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Sample records for affect clinical decision

  1. How decision reversibility affects motivation.

    PubMed

    Bullens, Lottie; van Harreveld, Frenk; Förster, Jens; Higgins, Tory E

    2014-04-01

    The present research examined how decision reversibility can affect motivation. On the basis of extant findings, it was suggested that 1 way it could affect motivation would be to strengthen different regulatory foci, with reversible decision making, compared to irreversible decision making, strengthening prevention-related motivation relatively more than promotion-related motivation. If so, then decision reversibility should have effects associated with the relative differences between prevention and promotion motivation. In 5 studies, we manipulated the reversibility of a decision and used different indicators of regulatory focus motivation to test these predictions. Specifically, Study 1 tested for differences in participants' preference for approach versus avoidance strategies toward a desired end state. In Study 2, we used speed and accuracy performance as indicators of participants' regulatory motivation, and in Study 3, we measured global versus local reaction time performance. In Study 4, we approached the research question in a different way, making use of the value-from-fit hypothesis (Higgins, 2000, 2002). We tested whether a fit between chronic regulatory focus and focus induced by the reversibility of the decision increased participants' subjective positive feelings about the decision outcome. Finally, in Study 5, we tested whether regulatory motivation, induced by decision reversibility, also influenced participants' preference in specific product features. The results generally support our hypothesis showing that, compared to irreversible decisions, reversible decisions strengthen a prevention focus more than a promotion focus. Implications for research on decision making are discussed. PMID:23815456

  2. Shared clinical decision making

    PubMed Central

    AlHaqwi, Ali I.; AlDrees, Turki M.; AlRumayyan, Ahmad; AlFarhan, Ali I.; Alotaibi, Sultan S.; AlKhashan, Hesham I.; Badri, Motasim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine preferences of patients regarding their involvement in the clinical decision making process and the related factors in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in a major family practice center in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between March and May 2012. Multivariate multinomial regression models were fitted to identify factors associated with patients preferences. Results: The study included 236 participants. The most preferred decision-making style was shared decision-making (57%), followed by paternalistic (28%), and informed consumerism (14%). The preference for shared clinical decision making was significantly higher among male patients and those with higher level of education, whereas paternalism was significantly higher among older patients and those with chronic health conditions, and consumerism was significantly higher in younger age groups. In multivariate multinomial regression analysis, compared with the shared group, the consumerism group were more likely to be female [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) =2.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31-6.27, p=0.008] and non-dyslipidemic (AOR=2.90, 95% CI: 1.03-8.09, p=0.04), and the paternalism group were more likely to be older (AOR=1.03, 95% CI: 1.01-1.05, p=0.04), and female (AOR=2.47, 95% CI: 1.32-4.06, p=0.008). Conclusion: Preferences of patients for involvement in the clinical decision-making varied considerably. In our setting, underlying factors that influence these preferences identified in this study should be considered and tailored individually to achieve optimal treatment outcomes. PMID:26620990

  3. How clinical decisions are made

    PubMed Central

    Bate, Louise; Hutchinson, Andrew; Underhill, Jonathan; Maskrey, Neal

    2012-01-01

    There is much variation in the implementation of the best available evidence into clinical practice. These gaps between evidence and practice are often a result of multiple individual decisions. When making a decision, there is so much potentially relevant information available, it is impossible to know or process it all (so called ‘bounded rationality’). Usually, a limited amount of information is selected to reach a sufficiently satisfactory decision, a process known as satisficing. There are two key processes used in decision making: System 1 and System 2. System 1 involves fast, intuitive decisions; System 2 is a deliberate analytical approach, used to locate information which is not instantly recalled. Human beings unconsciously use System 1 processing whenever possible because it is quicker and requires less effort than System 2. In clinical practice, gaps between evidence and practice can occur when a clinician develops a pattern of knowledge, which is then relied on for decisions using System 1 processing, without the activation of a System 2 check against the best available evidence from high quality research. The processing of information and decision making may be influenced by a number of cognitive biases, of which the decision maker may be unaware. Interventions to encourage appropriate use of System 1 and System 2 processing have been shown to improve clinical decision making. Increased understanding of decision making processes and common sources of error should help clinical decision makers to minimize avoidable mistakes and increase the proportion of decisions that are better. PMID:22738381

  4. Models of Affective Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Charpentier, Caroline J.; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Li, Xinyi; Roiser, Jonathan P.; Sharot, Tali

    2016-01-01

    Intuitively, how you feel about potential outcomes will determine your decisions. Indeed, an implicit assumption in one of the most influential theories in psychology, prospect theory, is that feelings govern choice. Surprisingly, however, very little is known about the rules by which feelings are transformed into decisions. Here, we specified a computational model that used feelings to predict choices. We found that this model predicted choice better than existing value-based models, showing a unique contribution of feelings to decisions, over and above value. Similar to the value function in prospect theory, our feeling function showed diminished sensitivity to outcomes as value increased. However, loss aversion in choice was explained by an asymmetry in how feelings about losses and gains were weighted when making a decision, not by an asymmetry in the feelings themselves. The results provide new insights into how feelings are utilized to reach a decision. PMID:27071751

  5. Economic Choices. Political Decisions that Affect You.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritsche, Joellen M.; And Others

    The purpose of this book is to help students understand why the U.S. Government is involved in the economy, the underlying social values that government tries to promote, and how U.S. economic decisions affect the global economy. It was designed to give them the background they need to form their own opinions about the role of government in the…

  6. Economic aspects of clinical decision making: applications of clinical decision analysis.

    PubMed

    Crane, V S

    1988-03-01

    Clinical decision analysis as a basic tool for decision making is described, and potential applications of decision analysis in six areas of clinical practice are identified. Clinical decision analysis is a systematic method of describing clinical problems in a quantitative fashion, identifying possible courses of action, assessing the probability and value of outcomes, and then making a calculation to select the ultimate course of action. Clinical decision analysis provides a structure for clinical decision problems, helps clarify medical controversies, and encourages decision makers to speak a common language. Applications of clinical decision analysis in the areas of diagnostic testing, patient management, product and program selection, research and education, patient preferences, and health-care-policy evaluation are described. Decision analysis offers health professionals a tool for making quantifiable, cost-effective clinical decisions, especially in terms of clinical outcomes. PMID:3285672

  7. Can access limits on sales representatives to physicians affect clinical prescription decisions? A study of recent events with diabetes and lipid drugs.

    PubMed

    Chressanthis, George A; Khedkar, Pratap; Jain, Nitin; Poddar, Prashant; Seiders, Michael G

    2012-07-01

    The authors explored to what extent important medical decisions by practitioners can be influenced by pharmaceutical representatives and, in particular, whether restricting such access could delay appropriate changes in clinical practice. Medical practices were divided into four categories based on the degree of sales representative access to clinicians: very low, low, medium, and high from a database compiled by ZS Associates called AccessMonitor (Evanston, IL) used extensively by many pharmaceutical companies. Clinical decisions of 58,647 to 72,114 physicians were statistically analyzed using prescription data from IMS Health (Danbury, CT) in three critical areas: an innovative drug for type 2 diabetes (sitagliptin), an older diabetes drug with a new Food and Drug Administration-required black box warning for cardiovascular safety (rosiglitazone), and a combination lipid therapy that had reported negative outcomes in a clinical trial (simvastatin+ezetimbe). For the uptake of the new diabetes agent, the authors found that physicians with very low access to representatives had the lowest adoption of this new therapy and took 1.4 and 4.6 times longer to adopt than physicians in the low- and medium-access restriction categories, respectively. In responding to the black box warning for rosiglitazone, the authors found that physicians with very low access were 4.0 times slower to reduce their use of this treatment than those with low access. Likewise, there was significantly less response in terms of changing prescribing to the negative news with the lipid therapy for physicians in more access-restricted offices. Overall, cardiologists were the most responsive to information changes relative to primary care physicians. These findings emphasize that limiting access to pharmaceutical representatives can have the unintended effect of reducing appropriate responses to negative information about drugs just as much as responses to positive information about innovative

  8. Legal Considerations in Clinical Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ursu, Samuel C.

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of legal issues in dental clinical decision making looks at the nature and elements of applicable law, especially malpractice, locus of responsibility, and standards of care. Greater use of formal decision analysis in clinical dentistry and better research on diagnosis and treatment are recommended, particularly in light of increasing…

  9. ClinicalAccess: a clinical decision support tool.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Karen; Vardell, Emily

    2015-01-01

    ClinicalAccess is a new clinical decision support tool that uses a question-and-answer format to mirror clinical decision-making strategies. The unique format of ClinicalAccess delivers concise, authoritative answers to more than 120,000 clinical questions. This column presents a review of the product, a sample search, and a comparison with other point-of-care search engines. PMID:25927513

  10. Clinical Decision Making of Rural Novice Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seright, Teresa J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop substantive theory regarding decision making by the novice nurse in a rural hospital setting. Interviews were guided by the following research questions: What cues were used by novice rural registered nurses in order to make clinical decisions? What were the sources of feedback which influenced subsequent…

  11. Incorporating affective bias in models of human decision making

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nygren, Thomas E.

    1991-01-01

    Research on human decision making has traditionally focused on how people actually make decisions, how good their decisions are, and how their decisions can be improved. Recent research suggests that this model is inadequate. Affective as well as cognitive components drive the way information about relevant outcomes and events is perceived, integrated, and used in the decision making process. The affective components include how the individual frames outcomes as good or bad, whether the individual anticipates regret in a decision situation, the affective mood state of the individual, and the psychological stress level anticipated or experienced in the decision situation. A focus of the current work has been to propose empirical studies that will attempt to examine in more detail the relationships between the latter two critical affective influences (mood state and stress) on decision making behavior.

  12. Grand challenges in clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Sittig, Dean F; Wright, Adam; Osheroff, Jerome A; Middleton, Blackford; Teich, Jonathan M; Ash, Joan S; Campbell, Emily; Bates, David W

    2008-04-01

    There is a pressing need for high-quality, effective means of designing, developing, presenting, implementing, evaluating, and maintaining all types of clinical decision support capabilities for clinicians, patients and consumers. Using an iterative, consensus-building process we identified a rank-ordered list of the top 10 grand challenges in clinical decision support. This list was created to educate and inspire researchers, developers, funders, and policy-makers. The list of challenges in order of importance that they be solved if patients and organizations are to begin realizing the fullest benefits possible of these systems consists of: improve the human-computer interface; disseminate best practices in CDS design, development, and implementation; summarize patient-level information; prioritize and filter recommendations to the user; create an architecture for sharing executable CDS modules and services; combine recommendations for patients with co-morbidities; prioritize CDS content development and implementation; create internet-accessible clinical decision support repositories; use freetext information to drive clinical decision support; mine large clinical databases to create new CDS. Identification of solutions to these challenges is critical if clinical decision support is to achieve its potential and improve the quality, safety and efficiency of healthcare. PMID:18029232

  13. Helping novice nurses make effective clinical decisions: the situated clinical decision-making framework.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Mary; Peterson, Barbara L

    2009-01-01

    The nature of novice nurses' clinical decision-making has been well documented as linear, based on limited knowledge and experience in the profession, and frequently focused on single tasks or problems. Theorists suggest that, with sufficient experience in the clinical setting, novice nurses will move from reliance on abstract principles to the application of concrete experience and to view a clinical situation within its context and as a whole. In the current health care environment, novice nurses frequently work with few clinical supports and mentors while facing complex patient situations that demand skilled decision-making. The Situated Clinical Decision-Making Framework is presented for use by educators and novice nurses to support development of clinical decision-making. It provides novice nurses with a tool that a) assists them in making decisions; b) can be used to guide retrospective reflection on decision-making processes and outcomes; c) socializes them to an understanding of the nature of decision-making in nursing; and d) fosters the development of their knowledge, skill, and confidence as nurses. This article provides an overview of the framework, including its theoretical foundations and a schematic representation of its components. A case exemplar illustrates one application of the framework in assisting novice nurses in developing their decision-making skills. Future directions regarding the use and study of this framework in nursing education are considered. PMID:19606659

  14. Entrustment Decision Making in Clinical Training.

    PubMed

    Ten Cate, Olle; Hart, Danielle; Ankel, Felix; Busari, Jamiu; Englander, Robert; Glasgow, Nicholas; Holmboe, Eric; Iobst, William; Lovell, Elise; Snell, Linda S; Touchie, Claire; Van Melle, Elaine; Wycliffe-Jones, Keith

    2016-02-01

    The decision to trust a medical trainee with the critical responsibility to care for a patient is fundamental to clinical training. When carefully and deliberately made, such decisions can serve as significant stimuli for learning and also shape the assessment of trainees. Holding back entrustment decisions too much may hamper the trainee's development toward unsupervised practice. When carelessly made, however, they jeopardize patient safety. Entrustment decision-making processes, therefore, deserve careful analysis.Members (including the authors) of the International Competency-Based Medical Education Collaborative conducted a content analysis of the entrustment decision-making process in health care training during a two-day summit in September 2013 and subsequently reviewed the pertinent literature to arrive at a description of the critical features of this process, which informs this article.The authors discuss theoretical backgrounds and terminology of trust and entrustment in the clinical workplace. The competency-based movement and the introduction of entrustable professional activities force educators to rethink the grounds for assessment in the workplace. Anticipating a decision to grant autonomy at a designated level of supervision appears to align better with health care practice than do most current assessment practices. The authors distinguish different modes of trust and entrustment decisions and elaborate five categories, each with related factors, that determine when decisions to trust trainees are made: the trainee, supervisor, situation, task, and the relationship between trainee and supervisor. The authors' aim in this article is to lay a theoretical foundation for a new approach to workplace training and assessment. PMID:26630606

  15. Modelling and Decision Support of Clinical Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Roland; Lux, Thomas

    The German health care market is under a rapid rate of change, forcing especially hospitals to provide high-quality services at low costs. Appropriate measures for more effective and efficient service provision are process orientation and decision support by information technology of clinical pathway of a patient. The essential requirements are adequate modelling of clinical pathways as well as usage of adequate systems, which are capable of assisting the complete path of a patient within a hospital, and preferably also outside of it, in a digital way. To fulfil these specifications the authors present a suitable concept, which meets the challenges of well-structured clinical pathways as well as rather poorly structured diagnostic and therapeutic decisions, by interplay of process-oriented and knowledge-based hospital information systems.

  16. Cognitive Elements in Clinical Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunphy, Bruce C.; Cantwell, Robert; Bourke, Sid; Fleming, Mark; Smith, Bruce; Joseph, K. S.; Dunphy, Stacey L

    2010-01-01

    Physician cognition, metacognition and affect may have an impact upon the quality of clinical reasoning. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between measures of physician metacognition and affect and patient outcomes in obstetric practice. Reflective coping (RC), proactive coping, need for cognition (NFC), tolerance for…

  17. Clinical Decision Support Systems for Ambulatory Care

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Stephen C.

    1984-01-01

    This conference serves to further the state of the art in the application of computers to medical care via a forum for the intercommunication of ideas. Papers discuss the experiences of diverse research projects. It is the purpose of this article to review the major developments in ambulatory care decision support. From this vantage point, the major impediments to broad applicability of information systems are discussed. The DUCHESS Medical Information Management System is then described as a step towards overcoming these obstacles. Two distinct but often overlapping issues are the representation of the data and its subsequent manipulation: records vs. knowledge. The complexity of the medical record requires state-of-the-art computer science. Clinical decision support requires flexible means for representing medical knowledge and the ability to input “rules.” Artificial intelligence has provided tools for simulating the decision making processes. A sample of the major systems are contrasted and compared. In the realm of medical records COSTAR, TMR, SCAMP, HELP, and STOR are considered. In clinical decision support CADEUCUS, REGENSTRIEF, PKC, and DUCHESS are reviewed.

  18. Computerized Clinical Decision Support: Contributions from 2014

    PubMed Central

    Koutkias, V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To summarize recent research and propose a selection of best papers published in 2014 in the field of computerized clinical decision support for the Decision Support section of the IMIA yearbook. Method A literature review was performed by searching two bibliographic databases for papers related to clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) and computerized provider order entry systems in order to select a list of candidate best papers to be then peer-reviewed by external reviewers. A consensus meeting between the two section editors and the editorial team was finally organized to conclude on the selection of best papers. Results Among the 1,254 returned papers published in 2014, the full review process selected four best papers. The first one is an experimental contribution to a better understanding of unintended uses of CDSSs. The second paper describes the effective use of previously collected data to tailor and adapt a CDSS. The third paper presents an innovative application that uses pharmacogenomic information to support personalized medicine. The fourth paper reports on the long-term effect of the routine use of a CDSS for antibiotic therapy. Conclusions As health information technologies spread more and more meaningfully, CDSSs are improving to answer users’ needs more accurately. The exploitation of previously collected data and the use of genomic data for decision support has started to materialize. However, more work is still needed to address issues related to the correct usage of such technologies, and to assess their effective impact in the long term. PMID:26293858

  19. Nurses' Clinical Decision Making on Adopting a Wound Clinical Decision Support System.

    PubMed

    Khong, Peck Chui Betty; Hoi, Shu Yin; Holroyd, Eleanor; Wang, Wenru

    2015-07-01

    Healthcare information technology systems are considered the ideal tool to inculcate evidence-based nursing practices. The wound clinical decision support system was built locally to support nurses to manage pressure ulcer wounds in their daily practice. However, its adoption rate is not optimal. The study's objective was to discover the concepts that informed the RNs' decisions to adopt the wound clinical decision support system as an evidence-based technology in their nursing practice. This was an exploratory, descriptive, and qualitative design using face-to-face interviews, individual interviews, and active participatory observation. A purposive, theoretical sample of 14 RNs was recruited from one of the largest public tertiary hospitals in Singapore after obtaining ethics approval. After consenting, the nurses were interviewed and observed separately. Recruitment stopped when data saturation was reached. All transcribed interview data underwent a concurrent thematic analysis, whereas observational data were content analyzed independently and subsequently triangulated with the interview data. Eight emerging themes were identified, namely, use of the wound clinical decision support system, beliefs in the wound clinical decision support system, influences of the workplace culture, extent of the benefits, professional control over nursing practices, use of knowledge, gut feelings, and emotions (fear, doubt, and frustration). These themes represented the nurses' mental outlook as they made decisions on adopting the wound clinical decision support system in light of the complexities of their roles and workloads. This research has provided insight on the nurses' thoughts regarding their decision to interact with the computer environment in a Singapore context. It captured the nurses' complex thoughts when deciding whether to adopt or reject information technology as they practice in a clinical setting. PMID:26066306

  20. [Clinical decisions in a philosophical perspective].

    PubMed

    Wulff, H R

    1993-09-20

    Medicine is both a scientific and a humanistic discipline. The foundation for clinical decisions has four components (two scientific and two humanistic). 1) The biological component (reasoning based on biological theory). Biological thinking is currently being revolutionised, partly through the development of systems theory. 2) The empirical component (reasoning based on experience from earlier patients), which comprises both uncontrolled and controlled experience. 3) The empathic-hermeneutic component (reasoning based on an understanding of the patient as a fellow human being). Empathy requires hermeneutic knowledge which can be acquired through personal experience and by qualitative research. 4) The ethical component which comprises both utilitarian and deontological considerations. PMID:8211903

  1. Driving and dementia: a clinical decision pathway

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Kirsty; Monaghan, Sophie; O'Brien, John; Teodorczuk, Andrew; Mosimann, Urs; Taylor, John-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to develop a pathway to bring together current UK legislation, good clinical practice and appropriate management strategies that could be applied across a range of healthcare settings. Methods The pathway was constructed by a multidisciplinary clinical team based in a busy Memory Assessment Service. A process of successive iteration was used to develop the pathway, with input and refinement provided via survey and small group meetings with individuals from a wide range of regional clinical networks and diverse clinical backgrounds as well as discussion with mobility centres and Forum of Mobility Centres, UK. Results We present a succinct clinical pathway for patients with dementia, which provides a decision-making framework for how health professionals across a range of disciplines deal with patients with dementia who drive. Conclusions By integrating the latest guidance from diverse roles within older people's health services and key experts in the field, the resulting pathway reflects up-to-date policy and encompasses differing perspectives and good practice. It is potentially a generalisable pathway that can be easily adaptable for use internationally, by replacing UK legislation for local regulations. A limitation of this pathway is that it does not address the concern of mild cognitive impairment and how this condition relates to driving safety. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24865643

  2. A Digest of Supreme Court Decisions Affecting Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A., Ed.

    This digest is a reference tool documenting 144 of the most important Supreme Court cases affecting education from 1859 to 1977, with emphasis on the decisions made during the past 25 years. Each case is written up in a three-part format that provides the facts and background of the case. The cases are organized into five sections: school district…

  3. Factors, Correlates, Emotional Barriers Affecting Career Decisions of College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, James M.; And Others

    The correlates of career choice and the problem areas affecting career decisions are important to counseling psychologists. They are important to understanding the complexities of vocational behavior, facilitating differential treatment in counseling, and developing preventive career programs for men, women, and special groups. The effects of the…

  4. Outpatient diabetes clinical decision support: current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, P J; Sperl-Hillen, J M; Fazio, C J; Averbeck, B M; Rank, B H; Margolis, K L

    2016-06-01

    Outpatient clinical decision support systems have had an inconsistent impact on key aspects of diabetes care. A principal barrier to success has been low use rates in many settings. Here, we identify key aspects of clinical decision support system design, content and implementation that are related to sustained high use rates and positive impacts on glucose, blood pressure and lipid management. Current diabetes clinical decision support systems may be improved by prioritizing care recommendations, improving communication of treatment-relevant information to patients, using such systems for care coordination and case management and integrating patient-reported information and data from remote devices into clinical decision algorithms and interfaces. PMID:27194173

  5. Supporting patients in shared decision making in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Claire; Fraser, Aileen

    2015-04-01

    This article defines shared decision making in patient care and describes the background to this philosophy. The shared decision making approach is part of a wider initiative to promote patient-centred care and increase patient involvement in clinical decisions. Shared decision making recognises patients' rights to make decisions about their care and is used to assist them to make informed and individualised decisions about care and treatment. As well as reviewing the principles of shared decision making, the article offers practical guidance on how nurses can implement this initiative, including information on sharing expertise, agenda setting, assessing risks and benefits, setting goals, and support and follow up. PMID:25828022

  6. Phenotyping, endotyping and clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Fokkens, W J

    2016-06-01

    We have exiting times in the treatment of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). The last year has brought us a number of new ideas and publications to help in decision-making in daily practice. In the first issue of this year, Claire Hopkins and co-authors identified the most important outcomes for patients, public and practitioners that should be evaluated in studies on health interventions for CRS. In this issue of the journal, a group of experts tried to define appropriateness criteria for endoscopic sinus surgery during management of uncomplicated adult chronic rhinosinusitis. Appropriate indications for endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) are currently poorly defined and the lack of clear surgical indications for ESS likely contributes to the large geographic variation in surgical rates. Using the Delphi method a total of 624 clinical scenarios (half CRSsNP and half CRSwNP) were ranked. The study clearly states that this group of experts indicates that ESS can only be indicated after medical treatment has failed with patients still having significant symptoms (SNOT-22 over 20) and at least some abnormalities at CT scan. PMID:27236249

  7. Identifying the Basis for Clinical Decisions - A Feasibility Study.

    PubMed

    Hurlen, Petter; Ofstad, Eirik; Gulbrandsen, Pål

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the possibility of defining a set of terms to describe and identify the basis for clinical decisions in a set of transcriptions from clinical encounters with previously identified decisions. The paper presents the considerations behind the exploratory study and considerations for further work. PMID:27577435

  8. Heuristics in Managing Complex Clinical Decision Tasks in Experts’ Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Roosan; Weir, Charlene; Del Fiol, Guilherme

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical decision support is a tool to help experts make optimal and efficient decisions. However, little is known about the high level of abstractions in the thinking process for the experts. Objective The objective of the study is to understand how clinicians manage complexity while dealing with complex clinical decision tasks. Method After approval from the Institutional Review Board (IRB), three clinical experts were interviewed the transcripts from these interviews were analyzed. Results We found five broad categories of strategies by experts for managing complex clinical decision tasks: decision conflict, mental projection, decision trade-offs, managing uncertainty and generating rule of thumb. Conclusion Complexity is created by decision conflicts, mental projection, limited options and treatment uncertainty. Experts cope with complexity in a variety of ways, including using efficient and fast decision strategies to simplify complex decision tasks, mentally simulating outcomes and focusing on only the most relevant information. Application Understanding complex decision making processes can help design allocation based on the complexity of task for clinical decision support design.

  9. Decision Aids for Multiple-Decision Disease Management as Affected by Weather Input Errors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many disease management decision support systems (DSS) rely, exclusively or in part, on weather inputs to calculate an indicator for disease hazard. Error in the weather inputs, typically due to forecasting, interpolation or estimation from off-site sources, may affect model calculations and manage...

  10. Affective and cognitive mechanisms of risky decision making.

    PubMed

    Shimp, Kristy G; Mitchell, Marci R; Beas, B Sofia; Bizon, Jennifer L; Setlow, Barry

    2015-01-01

    The ability to make advantageous decisions under circumstances in which there is a risk of adverse consequences is an important component of adaptive behavior; however, extremes in risk taking (either high or low) can be maladaptive and are characteristic of a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. To better understand the contributions of various affective and cognitive factors to risky decision making, cohorts of male Long-Evans rats were trained in a "Risky Decision making Task" (RDT), in which they made discrete trial choices between a small, "safe" food reward and a large, "risky" food reward accompanied by varying probabilities of footshock. Experiment 1 evaluated the relative contributions of the affective stimuli (i.e., punishment vs. reward) to RDT performance by parametrically varying the magnitudes of the footshock and large reward. Varying the shock magnitude had a significant impact on choice of the large, "risky" reward, such that greater magnitudes were associated with reduced choice of the large reward. In contrast, varying the large, "risky" reward magnitude had minimal influence on reward choice. Experiment 2 compared individual variability in RDT performance with performance in an attentional set shifting task (assessing cognitive flexibility), a delayed response task (assessing working memory), and a delay discounting task (assessing impulsive choice). Rats characterized as risk averse in the RDT made more perseverative errors on the set shifting task than did their risk taking counterparts, whereas RDT performance was not related to working memory abilities or impulsive choice. In addition, rats that showed greater delay discounting (greater impulsive choice) showed corresponding poorer performance in the working memory task. Together, these results suggest that reward-related decision making under risk of punishment is more strongly influenced by the punishment than by the reward, and that risky and impulsive decision making are associated with

  11. Personalizing Drug Selection Using Advanced Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Pestian, John; Spencer, Malik; Matykiewicz, Pawel; Zhang, Kejian; Vinks, Alexander A.; Glauser, Tracy

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the process of developing an advanced pharmacogenetics clinical decision support at one of the United States’ leading pediatric academic medical centers. This system, called CHRISTINE, combines clinical and genetic data to identify the optimal drug therapy when treating patients with epilepsy or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. In the discussion a description of clinical decision support systems is provided, along with an overview of neurocognitive computing and how it is applied in this setting. PMID:19898682

  12. Language affects patterns of brain activation associated with perceptual decision.

    PubMed

    Tan, Li Hai; Chan, Alice H D; Kay, Paul; Khong, Pek-Lan; Yip, Lawrance K C; Luke, Kang-Kwong

    2008-03-11

    Well over half a century ago, Benjamin Lee Whorf [Carroll JB (1956) Language, Thought, and Reality: Selected Writings of Benjamin Lee Whorf (MIT Press, Cambridge, MA)] proposed that language affects perception and thought and is used to segment nature, a hypothesis that has since been tested by linguistic and behavioral studies. Although clear Whorfian effects have been found, it has not yet been demonstrated that language influences brain activity associated with perception and/or immediate postperceptual processes (referred hereafter as "perceptual decision"). Here, by using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show that brain regions mediating language processes participate in neural networks activated by perceptual decision. When subjects performed a perceptual discrimination task on easy-to-name and hard-to-name colored squares, largely overlapping cortical regions were identified, which included areas of the occipital cortex critical for color vision and regions in the bilateral frontal gyrus. Crucially, however, in comparison with hard-to-name colored squares, perceptual discrimination of easy-to-name colors evoked stronger activation in the left posterior superior temporal gyrus and inferior parietal lobule, two regions responsible for word-finding processes, as demonstrated by a localizer experiment that uses an explicit color patch naming task. This finding suggests that the language-processing areas of the brain are directly involved in visual perceptual decision, thus providing neuroimaging support for the Whorf hypothesis. PMID:18316728

  13. Serotonin and Dopamine: Unifying Affective, Activational, and Decision Functions

    PubMed Central

    Cools, Roshan; Nakamura, Kae; Daw, Nathaniel D

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin, like dopamine (DA), has long been implicated in adaptive behavior, including decision making and reinforcement learning. However, although the two neuromodulators are tightly related and have a similar degree of functional importance, compared with DA, we have a much less specific understanding about the mechanisms by which serotonin affects behavior. Here, we draw on recent work on computational models of dopaminergic function to suggest a framework by which many of the seemingly diverse functions associated with both DA and serotonin—comprising both affective and activational ones, as well as a number of other functions not overtly related to either—can be seen as consequences of a single root mechanism. PMID:20736991

