stretched more along their minor axis than major axis with a deformation of 5% and 2% respectively. This anisotropy vanished completely in microtubule-deprived cells and these cells showed a very high nuclear deformability along the minor axis when exposed to a compressive stretching strain field. CONCLUSIONS: The microtubules drive the anisotropic deformability of MDCK nuclei in a monolayer and maintain nuclear shape when exposed to compressive strain. Such intrinsic mechanical behavior indicates that microtubules are essential to maintain nuclear shape and may prevent down regulation of gene expression.

  8. Change in cell shape is required for matrix metalloproteinase-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Khauv, Davitte; Bissell, Mina J.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2008-06-26

    Cell morphology dictates response to a wide variety of stimuli, controlling cell metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and death. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental process in which epithelial cells acquire migratory characteristics, and in the process convert from a 'cuboidal' epithelial structure into an elongated mesenchymal shape. We had shown previously that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) can stimulate EMT of cultured mouse mammary epithelial cells through a process that involves increased expression of Rac1b, a protein that stimulates alterations in cytoskeletal structure. We show here that cells treated with MMP-3 or induced to express Rac1b spread to cover a larger surface, and that this induction of cell spreading is a requirement of MMP-3/Rac1b-induced EMT. We find that limiting cell spreading, either by increasing cell density or by culturing cells on precisely defined micropatterned substrata, blocks expression of characteristic markers of EMT in cells treated with MMP-3. These effects are not caused by general disruptions in cell signaling pathways, as TGF-{beta}-induced EMT is not affected by similar limitations on cell spreading. Our data reveal a previously unanticipated cell shape-dependent mechanism that controls this key phenotypic alteration and provide insight into the distinct mechanisms activated by different EMT-inducing agents.

  9. IgE epitope proximity determines immune complex shape and effector cell activation capacity

    PubMed Central

    Gieras, Anna; Linhart, Birgit; Roux, Kenneth H.; Dutta, Moumita; Khodoun, Marat; Zafred, Domen; Cabauatan, Clarissa R.; Lupinek, Christian; Weber, Milena; Focke-Tejkl, Margarete; Keller, Walter; Finkelman, Fred D.; Valenta, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Background IgE-allergen complexes induce mast cell and basophil activation and thus immediate allergic inflammation. They are also important for IgE-facilitated allergen presentation to T cells by antigen-presenting cells. Objective To investigate whether the proximity of IgE binding sites on an allergen affects immune complex shape and subsequent effector cell activation in vitro and in vivo. Methods We constructed artificial allergens by grafting IgE epitopes in different numbers and proximity onto a scaffold protein. The shape of immune complexes formed between artificial allergens and the corresponding IgE was studied by negative-stain electron microscopy. Allergenic activity was determined using basophil activation assays. Mice were primed with IgE, followed by injection of artificial allergens to evaluate their in vivo allergenic activity. Severity of systemic anaphylaxis was measured by changes in body temperature. Results We could demonstrate simultaneous binding of 4 IgE antibodies in close vicinity to each other. The proximity of IgE binding sites on allergens influenced the shape of the resulting immune complexes and the magnitude of effector cell activation and in vivo inflammation. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the proximity of IgE epitopes on an allergen affects its allergenic activity. We thus identified a novel mechanism by which IgE-allergen complexes regulate allergic inflammation. This mechanism should be important for allergy and other immune complex–mediated diseases. PMID:26684291

  10. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Zaritsky, Arieh; Woldringh, Conrad L

    2015-01-01

    The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the bacterial cell division cycle (BCD), described as "The Central Dogma in Bacteriology," is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion) is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that the total amount of DNA associated with the replication terminus, so called "nucleoid complexity," is directly related to cell size and shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation) to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, e.g., stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell's center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids. PMID:26284044

  11. Do non-native plant species affect the shape of productivity-diversity relationships?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drake, J.M.; Cleland, E.E.; Horner-Devine, M. C.; Fleishman, E.; Bowles, C.; Smith, M.D.; Carney, K.; Emery, S.; Gramling, J.; Vandermast, D.B.; Grace, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between ecosystem processes and species richness is an active area of research and speculation. Both theoretical and experimental studies have been conducted in numerous ecosystems. One finding of these studies is that the shape of the relationship between productivity and species richness varies considerably among ecosystems and at different spatial scales, though little is known about the relative importance of physical and biological mechanisms causing this variation. Moreover, despite widespread concern about changes in species' global distributions, it remains unclear if and how such large-scale changes may affect this relationship. We present a new conceptual model of how invasive species might modulate relationships between primary production and species richness. We tested this model using long-term data on relationships between aboveground net primary production and species richness in six North American terrestrial ecosystems. We show that primary production and abundance of non-native species are both significant predictors of species richness, though we fail to detect effects of invasion extent on the shapes of the relationship between species richness and primary production.

  12. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zaritsky, Arieh; Woldringh, Conrad L.

    2015-01-01

    The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the bacterial cell division cycle (BCD), described as “The Central Dogma in Bacteriology,” is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion) is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that the total amount of DNA associated with the replication terminus, so called “nucleoid complexity,” is directly related to cell size and shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation) to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, e.g., stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell’s center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids. PMID:26284044

  13. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells.

    PubMed

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M; Nguyen, Nguyen H P; Bishop, Kyle J M; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2015-08-25

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core-shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble-crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non-momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier-Stokes equation. PMID:26253763

  14. Shape control and compartmentalization in active colloidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Spellings, Matthew; Engel, Michael; Klotsa, Daphne; Sabrina, Syeda; Drews, Aaron M.; Nguyen, Nguyen H. P.; Bishop, Kyle J. M.; Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2015-01-01

    Small autonomous machines like biological cells or soft robots can convert energy input into control of function and form. It is desired that this behavior emerges spontaneously and can be easily switched over time. For this purpose we introduce an active matter system that is loosely inspired by biology and which we term an active colloidal cell. The active colloidal cell consists of a boundary and a fluid interior, both of which are built from identical rotating spinners whose activity creates convective flows. Similarly to biological cell motility, which is driven by cytoskeletal components spread throughout the entire volume of the cell, active colloidal cells are characterized by highly distributed energy conversion. We demonstrate that we can control the shape of the active colloidal cell and drive compartmentalization by varying the details of the boundary (hard vs. flexible) and the character of the spinners (passive vs. active). We report buckling of the boundary controlled by the pattern of boundary activity, as well as formation of core–shell and inverted Janus phase-separated configurations within the active cell interior. As the cell size is increased, the inverted Janus configuration spontaneously breaks its mirror symmetry. The result is a bubble–crescent configuration, which alternates between two degenerate states over time and exhibits collective migration of the fluid along the boundary. Our results are obtained using microscopic, non–momentum-conserving Langevin dynamics simulations and verified via a phase-field continuum model coupled to a Navier–Stokes equation. PMID:26253763

  15. Gold nanoparticle size and shape influence on osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingchao; Li, Jia'en Jasmine; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xinlong; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been extensively explored for biomedical applications due to their advantages of facile synthesis and surface functionalization. Previous studies have suggested that AuNPs can induce differentiation of stem cells into osteoblasts. However, how the size and shape of AuNPs affect the differentiation response of stem cells has not been elucidated. In this work, a series of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-coated Au nanospheres, Au nanostars and Au nanorods with different diameters of 40, 70 and 110 nm were synthesized and their effects on osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were investigated. All the AuNPs showed good cytocompatibility and did not influence proliferation of hMSCs at the studied concentrations. Osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs was dependent on the size and shape of AuNPs. Sphere-40, sphere-70 and rod-70 significantly increased the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium deposition of cells while rod-40 reduced the ALP activity and calcium deposition. Gene profiling revealed that the expression of osteogenic marker genes was down-regulated after incubation with rod-40. However, up-regulation of these genes was found in the sphere-40, sphere-70 and rod-70 treatment. Moreover, it was found that the size and shape of AuNPs affected the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs through regulating the activation of Yes-associated protein (YAP). These results indicate that the size and shape of AuNPs had an influence on the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, which should provide useful guidance for the preparation of AuNPs with defined size and shape for their biomedical applications.Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been extensively explored for biomedical applications due to their advantages of facile synthesis and surface functionalization. Previous studies have suggested that AuNPs can induce differentiation of stem cells into osteoblasts. However, how the size and shape of AuNPs affect the

  16. Oriented cell division shapes carnivorous pitcher leaves of Sarracenia purpurea.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Kenji; Fujita, Hironori; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Tsukaya, Hirokazu; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2015-01-01

    Complex morphology is an evolutionary outcome of phenotypic diversification. In some carnivorous plants, the ancestral planar leaf has been modified to form a pitcher shape. However, how leaf development was altered during evolution remains unknown. Here we show that the pitcher leaves of Sarracenia purpurea develop through cell division patterns of adaxial tissues that are distinct from those in bifacial and peltate leaves, subsequent to standard expression of adaxial and abaxial marker genes. Differences in the orientation of cell divisions in the adaxial domain cause bifacial growth in the distal region and adaxial ridge protrusion in the middle region. These different growth patterns establish pitcher morphology. A computer simulation suggests that the cell division plane is critical for the pitcher morphogenesis. Our results imply that tissue-specific changes in the orientation of cell division underlie the development of a morphologically complex leaf. PMID:25774486

  17. Oriented cell division shapes carnivorous pitcher leaves of Sarracenia purpurea

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Kenji; Fujita, Hironori; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Tsukaya, Hirokazu; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu

    2015-01-01

    Complex morphology is an evolutionary outcome of phenotypic diversification. In some carnivorous plants, the ancestral planar leaf has been modified to form a pitcher shape. However, how leaf development was altered during evolution remains unknown. Here we show that the pitcher leaves of Sarracenia purpurea develop through cell division patterns of adaxial tissues that are distinct from those in bifacial and peltate leaves, subsequent to standard expression of adaxial and abaxial marker genes. Differences in the orientation of cell divisions in the adaxial domain cause bifacial growth in the distal region and adaxial ridge protrusion in the middle region. These different growth patterns establish pitcher morphology. A computer simulation suggests that the cell division plane is critical for the pitcher morphogenesis. Our results imply that tissue-specific changes in the orientation of cell division underlie the development of a morphologically complex leaf. PMID:25774486

  18. A minimal physical model captures the shapes of crawling cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tjhung, E.; Tiribocchi, A.; Marenduzzo, D.; Cates, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Cell motility in higher organisms (eukaryotes) is crucial to biological functions ranging from wound healing to immune response, and also implicated in diseases such as cancer. For cells crawling on hard surfaces, significant insights into motility have been gained from experiments replicating such motion in vitro. Such experiments show that crawling uses a combination of actin treadmilling (polymerization), which pushes the front of a cell forward, and myosin-induced stress (contractility), which retracts the rear. Here we present a simplified physical model of a crawling cell, consisting of a droplet of active polar fluid with contractility throughout, but treadmilling connected to a thin layer near the supporting wall. The model shows a variety of shapes and/or motility regimes, some closely resembling cases seen experimentally. Our work strongly supports the view that cellular motility exploits autonomous physical mechanisms whose operation does not need continuous regulatory effort.

  19. Gold nanoparticle size and shape influence on osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingchao; Li, Jia'En Jasmine; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Xinlong; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2016-04-21

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been extensively explored for biomedical applications due to their advantages of facile synthesis and surface functionalization. Previous studies have suggested that AuNPs can induce differentiation of stem cells into osteoblasts. However, how the size and shape of AuNPs affect the differentiation response of stem cells has not been elucidated. In this work, a series of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-coated Au nanospheres, Au nanostars and Au nanorods with different diameters of 40, 70 and 110 nm were synthesized and their effects on osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were investigated. All the AuNPs showed good cytocompatibility and did not influence proliferation of hMSCs at the studied concentrations. Osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs was dependent on the size and shape of AuNPs. Sphere-40, sphere-70 and rod-70 significantly increased the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium deposition of cells while rod-40 reduced the ALP activity and calcium deposition. Gene profiling revealed that the expression of osteogenic marker genes was down-regulated after incubation with rod-40. However, up-regulation of these genes was found in the sphere-40, sphere-70 and rod-70 treatment. Moreover, it was found that the size and shape of AuNPs affected the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs through regulating the activation of Yes-associated protein (YAP). These results indicate that the size and shape of AuNPs had an influence on the osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs, which should provide useful guidance for the preparation of AuNPs with defined size and shape for their biomedical applications. PMID:27010117

  20. Shape features for recognition of Pap smear cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goggin, Shelly D. D.; Janson, Scott D.

    1996-10-01

    Automated cytology relies on the use of features extracted form cell images to classify cells. This paper examines the classification capability of a number of shape features on a database of normal, abnormal and endocervical cell nuclei images. The features include the chain code, the directed Hausdorff distance, measured of the length of the radii of the cell and measures of ellipticity. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve is used as a figure of merit. For the calculation of the directed Hausdorff distance, the images are filtered using the Sorbel gradient and erosion. The feature in the image with the largest chain code is considered to be the nucleus. The other features use images threshold at a percentage of the maximum intensity in the image. The best feature for the discrimination between normal cells and either abnormal or endocervical cells was the directed Hausdorff distance, but this feature is computationally expensive. The minimum diameter as determined by the chain code was the second best feature for recognizing abnormal cells and is less computationally expensive. Ellipticity was the second best feature for recognizing endocervical cells, which is also less computationally expensive than the directed Hausdorff distance. An optical design for the calculation of directed Hausdorff distance feature is included, which could reduce the computational expense.

  1. Non-universal Voronoi cell shapes in amorphous ellipsoid packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaller, Fabian M.; Kapfer, Sebastian C.; Hilton, James E.; Cleary, Paul W.; Mecke, Klaus; De Michele, Cristiano; Schilling, Tanja; Saadatfar, Mohammad; Schröter, Matthias; Delaney, Gary W.; Schröder-Turk, Gerd E.

    2015-07-01

    In particulate systems with short-range interactions, such as granular matter or simple fluids, local structure determines the macroscopic physical properties. We analyse local structure metrics derived from the Voronoi diagram of oblate ellipsoids, for various aspect ratios α and global packing fractions φ\\text{g} . We focus on jammed static configurations of frictional ellipsoids, obtained by tomographic imaging and by discrete element method simulations. The rescaled distribution of local packing fractions φ\\text{l} , defined as the ratio of particle volume and its Voronoi cell volume, is found to be independent of the particle aspect ratio, and coincide with results for sphere packs. By contrast, the typical Voronoi cell shape, quantified by the Minkowski tensor anisotropy index β=β_02,0 , points towards a difference between random packings of spheres and those of oblate ellipsoids. While the average cell shape β of all cells with a given value of φ\\text{l} is similar in dense and loose jammed sphere packings, the structure of dense and loose ellipsoid packings differs substantially such that this does not hold true.

  2. Cell shape acquisition and maintenance in rodlike bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Teeffelen, Sven; Wingreen, Ned; Gitai, Zemer

    2010-03-01

    The shape of rodlike bacteria such as Escherichia coli is mainly governed by the expansion and reorganization of the peptidoglycan cell wall. The cell wall is a huge, mostly single-layered molecule of stiff glycan strands that typically run perpendicular to the long axis and are crosslinked by short peptides. The wall resists the excess pressure from inside the cell. Although much is known about the enzymes that synthesize the wall, the mechanisms by which the cell maintains a constant rod diameter and uniform glycan strand orientation during growth remain unknown. Here we present quantitative results on the structure and dynamics of two essential proteins, which are believed to play an important role in cell wall synthesis. In particular, we have focused on the filament-forming protein MreB, an actin homolog that forms a long helical bundle along the inner membrane of the cell, and penicillin-binding protein 2, an essential protein for peptide bond formation in the periplasm. Based on their interplay we discuss the possibility of MreB serving as a guide and ruler for cell wall synthesis.

  3. Common Cell Shape Evolution of Two Nasopharyngeal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Veyrier, Frédéric J.; Biais, Nicolas; Morales, Pablo; Belkacem, Nouria; Guilhen, Cyril; Ranjeva, Sylvia; Sismeiro, Odile; Péhau-Arnaudet, Gérard; Rocha, Eduardo P.; Werts, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory infectious diseases are the third cause of worldwide death. The nasopharynx is the portal of entry and the ecological niche of many microorganisms, of which some are pathogenic to humans, such as Neisseria meningitidis and Moraxella catarrhalis. These microbes possess several surface structures that interact with the actors of the innate immune system. In our attempt to understand the past evolution of these bacteria and their adaption to the nasopharynx, we first studied differences in cell wall structure, one of the strongest immune-modulators. We were able to show that a modification of peptidoglycan (PG) composition (increased proportion of pentapeptides) and a cell shape change from rod to cocci had been selected for along the past evolution of N. meningitidis. Using genomic comparison across species, we correlated the emergence of the new cell shape (cocci) with the deletion, from the genome of N. meningitidis ancestor, of only one gene: yacF. Moreover, the reconstruction of this genetic deletion in a bacterium harboring the ancestral version of the locus together with the analysis of the PG structure, suggest that this gene is coordinating the transition from cell elongation to cell division. Accompanying the loss of yacF, the elongation machinery was also lost by several of the descendants leading to the change in the PG structure observed in N. meningitidis. Finally, the same evolution was observed for the ancestor of M. catarrhalis. This suggests a strong selection of these genetic events during the colonization of the nasopharynx. This selection may have been forced by the requirement of evolving permissive interaction with the immune system, the need to reduce the cellular surface exposed to immune attacks without reducing the intracellular storage capacity, or the necessity to better compete for adhesion to target cells. PMID:26162030

  4. Cell-sized liposomes reveal how actomyosin cortical tension drives shape change.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Kevin; Tsai, Feng-Ching; Tsai, Feng C; Lees, Edouard; Voituriez, Raphaël; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Sykes, Cecile

    2013-10-01

    Animal cells actively generate contractile stress in the actin cortex, a thin actin network beneath the cell membrane, to facilitate shape changes during processes like cytokinesis and motility. On the microscopic scale, this stress is generated by myosin molecular motors, which bind to actin cytoskeletal filaments and use chemical energy to exert pulling forces. To decipher the physical basis for the regulation of cell shape changes, here, we use a cell-like system with a cortex anchored to the outside or inside of a liposome membrane. This system enables us to dissect the interplay between motor pulling forces, cortex-membrane anchoring, and network connectivity. We show that cortices on the outside of liposomes either spontaneously rupture and relax built-up mechanical stress by peeling away around the liposome or actively compress and crush the liposome. The decision between peeling and crushing depends on the cortical tension determined by the amount of motors and also on the connectivity of the cortex and its attachment to the membrane. Membrane anchoring strongly affects the morphology of cortex contraction inside liposomes: cortices contract inward when weakly attached, whereas they contract toward the membrane when strongly attached. We propose a physical model based on a balance of active tension and mechanical resistance to rupture. Our findings show how membrane attachment and network connectivity are able to regulate actin cortex remodeling and membrane-shape changes for cell polarization. PMID:24065829

  5. Ordered Patterns of Cell Shape and Orientational Correlation during Spontaneous Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Iwaya, Suguru; Sano, Masaki

    2008-01-01

    Background In the absence of stimuli, most motile eukaryotic cells move by spontaneously coordinating cell deformation with cell movement in the absence of stimuli. Yet little is known about how cells change their own shape and how cells coordinate the deformation and movement. Here, we investigated the mechanism of spontaneous cell migration by using computational analyses. Methodology We observed spontaneously migrating Dictyostelium cells in both a vegetative state (round cell shape and slow motion) and starved one (elongated cell shape and fast motion). We then extracted regular patterns of morphological dynamics and the pattern-dependent systematic coordination with filamentous actin (F-actin) and cell movement by statistical dynamic analyses. Conclusions/Significance We found that Dictyostelium cells in both vegetative and starved states commonly organize their own shape into three ordered patterns, elongation, rotation, and oscillation, in the absence of external stimuli. Further, cells inactivated for PI3-kinase (PI3K) and/or PTEN did not show ordered patterns due to the lack of spatial control in pseudopodial formation in both the vegetative and starved states. We also found that spontaneous polarization was achieved in starved cells by asymmetric localization of PTEN and F-actin. This breaking of the symmetry of protein localization maintained the leading edge and considerably enhanced the persistence of directed migration, and overall random exploration was ensured by switching among the different ordered patterns. Our findings suggest that Dictyostelium cells spontaneously create the ordered patterns of cell shape mediated by PI3K/PTEN/F-actin and control the direction of cell movement by coordination with these patterns even in the absence of external stimuli. PMID:19011688

  6. SHAPE SELECTIVE NANOCATALYSTS FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Murph, S.

    2012-09-12

    While gold and platinum have long been recognized for their beauty and value, researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are working on the nano-level to use these elements for creative solutions to our nation's energy and security needs. Multiinterdisciplinary teams consisting of chemists, materials scientists, physicists, computational scientists, and engineers are exploring unchartered territories with shape-selective nanocatalysts for the development of novel, cost effective and environmentally friendly energy solutions to meet global energy needs. This nanotechnology is vital, particularly as it relates to fuel cells.SRNL researchers have taken process, chemical, and materials discoveries and translated them for technological solution and deployment. The group has developed state-of-the art shape-selective core-shell-alloy-type gold-platinum nanostructures with outstanding catalytic capabilities that address many of the shortcomings of the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). The newly developed nanostructures not only busted the performance of the platinum catalyst, but also reduced the material cost and overall weight of the fuel cell.

  7. Dynamics of cell wall elasticity pattern shapes the cell during yeast mating morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Goldenbogen, Björn; Giese, Wolfgang; Hemmen, Marie; Uhlendorf, Jannis; Herrmann, Andreas; Klipp, Edda

    2016-09-01

    The cell wall defines cell shape and maintains integrity of fungi and plants. When exposed to mating pheromone, Saccharomyces cerevisiae grows a mating projection and alters in morphology from spherical to shmoo form. Although structural and compositional alterations of the cell wall accompany shape transitions, their impact on cell wall elasticity is unknown. In a combined theoretical and experimental approach using finite-element modelling and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we investigated the influence of spatially and temporally varying material properties on mating morphogenesis. Time-resolved elasticity maps of shmooing yeast acquired with AFM in vivo revealed distinct patterns, with soft material at the emerging mating projection and stiff material at the tip. The observed cell wall softening in the protrusion region is necessary for the formation of the characteristic shmoo shape, and results in wider and longer mating projections. The approach is generally applicable to tip-growing fungi and plants cells. PMID:27605377

  8. Effect of Electrode Shape on Impedance of Single HeLa Cell: A COMSOL Simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Min-Haw; Chang, Wen-Hao

    2015-01-01

    In disease prophylaxis, single cell inspection provides more detailed data compared to conventional examinations. At the individual cell level, the electrical properties of the cell are helpful for understanding the effects of cellular behavior. The electric field distribution affects the results of single cell impedance measurements whereas the electrode geometry affects the electric field distributions. Therefore, this study obtained numerical solutions by using the COMSOL multiphysics package to perform FEM simulations of the effects of electrode geometry on microfluidic devices. An equivalent circuit model incorporating the PBS solution, a pair of electrodes, and a cell is used to obtain the impedance of a single HeLa cell. Simulations indicated that the circle and parallel electrodes provide higher electric field strength compared to cross and standard electrodes at the same operating voltage. Additionally, increasing the operating voltage reduces the impedance magnitude of a single HeLa cell in all electrode shapes. Decreasing impedance magnitude of the single HeLa cell increases measurement sensitivity, but higher operational voltage will damage single HeLa cell. PMID:25961043

  9. Memory of cell shape biases stochastic fate decision-making despite mitotic rounding

    PubMed Central

    Akanuma, Takashi; Chen, Cong; Sato, Tetsuo; Merks, Roeland M. H.; Sato, Thomas N.

    2016-01-01

    Cell shape influences function, and the current model suggests that such shape effect is transient. However, cells dynamically change their shapes, thus, the critical question is whether shape information remains influential on future cell function even after the original shape is lost. We address this question by integrating experimental and computational approaches. Quantitative live imaging of asymmetric cell-fate decision-making and their live shape manipulation demonstrates that cellular eccentricity of progenitor cell indeed biases stochastic fate decisions of daughter cells despite mitotic rounding. Modelling and simulation indicates that polarized localization of Delta protein instructs by the progenitor eccentricity is an origin of the bias. Simulation with varying parameters predicts that diffusion rate and abundance of Delta molecules quantitatively influence the bias. These predictions are experimentally validated by physical and genetic methods, showing that cells exploit a mechanism reported herein to influence their future fates based on their past shape despite dynamic shape changes. PMID:27349214

  10. Memory of cell shape biases stochastic fate decision-making despite mitotic rounding.

    PubMed

    Akanuma, Takashi; Chen, Cong; Sato, Tetsuo; Merks, Roeland M H; Sato, Thomas N

    2016-01-01

    Cell shape influences function, and the current model suggests that such shape effect is transient. However, cells dynamically change their shapes, thus, the critical question is whether shape information remains influential on future cell function even after the original shape is lost. We address this question by integrating experimental and computational approaches. Quantitative live imaging of asymmetric cell-fate decision-making and their live shape manipulation demonstrates that cellular eccentricity of progenitor cell indeed biases stochastic fate decisions of daughter cells despite mitotic rounding. Modelling and simulation indicates that polarized localization of Delta protein instructs by the progenitor eccentricity is an origin of the bias. Simulation with varying parameters predicts that diffusion rate and abundance of Delta molecules quantitatively influence the bias. These predictions are experimentally validated by physical and genetic methods, showing that cells exploit a mechanism reported herein to influence their future fates based on their past shape despite dynamic shape changes. PMID:27349214

  11. Hypoxia-shaped vascular niche for cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Collet, Guillaume; El Hafny-Rahbi, Bouchra; Nadim, Mahdi; Tejchman, Anna; Klimkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    The tumour microenvironment, long considered as determining cancer development, still offers research fields to define hallmarks of cancer. An early key-step, the “angiogenic switch”, allows tumour growth. Pathologic angiogenesis is a cancer hallmark as it features results of tumour-specific properties that can be summarised as a response to hypoxia. The hypoxic state occurs when the tumour mass reaches a volume sufficient not to permit oxygen diffusion inside the tumour centre. Thus tumour cells turn on adaptation mechanisms to the low pO2 level, inducing biochemical responses in terms of cytokines/chemokines/receptors and consequently recruitment of specific cell types, as well as cell-selection inside the tumour. Moreover, these changes are orchestrated by the microRNA balance strongly reflecting the hypoxic milieu and mediating the cross-talk between endothelial and tumour cells. MicroRNAs control of the endothelial precursor-vascular settings shapes the niche for selection of cancer stem cells. PMID:25691820

  12. Anatomically Shaped Tooth and Periodontal Regeneration by Cell Homing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, K.; Lee, C.H.; Kim, B.K.; Mao, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Tooth regeneration by cell delivery encounters translational hurdles. We hypothesized that anatomically correct teeth can regenerate in scaffolds without cell transplantation. Novel, anatomically shaped human molar scaffolds and rat incisor scaffolds were fabricated by 3D bioprinting from a hybrid of poly-ε-caprolactone and hydroxyapatite with 200-µm-diameter interconnecting microchannels. In each of 22 rats, an incisor scaffold was implanted orthotopically following mandibular incisor extraction, whereas a human molar scaffold was implanted ectopically into the dorsum. Stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF1) and bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7) were delivered in scaffold microchannels. After 9 weeks, a putative periodontal ligament and new bone regenerated at the interface of rat incisor scaffold with native alveolar bone. SDF1 and BMP7 delivery not only recruited significantly more endogenous cells, but also elaborated greater angiogenesis than growth-factor-free control scaffolds. Regeneration of tooth-like structures and periodontal integration by cell homing provide an alternative to cell delivery, and may accelerate clinical applications. PMID:20448245

  13. A model for shape generation by strain and cell-cell adhesion in the epithelium of an arthropod leg segment.

    PubMed

    Mittenthal, J E; Mazo, R M

    1983-02-01

    We present a model for the energetic factors determining the most stable shape of a tubular epithelium such as the hypodermis of an arthropod leg segment. The model uses the analysis by Steinberg (1963) of rearrangement of cells in aggregates under the influence of differential adhesion, combining this analysis with the assumption that the epithelium behaves as an elastic sheet. The epithelium is assumed to consist of blocks of cells with different adhesive affinities, which remain unmixed in a quilt pattern. Rearrangement of cells within each block can adjust the shape of the tube by changing the shapes of the blocks. By means of such rearrangements the tube develops that shape which minimizes a free energy. The free energy is the difference between the energy of mechanical strain due to bending of the epithelium and the work of adhesion among cells. Minimization of the free energy for a cylindrical segment yields a scaling relation involving the length and radius of the segment. Leg segments of Drosophila conformed approximately to this relation, with deviations which suggest that a whole-limb pattern of adhesive affinities modulates the shaping effects of an adhesive pattern repeated in each leg segment. The model also predicts a transient deformation in an epithelium following a grafting operation. For example, deleting a slab of tissue from a tubular segment and reuniting the cut ends should produce a constriction of the tube at the host-graft junction. We propose that patterns of strain and adhesion can provide positional information which regulates subsequent development. Local increases in strain or adhesive disparity may stimulate mitoses; the resulting changes in distribution of cells will affect morphogenesis. PMID:6834865

  14. Understanding Cell Shape Phenotypes Associated with Stem Cell Differentiation Induced by Topographical Cues of Nanofiber Microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Desu; Sarkar, Sumona; Losert, Wolfgang

    It is increasingly important to understand cell responses to bioinspired material structures and topographies designed to guide cell functional alterations. In this study, we investigated association between early stage cell morphological response and osteogenic differentiation of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) induced by poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) nanofiber scaffolds (PCL-NF). Accounting for both multi-parametric complexity and biological heterogeneity, we developed an analysis framework based on support vector machines and a multi-cell level averaging method (supercell) to determine the most pronounced cell shape features describing shape phenotypes of cells in PCL-NF compared to cells on flat PCL films. We found that smaller size and more dendritic shape were the major morphological responses of hBMSCs to PCL-NF on day 1 of cell culture. Further, we investigated the shape phenotypes of hBMSCs in PCL-NF of different fiber densities to monitor the transition between 2-D and 3-D topographies. We tracked the genotypic, phenotypic and morphological responses of hBMSCs to different fiber densities at multiple time points to identify correlations between hBMSCs differentiation and early stage morphology in PCL-NF scaffolds.

  15. Ring-Shaped Microlanes and Chemical Barriers as a Platform for Probing Single-Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Christoph; Segerer, Felix J.; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2016-01-01

    Quantification and discrimination of pharmaceutical and disease-related effects on cell migration requires detailed characterization of single-cell motility. In this context, micropatterned substrates that constrain cells within defined geometries facilitate quantitative readout of locomotion. Here, we study quasi-one-dimensional cell migration in ring-shaped microlanes. We observe bimodal behavior in form of alternating states of directional migration (run state) and reorientation (rest state). Both states show exponential lifetime distributions with characteristic persistence times, which, together with the cell velocity in the run state, provide a set of parameters that succinctly describe cell motion. By introducing PEGylated barriers of different widths into the lane, we extend this description by quantifying the effects of abrupt changes in substrate chemistry on migrating cells. The transit probability decreases exponentially as a function of barrier width, thus specifying a characteristic penetration depth of the leading lamellipodia. Applying this fingerprint-like characterization of cell motion, we compare different cell lines, and demonstrate that the cancer drug candidate salinomycin affects transit probability and resting time, but not run time or run velocity. Hence, the presented assay allows to assess multiple migration-related parameters, permits detailed characterization of cell motility, and has potential applications in cell biology and advanced drug screening. PMID:27242099

  16. Ring-Shaped Microlanes and Chemical Barriers as a Platform for Probing Single-Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Christoph; Segerer, Felix J; Wagner, Ernst; Roidl, Andreas; Rädler, Joachim O

    2016-01-01

    Quantification and discrimination of pharmaceutical and disease-related effects on cell migration requires detailed characterization of single-cell motility. In this context, micropatterned substrates that constrain cells within defined geometries facilitate quantitative readout of locomotion. Here, we study quasi-one-dimensional cell migration in ring-shaped microlanes. We observe bimodal behavior in form of alternating states of directional migration (run state) and reorientation (rest state). Both states show exponential lifetime distributions with characteristic persistence times, which, together with the cell velocity in the run state, provide a set of parameters that succinctly describe cell motion. By introducing PEGylated barriers of different widths into the lane, we extend this description by quantifying the effects of abrupt changes in substrate chemistry on migrating cells. The transit probability decreases exponentially as a function of barrier width, thus specifying a characteristic penetration depth of the leading lamellipodia. Applying this fingerprint-like characterization of cell motion, we compare different cell lines, and demonstrate that the cancer drug candidate salinomycin affects transit probability and resting time, but not run time or run velocity. Hence, the presented assay allows to assess multiple migration-related parameters, permits detailed characterization of cell motility, and has potential applications in cell biology and advanced drug screening. PMID:27242099

  17. Stathmin Activity Influences Sarcoma Cell Shape, Motility, and Metastatic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Belletti, Barbara; Nicoloso, Milena S.; Schiappacassi, Monica; Berton, Stefania; Lovat, Francesca; Wolf, Katarina; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; D'Andrea, Sara; Zucchetto, Antonella; Friedl, Peter; Colombatti, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    The balanced activity of microtubule-stabilizing and -destabilizing proteins determines the extent of microtubule dynamics, which is implicated in many cellular processes, including adhesion, migration, and morphology. Among the destabilizing proteins, stathmin is overexpressed in different human malignancies and has been recently linked to the regulation of cell motility. The observation that stathmin was overexpressed in human recurrent and metastatic sarcomas prompted us to investigate stathmin contribution to tumor local invasiveness and distant dissemination. We found that stathmin stimulated cell motility in and through the extracellular matrix (ECM) in vitro and increased the metastatic potential of sarcoma cells in vivo. On contact with the ECM, stathmin was negatively regulated by phosphorylation. Accordingly, a less phosphorylable stathmin point mutant impaired ECM-induced microtubule stabilization and conferred a higher invasive potential, inducing a rounded cell shape coupled with amoeboid-like motility in three-dimensional matrices. Our results indicate that stathmin plays a significant role in tumor metastasis formation, a finding that could lead to exploitation of stathmin as a target of new antimetastatic drugs. PMID:18305103

  18. Coiled-coil networking shapes cell molecular machinery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongqiang; Zhang, Xinlei; Zhang, Hong; Lu, Yi; Huang, Haolong; Dong, Xiaoxi; Chen, Jinan; Dong, Jiuhong; Yang, Xiao; Hang, Haiying; Jiang, Taijiao

    2012-01-01

    The highly abundant α-helical coiled-coil motif not only mediates crucial protein–protein interactions in the cell but is also an attractive scaffold in synthetic biology and material science and a potential target for disease intervention. Therefore a systematic understanding of the coiled-coil interactions (CCIs) at the organismal level would help unravel the full spectrum of the biological function of this interaction motif and facilitate its application in therapeutics. We report the first identified genome-wide CCI network in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which consists of 3495 pair-wise interactions among 598 predicted coiled-coil regions. Computational analysis revealed that the CCI network is specifically and functionally organized and extensively involved in the organization of cell machinery. We further show that CCIs play a critical role in the assembly of the kinetochore, and disruption of the CCI network leads to defects in kinetochore assembly and cell division. The CCI network identified in this study is a valuable resource for systematic characterization of coiled coils in the shaping and regulation of a host of cellular machineries and provides a basis for the utilization of coiled coils as domain-based probes for network perturbation and pharmacological applications. PMID:22875988

  19. Analysis of a minimal Rho-GTPase circuit regulating cell shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, William R.; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2016-08-01

    Networks of Rho-family GTPases regulate eukaryotic cell polarization and motility by controlling assembly and contraction of the cytoskeleton. The mutually inhibitory Rac–Rho circuit is emerging as a central, regulatory hub that can affect the shape and motility phenotype of eukaryotic cells. Recent experimental manipulation of the amounts of Rac and Rho or their regulators (guanine nucleotide-exchange factors, GTPase-activating proteins, guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors) have been shown to bias the prevalence of these different states and promote transitions between them. Here we show that part of this data can be understood in terms of inherent Rac–Rho mutually inhibitory dynamics. We analyze a spatio-temporal mathematical model of Rac–Rho dynamics to produce a detailed set of predictions of how parameters such as GTPase rates of activation and total amounts affect cell decisions (such as Rho-dominated contraction, Rac-dominated spreading, and spatially segregated Rac–Rho polarization). We find that in some parameter regimes, a cell can take on any of these three fates depending on its environment or stimuli. We also predict how experimental manipulations (corresponding to parameter variations) can affect cell shapes observed. Our methods are based on local perturbation analysis (a kind of nonlinear stability analysis), and an approximation of nonlinear feedback by sharp switches. We compare the Rac–Rho model to an even simpler single-GTPase (‘wave-pinning’) model and demonstrate that the overall behavior is inherent to GTPase properties, rather than stemming solely from network topology.

  20. Analysis of a minimal Rho-GTPase circuit regulating cell shape.

    PubMed

    Holmes, William R; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2016-01-01

    Networks of Rho-family GTPases regulate eukaryotic cell polarization and motility by controlling assembly and contraction of the cytoskeleton. The mutually inhibitory Rac-Rho circuit is emerging as a central, regulatory hub that can affect the shape and motility phenotype of eukaryotic cells. Recent experimental manipulation of the amounts of Rac and Rho or their regulators (guanine nucleotide-exchange factors, GTPase-activating proteins, guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors) have been shown to bias the prevalence of these different states and promote transitions between them. Here we show that part of this data can be understood in terms of inherent Rac-Rho mutually inhibitory dynamics. We analyze a spatio-temporal mathematical model of Rac-Rho dynamics to produce a detailed set of predictions of how parameters such as GTPase rates of activation and total amounts affect cell decisions (such as Rho-dominated contraction, Rac-dominated spreading, and spatially segregated Rac-Rho polarization). We find that in some parameter regimes, a cell can take on any of these three fates depending on its environment or stimuli. We also predict how experimental manipulations (corresponding to parameter variations) can affect cell shapes observed. Our methods are based on local perturbation analysis (a kind of nonlinear stability analysis), and an approximation of nonlinear feedback by sharp switches. We compare the Rac-Rho model to an even simpler single-GTPase ('wave-pinning') model and demonstrate that the overall behavior is inherent to GTPase properties, rather than stemming solely from network topology. PMID:27434017

  1. Tubular Scaffold with Shape Recovery Effect for Cell Guide Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Kazi M. Zakir; Zhu, Chenkai; Felfel, Reda M.; Sharmin, Nusrat; Ahmed, Ifty

    2015-01-01

    Tubular scaffolds with aligned polylactic acid (PLA) fibres were fabricated for cell guide applications by immersing rolled PLA fibre mats into a polyvinyl acetate (PVAc) solution to bind the mats. The PVAc solution was also mixed with up to 30 wt % β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) content. Cross-sectional images of the scaffold materials obtained via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed the aligned fibre morphology along with a significant number of voids in between the bundles of fibres. The addition of β-TCP into the scaffolds played an important role in increasing the void content from 17.1% to 25.3% for the 30 wt % β-TCP loading, which was measured via micro-CT (µCT) analysis. Furthermore, µCT analyses revealed the distribution of aggregated β-TCP particles in between the various PLA fibre layers of the scaffold. The compressive modulus properties of the scaffolds increased from 66 MPa to 83 MPa and the compressive strength properties decreased from 67 MPa to 41 MPa for the 30 wt % β-TCP content scaffold. The scaffolds produced were observed to change into a soft and flexible form which demonstrated shape recovery properties after immersion in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) media at 37 °C for 24 h. The cytocompatibility studies (using MG-63 human osteosarcoma cell line) revealed preferential cell proliferation along the longitudinal direction of the fibres as compared to the control tissue culture plastic. The manufacturing process highlighted above reveals a simple process for inducing controlled cell alignment and varying porosity features within tubular scaffolds for potential tissue engineering applications. PMID:26184328

  2. Shape matters: effects of silver nanospheres and wires on human alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In nanotoxicology, the exact role of particle shape, in relation to the composition, on the capacity to induce toxicity is largely unknown. We investigated the toxic and immunotoxic effects of silver wires (length: 1.5 - 25 μm; diameter 100 - 160 nm), spherical silver nanoparticles (30 nm) and silver microparticles (<45 μm) on alveolar epithelial cells (A549). Methods Wires and nanoparticles were synthesized by wet-chemistry methods and extensively characterized. Cell viability and cytotoxicity were assessed and potential immunotoxic effects were investigated. To compare the effects on an activated and a resting immune system, cells were stimulated with rhTNF-α or left untreated. Changes in intracellular free calcium levels were determined using calcium imaging. Finally, ion release from the particles was assessed by ICP-MS and the effects of released ions on cell viability and cytotoxicity were tested. Results No effects were observed for the spherical particles, whereas the silver wires significantly reduced cell viability and increased LDH release from A549 cells. Cytokine promoter induction and NF-κB activation decreased in a concentration dependent manner similar to the decrease seen in cell viability. In addition, a strong increase of intracellular calcium levels within minutes after addition of wires was observed. This toxicity was not due to free silver ions, since the samples with the highest ion release did not induce toxicity and ion release control experiments with cells treated with pre-incubated medium did not show any effects either. Conclusions These data showed that silver wires strongly affect the alveolar epithelial cells, whereas spherical silver particles had no effect. This supports the hypothesis that shape is one of the important factors that determine particle toxicity. PMID:22208550

  3. Handle Shape Affects the Grip Force Distribution and the Muscle Loadings During Power Grip Tasks.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Jérémy; Goislard De Monsabert, Benjamin; Berton, Eric; Vigouroux, Laurent

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the effect of handle shape on the grip force distribution in the hand and on the muscle forces during maximal power grip tasks. Eleven subjects maximally grasped 3 handles with different external shapes (circular, elliptic, and double-frustum). A handle dynamometer, equipped with both a force sensor and a pressure map, was used to record the forces exerted at the hand/handle interface. The finger and wrist joint postures were also computed from synchronized kinematic measurement. These processed data were then used as input of a biomechanical hand model to estimate muscle forces. The results showed that handle shape influences the maximal grip force, the grip force distribution, and the finger joint postures. Particularly, we observed that the elliptical shape resulted in a 6.6% lower maximal grip force compared with the circular and double-frustum handle. Concomitantly, the estimated muscle forces also varied significantly according to the handle shape, with up to 48% differences for the flexor digitorum superficialis muscle for example. Interestingly, different muscle coordination strategies were observed depending on the handle shape, therefore suggesting a potential influence of these geometrical characteristics on pathological risks such as tendonitis. PMID:26214057

  4. Dendritic Cells under Hypoxia: How Oxygen Shortage Affects the Linkage between Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Winning, Sandra; Fandrey, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered as one of the main regulators of immune responses. They collect antigens, process them, and present typical antigenic structures to lymphocytes, thereby inducing an adaptive immune response. All these processes take place under conditions of oxygen shortage (hypoxia) which is often not considered in experimental settings. This review highlights how deeply hypoxia modulates human as well as mouse immature and mature dendritic cell functions. It tries to link in vitro results to actual in vivo studies and outlines how hypoxia-mediated shaping of dendritic cells affects the activation of (innate) immunity. PMID:26966693

  5. Cell shape, spreading symmetry, and the polarization of stress-fibers in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemel, A.; Rehfeldt, F.; Brown, A. E. X.; Discher, D. E.; Safran, S. A.

    2010-05-01

    The active regulation of cellular forces during cell adhesion plays an important role in the determination of cell size, shape, and internal structure. While on flat, homogeneous and isotropic substrates some cells spread isotropically, others spread anisotropically and assume elongated structures. In addition, in their native environment as well as in vitro experiments, the cell shape and spreading asymmetry can be modulated by the local distribution of adhesive molecules and topography of the environment. We present a simple elastic model and experiments on stem cells to explain the variation of cell size with the matrix rigidity. In addition, we predict the experimental consequences of two mechanisms of acto-myosin polarization and focus here on the effect of the cell spreading asymmetry on the regulation of the stress-fiber alignment in the cytoskeleton. We show that when cell spreading is sufficiently asymmetric the alignment of acto-myosin forces in the cell increases monotonically with the matrix rigidity; however, in general this alignment is non-monotonic, as shown previously. These results highlight the importance of the symmetry characteristics of cell spreading in the regulation of cytoskeleton structure and suggest a mechanism by which different cell types may acquire different morphologies and internal structures in different mechanical environments.

  6. Directional control of lamellipodia extension by constraining cell shape and orienting cell tractional forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Kevin Kit; Brock, Amy Lepre; Brangwynne, Cliff; Mannix, Robert J.; Wang, Ning; Ostuni, Emanuele; Geisse, Nicholas A.; Adams, Josephine C.; Whitesides, George M.; Ingber, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    Directed cell migration is critical for tissue morphogenesis and wound healing, but the mechanism of directional control is poorly understood. Here we show that the direction in which cells extend their leading edge can be controlled by constraining cell shape using micrometer-sized extracellular matrix (ECM) islands. When cultured on square ECM islands in the presence of motility factors, cells preferentially extended lamellipodia, filopodia, and microspikes from their corners. Square cells reoriented their stress fibers and focal adhesions so that tractional forces were concentrated in these corner regions. When cell tension was dissipated, lamellipodia extension ceased. Mechanical interactions between cells and ECM that modulate cytoskeletal tension may therefore play a key role in the control of directional cell motility.

  7. Factors Affecting Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Performance and Reproducibility

    SciTech Connect

    Moller-Holst S.

    1998-11-01

    Development of fuel cells is often based on small-scale laboratory studies. Due to limited time and budgets, a minimum number of cells are usually prepared and tested, thus, conclusions about improved performance are often drawn from studies of a few cells. Generally, statistics showing the significance of an effect are seldom reported. In this work a simple PEM fuel cell electrode optimization experiment is used as an example to illustrate the importance of statistical evaluation of factors affecting cell performance. The use of fractional factorial design of experiments to reduce the number of cells that have to be studied is also addressed.

  8. Single cells spreading on a protein lattice adopt an energy minimizing shape.

    PubMed

    Vianay, Benoit; Käfer, Jos; Planus, Emmanuelle; Block, Marc; Graner, François; Guillou, Hervé

    2010-09-17

    When spreading onto a protein microlattice living cells spontaneously acquire simple shapes determined by the lattice geometry. This suggests that, on a lattice, living cells' shapes are in thermodynamic metastable states. Using a model at thermodynamic equilibrium we are able to reproduce the observed shapes. We build a phase diagram based on two adimensional parameters characterizing essential cellular properties involved in spreading: the cell's compressibility and fluctuations. PMID:20867675

  9. Wingless signaling and the control of cell shape in Drosophila wing imaginal discs.

    PubMed

    Widmann, Thomas J; Dahmann, Christian

    2009-10-01

    The control of cell morphology is important for shaping animals during development. Here we address the role of the Wnt/Wingless signal transduction pathway and two of its target genes, vestigial and shotgun (encoding E-cadherin), in controlling the columnar shape of Drosophila wing disc cells. We show that clones of cells mutant for arrow (encoding an essential component of the Wingless signal transduction pathway), vestigial or shotgun undergo profound cell shape changes and are extruded towards the basal side of the epithelium. Compartment-wide expression of a dominant-negative form of the Wingless transducer T-cell factor (TCF/Pangolin), or double-stranded RNA targeting vestigial or shotgun, leads to abnormally short cells throughout this region, indicating that these genes act cell autonomously to maintain normal columnar cell shape. Conversely, overexpression of Wingless, a constitutively-active form of the Wingless transducer beta-catenin/Armadillo, or Vestigial, results in precocious cell elongation. Co-expression of Vestigial partially suppresses the abnormal cell shape induced by dominant-negative TCF. We conclude that Wingless signal transduction plays a cell-autonomous role in promoting and maintaining the columnar shape of wing disc cells. Furthermore, our data suggest that Wingless controls cell shape, in part, through maintaining vestigial expression. PMID:19627985

  10. The Complexity of Background Clutter Affects Nectar Bat Use of Flower Odor and Shape Cues

    PubMed Central

    Muchhala, Nathan; Serrano, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Given their small size and high metabolism, nectar bats need to be able to quickly locate flowers during foraging bouts. Chiropterophilous plants depend on these bats for their reproduction, thus they also benefit if their flowers can be easily located, and we would expect that floral traits such as odor and shape have evolved to maximize detection by bats. However, relatively little is known about the importance of different floral cues during foraging bouts. In the present study, we undertook a set of flight cage experiments with two species of nectar bats (Anoura caudifer and A. geoffroyi) and artificial flowers to compare the importance of shape and scent cues in locating flowers. In a training phase, a bat was presented an artificial flower with a given shape and scent, whose position was constantly shifted to prevent reliance on spatial memory. In the experimental phase, two flowers were presented, one with the training-flower scent and one with the training-flower shape. For each experimental repetition, we recorded which flower was located first, and then shifted flower positions. Additionally, experiments were repeated in a simple environment, without background clutter, or a complex environment, with a background of leaves and branches. Results demonstrate that bats visit either flower indiscriminately with simple backgrounds, with no significant difference in terms of whether they visit the training-flower odor or training-flower shape first. However, in a complex background olfaction was the most important cue; scented flowers were consistently located first. This suggests that for well-exposed flowers, without obstruction from clutter, vision and/or echolocation are sufficient in locating them. In more complex backgrounds, nectar bats depend more heavily on olfaction during foraging bouts. PMID:26445216

  11. The Complexity of Background Clutter Affects Nectar Bat Use of Flower Odor and Shape Cues.

    PubMed

    Muchhala, Nathan; Serrano, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Given their small size and high metabolism, nectar bats need to be able to quickly locate flowers during foraging bouts. Chiropterophilous plants depend on these bats for their reproduction, thus they also benefit if their flowers can be easily located, and we would expect that floral traits such as odor and shape have evolved to maximize detection by bats. However, relatively little is known about the importance of different floral cues during foraging bouts. In the present study, we undertook a set of flight cage experiments with two species of nectar bats (Anoura caudifer and A. geoffroyi) and artificial flowers to compare the importance of shape and scent cues in locating flowers. In a training phase, a bat was presented an artificial flower with a given shape and scent, whose position was constantly shifted to prevent reliance on spatial memory. In the experimental phase, two flowers were presented, one with the training-flower scent and one with the training-flower shape. For each experimental repetition, we recorded which flower was located first, and then shifted flower positions. Additionally, experiments were repeated in a simple environment, without background clutter, or a complex environment, with a background of leaves and branches. Results demonstrate that bats visit either flower indiscriminately with simple backgrounds, with no significant difference in terms of whether they visit the training-flower odor or training-flower shape first. However, in a complex background olfaction was the most important cue; scented flowers were consistently located first. This suggests that for well-exposed flowers, without obstruction from clutter, vision and/or echolocation are sufficient in locating them. In more complex backgrounds, nectar bats depend more heavily on olfaction during foraging bouts. PMID:26445216

  12. Influence of cell wall shape and density on the mechanical behaviour of 2D foam structures

    SciTech Connect

    Harders, Harald . E-mail: h.harders@tu-bs.de; Hupfer, Knut; Roesler, Joachim

    2005-03-01

    This article describes simulations on the influence of the cell wall shape as well as the density on the elastic stiffness of regular and stochastic honeycomb structures. Starting from an equation by Gibson and Ashby for regular honeycombs, an analytical model is developed that describes the influence of different cell wall shapes on the elastic response of these structures. In addition, this analytical model is modified in order to use free parameters that can be fitted to finite element simulation results of stochastic Voronoi honeycomb structures. The model describes the results well. Young's modulus depends strongly on the cell wall shape, achieving a maximum for slightly concave shapes.

  13. Cell surface lectin array: parameters affecting cell glycan signature.

    PubMed

    Landemarre, Ludovic; Cancellieri, Perrine; Duverger, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Among the "omics", glycomics is one of the most complex fields and needs complementary strategies of analysis to decipher the "glycan dictionary". As an alternative method, which has developed since the beginning of the 21st century, lectin array technology could generate relevant information related to glycan motifs, accessibility and a number of other valuable insights from molecules (purified and non-purified) or cells. Based on a cell line model, this study deals with the key parameters that influence the whole cell surface glycan interaction with lectin arrays and the consequences on the interpretation and reliability of the results. The comparison between the adherent and suspension forms of Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells, showed respective glycan signatures, which could be inhibited specifically by neoglycoproteins. The modifications of the respective glycan signatures were also revealed according to the detachment modes and cell growth conditions. Finally the power of lectin array technology was highlighted by the possibility of selecting and characterizing a specific clone from the mother cell line, based on the slight difference determination in the respective glycan signatures. PMID:22899543

  14. Building ensemble representations: How the shape of preceding distractor distributions affects visual search.

    PubMed

    Chetverikov, Andrey; Campana, Gianluca; Kristjánsson, Árni

    2016-08-01

    Perception allows us to extract information about regularities in the environment. Observers can quickly determine summary statistics of a group of objects and detect outliers. The existing body of research has, however, not revealed how such ensemble representations develop over time. Moreover, the correspondence between the physical distribution of features in the external world and their potential internal representation as a probability density function (PDF) by the visual system is still unknown. Here, for the first time we demonstrate that such internal PDFs are built during visual search and show how they can be assessed with repetition and role-reversal effects. Using singleton search for an oddly oriented target line among differently oriented distractors (a priming of pop-out paradigm), we test how different properties of previously observed distractor distributions (mean, variability, and shape) influence search times. Our results indicate that observers learn properties of distractor distributions over and above mean and variance; in fact, response times also depend on the shape of the preceding distractor distribution. Response times decrease as a function of target distance from the mean of preceding Gaussian distractor distributions, and the decrease is steeper when preceding distributions have small standard deviations. When preceding distributions are uniform, however, this decrease in response times can be described by a two-piece function corresponding to the uniform distribution PDF. Moreover, following skewed distributions response times function is skewed in accordance with the skew in distributions. Indeed, internal PDFs seem to be specifically tuned to the observed feature distribution. PMID:27232163

  15. γδ T Cells Shape Preimmune Peripheral B Cell Populations.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yafei; Getahun, Andrew; Heiser, Ryan A; Detanico, Thiago O; Aviszus, Katja; Kirchenbaum, Greg A; Casper, Tamara L; Huang, Chunjian; Aydintug, M Kemal; Carding, Simon R; Ikuta, Koichi; Huang, Hua; Wysocki, Lawrence J; Cambier, John C; O'Brien, Rebecca L; Born, Willi K

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that selective ablation of certain γδ T cell subsets, rather than removal of all γδ T cells, strongly affects serum Ab levels in nonimmunized mice. This type of manipulation also changed T cells, including residual γδ T cells, revealing some interdependence of γδ T cell populations. For example, in mice lacking Vγ4(+) and Vγ6(+) γδ T cells (B6.TCR-Vγ4(-/-)/6(-/-)), we observed expanded Vγ1(+) cells, which changed in composition and activation and produced more IL-4 upon stimulation in vitro, increased IL-4 production by αβ T cells as well as spontaneous germinal center formation in the spleen, and elevated serum Ig and autoantibodies. We therefore examined B cell populations in this and other γδ-deficient mouse strains. Whereas immature bone marrow B cells remained largely unchanged, peripheral B cells underwent several changes. Specifically, transitional and mature B cells in the spleen of B6.TCR-Vγ4(-/-)/6(-/-) mice and other peripheral B cell populations were diminished, most of all splenic marginal zone (MZ) B cells. However, relative frequencies and absolute numbers of Ab-producing cells, as well as serum levels of Abs, IL-4, and BAFF, were increased. Cell transfers confirmed that these changes are directly dependent on the altered γδ T cells in this strain and on their enhanced potential of producing IL-4. Further evidence suggests the possibility of direct interactions between γδ T cells and B cells in the splenic MZ. Taken together, these data demonstrate the capability of γδ T cells of modulating size and productivity of preimmune peripheral B cell populations. PMID:26582947

  16. The FRIABLE1 Gene Product Affects Cell Adhesion in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Neumetzler, Lutz; Humphrey, Tania; Lumba, Shelley; Snyder, Stephen; Yeats, Trevor H.; Usadel, Björn; Vasilevski, Aleksandar; Patel, Jignasha; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.; Persson, Staffan; Bonetta, Dario

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion in plants is mediated predominantly by pectins, a group of complex cell wall associated polysaccharides. An Arabidopsis mutant, friable1 (frb1), was identified through a screen of T-DNA insertion lines that exhibited defective cell adhesion. Interestingly, the frb1 plants displayed both cell and organ dissociations and also ectopic defects in organ separation. The FRB1 gene encodes a Golgi-localized, plant specific protein with only weak sequence similarities to known proteins (DUF246). Unlike other cell adhesion deficient mutants, frb1 mutants do not have reduced levels of adhesion related cell wall polymers, such as pectins. Instead, FRB1 affects the abundance of galactose- and arabinose-containing oligosaccharides in the Golgi. Furthermore, frb1 mutants displayed alteration in pectin methylesterification, cell wall associated extensins and xyloglucan microstructure. We propose that abnormal FRB1 action has pleiotropic consequences on wall architecture, affecting both the extensin and pectin matrices, with consequent changes to the biomechanical properties of the wall and middle lamella, thereby influencing cell-cell adhesion. PMID:22916179

  17. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affects tissue specific stem cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Yuriko; Doi, Hanako; Ono, Yusuke; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Kitajima, Michio; Miura, Kiyonori; Li, Tao-Sheng; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal disorders are frequently observed in various organs, but their relationship with estrogen deficiency and mechanisms remain unclear. As tissue-specific stem cells have been found to express estrogen receptors, we examined the hypothesis that estrogen deficiency impairs stem cells, which consequently contributes to postmenopausal disorders. Six-week-old C57BL/6 female mice were ovariectomized, following which they received 17β-estradiol replacement or vehicle (control). Sham-operated mice were used as healthy controls. All mice were killed for evaluation 2 months after treatments. Compared with the healthy control, ovariectomy significantly decreased uterine weight, which was partially recovered by 17β-estradiol replacement. Ovariectomy significantly increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, but impaired their capacity to grow mixed cell-type colonies in vitro. Estrogen replacement further increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, without significantly affecting colony growth in vitro. The number of CD105-positive mesenchymal stem cells in bone marrow also significantly decreased after ovariectomy, but completely recovered following estrogen replacement. Otherwise, neither ovariectomy nor estrogen replacement changed the number of Pax7-positive satellite cells, which are a skeletal muscle-type stem cell. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affected tissue-specific stem cells, suggesting a likely and direct relationship with postmenopausal disorders. PMID:26245252

  18. Potato snakin-1 gene silencing affects cell division, primary metabolism, and cell wall composition.

    PubMed

    Nahirñak, Vanesa; Almasia, Natalia Inés; Fernandez, Paula Virginia; Hopp, Horacio Esteban; Estevez, José Manuel; Carrari, Fernando; Vazquez-Rovere, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Snakin-1 (SN1) is an antimicrobial cysteine-rich peptide isolated from potato (Solanum tuberosum) that was classified as a member of the Snakin/Gibberellic Acid Stimulated in Arabidopsis protein family. In this work, a transgenic approach was used to study the role of SN1 in planta. Even when overexpressing SN1, potato lines did not show remarkable morphological differences from the wild type; SN1 silencing resulted in reduced height, which was accompanied by an overall reduction in leaf size and severe alterations of leaf shape. Analysis of the adaxial epidermis of mature leaves revealed that silenced lines had 70% to 90% increases in mean cell size with respect to wild-type leaves. Consequently, the number of epidermal cells was significantly reduced in these lines. Confocal microscopy analysis after agroinfiltration of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves showed that SN1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein was localized in plasma membrane, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays revealed that SN1 self-interacted in vivo. We further focused our study on leaf metabolism by applying a combination of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and spectrophotometric techniques. These targeted analyses allowed a detailed examination of the changes occurring in 46 intermediate compounds from primary metabolic pathways and in seven cell wall constituents. We demonstrated that SN1 silencing affects cell division, leaf primary metabolism, and cell wall composition in potato plants, suggesting that SN1 has additional roles in growth and development beyond its previously assigned role in plant defense. PMID:22080603

  19. Examination of Cell Shape in Wall Thickness Direction for Foamed Polyurethane Resin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Tsutomu; Matsuoka, Shin-Ichi; Araki, Kuninari; Iseki, Takashi

    The foaming flow process of polyurethane resin is difficult because temperature, density and thermal conductivity are changed greatly by heat generation resulting from the mixing reaction of polyol and polyisocyanate resin. It is thought that thermal conductivity and strength are influenced by cell shape after the foaming process. In this study, we evaluate three-dimensional cell shapes by quantitatively observation of the ratio of the diameter of the parallel and the perpendicular section to flow direction, the ratio of the major axis and the minor axis, and direction of the major axis of cells for closed cell shapes in foamed polyurethane resin. It is thought that cell shapes are mainly deformed by shear stress and pressure of adjacent cells. It becomes obvious by cell shape evaluation that cells in the skin layer are compressed in the thickness direction by pressure of adjacent cells, cells between the skin layer and the core layer are stretched perpendicular to the flow direction by shear stress, and cells in the core layer are similar to the sphere shape.

