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Sample records for affect cellular functions

  1. Intermittent hypoxia leads to functional reorganization of mitochondria and affects cellular bioenergetics in marine molluscs.

    PubMed

    Ivanina, Anna V; Nesmelova, Irina; Leamy, Larry; Sokolov, Eugene P; Sokolova, Inna M

    2016-06-01

    Fluctuations in oxygen (O2) concentrations represent a major challenge to aerobic organisms and can be extremely damaging to their mitochondria. Marine intertidal molluscs are well-adapted to frequent O2 fluctuations, yet it remains unknown how their mitochondrial functions are regulated to sustain energy metabolism and prevent cellular damage during hypoxia and reoxygenation (H/R). We used metabolic control analysis to investigate the mechanisms of mitochondrial responses to H/R stress (18 h at <0.1% O2 followed by 1 h of reoxygenation) using hypoxia-tolerant intertidal clams Mercenaria mercenaria and hypoxia-sensitive subtidal scallops Argopecten irradians as models. We also assessed H/R-induced changes in cellular energy balance, oxidative damage and unfolded protein response to determine the potential links between mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular injury. Mitochondrial responses to H/R in scallops strongly resembled those in other hypoxia-sensitive organisms. Exposure to hypoxia followed by reoxygenation led to a strong decrease in the substrate oxidation (SOX) and phosphorylation (PHOS) capacities as well as partial depolarization of mitochondria of scallops. Elevated mRNA expression of a reactive oxygen species-sensitive enzyme aconitase and Lon protease (responsible for degradation of oxidized mitochondrial proteins) during H/R stress was consistent with elevated levels of oxidative stress in mitochondria of scallops. In hypoxia-tolerant clams, mitochondrial SOX capacity was enhanced during hypoxia and continued rising during the first hour of reoxygenation. In both species, the mitochondrial PHOS capacity was suppressed during hypoxia, likely to prevent ATP wastage by the reverse action of FO,F1-ATPase. The PHOS capacity recovered after 1 h of reoxygenation in clams but not in scallops. Compared with scallops, clams showed a greater suppression of energy-consuming processes (such as protein turnover and ion transport) during hypoxia, indicated

  2. Altered lysosomal positioning affects lysosomal functions in a cellular model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Erie, Christine; Sacino, Matthew; Houle, Lauren; Lu, Michael L; Wei, Jianning

    2015-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary and devastating neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation in the huntingtin protein. Understanding the functions of normal and mutant huntingtin protein is the key to revealing the pathogenesis of HD and developing therapeutic targets. Huntingtin plays an important role in vesicular and organelle trafficking. Lysosomes are dynamic organelles that integrate several degradative pathways and regulate the activity of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). In the present study, we found that the perinuclear accumulation of lysosomes was increased in a cellular model of HD derived from HD knock-in mice and primary fibroblasts from an HD patient. This perinuclear lysosomal accumulation could be reversed when normal huntingtin was overexpressed in HD cells. When we further investigated the functional significance of the increased perinuclear lysosomal accumulation in HD cells, we demonstrated that basal mTORC1 activity was increased in HD cells. In addition, autophagic influx was also increased in HD cells in response to serum deprivation, which leads to premature fusion of lysosomes with autophagosomes. Taken together, our data suggest that the increased perinuclear accumulation of lysosomes may play an important role in HD pathogenesis by altering lysosomal-dependent functions. PMID:25997742

  3. Intermediate Filaments as Organizers of Cellular Space: How They Affect Mitochondrial Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz, Nicole; Leube, Rudolf E.

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filaments together with actin filaments and microtubules form the cytoskeleton, which is a complex and highly dynamic 3D network. Intermediate filaments are the major mechanical stress protectors but also affect cell growth, differentiation, signal transduction, and migration. Using intermediate filament-mitochondrial crosstalk as a prominent example, this review emphasizes the importance of intermediate filaments as crucial organizers of cytoplasmic space to support these functions. We summarize observations in different mammalian cell types which demonstrate how intermediate filaments influence mitochondrial morphology, subcellular localization, and function through direct and indirect interactions and how perturbations of these interactions may lead to human diseases. PMID:27399781

  4. Reduction of Cellular Expression Levels Is a Common Feature of Functionally Affected Pendrin (SLC26A4) Protein Variants

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Vanessa C S; Bernardinelli, Emanuele; Zocal, Nathalia; Fernandez, Jhonathan A; Nofziger, Charity; Castilho, Arthur M; Sartorato, Edi L; Paulmichl, Markus; Dossena, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Sequence alterations in the pendrin gene (SLC26A4) leading to functionally affected protein variants are frequently involved in the pathogenesis of syndromic and nonsyndromic deafness. Considering the high number of SLC26A4 sequence alterations reported to date, discriminating between functionally affected and unaffected pendrin protein variants is essential in contributing to determine the genetic cause of deafness in a given patient. In addition, identifying molecular features common to the functionally affected protein variants can be extremely useful to design future molecule-directed therapeutic approaches. Here we show the functional and molecular characterization of six previously uncharacterized pendrin protein variants found in a cohort of 58 Brazilian deaf patients. Two variants (p.T193I and p.L445W) were undetectable in the plasma membrane, completely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and showed no transport function; four (p.P142L, p.G149R, p.C282Y and p.Q413R) showed reduced function and significant, although heterogeneous, expression levels in the plasma membrane. Importantly, total expression levels of all of the functionally affected protein variants were significantly reduced with respect to the wild-type and a fully functional variant (p.R776C), regardless of their subcellular localization. Interestingly, reduction of expression may also reduce the transport activity of variants with an intrinsic gain of function (p.Q413R). As reduction of overall cellular abundance was identified as a common molecular feature of pendrin variants with affected function, the identification of strategies to prevent reduction in expression levels may represent a crucial step of potential future therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring the transport activity of dysfunctional pendrin variants. PMID:26752218

  5. Hox Targets and Cellular Functions

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Herrero, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    Hox genes are a group of genes that specify structures along the anteroposterior axis in bilaterians. Although in many cases they do so by modifying a homologous structure with a different (or no) Hox input, there are also examples of Hox genes constructing new organs with no homology in other regions of the body. Hox genes determine structures though the regulation of targets implementing cellular functions and by coordinating cell behavior. The genetic organization to construct or modify a certain organ involves both a genetic cascade through intermediate transcription factors and a direct regulation of targets carrying out cellular functions. In this review I discuss new data from genome-wide techniques, as well as previous genetic and developmental information, to describe some examples of Hox regulation of different cell functions. I also discuss the organization of genetic cascades leading to the development of new organs, mainly using Drosophila melanogaster as the model to analyze Hox function. PMID:24490109

  6. Cellular Functions of Tissue Transglutaminase

    PubMed Central

    Nurminskaya, Maria V.; Belkin, Alexey M.

    2013-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2 or tissue transglutaminase) is a highly complex multifunctional protein that acts as transglutaminase, GTPase/ATPase, protein disulfide isomerase, and protein kinase. Moreover, TG2 has many well-documented nonenzymatic functions that are based on its noncovalent interactions with multiple cellular proteins. A vast array of biochemical activities of TG2 accounts for its involvement in a variety of cellular processes, including adhesion, migration, growth, survival, apoptosis, differentiation, and extracellular matrix organization. In turn, the impact of TG2 on these processes implicates this protein in various physiological responses and pathological states, contributing to wound healing, inflammation, autoimmunity, neurodegeneration, vascular remodeling, tumor growth and metastasis, and tissue fibrosis. TG2 is ubiquitously expressed and is particularly abundant in endothelial cells, fibroblasts, osteoblasts, monocytes/macrophages, and smooth muscle cells. The protein is localized in multiple cellular compartments, including the nucleus, cytosol, mitochondria, endolysosomes, plasma membrane, and cell surface and extracellular matrix, where Ca2+, nucleotides, nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species, membrane lipids, and distinct protein–protein interactions in the local microenvironment jointly regulate its activities. In this review, we discuss the complex biochemical activities and molecular interactions of TG2 in the context of diverse subcellular compartments and evaluate its wide ranging and cell type-specific biological functions and their regulation. PMID:22364871

  7. Cellular functions of the microprocessor.

    PubMed

    Macias, Sara; Cordiner, Ross A; Cáceres, Javier F

    2013-08-01

    The microprocessor is a complex comprising the RNase III enzyme Drosha and the double-stranded RNA-binding protein DGCR8 (DiGeorge syndrome critical region 8 gene) that catalyses the nuclear step of miRNA (microRNA) biogenesis. DGCR8 recognizes the RNA substrate, whereas Drosha functions as an endonuclease. Recent global analyses of microprocessor and Dicer proteins have suggested novel functions for these components independent of their role in miRNA biogenesis. A HITS-CLIP (high-throughput sequencing of RNA isolated by cross-linking immunoprecipitation) experiment designed to identify novel substrates of the microprocessor revealed that this complex binds and regulates a large variety of cellular RNAs. The microprocessor-mediated cleavage of several classes of RNAs not only regulates transcript levels, but also modulates alternative splicing events, independently of miRNA function. Importantly, DGCR8 can also associate with other nucleases, suggesting the existence of alternative DGCR8 complexes that may regulate the fate of a subset of cellular RNAs. The aim of the present review is to provide an overview of the diverse functional roles of the microprocessor.

  8. Do calcium-mediated cellular signalling pathways, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), estrogen or progesterone receptor antagonists, or bacterial endotoxins affect bovine placental function in vitro?

    PubMed

    Weems, Y S; Randel, R D; Carstens, G E; Welsh, T H; Weems, C W

    2004-04-01

    media treated with RU-486 increased (P < or = 0.05) at 4 and 8 h compared to vehicle controls and was not affected by other treatments (P > or = 0.05). Concentrations of PGE2 in media at 4 and 8 h were lower (P < or = 0.05) when compared to controls except treatment with PGE2 at 4 and 8h and RU-486 at 8h (P > or = 0.05). PGF2alpha was increased (P < or = 0.05) by RU-486 at 8h and no other treatment affected PGF2alpha at 4 or 8 h (P < or = 0.05). In conclusion, modulators of cellular calcium signalling pathways given alone do not affect bovine placental progesterone secretion at the days studied and progesterone receptor-mediated events appear to suppress placental progesterone, PGF2alpha, and PGE2 secretion in cattle. In addition, PGE2 does not appear to regulate bovine placental progesterone secretion when the corpus luteum is functional and bacterial endotoxin does not appear to affect bovine placental secretion of PGF2alpha or PGE2. PMID:15287156

  9. Molecular kinesis in cellular function and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Tiedge, H; Bloom, F E; Richter, D

    2001-06-19

    Intracellular transport and localization of cellular components are essential for the functional organization and plasticity of eukaryotic cells. Although the elucidation of protein transport mechanisms has made impressive progress in recent years, intracellular transport of RNA remains less well understood. The National Academy of Sciences Colloquium on Molecular Kinesis in Cellular Function and Plasticity therefore was devised as an interdisciplinary platform for participants to discuss intracellular molecular transport from a variety of different perspectives. Topics covered at the meeting included RNA metabolism and transport, mechanisms of protein synthesis and localization, the formation of complex interactive protein ensembles, and the relevance of such mechanisms for activity-dependent regulation and synaptic plasticity in neurons. It was the overall objective of the colloquium to generate momentum and cohesion for the emerging research field of molecular kinesis.

  10. Cellular metabolism and macrophage functional polarization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Linnan; Zhao, Qingjie; Yang, Tao; Ding, Wenjun; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are a functionally heterogeneous cell population that is mainly shaped by a variety of microenvironmental stimuli. Interferon γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induce a classical activation of macrophages (M1), whereas IL-4 and IL-13 induce an alternative activation program in macrophages (M2). Reprogramming of intracellular metabolisms is required for the proper polarization and functions of activated macrophages. Similar to the Warburg effect observed in tumor cells, M1 macrophages increase glucose consumption and lactate release and decreased oxygen consumption rate. In comparison, M2 macrophages mainly employ oxidative glucose metabolism pathways. In addition, fatty acids, vitamins, and iron metabolisms are also related to macrophage polarization. However, detailed metabolic pathways involved in macrophages have remained elusive. Understanding the bidirectional interactions between cellular metabolism and macrophage functions in physiological and pathological situations and the regulatory pathways involved may offer novel therapies for macrophage-associated diseases.

  11. Functional and cellular adaptations of rodent skeletal muscle to weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caiozzo, Vincent J.; Haddad, Fadia; Baker, Michael J.; Baldwin, Kenneth M.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the affects of microgravity upon three key cellular levels (functional, protein, and mRNA) that are linked to one another. It is clear that at each of these levels, microgravity produces rapid and substantial alterations. One of the key challenges facing the life science community is the development of effective countermeasures that prevent the loss of muscle function as described in this paper. The development of optimal countermeasures, however, awaits a clearer understanding of events occurring at the levels of transcription, translation, and degradation.

  12. Myosin VI: cellular functions and motor properties.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rhys; Lister, Ida; Schmitz, Stephan; Walker, Matthew; Veigel, Claudia; Trinick, John; Buss, Folma; Kendrick-Jones, John

    2004-01-01

    Myosin VI has been localized in membrane ruffles at the leading edge of cells, at the trans-Golgi network compartment of the Golgi complex and in clathrin-coated pits or vesicles, indicating that it functions in a wide variety of intracellular processes. Myosin VI moves along actin filaments towards their minus end, which is the opposite direction to all of the other myosins so far studied (to our knowledge), and is therefore thought to have unique properties and functions. To investigate the cellular roles of myosin VI, we identified various myosin VI binding partners and are currently characterizing their interactions within the cell. As an alternative approach, we have expressed and purified full-length myosin VI and studied its in vitro properties. Previous studies assumed that myosin VI was a dimer, but our biochemical, biophysical and electron microscopic studies reveal that myosin VI can exist as a stable monomer. We observed, using an optical tweezers force transducer, that monomeric myosin VI is a non-processive motor which, despite a relatively short lever arm, generates a large working stroke of 18 nm. Whether monomer and/or dimer forms of myosin VI exist in cells and their possible functions will be discussed. PMID:15647169

  13. Myosin VI: cellular functions and motor properties.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Rhys; Lister, Ida; Schmitz, Stephan; Walker, Matthew; Veigel, Claudia; Trinick, John; Buss, Folma; Kendrick-Jones, John

    2004-12-29

    Myosin VI has been localized in membrane ruffles at the leading edge of cells, at the trans-Golgi network compartment of the Golgi complex and in clathrin-coated pits or vesicles, indicating that it functions in a wide variety of intracellular processes. Myosin VI moves along actin filaments towards their minus end, which is the opposite direction to all of the other myosins so far studied (to our knowledge), and is therefore thought to have unique properties and functions. To investigate the cellular roles of myosin VI, we identified various myosin VI binding partners and are currently characterizing their interactions within the cell. As an alternative approach, we have expressed and purified full-length myosin VI and studied its in vitro properties. Previous studies assumed that myosin VI was a dimer, but our biochemical, biophysical and electron microscopic studies reveal that myosin VI can exist as a stable monomer. We observed, using an optical tweezers force transducer, that monomeric myosin VI is a non-processive motor which, despite a relatively short lever arm, generates a large working stroke of 18 nm. Whether monomer and/or dimer forms of myosin VI exist in cells and their possible functions will be discussed. PMID:15647169

  14. Sperm function in affective illness.

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, J; Winokur, A; Levin, R

    1981-04-01

    There is evidence for functional changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of patients with affective disorders. Little is known concerning spermatogenesis or sperm function in depressed men. We systematically evaluated the sperm indices in a group of depressed males complaining of diminished libido, and a healthy control group. No differences were noted in sperm parameters between the groups.

  15. Short-term exposure to engineered nanomaterials affects cellular epigenome

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Pirela, Sandra V.; Melnyk, Stepan; Koturbash, Igor; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Extensive incorporation of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) into industrial and biomedical applications increases the risks of exposure to these potentially hazardous materials. While the geno- and cytotoxic effects of ENMs have been investigated, the potential of ENMs to target the cellular epigenome remains largely unknown. Our goal was to determine whether or not industry relevant ENMs can affect the epigenome at low cytotoxic doses. A panel of cells relevant to inhalation exposures such as human and murine macrophages (THP-1 and RAW264.7, respectively) and human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) were exposed to printer-emitted engineered nanoparticles (PEPs), mild steel welding fumes (MS-WF), copper oxide (CuO), and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles. Toxicological effects, including cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses were assessed, taking into consideration in-vitro dosimetry. The effects of ENMs on cellular epigenome were determined by addressing the global and transposable elements (TEs)-associated DNA methylation and expression of DNA methylation machinery and TEs. The percentage of ENMs-induced cytotoxicity for all cell lines was in the range of 0-15%. Oxidative stress was evident in SAEC after exposure to PEPs and in THP-1 when exposed to CuO. Additionally, exposure to ENMs resulted in modest alterations in DNA methylation of two most abundant TEs in mammalian genomes, LINE-1 and Alu/SINE, their transcriptional reactivation, and decreased expression of DNA methylation machinery in a cell-, dose-, and ENM-dependent manner. These results indicate that exposure to ENMs at environmentally relevant concentrations, aside from the geno- and cytotoxic effects, can also affect the epigenome of target cells. PMID:25938281

  16. Role of XPD in cellular functions: To TFIIH and beyond.

    PubMed

    Houten, Bennett Van; Kuper, Jochen; Kisker, Caroline

    2016-08-01

    XPD, as part of the TFIIH complex, has classically been linked to the damage verification step of nucleotide excision repair (NER). However, recent data indicate that XPD, due to its iron-sulfur center interacts with the iron sulfur cluster assembly proteins, and may interact with other proteins in the cell to mediate a diverse set of biological functions including cell cycle regulation, mitosis, and mitochondrial function. In this perspective, after first reviewing the function and some of the key disease causing variants that affect XPD's interaction with TFIIH and the CDK-activating kinase complex (CAK), we investigate these intriguing cellular roles of XPD and highlight important unanswered questions that provide a fertile ground for further scientific exploration. PMID:27262611

  17. Regulation of cell function by the cellular hydration state.

    PubMed

    Häussinger, D; Lang, F; Gerok, W

    1994-09-01

    Cellular hydration can change within minutes under the influence of hormones, nutrients, and oxidative stress. Such short-term modulation of cell volume within a narrow range acts per se as a potent signal which modifies cellular metabolism and gene expression. It appears that cell swelling and cell shrinkage lead to certain opposite patterns of cellular metabolic function. Apparently, hormones and amino acids can trigger those patterns simply by altering cell volume. Thus alterations of cellular hydration may represent another important mechanism for metabolic control and act as another second or third messenger linking cell function to hormonal and environmental alterations.

  18. Regulation of SIRT1 in cellular functions: role of polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sangwoon; Yao, Hongwei; Caito, Samuel; Hwang, Jae-Woong; Arunachalam, Gnanapragasam; Rahman, Irfan

    2010-09-01

    Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is known to deacetylate histones and non-histone proteins including transcription factors thereby regulating metabolism, stress resistance, cellular survival, cellular senescence/aging, inflammation-immune function, endothelial functions, and circadian rhythms. Naturally occurring dietary polyphenols, such as resveratrol, curcumin, quercetin, and catechins, have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties via modulating different pathways, such as NF-kappaB- and mitogen activated protein kinase-dependent signaling pathways. In addition, these polyphenols have also been shown to activate SIRT1 directly or indirectly in a variety of models. Therefore, activation of SIRT1 by polyphenols is beneficial for regulation of calorie restriction, oxidative stress, inflammation, cellular senescence, autophagy/apoptosis, autoimmunity, metabolism, adipogenesis, circadian rhythm, skeletal muscle function, mitochondria biogenesis and endothelial dysfunction. In this review, we describe the regulation of SIRT1 by dietary polyphenols in various cellular functions in response to environmental and pro-inflammatory stimuli.

  19. Modelling thymic functions in a cellular automaton.

    PubMed

    Morpurgo, D; Serenthà, R; Seiden, P E; Celada, F

    1995-04-01

    Along the lines developed by Celada and Seiden, for simulating an immune system by means of cellular automata, we have constructed a 'thymus' where T cells undergo positive and negative selection. The populations thus 'matured' have been analyzed and their performance has been tested in machina. The key feature of this thymus is to allow chance meeting and possible interaction between newly born T cells and antigen presenting cells. The latter represent both the epithelial and the dendritic cells of the biological organ and are equipped with MHC molecules that can accommodate selected self peptides. All possible specificities are represented among the virgin T cells entering the thymus, but this diversity is drastically reduced by the time they exit as mature elements. In the model organ the fate of T cells, i.e. whether they will undergo proliferation or apoptosis, is governed by their capacity to recognize MHCs and the affinity of this interaction. Crucial parameters turn out to be the concentration of presenting cells, the number of types of MHC per cell, the 'size of self' in terms of the number of different peptides and their prevalence. According to the results, events in the automaton can realize unforeseen cooperations and competitions among receptors, depending upon the interaction order and frequency, and ultimately determine the rescue or the killing of thymocytes. Thus the making of the mature T repertoire has a random component and cannot be completely predicted.

  20. Cellular and molecular basis of cholinergic function

    SciTech Connect

    Dowdall, M.J.; Hawthorne, J.N.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 105 selections. Some of the titles are: Functional correlates of brain nicotine receptors; Muscarinic receptor subclasses; Cholinergic innervation and levels of nerve growth factor and its mRNA in the central nervous system; Developmentally regulated neurontrophic activities of Torpedo electric organ tissue; and Association of a regulatory peptide with cholinergic neurons.

  1. Microgravity and Cellular Consequences in Lymphocyte Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellis, Neal R.; Sundaresan, Alamelu

    2004-01-01

    Mammalian cells adapt to the environment of low gravity and express a series of responses, some possibly from direct effects on cells and others based on environmental conditions created by microgravity. Human lymphocytes in microgravity culture are functionally diminished in activation and locomotion. Both processes are integral to optimal immune response to fight pathogens. The NASA Rotating-wall vessel (RWV) is a well-accepted analog for microgravity culture on the ground. Gene array experiments and immunoblotting identified upstream events in human lymphocytes adapting to microgravity analog culture. Microgravity induces selective changes, many of which are cell membrane related. Results showed that upstream of PKC in the T cell activation cascade, PLC-gamma and LAT are significantly diminished. ZAP 70 which controls LAT activation is also down regulated in modeled microgravity. Thus events governing cell shape might warrant attention in microgravity conditions. The goal of this study is to delineate response suites that are consequential, direct or indirect effects of the microgravity environment and which of these are essential to lymphocytes

  2. Cellular functions of TMEM16/anoctamin.

    PubMed

    Oh, Uhtaek; Jung, Jooyoung

    2016-03-01

    Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (CaCCs) are a class of Cl(-) channels activated by intracellular Ca(2+) that are known to mediate numerous physiological functions. In 2008, the molecular identity of CaCCs was found to be anoctamin 1 (ANO1/TMEM16A). Its roles have been studied in electrophysiological, histological, and genetic aspects. ANO1 is known to mediate Cl(-) secretion in secretory epithelia such as airways, salivary glands, intestines, renal tubules, and sweat glands. ANO1 is a heat sensor activated by noxious heat in somatosensory neurons and mediates acute pain sensation as well as chronic pain. ANO1 is also observed in vascular as well as airway smooth muscles, controlling vascular tone as well as airway hypersensitivity. ANO1 is upregulated in numerous types of cancers and thus thought to be involved in tumorigenesis. ANO1 is also found in proliferating cells. In addition to ANO1, involvement of its paralogs in pathophysiological conditions was also reported. ANO2 is involved in olfaction, whereas ANO6 works as a scramblase whose mutation causes a rare bleeding disorder, the Scott syndrome. ANO5 is associated with muscle and bone diseases. Recently, an X-ray crystal structure of a fungal TMEM16 was reported, which explains a precise molecular gating mechanism as well as ion conduction or phospholipid transport across the plasma membrane. PMID:26811235

  3. Functional roles for myosin 1c in cellular signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Lisa M.; Brandstaetter, Hemma; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2013-01-01

    Cellular signaling pathways underlie the transfer of information throughout the cell and to adjoining cells and so govern most critical cellular functions. Increasing evidence points to the molecular motor myosin 1c as a prominent player in many signaling cascades, from the integrin-dependent signaling involved in cell migration to the signaling events underlying insulin resistance. Myosin 1c functions on these pathways both via an important role in regulating lipid raft recycling and also via direct involvement in signaling cascades. This review provides an overview of the functional involvement of myosin 1c in cellular signaling and discusses the possible potential for myosin 1c as a target for drug-based treatments for human diseases. PMID:23022959

  4. Placebo Sleep Affects Cognitive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draganich, Christina; Erdal, Kristi

    2014-01-01

    The placebo effect is any outcome that is not attributed to a specific treatment but rather to an individual's mindset (Benson & Friedman, 1996). This phenomenon can extend beyond its typical use in pharmaceutical drugs to involve aspects of everyday life, such as the effect of sleep on cognitive functioning. In 2 studies examining whether…

  5. Computer Modeling of the Earliest Cellular Structures and Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Chipot, Christophe; Schweighofer, Karl

    2000-01-01

    In the absence of extinct or extant record of protocells (the earliest ancestors of contemporary cells). the most direct way to test our understanding of the origin of cellular life is to construct laboratory models of protocells. Such efforts are currently underway in the NASA Astrobiology Program. They are accompanied by computational studies aimed at explaining self-organization of simple molecules into ordered structures and developing designs for molecules that perform proto-cellular functions. Many of these functions, such as import of nutrients, capture and storage of energy. and response to changes in the environment are carried out by proteins bound to membrane< We will discuss a series of large-scale, molecular-level computer simulations which demonstrate (a) how small proteins (peptides) organize themselves into ordered structures at water-membrane interfaces and insert into membranes, (b) how these peptides aggregate to form membrane-spanning structures (eg. channels), and (c) by what mechanisms such aggregates perform essential proto-cellular functions, such as proton transport of protons across cell walls, a key step in cellular bioenergetics. The simulations were performed using the molecular dynamics method, in which Newton's equations of motion for each item in the system are solved iteratively. The problems of interest required simulations on multi-nanosecond time scales, which corresponded to 10(exp 6)-10(exp 8) time steps.

  6. Nanotopographical modification: a regulator of cellular function through focal adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Manus Jonathan Paul; Richards, R. Geoff; Dalby, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    As materials technology and the field of biomedical engineering advances, the role of cellular mechanisms, in particular adhesive interactions with implantable devices, becomes more relevant in both research and clinical practice. A key tenet of medical device design has evolved from the exquisite ability of biological systems to respond to topographical features or chemical stimuli, a process that has led to the development of next-generation biomaterials for a wide variety of clinical disorders. In vitro studies have identified nanoscale features as potent modulators of cellular behavior through the onset of focal adhesion formation. The focus of this review is on the recent developments concerning the role of nanoscale structures on integrin-mediated adhesion and cellular function with an emphasis on the generation of medical constructs with regenerative applications. PMID:20138244

  7. Kinetic Adaptations of Myosins for Their Diverse Cellular Functions.

    PubMed

    Heissler, Sarah M; Sellers, James R

    2016-08-01

    Members of the myosin superfamily are involved in all aspects of eukaryotic life. Their function ranges from the transport of organelles and cargos to the generation of membrane tension, and the contraction of muscle. The diversity of physiological functions is remarkable, given that all enzymatically active myosins follow a conserved mechanoenzymatic cycle in which the hydrolysis of ATP to ADP and inorganic phosphate is coupled to either actin-based transport or tethering of actin to defined cellular compartments. Kinetic capacities and limitations of a myosin are determined by the extent to which actin can accelerate the hydrolysis of ATP and the release of the hydrolysis products and are indispensably linked to its physiological tasks. This review focuses on kinetic competencies that - together with structural adaptations - result in myosins with unique mechanoenzymatic properties targeted to their diverse cellular functions.

  8. Methods for Determining the Cellular Functions of Vimentin Intermediate Filaments.

    PubMed

    Ridge, Karen M; Shumaker, Dale; Robert, Amélie; Hookway, Caroline; Gelfand, Vladimir I; Janmey, Paul A; Lowery, Jason; Guo, Ming; Weitz, David A; Kuczmarski, Edward; Goldman, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    The type III intermediate filament protein vimentin was once thought to function mainly as a static structural protein in the cytoskeleton of cells of mesenchymal origin. Now, however, vimentin is known to form a dynamic, flexible network that plays an important role in a number of signaling pathways. Here, we describe various methods that have been developed to investigate the cellular functions of the vimentin protein and intermediate filament network, including chemical disruption, photoactivation and photoconversion, biolayer interferometry, soluble bead binding assay, three-dimensional substrate experiments, collagen gel contraction, optical-tweezer active microrheology, and force spectrum microscopy. Using these techniques, the contributions of vimentin to essential cellular processes can be probed in ever further detail.

  9. Cellular strategies for regulating functional and nonfunctional protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Gsponer, Jörg; Babu, M Madan

    2012-11-29

    Growing evidence suggests that aggregation-prone proteins are both harmful and functional for a cell. How do cellular systems balance the detrimental and beneficial effect of protein aggregation? We reveal that aggregation-prone proteins are subject to differential transcriptional, translational, and degradation control compared to nonaggregation-prone proteins, which leads to their decreased synthesis, low abundance, and high turnover. Genetic modulators that enhance the aggregation phenotype are enriched in genes that influence expression homeostasis. Moreover, genes encoding aggregation-prone proteins are more likely to be harmful when overexpressed. The trends are evolutionarily conserved and suggest a strategy whereby cellular mechanisms specifically modulate the availability of aggregation-prone proteins to (1) keep concentrations below the critical ones required for aggregation and (2) shift the equilibrium between the monomeric and oligomeric/aggregate form, as explained by Le Chatelier's principle. This strategy may prevent formation of undesirable aggregates and keep functional assemblies/aggregates under control. PMID:23168257

  10. Methods for Determining the Cellular Functions of Vimentin Intermediate Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, Karen M.; Shumaker, Dale; Robert, Amélie; Hookway, Caroline; Gelfand, Vladimir I.; Janmey, Paul A.; Lowery, Jason; Guo, Ming; Weitz, David A.; Kuczmarski, Edward; Goldman, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    The type III intermediate filament protein vimentin was once thought to function mainly as a static structural protein in the cytoskeleton of cells of mesenchymal origin. Now, however, vimentin is known to form a dynamic, flexible network that plays an important role in a number of signaling pathways. Here, we describe various methods that have been developed to investigate the cellular functions of the vimentin protein and intermediate filament network, including chemical disruption, photoactivation and photoconversion, biolayer interferometry, soluble bead binding assay, three-dimensional substrate experiments, collagen gel contraction, optical-tweezer active microrheology, and force spectrum microscopy. Using these techniques, the contributions of vimentin to essential cellular processes can be probed in ever further detail. PMID:26795478

  11. Representing and analysing molecular and cellular function using the computer.

    PubMed

    van Helden, J; Naim, A; Mancuso, R; Eldridge, M; Wernisch, L; Gilbert, D; Wodak, S J

    2000-01-01

    Determining the biological function of a myriad of genes, and understanding how they interact to yield a living cell, is the major challenge of the post genome-sequencing era. The complexity of biological systems is such that this cannot be envisaged without the help of powerful computer systems capable of representing and analysing the intricate networks of physical and functional interactions between the different cellular components. In this review we try to provide the reader with an appreciation of where we stand in this regard. We discuss some of the inherent problems in describing the different facets of biological function, give an overview of how information on function is currently represented in the major biological databases, and describe different systems for organising and categorising the functions of gene products. In a second part, we present a new general data model, currently under development, which describes information on molecular function and cellular processes in a rigorous manner. The model is capable of representing a large variety of biochemical processes, including metabolic pathways, regulation of gene expression and signal transduction. It also incorporates taxonomies for categorising molecular entities, interactions and processes, and it offers means of viewing the information at different levels of resolution, and dealing with incomplete knowledge. The data model has been implemented in the database on protein function and cellular processes 'aMAZE' (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/research/pfbp/), which presently covers metabolic pathways and their regulation. Several tools for querying, displaying, and performing analyses on such pathways are briefly described in order to illustrate the practical applications enabled by the model.

  12. The phosphate makes a difference: cellular functions of NADP.

    PubMed

    Agledal, Line; Niere, Marc; Ziegler, Mathias

    2010-01-01

    Recent research has unraveled a number of unexpected functions of the pyridine nucleotides. In this review, we will highlight the variety of known physiological roles of NADP. In its reduced form (NADPH), this molecule represents a universal electron donor, not only to drive biosynthetic pathways. Perhaps even more importantly, NADPH is the unique provider of reducing equivalents to maintain or regenerate the cellular detoxifying and antioxidative defense systems. The roles of NADPH in redox sensing and as substrate for NADPH oxidases to generate reactive oxygen species further extend its scope of functions. NADP(+), on the other hand, has acquired signaling functions. Its conversion to second messengers in calcium signaling may have critical impact on important cellular processes. The generation of NADP by NAD kinases is a key determinant of the cellular NADP concentration. The regulation of these enzymes may, therefore, be critical to feed the diversity of NADP-dependent processes adequately. The increasing recognition of the multiple roles of NADP has thus led to exciting new insights in this expanding field.

  13. Membrane-Based Functions in the Origin of Cellular Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipot, Christophe; New, Michael H.; Schweighofer, Karl; Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    1999-01-01

    Our objective is to help explain how the earliest ancestors of contemporary cells (protocells) performed their essential functions employing only the molecules available in the protobiological milieu. Our hypothesis is that vesicles, built of amphiphilic, membrane-forming materials, emerged early in protobiological evolution and served as precursors to protocells. We further assume that the cellular functions associated with contemporary membranes, such as capturing and, transducing of energy, signaling, or sequestering organic molecules and ions, evolved in these membrane environments. An alternative hypothesis is that these functions evolved in different environments and were incorporated into membrane-bound structures at some later stage of evolution. We focus on the application of the fundamental principles of physics and chemistry to determine how they apply to the formation of a primitive, functional cell. Rather than attempting to develop specific models for cellular functions and to identify the origin of the molecules which perform these functions, our goal is to define the structural and energetic conditions that any successful model must fulfill, therefore providing physico-chemical boundaries for these models. We do this by carrying out large-scale, molecular level computer simulations on systems of interest.

  14. Using RNA as Molecular Code for Programming Cellular Function.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Manish; Rostain, William; Prakash, Satya; Duncan, John N; Jaramillo, Alfonso

    2016-08-19

    RNA is involved in a wide-range of important molecular processes in the cell, serving diverse functions: regulatory, enzymatic, and structural. Together with its ease and predictability of design, these properties can lead RNA to become a useful handle for biological engineers with which to control the cellular machinery. By modifying the many RNA links in cellular processes, it is possible to reprogram cells toward specific design goals. We propose that RNA can be viewed as a molecular programming language that, together with protein-based execution platforms, can be used to rewrite wide ranging aspects of cellular function. In this review, we catalogue developments in the use of RNA parts, methods, and associated computational models that have contributed to the programmability of biology. We discuss how RNA part repertoires have been combined to build complex genetic circuits, and review recent applications of RNA-based parts and circuitry. We explore the future potential of RNA engineering and posit that RNA programmability is an important resource for firmly establishing an era of rationally designed synthetic biology. PMID:26999422

  15. PEG functionalized luminescent lipid particles for cellular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, Suman; Barick, K. C.; Shetake, Neena G.; Verma, Gunjan; Aswal, V. K.; Panicker, Lata; Pandey, B. N.; Hassan, P. A.

    2016-08-01

    We report here the synthesis, characterization and cellular uptake of luminescent micelle-like particles with phospholipid core and non-ionic PEG based surfactant polysorbate 80 shell. The adsorption of polysorbate 80 at the interface of lipid containing microemulsion droplets and its solidification upon removal of solvent leads to anchoring of PEG chain to the lipid particles. Hydrophobic partitioning of luminescent molecules, sodium 3-hydroxynaphthalene-2-carboxylic acid to the phospholipid core offers additional functionality to these particles. Thus, the cooperative assembly of lipid, non-ionic amphiphile and organic luminescent probe leads to the formation of multifunctional biocompatible particles which are useful for simultaneous imaging and therapy.

  16. Assemblages: Functional units formed by cellular phase separation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    The partitioning of intracellular space beyond membrane-bound organelles can be achieved with collections of proteins that are multivalent or contain low-complexity, intrinsically disordered regions. These proteins can undergo a physical phase change to form functional granules or other entities within the cytoplasm or nucleoplasm that collectively we term “assemblage.” Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) play an important role in forming a subset of cellular assemblages by promoting phase separation. Recent work points to an involvement of assemblages in disease states, indicating that intrinsic disorder and phase transitions should be considered in the development of therapeutics. PMID:25179628

  17. Toward a biaxial model of "bipolar" affective disorders: further exploration of genetic, molecular and cellular substrates.

    PubMed

    Askland, Kathleen

    2006-08-01

    functioning--neuroelectrical and neurochemical. The class(es) of primary genetic alteration (i.e., neuroelectrical, neurochemical or both) determines the type, while the locus and specific allelic variant determines the direction, of pathologic trait alteration(s). In addition to the class, locus and allelic variant of the primary genetic alteration, the cellular--and system-level expressions-including functional trait interaction therein--determine the nature and degree of clinical expression of each trait. Finally, the type, direction and presence of functional interaction between pathologic alterations would indicate the most appropriate pharmacology.

  18. Neurophysiology of HCN channels: from cellular functions to multiple regulations.

    PubMed

    He, Chao; Chen, Fang; Li, Bo; Hu, Zhian

    2014-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) cation channels are encoded by HCN1-4 gene family and have four subtypes. These channels are activated upon hyperpolarization of membrane potential and conduct an inward, excitatory current Ih in the nervous system. Ih acts as pacemaker current to initiate rhythmic firing, dampen dendritic excitability and regulate presynaptic neurotransmitter release. This review summarizes recent insights into the cellular functions of Ih and associated behavior such as learning and memory, sleep and arousal. HCN channels are excellent targets of various cellular signals to finely regulate neuronal responses to external stimuli. Numerous mechanisms, including transcriptional control, trafficking, as well as channel assembly and modification, underlie HCN channel regulation. In the next section, we discuss how the intracellular signals, especially recent findings concerning protein kinases and interacting proteins such as cGKII, Ca(2+)/CaMKII and TRIP8b, regulate function and expression of HCN channels, and subsequently provide an overview of the effects of neurotransmitters on HCN channels and their corresponding intracellular mechanisms. We also discuss the dysregulation of HCN channels in pathological conditions. Finally, insight into future directions in this exciting area of ion channel research is provided.

  19. Cellular Strategies for Regulating Functional and Nonfunctional Protein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Gsponer, Jörg; Babu, M. Madan

    2012-01-01

    Summary Growing evidence suggests that aggregation-prone proteins are both harmful and functional for a cell. How do cellular systems balance the detrimental and beneficial effect of protein aggregation? We reveal that aggregation-prone proteins are subject to differential transcriptional, translational, and degradation control compared to nonaggregation-prone proteins, which leads to their decreased synthesis, low abundance, and high turnover. Genetic modulators that enhance the aggregation phenotype are enriched in genes that influence expression homeostasis. Moreover, genes encoding aggregation-prone proteins are more likely to be harmful when overexpressed. The trends are evolutionarily conserved and suggest a strategy whereby cellular mechanisms specifically modulate the availability of aggregation-prone proteins to (1) keep concentrations below the critical ones required for aggregation and (2) shift the equilibrium between the monomeric and oligomeric/aggregate form, as explained by Le Chatelier’s principle. This strategy may prevent formation of undesirable aggregates and keep functional assemblies/aggregates under control. PMID:23168257

  20. Integrated Nanoplasmonic Sensing for Cellular Functional Immunoanalysis Using Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) nanoplasmonic effects allow for label-free, real-time detection of biomolecule binding events on a nanostructured metallic surface with simple optics and sensing tunability. Despite numerous reports on LSPR bionanosensing in the past, no study thus far has applied the technique for a cytokine secretion assay using clinically relevant immune cells from human blood. Cytokine secretion assays, a technique to quantify intercellular-signaling proteins secreted by blood immune cells, allow determination of the functional response of the donor’s immune cells, thus providing valuable information about the immune status of the donor. However, implementation of LSPR bionanosensing in cellular functional immunoanalysis based on a cytokine secretion assay poses major challenges primarily owing to its limited sensitivity and a lack of sufficient sample handling capability. In this paper, we have developed a label-free LSPR biosensing technique to detect cell-secreted tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α cytokines in clinical blood samples. Our approach integrates LSPR bionanosensors in an optofluidic platform that permits trapping and stimulation of target immune cells in a microfluidic chamber with optical access for subsequent cytokine detection. The on-chip spatial confinement of the cells is the key to rapidly increasing a cytokine concentration high enough for detection by the LSPR setup, thereby allowing the assay time and sample volume to be significantly reduced. We have successfully applied this approach first to THP-1 cells and then later to CD45 cells isolated directly from human blood. Our LSPR optofluidics device allows for detection of TNF-α secreted from cells as few as 1000, which translates into a nearly 100 times decrease in sample volume than conventional cytokine secretion assay techniques require. We achieved cellular functional immunoanalysis with a minimal blood sample volume (3 μL) and a total assay time 3 times

  1. Electrostatic bio-manipulation for the modification of cellular functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washizu, Masao

    2013-03-01

    The use of electrostatic field effects, including field-induced reversible-breakdown of the membrane and dielectrophoresis (DEP), in microfabricated structures are investigated. With the use of field constriction created by a micro-orifice whose diameter is smaller than the cells, controlled magnitude of pulsed voltage can be applied across the cell membrane regardless of the cell size, shape or orientation. As a result, the breakdown occurs reproducibly and with minimal invasiveness. The breakdown is used for two purposes, electroporation by which foreign substances can be fed into cells, and electrofusion which creates genetic and/or cytoplasmic mixture among two cells. When GFP plasmid is fed into MSC cell, the gene expression started within 2 hours, and finally observed in more than 50% of cells. For cell fusion, several ten percent fusion yield is achieved for most cell types, with the colony formation in several percents. Timing-controlled feeding foreign substances or mixing cellular contents, with high-yield and low-invasiveness, is expected to bring about a new technology for both genetic and epigenetic modifications of cellular functions, in such field as regenerative medicine.

  2. Dissecting the cellular functions of plant microtubules using mutant tubulins.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Takashi

    2013-04-01

    α- and β-tubulins, the building blocks of the microtubule (MT) polymer, are encoded by multiple genes that are largely functionally redundant in plants. Null tubulin mutants are thus phenotypically indistinguishable from the wild type, but miss-sense or deletion mutations of critical amino acid residues that are important for the assembly, stability, or dynamics of the polymer disrupt the proper organization and function of the resultant MT arrays. Mutant tubulins co-assemble with wild-type tubulins into mutant MTs with compromised functions, and thus mechanistically act as dominant-negative MT poisons. Cortical MT arrays in interphase plant cells are most sensitive to tubulin mutations, and are transformed into helical structures or random orientation, which produce twisted or radially swollen cells. Mutant plants resistant to MT-targeted herbicides may possess tubulin mutations at the binding sites of the herbicides. Tubulin mutants are valuable tools for investigating how individual MTs are organized into particular patterns in cortical arrays, and for defining the functional contribution of MTs to various MT-dependent or -assisted cellular processes in plant cells.

  3. Rejuvenating cellular respiration for optimizing respiratory function: targeting mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anurag; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan

    2016-01-15

    Altered bioenergetics with increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and degradation of epithelial function are key aspects of pathogenesis in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This motif is not unique to obstructive airway disease, reported in related airway diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia and parenchymal diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis. Similarly, mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular endothelium or skeletal muscles contributes to the development of pulmonary hypertension and systemic manifestations of lung disease. In experimental models of COPD or asthma, the use of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, such as MitoQ, has substantially improved mitochondrial health and restored respiratory function. Modulation of noncoding RNA or protein regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, or degradation has been found to be effective in models of fibrosis, emphysema, asthma, and pulmonary hypertension. Transfer of healthy mitochondria to epithelial cells has been associated with remarkable therapeutic efficacy in models of acute lung injury and asthma. Together, these form a 3R model--repair, reprogramming, and replacement--for mitochondria-targeted therapies in lung disease. This review highlights the key role of mitochondrial function in lung health and disease, with a focus on asthma and COPD, and provides an overview of mitochondria-targeted strategies for rejuvenating cellular respiration and optimizing respiratory function in lung diseases.

  4. The endoplasmic reticulum: structure, function and response to cellular signaling.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Dianne S; Blower, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a large, dynamic structure that serves many roles in the cell including calcium storage, protein synthesis and lipid metabolism. The diverse functions of the ER are performed by distinct domains; consisting of tubules, sheets and the nuclear envelope. Several proteins that contribute to the overall architecture and dynamics of the ER have been identified, but many questions remain as to how the ER changes shape in response to cellular cues, cell type, cell cycle state and during development of the organism. Here we discuss what is known about the dynamics of the ER, what questions remain, and how coordinated responses add to the layers of regulation in this dynamic organelle. PMID:26433683

  5. Alpha-Synuclein Function and Dysfunction on Cellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Snead, David

    2014-01-01

    Alpha-synuclein is a small neuronal protein that is closely associated with the etiology of Parkinson's disease. Mutations in and alterations in expression levels of alpha-synuclein cause autosomal dominant early onset heredity forms of Parkinson's disease, and sporadic Parkinson's disease is defined in part by the presence of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites that are composed primarily of alpha-synuclein deposited in an aggregated amyloid fibril state. The normal function of alpha-synuclein is poorly understood, and the precise mechanisms by which it leads to toxicity and cell death are also unclear. Although alpha-synuclein is a highly soluble, cytoplasmic protein, it binds to a variety of cellular membranes of different properties and compositions. These interactions are considered critical for at least some normal functions of alpha-synuclein, and may well play critical roles in both the aggregation of the protein and its mechanisms of toxicity. Here we review the known features of alpha-synuclein membrane interactions in the context of both the putative functions of the protein and of its pathological roles in disease. PMID:25548530

  6. Phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate: metabolism and cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Michell, Robert H; Heath, Victoria L; Lemmon, Mark A; Dove, Stephen K

    2006-01-01

    Polyphosphoinositides (PPIn) are low-abundance membrane phospholipids that each bind to a distinctive set of effector proteins and, thereby, regulate a characteristic suite of cellular processes. Major functions of phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(3,5)P(2)] are in membrane and protein trafficking, and in pH control in the endosome-lysosome axis. Recently identified PtdIns(3,5)P(2) effectors include a family of novel beta-propeller proteins, for which we propose the name PROPPINs [for beta-propeller(s) that binds PPIn], and possibly proteins of the epsin and CHMP (charged multi-vesicular body proteins) families. All eukaryotes, with the exception of some pathogenic protists and microsporidians, possess proteins needed for the formation, metabolism and functions of PtdIns(3,5)P(2). The importance of PtdIns(3,5)P(2) for normal cell function is underscored by recent evidence for its involvement in mammalian cell responses to insulin and for PtdIns(3,5)P(2) dysfunction in the human genetic conditions X-linked myotubular myopathy, Type-4B Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease and fleck corneal dystrophy.

  7. Degradation of plasma membrane phosphatidylcholine appears not to affect the cellular cholesterol distribution.

    PubMed

    Pörn, M I; Ares, M P; Slotte, J P

    1993-08-01

    To clarify the role of possible cholesterol/phosphatidylcholine interactions in cellular cholesterol distribution, we have used a phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus to degrade the cell surface phosphatidylcholine of cultured human fibroblasts. Of cellular phosphatidylcholine, approximately 15% was susceptible to degradation by the phospholipase. In spite of the dramatic redistribution of cellular cholesterol that can be observed after sphingomyelin depletion, the degradation of cell surface phosphatidylcholine did not affect the distribution of cholesterol in fibroblasts. In cholesterol-depleted cells as well as in cholesterol-loaded cells, the size of the cell surface cholesterol pool (susceptible to cholesterol oxidase) remained unchanged after phosphatidylcholine degradation. The rate of cholesterol esterification with [3H]oleic acid and the rate of [3H]cholesterol efflux from fibroblasts to high density lipoproteins also remained unchanged after degradation of plasma membrane phosphatidylcholine. An increase in the level of [3H]cholesterol efflux to high density lipoproteins was observed after degradation of plasma membrane sphingomyelin with exogenous sphingomyelinase, in-contrast to earlier reports, where no such effect was observed. The results suggest that interactions between cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine in the fibroblast plasma membranes are less important than cholesterol/sphingomyelin interactions for the asymmetric distribution of cellular cholesterol.

  8. Natural Products as Tools for Defining How Cellular Metabolism Influences Cellular Immune and Inflammatory Function during Chronic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lovelace, Erica S.; Polyak, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic viral infections like those caused by hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) cause disease that establishes an ongoing state of chronic inflammation. While there have been tremendous improvements towards curing HCV with directly acting antiviral agents (DAA) and keeping HIV viral loads below detection with antiretroviral therapy (ART), there is still a need to control inflammation in these diseases. Recent studies indicate that many natural products like curcumin, resveratrol and silymarin alter cellular metabolism and signal transduction pathways via enzymes such as adenosine monophosphate kinase (AMPK) and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), and these pathways directly influence cellular inflammatory status (such as NF-κB) and immune function. Natural products represent a vast toolkit to dissect and define how cellular metabolism controls cellular immune and inflammatory function. PMID:26633463

  9. Membrane-Based Functions in the Origin of Cellular Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    How simple membrane peptides performed such essential proto-cellular functions as transport of ions and organic matter across membranes separating the interior of the cell from the environment, capture and utilization of energy, and transduction of environmental signals, is a key question in protobiological evolution. On the basis of detailed, molecular-level computer simulations we investigate how these peptides insert into membranes, self-assemble into higher-order structures and acquire functions. We have studied the insertion of an a-helical peptide containing leucine (L) and serine (S) of the form (LSLLLSL)S into a model membrane. The transmembrane state is metastable, and approximately 15 kcal/mol is required to insert the peptide into the membrane. Investigations of dimers formed by (LSLLLSL)S and glycophorin A demonstrate how the favorable free energy of helix association can offset the unfavorable free energy of insertion, leading to self- assembly of peptide helices in the membrane. An example of a self-assembled structure is the tetrameric transmembrane pore of the influenza virus M2 protein, which is an efficient and selective voltage-gated proton channel. Our simulations explain the gating mechanism and provide guidelines how to reengineering the channel to act as a simple proton pump. In general, emergence of integral membrane proteins appears to be quite feasible and may be easier to envision than the emergence of water-soluble proteins.

  10. Compact Biocompatible Quantum Dots Functionalized for Cellular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenhao; Howarth, Mark; Greytak, Andrew B.; Zheng, Yi; Nocera, Daniel G.; Ting, Alice Y.; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2009-01-01

    We present a family of water-soluble quantum dots (QDs) that exhibit low nonspecific binding to cells, small hydrodynamic diameter, tunable surface charge, high quantum yield, and good solution stability across a wide pH range. These QDs are amenable to covalent modification via simple carbodiimide coupling chemistry, which is achieved by functionalizing the surface of QDs with a new class of heterobifunctional ligands incorporating dihydrolipoic acid, a short poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) spacer, and an amine or carboxylate terminus. The covalent attachment of molecules is demonstrated by appending a rhodamine dye to form a QD-dye conjugate exhibiting fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). High-affinity labeling is demonstrated by covalent attachment of streptavidin, thus enabling the tracking of biotinylated epidermal growth factor (EGF) bound to EGF receptor on live cells. In addition, QDs solubilized with the heterobifunctional ligands retain their metal-affinity driven conjugation chemistry with polyhistidine-tagged proteins. This dual functionality is demonstrated by simultaneous covalent attachment of a rhodamine FRET acceptor and binding of polyhistidine-tagged streptavidin on the same nanocrystal to create a targeted QD, which exhibits dual-wavelength emission. Such emission properties could serve as the basis for ratiometric sensing of the cellular receptor’s local chemical environment. PMID:18177042

  11. A structural and functional homolog supports a general role for frataxin in cellular iron chemistry.

    PubMed

    Qi, Wenbin; Cowan, J A

    2010-02-01

    Bacillus subtilis YdhG lacks sequence homology, but demonstrates structural and functional similarity to the frataxin family, supporting a general cellular role for frataxin-type proteins in cellular iron homeostasis.

  12. Cellular Functions of NSF: Not Just SNAPs and SNAREs

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chunxia; Slevin, John T.; Whiteheart, Sidney W.

    2007-01-01

    NSF is an AAA protein, broadly required for intracellular membrane fusion. NSF functions as a SNARE chaperone which binds, through SNAPs, to SNARE complexes and utilizes the energy of ATP hydrolysis to disassemble them thus facilitating SNARE recycling. While this is a major function of NSF, it does seem to interact with other proteins, such as the AMPA receptor subunit, GluR2, and β2-AR and is thought to affect their trafficking patterns. New data suggest that NSF may be regulated by transient post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and nitrosylation. These new aspects of NSF function as well as its role in SNARE complex dynamics will be discussed. PMID:17397838

  13. Soil restoration with organic amendments: linking cellular functionality and ecosystem processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastida, F.; Selevsek, N.; Torres, I. F.; Hernández, T.; García, C.

    2015-10-01

    A hot topic in recent decades, the application of organic amendments to arid-degraded soils has been shown to benefit microbially-mediated processes. However, despite the importance of soils for global sustainability, a gap has not been addressed yet in soil science: is there any connection between ecosystem-community processes, cellular functionality, and microbial lifestyles (i.e. oligotrophy-copiotrophy) in restored soils? Together with classical ecosystem indicators (fatty-acids, extracellular-enzyme activities, basal respiration), state-of-the-art metaproteomics was applied to fill this gap in a model-restoration experiment initiated 10-years ago by the addition of sewage-sludge and compost. Organic amendment strongly impacted ecosystem processes. Furthermore, the type of material used induced differences in the cellular functionalities through variations in the percentages of proteins involved in translation, transcription, energy production and C-fixation. We conclude that the long-term impact of organic restoration goes beyond ecosystem processes and affects cellular functionalities and phyla-lifestyles coupled with differences in microbial-community structures.

  14. Soil restoration with organic amendments: linking cellular functionality and ecosystem processes.

    PubMed

    Bastida, F; Selevsek, N; Torres, I F; Hernández, T; García, C

    2015-10-27

    A hot topic in recent decades, the application of organic amendments to arid-degraded soils has been shown to benefit microbially-mediated processes. However, despite the importance of soils for global sustainability, a gap has not been addressed yet in soil science: is there any connection between ecosystem-community processes, cellular functionality, and microbial lifestyles (i.e. oligotrophy-copiotrophy) in restored soils? Together with classical ecosystem indicators (fatty-acids, extracellular-enzyme activities, basal respiration), state-of-the-art metaproteomics was applied to fill this gap in a model-restoration experiment initiated 10-years ago by the addition of sewage-sludge and compost. Organic amendment strongly impacted ecosystem processes. Furthermore, the type of material used induced differences in the cellular functionalities through variations in the percentages of proteins involved in translation, transcription, energy production and C-fixation. We conclude that the long-term impact of organic restoration goes beyond ecosystem processes and affects cellular functionalities and phyla-lifestyles coupled with differences in microbial-community structures.

  15. Soil restoration with organic amendments: linking cellular functionality and ecosystem processes

    PubMed Central

    Bastida, F.; Selevsek, N.; Torres, I. F.; Hernández, T.; García, C.

    2015-01-01

    A hot topic in recent decades, the application of organic amendments to arid-degraded soils has been shown to benefit microbially-mediated processes. However, despite the importance of soils for global sustainability, a gap has not been addressed yet in soil science: is there any connection between ecosystem-community processes, cellular functionality, and microbial lifestyles (i.e. oligotrophy-copiotrophy) in restored soils? Together with classical ecosystem indicators (fatty-acids, extracellular-enzyme activities, basal respiration), state-of-the-art metaproteomics was applied to fill this gap in a model-restoration experiment initiated 10-years ago by the addition of sewage-sludge and compost. Organic amendment strongly impacted ecosystem processes. Furthermore, the type of material used induced differences in the cellular functionalities through variations in the percentages of proteins involved in translation, transcription, energy production and C-fixation. We conclude that the long-term impact of organic restoration goes beyond ecosystem processes and affects cellular functionalities and phyla-lifestyles coupled with differences in microbial-community structures. PMID:26503516

  16. Soil restoration with organic amendments: linking cellular functionality and ecosystem processes.

    PubMed

    Bastida, F; Selevsek, N; Torres, I F; Hernández, T; García, C

    2015-01-01

    A hot topic in recent decades, the application of organic amendments to arid-degraded soils has been shown to benefit microbially-mediated processes. However, despite the importance of soils for global sustainability, a gap has not been addressed yet in soil science: is there any connection between ecosystem-community processes, cellular functionality, and microbial lifestyles (i.e. oligotrophy-copiotrophy) in restored soils? Together with classical ecosystem indicators (fatty-acids, extracellular-enzyme activities, basal respiration), state-of-the-art metaproteomics was applied to fill this gap in a model-restoration experiment initiated 10-years ago by the addition of sewage-sludge and compost. Organic amendment strongly impacted ecosystem processes. Furthermore, the type of material used induced differences in the cellular functionalities through variations in the percentages of proteins involved in translation, transcription, energy production and C-fixation. We conclude that the long-term impact of organic restoration goes beyond ecosystem processes and affects cellular functionalities and phyla-lifestyles coupled with differences in microbial-community structures. PMID:26503516

  17. Cellular function of neuropathy target esterase in lysophosphatidylcholine action

    SciTech Connect

    Vose, Sarah C.; Fujioka, Kazutoshi; Gulevich, Alex G.; Lin, Amy Y.; Holland, Nina T.; Casida, John E.

    2008-11-01

    Neuropathy target esterase (NTE) plays critical roles in embryonic development and maintenance of peripheral axons. It is a secondary target of some organophosphorus toxicants including analogs of insecticides and chemical warfare agents. Although the mechanistic role of NTE in vivo is poorly defined, it is known to hydrolyze lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) in vitro and may protect cell membranes from cytotoxic accumulation of LPC. To determine the cellular function of NTE, Neuro-2a and COS-7 cells were transfected with a full-length human NTE-containing plasmid yielding recombinant NTE (rNTE). We find the same inhibitor sensitivity and specificity profiles for rNTE assayed with LPC or phenyl valerate (a standard NTE substrate) and that this correlation extends to the LPC hydrolases of human brain, lymphocytes and erythrocytes. All of these LPC hydrolases are therefore very similar to each other in respect to a conserved inhibitor binding site conformation. NTE is expressed in brain and lymphocytes and contributes to LPC hydrolase activities in these tissues. The enzyme or enzymes responsible for erythrocyte LPC hydrolase activity remain to be identified. We also show that rNTE protects Neuro-2a and COS-7 cells from exogenous LPC cytotoxicity. Expression of rNTE in Neuro-2a cells alters their phospholipid balance (analyzed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry with single ion monitoring) by lowering LPC-16:0 and LPC-18:0 and elevating glycerophosphocholine without a change in phosphatidylcholine-16:0/18:1 or 16:0/18:2. NTE therefore serves an important function in LPC homeostasis and action.

  18. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments. PMID:27729845

  19. New structural and functional defects in polyphosphate deficient bacteria: A cellular and proteomic study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP), a polymer of tens or hundreds of phosphate residues linked by ATP-like bonds, is found in all organisms and performs a wide variety of functions. PolyP is synthesized in bacterial cells by the actions of polyphosphate kinases (PPK1 and PPK2) and degraded by exopolyphosphatase (PPX). Bacterial cells with polyP deficiencies due to knocking out the ppk1 gene are affected in many structural and important cellular functions such as motility, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and virulence among others. The cause of this pleiotropy is not entirely understood. Results The overexpression of exopolyphosphatase in bacteria mimicked some pleitropic defects found in ppk1 mutants. By using this approach we found new structural and functional defects in the polyP-accumulating bacteria Pseudomonas sp. B4, which are most likely due to differences in the polyP-removal strategy. Colony morphology phenotype, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) structure changes and cellular division malfunction were observed. Finally, we used comparative proteomics in order to elucidate the cellular adjustments that occurred during polyP deficiency in this bacterium and found some clues that helped to understand the structural and functional defects observed. Conclusions The results obtained suggest that during polyP deficiency energy metabolism and particularly nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) formation were affected and that bacterial cells overcame this problem by increasing the flux of energy-generating metabolic pathways such as tricarboxilic acid (TCA) cycle, β-oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation and by reducing energy-consuming ones such as active transporters and amino acid biosynthesis. Furthermore, our results suggest that a general stress response also took place in the cell during polyP deficiency. PMID:20067623

  20. miR clusters target cellular functional complexes by defining their degree of regulatory freedom.

    PubMed

    Haier, Jörg; Ströse, Anda; Matuszcak, Christiane; Hummel, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Using the two paralog miR-23∼27∼24 clusters as an example and combining experimental and clinical data in a systematical approach to microRNA (miR) function and dysregulation, a complex picture of their roles in cancer is drawn. Various findings appear to be contradictory to a larger extent and cannot be fully explained by the classical regulatory network models and feedback loops that are mainly considered by one-to-one regulatory interactions of the involved molecules. Here, we propose an extended model of the regulatory role of miRs that, at least, supplements the usually considered single/oligo-target regulation of certain miRs. The cellular availability of the participating miR members in this model reflects an upper hierarchy level of intracellular and extracellular environmental influences, such as neighboring cells, soluble factors, hypoxia, chemotherapeutic drugs, and irradiation, among others. The novel model is based on the understanding of cellular functional complexes, such as for apoptosis, migration, and proliferation. These complexes consist of many regulatory components that can be targeted by miR cluster members to a different extent but may affect the functional complex in different ways. We propose that the final miR-related effect is a result of the possible degree of regulatory freedom provided by the miR effects on the whole functional complex structure. This degree of regulatory freedom defines to which extent the cellular functional complex can react in response to regulatory triggers, also understood as sensitization (more regulatory response options) or de-sensitization (less regulatory response options) of the system rather than single molecules.

  1. Molecular and cellular functions of the FANCJ DNA helicase defective in cancer and in Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Brosh, Robert M.; Cantor, Sharon B.

    2014-01-01

    The FANCJ DNA helicase is mutated in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer as well as the progressive bone marrow failure disorder Fanconi anemia (FA). FANCJ is linked to cancer suppression and DNA double strand break repair through its direct interaction with the hereditary breast cancer associated gene product, BRCA1. FANCJ also operates in the FA pathway of interstrand cross-link repair and contributes to homologous recombination. FANCJ collaborates with a number of DNA metabolizing proteins implicated in DNA damage detection and repair, and plays an important role in cell cycle checkpoint control. In addition to its role in the classical FA pathway, FANCJ is believed to have other functions that are centered on alleviating replication stress. FANCJ resolves G-quadruplex (G4) DNA structures that are known to affect cellular replication and transcription, and potentially play a role in the preservation and functionality of chromosomal structures such as telomeres. Recent studies suggest that FANCJ helps to maintain chromatin structure and preserve epigenetic stability by facilitating smooth progression of the replication fork when it encounters DNA damage or an alternate DNA structure such as a G4. Ongoing studies suggest a prominent but still not well-understood role of FANCJ in transcriptional regulation, chromosomal structure and function, and DNA damage repair to maintain genomic stability. This review will synthesize our current understanding of the molecular and cellular functions of FANCJ that are critical for chromosomal integrity. PMID:25374583

  2. Contaminant loading in remote Arctic lakes affects cellular stress-related proteins expression in feral charr.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiseman, Steve; Jorgensen, Even H.; Maule, Alec G.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2011-01-01

    The remote Arctic lakes on Bjornoya Island, Norway, offer a unique opportunity to study possible affect of lifelong contaminant exposure in wild populations of landlocked Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). This is because Lake Ellasjoen has persistent organic pollutant (POP) levels that are significantly greater than in the nearby Lake Oyangen. We examined whether this differential contaminant loading was reflected in the expression of protein markers of exposure and effect in the native fish. We assessed the expressions of cellular stress markers, including cytochrome P4501A (Cyp1A), heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in feral charr from the two lakes. The average polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) load in the charr liver from Ellasjoen was approximately 25-fold higher than in individuals from Oyangen. Liver Cyp1A protein expression was significantly higher in individuals from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen, confirming differential PCB exposure. There was no significant difference in hsp70 protein expression in charr liver between the two lakes. However, brain hsp70 protein expression was significantly elevated in charr from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen. Also, liver GR protein expression was significantly higher in the Ellasjoen charr compared with Oyangen charr. Taken together, our results suggest changes to cellular stress-related protein expression as a possible adaptation to chronic-contaminant exposure in feral charr in the Norwegian high-Arctic.

  3. The translational machinery is an optimized molecular network that affects cellular homoeostasis and disease.

    PubMed

    Kazana, Eleanna; von der Haar, Tobias

    2014-02-01

    Translation involves interactions between mRNAs, ribosomes, tRNAs and a host of translation factors. Emerging evidence on the eukaryotic translational machinery indicates that these factors are organized in a highly optimized network, in which the levels of the different factors are finely matched to each other. This optimal factor network is essential for producing proteomes that result in optimal fitness, and perturbations to the optimal network that significantly affect translational activity therefore result in non-optimal proteomes, fitness losses and disease. On the other hand, experimental evidence indicates that translation and cell growth are relatively robust to perturbations, and viability can be maintained even upon significant damage to individual translation factors. How the eukaryotic translational machinery is optimized, and how it can maintain optimization in the face of changing internal parameters, are open questions relevant to the interaction between translation and cellular disease states.

  4. In situ CUTANEOUS CELLULAR IMMUNE RESPONSE IN DOGS NATURALLY AFFECTED BY VISCERAL LEISHMANIASIS.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Claudio Nazaretian; Tomokane, Thaise Yumie; Batista, Luis Fábio da Silva; Marcondes, Mary; Larsson, Carlos Eduardo; Laurenti, Márcia Dalastra

    2016-07-11

    Thirty-eight dogs naturally affected by visceral leishmaniasis were recruited in Araçatuba, São Paulo State, Brazil - an endemic area for visceral leishmaniasis. The animals were distributed into one of two groups, according to their clinical and laboratory features, as either symptomatic or asymptomatic dogs. Correlations between clinical features and inflammatory patterns, cellular immune responses, and parasitism in the macroscopically uninjured skin of the ear were investigated. Histological skin patterns were similar in both groups, and were generally characterized by a mild to intense inflammatory infiltrate in the dermis, mainly consisting of mononuclear cells. There was no difference in the number of parasites in the skin (amastigotes/mm²) between the two groups. Concerning the characterization of the cellular immune response, the number of positive inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS+) cells was higher in the dermis of symptomatic than in asymptomatic dogs (p = 0.0368). A positive correlation between parasite density and macrophages density (p = 0.031), CD4+ T-cells (p = 0.015), and CD8+ T-cells (p = 0.023) was observed. Furthermore, a positive correlation between density of iNOS+ cells and CD3+ T-cells (p = 0.005), CD4+ T-cells (p = 0.001), and CD8+ T-cells (p = 0.0001) was also found. The results showed the existence of a non-specific chronic inflammatory infiltrate in the dermis of dogs affected by visceral leishmaniasis, characterized by the presence of activated macrophages and T-lymphocytes, associated to cutaneous parasitism, independent of clinical status. PMID:27410908

  5. In situ CUTANEOUS CELLULAR IMMUNE RESPONSE IN DOGS NATURALLY AFFECTED BY VISCERAL LEISHMANIASIS

    PubMed Central

    ROSSI, Claudio Nazaretian; TOMOKANE, Thaise Yumie; BATISTA, Luis Fábio da Silva; MARCONDES, Mary; LARSSON, Carlos Eduardo; LAURENTI, Márcia Dalastra

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Thirty-eight dogs naturally affected by visceral leishmaniasis were recruited in Araçatuba, São Paulo State, Brazil - an endemic area for visceral leishmaniasis. The animals were distributed into one of two groups, according to their clinical and laboratory features, as either symptomatic or asymptomatic dogs. Correlations between clinical features and inflammatory patterns, cellular immune responses, and parasitism in the macroscopically uninjured skin of the ear were investigated. Histological skin patterns were similar in both groups, and were generally characterized by a mild to intense inflammatory infiltrate in the dermis, mainly consisting of mononuclear cells. There was no difference in the number of parasites in the skin (amastigotes/mm²) between the two groups. Concerning the characterization of the cellular immune response, the number of positive inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS+) cells was higher in the dermis of symptomatic than in asymptomatic dogs (p = 0.0368). A positive correlation between parasite density and macrophages density (p = 0.031), CD4+ T-cells (p = 0.015), and CD8+ T-cells (p = 0.023) was observed. Furthermore, a positive correlation between density of iNOS+ cells and CD3+ T-cells (p = 0.005), CD4+ T-cells (p = 0.001), and CD8+ T-cells (p = 0.0001) was also found. The results showed the existence of a non-specific chronic inflammatory infiltrate in the dermis of dogs affected by visceral leishmaniasis, characterized by the presence of activated macrophages and T-lymphocytes, associated to cutaneous parasitism, independent of clinical status. PMID:27410908

  6. Cellular Engineering with Membrane Fusogenic Liposomes to Produce Functionalized Extracellular Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junsung; Lee, Hyoungjin; Goh, Unbyeol; Kim, Jiyoung; Jeong, Moonkyoung; Lee, Jean; Park, Ji-Ho

    2016-03-23

    Engineering of extracellular vesicles (EVs) without affecting biological functions remains a challenge, limiting the broad applications of EVs in biomedicine. Here, we report a method to equip EVs with various functional agents, including fluorophores, drugs, lipids, and bio-orthogonal chemicals, in an efficient and controlled manner by engineering parental cells with membrane fusogenic liposomes, while keeping the EVs intact. As a demonstration of how this method can be applied, we prepared EVs containing azide-lipids, and conjugated them with targeting peptides using copper-free click chemistry to enhance targeting efficacy to cancer cells. We believe that this liposome-based cellular engineering method will find utility in studying the biological roles of EVs and delivering therapeutic agents through their innate pathway. PMID:26954538

  7. SUMOylation affects the interferon blocking activity of the influenza A nonstructural protein NS1 without affecting its stability or cellular localization.

    PubMed

    Santos, Andres; Pal, Sangita; Chacón, Jason; Meraz, Katherine; Gonzalez, Jeanette; Prieto, Karla; Rosas-Acosta, Germán

    2013-05-01

    Our pioneering studies on the interplay between the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) and influenza A virus identified the nonstructural protein NS1 as the first known SUMO target of influenza virus and one of the most abundantly SUMOylated influenza virus proteins. Here, we further characterize the role of SUMOylation for the A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8) NS1 protein, demonstrating that NS1 is SUMOylated not only by SUMO1 but also by SUMO2/3 and mapping the main SUMOylation sites in NS1 to residues K219 and K70. Furthermore, by using SUMOylatable and non-SUMOylatable forms of NS1 and an NS1-specific artificial SUMO ligase (ASL) that increases NS1 SUMOylation ~4-fold, we demonstrate that SUMOylation does not affect the stability or cellular localization of PR8 NS1. However, NS1's ability to be SUMOylated appears to affect virus multiplication, as indicated by the delayed growth of a virus expressing the non-SUMOylatable form of NS1 in the interferon (IFN)-competent MDCK cell line. Remarkably, while a non-SUMOylatable form of NS1 exhibited a substantially diminished ability to neutralize IFN production, increasing NS1 SUMOylation beyond its normal levels also exerted a negative effect on its IFN-blocking function. This observation indicates the existence of an optimal level of NS1 SUMOylation that allows NS1 to achieve maximal activity and suggests that the limited amount of SUMOylation normally observed for most SUMO targets may correspond to an optimal level that maximizes the contribution of SUMOylation to protein function. Finally, protein cross-linking data suggest that SUMOylation may affect NS1 function by regulating the abundance of NS1 dimers and trimers in the cell.