  14. The value of foresight: how prospection affects decision-making.

    PubMed

    Pezzulo, Giovanni; Rigoli, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Traditional theories of decision-making assume that utilities are based on the intrinsic value of outcomes; in turn, these values depend on associations between expected outcomes and the current motivational state of the decision-maker. This view disregards the fact that humans (and possibly other animals) have prospection abilities, which permit anticipating future mental processes and motivational and emotional states. For instance, we can evaluate future outcomes in light of the motivational state we expect to have when the outcome is collected, not (only) when we make a decision. Consequently, we can plan for the future and choose to store food to be consumed when we expect to be hungry, not immediately. Furthermore, similarly to any expected outcome, we can assign a value to our anticipated mental processes and emotions. It has been reported that (in some circumstances) human subjects prefer to receive an unavoidable punishment immediately, probably because they are anticipating the dread associated with the time spent waiting for the punishment. This article offers a formal framework to guide neuroeconomic research on how prospection affects decision-making. The model has two characteristics. First, it uses model-based Bayesian inference to describe anticipation of cognitive and motivational processes. Second, the utility-maximization process considers these anticipations in two ways: to evaluate outcomes (e.g., the pleasure of eating a pie is evaluated differently at the beginning of a dinner, when one is hungry, and at the end of the dinner, when one is satiated), and as outcomes having a value themselves (e.g., the case of dread as a cost of waiting for punishment). By explicitly accounting for the relationship between prospection and value, our model provides a framework to reconcile the utility-maximization approach with psychological phenomena such as planning for the future and dread. PMID:21747755

  15. Prediction and diagnosis of clinical outcomes affecting restoration margins.

    PubMed

    Dennison, J B; Sarrett, D C

    2012-04-01

    The longevity of dental restorations is largely dependent on the continuity at the interface between the restorative material and adjacent tooth structure (the restoration margin). Clinical decisions on restoration repair or replacement are usually based upon the weakest point along that margin interface. Physical properties of a restorative material, such as polymerisation shrinkage, water sorption, solubility, elastic modulus and shear strength, all have an effect on stress distribution and can significantly affect margin integrity. This review will focus on two aspects of margin deterioration in the oral environment: the in vitro testing of margin seal using emersion techniques to simulate the oral environment and to predict clinical margin failure and the relationship between clinically observable microleakage and secondary caries. The many variables associated with in vitro testing of marginal leakage and the interpretation of the data are presented in detail. The most recent studies of marginal leakage mirror earlier methodology and lack validity and reliability. The lack of standardised testing procedures makes it impossible to compare studies or to predict the clinical performance of adhesive materials. Continual repeated in vitro studies contribute little to the science in this area. Clinical evidence is cited to refute earlier conclusions that clinical microleakage (penetrating margin discoloration) leads to caries development and is an indication for restoration replacement. Margin defects, without visible evidence of soft dentin on the wall or base of the defect, should be monitored, repaired or resealed, in lieu of total restoration replacement. PMID:22066463

  16. Clinical Decision Making among Dental Students and General Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grembowski, David; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Senior dental students and family dental practitioners were surveyed concerning their choice of pairs of alternative treatments and the technical and patient factors influencing their decisions. Greater agreement in clinical decision-making was found among dentists than among students for all four pairs of alternative services. (MSE)

  17. The factors facilitating and inhibiting effective clinical decision-making in nursing: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hagbaghery, Mohsen Adib; Salsali, Mahvash; Ahmadi, Fazlolah

    2004-01-01

    Background Nurses' practice takes place in a context of ongoing advances in research and technology. The dynamic and uncertain nature of health care environment requires nurses to be competent decision-makers in order to respond to clients' needs. Recently, the public and the government have criticized Iranian nurses because of poor quality of patient care. However nurses' views and experiences on factors that affect their clinical function and clinical decision-making have rarely been studied. Methods Grounded theory methodology was used to analyze the participants' lived experiences and their viewpoints regarding the factors affecting their clinical function and clinical decision-making. Semi-structured interviews and participant observation methods were used to gather the data. Thirty-eight participants were interviewed and twelve sessions of observation were carried out. Constant comparative analysis method was used to analyze the data. Results Five main themes emerged from the data. From the participants' points of view, "feeling competent", "being self-confident", "organizational structure", "nursing education", and "being supported" were considered as important factors in effective clinical decision-making. Conclusion As participants in this research implied, being competent and self-confident are the most important personal factors influencing nurses clinical decision-making. Also external factors such as organizational structure, access to supportive resources and nursing education have strengthening or inhibiting effects on the nurses' decisions. Individual nurses, professional associations, schools of nursing, nurse educators, organizations that employ nurses and government all have responsibility for developing and finding strategies that facilitate nurses' effective clinical decision-making. They are responsible for identifying barriers and enhancing factors within the organizational structure that facilitate nurses' clinical decision-making. PMID

  18. A Framework and Model for Evaluating Clinical Decision Support Architectures

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a four-phase model for evaluating architectures for clinical decision support that focuses on: defining a set of desirable features for a decision support architecture; building a proof-of-concept prototype; demonstrating that the architecture is useful by showing that it can be integrated with existing decision support systems and comparing its coverage to that of other architectures. We apply this framework to several well-known decision support architectures, including Arden Syntax, GLIF, SEBASTIAN and SAGE PMID:18462999

  19. Endodontic retreatment. Aspects of decision making and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Kvist, T

    2001-01-01

    Epidemiological surveys have reported that 25%-35% of root filled teeth are associated with periapical radiolucencies. Descriptive studies have demonstrated that clinicians' decision making regarding such teeth are subject to substantial variation. A coherent model to explain the observed variation has not been produced. In the present thesis a "Praxis Concept theory" was proposed. The theory suggests that dentists perceive periapical lesions of varying sizes as different stages on a continuous health scale. Interindividual variations can then be regarded as the result of the choice of different cut-off points on the continuum for prescribing retreatment. In the present study experiments among novice and expert decision makers gave evidence in favour of the theory. Data also suggested that the choice of retreatment criterion is affected by values, costs of retreatment and technical quality of original treatment. From a prescriptive point of view, the presence of a persistent periapical radiolucency has often been used as a criterion of endodontic "failure" and as an indication for endodontic retreatment. As an alternative decision strategy, the use of decision analysis has been proposed. Logical display of decision alternatives, values of probabilities, utility values (U-values) of the different outcomes and calculation of optimal decision strategy are features of this theory. The implementation of this approach is impeded by the uncertainty of outcome probabilities and lack of investigations concerning U-values. U-values of two periapical health states in root filled teeth (with and without a periapical lesion respectively) were investigated in a group of 82 dental students and among 16 Swedish endodontists. Two methods were used to elicit U-values: Standard gamble and Visual Analogue Scale. Large interindividual variation for both health states were recorded. The difference in U-values between the two health states was found to be statistically significant

  20. Developing and implementing computerized protocols for standardization of clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Morris, A H

    2000-03-01

    Humans have only a limited ability to incorporate information in decision making. In certain situations, the mismatch between this limitation and the availability of extensive information contributes to the varying performance and high error rate of clinical decision makers. Variation in clinical practice is due in part to clinicians' poor compliance with guidelines and recommended therapies. The use of decision-support tools is a response to both the information revolution and poor compliance. Computerized protocols used to deliver decision support can be configured to contain much more detail than textual guidelines or paper-based flow diagrams. Such protocols can generate patient-specific instructions for therapy that can be carried out with little interclinician variability; however, clinicians must be willing to modify personal styles of clinical management. Protocols need not be perfect. Several defensible and reasonable approaches are available for clinical problems. However, one of these reasonable approaches must be chosen and incorporated into the protocol to promote consistent clinical decisions. This reasoning is the basis of an explicit method of decision support that allows the rigorous evaluation of interventions, including use of the protocols themselves. Computerized protocols for mechanical ventilation and management of intravenous fluid and hemodynamic factors in patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome provide case studies for this discussion. PMID:10691588

  1. Better clinical decision making and reducing diagnostic error.

    PubMed

    Croskerry, P; Nimmo, G R

    2011-06-01

    A major amount of our time working in clinical practice involves thinking and decision making. Perhaps it is because decision making is such a commonplace activity that it is assumed we can all make effective decisions. However, this is not the case and the example of diagnostic error supports this assertion. Until quite recently there has been a general nihilism about the ability to change the way that we think, but it is now becoming accepted that if we can think about, and understand, our thinking processes we can improve our decision making, including diagnosis. In this paper we review the dual process model of decision making and highlight ways in which decision making can be improved through the application of this model to our day-to-day practice and by the adoption of de-biasing strategies and critical thinking. PMID:21677922

  2. Reducing Diagnostic Error with Computer-Based Clinical Decision Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenes, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Information technology approaches to delivering diagnostic clinical decision support (CDS) are the subject of the papers to follow in the proceedings. These will address the history of CDS and present day approaches (Miller), evaluation of diagnostic CDS methods (Friedman), and the role of clinical documentation in supporting diagnostic decision…

  3. Factors affecting clinical reasoning of occupational therapists: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Shafaroodi, Narges; Kamali, Mohammad; Parvizy, Soroor; Mehraban, Afsoon Hassani; O’Toole, Giyn

    2014-01-01

    Background: Clinical reasoning is generally defined as the numerous modes of thinking that guide clinical practice but little is known about the factors affecting how occupational therapists manage the decision-making process. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the factors influencing the clinical reasoning of occupational therapists. Methods: Twelve occupational therapy practitioners working in mental and physical dysfunction fields participated in this study. The sampling method was purposeful and interviews were continued until data saturation. All the interviews were recorded and transcribed. The data were analyzed through a qualitative content analysis method. Results: There were three main themes. The first theme: socio-cultural conditions included three subthemes: 1- client beliefs; 2- therapist values and beliefs; 3- social attitude to disability. The second theme: individual attributions included two subthemes 1- client attributions; 2- therapist attributions. The final theme was the workplace environment with the three subthemes: 1- knowledge of the managers of rehabilitation services, 2- working in an inter-professional team; 3- limited clinical facilities and resources. Conclusion: In this study, the influence of the attitudes and beliefs of client, therapist and society about illness, abilities and disabilities upon reasoning was different to previous studies. Understanding these factors, especially the socio-cultural beliefs basis can play a significant role in the quality of occupational therapy services. Accurate understanding of these influential factors requires more extensive qualitative and quantitative studies. PMID:25250253

  4. Affective State Influences Perception by Affecting Decision Parameters Underlying Bias and Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Spencer K.; Zhang, Xuan; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the effect of affect on perception often show consistent directional effects of a person’s affective state on perception. Unpleasant emotions have been associated with a “locally focused” style of stimulus evaluation, and positive emotions with a “globally focused” style. Typically, however, studies of affect and perception have not been conducted under the conditions of perceptual uncertainty and behavioral risk inherent to perceptual judgments outside the laboratory. We investigated the influence of perceivers’ experience affect (valence and arousal) on the utility of social threat perception by combining signal detection theory and behavioral economics. We created three perceptual decision environments that systematically differed with respect to factors that underlie uncertainty and risk: the base rate of threat, the costs of incorrect identification threat, and the perceptual similarity of threats and non-threats. We found that no single affective state yielded the best performance on the threat perception task across the three environments. Unpleasant valence promoted calibration of response bias to base rate and costs, high arousal promoted calibration of perceptual sensitivity to perceptual similarity, and low arousal was associated with an optimal adjustment of bias to sensitivity. However, the strength of these associations was conditional upon the difficulty of attaining optimal bias and high sensitivity, such that the effect of the perceiver’s affective state on perception differed with the cause and/or level of uncertainty and risk. PMID:22251054

  5. Parent-Child Engagement in Decision Making and the Development of Adolescent Affective Decision Capacity and Binge Drinking

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lin; Bechara, Antoine; Palmer, Paula H.; Trinidad, Dennis R.; Wei, Yonglan; Jia, Yong; Johnson, C. Anderson

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate how parents’ engagement of their child in everyday decision-making influenced their adolescent’s development on two neuropsychological functions, namely, affective decision-making and working memory, and its effect on adolescent binge-drinking behavior. We conducted a longitudinal study of 192 Chinese adolescents. In 10th grade, the adolescents were tested for their affective decision-making ability using the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and working memory capacity using the Self-ordered Pointing Test (SOPT). Questionnaires were used to assess perceived parent-child engagement in decision-making, academic performance and drinking behavior. At one-year follow-up, the same neuropsychological tasks and questionnaires were repeated. Results indicate that working memory and academic performance were uninfluenced by parent-child engagement in decision-making. However, compared to adolescents whose parents made solitary decisions for them, adolescents engaged in everyday decision-making showed significant improvement on affective decision capacity and significantly less binge-drinking one year later. These findings suggest that parental engagement of children in everyday decision-making might foster the development of neurocognitive functioning relative to affective decision-making and reduce adolescent substance use behaviors. PMID:21804682

  6. Clinical Decision Support Tools: The Evolution of a Revolution.

    PubMed

    Mould, D R; D'Haens, G; Upton, R N

    2016-04-01

    Dashboard systems for clinical decision support integrate data from multiple sources. These systems, the newest in a long line of dose calculators and other decision support tools, utilize Bayesian approaches to fully individualize dosing using information gathered through therapeutic drug monitoring. In the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease patients with infliximab, dashboards may reduce therapeutic failures and treatment costs. The history and future development of modern Bayesian dashboard systems is described. PMID:26785109

  7. Consensus, clinical decision making, and unsettled cases.

    PubMed

    Adams, David M; Winslade, William J

    2011-01-01

    The model of clinical ethics consultation (CEC) defended in the ASBH Core Competencies report has gained significant traction among scholars and healthcare providers. On this model, the aim of CEC is to facilitate deliberative reflection and thereby resolve conflicts and clarify value uncertainty by invoking and pursuing a process of consensus building. It is central to the model that the facilitated consensus falls within a range of allowable options, defined by societal values: prevailing legal requirements, widely endorsed organizational policies, and professional standards of practice and codes of conduct. Moreover, the model stipulates that ethics consultants must refrain from giving substantive recommendations regarding how parties to a moral disagreement in the clinic should evaluate their options. We argue that this model of CEC is incomplete, because it wrongly assumes that what counts as the proper set of allowable options among which the parties are to deliberate will itself always be clearly discernible. We illustrate this problem with a recent case on which one of us consulted-a neonate born with trisomy 18 (T18). We try to show that law, policy, and standards of practice reveal no clear answer to the question posed by the case: namely, whether forgoing gastrostomy tube feedings for a baby with T18 is allowable. We suggest there may be other kinds of cases in which it may simply be unsettled whether a given choice falls within the set of allowable options within which consensus is to be facilitated. What should an ethicist do when confronting such unsettled cases? We agree with the facilitation model that an ethicist should remain neutral among the allowable options, when it is clear what the allowable options are. But, in unsettled cases, the role of a consultant should be expanded to include a process of moral inquiry into what the allowable options should be. We end by raising the issue of whether this means an ethicist should share his or her own

  8. What can Natural Language Processing do for Clinical Decision Support?

    PubMed Central

    Demner-Fushman, Dina; Chapman, Wendy W.; McDonald, Clement J.

    2009-01-01

    Computerized Clinical Decision Support (CDS) aims to aid decision making of health care providers and the public by providing easily accessible health-related information at the point and time it is needed. Natural Language Processing (NLP) is instrumental in using free-text information to drive CDS, representing clinical knowledge and CDS interventions in standardized formats, and leveraging clinical narrative. The early innovative NLP research of clinical narrative was followed by a period of stable research conducted at the major clinical centers and a shift of mainstream interest to biomedical NLP. This review primarily focuses on the recently renewed interest in development of fundamental NLP methods and advances in the NLP systems for CDS. The current solutions to challenges posed by distinct sublanguages, intended user groups, and support goals are discussed. PMID:19683066

  9. The thinking doctor: clinical decision making in contemporary medicine.

    PubMed

    Trimble, Michael; Hamilton, Paul

    2016-08-01

    Diagnostic errors are responsible for a significant number of adverse events. Logical reasoning and good decision-making skills are key factors in reducing such errors, but little emphasis has traditionally been placed on how these thought processes occur, and how errors could be minimised. In this article, we explore key cognitive ideas that underpin clinical decision making and suggest that by employing some simple strategies, physicians might be better able to understand how they make decisions and how the process might be optimised. PMID:27481378

  10. DocBot: a novel clinical decision support algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ninh, Andrew Q

    2014-01-01

    DocBot is a web-based clinical decision support system (CDSS) that uses patient interaction and electronic health record analytics to assist medical practitioners with decision making. It consists of two distinct HTML interfaces: a preclinical form wherein a patient inputs symptomatic and demographic information, and an interface wherein a medical practitioner views patient information and analysis. DocBot comprises an improved software architecture that uses patient information, electronic health records, and etiologically relevant binary decision questions (stored in a knowledgebase) to provide medical practitioners with information including, but not limited to medical assessments, treatment plans, and specialist referrals. PMID:25571435

  11. Improving clinical decision support using data mining techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burn-Thornton, Kath E.; Thorpe, Simon I.

    1999-02-01

    Physicians, in their ever-demanding jobs, are looking to decision support systems for aid in clinical diagnosis. However, clinical decision support systems need to be of sufficiently high accuracy that they help, rather than hinder, the physician in his/her diagnosis. Decision support systems with accuracies, of patient state determination, of greater than 80 percent, are generally perceived to be sufficiently accurate to fulfill the role of helping the physician. We have previously shown that data mining techniques have the potential to provide the underpinning technology for clinical decision support systems. In this paper, an extension of the work in reverence 2, we describe how changes in data mining methodologies, for the analysis of 12-lead ECG data, improve the accuracy by which data mining algorithms determine which patients are suffering from heart disease. We show that the accuracy of patient state prediction, for all the algorithms, which we investigated, can be increased by up to 6 percent, using the combination of appropriate test training ratios and 5-fold cross-validation. The use of cross-validation greater than 5-fold, appears to reduce the improvement in algorithm classification accuracy gained by the use of this validation method. The accuracy of 84 percent in patient state predictions, obtained using the algorithm OCI, suggests that this algorithm will be capable of providing the required accuracy for clinical decision support systems.

  12. Floral odor learning within the hive affects honeybees' foraging decisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenas, Andrés; Fernández, Vanesa M.; Farina, Walter M.

    2007-03-01

    Honeybees learn odor cues quickly and efficiently when visiting rewarding flowers. Memorization of these cues facilitates the localization and recognition of food sources during foraging flights. Bees can also use information gained inside the hive during social interactions with successful foragers. An important information cue that can be learned during these interactions is food odor. However, little is known about how floral odors learned in the hive affect later decisions of foragers in the field. We studied the effect of food scent on foraging preferences when this learning is acquired directly inside the hive. By using in-hive feeders that were removed 24 h before the test, we showed that foragers use the odor information acquired during a 3-day stimulation period with a scented solution during a food-choice situation outside the nest. This bias in food preference is maintained even 24 h after the replacement of all the hive combs. Thus, without being previously collected outside by foragers, food odors learned within the hive can be used during short-range foraging flights. Moreover, correct landings at a dual-choice device after replacing the storing combs suggests that long-term memories formed within the colony can be retrieved while bees search for food in the field.

  13. Semantic Interoperability in Clinical Decision Support Systems: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Marco-Ruiz, Luis; Bellika, Johan Gustav

    2015-01-01

    The interoperability of Clinical Decision Support (CDS) systems with other health information systems has become one of the main limitations to their broad adoption. Semantic interoperability must be granted in order to share CDS modules across different health information systems. Currently, numerous standards for different purposes are available to enable the interoperability of CDS systems. We performed a literature review to identify and provide an overview of the available standards that enable CDS interoperability in the areas of clinical information, decision logic, terminology, and web service interfaces. PMID:26262260

  14. Physician, Patient and Contextual Factors Affecting Treatment Decisions in Older Adults with Cancer: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tariman, J. D.; Berry, D. L.; Cochrane, B.; Doorenbos, A.; Schepp, K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To review physician, patient, and contextual factors that affect treatment decision-making in older adults diagnosed with cancer and relate these factors to theoretical models of decision-making. Data Sources PubMed (1966-April 2010), PsycINFO (1967-April 2010) and CINAHL (1982-April 2010) databases were searched to access relevant medical, psychological and nursing literature. Data Synthesis Physician factors in treatment decisions include physician personal beliefs and values, expertise, practice type, perception of lowered life expectancy, medical factors, power, and communication style. Patient factors include personal beliefs and values, ethnicity, decisional control preferences, previous health-related experience, perception of the decision-making process, and personal factors. Contextual factors include availability of caregiver, lack of insurance, poor financial status, and geographical barrier. The interplay of physician, patient, and contextual factors are not well understood. Existing models of decision-making are not sufficient to explicate TDM process in older adults diagnosed with cancer. Conclusions Clinical studies in older adult patient population using a longitudinal and prospective design are needed to examine real-time interplay of patient, physician, and contextual factors and to better understand how these divergent factors influenced actual treatment decisions. Implications for Nursing Oncology nurses can advocate for a patient’s autonomy during TDM by coaching them to seek evidence-based discussion of various treatment options, benefits and risks assessments, and truthful discussion of the probability of success for each treatment option from their physicians. Oncology nurses must promote an informed treatment decisions that are consistent with a patient’s personal preference and values within the limits of the patient’s personal contexts. PMID:22201670

  15. The role of emotions in clinical reasoning and decision making.

    PubMed

    Marcum, James A

    2013-10-01

    What role, if any, should emotions play in clinical reasoning and decision making? Traditionally, emotions have been excluded from clinical reasoning and decision making, but with recent advances in cognitive neuropsychology they are now considered an important component of them. Today, cognition is thought to be a set of complex processes relying on multiple types of intelligences. The role of mathematical logic (hypothetico-deductive thinking) or verbal linguistic intelligence in cognition, for example, is well documented and accepted; however, the role of emotional intelligence has received less attention-especially because its nature and function are not well understood. In this paper, I argue for the inclusion of emotions in clinical reasoning and decision making. To that end, developments in contemporary cognitive neuropsychology are initially examined and analyzed, followed by a review of the medical literature discussing the role of emotions in clinical practice. Next, a published clinical case is reconstructed and used to illustrate the recognition and regulation of emotions played during a series of clinical consultations, which resulted in a positive medical outcome. The paper's main thesis is that emotions, particularly in terms of emotional intelligence as a practical form of intelligence, afford clinical practitioners a robust cognitive resource for providing quality medical care. PMID:23975905

  16. Improving Congestive Heart Failure Care with a Clinical Decision Unit.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Jo Ellen; Short, Nancy; Williams, Tracy E; Yandell, Ben; Bowers, Margaret T

    2015-01-01

    Evidence supporting the development of Clinical Decision Units (CDUs) to impact congestive heart failure readmission rates comes from several categories of the literature. In this study, a pre-post design with comparison group was used to evaluate the impact of the CDU. Early changes in clinical and financial outcome indicators are encouraging. Nurse leaders seek ways to improve clinical outcomes while managing the current financially challenging environment. Implementation of a CDU provides many opportunities for nurse leaders to positively impact clinical care and financial performance within their institutions. PMID:26625578

  17. Hip Arthroplasty Pseudotumors: Pathogenesis, Imaging, and Clinical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Derik L; Morrison, James J

    2016-01-01

    Pseudotumors are a complication of hip arthroplasty. The goal of this article is to review the clinical presentation, pathogenesis, histology, and the role of diagnostic imaging in clinical decision making for treatment, and surveillance of pseudotumors. We will discuss the multimodal imaging appearances, differential diagnosis, associated complications, treatment, and prognosis of pseudotumors, as an aid to the assessment of orthopedic prostheses at the hip. PMID:27195183

  18. Models of Affective Decision Making: How Do Feelings Predict Choice?

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Caroline J; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Li, Xinyi; Roiser, Jonathan P; Sharot, Tali

    2016-06-01

    Intuitively, how you feel about potential outcomes will determine your decisions. Indeed, an implicit assumption in one of the most influential theories in psychology, prospect theory, is that feelings govern choice. Surprisingly, however, very little is known about the rules by which feelings are transformed into decisions. Here, we specified a computational model that used feelings to predict choices. We found that this model predicted choice better than existing value-based models, showing a unique contribution of feelings to decisions, over and above value. Similar to the value function in prospect theory, our feeling function showed diminished sensitivity to outcomes as value increased. However, loss aversion in choice was explained by an asymmetry in how feelings about losses and gains were weighted when making a decision, not by an asymmetry in the feelings themselves. The results provide new insights into how feelings are utilized to reach a decision. PMID:27071751

  19. The relationship between patient data and pooled clinical management decisions.

    PubMed

    Ludbrook, G I; O'Loughlin, E J; Corcoran, T B; Grant, C

    2013-01-01

    A strong relationship between patient data and preoperative clinical decisions could potentially be used to support clinical decisions in preoperative management. The aim of this exploratory study was to determine the relationship between key patient data and pooled clinical opinions on management. In a previous study, panels of anaesthetists compared the quality of computer-assisted patient health assessments with outpatient consultations and made decisions on the need for preoperative tests, no preoperative outpatient assessment, possible postoperative intensive care unit/high dependency unit requirements and aspiration prophylaxis. In the current study, the relationship between patient data and these decisions was examined using binomial logistic regression analysis. Backward stepwise regression was used to identify independent predictors of each decision (at P >0.15), which were then incorporated into a predictive model. The number of factors related to each decision varied: blood picture (four factors), biochemistry (six factors), coagulation studies (three factors), electrocardiography (eight factors), chest X-ray (seven factors), preoperative outpatient assessment (17 factors), intensive care unit requirement (eight factors) and aspiration prophylaxis (one factor). The factor types also varied, but included surgical complexity, age, gender, number of medications or comorbidities, body mass index, hypertension, central nervous system condition, heart disease, sleep apnoea, smoking, persistent pain and stroke. Models based on these relationships usually demonstrated good sensitivity and specificity, with receiver operating characteristics in the following areas under curve: blood picture (0.75), biochemistry (0.86), coagulation studies (0.71), electrocardiography (0.90), chest X-ray (0.85), outpatient assessment (0.85), postoperative intensive care unit requirement (0.88) and aspiration prophylaxis (0.85). These initial results suggest modelling of patient

  20. Thinking Processes Used by Nurses in Clinical Decision Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higuchi, Kathryn A. Smith; Donald, Janet G.

    2002-01-01

    Interviews with eight medical and surgical nurses and audits of patient charts investigated clinical decision-making processes. Predominant thinking processes were description of facts, selection of information, inference, syntheses, and verification, with differences between medical and surgical specialties. Exemplars of thinking processes…

  1. Using Clinical Decision Support Software in Health Insurance Company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, R.; Kumlander, Deniss

    This paper proposes the idea to use Clinical Decision Support software in Health Insurance Company as a tool to reduce the expenses related to Medication Errors. As a prove that this class of software will help insurance companies reducing the expenses, the research was conducted in eight hospitals in United Arab Emirates to analyze the amount of preventable common Medication Errors in drug prescription.

