Science.gov

Sample records for affect cellular proliferation

  1. Artesunate attenuates glioma proliferation, migration and invasion by affecting cellular mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Lian, Shizhong; Shi, Ruyi; Huang, Xun; Hu, Xiaoling; Song, Bin; Bai, Yinshan; Yang, Bin; Dong, Jinyao; Du, Zhijie; Zhang, Yanyan; Jia, Junmei; Ma, Ning; Guo, Geng; Wang, Mingyu

    2016-08-01

    Glioma is one of the most common malignant brain tumors. Current chemotherapy is far from providing satisfactory clinical outcomes for patients with glioma. More efficient drugs are urgently needed. Artesunate (ART) is clinically used as an anti-malarial agent and exhibits potent antiproliferative activity as a traditional Chinese medicine. In addition, ART has been shown to exert a profound cytotoxic effect on various tumor cell lines, presenting a novel candidate for cancer chemotherapy. However, its anticancer effect on glioma by altering cell biomechanical properties remains unclear. The present study aimed to identify the anticancer effects of ART on human glioma SHG44 cells by assessing cell proliferation, migration/invasion, the expression of claudin-1 and the biomechanical properties of ART-treated SHG44 cells. The proliferation of the SHG44 cells was assessed by MTT assay. The cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. For cell migration and invasion assays, the Transwell was used. The expression of the gene claudin-1 was detected by polymerase chain reaction. The cell membrane and biomechanical properties, as targets of ART action, were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). ART significantly inhibited the proliferation of SHG44 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. After treatment with 30 mg/l ART, the level of cell apoptosis was significantly increased (from 6.88±0.062 to 23.7±4.16%). Furthermore, the cell migration and invasion abilities of the SHG44 cells were markedly inhibited after treatment with 30 mg/l ART. Compared with the control group (0 mg/l ART), the SHG44 cells treated with 30 mg/l ART exhibited upregulated expression of claudin-1, increased adhesive force (from 2,400±300 to 3,600±500 pN), increased high connection among SHG44 cells, increased cytomembrane roughness (from 0.118±0.011 to 0.269±0.015 µm) and reduced elasticity (from 23±8 to 3.5±1.1 MPa). The present study demonstrated that ART could

  2. Binding of sFRP-3 to EGF in the Extra-Cellular Space Affects Proliferation, Differentiation and Morphogenetic Events Regulated by the Two Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Tosoni, Daniela; Borello, Ugo; Sampaolesi, Maurilio; Sciorati, Clara; Cannata, Stefano; Clementi, Emilio; Brunelli, Silvia; Cossu, Giulio

    2008-01-01

    Background sFRP-3 is a soluble antagonist of Wnts, widely expressed in developing embryos. The Wnt gene family comprises cysteine-rich secreted ligands that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, organogenesis and oncogenesis of different organisms ranging from worms to mammals. In the canonical signal transduction pathway Wnt proteins bind to the extracellular domain of Frizzled receptors and consequently recruit Dishevelled (Dsh) to the cell membrane. In addition to Wnt membrane receptors belonging to the Frizzled family, several other molecules have been described which share homology in the CRD domain and lack the putative trans-membrane domain, such as sFRP molecules (soluble Frizzled Related Protein). Among them, sFRP-3 was originally isolated from bovine articular cartilage and also as a component of the Spemann organizer. sFRP-3 blocks Wnt-8 induced axis duplication in Xenopus embryos and binds to the surface of cells expressing a membrane-anchored form of Wnt-1. Injection of sFRP-3 mRNA blocks expression of XMyoD mRNA and leads to embryos with enlarged heads and shortened trunks. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report that sFRP-3 specifically blocks EGF-induced fibroblast proliferation and foci formation. Over-expression of sFRP-3 reverts EGF-mediated inhibition of hair follicle development in the mouse ectoderm while its ablation in Xenopus maintains EGF-mediated inhibition of ectoderm differentiation. Conversely, over-expression of EGF reverts the inhibition of somitic myogenesis and axis truncation in Xenopus and mouse embryos caused by sFRP-3. In vitro experiments demonstrated a direct binding of EGF to sFRP-3 both on heparin and on the surface of CHO cells where the molecule had been membrane anchored. Conclusions/Significance sFRP-3 and EGF reciprocally inhibit their effects on cell proliferation, differentiation and morphogenesis and indeed are expressed in contiguous domains of the embryo, suggesting that in addition to their

  3. Quantification of Cellular Proliferation in Mouse Atherosclerotic Lesions.

    PubMed

    Fuster, José J

    2015-01-01

    Excessive cell proliferation within atherosclerotic plaques plays an important role in the progression of atherosclerosis. Macrophage proliferation in particular has become a major focus of attention in the cardiovascular field because it appears to mediate most of macrophage expansion in mouse atherosclerotic arteries. Therefore, quantification of cell proliferation is an essential part of the characterization of atherosclerotic plaques in experimental studies. This chapter describes two variants of a simple immunostaining protocol that allow for the quantification of cellular proliferation in mouse atherosclerotic lesions based on the detection of the proliferation-associated antigen Ki-67. PMID:26445791

  4. Cellular proliferation after experimental glaucoma filtration surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Jampel, H.D.; McGuigan, L.J.; Dunkelberger, G.R.; L'Hernault, N.L.; Quigley, H.A.

    1988-01-01

    We used light microscopic autoradiography to determine the time course of cellular incorporation of tritiated thymidine (a correlate of cell division) following glaucoma filtration surgery in seven eyes of four cynomolgus monkeys with experimental glaucoma. Incorporation of tritiated thymidine was detected as early as 24 hours postoperatively. Peak incorporation occurred five days postoperatively and had returned to baseline levels by day 11. Cells incorporating tritiated thymidine included keratocytes, episcleral cells, corneal and capillary endothelial cells, and conjunctival and corneal epithelial cells. Transmission electron microscopy was correlated with the autoradiographic results to demonstrate that fibroblasts were dividing on the corneoscleral margin. These findings have potential clinical implications for the use of antiproliferative agents after filtration surgery.

  5. Cellular adhesion, proliferation and viability on conducting polymer substrates.

    PubMed

    del Valle, Luis J; Estrany, Francesc; Armelin, Elaine; Oliver, Ramón; Alemán, Carlos

    2008-12-01

    This work reports a comprehensive study about cell adhesion and proliferation on the surface of different electroactive substrates formed by pi-conjugated polymers. Biological assays were performed considering four different cellular lines: two epithelial and two fibroblasts. On the other hand, the electroactivity of the three conducting systems was determined in physiological conditions. Results indicate that the three substrates behave as a cellular matrix, even though compatibility with cells is larger for PPy and the 3-layered system. Furthermore, the three polymeric systems are electro-compatible with the cellular monolayers. PMID:18683167

  6. Tetraspanin CD9 modulates human lymphoma cellular proliferation via histone deacetylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Herr, Michael J.; Longhurst, Celia M.; Baker, Benjamin; Homayouni, Ramin; Speich, Henry E.; Kotha, Jayaprakash; Jennings, Lisa K.

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • CD9 is differentially expressed in human Burkitt’s lymphoma cells. • We found that CD9 expression promotes these cells proliferation. • CD9 expression also increases HDAC activity. • HDAC inhibition decreased both cell proliferation and importantly CD9 expression. • CD9 may dictate HDAC efficacy and play a role in HDAC regulation. - Abstract: Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) is a type of hematological malignancy that affects two percent of the overall population in the United States. Tetraspanin CD9 is a cell surface protein that has been thoroughly demonstrated to be a molecular facilitator of cellular phenotype. CD9 expression varies in two human lymphoma cell lines, Raji and BJAB. In this report, we investigated the functional relationship between CD9 and cell proliferation regulated by histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in these two cell lines. Introduction of CD9 expression in Raji cells resulted in significantly increased cell proliferation and HDAC activity compared to Mock transfected Raji cells. The increase in CD9–Raji cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by HDAC inhibitor (HDACi) treatment. Pretreatment of BJAB cells with HDAC inhibitors resulted in a significant decrease in endogenous CD9 mRNA and cell surface expression. BJAB cells also displayed decreased cell proliferation after HDACi treatment. These results suggest a significant relationship between CD9 expression and cell proliferation in human lymphoma cells that may be modulated by HDAC activity.

  7. Cellular proliferation, cellular viability, and biocompatibility of HA-ZnO composites.

    PubMed

    Saha, Naresh; Dubey, Ashutosh K; Basu, Bikramjit

    2012-01-01

    One of the important issues in the development of hydroxyapatite (HA)-based biomaterials is the prosthetic infection, which limits wider use of monolithic HA despite superior cellular response. Recently, we reported that ZnO addition to HA can induce bactericidal property. It is therefore important to assess how ZnO addition influences the cytotoxicity property and cell adhesion/proliferation on HA-ZnO composite surfaces in vitro. In the above perspective, the objective of this study is to investigate the cell type and material composition dependent cellular proliferation and viability of pressureless sintered HA-ZnO composites. The combination of cell viability data as well as morphological observations of cultured human osteoblast-like SaOS2 cells and mouse fibroblast L929 cells suggests that HA-ZnO composites containing 10 Wt % or lower ZnO exhibit the ability to support cell adhesion and proliferation. Both SaOS2 and L929 cells exhibit extensive multidirectional network of actin cytoskeleton and cell flattening on the lower ZnO containing (≤10 Wt %) HA-ZnO composites. The in vitro results illustrate how variation in ZnO content can influence significantly the cell vitality, as evaluated using MTT biochemical assay. Also, the critical statistical analysis reveals that ZnO addition needs to be carefully tailored to ensure good in vitro cytocompatibility. The underlying reasons for difference in biological properties are analyzed. It is suggested that surface wettability as well as dissolution of ZnO, both contribute to the observed differences in cellular viability and proliferation. PMID:22102555

  8. Induction of sister chromatid exchanges and inhibition of cellular proliferation in vitro. I. Caffeine

    SciTech Connect

    Guglielmi, G.E.; Vogt, T.F.; Tice, R.R.

    1982-01-01

    While many agents have been examined for their ability to induce SCE's, complete dose-response information has often been lacking. We have reexamined the ability of one such compound - caffeine - to induce SCEs and also to inhibit cellular proliferation in human peripheral lymphocytes in vitro. An acute exposure to caffeine prior to the DNA synthetic period did not affect either SCE frequency or the rate of cellular proliferation. Chronic exposure to caffeine throughout the culture period lead to both a dose-dependent increase in SCEs (SCE/sub d/ or doubling dose = 2.4 mM; SCE/sub 10/ or the dose capable of inducing 10 SCE = 1.4 mM) and a dose-dependent inhibition of cellular proliferation (IC/sub 50/ or the 50% inhibition concentration = 2.6 mM). The relative proportion of first generation metaphase cells, an assessment of proliferative inhibiton, increased linearly with increasing caffeine concentrations. However, SCE frequency increased nonlinearly over the same range of caffeine concentrations. Examination of the ratio of nonsymmetrical to symmetrical SCEs in third generation metaphase cells indicated that caffeine induced SCEs in equal frequency in each of three successive generations. The dependency of SCE induction and cellular proliferative inhibition on caffeine's presence during the DNA synthetic period suggests that caffeine may act as an antimetabolite in normal human cells.

  9. Polo-like kinase, a novel marker for cellular proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, J.; Hörlin, A.; Hock, B.; Stutte, H. J.; Rübsamen-Waigmann, H.; Strebhardt, K.

    1997-01-01

    PLK (polo-like kinase) belongs to a family of serine/threonine kinases and represents the human counterpart of polo in Drosophila melanogaster and of CDC5 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is strongly involved in spindle formation and chromosome segregation during mitosis. We have shown previously that PLK mRNA expression correlates with the mitotic activity of cells and the prognosis of lung cancer patients. In this report, the level of PLK protein was analyzed using immunohistochemical techniques. PLK protein was found expressed in the nuclei of tumor cells from lung and breast cancer as well as in several tumor cell lines. Furthermore, in peripheral lymphocytes treated with phytohemagglutinin, elevated proliferative activity of the cells correlated with the up-regulation of PLK protein expression. In contrast, in U937 and HL-60 cells after induction of differentiation with phorbol ester, PLK immunostaining disappeared under conditions of terminal differentiation. Most of the PLK protein was found in the nucleus of proliferating cells with diffuse but distinct staining also in the cytoplasm. Taken together, high levels of PLK protein are associated with cellular proliferation. Combined with other proliferative and oncogene markers, PLK may be useful for improved prediction of the clinical prognosis of cancer patients and for early cancer diagnosis. Due to its activity late in the cell cycle, it may be a target for cancer chemotherapy. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9094972

  10. Selective transcription and cellular proliferation induced by PDGF require histone deacetylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Catania, Annunziata; Iavarone, Carlo; Carlomagno, Stella M.; Chiariello, Mario . E-mail: chiariel@unina.it

    2006-05-05

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are key regulatory enzymes involved in the control of gene expression and their inhibition by specific drugs has been widely correlated to cell cycle arrest, terminal differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we investigated whether HDAC activity was required for PDGF-dependent signal transduction and cellular proliferation. Exposure of PDGF-stimulated NIH3T3 fibroblasts to the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) potently repressed the expression of a group of genes correlated to PDGF-dependent cellular growth and pro-survival activity. Moreover, we show that TSA interfered with STAT3-dependent transcriptional activity induced by PDGF. Still, neither phosphorylation nor nuclear translocation and DNA-binding in vitro and in vivo of STAT3 were affected by using TSA to interfere with PDGF stimulation. Finally, TSA treatment resulted in the suppression of PDGF-dependent cellular proliferation without affecting cellular survival of NIH3T3 cells. Our data indicate that inhibition of HDAC activity antagonizes the mitogenic effect of PDGF, suggesting that these drugs may specifically act on the expression of STAT-dependent, PDGF-responsive genes.

  11. Transferrin synthesis by small cell lung cancer cells acts as an autocrine regulator of cellular proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Vostrejs, M; Moran, P L; Seligman, P A

    1988-01-01

    Since transferrin is required for cellular proliferation, we investigated transferrin synthesis by a small cell lung cancer line (NCI-H510) that survives in serum-free media without added transferrin. Immunoassays for human transferrin demonstrated that these cells contained immunoreactive human transferrin. Immunofluorescence studies showed that the protein is expressed on the surface of cells, presumably bound to transferrin receptor. Media conditioned by NCI-H510 cells support proliferation of human leukemic cells that would not survive in media lacking transferrin. [35S]Methionine incorporation documented transferrin synthesis by NCI-H510 cells as well as three other small cell lines. Transferrin synthesis by NCI-H510 cells increased more than 10-fold when cells entered active phases of the cell cycle, and this increase was seen before large increases in transferrin-receptor expression. Further experiments examining the effects of agents that affect iron metabolism show that the addition of transferrin-iron or hemin to the media is associated with a more rapid initial rate of proliferation and lower rates of transferrin synthesis than control cells. Gallium salts, which inhibit iron uptake, inhibited proliferation of these cells. If the cells recovered from this effect, transferrin synthesis remained greatly increased compared to control. We conclude that transferrin synthesis by these malignant cells is ultimately related to an iron requirement for cellular proliferation. It appears that this synthesized transferrin acts as part of an important autocrine mechanism permitting proliferation of these cells, and perhaps permitting tumor cell growth in vivo in areas not well vascularized. Images PMID:2839550

  12. Imaging Cellular Proliferation in Prostate Cancer with Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jadvar, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains a major public health problem worldwide. Imaging plays an important role in the assessment of disease at all its clinical phases, including staging, restaging after definitive therapy, evaluation of therapy response, and prognostication. Positron emission tomography with a number of biologically targeted radiotracers has been demonstrated to have potential diagnostic and prognostic utility in the various clinical phases of this prevalent disease. Given the remarkable biological heterogeneity of prostate cancer, one major unmet clinical need that remains is the non-invasive imaging-based characterization of prostate tumors. Accurate tumor characterization allows for image-targeted biopsy and focal therapy as well as facilitates objective assessment of therapy effect. PET in conjunction with radiotracers that track the thymidine salvage pathway of DNA synthesis may be helpful to fulfill this necessity. We review briefly the preclinical and pilot clinical experience with the two major cellular proliferation radiotracers, [18F]-3’-deoxy-3’-fluorothymidine and [18F]-2’-fluoro-5-methyl-1-beta-D-arabinofuranosyluracil in prostate cancer. PMID:27408885

  13. Human Homolog of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI) is a marker of cellular proliferation associated with nuclear bodies

    SciTech Connect

    Elmehdawi, Fatima; Wheway, Gabrielle; Szymanska, Katarzyna; Adams, Matthew; High, Alec S.; Johnson, Colin A.; Robinson, Philip A.

    2013-02-01

    HHARI (also known as ARIH1) is an ubiquitin-protein ligase and is the cognate of the E2, UbcH7 (UBE2L3). To establish a functional role for HHARI in cellular proliferation processes, we performed a reverse genetics screen that identified n=86/522 (16.5%) ubiquitin conjugation components that have a statistically significant effect on cell proliferation, which included HHARI as a strong hit. We then produced and validated a panel of specific antibodies that establish HHARI as both a nuclear and cytoplasmic protein that is expressed in all cell types studied. HHARI was expressed at higher levels in nuclei, and co-localized with nuclear bodies including Cajal bodies (p80 coilin, NOPP140), PML and SC35 bodies. We confirmed reduced cellular proliferation after ARIH1 knockdown with individual siRNA duplexes, in addition to significantly increased levels of apoptosis, an increased proportion of cells in G2 phase of the cell cycle, and significant reductions in total cellular RNA levels. In head and neck squamous cell carcinoma biopsies, there are higher levels of HHARI expression associated with increased levels of proliferation, compared to healthy control tissues. We demonstrate that HHARI is associated with cellular proliferation, which may be mediated through its interaction with UbcH7 and modification of proteins in nuclear bodies. -- Highlights: ► We produce and validate new antibody reagents for the ubiquitin-protein ligase HHARI. ► HHARI colocalizes with nuclear bodies including Cajal, PML and SC35 bodies. ► We establish new functions in cell proliferation regulation for HHARI. ► Increased HHARI expression associates with squamous cell carcinoma and proliferation.

  14. Stereotyped distribution of proliferating keratinocytes in disorders affecting the epidermis

    SciTech Connect

    Pierard-Franchimont, C.; Pierard, G.E.

    1989-06-01

    We used the technique of autoradiography after incorporation of tritiated thymidine (/sup 3/H-TdR) to evaluate keratinocyte proliferation in basal, epibasal, and other epidermal layers in 30 diseases affecting the epidermis. The number and proportion of /sup 3/H-TdR-labeled keratinocytes were counted in the different layers of the epidermis. Significant correlations were found between the proliferative indices of the different epidermal layers. Such links indicate that the epidermis responds in a rather stereotyped way to various pathological conditions. There exists some regulation in the distribution, number, and proportion of /sup 3/H-TdR-labeled keratinocytes in the various layers of the epidermis.

  15. [Cell signaling pathways interaction in cellular proliferation: Potential target for therapeutic interventionism].

    PubMed

    Valdespino-Gómez, Víctor Manuel; Valdespino-Castillo, Patricia Margarita; Valdespino-Castillo, Víctor Edmundo

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, cellular physiology is best understood by analysing their interacting molecular components. Proteins are the major components of the cells. Different proteins are organised in the form of functional clusters, pathways or networks. These molecules are ordered in clusters of receptor molecules of extracellular signals, transducers, sensors and biological response effectors. The identification of these intracellular signaling pathways in different cellular types has required a long journey of experimental work. More than 300 intracellular signaling pathways have been identified in human cells. They participate in cell homeostasis processes for structural and functional maintenance. Some of them participate simultaneously or in a nearly-consecutive progression to generate a cellular phenotypic change. In this review, an analysis is performed on the main intracellular signaling pathways that take part in the cellular proliferation process, and the potential use of some components of these pathways as target for therapeutic interventionism are also underlined. PMID:25986976

  16. Effect of chronic low dose of methotrexate on cellular proliferation during spermatogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Saxena, A K; Dhungel, S; Bhattacharya, S; Jha, C B; Srivastava, A K

    2004-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate cellular proliferation of germinal and non-germinal elements of seminiferous tubules following continuous Day 1 to Day 17 exposure of methotrexate (12.5 microgram) in male rats. There was significant decrease in the diameter of seminiferous tubules (P < 0.10) followed by increase of interstitial space (P < 0.01). The size of various stages of primary, secondary spermatocytes, and spermatids was altered significantly compared to controls. Vacuolization/decondensation of "chromatin-mass" in spermatocytes changed from rounded to oval. The size of the Sertoli and Leydig cells were reduced significantly. Basement membrane at some places seems to be disrupted and thin in experimental testis. Methotrexate induced cytotoxicity on the proliferation of cellular contents of seminiferous tubules elucidating the mechanism of dose-dependent drug induced testicular damage during spermatogenesis. PMID:14660169

  17. Obesity and cancer: At the crossroads of cellular metabolism and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    O’Rourke, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of cancer. The mechanisms underlying this association include but are not limited to increased systemic inflammation, an anabolic hormonal milieu, and adipocyte-cancer crosstalk, aberrant stimuli that conspire to promote neoplastic transformation. Cellular proliferation is uncoupled from nutrient availability in malignant cells, promoting tumor progression. Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the obesity-cancer connection will lead to the development of novel metabolism-based agents for cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:25264328

  18. Long-term effect of PROLI/NO on cellular proliferation and phenotype after arterial injury.

    PubMed

    Bahnson, Edward S M; Vavra, Ashley K; Flynn, Megan E; Vercammen, Janet M; Jiang, Qun; Schwartz, Amanda R; Kibbe, Melina R

    2016-01-01

    Vascular interventions are associated with high failure rates from restenosis secondary to negative remodeling and neointimal hyperplasia. Periadventitial delivery of nitric oxide (NO) inhibits neointimal hyperplasia, preserving lumen patency. With the development of new localized delivery vehicles, NO-based therapies remain a promising therapeutic avenue for the prevention of restenosis. While the time course of events during neointimal development has been well established, a full characterization of the impact of NO donors on the cells that comprise the arterial wall has not been performed. Thus, the aim of our study was to perform a detailed assessment of proliferation, cellularity, inflammation, and phenotypic cellular modulation in injured arteries treated with the short-lived NO donor, PROLI/NO. PROLI/NO provided durable inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia for 6 months after arterial injury. PROLI/NO inhibited proliferation and cellularity in the media and intima at all of the time points studied. However, PROLI/NO caused an increase in adventitial proliferation at 2 weeks, resulting in increased cellularity at 2 and 8 weeks compared to injury alone. PROLI/NO promoted local protein S-nitrosation and increased local tyrosine nitration, without measurable systemic effects. PROLI/NO predominantly inhibited contractile smooth muscle cells in the intima and media, and had little to no effect on vascular smooth muscle cells or myofibroblasts in the adventitia. Finally, PROLI/NO caused a delayed and decreased leukocyte infiltration response after injury. Our results show that a short-lived NO donor exerts durable effects on proliferation, phenotype modulation, and inflammation that result in long-term inhibition of neointimal hyperplasia. PMID:26627935

  19. Acute lethal graft-versus-host disease stimulates cellular proliferation in the adult rat liver.

    PubMed

    Klein, R M; Clancy, J; Stuart, S

    1982-11-01

    The present investigation was designed to analyse the effects of acute lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in adult (DA x LEW)F1 rats on cellular proliferation within the liver. The influence of the host thymus on GVHD-induced proliferation was also assessed. From 1-28 days after initiation of GVHD [3H]thymidine ([3H]-TdR) was injected i.v. and rats were killed one hour later. Percentage labelled cells (LI) of periportal infiltrating cells (PIC), hepatocytes (H), and sinusoidal lining cells (SC) were counted. Mean values for control rats were 0.3 +/- 0.1% (H), 0.4 +/- 0.1% (SC) and 0.2 +/- 0.1% (PIC). GVHD rats demonstrated a significant increase in LI of PIC (days 1-21), SC (days 2-17) and H (days 2-17). Most labelled cells in PIC were large lymphocytes. Peak LI values were 7.0 +/- 1.0% PIC (day 17), 6.8 +/- 0.9% SC (day 17), and 5.2 +/- 0.9% H (day 7), with all cellular compartments returning to near normal LI values by day 28. Stimulation of cellular proliferation occurred in all three liver cell compartments in neonatally thymectomized (TXM) rats. The intensity of GVHD-induced cell proliferation was significantly decreased at day 7 in all compartments and PIC was dramatically decreased at day 21 in TXM-GVHD rats as compared to non-TXM-GVHD rats. It is hypothesized that the general stimulation of hepatocyte cell proliferation in GVHD is related to the secretion of lymphokines by primarily donor and secondarily host T cells in the periportal infiltrate. PMID:7172201

  20. Fish oil supplementation associated with decreased cellular degeneration and increased cellular proliferation 6 weeks after middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Pascoe, Michaela C; Howells, David W; Crewther, David P; Carey, Leeanne M; Crewther, Sheila G

    2015-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3-LC-PUFAs) are both neuroprotective and have antidepressive effects. However the influence of dietary supplemented n-3-LC-PUFAs on inflammation-related cell death and proliferation after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo)-induced stroke is unknown. We have previously demonstrated that anxiety-like and hyperactive locomotor behaviors are reduced in n-3-LC-PUFA-fed MCAo animals. Thus in the present study, male hooded Wistar rats were exposed to MCAo or sham surgeries and examined behaviorally 6 weeks later, prior to euthanasia and examination of lesion size, cell death and proliferation in the dentate gyrus, cornu ammonis region of the hippocampus of the ipsilesional hemispheres, and the thalamus of the ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres. Markers of cell genesis and cell degeneration in the hippocampus or thalamus of the ipsilesional hemisphere did not differ between surgery and diet groups 6 weeks post MCAo. Dietary supplementation with n-3-LC-PUFA decreased cell degeneration and increased cell proliferation in the thalamic region of the contralesional hemisphere. MCAo-associated cell degeneration in the hippocampus and thalamus positively correlated with anxiety-like and hyperactive locomotor behaviors previously reported in these animals. These results suggest that anti-inflammatory n-3-LC-PUFA supplementation appears to have cellular protective effects after MCAo in the rat, which may affect behavioral outcomes. PMID:25609971

  1. Fish oil supplementation associated with decreased cellular degeneration and increased cellular proliferation 6 weeks after middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Pascoe, Michaela C; Howells, David W; Crewther, David P; Carey, Leeanne M; Crewther, Sheila G

    2015-01-01

    Anti-inflammatory long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3-LC-PUFAs) are both neuroprotective and have antidepressive effects. However the influence of dietary supplemented n-3-LC-PUFAs on inflammation-related cell death and proliferation after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo)-induced stroke is unknown. We have previously demonstrated that anxiety-like and hyperactive locomotor behaviors are reduced in n-3-LC-PUFA-fed MCAo animals. Thus in the present study, male hooded Wistar rats were exposed to MCAo or sham surgeries and examined behaviorally 6 weeks later, prior to euthanasia and examination of lesion size, cell death and proliferation in the dentate gyrus, cornu ammonis region of the hippocampus of the ipsilesional hemispheres, and the thalamus of the ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres. Markers of cell genesis and cell degeneration in the hippocampus or thalamus of the ipsilesional hemisphere did not differ between surgery and diet groups 6 weeks post MCAo. Dietary supplementation with n-3-LC-PUFA decreased cell degeneration and increased cell proliferation in the thalamic region of the contralesional hemisphere. MCAo–associated cell degeneration in the hippocampus and thalamus positively correlated with anxiety-like and hyperactive locomotor behaviors previously reported in these animals. These results suggest that anti-inflammatory n-3-LC-PUFA supplementation appears to have cellular protective effects after MCAo in the rat, which may affect behavioral outcomes. PMID:25609971

  2. Myocardin inhibits cellular proliferation by inhibiting NF-kappaB(p65)-dependent cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ru-Hang; Zheng, Xi-Long; Callis, Thomas E; Stansfield, William E; He, Jiayin; Baldwin, Albert S; Wang, Da-Zhi; Selzman, Craig H

    2008-03-01

    We previously reported the importance of the serum response factor (SRF) cofactor myocardin in controlling muscle gene expression as well as the fundamental role for the inflammatory transcription factor NF-kappaB in governing cellular fate. Inactivation of myocardin has been implicated in malignant tumor growth. However, the underlying mechanism of myocardin regulation of cellular growth remains unclear. Here we show that NF-kappaB(p65) represses myocardin activation of cardiac and smooth muscle genes in a CArG-box-dependent manner. Consistent with their functional interaction, p65 directly interacts with myocardin and inhibits the formation of the myocardin/SRF/CArG ternary complex in vitro and in vivo. Conversely, myocardin decreases p65-mediated target gene activation by interfering with p65 DNA binding and abrogates LPS-induced TNF-alpha expression. Importantly, myocardin inhibits cellular proliferation by interfering with NF-kappaB-dependent cell-cycle regulation. Cumulatively, these findings identify a function for myocardin as an SRF-independent transcriptional repressor and cell-cycle regulator and provide a molecular mechanism by which interaction between NF-kappaB and myocardin plays a central role in modulating cellular proliferation and differentiation. PMID:18296632

  3. AMPKα1 deficiency promotes cellular proliferation and DNA damage via p21 reduction in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hairong; Zhou, Yanhong; Coughlan, Kathleen A.; Ding, Ye; Wang, Shaobin; Wu, Yue; Song, Ping; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an energy gauge and redox sensor, controls the cell cycle and protects against DNA damage. However, the molecular mechanisms by which AMPKα isoform regulates DNA damage remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if AMPKα deletion contributes to cellular hyperproliferation by reducing p21WAF1/Cip1 (p21) expression thereby leading to accumulated DNA damage. The markers for DNA damage, cell cycle proteins, and apoptosis were monitored in cultured mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from wild type (WT, C57BL/6J), AMPKα1, or AMPKα2 homozygous deficient (AMPKα1−/−, AMPKα2−/−) mice by Western blot, flow cytometry, and cellular immunofluorescence staining. Deletion of AMPKα1, the predominant AMPKα isoform, but not AMPKα2 in immortalized MEFs led to spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) which corresponded to repair protein p53-binding protein1 (53BP1) foci formation and subsequent apoptosis. Furthermore, AMPKα1 localizes to chromatin and AMPKα1 deletion down-regulates cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21, an important protein that plays a role in decreasing the incidence of spontaneous DSB via inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, AMPKα1 null cells exhibited enhanced cell proliferation. Finally, p21 overexpression partially blocked the cellular hyperproliferation of AMPKα1-deleted MEFs via the inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). Taken together, our results suggest that AMPKα1 plays a fundamental role in controlling the cell cycle thereby affecting DNA damage and cellular apoptosis. PMID:25307521

  4. Locust cellular defense against infections: sites of pathogen clearance and hemocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Duressa, Tewodros Firdissa; Vanlaer, Ria; Huybrechts, Roger

    2015-01-01

    The locust cellular defense is mediated by hemocytes and hematopoietic tissue. In Locusta migratoria, the hemocytes and hematopoietic tissue mutually assist each other in clearing invading pathogens from circulation. A β-1, 3-glucan infection induces nodule formation and apoptotic, TUNEL positive, cells in the hematopoietic tissue and massive loss of hemocytes in the circulation, calling for instant proliferation of hemocytes and hematopoietic tissue cells to assure continued host cellular defense. As the locust hematopoietic tissue persists at the adult stage, it was originally designated as being the major source for the replenishment process. Revisiting post infection hemocyte proliferation, using immunofluorescence based tests for DNA synthesis and mitosis, evidenced the lack of β-1, 3-glucan induced cell proliferation in the hematopoietic tissue. Instead these tests identified the circulating hemocytes as the major source for hemocyte replenishment in the circulation. The hematopoietic tissue, however, undergoes a continuous, slow and infection independent regeneration, thereby accumulating potential phagocytes despite infection, and might serve a prophylactic role in containing pathogens in this swarming insect. PMID:25281274

  5. Silibinin Inhibits HIV-1 Infection by Reducing Cellular Activation and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Janela; Lovelace, Erica S.; Elahi, Shokrollah; Maurice, Nicholas J.; Wagoner, Jessica; Dragavon, Joan; Mittler, John E.; Kraft, Zane; Stamatatos, Leonidis; Horton, Helen; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Coombs, Robert W.; Polyak, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Purified silymarin-derived natural products from the milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum) block hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and inhibit T cell proliferation in vitro. An intravenous formulation of silibinin (SIL), a major component of silymarin, displays anti-HCV effects in humans and also inhibits T-cell proliferation in vitro. We show that SIL inhibited replication of HIV-1 in TZM-bl cells, PBMCs, and CEM cells in vitro. SIL suppression of HIV-1 coincided with dose-dependent reductions in actively proliferating CD19+, CD4+, and CD8+ cells, resulting in fewer CD4+ T cells expressing the HIV-1 co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5. SIL inhibition of T-cell growth was not due to cytotoxicity measured by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or necrosis. SIL also blocked induction of the activation markers CD38, HLA-DR, Ki67, and CCR5 on CD4+ T cells. The data suggest that SIL attenuated cellular functions involved in T-cell activation, proliferation, and HIV-1 infection. Silymarin-derived compounds provide cytoprotection by suppressing virus infection, immune activation, and inflammation, and as such may be relevant for both HIV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects. PMID:22848626

  6. In vivo imaging of cellular proliferation in renal cell carcinoma using 18F-fluorothymidine PET

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Peter K.; Lee, Sze Ting; Murone, Carmel; Eng, John; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Berlangieri, Salvatore U.; Pathmaraj, Kunthi; O’Keefe, Graeme J.; Sachinidis, John; Byrne, Amanda J.; Bolton, Damien M.; Davis, Ian D.; Scott, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): The ability to measure cellular proliferation non-invasively in renal cell carcinoma may allow prediction of tumour aggressiveness and response to therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the uptake of 18F-fluorothymidine (FLT) PET in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and to compare this to 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and to an immunohistochemical measure of cellular proliferation (Ki-67). Methods: Twenty seven patients (16 male, 11 females; age 42-77) with newly diagnosed renal cell carcinoma suitable for resection were prospectively enrolled. All patients had preoperative FLT and FDG PET scans. Visual identification of tumour using FLT PET compared to normal kidney was facilitated by the use of a pre-operative contrast enhanced CT scan. After surgery tumour was taken for histologic analysis and immunohistochemical staining by Ki-67. Results: The SUVmax (maximum standardized uptake value) mean±SD for FLT in tumour was 2.59±1.27, compared to normal kidney (2.47±0.34). The mean SUVmax for FDG in tumour was similar to FLT (2.60±1.08). There was a significant correlation between FLT uptake and the immunohistochemical marker Ki-67 (r=0.72, P<0.0001) in RCC. Ki-67 proliferative index was mean ± SD of 13.3%±9.2 (range 2.2% - 36.3%). Conclusion: There is detectable uptake of FLT in primary renal cell carcinoma, which correlates with cellular proliferation as assessed by Ki-67 labelling index. This finding has relevance to the use of FLT PET in molecular imaging studies of renal cell carcinoma biology.

  7. Short-term exposure to engineered nanomaterials affects cellular epigenome

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Pirela, Sandra V.; Melnyk, Stepan; Koturbash, Igor; Demokritou, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Extensive incorporation of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) into industrial and biomedical applications increases the risks of exposure to these potentially hazardous materials. While the geno- and cytotoxic effects of ENMs have been investigated, the potential of ENMs to target the cellular epigenome remains largely unknown. Our goal was to determine whether or not industry relevant ENMs can affect the epigenome at low cytotoxic doses. A panel of cells relevant to inhalation exposures such as human and murine macrophages (THP-1 and RAW264.7, respectively) and human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) were exposed to printer-emitted engineered nanoparticles (PEPs), mild steel welding fumes (MS-WF), copper oxide (CuO), and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles. Toxicological effects, including cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses were assessed, taking into consideration in-vitro dosimetry. The effects of ENMs on cellular epigenome were determined by addressing the global and transposable elements (TEs)-associated DNA methylation and expression of DNA methylation machinery and TEs. The percentage of ENMs-induced cytotoxicity for all cell lines was in the range of 0-15%. Oxidative stress was evident in SAEC after exposure to PEPs and in THP-1 when exposed to CuO. Additionally, exposure to ENMs resulted in modest alterations in DNA methylation of two most abundant TEs in mammalian genomes, LINE-1 and Alu/SINE, their transcriptional reactivation, and decreased expression of DNA methylation machinery in a cell-, dose-, and ENM-dependent manner. These results indicate that exposure to ENMs at environmentally relevant concentrations, aside from the geno- and cytotoxic effects, can also affect the epigenome of target cells. PMID:25938281

  8. Short-term exposure to engineered nanomaterials affects cellular epigenome.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoyan; Miousse, Isabelle R; Pirela, Sandra V; Melnyk, Stepan; Koturbash, Igor; Demokritou, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Extensive incorporation of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) into industrial and biomedical applications increases the risks of exposure to these potentially hazardous materials. While the geno- and cytotoxic effects of ENMs have been investigated, the potential of ENMs to target the cellular epigenome remains largely unknown. Our goal was to determine whether industry relevant ENMs can affect the epigenome at low cytotoxic doses. A panel of cells relevant to inhalation exposures such as human and murine macrophages (THP-1 and RAW264.7, respectively) and human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC) were exposed to printer-emitted engineered nanoparticles (PEPs), mild steel welding fumes (MS-WF), copper oxide (CuO) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles. Toxicological effects, including cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses were assessed, taking into consideration in vitro dosimetry. The effects of ENMs on cellular epigenome were determined by addressing the global and transposable elements (TEs)-associated DNA methylation and expression of DNA methylation machinery and TEs. The percentage of ENMs-induced cytotoxicity for all cell lines was in the range of 0-15%. Oxidative stress was evident in SAEC after exposure to PEPs and in THP-1 when exposed to CuO. In addition, exposure to ENMs resulted in modest alterations in DNA methylation of two most abundant TEs in mammalian genomes, LINE-1 and Alu/SINE, their transcriptional reactivation, and decreased expression of DNA methylation machinery in a cell-, dose- and ENM-dependent manner. These results indicate that exposure to ENMs at environmentally relevant concentrations, aside from the geno- and cytotoxic effects, can also affect the epigenome of target cells. PMID:25938281

  9. Diffusion kurtosis imaging can efficiently assess the glioma grade and cellular proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lingyun; Zhang, Jiaxuan; Zhang, Shun; Yao, Yihao; Yang, Shiqi; Shi, Jingjing; Shen, Nanxi; Su, Changliang; Zhang, Ju; Zhu, Wenzhen

    2015-01-01

    Conventional diffusion imaging techniques are not sufficiently accurate for evaluating glioma grade and cellular proliferation, which are critical for guiding glioma treatment. Diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI), an advanced non-Gaussian diffusion imaging technique, has shown potential in grading glioma; however, its applications in this tumor have not been fully elucidated. In this study, DKI and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) were performed on 74 consecutive patients with histopathologically confirmed glioma. The kurtosis and conventional diffusion metric values of the tumor were semi-automatically obtained. The relationships of these metrics with the glioma grade and Ki-67 expression were evaluated. The diagnostic efficiency of these metrics in grading was further compared. It was demonstrated that compared with the conventional diffusion metrics, the kurtosis metrics were more promising imaging markers in distinguishing high-grade from low-grade gliomas and distinguishing among grade II, III and IV gliomas; the kurtosis metrics also showed great potential in the prediction of Ki-67 expression. To our best knowledge, we are the first to reveal the ability of DKI to assess the cellular proliferation of gliomas, and to employ the semi-automatic method for the accurate measurement of gliomas. These results could have a significant impact on the diagnosis and subsequent therapy of glioma. PMID:26544514

  10. Commonly consumed and specialty dietary mushrooms reduce cellular proliferation in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Martin, Keith R; Brophy, Sara K

    2010-11-01

    Worldwide, over one million women will be newly diagnosed with breast cancer in the next year. Moreover, breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the USA. An accumulating body of evidence suggests that consumption of dietary mushrooms can protect against breast cancer. In this study, we tested and compared the ability of five commonly consumed or specialty mushrooms to modulate cell number balance in the cancer process using MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. Hot water extracts (80°C for 2 h) of maitake (MT, Grifola frondosa), crimini (CRIM, Agaricus bisporus), portabella (PORT, Agaricus bisporus), oyster (OYS, Pleurotus ostreatus) and white button (WB, Agaricus bisporus) mushrooms or water alone (5% v/v) were incubated for 24 h with MCF-7 cells. Cellular proliferation determined by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced up to 33% by all mushrooms, with MT and OYS being the most effective. MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) reduction, an often used mitochondrion-dependent marker of proliferation, was unchanged although decreased (P > 0.05) by 15% with OYS extract. Lactate dehydrogenase release, as a marker of necrosis, was significantly increased after incubation with MT but not with other test mushrooms. Furthermore, MT extract significantly increased apoptosis, or programmed cell death, as determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl end labeling method, whereas other test mushrooms displayed trends of ∼15%. The total numbers of cells per flask, determined by hemacytometry, were not different from control cultures. Overall, all test mushrooms significantly suppressed cellular proliferation, with MT further significantly inducing apoptosis and cytotoxicity in human breast cancer cells. This suggests that both common and specialty mushrooms may be chemoprotective against breast cancer. PMID:20921274

  11. Arecoline augments cellular proliferation in the prostate gland of male Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Indraneel; Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Mondal, Anushree; Maiti, Bishwa Ranjan; Chatterji, Urmi

    2011-09-01

    Areca nut chewing is the fourth most popular habit in the world due to its effects as a mild stimulant, causing a feeling of euphoria and slightly heightened alertness. Areca nuts contain several alkaloids and tannins, of which arecoline is the most abundant and known to have several adverse effects in humans, specially an increased risk of oral cancer. On evaluating the effects of arecoline on the male endocrine physiology in Wistar rats, it was found that arecoline treatment led to an overall enlargement and increase in the wet weight of the prostate gland, and a two-fold increase in serum gonadotropin and testosterone levels. Since the prostate is a major target for testosterone, the consequences of arecoline consumption were studied specifically in the prostate gland. Arecoline treatment led to an increase in the number of rough endoplasmic reticulum and reduction of secretory vesicles, signifying a hyperactive state of the prostate. Increased expression of androgen receptors in response to arecoline allowed for enhanced effect of testosterone in the prostate of treated animals, which augmented cell proliferation, subsequently confirmed by an increase in the expression of Ki-67 protein. Cellular proliferation was also the outcome of concomitant over expression of the G{sub 1}-to-S cell cycle regulatory proteins, cyclin D1 and CDK4, both at the transcriptional and translational levels. Taken together, the findings provide the first evidence that regular use of arecoline may lead to prostatic hyperplasia and hypertrophy, and eventually to disorders associated with prostate enlargement. - Highlights: > Effect of arecoline was investigated on the endocrine physiology of male Wistar rats. > Increase observed in prostate size, wet weight, serum testosterone and gonadotropins. > Arecoline increased RER, expression of androgen receptor and cellular proliferation. > Upregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4 seen at transcriptional and translational levels. > It may cause

  12. Modulation of 17β-Estradiol Signaling on Cellular Proliferation by Caveolin-2.

    PubMed

    Totta, Pierangela; Gionfra, Fabio; Busonero, Claudia; Acconcia, Filippo

    2016-06-01

    The sex hormone 17β-estradiol (E2) exerts pleiotropic effects by binding to the ligand-activated transcription factor estrogen receptor α (ERα). The E2:ERα complex regulates several physiological processes, including cell survival and proliferation, through transcriptional effects (i.e., estrogen responsive element [ERE]-based gene transcription) and non-transcriptional membrane-initiated effects (i.e., the activation of extra-nuclear signaling cascades), which derive from the activation of the pool of ERα that is localized to plasma membrane caveolae. Caveolae are ω-shaped membrane sub-domains that are composed of scaffold proteins named caveolins (i.e., caveolin-1, caveolin-2, and caveolin-3). Although caveolin-3 is exclusively expressed in muscles, caveolin-1 and caveolin-2 are co-expressed in all human tissues. From a functional point of view, caveolin-2 can operate both dependently on and independently of caveolin-1, which is the main coat component of caveolae. Interestingly, while a functional interplay between caveolin-1 and ERα has been reported in the control of E2-induced physiological effects, the role of caveolin-2 in E2:ERα signaling within the cell remains poorly understood. This study shows that siRNA-mediated caveolin-2 depletion in breast ductal carcinoma cells (MCF-7) reduces E2-induced ERα phosphorylation at serine residue 118 (S118), controls intracellular receptor levels, precludes ERα-mediated extra-nuclear activation of signaling pathways, reduces ERα transcriptional activity, and prevents cellular proliferation. Meanwhile, the impact of caveolin-1 depletion on ERα signaling in MCF-7 cells is shown to be similar to that elicited by siRNA-mediated caveolin-2 depletion. Altogether, these data demonstrate that caveolin-2 expression is necessary for the control of E2-dependent cellular proliferation. PMID:26480297

  13. Graphene Enhances Cellular Proliferation through Activating the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Sun, Cheng; Liao, Chunyang; Cui, Lin; Li, Haishan; Qu, Guangbo; Yu, Wenlian; Song, Naining; Cui, Yuan; Wang, Zheng; Xie, Wenping; Chen, Huiming; Zhou, Qunfang

    2016-07-27

    Graphene has promising applications in food packaging, water purification, and detective sensors for contamination monitoring. However, the biological effects of graphene are not fully understood. It is necessary to clarify the potential risks of graphene exposure to humans through diverse routes, such as foods. In the present study, graphene, as the model nanomaterial, was used to test its potential effects on the cell proliferation based on multiple representative cell lines, including HepG2, A549, MCF-7, and HeLa cells. Graphene was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, particle size analysis, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The cellular responses to graphene exposure were evaluated using flow cytometry, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, and alamarBlue assays. Rat cerebral astrocyte cultures, as the non-cancer cells, were used to assess the potential cytotoxicity of graphene as well. The results showed that graphene stimulation enhanced cell proliferation in all tested cell cultures and the highest elevation in cell growth was up to 60%. A western blot assay showed that the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) was upregulated upon graphene treatment. The phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) and the downstream proteins, ShC and extracellular regulating kinase (ERK), were remarkably induced, indicating that the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK signaling pathway was triggered. The activation of PI3 kinase p85 and AKT showed that the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway was also involved in graphene-induced cell proliferation, causing the increase of cell ratios in the G2/M phase. No influences on cell apoptosis were observed in graphene-treated cells when compared to the negative controls, proving the low cytotoxicity of this emerging nanomaterial. The findings in this study revealed the potential cellular biological effect of graphene, which may give useful hints on its biosafety

  14. Neuropeptide Y directly affects ovarian cell proliferation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, Alexander V; Kardošová, Diana; Alwasel, Saleh Hamad; Harrath, Abdel Halim

    2015-12-01

    The effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY; 0, 10, 100 and 1000 ng/mL) on the expression of PCNA, bax and p53 were examined by immunocytochemistry in porcine luteinized granulosa cells. NPY inhibited proliferation as well as promoted apoptosis and accumulation of p53 in the cells. This is the first report to demonstrate the direct action of NPY on ovarian cell proliferation and apoptosis. The results of the study suggest that the effect is mediated by transcription factor p53. PMID:26679167

  15. Structure and biochemical characterization of proliferating cellular nuclear antigen from a parasitic protozoon

    SciTech Connect

    Cardona-Felix, Cesar S.; Lara-Gonzalez, Samuel; Brieba, Luis G.

    2012-02-08

    Proliferating cellular nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a toroidal-shaped protein that is involved in cell-cycle control, DNA replication and DNA repair. Parasitic protozoa are early-diverged eukaryotes that are responsible for neglected diseases. In this work, a PCNA from a parasitic protozoon was identified, cloned and biochemically characterized and its crystal structure was determined. Structural and biochemical studies demonstrate that PCNA from Entamoeba histolytica assembles as a homotrimer that is able to interact with and stimulate the activity of a PCNA-interacting peptide-motif protein from E. histolytica, EhDNAligI. The data indicate a conservation of the biochemical mechanisms of PCNA-mediated interactions between metazoa, yeast and parasitic protozoa.

  16. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 affects endothelial progenitor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Colleselli, Daniela; Bijuklic, Klaudija; Mosheimer, Birgit A.; Kaehler, Christian M. . E-mail: C.M.Kaehler@uibk.ac.at

    2006-09-10

    Growing evidence indicates that inducible cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders and various types of cancer. Endothelial progenitor cells recruited from the bone marrow have been shown to be involved in the formation of new vessels in malignancies and discussed for being a key point in tumour progression and metastasis. However, until now, nothing is known about an interaction between COX and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Expression of COX-1 and COX-2 was detected by semiquantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. Proliferation kinetics, cell cycle distribution and rate of apoptosis were analysed by MTT test and FACS analysis. Further analyses revealed an implication of Akt phosphorylation and caspase-3 activation. Both COX-1 and COX-2 expression can be found in bone-marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells in vitro. COX-2 inhibition leads to a significant reduction in proliferation of endothelial progenitor cells by an increase in apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. COX-2 inhibition leads further to an increased cleavage of caspase-3 protein and inversely to inhibition of Akt activation. Highly proliferating endothelial progenitor cells can be targeted by selective COX-2 inhibition in vitro. These results indicate that upcoming therapy strategies in cancer patients targeting COX-2 may be effective in inhibiting tumour vasculogenesis as well as angiogenic processes.

  17. Cellular proliferation and infiltration following interstitial irradiation of normal dog brain is altered by an inhibitor of polyamine synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fike, J.R.; Gobbel, G.T.; Chou, D.

    1995-07-15

    The objectives of this study were to quantitatively define proliferative and infiltrative cell responses after focal {sup 125}I irradiation of normal brain, and to determine the effects of an intravenous infusion of {alpha}-defluoromethylornithine (DFMO) on those responses. Adult beagle dogs were irradiated using high activity {sup 125}I sources. Cellular responses were quantified using a histomorphometric analysis. After radiation alone, cellular events included a substantial acute inflammatory response followed by increased BrdU labeling and progressive increases in numbers of capillaries and astrocytes. {alpha}-Difluoromethylornithine treatment significantly affected the measured cell responses. As in controls, an early inflammatory response was measured, but after 2 weeks there were more PMNs/unit area than in controls. The onset of measurable BrdU labeling was delayed in DFMO-treated animals, and the magnitude of labeling was significantly reduced. Increases in astrocyte and vessel numbers/mm{sup 2} were observed after a 2-week delay. At the site of implant, astrocytes from DFMO-treated dogs were significantly smaller than those from controls. There is substantial cell proliferation and infiltration in response to interstitial irradiation of normal brain, and these responses are significantly altered by DFMO treatment. Although the precise mechanisms by which DFMO exerts its effects in this model are not known, the results from this study suggest that modification of radiation injury may be possible by manipulating the response of normal cells to injury. 57 refs., 6 figs.

  18. CD10/NEP in non-small cell lung carcinomas. Relationship to cellular proliferation.

    PubMed Central

    Ganju, R K; Sunday, M; Tsarwhas, D G; Card, A; Shipp, M A

    1994-01-01

    The cell surface metalloproteinase CD10/neutral endopeptidase 24.11 (NEP) hydrolyzes a variety of peptide substrates and reduces cellular responses to specific peptide hormones. Because CD10/NEP modulates peptide-mediated proliferation of small cell carcinomas of the lung (SCLC) and normal fetal bronchial epithelium, we evaluated the enzyme's expression in non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC). Bronchoalveolar and large cell carcinoma cell lines had low levels of CD10/NEP expression whereas squamous, adenosquamous, and adenocarcinoma cell lines had higher and more variable levels of the cell surface enzyme. Regional variations in CD10/NEP immunostaining in primary NSCLC specimens prompted us to correlate CD10/NEP expression with cell growth. In primary carcinomas of the lung, clonal NSCLC cell lines and SV40-transformed fetal airway epithelium, subsets of cells expressed primarily CD10/NEP or the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Cultured airway epithelial cells had the lowest levels of CD10/NEP expression when the highest percentage of cells were actively dividing; in addition, these cells grew more rapidly when cell surface CD10/NEP was inhibited. NSCLC cell lines had receptors for a variety of mitogenic peptides known to be CD10/NEP substrates, underscoring the functional significance of growth-related variability in CD10/NEP expression. Images PMID:7962523

  19. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 perturbs DREAM to promote cellular proliferation and mitotic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    DeCaprio, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Study of the small DNA tumor viruses continues to provide valuable new insights into oncogenesis and fundamental biological processes. While much has already been revealed about how the human papillomaviruses (HPVs) can transform cells and contribute to cervical and oropharyngeal cancer, there clearly is much more to learn. In this issue of Oncogene, Pang et al. demonstrate that the high-risk HPV16 E7 oncogene can promote cellular proliferation by interacting with the DREAM (DP, RB-like, E2F and MuvB) complex at two distinct phases of the cell cycle (1). Consistent with earlier work, HPV16 E7 can bind to the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (RB) family member p130 (RBL2) protein and promote its proteasome-mediated destruction thereby disrupting the DREAM complex and prevent exit from the cell cycle into quiescence. In addition, they demonstrate that HPV16 E7 can bind to MuvB core complex in association with BMYB and FOXM1 and activate gene expression during the G2 and M phase of the cell cycle. Thus, HPV16 E7 acts to prevent exit from the cell cycle entry and promotes mitotic proliferation and may account for the high levels of FOXM1 often observed in poor risk cervical cancers. PMID:24166507

  20. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 perturbs DREAM to promote cellular proliferation and mitotic gene expression.

    PubMed

    DeCaprio, J A

    2014-07-31

    The study of the small DNA tumor viruses continues to provide valuable new insights into oncogenesis and fundamental biological processes. Although much has already been revealed about how the human papillomaviruses (HPVs) can transform cells and contribute to cervical and oropharyngeal cancer, there clearly is much more to learn. In this issue of Oncogene, Pang et al., doi:10.1038/onc.2013.426, demonstrate that the high-risk HPV16 E7 oncogene can promote cellular proliferation by interacting with the DREAM (DP, RB-like, E2F and MuvB) complex at two distinct phases of the cell cycle. Consistent with earlier work, HPV16 E7 can bind to the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (RB) family member p130 (RBL2) protein and promote its proteasome-mediated destruction thereby disrupting the DREAM complex and can prevent exit from the cell cycle into quiescence. In addition, they demonstrate that HPV16 E7 can bind to MuvB core complex in association with BMYB and FOXM1 and activate gene expression during the G2 and M phase of the cell cycle. Thus, HPV16 E7 acts to prevent exit from the cell cycle entry and promotes mitotic proliferation and may account for the high levels of FOXM1 often observed in poor-risk cervical cancers. PMID:24166507

  1. Suppression of cellular proliferation and invasion by the concerted lipid and protein phosphatase activities of PTEN

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Lindsay; Maccario, Helene; Perera, Nevin M.; Yang, Xuesong; Spinelli, Laura; Tibarewal, Priyanka; Glancy, Ben; Gray, Alex; Weijer, Cornelis J.; Downes, C. Peter; Leslie, Nick R.

    2009-01-01

    PTEN is a tumour suppressor with phosphatase activity in vitro against both lipids and proteins and other potential non-enzymatic mechanisms of action. Although the importance of PTEN’s lipid phosphatase activity in regulating the PI3K signalling pathway is recognised, the significance of PTEN’s other mechanisms of action is currently unclear. Here, we describe the systematic identification of a PTEN mutant, PTEN Y138L, with activity against lipid, but not soluble substrates. Using this mutant we provide evidence for the interfacial activation of PTEN against lipid substrates. We also show that when re-expressed at physiological levels in PTEN null U87MG glioblastoma cells the protein phosphatase activity of PTEN is not required to regulate cellular PtdInsP3 levels or the downstream protein kinase Akt/PKB. Finally, in 3D Matrigel cultures of U87MG cells similarly re-expressing PTEN mutants, both the protein and lipid phosphatase activities were required to inhibit invasion, but either activity alone significantly inhibited proliferation, albeit only weakly for the protein phosphatase activity. Our data provides a novel tool to address the significance of PTEN’s separable lipid and protein phosphatase activities and suggest that both activities act to suppress proliferation and act together to suppress invasion. PMID:19915616

  2. Effects of nicotine on cellular proliferation, macromolecular synthesis and cell cycle phase distribution in human and murine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Konno, S.; Chiao, J.; Rossi, J.; Wang, C.H.; Wu, J.M.

    1986-05-01

    Addition of nicotine causes a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell growth in established human and murine cells. In the human promyelocytic HL-60 leukemic cells, 3 mM nicotine results in a 50% inhibition of cellular proliferation after 80 h. Nicotine was also found to affect the cell cycle distribution of HL-60 cells. Treatment with 4 mM nicotine for 20 h causes an increase in proportion of Gl-phase cells (from 49% to 57%) and a significant decrease in the proportion of S-phase cells (from 41% to 32%). These results suggest that nicotine causes cell arrest in the Gl-phase which may in part account for its effects on cell growth. To determine whether nicotine has a primary effect on the uptake/transport of macromolecular precursors into cells, HL-60 cells were treated with 2-6 mM nicotine for 30 h/sub 3/ at the end of which time cells were labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine, (/sup 3/H)uridine, (/sup 14/C)lysine and (/sup 35/S)methionine, the trichloroacetic acid (TCA) soluble and insoluble radioactivities from each of the labeling conditions were determined. These studies show that nicotine primarily affect the synthesis of proteins.

  3. Growth hormone in vascular pathology: neovascularization and expression of receptors is associated with cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Lincoln, D T; Singal, P K; Al-Banaw, A

    2007-01-01

    were of the following pathological entities: Haemangioma (n = 12); haemangioendothelioma (n = 10); Castleman's disease (n = 3), haemangiopericytoma (n = 4); angiosarcoma, (n = 11), Kaposi's sarcoma with focal infiltration by lymphoma, HIV +ve (n = 7), Kaposi's sarcoma (n = 17). The endothelial cell marker CD-31 was used to establish endothelial cell characteristics and microvascular density. To delineate tumour cell growth, immunohistochemical analysis of cycling nuclear protein and of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, using Ki-67 and PCNA polyclonal antibodies respectively, was used to demonstrate proliferative indexes. Results show that, compared to their normal tissue counterparts, nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of GHR consistently result in strong receptor immunoreactivity in the highly malignant angiosarcomas and Kaposi's sarcomas and was localized in the cell membranes and cytoplasm, but strong nuclear immunoreactivity was also identified. The presence of intracellular GHR is the result of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi localization. Nuclear localization is due to identical nuclear GHR-binding protein. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation of GHR immunoreactivity with neoplastic cellular proliferation and cycling, as measured by Ki-67 and PCNA. In conclusion, this study shows that GHR expression in vascular tumours is a function of malignancy and cancer progression. Malignant cells, which are highly expressive of the receptor, have a greater proliferation rate and thereby also higher survival rate compared to tumours expressing lower or minimal receptor level. The presence of GHR in endothelial cells of vascular neoplasm indicates that they are target cells and GH is of importance in the proliferation of vascular tumour angiogenesis. GH is necessary not only for differentiation of progenitor cells, but also for their subsequent clonal expansion and maintenance. The results support the hypothesis that GH is involved in the paracrine

  4. Surfactant tuning of hydrophilicity of porous degradable copolymer scaffolds promotes cellular proliferation and enhances bone formation.

    PubMed

    Yassin, Mohammed A; Leknes, Knut N; Sun, Yang; Lie, Stein A; Finne-Wistrand, Anna; Mustafa, Kamal

    2016-08-01

    Poly(l-lactide-co-ɛ-caprolactone) (poly(LLA-co-CL)) has been blended with Tween 80 to tune the material properties and optimize cell-material interactions. Accordingly, the aims of this study were fourfold: to evaluate the effect of low concentrations of Tween 80 on the surface microstructure of 3D poly(LLA-co-CL) porous scaffolds: to determine the effect of different concentrations of Tween 80 on proliferation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in vitro under dynamic cell culture at 7 and 21 days; to assess the influence of Tween 80 on the degradation rate of poly(LLA-co-CL) at 7 and 21 days; and in a subcutaneous rat model, to evaluate the effect on bone formation of porous scaffolds modified with 3% Tween 80 at 2 and 8 weeks. Blending 3% (w/w) Tween 80 with poly(LLA-co-CL) improves the surface wettability (p < 0.001). Poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 shows significantly increased cellular proliferation at days 7 and 21 (p < 0.001). Moreover, the presence of Tween 80 facilitates the degradation of poly(LLA-co-CL). Two weeks post-implantation, the poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 scaffolds exhibit significant mRNA expression of Runx2 (p = 0.004). After 8 weeks, poly(LLA-co-CL)/3% Tween 80 scaffolds show significantly increased de novo bone formation, demonstrated by μ-CT (p = 0.0133) and confirmed histologically. It can be concluded that blending 3% (w/w) Tween 80 with poly (LLA-co-CL) improves the hydrophilicity and osteogenic potential of the scaffolds. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2049-2059, 2016. PMID:27086867

  5. Protein coronas on gold nanorods passivated with amphiphilic ligands affect cytotoxicity and cellular response to penicillin/streptomycin.

    PubMed

    Kah, James Chen Yong; Grabinski, Christin; Untener, Emily; Garrett, Carol; Chen, John; Zhu, David; Hussain, Saber M; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    2014-05-27

    We probe how amphiphilic ligands (ALs) of four different types affect the formation of protein coronas on gold nanorods (NRs) and their impact on cellular response. NRs coated with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide were ligand exchanged with polyoxyethylene[10]cetyl ether, oligofectamine, and phosphatidylserine (PS). Protein coronas from equine serum (ES) were formed on these NR-ALs, and their colloidal stability, as well as cell uptake, proliferation, oxidative stress, and gene expression, were examined. We find that the protein corona that forms and its colloidal stability are affected by AL type and that the cellular response to these NR-AL-coronas (NR-AL-ES) is both ligand and corona dependent. We also find that the presence of common cell culture supplement penicillin/streptomycin can impact the colloidal stability and cellular response of NR-AL and NR-AL-ES, showing that the cell response is not necessarily inert to pen/strep when in the presence of nanoparticles. Although the protein corona is what the cells see, the underlying surface ligands evidently play an important role in shaping and defining the physical characteristics of the corona, which ultimately impacts the cellular response. Further, the results of this study suggest that the cellular behavior toward NR-AL is mediated by not only the type of AL and the protein corona it forms but also its resulting colloidal stability and interaction with cell culture supplements. PMID:24758495

  6. Post-transcriptional RNA Regulons Affecting Cell Cycle and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Blackinton, Jeff G.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular growth cycle is initiated and maintained by punctual, yet agile, regulatory events involving modifications of cell cycle proteins as well as coordinated gene expression to support cyclic checkpoint decisions. Recent evidence indicates that post-transcriptional partitioning of messenger RNA subsets by RNA-binding proteins help physically localize, temporally coordinate, and efficiently translate cell cycle proteins. This dynamic organization of mRNAs encoding cell cycle components contributes to the overall economy of the cell cycle consistent with the post-transcriptional RNA regulon model of gene expression. This review examines several recent studies demonstrating the coordination of mRNA subsets encoding cell cycle proteins during nuclear export and subsequent coupling to protein synthesis, and discusses evidence for mRNA coordination of p53 targets and the DNA damage response pathway. We consider how these observations may connect to upstream and downstream post-transcriptional coordination and coupling of splicing, export, localization, and translation. Published examples from yeast, nematode, insect, and mammalian systems are discussed, and we consider genetic evidence supporting the conclusion that dysregulation of RNA regulons may promote pathogenic states of growth such as carcinogenesis. PMID:24882724

  7. Altered control of cellular proliferation in the absence of mammalian brahma (SNF2alpha).

    PubMed

    Reyes, J C; Barra, J; Muchardt, C; Camus, A; Babinet, C; Yaniv, M

    1998-12-01

    The mammalian SWI-SNF complex is an evolutionarily conserved, multi-subunit machine, involved in chromatin remodelling during transcriptional activation. Within this complex, the BRM (SNF2alpha) and BRG1 (SNF2beta) proteins are mutually exclusive subunits that are believed to affect nucleosomal structures using the energy of ATP hydrolysis. In order to characterize possible differences in the function of BRM and BRG1, and to gain further insights into the role of BRM-containing SWI-SNF complexes, the mouse BRM gene was inactivated by homologous recombination. BRM-/- mice develop normally, suggesting that an observed up-regulation of the BRG1 protein can functionally replace BRM in the SWI-SNF complexes of mutant cells. Nonetheless, adult mutant mice were approximately 15% heavier than control littermates. This may be caused by increased cell proliferation, as demonstrated by a higher mitotic index detected in mutant livers. This is supported further by the observation that mutant embryonic fibroblasts were significantly deficient in their ability to arrest in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle in response to cell confluency or DNA damage. These studies suggest that BRM participates in the regulation of cell proliferation in adult mice. PMID:9843504

  8. Girdin/GIV is upregulated by cyclic tension, propagates mechanical signal transduction, and is required for the cellular proliferation and migration of MG-63 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jiang-Tian; Li, Yan; Yu, Bing; Gao, Guo-Jie; Zhou, Ting; Li, Song

    2015-08-21

    To explore how Girdin/GIV is regulated by cyclic tension and propagates downstream signals to affect cell proliferation and migration. Human osteoblast-like MG-63 cells were exposed to cyclic tension force at 4000 μstrain and 0.5 Hz for 6 h, produced by a four-point bending system. Cyclic tension force upregulated Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation in cultured MG-63 cells. Girdin and Akt each promoted the phosphorylation of the other under stimulated tension. In vitro MTT and transwell assays showed that Girdin and Akt are required for cell proliferation and migration during cellular quiescence. Moreover, STAT3 was determined to be essential for Girdin expression under stimulated tension force in the physiological condition, as well as for osteoblast proliferation and migration during quiescence. These findings suggest that the STAT3/Girdin/Akt pathway activates in osteoblasts in response to mechanical stimulation and may play a significant role in triggering osteoblast proliferation and migration during orthodontic treatment. - Highlights: • Tension force upregulates Girdin and Akt expression and phosphorylation. • Girdin and Akt promotes the phosphorylation of each other under tension stimulation. • Girdin and Akt are required for MG-63 cell proliferation and migration. • STAT3 is essential for Girdin expression after application of the tension forces.

  9. WS6 induces both alpha and beta cell proliferation without affecting differentiation or viability

    PubMed Central

    Boerner, Brian P.; George, Nicholas M.; Mir, Shakeel U.R.; Sarvetnick, Nora E.

    2016-01-01

    Agents that stimulate human pancreatic beta cell proliferation are needed to improve diabetes mellitus treatment. Recently, a small molecule, WS6, was observed to stimulate human beta cell proliferation. However, little is known about its other effects on human islets. To better understand the role of WS6 as a possible beta cell regenerative therapy, we carried out in-depth phenotypic analysis of WS6-treated human islets, exploring its effects on non-beta cell proliferation, beta cell differentiation, and islet cell viability. WS6 not only stimulated beta cell proliferation in cultured human islets (in agreement with previous reports), but also human alpha cell proliferation, indicating that WS6 is not a beta cell-specific mitogen. WS6 did not change the proportion of insulin-positive beta cells or the expression of beta cell-specific transcription factors, suggesting that WS6 does not alter beta cell differentiation, and WS6 had no effect on human islet cell apoptosis or viability. In conclusion, WS6 stimulates proliferation of both human beta and alpha cells while maintaining cellular viability and the beta cell differentiated phenotype. These findings expand the literature on WS6 and support the suggestion that WS6 may help increase human islet mass needed for successful treatment of diabetes. PMID:25739404

  10. Cellular cofactors affecting hepatitis C virus infection and replication

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Glenn; Panis, Maryline; Cooper, Jacob D.; Tellinghuisen, Timothy L.; Sukhodolets, Karen E.; Pfeffer, Sebastien; Landthaler, Markus; Landgraf, Pablo; Kan, Sherry; Lindenbach, Brett D.; Chien, Minchen; Weir, David B.; Russo, James J.; Ju, Jingyue; Brownstein, Michael J.; Sheridan, Robert; Sander, Chris; Zavolan, Mihaela; Tuschl, Thomas; Rice, Charles M.

    2007-01-01

    Recently identified hepatitis C virus (HCV) isolates that are infectious in cell culture provide a genetic system to evaluate the significance of virus–host interactions for HCV replication. We have completed a systematic RNAi screen wherein siRNAs were designed that target 62 host genes encoding proteins that physically interact with HCV RNA or proteins or belong to cellular pathways thought to modulate HCV infection. This includes 10 host proteins that we identify in this study to bind HCV NS5A. siRNAs that target 26 of these host genes alter infectious HCV production >3-fold. Included in this set of 26 were siRNAs that target Dicer, a principal component of the RNAi silencing pathway. Contrary to the hypothesis that RNAi is an antiviral pathway in mammals, as has been reported for subgenomic HCV replicons, siRNAs that target Dicer inhibited HCV replication. Furthermore, siRNAs that target several other components of the RNAi pathway also inhibit HCV replication. MicroRNA profiling of human liver, human hepatoma Huh-7.5 cells, and Huh-7.5 cells that harbor replicating HCV demonstrated that miR-122 is the predominant microRNA in each environment. miR-122 has been previously implicated in positively regulating the replication of HCV genotype 1 replicons. We find that 2′-O-methyl antisense oligonucleotide depletion of miR-122 also inhibits HCV genotype 2a replication and infectious virus production. Our data define 26 host genes that modulate HCV infection and indicate that the requirement for functional RNAi for HCV replication is dominant over any antiviral activity this pathway may exert against HCV. PMID:17616579

  11. Biological effects of near-infrared lasers on fibroblast cellular differentiation, proliferation and contraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acquaviva, Joseph T.; Chen, Wei R.; Vaughan, Melville B.

    2013-02-01

    Combining near infrared (NIR) laser irradiation into a tumor treatment therapy has shown promising results. For a comprehensive tumor therapy, it is important to understand the effects of NIR irradiation not only on the tumor, but on the tumor stroma as well. The composition of the microenvironment present near the tumor cells is critical to the phenotype of the tumor. Fibroblasts affect tissue homeostasis and change the microenvironment surrounding the tumor. Myofibroblast are derived from fibroblast cells, and in some cases indicate the transformation of healthy tissue into malignant tissue. Wound healing environments are rich in fibroblast cells and are similar to tumor stromas. To simulate a tumor stroma a wound healing environment was constructed. Two different human fibroblast cells were cultured in collagen lattices. Specifically, collagen lattices were created, with type 1 collagen, incubated for 5 days and irradiated with a 980nm laser on the 4th day. The subsequent collagen lattices were either released and measured, or fixed for immunostaining on the 5th day; the contraction rates also were analyzed. Furthermore, collagen lattices were stained to identify fibroblast proliferation and differentiation, into myofibroblasts. The results suggested NIR laser irradiation had some biological effects on the fibroblast cells, but the full extent of the effects is still unclear.

  12. Aquaporin-1 plays important role in proliferation by affecting cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Galán-Cobo, Ana; Ramírez-Lorca, Reposo; Toledo-Aral, Juan José; Echevarría, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) has been associated with tumor development. Here, we investigated how AQP1 may affect cell proliferation. The proliferative rate of adult carotid body (CB) cells, known to proliferate under chronic hypoxia, was analyzed in wild-type (AQP1(+/+) ) and knock out (AQP1(-/-) ) mice, maintained in normoxia or exposed to hypoxia while BrdU was administered. Fewer numbers of total BrdU(+) and TH-BrdU(+) cells were observed in AQP1(-/-) mice, indicating a role for AQP1 in CB proliferation. Then, by flow cytometry, cell cycle state and proliferation of cells overexpressing AQP1 were compared to those of wild-type cells. In the AQP1-overexpressing cells, we observed higher cell proliferation and percentages of cells in phases S and G2/M and fewer apoptotic cells after nocodazole treatment were detected by annexin V staining. Also in these cells, proteomic assays showed higher expression of cyclin D1 and E1 and microarray analysis revealed changes in many cell proliferation-related molecules, including, Zeb 2, Jun, NF-kβ, Cxcl9, Cxcl10, TNF, and the TNF receptor. Overall, our results indicate that the presence of AQP1 modifies the expression of key cell cycle proteins apparently related to increases in cell proliferation. This contributes to explaining the presence of AQP1 in many different tumors. PMID:26081645

  13. LED illumination effects on proliferation and survival of meningioma cellular cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solarte, Efrain; Urrea, Hernan; Criollo, William; Gutierrez, Oscar

    2010-02-01

    Meningioma cell cultures were prepared from frozen cell samples in 96 wells culture plates. Semiconductor light sources (LED) in seven different wavelength ranges were used to illuminate the wells, three different irradiation doses were selected per LED. Control cultures using three different concentrations of FBS were processed for comparison. Cell proliferation, viability, and cytotoxicity were measured every 24 hours for 6 days, using the XTT colorimetric assay (RocheR). None of the irradiated cultures exhibit cytotoxicity; but some of them exhibit proliferation inhibition. The larger proliferation was detected at a 0.05J/cm2 dose, for all LEDs; but for the orange and violet LEDs generated the bigger proliferation rate was measured. Results show the improvement of meningioma cell proliferation using illumination in some given wavelength ranges.