  8. SUMOylation Affects the Interferon Blocking Activity of the Influenza A Nonstructural Protein NS1 without Affecting Its Stability or Cellular Localization

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Andres; Pal, Sangita; Chacón, Jason; Meraz, Katherine; Gonzalez, Jeanette; Prieto, Karla

    2013-01-01

    Our pioneering studies on the interplay between the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) and influenza A virus identified the nonstructural protein NS1 as the first known SUMO target of influenza virus and one of the most abundantly SUMOylated influenza virus proteins. Here, we further characterize the role of SUMOylation for the A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8) NS1 protein, demonstrating that NS1 is SUMOylated not only by SUMO1 but also by SUMO2/3 and mapping the main SUMOylation sites in NS1 to residues K219 and K70. Furthermore, by using SUMOylatable and non-SUMOylatable forms of NS1 and an NS1-specific artificial SUMO ligase (ASL) that increases NS1 SUMOylation ∼4-fold, we demonstrate that SUMOylation does not affect the stability or cellular localization of PR8 NS1. However, NS1's ability to be SUMOylated appears to affect virus multiplication, as indicated by the delayed growth of a virus expressing the non-SUMOylatable form of NS1 in the interferon (IFN)-competent MDCK cell line. Remarkably, while a non-SUMOylatable form of NS1 exhibited a substantially diminished ability to neutralize IFN production, increasing NS1 SUMOylation beyond its normal levels also exerted a negative effect on its IFN-blocking function. This observation indicates the existence of an optimal level of NS1 SUMOylation that allows NS1 to achieve maximal activity and suggests that the limited amount of SUMOylation normally observed for most SUMO targets may correspond to an optimal level that maximizes the contribution of SUMOylation to protein function. Finally, protein cross-linking data suggest that SUMOylation may affect NS1 function by regulating the abundance of NS1 dimers and trimers in the cell. PMID:23468495

  9. Cellular localization of long non-coding RNAs affects silencing by RNAi more than by antisense oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Lennox, Kim A.; Behlke, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified in mammalian cells. Some have important functions and their dysregulation can contribute to a variety of disease states. However, most lncRNAs have not been functionally characterized. Complicating their study, lncRNAs have widely varying subcellular distributions: some reside predominantly in the nucleus, the cytoplasm or in both compartments. One method to query function is to suppress expression and examine the resulting phenotype. Methods to suppress expression of mRNAs include antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and RNA interference (RNAi). Antisense and RNAi-based gene-knockdown methods vary in efficacy between different cellular compartments. It is not known if this affects their ability to suppress lncRNAs. To address whether localization of the lncRNA influences susceptibility to degradation by either ASOs or RNAi, nuclear lncRNAs (MALAT1 and NEAT1), cytoplasmic lncRNAs (DANCR and OIP5-AS1) and dual-localized lncRNAs (TUG1, CasC7 and HOTAIR) were compared for knockdown efficiency. We found that nuclear lncRNAs were more effectively suppressed using ASOs, cytoplasmic lncRNAs were more effectively suppressed using RNAi and dual-localized lncRNAs were suppressed using both methods. A mixed-modality approach combining ASOs and RNAi reagents improved knockdown efficacy, particularly for those lncRNAs that localize to both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. PMID:26578588

  10. Cellular localization of long non-coding RNAs affects silencing by RNAi more than by antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Kim A; Behlke, Mark A

    2016-01-29

    Thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified in mammalian cells. Some have important functions and their dysregulation can contribute to a variety of disease states. However, most lncRNAs have not been functionally characterized. Complicating their study, lncRNAs have widely varying subcellular distributions: some reside predominantly in the nucleus, the cytoplasm or in both compartments. One method to query function is to suppress expression and examine the resulting phenotype. Methods to suppress expression of mRNAs include antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and RNA interference (RNAi). Antisense and RNAi-based gene-knockdown methods vary in efficacy between different cellular compartments. It is not known if this affects their ability to suppress lncRNAs. To address whether localization of the lncRNA influences susceptibility to degradation by either ASOs or RNAi, nuclear lncRNAs (MALAT1 and NEAT1), cytoplasmic lncRNAs (DANCR and OIP5-AS1) and dual-localized lncRNAs (TUG1, CasC7 and HOTAIR) were compared for knockdown efficiency. We found that nuclear lncRNAs were more effectively suppressed using ASOs, cytoplasmic lncRNAs were more effectively suppressed using RNAi and dual-localized lncRNAs were suppressed using both methods. A mixed-modality approach combining ASOs and RNAi reagents improved knockdown efficacy, particularly for those lncRNAs that localize to both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. PMID:26578588

  11. Cellular senescence induced by prolonged subculture adversely affects glutamate uptake in C6 lineage.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Mery Stéfani Leivas; Zenki, Kamila; Cavalheiro, Marcela Mendonça; Thomé, Chairini Cássia; Filippi-Chiela, Eduardo Cremonese; Lenz, Guido; de Souza, Diogo Onofre Gomes; de Oliveira, Diogo Losch

    2014-05-01

    Several researchers have recently used C6 cells to evaluate functional properties of high-affinity glutamate transporters. However, it has been demonstrated that this lineage suffers several morphological and biochemical alterations according to the number of passages in culture. Currently, there are no reports showing whether functional properties of high-affinity glutamate transporters comply with these sub culturing-dependent modifications. The present study aimed to compare the functional properties of high-affinity glutamate transporters expressed in early (EPC6) and late (LPC6) passage C6 cells through a detailed pharmacological and biochemical characterization. Between 60-180 min of L-[(3)H]glu incubation, LPC6 presented an intracellular [(3)H] 55% lower than EPC6. Both cultures showed a time-dependent increase of intracellular [(3)H] reaching maximal levels at 120 min. Cultures incubated with D-[(3)H]asp showed a time-dependent increase of [(3)H] until 180 min. Moreover, LPC6 have a D-[(3)H]asp-derived intracellular [(3)H] 30-45% lower than EPC6 until 120 min. Only EAAT3 was immunodetected in cultures and its total content was equal between them. PMA-stimulated EAAT3 trafficking to membrane increased 50% of L-[(3)H]glu-derived intracellular [(3)H] in EPC6 and had no effect in LPC6. LPC6 displayed characteristics that resemble senescence, such as high β-Gal staining, cell enlargement and increase of large and regular nuclei. Our results demonstrated that LPC6 exhibited glutamate uptake impairment, which may have occurred due to its inability to mobilize EAAT3 to cell membrane. This profile might be related to senescent process observed in this culture. Our results suggest that LPC6 cells are an inappropriate glial cellular model to investigate the functional properties of high-affinity glutamate transporters.

  12. Bacterial formyl peptides affect the innate cellular antimicrobial responses of larval Galleria mellonella (Insecta: Lepidoptera).

    PubMed

    Alavo, Thiery B C; Dunphy, Gary B

    2004-04-01

    The non-self cellular (hemocytic) responses of Galleria mellonella larvae, including the attachment to slides and the removal of the bacteria Xenorhabdus nematophila and Bacillus subtilis from the hemolymph, were affected by N-formyl peptides. Both N-formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLF) and the ester derivative decreased hemocyte adhesion in vitro, and both elevated hemocyte counts and suppressed the removal of both X. nematophila and B. subtilis from the hemolymph in vivo. The amide derivative and the antagonist tertiary-butoxy-carbonyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (tBOC) increased hemocyte attachment to glass. The fMLF suppressed protein discharge from monolayers of granular cells with and without bacterial stimulation, while tBOC stimulated protein discharge. The peptide tBOC offset the effects of fMLF in vitro and in vivo. This is the first report implying the existence of formyl peptide receptors on insect hemocytes in which the compounds fMLF and tBOC inhibited and activated hemocyte activity, respectively.

  13. Photothermal cellular stimulation in functional bio-polymer interfaces.

    PubMed

    Martino, Nicola; Feyen, Paul; Porro, Matteo; Bossio, Caterina; Zucchetti, Elena; Ghezzi, Diego; Benfenati, Fabio; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Antognazza, Maria Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid interfaces between organic semiconductors and living tissues represent a new tool for in-vitro and in-vivo applications, bearing a huge potential, from basic researches to clinical applications. In particular, light sensitive conjugated polymers can be exploited as a new approach for optical modulation of cellular activity. In this work we focus on light-induced changes in the membrane potential of Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells grown on top of a poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) thin film. On top of a capacitive charging of the polymer interface, we identify and fully characterize two concomitant mechanisms, leading to membrane depolarization and hyperpolarisation, both mediated by a thermal effect. Our results can be usefully exploited in the creation of a new platform for light-controlled cell manipulation, with possible applications in neuroscience and medicine. PMID:25753132

  14. Photothermal cellular stimulation in functional bio-polymer interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Nicola; Feyen, Paul; Porro, Matteo; Bossio, Caterina; Zucchetti, Elena; Ghezzi, Diego; Benfenati, Fabio; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Antognazza, Maria Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid interfaces between organic semiconductors and living tissues represent a new tool for in-vitro and in-vivo applications, bearing a huge potential, from basic researches to clinical applications. In particular, light sensitive conjugated polymers can be exploited as a new approach for optical modulation of cellular activity. In this work we focus on light-induced changes in the membrane potential of Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells grown on top of a poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) thin film. On top of a capacitive charging of the polymer interface, we identify and fully characterize two concomitant mechanisms, leading to membrane depolarization and hyperpolarisation, both mediated by a thermal effect. Our results can be usefully exploited in the creation of a new platform for light-controlled cell manipulation, with possible applications in neuroscience and medicine. PMID:25753132

  15. Deletion or overexpression of mitochondrial NAD+ carriers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae alters cellular NAD and ATP contents and affects mitochondrial metabolism and the rate of glycolysis.

    PubMed

    Agrimi, Gennaro; Brambilla, Luca; Frascotti, Gianni; Pisano, Isabella; Porro, Danilo; Vai, Marina; Palmieri, Luigi

    2011-04-01

    The modification of enzyme cofactor concentrations can be used as a method for both studying and engineering metabolism. We varied Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial NAD levels by altering expression of its specific mitochondrial carriers. Changes in mitochondrial NAD levels affected the overall cellular concentration of this coenzyme and the cellular metabolism. In batch culture, a strain with a severe NAD depletion in mitochondria succeeded in growing, albeit at a low rate, on fully respiratory media. Although the strain increased the efficiency of its oxidative phosphorylation, the ATP concentration was low. Under the same growth conditions, a strain with a mitochondrial NAD concentration higher than that of the wild type similarly displayed a low cellular ATP level, but its growth rate was not affected. In chemostat cultures, when cellular metabolism was fully respiratory, both mutants showed low biomass yields, indicative of impaired energetic efficiency. The two mutants increased their glycolytic fluxes, and as a consequence, the Crabtree effect was triggered at lower dilution rates. Strikingly, the mutants switched from a fully respiratory metabolism to a respirofermentative one at the same specific glucose flux as that of the wild type. This result seems to indicate that the specific glucose uptake rate and/or glycolytic flux should be considered one of the most important independent variables for establishing the long-term Crabtree effect. In cells growing under oxidative conditions, bioenergetic efficiency was affected by both low and high mitochondrial NAD availability, which suggests the existence of a critical mitochondrial NAD concentration in order to achieve optimal mitochondrial functionality.

  16. Mutations in MCT8 in patients with Allan-Herndon-Dudley-syndrome affecting its cellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Kersseboom, Simone; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Friesema, Edith C H; Visser, W Edward; Klootwijk, Wim; Peeters, Robin P; Visser, Theo J

    2013-05-01

    Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) is a thyroid hormone (TH)-specific transporter. Mutations in the MCT8 gene are associated with Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome (AHDS), consisting of severe psychomotor retardation and disturbed TH parameters. To study the functional consequences of different MCT8 mutations in detail, we combined functional analysis in different cell types with live-cell imaging of the cellular distribution of seven mutations that we identified in patients with AHDS. We used two cell models to study the mutations in vitro: 1) transiently transfected COS1 and JEG3 cells, and 2) stably transfected Flp-in 293 cells expressing a MCT8-cyan fluorescent protein construct. All seven mutants were expressed at the protein level and showed a defect in T3 and T4 transport in uptake and metabolism studies. Three mutants (G282C, P537L, and G558D) had residual uptake activity in Flp-in 293 and COS1 cells, but not in JEG3 cells. Four mutants (G221R, P321L, D453V, P537L) were expressed at the plasma membrane. The mobility in the plasma membrane of P537L was similar to WT, but the mobility of P321L was altered. The other mutants studied (insV236, G282C, G558D) were predominantly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. In essence, loss of function by MCT8 mutations can be divided in two groups: mutations that result in partial or complete loss of transport activity (G221R, P321L, D453V, P537L) and mutations that mainly disturb protein expression and trafficking (insV236, G282C, G558D). The cell type-dependent results suggest that MCT8 mutations in AHDS patients may have tissue-specific effects on TH transport probably caused by tissue-specific expression of yet unknown MCT8-interacting proteins. PMID:23550058

  17. Improved cellular uptake of functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, A.; Serafini, S.; Menotta, M.; Sfara, C.; Pierigé, F.; Giorgi, L.; Ambrosi, G.; Rossi, L.; Magnani, M.

    2010-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) due to their unique structural and physicochemical properties, have been proposed as delivery systems for a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic agents. However, SWNTs have proven difficult to solubilize in aqueous solution, limiting their use in biological applications. In an attempt to improve SWNTs' solubility, biocompatibility, and to increase cell penetration we have thoroughly investigated the construction of carbon scaffolds coated with aliphatic carbon chains and phospholipids to obtain micelle-like structures. At first, oxidized SWNTs (2370 ± 30 nmol mg - 1 of SWNTs) were covalently coupled with an alcoholic chain (stearyl alcohol, C18H37OH; 816 nmol mg - 1 of SWNTs). Subsequently, SWNTs-COOC18H37 derivatives were coated with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) or -serine (PS) phospholipids obtaining micelle-like structures. We found that cellular uptake of these constructs by phagocytic cells occurs via an endocytotic mechanism for constructs larger than 400 nm while occurs via diffusion through the cell membrane for constructs up to 400 nm. The material that enters the cell by phagocytosis is actively internalized by macrophages and localizes inside endocytotic vesicles. In contrast the material that enters the cells by diffusion is found in the cell cytosol. In conclusion, we have realized new biomimetic constructs based on alkylated SWNTs coated with phospholipids that are efficiently internalized by different cell types only if their size is lower than 400 nm. These constructs are not toxic to the cells and could now be explored as delivery systems for non-permeant cargoes.

  18. [Effects of electromagnetic field from cellular phones on selected central nervous system functions: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Bak, Marek; Zmyślony, Marek

    2010-01-01

    In the opinion of some experts, a growing emission of man-made electromagnetic fields (EMF), also known as electromagnetic is a source of continuously increasing health hazards to the general population. Due to their large number and very close proximity to the user's head, mobile phones deserve special attention. This work is intended to give a systematic review of objective studies, assessing the effects of mobile phone EMF on the functions of the central nervous system (CNS) structures. Our review shows that short exposures to mobile phone EMF, experienced by telephone users during receiving calls, do not affect the cochlear function. Effects of GSM mobile phone EMF on the conduction of neural impulses from the inner car neurons to the brainstem auditory centres have not been detected either. If Picton's principle, saying that P300 amplitude varies with the improbability of the targets and its latency varies with difficulty of discriminating the target stimulus from standard stimuli, is true, EMF changes the improbability of the targets without hindering their discrimination. Experiments with use of indirect methods do not enable unequivocal verification of EMF effects on the cognitive functions due to the CNS anatomical and functional complexity. Thus, it seems advisable to develop a model of EMF effects on the excitable brain structures at the cellular level. PMID:21452571

  19. Viral and cellular SOS-regulated motor proteins: dsDNA translocation mechanisms with divergent functions.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Annie; Phipps, Kara; Weitao, Tao

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage attacks on bacterial cells have been known to activate the SOS response, a transcriptional response affecting chromosome replication, DNA recombination and repair, cell division and prophage induction. All these functions require double-stranded (ds) DNA translocation by ASCE hexameric motors. This review seeks to delineate the structural and functional characteristics of the SOS response and the SOS-regulated DNA translocases FtsK and RuvB with the phi29 bacteriophage packaging motor gp16 ATPase as a prototype to study bacterial motors. While gp16 ATPase, cellular FtsK and RuvB are similarly comprised of hexameric rings encircling dsDNA and functioning as ATP-driven DNA translocases, they utilize different mechanisms to accomplish separate functions, suggesting a convergent evolution of these motors. The gp16 ATPase and FtsK use a novel revolution mechanism, generating a power stroke between subunits through an entropy-DNA affinity switch and pushing dsDNA inward without rotation of DNA and the motor, whereas RuvB seems to employ a rotation mechanism that remains to be further characterized. While FtsK and RuvB perform essential tasks during the SOS response, their roles may be far more significant as SOS response is involved in antibiotic-inducible bacterial vesiculation and biofilm formation as well as the perspective of the bacteria-cancer evolutionary interaction.

  20. p53 Cellular Localization and Function in Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Tweddle, Deborah A.; Malcolm, Archie J.; Cole, Michael; Pearson, Andrew D.J.; Lunec, John

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated the hypothesis that p53 accumulation in neuroblastoma, in the absence of mutation, is associated with functional inactivation, which interferes with downstream mediators of p53 function. To test this hypothesis, p53 expression, location, and functional integrity was examined in neuroblastoma by irradiating 6 neuroblastoma cell lines and studying the effects on p53 transcriptional function, cell cycle arrest, and induction of apoptosis, together with the transcriptional function of p53 after irradiation in three ex vivo primary, untreated neuroblastoma tumors. p53 sequencing showed five neuroblastoma cell lines, two of which were MYCN-amplified, and that all of the tumors were wild-type for p53. p53 was found to be predominantly nuclear before and after irradiation and to up-regulate the p53 responsive genes WAF1 and MDM2 in wild-type p53 cell lines and a poorly-differentiated neuroblastoma, but not a differentiating neuroblastoma or the ganglioneuroblastoma part of a nodular ganglioneuroblastoma in short term culture. This suggests intact p53 transcriptional activity in proliferating neuroblastoma. Irradiation of wild-type p53 neuroblastoma cell lines led to G1 cell cycle arrest in cell lines without MYCN amplification, but not in those with MYCN amplification, despite induction of WAF1. This suggests MYCN amplification may alter downstream mediators of p53 function in neuroblastoma. PMID:11395384

  1. Acute in vivo effect of octreotide acetate, a somatostatin analogue on the cellular function of gastric mucosa in the rat.

    PubMed

    Motegi, M; Nagamachi, Y; Kaneko, T; Matsuzaki, S

    1998-02-01

    Somatostatin is known to suppress various cellular functions of the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, octreotide acetate, a synthetic long-acting somatostatin analogue was tested for its effects on some cellular functions of gastric mucosa. Octreotide raised the gastric mucosal pH within 1 h after a single subcutaneous injection to rats at doses of 1-100 microg/kg bodyweight. Serum gastrin levels increased transiently at a dose of 10 microg/kg bodyweight but not at 100 microg/kg. Basal levels of serum gastrin were not affected, while famotidine-induced gastrin secretion was suppressed by octreotide at a single dose of 100 microg/kg. The increase in the intragastric acidity and histidine decarboxylase activity following pentagastrin treatment was significantly reduced by octreotide. These results suggested that this somatostatin analogue inhibits the function of not only the parietal cell and G cell but also the enterochromaffin-like (ECL) cell, resulting in intraluminal hypoacidity.

  2. Pregnancy affects cellular activity, but not tissue mechanical properties, in the healing rabbit medial collateral ligament.

    PubMed

    Hart, D A; Reno, C; Frank, C B; Shrive, N G

    2000-05-01

    Recently, evidence has been accumulating that ligament and joint laxity is altered in women and rabbits during pregnancy. Furthermore, many female adolescents injure ligaments through participation in athletics and other activities. Therefore, to determine whether pregnancy has different effects on the injured and uninjured medial collateral ligament of the rabbit knee, we investigated cellular changes (mRNA levels) and alterations in tissue properties (biomechanics) accompanying pregnancy in animals with the medial collateral ligament injured during adolescence and bred for their primigravid pregnancy as young adults. Assessment of mRNA levels for matrix molecules, matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, growth factors and sex hormone receptors, inflammatory cytokines, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and cyclooxygenase-2 by semiquantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that pregnancy had different impacts on scar and uninjured tissue for six of 15 genes assessed. A pregnancy-associated increase in laxity of the medial collateral ligament was observed for rabbits in the uninjured primigravida group; however, no increase was observed for injured rabbits during pregnancy. The injured ligament was already significantly more lax than the normal counterpart, and pregnancy did not lead to additional laxity or prevent the normal decline in laxity as the scar matured in nonpregnant animals. These results indicate that the impact of pregnancy on laxity and cell activity of the medial collateral ligament is dependent on whether the ligament is uninjured or injured. Pregnancy had no significant effect on structural (stiffness and failure load), material (stress at failure and Young's modulus), or viscoelastic (cyclic and static relaxation) properties of tissue from uninjured or injured medial collateral ligament. Therefore, the properties of the healing ligament were not adversely affected during pregnancy in this

  3. Anthocyanidins modulate the activity of human DNA topoisomerases I and II and affect cellular DNA integrity.

    PubMed

    Habermeyer, Michael; Fritz, Jessica; Barthelmes, Hans U; Christensen, Morten O; Larsen, Morten K; Boege, Fritz; Marko, Doris

    2005-09-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of anthocyanidins on human topoisomerases I and II and its relevance for DNA integrity within human cells. Anthocyanidins bearing vicinal hydroxy groups at the B-ring (delphinidin, DEL; cyanidin, CY) were found to potently inhibit the catalytic activity of human topoisomerases I and II, without discriminating between the IIalpha and the IIbeta isoforms. However, in contrast to topoisomerase poisons, DEL and CY did not stabilize the covalent DNA-topoisomerase intermediates (cleavable complex) of topoisomerase I or II. Using recombinant topoisomerase I, the presence of CY or DEL (> or = 1 microM) effectively prohibited the stabilization of the cleavable complex by the topoisomerase I poison camptothecin. We furthermore investigated whether the potential protective effect vs topoisomerase I poisons is reflected also on the cellular level, affecting the DNA damaging properties of camptothecin. Indeed, in HT29 cells, low micromolar concentrations of DEL (1-10 microM) significantly diminished the DNA strand breaking effect of camptothecin (100 microM). However, at concentrations > or = 50 microM, all anthocyanidins tested (delphinidin, cyanidin, malvidin, pelargonidin, and paeonidin), including those not interfering with topoisomerases, were found to induce DNA strand breaks in the comet assay. All of these analogues were able to compete with ethidium bromide for the intercalation into calf thymus DNA and to replace the minor groove binder Hoechst 33258. These data indicate substantial affinity to double-stranded DNA, which might contribute at least to the DNA strand breaking effect of anthocyanidins at higher concentrations (> or = 50 microM).

  4. Toxicity of cadmium in Japanese quail: Evaluation of body weight, hepatic and renal function, and cellular immune response

    SciTech Connect

    Sant'Ana, M.G.; Moraes, R.; Bernardi, M.M. . E-mail: bernarde@usp.com

    2005-10-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an environmental pollutant that is able to alter the immune function. Previous studies have shown that, in mammals, chronic exposure to Cd decreases the release of macrophagic cytokines such as IL1 and TN{alpha} and decreases phagocytosis activity. On the other hand contradictory results showed an increase in the humoral response. The cellular response could be decreased by exposure to Cd. These alterations were observed in mammals. The present study aimed to investigate some of the toxic effects of Cd exposure in birds. In particular, the main objective of this work was to elucidate the effects of exposure to this pollutant on the cellular immune function of the Japanese quail as a model for the study of toxicity in animals exposed in nature. The animals were exposed to the metal (100 ppm, per os) during development, i.e., from 1 to 28 days old. Body weight, biochemical parameters, and cellular immune response were measured during and at the end of treatment. The results showed that the exposure to Cd for 28 days significantly reduced the body weight and induced hepatic toxicity. The kidney function and cellular immune response were not affected by the Cd exposure.

  5. Protein coronas on gold nanorods passivated with amphiphilic ligands affect cytotoxicity and cellular response to penicillin/streptomycin.

    PubMed

    Kah, James Chen Yong; Grabinski, Christin; Untener, Emily; Garrett, Carol; Chen, John; Zhu, David; Hussain, Saber M; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2014-05-27

    We probe how amphiphilic ligands (ALs) of four different types affect the formation of protein coronas on gold nanorods (NRs) and their impact on cellular response. NRs coated with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide were ligand exchanged with polyoxyethylene[10]cetyl ether, oligofectamine, and phosphatidylserine (PS). Protein coronas from equine serum (ES) were formed on these NR-ALs, and their colloidal stability, as well as cell uptake, proliferation, oxidative stress, and gene expression, were examined. We find that the protein corona that forms and its colloidal stability are affected by AL type and that the cellular response to these NR-AL-coronas (NR-AL-ES) is both ligand and corona dependent. We also find that the presence of common cell culture supplement penicillin/streptomycin can impact the colloidal stability and cellular response of NR-AL and NR-AL-ES, showing that the cell response is not necessarily inert to pen/strep when in the presence of nanoparticles. Although the protein corona is what the cells see, the underlying surface ligands evidently play an important role in shaping and defining the physical characteristics of the corona, which ultimately impacts the cellular response. Further, the results of this study suggest that the cellular behavior toward NR-AL is mediated by not only the type of AL and the protein corona it forms but also its resulting colloidal stability and interaction with cell culture supplements.

  6. Cellular functions of gamma-secretase-related proteins.

    PubMed

    Haffner, Christof; Haass, Christian

    2006-01-01

    Amyloid-beta peptide (Abeta) is generated by gamma-secretase, a membrane protein complex with an unusual aspartyl protease activity consisting of the four components presenilin, nicastrin, APH-1 and PEN-2. Presenilin is considered the catalytic subunit of this complex since it represents the prototype of the new family of intramembrane-cleaving GxGD-type aspartyl proteases. Recently, five novel members of this family and a nicastrin-like protein were identified. Whereas one of the GxGD-type proteins was shown to be identical with signal peptide peptidase (SPP), the function of the others, now called SPP-like proteins (SPPLs), is not known. We therefore analyzed SPPL2b and SPPL3 and demonstrated that they localize to different subcellular compartments suggesting nonredundant functions. This was supported by different phenotypes obtained in knockdown studies in zebrafish embryos. In addition, these phenotypes could be phenocopied by ectopic expression of putative active site mutants, providing strong evidence for a proteolytic function of SPPL2b and SPPL3. We also identified and characterized the nicastrin-like protein nicalin which, together with the 130-kDa protein NOMO (Nodal modulator), forms a membrane protein complex different from gamma-secretase. We found that during zebrafish embryogenesis this complex is involved in the patterning of the axial mesendoderm, a process controlled by the Nodal signaling pathway. PMID:17047369

  7. Extracellular nucleotides regulate cellular functions of podocytes in culture.

    PubMed

    Fischer, K G; Saueressig, U; Jacobshagen, C; Wichelmann, A; Pavenstädt, H

    2001-12-01

    Extracellular nucleotides are assumed to be important regulators of glomerular functions. This study characterizes purinergic receptors in podocytes. The effects of purinergic agonists on electrophysiological properties and the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration of differentiated podocytes were examined with the patch-clamp and fura 2 fluorescence techniques. mRNA expression of purinergic receptors was investigated by RT-PCR. Purinergic agonists depolarized podocytes. Purinergic agonists similarly increased intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration of podocytes. The rank order of potency of various nucleotides on membrane voltage and free cytosolic calcium concentration was UTP approximately UDP > [adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (ATP-gamma-S)] > ATP > 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-triphosphate (2-MeS-ATP) > 2'- and 3'-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)-adenosine 5'-triphosphate (BzATP) > ADP-beta-S. alpha,beta-Me-ATP was without effect. In the presence of UTP, BzATP did not cause an additional depolarization of podocytes. Incubation of cells with ATP or BzATP did not induce lactate dehydrogenase release. In RT-PCR studies, mRNAs of the P2Y(1), P2Y(2), P2Y(6), and P2X(7) receptors were detected within glomeruli and podocytes. The data indicate that extracellular nucleotides modulate podocyte function mainly by an activation of both P2Y(2) and P2Y(6) receptors.

  8. Cellular consequences of the microgravity environment on lymphocyte function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Pellis, N. R.

    Microgravity induces a cascade of changes in cell morphology and function. Mammalian cells adapt to the environment of low gravity and express a series of responses, some possibly from direct effects on cells and others based on environmental conditions created by microgravity. Human lymphocytes in microgravity culture are functionally diminished in activation and locomotion. Both processes are integral to optimal immune response to fight pathogens. The NASA Rotating-wall vessel (RWV) is an analog to many aspects of microgravity and is used to model microgravity for ground-based experiments. We found that lymphocyte activation and locomotion were significantly down-regulated in spaceflight and in the RWV. Using this analog culture system, we have isolated a signal transduction lesion either at the level of, or upstream from, Protein kinase C (PKC) activation. Analysis of expression and adaptation by gene array experiments and immunoblotting to identified upstream events in human lymphocytes adapting to microgravity analog culture. Microgravity induces selective changes, many of which are cell membrane related. Results showed that upstream of PKC in the T cell activation cascade, PLC-gamma and LAT are significantly diminished. ZAP 70 which controls LAT activation is also down-regulated in modeled microgravity indicating that events governing cell shape might warrant special attention in microgravity conditions. The goal of this study is to delineate response suites which are consequential, direct or indirect effects of the microgravity environment and which of these are essential to lymphocytes.

  9. Extracellular nucleotides regulate cellular functions of podocytes in culture.

    PubMed

    Fischer, K G; Saueressig, U; Jacobshagen, C; Wichelmann, A; Pavenstädt, H

    2001-12-01

    Extracellular nucleotides are assumed to be important regulators of glomerular functions. This study characterizes purinergic receptors in podocytes. The effects of purinergic agonists on electrophysiological properties and the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration of differentiated podocytes were examined with the patch-clamp and fura 2 fluorescence techniques. mRNA expression of purinergic receptors was investigated by RT-PCR. Purinergic agonists depolarized podocytes. Purinergic agonists similarly increased intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration of podocytes. The rank order of potency of various nucleotides on membrane voltage and free cytosolic calcium concentration was UTP approximately UDP > [adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (ATP-gamma-S)] > ATP > 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-triphosphate (2-MeS-ATP) > 2'- and 3'-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl)-adenosine 5'-triphosphate (BzATP) > ADP-beta-S. alpha,beta-Me-ATP was without effect. In the presence of UTP, BzATP did not cause an additional depolarization of podocytes. Incubation of cells with ATP or BzATP did not induce lactate dehydrogenase release. In RT-PCR studies, mRNAs of the P2Y(1), P2Y(2), P2Y(6), and P2X(7) receptors were detected within glomeruli and podocytes. The data indicate that extracellular nucleotides modulate podocyte function mainly by an activation of both P2Y(2) and P2Y(6) receptors. PMID:11704558

  10. Functional and Structural Mimicry of Cellular Protein Kinase A Anchoring Proteins by a Viral Oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    King, Cason R.; Cohen, Michael J.; Fonseca, Gregory J.; Dirk, Brennan S.; Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Mymryk, Joe S.

    2016-01-01

    The oncoproteins of the small DNA tumor viruses interact with a plethora of cellular regulators to commandeer control of the infected cell. During infection, adenovirus E1A deregulates cAMP signalling and repurposes it for activation of viral gene expression. We show that E1A structurally and functionally mimics a cellular A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP). E1A interacts with and relocalizes protein kinase A (PKA) to the nucleus, likely to virus replication centres, via an interaction with the regulatory subunits of PKA. Binding to PKA requires the N-terminus of E1A, which bears striking similarity to the amphipathic α-helical domain present in cellular AKAPs. E1A also targets the same docking-dimerization domain of PKA normally bound by cellular AKAPs. In addition, the AKAP like motif within E1A could restore PKA interaction to a cellular AKAP in which its normal interaction motif was deleted. During infection, E1A successfully competes with endogenous cellular AKAPs for PKA interaction. E1A’s role as a viral AKAP contributes to viral transcription, protein expression and progeny production. These data establish HAdV E1A as the first known viral AKAP. This represents a unique example of viral subversion of a crucial cellular regulatory pathway via structural mimicry of the PKA interaction domain of cellular AKAPs. PMID:27137912

  11. [Effects of electromagnetic radiation from handsets of cellular telephone on neurobehavioral function].

    PubMed

    Cao, Z; Liu, J; Li, S; Zhao, X

    2000-03-30

    In order to study the effects of electromagnetic radiation from handsets of cellular telephone on neurobehavioral function, 81 staff with handsets of cellular telephone and 63 staff without handsets of cellular telephone from corporations were selected as the subjects. The subjects were investigated by questionnaire on their general health, lifestyle habit, suppress of spirit, handset using of cellular telephone, environmental exposure, morbidity, and the neurobehavioral core test battery(NCTB). The data was analyzed by chi-square, stepwise regression analysis and covariance statistics. The results showed that the average reaction time in user's group was longer than that in control group (P < 0.01). The time of using handset was negatively associated with corrected reaction number (P < 0.01). The fast reaction time and the slowest reaction time were positively associated with the length of handset using (P < 0.01, P < 0.05). The results suggested that the handset using could cause adverse health effects in neurobehavioral function.

  12. Integrative Chemistry: Advanced functional cellular materials bearing multiscale porosity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Depardieu, M.; Kinadjian, N.; Backov, R.

    2015-07-01

    With this mini review we show through the sol-gel and emulsion-based Integrative Chemistry how it is possible to trigger materials dimensionality and beyond their functionalities when reaching enhanced applications. In here we focus on 3D macrocellular monolithic foams bearing hierarchical porosities and applications thereof. We first depict the general background of emulsions focusing on concentrated ones, acting as soft templates for the design of PolyHIPE foams, HIPE being the acronym of High Internal Phase Emulsions while encompassing both sol-gel and polymer chemistry. Secondly we extend this approach toward the design of hybrid organic-inorganic foams, labeled Organo-Si(HIPE), where photonics and heterogeneous catalysis applications are addressed. In a third section we show how inorganic Si(HIPE) matrices can be employed as sacrificial hard templates for the generation carbonaceous foams, labeled Carbon(HIPE). These foams being conductive we show applications when employed as electrodes for Li-S battery and as hosts for Li(BH4)-based hydrogen storage.

  13. The Yeast Actin Cytoskeleton: from Cellular Function to Biochemical Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, James B.; Goode, Bruce L.

    2006-01-01

    All cells undergo rapid remodeling of their actin networks to regulate such critical processes as endocytosis, cytokinesis, cell polarity, and cell morphogenesis. These events are driven by the coordinated activities of a set of 20 to 30 highly conserved actin-associated proteins, in addition to many cell-specific actin-associated proteins and numerous upstream signaling molecules. The combined activities of these factors control with exquisite precision the spatial and temporal assembly of actin structures and ensure dynamic turnover of actin structures such that cells can rapidly alter their cytoskeletons in response to internal and external cues. One of the most exciting principles to emerge from the last decade of research on actin is that the assembly of architecturally diverse actin structures is governed by highly conserved machinery and mechanisms. With this realization, it has become apparent that pioneering efforts in budding yeast have contributed substantially to defining the universal mechanisms regulating actin dynamics in eukaryotes. In this review, we first describe the filamentous actin structures found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (patches, cables, and rings) and their physiological functions, and then we discuss in detail the specific roles of actin-associated proteins and their biochemical mechanisms of action. PMID:16959963

  14. Multicompartmentalized polymeric systems: towards biomimetic cellular structure and function.

    PubMed

    Marguet, Maïté; Bonduelle, Colin; Lecommandoux, Sébastien

    2013-01-21

    The cell is certainly one of the most complex and exciting systems in Nature that scientists are still trying to fully understand. Such a challenge pushes material scientists to seek to reproduce its perfection by building biomimetic materials with high-added value and previously unmatched properties. Thanks to their versatility, their robustness and the current state of polymer chemistry science, we believe polymer-based materials to constitute or represent ideal candidates when addressing the challenge of biomimicry, which defines the focus of this review. The first step consists in mimicking the structure of the cell: its inner compartments, the organelles, with a multicompartmentalized structure, and the rest, i.e. the cytoplasm minus the organelles (mainly cytoskeleton/cytosol) with gels or particular solutions (highly concentrated for example) in one compartment, and finally the combination of both. Achieving this first structural step enables us to considerably widen the gap of possibilities in drug delivery systems. Another powerful property of the cell lies in its metabolic function. The second step is therefore to achieve enzymatic reactions in a compartment, as occurs in the organelles, in a highly controlled, selective and efficient manner. We classify the most exciting polymersome nanoreactors reported in our opinion into two different subsections, depending on their very final concept or purpose of design. We also highlight in a thorough table the experimental sections crucial to such work. Finally, after achieving control over these prerequisites, scientists are able to combine them and push the frontiers of biomimicry further: from cell structure mimics towards a controlled biofunctionality. Such a biomimetic approach in material design and the future research it will stimulate, are believed to bring considerable enrichments to the fields of drug delivery, (bio)sensors, (bio)catalysis and (bio)technology.

  15. [Neurofibromin - protein structure and cellular functions in the context of neurofibromatosis type I pathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Abramowicz, Anna; Gos, Monika

    2015-12-09

    Neurofibromatosis type I (NF1) is multisystemic disease characterized by pigmentary skin changes, increased susceptibility to tumor formation, neurological deficits and skeletal defects. The disease is a monogenic, autosomal dominant disorder, caused by the presence of mutations in the NF1 gene encoding neurofibromin - a multifunctional regulatory protein. The basic function of neurofibromin protein is modulation of the RAS protein activity necessary for regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation by the RAS/MAPK and RAS/PI3K/AKT signal transduction pathways. In addition, neurofibromin is a regulator of adenylate cyclase activity and therefore may interfere with signaling by the cAMP/protein kinase A pathway that regulates cell cycle progression or learning and memory formation processes. Neurofibromin also interacts with many other proteins that are engaged in intracellular transport (tubulin, kinesin), actin cytoskeleton rearrangements (LIMK2, Rho and Rac) or morphogenesis of neural cells (syndecans, CRMP proteins). The activity of neurofibromin is strictly regulated by the expression of different NF1 mRNA isoforms depending on tissue type or period in organism development, the protein localization, posttranslational modifications (phosphorylation, ubiquitination) or interactions with other proteins (e.g. 14-3-3). The fact that neurofibromin is engaged in many cellular processes has significant consequences when the proper protein functioning is impaired due to decreased protein level or activity. It affects the normal cell function and results in disturbances of organism development that lead to the occurrence of clinical signs specific for NF1. In the article, the basic neurofibromin functions are presented in the context of the molecular pathogenesis of NF1.

  16. Physiological enzymology: The next frontier in understanding protein structure and function at the cellular level.

    PubMed

    Lee, Irene; Berdis, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the study of proteins has relied heavily on characterizing the activity of a single purified protein isolated from other cellular components. This classic approach allowed scientists to unambiguously define the intrinsic kinetic and chemical properties of that protein. The ultimate hope was to extrapolate this information toward understanding how the enzyme or receptor behaves within its native cellular context. These types of detailed in vitro analyses were necessary to reduce the innate complexities of measuring the singular activity and biochemical properties of a specific enzyme without interference from other enzymes and potential competing substrates. However, recent developments in fields encompassing cell biology, molecular imaging, and chemical biology now provide the unique chemical tools and instrumentation to study protein structure, function, and regulation in their native cellular environment. These advancements provide the foundation for a new field, coined physiological enzymology, which quantifies the function and regulation of enzymes and proteins at the cellular level. In this Special Edition, we explore the area of Physiological Enzymology and Protein Function through a series of review articles that focus on the tools and techniques used to measure the cellular activity of proteins inside living cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Physiological Enzymology and Protein Functions.

  17. Positive and negative affective processing exhibit dissociable functional hubs during the viewing of affective pictures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenhai; Li, Hong; Pan, Xiaohong

    2015-02-01

    Recent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies using graph theory metrics have revealed that the functional network of the human brain possesses small-world characteristics and comprises several functional hub regions. However, it is unclear how the affective functional network is organized in the brain during the processing of affective information. In this study, the fMRI data were collected from 25 healthy college students as they viewed a total of 81 positive, neutral, and negative pictures. The results indicated that affective functional networks exhibit weaker small-worldness properties with higher local efficiency, implying that local connections increase during viewing affective pictures. Moreover, positive and negative emotional processing exhibit dissociable functional hubs, emerging mainly in task-positive regions. These functional hubs, which are the centers of information processing, have nodal betweenness centrality values that are at least 1.5 times larger than the average betweenness centrality of the network. Positive affect scores correlated with the betweenness values of the right orbital frontal cortex (OFC) and the right putamen in the positive emotional network; negative affect scores correlated with the betweenness values of the left OFC and the left amygdala in the negative emotional network. The local efficiencies in the left superior and inferior parietal lobe correlated with subsequent arousal ratings of positive and negative pictures, respectively. These observations provide important evidence for the organizational principles of the human brain functional connectome during the processing of affective information.

  18. Slight temperature changes affect protein affinity and cellular uptake/toxicity of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Morteza; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A; Behzadi, Shahed

    2013-04-21

    It is known that what the cell actually "sees" at the nanoscale is an outer shell formed of 'protein corona' on the surface of nanoparticles (NPs). The amount and composition of various proteins on the corona are strongly dependent on the biophysicochemical properties of NPs, which have been extensively studied. However, the effect of a small variation in temperature, due to the human circadian rhythm, on the composition of the protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs, was ignored. Here, the effect of temperature on the composition of protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs and, subsequently, cell responses to the protein coated NPs are probed. The results confirmed that cellular entrance, dispersion, and toxicity of NPs are strongly diverse with slight body temperature changes. This new finding can help scientists to maximise NP entrance to specific cells/organs with lower toxicity by adjusting the cellular/organ temperature.

  19. Irradiation affects cellular properties and Eph receptor expression in human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Mosch, Birgit; Pietzsch, Doreen; Pietzsch, Jens

    2012-01-01

    X-ray irradiation influences metastatic properties of tumor cells and, moreover, metastasis and cellular motility can be modified by members of the Eph receptor/ephrin family of receptor tyrosine kinases. We hypothesized that irradiation-induced changes in cellular properties relevant for metastasis in melanoma cells could be mediated by Eph receptor/ephrin signaling. In this pilot study, we analyzed one pre-metastatic (Mel-Juso) and three metastatic human melanoma (Mel-Juso-L3, A375, and A2058) cells lines and predominantly found anti-metastatic effects of X-ray irradiation with impaired cell growth, clonal growth and motility. Additionally, we observed an irradiation-induced increase in adhesion paralleled by a decrease in migration in Mel-Juso and Mel-Juso-L3 cells and, in part, also in A375 cells. We further demonstrate a decrease of EphA2 both in expression and activity at 7 d after irradiation paralleled by an upregulation of EphA3. Analyzing downstream signaling after irradiation, we detected decreased Src kinase phosphorylation, but unchanged focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation, indicating, in part, irradiation-induced downregulation of signaling via the EphA2-Src-FAK axis in melanoma cells. However, to which extent this finding contributes to the modification of metastasis-relevant cellular properties remains to be elucidated. PMID:22568947

  20. Thymus-associated parathyroid hormone has two cellular origins with distinct endocrine and immunological functions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhijie; Farley, Alison; Chen, Lizhen; Kirby, Beth J; Kovacs, Christopher S; Blackburn, C Clare; Manley, Nancy R

    2010-01-01

    In mammals, parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a key regulator of extracellular calcium and inorganic phosphorus homeostasis. Although the parathyroid glands were thought to be the only source of PTH, extra-parathyroid PTH production in the thymus, which shares a common origin with parathyroids during organogenesis, has been proposed to provide an auxiliary source of PTH, resulting in a higher than expected survival rate for aparathyroid Gcm2⁻/⁻ mutants. However, the developmental ontogeny and cellular identity of these "thymic" PTH-expressing cells is unknown. We found that the lethality of aparathyroid Gcm2⁻/⁻ mutants was affected by genetic background without relation to serum PTH levels, suggesting a need to reconsider the physiological function of thymic PTH. We identified two sources of extra-parathyroid PTH in wild-type mice. Incomplete separation of the parathyroid and thymus organs during organogenesis resulted in misplaced, isolated parathyroid cells that were often attached to the thymus; this was the major source of thymic PTH in normal mice. Analysis of thymus and parathyroid organogenesis in human embryos showed a broadly similar result, indicating that these results may provide insight into human parathyroid development. In addition, medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) express PTH in a Gcm2-independent manner that requires TEC differentiation and is consistent with expression as a self-antigen for negative selection. Genetic or surgical removal of the thymus indicated that thymus-derived PTH in Gcm2⁻/⁻ mutants did not provide auxiliary endocrine function. Our data show conclusively that the thymus does not serve as an auxiliary source of either serum PTH or parathyroid function. We further show that the normal process of parathyroid organogenesis in both mice and humans leads to the generation of multiple small parathyroid clusters in addition to the main parathyroid glands, that are the likely source of physiologically relevant "thymic

  1. On the Quest of Cellular Functions of PEA-15 and the Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Phosphoprotein enriched in astrocytes, 15 KDa (PEA-15), a ubiquitously expressed small protein in all mammals, is known for decades for its potent interactions with various protein partners along distinct biological pathways. Most notable interacting partners of PEA-15 include extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, the Fas-associated death domain (FADD) protein involving in the formation of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC), and the phospholipase D1 (PLD1) affecting the insulin sensitivity. However, the actual cellular functions of PEA-15 are still mysterious, and the question why this protein is expressed in almost all cell and tissue types remains unanswered. Here we synthesize the most recent structural, biological, and clinical studies on PEA-15 with emphases on its anti-apoptotic, anti-proliferative, and anti-inflammative properties, and propose a converged protective role of PEA-15 that maintains the balance of death and survival in different cell types. Under conditions that this delicate balance is unsustainable, PEA-15 may become pathological and lead to various diseases, including cancers and diabetes. Targeting PEA-15 interactions, or the use of PEA-15 protein as therapeutics, may provide a wider window of opportunities to treat these diseases. PMID:26263999

  2. A loss of FUS/TLS function leads to impaired cellular proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ward, C L; Boggio, K J; Johnson, B N; Boyd, J B; Douthwright, S; Shaffer, S A; Landers, J E; Glicksman, M A; Bosco, D A

    2014-01-01

    Fused in sarcoma/translocated in liposarcoma (FUS/TLS or FUS) is a multifunctional RNA/DNA-binding protein that is pathologically associated with cancer and neurodegeneration. To gain insight into the vital functions of FUS and how a loss of FUS function impacts cellular homeostasis, FUS expression was reduced in different cellular models through RNA interference. Our results show that a loss of FUS expression severely impairs cellular proliferation and leads to an increase in phosphorylated histone H3, a marker of mitotic arrest. A quantitative proteomics analysis performed on cells undergoing various degrees of FUS knockdown revealed protein expression changes for known RNA targets of FUS, consistent with a loss of FUS function with respect to RNA processing. Proteins that changed in expression as a function of FUS knockdown were associated with multiple processes, some of which influence cell proliferation including cell cycle regulation, cytoskeletal organization, oxidative stress and energy homeostasis. FUS knockdown also correlated with increased expression of the closely related protein EWS (Ewing's sarcoma). We demonstrate that the maladaptive phenotype resulting from FUS knockdown is reversible and can be rescued by re-expression of FUS or partially rescued by the small-molecule rolipram. These results provide insight into the pathways and processes that are regulated by FUS, as well as the cellular consequences for a loss of FUS function. PMID:25501833

  3. Multiple functions of Maf in the regulation of cellular development and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cellular muscular aponeurotic fibrosarcoma (c‐Maf) is a member of the large macrophage‐activating factor family. C‐Maf plays important roles in the morphogenetic processes and cellular differentiation of the lens, kidneys, liver, T cells and nervous system, and it is particularly important in pancreatic islet and erythroblastic island formation. However, the exact role of c‐Maf remains to be elucidated. In this review, we summarize the research to clarify the functions of c‐Maf in the cellular development and differentiation. The expression of c‐Maf is higher in pancreatic duct cells than in pancreatic islet cells. Therefore, we suggest that pancreatic duct cells may be converted to the functional insulin‐secreting cells by regulating c‐Maf. © 2015 National Natural Science Foundation of China. Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26122665

  4. Copper transporters and chaperones: Their function on angiogenesis and cellular signalling.

    PubMed

    Bharathi Devi, S R; Dhivya M, Aloysius; Sulochana, K N

    2016-09-01

    Copper, although known as a micronutrient, has a pivotal role in modulating the cellular metabolism. Many studies have reported the role of copper in angiogenesis. Copper chaperones are intracellular proteins that mediate copper trafficking to various cell organelles. However, the role and function of copper chaperones in relation to angiogenesis has to be further explored. The intracellular copper levels when in excess are deleterious and certain mutations of copper chaperones have been shown to induce cell death and influence various cellular metabolisms. The study of these chaperones will be helpful in understanding the players in the cascade of events in angiogenesis and their role in cellular metabolic pathways. In this review we have briefly listed the copper chaperones associated with angiogenic and metabolic signalling and their function. PMID:27581939

  5. Slight temperature changes affect protein affinity and cellular uptake/toxicity of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Morteza; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A.; Behzadi, Shahed

    2013-03-01

    It is known that what the cell actually ``sees'' at the nanoscale is an outer shell formed of `protein corona' on the surface of nanoparticles (NPs). The amount and composition of various proteins on the corona are strongly dependent on the biophysicochemical properties of NPs, which have been extensively studied. However, the effect of a small variation in temperature, due to the human circadian rhythm, on the composition of the protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs, was ignored. Here, the effect of temperature on the composition of protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs and, subsequently, cell responses to the protein coated NPs are probed. The results confirmed that cellular entrance, dispersion, and toxicity of NPs are strongly diverse with slight body temperature changes. This new finding can help scientists to maximise NP entrance to specific cells/organs with lower toxicity by adjusting the cellular/organ temperature.It is known that what the cell actually ``sees'' at the nanoscale is an outer shell formed of `protein corona' on the surface of nanoparticles (NPs). The amount and composition of various proteins on the corona are strongly dependent on the biophysicochemical properties of NPs, which have been extensively studied. However, the effect of a small variation in temperature, due to the human circadian rhythm, on the composition of the protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs, was ignored. Here, the effect of temperature on the composition of protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs and, subsequently, cell responses to the protein coated NPs are probed. The results confirmed that cellular entrance, dispersion, and toxicity of NPs are strongly diverse with slight body temperature changes. This new finding can help scientists to maximise NP entrance to specific cells/organs with lower toxicity by adjusting the cellular

  6. Global Functional Analyses of Cellular Responses to Pore-Forming Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Cheng-Yuan; Wachi, Shinichiro; Kloft, Nicole; Husmann, Matthias; Karabrahimi, Valbona; Schwartz, Jean-Louis; Bellier, Audrey; Ha, Christine; Sagong, Youn; Fan, Hui; Ghosh, Partho; Hsieh, Mindy; Hsu, Chih-Shen; Chen, Li; Aroian, Raffi V.

    2011-01-01

    Here we present the first global functional analysis of cellular responses to pore-forming toxins (PFTs). PFTs are uniquely important bacterial virulence factors, comprising the single largest class of bacterial protein toxins and being important for the pathogenesis in humans of many Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. Their mode of action is deceptively simple, poking holes in the plasma membrane of cells. The scattered studies to date of PFT-host cell interactions indicate a handful of genes are involved in cellular defenses to PFTs. How many genes are involved in cellular defenses against PFTs and how cellular defenses are coordinated are unknown. To address these questions, we performed the first genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen for genes that, when knocked down, result in hypersensitivity to a PFT. This screen identifies 106 genes (∼0.5% of genome) in seven functional groups that protect Caenorhabditis elegans from PFT attack. Interactome analyses of these 106 genes suggest that two previously identified mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, one (p38) studied in detail and the other (JNK) not, form a core PFT defense network. Additional microarray, real-time PCR, and functional studies reveal that the JNK MAPK pathway, but not the p38 MAPK pathway, is a key central regulator of PFT-induced transcriptional and functional responses. We find C. elegans activator protein 1 (AP-1; c-jun, c-fos) is a downstream target of the JNK-mediated PFT protection pathway, protects C. elegans against both small-pore and large-pore PFTs and protects human cells against a large-pore PFT. This in vivo RNAi genomic study of PFT responses proves that cellular commitment to PFT defenses is enormous, demonstrates the JNK MAPK pathway as a key regulator of transcriptionally-induced PFT defenses, and identifies AP-1 as the first cellular component broadly important for defense against large- and small-pore PFTs. PMID:21408619

  7. Oxidized (non)-regenerated cellulose affects fundamental cellular processes of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Wagenhäuser, M. U.; Mulorz, J.; Ibing, W.; Simon, F.; Spin, J. M.; Schelzig, H.; Oberhuber, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated how hemostats such as oxidized regenerated cellulose (ORC, TABOTAMP) and oxidized non-regenerated cellulose (ONRC, RESORBA CELL) influence local cellular behavior and contraction of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Human stromal fibroblasts were inoculated in vitro with ORC and ONRC. Cell proliferation was assayed over time, and migration was evaluated by Live Cell imaging microscopy. Fibroblasts grown in collagen-gels were treated with ORC or ONRC, and ECM contraction was measured utilizing a contraction assay. An absolute pH decline was observed with both ORC and ONRC after 1 hour. Mean daily cell proliferation, migration and matrix contraction were more strongly inhibited by ONRC when compared with ORC (p < 0.05). When control media was pH-lowered to match the lower pH values typically seen with ORC and ONRC, significant differences in cell proliferation and migration were still observed between ONRC and ORC (p < 0.05). However, in these pH conditions, inhibition of matrix contraction was only significant for ONRC (p < 0.05). We find that ORC and ONRC inhibit fibroblast proliferation, migration and matrix contraction, and stronger inhibition of these essential cellular processes of wound healing were observed for ONRC when compared with ORC. These results will require further validation in future in vivo experiments to clarify the clinical implications for hemostat use in post-surgical wound healing. PMID:27557881

  8. Ellagic Acid and Embelin Affect Key Cellular Components of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma, Cancer and Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Edderkaoui, Mouad; Lugea, Aurelia; Hui, Hongxiang; Eibl, Guido; Lu, Qing-Yi; Moro, Aune; Lu, Xuyang; Li, Gang; Go, Vay-Liang; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Ellagic acid is a polyphenolic phytochemical present in many fruits and nuts with anti-cancer properties demonstrated in experimental tumor studies. Embelin is a benzoquinone phytochemical isolated from the Japanese herb Ardisiae Japonicae and has been shown to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. We found that ellagic acid and embelin each dose-dependently increased apoptosis and inhibited proliferation in human pancreatic cancer cells, MIA PaCa-2 and HPAF-II cells, and in pancreatic stellate cells (PaSCs) which are progenitors of pancreatic cancer desmoplasia. In each of these cell types, combinations of ellagic acid and embelin at low micromolar concentrations (0.5–3 μM) induced synergistic increases in apoptosis and decreases in proliferation. Ellagic acid decreased NF-κB transcriptional activity, whereas embelin decreased STAT-3 phosphorylation and protein expression of its downstream target survivin, in cancer cells. In vivo dietary ellagic acid alone or in combination with embelin decreased tumor size and tumor cellularity in a subcutaneous (s.c.) xenograft mouse model of pancreatic cancer. These results show that ellagic acid and embelin interact with divergent intracellular signaling pathways resulting in augmentation of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation at low micromolar concentrations for the key cellular components of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:24127740

  9. Oxidized (non)-regenerated cellulose affects fundamental cellular processes of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Wagenhäuser, M U; Mulorz, J; Ibing, W; Simon, F; Spin, J M; Schelzig, H; Oberhuber, A

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated how hemostats such as oxidized regenerated cellulose (ORC, TABOTAMP) and oxidized non-regenerated cellulose (ONRC, RESORBA CELL) influence local cellular behavior and contraction of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Human stromal fibroblasts were inoculated in vitro with ORC and ONRC. Cell proliferation was assayed over time, and migration was evaluated by Live Cell imaging microscopy. Fibroblasts grown in collagen-gels were treated with ORC or ONRC, and ECM contraction was measured utilizing a contraction assay. An absolute pH decline was observed with both ORC and ONRC after 1 hour. Mean daily cell proliferation, migration and matrix contraction were more strongly inhibited by ONRC when compared with ORC (p < 0.05). When control media was pH-lowered to match the lower pH values typically seen with ORC and ONRC, significant differences in cell proliferation and migration were still observed between ONRC and ORC (p < 0.05). However, in these pH conditions, inhibition of matrix contraction was only significant for ONRC (p < 0.05). We find that ORC and ONRC inhibit fibroblast proliferation, migration and matrix contraction, and stronger inhibition of these essential cellular processes of wound healing were observed for ONRC when compared with ORC. These results will require further validation in future in vivo experiments to clarify the clinical implications for hemostat use in post-surgical wound healing. PMID:27557881

  10. Vacuole membrane contact sites and domains: emerging hubs to coordinate organelle function with cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Malia, Pedro Carpio; Ungermann, Christian

    2016-04-15

    Eukaryotic cells rely on a set of membrane-enclosed organelles to perform highly efficient reactions in an optimized environment. Trafficking of molecules via vesicular carriers and membrane contact sites (MCS) allow the coordination between these compartments, though the precise mechanisms are still enigmatic. Among the cellular organelles, the lysosome/vacuole stands out as a central hub, where multiple pathways merge. Importantly, the delivered material is degraded and the monomers are recycled for further usage, which explains its wide variety of roles in controlling cellular metabolism. We will highlight recent advances in the field by focusing on the yeast vacuole as a model system to understand lysosomal function in general.

  11. Ocean acidification affects competition for space: projections of community structure using cellular automata.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Sophie J; Allesina, Stefano; Pfister, Catherine A

    2016-03-16

    Historical ecological datasets from a coastal marine community of crustose coralline algae (CCA) enabled the documentation of ecological changes in this community over 30 years in the Northeast Pacific. Data on competitive interactions obtained from field surveys showed concordance between the 1980s and 2013, yet also revealed a reduction in how strongly species interact. Here, we extend these empirical findings with a cellular automaton model to forecast ecological dynamics. Our model suggests the emergence of a new dominant competitor in a global change scenario, with a reduced role of herbivory pressure, or trophic control, in regulating competition among CCA. Ocean acidification, due to its energetic demands, may now instead play this role in mediating competitive interactions and thereby promote species diversity within this guild.

  12. Quantum dots for tracking cellular transport of lectin-functionalized nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Xiaoling; Wang Tao; Wu Bingxian; Chen Jun; Chen Jiyao; Yue Yang; Dai Ning; Chen Hongzhuan Jiang Xinguo

    2008-12-05

    Successful drug delivery by functionalized nanocarriers largely depends on their efficient intracellular transport which has not yet been fully understood. We developed a new tracking technique by encapsulating quantum dots into the core of wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated nanoparticles (WGA-NP) to track cellular transport of functionalized nanocarriers. The resulting nanoparticles showed no changes in particle size, zeta potential or biobinding activity, and the loaded probe presented excellent photostability and tracking ability. Taking advantage of these properties, cellular transport profiles of WGA-NP in Caco-2 cells was demonstrated. The cellular uptake begins with binding of WGA to its receptor at the cell surface. The subsequent endocytosis happened in a cytoskeleton-dependent manner and by means of clathrin and caveolae-mediated mechanisms. After endosome creating, transport occurs to both trans-Golgi and lysosome. Our study provides new evidences for quantum dots as a cellular tracking probe of nanocarriers and helps understand intracellular transport profile of lectin-functionalized nanoparticles.

  13. Function of Membrane Rafts in Viral Lifecycles and Host Cellular Response

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Suzuki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Membrane rafts are small (10–200 nm) sterol- and sphingolipid-enriched domains that compartmentalize cellular processes. Membrane rafts play an important role in viral infection cycles and viral virulence. Viruses are divided into four main classes, enveloped DNA virus, enveloped RNA virus, nonenveloped DNA virus, and nonenveloped RNA virus. General virus infection cycle is also classified into two sections, the early stage (entry process) and the late stage (assembly, budding, and release processes of virus particles). In the viral cycle, membrane rafts act as a scaffold of many cellular signal transductions, which are associated with symptoms caused by viral infections. In this paper, we describe the functions of membrane rafts in viral lifecycles and host cellular response according to each virus classification, each stage of the virus lifecycle, and each virus-induced signal transduction. PMID:22191032

  14. Affect integration and reflective function: clarification of central conceptual issues.

    PubMed

    Solbakken, Ole André; Hansen, Roger Sandvik; Monsen, Jon Trygve

    2011-07-01

    The importance of affect regulation, modulation or integration for higher-order reflection and adequate functioning is increasingly emphasized across different therapeutic approaches and theories of change. These processes are probably central to any psychotherapeutic endeavor, whether explicitly conceptualized or not, and in recent years a number of therapeutic approaches have been developed that explicitly target them as a primary area of change. However, there still is important lack of clarity in the field regarding the understanding and operationalization of affect integration, particularly when it comes to specifying underlying mechanisms, the significance of different affect states, and the establishment of operational criteria for measurement. The conceptual relationship between affect integration and reflective function thus remains ambiguous. The present article addresses these topics, indicating ways in which a more complex and exhaustive understanding of integration of affect, cognition and behavior can be attained.

  15. How Does Maternal Employment Affect Children's Socioemotional Functioning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Gigi

    2015-01-01

    The maternal employment becomes an irreversible trend across the globe. The effect of maternal employment on children's socioemotional functioning is so pervasive that it warrants special attention to investigate into the issue. A trajectory of analytical framework of how maternal employment affects children's socioemotional functioning originates…

  16. Protein source and choice of anticoagulant decisively affect nanoparticle protein corona and cellular uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöttler, S.; Klein, Katja; Landfester, K.; Mailänder, V.

    2016-03-01

    Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance of the choice of protein source used for in vitro protein corona analysis is concisely investigated. Major and decisive differences in cellular uptake of a polystyrene nanoparticle incubated in fetal bovine serum, human serum, human citrate and heparin plasma are reported. Furthermore, the protein compositions are determined for coronas formed in the respective incubation media. A strong influence of heparin, which is used as an anticoagulant for plasma generation, on cell interaction is demonstrated. While heparin enhances the uptake into macrophages, it prevents internalization into HeLa cells. Taken together we can give the recommendation that human plasma anticoagulated with citrate seems to give the most relevant results for in vitro studies of nanoparticle uptake.Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance

  17. Mps1 (Monopolar Spindle 1) Protein Inhibition Affects Cellular Growth and Pro-Embryogenic Masses Morphology in Embryogenic Cultures of Araucaria angustifolia (Araucariaceae).

    PubMed

    Douétts-Peres, Jackellinne C; Cruz, Marco Antônio L; Reis, Ricardo S; Heringer, Angelo S; de Oliveira, Eduardo A G; Elbl, Paula M; Floh, Eny I S; Silveira, Vanildo; Santa-Catarina, Claudete

    2016-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis has been shown to be an efficient tool for studying processes based on cell growth and development. The fine regulation of the cell cycle is essential for proper embryo formation during the process of somatic embryogenesis. The aims of the present work were to identify and perform a structural and functional characterization of Mps1 and to analyze the effects of the inhibition of this protein on cellular growth and pro-embryogenic mass (PEM) morphology in embryogenic cultures of A. angustifolia. A single-copy Mps1 gene named AaMps1 was retrieved from the A. angustifolia transcriptome database, and through a mass spectrometry approach, AaMps1 was identified and quantified in embryogenic cultures. The Mps1 inhibitor SP600125 (10 μM) inhibited cellular growth and changed PEMs, and these effects were accompanied by a reduction in AaMps1 protein levels in embryogenic cultures. Our work has identified the Mps1 protein in a gymnosperm species for the first time, and we have shown that inhibiting Mps1 affects cellular growth and PEM differentiation during A. angustifolia somatic embryogenesis. These data will be useful for better understanding cell cycle control during somatic embryogenesis in plants. PMID:27064899

  18. Mps1 (Monopolar Spindle 1) Protein Inhibition Affects Cellular Growth and Pro-Embryogenic Masses Morphology in Embryogenic Cultures of Araucaria angustifolia (Araucariaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Douétts-Peres, Jackellinne C.; Cruz, Marco Antônio L.; Reis, Ricardo S.; Heringer, Angelo S.; de Oliveira, Eduardo A. G.; Elbl, Paula M.; Floh, Eny I. S.; Silveira, Vanildo

    2016-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis has been shown to be an efficient tool for studying processes based on cell growth and development. The fine regulation of the cell cycle is essential for proper embryo formation during the process of somatic embryogenesis. The aims of the present work were to identify and perform a structural and functional characterization of Mps1 and to analyze the effects of the inhibition of this protein on cellular growth and pro-embryogenic mass (PEM) morphology in embryogenic cultures of A. angustifolia. A single-copy Mps1 gene named AaMps1 was retrieved from the A. angustifolia transcriptome database, and through a mass spectrometry approach, AaMps1 was identified and quantified in embryogenic cultures. The Mps1 inhibitor SP600125 (10 μM) inhibited cellular growth and changed PEMs, and these effects were accompanied by a reduction in AaMps1 protein levels in embryogenic cultures. Our work has identified the Mps1 protein in a gymnosperm species for the first time, and we have shown that inhibiting Mps1 affects cellular growth and PEM differentiation during A. angustifolia somatic embryogenesis. These data will be useful for better understanding cell cycle control during somatic embryogenesis in plants. PMID:27064899

  19. Mps1 (Monopolar Spindle 1) Protein Inhibition Affects Cellular Growth and Pro-Embryogenic Masses Morphology in Embryogenic Cultures of Araucaria angustifolia (Araucariaceae).

    PubMed

    Douétts-Peres, Jackellinne C; Cruz, Marco Antônio L; Reis, Ricardo S; Heringer, Angelo S; de Oliveira, Eduardo A G; Elbl, Paula M; Floh, Eny I S; Silveira, Vanildo; Santa-Catarina, Claudete

    2016-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis has been shown to be an efficient tool for studying processes based on cell growth and development. The fine regulation of the cell cycle is essential for proper embryo formation during the process of somatic embryogenesis. The aims of the present work were to identify and perform a structural and functional characterization of Mps1 and to analyze the effects of the inhibition of this protein on cellular growth and pro-embryogenic mass (PEM) morphology in embryogenic cultures of A. angustifolia. A single-copy Mps1 gene named AaMps1 was retrieved from the A. angustifolia transcriptome database, and through a mass spectrometry approach, AaMps1 was identified and quantified in embryogenic cultures. The Mps1 inhibitor SP600125 (10 μM) inhibited cellular growth and changed PEMs, and these effects were accompanied by a reduction in AaMps1 protein levels in embryogenic cultures. Our work has identified the Mps1 protein in a gymnosperm species for the first time, and we have shown that inhibiting Mps1 affects cellular growth and PEM differentiation during A. angustifolia somatic embryogenesis. These data will be useful for better understanding cell cycle control during somatic embryogenesis in plants.

  20. Cellular bioenergetics changes in magnocellular neurons may affect copeptin expression in the late phase of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira-Pelegrin, Gabriela R; Basso, Paulo J; Rocha, Maria José A

    2014-02-15

    We investigated whether inflammatory mediators during cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis may diminish copeptin expression in magnocellular neurons, thus affecting arginine-vasopressin (AVP) synthesis. The transcript abundance of IL-1β, IL-1R1, iNOS and HIF-1α was continuously elevated. IL-1β, iNOS and cytochrome c protein levels progressively increased until 24h. Immunostaining for these proteins was higher at 6 and 24h, as also seen in the annexin-V assay, while copeptin was continuously decreased. This suggests that increased IL-1β and NO levels may cause significant bioenergetics changes in magnocellular neurons, affecting copeptin expression and compromising AVP synthesis and secretion in the late phase of sepsis.

  1. Cellular senescence checkpoint function determines differential Notch1-dependent oncogenic and tumor suppressor activities

    PubMed Central

    Kagawa, Shingo; Natsuizaka, Mitsuteru; Whelan, Kelly A.; Facompre, Nicole; Naganuma, Seiji; Ohashi, Shinya; Kinugasa, Hideaki; Egloff, Ann Marie; Basu, Devraj; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Bass, Adam; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Diehl, J. Alan; Rustgi, Anil K.; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Notch activity regulates tumor biology in a context-dependent and complex manner. Notch may act as an oncogene or a tumor suppressor gene even within the same tumor type. Recently, Notch signaling has been implicated in cellular senescence. Yet, it remains unclear as to how cellular senescence checkpoint functions may interact with Notch-mediated oncogenic and tumor suppressor activities. Herein, we used genetically engineered human esophageal keratinocytes and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells to delineate the functional consequences of Notch activation and inhibition along with pharmacological intervention and RNA interference (RNAi) experiments. When expressed in a tetracycline-inducible manner, the ectopically expressed activated form of Notch1 (ICN1) displayed oncogene-like characteristics inducing cellular senescence corroborated by the induction of G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest, Rb dephosphorylation, flat and enlarged cell morphology and senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Notch-induced senescence involves canonical CSL/RBPJ-dependent transcriptional activity and the p16INK4A-Rb pathway. Loss of p16INK4A or the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogene products not only prevented ICN1 from inducing senescence, but permitted ICN1 to facilitate anchorage-independent colony formation and xenograft tumor growth with increased cell proliferation and reduced squamous-cell differentiation. Moreover, Notch1 appears to mediate replicative senescence as well as TGF-β-induced cellular senescence in non-transformed cells and that HPV E6/E7 targets Notch1 for inactivation to prevent senescence, revealing a tumor suppressor attribute of endogenous Notch1. In aggregate, cellular senescence checkpoint functions may influence dichotomous Notch activities in the neoplastic context. PMID:24931169

  2. Cellular senescence checkpoint function determines differential Notch1-dependent oncogenic and tumor-suppressor activities.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, S; Natsuizaka, M; Whelan, K A; Facompre, N; Naganuma, S; Ohashi, S; Kinugasa, H; Egloff, A M; Basu, D; Gimotty, P A; Klein-Szanto, A J; Bass, A J; Wong, K-K; Diehl, J A; Rustgi, A K; Nakagawa, H

    2015-04-30

    Notch activity regulates tumor biology in a context-dependent and complex manner. Notch may act as an oncogene or a tumor-suppressor gene even within the same tumor type. Recently, Notch signaling has been implicated in cellular senescence. Yet, it remains unclear as to how cellular senescence checkpoint functions may interact with Notch-mediated oncogenic and tumor-suppressor activities. Herein, we used genetically engineered human esophageal keratinocytes and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells to delineate the functional consequences of Notch activation and inhibition along with pharmacological intervention and RNA interference experiments. When expressed in a tetracycline-inducible manner, the ectopically expressed activated form of Notch1 (ICN1) displayed oncogene-like characteristics inducing cellular senescence corroborated by the induction of G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest, Rb dephosphorylation, flat and enlarged cell morphology and senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity. Notch-induced senescence involves canonical CSL/RBPJ-dependent transcriptional activity and the p16(INK4A)-Rb pathway. Loss of p16(INK4A) or the presence of human papilloma virus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogene products not only prevented ICN1 from inducing senescence but permitted ICN1 to facilitate anchorage-independent colony formation and xenograft tumor growth with increased cell proliferation and reduced squamous-cell differentiation. Moreover, Notch1 appears to mediate replicative senescence as well as transforming growth factor-β-induced cellular senescence in non-transformed cells and that HPV E6/E7 targets Notch1 for inactivation to prevent senescence, revealing a tumor-suppressor attribute of endogenous Notch1. In aggregate, cellular senescence checkpoint functions may influence dichotomous Notch activities in the neoplastic context.

  3. Simultaneous characterization of cellular RNA structure and function with in-cell SHAPE-Seq

    PubMed Central

    Watters, Kyle E.; Abbott, Timothy R.; Lucks, Julius B.

    2016-01-01

    Many non-coding RNAs form structures that interact with cellular machinery to control gene expression. A central goal of molecular and synthetic biology is to uncover design principles linking RNA structure to function to understand and engineer this relationship. Here we report a simple, high-throughput method called in-cell SHAPE-Seq that combines in-cell probing of RNA structure with a measurement of gene expression to simultaneously characterize RNA structure and function in bacterial cells. We use in-cell SHAPE-Seq to study the structure–function relationship of two RNA mechanisms that regulate translation in Escherichia coli. We find that nucleotides that participate in RNA–RNA interactions are highly accessible when their binding partner is absent and that changes in RNA structure due to RNA–RNA interactions can be quantitatively correlated to changes in gene expression. We also characterize the cellular structures of three endogenously expressed non-coding RNAs: 5S rRNA, RNase P and the btuB riboswitch. Finally, a comparison between in-cell and in vitro folded RNA structures revealed remarkable similarities for synthetic RNAs, but significant differences for RNAs that participate in complex cellular interactions. Thus, in-cell SHAPE-Seq represents an easily approachable tool for biologists and engineers to uncover relationships between sequence, structure and function of RNAs in the cell. PMID:26350218

  4. Simultaneous characterization of cellular RNA structure and function with in-cell SHAPE-Seq.

    PubMed

    Watters, Kyle E; Abbott, Timothy R; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-29

    Many non-coding RNAs form structures that interact with cellular machinery to control gene expression. A central goal of molecular and synthetic biology is to uncover design principles linking RNA structure to function to understand and engineer this relationship. Here we report a simple, high-throughput method called in-cell SHAPE-Seq that combines in-cell probing of RNA structure with a measurement of gene expression to simultaneously characterize RNA structure and function in bacterial cells. We use in-cell SHAPE-Seq to study the structure-function relationship of two RNA mechanisms that regulate translation in Escherichia coli. We find that nucleotides that participate in RNA-RNA interactions are highly accessible when their binding partner is absent and that changes in RNA structure due to RNA-RNA interactions can be quantitatively correlated to changes in gene expression. We also characterize the cellular structures of three endogenously expressed non-coding RNAs: 5S rRNA, RNase P and the btuB riboswitch. Finally, a comparison between in-cell and in vitro folded RNA structures revealed remarkable similarities for synthetic RNAs, but significant differences for RNAs that participate in complex cellular interactions. Thus, in-cell SHAPE-Seq represents an easily approachable tool for biologists and engineers to uncover relationships between sequence, structure and function of RNAs in the cell.

  5. Simultaneous characterization of cellular RNA structure and function with in-cell SHAPE-Seq.

    PubMed

    Watters, Kyle E; Abbott, Timothy R; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-29

    Many non-coding RNAs form structures that interact with cellular machinery to control gene expression. A central goal of molecular and synthetic biology is to uncover design principles linking RNA structure to function to understand and engineer this relationship. Here we report a simple, high-throughput method called in-cell SHAPE-Seq that combines in-cell probing of RNA structure with a measurement of gene expression to simultaneously characterize RNA structure and function in bacterial cells. We use in-cell SHAPE-Seq to study the structure-function relationship of two RNA mechanisms that regulate translation in Escherichia coli. We find that nucleotides that participate in RNA-RNA interactions are highly accessible when their binding partner is absent and that changes in RNA structure due to RNA-RNA interactions can be quantitatively correlated to changes in gene expression. We also characterize the cellular structures of three endogenously expressed non-coding RNAs: 5S rRNA, RNase P and the btuB riboswitch. Finally, a comparison between in-cell and in vitro folded RNA structures revealed remarkable similarities for synthetic RNAs, but significant differences for RNAs that participate in complex cellular interactions. Thus, in-cell SHAPE-Seq represents an easily approachable tool for biologists and engineers to uncover relationships between sequence, structure and function of RNAs in the cell. PMID:26350218

  6. The histone deacetylase inhibitor, romidepsin, suppresses cellular immune functions of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Kelly-Sell, Michael J; Kim, Youn H; Straus, Suzanne; Benoit, Bernice; Harrison, Cameron; Sutherland, Katherine; Armstrong, Randall; Weng, Wen-Kai; Showe, Louise C; Wysocka, Maria; Rook, Alain H

    2012-04-01

    Romidepsin is the second histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) approved for the treatment of advanced stages of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Recent in vitro data suggest that HDACis suppress immune function although these findings have not been confirmed in patients. Thus, we serially examined the cellular immune function of eight CTCL patients undergoing treatment with three cycles of romidepsin. We measured the patients' natural killer (NK) and dendritic cell (DC) function and performed an in vitro terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay to measure cellular apoptosis. Patients' NK cell cytolytic activity decreased from baseline to the third cycle of treatment (P = 0.018) but stimulation with a toll-like receptor (TLR) agonist increased this activity (P = 0.018). At baseline, a TLR agonist could both activate patients' DC (P = 0.043) and stimulate interleukin-12 protein production (P = 0.043) but both were suppressed after the first cycle of romidepsin. Finally, we observed increased specificity for romidepsin-induced CD4+ tumor cell apoptosis and dose-dependent increases in cellular apoptosis of healthy cells in multiple lineages (P < 0.05). These findings raise concern that HDACis suppress immune function in CTCL patients and they support the concurrent use of multiple immune stimulatory agents to preserve the host immune response.