  2. Adoption of Clinical Decision Support in Multimorbidity: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Arguello Casteleiro, Mercedes; Ainsworth, John; Buchan, Iain

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with multiple conditions have complex needs and are increasing in number as populations age. This multimorbidity is one of the greatest challenges facing health care. Having more than 1 condition generates (1) interactions between pathologies, (2) duplication of tests, (3) difficulties in adhering to often conflicting clinical practice guidelines, (4) obstacles in the continuity of care, (5) confusing self-management information, and (6) medication errors. In this context, clinical decision support (CDS) systems need to be able to handle realistic complexity and minimize iatrogenic risks. Objective The aim of this review was to identify to what extent CDS is adopted in multimorbidity. Methods This review followed PRISMA guidance and adopted a multidisciplinary approach. Scopus and PubMed searches were performed by combining terms from 3 different thesauri containing synonyms for (1) multimorbidity and comorbidity, (2) polypharmacy, and (3) CDS. The relevant articles were identified by examining the titles and abstracts. The full text of selected/relevant articles was analyzed in-depth. For articles appropriate for this review, data were collected on clinical tasks, diseases, decision maker, methods, data input context, user interface considerations, and evaluation of effectiveness. Results A total of 50 articles were selected for the full in-depth analysis and 20 studies were included in the final review. Medication (n=10) and clinical guidance (n=8) were the predominant clinical tasks. Four studies focused on merging concurrent clinical practice guidelines. A total of 17 articles reported their CDS systems were knowledge-based. Most articles reviewed considered patients’ clinical records (n=19), clinical practice guidelines (n=12), and clinicians’ knowledge (n=10) as contextual input data. The most frequent diseases mentioned were cardiovascular (n=9) and diabetes mellitus (n=5). In all, 12 articles mentioned generalist doctor(s) as the

  3. The Relationship Between the Clinical Orientation of Substance Abuse Professionals and Their Clinical Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toriello, Paul J.; Leierer, Stephen J.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the relationship between the clinical orientations of substance abuse professionals (SAPs) and their clinical decisions. Cluster analysis grouped a sample of 245 SAPs on two clinical orientations that differed in their relative endorsement of traditional versus contemporary substance abuse counseling processes…

  4. Dynamic clinical data mining: search engine-based decision support.

    PubMed

    Celi, Leo Anthony; Zimolzak, Andrew J; Stone, David J

    2014-01-01

    The research world is undergoing a transformation into one in which data, on massive levels, is freely shared. In the clinical world, the capture of data on a consistent basis has only recently begun. We propose an operational vision for a digitally based care system that incorporates data-based clinical decision making. The system would aggregate individual patient electronic medical data in the course of care; query a universal, de-identified clinical database using modified search engine technology in real time; identify prior cases of sufficient similarity as to be instructive to the case at hand; and populate the individual patient's electronic medical record with pertinent decision support material such as suggested interventions and prognosis, based on prior outcomes. Every individual's course, including subsequent outcomes, would then further populate the population database to create a feedback loop to benefit the care of future patients. PMID:25600664

  5. Dynamic Clinical Data Mining: Search Engine-Based Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Zimolzak, Andrew J; Stone, David J

    2014-01-01

    The research world is undergoing a transformation into one in which data, on massive levels, is freely shared. In the clinical world, the capture of data on a consistent basis has only recently begun. We propose an operational vision for a digitally based care system that incorporates data-based clinical decision making. The system would aggregate individual patient electronic medical data in the course of care; query a universal, de-identified clinical database using modified search engine technology in real time; identify prior cases of sufficient similarity as to be instructive to the case at hand; and populate the individual patient's electronic medical record with pertinent decision support material such as suggested interventions and prognosis, based on prior outcomes. Every individual's course, including subsequent outcomes, would then further populate the population database to create a feedback loop to benefit the care of future patients. PMID:25600664

  6. Factors affecting decision-making of patients choosing acupuncture in a public hospital

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Thean Howe Bryan; Kong, Keng He; Low, Yin Peng

    2015-01-01

    Background With increasing evidence to support its practice, acupuncture has been integrated within many hospitals around the world. The purpose of this study is to understand the factors affecting decision making of patients as they select acupuncture treatment for their medical conditions and symptoms within a public hospital. Methods A qualitative study consisting of in depth interviews with 14 patients was conducted. All patients attended an acupuncture clinic within a public hospital. Data collected was analysed via thematic analysis. Results Four main factor groups affecting decision making of patients were identified- factors affecting the level and value of patient-centric care, the confidence and trust patients place within the acupuncture service, the presence of collaborative efforts between acupuncturists and Western medicine practitioners, and the knowledge, culture and belief society has regarding the role of acupuncture and Western medicine. All participants interviewed had more than one factor group present as enablers toward their eventual selection of acupuncture for ailment management. It was also noted that although the majority of participants had sufficient knowledge regarding acupuncture, there were a select few who had misperceptions or no knowledge regarding certain aspects of acupuncture. Conclusions There may be certain patterns in the way patients choose to utilise acupuncture services in public hospitals. Further studies should also be carried out in other public hospitals to analyse the factor groups identified further. PMID:26697443

  7. Clinical factors affecting the timing of delivery in twin pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chae Min; Yang, Sun Hye; Lee, Sun Pyo; Hwang, Byung Chul

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate clinical factors affecting the timing of delivery in twin pregnancies in order to minimize perinatal complications. Methods A retrospective study involved 163 twin pregnancies delivered from January 2006 to September 2011 at Gachon University Gil Medical Center. These cases were divided into three groups based on the delivery timing: less than 32 weeks' gestation (group A), between 32 and 35+6 weeks' gestation (group B), and over 36 weeks' gestation (group C). Clinical factors including maternal age, parity, presence of premature uterine contraction, presence of premature rupture of membrane, white blood cell, high sensitive C-reactive protein level, cervical dilatation, maternal complication, chorionicity, twin specific complication, and perinatal complication were analyzed for each group. Results In group B, the timing of delivery was postponed for 14 days or more from the time of admission, and there were fewer numbers of babies with low Apgar score at birth compared with other groups. The frequency of uterine contraction (P<0.001), presence of premature rupture of membranes (P=0.017), dilatation of cervix (P<0.001), increased white blood cell and high sensitive C-reactive protein levels (P=0.002, P<0.001) were important clinical factors during decision making process of delivery timing in twin pregnancies. Twin specific fetal conditions, such as twin-twin transfusion syndrome and discordant growth (over 25% or more) were shown more frequently in group A. However, there were no significant statistical differences among three groups (P=0.06, P=0.14). Conclusion Proper management for preventing premature contraction and inflammation can be essential in twin pregnancies until 32 weeks' gestation, and may decrease maternal and perinatal complications. PMID:25469330

  8. Ethical decision-making challenges in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Beverly P

    2003-01-01

    Today's health care environment requires professionals to pay increasing attention to efficiencies and functional outcomes. Today's patients are hospitalized for short stays, and those needing rehabilitation often have multiple diagnoses and goals. Cost effective strategies support fast paced occupational therapy programs and professionals who are adept multi-task specialists and problem solvers. Practitioners have multiple resources and strategies for clinical reasoning and decision-making; however, ethical decision-making requires use of additional resources and strategies. This paper provides strategies to examine everyday ethical problems and dilemmas, including application of The American Occupational Therapy's Code of Ethics, to support ethical decision-making in practice settings (American Occupational Therapy Association, 2000a). PMID:23930704

  9. The effects of clinical decision making on nurse practitioners' clinical productivity.

    PubMed

    Chumbler, N R; Geller, J M; Weier, A W

    2000-09-01

    The degree of clinical decision making and clinical productivity among nurse practitioners (NPs) is of great interest to policy makers and planners involved in providing appropriate outpatient primary care services. The authors performed a statewide mailed survey of all NPs practicing either full-time or part-time in Wisconsin (response rate of 72.1%) to address the following research questions: Do the demographic characteristics, practice attributes, and primary practice settings of NPs impact their level of clinical decision making (e.g., the autonomy to order laboratory and radiological tests or to refer a patient to a physician specialist other than their collaborating physician)? Do NPs' levels of clinical decision making correlate with their outpatient clinical productivity, adjusting for demographic characteristics, practice attributes, and primary practice settings? The multiple linear regression results indicated that having more years in practice as an NP, practicing in the family specialty area (vs. a combined other category, which included pediatrics, acute care, geriatrics, neonatal, and school), treating patients according to clinical guidelines, practicing in settings with a fewer number of physicians, and practicing in a multispecialty group practice versus a single-specialty group practice were associated with greater levels of clinical decision making. However, NPs who primarily practiced in a hospital/facility-based practice, as compared with a single-specialty group practice, had lower levels of clinical decision making. After adjusting for demographic characteristics, practice attributes, and primary practice settings, NPs with greater clinical decision-making authority had greater outpatient clinical productivity. The conclusions discuss the policy implications of the findings. PMID:11067192

  10. Creating Shareable Clinical Decision Support Rules for a Pharmacogenomics Clinical Guideline Using Structured Knowledge Representation.

    PubMed

    Linan, Margaret K; Sottara, Davide; Freimuth, Robert R

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics (PGx) guidelines contain drug-gene relationships, therapeutic and clinical recommendations from which clinical decision support (CDS) rules can be extracted, rendered and then delivered through clinical decision support systems (CDSS) to provide clinicians with just-in-time information at the point of care. Several tools exist that can be used to generate CDS rules that are based on computer interpretable guidelines (CIG), but none have been previously applied to the PGx domain. We utilized the Unified Modeling Language (UML), the Health Level 7 virtual medical record (HL7 vMR) model, and standard terminologies to represent the semantics and decision logic derived from a PGx guideline, which were then mapped to the Health eDecisions (HeD) schema. The modeling and extraction processes developed here demonstrate how structured knowledge representations can be used to support the creation of shareable CDS rules from PGx guidelines. PMID:26958298

  11. Creating Shareable Clinical Decision Support Rules for a Pharmacogenomics Clinical Guideline Using Structured Knowledge Representation

    PubMed Central

    Linan, Margaret K.; Sottara, Davide; Freimuth, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacogenomics (PGx) guidelines contain drug-gene relationships, therapeutic and clinical recommendations from which clinical decision support (CDS) rules can be extracted, rendered and then delivered through clinical decision support systems (CDSS) to provide clinicians with just-in-time information at the point of care. Several tools exist that can be used to generate CDS rules that are based on computer interpretable guidelines (CIG), but none have been previously applied to the PGx domain. We utilized the Unified Modeling Language (UML), the Health Level 7 virtual medical record (HL7 vMR) model, and standard terminologies to represent the semantics and decision logic derived from a PGx guideline, which were then mapped to the Health eDecisions (HeD) schema. The modeling and extraction processes developed here demonstrate how structured knowledge representations can be used to support the creation of shareable CDS rules from PGx guidelines. PMID:26958298

  12. Clinical decision support systems: data quality management and governance.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Siaw-Teng

    2013-01-01

    This chapter examines data quality management (DQM) and information governance (IG) of electronic decision support (EDS) systems so that they are safe and fit for use by clinicians and patients and their carers. This is consistent with the ISO definition of data quality as being fit for purpose. The scope of DQM & IG should range from data creation and collection in clinical settings, through cleaning and, where obtained from multiple sources, linkage, storage, use by the EDS logic engine and algorithms, knowledge base and guidance provided, to curation and presentation. It must also include protocols and mechanisms to monitor the safety of EDS, which will feedback into DQM & IG activities. Ultimately, DQM & IG must be integrated across the data cycle to ensure that the EDS systems provide guidance that leads to safe and effective clinical decisions and care. PMID:24018528

  13. Negative Affectivity Predicts Individual Differences in Decision Making for Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garon, Nancy; Moore, Chris

    2006-01-01

    The authors' goal in conducting this study was to explore the association between temperament and future-oriented decision making. Forty-three preschoolers (mean age = 51 months) were given a child variant of the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and asked to choose between a deck with higher immediate rewards and a deck with higher future rewards.…

  14. Students' Perceptions of Factors that Affect College Funding Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Julia Y.; Fossey, W. Richard; Davis, William E.; Burnett, Michael F.; Stuhlmann, Janice; Suchy, Patricia A.

    2006-01-01

    This exploratory study examines the factors that college students perceive are important in helping them make good financial decisions about paying for a college education. The study categorizes and summarizes students' self-reported responses to an open-ended survey question about recommendations for changes in financial aid counseling practices.…

  15. IBM’s Health Analytics and Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Sun, J.; Knoop, S.; Shabo, A.; Carmeli, B.; Sow, D.; Syed-Mahmood, T.; Rapp, W.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives This survey explores the role of big data and health analytics developed by IBM in supporting the transformation of healthcare by augmenting evidence-based decision-making. Methods Some problems in healthcare and strategies for change are described. It is argued that change requires better decisions, which, in turn, require better use of the many kinds of healthcare information. Analytic resources that address each of the information challenges are described. Examples of the role of each of the resources are given. Results There are powerful analytic tools that utilize the various kinds of big data in healthcare to help clinicians make more personalized, evidenced-based decisions. Such resources can extract relevant information and provide insights that clinicians can use to make evidence-supported decisions. There are early suggestions that these resources have clinical value. As with all analytic tools, they are limited by the amount and quality of data. Conclusion Big data is an inevitable part of the future of healthcare. There is a compelling need to manage and use big data to make better decisions to support the transformation of healthcare to the personalized, evidence-supported model of the future. Cognitive computing resources are necessary to manage the challenges in employing big data in healthcare. Such tools have been and are being developed. The analytic resources, themselves, do not drive, but support healthcare transformation. PMID:25123736

  16. Clinical Decision Support for Vascular Disease in Community Family Practice

    PubMed Central

    Keshavjee, K; Holbrook, AM; Lau, E; Esporlas-Jewer, I; Troyan, S

    2006-01-01

    The COMPETE III Vascular Disease Tracker (C3VT) is a personalized, Web-based, clinical decision support tool that provides patients and physicians access to a patient’s 16 individual vascular risk markers, specific advice for each marker and links to best practices in vascular disease management. It utilizes the chronic care model1 so that physicians can better manage patients with chronic diseases. Over 1100 patients have been enrolled into the COMPETE III study to date.

  17. Knowledge-analytics synergy in Clinical Decision Support.

    PubMed

    Slonim, Noam; Carmeli, Boaz; Goldsteen, Abigail; Keller, Oliver; Kent, Carmel; Rinott, Ruty

    2012-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support (CDS) systems hold tremendous potential for improving patient care. Most existing systems are knowledge-based tools that rely on relatively simple rules. More recent approaches rely on analytics techniques to automatically mine EHR data to reveal meaningful insights. Here, we propose the Knowledge-Analytics Synergy paradigm for CDS, in which we synergistically combine existing relevant knowledge with analytics applied to EHR data. We propose a framework for implementing such a paradigm and demonstrate its principles over real-world clinical and genomic data of hypertensive patients. PMID:22874282

  18. [ Preventing adverse drug events using clinical decision support systems].

    PubMed

    Salili, Ali Reza; Hammann, Felix; Taegtmeyer, Anne B

    2015-12-01

    Adverse drug events pose a great risk to patients, are an everyday clinical problem and can have potential/ega/ consequences. Computerized physician order entry or computerized provider order entry (CPOE} in combination with clinical decision support systems {CDSS) are popular and aim to reduce prescribing errors as well as identifying potentially harmful drug drug interactions. The quantifiable benejit these systems bring to patients, has however, yet to be definitively proven. This article focusses on the current standpoint of CPOE-/CDSS, their risks and benefits, the potential for improvement and their perspectives for the future. PMID:26654813

  19. Mechanistic biomarkers for clinical decision making in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, William H.; Lindstrom, Tamsin M.; Cheung, Regina K.; Sokolove, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The use of biomarkers is becoming increasingly intrinsic to the practice of medicine and holds great promise for transforming the practice of rheumatology. Biomarkers have the potential to aid clinical diagnosis when symptoms are present or to provide a means of detecting early signs of disease when they are not. Some biomarkers can serve as early surrogates of eventual clinical outcomes or guide therapeutic decision making by enabling identification of individuals likely to respond to a specific therapy. Using biomarkers might reduce the costs of drug development by enabling individuals most likely to respond to be enrolled in clinical trials, thereby minimizing the number of participants required. In this Review, we discuss the current use and the potential of biomarkers in rheumatology and in select fields at the forefront of biomarker research. We emphasize the value of different types of biomarkers, addressing the concept of ‘actionable’ biomarkers, which can be used to guide clinical decision making, and ‘mechanistic’ biomarkers, a subtype of actionable biomarker that is embedded in disease pathogenesis and, therefore, represents a superior biomarker. We provide examples of actionable and mechanistic biomarkers currently available, and discuss how development of such biomarkers could revolutionize clinical practice and drug development. PMID:23419428

  20. Neural networks and psychiatry: candidate applications in clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Florio, T; Einfeld, S; Levy, F

    1994-12-01

    Neural networks comprise a fundamentally new type of computer system inspired by the functioning of neurons in the brain. Such networks are good at solving problems that involve pattern recognition and categorisation. An important difference between a neural network and a traditional computer system is that in developing an application, a neural network is not programmed; instead, it is trained to solve a particular type of problem. This ability to learn to solve a problem makes neural networks adaptable to solving a wide variety of problems, some of which have proved intractable using a traditional computing approach. Neural networks are particularly suited to tasks involving the categorisation of patterns of information, such as is required in diagnosis and clinical decision making. In the last three years reports of applications involving neural networks have begun to appear in the medical literature, and these are described in this paper. However, a comprehensive search of the literature has shown that there have not as yet been reports of any applications in psychiatry. This paper discusses the nature of clinical decision making, outlines the sorts of problems in psychiatry which neural networks applications might be developed to address, and gives examples of candidate applications in clinical decision making. PMID:7794209

  1. Priority oral health research identification for clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Helen; Clarkson, Jan; Weldon, Jo

    2015-09-01

    The Cochrane Library is a core resource for clinical decision-making globally, by clinicians, guideline developers, healthcare providers and patients.The publication of Cochrane Library systematic reviews concerning oral health conditions has grown exponentially to over 215 individual titles (as of 20 June 2015) during the past 20 years.Consequently, maintaining updates of the most clinically important reviews to provide up-to-date and accurate sources of evidence for decision-making has become a pressing concern for the editorial group behind their production, Cochrane Oral Health Group.To identify priority research required by oral health decision-makers, the Cochrane OHG embarked on a consultation process across eight defined areas of dentistry (periodontology, operative (including endodontics) and prosthodontics, paediatric dentistry, dental public health, oral and maxillofacial surgery, oral medicine, orthodontics, cleft lip and/or palate) with existing authors (by email), with members of the public (by online survey), and established internationally clinically expert panels for each area of defined area of dentistry to discuss and ratify (by teleconference) a core portfolio of priority evidence to be produced and maintained on the Cochrane Library.The resulting portfolio of priority research encompasses 81 existing titles to be maintained, and an additional 15 new systematic reviews to be developed by the Cochrane OHG in due course.The Cochrane OHG has actively responded to the outcomes of this prioritisation process by allocating resources to primarily supporting the maintenance of identified priority evidence for the Cochrane Library. PMID:26492797

  2. Reducing diagnostic error with computer-based clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Greenes, Robert A

    2009-09-01

    Information technology approaches to delivering diagnostic clinical decision support (CDS) are the subject of the papers to follow in the proceedings. These will address the history of CDS and present day approaches (Miller), evaluation of diagnostic CDS methods (Friedman), and the role of clinical documentation in supporting diagnostic decision making (Schiff). In addition, several other considerations relating to this topic are interesting to ponder. We are moving toward increased understanding of gene regulation and gene expression, identification of biomarkers, and the ability to predict patient response to disease and to tailor treatments to these individual variations-referred to as "personalized" or, more recently, "predictive" medicine. Consequently, diagnostic decision making is more and more linked to management decision making, and generic diagnostic labels like "diabetes" or "colon cancer" will no longer be sufficient, because they don't tell us what to do. Ultimately, if we have more complete data including more structured capture of phenomic data as well as the characterization of the patient's genome, direct prediction from responses of highly refined subsets of similar patients in a database can be used to select appropriate management, the effectiveness of which was demonstrated in projects in selected limited domains as early as the 1970s. In general, there are six classes of methodologies, including the above, which can be applied to delivering CDS. In addition, patients are becoming more knowledgeable and should be regarded as active participants, not only in helping to obtain data but also in their own status assessment and as recipients of decision support. With the above advances, this is a very promising time to be engaged in pursuit of methods of CDS. PMID:19669915

  3. Cancer diagnostics: decision criteria for marker utilization in the clinic.

    PubMed

    Taube, Sheila E; Jacobson, James W; Lively, Tracy G

    2005-01-01

    A new diagnostic tool must pass three major tests before it is adopted for routine clinical use. First, the tool must be robust and reproducible; second, the clinical value of the tool must be proven, i.e. the tool should reliably trigger a clinical decision that results in patient benefit; and, third, the clinical community has to be convinced of the need for this tool and the benefits it affords. Another factor that can influence the adoption of new tools relates to the cost and the vagaries of insurance reimbursement. The Cancer Diagnosis Program (CDP) of the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) launched the Program for the Assessment of Clinical Cancer Tests (PACCT) in 2000 to develop a process for moving the results of new technologies and new understanding of cancer biology more efficiently and effectively into clinical practice. PACCT has developed an algorithm that incorporates the iterative nature of assay development into an evaluation process that includes developers and end users. The effective introduction of new tests into clinical practice has been hampered by a series of common problems that are best described using examples of successes and failures. The successful application of the PACCT algorithm is described in the discussion of the recent development of the OncotypeDX assay and plan for a prospective trial of this assay by the NCI-supported Clinical Trials Cooperative Groups. The assay uses reverse transcription (RT)-PCR evaluation of a set of 16 genes that were shown to strongly associate with the risk of recurrence of breast cancer in women who presented with early stage disease (hormone responsive, and no involvement of the auxiliary lymph nodes). The test is highly reproducible. It provides information to aid the physician and patient in making important clinical decisions, including the aggressiveness of the therapy that should be recommended. A trial is planned to test whether OncotypeDX can be used as a standalone trigger for specific

  4. Web-based health services and clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Jegelevicius, Darius; Marozas, Vaidotas; Lukosevicius, Arunas; Patasius, Martynas

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was the development of a Web-based e-health service for comprehensive assistance and clinical decision support. The service structure consists of a Web server, a PHP-based Web interface linked to a clinical SQL database, Java applets for interactive manipulation and visualization of signals and a Matlab server linked with signal and data processing algorithms implemented by Matlab programs. The service ensures diagnostic signal- and image analysis-sbased clinical decision support. By using the discussed methodology, a pilot service for pathology specialists for automatic calculation of the proliferation index has been developed. Physicians use a simple Web interface for uploading the pictures under investigation to the server; subsequently a Java applet interface is used for outlining the region of interest and, after processing on the server, the requested proliferation index value is calculated. There is also an "expert corner", where experts can submit their index estimates and comments on particular images, which is especially important for system developers. These expert evaluations are used for optimization and verification of automatic analysis algorithms. Decision support trials have been conducted for ECG and ophthalmology ultrasonic investigations of intraocular tumor differentiation. Data mining algorithms have been applied and decision support trees constructed. These services are under implementation by a Web-based system too. The study has shown that the Web-based structure ensures more effective, flexible and accessible services compared with standalone programs and is very convenient for biomedical engineers and physicians, especially in the development phase. PMID:15718591

  5. Computer-Based Medical Decision Support System based on guidelines, clinical pathways and decision nodes.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, Wiesław

    2012-01-01

    A continuous and dynamic development of medical sciences which is currently taking place all over the world is associated with a considerable increase in the number of scientific reports and papers of importance in enhancing the effectiveness of treatment and quality of medical care. However, it is difficult, or, indeed, impossible, for physicians to regularly follow all recent innovations in medical knowledge and to apply the latest research findings to their daily clinical practice. More and more studies conducted both in Poland and worldwide as well as experience from clinical practice in various countries provide convincing evidence that various systems supporting medical decision-making by physicians or other medical professionals visibly improve the quality of medical care. The use of such systems is already possible and recently has been developing especially dynamically, as the level of knowledge and information and communication technology now permits their effective implementation. Currently, electronic knowledge bases, together with inference procedures, form intelligent medical information systems, which offer many possibilities for the support of medical decision-making, mainly in regard to interactive diagnostic work-up, but also the selection of the most suitable treatment plan (clinical pathway). Regardless of their scale and area of application, these systems are referred to as Computer-Based Medical Decision Support Systems (CBMDSS). PMID:22741924

  6. DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING CLINICAL PRACTICES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PREDICTING MEDICAL DECISIONS.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jonathan H; Goldstein, Mary K; Asch, Steven M; Altman, Russ B

    2016-01-01

    Automatically data-mining clinical practice patterns from electronic health records (EHR) can enable prediction of future practices as a form of clinical decision support (CDS). Our objective is to determine the stability of learned clinical practice patterns over time and what implication this has when using varying longitudinal historical data sources towards predicting future decisions. We trained an association rule engine for clinical orders (e.g., labs, imaging, medications) using structured inpatient data from a tertiary academic hospital. Comparing top order associations per admission diagnosis from training data in 2009 vs. 2012, we find practice variability from unstable diagnoses with rank biased overlap (RBO)<0.35 (e.g., pneumonia) to stable admissions for planned procedures (e.g., chemotherapy, surgery) with comparatively high RBO>0.6. Predicting admission orders for future (2013) patients with associations trained on recent (2012) vs. older (2009) data improved accuracy evaluated by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC) 0.89 to 0.92, precision at ten (positive predictive value of the top ten predictions against actual orders) 30% to 37%, and weighted recall (sensitivity) at ten 2.4% to 13%, (P<10(-10)). Training with more longitudinal data (2009-2012) was no better than only using recent (2012) data. Secular trends in practice patterns likely explain why smaller but more recent training data is more accurate at predicting future practices. PMID:26776186

  7. DYNAMICALLY EVOLVING CLINICAL PRACTICES AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PREDICTING MEDICAL DECISIONS

    PubMed Central

    CHEN, JONATHAN H; GOLDSTEIN, MARY K; ASCH, STEVEN M; ALTMAN, RUSS B

    2015-01-01

    Automatically data-mining clinical practice patterns from electronic health records (EHR) can enable prediction of future practices as a form of clinical decision support (CDS). Our objective is to determine the stability of learned clinical practice patterns over time and what implication this has when using varying longitudinal historical data sources towards predicting future decisions. We trained an association rule engine for clinical orders (e.g., labs, imaging, medications) using structured inpatient data from a tertiary academic hospital. Comparing top order associations per admission diagnosis from training data in 2009 vs. 2012, we find practice variability from unstable diagnoses with rank biased overlap (RBO)<0.35 (e.g., pneumonia) to stable admissions for planned procedures (e.g., chemotherapy, surgery) with comparatively high RBO>0.6. Predicting admission orders for future (2013) patients with associations trained on recent (2012) vs. older (2009) data improved accuracy evaluated by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC) 0.89 to 0.92, precision at ten (positive predictive value of the top ten predictions against actual orders) 30% to 37%, and weighted recall (sensitivity) at ten 2.4% to 13%, (P<10−10). Training with more longitudinal data (2009-2012) was no better than only using recent (2012) data. Secular trends in practice patterns likely explain why smaller but more recent training data is more accurate at predicting future practices. PMID:26776186

  8. Clinical decision making-a functional medicine perspective.

    PubMed

    Pizzorno, Joseph E

    2012-09-01

    As 21st century health care moves from a disease-based approach to a more patient-centric system that can address biochemical individuality to improve health and function, clinical decision making becomes more complex. Accentuating the problem is the lack of a clear standard for this more complex functional medicine approach. While there is relatively broad agreement in Western medicine for what constitutes competent assessment of disease and identification of related treatment approaches, the complex functional medicine model posits multiple and individualized diagnostic and therapeutic approaches, most or many of which have reasonable underlying science and principles, but which have not been rigorously tested in a research or clinical setting. This has led to non-rigorous thinking and sometimes to uncritical acceptance of both poorly documented diagnostic procedures and ineffective therapies, resulting in less than optimal clinical care. PMID:24278827

  9. Clinical decision support for physician order-entry: design challenges.

    PubMed

    Broverman, C A; Clyman, J I; Schlesinger, J M; Want, E

    1996-01-01

    We report on a joint development effort between ALLTEL Information Services Health Care Division and IBM Worldwide Healthcare Industry to demonstrate concurrent clinical decision support using Arden Syntax at order-entry time. The goal of the partnership is to build a high performance CDS toolkit that may be easily customized for multiple health care enterprises. Our work uses and promotes open technologies and health care standards while building a generalizable interface to a legacy patient-care system and clinical database. This paper identifies four areas of design challenges and solutions unique to a concurrent order-entry environment: the clinical information model, the currency of the patient virtual chart, the granularity of event triggers and rule evaluation context, and performance. PMID:8947731

  10. A Clinical Decision Support System for Breast Cancer Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Ana S.; Alves, Pedro; Jarman, Ian H.; Etchells, Terence A.; Fonseca, José M.; Lisboa, Paulo J. G.

    This paper proposes a Web clinical decision support system for clinical oncologists and for breast cancer patients making prognostic assessments, using the particular characteristics of the individual patient. This system comprises three different prognostic modelling methodologies: the clinically widely used Nottingham prognostic index (NPI); the Cox regression modelling and a partial logistic artificial neural network with automatic relevance determination (PLANN-ARD). All three models yield a different prognostic index that can be analysed together in order to obtain a more accurate prognostic assessment of the patient. Missing data is incorporated in the mentioned models, a common issue in medical data that was overcome using multiple imputation techniques. Risk group assignments are also provided through a methodology based on regression trees, where Boolean rules can be obtained expressed with patient characteristics.

  11. A highly scalable, interoperable clinical decision support service

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Howard S; Paterno, Marilyn D; Rocha, Beatriz H; Schaeffer, Molly; Wright, Adam; Erickson, Jessica L; Middleton, Blackford

    2014-01-01

    Objective To create a clinical decision support (CDS) system that is shareable across healthcare delivery systems and settings over large geographic regions. Materials and methods The enterprise clinical rules service (ECRS) realizes nine design principles through a series of enterprise java beans and leverages off-the-shelf rules management systems in order to provide consistent, maintainable, and scalable decision support in a variety of settings. Results The ECRS is deployed at Partners HealthCare System (PHS) and is in use for a series of trials by members of the CDS consortium, including internally developed systems at PHS, the Regenstrief Institute, and vendor-based systems deployed at locations in Oregon and New Jersey. Performance measures indicate that the ECRS provides sub-second response time when measured apart from services required to retrieve data and assemble the continuity of care document used as input. Discussion We consider related work, design decisions, comparisons with emerging national standards, and discuss uses and limitations of the ECRS. Conclusions ECRS design, implementation, and use in CDS consortium trials indicate that it provides the flexibility and modularity needed for broad use and performs adequately. Future work will investigate additional CDS patterns, alternative methods of data passing, and further optimizations in ECRS performance. PMID:23828174

  12. The impact of goal-directed transvaginal ultrasonography on clinical decision-making for emergency physicians.

    PubMed

    Sayrac, Neslihan; Bektas, Firat; Soyuncu, Secgin; Sayrac, Vefa

    2015-07-01

    The aim of study was to determine the impact of "goal-directed transvaginal ultrasonography" (TVUSG) on real-time clinical decision making of attending emergency physicians evaluating their level of certainty for preliminary diagnosis, admission, surgery, treatment, additional laboratory, and discharge in patients presenting with acute pelvic pain to the emergency department (ED). This prospective cross-sectional clinical study was conducted on sexually active female patients older than 18 years who presented with acute pelvic pain in the ED. The level of certainty of clinical decision making as mentioned above was measured by a visual analogue scale from 0 to 100 mm with 100 mm being most certain before and after TVUSG. Statistical analysis was performed on 88 patients. The mean age was 31.7 ±8.3 years with a median of 30 years. Among clinical decisions, there was a significant difference between pre-TVUSG and post-TVUSG certainty of the decision to perform preliminary diagnoses derived from patient's history and physical examination but not in the other outcomes (treatment, admission, surgery, and discharge). (P = .05). Of the patients included in the study, 11 (12.5%) were admitted to hospital, and 2 (2.3%) of them were operated on. The remaining 75 (85.2%) patients were discharged from the ED; of the patients that had been discharged, 18 (20.5%) patients later consulted another physician, and no further pathology could be discovered. In conclusion, US performed by attending emergency physicians may affect the certainty of their decisions in patients presenting with acute pelvic pain. This effect statistically significantly on the decision to determine preliminary diagnosis. PMID:25963680

  13. A health examination system integrated with clinical decision support system.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Kuan-Liang; Fuh, Chiou-Shann

    2010-10-01

    Health examinations play a key role in preventive medicine. We propose a health examination system named Health Examination Automatic Logic System (HEALS) to assist clinical workers in improving the total quality of health examinations. Quality of automated inference is confirmed by the zero inference error where during 6 months and 14,773 cases. Automated inference time is less than one second per case in contrast to 2 to 5 min for physicians. The most significant result of efficiency evaluation is that 3,494 of 4,356 (80.2%) cases take less than 3 min per case for producing a report summary. In the evaluation of effectiveness, novice physicians got 18% improvement in making decisions with the assistance of our system. We conclude that a health examination system with a clinical decision system can greatly reduce the mundane burden on clinical workers and markedly improve the quality and efficiency of health examination tasks. PMID:20703626

  14. Economy Affects Students' Academic Performance as Well as Spending Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sander, Libby

    2012-01-01

    Like many Americans caught up in the economic downturn, college students are worried about money. Now research indicates that financial worries may affect their academic performance. The author presents the results of this year's National Survey of Student Engagement. The survey reveals that more than a third of seniors and more than a quarter of…

  15. Is it the time to rethink clinical decision-making strategies? From a single clinical outcome evaluation to a Clinical Multi-criteria Decision Assessment (CMDA).