  14. TORC1 signaling inhibition by rapamycin and caffeine affect lifespan, global gene expression, and cell proliferation of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Rallis, Charalampos; Codlin, Sandra; Bähler, Jürg

    2013-08-01

    Target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is implicated in growth control and aging from yeast to humans. Fission yeast is emerging as a popular model organism to study TOR signaling, although rapamycin has been thought to not affect cell growth in this organism. Here, we analyzed the effects of rapamycin and caffeine, singly and combined, on multiple cellular processes in fission yeast. The two drugs led to diverse and specific phenotypes that depended on TORC1 inhibition, including prolonged chronological lifespan, inhibition of global translation, inhibition of cell growth and division, and reprograming of global gene expression mimicking nitrogen starvation. Rapamycin and caffeine differentially affected these various TORC1-dependent processes. Combined drug treatment augmented most phenotypes and effectively blocked cell growth. Rapamycin showed a much more subtle effect on global translation than did caffeine, while both drugs were effective in prolonging chronological lifespan. Rapamycin and caffeine did not affect the lifespan via the pH of the growth media. Rapamycin prolonged the lifespan of nongrowing cells only when applied during the growth phase but not when applied after cells had stopped proliferation. The doses of rapamycin and caffeine strongly correlated with growth inhibition and with lifespan extension. This comprehensive analysis will inform future studies into TORC1 function and cellular aging in fission yeast and beyond. PMID:23551936

  15. Oxidized (non)-regenerated cellulose affects fundamental cellular processes of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Wagenhäuser, M. U.; Mulorz, J.; Ibing, W.; Simon, F.; Spin, J. M.; Schelzig, H.; Oberhuber, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated how hemostats such as oxidized regenerated cellulose (ORC, TABOTAMP) and oxidized non-regenerated cellulose (ONRC, RESORBA CELL) influence local cellular behavior and contraction of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Human stromal fibroblasts were inoculated in vitro with ORC and ONRC. Cell proliferation was assayed over time, and migration was evaluated by Live Cell imaging microscopy. Fibroblasts grown in collagen-gels were treated with ORC or ONRC, and ECM contraction was measured utilizing a contraction assay. An absolute pH decline was observed with both ORC and ONRC after 1 hour. Mean daily cell proliferation, migration and matrix contraction were more strongly inhibited by ONRC when compared with ORC (p < 0.05). When control media was pH-lowered to match the lower pH values typically seen with ORC and ONRC, significant differences in cell proliferation and migration were still observed between ONRC and ORC (p < 0.05). However, in these pH conditions, inhibition of matrix contraction was only significant for ONRC (p < 0.05). We find that ORC and ONRC inhibit fibroblast proliferation, migration and matrix contraction, and stronger inhibition of these essential cellular processes of wound healing were observed for ONRC when compared with ORC. These results will require further validation in future in vivo experiments to clarify the clinical implications for hemostat use in post-surgical wound healing. PMID:27557881

  16. Oxidized (non)-regenerated cellulose affects fundamental cellular processes of wound healing.

    PubMed

    Wagenhäuser, M U; Mulorz, J; Ibing, W; Simon, F; Spin, J M; Schelzig, H; Oberhuber, A

    2016-01-01

    In this study we investigated how hemostats such as oxidized regenerated cellulose (ORC, TABOTAMP) and oxidized non-regenerated cellulose (ONRC, RESORBA CELL) influence local cellular behavior and contraction of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Human stromal fibroblasts were inoculated in vitro with ORC and ONRC. Cell proliferation was assayed over time, and migration was evaluated by Live Cell imaging microscopy. Fibroblasts grown in collagen-gels were treated with ORC or ONRC, and ECM contraction was measured utilizing a contraction assay. An absolute pH decline was observed with both ORC and ONRC after 1 hour. Mean daily cell proliferation, migration and matrix contraction were more strongly inhibited by ONRC when compared with ORC (p < 0.05). When control media was pH-lowered to match the lower pH values typically seen with ORC and ONRC, significant differences in cell proliferation and migration were still observed between ONRC and ORC (p < 0.05). However, in these pH conditions, inhibition of matrix contraction was only significant for ONRC (p < 0.05). We find that ORC and ONRC inhibit fibroblast proliferation, migration and matrix contraction, and stronger inhibition of these essential cellular processes of wound healing were observed for ONRC when compared with ORC. These results will require further validation in future in vivo experiments to clarify the clinical implications for hemostat use in post-surgical wound healing. PMID:27557881

  17. ROLE OF CELLULAR BIOENERGETICS IN SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL PROLIFERATION INDUCED BY PLATELET-DERIVED GROWTH FACTOR

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jessica; Hill, Bradford G.; Benavides, Gloria A.; Dranka, Brian P.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Abnormal smooth muscle cell proliferation is a hallmark of vascular disease. Although growth factors are known to contribute to cell hyperplasia, the changes in metabolism associated with this response, particularly mitochondrial respiration, remain unclear. Given the increased energy requirements for proliferation, we hypothesized that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) would stimulate glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration and that this elevated bioenergetic capacity is required for smooth muscle cell hyperplasia. To test this hypothesis, cell proliferation, glycolytic flux, and mitochondrial oxygen consumption were measured after treatment of primary rat aortic smooth muscle cells with PDGF. PDGF increased basal and maximal rates of glycolytic flux and mitochondrial oxygen consumption; enhancement of these bioenergetic pathways led to a substantial increase in the mitochondrial reserve capacity. Interventions with the PI3K inhibitor LY-294002 or the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose abrogated PDGF-stimulated proliferation and prevented augmentation of glycolysis and mitochondrial reserve capacity. Similarly, when L-glucose was substituted for D-glucose, PDGF-dependent proliferation was abolished, as were changes in glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. Interestingly, lactate dehydrogenase protein levels and activity were significantly increased after PDGF treatment. Moreover, L-lactate substitution for D-glucose was sufficient for increasing the mitochondrial reserve capacity and cell proliferation after treatment with PDGF; these effects were inhibited by the lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor, oxamate. These data suggest that glycolysis, by providing substrates that enhance the mitochondrial reserve capacity, plays an essential role in PDGF-induced cell proliferation, underscoring the integrated metabolic response required for proliferation of VSMC in the diseased vasculature. PMID:20331438

  18. Depolarization of Cellular Resting Membrane Potential Promotes Neonatal Cardiomyocyte Proliferation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Jen-Yu; Williams, Corin; Levin, Michael; Black, Lauren Deems

    2014-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes (CMs) undergo a rapid transition from hyperplastic to hypertrophic growth soon after birth, which is a major challenge to the development of engineered cardiac tissue for pediatric patients. Resting membrane potential (Vmem) has been shown to play an important role in cell differentiation and proliferation during development. We hypothesized that depolarization of neonatal CMs would stimulate or maintain CM proliferation in vitro. To test our hypothesis, we isolated postnatal day 3 neonatal rat CMs and subjected them to sustained depolarization via the addition of potassium gluconate or Ouabain to the culture medium. Cell density and CM percentage measurements demonstrated an increase in mitotic CMs along with a ~2 fold increase in CM numbers with depolarization. In addition, depolarization led to an increase in cells in G2 and S phase, indicating increased proliferation, as measured by flow cytometry. Surprisingly depolarization of Vmem with either treatment led to inhibition of proliferation in cardiac fibroblasts. This effect is abrogated when the study was carried out on postnatal day 7 neonatal CMs, which are less proliferative, indicating that the likely mechanism of depolarization is the maintenance of the proliferating CM population. In summary, our findings suggest that depolarization maintains postnatal CM proliferation and may be a novel approach to encourage growth of engineered tissue and cardiac regeneration in pediatric patients. PMID:25295125

  19. Glutathione and the rate of cellular proliferation determine tumour cell sensitivity to tumour necrosis factor in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Obrador, E; Navarro, J; Mompo, J; Asensi, M; Pellicer, J A; Estrela, J M

    1997-01-01

    Low rates of cellular proliferation are associated with low GSH content and enhanced sensitivity of Ehrlich ascites-tumour (EAT) cells to the cytotoxic effects of recombinant human tumour necrosis factor (rhTNF-alpha). Buthionine sulphoximine, a selective inhibitor of GSH synthesis, inhibited tumour growth and increased rhTNF-alpha cytoxicity in vitro. Administration of sublethal doses (10(6)units/kg per day) of rhTNF-alpha to EAT-bearing mice promoted oxidative stress (as measured by increases in intracellular peroxide levels, O2(-); generation and mitochondrial GSSG) and resulted in a slight reduction (19%) in tumour cell number when controls showed the highest rate of cellular proliferation. ATP (1mmol/kg per day)-induced selective GSH depletion, when combined with rhTNF-alpha administration, afforded a 61% inhibition of tumour growth and resulted in a significant extension of host survival. Administration of N-acetylcysteine (1mmol/kg per day) or GSH ester (5mmol/kg per day) abolished the rhTNF-alpha- and ATP-induced effects on tumour growth by maintaining high GSH levels in the cancer cells. Our results demonstrate that the sensitivity of tumour cells to rhTNF-alpha in vivo depends on their GSH content and their rate of proliferation. PMID:9224645

  20. Induction of vascular endothelial phenotype and cellular proliferation from human cord blood stem cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Brian; Z-M Wan, Jim; Abley, Doris; Akabutu, John

    2005-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that stem cells derived from adult hematopoietic tissues are capable of trans-differentiation into non-hematopoietic cells, and that the culture in microgravity ( μg) may modulate the proliferation and differentiation. We investigated the application of μg to human umbilical cord blood stem cells (CBSC) in the induction of vascular endothelial phenotype expression and cellular proliferation. CD34+ mononuclear cells were isolated from waste human umbilical cord blood samples and cultured in simulated μg for 14 days. The cells were seeded in rotary wall vessels (RWV) with or without microcarrier beads (MCB) and vascular endothelial growth factor was added during culture. Controls consisted of culture in 1 G. The cell cultures in RWV were examined by inverted microscopy. Cell counts, endothelial cell and leukocyte markers performed by flow-cytometry and FACS scan were assayed at days 1, 4, 7 and at the termination of the experiments. Culture in RWV revealed significantly increased cellular proliferation with three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like aggregates. At day 4, CD34+ cells cultured in RWV bioreactor without MCB developed vascular tubular assemblies and exhibited endothelial phenotypic markers. These data suggest that CD34+ human umbilical cord blood progenitors are capable of trans-differentiation into vascular endothelial cell phenotype and assemble into 3D tissue structures. Culture of CBSC in simulated μg may be potentially beneficial in the fields of stem cell biology and somatic cell therapy.

  1. miR-342-3p affects hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation via regulating NF-κB pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Yubao

    2015-02-13

    Recent research indicates that non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) help regulate basic cellular processes in many types of cancer cells. We hypothesized that overexpression of miR-342-3p might affect proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. After confirming overexpression of miR-342-3p with qRT-PCR, MTT assay showed that HCC cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by miR-342-3p, and that it significantly decreased BrdU-positive cell proliferation by nearly sixfold. Searching for targets using three algorithms we found that miR-342-3p is related to the NF-κB pathway and luciferase assay found that IKK-γ, TAB2 and TAB3 are miR-342-3p target genes. Results of western blot on extracted nuclear proteins of HepG2 and HCT-116 cells showed that miR-342-3p reduced and miR-342-3p-in increased p65 nuclear levels and qRT-PCR found that NF-κB pathway downstream genes were downregulated by miR-342-3p and upregulated by miR-342-3p-in, confirming that miR-342 targets NF-κB pathway. Overexpression of Ikk-γ, TAB2 and TAB3 partially rescued HCC cells proliferation inhibited by miR-342-3p. Using the GSE54751 database we evaluated expression from 10 HCC samples, which strongly suggested downregulation of miR-342-3p and we also found inverse expression between miR-342-3p and its targets IKK-γ, TAB2 and TAB3 from 71 HCC samples. Our results show that miR-342-3p has a significant role in HCC cell proliferation and is suitable for investigation of therapeutic targets. - Highlights: • MiR-342-3p suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma cell proliferation. • MiR-342-3p targets IKK-γ, TAB2 and TAB3 genes. • MiR-342-3p downregulates NF-kB signaling pathway. • MiR-342-3p is downregulated in clinical hepatocellular carcinoma samples. • The expression of miR-342-3p and its target gene is inversely related.

  2. cdk4 Deficiency Inhibits Skin Tumor Development but Does Not Affect Normal Keratinocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.; Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; LaCava, Margaret; Moons, David S.; Kiyokawa, Hiroaki; Conti, Claudio J.

    2002-01-01

    Most human tumors have mutations that result in deregulation of the cdk4/cyclin-Ink4-Rb pathway. Overexpression of D-type cyclins or cdk4 and inactivation of Ink4 inhibitors are common in human tumors. Conversely, lack of cyclin D1 expression results in significant reduction in mouse skin and mammary tumor development. However, complete elimination of tumor development was not observed in these models, suggesting that other cyclin/cdk complexes play an important role in tumorigenesis. Here we described the effects of cdk4 deficiency on mouse skin proliferation and tumor development. Cdk4 deficiency resulted in a 98% reduction in the number of tumors generated through the two-stage carcinogenesis model. The absence of cdk4 did not affect normal keratinocyte proliferation and both wild-type and cdk4 knockout epidermis are equally affected after topical treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), resulting in epidermal hyperplasia. In similar fashion, cdk4 knockout keratinocytes proliferated well in an in vivo model of wound-induced proliferation. Biochemical studies in mouse epidermis showed that cdk6 activity increased twofold in cdk4-deficient mice compared to wild-type siblings. These results suggest that therapeutic approaches to inhibit cdk4 activity could provide a target to inhibit tumor development with minimal or no effect in normal tissue. PMID:12163365

  3. Control of cellular proliferation by modulation of oxidative phosphorylation in human and rodent fast-growing tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Enriquez, Sara . E-mail: rodsar@mail.cardiologia.org.mx; Vital-Gonzalez, Paola A.; Flores-Rodriguez, Fanny L.; Marin-Hernandez, Alvaro; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena; Moreno-Sanchez, Rafael

    2006-09-01

    The relationship between cell proliferation and the rates of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in HeLa (human) and AS-30D (rodent) tumor cells was evaluated. In glutamine plus glucose medium, both tumor lines grew optimally. Mitochondria were the predominant source of ATP in both cell types (66-75%), despite an active glycolysis. In glucose-free medium with glutamine, proliferation of both lines diminished by 30% but oxidative phosphorylation and the cytosolic ATP level increased by 50%. In glutamine-free medium with glucose, proliferation, oxidative phosphorylation and ATP concentration diminished drastically, although the cells were viable. Oligomycin, in medium with glutamine plus glucose, abolished growth of both tumor lines, indicating an essential role of mitochondrial ATP for tumor progression. The presumed mitochondrial inhibitors rhodamines 123 and 6G, and casiopeina II-gly, inhibited tumor cell proliferation and oxidative phosphorylation, but also glycolysis. In contrast, gossypol, iodoacetate and arsenite strongly blocked glycolysis; however, they did not affect tumor proliferation or mitochondrial metabolism. Growth of both tumor lines was highly sensitive to rhodamines and casiopeina II-gly, with IC{sub 5} values for HeLa cells lower than 0.5 {mu}M, whereas viability and proliferation of human lymphocytes were not affected by these drugs (IC{sub 5} > 30 {mu}M). Moreover, rhodamine 6G and casiopeina II-gly, at micromolar doses, prolonged the survival of animals bearing i.p. implanted AS-30D hepatoma. It is concluded that fast-growing tumor cells have a predominantly oxidative type of metabolism, which might be a potential therapeutic target.

  4. Fatostatin Inhibits Cancer Cell Proliferation by Affecting Mitotic Microtubule Spindle Assembly and Cell Division.

    PubMed

    Gholkar, Ankur A; Cheung, Keith; Williams, Kevin J; Lo, Yu-Chen; Hamideh, Shadia A; Nnebe, Chelsea; Khuu, Cindy; Bensinger, Steven J; Torres, Jorge Z

    2016-08-12

    The sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors have become attractive targets for pharmacological inhibition in the treatment of metabolic diseases and cancer. SREBPs are critical for the production and metabolism of lipids and cholesterol, which are essential for cellular homeostasis and cell proliferation. Fatostatin was recently discovered as a specific inhibitor of SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), which is required for SREBP activation. Fatostatin possesses antitumor properties including the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and migration, and it arrests cancer cells in G2/M phase. Although Fatostatin has been viewed as an antitumor agent due to its inhibition of SREBP and its effect on lipid metabolism, we show that Fatostatin's anticancer properties can also be attributed to its inhibition of cell division. We analyzed the effect of SREBP activity inhibitors including Fatostatin, PF-429242, and Betulin on the cell cycle and determined that only Fatostatin possessed antimitotic properties. Fatostatin inhibited tubulin polymerization, arrested cells in mitosis, activated the spindle assembly checkpoint, and triggered mitotic catastrophe and reduced cell viability. Thus Fatostatin's ability to inhibit SREBP activity and cell division could prove beneficial in treating aggressive types of cancers such as glioblastomas that have elevated lipid metabolism and fast proliferation rates and often develop resistance to current anticancer therapies. PMID:27378817

  5. Cellular Intrinsic Mechanism Affecting the Outcome of AML Treated with Ara-C in a Syngeneic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dongming; Su, Guangsong; Zheng, Yanwen; He, Chao; Mao, Zhengwei J.; Singleton, Timothy P.; Yin, Bin

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treatment failure are not clear. Here, we established a mouse model of AML by syngeneic transplantation of BXH-2 derived myeloid leukemic cells and developed an efficacious Ara-C-based regimen for treatment of these mice. We proved that leukemic cell load was correlated with survival. We also demonstrated that the susceptibility of leukemia cells to Ara-C could significantly affect the survival. To examine the molecular alterations in cells with different sensitivity, genome-wide expression of the leukemic cells was profiled, revealing that overall 366 and 212 genes became upregulated or downregulated, respectively, in the resistant cells. Many of these genes are involved in the regulation of cell cycle, cellular proliferation, and apoptosis. Some of them were further validated by quantitative PCR. Interestingly, the Ara-C resistant cells retained the sensitivity to ABT-737, an inhibitor of anti-apoptosis proteins, and treatment with ABT-737 prolonged the life span of mice engrafted with resistant cells. These results suggest that leukemic load and intrinsic cellular resistance can affect the outcome of AML treated with Ara-C. Incorporation of apoptosis inhibitors, such as ABT-737, into traditional cytotoxic regimens merits consideration for the treatment of AML in a subset of patients with resistance to Ara-C. This work provided direct in vivo evidence that leukemic load and intrinsic cellular resistance can affect the outcome of AML treated with Ara-C, suggesting that incorporation of apoptosis inhibitors into traditional cytotoxic regimens merits consideration for the treatment of AML in a subset of patients with resistance to Ara-C. PMID:25314317

  6. Zearalenone exposure affects mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and granulosa cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yan-Jun; Zhu, Cheng-Cheng; Xu, Yin-Xue; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2015-09-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a metabolite of Fusarium and is a common contaminant of grains and foodstuffs. ZEN acts as a xenoestrogen and is considered to be cytotoxic, tissue toxic, and genotoxic, which causes abortions and stillbirths in humans and animals. Since estrogens affect oocyte maturation during meiosis, in this study we investigated the effects of ZEN on mouse oocyte meiotic maturation and granulosa cell proliferation. Our results showed that ZEN-treated oocyte maturation rates were decreased, which might be due to the disrupted cytoskeletons: (1) ZEN treatment resulted in significantly more oocytes with abnormal spindle morphologies; (2) actin filament expression and distribution were also disrupted after ZEN treatment, which was confirmed by the aberrant distribution of actin regulatory proteins. In addition, cortical granule-free domains (CGFDs) were disrupted after ZEN treatment, which indicated that ZEN may affect mouse oocyte fertilization capability. ZEN reduced mouse granulosa cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner as determined by MTT assay and TUNEL apoptosis analysis, which may be another cause for the decreased oocyte maturation. Thus, our results demonstrated that exposure to zearalenone affected oocyte meiotic maturation and granulosa cell proliferation in mouse. PMID:24733567

  7. A Novel Interaction between FLICE-Associated Huge Protein (FLASH) and E2A Regulates Cell Proliferation and Cellular Senescence via Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-Alpha-p21WAF1/CIP1 Axis

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Takahiro; Murakami, Taichi; Ono, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Akiko; Tominaga, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Toshikazu; Nagai, Kojiro; Doi, Toshio; Abe, Hideharu

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the cell proliferation has been implicated in the pathophysiology of a number of diseases. Cellular senescence limits proliferation of cancer cells, preventing tumorigenesis and restricting tissue damage. However, the role of cellular senescence in proliferative nephritis has not been determined. The proliferative peak in experimental rat nephritis coincided with a peak in E2A expression in the glomeruli. Meanwhile, E12 (an E2A-encoded transcription factor) did not promote proliferation of Mesangial cells (MCs) by itself. We identified caspase-8-binding protein FLICE-associated huge protein (FLASH) as a novel E2A-binding partner by using a yeast two-hybrid screening. Knockdown of FLASH suppressed proliferation of MCs. This inhibitory effect was partially reversed by the knockdown of E2A. In addition, the knockdown of FLASH induced cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 (p21) expression, but did not affect p53 expression. Furthermore, overexpression of E12 and E47 induced p21, but not p53 in MCs, in the absence of FLASH. We also demonstrated that E2A and p21 expression at the peak of proliferation was followed by significant induction of FLASH in mesangial areas in rat proliferative glomerulonephritis. Moreover, we revealed that FLASH negatively regulates cellular senescence via the interaction with E12. We also demonstrated that FLASH is involved in the TNF-α-induced p21 expressions. These results suggest that the functional interaction of E2A and FLASH play an important role in cell proliferation and cellular senescence via regulation of p21 expression in experimental glomerulonephritis. PMID:26208142

  8. Modulation of Estrogen Response Element-Driven Gene Expressions and Cellular Proliferation with Polar Directions by Designer Transcription Regulators

    PubMed Central

    Muyan, Mesut; Güpür, Gizem; Yaşar, Pelin; Ayaz, Gamze; User, Sırma Damla; Kazan, Hasan Hüseyin; Huang, Yanfang

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα), as a ligand-dependent transcription factor, mediates 17β-estradiol (E2) effects. ERα is a modular protein containing a DNA binding domain (DBD) and transcription activation domains (AD) located at the amino- and carboxyl-termini. The interaction of the E2-activated ERα dimer with estrogen response elements (EREs) of genes constitutes the initial step in the ERE-dependent signaling pathway necessary for alterations of cellular features. We previously constructed monomeric transcription activators, or monotransactivators, assembled from an engineered ERE-binding module (EBM) using the ERα-DBD and constitutively active ADs from other transcription factors. Monotransactivators modulated cell proliferation by activating and repressing ERE-driven gene expressions that simulate responses observed with E2-ERα. We reasoned here that integration of potent heterologous repression domains (RDs) into EBM could generate monotransrepressors that alter ERE-bearing gene expressions and cellular proliferation in directions opposite to those observed with E2-ERα or monotransactivators. Consistent with this, monotransrepressors suppressed reporter gene expressions that emulate the ERE-dependent signaling pathway. Moreover, a model monotransrepressor regulated DNA synthesis, cell cycle progression and proliferation of recombinant adenovirus infected ER-negative cells through decreasing as well as increasing gene expressions with polar directions compared with E2-ERα or monotransactivator. Our results indicate that an ‘activator’ or a ‘repressor’ possesses both transcription activating/enhancing and repressing/decreasing abilities within a chromatin context. Offering a protein engineering platform to alter signal pathway-specific gene expressions and cell growth, our approach could also be used for the development of tools for epigenetic modifications and for clinical interventions wherein multigenic de-regulations are an issue. PMID:26295471

  9. 14-3-3σ regulates keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation by modulating Yap1 cellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Sambandam, Sumitha A.T.; Kasetti, Ramesh Babu; Xue, Lei; Dean, Douglas C.; Lu, Qingxian; Li, Qiutang

    2015-01-01

    The homozygous repeated epilation (Er/Er) mouse mutant of the gene encoding 14-3-3σ displays an epidermal phenotype characterized by hyperproliferative keratinocytes and undifferentiated epidermis. Heterozygous Er/+ mice develop spontaneous skin tumors and are highly sensitive to tumor-promoting DMBA/TPA induction. The molecular mechanisms underlying 14-3-3σ regulation of epidermal proliferation, differentiation, and tumor formation have not been well elucidated. In the present study, we found that Er/Er keratinocytes failed to sequester Yap1 in the cytoplasm, leading to its nuclear localization during epidermal development in vivo and under differentiation-inducing culture conditions in vitro. In addition, enhanced Yap1 nuclear localization was also evident in DMBA/TPA-induced tumors from Er/+ skin. Furthermore, shRNA knockdown of Yap1 expression in Er/Er keratinocytes inhibited their proliferation, suggesting that YAP1 functions as a downstream effector of 14-3-3σ controlling epidermal proliferation. We then demonstrated that keratinocytes express all seven 14-3-3 protein isoforms, some of which form heterodimers with 14-3-3σ, either full-length WT or the mutant form found in Er/Er mice. However Er 14-3-3σ does not interact with Yap1, as demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation. We conclude that Er 14-3-3σ disrupts the interaction between 14-3-3 and Yap1, thus fails to block Yap1 nuclear transcriptional function, causing continued progenitor expansion and inhibition of differentiation in Er/Er epidermis. PMID:25668240

  10. Catechins Variously Affect Activities of Conjugation Enzymes in Proliferating and Differentiated Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Lněničková, Kateřina; Procházková, Eliška; Skálová, Lenka; Matoušková, Petra; Bártíková, Hana; Souček, Pavel; Szotáková, Barbora

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of processes in intestinal cells is essential, as most xenobiotics come into contact with the small intestine first. Caco-2 cells are human colorectal adenocarcinoma that once differentiated, exhibit enterocyte-like characteristics. Our study compares activities and expressions of important conjugation enzymes and their modulation by green tea extract (GTE) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) using both proliferating (P) and differentiated (D) caco-2 cells. The mRNA levels of the main conjugation enzymes were significantly elevated after the differentiation of Caco-2 cells. However, no increase in conjugation enzymes' activities in differentiated cells was detected in comparison to proliferating ones. GTE/EGCG treatment did not affect the mRNA levels of any of the conjugation enzymes tested in either type of cells. Concerning conjugation enzymes activities, GTE/EGCG treatment elevated glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity by approx. 30% and inhibited catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) activity by approx. 20% in differentiated cells. On the other hand, GTE as well as EGCG treatment did not significantly affect the activities of conjugation enzymes in proliferating cells. Administration of GTE/EGCG mediated only mild changes of GST and COMT activities in enterocyte-like cells, indicating a low risk of GTE/EGCG interactions with concomitantly administered drugs. However, a considerable chemo-protective effect of GTE via the pronounced induction of detoxifying enzymes cannot be expected as well. PMID:27617982

  11. Annexin A1 sustains tumor metabolism and cellular proliferation upon stable loss of HIF1A

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Christina; Lin, Suling J.; Wappler, Jessica; Klinger, Bertram; Blüthgen, Nils; Du Bois, Ilona; Schmeck, Bernd; Lehrach, Hans; de Graauw, Marjo; Goncalves, Emanuel; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Tan, Patrick; Grabsch, Heike I.; Prigione, Alessandro; Kempa, Stefan; Cramer, Thorsten

    2016-01-01

    Despite the approval of numerous molecular targeted drugs, long-term antiproliferative efficacy is rarely achieved and therapy resistance remains a central obstacle of cancer care. Combined inhibition of multiple cancer-driving pathways promises to improve antiproliferative efficacy. HIF-1 is a driver of gastric cancer and considered to be an attractive target for therapy. We noted that gastric cancer cells are able to functionally compensate the stable loss of HIF-1α. Via transcriptomics we identified a group of upregulated genes in HIF-1α-deficient cells and hypothesized that these genes confer survival upon HIF-1α loss. Strikingly, simultaneous knock-down of HIF-1α and Annexin A1 (ANXA1), one of the identified genes, resulted in complete cessation of proliferation. Using stable isotope-resolved metabolomics, oxidative and reductive glutamine metabolism was found to be significantly impaired in HIF-1α/ANXA1-deficient cells, potentially explaining the proliferation defect. In summary, we present a conceptually novel application of stable gene inactivation enabling in-depth deconstruction of resistance mechanisms. In theory, this experimental approach is applicable to any cancer-driving gene or pathway and promises to identify various new targets for combination therapies. PMID:26760764

  12. Annexin A1 sustains tumor metabolism and cellular proliferation upon stable loss of HIF1A.

    PubMed

    Rohwer, Nadine; Bindel, Fabian; Grimm, Christina; Lin, Suling J; Wappler, Jessica; Klinger, Bertram; Blüthgen, Nils; Du Bois, Ilona; Schmeck, Bernd; Lehrach, Hans; de Graauw, Marjo; Goncalves, Emanuel; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Tan, Patrick; Grabsch, Heike I; Prigione, Alessandro; Kempa, Stefan; Cramer, Thorsten

    2016-02-01

    Despite the approval of numerous molecular targeted drugs, long-term antiproliferative efficacy is rarely achieved and therapy resistance remains a central obstacle of cancer care. Combined inhibition of multiple cancer-driving pathways promises to improve antiproliferative efficacy. HIF-1 is a driver of gastric cancer and considered to be an attractive target for therapy. We noted that gastric cancer cells are able to functionally compensate the stable loss of HIF-1α. Via transcriptomics we identified a group of upregulated genes in HIF-1α-deficient cells and hypothesized that these genes confer survival upon HIF-1α loss. Strikingly, simultaneous knock-down of HIF-1α and Annexin A1 (ANXA1), one of the identified genes, resulted in complete cessation of proliferation. Using stable isotope-resolved metabolomics, oxidative and reductive glutamine metabolism was found to be significantly impaired in HIF-1α/ANXA1-deficient cells, potentially explaining the proliferation defect. In summary, we present a conceptually novel application of stable gene inactivation enabling in-depth deconstruction of resistance mechanisms. In theory, this experimental approach is applicable to any cancer-driving gene or pathway and promises to identify various new targets for combination therapies. PMID:26760764

  13. Carnosine inhibits KRAS-mediated HCT116 proliferation by affecting ATP and ROS production.

    PubMed

    Iovine, Barbara; Iannella, Maria Luigia; Nocella, Francesca; Pricolo, Maria Rosaria; Bevilacqua, Maria Assunta

    2012-02-28

    Carnosine is a natural dipeptide that has generated particular interest for its antioxidant, anti-aging and especially for its antiproliferative properties. In this study, we demonstrate that carnosine inhibits the proliferation of human HCT116 colon cancer cells. In this cell line, the activating KRAS mutation induces mitochondrial ROS, the signaling molecules for cell proliferation. We observed that 50-100 mM carnosine decreases ATP and ROS concentration and induces cell cycle arrest in G1 phase. In HCT116 cells these effects are related to decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and increased p21waf1 protein. Our findings support the concept that carnosine could inhibit HCT116 cell growth via its antioxidant activity and its ability to affect glycolysis. PMID:22137144

  14. Role of EGF receptor ligands in TCDD-induced EGFR down-regulation and cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Campion, Christina M; Leon Carrion, Sandra; Mamidanna, Gayatri; Sutter, Carrie Hayes; Sutter, Thomas R; Cole, Judith A

    2016-06-25

    In cultures of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces the expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor ligands transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) and epiregulin (EREG). TCDD also down-regulates EGF receptors (EGFR), suggesting that decreases in signaling contribute to the effects of TCDD. In this study, we treated post-confluent NHEKs with 10 nM TCDD and assessed its effects on EGFR binding, EGFR ligand secretion, basal ERK activity, and proliferation. TCDD caused time-dependent deceases in [(125)I]-EGF binding to levels 78% of basal cell values at 72 h. Amphiregulin (AREG) levels increased with time in culture in basal and TCDD-treated cells, while TGF-α and epiregulin (EREG) secretion were stimulated by TCDD. Inhibiting EGFR ligand release with the metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat prevented EGFR down-regulation and neutralizing antibodies for AREG and EREG relieved receptor down-regulation. In contrast, neutralizing TGF-α intensified EGFR down-regulation. Treating NHEKs with AREG or TGF-α caused rapid internalization of receptors with TGF-α promoting recycling within 90 min. EREG had limited effects on rapid internalization or recycling. TCDD treatment increased ERK activity, a response reduced by batimastat and the neutralization of all three ligands indicating that the EGFR and its ligands maintain ERK activity. All three EGFR ligands were required for the maintenance of total cell number in basal and TCDD-treated cultures. The EGFR inhibitor PD1530305 blocked basal and TCDD-induced increases in the number of cells labeled by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine, identifying an EGFR-dependent pool of proliferating cells that is larger in TCDD-treated cultures. Overall, these data indicate that TCDD-induced EGFR down-regulation in NHEKs is caused by AREG, TGF-α, and EREG, while TGF-α enhances receptor recycling to maintain a pool of EGFR at the cell surface. These receptors are required for

  15. Effect of prior dietary exposure to cows' milk protein on antigen-specific and nonspecific cellular proliferation in mice.

    PubMed

    Brix, Susanne; Magyar, Orit H; Barkholt, Vibeke; Frøkiaer, Hanne

    2005-05-01

    The impact of dietary components on the immune system is gaining increased attention in the effort to develop safe food products, some even with health-promoting potential, as well as to improve the basic understanding of the immunomodulatory potential of common food components. In such studies, which are mainly based on experiments in vitro, it is important to be able to differentiate nonspecific activation of immune cells induced by dietary components from ex vivo restimulation of antigen-specific cells that might be present in cell cultures owing to prior dietary exposure to the antigens in cell donors. Focusing on the immunostimulatory potential of cows' milk proteins and peptides, we studied the impact of prior dietary exposure to cows' milk on proliferation of murine immune cells upon ex vivo stimulation with bovine milk proteins. Nonspecific proliferation induced by beta-casein peptides was further assessed on cells from mice bred on a cows'-milk-free diet. Regarding the dietary effect, we found that prior oral intake of cows' milk proteins affected cell proliferation induced by culturing with cows' milk proteins in vitro, as spleen cells from mice fed a milk-containing diet showed a significantly greater proliferative response than did cells from mice bred on a cows'-milk-free diet. Studies of immune enhancing potentials of beta-casein peptides showed that some peptides stimulate proliferation of immune cells nonspecifically. In conclusion, these findings stress the importance of employing immune cells from mice unexposed to cows' milk for studies of the immunomodulating capacity of cows' milk proteins and peptides, in order to rule out the interference caused by antigen-specific immune responses. By using such cells, we here show that some beta-casein peptides possess the potential to induce proliferation in immune cells in a nonspecific manner. PMID:15909688

  16. Dysfunctional telomeres induce p53-dependent and independent apoptosis to compromise cellular proliferation and inhibit tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Wang, Xinwei; Flores, Elsa R; Yu, Jian; Chang, Sandy

    2016-08-01

    Aging is associated with progressive telomere shortening, resulting in the formation of dysfunctional telomeres that compromise tissue proliferation. However, dysfunctional telomeres can limit tumorigenesis by activating p53-dependent cellular senescence and apoptosis. While activation of both senescence and apoptosis is required for repress tumor formation, it is not clear which pathway is the major tumor suppressive pathway in vivo. In this study, we generated Eμ-myc; Pot1b(∆/∆) mouse to directly compare tumor formation under conditions in which either p53-dependent apoptosis or senescence is activated by telomeres devoid of the shelterin component Pot1b. We found that activation of p53-dependent apoptosis plays a more critical role in suppressing lymphoma formation than p53-dependent senescence. In addition, we found that telomeres in Pot1b(∆/∆) ; p53(-/-) mice activate an ATR-Chk1-dependent DNA damage response to initiate a robust p53-independent, p73-dependent apoptotic pathway that limited stem cell proliferation but suppressed B-cell lymphomagenesis. Our results demonstrate that in mouse models, both p53-dependent and p53-independent apoptosis are important to suppressing tumor formation. PMID:27113195

  17. IL-6 Trans-signaling-STAT3 Pathway Mediates ECM and Cellular Proliferation in Fibroblasts from Hypertrophic Scar

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Sutapa; Ju, Xiaoxi; Sun, Hong; Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N; Brasier, Allan R

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms behind the pathogenesis of post-burn hypertrophic scar (HS) remain unclear. Here, we investigate the role of interleukin-6 (IL-6) trans-signaling-STAT3 pathway in HS fibroblasts (HSF) derived from burned-induced HS skin. HSF showed increased Tyr 705 STAT3 phosphorylation over normal fibroblast (NF) after IL-6•IL-6Rα stimulation by immunoassays. The endogenous STAT3 target gene, SOCS3, was upregulated in HSF and showed increased STAT3 binding on its promoter relative to NF in Chromatin Immunoprecipitation assay. We observed that the cell surface signaling transducer glycoprotein 130 is upregulated in HSF using Q-RT-PCR and flow cytometry. The production of excessive extracellular matrix (ECM), including the expression of alpha2 (1) procollagen (Col1A2) and fibronectin 1 (FN) were seen in HSFs. A STAT3 peptide inhibitor abrogated FN and Col1A2 gene expression in HSF indicating involvement of STAT3 in ECM production. The cellular proliferation markers Cyclin D1, Bcl-Xl and c-Myc were also upregulated in HSF and knockdown of STAT3 by siRNA attenuated c-Myc expression indicating the essential role of STAT3 in fibroblast proliferation. Taken together, our results suggest that the IL-6-trans-signaling-STAT3 pathway may play an integral role in HS pathogenesis and disruption of this pathway could be a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of burn-induced HS. PMID:23303450

  18. TRPV1 mediates cellular uptake of anandamide and thus promotes endothelial cell proliferation and network-formation

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Nicole A.; Barth, Sonja; Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Klec, Christiane; Strunk, Dirk; Malli, Roland; Graier, Wolfgang F.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Anandamide (N-arachidonyl ethanolamide, AEA) is an endogenous cannabinoid that is involved in various pathological conditions, including cardiovascular diseases and tumor-angiogenesis. Herein, we tested the involvement of classical cannabinoid receptors (CBRs) and the Ca2+-channel transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) on cellular AEA uptake and its effect on endothelial cell proliferation and network-formation. Uptake of the fluorescence-labeled anandamide (SKM4-45-1) was monitored in human endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs) and a human endothelial-vein cell line (EA.hy926). Involvement of the receptors during AEA translocation was determined by selective pharmacological inhibition (AM251, SR144528, CID16020046, SB366791) and molecular interference by TRPV1-selective siRNA-mediated knock-down and TRPV1 overexpression. We show that exclusively TRPV1 contributes essentially to AEA transport into endothelial cells in a Ca2+-independent manner. This TRPV1 function is a prerequisite for AEA-induced endothelial cell proliferation and network-formation. Our findings point to a so far unknown moonlighting function of TRPV1 as Ca2+-independent contributor/regulator of AEA uptake. We propose TRPV1 as representing a promising target for development of pharmacological therapies against AEA-triggered endothelial cell functions, including their stimulatory effect on tumor-angiogenesis. PMID:25395667

  19. (18)F-FLT PET imaging of cellular proliferation in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lamarca, Angela; Asselin, Marie-Claude; Manoharan, Prakash; McNamara, Mairéad G; Trigonis, Ioannis; Hubner, Richard; Saleem, Azeem; Valle, Juan W

    2016-03-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is known for its poor prognosis. Since the development of computerized tomography, magnetic resonance and endoscopic ultrasound, novel imaging techniques have struggled to get established in the management of patients diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma for several reasons. Thus, imaging assessment of pancreatic cancer remains a field with scope for further improvement. In contrast to cross-sectional anatomical imaging methods, molecular imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) can provide information on tumour function. Particularly, tumour proliferation may be assessed by measurement of intracellular thymidine kinase 1 (TK1) activity level using thymidine analogues radiolabelled with a positron emitter for use with PET. This approach, has been widely explored with [(18)F]-fluoro-3'-deoxy-3'-l-fluorothymidine ((18)F-FLT) PET. This manuscript reviews the rationale and physiology behind (18)F-FLT PET imaging, with special focus on pancreatic cancer and other gastrointestinal malignancies. Potential benefit and challenges of this imaging technique for diagnosis, staging and assessment of treatment response in abdominal malignancies are discussed. PMID:26778585

  20. Use of a Generalized Additive Model to Investigate Key Abiotic Factors Affecting Microcystin Cellular Quotas in Heavy Bloom Areas of Lake Taihu

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Min; Xie, Ping; Chen, Jun; Qin, Boqiang; Zhang, Dawen; Niu, Yuan; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Qing; Wu, Laiyan

    2012-01-01

    Lake Taihu is the third largest freshwater lake in China and is suffering from serious cyanobacterial blooms with the associated drinking water contamination by microcystin (MC) for millions of citizens. So far, most studies on MCs have been limited to two small bays, while systematic research on the whole lake is lacking. To explain the variations in MC concentrations during cyanobacterial bloom, a large-scale survey at 30 sites across the lake was conducted monthly in 2008. The health risks of MC exposure were high, especially in the northern area. Both Microcystis abundance and MC cellular quotas presented positive correlations with MC concentration in the bloom seasons, suggesting that the toxic risks during Microcystis proliferations were affected by variations in both Microcystis density and MC production per Microcystis cell. Use of a powerful predictive modeling tool named generalized additive model (GAM) helped visualize significant effects of abiotic factors related to carbon fixation and proliferation of Microcystis (conductivity, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), water temperature and pH) on MC cellular quotas from recruitment period of Microcystis to the bloom seasons, suggesting the possible use of these factors, in addition to Microcystis abundance, as warning signs to predict toxic events in the future. The interesting relationship between macrophytes and MC cellular quotas of Microcystis (i.e., high MC cellular quotas in the presence of macrophytes) needs further investigation. PMID:22384128

  1. Use of a generalized additive model to investigate key abiotic factors affecting microcystin cellular quotas in heavy bloom areas of Lake Taihu.

    PubMed

    Tao, Min; Xie, Ping; Chen, Jun; Qin, Boqiang; Zhang, Dawen; Niu, Yuan; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Qing; Wu, Laiyan

    2012-01-01

    Lake Taihu is the third largest freshwater lake in China and is suffering from serious cyanobacterial blooms with the associated drinking water contamination by microcystin (MC) for millions of citizens. So far, most studies on MCs have been limited to two small bays, while systematic research on the whole lake is lacking. To explain the variations in MC concentrations during cyanobacterial bloom, a large-scale survey at 30 sites across the lake was conducted monthly in 2008. The health risks of MC exposure were high, especially in the northern area. Both Microcystis abundance and MC cellular quotas presented positive correlations with MC concentration in the bloom seasons, suggesting that the toxic risks during Microcystis proliferations were affected by variations in both Microcystis density and MC production per Microcystis cell. Use of a powerful predictive modeling tool named generalized additive model (GAM) helped visualize significant effects of abiotic factors related to carbon fixation and proliferation of Microcystis (conductivity, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), water temperature and pH) on MC cellular quotas from recruitment period of Microcystis to the bloom seasons, suggesting the possible use of these factors, in addition to Microcystis abundance, as warning signs to predict toxic events in the future. The interesting relationship between macrophytes and MC cellular quotas of Microcystis (i.e., high MC cellular quotas in the presence of macrophytes) needs further investigation. PMID:22384128

  2. BRCA1 Haploinsufficiency Leads to Altered Expression of Genes Involved in Cellular Proliferation and Development

    PubMed Central

    Feilotter, Harriet E.; Michel, Claire; Uy, Paolo; Bathurst, Lauren; Davey, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of BRCA1 and BRCA2 coding sequences to identify pathogenic mutations associated with inherited breast/ovarian cancer syndrome has provided a method to identify high-risk individuals, allowing them to seek preventative treatments and strategies. However, the current test is expensive, and cannot differentiate between pathogenic variants and those that may be benign. Focusing only on one of the two BRCA partners, we have developed a biological assay for haploinsufficiency of BRCA1. Using a series of EBV-transformed cell lines, we explored gene expression patterns in cells that were BRCA1 wildtype compared to those that carried (heterozygous) BRCA1 pathogenic mutations. We identified a subset of 43 genes whose combined expression pattern is a sensitive predictor of BRCA1 status. The gene set was disproportionately made up of genes involved in cellular differentiation, lending credence to the hypothesis that single copy loss of BRCA1 function may impact differentiation, rendering cells more susceptible to undergoing malignant processes. PMID:24950059

  3. LETM1-dependent mitochondrial Ca2+ flux modulates cellular bioenergetics and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Doonan, Patrick J; Chandramoorthy, Harish C; Hoffman, Nicholas E; Zhang, Xueqian; Cárdenas, César; Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Rajan, Sudarsan; Vallem, Sandhya; Chen, Xiongwen; Foskett, J Kevin; Cheung, Joseph Y; Houser, Steven R; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2014-11-01

    Dysregulation of mitochondrial Ca(2+)-dependent bioenergetics has been implicated in various pathophysiological settings, including neurodegeneration and myocardial infarction. Although mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport has been characterized, and several molecules, including LETM1, have been identified, the functional role of LETM1-mediated Ca(2+) transport remains unresolved. This study examines LETM1-mediated mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport and bioenergetics in multiple cell types, including fibroblasts derived from patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS). The results show that both mitochondrial Ca(2+) influx and efflux rates are impaired in LETM1 knockdown, and similar phenotypes were observed in ΔEF hand, (D676A D688K)LETM1 mutant-overexpressed cells, and in cells derived from patients with WHS. Although LETM1 levels were lower in WHS-derived fibroblasts, the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter components MCU, MCUR1, and MICU1 remain unaltered. In addition, the MCU mitoplast patch-clamp current (IMCU) was largely unaffected in LETM1-knockdown cells. Silencing of LETM1 also impaired basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption, possibly via complex IV inactivation and ATP production. Remarkably, LETM1 knockdown also resulted in increased reactive oxygen species production. Further, LETM1 silencing promoted AMPK activation, autophagy, and cell cycle arrest. Reconstitution of LETM1 or antioxidant overexpression rescued mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport and bioenergetics. These findings reveal the role of LETM1-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) flux in shaping cellular bioenergetics. PMID:25077561

  4. Time course of increased cellular proliferation in collateral arteries after administration of vascular endothelial growth factor in a rabbit model of lower limb vascular insufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, S.; Rossow, S. T.; Kearney, M.; Zheng, L. P.; Bauters, C.; Bunting, S.; Ferrara, N.; Symes, J. F.; Isner, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Proliferation of vascular cells has been previously shown to contribute to spontaneous development of coronary collaterals. Recent studies from several laboratories have established that collateral artery growth in both the heart and limb can be enhanced by administration of angiogenic growth factors, or therapeutic angiogenesis. In this study, we sought (1) to define the extent and time course of endothelial cell (EC) and smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation accompanying spontaneous collateral development during limb ischemia and (2) to determine the extent to which proliferative activity of ECs and SMCs is augmented during therapeutic angiogenesis with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a heparin-binding EC-specific mitogen. Ten days after induction of limb ischemia by surgically excising the femoral artery of rabbits, either VEGF (500 to 1000 micrograms) or saline was administered as a bolus into the iliac artery of the ischemic limb. Cellular proliferation was evaluated by bromodeoxyuridine labeling for 24 hours at day 0 (immediately before VEGF administration) and at days 3, 5, and 7 after VEGF, EC proliferation in the midzone collaterals of VEGF-treated animals increased 2.8-fold at day 5 (P < 0.05 versus control), and returned to baseline levels by day 7. SMC proliferation in midzone collaterals also increased 2.7-fold in response to VEGF (P < 0.05). No significant increase in EC or SMC proliferation was observed in either the stem or re-entry collaterals of VEGF-treated animals compared with untreated ischemic control animals. Reduction of hemodynamic deficit in the ischemic limb measured by lower limb blood pressure was documented at day 7 after VEGF (P < 0.01 versus untreated, ischemic control). These data thus (1) establish the contribution of cellular proliferation to collateral vessel development in limb ischemia and (2) support the concept that augmented cellular proliferation contributes to the enhanced formation of collateral vessels after

  5. 50 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields do not affect human lymphocyte activation and proliferation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capri, Miriam; Mesirca, Pietro; Remondini, Daniel; Carosella, Simona; Pasi, Sara; Castellani, Gastone; Franceschi, Claudio; Bersani, Ferdinando

    2004-12-01

    In the last 30 years, an increasing public concern about the possible harmful effects of electromagnetic fields generated by power lines and domestic appliances has pushed the scientific community to search for a correct and comprehensive answer to this problem. In this work the effects of exposure to 50 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields, with a magnetic flux density of 0.05 mT and 2.5 mT (peak values), were studied on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) collected from healthy young and elderly donors. Cell activation and proliferation were investigated by using flow cytometry techniques and 3H-TdR incorporation assays, respectively. The results obtained indicated that exposure to the fields altered neither DNA synthesis nor the capacity of lymphocytes to enter the activation phase and progress into the cell cycle. Thus, the conclusions are that two important functional phases of human lymphocytes, such as activation and proliferation, are not affected by exposures to 50 Hz magnetic fields similar to those found under power lines.

  6. Cellular Growth and Mitochondrial Ultrastructure of Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis Promastigotes Are Affected by the Iron Chelator 2,2-Dipyridyl

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita-Rodrigues, Camila; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F. S.; Sabóia-Vahia, Leonardo; Da-Silva, Silvia A. G.; de Souza, Elen M.; Waghabi, Mariana C.; Cuervo, Patrícia; De Jesus, José B.

    2013-01-01

    multifactorial response that results in cellular collapse, starting with the interruption of cell proliferation and culminating in marked mitochondrial impairment in some parasites and their subsequent cell death, whereas others may survive and resume proliferating. PMID:24147167

  7. Silencing of HMGA2 suppresses cellular proliferation, migration, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhan; Li, Xiang; Wu, Ding; Tang, Run; Chen, Renfu; Xue, Song; Sun, Xiaoqing

    2016-06-01

    The high-mobility group protein A2 (HMGA2) is an architectural transcription factor that plays a crucial role in the development and progression of various malignant cancers. However, the function of HMGA2 in bladder cancer remains largely unknown. Therefore, we aim to investigate the effect of HMGA2 on the proliferation, migration, invasion, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of bladder cancer cells. The expression of HMGA2 in human bladder cancer cells was downregulated by small interfering RNA (siRNA). The protein levels of HMGA2 and other related proteins were detected by Western blotting. The cell proliferation and apoptosis were examined by Cell Counting Kit-8 and flow cytometry, respectively. Transwell migration and invasion assays were performed to assess the effect of HMGA2 on the migration and invasion ability of cells. In conclusion, we found that HMGA2 knockdown markedly inhibited cell proliferation; this reduced cell growth was due to the high apoptosis rate of cells, as Bcl-xl was diminished, whereas Bax was upregulated. Moreover, our results showed that silencing of HMGA2 in cancer cells greatly inhibited the cell migration and invasion, decreased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and affected the occurrence of EMT. We further found that decreased HMGA2 expression suppressed the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in bladder cancer cells. These results revealed that HMGA2 played an important role in the progression of bladder cancer and might be a novel target for therapy in human bladder cancer. PMID:26684800

  8. Methods to assess the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of the HPV E1 helicase and its effects on cellular proliferation and induction of a DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Lehoux, Michaël; Fradet-Turcotte, Amélie; Archambault, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Replication of the human papillomavirus (HPV) double-stranded DNA genome in the nucleus of infected cells relies on the viral proteins E1 and E2 in conjunction with the host DNA replication machinery. This process is tightly linked to the replication of cellular DNA, in part through the cyclin-dependent phosphorylation of E1, which inhibits its export out of the nucleus to promote its accumulation in this compartment during S-phase. It has been recently shown that accumulation of E1 in the nucleus, while a prerequisite for viral DNA replication, leads to the inhibition of cellular proliferation and the activation of a DNA damage response (DDR). Here we describe methods to monitor the subcellular localization of E1 and to assess the deleterious effects of its nuclear accumulation on cellular proliferation, cell cycle progression and the induction of a DDR, using a combination of colony formation assays, immunofluorescence microcopy, and flow cytometry approaches. PMID:25348298

  9. Long noncoding RNA HOTAIR is relevant to cellular proliferation, invasiveness, and clinical relapse in small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Hiroshi; Motoi, Noriko; Nagano, Hiroko; Miyauchi, Eisaku; Ushijima, Masaru; Matsuura, Masaaki; Okumura, Sakae; Nishio, Makoto; Hirose, Tetsuro; Inase, Naohiko; Ishikawa, Yuichi

    2014-01-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a subtype of lung cancer with poor prognosis. To identify accurate predictive biomarkers and effective therapeutic modalities, we focus on a long noncoding RNA, Hox transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR), and investigated its expression, cellular functions, and clinical relevance in SCLC. In this study, HOTAIR expression was assessed in 35 surgical SCLC samples and 10 SCLC cell lines. The efficacy of knockdown of HOTAIR by siRNA transfection was evaluated in SBC-3 cells in vitro, and the gene expression was analyzed using microarray. HOTAIR was expressed highly in pure, rather than combined, SCLC (P = 0.012), that the subgroup with high expression had significantly more pure SCLC (P = 0.04), more lymphatic invasion (P = 0.03) and more relapse (P = 0.04) than the low-expression subgroup. The knockdown of HOTAIR in SBC-3 cells led to decreased proliferation activity and decreased invasiveness in vitro. Gene expression analysis indicated that depletion of HOTAIR resulted in upregulation of cell adhesion-related genes such as ASTN1, PCDHA1, and mucin production-related genes such as MUC5AC, and downregulation of genes involved in neuronal growth and signal transduction including NTM and PTK2B. Our results suggest that HOTAIR has an oncogenic role in SCLC and could be a prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target. PMID:24591352

  10. CD147 and AGR2 expression promote cellular proliferation and metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeny, Larissa; Liu, Zhiyong; Bush, Benjamin D.; Hartman, Yolanda; Zhou, Tong; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2012-08-15

    The signaling pathways facilitating metastasis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cells are not fully understood. CD147 is a transmembrane glycoprotein known to induce cell migration and invasion. AGR2 is a secreted peptide also known to promote cell metastasis. Here we describe their importance in the migration and invasion of HNSCC cells (FADU and OSC-19) in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 decreased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion. In vivo, knockdown of CD147 or AGR2 expression decreased primary tumor growth as well as regional and distant metastasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigated AGR2 in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explored the relationship between AGR2 and CD147 for the first time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AGR2 and CD147 appear to co-localize in head and squamous cell carcinoma samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 reduced migration and invasion in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of both AGR2 and CD147 decreased metastasis in vivo.

  11. After portal branch ligation in the rat, cellular proliferation in associated with selective induction of c-Ha-ras, p53, cyclin E, and Cdk2

    PubMed Central

    Starkel, P; Lambotte, L; Sempoux, C; De Saeger, C; Saliez, A; Maiter, D; Horsmans, Y

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—In liver regeneration after portal branch ligation we previously showed that early cellular changes are observed in both the proliferating and atrophying liver lobes. They are therefore not indicative of future proliferative response. In this study we attempted to define precisely, in the same model, the time at which the cellular processes diverge between the lobes by measuring various parameters associated with cellular proliferation. We also investigated the possible role of inhibitors of cell proliferation in the absence of progression towards the S phase in the atrophying lobes.
AIMS—Expression of p53, c-Ha-ras, cyclin E, cyclin dependent kinase (Cdk2), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, and interleukin (IL)-1α and IL-1β were assessed in relation to their potential role in proliferating and atrophying cellular phenomenons.
METHODS—Immunohistochemistry, northern blotting, western blotting, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were performed, mainly at time points corresponding to mid-G1/S phase progression (8-24 hours after surgery).
RESULTS—The common and thus most likely non-specific response was still evident 5-8 hours after surgery and included an increase in IL-1 mRNA as well as p53 and cyclin E proteins. From 12 hours onwards, p53, c-Ha-ras, cyclin E, and Cdk2 were selectively induced in proliferating lobes whereas IL-1β was predominantly activated in atrophying lobes. No changes in TGF-β or IL-1α expression were observed at the same time points in any of the liver lobes.
CONCLUSIONS—The initial response to portal branch ligation and thus probably to partial hepatectomy seems to be non-specific for at least eight hours. Thereafter, p53, c-Ha-ras, cyclin E, and Cdk2 seem to drive cellular proliferation while IL-1β is associated with cellular atrophy. In contrast, TGF-β and IL-1α do not seem to play a role in determining the commitment of cells towards atrophy or proliferation.


Keywords: portal

  12. Kalanchoe tubiflora extract inhibits cell proliferation by affecting the mitotic apparatus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Kalanchoe tubiflora (KT) is a succulent plant native to Madagascar, and is commonly used as a medicinal agent in Southern Brazil. The underlying mechanisms of tumor suppression are largely unexplored. Methods Cell viability and wound-healing were analyzed by MTT assay and scratch assay respectively. Cell cycle profiles were analyzed by FACS. Mitotic defects were analyzed by indirect immunofluoresence images. Results An n-Butanol-soluble fraction of KT (KT-NB) was able to inhibit cell proliferation. After a 48 h treatment with 6.75 μg/ml of KT, the cell viability was less than 50% of controls, and was further reduced to less than 10% at higher concentrations. KT-NB also induced an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle as well as an increased level of cells in the subG1 phase. Instead of disrupting the microtubule network of interphase cells, KT-NB reduced cell viability by inducing multipolar spindles and defects in chromosome alignment. KT-NB inhibits cell proliferation and reduces cell viability by two mechanisms that are exclusively involved with cell division: first by inducing multipolarity; second by disrupting chromosome alignment during metaphase. Conclusion KT-NB reduced cell viability by exclusively affecting formation of the proper structure of the mitotic apparatus. This is the main idea of the new generation of anti-mitotic agents. All together, KT-NB has sufficient potential to warrant further investigation as a potential new anticancer agent candidate. PMID:22963191

  13. Inhibition of cellular proliferation and modulation of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins by retinoids in a bovine mammary epithelial cell line.

    PubMed

    Woodward, T L; Turner, J D; Hung, H T; Zhao, X

    1996-06-01

    Retinoids are potent inhibitors of growth and tumor progression in many mammary carcinoma cell lines, though regulation of growth in nontumorigenic mammary epithelial cells by retinoids is less clear. Here, we have characterized the inhibition of MAC-T (a nontransformed bovine mammary epithelial cell line) cellular proliferation by retinoids and their role in regulating insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs). Retinoic acid (RA) (100 nM) was a potent inhibitor of MAC-T cell proliferation. Retinol was 10-100 times less effective. Neither retinoid could completely arrest growth at noncytotoxic concentrations. Retinoic acid inhibited cellular proliferation by 1 h (P < .05), but inhibition was fivefold greater by 24 h (P < .01). This second stage of growth inhibition (after 12 h) was dependent upon protein synthesis. However, RA-induced inhibition of cellular proliferation did not persist, with thymidine incorporation increasing toward control levels by 4 days in culture. Retinoic acid was less effective in inhibiting thymidine incorporation when cells were stimulated with insulin, des(1-3) IGF-I, or Long(R3) IGF-I when compared to cells stimulated with native IGF-I or serum. Inhibition of proliferation by RA was associated with increased levels of IGFBP-2 in conditioned media and in plasma membrane preparations. Treatment with insulin or des(1-3) IGF-I resulted in the appearance of IGFBP-3 in conditioned media and on the cell surface. However, RA significantly reduced IGFBP-3 levels in conditioned media and eliminated IGFBP-3 associated with the plasma membrane. Thus, RA is a potent but transient inhibitor of bovine mammary epithelial cell proliferation, and this growth inhibition is correlated with increased IGFBP-2 accumulation and inhibition of IGF-I stimulated IGFBP-3 protein secretion. PMID:8655603

  14. Proliferation of Purple Sulphur Bacteria at the Sediment Surface Affects Intertidal Mat Diversity and Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Hubas, Cédric; Jesus, Bruno; Ruivo, Mickael; Meziane, Tarik; Thiney, Najet; Davoult, Dominique; Spilmont, Nicolas; Paterson, David M.; Jeanthon, Christian

    2013-01-01

    There is a relative absence of studies dealing with mats of purple sulphur bacteria in the intertidal zone. These bacteria display an array of metabolic pathways that allow them to disperse and develop under a wide variety of conditions, making these mats important in terms of ecosystem processes and functions. Mass blooms of purple sulphur bacteria develop during summer on sediments in the intertidal zone especially on macroalgal deposits. The microbial composition of different types of mats differentially affected by the development of purple sulphur bacteria was examined, at low tide, using a set of biochemical markers (fatty acids, pigments) and composition was assessed against their influence on ecosystem functions (sediment cohesiveness, CO2 fixation). We demonstrated that proliferation of purple sulphur bacteria has a major impact on intertidal mats diversity and functions. Indeed, assemblages dominated by purple sulphur bacteria (Chromatiaceae) were efficient exopolymer producers and their biostabilisation potential was significant. In addition, the massive growth of purple sulphur bacteria resulted in a net CO2 degassing whereas diatom dominated biofilms represented a net CO2 sink. PMID:24340018

  15. Contaminant loading in remote Arctic lakes affects cellular stress-related proteins expression in feral charr.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiseman, Steve; Jorgensen, Even H.; Maule, Alec G.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2011-01-01

    The remote Arctic lakes on Bjornoya Island, Norway, offer a unique opportunity to study possible affect of lifelong contaminant exposure in wild populations of landlocked Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus). This is because Lake Ellasjoen has persistent organic pollutant (POP) levels that are significantly greater than in the nearby Lake Oyangen. We examined whether this differential contaminant loading was reflected in the expression of protein markers of exposure and effect in the native fish. We assessed the expressions of cellular stress markers, including cytochrome P4501A (Cyp1A), heat shock protein 70 (hsp70), and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) in feral charr from the two lakes. The average polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) load in the charr liver from Ellasjoen was approximately 25-fold higher than in individuals from Oyangen. Liver Cyp1A protein expression was significantly higher in individuals from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen, confirming differential PCB exposure. There was no significant difference in hsp70 protein expression in charr liver between the two lakes. However, brain hsp70 protein expression was significantly elevated in charr from Ellasjoen compared with Oyangen. Also, liver GR protein expression was significantly higher in the Ellasjoen charr compared with Oyangen charr. Taken together, our results suggest changes to cellular stress-related protein expression as a possible adaptation to chronic-contaminant exposure in feral charr in the Norwegian high-Arctic.

  16. Environment temperature affects cell proliferation in the spinal cord and brain of juvenile turtles.

    PubMed

    Radmilovich, Milka; Fernández, Anabel; Trujillo-Cenóz, Omar

    2003-09-01

    The spinal cords and brains--comprising dorsal cortex (DC), medial cortex (MC) and diencephalon (Dien)--of juvenile turtles acclimated to warm temperature [27-30 degrees C; warm-acclimated turtles (WATs)] revealed higher density values of bromodeoxyuridine-labeled cells (BrdU-LCs) than those acclimated to a cooler environment [5-14 degrees C; cold-acclimated turtles (CATs)]. Both populations were under the influence of the seasonal daily light-dark rhythms. Pronounced differences between WATs and CATs (independent t-test; confidence level, P<0.01) were found in the central area of the spinal gray matter and in the ependymal epithelium lining the brain ventricles. Forebrain regions (DC, MC and Dien) also revealed significant differences between WATs and CATs (independent t-test; confidence level, P<0.01-0.05). Unexplored biological clocks that may be affecting cell proliferation were equalized by performing paired experiments involving one WAT and one CAT. Both animals were injected on the same day at the same time and both were sacrificed 24 h later. These experiments confirmed that a warm environment increased cell proliferation in the CNS of turtles. Double- and triple-labeling experiments involving anti-BrdU antibody together with anti-glial protein antibodies revealed that temperature modulates not only cell populations expressing glial markers but also other cells that do not express them. As expected, in the case of short post-injection (BrdU) surviving time points, no cells were found colabeling for BrdU and NeuN (neuronal marker). The probable direct effect of temperature on the cell division rate should be analyzed together with potential indirect effects involving increased motor activity and increased food intake. The fate of the increased BrdU-LCs (death, permanence as progenitor cells or differentiation following neuronal or glial lines) remains a matter for further investigation. Results are discussed in the light of current opinions concerned with

  17. Tumor suppressor KAI1 affects integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated ovarian cancer cell adhesion, motility, and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruseva, Zlatna; Geiger, Pamina Xenia Charlotte; Hutzler, Peter; Kotzsch, Matthias; Luber, Birgit; Schmitt, Manfred; Gross, Eva; Reuning, Ute

    2009-06-10

    The tetraspanin KAI1 had been described as a metastasis suppressor in many different cancer types, a function for which associations of KAI1 with adhesion and signaling receptors of the integrin superfamily likely play a role. In ovarian cancer, integrin {alpha}v{beta}3 correlates with tumor progression and its elevation in vitro provoked enhanced cell adhesion accompanied by significant increases in cell motility and proliferation in the presence of its major ligand vitronectin. In the present study, we characterized integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated tumor biological effects as a function of cellular KAI1 restoration and proved for the first time that KAI1, besides its already known physical crosstalk with {beta}1-integrins, also colocalizes with integrin {alpha}v{beta}3. Functionally, elevated KAI1 levels drastically increased integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-dependent ovarian cancer cell adhesion. Since an intermediate level of cell adhesive strength is required for optimal cell migration, we next studied ovarian cancer cell motility as a function of KAI1 restoration. By time lapse video microscopy, we found impaired integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-mediated cell migration most probably due to strongly enhanced cellular immobilization onto the adhesion-supporting matrix. Moreover, KAI1 reexpression significantly diminished cell proliferation. These data strongly indicate that KAI1 may suppress ovarian cancer progression by inhibiting integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-provoked tumor cell motility and proliferation as important hallmarks of the oncogenic process.

  18. In situ CUTANEOUS CELLULAR IMMUNE RESPONSE IN DOGS NATURALLY AFFECTED BY VISCERAL LEISHMANIASIS

    PubMed Central

    ROSSI, Claudio Nazaretian; TOMOKANE, Thaise Yumie; BATISTA, Luis Fábio da Silva; MARCONDES, Mary; LARSSON, Carlos Eduardo; LAURENTI, Márcia Dalastra

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Thirty-eight dogs naturally affected by visceral leishmaniasis were recruited in Araçatuba, São Paulo State, Brazil - an endemic area for visceral leishmaniasis. The animals were distributed into one of two groups, according to their clinical and laboratory features, as either symptomatic or asymptomatic dogs. Correlations between clinical features and inflammatory patterns, cellular immune responses, and parasitism in the macroscopically uninjured skin of the ear were investigated. Histological skin patterns were similar in both groups, and were generally characterized by a mild to intense inflammatory infiltrate in the dermis, mainly consisting of mononuclear cells. There was no difference in the number of parasites in the skin (amastigotes/mm²) between the two groups. Concerning the characterization of the cellular immune response, the number of positive inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS+) cells was higher in the dermis of symptomatic than in asymptomatic dogs (p = 0.0368). A positive correlation between parasite density and macrophages density (p = 0.031), CD4+ T-cells (p = 0.015), and CD8+ T-cells (p = 0.023) was observed. Furthermore, a positive correlation between density of iNOS+ cells and CD3+ T-cells (p = 0.005), CD4+ T-cells (p = 0.001), and CD8+ T-cells (p = 0.0001) was also found. The results showed the existence of a non-specific chronic inflammatory infiltrate in the dermis of dogs affected by visceral leishmaniasis, characterized by the presence of activated macrophages and T-lymphocytes, associated to cutaneous parasitism, independent of clinical status. PMID:27410908

  19. In situ CUTANEOUS CELLULAR IMMUNE RESPONSE IN DOGS NATURALLY AFFECTED BY VISCERAL LEISHMANIASIS.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Claudio Nazaretian; Tomokane, Thaise Yumie; Batista, Luis Fábio da Silva; Marcondes, Mary; Larsson, Carlos Eduardo; Laurenti, Márcia Dalastra

    2016-07-11

    Thirty-eight dogs naturally affected by visceral leishmaniasis were recruited in Araçatuba, São Paulo State, Brazil - an endemic area for visceral leishmaniasis. The animals were distributed into one of two groups, according to their clinical and laboratory features, as either symptomatic or asymptomatic dogs. Correlations between clinical features and inflammatory patterns, cellular immune responses, and parasitism in the macroscopically uninjured skin of the ear were investigated. Histological skin patterns were similar in both groups, and were generally characterized by a mild to intense inflammatory infiltrate in the dermis, mainly consisting of mononuclear cells. There was no difference in the number of parasites in the skin (amastigotes/mm²) between the two groups. Concerning the characterization of the cellular immune response, the number of positive inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS+) cells was higher in the dermis of symptomatic than in asymptomatic dogs (p = 0.0368). A positive correlation between parasite density and macrophages density (p = 0.031), CD4+ T-cells (p = 0.015), and CD8+ T-cells (p = 0.023) was observed. Furthermore, a positive correlation between density of iNOS+ cells and CD3+ T-cells (p = 0.005), CD4+ T-cells (p = 0.001), and CD8+ T-cells (p = 0.0001) was also found. The results showed the existence of a non-specific chronic inflammatory infiltrate in the dermis of dogs affected by visceral leishmaniasis, characterized by the presence of activated macrophages and T-lymphocytes, associated to cutaneous parasitism, independent of clinical status. PMID:27410908

  20. Retinoic acid differentially affects in vitro proliferation, differentiation and mineralization of two fish bone-derived cell lines: different gene expression of nuclear receptors and ECM proteins.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Ignacio; Tiago, Daniel M; Laizé, Vincent; Leonor Cancela, M; Gisbert, Enric

    2014-03-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the main active metabolite of vitamin A, regulates vertebrate morphogenesis through signaling pathways not yet fully understood. Such process involves the specific activation of retinoic acid and retinoid X receptors (RARs and RXRs), which are nuclear receptors of the steroid/thyroid hormone receptor superfamily. Teleost fish are suitable models to study vertebrate development, such as skeletogenesis. Cell systems capable of in vitro mineralization have been developed for several fish species and may provide new insights into the specific cellular and molecular events related to vitamin A activity in bone, complementary to in vivo studies. This work aims at investigating the in vitro effects of RA (0.5 and 12.5 μM) on proliferation, differentiation and extracellular matrix (ECM) mineralization of two gilthead seabream bone-derived cell lines (VSa13 and VSa16), and at identifying molecular targets of its action through gene expression analysis. RA induced phenotypic changes and cellular proliferation was inhibited in both cell lines in a cell type-dependent manner (36-59% in VSa13 and 17-46% in VSa16 cells). While RA stimulated mineral deposition in VSa13 cell cultures (50-62% stimulation), it inhibited the mineralization of extracellular matrix in VSa16 cells (11-57% inhibition). Expression of hormone receptor genes (rars and rxrs), and extracellular matrix-related genes such as matrix and bone Gla proteins (mgp and bglap), osteopontin (spp1) and type I collagen (col1a1) were differentially regulated upon exposure to RA in proliferating, differentiating and mineralizing cultures of VSa13 and VSa16 cells. Altogether, our results show: (i) RA affects proliferative and mineralogenic activities in two fish skeletal cell types and (ii) that during phenotype transitions, specific RA nuclear receptors and bone-related genes are differentially expressed in a cell type-dependent manner. PMID:24291400

  1. Flame synthesis and in vitro biocompatibility assessment of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: cellular uptake, toxicity and proliferation studies.

    PubMed

    Buyukhatipoglu, K; Miller, T A; Clyne, A Morss

    2009-12-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles are used in diverse applications, such as targeted drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging and hyperthermic malignant cell therapy. In the current work, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles were produced by flame synthesis, which has improved nanoparticle property control and is capable of commercial production rates with minimal post-processing. The iron oxide nanoparticle material characteristics were analyzed by electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Finally, flame synthesized iron oxide nanoparticle interaction with endothelial cells was compared to commercially available iron oxide nanoparticles. Flame synthesis produced a heterogeneous mixture of 6-12 nm diameter hematite and magnetite nanoparticles with superparamagnetic properties. Endothelial cell scanning electron microscopy, confirmed by energy dispersive spectroscopy, demonstrated that flame synthesized nanoparticles are ingested into cells in a similar manner to commercially available nanoparticles. The flame synthesized particles showed no statistically significant toxicity difference from commercially available nanoparticles, as measured by Live/Dead assay, Alamar blue, and lactase dehydrogenase release. Neither type of nanoparticle affected cell proliferation induced by fibroblast growth factor-2. These data suggest that combustion synthesized iron oxide nanoparticles are comparable to commercially available nanoparticles for biological applications, yet flame synthesis is a simpler process with higher purity products and lower manufacturing costs. Future work will include functionalizing nanoparticles for specific cell targeting and bioactive factor delivery. PMID:19908687

  2. Regulation of PMP22 mRNA by G3BP1 affects cell proliferation in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Regulation of mRNAs is one way to control protein levels and thereby important cellular processes such as growth, invasion and apoptosis. G3BPs constitute a family of mRNA-binding proteins, shown to be overexpressed in several cancer types, including breast, colon and pancreas cancer. G3BP has been reported to both stabilize and induce degradation of specific mRNAs. Results Here, we show that G3BP1, but not G3BP2, supports proliferation of several breast cancer cell lines. Global gene expression analyses of G3BP1- and G3BP2-depleted cells indicate that primarily G3BP1, and much less G3BP2, influences mRNA expression levels. Peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) was one gene that was significantly influenced by G3BP1 depletion which led to a 2–3 fold increased expression. Depletion of PMP22 resulted in increased proliferation and the G3BP1-mediated effect on proliferation was not seen upon PMP22-depletion. Conclusions This indicates a novel role for G3BP1 in the regulation of cell proliferation in breast cancer cells, perhaps via a regulatory effect on PMP22 expression. PMID:24321297

  3. Donor Age of Human Platelet Lysate Affects Proliferation and Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lohmann, Michael; Walenda, Gudrun; Hemeda, Hatim; Joussen, Sylvia; Drescher, Wolf; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Hutschenreuter, Gabriele; Zenke, Martin; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The regenerative potential declines upon aging. This might be due to cell-intrinsic changes in stem and progenitor cells or to influences by the microenvironment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) raise high hopes in regenerative medicine. They are usually culture expanded in media with fetal calf serum (FCS) or other serum supplements such as human platelet lysate (HPL). In this study, we have analyzed the impact of HPL-donor age on culture expansion. 31 single donor derived HPLs (25 to 57 years old) were simultaneously compared for culture of MSC. Proliferation of MSC did not reveal a clear association with platelet counts of HPL donors or growth factors concentrations (PDGF-AB, TGF-β1, bFGF, or IGF-1), but it was significantly higher with HPLs from younger donors (<35 years) as compared to older donors (>45 years). Furthermore, HPLs from older donors increased activity of senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-βgal). HPL-donor age did not affect the fibroblastoid colony-forming unit (CFU-f) frequency, immunophenotype or induction of adipogenic differentiation, whereas osteogenic differentiation was significantly lower with HPLs from older donors. Concentrations of various growth factors (PDGF-AB, TGF-β1, bFGF, IGF-1) or hormones (estradiol, parathormone, leptin, 1,25 vitamin D3) were not associated with HPL-donor age or MSC growth. Taken together, our data support the notion that aging is associated with systemic feedback mechanisms acting on stem and progenitor cells, and this is also relevant for serum supplements in cell culture: HPLs derived from younger donors facilitate enhanced expansion and more pronounced osteogenic differentiation. PMID:22662236

  4. Hypoxia affects in vitro proliferation and differentiation of mouse corneal epithelial progenitor cell.

    PubMed

    Dong, Nuo; Qin, Wenjuan; Xue, Yuhua; Li, Cheng; Liu, Zuguo

    2013-08-01

    This study was to investigate the proliferation and differentiation of mouse corneal epithelial progenitor cell in hypoxic airlift culture. Mouse corneal epithelial progenitor cell line progenitor cells were cultured under airlift with normoxic and hypoxic conditions for various durations up to 2 wk. Under normoxic conditions when exposed to air, the hyperproliferation and abnormal epidermal-like differentiation of mouse corneal epithelium was induced, whereas when exposed to air under hypoxic conditions, although we observed augmented proliferation, the abnormal differentiation was inhibited. The mechanism by which hypoxia prevents abnormal differentiation may involve downregulation of Wnt signaling pathways, which were inhibited in cells cultured with hypoxic airlift technique. In conclusion, hypoxia can prevent abnormal differentiation while enhancing the proliferation of corneal epithelial cells by blocking Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. PMID:23739874

  5. The human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 controls cellular proliferation through regulation of p27{sup Kip1} protein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Butz, Nicole; Ruetz, Stephan; Natt, Francois; Hall, Jonathan; Weiler, Jan; Mestan, Juergen; Ducarre, Monique; Grossenbacher, Rita; Hauser, Patrick; Kempf, Dominique; Hofmann, Francesco . E-mail: francesco.hofmann@pharma.novartis.com

    2005-02-15

    Ubiquitin-mediated degradation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27{sup Kip1} was shown to be required for the activation of key cyclin-dependent kinases, thereby triggering the onset of DNA replication and cell cycle progression. Although the SCF{sup Skp2} ubiquitin ligase has been reported to mediate p27{sup Kip1} degradation, the nature of the human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme involved in this process has not yet been determined at the cellular level. Here, we show that antisense oligonucleotides targeting the human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 downregulate its expression, inhibit the degradation of p27{sup Kip1}, and prevent cellular proliferation. Elevation of p27{sup Kip1} protein level is found to be the sole requirement for the inhibition of cellular proliferation induced upon downregulation of Cdc34. Indeed, reducing the expression of p27{sup Kip1} with a specific antisense oligonucleotide is sufficient to reverse the anti-proliferative phenotype elicited by the Cdc34 antisense. Furthermore, downregulation of Cdc34 is found to specifically increase the abundance of the SCF{sup Skp2} ubiquitin ligase substrate p27{sup Kip1}, but has no concomitant effect on the level of IkB{alpha} and {beta}-catenin, which are known substrates of a closely related SCF ligase.

  6. Regulation of the proliferation of colon cancer cells by compounds that affect glycolysis, including 3-bromopyruvate, 2-deoxyglucose and biguanides.

    PubMed

    Lea, Michael A; Qureshi, Mehreen S; Buxhoeveden, Michael; Gengel, Nicolette; Kleinschmit, Jessica; Desbordes, Charles

    2013-02-01

    In previous studies performed by our group, we observed that 2-deoxyglucose blocked the acidification of the medium used for culture of colon cancer cells caused by incubation with biguanides and it had an additive inhibitory effect on growth. In the present work, we found that 3-bromopyruvate can also prevent the lowering of pH caused by biguanide treatment. 3-Bromopyruvate inhibited colonic cancer cell proliferation, but the effect was not always additive to that of biguanides and an additive effect was more notable in combined treatment with 3-bromopyruvate and 2-deoxyglucose. The induction of alkaline phosphatase activity by butyrate was not consistently affected by combination with other agents that modified glucose metabolism. The drug combinations that were examined inhibited proliferation of wild-type and p53-null cells and affected colonic cancer lines with different growth rates. PMID:23393330

  7. The Role of HIV-1 in Affecting the Proliferation Ability of HPCs Derived From BM.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaolin; He, Sijia; Lv, Xiaoyi; Ding, Haibo; Li, Sha; Kang, Jing; Liu, Jing; Qin, Chaolong; Geng, Wenqing; Jiang, Yongjun; Shang, Hong

    2016-04-15

    HIV-1 causes chronic infection characterized by the depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes and the development of AIDS. Current antiretroviral drugs inhibit viral spread, but they do not lead to a full immune recovery. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and multipotent hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) give rise to all blood and immune cells, and in HIV infection, hematological abnormalities frequently occur in patients. Here, we used bone marrow samples from HIV-1-infected people to study the relationship between the proliferation ability of HSCs/HPCs and peripheral CD4+ T lymphocytes. Three indexes were used to reflect the proliferation ability of HSCs and HPCs: (1) colony-forming units of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs), (2) amplification of CD34+ cells purified from bone marrow mononuclear cells, (3) expression of HOXB4 and HOXA9 in CD34+ cells. We observed a direct correlation between peripheral number of CD4+ T lymphocytes and the HSCs/HPCs proliferation ability in our study. We also compared HIV-infected patients with or without antiretroviral therapy (ART). Our results demonstrated that after antiretroviral therapy, CD4+ T-cell recovery and HPCs proliferation ability are correlated. Our findings have implications in understanding whether bone marrow-derived HPCs can supplement for the loss of CD4+ T lymphocytes during HIV-1 infection. PMID:26974413

  8. Repeated treatment with oxytocin promotes hippocampal cell proliferation, dendritic maturation and affects socio-emotional behavior.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vidaña, Dalinda Isabel; Chan, Ngai-Man Jackie; Chan, Alan H L; Hui, Katy K Y; Lee, Sylvia; Chan, Hoi-Yi; Law, Yuen Shan; Sze, Mei Yi; Tsui, Wai-Ching Sarah; Fung, Timothy K H; Lau, Benson Wui-Man; Lai, Cynthia Y Y

    2016-10-01

    Rewarding social behaviors including positive social interactions and sexual behaviors are shown to regulate adult neurogenesis, but the underlying biological mechanisms remain elusive. Oxytocin, a neurohypophysial hormone secreted after exposure to social interaction or sexual behaviors, has a profound role in the formation of social bonding and regulation of emotional distress. While the acute effect of oxytocin was usually studied, relatively scarce evidence showed the behavioral consequence of repeated oxytocin treatment. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of repeated oxytocin treatment on hippocampal cell proliferation, dendritic maturation of new born neurons and social/emotional behaviors. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats received treatment with either vehicle or oxytocin (1mg/kg) daily for two weeks. Behavioral tests revealed that oxytocin increased social behaviors and reduced the anxiety- and depression-like behaviors. Cell proliferation, differentiation and the dendritic complexity of new born neurons in the hippocampus were promoted by oxytocin treatment. Depression- and anxiety-like behaviors were induced by repeated treatment of corticosterone (40mg/kg) for two weeks while oxytocin treatment reversed the behavioral disturbances. Suppression of cell proliferation caused by corticosterone was reverted by oxytocin treatment in which cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and dendritic complexity increased. The present findings reveal that oxytocin not only enhances cell proliferation, but also promotes the development of the new neurons which is associated with the induction of positive emotional and social behaviors. The results also suggest that oxytocin may be a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of emotional and social dysfunction. PMID:27418343

  9. Mapping cellular processes in the mesenchyme during palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 reveals complex proliferation changes and perturbed cell packing and polarity.