  7. Histological Lesions and Cellular Response in the Skin of Alpine Chamois (Rupicapra r. rupicapra) Spontaneously Affected by Sarcoptic Mange

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Claudia; Lazzarotti, Camilla; Trogu, Tiziana; Lanfranchi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Population dynamics of chamois (genus Rupicapra, subfamily Caprinae) can be influenced by infectious diseases epizootics, of which sarcoptic mange is probably the most severe in the Alpine chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra rupicapra). In this study, skin lesions and cellular inflammatory infiltrates were characterized in 44 Alpine chamois affected by sarcoptic mange. Dermal cellular responses were evaluated in comparison with chamois affected by trombiculosis and controls. In both sarcoptic mange and trombiculosis, a significantly increase of eosinophils, mast cells, T and B lymphocytes, and macrophages was detected. Moreover, in sarcoptic mange significant higher numbers of T lymphocytes and macrophages compared to trombiculosis were observed. Lesions in sarcoptic mange were classified in three grades, according to crusts thickness, correlated with mite counts. Grade 3 represented the most severe form with crust thickness more than 3.5 mm, high number of mites, and severe parakeratosis with diffuse bacteria. Evidence of immediate and delayed hypersensitivity was detected in all three forms associated with diffuse severe epidermal hyperplasia. In grade 3, a significant increase of B lymphocytes was evident compared to grades 1 and 2, while eosinophil counts were significantly higher than in grade 1, but lower than in grade 2 lesions. An involvement of nonprotective Th2 immune response could in part account for severe lesions of grade 3. PMID:27403422

  8. Cellular resolution functional imaging in behaving rats using voluntary head restraint

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Benjamin B.; Brody, Carlos D.; Tank, David W.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY High-throughput operant conditioning systems for rodents provide efficient training on sophisticated behavioral tasks. Combining these systems with technologies for cellular resolution functional imaging would provide a powerful approach to study neural dynamics during behavior. Here we describe an integrated two-photon microscope and behavioral apparatus that allows cellular resolution functional imaging of cortical regions during epochs of voluntary head restraint. Rats were trained to initiate periods of restraint up to 8 seconds in duration, which provided the mechanical stability necessary for in vivo imaging while allowing free movement between behavioral trials. A mechanical registration system repositioned the head to within a few microns, allowing the same neuronal populations to be imaged on each trial. In proof-of-principle experiments, calcium dependent fluorescence transients were recorded from GCaMP-labeled cortical neurons. In contrast to previous methods for head restraint, this system can also be incorporated into high-throughput operant conditioning systems. PMID:24055015

  9. PIP1 plasma membrane aquaporins in tobacco: from cellular effects to function in plants.

    PubMed

    Siefritz, Franka; Tyree, Melvin T; Lovisolo, Claudio; Schubert, Andrea; Kaldenhoff, Ralf

    2002-04-01

    The molecular functions of several aquaporins are well characterized (e.g., by analysis of aquaporin-expressing Xenopus oocytes). However, their significance in the physiology of water transport in multicellular organisms remains uncertain. The tobacco plasma membrane aquaporin NtAQP1 was used to elucidate this issue. By comparing antisense plants that were inhibited in NtAQP1 expression with control plants, we found evidence for NtAQP1 function in cellular and whole-plant water relations. The consequences of a decrease in cellular water permeability were determined by measurement of transpiration rate and stem and leaf water potential as well as growth experiments under extreme soil water depletion. Plants impaired in NtAQP1 expression showed reduced root hydraulic conductivity and lower water stress resistance. In conclusion, our results emphasize the importance of symplastic aquaporin-mediated water transport in whole-plant water relations. PMID:11971141

  10. Inhibitory effects of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 on cellular functions of sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Araki, Mutsumi; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Ozaki, Shuhei; Mori, Shiori; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Honoki, Kanya; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2014-06-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive lipid that interacts with G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA receptor-1 (LPA1) to LPA6). Here, we investigated the effects of LPA signaling via LPA5 on cellular functions of sarcoma cells by generating Lpar5 overexpressing and Lpar5 knockdown cells from rat osteosarcoma and malignant fibrous histiocytoma cells, respectively. The cell motility activity of Lpar5 overexpressing cells was significantly lower, while Lpar5 knockdown cells showed high cell motility, compared with respective controls. Gelatin zymography showed that LPA5 suppressed the activation of matrix metalloproteinase-2. LPA5 also inhibited the cell motility activity of endothelial cells, correlating with the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor genes. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA5 negatively regulates the cellular functions of rat sarcoma cells. PMID:24798396

  11. SUMO1 Affects Synaptic Function, Spine Density and Memory.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Shinsuke; Lee, Linda; Knock, Erin; Srikumar, Tharan; Sakurai, Mikako; Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Katayama, Taiichi; Staniszewski, Agnieszka; Raught, Brian; Arancio, Ottavio; Fraser, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modifier-1 (SUMO1) plays a number of roles in cellular events and recent evidence has given momentum for its contributions to neuronal development and function. Here, we have generated a SUMO1 transgenic mouse model with exclusive overexpression in neurons in an effort to identify in vivo conjugation targets and the functional consequences of their SUMOylation. A high-expressing line was examined which displayed elevated levels of mono-SUMO1 and increased high molecular weight conjugates in all brain regions. Immunoprecipitation of SUMOylated proteins from total brain extract and proteomic analysis revealed ~95 candidate proteins from a variety of functional classes, including a number of synaptic and cytoskeletal proteins. SUMO1 modification of synaptotagmin-1 was found to be elevated as compared to non-transgenic mice. This observation was associated with an age-dependent reduction in basal synaptic transmission and impaired presynaptic function as shown by altered paired pulse facilitation, as well as a decrease in spine density. The changes in neuronal function and morphology were also associated with a specific impairment in learning and memory while other behavioral features remained unchanged. These findings point to a significant contribution of SUMO1 modification on neuronal function which may have implications for mechanisms involved in mental retardation and neurodegeneration. PMID:26022678

  12. Identification of IAA transport inhibitors including compounds affecting cellular PIN trafficking by two chemical screening approaches using maize coleoptile systems.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takeshi; Matano, Naoyuki; Morishima, Taichi; Kakinuma, Chieko; Hayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Komano, Teruya; Kubo, Minoru; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Kamiya, Yuji; Koshiba, Tomokazu

    2012-10-01

    The monocot coleoptile tip region has been generally supposed to be the source of IAA to supply IAA to basal parts by the polar IAA transport system, which results in gravi- and phototropic curvature of coleoptiles. Based on this IAA transport system and gravitropism of maize coleoptiles, we have developed two screening methods to identify small molecules from a large chemical library that inhibit IAA transport. The methods detect molecules that affect (i) gravitropic curvature of coleoptiles; and (ii) the amount of IAA transported from the tip. From 10,000 chemicals, eight compounds were identified and categorized into two groups. Four chemicals in group A decreased IAA transport from the tip, and increased endogenous IAA levels in the tip. The structures of two compounds resembled that of 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA), but those of the other two differed from structures of known IAA transport inhibitors. Four chemicals in group B strongly inhibited IAA transport from the tip, but IAA levels at the tip were only slightly affected. At higher concentrations, group B compounds inhibited germination of Arabidopsis, similarly to brefeldin A (BFA). Analysis of the cellular distribution of PIN2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and PIN1-GFP in Arabidopsis revealed that one of the four chemicals in group B induced internalization of PIN1 and PIN2 proteins into vesicles smaller than BFA bodies, suggesting that this compound affects cellular vesicle trafficking systems related to PIN trafficking. The eight chemicals identified here will be a useful tool for understanding the mechanisms of IAA transport in plants. PMID:22875609

  13. DGAT1-deficiency affects the cellular distribution of hepatic retinoid and attenuates the progression of CCl4-induced liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Jason J.; Lee, Seung-Ah; Jiang, Hongfeng; Brun, Pierre-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Background Diacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) catalyzes the final step of triglyceride synthesis, transferring an acyl group from acyl-CoA to diacylglycerol. DGAT1 also catalyzes the acyl-CoA-dependent formation of retinyl esters in vitro and in mouse intestine and skin. Although DGAT1 is expressed in both hepatocytes and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), we reported genetic and nutritional studies that established that DGAT1 does not contribute to retinyl ester formation in the liver. Methods We now have explored in more depth the role(s) of DGAT1 in hepatic retinoid metabolism and storage. Results Our data show that DGAT1 affects the cellular distribution between hepatocytes and HSCs of stored and newly absorbed dietary retinol. For livers of Dgat1-deficient mice, a greater percentage of stored retinyl ester is present in HSCs at the expense of hepatocytes. This is also true for newly absorbed oral [3H]retinol. These differences are associated with significantly increased expression, by 2.8-fold, of cellular retinol-binding protein, type I (RBP1) in freshly isolated HSCs from Dgat1-deficient mice, raising the possibility that RBP1, which contributes to retinol uptake into cells and retinyl ester synthesis, accounts for the differences. We further show that the retinyl ester-containing lipid droplets in HSCs are affected in Dgat1-null mice, being fewer in number but, on average, larger than in wild type (WT) HSCs. Finally, we demonstrate that DGAT1 affects experimentally induced HSC activation in vivo but that this effect is independent of altered retinoic acid availability or effects on gene expression. Conclusions Our studies establish that DGAT1 has a role in hepatic retinoid storage and metabolism, but this does not involve direct actions of DGAT1 in retinyl ester synthesis. PMID:26151058

  14. Functions of the cellular prion protein, the end of Moore's law, and Ockham's razor theory

    PubMed Central

    del Río, José A.; Gavín, Rosalina

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Since its discovery the cellular prion protein (encoded by the Prnp gene) has been associated with a large number of functions. The proposed functions rank from basic cellular processes such as cell cycle and survival to neural functions such as behavior and neuroprotection, following a pattern similar to that of Moore's law for electronics. In addition, particular interest is increasing in the participation of Prnp in neurodegeneration. However, in recent years a redefinition of these functions has begun, since examples of previously attributed functions were increasingly re-associated with other proteins. Most of these functions are linked to so-called “Prnp-flanking genes” that are close to the genomic locus of Prnp and which are present in the genome of some Prnp mouse models. In addition, their role in neuroprotection against convulsive insults has been confirmed in recent studies. Lastly, in recent years a large number of models indicating the participation of different domains of the protein in apoptosis have been uncovered. However, after more than 10 years of molecular dissection our view is that the simplest mechanistic model in PrPC-mediated cell death should be considered, as Ockham's razor theory suggested. PMID:26890218

  15. Functions of the cellular prion protein, the end of Moore's law, and Ockham's razor theory.

    PubMed

    del Río, José A; Gavín, Rosalina

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery the cellular prion protein (encoded by the Prnp gene) has been associated with a large number of functions. The proposed functions rank from basic cellular processes such as cell cycle and survival to neural functions such as behavior and neuroprotection, following a pattern similar to that of Moore's law for electronics. In addition, particular interest is increasing in the participation of Prnp in neurodegeneration. However, in recent years a redefinition of these functions has begun, since examples of previously attributed functions were increasingly re-associated with other proteins. Most of these functions are linked to so-called "Prnp-flanking genes" that are close to the genomic locus of Prnp and which are present in the genome of some Prnp mouse models. In addition, their role in neuroprotection against convulsive insults has been confirmed in recent studies. Lastly, in recent years a large number of models indicating the participation of different domains of the protein in apoptosis have been uncovered. However, after more than 10 years of molecular dissection our view is that the simplest mechanistic model in PrP(C)-mediated cell death should be considered, as Ockham's razor theory suggested.

  16. Secreted biofilm factors adversely affect cellular wound healing responses in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jeffery Marano, Robert; Jane Wallace, Hilary; Wijeratne, Dulharie; William Fear, Mark; San Wong, Hui; O'Handley, Ryan

    2015-08-17

    Although most chronic wounds possess an underlying pathology, infectious agents also contribute. In many instances, pathogens exist as biofilms forming clusters surrounded by a secreted extracellular substance. We hypothesized that compounds secreted by biofilm bacteria may inhibit normal wound healing events including cell proliferation and migration. Conditioned media from two common bacterial species associated with chronic skin wounds and chronic tympanic membrane perforations, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were evaluated for their capacity to affect keratinocyte proliferation and migration. Additionally, proteomic analysis was performed to identify proteins within the biofilm conditioned media that may contribute to these observed effects. Biofilm conditioned media from both species inhibited proliferation in human tympanic membrane derived keratinocytes, whereas only biofilm conditioned media from S. aureus inhibited migration. Human epidermal keratinocytes were found to be more sensitive to the effects of the conditioned media resulting in high levels of cell death. Heat treatment and microfiltration suggested that S. aureus activity was due to a protein, while P. aeruginosa activity was more likely due to a small molecule. Proteomic analysis identified several proteins with putative links to delayed wound healing. These include alpha hemolysin, alcohol dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, lactate dehydrogenase and epidermal cell differentiation inhibitor.

  17. Secreted biofilm factors adversely affect cellular wound healing responses in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jeffery Marano, Robert; Jane Wallace, Hilary; Wijeratne, Dulharie; William Fear, Mark; San Wong, Hui; O'Handley, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Although most chronic wounds possess an underlying pathology, infectious agents also contribute. In many instances, pathogens exist as biofilms forming clusters surrounded by a secreted extracellular substance. We hypothesized that compounds secreted by biofilm bacteria may inhibit normal wound healing events including cell proliferation and migration. Conditioned media from two common bacterial species associated with chronic skin wounds and chronic tympanic membrane perforations, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were evaluated for their capacity to affect keratinocyte proliferation and migration. Additionally, proteomic analysis was performed to identify proteins within the biofilm conditioned media that may contribute to these observed effects. Biofilm conditioned media from both species inhibited proliferation in human tympanic membrane derived keratinocytes, whereas only biofilm conditioned media from S. aureus inhibited migration. Human epidermal keratinocytes were found to be more sensitive to the effects of the conditioned media resulting in high levels of cell death. Heat treatment and microfiltration suggested that S. aureus activity was due to a protein, while P. aeruginosa activity was more likely due to a small molecule. Proteomic analysis identified several proteins with putative links to delayed wound healing. These include alpha hemolysin, alcohol dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, lactate dehydrogenase and epidermal cell differentiation inhibitor. PMID:26278131

  18. Modeling physicochemical interactions affecting in vitro cellular dosimetry of engineered nanomaterials: application to nanosilver

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Dwaipayan; Leo, Bey Fen; Royce, Steven G.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Ryan, Mary P.; Schwander, Stephan; Chung, Kian Fan; Tetley, Teresa D.; Zhang, Junfeng; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) possess unique characteristics affecting their interactions in biological media and biological tissues. Systematic investigation of the effects of particle properties on biological toxicity requires a comprehensive modeling framework which can be used to predict ENM particokinetics in a variety of media. The Agglomeration-diffusion-sedimentation-reaction model (ADSRM) described here is stochastic, using a direct simulation Monte Carlo method to study the evolution of nanoparticles in biological media, as they interact with each other and with the media over time. Nanoparticle diffusion, gravitational settling, agglomeration, and dissolution are treated in a mechanistic manner with focus on silver ENMs (AgNPs). The ADSRM model utilizes particle properties such as size, density, zeta potential, and coating material, along with medium properties like density, viscosity, ionic strength, and pH, to model evolving patterns in a population of ENMs along with their interaction with associated ions and molecules. The model predictions for agglomeration and dissolution are compared with in vitro measurements for various types of ENMs, coating materials, and incubation media, and are found to be overall consistent with measurements. The model has been implemented for an in vitro case in cell culture systems to inform in vitro dosimetry for toxicology studies, and can be directly extended to other biological systems, including in vivo tissue subsystems by suitably modifying system geometry. PMID:25598696

  19. Mutations affecting sensitivity of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum to DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Bronner, C E; Welker, D L; Deering, R A

    1992-09-01

    We describe 22 new mutants of D. discoideum that are sensitive to DNA damage. These mutants were isolated on the basis of sensitivity to either temperature, gamma-rays, or 4-nitroquinolone-1-oxide (4NQO). The doses of gamma-rays, ultraviolet light (UV), and 4NQO required to reduce the survival of colony-forming ability of these mutants to 10% (D10) range from 2% to 100% of the D10s for the nonmutant, parent strains. For most of the mutants, those which are very sensitive to one agent are very sensitive to all agents tested and those which are moderately sensitive to one agent, are moderately sensitive to all agents tested. One mutant is sensitive only to 4NQO. Linkage relationships have been examined for 13 of these mutants. This linkage information was used to design complementation tests to determine allelism with previously characterized complementation groups affecting sensitivity to radiation. 4 of the new mutants fall within previously identified complementation groups and 3 new complementation groups have been identified (radJ, radK and radL). Other new loci probably also exist among these new mutants. This brings the number of characterized mutants of D. discoideum which are sensitive to DNA-damaging agents to 33 and the number of assigned complementation groups to 11. PMID:1380652

  20. [Monocyte functional activity and nonspecific antiviral cellular resistance in adaptation to the conditions of eastern Siberia].

    PubMed

    Zhiburt, E B; Filev, L V; Boĭchak, M P; Volchek, I V; Iakovlev, G P

    1993-01-01

    Monocyte functional activity and antiviral cellular resistance were studied in the newcomers to the Baikal region from the European Russia. A total of 105 patients with acute respiratory diseases and 30 normal subjects were examined. 46 healthy residents of St. Petersburg made up the reference group. The process of adaptation was found to be associated with changes in the functional activity of the immunocompetent cells. The authors came to a conclusion on the principal role of viral injury of the monocytes in the development of acute bronchitis or pneumonia.

  1. ABO desensitization affects cellular immunity and infection control after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schachtner, Thomas; Stein, Maik; Reinke, Petra

    2015-10-01

    The impact of ABO desensitization on overall immunity, infectious control, and alloreactivity remains unknown. We compared 35 ABO-incompatible kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) to a control of 62 ABO compatible KTRs. Samples were collected before, at +1, +2, +3, +6, and +12 months post-transplantation. CMV-, BKV-specific, and alloreactive T cells were measured using an interferon-γ ELISPOT assay. The extent of immunosuppression was quantified by enumeration of lymphocyte subpopulations and cytokines. No differences were observed for 5-year allograft survival and function between both groups (P > 0.05). However, ABO-incompatible KTRs were more likely to develop CMV infection, BKV-associated nephropathy, and severe sepsis (P = 0.001). Interestingly, ABO-incompatible KTRs with poor HLA-match showed the highest rates of infections and inferior allograft function (P < 0.05). CD3+, CD4+ T-cell counts, interferon-γ and IL-10 levels were lower in ABO-incompatible KTRs early post-transplantation (P < 0.05). Likewise, ABO-incompatible KTRs showed impaired BKV- and CMV-specific T-cell immunity (P < 0.05). ABO-incompatible KTRs showed lower frequencies of alloreactive T cells (P < 0.05). Our data suggest T-cell depletion due to ABO desensitization, which may contribute to the increased risk of T-cell-dependent infections. Elimination of B cells serving as antigen-presenting cells, thereby causing impaired T-cell activation, plays a significant role in both impaired infection control and reduced alloreactive T-cell activation.

  2. Functional connectivity estimation over large networks at cellular resolution based on electrophysiological recordings and structural prior

    PubMed Central

    Ullo, Simona; Nieus, Thierry R.; Sona, Diego; Maccione, Alessandro; Berdondini, Luca; Murino, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Despite many structural and functional aspects of the brain organization have been extensively studied in neuroscience, we are still far from a clear understanding of the intricate structure-function interactions occurring in the multi-layered brain architecture, where billions of different neurons are involved. Although structure and function can individually convey a large amount of information, only a combined study of these two aspects can probably shade light on how brain circuits develop and operate at the cellular scale. Here, we propose a novel approach for refining functional connectivity estimates within neuronal networks using the structural connectivity as prior. This is done at the mesoscale, dealing with thousands of neurons while reaching, at the microscale, an unprecedented cellular resolution. The High-Density Micro Electrode Array (HD-MEA) technology, combined with fluorescence microscopy, offers the unique opportunity to acquire structural and functional data from large neuronal cultures approaching the granularity of the single cell. In this work, an advanced method based on probabilistic directional features and heat propagation is introduced to estimate the structural connectivity from the fluorescence image while functional connectivity graphs are obtained from the cross-correlation analysis of the spiking activity. Structural and functional information are then integrated by reweighting the functional connectivity graph based on the structural prior. Results show that the resulting functional connectivity estimates are more coherent with the network topology, as compared to standard measures purely based on cross-correlations and spatio-temporal filters. We finally use the obtained results to gain some insights on which features of the functional activity are more relevant to characterize actual neuronal interactions. PMID:25477790

  3. Functional connectivity estimation over large networks at cellular resolution based on electrophysiological recordings and structural prior.

    PubMed

    Ullo, Simona; Nieus, Thierry R; Sona, Diego; Maccione, Alessandro; Berdondini, Luca; Murino, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Despite many structural and functional aspects of the brain organization have been extensively studied in neuroscience, we are still far from a clear understanding of the intricate structure-function interactions occurring in the multi-layered brain architecture, where billions of different neurons are involved. Although structure and function can individually convey a large amount of information, only a combined study of these two aspects can probably shade light on how brain circuits develop and operate at the cellular scale. Here, we propose a novel approach for refining functional connectivity estimates within neuronal networks using the structural connectivity as prior. This is done at the mesoscale, dealing with thousands of neurons while reaching, at the microscale, an unprecedented cellular resolution. The High-Density Micro Electrode Array (HD-MEA) technology, combined with fluorescence microscopy, offers the unique opportunity to acquire structural and functional data from large neuronal cultures approaching the granularity of the single cell. In this work, an advanced method based on probabilistic directional features and heat propagation is introduced to estimate the structural connectivity from the fluorescence image while functional connectivity graphs are obtained from the cross-correlation analysis of the spiking activity. Structural and functional information are then integrated by reweighting the functional connectivity graph based on the structural prior. Results show that the resulting functional connectivity estimates are more coherent with the network topology, as compared to standard measures purely based on cross-correlations and spatio-temporal filters. We finally use the obtained results to gain some insights on which features of the functional activity are more relevant to characterize actual neuronal interactions. PMID:25477790

  4. Telomere protein RAP1 levels are affected by cellular aging and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Mark J.; Baribault, Michelle E.; Israel, Joanna N.; Bae, Nancy S.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are important for maintaining the integrity of the genome through the action of the shelterin complex. Previous studies indicted that the length of the telomere did not have an effect on the amount of the shelterin subunits; however, those experiments were performed using immortalized cells with stable telomere lengths. The interest of the present study was to observe how decreasing telomere lengths over successive generations would affect the shelterin subunits. As neonatal human dermal fibroblasts aged and their telomeres became shorter, the levels of the telomere-binding protein telomeric repeat factor 2 (TRF2) decreased significantly. By contrast, the levels of one of its binding partners, repressor/activator protein 1 (RAP1), decreased to a lesser extent than would be expected from the decrease in TRF2. Other subunits, TERF1-interacting nuclear factor 2 and protection of telomeres protein 1, remained stable. The decrease in RAP1 in the older cells occurred in the nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) stress was used as an artificial means of aging in the cells, and this resulted in RAP1 levels decreasing, but the effect was only observed in the nuclear portion. Similar results were obtained using U251 glioblastoma cells treated with H2O2 or grown in serum-depleted medium. The present findings indicate that TRF2 and RAP1 levels decrease as fibroblasts naturally age. RAP1 remains more stable compared to TRF2. RAP1 also responds to oxidative stress, but the response is different to that observed in aging. PMID:27446538

  5. THE MITOCHONDRIAL PARADIGM FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY AND CELLULAR FUNCTION: A COMPLEMENTARY CONCEPT TO MENDELIAN GENETICS

    PubMed Central

    Kryzwanski, David M.; Moellering, Douglas; Fetterman, Jessica L.; Dunham-Snary, Kimberly J.; Sammy, Melissa J.; Ballinger, Scott W.

    2013-01-01

    While there is general agreement that cardiovascular disease (CVD) development is influenced by a combination of genetic, environmental, and behavioral contributors, the actual mechanistic basis of how these factors initiate or promote CVD development in some individuals while others with identical risk profiles do not, is not clearly understood. This review considers the potential role for mitochondrial genetics and function in determining CVD susceptibility from the standpoint that the original features that molded cellular function were based upon mitochondrial-nuclear relationships established millions of years ago and were likely refined during prehistoric environmental selection events that today, are largely absent. Consequently, contemporary risk factors that influence our susceptibility to a variety of age-related diseases, including CVD were probably not part of the dynamics that defined the processes of mitochondrial – nuclear interaction, and thus, cell function. In this regard, the selective conditions that contributed to cellular functionality and evolution should be given more consideration when interpreting and designing experimental data and strategies. Finally, future studies that probe beyond epidemiologic associations are required. These studies will serve as the initial steps for addressing the provocative concept that contemporary human disease susceptibility is the result of selection events for mitochondrial function that increased chances for prehistoric human survival and reproductive success. PMID:21647091

  6. Cellular effect evaluation of micropollutants using transporter functions of renal proximal tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xianghao; Lee, Yu Jin; Han, Ho Jae; Kim, In S

    2009-11-01

    Issues pertaining to the effects of micropollutants in reclaimed water are arising in terms of their effect on human health. However, current cellular methodologies face some difficulties to detect subtle effects of waterborne micropollutants at environmental concentrations (ngL(-1)-microgL(-1)) on human and animal cells. In this study, an appropriate cellular model capable of detecting the subtle effects of aquatic micropollutants at environmental concentrations using the functions of primary cultured rabbit renal proximal tubule cells (PTCs) is proposed. Tris-(2-chloroethyl)-phosphate (TCEP) was chosen as the representative micropollutant from eight typical micropollutants via lactate dehydrogenase assay. TCEP significantly decreased not only ion (sodium, calcium, and phosphate) uptake from 10(-2) mg L(-1) (64.8-82.5%, 60.4-68.8%, and 91.9-93.8% of the control, respectively), but also the expression of ion transporters (NHE-3 and L-type Ca channel) from 10(-2) mg L(-1) (53.9-87.4% and 38.6-63.6% of the control, respectively). Moreover, TCEP significantly decreased both the non-ion (glucose, fructose, and l-arginine) uptake and the expression of non-ion transporters (SGLT 1, GLUT 5, and rBAT) from 10(-2) mg L(-1). Therefore, the results demonstrated that the function of PTCs as a cellular model can be used to determine subtle effects of environmental micropollutants at low concentrations. PMID:19729184

  7. Control of leucocyte function-associated antigen-1-dependent cellular conjugation by divalent cations.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, A M; Alexandroff, A B; Lappin, M B; Esuvaranathan, K; James, K; Chisholm, G D

    1994-01-01

    The control of integrin activation is fundamental to an understanding of the integrin-dependent cellular adhesion thought to be important for a plethora of basic cellular functions. Using a cell-cell conjugation assay the role of divalent cations in leucocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1)-dependent cellular adhesion was further investigated. The conjugation of interleukin-2 (IL-2)-activated lymphocytes to tumour cells was found to be energy dependent and required the presence of various divalent cations, removal of which decreased the level of conjugation. Increased concentrations of calcium, magnesium and manganese ions resulted in a corresponding increase in levels of conjugation. This increase in conjugation was LFA-1 dependent. Interestingly, when calcium ions were first removed from LFA-1, treatment of lymphocytes with magnesium and manganese ions gave significantly higher levels of conjugation than in the presence of calcium. Using a simple displacement study, calcium ions were shown to displace magnesium ions resulting in decreased conjugation. However, calcium ions were unable to displace manganese ions for binding to LFA-1. That manganese was exerting its effect via an LFA-1-dependent mechanism was confirmed using monoclonal antibodies to CD11a which negated the increased conjugation frequency due to manganese. PMID:7907574

  8. Expression of virus-encoded proteinases: functional and structural similarities with cellular enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, W G; Semler, B L

    1993-01-01

    Many viruses express their genome, or part of their genome, initially as a polyprotein precursor that undergoes proteolytic processing. Molecular genetic analyses of viral gene expression have revealed that many of these processing events are mediated by virus-encoded proteinases. Biochemical activity studies and structural analyses of these viral enzymes reveal that they have remarkable similarities to cellular proteinases. However, the viral proteinases have evolved unique features that permit them to function in a cellular environment. In this article, the current status of plant and animal virus proteinases is described along with their role in the viral replication cycle. The reactions catalyzed by viral proteinases are not simple enzyme-substrate interactions; rather, the processing steps are highly regulated, are coordinated with other viral processes, and frequently involve the participation of other factors. Images PMID:8302216

  9. Understanding the Cellular Function of TRPV2 Channel through Generation of Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Matthew R.; Huynh, Kevin W.; Cawley, Daniel; Moiseenkova-Bell, Vera Y.

    2013-01-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) is a Ca2+-permeable nonselective cation channel proposed to play a critical role in a wide array of cellular processes. Although TRPV2 surface expression was originally determined to be sensitive to growth factor signaling, regulated trafficking of TRPV2 has remained controversial. TRPV2 has proven difficult to study due to the lack of specific pharmacological tools to modulate channel activity; therefore, most studies of the cellular function of TRPV2 rely on immuno-detection techniques. Polyclonal antibodies against TRPV2 have not been properly validated and characterized, which may contribute to conflicting results regarding its function in the cell. Here, we developed monoclonal antibodies using full-length TRPV2 as an antigen. Extensive characterization of these antibodies and comparison to commonly used commercially available TRPV2 antibodies revealed that while monoclonal antibodies generated in our laboratory were suitable for detection of endogenous TRPV2 by western blot, immunoprecipitation and immunocytochemistry, the commercially available polyclonal antibodies we tested were not able to recognize endogenous TRPV2. We used our newly generated and validated TRPV2 antibodies to determine the effects of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) on TRPV2 surface expression in heterologous and endogenous expression systems. We found that IGF-1 had little to no effect on trafficking and plasma membrane expression of TRPV2. Overall, these new TRPV2 monoclonal antibodies served to dispel the controversy of the effects of IGF-1 on TRPV2 plasma membrane expression and will clarify the role TRPV2 plays in cellular function. Furthermore, our strategy of using full-length tetrameric TRP channels may allow for the generation of antibodies against other TRP channels of unclear function. PMID:24392006

  10. Dynamic circadian protein-protein interaction networks predict temporal organization of cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Wallach, Thomas; Schellenberg, Katja; Maier, Bert; Kalathur, Ravi Kiran Reddy; Porras, Pablo; Wanker, Erich E; Futschik, Matthias E; Kramer, Achim

    2013-03-01

    Essentially all biological processes depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs). Timing of such interactions is crucial for regulatory function. Although circadian (~24-hour) clocks constitute fundamental cellular timing mechanisms regulating important physiological processes, PPI dynamics on this timescale are largely unknown. Here, we identified 109 novel PPIs among circadian clock proteins via a yeast-two-hybrid approach. Among them, the interaction of protein phosphatase 1 and CLOCK/BMAL1 was found to result in BMAL1 destabilization. We constructed a dynamic circadian PPI network predicting the PPI timing using circadian expression data. Systematic circadian phenotyping (RNAi and overexpression) suggests a crucial role for components involved in dynamic interactions. Systems analysis of a global dynamic network in liver revealed that interacting proteins are expressed at similar times likely to restrict regulatory interactions to specific phases. Moreover, we predict that circadian PPIs dynamically connect many important cellular processes (signal transduction, cell cycle, etc.) contributing to temporal organization of cellular physiology in an unprecedented manner. PMID:23555304

  11. Comprehensive interrogation of the cellular response to fluorescent, detonation and functionalized nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Moore, Laura; Grobárová, Valéria; Shen, Helen; Man, Han Bin; Míčová, Júlia; Ledvina, Miroslav; Štursa, Jan; Nesladek, Milos; Fišerová, Anna; Ho, Dean

    2014-10-21

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are versatile nanoparticles that are currently being investigated for a variety of applications in drug delivery, biomedical imaging and nanoscale sensing. Although initial studies indicate that these small gems are biocompatible, there is a great deal of variability in synthesis methods and surface functionalization that has yet to be evaluated. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the cellular compatibility of an array of nanodiamond subtypes and surface functionalization strategies. These results demonstrate that NDs are well tolerated by multiple cell types at both functional and gene expression levels. In addition, ND-mediated delivery of daunorubicin is less toxic to multiple cell types than treatment with daunorubicin alone, thus demonstrating the ability of the ND agent to improve drug tolerance and decrease therapeutic toxicity. Overall, the results here indicate that ND biocompatibility serves as a promising foundation for continued preclinical investigation. PMID:25037888

  12. Comprehensive interrogation of the cellular response to fluorescent, detonation and functionalized nanodiamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Laura; Grobárová, Valéria; Shen, Helen; Man, Han Bin; Míčová, Júlia; Ledvina, Miroslav; Štursa, Jan; Nesladek, Milos; Fišerová, Anna; Ho, Dean

    2014-09-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are versatile nanoparticles that are currently being investigated for a variety of applications in drug delivery, biomedical imaging and nanoscale sensing. Although initial studies indicate that these small gems are biocompatible, there is a great deal of variability in synthesis methods and surface functionalization that has yet to be evaluated. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of the cellular compatibility of an array of nanodiamond subtypes and surface functionalization strategies. These results demonstrate that NDs are well tolerated by multiple cell types at both functional and gene expression levels. In addition, ND-mediated delivery of daunorubicin is less toxic to multiple cell types than treatment with daunorubicin alone, thus demonstrating the ability of the ND agent to improve drug tolerance and decrease therapeutic toxicity. Overall, the results here indicate that ND biocompatibility serves as a promising foundation for continued preclinical investigation.

  13. Stress, Inflammation, and Cellular Vulnerability during Early Stages of Affective Disorders: Biomarker Strategies and Opportunities for Prevention and Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Adam J.; Kim, Yesul; Price, J. Blair; Kale, Rajas P.; McGillivray, Jane A.; Berk, Michael; Tye, Susannah J.

    2014-01-01

    The mood disorder prodrome is conceptualized as a symptomatic, but not yet clinically diagnosable stage of an affective disorder. Although a growing area, more focused research is needed in the pediatric population to better characterize psychopathological symptoms and biological markers that can reliably identify this very early stage in the evolution of mood disorder pathology. Such information will facilitate early prevention and intervention, which has the potential to affect a person’s disease course. This review focuses on the prodromal characteristics, risk factors, and neurobiological mechanisms of mood disorders. In particular, we consider the influence of early-life stress, inflammation, and allostatic load in mediating neural mechanisms of neuroprogression. These inherently modifiable factors have known neuroadaptive and neurodegenerative implications, and consequently may provide useful biomarker targets. Identification of these factors early in the course of the disease will accordingly allow for the introduction of early interventions which augment an individual’s capacity for psychological resilience through maintenance of synaptic integrity and cellular resilience. A targeted and complementary approach to boosting both psychological and physiological resilience simultaneously during the prodromal stage of mood disorder pathology has the greatest promise for optimizing the neurodevelopmental potential of those individuals at risk of disabling mood disorders. PMID:24782789

  14. Cognitive function in the affective disorders: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bulbena, A; Berrios, G E

    1993-01-01

    A prospective, controlled study of 50 subjects confirmed claims that major depression or mania may cause temporary disorders of attention, memory, visuo-spatial function, and choice reaction time, and cause-independently of medication-the appearance of glabellar tap, positive hand-face test, nuchocephalic reflex, and graphesthesia. On follow-up, all these phenomena either disappeared or markedly improved. Age and age of onset, but not pre-morbid intelligence or history of ECT, seemed to modulate the severity of the cognitive impairment. Presence of delusions predicted poor (but reversible) visuo-spatial function. Cognitive impairment accompanied by reversible soft neurological signs was more marked but patients thus affected surprisingly showed lower depressive scores; this was interpreted as representing a secondary, 'organic' form of affective disorder (i.e. a behavioural phenocopy of depression) characterised by a reduced capacity to experience depressive symptoms and by little improvement at follow-up.

  15. Age-Related Impairment of Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function: Pathophysiological and Cellular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    De Tata, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes significantly increases with age. The relevance of this association is dramatically magnified by the concomitant global aging of the population, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated. Here, some recent advances in this field are reviewed at the level of both the pathophysiology of glucose homeostasis and the cellular senescence of pancreatic islets. Overall, recent results highlight the crucial role of beta-cell dysfunction in the age-related impairment of pancreatic endocrine function and delineate the possibility of new original therapeutic interventions. PMID:25232350

  16. Functional recognition imaging using artificial neural networks: applications to rapid cellular identification via broadband electromechanical response.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, M P; Reukov, V V; Thompson, G L; Vertegel, A A; Guo, S; Kalinin, S V; Jesse, S

    2009-10-01

    Functional recognition imaging in scanning probe microscopy (SPM) using artificial neural network identification is demonstrated. This approach utilizes statistical analysis of complex SPM responses at a single spatial location to identify the target behavior, which is reminiscent of associative thinking in the human brain, obviating the need for analytical models. We demonstrate, as an example of recognition imaging, rapid identification of cellular organisms using the difference in electromechanical activity over a broad frequency range. Single-pixel identification of model Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria is achieved, demonstrating the viability of the method.

  17. Short-term plasticity in thalamocortical pathways: cellular mechanisms and functional roles.

    PubMed

    Castro-Alamancos, M A

    1997-01-01

    Information reaches the neocortex through different types of thalamocortical pathways. These differ in many morphological and physiological properties. One interesting aspect in which thalamocortical pathways differ is in their temporal dynamics, such as their short-term plasticity. Primary pathways display frequency-dependent depression, while secondary pathways display frequency-dependent enhancement. The cellular mechanisms underlying these dynamic responses involve pre- and post-synaptic and circuit properties. They may serve to synchronize, amplify and/or filter neural activity in neocortex depending on behavioral demands, and thus to adapt each pathway to its specific function.

  18. Functional Recognition Imaging Using Artificial Neural Networks: Applications to Rapid Cellular Identification by Broadband Electromechanical Response

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforov, M.P.; Reukov, V.V.; Thompson, G.L.; Vertegel, A.A.; Guo, S.; Jesse, S.; Kalinin, S.V.

    2010-01-01

    Functional recognition imaging in Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) using artificial neural network identification is demonstrated. This approach utilizes statistical analysis of complex SPM responses to identify the target behavior, reminiscent of associative thinking in the human brain and obviating the need for analytical models. As an example of recognition imaging, we demonstrate rapid identification of cellular organisms using difference in electromechanical activity in a broad frequency range. Single-pixel identification of model Micrococcus lysodeikticus and Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria is achieved, demonstrating the viability of the method. PMID:19752493

  19. Recycling of inorganic waste in monolithic and cellular glass‐based materials for structural and functional applications

    PubMed Central

    Rincón, Acacio; Marangoni, Mauro; Cetin, Suna

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The stabilization of inorganic waste of various nature and origin, in glasses, has been a key strategy for environmental protection for the last decades. When properly formulated, glasses may retain many inorganic contaminants permanently, but it must be acknowledged that some criticism remains, mainly concerning costs and energy use. As a consequence, the sustainability of vitrification largely relies on the conversion of waste glasses into new, usable and marketable glass‐based materials, in the form of monolithic and cellular glass‐ceramics. The effective conversion in turn depends on the simultaneous control of both starting materials and manufacturing processes. While silica‐rich waste favours the obtainment of glass, iron‐rich wastes affect the functionalities, influencing the porosity in cellular glass‐based materials as well as catalytic, magnetic, optical and electrical properties. Engineered formulations may lead to important reductions of processing times and temperatures, in the transformation of waste‐derived glasses into glass‐ceramics, or even bring interesting shortcuts. Direct sintering of wastes, combined with recycled glasses, as an example, has been proven as a valid low‐cost alternative for glass‐ceramic manufacturing, for wastes with limited hazardousness. The present paper is aimed at providing an up‐to‐date overview of the correlation between formulations, manufacturing technologies and properties of most recent waste‐derived, glass‐based materials. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Human Cytomegalovirus nuclear egress and secondary envelopment are negatively affected in the absence of cellular p53.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Man I; O'Dowd, John M; Chughtai, Kamila; Hayman, Ian; Brown, Celeste J; Fortunato, Elizabeth A

    2016-10-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection is compromised in cells lacking p53, a transcription factor that mediates cellular stress responses. In this study we have investigated compromised functional virion production in cells with p53 knocked out (p53KOs). Infectious center assays found most p53KOs released functional virions. Analysis of electron micrographs revealed modestly decreased capsid production in infected p53KOs compared to wt. Substantially fewer p53KOs displayed HCMV-induced infoldings of the inner nuclear membrane (IINMs). In p53KOs, fewer capsids were found in IINMs and in the cytoplasm. The deficit in virus-induced membrane remodeling within the nucleus of p53KOs was mirrored in the cytoplasm, with a disproportionately smaller number of capsids re-enveloped. Reintroduction of p53 substantially recovered these deficits. Overall, the absence of p53 contributed to inhibition of the formation and function of IINMs and re-envelopment of the reduced number of capsids able to reach the cytoplasm.

  1. CELLULAR BIOAVAILABILITY OF NATURAL HORMONES AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS AS A FUNCTION OF SERUM AND CYTOSOLIC BINDING FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental contaminants have been reported to function as hormone mimics in various wildlife species. To investigate a potential mechanism for the interaction of contaminants with the endocrine system, we evaluated the cellular bioavailability of numerous chemicals. Hormone bi...

  2. NAD+/NADH and NADP+/NADPH in cellular functions and cell death: regulation and biological consequences.

    PubMed

    Ying, Weihai

    2008-02-01

    Accumulating evidence has suggested that NAD (including NAD+ and NADH) and NADP (including NADP+ and NADPH) could belong to the fundamental common mediators of various biological processes, including energy metabolism, mitochondrial functions, calcium homeostasis, antioxidation/generation of oxidative stress, gene expression, immunological functions, aging, and cell death: First, it is established that NAD mediates energy metabolism and mitochondrial functions; second, NADPH is a key component in cellular antioxidation systems; and NADH-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation from mitochondria and NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS generation are two critical mechanisms of ROS generation; third, cyclic ADP-ribose and several other molecules that are generated from NAD and NADP could mediate calcium homeostasis; fourth, NAD and NADP modulate multiple key factors in cell death, such as mitochondrial permeability transition, energy state, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1, and apoptosis-inducing factor; and fifth, NAD and NADP profoundly affect aging-influencing factors such as oxidative stress and mitochondrial activities, and NAD-dependent sirtuins also mediate the aging process. Moreover, many recent studies have suggested novel paradigms of NAD and NADP metabolism. Future investigation into the metabolism and biological functions of NAD and NADP may expose fundamental properties of life, and suggest new strategies for treating diseases and slowing the aging process.

  3. Cellular functions and X-ray structure of anthrolysin O, a cholesterol-dependent cytolysin secreted by Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Bourdeau, Raymond W; Malito, Enrico; Chenal, Alexandre; Bishop, Brian L; Musch, Mark W; Villereal, Mitch L; Chang, Eugene B; Mosser, Elise M; Rest, Richard F; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-05-22

    Anthrolysin O (ALO) is a pore-forming, cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) secreted by Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agent for anthrax. Growing evidence suggests the involvement of ALO in anthrax pathogenesis. Here, we show that the apical application of ALO decreases the barrier function of human polarized epithelial cells as well as increases intracellular calcium and the internalization of the tight junction protein occludin. Using pharmacological agents, we also found that barrier function disruption requires increased intracellular calcium and protein degradation. We also report a crystal structure of the soluble state of ALO. Based on our analytical ultracentrifugation and light scattering studies, ALO exists as a monomer. Our ALO structure provides the molecular basis as to how ALO is locked in a monomeric state, in contrast to other CDCs that undergo antiparallel dimerization or higher order oligomerization in solution. ALO has four domains and is globally similar to perfringolysin O (PFO) and intermedilysin (ILY), yet the highly conserved undecapeptide region in domain 4 (D4) adopts a completely different conformation in all three CDCs. Consistent with the differences within D4 and at the D2-D4 interface, we found that ALO D4 plays a key role in affecting the barrier function of C2BBE cells, whereas PFO domain 4 cannot substitute for this role. Novel structural elements and unique cellular functions of ALO revealed by our studies provide new insight into the molecular basis for the diverse nature of the CDC family.

  4. Cellular Functions and X-ray Structure of Anthrolysin O, a Cholesterol-dependent Cytolysin Secreted by Bacillus anthracis

    SciTech Connect

    Bourdeau, Raymond W.; Malito, Enrico; Chenal, Alexandre; Bishop, Brian L.; Musch, Mark W.; Villereal, Mitch L.; Chang, Eugene B.; Mosser, Elise M.; Rest, Richard F.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-06-02

    Anthrolysin O (ALO) is a pore-forming, cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) secreted by Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agent for anthrax. Growing evidence suggests the involvement of ALO in anthrax pathogenesis. Here, we show that the apical application of ALO decreases the barrier function of human polarized epithelial cells as well as increases intracellular calcium and the internalization of the tight junction protein occludin. Using pharmacological agents, we also found that barrier function disruption requires increased intracellular calcium and protein degradation. We also report a crystal structure of the soluble state of ALO. Based on our analytical ultracentrifugation and light scattering studies, ALO exists as a monomer. Our ALO structure provides the molecular basis as to how ALO is locked in a monomeric state, in contrast to other CDCs that undergo antiparallel dimerization or higher order oligomerization in solution. ALO has four domains and is globally similar to perfringolysin O (PFO) and intermedilysin (ILY), yet the highly conserved undecapeptide region in domain 4 (D4) adopts a completely different conformation in all three CDCs. Consistent with the differences within D4 and at the D2-D4 interface, we found that ALO D4 plays a key role in affecting the barrier function of C2BBE cells, whereas PFO domain 4 cannot substitute for this role. Novel structural elements and unique cellular functions of ALO revealed by our studies provide new insight into the molecular basis for the diverse nature of the CDC family.

  5. Molecular, Cellular and Functional Effects of Radiation-Induced Brain Injury: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Balentova, Sona; Adamkov, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is the most effective non-surgical treatment of primary brain tumors and metastases. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into pathogenesis of radiation-induced injury to the central nervous system. Radiation-induced brain injury can damage neuronal, glial and vascular compartments of the brain and may lead to molecular, cellular and functional changes. Given its central role in memory and adult neurogenesis, the majority of studies have focused on the hippocampus. These findings suggested that hippocampal avoidance in cranial radiotherapy prevents radiation-induced cognitive impairment of patients. However, multiple rodent studies have shown that this problem is more complex. As the radiation-induced cognitive impairment reflects hippocampal and non-hippocampal compartments, it is of critical importance to investigate molecular, cellular and functional modifications in various brain regions as well as their integration at clinically relevant doses and schedules. We here provide a literature overview, including our previously published results, in order to support the translation of preclinical findings to clinical practice, and improve the physical and mental status of patients with brain tumors. PMID:26610477

  6. Cardiac function in an endothermic fish: cellular mechanisms for overcoming acute thermal challenges during diving.

    PubMed

    Shiels, H A; Galli, G L J; Block, B A

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the physiology of vertebrate thermal tolerance is critical for predicting how animals respond to climate change. Pacific bluefin tuna experience a wide range of ambient sea temperatures and occupy the largest geographical niche of all tunas. Their capacity to endure thermal challenge is due in part to enhanced expression and activity of key proteins involved in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, which improve cardiomyocyte function and whole animal performance during temperature change. To define the cellular mechanisms that enable bluefin tuna hearts to function during acute temperature change, we investigated the performance of freshly isolated ventricular myocytes using confocal microscopy and electrophysiology. We demonstrate that acute cooling and warming (between 8 and 28°C) modulates the excitability of the cardiomyocyte by altering the action potential (AP) duration and the amplitude and kinetics of the cellular Ca(2+) transient. We then explored the interactions between temperature, adrenergic stimulation and contraction frequency, and show that when these stressors are combined in a physiologically relevant way, they alter AP characteristics to stabilize excitation-contraction coupling across an acute 20°C temperature range. This allows the tuna heart to maintain consistent contraction and relaxation cycles during acute thermal challenges. We hypothesize that this cardiac capacity plays a key role in the bluefin tunas' niche expansion across a broad thermal and geographical range.

  7. Cardiac function in an endothermic fish: cellular mechanisms for overcoming acute thermal challenges during diving

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, H. A.; Galli, G. L. J.; Block, B. A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the physiology of vertebrate thermal tolerance is critical for predicting how animals respond to climate change. Pacific bluefin tuna experience a wide range of ambient sea temperatures and occupy the largest geographical niche of all tunas. Their capacity to endure thermal challenge is due in part to enhanced expression and activity of key proteins involved in cardiac excitation–contraction coupling, which improve cardiomyocyte function and whole animal performance during temperature change. To define the cellular mechanisms that enable bluefin tuna hearts to function during acute temperature change, we investigated the performance of freshly isolated ventricular myocytes using confocal microscopy and electrophysiology. We demonstrate that acute cooling and warming (between 8 and 28°C) modulates the excitability of the cardiomyocyte by altering the action potential (AP) duration and the amplitude and kinetics of the cellular Ca2+ transient. We then explored the interactions between temperature, adrenergic stimulation and contraction frequency, and show that when these stressors are combined in a physiologically relevant way, they alter AP characteristics to stabilize excitation–contraction coupling across an acute 20°C temperature range. This allows the tuna heart to maintain consistent contraction and relaxation cycles during acute thermal challenges. We hypothesize that this cardiac capacity plays a key role in the bluefin tunas' niche expansion across a broad thermal and geographical range. PMID:25540278

  8. S-glutathionylation uncouples eNOS and regulates its cellular and vascular function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-An; Wang, Tse-Yao; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; Reyes, Levy A.; Hemann, Craig; Hassan Talukder, M. A.; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Druhan, Lawrence J.; Zweier, Jay L.

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is critical in the regulation of vascular function, and can generate both nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O2•−), which are key mediators of cellular signalling. In the presence of Ca2+/calmodulin, eNOS produces NO, endothelial-derived relaxing factor, from L-arginine (L-Arg) by means of electron transfer from NADPH through a flavin containing reductase domain to oxygen bound at the haem of an oxygenase domain, which also contains binding sites for tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and L-Arg1–3. In the absence of BH4, NO synthesis is abrogated and instead O2•− is generated4–7. While NOS dysfunction occurs in diseases with redox stress, BH4 repletion only partly restores NOS activity and NOS-dependent vasodilation7. This suggests that there is an as yet unidentified redox-regulated mechanism controlling NOS function. Protein thiols can undergo S-glutathionylation, a reversible protein modification involved in cellular signalling and adaptation8,9. Under oxidative stress, S-glutathionylation occurs through thiol–disulphide exchange with oxidized glutathione or reaction of oxidant-induced protein thiyl radicals with reduced glutathione10,11. Cysteine residues are critical for the maintenance of eNOS function12,13; we therefore speculated that oxidative stress could alter eNOS activity through S-glutathionylation. Here we show that S-glutathionylation of eNOS reversibly decreases NOS activity with an increase in O2•− generation primarily from the reductase, in which two highly conserved cysteine residues are identified as sites of S-glutathionylation and found to be critical for redox-regulation of eNOS function. We show that eNOS S-glutathionylation in endothelial cells, with loss of NO and gain of O2•− generation, is associated with impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation. In hypertensive vessels, eNOS S-glutathionylation is increased with impaired endothelium-dependent vasodilation that is restored by thiol

  9. Neurotransmitter Specific, Cellular-Resolution Functional Brain Mapping Using Receptor Coated Nanoparticles: Assessment of the Possibility

    PubMed Central

    Forati, Ebrahim; Sabouni, Abas; Ray, Supriyo; Head, Brian; Schoen, Christian; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Receptor coated resonant nanoparticles and quantum dots are proposed to provide a cellular-level resolution image of neural activities inside the brain. The functionalized nanoparticles and quantum dots in this approach will selectively bind to different neurotransmitters in the extra-synaptic regions of neurons. This allows us to detect neural activities in real time by monitoring the nanoparticles and quantum dots optically. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with two different geometries (sphere and rod) and quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes were studied along with three different neurotransmitters: dopamine, gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glycine. The absorption/emission spectra of GNPs and QDs before and after binding of neurotransmitters and their corresponding receptors are reported. The results using QDs and nanorods with diameter 25nm and aspect rations larger than three were promising for the development of the proposed functional brain mapping approach. PMID:26717196

  10. A Functional Genomic Screen Identifies Cellular Cofactors of Hepatitis C Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Andrew W.; Benita, Yair; Peng, Lee F.; Kim, Sun-Suk; Sakamoto, Naoya; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Chung, Raymond T.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronically infects 3% of the world’s population, and complications from HCV are the leading indication for liver transplantation. Given the need for better anti-HCV therapies, one strategy is to identify and target cellular cofactors of the virus lifecycle. Using a genome-wide siRNA library, we identified 96 human genes that support HCV replication, with a significant number of them being involved in vesicle organization and biogenesis. Phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase PI4KA and multiple subunits of the COPI vesicle coat complex were among the genes identified. Consistent with this, pharmacologic inhibitors of COPI and PI4KA blocked HCV replication. Targeting hepcidin, a peptide critical for iron homeostasis, also affected HCV replication, which may explain the known dysregulation of iron homeostasis in HCV infection. The host cofactors for HCV replication identified in this study should serve as a useful resource in delineating new targets for anti-HCV therapies. PMID:19286138

  11. Influence of D-net (European GSM-Standard) cellular phones on pacemaker function in 50 patients with permanent pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Wilke, A; Grimm, W; Funck, R; Maisch, B

    1996-10-01

    The widespread use of cellular phones in the last years has prompted some recent studies to suggest an interference of pacemaker function by cellular phone usage. To determine the risk of pacemaker patients using D-net cellular phones, we tested 50 patients with permanent pacemakers after routine pacemaker check by short phone calls using a cellular phone (Ericsson, D-net, frequency 890-915 MHz, digital information coding, equivalent to the European Groupe Systemes Mobiles standard). A six-channel surface ECG was continuously recorded from each patient to detect any interactions between pacemakers and cellular phones. Phone calls were repeated during the following pacemaker settings: (1) preexisting setting; (2) minimum ventricular rate of 90 beats/min and preexisting sensitivity; and (3) minimum ventricular rate of 90 beats/min and maximum sensitivity without T wave oversensing. Only 2 (4%) of 50 patients repeatedly showed intermittent pacemaker inhibition during calls with the cellular phone. Both pacemakers had unipolar sensing. Therefore, although interactions between cellular phone use and pacemaker function appear to be rare in our study, pacemaker dependent patients in particular should avoid the use of cellular phones.

  12. Molecular design and nanoparticle-mediated intracellular delivery of functional proteins to target cellular pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Dhiral Ashwin

    Intracellular delivery of specific proteins and peptides represents a novel method to influence stem cells for gain-of-function and loss-of-function. Signaling control is vital in stem cells, wherein intricate control of and interplay among critical pathways directs the fate of these cells into either self-renewal or differentiation. The most common route to manipulate cellular function involves the introduction of genetic material such as full-length genes and shRNA into the cell to generate (or prevent formation of) the target protein, and thereby ultimately alter cell function. However, viral-mediated gene delivery may result in relatively slow expression of proteins and prevalence of oncogene insertion into the cell, which can alter cell function in an unpredictable fashion, and non-viral delivery may lead to low efficiency of genetic delivery. For example, the latter case plagues the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and hinders their use for in vivo applications. Alternatively, introducing proteins into cells that specifically recognize and influence target proteins, can result in immediate deactivation or activation of key signaling pathways within the cell. In this work, we demonstrate the cellular delivery of functional proteins attached to hydrophobically modified silica (SiNP) nanoparticles to manipulate specifically targeted cell signaling proteins. In the Wnt signaling pathway, we have targeted the phosphorylation activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) by designing a chimeric protein and delivering it in neural stem cells. Confocal imaging indicates that the SiNP-chimeric protein conjugates were efficiently delivered to the cytosol of human embryonic kidney cells and rat neural stem cells, presumably via endocytosis. This uptake impacted the Wnt signaling cascade, indicated by the elevation of beta-catenin levels, and increased transcription of Wnt target genes, such as c-MYC. The results presented here suggest that

  13. Factors affecting sexual function in menopause: A review article.

    PubMed

    Nazarpour, Soheila; Simbar, Masoumeh; Tehrani, Fahimeh Ramezani

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to systematically review the articles on factors affecting sexual function during menopause. Searching articles indexed in Pubmed, Science Direct, Iranmedex, EMBASE, Scopus, and Scientific Information Database databases, a total number of 42 studies published between 2003 and 2013 were selected. Age, estrogen deficiency, type of menopause, chronic medical problems, partner's sex problems, severity of menopause symptoms, dystocia history, and health status were the physical factors influencing sexual function of menopausal women. There were conflicting results regarding the amount of androgens, hormonal therapy, exercise/physical activity, and obstetric history. In the mental-emotional area, all studies confirmed the impact of depression and anxiety. Social factors, including smoking, alcohol consumption, the quality of relationship with husband, partner's loyalty, sexual knowledge, access to health care, a history of divorce or the death of a husband, living apart from a spouse, and a negative understanding of women's health were found to affect sexual function; however, there were conflicting results regarding the effects of education, occupation, socioeconomic status, marital duration, and frequency of sexual intercourse. PMID:27590367

  14. Microbial composition affects the functioning of estuarine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Heather E; Martiny, Jennifer BH

    2013-01-01

    Although microorganisms largely drive many ecosystem processes, the relationship between microbial composition and their functioning remains unclear. To tease apart the effects of composition and the environment directly, microbial composition must be manipulated and maintained, ideally in a natural ecosystem. In this study, we aimed to test whether variability in microbial composition affects functional processes in a field setting, by reciprocally transplanting riverbed sediments between low- and high-salinity locations along the Nonesuch River (Maine, USA). We placed the sediments into microbial ‘cages' to prevent the migration of microorganisms, while allowing the sediments to experience the abiotic conditions of the surroundings. We performed two experiments, short- (1 week) and long-term (7 weeks) reciprocal transplants, after which we assayed a variety of functional processes in the cages. In both experiments, we examined the composition of bacteria generally (targeting the 16S rDNA gene) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) specifically (targeting the dsrAB gene) using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). In the short-term experiment, sediment processes (CO2 production, CH4 flux, nitrification and enzyme activities) depended on both the sediment's origin (reflecting differences in microbial composition between salt and freshwater sediments) and the surrounding environment. In the long-term experiment, general bacterial composition (but not SRB composition) shifted in response to their new environment, and this composition was significantly correlated with sediment functioning. Further, sediment origin had a diminished effect, relative to the short-term experiment, on sediment processes. Overall, this study provides direct evidence that microbial composition directly affects functional processes in these sediments. PMID:23235294

  15. How the knowledge of genetic "makeup" and cellular data can affect the analysis of repolarization in surface electrocardiogram.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Wataru

    2010-01-01

    This review article sought to describe patterns of repolarization on the surface electrocardiogram in inherited cardiac arrhythmias and to discuss how the knowledge of genetic makeup and cellular data can affect the analysis based on the data derived from the experimental studies using arterially perfused canine ventricular wedge preparations. Molecular genetic studies have established a link between a number of inherited cardiac arrhythmia syndromes and mutations in genes encoding cardiac ion channels or membrane components during the past 2 decades. Twelve forms of congenital long QT syndrome have been so far identified, and genotype-phenotype correlations have been investigated especially in the 3 major genotypes-LQT1, LQT2, and LQT3. Abnormal T waves are reported in the LQT1, LQT2, and LQT3, and the differences in the time course of repolarization of the epicardial, midmyocardial, and endocardial cells give rise to voltage gradients responsible for the manifestation of phenotypic appearance of abnormal T waves. Brugada syndrome is characterized by ST-segment elevation in leads V1 to V3 and an episode of ventricular fibrillation, in which 7 genotypes have been reported. An intrinsically prominent transient outward current (I(to))-mediated action potential notch and a subsequent loss of action potential dome in the epicardium, but not in the endocardium of the right ventricular outflow tract, give rise to a transmural voltage gradient, resulting in ST-segment elevation, and a subsequent phase 2 reentry-induced ventricular fibrillation. In conclusion, transmural electrical heterogeneity of repolarization across the ventricular wall profoundly affects the phenotypic manifestation of repolarization patterns on the surface electrocardiogram in inherited cardiac arrhythmias.

  16. Cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 ubiquitinates endonuclease G but does not affect endonuclease G-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Seo, Tae Woong; Lee, Ji Sun; Yoo, Soon Ji

    2014-09-01

    Inhibitors of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) are evolutionarily well conserved and have been recognized as the key negative regulators of apoptosis. Recently, the role of IAPs as E3 ligases through the Ring domain was revealed. Using proteomic analysis to explore potential target proteins of DIAP1, we identified Drosophila Endonuclease G (dEndoG), which is known as an effector of caspase-independent cell death. In this study, we demonstrate that human EndoG interacts with IAPs, including human cellular Inhibitor of Apoptosis Protein 1 (cIAP1). EndoG was ubiquitinated by IAPs in vitro and in human cell lines. Interestingly, cIAP1 was capable of ubiquitinating EndoG in the presence of wild-type and mutant Ubiquitin, in which all lysines except K63 were mutated to arginine. cIAP1 expression did not change the half-life of EndoG and cIAP1 depletion did not alter its levels. Expression of dEndoG 54310, in which the mitochondrial localization sequence was deleted, led to cell death that could not be suppressed by DIAP1 in S2 cells. Moreover, EndoG-mediated cell death induced by oxidative stress in HeLa cells was not affected by cIAP1. Therefore, these results indicate that IAPs interact and ubiquitinate EndoG via K63-mediated isopeptide linkages without affecting EndoG levels and EndoG-mediated cell death, suggesting that EndoG ubiquitination by IAPs may serve as a regulatory signal independent of proteasomal degradation.

  17. High-Throughput Screening of Australian Marine Organism Extracts for Bioactive Molecules Affecting the Cellular Storage of Neutral Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Rae, James; Fontaine, Frank; Salim, Angela A.; Lo, Harriet P.; Capon, Robert J.; Parton, Robert G.; Martin, Sally

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian cells store excess fatty acids as neutral lipids in specialised organelles called lipid droplets (LDs). Using a simple cell-based assay and open-source software we established a high throughput screen for LD formation in A431 cells in order to identify small bioactive molecules affecting lipid storage. Screening an n-butanol extract library from Australian marine organisms we identified 114 extracts that produced either an increase or a decrease in LD formation in fatty acid-treated A431 cells with varying degrees of cytotoxicity. We selected for further analysis a non-cytotoxic extract derived from the genus Spongia (Heterofibria). Solvent partitioning, HPLC fractionation and spectroscopic analysis (NMR, MS) identified a family of related molecules within this extract with unique structural features, a subset of which reduced LD formation. We selected one of these molecules, heterofibrin A1, for more detailed cellular analysis. Inhibition of LD biogenesis by heterofibrin A1 was observed in both A431 cells and AML12 hepatocytes. The activity of heterofibrin A1 was dose dependent with 20 µM inhibiting LD formation and triglyceride accumulation by ∼50% in the presence of 50 µM oleic acid. Using a fluorescent fatty acid analogue we found that heterofibrin A1 significantly reduces the intracellular accumulation of fatty acids and results in the formation of distinct fatty acid metabolites in both cultured cells and in embryos of the zebrafish Danio rerio. In summary we have shown using readily accessible software and a relatively simple assay system that we can identify and isolate bioactive molecules from marine extracts, which affect the formation of LDs and the metabolism of fatty acids both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:21857959

  18. The Na+/K(+)-pump in rat peritoneal mast cells: some aspects of regulation of activity and cellular function.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, T

    1995-11-01

    from the mast cell in a calcium-free medium, while there is no effect of digitalis glycosides in a medium containing physiologically relevant concentrations of calcium. The effect of digitalis glycosides on the histamine release is dependent on the drug concentrations used and the time of preincubation. An increase in the intracellular concentration of sodium secondary to inhibition of the Na+/K(+)-pump is the effector mechanism likely to explain the effect of digitalis glycosides on the mast cell histamine release. Increases in intracellular sodium might affect the intracellular concentration of calcium via changes in Na+/Ca(2+)-exchange. IgE-directed and non-IgE-directed stimulation of the mast cell activates the Na+/K(+)-pump. In case of compound 48/80-induced histamine release, the pump is stimulated for at least 2 hr. It is proposed, that the poststimulatory activation of the Na+/K(+)-pump is due to increased cellular sodium uptake associated with the release process. This sodium uptake may occur via Na+/Ca(2+)-exchange, Na+/H(+)-exchange, Na+/K+/2Cl(-)-cotransport or a non-selective ion channel. Besides describing aspects of the function and regulation of the Na+/K(+)-pump in the rat peritoneal mast cells, this thesis points to the potential role of sodium transport mechanisms in mast cell physiology. Pharmacological manipulations of such transport mechanisms might in the future add to the treatment of allergic diseases.

  19. Biomaterial design for specific cellular interactions: Role of surface functionalization and geometric features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolhar, Poornima

    The areas of drug delivery and tissue engineering have experienced extraordinary growth in recent years with the application of engineering principles and their potential to support and improve the field of medicine. The tremendous progress in nanotechnology and biotechnology has lead to this explosion of research and development in biomedical applications. Biomaterials can now be engineered at a nanoscale and their specific interactions with the biological tissues can be modulated. Various design parameters are being established and researched for design of drug-delivery carriers and scaffolds to be implanted into humans. Nanoparticles made from versatile biomaterial can deliver both small-molecule drugs and various classes of bio-macromolecules, such as proteins and oligonucleotides. Similarly in the field of tissue engineering, current approaches emphasize nanoscale control of cell behavior by mimicking the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) unlike, traditional scaffolds. Drug delivery and tissue engineering are closely connected fields and both of these applications require materials with exceptional physical, chemical, biological, and biomechanical properties to provide superior therapy. In the current study the surface functionalization and the geometric features of the biomaterials has been explored. In particular, a synthetic surface for culture of human embryonic stem cells has been developed, demonstrating the importance of surface functionalization in maintaining the pluripotency of hESCs. In the second study, the geometric features of the drug delivery carriers are investigated and the polymeric nanoneedles mediated cellular permeabilization and direct cytoplasmic delivery is reported. In the third study, the combined effect of surface functionalization and geometric modification of carriers for vascular targeting is enunciated. These studies illustrate how the biomaterials can be designed to achieve various cellular behaviors and control the

  20. PMP22 Is Critical for Actin-Mediated Cellular Functions and for Establishing Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sooyeon; Amici, Stephanie; Tavori, Hagai; Zeng, Waylon M.; Freeland, Steven; Fazio, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency of peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, a peripheral nerve lesion induced by minimal trauma or compression. As PMP22 is localized to cholesterol-enriched membrane domains that are closely linked with the underlying actin network, we asked whether the myelin instability associated with PMP22 deficiency could be mediated by involvement of the protein in actin-dependent cellular functions and/or lipid raft integrity. In peripheral nerves and cells from mice with PMP22 deletion, we assessed the organization of filamentous actin (F-actin), and actin-dependent cellular functions. Using in vitro models, we discovered that, in the absence of PMP22, the migration and adhesion capacity of Schwann cells and fibroblasts are similarly impaired. Furthermore, PMP22-deficient Schwann cells produce shortened myelin internodes, and display compressed axial cell length and collapsed lamellipodia. During early postnatal development, F-actin-enriched Schmidt-Lanterman incisures do not form properly in nerves from PMP22−/− mice, and the expression and localization of molecules associated with uncompacted myelin domains and lipid rafts, including flotillin-1, cholesterol, and GM1 ganglioside, are altered. In addition, we identified changes in the levels and distribution of cholesterol and ApoE when PMP22 is absent. Significantly, cholesterol supplementation of the culture medium corrects the elongation and migration deficits of PMP22−/− Schwann cells, suggesting that the observed functional impairments are directly linked with cholesterol deficiency of the plasma membrane. Our findings support a novel role for PMP22 in the linkage of the actin cytoskeleton with the plasma membrane, likely through regulating the cholesterol content of lipid rafts. PMID:25429154

  1. A Current View of Functional Biomaterials for Wound Care, Molecular and Cellular Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Piraino, Francesco; Selimović, Šeila

    2015-01-01

    The intricate process of wound healing involves activation of biological pathways that work in concert to regenerate a tissue microenvironment consisting of cells and external cellular matrix (ECM) with enzymes, cytokines, and growth factors. Distinct stages characterize the mammalian response to tissue injury: hemostasis, inflammation, new tissue formation, and tissue remodeling. Hemostasis and inflammation start right after the injury, while the formation of new tissue, along with migration and proliferation of cells within the wound site, occurs during the first week to ten days after the injury. In this review paper, we discuss approaches in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine to address each of these processes through the application of biomaterials, either as support to the native microenvironment or as delivery vehicles for functional hemostatic, antibacterial, or anti-inflammatory agents. Molecular therapies are also discussed with particular attention to drug delivery methods and gene therapies. Finally, cellular treatments are reviewed, and an outlook on the future of drug delivery and wound care biomaterials is provided. PMID:26509154

  2. Functional Modification of Fibrous PCL Scaffolds with Fusion Protein VEGF-HGFI Enhanced Cellularization and Vascularization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liqiang; Ma, Shaoyang; Pan, Yiwa; Zhang, Qiuying; Wang, Kai; Song, Dongmin; Wang, Xiangxiang; Feng, Guowei; Liu, Ruming; Xu, Haijin; Zhang, Jun; Qiao, Mingqiang; Kong, Deling

    2016-09-01

    The lack of efficient vascularization within frequently used poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds has hindered their application in tissue engineering. Hydrophobin HGFI, an amphiphilic protein, can form a self-assembly layer on the surface of PCL scaffolds and convert their wettability. In this study, a fusion protein consisting of HGFI and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is prepared by Pichia pastoris expression system. Sodium dodecyl sulface-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and western blotting confirm that the VEGF-HGFI is successfully isolated and purified. Transmission electron microscope and water contact angle measurement demonstrate that VEGF-HGFI can form a self-assembly layer with about 25 nm in thickness on electrospun PCL fibers and increase their hydrophilicity. VEGF-HGFI modification can effectively enhance the adhesion, migration, and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Near-infrared fluorescence imaging shows that the VEGF-HGFI modification on PCL scaffolds can exist at least 21 d in vitro and at least 14 d in vivo. Bioluminescence imaging shows that VEGF-HGFI can effectively activate vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 receptors. Subcutaneous implantation in mice and rats reveal that cellularization and vascularization are significantly improved in VEGF-HGFI modified PCL scaffolds. These results suggest that VEGF-HGFI is a useful molecule for functional modification of scaffolds to enhance cellularization and vascularization in tissue engineering. PMID:27391702

  3. Uniaxial cell stretching device for live-cell imaging of mechanosensitive cellular functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yue; Tan, Xinyu; Novitski, Roman; Muqaddam, Mishaal; List, Paul; Williamson, Laura; Fu, Jianping; Liu, Allen P.

    2013-11-01

    External mechanical stretch plays an important role in regulating cellular behaviors through intracellular mechanosensitive and mechanotransductive machineries such as the F-actin cytoskeleton (CSK) structures and focal adhesions (FAs) anchoring the F-actin CSK to the extracellular environment. Studying the mechanoresponsive behaviors of the F-actin CSK and FAs in response to cell stretch has great importance for further understanding mechanotransduction and mechanobiology. In this work, we developed a novel cell stretching device combining dynamic directional cell stretch with in situ subcellular live-cell imaging. Using a cam and follower mechanism and applying a standard mathematical model for cam design, we generated different dynamic stretch outputs. By examining stretch-mediated FA dynamics under step-function static stretch and the realignment of cell morphology and the F-actin CSK under cyclic stretch, we demonstrated successful applications of our cell stretching device for mechanobiology studies where external stretch plays an important role in regulating subcellular molecular dynamics and cellular phenotypes.

  4. Mapping the functional domains of TCblR/CD320, the receptor for cellular uptake of transcobalamin-bound cobalamin

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wenxia; Nakayama, Yasumi; Sequeira, Jeffrey M.; Quadros, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    The membrane receptor TCblR/CD320 binds transcobalamin (TC) saturated with vitamin B12 [cobalamin (Cbl)] and mediates cellular uptake of the vitamin. The specificity of TC for Cbl and of the receptor for TC-Cbl ensures efficient uptake of Cbl into cells. The high-affinity interaction of TCblR with TC-Cbl (Ka=10 nM−1) was investigated using deletions and mutations of amino acid sequences in TCblR. Only the extracellular region (aa 32–229) is needed for TC-Cbl binding, but the N-glycosylation sites (N126, N195, and N213) are of no importance for this function. Deleting the cysteine-rich region (aa 95–141) that separates the two low-density lipoprotein receptor type A (LDLR-A) domains does not affect TC-Cbl binding (Ka = 19–24 nM−1). The two LDLR-A domains (aa 54–89 and 132–167) with the negatively charged acidic residues involved in Ca2+ binding are critical determinants of ligand binding. The cytoplasmic tail is apparently crucial for internalization of the ligand. Within this region, the RPLGLL motif and the PDZ binding motifs (QERL/KESL) appear to be involved in initiating and completing the process of ligand internalization. Mutations and deletions of these regions involved in binding and internalization of TC-Cbl are likely to produce the biochemical and clinical phenotype of Cbl deficiency.—Jiang, W., Nakayama, Y., Sequeira, J. M., Quadros, E. V. Mapping the functional domains of TCblR/CD320, the receptor for cellular uptake of transcobalamin-bound cobalamin. PMID:23603833

  5. Enhancing Cellular Uptake and Doxorubicin Delivery of Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles via Surface Functionalization: Effects of Serum.

    PubMed

    Shahabi, Shakiba; Döscher, Svea; Bollhorst, Tobias; Treccani, Laura; Maas, Michael; Dringen, Ralf; Rezwan, Kurosch

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we demonstrate how functional groups on the surface of mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) can influence the encapsulation and release of the anticancer drug doxorubicin, as well as cancer cell response in the absence or presence of serum proteins. To this end, we synthesized four differently functionalized MSNPs with amine, sulfonate, polyethylene glycol, or polyethylene imine functional surface groups, as well as one type of antibody-conjugated MSNP for specific cellular targeting, and we characterized these MSNPs regarding their physicochemical properties, colloidal stability in physiological media, and uptake and release of doxorubicin in vitro. Then, the MSNPs were investigated for their cytotoxic potential on cancer cells. Cationic MSNPs could not be loaded with doxorubicin and did therefore not show any cytotoxic and antiproliferative potential on osteosarcoma cells, although they were efficiently taken up into the cells in the presence or absence of serum. In contrast, substantial amounts of doxorubicin were loaded into negatively charged and unfunctionalized MSNPs. Especially, sulfonate-functionalized doxorubicin-loaded MSNPs were efficiently taken up into the cells in the presence of serum and showed an accelerated toxic and antiproliferative potential compared to unfunctionalized MSNPs, antibody-conjugated MSNPs, and even free doxorubicin. These findings stress the high importance of the surface charge as well as of the protein corona for designing and applying nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery.