    PubMed

    Migliore, Alberto; Integlia, Davide; Bizzi, Emanuele; Piaggio, Tomaso

    2015-10-01

    There are plenty of different clinical, organizational and economic parameters to consider in order having a complete assessment of the total impact of a pharmaceutical treatment. In the attempt to follow, a holistic approach aimed to provide an evaluation embracing all clinical parameters in order to choose the best treatments, it is necessary to compare and weight multiple criteria. Therefore, a change is required: we need to move from a decision-making context based on the assessment of one single criteria towards a transparent and systematic framework enabling decision makers to assess all relevant parameters simultaneously in order to choose the best treatment to use. In order to apply the MCDA methodology to clinical decision making the best pharmaceutical treatment (or medical devices) to use to treat a specific pathology, we suggest a specific application of the Multiple Criteria Decision Analysis for the purpose, like a Clinical Multi-criteria Decision Assessment CMDA. In CMDA, results from both meta-analysis and observational studies are used by a clinical consensus after attributing weights to specific domains and related parameters. The decision will result from a related comparison of all consequences (i.e., efficacy, safety, adherence, administration route) existing behind the choice to use a specific pharmacological treatment. The match will yield a score (in absolute value) that link each parameter with a specific intervention, and then a final score for each treatment. The higher is the final score; the most appropriate is the intervention to treat disease considering all criteria (domain an parameters). The results will allow the physician to evaluate the best clinical treatment for his patients considering at the same time all relevant criteria such as clinical effectiveness for all parameters and administration route. The use of CMDA model will yield a clear and complete indication of the best pharmaceutical treatment to use for patients

  16. Clinical genomics information management software linking cancer genome sequence and clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Watt, Stuart; Jiao, Wei; Brown, Andrew M K; Petrocelli, Teresa; Tran, Ben; Zhang, Tong; McPherson, John D; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne; Bedard, Philippe L; Onetto, Nicole; Hudson, Thomas J; Dancey, Janet; Siu, Lillian L; Stein, Lincoln; Ferretti, Vincent

    2013-09-01

    Using sequencing information to guide clinical decision-making requires coordination of a diverse set of people and activities. In clinical genomics, the process typically includes sample acquisition, template preparation, genome data generation, analysis to identify and confirm variant alleles, interpretation of clinical significance, and reporting to clinicians. We describe a software application developed within a clinical genomics study, to support this entire process. The software application tracks patients, samples, genomic results, decisions and reports across the cohort, monitors progress and sends reminders, and works alongside an electronic data capture system for the trial's clinical and genomic data. It incorporates systems to read, store, analyze and consolidate sequencing results from multiple technologies, and provides a curated knowledge base of tumor mutation frequency (from the COSMIC database) annotated with clinical significance and drug sensitivity to generate reports for clinicians. By supporting the entire process, the application provides deep support for clinical decision making, enabling the generation of relevant guidance in reports for verification by an expert panel prior to forwarding to the treating physician. PMID:23603536

  17. Multiple Perspectives on the Meaning of Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Joshua E.; Ash, Joan S.; Sittig, Dean F.; Bunce, Arwen; Carpenter, James; Dykstra, Richard H.; Guappone, Ken; McCormack, James; McMullen, Carmit K.; Shapiro, Michael; Wright, Adam; Middleton, Blackford

    2010-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support (CDS) is viewed as a means to improve safety and efficiency in health care. Yet the lack of consensus about what is meant by CDS represents a barrier to effective design, implementation, and utilization of CDS tools. We conducted a multi-site qualitative inquiry to understand how different people define and describe CDS. Using subjects’ multiple perspectives we were able to gain new insights as to what stakeholders want CDS to achieve and how to achieve it even when those perspectives are competing and conflicting. PMID:21347119

  18. Multiple Perspectives on the Meaning of Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Joshua E.; Ash, Joan S.; Sittig, Dean F.; Bunce, Arwen; Carpenter, James; Dykstra, Richard H.; Guappone, Ken; McMullen, Carmit K.; Shapiro, Michael; Wright, Adam

    2010-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support (CDS) is viewed as a means to improve safety and efficiency in health care. Yet the lack of a consensus around what is meant by CDS represents a barrier to effective design, use, and utilization of CDS tools. We conducted a multi-site qualitative inquiry to understand how different people define and describe CDS. Using subjects’ multiple perspectives we were able to gain new insights as to what stakeholders want CDS to achieve and how to achieve it; even at times when those perspectives are competing and conflicting. PMID:21347063

  19. The Arithmetic of Emotion: Integration of Incidental and Integral Affect in Judgments and Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Västfjäll, Daniel; Slovic, Paul; Burns, William J.; Erlandsson, Arvid; Koppel, Lina; Asutay, Erkin; Tinghög, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that two types of affect have an influence on judgment and decision making: incidental affect (affect unrelated to a judgment or decision such as a mood) and integral affect (affect that is part of the perceiver’s internal representation of the option or target under consideration). So far, these two lines of research have seldom crossed so that knowledge concerning their combined effects is largely missing. To fill this gap, the present review highlights differences and similarities between integral and incidental affect. Further, common and unique mechanisms that enable these two types of affect to influence judgment and choices are identified. Finally, some basic principles for affect integration when the two sources co-occur are outlined. These mechanisms are discussed in relation to existing work that has focused on incidental or integral affect but not both. PMID:27014136

  20. The Arithmetic of Emotion: Integration of Incidental and Integral Affect in Judgments and Decisions.

    PubMed

    Västfjäll, Daniel; Slovic, Paul; Burns, William J; Erlandsson, Arvid; Koppel, Lina; Asutay, Erkin; Tinghög, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that two types of affect have an influence on judgment and decision making: incidental affect (affect unrelated to a judgment or decision such as a mood) and integral affect (affect that is part of the perceiver's internal representation of the option or target under consideration). So far, these two lines of research have seldom crossed so that knowledge concerning their combined effects is largely missing. To fill this gap, the present review highlights differences and similarities between integral and incidental affect. Further, common and unique mechanisms that enable these two types of affect to influence judgment and choices are identified. Finally, some basic principles for affect integration when the two sources co-occur are outlined. These mechanisms are discussed in relation to existing work that has focused on incidental or integral affect but not both. PMID:27014136

  1. Comparing and using assessments of the value of information to clinical decision-making.

    PubMed Central

    Urquhart, C J; Hepworth, J B

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses the Value project, which assessed the value to clinical decision-making of information supplied by National Health Service (NHS) library and information services. The project not only showed how health libraries in the United Kingdom help clinicians in decision-making but also provided quality assurance guidelines for these libraries to help make their information services more effective. The paper reviews methods and results used in previous studies of the value of health libraries, noting that methodological differences appear to affect the results. The paper also discusses aspects of user involvement, categories of clinical decision-making, the value of information to present and future clinical decisions, and the combination of quantitative and qualitative assessments of value, as applied to the Value project and the studies reviewed. The Value project also demonstrated that the value placed on information depends in part on the career stage of the physician. The paper outlines the structure of the quality assurance tool kit, which is based on the findings and methods used in the Value project. PMID:8913550

  2. Evaluation of RxNorm for Medication Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Freimuth, Robert R.; Wix, Kelly; Zhu, Qian; Siska, Mark; Chute, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the potential use of RxNorm to provide standardized representations of generic drug name and route of administration to facilitate management of drug lists for clinical decision support (CDS) rules. We found a clear representation of generic drug name but not route of administration. We identified several issues related to data quality, including erroneous or missing defined relationships, and the use of different concept hierarchies to represent the same drug. More importantly, we found extensive semantic precoordination of orthogonal concepts related to route and dose form, which would complicate the use of RxNorm for drug-based CDS. This study demonstrated that while RxNorm is a valuable resource for the standardization of medications used in clinical practice, additional work is required to enhance the terminology so that it can support expanded use cases, such as managing drug lists for CDS. PMID:25954360

  3. Clinical Decision Support Knowledge Management: Strategies for Success.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Mohamed; Alswailem, Osama

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems have been shown to increase quality of care, patient safety, improve adherence to guidelines for prevention and treatment, and avoid medication errors. Such systems depend mainly on two types of content; the clinical information related to patients and the medical knowledge related to the specialty that informs the system rules and alerts. At King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Saudi Arabia, the Health Information Technology Affairs worked on identifying best strategies and recommendations for successful CDSS knowledge management. A review of literature was conducted to identify main areas of challenges and factors of success. A qualitative survey was used over six months' duration to collect opinions, experiences and suggestions from both IT and healthcare professionals. Recommendations were categorized into ten main topics that should be addressed during the development and implementation of CDSS knowledge management tools in the hospital. PMID:26152955

  4. Evaluation of RxNorm for Medication Clinical Decision Support.

    PubMed

    Freimuth, Robert R; Wix, Kelly; Zhu, Qian; Siska, Mark; Chute, Christopher G

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the potential use of RxNorm to provide standardized representations of generic drug name and route of administration to facilitate management of drug lists for clinical decision support (CDS) rules. We found a clear representation of generic drug name but not route of administration. We identified several issues related to data quality, including erroneous or missing defined relationships, and the use of different concept hierarchies to represent the same drug. More importantly, we found extensive semantic precoordination of orthogonal concepts related to route and dose form, which would complicate the use of RxNorm for drug-based CDS. This study demonstrated that while RxNorm is a valuable resource for the standardization of medications used in clinical practice, additional work is required to enhance the terminology so that it can support expanded use cases, such as managing drug lists for CDS. PMID:25954360

  5. Threat affects risk preferences in movement decision making

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Megan K.; Ahmed, Alaa A.

    2015-01-01

    Emotional states such as sadness, anger, and threat have been shown to play a critical role in decision-making processes. Here we addressed the question of whether risk preferences are influenced by postural threat and whether this influence generalizes across motor tasks. We examined risk attitudes in the context of arm-reaching (ARM) and whole-body (WB) leaning movements, expecting that increased postural threat would lead to proportionally similar changes in risk-sensitivity for each motor task. Healthy young adults were shown a series of two-alternative forced-choice lotteries, where they were asked to choose between a riskier lottery and a safer lottery on each trial. Our lotteries consisted of different monetary rewards and target sizes. Subjects performed each choice task at ground level and atop an elevated platform. In the presence of this postural threat, increased physiological arousal was correlated with decreased movement variability. To determine risk-sensitivity, we quantified the frequency with which a subject chose the riskier lottery and fit lottery responses to a choice model based on cumulative prospect theory (CPT). Subjects exhibited idiosyncratic changes in risk-sensitivity between motor tasks and between elevations. However, we found that overweighting of small probabilities increased with postural threat in the WB task, indicating a more cautious, risk-averse strategy is ascribed to the possibility of a fall. Subjects were also more risk-seeking in the WB movements than in ARM at low elevation; this behavior does not seem to derive from consistent distortions in utility or probability representations but may be explained by subjects' inaccurate estimation of their own motor variability. Overall, our findings suggest that implicit threat can modify risk attitudes in the motor domain, and the threat may induce risk-aversion in salient movement tasks. PMID:26106311

  6. Practical clinical trials: increasing the value of clinical research for decision making in clinical and health policy.

    PubMed

    Tunis, Sean R; Stryer, Daniel B; Clancy, Carolyn M

    2003-09-24

    Decision makers in health care are increasingly interested in using high-quality scientific evidence to support clinical and health policy choices; however, the quality of available scientific evidence is often found to be inadequate. Reliable evidence is essential to improve health care quality and to support efficient use of limited resources. The widespread gaps in evidence-based knowledge suggest that systematic flaws exist in the production of scientific evidence, in part because there is no consistent effort to conduct clinical trials designed to meet the needs of decision makers. Clinical trials for which the hypothesis and study design are developed specifically to answer the questions faced by decision makers are called pragmatic or practical clinical trials (PCTs). The characteristic features of PCTs are that they (1) select clinically relevant alternative interventions to compare, (2) include a diverse population of study participants, (3) recruit participants from heterogeneous practice settings, and (4) collect data on a broad range of health outcomes. The supply of PCTs is limited primarily because the major funders of clinical research, the National Institutes of Health and the medical products industry, do not focus on supporting such trials. Increasing the supply of PCTs will depend on the development of a mechanism to establish priorities for these studies, significant expansion of an infrastructure to conduct clinical research within the health care delivery system, more reliance on high-quality evidence by health care decision makers, and a substantial increase in public and private funding for these studies. For these changes to occur, clinical and health policy decision makers will need to become more involved in all aspects of clinical research, including priority setting, infrastructure development, and funding. PMID:14506122

  7. Are patient decision aids the best way to improve clinical decision making? Report of the IPDAS Symposium.

    PubMed

    Holmes-Rovner, Margaret; Nelson, Wendy L; Pignone, Michael; Elwyn, Glyn; Rovner, David R; O'Connor, Annette M; Coulter, Angela; Correa-de-Araujo, Rosaly

    2007-01-01

    This article reports on the International Patient Decision Aid Standards Symposium held in 2006 at the annual meeting of the Society for Medical Decision Making in Cambridge, Massachusetts. The symposium featured a debate regarding the proposition that "decision aids are the best way to improve clinical decision making.'' The formal debate addressed the theoretical problem of the appropriate gold standard for an improved decision, efficacy of decision aids, and prospects for implementation. Audience comments and questions focused on both theory and practice: the often unacknowledged roots of decision aids in expected utility theory and the practical problems of limited patient decision aid implementation in health care. The participants' vote on the proposition was approximately half for and half against. PMID:17873257

  8. A systematic review of clinical decision rules for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Colin B; Sandy, Sherry; Jette, Nathalie; Sajobi, Tolulope T; Marshall, Deborah; Wiebe, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    Clinical decision rules (CDRs) have been empirically demonstrated to improve patient satisfaction and enhance cost-effective care. The use of CDRs has not yet been robustly explored for epilepsy. We performed a systematic review of MEDLINE (from 1946) and Embase (from 1947) using Medical Subject Headings and keywords related to CDRs and epilepsy. We included original research of any language deriving, validating, or implementing a CDR using standardized definitions. Study quality was determined using a modified version of previously published criteria. A bivariate model was used to meta-analyze studies undergoing sequential derivation and validation studies. Of 2445 unique articles, 5 were determined to be relevant to this review. Three were derivation studies (three diagnostic and one therapeutic), one validation study, and one combined derivation and validation study. No implementation studies were identified. Study quality varied but was primarily of a moderate level. Two CDRs were validated and, thus, able to be meta-analyzed. Although initial measures of accuracy were high (sensitivity ~80% or above), they tended to diminish significantly in the validation studies. The pooled estimates of sensitivity and specificity both exhibited wide 95% confidence and prediction intervals that may limit their utility in routine practice. Despite the advances in therapeutic and diagnostic interventions for epilepsy, few CDRs have been developed to guide their use. Future CDRs should address common clinical scenarios such as efficient use of diagnostic tools and optimal clinical treatment decisions. Given their potential for advancing efficient, evidence-based, patient-centered healthcare, CDR development should be a priority in epilepsy. PMID:26922491

  9. Biostatistics in clinical decision making for cardiothoracic radiologists.

    PubMed

    Zurakowski, David; Johnson, Victor M; Lee, Edward Y

    2013-11-01

    Cardiothoracic radiologists are intuitively aware of sensitivity and specificity as they pertain to diagnostic tests involving clinical information. However, many cardiothoracic radiologists are unfamiliar with odds ratios, likelihood ratios, predictive values, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, which provide more information about the performance of a test. Our article will first review the fundamental concepts of sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, and likelihood ratios. The ROC curve methodology will be covered with an emphasis on creating a look-up table, a straightforward table that communicates important information to the clinician to aid in diagnosis. The article reviews sensitivity and specificity, as well as predictive values, logistic regression, and ROC curves, using conceptual principles without unnecessary mathematical rigor. We will apply principles of sensitivity and specificity to continuous measurements by constructing ROC curves in order to tie together key ideas in diagnostic decision making. Three clinical examples are presented to illustrate these fundamental statistical concepts: predictors of pulmonary embolism in children, use of dobutamine-cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to identify impaired ventricular function in patients who have suffered a myocardial infarction, and diagnostic accuracy of 64-multidetector row computed tomography to identify occluded vessels in adult patients with suspected coronary artery disease. In addition, a glossary is provided at the end of the article with key terms important in diagnostic imaging. An understanding of the concepts presented will assist cardiothoracic radiologists in critically discerning the usefulness of diagnostic tests and how these statistics can be applied to make judgments and decisions that are essential to clinical practice. PMID:23358369

  10. The Gambler’s Fallacy Is Associated with Weak Affective Decision Making but Strong Cognitive Ability

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Gui; He, Qinghua; Lei, Xuemei; Chen, Chunhui; Liu, Yuyun; Chen, Chuansheng; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Dong, Qi; Bechara, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    Humans demonstrate an inherent bias towards making maladaptive decisions, as shown by a phenomenon known as the gambler’s fallacy (GF). The GF has been traditionally considered as a heuristic bias supported by the fast and automatic intuition system, which can be overcome by the reasoning system. The present study examined an intriguing hypothesis, based on emerging evidence from neuroscience research, that the GF might be attributed to a weak affective but strong cognitive decision making mechanism. With data from a large sample of college students, we found that individuals’ use of the GF strategy was positively correlated with their general intelligence and executive function, such as working memory and conflict resolution, but negatively correlated with their affective decision making capacities, as measured by the Iowa Gambling Task. Our result provides a novel insight into the mechanisms underlying the GF, which highlights the significant role of affective mechanisms in adaptive decision-making. PMID:23071701

  11. Affective Decision-Making and Externalizing Behaviors: The Role of Autonomic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Drabick, Deborah A. G.

    2013-01-01

    We tested a conceptual model involving the inter-relations among affective decision-making (indexed by a gambling task), autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms in a largely impoverished, inner city sample of first through third grade children (N=63, 54% male). The present study hypothesized that impaired affective decision-making and decreased sympathetic and parasympathetic activation would be associated with higher levels of ADHD and ODD symptoms, and that low sympathetic and parasympathetic activation during an emotion-inducing task would mediate the relation between affective decision-making and child externalizing symptoms. In support of our model, disadvantageous decision-making on a gambling task was associated with ADHD hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms among boys, and attenuated sympathetic activation during an emotion-inducing task mediated this relation. Support for the model was not found among girls. PMID:18317919

  12. THE IMPACT OF RACISM ON CLINICIAN COGNITION, BEHAVIOR, AND CLINICAL DECISION MAKING

    PubMed Central

    van Ryn, Michelle; Burgess, Diana J.; Dovidio, John F.; Phelan, Sean M.; Saha, Somnath; Malat, Jennifer; Griffin, Joan M.; Fu, Steven S.; Perry, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, thousands of studies have demonstrated that Blacks receive lower quality medical care than Whites, independent of disease status, setting, insurance, and other clinically relevant factors. Despite this, there has been little progress towards eradicating these inequities. Almost a decade ago we proposed a conceptual model identifying mechanisms through which clinicians’ behavior, cognition, and decision making might be influenced by implicit racial biases and explicit racial stereotypes, and thereby contribute to racial inequities in care. Empirical evidence has supported many of these hypothesized mechanisms, demonstrating that White medical care clinicians: (1) hold negative implicit racial biases and explicit racial stereotypes, (2) have implicit racial biases that persist independently of and in contrast to their explicit (conscious) racial attitudes, and (3) can be influenced by racial bias in their clinical decision making and behavior during encounters with Black patients. This paper applies evidence from several disciplines to further specify our original model and elaborate on the ways racism can interact with cognitive biases to affect clinicians’ behavior and decisions and in turn, patient behavior and decisions. We then highlight avenues for intervention and make specific recommendations to medical care and grant-making organizations. PMID:24761152

  13. Methodologic standards for interpreting clinical decision rules in emergency medicine: 2014 update.

    PubMed

    Green, Steven M; Schriger, David L; Yealy, Donald M

    2014-09-01

    Clinical decision rules are increasingly prominent in medicine, particularly in emergency care. The quality, use, and impact of current published decision rules widely vary, requiring clinicians to be critical consumers. We present an approach to assist in the appraisal of clinical decision rules and in judging when to use such rules. PMID:24530108

  14. Clinical decision support for perioperative information management systems.

    PubMed

    Wanderer, Jonathan P; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M

    2013-12-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) systems are being used to optimize the increasingly complex care that our health care system delivers. These systems have become increasingly important in the delivery of perioperative care for patients undergoing cardiac, thoracic, and vascular procedures. The adoption of perioperative information management systems (PIMS) has allowed these technologies to enter the operating room and support the clinical work flow of anesthesiologists and operational processes. Constructing effective CDS systems necessitates an understanding of operative work flow and technical considerations as well as achieving integration with existing information systems. In this review, we describe published examples of CDS for PIMS, including support for cardiopulmonary bypass separation physiological alarms, β-blocker guideline adherence, enhanced revenue capture for arterial line placement, and detection of hemodynamic monitoring gaps. Although these and other areas are amenable to CDS systems, the challenges of latency and data reliability represent fundamental limitations on the potential application of these tools to specific types of clinical issues. Ultimately, we expect that CDS will remain an important tool in our efforts to optimize the quality of care delivered. PMID:23690340

  15. Optimizing perioperative decision making: improved information for clinical workflow planning.

    PubMed

    Doebbeling, Bradley N; Burton, Matthew M; Wiebke, Eric A; Miller, Spencer; Baxter, Laurence; Miller, Donald; Alvarez, Jorge; Pekny, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Perioperative care is complex and involves multiple interconnected subsystems. Delayed starts, prolonged cases and overtime are common. Surgical procedures account for 40-70% of hospital revenues and 30-40% of total costs. Most planning and scheduling in healthcare is done without modern planning tools, which have potential for improving access by assisting in operations planning support. We identified key planning scenarios of interest to perioperative leaders, in order to examine the feasibility of applying combinatorial optimization software solving some of those planning issues in the operative setting. Perioperative leaders desire a broad range of tools for planning and assessing alternate solutions. Our modeled solutions generated feasible solutions that varied as expected, based on resource and policy assumptions and found better utilization of scarce resources. Combinatorial optimization modeling can effectively evaluate alternatives to support key decisions for planning clinical workflow and improving care efficiency and satisfaction. PMID:23304284

  16. Optimizing Perioperative Decision Making: Improved Information for Clinical Workflow Planning

    PubMed Central

    Doebbeling, Bradley N.; Burton, Matthew M.; Wiebke, Eric A.; Miller, Spencer; Baxter, Laurence; Miller, Donald; Alvarez, Jorge; Pekny, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Perioperative care is complex and involves multiple interconnected subsystems. Delayed starts, prolonged cases and overtime are common. Surgical procedures account for 40–70% of hospital revenues and 30–40% of total costs. Most planning and scheduling in healthcare is done without modern planning tools, which have potential for improving access by assisting in operations planning support. We identified key planning scenarios of interest to perioperative leaders, in order to examine the feasibility of applying combinatorial optimization software solving some of those planning issues in the operative setting. Perioperative leaders desire a broad range of tools for planning and assessing alternate solutions. Our modeled solutions generated feasible solutions that varied as expected, based on resource and policy assumptions and found better utilization of scarce resources. Combinatorial optimization modeling can effectively evaluate alternatives to support key decisions for planning clinical workflow and improving care efficiency and satisfaction. PMID:23304284

  17. Details of a Successful Clinical Decision Support System

    PubMed Central

    Friedlin, Jeff; Dexter, Paul R.; Overhage, J. Marc

    2007-01-01

    Computerized physician order entry (CPOE) with clinical decision support (CDS) is regarded as one of the most effective ways to improve the quality of health care and increase patient safety. As electronic medical records become more available, such systems will increasingly become the method of choice to achieve these goals. Creating a CPOE/CDS system is a complex task, and some fail despite time consuming and expensive development. The CPOE system at the Regenstrief Institute incorporates sophisticated CDS and is one of the oldest and most successful in the U.S. Many years in development, it is currently used by hundreds of providers. Our well established, successful system can serve as a template or model for the future development of similar systems. We recently completed a full analysis of our CPOE/CDS system and present details of its structure, functionality and contents. PMID:18693837

  18. Influence of Patients’ Socioeconomic Status on Clinical Management Decisions: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Bernheim, Susannah M.; Ross, Joseph S.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE Little is known about how patients’ socioeconomic status (SES) influences physicians’ clinical management decisions, although this information may have important implications for understanding inequities in health care quality. We investigated physician perspectives on how patients’ SES influences care. METHODS The study consisted of in-depth semistructured interviews with primary care physicians in Connecticut. Investigators coded interviews line by line and refined the coding structure and interview guide based on successive interviews. Recurrent themes emerged through iterative analysis of codes and tagged quotations. RESULTS We interviewed 18 physicians from varied practice settings, 6 female, 9 from minority racial backgrounds, and 3 of Hispanic ethnicity. Four themes emerged from our interviews: (1) physicians held conflicting views about the effect of patient SES on clinical management, (2) physicians believed that changes in clinical management based on the patient’s SES were made in the patient’s interest, (3) physicians varied in the degree to which they thought changes in clinical management influenced patient outcomes, and (4) physicians faced personal and financial strains when caring for patients of low SES. CONCLUSIONS Physicians indicated that patient SES did affect their clinical management decisions. As a result, physicians commonly undertook changes to their management plan in an effort to enhance patient outcomes, but they experienced numerous strains when trying to balance what they believed was feasible for the patient with what they perceived as established standards of care. PMID:18195315

  19. Sustainable Decisions Signal Sustainable Relationships: How Purchasing Decisions Affect Perceptions and Romantic Attraction.