    PubMed

    Brock, Lara J; Economou, Andrew D; Cobourne, Martyn T; Green, Jeremy B A

    2016-03-01

    The 22q11 deletion syndromes represent a spectrum of overlapping conditions including cardiac defects and craniofacial malformations. Amongst the craniofacial anomalies that are seen, cleft of the secondary palate is a common feature. Haploinsufficiency of TBX1 is believed to be a major contributor toward many of the developmental structural anomalies that occur in these syndromes, and targeted deletion of Tbx1 in the mouse reproduces many of these malformations, including cleft palate. However, the cellular basis of this defect is only poorly understood. Here, palatal development in the absence of Tbx1 has been analysed, focusing on cellular properties within the whole mesenchymal volume of the palatal shelves. Novel image analyses and data presentation tools were applied to quantify cell proliferation rates, including regions of elevated as well as reduced proliferation, and cell packing in the mesenchyme. Also, cell orientations (nucleus-Golgi axis) were mapped as a potential marker of directional cell movement. Proliferation differed only subtly between wild-type and mutant until embryonic day (E)15.5 when proliferation in the mutant was significantly lower. Tbx1(-/-) palatal shelves had slightly different cell packing than wild-type, somewhat lower before elevation and higher at E15.5 when the wild-type palate has elevated and fused. Cell orientation is biased towards the shelf distal edge in the mid-palate of wild-type embryos but is essentially random in the Tbx1(-/-) mutant shelves, suggesting that polarised processes such as directed cell rearrangement might be causal for the cleft phenotype. The implications of these findings in the context of further understanding Tbx1 function during palatogenesis and of these methods for the more general analysis of genotype-phenotype functional relationships are discussed. PMID:26689739

  10. Molecular and cellular effects of cis-9, trans-11-conjugated linoleic acid in enterocytes: effects on proliferation, differentiation, and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Lampen, A; Leifheit, M; Voss, J; Nau, H

    2005-06-15

    It has been hypothesized that dietary conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) may inhibit colon tumorigenesis. The aim of our study was to investigate the cellular and molecular effects of cis-9 (9Z), trans-11 (11E)-CLA on the proliferation, differentiation, interaction with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs), and expression of genes relevant in the APC-beta-catenin-TCF4 signalling pathway in human HT-29 and Caco-2 colon cells. We found that 9Z,11E-CLA inhibited the proliferation of HT-29 and Caco-2 cells. Trans-vaccenic acid (VA) showed no antiproliferative effects at all. We determined that 9Z,11E-CLA induced cell differentiation as measured by intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP) enzyme activity in Caco-2 cells, mRNA expression of IAP, and activation of a 5' flanking region of IAP. The 9Z,11E-CLA activated human PPARdelta as measured in a reporter gene assay. Treatment of HT29 cells in the poliferation phase with 9Z,11E-CLA repressed mRNA-expression of proliferation genes such as c-myc, cyclin D1 and c-jun in a concentration dependent manner. The promoter activities of c-myc and AP1 were also inhibited after incubation with 9Z,11E-CLA. beta-Catenin mRNA and protein expression was also repressed by the treatment with 9Z,11E-CLA. In addition, the mRNA expression of PPARdelta was repressed by treatment of the HT-29 cells with 9Z,11E-CLA. We conclude that 9Z,11E-CLA has an antiproliferative effect at the cellular and molecular levels in human colon cells. The results indicate that the preventive effects of CLA in the development of colon cancer may be due to their downregulation of some target genes of the APC-beta-catenin-TCF-4- and PPARdelta signalling pathway. PMID:15935729

  11. Relation of Internal Elastic Lamellar Layer Disruption to Neointimal Cellular Proliferation and Type III Collagen Deposition in Human Peripheral Artery Restenosis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Prakash; Purushothaman, K-Raman; Purushothaman, Meerarani; Baber, Usman; Tarricone, Arthur; Vasquez, Miguel; Wiley, Jose; Kini, Annapoorna; Sharma, Samin K; O'Connor, William N; Moreno, Pedro R

    2016-04-01

    Smooth muscle cell proliferation and extracellular matrix formation are responsible for disease progression in de novo and restenotic atherosclerosis. Internal elastic lamella (IEL) layer maintains the structural integrity of intima, and disruption of IEL may be associated with alterations in neointima, type III collagen deposition, and lesion progression in restenosis. Nineteen restenotic plaques (12 patients) procured during peripheral interventions were compared with 13 control plaques (12 patients) without restenosis. Hematoxylin & Eosin and elastic trichrome stains were used to measure length and percentage of IEL disruption, cellularity, and inflammation score. Type I and III collagens, smooth muscle cell (smc), fibroblast density, and nuclear proliferation (Ki67) percentage were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. IEL disruption percentage (28 ± 3.6 vs 6.1 ± 2.4; p = 0.0006), type III collagen content (0.33 ± 0.06 vs 0.17 ± 0.07; p = 0.0001), smc density (2014 ± 120 vs 923 ± 150; p = 0.0001), fibroblast density (2,282 ± 297 vs 906 ± 138; p = 0.0001), and Ki67 percentage (21.6 ± 2 vs 8.2 ± 0.65; p = 0.0001) were significantly increased in restenotic plaques compared to de novo plaques. Logistic regression analysis identified significant correlation between IEL disruption and neointimal smc density (r = 0.45; p = 0.01) and with type III collagen deposition (r = 0.61; p = 0.02) in restenosis. Increased IEL disruption may trigger cellular proliferation, altering collagen production, and enhancing restenotic neointima. In conclusion, understanding the pathologic and molecular basis of restenosis and meticulous-guided interventions oriented to minimize IEL damage may aid to reduce neointimal proliferation and the occurrence of restenosis. PMID:26857165

  12. Anthocyanidins modulate the activity of human DNA topoisomerases I and II and affect cellular DNA integrity.

    PubMed

    Habermeyer, Michael; Fritz, Jessica; Barthelmes, Hans U; Christensen, Morten O; Larsen, Morten K; Boege, Fritz; Marko, Doris

    2005-09-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of anthocyanidins on human topoisomerases I and II and its relevance for DNA integrity within human cells. Anthocyanidins bearing vicinal hydroxy groups at the B-ring (delphinidin, DEL; cyanidin, CY) were found to potently inhibit the catalytic activity of human topoisomerases I and II, without discriminating between the IIalpha and the IIbeta isoforms. However, in contrast to topoisomerase poisons, DEL and CY did not stabilize the covalent DNA-topoisomerase intermediates (cleavable complex) of topoisomerase I or II. Using recombinant topoisomerase I, the presence of CY or DEL (> or = 1 microM) effectively prohibited the stabilization of the cleavable complex by the topoisomerase I poison camptothecin. We furthermore investigated whether the potential protective effect vs topoisomerase I poisons is reflected also on the cellular level, affecting the DNA damaging properties of camptothecin. Indeed, in HT29 cells, low micromolar concentrations of DEL (1-10 microM) significantly diminished the DNA strand breaking effect of camptothecin (100 microM). However, at concentrations > or = 50 microM, all anthocyanidins tested (delphinidin, cyanidin, malvidin, pelargonidin, and paeonidin), including those not interfering with topoisomerases, were found to induce DNA strand breaks in the comet assay. All of these analogues were able to compete with ethidium bromide for the intercalation into calf thymus DNA and to replace the minor groove binder Hoechst 33258. These data indicate substantial affinity to double-stranded DNA, which might contribute at least to the DNA strand breaking effect of anthocyanidins at higher concentrations (> or = 50 microM). PMID:16167831

  13. Propranolol affects stress-induced leukocytosis and cellular adhesion molecule expression.

    PubMed

    Kühlwein, E C; Irwin, M R; Ziegler, M G; Woods, V L; Kennedy, B; Mills, P J

    2001-12-01

    In this study, the impact of the beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol on resting and acute psychological- and physical-stress-induced circulating leukocyte numbers and the density of cellular adhesion molecules was investigated. In a randomized double-blind crossover design, 45 healthy volunteers performed a 15-min public speaking task and 21 subjects performed a 16-min bicycle exercise after 5 days of ingesting a placebo and after 5 days of ingesting 100 mg/day propranolol. One week of ingesting propranolol modestly elevated the numbers of CD62L+ (P<0.019) but not CD62L- T-lymphocytes. Moreover, propranolol preferentially blunted-psychological stress-induced increases in naïve T-helper (CD4+CD62L+; P<0.049) and naïve T-cytotoxic lymphocytes (CD8+CD62L+; P<0.003), as well as activated T-cytotoxic lymphocytes (CD8+CD29+; P<0.005). However, exercise-induced increases in leukocyte numbers were enhanced following propranolol treatment (P<0.04). In contrast to the effect on the numbers of adhesion-molecule-bearing cells, there was only a modest effect of propranolol on stress-induced alterations of the density of CD62L, CD54 and CD11a. In this study, propranolol treatment interfered with the adrenergic regulation of circulating leukocyte numbers by blunting psychological stress effects but enhancing exercise effects. Propranolol affected the cell activation status to a lesser extent, as reflected by the density of adhesion molecules. PMID:11822472

  14. microRNA 21-mediated suppression of Sprouty1 by Pokemon affects liver cancer cell growth and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiu-Li; Sun, Qin-Sheng; Liu, Feng; Yang, Hong-Wei; Liu, Min; Liu, Hong-Xia; Xu, Wei; Jiang, Yu-Yang

    2013-07-01

    Transcriptional repressor Pokemon is a critical factor in embryogenesis, development, cell proliferation, differentiation, and oncogenesis, thus behaving as an oncogene. Oncomine database suggests a potential correlation between the expressions of Pokemon and Sprouty1. This study investigated the regulatory role of Pokemon in Sprouty1 expression and the effect on liver cancer cell growth and proliferation, revealing a novel miR-21-mediated regulatory circuit. In normal (HL-7702) and cancer (QGY-7703) liver cell lines, Sprouty1 expression is inversely correlated with Pokemon levels. Targeted expression or siRNA-mediated silencing showed that Pokemon is a repressor of Sprouty1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels, but Pokemon cannot affect the promoter activity of Sprouty1. Sprouty1 is a target of miR-21 and interestingly, we found that miR-21 is up-regulated by Pokemon in liver cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Pokemon up-regulated miR-21 transcription in a dose-dependent manner, and ChIP assay exhibited a direct binding of Pokemon to the miR-21 promoter at -747 to -399 bp. Site-directed mutagenesis of the GC boxes at -684 to -679 bp and -652 to -647 bp of miR-21 promoter abolished the regulatory activity by Pokemon. Furthermore, we found that the modulation of Pokemon and miR-21 expression affected the growth and proliferation of liver cancer cells QGY-7703. In summary, our findings demonstrate that Pokemon suppresses Sprouty1 expression through a miR-21-mediated mechanism, affecting the growth and proliferation of liver cancer cells. This study recognized miR-21 and Sprouty1 as novel targets of the Pokemon regulatory network. PMID:23355454

  15. Platelet rich concentrate promotes early cellular proliferation and multiple lineage differentiation of human mesenchymal stromal cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shani, Samuel; Ahmad, Raja Elina; Naveen, Sangeetha Vasudevaraj; Murali, Malliga Raman; Puvanan, Karunanithi; Abbas, Azlina Amir; Kamarul, Tunku

    2014-01-01

    Platelet rich concentrate (PRC) is a natural adjuvant that aids in human mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC) proliferation in vitro; however, its role requires further exploration. This study was conducted to determine the optimal concentration of PRC required for achieving the maximal proliferation, and the need for activating the platelets to achieve this effect, and if PRC could independently induce early differentiation of hMSC. The gene expression of markers for osteocytes (ALP, RUNX2), chondrocytes (SOX9, COL2A1), and adipocytes (PPAR-γ) was determined at each time point in hMSC treated with 15% activated and nonactivated PRC since maximal proliferative effect was achieved at this concentration. The isolated PRC had approximately fourfold higher platelet count than whole blood. There was no significant difference in hMSC proliferation between the activated and nonactivated PRC. Only RUNX2 and SOX9 genes were upregulated throughout the 8 days. However, protein expression study showed formation of oil globules from day 4, significant increase in ALP at days 6 and 8 (P ≤ 0.05), and increased glycosaminoglycan levels at all time points (P < 0.05), suggesting the early differentiation of hMSC into osteogenic and adipogenic lineages. This study demonstrates that the use of PRC increased hMSC proliferation and induced early differentiation of hMSC into multiple mesenchymal lineages, without preactivation or addition of differentiation medium. PMID:25436230

  16. Overexpression of HOXB7 homeobox gene in oral cancer induces cellular proliferation and is associated with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    De Souza Setubal Destro, Maria Fernanda; Bitu, Carolina Cavalcanti; Zecchin, Karina G; Graner, Edgard; Lopes, Marcio A; Kowalski, Luis Paulo; Coletta, Ricardo D

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence has confirmed the involvement of dysregulated expression of HOX genes in cancer. HOX genes are a family of 39 transcription factors, divided in 4 clusters (HOXA to HOXD), that during normal development regulate cell proliferation and specific cell fate. In the present study it was investigated whether genes of the HOXB cluster play a role in oral cancer. We showed that most of the genes in the HOXB network are inactive in oral tissues, with exception of HOXB2, HOXB7 and HOXB13. Expression of HOXB7 was significantly higher in oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) compared to normal oral mucosas. We further demonstrated that HOXB7 overexpression in HaCAT human epithelial cell line promoted proliferation, whereas downregulation of HOXB7 endogenous levels in human oral carcinoma cells (SCC9 cells) decreased proliferation. In OSCCs, expression of HOXB7 and Ki67, a marker of proliferation, correlate strongly with each other (rs=0.79, p<0.006). High immunohistochemical expression of HOXB7 was correlated with T stage (p=0.06), N stage (p=0.07), disease stage (p=0.09) and Ki67 expression (p=0.01), and patients with tumors showing high number of HOXB7-positive cells had shorter overall survival (p=0.08) and shorter disease-free survival after treatment (p=0.10) compared with patients with tumors exhibiting low amount of HOXB7-positive cells. Our data suggest that HOXB7 may contribute to oral carcinogenesis by increasing tumor cell proliferation, and imply that HOXB7 may be an important determinant of OSCC patient prognosis. PMID:19956843

  17. Down-regulation of Wnt10a affects odontogenesis and proliferation in mesenchymal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang Han, Dong Wang, Lei Feng, Hailan

    2013-05-17

    Highlights: •Down-regulation of Wnt10a in dental mesenchymal cells impairs odontogenesis of reassociated tooth germs. •Dspp is down- and up-regulated after Wnt10a-knockdown and overexpression in dental mesenchymal cells. •Down-regulation of Wnt10a inhibits proliferation of dental mesenchymal cells. -- Abstract: The WNT10a mutation has been found in patients with abnormal odontogenesis. In mice, Wnt10a expression is found in the tooth germ, but its role has not yet been elucidated. We aimed to investigate the role of Wnt10a in odontogenesis. Mesenchymal cells of the first mandibular molar germ at the bell stage were isolated, transfected with Wnt10a SiRNA or plasmid, and reassociated with epithelial part of the molar germ. Scrambled SiRNA or empty vector was used in the control group. The reassociated tooth germs were transplanted into mice subrenal capsules. After gene modification, dental mesenchymal cells cultured in vitro were checked for cell proliferation and the expression of Dspp was examined. All 12 reassociated tooth germs in the control group resumed odontogenesis, while only 5 of 12 in the Wnt10a knockdown group developed into teeth. After Wnt10a knockdown, the mesenchymal cells cultured in vitro presented repressed proliferation. Wnt10a knockdown and overexpression led to both down- and up-regulation of Dspp. We conclude that the down-regulation of Wnt10a impairs odontogensis and cell proliferation, and that Wnt10a regulates Dspp expression in mesenchymal cells. These findings help to elucidate the mechanism of abnormal tooth development in patients with the WNT10A mutation.

  18. DNA Replication Licensing Affects Cell Proliferation or Endoreplication in a Cell Type–Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    del Mar Castellano, María; Boniotti, María Beatrice; Caro, Elena; Schnittger, Arp; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2004-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the function of DNA replication licensing components (Cdc6 and Cdt1, among others) is crucial for cell proliferation and genome stability. However, little is known about their role in whole organisms and whether licensing control interfaces with differentiation and developmental programs. Here, we study Arabidopsis thaliana CDT1, its regulation, and the consequences of overriding licensing control. The availability of AtCDT1 is strictly regulated at two levels: (1) at the transcription level, by E2F and growth-arresting signals, and (2) posttranscriptionally, by CDK phosphorylation, a step that is required for its proteasome-mediated degradation. We also show that CDC6 and CDT1 are key targets for the coordination of cell proliferation, differentiation, and development. Indeed, altered CDT1 or CDC6 levels have cell type–specific effects in developing Arabidopsis plants: in leaf cells competent to divide, cell proliferation is stimulated, whereas in cells programmed to undergo differentiation-associated endoreplication rounds, extra endocycles are triggered. Thus, we propose that DNA replication licensing control is critical for the proper maintenance of proliferative potential, developmental programs, and morphogenetic patterns. PMID:15316110

  19. Inhibition of cellular proliferation by the Wilms' tumor suppressor WT1 is associated with suppression of insulin-like growth factor I receptor gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Werner, H; Shen-Orr, Z; Rauscher, F J; Morris, J F; Roberts, C T; LeRoith, D

    1995-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-I-R) gene promoter by the Wilms' tumor suppressor WT1 in intact cells. The levels of endogenous IGF-I-R mRNA and the activity of IGF-I-R gene promoter fragments in luciferase reporter constructs were found to be significantly higher in G401 cells (a Wilms' tumor-derived cell line lacking detectable WT1 mRNA) than in 293 cells (a human embryonic kidney cell line which expresses significant levels of WT1 mRNA). To study whether WT1 could suppress the expression of the endogenous IGF-I-R gene, WT1-negative G401 cells were stably transfected with a WT1 expression vector. Expression of WT1 mRNA in G401 cells resulted in a significant decrease in the rate of cellular proliferation, which was associated with a reduction in the levels of IGF-I-R mRNA, promoter activity, and ligand binding and with a reduction in IGF-I-stimulated cellular proliferation, thymidine incorporation, and anchorage-independent growth. These data suggest that a major aspect of the action of the WT1 tumor suppressor is the repression of IGF-I-R gene expression. PMID:7791758

  20. Store-Operated Ca2+ Entry Does Not Control Proliferation in Primary Cultures of Human Metastatic Renal Cellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Turin, Ilaria; Potenza, Duilio Michele; Bottino, Cinzia; Glasnov, Toma N.; Ferulli, Federica; Mosca, Alessandra; Guerra, Germano; Rosti, Vittorio; Luinetti, Ombretta; Porta, Camillo; Pedrazzoli, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE) is activated following depletion of the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-sensitive Ca2+ pool to regulate proliferation in immortalized cell lines established from either primary or metastatic lesions. The molecular nature of SOCE may involve both Stim1, which senses Ca2+ levels within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ reservoir, and a number of a Ca2+-permeable channels on the plasma membrane, including Orai1, Orai3, and members of the canonical transient receptor (TRPC1–7) family of ion channels. The present study was undertaken to assess whether SOCE is expressed and controls proliferation in primary cultures isolated from secondary lesions of heavily pretreated metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) patients. SOCE was induced following pharmacological depletion of the ER Ca2+ store, but not by InsP3-dependent Ca2+ release. Metastatic RCC cells express Stim1-2, Orai1–3, and TRPC1–7 transcripts and proteins. In these cells, SOCE was insensitive to BTP-2, 10 µM Gd3+ and Pyr6, while it was inhibited by 100 µM Gd3+, 2-APB, and carboxyamidotriazole (CAI). Neither Gd3+ nor 2-APB or CAI impaired mRCC cell proliferation. Consistently, no detectable Ca2+ signal was elicited by growth factor stimulation. Therefore, a functional SOCE is expressed but does not control proliferation of mRCC cells isolated from patients resistant to multikinase inhibitors. PMID:25126575

  1. Downregulation of cellular prion protein inhibited the proliferation and invasion and induced apoptosis of Marek's disease virus-transformed avian T cells.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xuerui; Yang, Runxia; Liu, Guilin; Zhu, Manling; Zhang, Tianliang; Liu, Lei; Wu, Run

    2016-06-30

    Cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is ubiquitously expressed in the cytomembrane of a considerable number of eukaryotic cells. Although several studies have investigated the functions of PrP(C) in cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, and tumorigenesis of mammals, the correlated functions of chicken PrP(C) (chPrP(C)) remain unknown. In this study, stable chPrP(C)-downregulated Marek's disease (MD) virus-transformed avian T cells (MSB1-SiRNA-3) were established by introducing short interfering RNA (SiRNA) targeting chicken prion protein genes. We found that downregulation of chPrP(C) inhibits proliferation, invasion, and migration, and induces G1 cell cycle phase arrest and apoptosis of MSB1-SiRNA-3 cells compared with Marek's disease virus-transformed avian T cells (MSB1) and negative control cells. To the best of our knowledge, the present study provides the first evidence supporting the positive correlation between the expression level of chPrP(C) and the proliferation, migration, and invasion ability of MSB1 cells, but appears to protect MSB1 cells from apoptosis, which suggests it functions in the formation and development of MD tumors. This evidence may contribute to future research into the specific molecular mechanisms of chPrP(C) in the formation and development of MD tumors. PMID:26243599

  2. Downregulation of cellular prion protein inhibited the proliferation and invasion and induced apoptosis of Marek's disease virus-transformed avian T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xuerui; Yang, Runxia; Liu, Guilin; Zhu, Manling; Zhang, Tianliang; Liu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Cellular prion protein (PrPC) is ubiquitously expressed in the cytomembrane of a considerable number of eukaryotic cells. Although several studies have investigated the functions of PrPC in cell proliferation, cell apoptosis, and tumorigenesis of mammals, the correlated functions of chicken PrPC (chPrPC) remain unknown. In this study, stable chPrPC-downregulated Marek's disease (MD) virus-transformed avian T cells (MSB1-SiRNA-3) were established by introducing short interfering RNA (SiRNA) targeting chicken prion protein genes. We found that downregulation of chPrPC inhibits proliferation, invasion, and migration, and induces G1 cell cycle phase arrest and apoptosis of MSB1-SiRNA-3 cells compared with Marek's disease virus-transformed avian T cells (MSB1) and negative control cells. To the best of our knowledge, the present study provides the first evidence supporting the positive correlation between the expression level of chPrPC and the proliferation, migration, and invasion ability of MSB1 cells, but appears to protect MSB1 cells from apoptosis, which suggests it functions in the formation and development of MD tumors. This evidence may contribute to future research into the specific molecular mechanisms of chPrPC in the formation and development of MD tumors. PMID:26243599

  3. Cellular proliferation in the skin of X-rayed newt limbs (with a note on x-ray-induced limb regression)

    SciTech Connect

    Wertz, R.L.

    1982-07-01

    Left hind limbs, including the pelvis, of adult newts (Notophthalmus viridescens) were locally irradiated with a dose of x-rays that inhibited regeneration (2,000 R). This x-ray dose and other doses (700-2,000 R) capable of inhibiting limb regeneration also cause limb regression prior to amputation. Before limb regression occurred, there was a latent period of 3 to 6 weeks. Limb regression was characterized by necrotic wasting and resorption of distal elements. The degree of loss was variable and dependent upon dosage. After this further degenerative changes were not noted. Proliferation of epidermal cells was examined 4 days after irradiation prior to limb regression or after x-ray-induced degeneration of the limbs had ended. Proliferative activity in x-rayed limbs was also compared at various stages of contralateral control limb regeneration. Limbs examined after x-ray-induced limb regression had ended showed levels of (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation into DNA comparable to normal epidermis. In contrast, limbs examined 4 days after irradiation had lower levels of DNA synthesis (P much less than 0.01). Amputation of limbs in both groups caused an increase in DNA synthesis (P much less than 0.01). Histological examination showed that cellular proliferation was associated primarily with the epidermis. These results indicate that epidermal cell proliferation was not resistant to x-rays. However, levels of normal cell division were observed after amputation of after cessation of x-ray-induced limb regression.

  4. ERK2 protein regulates the proliferation of human mesenchymal stem cells without affecting their mobilization and differentiation potential

    SciTech Connect

    Carcamo-Orive, Ivan; Tejados, Naiara; Delgado, Jesus; Gaztelumendi, Ainhoa; Otaegui, David; Lang, Valerie; Trigueros, Cesar

    2008-05-01

    Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hMSC), derived mainly from adult bone marrow, are valuable models for the study of processes involved in stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. As the Extracellular signal-Regulated Kinase (ERK) signalling pathway is a major contributor to cellular growth, differentiation and survival, we have studied the functions of this kinase in hMSC activity. Ablation of ERK2 gene expression (but not ERK1) by RNA interference significantly reduced proliferation of hMSC. This reduction was due to a defect in Cyclin D1 expression and subsequent arrest in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. hMSC growth is enhanced through culture medium supplementation with growth factors (GFs) such as Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF), basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) or Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF). However, these supplements could not rescue the defect observed after ERK2 knockdown, suggesting a common signalling pathway used by these GFs for proliferation. In contrast, ERK1/2 may be dissociated from chemotactic signalling induced by the same GFs. Additionally, hMSCs were capable of differentiating into adipocytes even in the absence of either ERK1 or ERK2 proteins. Our data show that hMSCs do not require cell division to enter the adipogenic differentiation process, indicating that clonal amplification of these cells is not a critical step. However, cell-cell contact seems to be an essential requirement to be able to differentiate into mature adipocytes.

  5. Dietary fiber and short-chain fatty acids affect cell proliferation and protein synthesis in isolated rat colonocytes.

    PubMed

    Marsman, K E; McBurney, M I

    1996-05-01

    Colonic metabolism may be affected by dietary fiber and short-chain fatty acids, the products of fiber fermentation. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of fiber supplementation (150 g/kg diet) on dynamic measurements of metabolism in isolated rat colonic epithelial cells. Additionally, we investigated the effect of in vitro short-chain fatty acid and glutamine concentrations and media osmolarity on oxygen uptake, protein synthesis, cell proliferation and anaplerotic flux. Colonocyte oxygen consumption did not differ due to fiber supplementation or the inclusion of short -chain fatty acids in incubation media. Cell proliferation (3H-thymidine uptake) was increased by fiber consumption (P proliferation, the unchanged oxygen uptake rate indicates that there was no concurrent increase in energy expenditure. PMID:8618140

  6. Interleukin 22 early affects keratinocyte differentiation, but not proliferation, in a three-dimensional model of normal human skin.

    PubMed

    Donetti, Elena; Cornaghi, Laura; Arnaboldi, Francesca; Landoni, Federica; Romagnoli, Paolo; Mastroianni, Nicolino; Pescitelli, Leonardo; Baruffaldi Preis, Franz W; Prignano, Francesca

    2016-07-15

    Interleukin (IL)-22 is a pro-inflammatory cytokine driving the progression of the psoriatic lesion with other cytokines, as Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-alpha and IL-17. Our study was aimed at evaluating the early effect of IL-22 alone or in combination with TNF-alpha and IL-17 by immunofluorescence on i) keratinocyte (KC) proliferation, ii) terminal differentiation biomarkers as keratin (K) 10 and 17 expression, iii) intercellular junctions. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis was performed. A model of human skin culture reproducing a psoriatic microenvironment was used. Plastic surgery explants were obtained from healthy young women (n=7) after informed consent. Fragments were divided before adding IL-22 or a combination of the three cytokines, and harvested 24 (T24), 48 (T48), and 72 (T72)h later. From T24, in IL-22 samples we detected a progressive decrease in K10 immunostaining in the spinous layer paralleled by K17 induction. By TEM, after IL-22 incubation, keratin aggregates were evident in the perinuclear area. Occludin immunostaining was not homogeneously distributed. Conversely, KC proliferation was not inhibited by IL-22 alone, but only by the combination of cytokines. Our results suggest that IL-22 affects keratinocyte terminal differentiation, whereas, in order to induce a proliferation impairment, a more complex psoriatic-like microenvironment is needed. PMID:27207586

  7. In vivo genetic ablation of the periotic mesoderm affects cell proliferation survival and differentiation in the cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huansheng; Chen, Li; Baldini, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Tbx1 is required for ear development in humans and mice. Gene manipulation in the mouse has discovered multiple consequences of loss of function on early development of the inner ear, some of which are attributable to a cell autonomous role in maintaining cell proliferation of epithelial progenitors of the cochlear and vestibular apparata. However, ablation of the mesodermal domain of the gene also results in severe but more restricted abnormalities. Here we show that Tbx1 has a dynamic expression during late development of the ear, in particular, is expressed in the sensory epithelium of the vestibular organs but not of the cochlea. Vice versa, it is expressed in the condensed mesenchyme that surrounds the cochlea but not in the one that surrounds the vestibule. Loss of Tbx1 in the mesoderm disrupts this peri-cochlear capsule by strongly reducing the proliferation of mesenchymal cells. The organogenesis of the cochlea, which normally occurs inside the capsule, was dramatically affected in terms of growth of the organ, as well as proliferation, differentiation and survival of its epithelial cells. This model provides a striking demonstration of the essential role played by the periotic mesenchyme in the organogenesis of the cochlea. PMID:17825816

  8. Biofouling of inlet pipes affects water quality in running seawater aquaria and compromises sponge cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Brittany E; Mueller, Benjamin; Vermeij, Mark J A; van der Geest, Harm H G; de Goeij, Jasper M

    2015-01-01

    Marine organism are often kept, cultured, and experimented on in running seawater aquaria. However, surprisingly little attention is given to the nutrient composition of the water flowing through these systems, which is generally assumed to equal in situ conditions, but may change due to the presence of biofouling organisms. Significantly lower bacterial abundances and higher inorganic nitrogen species (nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium) were measured in aquarium water when biofouling organisms were present within a 7-year old inlet pipe feeding a tropical reef running seawater aquaria system, compared with aquarium water fed by a new, biofouling-free inlet pipe. These water quality changes are indicative of the feeding activity and waste production of the suspension- and filter-feeding communities found in the old pipe, which included sponges, bivalves, barnacles, and ascidians. To illustrate the physiological consequences of these water quality changes on a model organism kept in the aquaria system, we investigated the influence of the presence and absence of the biofouling community on the functioning of the filter-feeding sponge Halisarca caerulea, by determining its choanocyte (filter cell) proliferation rates. We found a 34% increase in choanocyte proliferation rates following the replacement of the inlet pipe (i.e., removal of the biofouling community). This indicates that the physiological functioning of the sponge was compromised due to suboptimal food conditions within the aquarium resulting from the presence of the biofouling organisms in the inlet pipe. This study has implications for the husbandry and performance of experiments with marine organisms in running seawater aquaria systems. Inlet pipes should be checked regularly, and replaced if necessary, in order to avoid excessive biofouling and to approach in situ water quality. PMID:26664799

  9. Biofouling of inlet pipes affects water quality in running seawater aquaria and compromises sponge cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Benjamin; Vermeij, Mark J.A.; van der Geest, Harm H.G.

    2015-01-01

    Marine organism are often kept, cultured, and experimented on in running seawater aquaria. However, surprisingly little attention is given to the nutrient composition of the water flowing through these systems, which is generally assumed to equal in situ conditions, but may change due to the presence of biofouling organisms. Significantly lower bacterial abundances and higher inorganic nitrogen species (nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium) were measured in aquarium water when biofouling organisms were present within a 7-year old inlet pipe feeding a tropical reef running seawater aquaria system, compared with aquarium water fed by a new, biofouling-free inlet pipe. These water quality changes are indicative of the feeding activity and waste production of the suspension- and filter-feeding communities found in the old pipe, which included sponges, bivalves, barnacles, and ascidians. To illustrate the physiological consequences of these water quality changes on a model organism kept in the aquaria system, we investigated the influence of the presence and absence of the biofouling community on the functioning of the filter-feeding sponge Halisarca caerulea, by determining its choanocyte (filter cell) proliferation rates. We found a 34% increase in choanocyte proliferation rates following the replacement of the inlet pipe (i.e., removal of the biofouling community). This indicates that the physiological functioning of the sponge was compromised due to suboptimal food conditions within the aquarium resulting from the presence of the biofouling organisms in the inlet pipe. This study has implications for the husbandry and performance of experiments with marine organisms in running seawater aquaria systems. Inlet pipes should be checked regularly, and replaced if necessary, in order to avoid excessive biofouling and to approach in situ water quality. PMID:26664799

  10. Molecular and cellular targets affected by green tea extracts in vascular cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of green or black tea has been associated with a lower risk for the development of cardiovascular diseases, but despite many studies, a firm connection has not been delineated. Several molecular and cellular mechanisms may play a role in the preventive activity of tea. As reviewed here, ...

  11. Distinct effects of β1 integrin on cell proliferation and cellular signaling in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Sicong; Isaji, Tomoya; Hang, Qinglei; Im, Sanghun; Fukuda, Tomohiko; Gu, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    An aberrant expression of integrin β1 has been implicated in breast cancer progression. Here, we compared the cell behaviors of wild-type (WT), β1 gene deleted (KO), and β1 gene restored (Res) MDA-MB-231 cells. Surprisingly, the expression of β1 exhibited opposite effects on cell proliferation. These effects were dependent on cell densities, and they showed an up-regulation of cell proliferation when cells were cultured under sparse conditions, and a down-regulation of cell growth under dense conditions. By comparison with WT cells, the phosphorylation levels of ERK in KO cells were consistently suppressed under sparse culture conditions, but consistently up-regulated under dense culture conditions. The phosphorylation levels of EGFR were increased in the KO cells. By contrast, the phosphorylation levels of AKT were decreased in the KO cells. The abilities for both colony and tumor formation were significantly suppressed in the KO cells, suggesting that β1 plays an important role in cell survival signaling for tumorigenesis. These aberrant phenotypes in the KO cells were rescued in the Res cells. Taken together, these results clearly showed the distinct roles of β1 in cancer cells: the inhibition of cell growth and the promotion of cell survival, which may shed light on cancer therapies. PMID:26728650

  12. Caffeic Acid Inhibits Chronic UVB-Induced Cellular Proliferation Through JAK-STAT3 Signaling in Mouse Skin.

    PubMed

    Agilan, Balupillai; Rajendra Prasad, N; Kanimozhi, Govindasamy; Karthikeyan, Ramasamy; Ganesan, Muthusamy; Mohana, Shanmugam; Velmurugan, Devadasan; Ananthakrishnan, Dhanapalan

    2016-05-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) play a critical role in inflammation, proliferation and carcinogenesis. Inhibition of JAK-STAT3 signaling is proved to be a novel target for prevention of UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis. In this study, chronic UVB irradiation (180 mJ cm(-2) ; weekly thrice for 30 weeks) induces the expression of IL-10 and JAK1 that eventually activates the STAT3 which leads to the transcription of proliferative and antiapoptotic markers such as PCNA, Cyclin-D1, Bcl2 and Bcl-xl, respectively. Caffeic acid (CA) inhibits JAK-STAT3 signaling, thereby induces apoptotic cell death by upregulating Bax, Cytochrome-C, Caspase-9 and Caspase-3 expression in mouse skin. Furthermore, TSP-1 is an antiangiogeneic protein, which is involved in the inhibition of angiogenesis and proliferation. Chronic UVB exposure decreased the expression of TSP-1 and pretreatment with CA prevented the UVB-induced loss of TSP-1 in UVB-irradiated mouse skin. Thus, CA offers protection against UVB-induced photocarcinogenesis probably through modulating the JAK-STAT3 in the mouse skin. PMID:27029485

  13. MicroRNA-203 inhibits cellular proliferation and invasion by targeting Bmi1 in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, TENGFEI; XU, CHUN; CHEN, JUN; DING, CHENG; XU, ZHENLEI; LI, CHANG; ZHAO, JUN

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are proposed to serve vital functions in the regulation of tumor progression and invasion. However, the expression levels of miR-203 in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and its clinical significance remain unknown. In the present study, the association between B-cell-specific moloney murine leukemia virus insertion site 1 (Bmi1) and miR-203 was investigated. miR-203 was demonstrated to act as a tumor suppressor by regulating the expression of Bmi1. miR-203 expression levels were downregulated in NSCLC tissues while Bmi1 expression was upregulated in NSCLC tissues and cell lines. Furthermore, downregulated Bmi1 or enhanced miR-203 expression inhibited NSCLC cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. In addition, a dual-luciferase reporter assay was performed, which identified Bmi1 as a novel target of miR-203. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that miR-203 functions as a tumor suppressor and is important in inhibiting the proliferation of NSCLC cells through targeting Bmi1. These findings indicate that miR-203 may be useful as a novel potential therapeutic target for NSCLC. PMID:26137120

  14. Long non-coding RNA CCAT2 functions as an oncogene in hepatocellular carcinoma, regulating cellular proliferation, migration and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, NING; SI, ZHONGZHOU; LI, TING; CHEN, GUANGSHUN; ZHANG, ZHONGQIANG; QI, HAIZHI

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that the dysregulation of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) may serve an important role in tumor progression. Previous studies have reported that the lncRNA, colon cancer associated transcript 2 (CCAT2), was highly expressed in various tumors. However, the function of CCAT2 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has not yet been elucidated. The aim of the present study was to identify novel oncogene lncRNAs and investigate their physiological function and mechanism in HCC. Using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, it was observed that CCAT2 was upregulated in HCC tissues and human HCC cell lines. Furthermore, the impacts of CCAT2 on cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis were analyzed using cell migration, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis respectively. The overexpression of CCAT2 using a synthesized vector significantly promoted cell migration and proliferation, and inhibited apoptosis of HCC cells in vitro. The suppression of CCAT2 expression resulted in opposing effects. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that CCAT2 functions as a oncogene in HCC. Further investigation is required to clarify the molecular mechanisms of this lncRNA in HCC development.

  15. Study on connexin gene and protein expression and cellular distribution in relation to real-time proliferation of porcine granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Kempisty, B; Ziółkowska, A; Ciesiółka, S; Piotrowska, H; Antosik, P; Bukowska, D; Nowicki, M; Brüssow, K P; Zabel, M

    2014-01-01

    Granulosa cells (GCs) play an important role during follicle growth and development in preovulatory stage. Moreover, the proteins such as connexins are responsible for formation of protein channel between follicular-cumulus cells and oocyte. This study was aimed to investigate the role of connexin expression in porcine GCs in relation to their cellular distribution and real-time cell proliferation. In the present study, porcine GCs were isolated from the follicles of puberal gilts and then cultured in a real-time cellular analyzer (RTCA) system for 168 h. The expression levels of connexins (Cxs) Cx36, Cx37, Cx40 and Cx43 mRNA were measured by RQ-PCR analysis, and differences in the expression and distribution of Cx30, Cx31, Cx37, Cx43 and Cx45 proteins were analyzed by confocal microscopic visualization. We found higher level of Cx36, Cx37, and Cx43 mRNA expression in GCs at recovery (at 0 h of in vitro culture, IVC) compared to all analyzed time periods of IVC (24, 48, 72, 96, 120, 144 and 168 h; P<0.001). On the other hand, the expression level of Cx40 transcripts was higher after 24 h of IVC compared to 0 h and the other times of IVC (P<0.001). Similarly to mRNAs, the expression levels of Cx31, Cx37 and Cx45 proteins were higher before (0 h) compared to after 168 h of IVC. The expression of Cx30 and Cx43, however, did not vary between the groups. In all, the proteins were distributed throughout the cell membrane rather than in the cytoplasm both before and after IVC. After 24 h of IVC, we observed a significant increase in the proliferation of GCs (log phase). We found differences in the proliferation index between 72-96 and 96- 140 h within the same population of GCs. In conclusion, the decrease in the expression of Cx mRNAs and proteins following IVC could be associated with a breakdown in gap-junction connections (GJCs), and leads to the decreased of their activity, which may be a reason of non-functional existence of connexon in follicular granulosa cells

  16. Sensitivity to methylmercury toxicity is enhanced in oxoguanine glycosylase 1 knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts and is dependent on cellular proliferation capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Ondovcik, Stephanie L.; Tamblyn, Laura; McPherson, John Peter; Wells, Peter G.

    2013-07-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a persistent environmental contaminant with potent neurotoxic action for which the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be conclusively delineated. Our objectives herein were twofold: first, to corroborate our previous findings of an increased sensitivity of spontaneously-immortalized oxoguanine glycosylase 1-null (Ogg1{sup −/−}) murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to MeHg through generation of Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen-immortalized wild-type and Ogg1{sup −/−} MEFs; and second, to determine whether MeHg toxicity is proliferation-dependent. As with the spontaneously-immortalized cells used previously, the SV40 large T antigen-immortalized cells exhibited similar tendencies to undergo MeHg-initiated cell cycle arrest, with increased sensitivity in the Ogg1{sup −/−} MEFs as measured by clonogenic survival and DNA damage. Compared to exponentially growing cells, those seeded at a higher density exhibited compromised proliferation, which proved protective against MeHg-mediated cell cycle arrest and induction of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), measured by phosphorylation of the core histone H2A variant (H2AX) on serine 139 (γH2AX), and by its functional confirmation by micronucleus assessment. This enhanced sensitivity of Ogg1{sup −/−} MEFs to MeHg toxicity using discrete SV40 immortalization corroborates our previous studies, and suggests a novel role for OGG1 in minimizing MeHg-initiated DNA lesions that trigger replication-associated DSBs. Furthermore, proliferative capacity may determine MeHg toxicity in vivo and in utero. Accordingly, variations in cellular proliferative capacity and interindividual variability in repair activity may modulate the risk of toxicological consequences following MeHg exposure. - Highlights: • SV40 large T antigen-immortalized Ogg1{sup −/−} cells are more sensitive to MeHg. • Sensitivity to MeHg is dependent on cellular proliferation capacity. • OGG1 maintains genomic

  17. Acetyl-keto-beta-boswellic acid inhibits cellular proliferation through a p21-dependent pathway in colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Jun; Huang, Baohua; Hooi, Shing Chuan

    2006-08-01

    1. Although there is increasing evidence showing that boswellic acid might be a potential anticancer agent, the mechanisms involved in its action are unclear. 2. In the present study, we showed that acetyl-keto-beta-boswellic acid (AKBA) inhibited cellular growth in several colon cancer cell lines. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry showed that cells were arrested at the G1 phase after AKBA treatment. 3. Further analysis showed that cyclin D1 and E, CDK 2 and 4 and phosphorylated Rb were decreased in AKBA-treated cells while p21 expression was increased. 4. The growth inhibitory effect of AKBA was dependent on p21 but not p53. HCT-116 p53(-/-) cells were sensitized to the apoptotic effect of AKBA, suggesting that p21 may have protected cells against apoptosis by inducing a G1 arrest.5. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that AKBA inhibited cellular growth in colon cancer cells. These findings may have implications to the use of boswellic acids as potential anticancer agents in colon cancer. PMID:16783403

  18. Imaging of cellular proliferation in liver metastasis by [18F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography: effect of therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contractor, Kaiyumars; Challapalli, Amarnath; Tomasi, Giampaolo; Rosso, Lula; Wasan, Harpreet; Stebbing, Justin; Kenny, Laura; Mangar, Stephen; Riddle, Pippa; Palmieri, Carlo; Al-Nahhas, Adil; Sharma, Rohini; Turkheimer, Federico; Coombes, R. Charles; Aboagye, Eric

    2012-06-01

    Although [18F]fluorothymidine positron emission tomography (FLT-PET) permits estimation of tumor thymidine kinase-1 expression, and thus, cell proliferation, high physiological uptake of tracer in liver tissue can limit its utility. We evaluated FLT-PET combined with a temporal-intensity information-based voxel-clustering approach termed kinetic spatial filtering (FLT-PETKSF) for detecting drug response in liver metastases. FLT-PET and computed tomography data were collected from patients with confirmed breast or colorectal liver metastases before, and two weeks after the first cycle of chemotherapy. Changes in tumor FLT-PET and FLT-PETKSF variables were determined. Visual distinction between tumor and normal liver was seen in FLT-PETKSF images. Of the 33 metastases from 20 patients studied, 26 were visible after kinetic filtering. The net irreversible retention of the tracer (Ki; from unfiltered data) in the tumor, correlated strongly with tracer uptake when the imaging variable was an unfiltered average or maximal standardized uptake value, 60 min post-injection (SUV60,av: r = 0.9, SUV60,max: r = 0.7; p < 0.0001 for both) and occurrence of high intensity voxels derived from FLT-PETKSF (r = 0.7, p < 0.0001). Overall, a significant reduction in the imaging variables was seen in responders compared to non-responders; however, the two week time point selected for imaging was too early to allow prediction of long term clinical benefit from chemotherapy. FLT-PET and FLT-PETKSF detected changes in proliferation in liver metastases.

  19. Different Culture Media Affect Proliferation, Surface Epitope Expression, and Differentiation of Ovine MSC.

    PubMed

    Adamzyk, Carina; Emonds, Tanja; Falkenstein, Julia; Tolba, René; Jahnen-Dechent, Wilhelm; Lethaus, Bernd; Neuss, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Orthopedic implants including engineered bone tissue are commonly tested in sheep. To avoid rejection of heterologous or xenogeneic cells, autologous cells are preferably used, that is, ovine mesenchymal stem cells (oMSC). Unlike human MSC, ovine MSC are not well studied regarding isolation, expansion, and characterization. Here we investigated the impact of culture media composition on growth characteristics, differentiation, and surface antigen expression of oMSC. The culture media varied in fetal calf serum (FCS) content and in the addition of supplements and/or additional epidermal growth factor (EGF). We found that FCS strongly influenced oMSC proliferation and that specific combinations of supplemental factors (MCDB-201, ITS-plus, dexamethasone, and L-ascorbic acid) determined the expression of surface epitopes. We compared two published protocols for oMSC differentiation towards the osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic fate and found (i) considerable donor to donor variations, (ii) protocol-dependent variations, and (iii) variations resulting from the preculture medium composition. Our results indicate that the isolation and culture of oMSC in different growth media are highly variable regarding oMSC phenotype and behaviour. Furthermore, variations from donor to donor critically influence growth rate, surface marker expression, and differentiation. PMID:24228035

  20. Irradiation affects cellular properties and Eph receptor expression in human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Mosch, Birgit; Pietzsch, Doreen; Pietzsch, Jens

    2012-01-01

    X-ray irradiation influences metastatic properties of tumor cells and, moreover, metastasis and cellular motility can be modified by members of the Eph receptor/ephrin family of receptor tyrosine kinases. We hypothesized that irradiation-induced changes in cellular properties relevant for metastasis in melanoma cells could be mediated by Eph receptor/ephrin signaling. In this pilot study, we analyzed one pre-metastatic (Mel-Juso) and three metastatic human melanoma (Mel-Juso-L3, A375, and A2058) cells lines and predominantly found anti-metastatic effects of X-ray irradiation with impaired cell growth, clonal growth and motility. Additionally, we observed an irradiation-induced increase in adhesion paralleled by a decrease in migration in Mel-Juso and Mel-Juso-L3 cells and, in part, also in A375 cells. We further demonstrate a decrease of EphA2 both in expression and activity at 7 d after irradiation paralleled by an upregulation of EphA3. Analyzing downstream signaling after irradiation, we detected decreased Src kinase phosphorylation, but unchanged focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation, indicating, in part, irradiation-induced downregulation of signaling via the EphA2-Src-FAK axis in melanoma cells. However, to which extent this finding contributes to the modification of metastasis-relevant cellular properties remains to be elucidated. PMID:22568947

  1. Characterization of a cellular inhibitory activity affecting the human autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Haynes, M.K.

    1987-01-01

    The human autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction, peripheral blood T cells are stimulated to proliferate when co-cultured with irradiated, autologous, non-T cells was studied. ({sup 3}H)-thymidine uptake was maximal on day 7 and observable on day 9. Non-adherent and adherent fractions of non-T population and lectin-activated T cell blasts contributed. Unseparated non-T stimulator cells were used. Autologous T cells, when added as irradiated third party cells, reduced AMLR proliferative responses. Depletion of Fc IgG receptor-bearing cells (T{gamma}) from T cell population by (a) IgG-sensitized ox erythrocyte rosetting (EA-rosettes) or (b) adsorption of the T{gamma} cells onto a Sepharose 6MB {approximately} BSA/anti-BSA immune complex column resulted in enhanced AMLR proliferation not attributed solely to an increase in CD8+ AMLR responder cell phenotype. Isolated T{gamma} populations exhibited a reversed helper/suppressor phenotype containing HLA DR+ and CD8+ cells. Dual labeling studies demonstrated 7-24% of CD8+ cells expressed DR antigens. After separation, AMLR proliferative capacity was localized in T-depleted population.

  2. The conflict between cell proliferation and expansion primarily affects stem organogenesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Saori; Gunji, Shizuka; Hanai, Kenya; Hirano, Tomonari; Kazama, Yusuke; Ohbayashi, Iwai; Abe, Tomoko; Sawa, Shinichiro; Tsukaya, Hirokazu; Ferjani, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Plant shoot organs such as stems, leaves and flowers are derived from specialized groups of stem cells organized at the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Organogenesis involves two major processes, namely cell proliferation and differentiation, whereby the former contributes to increasing the cell number and the latter involves substantial increases in cell volume through cell expansion. Co-ordination between the above processes in time and space is essential for proper organogenesis. To identify regulatory factors involved in proper organogenesis, heavy-ion beam-irradiated de-etiolated (det) 3-1 seeds have been used to identify striking phenotypes in the A#26-2; det3-1 mutant. In addition to the stunted plant stature mimicking det3-1, the A#26-2; det3-1 mutant exhibited stem thickening, increased floral organ number and a fruit shape reminiscent of clavata (clv) mutants. DNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that A#26-2; det3-1 harbors a mutation in the CLV3 gene. Importantly, A#26-2; det3-1 displayed cracks that randomly occurred on the main stem with a frequency of approximately 50%. Furthermore, the double mutants clv3-8 det3-1, clv1-4 det3-1 and clv2-1 det3-1 consistently showed stem cracks with frequencies of approximately 97, 38 and 35%, respectively. Cross-sections of stems further revealed an increase in vascular bundle number, cell number and size in the pith of clv3-8 det3-1 compared with det3-1. These findings suggest that the stem inner volume increase due to clv mutations exerts an outward mechanical stress; that in a det3-1 background (defective in cell expansion) resulted in cracking of the outermost layer of epidermal cells. PMID:25246492

  3. Short-term administration of rhGH increases markers of cellular proliferation but not milk protein gene expression in normal lactating women

    PubMed Central

    Maningat, Patricia D.; Sen, Partha; Rijnkels, Monique; Hadsell, Darryl L.; Bray, Molly S.

    2011-01-01

    Growth hormone is one of few pharmacologic agents known to augment milk production in humans. We hypothesized that recombinant human GH (rhGH) increases the expression of cell proliferation and milk protein synthesis genes. Sequential milk and blood samples collected over four days were obtained from five normal lactating women. Following 24 h of baseline milk and blood sampling, rhGH (0.1 mg/kg/day) was administered subcutaneously once daily for 3 days. Gene expression changes were determined by microarray studies utilizing milk fat globule RNA isolated from each milk sample. Following rhGH administration, DNA synthesis and cell cycle genes were induced, while no significant changes were observed in the expression of milk synthesis genes. Expression of glycolysis and citric acid cycle genes were increased by day 4 compared with day 1, while lipid synthesis genes displayed a circadian-like pattern. Cell cycle gene upregulation occurred after a lag of ∼2 days, likely explaining the failure to increase milk production after only 3 days of rhGH treatment. We conclude that rhGH induces expression of cellular proliferation and metabolism genes but does not induce milk protein gene expression, as potential mechanisms for increasing milk production and could account for the known effect of rhGH to increase milk production following 7–10 days. PMID:21205870

  4. Short-term administration of rhGH increases markers of cellular proliferation but not milk protein gene expression in normal lactating women.

    PubMed

    Maningat, Patricia D; Sen, Partha; Rijnkels, Monique; Hadsell, Darryl L; Bray, Molly S; Haymond, Morey W

    2011-04-27

    Growth hormone is one of few pharmacologic agents known to augment milk production in humans. We hypothesized that recombinant human GH (rhGH) increases the expression of cell proliferation and milk protein synthesis genes. Sequential milk and blood samples collected over four days were obtained from five normal lactating women. Following 24 h of baseline milk and blood sampling, rhGH (0.1 mg/kg/day) was administered subcutaneously once daily for 3 days. Gene expression changes were determined by microarray studies utilizing milk fat globule RNA isolated from each milk sample. Following rhGH administration, DNA synthesis and cell cycle genes were induced, while no significant changes were observed in the expression of milk synthesis genes. Expression of glycolysis and citric acid cycle genes were increased by day 4 compared with day 1, while lipid synthesis genes displayed a circadian-like pattern. Cell cycle gene upregulation occurred after a lag of ∼2 days, likely explaining the failure to increase milk production after only 3 days of rhGH treatment. We conclude that rhGH induces expression of cellular proliferation and metabolism genes but does not induce milk protein gene expression, as potential mechanisms for increasing milk production and could account for the known effect of rhGH to increase milk production following 7-10 days. PMID:21205870

  5. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Interacts with the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Delta to Induce Genes Affecting Fatty Acid Oxidation in Human Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kemmerer, Marina; Finkernagel, Florian; Cavalcante, Marcela Frota; Abdalla, Dulcineia Saes Parra; Müller, Rolf; Brüne, Bernhard; Namgaladze, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) maintains energy homeostasis by suppressing cellular ATP-consuming processes and activating catabolic, ATP-producing pathways such as fatty acid oxidation (FAO). The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) also affects fatty acid metabolism, stimulating the expression of genes involved in FAO. To question the interplay of AMPK and PPARδ in human macrophages we transduced primary human macrophages with lentiviral particles encoding for the constitutively active AMPKα1 catalytic subunit, followed by microarray expression analysis after treatment with the PPARδ agonist GW501516. Microarray analysis showed that co-activation of AMPK and PPARδ increased expression of FAO genes, which were validated by quantitative PCR. Induction of these FAO-associated genes was also observed upon infecting macrophages with an adenovirus coding for AMPKγ1 regulatory subunit carrying an activating R70Q mutation. The pharmacological AMPK activator A-769662 increased expression of several FAO genes in a PPARδ- and AMPK-dependent manner. Although GW501516 significantly increased FAO and reduced the triglyceride amount in very low density lipoproteins (VLDL)-loaded foam cells, AMPK activation failed to potentiate this effect, suggesting that increased expression of fatty acid catabolic genes alone may be not sufficient to prevent macrophage lipid overload. PMID:26098914

  6. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Interacts with the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Delta to Induce Genes Affecting Fatty Acid Oxidation in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Kemmerer, Marina; Finkernagel, Florian; Cavalcante, Marcela Frota; Abdalla, Dulcineia Saes Parra; Müller, Rolf; Brüne, Bernhard; Namgaladze, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) maintains energy homeostasis by suppressing cellular ATP-consuming processes and activating catabolic, ATP-producing pathways such as fatty acid oxidation (FAO). The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) also affects fatty acid metabolism, stimulating the expression of genes involved in FAO. To question the interplay of AMPK and PPARδ in human macrophages we transduced primary human macrophages with lentiviral particles encoding for the constitutively active AMPKα1 catalytic subunit, followed by microarray expression analysis after treatment with the PPARδ agonist GW501516. Microarray analysis showed that co-activation of AMPK and PPARδ increased expression of FAO genes, which were validated by quantitative PCR. Induction of these FAO-associated genes was also observed upon infecting macrophages with an adenovirus coding for AMPKγ1 regulatory subunit carrying an activating R70Q mutation. The pharmacological AMPK activator A-769662 increased expression of several FAO genes in a PPARδ- and AMPK-dependent manner. Although GW501516 significantly increased FAO and reduced the triglyceride amount in very low density lipoproteins (VLDL)-loaded foam cells, AMPK activation failed to potentiate this effect, suggesting that increased expression of fatty acid catabolic genes alone may be not sufficient to prevent macrophage lipid overload. PMID:26098914

  7. Expression of mRNAs encoding mammalian chromosomal proteins HMG-I and HMG-Y during cellular proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.R.; Disney, J.E.; Wyatt, C.R.; Reeves, R. )

    1990-03-01

    The high mobility group chromosomal proteins HMG-I and HMG-Y are closely related isoforms that are expressed at high levels in rapidly dividing, undifferentiated mammalian cells. The authors analyzed HMG-I/Y mRNA levels at various cell cycle stages in murine NIH/3T3 fibroblasts partially synchronized by seeding from quiescent, contact-inhibited cultures. Flow microfluorometric analysis of DNA content demonstrated a comparable degree of synchronization in such seeded NIH 3T3 cell populations as is obtained by serum deprivation or other means and has the added advantage of avoiding the use of possibly detrimental inhibitors or metabolic starvation to induce such synchrony. They show that HMG-I/Y mRNA levels gradually increase in NIH/3T3 cells during the first 16 hours after seeding (G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} to late S phase), but thereafter remain constant, in contrast to the cell cycle-regulated expression of the histone H3 gene. The HMG-I/Y mRNAs appear to be very stable; there was no decrease in their levels 6 hours after actinomycin D transcription termination. The proportion of HMG-I to HMG-Y mRNAs was greater in the human than in the murine cells examined, appeared to be greater in proliferating than in quiescent cells, and did not always correspond with the HMG-I to HMG-Y protein ratio.

  8. Slight temperature changes affect protein affinity and cellular uptake/toxicity of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Morteza; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A.; Behzadi, Shahed

    2013-03-01

    It is known that what the cell actually ``sees'' at the nanoscale is an outer shell formed of `protein corona' on the surface of nanoparticles (NPs). The amount and composition of various proteins on the corona are strongly dependent on the biophysicochemical properties of NPs, which have been extensively studied. However, the effect of a small variation in temperature, due to the human circadian rhythm, on the composition of the protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs, was ignored. Here, the effect of temperature on the composition of protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs and, subsequently, cell responses to the protein coated NPs are probed. The results confirmed that cellular entrance, dispersion, and toxicity of NPs are strongly diverse with slight body temperature changes. This new finding can help scientists to maximise NP entrance to specific cells/organs with lower toxicity by adjusting the cellular/organ temperature.It is known that what the cell actually ``sees'' at the nanoscale is an outer shell formed of `protein corona' on the surface of nanoparticles (NPs). The amount and composition of various proteins on the corona are strongly dependent on the biophysicochemical properties of NPs, which have been extensively studied. However, the effect of a small variation in temperature, due to the human circadian rhythm, on the composition of the protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs, was ignored. Here, the effect of temperature on the composition of protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs and, subsequently, cell responses to the protein coated NPs are probed. The results confirmed that cellular entrance, dispersion, and toxicity of NPs are strongly diverse with slight body temperature changes. This new finding can help scientists to maximise NP entrance to specific cells/organs with lower toxicity by adjusting the cellular

  9. Intermittent hypoxia leads to functional reorganization of mitochondria and affects cellular bioenergetics in marine molluscs.

    PubMed

    Ivanina, Anna V; Nesmelova, Irina; Leamy, Larry; Sokolov, Eugene P; Sokolova, Inna M

    2016-06-01

    Fluctuations in oxygen (O2) concentrations represent a major challenge to aerobic organisms and can be extremely damaging to their mitochondria. Marine intertidal molluscs are well-adapted to frequent O2 fluctuations, yet it remains unknown how their mitochondrial functions are regulated to sustain energy metabolism and prevent cellular damage during hypoxia and reoxygenation (H/R). We used metabolic control analysis to investigate the mechanisms of mitochondrial responses to H/R stress (18 h at <0.1% O2 followed by 1 h of reoxygenation) using hypoxia-tolerant intertidal clams Mercenaria mercenaria and hypoxia-sensitive subtidal scallops Argopecten irradians as models. We also assessed H/R-induced changes in cellular energy balance, oxidative damage and unfolded protein response to determine the potential links between mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular injury. Mitochondrial responses to H/R in scallops strongly resembled those in other hypoxia-sensitive organisms. Exposure to hypoxia followed by reoxygenation led to a strong decrease in the substrate oxidation (SOX) and phosphorylation (PHOS) capacities as well as partial depolarization of mitochondria of scallops. Elevated mRNA expression of a reactive oxygen species-sensitive enzyme aconitase and Lon protease (responsible for degradation of oxidized mitochondrial proteins) during H/R stress was consistent with elevated levels of oxidative stress in mitochondria of scallops. In hypoxia-tolerant clams, mitochondrial SOX capacity was enhanced during hypoxia and continued rising during the first hour of reoxygenation. In both species, the mitochondrial PHOS capacity was suppressed during hypoxia, likely to prevent ATP wastage by the reverse action of FO,F1-ATPase. The PHOS capacity recovered after 1 h of reoxygenation in clams but not in scallops. Compared with scallops, clams showed a greater suppression of energy-consuming processes (such as protein turnover and ion transport) during hypoxia, indicated

  10. Accumulated SET protein up-regulates and interacts with hnRNPK, increasing its binding to nucleic acids, the Bcl-xS repression, and cellular proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Almeida, Luciana O.; Garcia, Cristiana B.; Matos-Silva, Flavia A.; Curti, Carlos; Leopoldino, Andréia M.

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • hnRNPK is a new target of SET. • SET regulates hnRNPK. • SET and hnRNPK accumulation promotes tumorigenesis. • SET accumulation is a potential model to study genes regulated by SET-hnRNPK. - Abstract: SET and hnRNPK are proteins involved in gene expression and regulation of cellular signaling. We previously demonstrated that SET accumulates in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC); hnRNPK is a prognostic marker in cancer. Here, we postulate that SET and hnRNPK proteins interact to promote tumorigenesis. We performed studies in HEK293 and HNSCC (HN6, HN12, and HN13) cell lines with SET/hnRNPK overexpression and knockdown, respectively. We found that SET and/or hnRNPK protein accumulation increased cellular proliferation. SET accumulation up-regulated hnRNPK mRNA and total/phosphorylated protein, promoted hnRNPK nuclear location, and reduced Bcl-x mRNA levels. SET protein directly interacted with hnRNPK, increasing both its binding to nucleic acids and Bcl-xS repression. We propose that hnRNPK should be a new target of SET and that SET–hnRNPK interaction, in turn, has potential implications in cell survival and malignant transformation.

  11. A chimera embryo assay reveals a decrease in embryonic cellular proliferation induced by sperm from X-irradiated male mice

    SciTech Connect

    Obasaju, M.F.; Wiley, L.M.; Oudiz, D.J.; Raabe, O.; Overstreet, J.W.

    1989-05-01

    Male mice were divided into three experimental groups and a control group. Mice in the experimental groups received one of three doses of acute X irradiation (1.73, 0.29, and 0.05 Gy) and together with the control unirradiated mice were then mated weekly to unirradiated female mice for a 9-week experimental period. Embryos were recovered from the weekly matings at the four-cell stage and examined by the chimera assay for proliferative disadvantage. Aggregation chimeras were constructed of embryos from female mice mated to irradiated males (experimental embryos) and embryos from females mated to unexposed males (control embryos) and contained either one experimental embryo and one control embryo (heterologous chimera) or two control embryos (control chimera). The control embryo in heterologous chimeras and either embryo in control chimeras were prelabeled with the vital dye fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC), and the chimeras were cultured for 40 h and viewed under phase-contrast and epifluorescence microscopy to obtain total embryo cell number and the cellular contribution from the FITC-labeled embryo. Experimental and control embryos that were cultured singly were also examined for embryo cell number at the end of the 40-h culture period. In control chimeras, the mean ratio of the unlabeled cells:total chimera cell number (henceforth referred to as ''mean ratio'') was 0.50 with little or no weekly variation over the 9-week experimental period. During Weeks 4-7, the mean ratios of heterologous chimeras differed significantly from the mean ratio of control chimeras with the greatest differences occurring during Week 7 (0.41 for chimeras of 0.05 Gy dose group, 0.40 for chimeras of the 0.29 Gy dose group, and 0.17 for chimeras of the 1.73 Gy dose group).

  12. Ocean acidification affects competition for space: projections of community structure using cellular automata.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Sophie J; Allesina, Stefano; Pfister, Catherine A

    2016-03-16

    Historical ecological datasets from a coastal marine community of crustose coralline algae (CCA) enabled the documentation of ecological changes in this community over 30 years in the Northeast Pacific. Data on competitive interactions obtained from field surveys showed concordance between the 1980s and 2013, yet also revealed a reduction in how strongly species interact. Here, we extend these empirical findings with a cellular automaton model to forecast ecological dynamics. Our model suggests the emergence of a new dominant competitor in a global change scenario, with a reduced role of herbivory pressure, or trophic control, in regulating competition among CCA. Ocean acidification, due to its energetic demands, may now instead play this role in mediating competitive interactions and thereby promote species diversity within this guild. PMID:26936244

  13. Fetal radiofrequency radiation exposure from 800-1900 mhz-rated cellular telephones affects neurodevelopment and behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Aldad, Tamir S; Gan, Geliang; Gao, Xiao-Bing; Taylor, Hugh S

    2012-01-01

    Neurobehavioral disorders are increasingly prevalent in children, however their etiology is not well understood. An association between prenatal cellular telephone use and hyperactivity in children has been postulated, yet the direct effects of radiofrequency radiation exposure on neurodevelopment remain unknown. Here we used a mouse model to demonstrate that in-utero radiofrequency exposure from cellular telephones does affect adult behavior. Mice exposed in-utero were hyperactive and had impaired memory as determined using the object recognition, light/dark box and step-down assays. Whole cell patch clamp recordings of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) revealed that these behavioral changes were due to altered neuronal developmental programming. Exposed mice had dose-responsive impaired glutamatergic synaptic transmission onto layer V pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex. We present the first experimental evidence of neuropathology due to in-utero cellular telephone radiation. Further experiments are needed in humans or non-human primates to determine the risk of exposure during pregnancy. PMID:22428084

  14. Protein source and choice of anticoagulant decisively affect nanoparticle protein corona and cellular uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöttler, S.; Klein, Katja; Landfester, K.; Mailänder, V.

    2016-03-01

    Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance of the choice of protein source used for in vitro protein corona analysis is concisely investigated. Major and decisive differences in cellular uptake of a polystyrene nanoparticle incubated in fetal bovine serum, human serum, human citrate and heparin plasma are reported. Furthermore, the protein compositions are determined for coronas formed in the respective incubation media. A strong influence of heparin, which is used as an anticoagulant for plasma generation, on cell interaction is demonstrated. While heparin enhances the uptake into macrophages, it prevents internalization into HeLa cells. Taken together we can give the recommendation that human plasma anticoagulated with citrate seems to give the most relevant results for in vitro studies of nanoparticle uptake.Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance

  15. Protein source and choice of anticoagulant decisively affect nanoparticle protein corona and cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Schöttler, S; Klein, Katja; Landfester, K; Mailänder, V

    2016-03-14

    Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance of the choice of protein source used for in vitro protein corona analysis is concisely investigated. Major and decisive differences in cellular uptake of a polystyrene nanoparticle incubated in fetal bovine serum, human serum, human citrate and heparin plasma are reported. Furthermore, the protein compositions are determined for coronas formed in the respective incubation media. A strong influence of heparin, which is used as an anticoagulant for plasma generation, on cell interaction is demonstrated. While heparin enhances the uptake into macrophages, it prevents internalization into HeLa cells. Taken together we can give the recommendation that human plasma anticoagulated with citrate seems to give the most relevant results for in vitro studies of nanoparticle uptake. PMID:26804616

  16. Altered lysosomal positioning affects lysosomal functions in a cellular model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Erie, Christine; Sacino, Matthew; Houle, Lauren; Lu, Michael L; Wei, Jianning

    2015-08-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary and devastating neurodegenerative disorder caused by a mutation in the huntingtin protein. Understanding the functions of normal and mutant huntingtin protein is the key to revealing the pathogenesis of HD and developing therapeutic targets. Huntingtin plays an important role in vesicular and organelle trafficking. Lysosomes are dynamic organelles that integrate several degradative pathways and regulate the activity of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). In the present study, we found that the perinuclear accumulation of lysosomes was increased in a cellular model of HD derived from HD knock-in mice and primary fibroblasts from an HD patient. This perinuclear lysosomal accumulation could be reversed when normal huntingtin was overexpressed in HD cells. When we further investigated the functional significance of the increased perinuclear lysosomal accumulation in HD cells, we demonstrated that basal mTORC1 activity was increased in HD cells. In addition, autophagic influx was also increased in HD cells in response to serum deprivation, which leads to premature fusion of lysosomes with autophagosomes. Taken together, our data suggest that the increased perinuclear accumulation of lysosomes may play an important role in HD pathogenesis by altering lysosomal-dependent functions. PMID:25997742

  17. Modification of Cellular Cholesterol Content Affects Traction Force, Adhesion and Cell Spreading

    PubMed Central

    Norman, Leann L.; Oetama, Ratna J.; Dembo, Micah; Byfield, F.; Hammer, Daniel A.; Levitan, Irena; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2011-01-01

    Cellular cholesterol is a critical component of the plasma membrane, and plays a key role in determining the physical properties of the lipid bilayer, such as elasticity, viscosity, and permeability. Surprisingly, it has been shown that cholesterol depletion increases cell stiffness, not due to plasma membrane stiffening, but rather, due to the interaction between the actin cytoskeleton and the plasma membrane. This indicates that traction stresses of the acto-myosin complex likely increase during cholesterol depletion. Here we use force traction microscopy to quantify the forces individual cells are exerting on the substrate, and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy as well as interference reflection microscopy to observe cell–substrate adhesion and spreading. We show that single cells depleted of cholesterol produce larger traction forces and have large focal adhesions compared to untreated or cholesterol-enriched cells. Cholesterol depletion also causes a decrease in adhesion area for both single cells and monolayers. Spreading experiments illustrate a decrease in spreading area for cholesterol-depleted cells, and no effect on cholesterol-enriched cells. These results demonstrate that cholesterol plays an important role in controlling and regulating the cell–substrate interactions through the actin–plasma membrane complex, cell–cell adhesion, and spreading. PMID:21461187

  18. Histological Lesions and Cellular Response in the Skin of Alpine Chamois (Rupicapra r. rupicapra) Spontaneously Affected by Sarcoptic Mange

    PubMed Central

    Salvadori, Claudia; Lazzarotti, Camilla; Trogu, Tiziana; Lanfranchi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Population dynamics of chamois (genus Rupicapra, subfamily Caprinae) can be influenced by infectious diseases epizootics, of which sarcoptic mange is probably the most severe in the Alpine chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra rupicapra). In this study, skin lesions and cellular inflammatory infiltrates were characterized in 44 Alpine chamois affected by sarcoptic mange. Dermal cellular responses were evaluated in comparison with chamois affected by trombiculosis and controls. In both sarcoptic mange and trombiculosis, a significantly increase of eosinophils, mast cells, T and B lymphocytes, and macrophages was detected. Moreover, in sarcoptic mange significant higher numbers of T lymphocytes and macrophages compared to trombiculosis were observed. Lesions in sarcoptic mange were classified in three grades, according to crusts thickness, correlated with mite counts. Grade 3 represented the most severe form with crust thickness more than 3.5 mm, high number of mites, and severe parakeratosis with diffuse bacteria. Evidence of immediate and delayed hypersensitivity was detected in all three forms associated with diffuse severe epidermal hyperplasia. In grade 3, a significant increase of B lymphocytes was evident compared to grades 1 and 2, while eosinophil counts were significantly higher than in grade 1, but lower than in grade 2 lesions. An involvement of nonprotective Th2 immune response could in part account for severe lesions of grade 3. PMID:27403422

  19. Mutations in MCT8 in patients with Allan-Herndon-Dudley-syndrome affecting its cellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Kersseboom, Simone; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Friesema, Edith C H; Visser, W Edward; Klootwijk, Wim; Peeters, Robin P; Visser, Theo J

    2013-05-01

    Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) is a thyroid hormone (TH)-specific transporter. Mutations in the MCT8 gene are associated with Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome (AHDS), consisting of severe psychomotor retardation and disturbed TH parameters. To study the functional consequences of different MCT8 mutations in detail, we combined functional analysis in different cell types with live-cell imaging of the cellular distribution of seven mutations that we identified in patients with AHDS. We used two cell models to study the mutations in vitro: 1) transiently transfected COS1 and JEG3 cells, and 2) stably transfected Flp-in 293 cells expressing a MCT8-cyan fluorescent protein construct. All seven mutants were expressed at the protein level and showed a defect in T3 and T4 transport in uptake and metabolism studies. Three mutants (G282C, P537L, and G558D) had residual uptake activity in Flp-in 293 and COS1 cells, but not in JEG3 cells. Four mutants (G221R, P321L, D453V, P537L) were expressed at the plasma membrane. The mobility in the plasma membrane of P537L was similar to WT, but the mobility of P321L was altered. The other mutants studied (insV236, G282C, G558D) were predominantly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. In essence, loss of function by MCT8 mutations can be divided in two groups: mutations that result in partial or complete loss of transport activity (G221R, P321L, D453V, P537L) and mutations that mainly disturb protein expression and trafficking (insV236, G282C, G558D). The cell type-dependent results suggest that MCT8 mutations in AHDS patients may have tissue-specific effects on TH transport probably caused by tissue-specific expression of yet unknown MCT8-interacting proteins. PMID:23550058

  20. Tolerance to Gamma Radiation in the Tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini from Embryo to Adult Correlate Inversely with Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán-Pardo, Eliana; Jönsson, K. Ingemar; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats; Haghdoost, Siamak; Wojcik, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Tardigrades are highly tolerant to desiccation and ionizing radiation but the mechanisms of this tolerance are not well understood. In this paper, we report studies on dose responses of adults and eggs of the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini exposed to gamma radiation. In adults the LD50/48h for survival was estimated at ~ 4200 Gy, and doses higher than 100 Gy reduced both fertility and hatchability of laid eggs drastically. We also evaluated the effect of radiation (doses 50 Gy, 200 Gy, 500 Gy) on eggs in the early and late embryonic stage of development, and observed a reduced hatchability in the early stage, while no effect was found in the late stage of development. Survival of juveniles from irradiated eggs was highly affected by a 500 Gy dose, both in the early and the late stage. Juveniles hatched from eggs irradiated at 50 Gy and 200 Gy developed into adults and produced offspring, but their fertility was reduced compared to the controls. Finally we measured the effect of low temperature during irradiation at 4000 Gy and 4500 Gy on survival in adult tardigrades, and observed a slight delay in the expressed mortality when tardigrades were irradiated on ice. Since H. dujardini is a freshwater tardigrade with lower tolerance to desiccation compared to limno-terrestrial tardigrades, the high radiation tolerance in adults, similar to limno-terrestrial tardigrades, is unexpected and seems to challenge the idea that desiccation and radiation tolerance rely on the same molecular mechanisms. We suggest that the higher radiation tolerance in adults and late stage embryos of H. dujardini (and in other studied tardigrades) compared to early stage embryos may partly be due to limited mitotic activity, since tardigrades have a low degree of somatic cell division (eutely), and dividing cells are known to be more sensitive to radiation. PMID:26208275

  1. MicroRNA-320 family is downregulated in colorectal adenoma and affects tumor proliferation by targeting CDK6

    PubMed Central

    Tadano, Toshihiro; Kakuta, Yoichi; Hamada, Shin; Shimodaira, Yosuke; Kuroha, Masatake; Kawakami, Yoko; Kimura, Tomoya; Shiga, Hisashi; Endo, Katsuya; Masamune, Atsushi; Takahashi, Seiichi; Kinouchi, Yoshitaka; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the microRNA (miRNA) expression during histological progression from colorectal normal mucosa through adenoma to carcinoma within a lesion. METHODS: Using microarray, the sequential changes in miRNA expression profiles were compared in colonic lesions from matched samples; histologically, non-neoplastic mucosa, adenoma, and submucosal invasive carcinoma were microdissected from a tissue sample. Cell proliferation assay was performed to observe the effect of miRNA, and its target genes were predicted using bioinformatics approaches and the expression profile of SW480 transfected with the miRNA mimics. mRNA and protein levels of the target gene in colon cancer cell lines with a mimic control or miRNA mimics were measured using qRT-PCR and Western blotting. The expression levels of miRNA and target gene in colorectal tissue samples were also measured. RESULTS: Microarray analysis identified that the miR-320 family, including miR-320a, miR-320b, miR-320c, miR-320d and miR-320e, were differentially expressed in adenoma and submucosal invasive carcinoma. The miR-320 family, which inhibits cell proliferation, is frequently downregulated in colorectal adenoma and submucosal invasive carcinoma tissues. Seven genes including CDK6 were identified to be common in the results of gene expression array and bioinformatics analyses performed to find the target gene of the miR-320 family. We confirmed that mRNA and protein levels of CDK6 were significantly suppressed in colon cancer cell lines with miR-320 family mimics. CDK6 expression was found to increase from non-neoplastic mucosa through adenoma to submucosal invasive carcinoma tissues and showed an inverse correlation with miR-320 family expression. CONCLUSION: MiR-320 family affects colorectal tumor proliferation by targeting CDK6, plays important role in its growth, and is considered to be a biomarker for its early detection. PMID:27559432

  2. Aptamer targeting EGFRvIII mutant hampers its constitutive autophosphorylation and affects migration, invasion and proliferation of glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Camorani, Simona; Crescenzi, Elvira; Colecchia, David; Carpentieri, Andrea; Amoresano, Angela; Fedele, Monica; Chiariello, Mario; Cerchia, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive human brain tumor, associated with very poor survival despite surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (PDGFRβ) are hallmarks in GBM with driving roles in tumor progression. In approximately half of the tumors with amplified EGFR, the EGFRvIII truncated extracellular mutant is detected. EGFRvIII does not bind ligands, is highly oncogenic and its expression confers resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). It has been demonstrated that EGFRvIII-dependent cancers may escape targeted therapy by developing dependence on PDGFRβ signaling, thus providing a strong rationale for combination therapy aimed at blocking both EGFRvIII and PDGFRβ signaling. We have recently generated two nuclease resistant RNA aptamers, CL4 and Gint4.T, as high affinity ligands and inhibitors of the human wild-type EGFR (EGFRwt) and PDGFRβ, respectively. Herein, by different approaches, we demonstrate that CL4 aptamer binds to the EGFRvIII mutant even though it lacks most of the extracellular domain. As a consequence of binding, the aptamer inhibits EGFRvIII autophosphorylation and downstream signaling pathways, thus affecting migration, invasion and proliferation of EGFRvIII-expressing GBM cell lines. Further, we show that targeting EGFRvIII by CL4, as well as by EGFR-TKIs, erlotinib and gefitinib, causes upregulation of PDGFRβ. Importantly, CL4 and gefitinib cooperate with the anti-PDGFRβ Gint4.T aptamer in inhibiting cell proliferation. The proposed aptamer-based strategy could have impact on targeted molecular cancer therapies and may result in progresses against GBMs. PMID:26461476

  3. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma activators affect the maturation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Gosset, P; Charbonnier, A S; Delerive, P; Fontaine, J; Staels, B; Pestel, J; Tonnel, A B; Trottein, F

    2001-10-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma ), a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, has recently been described as a modulator of macrophage functions and as an inhibitor of T cell proliferation. Here, we investigated the role of PPARgamma in dendritic cells (DC), the most potent antigen-presenting cells. We showed that PPARgamma is highly expressed in immature human monocyte-derived DC (MDDC) and that it may affect the immunostimulatory function of MDDC stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or via CD40 ligand (CD40L). We found that the synthetic PPARgamma agonist rosiglitazone (as well as pioglitazone and troglitazone) significantly increases on LPS- and CD40L-activated MDDC, the surface expression of CD36 (by 184% and 104%, respectively) and CD86 (by 54% and 48%), whereas it reduces the synthesis of CD80 (by 42% and 42%). Moreover, activation of PPARgamma resulted in a dramatic decreased secretion of the Th1-promoting factor IL-12 in LPS- and CD40L-stimulated cells (by 47% and 62%), while the production of IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10 was unaffected. Finally, PPARgamma ligands down-modulate the synthesis of IFN-gamma -inducible protein-10 (recently termed as CXCL10) and RANTES (CCL5), both chemokines involved in the recruitment of Th1 lymphocytes (by 49% and 30%), but not the levels of the Th2 cell-attracting chemokines,macrophage-derived chemokine (CCL22) and thymus and activation regulated chemokine (CCL17), in mature MDDC. Taken together, our data suggest that activation of PPARgamma in human DC may have an impact in the orientation of primary and secondary immune responses by favoring type 2 responses. PMID:11592060

  4. Methylmercury Exposure during Early Xenopus laevis Development Affects Cell Proliferation and Death but not Neural Progenitor Specification

    PubMed Central

    Huyck, Ryan W.; Nagarkar, Maitreyi; Olsen, Nina; Clamons, Samuel E.; Saha, Margaret S.