  6. Cellular ferroelectrets for electroactive polymer hybrid systems: soft matter integrated devices with advanced functionality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwödiauer, Reinhard; Graz, Ingrid; Kaltenbrunner, Martin; Keplinger, Christoph; Bartu, Petr; Buchberger, Gerda; Ortwein, Christoph; Bauer, Siegfried

    2008-03-01

    Thin polymer foams with a closed cell void-structure can be internally charged by silent or partial discharges within the voids. The resulting material, which carries positive and negative charges on the internal void surfaces is called a ferroelectret. Ferroelectrets behave like typical ferroelectrics, hence they provide a novel class of ferroic materials. The soft foams are strongly piezoelectric in the 3-direction, but show negligible piezoelectric response in the transverse direction. This, together with a very low pyroelectric coefficient, make ferroelectrets highly suitable for flexible electroactive transducer element which can be integrated in thin bendable organic electronic devices. Here we describe some fundamental characteristics of cellular ferroelectrets and present a number of promising examples for a possible combination with various functional polymer systems. Our examples focus on flexible ferroelectret field-effect transistor systems for large-area sensor skins and microphones, flexible large-array position detectors (touchpad), and stretchable large-array pressure sensors.

  7. Cellular prion protein ablation impairs behavior as a function of age.

    PubMed

    Coitinho, Adriana S; Roesler, Rafael; Martins, Vilma R; Brentani, Ricardo R; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2003-07-18

    Cellular prion protein (PrPc) has been associated with some physiological functions in recent reports. Here we investigate behavioral parameters in 3- and 9-month-old mice lacking PrPc protein (Prnp0/0) and in rats after intrahippocampal administration of affinity purified anti-PrPc IgG (0.09 microg/side). No differences were observed between 3-month-old animals. However, 9-month-old Prnp0/0 mice and rats infused with anti-PrPc antibody showed a clear impairment of short- and long-term memory retention of a step-down inhibitory avoidance task. A decreased locomotor activity during exploration of an open field was also observed. These results suggest that systems involved in memory formation become more susceptible to mechanisms that require PrPc between the ages of 3 and 9 months in both mice and rats.

  8. Flow-cytometric study of vital cellular functions in Escherichia coli during solar disinfection (SODIS).

    PubMed

    Berney, Michael; Weilenmann, Hans-Ulrich; Egli, Thomas

    2006-06-01

    The effectiveness of solar disinfection (SODIS), a low-cost household water treatment method for developing countries, was investigated with flow cytometry and viability stains for the enteric bacterium Escherichia coli. A better understanding of the process of injury or death of E. coli during SODIS could be gained by investigating six different cellular functions, namely: efflux pump activity (Syto 9 plus ethidium bromide), membrane potential [bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid)trimethine oxonol; DiBAC4(3)], membrane integrity (LIVE/DEAD BacLight), glucose uptake activity (2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-d-glucose; 2-NBDG), total ATP concentration (BacTiter-Glo) and culturability (pour-plate method). These variables were measured in E. coli K-12 MG1655 cells that were exposed to either sunlight or artificial UVA light. The inactivation pattern of cellular functions was very similar for both light sources. A UVA light dose (fluence) of <500 kJ m(-2) was enough to lower the proton motive force, such that efflux pump activity and ATP synthesis decreased significantly. The loss of membrane potential, glucose uptake activity and culturability of >80 % of the cells was observed at a fluence of approximately 1500 kJ m(-2), and the cytoplasmic membrane of bacterial cells became permeable at a fluence of >2500 kJ m(-2). Culturable counts of stressed bacteria after anaerobic incubation on sodium pyruvate-supplemented tryptic soy agar closely correlated with the loss of membrane potential. The results strongly suggest that cells exposed to >1500 kJ m(-2) solar UVA (corresponding to 530 W m(-2) global sunlight intensity for 6 h) were no longer able to repair the damage and recover. Our study confirms the lethal effect of SODIS with cultivation-independent methods and gives a detailed picture of the 'agony' of E. coli when it is stressed with sunlight. PMID:16735735

  9. Studying the Effects of Matrix Stiffness on Cellular Function using Acrylamide-based Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Cretu, Alexandra; Castagnino, Paola; Assoian, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Tissue stiffness is an important determinant of cellular function, and changes in tissue stiffness are commonly associated with fibrosis, cancer and cardiovascular disease1-11. Traditional cell biological approaches to studying cellular function involve culturing cells on a rigid substratum (plastic dishes or glass coverslips) which cannot account for the effect of an elastic ECM or the variations in ECM stiffness between tissues. To model in vivo tissue compliance conditions in vitro, we and others use ECM-coated hydrogels. In our laboratory, the hydrogels are based on polyacrylamide which can mimic the range of tissue compliances seen biologically12. "Reactive" cover slips are generated by incubation with NaOH followed by addition of 3-APTMS. Glutaraldehyde is used to cross-link the 3-APTMS and the polyacrylamide gel. A solution of acrylamide (AC), bis-acrylamide (Bis-AC) and ammonium persulfate is used for the polymerization of the hydrogel. N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) is incorporated into the AC solution to crosslink ECM protein to the hydrogel. Following polymerization of the hydrogel, the gel surface is coated with an ECM protein of choice such as fibronectin, vitronectin, collagen, etc. The stiffness of a hydrogel can be determined by rheology or atomic force microscopy (AFM) and adjusted by varying the percentage of AC and/or bis-AC in the solution12. In this manner, substratum stiffness can be matched to the stiffness of biological tissues which can also be quantified using rheology or AFM. Cells can then be seeded on these hydrogels and cultured based upon the experimental conditions required. Imaging of the cells and their recovery for molecular analysis is straightforward. For this article, we define soft substrata as those having elastic moduli (E) <3000 Pascal and stiff substrata/tissues as those with E >20,000 Pascal. PMID:20736914

  10. Flow-cytometric study of vital cellular functions in Escherichia coli during solar disinfection (SODIS).

    PubMed

    Berney, Michael; Weilenmann, Hans-Ulrich; Egli, Thomas

    2006-06-01

    The effectiveness of solar disinfection (SODIS), a low-cost household water treatment method for developing countries, was investigated with flow cytometry and viability stains for the enteric bacterium Escherichia coli. A better understanding of the process of injury or death of E. coli during SODIS could be gained by investigating six different cellular functions, namely: efflux pump activity (Syto 9 plus ethidium bromide), membrane potential [bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid)trimethine oxonol; DiBAC4(3)], membrane integrity (LIVE/DEAD BacLight), glucose uptake activity (2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-d-glucose; 2-NBDG), total ATP concentration (BacTiter-Glo) and culturability (pour-plate method). These variables were measured in E. coli K-12 MG1655 cells that were exposed to either sunlight or artificial UVA light. The inactivation pattern of cellular functions was very similar for both light sources. A UVA light dose (fluence) of <500 kJ m(-2) was enough to lower the proton motive force, such that efflux pump activity and ATP synthesis decreased significantly. The loss of membrane potential, glucose uptake activity and culturability of >80 % of the cells was observed at a fluence of approximately 1500 kJ m(-2), and the cytoplasmic membrane of bacterial cells became permeable at a fluence of >2500 kJ m(-2). Culturable counts of stressed bacteria after anaerobic incubation on sodium pyruvate-supplemented tryptic soy agar closely correlated with the loss of membrane potential. The results strongly suggest that cells exposed to >1500 kJ m(-2) solar UVA (corresponding to 530 W m(-2) global sunlight intensity for 6 h) were no longer able to repair the damage and recover. Our study confirms the lethal effect of SODIS with cultivation-independent methods and gives a detailed picture of the 'agony' of E. coli when it is stressed with sunlight.

  11. Epoxy-functionalized mesostructured cellular foams as effective support for covalent immobilization of penicillin G acylase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Ping; Xu, Fang; Xu, Lidong

    2008-12-01

    The epoxy-functionalized mesoporous cellular foams (G-MCFs) with high specific surface area (˜400 m 2/g) and large-size mesopores (˜17 nm) were obtained by condensation of 3-glycidoxypropyltriethoxysilane (GPTS) and the surface silanol groups of mesoporous cellular foams (MCFs) and used as the support for immobilization of penicillin G acylase (PGA). The structural properties of G-MCF were characterized by FT-IR, N 2 adsorption, TG-DTA and 29Si MAS NMR. The studies indicated that the glycidoxypropyl groups were chemically bonded to the silicon atoms on the surface of MCF. The epoxy-functionalized mesoporous cellular foams can provide the microenvironments suitable for the immobilization of PGA, and the enzyme molecules could be immobilized covalently onto the G-MCF under mild conditions by reaction between the amino groups of the enzyme molecules and the epoxy groups on the surface of G-MCF. The PGA immobilized on G-MCF (PGA/G-MCF) exhibited the apparent activity of 1782 IU/g and 46.6% of activity recovery for hydrolyzing penicillin G potassium to produce 6-aminopenicillanic acid at 37 °C which were higher than that of PGA on pure silica MCF (1521 IU/g and 39.8%, respectively). The kinetic study also indicated that PGA immobilized on G-MCF has a Km of 2.1 × 10 -2 mol/L lower than that of PGA immobilized on the pure silica MCF (5.0 × 10 -2 mol/L). These may be attributed to the enhanced surface affinity between G-MCF support and the substrate molecules. Due to the covalent immobilization of PGA molecules on the surface of G-MCF, the immobilized PGA with considerable operational stability was achieved. The activity of PGA/G-MCF is still about 91.4% of its initial activity at the 10th cycle reuse while that of PGA/MCF only remains 41.5% of its initial activity at the same reuse numbers. In addition, the investigation results show the thermal stability and durability on acid or basic medium of PGA immobilized on G-MCF were improved remarkably.

  12. Cellular prostatic acid phosphatase, a PTEN-functional homologue in prostate epithelia, functions as a prostate-specific tumor suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Muniyan, Sakthivel; Ingersoll, Matthew A.; Batra, Surinder K.; Lin, Ming-Fong

    2014-01-01

    The inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) plays a vital role in the progression of human cancers. Nevertheless, those ubiquitous TSGs have been shown with limited roles in various stages of diverse carcinogenesis. Investigation on identifying unique TSG, especially for early stage of carcinogenesis, is imperative. As such, the search for organ-specific TSGs has emerged as a major strategy in cancer research. Prostate cancer (PCa) has the highest incidence in solid tumors in US males. Cellular prostatic acid phosphatase (cPAcP) is a prostate-specific differentiation antigen. Despite intensive studies over the past several decades on PAcP as a PCa biomarker, the role of cPAcP as a PCa-specific tumor suppressor has only recently been emerged and validated. The mechanism underlying the pivotal role of cPAcP as a prostate-specific TSG is, in part, due to its function as a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) as well as a phosphoinositide phosphatase (PIP), an apparent functional homologue to Phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) in PCa cells. This review is focused on discussing the function of this authentic prostate-specific tumor suppressor and the mechanism behind the loss of cPAcP expression leading to prostate carcinogenesis. We review other phosphatases’ roles as TSGs which regulate oncogenic PI3K signaling in PCa and discuss the functional similarity between cPAcP and PTEN in prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:24747769

  13. KIR/HLA interactions negatively affect rituximab- but not GA101 (obinutuzumab)-induced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Terszowski, Grzegorz; Klein, Christian; Stern, Martin

    2014-06-15

    Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) mediated by NK cells is regulated by inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIRs), which interact with target cell HLA class I. We analyzed how KIR/HLA interactions influence ADCC induced by rituximab and by GA101, a novel type II CD20 Ab glycoengineered for increased FcgRIII binding and ADCC capacity. We found that KIR/HLA interactions strongly and selectively inhibit rituximab-induced in vitro ADCC toward target cells expressing cognate HLA KIR ligands. NK cells of donors carrying all three ligands to inhibitory KIR showed weak activation and target cell depletion capacity when incubated with rituximab and KIR-ligand matched target B cells. In contrast, NK cells from individuals missing one or more KIR ligands activated more strongly and depleted KIR ligand-matched target B cells more efficiently in the presence of rituximab. NK cells expressing a KIR for which the ligand was absent were the main effectors of ADCC in these donors. Notably, the influence of KIR/HLA interactions on NK cell activation was synergistic with the effect of the V158F FCGR3A single nucleotide polymorphism. In contrast, GA101 induced activation of NK cells irrespective of inhibitory KIR expression, and efficiency of target cell depletion was not negatively affected by KIR/HLA interactions. These data show that modification of the Fc fragment to enhance ADCC can be an effective strategy to augment the efficacy of therapeutic mAbs by recruiting NK cells irrespective of their inhibitory KIR expression.

  14. The functional micro-organization of grid cells revealed by cellular-resolution imaging

    PubMed Central

    Heys, James G.; Rangarajan, Krsna V.; Dombeck, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Establishing how grid cells are anatomically arranged, on a microscopic scale, in relation to their firing patterns in the environment would facilitate a greater micro-circuit level understanding of the brain’s representation of space. However, all previous grid cell recordings used electrode techniques that provide limited descriptions of fine-scale organization. We therefore developed a technique for cellular-resolution functional imaging of medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) neurons in mice navigating a virtual linear track, enabling a new experimental approach to study MEC. Using these methods, we show that grid cells are physically clustered in MEC compared to non-grid cells. Additionally, we demonstrate that grid cells are functionally micro-organized: The similarity between the environment firing locations of grid cell pairs varies as a function of the distance between them according to a “Mexican Hat” shaped profile. This suggests that, on average, nearby grid cells have more similar spatial firing phases than those further apart. PMID:25467986

  15. NFAT5 in cellular adaptation to hypertonic stress - regulations and functional significance.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Chris Yk; Ko, Ben Cb

    2013-01-01

    The Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells-5 (NFAT5), also known as OREBP or TonEBP, is a member of the nuclear factors of the activated T cells family of transcription factors. It is also the only known tonicity-regulated transcription factor in mammals. NFAT5 was initially known for its role in the hypertonic kidney inner medulla for orchestrating a genetic program to restore the cellular homeostasis. Emerging evidence, however, suggests that NFAT5 might play a more diverse functional role, including a pivotal role in blood pressure regulation and the development of autoimmune diseases. Despite the growing significance of NFAT5 in physiology and diseases, our understanding of how its activity is regulated remains very limited. Furthermore, how changes in tonicities are converted into functional outputs via NFAT5 remains elusive. Therefore, this review aims to summarize our current knowledge on the functional roles of NFAT5 in osmotic stress adaptation and the signaling pathways that regulate its activity. PMID:23618372

  16. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B Alex; Jetten, Anton M; Austin, Christopher P; Tice, Raymond R

    2013-05-25

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR.

  17. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B. Alex; Jetten, Anton M.; Austin, Christopher, P.; Tice, Raymond R.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR. PMID:23562765

  18. Functional characterization and cellular dynamics of the CDC-42 - RAC - CDC-24 module in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Araujo-Palomares, Cynthia L; Richthammer, Corinna; Seiler, Stephan; Castro-Longoria, Ernestina

    2011-01-01

    Rho-type GTPases are key regulators that control eukaryotic cell polarity, but their role in fungal morphogenesis is only beginning to emerge. In this study, we investigate the role of the CDC-42 - RAC - CDC-24 module in Neurospora crassa. rac and cdc-42 deletion mutants are viable, but generate highly compact colonies with severe morphological defects. Double mutants carrying conditional and loss of function alleles of rac and cdc-42 are lethal, indicating that both GTPases share at least one common essential function. The defects of the GTPase mutants are phenocopied by deletion and conditional alleles of the guanine exchange factor (GEF) cdc-24, and in vitro GDP-GTP exchange assays identify CDC-24 as specific GEF for both CDC-42 and RAC. In vivo confocal microscopy shows that this module is organized as membrane-associated cap that covers the hyphal apex. However, the specific localization patterns of the three proteins are distinct, indicating different functions of RAC and CDC-42 within the hyphal tip. CDC-42 localized as confined apical membrane-associated crescent, while RAC labeled a membrane-associated ring excluding the region labeled by CDC42. The GEF CDC-24 occupied a strategic position, localizing as broad apical membrane-associated crescent and in the apical cytosol excluding the Spitzenkörper. RAC and CDC-42 also display distinct localization patterns during branch initiation and germ tube formation, with CDC-42 accumulating at the plasma membrane before RAC. Together with the distinct cellular defects of rac and cdc-42 mutants, these localizations suggest that CDC-42 is more important for polarity establishment, while the primary function of RAC may be maintaining polarity. In summary, this study identifies CDC-24 as essential regulator for RAC and CDC-42 that have common and distinct functions during polarity establishment and maintenance of cell polarity in N. crassa.

  19. Symptoms of Problematic Cellular Phone Use, Functional Impairment and Its Association with Depression among Adolescents in Southern Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Cheng-Fang; Tang, Tze-Chun; Yen, Ju-Yu; Lin, Huang-Chi; Huang, Chi-Fen; Liu, Shu-Chun; Ko, Chih-Hung

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were: (1) to examine the prevalence of symptoms of problematic cellular phone use (CPU); (2) to examine the associations between the symptoms of problematic CPU, functional impairment caused by CPU and the characteristics of CPU; (3) to establish the optimal cut-off point of the number of symptoms for functional impairment…

  20. Can lifestyle modification affect men’s erectile function?

    PubMed Central

    Hehemann, Marah C.

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition affecting millions of men worldwide. The pathophysiology and epidemiologic links between ED and risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) are well-established. Lifestyle modifications such as smoking cessation, weight reduction, dietary modification, physical activity, and psychological stress reduction have been increasingly recognized as foundational to the prevention and treatment of ED. The aim of this review is to outline behavioral choices which may increase ones risk of developing ED, to present relevant studies addressing lifestyle factors correlated with ED, and to highlight proposed mechanisms for intervention aimed at improving erectile function in men with ED. These recommendations can provide a framework for counseling patients with ED about lifestyle modification. PMID:27141445

  1. Dehydration affects brain structure and function in healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kempton, Matthew J; Ettinger, Ulrich; Foster, Russell; Williams, Steven C R; Calvert, Gemma A; Hampshire, Adam; Zelaya, Fernando O; O'Gorman, Ruth L; McMorris, Terry; Owen, Adrian M; Smith, Marcus S

    2011-01-01

    It was recently observed that dehydration causes shrinkage of brain tissue and an associated increase in ventricular volume. Negative effects of dehydration on cognitive performance have been shown in some but not all studies, and it has also been reported that an increased perceived effort may be required following dehydration. However, the effects of dehydration on brain function are unknown. We investigated this question using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 10 healthy adolescents (mean age = 16.8, five females). Each subject completed a thermal exercise protocol and nonthermal exercise control condition in a cross-over repeated measures design. Subjects lost more weight via perspiration in the thermal exercise versus the control condition (P < 0.0001), and lateral ventricle enlargement correlated with the reduction in body mass (r = 0.77, P = 0.01). Dehydration following the thermal exercise protocol led to a significantly stronger increase in fronto-parietal blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) response during an executive function task (Tower of London) than the control condition, whereas cerebral perfusion during rest was not affected. The increase in BOLD response after dehydration was not paralleled by a change in cognitive performance, suggesting an inefficient use of brain metabolic activity following dehydration. This pattern indicates that participants exerted a higher level of neuronal activity in order to achieve the same performance level. Given the limited availability of brain metabolic resources, these findings suggest that prolonged states of reduced water intake may adversely impact executive functions such as planning and visuo-spatial processing.

  2. Dehydration affects brain structure and function in healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kempton, Matthew J; Ettinger, Ulrich; Foster, Russell; Williams, Steven C R; Calvert, Gemma A; Hampshire, Adam; Zelaya, Fernando O; O'Gorman, Ruth L; McMorris, Terry; Owen, Adrian M; Smith, Marcus S

    2011-01-01

    It was recently observed that dehydration causes shrinkage of brain tissue and an associated increase in ventricular volume. Negative effects of dehydration on cognitive performance have been shown in some but not all studies, and it has also been reported that an increased perceived effort may be required following dehydration. However, the effects of dehydration on brain function are unknown. We investigated this question using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 10 healthy adolescents (mean age = 16.8, five females). Each subject completed a thermal exercise protocol and nonthermal exercise control condition in a cross-over repeated measures design. Subjects lost more weight via perspiration in the thermal exercise versus the control condition (P < 0.0001), and lateral ventricle enlargement correlated with the reduction in body mass (r = 0.77, P = 0.01). Dehydration following the thermal exercise protocol led to a significantly stronger increase in fronto-parietal blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) response during an executive function task (Tower of London) than the control condition, whereas cerebral perfusion during rest was not affected. The increase in BOLD response after dehydration was not paralleled by a change in cognitive performance, suggesting an inefficient use of brain metabolic activity following dehydration. This pattern indicates that participants exerted a higher level of neuronal activity in order to achieve the same performance level. Given the limited availability of brain metabolic resources, these findings suggest that prolonged states of reduced water intake may adversely impact executive functions such as planning and visuo-spatial processing. PMID:20336685

  3. Functional roles affect diversity-succession relationships for boreal beetles.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Heloise; Johansson, Therese; Stenbacka, Fredrik; Hjältén, Joakim

    2013-01-01

    Species diversity commonly increases with succession and this relationship is an important justification for conserving large areas of old-growth habitats. However, species with different ecological roles respond differently to succession. We examined the relationship between a range of diversity measures and time since disturbance for boreal forest beetles collected over a 285 year forest chronosequence. We compared responses of "functional" groups related to threat status, dependence on dead wood habitats, diet and the type of trap in which they were collected (indicative of the breadth of ecologies of species). We examined fits of commonly used rank-abundance models for each age class and traditional and derived diversity indices. Rank abundance distributions were closest to the Zipf-Mandelbrot distribution, suggesting little role for competition in structuring most assemblages. Diversity measures for most functional groups increased with succession, but differences in slopes were common. Evenness declined with succession; more so for red-listed species than common species. Saproxylic species increased in diversity with succession while non-saproxylic species did not. Slopes for fungivores were steeper than other diet groups, while detritivores were not strongly affected by succession. Species trapped using emergence traps (log specialists) responded more weakly to succession than those trapped using flight intercept traps (representing a broader set of ecologies). Species associated with microhabitats that accumulate with succession (fungi and dead wood) thus showed the strongest diversity responses to succession. These clear differences between functional group responses to forest succession should be considered in planning landscapes for optimum conservation value, particularly functional resilience.

  4. Structural and functional cellular alterations underlying the toxicity of methamphetamine in rat retina and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Prudêncio, Cristina; Abrantes, Bruno; Lopes, Isabel; Tavares, Maria Amélia

    2002-06-01

    The consumption of illicit drugs is an increasing problem in contemporary societies, and is one of the major causes of death and illness all over the world. Methamphetamine is among the drugs more widely used. Although evidence for a role of reactive species--especially reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptotic events--has been shown, the mechanism(s) underlying the cellular toxicity induced by this drug is not yet fully identified. In this context the elucidation of the cytotoxic effects induced by methamphetamine in rat frontal cortex and retina, which compromise cell viability and ultimately result in cell death, can further contribute to the understanding of its mechanism of action. This knowledge may provide new insights into the development of new therapeutic approaches to prevent or ameliorate deleterious alterations of the nervous system. The use of epifluorescence microscopy associated with different fluorescent probes, markers of structural and/or functional cell parameters, can be used as a powerful tool to carry out those studies, in particular, the viability probes propidium iodide (PI) to assess plasma membrane integrity and fluorescein diacetate (FDA), which can monitor intracellular esterase activity and/or pH. In a preliminary study, the kinetic assessment of cellular changes induced by different drug concentrations (0, 1.2, 3, and 6 mM) allowed detection of dose-dependent alterations that are observed earlier in the retina. In fact, in the retina it was possible to monitor alterations (at 4 h of incubation) both in plasma membrane integrity and in esterase activity and/or pH for the lowest drug concentration (1.2 mM). In the prefrontal cortex these changes were only visible for drug concentrations > or = 3 mM. This work is a novel approach to the mechanisms of action of illicit drugs in the central nervous system and will provide the foundations and guidelines for further investigations in the context of tolerance, dependence, and addiction.

  5. Cellular Trafficking of Phospholamban and Formation of Functional Sarcoplasmic Reticulum During Myocyte DIfferentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Stenoien, David L.; Knyushko, Tatyana V.; Londono, Monica P.; Opresko, Lee; Mayer, M. Uljana; Brady, Scott T.; Squier, Thomas C.; Bigelow, Diana J.

    2007-06-01

    The sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca-ATPase (SERCA) family members are transmembrane proteins that play an essential role in regulating intracellular calcium levels. Phospholamban (PLB), a 52 amino acid phosphoprotein, regulates SERCA activity in adult heart and skeletal muscle. Using the C2C12 myocyte cell line, we find endogenous PLB constitutively expressed in both myoblasts and myotubes, whereas SERCA expression coincides with activation of the differentiation program. PLB has a punctuate distribution in myoblasts changing to a reticular distribution in myotubes where it colocalizes with SERCAs. To examine the distribution and dynamics of PLB and SERCA, we expressed fluorescent fusion proteins (GFP, CFP, and YFP) of PLB and SERCA in myoblasts. Coexpressed PLB and SERCA localize to distinct cellular compartments in myoblasts but begin to colocalize as cells differentiate. Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP) studies show different recovery patterns for each protein in myoblasts confirming their localization to distinct compartments. To extend these studies, we created stable cell lines expressing O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) fusions with PLB or SERCA to track their localization as myocytes differentiate. These experiments demonstrate that PLB localizes to punctate vesicles in myoblasts and adopts a reticular distribution that coincides with SERCA distribution after differentiation. Colocalization experiments indicate that a subset of PLB in myoblasts colocalizes with endosomes, Golgi, and the plasma membrane however PLB also localizes to other, as yet unidentified vesicles. Our results indicate that differentiation plays a critical role in regulating PLB distribution to ensure its colocalization within the same cellular compartment as SERCA in differentiated cells. The presence and altered distribution of PLB in undifferentiated myoblasts raises the possibility that this protein has additional functions distinct from SERCA regulation.

  6. To what extent does urbanisation affect fragmented grassland functioning?

    PubMed

    van der Walt, L; Cilliers, S S; Kellner, K; Du Toit, M J; Tongway, D

    2015-03-15

    Urbanisation creates altered environments characterised by increased human habitation, impermeable surfaces, artificial structures, landscape fragmentation, habitat loss, resulting in different resource loss pathways. The vulnerable Rand Highveld Grassland vegetation unit in the Tlokwe Municipal area, South Africa, has been extensively affected and transformed by urbanisation, agriculture, and mining. Grassland fragments in urban areas are often considered to be less species rich and less functional than in the more untransformed or "natural" exurban environments, and are therefore seldom a priority for conservation. Furthermore, urban grassland fragments are often being more intensely managed than exurban areas, such as consistent mowing in open urban areas. Four urbanisation measures acting as indicators for patterns and processes associated with urban areas were calculated for matrix areas surrounding each selected grassland fragment to quantify the position of each grassland remnant along an urbanisation gradient. The grassland fragments were objectively classified into two classes of urbanisation, namely "exurban" and "urban" based on the urbanisation measure values. Grazing was recorded in some exurban grasslands and mowing in some urban grassland fragments. Unmanaged grassland fragments were present in both urban and exurban areas. Fine-scale biophysical landscape function was determined by executing the Landscape Function Analysis (LFA) method. LFA assesses fine-scale landscape patchiness (entailing resource conserving potential and erosion resistance) and 11 soil surface indicators to produce three main LFA parameters (stability, infiltration, and nutrient cycling), which indicates how well a system is functioning in terms of fine-scale biophysical soil processes and characteristics. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of urbanisation and associated management practices on fine-scale biophysical landscape function of urban and exurban

  7. To what extent does urbanisation affect fragmented grassland functioning?

    PubMed

    van der Walt, L; Cilliers, S S; Kellner, K; Du Toit, M J; Tongway, D

    2015-03-15

    Urbanisation creates altered environments characterised by increased human habitation, impermeable surfaces, artificial structures, landscape fragmentation, habitat loss, resulting in different resource loss pathways. The vulnerable Rand Highveld Grassland vegetation unit in the Tlokwe Municipal area, South Africa, has been extensively affected and transformed by urbanisation, agriculture, and mining. Grassland fragments in urban areas are often considered to be less species rich and less functional than in the more untransformed or "natural" exurban environments, and are therefore seldom a priority for conservation. Furthermore, urban grassland fragments are often being more intensely managed than exurban areas, such as consistent mowing in open urban areas. Four urbanisation measures acting as indicators for patterns and processes associated with urban areas were calculated for matrix areas surrounding each selected grassland fragment to quantify the position of each grassland remnant along an urbanisation gradient. The grassland fragments were objectively classified into two classes of urbanisation, namely "exurban" and "urban" based on the urbanisation measure values. Grazing was recorded in some exurban grasslands and mowing in some urban grassland fragments. Unmanaged grassland fragments were present in both urban and exurban areas. Fine-scale biophysical landscape function was determined by executing the Landscape Function Analysis (LFA) method. LFA assesses fine-scale landscape patchiness (entailing resource conserving potential and erosion resistance) and 11 soil surface indicators to produce three main LFA parameters (stability, infiltration, and nutrient cycling), which indicates how well a system is functioning in terms of fine-scale biophysical soil processes and characteristics. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of urbanisation and associated management practices on fine-scale biophysical landscape function of urban and exurban

  8. Respiratory symptoms, lung function, and nasal cellularity in Indonesian wood workers: a dose-response analysis

    PubMed Central

    Borm, P; Jetten, M; Hidayat, S; van de Burgh, N; Leunissen, P; Kant, I; Houba, R; Soeprapto, H

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: It was hypothesised that inflammation plays a dominant part in the respiratory effects of exposure to wood dust. The purpose of this study was to relate the nasal inflammatory responses of workers exposed to meranti wood dust to (a) levels of exposure, (b) respiratory symptoms and (c) respiratory function. Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out in 1997 in a woodworking plant that used mainly meranti, among 982 workers exposed to different concentrations of wood dust. Personal sampling (n=243) of inhalable dust measurements indicated mean exposure in specific jobs, and enabled classification of 930 workers in three exposure classes (<2, 2–5, and >5 mg/m3) based on job title. Questionnaires were used to screen respiratory symptoms in the entire population. Lung function was measured with two different techniques, conventional flow-volume curves and the forced oscillation technique. Nasal lavage was done to assess inflammation in the upper respiratory tract. Results: A negative trend between years of employment and most flow-volume variables was found in men, but not in women workers. Current exposure, however, was not related to spirometric outcomes, respiratory symptoms, or nasal cellularity. Some impedance variables were related to current exposure but also with better function at higher exposure. Conclusions: Exposure to meranti wood dust did not cause an inflammation in the upper respiratory tract nor an increase of respiratory symptoms or decrease of lung function. These data do not corroborate the hypothesis that inflammation plays a part in airway obstruction induced by wood dust. PMID:11983850

  9. Activation Mechanism of LRRK2 and Its Cellular Functions in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Rosenbusch, Katharina E; Kortholt, Arjan

    2016-01-01

    Human LRRK2 (Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2) has been associated with both familial and idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Although several LRRK2 mediated pathways and interaction partners have been identified, the cellular functions of LRRK2 and LRRK2 mediated progression of PD are still only partially understood. LRRK2 belongs to the group of Roco proteins which are characterized by the presence of a Ras-like G-domain (Roc), a C-terminal of Roc domain (COR), a kinase, and several protein-protein interaction domains. Roco proteins exhibit a complex activation mechanism involving intramolecular signaling, dimerization, and substrate/effector binding. Importantly, PD mutations in LRRK2 have been linked to a decreased GTPase and impaired kinase activity, thus providing putative therapeutic targets. To fully explore these potential targets it will be crucial to understand the function and identify the pathways responsible for LRRK2-linked PD. Here, we review the recent progress in elucidating the complex LRRK2 activation mechanism, describe the accumulating evidence that link LRRK2-mediated PD to mitochondrial dysfunction and aberrant autophagy, and discuss possible ways for therapeutically targeting LRRK2.

  10. Substrate recognition and function of the R2TP complex in response to cellular stress

    PubMed Central

    von Morgen, Patrick; Hořejší, Zuzana; Macurek, Libor

    2015-01-01

    The R2TP complex is a HSP90 co-chaperone, which consists of four subunits: PIH1D1, RPAP3, RUVBL1, and RUVBL2. It is involved in the assembly of large protein or protein–RNA complexes such as RNA polymerase, small nucleolar ribonucleoproteins (snoRNPs), phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase-related kinases (PIKKs), and their complexes. While RPAP3 has a HSP90 binding domain and the RUVBLs comprise ATPase activities important for R2TP functions, PIH1D1 contains a PIH-N domain that specifically recognizes phosphorylated substrates of the R2TP complex. In this review we provide an overview of the current knowledge of the R2TP complex with the focus on the recently identified structural and mechanistic features of the R2TP complex functions. We also discuss the way R2TP regulates cellular response to stress caused by low levels of nutrients or by DNA damage and its possible exploitation as a target for anti-cancer therapy. PMID:25767478

  11. Cellular functions of the ADF/cofilin family at a glance.

    PubMed

    Kanellos, Georgios; Frame, Margaret C

    2016-09-01

    The actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin family comprises small actin-binding proteins with crucial roles in development, tissue homeostasis and disease. They are best known for their roles in regulating actin dynamics by promoting actin treadmilling and thereby driving membrane protrusion and cell motility. However, recent discoveries have increased our understanding of the functions of these proteins beyond their well-characterized roles. This Cell Science at a Glance article and the accompanying poster serve as an introduction to the diverse roles of the ADF/cofilin family in cells. The first part of the article summarizes their actions in actin treadmilling and the main mechanisms for their intracellular regulation; the second part aims to provide an outline of the emerging cellular roles attributed to the ADF/cofilin family, besides their actions in actin turnover. The latter part discusses an array of diverse processes, which include regulation of intracellular contractility, maintenance of nuclear integrity, transcriptional regulation, nuclear actin monomer transfer, apoptosis and lipid metabolism. Some of these could, of course, be indirect consequences of actin treadmilling functions, and this is discussed. PMID:27505888

  12. Much to know about proteolysis: intricate proteolytic machineries compromise essential cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Marfany, Gemma; Farràs, Rosa; Salido, Eduardo; Xirodimas, Dimitris P; Rodríguez, Manuel S

    2008-10-01

    Proteolysis has traditionally been considered as a radical way to terminate the function of a protein. However, protein destruction also is the starting point for many processes as they can only occur when the way has been cleared for the action of other proteins. Protein destruction can occur virtually in all compartments and organelles of the cell, associated with cell membranes or large protein complexes, it determines subcellular partitioning, association with positive or negative regulators which conditions the action of many critical cellular factors. The third intracellular proteolysis meeting held by the University La Laguna, Canary Islands, Spain, included speakers working with some of the most important proteolytic systems present in higher eukaryotes, such as the UPS (ubiquitin-proteasome system) and autophagy. Owing to the fact that these pathways directly or indirectly regulate many cell functions, this meeting brought together an audience with a wide range of research interests, including genetic, cell biological, biochemical and structural aspects of protein degradation. Some of these topics inspired interesting discussions and a significant number of these are developed in the issues reviewed herein.

  13. Integrating Negative Affect Measures in a Measurement Model: Assessing the Function of Negative Affect as Interference to Self-Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magno, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the composition of negative affect and its function as inhibitory to thought processes such as self-regulation. Negative affect in the present study were composed of anxiety, worry, thought suppression, and fear of negative evaluation. These four factors were selected based on the criteria of negative affect by…

  14. Does Ramadan Fasting Adversely Affect Cognitive Function in Young Females?

    PubMed Central

    Ghayour Najafabadi, Mahboubeh; Rahbar Nikoukar, Laya; Memari, Amir; Ekhtiari, Hamed; Beygi, Sara

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of Ramadan fasting on cognitive function in 17 female athletes. Data were obtained from participants of two fasting (n = 9) and nonfasting (n = 8) groups at three periods of the study (before Ramadan, at the third week in Ramadan, and after Ramadan). Digit span test (DST) and Stroop color test were employed to assess short-term memory and inhibition/cognitive flexibility at each time point. There were no significant changes for DST and Stroop task 1 in both groups, whereas Stroop task 2 and task 3 showed significant improvements in Ramadan condition (p < 0.05). Interference indices did not change significantly across the study except in post-Ramadan period of fasting group (p < 0.05). Group × week interaction was significant only for error numbers (p < 0.05). Athletes in nonfasting showed a significant decrease in number of errors in Ramadan compared to baseline (p < 0.05). The results suggest that Ramadan fasting may not adversely affect cognitive function in female athletes. PMID:26697263

  15. Functional Roles Affect Diversity-Succession Relationships for Boreal Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, Heloise; Johansson, Therese; Stenbacka, Fredrik; Hjältén, Joakim

    2013-01-01

    Species diversity commonly increases with succession and this relationship is an important justification for conserving large areas of old-growth habitats. However, species with different ecological roles respond differently to succession. We examined the relationship between a range of diversity measures and time since disturbance for boreal forest beetles collected over a 285 year forest chronosequence. We compared responses of “functional” groups related to threat status, dependence on dead wood habitats, diet and the type of trap in which they were collected (indicative of the breadth of ecologies of species). We examined fits of commonly used rank-abundance models for each age class and traditional and derived diversity indices. Rank abundance distributions were closest to the Zipf-Mandelbrot distribution, suggesting little role for competition in structuring most assemblages. Diversity measures for most functional groups increased with succession, but differences in slopes were common. Evenness declined with succession; more so for red-listed species than common species. Saproxylic species increased in diversity with succession while non-saproxylic species did not. Slopes for fungivores were steeper than other diet groups, while detritivores were not strongly affected by succession. Species trapped using emergence traps (log specialists) responded more weakly to succession than those trapped using flight intercept traps (representing a broader set of ecologies). Species associated with microhabitats that accumulate with succession (fungi and dead wood) thus showed the strongest diversity responses to succession. These clear differences between functional group responses to forest succession should be considered in planning landscapes for optimum conservation value, particularly functional resilience. PMID:23977350

  16. The function of EHD2 in endocytosis and defense signaling is affected by SUMO.

    PubMed

    Bar, Maya; Schuster, Silvia; Leibman, Meirav; Ezer, Ran; Avni, Adi

    2014-03-01

    Post-translational modification of target proteins by the small ubiquitin-like modifier protein (SUMO) regulates many cellular processes. SUMOylation has been shown to regulate cellular localization and function of a variety of proteins, in some cases affecting nuclear import or export. We have previously characterized two EHDs (EH domain containing proteins) in Arabidospis and showed their involvement in plant endocytosis. AtEHD2 has an inhibitory effect on endocytosis of transferrin, FM-4-64, and the leucine rich repeat receptor like protein LeEix2, an effect that requires and intact coiled-coil domain. Inhibition of endocytosis of LeEix2 by EHD2 is effective in inhibiting defense responses mediated by the LeEix2 receptor in response to its ligand EIX. In the present work we demonstrate that SUMOylation of EHD2 appears to be required for EHD2-induced inhibition of LeEix2 endocytosis. Indeed, we found that a mutant form of EHD2, possessing a defective SUMOylation site, has an increased nuclear abundance, can no longer be SUMOylated and is no longer effective in inhibiting LeEix2 endocytosis or defense signaling in response to EIX. PMID:24154852

  17. Molecular and cellular mechanisms for the regulation of ovarian follicular function in cows

    PubMed Central

    SHIMIZU, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Ovary is an important organ that houses the oocytes (reproductive cell). Oocyte growth depends on the function of follicular cells such as the granulosa and theca cells. Two-cell two gonadotropin systems are associated with oocyte growth and follicular cell functions. In addition to these systems, it is also known that several growth factors regulate oocyte growth and follicular cell functions. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is involved in thecal vasculature during follicular development and the suppression of granulosa cell apoptosis. Metabolic factors such as insulin, growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) also play critical roles in the process of follicular development and growth. These factors are associated not only with follicular development, but also with follicular cell function. Steroid hormones (estrogens, androgens, and progestins) that are secreted from follicular cells influence the function of the female genital tract and its affect the susceptibility to bacterial infection. This review covers our current understanding of the mechanisms by which gonadotrophins and/or steroid hormones regulate the growth factors in the follicular cells of the bovine ovary. In addition, this review describes the effect of endotoxin on the function of follicular cells. PMID:27097851

  18. Molecular and cellular mechanisms for the regulation of ovarian follicular function in cows.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takashi

    2016-08-25

    Ovary is an important organ that houses the oocytes (reproductive cell). Oocyte growth depends on the function of follicular cells such as the granulosa and theca cells. Two-cell two gonadotropin systems are associated with oocyte growth and follicular cell functions. In addition to these systems, it is also known that several growth factors regulate oocyte growth and follicular cell functions. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is involved in thecal vasculature during follicular development and the suppression of granulosa cell apoptosis. Metabolic factors such as insulin, growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) also play critical roles in the process of follicular development and growth. These factors are associated not only with follicular development, but also with follicular cell function. Steroid hormones (estrogens, androgens, and progestins) that are secreted from follicular cells influence the function of the female genital tract and its affect the susceptibility to bacterial infection. This review covers our current understanding of the mechanisms by which gonadotrophins and/or steroid hormones regulate the growth factors in the follicular cells of the bovine ovary. In addition, this review describes the effect of endotoxin on the function of follicular cells. PMID:27097851

  19. Boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) functionalized carbon nano-onions for high resolution cellular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartelmess, Juergen; de Luca, Elisa; Signorelli, Angelo; Baldrighi, Michele; Becce, Michele; Brescia, Rosaria; Nardone, Valentina; Parisini, Emilio; Echegoyen, Luis; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Giordani, Silvia

    2014-10-01

    Carbon nano-onions (CNOs) are an exciting class of carbon nanomaterials, which have recently demonstrated a facile cell-penetration capability. In the present work, highly fluorescent boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dyes were covalently attached to the surface of CNOs. The introduction of this new carbon nanomaterial-based imaging platform, made of CNOs and BODIPY fluorophores, allows for the exploration of synergetic effects between the two building blocks and for the elucidation of its performance in biological applications. The high fluorescence intensity exhibited by the functionalized CNOs translates into an excellent in vitro probe for the high resolution imaging of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. It was also found that the CNOs, internalized by the cells by endocytosis, localized in the lysosomes and did not show any cytotoxic effects. The presented results highlight CNOs as excellent platforms for biological and biomedical studies due to their low toxicity, efficient cellular uptake and low fluorescence quenching of attached probes.Carbon nano-onions (CNOs) are an exciting class of carbon nanomaterials, which have recently demonstrated a facile cell-penetration capability. In the present work, highly fluorescent boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dyes were covalently attached to the surface of CNOs. The introduction of this new carbon nanomaterial-based imaging platform, made of CNOs and BODIPY fluorophores, allows for the exploration of synergetic effects between the two building blocks and for the elucidation of its performance in biological applications. The high fluorescence intensity exhibited by the functionalized CNOs translates into an excellent in vitro probe for the high resolution imaging of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. It was also found that the CNOs, internalized by the cells by endocytosis, localized in the lysosomes and did not show any cytotoxic effects. The presented results highlight CNOs as excellent platforms for biological and biomedical

  20. Functions and Cellular Compartmentation of the Thioredoxin and Glutathione Pathways in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Delaunay-Moisan, Agnès; Outten, Caryn E.; Igbaria, Aeid

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The thioredoxin (TRX) and glutathione (GSH) pathways are universally conserved thiol-reductase systems that drive an array of cellular functions involving reversible disulfide formation. Here we consider these pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, focusing on their cell compartment-specific functions, as well as the mechanisms that explain extreme differences of redox states between compartments. Recent Advances: Recent work leads to a model in which the yeast TRX and GSH pathways are not redundant, in contrast to Escherichia coli. The cytosol possesses full sets of both pathways, of which the TRX pathway is dominant, while the GSH pathway acts as back up of the former. The mitochondrial matrix also possesses entire sets of both pathways, in which the GSH pathway has major role in redox control. In both compartments, GSH has also nonredox functions in iron metabolism, essential for viability. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS) are sites of intense thiol oxidation, but except GSH lack thiol-reductase pathways. Critical Issues: What are the thiol-redox links between compartments? Mitochondria are totally independent, and insulated from the other compartments. The cytosol is also totally independent, but also provides reducing power to the ER and IMS, possibly by ways of reduced and oxidized GSH entering and exiting these compartments. Future Directions: Identifying the mechanisms regulating fluxes of GSH and oxidized glutathione between cytosol and ER, IMS, and possibly also peroxisomes, vacuole is needed to establish the proposed model of eukaryotic thiol-redox homeostasis, which should facilitate exploration of this system in mammals and plants. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1699–1711. PMID:23198979

  1. Exposure to high static or pulsed magnetic fields does not affect cellular processes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Anton-Leberre, Veronique; Haanappel, Evert; Marsaud, Nathalie; Trouilh, Lidwine; Benbadis, Laurent; Boucherie, Helian; Massou, Sophie; François, Jean M

    2010-01-01

    We report results of a study of the effects of strong static (up to 16 T for 8 h) and pulsed (up to 55 T single-shot and 4 x 20 T repeated shots) magnetic fields on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cultures in the exponential phase of growth. In contrast to previous reports restricted to only a limited number of cellular parameters, we have examined a wide variety of cellular processes: genome-scale gene expression, proteome profile, cell viability, morphology, and growth, metabolic and fermentation activity after magnetic field exposure. None of these cellular activities were impaired in response to static or pulsed magnetic field exposure. Our results confirm and extend previous reports on the absence of magnetic field effects on yeast and support the hypothesis that magnetic fields have no impact on the transcriptional machinery and on the integrity of unicellular biological systems.

  2. Cardiac ferroportin regulates cellular iron homeostasis and is important for cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Lakhal-Littleton, Samira; Wolna, Magda; Carr, Carolyn A; Miller, Jack J J; Christian, Helen C; Ball, Vicky; Santos, Ana; Diaz, Rebeca; Biggs, Daniel; Stillion, Richard; Holdship, Philip; Larner, Fiona; Tyler, Damian J; Clarke, Kieran; Davies, Benjamin; Robbins, Peter A

    2015-03-10

    Iron is essential to the cell. Both iron deficiency and overload impinge negatively on cardiac health. Thus, effective iron homeostasis is important for cardiac function. Ferroportin (FPN), the only known mammalian iron-exporting protein, plays an essential role in iron homeostasis at the systemic level. It increases systemic iron availability by releasing iron from the cells of the duodenum, spleen, and liver, the sites of iron absorption, recycling, and storage respectively. However, FPN is also found in tissues with no known role in systemic iron handling, such as the heart, where its function remains unknown. To explore this function, we generated mice with a cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of Fpn. We show that these animals have severely impaired cardiac function, with a median survival of 22 wk, despite otherwise unaltered systemic iron status. We then compared their phenotype with that of ubiquitous hepcidin knockouts, a recognized model of the iron-loading disease hemochromatosis. The phenotype of the hepcidin knockouts was far milder, with normal survival up to 12 mo, despite far greater iron loading in the hearts. Histological examination demonstrated that, although cardiac iron accumulates within the cardiomyocytes of Fpn knockouts, it accumulates predominantly in other cell types in the hepcidin knockouts. We conclude, first, that cardiomyocyte FPN is essential for intracellular iron homeostasis and, second, that the site of deposition of iron within the heart determines the severity with which it affects cardiac function. Both findings have significant implications for the assessment and treatment of cardiac complications of iron dysregulation.

  3. Tumor suppressor BTG1 promotes PRMT1-mediated ATF4 function in response to cellular stress

    PubMed Central

    Tijchon, Esther; van Ingen Schenau, Dorette; van Emst, Liesbeth; Levers, Marloes; Palit, Sander A.L.; Rodenbach, Caroline; Poelmans, Geert; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Shan, Jixiu; Kilberg, Michael S.; Scheijen, Blanca; van Leeuwen, Frank N.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells are frequently exposed to physiological stress conditions such as hypoxia and nutrient limitation. Escape from stress-induced apoptosis is one of the mechanisms used by malignant cells to survive unfavorable conditions. B-cell Translocation Gene 1 (BTG1) is a tumor suppressor that is frequently deleted in acute lymphoblastic leukemia and recurrently mutated in diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Moreover, low BTG1 expression levels have been linked to poor outcome in several solid tumors. How loss of BTG1 function contributes to tumor progression is not well understood. Here, using Btg1 knockout mice, we demonstrate that loss of Btg1 provides a survival advantage to primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) under stress conditions. This pro-survival effect involves regulation of Activating Transcription Factor 4 (ATF4), a key mediator of cellular stress responses. We show that BTG1 interacts with ATF4 and positively modulates its activity by recruiting the protein arginine methyl transferase PRMT1 to methylate ATF4 on arginine residue 239. We further extend these findings to B-cell progenitors, by showing that loss of Btg1 expression enhances stress adaptation of mouse bone marrow-derived B cell progenitors. In conclusion, we have identified the BTG1/PRMT1 complex as a new modifier of ATF4 mediated stress responses. PMID:26657730

  4. The bacterial virulence factor NleA inhibits cellular protein secretion by disrupting mammalian COPII function.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinoh; Thanabalasuriar, Ajitha; Chaworth-Musters, Tessa; Fromme, J Chris; Frey, Elizabeth A; Lario, Paula I; Metalnikov, Pavel; Rizg, Keyrillos; Thomas, Nikhil A; Lee, Sau Fung; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Hardwidge, Philip R; Pawson, Tony; Strynadka, Natalie C; Finlay, B Brett; Schekman, Randy; Gruenheid, Samantha

    2007-09-13

    Enterohemorrhagic and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EHEC and EPEC) maintain an extracellular lifestyle and use a type III secretion system to translocate effector proteins into the host cytosol. These effectors manipulate host pathways to favor bacterial replication and survival. NleA is an EHEC/EPEC- and related species-specific translocated effector protein that is essential for bacterial virulence. However, the mechanism by which NleA impacts virulence remains undetermined. Here we demonstrate that NleA compromises the Sec23/24 complex, a component of the mammalian COPII protein coat that shapes intracellular protein transport vesicles, by directly binding Sec24. Expression of an NleA-GFP fusion protein reduces the efficiency of cellular secretion by 50%, and secretion is inhibited in EPEC-infected cells. Direct biochemical experiments show that NleA inhibits COPII-dependent protein export from the endoplasmic reticulum. Collectively, these findings indicate that disruption of COPII function in host cells contributes to the virulence of EPEC and EHEC.

  5. Activation of Yap-Directed Transcription by Knockdown of Conserved Cellular Functions.

    PubMed

    Agarinis, C; Orsini, V; Megel, P; Abraham, Y; Yang, H; Mickanin, C; Myer, V; Bouwmeester, T; Tchorz, J S; Parker, C N

    2016-03-01

    The Yap-Hippo pathway has a significant role in regulating cell proliferation and growth, thus controlling organ size and regeneration. The Hippo pathway regulates two highly conserved, transcription coactivators, YAP and TAZ. The upstream regulators of the Yap-Hippo pathway have not been fully characterized. The aim of this study was to use a siRNA screen, in a liver biliary cell line, to identify regulators of the Yap-Hippo pathway that allow activation of the YAP transcription coactivator at high cell density. Activation of the YAP transcription coactivator was monitored using a high-content, image-based assay that measured the intracellular localization of native YAP protein. Active siRNAs were identified and further validated by quantification of CYR61 mRNA levels (a known YAP target gene). The effect of compounds targeting the putative gene targets identified as hits was also used for further validation. A number of validated hits reveal basic aspects of Yap-Hippo biology, such as components of the nuclear pore, by which YAP cytoplasmic-nuclear shuttling occurs, or how proteasomal degradation regulates intracellular YAP concentrations, which then alter YAP localization and transcription. Such results highlight how targeting conserved cellular functions can lead to validated activity in phenotypic assays.

  6. Conserved cellular function and stress-mediated regulation among members of the proteolipid protein family.

    PubMed

    Fernández, María E; Alfonso, Julieta; Brocco, Marcela A; Frasch, Alberto C

    2010-05-01

    Chronic stress causes morphological alterations in the hippocampus of rodents and tree shrews, including atrophy of CA3 dendrites and loss of synapses. The molecular mechanisms underlying these structural changes remain largely unknown. We have previously identified M6a as a stress responsive gene and shown that M6a is involved in filopodium/spine outgrowth and, likely, synapse formation. M6a belongs to the proteolipid protein (PLP) family, all of their members having four transmembrane domains that allow their localization at the plasma membrane. In the present work, we analyzed other members of this family, the closely related M6b as well as PLP and its splice variant DM20. We found that chronic restraint stress in mice reduces M6b and DM20, but not PLP, mRNA levels in the hippocampus. In addition, M6b and DM20, but again not PLP, induce filopodium formation in primary cultures of hippocampal neurons. Several M6b protein isoforms were studied, all of them having similar effects except for the one lacking the transmembrane domains. Our results reveal a conserved cellular function and a stress-mediated regulation among members of the proteolipid protein family, suggesting an involvement of proteolipid proteins in the stress response. PMID:19937804

  7. Cellular and functional specificity among ferritin-like proteins in the multicellular cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme.

    PubMed

    Ekman, Martin; Sandh, Gustaf; Nenninger, Anja; Oliveira, Paulo; Stensjö, Karin

    2014-03-01

    Ferritin-like proteins constitute a remarkably heterogeneous protein family, including ferritins, bacterioferritins and Dps proteins. The genome of the filamentous heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme encodes five ferritin-like proteins. In the present paper, we report a multidimensional characterization of these proteins. Our phylogenetic and bioinformatics analyses suggest both structural and physiological differences among the ferritin-like proteins. The expression of these five genes responded differently to hydrogen peroxide treatment, with a significantly higher rise in transcript level for Npun_F3730 as compared with the other four genes. A specific role for Npun_F3730 in the cells tolerance against hydrogen peroxide was also supported by the inactivation of Npun_F3730, Npun_R5701 and Npun_R6212; among these, only the ΔNpun_F3730 strain showed an increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide compared with wild type. Analysis of promoter-GFP reporter fusions of the ferritin-like genes indicated that Npun_F3730 and Npun_R5701 were expressed in all cell types of a diazotrophic culture, while Npun_F6212 was expressed specifically in heterocysts. Our study provides the first comprehensive analysis combining functional differentiation and cellular specificity within this important group of proteins in a multicellular cyanobacterium. PMID:23992552

  8. Elucidating the Function of Penetratin and a Static Magnetic Field in Cellular Uptake of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Suman; Smith, Carol Anne; del Pino, Pablo; de la Fuente, Jesus M.; Mullin, Margaret; Hursthouse, Andrew; Stirling, David; Berry, Catherine C.

    2013-01-01

    Nanotechnology plays an increasingly important role in the biomedical arena. In particular, magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs) have become important tools in molecular diagnostics, in vivo imaging and improved treatment of disease, with the ultimate aim of producing a more theranostic approach. Due to their small sizes, the nanoparticles can cross most of the biological barriers such as the blood vessels and the blood brain barrier, thus providing ubiquitous access to most tissues. In all biomedical applications maximum nanoparticle uptake into cells is required. Two promising methods employed to this end include functionalization of mNPs with cell-penetrating peptides to promote efficient translocation of cargo into the cell and the use of external magnetic fields for enhanced delivery. This study aimed to compare the effect of both penetratin and a static magnetic field with regards to the cellular uptake of 200 nm magnetic NPs and determine the route of uptake by both methods. Results demonstrated that both techniques increased particle uptake, with penetratin proving more cell specific. Clathrin- medicated endocytosis appeared to be responsible for uptake as shown via PCR and western blot, with Pitstop 2 (known to selectively block clathrin formation) blocking particle uptake. Interestingly, it was further shown that a magnetic field was able to reverse or overcome the blocking, suggesting an alternative route of uptake. PMID:24275948

  9. Cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes in human and mouse as annotated in the gene ontology.

    PubMed

    Hamed, Mohamed; Ismael, Siba; Paulsen, Martina; Helms, Volkhard

    2012-01-01

    By analyzing the cellular functions of genetically imprinted genes as annotated in the Gene Ontology for human and mouse, we found that imprinted genes are often involved in developmental, transport and regulatory processes. In the human, paternally expressed genes are enriched in GO terms related to the development of organs and of anatomical structures. In the mouse, maternally expressed genes regulate cation transport as well as G-protein signaling processes. Furthermore, we investigated if imprinted genes are regulated by common transcription factors. We identified 25 TF families that showed an enrichment of binding sites in the set of imprinted genes in human and 40 TF families in mouse. In general, maternally and paternally expressed genes are not regulated by different transcription factors. The genes Nnat, Klf14, Blcap, Gnas and Ube3a contribute most to the enrichment of TF families. In the mouse, genes that are maternally expressed in placenta are enriched for AP1 binding sites. In the human, we found that these genes possessed binding sites for both, AP1 and SP1. PMID:23226257

  10. Glycosaminoglycan-functionalized poly-lactide-co-glycolide nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, cytocompatibility, and cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Lamichhane, Surya P; Arya, Neha; Ojha, Nirdesh; Kohler, Esther; Shastri, V Prasad

    2015-01-01

    The efficient delivery of chemotherapeutics to the tumor via nanoparticle (NP)-based delivery systems remains a significant challenge. This is compounded by the fact that the tumor is highly dynamic and complex environment composed of a plurality of cell types and extracellular matrix. Since glycosaminoglycan (GAG) production is altered in many diseases (or pathologies), NPs bearing GAG moieties on the surface may confer some unique advantages in interrogating the tumor microenvironment. In order to explore this premise, in the study reported here poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) NPs in the range of 100-150 nm bearing various proteoglycans were synthesized by a single-step nanoprecipitation and characterized. The surface functionalization of the NPs with GAG moieties was verified using zeta potential measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. To establish these GAG-bearing NPs as carriers of therapeutics, cellular toxicity assays were undertaken in lung epithelial adenocarcinoma (A549) cells, human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC), and renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. In general NPs were well tolerated over a wide concentration range (100-600 μg/mL) by all cell types and were taken up to appreciable extents without any adverse cell response in A549 cells and HPMEC. Further, GAG-functionalized PLGA NPs were taken up to different extents in A459 cells and HPMEC. In both cell systems, the uptake of heparin-modified NPs was diminished by 50%-65% in comparison to that of unmodified PLGA. Interestingly, the uptake of chondroitin sulfate NPs was the highest in both cell systems with 40%-60% higher uptake when compared with that of PLGA, and this represented an almost twofold difference over heparin-modified NPs. These findings suggest that GAG modification can be explored as means of changing the uptake behavior of PLGA NPs and these NP systems have potential in cancer therapy.

  11. Glycosaminoglycan-functionalized poly-lactide-co-glycolide nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, cytocompatibility, and cellular uptake

    PubMed Central

    Lamichhane, Surya P; Arya, Neha; Ojha, Nirdesh; Kohler, Esther; Shastri, V Prasad

    2015-01-01

    The efficient delivery of chemotherapeutics to the tumor via nanoparticle (NP)-based delivery systems remains a significant challenge. This is compounded by the fact that the tumor is highly dynamic and complex environment composed of a plurality of cell types and extracellular matrix. Since glycosaminoglycan (GAG) production is altered in many diseases (or pathologies), NPs bearing GAG moieties on the surface may confer some unique advantages in interrogating the tumor microenvironment. In order to explore this premise, in the study reported here poly-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) NPs in the range of 100–150 nm bearing various proteoglycans were synthesized by a single-step nanoprecipitation and characterized. The surface functionalization of the NPs with GAG moieties was verified using zeta potential measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. To establish these GAG-bearing NPs as carriers of therapeutics, cellular toxicity assays were undertaken in lung epithelial adenocarcinoma (A549) cells, human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC), and renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. In general NPs were well tolerated over a wide concentration range (100–600 μg/mL) by all cell types and were taken up to appreciable extents without any adverse cell response in A549 cells and HPMEC. Further, GAG-functionalized PLGA NPs were taken up to different extents in A459 cells and HPMEC. In both cell systems, the uptake of heparin-modified NPs was diminished by 50%–65% in comparison to that of unmodified PLGA. Interestingly, the uptake of chondroitin sulfate NPs was the highest in both cell systems with 40%–60% higher uptake when compared with that of PLGA, and this represented an almost twofold difference over heparin-modified NPs. These findings suggest that GAG modification can be explored as means of changing the uptake behavior of PLGA NPs and these NP systems have potential in cancer therapy. PMID:25632234

  12. Functional DNA-Containing Nanomaterials: Cellular Applications in Biosensing, Imaging, and Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Conspectus DNA performs a vital function as a carrier of genetic code, but in the field of nanotechnology, DNA molecules can catalyze chemical reactions in the cell, that is, DNAzymes, or bind with target-specific ligands, that is, aptamers. These functional DNAs with different modifications have been developed for sensing, imaging, and therapeutic systems. Thus, functional DNAs hold great promise for future applications in nanotechnology and bioanalysis. However, these functional DNAs face challenges, especially in the field of biomedicine. For example, functional DNAs typically require the use of cationic transfection reagents to realize cellular uptake. Such reagents enter the cells, increasing the difficulty of performing bioassays in vivo and potentially damaging the cell’s nucleus. To address this obstacle, nanomaterials, such as metallic, carbon, silica, or magnetic materials, have been utilized as DNA carriers or assistants. In this Account, we describe selected examples of functional DNA-containing nanomaterials and their applications from our recent research and those of others. As models, we have chosen to highlight DNA/nanomaterial complexes consisting of gold nanoparticles, graphene oxides, and aptamer–micelles, and we illustrate the potential of such complexes in biosensing, imaging, and medical diagnostics. Under proper conditions, multiple ligand–receptor interactions, decreased steric hindrance, and increased surface roughness can be achieved from a high density of DNA that is bound to the surface of nanomaterials, resulting in a higher affinity for complementary DNA and other targets. In addition, this high density of DNA causes a high local salt concentration and negative charge density, which can prevent DNA degradation. For example, DNAzymes assembled on gold nanoparticles can effectively catalyze chemical reactions even in living cells. And it has been confirmed that DNA–nanomaterial complexes can enter cells more easily than free

  13. PHYSIOLOGY AND ENDOCRINOLOGY SYMPOSIUM: Cellular and molecular mechanisms of heat stress related to bovine ovarian function.

    PubMed

    Roth, Z

    2015-05-01

    In light of the intensive genetic selection for high milk production and the onset of global warming, it seems that the reduced fertility of lactating cows during the summer will worsen in coming years. Although not entirely clear, the mechanism appears to be multifactorial in nature. It includes alterations in follicular development, depression of follicular dominance, and impairment of steroidogenesis and gonadotropin secretion. Heat-induced perturbations in the physiology of the follicle-enclosed oocyte have also been documented, expressed by impaired cleavage rate and reduced developmental competence. With respect to the oocyte, alterations include an increase in PUFA in the membrane, reactive oxygen species, ceramide formation and caspase activity, and induction of apoptosis via the sphingomyelin and/or mitochondrial pathways. New insight into cellular and molecular alterations has revealed that heat induces perturbations in both nuclear and cytoplasmic maturation events, such as resumption of meiosis, metaphase II plate formation, cytoskeleton rearrangement, and translocation of cortical granules. Alterations in mitochondrial distribution (i.e., low proportion of category I mitochondria) and function (i.e., low membrane potential) have recently been reported for oocytes collected during the summer. These were associated with impaired expression of both nuclear (succinate dehydrogenase subunit [SDHD], adenosine triphosphate [ATP] synthase subunit beta [ATP5B]), mitochondrially NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 (ND2), and mitochondiral (cytochrome c oxidase subunit II [MT-CO2] and cytochrome b [MT-CYB]) genes that are crucial in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. In addition, season-induced alteration in the stored maternal mRNA has been documented, expressed by reduced transcript levels (oocyte maturation factor MOS [C-MOS], growth differentiation factor 9 [GDF9], POU domain class 5 transcription factor 1 [POU5F1], and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase

  14. Functional Contributions of Strong and Weak Cellular Oscillators to Synchrony and Light-shifted Phase Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Logan; Leise, Tanya L; Welsh, David K; Holmes, Todd C

    2016-08-01

    Light is the primary signal that calibrates circadian neural circuits and thus coordinates daily physiological and behavioral rhythms with solar entrainment cues. Drosophila and mammalian circadian circuits consist of diverse populations of cellular oscillators that exhibit a wide range of dynamic light responses, periods, phases, and degrees of synchrony. How heterogeneous circadian circuits can generate robust physiological rhythms while remaining flexible enough to respond to synchronizing stimuli has long remained enigmatic. Cryptochrome is a short-wavelength photoreceptor that is endogenously expressed in approximately half of Drosophila circadian neurons. In a previous study, physiological light response was measured using real-time bioluminescence recordings in Drosophila whole-brain explants, which remain intrinsically light-sensitive. Here we apply analysis of real-time bioluminescence experimental data to show detailed dynamic ensemble representations of whole circadian circuit light entrainment at single neuron resolution. Organotypic whole-brain explants were either maintained in constant darkness (DD) for 6 days or exposed to a phase-advancing light pulse on the second day. We find that stronger circadian oscillators support robust overall circuit rhythmicity in DD, whereas weaker oscillators can be pushed toward transient desynchrony and damped amplitude to facilitate a new state of phase-shifted network synchrony. Additionally, we use mathematical modeling to examine how a network composed of distinct oscillator types can give rise to complex dynamic signatures in DD conditions and in response to simulated light pulses. Simulations suggest that complementary coupling mechanisms and a combination of strong and weak oscillators may enable a robust yet flexible circadian network that promotes both synchrony and entrainment. A more complete understanding of how the properties of oscillators and their signaling mechanisms facilitate their distinct roles

  15. Cellular interference in craniofrontonasal syndrome: males mosaic for mutations in the X-linked EFNB1 gene are more severely affected than true hemizygotes

    PubMed Central

    Twigg, Stephen R.F.; Babbs, Christian; van den Elzen, Marijke E.P.; Goriely, Anne; Taylor, Stephen; McGowan, Simon J.; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Lonie, Lorne; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Akha, Elham Sadighi; Knight, Samantha J.L.; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M.; Hoogeboom, Jeannette A.M.; Pober, Barbara R.; Toriello, Helga V.; Wall, Steven A.; Rita Passos-Bueno, M.; Brunner, Han G.; Mathijssen, Irene M.J.; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.

    2013-01-01

    Craniofrontonasal syndrome (CFNS), an X-linked disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations of EFNB1, exhibits a paradoxical sex reversal in phenotypic severity: females characteristically have frontonasal dysplasia, craniosynostosis and additional minor malformations, but males are usually more mildly affected with hypertelorism as the only feature. X-inactivation is proposed to explain the more severe outcome in heterozygous females, as this leads to functional mosaicism for cells with differing expression of EPHRIN-B1, generating abnormal tissue boundaries—a process that cannot occur in hemizygous males. Apparently challenging this model, males occasionally present with a more severe female-like CFNS phenotype. We hypothesized that such individuals might be mosaic for EFNB1 mutations and investigated this possibility in multiple tissue samples from six sporadically presenting males. Using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography, massively parallel sequencing and multiplex-ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to increase sensitivity above standard dideoxy sequencing, we identified mosaic mutations of EFNB1 in all cases, comprising three missense changes, two gene deletions and a novel point mutation within the 5′ untranslated region (UTR). Quantification by Pyrosequencing and MLPA demonstrated levels of mutant cells between 15 and 69%. The 5′ UTR variant mutates the stop codon of a small upstream open reading frame that, using a dual-luciferase reporter construct, was demonstrated to exacerbate interference with translation of the wild-type protein. These results demonstrate a more severe outcome in mosaic than in constitutionally deficient males in an X-linked dominant disorder and provide further support for the cellular interference mechanism, normally related to X-inactivation in females. PMID:23335590

  16. Biophysical properties of dermal building-blocks affects extra cellular matrix assembly in 3D endogenous macrotissue.

    PubMed

    Urciuolo, F; Garziano, A; Imparato, G; Panzetta, V; Fusco, S; Casale, C; Netti, P A

    2016-01-29

    The fabrication of functional tissue units is one of the major challenges in tissue engineering due to their in vitro use in tissue-on-chip systems, as well as in modular tissue engineering for the construction of macrotissue analogs. In this work, we aim to engineer dermal tissue micromodules obtained by culturing human dermal fibroblasts into porous gelatine microscaffold. We proved that such stromal cells coupled with gelatine microscaffolds are able to synthesize and to assemble an endogenous extracellular matrix (ECM) resulting in tissue micromodules, which evolve their biophysical features over the time. In particular, we found a time-dependent variation of oxygen consumption kinetic parameters, of newly formed ECM stiffness and of micromodules self-aggregation properties. As consequence when used as building blocks to fabricate larger tissues, the initial tissue micromodules state strongly affects the ECM organization and maturation in the final macrotissue. Such results highlight the role of the micromodules properties in controlling the formation of three-dimensional macrotissue in vitro, defining an innovative design criterion for selecting tissue-building blocks for modular tissue engineering.

  17. Dietary carbohydrate restriction improves insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, microvascular function, and cellular adhesion markers in individuals taking statins.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Kevin D; Quann, Erin E; Kupchak, Brian R; Volk, Brittanie M; Kawiecki, Diana M; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Seip, Richard L; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S

    2013-11-01

    Statins positively impact plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, inflammation and vascular endothelial function (VEF). Carbohydrate restricted diets (CRD) improve atherogenic dyslipidemia, and similar to statins, have been shown to favorably affect markers of inflammation and VEF. No studies have examined whether a CRD provides additional benefit beyond that achieved by habitual statin use. We hypothesized that a CRD (<50 g carbohydrate/d) for 6 weeks would improve lipid profiles and insulin sensitivity, reduce blood pressure, decrease cellular adhesion and inflammatory biomarkers, and augment VEF (flow-mediated dilation and forearm blood flow) in statin users. Participants (n = 21; 59.3 ± 9.3 y, 29.5 ± 3.0 kg/m(2)) decreased total caloric intake by approximately 415 kcal at 6 weeks (P < .001). Daily nutrient intakes at baseline (46/36/17% carb/fat/pro) and averaged across the intervention (11/58/28% carb/fat/pro) demonstrated dietary compliance, with carbohydrate intake at baseline nearly 5-fold greater than during the intervention (P < .001). Compared to baseline, both systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased after 3 and 6 weeks (P < .01). Peak forearm blood flow, but not flow-mediated dilation, increased at week 6 compared to baseline and week 3 (P ≤ .03). Serum triglyceride, insulin, soluble E-Selectin and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 decreased (P < .01) from baseline at week 3, and this effect was maintained at week 6. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that individuals undergoing statin therapy experience additional improvements in metabolic and vascular health from a 6 weeks CRD as evidenced by increased insulin sensitivity and resistance vessel endothelial function, and decreased blood pressure, triglycerides, and adhesion molecules. PMID:24176230

  18. Dietary carbohydrate restriction improves insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, microvascular function, and cellular adhesion markers in individuals taking statins.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Kevin D; Quann, Erin E; Kupchak, Brian R; Volk, Brittanie M; Kawiecki, Diana M; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Seip, Richard L; Maresh, Carl M; Kraemer, William J; Volek, Jeff S

    2013-11-01

    Statins positively impact plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, inflammation and vascular endothelial function (VEF). Carbohydrate restricted diets (CRD) improve atherogenic dyslipidemia, and similar to statins, have been shown to favorably affect markers of inflammation and VEF. No studies have examined whether a CRD provides additional benefit beyond that achieved by habitual statin use. We hypothesized that a CRD (<50 g carbohydrate/d) for 6 weeks would improve lipid profiles and insulin sensitivity, reduce blood pressure, decrease cellular adhesion and inflammatory biomarkers, and augment VEF (flow-mediated dilation and forearm blood flow) in statin users. Participants (n = 21; 59.3 ± 9.3 y, 29.5 ± 3.0 kg/m(2)) decreased total caloric intake by approximately 415 kcal at 6 weeks (P < .001). Daily nutrient intakes at baseline (46/36/17% carb/fat/pro) and averaged across the intervention (11/58/28% carb/fat/pro) demonstrated dietary compliance, with carbohydrate intake at baseline nearly 5-fold greater than during the intervention (P < .001). Compared to baseline, both systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased after 3 and 6 weeks (P < .01). Peak forearm blood flow, but not flow-mediated dilation, increased at week 6 compared to baseline and week 3 (P ≤ .03). Serum triglyceride, insulin, soluble E-Selectin and intracellular adhesion molecule-1 decreased (P < .01) from baseline at week 3, and this effect was maintained at week 6. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that individuals undergoing statin therapy experience additional improvements in metabolic and vascular health from a 6 weeks CRD as evidenced by increased insulin sensitivity and resistance vessel endothelial function, and decreased blood pressure, triglycerides, and adhesion molecules.

  19. The UL24 protein of herpes simplex virus 1 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Abdeljelil, Nawel; Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Pearson, Angela

    2013-09-15

    Mutations in UL24 of herpes simplex virus type 1 can lead to a syncytial phenotype. We hypothesized that UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion. In non-immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) we detected viral glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH and gL present in extended blotches throughout the cytoplasm with limited nuclear membrane staining; however, in HFFs infected with a UL24-deficient virus (UL24X), staining for the viral glycoproteins appeared as long, thin streaks running across the cell. Interestingly, there was a decrease in co-localized staining of gB and gD with F-actin at late times in UL24X-infected HFFs. Treatment with chemical agents that perturbed the actin cytoskeleton hindered the formation of UL24X-induced syncytia in these cells. These data support a model whereby the UL24 syncytial phenotype results from a mislocalization of viral glycoproteins late in infection. - Highlights: • UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins required for fusion. • Sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins varies in cell-type dependent manner. • Drugs targeting actin microfilaments affect formation of UL24-related syncytia in HFFs.

  20. The role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in cellular function and protection in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Andrew; Aziz, Qadeer; Thomas, Alison

    2014-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K(ATP)) are widely distributed and present in a number of tissues including muscle, pancreatic beta cells and the brain. Their activity is regulated by adenine nucleotides, characteristically being activated by falling ATP and rising ADP levels. Thus, they link cellular metabolism with membrane excitability. Recent studies using genetically modified mice and genomic studies in patients have implicated K(ATP) channels in a number of physiological and pathological processes. In this review, we focus on their role in cellular function and protection particularly in the cardiovascular system.

  1. Perturbing the Cellular Levels of Steroid Receptor Coactivator-2 Impairs Murine Endometrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Szwarc, Maria M.; Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Jeong, Jae-Wook; Wu, San-Pin; Tsai, Sophia Y.; Tsai, Ming-Jer; O’Malley, Bert W.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Lydon, John P.

    2014-01-01

    As pleiotropic coregulators, members of the p160/steroid receptor coactivator (SRC) family control a broad spectrum of transcriptional responses that underpin a diverse array of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Because of their potent coregulator properties, strict controls on SRC expression levels are required to maintain normal tissue functionality. Accordingly, an unwarranted increase in the cellular levels of SRC members has been causally linked to the initiation and/or progression of a number of clinical disorders. Although knockout mouse models have underscored the critical non-redundant roles for each SRC member in vivo, there are surprisingly few mouse models that have been engineered to overexpress SRCs. This deficiency is significant since SRC involvement in many of these disorders is based on unscheduled increases in the levels (rather than the absence) of SRC expression. To address this deficiency, we used recent mouse technology that allows for the targeted expression of human SRC-2 in cells which express the progesterone receptor. Through cre-loxP recombination driven by the endogenous progesterone receptor promoter, a marked elevation in expression levels of human SRC-2 was achieved in endometrial cells that are positive for the progesterone receptor. As a result of this increase in coregulator expression, female mice are severely subfertile due to a dysfunctional uterus, which exhibits a hypersensitivity to estrogen exposure. Our findings strongly support the proposal from clinical observations that increased levels of SRC-2 are causal for a number of endometrial disorders which compromise fertility. Future studies will use this mouse model to decipher the molecular mechanisms that underpin the endometrial defect. We believe such mechanistic insight may provide new molecular descriptors for diagnosis, prognosis, and/or therapy in the clinical management of female infertility. PMID:24905738

  2. AntiJen: a quantitative immunology database integrating functional, thermodynamic, kinetic, biophysical, and cellular data.