  20. Cell differentiation on disk- and string-shaped hydrogels fabricated from Ca(2+) -responsive self-assembling peptides.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Kazuto; Tsutsumi, Hiroshi; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2016-11-01

    We recently developed a self-assembling peptide, E1Y9, that self-assembles into nanofibers and forms a hydrogel in the presence of Ca(2+) . E1Y9 derivatives conjugated with functional peptide sequences derived from extracellular matrices (ECMs) reportedly self-assemble into peptide nanofibers that enhance cell adhesion and differentiation. In this study, E1Y9/E1Y9-IKVAV-mixed hydrogels were constructed to serve as artificial ECMs that promote cell differentiation. E1Y9 and E1Y9-IKVAV co-assembled into networked nanofibers, and hydrogels with disk and string shapes were formed in response to Ca(2+) treatment. The neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells was facilitated on hydrogels of both shapes that contained the IKVAV motifs. Moreover, long neurites extended along the long axis of the string-shaped gel, suggesting that the structure of hydrogels of this shape can affect cellular orientation. Thus, E1Y9 hydrogels can potentially be used as artificial ECMs with desirable bioactivities and shapes that could be useful in tissue engineering applications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 476-483, 2016. PMID:26501895

  1. Water Imbibition into Rock as Affected by Sample Shape, Pore, Conductivity, and Antecedent Water Content

    SciTech Connect

    R.P. Ewing

    2005-08-29

    Infiltration is often presumed to follow Philip's equation, I = st{sup 1/2}, where I is cumulative infiltration, s is sorptivity, and t is time. This form of the equation is appropriate for short times, and/or for negligible gravitational effects. For a uniform soil, this equation describes a plot of log(mass imbibed) versus log(time), with a slope (imbibition exponent) of 1/2. The equation has also been applied to low-porosity rocks, where the extremely small pores render gravitational forces negligible. Experiments recently performed on a wide variety of rocks produced imbibition exponents from 0.2 to 0.5. Many rock types showed initial imbibition proceeding as I {approx} t{sup 1/4}, then later switched to ''normal'' (t{sup 1/2}) behavior. The distance to the wetting front that corresponds to this cross-over behavior was found to be related to the sample shape: tall thin samples are more likely to exhibit the exponent 1/4, and to cross over to 1/2-type behavior later, while short, squat samples are less likely to display the 1/4-type behavior at all. Additionally, the exponents are sensitive to antecedent water content, with initially wetter samples having smaller values. In this study, we present the experimental data, and provide a consistent and physically-based explanation using percolation theory. The analogy between imbibition and diffusion is used to model imbibition into samples with low pore connectivity, with the exponents and their crossover behavior emerging from a random walk process. All laboratory phenomena--different exponents, crossover behavior, and effects of sample shape and antecedent water content--are reproduced by the model, with similar patterns across experiment and simulation. We conclude both that diffusion is a useful and powerful conceptual model for understanding imbibition, and also that imbibition experiments, being simpler than diffusion measurements, can be used to examine diffusive behavior in rock.

  2. Errors in Moral Forecasting: Perceptions of Affect Shape the Gap Between Moral Behaviors and Moral Forecasts.

    PubMed

    Teper, Rimma; Tullett, Alexa M; Page-Gould, Elizabeth; Inzlicht, Michael

    2015-07-01

    Research in moral decision making has shown that there may not be a one-to-one relationship between peoples' moral forecasts and behaviors. Although past work suggests that physiological arousal may account for part of the behavior-forecasting discrepancy, whether or not perceptions of affect play an important determinant remains unclear. Here, we investigate whether this discrepancy may arise because people fail to anticipate how they will feel in morally significant situations. In Study 1, forecasters predicted cheating significantly more on a test than participants in a behavior condition actually cheated. Importantly, forecasters who received false somatic feedback, indicative of high arousal, produced forecasts that aligned more closely with behaviors. In Study 2, forecasters who misattributed their arousal to an extraneous source forecasted cheating significantly more. In Study 3, higher dispositional emotional awareness was related to less forecasted cheating. These findings suggest that perceptions of affect play a key role in the behavior-forecasting dissociation. PMID:25900823

  3. Machine learning based methodology to identify cell shape phenotypes associated with microenvironmental cues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Desu; Sarkar, Sumona; Candia, Julián; Florczyk, Stephen J; Bodhak, Subhadip; Driscoll, Meghan K; Simon, Carl G; Dunkers, Joy P; Losert, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    Cell morphology has been identified as a potential indicator of stem cell response to biomaterials. However, determination of cell shape phenotype in biomaterials is complicated by heterogeneous cell populations, microenvironment heterogeneity, and multi-parametric definitions of cell morphology. To associate cell morphology with cell-material interactions, we developed a shape phenotyping framework based on support vector machines. A feature selection procedure was implemented to select the most significant combination of cell shape metrics to build classifiers with both accuracy and stability to identify and predict microenvironment-driven morphological differences in heterogeneous cell populations. The analysis was conducted at a multi-cell level, where a "supercell" method used average shape measurements of small groups of single cells to account for heterogeneous populations and microenvironment. A subsampling validation algorithm revealed the range of supercell sizes and sample sizes needed for classifier stability and generalization capability. As an example, the responses of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) to fibrous vs flat microenvironments were compared on day 1. Our analysis showed that 57 cells (grouped into supercells of size 4) are the minimum needed for phenotyping. The analysis identified that a combination of minor axis length, solidity, and mean negative curvature were the strongest early shape-based indicator of hBMSCs response to fibrous microenvironment. PMID:27449947

  4. Distinct protease pathways control cell shape and apoptosis in v-src-transformed quail neuroretina cells

    SciTech Connect

    Neel, Benjamin D.; Gillet, Germain . E-mail: g.gillet@ibcp.fr

    2005-11-15

    Intracellular proteases play key roles in cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. In nerve cells, little is known about their relative contribution to the pathways which control cell physiology, including cell death. Neoplastic transformation of avian neuroretina cells by p60 {sup v-src} tyrosine kinase results in dramatic morphological changes and deregulation of apoptosis. To identify the proteases involved in the cellular response to p60 {sup v-src}, we evaluated the effect of specific inhibitors of caspases, calpains and the proteasome on cell shape changes and apoptosis induced by p60 {sup v-src} inactivation in quail neuroretina cells transformed by tsNY68, a thermosensitive strain of Rous sarcoma virus. We found that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is recruited early after p60 {sup v-src} inactivation and is critical for morphological changes, whereas caspases are essential for cell death. This study provides evidence that distinct intracellular proteases are involved in the control of the morphology and fate of v-src-transformed cells.

  5. Shaping of the tumor microenvironment: Stromal cells and vessels.

    PubMed

    Blonska, Marzenna; Agarwal, Nitin K; Vega, Francisco

    2015-10-01

    Lymphomas develop and progress in a specialized tissue microenvironment such as bone marrow as well as secondary lymphoid organs such as lymph node and spleen. The lymphoma microenvironment is characterized by a heterogeneous population of stromal cells, including fibroblastic reticular cells, nurse-like cells, mesenchymal stem cells, follicular dendritic cells, and inflammatory cells such as macrophages, T- and B-cells. These cell populations interact with the lymphoma cells to promote lymphoma growth, survival and drug resistance through multiple mechanisms. Angiogenesis is also recognized as an important factor associated with lymphoma progression. In recent years, we have learned that the interaction between the malignant and non-malignant cells is bidirectional and resembles, at least in part, the pattern seen between non-neoplastic lymphoid cells and the normal microenvironment of lymphoid organs. A summary of the current knowledge of lymphoma microenvironment focusing on the cellular components will be reviewed here. PMID:25794825

  6. Magnetically shaped cell aggregates: from granular to contractile materials.

    PubMed

    Frasca, G; Du, V; Bacri, J-C; Gazeau, F; Gay, C; Wilhelm, C

    2014-07-28

    In recent decades, significant advances have been made in the description and modelling of tissue morphogenesis. By contrast, the initial steps leading to the formation of a tissue structure, through cell-cell adhesion, have so far been described only for small numbers of interacting cells. Here, through the use of remote magnetic forces, we succeeded at creating cell aggregates of half million cells, instantaneously and for several cell types, not only those known to form spheroids. This magnetic compaction gives access to the cell elasticity, found in the range of 800 Pa. The magnetic force can be removed at any time, allowing the cell mass to evolve spontaneously thereafter. The dynamics of contraction of these cell aggregates just after their formation (or, in contrast, their spreading for non-interacting monocyte cells) provides direct information on cell-cell interactions and allows retrieving the adhesion energy, in between 0.05 and 2 mJ m(-2), depending on the cell type tested, and in the case of cohesive aggregates. Thus, we show, by probing a large number of cell types, that cell aggregates behave like complex materials, undergoing a transition from a wet granular to contractile network, and that this transition is controlled by cell-cell interactions. PMID:24710948

  7. TCP14 and TCP15 affect internode length and leaf shape in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kieffer, Martin; Master, Vera; Waites, Richard; Davies, Brendan

    2011-01-01

    TCP transcription factors constitute a small family of plant-specific bHLH-containing, DNA-binding proteins that have been implicated in the control of cell proliferation in plants. Despite the significant role that is likely to be played by genes that control cell division in the elaboration of plant architecture, functional analysis of this family by forward and reverse genetics has been hampered by genetic redundancy. Here we show that mutants in two related class I TCP genes display a range of growth-related phenotypes, consistent with their dynamic expression patterns; these phenotypes are enhanced in the double mutant. Together, the two genes influence plant stature by promoting cell division in young internodes. Reporter gene analysis and use of SRDX fusions suggested that TCP14 and TCP15 modulate cell proliferation in the developing leaf blade and specific floral tissues; a role that was not apparent in our phenotypic analysis of single or double mutants. However, when the relevant mutants were subjected to computer-aided morphological analysis of the leaves, the consequences of loss of either or both genes became obvious. The effects on cell proliferation of perturbing the function of TCP14 and TCP15 vary with tissue, as has been suggested for other TCP factors. These findings indicate that the precise elaboration of plant form is dependent on the cumulative influence of many TCP factors acting in a context-dependent fashion. The study highlights the need for advanced methods of phenotypic analysis in order to characterize phenotypes and to construct a dynamic model for TCP gene function. PMID:21668538

  8. How does particle shape affect the near jamming properties of granular materials? Pentagons vs. disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yiqiu; Bares, Jonathan; Behringer, Bob

    Understanding the role of particle shape in system-scale properties is a fundamental challenge in granular physics. We investigated the difference between the response of systems made of pentagons vs. more traditional disks. We performed isotropic compression experiments on 2D photoelastic pentagons and disks near the jamming transition. These experiments show qualitative and quantitative differences in the macroscopic responses of the two systems, such as shifts in the packing fraction at jamming onset and differences in the contact number evolution. Some of these differences are due to a reduction of packing order and the appearance of side-side contacts for the pentatons. We also examined the stress relaxation and dynamical heterogeneity of pentagon particles by performing cyclic compression to allow the system explore phase diagram. We contrast disk and pentagon evolution using four-point-susceptibility and G2 techniques. Work supported by NSF-DMR1206351, DMS1248071, NASA NNX15AD38G, and the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  9. (19)F Magnetic Resonance Imaging Signals from Peptide Amphiphile Nanostructures Are Strongly Affected by Their Shape.

    PubMed

    Preslar, Adam T; Tantakitti, Faifan; Park, Kitae; Zhang, Shanrong; Stupp, Samuel I; Meade, Thomas J

    2016-08-23

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive imaging modality that provides excellent spatial and temporal resolution. The most commonly used MR probes face significant challenges originating from the endogenous (1)H background signal of water. In contrast, fluorine MRI ((19)F MRI) allows quantitative probe imaging with zero background signal. Probes with high fluorine content are required for high sensitivity, suggesting nanoscale supramolecular assemblies containing (19)F probes offer a potentially useful strategy for optimum imaging as a result of improved payload. We report here on supramolecular nanostructures formed by fluorinated peptide amphiphiles containing either glutamic acid or lysine residues in their sequence. We identified molecules that form aggregates in water which transition from cylindrical to ribbon-like shape as pH increased from 4.5 to 8.0. Interestingly, we found that ribbon-like nanostructures had reduced magnetic resonance signal, whereas their cylindrical counterparts exhibited strong signals. We attribute this drastic difference to the greater mobility of fluorinated tails in the hydrophobic compartment of cylindrical nanostructures compared to lower mobility in ribbon-like assemblies. This discovery identifies a strategy to design supramolecular, self-assembling contrast agents for (19)F MRI that can spatially map physiologically relevant changes in pH using changes in morphology. PMID:27425636

  10. The sertolian epithelium in the testis of men affected by 'Sertoli-cell-only syndrome'.

    PubMed

    Tedde, G; Montella, A; Fiocca, D; Delrio, A N

    1993-01-01

    Because of the architectural complexity of the seminiferous epithelium, the Sertoli cell is extremely difficult to study. The individual cellular constituents of the tubular wall are intimately associated with one another; especially Sertoli cells and germinal cells are tightly connected. As implied by the name, Sertoli-cell-only syndrome (SCOS) is characterized by the presence of only Sertoli cells in the seminiferous tubule. The absence of germinal cells makes this condition ideal for the morphological study of Sertoli cell. Testicular biopsy specimens of subjects affected by SCOS were studied under light and electron microscopy. The Sertoli cells appeared to be morphologically normal, except for their shape, that appears to be columnar as result of the complete absence of the germinal cells. The cellular outlines were irregular, particularly at the base, but the cytoplasm contained normal organelles and inclusions. The presence of both pale and dark elements was evident. These differences in staining reflect the variability in concentration of glycogen particles and intermediate microfilaments in the cytoplasm. In spite of these differences between Sertoli cells in SCOS and those in normal subjects, SCOS represents a satisfactory model for the morphological and functional analysis of the Sertoli cells. PMID:7694556

  11. Phorbol esters modulate the shape of cultured canine vascular smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Di Salvo, J.; Kolquist, K.; Semenchuk, L.; Rengstorf, J. )

    1991-03-11

    Marked changes in the shape of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) occur during early development, repair of the vascular wall, and formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Yet, surprisingly little is known about mechanisms which regulate the shape of VSMC. Since protein kinase C (PKC) is involved in regulation of multiple cellular functions including interactions between contractile and cytoskeletal proteins, the authors suspected it might also regulate VSMC shape. Accordingly, the authors studied the influence of a known activator of PKC, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), on the shape of cultured canine carotid arterial BSMC. PMA produced time and concentration dependent changes from normal elongated shape to pronounced circular forms. Cells recovered normal shape within 24 hrs even though exposure to PMA was continued. Analogs of PMA which do not activate PKC did not alter shape, whereas phorbol 13, 14 diacetate, an analog which activates PKC, did produce changes in shape similar to those produced by PMA. Cycloheximide, an inhibitor of protein synthesis, or actinomycin D, an inhibitor of mRNA synthesis, did not alter PMA-induced changes in morphology. In contrast, however, recovery of normal shape after prolonged exposure to PMA was blocked by either cycloheximide or actinomycin D. These results suggest activation of PKC produces changes in VSMC shape that are independent of transcription or translation, whereas recovery is dependent on both transcription and translation. The results also suggest PKC may modulate in vivo changes in VSMC shape occurring during different pathophysiological states.

  12. Endogeic earthworms shape bacterial functional communities and affect organic matter mineralization in a tropical soil

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Laetitia; Chapuis-Lardy, Lydie; Razafimbelo, Tantely; Razafindrakoto, Malalatiana; Pablo, Anne-Laure; Legname, Elvire; Poulain, Julie; Brüls, Thomas; O'Donohue, Michael; Brauman, Alain; Chotte, Jean-Luc; Blanchart, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Priming effect (PE) is defined as a stimulation of the mineralization of soil organic matter (SOM) following a supply of fresh organic matter. This process can have important consequences on the fate of SOM and on the management of residues in agricultural soils, especially in tropical regions where soil fertility is essentially based on the management of organic matter. Earthworms are ecosystem engineers known to affect the dynamics of SOM. Endogeic earthworms ingest large amounts of soil and assimilate a part of organic matter it contains. During gut transit, microorganisms are transported to new substrates and their activity is stimulated by (i) the production of readily assimilable organic matter (mucus) and (ii) the possible presence of fresh organic residues in the ingested soil. The objective of our study was to see (i) whether earthworms impact the PE intensity when a fresh residue is added to a tropical soil and (ii) whether this impact is linked to a stimulation/inhibition of bacterial taxa, and which taxa are affected. A tropical soil from Madagascar was incubated in the laboratory, with a 13C wheat straw residue, in the presence or absence of a peregrine endogeic tropical earthworm, Pontoscolex corethrurus. Emissions of 12CO2 and 13CO2 were followed during 16 days. The coupling between DNA-SIP (stable isotope probing) and pyrosequencing showed that stimulation of both the mineralization of wheat residues and the PE can be linked to the stimulation of several groups especially belonging to the Bacteroidetes phylum. PMID:21753801

  13. Commensal Microbiota and CD8+ T Cells Shape the Formation of Invariant NKT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Bo; Wingender, Gerhard; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Chen, Diana YuHui; McPherson, Michael; Brewer, Sarah; Borneman, James; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Braun, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Commensal bacteria play an important role in formation of the immune system, but the mechanisms involved are incompletely understood. In this study, we analyze CD1d-restricted invariant NKT (iNKT) cells in germfree mice and in two colonies of C57BL/6 mice termed conventional flora and restricted flora (RF), stably bearing commensal microbial communities of diverse but distinct composition. In germfree mice, iNKT cells were moderately reduced, suggesting that commensal microbiota were partially required for the antigenic drive in maintaining systemic iNKT cells. Surprisingly, even greater depletion of iNKT cell population occurred in RF mice. This was in part attributable to reduced RF levels of intestinal microbial taxa (Sphingomonas spp.) known to express antigenic glycosphingolipid products. However, memory and activated CD8+ T cells were also expanded in RF mice, prompting us to test whether CD8+ T cell activity might be further depleting iNKT cells. Indeed, iNKT cell numbers were restored in RF mice bearing the CD8α−/− genotype or in adult wild-type RF mice acutely depleted with anti-CD8 Ab. Moreover, iNKT cells were restored in RF mice bearing the Prf1−/− phenotype, a key component of cytolytic function. These findings indicate that commensal microbiota, through positive (antigenic drive) and negative (cytolytic depletion by CD8+ T cells) mechanisms, profoundly shape the iNKT cell compartment. Because individuals greatly vary in the composition of their microbial communities, enteric microbiota may play an important epigenetic role in the striking differences in iNKT cell abundance in humans and therefore in their potential contribution to host immune status. PMID:20048124

  14. Wdr1-mediated cell shape dynamics and cortical tension are essential for epidermal planar cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Pasolli, H. Amalia; Chai, Sophia; Nikolova, Maria; Stokes, Nicole; Fuchs, Elaine

    2015-01-01

    During mouse development, core planar cell polarity (PCP) proteins become polarized in the epidermal plane to guide angling/morphogenesis of hair follicles. How PCP is established is poorly understood. Here, we identify a key role for Wdr1 (also known as Aip1), an F-actin-binding protein that enhances cofilin/destrin-mediated F-actin disassembly. We show that cofilin and destrin function redundantly in developing epidermis, but their combined depletion perturbs cell adhesion, cytokinesis, apicobasal polarity and PCP. Although Wdr1 depletion accentuates single-loss-of-cofilin/destrin phenotypes, alone it resembles core PCP mutations. Seeking a mechanism, we find that Wdr1 and cofilin/destrin-mediated actomyosin remodelling are essential for generating or maintaining cortical tension within the developing epidermal sheet and driving the cell shape and planar orientation changes that accompany establishment of PCP in mammalian epidermis. Our findings suggest intriguing evolutionary parallels but mechanistic modifications to the distal wing hinge-mediated mechanical forces that drive cell shape change and orient PCP in the Drosophila wing disc. PMID:25915128

  15. A feed-forward spiking model of shape-coding by IT cells.

    PubMed

    Romeo, August; Supèr, Hans

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize a shape is linked to figure-ground (FG) organization. Cell preferences appear to be correlated across contrast-polarity reversals and mirror reversals of polygon displays, but not so much across FG reversals. Here we present a network structure which explains both shape-coding by simulated IT cells and suppression of responses to FG reversed stimuli. In our model FG segregation is achieved before shape discrimination, which is itself evidenced by the difference in spiking onsets of a pair of output cells. The studied example also includes feature extraction and illustrates a classification of binary images depending on the dominance of vertical or horizontal borders. PMID:24904494

  16. Single Cells Spreading on a Protein Lattice Adopt an Energy Minimizing Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vianay, Benoit; Käfer, Jos; Planus, Emmanuelle; Block, Marc; Graner, François; Guillou, Hervé

    2010-09-01

    When spreading onto a protein microlattice living cells spontaneously acquire simple shapes determined by the lattice geometry. This suggests that, on a lattice, living cells’ shapes are in thermodynamic metastable states. Using a model at thermodynamic equilibrium we are able to reproduce the observed shapes. We build a phase diagram based on two adimensional parameters characterizing essential cellular properties involved in spreading: the cell’s compressibility and fluctuations.

  17. Single cells spreading on a protein lattice adopt an energy minimizing shape

    PubMed Central

    Vianay, Benoit; Käfer, Jos; Planus, Emmanuelle; Block, Marc; Graner, François; Guillou, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    When spreading onto a protein microlattice living cells spontaneously acquire simple shapes determined by the lattice geometry. This suggests that, on a lattice, living cells’ shapes are in thermodynamic metastable states. Using a model at thermodynamic equilibrium we are able to reproduce the observed shapes. We build a phase diagram based on two adimensional parameters characterizing essential cellular properties involved in spreading: the cell’s compressibility and fluctuations. PMID:20867675

  18. Global architecture of F-actin cytoskeleton regulates cell shape-dependent endothelial mechanotransduction

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yue; Mann, Jennifer M.; Chen, Weiqiang; Fu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Uniaxial stretch is an important biophysical regulator of cell morphology (or shape) and functions of vascular endothelial cells (ECs). However, it is unclear whether and how cell shape can independently regulate EC mechanotransductive properties under uniaxial stretch. Herein, utilizing a novel uniaxial cell-stretching device integrated with micropost force sensors, we reported the first experimental evidence showing cell shape-dependent EC mechanotransduction via cytoskeleton (CSK) contractile forces in response to uniaxial stretch. Combining experiments and theoretical modeling from first principles, we showed that it was the global architecture of the F-actin CSK that instructed the cell shape-dependent EC mechanotransductive process. Furthermore, a cell shape-dependent nature was relayed in EC mechanotransduction via dynamic focal adhesion (FA) assembly. Our results suggested a novel mechanotransductive process in ECs wherein the global architecture of the F-actin CSK, governed by cell shape, controls mechanotransduction via CSK contractile forces and force-dependent FA assembly under uniaxial stretch. PMID:24435061

  19. Analysis of cancer cell morphology in fluorescence microscopy image exploiting shape descriptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Kim, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Sudong; Ryu, Gyu Ha; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2016-04-01

    Cancer cell morphology is closely related to their phenotype and activity. These characteristics are important in drug-response prediction for personalized cancer therapeutics. We used multi-channel fluorescence microscopy images to analyze the morphology of highly cohesive cancer cells. First, we detected individual nuclei regions in single-channel images using advanced simple linear iterative clustering. The center points of the nuclei regions were used as seeds for the Voronoi diagram method to extract spatial arrangement features from cell images. Human cancer cell populations form irregularly shaped aggregates, making their detection more difficult. We overcame this problem by identifying individual cells using an image-based shape descriptor. Finally, we analyzed the correlation between cell agglutination and cell shape.

  20. Classification of cultured mammalian cells by shape analysis and pattern recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, A C; Larson, N M; Heckman, C A

    1980-01-01

    We have developed a method for classifying cultured cells on the basis of shape characteristics. High-resolution optical information on three-dimensional shape was obtained by anodic oxide interferometry. Each interference order formed in a cell was considered as a closed figure; measurement of 37 mathematical descriptors was carried out for each figure. The individual cells were classified according to the values of their descriptors. We used standard principles of pattern recognition, such as hierarchical cluster analysis and nearest neighbor analysis, as a basis for ordering the cells into groups. Alternatively, linear discriminant functions could be used, but they provided only a slight improvement in correct classification of the cells. We anticipate that the method will be appropriate for classification of cultured cell lines and for determination of the magnitude and direction of cell shape changes implicated in various biological processes. Images PMID:6929502

  1. Epithelial tricellular junctions act as interphase cell shape sensors to orient mitosis.

    PubMed

    Bosveld, Floris; Markova, Olga; Guirao, Boris; Martin, Charlotte; Wang, Zhimin; Pierre, Anaëlle; Balakireva, Maria; Gaugue, Isabelle; Ainslie, Anna; Christophorou, Nicolas; Lubensky, David K; Minc, Nicolas; Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2016-02-25

    The orientation of cell division along the long axis of the interphase cell--the century-old Hertwig's rule--has profound roles in tissue proliferation, morphogenesis, architecture and mechanics. In epithelial tissues, the shape of the interphase cell is influenced by cell adhesion, mechanical stress, neighbour topology, and planar polarity pathways. At mitosis, epithelial cells usually adopt a rounded shape to ensure faithful chromosome segregation and to promote morphogenesis. The mechanisms underlying interphase cell shape sensing in tissues are therefore unknown. Here we show that in Drosophila epithelia, tricellular junctions (TCJs) localize force generators, pulling on astral microtubules and orienting cell division via the Dynein-associated protein Mud independently of the classical Pins/Gαi pathway. Moreover, as cells round up during mitosis, TCJs serve as spatial landmarks, encoding information about interphase cell shape anisotropy to orient division in the rounded mitotic cell. Finally, experimental and simulation data show that shape and mechanical strain sensing by the TCJs emerge from a general geometric property of TCJ distributions in epithelial tissues. Thus, in addition to their function as epithelial barrier structures, TCJs serve as polarity cues promoting geometry and mechanical sensing in epithelial tissues. PMID:26886796

  2. Experience affects the use of ego-motion signals during 3D shape perception

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anshul; Backus, Benjamin T.

    2011-01-01

    Experience has long-term effects on perceptual appearance (Q. Haijiang, J. A. Saunders, R. W. Stone, & B. T. Backus, 2006). We asked whether experience affects the appearance of structure-from-motion stimuli when the optic flow is caused by observer ego-motion. Optic flow is an ambiguous depth cue: a rotating object and its oppositely rotating, depth-inverted dual generate similar flow. However, the visual system exploits ego-motion signals to prefer the percept of an object that is stationary over one that rotates (M. Wexler, F. Panerai, I. Lamouret, & J. Droulez, 2001). We replicated this finding and asked whether this preference for stationarity, the “stationarity prior,” is modulated by experience. During training, two groups of observers were exposed to objects with identical flow, but that were either stationary or moving as determined by other cues. The training caused identical test stimuli to be seen preferentially as stationary or moving by the two groups, respectively. We then asked whether different priors can exist independently at different locations in the visual field. Observers were trained to see objects either as stationary or as moving at two different locations. Observers’ stationarity bias at the two respective locations was modulated in the directions consistent with training. Thus, the utilization of extraretinal ego-motion signals for disambiguating optic flow signals can be updated as the result of experience, consistent with the updating of a Bayesian prior for stationarity. PMID:21191132

  3. The Impact of Cathode Material and Shape on Current Density in an Aluminum Electrolysis Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yang; Peng, Jianping; Di, Yuezhong; Wang, Yaowu; Li, Baokuan; Feng, Naixiang

    2016-02-01

    A finite element model was developed to determine the impact of cathode material and shape on current density in an aluminum electrolysis cell. For the cathode material, results show that increased electrical resistivity leads to a higher cathode voltage drop; however, the horizontal current is reduced in the metal. The horizontal current magnitude for six different cathode materials in decreasing order is graphitized, semi-graphitized, full graphitic, 50% anthracite (50% artificial graphite), 70% anthracite (30% artificial graphite), 100% anthracite. The modified cathode shapes with an inclined cathode surface, higher collector bar and cylindrical protrusions are intended to improve horizontal current and flow resistance. Compared to a traditional cathode, modified collector bar sizes of 70 mm × 230 mm and 80 mm × 270 mm can reduce horizontal current density component Jx by 10% and 19%, respectively, due to better conductivity of the steel. The horizontal current in the metal decreases with increase of cathode inclination. The peak value of Jx can be approximately reduced by 20% for a 2° change in inclination. Cylindrical protrusions lead to local horizontal current increase on their tops, but the average current is less affected and the molten metal is effectively slowed down.

  4. Interleukin-12 is synthesized by mesangial cells and stimulates platelet-activating factor synthesis, cytoskeletal reorganization, and cell shape change.

    PubMed

    Bussolati, B; Mariano, F; Biancone, L; Foà, R; David, S; Cambi, V; Camussi, G

    1999-02-01

    Preliminary studies indicate the involvement of interleukin (IL)-12 in experimental renal pathology. In the present study, we evaluated whether cultured glomerular mesangial cells are able to produce IL-12 and whether IL-12 may regulate some of their functions, including the cytoskeletal reorganization, the change in cell shape, and the production of platelet-activating factor (PAF). The results obtained indicate that pro-inflammatory stimuli, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha and bacterial polysaccharides, induce the expression of IL-12 mRNA and the synthesis of the protein by cultured mesangial cells. Moreover, cultured mesangial cells were shown to bind IL-12 and to express the human low-affinity IL-12 beta1-chain receptor. When challenged with IL-12, mesangial cells produced PAF in a dose- and time-dependent manner and superoxide anions. No production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and IL-8 was observed. Moreover, we demonstrate that IL-12 induced a delayed and sustained shape change of mesangial cells that reached its maximum between 90 and 120 minutes of incubation. The changes in cell shape occurred concomitantly with cytoskeletal rearrangements and may be consistent with cell contraction. As IL-12-dependent shape change of mesangial cells was concomitant with the synthesis of PAF, which is known to promote mesangial cell contraction, we investigated the role of PAF using two chemically different PAF receptor antagonists. Both antagonists inhibited almost completely the cell shape change induced by IL-12, whereas they were ineffective on angiotensin-II-induced cell shape change. In conclusion, our results suggest that mesangial cells can either produce IL-12 or be stimulated by this cytokine to synthesize PAF and to undergo shape changes compatible with cell contraction. PMID:10027419

  5. Auxin and LANCEOLATE affect leaf shape in tomato via different developmental processes.

    PubMed

    Ben-Gera, Hadas; Ori, Naomi

    2012-10-01

    Elaboration of a complex leaves depends on the morphogenetic activity of a specific tissue at the leaf margin termed marginal-blastozon (MB). In tomato (Solanum lycopersicym), prolonged activity of the MB leads to the development of compound leaves. The activity of the MB is restricted by the TCP transcription factor LANCEOLATE (LA). Plants harboring the dominant LA mutant allele La-2 have simple leaves with a uniform blade. Conversely, leaves of pFIL > > miR319 are compound and grow indeterminately in their margins due to leaf overexpression of miR319, a negative regulator of LA and additional miR319-sensitive genes. We have recently shown that the auxin-response sensor DR5::VENUS marks and precedes leaflet initiation events in the MB. Mutations in ENTIRE (E), an auxin signal inhibitor from the Aux/IAA family, lead to the expansion of the DR5::VENUS signal to throughout the leaf-primordia margin, and to a simplified leaf phenotype. Here, we examined the interaction between auxin, E, and LA in tomato leaf development. In La-2 leaf primordia, the auxin signal is very weak and is diffused to throughout the leaf margin, suggesting that auxin acts within the developmental-context of MB activity, which is controlled by LA. e La-2 double mutants showed an enhanced simple leaf phenotype and e pFIL > > miR319 leaves initiated less leaflets than wild-type, but their margins showed continuous growth. These results suggest that E and auxin affect leaflet initiation within the context of the extended MB activity, but their influence on the extent of indeterminate growth of the leaf is minor. PMID:22902691

  6. Crawling and Gliding: A Computational Model for Shape-Driven Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Niculescu, Ioana; Textor, Johannes; de Boer, Rob J.

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is a complex process involving many intracellular and extracellular factors, with different cell types adopting sometimes strikingly different morphologies. Modeling realistically behaving cells in tissues is computationally challenging because it implies dealing with multiple levels of complexity. We extend the Cellular Potts Model with an actin-inspired feedback mechanism that allows small stochastic cell rufflings to expand to cell protrusions. This simple phenomenological model produces realistically crawling and deforming amoeboid cells, and gliding half-moon shaped keratocyte-like cells. Both cell types can migrate randomly or follow directional cues. They can squeeze in between other cells in densely populated environments or migrate collectively. The model is computationally light, which allows the study of large, dense and heterogeneous tissues containing cells with realistic shapes and migratory properties. PMID:26488304

  7. Crawling and Gliding: A Computational Model for Shape-Driven Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Niculescu, Ioana; Textor, Johannes; de Boer, Rob J

    2015-10-01

    Cell migration is a complex process involving many intracellular and extracellular factors, with different cell types adopting sometimes strikingly different morphologies. Modeling realistically behaving cells in tissues is computationally challenging because it implies dealing with multiple levels of complexity. We extend the Cellular Potts Model with an actin-inspired feedback mechanism that allows small stochastic cell rufflings to expand to cell protrusions. This simple phenomenological model produces realistically crawling and deforming amoeboid cells, and gliding half-moon shaped keratocyte-like cells. Both cell types can migrate randomly or follow directional cues. They can squeeze in between other cells in densely populated environments or migrate collectively. The model is computationally light, which allows the study of large, dense and heterogeneous tissues containing cells with realistic shapes and migratory properties. PMID:26488304

  8. Changes in cell shape are correlated with metastatic potential in murine and human osteosarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Samanthe M.; Alizadeh, Elaheh; Mannheimer, Joshua; Schuamberg, Katherine; Castle, Jordan; Schroder, Bryce; Turk, Philip; Thamm, Douglas; Prasad, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Metastatic cancer cells for many cancers are known to have altered cytoskeletal properties, in particular to be more deformable and contractile. Consequently, shape characteristics of more metastatic cancer cells may be expected to have diverged from those of their parental cells. To examine this hypothesis we study shape characteristics of paired osteosarcoma cell lines, each consisting of a less metastatic parental line and a more metastatic line, derived from the former by in vivo selection. Two-dimensional images of four pairs of lines were processed. Statistical analysis of morphometric characteristics shows that shape characteristics of the metastatic cell line are partly overlapping and partly diverged from the parental line. Significantly, the shape changes fall into two categories, with three paired cell lines displaying a more mesenchymal-like morphology, while the fourth displaying a change towards a more rounded morphology. A neural network algorithm could distinguish between samples of the less metastatic cells from the more metastatic cells with near perfect accuracy. Thus, subtle changes in shape carry information about the genetic changes that lead to invasiveness and metastasis of osteosarcoma cancer cells. PMID:26873952

  9. Changes in cell shape are correlated with metastatic potential in murine and human osteosarcomas.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Samanthe M; Alizadeh, Elaheh; Mannheimer, Joshua; Schuamberg, Katherine; Castle, Jordan; Schroder, Bryce; Turk, Philip; Thamm, Douglas; Prasad, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic cancer cells for many cancers are known to have altered cytoskeletal properties, in particular to be more deformable and contractile. Consequently, shape characteristics of more metastatic cancer cells may be expected to have diverged from those of their parental cells. To examine this hypothesis we study shape characteristics of paired osteosarcoma cell lines, each consisting of a less metastatic parental line and a more metastatic line, derived from the former by in vivo selection. Two-dimensional images of four pairs of lines were processed. Statistical analysis of morphometric characteristics shows that shape characteristics of the metastatic cell line are partly overlapping and partly diverged from the parental line. Significantly, the shape changes fall into two categories, with three paired cell lines displaying a more mesenchymal-like morphology, while the fourth displaying a change towards a more rounded morphology. A neural network algorithm could distinguish between samples of the less metastatic cells from the more metastatic cells with near perfect accuracy. Thus, subtle changes in shape carry information about the genetic changes that lead to invasiveness and metastasis of osteosarcoma cancer cells. PMID:26873952

  10. 3D time series analysis of cell shape using Laplacian approaches

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Fundamental cellular processes such as cell movement, division or food uptake critically depend on cells being able to change shape. Fast acquisition of three-dimensional image time series has now become possible, but we lack efficient tools for analysing shape deformations in order to understand the real three-dimensional nature of shape changes. Results We present a framework for 3D+time cell shape analysis. The main contribution is three-fold: First, we develop a fast, automatic random walker method for cell segmentation. Second, a novel topology fixing method is proposed to fix segmented binary volumes without spherical topology. Third, we show that algorithms used for each individual step of the analysis pipeline (cell segmentation, topology fixing, spherical parameterization, and shape representation) are closely related to the Laplacian operator. The framework is applied to the shape analysis of neutrophil cells. Conclusions The method we propose for cell segmentation is faster than the traditional random walker method or the level set method, and performs better on 3D time-series of neutrophil cells, which are comparatively noisy as stacks have to be acquired fast enough to account for cell motion. Our method for topology fixing outperforms the tools provided by SPHARM-MAT and SPHARM-PDM in terms of their successful fixing rates. The different tasks in the presented pipeline for 3D+time shape analysis of cells can be solved using Laplacian approaches, opening the possibility of eventually combining individual steps in order to speed up computations. PMID:24090312

  11. How Do the Size, Charge and Shape of Nanoparticles Affect Amyloid β Aggregation on Brain Lipid Bilayer?

    PubMed

    Kim, Yuna; Park, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Hyojin; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the effect of the size, shape, and surface charge of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on amyloid beta (Aβ) aggregation on a total brain lipid-based supported lipid bilayer (brain SLB), a fluid platform that facilitates Aβ-AuNP aggregation process. We found that larger AuNPs induce large and amorphous aggregates on the brain SLB, whereas smaller AuNPs induce protofibrillar Aβ structures. Positively charged AuNPs were more strongly attracted to Aβ than negatively charged AuNPs, and the stronger interactions between AuNPs and Aβ resulted in fewer β-sheets and more random coil structures. We also compared spherical AuNPs, gold nanorods (AuNRs), and gold nanocubes (AuNCs) to study the effect of nanoparticle shape on Aβ aggregation on the brain SLB. Aβ was preferentially bound to the long axis of AuNRs and fewer fibrils were formed whereas all the facets of AuNCs interacted with Aβ to produce the fibril networks. Finally, it was revealed that different nanostructures induce different cytotoxicity on neuroblastoma cells, and, overall, smaller Aβ aggregates induce higher cytotoxicity. The results offer insight into the roles of NPs and brain SLB in Aβ aggregation on the cell membrane and can facilitate the understanding of Aβ-nanostructure co-aggregation mechanism and tuning Aβ aggregate structures. PMID:26782664

  12. How Do the Size, Charge and Shape of Nanoparticles Affect Amyloid β Aggregation on Brain Lipid Bilayer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yuna; Park, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Hyojin; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the effect of the size, shape, and surface charge of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on amyloid beta (Aβ) aggregation on a total brain lipid-based supported lipid bilayer (brain SLB), a fluid platform that facilitates Aβ-AuNP aggregation process. We found that larger AuNPs induce large and amorphous aggregates on the brain SLB, whereas smaller AuNPs induce protofibrillar Aβ structures. Positively charged AuNPs were more strongly attracted to Aβ than negatively charged AuNPs, and the stronger interactions between AuNPs and Aβ resulted in fewer β-sheets and more random coil structures. We also compared spherical AuNPs, gold nanorods (AuNRs), and gold nanocubes (AuNCs) to study the effect of nanoparticle shape on Aβ aggregation on the brain SLB. Aβ was preferentially bound to the long axis of AuNRs and fewer fibrils were formed whereas all the facets of AuNCs interacted with Aβ to produce the fibril networks. Finally, it was revealed that different nanostructures induce different cytotoxicity on neuroblastoma cells, and, overall, smaller Aβ aggregates induce higher cytotoxicity. The results offer insight into the roles of NPs and brain SLB in Aβ aggregation on the cell membrane and can facilitate the understanding of Aβ-nanostructure co-aggregation mechanism and tuning Aβ aggregate structures.

  13. Dexamethasone and Azathioprine Promote Cytoskeletal Changes and Affect Mesenchymal Stem Cell Migratory Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Natália; Gonçalves, Fabiany da Costa; Pinto, Fernanda Otesbelgue; Lopez, Patrícia Luciana da Costa; Araújo, Anelise Bergmann; Pfaffenseller, Bianca; Passos, Eduardo Pandolfi; Cirne-Lima, Elizabeth Obino; Meurer, Luíse; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron; Paz, Ana Helena

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids and immunosuppressive drugs are commonly used to treat inflammatory disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and despite a few improvements, the remission of IBD is still difficult to maintain. Due to their immunomodulatory properties, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have emerged as regulators of the immune response, and their viability and activation of their migratory properties are essential for successful cell therapy. However, little is known about the effects of immunosuppressant drugs used in IBD treatment on MSC behavior. The aim of this study was to evaluate MSC viability, nuclear morphometry, cell polarity, F-actin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) distribution, and cell migratory properties in the presence of the immunosuppressive drugs azathioprine (AZA) and dexamethasone (DEX). After an initial characterization, MSCs were treated with DEX (10 μM) or AZA (1 μM) for 24 hrs or 7 days. Neither drug had an effect on cell viability or nuclear morphometry. However, AZA treatment induced a more elongated cell shape, while DEX was associated with a more rounded cell shape (P < 0.05) with a higher presence of ventral actin stress fibers (P < 0.05) and a decrease in protrusion stability. After 7 days of treatment, AZA improved the cell spatial trajectory (ST) and increased the migration speed (24.35%, P < 0.05, n = 4), while DEX impaired ST and migration speed after 24 hrs and 7 days of treatment (-28.69% and -25.37%, respectively; P < 0.05, n = 4). In conclusion, our data suggest that these immunosuppressive drugs each affect MSC morphology and migratory capacity differently, possibly impacting the success of cell therapy. PMID:25756665

  14. Active self-polarization of contractile cells in asymmetrically shaped domains.

    PubMed

    Zemel, A; Safran, S A

    2007-08-01

    Mechanical forces generated by contractile cells allow the cells to sense their environment and to interact with other cells. By locally pulling on their environment, cells can sense and respond to mechanical features such as the local stress (or strain), the shape of a cellular domain, and the surrounding rigidity; at the same time, they also modify the mechanical state of the system. This creates a mechanical feedback loop that can result in self-polarization of cells. In this paper, we present a quantitative mechanical model that predicts the self-polarization of cells in spheroidally shaped domains, comprising contractile cells and an elastic matrix, that are embedded in a three-dimensional, cell-free gel. The theory is based on a generalization of the known results for passive inclusions in solids to include the effects of cell activity. We use the active cellular susceptibility tensor presented by Zemel [Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 128103 (2006)] to calculate the polarization response and hence the elastic stress field developed by the cells in the cellular domain. The cell polarization is analyzed as a function of the shape and the elastic moduli of the cellular domain compared with the cell-free surrounding material. Consistent with experiment, our theory predicts the development of a stronger contractile force for cells in a gel that is surrounded by a large, cell-free material whose elastic modulus is stiffer than that of the gel that contains the cells. This provides a quantitative explanation of the differences in the development of cellular forces as observed in free and fixed gels. In the case of an asymmetrically shaped (spheroidal) domain of cells, we show that the anisotropic elastic field within the domain leads to a spontaneous self-polarization of the cells along the long axis of the domain. PMID:17930063

  15. Melanopsin, Photosensitive Ganglion Cells, and Seasonal Affective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Roecklein, Kathryn A.; Wong, Patricia M.; Miller, Megan A.; Donofry, Shannon D.; Kamarck, Marissa L.; Brainard, George C.

    2013-01-01

    ROECKLEIN, K.A., WONG, P.M., MILLER, M.A., DONOFRY, S.D., KAMARCK, M.L., BRAINARD, G.C. Melanopsin, Photosensitive Ganglion Cells, and Seasonal Affective Disorder…NEUROSCI BIOBEHAV REV x(x) XXX-XXX, 2012. In two recent reports, melanopsin gene variations were associated with seasonal affective disorder (SAD), and in changes in the timing of sleep and activity in healthy individuals. New studies have deepened our understanding of the retinohypothalamic tract, which translates environmental light received by the retina into neural signals sent to a set of nonvisual nuclei in the brain that are responsible for functions other than sight including circadian, neuroendocrine and neurobehavioral regulation. Because this pathway mediates seasonal changes in physiology, behavior, and mood, individual variations in the pathway may explain why approximately 1–2% of the North American population develops mood disorders with a seasonal pattern (i.e., Major Depressive and Bipolar Disorders with a seasonal pattern, also known as seasonal affective disorder/SAD). Components of depression including mood changes, sleep patterns, appetite, and cognitive performance can be affected by the biological and behavioral responses to light. Specifically, variations in the gene sequence for the retinal photopigment, melanopsin, may be responsible for significant increased risk for mood disorders with a seasonal pattern, and may do so by leading to changes in activity and sleep timing in winter. The retinal sensitivity of SAD is hypothesized to be decreased compared to controls, and that further decrements in winter light levels may combine to trigger depression in winter. Here we outline steps for new research to address the possible role of melanopsin in seasonal affective disorder including chromatic pupillometry designed to measure the sensitivity of melanopsin containing retinal ganglion cells. PMID:23286902

  16. ALDH isozymes downregulation affects cell growth, cell motility and gene expression in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreb, Jan S; Baker, Henry V; Chang, Lung-Ji; Amaya, Maria; Lopez, M Cecilia; Ostmark, Blanca; Chou, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are highly expressed in non small cell lung cancer. Neither the mechanisms nor the biologic significance for such over expression have been studied. Methods We have employed oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze changes in gene profiles in A549 lung cancer cell line in which ALDH activity was reduced by up to 95% using lentiviral mediated expression of siRNA against both isozymes (Lenti 1+3). Stringent analysis methods were used to identify gene expression patterns that are specific to the knock down of ALDH activity and significantly different in comparison to wild type A549 cells (WT) or cells similarly transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP) siRNA. Results We confirmed significant and specific down regulation of ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 in Lenti 1+3 cells and in comparison to 12 other ALDH genes detected. The results of the microarray analysis were validated by real time RT-PCR on RNA obtained from Lenti 1+3 or WT cells treated with ALDH activity inhibitors. Detailed functional analysis was performed on 101 genes that were significantly different (P < 0.001) and their expression changed by ≥ 2 folds in the Lenti 1+3 group versus the control groups. There were 75 down regulated and 26 up regulated genes. Protein binding, organ development, signal transduction, transcription, lipid metabolism, and cell migration and adhesion were among the most affected pathways. Conclusion These molecular effects of the ALDH knock-down are associated with in vitro functional changes in the proliferation and motility of these cells and demonstrate the significance of ALDH enzymes in cell homeostasis with a potentially significant impact on the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:19025616

  17. The hexagonal shape of the honeycomb cells depends on the construction behavior of bees.

    PubMed

    Nazzi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The hexagonal shape of the honey bee cells has attracted the attention of humans for centuries. It is now accepted that bees build cylindrical cells that later transform into hexagonal prisms through a process that it is still debated. The early explanations involving the geometers' skills of bees have been abandoned in favor of new hypotheses involving the action of physical forces, but recent data suggest that mechanical shaping by bees plays a role. However, the observed geometry can arise only if isodiametric cells are previously arranged in a way that each one is surrounded by six other similar cells; here I suggest that this is a consequence of the building program adopted by bees and propose a possible behavioral rule ultimately accounting for the hexagonal shape of bee cells. PMID:27320492

  18. The hexagonal shape of the honeycomb cells depends on the construction behavior of bees

    PubMed Central

    Nazzi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    The hexagonal shape of the honey bee cells has attracted the attention of humans for centuries. It is now accepted that bees build cylindrical cells that later transform into hexagonal prisms through a process that it is still debated. The early explanations involving the geometers’ skills of bees have been abandoned in favor of new hypotheses involving the action of physical forces, but recent data suggest that mechanical shaping by bees plays a role. However, the observed geometry can arise only if isodiametric cells are previously arranged in a way that each one is surrounded by six other similar cells; here I suggest that this is a consequence of the building program adopted by bees and propose a possible behavioral rule ultimately accounting for the hexagonal shape of bee cells. PMID:27320492

  19. Fabrication method for cores of structural sandwich materials including star shaped core cells

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Richard M.

    1997-01-01

    A method for fabricating structural sandwich materials having a core pattern which utilizes star and non-star shaped cells. The sheets of material are bonded together or a single folded sheet is used, and bonded or welded at specific locations, into a flat configuration, and are then mechanically pulled or expanded normal to the plane of the sheets which expand to form the cells. This method can be utilized to fabricate other geometric cell arrangements than the star/non-star shaped cells. Four sheets of material (either a pair of bonded sheets or a single folded sheet) are bonded so as to define an area therebetween, which forms the star shaped cell when expanded.

  20. Fabrication method for cores of structural sandwich materials including star shaped core cells

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, R.M.

    1997-07-15

    A method for fabricating structural sandwich materials having a core pattern which utilizes star and non-star shaped cells is disclosed. The sheets of material are bonded together or a single folded sheet is used, and bonded or welded at specific locations, into a flat configuration, and are then mechanically pulled or expanded normal to the plane of the sheets which expand to form the cells. This method can be utilized to fabricate other geometric cell arrangements than the star/non-star shaped cells. Four sheets of material (either a pair of bonded sheets or a single folded sheet) are bonded so as to define an area therebetween, which forms the star shaped cell when expanded. 3 figs.

  1. Linking cell shape, elasticity and fate: in vitro re-differentiation of chondrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiaofei; Chim, Yahua; Yin, Huabing

    2014-02-01

    Autologous chondrocyte transplantation (ACT) has become a promising method for repairing large articular defects. However, dedifferentiation of chondrocytes during cell expansion remains a major limitation for ACT procedures. In this study, we explore the potential of confining cell shape for re-differentiation of dedifferentiated bovine chondrocytes. A novel culture system, combining 2D micropatterning with 3D matrix formation, was developed to control and maintain individual chondrocyte's shape. Both collagen II synthesis and the mechanical properties of cells were monitored during re-differentiation. We show that a spherical morphology without cell spreading plays a limited role in induction of re-differentiation. Instead, isolated, dedifferentiated chondrocytes partially regain chondrogenic properties if they have an appropriate cell shape and limited spreading.

  2. Shape optimization of axisymmetric solids with the finite cell method using a fixed grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Liang; Zhang, Wei-Hong; Zhu, Ji-Hong; Xu, Zhao; Cai, Shou-Hu

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a design procedure extending the B-spline based finite cell method into shape optimization is developed for axisymmetric solids involving the centrifugal force effect. We first replace the traditional conforming mesh in the finite element method with structured cells that are fixed during the whole design process with a view to avoid the sophisticated re-meshing and eventual mesh distortion. Then, B-spline shape functions are further implemented to yield a high-order continuity field along the cell boundary in stress analysis. By means of the implicit description of the shape boundary, stress sensitivity is analytically derived with respect to shape design variables. Finally, we illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed protocol by several numerical test cases as well as a whole design procedure carried out on an aeronautic turbine disk.

  3. Shape optimization of axisymmetric solids with the finite cell method using a fixed grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Liang; Zhang, Wei-Hong; Zhu, Ji-Hong; Xu, Zhao; Cai, Shou-Hu

    2016-02-01

    In this work, a design procedure extending the B-spline based finite cell method into shape optimization is developed for axisymmetric solids involving the centrifugal force effect. We first replace the traditional conforming mesh in the finite element method with structured cells that are fixed during the whole design process with a view to avoid the sophisticated re-meshing and eventual mesh distortion. Then, B-spline shape functions are further implemented to yield a high-order continuity field along the cell boundary in stress analysis. By means of the implicit description of the shape boundary, stress sensitivity is analytically derived with respect to shape design variables. Finally, we illustrate the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed protocol by several numerical test cases as well as a whole design procedure carried out on an aeronautic turbine disk.

  4. Optimizing micropattern geometries for cell shape and migration with genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Albert, Philipp J; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2016-07-11

    Adhesive micropatterns have become a standard tool to control cell shape and function in cell culture. However, the variety of possible patterns is infinitely large and experiments often restrict themselves to established designs. Here we suggest a systematic method to establish novel micropatterns for desired functions using genetic algorithms. The evolutionary fitness of a certain pattern is computed using a cellular Potts model that describes cell behavior on micropattern. We first predict optimal patterns for a desired cell shape. We then optimize ratchet geometries to bias cell migration in a certain direction and find that asymmetric triangles are superior over the symmetric ones often used in experiments. Finally we design geometries which reverse the migration direction of cells when cell density increases due to cell division. PMID:27334659

  5. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome alters nuclear shape and reduces cell motility in three dimensional model substrates.

    PubMed

    Booth-Gauthier, Elizabeth A; Du, Vicard; Ghibaudo, Marion; Rape, Andrew D; Dahl, Kris Noel; Ladoux, Benoit

    2013-03-01

    Cell migration through tight interstitial spaces in three dimensional (3D) environments impacts development, wound healing and cancer metastasis and is altered by the aging process. The stiffness of the extracellular matrix (ECM) increases with aging and affects the cells and cytoskeletal processes involved in cell migration. However, the nucleus, which is the largest and densest organelle, has not been widely studied during cell migration through the ECM. Additionally, the nucleus is stiffened during the aging process through the accumulation of a mutant nucleoskeleton protein lamin A, progerin. By using microfabricated substrates to mimic the confined environment of surrounding tissues, we characterized nuclear movements and deformation during cell migration into micropillars where interspacing can be tuned to vary nuclear confinement. Cell motility decreased with decreased micropillar (μP) spacing and correlated with increased dysmorphic shapes of nuclei. We examined the effects of increased nuclear stiffness which correlates with cellular aging by studying Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome cells which are known to accumulate progerin. With the expression of progerin, cells showed a threshold response to decreased μP spacing. Cells became trapped in the close spacing, possibly from visible micro-defects in the nucleoskeleton induced by cell crawling through the μP and from reduced force generation, measured independently. We suggest that ECM changes during aging could be compounded by the increasing stiffness of the nucleus and thus changes in cell migration through 3D tissues. PMID:23370891

  6. Influence of cell shape, inhomogeneities and diffusion barriers in cell polarization models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Wolfgang; Eigel, Martin; Westerheide, Sebastian; Engwer, Christian; Klipp, Edda

    2015-12-01

    In silico experiments bear the potential for further understanding of biological transport processes by allowing a systematic modification of any spatial property and providing immediate simulation results. Cell polarization and spatial reorganization of membrane proteins are fundamental for cell division, chemotaxis and morphogenesis. We chose the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an exemplary model system which entails the shuttling of small Rho GTPases such as Cdc42 and Rho, between an active membrane-bound form and an inactive cytosolic form. We used partial differential equations to describe the membrane-cytosol shuttling of proteins. In this study, a consistent extension of a class of 1D reaction-diffusion systems into higher space dimensions is suggested. The membrane is modeled as a thin layer to allow for lateral diffusion and the cytosol is modeled as an enclosed volume. Two well-known polarization mechanisms were considered. One shows the classical Turing-instability patterns, the other exhibits wave-pinning dynamics. For both models, we investigated how cell shape and diffusion barriers like septin structures or bud scars influence the formation of signaling molecule clusters and subsequent polarization. An extensive set of in silico experiments with different modeling hypotheses illustrated the dependence of cell polarization models on local membrane curvature, cell size and inhomogeneities on the membrane and in the cytosol. In particular, the results of our computer simulations suggested that for both mechanisms, local diffusion barriers on the membrane facilitate Rho GTPase aggregation, while diffusion barriers in the cytosol and cell protrusions limit spontaneous molecule aggregations of active Rho GTPase locally.