    2015-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a widespread environmental toxin that preferentially and adversely affects developing organisms. To investigate the impact of MeHg toxicity on the formation of the vertebrate nervous system at physiologically relevant concentrations, we designed a graded phenotype scale for evaluating Xenopus laevis embryos exposed to MeHg in solution. Embryos displayed a range of abnormalities in response to MeHg, particularly in brain development, which is influenced by both MeHg concentration and the number of embryos per ml of exposure solution. A TC50 of ~50 μg/l and LC50 of ~100 μg/l were found when maintaining embryos at a density of one per ml, and both increased with increasing embryo density. In situ hybridization and microarray analysis showed no significant change in expression of early neural patterning genes including sox2, en2, or delta; however a noticeable decrease was observed in the terminal neural differentiation genes GAD and xGAT, but not xVGlut. PCNA, a marker for proliferating cells, was negatively correlated with MeHg dose, with a significant reduction in cell number in the forebrain and spinal cord of exposed embryos by tadpole stages. Conversely, the number of apoptotic cells in neural regions detected by a TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling) assay was significantly increased. These results provide evidence that disruption of embryonic neural development by MeHg may not be directly due to a loss of neural progenitor specification and gene transcription, but to a more general decrease in cell proliferation and increase in cell death throughout the developing nervous system. PMID:25496965

  5. In vitro effect of histamine and histamine H1 and H2 receptor antagonists on cellular proliferation of human malignant melanoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, J L; Akhter, J; Morris, D L

    1996-04-01

    Histamine is an established growth factor for gastric and colorectal cancer. Contradictory data for response of melanoma to histamine have been reported. Our aims were to determine the effect of histamine and H1 and H2 receptor antagonists on cell growth and cyclic AMP production. Four human melanoma cell lines were cultured with a range of concentrations of histamine, and with the H2 receptor antagonists cimetidine, ranitidine or famotidine, or the H1 receptor antagonist diphenhydramine. Cellular proliferation was measured by the uptake of [3H]-thymidine. Cyclic AMP production was also measured to determine the receptor status of the cell lines. Histamine significantly stimulated growth in two of four cell lines, with maximal stimulation at 1 x 10(-8) M. This effect was inhibited by all four antagonists in a dose-dependent manner. Histamine [10(-7) to 10(-4) M] also induced a dose-dependent increase in cyclic AMP production in the two histamine-responsive cell lines, suggesting that these cell lines express H2 receptors. We conclude that there may be a role for histamine receptor antagonists in melanoma treatment and that further investigation is warranted. PMID:8791266

  6. Threshold effect with stochastic fluctuation in bacteria-colony-like proliferation dynamics as analyzed through a comparative study of reaction-diffusion equations and cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odagiri, Kenta; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2009-02-01

    We report a comparative study on pattern formation between the methods of cellular automata (CA) and reaction-diffusion equations (RD) applying to a morphology of bacterial colony formation. To do so, we began the study with setting an extremely simple model, which was designed to realize autocatalytic proliferation of bacteria (denoted as X ) fed with nutrition (N) and their inactive state (prespore state) P1 due to starvation: X+N→2X and X→P1 , respectively. It was found numerically that while the CA could successfully generate rich patterns ranging from the circular fat structure to the viscous-finger-like complicated one, the naive RD reproduced only the circular pattern but failed to give a finger structure. Augmenting the RD equations by adding two physical factors, (i) a threshold effect in the dynamics of X+N→2X (breaking the continuity limit of RD) and (ii) internal noise with onset threshold (breaking the inherent symmetry of RD), we have found that the viscous-finger-like realistic patterns are indeed recovered by thus modified RD. This highlights the important difference between CA and RD, and at the same time, clarifies the necessary factors for the complicated patterns to emerge in such a surprisingly simple model system.

  7. Cellular and molecular mechanisms affecting tumour radiosensitivity : An in vitro study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Olive Mary

    The response of tumour cells in vitro to ionising radiation can, to a certain extent, predict the response of tumours to various radiotherapy treatment modalities. This thesis considers some of the factors known to be involved in the radiation response of human tumour cells in vitro. These parameters include radiation-induced cell-cycle perturbations, apoptosis and DNA damage repair. A panel of eight human tumour cell lines with markedly differing radiosensitivities were assessed in order to determine the key factors governing their radiation response. A wide range of doses spanning both the low dose region (0-2 Gy and 0-5 Gy) and the clinically relevant region (1-4 Gy) were used to determine whether differences in responses could distinguish cells which were radiosensitive or resistant. Ionising radiation produced a cell cycle delay in all cell lines in one or both of the cellular checkpoints. A Gl/S delay was detected in those cell lines that expressed wild-type p53, and the duration of this delay appeared to be directly related to the level of constitutive protein. p53 protein stabilisation was observed after 4 h, even at doses of 0-2 Gy, although a Gl/S delay was only detectable at higher doses. There was no direct relationship between p53 status and survival although wild-type p53 expression was more prevalent in the radiosensitive cell lines (3/4 sensitives are wild-type versus 2/4 resistants). A G2/M delay could only be detected at doses of > 1 Gy. This delay appeared to be dose independent in the resistant cell lines, suggesting a threshold dose of IGy, above which no further effect is observed. A radiation-induced reduction of cyclin B1 protein was observed in all cell lines implicating this protein in the induction of a G2/M delay. The duration of G2/M delay was significantly longer in the radiosensitive cell lines at 4 Gy (7-20 h versus 4-6 h at 4 Gy). The proportion of cells that exited the G2/M block and re-entered GO/G1 phase was also significantly

  8. How does the supernatant of Lactobacillus acidophilus affect the proliferation and differentiation activities of rat bone marrow-derived stromal cells?

    PubMed

    Samadikuchaksaraei, A; Gholipourmalekabadi, M; Saberian, M; Abdollahpour Alitappeh, M; Shahidi Delshad, E

    2016-01-01

    Low proliferation rate and unwanted differentiation of bone marrow-derived stromal cells (rBMSCs) during the frequent passages have limited the use of such cells in clinical cell therapy. Recently, the researchers have focused on the effects of the components produced by some bacteria on proliferation of the stem cells. In this study, we discussed the possible effects of the Lactobacillus acidophilus supernatant on proliferation and differentiation of the rBMSCs. For this aim, the cells were isolated from rat bone marrow, characterized by culturing on tissue specific differentiation media and stained. The cells (passage two) were treated with different concentrations of the L. acidophilus supernatant (0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.9, 3, 9 and 30 &mgr;l/ml) for 14 days. The proliferation and differentiation capacity of the cells were then determined by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT assay) and tissue specific staining. The results showed a positive effect of the supernatant on the cell proliferation in 3 and 9 &mgr;l/ml concentrations, while did not affect the differentiation capacity of the rBMSCs. The current study strongly suggests the L. acidophilus supernatant as an alternative material that could be added to the media with aim of improvement in the proliferation rate of the rBMSCs without affecting their differentiation capacity. PMID:27609467

  9. Modeling physicochemical interactions affecting in vitro cellular dosimetry of engineered nanomaterials: application to nanosilver

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Dwaipayan; Leo, Bey Fen; Royce, Steven G.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Ryan, Mary P.; Schwander, Stephan; Chung, Kian Fan; Tetley, Teresa D.; Zhang, Junfeng; Georgopoulos, Panos G.

    2014-01-01

    Engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) possess unique characteristics affecting their interactions in biological media and biological tissues. Systematic investigation of the effects of particle properties on biological toxicity requires a comprehensive modeling framework which can be used to predict ENM particokinetics in a variety of media. The Agglomeration-diffusion-sedimentation-reaction model (ADSRM) described here is stochastic, using a direct simulation Monte Carlo method to study the evolution of nanoparticles in biological media, as they interact with each other and with the media over time. Nanoparticle diffusion, gravitational settling, agglomeration, and dissolution are treated in a mechanistic manner with focus on silver ENMs (AgNPs). The ADSRM model utilizes particle properties such as size, density, zeta potential, and coating material, along with medium properties like density, viscosity, ionic strength, and pH, to model evolving patterns in a population of ENMs along with their interaction with associated ions and molecules. The model predictions for agglomeration and dissolution are compared with in vitro measurements for various types of ENMs, coating materials, and incubation media, and are found to be overall consistent with measurements. The model has been implemented for an in vitro case in cell culture systems to inform in vitro dosimetry for toxicology studies, and can be directly extended to other biological systems, including in vivo tissue subsystems by suitably modifying system geometry. PMID:25598696

  10. Mutations affecting sensitivity of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum to DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Bronner, C E; Welker, D L; Deering, R A

    1992-09-01

    We describe 22 new mutants of D. discoideum that are sensitive to DNA damage. These mutants were isolated on the basis of sensitivity to either temperature, gamma-rays, or 4-nitroquinolone-1-oxide (4NQO). The doses of gamma-rays, ultraviolet light (UV), and 4NQO required to reduce the survival of colony-forming ability of these mutants to 10% (D10) range from 2% to 100% of the D10s for the nonmutant, parent strains. For most of the mutants, those which are very sensitive to one agent are very sensitive to all agents tested and those which are moderately sensitive to one agent, are moderately sensitive to all agents tested. One mutant is sensitive only to 4NQO. Linkage relationships have been examined for 13 of these mutants. This linkage information was used to design complementation tests to determine allelism with previously characterized complementation groups affecting sensitivity to radiation. 4 of the new mutants fall within previously identified complementation groups and 3 new complementation groups have been identified (radJ, radK and radL). Other new loci probably also exist among these new mutants. This brings the number of characterized mutants of D. discoideum which are sensitive to DNA-damaging agents to 33 and the number of assigned complementation groups to 11. PMID:1380652

  11. Telomere protein RAP1 levels are affected by cellular aging and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Mark J.; Baribault, Michelle E.; Israel, Joanna N.; Bae, Nancy S.

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are important for maintaining the integrity of the genome through the action of the shelterin complex. Previous studies indicted that the length of the telomere did not have an effect on the amount of the shelterin subunits; however, those experiments were performed using immortalized cells with stable telomere lengths. The interest of the present study was to observe how decreasing telomere lengths over successive generations would affect the shelterin subunits. As neonatal human dermal fibroblasts aged and their telomeres became shorter, the levels of the telomere-binding protein telomeric repeat factor 2 (TRF2) decreased significantly. By contrast, the levels of one of its binding partners, repressor/activator protein 1 (RAP1), decreased to a lesser extent than would be expected from the decrease in TRF2. Other subunits, TERF1-interacting nuclear factor 2 and protection of telomeres protein 1, remained stable. The decrease in RAP1 in the older cells occurred in the nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) stress was used as an artificial means of aging in the cells, and this resulted in RAP1 levels decreasing, but the effect was only observed in the nuclear portion. Similar results were obtained using U251 glioblastoma cells treated with H2O2 or grown in serum-depleted medium. The present findings indicate that TRF2 and RAP1 levels decrease as fibroblasts naturally age. RAP1 remains more stable compared to TRF2. RAP1 also responds to oxidative stress, but the response is different to that observed in aging. PMID:27446538

  12. Reduction of Cellular Expression Levels Is a Common Feature of Functionally Affected Pendrin (SLC26A4) Protein Variants

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, Vanessa C S; Bernardinelli, Emanuele; Zocal, Nathalia; Fernandez, Jhonathan A; Nofziger, Charity; Castilho, Arthur M; Sartorato, Edi L; Paulmichl, Markus; Dossena, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Sequence alterations in the pendrin gene (SLC26A4) leading to functionally affected protein variants are frequently involved in the pathogenesis of syndromic and nonsyndromic deafness. Considering the high number of SLC26A4 sequence alterations reported to date, discriminating between functionally affected and unaffected pendrin protein variants is essential in contributing to determine the genetic cause of deafness in a given patient. In addition, identifying molecular features common to the functionally affected protein variants can be extremely useful to design future molecule-directed therapeutic approaches. Here we show the functional and molecular characterization of six previously uncharacterized pendrin protein variants found in a cohort of 58 Brazilian deaf patients. Two variants (p.T193I and p.L445W) were undetectable in the plasma membrane, completely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and showed no transport function; four (p.P142L, p.G149R, p.C282Y and p.Q413R) showed reduced function and significant, although heterogeneous, expression levels in the plasma membrane. Importantly, total expression levels of all of the functionally affected protein variants were significantly reduced with respect to the wild-type and a fully functional variant (p.R776C), regardless of their subcellular localization. Interestingly, reduction of expression may also reduce the transport activity of variants with an intrinsic gain of function (p.Q413R). As reduction of overall cellular abundance was identified as a common molecular feature of pendrin variants with affected function, the identification of strategies to prevent reduction in expression levels may represent a crucial step of potential future therapeutic interventions aimed at restoring the transport activity of dysfunctional pendrin variants. PMID:26752218

  13. Identification of multiple cellular uptake pathways of polystyrene nanoparticles and factors affecting the uptake: relevance for drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Firdessa, Rebuma; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A; Moll, Heidrun

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles may address challenges by human diseases through improving diagnosis, vaccination and treatment. The uptake mechanism regulates the type of threat a particle poses on the host cells and how a cell responds to it. Hence, understanding the uptake mechanisms and cellular interactions of nanoparticles at the cellular and subcellular level is a prerequisite for their effective biomedical applications. The present study shows the uptake mechanisms of polystyrene nanoparticles and factors affecting their uptake in bone marrow-derived macrophages, 293T kidney epithelial cells and L929 fibroblasts. Labeling with the endocytic marker FM4-64 and transmission electron microscopy studies show that the nanoparticles were internalized rapidly via endocytosis and accumulated in intracellular vesicles. Soon after their internalizations, nanoparticles trafficked to organelles with acidic pH. Analysis of the ultrastructural morphology of the plasma membrane invaginations or extravasations provides clear evidence for the involvement of several uptake routes in parallel to internalize a given type of nanoparticles by mammalian cells, highlighting the complexity of the nanoparticle-cell interactions. Blocking the specific endocytic pathways by different pharmacological inhibitors shows similar outcomes. The potential to take up nanoparticles varies highly among different cell types in a particle sizes-, time- and energy-dependent manner. Furthermore, infection and the activation status of bone marrow-derived macrophages significantly affect the uptake potential of the cells, indicating the need to understand the diseases' pathogenesis to establish effective and rational drug-delivery systems. This study enhances our understanding of the application of nanotechnology in biomedical sciences. PMID:25224362

  14. New insights into the relationship of neurogenesis and affect: tickling induces hippocampal cell proliferation in rats emitting appetitive 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations.

    PubMed

    Wöhr, M; Kehl, M; Borta, A; Schänzer, A; Schwarting, R K W; Höglinger, G U

    2009-11-10

    Adult hippocampal cell proliferation (HCP) has been associated with psychopathology, especially depression. However, it is controversial whether a constitutively low rate of HCP is a trait predisposing an individual to psychopathology or whether HCP varies with the subject's affective state. We made use of a so-far neglected measure of affect, namely ultrasonic vocalizations, to gain new insights into the relationship of HCP and affect. Rats emit distinct types of ultrasonic vocalizations, which serve as situation-dependent affective signals. In appetitive situations, rats produce 50-kHz-calls, whereas 22-kHz-calls occur in aversive situations. We applied a standardized protocol of repeated tickling and assessed tickling-induced ultrasonic vocalizations as an index of the animals affect. Stereological quantifications of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and proliferating-cells-nuclear-antigen (PCNA) immunolabeled cells were used to estimate the rate of cell proliferation in the subventricular zone and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus. The rate of cell proliferation was compared between the groups of tickled vs. non-tickled rats and between subgroups of tickled rats defined by the effect of tickling on ultrasonic vocalizations. Tickling induced ultrasonic vocalizations in a subject-dependent manner. HCP correlated positively with appetitive 50-kHz-calls, but negatively with aversive 22-kHz-calls in individual animals, while cell proliferation in the subventricular zone was not associated with the emission of ultrasonic vocalizations. Repeated tickling did not change HCP in all rats, but increased HCP in the subgroup of rats, which experienced this procedure as appetitive, i.e. in rats emitting high numbers of 50-kHz-calls or low numbers of 22-kHz-calls. Together, these data indicate that the effect of tickling on HCP depends on an interaction between a predisposing trait and stimulation-dependent variations of the subject's affective state

  15. Real-time proliferation of porcine cumulus cells is related to the protein levels and cellular distribution of Cdk4 and Cx43.

    PubMed

    Kempisty, Bartosz; Ziółkowska, Agnieszka; Piotrowska, Hanna; Zawierucha, Piotr; Antosik, Paweł; Bukowska, Dorota; Ciesiółka, Sylwia; Jaśkowski, Jędrzej M; Brüssow, Klaus P; Nowicki, Michał; Zabel, Maciej

    2013-09-01

    The proper maturation of cumulus somatic cells depends on bidirectional communication between the oocyte and the surrounding cumulus cells (CCs). The aim of this study was (i) to investigate maturation markers, such as Cx43 and Cdk4 protein levels, and (ii) to analyze the distribution of these two proteins in CCs cultured for 44, 88, 132, and 164 hours in both separated and cumulus-enclosed oocyte cultures. CCs were isolated from porcine ovarian follicles after the treatment of the recovered COCs with collagenase. Then, the separated CCs were cultured in TCM-199 for 0 to 164 hours, using a real-time cellular analyzer; however, the immunostaining was performed only after 44, 88, and 132 hours. The protein levels and distribution were analyzed using confocal microscopy. After the CCs underwent in vitro cultivation (IVC) for 25 hours, a logarithmically increasing normalized proliferation index was found throughout the entire 164 hours cultivation time. The Cx43 and Cdk4 proteins were observed at higher levels after 44 hours of culture than before IVC. After 88 and 132 hours of IVC, no significant alterations in either mRNA or protein levels of Cx43 and Cdk4 were found. Cx43 and Cdk4 were localized in the cell nucleus before IVC, whereas after 44, 88, and 132 hours of IVC, both proteins translocated to the cytoplasm. In cumulus-enclosed oocyte cultures, Cdk4 was localized both in the nucleus and cytoplasm, whereas Cx43 was only in the cytoplasm. Additionally, only low levels of the cumulus expansion markers MIS and SNAT3 were observed. In summary, we could demonstrate that the in vitro cultivation of CCs was associated with cell proliferation and that Cx43 and Cdk4 gene expression was upregulated after IVC, resulting in significantly higher protein levels. Moreover, the two proteins translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of the CCs during IVC. The protein distribution is presumably related to different protein functions during bidirectional communication via

  16. The transcriptional activities and cellular localization of the human estrogen receptor alpha are affected by the synonymous Ala87 mutation.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Calero, Tamara; Astrada, Soledad; Alberti, Alvaro; Horjales, Sofía; Arnal, Jean Francois; Rovira, Carlos; Bollati-Fogolín, Mariela; Flouriot, Gilles; Marin, Mónica

    2014-09-01

    Until recently, synonymous mutations (which do not change amino acids) have been much neglected. Some evidence suggests that this kind of mutations could affect mRNA secondary structure or stability, translation kinetics and protein structure. To explore deeper the role of synonymous mutations, we studied their consequence on the functional activity of the estrogen receptor alpha (ERα). The ERα is a ligand-inducible transcription factor that orchestrates pleiotropic cellular effects, at both genomic and non-genomic levels in response to estrogens. In this work we analyzed in transient transfection experiments, the activity of ERα carrying the synonymous mutation Ala87, a polymorphism involving about 5-10% of the population. In comparison to the wild type receptor, our results show that ERαA87 mutation reduces the transactivation efficiency of ERα on an ERE reporter gene while its expression level remains similar. This mutation enhances 4-OHT-induced transactivation of ERα on an AP1 reporter gene. Finally, the mutation affects the subcellular localization of ERα in a cell type specific manner. It enhances the cytoplasmic location of ERα without significant changes in non-genomic effects of E2. The functional alteration of the ERαA87 determined in this work highlights the relevance of synonymous mutations for biomedical and pharmacological points of view. PMID:24607813

  17. Overexpression of the Circadian Clock Gene Rev-erbα Affects Murine Bone Mesenchymal Stem Cell Proliferation and Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    He, Yao; Lin, Fuwei; Chen, Yaqun; Tan, Zhen; Bai, Ding

    2015-01-01

    Bone mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) age-related changes include decreased osteogenesis and increased adipogenesis. Rev-erbα and the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway were known to play important roles in BMSC aging. In this study, we have aimed to elucidate whether Rev-erbα and Wnt/β-catenin signaling interact during BMSC proliferation and osteogenesis. Our results showed that Rev-erbα expression gradually dropped during BMSC osteogenesis, and overexpression of Rev-erbα in BMSCs inhibited cell proliferation and osteogenesis. The inhibition of cell proliferation induced by Rev-erbα overexpression was partially reversed when Wnt/β-catenin signaling was activated. These results suggested that Rev-erbα could promote BMSC aging and may be the negative regulator during the late stage of osteogenesis. The clock gene Rev-erbα and Wnt/β-catenin signaling interact in the regulation of cell proliferation. PMID:25539035

  18. Cellular localization of long non-coding RNAs affects silencing by RNAi more than by antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Kim A; Behlke, Mark A

    2016-01-29

    Thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified in mammalian cells. Some have important functions and their dysregulation can contribute to a variety of disease states. However, most lncRNAs have not been functionally characterized. Complicating their study, lncRNAs have widely varying subcellular distributions: some reside predominantly in the nucleus, the cytoplasm or in both compartments. One method to query function is to suppress expression and examine the resulting phenotype. Methods to suppress expression of mRNAs include antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and RNA interference (RNAi). Antisense and RNAi-based gene-knockdown methods vary in efficacy between different cellular compartments. It is not known if this affects their ability to suppress lncRNAs. To address whether localization of the lncRNA influences susceptibility to degradation by either ASOs or RNAi, nuclear lncRNAs (MALAT1 and NEAT1), cytoplasmic lncRNAs (DANCR and OIP5-AS1) and dual-localized lncRNAs (TUG1, CasC7 and HOTAIR) were compared for knockdown efficiency. We found that nuclear lncRNAs were more effectively suppressed using ASOs, cytoplasmic lncRNAs were more effectively suppressed using RNAi and dual-localized lncRNAs were suppressed using both methods. A mixed-modality approach combining ASOs and RNAi reagents improved knockdown efficacy, particularly for those lncRNAs that localize to both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. PMID:26578588

  19. Microbial biofilm proliferation within sealer-root dentin interfaces is affected by sealer type and aging period

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Karina A; Friedman, Shimon; Lévesque, Céline M; Basrani, Bettina R; Finer, Yoav

    2012-01-01

    Background Root canal fillings are intended to prevent microbial proliferation over time in the canal after treatment. Objective To assess biofilm proliferation within the sealer-dentin interfaces of two methacrylate resin-based systems, self-etch (SE) and total-etch (TE), and an epoxy resin-based sealer (EP), aged for up to 6 months. Methods Standardized specimens (n=45) comprising the coronal 5 mm of human roots were filled with the test materials and gutta-percha. Specimens were either not pre-incubated (control; n=9), or incubated in sterile saline for 1 week, 1 month, 3 months or 6 months (n=3/group). Monospecies biofilms of Enterococcus faecalis were grown on the specimens for 7 days in a chemostat-based biofilm fermentor mimicking pathogenic oral conditions. The extent of E. faecalis proliferation within the sealer-dentin interface for each material and incubation period group was assessed using fluorescence microscopy of dihydroethidium-stained specimens. Results TE had less biofilm proliferation than both EP and SE (p<0.01). Deeper biofilm proliferation was detected in SE and EP specimens aged for 1 and 3 months than those aged for 1 week or 6 months (p<0.05). Maximum depth of biofilm penetration was recorded for SE at 1 month (p<0.05). Conclusion Within the test model used, the self-etch and epoxy resin-based sealers were more susceptible to interfacial biofilm proliferation than the total-etch restorative material. This susceptibility diminished after aging the materials’ interfaces for 6 months. PMID:22892745

  20. HER kinase axis receptor dimer partner switching occurs in response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibition despite failure to block cellular proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jain, Anjali; Penuel, Elicia; Mink, Sheldon; Schmidt, Joanna; Hodge, Amanda; Favero, Kristin; Tindell, Charles; Agus, David B

    2010-03-01

    The human epidermal receptor (HER) axis consists of a dynamic, interconnected family of receptors that make critical contributions to a number of malignancies. Therapeutics targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are unable to effectively inhibit tumor growth in a majority of cases. These tumors are assumed to possess primary resistance to anti-EGFR therapies, but the consequence of inhibiting EGFR in these tumors is unclear. We established isogenic cell lines by prolonged gefitinib treatment at concentrations that are in excess of that which is required for complete EGFR kinase inhibition but only minimally affected growth. Subsequently, we monitored the ligand-dependent HER profiles based on receptor expression, phosphorylation, and dimerization in conjunction with measurements of cellular susceptibility to gefitinib. Chronic EGFR kinase inhibition rapidly switched the HER network from dependence on EGFR to HER2. However, both receptors activated the critical signaling proteins AKT and mitogen-activated protein kinase, and in both cases, HER3 was the common association partner. Remarkably, the switch in receptor dimers caused diminished susceptibility to EGFR-targeted inhibitors gefitinib and cetuximab but acquired susceptibility to the HER2-targeted inhibitor pertuzumab. Overall, our study indicates that the EGFR pathway is responsive to EGFR inhibiting therapies that are not dependent on EGFR for their growth and survival, thus challenging the current definition of primary therapeutic resistance. Furthermore, EGFR kinase inhibition induces HER kinase receptors to engage in alternative dimerization that can ultimately influence therapeutic selection and responsiveness. PMID:20160029

  1. Estradiol and GPER Activation Differentially Affect Cell Proliferation but Not GPER Expression in the Hippocampus of Adult Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Duarte-Guterman, Paula; Lieblich, Stephanie E.; Chow, Carmen; Galea, Liisa A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Estradiol increases cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the female rodent but it is not known whether the G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER), a membrane receptor, is involved in this process, nor whether there are regional differences in estradiol’s effects on cell proliferation. Thus, we investigated whether estradiol exerts its effects on cell proliferation in the dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus through GPER, using the GPER agonist, G1, and antagonist, G15. Ovariectomized adult female rats received a single injection of either: 17β-estradiol (10 μg), G1 (0.1, 5, 10 μg), G15 (40 μg), G15 and estradiol, or vehicle (oil, DMSO, or oil+DMSO). After 30 min, animals received an injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and were perfused 24 h later. Acute treatment with estradiol increased, while the GPER agonist G1 (5 μg) decreased, the number of BrdU+ cells in the dentate gyrus relative to controls. The GPER antagonist, G15 increased the number of BrdU+ cells relative to control in the dorsal region and decreased the number of BrdU+ cells in the ventral region. However, G15 treatment in conjunction with estradiol partially eliminated the estradiol-induced increase in cell proliferation in the dorsal dentate gyrus. Furthermore, G1 decreased the expression of GPER in the dentate gyrus but not the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. In summary, we found that activation of GPER decreased cell proliferation and GPER expression in the dentate gyrus of young female rats, presenting a potential and novel estrogen-independent role for this receptor in the adult hippocampus. PMID:26075609

  2. Apatite formation on bioactive calcium-silicate cements for dentistry affects surface topography and human marrow stromal cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    Gandolfi, Maria Giovanna; Ciapetti, Gabriela; Taddei, Paola; Perut, Francesca; Tinti, Anna; Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; Van Meerbeek, Bart; Prati, Carlo

    2010-10-01

    The effect of ageing in phosphate-containing solution of bioactive calcium-silicate cements on the chemistry, morphology and topography of the surface, as well as on in vitro human marrow stromal cells viability and proliferation was investigated. A calcium-silicate cement (wTC) mainly based on dicalcium-silicate and tricalcium-silicate was prepared. Alpha-TCP was added to wTC to obtain wTC-TCP. Bismuth oxide was inserted in wTC to prepare a radiopaque cement (wTC-Bi). A commercial calcium-silicate cement (ProRoot MTA) was tested as control. Cement disks were aged in DPBS for 5 h ('fresh samples'), 14 and 28 days, and analyzed by ESEM/EDX, SEM/EDX, ATR-FTIR, micro-Raman techniques and scanning white-light interferometry. Proliferation, LDH release, ALP activity and collagen production of human marrow stromal cells (MSC) seeded for 1-28 days on the cements were evaluated. Fresh samples exposed a surface mainly composed of calcium-silicate hydrates CSH (from the hydration of belite and alite), calcium hydroxide, calcium carbonate, and ettringite. Apatite nano-spherulites rapidly precipitated on cement surfaces within 5 h. On wTC-TCP the Ca-P deposits appeared thicker than on the other cements. Aged cements showed an irregular porous calcium-phosphate (Ca-P) coating, formed by aggregated apatite spherulites with interspersed calcite crystals. All the experimental cements exerted no acute toxicity in the cell assay system and allowed cell growth. Using biochemical results, the scores were: fresh cements>aged cements for cell proliferation and ALP activity (except for wTC-Bi), whereas fresh cementsproliferation than aged cements, probably favoured by the presence of Si-OH gel and the early formation of apatite nano-spherulites; (2) the alpha-TCP doped cement aged for 28 days displayed the highest bioactivity and cell proliferation; (3) the deleterious effect of bismuth on cell

  3. Increased cellular immune responses and CD4+ T-cell proliferation correlate with reduced plasma viral load in SIV challenged recombinant simian varicella virus - simian immunodeficiency virus (rSVV-SIV) vaccinated rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background An effective AIDS vaccine remains one of the highest priorities in HIV-research. Our recent study showed that vaccination of rhesus macaques with recombinant simian varicella virus (rSVV) vector – simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) envelope and gag genes, induced neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses to SIV and also significantly reduced plasma viral loads following intravenous pathogenic challenge with SIVMAC251/CX1. Findings The purpose of this study was to define cellular immunological correlates of protection in rSVV-SIV vaccinated and SIV challenged animals. Immunofluorescent staining and multifunctional assessment of SIV-specific T-cell responses were evaluated in both Experimental and Control vaccinated animal groups. Significant increases in the proliferating CD4+ T-cell population and polyfunctional T-cell responses were observed in all Experimental-vaccinated animals compared with the Control-vaccinated animals. Conclusions Increased CD4+ T-cell proliferation was significantly and inversely correlated with plasma viral load. Increased SIV-specific polyfunctional cytokine responses and increased proliferation of CD4+ T-cell may be crucial to control plasma viral loads in vaccinated and SIVMAC251/CX1 challenged macaques. PMID:22889373

  4. Orexin A Affects INS-1 Rat Insulinoma Cell Proliferation via Orexin Receptor 1 and the AKT Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Zhao, Yuyan; Zheng, Delu; Ju, Shujing; Shen, Yang; Guo, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Our aim is to investigate the role of the AKT/PKB (protein kinase B) signaling pathway acting via orexin receptor 1 (OX1R) and the effects of orexin A (OXA) on cell proliferation in the insulin-secreting beta-cell line (INS-1 cells). Rat INS-1 cells were exposed to different concentrations of OXA in vitro and treated with OX1R antagonist (SB334867), PI3K antagonist (wortmannin), AKT antagonist (PF-04691502), or negative control. INS-1 amount of cell proliferation, viability and apoptosis, insulin secretion, OX1R protein expression, caspase-3 activity, and AKT protein levels were determined. We report that OXA (10−10 to 10−6 M) stimulates INS-1 cell proliferation and viability, reduces the proapoptotic activity of caspase-3 to protect against apoptotic cell death, and increases insulin secretion. Additionally, AKT phosphorylation was stimulated by OXA (10−10 to 10−6 M). However, the OX1R antagonist SB334867 (10−6 M), the PI3K antagonist wortmannin (10−8 M), the AKT antagonist PF-04691502 (10−6 M), or the combination of both abolished the effects of OXA to a certain extent. These results suggest that the upregulation of OXA-OX1R mediated by AKT activation may inhibit cell apoptosis and promote cell proliferation in INS-1 cells. This finding provides functional evidence of the biological actions of OXA in rat insulinoma cells. PMID:24382962

  5. Expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α affects tumor proliferation and antiapoptosis in surgically resected lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Takasaki, Chihiro; Kobayashi, Masashi; Ishibashi, Hironori; Akashi, Takumi; Okubo, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1 is a transcription factor that allows cells to adapt to hypoxic situations. HIF-1 is known to control tissue proliferation, antiapoptosis, angiogenesis and glucose metabolism. Furthermore, HIF-1 is involved in the growth of numerous cancer types. The present study aimed to examine the expression of HIF-1α immunohistochemically in resected lung cancers. The present study included 216 consecutive patients with lung cancer who underwent resection between April 2013 and January 2015. The patients' clinicopathological data were summarized, including imaging findings, tumor pathological characteristics, and the patient's age, sex and smoking status. The intratumoral expression of HIF-1α, survivin, c-Myc and the Ki-67 proliferation index were evaluated immunohistochemically. The patients were divided into two groups, according to the expression of HIF-1α (low vs. high) and the clinicopathological characteristics of these groups were compared. It was revealed that HIF-1α expression was significantly associated with ground glass opacity ratio, maximum standardized uptake value index, histological type (squamous cell carcinoma), differentiation and lymphatic invasion. Regarding the immunohistochemical findings, HIF-1α expression was significantly correlated with the expression levels of c-Myc (P<0.01) and survivin (P<0.01). Furthermore, the Ki-67 proliferation index was significantly higher in high-HIF-1α tumors compared with in low-HIF-1α tumors (P=0.01). The multivariate analysis identified squamous cell carcinoma, high SUVmax and lymphatic invasion as significant and independent factors for high HIF-1α expression. In conclusion, HIF-1 was highly expressed in certain subgroups of lung cancer with specific histopathology and images. HIF-1α expression was associated with tumor proliferation and antiapoptosis in lung cancer. PMID:27446567

  6. Nerve Regeneration Potential of Protocatechuic Acid in RSC96 Schwann Cells by Induction of Cellular Proliferation and Migration through IGF-IR-PI3K-Akt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ju, Da-Tong; Liao, Hung-En; Shibu, Marthandam Asokan; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chung, Li-Chin; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Lin, Chien-Chung; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-12-31

    Peripheral nerve injuries, caused by accidental trauma, acute compression or surgery, often result in temporary or life-long neuronal dysfunctions and inflict great economic or social burdens on the patients. Nerve cell proliferation is an essential process to restore injured nerves of adults. Schwann cells play a crucial role in endogenous repair of peripheral nerves due to their ability to proliferate, migrate and provide trophic support to axons via expression of various neurotrophic factors, such as the nerve growth factor (NGF), especially after nerve injury. Protocatechuic acid (PCA) is a dihydroxybenzoic acid, a type of phenolic acid, isolated from the kernels of Alpinia oxyphylla Miq (AOF), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine the fruits of which are widely used as a tonic, aphrodisiac, anti-salivation and anti-diarrheatic. This study investigated the molecular mechanisms by which PCA induces Schwann cell proliferation by activating IGF-IR-PI3K-Akt pathway. Treatment with PCA induces phosphorylation of the insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/serine - threonine kinase (PI3K/Akt) pathway, and activates expression of cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle analysis after 18 h of treatment showed that proliferation of the RSC96 cells was enhanced by PCA treatment. The PCA induced proliferation was accompanied by modulation in the expressions of cell cycle proteins cyclin D1, cyclin E and cyclin A. Knockdown of PI3K using small interfering RNA (siRNA) and inhibition of IGF-IR receptor resulted in the reduction in cell survival proteins. The results collectively showed that PCA treatment promoted cell proliferation and cell survival via IGF-I signaling. PMID:26717920

  7. Lipogems Product Treatment Increases the Proliferation Rate of Human Tendon Stem Cells without Affecting Their Stemness and Differentiation Capability

    PubMed Central

    Randelli, Pietro; Menon, Alessandra; Ragone, Vincenza; Creo, Pasquale; Bergante, Sonia; Randelli, Filippo; De Girolamo, Laura; Alfieri Montrasio, Umberto; Banfi, Giuseppe; Cabitza, Paolo; Tettamanti, Guido; Anastasia, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the success rate of rotator cuff healing remains tremendous challenge. Among many approaches, the possibility of activating resident stem cells in situ, without the need to isolate them from biopsies, could represent valuable therapeutic strategy. Along this line, it has been recently demonstrated that lipoaspirate product, Lipogems, contains and produces growth-factors that may activate resident stem cells. In this study, human tendon stem cells (hTSCs) from the rotator cuff were cocultured in a transwell system with the Lipogems lipoaspirate product and compared to control untreated cells in terms of cell proliferation, morphology, stem cell marker and VEGF expression, and differentiation and migration capabilities. Results showed that the Lipogems product significantly increases the proliferation rate of hTSCs without altering their stemness and differentiation capability. Moreover, treated cells increase the expression of VEGF, which is crucial for the neovascularization of the tissue during the healing process. Overall, this study supports that directly activating hTSCs with the Lipogems lipoaspirate could represent a new practical therapeutic approach. In fact, obtaining a lipoaspirate is easier, safer, and more cost-effective than harvesting cells from tendon or bone marrow biopsies, expanding them in GMP facility and then reinjecting them in the patient. PMID:27057170

  8. Lipogems Product Treatment Increases the Proliferation Rate of Human Tendon Stem Cells without Affecting Their Stemness and Differentiation Capability.

    PubMed

    Randelli, Pietro; Menon, Alessandra; Ragone, Vincenza; Creo, Pasquale; Bergante, Sonia; Randelli, Filippo; De Girolamo, Laura; Alfieri Montrasio, Umberto; Banfi, Giuseppe; Cabitza, Paolo; Tettamanti, Guido; Anastasia, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Increasing the success rate of rotator cuff healing remains tremendous challenge. Among many approaches, the possibility of activating resident stem cells in situ, without the need to isolate them from biopsies, could represent valuable therapeutic strategy. Along this line, it has been recently demonstrated that lipoaspirate product, Lipogems, contains and produces growth-factors that may activate resident stem cells. In this study, human tendon stem cells (hTSCs) from the rotator cuff were cocultured in a transwell system with the Lipogems lipoaspirate product and compared to control untreated cells in terms of cell proliferation, morphology, stem cell marker and VEGF expression, and differentiation and migration capabilities. Results showed that the Lipogems product significantly increases the proliferation rate of hTSCs without altering their stemness and differentiation capability. Moreover, treated cells increase the expression of VEGF, which is crucial for the neovascularization of the tissue during the healing process. Overall, this study supports that directly activating hTSCs with the Lipogems lipoaspirate could represent a new practical therapeutic approach. In fact, obtaining a lipoaspirate is easier, safer, and more cost-effective than harvesting cells from tendon or bone marrow biopsies, expanding them in GMP facility and then reinjecting them in the patient. PMID:27057170

  9. Ischemic preconditioning affects long-term cell fate through DNA damage-related molecular signaling and altered proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Sorabh; Berishvili, Ekaterine; Bandi, Sriram; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2014-10-01

    Despite the potential of ischemic preconditioning for organ protection, long-term effects in terms of molecular processes and cell fates are ill defined. We determined consequences of hepatic ischemic preconditioning in rats, including cell transplantation assays. Ischemic preconditioning induced persistent alterations; for example, after 5 days liver histology was normal, but γ-glutamyl transpeptidase expression was observed, with altered antioxidant enzyme content, lipid peroxidation, and oxidative DNA adducts. Nonetheless, ischemic preconditioning partially protected from toxic liver injury. Similarly, primary hepatocytes from donor livers preconditioned with ischemia exhibited undesirably altered antioxidant enzyme content and lipid peroxidation, but better withstood insults. However, donor hepatocytes from livers preconditioned with ischemia did not engraft better than hepatocytes from control livers. Moreover, proliferation of hepatocytes from donor livers preconditioned with ischemia decreased under liver repopulation conditions. Hepatocytes from donor livers preconditioned with ischemia showed oxidative DNA damage with expression of genes involved in MAPK signaling that impose G1/S and G2/M checkpoint restrictions, including p38 MAPK-regulated or ERK-1/2-regulated cell-cycle genes such as FOS, MAPK8, MYC, various cyclins, CDKN2A, CDKN2B, TP53, and RB1. Thus, although ischemic preconditioning allowed hepatocytes to better withstand secondary insults, accompanying DNA damage and molecular events simultaneously impaired their proliferation capacity over the long term. Mitigation of ischemic preconditioning-induced DNA damage and deleterious molecular perturbations holds promise for advancing clinical applications. PMID:25128377

  10. Short-term administration of rhGH increases markers of cellular proliferation, but not milk protein gene expression in normal lactating women.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growth hormone is one of few pharmacologic agents known to augment milk production in humans. We hypothesized that recombinant human GH (rhGH) increases the expression of cell proliferation and milk protein synthesis genes. Sequential milk and blood samples collected over four days were obtained fro...

  11. MicroRNA-520b affects the proliferation of human glioblastoma cells by directly targeting cyclin D1.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuchang; Wang, Fachen; Tian, Lin; Wang, Tongxin; Zhang, Wei; Li, Ben; Bai, Yun-An

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) represents one of most common tumors in humans. However, the biological processes and molecular mechanisms of GBM are still unclear. It is known that microRNA-520b (miR-520b) participates in the development of various tumor progressions. The present study was to evaluate the level of miR-520b in GBM tissues and cells. We further investigated the molecular mechanisms of miR-520b in U87 and U251 cell lines. Here, our data showed that the expression levels of miR-520b were significantly reduced in clinical GBM tissues and cell lines. Accordingly, the expression levels of cyclin D1 were significantly increased in clinical GBM tissues and cell lines. Ectopic expression of miR-520b in U87 and U251 cells resulted in decreased cell proliferation and enhanced cell apoptosis. Further study characterized the 3' untranslated region (3'-UTR) of cyclin D1 gene as a direct target of miR-520b in U87 and U251 cells as determined by luciferase reporter assays. In addition, ectopic expression of miR-520b led to the down-regulation of phosphorylated retinoblastoma (p-Rb, a downstream effector of cyclin D1), while the overexpression of cyclin D1 reversed the miR-520b-induced inhibition of p-Rb expression. In conclusion, this study highlights the importance of miR-520b in regulating the proliferation and apoptosis of GBM by directly targeting cyclin D1, and miR-520b may represent a potential therapeutic strategy for GBM. PMID:26700671

  12. Association between the expression of LHR, FSHR and CYP19 genes, cellular distribution of encoded proteins and proliferation of porcine granulosa cells in real-time.

    PubMed

    Kempisty, B; Ziółkowska, A; Ciesiółka, S; Piotrowska, H; Antosik, P; Bukowska, D; Nowicki, M; Brüssow, K P; Zabel, M

    2014-01-01

    The process of granulosa cell luteinization is part of the main process determining growth, differentiation and proliferation of these cells. Although the mechanisms underlying the regulation of luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR), follicle stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) and cytochrome P450 aromatase expression in mammalian granulosa cells is well understood, still little is known about the expression of mRNA and encoded proteins in relation to cell proliferation and luteinization in vitro. Porcine granulosa cells were observed in vitro at a168-h period while undergoing real-time proliferation using an RTCA system. Furthermore, LHR, FSHR and CYP19 mRNA expression were detected using RQ-PCR after 168 h of in vitro culture (IVC) at 24-h intervals, and LHR, FSHR and P450arom were examined by confocal microscopic observation at 0 h, 24 h, 48 h, 96 h, and 168 h of IVC. We found increased expression of LHR and CYP19 mRNA at 24 h and 48 h of IVC compared to the other stages (P less than 0.01, P less than 0.001), whereas FSHR mRNA was higher only at 0 h (P less than 0.001). In contrast, LHR, FSHR and P450arom protein expression was significantly higher at the end of the 168-h IVC period compared to 0 h, 24 h, 48 h and 96 h (P less than 0.001). LHR, FSHR and P450arom were distributed in the cytoplasm of porcine GCs at each time point of IVC. When analyzing cell proliferation, differences in cell index were observed (at least P less than 0.05) between the first (0-24 h) and the last period (144-168 h) of IVC; however, soon after 24 h of IVC a logarithmic increase in proliferation was also seen. We assume that the expression of LHR, FSHR and CYP19 mRNAs depends on the period of in vitro cultivation and may be linked with the luteinization process of porcine GCs. Furthermore, the patterns of mRNA and protein expression suggest a post-transcriptional regulation of LHR, FSHR and P450arom. In summary, it can be presumed that mRNA and protein expression and in vitro

  13. The UL24 protein of herpes simplex virus 1 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Abdeljelil, Nawel; Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Pearson, Angela

    2013-09-15

    Mutations in UL24 of herpes simplex virus type 1 can lead to a syncytial phenotype. We hypothesized that UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion. In non-immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) we detected viral glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH and gL present in extended blotches throughout the cytoplasm with limited nuclear membrane staining; however, in HFFs infected with a UL24-deficient virus (UL24X), staining for the viral glycoproteins appeared as long, thin streaks running across the cell. Interestingly, there was a decrease in co-localized staining of gB and gD with F-actin at late times in UL24X-infected HFFs. Treatment with chemical agents that perturbed the actin cytoskeleton hindered the formation of UL24X-induced syncytia in these cells. These data support a model whereby the UL24 syncytial phenotype results from a mislocalization of viral glycoproteins late in infection. - Highlights: • UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins required for fusion. • Sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins varies in cell-type dependent manner. • Drugs targeting actin microfilaments affect formation of UL24-related syncytia in HFFs.

  14. Cell Membrane CD44v6 Levels in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung: Association with High Cellular Proliferation and High Concentrations of EGFR and CD44v5

    PubMed Central

    Ruibal, Álvaro; Aguiar, Pablo; Del Río, María Carmen; Nuñez, Matilde Isabel; Pubul, Virginia; Herranz, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Membranous CD44v6 levels in tumors and surrounding samples obtained from 94 patients with squamous cell lung carcinomas were studied and compared to clinical stage, cellular proliferation, membranous CD44v5 levels, epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR and cytoplasmatic concentrations of CYFRA 21.1. CD44v6 positive values were observed in 33/38 non-tumor samples and in 76/94 tumor samples, but there were not statistically significant differences between both subgroups. In CD44v6 positive tumor samples, CD44v6 was not associated with clinical stage, histological grade, ploidy and lymph node involvement, but significant association was found with high cellular proliferation. Likewise, CD44v6 positive tumors had significantly higher levels of EGFR and CD44v5. In patients with squamous cell lung carcinomas and clinical stage I, positive CD44v6 cases were associated with the same parameters. Furthermore, positive CD44v5 squamous tumors were associated significantly with histological grade III and lower levels of CYFRA21.1. Our findings support the value of CD44v6 as a possible indicator of poor outcome in patients with squamous lung carcinomas. PMID:25809603

  15. Cell membrane CD44v6 levels in squamous cell carcinoma of the lung: association with high cellular proliferation and high concentrations of EGFR and CD44v5.

    PubMed

    Ruibal, Álvaro; Aguiar, Pablo; Del Río, María Carmen; Nuñez, Matilde Isabel; Pubul, Virginia; Herranz, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Membranous CD44v6 levels in tumors and surrounding samples obtained from 94 patients with squamous cell lung carcinomas were studied and compared to clinical stage, cellular proliferation, membranous CD44v5 levels, epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR and cytoplasmatic concentrations of CYFRA 21.1. CD44v6 positive values were observed in 33/38 non-tumor samples and in 76/94 tumor samples, but there were not statistically significant differences between both subgroups. In CD44v6 positive tumor samples, CD44v6 was not associated with clinical stage, histological grade, ploidy and lymph node involvement, but significant association was found with high cellular proliferation. Likewise, CD44v6 positive tumors had significantly higher levels of EGFR and CD44v5. In patients with squamous cell lung carcinomas and clinical stage I, positive CD44v6 cases were associated with the same parameters. Furthermore, positive CD44v5 squamous tumors were associated significantly with histological grade III and lower levels of CYFRA21.1. Our findings support the value of CD44v6 as a possible indicator of poor outcome in patients with squamous lung carcinomas. PMID:25809603

  16. Hepatitis C virus E2 protein promotes human hepatoma cell proliferation through the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway via cellular receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Lanjuan; Wang Lu; Ren Hao; Cao Jie; Li Li; Ke Jinshan; Qi Zhongtian . E-mail: qizt53@hotmail.com

    2005-04-15

    Dysregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways by various viruses has been shown to be responsible for viral pathogenicity. The molecular mechanism by which hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection caused human liver diseases has been investigated on the basis of abnormal intracellular signal events. Current data are very limited involved in transmembrane signal transduction triggered by HCV E2 protein. Here we explored regulation of the MAPK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) signaling pathway by E2 expressed in Chinese hamster oval cells. In human hepatoma Huh-7 cells, E2 specifically activated the MAPK/ERK pathway including downstream transcription factor ATF-2 and greatly promoted cell proliferation. CD81 and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) on the cell surface mediated binding of E2 to Huh-7 cells. The MAPK/ERK activation and cell proliferation driven by E2 were suppressed by blockage of CD81 as well as LDLR. Furthermore, pretreatment with an upstream kinase MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 also impaired the MAPK/ERK activation and cell proliferation induced by E2. Our results suggest that the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway triggered by HCV E2 via its receptors maintains survival and growth of target cells.

  17. Depletion of tumour glutathione in vivo by buthionine sulphoximine: modulation by the rate of cellular proliferation and inhibition of cancer growth.

    PubMed Central

    Terradez, P; Asensi, M; Lasso de la Vega, M C; Puertes, I R; Viña, J; Estrela, J M

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated in Ehrlich-ascites-tumour-bearing mice the effect of buthionine sulphoximine (BSO), a selective inhibitor of GSH synthesis, on the rate of GSH depletion of tumour versus normal tissues and its relation to tumour cell proliferation. In normal tissues, GSH and GSSG remain unchanged or close to normal values during tumour growth, even at the last stage of growth when the animal is close to death. After administration of a single dose of BSO (4 mmol/kg), the rates of GSH depletion and recovery in the tumour and in several normal tissues are very different. BSO depletes GSH in cancer cells to a level of 0.3-0.4 mumol/g. The fall in GSH levels is faster when tumour cells do not proliferate actively. Four treatments of 4 mmol of BSO/kg at 48 h intervals induce a significant decrease (about 44%) in tumour growth. Our data show that the rate of BSO-induced GSH depletion in cancer cells depends on the stage of tumour growth, and that BSO administration also inhibits cancer-cell proliferation. A mechanism involving changes in protein kinase C activity and intracellular pH is proposed to explain the inhibition of cancer growth elicited by BSO. PMID:8503882

  18. Calcium and ascorbic acid affect cellular structure and water mobility in apple tissue during osmotic dehydration in sucrose solutions.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Maria A; Dellarosa, Nicolò; Tylewicz, Urszula; Tappi, Silvia; Laghi, Luca; Rocculi, Pietro; Rosa, Marco Dalla

    2016-03-15

    The effects of the addition of calcium lactate and ascorbic acid to sucrose osmotic solutions on cell viability and microstructure of apple tissue were studied. In addition, water distribution and mobility modification of the different cellular compartments were observed. Fluorescence microscopy, light microscopy and time domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR) were respectively used to evaluate cell viability and microstructural changes during osmotic dehydration. Tissues treated in a sucrose-calcium lactate-ascorbic acid solution did not show viability. Calcium lactate had some effects on cell walls and membranes. Sucrose solution visibly preserved the protoplast viability and slightly influenced the water distribution within the apple tissue, as highlighted by TD-NMR, which showed higher proton intensity in the vacuoles and lower intensity in cytoplasm-free spaces compared to other treatments. The presence of ascorbic acid enhanced calcium impregnation, which was associated with permeability changes of the cellular wall and membranes. PMID:26575708

  19. Concentration of Fibrin and Presence of Plasminogen Affect Proliferation, Fibrinolytic Activity, and Morphology of Human Fibroblasts and Keratinocytes in 3D Fibrin Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Reinertsen, Erik; Skinner, Michael; Wu, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Fibrin is a hemostatic protein found in the clotting cascade. It is used in the operating room to stop bleeding and deliver cells and growth factors to heal wounds. However, formulations of clinically approved fibrin are optimized for hemostasis, and the extent to which biochemical and physical cues in fibrin mediate skin cell behavior is not fully understood nor utilized in the design of biomaterials. To determine if the concentration of fibrinogen and the presence of plasminogen affect cell behavior relevant to wound healing, we fabricated three-dimensional fibrin constructs made from 5, 10, or 20 mg/mL of clinical fibrin or plasminogen-depleted (PD) fibrin. We cultured dermal fibroblasts or epidermal keratinocytes in these constructs. Fibroblasts proliferated similarly in both types of fibrin, but keratinocytes proliferated more in low concentrations of clinical fibrin and less in PD fibrin. Clinical fibrin constructs with fibroblasts were less stiff and degraded faster than PD fibrin constructs with fibroblasts. Similarly, keratinocytes degraded clinical fibrin, but not PD fibrin. Fibroblast spreading varied with fibrin concentration in both types of fibrin. In conclusion, the concentration of fibrinogen and the presence of plasminogen affect fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation, morphology, and fibrin degradation. Creating materials with heterogeneous regions of fibrin formulations and concentrations could be a novel strategy for controlling the phenotype of encapsulated fibroblasts and keratinocytes, and the subsequent biomechanical properties of the construct. However, other well-investigated aspects of wound healing remain to be utilized in the design of fibrin biomaterials, such as autocrine and paracrine signaling between fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and immune cells. PMID:24738616

  20. TDP-43 affects splicing profiles and isoform production of genes involved in the apoptotic and mitotic cellular pathways

    PubMed Central

    De Conti, Laura; Akinyi, Maureen V.; Mendoza-Maldonado, Ramiro; Romano, Maurizio; Baralle, Marco; Buratti, Emanuele

    2015-01-01

    In recent times, high-throughput screening analyses have broadly defined the RNA cellular targets of TDP-43, a nuclear factor involved in neurodegeneration. A common outcome of all these studies is that changing the expression levels of this protein can alter the expression of several hundred RNAs within cells. What still remains to be clarified is which changes represent direct cellular targets of TDP-43 or just secondary variations due to the general role played by this protein in RNA metabolism. Using an HTS-based splicing junction analysis we identified at least six bona fide splicing events that are consistent with being controlled by TDP-43. Validation of the data, both in neuronal and non-neuronal cell lines demonstrated that TDP-43 substantially alters the levels of isoform expression in four genes potentially important for neuropathology: MADD/IG20, STAG2, FNIP1 and BRD8. For MADD/IG20 and STAG2, these changes could also be confirmed at the protein level. These alterations were also observed in a cellular model that successfully mimics TDP-43 loss of function effects following its aggregation. Most importantly, our study demonstrates that cell cycle alterations induced by TDP-43 knockdown can be recovered by restoring the STAG2, an important component of the cohesin complex, normal splicing profile. PMID:26261209

  1. Deletion or Overexpression of Mitochondrial NAD+ Carriers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Alters Cellular NAD and ATP Contents and Affects Mitochondrial Metabolism and the Rate of Glycolysis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Agrimi, Gennaro; Brambilla, Luca; Frascotti, Gianni; Pisano, Isabella; Porro, Danilo; Vai, Marina; Palmieri, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    The modification of enzyme cofactor concentrations can be used as a method for both studying and engineering metabolism. We varied Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial NAD levels by altering expression of its specific mitochondrial carriers. Changes in mitochondrial NAD levels affected the overall cellular concentration of this coenzyme and the cellular metabolism. In batch culture, a strain with a severe NAD depletion in mitochondria succeeded in growing, albeit at a low rate, on fully respiratory media. Although the strain increased the efficiency of its oxidative phosphorylation, the ATP concentration was low. Under the same growth conditions, a strain with a mitochondrial NAD concentration higher than that of the wild type similarly displayed a low cellular ATP level, but its growth rate was not affected. In chemostat cultures, when cellular metabolism was fully respiratory, both mutants showed low biomass yields, indicative of impaired energetic efficiency. The two mutants increased their glycolytic fluxes, and as a consequence, the Crabtree effect was triggered at lower dilution rates. Strikingly, the mutants switched from a fully respiratory metabolism to a respirofermentative one at the same specific glucose flux as that of the wild type. This result seems to indicate that the specific glucose uptake rate and/or glycolytic flux should be considered one of the most important independent variables for establishing the long-term Crabtree effect. In cells growing under oxidative conditions, bioenergetic efficiency was affected by both low and high mitochondrial NAD availability, which suggests the existence of a critical mitochondrial NAD concentration in order to achieve optimal mitochondrial functionality. PMID:21335394

  2. MiR-449a Affects Epithelial Proliferation during the Pseudoglandular and Canalicular Phases of Avian and Mammal Lung Development.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Ethan L; Choy, Kwong W; Donahoe, Patricia K; Tracy, Adam A; Hila, Regis; Loscertales, Maria; Longoni, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is associated with pulmonary hypoplasia and respiratory distress, which result in high mortality and morbidity. Although several transgenic mouse models of lung hypoplasia exist, the role of miRNAs in this phenotype is incompletely characterized. In this study, we assessed microRNA expression levels during the pseudoglandular to canalicular phase transition of normal human fetal lung development. At this critical time, when the distal respiratory portion of the airways begins to form, microarray analysis showed that the most significantly differentially expressed miRNA was miR-449a. Prediction algorithms determined that N-myc is a target of miR-449a and identified the likely miR-449a:N-myc binding sites, confirmed by luciferase assays and targeted mutagenesis. Functional ex vivo knock-down in organ cultures of murine embryonic lungs, as well as in ovo overexpression in avian embryonic lungs, suggested a role for miR-449a in distal epithelial proliferation. Finally, miR-449a expression was found to be abnormal in rare pulmonary specimens of human fetuses with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in the pseudoglandular or canalicular phase. This study confirms the conserved role of miR-449a for proper pulmonary organogenesis, supporting the delicate balance between expansion of progenitor cells and their terminal differentiation, and proposes the potential involvement of this miRNA in human pulmonary hypoplasia. PMID:26891231

  3. Rosiglitazone stimulates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma expression and directly affects in vitro steroidogenesis in porcine ovarian follicles.

    PubMed

    Rak-Mardyła, Agnieszka; Karpeta, Anna

    2014-07-01

    Rosiglitazone is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) synthetic activator from the group of thiazolidinediones often used in the treatment of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and other forms of insulin resistance. The present in vitro study assessed the direct effects of rosiglitazone at 25 and 50 μM doses on PPARγ gene expression, steroid secretion (progesterone [P4], androstenedione [A4], testosterone [T], and estradiol), and protein expression of PPARγ, 3βHSD, CYP17, 17βHSD, CYP19 by porcine ovarian follicles from prepubertal and cycling animals. We analyzed also steroid enzymatic activity by conversion of pregnen-3β-ol-20-one to P4, P4 to A4, and A4 to T. Our results indicated that rosiglitazone increased significantly PPARγ expression, P4 secretion, 3βHSD activity, and protein expression. Rosiglitazone decreased A4 and T secretion by reducing the expression and activity of CYP17 and 17βHSD and did not change estradiol secretion and CYP19. Similarly results was observed both in prepubertal and cycling pigs. Our results indicate that these direct effects of rosiglitazone on ovarian steroidogenesis provide a framework for testing several potential new mechanisms of PPAR-γ actions on porcine ovarian function. PMID:24681211

  4. Cell surface localization of importin α1/KPNA2 affects cancer cell proliferation by regulating FGF1 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Kohji; Miyamoto, Yoichi; Tsujii, Akira; Moriyama, Tetsuji; Ikuno, Yudai; Shiromizu, Takashi; Serada, Satoshi; Fujimoto, Minoru; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Naka, Tetsuji; Yoneda, Yoshihiro; Oka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Importin α1 is involved in nuclear import as a receptor for proteins with a classical nuclear localization signal (cNLS). Here, we report that importin α1 is localized to the cell surface in several cancer cell lines and detected in their cultured medium. We also found that exogenously added importin α1 is associated with the cell membrane via interaction with heparan sulfate. Furthermore, we revealed that the cell surface importin α1 recognizes cNLS-containing substrates. More particularly, importin α1 bound directly to FGF1 and FGF2, secreted cNLS-containing growth factors, and addition of exogenous importin α1 enhanced the activation of ERK1/2, downstream targets of FGF1 signalling, in FGF1-stimulated cancer cells. Additionally, anti-importin α1 antibody treatment suppressed the importin α1−FGF1 complex formation and ERK1/2 activation, resulting in decreased cell growth. This study provides novel evidence that functional importin α1 is located at the cell surface, where it accelerates the proliferation of cancer cells. PMID:26887791

  5. P120-catenin isoforms 1A and 3A differently affect invasion and proliferation of lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Yang; Dong Qianze; Zhao Yue; Dong Xinjun; Miao Yuan; Dai Shundong; Yang Zhiqiang; Zhang Di; Wang Yan; Li Qingchang; Zhao Chen; Wang Enhua

    2009-03-10

    Different isoforms of p120-catenin (p120ctn), a member of the Armadillo gene family, are variably expressed in different tissues as a result of alternative splicing and the use of multiple translation initiation codons. When expressed in cancer cells, these isoforms may confer different properties with respect to cell adhesion and invasion. We have previously reported that the p120ctn isoforms 1 and 3 were the most highly expressed isoforms in normal lung tissues, and their expression level was reduced in lung tumor cells. To precisely define their biological roles, we transfected p120ctn isoforms 1A and 3A into the lung cancer cell lines A549 and NCI-H460. Enhanced expression of p120ctn isoform 1A not only upregulated E-cadherin and {beta}-catenin, but also downregulated the Rac1 activity, and as a result, inhibited the ability of cells to invade. In contrast, overexpression of p120ctn isoform 3A led to the inactivation of Cdc42 and the activation of RhoA, and had a smaller influence on invasion. However, we found that isoform 3A had a greater ability than isoform 1A in both inhibiting the cell cycle and reducing tumor cell proliferation. The present study revealed that p120ctn isoforms 1A and 3A differently regulated the adhesive, proliferative, and invasive properties of lung cancer cells through distinct mechanisms.

  6. PU.1 affects proliferation of the human acute myeloid leukemia U937 cell line by directly regulating MEIS1

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, JING; ZHANG, XIAOFENG; WANG, YUHUA; GUAN, YINGHUI

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor PU.1 is a member of the ETS family, which is expressed in a wide variety of hematopoietic lineages. Accumulating evidence has indicated that PU.1 plays a key role in hematopoiesis, and reduced expression of PU.1 leads to the pathogenesis of human myeloid leukemia. As a multi-functional factor, PU.1 is also required for mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) stem cell potential and the development of MLL. However, the function of PU.1 in human non-MLL leukemia and its molecular mechanism remains poorly understood. In the present study, PU.1 siRNA was demonstrated to efficiently inhibit the transcription level of oncogene MEIS1 in the human acute myeloid non-MLL leukemia U937 cell line. In addition, PU.1, as a positive regulator of MEIS1, performed a crucial role in maintaining cell proliferation. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assay, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis and luciferase reporter assay, previously unexplored evidence that PU.1 activated the MEIS1 promoter through a conserved binding motif in vitro and in vivo was further defined. Overall, the present study provides insight into the molecular mechanism of the contribution of PU.1 to the pathogenesis of non-MLL U937 cells, which is mediated by direct regulation of MEIS1 transcription. The present data reveal the possibility of developing an alternative therapy for non-MLL leukemia by targeting PU.1-mediated MEIS1 gene activation. PMID:26622774

  7. MiR-449a Affects Epithelial Proliferation during the Pseudoglandular and Canalicular Phases of Avian and Mammal Lung Development

    PubMed Central

    Sanford, Ethan L.; Choy, Kwong W.; Donahoe, Patricia K.; Tracy, Adam A.; Hila, Regis

    2016-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is associated with pulmonary hypoplasia and respiratory distress, which result in high mortality and morbidity. Although several transgenic mouse models of lung hypoplasia exist, the role of miRNAs in this phenotype is incompletely characterized. In this study, we assessed microRNA expression levels during the pseudoglandular to canalicular phase transition of normal human fetal lung development. At this critical time, when the distal respiratory portion of the airways begins to form, microarray analysis showed that the most significantly differentially expressed miRNA was miR-449a. Prediction algorithms determined that N-myc is a target of miR-449a and identified the likely miR-449a:N-myc binding sites, confirmed by luciferase assays and targeted mutagenesis. Functional ex vivo knock-down in organ cultures of murine embryonic lungs, as well as in ovo overexpression in avian embryonic lungs, suggested a role for miR-449a in distal epithelial proliferation. Finally, miR-449a expression was found to be abnormal in rare pulmonary specimens of human fetuses with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia in the pseudoglandular or canalicular phase. This study confirms the conserved role of miR-449a for proper pulmonary organogenesis, supporting the delicate balance between expansion of progenitor cells and their terminal differentiation, and proposes the potential involvement of this miRNA in human pulmonary hypoplasia. PMID:26891231

  8. Down-regulated FSTL5 promotes cell proliferation and survival by affecting Wnt/β-catenin signaling in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dengyong; Ma, Xiang; Sun, Wanliang; Cui, Peiyuan; Lu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Follistatin-like 5 (FSTL5), a member of the follistatin family of genes, encodes a secretory glycoprotein. Previous study revealed that it might play a suppressive role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, its clinical significances, biological functions and molecular mechanisms in HCC development are poorly understood. To gain insight to the functions of FSTL5 in HCC, We examined FSTL5 expression pattern in 117 HCC tissue samples. The results of immunohistochemical staining analysis showed that FSTL5 is more commonly down-regulated in HCC compared to adjacent tissues and further clinicopathological analysis showed that its expression level is closely correlated with tumor size, TNM stage, local infiltration and patient prognosis. Both gain function assays and recombinant human FSTL5 protein treatment assays in vitro revealed that over-expressing FSTL5 could inhibit the abilities of cancer cell proliferation and survival. Further, we found that those effects on HCC growth and survival are associated with Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Taken together, all of our results validate that FSTL5 plays a suppressive role in HCC and suggest that down-regulated FSTL5 could elevate abilities of growth and survival of HCC cells by activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. PMID:26045876

  9. Tumor suppressor miR-149-5p is associated with cellular migration, proliferation and apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jin, Lu; Li, Yifan; Liu, Jiaju; Yang, Shangqi; Gui, Yaoting; Mao, Xiangming; Nie, Guohui; Lai, Yongqing

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have recently explored the role of microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) in the tumorigenesis of various types of cancer. miRNAs have been reported to be involved in numerous cell processes, including cell apoptosis, proliferation and migration, thus suggesting that miRNAs may have an important role in cancer progression. Downregulation of miR-149-5p has been detected in RCC tissues by microarray profiling; however, its expression and function in RCC has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the expression levels of miR‑149‑5p in RCC tissues and paired normal tissues. In order to determine whether miR-149-5p was able to regulate cell proliferation, apoptosis or migration, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, flow cytometric and wound healing assays were conducted. The results demonstrated that miR‑149‑5p was significantly downregulated in RCC tissues compared with in normal tissues (P<0.05). The restoration of miR-149-5p expression using synthetic mimics suppressed cell proliferation and migration, and promoted cell apoptosis. These results indicated that miR‑149‑5p may act as a tumor suppressor in RCC. The present study is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to identify miR‑149‑5p as a tumor suppressor in RCC. Future studies will be focused on the potential role of miR‑149‑5p as a biomarker for the early detection and prognostic prediction of RCC, and as a therapeutic target in RCC. In addition, further exploration regarding the pathways underlying the effects of miR‑149‑5p in RCC is required. PMID:27121091

  10. EZH2-mediated epigenetic suppression of long noncoding RNA SPRY4-IT1 promote s NSCLC cell proliferation and metastasis by affecting the epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Sun, M; Liu, X-H; Lu, K-H; Nie, F-Q; Xia, R; Kong, R; Yang, J-S; Xu, T-P; Liu, Y-W; Zou, Y-F; Lu, B-B; Yin, R; Zhang, E-B; Xu, L; De, W; Wang, Z-X

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have a critical role in the regulation of cellular processes such as differentiation, proliferation, and metastasis. These lncRNAs are dysregulated in a variety of cancers and many function as tumor suppressors; however, the regulatory factors involved in silencing lncRNA transcription are poorly understood. In this study, we showed that epigenetic silencing of lncRNA SPRY4 intronic transcript 1 (SPRY4-IT1) occurs in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells through direct transcriptional repression mediated by the Polycomb group protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2). SPRY4-IT1 is derived from an intron within SPRY4, and is upregulated in melanoma cells; knockdown of its expression leads to cell growth arrest, invasion inhibition, and elevated rates of apoptosis. Upon depletion of EZH2 by RNA interference, SPRY4-IT1 expression was restored, and transfection of SPRY4-IT1 into NSCLC cells resulted in a significant antitumoral effect, both in culture and in xenografted nude mice. Moreover, overexpression of SPRY4-IT1 was found to have a key role in the epithelial–mesenchymal transition through the regulation of E-cadherin and vimentin expression. In EZH2-knockdown cells, which characteristically showed impaired cell proliferation and metastasis, the induction of SPRY4-IT1 depletion partially rescued the oncogenic phenotype, suggesting that SPRY4-IT1 repression has an important role in EZH2 oncogenesis. Of most relevance, translation of these findings into human NSCLC tissue samples demonstrated that patients with low levels of SPRY4-IT1 expression had a shorter overall survival time, suggesting that SPRY4-IT1 could be a biomarker for poor prognosis of NSCLC. PMID:24967960

  11. Salmonella adhesion, invasion and cellular immune responses are differentially affected by iron concentrations in a combined in vitro gut fermentation-cell model.

    PubMed

    Dostal, Alexandra; Gagnon, Mélanie; Chassard, Christophe; Zimmermann, Michael Bruce; O'Mahony, Liam; Lacroix, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    In regions with a high infectious disease burden, concerns have been raised about the safety of iron supplementation because higher iron concentrations in the gut lumen may increase risk of enteropathogen infection. The aim of this study was to investigate interactions of the enteropathogen Salmonella enterica ssp. enterica Typhimurium with intestinal cells under different iron concentrations encountered in the gut lumen during iron deficiency and supplementation using an in vitro colonic fermentation system inoculated with immobilized child gut microbiota combined with Caco-2/HT29-MTX co-culture monolayers. Colonic fermentation effluents obtained during normal, low (chelation by 2,2'-dipyridyl) and high iron (26.5 mg iron/L) fermentation conditions containing Salmonella or pure Salmonella cultures with similar iron conditions were applied to cellular monolayers. Salmonella adhesion and invasion capacity, cellular integrity and immune response were assessed. Under high iron conditions in pure culture, Salmonella adhesion was 8-fold increased compared to normal iron conditions while invasion was not affected leading to decreased invasion efficiency (-86%). Moreover, cellular cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α secretion as well as NF-κB activation in THP-1 cells were attenuated under high iron conditions. Low iron conditions in pure culture increased Salmonella invasion correlating with an increase in IL-8 release. In fermentation effluents, Salmonella adhesion was 12-fold and invasion was 428-fold reduced compared to pure culture. Salmonella in high iron fermentation effluents had decreased invasion efficiency (-77.1%) and cellular TNF-α release compared to normal iron effluent. The presence of commensal microbiota and bacterial metabolites in fermentation effluents reduced adhesion and invasion of Salmonella compared to pure culture highlighting the importance of the gut microbiota as a barrier during pathogen invasion. High iron concentrations as

  12. Inhibition of Macrophage CD36 Expression and Cellular Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein (oxLDL) Accumulation by Tamoxifen: A PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR (PPAR)γ-DEPENDENT MECHANISM.

    PubMed

    Yu, Miao; Jiang, Meixiu; Chen, Yuanli; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Wenwen; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Xiaoju; Li, Yan; Duan, Shengzhong; Han, Jihong; Duan, Yajun

    2016-08-12

    Macrophage CD36 binds and internalizes oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) to facilitate foam cell formation. CD36 expression is activated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Tamoxifen, an anti-breast cancer medicine, has demonstrated pleiotropic functions including cardioprotection with unfully elucidated mechanisms. In this study, we determined that treatment of ApoE-deficient mice with tamoxifen reduced atherosclerosis, which was associated with decreased CD36 and PPARγ expression in lesion areas. At the cellular level, we observed that tamoxifen inhibited CD36 protein expression in human THP-1 monocytes, THP-1/PMA macrophages, and human blood monocyte-derived macrophages. Associated with decreased CD36 protein expression, tamoxifen reduced cellular oxLDL accumulation in a CD36-dependent manner. At the transcriptional level, tamoxifen decreased CD36 mRNA expression, promoter activity, and the binding of the PPARγ response element in CD36 promoter to PPARγ protein. Tamoxifen blocked ligand-induced PPARγ nuclear translocation and CD36 expression, but it increased PPARγ phosphorylation, which was due to that tamoxifen-activated ERK1/2. Furthermore, deficiency of PPARγ expression in macrophages abolished the inhibitory effect of tamoxifen on CD36 expression or cellular oxLDL accumulation both in vitro and in vivo Taken together, our study demonstrates that tamoxifen inhibits CD36 expression and cellular oxLDL accumulation by inactivating the PPARγ signaling pathway, and the inhibition of macrophage CD36 expression can be attributed to the anti-atherogenic properties of tamoxifen. PMID:27358406

  13. Xanthosine administration does not affect the proportion of epithelial stem cells in bovine mammary tissue, but has a latent negative effect on cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Rauner, Gat; Barash, Itamar

    2014-10-15

    The challenge in manipulating the proportion of somatic stem cells lies in having to override tissue homeostasis. Xanthosine infusion via the teat canal has been reported to augment the number of label-retaining cells in the mammary gland of 3-month-old bovine calves. To further delineate xanthosine's effect on defined stem cells in the mammary gland of heifers—which are candidates for increased prospective milk production following such manipulation—bovine mammary parenchymal tissue was transplanted and integrated into the cleared mammary fat pad of immunodeficient mice. Xanthosine administration for 14 days did not affect the number of label-retaining cells after 10- and 11-week chases. No change in stem cell proportion, analyzed according to CD49f and CD24 expression, was noted. Clone formation and propagation rate of cultured cells, as well as expression of stem cell markers, were also unaffected. In contrast, a latent 50% decrease in bovine mammary cell proliferation rate was observed 11 weeks after xanthosine administration. Tumor development in mice was also limited by xanthosine administration. These effects may have resulted from an initial decrease in expression of the rate-limiting enzyme in guanine synthesis, IMPDH. The data indicate that caution should be exerted when considering xanthosine for stem cell manipulation. - Highlights: • Novel “bovinized“ mouse model for exogenous effects on bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine did not affect stem cell number/function in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine caused an immediate decrease in IMPDH expression in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine had latent negative effect on cell proliferation in bovine mammary gland. • Xanthosine administration limited mammary tumor growth.