    PubMed

    Toseland, Christopher P; Clayton, Debra J; McSparron, Helen; Hemsley, Shelley L; Blythe, Martin J; Paine, Kelly; Doytchinova, Irini A; Guan, Pingping; Hattotuwagama, Channa K; Flower, Darren R

    2005-10-01

    AntiJen is a database system focused on the integration of kinetic, thermodynamic, functional, and cellular data within the context of immunology and vaccinology. Compared to its progenitor JenPep, the interface has been completely rewritten and redesigned and now offers a wider variety of search methods, including a nucleotide and a peptide BLAST search. In terms of data archived, AntiJen has a richer and more complete breadth, depth, and scope, and this has seen the database increase to over 31,000 entries. AntiJen provides the most complete and up-to-date dataset of its kind. While AntiJen v2.0 retains a focus on both T cell and B cell epitopes, its greatest novelty is the archiving of continuous quantitative data on a variety of immunological molecular interactions. This includes thermodynamic and kinetic measures of peptide binding to TAP and the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC), peptide-MHC complexes binding to T cell receptors, antibodies binding to protein antigens and general immunological protein-protein interactions. The database also contains quantitative specificity data from position-specific peptide libraries and biophysical data, in the form of diffusion co-efficients and cell surface copy numbers, on MHCs and other immunological molecules. The uses of AntiJen include the design of vaccines and diagnostics, such as tetramers, and other laboratory reagents, as well as helping parameterize the bioinformatic or mathematical in silico modeling of the immune system. The database is accessible from the URL: http://www.jenner.ac.uk/antijen. PMID:16305757

  3. Calcium and ascorbic acid affect cellular structure and water mobility in apple tissue during osmotic dehydration in sucrose solutions.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Maria A; Dellarosa, Nicolò; Tylewicz, Urszula; Tappi, Silvia; Laghi, Luca; Rocculi, Pietro; Rosa, Marco Dalla

    2016-03-15

    The effects of the addition of calcium lactate and ascorbic acid to sucrose osmotic solutions on cell viability and microstructure of apple tissue were studied. In addition, water distribution and mobility modification of the different cellular compartments were observed. Fluorescence microscopy, light microscopy and time domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR) were respectively used to evaluate cell viability and microstructural changes during osmotic dehydration. Tissues treated in a sucrose-calcium lactate-ascorbic acid solution did not show viability. Calcium lactate had some effects on cell walls and membranes. Sucrose solution visibly preserved the protoplast viability and slightly influenced the water distribution within the apple tissue, as highlighted by TD-NMR, which showed higher proton intensity in the vacuoles and lower intensity in cytoplasm-free spaces compared to other treatments. The presence of ascorbic acid enhanced calcium impregnation, which was associated with permeability changes of the cellular wall and membranes. PMID:26575708

  4. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate affects the growth of LNCaP cells via membrane fluidity and distribution of cellular zinc*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun-guo; Yu, Hai-ning; Sun, Shi-li; Zhang, Lan-cui; He, Guo-qing; Das, Undurti N.; Ruan, Hui; Shen, Sheng-rong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate effects of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the viability, membrane properties, and zinc distribution, with and without the presence of Zn2+, in human prostate carcinoma LNCaP cells. Methods: We examined changes in cellular morphology and membrane fluidity of LNCaP cells, distribution of cellular zinc, and the incorporated portion of EGCG after treatments with EGCG, Zn2+, and EGCG+Zn2+. Results: We observed an alteration in cellular morphology and a decrease in membrane fluidity of LNCaP cells after treatment with EGCG or Zn2+. The proportion of EGCG incorporated into liposomes treated with the mixture of EGCG and Zn2+ at the ratio of 1:1 was 90.57%, which was significantly higher than that treated with EGCG alone (30.33%). Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies and determination of fatty acids showed that the effects of EGCG on the membrane fluidity of LNCaP were decreased by Zn2+. EGCG accelerated the accumulation of zinc in the mitochondria and cytosol as observed by atomic absorption spectrometer. Conclusion: These results show that EGCG interacted with cell membrane, decreased the membrane fluidity of LNCaP cells, and accelerated zinc accumulation in the mitochondria and cytosol, which could be the mechanism by which EGCG inhibits proliferation of LNCaP cells. In addition, high concentrations of Zn2+ could attenuate the actions elicited by EGCG. PMID:19489106

  5. Proteomic Profiling in the Brain of CLN1 Disease Model Reveals Affected Functional Modules.

    PubMed

    Tikka, Saara; Monogioudi, Evanthia; Gotsopoulos, Athanasios; Soliymani, Rabah; Pezzini, Francesco; Scifo, Enzo; Uusi-Rauva, Kristiina; Tyynelä, Jaana; Baumann, Marc; Jalanko, Anu; Simonati, Alessandro; Lalowski, Maciej

    2016-03-01

    Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses (NCL) are the most commonly inherited progressive encephalopathies of childhood. Pathologically, they are characterized by endolysosomal storage with different ultrastructural features and biochemical compositions. The molecular mechanisms causing progressive neurodegeneration and common molecular pathways linking expression of different NCL genes are largely unknown. We analyzed proteome alterations in the brains of a mouse model of human infantile CLN1 disease-palmitoyl-protein thioesterase 1 (Ppt1) gene knockout and its wild-type age-matched counterpart at different stages: pre-symptomatic, symptomatic and advanced. For this purpose, we utilized a combination of laser capture microdissection-based quantitative liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight MS imaging to quantify/visualize the changes in protein expression in disease-affected brain thalamus and cerebral cortex tissue slices, respectively. Proteomic profiling of the pre-symptomatic stage thalamus revealed alterations mostly in metabolic processes and inhibition of various neuronal functions, i.e., neuritogenesis. Down-regulation in dynamics associated with growth of plasma projections and cellular protrusions was further corroborated by findings from RNA sequencing of CLN1 patients' fibroblasts. Changes detected at the symptomatic stage included: mitochondrial functions, synaptic vesicle transport, myelin proteome and signaling cascades, such as RhoA signaling. Considerable dysregulation of processes related to mitochondrial cell death, RhoA/Huntington's disease signaling and myelin sheath breakdown were observed at the advanced stage of the disease. The identified changes in protein levels were further substantiated by bioinformatics and network approaches, immunohistochemistry on brain tissues and literature knowledge, thus identifying various functional modules affected in the CLN1 childhood

  6. Copper sulfate affects Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) cardiomyocytes structure and contractile function.

    PubMed

    de Andrade Waldemarin, Kátia Cristina; Alves, Rosiane Nascimento; Beletti, Marcelo Emílio; Rantin, Francisco Tadeu; Kalinin, Ana Lúcia

    2012-04-01

    Copper sulfate (CuSO(4))is an inorganic chemical product worldwide used as an algaecide and a fungicide in aquaculture and agriculture and being discharged into freshwater environments where it can affect the freshwater fauna, especially fishes. The impact of copper on fish cardiac function was analyzed in two groups of Nile tilapias, Oreochromis niloticus (control group and group exposed to 1 mg l(-1) of CuSO(4) for 96 h). Structural and ultra-structural changes were studied and related to perturbations of the inotropic and chronotropic responses of ventricle strips. Fish of Cu exposed group did not show significant alterations in the medium diameter and in the percentage of collagen in the cardiac myocytes when evaluated through the light microscope. However, the ultrastructural analysis revealed cellular swelling followed by mitochondrial swelling. The myofibrils did not show significant variations among groups. Force contraction was significantly decreased, and rates of time to tension increase (contraction) and decrease (relaxation) were significantly augmented after copper exposure. The results suggest that the copper sulfate impairs the oxidative mitochondrial function and consequently alters the cardiac performance of this species.

  7. Pathogen virulence factors as molecular probes of basic plant cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Speth, Elena Bray; Lee, Young Nam; He, Sheng Yang

    2007-12-01

    To successfully colonize plants, pathogens have evolved a myriad of virulence factors that allow them to manipulate host cellular pathways in order to gain entry into, multiply and move within, and eventually exit the host for a new infection cycle. In the past few years, substantial progress has been made in characterizing the host targets of viral and bacterial virulence factors, providing unique insights into basic plant cellular processes such as gene silencing, vesicle trafficking, hormone signaling, and innate immunity. Identification of the host targets of additional pathogen virulence factors promises to continue shedding light on fundamental cellular mechanisms in plants, thus enhancing our understanding of plant signaling, metabolism, and cell biology. PMID:17884715

  8. Optical system module having zooming function and image quality of mega pixel for a cellular phone camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Seong Jong; Lee, Jong Jin; Chung, Chang Sub

    2009-08-01

    We designed and developed a cellular phone camera like HD digital still camera having zooming function. To design an optical system module having the auto-zooming and the image quality of 2M mega pixel using Code V, we considered 6 lenses which were four aspheric plastic lenses and two glass lenses. The specifications of designed optical system module for a cellular phone camera were the focal length of 4.29mm at wide position to 10.55mm at tele position, fnumber of 3.2 at wide position to 5.3 at tele position, and field of view of 27.4 degree at tele position to 65.8 degree at wide position. Its zoom ratio was 2.5. The values of modulation transfer function (MTF) at 200lp/mm of the designed optical system module were over 21% at zoom position. We applied the design results of optical system module to the fabrication of a cellular phone camera having the zoom ratio of 2.5 and the image quality of 2M mega pixel, and adopted the aspheric glass lens having higher abbe number to compensate chromatic aberration and the VCM (Voice Coil Motor) as sub-miniature motor. We fabricated the optical module system having zoom ratio of 2.5 and image quality of 2M mega pixel in order to apply to a HD cellular phone camera.

  9. Experimentally induced diabetes causes glial activation, glutamate toxicity and cellular damage leading to changes in motor function

    PubMed Central

    Nagayach, Aarti; Patro, Nisha; Patro, Ishan

    2014-01-01

    Behavioral impairments are the most empirical consequence of diabetes mellitus documented in both humans and animal models, but the underlying causes are still poorly understood. As the cerebellum plays a major role in coordination and execution of the motor functions, we investigated the possible involvement of glial activation, cellular degeneration and glutamate transportation in the cerebellum of rats, rendered diabetic by a single injection of streptozotocin (STZ; 45 mg/kg body weight; intraperitoneally). Motor function alterations were studied using Rotarod test (motor coordination) and grip strength (muscle activity) at 2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, 10th, and 12th week post-diabetic confirmation. Scenario of glial (astroglia and microglia) activation, cell death and glutamate transportation was gaged using immunohistochemistry, histological study and image analysis. Cellular degeneration was clearly demarcated in the diabetic cerebellum. Glial cells were showing sequential and marked activation following diabetes in terms of both morphology and cell number. Bergmann glial cells were hypertrophied and distorted. Active caspase-3 positive apoptotic cells were profoundly present in all three cerebellar layers. Reduced co-labeling of GLT-1 and GFAP revealed the altered glutamate transportation in cerebellum following diabetes. These results, exclusively derived from histology, immunohistochemistry and cellular quantification, provide first insight over the associative reciprocity between the glial activation, cellular degeneration and reduced glutamate transportation, which presumably lead to the behavioral alterations following STZ-induced diabetes. PMID:25400546

  10. Multiscale design and multiobjective optimization of orthopedic hip implants with functionally graded cellular material.

    PubMed

    Arabnejad Khanoki, Sajad; Pasini, Damiano

    2012-03-01

    Revision surgeries of total hip arthroplasty are often caused by a deficient structural compatibility of the implant. Two main culprits, among others, are bone-implant interface instability and bone resorption. To address these issues, in this paper we propose a novel type of implant, which, in contrast to current hip replacement implants made of either a fully solid or a foam material, consists of a lattice microstructure with nonhomogeneous distribution of material properties. A methodology based on multiscale mechanics and design optimization is introduced to synthesize a graded cellular implant that can minimize concurrently bone resorption and implant interface failure. The procedure is applied to the design of a 2D left implanted femur with optimized gradients of relative density. To assess the manufacturability of the graded cellular microstructure, a proof-of-concept is fabricated by using rapid prototyping. The results from the analysis are used to compare the optimized cellular implant with a fully dense titanium implant and a homogeneous foam implant with a relative density of 50%. The bone resorption and the maximum value of interface stress of the cellular implant are found to be over 70% and 50% less than the titanium implant while being 53% and 65% less than the foam implant.

  11. Concomitant gastroparesis negatively affects children with functional gallbladder disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether concomitant gastroparesis and biliary dyskinesia (BD) occur in children, and if so, to determine whether concomitant gastroparesis affects clinical outcome in children with BD. We conducted a retrospective chart review of children with BD (ejecti...

  12. Altered T-cell function in schizophrenia: a cellular model to investigate molecular disease mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Craddock, Rachel M; Lockstone, Helen E; Rider, David A; Wayland, Matthew T; Harris, Laura J W; McKenna, Peter J; Bahn, Sabine

    2007-01-01

    may affect the ability of patient cells to respond to stimulation. Functional profiling showed prominent transcript changes in categories pertaining to cell cycle machinery, intracellular signalling, oxidative stress and metabolism. Intriguingly, chromosomal location analysis of genes significantly altered between schizophrenia and controls revealed clusters at 1p36, 1q42 and 6p22, which have previously been identified as strong susceptibility loci for schizophrenia.

  13. Telomerase deficiency affects normal brain functions in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehoon; Jo, Yong Sang; Sung, Young Hoon; Hwang, In Koo; Kim, Hyuk; Kim, Song-Yi; Yi, Sun Shin; Choi, June-Seek; Sun, Woong; Seong, Je Kyung; Lee, Han-Woong

    2010-02-01

    Telomerase maintains telomere structures and chromosome stability, and it is essential for preserving the characteristics of stem and progenitor cells. In the brain, the hippocampus and the olfactory bulbs are continuously supplied with neural stem and progenitor cells that are required for adult neurogenesis throughout the life. Therefore, we examined whether telomerase plays important roles in maintaining normal brain functions in vivo. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) expression was observed in the hippocampus, the olfactory bulbs, and the cerebellum, but the telomerase RNA component (TERC) was not detected in hippocampus and olfactory bulbs. Interestingly, TERT-deficient mice exhibited significantly altered anxiety-like behaviors and abnormal olfaction measuring the functions of the hippocampus and the olfactory bulbs, respectively. However, the cerebellum-dependent behavior was not changed in these mutant mice. These results suggest that TERT is constitutively expressed in the hippocampus and the olfactory bulbs, and that it is important for regulating normal brain functions. PMID:19685288

  14. Fetal urinoma and prenatal hydronephrosis: how is renal function affected?

    PubMed Central

    Oktar, Tayfun; Salabaş, Emre; Kalelioğlu, İbrahim; Atar, Arda; Ander, Haluk; Ziylan, Orhan; Has, Recep; Yüksel, Atıl

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In our study, the functional prognosis of kidneys with prenatal urinomas were investigated. Material and methods: Between 2006 and 2010, fetal urinomas were detected in 19 fetuses using prenatal ultrasonography (US), and the medical records were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 19 cases, the follow-up data were available for 10 fetuses. The gestational age at diagnosis, prognosis of urinomas, clinical course and renal functions were recorded. Postnatal renal functions were assessed with renal scintigraphy. Results: Unilateral urinomas and increased parenchyma echogenicity in the ipsilateral kidney were detected in all of the fetuses. Of the 10 fetuses with follow-up data, the option of termination was offered in 6 cases of anhydramnios, including 3 cases with signs of infravesical obstruction (a possible posterior urethral valve (PUV) and poor prognostic factors and 3 cases with unilateral hydronephrosis and increased echogenicity in the contralateral kidney. Only one family agreed the termination. The other 5 fetuses died during the early postnatal period. The average postnatal follow-up period in the 4 surviving fetuses was 22.5 months (8–38 months). One patient with a PUV underwent ablation surgery during the early postnatal period. In the postnatal period, none of the 4 kidneys that were ipsilateral to the urinoma were functional on scintigraphic evaluation. The urinomas disappeared in 3 cases. Nephrectomy was performed in one case due to recurrent urinary tract infections. Conclusion: In our study, no function was detected in the ipsilateral kidney of surviving patients with urinomas. Upper urinary tract dilatation accompanied by a urinoma is a poor prognostic factor for renal function. PMID:26328088

  15. [Regulatory role of mechanical stress response in cellular function: development of new drugs and tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Momose, Kazutaka; Matsuda, Takehisa; Oike, Masahiro; Obara, Kazuo; Laher, Ismail; Sugiura, Seiryo; Ohata, Hisayuki; Nakayama, Koichi

    2003-02-01

    The investigation of mechanotransduction in the cardiovascular system is essentially important for elucidating the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in not only the maintenance of hemodynamic homeostasis but also etiology of cardiovascular diseases including arteriosclerosis. The present review summarizes the latest research performed by six academic groups, and presented at the 75th Annual Meeting of the Japanese Pharmacological Society. Technology of cellular biomechanics is also required for research and clinical application of a vascular hybrid tissue responding to pulsatile stress. 1) Vascular tissue engineering: Design of pulsatile stress-responsive scaffold and in vivo vascular wall reconstruction (T. Matsuda); 2) Cellular mechanisms of mechanosensitive calcium transients in vascular endothelium (M. Oike et al.); 3) Cross-talk of stimulation with fluid flow and lysophosphatidic acid in vascular endothelial cells (K. Momose et al.); 4) Mechanotransduction of vascular smooth muscles: Rate-dependent stretch-induced protein phosphorylations and contractile activation (K. Obara et al.); 5) Lipid mediators in vascular myogenic tone (I. Laher et al.); and 6) Caldiomyocyte regulates its mechanical output in response to mechanical load (S. Sugiura et al.).

  16. TWO INNEXINS OF Spodoptera litura INFLUENCES HEMICHANNEL AND GAP JUNCTION FUNCTIONS IN CELLULAR IMMUNE RESPONSES.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zunyu; Li, Ming; Yu, Dongshuai; Yan, Zhang; Liu, Xinyi; Ji, Xinglai; Yang, Yang; Hu, Jiansheng; Luo, Kaijun

    2015-09-01

    Insect cellular immune responses include encapsulation, nodule formation, and phagocytosis. Hemichannels and gap junctions are involved in these cellular actions. Innexins (Inxs: analogous to the vertebrate connexins) form hemichannels and gap junctions, but the molecular mechanisms underlying their biology is still unclear. In this article, we reported a steady-state level of Inxs (SpliInxs) in hemocytes of Spodoptera litura, which formed nonfunctional hemichannels on the cell surface to maintain normal metabolism. We also reported that two innnexins (SpliInx2 and SpliInx3) were expressed significantly higher in hemocytes compared to other tissues, suggesting that they play important roles in hemocytes. Amino acid analysis found that two cysteine residues in two extracellular loops provided the capability for SpliInx2 and SpliInx3 hemichannels to dock into gap junctions. Western blotting demonstrated that both extracellular and intracellular loops of SpliInx3 and the extracellular loops of SpliInx2 might undergo posttranslational modification during the formation of a steady-state hemichannel. During hemichannel formation, SpliInx2 presented as one isoform, while SpliInx3 presented as three isoforms. These results provide fundamental knowledge for further study of how steady-state levels of SpliInxs are dynamically adjusted to perform cellular immune responses under immune challenge. PMID:25939810

  17. Chemical Modifications that Affect Nutritional and Functional Properties of Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, T.; Kester, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses chemical alterations of selected amino acids resulting from environmental effects (photooxidations, pH extremes, thermally induced effects). Also dicusses use of intentional chemical derivatizations of various functional groups in amino acid residue side chains and how recombinant DNA techniques might be useful in structure/function…

  18. Can Particulate Pollution Affect Lung Function in Healthy Adults?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accompanying editorial to paper from Harvard by Rice et al. entitled "Long-Term Exposure to Traffic Emissions and Fine Particulate Matter and Lung Function Decline in the Framingham Heart StudyBy almost any measure the Clean Air Act and its amendments has to be considered as one...

  19. Drying process strongly affects probiotics viability and functionalities.

    PubMed

    Iaconelli, Cyril; Lemetais, Guillaume; Kechaou, Noura; Chain, Florian; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Langella, Philippe; Gervais, Patrick; Beney, Laurent

    2015-11-20

    Probiotic formulations are widely used and are proposed to have a variety of beneficial effects, depending on the probiotic strains present in the product. The impact of drying processes on the viability of probiotics is well documented. However, the impact of these processes on probiotics functionality remains unclear. In this work, we investigated variations in seven different bacterial markers after various desiccation processes. Markers were composed of four different viability evaluation (combining two growth abilities and two cytometric measurements) and in three in vitro functionalities: stimulation of IL-10 and IL-12 production by PBMCs (immunomodulation) and bacterial adhesion to hexadecane. We measured the impact of three drying processes (air-drying, freeze-drying and spray-drying), without the use of protective agents, on three types of probiotic bacteria: Bifidobacterium bifidum, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus zeae. Our results show that the bacteria respond differently to the three different drying processes, in terms of viability and functionality. Drying methods produce important variations in bacterial immunomodulation and hydrophobicity, which are correlated. We also show that adherence can be stimulated (air-drying) or inhibited (spray-drying) by drying processes. Results of a multivariate analysis show no direct correlation between bacterial survival and functionality, but do show a correlation between probiotic responses to desiccation-rewetting and the process used to dry the bacteria.

  20. Effects of acamprosate on attentional set-shifting and cellular function in the prefrontal cortex of chronic alcohol-exposed mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wei

    Background: The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) inhibits impulsive and compulsive behaviors that characterize drug abuse and dependence. Acamprosate is the leading medication approved for the maintenance of abstinence, shown to reduce craving and relapse in animal models and human alcoholics. Whether acamprosate can modulate executive functions that are impaired by chronic ethanol exposure is unknown. Here we explored the effects of acamprosate on an attentional set-shifting task, and tested whether these behavioral effects are correlated with modulation of glutamatergic synaptic transmission and intrinsic excitability of mPFC neurons. Methods: We induced alcohol dependence in mice via chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure in vapor chambers and measured changes in alcohol consumption in a limited access 2-bottle choice paradigm. Impairments of executive function were assessed in an attentional set-shifting task. Acamprosate was applied subchronically for 2 days during withdrawal before the final behavioral test. Alcohol-induced changes in cellular function of layer 5/6 pyramidal neurons, and the potential modulation of these changes by acamprosate, were measured using patch clamp recordings in brain slices. Results: Chronic ethanol exposure impaired cognitive flexibility in the attentional set-shifting task. Acamprosate improved overall performance and reduced perseveration. Recordings of mPFC neurons showed that chronic ethanol exposure increased use-dependent presynaptic transmitter release and enhanced postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function. Moreover, CIE-treatment lowered input resistance, and decreased the threshold and the afterhyperpolarization (AHP) of action potentials, suggesting chronic ethanol exposure also impacted membrane excitability of mPFC neurons. However, acamprosate treatment did not reverse these ethanol-induced changes cellular function. Conclusion: Acamprosate improved attentional control of ethanol exposed animals

  1. Carboxy-terminal truncations of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor affect diverse EGF-induced cellular responses.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Hack, N; Margolis, B; Ullrich, A; Skorecki, K; Schlessinger, J

    1991-08-01

    The binding of epidermal growth factor (EGF) to its receptor induces tyrosine phosphorylation of phospholipase C gamma (PLC gamma), which appears to be necessary for its activation leading to phosphatidyl inositol (PI) hydrolysis. Moreover, EGF-receptor (EGF-R) activation and autophosphorylation results in binding of PLC gamma to the tyrosine phosphorylated carboxy-terminus of the receptor. To gain further insights into the mechanisms and interactions regulating these processes, we have analyzed transfected NIH-3T3 cells expressing two EGF-R carboxy-terminal deletion mutants (CD63 and CD126) with reduced capacity to stimulate PI hydrolysis, Ca2+ rises, and DNA synthesis. In fact, the CD126 mutant lacking 126 carboxy-terminal amino acids, including four tyrosine autophosphorylation sites, was unable to stimulate PI hydrolysis or Ca2+ rise in response to EGF. Surprisingly, EGF binding to the cell lines expressing CD63 or CD126 mutants was followed by similar stimulation of tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC gamma. Our results suggest that although necessary, tyrosine phosphorylation of PLC gamma may not be sufficient for stimulation and PI hydrolysis. It is clear, however, that the carboxy-terminal region of EGF-R is involved in regulation of interactions with cellular targets and therefore plays a crucial role in postreceptor signaling pathways.

  2. Double-sieving-defective aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase causes protein mistranslation and affects cellular physiology and development

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jiongming; Bergert, Martin; Walther, Anita; Suter, Beat

    2014-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (aaRSs) constitute a family of ubiquitously expressed essential enzymes that ligate amino acids to their cognate tRNAs for protein synthesis. Recently, aaRS mutations have been linked to various human diseases; however, how these mutations lead to diseases has remained unclear. In order to address the importance of aminoacylation fidelity in multicellular organisms, we generated an amino-acid double-sieving model in Drosophila melanogaster using phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase (PheRS). Double-sieving-defective mutations dramatically misacylate non-cognate Tyr, induce protein mistranslation and cause endoplasmic reticulum stress in flies. Mutant adults exhibit many defects, including loss of neuronal cells, impaired locomotive performance, shortened lifespan and smaller organ size. At the cellular level, the mutations reduce cell proliferation and promote cell death. Our results also reveal the particular importance of the first amino-acid recognition sieve. Overall, these findings provide new mechanistic insights into how malfunctioning of aaRSs can cause diseases. PMID:25427601

  3. Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) imaging: From cancer detection to sub-cellular function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Le

    Light scattering spectroscopy (LSS), an optical technique that relates the spectroscopic properties of light elastically scattered by small particles to their size, refractive index and shape, has been recently successfully employed for sensing morphological and biochemical properties of epithelial tissues and cells in vivo. LSS does not require exogenous markers, is non-invasive, and, due to its multispectral nature, can sense biological structures well beyond the diffraction limit. All that makes LSS be a very good candidate to be used both in clinical medicine for in vivo detection of disease and in cell biology to monitor cell function on the organelle scale. Recently we developed two LSS-based imaging modalities: clinical Polarized LSS (PLSS) Endoscopic Technique for locating early pre-cancerous changes in GI tract and Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) Microscopy for studying cells in vivo without exogenous markers. One important application of the clinical PLSS endoscopic instrument, a noncontact scanning imaging device compatible with the standard clinical endoscopes and capable of detecting dysplastic changes, is to serve as a guide for biopsy in Barrett's esophagus (BE). The instrument detects parallel and perpendicular components of the polarized light, backscattered from epithelial tissues, and determines characteristics of epithelial nuclei from the residual spectra. It also can find tissue oxygenation, hemoglobin content and other properties from the diffuse light component. By rapidly scanning esophagus the PLSS endoscopic instrument makes sure the entire BE portion is scanned and examined for the presence of dysplasia. CLASS microscopy, on the other hand, combines principles of light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) with confocal microscopy. Its main purpose is to image cells on organelle scale in vivo without the use of exogenous labels which may affect the cell function. The confocal geometry selects specific region and

  4. SLE-associated risk factors affect DC function.

    PubMed

    Son, Myoungsun; Kim, Sun Jung; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Numerous risk alleles for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have now been identified. Analysis of the expression of genes with risk alleles in cells of hematopoietic origin demonstrates them to be most abundantly expressed in B cells and dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that these cell types may be the drivers of the inflammatory changes seen in SLE. DCs are of particular interest as they act to connect the innate and the adaptive immune response. Thus, DCs can transform inflammation into autoimmunity, and autoantibodies are the hallmark of SLE. In this review, we focus on mechanisms of tolerance that maintain DCs in a non-activated, non-immunogenic state. We demonstrate, using examples from our own studies, how alterations in DC function stemming from either DC-intrinsic abnormalities or DC-extrinsic regulators of function can predispose to autoimmunity.

  5. SLE-associated risk factors affect DC function.

    PubMed

    Son, Myoungsun; Kim, Sun Jung; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Numerous risk alleles for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have now been identified. Analysis of the expression of genes with risk alleles in cells of hematopoietic origin demonstrates them to be most abundantly expressed in B cells and dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that these cell types may be the drivers of the inflammatory changes seen in SLE. DCs are of particular interest as they act to connect the innate and the adaptive immune response. Thus, DCs can transform inflammation into autoimmunity, and autoantibodies are the hallmark of SLE. In this review, we focus on mechanisms of tolerance that maintain DCs in a non-activated, non-immunogenic state. We demonstrate, using examples from our own studies, how alterations in DC function stemming from either DC-intrinsic abnormalities or DC-extrinsic regulators of function can predispose to autoimmunity. PMID:26683148

  6. SLE-associated risk factors affect DC function

    PubMed Central

    Son, Myoungsun; Kim, Sun Jung; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Numerous risk alleles for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have now been identified. Analysis of the expression of genes with risk alleles in cells of hematopoietic origin demonstrates them to be most abundantly expressed in B cells and dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that these cell types may be the drivers of the inflammatory changes seen in SLE. DCs are of particular interest as they act to connect the innate and the adaptive immune response. Thus, DCs can transform inflammation into autoimmunity, and autoantibodies are the hallmark of SLE. In this review, we focus on mechanisms of tolerance that maintain DCs in a non-activated, non-immunogenic state. We demonstrate, using examples from our own studies, how alterations in DC function stemming from either DC-intrinsic abnormalities or DC-extrinsic regulators of function can predispose to autoimmunity. PMID:26683148

  7. Analyses of Dynein Heavy Chain Mutations Reveal Complex Interactions Between Dynein Motor Domains and Cellular Dynein Functions

    PubMed Central

    Sivagurunathan, Senthilkumar; Schnittker, Robert R.; Razafsky, David S.; Nandini, Swaran; Plamann, Michael D.; King, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein transports cargoes for a variety of crucial cellular functions. However, since dynein is essential in most eukaryotic organisms, the in-depth study of the cellular function of dynein via genetic analysis of dynein mutations has not been practical. Here, we identify and characterize 34 different dynein heavy chain mutations using a genetic screen of the ascomycete fungus Neurospora crassa, in which dynein is nonessential. Interestingly, our studies show that these mutations segregate into five different classes based on the in vivo localization of the mutated dynein motors. Furthermore, we have determined that the different classes of dynein mutations alter vesicle trafficking, microtubule organization, and nuclear distribution in distinct ways and require dynactin to different extents. In addition, biochemical analyses of dynein from one mutant strain show a strong correlation between its in vitro biochemical properties and the aberrant intracellular function of that altered dynein. When the mutations were mapped to the published dynein crystal structure, we found that the three-dimensional structural locations of the heavy chain mutations were linked to particular classes of altered dynein functions observed in cells. Together, our data indicate that the five classes of dynein mutations represent the entrapment of dynein at five separate points in the dynein mechanochemical and transport cycles. We have developed N. crassa as a model system where we can dissect the complexities of dynein structure, function, and interaction with other proteins with genetic, biochemical, and cell biological studies. PMID:22649085

  8. Analyses of dynein heavy chain mutations reveal complex interactions between dynein motor domains and cellular dynein functions.

    PubMed

    Sivagurunathan, Senthilkumar; Schnittker, Robert R; Razafsky, David S; Nandini, Swaran; Plamann, Michael D; King, Stephen J

    2012-08-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein transports cargoes for a variety of crucial cellular functions. However, since dynein is essential in most eukaryotic organisms, the in-depth study of the cellular function of dynein via genetic analysis of dynein mutations has not been practical. Here, we identify and characterize 34 different dynein heavy chain mutations using a genetic screen of the ascomycete fungus Neurospora crassa, in which dynein is nonessential. Interestingly, our studies show that these mutations segregate into five different classes based on the in vivo localization of the mutated dynein motors. Furthermore, we have determined that the different classes of dynein mutations alter vesicle trafficking, microtubule organization, and nuclear distribution in distinct ways and require dynactin to different extents. In addition, biochemical analyses of dynein from one mutant strain show a strong correlation between its in vitro biochemical properties and the aberrant intracellular function of that altered dynein. When the mutations were mapped to the published dynein crystal structure, we found that the three-dimensional structural locations of the heavy chain mutations were linked to particular classes of altered dynein functions observed in cells. Together, our data indicate that the five classes of dynein mutations represent the entrapment of dynein at five separate points in the dynein mechanochemical and transport cycles. We have developed N. crassa as a model system where we can dissect the complexities of dynein structure, function, and interaction with other proteins with genetic, biochemical, and cell biological studies.

  9. Prenatal drug exposure affects neonatal brain functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Salzwedel, Andrew P; Grewen, Karen M; Vachet, Clement; Gerig, Guido; Lin, Weili; Gao, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Prenatal drug exposure, particularly prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE), incurs great public and scientific interest because of its associated neurodevelopmental consequences. However, the neural underpinnings of PCE remain essentially uncharted, and existing studies in school-aged children and adolescents are confounded greatly by postnatal environmental factors. In this study, leveraging a large neonate sample (N = 152) and non-invasive resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared human infants with PCE comorbid with other drugs (such as nicotine, alcohol, marijuana, and antidepressant) with infants with similar non-cocaine poly drug exposure and drug-free controls. We aimed to characterize the neural correlates of PCE based on functional connectivity measurements of the amygdala and insula at the earliest stage of development. Our results revealed common drug exposure-related connectivity disruptions within the amygdala-frontal, insula-frontal, and insula-sensorimotor circuits. Moreover, a cocaine-specific effect was detected within a subregion of the amygdala-frontal network. This pathway is thought to play an important role in arousal regulation, which has been shown to be irregular in PCE infants and adolescents. These novel results provide the earliest human-based functional delineations of the neural-developmental consequences of prenatal drug exposure and thus open a new window for the advancement of effective strategies aimed at early risk identification and intervention.

  10. Prenatal drug exposure affects neonatal brain functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Salzwedel, Andrew P; Grewen, Karen M; Vachet, Clement; Gerig, Guido; Lin, Weili; Gao, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Prenatal drug exposure, particularly prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE), incurs great public and scientific interest because of its associated neurodevelopmental consequences. However, the neural underpinnings of PCE remain essentially uncharted, and existing studies in school-aged children and adolescents are confounded greatly by postnatal environmental factors. In this study, leveraging a large neonate sample (N = 152) and non-invasive resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared human infants with PCE comorbid with other drugs (such as nicotine, alcohol, marijuana, and antidepressant) with infants with similar non-cocaine poly drug exposure and drug-free controls. We aimed to characterize the neural correlates of PCE based on functional connectivity measurements of the amygdala and insula at the earliest stage of development. Our results revealed common drug exposure-related connectivity disruptions within the amygdala-frontal, insula-frontal, and insula-sensorimotor circuits. Moreover, a cocaine-specific effect was detected within a subregion of the amygdala-frontal network. This pathway is thought to play an important role in arousal regulation, which has been shown to be irregular in PCE infants and adolescents. These novel results provide the earliest human-based functional delineations of the neural-developmental consequences of prenatal drug exposure and thus open a new window for the advancement of effective strategies aimed at early risk identification and intervention. PMID:25855194

  11. Nuclear cyclophilins affect spliceosome assembly and function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Adams, B M; Coates, Miranda N; Jackson, S RaElle; Jurica, Melissa S; Davis, Tara L

    2015-07-15

    Cyclophilins are ubiquitously expressed proteins that bind to prolines and can catalyse cis/trans isomerization of proline residues. There are 17 annotated members of the cyclophilin family in humans, ubiquitously expressed and localized variously to the cytoplasm, nucleus or mitochondria. Surprisingly, all eight of the nuclear localized cyclophilins are found associated with spliceosomal complexes. However, their particular functions within this context are unknown. We have therefore adapted three established assays for in vitro pre-mRNA splicing to probe the functional roles of nuclear cyclophilins in the context of the human spliceosome. We find that four of the eight spliceosom-associated cyclophilins exert strong effects on splicing in vitro. These effects are dose-dependent and, remarkably, uniquely characteristic of each cyclophilin. Using both qualitative and quantitative means, we show that at least half of the nuclear cyclophilins can act as regulatory factors of spliceosome function in vitro. The present work provides the first quantifiable evidence that nuclear cyclophilins are splicing factors and provides a novel approach for future work into small molecule-based modulation of pre-mRNA splicing.

  12. Development of affective theory of mind across adolescence: disentangling the role of executive functions.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Nora C; Altgassen, Mareike; Phillips, Louise; Mahy, Caitlin E V; Kliegel, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Theory of mind, the ability to understand mental states, involves inferences about others' cognitive (cognitive theory of mind) and emotional (affective theory of mind) mental states. The current study explored the role of executive functions in developing affective theory of mind across adolescence. Affective theory of mind and three subcomponents of executive functions (inhibition, updating, and shifting) were measured. Affective theory of mind was positively related to age, and all three executive functions. Specifically, inhibition explained the largest amount of variance in age-related differences in affective theory of mind.

  13. Poly(methyl vinyl ether-alt-maleic acid)-functionalized porous silicon nanoparticles for enhanced stability and cellular internalization.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Almeida, Patrick V; Mäkilä, Ermei; Correia, Alexandra; Ferreira, Mónica P A; Kaasalainen, Martti; Salonen, Jarno; Hirvonen, Jouni; Santos, Hélder A

    2014-03-01

    Currently, developing a stable nanocarrier with high cellular internalization and low toxicity is a key bottleneck in nanomedicine. Here, we have developed a successful method to covalently conjugate poly(methyl vinyl ether-co-maleic acid) (PMVE-MA) copolymer on the surface of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-functionalized thermally carbonized porous silicon nanoparticles (APSTCPSi NPs), forming a surface negatively charged nanovehicle with unique properties. This polymer conjugated NPs could modify surface smoothness, charge, and hydrophilicity of the developed NPs, leading to considerable improvement in the colloidal and plasma stabilities via enhanced suspensibility and charge repulsion. Furthermore, despite the surface negative charge of the polymer-conjugated NPs, the cellular internalization was increased in both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells. These results provide a proof-of-concept evidence that such polymer-based PSi nanocomposite can be extensively used as a promising candidate for intracellular drug delivery.

  14. The effect of negative affect on cognition: Anxiety, not anger, impairs executive function.

    PubMed

    Shields, Grant S; Moons, Wesley G; Tewell, Carl A; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2016-09-01

    It is often assumed that negative affect impairs the executive functions that underlie our ability to control and focus our thoughts. However, support for this claim has been mixed. Recent work has suggested that different negative affective states like anxiety and anger may reflect physiologically separable states with distinct effects on cognition. However, the effects of these 2 affective states on executive function have never been assessed. As such, we induced anxiety or anger in participants and examined the effects on executive function. We found that anger did not impair executive function relative to a neutral mood, whereas anxiety did. In addition, self-reports of induced anxiety, but not anger, predicted impairments in executive function. These results support functional models of affect and cognition, and highlight the need to consider differences between anxiety and anger when investigating the influence of negative affect on fundamental cognitive processes such as memory and executive function. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27100367

  15. Whole-body microwave exposure emitted by cellular phones and testicular function of rats.

    PubMed

    Dasdag, S; Ketani, M A; Akdag, Z; Ersay, A R; Sari, I; Demirtas, O C; Celik, M S

    1999-06-01

    This study investigated whether there are adverse effects due to microwave exposure emitted by cellular phones in male rats. Eighteen Wistar Albino rats were separated into three groups, a sham group and two experimental groups. The rats were confined in Plexiglas cages and cellular phones were placed 0.5 cm under the cages. In the first experimental group, cellular phones were in standby position for 2 h. In the second experimental group, phones were turned to the speech position three times each for 1 min duration over 2 h. Rats in the first and second experimental groups were exposed to microwaves emitted by phones for 2 h/day for a duration of 1 month. After the last exposure the rats were killed. Brain, eyes, ears, liver, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, testes, small and large intestines and skin of the rats were observed histologically. The decrease of epididymal sperm counts in the speech groups were not found to be significant (P > 0.05). Differences in terms of normal and abnormal sperm forms were not observed (P > 0.05). Histological changes were especially observed in the testes of rats of the speech groups. Seminiferous tubular diameter of rat testes in the standby and speech groups was found to be lower than the sham group (P < 0.05). Rectal temperatures of rats in the speech group were found to be higher than the sham and standby groups (P < 0.05). The rectal temperatures of rats before and after exposure were also found to be significantly higher in the speech group (P < 0.05). Specific absorption rate (SAR) was determined as 0.141 W/kg.

  16. BREFELDIN A INHIBITS CHOLESTEROL EFFLUX WITHOUT AFFECTING THE RATE OF CELLULAR UPTAKE AND RESECRETION OF APOLIPOPROTEIN A-I IN ADIPOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Philip B; Arrese, Estela L; Howard, Alisha D; Soulages, Jose L

    2008-01-01

    A possible role of cellular uptake and re-secretion of apoA-I in the mechanism of cholesterol efflux induced by apoA-I was investigated using a novel experimental approach. Incubation of adipocytes with a recombinant human apoA-I containing a consensus PKA phosphorylation site, pka-ApoA-I, leads to the appearance of phosphorylated protein in the cell culture medium unambiguously proving cellular uptake and re-secretion of pka-ApoA-I. Phosphorylation of apoA-I is abolished by PKA inhibitors and enhanced by PKA activators demonstrating the specific involvement of PKA. Studies on the concentration dependence of pka-apoA-I phosphorylation and competition experiments with human apoA-I suggest that apolipoprotein uptake is a receptor mediated process. A possible role of apoA-I recycling in the mechanism of cholesterol efflux was investigated by determining the rates of apoA-I induced cholesterol efflux and apoA-I recycling in the presence and in the absence of Brefeldin A (BFA). The studies showed that BFA strongly inhibits cholesterol efflux without affecting the rate of apoA-I recycling. Since BFA affects vesicular trafficking of ABCA1, this study suggests that the interaction of apoA-I with ABCA1 does not mediate apolipoprotein uptake and re-secretion. This result suggests that lipidation of apoA-I and apolipoprotein uptake/re-secretion are independent processes. PMID:18708026

  17. Does prolonged cycling of moderate intensity affect immune cell function?

    PubMed Central

    Scharhag, J; Meyer, T; Gabriel, H; Schlick, B; Faude, O; Kindermann, W; Shephard, R

    2005-01-01

    Background: Prolonged exercise may induce temporary immunosuppression with a presumed increased susceptibility for infection. However, there are only few data on immune cell function after prolonged cycling at moderate intensities typical for road cycling training sessions. Methods: The present study examined the influence on immune cell function of 4 h of cycling at a constant intensity of 70% of the individual anaerobic threshold. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP), leukocyte and lymphocyte populations, activities of natural killer (NK), neutrophils, and monocytes were examined before and after exercise, and also on a control day without exercise. Results: Cycling for 4 h induced a moderate acute phase response with increases in IL-6 from 1.0 (SD 0.5) before to 9.6 (5.6) pg/ml 1 h after exercise and CRP from 0.5 (SD 0.4) before to 1.8 (1.3) mg/l 1 day after exercise. Although absolute numbers of circulating NK cells, monocytes, and neutrophils increased during exercise, on a per cell basis NK cell activity, neutrophil and monocyte phagocytosis, and monocyte oxidative burst did not significantly change after exercise. However, a minor effect over time for neutrophil oxidative burst was noted, tending to decrease after exercise. Conclusions: Prolonged cycling at moderate intensities does not seem to seriously alter the function of cells of the first line of defence. Therefore, the influence of a single typical road cycling training session on the immune system is only moderate and appears to be safe from an immunological point of view. PMID:15728699

  18. Yersinia enterocolitica Affects Intestinal Barrier Function in the Colon.

    PubMed

    Hering, Nina A; Fromm, Anja; Kikhney, Judith; Lee, In-Fah M; Moter, Annette; Schulzke, Jörg D; Bücker, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Infection with Yersinia enterocolitica causes acute diarrhea in early childhood. A mouse infection model presents new findings on pathological mechanisms in the colon. Symptoms involve diarrhea with watery feces and weight loss that have their functional correlates in decreased transepithelial electrical resistance and increased fluorescein permeability. Y. enterocolitica was present within the murine mucosa of both ileum and colon. Here, the bacterial insult was of focal nature and led to changes in tight junction protein expression and architecture. These findings are in concordance with observations from former cell culture studies and suggest a leak flux mechanism of diarrhea.

  19. Repeated Traumatic Brain Injury Affects Composite Cognitive Function in Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Friess, Stuart H.; Ichord, Rebecca N.; Ralston, Jill; Ryall, Karen; Helfaer, Mark A.; Smith, Colin

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cumulative effects of repetitive mild head injury in the pediatric population are unknown. We have developed a cognitive composite dysfunction score that correlates white matter injury severity in neonatal piglets with neurobehavioral assessments of executive function, memory, learning, and problem solving. Anesthetized 3- to 5-day-old piglets were subjected to single (n = 7), double one day apart (n = 7), and double one week apart (n = 7) moderate (190 rad/s) rapid non-impact axial rotations of the head and compared to instrumented shams (n = 7). Animals experiencing two head rotations one day apart had a significantly higher mortality rate (43%) compared to the other groups and had higher failures rates in visual-based problem solving compared to instrumented shams. White matter injury, assessed by β-APP staining, was significantly higher in the double one week apart group compared to that with single injury and sham. Worsening performance on cognitive composite score correlated well with increasing severity of white matter axonal injury. In our immature large animal model of TBI, two head rotations produced poorer outcome as assessed by neuropathology and neurobehavioral functional outcomes compared to that with single rotations. More importantly, we have observed an increase in injury severity and mortality when the head rotations occur 24 h apart compared to 7 days apart. These observations have important clinical translation to infants subjected to repeated inflicted head trauma. PMID:19275468

  20. Picornaviruses and nuclear functions: targeting a cellular compartment distinct from the replication site of a positive-strand RNA virus

    PubMed Central

    Flather, Dylan; Semler, Bert L.

    2015-01-01

    The compartmentalization of DNA replication and gene transcription in the nucleus and protein production in the cytoplasm is a defining feature of eukaryotic cells. The nucleus functions to maintain the integrity of the nuclear genome of the cell and to control gene expression based on intracellular and environmental signals received through the cytoplasm. The spatial separation of the major processes that lead to the expression of protein-coding genes establishes the necessity of a transport network to allow biomolecules to translocate between these two regions of the cell. The nucleocytoplasmic transport network is therefore essential for regulating normal cellular functioning. The Picornaviridae virus family is one of many viral families that disrupt the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of cells to promote viral replication. Picornaviruses contain positive-sense, single-stranded RNA genomes and replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. As a result of the limited coding capacity of these viruses, cellular proteins are required by these intracellular parasites for both translation and genomic RNA replication. Being of messenger RNA polarity, a picornavirus genome can immediately be translated upon entering the cell cytoplasm. However, the replication of viral RNA requires the activity of RNA-binding proteins, many of which function in host gene expression, and are consequently localized to the nucleus. As a result, picornaviruses disrupt nucleocytoplasmic trafficking to exploit protein functions normally localized to a different cellular compartment from which they translate their genome to facilitate efficient replication. Furthermore, picornavirus proteins are also known to enter the nucleus of infected cells to limit host-cell transcription and down-regulate innate antiviral responses. The interactions of picornavirus proteins and host-cell nuclei are extensive, required for a productive infection, and are the focus of this review. PMID:26150805

  1. Cellular Signaling Networks Function as Generalized Wiener-Kolmogorov Filters to Suppress Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2014-10-01

    Cellular signaling involves the transmission of environmental information through cascades of stochastic biochemical reactions, inevitably introducing noise that compromises signal fidelity. Each stage of the cascade often takes the form of a kinase-phosphatase push-pull network, a basic unit of signaling pathways whose malfunction is linked with a host of cancers. We show that this ubiquitous enzymatic network motif effectively behaves as a Wiener-Kolmogorov optimal noise filter. Using concepts from umbral calculus, we generalize the linear Wiener-Kolmogorov theory, originally introduced in the context of communication and control engineering, to take nonlinear signal transduction and discrete molecule populations into account. This allows us to derive rigorous constraints for efficient noise reduction in this biochemical system. Our mathematical formalism yields bounds on filter performance in cases important to cellular function—such as ultrasensitive response to stimuli. We highlight features of the system relevant for optimizing filter efficiency, encoded in a single, measurable, dimensionless parameter. Our theory, which describes noise control in a large class of signal transduction networks, is also useful both for the design of synthetic biochemical signaling pathways and the manipulation of pathways through experimental probes such as oscillatory input.

  2. Multi-functionality Redefined with Colloidal Carotene Carbon Nanoparticles for Synchronized Chemical Imaging, Enriched Cellular Uptake and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Misra, Santosh K; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Chang, Huei-Huei; Tiwari, Saumya; Gryka, Mark; Bhargava, Rohit; Pan, Dipanjan

    2016-01-01

    Typically, multiplexing high nanoparticle uptake, imaging, and therapy requires careful integration of three different functions of a multiscale molecular-particle assembly. Here, we present a simpler approach to multiplexing by utilizing one component of the system for multiple functions. Specifically, we successfully synthesized and characterized colloidal carotene carbon nanoparticle (C(3)-NP), in which a single functional molecule served a threefold purpose. First, the presence of carotene moieties promoted the passage of the particle through the cell membrane and into the cells. Second, the ligand acted as a potent detrimental moiety for cancer cells and, finally, the ligands produced optical contrast for robust microscopic detection in complex cellular environments. In comparative tests, C(3)-NP were found to provide effective intracellular delivery that enables both robust detection at cellular and tissue level and presents significant therapeutic potential without altering the mechanism of intracellular action of β-carotene. Surface coating of C(3) with phospholipid was used to generate C(3)-Lipocoat nanoparticles with further improved function and biocompatibility, paving the path to eventual in vivo studies. PMID:27405011

  3. Multi-functionality Redefined with Colloidal Carotene Carbon Nanoparticles for Synchronized Chemical Imaging, Enriched Cellular Uptake and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Santosh K.; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Chang, Huei-Huei; Tiwari, Saumya; Gryka, Mark; Bhargava, Rohit; Pan, Dipanjan

    2016-01-01

    Typically, multiplexing high nanoparticle uptake, imaging, and therapy requires careful integration of three different functions of a multiscale molecular-particle assembly. Here, we present a simpler approach to multiplexing by utilizing one component of the system for multiple functions. Specifically, we successfully synthesized and characterized colloidal carotene carbon nanoparticle (C3-NP), in which a single functional molecule served a threefold purpose. First, the presence of carotene moieties promoted the passage of the particle through the cell membrane and into the cells. Second, the ligand acted as a potent detrimental moiety for cancer cells and, finally, the ligands produced optical contrast for robust microscopic detection in complex cellular environments. In comparative tests, C3-NP were found to provide effective intracellular delivery that enables both robust detection at cellular and tissue level and presents significant therapeutic potential without altering the mechanism of intracellular action of β-carotene. Surface coating of C3 with phospholipid was used to generate C3-Lipocoat nanoparticles with further improved function and biocompatibility, paving the path to eventual in vivo studies. PMID:27405011

  4. Multi-functionality Redefined with Colloidal Carotene Carbon Nanoparticles for Synchronized Chemical Imaging, Enriched Cellular Uptake and Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Santosh K.; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Chang, Huei-Huei; Tiwari, Saumya; Gryka, Mark; Bhargava, Rohit; Pan, Dipanjan

    2016-07-01

    Typically, multiplexing high nanoparticle uptake, imaging, and therapy requires careful integration of three different functions of a multiscale molecular-particle assembly. Here, we present a simpler approach to multiplexing by utilizing one component of the system for multiple functions. Specifically, we successfully synthesized and characterized colloidal carotene carbon nanoparticle (C3-NP), in which a single functional molecule served a threefold purpose. First, the presence of carotene moieties promoted the passage of the particle through the cell membrane and into the cells. Second, the ligand acted as a potent detrimental moiety for cancer cells and, finally, the ligands produced optical contrast for robust microscopic detection in complex cellular environments. In comparative tests, C3-NP were found to provide effective intracellular delivery that enables both robust detection at cellular and tissue level and presents significant therapeutic potential without altering the mechanism of intracellular action of β-carotene. Surface coating of C3 with phospholipid was used to generate C3-Lipocoat nanoparticles with further improved function and biocompatibility, paving the path to eventual in vivo studies.

  5. Multi-functionality Redefined with Colloidal Carotene Carbon Nanoparticles for Synchronized Chemical Imaging, Enriched Cellular Uptake and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Misra, Santosh K; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Chang, Huei-Huei; Tiwari, Saumya; Gryka, Mark; Bhargava, Rohit; Pan, Dipanjan

    2016-07-11

    Typically, multiplexing high nanoparticle uptake, imaging, and therapy requires careful integration of three different functions of a multiscale molecular-particle assembly. Here, we present a simpler approach to multiplexing by utilizing one component of the system for multiple functions. Specifically, we successfully synthesized and characterized colloidal carotene carbon nanoparticle (C(3)-NP), in which a single functional molecule served a threefold purpose. First, the presence of carotene moieties promoted the passage of the particle through the cell membrane and into the cells. Second, the ligand acted as a potent detrimental moiety for cancer cells and, finally, the ligands produced optical contrast for robust microscopic detection in complex cellular environments. In comparative tests, C(3)-NP were found to provide effective intracellular delivery that enables both robust detection at cellular and tissue level and presents significant therapeutic potential without altering the mechanism of intracellular action of β-carotene. Surface coating of C(3) with phospholipid was used to generate C(3)-Lipocoat nanoparticles with further improved function and biocompatibility, paving the path to eventual in vivo studies.

  6. Does vitamin C deficiency affect cognitive development and function?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Stine Normann; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-09-01

    Vitamin C is a pivotal antioxidant in the brain and has been reported to have numerous functions, including reactive oxygen species scavenging, neuromodulation, and involvement in angiogenesis. Absence of vitamin C in the brain has been shown to be detrimental to survival in newborn SVCT2(-/-) mice and perinatal deficiency have shown to reduce hippocampal volume and neuron number and cause decreased spatial cognition in guinea pigs, suggesting that maternal vitamin C deficiency could have severe consequences for the offspring. Furthermore, vitamin C deficiency has been proposed to play a role in age-related cognitive decline and in stroke risk and severity. The present review discusses the available literature on effects of vitamin C deficiency on the developing and aging brain with particular focus on in vivo experimentation and clinical studies.

  7. Does Vitamin C Deficiency Affect Cognitive Development and Function?

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Stine Normann; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin C is a pivotal antioxidant in the brain and has been reported to have numerous functions, including reactive oxygen species scavenging, neuromodulation, and involvement in angiogenesis. Absence of vitamin C in the brain has been shown to be detrimental to survival in newborn SVCT2(−/−) mice and perinatal deficiency have shown to reduce hippocampal volume and neuron number and cause decreased spatial cognition in guinea pigs, suggesting that maternal vitamin C deficiency could have severe consequences for the offspring. Furthermore, vitamin C deficiency has been proposed to play a role in age-related cognitive decline and in stroke risk and severity. The present review discusses the available literature on effects of vitamin C deficiency on the developing and aging brain with particular focus on in vivo experimentation and clinical studies. PMID:25244370

  8. Endocannabinoids affect the reproductive functions in teleosts and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Cottone, E; Guastalla, A; Mackie, K; Franzoni, M F

    2008-04-16

    Following the discovery in the brain of the bonyfish Fugu rubripes of two genes encoding for type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1A and CB1B), investigations on the phylogeny of these receptors have indicated that the cannabinergic system is highly conserved. Among the multiple functions modulated by cannabinoids/endocannabinoids through the CB1 receptors one of the more investigated is the mammalian reproduction. Therefore, since studies performed in animal models other than mammals might provide further insight into the biology of these signalling molecules, the major aim of the present paper was to review the comparative data pointing toward the endocannabinoid involvement in the reproductive control of non-mammalian vertebrates, namely bonyfish and amphibians. The expression and distribution of CB1 receptors were investigated in the CNS and gonads of two teleosts, Pelvicachromis pulcher and Carassius auratus as well as in the anuran amphibians Xenopus laevis and Rana esculenta. In general the large diffusion of neurons targeted by cannabinoids in both fish and amphibian forebrain indicate endocannabinoids as pivotal local messengers in several neural circuits involved in either sensory integrative activities, like the olfactory processes (in amphibians) and food response (in bonyfish), or neuroendocrine machinery (in both). By using immunohistochemistry for CB1 and GnRH-I, the codistribution of the two signalling molecules was found in the fish basal telencephalon and preoptic area, which are key centers for gonadotropic regulation in all vertebrates. A similar topographical codistribution was observed also in the septum of the telencephalon in Rana esculenta and Xenopus laevis. Interestingly, the double standard immunofluorescence on the same brain section, aided with a laser confocal microscope, showed that in anurans a subset of GnRH-I neurons exhibited also the CB1 immunostaining. The fact that CB1-LI-IR was found indeed in the FSH gonadotrophs of the Xenopus

  9. Consumption of bee pollen affects rat ovarian functions.

    PubMed

    Kolesarova, A; Bakova, Z; Capcarova, M; Galik, B; Juracek, M; Simko, M; Toman, R; Sirotkin, A V

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine possible effects of bee pollen added to the feed mixture (FM) on rat ovarian functions (secretion activity and apoptosis). We evaluated the bee pollen effect on the release of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and steroid hormones (progesterone and estradiol), as well as on the expression of markers of apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3) in rat ovarian fragments. Female rats (n = 15) were fed during 90 days by FM without or with rape seed bee pollen in dose either 3 kg/1000 kg FM or 5 kg/1000 kg FM. Fragments of ovaries isolated from rats of each group (totally 72 pieces) were incubated for 24 h. Hormonal secretion into the culture medium was detected by RIA. The markers of apoptosis were evaluated by Western blotting. It was observed that IGF-I release by rat ovarian fragments was significantly (p < 0.05) decreased; on the other hand, progesterone and estradiol secretion was increased after bee pollen treatment at dose 5 kg/1000 kg FM but not at 3 kg/1000 FM. Accumulation of Bcl-2 was increased by bee pollen added at 3 kg/1000 kg FM, but not at higher dose. Accumulation of Bax was increased in ovaries of rats fed by bee pollen at doses either 3 or 5 kg/1000 kg FM, whilst accumulation of caspase-3 increased after feeding with bee pollen at dose 5 kg/1000 kg FM, but not at 3 kg/1000 kg FM. Our results contribute to new insights regarding the effect of bee pollen on both secretion activity (release of growth factor IGF-I and steroid hormones progesterone and estradiol) and apoptosis (anti- and pro-apoptotic markers Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3). Bee pollen is shown to be a potent regulator of rat ovarian functions. PMID:23137268

  10. Ectomycorrhizal symbiosis affects functional diversity of rhizosphere fluorescent pseudomonads.

    PubMed

    Frey-Klett, Pascale; Chavatte, Michaël; Clausse, Marie-Lise; Courrier, Sébastien; Le Roux, Christine; Raaijmakers, Jos; Martinotti, Maria Giovanna; Pierrat, Jean-Claude; Garbaye, Jean

    2005-01-01

    Here we characterized the effect of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis on the genotypic and functional diversity of soil Pseudomonas fluorescens populations and analysed its possible consequences in terms of plant nutrition, development and health. Sixty strains of P. fluorescens were isolated from the bulk soil of a forest nursery, the ectomycorrhizosphere and the ectomycorrhizas of the Douglas fir (Pseudostuga menziesii) seedlings-Laccaria bicolor S238N. They were characterized in vitro with the following criteria: ARDRA, phosphate solubilization, siderophore, HCN and AIA production, genes of N2-fixation and antibiotic synthesis, in vitro confrontation with a range of phytopathogenic and ectomycorrhizal fungi, effect on the Douglas fir-L. bicolor symbiosis. For most of these criteria, we demonstrated that the ectomycorrhizosphere significantly structures the P. fluorescens populations and selects strains potentially beneficial to the symbiosis and to the plant. This prompts us to propose the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis as a true microbial complex where multitrophic interactions take place. Moreover it underlines the fact that this symbiosis has an indirect positive effect on plant growth, via its selective pressure on bacterial communities, in addition to its known direct positive effect. PMID:15720643

  11. Gas1 is a pleiotropic regulator of cellular functions: from embryonic development to molecular actions in cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Segovia, José; Zarco, Natanael

    2014-01-01

    Cellular homeostasis is governed by a precise regulation of the molecular mechanisms of action of several proteins in a given time. There is a group of proteins that have a particular role depending on the cellular context in which they are present and are known as pleiotropic proteins. The Gas1 (Growth Arrest Specific 1) gene was isolated from a subtraction library from serum arrested versus growing NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast. Gas1 is a member of the alpha receptors (GFRα) for the family of GDNF ligands (GFL), we have previously shown that Gas1 acts as a negative modulator of the GDNF-induced intracellular signaling and induces cell arrest and apoptosis. This modulating activity is the cause of the capacity of Gas1 to act as a tumor suppressor. On the other hand, several studies have shown the interaction between Gas1 and Hh (Hedgehog) proteins to potentiate the positive regulation of this pathway, which is involved in the development of the nervous system, and in both the origin and progression of different tumors. This review summarizes our current understanding of the structure of Gas1 and the molecular mechanism of action in different cellular functions, both during embryonic development, in the adult and its effects inhibiting cell growth and inducing apoptosis of cancer cells.

  12. Dimer monomer transition and dimer re-formation play important role for ATM cellular function during DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Fengxia; Zhang, Minjie; Li, Xiaohua; Yang, Caiyun; Meng, Hao; Wang, Dong; Chang, Shuang; Xu, Ye; Price, Brendan; Sun, Yingli

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • ATM phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. • The PETPVFRLT box of ATM plays a key role in its dimer dissociation in DNA repair. • The dephosphorylation of ATM is critical for dimer re-formation after DNA repair. - Abstract: The ATM protein kinase, is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is recruited and activated by DNA double-strand breaks, mediates responses to ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. Here we show that ATM is held inactive in unirradiated cells as a dimer and phosphorylates the opposite strand of the dimer in response to DNA damage. Cellular irradiation induces rapid intermolecular autophosphorylation of serine 1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates cellular ATM kinase activity. ATM cannot phosphorylate the substrates when it could not undergo dimer monomer transition. After DNA repair, the active monomer will undergo dephosphorylation to form dimer again and dephosphorylation is critical for dimer re-formation. Our work reveals novel function of ATM dimer monomer transition and explains why ATM dimer monomer transition plays such important role for ATM cellular activity during DNA repair.

  13. Aluminum fluoride affects the structure and functions of cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Norris, B; Villena, F; Cuevas, F; Sotomayor, P; Zatta, P

    2004-06-01

    No useful biological function for aluminum has been found. To the contrary, it might play an important role in several pathologies, which could be related to its interactions with cell membranes. On the other hand, fluoride is a normal component of body fluids, soft tissues, bones and teeth. Its sodium salt is frequently added to drinking water to prevent dental caries. However, large doses cause severe pathological alterations. In view of the toxicity of Al(3+) and F(-) ions, it was thought of interest to explore the damaging effects that AlF(3) might induce in cell membranes. With this aim, it was incubated with human erythrocytes, which were examined by phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy, and molecular models of biomembranes. The latter consisted of large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and bilayers of DMPC and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) which were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. In order to understand the effects of AlF(3) on ion transport (principally sodium and chloride) we used the isolated toad skin to which electrophysiological measurements were applied. It was found that AlF(3) altered the shape of erythrocytes inducing the formation of echinocytes. This effect was explained by X-ray diffraction which revealed that AlF(3) perturbed the structure of DMPC, class of lipids located in the outer monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane. This result was confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy on DMPC LUV. The biphasic (stimulatory followed by inhibitory) effects on the isolated skin suggested changes in apical Cl(-) secretion and moderate ATPase inactivation. PMID:15110101

  14. Radiation-Induced Loss of Salivary Gland Function Is Driven by Cellular Senescence and Prevented by IL6 Modulation.

    PubMed

    Marmary, Yitzhak; Adar, Revital; Gaska, Svetlana; Wygoda, Annette; Maly, Alexander; Cohen, Jonathan; Eliashar, Ron; Mizrachi, Lina; Orfaig-Geva, Carmit; Baum, Bruce J; Rose-John, Stefan; Galun, Eithan; Axelrod, Jonathan H

    2016-03-01

    Head and neck cancer patients treated by radiation commonly suffer from a devastating side effect known as dry-mouth syndrome, which results from the irreversible loss of salivary gland function via mechanisms that are not completely understood. In this study, we used a mouse model of radiation-induced salivary hypofunction to investigate the outcomes of DNA damage in the head and neck region. We demonstrate that the loss of salivary function was closely accompanied by cellular senescence, as evidenced by a persistent DNA damage response (γH2AX and 53BP1) and the expression of senescence-associated markers (SA-βgal, p19ARF, and DcR2) and secretory phenotype (SASP) factors (PAI-1 and IL6). Notably, profound apoptosis or necrosis was not observed in irradiated regions. Signs of cellular senescence were also apparent in irradiated salivary glands surgically resected from human patients who underwent radiotherapy. Importantly, using IL6 knockout mice, we found that sustained expression of IL6 in the salivary gland long after initiation of radiation-induced DNA damage was required for both senescence and hypofunction. Additionally, we demonstrate that IL6 pretreatment prevented both senescence and salivary gland hypofunction via a mechanism involving enhanced DNA damage repair. Collectively, these results indicate that cellular senescence is a fundamental mechanism driving radiation-induced damage in the salivary gland and suggest that IL6 pretreatment may represent a promising therapeutic strategy to preserve salivary gland function in head and neck cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. PMID:26759233

  15. A new flow-regulating cell type in the Demosponge Tethya wilhelma - functional cellular anatomy of a leuconoid canal system.

    PubMed

    Hammel, Jörg U; Nickel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Demosponges possess a leucon-type canal system which is characterized by a highly complex network of canal segments and choanocyte chambers. As sponges are sessile filter feeders, their aquiferous system plays an essential role in various fundamental physiological processes. Due to the morphological and architectural complexity of the canal system and the strong interdependence between flow conditions and anatomy, our understanding of fluid dynamics throughout leuconoid systems is patchy. This paper provides comprehensive morphometric data on the general architecture of the canal system, flow measurements and detailed cellular anatomical information to help fill in the gaps. We focus on the functional cellular anatomy of the aquiferous system and discuss all relevant cell types in the context of hydrodynamic and evolutionary constraints. Our analysis is based on the canal system of the tropical demosponge Tethya wilhelma, which we studied using scanning electron microscopy. We found a hitherto undescribed cell type, the reticuloapopylocyte, which is involved in flow regulation in the choanocyte chambers. It has a highly fenestrated, grid-like morphology and covers the apopylar opening. The minute opening of the reticuloapopylocyte occurs in an opened, intermediate and closed state. These states permit a gradual regulation of the total apopylar opening area. In this paper the three states are included in a theoretical study into flow conditions which aims to draw a link between functional cellular anatomy, the hydrodynamic situation and the regular body contractions seen in T. wilhelma. This provides a basis for new hypotheses regarding the function of bypass elements and the role of hydrostatic pressure in body contractions. Our study provides insights into the local and global flow conditions in the sponge canal system and thus enhances current understanding of related physiological processes.

  16. Neurology of Affective Prosody and Its Functional-Anatomic Organization in Right Hemisphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Elliott D.; Monnot, Marilee

    2008-01-01

    Unlike the aphasic syndromes, the organization of affective prosody in brain has remained controversial because affective-prosodic deficits may occur after left or right brain damage. However, different patterns of deficits are observed following left and right brain damage that suggest affective prosody is a dominant and lateralized function of…

  17. Biochemical and cellular implications of a dual lipase-GEF function of phospholipase D2 (PLD2)

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Cambronero, Julian

    2012-01-01

    PLD2 plays a key role in cell membrane lipid reorganization and as a key cell signaling protein in leukocyte chemotaxis and phagocytosis. Adding to the large role for a lipase in cellular functions, recently, our lab has identified a PLD2-Rac2 binding through two CRIB domains in PLD2 and has defined PLD2 as having a new function, that of a GEF for Rac2. PLD2 joins other major GEFs, such as P-Rex1 and Vav, which operate mainly in leukocytes. We explain the biochemical and cellular implications of a lipase-GEF duality. Under normal conditions, GEFs are not constitutively active; instead, their activation is highly regulated. Activation of PLD2 leads to its localization at the plasma membrane, where it can access its substrate GTPases. We propose that PLD2 can act as a “scaffold” protein to increase efficiency of signaling and compartmentalization at a phagocytic cup or the leading edge of a leukocyte lamellipodium. This new concept will help our understanding of leukocyte crucial functions, such as cell migration and adhesion, and how their deregulation impacts chronic inflammation. PMID:22750546

  18. Phosphate Ions Affect the Water Structure at Functionalized Membrane Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Aliyah; Imbrogno, Joseph; Belfort, Georges; Petersen, Poul B

    2016-09-01

    Antifouling surfaces improve function, efficiency, and safety in products such as water filtration membranes, marine vehicle coatings, and medical implants by resisting protein and biofilm adhesion. Understanding the role of water structure at these materials in preventing protein adhesion and biofilm formation is critical to designing more effective coatings. Such fouling experiments are typically performed under biological conditions using isotonic aqueous buffers. Previous studies have explored the structure of pure water at a few different antifouling surfaces, but the effect of electrolytes and ionic strength (I) on the water structure at antifouling surfaces is not well studied. Here sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy is used to characterize the interfacial water structure at poly(ether sulfone) (PES) and two surface-modified PES films in contact with 0.01 M phosphate buffer with high and low salt (Ionic strength, I= 0.166 and 0.025 M, respectively). Unmodified PES, commonly used as a filtration membrane, and modified PES with a hydrophobic alkane (C18) and with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were used. In the low ionic strength phosphate buffer, water was strongly ordered near the surface of the PEG-modified PES film due to exclusion of phosphate ions and the creation of a surface potential resulting from charge separation between phosphate anions and sodium cations. However, in the high ionic strength phosphate buffer, the sodium and potassium chloride (138 and 3 mM, respectively) in the phosphate buffered saline screened this charge and substantially reduced water ordering. A much smaller water ordering and subsequent reduction upon salt addition was observed for the C18-modified PES, and little water structure change was seen for the unmodified PES. The large difference in water structuring with increasing ionic strength between widely used phosphate buffer and phosphate buffered saline at the PEG interface demonstrates the importance of studying

  19. Familial Clustering of Executive Functioning in Affected Sibling Pair Families with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaats-Willemse, Dorine; Swaab-Barneveld, Hanna; De Sonneville, Leo; Buitelaar, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate familial clustering of executive functioning (i.e., response inhibition, fine visuomotor functioning, and attentional control) in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-affected sibling pairs. Method: Fifty-two affected sibling pairs aged 6 to 18 years and diagnosed with ADHD according to DSM-IV performed the…

  20. The cerebellum: its role in language and related cognitive and affective functions.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Hyo Jung; Paquier, Philippe; Verhoeven, Jo; Mariën, Peter

    2013-12-01

    The traditional view on the cerebellum as the sole coordinator of motor function has been substantially redefined during the past decades. Neuroanatomical, neuroimaging and clinical studies have extended the role of the cerebellum to the modulation of cognitive and affective processing. Neuroanatomical studies have demonstrated cerebellar connectivity with the supratentorial association areas involved in higher cognitive and affective functioning, while functional neuroimaging and clinical studies have provided evidence of cerebellar involvement in a variety of cognitive and affective tasks. This paper reviews the recently acknowledged role of the cerebellum in linguistic and related cognitive and behavioral-affective functions. In addition, typical cerebellar syndromes such as the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS) and the posterior fossa syndrome (PFS) will be briefly discussed and the current hypotheses dealing with the presumed neurobiological mechanisms underlying the linguistic, cognitive and affective modulatory role of the cerebellum will be reviewed.

  1. Low-dose AgNPs reduce lung mechanical function and innate immune defense in the absence of cellular toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Danielle J.; Leo, Bey Fen; Massa, Christopher B.; Sarkar, Srijata; Tetley, Terry D.; Chung, Kian Fan; Chen, Shu; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Zhang, Junfeng; Schwander, Stephan K.; Gow, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies have examined the direct cellular toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). However, the lung is a complex biological system with multiple cell types and a lipid-rich surface fluid; therefore, organ level responses may not depend on direct cellular toxicity. We hypothesized that interaction with the lung lining is a critical determinant of organ level responses. Here, we have examined the effects of low dose intratracheal instillation of AgNPs (0.05 µg/g body weight) 20 and 110nm diameter in size, and functionalized with citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone. Both size and functionalization were significant factors in particle aggregation and lipid interaction in vitro. One day post-intratracheal instillation lung function was assessed, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue collected. There were no signs of overt inflammation. There was no change in surfactant protein-B content in the BAL but there was loss of surfactant protein-D with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-stabilized particles. Mechanical impedance data demonstrated a significant increase in pulmonary elastance as compared to control, greatest with 110nm PVP-stabilized particles. Seven days post-instillation of PVP-stabilized particles increased BAL cell counts, and reduced lung function was observed. These changes resolved by 21 days. Hence, AgNP-mediated alterations in the lung lining and mechanical function resolve by 21 days. Larger particles and PVP stabilization produce the largest disruptions. These studies demonstrate that low dose AgNPs elicit deficits in both mechanical and innate immune defense function, suggesting that organ level toxicity should be considered. PMID:26152688

  2. Low-dose AgNPs reduce lung mechanical function and innate immune defense in the absence of cellular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Botelho, Danielle J; Leo, Bey Fen; Massa, Christopher B; Sarkar, Srijata; Tetley, Terry D; Chung, Kian Fan; Chen, Shu; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E; Zhang, Junfeng; Schwander, Stephan K; Gow, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Multiple studies have examined the direct cellular toxicity of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). However, the lung is a complex biological system with multiple cell types and a lipid-rich surface fluid; therefore, organ level responses may not depend on direct cellular toxicity. We hypothesized that interaction with the lung lining is a critical determinant of organ level responses. Here, we have examined the effects of low dose intratracheal instillation of AgNPs (0.05 μg/g body weight) 20 and 110 nm diameter in size, and functionalized with citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone. Both size and functionalization were significant factors in particle aggregation and lipid interaction in vitro. One day post-intratracheal instillation lung function was assessed, and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and lung tissue collected. There were no signs of overt inflammation. There was no change in surfactant protein-B content in the BAL but there was loss of surfactant protein-D with polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-stabilized particles. Mechanical impedance data demonstrated a significant increase in pulmonary elastance as compared to control, greatest with 110 nm PVP-stabilized particles. Seven days post-instillation of PVP-stabilized particles increased BAL cell counts, and reduced lung function was observed. These changes resolved by 21 days. Hence, AgNP-mediated alterations in the lung lining and mechanical function resolve by 21 days. Larger particles and PVP stabilization produce the largest disruptions. These studies demonstrate that low dose AgNPs elicit deficits in both mechanical and innate immune defense function, suggesting that organ level toxicity should be considered.