    PubMed

    DiDonato, Theresa E; Jakubiak, Brittany K

    2016-01-01

    In the pursuit of love, individuals strategically use luxury products to signal status and other attractive attributes. Might eco-friendly products also signal mate-relevant information? The current research examined inferences from eco-friendly purchases and how they predict perceived suitability for short- and long-term romantic relationships. Participants read descriptions of a stranger's eco-friendly or luxury purchase decisions, reported their perceptions of the purchaser, and indicated their potential romantic interest in the purchaser. The influence of the relative price of the chosen product was also investigated. Compared to luxury purchasers, eco-friendly purchasers were ascribed greater warmth, competence, and good partner traits, but less physical appeal, and they were preferred for long-term but not short-term relationships. The social costs and benefits of "going green" are discussed in light of their implications for environmental sustainability efforts. PMID:25695751

  20. Clinical implementation of RNA signatures for pharmacogenomic decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Weihua; Hu, Zhiyuan; Muallem, Hind; Gulley, Margaret L

    2011-01-01

    RNA profiling is increasingly used to predict drug response, dose, or toxicity based on analysis of drug pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic pathways. Before implementing multiplexed RNA arrays in clinical practice, validation studies are carried out to demonstrate sufficient evidence of analytic and clinical performance, and to establish an assay protocol with quality assurance measures. Pathologists assure quality by selecting input tissue and by interpreting results in the context of the input tissue as well as the technologies that were used and the clinical setting in which the test was ordered. A strength of RNA profiling is the array-based measurement of tens to thousands of RNAs at once, including redundant tests for critical analytes or pathways to promote confidence in test results. Instrument and reagent manufacturers are crucial for supplying reliable components of the test system. Strategies for quality assurance include careful attention to RNA preservation and quality checks at pertinent steps in the assay protocol, beginning with specimen collection and proceeding through the various phases of transport, processing, storage, analysis, interpretation, and reporting. Specimen quality is checked by probing housekeeping transcripts, while spiked and exogenous controls serve as a check on analytic performance of the test system. Software is required to manipulate abundant array data and present it for interpretation by a laboratory physician who reports results in a manner facilitating therapeutic decision-making. Maintenance of the assay requires periodic documentation of personnel competency and laboratory proficiency. These strategies are shepherding genomic arrays into clinical settings to provide added value to patients and to the larger health care system. PMID:23226056

  1. A Scalable Architecture for Rule Engine Based Clinical Decision Support Systems.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Soumi; Banerjee, Ansuman; Banerjee, Nilanjan

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support systems (CDSS) have reached a fair level of sophistication and have emerged as the popular system of choice for their aid in clinical decision making. These decision support systems are based on rule engines navigate through a repertoire of clinical rules and multitudes of facts to assist a clinical expert to decide on the set of actuations in response to a medical situation. In this paper, we present the design of a scalable architecture for a rule engine based clinical decision system. PMID:26262249

  2. ASSESSMENT OF UPPER EXTREMITY IMPAIRMENT, FUNCTION, AND ACTIVITY FOLLOWING STROKE: FOUNDATIONS FOR CLINICAL DECISION MAKING

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Catherine E.; Bland, Marghuretta D.; Bailey, Ryan R.; Schaefer, Sydney Y.; Birkenmeier, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to provide a comprehensive approach for assessing the upper extremity (UE) after stroke. First, common upper extremity impairments and how to assess them are briefly discussed. While multiple UE impairments are typically present after stroke, the severity of one impairment, paresis, is the primary determinant of UE functional loss. Second, UE function is operationally defined and a number of clinical measures are discussed. It is important to consider how impairment and loss of function affect UE activity outside of the clinical environment. Thus, this review also identifies accelerometry as an objective method for assessing UE activity in daily life. Finally, the role that each of these levels of assessment should play in clinical decision making is discussed in order to optimize the provision of stroke rehabilitation services. PMID:22975740

  3. Knowledge of Fecal Calprotectin and Infliximab Trough Levels Alters Clinical Decision-making for IBD Outpatients on Maintenance Infliximab Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Connie; Kroeker, Karen I.; Wang, Haili; Shalapay, Carol; Dhami, Neil; Fedorak, Darryl K.; Halloran, Brendan; Dieleman, Levinus A.; Goodman, Karen J.; Fedorak, Richard N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infliximab is an effective therapy for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, more than 50% of patients lose response. Empiric dose intensification is not effective for all patients because not all patients have objective disease activity or subtherapeutic drug level. The aim was to determine how an objective marker of disease activity or therapeutic drug monitoring affects clinical decisions regarding maintenance infliximab therapy in outpatients with IBD. Methods: Consecutive patients with IBD on maintenance infliximab therapy were invited to participate by providing preinfusion stool and blood samples. Fecal calprotectin (FCP) and infliximab trough levels (ITLs) were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Three decisions were compared: (1) actual clinical decision, (2) algorithmic FCP or ITL decisions, and (3) expert panel decision based on (a) clinical data, (b) clinical data plus FCP, and (c) clinical data plus FCP plus ITL. In secondary analysis, Receiver-operating curves were used to assess the ability of FCP and ITL in predicting clinical disease activity or remission. Results: A total of 36 sets of blood and stool were available for analysis; median FCP 191.5 μg/g, median ITLs 7.3 μg/mL. The actual clinical decision differed from the hypothetical decision in 47.2% (FCP algorithm); 69.4% (ITL algorithm); 25.0% (expert panel clinical decision); 44.4% (expert panel clinical plus FCP); 58.3% (expert panel clinical plus FCP plus ITL) cases. FCP predicted clinical relapse (area under the curve [AUC] = 0.417; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.197–0.641) and subtherapeutic ITL (AUC = 0.774; 95% CI, 0.536–1.000). ITL predicted clinical remission (AUC = 0.498; 95% CI, 0.254–0.742) and objective remission (AUC = 0.773; 95% CI, 0.622–0.924). Conclusions: Using FCP and ITLs in addition to clinical data results in an increased number of decisions to optimize management in outpatients with IBD on stable maintenance infliximab therapy. PMID

  4. Reducing inappropriate ESR testing with computerized clinical decision support

    PubMed Central

    Gottheil, Stephanie; Khemani, Ekta; Copley, Katherine; Keeney, Michael; Kinney, Jeff; Chin-Yee, Ian; Gob, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory test overutilization increases health care costs, leads to unwarranted investigations, and may have a negative impact on health outcomes. The American Society of Clinical Pathology, in its Choosing Wisely Campaign, advocates that inflammation be investigated with C-reactive protein (CRP) instead of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR). London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC), a tertiary care hospital organization in Ontario, Canada, set a goal to reduce inappropriate ESR orders by 50%. After developing appropriateness criteria for ESR, we used a series of PDSA cycles to reduce inappropriate ESR ordering and analyzed our results with an interrupted time series design. Our intervention began with an educational bulletin and moved to city-wide implementation of computerized Clinical Decision Support (CDS). After implementation, ESR orders decreased by 40% from 386 orders per week to 241 orders per week. Our results are supported by previous literature on the effectiveness of CDS in reducing overutilization and suggest that provider habit is a significant contributor to inappropriate ordering. PMID:27096092

  5. Reducing inappropriate ESR testing with computerized clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Gottheil, Stephanie; Khemani, Ekta; Copley, Katherine; Keeney, Michael; Kinney, Jeff; Chin-Yee, Ian; Gob, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory test overutilization increases health care costs, leads to unwarranted investigations, and may have a negative impact on health outcomes. The American Society of Clinical Pathology, in its Choosing Wisely Campaign, advocates that inflammation be investigated with C-reactive protein (CRP) instead of Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR). London Health Sciences Centre (LHSC), a tertiary care hospital organization in Ontario, Canada, set a goal to reduce inappropriate ESR orders by 50%. After developing appropriateness criteria for ESR, we used a series of PDSA cycles to reduce inappropriate ESR ordering and analyzed our results with an interrupted time series design. Our intervention began with an educational bulletin and moved to city-wide implementation of computerized Clinical Decision Support (CDS). After implementation, ESR orders decreased by 40% from 386 orders per week to 241 orders per week. Our results are supported by previous literature on the effectiveness of CDS in reducing overutilization and suggest that provider habit is a significant contributor to inappropriate ordering. PMID:27096092

  6. Evaluating clinical decision support rules as an intervention in clinician workflows with technology.

    PubMed

    Brokel, Jane M; Schwichtenberg, Tamara J; Wakefield, Douglas S; Ward, Marcia M; Shaw, Michael G; Kramer, J Michael

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of electronic health records in rural settings generated new challenges beyond those seen in urban hospitals. The preparation, implementation, and sustaining of clinical decision support rules require extensive attention to standards, content design, support resources, expert knowledge, and more. A formative evaluation was used to present progress and evolution of clinical decision support rule implementation and use within clinician workflows for application in an electronic health record. The rural hospital was able to use clinical decision support rules from five urban hospitals within its system to promote safety, prevent errors, establish evidence-based practices, and support communication. This article describes tools to validate initial 54 clinical decision support rules used in a rural referral hospital and 17 used in clinics. Since 2005, the study hospital has added specific system clinical decision support rules for catheter-acquired urinary tract infection, deep venous thrombosis, heart failure, and more. The findings validate the use of clinical decision support rules across sites and ability to use existing indicators to measure outcomes. Rural hospitals can rapidly overcome the barriers to prepare and implement as well as sustain use of clinical decision support rules with a systemized approach and support structures. A model for design and validation of clinical decision support rules into workflow processes is presented. The replication and reuse of clinical decision support rule templates with data specifications that follow data models can support reapplication of the rule intervention in subsequent rural and critical access hospitals through system support resources. PMID:21099543

  7. A rule-based clinical decision model to support interpretation of multiple data in health examinations.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Kuan-Liang; Fuh, Chiou-Shann

    2011-12-01

    Health examinations can obtain relatively complete health information and thus are important for the personal and public health management. For clinicians, one of the most important works in the health examinations is to interpret the health examination results. Continuously interpreting numerous health examination results of healthcare receivers is tedious and error-prone. This paper proposes a clinical decision support system to assist solving above problems. In order to customize the clinical decision support system intuitively and flexibly, this paper also proposes the rule syntax to implement computer-interpretable logic for health examinations. It is our purpose in this paper to describe the methodology of the proposed clinical decision support system. The evaluation was performed by the implementation and execution of decision rules on health examination results and a survey on clinical decision support system users. It reveals the efficiency and user satisfaction of proposed clinical decision support system. Positive impact of clinical data interpretation is also noted. PMID:20703517

  8. Affecting others: social appraisal and emotion contagion in everyday decision making.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Brian; Simons, Gwenda

    2009-08-01

    In a diary study of interpersonal affect transfer, 41 participants reported on decisions involving other people over 3 weeks. Reported anxiety and excitement were reliably related to the perceived anxiety and excitement of another person who was present during decision making. Risk and importance appraisals partially mediated effects of other's anxiety on own anxiety as predicted by social appraisal theory. However, other's emotion remained a significant independent predictor of own emotion after controlling for appraisals, supporting the additional impact of more direct forms of affect transfer such as emotion contagion. Significant affect-transfer effects remained even after controlling for participants' perceptions of the other's emotion in addition to all measured appraisals, confirming that affect transfer does not require explicit registration of someone else's feelings. This research provides some of the clearest evidence for the operation of both social appraisal and automatic affect transfer in everyday social life. PMID:19474455

  9. Comparison of residents’ approaches to clinical decisions before and after the implementation of Evidence Based Medicine course

    PubMed Central

    KARIMIAN, ZAHRA; KOJURI, JAVAD; SAGHEB, MOHAMMAD MAHDI; MAHBOUDI, ALI; SABER, MAHBOOBEH; AMINI, MITRA; DEHGHANI, MOHAMMAD REZA

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: It has been found that the decision-making process in medicine is affected, to a large extent, by one’s experience, individual mentality, previous models, and common habitual approaches, in addition to scientific principles. Evidence-based medicine is an approach attempting to reinforce scientific, systematic and critical thinking in physicians and provide the ground for optimal decision making. In this connection, the purpose of the present study is to find out to what extent the education of evidence based medicine affects clinical decision making. Methods: The present quasi-experimental study was carried out on 110 clinical residents, who started their education in September, 2012 and finally 62 residents filled out the questionnaires. The instrument used was a researcher-made questionnaire containing items on four decision-making approaches. The questionnaire was used both as a pre-test and a post-test to assess the residents’ viewpoints on decision making approaches. The validity of the questionnaire was determined using medical education and clinical professionals’ viewpoints, and the reliability was calculated through Chronbach alpha; it was found to be 0.93. The results were analyzed by paired t-test using SPSS, version 14. Results: The results demonstrated that evidence-based medicine workshop significantly affected the residents’ decision-making approaches (p<0.001). The pre-test showed that principles-based, reference-based and routine model-based approaches were more preferred before the program (p<0.001). However, after the implementation of the program, the dominant approaches used by the residents in their decision making were evidence-based ones.  Conclusion: To develop the evidence-based approach, it is necessary for educational programs to continue steadily and goal-orientedly. In addition, the equipment infrastructure such as the Internet, access to data bases, scientific data, and clinical guides should develop more in the

  10. Improving Clinical Decisions on T2DM Patients Integrating Clinical, Administrative and Environmental Data.

    PubMed

    Segagni, Daniele; Sacchi, Lucia; Dagliati, Arianna; Tibollo, Valentina; Leporati, Paola; De Cata, Pasqale; Chiovato, Luca; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    This work describes an integrated informatics system developed to collect and display clinically relevant data that can inform physicians and researchers about Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) patient clinical pathways and therapy adherence. The software we developed takes data coming from the electronic medical record (EMR) of the IRCCS Fondazione Maugeri (FSM) hospital of Pavia, Italy, and combines the data with administrative, pharmacy drugs (purchased from the local healthcare agency (ASL) of the Pavia area), and open environmental data of the same region. By using different use cases, we explain the importance of gathering and displaying the data types through a single informatics tool: the use of the tool as a calculator of risk factors and indicators to improve current detection of T2DM, a generator of clinical pathways and patients' behaviors from the point of view of the hospital care management, and a decision support tool for follow-up visits. The results of the performed data analysis report how the use of the dashboard displays meaningful clinical decisions in treating complex chronic diseases and might improve health outcomes. PMID:26262138

  11. Clinical Decision Support for Early Recognition of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Amland, Robert C.; Hahn-Cover, Kristin E.

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is an inflammatory response triggered by infection, with a high in-hospital mortality rate. Early recognition and treatment can reverse the inflammatory response, with evidence of improved patient outcomes. One challenge clinicians face is identifying the inflammatory syndrome against the background of the patient’s infectious illness and comorbidities. An approach to this problem is implementation of computerized early warning tools for sepsis. This multicenter retrospective study sought to determine clinimetric performance of a cloud-based computerized sepsis clinical decision support system (CDS), understand the epidemiology of sepsis, and identify opportunities for quality improvement. Data encompassed 6200 adult hospitalizations from 2012 through 2013. Of 13% patients screened-in, 51% were already suspected to have an infection when the system activated. This study focused on a patient cohort screened-in before infection was suspected; median time from arrival to CDS activation was 3.5 hours, and system activation to diagnostic collect was another 8.6 hours. PMID:25385815

  12. Virtual Characters: Visual Realism Affects Response Time and Decision-Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibuma, Bernadette

    2012-01-01

    This study integrates agent research with a neurocognitive technique to study how character faces affect cognitive processing. The N170 event-related potential (ERP) was used to study face processing during simple decision-making tasks. Twenty-five adults responded to facial expressions (fear/neutral) presented in three designs…

  13. Affective Decision-Making and Tactical Behavior of Under-15 Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Gonzaga, Adeilton dos Santos; Albuquerque, Maicon Rodrigues; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro Fernandes; Greco, Pablo Juan; Teoldo da Costa, Israel

    2014-01-01

    Affective decision-making is a type of Executive Function related to cost benefit analysis in situations where gains and losses imply direct consequences for the subject. The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of the affective decision-making on tactical behavior in soccer players under the age of 15 years old. The System of Tactical Assessment in Soccer (FUT-SAT) was used to assess tactical behavior. To evaluate affective decision-making, we used the neuropsychological test called The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). The values of the offensive, defensive and game tactical behavior of participants were used to create performance groups. The low (≤25%) and high (≥75%) groups, according to offensive, defensive and game tactical behavior, were compared and shown to be different. The values of the IGT net score of the participants with low and high tactical behavior were compared using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. Statistically significant differences between the groups were observed for Defensive Tactical Behavior (Z = −3.133; p = 0.002; r = −0.355) and Game Tactical Behavior (Z = −2.267; p = 0.023; r = −0.260). According to these results, it is possible to state that affective decision-making can influence the tactical behavior of under-15 soccer players. PMID:24978030

  14. Affective Decision-Making and Externalizing Behaviors: The Role of Autonomic Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bubier, Jennifer L.; Drabick, Deborah A. G.

    2008-01-01

    We tested a conceptual model involving the inter-relations among affective decision-making (indexed by a gambling task), autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) symptoms in a largely impoverished, inner city sample of first through third grade children (N…

  15. Affective decision-making and tactical behavior of under-15 soccer players.

    PubMed

    Gonzaga, Adeilton dos Santos; Albuquerque, Maicon Rodrigues; Malloy-Diniz, Leandro Fernandes; Greco, Pablo Juan; Teoldo da Costa, Israel

    2014-01-01

    Affective decision-making is a type of Executive Function related to cost benefit analysis in situations where gains and losses imply direct consequences for the subject. The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of the affective decision-making on tactical behavior in soccer players under the age of 15 years old. The System of Tactical Assessment in Soccer (FUT-SAT) was used to assess tactical behavior. To evaluate affective decision-making, we used the neuropsychological test called The Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). The values of the offensive, defensive and game tactical behavior of participants were used to create performance groups. The low (≤25%) and high (≥75%) groups, according to offensive, defensive and game tactical behavior, were compared and shown to be different. The values of the IGT net score of the participants with low and high tactical behavior were compared using the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test. Statistically significant differences between the groups were observed for Defensive Tactical Behavior (Z = -3.133; p = 0.002; r = -0.355) and Game Tactical Behavior (Z = -2.267; p = 0.023; r = -0.260). According to these results, it is possible to state that affective decision-making can influence the tactical behavior of under-15 soccer players. PMID:24978030

  16. Factors Affecting Career Decision Making of Mexican and Mexican-American Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newlon, Betty J.; Borboa, Roman

    The purpose of this research was to identify the self-reported factors affecting the career decision making of Mexican and Mexican-American students. It was hypothesized that the factor clusters would differ between the two sample populations, Mexican and Mexican-American. It was also hypothesized that these clusters would differ from six clusters…

  17. Factors Affecting Christian Parents' School Choice Decision Processes: A Grounded Theory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prichard, Tami G.; Swezey, James A.

    2016-01-01

    This study identifies factors affecting the decision processes for school choice by Christian parents. Grounded theory design incorporated interview transcripts, field notes, and a reflective journal to analyze themes. Comparative analysis, including open, axial, and selective coding, was used to reduce the coded statements to five code families:…

  18. Boosting standard order sets utilization through clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Li, Haomin; Zhang, Yinsheng; Cheng, Haixia; Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huilong

    2013-01-01

    Well-designed standard order sets have the potential to integrate and coordinate care by communicating best practices through multiple disciplines, levels of care, and services. However, there are several challenges which certainly affected the benefits expected from standard order sets. To boost standard order sets utilization, a problem-oriented knowledge delivery solution was proposed in this study to facilitate access of standard order sets and evaluation of its treatment effect. In this solution, standard order sets were created along with diagnostic rule sets which can trigger a CDS-based reminder to help clinician quickly discovery hidden clinical problems and corresponding standard order sets during ordering. Those rule set also provide indicators for targeted evaluation of standard order sets during treatment. A prototype system was developed based on this solution and will be presented at Medinfo 2013. PMID:23920727

  19. Autism spectrum disorders: a qualitative study of attitudes toward prenatal genetic testing and termination decisions of affected pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Chen, L S; Xu, L; Dhar, S U; Li, M; Talwar, D; Jung, E

    2015-08-01

    In the United States, prenatal genetic testing (PGT) for Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) is currently available via clinical genetic services. Such testing may inform parents about their unborn child's risk for ASD, prepare parents for the birth of an affected infant, and allow them to arrange for early interventions. Although PGT for autism has potential benefits, the associated ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) should be considered. This first qualitative study employed a hypothetical scenario to explore the attitudes toward PGT and termination decisions of 42 parents of children with ASD. Over half of the participants expressed willingness to undergo PGT for autism. Reasons included better preparation for birth, early and better treatment, termination of affected pregnancy, contribution to research, and curiosity. Of the 31 parents who were either willing or unsure about undergoing the PGT, approximately three-fourths would continue their hypothetical affected pregnancies. Explanations included preparation for birth of the child, bonding or acceptance of existing ASD-affected children, apprehensions about test limitations, and religious concerns. Parents who reported they would terminate the affected pregnancy in this hypothetical situation were primarily Asians. This study contributes to the growing understanding of the ELSI aspects of PGT in clinical practice. PMID:25251361

  20. Decision analysis in the clinical neurosciences: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Dippel, D W; Habbema, J D

    1995-12-01

    Clinical decision analysis can be a useful scientific tool for individual patient management, for planning of clinical research and for reaching consensus about clinical problems. We systematically reviewed the decision analytic studies in the clinical neurosciences that were published between 1975 and July 1994. All studies were assessed on aspects of clinical applicability: presence of case and context description, completeness of the analysed strategies from a clinical point of view, extendibility of the analyses to different patient profiles, and up-to-date-ness. Fifty-nine decision analyses of twenty-eight different clinical problems were identified. Twenty-eight analyses were based on the theory of subjective expected utility, twelve on cost-effectiveness analysis. Four studies used ROC analysis, and fifteen were risk-, or risk-benefit analyses. At least six studies could have been improved by more elaborately disclosing the context of the clinical problem that was addressed. In eleven studies, the effect of different, yet plausible assumptions was not explored, and in eighteen studies the reader was not informed how to extend the results of the analysis to patients with (slightly) different clinical characterisitics. All studies had, by nature, the potential to promote insight into the clinical problem and focus the discussion on clinically important aspects, and gave clinically useful advice. We conclude that clinical decision analysis, as an explicit, quantitative approach to uncertainty in decision making in the clinical neurosciences will fulfill a growing need in the near future. PMID:24283779

  1. The Influence of Temporal Orientation and Affective Frame on use of Ethical Decision-Making Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Laura E.; Stenmark, Cheryl K.; Thiel, Chase E.; Antes, Alison L.; Mumford, Michael D.; Connelly, Shane; Devenport, Lynn D.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the role of temporal orientation and affective frame in the execution of ethical decision-making strategies. In reflecting on a past experience or imagining a future experience, participants thought about experiences that they considered either positive or negative. The participants recorded their thinking about that experience by responding to several questions, and their responses were content-analyzed for the use of ethical decision-making strategies. The findings indicated that a future temporal orientation was associated with greater strategy use. Likewise, a positive affective frame was associated with greater strategy use. Future orientation may permit better strategy execution than a past orientation because it facilitates more objective, balanced contemplation of the reflected-upon situation, and minimizes potential self-threat associated with past behavior. A positive affective frame likely improves strategy execution because it facilitates active analysis of the experience. Future directions and implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:21572582

  2. Clinical decision making in restorative dentistry, endodontics, and antibiotic prescription.

    PubMed

    Zadik, Yehuda; Levin, Liran

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of geographic location of graduation (Israel, Eastern Europe, Latin America) on decision making regarding management of dental caries, periapical lesions, and antibiotic prescribing routines. A questionnaire was given to ninety-eight general practitioners regarding demographic and work habits. Photographs of lesions were shown on a screen. Participants reported recommended treatment and whether they would routinely prescribe antibiotics following regular endodontic treatment, retreatment, and impacted third molar surgical extraction in healthy patients. There was a 94 percent (n=92) response rate, of which eighty-five responses were used in the data analysis. Surgical treatment of asymptomatic enamel caries lesions was not recommended by most of the subjects, and surgery was recommended for DEJ caries lesions in low or moderate caries risk patients, both without significant differences between geographic regions of dental school graduation. Israelis had a lower frequency of retreatment in asymptomatic teeth that demonstrated periapical radiolucency with post restoration (without crown) compared to Latin Americans and East Europeans. Most of the participants would not retreat asymptomatic teeth that demonstrated periapical radiolucency with post and crown. After third molar surgery, 46 percent of participants routinely prescribed antibiotics. Significantly more Latin American graduates prescribed antibiotics following endodontic treatment, retreatment, and third molar extractions (p<0.05). Overmedication (antibiotics) and overtreatment (caries) among young practitioners reflect failure of undergraduate education in proper use of antibiotics and management of the carious lesions according to the patient's clinical presentation and caries risk assessment rather than routinely undertaking surgical caries treatment. PMID:18172239

  3. SANDS: a service-oriented architecture for clinical decision support in a National Health Information Network.

    PubMed

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we describe and evaluate a new distributed architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support), which leverages current health information exchange efforts and is based on the principles of a service-oriented architecture. The architecture allows disparate clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems to be seamlessly integrated over a network according to a set of interfaces and protocols described in this paper. The architecture described is fully defined and developed, and six use cases have been developed and tested using a prototype electronic health record which links to one of the existing prototype National Health Information Networks (NHIN): drug interaction checking, syndromic surveillance, diagnostic decision support, inappropriate prescribing in older adults, information at the point of care and a simple personal health record. Some of these use cases utilize existing decision support systems, which are either commercially or freely available at present, and developed outside of the SANDS project, while other use cases are based on decision support systems developed specifically for the project. Open source code for many of these components is available, and an open source reference parser is also available for comparison and testing of other clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems that wish to implement the SANDS architecture. The SANDS architecture for decision support has several significant advantages over other architectures for clinical decision support. The most salient of these are: PMID:18434256

  4. The orbitofrontal cortex and beyond: from affect to decision-making.

    PubMed

    Rolls, Edmund T; Grabenhorst, Fabian

    2008-11-01

    The orbitofrontal cortex represents the reward or affective value of primary reinforcers including taste, touch, texture, and face expression. It learns to associate other stimuli with these to produce representations of the expected reward value for visual, auditory, and abstract stimuli including monetary reward value. The orbitofrontal cortex thus plays a key role in emotion, by representing the goals for action. The learning process is stimulus-reinforcer association learning. Negative reward prediction error neurons are related to this affective learning. Activations in the orbitofrontal cortex correlate with the subjective emotional experience of affective stimuli, and damage to the orbitofrontal cortex impairs emotion-related learning, emotional behaviour, and subjective affective state. With an origin from beyond the orbitofrontal cortex, top-down attention to affect modulates orbitofrontal cortex representations, and attention to intensity modulates representations in earlier cortical areas of the physical properties of stimuli. Top-down word-level cognitive inputs can bias affective representations in the orbitofrontal cortex, providing a mechanism for cognition to influence emotion. Whereas the orbitofrontal cortex provides a representation of reward or affective value on a continuous scale, areas beyond the orbitofrontal cortex such as the medial prefrontal cortex area 10 are involved in binary decision-making when a choice must be made. For this decision-making, the orbitofrontal cortex provides a representation of each specific reward in a common currency. PMID:18824074

  5. Heterogeneity of major affective disorders. Biological and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Vita, A; Sacchetti, E; Conte, G; Alciati, A; Pennati, A

    1985-01-01

    In this paper we summarize the results of our recent and present research focused on analyzing the correlations between neurochemical, pharmacological and clinical parameters in patients with Major Depression. There is evidence that: a) pretreatment urinary MHPG is a useful predictor for clinical response to tricyclic antidepressants and to long-term lithium treatment; b) urinary MHPG is positively correlated to the age at onset of the disease; c) previous responses to tricyclics and age at onset of affective illness are supplementary tools for predicting the effectiveness of lithium and antidepressant drugs; d) platelet alpha-2-adrenoceptor density is inversely correlated with both urinary MHPG and age at onset; e) cerebral ventricular size is positively correlated with urinary MHPG and age at onset and may discriminate between patients with different outcomes on lithium prophylaxis; f) low MHPG excretors are more likely to have suffered from stressful life events in early childhood than normal-to-high excretors. Taken together, these results lend strong support to the hypothesis that Major Affective Disorder is a heterogeneous illness and that inherently different subgroups of affective patients can be recognized. PMID:2990848

  6. Older and wiser? An affective science perspective on age-related challenges in financial decision making

    PubMed Central

    Kensinger, Elizabeth A.; Munnell, Alicia H.; Sass, Steven A.; Dickerson, Brad C.; Wright, Christopher I.; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2011-01-01

    Financial planning decisionss are fundamentally affective in nature; they are decisions related to money, longevity and quality of life. Over the next several decades people will be increasingly responsible for managing their own assets and investments, and they will be subject to the affective influences on active, personal decision-making. Many of these crucial decisions are made and revised across the lifespan, including when to buy or sell a home, how to save for childrens’ education, how to manage healthcare costs, when to retire, how much to save for retirement and how to allocate retirement funds. As average life expectancy increases, many retirees will be faced with inadequate savings to live comfortably until the end of their lives. In the current article, we examine the problems of and potential solutions to inadequate financial planning through the lens of affective science, with an emphasis on how brain-based changes in affective processing with age might contribute to the challenge of financial planning. PMID:20587596

  7. System-agnostic clinical decision support services: benefits and challenges for scalable decision support.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Orton, Charles; Lobach, David F

    2010-01-01

    System-agnostic clinical decision support (CDS) services provide patient evaluation capabilities that are independent of specific CDS systems and system implementation contexts. While such system-agnostic CDS services hold great potential for facilitating the widespread implementation of CDS systems, little has been described regarding the benefits and challenges of their use. In this manuscript, the authors address this need by describing potential benefits and challenges of using a system-agnostic CDS service. This analysis is based on the authors' formal assessments of, and practical experiences with, various approaches to developing, implementing, and maintaining CDS capabilities. In particular, the analysis draws on the authors' experience developing and leveraging a system-agnostic CDS Web service known as SEBASTIAN. A primary potential benefit of using a system-agnostic CDS service is the relative ease and flexibility with which the service can be leveraged to implement CDS capabilities across applications and care settings. Other important potential benefits include facilitation of centralized knowledge management and knowledge sharing; the potential to support multiple underlying knowledge representations and knowledge resources through a common service interface; improved simplicity and componentization; easier testing and validation; and the enabling of distributed CDS system development. Conversely, important potential challenges include the increased effort required to develop knowledge resources capable of being used in many contexts and the critical need to standardize the service interface. Despite these challenges, our experiences to date indicate that the benefits of using a system-agnostic CDS service generally outweigh the challenges of using this approach to implementing and maintaining CDS systems. PMID:21603281

  8. Clinical trials involving cats: What factors affect owner 1 participation?

    PubMed Central

    Gruen, Margaret E; Jiamachello, Katrina N; Thomson, Andrea; Lascelles, BDX

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials are frequently hindered by difficulty recruiting eligible participants, increasing the timeline and limiting generalizability of results. In veterinary medicine, where proxy enrollment is required, no studies have detailed what factors influence owner participation in studies involving cats. We aimed to investigate these factors through a survey of owners at first opinion practices. The survey was designed using feedback from a pilot study and input from clinical researchers. Owners were asked demographic questions and whether they would, would not, or were unsure about participating in a clinical trial with their cat. They then ranked the importance and influence of various factors on participation using a 5-point Likert-type scale, and incentives from most to least encouraging. A total of 413 surveys were distributed to cat owners at four hospitals, two feline-only and two multi-species; 88.6% were completed. Data for importance and influence factors as well as incentive rankings were analyzed overall, by hospital type, location and whether owners would consider participating. The most influential factors were trust in the organization, benefit to the cat and veterinarian recommendation. Importance and influence factors varied by willingness to participate. Ranked incentives were not significantly different across groups, with “Free Services” ranked highest. This study provides a first look at what factors influence participation in clinical trials with cats. Given the importance placed in the recommendation of veterinarians, continued work is needed to determine veterinarian related factors affecting clinical trial participation. The results provide guidance towards improved clinical trial design, promotion and education. PMID:24938313

  9. Representation of Clinical Practice Guidelines in Conventional and Augmented Decision Tables

    PubMed Central

    Shiffman, Richard N.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To develop a knowledge representation model for clinical practice guidelines that is linguistically adequate, comprehensible, reusable, and maintainable. Design: Decision tables provide the basic framework for the proposed knowledge representation model. Guideline logic is represented as rules in conventional decision tables. These tables are augmented by layers where collateral information is recorded in slots beneath the logic. Results: Decision tables organize rules into cohesive rule sets wherein complex logic is clarified. Decision table rule sets may be verified to assure completeness and consistency. Optimization and display of rule sets as sequential decision trees may enhance the comprehensibility of the logic. The modularity of the rule formats may facilitate maintenance. The augmentation layers provide links to descriptive language, information sources, decision variable characteristics, costs and expected values of policies, and evidence sources and quality. Conclusion: Augmented decision tables can serve as a unifying knowledge representation for developers and implementers of clinical practice guidelines. PMID:9292844

  10. Clinical factors affecting quality of life of patients with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Uchmanowicz, Bartosz; Panaszek, Bernard; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Rosińczuk, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Background In recent years, there has been increased interest in the subjective quality of life (QoL) of patients with bronchial asthma. QoL is a significant indicator guiding the efforts of professionals caring for patients, especially chronically ill ones. The identification of factors affecting the QoL reported by patients, despite their existing condition, is important and useful to provide multidisciplinary care for these patients. Aim To investigate the clinical factors affecting asthma patients’ QoL. Methods The study comprised 100 patients (73 female, 27 male) aged 18–84 years (mean age was 45.7) treated in the Allergy Clinic of the Wroclaw Medical University Department and Clinic of Internal Diseases, Geriatrics and Allergology. All asthma patients meeting the inclusion criteria were invited to participate. Data on sociodemographic and clinical variables were collected. In this study, we used medical record analysis and two questionnaires: the Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) to assess the QoL of patients with asthma and the Asthma Control Test to measure asthma control. Results Active smokers were shown to have a significantly lower QoL in the “Symptoms” domain than nonsmokers (P=0.006). QoL was also demonstrated to decrease significantly as the frequency of asthma exacerbations increased (R=−0.231, P=0.022). QoL in the domain “Activity limitation” was shown to increase significantly along with the number of years of smoking (R=0.404; P=0.004). Time from onset and the dominant symptom of asthma significantly negatively affected QoL in the “Activity limitation” domain of the AQLQ (R=−0.316, P=0.001; P=0.029, respectively). QoL scores in the “Emotional function” and “Environmental stimuli” subscale of the AQLQ decreased significantly as time from onset increased (R=−0.200, P=0.046; R=−0.328, P=0.001, respectively). Conclusion Patients exhibiting better symptom control have higher QoL scores. Asthma patients’ Qo

  11. A Representation for Gaining Insight into Clinical Decision Models

    PubMed Central

    Jimison, Holly B.