  14. FGF-2 induces the proliferation of human periodontal ligament cells and modulates their osteoblastic phenotype by affecting Runx2 expression in the presence and absence of osteogenic inducers

    PubMed Central

    AN, SHAOFENG; HUANG, XIANGYA; GAO, YAN; LING, JUNQI; HUANG, YIHUA; XIAO, YIN

    2015-01-01

    The exact phenotype of human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs) remains a controversial area. Basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) exhibits various functions and its effect on hPDLCs is also controversial. Therefore, the present study examined the effect of FGF-2 on the growth and osteoblastic phenotype of hPDLCs with or without osteogenic inducers (dexamethasone and β-glycerophosphate). FGF-2 was added to defined growth culture medium and osteogenic inductive culture medium. Cell proliferation, osteogenic differentiation and mineralization were measured. The selected differentiation markers, Runx2, collagen type I, α1 (Col1a1), osteocalcin (OCN) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), were investigated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Runx2 and OCN protein expression was measured by western blotting. FGF-2 significantly increased the proliferation of hPDLCs, but did not affect alkaline phosphatase activity. RT-qPCR analysis revealed enhanced mRNA expression of Runx2, OCN and EGFR, but suppressed Col1a1 gene expression in the absence of osteogenic inducers, whereas all these gene levels had no clear trend in their presence. The Runx2 protein expression was clearly increased, but the OCN protein level showed no evident trend. The mineralization assay demonstrated that FGF-2 inhibited mineralized matrix deposition with osteogenic inducers. These results suggested that FGF-2 induces the growth of immature hPDLCs, which is a competitive inhibitor of epithelial downgrowth, and suppresses their differentiation into mineralized tissue by affecting Runx2 expression. Therefore, this may lead to the acceleration of periodontal regeneration. PMID:26133673

  15. Mps1 (Monopolar Spindle 1) Protein Inhibition Affects Cellular Growth and Pro-Embryogenic Masses Morphology in Embryogenic Cultures of Araucaria angustifolia (Araucariaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Douétts-Peres, Jackellinne C.; Cruz, Marco Antônio L.; Reis, Ricardo S.; Heringer, Angelo S.; de Oliveira, Eduardo A. G.; Elbl, Paula M.; Floh, Eny I. S.; Silveira, Vanildo

    2016-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis has been shown to be an efficient tool for studying processes based on cell growth and development. The fine regulation of the cell cycle is essential for proper embryo formation during the process of somatic embryogenesis. The aims of the present work were to identify and perform a structural and functional characterization of Mps1 and to analyze the effects of the inhibition of this protein on cellular growth and pro-embryogenic mass (PEM) morphology in embryogenic cultures of A. angustifolia. A single-copy Mps1 gene named AaMps1 was retrieved from the A. angustifolia transcriptome database, and through a mass spectrometry approach, AaMps1 was identified and quantified in embryogenic cultures. The Mps1 inhibitor SP600125 (10 μM) inhibited cellular growth and changed PEMs, and these effects were accompanied by a reduction in AaMps1 protein levels in embryogenic cultures. Our work has identified the Mps1 protein in a gymnosperm species for the first time, and we have shown that inhibiting Mps1 affects cellular growth and PEM differentiation during A. angustifolia somatic embryogenesis. These data will be useful for better understanding cell cycle control during somatic embryogenesis in plants. PMID:27064899

  16. E2F1-Mediated Upregulation of p19INK4d Determines Its Periodic Expression during Cell Cycle and Regulates Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Carcagno, Abel L.; Marazita, Mariela C.; Ogara, María F.; Ceruti, Julieta M.; Sonzogni, Silvina V.; Scassa, María E.; Giono, Luciana E.; Cánepa, Eduardo T.

    2011-01-01

    Background A central aspect of development and disease is the control of cell proliferation through regulation of the mitotic cycle. Cell cycle progression and directionality requires an appropriate balance of positive and negative regulators whose expression must fluctuate in a coordinated manner. p19INK4d, a member of the INK4 family of CDK inhibitors, has a unique feature that distinguishes it from the remaining INK4 and makes it a likely candidate for contributing to the directionality of the cell cycle. p19INK4d mRNA and protein levels accumulate periodically during the cell cycle under normal conditions, a feature reminiscent of cyclins. Methodology/Principal Findings In this paper, we demonstrate that p19INK4d is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1 through two response elements present in the p19INK4d promoter. Ablation of this regulation reduced p19 levels and restricted its expression during the cell cycle, reflecting the contribution of a transcriptional effect of E2F1 on p19 periodicity. The induction of p19INK4d is delayed during the cell cycle compared to that of cyclin E, temporally separating the induction of these proliferative and antiproliferative target genes. Specific inhibition of the E2F1-p19INK4d pathway using triplex-forming oligonucleotides that block E2F1 binding on p19 promoter, stimulated cell proliferation and increased the fraction of cells in S phase. Conclusions/Significance The results described here support a model of normal cell cycle progression in which, following phosphorylation of pRb, free E2F induces cyclin E, among other target genes. Once cyclinE/CDK2 takes over as the cell cycle driving kinase activity, the induction of p19 mediated by E2F1 leads to inhibition of the CDK4,6-containing complexes, bringing the G1 phase to an end. This regulatory mechanism constitutes a new negative feedback loop that terminates the G1 phase proliferative signal, contributing to the proper coordination of the cell cycle and provides an

  17. Parenteral and enteral feeding in preterm piglets differently affects extracellular matrix proteins, enterocyte proliferation and apoptosis in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Oste, Marijke; De Vos, Maartje; Van Haver, Els; Van Brantegem, Leen; Thymann, Thomas; Sangild, Per; Weyns, Andre; Van Ginneken, Chris

    2010-10-01

    The preterm intestine is immature and responds differently to total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and enteral nutrition, compared with the term intestine. We hypothesised that in preterms, diet composition and feeding route affect mucosal morphology, enterocyte mitosis and apoptosis, and the distribution of laminin-1, fibronectin and collagen IV (extracellular matrix proteins (ECMP)). Preterm piglets (93.5 % of gestation) were delivered via caesarean section and birth weight-matched allocated to one of the four experimental groups: the piglets were either euthanised immediately after delivery, after 3 d of TPN or after 2 d enteral feeding with colostrum or milk formula, following 3 d of TPN. We combined immunohistochemistry, image analysis and stereological measurements to describe the intestinal mucosal layer. No significant changes occurred after 3 d of TPN. Feeding colostrum or milk replacer for 2 d after TPN was associated with an increased crypt depth. Only enteral feeding with colostrum resulted in an increased villus height and mitotic index. Neither TPN nor enteral feeding changed the distribution pattern of ECMP or the occurrence of bifid crypts. The immature distribution pattern of ECMP in TPN-fed piglets, coupled with unchanged enterocyte mitosis and apoptosis indices, illustrates that feeding preterm pigs 3 d TPN does not lead to mucosal atrophy. Despite the invariable distribution of ECMP, colostrum was associated with crypt hyperplasia resulting in an increased villus height. These data illustrate that some mechanisms regulating cell turnover are immature in preterms and may in part explain the abnormal gut responses to TPN and enteral feeding in prematurely born pigs. PMID:20887647

  18. Statin drugs mitigate cellular inflammatory response after ST elevation myocardial infarction, but do not affect in-hospital mortality

    PubMed Central

    Pourafkari, Leili; Visnjevac, Ognjen; Ghaffari, Samad; Nader, Nader D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The objective was to examine the role of statins in modulating post-STEMI inflammation and related mortality. Methods: A total of 404 patients with STEMI were reviewed. Demographics, comorbidities, laboratory values, and outcomes were collected. The patients were grouped as STATIN and NOSTAT based on the use of statin drugs at the time of admission. Ninety-seven patients were receiving statin drugs. Results: The patients in the STATIN group were more likely to be hypertensive (53.6%), diabetic (37.1%) and to have previous coronary revascularization (9.3%). Following propensity matching of 89 patients in STATIN group to an equal number of patients in NOSTAT controls had lower neutrophil count 7.8 (6.8-8.4) compared to those in the NOSTAT group 9.1 (7.9-10.1). Although there was no difference in-hospital mortality between the two groups, the incidence of pump failure was lower in the STATIN group (5.6% vs. 15.7%; P < 0.01). Conclusion: Statin treatment prior to STEMI mitigates the cellular inflammatory response after the myocardial infarction, as evidenced by lower leukocyte and neutrophil cell counts in the STATIN group. PMID:27069565

  19. Adoptive transfer of natural antibodies to non-immunized chickens affects subsequent antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Aart; Klomp, Marcel E V; Nieuwland, Mike G B; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Parmentier, Henk K

    2004-01-01

    To determine a regulatory function of natural antibodies in the immune response of chickens, pooled plasma obtained from non-immunized (naïve) 15 months old hens was subjected to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) antigen-affinity chromatography. Purified KLH-binding antibodies were adoptively transferred intravenously to 5 weeks-old cocks that were subsequently immunized subcutaneously 24 h later with KLH. Control groups consisted of birds that were either adoptively transferred with KLH-binding antibodies purified from plasma of KLH-immunized chickens, or PBS, or a salt precipitated total immunoglobulin fraction obtained from the corresponding pooled nai;ve chicken plasma, respectively.Total, IgM and IgY antibody titers to KLH in the plasma of recipients adoptively transferred with KLH-NAb, but not in the plasma of the groups transferred with salt precipitate or KLH-binding specific antibodies, were significantly enhanced as compared to the non-treated, KLH immunized group. Titers of IgA antibodies binding KLH were decreased in the plasma of the group that received specific KLH-binding antibodies, but not in the plasma of the other groups. Proliferation from peripheral blood leucocytes in whole blood from the KLH-NAb treated group, the group treated with KLH-binding specific antibodies and the group treated with salt precipitate, respectively, to both concanavalin A and KLH were significantly decreased as compared to the group receiving PBS. Our data show that antigen-specific antibodies can be isolated from plasma obtained from non-immunized chickens. Such antibodies that resemble natural antibodies as described in mammals may perform an important role in the enhancement of subsequent antigen-specific antibody responses or the maturation of the immune system, which may differ from the role of specific antibodies. PMID:12962982

  20. Down-regulation of pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 by somatostatin receptor subtype 5: a novel mechanism for inhibition of cellular proliferation and insulin secretion by somatostatin

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guisheng; Sinnett-Smith, Jim; Liu, Shi-He; Yu, Juehua; Wu, James; Sanchez, Robbi; Pandol, Stephen J.; Abrol, Ravinder; Nemunaitis, John; Rozengurt, Enrique; Brunicardi, F. Charles

    2014-01-01

    Somatostatin (SST) is a regulatory peptide and acts as an endogenous inhibitory regulator of the secretory and proliferative responses of target cells. SST’s actions are mediated by a family of seven transmembrane domain G protein-coupled receptors that comprise five distinct subtypes (SSTR1-5). SSTR5 is one of the major SSTRs in the islets of Langerhans. Homeodomain-containing transcription factor pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1 (PDX-1) is essential for pancreatic development, β cell differentiation, maintenance of normal β cell functions in adults and tumorigenesis. Recent studies show that SSTR5 acts as a negative regulator for PDX-1 expression and that SSTR5 mediates somatostatin’s inhibitory effect on cell proliferation and insulin expression/excretion through down-regulating PDX-1 expression. SSTR5 exerts its inhibitory effect on PDX-1 expression at both the transcriptional level by down-regulating PDX-1 mRNA and the post-translational level by enhancing PDX-1 ubiquitination. Identification of PDX-1 as a transcriptional target for SSTR5 may help in guiding the choice of therapeutic cancer treatments. PMID:25009500

  1. ATXN7L3 and ENY2 Coordinate Activity of Multiple H2B Deubiquitinases Important for Cellular Proliferation and Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Atanassov, Boyko S; Mohan, Ryan D; Lan, Xianjiang; Kuang, Xianghong; Lu, Yue; Lin, Kevin; McIvor, Elizabeth; Li, Wenqian; Zhang, Ying; Florens, Laurence; Byrum, Stephanie D; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Koutelou, Evangelia; Wang, Li; Tang, Dean G; Tackett, Alan J; Washburn, Michael P; Workman, Jerry L; Dent, Sharon Y R

    2016-05-19

    Histone H2B monoubiquitination (H2Bub1) is centrally involved in gene regulation. The deubiquitination module (DUBm) of the SAGA complex is a major regulator of global H2Bub1 levels, and components of this DUBm are linked to both neurodegenerative diseases and cancer. Unexpectedly, we find that ablation of USP22, the enzymatic center of the DUBm, leads to a reduction, rather than an increase, in global H2bub1 levels. In contrast, depletion of non-enzymatic components, ATXN7L3 or ENY2, results in increased H2Bub1. These observations led us to discover two H2Bub1 DUBs, USP27X and USP51, which function independently of SAGA and compete with USP22 for ATXN7L3 and ENY2 for activity. Like USP22, USP51 and USP27X are required for normal cell proliferation, and their depletion suppresses tumor growth. Our results reveal that ATXN7L3 and ENY2 orchestrate activities of multiple deubiquitinating enzymes and that imbalances in these activities likely potentiate human diseases including cancer. PMID:27132940

  2. Cellular senescence: when bad things happen to good cells.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Judith; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2007-09-01

    Cells continually experience stress and damage from exogenous and endogenous sources, and their responses range from complete recovery to cell death. Proliferating cells can initiate an additional response by adopting a state of permanent cell-cycle arrest that is termed cellular senescence. Understanding the causes and consequences of cellular senescence has provided novel insights into how cells react to stress, especially genotoxic stress, and how this cellular response can affect complex organismal processes such as the development of cancer and ageing. PMID:17667954

  3. HER-kinase Axis Receptor Dimer Partner Switching Occurs in Response to EGFR Tyrosine Kinase Inhibition Despite Failure to Block Cellular Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anjali; Penuel, Elicia; Mink, Sheldon; Schmidt, Joanna; Hodge, Amanda; Favero, Kristin; Tindell, Charles; Agus, David B.

    2010-01-01

    The HER-axis consists of a dynamic, interconnected family of receptors that make critical contributions to a number of malignancies. Therapeutics targeting EGFR, are unable to effectively inhibit tumor growth in a majority of cases. These tumors are assumed to possess primary resistance to anti-EGFR therapies but the consequence of inhibiting EGFR in these tumors is unclear. We established isogenic cell lines by prolonged gefitinib treatment at concentrations that are in excess of that which is required for complete EGFR kinase inhibition but only minimally effected growth. Subsequently, we monitored the ligand-dependent HER profiles based on receptor expression, phosphorylation and dimerization in conjunction with measurements of cellular susceptibility to gefitinib. Chronic EGFR kinase inhibition rapidly switched the HER network from dependence on EGFR to HER2. However, both receptors activated the critical signaling proteins, AKT and MAPK and in both cases HER3 was the common association partner. Remarkably, the switch in receptor dimers caused diminished susceptibility to EGFR-targeted inhibitors, gefitinib and cetuximab, but acquired susceptibility to the HER2-targeted inhibitor, pertuzumab. Overall, our study indicates that the EGFR pathway is responsive to EGFR inhibiting therapies that are not dependent on EGFR for their growth and survival thus challenging the current definition of primary therapeutic resistance. Further, EGFR kinase inhibition induces HER-kinase receptors to engage in alternative dimerization that can ultimately influence therapeutic selection and responsiveness. PMID:20160029

  4. microRNA miR-200b affects proliferation, invasiveness and stemness of endometriotic cells by targeting ZEB1, ZEB2 and KLF4.

    PubMed

    Eggers, Julia C; Martino, Valentina; Reinbold, Rolland; Schäfer, Sebastian D; Kiesel, Ludwig; Starzinski-Powitz, Anna; Schüring, Andreas N; Kemper, Björn; Greve, Burkhard; Götte, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Endometriosis is characterized by growth of endometrial tissue at ectopic locations. Down-regulation of microRNA miR-200b is observed in endometriosis and malignant disease, driving tumour cells towards an invasive state by enhancing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). miR-200b up-regulation may inhibit EMT and invasive growth in endometriosis. To study its functional impact on the immortalized endometriotic cell line 12Z, the stromal cell line ST-T1b, and primary endometriotic stroma cells, a transient transfection approach with microRNA precursors was employed. Expression of bioinformatically predicted targets of miR-200b was analysed by qPCR. The cellular phenotype was monitored by Matrigel invasion assays, digital-holographic video microscopy and flow cytometry. qPCR revealed significant down-regulation of ZEB1 (P < 0.05) and ZEB2 (P < 0.01) and an increase in E-cadherin (P < 0.01). miR-200b overexpression decreased invasiveness (P < 0.0001) and cell motility (P < 0.05). In contrast, cell proliferation (P < 0.0001) and the stemness-associated side population phenotype (P < 0.01) were enhanced following miR-200b transfection. These properties were possibly due to up-regulation of the pluripotency-associated transcription factor KLF4 (P < 0.05) and require attention when considering therapeutic strategies. In conclusion, up-regulation of miR-200b reverts EMT, emerging as a potential therapeutic approach to inhibit endometriotic cell motility and invasiveness. PMID:26854065

  5. Biophysical properties of dermal building-blocks affects extra cellular matrix assembly in 3D endogenous macrotissue.

    PubMed

    Urciuolo, F; Garziano, A; Imparato, G; Panzetta, V; Fusco, S; Casale, C; Netti, P A

    2016-03-01

    The fabrication of functional tissue units is one of the major challenges in tissue engineering due to their in vitro use in tissue-on-chip systems, as well as in modular tissue engineering for the construction of macrotissue analogs. In this work, we aim to engineer dermal tissue micromodules obtained by culturing human dermal fibroblasts into porous gelatine microscaffold. We proved that such stromal cells coupled with gelatine microscaffolds are able to synthesize and to assemble an endogenous extracellular matrix (ECM) resulting in tissue micromodules, which evolve their biophysical features over the time. In particular, we found a time-dependent variation of oxygen consumption kinetic parameters, of newly formed ECM stiffness and of micromodules self-aggregation properties. As consequence when used as building blocks to fabricate larger tissues, the initial tissue micromodules state strongly affects the ECM organization and maturation in the final macrotissue. Such results highlight the role of the micromodules properties in controlling the formation of three-dimensional macrotissue in vitro, defining an innovative design criterion for selecting tissue-building blocks for modular tissue engineering. PMID:26824879

  6. Innervation of Gill Lateral Cells in the Bivalve Mollusc Crassostrea virginica Affects Cellular Membrane Potential and Cilia Activity

    PubMed Central

    Catapane, Edward J; Nelson, Michael; Adams, Trevon; Carroll, Margaret A

    2016-01-01

    Gill lateral cells of Crassostrea virginica are innervated by the branchial nerve, which contains serotonergic and dopaminergic fibers that regulate cilia beating rate. Terminal release of serotonin or dopamine results in an increase or decrease, respectively, of cilia beating rate in lateral gill cells. In this study we used the voltage sensitive fluorescent probe DiBAC4(3) to quantify changes in gill lateral cell membrane potential in response to electrical stimulation of the branchial nerve or to applications of serotonin and dopamine, and correlate these changes to cilia beating rates. Application of serotonin to gill lateral cells caused prolonged membrane depolarization, similar to plateau potentials, while increasing cilia beating rate. Application of dopamine hyperpolarized the resting membrane while decreasing cilia beating rate. Low frequency (5 Hz) electrical stimulations of the branchial nerve, which cause terminal release of endogenous serotonin, or high frequency (20 Hz) stimulations, which cause terminal release of endogenous dopamine, had the same effects on gill lateral cell membrane potentials and cilia beating rate as the respective applications of serotonin or dopamine. The study shows that innervation of gill lateral cells by the branchial nerve affects membrane potential as well as cilia beating rate, and demonstrates a strong correlation between changes in membrane potential and regulation of cilia beating rate. The study furthers the understanding of serotonin and dopamine signaling in the innervation and regulation of gill cilia in bivalves. The study also shows that voltage sensitive fluorescent probes like DiBAC 4(3) can be successfully used as an alternative to microelectrodes to measure changes in membrane potential of ciliated gill cells and other small cells with fast moving cilia. PMID:27489887

  7. Campylobacter Colonization and Proliferation in the Broiler Chicken upon Natural Field Challenge Is Not Affected by the Bird Growth Rate or Breed

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Richard A.; Watson, Kellie A.; McAdam, Jim; Avendaño, Santiago; Stanley, William A.; Koerhuis, Alfons N. M.

    2014-01-01

    The zoonotic association between Campylobacter bacteria in poultry and humans has been characterized by decades of research which has attempted to elucidate the epidemiology of this complex relationship and to reduce carriage within poultry. While much work has focused on the mechanisms facilitating its success in contaminating chicken flocks (and other animal hosts), it remains difficult to consistently exclude Campylobacter under field conditions. Within the United Kingdom poultry industry, various bird genotypes with widely varying growth rates are available to meet market needs and consumer preferences. However, little is known about whether any differences in Campylobacter carriage exist across this modern broiler range. The aim of this study was to establish if a relationship exists between growth rate or breed and cecal Campylobacter concentration after natural commercial flock Campylobacter challenge. In one investigation, four pure line genotypes of various growth rates were grown together, while in the second, eight different commercial broiler genotypes were grown individually. In both studies, the Campylobacter concentration was measured in the ceca at 42 days of age, revealing no significant difference in cecal load between birds of different genotypes both in mixed- and single-genotype pens. This is important from a public health perspective and suggests that other underlying reasons beyond genotype are likely to control and affect Campylobacter colonization within chickens. Further studies to gain a better understanding of colonization dynamics and subsequent proliferation are needed, as are novel approaches to reduce the burden in poultry. PMID:25172857

  8. c-Rel arrests the proliferation of HeLa cells and affects critical regulators of the G1/S-phase transition.

    PubMed Central

    Bash, J; Zong, W X; Gélinas, C

    1997-01-01

    A tetracycline-regulated system was used to characterize the effects of c-Rel on cell proliferation. The expression of c-Rel in HeLa cells led to growth arrest at the G1/S-phase transition, which correlated with its nuclear localization and the induction of endogenous IkappaB alpha expression. These changes were accompanied by a decrease in E2F DNA binding and the accumulation of the hypophosphorylated form of Rb. In vitro kinase assays showed a reduction in Cdk2 kinase activity that correlated with elevated levels of p21WAF1 Cdk inhibitor and p53 tumor suppressor protein. While the steady-state levels of WAF1 transcripts were increased, pulse-chase analysis revealed a sharp increase in p53 protein stability. Importantly, the deletion of the C-terminal transactivation domains of c-Rel abolished these effects. Together, these studies demonstrate that c-Rel can affect cell cycle control and suggest the involvement of the p21WAF1 and p53 cell cycle regulators. PMID:9343416

  9. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ is a Sensitive Target for Oil Sands Process-Affected Water: Effects on Adipogenesis and Identification of Ligands.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Sun, Jianxian; Alharbi, Hattan A; Jones, Paul D; Giesy, John P; Wiseman, Steve

    2016-07-19

    Identification of toxic components of complex mixtures is a challenge. Here, oil sands process-affected water (OSPW) was used as a case study to identify those toxic components with a known protein target. Organic chemicals in OSPW exhibited dose-dependent activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) at concentrations less than those currently in the environment (0.025× equivalent of full-strength OSPW), by use of a luciferase reporter gene assay. Activation of PPARγ-mediated adipogenesis by OSPW was confirmed in 3T3L1 preadipocytes, as evidenced by accumulation of lipids and up-regulation of AP2, LPL, and PPARγ gene expression after exposure to polar fractions of OSPW. Unexpectedly, the nonpolar fractions of OSPW inhibited differentiation of preadipocytes via activation of the Wnt signaling pathway. Organic chemicals in OSPW that were ligands of PPARγ were identified by use of a pull-down system combined with untargeted chemical analysis (PUCA), with a recombinant PPARγ protein. Thirty ligands of PPARγ were identified by use of the PUCA assay. High resolution MS(1) and MS(2) spectra were combined to predict the formulas or structures of a subset of ligands, and polyoxygenated or heteroatomic chemicals, especially hydroxylated carboxylic/sulfonic acids, were the major ligands of PPARγ. PMID:27340905

  10. Sublethal red tide toxin exposure in free-ranging manatees (Trichechus manatus) affects the immune system through reduced lymphocyte proliferation responses, inflammation, and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Catherine J; Butawan, Matthew; Yordy, Jennifer; Ball, Ray; Flewelling, Leanne; de Wit, Martine; Bonde, Robert K

    2015-04-01

    The health of many Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) is adversely affected by exposure to blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. K. brevis blooms are common in manatee habitats of Florida's southwestern coast and produce a group of cyclic polyether toxins collectively referred to as red tide toxins, or brevetoxins. Although a large number of manatees exposed to significant levels of red tide toxins die, several manatees are rescued from sublethal exposure and are successfully treated and returned to the wild. Sublethal brevetoxin exposure may potentially impact the manatee immune system. Lymphocyte proliferative responses and a suite of immune function parameters in the plasma were used to evaluate effects of brevetoxin exposure on health of manatees rescued from natural exposure to red tide toxins in their habitat. Blood samples were collected from rescued manatees at Lowry Park Zoo in Tampa, FL and from healthy, unexposed manatees in Crystal River, FL. Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) isolated from whole blood were stimulated with T-cell mitogens, ConA and PHA. A suite of plasma parameters, including plasma protein electrophoresis profiles, lysozyme activity, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and reactive oxygen/nitrogen (ROS/RNS) species, was also used to assess manatee health. Significant decreases (p<0.05) in lymphocyte proliferation were observed in ConA and PHA stimulated lymphocytes from rescued animals compared to non-exposed animals. Significant correlations were observed between oxidative stress markers (SOD, ROS/RNS) and plasma brevetoxin concentrations. Sublethal exposure to brevetoxins in the wild impacts some immune function components, and thus, overall health, in the Florida manatee. PMID:25678466

  11. Imaging Cellular Proliferation During Chemo-Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study of Serial {sup 18}F-FLT Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Imaging for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Everitt, Sarah; Hicks, Rodney J.; Ball, David; Kron, Tomas; Schneider-Kolsky, Michal; Walter, Tania; Binns, David; Mac Manus, Michael

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To establish whether {sup 18}F-3'-deoxy-3'-fluoro-L-thymidine ({sup 18}F-FLT) can monitor changes in cellular proliferation of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during radical chemo-radiotherapy (chemo-RT). Methods and Materials: As part of a prospective pilot study, 5 patients with locally advanced NSCLC underwent serial {sup 18}F-FLT positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) scans during treatment. Baseline {sup 18}F-FLT PET/CT scans were compared with routine staging {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scans. Two on-treatment {sup 18}F-FLT scans were performed for each patient on Days 2, 8, 15 or 29, providing a range of time points for response assessment. Results: In all 5 patients, baseline lesional uptake of {sup 18}F-FLT on PET/CT corresponded to staging {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT abnormalities. {sup 18}F-FLT uptake in tumor was observed on five of nine (55%) on-treatment scans, on Days 2, 8 and 29, but not Day 15. A 'flare' of {sup 18}F-FLT uptake in the primary tumor of one case was observed after 2 Gy of radiation (1.22 x baseline). The remaining eight on-treatment scans demonstrated a mean reduction in {sup 18}F-FLT tumor uptake of 0.58 x baseline. A marked reduction of {sup 18}F-FLT uptake in irradiated bone marrow was observed for all cases. This reduction was observed even after only 2 Gy, and all patients demonstrated a complete absence of proliferating marrow after 10 Gy. Conclusions: This proof of concept study indicates that {sup 18}F-FLT uptake can monitor the distinctive biologic responses of epithelial cancers and highly radiosensitive normal tissue changes during radical chemo-RT. Further studies of {sup 18}F-FLT PET/CT imaging during therapy may suggest that this tracer is useful in developing response-adapted RT for NSCLC.

  12. Do calcium-mediated cellular signalling pathways, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), estrogen or progesterone receptor antagonists, or bacterial endotoxins affect bovine placental function in vitro?

    PubMed

    Weems, Y S; Randel, R D; Carstens, G E; Welsh, T H; Weems, C W

    2004-04-01

    media treated with RU-486 increased (P < or = 0.05) at 4 and 8 h compared to vehicle controls and was not affected by other treatments (P > or = 0.05). Concentrations of PGE2 in media at 4 and 8 h were lower (P < or = 0.05) when compared to controls except treatment with PGE2 at 4 and 8h and RU-486 at 8h (P > or = 0.05). PGF2alpha was increased (P < or = 0.05) by RU-486 at 8h and no other treatment affected PGF2alpha at 4 or 8 h (P < or = 0.05). In conclusion, modulators of cellular calcium signalling pathways given alone do not affect bovine placental progesterone secretion at the days studied and progesterone receptor-mediated events appear to suppress placental progesterone, PGF2alpha, and PGE2 secretion in cattle. In addition, PGE2 does not appear to regulate bovine placental progesterone secretion when the corpus luteum is functional and bacterial endotoxin does not appear to affect bovine placental secretion of PGF2alpha or PGE2. PMID:15287156

  13. Downregulation of lncRNA-MALAT1 Affects Proliferation and the Expression of Stemness Markers in Glioma Stem Cell Line SHG139S.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong; Zhou, Liang; Wu, Tingfeng; Huang, Yulun; Cheng, Zhe; Li, Xuetao; Sun, Ting; Zhou, Youxin; Du, Ziwei

    2016-10-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is among the most abundant and highly conserved lncRNAs, which has been detected in a wide variety of human tumors, including gastric cancer, gallbladder cancer, and so on. Previous research has showed that MALAT1 can activate LTBP3 gene in mesenchymal stem cells. However, the specific roles of MALAT1 in glioma stem cells (GSCs) remain unclear. In this study, we aimed to identify the effects of MALAT1 on proliferation and the expression of stemness markers on glioma stem cell line SHG139S. Our results showed that downregulation of MALAT1 suppressed the expression of Sox2 and Nestin which are related to stemness, while downregulation of MALAT1 promoted the proliferation in SHG139S. Further research on the underlying mechanism showed that the effects of MALAT1 downregulation on SHG139S were through regulating ERK/MAPk signaling activity. And we also found that downregulation of MALAT1 could activate ERK/MAPK signaling and promoted proliferation in SHG139 cells. These findings show that MALAT1 plays an important role in regulating the expression of stemness markers and proliferation of SHG139S, and provide a new research direction to target the progression of GSCs. PMID:26649728

  14. Cellular interference in craniofrontonasal syndrome: males mosaic for mutations in the X-linked EFNB1 gene are more severely affected than true hemizygotes

    PubMed Central

    Twigg, Stephen R.F.; Babbs, Christian; van den Elzen, Marijke E.P.; Goriely, Anne; Taylor, Stephen; McGowan, Simon J.; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Lonie, Lorne; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Akha, Elham Sadighi; Knight, Samantha J.L.; Zechi-Ceide, Roseli M.; Hoogeboom, Jeannette A.M.; Pober, Barbara R.; Toriello, Helga V.; Wall, Steven A.; Rita Passos-Bueno, M.; Brunner, Han G.; Mathijssen, Irene M.J.; Wilkie, Andrew O.M.

    2013-01-01

    Craniofrontonasal syndrome (CFNS), an X-linked disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations of EFNB1, exhibits a paradoxical sex reversal in phenotypic severity: females characteristically have frontonasal dysplasia, craniosynostosis and additional minor malformations, but males are usually more mildly affected with hypertelorism as the only feature. X-inactivation is proposed to explain the more severe outcome in heterozygous females, as this leads to functional mosaicism for cells with differing expression of EPHRIN-B1, generating abnormal tissue boundaries—a process that cannot occur in hemizygous males. Apparently challenging this model, males occasionally present with a more severe female-like CFNS phenotype. We hypothesized that such individuals might be mosaic for EFNB1 mutations and investigated this possibility in multiple tissue samples from six sporadically presenting males. Using denaturing high performance liquid chromatography, massively parallel sequencing and multiplex-ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) to increase sensitivity above standard dideoxy sequencing, we identified mosaic mutations of EFNB1 in all cases, comprising three missense changes, two gene deletions and a novel point mutation within the 5′ untranslated region (UTR). Quantification by Pyrosequencing and MLPA demonstrated levels of mutant cells between 15 and 69%. The 5′ UTR variant mutates the stop codon of a small upstream open reading frame that, using a dual-luciferase reporter construct, was demonstrated to exacerbate interference with translation of the wild-type protein. These results demonstrate a more severe outcome in mosaic than in constitutionally deficient males in an X-linked dominant disorder and provide further support for the cellular interference mechanism, normally related to X-inactivation in females. PMID:23335590

  15. How do changes to plate thickness, length, and face-connectivity affect femoral cancellous bone's density and surface area? An investigation using regular cellular models.

    PubMed

    Anderson, I A; Carman, J B

    2000-03-01

    Models of regular cellular-solids representing femoral head 'medial group' bone were used to (1) compare thickness data for plate-like and beam-like structures at realistic surface areas and densities; (2) test the validity of a standard formula for trabecular thickness (Tb.Th); and (3) study how systematic changes in cancellous bone thicknesses, spacing, and face-connectivity affect relative density and surface area. Models of different face-connectivities, produced by plate removal from the unit cell, were fitted to bone density and surface area data. The medial group bone was anisotropic: the supero-inferior (SI) direction was the principal direction for bone plate alignment and the plane normal to this had the largest number of bone/void intersections per unit line length (P(I)). A comparison of boundary perimeter per unit area data, in planes normal to SI, with surface area data placed the medial group bone between prismatic structures in which walls are parallel to one principal direction and isotropic structures. Selective removal of plates from a closed-cell model produced a similar result. For the same relative density and surface-area, plate-like models had significantly thinner cross-sections than beam-like models. The formula for Tb.Th produced overestimates of model plate thickness by up to 20% at realistic femoral cancellous densities. Trends in data on surface area to volume ratio and density observed on sampled medial group bone could be simulated by plate thickness changes on models of intermediate face-connectivity (approximately 1.5) or by plate removal from models with relatively thick and short (low aspect-ratio) plates. The latter mechanism is unrealistic for it resulted in beam-like structures at low 'medial group' densities, an architecture unlike the predominantly plate-like bone in the sample. PMID:10673116

  16. Nuclear localization of CPI-17, a protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor protein, affects histone H3 phosphorylation and corresponds to proliferation of cancer and smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Masumi; Kirkbride, Jason A.; Chugh, Rishika; Karikari, Nana Kofi; Kim, Jee In

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •Non-canonical roles of the myosin phosphatase inhibitor (CPI-17) were studied. •CPI-17 is localized in the nucleus of hyperplastic cancer and smooth muscle cells. •CPI-17 Ser12 phosphorylation may regulate the nuclear import. •CPI-17 regulates histone H3 phosphorylation and cell proliferation. •The nuclear CPI-17-PP1 axis plays a proliferative role in cells. -- Abstract: CPI-17 (C-kinase-activated protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) inhibitor, 17 kDa) is a cytoplasmic protein predominantly expressed in mature smooth muscle (SM) that regulates the myosin-associated PP1 holoenzyme (MLCP). Here, we show CPI-17 expression in proliferating cells, such as pancreatic cancer and hyperplastic SM cells. Immunofluorescence showed that CPI-17 was concentrated in nuclei of human pancreatic cancer (Panc1) cells. Nuclear accumulation of CPI-17 was also detected in the proliferating vascular SM cell culture and cells at neointima of rat vascular injury model. The N-terminal 21-residue tail domain of CPI-17 was necessary for the nuclear localization. Phospho-mimetic Asp-substitution of CPI-17 at Ser12 attenuated the nuclear import. CPI-17 phosphorylated at Ser12 was not localized at nuclei, suggesting a suppressive role of Ser12 phosphorylation in the nuclear import. Activated CPI-17 bound to all three isoforms of PP1 catalytic subunit in Panc1 nuclear extracts. CPI-17 knockdown in Panc1 resulted in dephosphorylation of histone H3 at Thr3, Ser10 and Thr11, whereas it had no effects on the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and merlin, the known targets of MLCP. In parallel, CPI-17 knockdown suppressed Panc1 proliferation. We propose that CPI-17 accumulated in the nucleus through the N-terminal tail targets multiple PP1 signaling pathways regulating cell proliferation.

  17. From proliferation to proliferation: monocyte lineage comes full circle

    PubMed Central

    Swirski, Filip K.; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Robbins, Clinton S.

    2014-01-01

    Monocytes are mononuclear circulating phagocytes that originate in the bone marrow and give rise to macrophages in peripheral tissue. For decades, our understanding of monocyte lineage was bound to a stepwise model that favored an inverse relationship between cellular proliferation and differentiation. Sophisticated molecular and surgical cell tracking tools have transformed our thinking about monocyte topo-ontogeny and function. Here, we discuss how recent studies focusing on progenitor proliferation and differentiation, monocyte mobilization and recruitment, and macrophage differentiation and proliferation are reshaping knowledge of monocyte lineage in steady state and disease. PMID:24435095

  18. MiR-338-3p targets pyruvate kinase M2 and affects cell proliferation and metabolism of ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuting; Shi, Bing; Chen, Jiang; Hu, Lina; Zhao, Chunquan

    2016-01-01

    MiR-338-3p is down-regulated in cancer, which inhibits cancer cell proliferation, metastasis, and increases chemosensitivity, but its functions in ovarian cancer remains unknown. The present study aims to identify the miR-338-3p targeted genes and to investigate the associated regulatory mechanisms in ovarian cancer cell proliferation and metabolism. Our results demonstrated miR-338-3p expression was down-regulated in most of ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines. Restoration of miR-338-3p expression in ovarian cancer cells could inhibit cell proliferation, lactate production and lactate production of ovarian cancer cells. PKM2 was verified as a target gene of miR-338-3p by luciferase assay. Further study indicated miR-338-3p controlled ovarian cancer cell metabolism by inhibiting PKM2 expression. It is summarized that the regulatory role of miR-338-3p on PKM2 expression in ovarian cancer may play important roles in cell metabolism. PMID:27508048

  19. MiR-338-3p targets pyruvate kinase M2 and affects cell proliferation and metabolism of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuting; Shi, Bing; Chen, Jiang; Hu, Lina; Zhao, Chunquan

    2016-01-01

    MiR-338-3p is down-regulated in cancer, which inhibits cancer cell proliferation, metastasis, and increases chemosensitivity, but its functions in ovarian cancer remains unknown. The present study aims to identify the miR-338-3p targeted genes and to investigate the associated regulatory mechanisms in ovarian cancer cell proliferation and metabolism. Our results demonstrated miR-338-3p expression was down-regulated in most of ovarian cancer tissues and cell lines. Restoration of miR-338-3p expression in ovarian cancer cells could inhibit cell proliferation, lactate production and lactate production of ovarian cancer cells. PKM2 was verified as a target gene of miR-338-3p by luciferase assay. Further study indicated miR-338-3p controlled ovarian cancer cell metabolism by inhibiting PKM2 expression. It is summarized that the regulatory role of miR-338-3p on PKM2 expression in ovarian cancer may play important roles in cell metabolism. PMID:27508048

  20. Acrylamide affects proliferation and differentiation of the neural progenitor cell line C17.2 and the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y.

    PubMed

    Attoff, K; Kertika, D; Lundqvist, J; Oredsson, S; Forsby, A

    2016-09-01

    Acrylamide is a well-known neurotoxic compound and people get exposed to the compound by food consumption and environmental pollutants. Since acrylamide crosses the placenta barrier, the fetus is also being exposed resulting in a risk for developmental neurotoxicity. In this study, the neural progenitor cell line C17.2 and the neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y were used to study proliferation and differentiation as alerting indicators for developmental neurotoxicity. For both cell lines, acrylamide reduced the number of viable cells by reducing proliferation and inducing cell death in undifferentiated cells. Acrylamide concentrations starting at 10fM attenuated the differentiation process in SH-SY5Y cells by sustaining cell proliferation and neurite outgrowth was reduced at concentrations from 10pM. Acrylamide significantly reduced the number of neurons starting at 1μM and altered the ratio between the different phenotypes in differentiating C17.2 cell cultures. Ten micromolar of acrylamide also reduced the expression of the neuronal and astrocyte biomarkers. Although the neurotoxic concentrations in the femtomolar range seem to be specific for the SH-SY5Y cell line, the fact that micromolar concentrations of acrylamide seem to attenuate the differentiation process in both cell lines raises the interest to further investigations on the possible developmental neurotoxicity of acrylamide. PMID:27241584

  1. Cellular proliferation rate and insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-2 and IGFBP-3 and estradiol receptor alpha expression in the mammary gland of dairy heifers naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes during development.

    PubMed

    Perri, A F; Dallard, B E; Baravalle, C; Licoff, N; Formía, N; Ortega, H H; Becú-Villalobos, D; Mejia, M E; Lacau-Mengido, I M

    2014-01-01

    Mammary ductal morphogenesis during prepuberty occurs mainly in response to insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and estradiol stimulation. Dairy heifers infected with gastrointestinal nematodes have reduced IGF-1 levels, accompanied by reduced growth rate, delayed puberty onset, and lower parenchyma-stroma relationship in their mammary glands. Immunohistochemical studies were undertaken to determine variations in cell division rate, IGF-1 system components, and estradiol receptors (ESR) during peripubertal development in the mammary glands of antiparasitic-treated and untreated Holstein heifers naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. Mammary biopsies were taken at 20, 30, 40, and 70 wk of age. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunolabeling, evident in nuclei, tended to be higher in the parenchyma of the glands from treated heifers than in those from untreated. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP) type 2 and type 3 immunolabeling was cytoplasmic and was evident in stroma and parenchyma. The IGFBP2-labeled area was lower in treated than in untreated heifers. In the treated group, a maximal expression of this protein was seen at 40 wk of age, whereas in the untreated group the labeling remained constant. No differences were observed for IGFBP3 between treatment groups or during development. Immunolabeling for α ESR (ESR1) was evident in parenchymal nuclei and was higher in treated than in untreated heifers. In the treated group, ESR1 peaked at 30 wk of age and then decreased. These results demonstrate that the parasite burden in young heifers negatively influence mammary gland development, affecting cell division rate and parameters related to estradiol and IGF-1 signaling in the gland. PMID:24931533

  2. Overexpression of caspase 7 is ERα dependent to affect proliferation and cell growth in breast cancer cells by targeting p21Cip

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, S; Madhukrishna, B; Adhya, A K; Keshari, S; Mishra, S K

    2016-01-01

    Caspase 7 (CASP7) expression has important function during cell cycle progression and cell growth in certain cancer cells and is also involved in the development and differentiation of dental tissues. However, the function of CASP7 in breast cancer cells is unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of CASP7 in breast carcinoma patients and determine the role of CASP7 in regulating tumorigenicity in breast cancer cells. In this study, we show that the CASP7 expression is high in breast carcinoma tissues compared with normal counterpart. The ectopic expression of CASP7 is significantly associated with ERα expression status and persistently elevated in different stages of the breast tumor grades. High level of CASP7 expression showed better prognosis in breast cancer patients with systemic endocrine therapy as observed from Kaplan–Meier analysis. S3 and S4, estrogen responsive element (ERE) in the CASP7 promoter, is important for estrogen-ERα-mediated CASP7 overexpression. Increased recruitment of p300, acetylated H3 and pol II in the ERE region of CASP7 promoter is observed after hormone stimulation. Ectopic expression of CASP7 in breast cancer cells results in cell growth and proliferation inhibition via p21Cip reduction, whereas small interfering RNA (siRNA) mediated reduction of CASP7 rescued p21Cip levels. We also show that pro- and active forms of CASP7 is located in the nucleus apart from cytoplasmic region of breast cancer cells. The proliferation and growth of breast cancer cells is significantly reduced by broad-spectrum peptide inhibitors and siRNA of CASP7. Taken together, our findings show that CASP7 is aberrantly expressed in breast cancer and contributes to cell growth and proliferation by downregulating p21Cip protein, suggesting that targeting CASP7-positive breast cancer could be one of the potential therapeutic strategies. PMID:27089142

  3. The poplar basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor BEE3 – Like gene affects biomass production by enhancing proliferation of xylem cells in poplar

    SciTech Connect

    Noh, Seol Ah Choi, Young-Im Cho, Jin-Seong Lee, Hyoshin

    2015-06-19

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) play important roles in many aspects of plant growth and development, including regulation of vascular cambium activities and cell elongation. BR-induced BEE3 (brassinosteroid enhanced expression 3) is required for a proper BR response. Here, we identified a poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) BEE3-like gene, PagBEE3L, encoding a putative basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)-type transcription factor. Expression of PagBEE3L was induced by brassinolide (BL). Transcripts of PagBEE3L were mainly detected in stems, with the internode having a low level of transcription and the node having a relatively higher level. The function of the PagBEE3L gene was investigated through phenotypic analyses with PagBEE3L-overexpressing (ox) transgenic lines. This work particularly focused on a potential role of PagBEE3L in stem growth and development of polar. The PagBEE3L-ox poplar showed thicker and longer stems than wild-type plants. The xylem cells from the stems of PagBEE3L-ox plants revealed remarkably enhanced proliferation, resulting in an earlier thickening growth than wild-type plants. Therefore, this work suggests that xylem development of poplar is accelerated in PagBEE3L-ox plants and PagBEE3L plays a role in stem growth by increasing the proliferation of xylem cells to promote the initial thickening growth of poplar stems. - Highlights: • We identify the BEE3-like gene form hybrid poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa). • We examine effects of overexpression of PagBEE3L on growth in poplar. • We found that 35S:BEE3L transgenic plants showed more rapid growth than wild-type plants. • BEE3L protein plays an important role in the development of plant stem.

  4. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor affects follicular development and ovarian proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis in prepubertal eCG-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Pascuali, Natalia; Scotti, Leopoldina; Abramovich, Dalhia; Irusta, Griselda; Di Pietro, Mariana; Bas, Diana; Tesone, Marta; Parborell, Fernanda

    2015-09-01

    The platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) system is crucial for blood vessel stability. In the present study, we evaluated whether PDGFs play a critical intraovarian survival role in gonadotropin-dependent folliculogenesis. We examined the effect of intrabursal administration of a selective platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) inhibitor (AG1295) on follicular development, proliferation, apoptosis and blood vessel formation and stability in ovaries from rats treated with equine chorionic gonadotropin (eCG). The percentages of preantral follicles (PAFs) and early antral follicles (EAFs) were lower in AG1295-treated ovaries than in control ovaries (p < 0.01-0.05). The percentage of atretic follicles (AtrFs) increased in AG1295-treated ovaries compared to control (p < 0.05). The ovarian weight and estradiol concentrations were lower in AG1295-treated ovaries than in the control group (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively), whereas progesterone concentrations did not change. AG1295 decreased the proliferation index in EAFs (p < 0.05) and increased the percentage of nuclei positive for cleaved caspase-3 and apoptotic DNA fragmentation (p < 0.01-0.05). AG1295 increased the expression of Bax (p < 0.05) without changes in the expression of Bcl-2 protein. AG1295-treated ovaries increased the cleavage of caspase-8 (p < 0.05) and decreased AKT and BAD phosphorylation compared with control ovaries (p < 0.05). AG1295 caused a decrease not only in the endothelial cell area but also in the area of pericytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in the ovary (p < 0.05). Our findings suggest that the local inhibition of PDGFs causes an increase in ovarian apoptosis through an imbalance in the ratio of antiapoptotic to proapoptotic proteins, thus leading a larger number of follicles to atresia. PDGFs could exert their mechanism of action through an autocrine/paracrine effect on granulosa and theca cells mediated by PDGFRs. In

  5. Effect of mitoxantrone on proliferation dynamics and cell-cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shahper N; Lal, Sunil K; Kumar, Purnima; Khan, Asad U

    2010-12-01

    MTX (mitoxantrone), an anti-tumour antibiotic, is known to cause cell death by intercalating the DNA bases. But how it interferes with the cellular proliferation is not well known. Hence, in the present study, we have tried to evaluate the interaction of this drug using proliferation dynamics to gain a better understanding of MTX's antineoplastic action. Inhibition of proliferation by these drugs was detected by evaluating its effect on cell proliferation and growth curve of the cells. MTX was also found to affect the cell viability and, thereby, cell physiology. Typical apoptotic morphologies such as condensation of nuclei and membrane permeabilization were observed through CLSM (confocal laser scanning microscopy) and fluorescence spectroscopy, which implicates commitment to cell death. Cell-cycle distribution was measured by flow cytometric measurements. The analysis demonstrated significant cell-cycle arrest on MTX treatment. Inhibition of lacZ gene expression was also observed on drug treatment, which implicates its interaction with gene expression. PMID:19951261

  6. Clustering Nuclear Receptors in Liver Regeneration Identifies Candidate Modulators of Hepatocyte Proliferation and Hepatocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Giusi; D'Orazio, Andria; Cariello, Marica; Massafra, Vittoria; Salvatore, Lorena; Martelli, Nicola; Murzilli, Stefania; Sasso, Giuseppe Lo; Mariani-Costantini, Renato; Moschetta, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver regeneration (LR) is a valuable model for studying mechanisms modulating hepatocyte proliferation. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are key players in the control of cellular functions, being ideal modulators of hepatic proliferation and carcinogenesis. Methods & Results We used a previously validated RT-qPCR platform to profile modifications in the expression of all 49 members of the NR superfamily in mouse liver during LR. Twenty-nine NR transcripts were significantly modified in their expression during LR, including fatty acid (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, PPARs) and oxysterol (liver X receptors, Lxrs) sensors, circadian masters RevErbα and RevErbβ, glucocorticoid receptor (Gr) and constitutive androxane receptor (Car). In order to detect the NRs that better characterize proliferative status vs. proliferating liver, we used the novel Random Forest (RF) analysis to selected a trio of down-regulated NRs (thyroid receptor alpha, Trα; farsenoid X receptor beta, Fxrβ; Pparδ) as best discriminators of the proliferating status. To validate our approach, we further studied PPARδ role in modulating hepatic proliferation. We first confirmed the suppression of PPARδ both in LR and human hepatocellular carcinoma at protein level, and then demonstrated that PPARδ agonist GW501516 reduces the proliferative potential of hepatoma cells. Conclusions Our data suggest that NR transcriptome is modulated in proliferating liver and is a source of biomarkers and bona fide pharmacological targets for the management of liver disease affecting hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:25116592

  7. Sam68 affects cell proliferation and apoptosis of human adult T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells via AKT/mTOR signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Li, Yuanye; Cheng, Jingying; Chen, Long; Xu, Hua; Li, Qinghua; Pang, Tianxiang

    2016-07-01

    Sam68 (Src associated in mitosis, 68kDa) belongs to the signal,transduction and activation of RNA (STAR) family and its function has been linked to the onset and progression of many tumors. However, the role of Sam68 in T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) remains unclear. This present study aimed to investigate whether and how Sam68 involved in T-ALL. Our results showed high expression of Sam68 in adult T-ALL cases, Jurkat and CCRF-CEM cell lines. Knockdown of Sam68 repressed cell proliferation, increased apoptosis, induced S arrest along with upregulation of p21, Bad, cleaved caspase-9, caspase-3, PARP and downregulation of CDK2 and Bcl-xl. Furthermore, the data indicated that the expression change of Sam68 went with the changes of AKT/mTOR signaling pathway in T-ALL cell lines. Our findings demonstrated that Sam68 possibly participated in the progresses of T-ALL at least partially via AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:27107742

  8. Power Frequency Magnetic Fields Affect the p38 MAPK-Mediated Regulation of NB69 Cell Proliferation Implication of Free Radicals

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, María Antonia; Úbeda, Alejandro; Moreno, Jorge; Trillo, María Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    The proliferative response of the neuroblastoma line NB69 to a 100 µT, 50 Hz magnetic field (MF) has been shown mediated by activation of the MAPK-ERK1/2 pathway. This work investigates the MF effect on the cell cycle of NB69, the participation of p38 and c-Jun N-terminal (JNK) kinases in the field-induced proliferative response and the potential involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the activation of the MAPK-ERK1/2 and -p38 signaling pathways. NB69 cultures were exposed to the 100 µT MF, either intermittently for 24, 42 or 63 h, or continuously for periods of 15 to 120 min, in the presence or absence of p38 or JNK inhibitors: SB203580 and SP600125, respectively. Antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was used as ROS scavenger. Field exposure induced transient activation of p38, JNK and ERK1/2. The MF proliferative effect, which was mediated by changes in the cell cycle, was blocked by the p38 inhibitor, but not by the JNK inhibitor. NAC blocked the field effects on cell proliferation and p38 activation, but not those on ERK1/2 activation. The MF-induced proliferative effects are exerted through sequential upregulation of MAPK-p38 and -ERK1/2 activation, and they are likely mediated by a ROS-dependent activation of p38. PMID:27058530

  9. Power Frequency Magnetic Fields Affect the p38 MAPK-Mediated Regulation of NB69 Cell Proliferation Implication of Free Radicals.

    PubMed

    Martínez, María Antonia; Úbeda, Alejandro; Moreno, Jorge; Trillo, María Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    The proliferative response of the neuroblastoma line NB69 to a 100 µT, 50 Hz magnetic field (MF) has been shown mediated by activation of the MAPK-ERK1/2 pathway. This work investigates the MF effect on the cell cycle of NB69, the participation of p38 and c-Jun N-terminal (JNK) kinases in the field-induced proliferative response and the potential involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the activation of the MAPK-ERK1/2 and -p38 signaling pathways. NB69 cultures were exposed to the 100 µT MF, either intermittently for 24, 42 or 63 h, or continuously for periods of 15 to 120 min, in the presence or absence of p38 or JNK inhibitors: SB203580 and SP600125, respectively. Antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was used as ROS scavenger. Field exposure induced transient activation of p38, JNK and ERK1/2. The MF proliferative effect, which was mediated by changes in the cell cycle, was blocked by the p38 inhibitor, but not by the JNK inhibitor. NAC blocked the field effects on cell proliferation and p38 activation, but not those on ERK1/2 activation. The MF-induced proliferative effects are exerted through sequential upregulation of MAPK-p38 and -ERK1/2 activation, and they are likely mediated by a ROS-dependent activation of p38. PMID:27058530

  10. Loss of Cellular Sialidases Does Not Affect the Sialylation Status of the Prion Protein but Increases the Amounts of Its Proteolytic Fragment C1

    PubMed Central

    Katorcha, Elizaveta; Klimova, Nina; Makarava, Natallia; Savtchenko, Regina; Pan, Xuefang; Annunziata, Ida; Takahashi, Kohta; Miyagi, Taeko; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V.; d’Azzo, Alessandra; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2015-01-01

    The central molecular event underlying prion diseases involves conformational change of the cellular form of the prion protein (PrPC), which is a sialoglycoprotein, into the disease-associated, transmissible form denoted PrPSc. Recent studies revealed a correlation between the sialylation status of PrPSc and incubation time to disease and introduced a new hypothesis that progression of prion diseases could be controlled or reversed by altering the sialylation level of PrPC. Of the four known mammalian sialidases, the enzymes that cleave off sialic acid residues, only NEU1, NEU3 and NEU4 are expressed in the brain. To test whether cellular sialidases control the steady-state sialylation level of PrPC and to identify the putative sialidase responsible for desialylating PrPC, we analyzed brain-derived PrPC from knockout mice deficient in Neu1, Neu3, Neu4, or from Neu3/Neu4 double knockouts. Surprisingly, no differences in the sialylation of PrPC or its proteolytic product C1 were noticed in any of the knockout mice tested as compared to the age-matched controls. However, significantly higher amounts of the C1 fragment relative to full-length PrPC were detected in the brains of Neu1 knockout mice as compared to WT mice or to the other knockout mice. Additional experiments revealed that in neuroblastoma cell line the sialylation pattern of C1 could be changed by an inhibitor of sialylatransferases. In summary, this study suggests that targeting cellular sialidases is apparently not the correct strategy for altering the sialylation levels of PrPC, whereas modulating the activity of sialylatransferases might offer a more promising approach. Our findings also suggest that catabolism of PrPC involves its α-cleavage followed by desialylation of the resulting C1 fragments by NEU1 and consequent fast degradation of the desialylated products. PMID:26569607

  11. Apo- and holo-lactoferrin are both internalized by lactoferrin receptor via clathrin-mediated endocytosis but differentially affect ERK-signaling and cell proliferation in Caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rulan; Lopez, Veronica; Kelleher, Shannon L.; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) is a major iron-binding and multi-functional protein in exocrine fluids such as breast milk and mucosal secretions. The functions of Lf appear dependent upon the iron-saturation of the Lf protein and are postulated to be mediated through Lf internalization by a Lf receptor (LfR). However, mechanisms by which LfR mediates Lf internalization in enterocytes are unknown. We now demonstrate that a LfR previously cloned from the small intestine mediates Lf endocytosis in a human enterocyte model (Caco-2 cells). LfR was detected at the plasma membrane by cell surface biotinylation; both apo-Lf and holo-Lf uptake were significantly inhibited in cells transfected with LfR siRNA. Treatments of hypertonic sucrose and clathrin siRNA and co-immunoprecipitation of LfR with clathrin adaptor AP2 indicate that LfR regulates Lf endocytosis via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Although both iron-free Lf (apo-Lf) and iron-saturated Lf (holo-Lf) enter Caco-2 cells via a similar mechanism and no significant differences were observed in the binding and uptake of apo- and holo-Lf in Caco-2 cells, apo-Lf but not holo-Lf stimulates proliferation of Caco-2 cells. Interestingly, apo-Lf stimulated extracellular signal-regulated mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK) cascade to a significantly greater extent than holo-Lf and the apo-Lf induced proliferation was significantly inhibited by an ERK cascade inhibitor (U0126) and clathrin siRNA. Taken together, our data suggest that LfR is a major pathway through which Lf is taken up by enterocytes, which occurs independently of iron saturation through clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The differential effects of apo- and holo-Lf are not due to differences in cellular internalization mechanisms. PMID:21935933

  12. P53-regulated long non-coding RNA TUG1 affects cell proliferation in human non-small cell lung cancer, partly through epigenetically regulating HOXB7 expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, E-b; Yin, D-d; Sun, M; Kong, R; Liu, X-h; You, L-h; Han, L; Xia, R; Wang, K-m; Yang, J-s; De, W; Shu, Y-q; Wang, Z-x

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a novel class of transcripts, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), is being identified at a rapid pace. These RNAs have critical roles in diverse biological processes, including tumorigenesis. Here we report that taurine-upregulated gene 1 (TUG1), a 7.1-kb lncRNA, recruiting and binding to polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2), is generally downregulated in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tissues. In a cohort of 192 NSCLC patients, the lower expression of TUG1 was associated with a higher TNM stage and tumor size, as well as poorer overall survival (P<0.001). Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that TUG1 expression serves as an independent predictor for overall survival (P<0.001). Further experiments revealed that TUG1 expression was induced by p53, and luciferase and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays confirmed that TUG1 was a direct transcriptional target of p53. TUG1 knockdown significantly promoted the proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the lncRNA-mediated regulation of the expression of HOX genes in tumorigenesis and development has been recently receiving increased attention. Interestingly, inhibition of TUG1 could upregulate homeobox B7 (HOXB7) expression; ChIP assays demonstrated that the promoter of HOXB7 locus was bound by EZH2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2), a key component of PRC2, and was H3K27 trimethylated. This TUG1-mediated growth regulation is in part due to specific modulation of HOXB7, thus participating in AKT and MAPK pathways. Together, these results suggest that p53-regulated TUG1 is a growth regulator, which acts in part through control of HOXB7. The p53/TUG1/PRC2/HOXB7 interaction might serve as targets for NSCLC diagnosis and therapy. PMID:24853421

  13. Body Mass Index in Pregnancy Does Not Affect Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor Gamma Promoter Region (−359 to −260) Methylation in the Neonate

    PubMed Central

    Casamadrid, VRE; Amaya, CA; Mendieta, ZH

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obesity in pregnancy can contribute to epigenetic changes. Aim: To assess whether body mass index (BMI) in pregnancy is associated with changes in the methylation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR) promoter region (-359 to - 260) in maternal and neonatal leukocytes. Subjects and Methods: In this matched, cohort study 41 pregnant women were allocated into two groups: (a) Normal weight (n = 21) and (b) overweight (n = 20). DNA was extracted from maternal and neonatal leukocytes (4000-10,000 cells) in MagNA Pure (Roche) using MagNA Pure LC DNA Isolation Kit 1 (Roche, Germany). Treatment of DNA (2 μg) was performed with sodium bisulfite (EZ DNA Methylation-Direct™ Kit; Zymo Research). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed in a LightCycler 2.0 (Roche) using the SYBR® Advantage® qPCR Premix Kit (Clontech). The primers used for PPARγ coactivator (PPARG) M3 were 5’- aagacggtttggtcgatc-3’ (forward), and5’- cgaaaaaaaatccgaaatttaa-3’ (reverse) and those for PPARG unmethylated were: 5’-gggaagatggtttggttgatt-3’ (forward) and 5’- ttccaaaaaaaaatccaaaatttaa-3’ (reverse). Intergroup differences were calculated using the Mann-Whitney U-test, and intragroup differences, with the Wilcoxon test (IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 19.0. Armonk, NY: IBM Corp.). Results: Significant differences were found in BMI, pregestational weight, and postdelivery weight between groups but not in the methylation status of the PPARγ promoter region (-359 to - 260). Conclusion: The PPARγ promoter region (-359 to - 260) in peripheral leukocytes is unlikely to get an obesity-induced methylation in pregnancy. PMID:27144075

  14. Mutations of the functional ARH1 allele in tumors from ARH1 heterozygous mice and cells affect ARH1 catalytic activity, cell proliferation and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kato, J; Vekhter, D; Heath, J; Zhu, J; Barbieri, J T; Moss, J

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation results from transfer of the ADP-ribose moiety of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to an acceptor with ADP-ribose-acceptor content determined by the activities of ADP-ribosyltransferases, which modify the acceptor, and ADP-ribose-acceptor hydrolase (ARH), which cleave the ADP-ribose-acceptor bond. ARH1 was discovered as an ADP-ribose(arginine)protein hydrolase. Previously, we showed that ARH1-knockout and ARH1 heterozygous mice spontaneously developed tumors. Further, ARH1-knockout and ARH1 heterozygous mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) produced tumors when injected into nude mice. In tumors arising in ARH1 heterozygous mice and MEFs, we found both loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the ARH1 gene and ARH1 gene mutations. In the present report, we found that these mutant ARH1 genes encode proteins with reduced ARH1 enzymatic activity. Moreover, MEFs transformed with ARH1 mutant genes exhibiting different levels of ARH1 activity showed altered rates of proliferation, anchorage-independent colony growth in soft agar, and tumorigenesis in nude mice. MEFs transformed with the wild-type (WT) gene, but expressing low levels of hydrolase activity were also tumorigenic. However, transformation with the WT gene was less likely to yield tumors than transformation with a mutant gene exhibiting similar hydrolase activity. Thus, control of protein-ADP-ribosylation by ARH1 is critical for tumorigenesis. In the human cancer database, LOH and mutations of the ARH1 gene were observed. Further, ARH1 gene mutations were located in exons 3 and 4, comparable to exons 2 and 3 of the murine ARH1 gene, which comprise the catalytic site. Thus, human ARH1 gene mutations similar to their murine counterparts may be involved in human cancers. PMID:26029825

  15. MicroRNA-34a affects chondrocyte apoptosis and proliferation by targeting the SIRT1/p53 signaling pathway during the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    YAN, SHIJU; WANG, MENG; ZHAO, JIAN; ZHANG, HONGTAO; ZHOU, CHENGPEI; JIN, LEI; ZHANG, YINGLONG; QIU, XIUCHUN; MA, BAOAN; FAN, QINGYU

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent degenerative joint disease with multifactorial etiology caused by risk factors such as ageing, obesity and trauma. Previously, it was reported that the inhibition of microRNA-34a (miR-34a) may reduce rat chondrocyte apoptosis induced by IL-1β, whereas the molecular mechanism and the role of miR-34a in human chondrocyte as well as in OA progression remains to be determined. In the current study, using MTT, luciferase reporter assays and western blot analysis we identified that miR-34a was upregulated while silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) was inhibited in chondrocytes from 12 OA patients compared with healthy chondrocytes from 10 trauma amputees. Overexpression of miR-34a promoted apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation in human chondrocytes. Transfection with miR-34a mimic inhibited SIRT1 expression, which attenuated the deacetylation of p53, leading to the upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2. Furthermore, results from the western blot analysis and luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that SIRT1 was directly regulated by miR-34a in human chondrocytes. A rat model of OA was induced through anterior cruciate ligament transection and medial meniscus resection (ACLT+MMx). The results showed that the intra-articular injection of lentiviral vector encoding anti-miR-34a sequence effectively ameliorated the progression of OA. The results suggest that miR-34a has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of OA through direct regulation of the SIRT1/p53 signaling pathway and serves as a potential therapeutic target of OA. PMID:27247228

  16. MicroRNA-34a affects chondrocyte apoptosis and proliferation by targeting the SIRT1/p53 signaling pathway during the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shiju; Wang, Meng; Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhou, Chengpei; Jin, Lei; Zhang, Yinglong; Qiu, Xiuchun; Ma, Baoan; Fan, Qingyu

    2016-07-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most prevalent degenerative joint disease with multifactorial etiology caused by risk factors such as ageing, obesity and trauma. Previously, it was reported that the inhibition of microRNA-34a (miR-34a) may reduce rat chondrocyte apoptosis induced by IL-1β, whereas the molecular mechanism and the role of miR-34a in human chondrocyte as well as in OA progression remains to be determined. In the current study, using MTT, luciferase reporter assays and western blot analysis we identified that miR-34a was upregulated while silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) was inhibited in chondrocytes from 12 OA patients compared with healthy chondrocytes from 10 trauma amputees. Overexpression of miR-34a promoted apoptosis and inhibited cell proliferation in human chondrocytes. Transfection with miR-34a mimic inhibited SIRT1 expression, which attenuated the deacetylation of p53, leading to the upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2. Furthermore, results from the western blot analysis and luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that SIRT1 was directly regulated by miR-34a in human chondrocytes. A rat model of OA was induced through anterior cruciate ligament transection and medial meniscus resection (ACLT+MMx). The results showed that the intra‑articular injection of lentiviral vector encoding anti-miR‑34a sequence effectively ameliorated the progression of OA. The results suggest that miR-34a has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of OA through direct regulation of the SIRT1/p53 signaling pathway and serves as a potential therapeutic target of OA. PMID:27247228

  17. Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae infection affects the expression of genes involved in cellular signal transduction and iron metabolism in the kidney of the brown trout Salmo trutta.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gokhlesh; Sarker, Subhodeep; Menanteau-Ledouble, Simon; El-Matbouli, Mansour

    2015-06-01

    Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae is an enigmatic endoparasite which causes proliferative kidney disease in various species of salmonids in Europe and North America. The life cycle of the European strain of T. bryosalmonae generally completes in an invertebrate host freshwater bryozoan and vertebrate host brown trout (Salmo trutta) Linnaeus, 1758. Little is known about the gene expression in the kidney of brown trout during the developmental stages of T. bryosalmonae. In the present study, quantitative real-time PCR was applied to quantify the target genes of interest in the kidney of brown trout at different time points of T. bryosalmonae development. PCR primers specific for target genes were designed and optimized, and their gene expression levels were quantified in the cDNA kidney samples using SYBR Green Supermix. Expression of Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor beta, integral membrane protein 2B, NADH dehydrogenase 1 beta subcomplex subunit 6, and 26S protease regulatory subunit S10B were upregulated significantly in infected brown trout, while the expression of the ferritin M middle subunit was downregulated significantly. These results suggest that host genes involved in cellular signal transduction, proteasomal activities, including membrane transporters and cellular iron storage, are differentially upregulated or downregulated in the kidney of brown trout during parasite development. The gene expression pattern of infected renal tissue may support the development of intraluminal sporogonic stages of T. bryosalmonae in the renal tubular lumen of brown trout which may facilitate the release of viable parasite spores to transmit to the invertebrate host bryozoan. PMID:25786607

  18. NMDA-R inhibition affects cellular process formation in Tilapia melanocytes; a model for pigmented adrenergic neurons in process formation and retraction.

    PubMed

    Ogundele, Olalekan Michael; Okunnuga, Adetokunbo Adedotun; Fabiyi, Temitope Deborah; Olajide, Olayemi Joseph; Akinrinade, Ibukun Dorcas; Adeniyi, Philip Adeyemi; Ojo, Abiodun Ayodele

    2014-06-01

    Parkinson's disease has long been described to be a product of dopamine and (or) melanin loss in the substanstia nigra (SN). Although most studies have focused on dopaminergic neurons, it is important to consider the role of pigment cells in the etiology of the disease and to create an in vitro live cell model for studies involving pigmented adrenergic cells of the SN in Parkinsonism. The Melanocytes share specific features with the pigmented adrenergic neurons as both cells are pigmented, contain adrenergic receptors and have cellular processes. Although the melanocyte cellular processes are relatively short and observable only when stimulated appropriately by epinephrine and other factors or molecules. This study employs the manipulation of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor (NMDA-R), a major receptor in neuronal development, in the process formation pattern of the melanocyte in order to create a suitable model to depict cellular process elongation and shortening in pigmented adrenergic cells. NMDA-R is an important glutamate receptor implicated in neurogenesis, neuronal migration, maturation and cell death, thus we investigated the role of NMDA-R potentiation by glutamate/KCN and its inhibition by ketamine in the behavior of fish scale melanocytes in vitro. This is aimed at establishing the regulatory role of NMDA-R in this cell type (melanocytes isolated form Tilapia) in a similar manner to what is observable in the mammalian neurons. In vitro live cell culture was prepared in modified Ringer's solution following which the cells were treated as follows; Control, Glutamate, Ketamine, Glutamate + Ketamine, KCN + Ketamine and KCN. The culture was maintained for 10 min and the changes were captured in 3D-Time frame at 0, 5 and 10 min for the control and 5, 7 and 10 min for each of the treatment category. Glutamate treatment caused formation of short cellular processes localized directly on the cell body while ketamine treatment (inhibition of NMDA-R) facilitated

  19. Factors Affecting Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Guo, S.; DiPietro, L.A.

    2010-01-01

    Wound healing, as a normal biological process in the human body, is achieved through four precisely and highly programmed phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. For a wound to heal successfully, all four phases must occur in the proper sequence and time frame. Many factors can interfere with one or more phases of this process, thus causing improper or impaired wound healing. This article reviews the recent literature on the most significant factors that affect cutaneous wound healing and the potential cellular and/or molecular mechanisms involved. The factors discussed include oxygenation, infection, age and sex hormones, stress, diabetes, obesity, medications, alcoholism, smoking, and nutrition. A better understanding of the influence of these factors on repair may lead to therapeutics that improve wound healing and resolve impaired wounds. PMID:20139336

  20. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  1. Demonstration by real-time polymerase chain reaction that cellular DNA alkylation by novel aminoindoline compounds affects expression of the protooncogene c-myc.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Stephanie M; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Denny, William A

    2005-02-01

    Aminoindolines, analogues of the potent DNA alkylating agent seco-CBI-TMI, bind to and alkylate in the minor groove of AT-rich DNA in vitro. Here we extend the in vitro mechanism of action studies by treating cells in culture and examining the DNA binding patterns within AT-rich regions of the protooncogene locus c-myc, using a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) stop assay. In addition, real-time reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR is used to examine the immediate effects of drug treatment on c-myc expression. These analyses demonstrate a concentration and time dependence for DNA alkylation at the chosen sites within the c-myc locus, as well as a prompt and significant downregulation of c-myc expression. While downregulation of this important growth regulator is likely not the only consequence of aminoindoline treatment, these studies begin to address the cellular pathways that are involved in the potent cytotoxic effects observed and provide insights for the future development of anticancer drugs of this class. PMID:15720128

  2. Rate of oxidant stress regulates balance between rat gastric mucosa proliferation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Olguín-Martínez, Marisela; Mendieta-Condado, Edgar; Contreras-Zentella, Martha; Escamilla, José E; Aranda-Fraustro, Alberto; El-Hafidi, Mohammed; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando

    2006-10-15

    We have characterized an experimental model of ethanol-induced chronic gastritis in which a compensatory mucosal cell proliferation is apparently regulated by lipoperoxidative events. Therefore, the present study is an attempt to further assess the participation of oxidant stress during gastric mucosa proliferation, by administering alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E) to rats with gastritis. A morphometric analysis was done, and parameters indicative of oxidant stress, cellular proliferation (including cyclin D1 levels), apoptotic events, and activities of endogenous antioxidant systems were measured in gastric mucosa from our experimental groups. After ethanol withdrawal, restitution of surface epithelium coincided with increased lipid peroxidation and cell proliferation and further active apoptosis. High alpha-tocopherol dosing (100 IU/kg bw) showed a clear antioxidant effect, abolished cell proliferation, and promoted an early and progressive apoptosis, despite vitamin E also enhancing levels of endogenous antioxidants. Indicators of cell proliferation inversely correlated with apoptotic events, and this relationship was blunted by administering vitamin E, probably by affecting translocation of active cyclin D1 into the nucleus. In conclusion, alpha-tocopherol administration inhibited cell proliferation, leading to a predominance of apoptotic events in ethanol-induced gastric damage. Therefore, the timing and magnitude of lipoperoxidative events seemed to synchronize in vivo cell proliferative and apoptotic events, probably by changing the cell redox state. PMID:17015179

  3. Calcium signaling and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Mauro Cunha Xavier; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki; Goulart, Vânia A M; Tonelli, Fernanda M P; Gomes, Katia N; Ulrich, Henning; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2015-11-01

    Cell proliferation is orchestrated through diverse proteins related to calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling inside the cell. Cellular Ca(2+) influx that occurs first by various mechanisms at the plasma membrane, is then followed by absorption of Ca(2+) ions by mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and, finally, there is a connection of calcium stores to the nucleus. Experimental evidence indicates that the fluctuation of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum provides a pivotal and physiological role for cell proliferation. Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmatic reticulum triggers Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane in an phenomenon called store-operated calcium entries (SOCEs). SOCE is activated through a complex interplay between a Ca(2+) sensor, denominated STIM, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and a Ca(2+) channel at the cell membrane, denominated Orai. The interplay between STIM and Orai proteins with cell membrane receptors and their role in cell proliferation is discussed in this review. PMID:26275497

  4. Mitochondrial dysfunction in inflammatory responses and cellular senescence: pathogenesis and pharmacological targets for chronic lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Yue, Li; Yao, Hongwei

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles, which couple the various cellular processes that regulate metabolism, cell proliferation and survival. Environmental stress can cause mitochondrial dysfunction and dynamic changes including reduced mitochondrial biogenesis, oxidative phosphorylation and ATP production, as well as mitophagy impairment, which leads to increased ROS, inflammatory responses and cellular senescence. Oxidative stress, inflammation and cellular senescence all have important roles in the pathogenesis of chronic lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pulmonary fibrosis and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. In this review, we discuss the current state on how mitochondrial dysfunction affects inflammatory responses and cellular senescence, the mechanisms of mitochondrial dysfunction underlying the pathogenesis of chronic lung diseases and the potential of mitochondrial transfer and replacement as treatments for these diseases. PMID:27189175

  5. Homeobox A7 stimulates breast cancer cell proliferation by up-regulating estrogen receptor-alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yu; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Huang, He-Feng; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •HOXA7 regulates MCF7 cell proliferation. •HOXA7 up-regulates ERα expression. •HOXA7 mediates estrogen-induced MCF7 cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Breast cancer is the most common hormone-dependent malignancy in women. Homeobox (HOX) transcription factors regulate many cellular functions, including cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. The aberrant expression of HOX genes has been reported to be associated with human reproductive cancers. Estradiol (E2) and its nuclear receptors, estrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and ER-beta, are known to play critical roles in the regulation of breast cancer cell growth. However, an understanding of the potential relationship between HOXA7 and ER in breast cancer cells is limited. In this study, our results demonstrate that knockdown of HOXA7 in MCF7 cells significantly decreased cell proliferation and ERα expression. In addition, HOXA7 knockdown attenuated E2-induced cell proliferation as well as progesterone receptor (PR) expression. The stimulatory effects of E2 on cell proliferation and PR expression were abolished by co-treatment with ICI 182780, a selective ERα antagonist. In contrast, overexpression of HOXA7 significantly stimulated cell proliferation and ERα expression. Moreover, E2-induced cell proliferation, as well as PR expression, was enhanced by the overexpression of HOXA7. Neither knockdown nor overexpression of HOXA7 affected the ER-beta levels. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanistic role for HOXA7 in modulating breast cancer cell proliferation via regulation of ERα expression. This finding contributes to our understanding of the role HOXA7 plays in regulating the proliferation of ER-positive cancer cells.