  3. Innervation of Gill Lateral Cells in the Bivalve Mollusc Crassostrea virginica Affects Cellular Membrane Potential and Cilia Activity

    PubMed Central

    Catapane, Edward J; Nelson, Michael; Adams, Trevon; Carroll, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    Gill lateral cells of Crassostrea virginica are innervated by the branchial nerve, which contains serotonergic and dopaminergic fibers that regulate cilia beating rate. Terminal release of serotonin or dopamine results in an increase or decrease, respectively, of cilia beating rate in lateral gill cells. In this study we used the voltage sensitive fluorescent probe DiBAC4(3) to quantify changes in gill lateral cell membrane potential in response to electrical stimulation of the branchial nerve or to applications of serotonin and dopamine, and correlate these changes to cilia beating rates. Application of serotonin to gill lateral cells caused prolonged membrane depolarization, similar to plateau potentials, while increasing cilia beating rate. Application of dopamine hyperpolarized the resting membrane while decreasing cilia beating rate. Low frequency (5 Hz) electrical stimulations of the branchial nerve, which cause terminal release of endogenous serotonin, or high frequency (20 Hz) stimulations, which cause terminal release of endogenous dopamine, had the same effects on gill lateral cell membrane potentials and cilia beating rate as the respective applications of serotonin or dopamine. The study shows that innervation of gill lateral cells by the branchial nerve affects membrane potential as well as cilia beating rate, and demonstrates a strong correlation between changes in membrane potential and regulation of cilia beating rate. The study furthers the understanding of serotonin and dopamine signaling in the innervation and regulation of gill cilia in bivalves. The study also shows that voltage sensitive fluorescent probes like DiBAC 4(3) can be successfully used as an alternative to microelectrodes to measure changes in membrane potential of ciliated gill cells and other small cells with fast moving cilia. PMID:27489887

  4. β-Arrestin-2 knockout prevents development of cellular μ-opioid receptor tolerance but does not affect opioid-withdrawal-related adaptations in single PAG neurons

    PubMed Central

    Connor, M; Bagley, E E; Chieng, B C; Christie, M J

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Tolerance to the behavioural effects of morphine is blunted in β-arrestin-2 knockout mice, but opioid withdrawal is largely unaffected. The cellular mechanisms of tolerance have been studied in some neurons from β-arrestin-2 knockouts, but tolerance and withdrawal mechanisms have not been examined at the cellular level in periaqueductal grey (PAG) neurons, which are crucial for central tolerance and withdrawal phenomena. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH μ-Opioid receptor (MOPr) inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channel currents (ICa) was examined by patch-clamp recordings from acutely dissociated PAG neurons from wild-type and β-arrestin-2 knockout mice treated chronically with morphine (CMT) or vehicle. Opioid withdrawal-induced activation of GABA transporter type 1 (GAT-1) currents was determined using perforated patch recordings from PAG neurons in brain slices. KEY RESULTS MOPr inhibition of ICa in PAG neurons was unaffected by β-arrestin-2 deletion. CMT impaired coupling of MOPrs to ICa in PAG neurons from wild-type mice, but this cellular tolerance was not observed in neurons from CMT β-arrestin-2 knockouts. However, β-arrestin-2 knockouts displayed similar opioid-withdrawal-induced activation of GAT-1 currents as wild-type PAG neurons. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS In β-arrestin-2 knockout mice, the central neurons involved in the anti-nociceptive actions of opioids also fail to develop cellular tolerance to opioids following chronic morphine. The results also provide the first cellular physiological evidence that opioid withdrawal is not disrupted by β-arrestin-2 deletion. However, the unaffected basal sensitivity to opioids in PAG neurons provides further evidence that changes in basal MOPr sensitivity cannot account for the enhanced acute nociceptive response to morphine reported in β-arrestin-2 knockouts. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other

  5. Synthesis of functionalized Pluronic-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) and the comparative study of their pendant groups on the cellular internalization behavior.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhengzhen; Zhang, Yan; Lang, Meidong

    2015-04-01

    This study focuses on the synthesis of Pluronic-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) bearing benzyl-oxycarbonylmethyl and carboxylic groups and the comparative study to investigate the influence of the different pendant groups on the cellular behavior. The functionalized Pluronic-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) bearing two kinds of pendant groups are synthesized via ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone and 6-(benzyl-oxycarbonyl methyl)-ε-caprolactone and followed by deprotection respectively. The structure of the copolymers is confirmed and the polymeric micelles are formed by an emulsion/solvent evaporation technique. The critical micelle concentrations are improved compared with Pluronic F127, the morphologies of the micelles are spherical with the diameter on nano scale and good colloidal stability. The copolymers have good cytocompatibility and the comparative study reveals that cellular internalization, digesting by lysosome and intracellular distribution are affected by the pendant groups, moreover, the endocytosis pathway is determined by the pendant groups. Therefore, the definite internalization mechanism is beneficial for the design of polymeric micellar carriers to achieve intra- or extracellular modes of drug delivery and provide better access to either cell membrane or intracellular organelles.

  6. Natural allelic variations in glutathione peroxidase-1 affect its subcellular localization and function.

    PubMed

    Bera, Soumen; Weinberg, Frank; Ekoue, Dede N; Ansenberger-Fricano, Kristine; Mao, Mao; Bonini, Marcelo G; Diamond, Alan M

    2014-09-15

    Glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx-1) has been implicated in the etiology of several common diseases due to the association between specific allelic variations and cancer risk. The most common among these variations are the codon 198 polymorphism that results in either a leucine or proline and the number of alanine repeat codons in the coding sequence. The molecular and biologic consequences of these variations remain to be characterized. Toward achieving this goal, we have examined the cellular location of GPx-1 encoded by allelic variants by ectopically expressing these genes in MCF-7 human breast carcinoma cells that produce undetectable levels of GPx-1, thus achieving exclusive expression in the same cellular environment. A differential distribution between the cytoplasm and mitochondria was observed, with the allele expressing the leucine-198 polymorphism and 7 alanine repeats being more cytoplasmically located than the other alleles examined. To assess whether the distribution of GPx-1 between the cytoplasm and mitochondria had a biologic consequence, we engineered derivative GPx-1 proteins that were targeted to the mitochondria by the addition of a mitochondria targeting sequence and expressed these proteins in MCF-7 cells. These cells were examined for their response to oxidative stress, energy metabolism, and impact on cancer-associated signaling molecules. The results obtained indicated that both primary GPx-1 sequence and cellular location have a profound impact on cellular biology and offer feasible hypotheses about how expression of distinct GPx-1 alleles can affect cancer risk. Cancer Res; 74(18); 5118-26. ©2014 AACR.

  7. Bisphosphonates modulate vital functions of human osteoblasts and affect their interactions with breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Tatjana; Teufel, Ingrid; Geiger, Konstanze; Vater, Yvonne; Aicher, Wilhelm K; Klein, Gerd; Fehm, Tanja

    2013-07-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are in clinical use for the treatment of breast cancer patients with bone metastases. Their anti-resorptive effect is mainly explained by inhibition of osteoclast activity, but recent evidence also points to a direct action of BPs on bone-forming osteoblasts. However, the mechanisms how BPs influence osteoblasts and their interactions with breast cancer cells are still poorly characterized. Human osteoblasts isolated from bone specimens were characterized in depth by their expression of osteogenic marker genes. The influence of the nitrogen-containing BPs zoledronate (Zol), ibandronate (Iban), and pamidronate (Pam) on molecular and cellular functions of osteoblasts was assessed focusing on cell proliferation and viability, apoptosis, cytokine secretion, and osteogenic-associated genes. Furthermore, effects of BPs on osteoblast-breast tumor cell interactions were examined in an established in vitro model system. The BPs Zol and Pam inhibited cell viability of osteoblasts. This effect was mediated by an induction of caspase-dependent apoptosis in osteoblasts. By interfering with the mevalonate pathway, Zol also reduces the proliferation of osteoblasts. The expression of phenotypic markers of osteogenic differentiation was altered by Zol and Pam. In addition, both BPs strongly influenced the secretion of the chemokine CCL2 by osteoblasts. Breast cancer cells also responded to Zol and Pam with a reduced cell adhesion to osteoblast-derived extracellular matrix molecules and with a decreased migration in response to osteoblast-secreted factors. BPs revealed prominent effects on human osteoblasts. Zol and Pam as the most potent BPs affected not only the expression of osteogenic markers, osteoblast viability, and proliferation but also important osteoblast-tumor cell interactions. Changing the osteoblast metabolism by BPs modulates migration and adhesion of breast cancer cells as well. PMID:23807419

  8. Inhibiting the NF-kappaB pathway to assess its function in the cellular response to space radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Kristina; Baumstark-Khan, Christa; Hellweg, Christine; Testard, Isabelle; Reitz, Guenther

    2012-07-01

    Radiation is regarded as one of the limiting factors for space missions. Therefore the cellular radiation response needs to be studied in order to estimate risks and to develop appropriate countermeasures. Exposure of human cells to ionizing radiation can provoke cell cycle arrest, leading to cellular senescence or premature differentiation, and different types of cell death. Previous heavy ion experiments have shown that the Nuclear Factor κB (NF-κB) pathway is activated by fluences that can be reached during long-term missions and thereby NF-κB was identified as an important modulating factor in the cellular radiation response. It could improve cellular survival after exposure to high radiation doses and influence the cancer risk of astronauts. The classical and the genotoxic stress induced NF-κB pathway result in nuclear translocation of the p65/p50 dimer. Both pathways might contribute to the cellular radiation response. Chemical inhibitors were tested to suppress the NF-κB pathway in recombinant HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo cells. The efficacy and cytotoxicity of the inhibitors targeting different elements of the NF-κB pathway were analyzed and found mostly inappropriate as inhibitors were partly cytotoxic or unspecific. Alternatively a functional knock-out of RelA (p65) was used to identify the contribution of the NF-κB pathway to different cellular outcomes. Small hairpin RNA constructs (shRNA) were transfected into the HEK-pNF-κB-d2EGFP/Neo cell line. Their functionality was assessed by quantitative Reverse Transcriptase real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to verify that the RelA mRNA amount was reduced by more than 80% in the knock-down cells The original cell line had been stably transfected with a reporter system to monitor NF-κB activation by measuring destabilized Enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (d2EGFP)-expression. It was shown that after 18 hours d2EGFP reaches its highest expression level after activation of NF-κB and can be measured by FACS analysis

  9. A knowledge base for the discovery of function, diagnostic potential and drug effects on cellular and extracellular miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that play an important role in the regulation of various biological processes through their interaction with cellular mRNAs. A significant amount of miRNAs has been found in extracellular human body fluids (e.g. plasma and serum) and some circulating miRNAs in the blood have been successfully revealed as biomarkers for diseases including cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Released miRNAs do not necessarily reflect the abundance of miRNAs in the cell of origin. It is claimed that release of miRNAs from cells into blood and ductal fluids is selective and that the selection of released miRNAs may correlate with malignancy. Moreover, miRNAs play a significant role in pharmacogenomics by down-regulating genes that are important for drug function. In particular, the use of drugs should be taken into consideration while analyzing plasma miRNA levels as drug treatment. This may impair their employment as biomarkers. Description We enriched our manually curated extracellular/circulating microRNAs database, miRandola, by providing (i) a systematic comparison of expression profiles of cellular and extracellular miRNAs, (ii) a miRNA targets enrichment analysis procedure, (iii) information on drugs and their effect on miRNA expression, obtained by applying a natural language processing algorithm to abstracts obtained from PubMed. Conclusions This allows users to improve the knowledge about the function, diagnostic potential, and the drug effects on cellular and circulating miRNAs. PMID:25077952

  10. Cellular Defense and Sensory Cell Survival Require Distinct Functions of ebi in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Young-Mi; Yagi, Yoshimasa; Tsuda, Leo

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune response and stress-induced apoptosis are well-established signaling pathways related to cellular defense. NF-κB and AP-1 are redox-sensitive transcription factors that play important roles in those pathways. Here we show that Ebi, a Drosophila homolog of the mammalian co-repressor molecule transducin β-like 1 (TBL1), variously regulates the expression of specific genes that are targets of redox-sensitive transcription factors. In response to different stimuli, Ebi activated gene expression to support the acute immune response in fat bodies, whereas Ebi repressed genes that are involved in apoptosis in photoreceptor cells. Thus, Ebi seems to act as a regulatory switch for genes that are activated or repressed in response to different external stimuli. Our results offer clear in vivo evidence that the Ebi-containing co-repressor complex acts in a distinct manner to regulate transcription that is required for modulating the output of various processes during Drosophila development. PMID:26524764

  11. Functional domains and sub-cellular distribution of the Hedgehog transducing protein Smoothened in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Y; Nystedt, S; Shivdasani, A A; Strutt, H; Thomas, C; Ingham, P W

    2004-06-01

    The Hedgehog signalling pathway is deployed repeatedly during normal animal development and its inappropriate activity is associated with various tumours in human. The serpentine protein Smoothened (Smo) is essential for cells to respond to the Hedeghog (Hh) signal; oncogenic forms of Smo have been isolated from human basal cell carcinomas. Despite similarities with ligand binding G-protein coupled receptors, the molecular basis of Smo activity and its regulation remains unclear. In non-responding cells, Smo is suppressed by the activity of another multipass membrane spanning protein Ptc, which acts as the Hh receptor. In Drosophila, binding of Hh to Ptc has been shown to cause an accumulation of phosphorylated Smo protein and a concomitant stabilisation of the activated form of the Ci transcription factor. Here, we identify domains essential for Smo activity and investigate the sub-cellular distribution of the wild type protein in vivo. We find that deletion of the amino terminus and the juxtamembrane region of the carboxy terminus of the protein result in the loss of normal Smo activity. Using Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and horseradish peroxidase fusion proteins we show that Smo accumulates in the plasma membrane of cells in which Ptc activity is abrogated by Hh but is targeted to the degradative pathway in cells where Ptc is active. We further demonstrate that Smo accumulation is likely to be a cause, rather than a consequence, of Hh signal transduction.

  12. Cellular Functions and X-ray Structure of Anthrolysin O, a Cholesterol-dependent Cytolysin Secreted by Bacillus anthracis*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Bourdeau, Raymond W.; Malito, Enrico; Chenal, Alexandre; Bishop, Brian L.; Musch, Mark W.; Villereal, Mitch L.; Chang, Eugene B.; Mosser, Elise M.; Rest, Richard F.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-01-01

    Anthrolysin O (ALO) is a pore-forming, cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) secreted by Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agent for anthrax. Growing evidence suggests the involvement of ALO in anthrax pathogenesis. Here, we show that the apical application of ALO decreases the barrier function of human polarized epithelial cells as well as increases intracellular calcium and the internalization of the tight junction protein occludin. Using pharmacological agents, we also found that barrier function disruption requires increased intracellular calcium and protein degradation. We also report a crystal structure of the soluble state of ALO. Based on our analytical ultracentrifugation and light scattering studies, ALO exists as a monomer. Our ALO structure provides the molecular basis as to how ALO is locked in a monomeric state, in contrast to other CDCs that undergo antiparallel dimerization or higher order oligomerization in solution. ALO has four domains and is globally similar to perfringolysin O (PFO) and intermedilysin (ILY), yet the highly conserved undecapeptide region in domain 4 (D4) adopts a completely different conformation in all three CDCs. Consistent with the differences within D4 and at the D2-D4 interface, we found that ALO D4 plays a key role in affecting the barrier function of C2BBE cells, whereas PFO domain 4 cannot substitute for this role. Novel structural elements and unique cellular functions of ALO revealed by our studies provide new insight into the molecular basis for the diverse nature of the CDC family. PMID:19307185

  13. Identification of cyclophilin-40 interacting proteins reveals potential cellular function of cyclophilin-40

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miki Susanto; Chu, Feixia; Xie, Jinghang; Wang, Yu; Bhattacharya, Pompeya; Chan, William K.

    2010-01-01

    Cyclophilin-40 (CyP40) is part of the immunophilin family and is found in Hsp90-containing protein complexes. We are interested in identifying proteins that interact with CyP40. CyP40 interacting proteins in HeLa cells were identified using the tandem affinity purification approach. Adenovirus (AdCyP40) expressing human CyP40 protein, fused with a streptavidin and a calmodulin binding peptides at the N-terminus, was generated. Proteins were separated on a SDS-PAGE gel after tandem affinity purification. Ten silver-stained protein bands that were enriched in the AdCyP40-infected lysate and the corresponding regions in the control lysate were excised, digested by trypsin and identified by tandem mass spectrometric analysis. Eleven interacting proteins were identified and four of which (RACK1, Ku70, RPS3, and NF45) were expressed in rabbit reticulocyte lysates, bacteria, and MCF-7 cells. We confirmed that these proteins interact with CyP40. We observed that RACK1 suppressed the cobalt chloride-induced, HRE-dependent luciferase activity in MCF-7 cells but not in MCF-7 stable cells expressing about 5% of the cellular CyP40 content. In addition, RACK1 reduced the HIF-1α protein accumulation after cobalt chloride treatment which was not observed when the CyP40 content was down-regulated. Collectively, we conclude that reduction of the HIF-1α protein by RACK1 is CyP40-mediated. PMID:21146485

  14. Anacardic Acid, Salicylic Acid, and Oleic Acid Differentially Alter Cellular Bioenergetic Function in Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Radde, Brandie N; Alizadeh-Rad, Negin; Price, Stephanie M; Schultz, David J; Klinge, Carolyn M

    2016-11-01

    Anacardic acid is a dietary and medicinal phytochemical that inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in isolated rat liver mitochondria. Since mitochondrial-targeted anticancer therapy (mitocans) may be useful in breast cancer, we examined the effect of anacardic acid on cellular bioenergetics and OXPHOS pathway proteins in breast cancer cells modeling progression to endocrine-independence: MCF-7 estrogen receptor α (ERα)+ endocrine-sensitive; LCC9 and LY2 ERα+, endocrine-resistant, and MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. At concentrations similar to cell proliferation IC50 s, anacardic acid reduced ATP-linked oxygen consumption rate (OCR), mitochondrial reserve capacity, and coupling efficiency while increasing proton leak, reflecting mitochondrial toxicity which was greater in MCF-7 compared to endocrine-resistant and TNBC cells. These results suggest tolerance in endocrine-resistant and TNBC cells to mitochondrial stress induced by anacardic acid. Since anacardic acid is an alkylated 2-hydroxybenzoic acid, the effects of salicylic acid (SA, 2-hydroxybenzoic acid moiety) and oleic acid (OA, monounsaturated alkyl moiety) were tested. SA inhibited whereas OA stimulated cell viability. In contrast to stimulation of basal OCR by anacardic acid (uncoupling effect), neither SA nor OA altered basal OCR- except OA inhibited basal and ATP-linked OCR, and increased ECAR, in MDA-MB-231 cells. Changes in OXPHOS proteins correlated with changes in OCR. Overall, neither the 2-hydroxybenzoic acid moiety nor the monounsaturated alky moiety of anacardic acid is solely responsible for the observed mitochondria-targeted anticancer activity in breast cancer cells and hence both moieties are required in the same molecule for the observed effects. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2521-2532, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26990649

  15. TRPV4 is necessary for trigeminal irritant pain and functions as a cellular formalin receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Kanju, Patrick; Fang, Quan; Lee, Suk Hee; Parekh, Puja K; Lee, Whasil; Moore, Carlene; Brenner, Daniel; Gereau, Robert W; Wang, Fan; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Detection of external irritants by head nociceptor neurons has deep evolutionary roots. Irritant-induced aversive behavior is a popular pain model in laboratory animals. It is used widely in the formalin model, where formaldehyde is injected into the rodent paw, eliciting quantifiable nocifensive behavior that has a direct, tissue-injury-evoked phase, and a subsequent tonic phase caused by neural maladaptation. The formalin model has elucidated many antipain compounds and pain-modulating signaling pathways. We have adopted this model to trigeminally innervated territories in mice. In addition, we examined the involvement of TRPV4 channels in formalin-evoked trigeminal pain behavior because TRPV4 is abundantly expressed in trigeminal ganglion (TG) sensory neurons, and because we have recently defined TRPV4's role in response to airborne irritants and in a model for temporomandibular joint pain. We found TRPV4 to be important for trigeminal nocifensive behavior evoked by formalin whisker pad injections. This conclusion is supported by studies with Trpv4(-/-) mice and TRPV4-specific antagonists. Our results imply TRPV4 in MEK-ERK activation in TG sensory neurons. Furthermore, cellular studies in primary TG neurons and in heterologous TRPV4-expressing cells suggest that TRPV4 can be activated directly by formalin to gate Ca(2+). Using TRPA1-blocker and Trpa1(-/-) mice, we found that both TRP channels co-contribute to the formalin trigeminal pain response. These results imply TRPV4 as an important signaling molecule in irritation-evoked trigeminal pain. TRPV4-antagonistic therapies can therefore be envisioned as novel analgesics, possibly for specific targeting of trigeminal pain disorders, such as migraine, headaches, temporomandibular joint, facial, and dental pain, and irritation of trigeminally innervated surface epithelia.

  16. Characterization of the cellular immune function of patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    De Moraes-Vasconcelos, D; Orii, N M; Romano, C C; Iqueoka, R Y; Duarte, A J Da S

    2001-01-01

    Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC) is a rare syndrome characterized by persistent and refractory infections of the skin, nails and mucosal tissues by yeasts of the genus Candida. Defects in the cellular limb of the immune system are well documented in CMC patients, but non-specific immune defects, such as myeloperoxidase deficiency or phagocyte chemotaxis disorders, have also been described. Nonetheless, the underlying defect(s) remains poorly understood, and further studies are required. We studied eight CMC patients without endocrinopathies, who showed (i) low normal proliferative response to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), (ii) partially defective response to pokeweed mitogen (PWM), and (iii) impaired response to Candida and PPD antigens. Furthermore, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from CMC patients produced lower levels of type-1 cytokines (IL-2 and interferon-gamma) in response to Candida antigens, compared with control individuals. Conversely, we did not observe an enhancement of IL-4 and IL-10 in the patients, suggesting that, even though Th1 cytokines are decreased, the Th2 response is not increased in CMC. Nevertheless, the synthesis of these cytokines was normal when induced by PHA. We also observed an increased antigen-induced apoptosis in lymphocytes from the patients compared with controls, and this applied both to Candida and PPD antigens. Lastly, innate immunity defects were investigated. We observed an impairment of natural killer activity against K-562 target cells in half of the studied patients. These findings corroborate the extensive clinical and laboratory variability of CMC, which requires further studies on a larger number of patients to be better understood. PMID:11207655

  17. Utilization of microscale silicon cantilevers to assess cellular contractile function in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alec S.T.; Long, Christopher J.; McAleer, Christopher; Bobbitt, Nathaniel; Srinivasan, Balaji; Hickman, James J.

    2016-01-01

    The development of more predictive and biologically relevant in vitro assays is predicated on the advancement of versatile cell culture systems which facilitate the functional assessment of the seeded cells. To that end, microscale cantilever technology offers a platform with which to measure the contractile functionality of a range of cell types, including skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle cells, through assessment of contraction induced substrate bending. Application of multiplexed cantilever arrays provides the means to develop moderate to high-throughput protocols for assessing drug efficacy and toxicity, disease phenotype and progression, as well as neuromuscular and other cell-cell interactions. This manuscript provides the details for fabricating reliable cantilever arrays for this purpose, and the methods required to successfully culture cells on these surfaces. Further description is provided on the steps necessary to perform functional analysis of contractile cell types maintained on such arrays using a novel laser and photo-detector system. The representative data provided highlights the precision and reproducible nature of the analysis of contractile function possible using this system, as well as the wide range of studies to which such technology can be applied. Successful widespread adoption of this system could provide investigators with the means to perform rapid, low cost functional studies in vitro, leading to more accurate predictions of tissue performance, disease development and response to novel therapeutic treatment. PMID:25350792

  18. Utilization of Microscale Silicon Cantilevers to Assess Cellular Contractile Function In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Alec S.T.; Long, Christopher J.; McAleer, Christopher; Bobbitt, Nathaniel; Srinivasan, Balaji; Hickman, James J.

    2014-01-01

    The development of more predictive and biologically relevant in vitro assays is predicated on the advancement of versatile cell culture systems which facilitate the functional assessment of the seeded cells. To that end, microscale cantilever technology offers a platform with which to measure the contractile functionality of a range of cell types, including skeletal, cardiac, and smooth muscle cells, through assessment of contraction induced substrate bending. Application of multiplexed cantilever arrays provides the means to develop moderate to high-throughput protocols for assessing drug efficacy and toxicity, disease phenotype and progression, as well as neuromuscular and other cell-cell interactions. This manuscript provides the details for fabricating reliable cantilever arrays for this purpose, and the methods required to successfully culture cells on these surfaces. Further description is provided on the steps necessary to perform functional analysis of contractile cell types maintained on such arrays using a novel laser and photo-detector system. The representative data provided highlights the precision and reproducible nature of the analysis of contractile function possible using this system, as well as the wide range of studies to which such technology can be applied. Successful widespread adoption of this system could provide investigators with the means to perform rapid, low cost functional studies in vitro, leading to more accurate predictions of tissue performance, disease development and response to novel therapeutic treatment. PMID:25350792

  19. Functional imaging with cellular resolution reveals precise micro-architecture in visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohki, Kenichi; Chung, Sooyoung; Ch'ng, Yeang H.; Kara, Prakash; Reid, R. Clay

    2005-02-01

    Neurons in the cerebral cortex are organized into anatomical columns, with ensembles of cells arranged from the surface to the white matter. Within a column, neurons often share functional properties, such as selectivity for stimulus orientation; columns with distinct properties, such as different preferred orientations, tile the cortical surface in orderly patterns. This functional architecture was discovered with the relatively sparse sampling of microelectrode recordings. Optical imaging of membrane voltage or metabolic activity elucidated the overall geometry of functional maps, but is averaged over many cells (resolution >100µm). Consequently, the purity of functional domains and the precision of the borders between them could not be resolved. Here, we labelled thousands of neurons of the visual cortex with a calcium-sensitive indicator in vivo. We then imaged the activity of neuronal populations at single-cell resolution with two-photon microscopy up to a depth of 400µm. In rat primary visual cortex, neurons had robust orientation selectivity but there was no discernible local structure; neighbouring neurons often responded to different orientations. In area 18 of cat visual cortex, functional maps were organized at a fine scale. Neurons with opposite preferences for stimulus direction were segregated with extraordinary spatial precision in three dimensions, with columnar borders one to two cells wide. These results indicate that cortical maps can be built with single-cell precision.

  20. Hsp70 chaperone systems: diversity of cellular functions and mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Mayer, M P; Bukau, B

    1998-03-01

    Hsp70 chaperone systems play an essential role in the life cycle of many proteins not only in an hostile environment but also under normal growth conditions. In the course of evolution the diversification of functions was accompanied by an amplification of components of the Hsp70 system. Here strategies are reviewed how different Hsp70 systems work independently or cooperate with each other in a functional network to perform their housekeeping tasks even under stress conditions. We further discuss how co-chaperones which act as targeting factors regulate the cycle of substrate binding and release upon which the Hsp70 chaperone activity depends.

  1. Signal transduction mediated by endostatin directly modulates cellular function of lung cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ri; Ohashi, Rina; Takahashi, Fumiyuki; Yoshioka, Masakata; Tominaga, Shigeru; Sasaki, Shinichi; Gu, Tao; Takagi, Yumiko; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2007-06-01

    Endostatin (ED) is a carboxyl-terminal fragment of collagen XVIII with strong antiangiogenic activity. ED has been considered as a highly specific inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation and migration through interaction with its receptor on the surface of endothelial cells. Recently, direct antitumor effects of ED in colon cancer cells and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells has been reported. However, its effect on lung cancer cells has not been clarified. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of ED on in vitro lung cancer cell function and to identify its receptor on lung cancer cells. We revealed that alpha5 integrin is capable of being a functional ED receptor among several integrins that are expressed on murine lung cancer (Lewis lung cancer [LLC]) cells. We further demonstrated that the ED-integrin interaction modulates various in vitro biological functions of LLC cells as we revealed that immobilized ED helps in LLC cell adhesion and migration in an integrin-dependent manner. Furthermore, ED inhibited LLC cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. Interestingly, ED did not demonstrate any antiproliferative activity against the other murine lung cancer cell line, KLN205, that lacks alpha5 integrin but binds to immobilized ED through the beta1 integrin. In addition, the binding of ED to alpha5 integrin on LLC cells induced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase. Taken together, these results suggest that the interaction between ED and alpha5 integrin may play an important role in lung cancer cell function.

  2. Assembling global maps of cellular function through integrative analysis of physical and genetic networks

    PubMed Central

    Srivas, Rohith; Hannum, Gregory; Ruscheinski, Johannes; Ono, Keiichiro; Wang, Peng-Liang; Smoot, Michael; Ideker, Trey

    2012-01-01

    To take full advantage of high-throughput genetic and physical interaction mapping projects, the raw interactions must first be assembled into models of cell structure and function. PanGIA (for physical and genetic interaction alignment) is a plug-in for the bioinformatics platform Cytoscape, designed to integrate physical and genetic interactions into hierarchical module maps. PanGIA identifies ‘modules’ as sets of proteins whose physical and genetic interaction data matches that of known protein complexes. Higher-order functional cooperativity and redundancy is identified by enrichment for genetic interactions across modules. This protocol begins with importing interaction networks into Cytoscape, followed by filtering and basic network visualization. Next, PanGIA is used to infer a set of modules and their functional inter-relationships. This module map is visualized in a number of intuitive ways, and modules are tested for functional enrichment and overlap with known complexes. The full protocol can be completed between 10 and 30 min, depending on the size of the data set being analyzed. PMID:21886098

  3. Functional relevance during lymphocyte migration and cellular localization of activated beta1 integrins.

    PubMed

    Gómez, M; Luque, A; del Pozo, M A; Hogg, N; Sánchez-Madrid, F; Cabañas, C

    1997-01-01

    The state of integrin activation can be assessed by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) that selectively recognize integrins in their active form. We demonstrate herein that the expression of the epitope recognized by mAb HUTS-21 is induced on T lymphoblasts upon binding of soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 and an 80-kDa tryptic fragment of fibronectin (FN80) to the beta1 integrins very late activation antigen (VLA)-4 and VLA-5, and that this effect is dependent on ligand concentration and is specific for beta1 integrins. On T lymphoblasts adhering to immobilized fibronectin, the HUTS-21 epitope localized exclusively to sites of integrin binding to fibronectin. These results indicate that mAb HUTS-21 recognizes a ligand-induced binding site (LIBS) on the common beta1 subunit of VLA proteins. Engagement of beta1 integrins through this LIBS epitope inhibited T lymphoblast movement on fibronectin, as determined by quantitative time-lapse video microscopy studies. Furthermore, the HUTS-21 mAb also prevented T lymphoblast-directed migration through gradients of substratum-immobilized beta1 integrin ligands such as fibronectin or VCAM-1, whereas it did not affect migration on intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1. This anti-LIBS mAb stimulated cell adhesion through postreceptor events, without affecting receptor affinity for ligand, and appears to interfere with cell migration by a mechanism distinct from that of other anti-beta1 activating antibodies.

  4. Functional Characterization of Water Transport and Cellular Localization of Three Aquaporin Paralogs in the Salmonid Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Steffen S.; Olesen, Jesper H.; Bedal, Konstanze; Engelund, Morten Buch; Velasco-Santamaría, Yohana M.; Tipsmark, Christian K.

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal water absorption is greatly enhanced in salmonids upon acclimation from freshwater (FW) to seawater (SW); however, the molecular mechanism for water transport is unknown. We conducted a pharmacological characterization of water absorption in the rainbow trout intestine along with an investigation of the distribution and cellular localization of three aquaporins (Aqp1aa, -1ab, and -8ab) in pyloric caeca, middle (M), and posterior (P) intestine of the Atlantic salmon. In vitro iso-osmotic water absorption (Jv) was higher in SW than FW-trout and was inhibited by (mmol L−1): 0.1 KCN (41%), 0.1 ouabain (72%), and 0.1 bumetanide (82%) suggesting that active transport, Na+, K+-ATPase and Na+, K+, 2Cl−-co-transport are involved in establishing the driving gradient for water transport. Jv was also inhibited by 1 mmol L−1 HgCl2, serosally (23% in M and 44% in P), mucosally (27% in M), or both (61% in M and 58% in P), suggesting involvement of both apical and basolateral aquaporins in water transport. The inhibition was antagonized by 5 mmol L−1 mercaptoethanol. By comparison, 10 mmol L−1 mucosal tetraethylammonium, an inhibitor of certain aquaporins, inhibited Jv by 20%. In the presence of glucose, mucosal addition of phloridzin inhibited water transport by 20%, suggesting that water transport is partially linked to the Na+-glucose co-transporter. Using polyclonal antibodies against salmon Aqp1aa, -1ab, and -8ab, we detected Aqp1aa, and -1ab immunoreactivity in the brush border and sub-apical region of enterocytes in all intestinal segments. The Aqp8ab antibody showed a particularly strong immunoreaction in the brush border and sub-apical region of enterocytes throughout the intestine and also stained lateral membranes and peri-nuclear regions though at lower intensity. The present localization of three aquaporins in both apical and lateral membranes of salmonid enterocytes facilitates a model for transcellular water transport in the

  5. Training of affect recognition (TAR) in schizophrenia--impact on functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Sachs, G; Winklbaur, B; Jagsch, R; Lasser, I; Kryspin-Exner, I; Frommann, N; Wölwer, W

    2012-07-01

    Deficits in facial affect recognition as one aspect of social cognitive deficits are treatment targets to improve functional outcome in schizophrenia. According to preliminary results antipsychotics alone show little effects on affect recognition. A few randomized intervention studies have evaluated special psychosocial treatment programs on social cognition. In this study, the effects of a computer-based training of affect recognition were investigated as well as its impact on facial affect recognition and functional outcome, particularly on patients' quality of life. Forty clinically stabilized schizophrenic patients were randomized to a six-week training on affect recognition (TAR) or treatment as usual including occupational therapy (TAU) and completed pre- and post-treatment assessments of emotion recognition, cognition, quality of life and clinical symptoms. Between pre- and post treatment, the TAR group achieved significant improvements in facial affect recognition, in particular in recognizing sad faces and, in addition, in the quality of life domain social relationship. These changes were not found in the TAU group. Furthermore, the TAR training contributes to enhancing some aspects of cognitive functioning and negative symptoms. These improvements in facial affect recognition and quality of life were independent of changes in clinical symptoms and general cognitive functions. The findings support the efficacy of an affect recognition training for patients with schizophrenia and the generalization to social relationship. Further development is needed in the impact of a psychosocial intervention in other aspects of social cognition and functional outcome.

  6. Predicting the accuracy of facial affect recognition: the interaction of child maltreatment and intellectual functioning.

    PubMed

    Shenk, Chad E; Putnam, Frank W; Noll, Jennie G

    2013-02-01

    Previous research demonstrates that both child maltreatment and intellectual performance contribute uniquely to the accurate identification of facial affect by children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to extend this research by examining whether child maltreatment affects the accuracy of facial recognition differently at varying levels of intellectual functioning. A sample of maltreated (n=50) and nonmaltreated (n=56) adolescent females, 14 to 19 years of age, was recruited to participate in this study. Participants completed demographic and study-related questionnaires and interviews to control for potential psychological and psychiatric confounds such as symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, negative affect, and difficulties in emotion regulation. Participants also completed an experimental paradigm that recorded responses to facial affect displays starting in a neutral expression and changing into a full expression of one of six emotions: happiness, sadness, anger, disgust, fear, or surprise. Hierarchical multiple regression assessed the incremental advantage of evaluating the interaction between child maltreatment and intellectual functioning. Results indicated that the interaction term accounted for a significant amount of additional variance in the accurate identification of facial affect after controlling for relevant covariates and main effects. Specifically, maltreated females with lower levels of intellectual functioning were least accurate in identifying facial affect displays, whereas those with higher levels of intellectual functioning performed as well as nonmaltreated females. These results suggest that maltreatment and intellectual functioning interact to predict the recognition of facial affect, with potential long-term consequences for the interpersonal functioning of maltreated females.

  7. Predicting the accuracy of facial affect recognition: the interaction of child maltreatment and intellectual functioning.

    PubMed

    Shenk, Chad E; Putnam, Frank W; Noll, Jennie G

    2013-02-01

    Previous research demonstrates that both child maltreatment and intellectual performance contribute uniquely to the accurate identification of facial affect by children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to extend this research by examining whether child maltreatment affects the accuracy of facial recognition differently at varying levels of intellectual functioning. A sample of maltreated (n=50) and nonmaltreated (n=56) adolescent females, 14 to 19 years of age, was recruited to participate in this study. Participants completed demographic and study-related questionnaires and interviews to control for potential psychological and psychiatric confounds such as symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, negative affect, and difficulties in emotion regulation. Participants also completed an experimental paradigm that recorded responses to facial affect displays starting in a neutral expression and changing into a full expression of one of six emotions: happiness, sadness, anger, disgust, fear, or surprise. Hierarchical multiple regression assessed the incremental advantage of evaluating the interaction between child maltreatment and intellectual functioning. Results indicated that the interaction term accounted for a significant amount of additional variance in the accurate identification of facial affect after controlling for relevant covariates and main effects. Specifically, maltreated females with lower levels of intellectual functioning were least accurate in identifying facial affect displays, whereas those with higher levels of intellectual functioning performed as well as nonmaltreated females. These results suggest that maltreatment and intellectual functioning interact to predict the recognition of facial affect, with potential long-term consequences for the interpersonal functioning of maltreated females. PMID:23036371

  8. Protein turnover and cellular stress in mildly and severely affected muscles from patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I.

    PubMed

    Hauerslev, Simon; Sveen, Marie L; Vissing, John; Krag, Thomas O

    2013-01-01

    Patients with Limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I) are characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting primarily in the proximal muscles, while distal muscles often are spared. Our aim was to investigate if wasting could be caused by impaired regeneration in the proximal compared to distal muscles. Biopsies were simultaneously obtained from proximal and distal muscles of the same patients with LGMD2I (n = 4) and healthy subjects (n = 4). The level of past muscle regeneration was evaluated by counting internally nucleated fibers and determining actively regenerating fibers by using the developmental markers embryonic myosin heavy chain (eMHC) and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and also assessing satellite cell activation status by myogenin positivity. Severe muscle histopathology was occasionally observed in the proximal muscles of patients with LGMD2I whereas distal muscles were always relatively spared. No difference was found in the regeneration markers internally nucleated fibers, actively regenerating fibers or activation status of satellite cells between proximal and distal muscles. Protein turnover, both synthesis and breakdown, as well as cellular stress were highly increased in severely affected muscles compared to mildly affected muscles. Our results indicate that alterations in the protein turnover and myostatin levels could progressively impair the muscle mass maintenance and/or regeneration resulting in gradual muscular atrophy.

  9. Cellular mechanisms of netrin function: long-range and short-range actions.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, T E

    2000-01-01

    Netrins are secreted proteins that direct axon extension and cell migration during neural development. They are bifunctional cues that act as an attractant for some cell types and as a repellent for others. Several lines of evidence suggest that two classes of receptors, the deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC) family and the UNC-5 family, mediate the attractant and repellent response to netrin. Although netrins were first identified as diffusible long-range cues for developing axons, recent findings provide evidence that they also function as short-range cues close to the surface of the cells that produce them. This short-range function of netrin contributes to guiding neurite outgrowth and mediating cell-cell interactions during development and perhaps also in adults.

  10. The emerging role of pseudogene expressed non-coding RNAs in cellular functions

    PubMed Central

    Groen, Jessica N.; Capraro, David; Morris, Kevin V.

    2014-01-01

    A paradigm shift is sweeping modern day molecular biology following the realisation that large amounts of “junk” DNA”, thought initially to be evolutionary remnants, may actually be functional. Several recent studies support a functional role for pseudogene-expressed non-coding RNAs in regulating their protein-coding counterparts. Several hundreds of pseudogenes have been reported as transcribed into RNA in a large variety of tissues and tumours. Most studies have focused on pseudogenes expressed in the sense direction, but some reports suggest that pseudogenes can also be transcribed as antisense RNAs (asRNAs). A few examples of key regulatory genes, such as PTEN and OCT4, have in fact been reported to be under the regulation of pseudogene-expressed asRNAs. Here, we review what are known about pseudogene expressed non-coding RNA mediated gene regulation and their roles in the control of epigenetic states. PMID:24842102

  11. Auxin-binding pocket of ABP1 is crucial for its gain-of-function cellular and developmental roles.

    PubMed

    Grones, Peter; Chen, Xu; Simon, Sibu; Kaufmann, Walter A; De Rycke, Riet; Nodzyński, Tomasz; Zažímalová, Eva; Friml, Jiří

    2015-08-01

    The plant hormone auxin is a key regulator of plant growth and development. Auxin levels are sensed and interpreted by distinct receptor systems that activate a broad range of cellular responses. The Auxin-Binding Protein1 (ABP1) that has been identified based on its ability to bind auxin with high affinity is a prime candidate for the extracellular receptor responsible for mediating a range of auxin effects, in particular, the fast non-transcriptional ones. Contradictory genetic studies suggested prominent or no importance of ABP1 in many developmental processes. However, how crucial the role of auxin binding to ABP1 is for its functions has not been addressed. Here, we show that the auxin-binding pocket of ABP1 is essential for its gain-of-function cellular and developmental roles. In total, 16 different abp1 mutants were prepared that possessed substitutions in the metal core or in the hydrophobic amino acids of the auxin-binding pocket as well as neutral mutations. Their analysis revealed that an intact auxin-binding pocket is a prerequisite for ABP1 to activate downstream components of the ABP1 signalling pathway, such as Rho of Plants (ROPs) and to mediate the clathrin association with membranes for endocytosis regulation. In planta analyses demonstrated the importance of the auxin binding pocket for all known ABP1-mediated postembryonic developmental processes, including morphology of leaf epidermal cells, root growth and root meristem activity, and vascular tissue differentiation. Taken together, these findings suggest that auxin binding to ABP1 is central to its function, supporting the role of ABP1 as auxin receptor.

  12. Bioinspired genotype–phenotype linkages: mimicking cellular compartmentalization for the engineering of functional proteins

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Liisa D.; Colin, Pierre-Yves; Hollfelder, Florian

    2015-01-01

    The idea of compartmentalization of genotype and phenotype in cells is key for enabling Darwinian evolution. This contribution describes bioinspired systems that use in vitro compartments—water-in-oil droplets and gel-shell beads—for the directed evolution of functional proteins. Technologies based on these principles promise to provide easier access to protein-based therapeutics, reagents for processes involving enzyme catalysis, parts for synthetic biology and materials with biological components. PMID:26464791

  13. Tissue architecture and function: dynamic reciprocity via extra- and intra-cellular matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ren; Boudreau, Aaron; Bissell, Mina J

    2008-12-23

    Mammary gland development, functional differentiation, and homeostasis are orchestrated and sustained by a balance of biochemical and biophysical cues from the organ's microenvironment. The three-dimensional microenvironment of the mammary gland, predominantly 'encoded' by a collaboration between the extracellular matrix (ECM), hormones, and growth factors, sends signals from ECM receptors through the cytoskeletal intracellular matrix to nuclear and chromatin structures resulting in gene expression; the ECM in turn is regulated and remodeled by signals from the nucleus. In this chapter, we discuss how coordinated ECM deposition and remodeling is necessary for mammary gland development, how the ECM provides structural and biochemical cues necessary for tissue-specific function, and the role of the cytoskeleton in mediating the extra - to intracellular dialogue occurring between the nucleus and the microenvironment. When operating normally, the cytoskeletal-mediated dynamic and reciprocal integration of tissue architecture and function directs mammary gland development, tissue polarity, and ultimately, tissue-specific gene expression. Cancer occurs when these dynamic interactions go awry for an extended time.

  14. Lifelong maintenance of composition, function and cellular/subcellular distribution of proteasomes in human liver.

    PubMed

    Bellavista, Elena; Martucci, Morena; Vasuri, Francesco; Santoro, Aurelia; Mishto, Michele; Kloss, Alexander; Capizzi, Elisa; Degiovanni, Alessio; Lanzarini, Catia; Remondini, Daniel; Dazzi, Alessandro; Pellegrini, Sara; Cescon, Matteo; Capri, Miriam; Salvioli, Stefano; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Dahlmann, Burkhardt; Grazi, Gian Luca; Franceschi, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Owing to organ shortage, livers from old donors are increasingly used for transplantation. The function and duration of such transplanted livers are apparently comparable to those from young donors, suggesting that, despite some morphological and structural age-related changes, no major functional changes do occur in liver with age. We tested this hypothesis by performing a comprehensive study on proteasomes, major cell organelles responsible for proteostasis, in liver biopsies from heart-beating donors. Oxidized and poly-ubiquitin conjugated proteins did not accumulate with age and the three major proteasome proteolytic activities were similar in livers from young and old donors. Analysis of proteasomes composition showed an age-related increased of β5i/α4 ratio, suggesting a shift toward proteasomes containing inducible subunits and a decreased content of PA28α subunit, mainly in the cytosol of hepatocytes. Thus our data suggest that, proteasomes activity is well preserved in livers from aged donors, concomitantly with subtle changes in proteasome subunit composition which might reflect the occurrence of a functional remodelling to maintain an efficient proteostasis. Gender differences are emerging and they deserve further investigations owing to the different aging trajectories between men and women. Finally, our data support the safe use of livers from old donors for transplantation.

  15. A second functional delta5 fatty acid desaturase in the cellular slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Morio, T; Ochiai, H

    2000-03-01

    A cDNA with homology to fatty acid desaturases was selected by searching the cDNA data bank of Dictyostelium discoideum (http://www. csm.biol.tsukuba.ac.jp/cDNAproject.html) with conserved histidine box motifs. Using this sequence, genomic DNA encoding the Delta5 desaturase was amplified from the genomic DNA of D. discoideum, and its desaturase activity was confirmed by the overexpression mutation in D. discoideum and the gain-of-function mutation in yeast. The cloned cDNA is 1565 nucleotides in length, and the deduced amino-acid sequence comprised 467 amino-acid residues containing an N-terminal cytochrome b5 domain that shared 43% identity with cytochrome b5 of Oryza sativa. The whole sequence was 42% identical to the Delta5 desaturase of Mortierella alpina. This desaturase is a novel member of the cytochrome b5-containing Delta5 fatty acid desaturase. As we have already reported one other Delta5 desaturase in Dictyostelium, this organism is the first to be confirmed as having two functional Delta5 fatty acid desaturase genes. The substrate specificities of the two functional Delta5 desaturases of D. discoideum were also examined.

  16. Toxics of Tobacco Smoke and Cardiovascular System: From Functional to Cellular Damage.

    PubMed

    Leone, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    Manufactured tobacco contains over 4, 000 toxic substances, but only a few exert adverse cardiovascular effects. Nicotine and its metabolites, carbon monoxide, thiocyanate and some aromatic amines play a strong, although different, role to determine cardiovascular damage. Of these substances, however, nicotine, acting by the double mechanism of addiction and receptor-binding, and carbon monoxide by increasing the production of carboxyhemoglobin and hypoxia, are the main determinants of the damage. The development of the alterations of heart and blood vessels follows a typical way, initially consisting of functional responses that become irreversible pathological lesions at the time. Myocardium and endothelial cells are the targets where cigarette smoking exerts its effects. The first displays functional and pathological disorders primarily related to ischemic heart disease, cardiomyopathy, including experimental cardiomyopathy from smoking, and heart failure, while the second should be interpreted as a structure, which shows early alterations caused by smoking as clearly evident, repeatable and typically depending on smoking toxicity. Cardiovascular damage has a functional onset, which, at the time, leads to irreversible morphological damage of myocardial and endothelial cells.

  17. Cellular uptake behavior of unfunctionalized and functionalized PBCA particles prepared in a miniemulsion.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Clemens K; Lorenz, Myriam R; Landfester, Katharina; Mailänder, Volker

    2007-07-01

    Fluorescent dye labeled unfunctionalized and functionalized poly(n-butylcyanoacrylate) nanoparticles were prepared using a miniemulsion technique. Amino acid and methoxyPEG functionalization could be introduced by using aqueous solutions as an initiator for the anionic polymerization in the heterophase. All the particles prepared had sizes smaller than 250 nm and negative zeta-potentials. The molar mass distribution of the polymer was dependent on the acid used as the continuous phase and the initiator solution applied. Cells of three lines (HeLa, Jurkat and mesenchymal stem cells) were incubated with the particles. The molar mass of the polymer determined the onset and extent of apoptosis, and the total uptake was determined by the size and functionalization of the particles. Different uptake kinetics were obtained with HeLa and Jurkat cells after incubation with the same particle batch. The intracellular particle distribution, visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy, did not show significant differences for either of the cell lines or particle batches.

  18. Pressuromodulation at the cell membrane as the basis for small molecule hormone and peptide regulation of cellular and nuclear function.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Hemant

    2015-11-26

    Building on recent knowledge that the specificity of the biological interactions of small molecule hydrophiles and lipophiles across microvascular and epithelial barriers, and with cells, can be predicted on the basis of their conserved biophysical properties, and the knowledge that biological peptides are cell membrane impermeant, it has been further discussed herein that cellular, and thus, nuclear function, are primarily regulated by small molecule hormone and peptide/factor interactions at the cell membrane (CM) receptors. The means of regulating cellular, and thus, nuclear function, are the various forms of CM Pressuromodulation that exist, which include Direct CM Receptor-Mediated Stabilizing Pressuromodulation, sub-classified as Direct CM Receptor-Mediated Stabilizing Shift Pressuromodulation (Single, Dual or Tri) or Direct CM Receptor-Mediated Stabilizing Shift Pressuromodulation (Single, Dual or Tri) cum External Cationomodulation (≥3+ → 1+); which are with respect to acute CM receptor-stabilizing effects of small biomolecule hormones, growth factors or cytokines, and also include Indirect CM- or CM Receptor-Mediated Pressuromodulation, sub-classified as Indirect 1ary CM-Mediated Shift Pressuromodulation (Perturbomodulation), Indirect 2ary CM Receptor-Mediated Shift Pressuromodulation (Tri or Quad Receptor Internal Pseudo-Cationomodulation: SS 1+), Indirect 3ary CM Receptor-Mediated Shift Pressuromodulation (Single or Dual Receptor Endocytic External Cationomodulation: 2+) or Indirect (Pseudo) 3ary CM Receptor-Mediated Shift Pressuromodulation (Receptor Endocytic Hydroxylocarbonyloetheroylomodulation: 0), which are with respect to sub-acute CM receptor-stabilizing effects of small biomolecules, growth factors or cytokines. As a generalization, all forms of CM pressuromodulation decrease CM and nuclear membrane (NM) compliance (whole cell compliance), due to pressuromodulation of the intracellular microtubule network and increases the exocytosis of pre

  19. Function and expression of a novel rat salt-tolerant protein: evidence of a role in cellular sodium metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, E; Tsuji, Y; Sasaguri, M; Arakawa, K

    1998-09-01

    Higher dietary salt intake in humans is associated with higher BP, but the BP response to NaCl, so-called salt sensitivity, is heterogeneous among individuals. It has been postulated that modifications in cellular cation metabolism may be related to salt sensitivity in mammalian hypertension. The authors have isolated a novel rat complementary DNA, called salt-tolerant protein (STP), that can functionally complement Saccharomyces cervisiae HAL1, which improves salt tolerance by modulating the cation transport system. On high-salt (8% NaCl) diets, both Dahl salt-sensitive and salt-resistant rats displayed an elevated BP and increased STP mRNA expression. Immunohistochemistry using an anti-rat STP antibody demonstrated the presence of STP immunoreactivity in the proximal tubules. In cells that transiently expressed STP, the intracellular [Na+]/[K+] ratio was higher than that in control cells. STP contains predicted coiled-coil and Src homology 3 domains, and shows a partially high degree of nucleotide identity to human thyroid-hormone receptor interacting protein. These results suggest that STP may play an important role in salt sensitivity through cellular sodium metabolism by mediating signal transduction and a hormone-dependent transcription mechanism. PMID:9727364

  20. Functional expression and cellular distribution of diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene mutations in HEK cells.

    PubMed

    Karniski, Lawrence P

    2004-10-01

    Defects in sulfate transport in chondrocytes lead to undersulfation of the cartilage extracellular matrix proteoglycans. Mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene have been linked to four chondrodysplasias of varying severity. To characterize disease-causing mutations of DTDST, we expressed DTDST-mediated sulfate transport in mammalian HEK-293 cells and determined that the wild-type protein is glycosylated and localized to the cell plasma membrane. Four mutations, A715V, C653S, Q454P and R279W, stimulated sulfate transport at rates only 39-62% of wild-type DTDST. These four mutations were expressed on the plasma membrane of the cell, but the amount of expressed protein was reduced when compared with wild-type DTDST. The Q454P mutant is unique in that it is not properly glycosylated in HEK cells. There was no difference in sulfate transport activity between cells transfected with either the DeltaV340 or the G678V mutations and control HEK cells. Furthermore, the G678V mutation is not expressed along the plasma membrane, but is trapped within the cytoplasm. When comparing the sulfate transport capacity of each DTDST mutation with the chondrodysplasia in which it has been identified, we find that individuals with severe achondrogenesis 1B phenotype have null mutations on both DTDST alleles. Heterozygotes for both a null mutation and a partial-function mutation result in either atelosteogenesis type 2 or DTD, whereas the milder, recessive multiple epiphyseal dysplasia phenotype is homozygous for partial-function mutations. In contrast to previous studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we find a strong correlation between the severity of the phenotype and the level of residual transport function in mammalian cells. PMID:15294877

  1. c-Myc and AMPK Control Cellular Energy Levels by Cooperatively Regulating Mitochondrial Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Lia R.; Sharma, Lokendra; Wang, Huabo; Kang, Audry; d’Souza, Sonia; Lu, Jie; McLaughlin, Michael; Dolezal, James M.; Gao, Xiaoli; Weintraub, Susan T.; Ding, Ying; Zeng, Xuemei; Yates, Nathan; Prochownik, Edward V.

    2015-01-01

    The c-Myc (Myc) oncoprotein and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulate glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (Oxphos) although often for different purposes. Because Myc over-expression depletes ATP with the resultant activation of AMPK, we explored the potential co-dependency of and cross-talk between these proteins by comparing the consequences of acute Myc induction in ampk+/+ (WT) and ampk-/- (KO) murine embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). KO MEFs showed a higher basal rate of glycolysis than WT MEFs and an appropriate increase in response to activation of a Myc-estrogen receptor (MycER) fusion protein. However, KO MEFs had a diminished ability to increase Oxphos, mitochondrial mass and reactive oxygen species in response to MycER activation. Other differences between WT and KO MEFs, either in the basal state or following MycER induction, included abnormalities in electron transport chain function, levels of TCA cycle-related oxidoreductases and cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox states. Transcriptional profiling of pathways pertinent to glycolysis, Oxphos and mitochondrial structure and function also uncovered significant differences between WT and KO MEFs and their response to MycER activation. Finally, an unbiased mass-spectrometry (MS)-based survey capable of quantifying ~40% of all mitochondrial proteins, showed about 15% of them to be AMPK- and/or Myc-dependent in their steady state. Significant differences in the activities of the rate-limiting enzymes pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase, which dictate pyruvate and acetyl coenzyme A abundance, were also differentially responsive to Myc and AMPK and could account for some of the differences in basal metabolite levels that were also detected by MS. Thus, Myc and AMPK are highly co-dependent and appear to engage in significant cross-talk across numerous pathways which support metabolic and ATP-generating functions. PMID:26230505

  2. Macrophage polarization and function with emphasis on the evolving roles of coordinated regulation of cellular signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dexi; Huang, Cheng; Lin, Zhen; Zhan, Shuxiang; Kong, Lingna; Fang, Chengbo; Li, Jun

    2014-02-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are heterogeneous and versatile cells that could undergo their phenotypically/functionally dynamic switch in response to the microenvironment signals. Two major macrophage subpopulations with different functions which represent extreme of a continuum in a universe of activation states, including classically activated/inflammatory (M1) and alternatively activated/regenerative (M2) macrophages, have long been recognized. Emerging evidence through genetic or pharmacologic approaches has now been made in defining the actual fate in vivo and in vitro underlying M1 or M2-like polarized activation under physiological and pathological conditions. These cells are characterized by their expression of cell surface markers, secreted cytokines and chemokines, and transcription and epigenetic pathways. Here in this review, we shed new light on the contribution of several major signaling pathways and their modulators/targets involved in directing the macrophage plasticity and polarized function, assess the mechanisms of macrophage polarization by interacting endogenous cellular mechanisms and molecules associated with reciprocal skewing of macrophage polarization between the M1 and M2 states. The identification of mechanisms underlying functional polarization of macrophages into M1 or M2 cells might provide new insights into a basis for macrophage-centered diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for multiple diseases. PMID:24219909

  3. Snai2 and Snai3 transcriptionally regulate cellular fitness and functionality of T cell lineages through distinct gene programs.

    PubMed

    Pioli, Peter D; Whiteside, Sarah K; Weis, Janis J; Weis, John H

    2016-05-01

    T lymphocytes are essential contributors to the adaptive immune system and consist of multiple lineages that serve various effector and regulatory roles. As such, precise control of gene expression is essential to the proper development and function of these cells. Previously, we identified Snai2 and Snai3 as being essential regulators of immune tolerance partly due to the impaired function of CD4(+) regulatory T cells in Snai2/3 conditional double knockout mice. Here we extend those previous findings using a bone marrow transplantation model to provide an environmentally unbiased view of the molecular changes imparted onto various T lymphocyte populations once Snai2 and Snai3 are deleted. The data presented here demonstrate that Snai2 and Snai3 transcriptionally regulate the cellular fitness and functionality of not only CD4(+) regulatory T cells but effector CD8(α+) and CD4(+) conventional T cells as well. This is achieved through the modulation of gene sets unique to each cell type and includes transcriptional targets relevant to the survival and function of each T cell lineage. As such, Snai2 and Snai3 are essential regulators of T cell immunobiology.

  4. Macrophage polarization and function with emphasis on the evolving roles of coordinated regulation of cellular signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Dexi; Huang, Cheng; Lin, Zhen; Zhan, Shuxiang; Kong, Lingna; Fang, Chengbo; Li, Jun

    2014-02-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are heterogeneous and versatile cells that could undergo their phenotypically/functionally dynamic switch in response to the microenvironment signals. Two major macrophage subpopulations with different functions which represent extreme of a continuum in a universe of activation states, including classically activated/inflammatory (M1) and alternatively activated/regenerative (M2) macrophages, have long been recognized. Emerging evidence through genetic or pharmacologic approaches has now been made in defining the actual fate in vivo and in vitro underlying M1 or M2-like polarized activation under physiological and pathological conditions. These cells are characterized by their expression of cell surface markers, secreted cytokines and chemokines, and transcription and epigenetic pathways. Here in this review, we shed new light on the contribution of several major signaling pathways and their modulators/targets involved in directing the macrophage plasticity and polarized function, assess the mechanisms of macrophage polarization by interacting endogenous cellular mechanisms and molecules associated with reciprocal skewing of macrophage polarization between the M1 and M2 states. The identification of mechanisms underlying functional polarization of macrophages into M1 or M2 cells might provide new insights into a basis for macrophage-centered diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for multiple diseases.

  5. Lexical and Affective Prosody in Children with High-Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Ruth B.; Bemis, Rhyannon H.; Skwerer, Daniela Plesa; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the perception and production of lexical stress and processing of affective prosody in adolescents with high-functioning autism (HFA). We hypothesized preserved processing of lexical and affective prosody but atypical lexical prosody production. Method: Sixteen children with HFA and 15 typically developing (TD) peers…

  6. Evolution and cellular function of monothiol glutaredoxins: involvement in iron-sulphur cluster assembly.

    PubMed

    Vilella, Felipe; Alves, Rui; Rodríguez-Manzaneque, María Teresa; Bellí, Gemma; Swaminathan, Swarna; Sunnerhagen, Per; Herrero, Enrique

    2004-01-01

    A number of bacterial species, mostly proteobacteria, possess monothiol glutaredoxins homologous to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial protein Grx5, which is involved in iron-sulphur cluster synthesis. Phylogenetic profiling is used to predict that bacterial monothiol glutaredoxins also participate in the iron-sulphur cluster (ISC) assembly machinery, because their phylogenetic profiles are similar to the profiles of the bacterial homologues of yeast ISC proteins. High evolutionary co-occurrence is observed between the Grx5 homologues and the homologues of the Yah1 ferredoxin, the scaffold proteins Isa1 and Isa2, the frataxin protein Yfh1 and the Nfu1 protein. This suggests that a specific functional interaction exists between these ISC machinery proteins. Physical interaction analyses using low-definition protein docking predict the formation of strong and specific complexes between Grx5 and several components of the yeast ISC machinery. Two-hybrid analysis has confirmed the in vivo interaction between Grx5 and Isa1. Sequence comparison techniques and cladistics indicate that the other two monothiol glutaredoxins of S. cerevisiae, Grx3 and Grx4, have evolved from the fusion of a thioredoxin gene with a monothiol glutaredoxin gene early in the eukaryotic lineage, leading to differential functional specialization. While bacteria do not contain these chimaeric glutaredoxins, in many eukaryotic species Grx5 and Grx3/4-type monothiol glutaredoxins coexist in the cell. PMID:18629168

  7. Evolution and Cellular Function of Monothiol Glutaredoxins: Involvement in Iron-Sulphur Cluster Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Vilella, Felipe; Alves, Rui; Rodríguez-Manzaneque, María Teresa; Bellí, Gemma; Swaminathan, Swarna; Sunnerhagen, Per

    2004-01-01

    A number of bacterial species, mostly proteobacteria, possess monothiol glutaredoxins homologous to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial protein Grx5, which is involved in iron–sulphur cluster synthesis. Phylogenetic profiling is used to predict that bacterial monothiol glutaredoxins also participate in the iron–sulphur cluster (ISC) assembly machinery, because their phylogenetic profiles are similar to the profiles of the bacterial homologues of yeast ISC proteins. High evolutionary co-occurrence is observed between the Grx5 homologues and the homologues of the Yah1 ferredoxin, the scaffold proteins Isa1 and Isa2, the frataxin protein Yfh1 and the Nfu1 protein. This suggests that a specific functional interaction exists between these ISC machinery proteins. Physical interaction analyses using low-definition protein docking predict the formation of strong and specific complexes between Grx5 and several components of the yeast ISC machinery. Two-hybrid analysis has confirmed the in vivo interaction between Grx5 and Isa1. Sequence comparison techniques and cladistics indicate that the other two monothiol glutaredoxins of S. cerevisiae, Grx3 and Grx4, have evolved from the fusion of a thioredoxin gene with a monothiol glutaredoxin gene early in the eukaryotic lineage, leading to differential functional specialization. While bacteria do not contain these chimaeric glutaredoxins, in many eukaryotic species Grx5 and Grx3/4-type monothiol glutaredoxins coexist in the cell. PMID:18629168

  8. The phosphoproteome of Aspergillus nidulans reveals functional association with cellular processes involved in morphology and secretion.

    PubMed

    Ramsubramaniam, Nikhil; Harris, Steven D; Marten, Mark R

    2014-11-01

    We describe the first phosphoproteome of the model filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide, separated using a convenient ultra-long reverse phase gradient, and identified using a "high-high" strategy (high mass accuracy on the parent and fragment ions) with higher-energy collisional dissociation. Using this approach 1801 phosphosites, from 1637 unique phosphopeptides, were identified. Functional classification revealed phosphoproteins were overrepresented under GO categories related to fungal morphogenesis: "sites of polar growth," "vesicle mediated transport," and "cytoskeleton organization." In these same GO categories, kinase-substrate analysis of phosphoproteins revealed the majority were target substrates of CDK and CK2 kinase families, indicating these kinase families play a prominent role in fungal morphogenesis. Kinase-substrate analysis also identified 57 substrates for kinases known to regulate secretion of hydrolytic enzymes (e.g. PkaA, SchA, and An-Snf1). Altogether this data will serve as a benchmark that can be used to elucidate regulatory networks functionally associated with fungal morphogenesis and secretion. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000715 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000715).

  9. Enhanced Cellular Adhesion on Titanium by Silk Functionalized with titanium binding and RGD peptides

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Guillaume; Blanchi, Thomas; Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Calabrese, Rossella; Rossi, Claire; Vigneron, Pascale; Duval, Jean-Luc; Kaplan, David L.; Egles, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Soft tissue adhesion on titanium represents a challenge for implantable materials. In order to improve adhesion at the cell/material interface we used a new approach based on the molecular recognition of titanium by specific peptides. Silk fibroin protein was chemically grafted with titanium binding peptide (TiBP) to increase adsorption of these chimeric proteins to the metal surface. Quartz Crystal Microbalance was used to quantify the specific adsorption of TiBP-functionalized silk and an increase in protein deposition by more than 35% was demonstrated due to the presence of the binding peptide. A silk protein grafted with TiBP and fibronectin-derived RGD peptide was then prepared. The adherence of fibroblasts on the titanium surface modified with the multifunctional silk coating demonstrated an increase in the number of adhering cells by 60%. The improved adhesion was demonstrated by Scanning Electron Microscopy and immunocytochemical staining of focal contact points. Chick embryo organotypic culture also revealed strong adhesion of endothelial cells expanding on the multifunctional silk-peptide coating. These results demonstrated that silk functionalized with TiBP and RGD represents a promising approach to modify cell-biomaterial interfaces, opening new perspectives for implantable medical devices, especially when reendothelialization is required. PMID:22975628

  10. Alteration of some cellular function in amikacin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa transfected macrophages: a time dependent approach

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; KarMahapatra, Santanu; Das, Sabyasachi; Roy, Somenath

    2011-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the free radical generation and antioxidant enzymes status in murine peritoneal macrophage during in vitro amikacin resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ARPA) treatment with different time interval. Methods Peritoneal macrophages were treated with 1×108 CFU/mL ARPA cell suspension in vitro for different time interval (1, 2, 3, 6, 12, and 24 h) and super oxide anion generation, NO generation, reduced glutathione level and antioxidant enzymes status were analyzed. Results Super oxide anion generation and NO generation got peak at 12 h, indicating maximal free radical generation through activation of NADPH oxidase in murine peritoneal macrophages during ARPA transfection. Reduced glutathione level and antioxidant enzymes status were decreased significantly (P<0.05) with increasing time of ARPA transfection. All the changes in peritoneal macrophages after 12 h in vitro ARPA transfection had significant difference (P<0.05). Conclusions From this study, it may be summarized that in vitro ARPA infection not only generates excess free radical but also affects the antioxidant system and glutathione cycle in murine peritoneal macrophage. PMID:23569818

  11. Functional adaptation and phenotypic plasticity at the cellular and whole plant level.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Karl J

    2009-10-01

    The ability to adaptively alter morphological, anatomical, or physiological functional traits to local environmental variations using external environmental cues is especially well expressed by all terrestrial and most aquatic plants. A ubiquitous cue eliciting these plastic phenotypic responses is mechanical perturbation (MP), which can evoke dramatic differences in the size, shape, or mechanical properties of conspecifics. Current thinking posits that MP is part of a very ancient "stress-perception response system" that involves receptors located at the cell membrane/cell wall interface capable of responding to a broad spectrum of stress-inducing factors. This hypothesis is explored here from the perspective of cell wall evolution and the control of cell wall architecture by unicellular and multicellular plants. Among the conclusions that emerge from this exploration is the perspective that the plant cell is phenotypically plastic. PMID:19920346

  12. The persistent contributions of RNA to eukaryotic gen(om)e architecture and cellular function.

    PubMed

    Brosius, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    Currently, the best scenario for earliest forms of life is based on RNA molecules as they have the proven ability to catalyze enzymatic reactions and harbor genetic information. Evolutionary principles valid today become apparent in such models already. Furthermore, many features of eukaryotic genome architecture might have their origins in an RNA or RNA/protein (RNP) world, including the onset of a further transition, when DNA replaced RNA as the genetic bookkeeper of the cell. Chromosome maintenance, splicing, and regulatory function via RNA may be deeply rooted in the RNA/RNP worlds. Mostly in eukaryotes, conversion from RNA to DNA is still ongoing, which greatly impacts the plasticity of extant genomes. Raw material for novel genes encoding protein or RNA, or parts of genes including regulatory elements that selection can act on, continues to enter the evolutionary lottery. PMID:25081515

  13. Viral Interference with Functions of the Cellular Receptor Tyrosine Phosphatase CD45

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Nadine; Zischke, Jasmin; Elbasani, Endrit; Kay-Fedorov, Penelope; Messerle, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine phosphatase CD45 is expressed on the surface of almost all cells of hematopoietic origin. CD45 functions are central to the development of T cells and determine the threshold at which T and B lymphocytes can become activated. Given this pivotal role of CD45 in the immune system, it is probably not surprising that viruses interfere with the activity of CD45 in lymphocytes to dampen the immune response and that they also utilize this molecule to accomplish their replication cycle. Here we report what is known about the interaction of viral proteins with CD45. Moreover, we debate putative interactions of viruses with CD45 in myeloid cells and the resulting consequences—subjects that remain to be investigated. Finally, we summarize the evidence that pathogens were the driving force for the evolution of CD45. PMID:25807057

  14. 3D Conducting Polymer Platforms for Electrical Control of Protein Conformation and Cellular Functions

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Alwin Ming-Doug; Inal, Sahika; Williams, Tiffany; Wang, Karin; Leleux, Pierre; Estevez, Luis; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Fischbach, Claudia; Malliaras, George G.; Gourdon, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of three dimensional (3D) macroporous scaffolds made from poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) via an ice-templating method. The scaffolds offer tunable pore size and morphology, and are electrochemically active. When a potential is applied to the scaffolds, reversible changes take place in their electrical doping state, which in turn enables precise control over the conformation of adsorbed proteins (e.g., fibronectin). Additionally, the scaffolds support the growth of mouse fibroblasts (3T3-L1) for 7 days, and are able to electrically control cell adhesion and pro-angiogenic capability. These 3D matrix-mimicking platforms offer precise control of protein conformation and major cell functions, over large volumes and long cell culture times. As such, they represent a new tool for biological research with many potential applications in bioelectronics, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine. PMID:26413300

  15. Role of Mitochondria in Cerebral Vascular Function: Energy Production, Cellular Protection, and Regulation of Vascular Tone.

    PubMed

    Busija, David W; Rutkai, Ibolya; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V

    2016-06-13

    Mitochondria not only produce energy in the form of ATP to support the activities of cells comprising the neurovascular unit, but mitochondrial events, such as depolarization and/or ROS release, also initiate signaling events which protect the endothelium and neurons against lethal stresses via pre-/postconditioning as well as promote changes in cerebral vascular tone. Mitochondrial depolarization in vascular smooth muscle (VSM), via pharmacological activation of the ATP-dependent potassium channels on the inner mitochondrial membrane (mitoKATP channels), leads to vasorelaxation through generation of calcium sparks by the sarcoplasmic reticulum and subsequent downstream signaling mechanisms. Increased release of ROS by mitochondria has similar effects. Relaxation of VSM can also be indirectly achieved via actions of nitric oxide (NO) and other vasoactive agents produced by endothelium, perivascular and parenchymal nerves, and astroglia following mitochondrial activation. Additionally, NO production following mitochondrial activation is involved in neuronal preconditioning. Cerebral arteries from female rats have greater mitochondrial mass and respiration and enhanced cerebral arterial dilation to mitochondrial activators. Preexisting chronic conditions such as insulin resistance and/or diabetes impair mitoKATP channel relaxation of cerebral arteries and preconditioning. Surprisingly, mitoKATP channel function after transient ischemia appears to be retained in the endothelium of large cerebral arteries despite generalized cerebral vascular dysfunction. Thus, mitochondrial mechanisms may represent the elusive signaling link between metabolic rate and blood flow as well as mediators of vascular change according to physiological status. Mitochondrial mechanisms are an important, but underutilized target for improving vascular function and decreasing brain injury in stroke patients. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1529-1548, 2016.

  16. Cross-species functional complementation of cellulose synthase during the development of cellular slime molds.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Hidekazu; Tohyama, Takeru; Urushihara, Hideko

    2014-09-01

    Cellulose is a major and important component of the extracellular matrix during the development of Dictyostelium discoideum. Upon starvation, solitary amoebae of D. discoideum gather and form fruiting bodies in which cells differentiate into stalk cells and spores. The stalk tubes and walls of spores and stalk cells are made of cellulose. In the genus Acytostelium, however, all cells are destined to become spores and the stalks comprise only a cellulose tube, suggesting species-specific regulation of cellulose synthesis. In this study, we cloned a putative cellulose synthase gene (cesA) of Acytostelium subglobosum and performed comparative analyses with the D. discoideum cellulose synthase gene (dcsA). Although the deduced amino acid sequences were highly conserved between cesA and dcsA, the numbers of transmembrane spans preceding the catalytic domain were dissimilar; 2 and 3, respectively. Since ectopic expression of cesA in dcsA(-) null cells failed to restore the developmental defects of the mutant, we constructed a series of chimerical genes for complementation analyses and found that the catalytic domain of cesA was functional in D. discoideum cells if the preceding transmembrane region was swapped with dcsA. The non-functional products that contained the cesA-derived transmembrane region were localized to lysosomes. These results indicate that the transmembrane region of cellulose synthase is essential for proper accumulation of cellulose during the development of D. discoideum and that its differential localization in A. subglobosum may be related to the characteristic morphogenesis in this species.