    1988-01-01

    For many medical domains uncertainty and patient preferences are important components of decision making. Decision theory is useful as a representation for such medical models in computer decision aids, but the methodology has typically had poor performance in the areas of explanation and user interface. The additional representation of probabilities and utilities as random variables serves to provide a framework for graphical and text insight into complicated decision models. The approach allows for efficient customization of a generic model that describes the general patient population of interest to a patient- specific model. Monte Carlo simulation is used to calculate the expected value of information and sensitivity for each model variable, thus providing a metric for deciding what to emphasize in the graphics and text summary. The computer-generated explanation includes variables that are sensitive with respect to the decision or that deviate significantly from what is typically observed. These techniques serve to keep the assessment and explanation of the patient's decision model concise, allowing the user to focus on the most important aspects for that patient.

  12. How type of excuse defense, mock juror age, and defendant age affect mock jurors' decisions.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Pamela L; Heath, Wendy P; Grannemann, Bruce D

    2007-08-01

    The authors investigated the effects of mock juror age (younger vs. older), defendant age (22 vs. 65), and type of excuse defense used by defendants (a highly self-inflicted condition, Cocaine Dependency Disorder, vs. a less self-inflicted condition, Posttraumatic Stress Disorder) on mock juror decisions. Ninety-six younger and 96 older adults read a scenario and answered a questionnaire. Results indicated that the defendant using the highly self-inflicted excuse was more likely to receive a guilty verdict and a longer sentence than was the defendant using the less self-inflicted excuse. Older jurors were more certain of their verdicts and saw the defendant as more responsible for his condition than did younger jurors. Defendant age did not affect juror decisions. In addition, excuse type and juror age affected the jurors' perceptions of the victim's responsibility for the attack. The authors discuss the potential influence of juror age on perceptions of defendant responsibility. PMID:17955749

  13. The Fox and the Grapes-How Physical Constraints Affect Value Based Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Gross, Jörg; Woelbert, Eva; Strobel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    One fundamental question in decision making research is how humans compute the values that guide their decisions. Recent studies showed that people assign higher value to goods that are closer to them, even when physical proximity should be irrelevant for the decision from a normative perspective. This phenomenon, however, seems reasonable from an evolutionary perspective. Most foraging decisions of animals involve the trade-off between the value that can be obtained and the associated effort of obtaining. Anticipated effort for physically obtaining a good could therefore affect the subjective value of this good. In this experiment, we test this hypothesis by letting participants state their subjective value for snack food while the effort that would be incurred when reaching for it was manipulated. Even though reaching was not required in the experiment, we find that willingness to pay was significantly lower when subjects wore heavy wristbands on their arms. Thus, when reaching was more difficult, items were perceived as less valuable. Importantly, this was only the case when items were physically in front of the participants but not when items were presented as text on a computer screen. Our results suggest automatic interactions of motor and valuation processes which are unexplored to this date and may account for irrational decisions that occur when reward is particularly easy to reach. PMID:26061087

  14. The Fox and the Grapes—How Physical Constraints Affect Value Based Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    One fundamental question in decision making research is how humans compute the values that guide their decisions. Recent studies showed that people assign higher value to goods that are closer to them, even when physical proximity should be irrelevant for the decision from a normative perspective. This phenomenon, however, seems reasonable from an evolutionary perspective. Most foraging decisions of animals involve the trade-off between the value that can be obtained and the associated effort of obtaining. Anticipated effort for physically obtaining a good could therefore affect the subjective value of this good. In this experiment, we test this hypothesis by letting participants state their subjective value for snack food while the effort that would be incurred when reaching for it was manipulated. Even though reaching was not required in the experiment, we find that willingness to pay was significantly lower when subjects wore heavy wristbands on their arms. Thus, when reaching was more difficult, items were perceived as less valuable. Importantly, this was only the case when items were physically in front of the participants but not when items were presented as text on a computer screen. Our results suggest automatic interactions of motor and valuation processes which are unexplored to this date and may account for irrational decisions that occur when reward is particularly easy to reach. PMID:26061087

  15. Transient ischaemic attack clinic: an evaluation of diagnoses and clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Lee, Will; Frayne, Judith

    2015-04-01

    The diagnosis of transient ischaemic attack (TIA) is based largely on the patient's symptom recall and clinical judgement. This decision-making process is highly subjective and the inter-observer reliability of TIA diagnosis is at best moderate, even among neurologists. The aim of this study is to examine the presenting features and final diagnoses of referrals to a TIA clinic and to evaluate characteristics that favoured the diagnosis of TIA over other TIA "mimics". Consecutive new referrals to a tertiary metropolitan hospital TIA clinic over a 9month period were examined. Characteristics between TIA and non-TIA diagnoses were compared and analysed. Eighty-two patients were recruited. Eighteen (22%) were given a final diagnosis of TIA or stroke. Major alternative diagnoses included migraine (n=17, 21%), presyncope/syncope (n=13, 16%) and anxiety (n=7, 9%). Four (5%) patients had unclassifiable symptoms with no clear final diagnosis. Mean age was 67±a standard deviation of 17years and patients diagnosed with TIA/stroke were on average older than those with non-TIA diagnoses (77±10 versus 64±17years, p=0.003). A diagnosis of TIA/stroke was favoured in the presence of moderate to severe weakness (p=0.032), dysphasia (p=0.037) or dysarthria (p=0.005). Unclassifiable symptoms (for example, palpitations, confusion, headache) were reported in 27 patients (33%) and their presence favoured non-TIA diagnoses (p=0.0003). TIA constituted a minority of the referrals to our clinic. Accurate clinical diagnosis of TIA facilitates early stroke prevention and avoids unnecessary investigations and prescriptions. Attempts to improve diagnostic accuracy of TIA should target improving the education and awareness of frontline medical practitioners. PMID:25669115

  16. Human and nature-caused hazards: the affect heuristic causes biased decisions.

    PubMed

    Siegrist, Michael; Sütterlin, Bernadette

    2014-08-01

    People are more concerned about the negative consequences of human hazards compared with natural hazards. Results of four experiments show that the same negative outcome (e.g., number of birds killed by an oil spill) was more negatively evaluated when caused by humans than when caused by nature. Results further show that when identical risk information was provided, participants evaluated nuclear power more negatively compared with solar power. The affect associated with the hazard per se influenced the interpretation of the new information. Furthermore, the affect experienced in the situation fully mediated the evaluation of the negative outcomes of a hazard. People's reliance on the affect heuristic is a challenge for acceptance of cost-benefit analyses because equally negative outcomes are differently evaluated depending on the cause. Symbolically significant information and the affect evoked by this information may result in biased and riskier decisions. PMID:24576178

  17. Implementation of workflow engine technology to deliver basic clinical decision support functionality

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Workflow engine technology represents a new class of software with the ability to graphically model step-based knowledge. We present application of this novel technology to the domain of clinical decision support. Successful implementation of decision support within an electronic health record (EHR) remains an unsolved research challenge. Previous research efforts were mostly based on healthcare-specific representation standards and execution engines and did not reach wide adoption. We focus on two challenges in decision support systems: the ability to test decision logic on retrospective data prior prospective deployment and the challenge of user-friendly representation of clinical logic. Results We present our implementation of a workflow engine technology that addresses the two above-described challenges in delivering clinical decision support. Our system is based on a cross-industry standard of XML (extensible markup language) process definition language (XPDL). The core components of the system are a workflow editor for modeling clinical scenarios and a workflow engine for execution of those scenarios. We demonstrate, with an open-source and publicly available workflow suite, that clinical decision support logic can be executed on retrospective data. The same flowchart-based representation can also function in a prospective mode where the system can be integrated with an EHR system and respond to real-time clinical events. We limit the scope of our implementation to decision support content generation (which can be EHR system vendor independent). We do not focus on supporting complex decision support content delivery mechanisms due to lack of standardization of EHR systems in this area. We present results of our evaluation of the flowchart-based graphical notation as well as architectural evaluation of our implementation using an established evaluation framework for clinical decision support architecture. Conclusions We describe an implementation of

  18. Clinical capital equipment acquisition: decision-making at the executive level.

    PubMed

    Greisler, D S; Stupak, R J

    1999-01-01

    Capital investment in the United States health care industry is one of the components of the system that has historically fueled cost increases and complicated the quality/cost/access conundrum. This article is concerned with capital development focused on clinical equipment acquisition in acute care hospitals. The research findings suggest that decision-makers are abandoning two approaches to decision-making known as Quantitative Decision-Making and Mixed Scanning in favor of two models known as Rational Decision-Making and Political Decision-Making. While this is the case, a method of decision-making known as Idea Sets (developed and labeled by James March as Garbage Can Decision-Making) is the most widely used approach. Equipment acquisition criteria used by the decision-makers are shifting away from concerns of enhancing existing clinical programs and/or adding new clinical programs. Acquisition criteria are shifting toward procuring equipment which will decrease institutional expense, improve organizational efficiency, and galvanize operational effectiveness. In addition to the technical findings of the research, further insights about ourselves and our colleagues are gleaned. Accordingly, we understand more completely the human dynamics surrounding decisions and thus are able to dialogue more richly about issues. Meaningful dialogue such as this will have the dual benefit of advancing teamwork and facilitating decision-making. PMID:10848195

  19. The Clinical Intuition Exploration Guide: A Decision-Making Tool for Counselors and Supervisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffrey, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Clinical intuition is a common experience among counselors, yet many do not know what to do with intuition when it occurs. This article reviews the role intuition plays in clinical work and presents the research-based Clinical Intuition Exploration Guide to help counselors navigate the decision-making process. The guide consists of self-reflection…

  20. Clinical Verification of A Clinical Decision Support System for Ventilator Weaning

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Weaning is typically regarded as a process of discontinuing mechanical ventilation in the daily practice of an intensive care unit (ICU). Among the ICU patients, 39%-40% need mechanical ventilator for sustaining their lives. The predictive rate of successful weaning achieved only 35-60% for decisions made by physicians. Clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) are promising in enhancing diagnostic performance and improve healthcare quality in clinical setting. To our knowledge, a prospective study has never been conducted to verify the effectiveness of the CDSS in ventilator weaning before. In this study, the CDSS capable of predicting weaning outcome and reducing duration of ventilator support for patients has been verified. Methods A total of 380 patients admitted to the respiratory care center of the hospital were randomly assigned to either control or study group. In the control group, patients were weaned with traditional weaning method, while in the study group, patients were weaned with CDSS monitored by physicians. After excluding the patients who transferred to other hospitals, refused further treatments, or expired the admission period, data of 168 and 144 patients in the study and control groups, respectively, were used for analysis. Results The results show that a sensitivity of 87.7% has been achieved, which is significantly higher (p<0.01) than the weaning determined by physicians (sensitivity: 61.4%). Furthermore, the days using mechanical ventilator for the study group (38.41 ± 3.35) is significantly (p<0.001) shorter than the control group (43.69 ± 14.89), with a decrease of 5.2 days in average, resulting in a saving of healthcare cost of NT$45,000 (US$1,500) per patient in the current Taiwanese National Health Insurance setting. Conclusions The CDSS is demonstrated to be effective in identifying the earliest time of ventilator weaning for patients to resume and sustain spontaneous breathing, thereby avoiding unnecessary prolonged

  1. Information and decision-making needs among people with affective disorders – results of an online survey

    PubMed Central

    Liebherz, Sarah; Tlach, Lisa; Härter, Martin; Dirmaier, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient decision aids are one possibility for enabling and encouraging patients to participate in medical decisions. Objective This paper aims to describe patients’ information and decision-making needs as a prerequisite for the development of high-quality, web-based patient decision aids for affective disorders. Design We conducted an online cross-sectional survey by using a self-administered questionnaire including items on Internet use, online health information needs, role in decision making, and important treatment decisions, performing descriptive and comparative statistical analyses. Participants A total of 210 people with bipolar disorder/mania as well as 112 people with unipolar depression participated in the survey. Results Both groups specified general information search as their most relevant information need and decisions on treatment setting (inpatient or outpatient) as well as decisions on pharmacological treatment as the most difficult treatment decisions. For participants with unipolar depression, decisions concerning psychotherapeutic treatment were also especially difficult. Most participants of both groups preferred shared decisions but experienced less shared decisions than desired. Discussion and conclusion Our results show the importance of information for patients with affective disorders, with a focus on pharmacological treatment and on the different treatment settings, and highlight patients’ requirements to be involved in the decision-making process. Since our sample reported a chronic course of disease, we do not know if our results are applicable for newly diagnosed patients. Further studies should consider how the reported needs could be addressed in health care practice. PMID:25999698

  2. Inactivation of Parietal Reach Region Affects Reaching But Not Saccade Choices in Internally Guided Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Bonaiuto, James; Kagan, Igor; Andersen, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) has traditionally been considered important for awareness, spatial perception, and attention. However, recent findings provide evidence that the PPC also encodes information important for making decisions. These findings have initiated a running argument of whether the PPC is critically involved in decision making. To examine this issue, we reversibly inactivated the parietal reach region (PRR), the area of the PPC that is specialized for reaching movements, while two monkeys performed a memory-guided reaching or saccade task. The task included choices between two equally rewarded targets presented simultaneously in opposite visual fields. Free-choice trials were interleaved with instructed trials, in which a single cue presented in the peripheral visual field defined the reach and saccade target unequivocally. We found that PRR inactivation led to a strong reduction of contralesional choices, but only for reaches. On the other hand, saccade choices were not affected by PRR inactivation. Importantly, reaching and saccade movements to single instructed targets remained largely intact. These results cannot be explained as an effector-nonspecific deficit in spatial attention or awareness, since the temporary “lesion” had an impact only on reach choices. Hence, the PPR is a part of a network for reach decisions and not just reach planning. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT There has been an ongoing debate on whether the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) represents only spatial awareness, perception, and attention or whether it is also involved in decision making for actions. In this study we explore whether the parietal reach region (PRR), the region of the PPC that is specialized for reaches, is involved in the decision process. We inactivated the PRR while two monkeys performed reach and saccade choices between two targets presented simultaneously in both hemifields. We found that inactivation affected only the reach choices, while leaving

  3. Mental Workload as a Key Factor in Clinical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Aidan

    2013-01-01

    The decision making process is central to the practice of a clinician and has traditionally been described in terms of the hypothetico-deductive model. More recently, models adapted from cognitive psychology, such as the dual process and script theories have proved useful in explaining patterns of practice not consistent with purely cognitive…

  4. Counseling About Medication-Induced Birth Defects with Clinical Decision Support in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Parisi, Sara M.; Handler, Steven M.; Koren, Gideon; Shevchik, Grant; Fischer, Gary S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background We evaluated how computerized clinical decision support (CDS) affects the counseling women receive when primary care physicians (PCPs) prescribe potential teratogens and how this counseling affects women's behavior. Methods Between October 2008 and April 2010, all women aged 18–50 years visiting one of three community-based family practice clinics or an academic general internal medicine clinic were invited to complete a survey 5–30 days after their clinic visit. Women who received prescriptions were asked if they were counseled about teratogenic risks or contraception and if they used contraception at last intercourse. Results Eight hundred one women completed surveys; 27% received a prescription for a potential teratogen. With or without CDS, women prescribed potential teratogens were more likely than women prescribed safer medications to report counseling about teratogenic risks. However, even with CDS 43% of women prescribed potential teratogens reported no counseling. In multivariable models, women were more likely to report counseling if they saw a female PCP (odds ratio: 1.97; 95% confidence interval: 1.26–3.09). Women were least likely to report counseling if they received angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. Women who were pregnant or trying to conceive were not more likely to report counseling. Nonetheless, women who received counseling about contraception or teratogenic risks were more likely to use contraception after being prescribed potential teratogens than women who received no counseling. Conclusions Physician counseling can reduce risk of medication-induced birth defects. However, efforts are needed to ensure that PCPs consistently inform women of teratogenic risks and provide access to highly effective contraception. PMID:23930947

  5. [Locator or ball attachment: a guide for clinical decision making].

    PubMed

    Büttel, Adrian E; Bühler, Nico M; Marinello, Carlo P

    2009-01-01

    Various attachments are available to retain overdentures on natural roots or implants. Technical aspects, the clinical handling, the capability to adapt or repair and the costs are parameters to be considered when choosing the appropriate attachment. Ball attachments and bars are clinically established and well documented. Ball attachments as prefabricated, unsplinted units are easily replaceable and show hygienic advantages, while bars show favorable stability. The Locator is a newer, popular clinical alternative to these established attachments. The ball attachment and the Locator are compared from a technical and clinical point of view. PMID:19852208

  6. Factors Predicting Oncology Care Providers' Behavioral Intention to Adopt Clinical Decision Support Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfenden, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative correlation study was to examine the predictors of user behavioral intention on the decision of oncology care providers to adopt or reject the clinical decision support system. The Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) formed the foundation of the research model and survey instrument. The…

  7. An Examination of Accelerated and Basic Baccalaureate Nursing Students' Perceptions of Clinical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumwiede, Kelly A.

    2010-01-01

    Developing decision-making skills is essential in education in order to be a competent nurse. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the perceptions of clinical decision-making skills of students enrolled in accelerated and basic baccalaureate nursing programs. A comparative descriptive research design was used for this study.…

  8. Disciplined Decision Making in an Interdisciplinary Environment: Some Implications for Clinical Applications of Statistical Process Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hantula, Donald A.

    1995-01-01

    Clinical applications of statistical process control (SPC) in human service organizations are considered. SPC is seen as providing a standard set of criteria that serves as a common interface for data-based decision making, which may bring decision making under the control of established contingencies rather than the immediate contingencies of…

  9. SANDS: A Service-Oriented Architecture for Clinical Decision Support in a National Health Information Network

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe and evaluate a new distributed architecture for clinical decision support called SANDS (Service-oriented Architecture for NHIN Decision Support), which leverages current health information exchange efforts and is based on the principles of a service-oriented architecture. The architecture allows disparate clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems to be seamlessly integrated over a network according to a set of interfaces and protocols described in this paper. The architecture described is fully defined and developed, and six use cases have been developed and tested using a prototype electronic health record which links to one of the existing prototype National Health Information Networks (NHIN): drug interaction checking, syndromic surveillance, diagnostic decision support, inappropriate prescribing in older adults, information at the point of care and a simple personal health record. Some of these use cases utilize existing decision support systems, which are either commercially or freely available at present, and developed outside of the SANDS project, while other use cases are based on decision support systems developed specifically for the project. Open source code for many of these components is available, and an open source reference parser is also available for comparison and testing of other clinical information systems and clinical decision support systems that wish to implement the SANDS architecture. PMID:18434256

  10. Clinical Decision Analysis and Markov Modeling for Surgeons: An Introductory Overview.

    PubMed

    Hogendoorn, Wouter; Moll, Frans L; Sumpio, Bauer E; Hunink, M G Myriam

    2016-08-01

    This study addresses the use of decision analysis and Markov models to make contemplated decisions for surgical problems. Decision analysis and decision modeling in surgical research are increasing, but many surgeons are unfamiliar with the techniques and are skeptical of the results. The goal of this review is to familiarize surgeons with techniques and terminology used in decision analytic papers, to provide the reader a practical guide to read these papers, and to ensure that surgeons can critically appraise the quality of published clinical decision models and draw well founded conclusions from such reports.First, a brief explanation of decision analysis and Markov models is presented in simple steps, followed by an overview of the components of a decision and Markov model. Subsequently, commonly used terms and definitions are described and explained, including quality-adjusted life-years, disability-adjusted life-years, discounting, half-cycle correction, cycle length, probabilistic sensitivity analysis, incremental cost-effectiveness ratio, and the willingness-to-pay threshold.Finally, the advantages and limitations of research with Markov models are described, and new modeling techniques and future perspectives are discussed. It is important that surgeons are able to understand conclusions from decision analytic studies and are familiar with the specific definitions of the terminology used in the field to keep up with surgical research. Decision analysis can guide treatment strategies when complex clinical questions need to be answered and is a necessary and useful addition to the surgical research armamentarium. PMID:26756750

  11. Use of Simulation to Study Nurses' Acceptance and Nonacceptance of Clinical Decision Support Suggestions.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Vanessa E C; Lopez, Karen Dunn; Febretti, Alessandro; Stifter, Janet; Yao, Yingwei; Johnson, Andrew; Wilkie, Diana J; Keenan, Gail M

    2015-10-01

    Our long-term goal was to ensure nurse clinical decision support works as intended before full deployment in clinical practice. As part of a broader effort, this pilot project explored factors influencing acceptance/nonacceptance of eight clinical decision support suggestions displayed in an electronic health record-based nursing plan of care software prototype. A diverse sample of 21 nurses participated in this high-fidelity clinical simulation experience and completed a questionnaire to assess reasons for accepting/not accepting the clinical decision support suggestions. Of 168 total suggestions displayed during the experiment (eight for each of the 21 nurses), 123 (73.2%) were accepted, and 45 (26.8%) were not accepted. The mode number of acceptances by nurses was seven of eight, with only two of 21 nurses accepting all. The main reason for clinical decision support acceptance was the nurse's belief that the suggestions were good for the patient (100%), with other features providing secondary reinforcement. Reasons for nonacceptance were less clear, with fewer than half of the subjects indicating low confidence in the evidence. This study provides preliminary evidence that high-quality simulation and targeted questionnaires about specific clinical decision support selections offer a cost-effective means for testing before full deployment in clinical practice. PMID:26361268

  12. Disaster dilemma: factors affecting decision to come to work during a natural disaster.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Judy E; Sekayan, Ani; Agan, Donna; Good, Linda; Shaw, David; Smilde, Renee

    2009-01-01

    Natural disasters threaten the ability to staff a hospital. The objective of this study was to identify factors influencing decision to come to work during a fire disaster. The authors' hospital experienced a 17-fold increase in no-shows during a fire. Phenomenography was used to explore staff experiences immediately following wildfires. Factors affecting decision to work during a disaster included vulnerability of family, personal safety, and fire proximity. Modifiable factors were identified as follows: past experience with disasters, perceived importance, relationship with the organization, and caring connection with the organization. Employees experienced tension between obligations to family, community, and organization. Pets were seen as family and as important as biological family. Further research is indicated to determine predictive modeling and generalizability. Hospital leaders may influence disaster response by establishing a caring connection, providing resources for family members/pets, and promoting perceived importance of the employee. PMID:20118877

  13. The role of current affect, anticipated affect and spontaneous self-affirmation in decisions to receive self-threatening genetic risk information.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Rebecca A; Taber, Jennifer M; Klein, William M P; Harris, Peter R; Lewis, Katie L; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2015-01-01

    One reason for not seeking personally threatening information may be negative current and anticipated affective responses. We examined whether current (e.g., worry) and anticipated negative affect predicted intentions to seek sequencing results in the context of an actual genomic sequencing trial (ClinSeq®; n = 545) and whether spontaneous self-affirmation mitigated any (negative) association between affect and intentions. Anticipated affective response negatively predicted intentions to obtain and share results pertaining to both medically actionable and non-actionable disease, whereas current affect was only a marginal predictor. The negative association between anticipated affect and intentions to obtain results pertaining to non-actionable disease was weaker in individuals who were higher in spontaneous self-affirmation. These results have implications for the understanding of current and anticipated affect, self-affirmation and consequential decision-making and contribute to a growing body of evidence on the role of affect in medical decisions. PMID:25482843

  14. Hip fractures and dementia: clinical decisions for the future

    PubMed Central

    Waran, Eswaran; William, Leeroy

    2016-01-01

    Severe dementia is a life-limiting condition; hip fractures are more common in patients who have dementia. This study outlines the case of a 92-year-old female with severe dementia who sustained a hip fracture. Despite having a terminal diagnosis (severe dementia and hip fracture) and poor premorbid quality of life, she had a life-prolonging surgery. The report outlines issues around treatment options in such circumstances, informed consent and substitute decision-making. The authors propose a ‘goals of care’ approach to manage patients in whom the best treatment is unclear, during their attendance to the emergency department. It is suggested that utilization of such a model may help with substitute decision-making and true informed consent. PMID:26949537

  15. A decision-analysis methodology for consideration of morbidity factors in clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Corder, M P; Ellwein, L B

    1984-02-01

    An explicit and systematic means of incorporation of good medical practice plus individual patient preferences (utilities) for pretreatment and treatment options for a serious but curable neoplastic disease has been investigated. The methodology allows important quality-of-life information to be transmitted to patients, with the goal of providing an improved basis for informed consent. The example of Hodgkin's lymphoma staging and treatment selection is used. Individual patient utilities can be expressed and incorporated into a formal decision analysis for those who face the option of selecting MOPP chemotherapy or of pursuing the staging process in order to obtain a chance of being treated appropriately with irradiation. Equal survival probabilities for the two options are assumed, thus the short- and long-term toxicities (quality of Life) are the determinants of the decision. Patient-derived utilities can be developed for the 15 categories of anticipated toxicity. This, together with probabilistic inputs regarding toxicity severity and duration, will yield expected utilities for each of the decision options. Three physicians were studied and evaluated in the role of a patient. The physicians' toxicity preferences were different and because of this the management option of choice was different for each. This methodology allows explicit patient preferences to be incorporated into medical decisions without the requirement for detailed patient understanding of testing and/or treatment morbidity frequency and severity. PMID:6546469

  16. Social context and reproductive potential affect worker reproductive decisions in a eusocial insect.

    PubMed

    Yagound, Boris; Blacher, Pierre; Chameron, Stéphane; Châline, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Context-dependent decision-making conditions individual plasticity and is an integrant part of alternative reproductive strategies. In eusocial Hymenoptera (ants, bees and wasps), the discovery of worker reproductive parasitism recently challenged the view of workers as a homogeneous collective entity and stressed the need to consider them as autonomous units capable of elaborate choices which influence their fitness returns. The reproductive decisions of individual workers thus need to be investigated and taken into account to understand the regulation of reproduction in insect societies. However, we know virtually nothing about the proximate mechanisms at the basis of worker reproductive decisions. Here, we test the hypothesis that the capacity of workers to reproduce in foreign colonies lies in their ability to react differently according to the colonial context and whether this reaction is influenced by a particular internal state. Using the bumble bee Bombus terrestris, we show that workers exhibit an extremely high reproductive plasticity which is conditioned by the social context they experience. Fertile workers reintroduced into their mother colony reverted to sterility, as expected. On the contrary, a high level of ovary activity persisted in fertile workers introduced into a foreign nest, and this despite more frequent direct contacts with the queen and the brood than control workers. Foreign workers' reproductive decisions were not affected by the resident queen, their level of fertility being similar whether or not the queen was removed from the host colony. Workers' physiological state at the time of introduction is also of crucial importance, since infertile workers failed to develop a reproductive phenotype in a foreign nest. Therefore, both internal and environmental factors appear to condition individual reproductive strategies in this species, suggesting that more complex decision-making mechanisms are involved in the regulation of worker

  17. Antecedents of ethical decision-making: intercollegiate sporting environments as clinical education and practice settings.