  6. Carbon nanotubes affect the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles to denitrification in marine sediments by altering cellular internalization of nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Huang, Haining; Li, Xu

    2016-06-01

    Denitrification is an important pathway for nitrate transformation in marine sediments, and this process has been observed to be negatively affected by engineered nanomaterials. However, previous studies only focused on the potential effect of a certain type of nanomaterial on microbial denitrification. Here we show that the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles (NPs) to denitrification in marine sediments is highly affected by the presence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). It was found that the removal efficiency of total NOX‑-N (NO3‑-N and NO2‑-N) in the presence of CuO NPs was only 62.3%, but it increased to 81.1% when CNTs appeared in this circumstance. Our data revealed that CuO NPs were more easily attached to CNTs rather than cell surface because of the lower energy barrier (3.5 versus 36.2 kT). Further studies confirmed that the presence of CNTs caused the formation of large, incompact, non-uniform dispersed, and more negatively charged CuO-CNTs heteroaggregates, and thus reduced the nanoparticle internalization by cells, leading to less toxicity to metabolism of carbon source, generation of reduction equivalent, and activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase. These results indicate that assessing nanomaterial-induced risks in real circumstances needs to consider the “mixed” effects of nanomaterials.

  7. Carbon nanotubes affect the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles to denitrification in marine sediments by altering cellular internalization of nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Huang, Haining; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is an important pathway for nitrate transformation in marine sediments, and this process has been observed to be negatively affected by engineered nanomaterials. However, previous studies only focused on the potential effect of a certain type of nanomaterial on microbial denitrification. Here we show that the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles (NPs) to denitrification in marine sediments is highly affected by the presence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). It was found that the removal efficiency of total NOX(-)-N (NO3(-)-N and NO2(-)-N) in the presence of CuO NPs was only 62.3%, but it increased to 81.1% when CNTs appeared in this circumstance. Our data revealed that CuO NPs were more easily attached to CNTs rather than cell surface because of the lower energy barrier (3.5 versus 36.2 kT). Further studies confirmed that the presence of CNTs caused the formation of large, incompact, non-uniform dispersed, and more negatively charged CuO-CNTs heteroaggregates, and thus reduced the nanoparticle internalization by cells, leading to less toxicity to metabolism of carbon source, generation of reduction equivalent, and activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase. These results indicate that assessing nanomaterial-induced risks in real circumstances needs to consider the "mixed" effects of nanomaterials. PMID:27279546

  8. Carbon nanotubes affect the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles to denitrification in marine sediments by altering cellular internalization of nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Huang, Haining; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is an important pathway for nitrate transformation in marine sediments, and this process has been observed to be negatively affected by engineered nanomaterials. However, previous studies only focused on the potential effect of a certain type of nanomaterial on microbial denitrification. Here we show that the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles (NPs) to denitrification in marine sediments is highly affected by the presence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). It was found that the removal efficiency of total NOX−-N (NO3−-N and NO2−-N) in the presence of CuO NPs was only 62.3%, but it increased to 81.1% when CNTs appeared in this circumstance. Our data revealed that CuO NPs were more easily attached to CNTs rather than cell surface because of the lower energy barrier (3.5 versus 36.2 kT). Further studies confirmed that the presence of CNTs caused the formation of large, incompact, non-uniform dispersed, and more negatively charged CuO-CNTs heteroaggregates, and thus reduced the nanoparticle internalization by cells, leading to less toxicity to metabolism of carbon source, generation of reduction equivalent, and activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase. These results indicate that assessing nanomaterial-induced risks in real circumstances needs to consider the “mixed” effects of nanomaterials. PMID:27279546

  9. How do the physicochemical properties of nanoliposomes affect their interactions with the hCMEC/D3 cellular model of the BBB?

    PubMed

    Papadia, Konstantina; Markoutsa, Eleni; Antimisiaris, Sophia G

    2016-07-25

    Nanosized liposomes composed of 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphatidylcholine (DSPC), cholesterol and polyethylene glycol-conjugated phospholipid (PEG), incorporating FITC-dextran (FITC) and in some cases also Rhodamine-conjugated phospholipid (RHO) (as labels) were constructed by the thin film hydration method, followed by extrusion; membranes with pore diameters from 50 to 400nm were used, while charged vesicles were produced by partially replacing DSPC with 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-(1'-rac-glycerol) (DSPG). The uptake of liposomes by hCMED/D3 cells was evaluated by measuring FITC in cells, and their permeability across cell monolayers was evaluated, by measuring the FI of liposome associated-FITC and RHO in the receiving side of a monolayer-transwell system. Results prove that liposome size has a significant effect on their uptake and permeability (for both charged and non-charged vesicles). The effect of liposome charge on cell uptake was slight (but significant), however charge (in the range from -2 to -16mV) did not significantly affect vesicle permeability; a significant decrease was only demonstrated for the liposome with the highest charge. PMID:27286634

  10. TAp73 promotes anti-senescence-anabolism not proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Massimiliano; Niklison-Chirou, Maria Victoria; Catani, Maria Valeria; Knight, Richard A.; Melino, Gerry; Rufini, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    TAp73, a member of the p53 family, has been traditionally considered a tumor suppressor gene, but a recent report has claimed that it can promote cellular proliferation. This assumption is based on biochemical evidence of activation of anabolic metabolism, with enhanced pentose phosphate shunt (PPP) and nucleotide biosynthesis. Here, while we confirm that TAp73 expression enhances anabolism, we also substantiate its role in inhibiting proliferation and promoting cell death. Hence, we would like to propose an alternative interpretation of the accumulating data linking p73 to cellular metabolism: we suggest that TAp73 promotes anabolism to counteract cellular senescence rather than to support proliferation. PMID:25554796

  11. The yield and quality of cellular and bacterial DNA extracts from human oral rinse samples are variably affected by the cell lysis methodology.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, Mohsen; Nair, Raj G; Samaranayake, Lakshman P; Zhang, Li; Zulfiker, Abu Hasanat Md; Ahmetagic, Adnan; Good, David; Wei, Ming Q

    2016-03-01

    Recent culture-independent studies have enabled detailed mapping of human microbiome that has not been hitherto achievable by culture-based methods. DNA extraction is a key element of bacterial culture-independent studies that critically impacts on the outcome of the detected microbial profile. Despite the variations in DNA extraction methods described in the literature, no standardized technique is available for the purpose of microbiome profiling. Hence, standardization of DNA extraction methods is urgently needed to yield comparable data from different studies. We examined the effect of eight different cell lysis protocols on the yield and quality of the extracted DNA from oral rinse samples. These samples were exposed to cell lysis techniques based on enzymatic, mechanical, and a combination of enzymatic-mechanical methods. The outcome measures evaluated were total bacterial population, Firmicutes levels and human DNA contamination (in terms of surrogate GAPDH levels). We noted that all three parameters were significantly affected by the method of cell lysis employed. Although the highest yield of gDNA was obtained using lysozyme-achromopeptidase method, the lysozyme-zirconium beads method yielded the peak quantity of total bacterial DNA and Firmicutes with a lower degree of GAPDH contamination compared with the other methods. Taken together our data clearly points to an urgent need for a consensus, standardized DNA extraction technique to evaluate the oral microbiome using oral rinse samples. Further, if Firmicutes levels are the focus of investigation in oral rinse microbiome analyses then the lysozyme-zirconium bead method would be the method of choice in preference to others. PMID:26812577

  12. Ammonia Affects Astroglial Proliferation in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Bodega, Guillermo; Segura, Berta; Ciordia, Sergio; Mena, María del Carmen; López-Fernández, Luis Andrés; García, María Isabel; Trabado, Isabel; Suárez, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Primary cultures of rat astroglial cells were exposed to 1, 3 and 5 mM NH4Cl for up to 10 days. Dose- and time-dependent reductions in cell numbers were seen, plus an increase in the proportion of cells in the S phase. The DNA content was reduced in the treated cells, and BrdU incorporation diminished. However, neither ammonia nor ammonia plus glutamine had any effect on DNA polymerase activity. iTRAQ analysis showed that exposure to ammonia induced a significant reduction in histone and heterochromatin protein 1 expression. A reduction in cell viability was also noted. The ammonia-induced reduction of proliferative activity in these cultured astroglial cells seems to be due to a delay in the completion of the S phase provoked by the inhibition of chromatin protein synthesis. PMID:26421615

  13. Markers of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening as a marker of cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The cellular senescence definition comes to the fact of cells irreversible proliferation disability. Besides the cell cycle arrest, senescent cells go through some morphological, biochemical, and functional changes which are the signs of cellular senescence. The senescent cells (including replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence) of all the tissues look alike. They are metabolically active and possess the set of characteristics in vitro and in vivo, which are known as biomarkers of aging and cellular senescence. Among biomarkers of cellular senescence telomere shortening is a rather elegant frequently used biomarker. Validity of telomere shortening as a marker for cellular senescence is based on theoretical and experimental data. PMID:26805432

  14. Markers of cellular senescence. Telomere shortening as a marker of cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Bernadotte, Alexandra; Mikhelson, Victor M; Spivak, Irina M

    2016-01-01

    The cellular senescence definition comes to the fact of cells irreversible proliferation disability. Besides the cell cycle arrest, senescent cells go through some morphological, biochemical, and functional changes which are the signs of cellular senescence. The senescent cells (including replicative senescence and stress-induced premature senescence) of all the tissues look alike. They are metabolically active and possess the set of characteristics in vitro and in vivo, which are known as biomarkers of aging and cellular senescence. Among biomarkers of cellular senescence telomere shortening is a rather elegant frequently used biomarker. Validity of telomere shortening as a marker for cellular senescence is based on theoretical and experimental data. PMID:26805432

  15. Perturbations of Amino Acid Metabolism Associated with Glyphosate-Dependent Inhibition of Shikimic Acid Metabolism Affect Cellular Redox Homeostasis and Alter the Abundance of Proteins Involved in Photosynthesis and Photorespiration1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Vivancos, Pedro Diaz; Driscoll, Simon P.; Bulman, Christopher A.; Ying, Liu; Emami, Kaveh; Treumann, Achim; Mauve, Caroline; Noctor, Graham; Foyer, Christine H.

    2011-01-01

    The herbicide glyphosate inhibits the shikimate pathway of the synthesis of amino acids such as phenylalanine, tyrosine, and tryptophan. However, much uncertainty remains concerning precisely how glyphosate kills plants or affects cellular redox homeostasis and related processes in glyphosate-sensitive and glyphosate-resistant crop plants. To address this issue, we performed an integrated study of photosynthesis, leaf proteomes, amino acid profiles, and redox profiles in the glyphosate-sensitive soybean (Glycine max) genotype PAN809 and glyphosate-resistant Roundup Ready Soybean (RRS). RRS leaves accumulated much more glyphosate than the sensitive line but showed relatively few changes in amino acid metabolism. Photosynthesis was unaffected by glyphosate in RRS leaves, but decreased abundance of photosynthesis/photorespiratory pathway proteins was observed together with oxidation of major redox pools. While treatment of a sensitive genotype with glyphosate rapidly inhibited photosynthesis and triggered the appearance of a nitrogen-rich amino acid profile, there was no evidence of oxidation of the redox pools. There was, however, an increase in starvation-associated and defense proteins. We conclude that glyphosate-dependent inhibition of soybean leaf metabolism leads to the induction of defense proteins without sustained oxidation. Conversely, the accumulation of high levels of glyphosate in RRS enhances cellular oxidation, possibly through mechanisms involving stimulation of the photorespiratory pathway. PMID:21757634

  16. Cellular resilience.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Lena; Harris, Georgina; Leist, Marcel; Hartung, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Cellular resilience describes the ability of a cell to cope with environmental changes such as toxicant exposure. If cellular metabolism does not collapse directly after the hit or end in programmed cell death, the ensuing stress responses promote a new homeostasis under stress. The processes of reverting "back to normal" and reversal of apoptosis ("anastasis") have been studied little at the cellular level. Cell types show astonishingly similar vulnerability to most toxicants, except for those that require a very specific target, metabolism or mechanism present only in specific cell types. The majority of chemicals triggers "general cytotoxicity" in any cell at similar concentrations. We hypothesize that cells differ less in their vulnerability to a given toxicant than in their resilience (coping with the "hit"). In many cases, cells do not return to the naive state after a toxic insult. The phenomena of "pre-conditioning", "tolerance" and "hormesis" describe this for low-dose exposures to toxicants that render the cell more resistant to subsequent hits. The defense and resilience programs include epigenetic changes that leave a "memory/scar" - an alteration as a consequence of the stress the cell has experienced. These memories might have long-term consequences, both positive (resistance) and negative, that contribute to chronic and delayed manifestations of hazard and, ultimately, disease. This article calls for more systematic analyses of how cells cope with toxic perturbations in the long-term after stressor withdrawal. A technical prerequisite for these are stable (organotypic) cultures and a characterization of stress response molecular networks. PMID:26536287

  17. Antigens of Lyme disease of spirochaete Borrelia burgdorferi inhibits antigen or mitogen-induced lymphocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chiao, J W; Pavia, C; Riley, M; Altmann-Lasekan, W; Abolhassani, M; Liegner, K; Mittelman, A

    1994-02-01

    Modulation of cellular immune responses by the spirochaete Borrelia burgdorferi, the bacteria that causes Lyme disease, was demonstrated. When cultured in the presence of sonicated Borrelia preparation (Bb), the mitogen- or antigen-stimulated proliferative responses of normal lymphocytes were consistently lowered. Bb caused the greatest reduction in Concanavalin A (ConA) or antigen-stimulated proliferation, where almost 100% reduction in proliferation could be achieved. Bb also reduced phytohemagglutinin-M (PHA) or pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) proliferation, with the PWM proliferation being the least affected. This regulatory activity was not due to toxicity and was determined to be caused by Bb protein antigens. The degree of the proliferation reduction was directly proportional to both Bb quantity and length of exposure to lymphocytes. IL-2 production was significantly reduced from Bb-exposed lymphocytes. The entry of lymphocytes into the proliferating phases of the cell cycle was also shown to be blocked. These results have demonstrated an immune suppressive mechanism of B. burgdorferi. The magnitude of host immune responses may be dependent on the degree of suppression which is related to the spirochaete quantity and their length of presence in the host. PMID:8173554

  18. Nitrite circumvents canonical cGMP signaling to enhance proliferation of myocyte precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Totzeck, Matthias; Schicho, Andreas; Stock, Pia; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B

    2015-03-01

    Skeletal muscle tissue has a remarkable high regenerative capacity. The underlying cellular events are governed by complex signaling processes, and the proliferation of skeletal myoblasts is a key initial event. The role of nitric oxide (NO) in cell cycle regulation is well-appreciated. Nitrite, an NO oxidation product, is a stable source for NO-like bioactivity particularly in cases when oxygen shortage compromises NO-synthases activity. Although numerous studies suggest that nitrite effects are largely related to NO-dependent signaling, emerging evidence also implicates that nitrite itself can activate protein pathways albeit under physiological, normoxic conditions. This includes a recently demonstrated cyclic guanosine monophosphate-(cGMP)-independent enhancement of endothelial cell proliferation. Whether nitrite itself has the potential to affect myoblast proliferation and metabolism with or without activation of the canonical NO/cGMP pathway to subsequently support muscle cell regeneration is not known. Here we show that nitrite increases proliferation and metabolic activity of murine cultured myoblasts dose-dependently. This effect is not abolished by the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimida-zoline-1-oxyl-3 oxide and does not affect intracellular cGMP levels, implicating a cGMP-independent mechanism. Nitrite circumvents the rapamycin induced attenuation of myoblast proliferation and enhances mTOR activity. Our results provide evidence for a novel potential physiological and therapeutic approach of nitrite in skeletal muscle regeneration processes under normoxia independent of NO and cGMP. PMID:25501648

  19. Sodium and potassium currents in freshly isolated and in proliferating human muscle satellite cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hamann, M; Widmer, H; Baroffio, A; Aubry, J P; Krause, R M; Kaelin, A; Bader, C R

    1994-01-01

    1. Human muscle satellite cells (SC) were studied either immediately after dissociation of muscle biopsies or later, as they proliferated in culture. A purification procedure combined with clonal cultures ensured that electrophysiological recordings were done in myogenic cells. Hoechst staining for the DNA attested that cells were mononucleated. 2. The goals of this study were to examine (i) whether the electrophysiological properties of freshly isolated SC resembled those of SC that proliferated in culture for several weeks, (ii) whether freezing and thawing affected these properties, and (iii) whether SC constituted a homogeneous population. 3. We found that there were only subtle differences between the electrophysiological results obtained in freshly isolated SC and in proliferating SC with or without previous freezing and thawing. Most SC expressed two voltage-gated currents, a TTX-resistant Na+ current and a calcium-activated potassium current (IK, Ca). 4. The level of expression of the Na+ current and of IK, Ca was affected in a different way by cellular proliferation; the normalized Na+ conductance (pS pF-1) of proliferating cells resembled that of freshly isolated SC, whereas the IK, Ca conductance increased 10 times. The analysis of the amplitude distributions of the Na+ current and of IK, Ca in the various SC preparations suggested that there was only one class of SC. PMID:8021836

  20. Vitamin E Supplementation Delays Cellular Senescence In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    La Fata, Giorgio; Seifert, Nicole; Weber, Peter; Mohajeri, M. Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin E is an important antioxidant that protects cells from oxidative stress-induced damage, which is an important contributor to the progression of ageing. Ageing can be studied in vitro using primary cells reaching a state of irreversible growth arrest called senescence after a limited number of cellular divisions. Generally, the most utilized biomarker of senescence is represented by the expression of the senescence associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal). We aimed here to study the possible effects of vitamin E supplementation in two different human primary cell types (HUVECs and fibroblasts) during the progression of cellular senescence. Utilizing an unbiased automated system, based on the detection of the SA-β-gal, we quantified cellular senescence in vitro and showed that vitamin E supplementation reduced the numbers of senescent cells during progression of ageing. Acute vitamin E supplementation did not affect cellular proliferation, whereas it was decreased after chronic treatment. Mechanistically, we show that vitamin E supplementation acts through downregulation of the expression of the cycline dependent kinase inhibitor P21. The data obtained from this study support the antiageing properties of vitamin E and identify possible mechanisms of action that warrant further investigation. PMID:26613084

  1. Vitamin E Supplementation Delays Cellular Senescence In Vitro.

    PubMed

    La Fata, Giorgio; Seifert, Nicole; Weber, Peter; Mohajeri, M Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin E is an important antioxidant that protects cells from oxidative stress-induced damage, which is an important contributor to the progression of ageing. Ageing can be studied in vitro using primary cells reaching a state of irreversible growth arrest called senescence after a limited number of cellular divisions. Generally, the most utilized biomarker of senescence is represented by the expression of the senescence associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal). We aimed here to study the possible effects of vitamin E supplementation in two different human primary cell types (HUVECs and fibroblasts) during the progression of cellular senescence. Utilizing an unbiased automated system, based on the detection of the SA-β-gal, we quantified cellular senescence in vitro and showed that vitamin E supplementation reduced the numbers of senescent cells during progression of ageing. Acute vitamin E supplementation did not affect cellular proliferation, whereas it was decreased after chronic treatment. Mechanistically, we show that vitamin E supplementation acts through downregulation of the expression of the cycline dependent kinase inhibitor P21. The data obtained from this study support the antiageing properties of vitamin E and identify possible mechanisms of action that warrant further investigation. PMID:26613084

  2. SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, is involved in a wide array of cellular processes, including glucose homeostasis, energy metabolism, proliferation and apoptosis, and immune response. However, it is un...

  3. Progressive effects of N-myc deficiency on proliferation, neurogenesis, and morphogenesis in the olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Walter; Schimmang, Thomas; Gunhaga, Lena

    2014-06-01

    N-myc belongs to the myc proto-oncogene family, which is involved in numerous cellular processes such as proliferation, growth, apoptosis, and differentiation. Conditional deletion of N-myc in the mouse nervous system disrupted brain development, indicating that N-myc plays an essential role during neural development. How the development of the olfactory epithelium and neurogenesis within are affected by the loss of N-myc has, however, not been determined. To address these issues, we examined an N-myc(Foxg1Cre) conditional mouse line, in which N-myc is depleted in the olfactory epithelium. First changes in N-myc mutants were detected at E11.5, with reduced proliferation and neurogenesis in a slightly smaller olfactory epithelium. The phenotype was more pronounced at E13.5, with a complete lack of Hes5-positive progenitor cells, decreased proliferation, and neurogenesis. In addition, stereological analyses revealed reduced cell size of post-mitotic neurons in the olfactory epithelium, which contributed to a smaller olfactory pit. Furthermore, we observed diminished proliferation and neurogenesis also in the vomeronasal organ, which likewise was reduced in size. In addition, the generation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons was severely reduced in N-myc mutants. Thus, diminished neurogenesis and proliferation in combination with smaller neurons might explain the morphological defects in the N-myc depleted olfactory structures. Moreover, our results suggest an important role for N-myc in regulating ongoing neurogenesis, in part by maintaining the Hes5-positive progenitor pool. In summary, our results provide evidence that N-myc deficiency in the olfactory epithelium progressively diminishes proliferation and neurogenesis with negative consequences at structural and cellular levels. PMID:24376126

  4. Ghrelin promotes oral tumor cell proliferation by modifying GLUT1 expression.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Dominik; Reckenbeil, Jan; Wenghoefer, Matthias; Stark, Helmut; Frentzen, Matthias; Allam, Jean-Pierre; Novak, Natalija; Frede, Stilla; Götz, Werner; Probstmeier, Rainer; Meyer, Rainer; Winter, Jochen

    2016-03-01

    In our study, ghrelin was investigated with respect to its capacity on proliferative effects and molecular correlations on oral tumor cells. The presence of all molecular components of the ghrelin system, i.e., ghrelin and its receptors, was analyzed and could be detected using real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry. To examine cellular effects caused by ghrelin and to clarify downstream-regulatory mechanisms, two different oral tumor cell lines (BHY and HN) were used in cell culture experiments. Stimulation of either cell line with ghrelin led to a significantly increased proliferation. Signal transduction occurred through phosphorylation of GSK-3β and nuclear translocation of β-catenin. This effect could be inhibited by blocking protein kinase A. Glucose transporter1 (GLUT1), as an important factor for delivering sufficient amounts of glucose to tumor cells having high requirements for this carbohydrate (Warburg effect) was up-regulated by exogenous and endogenous ghrelin. Silencing intracellular ghrelin concentrations using siRNA led to a significant decreased expression of GLUT1 and proliferation. In conclusion, our study describes the role for the appetite-stimulating peptide hormone ghrelin in oral cancer proliferation under the particular aspect of glucose uptake: (1) tumor cells are a source of ghrelin. (2) Ghrelin affects tumor cell proliferation through autocrine and/or paracrine activity. (3) Ghrelin modulates GLUT1 expression and thus indirectly enhances tumor cell proliferation. These findings are of major relevance, because glucose uptake is assumed to be a promising target for cancer treatment. PMID:26407611

  5. Nuclear Proliferation Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Professor William Potter

    2005-11-28

    William C. Potter, Director of the Center for Non Proliferation Studies and the Center for Russian and Eurasian Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies, will present nuclear proliferation challenges following the 2005 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) Review Conference. In addition to elucidating reasons for, and implications of, the conference’s failure, Dr. Potter will discuss common ground between nuclear proliferation and terrorism issues and whether corrective action can be taken.

  6. Characterization of Morphological and Cellular Events Underlying Oral Regeneration in the Sea Anemone, Nematostella vectensis.

    PubMed

    Amiel, Aldine R; Johnston, Hereroa T; Nedoncelle, Karine; Warner, Jacob F; Ferreira, Solène; Röttinger, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarians, the extant sister group to bilateria, are well known for their impressive regenerative capacity. The sea anemone Nematostella vectensis is a well-established system for the study of development and evolution that is receiving increased attention for its regenerative capacity. Nematostella is able to regrow missing body parts within five to six days after its bisection, yet studies describing the morphological, cellular, and molecular events underlying this process are sparse and very heterogeneous in their experimental approaches. In this study, we lay down the basic framework to study oral regeneration in Nematostella vectensis. Using various imaging and staining techniques we characterize in detail the morphological, cellular, and global molecular events that define specific landmarks of this process. Furthermore, we describe in vivo assays to evaluate wound healing success and the initiation of pharynx reformation. Using our described landmarks for regeneration and in vivo assays, we analyze the effects of perturbing either transcription or cellular proliferation on the regenerative process. Interestingly, neither one of these experimental perturbations has major effects on wound closure, although they slightly delay or partially block it. We further show that while the inhibition of transcription blocks regeneration in a very early step, inhibiting cellular proliferation only affects later events such as pharynx reformation and tentacle elongation. PMID:26633371

  7. Characterization of Morphological and Cellular Events Underlying Oral Regeneration in the Sea Anemone, Nematostella vectensis

    PubMed Central

    Amiel, Aldine R.; Johnston, Hereroa T.; Nedoncelle, Karine; Warner, Jacob F.; Ferreira, Solène; Röttinger, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Cnidarians, the extant sister group to bilateria, are well known for their impressive regenerative capacity. The sea anemone Nematostella vectensis is a well-established system for the study of development and evolution that is receiving increased attention for its regenerative capacity. Nematostella is able to regrow missing body parts within five to six days after its bisection, yet studies describing the morphological, cellular, and molecular events underlying this process are sparse and very heterogeneous in their experimental approaches. In this study, we lay down the basic framework to study oral regeneration in Nematostella vectensis. Using various imaging and staining techniques we characterize in detail the morphological, cellular, and global molecular events that define specific landmarks of this process. Furthermore, we describe in vivo assays to evaluate wound healing success and the initiation of pharynx reformation. Using our described landmarks for regeneration and in vivo assays, we analyze the effects of perturbing either transcription or cellular proliferation on the regenerative process. Interestingly, neither one of these experimental perturbations has major effects on wound closure, although they slightly delay or partially block it. We further show that while the inhibition of transcription blocks regeneration in a very early step, inhibiting cellular proliferation only affects later events such as pharynx reformation and tentacle elongation. PMID:26633371

  8. Magnesium regulates neural stem cell proliferation in the mouse hippocampus by altering mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Jia, Shanshan; Mou, Chengzhi; Ma, Yihe; Han, Ruijie; Li, Xue

    2016-04-01

    In the adult brain, neural stem cells from the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the cortex progress through the following five developmental stages: radial glia-like cells, neural progenitor cells, neuroblasts, immature neurons, and mature neurons. These developmental stages are linked to both neuronal microenvironments and energy metabolism. Neurogenesis is restricted and has been demonstrated to arise from tissue microenvironments. We determined that magnesium, a key nutrient in cellular energy metabolism, affects neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation in cells derived from the embryonic hippocampus by influencing mitochondrial function. Densities of proliferating cells and NSCs both showed their highest values at 0.8 mM [Mg(2+) ]o , whereas lower proliferation rates were observed at 0.4 and 1.4 mM [Mg(2+) ]o . The numbers and sizes of the neurospheres reached the maximum at 0.8 mM [Mg(2+) ]o and were weaker under both low (0.4 mM) and high (1.4 mM) concentrations of magnesium. In vitro experimental evidence demonstrates that extracellular magnesium regulates the number of cultured hippocampal NSCs, affecting both magnesium homeostasis and mitochondrial function. Our findings indicate that the effect of [Mg(2+) ]o on NSC proliferation may lie downstream of alterations in mitochondrial function because mitochondrial membrane potential was highest in the NSCs in the moderate [Mg(2+) ]o (0.8 mM) group and lower in both the low (0.4 mM) and high (1.4 mM) [Mg(2+) ]o groups. Overall, these findings demonstrate a new function for magnesium in the brain in the regulation of hippocampal neural stem cells: affecting their cellular energy metabolism. PMID:26634890

  9. Hop Shoot Proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop shoot proliferation disease has been described in Poland., and is associated with phytoplasma infection. Hop shoot proliferation occurs rarely and seems to be of little economic concern in most regions of hop production. Hop shoot proliferation is thought to be caused by aster yellows phytoplas...

  10. Thyroid hormone receptors regulate adipogenesis and carcinogenesis via crosstalk signaling with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Changxue; Cheng, Sheue-Yann

    2012-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They are ligand-dependent transcription factors that interact with their cognate hormone response elements in the promoters to regulate respective target gene expression to modulate cellular functions. While the transcription activity of each is regulated by their respective ligands, recent studies indicate that via multiple mechanisms PPARs and TRs crosstalk to affect diverse biological functions. Here, we review recent advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms and biological impact of crosstalk between these two important nuclear receptors, focusing on their roles in adipogenesis and carcinogenesis. PMID:19741045

  11. Downregulation of FOXP1 Inhibits Cell Proliferation in Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Inducing G1/S Phase Cell Cycle Arrest.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Sun, Ji; Cui, Meiling; Zhao, Fangyu; Ge, Chao; Chen, Taoyang; Yao, Ming; Li, Jinjun

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead box P1 (FOXP1) belongs to a family of winged-helix transcription factors that are involved in the processes of cellular proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, and longevity. FOXP1 can affect cell proliferation and migratory ability in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in vitro. However, little is known about the mechanism of FOXP1 in the proliferation of HCC cells. This study aimed to further explore the function of FOXP1 on the proliferation of HCC cells as well as the relevant mechanism involved. Western blot analysis, tumor xenograft models, and flow cytometry analysis were performed to elucidate the function of FOXP1 in the regulation of cell proliferation in human HCC. We observed that silencing FOXP1 significantly suppressed the growth ability of HCC cells both in vitro and in vivo. In addition, knockdown of FOXP1 induced G1/S phase arrest, and the expression of total and phosphorylated Rb (active type) as well as the levels of E2F1 were markedly decreased at 24 h; however, other proteins, including cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and cyclin D1 did not show noticeable changes. In conclusion, downregulation of FOXP1 inhibits cell proliferation in hepatocellular carcinoma by inducing G1/S phase cell cycle arrest, and the decrease in phosphorylated Rb is the main contributor to this G1/S phase arrest. PMID:27618020

  12. Proliferation resistance: issues, initiatives and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, Joseph F

    2009-01-01

    The vision of a nuclear renaissance has highlighted the issue of proliferation resistance. The prospects for a dramatic growth in nuclear power may depend on the effectiveness of, and the resources devoted to, plans to develop and implement technologies and approaches that strengthen proliferation resistance. The GenIV International Forum (GIF) and others have devoted attention and resources to proliferation resistance. However, the hope of finding a way to make the peaceful uses of nuclear energy resistant to proliferation has reappeared again and again in the history of nuclear power with little practical consequence. The concept of proliferation resistance has usually focused on intrinsic (technological) as opposed to extrinsic (institutional) factors. However, if there are benefits that may yet be realized from reactors and other facilities designed to minimize proliferation risks, it is their coupling with effective safeguards and other nonproliferation measures that likely will be critical. Proliferation resistance has also traditionally been applied only to state threats. Although there are no technologies that can wholly eliminate the risk of proliferation by a determined state, technology can play a limited role in reducing state threats and perhaps in eliminating many non-state threats. These and other issues are not academic. They affect efforts to evaluate proliferation resistance, including the methodology developed by GIF's Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP) Working Group as well as the proliferation resistance initiatives that are being pursued or may be developed in the future. This paper will offer a new framework for thinking about proliferation resistance issues, including the ways the output of the methodology could be developed to inform the decisions that states, the International Atomic Energy (IAEA) and others will have to make in order to fully realize the promise of a nuclear renaissance.

  13. Active Cellular Nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkaemper, Christoph; Garcia, Simon; Yevick, Hannah; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal; Biology inspired physics at mesoscales Team; Physical approach of biological problems Team

    We study the emergence of a nematic order in a two-dimensional tissue of apolar elongated fibroblast cells. Initially, these cells are very motile and the monolayer is characterized by giant density fluctuations, a signature of far-from-equilibrium systems. As the cell density increases because of proliferation, the cells align with each other forming large perfectly oriented domains while the cellular movements slow down and eventually freeze. Therefore topological defects characteristic of nematic phases remain trapped at long times, preventing the development of infinite domains. By analogy with classical non-active nematics, we have investigated the role of boundaries and we have shown that cells confined in stripes of width smaller than typically 500 µm are perfectly aligned in the stripe direction. Experiments performed in cross-shaped patterns show that both the number of cells and the degree of alignment impact the final orientation. Reference: Duclos G., Garcia S., Yevick H.G. and Silberzan P., ''Perfect nematic order in confined monolayers of spindle-shaped cells'', Soft Matter, 10, 14, 2014

  14. Epithelial cell proliferation arrest induced by lactate and acetate from Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium breve.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Takahiro; Pédron, Thierry; Regnault, Béatrice; Mulet, Céline; Hara, Taeko; Sansonetti, Philippe J

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to identify and characterize how symbiotic bacteria of the gut microbiota affect the molecular and cellular mechanisms of epithelial homeostasis, intestinal epithelial cells were co-cultured with either Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium as bona fide symbionts to examine potential gene modulations. In addition to genes involved in the innate immune response, genes encoding check-point molecules controlling the cell cycle were among the most modulated in the course of these interactions. In the m-ICcl2 murine cell line, genes encoding cyclin E1 and cyclin D1 were strongly down regulated by L. casei and B. breve respectively. Cell proliferation arrest was accordingly confirmed. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) were the effectors of this modulation, alone or in conjunction with the acidic pH they generated. These results demonstrate that the production of SCFAs, a characteristic of these symbiotic microorganisms, is potentially an essential regulatory effector of epithelial proliferation in the gut. PMID:23646174

  15. Targeting Homeostatic T Cell Proliferation to Control Beta-Cell Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Vignali, Debora; Monti, Paolo

    2016-05-01

    Immunomodulation of the autoreactive T cell response is considered a major strategy to control beta-cell autoimmunity, both in the natural history of type 1 diabetes and in islet transplantation, which can be affected by autoimmunity recurrence. So far, these strategies have had modest results, prompting efforts to define novel cellular and molecular targets to control autoreactive T cell expansion and activation. Novel findings highlighted the important role of the homeostatic cytokine interleukin-7 in inducing proliferation and differentiation of autoreactive T cell clones that causes beta-cell autoimmunity. In this review, we discuss recent evidences and novel findings on the role of IL-7 mediated homeostatic T cell proliferation in the process of beta-cell destruction and evidences of how targeting IL-7 and its receptor could be an innovative and effective strategy to control beta-cell autoimmunity. PMID:26983628

  16. Epithelial Cell Proliferation Arrest Induced by Lactate and Acetate from Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium breve

    PubMed Central

    Regnault, Béatrice; Mulet, Céline; Hara, Taeko; Sansonetti, Philippe J.

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to identify and characterize how symbiotic bacteria of the gut microbiota affect the molecular and cellular mechanisms of epithelial homeostasis, intestinal epithelial cells were co-cultured with either Lactobacillus or Bifidobacterium as bona fide symbionts to examine potential gene modulations. In addition to genes involved in the innate immune response, genes encoding check-point molecules controlling the cell cycle were among the most modulated in the course of these interactions. In the m-ICcl2 murine cell line, genes encoding cyclin E1 and cyclin D1 were strongly down regulated by L. casei and B. breve respectively. Cell proliferation arrest was accordingly confirmed. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA) were the effectors of this modulation, alone or in conjunction with the acidic pH they generated. These results demonstrate that the production of SCFAs, a characteristic of these symbiotic microorganisms, is potentially an essential regulatory effector of epithelial proliferation in the gut. PMID:23646174

  17. Social isolation increases cell proliferation in male and cell survival in female California mice (Peromyscus californicus).

    PubMed

    Ruscio, Michael G; Bradley King, S; Haun, Harold L

    2015-11-01

    Social environment has direct effects on an animal's behavior, physiology and neurobiology. In particular, adult neurogenesis is notably affected by a variety of social manipulations, including social isolation. We hypothesized that social isolation should have particularly acute effects on neurogenesis in a highly social (monogamous and bi-parental) species such as Peromyscus californicus, the California mouse. Adult male and female P. californicus mice were housed in isolation or in same-sex pairs for 4 or 24 days. At the end of each period, either cell proliferation or cell survival was quantified with BrdU label and neuronal markers (either TuJ1 or NeuN). After 4 days, isolated males had greater cellular proliferation in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus (DG) than pair housed males. After 24 days, isolate females demonstrated greater cell survival in the DG than paired females. Males demonstrated a similar, but non-significant pattern. No differences in cellular proliferation or cell survival were found in the subventricular zone (SVZ), or medial amygdala (MeA). These results add to the evidence which demonstrates that neurogenic responses to environmental conditions are not identical across species. These data may be critical in understanding the functional significance of neurogenesis as it relates to the interactions between social systems, social environment and the display of social behaviors. PMID:26342752

  18. Progranulin enhances neural progenitor cell proliferation through glycogen synthase kinase 3β phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Nedachi, T; Kawai, T; Matsuwaki, T; Yamanouchi, K; Nishihara, M

    2011-06-30

    Progranulin (PGRN) is an estrogen-inducible growth factor thought to affect multiple processes in the CNS, including brain sexual differentiation, adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus, and development of neurodegenerative diseases. However, the precise physiological functions of PGRN in individual nerve cells are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to enhance the understanding of PGRN function in the CNS by investigating the effects of PGRN on neural progenitor cells (NPCs). We found that significant amounts of endogenous PGRN were secreted from isolated NPCs in cultures. To assess the bioactivities of endogenous and exogenous PGRN, we studied NPCs derived from wild-type mice (WT-NPCs) and PGRN-deficient mice (KO-NPCs). We found that proliferation of KO-NPCs was significantly enhanced by PGRN treatment; however, PGRN treatment apparently did not affect proliferation of WT-NPCs perhaps because of the high levels of endogenous PGRN expression. NPC death and asymmetric cellular division of KO-NPCs and WT-NPCs, which results in production of neural stem cells, astrocytes, or oligodendrocytes, were not affected by PGRN treatment. We also investigated the signaling mechanism(s) that mediate PGRN-induced NPC proliferation and found that phosphorylation of serine 9 (S9) of glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta (GSK3β), which was dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, was induced by PGRN treatment. In addition, a GSK3β-specific inhibitor enhanced NPC proliferation. Taken together, our observations indicate that PGRN enhanced NPC proliferation, at least in part, via inducing GSK3β phosphorylation. PMID:21540081

  19. Epithelial Proliferation on Curved Toroidal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ya-Wen; Cruz, Ricardo; Fragkopoulos, Alexandros; Marquez, Samantha; Garcia, Andres; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    Cellular environment influences a multitude of cellular functions by providing chemical and physical signals that modulate cell behavior, dynamics, development, and eventually survival. In strongly interacting epithelial cells, cells coordinate their behavior to respond to mechanical constraints in 2D. Local differences in tissue tension has also been shown to impact cell reproduction within an epithelial-cell sheet. Much less is known about how cells respond to out-of-plane curvatures. Here, we describe the proliferation of MDCK on toroidal hydrogel substrates, which unlike spheres or planes, have regions of both positive and negative Gaussian curvature. Additionally, the range of curvatures can be controlled by varying the size and aspect ratio of the torus, allowing us to quantify the relation between substrate curvature and cell proliferation.

  20. Fractal Dimensions of In Vitro Tumor Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Lambrou, George I.

    2015-01-01

    Biological systems are characterized by their potential for dynamic adaptation. One of the challenges for systems biology approaches is their contribution towards the understanding of the dynamics of a growing cell population. Conceptualizing these dynamics in tumor models could help us understand the steps leading to the initiation of the disease and its progression. In vitro models are useful in answering this question by providing information over the spatiotemporal nature of such dynamics. In the present work, we used physical quantities such as growth rate, velocity, and acceleration for the cellular proliferation and identified the fractal structures in tumor cell proliferation dynamics. We provide evidence that the rate of cellular proliferation is of nonlinear nature and exhibits oscillatory behavior. We also calculated the fractal dimensions of our cellular system. Our results show that the temporal transitions from one state to the other also follow nonlinear dynamics. Furthermore, we calculated self-similarity in cellular proliferation, providing the basis for further investigation in this topic. Such systems biology approaches are very useful in understanding the nature of cellular proliferation and growth. From a clinical point of view, our results may be applicable not only to primary tumors but also to tumor metastases. PMID:25883653

  1. Cellular Functions of Transient Receptor Potential channels

    PubMed Central

    Dadon, Daniela; Minke, Baruch

    2010-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential channels are polymodal cellular sensors involved in a wide variety of cellular processes, mainly by increasing cellular Ca2+. In this review we focus on the roles of these channels in: i) cell death ii) proliferation and differentiation and iii) synaptic vesicle release. Cell death Ca2+ influx participates in apoptotic and necrotic cell death. The Ca2+ permeability and high sensitivity of part of these channels to oxidative/metabolic stress make them important participants in cell death. Several examples are given. Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 is activated by H2O2, inducing cell death through an increase in cellular Ca2+ and activation of Poly ADP-Ribose Polymerase. Exposure of cultured cortical neurons to oxygen-glucose deprivation, in vitro, causes cell death via cation influx, mediated by Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7. Metabolic stress constitutively activates the Ca2+ permeable Transient Receptor Potential channels of Drosophila photoreceptor in the dark, potentially leading to retinal degeneration. Similar sensitivity to metabolic stress characterizes several mammalian Transient Receptor Potential Canonical channels. Proliferation and differentiation The rise in cytosolic Ca2+ induces cell growth, differentiation and proliferation via activation of several transcription factors. Activation a variety of store operated and Transient Receptor Potential channels cause a rise in cytosolic Ca2+, making these channels components involved in proliferation and differentiation. Synaptic vesicle release Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 7 channels reside in synaptic vesicles and regulate neurotransmitter release by a mechanism that is not entirely clear. All the above features of Transient Receptor Potential channels make them crucial components in important, sometimes conflicting, cellular processes that still need to be explored. PMID:20399884

  2. Simvastatin suppresses breast cancer cell proliferation induced by senescent cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Su; Uppal, Harpreet; Demaria, Marco; Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith; Kapahi, Pankaj

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence suppresses cancer by preventing the proliferation of damaged cells, but senescent cells can also promote cancer though the pro-inflammatory senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). Simvastatin, an HMG-coA reductase inhibitor, is known to attenuate inflammation and prevent certain cancers. Here, we show that simvastatin decreases the SASP of senescent human fibroblasts by inhibiting protein prenylation, without affecting the senescent growth arrest. The Rho family GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42 were activated in senescent cells, and simvastatin reduced both activities. Further, geranylgeranyl transferase, Rac1 or Cdc42 depletion reduced IL-6 secretion by senescent cells. We also show that simvastatin mitigates the effects of senescent conditioned media on breast cancer cell proliferation and endocrine resistance. Our findings identify a novel activity of simvastatin and mechanism of SASP regulation. They also suggest that senescent cells, which accumulate after radio/chemo therapy, promote endocrine resistance in breast cancer and that simvastatin might suppress this resistance. PMID:26658759

  3. Erythropoietin receptor signals both proliferation and erythroid-specific differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Liboi, E; Carroll, M; D'Andrea, A D; Mathey-Prevot, B

    1993-01-01

    Ectopic expression of the erythropoietin receptor (EPO-R) in Ba/F3, an interleukin 3-dependent progenitor cell line, confers EPO-dependent cell growth. To examine whether the introduced EPO-R could affect differentiation, we isolated Ba/F3-EPO-R subclones in interleukin 3 and assayed for the induction of beta-globin mRNA synthesis after exposure to EPO. Detection of beta-globin mRNA was observed within 3 days of EPO treatment, with peak levels accumulating after 10 days. When EPO was withdrawn, expression of beta-globin mRNA persisted in most clones, suggesting that commitment to erythroid differentiation had occurred. Although EPO-R expression also supports EPO-dependent proliferation of CTLL-2, a mature T-cell line, those cells did not produce globin transcripts, presumably because they lack requisite cellular factors involved in erythrocyte differentiation. We conclude that the EPO-R transmits signals important for both proliferation and differentiation along the erythroid lineage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8248252

  4. Cellular and molecular drivers of differential organ growth: insights from the limbs of Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Anna; Doroba, Carolyn; Maier, Jennifer A; Cohen, Lorna; VandeBerg, John; Sears, Karen E

    2016-06-01

    A fundamental question in biology is "how is growth differentially regulated during development to produce organs of particular sizes?" We used a new model system for the study of differential organ growth, the limbs of the opossum (Monodelphis domestica), to investigate the cellular and molecular basis of differential organ growth in mammals. Opossum forelimbs grow much faster than hindlimbs, making opossum limbs an exceptional system with which to study differential growth. We first used the great differences in opossum forelimb and hindlimb growth to identify cellular processes and molecular signals that underlie differential limb growth. We then used organ culture and pharmacological addition of FGF ligands and inhibitors to test the role of the Fgf/Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) signaling pathway in driving these cellular processes. We found that molecular signals from within the limb drive differences in cell proliferation that contribute to the differential growth of the forelimb and hindlimbs of opossums. We also found that alterations in the Fgf/MAPK pathway can generate differences in cell proliferation that mirror those observed between wild-type forelimb and hindlimbs of opossums and that manipulation of Fgf/MAPK signaling affects downstream focal adhesion-extracellular matrix (FA-ECM) and Wnt signaling in opossum limbs. Taken together, these findings suggest that evolutionary changes in the Fgf/MAPK pathway could help drive the observed differences in cell behaviors and growth in opossum forelimb and hindlimbs. PMID:27194412

  5. Leucine Promotes Proliferation and Differentiation of Primary Preterm Rat Satellite Cells in Part through mTORC1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jie-Min; Yu, Mu-Xue; Shen, Zhen-Yu; Guo, Chu-Yi; Zhuang, Si-Qi; Qiu, Xiao-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in response to leucine modulates many cellular and developmental processes. However, in the context of satellite cell proliferation and differentiation, the role of leucine and mTORC1 is less known. This study investigates the role of leucine in the process of proliferation and differentiation of primary preterm rat satellite cells, and the relationship with mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation. Dissociation of primary satellite cells occurred with type I collagenase and trypsin, and purification, via different speed adherence methods. Satellite cells with positive expression of Desmin were treated with leucine and rapamycin. We observed that leucine promoted proliferation and differentiation of primary satellite cells and increased the phosphorylation of mTOR. Rapamycin inhibited proliferation and differentiation, as well as decreased the phosphorylation level of mTOR. Furthermore, leucine increased the expression of MyoD and myogenin while the protein level of MyoD decreased due to rapamycin. However, myogenin expressed no affect by rapamycin. In conclusion, leucine may up-regulate the activation of mTORC1 to promote proliferation and differentiation of primary preterm rat satellite cells. We have shown that leucine promoted the differentiation of myotubes in part through the mTORC1-MyoD signal pathway. PMID:26007333

  6. Foxp1 Regulates the Proliferation of Hair Follicle Stem Cells in Response to Oxidative Stress during Hair Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianzhi; Li, Hanjun; Zhou, Rujiang; Ma, Gang; Dekker, Joseph D.; Tucker, Haley O.; Yao, Zhengju; Guo, Xizhi

    2015-01-01

    Hair follicle stem cells (HFSCs) in the bugle circularly generate outer root sheath (ORS) through linear proliferation within limited cycles during anagen phases. However, the mechanisms controlling the pace of HFSC proliferation remain unclear. Here we revealed that Foxp1, a transcriptional factor, was dynamically relocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of HFSCs in phase transitions from anagen to catagen, coupled with the rise of oxidative stress. Mass spectrum analyses revealed that the S468 phosphorylation of Foxp1 protein was responsive to oxidative stress and affected its nucleocytoplasmic translocation. Foxp1 deficiency in hair follicles led to compromised ROS accrual and increased HFSC proliferation. And more, NAC treatment profoundly elongated the anagen duration and HFSC proliferation in Foxp1-deficient background. Molecularly, Foxp1 augmented ROS levels through suppression of Trx1-mediated reductive function, thereafter imposing the cell cycle arrest by modulating the activity of p19/p53 pathway. Our findings identify a novel role for Foxp1 in controlling HFSC proliferation with cellular dynamic location in response to oxidative stress during hair cycling. PMID:26171970

  7. Cellular Stress Responses and Monitored Cellular Activities.

    PubMed

    Sawa, Teiji; Naito, Yoshifumi; Kato, Hideya; Amaya, Fumimasa

    2016-08-01

    To survive, organisms require mechanisms that enable them to sense changes in the outside environment, introduce necessary responses, and resist unfavorable distortion. Consequently, through evolutionary adaptation, cells have become equipped with the apparatus required to monitor their fundamental intracellular processes and the mechanisms needed to try to offset malfunction without receiving any direct signals from the outside environment. It has been shown recently that eukaryotic cells are equipped with a special mechanism that monitors their fundamental cellular functions and that some pathogenic proteobacteria can override this monitoring mechanism to cause harm. The monitored cellular activities involved in the stressed intracellular response have been researched extensively in Caenorhabditis elegans, where discovery of an association between key mitochondrial activities and innate immune responses was named "cellular associated detoxification and defenses (cSADD)." This cellular surveillance pathway (cSADD) oversees core cellular activities such as mitochondrial respiration and protein transport into mitochondria, detects xenobiotics and invading pathogens, and activates the endocrine pathways controlling behavior, detoxification, and immunity. The cSADD pathway is probably associated with cellular responses to stress in human inflammatory diseases. In the critical care field, the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes (e.g., respiratory distress syndromes and sepsis) involves the disturbance of mitochondrial respiration leading to cell death. Up-to-date knowledge about monitored cellular activities and cSADD, especially focusing on mitochondrial involvement, can probably help fill a knowledge gap regarding the pathogenesis of lethal inflammatory syndromes in the critical care field. PMID:26954943

  8. Cellular viability and genetic expression of human gingival fibroblasts to zirconia with enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain®)

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong-Dae; Choi, Hyun-jung; Lee, Heesu; Lee, Jung-Woo; Weber, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The objective of this study was to investigate the biologic effects of enamel matrix derivative (EMD) with different concentrations on cell viability and the genetic expression of human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) to zirconia surfaces. MATERIALS AND METHODS Immortalized human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) were cultured (1) without EMD, (2) with EMD 25 µg/mL, and (3) with EMD 100 µg/mL on zirconia discs. MTT assay was performed to evaluate the cell proliferation activity and SEM was carried out to examine the cellular morphology and attachment. The mRNA expression of collagen type I, osteopontin, fibronectin, and TGF-β1 was evaluated with the real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS From MTT assay, HGF showed more proliferation in EMD 25 µg/mL group than control and EMD 100 µg/mL group (P<.05). HGFs showed more flattened cellular morphology on the experimental groups than on the control group after 4h culture and more cellular attachments were observed on EMD 25 µg/mL group and EMD 100 µg/mL group after 24h culture. After 48h of culture, cellular attachment was similar in all groups. The mRNA expression of type I collagen increased in a concentration dependent manner. The genetic expression of osteopontin, fibronectin, and TGF-β1 was increased at EMD 100 µg/mL. However, the mRNA expression of proteins associated with cellular attachment was decreased at EMD 25 µg/mL. CONCLUSION Through this short term culture of HGF on zirconium discs, we conclude that EMD affects the proliferation, attachment, and cell morphology of HGF cells. Also, EMD stimulates production of extracellular matrix collagen, osteopontin, and TGF-β1 in high concentration levels. CLINICAL RELEVANCE With the use of EMD, protective barrier between attached gingiva and transmucosal zirconia abutment may be enhanced leading to final esthetic results with implants. PMID:25352963

  9. Charged Amino Acid-rich Leucine Zipper-1 (Crlz-1) as a Target of Wnt Signaling Pathway Controls Pre-B Cell Proliferation by Affecting Runx/CBFβ-targeted VpreB and λ5 Genes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung-Young; Park, Sung-Kyun; Yoo, Han-Woong; Pi, Joo-Hyun; Kang, Chang-Joong

    2016-07-15

    The proliferation of pre-B cells is known to further increase the clonal diversity of B cells at the stage of pre-B cells by allowing the same rearranged heavy chains to combine with differently rearranged light chains in a subsequent developmental stage. Crlz-1 (charged amino acid-rich leucine zipper-1) was found to control this proliferation of pre-B cells by working as a Wnt (wingless-related mouse mammary tumor virus integration site) target gene in these cells. Mechanistically, Crlz-1 protein functioned by mobilizing cytoplasmic CBFβ (core binding factor β) into the nucleus to allow Runx (runt-related transcription factor)/CBFβ heterodimerization. Runx/CBFβ then turned on its target genes such as EBF (early B cell factor), VpreB, and λ5 and thereby pre-B cell receptor signaling, leading to the expression of cyclins D2 and D3 Actually, the proliferative function of Crlz-1 was demonstrated by not only Crlz-1 or β-catenin knockdown but also Crlz-1 overexpression. Furthermore, the mechanistic view that the proliferative function of Crlz-1 is caused by relaying Wnt/β-catenin to pre-B cell receptor signaling pathways through the regulation of Runx/CBFβ heterodimerization was also verified by employing niclosamide, XAV939, and LiCl as Wnt inhibitors and activator, respectively. PMID:27226553

  10. Cellular Phone Towers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the call. How are people exposed to the energy from cellular phone towers? As people use cell ... where people can be exposed to them. The energy from a cellular phone tower antenna, like that ...

  11. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young's modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  12. Hierarchical cellular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, L.J.

    1991-12-31

    In this paper a method for estimating the contributions of both the composite and the cellular microstructures to the overall material properties and the mechanical efficiency of natural cellular solids will be described. The method will be demonstrated by focusing on the Young`s modulus; similar techniques can be used for other material properties. The results suggest efficient microstructures for engineered cellular materials.

  13. JPRS report. Proliferation issues

    SciTech Connect

    1992-03-26

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons-relevant technologies.

  14. MicroRNA‑21 expression is associated with the clinical features of patients with gastric carcinoma and affects the proliferation, invasion and migration of gastric cancer cells by regulating Noxa.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haibin; Wang, Panzhi; Zhang, Qiangnu; He, Xiaoyan; Zai, Guozhen; Wang, Xudong; Ma, Mei; Sun, Xiaoli

    2016-03-01

    The expression levels of microRNA‑21 (miR‑21) are increased in a number of types of solid tumors. However, the association between miR‑21 expression and clinical features of patients with gastric carcinoma, and gastric cancer proliferation, invasion and migration remains to be elucidated. The present study investigated the effect of miR‑21 on the clinical features, proliferation, invasion and migration of gastric cancer and the underlying mechanisms associated with Noxa. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT‑qPCR) was performed to detect the expression levels of miR‑21 and Noxa in samples of gastric cancer tissue and matched, adjacent, non‑tumor tissue. The association between miR‑21 expression and the clinical features of patients with gastric carcinoma, as well as the correlation between the mRNA and protein expression levels of miR‑21 and Noxa were analyzed. SGC‑7901 gastric cancer cells were cultured in vitro and transfected with an miR‑21 mimic. The effect of miR‑21 upregulation on proliferation and the cell cycle was determined using the MTT assay and flow cytometry. In addition, migration and invasion of SGC‑7901 cells were observed using the Transwell assay. The target gene of miR‑21 was identified using bioinformatics software and a dual luciferase reporting system. The effect of miR‑21 upregulation on Noxa expression levels in SGC‑7901 cells was also analyzed by RT‑qPCR and western blotting. Increased levels of miR‑21 expression and decreased levels of Noxa expression were observed in gastric cancer tissue samples when compared with the adjacent non‑tumor tissue samples. An increased miR‑21 expression level was identified as a risk factor for advanced stage gastric cancer, lymph node metastasis and larger primary tumors. Furthermore, the overexpression of miR‑21 inhibited Noxa expression levels in SGC‑7901 cells. Therefore, high levels of miR‑21 expression may induce gastric cancer

  15. Methylprednisolone inhibits the proliferation and affects the differentiation of rat spinal cord-derived neural progenitor cells cultured in low oxygen conditions by inhibiting HIF-1α and Hes1 in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenhao; Wang, Peng; Li, Shiyuan; Yang, Jiewen; Liang, Xinjun; Tang, Yong; Li, Yuxi; Yang, Rui; Wu, Yanfeng; Shen, Huiyong

    2014-09-01

    Although there is much controversy over the use of methylprednisolone (MP), it is one of the main drugs used in the treatment of acute spinal cord injury (SCI). The induction of the proliferation and differentiation of endogenous neural progenitor cells (NPCs) is considered a promising mode of treatment for SCI. However, the effects of MP on spinal cord-derived endogenous NPCs in a low oxygen enviroment remain to be delineated. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential effects of MP on NPCs cultured under low oxygen conditions in vitro and to elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved. Fetal rat spinal cord-derived NPCs were harvested and divided into 4 groups: 2 groups of cells cultured under normal oxygen conditions and treated with or without MP, and 2 groups incubated in 3% O2 (low oxygen) treated in a similar manner. We found that MP induced suppressive effects on NPC proliferation even under low oxygen conditions (3% O2). The proportion of nestin-positive NPCs decreased from 51.8±2.46% to 36.17±3.55% following the addition of MP and decreased more significantly to 27.20±2.68% in the cells cultured in 3% O2. In addition, a smaller number of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells and a greater number of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2)-positive cells was observed following the addition of MP under both normal (normoxic) and low oxygen (hypoxic) conditions. In response to MP treatment, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and the Notch signaling pathway downstream protein, Hes1, but not the upstream Notch-1 intracelluar domain (NICD), were inhibited. After blocking NICD with a γ-secretase inhibitor (DAPT) MP still inhibited the expression of Hes1. Our results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the MP-induced inhibition of proliferation and its effects on differentiation and suggest that HIF-1α and Hes1 play an important role in this effect. PMID:24992925

  16. Mode of action framework analysis for receptor-mediated toxicity: the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor alpha (PPARα) as a case study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Therapeutic hypolipidemic agents and industrial chemicals that cause peroxisome proliferation and induce liver tumors in rodents activate the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). Research has elucidated the cellular and molecular events by w...

  17. Anatomically discrete sex differences and enhancement by testosterone of cell proliferation in the telencephalic ventricle zone of the adult canary brain

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Jennifer M.; Ball, Gregory F.; Balthazart, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Previous work in songbirds has suggested that testosterone increases neuronal recruitment and survival in HVC but does not affect neuronal proliferation in the ventricular zone and that males and females have similar rates of proliferation except at discrete locations. Many of these conclusions are however based on limited data or were inferred indirectly. Here we specifically tested the effects of testosterone on cellular proliferation in the ventricular zone of both male and female adult canaries. We implanted adult birds of both sexes with testosterone or empty implants for one week and injected them with BrdU. One day later, we collected their brains and quantified BrdU-positive cells in the ventricular zone (VZ) at different rostro-caudal levels of the brain, ranging from the level where the song nucleus Area X occurs through the caudal extent of HVC. Proliferation in the dorsal part of the VZ was low and unaffected by sex or testosterone treatment. In the ventral part of the VZ, females had more proliferating cells than males, but only at rostral levels, near Area X. Also in the ventral part of the VZ, testosterone increased proliferation in birds of both sexes, but only in the mid- to caudal-VZ, caudal to the level of Area X, around the septum and HVC. We thus demonstrate here that there is both an effect of testosterone and possibly a more subtle effect of sex on cellular proliferation in the adult songbird brain, and that these effects are specific to different levels of the brain. PMID:24211440

  18. Knockdown of the cellular protein LRPPRC attenuates HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Cameron J; Matthews, John M; Madson, Christian J; Donnellan, Meghan R; Cerny, Ronald L; Belshan, Michael

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 exploits numerous host cellular pathways for productive infection. To identify novel factors involved in HIV-1 replication, HIV-1 integrase and matrix protein complexes were captured at 4 hours post infection for proteomic analysis using an affinity purification system. Leucine-rich PPR-motif containing (LRPPRC) protein, a cellular protein involved in mitochondrial function, cell metabolism, and cell-cycle progression was identified as one of the candidate HIV-1 factors. Co-immunoprecipitation RT-PCR experiments confirmed that LRPPRC associated with HIV-1 nucleic acids during the early steps of virus infection. To establish if LRPPRC was critical for HIV-1 infection, three independent LRPPRC knockdown cell lines were constructed (2.7, 3.6, and 4.1). Subcellular fractionation of these cell lines revealed differential knockdown of LRPPRC in subcellular compartments. LRPPRC was knocked down in the insoluble/cytoskeletal fractions of all three cell lines, but the 3.6 and 4.1 cells also showed a reduction in nuclear LRPPRC. Additionally, several cellular factors were downregulated and/or disrupted by loss of LRPPRC. HIV-1 infection was reduced in all three cell lines, but virus production and RNA encapsidation were unaffected, suggesting that LRPPRC was critical for the afferent stage of virus replication. Two of the three cell lines (3.6, 4.1) were refractory for murine leukemia virus infection, a virus dependent on cellular proliferation for productive infection. Consistent with this, these two cell lines exhibited reduced cellular growth with no loss of cellular viability or change in cell cycle phenotype. The early steps of virus infection were also differentially affected among the cell lines. A reduced level of preintegration complex formation was observed in all three cell lines, but viral DNA nuclear import was reduced only in the 3.6 and 4.1 cells. Combined, these data identify LRPPRC as a HIV-1 factor that is involved in HIV-1 replication through more

  19. Regulation of cellular chromatin state

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rakesh K; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2010-01-01

    The identity and functionality of eukaryotic cells is defined not just by their genomic sequence which remains constant between cell types, but by their gene expression profiles governed by epigenetic mechanisms. Epigenetic controls maintain and change the chromatin state throughout development, as exemplified by the setting up of cellular memory for the regulation and maintenance of homeotic genes in proliferating progenitors during embryonic development. Higher order chromatin structure in reversibly arrested adult stem cells also involves epigenetic regulation and in this review we highlight common trends governing chromatin states, focusing on quiescence and differentiation during myogenesis. Together, these diverse developmental modules reveal the dynamic nature of chromatin regulation providing fresh insights into the role of epigenetic mechanisms in potentiating development and differentiation. PMID:20592864

  20. Scaffold architecture and fibrin gels promote meniscal cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Pawelec, K. M. E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk; Best, S. M.; Cameron, R. E.; Wardale, R. J. E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk

    2015-01-01

    Stability of the knee relies on the meniscus, a complex connective tissue with poor healing ability. Current meniscal tissue engineering is inadequate, as the signals for increasing meniscal cell proliferation have not been established. In this study, collagen scaffold structure, isotropic or aligned, and fibrin gel addition were tested. Metabolic activity was promoted by fibrin addition. Cellular proliferation, however, was significantly increased by both aligned architectures and fibrin addition. None of the constructs impaired collagen type I production or triggered adverse inflammatory responses. It was demonstrated that both fibrin gel addition and optimized scaffold architecture effectively promote meniscal cell proliferation.

  1. Cellular mechanisms of cadmium-induced toxicity: a review.

    PubMed

    Rani, Anju; Kumar, Anuj; Lal, Ankita; Pant, Manu

    2014-08-01

    Cadmium is a widespread toxic pollutant of occupational and environmental concern because of its diverse toxic effects: extremely protracted biological half-life (approximately 20-30 years in humans), low rate of excretion from the body and storage predominantly in soft tissues (primarily, liver and kidneys). It is an extremely toxic element of continuing concern because environmental levels have risen steadily due to continued worldwide anthropogenic mobilization. Cadmium is absorbed in significant quantities from cigarette smoke, food, water and air contamination and is known to have numerous undesirable effects in both humans and animals. Cadmium has a diversity of toxic effects including nephrotoxicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity and endocrine and reproductive toxicities. At the cellular level, cadmium affects cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and other cellular activities. Current evidence suggests that exposure to cadmium induces genomic instability through complex and multifactorial mechanisms. Most important seems to be cadmium interaction with DNA repair mechanism, generation of reactive oxygen species and induction of apoptosis. In this article, we have reviewed recent developments and findings on cadmium toxicology. PMID:24117228

  2. Effect of fibronectin adsorption on osteoblastic cellular responses to hydroxyapatite and alumina.

    PubMed

    Kawashita, Masakazu; Hasegawa, Maki; Kudo, Tada-Aki; Kanetaka, Hiroyasu; Miyazaki, Toshiki; Hashimoto, Masami

    2016-12-01

    Initial cellular responses following implantation are important for inducing osteoconduction. We investigated cell adhesion, spreading, proliferation and differentiation of mouse MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells on untreated or fibronectin (Fn)-coated discs of hydroxyapatite (HAp) or alpha-type alumina (α-Al2O3). Fn coating significantly enhanced adhesion and spreading of MC3T3-E1 cells on HAp, but did not affect MC3T3-E1 cell proliferation and differentiation on HAp or α-Al2O3. Fn-coated HAp likely does not stimulate pre-osteoblast cells to initiate the process of osteoconduction; however, Fn adsorption might affect the response of inflammatory cells to the implanted material or, in conjunction with other serum proteins, stimulate pre-osteoblast cell proliferation and differentiation. Further studies on the effect of serum proteins in cell culture and the efficacy of Fn-coated HAp and α-Al2O3in vivo are warranted. PMID:27612826

  3. Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) downregulates telomerase activity and inhibits proliferation in telomerase-expressing cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Uziel, O; Fenig, E; Nordenberg, J; Beery, E; Reshef, H; Sandbank, J; Birenbaum, M; Bakhanashvili, M; Yerushalmi, R; Luria, D; Lahav, M

    2005-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate (IM) is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, which inhibits phosphorylation of downstream proteins involved in BCR-ABL signal transduction. It has proved beneficial in treating patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). In addition, IM demonstrates activity against malignant cells expressing c-kit and platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGF-R). The activity of IM in the blastic crisis of CML and against various myeloma cell lines suggests that this drug may also target other cellular components. In the light of the important role of telomerase in malignant transformation, we evaluated the effect of IM on telomerase activity (TA) and regulation in various malignant cell lines. Imatinib mesylate caused a dose-dependent inhibition of TA (up to 90% at a concentration of 15 μM IM) in c-kit-expressing SK-N-MC (Ewing sarcoma), SK-MEL-28 (melanoma), RPMI 8226 (myeloma), MCF-7 (breast cancer) and HSC 536/N (Fanconi anaemia) cells as well as in ba/F3 (murine pro-B cells), which do not express c-kit, BCR-ABL or PDGF-R. Imatinib mesylate did not affect the activity of other DNA polymerases. Inhibition of TA was associated with 50% inhibition of proliferation. The inhibition of proliferation was associated with a decrease in the S-phase of the cell cycle and an accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase. No apoptosis was observed. Inhibition of TA was caused mainly by post-translational modifications: dephosphorylation of AKT and, to a smaller extent, by early downregulation of hTERT (the catalytic subunit of the enzyme) transcription. Other steps of telomerase regulation were not affected by IM. This study demonstrates an additional cellular target of IM, not necessarily mediated via known tyrosine kinases, that causes inhibition of TA and cell proliferation. PMID:15870711

  4. The risk-associated long noncoding RNA NBAT-1 controls neuroblastoma progression by regulating cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Gaurav Kumar; Mitra, Sanhita; Subhash, Santhilal; Hertwig, Falk; Kanduri, Meena; Mishra, Kankadeb; Fransson, Susanne; Ganeshram, Abiarchana; Mondal, Tanmoy; Bandaru, Sashidhar; Ostensson, Malin; Akyürek, Levent M; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Pfeifer, Susan; Larsson, Erik; Shi, Leming; Peng, Zhiyu; Fischer, Matthias; Martinsson, Tommy; Hedborg, Fredrik; Kogner, Per; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2014-11-10

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonal tumor of the sympathetic nervous system and the most common extracranial tumor of childhood. By sequencing transcriptomes of low- and high-risk neuroblastomas, we detected differentially expressed annotated and nonannotated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs). We identified a lncRNA neuroblastoma associated transcript-1 (NBAT-1) as a biomarker significantly predicting clinical outcome of neuroblastoma. CpG methylation and a high-risk neuroblastoma associated SNP on chromosome 6p22 functionally contribute to NBAT-1 differential expression. Loss of NBAT-1 increases cellular proliferation and invasion. It controls these processes via epigenetic silencing of target genes. NBAT-1 loss affects neuronal differentiation through activation of the neuronal-specific transcription factor NRSF/REST. Thus, loss of NBAT-1 contributes to aggressive neuroblastoma by increasing proliferation and impairing differentiation of neuronal precursors. PMID:25517750

  5. Resveratrol induces cellular senescence with attenuated mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B in glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Zhen; Xu, Michael S.; Barnett, Tamara L.; Xu, C. Wilson

    2011-04-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Resveratrol induces cellular senescence in glioma cell. {yields} Resveratrol inhibits mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120. {yields} Depletion of RNF20, phenocopies the inhibitory effects of resveratrol. {yields} Mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120 is a novel target of resveratrol. {yields} RNF20 inhibits cellular senescence in proliferating glioma cells. -- Abstract: Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), a polyphenol naturally occurring in grapes and other plants, has cancer chemo-preventive effects and therapeutic potential. Although resveratrol modulates multiple pathways in tumor cells, how resveratrol or its affected pathways converge on chromatin to mediate its effects is not known. Using glioma cells as a model, we showed here that resveratrol inhibited cell proliferation and induced cellular hypertrophy by transforming spindle-shaped cells to enlarged, irregular and flatten-shaped ones. We further showed that resveratrol-induced hypertrophic cells expressed senescence-associated-{beta}-galactosidase, suggesting that resveratrol-induced cellular senescence in glioma cells. Consistent with these observations, we demonstrated that resveratrol inhibited clonogenic efficiencies in vitro and tumor growth in a xenograft model. Furthermore, we found that acute treatment of resveratrol inhibited mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120 (uH2B) in breast, prostate, pancreatic, lung, brain tumor cells as well as primary human cells. Chronic treatment with low doses of resveratrol also inhibited uH2B in the resveratrol-induced senescent glioma cells. Moreover, we showed that depletion of RNF20, a ubiquitin ligase of histone H2B, inhibited uH2B and induced cellular senescence in glioma cells in vitro, thereby recapitulated the effects of resveratrol. Taken together, our results suggest that uH2B is a novel direct or indirect chromatin target of resveratrol and RNF20 plays an important role in inhibiting cellular

  6. In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells on nanoporous alumina

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yuanhui; Ju, Yang; Song, Guanbin; Morita, Yasuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Cell adhesion, migration, and proliferation are significantly affected by the surface topography of the substrates on which the cells are cultured. Alumina is one of the most popular implant materials used in orthopedics, but few data are available concerning the cellular responses of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) grown on nanoporous structures. MSCs were cultured on smooth alumina substrates and nanoporous alumina substrates to investigate the interaction between surface topographies of nanoporous alumina and cellular behavior. Nanoporous alumina substrates with pore sizes of 20 nm and 100 nm were used to evaluate the effect of pore size on MSCs as measured by proliferation, morphology, expression of integrin β1, and osteogenic differentiation. An MTT assay was used to measure cell viability of MSCs on different substrates, and determined that cell viability decreased with increasing pore size. Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the effect of pore size on cell morphology. Extremely elongated cells and prominent cell membrane protrusions were observed in cells cultured on alumina with the larger pore size. The expression of integrin β1 was enhanced in MSCs cultured on porous alumina, revealing that porous alumina substrates were more favorable for cell growth than smooth alumina substrates. Higher levels of osteoblastic differentiation markers such as alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and mineralization were detected in cells cultured on alumina with 100 nm pores compared with cells cultured on alumina with either 20 nm pores or smooth alumina. This work demonstrates that cellular behavior is affected by variation in pore size, providing new insight into the potential application of this novel biocompatible material for the developing field of tissue engineering. PMID:23935364

  7. Defenses and disincentives to proliferation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Snipes, F.S.; Scesney, P.E.

    1992-03-02

    The proliferation of ballistic missiles and their associated technologies through the Third World has become a chief security concern for the United States and its allies. To meet this threat, the U.S. and other industrial nations have attempted to impose export controls on critical missile technologies in order to prohibit certain regimes from acquiring ballistic missile systems. Unfortunately, the controls have largely been ineffective as not only have ballistic missiles been acquired by dangerous Third World regimes, but often the technology and engineering expertise to indigenously produce these weapons have been obtained as well. Two major instances of ballistic missile use in the Third World--the Iran-Iraq War of the Cities and Desert Storm--have brought home the realization that arms control measures alone are not going to be successful in stopping proliferation of these weapons. Other responses to these systems are needed to enhance current arms control efforts. One of these responses is active ballistic missile defense. Desert Storm demonstrated the utility of defense as a response to the products of proliferation. Less obvious, but of great interest to SDI and U.S. foreign policy is how this demonstration of defensive prowess and subsequent development in defensive technologies will affect ballistic missile proliferation. The presence of defenses reduces the value of ballistic missiles that is determined by a potential proliferator. By doing so, defenses provide disincentives for regional countries to proliferate. Examining these disincentives is an integral part of determining the net value of defensive deployments.

  8. Alterations of Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis in the Hypoplastic Reeler Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Cocito, Carolina; Merighi, Adalberto; Giacobini, Mario; Lossi, Laura

    2016-01-01

    A mutation of the reln gene gives rise to the Reeler mouse (reln−∕−) displaying an ataxic phenotype and cerebellar hypoplasia. We have characterized the neurochemistry of postnatal (P0–P60) reln−∕− mouse cerebella with specific attention to the intervention of cell proliferation and apoptosis in the P0–P25 interval. Homozygous reln−∕− mice and age-matched controls were analyzed by immunofluorescence using primary antibodies against NeuN, calbindin, GFAP, vimentin, SMI32, and GAD67. Proliferation and apoptosis were detected after a single intraperitoneal BrdU injection and by the TUNEL assay with anti-digoxigenin rhodamine-conjugated antibodies. Quantitative analysis with descriptive and predictive statistics was used to calculate cell densities (number/mm2) after fluorescent nuclear stain (TCD, total cell density), labeling with BrdU (PrCD, proliferating cell density), or TUNEL (ApoCD, apoptotic cell density). By this approach we first have shown that the temporal pattern of expression of neuronal/glial markers in postnatal cerebellum is not affected by the Reeler mutation. Then, we have demonstrated that the hypoplasia in the Reeler mouse cerebellum is consequent to reduction of cortical size and cellularity (TCD), and that TCD is, in turn, linked to quantitative differences in the extent of cell proliferation and apoptosis, as well as derangements in their temporal trends during postnatal maturation. Finally, we have calculated that PrCD is the most important predictive factor to determine TCD in the cerebellar cortex of the mutants. These results support the notion that, beside the well-known consequences onto the migration of the cerebellar neurons, the lack of Reelin results in a measurable deficit in neural proliferation. PMID:27252624

  9. Single chemical modifications of the C-1027 enediyne core, a radiomimetic antitumor drug, affect both drug potency and the role of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated in cellular responses to DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Daniel R; Gawron, Loretta S; Ju, Jianhua; Liu, Wen; Shen, Ben; Beerman, Terry A

    2007-01-15

    The radiomimetic enediyne C-1027 induces almost exclusively DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) and is extremely cytotoxic. Unique among radiomimetics, ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is dispensable for cellular responses to C-1027-induced DNA damage. This study explores the biological activity of three recently bioengineered C-1027 analogues: 7''-desmethyl-C-1027 (desmethyl), 20'-deschloro-C-1027 (deschloro), and 22'-deshydroxy-C-1027 (deshydroxy). Each compound maintains the characteristic ability of radiomimetics to cleave DNA in cell-free systems, varying in activity from 2-fold (deschloro) to 55-fold (desmethyl) less than C-1027. The induction of cellular DNA breaks based on pulsed field gel electrophoresis, comet analysis, and gammaH2AX activation was in the same rank order as cell-free DNA break induction, although the amount of breaks induced by desmethyl is greatly reduced compared with the other analogues. Despite the disparity in inducing DNA DSBs, all of the analogues produced G2-M cell cycle arrest and activated DNA DSB damage response proteins, such as p53-Ser15 and Chk2-Thr68, at concentrations in concordance with their ability to inhibit cell growth. Interestingly, of the three analogues, only the desmethyl-induced DNA damage response was similar to C-1027, as it did not cause hypersensitive cell growth inhibition in the absence of ATM nor require the kinase to phosphorylate p53 or Chk2. These findings show that simple modifications of the chromophore of C-1027 can result in varied induction of, and cellular response to, DNA DSBs. PMID:17234789

  10. Cellular monitoring systems for the assessment of space environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, Christine E.; Arenz, Andrea; Meier, Matthias M.; Baumstark-Khan, Christa

    Detrimental environmental factors - namely ionizing radiation - will continue to affect future manned space missions. The Cellular Biodiagnostics group at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) develops cellular monitoring systems, which include bacterial and mammalian cell systems capable of responding to DNA damage as a consequence of the presence of genotoxic conditions. Such bioassays will complement the physical detector systems used in space, insofar as they yield intrinsically biologically weighted measures of cellular responses. Furthermore, synergistic toxic impacts of the radiation environment together with other potentially genotoxic constituents of the space habitat can be quantified using such systems. The biological end-point under investigation in this work is the gene activation by radiation in mammalian cells, based on fluorescent promoter reporter systems using the destabilized enhanced green fluorescent protein variant (d2EGFP). The promoter element to be investigated reflects the activity of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway. The NF-κB family of proteins plays a major role in the inflammatory and immune response, cell proliferation and differentiation, apoptosis and tumorigenesis. After exposure to X-rays, an increase in NF-κB activation was seen only with high doses. Experiments using accelerated argon ions (95 MeV/u, LET ˜230 keV/μm) produced at the French heavy ion accelerator GANIL have shown activation of the NF-κB pathway with doses greater than 1 × 10 6 particles cm -2 (P cm -2), reaching its maximal activation at 2 × 10 7 P cm -2. These results suggest that the exceptional radiation field in space may activate the NF-κB pathway in human cells.