  7. Reduced expression of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter and neurotransmitter content affects synaptic vesicle distribution and shape in mouse neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Hermann A; Fonseca, Matheus de C; Camargo, Wallace L; Lima, Patrícia M A; Martinelli, Patrícia M; Naves, Lígia A; Prado, Vânia F; Prado, Marco A M; Guatimosim, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    In vertebrates, nerve muscle communication is mediated by the release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine packed inside synaptic vesicles by a specific vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Here we used a mouse model (VAChT KD(HOM)) with 70% reduction in the expression of VAChT to investigate the morphological and functional consequences of a decreased acetylcholine uptake and release in neuromuscular synapses. Upon hypertonic stimulation, VAChT KD(HOM) mice presented a reduction in the amplitude and frequency of miniature endplate potentials, FM 1-43 staining intensity, total number of synaptic vesicles and altered distribution of vesicles within the synaptic terminal. In contrast, under electrical stimulation or no stimulation, VAChT KD(HOM) neuromuscular junctions did not differ from WT on total number of vesicles but showed altered distribution. Additionally, motor nerve terminals in VAChT KD(HOM) exhibited small and flattened synaptic vesicles similar to that observed in WT mice treated with vesamicol that blocks acetylcholine uptake. Based on these results, we propose that decreased VAChT levels affect synaptic vesicle biogenesis and distribution whereas a lower ACh content affects vesicles shape. PMID:24260111

  8. Ab-initio phasing using nanocrystal shape transforms with incomplete unit cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haiguang; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Spence, John C. H.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers are used in measuring diffraction patterns from nanocrystals in the ‘diffract-before-destroy’ mode by outrunning radiation damage. The finite-sized nanocrystals provide an opportunity to recover intensity between Bragg spots by removing the modulating function that depends on crystal shape, i.e. the transform of the crystal shape. This shape-transform dividing-out scheme for solving the phase problem has been tested using simulated examples with cubic crystals. It provides a phasing method which does not require atomic resolution data, chemical modification to the sample, or modelling based on the protein databases. It is common to find multiple structural units (e.g. molecules, in symmetry-related positions) within a single unit cell, therefore incomplete unit cells (e.g. one additional molecule) can be observed at surface layers of crystals. In this work, the effects of such incomplete unit cells on the ‘dividing-out’ phasing algorithm are investigated using 2D crystals within the projection approximation. It is found that the incomplete unit cells do not hinder the recovery of the scattering pattern from a single unit cell (after dividing out the shape transforms from data merged from many nanocrystals of different sizes), assuming that certain unit-cell types are preferred. The results also suggest that the dynamic range of the data is a critical issue to be resolved in order to apply the shape transform method practically. PMID:25075316

  9. Cell culture arrays using micron-sized ferromagnetic ring-shaped thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Lai, Mei-Feng; Ger, Tzong-Rong; Wei, Zung-Hang

    2015-05-01

    Cell patterning has become an important technology for tissue engineering. In this research, domain walls are formed at the two ends of a ferromagnetic ring thin film after applying a strong external magnetic field, which can effectively attract magnetically labeled cells and control the position for biological cell. Magnetophoresis experiment was conducted to quantify the magnetic nanoparticle inside the cells. A ring-shaped magnetic thin films array was fabricated through photolithography. It is observed that magnetically labeled cells can be successfully attracted to the two ends of the ring-shaped magnetic thin film structure and more cells were attracted and further attached to the structures. The cells are co-cultured with the structure and kept proliferating; therefore, such ring thin film can be an important candidate for in-vitro biomedical chips or tissue engineering.

  10. Cell Shapes and Traction Forces Determine Stress in Motile Confluent Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xingbo; Bi, Dapeng; Czajkowski, Michael; Manning, Lisa; Marchetti, Cristina

    Collective cell migration is a highly regulated process involved in wound healing, cancer metastasis and morphogenesis. The understanding of the regulatory mechanism requires the study of mechanical interactions among cells that coordinate their active motion. To this end, we develop a method that determines cellular forces and tissue stresses from experimentally accessible cell shapes and traction forces. This approach allows us for the first time to calculate membrane tensions and hydrostatic pressures at a cellular level in collective migrating cell layers out of equilibrium. It helps us understand the mechanical origin of tissue stresses as previous inferred using Traction Force Microscopy (TFM). We test this approach on a new model of motile confluent tissue, which we term Self-propelled Voronoi Model (SPV) that incorporates cell elasticity, Contractility and motility. With the model, we explore the mechanical properties of confluent motile tissue as a function of cell activities and cell shapes in various geometries.

  11. Global contraction or local growth, bleb shape depends on more than just cell structure.

    PubMed

    Woolley, Thomas E; Gaffney, Eamonn A; Oliver, James M; Waters, Sarah L; Baker, Ruth E; Goriely, Alain

    2015-09-01

    When the plasma membrane of a cell locally delaminates from its actin cortex the membrane is pushed outwards due to the cell׳s internal fluid pressure. The resulting spherical protrusion is known as a bleb. A cell׳s ability to function correctly is highly dependent on the production of such protrusions with the correct size and shape. Here, we investigate the nucleation of large blebs from small, local neck regions. A mathematical model of a cell׳s membrane, cortex and interconnecting adhesions demonstrates that these three components are unable to capture experimentally observed bleb shapes without the addition of further assumptions. We have identified that combinations of global cortex contraction and localised membrane growth are the most promising methods for generating prototypical blebs. Currently, neither proposed mechanism has been fully tested experimentally and, thus, we propose experiments that will distinguish between the two methods of bleb production. PMID:25934350

  12. How cells explore shape space: A quantitative statistical perspective of cellular morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Zheng; Sailem, Heba; Sero, Julia; Ardy, Rico; Wong, Stephen T.C.; Bakal, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Through statistical analysis of datasets describing single cell shape following systematic gene depletion, we have found that the morphological landscapes explored by cells are composed of a small number of attractor states. We propose that the topology of these landscapes is in large part determined by cell-intrinsic factors, such as biophysical constraints on cytoskeletal organization, and reflect different stable signaling and/or transcriptional states. Cell-extrinsic factors act to determine how cells explore these landscapes, and the topology of the landscapes themselves. Informational stimuli primarily drive transitions between stable states by engaging signaling networks, while mechanical stimuli tune, or even radically alter, the topology of these landscapes. As environments fluctuate, the topology of morphological landscapes explored by cells dynamically adapts to these fluctuations. Finally we hypothesize how complex cellular and tissue morphologies can be generated from a limited number of simple cell shapes. PMID:25220035

  13. Cell culture arrays using micron-sized ferromagnetic ring-shaped thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Wei, Zung-Hang; Lai, Mei-Feng; Ger, Tzong-Rong

    2015-05-07

    Cell patterning has become an important technology for tissue engineering. In this research, domain walls are formed at the two ends of a ferromagnetic ring thin film after applying a strong external magnetic field, which can effectively attract magnetically labeled cells and control the position for biological cell. Magnetophoresis experiment was conducted to quantify the magnetic nanoparticle inside the cells. A ring-shaped magnetic thin films array was fabricated through photolithography. It is observed that magnetically labeled cells can be successfully attracted to the two ends of the ring-shaped magnetic thin film structure and more cells were attracted and further attached to the structures. The cells are co-cultured with the structure and kept proliferating; therefore, such ring thin film can be an important candidate for in-vitro biomedical chips or tissue engineering.

  14. Curcumin affects cell survival and cell volume regulation in human renal and intestinal cells

    PubMed Central

    Kössler, Sonja; Nofziger, Charity; Jakab, Martin; Dossena, Silvia; Paulmichl, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin (1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1E,6E-heptadiene-3,5-dione or diferuloyl methane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, commonly known as turmeric. This substance has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries for its anti-oxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activity. More recently curcumin has been found to possess anti-cancer properties linked to its pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions. The underlying mechanisms of these diverse effects are complex, not fully elucidated and subject of intense scientific debate. Despite increasing evidence indicating that different cation channels can be a molecular target for curcumin, very little is known about the effect of curcumin on chloride channels. Since, (i) the molecular structure of curcumin indicates that the substance could potentially interact with chloride channels, (ii) chloride channels play a role during the apoptotic process and regulation of the cell volume, and (iii) apoptosis is a well known effect of curcumin, we set out to investigate whether or not curcumin could (i) exert a modulatory effect (direct or indirect) on the swelling activated chloride current IClswell in a human cell system, therefore (ii) affect cell volume regulation and (iii) ultimately modulate cell survival. The IClswell channels, which are essential for regulating the cell volume after swelling, are also known to be activated under isotonic conditions as an early event in the apoptotic process. Here we show that long-term exposure of a human kidney cell line to extracellular 0.1–10 μM curcumin modulates IClswell in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 μM curcumin is ineffective, 0.5–5.0 μM curcumin increase, while 10 μM curcumin decrease the current), and short-term exposure to micromolar concentrations of curcumin does not affect IClswell neither if applied from the extracellular nor from the intracellular side – therefore, a direct effect of curcumin on

  15. folded gastrulation, cell shape change and the control of myosin localization.

    PubMed

    Dawes-Hoang, Rachel E; Parmar, Kush M; Christiansen, Audrey E; Phelps, Chris B; Brand, Andrea H; Wieschaus, Eric F

    2005-09-01

    The global cell movements that shape an embryo are driven by intricate changes to the cytoarchitecture of individual cells. In a developing embryo, these changes are controlled by patterning genes that confer cell identity. However, little is known about how patterning genes influence cytoarchitecture to drive changes in cell shape. In this paper, we analyze the function of the folded gastrulation gene (fog), a known target of the patterning gene twist. Our analysis of fog function therefore illuminates a molecular pathway spanning all the way from patterning gene to physical change in cell shape. We show that secretion of Fog protein is apically polarized, making this the earliest polarized component of a pathway that ultimately drives myosin to the apical side of the cell. We demonstrate that fog is both necessary and sufficient to drive apical myosin localization through a mechanism involving activation of myosin contractility with actin. We determine that this contractility driven form of localization involves RhoGEF2 and the downstream effector Rho kinase. This distinguishes apical myosin localization from basal myosin localization, which we find not to require actinomyosin contractility or FOG/RhoGEF2/Rho-kinase signaling. Furthermore, we demonstrate that once localized apically, myosin continues to contract. The force generated by continued myosin contraction is translated into a flattening and constriction of the cell surface through a tethering of the actinomyosin cytoskeleton to the apical adherens junctions. Our analysis of fog function therefore provides a direct link from patterning to cell shape change. PMID:16123312

  16. Evolutionary Forces Shaping the Golgi Glycosylation Machinery: Why Cell Surface Glycans Are Universal to Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Varki, Ajit

    2011-01-01

    Despite more than 3 billion years since the origin of life on earth, the powerful forces of biological evolution seem to have failed to generate any living cell that is devoid of a dense and complex array of cell surface glycans. Thus, cell surface glycans seem to be as essential for life as having a DNA genetic code, diverse RNAs, structural/functional proteins, lipid-based membranes, and metabolites that mediate energy flux and signaling. The likely reasons for this apparently universal law of biology are considered here, and include the fact that glycans have the greatest potential for generating diversity, and thus evading recognition by pathogens. This may also explain why in striking contrast to the genetic code, glycans show widely divergent patterns between taxa. On the other hand, glycans have also been coopted for myriad intrinsic functions, which can vary in their importance for organismal survival. In keeping with these considerations, a significant percentage of the genes in the typical genome are dedicated to the generation and/or turnover of glycans. Among eukaryotes, the Golgi is the subcellular organelle that serves to generate much of the diversity of cell surface glycans, carrying out various glycan modifications of glycoconjugates that transit through the Golgi, en route to the cell surface or extracellular destinations. Here I present an overview of general considerations regarding the selective forces shaping evolution of the Golgi glycosylation machinery, and then briefly discuss the common types of variations seen in each major class of glycans, finally focusing on sialic acids as an extreme example of evolutionary glycan diversity generated by the Golgi. Future studies need to address both the phylogenetic diversity the Golgi and the molecular mechanisms for its rapid responses to intrinsic and environmental stimuli. PMID:21525513

  17. Fast Response, Open-Celled Porous, Shape Memory Effect Actuators with Integrated Attachments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jardine, Andrew Peter (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates to the exploitation of porous foam articles exhibiting the Shape Memory Effect as actuators. Each foam article is composed of a plurality of geometric shapes, such that some geometric shapes can fit snugly into or around rigid mating connectors that attach the Shape Memory foam article intimately into the load path between a static structure and a moveable structure. The foam is open-celled, composed of a plurality of interconnected struts whose mean diameter can vary from approximately 50 to 500 microns. Gases and fluids flowing through the foam transfer heat rapidly with the struts, providing rapid Shape Memory Effect transformations. Embodiments of porous foam articles as torsional actuators and approximately planar structures are disposed. Simple, integral connection systems exploiting the ability to supply large loads to a structure, and that can also supply hot and cold gases and fluids to effect rapid actuation are also disposed.

  18. Shape Recovery of Elastic Red Blood Cells from Shear Flow Induced Deformation in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yan; Gounley, John

    2015-11-01

    Red blood cells undergo substantial shape changes in vivo. Modeled as an elastic capsule, the shape recovery of a three dimensional biconcave capsule from shear flow is studied for different preferred elastic and bending configuration. The fluid-structure interaction is modeled using the multiple-relaxation time lattice Boltzmann (LBM) and immersed boundary (IBM) methods. Based on the studies of the limited shape memory observed in three dimensions, the shape recovery is caused by the preferred elastic configuration, at least when paired with a constant spontaneous curvature. For these capsules, the incompleteness of the shape recovery observed precludes any conjecture about whether a single or multiple phase(s) are necessary to describe the recovery process. Longer simulations and a more stable methodology will be necessary. Y. Peng acknowledges support from Old Dominion University Research Foundation Grant #503921 and National Science Foundation Grant DMS-1319078.

  19. Genome rearrangement affects RNA virus adaptability on prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pesko, Kendra; Voigt, Emily A; Swick, Adam; Morley, Valerie J; Timm, Collin; Yin, John; Turner, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    Gene order is often highly conserved within taxonomic groups, such that organisms with rearranged genomes tend to be less fit than wild type gene orders, and suggesting natural selection favors genome architectures that maximize fitness. But it is unclear whether rearranged genomes hinder adaptability: capacity to evolutionarily improve in a new environment. Negative-sense non-segmented RNA viruses (order Mononegavirales) have specific genome architecture: 3' UTR - core protein genes - envelope protein genes - RNA-dependent RNA-polymerase gene - 5' UTR. To test how genome architecture affects RNA virus evolution, we examined vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) variants with the nucleocapsid (N) gene moved sequentially downstream in the genome. Because RNA polymerase stuttering in VSV replication causes greater mRNA production in upstream genes, N gene translocation toward the 5' end leads to stepwise decreases in N transcription, viral replication and progeny production, and also impacts the activation of type 1 interferon mediated antiviral responses. We evolved VSV gene-order variants in two prostate cancer cell lines: LNCap cells deficient in innate immune response to viral infection, and PC-3 cells that mount an IFN stimulated anti-viral response to infection. We observed that gene order affects phenotypic adaptability (reproductive growth; viral suppression of immune function), especially on PC-3 cells that strongly select against virus infection. Overall, populations derived from the least-fit ancestor (most-altered N position architecture) adapted fastest, consistent with theory predicting populations with low initial fitness should improve faster in evolutionary time. Also, we observed correlated responses to selection, where viruses improved across both hosts, rather than suffer fitness trade-offs on unselected hosts. Whole genomics revealed multiple mutations in evolved variants, some of which were conserved across selective environments for a given gene

  20. An experimental study of mushroom shaped stall cells. [on finite wings with separated flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkelmann, A. E.

    1982-01-01

    Surface patterns characterized by a pair of counter-rotating swirls have been observed in connection with the conduction of surface flow visualization experiments involving test geometries with separated flows. An example of this phenomenon occurring on a finite wing with trailing edge stall has been referred to by Winkelmann and Barlow (1980) as 'mushroom shaped'. A description is presented of a collection of experimental results which show or suggest the occurrence of mushroom shaped stall cells on a variety of test geometries. Investigations conducted with finite wings, airfoil models, and flat plates are considered, and attention is given to studies involving the use of bluff models, investigations of shock induced boundary layer separation, and mushroom shaped patterns observed in a number of miscellaneous cases. It is concluded that the mushroom shaped stall cell appears commonly in separated flow regions.

  1. Shape quantification of single red blood cells based on their scattering patterns from microscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Gert; Artmann, Gerhard

    1995-02-01

    The differentiation between discocytic and stomatocytic red blood cell (RBC) shape using conventional microscopic imaging and image analysis tools is still on a very poor level. A procedure to differentiate the degree of stomatocytic shape changes was developed. We obtained multiple microscopic images of the same RBCs settled on a human albumin coated cover slip. The images were acquired when the microscope objective was subsequently focused through the cell layer. At equidistant horizontal planes (z-axis) below, within, and above the microscopic focal plane the light intensity distribution was considered. Using a model based on light refraction, we calculated the intensity distribution of the planes which are out of focus. Using this tool we are able to differentiate RBC shapes precisely. On the other hand, using this model from and the light intensity distributions of different focal planes, we are able to reconstruct the shape of one single RBC located in the optical axis of the microscope.

  2. Highly Stable, Anion Conductive, Comb-Shaped Copolymers for Alkaline Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, NW; Leng, YJ; Hickner, MA; Wang, CY

    2013-07-10

    To produce an anion-conductive and durable polymer electrolyte for alkaline fuel cell applications, a series of quaternized poly(2,6-dimethyl phenylene oxide)s containing long alkyl side chains pendant to the nitrogen-centered cation were synthesized using a Menshutkin reaction to form comb-shaped structures. The pendant alkyl chains were responsible for the development of highly conductive ionic domains, as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The comb-shaped polymers having one alkyl side chain showed higher hydroxide conductivities than those with benzyltrimethyl ammonium moieties or structures with more than one alkyl side chain per cationic site. The highest conductivity was observed for comb-shaped polymers with benzyldimethylhexadecyl ammonium cations. The chemical stabilities of the comb-shaped membranes were evaluated under severe, accelerated-aging conditions, and degradation was observed by measuring IEC and ion conductivity changes during aging. The comb-shaped membranes retained their high ion conductivity in 1 M NaOH at 80 degrees C for 2000 h. These cationic polymers were employed as ionomers in catalyst layers for alkaline fuel cells. The results indicated that the C-16 alkyl side chain ionomer had a slightly better initial performance, despite its low IEC value, but very poor durability in the fuel cell. In contrast, 90% of the initial performance was retained for the alkaline fuel cell with electrodes containing the C-6 side chain after 60 h of fuel cell operation.

  3. Cell shape-dependent shear stress on adherent cells in a micro-physiologic system as revealed by FEM.

    PubMed

    Pfister, C; Bozsak, C; Wolf, P; Demmel, F; Brischwein, M

    2015-05-01

    Flow-induced shear stress on adherent cells leads to biochemical signaling and mechanical responses of the cells. To determine the flow-induced shear stress on adherent cells cultured in a micro-scaled reaction chamber, we developed a suitable finite element method model. The influence of the most important parameters-cell shape, cell density, shear modulus and fluid velocity-was investigated. Notably, the cell shape strongly influences the resulting shear stress. Long and smooth cells undergo lower shear stress than more rounded cells. Changes in the curvature of the cells lead to stress peaks and single cells experience higher shear stress values than cells of a confluent monolayer. The computational results of the fluid flow simulation were validated experimentally. We also analyzed the influence of flow-induced shear stress on the metabolic activity and shape of L929, a mouse fibroblast cell line, experimentally. The results indicate that threshold stress values for continuous flow conditions cannot be transferred to quasi static flow conditions interrupted by short fluid exchange events. PMID:25856467

  4. Evolved Colloidosomes Undergoing Cell-like Autonomous Shape Oscillations with Buckling.

    PubMed

    Tamate, Ryota; Ueki, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ryo

    2016-04-18

    In living systems, there are many autonomous and oscillatory phenomena to sustain life, such as heart contractions and breathing. At the microscopic level, oscillatory shape deformations of cells are often observed in dynamic behaviors during cell migration and morphogenesis. In many cases, oscillatory behaviors of cells are not simplistic but complex with diverse deformations. So far, we have succeeded in developing self-oscillating polymers and gels, but complex oscillatory behaviors mimicking those of living cells have yet to be reproduced. Herein, we report a cell-like hollow sphere composed of self-oscillating microgels, that is, a colloidosome, that exhibits drastic shape oscillation in addition to swelling/deswelling oscillations driven by an oscillatory reaction. The resulting oscillatory profile waveform becomes markedly more complex than a conventional one. Especially for larger colloidosomes, multiple buckling and moving buckling points are observed to be analogous to cells. PMID:26960167

  5. Customized homogenization and shaping of LED light by micro cells arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asoubar, Daniel; Hellmann, Christian; Schweitzer, Hagen; Kuhn, Michael; Wyrowski, Frank

    2015-03-01

    The energy-efficient use of LED light requires the development of compact illumination systems for the customized homogenization and shaping of partially-coherent LED light. Therefore a design concept which is based on arrays of aperiodic micro structures, namely cells, for primary or secondary optics is introduced. Each cell of the array deflects locally the light into predefined directions and results in a light spot in the target plane. The light spots of all array cells together form the desired light pattern. The performance of three different cell geometries (linear gratings, micro prisms andmicromirrors) on the homogenization and shaping ofmonochromatic as well as white light LEDs is demonstrated. For the realistic evaluation of the illumination system an LED model including power spectrum, polarization, spatial and temporal coherence is chosen. Furthermore wave-optical effects like diffraction at the cell apertures are taken into account. For the grating cells arrays a rigorous analysis of the diffraction efficiencies is included.

  6. Universally Conserved Relationships between Nuclear Shape and Cytoplasmic Mechanical Properties in Human Stem Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozoya, Oswaldo A.; Gilchrist, Christopher L.; Guilak, Farshid

    2016-03-01

    The ability of cells to proliferate, differentiate, transduce extracellular signals and assemble tissues involves structural connections between nucleus and cytoskeleton. Yet, how the mechanics of these connections vary inside stem cells is not fully understood. To address those questions, we combined two-dimensional particle-tracking microrheology and morphological measures using variable reduction techniques to measure whether cytoplasmic mechanics allow for discrimination between different human adherent stem cell types and across different culture conditions. Here we show that nuclear shape is a quantifiable discriminant of mechanical properties in the perinuclear cytoskeleton (pnCSK) of various stem cell types. Also, we find the pnCSK is a region with different mechanical properties than elsewhere in the cytoskeleton, with heterogeneously distributed locations exhibiting subdiffusive features, and which obeys physical relations conserved among various stem cell types. Finally, we offer a prospective basis to discriminate between stem cell types by coupling perinuclear mechanical properties to nuclear shape.

  7. Universally Conserved Relationships between Nuclear Shape and Cytoplasmic Mechanical Properties in Human Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lozoya, Oswaldo A.; Gilchrist, Christopher L.; Guilak, Farshid

    2016-01-01

    The ability of cells to proliferate, differentiate, transduce extracellular signals and assemble tissues involves structural connections between nucleus and cytoskeleton. Yet, how the mechanics of these connections vary inside stem cells is not fully understood. To address those questions, we combined two-dimensional particle-tracking microrheology and morphological measures using variable reduction techniques to measure whether cytoplasmic mechanics allow for discrimination between different human adherent stem cell types and across different culture conditions. Here we show that nuclear shape is a quantifiable discriminant of mechanical properties in the perinuclear cytoskeleton (pnCSK) of various stem cell types. Also, we find the pnCSK is a region with different mechanical properties than elsewhere in the cytoskeleton, with heterogeneously distributed locations exhibiting subdiffusive features, and which obeys physical relations conserved among various stem cell types. Finally, we offer a prospective basis to discriminate between stem cell types by coupling perinuclear mechanical properties to nuclear shape. PMID:26976044

  8. Extracellular matrix and cell shape: potential control points for inhibition of angiogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D.

    1991-01-01

    Capillary endothelial (CE) cells require two extracellular signals in order to switch from quiescence to growth and back to differentiation during angiogenesis: soluble angiogenic factors and insoluble extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. Soluble endothelial mitogens, such as basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), act over large distances to trigger capillary growth, whereas ECM molecules act locally to modulate cell responsiveness to these soluble cues. Recent studies reveal that ECM molecules regulate CE cell growth and differentiation by modulating cell shape and by activating intracellular chemical signaling pathways inside the cell. Recognition of the importance of ECM and cell shape during capillary morphogenesis has led to the identification of a series of new angiogenesis inhibitors. Elucidation of the molecular mechanism of capillary regulation may result in development of even more potent angiogenesis modulators in the future.

  9. Intact vinculin protein is required for control of cell shape, cell mechanics, and rac-dependent lamellipodia formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldmann, Wolfgang H.; Ingber, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    Studies were carried out using vinculin-deficient F9 embryonic carcinoma (gamma229) cells to analyze the relationship between structure and function within the focal adhesion protein vinculin, in the context of control of cell shape, cell mechanics, and movement. Atomic force microscopy studies revealed that transfection of the head (aa 1-821) or tail (aa 811-1066) domain of vinculin, alone or together, was unable to fully reverse the decrease in cell stiffness, spreading, and lamellipodia formation caused by vinculin deficiency. In contrast, replacement with intact vinculin completely restored normal cell mechanics and spreading regardless of whether its tyrosine phosphorylation site was deleted. Constitutively active rac also only induced extension of lamellipodia when microinjected into cells that expressed intact vinculin protein. These data indicate that vinculin's ability to physically couple integrins to the cytoskeleton, to mechanically stabilize cell shape, and to support rac-dependent lamellipodia formation all appear to depend on its intact three-dimensional structure.

  10. Shape and shear guide sperm cells spiraling upstream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsler, Vasily; Dunkel, Jorn; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2014-11-01

    A major puzzle in biology is how mammalian sperm determine and maintain the correct swimming direction during the various phases of the sexual reproduction process. Currently debated mechanisms for sperm long range travel vary from peristaltic pumping to temperature sensing (thermotaxis) and direct response to fluid flow (rheotaxis), but little is known quantitatively about their relative importance. Here, we report the first quantitative experimental study of mammalian sperm rheotaxis. Using microfluidic devices, we investigate systematically the swimming behavior of human and bull sperm over a wide range of physiologically relevant shear rates and viscosities. Our measurements show that the interplay of fluid shear, steric surface-interactions and chirality of the flagellar beat leads to a stable upstream spiraling motion of sperm cells, thus providing a generic and robust rectification mechanism to support mammalian fertilization. To rationalize these findings, we identify a minimal mathematical model that is capable of describing quantitatively the experimental observations.

  11. Multiscale modeling of cell shape from the actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Rangamani, Padmini; Xiong, Granville Yuguang; Iyengar, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure that constantly undergoes complex reorganization events during many cellular processes. Mathematical models and simulations are powerful tools that can provide insight into the physical mechanisms underlying these processes and make predictions that can be experimentally tested. Representation of the interactions of the actin filaments with the plasma membrane and the movement of the plasma membrane for computation remains a challenge. Here, we provide an overview of the different modeling approaches used to study cytoskeletal dynamics and highlight the differential geometry approach that we have used to implement the interactions between the plasma membrane and the cytoskeleton. Using cell spreading as an example, we demonstrate how this approach is able to successfully capture in simulations, experimentally observed behavior. We provide a perspective on how the differential geometry approach can be used for other biological processes. PMID:24560144

  12. Geometrical shape design of nanophotonic surfaces for thin film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, W I; Yoo, Y J; Song, Y M

    2016-07-11

    We present the effect of geometrical parameters, particularly shape, on optical absorption enhancement for thin film solar cells based on crystalline silicon (c-Si) and gallium arsenide (GaAs) using a rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) method. It is discovered that the "sweet spot" that maximizes efficiency of solar cells exists for the design of nanophotonic surfaces. For the case of ultrathin, rod array is practical due to the effective optical resonances resulted from the optimum geometry whereas parabola array is viable for relatively thicker cells owing to the effective graded index profile. A specific value of thickness, which is the median value of other two devices tailored by rod and paraboloid, is optimized by truncated shape structure. It is therefore worth scanning the optimum shape of nanostructures in a given thickness in order to achieve high performance. PMID:27410892

  13. Automated characterization of cell shape changes during amoeboid motility by skeletonization

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The ability of a cell to change shape is crucial for the proper function of many cellular processes, including cell migration. One type of cell migration, referred to as amoeboid motility, involves alternating cycles of morphological expansion and retraction. Traditionally, this process has been characterized by a number of parameters providing global information about shape changes, which are insufficient to distinguish phenotypes based on local pseudopodial activities that typify amoeboid motility. Results We developed a method that automatically detects and characterizes pseudopodial behavior of cells. The method uses skeletonization, a technique from morphological image processing to reduce a shape into a series of connected lines. It involves a series of automatic algorithms including image segmentation, boundary smoothing, skeletonization and branch pruning, and takes into account the cell shape changes between successive frames to detect protrusion and retraction activities. In addition, the activities are clustered into different groups, each representing the protruding and retracting history of an individual pseudopod. Conclusions We illustrate the algorithms on movies of chemotaxing Dictyostelium cells and show that our method makes it possible to capture the spatial and temporal dynamics as well as the stochastic features of the pseudopodial behavior. Thus, the method provides a powerful tool for investigating amoeboid motility. PMID:20334652

  14. TUNING OF SIZE AND SHAPE OF AU-PT NANOCATALYST FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect

    Murph, S.

    2011-04-20

    In this paper, we report the precise control of the size, shape and surface morphology of Au-Pt nanocatalysts (cubes, blocks, octahedrons and dogbones) synthesized via a seed-mediated approach. Gold 'seeds' of different aspect ratios (1 to 4.2), grown by a silver-assisted approach, were used as templates for high-yield production of novel Au-Pt nanocatalysts at a low temperature (40 C). Characterization by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM, HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), UV-Vis spectroscopy, zeta-potential (surface charge), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used to better understand their physico-chemical properties, preferred reactivities and underlying nanoparticle growth mechanism. A rotating disk electrode was used to evaluate the Au-Pt nanocatalysts electrochemical performance in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) of direct methanol fuel cells. The results indicate the Au-Pt dogbones are partially and in some cases completely unaffected by methanol poisoning during the evaluation of the ORR. The ORR performance of the octahedron particles in the absence of MeOH is superior to that of the Au-Pt dogbones and Pt-black, however its performance is affected by the presence of MeOH.

  15. Tricellulin deficiency affects tight junction architecture and cochlear hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Gowri; Lee, Sue I.; Yousaf, Rizwan; Edelmann, Stephanie E.; Trincot, Claire; Van Itallie, Christina M.; Sinha, Ghanshyam P.; Rafeeq, Maria; Jones, Sherri M.; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Anderson, James M.; Forge, Andrew; Frolenkov, Gregory I.; Riazuddin, Saima

    2013-01-01

    The two compositionally distinct extracellular cochlear fluids, endolymph and perilymph, are separated by tight junctions that outline the scala media and reticular lamina. Mutations in TRIC (also known as MARVELD2), which encodes a tricellular tight junction protein known as tricellulin, lead to nonsyndromic hearing loss (DFNB49). We generated a knockin mouse that carries a mutation orthologous to the TRIC coding mutation linked to DFNB49 hearing loss in humans. Tricellulin was absent from the tricellular junctions in the inner ear epithelia of the mutant animals, which developed rapidly progressing hearing loss accompanied by loss of mechanosensory cochlear hair cells, while the endocochlear potential and paracellular permeability of a biotin-based tracer in the stria vascularis were unaltered. Freeze-fracture electron microscopy revealed disruption of the strands of intramembrane particles connecting bicellular and tricellular junctions in the inner ear epithelia of tricellulin-deficient mice. These ultrastructural changes may selectively affect the paracellular permeability of ions or small molecules, resulting in a toxic microenvironment for cochlear hair cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, hair cell loss was rescued in tricellulin-deficient mice when generation of normal endolymph was inhibited by a concomitant deletion of the transcription factor, Pou3f4. Finally, comprehensive phenotypic screening showed a broader pathological phenotype in the mutant mice, which highlights the non-redundant roles played by tricellulin. PMID:23979167

  16. Cell-Sorting System with On-Chip Imaging for Label-Free Shape-Based Selection of Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terazono, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Masahito; Kim, Hyonchol; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    We have developed a novel cell-sorting system involving microscopic imaging using a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based microfluidic chip with a pair of gel electrodes and real-time image-processing procedures for the quantification of cell shapes. The features of this system are as follows. 1) It can recognize cells both by microscopic cell imaging with a 10,000 event/s high-speed camera and by the photodetection of fluorescence. 2) Multistage sorting is used to reduce errors to an infinitesimally low level by using a pair of wide agarose-gel electrodes. 3) Carry-over-free analysis can be performed using a disposable microfluidic chip. 4) An field programmable gate array (FPGA) 10,000 event/s real-time image analysis unit for quantifying the cell images in cell sorting. To separate the target cells from other cells on the basis of the cell shape, we adopted an index of roughness for the cell surface R, which compares the actual perimeter of cell surface and the estimated perimeter of cross-sectional view of cell shape by approximating the cell as a sphere. Sample cells flowing through microchannels on the chip were distinguished by the dual recognition system involving optical analysis and a fluorescence detector, and then separated. Target cells could be sorted automatically by applying an electrophoretic force, and the sorting ability depended on the precision with which cells were shifted within the laminar flow. These results indicate that the cell-sorting system with on-chip imaging is practically applicable for biological research and clinical diagnostics.

  17. Rechargeable zinc cell with alkaline electrolyte which inhibits shape change in zinc electrode

    DOEpatents

    Adler, Thomas C.; McLarnon, Frank R.; Cairns, Elton J.

    1994-01-01

    An improved rechargeable zinc cell is described comprising a zinc electrode and another electrode such as, for example, a nickel-containing electrode, and having an electrolyte containing KOH and a combination of KF and K.sub.2 CO.sub.3 salts which inhibits shape change in the zinc electrode, i.e., the zinc electrode exhibits low shape change, resulting in an improved capacity retention of the cell over an number of charge-discharge cycles, while still maintaining high discharge rate characteristics.

  18. Rechargeable zinc cell with alkaline electrolyte which inhibits shape change in zinc electrode

    DOEpatents

    Adler, T.C.; McLarnon, F.R.; Cairns, E.J.

    1994-04-12

    An improved rechargeable zinc cell is described comprising a zinc electrode and another electrode such as, for example, a nickel-containing electrode, and having an electrolyte containing KOH and a combination of KF and K[sub 2]CO[sub 3] salts which inhibits shape change in the zinc electrode, i.e., the zinc electrode exhibits low shape change, resulting in an improved capacity retention of the cell over an number of charge-discharge cycles, while still maintaining high discharge rate characteristics. 8 figures.

  19. Unjamming and cell shape in the asthmatic airway epithelium.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Ah; Kim, Jae Hun; Bi, Dapeng; Mitchel, Jennifer A; Qazvini, Nader Taheri; Tantisira, Kelan; Park, Chan Young; McGill, Maureen; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Gweon, Bomi; Notbohm, Jacob; Steward, Robert; Burger, Stephanie; Randell, Scott H; Kho, Alvin T; Tambe, Dhananjay T; Hardin, Corey; Shore, Stephanie A; Israel, Elliot; Weitz, David A; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Henske, Elizabeth P; Weiss, Scott T; Manning, M Lisa; Butler, James P; Drazen, Jeffrey M; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2015-10-01

    From coffee beans flowing in a chute to cells remodelling in a living tissue, a wide variety of close-packed collective systems-both inert and living-have the potential to jam. The collective can sometimes flow like a fluid or jam and rigidify like a solid. The unjammed-to-jammed transition remains poorly understood, however, and structural properties characterizing these phases remain unknown. Using primary human bronchial epithelial cells, we show that the jamming transition in asthma is linked to cell shape, thus establishing in that system a structural criterion for cell jamming. Surprisingly, the collapse of critical scaling predicts a counter-intuitive relationship between jamming, cell shape and cell-cell adhesive stresses that is borne out by direct experimental observations. Cell shape thus provides a rigorous structural signature for classification and investigation of bronchial epithelial layer jamming in asthma, and potentially in any process in disease or development in which epithelial dynamics play a prominent role. PMID:26237129

  20. Fabrication of a membrane filter with controlled pore shape and its application to cell separation and strong single cell trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Dong-Hoon; Yoon, Gun-Wook; Park, Jeong Won; Ihm, Chunhwa; Lee, Dae-Sik; Yoon, Jun-Bo

    2015-10-01

    A porous membrane filter is one of the key components for sample preparation in lab-on-a-chip applications. However, most of the membranes reported to date have only been used for size-based separation since it is difficult to provide functionality to the membrane or improve the performance of the membrane. In this work, as a method to functionalize the membrane filter, controlling the shape of the membrane pores is suggested, and a convenient and mass-producible fabrication method is provided. With the proposed method, membrane filters with round, conical and funnel shape pores were successfully fabricated, and we demonstrated that the sidewall slope of the conical shape pores could be precisely controlled. To verify that the membrane filter can be functionalized by controlled pore shape, we investigated filtration and trapping performance of the membrane filter with conical shape pores. In a filtration test of 1000 cancer cells (MCF-7, a breast cancer cell line) spiked in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) solution, 77% of the total cancer cells were retained on the membrane, and each cell from among 99.3% of the retained cells was automatically isolated in a single conical pore during the filtration process. Thanks to its engineered pore shape, trapping ability of the membrane with conical pores is dramatically improved. Microparticles trapped in the conical pores maintain their locations without any losses even at a more than 30 times faster external flow rate com-pared with those mounted on conventional cylindrical pores. Also, 78% of the cells trapped in the conical pores withstand an external flow of over 300 μl min-1 whereas only 18% of the cells trapped in the cylindrical pores remain on the membrane after 120 μl min-1 of an external flow is applied.

  1. A genomic multi-process survey of the machineries that control and link cell shape, microtubule organisation and cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Geymonat, Marco; Bortfeld-Miller, Miriam; Walter, Thomas; Wagstaff, Laura; Piddini, Eugenia; Carazo Salas, Rafael E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Understanding cells as integrated systems requires that we systematically decipher how single genes affect multiple biological processes and how processes are functionally linked. Here, we used multi-process phenotypic profiling, combining high-resolution 3D confocal microscopy and multi-parametric image analysis, to simultaneously survey the fission yeast genome with respect to three key cellular processes: cell shape, microtubule organisation and cell cycle progression. We identify, validate and functionally annotate 262 genes controlling specific aspects of those processes. Of these 62% had not been linked to these processes before and 35% are implicated in multiple processes. Importantly, we identify a conserved role for DNA-damage responses in controlling microtubule stability. In addition, we investigate how the processes are functionally linked. We show unexpectedly that disruption of cell cycle progression does not necessarily impact on cell size control and that distinct aspects of cell shape regulate microtubules and vice-versa, identifying important systems-level links across these processes. PMID:25373780

  2. Specialized features of the outer hair cell shapes in the cochlear fovea of bats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, S Q; Li, S L; Zhu, H L; Yan, L Y

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the specialized features of the outer hair cells (OHCs) and the stereocilium bundles of the bat cochlear fovea. Bat cochlea hair cells were observed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and the auditory brainstem response thresholds were assessed. The stereocilia bundles of the OHCs were extremely short. The OHC bodies were flask-shaped and cambiform or ball-shape in the cochlear fovea. Digitations in the Deiters cells had exaggerated lengths, and cup formation of the Deiters cell, housed at the bottom of the OHC in the base of the cell, showed a specialized shape. Our results provide the first evidence that different shapes of the OHCs in the cochlea fovea are related to the high-frequency function of auditory response. Echolocating bats have cochlear morphologies that differ from those of non-echolocating animals. Bat cochlear foveae are specialized for analyzing the Doppler-shifted echoes of the first-harmonics of the CF2 component; these are overrepresented in the frequency range around the dominant harmonic of the echolocation calls of bats. However, the OHCs of the bat cochlear fovea have not been fully characterized. PMID:26345886

  3. Dynamics of Cell Shape and Forces on Micropatterned Substrates Predicted by a Cellular Potts Model

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Philipp J.; Schwarz, Ulrich S.

    2014-01-01

    Micropatterned substrates are often used to standardize cell experiments and to quantitatively study the relation between cell shape and function. Moreover, they are increasingly used in combination with traction force microscopy on soft elastic substrates. To predict the dynamics and steady states of cell shape and forces without any a priori knowledge of how the cell will spread on a given micropattern, here we extend earlier formulations of the two-dimensional cellular Potts model. The third dimension is treated as an area reservoir for spreading. To account for local contour reinforcement by peripheral bundles, we augment the cellular Potts model by elements of the tension-elasticity model. We first parameterize our model and show that it accounts for momentum conservation. We then demonstrate that it is in good agreement with experimental data for shape, spreading dynamics, and traction force patterns of cells on micropatterned substrates. We finally predict shapes and forces for micropatterns that have not yet been experimentally studied. PMID:24896113

  4. Glyco-gold nanoparticle shapes enhance carbohydrate-protein interactions in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Sangabathuni, Sivakoti; Vasudeva Murthy, Raghavendra; Chaudhary, Preeti Madhukar; Surve, Manalee; Banerjee, Anirban; Kikkeri, Raghavendra

    2016-07-01

    Advances in shape-dependent nanoparticle (NP) research have prompted a close scrutiny of the behaviour of nanostructures in vitro and in vivo. Data pertaining to cellular uptake and site specific sequestration of different shapes of NPs will undoubtedly assist researchers to design better nano-probes for therapeutic and imaging purposes. Herein, we investigated the shape dependent uptake of glyco-gold nanoparticles (G-AuNPs) in different cancer cell lines. Specifically, we have compared the behaviour of spherical, rod and star AuNPs with mannose and galactose conjugations. In vitro experiments showed that the rod-AuNPs exhibited the highest uptake over that of the star and spherical counterparts. Further, an investigation of the mechanism of the uptake clearly demonstrated clathrin mediated endocytosis of the specific G-AuNPs. These results reveal the benefits of different G-AuNP shapes in carbohydrate-mediated interactions. PMID:27279022

  5. A colour-tunable, weavable fibre-shaped polymer light-emitting electrochemical cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhitao; Guo, Kunping; Li, Yiming; Li, Xueyi; Guan, Guozhen; Li, Houpu; Luo, Yongfeng; Zhao, Fangyuan; Zhang, Qi; Wei, Bin; Pei, Qibing; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-04-01

    The emergence of wearable electronics and optoelectronics requires the development of devices that are not only highly flexible but can also be woven into textiles to offer a truly integrated solution. Here, we report a colour-tunable, weavable fibre-shaped polymer light-emitting electrochemical cell (PLEC). The fibre-shaped PLEC is fabricated using all-solution-based processes that can be scaled up for practical applications. The design has a coaxial structure comprising a modified metal wire cathode and a conducting aligned carbon nanotube sheet anode, with an electroluminescent polymer layer sandwiched between them. The fibre shape offers unique and promising advantages. For example, the luminance is independent of viewing angle, the fibre-shaped PLEC can provide a variety of different and tunable colours, it is lightweight, flexible and wearable, and it can potentially be woven into light-emitting clothes for the creation of smart fabrics.

  6. Numerical simulation of the transient shape of the red blood cell in microcapillary flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xing; Wang, Shuanglian; Zhang, Shuai

    2013-01-01

    The transient shape of a red blood cell (RBC) in a microcapillary flow is simulated under different initial conditions, including various axis orientations and centroid locations, using the LBM-DLM/FD method, which is derived from the lattice Boltzmann method and the distributed Lagrange multiplier/fictitious domain method. Although the terminal velocity is not sensitive to the initial configuration, the evolution of the velocity and the shape are determined by the initial conditions. The parachute and the slipper shape are the most probable shapes for a deformed RBC in the flow. An RBC with an initial axis orientation of 90 degrees exhibits a more complicated deformation. RBCs have a tendency to move to the centerline of a tube if an offset between the RBC centroid and the centerline exists. Our numerical results are validated by experiments, and some details beyond the experiment are provided.

  7. Gloss, colour and grip: multifunctional epidermal cell shapes in bee- and bird-pollinated flowers.

    PubMed

    Papiorek, Sarah; Junker, Robert R; Lunau, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Flowers bear the function of filters supporting the attraction of pollinators as well as the deterrence of floral antagonists. The effect of epidermal cell shape on the visual display and tactile properties of flowers has been evaluated only recently. In this study we quantitatively measured epidermal cell shape, gloss and spectral reflectance of flowers pollinated by either bees or birds testing three hypotheses: The first two hypotheses imply that bee-pollinated flowers might benefit from rough surfaces on visually-active parts produced by conical epidermal cells, as they may enhance the colour signal of flowers as well as the grip on flowers for bees. In contrast, bird-pollinated flowers might benefit from flat surfaces produced by flat epidermal cells, by avoiding frequent visitation from non-pollinating bees due to a reduced colour signal, as birds do not rely on specific colour parameters while foraging. Moreover, flat petal surfaces in bird-pollinated flowers may hamper grip for bees that do not touch anthers and stigmas while consuming nectar and thus, are considered as nectar thieves. Beside this, the third hypothesis implies that those flower parts which are vulnerable to nectar robbing of bee- as well as bird-pollinated flowers benefit from flat epidermal cells, hampering grip for nectar robbing bees. Our comparative data show in fact that conical epidermal cells are restricted to visually-active parts of bee-pollinated flowers, whereas robbing-sensitive parts of bee-pollinated as well as the entire floral surface of bird-pollinated flowers possess on average flat epidermal cells. However, direct correlations between epidermal cell shape and colour parameters have not been found. Our results together with published experimental studies show that epidermal cell shape as a largely neglected flower trait might act as an important feature in pollinator attraction and avoidance of antagonists, and thus may contribute to the partitioning of flower

  8. Gloss, Colour and Grip: Multifunctional Epidermal Cell Shapes in Bee- and Bird-Pollinated Flowers

    PubMed Central

    Papiorek, Sarah; Junker, Robert R.; Lunau, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Flowers bear the function of filters supporting the attraction of pollinators as well as the deterrence of floral antagonists. The effect of epidermal cell shape on the visual display and tactile properties of flowers has been evaluated only recently. In this study we quantitatively measured epidermal cell shape, gloss and spectral reflectance of flowers pollinated by either bees or birds testing three hypotheses: The first two hypotheses imply that bee-pollinated flowers might benefit from rough surfaces on visually-active parts produced by conical epidermal cells, as they may enhance the colour signal of flowers as well as the grip on flowers for bees. In contrast, bird-pollinated flowers might benefit from flat surfaces produced by flat epidermal cells, by avoiding frequent visitation from non-pollinating bees due to a reduced colour signal, as birds do not rely on specific colour parameters while foraging. Moreover, flat petal surfaces in bird-pollinated flowers may hamper grip for bees that do not touch anthers and stigmas while consuming nectar and thus, are considered as nectar thieves. Beside this, the third hypothesis implies that those flower parts which are vulnerable to nectar robbing of bee- as well as bird-pollinated flowers benefit from flat epidermal cells, hampering grip for nectar robbing bees. Our comparative data show in fact that conical epidermal cells are restricted to visually-active parts of bee-pollinated flowers, whereas robbing-sensitive parts of bee-pollinated as well as the entire floral surface of bird-pollinated flowers possess on average flat epidermal cells. However, direct correlations between epidermal cell shape and colour parameters have not been found. Our results together with published experimental studies show that epidermal cell shape as a largely neglected flower trait might act as an important feature in pollinator attraction and avoidance of antagonists, and thus may contribute to the partitioning of flower

  9. Simultaneous characterization of cellular RNA structure and function with in-cell SHAPE-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Watters, Kyle E.; Abbott, Timothy R.; Lucks, Julius B.

    2016-01-01

    Many non-coding RNAs form structures that interact with cellular machinery to control gene expression. A central goal of molecular and synthetic biology is to uncover design principles linking RNA structure to function to understand and engineer this relationship. Here we report a simple, high-throughput method called in-cell SHAPE-Seq that combines in-cell probing of RNA structure with a measurement of gene expression to simultaneously characterize RNA structure and function in bacterial cells. We use in-cell SHAPE-Seq to study the structure–function relationship of two RNA mechanisms that regulate translation in Escherichia coli. We find that nucleotides that participate in RNA–RNA interactions are highly accessible when their binding partner is absent and that changes in RNA structure due to RNA–RNA interactions can be quantitatively correlated to changes in gene expression. We also characterize the cellular structures of three endogenously expressed non-coding RNAs: 5S rRNA, RNase P and the btuB riboswitch. Finally, a comparison between in-cell and in vitro folded RNA structures revealed remarkable similarities for synthetic RNAs, but significant differences for RNAs that participate in complex cellular interactions. Thus, in-cell SHAPE-Seq represents an easily approachable tool for biologists and engineers to uncover relationships between sequence, structure and function of RNAs in the cell. PMID:26350218

  10. Simultaneous characterization of cellular RNA structure and function with in-cell SHAPE-Seq.

    PubMed

    Watters, Kyle E; Abbott, Timothy R; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-29

    Many non-coding RNAs form structures that interact with cellular machinery to control gene expression. A central goal of molecular and synthetic biology is to uncover design principles linking RNA structure to function to understand and engineer this relationship. Here we report a simple, high-throughput method called in-cell SHAPE-Seq that combines in-cell probing of RNA structure with a measurement of gene expression to simultaneously characterize RNA structure and function in bacterial cells. We use in-cell SHAPE-Seq to study the structure-function relationship of two RNA mechanisms that regulate translation in Escherichia coli. We find that nucleotides that participate in RNA-RNA interactions are highly accessible when their binding partner is absent and that changes in RNA structure due to RNA-RNA interactions can be quantitatively correlated to changes in gene expression. We also characterize the cellular structures of three endogenously expressed non-coding RNAs: 5S rRNA, RNase P and the btuB riboswitch. Finally, a comparison between in-cell and in vitro folded RNA structures revealed remarkable similarities for synthetic RNAs, but significant differences for RNAs that participate in complex cellular interactions. Thus, in-cell SHAPE-Seq represents an easily approachable tool for biologists and engineers to uncover relationships between sequence, structure and function of RNAs in the cell. PMID:26350218

  11. Cell shapes and patterns as quantitative indicators of tissue stress in the plant epidermis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangwoo; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2015-10-01

    In a confluent, single-cell tissue layer, we show that cell shapes and statistics correlate directly with the tissue's mechanical properties, described by an energy functional with generic interfacial terms only. Upon increasing the cohesive component of the model, we observe a clear transition from a tense state with isotropic cells to a relaxed state with anisotropic cells. Signatures of the transition are present in the interfacial mechanics, the domain geometry, and the domain statistics, thus linking all three fields of study. This transition persists for all cell size distributions, but its exact position is crucially dependent on fluctuations in the parameter values of the functional (quenched disorder). The magnitude of fluctuations can be matched to the observed shape distribution of cells, so that visual observation of cell shapes and statistics provides information about the mechanical state of the tissue. Comparing with experimental data from the Cucumis epidermis, we find that the system is located right at the transition, allowing the tissue to relieve most of the local stress while maintaining integrity. PMID:26264286

  12. Osteogenic Capacity of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells is Preserved Following Triggering of Shape Memory Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ling-Fang; Wang, Jing; Baker, Richard M; Wang, Guirong; Mather, Patrick T; Henderson, James H

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in shape memory polymers have enabled the study of programmable, shape-changing, cytocompatible tissue engineering scaffolds. For treatment of bone defects, scaffolds with shape memory functionality have been studied for their potential for minimally invasive delivery, conformal fitting to defect margins, and defect stabilization. However, the extent to which the osteogenic differentiation capacity of stem cells resident in shape memory scaffolds is preserved following programmed shape change has not yet been determined. As a result, the feasibility of shape memory polymer scaffolds being employed in stem cell-based treatment strategies remains unclear. To test the hypothesis that stem cell osteogenic differentiation can be preserved during and following triggering of programmed architectural changes in shape memory polymer scaffolds, human adipose-derived stem cells were seeded in shape memory polymer foam scaffolds or in shape memory polymer fibrous scaffolds programmed to expand or contract, respectively, when warmed to body temperature. Osteogenic differentiation in shape-changing and control scaffolds was compared using mineral deposition, protein production, and gene expression assays. For both shape-changing and control scaffolds, qualitatively and quantitatively comparable amounts of mineral deposition were observed; comparable levels of alkaline phosphatase activity were measured; and no significant differences in the expression of genetic markers of osteogenesis were detected. These findings support the feasibility of employing shape memory in scaffolds for stem cell-based therapies for bone repair. PMID:27401991

  13. Glyco-gold nanoparticle shapes enhance carbohydrate-protein interactions in mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangabathuni, Sivakoti; Vasudeva Murthy, Raghavendra; Chaudhary, Preeti Madhukar; Surve, Manalee; Banerjee, Anirban; Kikkeri, Raghavendra

    2016-06-01

    Advances in shape-dependent nanoparticle (NP) research have prompted a close scrutiny of the behaviour of nanostructures in vitro and in vivo. Data pertaining to cellular uptake and site specific sequestration of different shapes of NPs will undoubtedly assist researchers to design better nano-probes for therapeutic and imaging purposes. Herein, we investigated the shape dependent uptake of glyco-gold nanoparticles (G-AuNPs) in different cancer cell lines. Specifically, we have compared the behaviour of spherical, rod and star AuNPs with mannose and galactose conjugations. In vitro experiments showed that the rod-AuNPs exhibited the highest uptake over that of the star and spherical counterparts. Further, an investigation of the mechanism of the uptake clearly demonstrated clathrin mediated endocytosis of the specific G-AuNPs. These results reveal the benefits of different G-AuNP shapes in carbohydrate-mediated interactions.Advances in shape-dependent nanoparticle (NP) research have prompted a close scrutiny of the behaviour of nanostructures in vitro and in vivo. Data pertaining to cellular uptake and site specific sequestration of different shapes of NPs will undoubtedly assist researchers to design better nano-probes for therapeutic and imaging purposes. Herein, we investigated the shape dependent uptake of glyco-gold nanoparticles (G-AuNPs) in different cancer cell lines. Specifically, we have compared the behaviour of spherical, rod and star AuNPs with mannose and galactose conjugations. In vitro experiments showed that the rod-AuNPs exhibited the highest uptake over that of the star and spherical counterparts. Further, an investigation of the mechanism of the uptake clearly demonstrated clathrin mediated endocytosis of the specific G-AuNPs. These results reveal the benefits of different G-AuNP shapes in carbohydrate-mediated interactions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03008d

  14. Cell shape-dependent early responses of fibroblasts to cyclic strain.

    PubMed

    Gadhari, Neha; Charnley, Mirren; Marelli, Mattia; Brugger, Jürgen; Chiquet, Matthias

    2013-12-01

    Randomly spread fibroblasts on fibronectin-coated elastomeric membranes respond to cyclic strain by a varying degree of focal adhesion assembly and actin reorganization. We speculated that the individual shape of the cells, which is linked to cytoskeletal structure and pre-stress, might tune these integrin-dependent mechanotransduction events. To this aim, fibronectin circles, squares and rectangles of identical surface area (2000μm(2)) were micro-contact printed onto elastomeric substrates. Fibroblasts plated on these patterns occupied the corresponding shapes. Cyclic 10% equibiaxial strain was applied to patterned cells for 30min, and changes in cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions were quantified after fluorescence staining. After strain, megakaryocytic leukemia-1 protein translocated to the nucleus in most cells, indicating efficient RhoA activation independently of cell shape. However, circular and square cells (with radial symmetry) showed a significantly greater increase in the number of actin stress fibers and vinculin-positive focal adhesions after cyclic strain than rectangular (bipolar) cells of identical size. Conversely, cyclic strain induced larger changes in pY397-FAK positive focal complexes and zyxin relocation from focal adhesions to stress fibers in bipolar compared to symmetric cells. Thus, radially symmetric cells responded to cyclic strain with a larger increase in assembly, whereas bipolar cells reacted with more pronounced reorganization of actin stress fibers and matrix contacts. We conclude that integrin-mediated responses to external mechanical strain are differentially modulated in cells that have the same spreading area but different geometries, and do not only depend on mere cell size. PMID:24157374

  15. New common variants affecting susceptibility to basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Simon N; Sulem, Patrick; Masson, Gisli; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jakobsdottir, Margret; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Scherer, Dominique; Hemminki, Kari; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Soriano, Virtudes; Juberias, Pablo; Saez, Berta; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Corredera, Cristina; Grasa, Matilde; Höiom, Veronica; Lindblom, Annika; Bonenkamp, Johannes J; van Rossum, Michelle M; Aben, Katja K H; de Vries, Esther; Santinami, Mario; Di Mauro, Maria G; Maurichi, Andrea; Wendt, Judith; Hochleitner, Pia; Pehamberger, Hubert; Gudmundsson, Julius; Magnusdottir, Droplaug N; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Holm, Hilma; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Frigge, Michael L; Blondal, Thorarinn; Saemundsdottir, Jona; Bjarnason, Hjördis; Kristjansson, Kristleifur; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Okamoto, Ichiro; Rivoltini, Licia; Rodolfo, Monica; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Hansson, Johan; Nagore, Eduardo; Mayordomo, José I; Kumar, Rajiv; Karagas, Margaret R; Nelson, Heather H; Gulcher, Jeffrey R; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Olafsson, Jon H; Kong, Augustine; Stefansson, Kari