    PubMed

    Caswell, Shane V; Ambegaonkar, Jatin P; Caswell, Amanda M; Gould, Trenton E

    2009-01-01

    Unique among allied health care professions, athletic training is predominately practiced amid competitive intercollegiate sports. Competitive sporting environments have been suggested to adversely impact morality, ethical decision-making (EDM), and behavior. The purposes of this study were to (1) investigate the effect of institutional National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) participation level on preferred ethical ideologies and EDM, (2) determine the relationship between professional status (athletic training student [ATS] or certified athletic trainer [ATC]) and ethical ideology preferences and EDM, and (3) examine whether preferred ethical ideology is related to differences in EDM. A nationally representative sample of 610 ATSs and ATCs from 30 athletic training education programs, stratified by NCAA division level, participated in the study. All participants completed a demographic survey, the Ethics Position Questionnaire, and the Dilemmas in Athletic Training Questionnaire. No significant relationships were noted between NCAA participation level and respondents' ethical ideology preferences. However, ATSs and ATCs demonstrated significant preferences for specific ethical ideologies, with students adopting the subjectivist ideology more than expected and the exceptionist ideology less than expected and ATCs adopting the exceptionist ideology more than expected and the situationist ideology less than expected. In contrast to some previous research, our results suggest that competitive sporting environments do not affect ATSs' and ATCs' ethical ideology and EDM abilities at the collegiate level. These findings serve as a baseline for future research examining the ethical ideologies and ethical decision-making levels of athletic training practitioners and other allied health professionals across clinical settings. PMID:19361022

  18. Parallel effects of processing fluency and positive affect on familiarity-based recognition decisions for faces

    PubMed Central

    Duke, Devin; Fiacconi, Chris M.; Köhler, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    According to attribution models of familiarity assessment, people can use a heuristic in recognition-memory decisions, in which they attribute the subjective ease of processing of a memory probe to a prior encounter with the stimulus in question. Research in social cognition suggests that experienced positive affect may be the proximal cue that signals fluency in various experimental contexts. In the present study, we compared the effects of positive affect and fluency on recognition-memory judgments for faces with neutral emotional expression. We predicted that if positive affect is indeed the critical cue that signals processing fluency at retrieval, then its manipulation should produce effects that closely mirror those produced by manipulations of processing fluency. In two experiments, we employed a masked-priming procedure in combination with a Remember-Know (RK) paradigm that aimed to separate familiarity- from recollection-based memory decisions. In addition, participants performed a prime-discrimination task that allowed us to take inter-individual differences in prime awareness into account. We found highly similar effects of our priming manipulations of processing fluency and of positive affect. In both cases, the critical effect was specific to familiarity-based recognition responses. Moreover, in both experiments it was reflected in a shift toward a more liberal response bias, rather than in changed discrimination. Finally, in both experiments, the effect was found to be related to prime awareness; it was present only in participants who reported a lack of such awareness on the prime-discrimination task. These findings add to a growing body of evidence that points not only to a role of fluency, but also of positive affect in familiarity assessment. As such they are consistent with the idea that fluency itself may be hedonically marked. PMID:24795678

  19. Influence of negative affect on decision making in women with restrictive and binge-purge type anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Danner, Unna N; Sternheim, Lot; Bijsterbosch, Jojanneke M; Dingemans, Alexandra E; Evers, Catharine; van Elburg, Annemarie A

    2016-05-30

    The present study aims to examine the influence of negative affect on decision making in women with anorexia nervosa (AN) compared to healthy control women and, secondly, to assess differences between the restrictive (ANR) and binge-purge (ANBP) subtypes. One hundred four women (32 with ANR, 32 with ANBP, and 40 healthy controls) participated. All women were asked to watch either a negative or a control film fragment, both followed by the Bechara Gambling Task (BGT). Before and after the fragments negative affect was measured. Additionally, relevant characteristics (e.g., overall depressive symptoms) were assessed. Differences in negative affect did not influence decision making performance. Independent of affective state, decision making was found to be impaired in women with ANBP (no learning effect on the BGT), but not in women with ANR. These findings highlight the importance of considering different AN subtypes when examining decision making processes. However, the role of negative affect on decision making remains uncertain. Since other affect related factors such as affect dysregulation may also play a role, future studies on decision making in AN should take the role of affect into account. PMID:27137960

  20. Clinical Trial Decision Making in Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease: A Qualitative Study of Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Participation.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Chavis A; Chavez, Veronica; Mondestin, Valerie; Deatrick, Janet; Li, Yimei; Barakat, Lamia P

    2015-08-01

    Clinical trial research forms the foundation for advancing treatments; yet, children with sickle cell disease (SCD) are currently underrepresented. This qualitative study examines decision-making processes of youth with SCD and their caregivers regarding enrollment in clinical trial research. A subsample of participants from a study of clinical trial decision making among youth with health disparity conditions, 23 caregivers and 29 children/teens/young adults with SCD (age, 10 to 29 y), indicated whether or not they would participate in hypothetical medical and psychosocial clinical trials and prioritized barriers and benefits to participation via card sort and semistructured interviews. Audio recordings were transcribed and coded for themes. Participants reported that concerns of potential harm most affected their decision. Secondary factors were potential benefit, manageable study demands, and trust in the medical staff. Caregivers weighed potential harm more heavily than their children. Young children were more likely to endorse potential benefit. Overall, participants stated they would be willing to participate in research if the potential benefit outweighs potential harm and unmanageable study demands. To optimize recruitment, results suggest addressing potential harm first while highlighting potential benefits, creating manageable study demands, and endorsing the future benefits of research to the sickle cell community. PMID:25072368

  1. Abnormal affective decision making revealed in adolescent binge drinkers using a functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lin; Bechara, Antoine; Gong, Qiyong; Huang, Xiaoqi; Li, Xiangrui; Xue, Gui; Wong, Savio; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Palmer, Paula; Wei, Yonglan; Jia, Yong; Johnson, C Anderson

    2013-06-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the neural correlates of affective decision making, as measured by the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), which are associated with adolescent binge drinking. Fourteen adolescent binge drinkers (16-18 years of age) and 14 age-matched adolescents who had never consumed alcohol--never drinkers--were recruited from local high schools in Chengdu, China. Questionnaires were used to assess academic performance, drinking experience, and urgency. Brain regions activated by the IGT performance were identified with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Results showed that, compared to never drinkers, binge drinkers performed worse on the IGT and showed higher activity in the subcomponents of the decision-making neural circuitry implicated in the execution of emotional and incentive-related behaviors, namely, the left amygdala and insula bilaterally. Moreover, measures of the severity of drinking problems in real life, as well as high urgency scores, were associated with increased activity within the insula, combined with decreased activity within the orbitofrontal cortex. These results suggest that hyperreactivity of a neural system implicated in the execution of emotional and incentive-related behaviors can be associated with socially undesirable behaviors, such as binge drinking, among adolescents. These findings have social implications because they potentially reveal underlying neural mechanisms for making poor decisions, which may increase an individual's risk and vulnerability for alcoholism. PMID:22486330

  2. Visual cluster analysis in support of clinical decision intelligence.

    PubMed

    Gotz, David; Sun, Jimeng; Cao, Nan; Ebadollahi, Shahram

    2011-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) contain a wealth of information about patients. In addition to providing efficient and accurate records for individual patients, large databases of EHRs contain valuable information about overall patient populations. While statistical insights describing an overall population are beneficial, they are often not specific enough to use as the basis for individualized patient-centric decisions. To address this challenge, we describe an approach based on patient similarity which analyzes an EHR database to extract a cohort of patient records most similar to a specific target patient. Clusters of similar patients are then visualized to allow interactive visual refinement by human experts. Statistics are then extracted from the refined patient clusters and displayed to users. The statistical insights taken from these refined clusters provide personalized guidance for complex decisions. This paper focuses on the cluster refinement stage where an expert user must interactively (a) judge the quality and contents of automatically generated similar patient clusters, and (b) refine the clusters based on his/her expertise. We describe the DICON visualization tool which allows users to interactively view and refine multidimensional similar patient clusters. We also present results from a preliminary evaluation where two medical doctors provided feedback on our approach. PMID:22195102

  3. Visual Cluster Analysis in Support of Clinical Decision Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Gotz, David; Sun, Jimeng; Cao, Nan; Ebadollahi, Shahram

    2011-01-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) contain a wealth of information about patients. In addition to providing efficient and accurate records for individual patients, large databases of EHRs contain valuable information about overall patient populations. While statistical insights describing an overall population are beneficial, they are often not specific enough to use as the basis for individualized patient-centric decisions. To address this challenge, we describe an approach based on patient similarity which analyzes an EHR database to extract a cohort of patient records most similar to a specific target patient. Clusters of similar patients are then visualized to allow interactive visual refinement by human experts. Statistics are then extracted from the refined patient clusters and displayed to users. The statistical insights taken from these refined clusters provide personalized guidance for complex decisions. This paper focuses on the cluster refinement stage where an expert user must interactively (a) judge the quality and contents of automatically generated similar patient clusters, and (b) refine the clusters based on his/her expertise. We describe the DICON visualization tool which allows users to interactively view and refine multidimensional similar patient clusters. We also present results from a preliminary evaluation where two medical doctors provided feedback on our approach. PMID:22195102

  4. Empirically and Clinically Useful Decision Making in Psychotherapy: Differential Predictions with Treatment Response Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Wolfgang; Saunders, Stephen M.; Leon, Scott C.; Martinovich, Zoran; Kosfelder, Joachim; Schulte, Dietmar; Grawe, Klaus; Tholen, Sven

    2006-01-01

    In the delivery of clinical services, outcomes monitoring (i.e., repeated assessments of a patient's response to treatment) can be used to support clinical decision making (i.e., recurrent revisions of outcome expectations on the basis of that response). Outcomes monitoring can be particularly useful in the context of established practice research…

  5. Computer Decision Support to Improve Autism Screening and Care in Community Pediatric Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauer, Nerissa S.; Sturm, Lynne A.; Carroll, Aaron E.; Downs, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    An autism module was added to an existing computer decision support system (CDSS) to facilitate adherence to recommended guidelines for screening for autism spectrum disorders in primary care pediatric clinics. User satisfaction was assessed by survey and informal feedback at monthly meetings between clinical staff and the software team. To assess…

  6. Clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches in osteopathy - a qualitative grounded theory study.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Oliver P; Petty, Nicola J; Moore, Ann P

    2014-02-01

    There is limited understanding of how osteopaths make decisions in relation to clinical practice. The aim of this research was to construct an explanatory theory of the clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches of experienced osteopaths in the UK. Twelve UK registered osteopaths participated in this constructivist grounded theory qualitative study. Purposive and theoretical sampling was used to select participants. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews which were audio-recorded and transcribed. As the study approached theoretical sufficiency, participants were observed and video-recorded during a patient appointment, which was followed by a video-prompted interview. Constant comparative analysis was used to analyse and code data. Data analysis resulted in the construction of three qualitatively different therapeutic approaches which characterised participants and their clinical practice, termed; Treater, Communicator and Educator. Participants' therapeutic approach influenced their approach to clinical decision-making, the level of patient involvement, their interaction with patients, and therapeutic goals. Participants' overall conception of practice lay on a continuum ranging from technical rationality to professional artistry, and contributed to their therapeutic approach. A range of factors were identified which influenced participants' conception of practice. The findings indicate that there is variation in osteopaths' therapeutic approaches to practice and clinical decision-making, which are influenced by their overall conception of practice. This study provides the first explanatory theory of the clinical decision-making and therapeutic approaches of osteopaths. PMID:23932101

  7. An Integrative Process Approach on Judgment and Decision Making: The Impact of Arousal, Affect, Motivation, and Cognitive Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roets, Arne; Van Hiel, Alain

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to integrate the findings from various research traditions on human judgment and decision making, focusing on four process variables: arousal, affect, motivation, and cognitive capacity/ability. We advocate a broad perspective referred to as the integrative process approach (IPA) of decision making, in which these process…

  8. The Relationships among Three Factors Affecting the Financial Decision-Making Abilities of Adults with Mild Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suto, W. M. I.; Clare, I. C. H.; Holland, A. J.; Watson, P. C.

    2005-01-01

    Among adults with intellectual disabilities (IDs), there is a need not only to assess financial decision-making capacity, but also to understand how it can be maximized. Although increased financial independence is a goal for many people, it is essential that individuals decision-making abilities are sufficient, and many factors may affect the…

  9. Environmental Factors Affecting Pupation Decision in the Horned Flour Beetle Gnatocerus cornutus.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Takane; Ohta, Kunihiro; Shimada, Masakazu; Okada, Kensuke; Okada, Yasukazu

    2015-04-01

    Social environments often affect the development of organisms. In Tenebrionidae beetles, larval development can be arrested at the final instar stage in the presence of conspecific larvae. This developmental plasticity is considered to be an anti-cannibalistic strategy but the critical environmental determinants and actual effects remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the effects of the heterospecific environment, conspecific sexual environment (i.e., presence of conspecific male or female), and abiotic physical stimulation on the pupation decision of the sexually dimorphic horned-flour beetle Gnatocerus cornutus. Additionally, actual anti-cannibalistic or antipredatory effects of developmental arrest were evaluated by analyzing stage-dependent vulnerabilities. When G. cornutus larvae were maintained with a G. cornutus larva, a G. cornutus adult, or T. castaneum adult, the developmental period up to the prepupal stage was significantly elongated, suggesting that the cue is not species-specific. Sexual environment did not affect the timing of pupation in G. cornutus; however, we found that abiotic tactile stimulations by glass beads could repress pupation. We also discovered that prepupal and pupal stages were more vulnerable to cannibalism and predation than the larval stage. These data suggest that G. cornutus larvae use non-species specific tactile stimulation as a decision cue for pupation and it has broader defensive effects against heterospecific predation as well as conspecific cannibalism. PMID:25826068

  10. Detecting fast, online reasoning processes in clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Flores, Amanda; Cobos, Pedro L; López, Francisco J; Godoy, Antonio

    2014-06-01

    In an experiment that used the inconsistency paradigm, experienced clinical psychologists and psychology students performed a reading task using clinical reports and a diagnostic judgment task. The clinical reports provided information about the symptoms of hypothetical clients who had been previously diagnosed with a specific mental disorder. Reading times of inconsistent target sentences were slower than those of control sentences, demonstrating an inconsistency effect. The results also showed that experienced clinicians gave different weights to different symptoms according to their relevance when fluently reading the clinical reports provided, despite the fact that all the symptoms were of equal diagnostic value according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; American Psychiatric Association, 2000). The diagnostic judgment task yielded a similar pattern of results. In contrast to previous findings, the results of the reading task may be taken as direct evidence of the intervention of reasoning processes that occur very early, rapidly, and online. We suggest that these processes are based on the representation of mental disorders and that these representations are particularly suited to fast retrieval from memory and to making inferences. They may also be related to the clinicians' causal reasoning. The implications of these results for clinician training are also discussed. PMID:24274045

  11. A Three-Question Framework to Facilitate Clinical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sibold, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Context: Highly developed critical thinking and the ability to discriminate among many possible therapeutic interventions is a core behavior for the practicing athletic trainer. However, while athletic training students receive a great deal of clinically applicable information, many are not explicitly trained in efficient methods for channeling…

  12. Dental patient preferences and choice in clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Fukai, Kakuhiro; Yoshino, Koichi; Ohyama, Atsushi; Takaesu, Yoshinori

    2012-01-01

    In economics, the concept of utility refers to the strength of customer preference. In health care assessment, the visual analogue scale (VAS), the standard gamble, and the time trade-off are used to measure health state utilities. These utility measurements play a key role in promoting shared decision-making in dental care. Individual preference, however, is complex and dynamic. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between patient preference and educational intervention in the field of dental health. The data were collected by distributing questionnaires to employees of two companies in Japan. Participants were aged 18-65 years and consisted of 111 males and 93 females (204 in total). One company (Group A) had a dental program of annual check-ups and health education in the workplace, while the other company (Group B) had no such program. Statistical analyses were performed with the t-test and Chi-square test. The questionnaire items were designed to determine: (1) oral health-related quality of life, (2) dental health state utilities (using VAS), and (3) time trade-off for regular dental check-ups. The percentage of respondents in both groups who were satisfied with chewing function, appearance of teeth, and social function ranged from 23.1 to 42.4%. There were no significant differences between groups A and B in the VAS of decayed, filled, and missing teeth. The VAS of gum bleeding was 42.8 in Group A and 51.3 in Group B (p<0.05). The percentage of persons having a regular dental check-up every three months was 34.1 and 31.3% in Groups A and B respectively. These results suggest that low preference results from lack of opportunity or utilization of dental care in the worksite. Ascertaining the factors involved in patient preference may have significant potential benefits in shared decision-making. PMID:22790334

  13. Individual dispersal decisions affect fitness via maternal rank effects in male rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Weiß, Brigitte M; Kulik, Lars; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina V; Widdig, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Natal dispersal may have considerable social, ecological and evolutionary consequences. While species-specific dispersal strategies have received much attention, individual variation in dispersal decisions and its fitness consequences remain poorly understood. We investigated causes and consequences of natal dispersal age in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), a species with male dispersal. Using long-term demographic and genetic data from a semi-free ranging population on Cayo Santiago, Puerto Rico, we analysed how the social environment such as maternal family, group and population characteristics affected the age at which males leave their natal group. While natal dispersal age was unrelated to most measures of group or population structure, our study confirmed earlier findings that sons of high-ranking mothers dispersed later than sons of low-ranking ones. Natal dispersal age did not affect males' subsequent survival, but males dispersing later were more likely to reproduce. Late dispersers were likely to start reproducing while still residing in their natal group, frequently produced extra-group offspring before natal dispersal and subsequently dispersed to the group in which they had fathered offspring more likely than expected. Hence, the timing of natal dispersal was affected by maternal rank and influenced male reproduction, which, in turn affected which group males dispersed to. PMID:27576465

  14. Evaluating ambivalence: social-cognitive and affective brain regions associated with ambivalent decision-making.

    PubMed

    Nohlen, Hannah U; van Harreveld, Frenk; Rotteveel, Mark; Lelieveld, Gert-Jan; Crone, Eveline A

    2014-07-01

    Ambivalence is a state of inconsistency that is often experienced as affectively aversive. In this functional magnetic resonance imaging study, we investigated the role of cognitive and social-affective processes in the experience of ambivalence and coping with its negative consequences. We examined participants' brain activity during the dichotomous evaluation (pro vs contra) of pretested ambivalent (e.g. alcohol), positive (e.g. happiness) and negative (e.g. genocide) word stimuli. We manipulated evaluation relevance by varying the probability of evaluation consequences, under the hypothesis that ambivalence is experienced as more negative when outcomes are relevant. When making ambivalent evaluations, more activity was found in the anterior cingulate cortex, the insula, the temporal parietal junction (TPJ) and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC)/precuneus, for both high and low evaluation relevance. After statistically conservative corrections, activity in the TPJ and PCC/precuneus was negatively correlated with experienced ambivalence after scanning, as measured by Priester and Petty's felt ambivalence scale (1996). The findings show that cognitive and social-affective brain areas are involved in the experience of ambivalence. However, these networks are differently associated with subsequent reduction of ambivalence, thus highlighting the importance of understanding both cognitive and affective processes involved in ambivalent decision-making. PMID:23685774

  15. Individual dispersal decisions affect fitness via maternal rank effects in male rhesus macaques

    PubMed Central

    Weiß, Brigitte M.; Kulik, Lars; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina V.; Widdig, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Natal dispersal may have considerable social, ecological and evolutionary consequences. While species-specific dispersal strategies have received much attention, individual variation in dispersal decisions and its fitness consequences remain poorly understood. We investigated causes and consequences of natal dispersal age in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), a species with male dispersal. Using long-term demographic and genetic data from a semi-free ranging population on Cayo Santiago, Puerto Rico, we analysed how the social environment such as maternal family, group and population characteristics affected the age at which males leave their natal group. While natal dispersal age was unrelated to most measures of group or population structure, our study confirmed earlier findings that sons of high-ranking mothers dispersed later than sons of low-ranking ones. Natal dispersal age did not affect males’ subsequent survival, but males dispersing later were more likely to reproduce. Late dispersers were likely to start reproducing while still residing in their natal group, frequently produced extra-group offspring before natal dispersal and subsequently dispersed to the group in which they had fathered offspring more likely than expected. Hence, the timing of natal dispersal was affected by maternal rank and influenced male reproduction, which, in turn affected which group males dispersed to. PMID:27576465

  16. Evaluating the use of a computerized clinical decision support system for asthma by pediatric pulmonologists

    PubMed Central

    Lomotan, Edwin A.; Hoeksema, Laura J.; Edmonds, Diana E.; Ramírez-Garnica, Gabriela; Shiffman, Richard N.; Horwitz, Leora I.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate use of a new guideline-based, computerized clinical decision support (CCDS) system for asthma in a pediatric pulmonology clinic of a large academic medical center. Methods We conducted a qualitative evaluation including review of electronic data, direct observation, and interviews with all nine pediatric pulmonologists in the clinic. Outcome measures included patterns of computer use in relation to patient care, and themes surrounding the relationship between asthma care and computer use. Results The pediatric pulmonologists entered enough data to trigger the decision support system in 397/445 (89.2%) of all asthma visits from January 2009 to May 2009. However, interviews and direct observations revealed use of the decision support system was limited to documentation activities after clinic sessions ended. Reasons for delayed use reflected barriers common to general medical care and barriers specific to subspecialty care. Subspecialist-specific barriers included the perceived high complexity of patients, the impact of subject matter expertise on the types of decision support needed, and unique workflow concerns such as the need to create letters to referring physicians. Conclusions Pediatric pulmonologists demonstrated low use of a computerized decision support system for asthma care because of a combination of general and subspecialist-specific factors. Subspecialist-specific factors should not be underestimated when designing guideline-based, computerized decision support systems for the subspecialty setting. PMID:22204897

  17. Managing risk: clinical decision-making in mental health services.

    PubMed

    Muir-Cochrane, Eimear; Gerace, Adam; Mosel, Krista; O'Kane, Debra; Barkway, Patricia; Curren, David; Oster, Candice

    2011-01-01

    Risk assessment and management is a major component of contemporary mental health practice. Risk assessment in health care exists within contemporary perspectives of management and risk aversive practices in health care. This has led to much discussion about the best approach to assessing possible risks posed by people with mental health problems. In addition, researchers and commentators have expressed concern that clinical practice is being dominated by managerial models of risk management at the expense of meeting the patient's health and social care needs. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the risk assessment practices of a multidisciplinary mental health service. Findings indicate that mental health professionals draw on both managerial and therapeutic approaches to risk management, integrating these approaches into their clinical practice. Rather than being dominated by managerial concerns regarding risk, the participants demonstrate professional autonomy and concern for the needs of their clients. PMID:22077745

  18. Clinical decision making in seizures and status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Teran, Felipe; Harper-Kirksey, Katrina; Jagoda, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Seizures and status epilepticus are frequent neurologic emergencies in the emergency department, accounting for 1% of all emergency department visits. The management of this time-sensitive and potentially life-threatening condition is challenging for both prehospital providers and emergency clinicians. The approach to seizing patients begins with differentiating seizure activity from mimics and follows with identifying potential secondary etiologies, such as alcohol-related seizures. The approach to the patient in status epilepticus and the patient with nonconvulsive status epilepticus constitutes a special clinical challenge. This review summarizes the best available evidence and recommendations regarding diagnosis and resuscitation of the seizing patient in the emergency setting. PMID:25902572

  19. Framework for securing personal health data in clinical decision support systems.

    PubMed

    Sandell, Protik

    2007-01-01

    If appropriate security mechanisms aren't in place, individuals and groups can get unauthorized access to personal health data residing in clinical decision support systems (CDSS). These concerns are well founded; there has been a dramatic increase in reports of security incidents. The paper provides a framework for securing personal health data in CDSS. The framework breaks down CDSS into data gathering, data management and data delivery functions. It then provides the vulnerabilities that can occur in clinical decision support activities and the measures that need to be taken to protect the data. The framework is applied to protect the confidentiality, integrity and availability of personal health data in a decision support system. Using the framework, project managers and architects can assess the potential risk of unauthorized data access in their decision support system. Moreover they can design systems and procedures to effectively secure personal health data. PMID:17583166

  20. A study of the use of past experiences in clinical decision making in emergency situations.

    PubMed

    Cioffi, J

    2001-10-01

    Making decisions to call emergency assistance to patients is an important dimension of nursing practice. Most usually these decision making situations are uncertain and it is expected nurses rely on past clinical experiences. This study, approved by the ethics committees of both a university and an area health service, aimed to describe nurses' reliance on past experiences and identify associated judgement strategies (heuristics). Thirty-two registered nurses with five or more years experience were interviewed. Main findings were: nurses did use their past experiences and these experiences were used in the form of the three "classic" heuristics, representativeness, availability and anchoring and adjustment. It can be concluded past experiences are intrinsic to decision making and this has implications for both the clinical components of nursing educational programs and staffing allocations made by administrators. Some nurses, however, did not include referral to past experiences in their decision-making accounts which may be a limitation of the study design. PMID:11524105

  1. The Development and Validation of a Tool to Measure Self-Confidence and Anxiety in Nursing Students While Making Clinical Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Krista Alaine

    2011-01-01

    Clinical decision making (CDM) is a cornerstone skill for nurses. Self-confidence and anxiety are two affective influences that impact the learning and adeptness of CDM. Currently, no instruments exist that measure perceived self-confidence and anxiety level of undergraduate nursing students related to CDM. The purpose of this research was to…

  2. Integrated risk assessment and feedback reporting for clinical decision making in a Medicare Risk plan.

    PubMed

    Schraeder, C; Britt, T; Shelton, P

    2000-10-01

    The challenge of tapping into the rich resource of population-based, aggregated data to inform and guide clinical processes remains one of the largely unrealized potentials of managed care. This article describes a multifaceted approach of using health-related data to support providers in clinical decision making as an adjunct to case management and primary care delivery. The goal is to provide data that can be used for clinical decision making that is population based, yet individualized for specific patient care situations. Information reporting holds great potential in the clinical care of patients because it can be used to identify persons who could benefit from early detection, intervention, or treatment. It has been suggested that one of the keys to success in managed Medicare is the timely use of information that is detailed, comprehensive, and real-time describing key parameters of clinical encounters. PMID:11067092

  3. Shared Decision Making Does Not Influence Physicians against Clinical Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Guerrier, Mireille; Légaré, France; Turcotte, Stéphane; Labrecque, Michel; Rivest, Louis-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background While shared decision making (SDM) and adherence to clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) are important, some believe they are incompatible. This study explored the mutual influence between physicians’ intention to engage in SDM and their intention to follow CPGs. Methods Embedded within a clustered randomized trial to assess the impact of training physicians in SDM about using antibiotics to treat acute respiratory tract infections, this study evaluated physicians’ intentions to both engage in SDM and follow CPGs. A self-administered questionnaire based on the theory of planned behavior evaluated both behavioral intentions and their respective determinants (attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control) at study entry and exit. We used path analysis to explore the relationships between the intentions. We conducted statistical analyses using the maximum likelihood method and the variance-covariance matrix. Goodness of fit indices encompassed the chi-square statistic, the comparative fit index and the root mean square error of approximation. Results We analyzed 244 responses at entry and 236 at exit. In the control group, at entry we observed that physicians’ intention to engage in SDM (r = 0, t = 0.03) did not affect their intention to follow CPGs; however, their intention to follow CPGs (r = −0.31 t = −2.82) did negatively influence their intention to engage in SDM. At exit, neither behavioral intention influenced the other. In the experimental group, at entry neither behavioral intention influenced the other; at exit, the intention to engage in SDM still did not influence the intention to use CPGs, although the intention to follow CPGs (r = −0.15 t = −2.02) slightly negatively influenced the intention to engage in SDM, but this was not clinically significant. Conclusion Physicians’ intention to engage in SDM does not affect their intention to adopt CPGs even after SDM training. Physicians’ intention

  4. Quantitative ultrasound texture analysis for clinical decision making support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie Ying; Beland, Michael; Konrad, Joseph; Tuomi, Adam; Glidden, David; Grand, David; Merck, Derek

    2015-03-01

    We propose a general ultrasound (US) texture-analysis and machine-learning framework for detecting the presence of disease that is suitable for clinical application across clinicians, disease types, devices, and operators. Its stages are image selection, image filtering, ROI selection, feature parameterization, and classification. Each stage is modular and can be replaced with alternate methods. Thus, this framework is adaptable to a wide range of tasks. Our two preliminary clinical targets are hepatic steatosis and adenomyosis diagnosis. For steatosis, we collected US images from 288 patients and their pathology-determined values of steatosis (%) from biopsies. Two radiologists independently reviewed all images and identified the region of interest (ROI) most representative of the hepatic echotexture for each patient. To parameterize the images into comparable quantities, we filter the US images at multiple scales for various texture responses. For each response, we collect a histogram of pixel features within the ROI, and parameterize it as a Gaussian function using its mean, standard deviation, kurtosis, and skew to create a 36-feature vector. Our algorithm uses a support vector machine (SVM) for classification. Using a threshold of 10%, we achieved 72.81% overall accuracy, 76.18% sensitivity, and 65.96% specificity in identifying steatosis with leave-ten-out cross-validation (p<0.0001). Extending this framework to adenomyosis, we identified 38 patients with MR-confirmed findings of adenomyosis and previous US studies and 50 controls. A single rater picked the best US-image and ROI for each case. Using the same processing pipeline, we obtained 76.14% accuracy, 86.00% sensitivity, and 63.16% specificity with leave-one-out cross-validation (p<0.0001).