  11. Effects of homocysteine on mesenchymal cell proliferation and differentiation during chondrogenesis on limb development.

    PubMed

    Bourckhardt, Gilian Fernando; Cecchini, Manuela Sozo; Ammar, Dib; Kobus-Bianchini, Karoline; Müller, Yara Maria Rauh; Nazari, Evelise Maria

    2015-11-01

    High levels of homocysteine (Hcy) are related to an increased risk of the occurrence of congenital anomalies, including limb defects. However, few evaluations about how toxic levels of Hcy affect limb development have been reported. We investigated whether Hcy can affect the cell cycle proteins and proteins involved in mesenchymal cell differentiation during limb development, in a chicken embryo model. Embryos were treated with 20 µmol d-l Hcy/50 µl saline at embryonic day 2 and analyzed at embryonic day 6. Untreated control embryos received exclusively 50 µl saline solution. To identify cells in proliferation and cell cycle proteins, as well as Pax1/9 and Sox9 proteins, we performed immunolocalization and flow cytometry analyses using the antibodies anti-phosphohistone H3, anti-p53, anti-p21, anti-proliferating cell nuclear antigen, anti-Pax1, anti-Pax9 and anti-Sox9. No significant differences in cell proliferation were observed between Hcy-treated and untreated embryos. We observed a decrease of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen and p21 proteins, both involved in the G1 phase of cell cycle progression. On the other hand, in mesenchymal cells of the limbs, Hcy induces an increase of p53 protein, which can be activated by DNA damage. In cell differentiation, Hcy induced an increase mainly of Pax9 and Sox9 proteins. Our data indicate that the treatment with Hcy changes the mesenchymal cell dynamics during limb development, but does not change the morphology of the cartilage molds. These findings provide information to understand better the cellular basis of the toxicity of Hcy on chondrogenesis during limb development. PMID:25619733

  12. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) regulates proliferation of endochondral cells in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Ikuma; Hisaki, Tomoka; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko; Kano, Kiyoshi

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We produced in vitro and in vivo model to better understand the role of DDR2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DDR2 might play an inhibitory role in the proliferation of chondrocyte. -- Abstract: Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated by fibrillar collagens. DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. The decrement of endogenous DDR2 represses osteoblastic marker gene expression and osteogenic differentiation in murine preosteoblastic cells, but the functions of DDR2 in chondrogenic cellular proliferation remain unclear. To better understand the role of DDR2 signaling in cellular proliferation in endochondral ossification, we inhibited Ddr2 expression via the inhibitory effect of miRNA on Ddr2 mRNA (miDdr2) and analyzed the cellular proliferation and differentiation in the prechondrocyte ATDC5 cell lines. To investigate DDR2's molecular role in endochondral cellular proliferation in vivo, we also produced transgenic mice in which the expression of truncated, kinase dead (KD) DDR2 protein is induced, and evaluated the DDR2 function in cellular proliferation in chondrocytes. Although the miDdr2-transfected ATDC5 cell lines retained normal differentiation ability, DDR2 reduction finally promoted cellular proliferation in proportion to the decreasing ratio of Ddr2 expression, and it also promoted earlier differentiation to cartilage cells by insulin induction. The layer of hypertrophic chondrocytes in KD Ddr2 transgenic mice was not significantly thicker than that of normal littermates, but the layer of proliferative chondrocytes in KD-Ddr2 transgenic mice was significantly thicker than that of normal littermates

  13. Overexpression of prothymosin alpha accelerates proliferation and retards differentiation in HL-60 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, P; Viñuela, J E; Alvarez-Fernández, L; Buceta, M; Vidal, A; Domínguez, F; Gómez-Márquez, J

    1998-01-01

    Prothymosin alpha (ProTalpha) is an acidic nuclear protein the expression of which is related to the proliferation and differentiation processes in mammalian cells. In the present study we have stably transfected HL-60 cells, a biological system that allows the study of both proliferation and differentiation, with recombinant vectors encoding sense and antisense ProTalpha mRNA. In the HL-60 cell clones overexpressing ProTalpha we observed an acceleration in the growth rate, whereas expression of the antisense orientation showed the opposite effect. Moreover, cell-cycle analysis demonstrated that the G1-phase was shortened in the cells expressing the sense construct. Before studying how ProTalpha affects differentiation, we showed that the down-regulation of ProTalpha gene during differentiation occurs in all mammalian cell lines (HL-60, K562, U937, MEL C88, N2A and PC12) analysed. The biological effect evoked by the induction of the ProTalpha sense vector was the retardation of cell differentiation, although expression of the antisense construct showed no effect on differentiation. In conclusion, our findings provide evidence that ProTalpha is directly implicated in cellular proliferation and that the maintenance of high levels of ProTalpha inside HL-60 cells is incompatible with their ability to differentiate. PMID:9560301

  14. Prognostic Factors Including Proliferation Markers Ki-67, bax, and bcl-2 in Temporal Bone Paraganglioma

    PubMed Central

    Gjuric, Mislav; Völker, Uwe; Katalinic, Alexander; Wolf, Stephan Rüdiger

    1997-01-01

    Valuable criteria with which to predict the clinical behavior of the temporal bone paraganglioma or the response to treatment are lacking. The analysis of markers of cell proliferation is a possibility to estimate the prognosis. Extensive patient data on 40 temporal bone paragangliomas were gathered over the years and correlated with the data obtained by staining histologic sections with bcl-2, bax, and MIB I markers of cellular proliferation. The immunohistochemistry was in all cases negative for bcl-2, positive for bax, and for Ki-67 positive in 20% of tumors. The scores for Ki-67 did not correlate with the majority of clinical parameters, except for treatment modality, preoperative hearing loss, and cranial nerve involvement. The tendency toward poorer hearing and a higher incidence of preoperative lower cranial nerve palsies was demonstrated in patients with higher Ki-67 scores. Furthermore, the higher rate of subtotal tumor removals in these patients reveals technical difficulties in accomplishing a radical removal, although the incidence of residual tumors was thus not affected. In view of the present information obtained with proliferation markers, the site of tumor origin still remains the most predictive variable for the course of the disease. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171028

  15. Role of aquaporins in cell proliferation: What else beyond water permeability?

    PubMed

    Galán-Cobo, Ana; Ramírez-Lorca, Reposo; Echevarría, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    In addition to the extensive data demonstrating the importance of mammalian AQPs for the movement of water and some small solutes across the cell membrane, there is now a growing body of evidence indicating the involvement of these proteins in numerous cellular processes seemingly unrelated, at least some of them in a direct way, to their canonical function of water permeation. Here, we have presented a broad range of evidence demonstrating that these proteins have a role in cell proliferation by various different mechanisms, namely, by allowing fast cell volume regulation during cell division; by affecting progression of cell cycle and helping maintain the balance between proliferation and apoptosis, and by crosstalk with other cell membrane proteins or transcription factors that, in turn, modulate progression of the cell cycle or regulate biosynthesis pathways of cell structural components. In the end, however, after discussing all these data that strongly support a role for AQPs in the cell proliferation process, it remains impossible to conclude that all these other functions attributed to AQPs occur completely independently of their water permeability, and there is a need for new experiments designed specifically to address this interesting issue. PMID:26752515

  16. TRPV6 channel modulates proliferation of insulin secreting INS-1E beta cell line.

    PubMed

    Skrzypski, M; Khajavi, N; Mergler, S; Szczepankiewicz, D; Kołodziejski, P A; Metzke, D; Wojciechowicz, T; Billert, M; Nowak, K W; Strowski, M Z

    2015-12-01

    Transient receptor potential channel vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) is a non-selective cation channel with high permeability for Ca²⁺ ions. So far, the role of TRPV6 in pancreatic beta cells is unknown. In the present study, we characterized the role of TRPV6 in controlling calcium signaling, cell proliferation as well as insulin expression, and secretion in experimental INS-1E beta cell model. TRPV6 protein production was downregulated using siRNA by approx. 70%, as detected by Western blot. Intracellular free Ca²⁺ ([Ca²⁺]i) was measured by fluorescence Ca²⁺ imaging using fura-2. Calcineurin/NFAT signaling was analyzed using a NFAT reporter assay as well as a calcineurin activity assay. TRPV6 downregulation resulted in impaired cellular calcium influx. Its downregulation also reduced cell proliferation and decreased insulin mRNA expression. These changes were companied by the inhibition of the calcineurin/NFAT signaling. In contrast, insulin exocytosis was not affected by TRPV6 downregulation. In conclusion, this study demonstrates for the first time the expression of TRPV6 in INS-1E cells and rat pancreatic beta cells and describes its role in modulating calcium signaling, beta cell proliferation and insulin mRNA expression. In contrast, TRPV6 fails to influence insulin secretion. PMID:26384871

  17. Neural progenitors organize in small-world networks to promote cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Malmersjö, Seth; Rebellato, Paola; Smedler, Erik; Planert, Henrike; Kanatani, Shigeaki; Liste, Isabel; Nanou, Evanthia; Sunner, Hampus; Abdelhady, Shaimaa; Zhang, Songbai; Andäng, Michael; El Manira, Abdeljabbar; Silberberg, Gilad; Arenas, Ernest; Uhlén, Per

    2013-01-01

    Coherent network activity among assemblies of interconnected cells is essential for diverse functions in the adult brain. However, cellular networks before formations of chemical synapses are poorly understood. Here, embryonic stem cell-derived neural progenitors were found to form networks exhibiting synchronous calcium ion (Ca2+) activity that stimulated cell proliferation. Immature neural cells established circuits that propagated electrical signals between neighboring cells, thereby activating voltage-gated Ca2+ channels that triggered Ca2+ oscillations. These network circuits were dependent on gap junctions, because blocking prevented electrotonic transmission both in vitro and in vivo. Inhibiting connexin 43 gap junctions abolished network activity, suppressed proliferation, and affected embryonic cortical layer formation. Cross-correlation analysis revealed highly correlated Ca2+ activities in small-world networks that followed a scale-free topology. Graph theory predicts that such network designs are effective for biological systems. Taken together, these results demonstrate that immature cells in the developing brain organize in small-world networks that critically regulate neural progenitor proliferation. PMID:23576737

  18. Oncogenic relevant defensins: expression pattern and proliferation characteristics of human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jochen; Kraus, Dominik; Reckenbeil, Jan; Probstmeier, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate gene expression levels of oncogenic relevant human defensins and their impact on proliferation rates of 29 cell lines derived from main types of different tumor origins. Differential gene expression analysis of human defensins was performed by real-time PCR experiments. The proliferation rate of tumor cells that had been cultivated in the absence or presence of biologically active peptides was analyzed with a lactate dehydrogenase assay kit. At least one member of the defensin family was expressed in each tumor cell line, whereby α-defensin (DEFA1), DEFA2, or DEFA3 transcripts could be ubiquitously detected. Cell lines of neural origin (glioma, neuroblastoma, and small-cell lung carcinoma) expressed far less human β-defensins (hBDs) in comparison to other tumor types. The expression level of a specific defensin in various cell lines could vary by more than five orders of magnitude. Compensatory mechanisms on the expression levels of the different defensins could not be strictly observed. Only in 3 out of 29 tumor cell lines the proliferation rate was affected after defensin stimulation. The variable appearance of defensins, as well as the cell line-restricted functional activity, argues for the integration of defensins in complex cellular and molecular networks that tolerate rather flexible expression patterns. PMID:26711780

  19. Odd-skipped related 2 regulates genes related to proliferation and development

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Shinji; Abiko, Yoshimitsu; Amano, Atsuo

    2010-07-23

    Cell proliferation is a biological process in which chromosomes replicate in one cell and equally divide into two daughter cells. Our previous findings suggested that Odd-skipped related 2 (Osr2) plays an important role in cellular quiescence and proliferation under epigenetic regulation. However, the mechanism used by Osr2 to establish and maintain proliferation is unknown. To examine the functional role of Osr2 in cell proliferation, we analyzed its downstream target genes using microarray analysis following adenovirus-induced overexpression of Osr2 as well as knockdown with Osr2 siRNA, which showed that Osr2 regulates a multitude of genes involved in proliferation and the cell cycle, as well as development. Additional proliferation assays also indicated that Osr2 likely functions to elicit cell proliferation. Together, these results suggest that Osr2 plays important roles in proliferation and development.

  20. Suppression of splenic lymphocyte proliferation by Eucommia ulmoides and genipin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Gabsik; Kyoung Seo, Eun; Lee, Je-Hyun; Young Lee, Joo

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the modulation of innate and adaptive immune cell activation by Eucommia ulmoides Oliver extract (EUE) and its ingredient genipin. As an innate immunity indicator, the phagocytic activity of macrophages was determined by measuring engulfed, fluorescently labeled Escherichia coli. As a surrogate marker for the respective activation of cellular and humoral adaptive immunity, concanavalin A (Con A) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induction of primary splenocyte proliferation was assayed in in vitro and ex vivo systems. EUE and genipin suppressed the proliferation of primary splenic lymphocytes induced by Con A or LPS, but not macrophage phagocytosis. Oral administration of EUE and genipin to mice decreased splenic lymphocyte proliferation induced by Con A or LPS. These results revealed that E. ulmoides and genipin suppressed cellular and humoral adaptive immunity, and they suggest that E. ulmoides and genipin are promising candidates for immunosuppressive drugs that target diseases that involve excessive activation of adaptive immunity. PMID:25879499

  1. Proliferation: Threat and response

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    ;Table of Contents: Section I: The Regional Proliferation Challenge; Northeast Asia; The Middle East and North Africa; The Former Soviet Union: Russia, Ukrane, Kazakstan, And Belarus; South Asia; The International Threat: Dangers from Terrorism, Insurgencies, Civil Wars, And Organized Crime; Section II: Department of Defense Response; Technical Annex: Accessible Technologies; Glossary.

  2. JPRS report proliferation issues

    SciTech Connect

    1991-11-18

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons relevant technologies. The following locations are included: (1) China; (2) Indonesia; (3) Bulgaria; (4) Brazil, Cuba; (5) Egypt, India, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Pakistan; (6) Soviet Union; and (7) France, Germany, United Kingdom, Italy, Norway.

  3. Cell Proliferation in Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Stafman, Laura L; Beierle, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood, continues to carry a dismal prognosis for children diagnosed with advanced stage or relapsed disease. This review focuses upon factors responsible for cell proliferation in neuroblastoma including transcription factors, kinases, and regulators of the cell cycle. Novel therapeutic strategies directed toward these targets in neuroblastoma are discussed. PMID:26771642

  4. Controlling nuclear proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, W.

    1981-07-17

    Nuclear non-proliferation policy depends on the 1968 Non-Proliferation Treaty, in which countries promise not to acquire nuclear weapons in exchange for open access to peaceful nuclear technology, and a system of international safeguards that are imposed on exported nuclear equipment and facilities operated by parties to the treaty. Critics have feared all along that non-nuclear countries might circumvent or exploit the system to obtain nuclear weapons and that the Atoms for Peace plan would spread the very technology it sought to control. The nuclear weapons states would like everyone else to believe that atomic bombs are undesirable, but they continue to rely on the bombs for their own defense. Israel's raid on Iraq's nuclear reactor focused world attention on the proliferation problem and helped to broaden and sterengthen its prospects. It also highlighted the weakness that there are no effective sanctions against violators. Until the international community can ageee on enforcement measures powerful enough to prevent nuclear proliferation, individual countries may be tempted to follow Israel's example, 19 references.

  5. Cell Proliferation in Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Stafman, Laura L.; Beierle, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood, continues to carry a dismal prognosis for children diagnosed with advanced stage or relapsed disease. This review focuses upon factors responsible for cell proliferation in neuroblastoma including transcription factors, kinases, and regulators of the cell cycle. Novel therapeutic strategies directed toward these targets in neuroblastoma are discussed. PMID:26771642

  6. Modelling cellular behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endy, Drew; Brent, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Representations of cellular processes that can be used to compute their future behaviour would be of general scientific and practical value. But past attempts to construct such representations have been disappointing. This is now changing. Increases in biological understanding combined with advances in computational methods and in computer power make it possible to foresee construction of useful and predictive simulations of cellular processes.

  7. How phototherapy affects angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyson, Mary

    2007-02-01

    Angiogenesis is essential for normal growth, tissue repair and regeneration. Its stimulation accelerates repair and regeneration including wound healing where these processes are delayed. Its inhibition can reduce the rate of growth of solid tumors. Phototherapy can accelerate the resolution of acute inflammation with the result that the proliferative phase of tissue repair, when angiogenesis occurs, begins earlier than in sham-irradiated controls. Evidence that angiogenesis is enhanced in dermal repair, tendon repair and bone regeneration in rodents is presented. The cellular mechanisms that control angiogenesis involve the interaction of endothelial cells, macrophages, pericytes and other cells in response, for example, to changes in the availability of oxygen in the local environment. Pericytes and macrophages modulate endothelial cell proliferation; pericytes guide endothelial cell migration. The stimulation of endothelial cell proliferation in vitro following exposure to red (660 nm) and infrared (820 nm) radiation, 15 mW, at 2-8 J/cm2 is presented. 1J/cm2 was ineffective. 820 nm irradiation, 15 mW, at 8 J/cm2 was observed to inhibit pericyte proliferation in vitro. Indirect effects on endothelial cell and pericyte proliferation followed stimulation of soluble mediator production by macrophages following exposure to red and infrared radiation. The potential clinical significance of the results obtained is discussed and the necessity of clinical trials emphasized.

  8. miR-126 inhibits non-small cell lung cancer cells proliferation by targeting EGFL7

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yanqin; Bai, Yifeng; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Yu; Guo, Ying; Guo, Linlang

    2010-01-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent an abundant group of small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression, and have been demonstrated to play roles as tumor suppressor genes (oncogenes), and affect homeostatic processes such as development, cell proliferation, and cell death. Subsequently, epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (EGFL7), which is confirmed to be involved in cellular responses such as cell migration and blood vessel formation, is identified as a potential miR-126 target by bioinformatics. However, there is still no evidence showing EGFL7's relationship with miR-126 and the proliferation of lung cancer cells. The aim of this work is to investigate whether miR-126, together with EGFL7, have an effect on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells' proliferation. Therefore, we constructed overexpressed miR-126 plasmid to target EGFL7 and transfected them into NSCLC cell line A549 cells. Then, we used methods like quantitative RT-PCR, Western blot, flow cytometry assay, and immunohistochemistry staining to confirm our findings. The result was that overexpression of miR-126 in A549 cells could increase EGFL7 expression. Furthermore, the most notable finding by cell proliferation related assays is that miR-126 can inhibit A549 cells proliferation in vitro and inhibit tumor growth in vivo by targeting EGFL7. As a result, our study demonstrates that miR-126 can inhibit proliferation of non-small cell lung cancer cells through one of its targets, EGFL7.

  9. Pirin Inhibits Cellular Senescence in Melanocytic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Licciulli, Silvia; Luise, Chiara; Scafetta, Gaia; Capra, Maria; Giardina, Giuseppina; Nuciforo, Paolo; Bosari, Silvano; Viale, Giuseppe; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Tonelli, Chiara; Lanfrancone, Luisa; Alcalay, Myriam

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence has been widely recognized as a tumor suppressing mechanism that acts as a barrier to cancer development after oncogenic stimuli. A prominent in vivo model of the senescence barrier is represented by nevi, which are composed of melanocytes that, after an initial phase of proliferation induced by activated oncogenes (most commonly BRAF), are blocked in a state of cellular senescence. Transformation to melanoma occurs when genes involved in controlling senescence are mutated or silenced and cells reacquire the capacity to proliferate. Pirin (PIR) is a highly conserved nuclear protein that likely functions as a transcriptional regulator whose expression levels are altered in different types of tumors. We analyzed the expression pattern of PIR in adult human tissues and found that it is expressed in melanocytes and has a complex pattern of regulation in nevi and melanoma: it is rarely detected in mature nevi, but is expressed at high levels in a subset of melanomas. Loss of function and overexpression experiments in normal and transformed melanocytic cells revealed that PIR is involved in the negative control of cellular senescence and that its expression is necessary to overcome the senescence barrier. Our results suggest that PIR may have a relevant role in melanoma progression. PMID:21514450

  10. Distinct Effects of Different Phosphatidylglycerol Species on Mouse Keratinocyte Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ding; Seremwe, Mutsa; Edwards, John G.; Podolsky, Robert; Bollag, Wendy B.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that liposomes composed of egg-derived phosphatidylglycerol (PG), with a mixed fatty acid composition (comprising mainly palmitate and oleate), inhibit the proliferation and promote the differentiation of rapidly dividing keratinocytes, and stimulate the growth of slowly proliferating epidermal cells. To determine the species of PG most effective at modulating keratinocyte proliferation, primary mouse keratinocytes were treated with different PG species, and proliferation was measured. PG species containing polyunsaturated fatty acids were effective at inhibiting rapidly proliferating keratinocytes, whereas PG species with monounsaturated fatty acids were effective at promoting proliferation in slowly dividing cells. Thus, palmitoyl-arachidonyl-PG (16∶0/20∶4), palmitoyl-linoleoyl-PG (16∶0/18∶2), dilinoleoyl-PG (18∶2/18∶2) and soy PG (a PG mixture with a large percentage of polyunsaturated fatty acids) were particularly effective at inhibiting proliferation in rapidly dividing keratinocytes. Conversely, palmitoyl-oleoyl-PG (16∶0/18∶1) and dioleoyl-PG (18∶1/18∶1) were especially effective proproliferative PG species. This result represents the first demonstration of opposite effects of different species of a single class of phospholipid and suggests that these different PG species may signal to diverse effector enzymes to differentially affect keratinocyte proliferation and normalize keratinocyte proliferation. Thus, different PG species may be useful for treating skin diseases characterized by excessive or insufficient proliferation. PMID:25233484

  11. Cannabinoid receptor signaling in progenitor/stem cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Galve-Roperh, Ismael; Chiurchiù, Valerio; Díaz-Alonso, Javier; Bari, Monica; Guzmán, Manuel; Maccarrone, Mauro

    2013-10-01

    Cannabinoids, the active components of cannabis (Cannabis sativa) extracts, have attracted the attention of human civilizations for centuries, much earlier than the discovery and characterization of their substrate of action, the endocannabinoid system (ECS). The latter is an ensemble of endogenous lipids, their receptors [in particular type-1 (CB1) and type-2 (CB2) cannabinoid receptors] and metabolic enzymes. Cannabinoid signaling regulates cell proliferation, differentiation and survival, with different outcomes depending on the molecular targets and cellular context involved. Cannabinoid receptors are expressed and functional from the very early developmental stages, when they regulate embryonic and trophoblast stem cell survival and differentiation, and thus may affect the formation of manifold adult specialized tissues derived from the three different germ layers (ectoderm, mesoderm and endoderm). In the ectoderm-derived nervous system, both CB1 and CB2 receptors are present in neural progenitor/stem cells and control their self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation. CB1 and CB2 show opposite patterns of expression, the former increasing and the latter decreasing along neuronal differentiation. Recently, endocannabinoid (eCB) signaling has also been shown to regulate proliferation and differentiation of mesoderm-derived hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, with a key role in determining the formation of several cell types in peripheral tissues, including blood cells, adipocytes, osteoblasts/osteoclasts and epithelial cells. Here, we will review these new findings, which unveil the involvement of eCB signaling in the regulation of progenitor/stem cell fate in the nervous system and in the periphery. The developmental regulation of cannabinoid receptor expression and cellular/subcellular localization, together with their role in progenitor/stem cell biology, may have important implications in human health and disease. PMID:24076098

  12. Rac1 drives intestinal stem cell proliferation and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Myant, Kevin B; Scopelliti, Alessandro; Haque, Sara; Vidal, Marcos; Sansom, Owen J; Cordero, Julia B

    2013-01-01

    Adult stem cells are responsible for maintaining the balance between cell proliferation and differentiation within self-renewing tissues. The molecular and cellular mechanisms mediating such balance are poorly understood. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has emerged as an important mediator of stem cell homeostasis in various systems. Our recent work demonstrates that Rac1-dependent ROS production mediates intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation in mouse models of colorectal cancer (CRC). Here, we use the adult Drosophila midgut and the mouse small intestine to directly address the role of Rac1 in ISC proliferation and tissue regeneration in response to damage. Our results demonstrate that Rac1 is necessary and sufficient to drive ISC proliferation and regeneration in an ROS-dependent manner. Our data point to an evolutionarily conserved role of Rac1 in intestinal homeostasis and highlight the value of combining work in the mammalian and Drosophila intestine as paradigms to study stem cell biology. PMID:23974108

  13. Roles of cell volume in molecular and cellular biology.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Jean-Marc; Rouzaire-Dubois, Béatrice

    2012-04-01

    Extracellular tonicity and volume regulation control a great number of molecular and cellular functions including: cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, hormone and neuromediator release, gene expression, ion channel and transporter activity and metabolism. The aim of this review is to describe these effects and to determine if they are direct or are secondarily the result of the activity of second messengers. PMID:22192789

  14. Cellular Reflectarray Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    The cellular reflectarray antenna is intended to replace conventional parabolic reflectors that must be physically aligned with a particular satellite in geostationary orbit. These arrays are designed for specified geographical locations, defined by latitude and longitude, each called a "cell." A particular cell occupies nominally 1,500 square miles (3,885 sq. km), but this varies according to latitude and longitude. The cellular reflectarray antenna designed for a particular cell is simply positioned to align with magnetic North, and the antenna surface is level (parallel to the ground). A given cellular reflectarray antenna will not operate in any other cell.

  15. JPRS report proliferation issues

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-13

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons relevant technologies. The following locations are included: (1) South Africa; (2) China; (3) North and South Korea, Taiwan; (4) Hungary; (5) Brazil; (6) India, Iran, Israel, Pakistan; (7) Soviet Union; and (8) Austria, Germany, United Kingdom.

  16. JPRS report proliferation issues

    SciTech Connect

    1991-11-07

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons relevant technologies. The following locations are included: (1) South Africa; (2) China; (3) North and South Korea, Japan; (4) Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia; (5) Argentina, Brazil; (6) India, Iran, Israel, Pakistan, Libya, Iraq, Egypt; (7) Soviet Union; and (8) Belgium, Germany, United Kingdom, Netherlands, France.

  17. JPRS report proliferation issues

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-02

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons relevant technologies. The following locations are included: (1) South Africa; (2) China; (3) North and South Korea, Taiwan; (4) Hungary, Yugoslavia; (5) Brazil, Argentina; (6) Afghanistan, India, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Pakistan; (7) Soviet Union; and (8) France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland.

  18. JPRS report proliferation issues

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-27

    This report contains foreign media information on issues related to worldwide proliferation and transfer activities in nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons, including delivery systems and the transfer of weapons relevant technologies. The following locations are included: (1) South Africa, Namibia; (2) China; (3) South Korea, Australia, Indonesia, Japan, Philippines; (4) Yugoslavia; (5) Brazil, Argentina, Cuba; (6) India, Libya, Pakistan; (7) Soviet Union; and (8) France, Germany, Netherlands.

  19. Oxidized derivative of docosahexaenoic acid preferentially inhibit cell proliferation in triple negative over luminal breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    El-Bayoumy, Karam; Amin, Shantu; Gowda, Krishne; de Cicco, Ricardo López; Barton, Maria; Su, Yanrong; Russo, Irma H.; Himmelberger, Julie A.; Slifker, Michael; Manni, Andrea; Russo, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) exert an anticancer effect by affecting multiple cellular mechanisms leading to inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis. It is well known that breast cancer comprises distinct molecular subtypes which differ in their responsiveness to therapeutic and preventive agents. We tested the hypothesis that n-3FA may preferentially affect triple-negative breast cancer cells for which no targeted intervention is presently available. The in vitro antiproliferative effects of n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and its metabolite, 4-OH-DHA as well as its putative metabolite 4-OXO-DHA, were tested in five triple-negative human basal breast cell lines at different stages of transformation (MCF-10F, trMCF, bsMCF, MDA-MB-231, and BT-549) and three luminal breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T-47D, and SK-BR-3). Cell proliferation was measured with the tetrazolium MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. DHA and its oxidized derivatives significantly inhibited cell proliferation (20–90% reduction) of both basal and luminal breast cancer cell lines. The inhibitory effect was more pronounced on triple-negative basal breast cancer cell lines as compared to luminal breast cancer cell lines after 4-OXO-DHA treatment. Our data provide novel information regarding the preferential antitumor effect of oxidized derivatives of DHA on basal type breast cancer. PMID:25413005

  20. E-cadherin expression on human carcinoma cell affects trastuzumab-mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity through killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 on natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Chisako; Fujii, Satoshi; Kimura, Taichi; Kuwata, Takeshi; Wada, Noriaki; Mukai, Hirofumi; Matsumoto, Naoki; Fukayama, Masashi; Ochiai, Atsushi

    2011-05-01

    Trastuzumab is a recombinant antibody drug that is widely used for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast carcinoma. Despite encouraging clinical results, many HER2-overexpressing carcinomas are primarily resistant to trastuzumab. We attempted to explain trastuzumab resistance and search for solutions. Since the killer cell lectin-like receptor G1 (KLRG1), an inhibitory receptor expressed on subsets of natural killer (NK) cells recognizes E-cadherin as ligands and may inhibit immune responses by regulating the effector function of NK cells, we used HER2-overexpressing carcinoma cells which were expressing E-cadherin to investigate the role of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) through KLRG1 on NK cells in vitro and vivo. The results indicated that HER2-overexpressing carcinoma cells were killed by trastuzumab-mediated ADCC and the ADCC activity was reflected the degree of E-cadherin expression on carcinoma cells. We found that expression of E-cadherin was shown to be a predictor of response to trastuzumab-based treatment for HER2-overexpressing carcinomas, furthermore, trastuzumab-mediated ADCC was markedly enhanced by KLRG1-negative peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs(KLRG1(-))). PMID:21387286

  1. Proliferation and fission of peroxisomes - An update.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Michael; Costello, Joseph L; Godinho, Luis F; Azadi, Afsoon S; Islinger, Markus

    2016-05-01

    In mammals, peroxisomes perform crucial functions in cellular metabolism, signalling and viral defense which are essential to the health and viability of the organism. In order to achieve this functional versatility peroxisomes dynamically respond to molecular cues triggered by changes in the cellular environment. Such changes elicit a corresponding response in peroxisomes, which manifests itself as a change in peroxisome number, altered enzyme levels and adaptations to the peroxisomal structure. In mammals the generation of new peroxisomes is a complex process which has clear analogies to mitochondria, with both sharing the same division machinery and undergoing a similar division process. How the regulation of this division process is integrated into the cell's response to different stimuli, the signalling pathways and factors involved, remains somewhat unclear. Here, we discuss the mechanism of peroxisomal fission, the contributions of the various division factors and examine the potential impact of post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, on the proliferation process. We also summarize the signalling process and highlight the most recent data linking signalling pathways with peroxisome proliferation. PMID:26409486

  2. beta. -Adrenergic stimulation of brown adipocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Geloeen, A.; Collet, A.J.; Guay, G.; Bukowiecki, L.J. Laboratoire de Thermoregulation et Metabolisme Energetique, Lyon )

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms of brown adipose tissue (BAT) growth were studied by quantitative photonic radioautography using tritiated thymidine to follow mitotic activity. To identify the nature of the adrenergic pathways mediating brown adipocyte proliferation and differentiation, the effects of cold exposure (4 days at 4{degree}C) on BAT growth were compared with those induced by treating rats at 25{degree}C with norepinephrine (a mixed agonist), isoproterenol (a {beta}-agonist), and phenylephrine (an {alpha}-agonist). Norepinephrine mimicked the effects of cold exposure, not only on the mitotic activity, but also on the distribution of the labeling among the various cellular types. Isoproterenol entirely reproduced the effects of norepinephrine both on the labeling index and on the cellular type labeling frequency. These results demonstrate that norepinephrine triggers a coordinated proliferation of brown adipocytes and endothelial cells in warm-exposed rats that is similar to that observed after cold exposure. They also suggest that cold exposure stimulates BAT growth by increasing the release of norepinephrine from sympathetic nerves and that the neurohormone activates mitoses in BAT precursor cells via {beta}-adrenergic pathways.

  3. CELLULAR MAGNESIUM HOMEOSTASIS

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Andrea M.P.

    2011-01-01

    Magnesium, the second most abundant cellular cation after potassium, is essential to regulate numerous cellular functions and enzymes, including ion channels, metabolic cycles, and signaling pathways, as attested by more than 1000 entries in the literature. Despite significant recent progress, however, our understanding of how cells regulate Mg2+ homeostasis and transport still remains incomplete. For example, the occurrence of major fluxes of Mg2+ in either direction across the plasma membrane of mammalian cells following metabolic or hormonal stimuli has been extensively documented. Yet, the mechanisms ultimately responsible for magnesium extrusion across the cell membrane have not been cloned. Even less is known about the regulation in cellular organelles. The present review is aimed at providing the reader with a comprehensive and up-to-date understanding of the mechanisms enacted by eukaryotic cells to regulate cellular Mg2+ homeostasis and how these mechanisms are altered under specific pathological conditions. PMID:21640700

  4. Modeling boundary conditions for balanced proliferation in metastatic latency

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Donald P; Wells, Jakob Z; Savol, Andrej; Chennubhotla, Chakra; Wells, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Nearly half of cancer metastases become clinically evident five or more years after primary tumor treatment; thus metastatic cells survived without emerging for extended periods. This dormancy has been explained by at least two countervailing scenarios: cellular quiescence and balanced proliferation; these entail dichotomous mechanistic etiologies. To examine the boundary parameters for balanced proliferation, we performed in silico modeling. Experimental Design To illuminate the balanced proliferation hypothesis, we explored the specific boundary probabilities under which proliferating micrometastases would remain dormant. A two-state Markov chain Monte Carlo model simulated micrometastatic proliferation and death according to stochastic survival probabilities. We varied these probabilities across 100 simulated patients each with 1,000 metastatic deposits and documented whether the micrometastases exceeded one million cells, died out, or remained dormant (survived 1,218 generations). Results The simulations revealed a narrow survival probability window (49.7 – 50.8 percent) that allowed for dormancy across a range of starting cell numbers, and even then for only a small fraction of micrometastases. The majority of micrometastases died out quickly even at survival probabilities that led to rapid emergence of a subset of micrometastases. Within dormant metastases, cell populations depended sensitively on small survival probability increments. Conclusions Metastatic dormancy as explained solely by balanced proliferation is bounded by very tight survival probabilities. Considering the far larger survival variability thought to attend fluxing microenvironments, it is more probable that these micrometastatic nodules undergo at least periods of quiescence rather than exclusively being controlled by balanced proliferation. PMID:23329811

  5. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Róisín M; Finlay, David K

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses. PMID:26534957

  6. Cellular microRNAs and Picornaviral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Miao; Gao, Zeqian; Pan, Li; Zhang, Yongguang

    2014-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a subtype of short, endogenous, and non-coding RNAs, which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. The miRNA-mediated gene silencing mechanism is involved in a wide spectrum of biological processes, such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, and immune responses. Picornaviridae is a large family of RNA viruses, which includes a number of causative agents of many human and animal diseases viz., poliovirus, foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), and coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3). Accumulated evidences have demonstrated that replication of picornaviruses can be regulated by miRNAs and picornaviral infections can alter the expression of cellular miRNAs. Herein, we outline the intricate interactions between miRNAs and picornaviral infections. PMID:24921242

  7. Cellular and molecular introduction to brain development.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiangning; Nardelli, Jeannette

    2016-08-01

    Advances in the study of brain development over the last decades, especially recent findings regarding the evolutionary expansion of the human neocortex, and large-scale analyses of the proteome/transcriptome in the human brain, have offered novel insights into the molecular mechanisms guiding neural maturation, and the pathophysiology of multiple forms of neurological disorders. As a preamble to reviews of this issue, we provide an overview of the cellular, molecular and genetic bases of brain development with an emphasis on the major mechanisms associated with landmarks of normal neural development in the embryonic stage and early postnatal life, including neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation, cortical neuronal migration, evolution and folding of the cerebral cortex, synaptogenesis and neural circuit development, gliogenesis and myelination. We will only briefly depict developmental disorders that result from perturbations of these cellular or molecular mechanisms, and the most common perinatal brain injuries that could disturb normal brain development. PMID:26184894

  8. Effect of S(-) perillic acid on protein prenylation and arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ferri, N; Arnaboldi, L; Orlandi, A; Yokoyama, K; Gree, R; Granata, A; Hachem, A; Paoletti, R; Gelb, M H; Corsini, A

    2001-12-15

    A number of proteins post-translationally modified by the covalent attachment of mevalonate-derived isoprene groups farnesol (FOH) or geranylgeraniol (GGOH), play a role in cell proliferation. For this reason, protein farnesyltransferase (PFTase) and protein geranylgeranyltransferases (PGGTases) I and II have gained attention as novel targets for the development of antiproliferative agents. Monoterpenes [limonene, perillic acid (PA) and its derivatives] have been shown to inhibit cell growth and protein prenylation in cancer cells. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of S(-) PA on diploid rat aorta smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation as related to protein prenylation. S(-) PA (1-3.5 mM) decreased, in a concentration-dependent manner, rat SMC proliferation as evaluated by cell counting and DNA synthesis. Morphological criteria and flow cytometry analysis excluded the induction of apoptosis as a potential antiproliferative mechanism of S(-) PA on SMC and confirmed a block of the cell cycle progression in G(0)/G(1) phase. The antiproliferative effect of S(-) PA could not be prevented by the addition of mevalonate, FOH, and GGOH to the culture medium and was independent of cholesterol biosynthesis. Densitometric analysis of fluorographed gels, after sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the cell lysates, further supported that S(-) PA (1-3.5 mM), under the same experimental conditions, concentration-dependently inhibited FOH (up to 70%) and GGOH (up to 70%) incorporation into cellular proteins. We provide evidence that S(-) PA affects protein prenylation, an effect that may contribute to its inhibition of SMC proliferation. PMID:11755117

  9. Measurement Techniques for Cellular Biomechanics In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Addae-Mensah, Kweku A; Wikswo, John P

    2014-01-01

    Living cells and tissues experience mechanical forces in their physiological environments that are known to affect many cellular processes. Also of importance are the mechanical properties of cells, as well as the microforces generated by cellular processes themselves in their microenvironments. The difficulty associated with studying these phenomena in vivo has led to alternatives such as using in vitro models. The need for experimental techniques for investigating cellular biomechanics and mechanobiology in vitro has fueled an evolution in the technology used in these studies. Particularly noteworthy are some of the new biomicroelectromechanical systems (BioMEMs) devices and techniques that have been introduced to the field. We describe some of the cellular micromechanical techniques and methods that have been developed for in vitro studies, and provide summaries of the ranges of measured values of various biomechanical quantities. We also briefly address some of our experiences in using these methods and include modifications we have introduced in order to improve them. PMID:18445766

  10. Sphingosine-1-phosphate stimulates rat primary chondrocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Lee, Ha Young; Kwak, Jong-Young; Park, Joo-In; Yun, Jeanho; Bae, Yoe-Sik . E-mail: yoesik@donga.ac.kr

    2006-06-23

    Rat primary chondrocytes express the sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptor, S1P{sub 2}, S1P{sub 3}, S1P{sub 4}, but not S1P{sub 1}. When chondrocytes were stimulated with S1P or phytosphingosine-1-phosphate (PhS1P, an S1P{sub 1}- and S1P{sub 4}-selective agonist), phospholipase C-mediated cytosolic calcium increase was dramatically induced. S1P and PhS1P also stimulated two kinds of mitogen-activated protein kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p38 kinase in chondrocytes. In terms of the two phospholipids-mediated functional modulation of chondrocytes, S1P and PhS1P stimulated cellular proliferation. The two phospholipids-induced chondrocyte proliferations were almost completely blocked by PD98059 but not by SB203580, suggesting that ERK but not p38 kinase is essentially required for the proliferation. Pertussis toxin almost completely inhibited the two phospholipids-induced cellular proliferation and ERK activation, indicating the crucial role of G{sub i} protein. This study demonstrates the physiological role of two important phospholipids (S1P and PhS1P) on the modulation of rat primary chondrocyte proliferation, and the crucial role played by ERK in the process.

  11. TRIB2 regulates normal and stress-induced thymocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Kai Ling; O’Connor, Caitriona; Veiga, J Pedro; McCarthy, Tommie V; Keeshan, Karen

    2016-01-01

    TRIB2, a serine/threonine pseudokinase identified as an oncogene, is expressed at high levels in the T-cell compartment of hematopoiesis. The proliferation of developing thymocytes is tightly controlled to prevent leukemic transformation of T cells. Here we examine Trib2 loss in murine hematopoiesis under steady state and proliferative stress conditions, including genotoxic and oncogenic stress. Trib2−/− developing thymocytes show increased proliferation, and Trib2−/− mice have significantly higher thymic cellularity at steady state. During stress hematopoiesis, Trib2−/− developing thymocytes undergo accelerated proliferation and demonstrate hypersensitivity to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced cell death. Despite the increased cell death post 5-FU-induced proliferative stress, Trib2−/− mice exhibit accelerated thymopoietic recovery post treatment due to increased cell division kinetics of developing thymocytes. The increased proliferation in Trib2−/− thymocytes was exacerbated under oncogenic stress. In an experimental murine T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) model, Trib2−/− mice had reduced latency in vivo, which associated with impaired MAP kinase (MAPK) activation. High and low expression levels of Trib2 correlate with immature and mature subtypes of human T-ALL, respectively, and associate with MAPK. Thus, TRIB2 emerges as a novel regulator of thymocyte cellular proliferation, important for the thymopoietic response to genotoxic and oncogenic stress, and possessing tumor suppressor function. PMID:27462446

  12. Dual effect of LPS on murine myeloid leukemia cells: Pro-proliferation and anti-proliferation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingling; Zhao, Yingmin; Gu, Xin; Wang, Jijun; Pang, Lei; Zhang, Yanqing; Li, Yaoyao; Jia, Xiaoqin; Wang, Xin; Gu, Jian; Yu, Duonan

    2016-06-10

    Modification of the bone marrow microenvironment is considered as a promising strategy to control leukemic cell proliferation, diseases progression and relapse after treatment. However, due to the diversity and complexity of the cellular and molecular compartments in the leukemic microenvironment, it is extremely difficult to dissect the role of each individual molecule or cell type in vivo. Here we established an in vitro system to dissect the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), stromal cells and endothelial cells in the growth of mouse myeloid tumor cells and B-lymphoma cells. We found that either LPS or bone marrow stromal cells as a feeder layer in culture is required for the proliferation of myeloid tumor cells. Surprisingly, the growth of myeloid leukemic cells on stromal cells is strongly inhibited when coupled with LPS in culture. This opposing effect of LPS, a complete switch from pro-proliferation to antitumor growth is due, at least in part, to the rapidly increased production of interleukin 12, Fas ligand and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 from stromal cells stimulated by LPS. These results demonstrate that LPS can either facilitate or attenuate tumor cell proliferation, thus changing the disease course of myeloid leukemias through its direct effect or modulation of the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26968634

  13. Cellular Host Responses to Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Barish, Michael E.; Garcia, Elizabeth; Metz, Marianne Z.; Myers, Sarah M.; Gutova, Margarita; Frank, Richard T.; Miletic, Hrvoje; Kendall, Stephen E.; Glackin, Carlotta A.; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Aboody, Karen S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive type of malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Molecular and genetic analysis has advanced our understanding of glioma biology, however mapping the cellular composition of the tumor microenvironment is crucial for understanding the pathology of this dreaded brain cancer. In this study we identified major cell populations attracted by glioma using orthotopic rodent models of human glioma xenografts. Marker-specific, anatomical and morphological analyses revealed a robust influx of host cells into the main tumor bed and tumor satellites. Methodology/Principal Findings Human glioma cell lines and glioma spheroid orthotopic implants were used in rodents. In both models, the xenografts recruited large numbers of host nestin-expressing cells, which formed a ‘network’ with glioma. The host nestin-expressing cells appeared to originate in the subventricular zone ipsilateral to the tumor, and were clearly distinguishable from pericytes that expressed smooth muscle actin. These distinct cell populations established close physical contact in a ‘pair-wise’ manner and migrated together to the deeper layers of tumor satellites and gave rise to tumor vasculature. The GBM biopsy xenografts displayed two different phenotypes: (a) low-generation tumors (first in vivo passage in rats) were highly invasive and non-angiogenic, and host nestin-positive cells that infiltrated into these tumors displayed astrocytic or elongated bipolar morphology; (b) high-generation xenografts (fifth passage) had pronounced cellularity, were angiogenic with ‘glomerulus-like’ microvascular proliferations that contained host nestin-positive cells. Stromal cell-derived factor-1 and its receptor CXCR4 were highly expressed in and around glioma xenografts, suggesting their role in glioma progression and invasion. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate a robust migration of nestin-expressing host cells to glioma, which

  14. Inducing cellular senescence using defined genetic elements.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Opitz, Oliver G

    2007-01-01

    Cellular senescence is generally defined as an irreversible state of G1 cell cycle arrest in which cells are refractory to growth factor stimulation. Cellular senescence can be induced through several different mechanisms. Primary mammalian cells display a finite life span, suggesting a mechanism that counts cell divisions. Those cells initially proliferate but eventually enter a state of permanent growth arrest, called replicative senescence. Erosion of telomeric DNA has emerged as a key factor in replicative senescence, which is antagonized during cell immortalization. Nevertheless, besides telomere shortening, there are other mechanisms inducing a growth arrest similar to the replicative senescencent phenotype. Oncogenic or mitogenic signals as well as DNA damage can induce such a phenotype of cellular senescence. All forms of cellular senescence share common signaling pathways and morphological features. Thereby, p53 seems to be essential for the senescence response. Many of these senescence inducing mechanisms can be experimentally recapitulated by the introduction of defined genetic elements. Replicative senescence due to telomere shortening can, for example, be induced by a dominant negative version of telomerase, premature senescence by the overexpression of oncogenic ras, or p16. PMID:17634581

  15. Paradoxical effects of ethoxidine, a topoisomerase I inhibitor, in the cellular processes leading to angiogenesis on endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Clere, Nicolas; Faure, Sébastien; Helesbeux, Jean-Jacques; Duval, Olivier; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson

    2011-03-01

    Angiogenesis, a critical step in tumorigenesis, is defined by different processes leading to neovascularization. Topoisomerase I (Top I) is the target for some of the most successful anticancer drugs that decrease tumor cell proliferation. Ethoxidine, a benzo[c]phenanthridines derivative, camptothecin analogue, has been identified as a potent inhibitor of Top I in various cancer cell lines. This study was aimed to investigate the impact of ethoxidine on angiogenesis and cellular processes including migration, proliferation and adhesion since these processes play an important role in tumor progression. Ethoxidine was incubated for 24 h at low (10⁻⁹ M) and high (10⁻⁵ M) concentrations on two types of human endothelial cells: EaHy.926 and human umbilical endothelial cells. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, 20 ng/ml) was used as a positive control. Ethoxidine at low concentration increased cell proliferation and migration that was associated with enhanced metalloproteinase 2 expression and activity, whereas high concentration of ethoxidine inhibited all of these effects. The two concentrations of ethoxidine did not affect endothelial cell adhesion. Low concentration of ethoxidine increased VEGF expression and endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase expression, NO and superoxide anion productions, whereas high concentration of ethoxidine did not induce any effect. Taken together, the present results highlight paradoxical effects of ethoxidine on angiogenesis depending on the concentration used. This study underscores that in addition to its anti-proliferative properties, ethoxidine may affect the generation of vascular network in tumorigenesis. PMID:21135154

  16. Vitamin B12 deficiency reduces proliferation and promotes differentiation of neuroblastoma cells and up-regulates PP2A, proNGF, and TACE

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia-Hsu, Shyue-fang; Akchiche, Nassila; Noel, Nicole; Alberto, Jean-Marc; Jeannesson, Elise; Orozco-Barrios, Carlos Enrique; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Daval, Jean-Luc; Guéant, Jean-Louis

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl) is indispensable for proper brain development and functioning, suggesting that it has neurotrophic effects beside its well-known importance in metabolism. The molecular basis of these effects remains hypothetical, one of the reasons being that no efficient cell model has been made available for investigating the consequences of B12 cellular deficiency in neuronal cells. Here, we designed an approach by stable transfection of NIE115 neuroblastoma cells to impose the anchorage of a chimeric B12-binding protein, transcobalamin-oleosin (TO) to the intracellular membrane. This model produced an intracellular sequestration of B12 evidenced by decreased methyl-Cbl and S-adenosylmethionine and increased homocysteine and methylmalonic acid concentrations. B12 deficiency affected the proliferation of NIE115 cells through an overall increase in catalytic protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), despite its demethylation. It promoted cellular differentiation by improving initial outgrowth of neurites and, at the molecular level, by augmenting the levels of proNGF and p75NTR. The up-regulation of PP2A and pro-nerve growth factor (NGF) triggered changes in ERK1/2 and Akt, two signaling pathways that influence the balance between proliferation and neurite outgrowth. Compared with control cells, a 2-fold increase of p75NTR-regulated intramembraneous proteolysis (RIP) was observed in proliferating TO cells (P < 0.0001) that was associated with an increased expression of two tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α converting enzyme (TACE) secretase enzymes, Adam 10 and Adam 17. In conclusion, our data show that B12 cellular deficiency produces a slower proliferation and a speedier differentiation of neuroblastoma cells through interacting signaling pathways that are related with increased expression of PP2A, proNGF, and TACE. PMID:19959661

  17. Initiatives for proliferation prevention

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    Preventing the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction is a central part of US national security policy. A principal instrument of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) program for securing weapons of mass destruction technology and expertise and removing incentives for scientists, engineers and technicians in the newly independent states (NIS) of the former Soviet Union to go to rogue countries or assist terrorist groups is the Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP). IPP was initiated pursuant to the 1994 Foreign Operations Appropriations Act. IPP is a nonproliferation program with a commercialization strategy. IPP seeks to enhance US national security and to achieve nonproliferation objectives by engaging scientists, engineers and technicians from former NIS weapons institutes; redirecting their activities in cooperatively-developed, commercially viable non-weapons related projects. These projects lead to commercial and economic benefits for both the NIS and the US IPP projects are funded in Russian, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Belarus. This booklet offers an overview of the IPP program as well as a sampling of some of the projects which are currently underway.

  18. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiuguo; Tanaka, Naoki . E-mail: naopi@hsp.md.shinshu-u.ac.jp; Nakajima, Takero; Kamijo, Yuji; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2006-08-11

    Hepatic peroxisome proliferation, increases in the numerical and volume density of peroxisomes, is believed to be closely related to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) activation; however, it remains unknown whether peroxisome proliferation depends absolutely on this activation. To verify occurrence of PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation, fenofibrate treatment was used, which was expected to significantly enhance PPAR{alpha} dependence in the assay system. Surprisingly, a novel type of PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation and enlargement was uncovered in PPAR{alpha}-null mice. The increased expression of dynamin-like protein 1, but not peroxisome biogenesis factor 11{alpha}, might be associated with the PPAR{alpha}-independent peroxisome proliferation at least in part.

  19. Cellular Homeostasis and Aging.

    PubMed

    Hartl, F Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    Aging and longevity are controlled by a multiplicity of molecular and cellular signaling events that interface with environmental factors to maintain cellular homeostasis. Modulation of these pathways to extend life span, including insulin-like signaling and the response to dietary restriction, identified the cellular machineries and networks of protein homeostasis (proteostasis) and stress resistance pathways as critical players in the aging process. A decline of proteostasis capacity during aging leads to dysfunction of specific cell types and tissues, rendering the organism susceptible to a range of chronic diseases. This volume of the Annual Review of Biochemistry contains a set of two reviews addressing our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying aging in model organisms and humans. PMID:27050288

  20. Architected Cellular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  1. Irregular Cellular Learning Automata.

    PubMed

    Esnaashari, Mehdi; Meybodi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-08-01

    Cellular learning automaton (CLA) is a recently introduced model that combines cellular automaton (CA) and learning automaton (LA). The basic idea of CLA is to use LA to adjust the state transition probability of stochastic CA. This model has been used to solve problems in areas such as channel assignment in cellular networks, call admission control, image processing, and very large scale integration placement. In this paper, an extension of CLA called irregular CLA (ICLA) is introduced. This extension is obtained by removing the structure regularity assumption in CLA. Irregularity in the structure of ICLA is needed in some applications, such as computer networks, web mining, and grid computing. The concept of expediency has been introduced for ICLA and then, conditions under which an ICLA becomes expedient are analytically found. PMID:25291810

  2. Cell proliferation and survival mechanisms underlying the abnormal persistence of follicular cysts in bovines with cystic ovarian disease induced by ACTH.

    PubMed

    Salvetti, Natalia R; Stangaferro, Matías L; Palomar, Martín M; Alfaro, Natalia S; Rey, Florencia; Gimeno, Eduardo J; Ortega, Hugo H

    2010-10-01

    Cystic ovarian disease (COD) is an important cause of infertility that affects cattle. Alterations in the ovarian micro-environment of females with follicular cysts could alter the normal processes of proliferation and programmed cell death in ovarian cells. Thus, the objective in the present study was to evaluate apoptosis and proliferation in induced ovarian cystic follicles in cows to investigate the follicular persistence. Stage of estrous cycle was synchronized in 10 heifers and 5 were then subjected to the induction of COD by administration of ACTH. After the ovariectomy number of in situ apoptotic cells by TUNEL assay, active caspase-3, FAS/FASLG and members of the BCL2 family were compared by immunohistochemistry and multiplex PCR and cell proliferation by evaluation of Ki-67 protein and cyclin D1 and E mRNA. Significantly (p<0.05) lesser proliferative and apoptotic rates were found in cystic follicles from cows with COD compared with those with regular cycles. The relatively minimal proliferation found by immunohistochemistry with Ki-67 marker were confirmed by the gene expression of cyclin D1 and E. Lesser apoptotic rates were associated with decreased amounts of apoptotic-related proteins BAX, FASLG and caspase-3 as well as the in situ apoptosis detected by TUNEL assay, and increased amounts of the anti-apoptotic survival factor cellular BCL2 in the cystic follicles of the COD group. The BAX/BCL2 gene expression profile confirmed the immunohistochemical findings. Results from the present study indicate that cellular proliferation and apoptosis are altered in cystic follicles of cattle. The present study provides new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the aberrant persistence of follicular cysts and related diseases. PMID:20800980

  3. Cellular Responses Evoked by Different Surface Characteristics of Intraosseous Titanium Implants

    PubMed Central

    Feller, Liviu; Jadwat, Yusuf; Khammissa, Razia A. G.; Meyerov, Robin; Lemmer, Johan

    2015-01-01

    The properties of biomaterials, including their surface microstructural topography and their surface chemistry or surface energy/wettability, affect cellular responses such as cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration. The nanotopography of moderately rough implant surfaces enhances the production of biological mediators in the peri-implant microenvironment with consequent recruitment of differentiating osteogenic cells to the implant surface and stimulates osteogenic maturation. Implant surfaces with moderately rough topography and with high surface energy promote osteogenesis, increase the ratio of bone-to-implant contact, and increase the bonding strength of the bone to the implant at the interface. Certain features of implant surface chemistry are also important in enhancing peri-implant bone wound healing. It is the purpose of this paper to review some of the more important features of titanium implant surfaces which have an impact on osseointegration. PMID:25767803

  4. Effects of tiflucarbine as a dual protein kinase C/calmodulin antagonist on proliferation of human keratinocytes and release of reactive oxygen species from human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Hegemann, L; Fruchtmann, R; Bonnekoh, B; Schmidt, B H; Traber, J; Mahrle, G; Müller-Peddinghaus, R; van Rooijen, L A

    1991-01-01

    Various studies have suggested that calmodulin (CaM) is involved in the pathophysiology of psoriasis. Protein kinase C (PKC) is also accepted as playing a regulatory role in cell proliferation as well as in inflammatory processes. Therefore, we investigated the effects of the known CaM antagonist tiflucarbine (BAY/TVX P 4495) on two cellular systems related to the major clinical symptoms of psoriasis: proliferation of cultured human keratinocytes (HaCa T cell line) and release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL). Tiflucarbine inhibited both cellular responses in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, tiflucarbine directly affected PKC, and may thus be considered to be a dual PKC/CaM antagonist with putative antipsoriatic activity. The effects of tiflucarbine on the different parameters were compared with those of the structurally unrelated dual PKC/CaM inhibitor W-7 and those of the potent PKC inhibitor staurosporine. The potencies of all three compounds were found to be in the same range as their PKC-inhibiting potency. Our data indicate that PKC, rather than CaM, may play a regulatory role in the release of ROS as well as in keratinocyte proliferation. Therefore, inhibition of PKC in general might have a therapeutic benefit in psoriasis. PMID:1801655

  5. The Crossroads of Iron with Hypoxia and Cellular Metabolism. Implications in the Pathobiology of Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Brian B.; Rouault, Tracey C.; Tuder, Rubin M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathologic hallmark of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is pulmonary vascular remodeling, characterized by endothelial cell proliferation, smooth muscle hypertrophy, and perivascular inflammation, ultimately contributing to increased pulmonary arterial pressures. Several recent studies have observed that iron deficiency in patients with various forms of PAH is associated with worsened clinical outcome. Iron plays a key role in many cellular processes regulating the response to hypoxia, oxidative stress, cellular proliferation, and cell metabolism. Given the potential importance of iron supplementation in patients with the disease and the broad cellular functions of iron, we review its role in processes that pertain to PAH. PMID:24988529

  6. Atherogenesis and iron: from epidemiology to cellular level

    PubMed Central

    Vinchi, Francesca; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Da Silva, Milene C.; Balla, György; Balla, József; Jeney, Viktória

    2014-01-01

    Iron accumulates in human atherosclerotic lesions but whether it is a cause or simply a downstream consequence of the atheroma formation has been an open question for decades. According to the so called “iron hypothesis,” iron is believed to be detrimental for the cardiovascular system, thus promoting atherosclerosis development and progression. Iron, in its catalytically active form, can participate in the generation of reactive oxygen species and induce lipid-peroxidation, triggering endothelial activation, smooth muscle cell proliferation and macrophage activation; all of these processes are considered to be proatherogenic. On the other hand, the observation that hemochromatotic patients, affected by life-long iron overload, do not show any increased incidence of atherosclerosis is perceived as the most convincing evidence against the “iron hypothesis.” Epidemiological studies and data from animal models provided conflicting evidences about the role of iron in atherogenesis. Therefore, more careful studies are needed in which issues like the source and the compartmentalization of iron will be addressed. This review article summarizes what we have learnt about iron and atherosclerosis from epidemiological studies, animal models and cellular systems and highlights the rather contributory than innocent role of iron in atherogenesis. PMID:24847266

  7. EGF-mediated regulation of IGFBP-3 determines esophageal epithelial cellular response to IGF-I

    PubMed Central

    Takaoka, Munenori; Smith, Caitlin E.; Mashiba, Michael K.; Okawa, Takaomi; Andl, Claudia D.; El-Deiry, Wafik S.; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    IGF and EGF regulate various physiological and pathological processes. IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-3 regulates cell proliferation in IGF-dependent and -independent fashions. Recently, we identified IGFBP-3 as a novel EGF receptor (EGFR) downstream target molecule in primary and immortalized human esophageal epithelial cells, suggesting an interplay between the EGF and IGF signaling pathways. However, the regulatory mechanisms for IGFBP-3 expression and its functional role in esophageal cell proliferation remain to be elucidated. Herein, we report that IGFBP-3 mRNA and protein were induced upon growth factor deprivation in primary and immortalized human esophageal cells through mechanisms requiring p53-independent de novo mRNA transcription and protein synthesis. This occurred in the face of the activated phosphatidylinositol 3-OH-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Secreted IGFBP-3 neutralized IGFs and prevented IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR) activation. In contrast, EGF suppressed IGFBP-3 mRNA and protein expression through activation of MAPK in an EGFR-tyrosine kinase-dependent manner to restore the cellular response to IGF-I. When stably overexpressed, wild-type IGFBP-3 but not I56G/L80G/L81G (GGG) mutant IGFBP-3, which has a reduced affinity to IGFs, prevented IGF-I from activating IGF-IR and Akt as well as stimulating cell proliferation. However, unlike other cell types where IGFBP-3 exerts antiproliferative effects, neither wild-type nor GGG mutant IGFBP-3 alone affected cell proliferation or EGFR activity. These results indicate that IGF signaling is subject to negative regulation through IGFBP-3 and positive regulation by EGF, the latter of which suppresses IGFBP-3. This provides a platform for understanding the novel cross talk between EGF- and IGF-mediated pathways. PMID:16210470

  8. Axl as a mediator of cellular growth and survival

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, Haley; Pienta, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    The control of cellular growth and proliferation is key to the maintenance of homeostasis. Survival, proliferation, and arrest are regulated, in part, by Growth Arrest Specific 6 (Gas6) through binding to members of the TAM receptor tyrosine kinase family. Activation of the TAM receptors leads to downstream signaling through common kinases, but the exact mechanism within each cellular context varies and remains to be completely elucidated. Deregulation of the TAM family, due to its central role in mediating cellular proliferation, has been implicated in multiple diseases. Axl was cloned as the first TAM receptor in a search for genes involved in the progression of chronic to acute-phase leukemia, and has since been established as playing a critical role in the progression of cancer. The oncogenic nature of Axl is demonstrated through its activation of signaling pathways involved in proliferation, migration, inhibition of apoptosis, and therapeutic resistance. Despite its recent discovery, significant progress has been made in the development of effective clinical therapeutics targeting Axl. In order to accurately define the role of Axl in normal and diseased processes, it must be analyzed in a cell type-specific context. PMID:25344858

  9. Characterization of cellular titanium for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrabe, Nikolas Wilson

    By controlling structural features (relative density, pore size, strut size) of cellular titanium (also known as porous titanium), the mechanical properties can be optimized to reduce the effects of stress shielding currently observed in load-bearing bone replacement implants. Thermal gravimetric analysis of a sacrificial scaffold system lead to important processing modifications in an attempt to meet chemistry requirements for surgical grade titanium not met in previous work. Despite these modifications chemistry did not meet requirements for carbon, nitrogen, or oxygen. Commercially pure titanium (CPTi) porous structures were made over a range of relative densities using laser engineered net shaping (LENS). From monotonic compression tests, yield strength and elastic modulus in the range of bone were achieved but did not scale with relative density as predicted by the Gibson-Ashby analytical model. Compression-compression fatigue resistance was high, as no failures were observed for test stresses up to 133% yield strength, which is thought to be influenced by the dense exterior shell of the samples. Structures were also fabricated over a range of relative densities using selective electron beam melting (SEBM or EBM), and structural, mechanical, and in-vitro properties were measured for three materials (as-built Ti-6A1-4V, Ti-6A1-4V after hot isostatic pressing (HIPing), and as-built CPTi). For structures of all three materials, yield strength and elastic modulus was within the range for bone. Numerical modeling results suggested cell shape and sintered particles on strut surfaces affect the scaling of elastic modulus with relative density and lead to the observed difference from the Gibson-Ashby model. Normalized fatigue strengths at 106 cycles ranged from 0.150.25 for as-built Ti-6A1-4V structures, which is lower than expected. Results for HIPed Ti-6A1-4V structures and CPTi structures suggest that stress concentrations from closed porosity within struts as well

  10. Effect of Extracts of Terminalia chebula on Proliferation of Keratinocytes and Fibroblasts Cells: An Alternative Approach for Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Soon Mo; Zo, Sun Mi; Painuli, Rakesh Mohan; Kwon, Sung Won; Han, Sung Soo

    2014-01-01

    Terminalia chebula is one of the traditional medicines used in the treatment of many diseases. In the present work, different concentrations of various organic and aqueous extracts (solvent-free) of T. chebula were tested on fibroblast (L929) and keratinocytes cells to evaluate its biocompatible concentration by using MTT and live-dead viability/cytotoxic assay. These extracts were found to be effective in decreasing the ammonia accumulation in the media, thereby reducing its toxic effect on cells. DPPH assay further confirmed the free-radical scavenging ability of the extracts which increased with the increase in concentration of each extract. Cell proliferation/apoptosis, cytoskeletal structure, and ECM production were further evaluated by live-dead assay and phalloidin/cytokeratin staining, respectively. The cytoskeletal structure and ECM secretion of the cells treated with extracts showed higher cellular activity in comparison to control. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the effect of these extracts of T. chebula on both types of skin cells and optimized concentration in which it could be used as a bioactive component for wound healing applications by increasing cell proliferation and decreasing free-radical production without affecting the normal cellular matrix. It can also find applications in other therapeutics applications where ammonia toxicity is a limiting factor. PMID:24719644

  11. Reversible effect of all-trans-retinoic acid on AML12 hepatocyte proliferation and cell cycle progression

    EPA Science Inventory

    The role of all-trans-retinoic acid (atRA) in the regulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation is well documented. Numerous studies have established the cancer preventive propertiesofatRAwhichfunctionstoregulate levels ofcellcycleproteinsessentialfortheGliS transition...

  12. The 37/67kDa laminin receptor (LR) inhibitor, NSC47924, affects 37/67kDa LR cell surface localization and interaction with the cellular prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Sarnataro, Daniela; Pepe, Anna; Altamura, Gennaro; De Simone, Imma; Pesapane, Ada; Nitsch, Lucio; Montuori, Nunzia; Lavecchia, Antonio; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The 37/67 kDa laminin receptor (LR) is a non-integrin protein, which binds both laminin-1 of the extracellular matrix and prion proteins, that hold a central role in prion diseases. The 37/67 kDa LR has been identified as interactor for the prion protein (PrPC) and to be required for pathological PrP (PrPSc) propagation in scrapie-infected neuronal cells, leading to the possibility that 37/67 kDa LR-PrPC interaction is related to the pathogenesis of prion diseases. A relationship between 37/67 kDa LR and PrPC in the presence of specific LR inhibitor compounds has not been investigated yet. We have characterized the trafficking of 37/67 kDa LR in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells, finding the receptor on the cell surface and nuclei, and identified the 67 kDa LR as the almost exclusive isoform interacting with PrPC. Here, we show that the treatment with the 37/67 kDa LR inhibitor, NSC47924, affects both the direct 37/67 kDa LR-PrPC interaction in vitro and the formation of the immunocomplex in live cells, inducing a progressive internalization of 37/67 kDa LR and stabilization of PrPC on the cell surface. These data reveal NSC47924 as a useful tool to regulate PrPC and 37/67 kDa LR trafficking and degradation, representing a novel small molecule to be tested against prion diseases. PMID:27071549

  13. The changing proliferation threat

    SciTech Connect

    Sopko, J.F.

    1996-12-31

    Technological advances and new adversaries with new motives have reduced the relevancy and effectiveness of the American nonproliferation strategy that was developed during the Cold War. The Cold War`s end and the breakup of the Soviet Union have created new proliferation dangers even as they have reduced others. The familiar balance of nuclear terror that linked the superpowers and their client states for nearly 50 years in a choreographed series of confrontations has given way to a much less predictable situation, where weapons of unthinkable power appear within the grasp of those more willing to use them. Rogue nations and {open_quotes}clientless{close_quotes} states, terrorist groups, religious cults, ethnic minorities, disaffected political groups, and even individuals appear to have jointed a new arms race toward mass destruction. The author describes recent events that suggest the new trends and a serious challenge to US national security.

  14. Teaching cellular engineering.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Daniel A; Waugh, Richard E

    2006-02-01

    Cellular engineering is one of the fastest growing subdisciplines in the field of Biomedical Engineering. It involves the application of engineering analysis to understand and control cellular behavior, with the ultimate objective of developing novel therapeutic or diagnostic approaches for the clinic or harnessing cellular function for commercial applications. Well-educated students in this area need strong foundational knowledge in engineering science, chemistry, and cell and molecular biology. In undergraduate curricula, the challenge is to include essential engineering skills plus appropriate levels of training in chemistry and biology while satisfying accreditation-mandated breadth in engineering training. At the graduate level, educators must accommodate students with diverse backgrounds and provide them with both a state-of-the-art understanding of the life sciences and the most advanced engineering skills. Engineering curricular content should include mechanics and materials, physical chemistry, transport phenomena, and control theory. Training from faculty with appointments and research programs in the life sciences is generally recommended, and additional life science content should also be integrated within the engineering curriculum. A capstone course in cellular engineering that includes opportunities for students to have hands-on experiences with state-of-the-art laboratory techniques is highly recommended. PMID:16450196

  15. Auxin and Cellular Elongation.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Silvia Melina; Barbez, Elke; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen; Estevez, José M

    2016-03-01

    Auxin is a crucial growth regulator in plants. However, a comprehensive understanding of how auxin induces cell expansion is perplexing, because auxin acts in a concentration- and cell type-dependent manner. Consequently, it is desirable to focus on certain cell types to exemplify the underlying growth mechanisms. On the other hand, plant tissues display supracellular growth (beyond the level of single cells); hence, other cell types might compromise the growth of a certain tissue. Tip-growing cells do not display neighbor-induced growth constraints and, therefore, are a valuable source of information for growth-controlling mechanisms. Here, we focus on auxin-induced cellular elongation in root hairs, exposing a mechanistic view of plant growth regulation. We highlight a complex interplay between auxin metabolism and transport, steering root hair development in response to internal and external triggers. Auxin signaling modules and downstream cascades of transcription factors define a developmental program that appears rate limiting for cellular growth. With this knowledge in mind, the root hair cell is a very suitable model system in which to dissect cellular effectors required for cellular expansion. PMID:26787325

  16. The New Cellular Immunology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claman, Henry N.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the nature of the immune response and traces many of the discoveries that have led to the present state of knowledge in immunology. The new cellular immunology is directing its efforts toward improving health by proper manipulation of the immune mechanisms of the body. (JR)

  17. ASSESSING THE PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE OF INNOVATIVE NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLES.

    SciTech Connect

    BARI,R.; ROGLANS,J.; DENNING,R.; MLADINEO,S.