    2009-08-01

    In a follow-up to our previously reported genome-wide association study of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we describe here several new susceptibility variants. SNP rs11170164, encoding a G138E substitution in the keratin 5 (KRT5) gene, affects risk of BCC (OR = 1.35, P = 2.1 x 10(-9)). A variant at 9p21 near CDKN2A and CDKN2B also confers susceptibility to BCC (rs2151280[C]; OR = 1.19, P = 6.9 x 10(-9)), as does rs157935[T] at 7q32 near the imprinted gene KLF14 (OR = 1.23, P = 5.7 x 10(-10)). The effect of rs157935[T] is dependent on the parental origin of the risk allele. None of these variants were found to be associated with melanoma or fair-pigmentation traits. A melanoma- and pigmentation-associated variant in the SLC45A2 gene, L374F, is associated with risk of both BCC and squamous cell carcinoma. Finally, we report conclusive evidence that rs401681[C] in the TERT-CLPTM1L locus confers susceptibility to BCC but protects against melanoma. PMID:19578363

  16. Image analysis tools to quantify cell shape and protein dynamics near the leading edge.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Gillian L; Watanabe, Naoki; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    We present a set of flexible image analysis tools to analyze dynamics of cell shape and protein concentrations near the leading edge of cells adhered to glass coverslips. Plugins for ImageJ streamline common analyses of microscopic images of cells, including the calculation of leading edge speeds, total and average intensities of fluorescent markers, and retrograde flow rate measurements of fluorescent single-molecule speckles. We also provide automated calculations of auto- and cross-correlation functions between velocity and intensity measurements. The application of the methods is illustrated on images of XTC cells. PMID:23165752

  17. Implications of a Poroelastic Cytoplasm for the Dynamics of Animal Cell Shape

    PubMed Central

    TJ, Mitchison; GT, Charras; L, Mahadevan

    2009-01-01

    Two views have dominated recent discussions of the physical basis of cell shape change during migration and division of animal cells: the cytoplasm can be modeled as a viscoelastic continuum, and the forces that change its shape are generated only by actin polymerization and actomyosin contractility in the cell cortex. Here, we question both views: we suggest that the cytoplasm is better described as poroelastic, and that hydrodynamic forces may be generally important for its shape dynamics. In the poroelastic view, the cytoplasm consists of a porous, elastic solid (cytoskeleton, organelles, ribosomes) penetrated by an interstitial fluid (cytosol) that moves through the pores in response to pressure gradients. If the pore size is small (30–60nm), as has been observed in some cells, pressure does not globally equilibrate on time and length scales relevant to cell motility. Pressure differences across the plasma membrane drive blebbing, and potentially other type of protrusive motility. In the poroelastic view, these pressures can be higher in one part of a cell than another, and can thus cause local shape change. Local pressure transients could be generated by actomyosin contractility, or by local activation of osmogenic ion transporters in the plasma membrane. We propose that local activation of Na+/H+ antiporters (NHE1) at the front of migrating cells promotes local swelling there to help drive protrusive motility, acting in combination with actin polymerization. Local shrinking at the equator of dividing cells may similarly help drive invagination during cytokinesis, acting in combination with actomyosin contractility. Testing these hypotheses is not easy, as water is a difficult analyte to track, and will require a joint effort of the cytoskeleton and ion physiology communities. PMID:18395478

  18. Flickering Analysis of Erythrocyte Mechanical Properties: Dependence on Oxygenation Level, Cell Shape, and Hydration Level

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Young-Zoon; Hong, Ha; Brown, Aidan; Kim, Dong Chung; Kang, Dae Joon; Lew, Virgilio L.; Cicuta, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    Erythrocytes (red blood cells) play an essential role in the respiratory functions of vertebrates, carrying oxygen from lungs to tissues and CO2 from tissues to lungs. They are mechanically very soft, enabling circulation through small capillaries. The small thermally induced displacements of the membrane provide an important tool in the investigation of the mechanics of the cell membrane. However, despite numerous studies, uncertainties in the interpretation of the data, and in the values derived for the main parameters of cell mechanics, have rendered past conclusions from the fluctuation approach somewhat controversial. Here we revisit the experimental method and theoretical analysis of fluctuations, to adapt them to the case of cell contour fluctuations, which are readily observable experimentally. This enables direct measurements of membrane tension, of bending modulus, and of the viscosity of the cell cytoplasm. Of the various factors that influence the mechanical properties of the cell, we focus here on: 1), the level of oxygenation, as monitored by Raman spectrometry; 2), cell shape; and 3), the concentration of hemoglobin. The results show that, contrary to previous reports, there is no significant difference in cell tension and bending modulus between oxygenated and deoxygenated states, in line with the softness requirement for optimal circulatory flow in both states. On the other hand, tension and bending moduli of discocyte- and spherocyte-shaped cells differ markedly, in both the oxygenated and deoxygenated states. The tension in spherocytes is much higher, consistent with recent theoretical models that describe the transitions between red blood cell shapes as a function of membrane tension. Cell cytoplasmic viscosity is strongly influenced by the hydration state. The implications of these results to circulatory flow dynamics in physiological and pathological conditions are discussed. PMID:19751665

  19. Cubical Shape Enhances the Interaction of Layer-by-Layer Polymeric Particles with Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Jenolyn F; Kozlovskaya, Veronika; Chen, Jun; Kuncewicz, Thomas; Kharlampieva, Eugenia; Godin, Biana

    2015-12-01

    Blood-borne objects display a nonspherical shape with in-flow dimensions much larger than the vascular endothelial fenestrations, yet, at the diseased state, are able to traverse through these fenestrations owing to their elasticity. The role of physical parameters including shape and elasticity in the behavior of objects found in the tumor microenvironment needs to be understood to ultimately enhance chemotherapy and minimize its side effects. In this study, sphere- and cube-shaped biocompatible elastic microparticles (EM) made via layer-by-layer assembly of hydrogen-bonded tannic acid/poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (TA/PVPON) as hollow polymer shells and their rigid core-shell precursors (RM) are explored. In contrast to rigid five-bilayer (TA/PVPON) core shells, hollow elastic shells are unrecognized by J774A.1 macrophages, yet interact with endothelial and breast cancer cells. Internalization of cubical shells is fivefold more efficient by HMVEC (human microvascular endothelial cells) and sixfold and 2.5-fold more efficient by MDA-MB-231 and by SUM159 (breast cancer cells), respectively, compared to spherical shells. The interaction of cubical (TA/PVPON)5 shells with endothelial cells is similar under 10 s(-1) (characteristic of tumor vasculature) and 100 s(-1) shear rate (normal vasculature) while it is decreased at 100 s(-1) shear rate for the spherical shells. Our data suggest that cubical geometry promotes interaction of particles with breast cancer cells, while elasticity prevents engulfment by phagocytic cells in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26424126

  20. CellGeo: a computational platform for the analysis of shape changes in cells with complex geometries.

    PubMed

    Tsygankov, Denis; Bilancia, Colleen G; Vitriol, Eric A; Hahn, Klaus M; Peifer, Mark; Elston, Timothy C

    2014-02-01

    Cell biologists increasingly rely on computer-aided image analysis, allowing them to collect precise, unbiased quantitative results. However, despite great progress in image processing and computer vision, current computational approaches fail to address many key aspects of cell behavior, including the cell protrusions that guide cell migration and drive morphogenesis. We developed the open source MATLAB application CellGeo, a user-friendly computational platform to allow simultaneous, automated tracking and analysis of dynamic changes in cell shape, including protrusions ranging from filopodia to lamellipodia. Our method maps an arbitrary cell shape onto a tree graph that, unlike traditional skeletonization algorithms, preserves complex boundary features. CellGeo allows rigorous but flexible definition and accurate automated detection and tracking of geometric features of interest. We demonstrate CellGeo's utility by deriving new insights into (a) the roles of Diaphanous, Enabled, and Capping protein in regulating filopodia and lamellipodia dynamics in Drosophila melanogaster cells and (b) the dynamic properties of growth cones in catecholaminergic a-differentiated neuroblastoma cells. PMID:24493591

  1. Intracellular Delivery by Shape Anisotropic Magnetic Particle-Induced Cell Membrane Cuts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ming-Yu; Wu, Yi-Chien; Lee, Ji-Ann; Tung, Kuan-Wen; Zhou, Jessica; Teitell, Michael A; Yeh, J Andrew; Chiou, Pei Yu

    2016-08-01

    Introducing functional macromolecules into a variety of living cells is challenging but important for biology research and cell-based therapies. We report a novel cell delivery platform based on rotating shape anisotropic magnetic particles (SAMPs), which make very small cuts on cell membranes for macromolecule delivery with high efficiency and high survivability. SAMP delivery is performed by placing commercially available nickel powder onto cells grown in standard cell culture dishes. Application of a uniform magnetic field causes the magnetic particles to rotate because of mechanical torques induced by shape anisotropic magnetization. Cells touching these rotating particles are nicked, which generates transient membrane pores that enable the delivery of macromolecules into the cytosol of cells. Calcein dye, 3 and 40 kDa dextran polymers, a green fluorescence protein (GFP) plasmid, siRNA, and an enzyme (β-lactamase) were successfully delivered into HeLa cells, primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs), and mouse cortical neurons that can be difficult to transfect. The SAMP approach offers several advantages, including easy implementation, low cost, high throughput, and efficient delivery of a broad range of macromolecules. Collectively, SAMP delivery has great potential for a broad range of academic and industrial applications. PMID:26882924

  2. Shaped beam scattering from a single lymphocyte cell by generalized Lorenz-Mie theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia Jie; Han, Lu; Han, Yi Ping; Gouesbet, Gerard; Wu, Xuecheng; Wu, Yingchun

    2014-01-01

    With the aim of improving the measurement capabilities of laser-based diagnostic instruments for cells, an eccentric stratified dielectric sphere model illuminated by an arbitrary shaped beam is applied to the modeling of light scattering by a single nucleated cell within the framework of the generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT). A particular attention is paid to the study of scattering properties of a lymphocyte cell from an arbitrary incident Gaussian beam. Numerical results concerning the influence of shaped beam parameters (beam waist radius, incident angle, location of beam center) as well as of cellular parameters (ratio of nucleus size to cell size, location of the nucleus within the cell) on the scattering properties are presented and discussed, with comparisons to the scattering behaviors from a concentric stratified sphere model. The results reveal that the forward scattering intensities are mainly determined by the cell size regardless of the nucleus/cell ratio, while sideward scattering signals are sensitive to the change of cell internal structure. As the beam waist radius varies, the scattering patterns in the present cases are similar to each other, although the absolute intensities are different. Additionally, location of the nucleus within the cell, incident angle of the beam as well as location of the beam waist center play significant effects on the light scattering intensity distributions.

  3. Deformable L-shaped microwell array for trapping pairs of heterogeneous cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gi-Hun; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Kang, AhRan; Takayama, Shuichi; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Park, Joong Yull

    2015-03-01

    To study cell-to-cell interactions, there has been a continuous demand on developing microsystems for trapping pairs of two different cells in microwell arrays. Here, we propose an L-shaped microwell (L-microwell) array that relies on the elasticity of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrate for trapping and pairing heterogeneous cells. We designed an L-microwell suitable for trapping single cell in each branch via stretching/releasing the PDMS substrate, and also performed 3D time-dependent diffusion simulations to visualize how cell-secreted molecules diffuse in the L-microwell and communicate with the partner cell. The computational results showed that the secreted molecule first contacted the partner cell after 35 min, and the secreted molecule fully covered the partner cell in 4 h (when referenced to 10% of the secreted molecular concentration). The molecules that diffused to the outside of the L-microwell were significantly diluted by the bulk solution, which prevented unwanted cellular communication between neighboring L-microwells. We produced over 5000 cell pairs in one 2.25 cm2 array with about 30 000 L-microwells. The proposed L-microwell array offers a versatile and convenient cell pairing method to investigate cell-to-cell interactions in, for example, cell fusion, immune reactions, and cancer metastasis.

  4. The fundamental contribution of William Bate Hardy to shape the concept of mast cell heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Crivellato, Enrico; Ribatti, Domenico

    2010-07-01

    This review article acknowledges the pioneering contribution of William Bate Hardy in shaping the concept of mast cell heterogeneity. In two outstanding papers, published in 1894 and 1895, he focussed on the 'wandering cells' (the modern leucocytes) in different mammalian species and distinguished two types of granular basophil cells, i.e., the coarsely granular basophil cells and the splanchnic basophil cells. These corresponded to the populations of connective tissue-type and mucosal mast cells, respectively, described 70 years later by Enerbäck in rodents. Among the coarsely granular basophil cells, he also differentiated those cells which populated the serosal cavities - the so-called coelomic coarsely granular basophil cells - from the common coarsely granular basophil cells, which were localized in the connective tissues. He stated that the granular basophil cells presented with different morphological and histochemical characteristics in diverse animal species as well as at different anatomical sites. Remarkably, he performed a series of functional experiments on the basophil cells as well as the other wandering cells, and suggested the view that different granular basophil cells might express functional specializations. PMID:19814740

  5. Cell and nanoparticle transport in tumour microvasculature: the role of size, shape and surface functionality of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Lian, Yanping; Zhang, Lucy T; Aldousari, Saad M; Hedia, Hassan S; Asiri, Saeed A; Liu, Wing Kam

    2016-02-01

    Through nanomedicine, game-changing methods are emerging to deliver drug molecules directly to diseased areas. One of the most promising of these is the targeted delivery of drugs and imaging agents via drug carrier-based platforms. Such drug delivery systems can now be synthesized from a wide range of different materials, made in a number of different shapes, and coated with an array of different organic molecules, including ligands. If optimized, these systems can enhance the efficacy and specificity of delivery compared with those of non-targeted systems. Emerging integrated multiscale experiments, models and simulations have opened the door for endless medical applications. Current bottlenecks in design of the drug-carrying particles are the lack of knowledge about the dispersion of these particles in the microvasculature and of their subsequent internalization by diseased cells (Bao et al. 2014 J. R. Soc. Interface 11, 20140301 (doi:10.1098/rsif.2014.0301)). We describe multiscale modelling techniques that study how drug carriers disperse within the microvasculature. The immersed molecular finite-element method is adopted to simulate whole blood including blood plasma, red blood cells and nanoparticles. With a novel dissipative particle dynamics method, the beginning stages of receptor-driven endocytosis of nanoparticles can be understood in detail. Using this multiscale modelling method, we elucidate how the size, shape and surface functionality of nanoparticles will affect their dispersion in the microvasculature and subsequent internalization by targeted cells. PMID:26855759

  6. The Regulation of Traction Force in Relation to Cell Shape and Focal Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Rape, Andrew; Guo, Wei-hui; Wang, Yu-li

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical forces provide critical inputs for proper cellular functions. The interplay between the generation of, and response to, mechanical forces regulate such cellular processes as differentiation, proliferation, and migration. We postulate that adherent cells respond to a number of physical and topographical factors, including cell size and shape, by detecting the magnitude and/or distribution of traction forces under different conditions. To address this possibility we introduce a new simple method for precise micropatterning of hydrogels, and then apply the technique to systematically investigate the relationship between cell geometry, focal adhesions, and traction forces in cells with a series of spread areas and aspect ratios. Contrary to previous findings, we find that traction force is not determined primarily by the cell spreading area but by the distance from cell center to the perimeter. This distance in turn controls traction forces by regulating the size of focal adhesions, such that constraining the size of focal adhesions by micropatterning can override the effect of geometry. We propose that the responses of traction forces to center-periphery distance, possibly through a positive feedback mechanism that regulates focal adhesions, provide the cell with the information on its own shape and size. A similar positive feedback control may allow cells to respond to a variety of physical or topographical signals via a unified mechanism. PMID:21163521

  7. Enhanced cell adhesion to the dimpled surfaces of golf-ball-shaped microparticles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joo Hyuk; Lee, Chang-Soo; Cho, Kuk Young

    2014-10-01

    Engineering surface morphology as in honeycomb-structured planar films is of great importance for providing new potential application and improved performance in biomedical fields. We demonstrate potential new applications for the uniform biocompatible golf-ball-shaped microparticles that resembles 3D feature of honeycomb-structured film. Dimple size controllable golf-ball-shaped microparticles were fabricated by microfluidic device. Surface dimples not only can act as picoliter beaker but also enhance cell adhesion without any chemical modification of the surface. PMID:25265359

  8. Shape-dependent control of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis: switching between attractors in cell regulatory networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    Development of characteristic tissue patterns requires that individual cells be switched locally between different phenotypes or "fates;" while one cell may proliferate, its neighbors may differentiate or die. Recent studies have revealed that local switching between these different gene programs is controlled through interplay between soluble growth factors, insoluble extracellular matrix molecules, and mechanical forces which produce cell shape distortion. Although the precise molecular basis remains unknown, shape-dependent control of cell growth and function appears to be mediated by tension-dependent changes in the actin cytoskeleton. However, the question remains: how can a generalized physical stimulus, such as cell distortion, activate the same set of genes and signaling proteins that are triggered by molecules which bind to specific cell surface receptors. In this article, we use computer simulations based on dynamic Boolean networks to show that the different cell fates that a particular cell can exhibit may represent a preprogrammed set of common end programs or "attractors" which self-organize within the cell's regulatory networks. In this type of dynamic network model of information processing, generalized stimuli (e.g., mechanical forces) and specific molecular cues elicit signals which follow different trajectories, but eventually converge onto one of a small set of common end programs (growth, quiescence, differentiation, apoptosis, etc.). In other words, if cells use this type of information processing system, then control of cell function would involve selection of preexisting (latent) behavioral modes of the cell, rather than instruction by specific binding molecules. Importantly, the results of the computer simulation closely mimic experimental data obtained with living endothelial cells. The major implication of this finding is that current methods used for analysis of cell function that rely on characterization of linear signaling pathways or

  9. Interfacing electrogenic cells with 3D nanoelectrodes: position, shape, and size matter.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Francesca; Dasgupta, Sabyasachi; Schnitker, Jan; Auth, Thorsten; Neumann, Elmar; Panaitov, Gregory; Gompper, Gerhard; Offenhäusser, Andreas

    2014-07-22

    An in-depth understanding of the interface between cells and nanostructures is one of the key challenges for coupling electrically excitable cells and electronic devices. Recently, various 3D nanostructures have been introduced to stimulate and record electrical signals emanating from inside of the cell. Even though such approaches are highly sensitive and scalable, it remains an open question how cells couple to 3D structures, in particular how the engulfment-like processes of nanostructures work. Here, we present a profound study of the cell interface with two widely used nanostructure types, cylindrical pillars with and without a cap. While basic functionality was shown for these approaches before, a systematic investigation linking experimental data with membrane properties was not presented so far. The combination of electron microscopy investigations with a theoretical membrane deformation model allows us to predict the optimal shape and dimensions of 3D nanostructures for cell-chip coupling. PMID:24963873

  10. Cell shape and the microenvironment regulate nuclear translocation of NF-κB in breast epithelial and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sero, Julia E; Sailem, Heba Zuhair; Ardy, Rico Chandra; Almuttaqi, Hannah; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Although a great deal is known about the signaling events that promote nuclear translocation of NF-κB, how cellular biophysics and the microenvironment might regulate the dynamics of this pathway is poorly understood. In this study, we used high-content image analysis and Bayesian network modeling to ask whether cell shape and context features influence NF-κB activation using the inherent variability present in unperturbed populations of breast tumor and non-tumor cell lines. Cell-cell contact, cell and nuclear area, and protrusiveness all contributed to variability in NF-κB localization in the absence and presence of TNFα. Higher levels of nuclear NF-κB were associated with mesenchymal-like versus epithelial-like morphologies, and RhoA-ROCK-myosin II signaling was critical for mediating shape-based differences in NF-κB localization and oscillations. Thus, mechanical factors such as cell shape and the microenvironment can influence NF-κB signaling and may in part explain how different phenotypic outcomes can arise from the same chemical cues. PMID:25735303

  11. Face shape of unaffected parents with cleft affected offspring: combining three-dimensional surface imaging and geometric morphometrics

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, SM; Naidoo, SD; Bardi, KM; Brandon, CA; Neiswanger, K; Resick, JM; Martin, RA; Marazita, ML

    2009-01-01

    Objective Various lines of evidence suggest that face shape may be a predisposing factor for nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P). In the present study, 3D surface imaging and statistical shape analysis were used to evaluate face shape differences between the unaffected (non-cleft) parents of individuals with CL/P and unrelated controls. Methods Sixteen facial landmarks were collected from 3D captures of 80 unaffected parents and 80 matched controls. Prior to analysis, each unaffected parent was assigned to a subgroup on the basis of prior family history (positive or negative). A geometric morphometric approach was utilized to scale and superimpose the landmark coordinate data (Procrustes analysis), test for omnibus group differences in face shape, and uncover specific modes of shape variation capable of discriminating unaffected parents from controls. Results Significant disparity in face shape was observed between unaffected parents and controls (p < 0.01). Notably, these changes were specific to parents with a positive family history of CL/P. Shape changes associated with CL/P predisposition included marked flattening of the facial profile (midface retrusion), reduced upper facial height, increased lower facial height and excess interorbital width. Additionally, a sex-specific pattern of parent-control difference was evident in the transverse dimensions of the nasolabial complex. Conclusions The faces of unaffected parents from multiplex cleft families display meaningful shape differences compared with the general population. Quantitative assessment of the facial phenotype in cleft families may enhance efforts to discover the root causes of CL/P. PMID:19840279

  12. Altering the cellular mechanical force balance results in integrated changes in cell, cytoskeletal and nuclear shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, J. R.; Karp, S.; Ingber, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Studies were carried out with capillary endothelial cells cultured on fibronectin (FN)-coated dishes in order to analyze the mechanism of cell and nuclear shape control by extracellular matrix (ECM). To examine the role of the cytoskeleton in shape determination independent of changes in transmembrane osmotic pressure, membranes of adherent cells were permeabilized with saponin (25 micrograms/ml) using a buffer that maintains the functional integrity of contractile microfilaments. Real-time videomicroscopic studies revealed that addition of 250 microM ATP resulted in time-dependent retraction and rounding of permeabilized cells and nuclei in a manner similar to that observed in intact living cells following detachment using trypsin-EDTA. Computerized image analysis confirmed that permeabilized cells remained essentially rigid in the absence of ATP and that retraction was stimulated in a dose-dependent manner as the concentration of ATP was raised from 10 to 250 microM. Maximal rounding occurred by 30 min with projected cell and nuclear areas being reduced by 69 and 41%, respectively. ATP-induced rounding was also accompanied by a redistribution of microfilaments resulting in formation of a dense net of F-actin surrounding retracted nuclei. Importantly, ATP-stimulated changes in cell, cytoskeletal, and nuclear form were prevented in permeabilized cells using a synthetic myosin peptide (IRICRKG) that has been previously shown to inhibit actomyosin filament sliding in muscle. In contrast, both the rate and extent of cell and nuclear rounding were increased in permeabilized cells exposed to ATP when the soluble FN peptide, GRGDSP, was used to dislodge immobilized FN from cell surface integrin receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  13. Early-time dynamics of actomyosin polarization in cells of confined shape in elastic matrices.

    PubMed

    Nisenholz, Noam; Botton, Mordechai; Zemel, Assaf

    2014-04-14

    The cell shape and the rigidity of the extracellular matrix have been shown to play an important role in the regulation of cytoskeleton structure and force generation. Elastic stresses that develop by actomyosin contraction feedback on myosin activity and govern the anisotropic polarization of stress fibers in the cell. We theoretically study the consequences that the cell shape and matrix rigidity may have on the dynamics and steady state polarization of actomyosin forces in the cell. Actomyosin forces are assumed to polarize in accordance with the stresses that develop in the cytoskeleton. The theory examines this self-polarization process as a relaxation response determined by two distinct susceptibility factors and two characteristic times. These reveal two canonical polarization responses to local variations in the elastic stress: an isotropic response, in which actomyosin dipolar stress isotropically changes in magnitude, and an orientational response, in which actomyosin forces orient with no net change in magnitude. Actual polarization may show up as a superimposition of the two mechanisms yielding different phases in the polarization response as observed experimentally. The cell shape and elastic moduli of the surroundings are shown to govern both the dynamics of the process as well as the steady-state. We predict that in the steady-state, beyond a critical matrix rigidity, spherical cells exert maximal force, and below that rigidity, elongated or flattened cells exert more force. Similar behaviors are reflected in the rate of the polarization process. The theory is also applicable to study the elastic response of whole cell aggregates in a gel. PMID:24623163

  14. A contractile and counterbalancing adhesion system controls the 3D shape of crawling cells

    PubMed Central

    Burnette, Dylan T.; Shao, Lin; Ott, Carolyn; Pasapera, Ana M.; Fischer, Robert S.; Baird, Michelle A.; Der Loughian, Christelle; Delanoe-Ayari, Helene; Paszek, Matthew J.; Davidson, Michael W.; Betzig, Eric

    2014-01-01

    How adherent and contractile systems coordinate to promote cell shape changes is unclear. Here, we define a counterbalanced adhesion/contraction model for cell shape control. Live-cell microscopy data showed a crucial role for a contractile meshwork at the top of the cell, which is composed of actin arcs and myosin IIA filaments. The contractile actin meshwork is organized like muscle sarcomeres, with repeating myosin II filaments separated by the actin bundling protein α-actinin, and is mechanically coupled to noncontractile dorsal actin fibers that run from top to bottom in the cell. When the meshwork contracts, it pulls the dorsal fibers away from the substrate. This pulling force is counterbalanced by the dorsal fibers’ attachment to focal adhesions, causing the fibers to bend downward and flattening the cell. This model is likely to be relevant for understanding how cells configure themselves to complex surfaces, protrude into tight spaces, and generate three-dimensional forces on the growth substrate under both healthy and diseased conditions. PMID:24711500

  15. A Comparison of Computational Models for Eukaryotic Cell Shape and Motility

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, William R.; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell motility involves complex interactions of signalling molecules, cytoskeleton, cell membrane, and mechanics interacting in space and time. Collectively, these components are used by the cell to interpret and respond to external stimuli, leading to polarization, protrusion, adhesion formation, and myosin-facilitated retraction. When these processes are choreographed correctly, shape change and motility results. A wealth of experimental data have identified numerous molecular constituents involved in these processes, but the complexity of their interactions and spatial organization make this a challenging problem to understand. This has motivated theoretical and computational approaches with simplified caricatures of cell structure and behaviour, each aiming to gain better understanding of certain kinds of cells and/or repertoire of behaviour. Reaction–diffusion (RD) equations as well as equations of viscoelastic flows have been used to describe the motility machinery. In this review, we describe some of the recent computational models for cell motility, concentrating on simulations of cell shape changes (mainly in two but also three dimensions). The problem is challenging not only due to the difficulty of abstracting and simplifying biological complexity but also because computing RD or fluid flow equations in deforming regions, known as a “free-boundary” problem, is an extremely challenging problem in applied mathematics. Here we describe the distinct approaches, comparing their strengths and weaknesses, and the kinds of biological questions that they have been able to address. PMID:23300403

  16. An insight into morphometric descriptors of cell shape that pertain to regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Joana; See, Eugene Yong-Shun; Biggs, Manus; Pandit, Abhay

    2016-07-01

    Cellular morphology has recently been indicated as a powerful indicator of cellular function. The analysis of cell shape has evolved from rudimentary forms of microscopic visual inspection to more advanced methodologies that utilize high-resolution microscopy coupled with sophisticated computer hardware and software for data analysis. Despite this progress, there is still a lack of standardization in quantification of morphometric parameters. In addition, uncertainty remains as to which methodologies and parameters of cell morphology will yield meaningful data, which methods should be utilized to categorize cell shape, and the extent of reliability of measurements and the interpretation of the resulting analysis. A large range of descriptors has been employed to objectively assess the cellular morphology in two-dimensional and three-dimensional domains. Intuitively, simple and applicable morphometric descriptors are preferable and standardized protocols for cell shape analysis can be achieved with the help of computerized tools. In this review, cellular morphology is discussed as a descriptor of cellular function and the current morphometric parameters that are used quantitatively in two- and three-dimensional environments are described. Furthermore, the current problems associated with these morphometric measurements are addressed. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25757807

  17. Plasma membrane phosphoinositide balance regulates cell shape during Drosophila embryo morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Reversi, Alessandra; Loeser, Eva; Subramanian, Devaraj; Schultz, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Remodeling of cell shape during morphogenesis is driven by the coordinated expansion and contraction of specific plasma membrane domains. Loss of this coordination results in abnormal cell shape and embryonic lethality. Here, we show that plasma membrane lipid composition plays a key role in coordinating plasma membrane contraction during expansion. We found that an increase in PI(4,5)P2 levels caused premature actomyosin contraction, resulting in the formation of shortened cells. Conversely, acute depletion of PI(4,5)P2 blocked plasma membrane expansion and led to premature actomyosin disassembly. PI(4,5)P2-mediated contractility is counteracted by PI(3,4,5)P3 and the zygotic gene bottleneck, which acts by limiting myosin recruitment during plasma membrane expansion. Collectively, these data support a model in which the ratio of PI(4,5)P2/PI(3,4,5)P3 coordinates actomyosin contractility and plasma membrane expansion during tissue morphogenesis, thus ensuring proper cell shape. PMID:24798734

  18. Corneal endothelial cells possess an elaborate multipolar shape to maximize the basolateral to apical membrane area

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Theresa A.; He, Zhiguo; Boggs, Kristin; Thuret, Gilles; Liu, Hong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The corneal endothelium is widely believed to consist of geometrically regular cells interconnected by junctional complexes. However, while en face visualization of the endothelial apical surface reveals characteristic polygonal borders, the overall form of the component cells has rarely been observed. Methods To visualize the shape of individual endothelial cells within the native monolayer, two independent Cre/LoxP-based cell labeling approaches were used. In the first, a P0-Cre mouse driver strain was bred to an R26-tdTomato reporter line to map neural crest–derived endothelial cells with cytosolic red fluorescent protein. In the second, HPRT-Cre induction of small numbers of green and red fluorescent protein–filled cells within a background of unlabeled cells was achieved using a dual-color reporter system, mosaic analysis with double markers (MADM). Selective imaging of the endothelial lateral membranes at different apicobasal levels was accomplished after staining with antibodies to ZO-1 and the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). Results When viewed in their entirety in whole-mount preparations, fluorescent protein–filled cells appear star-shaped, extending multiple dendritic processes that radiate outward in the plane of the monolayer. Examination of rare cases where cells expressing different fluorescent proteins lie directly adjacent to one another reveals that these long processes undergo extensive interdigitation. The resulting overlap allows individual cells to extend over a greater area than if the cell boundaries were mutually exclusive. Anti-NCAM staining of these interlocking peripheral cell extensions reveals an elaborate system of lateral membrane folds that, when viewed in optical sections, increase in complexity from the apical to the basal pole. This not only produces a substantial increase in the basolateral, relative to the apical, membrane but also greatly extends the paracellular pathway as a highly convoluted space

  19. Structure of Csd3 from Helicobacter pylori, a cell shape-determining metallopeptidase

    SciTech Connect

    An, Doo Ri; Kim, Hyoun Sook; Kim, Jieun; Im, Ha Na; Yoon, Hye Jin; Yoon, Ji Young; Jang, Jun Young; Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Mobashery, Shahriar; Kim, Soon-Jong; Lee, Byung Il; Suh, Se Won

    2015-03-01

    H. pylori Csd3 (HP0506), together with other peptidoglycan hydrolases, plays an important role in determining cell shape. Its crystal structure in the latent state is reported. Helicobacter pylori is associated with various gastrointestinal diseases such as gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer. Its colonization of the human gastric mucosa requires high motility, which depends on its helical cell shape. Seven cell shape-determining genes (csd1, csd2, csd3/hdpA, ccmA, csd4, csd5 and csd6) have been identified in H. pylori. Their proteins play key roles in determining the cell shape through modifications of the cell-wall peptidoglycan by the alteration of cross-linking or by the trimming of peptidoglycan muropeptides. Among them, Csd3 (also known as HdpA) is a bifunctional enzyme. Its d, d-endopeptidase activity cleaves the d-Ala{sup 4}-mDAP{sup 3} peptide bond between cross-linked muramyl tetrapeptides and pentapeptides. It is also a d, d-carboxypeptidase that cleaves off the terminal d-Ala{sup 5} from the muramyl pentapeptide. Here, the crystal structure of this protein has been determined, revealing the organization of its three domains in a latent and inactive state. The N-terminal domain 1 and the core of domain 2 share the same fold despite a very low level of sequence identity, and their surface-charge distributions are different. The C-terminal LytM domain contains the catalytic site with a Zn{sup 2+} ion, like the similar domains of other M23 metallopeptidases. Domain 1 occludes the active site of the LytM domain. The core of domain 2 is held against the LytM domain by the C-terminal tail region that protrudes from the LytM domain.

  20. Transcriptome-wide interrogation of RNA secondary structure in living cells with icSHAPE.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Ryan A; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; Spitale, Robert C; Lee, Byron; Mumbach, Maxwell R; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-02-01

    icSHAPE (in vivo click selective 2-hydroxyl acylation and profiling experiment) captures RNA secondary structure at a transcriptome-wide level by measuring nucleotide flexibility at base resolution. Living cells are treated with the icSHAPE chemical NAI-N3 followed by selective chemical enrichment of NAI-N3-modified RNA, which provides an improved signal-to-noise ratio compared with similar methods leveraging deep sequencing. Purified RNA is then reverse-transcribed to produce cDNA, with SHAPE-modified bases leading to truncated cDNA. After deep sequencing of cDNA, computational analysis yields flexibility scores for every base across the starting RNA population. The entire experimental procedure can be completed in ∼5 d, and the sequencing and bioinformatics data analysis take an additional 4-5 d with no extensive computational skills required. Comparing in vivo and in vitro icSHAPE measurements can reveal in vivo RNA-binding protein imprints or facilitate the dissection of RNA post-transcriptional modifications. icSHAPE reactivities can additionally be used to constrain and improve RNA secondary structure prediction models. PMID:26766114

  1. Transcriptome-wide interrogation of RNA secondary structure in living cells with icSHAPE

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Ryan A; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; Spitale, Robert C; Lee, Byron; Mumbach, Maxwell R; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-01-01

    icSHAPE (in vivo click selective 2-hydroxyl acylation and profiling experiment) captures RNA secondary structure at a transcriptome-wide level by measuring nucleotide flexibility at base resolution. Living cells are treated with the icSHAPE chemical NAI-N3 followed by selective chemical enrichment of NAI-N3–modified RNA, which provides an improved signal-to-noise ratio compared with similar methods leveraging deep sequencing. Purified RNA is then reverse-transcribed to produce cDNA, with SHAPE-modified bases leading to truncated cDNA. After deep sequencing of cDNA, computational analysis yields flexibility scores for every base across the starting RNA population. The entire experimental procedure can be completed in ~5 d, and the sequencing and bioinformatics data analysis take an additional 4–5 d with no extensive computational skills required. Comparing in vivo and in vitro icSHAPE measurements can reveal in vivo RNA-binding protein imprints or facilitate the dissection of RNA post-transcriptional modifications. icSHAPE reactivities can additionally be used to constrain and improve RNA secondary structure prediction models. PMID:26766114

  2. Cell shape and the microenvironment regulate nuclear translocation of NF-κB in breast epithelial and tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Sero, Julia E; Sailem, Heba Zuhair; Ardy, Rico Chandra; Almuttaqi, Hannah; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Although a great deal is known about the signaling events that promote nuclear translocation of NF-κB, how cellular biophysics and the microenvironment might regulate the dynamics of this pathway is poorly understood. In this study, we used high-content image analysis and Bayesian network modeling to ask whether cell shape and context features influence NF-κB activation using the inherent variability present in unperturbed populations of breast tumor and non-tumor cell lines. Cell–cell contact, cell and nuclear area, and protrusiveness all contributed to variability in NF-κB localization in the absence and presence of TNFα. Higher levels of nuclear NF-κB were associated with mesenchymal-like versus epithelial-like morphologies, and RhoA-ROCK-myosin II signaling was critical for mediating shape-based differences in NF-κB localization and oscillations. Thus, mechanical factors such as cell shape and the microenvironment can influence NF-κB signaling and may in part explain how different phenotypic outcomes can arise from the same chemical cues. PMID:25735303

  3. Cell shape and the microenvironment regulate nuclear translocation of NF-κB in breast epithelial and tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Sero, Julia E; Sailem, Heba Zuhair; Ardy, Rico Chandra; Almuttaqi, Hannah; Zhang, Tongli; Bakal, Chris

    2015-03-01

    Although a great deal is known about the signaling events that promote nuclear translocation of NF-κB, how cellular biophysics and the microenvironment might regulate the dynamics of this pathway is poorly understood. In this study, we used high-content image analysis and Bayesian network modeling to ask whether cell shape and context features influence NF-κB activation using the inherent variability present in unperturbed populations of breast tumor and non-tumor cell lines. Cell–cell contact, cell and nuclear area, and protrusiveness all contributed to variability in NF-κB localization in the absence and presence of TNFα. Higher levels of nuclear NF-κB were associated with mesenchymal-like versus epithelial-like morphologies, and RhoA-ROCK-myosin II signaling was critical for mediating shape-based differences in NF-κB localization and oscillations. Thus, mechanical factors such as cell shape and the microenvironment can influence NF-κB signaling and may in part explain how different phenotypic outcomes can arise from the same chemical cues. PMID:26148352

  4. The spindle-shaped cells in cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. Histologic simulators include factor XIIIa dermal dendrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Nickoloff, B. J.; Griffiths, C. E.

    1989-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a neoplasm that develops as multifocal lesions, often involving the skin, characterized by a complex histologic picture including numerous vascular spaces, perivascular and interstitial spindle-shaped cells, and extravasated erythrocytes, lymphocytes, and plasma cells. Using an antibody against factor XIIIa, which identifies dermal dendrocytes, numerous factor XIIIa-positive dermal dendrocytes were detected among the spindle-shaped cells in 12 acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated, and five non-AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma lesions. The factor XIIIa-positive dermal dendrocytes were also increased in histologic simulators of Kaposi's sarcoma such as dermatofibroma, angiomatoid malignant fibrous histiocytoma, granuloma annulare, and early wound healing, but were absent in keloids. The increased number of dermal dendrocytes, which are often in an angiocentric configuration and which also express CD4, lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), and Leu M3 in Kaposi's sarcoma, may be important to the angioproliferative response. The results suggested that the spindle-shaped cells that are present in a variety of cutaneous lesions are dermal dendrocytes and belong to the reticuloendothelial system, unlike other mesenchymal cell types such as the endothelial cell. Apparently a diverse array of stimuli, including human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection and trauma, can stimulate the accumulation of factor XIIIa expressing dermal dendrocytes in the skin. These cells can then participate in different stages of a variety of cutaneous alterations including Kaposi's sarcoma, dermatofibroma, granuloma annulare, and early wound healing. Thus, the factor XIIIa-positive dermal dendrocyte is a common cellular denominator among diverse clinical entities that share some histologic features. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 p797-a PMID:2573283

  5. The spindle-shaped cells in cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma. Histologic simulators include factor XIIIa dermal dendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Nickoloff, B J; Griffiths, C E

    1989-11-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma is a neoplasm that develops as multifocal lesions, often involving the skin, characterized by a complex histologic picture including numerous vascular spaces, perivascular and interstitial spindle-shaped cells, and extravasated erythrocytes, lymphocytes, and plasma cells. Using an antibody against factor XIIIa, which identifies dermal dendrocytes, numerous factor XIIIa-positive dermal dendrocytes were detected among the spindle-shaped cells in 12 acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated, and five non-AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma lesions. The factor XIIIa-positive dermal dendrocytes were also increased in histologic simulators of Kaposi's sarcoma such as dermatofibroma, angiomatoid malignant fibrous histiocytoma, granuloma annulare, and early wound healing, but were absent in keloids. The increased number of dermal dendrocytes, which are often in an angiocentric configuration and which also express CD4, lymphocyte function associated antigen-1 (LFA-1), and Leu M3 in Kaposi's sarcoma, may be important to the angioproliferative response. The results suggested that the spindle-shaped cells that are present in a variety of cutaneous lesions are dermal dendrocytes and belong to the reticuloendothelial system, unlike other mesenchymal cell types such as the endothelial cell. Apparently a diverse array of stimuli, including human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection and trauma, can stimulate the accumulation of factor XIIIa expressing dermal dendrocytes in the skin. These cells can then participate in different stages of a variety of cutaneous alterations including Kaposi's sarcoma, dermatofibroma, granuloma annulare, and early wound healing. Thus, the factor XIIIa-positive dermal dendrocyte is a common cellular denominator among diverse clinical entities that share some histologic features. PMID:2573283

  6. An Adhesion-Dependent Switch between Mechanisms That Determine Motile Cell Shape

    PubMed Central

    Barnhart, Erin L.; Lee, Kun-Chun; Keren, Kinneret; Mogilner, Alex; Theriot, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Keratocytes are fast-moving cells in which adhesion dynamics are tightly coupled to the actin polymerization motor that drives migration, resulting in highly coordinated cell movement. We have found that modifying the adhesive properties of the underlying substrate has a dramatic effect on keratocyte morphology. Cells crawling at intermediate adhesion strengths resembled stereotypical keratocytes, characterized by a broad, fan-shaped lamellipodium, clearly defined leading and trailing edges, and persistent rates of protrusion and retraction. Cells at low adhesion strength were small and round with highly variable protrusion and retraction rates, and cells at high adhesion strength were large and asymmetrical and, strikingly, exhibited traveling waves of protrusion. To elucidate the mechanisms by which adhesion strength determines cell behavior, we examined the organization of adhesions, myosin II, and the actin network in keratocytes migrating on substrates with different adhesion strengths. On the whole, our results are consistent with a quantitative physical model in which keratocyte shape and migratory behavior emerge from the self-organization of actin, adhesions, and myosin, and quantitative changes in either adhesion strength or myosin contraction can switch keratocytes among qualitatively distinct migration regimes. PMID:21559321

  7. Fs-laser cell perforation using gold nanoparticles of different shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schomaker, Markus; Fehlauer, Holger; Bintig, Willem; Ngezahayo, Anaclet; Nolte, Ingo; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Lubatschowski, Holger; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2010-02-01

    The resulting effects of the interaction between nanoparticles and laser irradiation are a current matter in research. Depending on the laser parameters as well as the particles properties several effects may occur e.g. bubble formation, melting, fragmentation or an optical breakdown at the surface of the nanoparticle. Besides the investigations of these effects, we employed them to perforate the membrane of different cell lines and investigated nanoparticle mediated laser cell perforation as an alternative optical transfection method. Therefore, the gold nanoparticles (GNP) of different shapes were applied. Furthermore, we varied the methods for attaching GNP to the membrane, i.e. co-incubation of pure gold nanoparticles and bioconjugation of the surface of GNP. The optimal incubation time and the location of the GNP at the cell membrane were evaluated by multiphoton microscopy. If these GNP loaded cells are irradiated with a fs laser beam, small areas of the membrane can be perforated. Following, extra cellular molecules such as membrane impermeable dyes or foreign DNA (GFP vectors) are able to diffuse through the perforated area into the treated cells. We studied the dependence of the laser fluence, GNP concentration, GNP size and shape for successful nanoparticle mediated laser cell perforation. Due to a weak focusing of the laser beam a gentle cell treatment with high cell viabilities and high perforation efficiencies can be achieved. A further advantage of this perforation technique is the high number of cells that can be treated simultaneously. Additionally, we show applications of this method to primary and stem cells.

  8. Dispersive radio frequency electrometry using Rydberg atoms in a prism-shaped atomic vapor cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, H. Q.; Kumar, S.; Kübler, H.; Shaffer, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    We introduce a method to measure radio frequency (RF) electric fields (E-fields) using atoms contained in a prism-shaped vapor cell. The method utilizes the concept of electromagnetically induced transparency with Rydberg atoms. The RF E-field induces changes in the index of refraction of the vapor resulting in deflection of the probe laser beam as it passes through the prism-shaped vapor cell. We measured a minimum RF E-field of 8.25 μ {{Vcm}}-1 with a sensitivity of ∼ 46.5 μ {{Vcm}}-1 {{Hz}}-1/2. The experimental results agree with a numerical model that includes dephasing effects. We discuss possible improvements to obtain higher sensitivity for RF E-field measurements.

  9. Rechargeable zinc cell with alkaline electrolyte which inhibits shape change in zinc electrode

    DOEpatents

    Adler, Thomas C.; McLarnon, Frank R.; Cairns, Elton J.

    1995-01-01

    An improved rechargeable zinc cell is described comprising a zinc electrode and another electrode such as, for example, a nickel-containing electrode, and having an electrolyte containing one or more hydroxides having the formula M(OH), one or more fluorides having the formula MF, and one or more carbonates having the formula M.sub.2 CO.sub.3, where M is a metal selected from the group consisting of alkali metals. The electrolyte inhibits shape change in the zinc electrode, i.e., the zinc electrode exhibits low shape change, resulting in an improved capacity retention of the cell over an number of charge-discharge cycles, while still maintaining high discharge rate characteristics.

  10. A study of shape optimization on the metallic nanoparticles for thin-film solar cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The shape of metallic nanoparticles used to enhance the performance of thin-film solar cells is described by Gielis' superformula and optimized by an evolutionary algorithm. As a result, we have found a lens-like nanoparticle capable of improving the short circuit current density to 19.93 mA/cm2. Compared with a two-scale nanospherical configuration recently reported to synthesize the merits of large and small spheres into a single structure, the optimized nanoparticle enables the solar cell to achieve a further 7.75% improvement in the current density and is much more fabrication friendly due to its simple shape and tolerance to geometrical distortions. PMID:24168131

  11. The extent to which garments affect the assessment of body shapes of males from faceless CCTV images.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Teghan; Kumaratilake, Jaliya; Henneberg, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Closed circuit television (CCTV) systems are being widely used in crime surveillance. The images produced are of poor quality often face details are not visible, however expert witnesses in the field of biological anthropology use morphological descriptions of body shapes in an attempt to identify persons of interest. These methods can be applied to individual images when other cues such as gait, are not present. Criminals commonly disguise their faces, but body shape characteristics can be used to distinguish a person of interest from others. Garments may distort the body shape appearance, thus this study was undertaken to investigate the effects of garments on the description of body shape from CCTV images. Twelve adult males representing a wide body shape range of Sheldonian somatotypes were photographed in identical garments comprising of tight fitting black shirt, horizontally striped shirt, padded leather jacket and in naked torso. These photographs were assessed by 51 males and females aged 18-50 years, with varying levels of education, and different experience in use of CCTV images for identification of people, to identify the 12 participants. The effect of assessors was not significant. They correctly distinguished 88.6% of individuals wearing the same wear, but could not match the same individuals wearing different wear above the random expectations. However, they matched somatotypes above random expectation. Type of clothing produced little bias in somatotype matching; ectomorphic component of individuals wearing black shirts and padded jackets was overestimated and underestimated, respectively. In conclusion, type of the wear had little effect in the description of individuals from CCTV images using the body shapes. PMID:25065119

  12. Digital holography for recovering 3D shape of red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Memmolo, P.; Miccio, L.; Merola, F.; Gennari, O.; Netti, P.; Ferraro, Pietro

    2015-07-01

    Full morphometric data analysis and 3D rendering of Red Blood Cells (RBCs) is provided by means of Digital Holography (DH) in combination with Optical Tweezers (OT). The proposed method is compared with a geometrical model of RBC in order to evaluate its accuracy and tested for many kinds of RBCs, from healthy ones with double-concavity to that with abnormal shapes. Applications in diagnostics are foreseen.

  13. Cell position during larval development affects postdiapause development in Megachile rotundata (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae).

    PubMed

    Yocum, George D; Rinehart, Joseph P; Kemp, William P

    2014-08-01

    Megachile rotundata (F.) (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) is the primary pollinator of alfalfa in the northwestern United States and western Canada and provides pollination services for onion, carrot, hybrid canola, various legumes, and other specialty crops. M. rotundata females are gregarious, nest in cavities either naturally occurring or in artificial nesting blocks, where they construct a linear series of brood cells. Because of the physical layout of the nest, the age of the larvae within the nest and the microenvironment the individual larvae experience will vary. These interacting factors along with other maternal inputs affect the resulting phenotypes of the nest mates. To further our understanding of in-nest physiology, gender and developmental rates were examined in relationship to cell position within the nest. Eighty-two percent of the females were located within the first three cells, those furthest from the nest entrance. For those individuals developing in cells located in the deepest half of the nest, the sex of the previous bee had a significant effect on the female decision of the gender of the following nest mate. Removing the prepupae from the nest and rearing them under identical conditions demonstrated that position within the nest during larval development had a significant effect on the postdiapause developmental rates, with males whose larval development occurred deeper in the nest developing more slowly than those toward the entrance. No positional effect on postdiapause developmental rates was noted for the females. The cell position effect on male postdiapause developmental rate demonstrates that postdiapause development is not a rigid physiological mechanism uniform in all individuals, but is a dynamic plastic process shaped by past environmental conditions. PMID:24914676

  14. Human Immunodeficiency Syndromes Affecting Human Natural Killer Cell Cytolytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ham, Hyoungjun; Billadeau, Daniel D.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system that secrete cytokines upon activation and mediate the killing of tumor cells and virus-infected cells, especially those that escape the adaptive T cell response caused by the down regulation of MHC-I. The induction of cytotoxicity requires that NK cells contact target cells through adhesion receptors, and initiate activation signaling leading to increased adhesion and accumulation of F-actin at the NK cell cytotoxic synapse. Concurrently, lytic granules undergo minus-end directed movement and accumulate at the microtubule-organizing center through the interaction with microtubule motor proteins, followed by polarization of the lethal cargo toward the target cell. Ultimately, myosin-dependent movement of the lytic granules toward the NK cell plasma membrane through F-actin channels, along with soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor-dependent fusion, promotes the release of the lytic granule contents into the cleft between the NK cell and target cell resulting in target cell killing. Herein, we will discuss several disease-causing mutations in primary immunodeficiency syndromes and how they impact NK cell-mediated killing by disrupting distinct steps of this tightly regulated process. PMID:24478771

  15. Autologous Stem Cell Therapy: How Aging and Chronic Diseases Affect Stem and Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Efimenko, Anastasia Yu.; Kochegura, Tatiana N.; Akopyan, Zhanna A.; Parfyonova, Yelena V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract During recent years different types of adult stem/progenitor cells have been successfully applied for the treatment of many pathologies, including cardiovascular diseases. The regenerative potential of these cells is considered to be due to their high proliferation and differentiation capacities, paracrine activity, and immunologic privilege. However, therapeutic efficacy of the autologous stem/progenitor cells for most clinical applications remains modest, possibly because of the attenuation of their regenerative potential in aged patients with chronic diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders. In this review we will discuss the risk factors affecting the therapeutic potential of adult stem/progenitor cells as well as the main approaches to mitigating them using the methods of regenerative medicine. PMID:26309780

  16. How Chimeric Antigen Receptor Design Affects Adoptive T Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gacerez, Albert T; Arellano, Benjamine; Sentman, Charles L

    2016-12-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have been developed to treat tumors and have shown great success against B cell malignancies. Exploiting modular designs and swappable domains, CARs can target an array of cell surface antigens and, upon receptor-ligand interactions, direct signaling cascades, thereby driving T cell effector functions. CARs have been designed using receptors, ligands, or scFv binding domains. Different regions of a CAR have each been found to play a role in determining the overall efficacy of CAR T cells. Therefore, this review provides an overview of CAR construction and common designs. Each CAR region is discussed in the context of its importance to a CAR's function. Additionally, the review explores how various engineering strategies have been applied to CAR T cells in order to regulate CAR T cell function and activity. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2590-2598, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27163336

  17. In vitro developmental competence of pig nuclear transferred embryos: effects of GFP transfection, refrigeration, cell cycle synchronization and shapes of donor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-Hai; Pan, Deng-Ke; Sun, Xiu-Zhu; Sun, Guo-Jie; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Wang, Xiao-Bo; Tian, Xing-Hua; Li, Yan; Dai, Yun-Ping; Li, Ning

    2006-08-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the feasibility of producing pig transgenic blastocysts expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP) and to examine the effects of shape and preparation methods of donor cells on in vitro developmental ability of pig nuclear transferred embryos (NTEs). In experiment 1, the effect of GFP transfection on development of pig NTEs was evaluated. The cleavage and blastocyst rates showed no significant difference between NTEs derived from transfected and non-transfected donors. In experiment 2, the effect of different nuclear donor preparation methods on in vitro development of NTEs was examined. The cleavage rate showed no statistically significant differences among three preparation methods. The blastocyst rates of donor cells treated once at -4 degrees C and those of freshly digested cells were similar to each other (26.3% vs 17.9%). The lowest blastocyst rates (5.88%) were observed when cells cryopreserved at -196 degrees C were used as donors. In experiment 3, the effect of different cell cycle synchronization methods on the in vitro development potential of pig NTEs was evaluated. The cleavage rate of NTEs derived from cycling cells was much better than that of NTEs derived from serum-starved cells (64.4% vs 50.5%, p < 0.05), but no significant difference was observed between the the blastocyst rates of the two groups. In experiment 4, the effect of different shapes of cultured fibroblast cells on the in vitro development of pig NTEs was examined. The fusion rate for couplets derived from rough cells was poorer than that observed in couplets derived from round smooth cells (47.8% vs 76.8%, p < 0.05). However, there were no significant differences observed in the cleavage rate and blastocyst rate. In conclusion, the present study indicated that (i) refrigerated pig GFP-transfected cells could be used as donors in nuclear transfer and these NTEs could be effectively developed to blastocyst stage; (ii) serum starvation

  18. 5-ASA Affects Cell Cycle Progression in Colorectal Cells by Reversibly Activating a Replication Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    LUCIANI, M. GLORIA; CAMPREGHER, CHRISTOPH; FORTUNE, JOHN M.; KUNKEL, THOMAS A.; GASCHE, CHRISTOPH

    2007-01-01

    Background & Aims Individuals with inflammatory bowel disease are at risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC). Epidemiologic, animal, and laboratory studies suggest that 5-amino-salicylic acid (5-ASA) protects from the development of CRC by altering cell cycle progression and by inducing apoptosis. Our previous results indicate that 5-ASA improves replication fidelity in colorectal cells, an effect that is active in reducing mutations. In this study, we hypothesized that 5-ASA restrains cell cycle progression by activating checkpoint pathways in colorectal cell lines, which would prevent tumor development and improve genomic stability. Methods CRC cells with different genetic backgrounds such as HT29, HCT116, HCT116p53−/−, HCT116+chr3, and LoVo were treated with 5-ASA for 2–96 hours. Cell cycle progression, phosphorylation, and DNA binding of cell cycle checkpoint proteins were analyzed. Results We found that 5-ASA at concentrations between 10 and 40 mmol/L affects cell cycle progression by inducing cells to accumulate in the S phase. This effect was independent of the hMLH1, hMSH2, and p53 status because it was observed to a similar extent in all cell lines under investigation. Moreover, wash-out experiments demonstrated reversibility within 48 hours. Although p53 did not have a causative role, p53 Ser15 was strongly phosphorylated. Proteins involved in the ATM-and-Rad3-related kinase (ATR)-dependent S-phase checkpoint response (Chk1 and Rad17) were also phosphorylated but not ataxia telengectasia mutated kinase. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that 5-ASA causes cells to reversibly accumulate in S phase and activate an ATR-dependent checkpoint. The activation of replication checkpoint may slow down DNA replication and improve DNA replication fidelity, which increases the maintenance of genomic stability and counteracts carcinogenesis. PMID:17241873

  19. Compression and dilation of the membrane-cortex layer generates rapid changes in cell shape

    PubMed Central

    Elston, Timothy C.; Jacobson, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Rapid changes in cellular morphology require a cell body that is highly flexible yet retains sufficient strength to maintain structural integrity. We present a mechanism that meets both of these requirements. We demonstrate that compression (folding) and subsequent dilation (unfolding) of the coupled plasma membrane–cortex layer generates rapid shape transformations in rounded cells. Two- and three-dimensional live-cell images showed that the cyclic process of membrane-cortex compression and dilation resulted in a traveling wave of cortical actin density. We also demonstrate that the membrane-cortex traveling wave led to amoeboid-like cell migration. The compression–dilation hypothesis offers a mechanism for large-scale cell shape transformations that is complementary to blebbing, where the plasma membrane detaches from the actin cortex and is initially unsupported when the bleb extends as a result of cytosolic pressure. Our findings provide insight into the mechanisms that drive the rapid morphological changes that occur in many physiological contexts, such as amoeboid migration and cytokinesis. PMID:23295349

  20. Automatic Cell Segmentation Using a Shape-Classification Model in Immunohistochemically Stained Cytological Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Shishir

    This paper presents a segmentation method for detecting cells in immunohistochemically stained cytological images. A two-phase approach to segmentation is used where an unsupervised clustering approach coupled with cluster merging based on a fitness function is used as the first phase to obtain a first approximation of the cell locations. A joint segmentation-classification approach incorporating ellipse as a shape model is used as the second phase to detect the final cell contour. The segmentation model estimates a multivariate density function of low-level image features from training samples and uses it as a measure of how likely each image pixel is to be a cell. This estimate is constrained by the zero level set, which is obtained as a solution to an implicit representation of an ellipse. Results of segmentation are presented and compared to ground truth measurements.

  1. The forces that shape embryos: physical aspects of convergent extension by cell intercalation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Ray; Shook, David; Skoglund, Paul

    2008-03-01

    We discuss the physical aspects of the morphogenic process of convergence (narrowing) and extension (lengthening) of tissues by cell intercalation. These movements, often referred to as 'convergent extension', occur in both epithelial and mesenchymal tissues during embryogenesis and organogenesis of invertebrates and vertebrates, and they play large roles in shaping the body plan during development. Our focus is on the presumptive mesodermal and neural tissues of the Xenopus (frog) embryo, tissues for which some physical measurements have been made. We discuss the physical aspects of how polarized cell motility, oriented along future tissue axes, generate the forces that drive oriented cell intercalation and how this intercalation results in convergence and extension or convergence and thickening of the tissue. Our goal is to identify aspects of these morphogenic movements for further biophysical, molecular and cell biological, and modeling studies.