  17. Physicochemical properties and cellular toxicity of (poly)aminoalkoxysilanes-functionalized ZnO quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboulaich, Abdelhay; Tilmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Merlin, Christophe; Mercier, Cédric; Guilloteau, Hélène; Medjahdi, Ghouti; Schneider, Raphaël

    2012-08-01

    Luminescent ZnO nanocrystals were synthesized by basic hydrolysis of Zn(OAc)2 in the presence of oleic acid and then functionalized with (poly)aminotrimethoxysilanes in the presence of tetramethylammonium hydroxide to render the QDs water-dispersible. The highest photoluminescence quantum yield (17%) was achieved using N1-(2-aminoethyl)-N2-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]-1,2-ethanediamine as surface ligand. Transmission electron microscopy and powder x-ray diffraction showed highly crystalline materials with a ZnO nanoparticle diameter of about 4 nm. The cytotoxicity of the different siloxane-capped ZnO QDs towards growing Escherichia coli bacterial cells was evaluated in MOPS-minimal medium. Although concentrations of 5 mM in QDs caused a complete growth arrest in E. coli, siloxane-capped ZnO QDs appeared weakly toxic at lower doses (0.5 or 1 mM). The concentration of bioavailable Zn 2+ ions leaked from ZnO QDs was evaluated using the biosensor bacteria Cupriavidus metallidurans AE1433. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that concentrations of bioavailable Zn2+ are too low to explain the inhibitory effects of the ZnO QDs against bacteria cells at 1 mM and that the siloxane shell prevents ZnO QDs from dissolution contrary to uncapped ZnO nanoparticles. Because of their low cytotoxicity, good biocompatibility, low cost and large number of functional amine end groups, which makes them easy to tailor for end-user purposes, siloxane-capped ZnO QDs offer a high potential as fluorescent probes and as biosensors.

  18. Role of Mitochondria in Cerebral Vascular Function: Energy Production, Cellular Protection, and Regulation of Vascular Tone.

    PubMed

    Busija, David W; Rutkai, Ibolya; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria not only produce energy in the form of ATP to support the activities of cells comprising the neurovascular unit, but mitochondrial events, such as depolarization and/or ROS release, also initiate signaling events which protect the endothelium and neurons against lethal stresses via pre-/postconditioning as well as promote changes in cerebral vascular tone. Mitochondrial depolarization in vascular smooth muscle (VSM), via pharmacological activation of the ATP-dependent potassium channels on the inner mitochondrial membrane (mitoKATP channels), leads to vasorelaxation through generation of calcium sparks by the sarcoplasmic reticulum and subsequent downstream signaling mechanisms. Increased release of ROS by mitochondria has similar effects. Relaxation of VSM can also be indirectly achieved via actions of nitric oxide (NO) and other vasoactive agents produced by endothelium, perivascular and parenchymal nerves, and astroglia following mitochondrial activation. Additionally, NO production following mitochondrial activation is involved in neuronal preconditioning. Cerebral arteries from female rats have greater mitochondrial mass and respiration and enhanced cerebral arterial dilation to mitochondrial activators. Preexisting chronic conditions such as insulin resistance and/or diabetes impair mitoKATP channel relaxation of cerebral arteries and preconditioning. Surprisingly, mitoKATP channel function after transient ischemia appears to be retained in the endothelium of large cerebral arteries despite generalized cerebral vascular dysfunction. Thus, mitochondrial mechanisms may represent the elusive signaling link between metabolic rate and blood flow as well as mediators of vascular change according to physiological status. Mitochondrial mechanisms are an important, but underutilized target for improving vascular function and decreasing brain injury in stroke patients. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1529-1548, 2016. PMID:27347901

  19. NMDA-R inhibition affects cellular process formation in Tilapia melanocytes; a model for pigmented adrenergic neurons in process formation and retraction.

    PubMed

    Ogundele, Olalekan Michael; Okunnuga, Adetokunbo Adedotun; Fabiyi, Temitope Deborah; Olajide, Olayemi Joseph; Akinrinade, Ibukun Dorcas; Adeniyi, Philip Adeyemi; Ojo, Abiodun Ayodele

    2014-06-01

    elongation of secondary cellular processes (highly branched) from primary major processes (Less branched); co-incubation of glutamate and ketamine induced short and highly branched process formation. Cyanide toxicity induced degeneration and reduction of cell size while co-treatment of cyanide and ketamine gave changes similar to that observed in glutamate-ketamine co-incubation. NMDA-R is present in the melanocytes. Activation of the receptor reduced elongation process, while inhibition of the receptor facilitated cell process elongation and branching. This confirms that like pigmented adrenergic cells of the nervous system, this cell contains NMDA-R and this receptor also regulates cell process elongation. The study also showed that inhibition of NMDA-R in melanocytes gave opposite outcomes to the role of the receptor in developing neurons; a function that is protective in adult neurons.

  20. Binding of Hepatitis A Virus to its Cellular Receptor 1 Inhibits T-Regulatory Cell Functions in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Manangeeswaran, Mohanraj; Jacques, Jérôme; Tami, Cecilia; Konduru, Krishnamurthy; Amharref, Nadia; Perrella, Oreste; Casasnovas, Jose M.; Umetsu, Dale T.; DeKruyff, Rosemarie H.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Perrella, Alessandro; Kaplan, Gerardo G.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims CD4+ T regulatory (Treg) cells suppress immune responses and control self-tolerance and immunity to pathogens, cancer, and alloantigens. Most pathogens activate Treg cells to minimize immune-mediated tissue damage and prevent clearance, which promotes chronic infections. However, hepatitis A virus (HAV) temporarily inhibits Treg-cell functions. We investigated whether the interaction of HAV with its cellular receptor 1 (HAVCR1), a T-cell co-stimulatory molecule, inhibits the function of Treg cells to control HAV infection. Methods We studied the effects of HAV interaction with HAVCR1 on human T cells using binding, signal transduction, apoptosis, activation, suppression, cytokine production, and confocal microscopy analyses. Cytokines were analyzed in sera from 14 patients with HAV infection using bead arrays. Results Human Treg cells constitutively express HAVCR1. Binding of HAV to HAVCR1 blocked phosphorylation of Akt, prevented activation of the T-cell receptor, and inhibited function of Treg cells. At the peak viremia, patients with acute HAV infection had no Treg-cell suppression function, produced low levels of transforming growth factor-β (TGF–β), which limited leukocyte recruitment and survival, and high levels of interleukin-22, which prevented liver damage. Conclusions Interaction between HAV and its receptor HAVCR1 inhibits Treg cell function, resulting in an immune imbalance that allows viral expansion with limited hepatocellular damage during early stages of infection—a characteristic of HAV pathogenesis. The mechanism by which HAV is cleared in the absence of Treg-cell function could be used as a model to develop anti-cancer therapies, modulate autoimmune and allergic responses, and prevent transplant rejection. PMID:22430395

  1. Cyclic Di-GMP Regulates Multiple Cellular Functions in the Symbiotic Alphaproteobacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti

    PubMed Central

    Schäper, Simon; Krol, Elizaveta; Skotnicka, Dorota; Kaever, Volkhard; Hilker, Rolf; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sinorhizobium meliloti undergoes major lifestyle changes between planktonic states, biofilm formation, and symbiosis with leguminous plant hosts. In many bacteria, the second messenger 3′,5′-cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP, or cdG) promotes a sessile lifestyle by regulating a plethora of processes involved in biofilm formation, including motility and biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides (EPS). Here, we systematically investigated the role of cdG in S. meliloti Rm2011 encoding 22 proteins putatively associated with cdG synthesis, degradation, or binding. Single mutations in 21 of these genes did not cause evident changes in biofilm formation, motility, or EPS biosynthesis. In contrast, manipulation of cdG levels by overproducing endogenous or heterologous diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) or phosphodiesterases (PDEs) affected these processes and accumulation of N-Acyl-homoserine lactones in the culture supernatant. Specifically, individual overexpression of the S. meliloti genes pleD, SMb20523, SMb20447, SMc01464, and SMc03178 encoding putative DGCs and of SMb21517 encoding a single-domain PDE protein had an impact and resulted in increased levels of cdG. Compared to the wild type, an S. meliloti strain that did not produce detectable levels of cdG (cdG0) was more sensitive to acid stress. However, it was symbiotically potent, unaffected in motility, and only slightly reduced in biofilm formation. The SMc01790-SMc01796 locus, homologous to the Agrobacterium tumefaciens uppABCDEF cluster governing biosynthesis of a unipolarly localized polysaccharide, was found to be required for cdG-stimulated biofilm formation, while the single-domain PilZ protein McrA was identified as a cdG receptor protein involved in regulation of motility. IMPORTANCE We present the first systematic genome-wide investigation of the role of 3′,5′-cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP, or cdG) in regulation of motility, biosynthesis of exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation, quorum sensing, and symbiosis in a

  2. The cytoplasmic peptide:N-glycanase (NGLY1) - Structure, expression and cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tadashi; Huang, Chengcheng; Fujihira, Haruhiko

    2016-02-10

    NGLY1/Ngly1 is a cytosolic peptide:N-glycanase, i.e. de-N-glycosylating enzyme acting on N-glycoproteins in mammals, generating free, unconjugated N-glycans and deglycosylated peptides in which the N-glycosylated asparagine residues are converted to aspartates. This enzyme is known to be involved in the quality control system for the newly synthesized glycoproteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In this system, misfolded (glyco)proteins are retrotranslocated to the cytosol, where the 26S proteasomes play a central role in degrading the proteins: a process referred to as ER-associated degradation or ERAD in short. PNGase-mediated deglycosylation is believed to facilitate the efficient degradation of some misfolded glycoproteins. Human patients harboring mutations of NGLY1 gene (NGLY1-deficiency) have recently been discovered, clearly indicating the functional importance of this enzyme. This review summarizes the current state of our knowledge on NGLY1 and its gene product in mammalian cells. PMID:26611529

  3. Cellular and Behavioral Outcomes of Dorsal Striatonigral Neuron Ablation: New Insights into Striatal Functions

    PubMed Central

    Révy, Delphine; Jaouen, Florence; Salin, Pascal; Melon, Christophe; Chabbert, Dorian; Tafi, Elisiana; Concetta, Lena; Langa, Francina; Amalric, Marianne; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia; Marie, Hélène; Beurrier, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    The striatum is the input structure of the basal ganglia network that contains heterogeneous neuronal populations, including two populations of projecting neurons called the medium spiny neurons (MSNs), and different types of interneurons. We developed a transgenic mouse model enabling inducible ablation of the striatonigral MSNs constituting the direct pathway by expressing the human diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor under the control of the Slc35d3 gene promoter, a gene enriched in striatonigral MSNs. DT injection into the striatum triggered selective elimination of the majority of striatonigral MSNs. DT-mediated ablation of striatonigral MSNs caused selective loss of cholinergic interneurons in the dorsal striatum but not in the ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens), suggesting a region-specific critical role of the direct pathway in striatal cholinergic neuron homeostasis. Mice with DT injection into the dorsal striatum showed altered basal and cocaine-induced locomotion and dramatic reduction of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in the parkinsonian condition. In addition, these mice exhibited reduced anxiety, revealing a role of the dorsal striatum in the modulation of behaviors involving an emotional component, behaviors generally associated with limbic structures. Altogether, these results highlight the implication of the direct striatonigral pathway in the regulation of heterogeneous functions from cell survival to regulation of motor and emotion-associated behaviors. PMID:24903652

  4. Role of Heat-Shock Proteins in Cellular Function and in the Biology of Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Shraddha; Thakur, Raman; Shankar, Jata

    2015-01-01

    Stress (biotic or abiotic) is an unfavourable condition for an organism including fungus. To overcome stress, organism expresses heat-shock proteins (Hsps) or chaperons to perform biological function. Hsps are involved in various routine biological processes such as transcription, translation and posttranslational modifications, protein folding, and aggregation and disaggregation of proteins. Thus, it is important to understand holistic role of Hsps in response to stress and other biological conditions in fungi. Hsp104, Hsp70, and Hsp40 are found predominant in replication and Hsp90 is found in transcriptional and posttranscriptional process. Hsp90 and Hsp70 in combination or alone play a major role in morphogenesis and dimorphism. Heat stress in fungi expresses Hsp60, Hsp90, Hsp104, Hsp30, and Hsp10 proteins, whereas expression of Hsp12 protein was observed in response to cold stress. Hsp30, Hsp70, and Hsp90 proteins showed expression in response to pH stress. Osmotic stress is controlled by small heat-shock proteins and Hsp60. Expression of Hsp104 is observed under high pressure conditions. Out of these heat-shock proteins, Hsp90 has been predicted as a potential antifungal target due to its role in morphogenesis. Thus, current review focuses on role of Hsps in fungi during morphogenesis and various stress conditions (temperature, pH, and osmotic pressure) and in antifungal drug tolerance. PMID:26881084

  5. Human Brown Fat Inducible Thioesterase Variant 2 (BFIT2) Cellular Localization and Catalytic Function#

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Danqi; Latham, John; Zhao, Hong; Bisoffi, Marco; Farelli, Jeremiah; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian brown fat inducible thioesterase variant 2 (BFIT2), also known as ACOT11, is a multi-modular protein containing two consecutive hotdog-fold domains and a C-terminal steroidogenic acute regulatory protein related lipid transfer (START) domain (StarD14). In this study, we demonstrate that the N-terminal region of human BFIT2 (hBFIT2) constitutes a mitochondrial location signal sequence, which undergoes mitochondria-dependent posttranslational cleavage. The mature hBFIT2 is shown to be located in the mitochondrial matrix whereas the paralog “cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA hydrolase” (CACH, also known as ACOT12) was found in the cytoplam. In-vitro activity analysis of full-length hBFIT2 isolated from stably transfected HEK293 cells demonstrates selective thioesterase activity directed towards long chain fatty acyl-CoA thioesters, thus distinguishing BFIT2 catalytic function from that of CACH. The results from a protein-lipid overlay test indicate that the hBFIT2 StarD14 domain binds phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate. PMID:22897136

  6. Lead and cadmium induced alterations of cellular functions in leaves of Alocasia macrorrhiza L. Schott.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan; Lin, Zhi-Fang; Lin, Gui-Zhu; Song, Li-Ying; Chen, Shao-Wei; Mo, Hui; Peng, Chang-Lian

    2010-09-01

    Alocasia macrorrhiza is a fast growing and propagating herbaceous species commonly found in South China. To determine its physiological responses to Pb and Cd stresses, the biochemical, histochemical and cytochemical changes under PbAC2 and CdCl2 phytotoxicity were detected using leaf discs as an experimental model. After leaf discs were infiltrated in different concentrations of PbAC2 and CdCl2 solutions (0, 50, 100, 150, 200 microM) for 72 h, the formation of reactive oxygen species (H2O2 and O2-) in plant tissue were found to be exaggerated together with elevated OH concentration and cell death. Changes in chlorophyll fluorescence (Fv/Fm, PhiPSII, qP and NPQ) imaging colours/areas of leaf discs indicated decreased photosystem II functions by both heavy metal treatments and positive reactions of antioxidants under Pb2+ stress. Results showed that fluorescent detection of hydroxylated terephthlate using terephthalic acid as OH trap is a simple, yet valuable and specific method for monitoring OH generation in plant tissue under heavy metal stresses. As compared with Cd2+, Pb2+ was found to be less toxic, indicating that A. macrorrhiza tissue might have a potential tolerance to Pb.

  7. A phylogenomic census of molecular functions identifies modern thermophilic archaea as the most ancient form of cellular life.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Arshan; Kim, Kyung Mo; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    The origins of diversified life remain mysterious despite considerable efforts devoted to untangling the roots of the universal tree of life. Here we reconstructed phylogenies that described the evolution of molecular functions and the evolution of species directly from a genomic census of gene ontology (GO) definitions. We sampled 249 free-living genomes spanning organisms in the three superkingdoms of life, Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya, and used the abundance of GO terms as molecular characters to produce rooted phylogenetic trees. Results revealed an early thermophilic origin of Archaea that was followed by genome reduction events in microbial superkingdoms. Eukaryal genomes displayed extraordinary functional diversity and were enriched with hundreds of novel molecular activities not detected in the akaryotic microbial cells. Remarkably, the majority of these novel functions appeared quite late in evolution, synchronized with the diversification of the eukaryal superkingdom. The distribution of GO terms in superkingdoms confirms that Archaea appears to be the simplest and most ancient form of cellular life, while Eukarya is the most diverse and recent.

  8. A Phylogenomic Census of Molecular Functions Identifies Modern Thermophilic Archaea as the Most Ancient Form of Cellular Life

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyung Mo; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    The origins of diversified life remain mysterious despite considerable efforts devoted to untangling the roots of the universal tree of life. Here we reconstructed phylogenies that described the evolution of molecular functions and the evolution of species directly from a genomic census of gene ontology (GO) definitions. We sampled 249 free-living genomes spanning organisms in the three superkingdoms of life, Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya, and used the abundance of GO terms as molecular characters to produce rooted phylogenetic trees. Results revealed an early thermophilic origin of Archaea that was followed by genome reduction events in microbial superkingdoms. Eukaryal genomes displayed extraordinary functional diversity and were enriched with hundreds of novel molecular activities not detected in the akaryotic microbial cells. Remarkably, the majority of these novel functions appeared quite late in evolution, synchronized with the diversification of the eukaryal superkingdom. The distribution of GO terms in superkingdoms confirms that Archaea appears to be the simplest and most ancient form of cellular life, while Eukarya is the most diverse and recent. PMID:25249790

  9. Phenotypic and functional cellular differences between human CD3- decidual and peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Deniz, G; Christmas, S E; Brew, R; Johnson, P M

    1994-05-01

    CD3- leukocyte clones derived from human decidualized endometrial tissue of first trimester pregnancy have been compared with CD3- PBL clones. Most CD3- decidual granulated leukocyte (DGL) clones were CD16- CD56+, whereas most CD3- PBL clones were CD16+ CD56+. CD3- DGL and PBL clones, whether CD16+ or not, showed MHC-nonrestricted NK cell activity. However, CD3- CD16- DGL clones had low cytotoxic activity against the NK-resistant cell line BSM, whereas CD3- CD16+ DGL and CD3- PBL clones were strongly cytotoxic. Cytolytic activity has also been investigated in respect of target cell HLA-G expression, because this nonpolymorphic class I MHC molecule is expressed selectively by invasive fetal cytotrophoblast. Class I HLA Ag loss cell mutants were killed efficiently by CD3- DGL clones. Expression of transfected HLA-B8 increased their sensitivity to lysis by most CD3- DGL clones, whereas expression of transfected HLA-G commonly led to decreased target cell killing. In addition, the effects of uncloned CD3- DGL on the one-way MLR have been examined. These cells were very poor responders and, unless cultured to induce expression of class II MHC molecules, were also very poor stimulators. When fresh CD3- DGLs were added as third-party cells, either autologous or allogeneic to responder cells, [3H]TdR incorporation was decreased in the MLR. Thus, CD3- DGL clones express MHC-nonrestricted cytolytic activity, notably against HLA-negative cells, but expression of HLA-G offers protection to target cells. In addition, CD3- DGL may function to suppress allogeneic responses.

  10. Perception of affective prosody in major depression: a link to executive functions?

    PubMed

    Uekermann, Jennifer; Abdel-Hamid, Mona; Lehmkämper, Caroline; Vollmoeller, Wolfgang; Daum, Irene

    2008-07-01

    Major depression is associated with impairments of executive functions and affect perception deficits, both being linked to dysfunction of fronto-subcortical networks. So far, little is known about the relationship between cognitive and affective deficits in major depression. In the present investigation, affect perception and executive functions were assessed in 29 patients with a diagnosis of major depression (Dep) and 29 healthy controls (HC). Both groups were comparable on IQ, age, and gender distribution. Depressed patients showed deficits of perception of affective prosody, which were significantly related to inhibition, set shifting, and working memory. Our findings suggest a significant association between cognitive deficits and affect perception impairments in major depression, which may be of considerable clinical relevance and might be addressed in treatment approaches. Future studies are desirable to investigate the nature of the association in more detail.

  11. Negative affect predicts social functioning across schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: Findings from an integrated data analysis.

    PubMed

    Grove, Tyler B; Tso, Ivy F; Chun, Jinsoo; Mueller, Savanna A; Taylor, Stephan F; Ellingrod, Vicki L; McInnis, Melvin G; Deldin, Patricia J

    2016-09-30

    Most people with a serious mental illness experience significant functional impairment despite ongoing pharmacological treatment. Thus, in order to improve outcomes, a better understanding of functional predictors is needed. This study examined negative affect, a construct comprised of negative emotional experience, as a predictor of social functioning across serious mental illnesses. One hundred twenty-seven participants with schizophrenia, 113 with schizoaffective disorder, 22 with psychosis not otherwise specified, 58 with bipolar disorder, and 84 healthy controls (N=404) completed self-report negative affect measures. Elevated levels of negative affect were observed in clinical participants compared with healthy controls. For both clinical and healthy control participants, negative affect measures were significantly correlated with social functioning, and consistently explained significant amounts of variance in functioning. For clinical participants, this relationship persisted even after accounting for cognition and positive/negative symptoms. The findings suggest that negative affect is a strong predictor of outcome across these populations and treatment of serious mental illnesses should target elevated negative affect in addition to cognition and positive/negative symptoms.

  12. Molecular functions and cellular roles of the ChlR1 (DDX11) helicase defective in the rare cohesinopathy Warsaw breakage syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Khan, Irfan; Banerjee, Taraswi; Sommers, Joshua A.; Wu, Yuliang

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, a new recessive cohesinopathy disorder, designated Warsaw breakage syndrome (WABS), was described. The individual with WABS displayed microcephaly, pre- and postnatal growth retardation, and abnormal skin pigmentation. Cytogenetic analysis revealed mitomycin C (MMC)-induced chromosomal breakage; however, an additional sister chromatid cohesion defect was also observed. WABS is genetically linked to bi-allelic mutations in the ChlR1/DDX11 gene which encodes a protein of the conserved family of Iron–Sulfur (Fe–S) cluster DNA helicases. Mutations in the budding yeast ortholog of ChlR1, known as Chl1, were known to cause sister chromatid cohesion defects, indicating a conserved function of the gene. In 2012, three affected siblings were identified with similar symptoms to the original WABS case, and found to have a homozygous mutation in the conserved Fe–S domain of ChlR1, confirming the genetic linkage. Significantly, the clinically relevant mutations perturbed ChlR1 DNA unwinding activity. In addition to its genetic importance in human disease, ChlR1 is implicated in papillomavirus genome maintenance and cancer. Although its precise functions in genome homeostasis are still not well understood, ongoing molecular studies of ChlR1 suggest the helicase plays a critically important role in cellular replication and/or DNA repair. PMID:24487782

  13. Linking and Psychological Functioning in a Chinese Sample: The Multiple Mediation of Response to Positive Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Hongfei; Li, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the associations between linking, response to positive affect, and psychological functioning in Chinese college students. The results of conducting multiple mediation analyses indicated that emotion- and self-focused positive rumination mediated the relationship between linking and psychological functioning, whereas…

  14. Determining place and process: functional traits of ectomycorrhizal fungi that affect both community structure and ecosystem function.

    PubMed

    Koide, Roger T; Fernandez, Christopher; Malcolm, Glenna

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing interest amongst community ecologists in functional traits. Response traits determine membership in communities. Effect traits influence ecosystem function. One goal of community ecology is to predict the effect of environmental change on ecosystem function. Environmental change can directly and indirectly affect ecosystem function. Indirect effects are mediated through shifts in community structure. It is difficult to predict how environmental change will affect ecosystem function via the indirect route when the change in effect trait distribution is not predictable from the change in response trait distribution. When response traits function as effect traits, however, it becomes possible to predict the indirect effect of environmental change on ecosystem function. Here we illustrate four examples in which key attributes of ectomycorrhizal fungi function as both response and effect traits. While plant ecologists have discussed response and effect traits in the context of community structuring and ecosystem function, this approach has not been applied to ectomycorrhizal fungi. This is unfortunate because of the large effects of ectomycorrhizal fungi on ecosystem function. We hope to stimulate further research in this area in the hope of better predicting the ecosystem- and landscape-level effects of the fungi as influenced by changing environmental conditions.

  15. The E-domain region of mechano-growth factor inhibits cellular apoptosis and preserves cardiac function during myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Mavrommatis, Evangelos; Shioura, Krystyna M; Los, Tamara; Goldspink, Paul H

    2013-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) isoforms are expressed via alternative splicing. Expression of the minor isoform IGF-1Eb [also known as mechano-growth factor (MGF)] is responsive to cell stress. Since IGF-1 isoforms differ in their E-domain regions, we are interested in determining the biological function of the MGF E-domain. To do so, a synthetic peptide analog was used to gain mechanistic insight into the actions of the E-domain. Treatment of H9c2 cells indicated a rapid cellular uptake mechanism that did not involve IGF-1 receptor activation but resulted in a nuclear localization. Peptide treatment inhibited the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in H9c2 cells subjected to cell stress with sorbitol by preventing the collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential and inhibition of caspase-3 activation. Therefore, we administered the peptide at the time of myocardial infarction (MI) in mice. At 2 weeks post-MI cardiac function, gene expression and cell death were assayed. A significant decline in both systolic and diastolic function was evident in untreated mice based on PV loop analysis. Delivery of the E-peptide ameliorated the decline in function and resulted in significant preservation of cardiac contractility. Associated with these changes were an inhibition of pathologic hypertrophy and significantly fewer apoptotic nuclei in the viable myocardium of E-peptide-treated mice post-MI. We conclude that administration of the MGF E-domain peptide may provide a means of modulating local tissue IGF-1 autocrine/paracrine actions to preserve cardiac function, prevent cell death, and pathologic remodeling in the heart.

  16. Interferon-β Induces Cellular Senescence in Cutaneous Human Papilloma Virus-Transformed Human Keratinocytes by Affecting p53 Transactivating Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chiantore, Maria V.; Vannucchi, Serena; Accardi, Rosita; Tommasino, Massimo; Percario, Zulema A.; Vaccari, Gabriele; Affabris, Elisabetta; Fiorucci, Gianna; Romeo, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Interferon (IFN)-β inhibits cell proliferation and affects cell cycle in keratinocytes transformed by both mucosal high risk Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) and cutaneous HPV E6 and E7 proteins. In particular, upon longer IFN-β treatments, cutaneous HPV38 expressing cells undergo senescence. IFN-β appears to induce senescence by upregulating the expression of the tumor suppressor PML, a well known IFN-induced gene. Indeed, experiments in gene silencing via specific siRNAs have shown that PML is essential in the execution of the senescence programme and that both p53 and p21 pathways are involved. IFN-β treatment leads to a modulation of p53 phosphorylation and acetylation status and a reduction in the expression of the p53 dominant negative ΔNp73. These effects allow the recovery of p53 transactivating activity of target genes involved in the control of cell proliferation. Taken together, these studies suggest that signaling through the IFN pathway might play an important role in cellular senescence. This additional understanding of IFN antitumor action and mechanisms influencing tumor responsiveness or resistance appears useful in aiding further promising development of biomolecular strategies in the IFN therapy of cancer. PMID:22615843

  17. Vitamin B6 nutritional status and cellular availability of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate govern the function of the transsulfuration pathway's canonical reactions and hydrogen sulfide production via side reactions.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Jesse F; DeRatt, Barbara N; Rios-Avila, Luisa; Ralat, Maria; Stacpoole, Peter W

    2016-07-01

    The transsulfuration pathway (TS) acts in sulfur amino acid metabolism by contributing to the regulation of cellular homocysteine, cysteine production, and the generation of H2S for signaling functions. Regulation of TS pathway kinetics involves stimulation of cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) by S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and oxidants such as H2O2, and by Michaelis-Menten principles whereby substrate concentrations affect reaction rates. Although pyridoxal phosphate (PLP) serves as coenzyme for both CBS and cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), CSE exhibits much greater loss of activity than CBS during PLP insufficiency. Thus, cellular and plasma cystathionine concentrations increase in vitamin B6 deficiency mainly due to the bottleneck caused by reduced CSE activity. Because of the increase in cystathionine, the canonical production of cysteine (homocysteine → cystathionine → cysteine) is largely maintained even during vitamin B6 deficiency. Typical whole body transsulfuration flux in humans is 3-7 μmol/h per kg body weight. The in vivo kinetics of H2S production via side reactions of CBS and CSE in humans are unknown but they have been reported for cultured HepG2 cells. In these studies, cells exhibit a pronounced reduction in H2S production capacity and rates of lanthionine and homolanthionine synthesis in deficiency. In humans, plasma concentrations of lanthionine and homolanthionine exhibit little or no mean change due to 4-wk vitamin B6 restriction, nor do they respond to pyridoxine supplementation of subjects in chronically low-vitamin B6 status. Wide individual variation in responses of the H2S biomarkers to such perturbations of human vitamin B6 status suggests that the resulting modulation of H2S production may have physiological consequences in a subset of people. Supported by NIH grant DK072398. This paper refers to data from studies registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01128244 and NCT00877812.

  18. Aldehyde Oxidase Functions as a Superoxide Generating NADH Oxidase: An Important Redox Regulated Pathway of Cellular Oxygen Radical Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kundu, Tapan K.; Velayutham, Murugesan; Zweier, Jay L.

    2012-01-01

    The enzyme aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a member of the molybdenum hydroxylase family that includes xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR); however, its physiological substrates and functions remain unclear. Moreover, little is known about its role in cellular redox stress. Utilizing electron paramagnetic resonance spin trapping we measured the role of AO in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the oxidation of NADH, and the effects of inhibitors of AO on NADH-mediated superoxide ( O2•−) generation. NADH was found to be a good substrate for AO with apparent Km and Vmax values of 29μM and 12 nmol min−1 mg−1, respectively. From O2•− generation measurements by cytochrome c reduction the apparent Km and Vmax values of NADH for AO were 11 μM and 15 nmol min−1 mg−1, respectively. With NADH oxidation by AO, ≥65% of the total electron flux led to O2•− generation. Diphenyleneiodonium completely inhibited AO-mediated O2•− production confirming that this occurs at the FAD site. Inhibitors of this NADH-derived O2•− generation were studied with amidone the most potent exerting complete inhibition at 100 μM concentration, while 150 μM menadione, raloxifene or β-estradiol led to 81%, 46% or 26% inhibition, respectively. From the kinetic data, the levels of AO and NADH, O2•− production was estimated to be ~89 and ~4 nM/s in liver and heart, respectively, much higher than that estimated for XOR under similar conditions. Owing to the ubiquitous distribution of NADH, aldehydes, and other endogenous AO substrates, AO is predicted to have an important role in cellular redox stress and related disease pathogenesis. PMID:22404107

  19. Study on the effect of polysaccharides from Solanum nigrum Linne on cellular immune function in tumour-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hai; Qi, Xiaodong

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the anti-tumour effect of polysaccharides from Solanum nigrum Linne, and its relationship with the immune function of tumour-bearing organisms. MTT assay was used to observe the effect of different doses of polysaccharides from Solanum nigrum Linne on proliferation of lymphocytes in tumour-bearing mice. ELISA assay was also used to detect the levels of IL-2 in mice, and a laser scanning confocal microscope was used to detect the effect of polysaccharides from Solanum nigrum Linne on intralymphocytic free calcium ion concentration in tumour-bearing mice. Different doses of polysaccharides from Solanum nigrum Linne significantly inhibited the growth of mouse H22 solid tumours, improved the survival time of tumour-bearing mice, increased the proliferation of lymphocytes, elevated the levels of IL-2, and increased the concentration of calcium ions in the lymphocytes. Polysaccharides from Solanum nigrum Linne have certain anti-tumour effect, which is related with the cellular immune function that regulates the body. PMID:24146499

  20. Cellular interactions and stimulated biological functions mediated by nanostructured carbon for tissue reconstruction and tracheal tubes and sutures.

    PubMed

    Misra, R D K; Chaudhari, P M

    2013-02-01

    Nylon 6,6 is used for biological applications including gastrointestinal segments, tracheal tubes and sutures, vascular graft, and for hard tissue reconstruction. While it is a relatively inexpensive polymer, it is not widely acceptable as a preferred biomaterial because of bioactivity. To this end, we have discovered the exciting evidence that introduction of a novel nanostructured carbon, graphene, in the void space between the nylon chains and processing at elevated pressure favorably stimulates cellular functions and provides high degree of cytocompatibility. The cell-substrate interactions on stand alone Nylon 6,6 and Nylon 6,6-graphene oxide hybrid system were investigated in terms of cell attachment, viability, proliferation, and assessment of proteins, actin, vinculin, and fibronectin. The enhanced biological functions in the nanostructured hybrid system are attributed to relatively superior hydrophilicity of the surface and to the presence of graphene. Furthermore, it is proposed that the negatively charged graphene interacts with the polar nature of cells and the culture medium, such that the interaction is promoted through polar forces. This is accomplished by investigating cell attachment, proliferation, and morphology, including cytomorphometry evaluation, and quantitative assessment of prominent proteins, actin, vinculin, and fibronectin that are sensitive to cell-substrate interactions. Osteoblasts were studied to establish the practical viability of the hybrid nanostructured biomaterial. The study strengthens the foundation for utilizing nano- or quantum-size effects of nanostructured biomaterials.

  1. Arabidopsis thaliana expresses two functional isoforms of Arvp, a protein involved in the regulation of cellular lipid homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Forés, Oriol; Arró, Montserrat; Pahissa, Albert; Ferrero, Sergi; Germann, Melody; Stukey, Joseph; McDonough, Virginia; Nickels, Joseph T; Campos, Narciso; Ferrer, Albert

    2006-07-01

    Arv1p is involved in the regulation of cellular lipid homeostasis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we report the characterization of the two Arabidopsis thaliana ARV genes and the encoded proteins, AtArv1p and AtArv2p. The functional identity of AtArv1p and AtArv2p was demonstrated by complementation of the thermosensitive phenotype of the arv1Delta yeast mutant strain YJN1756. Both A. thaliana proteins contain the bipartite Arv1 homology domain (AHD), which consists of an NH(2)-terminal cysteine-rich subdomain with a putative zinc-binding motif followed by a C-terminal subdomain of 33 amino acids. Removal of the cysteine-rich subdomain has no effect on Arvp activity, whereas the presence of the C-terminal subdomain of the AHD is critical for Arvp function. Localization experiments of AtArv1p and AtArv2p tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expressed in onion epidermal cells demonstrated that both proteins are exclusively targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum. Analysis of beta-glucuronidase (GUS) activity in transgenic A. thaliana plants carrying chimeric ARV1::GUS and ARV2::GUS genes showed that ARV gene promoters direct largely overlapping patterns of expression that are restricted to tissues in which cells are actively dividing or expanding. The results of this study support the notion that plants, yeast and mammals share common molecular mechanisms regulating intracellular lipid homeostasis.

  2. Toxicity of Functional Nano-Micro Zinc Oxide Tetrapods: Impact of Cell Culture Conditions, Cellular Age and Material Properties

    PubMed Central

    Papavlassopoulos, Heike; Mishra, Yogendra K.; Kaps, Sören; Paulowicz, Ingo; Abdelaziz, Ramzy; Elbahri, Mady; Maser, Edmund; Adelung, Rainer; Röhl, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    With increasing production and applications of nanostructured zinc oxide, e.g., for biomedical and consumer products, the question of safety is getting more and more important. Different morphologies of zinc oxide structures have been synthesized and accordingly investigated. In this study, we have particularly focused on nano-micro ZnO tetrapods (ZnO-T), because their large scale fabrication has been made possible by a newly introduced flame transport synthesis approach which will probably lead to several new applications. Moreover, ZnO-T provide a completely different morphology then classical spherical ZnO nanoparticles. To get a better understanding of parameters that affect the interactions between ZnO-T and mammalian cells, and thus their biocompatibility, we have examined the impact of cell culture conditions as well as of material properties on cytotoxicity. Our results demonstrate that the cell density of fibroblasts in culture along with their age, i.e., the number of preceding cell divisions, strongly affect the cytotoxic potency of ZnO-T. Concerning the material properties, the toxic potency of ZnO-T is found to be significantly lower than that of spherical ZnO nanoparticles. Furthermore, the morphology of the ZnO-T influenced cellular toxicity in contrast to surface charges modified by UV illumination or O2 treatment and to the material age. Finally, we have observed that direct contact between tetrapods and cells increases their toxicity compared to transwell culture models which allow only an indirect effect via released zinc ions. The results reveal several parameters that can be of importance for the assessment of ZnO-T toxicity in cell cultures and for particle development. PMID:24454775

  3. Toxicity of functional nano-micro zinc oxide tetrapods: impact of cell culture conditions, cellular age and material properties.

    PubMed

    Papavlassopoulos, Heike; Mishra, Yogendra K; Kaps, Sören; Paulowicz, Ingo; Abdelaziz, Ramzy; Elbahri, Mady; Maser, Edmund; Adelung, Rainer; Röhl, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    With increasing production and applications of nanostructured zinc oxide, e.g., for biomedical and consumer products, the question of safety is getting more and more important. Different morphologies of zinc oxide structures have been synthesized and accordingly investigated. In this study, we have particularly focused on nano-micro ZnO tetrapods (ZnO-T), because their large scale fabrication has been made possible by a newly introduced flame transport synthesis approach which will probably lead to several new applications. Moreover, ZnO-T provide a completely different morphology then classical spherical ZnO nanoparticles. To get a better understanding of parameters that affect the interactions between ZnO-T and mammalian cells, and thus their biocompatibility, we have examined the impact of cell culture conditions as well as of material properties on cytotoxicity. Our results demonstrate that the cell density of fibroblasts in culture along with their age, i.e., the number of preceding cell divisions, strongly affect the cytotoxic potency of ZnO-T. Concerning the material properties, the toxic potency of ZnO-T is found to be significantly lower than that of spherical ZnO nanoparticles. Furthermore, the morphology of the ZnO-T influenced cellular toxicity in contrast to surface charges modified by UV illumination or O2 treatment and to the material age. Finally, we have observed that direct contact between tetrapods and cells increases their toxicity compared to transwell culture models which allow only an indirect effect via released zinc ions. The results reveal several parameters that can be of importance for the assessment of ZnO-T toxicity in cell cultures and for particle development.

  4. Fc Engineering of Human IgG1 for Altered Binding to the Neonatal Fc Receptor Affects Fc Effector Functions.

    PubMed

    Grevys, Algirdas; Bern, Malin; Foss, Stian; Bratlie, Diane Bryant; Moen, Anders; Gunnarsen, Kristin Støen; Aase, Audun; Michaelsen, Terje Einar; Sandlie, Inger; Andersen, Jan Terje

    2015-06-01

    Engineering of the constant Fc part of monoclonal human IgG1 (hIgG1) Abs is an approach to improve effector functions and clinical efficacy of next-generation IgG1-based therapeutics. A main focus in such development is tailoring of in vivo half-life and transport properties by engineering the pH-dependent interaction between IgG and the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), as FcRn is the main homeostatic regulator of hIgG1 half-life. However, whether such engineering affects binding to other Fc-binding molecules, such as the classical FcγRs and complement factor C1q, has not been studied in detail. These effector molecules bind to IgG1 in the lower hinge-CH2 region, structurally distant from the binding site for FcRn at the CH2-CH3 elbow region. However, alterations of the structural composition of the Fc may have long-distance effects. Indeed, in this study we show that Fc engineering of hIgG1 for altered binding to FcRn also influences binding to both the classical FcγRs and complement factor C1q, which ultimately results in alterations of cellular mechanisms such as Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis, and Ab-dependent complement-mediated cell lysis. Thus, engineering of the FcRn-IgG1 interaction may greatly influence effector functions, which has implications for the therapeutic efficacy and use of Fc-engineered hIgG1 variants.

  5. Fc Engineering of Human IgG1 for Altered Binding to the Neonatal Fc Receptor Affects Fc Effector Functions

    PubMed Central

    Grevys, Algirdas; Bern, Malin; Foss, Stian; Bratlie, Diane Bryant; Moen, Anders; Gunnarsen, Kristin Støen; Aase, Audun; Michaelsen, Terje Einar; Sandlie, Inger

    2015-01-01

    Engineering of the constant Fc part of monoclonal human IgG1 (hIgG1) Abs is an approach to improve effector functions and clinical efficacy of next-generation IgG1-based therapeutics. A main focus in such development is tailoring of in vivo half-life and transport properties by engineering the pH-dependent interaction between IgG and the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn), as FcRn is the main homeostatic regulator of hIgG1 half-life. However, whether such engineering affects binding to other Fc-binding molecules, such as the classical FcγRs and complement factor C1q, has not been studied in detail. These effector molecules bind to IgG1 in the lower hinge–CH2 region, structurally distant from the binding site for FcRn at the CH2–CH3 elbow region. However, alterations of the structural composition of the Fc may have long-distance effects. Indeed, in this study we show that Fc engineering of hIgG1 for altered binding to FcRn also influences binding to both the classical FcγRs and complement factor C1q, which ultimately results in alterations of cellular mechanisms such as Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, Ab-dependent cellular phagocytosis, and Ab-dependent complement-mediated cell lysis. Thus, engineering of the FcRn–IgG1 interaction may greatly influence effector functions, which has implications for the therapeutic efficacy and use of Fc-engineered hIgG1 variants. PMID:25904551

  6. The Bioavailability of Soluble Cigarette Smoke Extract Is Reduced through Interactions with Cells and Affects the Cellular Response to CSE Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bourgeois, Jeffrey S.; Jacob, Jeeva; Garewal, Aram; Ndahayo, Renata; Paxson, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Cellular exposure to cigarette smoke leads to an array of complex responses including apoptosis, cellular senescence, telomere dysfunction, cellular aging, and neoplastic transformation. To study the cellular response to cigarette smoke, a common in vitro model exposes cultured cells to a nominal concentration (i.e. initial concentration) of soluble cigarette smoke extract (CSE). However, we report that use of the nominal concentration of CSE as the only measure of cellular exposure is inadequate. Instead, we demonstrate that cellular response to CSE exposure is dependent not only on the nominal concentration of CSE, but also on specific experimental variables, including the total cell number, and the volume of CSE solution used. As found in other similar xenobiotic assays, our work suggests that the effective dose of CSE is more accurately related to the amount of bioavailable chemicals per cell. In particular, interactions of CSE components both with cells and other physical factors limit CSE bioavailability, as demonstrated by a quantifiably reduced cellular response to CSE that is first modified by such interactions. This has broad implications for the nature of cellular response to CSE exposure, and for the design of in vitro assays using CSE. PMID:27649082

  7. The Bioavailability of Soluble Cigarette Smoke Extract Is Reduced through Interactions with Cells and Affects the Cellular Response to CSE Exposure.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Jeffrey S; Jacob, Jeeva; Garewal, Aram; Ndahayo, Renata; Paxson, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Cellular exposure to cigarette smoke leads to an array of complex responses including apoptosis, cellular senescence, telomere dysfunction, cellular aging, and neoplastic transformation. To study the cellular response to cigarette smoke, a common in vitro model exposes cultured cells to a nominal concentration (i.e. initial concentration) of soluble cigarette smoke extract (CSE). However, we report that use of the nominal concentration of CSE as the only measure of cellular exposure is inadequate. Instead, we demonstrate that cellular response to CSE exposure is dependent not only on the nominal concentration of CSE, but also on specific experimental variables, including the total cell number, and the volume of CSE solution used. As found in other similar xenobiotic assays, our work suggests that the effective dose of CSE is more accurately related to the amount of bioavailable chemicals per cell. In particular, interactions of CSE components both with cells and other physical factors limit CSE bioavailability, as demonstrated by a quantifiably reduced cellular response to CSE that is first modified by such interactions. This has broad implications for the nature of cellular response to CSE exposure, and for the design of in vitro assays using CSE. PMID:27649082

  8. Plant Species and Functional Group Combinations Affect Green Roof Ecosystem Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lundholm, Jeremy; MacIvor, J. Scott; MacDougall, Zachary; Ranalli, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Background Green roofs perform ecosystem services such as summer roof temperature reduction and stormwater capture that directly contribute to lower building energy use and potential economic savings. These services are in turn related to ecosystem functions performed by the vegetation layer such as radiation reflection and transpiration, but little work has examined the role of plant species composition and diversity in improving these functions. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a replicated modular extensive (shallow growing- medium) green roof system planted with monocultures or mixtures containing one, three or five life-forms, to quantify two ecosystem services: summer roof cooling and water capture. We also measured the related ecosystem properties/processes of albedo, evapotranspiration, and the mean and temporal variability of aboveground biomass over four months. Mixtures containing three or five life-form groups, simultaneously optimized several green roof ecosystem functions, outperforming monocultures and single life-form groups, but there was much variation in performance depending on which life-forms were present in the three life-form mixtures. Some mixtures outperformed the best monocultures for water capture, evapotranspiration, and an index combining both water capture and temperature reductions. Combinations of tall forbs, grasses and succulents simultaneously optimized a range of ecosystem performance measures, thus the main benefit of including all three groups was not to maximize any single process but to perform a variety of functions well. Conclusions/Significance Ecosystem services from green roofs can be improved by planting certain life-form groups in combination, directly contributing to climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies. The strong performance by certain mixtures of life-forms, especially tall forbs, grasses and succulents, warrants further investigation into niche complementarity or facilitation as mechanisms

  9. Affect and the Brain's Functional Organization: A Resting-State Connectivity Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rohr, Christiane S.; Okon-Singer, Hadas; Craddock, R. Cameron; Villringer, Arno; Margulies, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    The question of how affective processing is organized in the brain is still a matter of controversial discussions. Based on previous initial evidence, several suggestions have been put forward regarding the involved brain areas: (a) right-lateralized dominance in emotional processing, (b) hemispheric dominance according to positive or negative valence, (c) one network for all emotional processing and (d) region-specific discrete emotion matching. We examined these hypotheses by investigating intrinsic functional connectivity patterns that covary with results of the Positive and Negative Affective Schedule (PANAS) from 65 participants. This approach has the advantage of being able to test connectivity rather than activation, and not requiring a potentially confounding task. Voxelwise functional connectivity from 200 regions-of-interest covering the whole brain was assessed. Positive and negative affect covaried with functional connectivity involving a shared set of regions, including the medial prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate, the visual cortex and the cerebellum. In addition, each affective domain had unique connectivity patterns, and the lateralization index showed a right hemispheric dominance for negative affect. Therefore, our results suggest a predominantly right-hemispheric network with affect-specific elements as the underlying organization of emotional processes. PMID:23935850

  10. Sexual function and affect in parkinsonian men treated with L-dopa.

    PubMed

    Brown, E; Brown, G M; Kofman, O; Quarrington, B

    1978-12-01

    Using psychiatric interviews, sexual and affect rating scales, hormonal studies, and neurologic assessment, the authors assessed the effect of L-dopa treatment on men with Parkinson's disease. Patients demonstrated variable affect changes. Approximately one-half of the patients reported an increased sexual interest that was not related to improvement in locomotor function. Hormonal factors appeared to be involved. The findings suggest that male parkinsonian patients who possess an intact hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis experience increased sexual function related to L-dopa treatment.

  11. D77, one benzoic acid derivative, functions as a novel anti-HIV-1 inhibitor targeting the interaction between integrase and cellular LEDGF/p75

    SciTech Connect

    Du Li; Zhao Yaxue; Chen, Jing; Yang Liumeng; Zheng Yongtang; Tang Yun Shen Xu Jiang Hualiang

    2008-10-10

    Integration of viral-DNA into host chromosome mediated by the viral protein HIV-1 integrase (IN) is an essential step in the HIV-1 life cycle. In this process, Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75) is discovered to function as a cellular co-factor for integration. Since LEDGF/p75 plays an important role in HIV integration, disruption of the LEDGF/p75 interaction with IN has provided a special interest for anti-HIV agent discovery. In this work, we reported that a benzoic acid derivative, 4-[(5-bromo-4-{l_brace}[2,4-dioxo-3-(2-oxo-2-phenylethyl) -1,3-thiazolidin-5-ylidene]methyl{r_brace}-2-ethoxyphenoxy)methyl]benzoic acid (D77) could potently inhibit the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction and affect the HIV-1 IN nuclear distribution thus exhibiting antiretroviral activity. Molecular docking with site-directed mutagenesis analysis and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) binding assays has clarified possible binding mode of D77 against HIV-1 integrase. As the firstly discovered small molecular compound targeting HIV-1 integrase interaction with LEDGF/p75, D77 might supply useful structural information for further anti-HIV agent discovery.

  12. SAP gene transfer restores cellular and humoral immune function in a murine model of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Rivat, Christine; Booth, Claire; Alonso-Ferrero, Maria; Blundell, Michael; Sebire, Neil J; Thrasher, Adrian J; Gaspar, H Bobby

    2013-02-14

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP1) arises from mutations in the gene encoding SLAM-associated protein (SAP) and leads to abnormalities of NKT-cell development, NK-cell cytotoxicity, and T-dependent humoral function. Curative treatment is limited to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. We tested whether HSC gene therapy could correct the multilineage defects seen in SAP(-/-) mice. SAP(-/-) murine HSCs were transduced with lentiviral vectors containing either SAP or reporter gene before transplantation into irradiated recipients. NKT-cell development was significantly higher and NK-cell cytotoxicity restored to wild-type levels in mice receiving the SAP vector in comparison to control mice. Baseline immunoglobulin levels were significantly increased and T-dependent humoral responses to NP-CGG, including germinal center formation, were restored in SAP-transduced mice.We demonstrate for the first time that HSC gene transfer corrects the cellular and humoral defects in SAP(-/-) mice providing proof of concept for gene therapy in XLP1.

  13. Gall-forming root-knot nematodes hijack key plant cellular functions to induce multinucleate and hypertrophied feeding cells.

    PubMed

    Favery, Bruno; Quentin, Michaël; Jaubert-Possamai, Stéphanie; Abad, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Among plant-parasitic nematodes, the root-knot nematodes (RKNs) of the Meloidogyne spp. are the most economically important genus. RKN are root parasitic worms able to infect nearly all crop species and have a wide geographic distribution. During infection, RKNs establish and maintain an intimate relationship with the host plant. This includes the creation of a specialized nutritional structure composed of multinucleate and hypertrophied giant cells, which result from the redifferentiation of vascular root cells. Giant cells constitute the sole source of nutrients for the nematode and are essential for growth and reproduction. Hyperplasia of surrounding root cells leads to the formation of the gall or root-knot, an easily recognized symptom of plant infection by RKNs. Secreted effectors produced in nematode salivary glands and injected into plant cells through a specialized feeding structure called the stylet play a critical role in the formation of giant cells. Here, we describe the complex interactions between RKNs and their host plants. We highlight progress in understanding host plant responses, focusing on how RKNs manipulate key plant processes and functions, including cell cycle, defence, hormones, cellular scaffold, metabolism and transport.

  14. Investigation of potential effects of cellular phones on human auditory function by means of distortion product otoacoustic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Thomas; Boege, Paul; von Mikusch-Buchberg, Jutta; Raczek, Johannes

    2005-03-01

    Outer hair cells (OHC) are thought to act like piezoelectric transducers that amplify low sounds and hence enable the ear's exquisite sensitivity. Distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) reflect OHC function. The present study investigated potential effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) of GSM (Global System for Mobile Communication) cellular phones on OHCs by means of DPOAEs. DPOAE measurements were performed during exposure, i.e., between consecutive GSM signal pulses, and during sham exposure (no EMF) in 28 normally hearing subjects at tone frequencies around 4 kHz. For a reliable DPOAE measurement, a 900-MHz GSM-like signal was used where transmission pause was increased from 4.034 ms (GSM standard) to 24.204 ms. Peak transmitter power was set to 20 W, corresponding to a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.1 W/kg. No significant change in the DPOAE level in response to the EMF exposure was found. However, when undesired side effects on DPOAEs were compensated, in some subjects an extremely small EMF-exposure-correlated change in the DPOAE level (<1 dB) was observed. In view of the very large dynamic range of hearing in humans (120 dB), it is suggested that this observation is physiologically irrelevant. .

  15. Robust passive and active efflux of cellular cholesterol to a designer functional mimic of high density lipoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Luthi, Andrea J.; Lyssenko, Nicholas N.; Quach, Duyen; McMahon, Kaylin M.; Millar, John S.; Vickers, Kasey C.; Rader, Daniel J.; Phillips, Michael C.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Thaxton, C. Shad

    2015-01-01

    The ability of HDL to support macrophage cholesterol efflux is an integral part of its atheroprotective action. Augmenting this ability, especially when HDL cholesterol efflux capacity from macrophages is poor, represents a promising therapeutic strategy. One approach to enhancing macrophage cholesterol efflux is infusing blood with HDL mimics. Previously, we reported the synthesis of a functional mimic of HDL (fmHDL) that consists of a gold nanoparticle template, a phospholipid bilayer, and apo A-I. In this work, we characterize the ability of fmHDL to support the well-established pathways of cellular cholesterol efflux from model cell lines and primary macrophages. fmHDL received cell cholesterol by unmediated (aqueous) and ABCG1- and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI)-mediated diffusion. Furthermore, the fmHDL holoparticle accepted cholesterol and phospholipid by the ABCA1 pathway. These results demonstrate that fmHDL supports all the cholesterol efflux pathways available to native HDL and thus, represents a promising infusible therapeutic for enhancing macrophage cholesterol efflux. fmHDL accepts cholesterol from cells by all known pathways of cholesterol efflux: unmediated, ABCG1- and SR-BI-mediated diffusion, and through ABCA1. PMID:25652088

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein phosphatase 2A performs an essential cellular function and is encoded by two genes.

    PubMed Central

    Sneddon, A A; Cohen, P T; Stark, M J

    1990-01-01

    Two genes (PPH21 and PPH22) encoding the yeast homologues of protein serine-threonine phosphatase 2A have been cloned from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomic library using a rabbit protein phosphatase 2A cDNA as a hybridization probe. The PPH genes are genetically linked on chromosome IV and are predicted to encode polypeptides each with 74% amino acid sequence identity to rabbit type 2A protein phosphatase, indicating once again the extraordinarily high degree of sequence conservation shown by protein-phosphatases from different species. The two PPH genes show less than 10% amino acid sequence divergence from each other and while disruption of either PPH gene alone is without any major effect, the double disruption is lethal. This indicates that protein phosphatase 2A activity is an essential cellular function in yeast. Measurement of type 2A protein phosphatase activity in yeast strains lacking one or other of the genes indicates that they account for most, if not all, protein phosphatase 2A activity in the cell. Images Fig. 5. PMID:2176150

  17. CFH Variants Affect Structural and Functional Brain Changes and Genetic Risk of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Deng-Feng; Li, Jin; Wu, Huan; Cui, Yue; Bi, Rui; Zhou, He-Jiang; Wang, Hui-Zhen; Zhang, Chen; Wang, Dong; Kong, Qing-Peng; Li, Tao; Fang, Yiru; Jiang, Tianzi; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-03-01

    The immune response is highly active in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Identification of genetic risk contributed by immune genes to AD may provide essential insight for the prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment of this neurodegenerative disease. In this study, we performed a genetic screening for AD-related top immune genes identified in Europeans in a Chinese cohort, followed by a multiple-stage study focusing on Complement Factor H (CFH) gene. Effects of the risk SNPs on AD-related neuroimaging endophenotypes were evaluated through magnetic resonance imaging scan, and the effects on AD cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers (CSF) and CFH expression changes were measured in aged and AD brain tissues and AD cellular models. Our results showed that the AD-associated top immune genes reported in Europeans (CR1, CD33, CLU, and TREML2) have weak effects in Chinese, whereas CFH showed strong effects. In particular, rs1061170 (P(meta)=5.0 × 10(-4)) and rs800292 (P(meta)=1.3 × 10(-5)) showed robust associations with AD, which were confirmed in multiple world-wide sample sets (4317 cases and 16 795 controls). Rs1061170 (P=2.5 × 10(-3)) and rs800292 (P=4.7 × 10(-4)) risk-allele carriers have an increased entorhinal thickness in their young age and a higher atrophy rate as the disease progresses. Rs800292 risk-allele carriers have higher CSF tau and Aβ levels and severe cognitive decline. CFH expression level, which was affected by the risk-alleles, was increased in AD brains and cellular models. These comprehensive analyses suggested that CFH is an important immune factor in AD and affects multiple pathological changes in early life and during disease progress.

  18. CFH Variants Affect Structural and Functional Brain Changes and Genetic Risk of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Deng-Feng; Li, Jin; Wu, Huan; Cui, Yue; Bi, Rui; Zhou, He-Jiang; Wang, Hui-Zhen; Zhang, Chen; Wang, Dong; Kong, Qing-Peng; Li, Tao; Fang, Yiru; Jiang, Tianzi; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-03-01

    The immune response is highly active in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Identification of genetic risk contributed by immune genes to AD may provide essential insight for the prognosis, diagnosis, and treatment of this neurodegenerative disease. In this study, we performed a genetic screening for AD-related top immune genes identified in Europeans in a Chinese cohort, followed by a multiple-stage study focusing on Complement Factor H (CFH) gene. Effects of the risk SNPs on AD-related neuroimaging endophenotypes were evaluated through magnetic resonance imaging scan, and the effects on AD cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers (CSF) and CFH expression changes were measured in aged and AD brain tissues and AD cellular models. Our results showed that the AD-associated top immune genes reported in Europeans (CR1, CD33, CLU, and TREML2) have weak effects in Chinese, whereas CFH showed strong effects. In particular, rs1061170 (P(meta)=5.0 × 10(-4)) and rs800292 (P(meta)=1.3 × 10(-5)) showed robust associations with AD, which were confirmed in multiple world-wide sample sets (4317 cases and 16 795 controls). Rs1061170 (P=2.5 × 10(-3)) and rs800292 (P=4.7 × 10(-4)) risk-allele carriers have an increased entorhinal thickness in their young age and a higher atrophy rate as the disease progresses. Rs800292 risk-allele carriers have higher CSF tau and Aβ levels and severe cognitive decline. CFH expression level, which was affected by the risk-alleles, was increased in AD brains and cellular models. These comprehensive analyses suggested that CFH is an important immune factor in AD and affects multiple pathological changes in early life and during disease progress. PMID:26243271

  19. Design, Surface Treatment, Cellular Plating, and Culturing of Modular Neuronal Networks Composed of Functionally Inter-connected Circuits.

    PubMed

    Kanner, Sivan; Bisio, Marta; Cohen, Gilad; Goldin, Miri; Tedesco, Marieteresa; Hanein, Yael; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Barzilai, Ari; Chiappalone, Michela; Bonifazi, Paolo

    2015-04-15

    The brain operates through the coordinated activation and the dynamic communication of neuronal assemblies. A major open question is how a vast repertoire of dynamical motifs, which underlie most diverse brain functions, can emerge out of a fixed topological and modular organization of brain circuits. Compared to in vivo studies of neuronal circuits which present intrinsic experimental difficulties, in vitro preparations offer a much larger possibility to manipulate and probe the structural, dynamical and chemical properties of experimental neuronal systems. This work describes an in vitro experimental methodology which allows growing of modular networks composed by spatially distinct, functionally interconnected neuronal assemblies. The protocol allows controlling the two-dimensional (2D) architecture of the neuronal network at different levels of topological complexity. A desired network patterning can be achieved both on regular cover slips and substrate embedded micro electrode arrays. Micromachined structures are embossed on a silicon wafer and used to create biocompatible polymeric stencils, which incorporate the negative features of the desired network architecture. The stencils are placed on the culturing substrates during the surface coating procedure with a molecular layer for promoting cellular adhesion. After removal of the stencils, neurons are plated and they spontaneously redirected to the coated areas. By decreasing the inter-compartment distance, it is possible to obtain either isolated or interconnected neuronal circuits. To promote cell survival, cells are co-cultured with a supporting neuronal network which is located at the periphery of the culture dish. Electrophysiological and optical recordings of the activity of modular networks obtained respectively by using substrate embedded micro electrode arrays and calcium imaging are presented. While each module shows spontaneous global synchronizations, the occurrence of inter-module synchronization

  20. Estrogen-related Receptor β Reduces the Subnuclear Mobility of Estrogen Receptor α and Suppresses Estrogen-dependent Cellular Function*

    PubMed Central

    Tanida, Takashi; Matsuda, Ken Ichi; Yamada, Shunji; Hashimoto, Takashi; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptor (ERR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that has strong homology with estrogen receptor (ER) α. ERR has three subtypes (α, β, and γ) expressed in estrogen-sensitive organs, including ovary, breast, and brain. No endogenous ligands of ERRs have been identified, but these receptors share a common DNA element with ERα and control estrogen-mediated gene transcription. Recent evidence suggests a role of ERRs in estrogen-related pathophysiology, but the detailed mechanisms of ERR functions in estrogen-related tissues are unclear. Using live-cell imaging with fluorescent protein labeling, we found that only ERRβ among the ERRs exhibits a punctate intranuclear pattern overlapping with ERα following 17β-estradiol (E2)-stimulation. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching showed significant reduction of the mobility of ligand-activated ERα with co-expression of ERRβ. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer revealed that ERRβ directly interacts with ERα. The N-terminal domain of ERRβ was identified as the region that interacts with ERα. We also found a correlation between punctate cluster formation of ERα and interaction between the receptors. Expression of ERRβ significantly repressed ERα-mediated transactivity, whereas that of other ERR subtypes had no effect on the transactivity of ERα. Consistent with this finding, E2-stimulated proliferation of MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells and bcl-2 expression was significantly inhibited by expression of ERRβ. These results provide strong evidence for a suppressive effect of ERRβ on estrogen signaling through reduction of the intranuclear mobility of ERα. The findings further suggest a unique inhibitory role for ERRβ in estrogen-dependent cellular function such as cancer cell proliferation. PMID:25805499

  1. Functional evidence for ligand-dependent dissociation of thyroid hormone and retinoic acid receptors from an inhibitory cellular factor.

    PubMed Central

    Casanova, J; Helmer, E; Selmi-Ruby, S; Qi, J S; Au-Fliegner, M; Desai-Yajnik, V; Koudinova, N; Yarm, F; Raaka, B M; Samuels, H H

    1994-01-01

    The ligand-binding domains of thyroid hormone (L-triiodothyronine [T3]) receptors (T3Rs), all-trans retinoic acid (RA) receptors (RARs), and 9-cis RA receptors (RARs and RXRs) contain a series of heptad motifs thought to be important for dimeric interactions. Using a chimera containing amino acids 120 to 392 of chicken T3R alpha (cT3R alpha) positioned between the DNA-binding domain of the yeast GAL4 protein and the potent 90-amino-acid transactivating domain of the herpes simplex virus VP16 protein (GAL4-T3R-VP16), we provide functional evidence that binding of ligand releases T3Rs and RARs from an inhibitory cellular factor. GAL4-T3R-VP16 does not bind T3 and does not activate transcription from a GAL4 reporter when expressed alone but is able to activate transcription when coexpressed with unliganded T3R or RAR. This activation is reversed by T3 or RA, suggesting that these receptors compete with GAL4-T3R-VP16 for a cellular inhibitor and that ligand reverses this effect by dissociating T3R or RAR from the inhibitor. A chimera containing the entire ligand-binding domain of cT3R alpha (amino acids 120 to 408) linked to VP16 [GAL4-T3R(408)-VP16] is activated by unliganded receptor as well as by T3. In contrast, GAL4-T3R containing the amino acid 120 to 408 ligand-binding region without the VP16 domain is activated only by T3. The highly conserved ninth heptad, which is involved in heterodimerization, appears to participate in the receptor-inhibitor interaction, suggesting that the inhibitor is a related member of the receptor gene family. In striking contrast to T3R and RAR, RXR activates GAL4-T3R-VP16 only with its ligand, 9-cis RA, but unliganded RXR does not appear to be the inhibitor suggested by these studies. Further evidence that an orphan receptor may be the inhibitor comes from our finding that COUP-TF inhibits activation of GAL4-T3R-VP16 by unliganded T3R and the activation of GAL4-T3R by T3. These and other results suggest that an inhibitory factor

  2. Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy in Japanese Patients: Clinical Features, Visual Function, and Factors Affecting Visual Function

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Saho; Saito, Wataru; Saito, Michiyuki; Hashimoto, Yuki; Mori, Shohei; Noda, Kousuke; Namba, Kenichi; Ishida, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical features and investigate their relationship with visual function in Japanese patients with acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR). Methods Fifty-two eyes of 38 Japanese AZOOR patients (31 female and 7 male patients; mean age at first visit, 35.0 years; median follow-up duration, 31 months) were retrospectively collected: 31 untreated eyes with good visual acuity and 21 systemic corticosteroid-treated eyes with progressive visual acuity loss. Variables affecting the logMAR values of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and the mean deviation (MD) on Humphrey perimetry at initial and final visits were examined using multiple stepwise linear regression analysis. Results In untreated eyes, the mean MD at the final visit was significantly higher than that at the initial visit (P = 0.00002). In corticosteroid-treated eyes, the logMAR BCVA and MD at the final visit were significantly better than the initial values (P = 0.007 and P = 0.02, respectively). The final logMAR BCVA was 0.0 or less in 85% of patients. Variables affecting initial visual function were moderate anterior vitreous cells, myopia severity, and a-wave amplitudes on electroretinography; factors affecting final visual function were the initial MD values, female sex, moderate anterior vitreous cells, and retinal atrophy. Conclusions Our data indicated that visual functions in enrolled patients significantly improved spontaneously or after systemic corticosteroids therapy, suggesting that Japanese patients with AZOOR have good visual outcomes during the follow-up period of this study. Furthermore, initial visual field defects, gender, anterior vitreous cells, and retinal atrophy affected final visual functions in these patients. PMID:25919689

  3. Cobalt and chromium exposure affects osteoblast function and impairs the mineralization of prosthesis surfaces in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shah, Karan M; Wilkinson, Jeremy Mark; Gartland, Alison

    2015-11-01

    Cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) ions and nanoparticles equivalent to those released through tribo-corrosion of prosthetic metal-on-metal (MOM) bearings and taper junctions are detrimental to osteoblast activity and function in vitro when examined as individual species. Here we examined the effects of Co(2+):Cr(3+) and Co(2+):Cr(6+) combinations on osteoblast-like SaOS-2 cellular activity, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization to better reflect clinical exposure conditions in vivo. We also assessed the effect of Co(2+):Cr(3+) combinations and Co:Cr nanoparticles on SaOS-2 cell osteogenic responses on grit-blasted, plasma-sprayed titanium-coated, and hydroxyapatite-coated prosthesis surfaces. Cellular activity and ALP activity were reduced to a greater extent with combination treatments compared to individual ions. Co(2+) and Cr(3+) interacted additively and synergistically to reduce cellular activity and ALP activity, respectively, while the Co(2+) with Cr(6+) combination was dominated by the effect of Cr(6+) alone. Mineralization by osteoblasts was greater on hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces compared to grit-blasted and plasma-sprayed titanium-coated surfaces. Treatments with Co(2+):Cr(3+) ions and Co:Cr nanoparticles reduced the percentage mineralization on all surfaces, with hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces having the least reduction. In conclusion, our data suggests that previous studies investigating individual metal ions underestimate their potential clinical effects on osteoblast activity. Furthermore, the data suggests that hydroxyapatite-coated surfaces may modulate osteoblast responses to metal debris.

  4. Handgrip Strength, Positive Affect, and Perceived Health Are Prospectively Associated with Fewer Functional Limitations among Centenarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franke, Warren D.; Margrett, Jennifer A.; Heinz, Melinda; Martin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the association between perceived health, fatigue, positive and negative affect, handgrip strength, objectively measured physical activity, body mass index, and self-reported functional limitations, assessed 6 months later, among 11 centenarians (age = 102 plus or minus 1). Activities of daily living, assessed 6 months prior to…

  5. Weight Reduction in Athletes May Adversely Affect the Phagocytic Function of Monocytes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kono, Ichiro; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Study of the monocyte phagocytic function in nine competitive athletes before and after a two-week weight reduction (through calorie restriction) program revealed that their pre-program phagocytic activity was higher than in sedentary controls but decreased significantly after the program. This suggests calorie restriction may affect the human…

  6. Automatic facial responses to affective stimuli in high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Mathersul, Danielle; McDonald, Skye; Rushby, Jacqueline A

    2013-01-17

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) demonstrate atypical behavioural responses to affective stimuli, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Investigating automatic responses to these stimuli may help elucidate these mechanisms. 18 high-functioning adults with ASDs and 18 typically developing controls viewed 54 extreme pleasant (erotica), extreme unpleasant (mutilations), and non-social neutral images from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS). Two-thirds of images received an acoustic startle probe 3s post-picture onset. Facial electromyography (EMG) activity (orbicularis, zygomaticus, corrugator), skin conductance (SCR) and cardiac responses were recorded. The adults with ASDs demonstrated typical affective startle modulation and automatic facial EMG responses but atypical autonomic (SCRs and cardiac) responses, suggesting a failure to orient to, or a deliberate effort to disconnect from, socially relevant stimuli (erotica, mutilations). These results have implications for neural systems known to underlie affective processes, including the orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala. PMID:23142408

  7. Factors affecting longitudinal functional decline and survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hazuki; Atsuta, Naoki; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Ito, Mizuki; Senda, Jo; Katsuno, Masahisa; Izumi, Yuishin; Morita, Mitsuya; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Taniguchi, Akira; Aiba, Ikuko; Abe, Koji; Mizoguchi, Kouichi; Oda, Masaya; Kano, Osamu; Okamoto, Koichi; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Imai, Takashi; Aoki, Masashi; Tsuji, Shoji; Nakano, Imaharu; Kaji, Ryuji; Sobue, Gen

    2015-06-01

    Our objective was to elucidate the clinical factors affecting functional decline and survival in Japanese amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. We constructed a multicenter prospective ALS cohort that included 451 sporadic ALS patients in the analysis. We longitudinally utilized the revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) as the functional scale, and determined the timing of introduction of a tracheostomy for positive-pressure ventilation and death. A joint modelling approach was employed to identify prognostic factors for functional decline and survival. Age at onset was a common prognostic factor for both functional decline and survival (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, respectively). Female gender (p = 0.019) and initial symptoms, including upper limb weakness (p = 0.010), lower limb weakness (p = 0.008) or bulbar symptoms (p = 0.005), were related to early functional decline, whereas neck weakness as an initial symptom (p = 0.018), non-use of riluzole (p = 0.030) and proximal dominant muscle weakness in the upper extremities (p = 0.01) were related to a shorter survival time. A decline in the ALSFRS-R score was correlated with a shortened survival time (p < 0.001). In conclusion, the factors affecting functional decline and survival in ALS were common in part but different to some extent. This difference has not been previously well recognized but is informative in clinical practice and for conducting trials.

  8. Small but powerful: top predator local extinction affects ecosystem structure and function in an intermittent stream.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Verkaik, Iraima; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2015-01-01

    Top predator loss is a major global problem, with a current trend in biodiversity loss towards high trophic levels that modifies most ecosystems worldwide. Most research in this area is focused on large-bodied predators, despite the high extinction risk of small-bodied freshwater fish that often act as apex consumers. Consequently, it remains unknown if intermittent streams are affected by the consequences of top-predators' extirpations. The aim of our research was to determine how this global problem affects intermittent streams and, in particular, if the loss of a small-bodied top predator (1) leads to a 'mesopredator release', affects primary consumers and changes whole community structures, and (2) triggers a cascade effect modifying the ecosystem function. To address these questions, we studied the top-down effects of a small endangered fish species, Barbus meridionalis (the Mediterranean barbel), conducting an enclosure/exclosure mesocosm experiment in an intermittent stream where B. meridionalis became locally extinct following a wildfire. We found that top predator absence led to 'mesopredator release', and also to 'prey release' despite intraguild predation, which contrasts with traditional food web theory. In addition, B. meridionalis extirpation changed whole macroinvertebrate community composition and increased total macroinvertebrate density. Regarding ecosystem function, periphyton primary production decreased in apex consumer absence. In this study, the apex consumer was functionally irreplaceable; its local extinction led to the loss of an important functional role that resulted in major changes to the ecosystem's structure and function. This study evidences that intermittent streams can be affected by the consequences of apex consumers' extinctions, and that the loss of small-bodied top predators can lead to large ecosystem changes. We recommend the reintroduction of small-bodied apex consumers to systems where they have been extirpated, to restore

  9. Small but powerful: top predator local extinction affects ecosystem structure and function in an intermittent stream.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Verkaik, Iraima; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2015-01-01

    Top predator loss is a major global problem, with a current trend in biodiversity loss towards high trophic levels that modifies most ecosystems worldwide. Most research in this area is focused on large-bodied predators, despite the high extinction risk of small-bodied freshwater fish that often act as apex consumers. Consequently, it remains unknown if intermittent streams are affected by the consequences of top-predators' extirpations. The aim of our research was to determine how this global problem affects intermittent streams and, in particular, if the loss of a small-bodied top predator (1) leads to a 'mesopredator release', affects primary consumers and changes whole community structures, and (2) triggers a cascade effect modifying the ecosystem function. To address these questions, we studied the top-down effects of a small endangered fish species, Barbus meridionalis (the Mediterranean barbel), conducting an enclosure/exclosure mesocosm experiment in an intermittent stream where B. meridionalis became locally extinct following a wildfire. We found that top predator absence led to 'mesopredator release', and also to 'prey release' despite intraguild predation, which contrasts with traditional food web theory. In addition, B. meridionalis extirpation changed whole macroinvertebrate community composition and increased total macroinvertebrate density. Regarding ecosystem function, periphyton primary production decreased in apex consumer absence. In this study, the apex consumer was functionally irreplaceable; its local extinction led to the loss of an important functional role that resulted in major changes to the ecosystem's structure and function. This study evidences that intermittent streams can be affected by the consequences of apex consumers' extinctions, and that the loss of small-bodied top predators can lead to large ecosystem changes. We recommend the reintroduction of small-bodied apex consumers to systems where they have been extirpated, to restore

  10. Small but Powerful: Top Predator Local Extinction Affects Ecosystem Structure and Function in an Intermittent Stream

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Verkaik, Iraima; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2015-01-01

    Top predator loss is a major global problem, with a current trend in biodiversity loss towards high trophic levels that modifies most ecosystems worldwide. Most research in this area is focused on large-bodied predators, despite the high extinction risk of small-bodied freshwater fish that often act as apex consumers. Consequently, it remains unknown if intermittent streams are affected by the consequences of top-predators’ extirpations. The aim of our research was to determine how this global problem affects intermittent streams and, in particular, if the loss of a small-bodied top predator (1) leads to a ‘mesopredator release’, affects primary consumers and changes whole community structures, and (2) triggers a cascade effect modifying the ecosystem function. To address these questions, we studied the top-down effects of a small endangered fish species, Barbus meridionalis (the Mediterranean barbel), conducting an enclosure/exclosure mesocosm experiment in an intermittent stream where B. meridionalis became locally extinct following a wildfire. We found that top predator absence led to ‘mesopredator release’, and also to ‘prey release’ despite intraguild predation, which contrasts with traditional food web theory. In addition, B. meridionalis extirpation changed whole macroinvertebrate community composition and increased total macroinvertebrate density. Regarding ecosystem function, periphyton primary production decreased in apex consumer absence. In this study, the apex consumer was functionally irreplaceable; its local extinction led to the loss of an important functional role that resulted in major changes to the ecosystem’s structure and function. This study evidences that intermittent streams can be affected by the consequences of apex consumers’ extinctions, and that the loss of small-bodied top predators can lead to large ecosystem changes. We recommend the reintroduction of small-bodied apex consumers to systems where they have been

  11. Asymmetrical Fc Engineering Greatly Enhances Antibody-dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity (ADCC) Effector Function and Stability of the Modified Antibodies*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Gunasekaran, Kannan; Wang, Wei; Razinkov, Vladimir; Sekirov, Laura; Leng, Esther; Sweet, Heather; Foltz, Ian; Howard, Monique; Rousseau, Anne-Marie; Kozlosky, Carl; Fanslow, William; Yan, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is mediated through the engagement of the Fc segment of antibodies with Fcγ receptors (FcγRs) on immune cells upon binding of tumor or viral antigen. The co-crystal structure of FcγRIII in complex with Fc revealed that Fc binds to FcγRIII asymmetrically with two Fc chains contacting separate regions of the FcγRIII by utilizing different residues. To fully explore this asymmetrical nature of the Fc-FcγR interaction, we screened more than 9,000 individual clones in Fc heterodimer format in which different mutations were introduced at the same position of two Fc chains using a high throughput competition AlphaLISA® assay. To this end, we have identified a panel of novel Fc variants with significant binding improvement to FcγRIIIA (both Phe-158 and Val-158 allotypes), increased ADCC activity in vitro, and strong tumor growth inhibition in mice xenograft human tumor models. Compared with previously identified Fc variants in conventional IgG format, Fc heterodimers with asymmetrical mutations can achieve similar or superior potency in ADCC-mediated tumor cell killing and demonstrate improved stability in the CH2 domain. Fc heterodimers also allow more selectivity toward activating FcγRIIA than inhibitory FcγRIIB. Afucosylation of Fc variants further increases the affinity of Fc to FcγRIIIA, leading to much higher ADCC activity. The discovery of these Fc variants will potentially open up new opportunities of building the next generation of therapeutic antibodies with enhanced ADCC effector function for the treatment of cancers and infectious diseases. PMID:24311787

  12. Hijacking cellular garbage cans.

    PubMed

    Welsch, Sonja; Locker, Jacomine Krijnse

    2010-06-25

    Viruses are perfect opportunists that have evolved to modify numerous cellular processes in order to complete their replication cycle in the host cell. An article by Reggiori and coworkers in this issue of Cell Host & Microbe reveals how coronaviruses can divert a cellular quality control pathway that normally functions in degradation of mis-folded proteins to replicate the viral genome. PMID:20542246

  13. Pleiotropic Mutations at the TUP1 Locus That Affect the Expression of Mating-Type-Dependent Functions in SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE.