    2003-06-23

    The National Nuclear Security Administration is developing methods for nonproliferation assessments to support the development and implementation of U.S. nonproliferation policy. This paper summarizes the key results of that effort. Proliferation resistance is the degree of difficulty that a nuclear material, facility, process, or activity poses to the acquisition of one or more nuclear weapons. A top-level measure of proliferation resistance for a fuel cycle system is developed here from a hierarchy of metrics. At the lowest level, intrinsic and extrinsic barriers to proliferation are defined. These barriers are recommended as a means to characterize the proliferation characteristics of a fuel cycle. Because of the complexity of nonproliferation assessments, the problem is decomposed into: metrics to be computed, barriers to proliferation, and a finite set of threats. The spectrum of potential threats of nuclear proliferation is complex and ranges from small terrorist cells to industrialized countries with advanced nuclear fuel cycles. Two general categories of methods have historically been used for nonproliferation assessments: attribute analysis and scenario analysis. In the former, attributes of the systems being evaluated (often fuel cycle systems) are identified that affect their proliferation potential. For a particular system under consideration, the attributes are weighted subjectively. In scenario analysis, hypothesized scenarios of pathways to proliferation are examined. The analyst models the process undertaken by the proliferant to overcome barriers to proliferation and estimates the likelihood of success in achieving a proliferation objective. An attribute analysis approach should be used at the conceptual design level in the selection of fuel cycles that will receive significant investment for development. In the development of a detailed facility design, a scenario approach should be undertaken to reduce the potential for design vulnerabilities

  18. Histological, cellular and behavioral assessments of stroke outcomes after photothrombosis-induced ischemia in adult mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Following the onset of focal ischemic stroke, the brain experiences a series of alterations including infarct evolvement, cellular proliferation in the penumbra, and behavioral deficits. However, systematic study on the temporal and spatial dependence of these alterations has not been provided. Results Using multiple approaches, we assessed stroke outcomes by measuring brain injury, dynamic cellular and glial proliferation, and functional deficits at different times up to two weeks after photothrombosis (PT)-induced ischemic stroke in adult mice. Results from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Nissl staining showed a maximal infarction, and brain edema and swelling 1–3 days after PT. The rate of Bromodeoxyuridine (Brdu)-labeled proliferating cell generation is spatiotemporal dependent in the penumbra, with the highest rate in post ischemic days 3–4, and higher rate of proliferation in the region immediate to the ischemic core than in the distant region. Similar time-dependent generation of proliferating GFAP+ astrocytes and Iba1+ microglia/macrophage were observed in the penumbra. Using behavioral tests, we showed that PT resulted in the largest functional deficits during post ischemic days 2–4. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that first a few days is a critical period that causes brain expansion, cellular proliferation and behavioral deficits in photothrombosis-induced ischemic model, and proliferating astrocytes only have a small contribution to the pools of proliferating cells and reactive astrocytes. PMID:24886391

  19. CELLULAR PATHOGENESIS OF DIABETIC GASTROENTEROPATHY

    PubMed Central

    Ördög, Tamás; Hayashi, Yujiro; Gibbons, Simon J.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Gastroenteropathy manifesting in upper gastrointestinal symptoms, delayed gastric emptying, constipation, diarrhea and fecal incontinence occurs frequently in patients with diabetes mellitus and represents a significant health care burden. Current treatments are largely symptomatic and ineffective. Better understanding of the cellular and molecular pathogenesis of these disorders is required for the development of more effective therapies. Recent advances in our understanding of the inherent, high-level complexities of the control systems that execute and regulate gastrointestinal motility, together with the utilization of new experimental models and sophisticated physiological, morphological and molecular techniques have lead to the realization that diabetic gastroenteropathies cannot be ascribed to any singular defect or dysfunction. In fact, these disorders are multifactorial and involve a spectrum of metabolic and dystrophic changes that can potentially affect all key components of motor control including the systemic autonomic and enteric nervous systems, interstitial cells of Cajal and smooth muscle cells. Candidate pathomechanisms are also varied and include imbalance between pro- and anti-oxidative factors, altered trophic stimuli to mature cells and their progenitors, and, possibly, autoimmune factors. The goal of this paper is to review the cellular changes underlying diabetic gastroenteropathies and their potential causes, with particular focus on functional interactions between various cell types. It is proposed that diabetic gastroenteropathies should be considered a form of gastrointestinal neuromuscular dystrophy rather than a “functional” disorder. Future research should identify ways to block cytotoxic factors, support the regeneration of damaged cells and translate the experimental findings into new treatment modalities. PMID:19829287

  20. Roles of Nrf2 in cell proliferation and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shohei; Motohashi, Hozumi

    2015-11-01

    The Keap1-Nrf2 system plays pivotal roles in defense mechanisms by regulating cellular redox homeostasis. Nrf2 is an inducible transcription factor that activates a battery of genes encoding antioxidant proteins and phase II enzymes in response to oxidative stress and electrophilic xenobiotics. The activity of Nrf2 is regulated by Keap1, which promotes the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of Nrf2 under normal conditions and releases the inhibited Nrf2 activity upon exposure to the stresses. Though an impressive contribution of the Keap1-Nrf2 system to the protection from exogenous and endogenous electrophilic insults has been well established, a line of evidence has suggested that the Keap1-Nrf2 system has various novel functions, particularly in cell proliferation and differentiation. Because the proliferation and differentiation of diverse cell types are often influenced and modulated by the cellular redox balance, Nrf2 has been considered to control these cellular processes by regulating the cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, analyses of the genome-wide distribution of Nrf2 have identified new sets of Nrf2 target genes whose products are involved in cell proliferation and differentiation but not necessarily in the regulation of oxidative stress. Considering the most characteristic features of Nrf2 as an inducible transcription factor, a newly emerged concept proposes that the Keap1-Nrf2 system translates environmental stresses into regulatory network signals in cell fate determination. In this review, we introduce the contribution of Nrf2 to lineage-specific differentiation, maintenance and differentiation of stem cells, and proliferation of normal and cancer cells, and we discuss how the response to fluctuating environments modulates cell behavior through the Keap1-Nrf2 system. PMID:26119783

  1. RNA Polymerase I Stability Couples Cellular Growth to Metal Availability

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yueh-Jung; Lee, Chrissie Young; Grzechnik, Agnieszka; Gonzales-Zubiate, Fernando; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Lee, Albert; Wohlschlegel, James; Chanfreau, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Summary Zinc is an essential cofactor of all major eukaryotic RNA polymerases. How the activity of these enzymes is coordinated or regulated according to cellular zinc levels is largely unknown. Here we show that the stability of RNA Polymerase I (RNAPI) is tightly coupled to zinc availability in vivo. In zinc deficiency, RNAPI is specifically degraded by proteolysis in the vacuole in a pathway dependent on the exportin Xpo1p and deubiquitination of the RNAPI large subunit Rpa190p by Ubp2p and Ubp4p. RNAPII is unaffected, which allows for expression of genes required in zinc deficiency. RNAPI export to the vacuole is required for survival during zinc starvation, suggesting that degradation of zinc-binding subunits might provide a last resort zinc reservoir. These results reveal a hierarchy of cellular transcriptional activities during zinc starvation, and show that degradation of the most active cellular transcriptional machinery couples cellular growth and proliferation to zinc availability. PMID:23747013

  2. Alternating Current Electric Fields of Varying Frequencies: Effects on Proliferation and Differentiation of Porcine Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji-Hey; McCullen, Seth D.; Piedrahita, Jorge A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Application of sinusoidal electric fields (EFs) has been observed to affect cellular processes, including alignment, proliferation, and differentiation. In the present study, we applied low-frequency alternating current (AC) EFs to porcine neural progenitor cells (pNPCs) and investigated the effects on cell patterning, proliferation, and differentiation. pNPCs were grown directly on interdigitated electrodes (IDEs) localizing the EFs to a region accessible visually for fluorescence-based assays. Cultures of pNPCs were exposed to EFs (1 V/cm) of 1 Hz, 10 Hz, and 50 Hz for 3, 7, and 14 days and compared to control cultures. Immunocytochemistry was performed to evaluate the expression of neural markers. pNPCs grew uniformly with no evidence of alignment to the EFs and no change in cell numbers when compared with controls. Nestin expression was shown in all groups at 3 and 7 days, but not at 14 days. NG2 expression was low in all groups. Co-expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and TUJ1 was significantly higher in the cultures exposed to 10- and 50-Hz EFs than the controls. In summary, sinusoidal AC EFs via IDEs did not alter the alignment and proliferation of pNPCs, but higher frequency stimulation appeared to delay differentiation into mature astrocytes. PMID:23961767

  3. Adenosine A1 Receptors Selectively Modulate Oxygen-Induced Retinopathy at the Hyperoxic and Hypoxic Phases by Distinct Cellular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuya; Li, Haiyan; Li, Bo; Zhong, Dingjuan; Gu, Xuejiao; Tang, Lingyun; Wang, Yanyan; Wang, Cun; Zhou, Rong; Li, Yan; He, Yan; Chen, Mozi; Huo, Yuqing; Liu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Jiang-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We critically evaluated the role of the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R) in normal development of retinal vasculature and pathogenesis of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) by using the A1R knockout (KO) mice and oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model. Methods Mice deficient in A1Rs and their wild-type (WT) littermates were examined during normal postnatal development or after being subjected to 75% oxygen from postnatal day (P) 7 to P12 and to room air from P12 to P17 (OIR model of ROP). Retinal vascularization was examined by whole-mount fluorescence and cross-sectional hematoxylin-eosin staining. Cellular proliferation, astrocyte and microglial activation, and tip cell function were determined by isolectin staining and immunohistochemistry. Apoptosis was determined by TUNEL assay. Results Genetic deletion of the A1R did not affect normal retinal vascularization during postnatal development with indistinguishable three-layer vascularization patterns in retina between WT and A1R KO mice. In the OIR model, genetic deletion of the A1R resulted in stage-specific effects: reduced hyperoxia-induced retinal vaso-obliteration at P12, but reduced avascular area and attenuated hypoxia-induced intraretinal revascularization without affecting intravitreal neovascularization at P17 and reduced avascular areas in retina at P21. These distinct effects of A1Rs on OIR were associated with A1R control of apoptosis mainly in inner and outer nuclear layers at the vaso-obliterative phase (P12) and the growth of endothelium tip cells at the vasoproliferative phase (P17), without modification of cellular proliferation, astrocytic activation, and tissue inflammation. Conclusions Adenosine A1 receptor activity is not required for normal postnatal development of retinal vasculature but selectively controls hyperoxia-induced vaso-obliteration and hypoxia-driven revascularization by distinct cellular mechanisms. PMID:26720463

  4. Cellular ageing mechanisms in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Sacitharan, P K; Vincent, T L

    2016-08-01

    Age is the strongest independent risk factor for the development of osteoarthritis (OA) and for many years this was assumed to be due to repetitive microtrauma of the joint surface over time, the so-called 'wear and tear' arthritis. As our understanding of OA pathogenesis has become more refined, it has changed our appreciation of the role of ageing on disease. Cartilage breakdown in disease is not a passive process but one involving induction and activation of specific matrix-degrading enzymes; chondrocytes are exquisitely sensitive to changes in the mechanical, inflammatory and metabolic environment of the joint; cartilage is continuously adapting to these changes by altering its matrix. Ageing influences all of these processes. In this review, we will discuss how ageing affects tissue structure, joint use and the cellular metabolism. We describe what is known about pathways implicated in ageing in other model systems and discuss the potential value of targeting these pathways in OA. PMID:27215642

  5. Human keratinocytes have two interconvertible modes of proliferation.

    PubMed

    Roshan, Amit; Murai, Kasumi; Fowler, Joanna; Simons, Benjamin D; Nikolaidou-Neokosmidou, Varvara; Jones, Philip H

    2016-02-01

    Single stem cells, including those in human epidermis, have a remarkable ability to reconstitute tissues in vitro, but the cellular mechanisms that enable this are ill-defined. Here we used live imaging to track the outcome of thousands of divisions in clonal cultures of primary human epidermal keratinocytes. Two modes of proliferation were seen. In 'balanced' mode, similar proportions of proliferating and differentiating cells were generated, achieving the 'population asymmetry' that sustains epidermal homeostasis in vivo. In 'expanding' mode, an excess of cycling cells was produced, generating large expanding colonies. Cells in expanding mode switched their behaviour to balanced mode once local confluence was attained. However, when a confluent area was wounded in a scratch assay, cells near the scratch switched back to expanding mode until the defect was closed. We conclude that the ability of a single epidermal stem cell to reconstitute an epithelium is explained by two interconvertible modes of proliferation regulated by confluence. PMID:26641719

  6. Building and re-building the heart by cardiomyocyte proliferation.

    PubMed

    Foglia, Matthew J; Poss, Kenneth D

    2016-03-01

    The adult human heart does not regenerate significant amounts of lost tissue after injury. Rather than making new, functional muscle, human hearts are prone to scarring and hypertrophy, which can often lead to fatal arrhythmias and heart failure. The most-cited basis of this ineffective cardiac regeneration in mammals is the low proliferative capacity of adult cardiomyocytes. However, mammalian cardiomyocytes can avidly proliferate during fetal and neonatal development, and both adult zebrafish and neonatal mice can regenerate cardiac muscle after injury, suggesting that latent regenerative potential exists. Dissecting the cellular and molecular mechanisms that promote cardiomyocyte proliferation throughout life, deciphering why proliferative capacity normally dissipates in adult mammals, and deriving means to boost this capacity are primary goals in cardiovascular research. Here, we review our current understanding of how cardiomyocyte proliferation is regulated during heart development and regeneration. PMID:26932668

  7. Proliferation and Polarity in Breast Cancer: Untying the GordianKnot

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Hong; Radisky, Derek C.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2005-05-09

    Epithelial cancers are associated with genomic instability and alterations in signaling pathways that affect proliferation, apoptosis, and integrity of tissue structure. Overexpression of a number of oncogenic protein kinases has been shown to malignantly transform cells in culture and to cause tumors in vivo, but the interconnected signaling events induced by transformation still awaits detailed dissection. We propose that the network of cellular signaling pathways can be classified into functionally distinct branches, and that these pathways are rewired in transformed cells and tissues after they lose tissue-specific architecture to favor tumor expansion and invasion. Using three-dimensional (3D) culture systems, we recently demonstrated that polarity and proliferation of human mammary epithelial cancer cells were separable consequences of signaling pathways downstream of PI3 kinase.These, and results from a number of other laboratories are beginning to provide insight into how different signaling pathways may become interconnected in normal tissues to allow homeostasis, and how they are disrupted during malignant progression.

  8. Effect of melatonin or maternal nutrient restriction on vascularity and cell proliferation in the ovine placenta.

    PubMed

    Eifert, Adam W; Wilson, Matthew E; Vonnahme, Kimberly A; Camacho, Leticia E; Borowicz, Pawel P; Redmer, Dale A; Romero, Sinibaldo; Dorsam, Sheri; Haring, Jodie; Lemley, Caleb O

    2015-02-01

    Previously we reported increased umbilical artery blood flow in ewes supplemented with melatonin from mid- to late-pregnancy, while maternal nutrient restriction decreased uterine artery blood flow. To further unravel these responses, this study was designed to assess placental cell proliferation and vascularity following supplementation with melatonin or maternal nutrient restriction. For the first experiment, 31 primiparous ewes were supplemented with 5mg of melatonin per day (MEL) or no melatonin (CON) and allocated to receive 100% (adequate fed; ADQ) or 60% (restricted; RES) of their nutrient requirements from day 50 to 130 of gestation. To examine melatonin receptor dependent effects, a second experiment was designed utilizing 14 primiparous ewes infused with vehicle, melatonin, or luzindole (melatonin receptor 1 and 2 antagonist) from day 62 to 90 of gestation. For experiment 1, caruncle concentrations of RNA were increased in MEL-RES compared to CON-RES. Caruncle capillary area density and average capillary cross-sectional area were decreased in MEL-RES compared to CON-RES. Cotyledon vascularity was not different across dietary treatments. For experiment 2, placental cellular proliferation and vascularity were not affected by infusion treatment. In summary, melatonin interacted with nutrient restriction to alter caruncle vascularity and RNA concentrations during late pregnancy. Although melatonin receptor antagonism alters feto-placental blood flow, these receptor dependent responses were not observed in placental vascularity. Moreover, placental vascularity measures do not fully explain the alterations in uteroplacental blood flow. PMID:25578503

  9. A simple non-perturbing cell migration assay insensitive to proliferation effects.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Honor L; Messner, Jacob; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a fundamental cellular behavior that plays an indispensable role in development and homeostasis, but can also contribute to pathology such as cancer metastasis. Due to its relevance to many aspects of human health, the ability to accurately measure cell migration is of broad interest, and numerous approaches have been developed. One of the most commonly employed approaches, because of its simplicity and throughput, is the exclusion zone assay in which cells are allowed to migrate into an initially cell-free region. A major drawback of this assay is that it relies on simply counting cells in the exclusion zone and therefore cannot distinguish the effects of proliferation from migration. We report here a simple modification to the exclusion zone migration assay that exclusively measures cell migration and is not affected by proliferation. This approach makes use of a lineage-tracing vital stain that is retained through cell generations and effectively reads out migration relative to the original, parental cell population. This modification is simple, robust, non-perturbing, and inexpensive. We validate the method in a panel of cell lines under conditions that inhibit or promote migration and demonstrate its use in normal and cancer cell lines as well as primary cells. PMID:27535324

  10. Effects of titanium nanoparticles on adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yanhua; Cai, Kaiyong; Li, Jinghua; Chen, Xiuyong; Lai, Min; Hu, Yan; Luo, Zhong; Ding, Xingwei; Xu, Dawei

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate the influences of nanoscale wear particles derived from titanium/titanium alloy-based implants on integration of bone. Here we report the potential impact of titanium oxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from the cellular level to the molecular level in the Wistar rat. Methods A series of TiO2 nanoparticles (14 nm, 108 nm, and 196 nm) were synthesized and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. Results The TiO2 nanoparticles had negative effects on cell viability, proliferation, and the cell cycle of MSC in a dose-dependent and size-dependent manner. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to investigate the effects of particle internalization on adhesion, spreading, and morphology of MSC. The integrity of the cell membrane, cytoskeleton, and vinculin of MSC were negatively influenced by large TiO2 nanoparticles. Conclusion The Transwell migration assay and a wound healing model suggested that TiO2 nanoparticles had a strong adverse impact on cell migration as particle size increased (P < 0.01). Furthermore, alkaline phosphatase, gene expression of osteocalcin (OC) and osteopontin (OPN), and mineralization measurements indicate that the size of the TiO2 nanoparticles negatively affected osteogenic differentiation of MSC. PMID:24101871

  11. A simple non-perturbing cell migration assay insensitive to proliferation effects

    PubMed Central

    Glenn, Honor L.; Messner, Jacob; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2016-01-01

    Migration is a fundamental cellular behavior that plays an indispensable role in development and homeostasis, but can also contribute to pathology such as cancer metastasis. Due to its relevance to many aspects of human health, the ability to accurately measure cell migration is of broad interest, and numerous approaches have been developed. One of the most commonly employed approaches, because of its simplicity and throughput, is the exclusion zone assay in which cells are allowed to migrate into an initially cell-free region. A major drawback of this assay is that it relies on simply counting cells in the exclusion zone and therefore cannot distinguish the effects of proliferation from migration. We report here a simple modification to the exclusion zone migration assay that exclusively measures cell migration and is not affected by proliferation. This approach makes use of a lineage-tracing vital stain that is retained through cell generations and effectively reads out migration relative to the original, parental cell population. This modification is simple, robust, non-perturbing, and inexpensive. We validate the method in a panel of cell lines under conditions that inhibit or promote migration and demonstrate its use in normal and cancer cell lines as well as primary cells. PMID:27535324

  12. Cell proliferation inhibition in reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moos, P. J.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Extended durations of spaceflight have been shown to be deleterious on an organismic level; however, mechanisms underlying cellular sensitivity to the gravitational environment remain to be elucidated. The majority of the gravitational studies to date indicates that cell regulatory pathways may be influenced by their gravitational environment. Still, few cell biology experiments have been performed in space flight and even fewer experiments have been repeated on subsequent flights. With flight opportunities on STS-50, 54, and 57, Sf9 cells were flown in the BioServe Fluids Processing Apparatus and cell proliferation was measured with and without exposure to a cell regulatory sialoglycopeptide (CeReS) inhibitor. Results from these flights indicate that the Sf9 cells grew comparable to ground controls, that the CeReS inhibitor bound to its specific receptor, and that its signal transduction cascade was not gravity sensitive.

  13. Effect of weightlessness on lymphocyte proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, A.

    1981-01-01

    An experiment to study the effect of weightlessness on lymphocyte proliferation to detect possible alteration of the cells responsible for the immune response during long-duration space flights is described. Human lymphocytes in culture medium will be delivered shortly before launch in an incubator which will be kept at 37C. Mitogen will be added to the culture. A control without mitogen will be run in parallel. After 70 hours of incubation, radioactive thymidine will be added. After two hours, cellular activity will be stopped by fixation and incubator power switched off. Later, the amount of incorporated thymidine will be determined and the cell morphology and the distribution of cell organelles will be investigated.

  14. Fabrication of cellular materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prud'homme, Robert K.; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Garg, Rajeev

    1996-02-01

    Nature uses cellular materials in applications requiring strength while, simultaneously, minimizing raw materials requirements. Minimizing raw materials is efficient both in terms of the energy expended by the organism to synthesize the structure and in terms of the strength- to-weight ratio of the structure. Wood is the most obvious example of cellular bio-materials, and it is the focus of other presentations in this symposium. The lightweight bone structure of birds is another excellent example where weight is a key criterion. The anchoring foot of the common muscle [Mytilus edulis] whereby it attaches itself to objects is a further example of a biological system that uses a foam to fill space and yet conserve on raw materials. In the case of the muscle the foam is water filled and the foot structure distributes stress over a larger area so that the strength of the byssal thread from which it is suspended is matched to the strength of interfacial attachment of the foot to a substrate. In these examples the synthesis and fabrication of the cellular material is directed by intercellular, genetically coded, biochemical reactions. The resulting cell sizes are microns in scale. Cellular materials at the next larger scale are created by organisms at the next higher level of integration. For example an African tree frog lays her eggs in a gas/fluid foam sack she builds on a branch overhanging a pond. The outside of the foam sack hardens in the sun and prevents water evaporation. The foam structure minimizes the amount of fluid that needs to be incorporated into the sack and minimizes its weight. However, as far as the developing eggs are concerned, they are in an aqueous medium, i.e. the continuous fluid phase of the foam. After precisely six days the eggs hatch, and the solidified outer wall re-liquefies and dumps the emerging tadpoles into the pond below. The bee honeycomb is an example of a cellular material with exquisite periodicity at millimeter length scales. The

  15. Dehydroepiandrosterone and metformin regulate proliferation of murine T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Solano, M E; Sander, V; Wald, M R; Motta, A B

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA: 10 µM) and metformin (10 µM and 100 µM) in regulating proliferation of cultured T lymphocytes. T cells were isolated from lymph nodes of prepuberal BALB/c mice. We found that DHEA, metformin and DHEA + metformin added to the incubation media diminished proliferation of T cells. The inhibition by DHEA was higher than that produced by metformin, while the combined treatment showed a synergistic action that allowed us to speculate distinct regulatory pathways. This was supported later by other findings in which the addition of DHEA to the incubation media did not modify T lymphocyte viability, while treatment with metformin and DHEA + metformin diminished cellular viability and increased both early and late apoptosis. Moreover, DHEA diminished the content of the anti-oxidant molecule glutathione (GSH), whereas M and DHEA + metformin increased GSH levels and diminished lipid peroxidation. We conclude that DHEA and metformin diminish proliferation of T cells through different pathways and that not only the increase, but also the decrease of oxidative stress inhibited proliferation of T cells, i.e. a minimal status of oxidative stress, is necessary to trigger cellular response. PMID:18549441

  16. Cellularized Bilayer Pullulan-Gelatin Hydrogel for Skin Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Mathew N; Jeschke, Marc G; Amini-Nik, Saeid

    2016-05-01

    Skin substitutes significantly reduce the morbidity and mortality of patients with burn injuries and chronic wounds. However, current skin substitutes have disadvantages related to high costs and inadequate skin regeneration due to highly inflammatory wounds. Thus, new skin substitutes are needed. By combining two polymers, pullulan, an inexpensive polysaccharide with antioxidant properties, and gelatin, a derivative of collagen with high water absorbency, we created a novel inexpensive hydrogel-named PG-1 for "pullulan-gelatin first generation hydrogel"-suitable for skin substitutes. After incorporating human fibroblasts and keratinocytes onto PG-1 using centrifugation over 5 days, we created a cellularized bilayer skin substitute. Cellularized PG-1 was compared to acellular PG-1 and no hydrogel (control) in vivo in a mouse excisional skin biopsy model using newly developed dome inserts to house the skin substitutes and prevent mouse skin contraction during wound healing. PG-1 had an average pore size of 61.69 μm with an ideal elastic modulus, swelling behavior, and biodegradability for use as a hydrogel for skin substitutes. Excellent skin cell viability, proliferation, differentiation, and morphology were visualized through live/dead assays, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine proliferation assays, and confocal microscopy. Trichrome and immunohistochemical staining of excisional wounds treated with the cellularized skin substitute revealed thicker newly formed skin with a higher proportion of actively proliferating cells and incorporation of human cells compared to acellular PG-1 or control. Excisional wounds treated with acellular or cellularized hydrogels showed significantly less macrophage infiltration and increased angiogenesis 14 days post skin biopsy compared to control. These results show that PG-1 has ideal mechanical characteristics and allows ideal cellular characteristics. In vivo evidence suggests that cellularized PG-1 promotes skin regeneration and may

  17. Differential regulation of cell proliferation in neurogenic zones in mice lacking cystine transport by xCT

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Richard R.; Brown, Craig E.; Murphy, Timothy H.

    2007-12-21

    The cystine/glutamate exchanger (xCT) supplies intracellular cyst(e)ine for the production of glutathione, a major cellular anti-oxidant. xCT is enriched in brain regions associated with neurogenesis. Previous studies have shown that the malfunction of this protein greatly attenuates cell proliferation in vitro and is associated with brain atrophy in vivo. Using mice that are homozygous for a function-blocking deletion in xCT (Sut mice), we examined in vivo the role of xCT in cell proliferation in neurogenic regions of the subventricular zone (SVZ) and denate gyrus (DG) in the adult brain. Our results indicate that a high level of cellular proliferation in the adult brain persists even in the absence of functional xCT. Furthermore, in both young adult and middle-aged mice (3 and 11 months old), rates of SVZ cell proliferation were comparable between Sut and wild-type controls, although there was trend towards reduced proliferation in Sut mice (12% and 9% reduction, respectively). To our surprise, rates of cell proliferation in the DG were elevated in both 3- and 11-month-old Sut mice relative to controls (22% and 28% increase, respectively). These results demonstrate that xCT expression plays a role in regulating cellular proliferation in the DG, but not the SVZ of adult mice. Furthermore, unlike previous in vitro studies, our in vivo observations clearly indicate that xCT is not essential for ongoing cellular proliferation.

  18. Hypergravity Stimulates Osteoblast Proliferation Via Matrix-Integrin-Signaling Pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vercoutere, W.; Parra, M.; Roden, C.; DaCosta, M.; Wing, A.; Damsky, C.; Holton, E.; Searby, N.; Globus, R.; Almeida, E.

    2003-01-01

    Extensive characterizations of the physiologic consequences of microgravity and gravity indicate that lack of weight-bearing may cause tissue atrophy through cellular and subcellular level mechanisms. We hypothesize that gravity is needed for the efficient transduction of cell growth and survival signals from the extra-cellular matrix (ECM) in mechanosensitive tissues. Recent work from our laboratory and from others shows that an increase of gravity increases bone cell growth and survival. We found that 50-g hypergravity stimulation increased osteoblast proliferation for cells grown on Collagen Type I and Fibronectin, but not on Laminin or uncoated plastic. This may be a tissue-specific response, because 50-g hypergravity stimulation caused no increase in proliferation for primary rat fibroblasts. These results combined with RT-PCR for all possible integrins indicate that beta1 integrin subunit may be involved. The osteoblast proliferation response on Collagen Type I was greater at 25-g than at 10-g or 50-g; 24-h duration of hypergravity was necessary to see an increase in proliferation. Survival was enhanced during hypergravity stimulation by the presence of matrix. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that cell cycle may be altered; BrdU incorporation in proliferating cells showed an increase in the number of actively dividing cells from about 60% at 1-g to over 90% at 25-g. To further investigate the molecular components involved, we applied fluorescence labeling of cytoskeletal and signaling molecules to cells after 2 to 30 minutes of hypergravity stimulation. While structural components did not appear to be altered, phosphorylation increased, indicating that signaling pathways may be activated. These data indicate that gravity mechanostimulation of osteoblast proliferation involves specific matrix-integrin signaling pathways which are sensitive to duration and g-level.

  19. Identification of Predictive Gene Markers for Multipotent Stromal Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Bellayr, Ian H; Marklein, Ross A; Lo Surdo, Jessica L; Bauer, Steven R; Puri, Raj K

    2016-06-01

    Multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) are known for their distinctive ability to differentiate into different cell lineages, such as adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteocytes. They can be isolated from numerous tissue sources, including bone marrow, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and others. Because of their differentiation potential and secretion of growth factors, MSCs are believed to have an inherent quality of regeneration and immune suppression. Cellular expansion is necessary to obtain sufficient numbers for use; however, MSCs exhibit a reduced capacity for proliferation and differentiation after several rounds of passaging. In this study, gene markers of MSC proliferation were identified and evaluated for their ability to predict proliferative quality. Microarray data of human bone marrow-derived MSCs were correlated with two proliferation assays. A collection of 24 genes were observed to significantly correlate with both proliferation assays (|r| >0.70) for eight MSC lines at multiple passages. These 24 identified genes were then confirmed using an additional set of MSCs from eight new donors using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The proliferative potential of the second set of MSCs was measured for each donor/passage for confluency fraction, fraction of EdU+ cells, and population doubling time. The second set of MSCs exhibited a greater proliferative potential at passage 4 in comparison to passage 8, which was distinguishable by 15 genes; however, only seven of the genes (BIRC5, CCNA2, CDC20, CDK1, PBK, PLK1, and SPC25) demonstrated significant correlation with MSC proliferation regardless of passage. Our analyses revealed that correlation between gene expression and proliferation was consistently reduced with the inclusion of non-MSC cell lines; therefore, this set of seven genes may be more strongly associated with MSC proliferative quality. Our results pave the way to determine the quality of an MSC population for a

  20. Cellular growth in biofilms

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.D.; Whitaker, S.

    1999-09-20

    In this paper the authors develop a macroscopic evolutionary equation for the growth of the cellular phase starting from a microscopic description of mass transport and a simple structured model for product formation. The methods of continuum mechanics and volume averaging are used to develop the macroscopic representation by carefully considering the fluxes of chemical species that pertain to cell growth. The concept of structured models is extended to include the transport of reacting chemical species at the microscopic scale. The resulting macroscopic growth model is similar in form to previously published models for the transport of a single substrate and electron donor and for the production of cellular mass and exopolymer. The method of volume averaging indicated under what conditions the developed growth model is valid and provides an explicit connection between the relevant microscopic model parameters and their corresponding macroscopic counterparts.

  1. Cell proliferation of Paramecium tetraurelia on a slow rotating clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, Satoe; Mogami, Yoshihiro; Baba, Shoji A.

    Paramecium is known to proliferate faster under microgravity conditions, and slower under hypergravity. Experiments using axenic culture medium have demonstrated that hypergravity affected directly on the proliferation of Paramecium itself. In order to assess the mechanisms underlying the physiological effects of gravity on cell proliferation, Paramecium tetraurelia was grown under clinorotation (2.5 rpm) and the time course of the proliferation was investigated in detail on the basis of the logistic analysis. On the basis of the mechanical properties of Paramecium, this slow rate of the rotation appears to be enough to simulate microgravity in terms of the randomization of the cell orientation with respect to gravity. P. tetraurelia was cultivated in a closed chamber in which cells were confined without air bubbles, reducing the shear forces and turbulences under clinorotation. The chamber is made of quartz and silicone rubber film; the former is for the optically-flat walls for the measurement of cell density by means of a non-invasive laser optical-slice method, and the latter for gas exchange. Because of the small dimension for culture space, Paramecium does not accumulate at the top of the chamber in spite of its known negative gravitactic behavior. We measured the cell density at regular time intervals without breaking the configuration of the chamber, and analyzed the proliferation parameters by fitting the data to a logistic equation. As a result, P. tetraurelia showed reduced proliferation under slow clinorotation. The saturation of the cell density as well as the maximum proliferation rate decreased, although we found no significant changes on the half maximal time for proliferation. We also found that the mean swimming velocity decreased under slow clinorotation. These results were not consistent with those under microgravity and fast rotating clinostat. This may suggest that randomization of the cell orientation performed by slow rotating clinostat has

  2. Cellular dysfunction in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Singer, Mervyn

    2008-12-01

    Cellular dysfunction is a commonplace sequelum of sepsis and other systemic inflammatory conditions. Impaired energy production (related to mitochondrial inhibition, damage, and reduced protein turnover) appears to be a core mechanism underlying the development of organ dysfunction. The reduction in energy availability appears to trigger a metabolic shutdown that impairs normal functioning of the cell. This may well represent an adaptive mechanism analogous to hibernation that prevents a massive degree of cell death and thus enables eventual recovery in survivors. PMID:18954700

  3. Radiolabeled cellular blood elements

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, M.L.; Ezikowitz, M.D.; Hardeman, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers delivered by guest lectures and participants at the Advanced Study Institute's colloquium on Radiolabeled Cellular Blood Elements at Maratea, Italy on August 29, to September 9, 1982. The book includes chapters on basic cell physiology and critical reviews of data and experience in the preparation and use of radiolabeled cells, as well as reports on very recent developments, from a faculty that included experts on cell physiology in health and disease and on the technology of in vivo labeling.

  4. Cellular chromophores and signaling in low level light therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamblin, Michael R.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.

    2007-02-01

    The use of low levels of visible or near infrared light (LLLT) for reducing pain, inflammation and edema, promoting healing of wounds, deeper tissues and nerves, and preventing tissue damage by reducing cellular apoptosis has been known for almost forty years since the invention of lasers. Originally thought to be a peculiar property of laser light (soft or cold lasers), the subject has now broadened to include photobiomodulation and photobiostimulation using non-coherent light. Despite many reports of positive findings from experiments conducted in vitro, in animal models and in randomized controlled clinical trials, LLLT remains controversial. This likely is due to two main reasons; firstly the biochemical mechanisms underlying the positive effects are incompletely understood, and secondly the complexity of rationally choosing amongst a large number of illumination parameters such as wavelength, fluence, power density, pulse structure and treatment timing has led to the publication of a number of negative studies as well as many positive ones. In recent years major advances have been made in understanding the mechanisms that operate at the cellular and tissue levels during LLLT. Mitochondria are thought to be the main site for the initial effects of light and specifically cytochrome c oxidase that has absorption peaks in the red and near infrared regions of the electromagnetic spectrum matches the action spectra of LLLT effects. The discovery that cells employ nitric oxide (NO) synthesized in the mitochondria by neuronal nitric oxide synthase, to regulate respiration by competitive binding to the oxygen binding of cytochrome c oxidase, now suggests how LLLT can affect cell metabolism. If LLLT photodissociates inhibitory NO from cytochrome c oxidase, this would explain increased ATP production, modulation of reactive oxygen species, reduction and prevention of apoptosis, stimulation of angiogenesis, increase of blood flow and induction of transcription factors. In

  5. Global proliferation of cephalopods.

    PubMed

    Doubleday, Zoë A; Prowse, Thomas A A; Arkhipkin, Alexander; Pierce, Graham J; Semmens, Jayson; Steer, Michael; Leporati, Stephen C; Lourenço, Sílvia; Quetglas, Antoni; Sauer, Warwick; Gillanders, Bronwyn M

    2016-05-23

    Human activities have substantially changed the world's oceans in recent decades, altering marine food webs, habitats and biogeochemical processes [1]. Cephalopods (squid, cuttlefish and octopuses) have a unique set of biological traits, including rapid growth, short lifespans and strong life-history plasticity, allowing them to adapt quickly to changing environmental conditions [2-4]. There has been growing speculation that cephalopod populations are proliferating in response to a changing environment, a perception fuelled by increasing trends in cephalopod fisheries catch [4,5]. To investigate long-term trends in cephalopod abundance, we assembled global time-series of cephalopod catch rates (catch per unit of fishing or sampling effort). We show that cephalopod populations have increased over the last six decades, a result that was remarkably consistent across a highly diverse set of cephalopod taxa. Positive trends were also evident for both fisheries-dependent and fisheries-independent time-series, suggesting that trends are not solely due to factors associated with developing fisheries. Our results suggest that large-scale, directional processes, common to a range of coastal and oceanic environments, are responsible. This study presents the first evidence that cephalopod populations have increased globally, indicating that these ecologically and commercially important invertebrates may have benefited from a changing ocean environment. PMID:27218844

  6. Crack Propagation in Bamboo's Hierarchical Cellular Structure

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Meisam K.; Lu, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Bamboo, as a natural hierarchical cellular material, exhibits remarkable mechanical properties including excellent flexibility and fracture toughness. As far as bamboo as a functionally graded bio-composite is concerned, the interactions of different constituents (bamboo fibers; parenchyma cells; and vessels.) alongside their corresponding interfacial areas with a developed crack should be of high significance. Here, by using multi-scale mechanical characterizations coupled with advanced environmental electron microscopy (ESEM), we unambiguously show that fibers' interfacial areas along with parenchyma cells' boundaries were preferred routes for crack growth in both radial and longitudinal directions. Irrespective of the honeycomb structure of fibers along with cellular configuration of parenchyma ground, the hollow vessels within bamboo culm affected the crack propagation too, by crack deflection or crack-tip energy dissipation. It is expected that the tortuous crack propagation mode exhibited in the present study could be applicable to other cellular natural materials as well. PMID:24998298

  7. Predictability in cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Agapie, Alexandru; Andreica, Anca; Chira, Camelia; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-01-01

    Modelled as finite homogeneous Markov chains, probabilistic cellular automata with local transition probabilities in (0, 1) always posses a stationary distribution. This result alone is not very helpful when it comes to predicting the final configuration; one needs also a formula connecting the probabilities in the stationary distribution to some intrinsic feature of the lattice configuration. Previous results on the asynchronous cellular automata have showed that such feature really exists. It is the number of zero-one borders within the automaton's binary configuration. An exponential formula in the number of zero-one borders has been proved for the 1-D, 2-D and 3-D asynchronous automata with neighborhood three, five and seven, respectively. We perform computer experiments on a synchronous cellular automaton to check whether the empirical distribution obeys also that theoretical formula. The numerical results indicate a perfect fit for neighbourhood three and five, which opens the way for a rigorous proof of the formula in this new, synchronous case. PMID:25271778

  8. Probabilistic cellular automata.

    PubMed

    Agapie, Alexandru; Andreica, Anca; Giuclea, Marius

    2014-09-01

    Cellular automata are binary lattices used for modeling complex dynamical systems. The automaton evolves iteratively from one configuration to another, using some local transition rule based on the number of ones in the neighborhood of each cell. With respect to the number of cells allowed to change per iteration, we speak of either synchronous or asynchronous automata. If randomness is involved to some degree in the transition rule, we speak of probabilistic automata, otherwise they are called deterministic. With either type of cellular automaton we are dealing with, the main theoretical challenge stays the same: starting from an arbitrary initial configuration, predict (with highest accuracy) the end configuration. If the automaton is deterministic, the outcome simplifies to one of two configurations, all zeros or all ones. If the automaton is probabilistic, the whole process is modeled by a finite homogeneous Markov chain, and the outcome is the corresponding stationary distribution. Based on our previous results for the asynchronous case-connecting the probability of a configuration in the stationary distribution to its number of zero-one borders-the article offers both numerical and theoretical insight into the long-term behavior of synchronous cellular automata. PMID:24999557

  9. Quantum cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porod, Wolfgang; Lent, Craig S.; Bernstein, Gary H.

    1994-06-01

    The Notre Dame group has developed a new paradigm for ultra-dense and ultra-fast information processing in nanoelectronic systems. These Quantum Cellular Automata (QCA's) are the first concrete proposal for a technology based on arrays of coupled quantum dots. The basic building block of these cellular arrays is the Notre Dame Logic Cell, as it has been called in the literature. The phenomenon of Coulomb exclusion, which is a synergistic interplay of quantum confinement and Coulomb interaction, leads to a bistable behavior of each cell which makes possible their use in large-scale cellular arrays. The physical interaction between neighboring cells has been exploited to implement logic functions. New functionality may be achieved in this fashion, and the Notre Dame group invented a versatile majority logic gate. In a series of papers, the feasibility of QCA wires, wire crossing, inverters, and Boolean logic gates was demonstrated. A major finding is that all logic functions may be integrated in a hierarchial fashion which allows the design of complicated QCA structures. The most complicated system which was simulated to date is a one-bit full adder consisting of some 200 cells. In addition to exploring these new concepts, efforts are under way to physically realize such structures both in semiconductor and metal systems. Extensive modeling work of semiconductor quantum dot structures has helped identify optimum design parameters for QCA experimental implementations.

  10. Piezo Proteins: Regulators of Mechanosensation and Other Cellular Processes*

    PubMed Central

    Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N.; Gracheva, Elena O.; Gallagher, Patrick G.

    2014-01-01

    Piezo proteins have recently been identified as ion channels mediating mechanosensory transduction in mammalian cells. Characterization of these channels has yielded important insights into mechanisms of somatosensation, as well as other mechano-associated biologic processes such as sensing of shear stress, particularly in the vasculature, and regulation of urine flow and bladder distention. Other roles for Piezo proteins have emerged, some unexpected, including participation in cellular development, volume regulation, cellular migration, proliferation, and elongation. Mutations in human Piezo proteins have been associated with a variety of disorders including hereditary xerocytosis and several syndromes with muscular contracture as a prominent feature. PMID:25305018

  11. Intraretinal proliferation induced by retinal detachment

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, S.K.; Erickson, P.A.; Lewis, G.P.; Anderson, D.H. )

    1991-05-01

    Cellular proliferation after retinal detachment was studied by {sup 3}H-thymidine light microscopic autoradiography in cats that had experimental detachments of 0.5-180 days duration. The animals underwent labeling 2 hr before death with an intraocular injection of 200 microCi of {sup 3}H-thymidine. The number of labeled nuclei were counted in 1-micron thick tissue sections in regions of detachment, in regions of the experimental eyes that remained attached, and in control eyes that had no detachments. In the normal eye, in one that had only the lens and vitreous removed, and in the eyes with 0.5- and 1-day detachments, the number of labeled nuclei ranged from 0/mm (0.5-day detachment) to 0.38/mm (lens and vitreous removed only). By 2 days postdetachment, the number of labeled nuclei increased to 2.09/mm. The highest levels of labeling occurred in two animals with detachments of 3 (7.86/mm) and 4 (7.09/mm) days. Thereafter, the numbers declined steadily until near-baseline counts were obtained at 14 days. The number of labeled nuclei was slightly elevated in the attached regions of two animals with 3-day detachments. Labeled cell types included: Mueller cells, astrocytes, pericytes, and endothelial cells of the retinal vasculature, and both resident (microglial cells) and invading macrophages. In an earlier study RPE cells were also shown to proliferate in response to detachment. Thus, these data show that proliferation is a rapid response to detachment, reaching a maximum within 4 days, and that virtually every nonneuronal cell type in the retina can participate in this response. The data suggest that events leading to such clinical manifestations as proliferative vitreoretinopathy and subretinal fibrosis may have their beginnings in this very early proliferative response.

  12. Endostatin induces proliferation of oral carcinoma cells but its effect on invasion is modified by the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Alahuhta, Ilkka; Aikio, Mari; Väyrynen, Otto; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Suojanen, Juho; Teppo, Susanna; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Heljasvaara, Ritva; Salo, Tuula; Nyberg, Pia

    2015-08-01

    The turnover of extracellular matrix liberates various cryptic molecules with novel biological activities. Endostatin is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor that is derived from the non-collagenous domain of collagen XVIII. Although there are a large number of studies on its anti-tumor effects, the molecular mechanisms are not yet completely understood, and the reasons why endostatin has not been successful in clinical trials are unclear. Research has mostly focused on its anti-angiogenic effect in tumors. Here, we aimed to elucidate how endostatin affects the behavior of aggressive tongue HSC-3 carcinoma cells that were transfected to overproduce endostatin. Endostatin inhibited the invasion of HSC-3 cells in a 3D collagen–fibroblast model. However, it had no effect on invasion in a human myoma organotypic model, which lacks vital fibroblasts. Recombinant endostatin was able to reduce the Transwell migration of normal fibroblasts, but had no effect on carcinoma associated fibroblasts. Surprisingly, endostatin increased the proliferation and decreased the apoptosis of cancer cells in organotypic models. Also subcutaneous tumors overproducing endostatin grew bigger, but showed less local invasion in nude mice xenografts. We conclude that endostatin affects directly to HSC-3 cells increasing their proliferation, but its net effect on cancer invasion seem to depend on the cellular composition and interactions of tumor microenvironment. - Highlights: • Endostatin affects not only angiogenesis, but also carcinoma cells and fibroblasts. • Endostatin increased carcinoma cell proliferation, but decreased 3D invasion. • The invasion inhibitory effect was sensitive to the microenvironment composition. • Fibroblasts may be a factor regulating the fluctuating roles of endostatin.

  13. CLOCK promotes 3T3-L1 cell proliferation via Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Xu, Lirong; Yuan, Gongsheng; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Sun, Ning; Yan, Zuoqin; Lu, Chao; Qian, Ruizhe

    2016-07-01

    Circadian genes control most of the physiological functions including cell cycle. Cell proliferation is a critical factor in the differentiation of progenitor cells. However, the role of Clock gene in the regulation of cell cycle via wingless-type (Wnt) pathway and the relationship between Clock and adipogenesis are unclear. We found that the circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (Clock) regulated the proliferation and the adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. We found that Clock attenuation inhibited the viability of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in the cell counting kit 8. The expression of c-Myc and Cyclin D1 decreased dramatically in 3T3-L1 when Clock was silenced with short interfering RNA and was also decreased in fat tissue and adipose tissue-derived stem cells of Clock(Δ19) mice. Clock directly controls the expression of the components of Wnt signal transduction pathway, which was verified by serum shock, chromatin immunoprecipitation, Western blot, and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Furthermore, IWR-1, a Wnt signal pathway inhibitor, inhibited the cell cycle promotion by CLOCK, which was detected by cell viability assay, flow cytometry, and qRT-PCR. Therefore, CLOCK transcription control of Wnt signaling promotes cell cycle progression in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Clock inhibited the adipogenesis on day 2 in 3T3-L1 cells via Oil Red O staining and qRT-PCR detection and probably related to cellular differentiation. These data provide evidence that the circadian gene Clock regulates the proliferation of preadipocytes and affects adipogenesis. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(7):557-568, 2016. PMID:27194636

  14. C3 exoenzyme impairs cell proliferation and apoptosis by altering the activity of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    von Elsner, Leonie; Hagemann, Sandra; Just, Ingo; Rohrbeck, Astrid

    2016-09-01

    C3 exoenzyme from C. botulinum is an ADP-ribosyltransferase that inactivates selectively RhoA, B, and C by coupling an ADP-ribose moiety. Rho-GTPases are involved in various cellular processes, such as regulation of actin cytoskeleton, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Previous studies of our group with the murine hippocampal cell line HT22 revealed a C3-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation after 48 h and a prevention of serum-starved cells from apoptosis. For both effects, alterations of various signaling pathways are already known, including also changes on the transcriptional level. Investigations on the transcriptional activity in HT22 cells treated with C3 for 48 h identified five out of 48 transcription factors namely Sp1, ATF2, E2F-1, CBF, and Stat6 with a significantly regulated activity. For validation of identified transcription factors, studies on the protein level of certain target genes were performed. Western blot analyses exhibited an enhanced abundance of Sp1 target genes p21 and COX-2 as well as an increase in phosphorylation of c-Jun. In contrast, the level of p53 and apoptosis-inducing GADD153, a target gene of ATF2, was decreased. Our results reveal that C3 regulates the transcriptional activity of Sp1 and ATF2 resulting downstream in an altered protein abundance of various target genes. As the affected proteins are involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis, thus the C3-mediated anti-proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects are consequences of the Rho-dependent alterations of the activity of certain transcriptional factors. PMID:27351882

  15. Aging cellular networks: chaperones as major participants.

    PubMed

    Soti, C; Csermely, P

    2007-01-01

    We increasingly rely on the network approach to understand the complexity of cellular functions. Chaperones (heat shock proteins) are key "networkers", which sequester and repair damaged proteins. In order to link the network approach and chaperones with the aging process, we first summarize the properties of aging networks suggesting a "weak link theory of aging". This theory suggests that age-related random damage primarily affects the overwhelming majority of the low affinity, transient interactions (weak links) in cellular networks leading to increased noise, destabilization and diversity. These processes may be further amplified by age-specific network remodelling and by the sequestration of weakly linked cellular proteins to protein aggregates of aging cells. Chaperones are weakly linked hubs (i.e., network elements with a large number of connections) and inter-modular bridge elements of protein-protein interaction, signalling and mitochondrial networks. As aging proceeds, the increased overload of damaged proteins is an especially important element contributing to cellular disintegration and destabilization. Additionally, chaperone overload may contribute to the increase of "noise" in aging cells, which leads to an increased stochastic resonance resulting in a deficient discrimination between signals and noise. Chaperone- and other multi-target therapies, which restore the missing weak links in aging cellular networks, may emerge as important anti-aging interventions. PMID:16814508

  16. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase increases p53 levels in alloreactive human T cells, and both indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and p53 suppress glucose uptake, glycolysis and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Eleftheriadis, Theodoros; Pissas, Georgios; Antoniadi, Georgia; Spanoulis, Aginor; Liakopoulos, Vassilios; Stefanidis, Ioannis

    2014-12-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) suppresses adaptive immunity by inhibiting T-cell proliferation and altering glucose metabolism. The tumor suppressor p53 also alters these cellular processes with similar results. The effect of IDO on p53 and on glucose metabolism was evaluated in alloreactive T cells. Mixed-lymphocyte reactions (MLRs) were performed in the presence or not of the IDO inhibitor, 1-dl-methyl-tryptophan (1-MT) and/or the p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α (PFT). Cell proliferation, glucose consumption and lactate production were assessed. 1-MT increased cell proliferation, glucose influx and lactate production, whereas PFT enhanced cell proliferation and glucose influx, leaving lactate production unaffected. In MLR-derived T cells, protein analysis revealed that IDO activated general control non-derepressible 2 kinase and induced p53, p-p53 (p53 phosphorylated at serine 15) and p21. In addition, both IDO and p53 decreased glucose transporter 1 and TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator and increased synthesis of cytochrome c oxidase 2. IDO also reduced lactate dehydrogenase-A and glutaminase 2 levels, whereas p53 left them unaffected. Neither 1-MT nor PFT affected glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase. In conclusion, in alloreactive T cells, IDO increases p53 levels, and both IDO and p53 inhibit cell proliferation, glucose consumption and glycolysis. Lactate production and glutaminolysis are also suppressed by IDO, but not by p53. PMID:25064493

  17. Cellular phones: are they detrimental?

    PubMed

    Salama, Osama E; Abou El Naga, Randa M

    2004-01-01

    The issue of possible health effects of cellular phones is very much alive in the public's mind where the rapid increase in the number of the users of cell phones in the last decade has increased the exposure of people to the electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Health consequences of long term use of mobile phones are not known in detail but available data indicates the development of non specific annoying symptoms on acute exposure to mobile phone radiations. In an attempt to determine the prevalence of such cell phones associated health manifestations and the factors affecting their occurrence, a cross sectional study was conducted in five randomly selected faculties of Alexandria University. Where, 300 individuals including teaching staff, students and literate employee were equally allocated and randomly selected among the five faculties. Data about mobile phone's users and their medical history, their pattern of mobile usage and the possible deleterious health manifestations associated with cellular phone use was collected. The results revealed 68% prevalence of mobile phone usage, nearly three quarters of them (72.5%) were complainers of the health manifestations. They suffered from headache (43%), earache (38.3%), sense of fatigue (31.6%), sleep disturbance (29.5%), concentration difficulty (28.5%) and face burning sensation (19.2%). Both univariate and multivariate analysis were consistent in their findings. Symptomatic users were found to have significantly higher frequency of calls/day, longer call duration and longer total duration of mobile phone usage/day than non symptomatic users. For headache both call duration and frequency of calls/day were the significant predicting factors for its occurrence (chi2 = 18.208, p = 0.0001). For earache, in addition to call duration, the longer period of owning the mobile phone were significant predictors (chi2 = 16.996, p = 0.0002). Sense of fatigue was significantly affected by both call duration and age of the user

  18. Cell proliferation of Paramecium tetraurelia under simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawai, S.; Mogami, Y.; Baba, S. A.

    Paramecium is known to proliferate faster under microgravity in space and slower under hypergravity Experiments using axenic culture medium have demonstrated that the hypergravity affected directly on the proliferation of Paramecium itself Kato et al 2003 In order to assess the mechanisms underlying the physiological effects of gravity on cell proliferation Paramecium tetraurelia was grown under simulated microgravity performed by clinorotation and the time course of the proliferation was investigated in detail on the basis of the logistic analysis P tetraurelia was cultivated in a closed chamber in which cells were confined without air babbles reducing the shear stresses and turbulence under the rotation The chamber is made of quartz and silicone rubber film the former is for the optically-flat walls for the measurement of cell density by means of a non-invasive laser optical-slice method and the latter for gas exchange Because the closed chamber has an inner dimension of 3 times 3 times 60 mm Paramecium does not accumulate at the top of the chamber despite its negative gravitactic behavior We measured the cell density at regular time intervals without breaking the configuration of the chamber and analyzed the proliferation parameters by fitting the data to a logistic equation Clinorotation had the effects of reducing the proliferation of P tetraurelia It reduced both the saturation cell density and the maximum proliferation rate although it had little effect on the

  19. Microenvironmental stimuli for proliferation of functional islet β-cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by high blood glucose level due to either autoimmune destruction of islet β-cells or insufficient insulin secretion or glucose non-responsive production of insulin by β-cells. It is highly desired to replace biological functional β-cells for the treatment of diabetes. Unfortunately, β-cells proliferate with an extremely low rate. This cellular property hinders cell-based therapy for clinical application. Many attempts have been made to develop techniques that allow production of large quantities of clinically relevant islet β-cells in vitro. A line of studies evidently demonstrate that β-cells can proliferate under certain circumstances, giving the hopes for generating and expanding these cells in vitro and transplanting them to the recipient. In this review, we discuss the requirements of microenvironmental stimuli that stimulate β-cell proliferation in cell cultures. We highlight advanced approaches for augmentation of β-cell expansion that have recently emerged in this field. Furthermore, knowing the signaling pathways and molecular mechanisms would enable manipulating cell proliferation and optimizing its insulin secretory function. Thus, signaling pathways involved in the enhancement of cell proliferation are discussed as well. PMID:24594290

  20. Drugs affecting glycosaminoglycan metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ghiselli, Giancarlo; Maccarana, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are charged polysaccharides ubiquitously present at the cell surface and in the extracellular matrix. GAGs are crucial for cellular homeostasis, and their metabolism is altered during pathological processes. However, little consideration has been given to the regulation of the GAG milieu through pharmacological interventions. In this review, we provide a classification of small molecules affecting GAG metabolism based on their mechanism of action. Furthermore, we present evidence to show that clinically approved drugs affect GAG metabolism and that this could contribute to their therapeutic benefit. PMID:27217160

  1. Formin’ cellular structures

    PubMed Central

    Bogdan, Sven; Schultz, Jörg; Grosshans, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Diaphanous (Dia) protein family are key regulators of fundamental actin driven cellular processes, which are conserved from yeast to humans. Researchers have uncovered diverse physiological roles in cell morphology, cell motility, cell polarity, and cell division, which are involved in shaping cells into tissues and organs. The identification of numerous binding partners led to substantial progress in our understanding of the differential functions of Dia proteins. Genetic approaches and new microscopy techniques allow important new insights into their localization, activity, and molecular principles of regulation. PMID:24719676

  2. Control of cellular automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnoli, Franco; Rechtman, Raúl; El Yacoubi, Samira

    2012-12-01

    We study the problem of master-slave synchronization and control of totalistic cellular automata. The synchronization mechanism is that of setting a fraction of sites of the slave system equal to those of the master one (pinching synchronization). The synchronization observable is the distance between the two configurations. We present three control strategies that exploit local information (the number of nonzero first-order Boolean derivatives) in order to choose the sites to be synchronized. When no local information is used, we speak of simple pinching synchronization. We find the critical properties of control and discuss the best control strategy compared with simple synchronization.

  3. Cellular mechanics and motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  4. The thorny path linking cellular senescence to organismalaging

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Christopher K.; Mian, Saira; Campisi, Judith

    2005-08-09

    Half a century is fast approaching since Hayflick and colleagues formally described the limited ability of normal human cells to proliferate in culture (Hayflick and Moorhead, 1961). This finding--that normal somatic cells, in contrast to cancer cells, cannot divide indefinitely--challenged the prevailing idea that cells from mortal multicellular organisms were intrinsically ''immortal'' (Carrell, 1912). It also spawned two hypotheses, essential elements of which persist today. The first held that the restricted proliferation of normal cells, now termed cellular senescence, suppresses cancer (Hayflick, 1965; Sager, 1991; Campisi, 2001). The second hypothesis, as explained in the article by Lorenzini et al., suggested that the limited proliferation of cells in culture recapitulated aspects of organismal aging (Hayflick, 1965; Martin, 1993). How well have these hypotheses weathered the ensuing decades? Before answering this question, we first consider current insights into the causes and consequences of cellular senescence. Like Lorenzini et al., we limit our discussion to mammals. We also focus on fibroblasts, the cell type studied by Lorenzini et al., but consider other types as well. We suggest that replicative capacity in culture is not a straightforward assessment, and that it correlates poorly with both longevity and body mass. We speculate this is due to the malleable and variable nature of replicative capacity, which renders it an indirect metric of qualitative and quantitative differences among cells to undergo senescence, a response that directly alters cellular phenotype and might indirectly alter tissue structure and function.

  5. Spatial distribution and cellular composition of adult brain proliferative zones in the teleost, Gymnotus omarorum

    PubMed Central

    Olivera-Pasilio, Valentina; Peterson, Daniel A.; Castelló, María E.

    2014-01-01

    Proliferation of stem/progenitor cells during development provides for the generation of mature cell types in the CNS. While adult brain proliferation is highly restricted in the mammals, it is widespread in teleosts. The extent of adult neural proliferation in the weakly electric fish, Gymnotus omarorum has not yet been described. To address this, we used double thymidine analog pulse-chase labeling of proliferating cells to identify brain proliferation zones, characterize their cellular composition, and analyze the fate of newborn cells in adult G. omarorum. Short thymidine analog chase periods revealed the ubiquitous distribution of adult brain proliferation, similar to other teleosts, particularly Apteronotus leptorhynchus. Proliferating cells were abundant at the ventricular-subventricular lining of the ventricular-cisternal system, adjacent to the telencephalic subpallium, the diencephalic preoptic region and hypothalamus, and the mesencephalic tectum opticum and torus semicircularis. Extraventricular proliferation zones, located distant from the ventricular-cisternal system surface, were found in all divisions of the rombencephalic cerebellum. We also report a new adult proliferation zone at the caudal-lateral border of the electrosensory lateral line lobe. All proliferation zones showed a heterogeneous cellular composition. The use of short (24 h) and long (30 day) chase periods revealed abundant fast cycling cells (potentially intermediate amplifiers), sparse slow cycling (potentially stem) cells, cells that appear to have entered a quiescent state, and cells that might correspond to migrating newborn neural cells. Their abundance and migration distance differed among proliferation zones: greater numbers and longer range and/or pace of migrating cells were associated with subpallial and cerebellar proliferation zones. PMID:25249943

  6. Ras-activated RSK1 phosphorylates EBP50 to regulate its nuclear localization and promote cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, HooiCheng; Jou, Tzuu-Shuh

    2016-01-01

    Differential subcellular localization of EBP50 leads to its controversial role in cancer biology either as a tumor suppressor when it resides at the membrane periphery, or a tumor facilitator at the nucleus. However, the mechanism behind nuclear localization of EBP50 remains unclear. A RNA interference screening identified the downstream effector of the Ras-ERK cascade, RSK1, as the molecule unique for nuclear transport of EBP50. RSK1 binds to EBP50 and phosphorylates it at a conserved threonine residue at position 156 (T156) under the regulation of growth factor. Mutagenesis experiments confirmed the significance of T156 residue in nuclear localization of EBP50, cellular proliferation, and oncogenic transformation. Our study sheds light on a possible therapeutic strategy targeting at this aberrant nuclear expression of EBP50 without affecting the normal physiological function of EBP50 at other subcellular localization. PMID:26862730

  7. Inhibition of human copper trafficking by a small molecule significantly attenuates cancer cell proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Shan, Changliang; You, Qiancheng; Lu, Junyan; Elf, Shannon; Zhou, Yu; Wen, Yi; Vinkenborg, Jan L.; Fan, Jun; Kang, Heebum; Lin, Ruiting; Han, Dali; Xie, Yuxin; Karpus, Jason; Chen, Shijie; Ouyang, Shisheng; Luan, Chihao; Zhang, Naixia; Ding, Hong; Merkx, Maarten; Liu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Copper is a transition metal that plays critical roles in many life processes. Controlling the cellular concentration and trafficking of copper offers a route to disrupt these processes. Here we report small molecules that inhibit the human copper-trafficking proteins Atox1 and CCS, and so provide a selective approach to disrupt cellular copper transport. The knockdown of Atox1 and CCS or their inhibition leads to a significantly reduced proliferation of cancer cells, but not of normal cells, as well as to attenuated tumour growth in mouse models. We show that blocking copper trafficking induces cellular oxidative stress and reduces levels of cellular ATP. The reduced level of ATP results in activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase that leads to reduced lipogenesis. Both effects contribute to the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our results establish copper chaperones as new targets for future developments in anticancer therapies.

  8. Inhibition of human copper trafficking by a small molecule significantly attenuates cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Shan, Changliang; You, Qiancheng; Lu, Junyan; Elf, Shannon; Zhou, Yu; Wen, Yi; Vinkenborg, Jan L.; Fan, Jun; Kang, Heebum; Lin, Ruiting; Han, Dali; Xie, Yuxin; Karpus, Jason; Chen, Shijie; Ouyang, Shisheng; Luan, Chihao; Zhang, Naixia; Ding, Hong; Merkx, Maarten; Liu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Copper is a transition metal that plays critical roles in many life processes. Controlling the cellular concentration and trafficking of copper offers a route to disrupt these processes. Here we report small molecules that inhibit the human copper-trafficking proteins Atox1 and CCS, and so provide a selective approach to disrupt cellular copper transport. The knockdown of Atox1 and CCS or their inhibition leads to a significantly reduced proliferation of cancer cells, but not of normal cells, as well as to attenuated tumour growth in mouse models. We show that blocking copper trafficking induces cellular oxidative stress and reduces levels of cellular ATP. The reduced level of ATP results in activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase that leads to reduced lipogenesis. Both effects contribute to the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our results establish copper chaperones as new targets for future developments in anticancer therapies. PMID:26587712

  9. Inhibition of human copper trafficking by a small molecule significantly attenuates cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Luo, Cheng; Shan, Changliang; You, Qiancheng; Lu, Junyan; Elf, Shannon; Zhou, Yu; Wen, Yi; Vinkenborg, Jan L; Fan, Jun; Kang, Heebum; Lin, Ruiting; Han, Dali; Xie, Yuxin; Karpus, Jason; Chen, Shijie; Ouyang, Shisheng; Luan, Chihao; Zhang, Naixia; Ding, Hong; Merkx, Maarten; Liu, Hong; Chen, Jing; Jiang, Hualiang; He, Chuan

    2015-12-01

    Copper is a transition metal that plays critical roles in many life processes. Controlling the cellular concentration and trafficking of copper offers a route to disrupt these processes. Here we report small molecules that inhibit the human copper-trafficking proteins Atox1 and CCS, and so provide a selective approach to disrupt cellular copper transport. The knockdown of Atox1 and CCS or their inhibition leads to a significantly reduced proliferation of cancer cells, but not of normal cells, as well as to attenuated tumour growth in mouse models. We show that blocking copper trafficking induces cellular oxidative stress and reduces levels of cellular ATP. The reduced level of ATP results in activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase that leads to reduced lipogenesis. Both effects contribute to the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation. Our results establish copper chaperones as new targets for future developments in anticancer therapies. PMID:26587712

  10. Effects of Spaceflight on Molecular and Cellular Responses to Bleomycin-Induced DNA Damages in Confluent Human Fibroblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2016-01-01

    Spaceflights expose human beings to various risk factors. Among them are microgravity related physiological stresses in immune, cytoskeletal, and cardiovascular systems, and space radiation related elevation of cancer risk. Cosmic radiation consists of energetic protons and other heavier charged particles that induce DNA damages. Effective DNA damage response and repair mechanism is important to maintain genomic integrity and reduce cancer risk. There were studies on effects of spaceflight and microgravity on DNA damage response in cell and animal models, but the published results were mostly conflicting and inconsistent. To investigate effects of spaceflight on molecular and cellular responses to DNA damages, bleomycin, an anti-cancer drug and radiomimetic reagent, was used to induce DNA damages in confluent human fibroblasts flown to the International Space Station (ISS) and on ground. After exposure to 1.0 µg/ml bleomycin for 3 hours, cells were fixed for immunofluorescence assays and for RNA preparation. Extents of DNA damages were quantified by foci and pattern counting of phosphorylated histone protein H2AX (?-H2AX). The cells on the ISS showed modestly increased average foci counts per nucleus while the distribution of patterns was similar to that on the ground. PCR array analysis showed that expressions of several genes, including CDKN1A and PCNA, were significantly changed in response to DNA damages induced by bleomycin in both flight and ground control cells. However, there were no significant differences in the overall expression profile of DNA damage response genes between the flight and ground samples. Analysis of cellular proliferation status with Ki-67 staining showed a slightly higher proliferating population in cells on the ISS than those on ground. Our results suggested that the difference in ?-H2AX focus counts between flight and ground was due to the higher percentage of proliferating cells in space, but spaceflight did not significantly affect

  11. Epithelial Cell Proliferation Contributes to Airway Remodeling in Severe Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Lance; E, Xueping; Tarsi, Jaime; Ramkumar, Thiruvamoor; Horiuchi, Todd K.; Cochran, Rebecca; DeMartino, Steve; Schechtman, Kenneth B.; Hussain, Iftikhar; Holtzman, Michael J.; Castro, Mario

    2007-01-01

    Rationale: Despite long-term therapy with corticosteroids, patients with severe asthma develop irreversible airway obstruction. Objectives: To evaluate if there are structural and functional differences in the airway epithelium in severe asthma associated with airway remodeling. Methods: In bronchial biopsies from 21 normal subjects, 11 subjects with chronic bronchitis, 9 subjects with mild asthma, and 31 subjects with severe asthma, we evaluated epithelial cell morphology: epithelial thickness, lamina reticularis (LR) thickness, and epithelial desquamation. Levels of retinoblastoma protein (Rb), Ki67, and Bcl-2 were measured, reflecting cellular proliferation and death. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was used to study cellular apoptosis. Measurements and Main Results: Airway epithelial and LR thickness was greater in subjects with severe asthma compared with those with mild asthma, normal subjects, and diseased control subjects (p = 0.009 and 0.033, respectively). There was no significant difference in epithelial desquamation between groups. Active, hypophosphorylated Rb expression was decreased (p = 0.002) and Ki67 was increased (p < 0.01) in the epithelium of subjects with severe asthma as compared with normal subjects, indicating increased cellular proliferation. Bcl-2 expression was decreased (p < 0.001), indicating decreased cell death suppression. There was a greater level of apoptotic activity in the airway biopsy in subjects with severe asthma as compared with the normal subjects using the TUNEL assay (p = 0.002), suggesting increased cell death. Conclusions: In subjects with severe asthma, as compared with subjects with mild asthma, normal subjects, and diseased control subjects, we found novel evidence of increased cellular proliferation in the airway contributing to a thickened epithelium and LR. These changes may contribute to the progressive decline in lung function and airway remodeling in patients with severe

  12. Nuclear Proliferation and Grand Challenges

    ScienceCinema

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2013-05-28

    Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy leads systems analysis. She talks about proliferation and the grand challenges of nuclear R&D. For more information about INL energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  13. Nuclear Proliferation and Grand Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy leads systems analysis. She talks about proliferation and the grand challenges of nuclear R&D. For more information about INL energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  14. [Hematopoietic microenvironment: cellular and extracellular matrix elements].

    PubMed

    Minguell, J J; Fernández, M; Tetas, M; Martínez, J; Bruzzone, M; Rodríguez, J P

    1988-06-01

    In bone marrow, cellular stroma together with extracellular matrix (EM) provide an adequate microenvironment for the proliferation and differentiation of hemopoietic progenitor cells. In this article we describe studies on the cell characteristics of a main stromal phenotype, a fibroblast-like cell and its ability to produce in vitro EM components. Comparative studies were performed in fibroblast cultures derived from normal and acute lymphoblastic leukemic (ALL) bone marrow. The grow characteristics of fibroblasts from ALL marrow as well as its capacity to synthetize collagen, fibronectin and GAGs are impaired when compared to fibroblast from normal marrow. Thus, in ALL the impaired production of EM biomolecules by a transient damaged population of stromal cells, may contribute to the development of a defective microenvironment for hemopoiesis. PMID:3154858

  15. Low power laser and LED irradiation effect on proliferation and differentiation of Wistar rats mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancera, Diana; Solarte, Efrain; Fierro, Leonardo; Criollo, William

    2013-11-01

    It has been demonstrated that appropriately cultured and stimulated mesenchymal cells, can give rise to cells of all tissues of the body. We evaluate the cell proliferation and differentiation induced by low power light irradiation in cell cultures of mesenchymal cells, isolated and previously characterized, from Wistar rats. Roche® XTT and LDH tests were used to assess proliferation and cytotoxicity. Cellular differentiation was determined by optical microscopy and using specific fluorescent markers. We report laser cellular proliferation enhancement by 532 and 473 nm, and the best cell culture response by a dose of 2 Jcm-2. Although a three day irradiation protocol the cultures grown and no cytotoxicity was detected. Cellular differentiation occurred, and the production of cardiomyocytes was promoted by the cell proliferation stimulated by low power laser irradiation.

  16. Bioabsorbable zinc ion induced biphasic cellular responses in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Bioabsorbable metal zinc (Zn) is a promising new generation of implantable scaffold for cardiovascular and orthopedic applications. In cardiovascular stent applications, zinc ion (Zn2+) will be gradually released into the surrounding vascular tissues from such Zn-containing scaffolds after implantation. However, the interactions between vascular cells and Zn2+ are still largely unknown. We explored the short-term effects of extracellular Zn2+ on human smooth muscle cells (SMCs) up to 24 h, and an interesting biphasic effect of Zn2+ was observed. Lower concentrations (<80 μM) of Zn2+ had no adverse effects on cell viability but promoted cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell proliferation, cell migration, and enhanced the expression of F-actin and vinculin. Cells treated with such lower concentrations of Zn2+ displayed an elongated shape compared to controls without any treatment. In contrast, cells treated with higher Zn2+ concentrations (80–120 μM) had opposite cellular responses and behaviors. Gene expression profiles revealed that the most affected functional genes were related to angiogenesis, inflammation, cell adhesion, vessel tone, and platelet aggregation. Results indicated that Zn has interesting concentration-dependent biphasic effects on SMCs with low concentrations being beneficial to cellular functions. PMID:27248371

  17. Bioabsorbable zinc ion induced biphasic cellular responses in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhao, Nan; Zhu, Donghui

    2016-01-01

    Bioabsorbable metal zinc (Zn) is a promising new generation of implantable scaffold for cardiovascular and orthopedic applications. In cardiovascular stent applications, zinc ion (Zn(2+)) will be gradually released into the surrounding vascular tissues from such Zn-containing scaffolds after implantation. However, the interactions between vascular cells and Zn(2+) are still largely unknown. We explored the short-term effects of extracellular Zn(2+) on human smooth muscle cells (SMCs) up to 24 h, and an interesting biphasic effect of Zn(2+) was observed. Lower concentrations (<80 μM) of Zn(2+) had no adverse effects on cell viability but promoted cell adhesion, cell spreading, cell proliferation, cell migration, and enhanced the expression of F-actin and vinculin. Cells treated with such lower concentrations of Zn(2+) displayed an elongated shape compared to controls without any treatment. In contrast, cells treated with higher Zn(2+) concentrations (80-120 μM) had opposite cellular responses and behaviors. Gene expression profiles revealed that the most affected functional genes were related to angiogenesis, inflammation, cell adhesion, vessel tone, and platelet aggregation. Results indicated that Zn has interesting concentration-dependent biphasic effects on SMCs with low concentrations being beneficial to cellular functions. PMID:27248371

  18. Simvastatin modulates mesenchymal stromal cell proliferation and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zanette, Dalila Lucíola; Lorenzi, Julio Cesar Cetrulo; Panepucci, Rodrigo Alexandre; Palma, Patricia Vianna Bonini; Dos Santos, Daiane Fernanda; Prata, Karen Lima; Silva, Wilson Araújo

    2015-01-01

    Statins are widely used hypocholesterolemic drugs that block the mevalonate pathway, responsible for the biosysnthesis of cholesterol. However, statins also have pleiotropic effects that interfere with several signaling pathways. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are a heterogeneous mixture of cells that can be isolated from a variety of tissues and are identified by the expression of a panel of surface markers and by their ability to differentiate in vitro into osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes. MSC were isolated from amniotic membranes and bone marrows and characterized based on ISCT (International Society for Cell Therapy) minimal criteria. Simvastatin-treated cells and controls were directly assayed by CFSE (Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester) staining to assess their cell proliferation and their RNA was used for microarray analyses and quantitative PCR (qPCR). These MSC were also evaluated for their ability to inhibit PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) proliferation. We show here that simvastatin negatively modulates MSC proliferation in a dose-dependent way and regulates the expression of proliferation-related genes. Importantly, we observed that simvastatin increased the percentage of a subset of smaller MSC, which also were actively proliferating. The association of MSC decreased size with increased pluripotency and the accumulating evidence that statins may prevent cellular senescence led us to hypothesize that simvastatin induces a smaller subpopulation that may have increased ability to maintain the entire pool of MSC and also to protect them from cellular senescence induced by long-term cultures/passages in vitro. These results may be important to better understand the pleiotropic effects of statins and its effects on the biology of cells with regenerative potential. PMID:25874574

  19. New molecular and cellular targets for chemoprevention and treatment of skin tumors by plant polyphenols: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Korkina, L G; Pastore, S; Dellambra, E; De Luca, C

    2013-01-01

    As the incidence of skin tumors has been steadily growing, there is an urgent need for the preventive measures as well as the improved therapeutic approaches. In the last two decades, natural plant derived polyphenols (PPs, resveratrol, silibinin, green tea polyphenols, flavonoids, anthocyanins, etc.) have been drawing particular interest as emerging active substances in dermatological/cosmeceutical compositions for the prevention, slowing, or reversion of skin tumorigenesis (chemoprevention). When chronically applied to the skin, they supposedly would not damage normal skin cells or negatively affect their functions while they would suppress tumorigenic cell transformation, inhibit tumor cell proliferation, and activate tumor cell apoptosis. PPs are also reported to synergize with conventional anti-cancer therapies. The major aim of this critical review is to provide recent updates on the molecular and cellular targets for the prevention and therapy of skin tumors with a special focus on the crossroad between inflammation and carcinogenesis as the most promising approach to chemoprevention. Novel therapeutic targets as different as epidermal stem cells, cellular senescence, epigenetic enzymes involved in carcinogenesis, epidermal growth factor and aryl hydrocarbon receptors, and metabolic CYP1 subfamily enzymes are highlighted. The mechanisms of PPs interaction with these molecular and cellular targets are reviewed. The feasibility of PPs to prevent/ cure specific cutaneous toxicity connected to anti-EGFR therapy and to reduce multidrug resistance of skin tumors is also discussed. PMID:23210776

  20. Cellular Contraction and Polarization Drive Collective Cellular Motion.

    PubMed

    Notbohm, Jacob; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Utuje, Kazage J C; Gweon, Bomi; Jang, Hwanseok; Park, Yongdoo; Shin, Jennifer; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2016-06-21

    Coordinated motions of close-packed multicellular systems typically generate cooperative packs, swirls, and clusters. These cooperative motions are driven by active cellular forces, but the physical nature of these forces and how they generate collective cellular motion remain poorly understood. Here, we study forces and motions in a confined epithelial monolayer and make two experimental observations: 1) the direction of local cellular motion deviates systematically from the direction of the local traction exerted by each cell upon its substrate; and 2) oscillating waves of cellular motion arise spontaneously. Based on these observations, we propose a theory that connects forces and motions using two internal state variables, one of which generates an effective cellular polarization, and the other, through contractile forces, an effective cellular inertia. In agreement with theoretical predictions, drugs that inhibit contractility reduce both the cellular effective elastic modulus and the frequency of oscillations. Together, theory and experiment provide evidence suggesting that collective cellular motion is driven by at least two internal variables that serve to sustain waves and to polarize local cellular traction in a direction that deviates systematically from local cellular velocity. PMID:27332131

  1. Integrated cellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Jason C.

    The generation of new three-dimensional (3D) matrices that enable integration of biomolecular components and whole cells into device architectures, without adversely altering their morphology or activity, continues to be an expanding and challenging field of research. This research is driven by the promise that encapsulated biomolecules and cells can significantly impact areas as diverse as biocatalysis, controlled delivery of therapeutics, environmental and industrial process monitoring, early warning of warfare agents, bioelectronics, photonics, smart prosthetics, advanced physiological sensors, portable medical diagnostic devices, and tissue/organ replacement. This work focuses on the development of a fundamental understanding of the biochemical and nanomaterial mechanisms that govern the cell directed assembly and integration process. It was shown that this integration process relies on the ability of cells to actively develop a pH gradient in response to evaporation induced osmotic stress, which catalyzes silica condensation within a thin 3D volume surrounding the cells, creating a functional bio/nano interface. The mechanism responsible for introducing functional foreign membrane-bound proteins via proteoliposome addition to the silica-lipid-cell matrix was also determined. Utilizing this new understanding, 3D cellular immobilization capabilities were extended using sol-gel matrices endowed with glycerol, trehalose, and media components. The effects of these additives, and the metabolic phase of encapsulated S. cerivisiase cells, on long-term viability and the rate of inducible gene expression was studied. This enabled the entrapment of cells within a novel microfluidic platform capable of simultaneous colorimetric, fluorescent, and electrochemical detection of a single analyte, significantly improving confidence in the biosensor output. As a complementary approach, multiphoton protein lithography was utilized to engineer 3D protein matrices in which to

  2. Engineering Cellular Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Jens; Keasling, Jay D

    2016-03-10

    Metabolic engineering is the science of rewiring the metabolism of cells to enhance production of native metabolites or to endow cells with the ability to produce new products. The potential applications of such efforts are wide ranging, including the generation of fuels, chemicals, foods, feeds, and pharmaceuticals. However, making cells into efficient factories is challenging because cells have evolved robust metabolic networks with hard-wired, tightly regulated lines of communication between molecular pathways that resist efforts to divert resources. Here, we will review the current status and challenges of metabolic engineering and will discuss how new technologies can enable metabolic engineering to be scaled up to the industrial level, either by cutting off the lines of control for endogenous metabolism or by infiltrating the system with disruptive, heterologous pathways that overcome cellular regulation. PMID:26967285

  3. Cellular Morphogenesis In Silico

    PubMed Central

    Shinbrot, Troy; Chun, Young; Caicedo-Carvajal, Carlos; Foty, Ramsey

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We describe a model that simulates spherical cells of different types that can migrate and interact either attractively or repulsively. We find that both expected morphologies and previously unreported patterns spontaneously self-assemble. Among the newly discovered patterns are a segmented state of alternating discs, and a “shish-kebab” state, in which one cell type forms a ring around a second type. We show that these unique states result from cellular attraction that increases with distance (e.g., as membranes stretch viscoelastically), and would not be seen in traditional, e.g., molecular, potentials that diminish with distance. Most of the states found computationally have been observed in vitro, and it remains to be established what role these self-assembled states may play in in vivo morphogenesis. PMID:19686642

  4. Combinatorial approaches to evaluate nanodiamond uptake and induced cellular fate

    PubMed Central

    Eldawud, Reem; Reitzig, Manuela; Opitz, Jörg; Rojansakul, Yon; Jiang, Wenjuan; Nangia, Shikha; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica

    2016-01-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are an emerging class of engineered nanomaterials that hold great promise for the next generation of bionanotechnological products to be used for drug and gene delivery, or for bio-imaging and biosensing. Previous studies have shown that upon their cellular uptake, NDs exhibit high biocompatibility in various in vitro and in vivo set-ups. Herein we hypothesized that the increased NDs biocompatibility is a result of minimum membrane perturbations and their reduced ability to induce disruption or damage during cellular translocation. Using multi-scale combinatorial approaches that simulate ND-membrane interactions, we correlated NDs real-time cellular uptake and kinetics with the ND-induced membrane fluctuations to derive energy requirements for the uptake to occur. Our discrete and real-time analyses showed that the majority of NDs internalization occurs within 2 h of cellular exposure, however, with no effects on cellular viability, proliferation or cellular behavior. Furthermore, our simulation analyses using coarse-grained models identified key changes in the energy profile, membrane deformation and recovery time, all functions of the average ND or ND-based agglomerate size. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for ND-cell membrane interactions could possibly advance their implementation in various biomedical applications. PMID:26820775

  5. Combinatorial approaches to evaluate nanodiamond uptake and induced cellular fate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldawud, Reem; Reitzig, Manuela; Opitz, Jörg; Rojansakul, Yon; Jiang, Wenjuan; Nangia, Shikha; Zoica Dinu, Cerasela

    2016-02-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are an emerging class of engineered nanomaterials that hold great promise for the next generation of bionanotechnological products to be used for drug and gene delivery, or for bio-imaging and biosensing. Previous studies have shown that upon their cellular uptake, NDs exhibit high biocompatibility in various in vitro and in vivo set-ups. Herein we hypothesized that the increased NDs biocompatibility is a result of minimum membrane perturbations and their reduced ability to induce disruption or damage during cellular translocation. Using multi-scale combinatorial approaches that simulate ND-membrane interactions, we correlated NDs real-time cellular uptake and kinetics with the ND-induced membrane fluctuations to derive energy requirements for the uptake to occur. Our discrete and real-time analyses showed that the majority of NDs internalization occurs within 2 h of cellular exposure, however, with no effects on cellular viability, proliferation or cellular behavior. Furthermore, our simulation analyses using coarse-grained models identified key changes in the energy profile, membrane deformation and recovery time, all functions of the average ND or ND-based agglomerate size. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for ND-cell membrane interactions could possibly advance their implementation in various biomedical applications.

  6. Combinatorial approaches to evaluate nanodiamond uptake and induced cellular fate.

    PubMed

    Eldawud, Reem; Reitzig, Manuela; Opitz, Jörg; Rojansakul, Yon; Jiang, Wenjuan; Nangia, Shikha; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica

    2016-02-26

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are an emerging class of engineered nanomaterials that hold great promise for the next generation of bionanotechnological products to be used for drug and gene delivery, or for bio-imaging and biosensing. Previous studies have shown that upon their cellular uptake, NDs exhibit high biocompatibility in various in vitro and in vivo set-ups. Herein we hypothesized that the increased NDs biocompatibility is a result of minimum membrane perturbations and their reduced ability to induce disruption or damage during cellular translocation. Using multi-scale combinatorial approaches that simulate ND-membrane interactions, we correlated NDs real-time cellular uptake and kinetics with the ND-induced membrane fluctuations to derive energy requirements for the uptake to occur. Our discrete and real-time analyses showed that the majority of NDs internalization occurs within 2 h of cellular exposure, however, with no effects on cellular viability, proliferation or cellular behavior. Furthermore, our simulation analyses using coarse-grained models identified key changes in the e