  2. Programmed cell death acts at different stages of Drosophila neurodevelopment to shape the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Teixeira, Filipe; Konstantinides, Nikolaos; Desplan, Claude

    2016-08-01

    Nervous system development is a process that integrates cell proliferation, differentiation, and programmed cell death (PCD). PCD is an evolutionary conserved mechanism and a fundamental developmental process by which the final cell number in a nervous system is established. In vertebrates and invertebrates, PCD can be determined intrinsically by cell lineage and age, as well as extrinsically by nutritional, metabolic, and hormonal states. Drosophila has been an instrumental model for understanding how this mechanism is regulated. We review the role of PCD in Drosophila central nervous system development from neural progenitors to neurons, its molecular mechanism and function, how it is regulated and implemented, and how it ultimately shapes the fly central nervous system from the embryo to the adult. Finally, we discuss ideas that emerged while integrating this information. PMID:27404003

  3. Effect of Biodegradable Shape-Memory Polymers on Proliferation of 3T3 Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shuo-Gui; Zhang, Peng; Zhu, Guang-Ming; Jiang, Ying-Ming

    2011-07-01

    This article evaluates the in vitro biocompatibility for biodegradable shape-memory polymers (BSMP) invented by the authors. 3T3 cells (3T3-Swiss albino GNM 9) of primary and passaged cultures were inoculated into two kinds of carriers: the BSMP carrier and the control group carrier. Viability, proliferation, and DNA synthesis (the major biocompatibility parameters), were measured and evaluated for both the BSMP and naked carrier via cell growth curve analysis, MTT colorimetry and addition of 3H-TdR to culture media. The results showed that there was no difference between the BSMP carrier and the control dish in terms of viability, proliferation, and metabolism of the 3T3 cells. Overall, the BSMP carrier provides good biocompatibility and low toxicity to cells in vitro, and could indicate future potential for this medium as a biological material for implants in vivo.

  4. Finite element modelling predicts changes in joint shape and cell behaviour due to loss of muscle strain in jaw development

    PubMed Central

    Brunt, Lucy H.; Norton, Joanna L.; Bright, Jen A.; Rayfield, Emily J.; Hammond, Chrissy L.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal joint morphogenesis is linked to clinical conditions such as Developmental Dysplasia of the Hip (DDH) and to osteoarthritis (OA). Muscle activity is known to be important during the developmental process of joint morphogenesis. However, less is known about how this mechanical stimulus affects the behaviour of joint cells to generate altered morphology. Using zebrafish, in which we can image all joint musculoskeletal tissues at high resolution, we show that removal of muscle activity through anaesthetisation or genetic manipulation causes a change to the shape of the joint between the Meckel's cartilage and Palatoquadrate (the jaw joint), such that the joint develops asymmetrically leading to an overlap of the cartilage elements on the medial side which inhibits normal joint function. We identify the time during which muscle activity is critical to produce a normal joint. Using Finite Element Analysis (FEA), to model the strains exerted by muscle on the skeletal elements, we identify that minimum principal strains are located at the medial region of the joint and interzone during mouth opening. Then, by studying the cells immediately proximal to the joint, we demonstrate that biomechanical strain regulates cell orientation within the developing joint, such that when muscle-induced strain is removed, cells on the medial side of the joint notably change their orientation. Together, these data show that biomechanical forces are required to establish symmetry in the joint during development. PMID:26253758

  5. Internalization of Red Blood Cell-Mimicking Hydrogel Capsules with pH-Triggered Shape Responses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report on naturally inspired hydrogel capsules with pH-induced transitions from discoids to oblate ellipsoids and their interactions with cells. We integrate characteristics of erythrocytes such as discoidal shape, hollow structure, and elasticity with reversible pH-responsiveness of poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) to design a new type of drug delivery carrier to be potentially triggered by chemical stimuli in the tumor lesion. The capsules are fabricated from cross-linked PMAA multilayers using sacrificial discoid silicon templates. The degree of capsule shape transition is controlled by the pH-tuned volume change, which in turn is regulated by the capsule wall composition. The (PMAA)15 capsules undergo a dramatic 24-fold volume change, while a moderate 2.3-fold volume variation is observed for more rigid PMAA–(poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PMAA–PVPON)5 capsules when solution pH is varied between 7.4 and 4. Despite that both types of capsules exhibit discoid-to-oblate ellipsoid transitions, a 3-fold greater swelling in radial dimensions is found for one-component systems due to a greater degree of the circular face bulging. We also show that (PMAA–PVPON)5 discoidal capsules interact differently with J774A.1 macrophages, HMVEC endothelial cells, and 4T1 breast cancer cells. The discoidal capsules show 60% lower internalization as compared to spherical capsules. Finally, hydrogel capsules demonstrate a 2-fold decrease in size upon internalization. These capsules represent a unique example of elastic hydrogel discoids capable of pH-induced drastic and reversible variations in aspect ratios. Considering the RBC-mimicking shape, their dimensions, and their capability to undergo pH-triggered intracellular responses, the hydrogel capsules demonstrate considerable potential as novel carriers in shape-regulated transport and cellular uptake. PMID:24848786

  6. Cell Interactions and Patterned Intercalations Shape and Link Epithelial Tubes in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Jeffrey P.; Feldman, Jessica L.; Reddy, Sowmya Somashekar; Priess, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Many animal organs are composed largely or entirely of polarized epithelial tubes, and the formation of complex organ systems, such as the digestive or vascular systems, requires that separate tubes link with a common polarity. The Caenorhabditis elegans digestive tract consists primarily of three interconnected tubes—the pharynx, valve, and intestine—and provides a simple model for understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms used to form and connect epithelial tubes. Here, we use live imaging and 3D reconstructions of developing cells to examine tube formation. The three tubes develop from a pharynx/valve primordium and a separate intestine primordium. Cells in the pharynx/valve primordium polarize and become wedge-shaped, transforming the primordium into a cylindrical cyst centered on the future lumenal axis. For continuity of the digestive tract, valve cells must have the same, radial axis of apicobasal polarity as adjacent intestinal cells. We show that intestinal cells contribute to valve cell polarity by restricting the distribution of a polarizing cue, laminin. After developing apicobasal polarity, many pharyngeal and valve cells appear to explore their neighborhoods through lateral, actin-rich lamellipodia. For a subset of cells, these lamellipodia precede more extensive intercalations that create the valve. Formation of the valve tube begins when two valve cells become embedded at the left-right boundary of the intestinal primordium. Other valve cells organize symmetrically around these two cells, and wrap partially or completely around the orthogonal, lumenal axis, thus extruding a small valve tube from the larger cyst. We show that the transcription factors DIE-1 and EGL-43/EVI1 regulate cell intercalations and cell fates during valve formation, and that the Notch pathway is required to establish the proper boundary between the pharyngeal and valve tubes. PMID:24039608

  7. How does metabolism affect cell death in cancer?

    PubMed

    Villa, Elodie; Ricci, Jean-Ehrland

    2016-07-01

    In cancer research, identifying a specificity of tumor cells compared with 'normal' proliferating cells for targeted therapy is often considered the Holy Grail for researchers and clinicians. Although diverse in origin, most cancer cells share characteristics including the ability to escape cell death mechanisms and the utilization of different methods of energy production. In the current paradigm, aerobic glycolysis is considered the central metabolic characteristic of cancer cells (Warburg effect). However, recent data indicate that cancer cells also show significant changes in other metabolic pathways. Indeed, it was recently suggested that Kreb's cycle, pentose phosphate pathway intermediates, and essential and nonessential amino acids have key roles. Renewed interest in the fact that cancer cells have to reprogram their metabolism in order to proliferate or resist treatment must take into consideration the ability of tumor cells to adapt their metabolism to the local microenvironment (low oxygen, low nutrients). This variety of metabolic sources might be either a strength, resulting in infinite possibilities for adaptation and increased ability to resist chemotherapy-induced death, or a weakness that could be targeted to kill cancer cells. Here, we discuss recent insights showing how energetic metabolism may regulate cell death and how this might be relevant for cancer treatment. PMID:26498911

  8. Stem cell origin differently affects bone tissue engineering strategies

    PubMed Central

    Mattioli-Belmonte, Monica; Teti, Gabriella; Salvatore, Viviana; Focaroli, Stefano; Orciani, Monia; Dicarlo, Manuela; Fini, Milena; Orsini, Giovanna; Di Primio, Roberto; Falconi, Mirella

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue engineering approaches are encouraging for the improvement of conventional bone grafting technique drawbacks. Thanks to their self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation ability, stem cells are one of the major actors in tissue engineering approaches, and among these adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold a great promise for regenerative medicine strategies. Bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) are the first- identified and well-recognized stem cell population used in bone tissue engineering. Nevertheless, several factors hamper BM-MSC clinical application and subsequently, new stem cell sources have been investigated for these purposes. The fruitful selection and combination of tissue engineered scaffold, progenitor cells, and physiologic signaling molecules allowed the surgeon to reconstruct the missing natural tissue. On the basis of these considerations, we analyzed the capability of two different scaffolds, planned for osteochondral tissue regeneration, to modulate differentiation of adult stem cells of dissimilar local sources (i.e., periodontal ligament, maxillary periosteum) as well as adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), in view of possible craniofacial tissue engineering strategies. We demonstrated that cells are differently committed toward the osteoblastic phenotype and therefore, taking into account their specific features, they could be intriguing cell sources in different stem cell-based bone/periodontal tissue regeneration approaches. PMID:26441682

  9. Directly observed reversible shape changes and hemoglobin stratification during centrifugation of human and Amphiuma red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Joseph F; Inoué, Shinya

    2006-02-21

    This paper describes changes that occur in human and Amphiuma red blood cells observed during centrifugation with a special microscope. Dilute suspensions of cells were layered, in a centrifuge chamber, above an osmotically matched dense solution, containing Nycodenz, Ficoll, or Percoll (Pharmacia) that formed a density gradient that allowed the cells to slowly settle to an equilibrium position. Biconcave human red blood cells moved downward at low forces with minimum wobble. The cells oriented vertically when the force field was increased and Hb sedimented as the lower part of each cell became bulged and assumed a "bag-like" shape. The upper centripetal portion of the cell became thinner and remained biconcave. These changes occurred rapidly and were completely reversible upon lowering the centrifugal force. Bag-shaped cells, upon touching red cells in rouleau, immediately reverted to biconcave disks as they flipped onto a stack. Amphiuma red cells displayed a different type of reversible stratification and deformation at high force fields. Here the cells became stretched, with the nucleus now moving centrifugally, the Hb moving centripetally, and the bottom of the cells becoming thinner and clear. Nevertheless, the distribution of the marginal bands at the cells' rim was unchanged. We conclude that centrifugation, per se, while changing a red cell's shape and the distribution of its intracellular constituents, does so in a completely reversible manner. Centrifugation of red cells harboring altered or missing structural elements could provide information on shape determinants that are still unexplained. PMID:16477016

  10. Single-cell mass spectrometry reveals small molecules that affect cell fates in the 16-cell embryo

    PubMed Central

    Onjiko, Rosemary M.; Moody, Sally A.; Nemes, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Spatial and temporal changes in molecular expression are essential to embryonic development, and their characterization is critical to understand mechanisms by which cells acquire different phenotypes. Although technological advances have made it possible to quantify expression of large molecules during embryogenesis, little information is available on metabolites, the ultimate indicator of physiological activity of the cell. Here, we demonstrate that single-cell capillary electrophoresis-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry is able to test whether differential expression of the genome translates to the domain of metabolites between single embryonic cells. Dissection of three different cell types with distinct tissue fates from 16-cell embryos of the South African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis) and microextraction of their metabolomes enabled the identification of 40 metabolites that anchored interconnected central metabolic networks. Relative quantitation revealed that several metabolites were differentially active between the cell types in the wild-type, unperturbed embryos. Altering postfertilization cytoplasmic movements that perturb dorsal development confirmed that these three cells have characteristic small-molecular activity already at cleavage stages as a result of cell type and not differences in pigmentation, yolk content, cell size, or position in the embryo. Changing the metabolite concentration caused changes in cell movements at gastrulation that also altered the tissue fates of these cells, demonstrating that the metabolome affects cell phenotypes in the embryo. PMID:25941375

  11. Genetic background affects susceptibility to tumoral stem cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramírez, Idoia; Ruiz-Roca, Lucía; Martín-Lorenzo, Alberto; Blanco, Óscar; García-Cenador, María Begoña; García-Criado, Francisco Javier; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2013-01-01

    The latest studies of the interactions between oncogenes and its target cell have shown that certain oncogenes may act as passengers to reprogram tissue-specific stem/progenitor cell into a malignant cancer stem cell state. In this study, we show that the genetic background influences this tumoral stem cell reprogramming capacity of the oncogenes using as a model the Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice, where the type of tumor they develop, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), is a function of tumoral stem cell reprogramming. Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice containing FVB genetic components were significantly more resistant to CML. However, pure Sca1-BCRABLp210 FVB mice developed thymomas that were not seen in the Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice into the B6 background. Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that tumoral stem cell reprogramming fate is subject to polymorphic genetic control. PMID:23839033

  12. Harvesting Technique Affects Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Yield

    PubMed Central

    Iyyanki, Tejaswi; Hubenak, Justin; Liu, Jun; Chang, Edward I.; Beahm, Elisabeth K.; Zhang, Qixu

    2015-01-01

    Background The success of an autologous fat graft depends in part on its total stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs). However, variations in the yields of ASCs and SVF cells as a result of different harvesting techniques and donor sites are poorly understood. Objective To investigate the effects of adipose tissue harvesting technique and donor site on the yield of ASCs and SVF cells. Methods Subcutaneous fat tissues from the abdomen, flank, or axilla were harvested from patients of various ages by mechanical liposuction, direct surgical excision, or Coleman's technique with or without centrifugation. Cells were isolated and then analyzed with flow cytometry to determine the yields of total SVF cells and ASCs (CD11b−, CD45−, CD34+, CD90+, D7-FIB+). Differences in ASC and total SVF yields were assessed with one-way analysis of variance. Differentiation experiments were performed to confirm the multilineage potential of cultured SVF cells. Results Compared with Coleman's technique without centrifugation, direct excision yielded significantly more ASCs (P < .001) and total SVF cells (P = .007); liposuction yielded significantly fewer ASCs (P < .001) and total SVF cells (P < .05); and Coleman's technique with centrifugation yielded significantly more total SVF cells (P < .005), but not ASCs. The total number of SVF cells in fat harvested from the abdomen was significantly larger than the number in fat harvested from the flank or axilla (P < .05). Cultured SVF cells differentiated to adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes. Conclusions Adipose tissue harvested from the abdomen through direct excision or Coleman's technique with centrifugation was found to yield the most SVF cells and ASCs. PMID:25791999

  13. Myotube formation is affected by adipogenic lineage cells in a cell-to-cell contact-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Takegahara, Yuki; Yamanouchi, Keitaro; Nakamura, Katsuyuki; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Nishihara, Masugi

    2014-05-15

    Intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) formation is observed in some pathological conditions such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and sarcopenia. Several studies have suggested that IMAT formation is not only negatively correlated with skeletal muscle mass but also causes decreased muscle contraction in sarcopenia. In the present study, we examined w hether adipocytes affect myogenesis. For this purpose, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were transfected with siRNA of PPARγ (siPPARγ) in an attempt to inhibit adipogenesis. Myosin heavy chain (MHC)-positive myotube formation was promoted in cells transfected with siPPARγ compared to that of cells transfected with control siRNA. To determine whether direct cell-to-cell contact between adipocytes and myoblasts is a prerequisite for adipocytes to affect myogenesis, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with pre- or mature adipocytes in a Transwell coculture system. MHC-positive myotube formation was inhibited when skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with mature adipocytes, but was promoted when they were cocultured with preadipocytes. Similar effects were observed when pre- or mature adipocyte-conditioned medium was used. These results indicate that preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass by promoting myogenesis; once differentiated, the resulting mature adipocytes negatively affect myogenesis, leading to the muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies. PMID:24720912

  14. Shaping the T-cell repertoire: a matter of life and death.

    PubMed

    Wiegers, G Jan; Kaufmann, Manuel; Tischner, Denise; Villunger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Thymocyte selection aims to shape a T-cell repertoire that, on the one hand, is able to recognize and respond to foreign peptides and, on the other hand, tolerizes the presence of self-peptides in the periphery. Deletion of T cells or their precursors that fail to fulfill these criteria is mainly mediated by the Bcl-2-regulated apoptosis pathway. Absence of T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated signals or hyperactivation of the TCR by high-affinity self-peptide-major histocompatibility complexes can both trigger apoptotic cell death in developing thymocytes. Notably, TCR-signaling strength also defines survival and outgrowth of the fittest antigen-specific T-cell clones in the periphery. TCR threshold activity leading to such drastically opposing signaling outcomes (life or death) is modulated in part by cytokines and other factors, such as glucocorticoids, that fine-tune the Bcl-2 rheostat, thereby impacting on cell survival. This review aims to highlight the role of Bcl-2-regulated cell death for clonal T-cell selection. PMID:21060321

  15. Feeding Frequency Affects Cultured Rat Pituitary Cells in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Salada, T.; Cenci, R.; Krishnan, K.; Mukai, C.; Nagaoka, S.

    1996-01-01

    In this report, we describe the results of a rat pituitary cell culture experiment done on STS-65 in which the effect of cell feeding on the release of the six anterior pituitary hormones was studied. We found complex microgravity related interactions between the frequency of cell feeding and the quantity and quality (i.e. biological activity) of some of the six hormones released in flight. Analyses of growth hormone (GH) released from cells into culture media on different mission days using gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography yielded qualitatively similar results between ground and flight samples. Lack of cell feeding resulted in extensive cell clumping in flight (but not ground) cultures. Vigorous fibroblast growth occurred in both ground and flight cultures fed 4 times. These results are interpreted within the context of autocrine and or paracrine feedback interactions. Finally the payload specialist successfully prepared a fresh trypsin solution in microgravity, detached the cells from their surface and reinserted them back into the culture chamber. These cells reattached and continued to release hormone in microgravity. In summary, this experiment shows that pituitary cells are microgravity sensitive and that coupled operations routinely associated with laboratory cel1 culture can also be accomplished in low gravity.

  16. Bax alpha perturbs T cell development and affects cell cycle entry of T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Brady, H J; Gil-Gómez, G; Kirberg, J; Berns, A J

    1996-01-01

    Bax alpha can heterodimerize with Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L), countering their effects, as well as promoting apoptosis on overexpression. We show that bax alpha transgenic mice have greatly reduced numbers of mature T cells, which results from an impaired positive selection in the thymus. This perturbation in positive selection is accompanied by an increase in the number of cycling thymocytes. Further to this, mature T cells overexpressing Bax alpha have lower levels of p27Kip1 and enter S phase more rapidly in response to interleukin-2 stimulation than do control T cells, while the converse is true of bcl-2 transgenic T cells. These data indicate that apoptotic regulatory proteins can modulate the level of cell cycle-controlling proteins and thereby directly impact on the cell cycle. Images PMID:9003775

  17. Origins of Escherichia coli Growth Rate and Cell Shape Changes at High External Osmolality

    PubMed Central

    Pilizota, Teuta; Shaevitz, Joshua W.

    2014-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, a sudden increase in external concentration causes a pressure drop across the cell envelope, followed by an active recovery. After recovery, and if the external osmolality remains high, cells have been shown to grow more slowly, smaller, and at reduced turgor pressure. Despite the fact that the active recovery is a key stress response, the nature of these changes and how they relate to each other is not understood. Here, we use fluorescence imaging of single cells during hyperosmotic shocks, combined with custom made microfluidic devices, to show that cells fully recover their volume to the initial, preshock value and continue to grow at a slower rate immediately after the recovery. We show that the cell envelope material properties do not change after hyperosmotic shock, and that cell shape recovers along with cell volume. Taken together, these observations indicate that the turgor pressure recovers to its initial value so that reduced turgor is not responsible for the reduced growth rate observed immediately after recovery. To determine the point at which the reduction in cell size and turgor pressure occurs after shock, we measured the volume of E. coli cells at different stages of growth in bulk cultures. We show that cell volume reaches the same maximal level irrespective of the osmolality of the media. Based on these measurements, we propose that turgor pressure is used as a feedback variable for osmoregulatory pumps instead of being directly responsible for the reduction in growth rates. Reestablishment of turgor to its initial value might ensure correct attachment of the inner membrane and cell wall needed for cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:25418177

  18. Brucella abortus Choloylglycine Hydrolase Affects Cell Envelope Composition and Host Cell Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Marchesini, María Inés; Connolly, Joseph; Delpino, María Victoria; Baldi, Pablo C.; Mujer, Cesar V.; DelVecchio, Vito G.; Comerci, Diego J.

    2011-01-01

    Choloylglycine hydrolase (CGH, E.C. 3.5.1.24) is a conjugated bile salt hydrolase that catalyses the hydrolysis of the amide bond in conjugated bile acids. Bile salt hydrolases are expressed by gastrointestinal bacteria, and they presumably decrease the toxicity of host's conjugated bile salts. Brucella species are the causative agents of brucellosis, a disease affecting livestock and humans. CGH confers Brucella the ability to deconjugate and resist the antimicrobial action of bile salts, contributing to the establishment of a successful infection through the oral route in mice. Additionally, cgh-deletion mutant was also attenuated in intraperitoneally inoculated mice, which suggests that CGH may play a role during systemic infection other than hydrolyzing conjugated bile acids. To understand the role CGH plays in B. abortus virulence, we infected phagocytic and epithelial cells with a cgh-deletion mutant (Δcgh) and found that it is defective in the internalization process. This defect along with the increased resistance of Δcgh to the antimicrobial action of polymyxin B, prompted an analysis of the cell envelope of this mutant. Two-dimensional electrophoretic profiles of Δcgh cell envelope-associated proteins showed an altered expression of Omp2b and different members of the Omp25/31 family. These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis with monoclonal antibodies. Altogether, the results indicate that Brucella CGH not only participates in deconjugation of bile salts but also affects overall membrane composition and host cell internalization. PMID:22174816

  19. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... The appearance of normal teeth varies, especially the molars. ... conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth ...

  20. Tooth - abnormal shape

    MedlinePlus

    Hutchinson incisors; Abnormal tooth shape; Peg teeth; Mulberry teeth; Conical teeth ... from many different conditions. Specific diseases can affect tooth shape, tooth color, time of appearance, or absence ...

  1. The prospects for traveling magnetic fields to affect interface shape in the vertical gradient freeze growth of cadmium zinc telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeckel, Andrew; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2013-02-01

    The influence of a traveling magnetic field (TMF) on vertical gradient freeze (VGF) growth of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is studied using a coupled model of magnetic induction, fluid dynamics, and heat transfer. Simulations are performed to determine the influences of current, phase shift, and frequency on melt flow and growth interface shape. A downward traveling electromagnetic wave drives flow downward at the wall, which tends to flatten the interface, whereas an upward traveling wave has the opposite effect. An optimum phase shift that maximizes Lorentz force is found to depend only on system geometry. Large currents (˜300 A) and high frequencies (˜500 Hz) make a significant impact on interface shape in the absence of thermal buoyancy, but are ineffectual under realistic conditions in a 4 in.-diameter ampoule, for which buoyancy dominates Lorentz force throughout the melt. The results indicate that interface shape in this CZT growth system is strongly governed by furnace heat transfer and is difficult to modify by TMF-driven forced convection.

  2. Tuning Cell Differentiation into a 3D Scaffold Presenting a Pore Shape Gradient for Osteochondral Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Di Luca, Andrea; Lorenzo-Moldero, Ivan; Mota, Carlos; Lepedda, Antonio; Auhl, Dietmar; Van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Moroni, Lorenzo

    2016-07-01

    Osteochondral regeneration remains nowadays a major problem since the outcome of current techniques is not satisfactory in terms of functional tissue formation and development. A possible solution is the combination of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) with additive manufacturing technologies to fabricate scaffolds with instructive properties. In this study, the differentiation of hMSCs within a scaffold presenting a gradient in pore shape is presented. The variation in pore shape is determined by varying the angle formed by the fibers of two consequent layers. The fiber deposition patterns are 0-90, which generate squared pores, 0-45, 0-30, and 0-15, that generate rhomboidal pores with an increasing major axis as the deposition angle decreases. Within the gradient construct, squared pores support a better chondrogenic differentiation whereas cells residing in the rhomboidal pores display a better osteogenic differentiation. When cultured under osteochondral conditions the trend in both osteogenic and chondrogenic markers is maintained. Engineering the pore shape, thus creating axial gradients in structural properties, seems to be an instructive strategy to fabricate functional 3D scaffolds that are able to influence hMSCs differentiation for osteochondral tissue regeneration. PMID:27109461

  3. Effects of Adhesion Dynamics and Substrate Compliance on the Shape and Motility of Crawling Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2013-01-01

    Computational modeling of eukaryotic cells moving on substrates is an extraordinarily complex task: many physical processes, such as actin polymerization, action of motors, formation of adhesive contacts concomitant with both substrate deformation and recruitment of actin etc., as well as regulatory pathways are intertwined. Moreover, highly nontrivial cell responses emerge when the substrate becomes deformable and/or heterogeneous. Here we extended a computational model for motile cell fragments, based on an earlier developed phase field approach, to account for explicit dynamics of adhesion site formation, as well as for substrate compliance via an effective elastic spring. Our model displays steady motion vs. stick-slip transitions with concomitant shape oscillations as a function of the actin protrusion rate, the substrate stiffness, and the rates of adhesion. Implementing a step in the substrate’s elastic modulus, as well as periodic patterned surfaces exemplified by alternating stripes of high and low adhesiveness, we were able to reproduce the correct motility modes and shape phenomenology found experimentally. We also predict the following nontrivial behavior: the direction of motion of cells can switch from parallel to perpendicular to the stripes as a function of both the adhesion strength and the width ratio of adhesive to non-adhesive stripes. PMID:23741334

  4. Remodeling the shape of the skeleton in the intact red cell.

    PubMed Central

    Khodadad, J K; Waugh, R E; Podolski, J L; Josephs, R; Steck, T L

    1996-01-01

    The role of the membrane skeleton in determining the shape of the human red cell was probed by weakening it in situ with urea, a membrane-permeable perturbant of spectrin. Urea by itself did not alter the biconcave disk shape of the red cell; however, above threshold conditions (1.5 M, 37 degrees C, 10 min), it caused an 18% reduction in the membrane elastic shear modulus. It also potentiated the spiculation of cells by lysophosphatidylcholine. These findings suggest that the contour of the resting cell is not normally dependent on the elasticity of or tension in the membrane skeleton. Rather, the elasticity of the skeleton stabilizes membranes against deformation. Urea treatment also caused the projections induced both by micropipette aspiration and by lysophosphatidylcholine to become irreversible. Furthermore, urea converted the axisymmetric conical spicules induced by lysophosphatidylcholine into irregular, curved and knobby spicules; i.e., echinocytosis became acanthocytosis. Unlike controls, the ghosts and membrane skeletons obtained from urea-generated acanthocytes were imprinted with spicules. These data suggest that perturbing interprotein associations with urea in situ allowed the skeleton to evolve plastically to accommodate the contours imposed upon it by the overlying membrane. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 PMID:8789122

  5. Regulation of endothelial cell shape and monolayer permeability by atrial natriuretic peptide

    SciTech Connect

    Lofton-Day, C.E.

    1989-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), considered to be an important regulator of intravascular fluid volume, binds specifically to receptors on endothelial cells. In this study, the role of ANP-specific binding was investigated by examining the effect of ANP on the morphology and macromolecular permeability of monolayer cultures of bovine aortic endothelial cells. ANP alone had no observable effect on the monolayers. However, incubation of monolayers with ANP antagonized thrombin- or glucose oxidase-induced cell shape changes and intercellular gap formation. ANP pretreatment also opposed the effect of thrombin and glucose oxidase on actin filament distribution as observed by rhodamine-phalloidin staining and digital image analysis of F0actin staining. In addition, ANP reversed cell shape changes and cytoskeletal alterations induced by thrombin treatment but did not reverse alternations induced by glucose oxidase treatment. ANP significantly reduced increases in monolayer permeability to albumin resulting from thrombin or glucose oxidases treatment. Thrombin caused a 2-fold increase in monolayer permeability to {sup 125}I-labeled albumin, which was abolished by 10{sup {minus}8}-10{sup {minus}6}M ANP pretreatment. Glucose oxidase caused similar increases in permeability and was inhibited by ANP at slightly shorter time periods.

  6. The Redundancy of Peptidoglycan Carboxypeptidases Ensures Robust Cell Shape Maintenance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Katharina; Kannan, Suresh; Rao, Vincenzo A.; Biboy, Jacob; Vollmer, Daniela; Erickson, Stephen W.; Lewis, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Peptidoglycan (PG) is an essential structural component of the bacterial cell wall and maintains the integrity and shape of the cell by forming a continuous layer around the cytoplasmic membrane. The thin PG layer of Escherichia coli resides in the periplasm, a unique compartment whose composition and pH can vary depending on the local environment of the cell. Hence, the growth of the PG layer must be sufficiently robust to allow cell growth and division under different conditions. We have analyzed the PG composition of 28 mutants lacking multiple PG enzymes (penicillin-binding proteins [PBPs]) after growth in acidic or near-neutral-pH media. Statistical analysis of the muropeptide profiles identified dd-carboxypeptidases (DD-CPases) that were more active in cells grown at acidic pH. In particular, the absence of the DD-CPase PBP6b caused a significant increase in the pentapeptide content of PG as well as morphological defects when the cells were grown at acidic pH. Other DD-CPases (PBP4, PBP4b, PBP5, PBP6a, PBP7, and AmpH) and the PG synthase PBP1B made a smaller or null contribution to the pentapeptide-trimming activity at acidic pH. We solved the crystal structure of PBP6b and also demonstrated that the enzyme is more stable and has a lower Km at acidic pH, explaining why PBP6b is more active at low pH. Hence, PBP6b is a specialized DD-CPase that contributes to cell shape maintenance at low pH, and E. coli appears to utilize redundant DD-CPases for normal growth under different conditions. PMID:27329754

  7. Transcriptional modulator ZBED6 affects cell cycle and growth of human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar Ali, Muhammad; Younis, Shady; Wallerman, Ola; Gupta, Rajesh; Andersson, Leif; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor ZBED6 (zinc finger, BED-type containing 6) is a repressor of IGF2 whose action impacts development, cell proliferation, and growth in placental mammals. In human colorectal cancers, IGF2 overexpression is mutually exclusive with somatic mutations in PI3K signaling components, providing genetic evidence for a role in the PI3K pathway. To understand the role of ZBED6 in tumorigenesis, we engineered and validated somatic cell ZBED6 knock-outs in the human colorectal cancer cell lines RKO and HCT116. Ablation of ZBED6 affected the cell cycle and led to increased growth rate in RKO cells but reduced growth in HCT116 cells. This striking difference was reflected in the transcriptome analyses, which revealed enrichment of cell-cycle–related processes among differentially expressed genes in both cell lines, but the direction of change often differed between the cell lines. ChIP sequencing analyses displayed enrichment of ZBED6 binding at genes up-regulated in ZBED6-knockout clones, consistent with the view that ZBED6 modulates gene expression primarily by repressing transcription. Ten differentially expressed genes were identified as putative direct gene targets, and their down-regulation by ZBED6 was validated experimentally. Eight of these genes were linked to the Wnt, Hippo, TGF-β, EGF receptor, or PI3K pathways, all involved in colorectal cancer development. The results of this study show that the effect of ZBED6 on tumor development depends on the genetic background and the transcriptional state of its target genes. PMID:26056301

  8. Ionizing Radiation Impairs T Cell Activation by Affecting Metabolic Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Li, Heng-Hong; Wang, Yi-wen; Chen, Renxiang; Zhou, Bin; Ashwell, Jonathan D.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has a variety of acute and long-lasting adverse effects on the immune system. Whereas measureable effects of radiation on immune cell cytotoxicity and population change have been well studied in human and animal models, little is known about the functional alterations of the surviving immune cells after ionizing radiation. The objective of this study was to delineate the effects of radiation on T cell function by studying the alterations of T cell receptor activation and metabolic changes in activated T cells isolated from previously irradiated animals. Using a global metabolomics profiling approach, for the first time we demonstrate that ionizing radiation impairs metabolic reprogramming of T cell activation, which leads to substantial decreases in the efficiency of key metabolic processes required for activation, such as glucose uptake, glycolysis, and energy metabolism. In-depth understanding of how radiation impacts T cell function highlighting modulation of metabolism during activation is not only a novel approach to investigate the pivotal processes in the shift of T cell homeostasis after radiation, it also may lead to new targets for therapeutic manipulation in the combination of radiotherapy and immune therapy. Given that appreciable effects were observed with as low as 10 cGy, our results also have implications for low dose environmental exposures. PMID:26078715

  9. Structure of Csd3 from Helicobacter pylori, a cell shape-determining metallopeptidase.

    PubMed

    An, Doo Ri; Kim, Hyoun Sook; Kim, Jieun; Im, Ha Na; Yoon, Hye Jin; Yoon, Ji Young; Jang, Jun Young; Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Mobashery, Shahriar; Kim, Soon-Jong; Lee, Byung Il; Suh, Se Won

    2015-03-01

    Helicobacter pylori is associated with various gastrointestinal diseases such as gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer. Its colonization of the human gastric mucosa requires high motility, which depends on its helical cell shape. Seven cell shape-determining genes (csd1, csd2, csd3/hdpA, ccmA, csd4, csd5 and csd6) have been identified in H. pylori. Their proteins play key roles in determining the cell shape through modifications of the cell-wall peptidoglycan by the alteration of cross-linking or by the trimming of peptidoglycan muropeptides. Among them, Csd3 (also known as HdpA) is a bifunctional enzyme. Its D,D-endopeptidase activity cleaves the D-Ala(4)-mDAP(3) peptide bond between cross-linked muramyl tetrapeptides and pentapeptides. It is also a D,D-carboxypeptidase that cleaves off the terminal D-Ala(5) from the muramyl pentapeptide. Here, the crystal structure of this protein has been determined, revealing the organization of its three domains in a latent and inactive state. The N-terminal domain 1 and the core of domain 2 share the same fold despite a very low level of sequence identity, and their surface-charge distributions are different. The C-terminal LytM domain contains the catalytic site with a Zn(2+) ion, like the similar domains of other M23 metallopeptidases. Domain 1 occludes the active site of the LytM domain. The core of domain 2 is held against the LytM domain by the C-terminal tail region that protrudes from the LytM domain. PMID:25760614

  10. Structure of Csd3 from Helicobacter pylori, a cell shape-determining metallopeptidase

    PubMed Central

    An, Doo Ri; Kim, Hyoun Sook; Kim, Jieun; Im, Ha Na; Yoon, Hye Jin; Yoon, Ji Young; Jang, Jun Young; Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Mobashery, Shahriar; Kim, Soon-Jong; Lee, Byung Il; Suh, Se Won

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is associated with various gastrointestinal diseases such as gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer. Its colonization of the human gastric mucosa requires high motility, which depends on its helical cell shape. Seven cell shape-determining genes (csd1, csd2, csd3/hdpA, ccmA, csd4, csd5 and csd6) have been identified in H. pylori. Their proteins play key roles in determining the cell shape through modifications of the cell-wall peptidoglycan by the alteration of cross-linking or by the trimming of peptidoglycan muropeptides. Among them, Csd3 (also known as HdpA) is a bifunctional enzyme. Its d,d-endopeptidase activity cleaves the d-Ala4-mDAP3 peptide bond between cross-linked muramyl tetrapeptides and pentapeptides. It is also a d,d-carboxypeptidase that cleaves off the terminal d-Ala5 from the muramyl pentapeptide. Here, the crystal structure of this protein has been determined, revealing the organization of its three domains in a latent and inactive state. The N-terminal domain 1 and the core of domain 2 share the same fold despite a very low level of sequence identity, and their surface-charge distributions are different. The C-terminal LytM domain contains the catalytic site with a Zn2+ ion, like the similar domains of other M23 metallopeptidases. Domain 1 occludes the active site of the LytM domain. The core of domain 2 is held against the LytM domain by the C-terminal tail region that protrudes from the LytM domain. PMID:25760614

  11. Axial rotation in rat embryos: involvement of changes in the shapes and arrangement of cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, M; Yasutomi, M

    1995-02-01

    Rat embryos at the head-fold stage (9.5 days of gestation) were cultured for 32 hours in rat serum. Embryos rotated their axes (changing from the shape of a concave mid-region to that of a convex mid-region) during the last 5 hours of culture (from 27 h to 32 h in culture). Addition of 0.1 micrograms/ml cytochalasin D to the culture medium for this 5-hour period prevented axial rotation in the embryos and disturbed the appearance of microfilaments in the dermatome, the dorsal region of the trunk neural tube, and the dorsal epidermis. During the period of axial rotation, the dermatome and the dorsal epidermis extended and showed the arrangement of microfilaments along the cranio-caudal axis in the control embryos but not in the treated embryos. The dorsal region of the trunk neural tube in the control embryos consisted of a seam of neuroepithelial cells in which microfilaments were apparently arranged along the cranio-caudal axis but the region in the treated embryos was crowded with the neuroepithelial cells piled up randomly and microfilaments showed no arrangement. These results suggest that changes in the shapes and arrangement of the cells in the dermatome, the dorsal region of the trunk neural tube, and the dorsal epidermis cause extension of these tissues along the cranio-caudal axis and result in axial rotation. Microfilaments may play an essential role in changes in the shapes and arrangement of the cells in these tissues. PMID:7796462

  12. Shape-dependent conversion efficiency of Si nanowire solar cells with polygonal cross-sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yan; Yu, Wangbing; Ouyang, Gang

    2016-06-01

    A deeper insight into shape-dependent power conversion efficiency (PCE) of Si nanowire (SiNW) solar cells with polygonal cross-sectional shapes, including trigon, tetragon, hexagon, and circle, has been explored based on the atomic-bond-relaxation approach and detailed balance principle. It has been found that the surface effect induced by the loss-coordination atoms located at edges and surfaces, as well as the thermal effect, plays the dominant roles for the band shift and PCE of SiNWs due to the lattice strain occurrence at the self-equilibrium state. Our predictions are consistent with the available evidences, providing an important advance in the development of Si-based nanostructures for the desirable applications.

  13. The tumor microenvironment shapes hallmarks of mature B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shain, K H; Dalton, W S; Tao, J

    2015-09-01

    B-cell tumorigenesis results from a host of known and unknown genetic anomalies, including non-random translocations of genes that normally function as determinants of cell proliferation or cell survival to regions juxtaposed to active immunoglobulin heavy chain enhancer elements, chromosomal aneuploidy, somatic mutations that further affect oncogenic signaling and loss of heterozygosity of tumor-suppressor genes. However, it is critical to recognize that even in the setting of a genetic disease, the B-cell/plasma cell tumor microenvironment (TME) contributes significantly to malignant transformation and pathogenesis. Over a decade ago, we proposed the concept of cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance to delineate a form of TME-mediated drug resistance that protects hematopoietic tumor cells from the initial effect of diverse therapies. In the interim, it has been increasingly appreciated that TME also contributes to tumor initiation and progression through sustained growth/proliferation, self-renewal capacity, immune evasion, migration and invasion as well as resistance to cell death in a host of B-cell malignancies, including mantle cell lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, Waldenstroms macroglobulinemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia and multiple myeloma. Within this review, we propose that TME and the tumor co-evolve as a consequence of bidirectional signaling networks. As such, TME represents an important target and should be considered integral to tumor progression and drug response. PMID:25639873

  14. Mechanosensitivity of fibroblast cell shape and movement to anisotropic substratum topography gradients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Deok-Ho; Han, Karam; Gupta, Kshitiz; Kwon, Keon Woo

    2009-01-01

    In this report, we describe using ultraviolet (UV)-assisted capillary force lithography (CFL) to create a model substratum of anisotropic micro- and nanotopographic pattern arrays with variable local density for the analysis of cell-substratum interactions. A single cell adhesion substratum with the constant ridge width (1 µm), and depth (400 nm) and variable groove widths (1 µm to 9.1 µm) allowed us to characterize the dependence of cellular responses, including cell shape, orientation, and migration, on the anisotropy and local density of the variable micro- and nanotopographic pattern. We found that fibroblasts adhering to the denser pattern areas aligned and elongated more strongly along the direction of ridges, vs. those on the sparser areas, exhibiting a biphasic dependence of the migration speed on the pattern density. In addition, cells responded to local variations in topography by altering morphology and migrating along the direction of grooves biased by the direction of pattern orientation (short term) and pattern density (long term). Molecular dynamic live cell imaging and immunocytochemical analysis of focal adhesions and actin cytoskeleton suggest that variable substratum topography can result in distinct types of cytoskeleton reorganization. We also demonstrate that fibroblasts cultured as monolayers on the same substratum retain most of the properties displayed by single cells. This result, in addition to demonstrating a more sophisticated method to study aspects of wound healing processes, strongly suggests that even in the presence of considerable cell-cell interactions, the cues provided by the underlying substratum topography continue to exercise substantial influence on cell behavior. The described experimental platform might not only further our understanding of biomechanical regulation of cell-matrix interactions, but also contribute to bioengineering of devices with the optimally structured design of cell-material interface. PMID:19595452

  15. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Affect Disease Outcomes via Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guoping; Ge, Menghua; Qiu, Guanguan; Shu, Qiang; Xu, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent and self-renewable cells that reside in almost all postnatal tissues. In recent years, many studies have reported the effect of MSCs on the innate and adaptive immune systems. MSCs regulate the proliferation, activation, and effector function of T lymphocytes, professional antigen presenting cells (dendritic cells, macrophages, and B lymphocytes), and NK cells via direct cell-to-cell contact or production of soluble factors including indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, prostaglandin E2, tumor necrosis factor-α stimulated gene/protein 6, nitric oxide, and IL-10. MSCs are also able to reprogram macrophages from a proinflammatory M1 phenotype toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype capable of regulating immune response. Because of their capacity for differentiation and immunomodulation, MSCs have been used in many preclinical and clinical studies as possible new therapeutic agents for the treatment of autoimmune, degenerative, and inflammatory diseases. In this review, we discuss the central role of MSCs in macrophage polarization and outcomes of diseases such as wound healing, brain/spinal cord injuries, and diseases of heart, lung, and kidney in animal models. PMID:26257791

  16. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Affect Disease Outcomes via Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoping; Ge, Menghua; Qiu, Guanguan; Shu, Qiang; Xu, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent and self-renewable cells that reside in almost all postnatal tissues. In recent years, many studies have reported the effect of MSCs on the innate and adaptive immune systems. MSCs regulate the proliferation, activation, and effector function of T lymphocytes, professional antigen presenting cells (dendritic cells, macrophages, and B lymphocytes), and NK cells via direct cell-to-cell contact or production of soluble factors including indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, prostaglandin E2, tumor necrosis factor-α stimulated gene/protein 6, nitric oxide, and IL-10. MSCs are also able to reprogram macrophages from a proinflammatory M1 phenotype toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype capable of regulating immune response. Because of their capacity for differentiation and immunomodulation, MSCs have been used in many preclinical and clinical studies as possible new therapeutic agents for the treatment of autoimmune, degenerative, and inflammatory diseases. In this review, we discuss the central role of MSCs in macrophage polarization and outcomes of diseases such as wound healing, brain/spinal cord injuries, and diseases of heart, lung, and kidney in animal models. PMID:26257791

  17. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 affects endothelial progenitor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Colleselli, Daniela; Bijuklic, Klaudija; Mosheimer, Birgit A.; Kaehler, Christian M. . E-mail: C.M.Kaehler@uibk.ac.at

    2006-09-10

    Growing evidence indicates that inducible cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders and various types of cancer. Endothelial progenitor cells recruited from the bone marrow have been shown to be involved in the formation of new vessels in malignancies and discussed for being a key point in tumour progression and metastasis. However, until now, nothing is known about an interaction between COX and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Expression of COX-1 and COX-2 was detected by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. Proliferation kinetics, cell cycle distribution and rate of apoptosis were analysed by MTT test and FACS analysis. Further analyses revealed an implication of Akt phosphorylation and caspase-3 activation. Both COX-1 and COX-2 expression can be found in bone-marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in vitro. COX-2 inhibition leads to a significant reduction in proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells by an increase in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. COX-2 inhibition leads further to an increased cleavage of caspase-3 protein and inversely to inhibition of Akt activation. Highly proliferating endothelial progenitor cells can be targeted by selective COX-2 inhibition in vitro. These results indicate that upcoming therapy strategies in cancer patients targeting COX-2 may be effective in inhibiting tumour vasculogenesis as well as angiogenic processes.

  18. Senescence affects endothelial cells susceptibility to dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    AbuBakar, Sazaly; Shu, Meng-Hooi; Johari, Jefree; Wong, Pooi-Fong

    2014-01-01

    Alteration in the endothelium leading to increased vascular permeability contributes to plasma leakage seen in dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). An earlier study showed that senescent endothelial cells (ECs) altered the ECs permeability. Here we investigated the susceptibility of senescing human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to dengue virus infection and determined if dengue virus infection induces HUVECs senescence. Our results suggest that DENV type-2 (DENV-2) foci forming unit (FFU) and extracellular virus RNA copy number were reduced by at least 35% and 85% in infection of the intermediate young and early senescent HUVECs, respectively, in comparison to infection of young HUVECs. No to low infectivity was recovered from infection of late senescent HUVECs. DENV infection also increases the percentage of HUVECs expressing senescence-associated (SA)-β-gal, cells arrested at the G2/M phase or 4N DNA content stage and cells with enlarged morphology, indicative of senescing cells. Alteration of HUVECs morphology was recorded using impedance-based real-time cell analysis system following DENV-2 infection. These results suggest that senescing HUVECs do not support DENV infection and DENV infection induces HUVECs senescence. The finding highlights the possible role of induction of senescence in DENV infection of the endothelial cells. PMID:24782642

  19. Neuropeptide Y directly affects ovarian cell proliferation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, Alexander V; Kardošová, Diana; Alwasel, Saleh Hamad; Harrath, Abdel Halim

    2015-12-01

    The effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY; 0, 10, 100 and 1000 ng/mL) on the expression of PCNA, bax and p53 were examined by immunocytochemistry in porcine luteinized granulosa cells. NPY inhibited proliferation as well as promoted apoptosis and accumulation of p53 in the cells. This is the first report to demonstrate the direct action of NPY on ovarian cell proliferation and apoptosis. The results of the study suggest that the effect is mediated by transcription factor p53. PMID:26679167

  20. Mesenchymal stem cells secretomes' affect multiple myeloma translation initiation.

    PubMed

    Marcus, H; Attar-Schneider, O; Dabbah, M; Zismanov, V; Tartakover-Matalon, S; Lishner, M; Drucker, L

    2016-06-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells' (BM-MSCs) role in multiple myeloma (MM) pathogenesis is recognized. Recently, we have published that co-culture of MM cell lines with BM-MSCs results in mutual modulation of phenotype and proteome (via translation initiation (TI) factors eIF4E/eIF4GI) and that there are differences between normal donor BM-MSCs (ND-MSCs) and MM BM-MSCs (MM-MSCs) in this crosstalk. Here, we aimed to assess the involvement of soluble BM-MSCs' (ND, MM) components, more easily targeted, in manipulation of MM cell lines phenotype and TI with specific focus on microvesicles (MVs) capable of transferring critical biological material. We applied ND and MM-MSCs 72h secretomes to MM cell lines (U266 and ARP-1) for 12-72h and then assayed the cells' (viability, cell count, cell death, proliferation, cell cycle, autophagy) and TI (factors: eIF4E, teIF4GI; regulators: mTOR, MNK1/2, 4EBP; targets: cyclin D1, NFκB, SMAD5, cMyc, HIF1α). Furthermore, we dissected the secretome into >100kDa and <100kDa fractions and repeated the experiments. Finally, MVs were isolated from the ND and MM-MSCs secretomes and applied to MM cell lines. Phenotype and TI were assessed. Secretomes of BM-MSCs (ND, MM) significantly stimulated MM cell lines' TI, autophagy and proliferation. The dissected secretome yielded different effects on MM cell lines phenotype and TI according to fraction (>100kDa- repressed; <100kDa- stimulated) but with no association to source (ND, MM). Finally, in analyses of MVs extracted from BM-MSCs (ND, MM) we witnessed differences in accordance with source: ND-MSCs MVs inhibited proliferation, autophagy and TI whereas MM-MSCs MVs stimulated them. These observations highlight the very complex communication between MM and BM-MSCs and underscore its significance to major processes in the malignant cells. Studies into the influential MVs cargo are underway and expected to uncover targetable signals in the regulation of the TI/proliferation/autophagy cascade

  1. Continuous wet-process growth of ZnO nanoarrays for wire-shaped photoanode of dye-sensitized solar cell.

    PubMed

    Tao, Pan; Guo, Wanwan; Du, Jun; Tao, Changyuan; Qing, Shenglan; Fan, Xing

    2016-09-15

    Well-aligned ZnO nanorod arrays have been grown on metal-plated polymer fiber via a mild wet process in a newly-designed continuous reactor, aiming to provide wire-shaped photoanodes for wearable dye-sensitized solar cells. The growth conditions were systematically optimized with the help of computational flow-field simulation. The flow field in the reactor will not only affect the morphology of the ZnO nanorod⧹nanowire but also affect the pattern distribution of nanoarray on the electrode surface. Unlike the sectional structure from the traditional batch-type reactor, ZnO nanorods with finely-controlled length and uniform morphology could be grown from the continuous reactor. After optimization, the wire-shaped ZnO-type photoanode grown from the continuous reactor exhibited better photovoltaic performance than that from the traditional batch-type reactor. PMID:27289432

  2. Myosin II-mediated cell shape changes and cell intercalation contribute to primitive streak formation

    PubMed Central

    Song, Feifei; Sang, Helen M.; Martin, René; Knölker, Hans-Joachim; MacDonald, Michael P; Weijer, Cornelis J

    2016-01-01

    Primitive streak formation in the chick embryo involves large scale highly coordinated flows of over 100.000 cells in the epiblast. These large scale tissue flows and deformations can be correlated with specific anisotropic cell behaviours in the forming mesendoderm through a combined light-sheet microscopy and computational analysis. Relevant behaviours include apical contraction, elongation along the apical-basal axis followed by ingression as well as asynchronous directional cell intercalation of small groups of mesendoderm cells. Cell intercalation is associated with sequential, directional contraction of apical junctions, the onset, localisation and direction of which correlate strongly with the appearance of active Myosin II cables in aligned apical junctions in neighbouring cells. Use of a class specific Myosin inhibitors and gene specific knockdowns show that apical contraction and intercalation are Myosin II dependent and also reveal critical roles for Myosin I and Myosin V family members in the assembly of junctional Myosin II cables. PMID:25812521

  3. T Cell Activation Thresholds are Affected by Gravitational

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Charley; Gonzalez, M.; Nelman-Gonzalez, M.

    1999-01-01

    T cells stimulated in space flight by various mitogenic signals show a dramatic reduction in proliferation and expression of early activation markers. Similar results are also obtained in a ground based model of microgravity, clinorotation, which provides a vector-averaged reduction of the apparent gravity on cells without significant shear force. Here we demonstrate that T cell inhibition is due to an increase in the required threshold for activation. Dose response curves indicate that cells activated during clinorotation require higher stimulation to achieve the same level of activation, as measured by CD69 expression. Interleukin 2 receptor expression, and DNA synthesis. The amount of stimulation necessary for 50% activation is 5 fold in the clinostat relative to static. Correlation of TCR internalization with activation also exhibit a dramatic right shift in clinorotation, demonstrating unequivocally that signal transduction mechanism independent of TCR triggering account for the increased activation threshold. Previous results from space flight experiments are consistent with the dose response curves obtained for clinorotation. Activation thresholds are important aspects of T cell memory, autoimmunity and tolerance Clinorotation is a useful, noninvasive tool for the study of cellular and biochemical event regulating T cell activation threshold and the effects of gravitation forces on these systems.

  4. Overexpression of PhEXPA1 increases cell size, modifies cell wall polymer composition and affects the timing of axillary meristem development in Petunia hybrida.

    PubMed

    Zenoni, Sara; Fasoli, Marianna; Tornielli, Giovanni Battista; Dal Santo, Silvia; Sanson, Andrea; de Groot, Peter; Sordo, Sara; Citterio, Sandra; Monti, Francesca; Pezzotti, Mario

    2011-08-01

    • Expansins are cell wall proteins required for cell enlargement and cell wall loosening during many developmental processes. The involvement of the Petunia hybrida expansin A1 (PhEXPA1) gene in cell expansion, the control of organ size and cell wall polysaccharide composition was investigated by overexpressing PhEXPA1 in petunia plants. • PhEXPA1 promoter activity was evaluated using a promoter-GUS assay and the protein's subcellular localization was established by expressing a PhEXPA1-GFP fusion protein. PhEXPA1 was overexpressed in transgenic plants using the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and chemical analysis were used for the quantitative analysis of cell wall polymers. • The GUS and GFP assays demonstrated that PhEXPA1 is present in the cell walls of expanding tissues. The constitutive overexpression of PhEXPA1 significantly affected expansin activity and organ size, leading to changes in the architecture of petunia plants by initiating premature axillary meristem outgrowth. Moreover, a significant change in cell wall polymer composition in the petal limbs of transgenic plants was observed. • These results support a role for expansins in the determination of organ shape, in lateral branching, and in the variation of cell wall polymer composition, probably reflecting a complex role in cell wall metabolism. PMID:21534969

  5. Myotube formation is affected by adipogenic lineage cells in a cell-to-cell contact-independent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Takegahara, Yuki; Yamanouchi, Keitaro Nakamura, Katsuyuki; Nakano, Shin-ichi; Nishihara, Masugi

    2014-05-15

    Intramuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) formation is observed in some pathological conditions such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and sarcopenia. Several studies have suggested that IMAT formation is not only negatively correlated with skeletal muscle mass but also causes decreased muscle contraction in sarcopenia. In the present study, we examined w hether adipocytes affect myogenesis. For this purpose, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were transfected with siRNA of PPARγ (siPPARγ) in an attempt to inhibit adipogenesis. Myosin heavy chain (MHC)-positive myotube formation was promoted in cells transfected with siPPARγ compared to that of cells transfected with control siRNA. To determine whether direct cell-to-cell contact between adipocytes and myoblasts is a prerequisite for adipocytes to affect myogenesis, skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with pre- or mature adipocytes in a Transwell coculture system. MHC-positive myotube formation was inhibited when skeletal muscle progenitor cells were cocultured with mature adipocytes, but was promoted when they were cocultured with preadipocytes. Similar effects were observed when pre- or mature adipocyte-conditioned medium was used. These results indicate that preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass by promoting myogenesis; once differentiated, the resulting mature adipocytes negatively affect myogenesis, leading to the muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies. - Highlights: • We examined the effects of pre- and mature adipocytes on myogenesis in vitro. • Preadipocytes and mature adipocytes affect myoblast fusion. • Preadipocytes play an important role in maintaining skeletal muscle mass. • Mature adipocytes lead to muscle deterioration observed in skeletal muscle pathologies.

  6. Lipocalin produced by myelofibrosis cells affects the fate of both hematopoietic and marrow microenvironmental cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Min; Xia, Lijuan; Liu, Yen-Chun; Hochman, Tsivia; Bizzari, Laetizia; Aruch, Daniel; Lew, Jane; Weinberg, Rona; Goldberg, Judith D; Hoffman, Ronald

    2015-08-20

    Myelofibrosis (MF) is characterized by cytopenias, constitutional symptoms, splenomegaly, and marrow histopathological abnormalities (fibrosis, increased microvessel density, and osteosclerosis). The microenvironmental abnormalities are likely a consequence of the elaboration of a variety of inflammatory cytokines generated by malignant megakaryocytes and monocytes. We observed that levels of a specific inflammatory cytokine, lipocalin-2 (LCN2), were elevated in the plasmas of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MF > polycythemia vera or essential thrombocythemia) and that LCN2 was elaborated by MF myeloid cells. LCN2 generates increased reactive oxygen species, leading to increased DNA strand breaks and apoptosis of normal, but not MF, CD34(+) cells. Furthermore, incubation of marrow adherent cells or mesenchymal stem cells with LCN2 increased the generation of osteoblasts and fibroblasts, but not adipocytes. LCN2 priming of mesenchymal stem cells resulted in the upregulation of RUNX2 gene as well as other genes that are capable of further affecting osteoblastogenesis, angiogenesis, and the deposition of matrix proteins. These data indicate that LCN2 is an additional MF inflammatory cytokine that likely contributes to the creation of a cascade of events that results in not only a predominance of the MF clone but also a dysfunctional microenvironment. PMID:26022238

  7. Controlling shape and position of vascular formation in engineered tissues by arbitrary assembly of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Sakaguchi, Katsuhisa; Kuroda, Masatoshi; Muraoka, Megumi; Itoga, Kazuyoshi; Okano, Teruo; Shimizu, Tatsuya

    2015-12-01

    Cellular self-assembly based on cell-to-cell communication is a well-known tissue organizing process in living bodies. Hence, integrating cellular self-assembly processes into tissue engineering is a promising approach to fabricate well-organized functional tissues. In this research, we investigated the capability of endothelial cells (ECs) to control shape and position of vascular formation using arbitral-assembling techniques in three-dimensional engineered tissues. To quantify the degree of migration of ECs in endothelial network formation, image correlation analysis was conducted. Positive correlation between the original positions of arbitrarily assembled ECs and the positions of formed endothelial networks indicated the potential for controlling shape and position of vascular formations in engineered tissues. To demonstrate the feasibility of controlling vascular formations, engineered tissues with vascular networks in triangle and circle patterns were made. The technique reported here employs cellular self-assembly for tissue engineering and is expected to provide fundamental beneficial methods to supply various functional tissues for drug screening and regenerative medicine. PMID:26545138

  8. Spatial arrangement of prey affects the shape of ratio-dependent functional response in strongly antagonistic predators.