    PubMed

    Lemontt, J F; Fugit, D R; Mackay, V L

    1980-04-01

    The umr7-1 mutation, previously identified in a set of mutants that had been selected for defective UV-induced mutagenesis at CAN1, affects other cellular functions, including many of those regulated by the mating-type locus (MAT) in heterothallic Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The recessive umr7-1 allele, mapping approximately 20 cM distal to thr4 on chromosome III, causes clumpy growth in both a and alpha cells and has no apparent effect on a mating functions. However, alpha umr7 meiotic segregants fail to express several alpha-specific functions (e.g., high-frequency conjugation with a strains, secretion of the hormone alpha-factor and response to the hormone a-factor). In addition, alpha umr7 cells exhibit some a-specific characteristics, such as the barrier phenotype (Bar(+)) that prevents diffusion of alpha-factor and an increased mating frequency with alpha strains. The most striking property of alpha umr7 strains is their altered morphology, in which mitotic cells develop an asymmetric pear shape, like that of normal a cells induced to form "shmoos" by interaction with alpha-factor. Some a/alpha-specific diploid functions are also affected by umr7; instead of polar budding patterns, a/alpha umr7/umr7 diploids have medial budding like a/a, alpha/alpha and haploid strains. Moreover, a/alpha umr7/umr7 diploids have lost the ability to sporulate and are Bar(+) like a or a/a strains. Revertant studies indicate that umr7-1 is a single point mutation. The umr7 mutant fails to complement mutants of both tup1 (selected for deoxythymidine monophosphate utilization) and cyc9 (selected for high iso-2-cytochrome c levels), and all three isolates have similar genetic and phenotypic properties. It is suggested that the product of this gene plays some common central role in the complex regulation of the expression of both MAT-dependent and MAT-independent functions.

  14. Cholinergic and serotonergic modulations differentially affect large-scale functional networks in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Shah, Disha; Blockx, Ines; Keliris, Georgios A; Kara, Firat; Jonckers, Elisabeth; Verhoye, Marleen; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2016-07-01

    Resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI) is a widely implemented technique used to investigate large-scale topology in the human brain during health and disease. Studies in mice provide additional advantages, including the possibility to flexibly modulate the brain by pharmacological or genetic manipulations in combination with high-throughput functional connectivity (FC) investigations. Pharmacological modulations that target specific neurotransmitter systems, partly mimicking the effect of pathological events, could allow discriminating the effect of specific systems on functional network disruptions. The current study investigated the effect of cholinergic and serotonergic antagonists on large-scale brain networks in mice. The cholinergic system is involved in cognitive functions and is impaired in, e.g., Alzheimer's disease, while the serotonergic system is involved in emotional and introspective functions and is impaired in, e.g., Alzheimer's disease, depression and autism. Specific interest goes to the default-mode-network (DMN), which is studied extensively in humans and is affected in many neurological disorders. The results show that both cholinergic and serotonergic antagonists impaired the mouse DMN-like network similarly, except that cholinergic modulation additionally affected the retrosplenial cortex. This suggests that both neurotransmitter systems are involved in maintaining integrity of FC within the DMN-like network in mice. Cholinergic and serotonergic modulations also affected other functional networks, however, serotonergic modulation impaired the frontal and thalamus networks more extensively. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the utility of pharmacological rsfMRI in animal models to provide insights into the role of specific neurotransmitter systems on functional networks in neurological disorders. PMID:26195064

  15. An investigation on pharmacy functions and services affecting satisfaction of patients with prescriptions in community pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Hidehiko; Nakajima, Fumio; Tada, Yuichirou; Yoshikawa, Emi; Iwahashi, Yoshiki; Fujita, Kenji; Hayase, Yukitoshi

    2009-05-01

    Various functions expected by patient expects are needed with progress in the system for separation of dispensing and prescribing functions. In this investigation, the relationship between patient satisfaction and pharmacy function were analyzed quantitatively. A questionnaire survey was conducted in 178 community pharmacies. Questions on pharmacy functions and services totaled 87 items concerning information service, amenities, safety, personnel training, etc. The questionnaires for patients had five-grade scales and composed 11 items (observed variables). Based on the results, "the percentage of satisfied patients" was determined. Multivariate analysis was performed to investigate the relationship between patient satisfaction and pharmacy functions or services provided, to confirm patient's evaluation of the pharmacy, and how factors affected comprehensive satisfaction. In correlation analysis, "the number of pharmacists" and "comprehensive satisfaction" had a negative correlation. Other interesting results were obtained. As a results of factor analysis, three latent factors were obtained: the "human factor," "patients' convenience," and "environmental factor," Multiple regression analysis showed that the "human factor" affected "comprehensive satisfaction" the most. Various pharmacy functions and services influence patient satisfaction, and improvement in their quality increases patient satisfaction. This will result in the practice of patient-centered medicine.

  16. Functions and sources of perceived social support among children affected by HIV/AIDS in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guoxiang; Li, Xiaoming; Fang, Xiaoyi; Zhao, Junfeng; Hong, Yan; Lin, Xiuyun; Stanton, Bonita

    2011-06-01

    While the relationship between perceived social support (PSS) and psychosocial well-being has been well documented in the global literature, existing studies also suggest the existence of multiple domains in definition and measurement of PSS. The current study, utilizing data from 1299 rural children affected by HIV/AIDS in central China, examines the relative importance of PSS functional measures (informational/emotional, material/tangible, affectionate, and social interaction) and PSS structural measures (family/relatives, teachers, friends, and significant others) in predicting psychosocial outcomes including internalizing problems, externalizing problems, and educational resilience. Both functional and structural measures of PSS provided reliable measures of related but unique aspects of PSS. The findings of the current study confirmed the previous results that PSS is highly correlated with children's psychosocial well-being and such correlations vary by functions and sources of the PSS as well as different psychosocial outcomes. The findings in the current study suggested the roles of specific social support functions or resources may need to be assessed in relation to specific psychosocial outcome and the context of children's lives. The strong association between PSS and psychosocial outcomes underscores the importance of adequate social support to alleviate stressful life events and improve psychosocial well-being of children affected by HIV/AIDS. Meanwhile, the study findings call for gender and developmentally appropriate and situation-specific social support for children and families affected by HIV/AIDS. PMID:21287421

  17. Increase in cellular triacylglycerol content and emergence of large ER-associated lipid droplets in the absence of CDP-DG synthase function.

    PubMed

    He, Yue; Yam, Candice; Pomraning, Kyle; Chin, Jacqueline S R; Yew, Joanne Y; Freitag, Michael; Oliferenko, Snezhana

    2014-12-15

    Excess fatty acids and sterols are stored as triacylglycerols and sterol esters in specialized cellular organelles, called lipid droplets. Understanding what determines the cellular amount of neutral lipids and their packaging into lipid droplets is of fundamental and applied interest. Using two species of fission yeast, we show that cycling cells deficient in the function of the ER-resident CDP-DG synthase Cds1 exhibit markedly increased triacylglycerol content and assemble large lipid droplets closely associated with the ER membranes. We demonstrate that these unusual structures recruit the triacylglycerol synthesis machinery and grow by expansion rather than by fusion. Our results suggest that interfering with the CDP-DG route of phosphatidic acid utilization rewires cellular metabolism to adopt a triacylglycerol-rich lifestyle reliant on the Kennedy pathway. PMID:25318672

  18. Genes encoding Cher-TPR fusion proteins are predominantly found in gene clusters encoding chemosensory pathways with alternative cellular functions.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Martínez, Francisco; García-Fontana, Cristina; Rico-Jiménez, Miriam; Alfonso, Carlos; Krell, Tino

    2012-01-01

    Chemosensory pathways correspond to major signal transduction mechanisms and can be classified into the functional families flagellum-mediated taxis, type four pili-mediated taxis or pathways with alternative cellular functions (ACF). CheR methyltransferases are core enzymes in all of these families. CheR proteins fused to tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains have been reported and we present an analysis of this uncharacterized family. We show that CheR-TPRs are widely distributed in GRAM-negative but almost absent from GRAM-positive bacteria. Most strains contain a single CheR-TPR and its abundance does not correlate with the number of chemoreceptors. The TPR domain fused to CheR is comparatively short and frequently composed of 2 repeats. The majority of CheR-TPR genes were found in gene clusters that harbor multidomain response regulators in which the REC domain is fused to different output domains like HK, GGDEF, EAL, HPT, AAA, PAS, GAF, additional REC, HTH, phosphatase or combinations thereof. The response regulator architectures coincide with those reported for the ACF family of pathways. Since the presence of multidomain response regulators is a distinctive feature of this pathway family, we conclude that CheR-TPR proteins form part of ACF type pathways. The diversity of response regulator output domains suggests that the ACF pathways form a superfamily which regroups many different regulatory mechanisms, in which all CheR-TPR proteins appear to participate. In the second part we characterize WspC of Pseudomonas putida, a representative example of CheR-TPR. The affinities of WspC-Pp for S-adenosylmethionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine were comparable to those of prototypal CheR, indicating that WspC-Pp activity is in analogy to prototypal CheRs controlled by product feed-back inhibition. The removal of the TPR domain did not impact significantly on the binding constants and consequently not on the product feed-back inhibition. WspC-Pp was found to be

  19. Gravitational environment produced by a superconducting magnet affects osteoblast morphology and functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Airong; Zhang, Wei; Weng, Yuanyuan; Tian, Zongcheng; Di, Shengmeng; Yang, Pengfei; Yin, Dachuan; Hu, Lifang; Wang, Zhe; Xu, Huiyun; Shang, Peng

    The aims of this study are to investigate the effects of gravitational environment produced by a superconducting magnet on osteoblast morphology, proliferation and adhesion. A superconducting magnet which can produce large gradient high magnetic field (LGHMF) and provide three apparent gravity levels (0g,1gand2g) was employed to simulate space gravity environment. The effects of LGHMF on osteoblast morphology, proliferation, adhesion and the gene expression of fibronectin and collagen I were detected by scanning electron microscopy, immunocytochemistry, adhesion assays and real time PCR, respectively, after exposure of osteoblasts to LGHMF for 24 h. Osteoblast morphology was affected by LGHMF (0g,1gand2g) and the most evident morphology alteration was observed at 0g condition. Proliferative abilities of MC3T3 and MG-63 cell were affected under LGHMF (0g,1gand2g) conditions compared to control condition. The adhesive abilities of MC3T3 and MG-63 cells to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins (fibronectin, laminin, collagen IV) were also affected by LGHMF (0g,1gand2g), moreover, the effects of LGHMF on osteoblast adhesion to different ECM proteins were different. Fibronectin gene expression in MG63 cells under zero gravity condition was increased significantly compared to other conditions. Collagen I gene expression in MG-63 and MC3T3 cells was altered by both magnetic field and alerted gravity. The study indicates that the superconducting magnet which can produce LGHMF may be a novel ground-based space gravity simulator and can be used for biological experiment at cellular level.

  20. Social-adaptive and psychological functioning of patients affected by Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Laney, Dawn Alyssia; Gruskin, Daniel J; Fernhoff, Paul M; Cubells, Joseph F; Ousley, Opal Y; Hipp, Heather; Mehta, Ami J

    2010-12-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder caused by the deficiency of alpha-galactosidase A. In addition to the debilitating physical symptoms of FD, there are also under-recognized and poorly characterized psychiatric features. As a first step toward characterizing psychiatric features of FD, we administered the Achenbach adult self report questionnaire to 30 FD patients and the Achenbach adult behavior checklist questionnaire to 28 partners/parents/friends of FD patients. Data from at least one of the questionnaires were available on 33 subjects. Analysis focused on social-adaptive functioning in various aspects of daily life and on criteria related to the Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders IV (DSM-IV). Adaptive functioning scale values, which primarily measure social and relationship functioning and occupational success, showed that eight FD patients (six female and two male) had mean adaptive functioning deficits as compared to population norms. Greater rates of depression (P < 0.01), anxiety (P = 0.05), depression and anxiety (P = 0.03), antisocial personality (P < 0.001), attention-deficit/hyperactivity (AD/H; P < 0.01), hyperactivity-impulsivity (P < 0.01), and aggressive behavior (P = 0.03) were associated with poorer adaptive functioning. Decreased social-adaptive functioning in this study was not statistically significantly associated to disease severity, pain, or level of vitality. This study shows for the first time that FD patients, particularly women, are affected by decreased social-adaptive functioning. Comprehensive treatment plans for FD should consider assessments and interventions to evaluate and improve social, occupational, and psychological functioning. Attention to the behavioral aspects of FD could lead to improved treatment outcome and improved quality of life. Individuals affected by Fabry disease exhibited social-adaptive functioning deficits that were significantly correlated with anxiety

  1. Identification of Cellular Targets of MicroRNA-181a in HepG2 Cells: A New Approach for Functional Analysis of MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jane Yi Lin; Habib, Nagy A.; Chuah, York Wieo; Yau, Yin Hoe; Geifman-Shochat, Susana; Chen, Wei Ning

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are known to play a part in regulating important cellular processes. They generally perform their regulatory function through their binding with mRNAs, ultimately leading to a repression of target protein expression levels. However, their roles in cellular processes are poorly understood due to the limited understanding of their specific cellular targets. Aberrant levels of miRNAs have been found in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) including miR-181a. Using bioinformatics analysis, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1β) and transcriptional factor E2F7 were identified as potential targets of miR-181a. Validation analysis using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) showed a positive binding between miR-181a and the 3’UTRs of these two potential mRNA targets. In vivo luciferase assay further confirmed the positive miR-181a:mRNA bindings, where a significant decrease in luciferase activity was detected when HepG2 cells were co-transfected with the 3’UTR-containing reporter plasmids and miR-181a. The potential impact of miR-181a binding to its specific targets on the general cellular behavior was further investigated. Results showed that miR-181a significantly activated the MAPK/JNK pathway which regulates cell proliferation, supporting our recently reported findings. Inhibition of miR-181a, on the other hand, abolished the observed activation. Our findings open up a new approach in designing targeted functional analysis of miRNAs in cellular processes, through the identification of their cellular targets. PMID:25901570

  2. Functional ultrastructure of eggs and cellular organization of hexacanths of the cyclophyllidean cestode Thysanotaenia congolensis: a phylogenetic implication of obtained results.

    PubMed

    Świderski, Zdzisław; Miquel, Jordi; Conn, David Bruce

    2016-03-01

    The functional ultrastructure of eggs and cellular organization of hexacanths from gravid proglottids of Thysanotaenia congolensis, from black rats from Cape Verde, were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Mature eggs with fully formed hexacanths are grouped within parenchymatous capsules of gravid proglottids. Oncospheral envelopes surrounding mature hexacanths are reduced to a very thin membranous embryophore as their protective function is taken over by the parenchymatous capsules originating from the medullary parenchyma of immature proglottids and composed of three layers. Six major cell types are present: a bi-nucleate medullary centre; a six-nucleate U-shaped penetration gland; a second type of penetration gland; two neurosecretory-type nerve cells; about 30 somatic cells; and about 12 germinative cells. Present results on the functional ultrastructure of eggs and cellular organization of hexacanths support the phylogenetic distinction between T. congolensis and cestodes of the subfamily Anoplocephalinae. PMID:26689933

  3. Cognitive Function in Adolescent Patients with Anorexia Nervosa and Unipolar Affective Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sarrar, Lea; Holzhausen, Martin; Warschburger, Petra; Pfeiffer, Ernst; Lehmkuhl, Ulrike; Schneider, Nora

    2016-05-01

    Studies have shown impairments in cognitive function among adult patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and affective disorders (AD). The association between cognitive dysfunctions, AN and AD as well as the specificity for these psychiatric diagnoses remains unclear. Therefore, we examined cognitive flexibility and processing speed in 47 female adolescent patients with AN, 21 female adolescent patients with unipolar affective disorders and 48 female healthy adolescents. All participants completed a neuropsychological test battery. There were no significant group differences regarding cognitive function, except for psychomotor processing speed with poorer performance in patients with AN. A further analysis revealed that all groups performed with the normal range, although patients with AN were over represented in the poorest performing quartile. We found no severe cognitive impairments in either patient group. Nevertheless, belonging to the AN group contributed significantly to poor performances in neuropsychological tasks. Therefore, we conclude that the risk for cognitive impairments is slightly higher for patients with AN.

  4. The relationship between sleep-wake cycle and cognitive functioning in young people with affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Joanne S; Robillard, Rébecca; Lee, Rico S C; Hermens, Daniel F; Naismith, Sharon L; White, Django; Whitwell, Bradley; Scott, Elizabeth M; Hickie, Ian B

    2015-01-01

    Although early-stage affective disorders are associated with both cognitive dysfunction and sleep-wake disruptions, relationships between these factors have not been specifically examined in young adults. Sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances in those with affective disorders are considerably heterogeneous, and may not relate to cognitive dysfunction in a simple linear fashion. This study aimed to characterise profiles of sleep and circadian disturbance in young people with affective disorders and examine associations between these profiles and cognitive performance. Actigraphy monitoring was completed in 152 young people (16-30 years; 66% female) with primary diagnoses of affective disorders, and 69 healthy controls (18-30 years; 57% female). Patients also underwent detailed neuropsychological assessment. Actigraphy data were processed to estimate both sleep and circadian parameters. Overall neuropsychological performance in patients was poor on tasks relating to mental flexibility and visual memory. Two hierarchical cluster analyses identified three distinct patient groups based on sleep variables and three based on circadian variables. Sleep clusters included a 'long sleep' cluster, a 'disrupted sleep' cluster, and a 'delayed and disrupted sleep' cluster. Circadian clusters included a 'strong circadian' cluster, a 'weak circadian' cluster, and a 'delayed circadian' cluster. Medication use differed between clusters. The 'long sleep' cluster displayed significantly worse visual memory performance compared to the 'disrupted sleep' cluster. No other cognitive functions differed between clusters. These results highlight the heterogeneity of sleep and circadian profiles in young people with affective disorders, and provide preliminary evidence in support of a relationship between sleep and visual memory, which may be mediated by use of antipsychotic medication. These findings have implications for the personalisation of treatments and improvement of functioning in

  5. The relationship between sleep-wake cycle and cognitive functioning in young people with affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Joanne S; Robillard, Rébecca; Lee, Rico S C; Hermens, Daniel F; Naismith, Sharon L; White, Django; Whitwell, Bradley; Scott, Elizabeth M; Hickie, Ian B

    2015-01-01

    Although early-stage affective disorders are associated with both cognitive dysfunction and sleep-wake disruptions, relationships between these factors have not been specifically examined in young adults. Sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances in those with affective disorders are considerably heterogeneous, and may not relate to cognitive dysfunction in a simple linear fashion. This study aimed to characterise profiles of sleep and circadian disturbance in young people with affective disorders and examine associations between these profiles and cognitive performance. Actigraphy monitoring was completed in 152 young people (16-30 years; 66% female) with primary diagnoses of affective disorders, and 69 healthy controls (18-30 years; 57% female). Patients also underwent detailed neuropsychological assessment. Actigraphy data were processed to estimate both sleep and circadian parameters. Overall neuropsychological performance in patients was poor on tasks relating to mental flexibility and visual memory. Two hierarchical cluster analyses identified three distinct patient groups based on sleep variables and three based on circadian variables. Sleep clusters included a 'long sleep' cluster, a 'disrupted sleep' cluster, and a 'delayed and disrupted sleep' cluster. Circadian clusters included a 'strong circadian' cluster, a 'weak circadian' cluster, and a 'delayed circadian' cluster. Medication use differed between clusters. The 'long sleep' cluster displayed significantly worse visual memory performance compared to the 'disrupted sleep' cluster. No other cognitive functions differed between clusters. These results highlight the heterogeneity of sleep and circadian profiles in young people with affective disorders, and provide preliminary evidence in support of a relationship between sleep and visual memory, which may be mediated by use of antipsychotic medication. These findings have implications for the personalisation of treatments and improvement of functioning in

  6. Functional topography of serotonergic systems supports the Deakin/Graeff hypothesis of anxiety and affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Paul, Evan D; Lowry, Christopher A

    2013-12-01

    Over 20 years ago, Deakin and Graeff hypothesized about the role of different serotonergic pathways in controlling the behavioral and physiologic responses to aversive stimuli, and how compromise of these pathways could lead to specific symptoms of anxiety and affective disorders. A growing body of evidence suggests these serotonergic pathways arise from topographically organized subpopulations of serotonergic neurons located in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei. We argue that serotonergic neurons in the dorsal/caudal parts of the dorsal raphe nucleus project to forebrain limbic regions involved in stress/conflict anxiety-related processes, which may be relevant for anxiety and affective disorders. Serotonergic neurons in the "lateral wings" of the dorsal raphe nucleus provide inhibitory control over structures controlling fight-or-flight responses. Dysfunction of this pathway could be relevant for panic disorder. Finally, serotonergic neurons in the median raphe nucleus, and the developmentally and functionally-related interfascicular part of the dorsal raphe nucleus, give rise to forebrain limbic projections that are involved in tolerance and coping with aversive stimuli, which could be important for affective disorders like depression. Elucidating the mechanisms through which stress activates these topographically and functionally distinct serotonergic pathways, and how dysfunction of these pathways leads to symptoms of neuropsychiatric disorders, may lead to the development of novel approaches to both the prevention and treatment of anxiety and affective disorders.

  7. Intracellular Localization and Cellular Factors Interaction of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 Tax Proteins: Similarities and Functional Differences

    PubMed Central

    Bertazzoni, Umberto; Turci, Marco; Avesani, Francesca; Di Gennaro, Gianfranco; Bidoia, Carlo; Romanelli, Maria Grazia

    2011-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic viruses type 1 (HTLV-1) and type 2 (HTLV-2) present very similar genomic structures but HTLV-1 is more pathogenic than HTLV-2. Is this difference due to their transactivating Tax proteins, Tax-1 and Tax-2, which are responsible for viral and cellular gene activation? Do Tax-1 and Tax-2 differ in their cellular localization and in their interaction pattern with cellular factors? In this review, we summarize Tax-1 and Tax-2 structural and phenotypic properties, their interaction with factors involved in signal transduction and their localization-related behavior within the cell. Special attention will be given to the distinctions between Tax-1 and Tax-2 that likely play an important role in their transactivation activity. PMID:21994745

  8. Ex vivo assessment of cellular immune function - applications in patient care and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, M

    2014-11-01

    Cellular ex vivo assays have a broad range of applications in patient care and clinical studies, especially when they are standardized and highly sensitive. As compared to analyses by molecular genetics such as the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) testing, they are usually more global. These assays partly mimic the in vivo situation, relying on a complex interaction of various immune cells. For example, they can be used to determine modulation of alloresponses by treatment or underlying disease, diagnose and quantify primary and secondary cellular immunodeficiency, follow-up vaccination responses, measure adoptive transfer of virus-specific immunity via hematopoietic stem cell or liver transplantation, assess allergy, antimicrobial immunity and also rare effector/memory cells directed against tumor antigens. This review will first shortly describe various cellular in vitro methods and then present applications, summarizing some own studies performed within the last 18 years. PMID:25329632

  9. Associations between early adrenarche, affective brain function and mental health in children

    PubMed Central

    Whittle, Sarah; Simmons, Julian G.; Byrne, Michelle L.; Strikwerda-Brown, Cherie; Kerestes, Rebecca; Seal, Marc L.; Olsson, Craig A.; Dudgeon, Paul; Mundy, Lisa K.; Patton, George C.

    2015-01-01

    Early timing of adrenarche, associated with relatively high levels of Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in children, has been associated with mental health and behavioral problems. However, little is known about effects of adreneracheal timing on brain function. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of early adrenarche (defined by high DHEA levels independent of age) on affective brain function and symptoms of psychopathology in late childhood (N = 83, 43 females, M age 9.53 years, s.d. 0.34 years). Results showed that higher DHEA levels were associated with decreased affect-related brain activity (i) in the mid-cingulate cortex in the whole sample, and (ii) in a number of cortical and subcortical regions in female but not male children. Higher DHEA levels were also associated with increased externalizing symptoms in females, an association that was partly mediated by posterior insula activation to happy facial expressions. These results suggest that timing of adrenarche is an important moderator of affect-related brain function, and that this may be one mechanism linking early adrenarche to psychopathology. PMID:25678548

  10. Associations between early adrenarche, affective brain function and mental health in children.

    PubMed

    Whittle, Sarah; Simmons, Julian G; Byrne, Michelle L; Strikwerda-Brown, Cherie; Kerestes, Rebecca; Seal, Marc L; Olsson, Craig A; Dudgeon, Paul; Mundy, Lisa K; Patton, George C; Allen, Nicholas B

    2015-09-01

    Early timing of adrenarche, associated with relatively high levels of Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in children, has been associated with mental health and behavioral problems. However, little is known about effects of adreneracheal timing on brain function. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of early adrenarche (defined by high DHEA levels independent of age) on affective brain function and symptoms of psychopathology in late childhood (N = 83, 43 females, M age 9.53 years, s.d. 0.34 years). Results showed that higher DHEA levels were associated with decreased affect-related brain activity (i) in the mid-cingulate cortex in the whole sample, and (ii) in a number of cortical and subcortical regions in female but not male children. Higher DHEA levels were also associated with increased externalizing symptoms in females, an association that was partly mediated by posterior insula activation to happy facial expressions. These results suggest that timing of adrenarche is an important moderator of affect-related brain function, and that this may be one mechanism linking early adrenarche to psychopathology.

  11. Revealing how species loss affects ecosystem function: the trait-based Price Equation partition.

    PubMed

    Fox, Jeremy W; Harpole, W Stanley

    2008-01-01

    Species loss can alter ecosystem function. Recent work proposes a general theoretical framework, the "Price Equation partition," for understanding how species loss affects ecosystem functions that comprise the summed contributions of individual species (e.g., primary production). The Price Equation partition shows how the difference in function between a pre-species-loss site and a post-loss site can be partitioned into effects of random loss of species richness (species-richness effect; SRE), nonrandom loss of high- or low-functioning species (species-composition effect; SCE), and post-loss changes in the functional contributions of the remaining species (context-dependence effect; CDE). However, the Price Equation partition is silent on the underlying determinants of species' functional contributions. Here we extend the Price Equation partition by using multiple regression to describe how species' functional contributions depend on species' traits. This allows us to reexpress the SCE and CDE in terms of nonrandom loss of species with particular traits (trait-based SCE), and post-loss changes in species' traits and in the relationship between species' traits and species' functional contributions (trait-based CDE). We apply this new trait-based Price Equation partition to studies of species loss from grassland plant communities and protist microcosm food webs. In both studies, post-loss changes in the relationship between species' traits and their functional contributions alter ecosystem function more than nonrandom loss of species with particular traits. The protist microcosm data also illustrate how the trait-based Price Equation partition can be applied when species' functional contributions depend in part on the traits of other species. To do this, we define "synecological" traits that quantify how unique species are (e.g., in diet) compared to other species. Context dependence in the protist microcosm experiment arises in part because species loss alters the

  12. Affective Response to a Loved One's Pain: Insula Activity as a Function of Individual Differences

    PubMed Central

    Mazzola, Viridiana; Latorre, Valeria; Petito, Annamaria; Gentili, Nicoletta; Fazio, Leonardo; Popolizio, Teresa; Blasi, Giuseppe; Arciero, Giampiero; Bondolfi, Guido

    2010-01-01

    Individual variability in emotion processing may be associated with genetic variation as well as with psychological predispositions such as dispositional affect styles. Our previous fMRI study demonstrated that amygdala reactivity was independently predicted by affective-cognitive styles (phobic prone or eating disorders prone) and genotype of the serotonin transporter in a discrimination task of fearful facial expressions. Since the insula is associated with the subjective evaluation of bodily states and is involved in human feelings, we explored whether its activity could also vary in function of individual differences. In the present fMRI study, the association between dispositional affects and insula reactivity has been examined in two groups of healthy participants categorized according to affective-cognitive styles (phobic prone or eating disorders prone). Images of the faces of partners and strangers, in both painful and neutral situations, were used as visual stimuli. Interaction analyses indicate significantly different activations in the two groups in reaction to a loved one's pain: the phobic prone group exhibited greater activation in the left posterior insula. These results demonstrate that affective-cognitive style is associated with insula activity in pain empathy processing, suggesting a greater involvement of the insula in feelings for a certain cohort of people. In the mapping of individual differences, these results shed new light on variability in neural networks of emotion. PMID:21179564

  13. Estradiol affects liver mitochondrial function in ovariectomized and tamoxifen-treated ovariectomized female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Paula I.; Custodio, Jose B.A.; Nunes, Elsa; Moreno, Antonio; Seica, Raquel; Oliveira, Catarina R.; Santos, Maria S. . E-mail: mssantos@ci.uc.pt

    2007-05-15

    Given the tremendous importance of mitochondria to basic cellular functions as well as the critical role of mitochondrial impairment in a vast number of disorders, a compelling question is whether 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) modulates mitochondrial function. To answer this question we exposed isolated liver mitochondria to E2. Three groups of rat females were used: control, ovariectomized and ovariectomized treated with tamoxifen. Tamoxifen has antiestrogenic effects in the breast tissue and is the standard endocrine treatment for women with breast cancer. However, under certain circumstances and in certain tissues, tamoxifen can also exert estrogenic agonist properties. We observed that at basal conditions, ovariectomy and tamoxifen treatment do not induce any statistical alteration in oxidative phosphorylation system and respiratory chain parameters. Furthermore, tamoxifen treatment increases the capacity of mitochondria to accumulate Ca{sup 2+} delaying the opening of the permeability transition pore. The presence of 25 {mu}M E2 impairs respiration and oxidative phosphorylation system these effects being similar in all groups of animals studied. Curiously, E2 protects against lipid peroxidation and increases the production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in energized mitochondria of control females. Our results indicate that E2 has in general deleterious effects that lead to mitochondrial impairment. Since mitochondrial dysfunction is a triggering event of cell degeneration and death, the use of exogenous E2 must be carefully considered.

  14. How the sourdough may affect the functional features of leavened baked goods.

    PubMed

    Gobbetti, Marco; Rizzello, Carlo G; Di Cagno, Raffaella; De Angelis, Maria

    2014-02-01

    Sourdough fermentation is one of the oldest food biotechnologies, which has been studied and recently rediscovered for its effect on the sensory, structural, nutritional and shelf life properties of leavened baked goods. Acidification, proteolysis and activation of a number of enzymes as well as the synthesis of microbial metabolites cause several changes during sourdough fermentation, which affect the dough and baked good matrix, and influence the nutritional/functional quality. Currently, the literature is particularly rich of results, which show how the sourdough fermentation may affect the functional features of leavened baked goods. In the form of pre-treating raw materials, fermentation through sourdough may stabilize or to increase the functional value of bran fractions and wheat germ. Sourdough fermentation may decrease the glycaemic response of baked goods, improve the properties and bioavailability of dietary fibre complex and phytochemicals, and may increase the uptake of minerals. Microbial metabolism during sourdough fermentation may also produce new nutritionally active compounds, such as peptides and amino acid derivatives (e.g., γ-amino butyric acid) with various functionalities, and potentially prebiotic exo-polysaccharides. The wheat flour digested via fungal proteases and selected sourdough lactobacilli has been demonstrated to be probably safe for celiac patients.

  15. How the sourdough may affect the functional features of leavened baked goods.

    PubMed

    Gobbetti, Marco; Rizzello, Carlo G; Di Cagno, Raffaella; De Angelis, Maria

    2014-02-01

    Sourdough fermentation is one of the oldest food biotechnologies, which has been studied and recently rediscovered for its effect on the sensory, structural, nutritional and shelf life properties of leavened baked goods. Acidification, proteolysis and activation of a number of enzymes as well as the synthesis of microbial metabolites cause several changes during sourdough fermentation, which affect the dough and baked good matrix, and influence the nutritional/functional quality. Currently, the literature is particularly rich of results, which show how the sourdough fermentation may affect the functional features of leavened baked goods. In the form of pre-treating raw materials, fermentation through sourdough may stabilize or to increase the functional value of bran fractions and wheat germ. Sourdough fermentation may decrease the glycaemic response of baked goods, improve the properties and bioavailability of dietary fibre complex and phytochemicals, and may increase the uptake of minerals. Microbial metabolism during sourdough fermentation may also produce new nutritionally active compounds, such as peptides and amino acid derivatives (e.g., γ-amino butyric acid) with various functionalities, and potentially prebiotic exo-polysaccharides. The wheat flour digested via fungal proteases and selected sourdough lactobacilli has been demonstrated to be probably safe for celiac patients. PMID:24230470

  16. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms Elucidating Neurocognitive Basis of Functional Impairments Associated with Intellectual Disability in Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachidi, Mohammed; Lopes, Carmela

    2010-01-01

    Down syndrome, the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability, is associated with brain disorders due to chromosome 21 gene overdosage. Molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the neuromorphological alterations and cognitive impairments are reported herein in a global model. Recent advances in Down syndrome research have lead to…

  17. Glutathione Deficit Affects the Integrity and Function of the Fimbria/Fornix and Anterior Commissure in Mice: Relevance for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Corcoba, Alberto; Steullet, Pascal; Duarte, João M. N.; Van de Looij, Yohan; Monin, Aline; Cuenod, Michel; Gruetter, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Background: Structural anomalies of white matter are found in various brain regions of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar and other psychiatric disorders, but the causes at the cellular and molecular levels remain unclear. Oxidative stress and redox dysregulation have been proposed to play a role in the pathophysiology of several psychiatric conditions, but their anatomical and functional consequences are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate white matter throughout the brain in a preclinical model of redox dysregulation. Methods: In a mouse model with impaired glutathione synthesis (Gclm KO), a state-of-the-art multimodal magnetic resonance protocol at high field (14.1 T) was used to assess longitudinally the white matter structure, prefrontal neurochemical profile, and ventricular volume. Electrophysiological recordings in the abnormal white matter tracts identified by diffusion tensor imaging were performed to characterize the functional consequences of fractional anisotropy alterations. Results: Structural alterations observed at peri-pubertal age and adulthood in Gclm KO mice were restricted to the anterior commissure and fornix-fimbria. Reduced fractional anisotropy in the anterior commissure (-7.5%±1.9, P<.01) and fornix-fimbria (-4.5%±1.3, P<.05) were accompanied by reduced conduction velocity in fast-conducting fibers of the posterior limb of the anterior commissure (-14.3%±5.1, P<.05) and slow-conducting fibers of the fornix-fimbria (-8.6%±2.6, P<.05). Ventricular enlargement was found at peri-puberty (+25%±8 P<.05) but not in adult Gclm KO mice. Conclusions: Glutathione deficit in Gclm KO mice affects ventricular size and the integrity of the fornix-fimbria and anterior commissure. This suggests that redox dysregulation could contribute during neurodevelopment to the impaired white matter and ventricle enlargement observed in schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:26433393

  18. Plant diversity and functional groups affect Si and Ca pools in aboveground biomass of grassland systems.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Jörg; Roscher, Christiane; Hillebrand, Helmut; Weigelt, Alexandra; Oelmann, Yvonne; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Ebeling, Anne; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2016-09-01

    Plant diversity is an important driver of nitrogen and phosphorus stocks in aboveground plant biomass of grassland ecosystems, but plant diversity effects on other elements also important for plant growth are less understood. We tested whether plant species richness, functional group richness or the presence/absence of particular plant functional groups influences the Si and Ca concentrations (mmol g(-1)) and stocks (mmol m(-2)) in aboveground plant biomass in a large grassland biodiversity experiment (Jena Experiment). In the experiment including 60 temperate grassland species, plant diversity was manipulated as sown species richness (1, 2, 4, 8, 16) and richness and identity of plant functional groups (1-4; grasses, small herbs, tall herbs, legumes). We found positive species richness effects on Si as well as Ca stocks that were attributable to increased biomass production. The presence of particular functional groups was the most important factor explaining variation in aboveground Si and Ca stocks (mmol m(-2)). Grass presence increased the Si stocks by 140 % and legume presence increased the Ca stock by 230 %. Both the presence of specific plant functional groups and species diversity altered Si and Ca stocks, whereas Si and Ca concentration were affected mostly by the presence of specific plant functional groups. However, we found a negative effect of species diversity on Si and Ca accumulation, by calculating the deviation between mixtures and mixture biomass proportions, but in monoculture concentrations. These changes may in turn affect ecosystem processes such as plant litter decomposition and nutrient cycling in grasslands.

  19. Plant diversity and functional groups affect Si and Ca pools in aboveground biomass of grassland systems.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Jörg; Roscher, Christiane; Hillebrand, Helmut; Weigelt, Alexandra; Oelmann, Yvonne; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Ebeling, Anne; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2016-09-01

    Plant diversity is an important driver of nitrogen and phosphorus stocks in aboveground plant biomass of grassland ecosystems, but plant diversity effects on other elements also important for plant growth are less understood. We tested whether plant species richness, functional group richness or the presence/absence of particular plant functional groups influences the Si and Ca concentrations (mmol g(-1)) and stocks (mmol m(-2)) in aboveground plant biomass in a large grassland biodiversity experiment (Jena Experiment). In the experiment including 60 temperate grassland species, plant diversity was manipulated as sown species richness (1, 2, 4, 8, 16) and richness and identity of plant functional groups (1-4; grasses, small herbs, tall herbs, legumes). We found positive species richness effects on Si as well as Ca stocks that were attributable to increased biomass production. The presence of particular functional groups was the most important factor explaining variation in aboveground Si and Ca stocks (mmol m(-2)). Grass presence increased the Si stocks by 140 % and legume presence increased the Ca stock by 230 %. Both the presence of specific plant functional groups and species diversity altered Si and Ca stocks, whereas Si and Ca concentration were affected mostly by the presence of specific plant functional groups. However, we found a negative effect of species diversity on Si and Ca accumulation, by calculating the deviation between mixtures and mixture biomass proportions, but in monoculture concentrations. These changes may in turn affect ecosystem processes such as plant litter decomposition and nutrient cycling in grasslands. PMID:27164912

  20. Phthalate esters affect maturation and function of primate testis tissue ectopically grafted in mice.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Sosa, Jose R; Bondareva, Alla; Tang, Lin; Avelar, Gleide F; Coyle, Krysta M; Modelski, Mark; Alpaugh, Whitney; Conley, Alan; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine; França, Luiz R; Meyers, Stuart; Dobrinski, Ina

    2014-12-01

    Di-n-Butyl (DBP) and Di-(2-EthylHexyl) (DEHP) phthalates can leach from daily-use products resulting in environmental exposure. In male rodents, phthalate exposure results in reproductive effects. To evaluate effects on the immature primate testis, testis fragments from 6-month-old rhesus macaques were grafted subcutaneously to immune-deficient mice, which were exposed to 0, 10, or 500 mg/kg of DBP or DEHP for 14 weeks or 28 weeks (DBP only). DBP exposure reduced the expression of key steroidogenic genes, indicating that Leydig cell function was compromised. Exposure to 500 mg/kg impaired tubule formation and germ cell differentiation and reduced numbers of spermatogonia. Exposure to 10 mg/kg did not affect development, but reduced Sertoli cell number and resulted in increased expression of inhibin B. Exposure to DEHP for 14 week also affected steroidogenic genes expression. Therefore, long-term exposure to phthalate esters affected development and function of the primate testis in a time and dosage dependent manner.

  1. Incubation temperature affects the immune function of hatchling soft-shelled turtles, Pelodiscus sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Wei; Zhang, Wen; Du, Wei-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Identifying how developmental temperature affects the immune system is critical for understanding how ectothermic animals defend against pathogens and their fitness in the changing world. However, reptiles have received little attention regarding this issue. We incubated eggs at three ecologically relevant temperatures to determine how incubation temperature affects the immune function of hatchling soft-shelled turtles, Pelodiscus sinensis. When exposed to bacterial infections, hatchlings from 24 °C had lower cumulative mortalities (55%, therefore, higher immunocompetence) than those from 28 °C (85%) or 32 °C (100%). Consistent with higher immunocompetence, hatchlings from low incubation temperature had higher IgM, IgD, and CD3γ expressions than their counterparts from the other two higher incubation temperatures. Conversely, the activity of immunity-related enzymes did not match the among-temperature difference in immune function. Specifically, enzyme activity was higher at intermediate temperatures (alkaline phosphatase) or was not affected by incubation temperature (acid phosphatase, lysozyme). Our study is the first to provide unequivocal evidence (at the molecular and organismal level) about the significant effect of incubation temperature on offspring immunity in reptiles. Our results also indicate that the reduced immunity induced by high developmental temperatures might increase the vulnerability of reptiles to the outbreak of diseases under global warming scenarios. PMID:26028216

  2. Phthalate esters affect maturation and function of primate testis tissue ectopically grafted in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Sosa, Jose R; Bondareva, Alla; Tang, Lin; Avelar, Gleide F.; Coyle, Krysta M.; Modelski, Mark; Alpaugh, Whitney; Conley, Alan; Wynne-Edwards, Katherine; França, Luiz R; Meyers, Stuart; Dobrinski, Ina

    2014-01-01

    Di-n-Butyl (DBP) and Di-(2-EthylHexyl) (DEHP) phthalates can leach from daily-use products resulting in environmental exposure. In male rodents, phthalate exposure results in reproductive effects. To evaluate effects on the immature primate testis, testis fragments from 6-month-old rhesus macaques were grafted subcutaneously to immune-deficient mice, which were exposed to 0, 10, or 500 mg/kg of DBP or DEHP for 14 weeks or 28 weeks (DBP only). DBP exposure reduced the expression of key steroidogenic genes, indicating that Leydig cell function was compromised. Exposure to 500 mg/kg impaired tubule formation and germ cell differentiation and reduced numbers of spermatogonia. Exposure to 10 mg/kg did not affect development, but reduced Sertoli cell number and resulted in increased expression of inhibin B. Exposure to DEHP for 14 week also affected steroidogenic genes expression. Therefore, long-term exposure to phthalate esters affected development and function of the primate testis in a time and dosage dependent manner. PMID:25450860

  3. Incubation temperature affects the immune function of hatchling soft-shelled turtles, Pelodiscus sinensis.

    PubMed

    Dang, Wei; Zhang, Wen; Du, Wei-Guo

    2015-06-01

    Identifying how developmental temperature affects the immune system is critical for understanding how ectothermic animals defend against pathogens and their fitness in the changing world. However, reptiles have received little attention regarding this issue. We incubated eggs at three ecologically relevant temperatures to determine how incubation temperature affects the immune function of hatchling soft-shelled turtles, Pelodiscus sinensis. When exposed to bacterial infections, hatchlings from 24 °C had lower cumulative mortalities (55%, therefore, higher immunocompetence) than those from 28 °C (85%) or 32 °C (100%). Consistent with higher immunocompetence, hatchlings from low incubation temperature had higher IgM, IgD, and CD3γ expressions than their counterparts from the other two higher incubation temperatures. Conversely, the activity of immunity-related enzymes did not match the among-temperature difference in immune function. Specifically, enzyme activity was higher at intermediate temperatures (alkaline phosphatase) or was not affected by incubation temperature (acid phosphatase, lysozyme). Our study is the first to provide unequivocal evidence (at the molecular and organismal level) about the significant effect of incubation temperature on offspring immunity in reptiles. Our results also indicate that the reduced immunity induced by high developmental temperatures might increase the vulnerability of reptiles to the outbreak of diseases under global warming scenarios.

  4. Modulation of α power and functional connectivity during facial affect recognition.

    PubMed

    Popov, Tzvetan; Miller, Gregory A; Rockstroh, Brigitte; Weisz, Nathan

    2013-04-01

    Research has linked oscillatory activity in the α frequency range, particularly in sensorimotor cortex, to processing of social actions. Results further suggest involvement of sensorimotor α in the processing of facial expressions, including affect. The sensorimotor face area may be critical for perception of emotional face expression, but the role it plays is unclear. The present study sought to clarify how oscillatory brain activity contributes to or reflects processing of facial affect during changes in facial expression. Neuromagnetic oscillatory brain activity was monitored while 30 volunteers viewed videos of human faces that changed their expression from neutral to fearful, neutral, or happy expressions. Induced changes in α power during the different morphs, source analysis, and graph-theoretic metrics served to identify the role of α power modulation and cross-regional coupling by means of phase synchrony during facial affect recognition. Changes from neutral to emotional faces were associated with a 10-15 Hz power increase localized in bilateral sensorimotor areas, together with occipital power decrease, preceding reported emotional expression recognition. Graph-theoretic analysis revealed that, in the course of a trial, the balance between sensorimotor power increase and decrease was associated with decreased and increased transregional connectedness as measured by node degree. Results suggest that modulations in α power facilitate early registration, with sensorimotor cortex including the sensorimotor face area largely functionally decoupled and thereby protected from additional, disruptive input and that subsequent α power decrease together with increased connectedness of sensorimotor areas facilitates successful facial affect recognition.

  5. Functional connectivity of pain-mediated affect regulation in Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Niedtfeld, Inga; Kirsch, Peter; Schulze, Lars; Herpertz, Sabine C; Bohus, Martin; Schmahl, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Affective instability and self-injurious behavior are important features of Borderline Personality Disorder. Whereas affective instability may be caused by a pattern of limbic hyperreactivity paired with dysfunctional prefrontal regulation mechanisms, painful stimulation was found to reduce affective arousal at the neural level, possibly underlying the soothing effect of pain in BPD.We used psychophysiological interactions to analyze functional connectivity of (para-) limbic brain structures (i.e. amygdala, insula, anterior cingulate cortex) in Borderline Personality Disorder in response to painful stimulation. Therefore, we re-analyzed a dataset from 20 patients with Borderline Personality Disorder and 23 healthy controls who took part in an fMRI-task inducing negative (versus neutral) affect and subsequently applying heat pain (versus warmth perception).Results suggest an enhanced negative coupling between limbic as well as paralimbic regions and prefrontal regions, specifically with the medial and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, when patients experienced pain in addition to emotional arousing pictures. When neutral pictures were combined with painful heat sensation, we found positive connectivity in Borderline Personality Disorder between (para-)limbic brain areas and parts of the basal ganglia (lentiform nucleus, putamen), as well areas involved in self-referential processing (precuneus and posterior cingulate).We found further evidence for alterations in the emotion regulation process in Borderline Personality Disorder, in the way that pain improves the inhibition of limbic activity by prefrontal areas. This study provides new insights in pain processing in BPD, including enhanced coupling of limbic structures and basal ganglia. PMID:22428013

  6. Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Strategies to Rescue Factor IX Variants That Affect Splicing and Protein Function.

    PubMed

    Tajnik, Mojca; Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Bussani, Erica; Barbon, Elena; Balestra, Dario; Pinotti, Mirko; Pagani, Franco

    2016-05-01

    Mutations that result in amino acid changes can affect both pre-mRNA splicing and protein function. Understanding the combined effect is essential for correct diagnosis and for establishing the most appropriate therapeutic strategy at the molecular level. We have identified a series of disease-causing splicing mutations in coagulation factor IX (FIX) exon 5 that are completely recovered by a modified U1snRNP particle, through an SRSF2-dependent enhancement mechanism. We discovered that synonymous mutations and missense substitutions associated to a partial FIX secretion defect represent targets for this therapy as the resulting spliced-corrected proteins maintains normal FIX coagulant specific activity. Thus, splicing and protein alterations contribute to define at the molecular level the disease-causing effect of a number of exonic mutations in coagulation FIX exon 5. In addition, our results have a significant impact in the development of splicing-switching therapies in particular for mutations that affect both splicing and protein function where increasing the amount of a correctly spliced protein can circumvent the basic functional defects. PMID:27227676

  7. Laterality affects spontaneous recovery of contralateral hand motor function following motor cortex injury in rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Darling, Warren G; Helle, Nicole; Pizzimenti, Marc A; Rotella, Diane L; Hynes, Stephanie M; Ge, Jizhi; Stilwell-Morecraft, Kimberly S; Morecraft, Robert J

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether brain laterality influences spontaneous recovery of hand motor function after controlled brain injuries to arm areas of M1 and lateral premotor cortex (LPMC) of the hemisphere contralateral to the preferred hand in rhesus monkeys. We hypothesized that monkeys with stronger hand preference would exhibit poorer recovery of skilled hand use after such brain injury. Degree of handedness was assessed using a standard dexterity board task in which subjects could use either hand to retrieve small food pellets. Fine hand/digit motor function was assessed using a modified dexterity board before and after the M1 and LPMC lesions in ten monkeys. We found a strong negative relationship between the degree of handedness and the recovery of manipulation skill, demonstrating that higher hand preference was associated with poorer recovery of hand fine motor function. We also observed that monkeys with larger lesions within M1 and LPMC had greater initial impairment of manipulation and poorer recovery of reaching skill. We conclude that monkeys with a stronger hand preference are likely to show poorer recovery of contralesional hand fine motor skill after isolated brain lesions affecting the lateral frontal motor areas. These data may be extended to suggest that humans who exhibit weak hand dominance, and perhaps individuals who use both hands for fine motor tasks, may have a more favorable potential for recovery after a unilateral stroke or brain injury affecting the lateral cortical motor areas than individuals with a high degree of hand dominance.

  8. Microbial Functional Potential and Community Composition in Permafrost-Affected Soils of the NW Canadian Arctic

    PubMed Central

    Frank-Fahle, Béatrice A.; Yergeau, Étienne; Greer, Charles W.; Lantuit, Hugues; Wagner, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Permafrost-affected soils are among the most obvious ecosystems in which current microbial controls on organic matter decomposition are changing as a result of global warming. Warmer conditions in polygonal tundra will lead to a deepening of the seasonal active layer, provoking changes in microbial processes and possibly resulting in exacerbated carbon degradation under increasing anoxic conditions. To identify current microbial assemblages in carbon rich, water saturated permafrost environments, four polygonal tundra sites were investigated on Herschel Island and the Yukon Coast, Western Canadian Arctic. Ion Torrent sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA amplicons revealed the presence of all major microbial soil groups and indicated a local, vertical heterogeneity of the polygonal tundra soil community with increasing depth. Microbial diversity was found to be highest in the surface layers, decreasing towards the permafrost table. Quantitative PCR analysis of functional genes involved in carbon and nitrogen-cycling revealed a high functional potential in the surface layers, decreasing with increasing active layer depth. We observed that soil properties driving microbial diversity and functional potential varied in each study site. These results highlight the small-scale heterogeneity of geomorphologically comparable sites, greatly restricting generalizations about the fate of permafrost-affected environments in a warming Arctic. PMID:24416279

  9. Microbial functional potential and community composition in permafrost-affected soils of the NW Canadian Arctic.

    PubMed

    Frank-Fahle, Béatrice A; Yergeau, Etienne; Greer, Charles W; Lantuit, Hugues; Wagner, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    Permafrost-affected soils are among the most obvious ecosystems in which current microbial controls on organic matter decomposition are changing as a result of global warming. Warmer conditions in polygonal tundra will lead to a deepening of the seasonal active layer, provoking changes in microbial processes and possibly resulting in exacerbated carbon degradation under increasing anoxic conditions. To identify current microbial assemblages in carbon rich, water saturated permafrost environments, four polygonal tundra sites were investigated on Herschel Island and the Yukon Coast, Western Canadian Arctic. Ion Torrent sequencing of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA amplicons revealed the presence of all major microbial soil groups and indicated a local, vertical heterogeneity of the polygonal tundra soil community with increasing depth. Microbial diversity was found to be highest in the surface layers, decreasing towards the permafrost table. Quantitative PCR analysis of functional genes involved in carbon and nitrogen-cycling revealed a high functional potential in the surface layers, decreasing with increasing active layer depth. We observed that soil properties driving microbial diversity and functional potential varied in each study site. These results highlight the small-scale heterogeneity of geomorphologically comparable sites, greatly restricting generalizations about the fate of permafrost-affected environments in a warming Arctic.

  10. Molecular Basis and Therapeutic Strategies to Rescue Factor IX Variants That Affect Splicing and Protein Function

    PubMed Central

    Bussani, Erica; Barbon, Elena; Pinotti, Mirko; Pagani, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Mutations that result in amino acid changes can affect both pre-mRNA splicing and protein function. Understanding the combined effect is essential for correct diagnosis and for establishing the most appropriate therapeutic strategy at the molecular level. We have identified a series of disease-causing splicing mutations in coagulation factor IX (FIX) exon 5 that are completely recovered by a modified U1snRNP particle, through an SRSF2-dependent enhancement mechanism. We discovered that synonymous mutations and missense substitutions associated to a partial FIX secretion defect represent targets for this therapy as the resulting spliced-corrected proteins maintains normal FIX coagulant specific activity. Thus, splicing and protein alterations contribute to define at the molecular level the disease-causing effect of a number of exonic mutations in coagulation FIX exon 5. In addition, our results have a significant impact in the development of splicing-switching therapies in particular for mutations that affect both splicing and protein function where increasing the amount of a correctly spliced protein can circumvent the basic functional defects. PMID:27227676

  11. Effects of light therapy on neuropsychological function and mood in seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed Central

    Michalon, M; Eskes, G A; Mate-Kole, C C

    1997-01-01

    To date, little attention has been paid to changes in neuropsychological function in seasonal affective disorders (SAD). In this study, we investigated the performance of 30 patients with SAD on a wide range of cognitive variables before and after 2 weeks of light treatment with either white or placebo red light, as well as later in the summertime. Performance of subjects with SAD on neuropsychological tests was compared with a group of 29 age- and education-matched healthy control subjects. The most consistent deficits associated with SAD were on tests of cognitive failures, visual memory, and visual-construction skills. In contrast to specific bright light effects on psychiatric measures, reports of cognitive failures did not change with either light treatment. Visual memory and constructional deficits responded nonspecifically to treatment with either white or the presumed placebo red light. Surprisingly, visual memory deficits were seen again in the summer, at a time when mood, cognitive failures, and other cognitive functions appeared at normal levels. These data suggest that cognitive functioning is affected by SAD. In addition, light treatment may have differential effects on mood and cognition. PMID:9002389

  12. Dietary protein during gestation affects circulating indicators of placental function and fetal development in heifers.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, T M; Micke, G C; Magalhaes, R S; Martin, G B; Wallace, C R; Green, J A; Perry, V E A

    2009-04-01

    The influences of nutritional protein during the first and second trimesters of pregnancy on placental hormones and fetal growth were determined in composite beef heifers. At artificial insemination, heifers were stratified by weight within each composite genotype into 4 treatment groups: High High (HH=1.4kg crude protein (CP)/day for first and second trimesters of gestation; n=16), High Low (HL=1.4kg CP/day for first trimester and 0.4kg CP/day for second trimester; n=19), Low High (LH=0.4kg CP/day for first trimester and 1.4kg CP/day for second trimester; n=17) or Low Low (LL=0.4kg CP/day for first and second trimesters; n=19). Maternal plasma bovine pregnancy associated glycoprotein (bPAG) and progesterone (P4) were determined at gestation day (gd) 28, 82, 179 and 271 (mean gestation length 286 days) in addition to P4 at term. Estrone sulphate (ES) and bovine placental lactogen (bPL) concentrations were measured at gd 124, 179, 236 and 271 and at term in addition to ES at gd 82. Low dietary protein increased placental function as indicated by increased bPAG (P<0.001) and ES (P=0.02) concentrations in first trimester and increased bPL concentrations (P=0.01) in the second trimester of gestation. In the third trimester, when dietary treatment had ceased, placental function was no longer associated with previous dietary treatments. Dam genotype affected placental function as measured by bPL (P<0.001) and ES concentrations (P=0.02). Calf gender, heifer age and maternal insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, -II and leptin did not affect hormonal indicators or circulating markers of placental function. Enhanced placental function during the third trimester, as measured by ES, was associated with increased calf birth weight (P=0.003).

  13. Cure Kinetics of Epoxy Nanocomposites Affected by MWCNTs Functionalization: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Saeb, Mohammad Reza; Bakhshandeh, Ehsan; Khonakdar, Hossein Ali; Mäder, Edith; Scheffler, Christina; Heinrich, Gert

    2013-01-01

    The current paper provides an overview to emphasize the role of functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in manipulating cure kinetics of epoxy nanocomposites, which itself determines ultimate properties of the resulting compound. In this regard, the most commonly used functionalization schemes, that is, carboxylation and amidation, are thoroughly surveyed to highlight the role of functionalized nanotubes in controlling the rate of autocatalytic and vitrification kinetics. The current literature elucidates that the mechanism of curing in epoxy/MWCNTs nanocomposites remains almost unaffected by the functionalization of carbon nanotubes. On the other hand, early stage facilitation of autocatalytic reactions in the presence of MWCNTs bearing amine groups has been addressed by several researchers. When carboxylated nanotubes were used to modify MWCNTs, the rate of such reactions diminished as a consequence of heterogeneous dispersion within the epoxy matrix. At later stages of curing, however, the prolonged vitrification was seen to be dominant. Thus, the type of functional groups covalently located on the surface of MWCNTs directly affects the degree of polymer-nanotube interaction followed by enhancement of curing reaction. Our survey demonstrated that most widespread efforts ever made to represent multifarious surface-treated MWCNTs have not been directed towards preparation of epoxy nanocomposites, but they could result in property synergism. PMID:24348181

  14. The Functional Effect of Teacher Positive and Neutral Affect on Task Performance of Students with Significant Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sungho; Singer, George H. S.; Gibson, Mary

    2005-01-01

    The study uses an alternating treatment design to evaluate the functional effect of teacher's affect on students' task performance. Tradition in special education holds that teachers should engage students using positive and enthusiastic affect for task presentations and praise. To test this assumption, we compared two affective conditions. Three…

  15. Relationship between sodium-dependent phosphate transporter (NaPi-IIc) function and cellular vacuole formation in opossum kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, Yuji; Segawa, Hiroko; Ohnishi, Saori; Ohi, Akiko; Ito, Mikiko; Kaneko, Ichiro; Kido, Shinsuke; Tatsumi, Sawako; Miyamoto, Ken-ichi

    2015-01-01

    NaPi-IIc/SLC34A3 is a sodium-dependent inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporter in the renal proximal tubules and its mutations cause hereditary hypophosphatemic rickets with hypercalciuria (HHRH). In the present study, we created a specific antibody for opossum SLC34A3, NaPi-IIc (oNaPi-IIc), and analyzed its localization and regulation in opossum kidney cells (a tissue culture model of proximal tubular cells). Immunoreactive oNaPi-IIc protein levels increased during the proliferative phase and decreased during differentiation. Moreover, stimulating cell growth upregulated oNaPi-IIc protein levels, whereas suppressing cell proliferation downregulated oNaPi-IIc protein levels. Immunocytochemistry revealed that endogenous and exogenous oNaPi-IIc proteins localized at the protrusion of the plasma membrane, which is a phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) rich-membrane, and at the intracellular vacuolar membrane. Exogenous NaPi-IIc also induced cellular vacuoles and localized in the plasma membrane. The ability to form vacuoles is specific to electroneutral NaPi-IIc, and not electrogenic NaPi-IIa or NaPi-IIb. In addition, mutations of NaPi-IIc (S138F and R468W) in HHRH did not cause cellular PIP2-rich vacuoles. In conclusion, our data anticipate that NaPi-IIc may regulate PIP2 production at the plasma membrane and cellular vesicle formation. PMID:26399350

  16. Deletion of CGI-58 or adipose triglyceride lipase differently affects macrophage function and atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Goeritzer, Madeleine; Schlager, Stefanie; Radovic, Branislav; Madreiter, Corina T.; Rainer, Silvia; Thomas, Gwynneth; Lord, Caleb C.; Sacks, Jessica; Brown, Amanda L.; Vujic, Nemanja; Obrowsky, Sascha; Sachdev, Vinay; Kolb, Dagmar; Chandak, Prakash G.; Graier, Wolfgang F.; Sattler, Wolfgang; Brown, J. Mark; Kratky, Dagmar

    2014-01-01

    Cellular TG stores are efficiently hydrolyzed by adipose TG lipase (ATGL). Its coactivator comparative gene identification-58 (CGI-58) strongly increases ATGL-mediated TG catabolism in cell culture experiments. To investigate the consequences of CGI-58 deficiency in murine macrophages, we generated mice with a targeted deletion of CGI-58 in myeloid cells (macCGI-58−/− mice). CGI-58−/− macrophages accumulate intracellular TG-rich lipid droplets and have decreased phagocytic capacity, comparable to ATGL−/− macrophages. In contrast to ATGL−/− macrophages, however, CGI-58−/− macrophages have intact mitochondria and show no indications of mitochondrial apoptosis and endoplasmic reticulum stress, suggesting that TG accumulation per se lacks a significant role in processes leading to mitochondrial dysfunction. Another notable difference is the fact that CGI-58−/− macrophages adopt an M1-like phenotype in vitro. Finally, we investigated atherosclerosis susceptibility in macCGI-58/ApoE-double KO (DKO) animals. In response to high-fat/high-cholesterol diet feeding, DKO animals showed comparable plaque formation as observed in ApoE−/− mice. In agreement, antisense oligonucleotide-mediated knockdown of CGI-58 in LDL receptor−/− mice did not alter atherosclerosis burden in the aortic root. These results suggest that macrophage function and atherosclerosis susceptibility differ fundamentally in these two animal models with disturbed TG catabolism, showing a more severe phenotype by ATGL deficiency. PMID:25316883

  17. Genome-wide functional screen identifies a compendium of genes affecting sensitivity to tamoxifen

    PubMed Central

    Mendes-Pereira, Ana M.; Sims, David; Dexter, Tim; Fenwick, Kerry; Assiotis, Ioannis; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Mitsopoulos, Costas; Hakas, Jarle; Zvelebil, Marketa; Lord, Christopher J.; Ashworth, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Therapies that target estrogen signaling have made a very considerable contribution to reducing mortality from breast cancer. However, resistance to tamoxifen remains a major clinical problem. Here we have used a genome-wide functional profiling approach to identify multiple genes that confer resistance or sensitivity to tamoxifen. Combining whole-genome shRNA screening with massively parallel sequencing, we have profiled the impact of more than 56,670 RNA interference reagents targeting 16,487 genes on the cellular response to tamoxifen. This screen, along with subsequent validation experiments, identifies a compendium of genes whose silencing causes tamoxifen resistance (including BAP1, CLPP, GPRC5D, NAE1, NF1, NIPBL, NSD1, RAD21, RARG, SMC3, and UBA3) and also a set of genes whose silencing causes sensitivity to this endocrine agent (C10orf72, C15orf55/NUT, EDF1, ING5, KRAS, NOC3L, PPP1R15B, RRAS2, TMPRSS2, and TPM4). Multiple individual genes, including NF1, a regulator of RAS signaling, also correlate with clinical outcome after tamoxifen treatment. PMID:21482774

  18. Six-Digit CPK and Mildly Affected Renal Function in McArdle Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mcinnes, Andrew D.; DeGroote, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    A previously healthy, white 12-year-old girl presented with diffuse body aches and poor perfusion. She developed severe respiratory failure and marked rhabdomyolysis and was mechanically ventilated. Although her CPK peaked at 500,000 IU/L, her renal function was mildly affected and her creatinine did not exceed the 0.8 mg/dL. The rhabdomyolysis was gradually resolved following aggressive fluid hydration. The patient did not require dialysis and made a complete recovery. Genetic studies revealed the diagnosis of McArdle disease. PMID:25371840

  19. Ecosystem structure, function, and composition in rangelands are negatively affected by livestock grazing.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, David J; Poore, Alistair G B; Ruiz-Colmenero, Marta; Letnic, Mike; Soliveres, Santiago

    2016-06-01

    Reports of positive or neutral effects of grazing on plant species richness have prompted calls for livestock grazing to be used as a tool for managing land for conservation. Grazing effects, however, are likely to vary among different response variables, types, and intensity of grazing, and across abiotic conditions. We aimed to examine how grazing affects ecosystem structure, function, and composition. We compiled a database of 7615 records reporting an effect of grazing by sheep and cattle on 278 biotic and abiotic response variables for published studies across Australia. Using these data, we derived three ecosystem measures based on structure, function, and composition, which were compared against six contrasts of grazing pressure, ranging from low to heavy, two different herbivores (sheep, cattle), and across three different climatic zones. Grazing reduced structure (by 35%), function (24%), and composition (10%). Structure and function (but not composition) declined more when grazed by sheep and cattle together than sheep alone. Grazing reduced plant biomass (40%), animal richness (15%), and plant and animal abundance, and plant and litter cover (25%), but had no effect on plant richness nor soil function. The negative effects of grazing on plant biomass, plant cover, and soil function were more pronounced in drier environments. Grazing effects on plant and animal richness and composition were constant, or even declined, with increasing aridity. Our study represents a comprehensive continental assessment of the implications of grazing for managing Australian rangelands. Grazing effects were largely negative, even at very low levels of grazing. Overall, our results suggest that livestock grazing in Australia is unlikely to produce positive outcomes for ecosystem structure, function, and composition or even as a blanket conservation tool unless reduction in specific response variables is an explicit management objective.

  20. Ecosystem structure, function, and composition in rangelands are negatively affected by livestock grazing.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, David J; Poore, Alistair G B; Ruiz-Colmenero, Marta; Letnic, Mike; Soliveres, Santiago

    2016-06-01

    Reports of positive or neutral effects of grazing on plant species richness have prompted calls for livestock grazing to be used as a tool for managing land for conservation. Grazing effects, however, are likely to vary among different response variables, types, and intensity of grazing, and across abiotic conditions. We aimed to examine how grazing affects ecosystem structure, function, and composition. We compiled a database of 7615 records reporting an effect of grazing by sheep and cattle on 278 biotic and abiotic response variables for published studies across Australia. Using these data, we derived three ecosystem measures based on structure, function, and composition, which were compared against six contrasts of grazing pressure, ranging from low to heavy, two different herbivores (sheep, cattle), and across three different climatic zones. Grazing reduced structure (by 35%), function (24%), and composition (10%). Structure and function (but not composition) declined more when grazed by sheep and cattle together than sheep alone. Grazing reduced plant biomass (40%), animal richness (15%), and plant and animal abundance, and plant and litter cover (25%), but had no effect on plant richness nor soil function. The negative effects of grazing on plant biomass, plant cover, and soil function were more pronounced in drier environments. Grazing effects on plant and animal richness and composition were constant, or even declined, with increasing aridity. Our study represents a comprehensive continental assessment of the implications of grazing for managing Australian rangelands. Grazing effects were largely negative, even at very low levels of grazing. Overall, our results suggest that livestock grazing in Australia is unlikely to produce positive outcomes for ecosystem structure, function, and composition or even as a blanket conservation tool unless reduction in specific response variables is an explicit management objective. PMID:27509764

  1. Loss of Cellular Sialidases Does Not Affect the Sialylation Status of the Prion Protein but Increases the Amounts of Its Proteolytic Fragment C1

    PubMed Central

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Klimova, Nina; Makarava, Natallia; Savtchenko, Regina; Pan, Xuefang; Annunziata, Ida; Takahashi, Kohta; Miyagi, Taeko; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V.; d’Azzo, Alessandra; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2015-01-01

    The central molecular event underlying prion diseases involves conformational change of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrPC), which is a sialoglycoprotein, into the disease-associated, transmissible form denoted PrPSc. Recent studies revealed a correlation between the sialylation status of PrPSc and incubation time to disease and introduced a new hypothesis that progression of prion diseases could be controlled or reversed by altering the sialylation level of PrPC. Of the four known mammalian sialidases, the enzymes that cleave off sialic acid residues, only NEU1, NEU3 and NEU4 are expressed in the brain. To test whether cellular sialidases control the steady-state sialylation level of PrPC and to identify the putative sialidase responsible for desialylating PrPC, we analyzed brain-derived PrPC from knockout mice deficient in Neu1, Neu3, Neu4, or from Neu3/Neu4 double knockouts. Surprisingly, no differences in the sialylation of PrPC or its proteolytic product C1 were noticed in any of the knockout mice tested as compared to the age-matched controls. However, significantly higher amounts of the C1 fragment relative to full-length PrPC were detected in the brains of Neu1 knockout mice as compared to WT mice or to the other knockout mice. Additional experiments revealed that in neuroblastoma cell line the sialylation pattern of C1 could be changed by an inhibitor of sialylatransferases. In summary, this study suggests that targeting cellular sialidases is apparently not the correct strategy for altering the sialylation levels of PrPC, whereas modulating the activity of sialylatransferases might offer a more promising approach. Our findings also suggest that catabolism of PrPC involves its α-cleavage followed by desialylation of the resulting C1 fragments by NEU1 and consequent fast degradation of the desialylated products. PMID:26569607

  2. Loss of Cellular Sialidases Does Not Affect the Sialylation Status of the Prion Protein but Increases the Amounts of Its Proteolytic Fragment C1.

    PubMed

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Klimova, Nina; Makarava, Natallia; Savtchenko, Regina; Pan, Xuefang; Annunziata, Ida; Takahashi, Kohta; Miyagi, Taeko; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V; d'Azzo, Alessandra; Baskakov, Ilia V

    2015-01-01

    The central molecular event underlying prion diseases involves conformational change of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrPC), which is a sialoglycoprotein, into the disease-associated, transmissible form denoted PrPSc. Recent studies revealed a correlation between the sialylation status of PrPSc and incubation time to disease and introduced a new hypothesis that progression of prion diseases could be controlled or reversed by altering the sialylation level of PrPC. Of the four known mammalian sialidases, the enzymes that cleave off sialic acid residues, only NEU1, NEU3 and NEU4 are expressed in the brain. To test whether cellular sialidases control the steady-state sialylation level of PrPC and to identify the putative sialidase responsible for desialylating PrPC, we analyzed brain-derived PrPC from knockout mice deficient in Neu1, Neu3, Neu4, or from Neu3/Neu4 double knockouts. Surprisingly, no differences in the sialylation of PrPC or its proteolytic product C1 were noticed in any of the knockout mice tested as compared to the age-matched controls. However, significantly higher amounts of the C1 fragment relative to full-length PrPC were detected in the brains of Neu1 knockout mice as compared to WT mice or to the other knockout mice. Additional experiments revealed that in neuroblastoma cell line the sialylation pattern of C1 could be changed by an inhibitor of sialylatransferases. In summary, this study suggests that targeting cellular sialidases is apparently not the correct strategy for altering the sialylation levels of PrPC, whereas modulating the activity of sialylatransferases might offer a more promising approach. Our findings also suggest that catabolism of PrPC involves its α-cleavage followed by desialylation of the resulting C1 fragments by NEU1 and consequent fast degradation of the desialylated products. PMID:26569607

  3. Metabolic stressors and signals differentially affect energy allocation between reproduction and immune function.

    PubMed

    Carlton, Elizabeth D; Cooper, Candace L; Demas, Gregory E

    2014-11-01

    Most free-living animals have finite energy stores that they must allocate to different physiological and behavioral processes. In times of energetic stress, trade-offs in energy allocation among these processes may occur. The manifestation of trade-offs may depend on the source (e.g., glucose, lipids) and severity of energy limitation. In this study, we investigated energetic trade-offs between the reproductive and immune systems by experimentally limiting energy availability to female Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) with 2-deoxy-d-glucose, a compound that disrupts cellular utilization of glucose. We observed how glucoprivation at two levels of severity affected allocation to reproduction and immunity. Additionally, we treated a subset of these hamsters with leptin, an adipose hormone that provides a direct signal of available fat stores, in order to determine how increasing this signal of fat stores influences glucoprivation-induced trade-offs. We observed trade-offs between the reproductive and immune systems and that these trade-offs depended on the severity of energy limitation and exogenous leptin signaling. The majority of the animals experiencing mild glucoprivation entered anestrus, whereas leptin treatment restored estrous cycling in these animals. Surprisingly, virtually all animals experiencing more severe glucoprivation maintained normal estrous cycling throughout the experiment; however, exogenous leptin resulted in lower antibody production in this group. These data suggest that variation in these trade-offs may be mediated by shifts between glucose and fatty acid utilization. Collectively, the results of the present study highlight the context-dependent nature of these trade-offs, as trade-offs induced by the same metabolic stressor can manifest differently depending on its intensity.

  4. Modest maternal caffeine exposure affects developing embryonic cardiovascular function and growth.

    PubMed

    Momoi, Nobuo; Tinney, Joseph P; Liu, Li J; Elshershari, Huda; Hoffmann, Paul J; Ralphe, John C; Keller, Bradley B; Tobita, Kimimasa

    2008-05-01

    Caffeine consumption during pregnancy is reported to increase the risk of in utero growth restriction and spontaneous abortion. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that modest maternal caffeine exposure affects in utero developing embryonic cardiovascular (CV