    PubMed

    Hossie, Thomas J; Murray, Dennis L

    2016-04-01

    Predators play a key role in shaping natural ecosystems, and understanding the factors that influence a predator's kill rate is central to predicting predator-prey dynamics. While prey density has a well-established effect on predation, it is increasingly apparent that predator density also can critically influence predator kill rates. The effects of both prey and predator density on the functional response will, however, be determined in part by their distribution on the landscape. To examine this complex relationship we experimentally manipulated prey density, predator density, and prey distribution using a tadpole (prey)-dragonfly nymph (predator) system. Predation was strongly ratio-dependent irrespective of prey distribution, but the shape of the functional response changed from hyperbolic to sigmoidal when prey were clumped in space. This sigmoidal functional response reflected a relatively strong negative effect of predator interference on kill rates at low prey: predator ratios when prey were clumped. Prey aggregation also appeared to promote stabilizing density-dependent intraguild predation in our system. We conclude that systems with highly antagonistic predators and patchily distributed prey are more likely to experience stable dynamics, and that our understanding of the functional response will be improved by research that examines directly the mechanisms generating interference. PMID:27220200

  9. Daily rhythmic changes of cell size and shape in the first optic neuropil in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Pyza, E; Meinertzhagen, I A

    1999-07-01

    Daily rhythms of changes in axon size and shape are seen in two types of monopolar cell-L1 and L2-that are unique cells within each of the modules or cartridges of the first optic neuropil or lamina in the fly's optic lobe. In the fruit fly Drosophila, L1 and L2's axons swell at the beginning of both day and night, with larger size increases occurring at the beginning of night. Later, they shrink during the day and night, respectively. Simultaneously, they change shape from an inverted conical form during the day to a cylindrical one at night. This is because the axonal cross section of L1 increases during the night, especially at proximal depths of the lamina, closest to the brain, whereas the axon of L2 increases in size at distal lamina depths. The cross-sectional areas of the L1 cell and of an individual cartridge both change under constant darkness (DD), indicating the circadian origin of changes observed under day/night (LD) conditions. We sought to see whether such changes impart a net change to the entire lamina's volume or shape that is visible by light microscopy, but oscillations in the volume or the curvature of the whole lamina neuropil are found neither in LD nor in DD. These size changes are discussed in relation to previous findings in the housefly Musca, with respect to differences in L1 and L2 between the two species, and to differences in the time course of their circadian changes. PMID:10398073

  10. Low Temperature Affects Stem Cell Maintenance in Brassica oleracea Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Jennifer; Kodde, Jan; Severing, Edouard I.; Bonnema, Guusje; Angenent, Gerco C.; Immink, Richard G. H.; Groot, Steven P. C.

    2016-01-01

    Most of the above ground tissues in higher plants originate from stem cells located in the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Several plant species can suffer from spontaneous stem cell arrest resulting in lack of further shoot development. In Brassica oleracea this SAM arrest is known as blindness and occurs in an unpredictable manner leading to considerable economic losses for plant raisers and farmers. Detailed analyses of seedlings showed that stem cell arrest is triggered by low temperatures during germination. To induce this arrest reproducibly and to study the effect of the environment, an assay was developed. The role of genetic variation on the susceptibility to develop blind seedlings was analyzed by a quantitative genetic mapping approach, using seeds from a double haploid population from a cross between broccoli and Chinese kale, produced at three locations. The analysis revealed, besides an effect of the seed production location, a region on linkage group C3 associated with blindness sensitivity. A subsequent dynamic genome-wide transcriptome analysis resulted in the identification of around 3000 differentially expressed genes early after blindness induction. A large number of cell cycle genes were en masse induced early during the development of blindness, whereas shortly after, all were down-regulated. This miss-regulation of core cell cycle genes is accompanied with a strong reduction of cells reaching the DNA replication phase. From the differentially expressed genes, 90 were located in the QTL region C3. Among them are two genes belonging to the MINICHROMOSOMAL MAINTENANCE gene family, known to be involved in DNA replication, a RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED gene, a key regulator for cell cycle initiation, and several MutS homologs genes, involved in DNA repair. These genes are potential candidates for being involved in the development of blindness in Brassica oleracea sensitive genotypes. PMID:27375654

  11. New thiazolidinediones affect endothelial cell activation and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rudnicki, Martina; Tripodi, Gustavo L; Ferrer, Renila; Boscá, Lisardo; Pitta, Marina G R; Pitta, Ivan R; Abdalla, Dulcineia S P

    2016-07-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonists used in treating type 2 diabetes that may exhibit beneficial pleiotropic effects on endothelial cells. In this study, we characterized the effects of three new TZDs [GQ-32 (3-biphenyl-4-ylmethyl-5-(4-nitro-benzylidene)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione), GQ-169 (5-(4-chloro-benzylidene)-3-(2,6-dichloro-benzyl)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione), and LYSO-7 (5-(5-bromo-1H-indol-3-ylmethylene)-3-(4-chlorobenzyl)-thiazolidine-2,4-dione)] on endothelial cells. The effects of the new TZDs were evaluated on the production of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), cell migration, tube formation and the gene expression of adhesion molecules and angiogenic mediators in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). PPARγ activation by new TZDs was addressed with a reporter gene assay. The three new TZDs activated PPARγ and suppressed the tumor necrosis factor α-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 and intercellular adhesion molecule 1. GQ-169 and LYSO-7 also inhibited the glucose-induced ROS production. Although NO production assessed with 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein-FM probe indicated that all tested TZDs enhanced intracellular levels of NO, only LYSO-7 treatment significantly increased the release of NO from HUVEC measured by chemiluminescence analysis of culture media. Additionally, GQ-32 and GQ-169 induced endothelial cell migration and tube formation by the up-regulation of angiogenic molecules expression, such as vascular endothelial growth factor A and interleukin 8. GQ-169 also increased the mRNA levels of basic fibroblast growth factor, and GQ-32 enhanced transforming growth factor-β expression. Together, the results of this study reveal that these new TZDs act as partial agonists of PPARγ and modulate endothelial cell activation and endothelial dysfunction besides to stimulate migration and tube formation. PMID:27108791

  12. Low Temperature Affects Stem Cell Maintenance in Brassica oleracea Seedlings.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Jennifer; Kodde, Jan; Severing, Edouard I; Bonnema, Guusje; Angenent, Gerco C; Immink, Richard G H; Groot, Steven P C

    2016-01-01

    Most of the above ground tissues in higher plants originate from stem cells located in the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Several plant species can suffer from spontaneous stem cell arrest resulting in lack of further shoot development. In Brassica oleracea this SAM arrest is known as blindness and occurs in an unpredictable manner leading to considerable economic losses for plant raisers and farmers. Detailed analyses of seedlings showed that stem cell arrest is triggered by low temperatures during germination. To induce this arrest reproducibly and to study the effect of the environment, an assay was developed. The role of genetic variation on the susceptibility to develop blind seedlings was analyzed by a quantitative genetic mapping approach, using seeds from a double haploid population from a cross between broccoli and Chinese kale, produced at three locations. The analysis revealed, besides an effect of the seed production location, a region on linkage group C3 associated with blindness sensitivity. A subsequent dynamic genome-wide transcriptome analysis resulted in the identification of around 3000 differentially expressed genes early after blindness induction. A large number of cell cycle genes were en masse induced early during the development of blindness, whereas shortly after, all were down-regulated. This miss-regulation of core cell cycle genes is accompanied with a strong reduction of cells reaching the DNA replication phase. From the differentially expressed genes, 90 were located in the QTL region C3. Among them are two genes belonging to the MINICHROMOSOMAL MAINTENANCE gene family, known to be involved in DNA replication, a RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED gene, a key regulator for cell cycle initiation, and several MutS homologs genes, involved in DNA repair. These genes are potential candidates for being involved in the development of blindness in Brassica oleracea sensitive genotypes. PMID:27375654

  13. Shaping the repertoire of tumor-infiltrating effector and regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Peter A.; Leventhal, Daniel S.; Malchow, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many tumors express antigens that can be specifically or selectively recognized by T lymphocytes, suggesting that T cell-mediated immunity may be harnessed for the immunotherapy of cancer. However, since tumors originate from normal cells and evolve within the context of self tissues, the immune mechanisms that prevent the autoimmune attack of normal tissues function in parallel to restrict anti-tumor immunity. In particular, the purging of autoreactive T cells and the development of immune-suppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs) are thought to be major barriers impeding anti-tumor immune responses. Here, we discuss current understanding regarding the antigens recognized by tumor-infiltrating T cell populations, the mechanisms that shape the repertoire of these cells, and the role of the transcription factor autoimmune regulator (Aire) in these processes. Further elucidation of these principles is likely to be critical for optimizing emerging cancer immunotherapies, and for the rational design of novel therapies exhibiting robust anti-tumor activity with limited toxicity. PMID:24712470

  14. Cytosolic organelles shape calcium signals and exo-endocytotic responses of chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    García, Antonio G; Padín, Fernando; Fernández-Morales, José C; Maroto, Marcos; García-Sancho, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The concept of stimulus-secretion coupling was born from experiments performed in chromaffin cells 50 years ago. Stimulation of these cells with acetylcholine enhances calcium (Ca(2+)) entry and this generates a transient elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) that triggers the exocytotic release of catecholamines. The control of the [Ca(2+)](c) signal is complex and depends on various classes of plasmalemmal calcium channels, cytosolic calcium buffers, the uptake and release of Ca(2+) from cytoplasmic organelles, such as the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, chromaffin vesicles and the nucleus, and Ca(2+) extrusion mechanisms, such as the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-stimulated ATPase, and the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger. Computation of the rates of Ca(2+) fluxes between the different cell compartments support the proposal that the chromaffin cell has developed functional calcium tetrads formed by calcium channels, cytosolic calcium buffers, the endoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondria nearby the exocytotic plasmalemmal sites. These tetrads shape the Ca(2+) transients occurring during cell activation to regulate early and late steps of exocytosis, and the ensuing endocytotic responses. The different patterns of catecholamine secretion in response to stress may thus depend on such local [Ca(2+)](c) transients occurring at different cell compartments, and generated by redistribution and release of Ca(2+) by cytoplasmic organelles. In this manner, the calcium tetrads serve to couple the variable energy demands due to exo-endocytotic activities with energy production and protein synthesis. PMID:22209033

  15. Slow motility in hair cells of the frog amphibian papilla: Ca2+-dependent shape changes.

    PubMed

    Farahbakhsh, Nasser A; Narins, Peter M

    2006-02-01

    We investigated the process of slow motility in non-mammalian auditory hair cells by recording the time course of shape change in hair cells of the frog amphibian papilla. The tall hair cells in the rostral segment of this organ, reported to be the sole recipients of efferent innervation, were found to shorten in response to an increase in the concentration of the intracellular free calcium. These shortenings are composed of two partially-overlapping phases: an initial rapid iso-volumetric contraction, followed by a slower length decrease accompanied with swelling. It is possible to unmask the iso-volumetric contraction by delaying the cell swelling with the help of K+ or Cl- channel inhibitors, quinine or furosemide. Furthermore, it appears that the longitudinal contraction in these cells is Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent: in the presence of W-7, a calmodulin inhibitor, only a slow, swelling phase could be observed. These findings suggest that amphibian rostral AP hair cells resemble their mammalian counterparts in expressing both a Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent contractile structure and an "osmotic" mechanism capable of mediating length change in response to extracellular stimuli. Such a mechanism might be utilized by the efferent neurotransmitters for adaptive modulation of mechano-electrical transduction, sensitivity enhancement, frequency selectivity, and protection against over-stimulation. PMID:16426781

  16. Cigarette smoke extract affects mitochondrial function in alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ballweg, Korbinian; Mutze, Kathrin; Königshoff, Melanie; Eickelberg, Oliver; Meiners, Silke

    2014-12-01

    Cigarette smoke is the main risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Exposure of cells to cigarette smoke induces an initial adaptive cellular stress response involving increased oxidative stress and induction of inflammatory signaling pathways. Exposure of mitochondria to cellular stress alters their fusion/fission dynamics. Whereas mild stress induces a prosurvival response termed stress-induced mitochondrial hyperfusion, severe stress results in mitochondrial fragmentation and mitophagy. In the present study, we analyzed the mitochondrial response to mild and nontoxic doses of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in alveolar epithelial cells. We characterized mitochondrial morphology, expression of mitochondrial fusion and fission genes, markers of mitochondrial proteostasis, as well as mitochondrial functions such as membrane potential and oxygen consumption. Murine lung epithelial (MLE)12 and primary mouse alveolar epithelial cells revealed pronounced mitochondrial hyperfusion upon treatment with CSE, accompanied by increased expression of the mitochondrial fusion protein mitofusin 2 and increased metabolic activity. We did not observe any alterations in mitochondrial proteostasis, i.e., induction of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response or mitophagy. Therefore, our data indicate an adaptive prosurvival response of mitochondria of alveolar epithelial cells to nontoxic concentrations of CSE. A hyperfused mitochondrial network, however, renders the cell more vulnerable to additional stress, such as sustained cigarette smoke exposure. As such, cigarette smoke-induced mitochondrial hyperfusion, although part of a beneficial adaptive stress response in the first place, may contribute to the pathogenesis of COPD. PMID:25326581

  17. Allyl isothiocyanate affects the cell cycle of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Åsberg, Signe E.; Bones, Atle M.; Øverby, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Isothiocyanates (ITCs) are degradation products of glucosinolates present in members of the Brassicaceae family acting as herbivore repellents and antimicrobial compounds. Recent results indicate that allyl ITC (AITC) has a role in defense responses such as glutathione depletion, ROS generation and stomatal closure. In this study we show that exposure to non-lethal concentrations of AITC causes a shift in the cell cycle distribution of Arabidopsis thaliana leading to accumulation of cells in S-phases and a reduced number of cells in non-replicating phases. Furthermore, transcriptional analysis revealed an AITC-induced up-regulation of the gene encoding cyclin-dependent kinase A while several genes encoding mitotic proteins were down-regulated, suggesting an inhibition of mitotic processes. Interestingly, visualization of DNA synthesis indicated that exposure to AITC reduced the rate of DNA replication. Taken together, these results indicate that non-lethal concentrations of AITC induce cells of A. thaliana to enter the cell cycle and accumulate in S-phases, presumably as a part of a defensive response. Thus, this study suggests that AITC has several roles in plant defense and add evidence to the growing data supporting a multifunctional role of glucosinolates and their degradation products in plants. PMID:26042144

  18. Post-transcriptional RNA Regulons Affecting Cell Cycle and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Blackinton, Jeff G.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular growth cycle is initiated and maintained by punctual, yet agile, regulatory events involving modifications of cell cycle proteins as well as coordinated gene expression to support cyclic checkpoint decisions. Recent evidence indicates that post-transcriptional partitioning of messenger RNA subsets by RNA-binding proteins help physically localize, temporally coordinate, and efficiently translate cell cycle proteins. This dynamic organization of mRNAs encoding cell cycle components contributes to the overall economy of the cell cycle consistent with the post-transcriptional RNA regulon model of gene expression. This review examines several recent studies demonstrating the coordination of mRNA subsets encoding cell cycle proteins during nuclear export and subsequent coupling to protein synthesis, and discusses evidence for mRNA coordination of p53 targets and the DNA damage response pathway. We consider how these observations may connect to upstream and downstream post-transcriptional coordination and coupling of splicing, export, localization, and translation. Published examples from yeast, nematode, insect, and mammalian systems are discussed, and we consider genetic evidence supporting the conclusion that dysregulation of RNA regulons may promote pathogenic states of growth such as carcinogenesis. PMID:24882724

  19. Cell shape and the presentation of adhesion ligands guide smooth muscle myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Douglas; Sun, Michael B; Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A; Kilian, Kristopher A

    2016-05-01

    The reliable generation of smooth muscle cells is important for a number of tissue engineering applications. Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising progenitor of smooth muscle, with high expression of smooth muscle markers observed in a fraction of isolated cells, which can be increased by introduction of soluble supplements that direct differentiation. Here we demonstrate a new micropatterning technique, where peptides of different ligand affinity can be microcontact printed onto an inert background, to explore MSC differentiation to smooth muscle through controlled biochemical and biophysical cues alone. Using copper-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC), we patterned our surfaces with RGD peptide ligands-both a linear peptide with low integrin affinity and a cyclic version with high integrin affinity-for the culture of MSCs in shapes with various aspect ratios. At low aspect ratio, ligand affinity is a prime determinant for smooth muscle differentiation, while at high aspect ratio, ligand affinity has less of an effect. Pathway analysis reveals a role for focal adhesion turnover, Rac1, RhoA/ROCK, and calpain during smooth muscle differentiation of MSCs in response to cell shape and the affinity of the cell adhesion interface. Controlling integrin-ligand affinity at the biomaterials interface is important for mediating adhesion but may also prove useful for directing smooth muscle myogenesis. Peptide patterning enables the systematic investigation of single to multiple peptides derived from any protein, at different densities across a biomaterials surface, which has the potential to direct multiple MSC differentiation outcomes without the need for soluble supplements. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1212-1220, 2016. PMID:26799164

  20. Cell shape-dependent rectification of surface receptor transport in a sinusoidal electric field.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, R C; Gowrishankar, T R; Basch, R M; Patel, P K; Golan, D E

    1993-01-01

    In the presence of an extracellular electric field, transport dynamics of cell surface receptors represent a balance between electromigration and mutual diffusion. Because mutual diffusion is highly dependent on surface geometry, certain asymmetrical cell shapes effectively create an anisotropic resistance to receptor electromigration. If the resistance to receptor transport along a single axis is anisotropic, then an applied sinusoidal electric field will drive a net time-average receptor displacement, effectively rectifying receptor transport. To quantify the importance of this effect, a finite difference mathematical model was formulated and used to describe charged receptor transport in the plane of a plasma membrane. Representative values for receptor electromigration mobility and diffusivity were used. Model responses were examined for low frequency (10(-4)-10 Hz) 10-V/cm fields and compared with experimental measurements of receptor back-diffusion in human fibroblasts. It was found that receptor transport rectification behaved as a low-pass filter; at the tapered ends of cells, sinusoidal electric fields in the 10(-3) Hz frequency range caused a time-averaged accumulation of receptors as great as 2.5 times the initial uniform concentration. The extent of effective rectification of receptor transport was dependent on the rate of geometrical taper. Model studies also demonstrated that receptor crowding could alter transmembrane potential by an order of magnitude more than the transmembrane potential directly induced by the field. These studies suggest that cell shape is important in governing interactions between alternating current (ac) electric fields and cell surface receptors. PMID:8381681

  1. Claudin-16 affects transcellular Cl− secretion in MDCK cells

    PubMed Central

    Günzel, Dorothee; Amasheh, Salah; Pfaffenbach, Sandra; Richter, Jan F; Kausalya, P Jaya; Hunziker, Walter; Fromm, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Claudin-16 (paracellin-1) is a tight junction protein localized mainly in the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop and also in the distal nephron. Its defect causes familial hypomagnesaemia with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis. This had been taken as an indication that claudin-16 conveys paracellular Mg2+ and Ca2+ transport; however, evidence is still conflicting. We studied paracellular ion permeabilties as well as effects of claudin-16 on the driving forces for passive ion movement. MDCK-C7 cells were stably transfected with wild-type (wt) and mutant (R146T, T233R) claudin-16. Results indicated that paracellular permeability to Mg2+ but not to Ca2+ is increased in cells transfected with wt compared to mutant claudin-16 and control cells. Increased basolateral Mg2+ concentration activated a transcellular Cl− current which was greatly enhanced in cells transfected with wt and T233R claudin-16, as compared to R146T claudin-16-transfected or control cells. This current was triggered by the basolateral calcium-sensing receptor causing Ca2+ release from internal stores, thus activating apical Ca2+-sensitive Cl− channels and basolateral Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels. Immunohistochemical data suggest that the Cl− channel involved is bestrophin. We conclude that claudin-16 itself possesses only moderate paracellular Mg2+ permeability but governs transcellular Cl− currents by interaction with apical Ca2+-activated Cl− channels, presumably bestrophin. As the transepithelial voltage generated by such a current alters the driving force for all ions, this may be the major mechanism to regulate Mg2+ and Ca2+ absorption in the kidney. PMID:19528248

  2. A Cardiolipin-Deficient Mutant of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Has an Altered Cell Shape and Is Impaired in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ti-Yu; Santos, Thiago M. A.; Kontur, Wayne S.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell shape has been suggested to play an important role in the regulation of bacterial attachment to surfaces and the formation of communities associated with surfaces. We found that a cardiolipin synthase (Δcls) mutant of the rod-shaped bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides—in which synthesis of the anionic, highly curved phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) is reduced by 90%—produces ellipsoid-shaped cells that are impaired in biofilm formation. Reducing the concentration of CL did not cause significant defects in R. sphaeroides cell growth, swimming motility, lipopolysaccharide and exopolysaccharide production, surface adhesion protein expression, and membrane permeability. Complementation of the CL-deficient mutant by ectopically expressing CL synthase restored cells to their rod shape and increased biofilm formation. Treating R. sphaeroides cells with a low concentration (10 μg/ml) of the small-molecule MreB inhibitor S-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)isothiourea produced ellipsoid-shaped cells that had no obvious growth defect yet reduced R. sphaeroides biofilm formation. This study demonstrates that CL plays a role in R. sphaeroides cell shape determination, biofilm formation, and the ability of the bacterium to adapt to its environment. IMPORTANCE Membrane composition plays a fundamental role in the adaptation of many bacteria to environmental stress. In this study, we build a new connection between the anionic phospholipid cardiolipin (CL) and cellular adaptation in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. We demonstrate that CL plays a role in the regulation of R. sphaeroides morphology and is important for the ability of this bacterium to form biofilms. This study correlates CL concentration, cell shape, and biofilm formation and provides the first example of how membrane composition in bacteria alters cell morphology and influences adaptation. This study also provides insight into the potential of phospholipid biosynthesis as a target for new chemical strategies designed to

  3. To shape a cell: an inquiry into the causes of morphogenesis of microorganisms.

    PubMed Central

    Harold, F M

    1990-01-01

    We recognize organisms first and foremost by their forms, but how they grow and shape themselves still largely passes understanding. The objective of this article is to survey what has been learned of morphogenesis of walled eucaryotic microorganisms as a set of problems in cellular heredity, biochemistry, physiology, and organization. Despite the diversity of microbial forms and habits, some common principles can be discerned. (i) That the form of each organism represents the expression of a genetic program is almost universally taken for granted. However, reflection on the findings with morphologically aberrant mutants suggests that the metaphor of a genetic program is misleading. Cellular form is generated by a web of interacting chemical and physical processes, whose every strand is woven of multiple gene products. The relationship between genes and form is indirect and cumulative; therefore, morphogenesis must be addressed as a problem not of molecular genetics but of cellular physiology. (ii) The shape of walled cells is determined by the manner in which the wall is laid down during growth and development. Turgor pressure commonly, perhaps always, supplies the driving force for surface enlargement. Cells yield to this scalar force by localized, controlled wall synthesis; their forms represent variations on the theme of local compliance with global force. (iii) Growth and division in bacteria display most immediately the interplay of hydrostatic pressure, localized wall synthesis, and structural constraints. Koch's surface stress theory provides a comprehensive and quantitative framework for understanding bacterial shapes. (iv) In the larger and more versatile eucaryotic cells, expansion is mediated by the secretion of vesicles. Secretion and ancillary processes, such as cytoplasmic transport, are spatially organized on the micrometer scale. The diversity of vectorial physiology and of the forms it generates is illustrated by examples: apical growth of fungal

  4. Nanofibrous Microposts and Microwells of Controlled Shapes and Their Hybridization with Hydrogels for Cell Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A simple, robust, and cost-effective method is developed to fabricate nanofibrous micropatterns particularly microposts and microwells of controlled shapes. The key to this method is the use of an easily micropatternable and intrinsically conductive metal alloy as a template to collect electrospun fibers. The micropatterned alloy allows conformal fiber deposition with high fidelity on its topographical features and in situ formation of diverse, free-standing micropatterned nanofibrous membranes. Interestingly, these membranes can serve as structural frames to form robust hydrogel micropatterns that may otherwise be fragile on their own. These hybrid micropatterns represent a new platform for cell encapsulation where the nanofiber frames enhance the mechanical integrity of hydrogel and the micropatterns provide additional surface area for mass transfer and cell loading. PMID:24806031

  5. Wire-shaped perovskite solar cell based on TiO2 nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Kulkarni, Sneha A.; Li, Zhen; Xu, Wenjing; Batabyal, Sudip K.; Zhang, Sam; Cao, Anyuan; Wong, Lydia Helena

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a wire-shaped perovskite solar cell based on TiO2 nanotube (TNT) arrays is demonstrated for the first time by integrating a perovskite absorber on TNT-coated Ti wire. Anodization was adopted for the conformal growth of TNTs on Ti wire, together with the simultaneous formation of a compact TiO2 layer. A sequential step dipping process is employed to produce a uniform and compact perovskite layer on top of TNTs with conformal coverage as the efficient light absorber. Transparent carbon nanotube film is wrapped around Ti wire as the hole collector and counter electrode. The integrated perovskite solar cell wire by facile fabrication approaches shows a promising future in portable and wearable textile electronics.

  6. Wire-shaped perovskite solar cell based on TiO2 nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Kulkarni, Sneha A; Li, Zhen; Xu, Wenjing; Batabyal, Sudip K; Zhang, Sam; Cao, Anyuan; Wong, Lydia Helena

    2016-05-20

    In this work, a wire-shaped perovskite solar cell based on TiO2 nanotube (TNT) arrays is demonstrated for the first time by integrating a perovskite absorber on TNT-coated Ti wire. Anodization was adopted for the conformal growth of TNTs on Ti wire, together with the simultaneous formation of a compact TiO2 layer. A sequential step dipping process is employed to produce a uniform and compact perovskite layer on top of TNTs with conformal coverage as the efficient light absorber. Transparent carbon nanotube film is wrapped around Ti wire as the hole collector and counter electrode. The integrated perovskite solar cell wire by facile fabrication approaches shows a promising future in portable and wearable textile electronics. PMID:27070991

  7. Correlation of laser-Doppler-velocity measurements and endothelial cell shape in a stenosed dog aorta.

    PubMed

    Liepsch, D W; Levesque, M; Nerem, R M; Moravec, S T

    1988-01-01

    Laser-Doppler-velocity measurements were carried out in an elastic 1:1 true-to-scale silicone rubber model of a dog aorta with stenosis. The model was constructed from a cast of a severely stenosed dog aorta (71% of its area). The stenosis in the dog aorta was prepared by wrapping a cotton band around the aorta. This band was tightened until the presence of a thrill or a bruit was felt distal to the band. Twelve weeks later the animal was sacrificed and a cast was prepared from the aorta. From this vascular cast, the cross-sectional area was calculated. Endothelial cell geometry and orientation was studied using computerized analysis to determine the cell area and shape index. An elastic silicone rubber model was prepared from the cast to measure the velocity profiles and to estimate the local wall shear stress. Velocity measurements were done at steady and pulsatile flow using a Newtonian aqueous-glycerol solution and a non-Newtonian blood-like fluid. From those velocity measurements the velocity gradients near the wall were determined and the shear stress calculated. The flow distal to the stenosis separates from the wall at physiological conditions. The endothelial cells are smaller and more elongated in the throat; distal to the stenosis they are larger and rounder. The shape index distribution along the stenosed aorta is correlated with the level of wall shear stress. It is shown that even low changes in the wall shear stress have an influence on the orientation of the endothelial cells. PMID:2977525

  8. Contractility of single cardiomyocytes differentiated from pluripotent stem cells depends on physiological shape and substrate stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Alexandre J. S.; Ang, Yen-Sin; Fu, Ji-Dong; Rivas, Renee N.; Mohamed, Tamer M. A.; Higgs, Gadryn C.; Srivastava, Deepak; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2015-01-01

    Single cardiomyocytes contain myofibrils that harbor the sarcomere-based contractile machinery of the myocardium. Cardiomyocytes differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC-CMs) have potential as an in vitro model of heart activity. However, their fetal-like misalignment of myofibrils limits their usefulness for modeling contractile activity. We analyzed the effects of cell shape and substrate stiffness on the shortening and movement of labeled sarcomeres and the translation of sarcomere activity to mechanical output (contractility) in live engineered hPSC-CMs. Single hPSC-CMs were cultured on polyacrylamide substrates of physiological stiffness (10 kPa), and Matrigel micropatterns were used to generate physiological shapes (2,000-µm2 rectangles with length:width aspect ratios of 5:1–7:1) and a mature alignment of myofibrils. Translation of sarcomere shortening to mechanical output was highest in 7:1 hPSC-CMs. Increased substrate stiffness and applied overstretch induced myofibril defects in 7:1 hPSC-CMs and decreased mechanical output. Inhibitors of nonmuscle myosin activity repressed the assembly of myofibrils, showing that subcellular tension drives the improved contractile activity in these engineered hPSC-CMs. Other factors associated with improved contractility were axially directed calcium flow, systematic mitochondrial distribution, more mature electrophysiology, and evidence of transverse-tubule formation. These findings support the potential of these engineered hPSC-CMs as powerful models for studying myocardial contractility at the cellular level. PMID:26417073

  9. Alcohol-soluble Star-shaped Oligofluorenes as Interlayer for High Performance Polymer Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yang; He, Zhicai; Zhao, Baofeng; Liu, Yuan; Yang, Chuluo; Wu, Hongbin; Cao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Two star-shaped oligofluorenes with hexakis(fluoren-2-yl)benzene as core are designed and sythesized for interfacial materials in polymer solar cell. Diethanolamino groups are attached to the side chain of fluorene units for T0-OH and T1-OH to enable the alcohol solubility, and additional hydrophobic n-hexyl chains are also grafted on the increased fluorene arms for T1-OH. In conventional device with PCDTBT/PC71BM as active layer, a 50% enhanced PCE is obtained by incorporating T0-OH and T1-OH as the interlayer compared with device without interlayer. By optimizing the active material with PTB7 and with the inverted device structure, a maximum PCE of 9.30% is achieved, which is among the highest efficiencies for PTB7 based polymer solar cells. The work function of modified electrode, the surface morphology and the suraface properties are systematically studied. By modifying the structures of the star-shaped molecules, a balance between the hydrophobic and hydrophilic property is finely tuned, and thus facilitate the interlayer for high performance of PSCs. PMID:26612688

  10. Ultrastructural characterization of goblet-shaped particles from the cell wall of Flexibacter polymorphus.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, H F

    1977-09-01

    The ultrastructure of submicroscopic goblet-shaped particles ("goblets') from the cell wall of the marine-gliding microbe Flexibacter polymorphus was investigated. The goblets, which were partially purified by CsCl density-gradient centrifugation, were rich in protein, exhibiting a single absorption maximum in the ultraviolet at about 276 nm; they also contained a small amount of carbohydrate. As determined by electron microscopy, goblets negatively contrasted with ammonium molybdate were about 30 nm in diameter by 36 nm in length. When viewed in profile, each apparently consisted of five morphologically distinct kinds of components: the C-1, C-2, and C-3 subunits which formed the cup-shaped moiety of the goblet; a globular base unit; and a tubular stem-like structure connecting the cup with the base unit. In addition, a long fiber emerged from the interior of some goblets. The fine structural evidence suggested that goblets may be constructed from three stacked subunit rings (each composed of repeating C-1, C-2, or C-3 protomers) arranged concentrically. X-ray images of a clay model closely resembled electron micrographs of negatively stained goblets; thereby lending support to the proposed structure. It is speculated that goblets function in vivo as macromolecular pores through the outer membrane which mediate extrusion of extracellular fibers, possibly of importance in gliding motility or in attachment of cells to solid surfaces. PMID:907917

  11. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, N.R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development. PMID:26887292

  12. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  13. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, N R; Gazguez, E; Bidault, L; Guilbert, T; Vias, C; Vian, E; Watanabe, Y; Muller, L; Germain, S; Bondurand, N; Dufour, S; Fleury, V

    2016-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development. PMID:26887292

  14. Synergistic Targeting of Cell Membrane, Cytoplasm and Nucleus of Cancer Cells using Rod-Shaped Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Barua, Sutapa; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Design of carriers for effective delivery and targeting of drugs to cellular and sub-cellular compartments is an unmet need in medicine. Here, we report pure drug nanoparticles comprising camptothecin (CPT), trastuzumab (TTZ) and doxorubicin (DOX) to enable cell-specific interactions, subcellular accumulation and growth inhibition of breast cancer cells. CPT is formulated in the form of nanorods which are coated with TTZ. DOX is encapsulated in the TTZ corona around the CPT nanoparticle. Our results show that TTZ/DOX-coated CPT nanorods exhibit cell-specific internalization in BT-474 breast cancer cells, after which TTZ is recycled to the plasma membrane leaving CPT nanorods in the perinuclear region and delivering DOX into the nucleus of the cells. The effects of CPT-TTZ-DOX nanoparticles on growth inhibition are synergistic (combination index = 0.17±0.03) showing 10-10,000 fold lower inhibitory concentrations (IC50) compared to those of individual drugs. The design of antibody-targeted pure drug nanoparticles offers a promising design strategy to facilitate intracellular delivery and therapeutic efficiency of anticancer drugs. PMID:24053162

  15. Evolution of spur-length diversity in Aquilegia petals is achieved solely through cell-shape anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Puzey, Joshua R.; Gerbode, Sharon J.; Hodges, Scott A.; Kramer, Elena M.; Mahadevan, L.

    2012-01-01

    The role of petal spurs and specialized pollinator interactions has been studied since Darwin. Aquilegia petal spurs exhibit striking size and shape diversity, correlated with specialized pollinators ranging from bees to hawkmoths in a textbook example of adaptive radiation. Despite the evolutionary significance of spur length, remarkably little is known about Aquilegia spur morphogenesis and its evolution. Using experimental measurements, both at tissue and cellular levels, combined with numerical modelling, we have investigated the relative roles of cell divisions and cell shape in determining the morphology of the Aquilegia petal spur. Contrary to decades-old hypotheses implicating a discrete meristematic zone as the driver of spur growth, we find that Aquilegia petal spurs develop via anisotropic cell expansion. Furthermore, changes in cell anisotropy account for 99 per cent of the spur-length variation in the genus, suggesting that the true evolutionary innovation underlying the rapid radiation of Aquilegia was the mechanism of tuning cell shape. PMID:22090381

  16. Evolution of spur-length diversity in Aquilegia petals is achieved solely through cell-shape anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Puzey, Joshua R; Gerbode, Sharon J; Hodges, Scott A; Kramer, Elena M; Mahadevan, L

    2012-04-22

    The role of petal spurs and specialized pollinator interactions has been studied since Darwin. Aquilegia petal spurs exhibit striking size and shape diversity, correlated with specialized pollinators ranging from bees to hawkmoths in a textbook example of adaptive radiation. Despite the evolutionary significance of spur length, remarkably little is known about Aquilegia spur morphogenesis and its evolution. Using experimental measurements, both at tissue and cellular levels, combined with numerical modelling, we have investigated the relative roles of cell divisions and cell shape in determining the morphology of the Aquilegia petal spur. Contrary to decades-old hypotheses implicating a discrete meristematic zone as the driver of spur growth, we find that Aquilegia petal spurs develop via anisotropic cell expansion. Furthermore, changes in cell anisotropy account for 99 per cent of the spur-length variation in the genus, suggesting that the true evolutionary innovation underlying the rapid radiation of Aquilegia was the mechanism of tuning cell shape. PMID:22090381

  17. Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acids Affect Electrolyte Transport in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells: Dependence on Cyclooxygenase and Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Nüsing, Rolf M.; Schweer, Horst; Fleming, Ingrid; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Wegmann, Markus

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effects of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) on ion transport in the polarized renal distal tubular cell line, MDCK C7. Of the four EET regioisomers (5,6-EET, 8,9-EET, 11,12-EET, and 14,15-EET) studied, only apical, but not basolateral, application of 5,6-EET increased short circuit current (Isc) with kinetics similar to those of arachidonic acid. The ion transport was blocked by preincubation with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin or with the chloride channel blocker NPPB. Further, both a Cl−-free bath solution and the Ca2+ antagonist verapamil blocked 5,6-EET-induced ion transport. Although the presence of the PGE2 receptors EP2, EP3, and EP4 was demonstrated, apically added PGE2 was ineffective and basolaterally added PGE2 caused a different kinetics in ion transport compared to 5,6-EET. Moreover, PGE2 sythesis in MDCK C7 cells was unaffected by 5,6-EET treatment. GC/MS/MS analysis of cell supernatants revealed the presence of the biologically inactive 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE1 in 5,6-EET-treated cells, but not in control cells. Indomethacin suppressed the formation of 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE1. 5,6-epoxy-PGE1 the precursor of 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE1, caused a similar ion transport as 5,6-EET. Cytochrome P450 enzymes homolog to human CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2J2 protein were detected immunologically in the MDCK C7 cells. Our findings suggest that 5,6-EET affects Cl-transport in renal distal tubular cells independent of PGE2 but by a mechanism, dependent on its conversion to 5,6-epoxy-PGE1 by cyclooxygenase. We suggest a role for this P450 epoxygenase product in the regulation of electrolyte transport, especially as a saluretic compound acting from the luminal side of tubular cells in the mammalian kidney. PMID:17494091

  18. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids affect electrolyte transport in renal tubular epithelial cells: dependence on cyclooxygenase and cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Nüsing, Rolf M; Schweer, Horst; Fleming, Ingrid; Zeldin, Darryl C; Wegmann, Markus

    2007-07-01

    We investigated the effects of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) on ion transport in the polarized renal distal tubular cell line, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) C7. Of the four EET regioisomers (5,6-EET, 8,9-EET, 11,12-EET, and 14,15-EET) studied, only apical, but not basolateral, application of 5,6-EET increased short-circuit current (I(sc)) with kinetics similar to those of arachidonic acid. The ion transport was blocked by preincubation with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin or with the chloride channel blocker NPPB. Furthermore, both a Cl(-)-free bath solution and the Ca(2+) antagonist verapamil blocked 5,6-EET-induced ion transport. Although the presence of the PGE(2) receptors EP2, EP3, and EP4 was demonstrated, apically added PGE(2) was ineffective and basolaterally added PGE(2) caused a different kinetics in ion transport compared with 5,6-EET. Moreover, PGE(2) synthesis in MDCK C7 cells was unaffected by 5,6-EET treatment. GC/MS/MS analysis of cell supernatants revealed the presence of the biologically inactive 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE(1) in 5,6-EET-treated cells, but not in control cells. Indomethacin suppressed the formation of 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE(1). 5,6-Epoxy-PGE(1), the precursor of 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE(1), caused a similar ion transport as 5,6-EET. Cytochrome P-450 enzymes homolog to human CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2J2 protein were detected immunologically in the MDCK C7 cells. Our findings suggest that 5,6-EET affects Cl(-) transport in renal distal tubular cells independent of PGE(2) but by a mechanism, dependent on its conversion to 5,6-epoxy-PGE(1) by cyclooxygenase. We suggest a role for this P450 epoxygenase product in the regulation of electrolyte transport, especially as a saluretic compound acting from the luminal side of tubular cells in the mammalian kidney. PMID:17494091

  19. Control of cytoskeletal mechanics by extracellular matrix, cell shape, and mechanical tension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, N.; Ingber, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated how extracellular matrix (ECM) alters the mechanical properties of the cytoskeleton (CSK). Mechanical stresses were applied to integrin receptors on the apical surfaces of adherent endothelial cells using RGD-coated ferromagnetic microbeads (5.5-microns diameter) in conjunction with a magnetic twisting device. Increasing the number of basal cell-ECM contacts by raising the fibronectin (FN) coating density from 10 to 500 ng/cm2 promoted cell spreading by fivefold and increased CSK stiffness, apparent viscosity, and permanent deformation all by more than twofold, as measured in response to maximal stress (40 dyne/cm2). When the applied stress was increased from 7 to 40 dyne/cm2, the stiffness and apparent viscosity of the CSK increased in parallel, although cell shape, ECM contacts, nor permanent deformation was altered. Application of the same stresses over a lower number ECM contacts using smaller beads (1.4-microns diameter) resulted in decreased CSK stiffness and apparent viscosity, confirming that this technique probes into the depth of the CSK and not just the cortical membrane. When magnetic measurements were carried out using cells whose membranes were disrupted and ATP stores depleted using saponin, CSK stiffness and apparent viscosity were found to rise by approximately 20%, whereas permanent deformation decreased by more than half. Addition of ATP (250 microM) under conditions that promote CSK tension generation in membrane-permeabilized cells resulted in decreases in CSK stiffness and apparent viscosity that could be detected within 2 min after ATP addition, before any measurable change in cell size.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  20. Cycling of soluble lead flow cells comprising a honeycomb-shaped positive electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oury, A.; Kirchev, A.; Bultel, Y.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, soluble lead/methanesulfonic acid flow cells comprising a 3-D honeycomb-shaped positive electrode sandwiched between two planar negative electrodes are tested under galvanostatic cycling. Two types of materials are used for the honeycomb: homemade vitreous carbon/carbon composite and graphite. The cells comprising the C/C composite substrate shows a poor cyclability with coulombic and energy efficiencies below 80% and 50%, respectively, as well as a very limited lifetime. After a few tens of cycles, the cells cannot be discharged any longer due to the emergence of overvoltages associated with the passivation of the positive electrode in the discharged states. Using the graphite-based electrode, the cyclability is considerably improved: efficiencies of 95% in charge and 75% in energy are obtained, a hundred of cycles can be achieved and no passivation is observed. The cycle life of the cell is, however, limited by lead dendrite-like formation at the negative plates. Finally, this study shows that the incorporation of fluoride ions into the electrolyte improves greatly the adhesion of PbO2 on the positive electrode surface upon cycling.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of cuprous oxide solar cell with net-shaped counter electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basuki, Stefanus; Uranus, Henri P.; Pangaribuan, Julinda

    2015-01-01

    In this work, simple solar cells using cuprous oxide were fabricated and characterized. The solar cells in this experiment used cuprous oxide plate as detecting electrode and copper wires which were woven into a net-shape with a gap size of 2 x 2 cm as a counter electrode. Twenty samples of solar cells were fabricated with oxide layer which were thermally grown in temperature up to 550 oC. Samples with variations in oxidation time (15 minutes, 30 minutes, 40 minutes, and 45 minutes) and distance between electrodes (2 cm, 3 cm, and 4 cm) with an electrolyte solution of NaCl with molarity of 2.188 mol/l were produced. The samples were characterized by measuring their V-I curve. For this purpose, a simple, own-made solar simulator were fabricated and characterized. Using curve fitting technique, parameters such as FF (Fill Factor), efficiency, open circuit voltage, short circuit current, internal resistance, and performance degradation as a function of time of the cells were extracted. The result shows optimum efficiency of 4.573. 10-4%, while optimum oxidation time is 40 minutes and optimum distance between electrodes is 3 cm.

  2. How traditions of ethical reasoning and institutional processes shape stem cell research in Britain.

    PubMed

    Hauskeller, Christine

    2004-10-01

    This article aims to show how the traditions of ethical reasoning and policy-making shape stem cell research in Britain. To do so I give a detailed account of the earlier developments of regulations on embryo research and the specific scientific advances made in Britain. The subsequent regulation of stem cell research was largely predetermined by those structures and the different and partly opposing orientations of a utilitarian approach to policies on biomedicine. The setting up of the first stem cell bank and the directing of public funding into not only bioethical but also sociological guidance of the development of the new science field are aspects of the particular British way of supporting stem cell research. However, there is also an ongoing philosophical and juridical debate on the possible erosion of fundamental values caused by incremental regulatory weakening. Although I am highly sympathetic to the critical position that there is a need for a metaphysical anchor to secure individual human rights, one has to admit that the British mode of handling the inevitable ethical problems we face with biomedical progress is rather successful in terms of securing some of the basic needs and values of a modern democratic society. PMID:15545114

  3. Chimeric Protein Template-Induced Shape Control of Bone Mineral Nanoparticles and Its Impact on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yifan; Du, Yinying; Liu, Haoming; Zhu, Ye; Mao, Chuanbin; Zhang, Shengmin

    2016-01-01

    Protein-mediated molecular self-assembly has become a powerful strategy to fabricate biomimetic biomaterials with controlled shapes. Here we designed a novel chimeric molecular template made of two proteins, silk fibroin (SF) and albumin (ALB), which serve as a promoter and an inhibitor for hydroxyapatite (HA) formation, respectively, to synthesize HA nanoparticles with controlled shapes. HA nanospheres were produced by the chimeric ALB-SF template, whereas HA nanorods were generated by the SF template alone. The success in controlling the shape of HA nanoparticles allowed us to further study the effect of the shape of HA nanoparticles on the fate of rat mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). We found that the nanoparticle shape had a crucial impact on the cellular uptake and HA nanospheres were internalized in MSCs at a faster rate. Both HA nanospheres and nanorods showed no significant influence on cell proliferation and migration. However, HA nanospheres significantly promoted the osteoblastic differentiation of MSCs in comparison to HA nanorods. Our work suggests that a chimeric combination of promoter and inhibitor proteins is a promising approach to tuning the shape of nanoparticles. It also sheds new light into the role of the shape of the HA nanoparticles in directing stem cell fate. PMID:26079683

  4. Exogenous gangliosides may affect methylation mechanisms in neuronal cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Ferret, B.; Hubsch, A.; Dreyfus, H.; Massarelli, R. )

    1991-02-01

    Primary neurons in culture from chick embryo cerebral hemispheres were treated with a mixture of gangliosides added to the growth medium (final concentration: 10(-5)M and 10(-8)M) from the 3rd to the 6th day in vitro. Under these conditions methylation processes measured with (3H) and (35S) methionine and (3H)ethanolamine as precursors showed an increased methylation of (3H)ethanolamine containing phospholipids, a correspondent increased conversion of these compounds to (3H)choline containing phospholipids, and a general increased methylation of trichloroacetic acid precipitable macromolecules containing labeled methionine. A small increase in protein synthesis was observed after incubation of neurons with (3H)- and (35S)methionine. This was confirmed after electrophoretic separation of a protein extract with increased 3H- and 35S-labeling in protein bands with moecular weights between 50 and 60 KDaltons. A protein band of about 55 KDaltons appeared to be preferentially labelled when (3H) methionine was the precursor. The treatment with gangliosides increased the incorporation of (methyl-3H) label after incubation of neurons with (3H) methionine, into total DNA and decreased that of total RNA. The treatment of neurons in culture with exogenous gangliosides hence affects differently methylation processes, a finding which may confirm the involvement of gangliosides on the intracellular mediation of neuronal information mechanisms.

  5. Oryza sativa H+-ATPase (OSA) is Involved in the Regulation of Dumbbell-Shaped Guard Cells of Rice.

    PubMed

    Toda, Yosuke; Wang, Yin; Takahashi, Akira; Kawai, Yuya; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamaji, Naoki; Feng Ma, Jian; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-06-01

    The stomatal apparatus consists of a pair of guard cells and regulates gas exchange between the leaf and atmosphere. In guard cells, blue light (BL) activates H(+)-ATPase in the plasma membrane through the phosphorylation of its penultimate threonine, mediating stomatal opening. Although this regulation is thought to be widely adopted among kidney-shaped guard cells in dicots, the molecular basis underlying that of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocots remains unclear. Here, we show that H(+)-ATPases are involved in the regulation of dumbbell-shaped guard cells. Stomatal opening of rice was promoted by the H(+)-ATPase activator fusicoccin and by BL, and the latter was suppressed by the H(+)-ATPase inhibitor vanadate. Using H(+)-ATPase antibodies, we showed the presence of phosphoregulation of the penultimate threonine in Oryza sativa H(+)-ATPases (OSAs) and localization of OSAs in the plasma membrane of guard cells. Interestingly, we identified one H(+)-ATPase isoform, OSA7, that is preferentially expressed among the OSA genes in guard cells, and found that loss of function of OSA7 resulted in partial insensitivity to BL. We conclude that H(+)-ATPase is involved in BL-induced stomatal opening of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocotyledon species. PMID:27048369

  6. Impact of cell shape in hierarchically structured plant surfaces on the attachment of male Colorado potato beetles (Leptinotarsa decemlineata)

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Robin; Bohn, Holger Florian; Speck, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Summary Plant surfaces showing hierarchical structuring are frequently found in plant organs such as leaves, petals, fruits and stems. In our study we focus on the level of cell shape and on the level of superimposed microstructuring, leading to hierarchical surfaces if both levels are present. While it has been shown that epicuticular wax crystals and cuticular folds strongly reduce insect attachment, and that smooth papillate epidermal cells in petals improve the grip of pollinators, the impact of hierarchical surface structuring of plant surfaces possessing convex or papillate cells on insect attachment remains unclear. We performed traction experiments with male Colorado potato beetles on nine different plant surfaces with different structures. The selected plant surfaces showed epidermal cells with either tabular, convex or papillate cell shape, covered either with flat films of wax, epicuticular wax crystals or with cuticular folds. On surfaces possessing either superimposed wax crystals or cuticular folds we found traction forces to be almost one order of magnitude lower than on surfaces covered only with flat films of wax. Independent of superimposed microstructures we found that convex and papillate epidermal cell shapes slightly enhance the attachment ability of the beetles. Thus, in plant surfaces, cell shape and superimposed microstructuring yield contrary effects on the attachment of the Colorado potato beetle, with convex or papillate cells enhancing attachment and both wax crystals or cuticular folds reducing attachment. However, the overall magnitude of traction force mainly depends on the presence or absence of superimposed microstructuring. PMID:22428097

  7. Oryza sativa H+-ATPase (OSA) is Involved in the Regulation of Dumbbell-Shaped Guard Cells of Rice

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Yosuke; Wang, Yin; Takahashi, Akira; Kawai, Yuya; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamaji, Naoki; Feng Ma, Jian; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-01-01

    The stomatal apparatus consists of a pair of guard cells and regulates gas exchange between the leaf and atmosphere. In guard cells, blue light (BL) activates H+-ATPase in the plasma membrane through the phosphorylation of its penultimate threonine, mediating stomatal opening. Although this regulation is thought to be widely adopted among kidney-shaped guard cells in dicots, the molecular basis underlying that of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocots remains unclear. Here, we show that H+-ATPases are involved in the regulation of dumbbell-shaped guard cells. Stomatal opening of rice was promoted by the H+-ATPase activator fusicoccin and by BL, and the latter was suppressed by the H+-ATPase inhibitor vanadate. Using H+-ATPase antibodies, we showed the presence of phosphoregulation of the penultimate threonine in Oryza sativa H+-ATPases (OSAs) and localization of OSAs in the plasma membrane of guard cells. Interestingly, we identified one H+-ATPase isoform, OSA7, that is preferentially expressed among the OSA genes in guard cells, and found that loss of function of OSA7 resulted in partial insensitivity to BL. We conclude that H+-ATPase is involved in BL-induced stomatal opening of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocotyledon species. PMID:27048369

  8. Inner Membrane Protein YhcB Interacts with RodZ Involved in Cell Shape Maintenance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gaochi; Hamamoto, Kentaro; Kitakawa, Madoka

    2012-01-01

    Depletion of YhcB, an inner membrane protein of Escherichia coli, inhibited the growth of rodZ deletion mutant showing that the loss of both YhcB and RodZ is synthetically lethal. Furthermore, YhcB was demonstrated to interact with RodZ as well as several other proteins involved in cell shape maintenance and an inner membrane protein YciS of unknown function, using bacterial two-hybrid system. These observations seem to indicate that YhcB is involved in the biogenesis of cell envelope and the maintenance of cell shape together with RodZ.

  9. Sequential acquisition of cacophony calcium currents, sodium channels and voltage-dependent potassium currents affects spike shape and dendrite growth during postembryonic maturation of an identified Drosophila motoneuron

    PubMed Central

    Ryglewski, Stefanie; Kilo, Lukas; Duch, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    During metamorphosis the CNS undergoes profound changes to accommodate the switch from larval to adult behaviors. In Drosophila and other holometabolous insects, adult neurons differentiate either from respecified larval neurons, newly born neurons, or are born embryonically but remain developmentally arrested until differentiation during pupal life. This study addresses the latter in the identified Drosophila flight motoneuron 5. In situ patch-clamp recordings, intracellular dye fills and immunocytochemistry address the interplay between dendritic shape, excitability and ionic current development. During pupal life, changes in excitability and spike shape correspond to a stereotyped, progressive appearance of voltage-gated ion channels. High-voltage-activated calcium current is the first current to appear at pupal stage P4, prior to the onset of dendrite growth. This is followed by voltage-gated sodium as well as transient potassium channel expression, when first dendrites grow, and sodium-dependent action potentials can be evoked by somatic current injection. Sustained potassium current appears later than transient potassium current. During the early stages of rapid dendritic growth, sodium-dependent action potentials are broadened by a calcium component. Narrowing of spike shape coincides with sequential increases in transient and sustained potassium currents during stages when dendritic growth ceases. Targeted RNAi knockdown of pupal calcium current significantly reduces dendritic growth. These data indicate that the stereotyped sequential acquisition of different voltage-gated ion channels affects spike shape and excitability such that activity-dependent calcium influx serves as a partner of genetic programs during critical stages of motoneuron dendrite growth. PMID:24620836

  10. Shaping and preserving β-cell identity with microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Dumortier, O; Fabris, G; Van Obberghen, E

    2016-09-01

    The highly sophisticated identity of pancreatic β-cells is geared to accomplish its unique feat of providing insulin for organismal glucose and lipid homeostasis. This requires a particular and streamlined fuel metabolism which defines mature β-cells as glucose sensors linked to an insulin exocytosis machinery. The establishment of an appropriate β-cell mass and function during development as well as the maintenance of their identity throughout life are necessary for energy homeostasis. The small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), are now well-recognized regulators of gene transcripts, which in general are negatively affected by them. Convincing evidence exists to view miRNAs as major actors in β-cell development and function, suggesting an important role for them in the distinctive β-cell 'identity card'. Here, we summarize key features that associate miRNAs and the establishment of the appropriate β-cell identity and its necessary maintenance during their 'long life'. PMID:27615131

  11. Survivor needs or logistical convenience? Factors shaping decisions to deliver relief to earthquake-affected communities, Pakistan 2005-06.

    PubMed

    Benini, Aldo; Conley, Charles; Dittemore, Brody; Waksman, Zachary

    2009-03-01

    In Bureaucratizing the Good Samaritan, Waters (2001) argues that bureaucratic rationality distracts humanitarian agencies from the needs of the people they are supposed to assist, in favour of other values that their institutional frameworks dictate. We test his claim by investigating the response to the Pakistan 2005 earthquake. One of us (Dittemore) worked with the United Nations Joint Logistics Centre in the theatre, managing a relief cargo shipment database. The response, known as 'Operation Winter Race', was hampered by extreme logistical challenges, but ultimately succeeded in averting a second disaster resulting from cold and starvation. We use statistical models to probe whether survivor needs significantly guided decisions to deliver relief to affected communities. Needs assessments remained incomplete and incoherent. We measure needs through proxy indicators and integrate them, on a Geographic Information System (GIS) platform, with logistics and relief delivery data. We find that, despite strong logistics effects, needs orientations were significant. However, the strength of decision factors varies between commodity types (food versus clothing and shelter versus reconstruction materials) as well as over the different phases of the response. This study confirms Thomas's observation that logistics databases are rich 'repositories of data that can be analyzed to provide post-event learning' (Thomas, 2003, p. 4). This article is an invitation for others to engage in creative humanitarian data management. PMID:18513312

  12. Multiplied functions unify shapes of ganglion-cell receptive fields in retina of turtle.

    PubMed

    Dearworth, James R; Granda, A M

    2002-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells in the turtle were extracellularly recorded to define the shapes of their receptive fields by small moving light spots. To better define the geometries, spectral-light adaptations and vitreal injections of 2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (APB) were used to disrupt balances in field organization along dimensions of wavelength, ON and OFF responses, and center/surround areas. Three-dimensional data plots were fit by Gaussian, Gabor, and cardioid functions to show that the shapes of receptive fields are predicted by combinations of these multiplied functions. Results indicate that Gaussian functions describe simple symmetrical receptive fields that are center-only; Gabor functions describe center/surround color-opponent receptive fields that have a ring of spike activity in the periphery; and directionally selective receptive fields, in contrast, which are asymmetrical, are described by cardioid functions adjoined to Gaussian or Gabor functions. The advantage of linking multiplied functions is that receptive fields are unified by a model that predicts progressively more complex field geometries derived from particular stimulating conditions. PMID:12678583

  13. Natural dye sensitized TiO2 nanorods assembly of broccoli shape based solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yuvapragasam, Akila; Muthukumarasamy, N; Agilan, S; Velauthapillai, Dhayalan; Senthil, T S; Sundaram, Senthilarasu

    2015-07-01

    TiO2 nanorods based thin films with rutile phase have been synthesized using template free low temperature hydrothermal method. The scanning electron microscope images showed that the prepared TiO2 samples were made of TiO2 nanorods and the nanorods had arranged by itself to form a broccoli like shape. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the prepared TiO2 samples exhibit rutile phase. The grown TiO2 nanorods had been sensitized using the flowers of Sesbania (S) grandiflora, leaves of Camellia (C) sinensis and roots of Rubia (R) tinctorum. Dye sensitized solar cells had been fabricated using the natural dye sensitized TiO2 nanorods based thin film photoelectrode and the open circuit voltage and short circuit current density were found to lie in the range of 0.45-0.6 V and 5.6-6.4 mA/cm(2) respectively. The photovoltaic performance of all the fabricated natural dye sensitized TiO2 solar cells indicate that natural dyes have the potential to be used as effective sensitizer in dye sensitized solar cells. PMID:25974906

  14. Size, Shape, and Arrangement of Cellulose Microfibril in Higher Plant Cell Walls

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, S. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell walls from maize (Zea mays L.) are imaged using atomic force microscopy (AFM) at the sub-nanometer resolution. We found that the size and shape of fundamental cellulose elementary fibril (CEF) is essentially identical in different cell wall types, i.e., primary wall (PW), parenchyma secondary wall (pSW), and sclerenchyma secondary wall (sSW), which is consistent with previously proposed 36-chain model (Ding et al., 2006, J. Agric. Food Chem.). The arrangement of individual CEFs in these wall types exhibits two orientations. In PW, CEFs are horizontally associated through their hydrophilic faces, and the planar faces are exposed, forming ribbon-like macrofibrils. In pSW and sSW, CEFs are vertically oriented, forming layers, in which hemicelluloses are interacted with the hydrophobic faces of the CEF and serve as spacers between CEFs. Lignification occurs between CEF-hemicelluloses layers in secondary walls. Furthermore, we demonstrated quantitative analysis of plant cell wall accessibility to and digestibility by different cellulase systems at real-time using chemical imaging (e.g., stimulated Raman scattering) and fluorescence microscopy of labeled cellulases (Ding et al., 2012, Science, in press).

  15. Tension, cell shape and triple-junction angle anisotropy in the Drosophila germband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacy, Monica; Hutson, M. Shane; Meyer, Christian; McDonald, Xena

    In the field of tissue mechanics, the embryonic development of Drosophila melanogaster offers many opportunities for study. One of Drosophila's most crucial morphogenetic stages is the retraction of an epithelial tissue called the germband. During retraction, the segments of the retracting germband, as well as the individual germband cells, elongate in response to forces from a connected tissue, the amnioserosa. Modeling of this elongation, based on tissue responses to laser wounding, has plotted the internal germband tension against the external amnioserosa stress, creating a phase space to determine points and regions corresponding to stable elongation. Although the resulting fits indicate a necessary opposition of internal and external forces, they are inconclusive regarding the exact balance. We will present results testing the model predictions by measuring cell shapes and the correlations between cell-edge directions and triple-junction angles. These measures resolve the ambiguity in pinpointing the internal-external force balance for each germband segment. Research was supported by NIH Grant Numbers 1R01GM099107 and 1R21AR068933.

  16. Ferrofluid patterns in Hele-Shaw cells: Exact, stable, stationary shape solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lira, Sérgio A.; Miranda, José A.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a quasi-two-dimensional system composed of an initially circular ferrofluid droplet surrounded by a nonmagnetic fluid of higher density. These immiscible fluids flow in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell, under the influence of an in-plane radial magnetic field. We focus on the situation in which destabilizing bulk magnetic field effects are balanced by stabilizing centrifugal forces. In this framing, we consider the interplay of capillary and magnetic normal traction effects in determining the fluid-fluid interface morphology. By employing a vortex-sheet formalism, we have been able to find a family of exact stationary N -fold polygonal shape solutions for the interface. A weakly nonlinear theory is then used to verify that such exact interfacial solutions are in fact stable.

  17. A Single-Use Paper-Shaped Microbial Fuel Cell for Rapid Aqueous Biosensing.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Kuichang; Liu, Han; Zhang, Qiaoying; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia; Vecitis, Chad D

    2015-06-22

    The traditional chamber-based microbial fuel cell (MFC) often has the disadvantages of high ohmic resistance, large volume requirements, and delayed start-up. In this study, paper-shaped MFCs utilizing a porous carbon anode, a solid Ag2 O-coated carbon cathode, and a micrometer-thin porous polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) separator are investigated to address the classical MFC issues. The Ag2 O-coated cathode has a low overpotential of 0.06 V at a reducing current of 1 mA compared to a Pt-air cathode. Rapid inoculation by filtration results in an instantaneous power density of 92 mW m(-2) with an internal resistance of 162 Ω. Integrated current over the first 30 min of operation has a linear relation with microbial concentration. PMID:26013975

  18. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived fiber-shaped cardiac tissue on a chip.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Y; Mori, S; Sakai, F; Takeuchi, S

    2016-06-21

    We propose a method for the production of a fiber-shaped three-dimensional (3D) cellular construct of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs) for the quantification of the contractile force. By culturing the cardiomyocytes in a patterned hydrogel structure with fixed edges, we succeeded in fabricating hiPS-CM fibers with aligned cardiomyocytes. The fiber generated contractile force along the fiber direction due to the hiPS-CM alignment, and we were able to measure its contractile force accurately. Furthermore, to demonstrate the drug reactivity of hiPS-CM fibers, the changes in the contractile frequency and force following treatment with isoproterenol and propranolol were observed. We believe that hiPS-CM fibers will be a useful tool for pharmacokinetic analyses during drug development. PMID:27217209

  19. Ferrofluid patterns in Hele-Shaw cells: Exact, stable, stationary shape solutions.

    PubMed

    Lira, Sérgio A; Miranda, José A

    2016-01-01

    We investigate a quasi-two-dimensional system composed of an initially circular ferrofluid droplet surrounded by a nonmagnetic fluid of higher density. These immiscible fluids flow in a rotating Hele-Shaw cell, under the influence of an in-plane radial magnetic field. We focus on the situation in which destabilizing bulk magnetic field effects are balanced by stabilizing centrifugal forces. In this framing, we consider the interplay of capillary and magnetic normal traction effects in determining the fluid-fluid interface morphology. By employing a vortex-sheet formalism, we have been able to find a family of exact stationary N-fold polygonal shape solutions for the interface. A weakly nonlinear theory is then used to verify that such exact interfacial solutions are in fact stable. PMID:26871176

  20. SHAPE SELECTIVE NANO-CATALYSTS: TOWARD DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Murph, S.

    2010-06-16

    A series of bimetallic core-shell-alloy type Au-Pt nanomaterials with various morphologies, aspect ratios and compositions, were produced in a heterogenous epitaxial fashion. Gold nanoparticles with well-controlled particle size and shape, e.g. spheres, rods and cubes, were used as 'seeds' for platinum growth in the presence of a mild reducing agent, ascorbic acid and a cationic surfactant cethyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). The reactions take place in air and water, and are quick, economical and amenable for scaling up. The synthesized nanocatalysts were characterized by electron microscopy techniques and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Nafion membranes were embedded with the Au-Pt nanomaterials and analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for their potential in direct methanol fuel cells applications.

  1. Effects of Epidermal Cell Shape and Pigmentation on Optical Properties of Antirrhinum Petals at Visible and Ultraviolet Wavelengths.

    PubMed Central

    Gorton, H. L.; Vogelmann, T. C.

    1996-01-01

    We used the Mixta+ and mixta- lines of Antirrhinum majus as a model system to investigate the effects of epidermal cell shape and pigmentation on tissue optical properties in the visible and ultraviolet (UV) spectral regions. Adaxial epidermal cells of Mixta+ flowers have a conical-papillate shape; in the mixta- line the cells are slightly domed. Mixta+ cells contained significantly more anthocyanin and other flavonoids than mixta- cells when plants were grown under either high- or low-UV conditions. Mixta+ cells focused light (3.5-4.7 times incident) within their pigmented interiors, whereas mixta- cells focused light (2.1-2.7 times incident) in the unpigmented mesophyll. UV light penetrated the epidermis (commonly 20-50% transmittance at 312 nm) mainly through the unpigmented peripheral regions of the cells that were similar for the two lines, so that overall penetration through Mixta+ and mixta- epidermises was equal. However, maximum UV absorption in the central region of epidermal cells was slightly greater in Mixta+ than mixta-, and intact Mixta+ flowers reflected less light in the spectral regions with intermediate flavonoid absorbance. In both cases, about 50 to 75% of the difference could be attributed to cell shape and resulting changes in the optical pathlength or focusing. PMID:12226425

  2. Factors Affecting the Development of Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer Embryos in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    AKAGI, Satoshi; MATSUKAWA, Kazutsugu; TAKAHASHI, Seiya

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear transfer is a complex multistep procedure that includes oocyte maturation, cell cycle synchronization of donor cells, enucleation, cell fusion, oocyte activation and embryo culture. Therefore, many factors are believed to contribute to the success of embryo development following nuclear transfer. Numerous attempts to improve cloning efficiency have been conducted since the birth of the first sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, the efficiency of somatic cell cloning has remained low, and applications have been limited. In this review, we discuss some of the factors that affect the developmental ability of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in cattle. PMID:25341701

  3. Peptidoglycan ld-Carboxypeptidase Pgp2 Influences Campylobacter jejuni Helical Cell Shape and Pathogenic Properties and Provides the Substrate for the dl-Carboxypeptidase Pgp1*

    PubMed Central

    Frirdich, Emilisa; Vermeulen, Jenny; Biboy, Jacob; Soares, Fraser; Taveirne, Michael E.; Johnson, Jeremiah G.; DiRita, Victor J.; Girardin, Stephen E.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Gaynor, Erin C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the importance of Campylobacter jejuni as a pathogen, little is known about the fundamental aspects of its peptidoglycan (PG) structure and factors modulating its helical morphology. A PG dl-carboxypeptidase Pgp1 essential for maintenance of C. jejuni helical shape was recently identified. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the CJJ81176_0915 gene product as co-occurring with Pgp1 in several organisms. Deletion of cjj81176_0915 (renamed pgp2) resulted in straight morphology, representing the second C. jejuni gene affecting cell shape. The PG structure of a Δpgp2 mutant showed an increase in tetrapeptide-containing muropeptides and a complete absence of tripeptides, consistent with ld-carboxypeptidase activity, which was confirmed biochemically. PG analysis of a Δpgp1Δpgp2 double mutant demonstrated that Pgp2 activity is required to generate the tripeptide substrate for Pgp1. Loss of pgp2 affected several pathogenic properties; the deletion strain was defective for motility in semisolid agar, biofilm formation, and fluorescence on calcofluor white. Δpgp2 PG also caused decreased stimulation of the human nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (Nod1) proinflammatory mediator in comparison with wild type, as expected from the reduction in muropeptide tripeptides (the primary Nod1 agonist) in the mutant; however, these changes did not alter the ability of the Δpgp2 mutant strain to survive within human epithelial cells or to elicit secretion of IL-8 from epithelial cells after infection. The pgp2 mutant also showed significantly reduced fitness in a chick colonization model. Collectively, these analyses enhance our understanding of C. jejuni PG maturation and help to clarify how PG structure and cell shape impact pathogenic attributes. PMID:24394413

  4. Viscoelastic Retraction of Single Living Stress Fibers and Its Impact on Cell Shape, Cytoskeletal Organization, and Extracellular Matrix Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjay; Maxwell, Iva Z.; Heisterkamp, Alexander; Polte, Thomas R.; Lele, Tanmay P.; Salanga, Matthew; Mazur, Eric; Ingber, Donald E.

    2006-01-01

    Cells change their form and function by assembling actin stress fibers at their base and exerting traction forces on their extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesions. Individual stress fibers are thought to be actively tensed by the action of actomyosin motors and to function as elastic cables that structurally reinforce the basal portion of the cytoskeleton; however, these principles have not been directly tested in living cells, and their significance for overall cell shape control is poorly understood. Here we combine a laser nanoscissor, traction force microscopy, and fluorescence photobleaching methods to confirm that stress fibers in living cells behave as viscoelastic cables that are tensed through the action of actomyosin motors, to quantify their retraction kinetics in situ, and to explore their contribution to overall mechanical stability of the cell and interconnected ECM. These studies reveal that viscoelastic recoil of individual stress fibers after laser severing is partially slowed by inhibition of Rho-associated kinase and virtually abolished by direct inhibition of myosin light chain kinase. Importantly, cells cultured on stiff ECM substrates can tolerate disruption of multiple stress fibers with negligible overall change in cell shape, whereas disruption of a single stress fiber in cells anchored to compliant ECM substrates compromises the entire cellular force balance, induces cytoskeletal rearrangements, and produces ECM retraction many microns away from the site of incision; this results in large-scale changes of cell shape (> 5% elongation). In addition to revealing fundamental insight into the mechanical properties and cell shape contributions of individual stress fibers and confirming that the ECM is effectively a physical extension of the cell and cytoskeleton, the technologies described here offer a novel approach to spatially map the cytoskeletal mechanics of living cells on the nanoscale. PMID:16500961

  5. Cell adhesion property affected by cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase: Opto-electric approach.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang Kyoung; Sukhthankar, Mugdha; Kim, Chul-Ho; Lee, Seong-Ho; English, Anthony; Kihm, Kenneth D; Baek, Seung Joon

    2010-01-15

    Expression of cyclooxygenases (COX) and lipoxygenases (LOX) has been linked to many pathophysiological phenotypes, including cell adhesion. However, many current approaches to measure cellular changes are performed only in a fixed-time point. Since cells dynamically move in conjunction with the cell matrix, there is a pressing need for dynamic or time-dependent methods for the investigation of cell properties. In the presented study, we used stable human colorectal cancer cell lines ectopically expressing COX-1, COX-2, and 15LOX-1, to investigate whether expression of COX-1, COX-2, or 15LOX-1 would affect cell adhesion using our opto-electric methodology. In a fixed-time point experiment, only COX-1- and COX-2-expressing cells enhanced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, but all the transfected cells showed invasion activity. However, in a real-time experiment using opto-electric approaches, transmitted cellular morphology was much different with tight adhesion being shown in COX-2 expressing cells, as imaged by differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM) and interference reflection contrast microscopy (IRCM). Furthermore, micro-impedance measurements showed a continued increase in both resistance and reactance of COX- and LOX-transfected cells, consistent with the imaging data. Our data indicate that both COX- and LOX-expressing cells have strong cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate adhesions, and that cell imaging analysis with cell impedance data generates fully reliable results on cell adhesion measurement. PMID:20026301

  6. Glyceroglycolipids Affect Uptake of Carotenoids Solubilized in Mixed Micelles by Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kotake-Nara, Eiichi; Yonekura, Lina; Nagao, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    We previously reported that phospholipids markedly affected the uptake of carotenoids solubilized in mixed micelles by human intestinal Caco-2 cells. In the present study, we found that two classes of dietary glyceroglycolipids and the corresponding lysoglyceroglycolipids affected uptake of β-carotene and lutein by differentiated Caco-2 cells. The levels of carotenoid uptake from micelles containing digalactosyldiacylglycerol or sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol were significantly lower than that from control micelles. On the other hand, the uptakes from micelles containing digalactosylmonoacylglycerol or sulfoquinovosylmonoacylglycerol were significantly higher than that from control micelles. In dispersed cells and Caco-2 cells with poor cell-to-cell adhesion, however, the levels of uptake from micelles containing these lyso-lipids were much lower than that from control micelles. The uptake levels from control micelles were markedly decreased depending on the development of cell-to-cell/cell-matrix adhesion in Caco-2 cells, but the uptake levels from the micelles containing these lyso-lipids were not substantially changed, suggesting that the intercellular barrier formed by cell-to-cell/cell-matrix adhesion inhibited the uptake from control micelles, but not from the lyso-lipid-containing micelles. The lyso-lipids appeared to enhance carotenoid uptake by decreasing the intercellular barrier integrity. The results showed that some types of glyceroglycolipids have the potential to modify the intestinal uptake of carotenoids. PMID:26012480

  7. [Do the island neurons of regio entorhinalis belong to the class of pyramid or star-shaped cells?].

    PubMed

    Braak, H; Braak, E; Strenge, H

    1976-01-01

    In the vicinity of the collateral sulcus the cellular islands of the entorhinal region (lamina alpha of the outer principal layer = Pre-alpha) fuse, forming a cellular plate which runs obliquely through the outer laminae. Finally, the cellular elements of Pre-alpha lie in between the third and the fourth layer of the isocortex. The islands are mainly composed of star-shaped nerve cells with thorny dendrites and an axon extending into the white matter. Within the reaches of the oblique plate the shape of these cellular elements underlies an alteration. Apical and basal dendrites become more and more recognizable, the cell body gains the shape of a pyramid. For this reason, we consider the star-shaped neurons of the islands to be modified pyramidal cells. They are compared with the genuine star cells (Golgi-II-cells) of the layer. Distinguishing characteristics not only of the Golgi- but also of the pigment-picture allow the unequivocal distinction between the modified pyramids and the Golgi-II-cells. PMID:801848

  8. The sodium channel band shapes the response to electric stimulation in retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, J; Tang, S; Molnar, A; Desai, N J; Fried, S I

    2011-01-01

    To improve the quality of prosthetic vision, it is desirable to understand how targeted retinal neurons respond to stimulation. Unfortunately, the factors that shape the response of a single neuron to stimulation are not well understood. A dense band of voltage gated sodium channels within the proximal axon of retinal ganglion cells is the site most sensitive to electric stimulation, suggesting that band properties are likely to influence the response to stimulation. Here, we examined how three band properties influence sensitivity using a morphologically realistic ganglion cell model in NEURON. Longer bands were more sensitive to short-duration pulses than shorter bands and increasing the distance between band and soma also increased sensitivity. Simulations using the known limits of band length and location resulted in a sensitivity difference of approximately two. Additional simulations tested how changes to sodium channel conductance within the band influenced threshold and found that the sensitivity difference increased to a factor of nearly three. This is close to the factor of 5 difference measured in physiological studies suggesting that band properties contribute significantly to the sensitivity differences found between different types of retinal neurons. PMID:21558602

  9. Cell volume and shape oscillations in rat type-II somatotrophs at hypotonic conditions.

    PubMed

    Engström, K G; Sävendahl, L

    1995-05-01

    The size and shape of growth hormone (GH)-producing rat type-II somatotrophs was studied during osmotic manipulation. When somatotrophs were exposed to large osmotic stress (200 and 225 mOsm), the peak projected cell area (PCA) was 132.9% +/- 12.6% and 116.8% +/- 2.8% (P < 0.01) and triggered a regulatory volume decrease (RVD) to avoid lysis. At lower osmotic stress (250 mOsm), the rate of swelling was slower, and the volume reached a steady state at 109.4% +/- 2.4% (P < 0.05) and was without RVD. At 275 and 287 mOsm, the swelling was delayed [PCA peak at 3-4 min; 105.8% +/- 1.5% (P < 0.05) and 104.2% +/- 1.7%] and then showed repeated synchronized cycles of swelling and shrink-age (P < 0.05). The data suggest that somatotrophs may have more than one mechanism for volume regulation. One mechanism is for large swelling (classic RVD response), whereas the other represents more physiological mechanisms for regulating the cell volume within a more limited geometry range. For low osmotic stress (250-287 mOsm), the somatotrophs became less spherical during swelling and, thus, were without membrane dilation. Therefore, this type of volume regulation must work independently from membrane stress. Related volume regulation mechanisms may underlie the previously observed volume fluctuations in somatotrophs seen during secretory stimulation with GH-releasing hormone. PMID:7600901

  10. Two Putative Polysaccharide Deacetylases Are Required for Osmotic Stability and Cell Shape Maintenance in Bacillus anthracis*

    PubMed Central

    Arnaouteli, Sofia; Giastas, Petros; Andreou, Athina; Tzanodaskalaki, Mary; Aldridge, Christine; Tzartos, Socrates J.; Vollmer, Waldemar; Eliopoulos, Elias; Bouriotis, Vassilis

    2015-01-01

    Membrane-anchored lipoproteins have a broad range of functions and play key roles in several cellular processes in Gram-positive bacteria. BA0330 and BA0331 are the only lipoproteins among the 11 known or putative polysaccharide deacetylases of Bacillus anthracis. We found that both lipoproteins exhibit unique characteristics. BA0330 and BA0331 interact with peptidoglycan, and BA0330 is important for the adaptation of the bacterium to grow in the presence of a high concentration of salt, whereas BA0331 contributes to the maintenance of a uniform cell shape. They appear not to alter the peptidoglycan structure and do not contribute to lysozyme resistance. The high resolution x-ray structure of BA0330 revealed a C-terminal domain with the typical fold of a carbohydrate esterase 4 and an N-terminal domain unique for this family, composed of a two-layered (4 + 3) β-sandwich with structural similarity to fibronectin type 3 domains. Our data suggest that BA0330 and BA0331 have a structural role in stabilizing the cell wall of B. anthracis. PMID:25825488

  11. Two Putative Polysaccharide Deacetylases Are Required for Osmotic Stability and Cell Shape Maintenance in Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Arnaouteli, Sofia; Giastas, Petros; Andreou, Athina; Tzanodaskalaki, Mary; Aldridge, Christine; Tzartos, Socrates J; Vollmer, Waldemar; Eliopoulos, Elias; Bouriotis, Vassilis

    2015-05-22

    Membrane-anchored lipoproteins have a broad range of functions and play key roles in several cellular processes in Gram-positive bacteria. BA0330 and BA0331 are the only lipoproteins among the 11 known or putative polysaccharide deacetylases of Bacillus anthracis. We found that both lipoproteins exhibit unique characteristics. BA0330 and BA0331 interact with peptidoglycan, and BA0330 is important for the adaptation of the bacterium to grow in the presence of a high concentration of salt, whereas BA0331 contributes to the maintenance of a uniform cell shape. They appear not to alter the peptidoglycan structure and do not contribute to lysozyme resistance. The high resolution x-ray structure of BA0330 revealed a C-terminal domain with the typical fold of a carbohydrate esterase 4 and an N-terminal domain unique for this family, composed of a two-layered (4 + 3) β-sandwich with structural similarity to fibronectin type 3 domains. Our data suggest that BA0330 and BA0331 have a structural role in stabilizing the cell wall of B. anthracis. PMID:25825488

  12. Plasmolysis and cell shape depend on solute outer-membrane permeability during hyperosmotic shock in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Pilizota, Teuta; Shaevitz, Joshua W

    2013-06-18

    The concentration of chemicals inside the bacterial cytoplasm generates an osmotic pressure, termed turgor, which inflates the cell and is necessary for cell growth and survival. In Escherichia coli, a sudden increase in external concentration causes a pressure drop across the cell envelope that drives changes in cell shape, such as plasmolysis, where the inner and outer membranes separate. Here, we use fluorescence imaging of single cells during hyperosmotic shock with a time resolution on the order of seconds to examine the response of cells to a range of different conditions. We show that shock using an outer-membrane impermeable solute results in total cell volume reduction with no plasmolysis, whereas a shock caused by outer-membrane permeable ions causes plasmolysis immediately upon shock. Slowly permeable solutes, such as sucrose, which cross the membrane in minutes, cause plasmolysis to occur gradually as the chemical potential equilibrates. In addition, we quantify the detailed morphological changes to cell shape during osmotic shock. Nonplasmolyzed cells shrink in length with an additional lateral size reduction as the magnitude of the shock increases. Quickly plasmolyzing cells shrink largely at the poles, whereas gradually plasmolyzing cells invaginate along the cell cylinder. Our results give a comprehensive picture of the initial response of E. coli to hyperosmotic shock and offer explanations for seemingly opposing results that have been reported previously. PMID:23790382

  13. Cell proliferation, cell shape, and microtubule and cellulose microfibril organization of tobacco BY-2 cells are not altered by exposure to near weightlessness in space.

    PubMed

    Sieberer, Björn J; Kieft, Henk; Franssen-Verheijen, Tiny; Emons, Anne Mie C; Vos, Jan W

    2009-11-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton and the cell wall both play key roles in plant cell growth and division, determining the plant's final stature. At near weightlessness, tubulin polymerizes into microtubules in vitro, but these microtubules do not self-organize in the ordered patterns observed at 1g. Likewise, at near weightlessness cortical microtubules in protoplasts have difficulty organizing into parallel arrays, which are required for proper plant cell elongation. However, intact plants do grow in space and therefore should have a normally functioning microtubule cytoskeleton. Since the main difference between protoplasts and plant cells in a tissue is the presence of a cell wall, we studied single, but walled, tobacco BY-2 suspension-cultured cells during an 8-day space-flight experiment on board of the Soyuz capsule and the International Space Station during the 12S mission (March-April 2006). We show that the cortical microtubule density, ordering and orientation in isolated walled plant cells are unaffected by near weightlessness, as are the orientation of the cellulose microfibrils, cell proliferation, and cell shape. Likely, tissue organization is not essential for the organization of these structures in space. When combined with the fact that many recovering protoplasts have an aberrant cortical microtubule cytoskeleton, the results suggest a role for the cell wall, or its production machinery, in structuring the microtubule cytoskeleton. PMID:19756725

  14. Advanced Ring-Shaped Microelectrode Assay Combined with Small Rectangular Electrode for Quasi-In vivo Measurement of Cell-to-Cell Conductance in Cardiomyocyte Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Fumimasa; Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Hamada, Tomoyo; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2013-06-01

    To predict the risk of fatal arrhythmia induced by cardiotoxicity in the highly complex human heart system, we have developed a novel quasi-in vivo electrophysiological measurement assay, which combines a ring-shaped human cardiomyocyte network and a set of two electrodes that form a large single ring-shaped electrode for the direct measurement of irregular cell-to-cell conductance occurrence in a cardiomyocyte network, and a small rectangular microelectrode for forced pacing of cardiomyocyte beating and for acquiring the field potential waveforms of cardiomyocytes. The advantages of this assay are as follows. The electrophysiological signals of cardiomyocytes in the ring-shaped network are superimposed directly on a single loop-shaped electrode, in which the information of asynchronous behavior of cell-to-cell conductance are included, without requiring a set of huge numbers of microelectrode arrays, a set of fast data conversion circuits, or a complex analysis in a computer. Another advantage is that the small rectangular electrode can control the position and timing of forced beating in a ring-shaped human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPS)-derived cardiomyocyte network and can also acquire the field potentials of cardiomyocytes. First, we constructed the human iPS-derived cardiomyocyte ring-shaped network on the set of two electrodes, and acquired the field potential signals of particular cardiomyocytes in the ring-shaped cardiomyocyte network during simultaneous acquisition of the superimposed signals of whole-cardiomyocyte networks representing cell-to-cell conduction. Using the small rectangular electrode, we have also evaluated the response of the cell network to electrical stimulation. The mean and SD of the minimum stimulation voltage required for pacing (VMin) at the small rectangular electrode was 166+/-74 mV, which is the same as the magnitude of amplitude for the pacing using the ring-shaped electrode (179+/-33 mV). The results showed that the

  15. Eu/Tb codoped spindle-shaped fluorinated hydroxyapatite nanoparticles for dual-color cell imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Baojin; Zhang, Shan; Qiu, Jichuan; Li, Jianhua; Sang, Yuanhua; Xia, Haibing; Jiang, Huaidong; Claverie, Jerome; Liu, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Lanthanide doped fluorinated hydroxyapatite (FAp) nanoparticles are promising cell imaging nanomaterials but they are excited at wavelengths which do not match the light sources usually found in a commercial confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). In this work, we have successfully prepared spindle-shaped Eu/Tb codoped FAp nanoparticles by a hydrothermal method. Compared with single Eu doped FAp, Eu/Tb codoped FAp can be excited by a 488 nm laser, and exhibit both green and red light emission. By changing the amounts of Eu and Tb peaks, the emission in the green region (500-580 nm) can be decreased to the benefit of the emission in the red region (580-720 nm), thus reaching a balanced dual color emission. Using MC3T3-E1 cells co-cultured with Eu/Tb codoped FAp nanoparticles, it is observed that the nanoparticles are cytocompatible even at a concentration as high as 800 μg ml-1. The Eu/Tb codoped FAp nanoparticles are located in the cytoplasm and can be monitored by dual color--green and red imaging with a single excitation light at 488 nm. At a concentration of 200 μg ml-1, the cytoplasm is saturated in 8 hours, and Eu/Tb codoped FAp nanoparticles retain their fluorescence for at least 3 days. The cytocompatible Eu/Tb codoped FAp nanoparticles with unique dual color emission will be of great use for cell and tissue imaging.Lanthanide doped fluorinated hydroxyapatite (FAp) nanoparticles are promising cell imaging nanomaterials but they are excited at wavelengths which do not match the light sources usually found in a commercial confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). In this work, we have successfully prepared spindle-shaped Eu/Tb codoped FAp nanoparticles by a hydrothermal method. Compared with single Eu doped FAp, Eu/Tb codoped FAp can be excited by a 488 nm laser, and exhibit both green and red light emission. By changing the amounts of Eu and Tb peaks, the emission in the green region (500-580 nm) can be decreased to the benefit of the emission in the

  16. Structural basis for the recognition of muramyltripeptide by Helicobacter pylori Csd4, a d,l-carboxypeptidase controlling the helical cell shape

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyoun Sook; Kim, Jieun; Im, Ha Na; An, Doo Ri; Lee, Mijoon; Hesek, Dusan; Mobashery, Shahriar; Kim, Jin Young; Cho, Kun; Yoon, Hye Jin; Han, Byung Woo; Lee, Byung Il; Suh, Se Won

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection causes a variety of gastrointestinal diseases, including peptic ulcers and gastric cancer. Its colonization of the gastric mucosa of the human stomach is a prerequisite for survival in the stomach. Colonization depends on its motility, which is facilitated by the helical shape of the bacterium. In H. pylori, cross-linking relaxation or trimming of peptidoglycan muropeptides affects the helical cell shape. Csd4 has been identified as one of the cell shape-determining peptidoglycan hydrolases in H. pylori. It is a Zn2+-dependent d,l-carboxypeptidase that cleaves the bond between the γ-d-Glu and the mDAP of the non-cross-linked muramyl­tripeptide (muramyl-l-Ala-γ-d-Glu-mDAP) of the peptidoglycan to produce the muramyldipeptide (muramyl-l-Ala-γ-d-Glu) and mDAP. Here, the crystal structure of H. pylori Csd4 (HP1075 in strain 26695) is reported in three different states: the ligand-unbound form, the substrate-bound form and the product-bound form. H. pylori Csd4 consists of three domains: an N-terminal d,l-carboxypeptidase domain with a typical carboxy­peptidase fold, a central β-barrel domain with a novel fold and a C-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain. The d,l-carboxypeptidase domain recognizes the substrate by interacting primarily with the terminal mDAP moiety of the muramyltripeptide. It undergoes a significant structural change upon binding either mDAP or the mDAP-containing muramyl­tripeptide. It it also shown that Csd5, another cell-shape determinant in H. pylori, is capable of interacting not only with H. pylori Csd4 but also with the dipeptide product of the reaction catalyzed by Csd4. PMID:25372672

  17. Deficiency of the Planar Cell Polarity Protein Vangl2 in Podocytes Affects Glomerular Morphogenesis and Increases Susceptibility to Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rocque, Brittany L.; Babayeva, Sima; Li, Jane; Leung, Vicki; Nezvitsky, Lisa; Cybulsky, Andrey V.; Gros, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway is crucial for tissue morphogenesis. Van Gogh-like protein 2 (Vangl2) is central in the PCP pathway; in mice, Vangl2 loss is embryonically lethal because of neural tube defects, and mutations in Vangl2 are associated with human neural tube defects. In the kidney, PCP signaling may be important for tubular morphogenesis and organization of glomerular epithelial cells (podocytes) along the glomerular basement membrane. Podocyte cell protrusions (foot processes) are critical for glomerular permselectivity; loss of foot process architecture results in proteinuria and FSGS. Previously, we showed a profound effect of PCP signaling on podocyte shape, actin rearrangement, cell motility, and nephrin endocytosis. To test our hypothesis that the PCP pathway is involved in glomerular development and function and circumvent lethality of the ubiquitous Vangl2 mutation in the Looptail mouse, we generated a mouse model with a podocyte-specific ablation of the Vangl2 gene. We report here that podocyte-specific deletion of Vangl2 leads to glomerular maturation defects in fetal kidneys. In adult mice, we detected significantly smaller glomeruli, but it did not affect glomerular permselectivity in aging animals. However, in the context of glomerular injury induced by injection of antiglomerular basement membrane antibody, deletion of Vangl2 resulted in exacerbation of injury and accelerated progression to chronic segmental and global glomerular sclerosis. Our results indicate that Vangl2 function in podocytes is important for glomerular development and protects against glomerular injury in adult animals. PMID:25145929

  18. Mesenchymal stem cell adhesion but not plasticity is affected by high substrate stiffness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kal Van Tam, Janice; Uto, Koichiro; Ebara, Mitsuhiro; Pagliari, Stefania; Forte, Giancarlo; Aoyagi, Takao

    2012-12-01

    The acknowledged ability of synthetic materials to induce cell-specific responses regardless of biological supplies provides tissue engineers with the opportunity to find the appropriate materials and conditions to prepare tissue-targeted scaffolds. Stem and mature cells have been shown to acquire distinct morphologies in vitro and to modify their phenotype when grown on synthetic materials with tunable mechanical properties. The stiffness of the substrate used for cell culture is likely to provide cells with mechanical cues mimicking given physiological or pathological conditions, thus affecting the biological properties of cells. The sensitivity of cells to substrate composition and mechanical properties resides in multiprotein complexes called focal adhesions, whose dynamic modification leads to cytoskeleton remodeling and changes in gene expression. In this study, the remodeling of focal adhesions in human mesenchymal stem cells in response to substrate stiffness was followed in the first phases of cell-matrix interaction, using poly-ɛ-caprolactone planar films with similar chemical composition and different elasticity. As compared to mature dermal fibroblasts, mesenchymal stem cells showed a specific response to substrate stiffness, in terms of adhesion, as a result of differential focal adhesion assembly, while their multipotency as a bulk was not significantly affected by matrix compliance. Given the sensitivity of stem cells to matrix mechanics, the mechanobiology of such cells requires further investigations before preparing tissue-specific scaffolds.

  19. Optimistic Expectancies and Cell-Mediated Immunity: The Role of Positive Affect

    PubMed Central

    Segerstrom, Suzanne C.; Sephton, Sandra E.

    2014-01-01

    Optimistic expectancies affect many psychosocial outcomes and may also predict immune system changes and health, but the nature and mechanisms of any such physiological effects have not been identified. The present study related law-school expectancies to cell-mediated immunity (CMI), examining the within- and between-person components of this relationship and affective mediators. First-year law students (N = 124) completed questionnaire measures of expectancies and affect and received delayed-type hypersensitivity skin tests at five time points. A positive relationship between optimistic expectancies and CMI occurred, in which that changes in optimism correlated with changes in CMI. Likewise, changes in optimism predicted changes in positive and, to a lesser degree, negative affect, but the relationship between optimism and immunity was partially accounted for only by positive affect. This dynamic relationship between expectancies and immunity has positive implications for psychological interventions to improve health, particularly those that increase positive affect. PMID:20424083

  20. Aquaporin-1 plays important role in proliferation by affecting cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Galán-Cobo, Ana; Ramírez-Lorca, Reposo; Toledo-Aral, Juan José; Echevarría, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) has been associated with tumor development. Here, we investigated how AQP1 may affect cell proliferation. The proliferative rate of adult carotid body (CB) cells, known to proliferate under chronic hypoxia, was analyzed in wild-type (AQP1(+/+) ) and knock out (AQP1(-/-) ) mice, maintained in normoxia or exposed to hypoxia while BrdU was administered. Fewer numbers of total BrdU(+) and TH-BrdU(+) cells were observed in AQP1(-/-) mice, indicating a role for AQP1 in CB proliferation. Then, by flow cytometry, cell cycle state and proliferation of cells overexpressing AQP1 were compared to those of wild-type cells. In the AQP1-overexpressing cells, we observed higher cell proliferation and percentages of cells in phases S and G2/M and fewer apoptotic cells after nocodazole treatment were detected by annexin V staining. Also in these cells, proteomic assays showed higher expression of cyclin D1 and E1 and microarray analysis revealed changes in many cell proliferation-related molecules, including, Zeb 2, Jun, NF-kβ, Cxcl9, Cxcl10, TNF, and the TNF receptor. Overall, our results indicate that the presence of AQP1 modifies the expression of key cell cycle proteins apparently related to increases in cell proliferation. This contributes to explaining the presence of AQP1 in many different tumors. PMID:26081645

  1. Micro- and Nanopatterned Topographical Cues for Regulating Macrophage Cell Shape and Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Luu, Thuy U; Gott, Shannon C; Woo, Bryan W K; Rao, Masaru P; Liu, Wendy F

    2015-12-30

    Controlling the interactions between macrophages and biomaterials is critical for modulating the response to implants. While it has long been thought that biomaterial surface chemistry regulates the immune response, recent studies have suggested that material geometry may in fact dominate. Our previous work demonstrated that elongation of macrophages regulates their polarization toward a pro-healing phenotype. In this work, we elucidate how surface topology might be leveraged to alter macrophage cell morphology and polarization state. Using a deep etch technique, we fabricated titanium surfaces containing micro- and nanopatterned grooves, which have been previously shown to promote cell elongation. Morphology, phenotypic markers, and cytokine secretion of murine bone marrow derived macrophages on different groove widths were analyzed. The results suggest that micro- and nanopatterned grooves influenced macrophage elongation, which peaked on substrates with 400-500 nm wide grooves. Surface grooves did not affect inflammatory activation but drove macrophages toward an anti-inflammatory, pro-healing phenotype. While secretion of TNF-alpha remained low in macrophages across all conditions, macrophages secreted significantly higher levels of anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, on intermediate groove widths compared to cells on other Ti surfaces. Our findings highlight the potential of using surface topography to regulate macrophage function, and thus control the wound healing and tissue repair response to biomaterials. PMID:26605491

  2. Adhesion between cells, diffusion of growth factors, and elasticity of the AER produce the paddle shape of the chick limb

    PubMed Central

    Popławski, Nikodem J.; Swat, Maciej; Gens, J. Scott; Glazier, James A.

    2007-01-01

    A central question in developmental biology is how cells interact to organize into tissues? In this paper, we study the role of mesenchyme-ectoderm interaction in the growing chick limb bud using Glazier and Graner's cellular Potts model, a grid-based stochastic framework designed to simulate cell interactions and movement. We simulate cellular mechanisms including cell adhesion, growth, and division and diffusion of morphogens, to show that differential adhesion between the cells, diffusion of growth factors through the extracellular matrix, and the elastic properties of the apical ectodermal ridge together can produce the proper shape of the limb bud. PMID:18167520

  3. Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect the adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in distinct ontogenetic windows

    SciTech Connect

    Biemann, Ronald; Navarrete Santos, Anne; Navarrete Santos, Alexander; Riemann, Dagmar; Knelangen, Julia; Blueher, Matthias; Koch, Holger; Fischer, Bernd

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect adipogenesis in mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adipogenic impact depends strongly on the window of exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bisphenol A reduces the potential of MSC to differentiate into adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DEHP and TBT trigger the adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BPA, DEHP and TBT did not affect adipogenesis in embryonic stem cells. -- Abstract: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) like bisphenol A (BPA), bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and tributyltin (TBT) are ubiquitously present in the environment and in human tissues. They bind to nuclear hormone receptors and affect cellular and developmental processes. In this study, we show that BPA, DEHP and TBT affect the adipogenic differentiation of murine mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, C3H/10T1/2) in a concentration-, stage- and compound-specific manner. C3H/10T1/2 cells and embryonic stem cells (CGR8) were exposed to BPA, DEHP or TBT at different stages of cell determination and differentiation (undifferentiated growth, adipogenic induction and terminal adipogenic differentiation). The final amount of differentiated adipocytes, cellular triglyceride content and mRNA expression of adipogenic marker genes (adiponectin, FABP4, PPAR{gamma}2, LPL) were quantified and compared with corresponding unexposed cells. BPA (10 {mu}M) decreased subsequent adipogenic differentiation of MSC, when cells were exposed during undifferentiated growth. In contrast, DEHP (100 {mu}M) during the hormonal induction period, and TBT (100 nM) in all investigated stages, enhanced adipogenesis. Importantly, exposure of undifferentiated murine embryonic stem cells did not show any effect of the investigated EDC on subsequent adipogenic differentiation.

  4. Relationship between Microtubule Network Structure and Intracellular Transport in Cultured Endothelial Cells Affected by Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Susumu; Ikezawa, Kenji; Ikeda, Mariko; Tanishita, Kazuo

    Endothelial cells (ECs) that line the inner surface of blood vessels are barriers to the transport of various substances into or from vessel walls, and are continuously exposed to shear stress induced by blood flow in vivo. Shear stress affects the cytoskeleton (e.g., microtubules, microfilaments, intermediate filaments), and affects the transport of macromolecules. Here, the relationship between the microtubule network structure and this transport process for albumin uptake within cultured aortic endothelial cells affected by shear stress was studied. Based on fluorescent images of albumin uptake obtained by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), both the microtubule network and albumin uptake in ECs were disrupted by colchicine and were affected by shear stress loading.

  5. Relaxin affects cell organization and early and late stages of spermatogenesis in a coculture of rat testicular cells.

    PubMed

    Pimenta, M T; Francisco, R A R; Silva, R P; Porto, C S; Lazari, M F M

    2015-07-01

    Relaxin and its receptor RXFP1 are co-expressed in Sertoli cells, and relaxin can stimulate proliferation of Sertoli cells. In this study, we investigated a role of relaxin in spermatogenesis, using a short-term culture of testicular cells of the rat that allowed differentiation of spermatogonia to spermatids. Sertoli, germ, and peritubular myoid cells were the predominant cell types in the culture. Sertoli and germ cells expressed RXFP1. Cultures were incubated without (control) or with 0.5% fetal bovine serum (FBS) or 100 ng/mL H2 relaxin (RLN) for 2 days. Cell organization, number, and differentiation were analyzed after 2 (D2), 5 (D5) or 8 (D8) days of culturing. Although the proportion of germ cells decayed from D2 to D5, the relative contribution of HC, 1C, 2C, and 4C germ cell populations remained constant in the control group during the whole culture. RLN did not affect the proportion of germ cell populations compared with control, but increased gene and/or protein expression of the undifferentiated and differentiated spermatogonia markers PLZF and c-KIT, and of the post-meiotic marker Odf2 in D5. RLN favored organization of cells in tubule-like structures, the arrangement of myoid cells around the tubules, arrangement of c-KIT-positive spermatogonia at the basal region of the tubules, and expression of the cell junction protein β-catenin close to the plasma membrane region. Knockdown of relaxin with small interfering RNA (siRNA) reduced expression of β-catenin at the cell junctions, and shifted its expression to the nucleus. We propose that relaxin may affect spermatogenesis by modulating spermatogonial self renewal and favoring cell contact. PMID:26041439

  6. A temperature-responsive network links cell shape and virulence traits in a primary fungal pathogen.

    PubMed

    Beyhan, Sinem; Gutierrez, Matias; Voorhies, Mark; Sil, Anita

    2013-07-01

    Survival at host temperature is a critical trait for pathogenic microbes of humans. Thermally dimorphic fungal pathogens, including Histoplasma capsulatum, are soil fungi that undergo dramatic changes in cell shape and virulence gene expression in response to host temperature. How these organisms link changes in temperature to both morphologic development and expression of virulence traits is unknown. Here we elucidate a temperature-responsive transcriptional network in H. capsulatum, which switches from a filamentous form in the environment to a pathogenic yeast form at body temperature. The circuit is driven by three highly conserved factors, Ryp1, Ryp2, and Ryp3, that are required for yeast-phase growth at 37°C. Ryp factors belong to distinct families of proteins that control developmental transitions in fungi: Ryp1 is a member of the WOPR family of transcription factors, and Ryp2 and Ryp3 are both members of the Velvet family of proteins whose molecular function is unknown. Here we provide the first evidence that these WOPR and Velvet proteins interact, and that Velvet proteins associate with DNA to drive gene expression. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation studies, we determine that Ryp1, Ryp2, and Ryp3 associate with a large common set of genomic loci that includes known virulence genes, indicating that the Ryp factors directly control genes required for pathogenicity in addition to their role in regulating cell morphology. We further dissect the Ryp regulatory circuit by determining that a fourth transcription factor, which we name Ryp4, is required for yeast-phase growth and gene expression, associates with DNA, and displays interdependent regulation with Ryp1, Ryp2, and Ryp3. Finally, we define cis-acting motifs that recruit the Ryp factors to their interwoven network of temperature-responsive target genes. Taken together, our results reveal a positive feedback circuit that directs a broad transcriptional switch between environmental and

  7. Some relationships between membrane phospholipid domains, conformational order, and cell shape in intact human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Moore, D J; Gioioso, S; Sills, R H; Mendelsohn, R

    1999-01-01

    A novel method developed in this laboratory [D.J. Moore et al., Biochemistry 35 (1996) 229-235; D.J. Moore et al., Biochemistry 36 (1997) 660-664] to study the conformational order and the propensity for domain formation of specific phospholipids in intact human erythrocytes is extended to two additional species. Acyl chain perdeuterated 1,2-dilauroylphosphatidylethanolamine (diC12PE-d46) was incorporated preferentially (in separate experiments) into the inner leaflet of stomatocytic erythrocytes and into the outer leaflet of echinocytic erythrocytes, while acyl chain perdeuterated 1,2-dipentadecanoylphosphatidylcholine (diC15PC-d58) was incorporated into the outer leaflet of echinocytic erythrocytes. The conformational order and phase behavior of the incorporated molecules were monitored through FT-IR studies of the temperature dependence of the CD2 stretching vibrations. For both diC12PE-d46 and diC15PC-d58, the gel-->liquid crystal phase transition persisted when these lipids were located in the outer leaflet of echinocytic cells, a result indicative of the persistence of phospholipid domains. In each case, the transition widths were broadened compared to the pure lipids, suggestive of either small domains or the presence of additional molecular components within the domains. The conformational order of diC12PE-d46 differed markedly depending on its location and the morphology of the cells. When located predominantly in the inner membrane of stomatocytes, the phase transition of this species was abolished and the conformational order compared with pure lipid vesicles at the same temperature was much lower. The current results along with our previous studies provide a sufficient experimental basis to deduce some general principles of phospholipid conformational order and organization in both normal and shape-altered erythrocytes. PMID:9889394

  8. From shape to cells: mouse models reveal mechanisms altering palate development in Apert syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Holmes, Greg; Pankratz, Talia; Wang, Yingli; Zhou, Xueyan; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Richtsmeier, Joan T.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Apert syndrome is a congenital disorder characterized by severe skull malformations and caused by one of two missense mutations, S252W and P253R, on fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2). The molecular bases underlying differential Apert syndrome phenotypes are still poorly understood and it is unclear why cleft palate is more frequent in patients carrying the S252W mutation. Taking advantage of Apert syndrome mouse models, we performed a novel combination of morphometric, histological and immunohistochemical analyses to precisely quantify distinct palatal phenotypes in Fgfr2+/S252W and Fgfr2+/P253R mice. We localized regions of differentially altered FGF signaling and assessed local cell patterns to establish a baseline for understanding the differential effects of these two Fgfr2 mutations. Palatal suture scoring and comparative 3D shape analysis from high resolution μCT images of 120 newborn mouse skulls showed that Fgfr2+/S252W mice display relatively more severe palate dysmorphologies, with contracted and more separated palatal shelves, a greater tendency to fuse the maxillary-palatine sutures and aberrant development of the inter-premaxillary suture. These palatal defects are associated with suture-specific patterns of abnormal cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The posterior region of the developing palate emerges as a potential target for therapeutic strategies in clinical management of cleft palate in Apert syndrome patients. PMID:23519026

  9. Biochanin A affects steroidogenesis and estrogen receptor-β expression in porcine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Nynca, Anna; Swigonska, Sylwia; Piasecka, Joanna; Kolomycka, Agnieszka; Kaminska, Barbara; Radziewicz-Pigiel, Marta; Gut-Nagel, Marta; Ciereszko, Renata E

    2013-10-15

    Biochanin A, similar to other isoflavones, is present in soy and soy-based food, but predominantly in red clover. Red clover extract and biochanin A were reported to affect reproductive processes as well as to demonstrate menopause relief and anticancerogenic properties. Because porcine granulosa cells provide a suitable in vitro model for studying the intracellular mechanism of phytoestrogen action in the ovary, the objective of the study was to evaluate the in vitro effects of biochanin A on the following: (1) progesterone (P4) and estradiol (E2) secretion by granulosa cells, (2) viability of the granulosa cells, and (3) mRNA and protein expression of estrogen receptors α (ERα) and β (ERβ) in the granulosa cells harvested from both medium (3-6 mm) and large (≥8 mm) porcine ovarian follicles. RIA, alamarBlue assay, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, and immunocytochemistry were used in the study to address the objectives. Biochanin A significantly inhibited P4 and did not affect E2 secretion by porcine granulosa cells regardless of the size of follicles that served as the source of the cells. Cell viability was not affected by the treatment. Biochanin A did not alter ERα and ERβ mRNA levels in the cultured porcine granulosa cells. In contrast, this isoflavone increased (P < 0.05) the immunoexpression of ERβ in the cells from both follicle types. In summary, biochanin A, similar to genistein and daidzein, affects follicular steroidogenesis and ER expression. Its effect on ERβ protein was more intense compared with other previously examined phytoestrogens. PMID:23953692

  10. Cell-surface serglycin promotes adhesion of myeloma cells to collagen type I and affects the expression of matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Skliris, Antonis; Labropoulou, Vassiliki T; Papachristou, Dionysios J; Aletras, Alexios; Karamanos, Nikos K; Theocharis, Achilleas D

    2013-05-01

    Serglycin (SG) is mainly expressed by hematopoetic cells as an intracellular proteoglycan. Multiple myeloma cells constitutively secrete SG, which is also localized on the cell surface in some cell lines. In this study, SG isolated from myeloma cells was found to interact with collagen type I (Col I), which is a major bone matrix component. Notably, myeloma cells positive for cell-surface SG (csSG) adhered significantly to Col I, compared to cells lacking csSG. Removal of csSG by treatment of the cells with chondroitinase ABC or blocking of csSG by an SG-specific polyclonal antibody significantly reduced the adhesion of myeloma cells to Col I. Significant up-regulation of expression of the matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 at both the mRNA and protein levels was observed when culturing csSG-positive myeloma cells on Col I-coated dishes or in the presence of soluble Col I. MMP-9 and MMP-2 were also expressed in increased amounts by myeloma cells in the bone marrow of patients with multiple myeloma. Our data indicate that csSG of myeloma cells affects key functional properties, such as adhesion to Col I and the expression of MMPs, and imply that csSG may serve as a potential prognostic factor and/or target for pharmacological interventions in multiple myeloma. PMID:23387827

  11. Catechins Variously Affect Activities of Conjugation Enzymes in Proliferating and Differentiated Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lněničková, Kateřina; Procházková, Eliška; Skálová, Lenka; Matoušková, Petra; Bártíková, Hana; Souček, Pavel; Szotáková, Barbora

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of processes in intestinal cells is essential, as most xenobiotics come into contact with the small intestine first. Caco-2 cells are human colorectal adenocarcinoma that once differentiated, exhibit enterocyte-like characteristics. Our study compares activities and expressions of important conjugation enzymes and their modulation by green tea extract (GTE) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) using both proliferating (P) and differentiated (D) caco-2 cells. The mRNA levels of the main conjugation enzymes were significantly elevated after the differentiation of Caco-2 cells. However, no increase in conjugation enzymes' activities in differentiated cells was detected in comparison to proliferating ones. GTE/EGCG treatment did not affect the mRNA levels of any of the conjugation enzymes tested in either type of cells. Concerning conjugation enzymes activities, GTE/EGCG treatment elevated glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity by approx. 30% and inhibited catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity by approx. 20% in differentiated cells. On the other hand, GTE as well as EGCG treatment did not significantly affect the activities of conjugation enzymes in proliferating cells. Administration of GTE/EGCG mediated only mild changes of GST and COMT activities in enterocyte-like cells, indicating a low risk of GTE/EGCG interactions with concomitantly administered drugs. However, a considerable chemo-protective effect of GTE via the pronounced induction of detoxifying enzymes cannot be expected as well. PMID:27617982

  12. FAK and HAS inhibition synergistically decrease colon cancer cell viability and affect expression of critical genes.

    PubMed

    Heffler, Melissa; Golubovskaya, Vita M; Conroy, Jeffrey; Liu, Song; Wang, Dan; Cance, William G; Dunn, Kelli B

    2013-05-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK), hyaluronan (HA), and hyaluronan synthase-3 (HAS3) have been implicated in cancer growth and progression. FAK inhibition with the small molecule inhibitor Y15 decreases colon cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. HAS3 inhibition in colon cancer cells decreases FAK expression and activation, and exogenous HA increases FAK activation. We sought to determine the genes affected by HAS and FAK inhibition and hypothesized that dual inhibition would synergistically inhibit viability. Y15 (FAK inhibitor) and the HAS inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) decreased viability in a dose dependent manner; viability was further inhibited by treatment with Y15 and 4-MU in colon cancer cells. HAS inhibited cells treated with 2 μM of Y15 showed significantly decreased viability compared to HAS scrambled cells treated with the same dose (p < 0.05) demonstrating synergistic inhibition of viability with dual FAK/HAS inhibition. Microarray analysis showed more than 2-fold up- or down-regulation of 121 genes by HAS inhibition, and 696 genes by FAK inhibition (p < 0.05) and revealed 29 common genes affected by both signaling. Among the genes affected by FAK or HAS3 inhibition were genes, playing role in apoptosis, cell cycle regulation, adhesion, transcription, heatshock and WNT pathways. Thus, FAK or HAS inhibition decreases SW620 viability and affects several similar genes, which are involved in the regulation of tumor survival. Dual inhibition of FAK and HAS3 decreases viability to a greater degree than with either agent alone, and suggests that synergistic inhibition of colon cancer cell growth can result from affecting similar genetic pathways. PMID:22934709

  13. Polyglucosan Molecules Induce Mitochondrial Impairment and Apoptosis in Germ Cells Without Affecting the Integrity and Functionality of Sertoli Cells.

    PubMed

    Villarroel-Espíndola, Franz; Tapia, Cynthia; González-Stegmaier, Roxana; Concha, Ilona I; Slebe, Juan Carlos

    2016-10-01

    Glycogen is the main storage form of glucose; however, the accumulation of glycogen-like glucose polymers can lead to degeneration and cellular death. Previously, we reported that the accumulation of glycogen in testis of transgenic animals overexpressing a constitutively active form of glycogen synthase enhances the apoptosis of pre-meiotic male germ cells and a complete disorganization of the seminiferous tubules. Here we sought to further identify the effects of glycogen storage in cells from the seminiferous tubules and the mechanism behind the pro-apoptotic activity induced by its accumulation. Using an in vitro culture of Sertoli cells (line 42GPA9) and spermatocyte-like cells (line GC-1) expressing a superactive form of glycogen synthase or the Protein Targeting to Glycogen (PTG), we found that glycogen synthesized in both cell lines is poorly branched. In addition, the immunodetection of key molecules of apoptotic events suggests that cellular death induced by polyglucosan molecules affects GC-1 cells, but not 42GPA9 cells by mitochondrial impairment and activation of an intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Furthermore, we analyzed the effects of glycogen deposition during the establishment of an in vitro blood-testis barrier. The results using a non-permeable fluorescent molecule showed that, in conditions of over-synthesis of glycogen, 42GPA9 cells do not lose their capacity to generate an impermeable barrier and the levels of connexin43, occludin, and ZO1 proteins were not affected. These results suggest that the accumulation of polyglucosan molecules has a selective effect-triggered by the intrinsic activation of the apoptotic pathway-in germ cells without directly affecting Sertoli cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2142-2152, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26790645

  14. Actively targeted delivery of anticancer drug to tumor cells by redox-responsive star-shaped micelles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chunli; Guo, Xing; Qu, Qianqian; Tang, Zhaomin; Wang, Yi; Zhou, Shaobing

    2014-10-01

    In cancer therapy nanocargos based on star-shaped polymer exhibit unique features such as better stability, smaller size distribution and higher drug capacity in comparison to linear polymeric micelles. In this study, we developed a multifunctional star-shaped micellar system by combination of active targeting ability and redox-responsive behavior. The star-shaped micelles with good stability were self-assembled from four-arm poly(ε-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) copolymer. The redox-responsive behaviors of these micelles triggered by glutathione were evaluated from the changes of micellar size, morphology and molecular weight. In vitro drug release profiles exhibited that in a stimulated normal physiological environment, the redox-responsive star-shaped micelles could maintain good stability, whereas in a reducing and acid environment similar with that of tumor cells, the encapsulated agent was promptly released. In vitro cellular uptake and subcellular localization of these micelles were further studied with confocal laser scanning microscopy and flow cytometry against the human cervical cancer cell line HeLa. In vivo and ex vivo DOX fluorescence imaging displayed that these FA-functionalized star-shaped micelles possessed much better specificity to target solid tumor. Both the qualitative and quantitative results of the antitumor effect in 4T1 tumor-bearing BALB/c mice demonstrated that these redox-responsive star-shaped micelles have a high therapeutic efficiency to artificial solid tumor. Therefore, the multifunctional star-shaped micelles are a potential platform for targeted anticancer drug delivery. PMID:25002267

  15. Eight-Shaped Hatching Increases the Risk of Inner Cell Mass Splitting in Extended Mouse Embryo Culture.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zheng; Liang, Hongxing; Deng, Li; Long, Hui; Chen, Hong; Chai, Weiran; Suo, Lun; Xu, Chen; Kuang, Yanping; Wu, Lingqian; Lu, Shengsheng; Lyu, Qifeng

    2015-01-01

    Increased risk of monozygotic twinning (MZT) has been shown to be associated with assisted reproduction techniques, particularly blastocyst culture. Interestingly, inner cell mass (ICM) splitting in human '8'-shaped hatching blastocysts that resulted in MZT was reported. However, the underlying cause of MZT is not known. In this study, we investigated in a mouse model whether in vitro culture leads to ICM splitting and its association with hatching types. Blastocyst hatching was observed in: (i) in vivo developed blastocysts and (ii-iii) in vitro cultured blastocysts following in vivo or in vitro fertilization. We found that '8'-shaped hatching occurred with significantly higher frequency in the two groups of in vitro cultured blastocysts than in the group of in vivo developed blastocysts (24.4% and 20.4% versus 0.8%, respectively; n = 805, P < 0.01). Moreover, Oct4 immunofluorescence staining was performed to identify the ICM in the hatching and hatched blastocysts. Scattered and split distribution of ICM cells was observed around the small zona opening of '8'-shaped hatching blastocysts. This occurred at a high frequency in the in vitro cultured groups. Furthermore, we found more double OCT4-positive masses, suggestive of increased ICM splitting in '8'-shaped hatching and hatched blastocysts than in 'U'-shaped hatching and hatched blastocysts (12.5% versus 1.9%, respectively; n = 838, P < 0.01). Therefore, our results demonstrate that extended in vitro culture can cause high frequencies of '8'-shaped hatching, and '8'-shaped hatching that may disturb ICM herniation leading to increased risk of ICM splitting in mouse blastocysts. These results may provide insights into the increased risk of human MZT after in vitro fertilization and blastocyst transfer. PMID:26680631

  16. A novel tomato mutant, Solanum lycopersicum elongated fruit1 (Slelf1), exhibits an elongated fruit shape caused by increased cell layers in the proximal region of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Chusreeaeom, Katarut; Ariizumi, Tohru; Asamizu, Erika; Okabe, Yoshihiro; Shirasawa, Kenta; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Genes controlling fruit morphology offer important insights into patterns and mechanisms determining organ shape and size. In cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), a variety of fruit shapes are displayed, including round-, bell pepper-, pear-, and elongate-shaped forms. In this study, we characterized a tomato mutant possessing elongated fruit morphology by histologically analyzing its fruit structure and genetically analyzing and mapping the genetic locus. The mutant line, Solanum lycopersicum elongated fruit 1 (Slelf1), was selected in a previous study from an ethylmethane sulfonate-mutagenized population generated in the background of Micro-Tom, a dwarf and rapid-growth variety. Histological analysis of the Slelf1 mutant revealed dramatically increased elongation of ovary and fruit. Until 6 days before flowering, ovaries were round and they began to elongate afterward. We also determined pericarp thickness and the number of cell layers in three designated fruit regions. We found that mesocarp thickness, as well as the number of cell layers, was increased in the proximal region of immature green fruits, making this the key sector of fruit elongation. Using 262 F2 individuals derived from a cross between Slelf1 and the cultivar Ailsa Craig, we constructed a genetic map, simple sequence repeat (SSR), cleaved amplified polymorphism sequence (CAPS), and derived CAPS (dCAPS) markers and mapped to the 12 tomato chromosomes. Genetic mapping placed the candidate gene locus within a 0.2 Mbp interval on the long arm of chromosome 8 and was likely different from previously known loci affecting fruit shape. PMID:24519535

  17. Decreased Zinc Availability Affects Glutathione Metabolism in Neuronal Cells and in the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Omata, Yo; Salvador, Gabriela A.; Oteiza, Patricia I.

    2013-01-01

    A deficit in zinc (Zn) availability can increase cell oxidant production, affect the antioxidant defense system, and trigger oxidant-sensitive signals in neuronal cells. This work tested the hypothesis that a decreased Zn availability can affect glutathione (GSH) metabolism in the developing rat brain and in neuronal cells in culture, as well as the capacity of human neuroblastoma IMR-32 cells to upregulate GSH when challenged with dopamine (DA). GSH levels were low in the brain of gestation day 19 (GD19) fetuses from dams fed marginal Zn diets throughout gestation and in Zn-deficient IMR-32 cells. γ-Glutamylcysteine synthetase (GCL), the first enzyme in the GSH synthetic pathway, was altered by Zn deficiency (ZD). The protein and mRNA levels of the GCL modifier (GCLM) and catalytic (GCLC) subunits were lower in the Zn-deficient GD19 fetal brain and in IMR-32 cells compared with controls. The nuclear translocation of transcription factor nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2, which controls GCL transcription, was impaired by ZD. Posttranslationally, the caspase-3-dependent GCLC cleavage was high in Zn-deficient IMR-32 cells. Cells challenged with DA showed an increase in GCLM and GCLC protein and mRNA levels and a consequent increase in GSH concentration. Although Zn-deficient cells partially upregulated GCL subunits after exposure to DA, GSH content remained low. In summary, results show that a low Zn availability affects the GSH synthetic pathway in neuronal cells and fetal brain both at transcriptional and posttranslational levels. This can in part underlie the GSH depletion associated with ZD and the high sensitivity of Zn-deficient neurons to pro-oxidative stressors. PMID:23377617

  18. Skewed B cell differentiation affects lymphoid organogenesis but not T cell-mediated autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Colombo, E; Tentorio, P; Musio, S; Rajewsky, K; Pedotti, R; Casola, S; Farina, C

    2014-04-01

    B cell receptor (BCR) signalling determines B cell differentiation and may potentially alter T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study we used two transgenic strains of BCR-deficient mice expressing Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein (LMP)2A in B cells, where either follicular and marginal zone differentiation (D(H)LMP2A mice) or B-1 cell development (V(H)LMP2A mice) were supported, and evaluated the effects of skewed B lymphocyte differentiation on lymphoid organogenesis and T cell responses in vivo. Compared to wild-type animals, both transgenic strains displayed alterations in the composition of lymphoid organs and in the dynamics of distinct immune cell subsets following immunization with the self-antigen PLP₁₈₅₋₂₀₆. However, ex-vivo T cell proliferation to PLP₁₈₅₋₂₀₆ peptide measured in immunized D(H)LMP2A and V(H)LMP2A mice was similar to that detected in immunized control mice. Further, clinical expression of experimental autoimmune encephalitis in both LMP2A strains was identical to that of wild-type mice. In conclusion, mice with skewed B cell differentiation driven by LMP2A expression in BCR-negative B cells do not show changes in the development of a T cell mediated disease model of autoimmunity, suggesting that compensatory mechanisms support the generation of T cell responses. PMID:24325711

  19. Modulation of flagellum attachment zone protein FLAM3 and regulation of the cell shape in Trypanosoma brucei life cycle transitions

    PubMed Central

    Sunter, Jack D.; Benz, Corinna; Andre, Jane; Whipple, Sarah; McKean, Paul G.; Gull, Keith; Ginger, Michael L.; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The cell shape of Trypanosoma brucei is influenced by flagellum-to-cell-body attachment through a specialised structure – the flagellum attachment zone (FAZ). T. brucei exhibits numerous morphological forms during its life cycle and, at each stage, the FAZ length varies. We have analysed FLAM3, a large protein that localises to the FAZ region within the old and new flagellum. Ablation of FLAM3 expression causes a reduction in FAZ length; however, this has remarkably different consequences in the tsetse procyclic form versus the mammalian bloodstream form. In procyclic form cells FLAM3 RNAi results in the transition to an epimastigote-like shape, whereas in bloodstream form cells a severe cytokinesis defect associated with flagellum detachment is observed. Moreover, we demonstrate that the amount of FLAM3 and its localisation is dependent on ClpGM6 expression and vice versa. This evidence demonstrates that FAZ is a key regulator of trypanosome shape, with experimental perturbations being life cycle form dependent. An evolutionary cell biology explanation suggests that these differences are a reflection of the division process, the cytoskeleton and intrinsic structural plasticity of particular life cycle forms. PMID:26148511

  20. Triclosan and bisphenol a affect decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Forte, Maurizio; Mita, Luigi; Cobellis, Luigi; Merafina, Verdiana; Specchio, Raffaella; Rossi, Sergio; Mita, Damiano Gustavo; Mosca, Lavinia; Castaldi, Maria Antonietta; De Falco, Maria; Laforgia, Vincenza; Crispi, Stefania

    2016-02-15

    In recent years, impaired fertility and endometrium related diseases are increased. Many evidences suggest that environmental pollution might be considered a risk factor for endometrial physiopathology. Among environmental pollutants, endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) act on endocrine system, causing hormonal imbalance which, in turn, leads to female and male reproductive dysfunctions. In this work, we studied the effects of triclosan (TCL) and bisphenol A (BPA), two widespread EDCs, on human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs), derived from endometrial biopsies from woman not affected by endometriosis. Cell proliferation, cell cycle, migration and decidualization mechanisms were investigated. Treatments have been performed with both the EDCs separately or in presence and in absence of progesterone used as decidualization stimulus. Both TCL and BPA did not affect cell proliferation, but they arrested ESCs at G2/M phase of cell cycle enhancing cell migration. TCL and BPA also increased gene expression and protein levels of some decidualization markers, such as insulin growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) and prolactin (PRL), amplifying the effect of progesterone alone. All together, our data strongly suggest that TCL and BPA might alter human endometrium physiology so affecting fertility and pregnancy outcome. PMID:26604029

  1. Valproic Acid Affects Membrane Trafficking and Cell-Wall Integrity in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Miyatake, Makoto; Kuno, Takayoshi; Kita, Ayako; Katsura, Kosaku; Takegawa, Kaoru; Uno, Satoshi; Nabata, Toshiya; Sugiura, Reiko

    2007-01-01

    Valproic acid (VPA) is widely used to treat epilepsy and manic-depressive illness. Although VPA has been reported to exert a variety of biochemical effects, the exact mechanisms underlying its therapeutic effects remain elusive. To gain further insights into the molecular mechanisms of VPA action, a genetic screen for fission yeast mutants that show hypersensitivity to VPA was performed. One of the genes that we identified was vps45+, which encodes a member of the Sec1/Munc18 family that is implicated in membrane trafficking. Notably, several mutations affecting membrane trafficking also resulted in hypersensitivity to VPA. These include ypt3+ and ryh1+, both encoding a Rab family protein, and apm1+, encoding the μ1 subunit of the adaptor protein complex AP-1. More importantly, VPA caused vacuolar fragmentation and inhibited the glycosylation and the secretion of acid phosphatase in wild-type cells, suggesting that VPA affects membrane trafficking. Interestingly, the cell-wall-damaging agents such as micafungin or the inhibition of calcineurin dramatically enhanced the sensitivity of wild-type cells to VPA. Consistently, VPA treatment of wild-type cells enhanced their sensitivity to the cell-wall-digesting enzymes. Altogether, our results suggest that VPA affects membrane trafficking, which leads to the enhanced sensitivity to cell-wall damage in fission yeast. PMID:17287531

  2. Silver nanoparticles affect glucose metabolism in hepatoma cells through production of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Jin; Lee, Seung Jun; Yun, Su Jin; Jang, Ji-Young; Kang, Hangoo; Kim, Kyongmin; Choi, In-Hong; Park, Sun

    2016-01-01

    The silver nanoparticle (AgNP) is a candidate for anticancer therapy because of its effects on cell survival and signaling. Although numerous reports are available regarding their effect on cell death, the effect of AgNPs on metabolism is not well understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of AgNPs on glucose metabolism in hepatoma cell lines. Lactate release from both HepG2 and Huh7 cells was reduced with 5 nm AgNPs as early as 1 hour after treatment, when cell death did not occur. Treatment with 5 nm AgNPs decreased glucose consumption in HepG2 cells but not in Huh7 cells. Treatment with 5 nm AgNPs reduced nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 expression in both cell types without affecting its activation at the early time points after AgNPs’ treatment. Increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was detected 1 hour after 5 nm AgNPs’ treatment, and lactate release was restored in the presence of an ROS scavenger. Our results suggest that 5 nm AgNPs affect glucose metabolism by producing ROS. PMID:26730190

  3. Rolling-leaf14 is a 2OG-Fe (II) oxygenase family protein that modulates rice leaf rolling by affecting secondary cell wall formation in leaves.

    PubMed

    Fang, Likui; Zhao, Fangming; Cong, Yunfei; Sang, Xianchun; Du, Qing; Wang, Dezhong; Li, Yunfeng; Ling, Yinghua; Yang, Zhenglin; He, Guanghua

    2012-06-01

    As an important agronomic trait, leaf rolling in rice (Oryza sativa L.) has attracted much attention from plant biologists and breeders. Moderate leaf rolling increases the amount of photosynthesis in cultivars and hence raises grain yield. Here, we describe the map-based cloning of the gene RL14, which was found to encode a 2OG-Fe (II) oxygenase of unknown function. rl14 mutant plants had incurved leaves because of the shrinkage of bulliform cells on the adaxial side. In addition, rl14 mutant plants displayed smaller stomatal complexes and decreased transpiration rates, as compared with the wild type. Defective development could be rescued functionally by the expression of wild-type RL14. RL14 was transcribed in sclerenchymatous cells in leaves that remained wrapped inside the sheath. In mature leaves, RL14 accumulated mainly in the mesophyll cells that surround the vasculature. Expression of genes related to secondary cell wall formation was affected in rl14-1 mutants, and cellulose and lignin content were altered in rl14-1 leaves. These results reveal that the RL14 gene affects water transport in leaves by affecting the composition of the secondary cell wall. This change in water transport results in water deficiency, which is the major reason for the abnormal shape of the bulliform cells. PMID:22329407

  4. Particle-in-cell modeling for MJ scale dense plasma focus with varied anode shape

    SciTech Connect

    Link, A. Halvorson, C. Schmidt, A.; Hagen, E. C.; Rose, D. V.; Welch, D. R.

    2014-12-15

    Megajoule scale dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinches with deuterium gas fill are compact devices capable of producing 10{sup 12} neutrons per shot but past predictive models of large-scale DPF have not included kinetic effects such as ion beam formation or anomalous resistivity. We report on progress of developing a predictive DPF model by extending our 2D axisymmetric collisional kinetic particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations from the 4 kJ, 200 kA LLNL DPF to 1 MJ, 2 MA Gemini DPF using the PIC code LSP. These new simulations incorporate electrodes, an external pulsed-power driver circuit, and model the plasma from insulator lift-off through the pinch phase. To accommodate the vast range of relevant spatial and temporal scales involved in the Gemini DPF within the available computational resources, the simulations were performed using a new hybrid fluid-to-kinetic model. This new approach allows single simulations to begin in an electron/ion fluid mode from insulator lift-off through the 5-6 μs run-down of the 50+ cm anode, then transition to a fully kinetic PIC description during the run-in phase, when the current sheath is 2-3 mm from the central axis of the anode. Simulations are advanced through the final pinch phase using an adaptive variable time-step to capture the fs and sub-mm scales of the kinetic instabilities involved in the ion beam formation and neutron production. Validation assessments are being performed using a variety of different anode shapes, comparing against experimental measurements of neutron yield, neutron anisotropy and ion beam production.

  5. Donor age and cell passage affects differentiation potential of murine bone marrow-derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kretlow, James D; Jin, Yu-Qing; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Wen Jie; Hong, Tan-Hui; Zhou, Guangdong; Baggett, L Scott; Mikos, Antonios G; Cao, Yilin

    2008-01-01

    Background Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) are a widely researched adult stem cell population capable of differentiation into various lineages. Because many promising applications of tissue engineering require cell expansion following harvest and involve the treatment of diseases and conditions found in an aging population, the effect of donor age and ex vivo handling must be understood in order to develop clinical techniques and therapeutics based on these cells. Furthermore, there currently exists little understanding as to how these two factors may be influenced by one another. Results Differences in the adipogenic, chondrogenic, and osteogenic differentiation capacity of murine MSCs harvested from donor animals of different age and number of passages of these cells were observed. Cells from younger donors adhered to tissue culture polystyrene better and proliferated in greater number than those from older animals. Chondrogenic and osteogenic potential decreased with age for each group, and adipogenic differentiation decreased only in cells from the oldest donors. Significant decreases in differentiation potentials due to passage were observed as well for osteogenesis of BMSCs from the youngest donors and chondrogenesis of the cells from the oldest donors. Conclusion Both increasing age and the number of passages have lineage dependent effects on BMSC differentiation potential. Furthermore, there is an obvious interplay between donor age and cell passage that in the future must be accounted for when developing cell-based therapies for clinical use. PMID:18957087

  6. Facile moldless fabrication of disk-shaped and reed blood cell-like microparticles using photopolymerization of tripropylene glycol diacrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jongchul; Won, June; Song, Simon

    2014-12-01

    A facile method for the moldless fabrication of 2- or 3-dimensional microparticles is proposed by using a photopolymerization technique. Using only a monomer solution of tripropylene glycol diacrylate, a film mask and standard UV lithography equipment, we were able to fabricate microparticles of various shapes, such as disks, dimpled disks similar in shape to red blood cells, and slender gourd shapes, unlike previous moldless fabrication techniques requiring expensive and/or sophisticated equipment. The simple method could produce more than one million particles in a single batch, indicating that it can be applied to the mass production of polymer microparticles. Analyses of scanning electron micrographs and optical micrographs of the microparticles indicated that their size distribution was highly monodisperse. Detailed fabrication processes and statistics on the microparticle sizes are given in this paper.

  7. Dual-Doped Molybdenum Trioxide Nanowires: A Bifunctional Anode for Fiber-Shaped Asymmetric Supercapacitors and Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Minghao; Cheng, Xinyu; Zeng, Yinxiang; Wang, Zilong; Tong, Yexiang; Lu, Xihong; Yang, Shihe

    2016-06-01

    A novel in situ N and low-valence-state Mo dual doping strategy was employed to significantly improve the conductivity, active-site accessibility, and electrochemical stability of MoO3 , drastically boosting its electrochemical properties. Consequently, our optimized N-MoO3-x nanowires exhibited exceptional performances as a bifunctional anode material for both fiber-shaped asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs) and microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The flexible fiber-shaped ASC and MFC device based on the N-MoO3-x anode could deliver an unprecedentedly high energy density of 2.29 mWh cm(-3) and a remarkable power density of 0.76 μW cm(-1) , respectively. Such a bifunctional fiber-shaped N-MoO3-x electrode opens the way to integrate the electricity generation and storage for self-powered sources. PMID:27097987

  8. Key Immune Cell Cytokines Affects the Telomere Activity of Cord Blood Cells In vitro

    PubMed Central

    Brazvan, Balal; Farahzadi, Raheleh; Mohammadi, Seyede Momeneh; Montazer Saheb, Soheila; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Schmied, Laurent; Soleimani Rad, Jafar; Darabi, Masoud; Nozad Charoudeh, Hojjatollah

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Telomere is a nucleoprotein complex at the end of eukaryotic chromosomes and its length is regulated by telomerase. The number of DNA repeat sequence (TTAGGG)n is reduced with each cell division in differentiated cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of SCF (Stem Cell Factor), Flt3 (Fms- Like tyrosine kinase-3), Interleukin-2, 7 and 15 on telomere length and hTERT gene expression in mononuclear and umbilical cord blood stem cells (CD34+ cells) during development to lymphoid cells. Methods: The mononuclear cells were isolated from umbilical cord blood by Ficoll-Paque density gradient. Then cells were cultured for 21 days in the presence of different cytokines. Telomere length and hTERT gene expression were evaluated in freshly isolated cells, 7, 14 and 21 days of culture by real-time PCR. The same condition had been done for CD34+ cells but telomere length and hTERT gene expression were measured at initial and day 21 of the experiment. Results: Highest hTERT gene expression and maximum telomere length were measured at day14 of MNCs in the presence of IL-7 and IL-15. Also, there was a significant correlation between telomere length and telomerase gene expression in MNCs at 14 days in a combination of IL-7 and IL-15 (r = 0.998, p =0.04). In contrast, IL-2 showed no distinct effect on telomere length and hTERT gene expression in cells. Conclusion: Taken together, IL-7 and IL-15 increased telomere length and hTERT gene expression at 14 day of the experiment. In conclusion, it seems likely that cells maintain naïve phenotype due to prolonged exposure of IL-7 and IL-15. PMID:27478776

  9. Characterization of the activities of actin-affecting drugs on tumor cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Hayot, Caroline; Debeir, Olivier; Ham, Philippe van; Damme, Marc van; Kiss, Robert; Decaestecker, Christine . E-mail: cdecaes@ulb.ac.be

    2006-02-15

    Metastases kill 90% of cancer patients. It is thus a major challenge in cancer therapy to inhibit the spreading of tumor cells from primary tumor sites to those particular organs where metastases are likely to occur. Whereas the actin cytoskeleton is a key component involved in cell migration, agents targeting actin dynamics have been relatively poorly investigated. Consequently, valuable in vitro pharmacological tools are needed to selectively identify this type of agent. In response to the absence of any standardized process, the present work aims to develop a multi-assay strategy for screening actin-affecting drugs with anti-migratory potentials. To validate our approach, we used two cancer cell lines (MCF7 and A549) and three actin-affecting drugs (cytochalasin D, latrunculin A, and jasplakinolide). We quantified the effects of these drugs on the kinetics of actin polymerization in tubes (by means of spectrofluorimetry) and on the dynamics of actin cytoskeletons within whole cells (by means of fluorescence microscopy). Using quantitative videomicroscopy, we investigated the actual effects of the drugs on cell motility. Finally, the combined drug effects on cell motility and cell growth were evaluated by means of a scratch-wound assay. While our results showed concordant drug-induced effects on actin polymerization occurring in vitro in test tubes and within whole cells, the whole cell assay appeared more sensitive than the tube assay. The inhibition of actin polymerization induced by cytochalasin D was paralleled by a decrease in cell motility for both cell types. In the case of jasplakinolide, which induces actin polymerization, while it significantly enhanced the locomotion of the A549 cells, it significantly inhibited that of the MCF-7 ones. All these effects were confirmed by means of the scratch-wound assay except of the jasplakinolide-induced effects on MCF-7 cell motility. These later seemed compensated by an additional effect occurring during wound

  10. Factors affecting the attachment of Treponema pallidum to mammalian cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wong, G H; Steiner, B; Faine, S; Graves, S

    1983-02-01

    Attachment of Treponema pallidum (Nichols) to mammalian cells is probably the first step in the pathogenesis of syphilis. It may also be important for the multiplication of T pallidum in vitro. When factors affecting the attachment of T pallidum to mammalian cells in vitro were studied significantly greater numbers of treponemes were found to attach to baby rabbit genital organ (BRGO) cells than to five other mammalian cell lines. When attached to BRGO cells T pallidum survived longer in vitro than unattached treponemes. Eagle's minimal essential medium was superior to three other culture media in increasing attachment and maintaining the survival of treponemes. Dithiothreitol (0.25-1.0 mmol/l) had no effect on the attachment of T pallidum to BRGO cells. Anaerobic conditions were superior to microaerophilic conditions, and the latter were superior to aerobic conditions for the attachment and survival of T pallidum to BRGO cells. Within the range of concentrations tested the number of treponemes attached to the BRGO cells was directly dependent on the concentrations of viable treponemes in the inoculum. Greater numbers of treponemes attached to actively metabolising BRGO cells than to quiescent or slowly growing cells. PMID:6337680

  11. JAK2 inhibitors do not affect stem cells present in the spleens of patients with myelofibrosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Ye, Fei; Tripodi, Joseph; Hu, Cing Siang; Qiu, Jiajing; Najfeld, Vesna; Novak, Jesse; Li, Yan; Rampal, Raajit; Hoffman, Ronald

    2014-11-01

    Dysregulation of Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling is central to the pathogenesis of myelofibrosis (MF). JAK2 inhibitor therapy in MF patients results in a rapid reduction of the degree of splenomegaly, yet the mechanism underlying this effect remains unknown. The in vitro treatment of splenic and peripheral blood MF CD34(+) cells with the JAK1/2/3 inhibitor, AZD1480, reduced the absolute number of CD34(+), CD34(+)CD90(+), and CD34(+)CXCR4(+) cells as well as assayable hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) irrespective of the JAK2 and calreticulin mutational status. Furthermore, AZD1480 treatment resulted in only a modest reduction in the proportion of HPCs that were JAK2V617F(+) or had a chromosomal abnormality. To study the effect of the drug on MF stem cells (MF-SCs), splenic CD34(+) cells were treated with AZD1480 and transplanted into immunodeficient mice. JAK2 inhibitor therapy did not affect the degree of human cell chimerism or the proportion of malignant donor cells. These data indicate that JAK2 inhibitor treatment affects a subpopulation of MF-HPCs, while sparing another HPC subpopulation as well as MF-SCs. This pattern of activity might account for the reduction in spleen size observed with JAK2 inhibitor therapy as well as the rapid increase in spleen size observed frequently with its discontinuation. PMID:25193869

  12. JAK2 inhibitors do not affect stem cells present in the spleens of patients with myelofibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoli; Ye, Fei; Tripodi, Joseph; Hu, Cing Siang; Qiu, Jiajing; Najfeld, Vesna; Novak, Jesse; Li, Yan; Rampal, Raajit

    2014-01-01

    Dysregulation of Janus kinase (JAK)–signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling is central to the pathogenesis of myelofibrosis (MF). JAK2 inhibitor therapy in MF patients results in a rapid reduction of the degree of splenomegaly, yet the mechanism underlying this effect remains unknown. The in vitro treatment of splenic and peripheral blood MF CD34+ cells with the JAK1/2/3 inhibitor, AZD1480, reduced the absolute number of CD34+, CD34+CD90+, and CD34+CXCR4+ cells as well as assayable hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) irrespective of the JAK2 and calreticulin mutational status. Furthermore, AZD1480 treatment resulted in only a modest reduction in the proportion of HPCs that were JAK2V617F+ or had a chromosomal abnormality. To study the effect of the drug on MF stem cells (MF-SCs), splenic CD34+ cells were treated with AZD1480 and transplanted into immunodeficient mice. JAK2 inhibitor therapy did not affect the degree of human cell chimerism or the proportion of malignant donor cells. These data indicate that JAK2 inhibitor treatment affects a subpopulation of MF-HPCs, while sparing another HPC subpopulation as well as MF-SCs. This pattern of activity might account for the reduction in spleen size observed with JAK2 inhibitor therapy as well as the rapid increase in spleen size observed frequently with its discontinuation. PMID:25193869

  13. Plant-derived decapeptide OSIP108 interferes with Candida albicans biofilm formation without affecting cell viability.

    PubMed

    Delattin, Nicolas; De Brucker, Katrijn; Craik, David J; Cheneval, Olivier; Fröhlich, Mirjam; Veber, Matija; Girandon, Lenart; Davis, Talya R; Weeks, Anne E; Kumamoto, Carol A; Cos, Paul; Coenye, Tom; De Coninck, Barbara; Cammue, Bruno P A; Thevissen, Karin

    2014-05-01

    We previously identified a decapeptide from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, OSIP108, which is induced upon fungal pathogen infection. In this study, we demonstrated that OSIP108 interferes with biofilm formation of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans without affecting the viability or growth of C. albicans cells. OSIP108 displayed no cytotoxicity against various human cell lines. Furthermore, OSIP108 enhanced the activity of the antifungal agents amphotericin B and caspofungin in vitro and in vivo in a Caenorhabditis elegans-C. albicans biofilm infection model. These data point to the potential use of OSIP108 in combination therapy with conventional antifungal agents. In a first attempt to unravel its mode of action, we screened a library of 137 homozygous C. albicans mutants, affected in genes encoding cell wall proteins or transcription factors important for biofilm formation, for altered OSIP108 sensitivity. We identified 9 OSIP108-tolerant C. albicans mutants that were defective in either components important for cell wall integrity or the yeast-to-hypha transition. In line with these findings, we demonstrated that OSIP108 activates the C. albicans cell wall integrity pathway and that its antibiofilm activity can be blocked by compounds inhibiting the yeast-to-hypha transition. Furthermore, we found that OSIP108 is predominantly localized at the C. albicans cell surface. These data point to interference of OSIP108 with cell wall-related processes of C. albicans, resulting in impaired biofilm formation. PMID:24566179

  14. Replication Fork Polarity Gradients Revealed by Megabase-Sized U-Shaped Replication Timing Domains in Human Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Antoine; Audit, Benjamin; Chen, Chun-Long; Moindrot, Benoit; Leleu, Antoine; Guilbaud, Guillaume; Rappailles, Aurélien; Vaillant, Cédric; Goldar, Arach; Mongelard, Fabien; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Hyrien, Olivier; Thermes, Claude; Arneodo, Alain

    2012-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, replication program specification in different cell types remains to be fully understood. We show for seven human cell lines that about half of the genome is divided in domains that display a characteristic U-shaped replication timing profile with early initiation zones at borders and late replication at centers. Significant overlap is observed between U-domains of different cell lines and also with germline replication domains exhibiting a N-shaped nucleotide compositional skew. From the demonstration that the average fork polarity is directly reflected by both the compositional skew and the derivative of the replication timing profile, we argue that the fact that this derivative displays a N-shape in U-domains sustains the existence of large-scale gradients of replication fork polarity in somatic and germline cells. Analysis of chromatin interaction (Hi-C) and chromatin marker data reveals that U-domains correspond to high-order chromatin structural units. We discuss possible models for replication origin activation within U/N-domains. The compartmentalization of the genome into replication U/N-domains provides new insights on the organization of the replication program in the human genome. PMID:22496629

  15. Formulation Changes Affect Material Properties and Cell Behavior in HA-Based Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Lawyer, Thomas; McIntosh, Kristen; Clavijo, Cristian; Potekhina, Lydia; Mann, Brenda K.

    2012-01-01

    To develop and optimize new scaffold materials for tissue engineering applications, it is important to understand how changes to the scaffold affect the cells that will interact with that scaffold. In this study, we used a hyaluronic acid- (HA-) based hydrogel as a synthetic extracellular matrix, containing modified HA (CMHA-S), modified gelatin (Gtn-S), and a crosslinker (PEGda). By varying the concentrations of these components, we were able to change the gelation time, enzymatic degradation, and compressive modulus of the hydrogel. These changes also affected fibroblast spreading within the hydrogels and differentially affected the proliferation and metabolic activity of fibroblasts and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). In particular, PEGda concentration had the greatest influence on gelation time, compressive modulus, and cell spreading. MSCs appeared to require a longer period of adjustment to the new microenvironment of the hydrogels than fibroblasts. Fibroblasts were able to proliferate in all formulations over the course of two weeks, but MSCs did not. Metabolic activity changed for each cell type during the two weeks depending on the formulation. These results highlight the importance of determining the effect of matrix composition changes on a particular cell type of interest in order to optimize the formulation for a given application. PMID:23251160

  16. Motor-driven marginal band coiling promotes cell shape change during platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Diagouraga, Boubou; Grichine, Alexei; Fertin, Arnold; Wang, Jin; Khochbin, Saadi

    2014-01-01

    Platelets float in the blood as discoid particles. Their shape is maintained by microtubules organized in a ring structure, the so-called marginal band (MB), in the periphery of resting platelets. Platelets are activated after vessel injury and undergo a major shape change known as disc to sphere transition. It has been suggested that actomyosin tension induces the contraction of the MB to a smaller ring. In this paper, we show that antagonistic microtubule motors keep the MB in its resting state. During platelet activation, dynein slides microtubules apart, leading to MB extension rather than contraction. The MB then starts to coil, thereby inducing the spherical shape of activating platelets. Newly polymerizing microtubules within the coiled MB will then take a new path to form the smaller microtubule ring, in concerted action with actomyosin tension. These results present a new view of the platelet activation mechanism and reveal principal mechanistic features underlying cellular shape changes. PMID:24421335

  17. Fatostatin Inhibits Cancer Cell Proliferation by Affecting Mitotic Microtubule Spindle Assembly and Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Gholkar, Ankur A; Cheung, Keith; Williams, Kevin J; Lo, Yu-Chen; Hamideh, Shadia A; Nnebe, Chelsea; Khuu, Cindy; Bensinger, Steven J; Torres, Jorge Z

    2016-08-12

    The sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors have become attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition in the treatment of metabolic diseases and cancer. SREBPs are critical for the production and metabolism of lipids and cholesterol, which are essential for cellular homeostasis and cell proliferation. Fatostatin was recently discovered as a specific inhibitor of SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), which is required for SREBP activation. Fatostatin possesses antitumor properties including the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and migration, and it arrests cancer cells in G2/M phase. Although Fatostatin has been viewed as an antitumor agent due to its inhibition of SREBP and its effect on lipid metabolism, we show that Fatostatin's anticancer properties can also be attributed to its inhibition of cell division. We analyzed the effect of SREBP activity inhibitors including Fatostatin, PF-429242, and Betulin on the cell cycle and determined that only Fatostatin possessed antimitotic properties. Fatostatin inhibited tubulin polymerization, arrested cells in mitosis, activated the spindle assembly checkpoint, and triggered mitotic catastrophe and reduced cell viability. Thus Fatostatin's ability to inhibit SREBP activity and cell division could prove beneficial in treating aggressive types of cancers such as glioblastomas that have elevated lipid metabolism and fast proliferation rates and often develop resistance to current anticancer therapies. PMID:27378817

  18. The inhibition of aromatase alters the mechanical and rheological properties of non-small-cell lung cancer cell lines affecting cell migration.

    PubMed

    Giannopoulou, E; Siatis, K E; Metsiou, D; Kritikou, I; Papachristou, D J; Kalofonou, M; Koutras, A; Athanassiou, G; Kalofonos, H P

    2015-02-01

    Tumor invasion and metastasis are key aspects of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). During migration, cells undergo mechanical alterations. The mechanical phenotype of breast cancer cells is correlated with aromatase gene expression. We have previously shown that targeting aromatase is a promising strategy for NSCLC. The aim of this study was to examine morphological and mechanical changes of NSCLC cells, upon treatment with aromatase inhibitor and correlate their ability to migrate and invade. In vitro experiments were performed using H23 and A549 NSCLC cell lines and exemestane was used for aromatase inhibition. We demonstrated that exemestane reduced H23 cell migration and invasion and caused changes in cell morphology including increased vacuolar structures and greater pleomorphism. In addition, exemestane changed the distribution of α-tubulin in H23 and A549 cells in a way that might destabilize microtubules polymerization. These effects were associated with increased cell viscosity and decreased elastic shear modulus. Although exemestane caused similar effects in A549 cells regarding viscosity and elastic shear modulus, it did not affect A549 cell migration and caused an increase in invasion. The increased invasion was in line with vimentin perinuclear localization. Our data show that the treatment of NSCLC cells with an aromatase inhibitor not only affects cell migration and invasion but also alters the mechanical properties of the cells. It suggests that the different origin of cancer cells is associated with different morphological characteristics and mechanical behavior. PMID:25450981

  19. Experiment M115: Special hematologic effects: Dynamic changes in red cell shape in response to the space-flight environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimzey, S. L.; Burns, L. C.; Fischer, C. L.

    1974-01-01

    The significance of the transformations in red cell shape observed during the Skylab study must be considered relative to the limitation of man's participation in extended space flight missions. The results of this one study are not conclusive with respect to this question. Based on these examinations of red cells in normal, healthy men and based on other Skylab experiment data relative to the functional capacity of the red cells in vitro and the performance capacity of man as an integrated system, the changes observed would not appear to be the limiting factor in determining man's stay in space. However, the results of this experiment and the documented red cell mass loss during space flight raise serious questions at this time relative to the selection criteria utilized for passengers and crews of future space flights. Until the specific cause and impact of the red cell shape change on cell survival in vivo can be resolved, individuals with diagnosed hematologic abnormalities should not be considered as prime candidates for missions, especially those of longer duration.

  20. Foetal bovine serum-derived exosomes affect yield and phenotype of human cardiac progenitor cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Francesco; Ionta, Vittoria; Rossi, Fabrizio; Miraldi, Fabio; Messina, Elisa; Giacomello, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) represent a powerful tool in cardiac regenerative medicine. Pre-clinical studies suggest that most of the beneficial effects promoted by the injected cells are due to their paracrine activity exerted on endogenous cells and tissue. Exosomes are candidate mediators of this paracrine effects. According to their potential, many researchers have focused on characterizing exosomes derived from specific cell types, but, up until now, only few studies have analyzed the possible in vitro effects of bovine serum-derived exosomes on cell proliferation or differentiation. Methods: The aim of this study was to analyse, from a qualitative and quantitative point of view, the in vitro effects of bovine serum exosomes on human CPCs cultured either as cardiospheres or as monolayers of cardiosphere-forming cells. Results: Effects on proliferation, yield and molecular patterning were detected. We show, for the first time, that exogenous bovine exosomes support the proliferation and migration of human cardiosphere-forming cells, and that their depletion affects cardiospheres formation, in terms of size, yield and extra-cellular matrix production. Conclusion: These results stress the importance of considering differential biological effects of exogenous cell culture supplements on the final phenotype of primary human cell cultures.

  1. Kalanchoe tubiflora extract inhibits cell proliferation by affecting the mitotic apparatus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Kalanchoe tubiflora (KT) is a succulent plant native to Madagascar, and is commonly used as a medicinal agent in Southern Brazil. The underlying mechanisms of tumor suppression are largely unexplored. Methods Cell viability and wound-healing were analyzed by MTT assay and scratch assay respectively. Cell cycle profiles were analyzed by FACS. Mitotic defects were analyzed by indirect immunofluoresence images. Results An n-Butanol-soluble fraction of KT (KT-NB) was able to inhibit cell proliferation. After a 48 h treatment with 6.75 μg/ml of KT, the cell viability was less than 50% of controls, and was further reduced to less than 10% at higher concentrations. KT-NB also induced an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle as well as an increased level of cells in the subG1 phase. Instead of disrupting the microtubule network of interphase cells, KT-NB reduced cell viability by inducing multipolar spindles and defects in chromosome alignment. KT-NB inhibits cell proliferation and reduces cell viability by two mechanisms that are exclusively involved with cell division: first by inducing multipolarity; second by disrupting chromosome alignment during metaphase. Conclusion KT-NB reduced cell viability by exclusively affecting formation of the proper structure of the mitotic apparatus. This is the main idea of the new generation of anti-mitotic agents. All together, KT-NB has sufficient potential to warrant further investigation as a potential new anticancer agent candidate. PMID:22963191

  2. DNA Replication Licensing Affects Cell Proliferation or Endoreplication in a Cell Type–Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    del Mar Castellano, María; Boniotti, María Beatrice; Caro, Elena; Schnittger, Arp; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2004-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the function of DNA replication licensing components (Cdc6 and Cdt1, among others) is crucial for cell proliferation and genome stability. However, little is known about their role in whole organisms and whether licensing control interfaces with differentiation and developmental programs. Here, we study Arabidopsis thaliana CDT1, its regulation, and the consequences of overriding licensing control. The availability of AtCDT1 is strictly regulated at two levels: (1) at the transcription level, by E2F and growth-arresting signals, and (2) posttranscriptionally, by CDK phosphorylation, a step that is required for its proteasome-mediated degradation. We also show that CDC6 and CDT1 are key targets for the coordination of cell proliferation, differentiation, and development. Indeed, altered CDT1 or CDC6 levels have cell type–specific effects in developing Arabidopsis plants: in leaf cells competent to divide, cell proliferation is stimulated, whereas in cells programmed to undergo differentiation-associated endoreplication rounds, extra endocycles are triggered. Thus, we propose that DNA replication licensing control is critical for the proper maintenance of proliferative potential, developmental programs, and morphogenetic patterns. PMID:15316110

  3. Genomic Copy Number Variation Affecting Genes Involved in the Cell Cycle Pathway: Implications for Somatic Mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    Iourov, Ivan Y.; Vorsanova, Svetlana G.; Zelenova, Maria A.; Korostelev, Sergei A.; Yurov, Yuri B.

    2015-01-01

    Somatic genome variations (mosaicism) seem to represent a common mechanism for human intercellular/interindividual diversity in health and disease. However, origins and mechanisms of somatic mosaicism remain a matter of conjecture. Recently, it has been hypothesized that zygotic genomic variation naturally occurring in humans is likely to predispose to nonheritable genetic changes (aneuploidy) acquired during the lifetime through affecting cell cycle regulation, genome stability maintenance, and related pathways. Here, we have evaluated genomic copy number variation (CNV) in genes implicated in the cell cycle pathway (according to Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes/KEGG) within a cohort of patients with intellectual disability, autism, and/or epilepsy, in which the phenotype was not associated with genomic rearrangements altering this pathway. Benign CNVs affecting 20 genes of the cell cycle pathway were detected in 161 out of 255 patients (71.6%). Among them, 62 individuals exhibited >2 CNVs affecting the cell cycle pathway. Taking into account the number of individuals demonstrating CNV of these genes, a support for this hypothesis appears to be presented. Accordingly, we speculate that further studies of CNV burden across the genes implicated in related pathways might clarify whether zygotic genomic variation generates somatic mosaicism in health and disease. PMID:26421275

  4. The algal metabolite yessotoxin affects heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Young, Clifford; Truman, Penelope; Boucher, Magalie; Keyzers, Robert A; Northcote, Peter; Jordan, T William

    2009-05-01

    The dinoflagellate metabolite yessotoxin (YTX) is produced by several species of algae and accumulates in marine food chains, leading to concerns about possible affects on aquaculture industries and human health. In mice used for toxicity testing, YTX is lethal by the intraperitoneal route, but is considerably less toxic when orally administered. The mode of action of YTX and its potential effect on humans is unclear and we therefore conducted the first proteomic analysis of the effects of this compound. We used 2-DE to examine protein changes in HepG2 cell cultures exposed to 1.4 microM YTX for 3, 12.5, 18 and 24 h. After selecting proteins that changed more than three-fold after YTX exposure, 55 spots were deemed significantly affected by the toxin (p<0.05). Major groups of affected proteins include members from the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP), lamin, cathepsin and heat shock protein families that often are associated with apoptosis. We therefore confirmed apoptosis using Annexin-V-FLUOS staining of phosphatidylserine exposed at the surface of apoptotic cells. Ingenuity pathways analysis also indicated effects on pathways involved in protein processing, cell cycling and cell death. PMID:19343718

  5. MEASUREMENT OF RADIONUCLIDES USING ION CHROMATOGRAPHY AND FLOW-CELL SCINTILLATION COUNTING WITH PULSE SHAPE DISCRIMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Fjeld; T.A. DeVol; J.D. Leyba

    2000-03-30

    Radiological characterization and monitoring is an important component of environmental management activities throughout the Department of Energy complex. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is the technology most often used for the detection of radionuclides. However, radionuclides which cannot easily be detected by gamma-ray spectroscopy, such as pure beta emitters and transuranics, pose special problems because their quantification generally requires labor intensive radiochemical separations procedures that are time consuming and impractical for field applications. This project focused on a technology for measuring transuranics and pure beta emitters relatively quickly and has the potential of being field deployable. The technology combines ion exchange liquid chromatography and on-line alpha/beta pulse shape discriminating scintillation counting to produce simultaneous alpha and beta chromatograms. The basic instrumentation upon which the project was based was purchased in the early 1990's. In its original commercial form, the instrumentation was capable of separating select activation/fission products in ionic forms from relatively pure aqueous samples. We subsequently developed the capability of separating and detecting actinides (thorium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium) in less than 30 minutes (Reboul, 1993) and realized that the potential time savings over traditional radiochemical methods for isolating some of these radionuclides was significant. However, at that time, the technique had only been used for radionuclide concentrations that were considerably above environmental levels and for aqueous samples of relatively high chemical purity. For the technique to be useful in environmental applications, development work was needed in lowering detection limits; to be useful in applications involving non-aqueous matrices such as soils and sludges or complex aqueous matrices such as those encountered in waste samples, development work was needed in

  6. EGFRvIII does not affect radiosensitivity with or without gefitinib treatment in glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Struve, Nina; Riedel, Matthias; Schulte, Alexander; Rieckmann, Thorsten; Grob, Tobias J.; Gal, Andreas; Rothkamm, Kai; Lamszus, Katrin; Petersen, Cordula; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Kriegs, Malte

    2015-01-01

    Background Glioblastomas (GBM) are often characterized by an elevated expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII). We used GBM cell lines with native EGFRvIII expression to determine whether this EGFR variant affects radiosensitivity with or without EGFR targeting. Methods Experiments were performed with GBM cell lines lacking (LN229, U87MG, U251, CAS-1) or endogenously expressing EGFRvIII (BS153, DKMG). The two latter cell lines were also used to establish sublines with a low (−) or a high proportion (+) of cells expressing EGFRvIII. EGFR signaling and the cell cycle were analyzed using Western blot and flow cytometry; cell survival was assessed by colony forming assay and double-strand break repair capacity by immunofluorescence. Results DKMG and BS153 parental cells with heterogeneous EGFRvIII expression were clearly more radiosensitive compared to other GBM cell lines without EGFRvIII expression. However, no significant difference was observed in cell proliferation, clonogenicity or radiosensitivity between the EGFRvIII− and + sublines derived from DKMG and BS153 parental cells. Expression of EGFRvIII was associated with decreased DSB repair capacity for BS153 but not for DKMG cells. The effects of EGFR targeting by gefitinib alone or in combination with irradiation were also found not to depend on EGFRvIII expression. Gefitinib was only observed to influence the proliferation of EGFRvIII− BS153 cells. Conclusion The data indicate that EGFRvIII does not alter radiosensitivity with or without anti-EGFR treatment. PMID:26418954

  7. Tumor suppressor p53 and its homologue p73alpha affect cell migration.

    PubMed

    Sablina, Anna A; Chumakov, Peter M; Kopnin, Boris P

    2003-07-25

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a central role in the negative control of growth and survival of abnormal cells. Previously we demonstrated that in addition to these functions, p53 expression affects cell morphology and lamellar activity of the cell edge (Alexandrova, A., Ivanov, A., Chumakov, P. M., Kopnin, P. B., and Vasiliev, J. M. (2000) Oncogene 19, 5826-5830). In the present work we studied the effects of p53 and its homologue p73alpha on cell migration. We found that loss of p53 function correlated with decreased cell migration that was analyzed by in vitro wound closure test and Boyden chamber assay. The decreased motility of p53-deficient cells was observed in different cell contexts: human foreskin fibroblasts (BJ), human colon and lung carcinoma cell lines (HCT116 and H1299, respectively), as well as mouse normal fibroblasts from lung and spleen, peritoneal macrophages, and keratinocytes. On the other hand, overexpression of the p53 family member p73alpha stimulated cell migration. Changes in cell migration correlated directly with transcription activation induced by p53 or p73alpha. Noteworthy, p53 modulated cell motility in the absence of stress. The effect of p53 and p73alpha on cell migration was mediated through the activity of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Rac1 pathway. This p53/p73 function was mainly associated with some modulation of intracellular signaling rather than with stimulation of production of secreted motogenic factors. The identified novel activity of the p53 family members might be involved in regulation of embryogenesis, wound healing, or inflammatory response. PMID:12750388

  8. Scrapie affects the maturation cycle and immune complex trapping by follicular dendritic cells in mice.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Gillian; Mabbott, Neil; Jeffrey, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) or prion diseases are infectious neurological disorders of man and animals, characterised by abnormal disease-associated prion protein (PrP(d)) accumulations in the brain and lymphoreticular system (LRS). Prior to neuroinvasion, TSE agents often accumulate to high levels within the LRS, apparently without affecting immune function. However, our analysis of scrapie-affected sheep shows that PrP(d) accumulations within the LRS are associated with morphological changes to follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and tingible body macrophages (TBMs). Here we examined FDCs and TBMs in the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) of scrapie-affected mice by light and electron microscopy. In MLNs from uninfected mice, FDCs could be morphologically categorised into immature, mature and regressing forms. However, in scrapie-affected MLNs this maturation cycle was adversely affected. FDCs characteristically trap and retain immune complexes on their surfaces, which they display to B-lymphocytes. In scrapie-affected MLNs, some FDCs were found where areas of normal and abnormal immune complex retention occurred side by side. The latter co-localised with PrP(d) plasmalemmal accumulations. Our data suggest this previously unrecognised morphology represents the initial stage of an abnormal FDC maturation cycle. Alterations to the FDCs included PrP(d) accumulation, abnormal cell membrane ubiquitin and excess immunoglobulin accumulation. Regressing FDCs, in contrast, appeared to lose their membrane-attached PrP(d). Together, these data suggest that TSE infection adversely affects the maturation and regression cycle of FDCs, and that PrP(d) accumulation is causally linked to the abnormal pathology observed. We therefore support the hypothesis that TSEs cause an abnormality in immune function. PMID:19997557

  9. The conflict between cell proliferation and expansion primarily affects stem organogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Saori; Gunji, Shizuka; Hanai, Kenya; Hirano, Tomonari; Kazama, Yusuke; Ohbayashi, Iwai; Abe, Tomoko; Sawa, Shinichiro; Tsukaya, Hirokazu; Ferjani, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Plant shoot organs such as stems, leaves and flowers are derived from specialized groups of stem cells organized at the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Organogenesis involves two major processes, namely cell proliferation and differentiation, whereby the former contributes to increasing the cell number and the latter involves substantial increases in cell volume through cell expansion. Co-ordination between the above processes in time and space is essential for proper organogenesis. To identify regulatory factors involved in proper organogenesis, heavy-ion beam-irradiated de-etiolated (det) 3-1 seeds have been used to identify striking phenotypes in the A#26-2; det3-1 mutant. In addition to the stunted plant stature mimicking det3-1, the A#26-2; det3-1 mutant exhibited stem thickening, increased floral organ number and a fruit shape reminiscent of clavata (clv) mutants. DNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that A#26-2; det3-1 harbors a mutation in the CLV3 gene. Importantly, A#26-2; det3-1 displayed cracks that randomly occurred on the main stem with a frequency of approximately 50%. Furthermore, the double mutants clv3-8 det3-1, clv1-4 det3-1 and clv2-1 det3-1 consistently showed stem cracks with frequencies of approximately 97, 38 and 35%, respectively. Cross-sections of stems further revealed an increase in vascular bundle number, cell number and size in the pith of clv3-8 det3-1 compared with det3-1. These findings suggest that the stem inner volume increase due to clv mutations exerts an outward mechanical stress; that in a det3-1 background (defective in cell expansion) resulted in cracking of the outermost layer of epidermal cells. PMID:25246492

  10. Enhancing cell migration in shape-memory alginate-collagen composite scaffolds: In vitro and ex vivo assessment for intervertebral disc repair.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Olivier; Naqvi, Syeda Masooma; Lennon, Kerri; Buckley, Conor Timothy

    2015-04-01

    Lower lumbar disc disorders pose a significant problem in an aging society with substantial socioeconomic consequences. Both inner tissue (nucleus pulposus) and outer tissue (annulus fibrosus) of the intervertebral disc are affected by such debilitating disorders and can lead to disc herniation and lower back pain. In this study, we developed an alginate-collagen composite porous scaffold with shape-memory properties to fill defects occurring in annulus fibrosus tissue of degenerated intervertebral discs, which has the potential to be administered using minimal invasive surgery. In the first part of this work, we assessed how collagen incorporation on preformed alginate scaffolds influences the physical properties of the final composite scaffold. We also evaluated the ability of annulus fibrosus cells to attach, migrate, and proliferate on the composite alginate-collagen scaffolds compared to control scaffolds (alginate only). In vitro experiments, performed in intervertebral disc-like microenvironmental conditions (low glucose and low oxygen concentrations), revealed that for alginate only scaffolds, annulus fibrosus cells agglomerated in clusters with limited infiltration and migration capacity. In comparison, for alginate-collagen scaffolds, annulus fibrosus cells readily attached and colonized constructs, while preserving their typical fibroblastic-like cell morphology with spreading behavior and intense cytoskeleton expression. In a second part of this study, we investigated the effects of alginate-collagen scaffold when seeded with bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells. In vitro, we observed that alginate-collagen porous scaffolds supported cell proliferation and extracellular matrix deposition (collagen type I), with secretion amplified by the local release of transforming growth factor-β3. In addition, when cultured in ex vivo organ defect model, alginate-collagen scaffolds maintained viability of transplanted mesenchymal stem cells for up to 5

  11. Optical reprogramming of human somatic cells using ultrashort Bessel-shaped near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans Georg; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2015-11-01

    We report a virus-free optical approach to human cell reprogramming into induced pluripotent stem cells with low-power nanoporation using ultrashort Bessel-shaped laser pulses. Picojoule near-infrared sub-20 fs laser pulses at a high 85 MHz repetition frequency are employed to generate transient nanopores in the membrane of dermal fibroblasts for the introduction of four transcription factors to induce the reprogramming process. In contrast to conventional approaches which utilize retro- or lentiviruses to deliver genes or transcription factors into the host genome, the laser method is virus-free; hence, the risk of virus-induced cancer generation limiting clinical application is avoided.

  12. Light collection and pulse-shape discrimination in elongated scintillator cells for the PROSPECT reactor antineutrino experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashenfelter, J.; Balantekin, B.; Band, H. R.; Barclay, G.; Bass, C. D.; Berish, D.; Bowden, N. S.; Bowes, A.; Brodsky, J. P.; Bryan, C. D.; Cherwinka, J. J.; Chu, R.; Classen, T.; Commeford, K.; Davee, D.; Dean, D.; Deichert, G.; Diwan, M. V.; Dolinski, M. J.; Dolph, J.; Dwyer, D. A.; Gaison, J. K.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Gilje, K.; Glenn, A.; Goddard, B. W.; Green, M.; Han, K.; Hans, S.; Heeger, K. M.; Heffron, B.; Jaffe, D. E.; Langford, T. J.; Littlejohn, B. R.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McKeown, R. D.; Mendenhall, M. P.; Mueller, P.; Mumm, H. P.; Napolitano, J.; Neilson, R.; Norcini, D.; Pushin, D.; Qian, X.; Romero, E.; Rosero, R.; Saldana, L.; Seilhan, B. S.; Sharma, R.; Sheets, S.; Stemen, N. T.; Surukuchi, P. T.; Varner, R. L.; Viren, B.; Wang, W.; White, B.; White, C.; Wilhelmi, J.; Williams, C.; Wise, T.; Yao, H.; Yeh, M.; Yen, Y. R.; Zangakis, G.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, X.

    2015-11-01

    A meter-long, 23-liter EJ-309 liquid scintillator detector has been constructed to study the light collection and pulse-shape discrimination performance of elongated scintillator cells for the PROSPECT reactor antineutrino experiment. The magnitude and uniformity of light collection and neutron-gamma discrimination power in the energy range of antineutrino inverse beta decay products have been studied using gamma and spontaneous fission calibration sources deployed along the cell axis. We also study neutron-gamma discrimination and light collection abilities for differing PMT and reflector configurations. Key design features for optimizing MeV-scale response and background rejection capabilities are identified.

  13. Robot-assisted heminephrectomy for chromophobe renal cell carcinoma in L-shaped fused crossed ectopia: Surgical challenge.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Santosh; Singh, Shivanshu; Jain, Siddharth; Bora, Girdhar Singh; Singh, Shrawan Kumar

    2015-10-01

    Renal cell carcinoma associated with fused ectopic kidneys has rarely been reported in the literature. Here we report the first case of robot-assisted heminephrectomy for chromophobe renal cell carcinoma in an L-shaped fused ectopic kidney. The present case report highlights the importance of three-dimensional vision and enhanced maneuverability with the EndoWrist technology of the robotic surgical system for precise dissection. This report also highlights the importance of preoperative contrast-enhanced computed tomography with three-dimensional arterial reconstruction for surgical planning. PMID:26495075

  14. Light collection and pulse-shape discrimination in elongated scintillator cells for the PROSPECT reactor antineutrino experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ashenfelter, J.; Jaffe, D.; Diwan, M. V.; Dolph, J.; Qian, X.; Sharma, R.; Viren, B.; Zhang, C.

    2015-11-06

    A meter-long, 23-liter EJ-309 liquid scintillator detector has been constructed to study the light collection and pulse-shape discrimination performance of elongated scintillator cells for the PROSPECT reactor antineutrino experiment. The magnitude and uniformity of light collection and neutron-gamma discrimination power in the energy range of antineutrino inverse beta decay products have been studied using gamma and spontaneous fission calibration sources deployed along the cell axis. We also study neutron-gamma discrimination and light collection abilities for differing PMT and reflector configurations. As a result, key design features for optimizing MeV-scale response and background rejection capabilities are identified.

  15. Data in support on the shape of Schwann cells and sympathetic neurons onto microconically structured silicon surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Simitzi, C.; Efstathopoulos, P.; Kourgiantaki, A.; Ranella, A.; Charalampopoulos, I.; Fotakis, C.; Αthanassakis, Ι.; Stratakis, E.; Gravanis, A.

    2015-01-01

    This article contains data related to the research article entitled “Laser fabricated discontinuous anisotropic microconical substrates as a new model scaffold to control the directionality of neuronal network outgrowth” in the Biomaterials journal [1]. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis is performed to investigate whether Schwann cells and sympathetic neurons alter their morphology according to the underlying topography, comprising arrays of silicon microcones with anisotropic geometrical characteristics [1]. It is observed that although soma of sympathetic neurons always preserves its round shape, this is not the case for Schwann cells that become highly polarized in high roughness microconical substrates. PMID:26401519

  16. Optical reprogramming of human somatic cells using ultrashort Bessel-shaped near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans Georg; Batista, Ana; König, Karsten

    2015-11-01

    We report a virus-free optical approach to human cell reprogramming into induced pluripotent stem cells with low-power nanoporation using ultrashort Bessel-shaped laser pulses. Picojoule near-infrared sub-20 fs laser pulses at a high 85 MHz repetition frequency are employed to generate transient nanopores in the membrane of dermal fibroblasts for the introduction of four transcription factors to induce the reprogramming process. In contrast to conventional approaches which utilize retro- or lentiviruses to deliver genes or transcription factors into the host genome, the laser method is virus-free; hence, the risk of virus-induced cancer generation limiting clinical application is avoided. PMID:26618522

  17. Nanoscale topography and chemistry affect embryonic stem cell self-renewal and early differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lapointe, Vanessa L S; Fernandes, Ana Tiago; Bell, Nia C; Stellacci, Francesco; Stevens, Molly M

    2013-12-01

    Adherent cells respond to a wide range of substrate cues, including chemistry, topography, hydrophobicity, and surface energy. The cell-substrate interface is therefore an important design parameter in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications, where substrate cues are used to influence cell behavior. Thin films comprising 4.5 nm (average diameter) gold nanoparticles coated with a mixture of two alkanethiols can confer hemispherical topography and specific chemistry to bulk substrates. The behavior of murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) on the thin films can then be compared with their behavior on self-assembled monolayers of the same alkanethiols on vapor-deposited gold, which lack the topographical features. Cells cultured both with and without differentiation inhibitors are characterized by immunofluorescence for Oct4 and qPCR for Fgf5, Foxa2, Nanog, Pou5f1, and Sox2. Nanoscale chemistry and topography are found to influence ste