  5. Identifying ultrasound and clinical features of breast cancer molecular subtypes by ensemble decision.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Jing; Xiao, Yun; Cui, Hao; Du, Guoqing; Wang, Ying; Li, Ziyao; Wu, Tong; Li, Xia; Tian, Jiawei

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is molecularly heterogeneous and categorized into four molecular subtypes: Luminal-A, Luminal-B, HER2-amplified and Triple-negative. In this study, we aimed to apply an ensemble decision approach to identify the ultrasound and clinical features related to the molecular subtypes. We collected ultrasound and clinical features from 1,000 breast cancer patients and performed immunohistochemistry on these samples. We used the ensemble decision approach to select unique features and to construct decision models. The decision model for Luminal-A subtype was constructed based on the presence of an echogenic halo and post-acoustic shadowing or indifference. The decision model for Luminal-B subtype was constructed based on the absence of an echogenic halo and vascularity. The decision model for HER2-amplified subtype was constructed based on the presence of post-acoustic enhancement, calcification, vascularity and advanced age. The model for Triple-negative subtype followed two rules. One was based on irregular shape, lobulate margin contour, the absence of calcification and hypovascularity, whereas the other was based on oval shape, hypovascularity and micro-lobulate margin contour. The accuracies of the models were 83.8%, 77.4%, 87.9% and 92.7%, respectively. We identified specific features of each molecular subtype and expanded the scope of ultrasound for making diagnoses using these decision models. PMID:26046791

  6. Decision analysis and risk models for land development affecting infrastructure systems.

    PubMed

    Thekdi, Shital A; Lambert, James H

    2012-07-01

    Coordination and layering of models to identify risks in complex systems such as large-scale infrastructure of energy, water, and transportation is of current interest across application domains. Such infrastructures are increasingly vulnerable to adjacent commercial and residential land development. Land development can compromise the performance of essential infrastructure systems and increase the costs of maintaining or increasing performance. A risk-informed approach to this topic would be useful to avoid surprise, regret, and the need for costly remedies. This article develops a layering and coordination of models for risk management of land development affecting infrastructure systems. The layers are: system identification, expert elicitation, predictive modeling, comparison of investment alternatives, and implications of current decisions for future options. The modeling layers share a focus on observable factors that most contribute to volatility of land development and land use. The relevant data and expert evidence include current and forecasted growth in population and employment, conservation and preservation rules, land topography and geometries, real estate assessments, market and economic conditions, and other factors. The approach integrates to a decision framework of strategic considerations based on assessing risk, cost, and opportunity in order to prioritize needs and potential remedies that mitigate impacts of land development to the infrastructure systems. The approach is demonstrated for a 5,700-mile multimodal transportation system adjacent to 60,000 tracts of potential land development. PMID:22050390

  7. Fluctuating capacity and advance decision-making in Bipolar Affective Disorder - Self-binding directives and self-determination.

    PubMed

    Gergel, Tania; Owen, Gareth S

    2015-01-01

    For people with Bipolar Affective Disorder, a self-binding (advance) directive (SBD), by which they commit themselves to treatment during future episodes of mania, even if unwilling, can seem the most rational way to deal with an imperfect predicament. Knowing that mania will almost certainly cause enormous damage to themselves, their preferred solution may well be to allow trusted others to enforce treatment and constraint, traumatic though this may be. No adequate provision exists for drafting a truly effective SBD and efforts to establish such provision are hampered by very valid, but also paralysing ethical, clinical and legal concerns. Effectively, the autonomy and rights of people with bipolar are being 'protected' through being denied an opportunity to protect themselves. From a standpoint firmly rooted in the clinical context and experience of mania, this article argues that an SBD, based on a patient-centred evaluation of capacity to make treatment decisions (DMC-T) and grounded within the clinician-patient relationship, could represent a legitimate and ethically coherent form of self-determination. After setting out background information on fluctuating capacity, mania and advance directives, this article proposes a framework for constructing such an SBD, and considers common objections, possible solutions and suggestions for future research. PMID:25939286

  8. Fluctuating capacity and advance decision-making in Bipolar Affective Disorder — Self-binding directives and self-determination

    PubMed Central

    Gergel, Tania; Owen, Gareth S.

    2015-01-01

    For people with Bipolar Affective Disorder, a self-binding (advance) directive (SBD), by which they commit themselves to treatment during future episodes of mania, even if unwilling, can seem the most rational way to deal with an imperfect predicament. Knowing that mania will almost certainly cause enormous damage to themselves, their preferred solution may well be to allow trusted others to enforce treatment and constraint, traumatic though this may be. No adequate provision exists for drafting a truly effective SBD and efforts to establish such provision are hampered by very valid, but also paralysing ethical, clinical and legal concerns. Effectively, the autonomy and rights of people with bipolar are being ‘protected’ through being denied an opportunity to protect themselves. From a standpoint firmly rooted in the clinical context and experience of mania, this article argues that an SBD, based on a patient-centred evaluation of capacity to make treatment decisions (DMC-T) and grounded within the clinician–patient relationship, could represent a legitimate and ethically coherent form of self-determination. After setting out background information on fluctuating capacity, mania and advance directives, this article proposes a framework for constructing such an SBD, and considers common objections, possible solutions and suggestions for future research. PMID:25939286

  9. A service oriented approach for guidelines-based clinical decision support using BPMN.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Aziz, Ayesha; Chatwin, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Evidence-based medical practice requires that clinical guidelines need to be documented in such a way that they represent a clinical workflow in its most accessible form. In order to optimize clinical processes to improve clinical outcomes, we propose a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) based approach for implementing clinical guidelines that can be accessed from an Electronic Health Record (EHR) application with a Web Services enabled communication mechanism with the Enterprise Service Bus. We have used Business Process Modelling Notation (BPMN) for modelling and presenting the clinical pathway in the form of a workflow. The aim of this study is to produce spontaneous alerts in the healthcare workflow in the diagnosis of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The use of BPMN as a tool to automate clinical guidelines has not been previously employed for providing Clinical Decision Support (CDS). PMID:25160142

  10. Development and evaluation of learning module on clinical decision-making in Prosthodontics

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Saee; Lambade, Dipti; Chahande, Jayashree

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Best practice strategies for helping students learn the reasoning skills of problem solving and critical thinking (CT) remain a source of conjecture, particularly with regard to CT. The dental education literature is fundamentally devoid of research on the cognitive components of clinical decision-making. Aim: This study was aimed to develop and evaluate the impact of blended learning module on clinical decision-making skills of dental graduates for planning prosthodontics rehabilitation. Methodology: An interactive teaching module consisting of didactic lectures on clinical decision-making and a computer-assisted case-based treatment planning software was developed Its impact on cognitive knowledge gain in clinical decision-making was evaluated using an assessment involving problem-based multiple choice questions and paper-based case scenarios. Results: Mean test scores were: Pretest (17 ± 1), posttest 1 (21 ± 2) and posttest 2 (43 ± 3). Comparison of mean scores was done with one-way ANOVA test. There was overall significant difference in between mean scores at all the three points (P < 0.001). A pair-wise comparison of mean scores was done with Bonferroni test. The mean difference is significant at the 0.05 level. The pair-wise comparison shows that posttest 2 score is significantly higher than posttest 1 and posttest 1 is significantly higher than pretest that is, pretest 2 > posttest 1 > pretest. Conclusion: Blended teaching methods employing didactic lectures on the clinical decision-making as well as computer assisted case-based learning can be used to improve quality of clinical decision-making in prosthodontic rehabilitation for dental graduates. PMID:26929504

  11. Integrating decision support, based on the Arden Syntax, in a clinical laboratory environment.

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, B.; Bergqvist, Y.

    1993-01-01

    A clinical decision support system prototype have been developed in the clinical laboratory environment. The knowledge base consists of Medical Logic Modules, written in the Arden Syntax, and the work describes how these modules can be written, evoked and executed in a system, that is integrated with a laboratory information system, and facilitate real time validation of laboratory data. Tools and methods for building a decision support system are described and design aspects, such as database access, system validation and platform independence, are discussed. PMID:8130502

  12. Clinical decision rules for acute bacterial meningitis: current insights

    PubMed Central

    Viallon, Alain; Botelho-Nevers, Elisabeth; Zeni, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis (BM) requires rapid diagnosis so that suitable treatment can be instituted within 60 minutes of admitting the patient. The cornerstone of diagnostic examination is lumbar puncture, which enables microbiological analysis and determination of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytochemical characteristics. However, microbiological testing is not sufficiently sensitive to rule out this diagnosis. With regard to the analysis of standard CSF cytochemical characteristics (polymorphonuclear count, CSF glucose and protein concentration, and CSF:serum glucose), this is often misleading. Indeed, the relatively imprecise nature of the cutoff values for these BM diagnosis markers can make their interpretation difficult. However, there are two markers that appear to be more efficient than the standard ones: CSF lactate and serum procalcitonin levels. Scores and predictive models are also available; however, they only define a clinical probability, and in addition, their use calls for prior validation on the population in which they are used. In this article, we review current methods of BM diagnosis. PMID:27307768

  13. Telemonitoring in heart failure patients with clinical decision support to optimize medication doses based on guidelines.

    PubMed

    Kropf, Martin; Modre-Osprian, Robert; Hayn, Dieter; Fruhwald, Friedrich; Schreier, Günter

    2014-01-01

    The European Society of Cardiology guidelines for heart failure management are based on strong evidence that adherence to optimal medication is beneficial for heart failure patients. Telemonitoring with integrated clinical decision support enables physicians to adapt medication dose based on up to date vital parameters and reduces the number of hospital visits needed solely for up-titration of heart failure medication. Although keeping track of weight and blood pressure changes is recommended during unstable phases, e.g. post-discharge and during up-titration of medication, guidelines are rather vague regarding telehealth aspects. In this paper, we focus on the evaluation of a clinical decision support system for adaption of heart failure medication and for detecting early deteriorations through monitoring of blood pressure, heart rate and weight changes. This clinical decision support system is currently used in INTENSE-HF, a large scale telemonitoring trial with heart failure patients. The aim of this paper was to apply the decision support algorithm to an existing telemonitoring dataset, to assess the ability of the decision support concept to adhere to the guidelines and to discuss its limitations and potential improvements. PMID:25570663

  14. The interaction of patient race, provider bias, and clinical ambiguity on pain management decisions

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, Adam T.; Hollingshead, Nicole A.; Ashburn-Nardo, Leslie; Kroenke, Kurt

    2015-01-01

    Although racial disparities in pain care are widely reported, much remains to be known about the role of provider and contextual factors. We used computer-simulated patients to examine the influence of patient race, provider racial bias, and clinical ambiguity on pain decisions. One hundred twenty nine medical residents/fellows made assessment (pain intensity) and treatment (opioid and non-opioid analgesics) decisions for 12 virtual patients with acute pain. Race (Black/White) and clinical ambiguity (high/low) were manipulated across vignettes. Participants completed the Implicit Association Test and feeling thermometers, which assess implicit and explicit racial biases, respectively. Individual- and group-level analyses indicated that race and ambiguity had an interactive effect on providers’ decisions, such that decisions varied as a function of ambiguity for White but not Black patients. Individual differences across providers were observed for the effect of race and ambiguity on decisions; however providers’ implicit and explicit biases did not account for this variability. These data highlight the complexity of racial disparities and suggest that differences in care between White and Black patients are, in part, attributable to the nature (i.e., ambiguity) of the clinical scenario. The current study suggests that interventions to reduce disparities should differentially target patient, provider, and contextual factors. PMID:25828370

  15. Mobile clinical decision support systems and applications: a literature and commercial review.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pérez, Borja; de la Torre-Díez, Isabel; López-Coronado, Miguel; Sainz-de-Abajo, Beatriz; Robles, Montserrat; García-Gómez, Juan Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The latest advances in eHealth and mHealth have propitiated the rapidly creation and expansion of mobile applications for health care. One of these types of applications are the clinical decision support systems, which nowadays are being implemented in mobile apps to facilitate the access to health care professionals in their daily clinical decisions. The aim of this paper is twofold. Firstly, to make a review of the current systems available in the literature and in commercial stores. Secondly, to analyze a sample of applications in order to obtain some conclusions and recommendations. Two reviews have been done: a literature review on Scopus, IEEE Xplore, Web of Knowledge and PubMed and a commercial review on Google play and the App Store. Five applications from each review have been selected to develop an in-depth analysis and to obtain more information about the mobile clinical decision support systems. Ninety-two relevant papers and 192 commercial apps were found. Forty-four papers were focused only on mobile clinical decision support systems. One hundred seventy-one apps were available on Google play and 21 on the App Store. The apps are designed for general medicine and 37 different specialties, with some features common in all of them despite of the different medical fields objective. The number of mobile clinical decision support applications and their inclusion in clinical practices has risen in the last years. However, developers must be careful with their interface or the easiness of use, which can impoverish the experience of the users. PMID:24399281

  16. Evaluating a Clinical Decision Support Interface for End-of-Life Nurse Care

    PubMed Central

    Febretti, Alessandro; Stifter, Janet; Keenan, Gail M; Lopez, Karen D; Johnson, Andrew; Wilkie, Diana J

    2016-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) are tools that assist healthcare personnel in the decision-making process for patient care. Although CDSSs have been successfully deployed in the clinical setting to assist physicians, few CDSS have been targeted at professional nurses, the largest group of health providers. We present our experience in designing and testing a CDSS interface embedded within a nurse care planning and documentation tool. We developed four prototypes based on different CDSS feature designs, and tested them in simulated end-of-life patient handoff sessions with a group of 40 nurse clinicians. We show how our prototypes directed nurses towards an optimal care decision that was rarely performed in unassisted practice. We also discuss the effect of CDSS layout and interface navigation in a nurse’s acceptance of suggested actions. These findings provide insights into effective nursing CDSS design that are generalizable to care scenarios different than end-of-life.

  17. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Nurse-Focused Computerized Clinical Decision Support on Urinary Catheter Practice Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Robin Lynn Neal

    2012-01-01

    A growing national emphasis has been placed on health information technology (HIT) with robust computerized clinical decision support (CCDS) integration into health care delivery. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection is the most frequent health care-associated infection in the United States and is associated with high cost, high volumes and…

  18. Knowledge of risk factors and the periodontal disease-systemic link in dental students' clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Friesen, Lynn Roosa; Walker, Mary P; Kisling, Rebecca E; Liu, Ying; Williams, Karen B

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluated second-, third-, and fourth-year dental students' ability to identify systemic conditions associated with periodontal disease, risk factors most important for referral, and medications with an effect on the periodontium and their ability to apply this knowledge to make clinical decisions regarding treatment and referral of periodontal patients. A twenty-one question survey was administered at one U.S. dental school in the spring semester of 2012 to elicit the students' knowledge and confidence regarding clinical reasoning. The response rate was 86 percent. Periodontal risk factors were accurately selected by at least 50 percent of students in all three classes; these were poorly controlled diabetes, ≥6 mm pockets posteriorly, and lack of response to previous non-surgical therapy. Confidence in knowledge, knowledge of risk factors, and knowledge of medications with an effect on the periodontium improved with training and were predictive of better referral decision making. The greatest impact of training was seen on the students' ability to make correct decisions about referral and treatment for seven clinical scenarios. Although the study found a large increase in the students' abilities from the second through fourth years, the mean of 4.6 (out of 7) for the fourth-year students shows that, on average, those students missed correct treatment or referral on more than two of seven clinical cases. These results suggest that dental curricula should emphasize more critical decision making with respect to referral and treatment criteria in managing the periodontal patient. PMID:25179920

  19. Improving Emergency Department Triage Classification with Computerized Clinical Decision Support at a Pediatric Hospital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunisch, Joseph Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Emergency Severity Index (ESI) is an emergency department (ED) triage classification system based on estimated patient-specific resource utilization. Rules for a computerized clinical decision support (CDS) system based on a patient's chief complaint were developed and tested using a stochastic model for predicting ESI scores.…

  20. 78 FR 35937 - Food and Drug Administration Decisions for Investigational Device Exemption Clinical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... for Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) Clinical Investigations.'' This guidance document was... investigations to evaluate medical devices under FDA's IDE regulations. The guidance was also intended to provide... IDE and to provide a general explanation of the reasons for those decisions. This guidance has...

  1. Students' Stereotypes of Patients as Barriers to Clinical Decision-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Shirley M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    At the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, a study was designed that graphically illustrated to beginning students that unconscious sociocultural stereotypes may influence clinical decision-making. Students were shown a videotape depicting five simulated patients, each with the same physical complaint. (Author/MLW)

  2. A Mixed Methodological Analysis of the Role of Culture in the Clinical Decision-Making Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Danica G.; Prosek, Elizabeth A.; McLeod, Amy L.

    2010-01-01

    Even though literature indicates that particular cultural groups receive more severe diagnoses at disproportionate rates, there has been minimal research that addresses how culture interfaces specifically with clinical decision making. This mixed methodological study of 41 counselors indicated that cultural characteristics of both counselors and…

  3. The Contribution of Polysyllabic Words in Clinical Decision Making about Children's Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Deborah G. H.; van Doorn, Jan; McLeod, Sharynne

    2008-01-01

    Poor polysyllabic word (PSW) production seems to mark paediatric speech impairment as well as impairment in language, literacy and phonological processing. As impairment in these domains may only manifest in PSWs, PSW production may provide unique information that is often excluded from clinical decision making because insufficient PSWs are…

  4. The Impact of Reading a Clinical Study on Treatment Decisions of Physicians and Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, David A.; Pantell, Robert H.

    1986-01-01

    A study of the effect of reading a recent clinical study on pediatricians', pediatric residents', and family practitioners' decisions concerning treatment of a common, potentially serious problem revealed a considerable influence but physician difficulty in using probability data and reliance on intuition rather than calculation. (MSE)

  5. Affective associations and cognitive beliefs relate to individuals' decisions to perform testicular or breast self-exams.

    PubMed

    Brown-Kramer, Carolyn R; Kiviniemi, Marc T

    2015-08-01

    Affective associations with behavioral practices play an important role in individuals' uptake of a variety of health behaviors. Most work has looked at individual behavioral practices with a direct impact on health; because screening behaviors are conceptually distinct from such behaviors, it is important to examine the interplay of affect and cognition in screening decision making. The current research explored affective and cognitive predictors of testicular and breast self-examination behavior. Young adult participants (N = 184) reported cognitive beliefs and affective associations with testicular self-exam behavior (male participants) and breast self-exam behavior (female participants) and reported their own current screening behavior. In univariable models, affective associations were related to screening behavior for both testicular self-exams and breast self-exams. When examining affective associations and cognitive beliefs as simultaneous predictors, affective associations (but not cognitive beliefs) predicted testicular self-exams, and neither affective associations nor cognitive beliefs were uniquely related to breast self-exams. Moreover, for testicular self-exams, affective associations mediated the relation between cognitive beliefs and screening behavior; no mediation was present for breast self-exam behavior. These findings suggest three potential outcomes: first, that greater consideration of affective associations in testicular self-exam screening decisions may be warranted; second, that breast and testicular self-exams may have different antecedents; and third, that incorporation of affective factors in intervention design might have merit for increasing engagement in some cancer screening behaviors. PMID:25851610

  6. Fuzzy-Arden-Syntax-based, Vendor-agnostic, Scalable Clinical Decision Support and Monitoring Platform.

    PubMed

    Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; Fehre, Karsten; Rappelsberger, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    This study's objective is to develop and use a scalable genuine technology platform for clinical decision support based on Arden Syntax, which was extended by fuzzy set theory and fuzzy logic. Arden Syntax is a widely recognized formal language for representing clinical and scientific knowledge in an executable format, and is maintained by Health Level Seven (HL7) International and approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Fuzzy set theory and logic permit the representation of knowledge and automated reasoning under linguistic and propositional uncertainty. These forms of uncertainty are a common feature of patients' medical data, the body of medical knowledge, and deductive clinical reasoning. PMID:26262410

  7. Understanding clinical work practices for cross-boundary decision support in e-health.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Hissam; Anya, Obinna; Nagar, Atulya K

    2012-07-01

    One of the major concerns of research in integrated healthcare information systems is to enable decision support among clinicians across boundaries of organizations and regional workgroups. A necessary precursor, however, is to facilitate the construction of appropriate awareness of local clinical practices, including a clinician's actual cognitive capabilities, peculiar workplace circumstances, and specific patient-centered needs based on real-world clinical contexts across work settings. In this paper, a user-centered study aimed to investigate clinical practices across three different geographical areas-the U.K., the UAE and Nigeria-is presented. The findings indicate that differences in clinical practices among clinicians are associated with differences in local work contexts across work settings, but are moderated by adherence to best practice guidelines and the need for patient-centered care. The study further reveals that an awareness especially of the ontological, stereotypical, and situated practices plays a crucial role in adapting knowledge for cross-boundary decision support. The paper then outlines a set of design guidelines for the development of enterprise information systems for e-health. Based on the guidelines, the paper proposes the conceptual design of CaDHealth, a practice-centered framework for making sense of clinical practices across work settings for effective cross-boundary e-health decision support. PMID:22345549

  8. [The impact of guidelines, standards and economic restrictions on clinical decision-making processes].

    PubMed

    Linden, Michael

    2004-05-01

    Guidelines aim at improving clinical decision-making. Contrary to textbooks and reviews that want to improve medical knowledge, guidelines try to influence medical behaviour. Scientific models of clinical decision-making such as the action theory and empirical data on the effects of guidelines suggest that guidelines will not always reach their goals but can instead even lead to a deterioration in the quality of medical care. Therefore there is a need for controlled clinical trials to investigate whether guideline-exposed physicians yield better patient outcomes than guideline-naïve physicians. Guidelines should only be regarded as evidence-based if their positive effects have been empirically demonstrated. PMID:15250387

  9. Neighborhood graph and learning discriminative distance functions for clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Tsymbal, Alexey; Zhou, Shaohua Kevin; Huber, Martin

    2009-01-01

    There are two essential reasons for the slow progress in the acceptance of clinical case retrieval and similarity search-based decision support systems; the especial complexity of clinical data making it difficult to define a meaningful and effective distance function on them and the lack of transparency and explanation ability in many existing clinical case retrieval decision support systems. In this paper, we try to address these two problems by introducing a novel technique for visualizing inter-patient similarity based on a node-link representation with neighborhood graphs and by considering two techniques for learning discriminative distance function that help to combine the power of strong "black box" learners with the transparency of case retrieval and nearest neighbor classification. PMID:19964399

  10. Workshop on using natural language processing applications for enhancing clinical decision making: an executive summary

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Vinay M; Rodgers, Mary; Conroy, Richard; Luo, James; Zhou, Ruixia; Seto, Belinda

    2014-01-01

    In April 2012, the National Institutes of Health organized a two-day workshop entitled ‘Natural Language Processing: State of the Art, Future Directions and Applications for Enhancing Clinical Decision-Making’ (NLP-CDS). This report is a summary of the discussions during the second day of the workshop. Collectively, the workshop presenters and participants emphasized the need for unstructured clinical notes to be included in the decision making workflow and the need for individualized longitudinal data tracking. The workshop also discussed the need to: (1) combine evidence-based literature and patient records with machine-learning and prediction models; (2) provide trusted and reproducible clinical advice; (3) prioritize evidence and test results; and (4) engage healthcare professionals, caregivers, and patients. The overall consensus of the NLP-CDS workshop was that there are promising opportunities for NLP and CDS to deliver cognitive support for healthcare professionals, caregivers, and patients. PMID:23921193

  11. The doctor-patient relationship as a toolkit for uncertain clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Diamond-Brown, Lauren

    2016-06-01

    how the doctor-patient relationship and model of care affect physician decision-making, and for forming policy on the optimal structure of medical work. PMID:27179146

  12. Clinical decision guidelines for NHS cosmetic surgery: analysis of current limitations and recommendations for future development.

    PubMed

    Cook, S A; Rosser, R; Meah, S; James, M I; Salmon, P

    2003-07-01

    Because of increasing demand for publicly funded elective cosmetic surgery, clinical decision guidelines have been developed to select those patients who should receive it. The aims of this study were to identify: the main characteristics of such guidelines; whether and how they influence clinical decision making; and ways in which they should be improved. UK health authorities were asked for their current guidelines for elective cosmetic surgery and, in a single plastic surgery unit, we examined the impact of its guidelines by observing consultations and interviewing surgeons and managers. Of 115 authorities approached, 32 reported using guidelines and provided sufficient information for analysis. Guidelines mostly concerned arbitrary sets of cosmetic procedures and lacked reference to an evidence base. They allowed surgery for specified anatomical, functional or symptomatic reasons, but these indications varied between guidelines. Most guidelines also permitted surgery 'exceptionally' for psychological reasons. The guidelines that were studied in detail did not appreciably influence surgeons' decisions, which reflected criteria that were not cited in the guidelines, including cost of the procedure and whether patients sought restoration or improvement of their appearance. Decision guidelines in this area have several limitations. Future guidelines should: include all cosmetic procedures; be informed by a broad range of evidence; and, arguably, include several nonclinical criteria that currently inform surgeons' decision-making. PMID:12890455

  13. Clinical decision support must be useful, functional is not enough: a qualitative study of computer-based clinical decision support in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Health information technology, particularly electronic decision support systems, can reduce the existing gap between evidence-based knowledge and health care practice but professionals have to accept and use this information. Evidence is scant on which features influence the use of computer-based clinical decision support (eCDS) in primary care and how different professional groups experience it. Our aim was to describe specific reasons for using or not using eCDS among primary care professionals. Methods The setting was a Finnish primary health care organization with 48 professionals receiving patient-specific guidance at the point of care. Multiple data (focus groups, questionnaire and spontaneous feedback) were analyzed using deductive content analysis and descriptive statistics. Results The content of the guidance is a significant feature of the primary care professional’s intention to use eCDS. The decisive reason for using or not using the eCDS is its perceived usefulness. Functional characteristics such as speed and ease of use are important but alone these are not enough. Specific information technology, professional, patient and environment features can help or hinder the use. Conclusions Primary care professionals have to perceive eCDS guidance useful for their work before they use it. PMID:23039113

  14. Power to Punish Norm Violations Affects the Neural Processes of Fairness-Related Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xuemei; Zheng, Li; Li, Lin; Guo, Xiuyan; Wang, Qianfeng; Lord, Anton; Hu, Zengxi; Yang, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Punishing norm violations is considered an important motive during rejection of unfair offers in the ultimatum game (UG). The present study investigates the impact of the power to punish norm violations on people’s responses to unfairness and associated neural correlates. In the UG condition participants had the power to punish norm violations, while an alternate condition, the impunity game (IG), was presented where participants had no power to punish norm violations since rejection only reduced the responder’s income to zero. Results showed that unfair offers were rejected more often in UG compared to IG. At the neural level, anterior insula and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex were more active when participants received and rejected unfair offers in both UG and IG. Moreover, greater dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity was observed when participants rejected than accepted unfair offers in UG but not in IG. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex activation was higher in UG than IG when unfair offers were accepted as well as when rejecting unfair offers in IG as opposed to UG. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the power to punish norm violations affects not only people’s behavioral responses to unfairness but also the neural correlates of the fairness-related social decision-making process. PMID:26696858

  15. Power to Punish Norm Violations Affects the Neural Processes of Fairness-Related Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xuemei; Zheng, Li; Li, Lin; Guo, Xiuyan; Wang, Qianfeng; Lord, Anton; Hu, Zengxi; Yang, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Punishing norm violations is considered an important motive during rejection of unfair offers in the ultimatum game (UG). The present study investigates the impact of the power to punish norm violations on people's responses to unfairness and associated neural correlates. In the UG condition participants had the power to punish norm violations, while an alternate condition, the impunity game (IG), was presented where participants had no power to punish norm violations since rejection only reduced the responder's income to zero. Results showed that unfair offers were rejected more often in UG compared to IG. At the neural level, anterior insula and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex were more active when participants received and rejected unfair offers in both UG and IG. Moreover, greater dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity was observed when participants rejected than accepted unfair offers in UG but not in IG. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex activation was higher in UG than IG when unfair offers were accepted as well as when rejecting unfair offers in IG as opposed to UG. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the power to punish norm violations affects not only people's behavioral responses to unfairness but also the neural correlates of the fairness-related social decision-making process. PMID:26696858

  16. Future perspectives toward the early definition of a multivariate decision-support scheme employed in clinical decision making for senior citizens.

    PubMed

    Frantzidis, Christos A; Gilou, Sotiria; Billis, Antonis; Karagianni, Maria; Bratsas, Charalampos D; Bamidis, Panagiotis

    2016-03-01

    Recent neuroscientific studies focused on the identification of pathological neurophysiological patterns (emotions, geriatric depression, memory impairment and sleep disturbances) through computerised clinical decision-support systems. Almost all these research attempts employed either resting-state condition (e.g. eyes-closed) or event-related potentials extracted during a cognitive task known to be affected by the disease under consideration. This Letter reviews existing data mining techniques and aims to enhance their robustness by proposing a holistic decision framework dealing with comorbidities and early symptoms' identification, while it could be applied in realistic occasions. Multivariate features are elicited and fused in order to be compared with average activities characteristic of each neuropathology group. A proposed model of the specific cognitive function which may be based on previous findings (a priori information) and/or validated by current experimental data should be then formed. So, the proposed scheme facilitates the early identification and prevention of neurodegenerative phenomena. Neurophysiological semantic annotation is hypothesised to enhance the importance of the proposed framework in facilitating the personalised healthcare of the information society and medical informatics research community. PMID:27222732

  17. Consensus Recommendations for Systematic Evaluation of Drug-Drug Interaction Evidence for Clinical Decision Support

    PubMed Central

    Scheife, Richard T.; Hines, Lisa E.; Boyce, Richard D.; Chung, Sophie P.; Momper, Jeremiah; Sommer, Christine D.; Abernethy, Darrell R.; Horn, John; Sklar, Stephen J.; Wong, Samantha K.; Jones, Gretchen; Brown, Mary; Grizzle, Amy J.; Comes, Susan; Wilkins, Tricia Lee; Borst, Clarissa; Wittie, Michael A.; Rich, Alissa; Malone, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Healthcare organizations, compendia, and drug knowledgebase vendors use varying methods to evaluate and synthesize evidence on drug-drug interactions (DDIs). This situation has a negative effect on electronic prescribing and medication information systems that warn clinicians of potentially harmful medication combinations. Objective To provide recommendations for systematic evaluation of evidence from the scientific literature, drug product labeling, and regulatory documents with respect to DDIs for clinical decision support. Methods A conference series was conducted to develop a structured process to improve the quality of DDI alerting systems. Three expert workgroups were assembled to address the goals of the conference. The Evidence Workgroup consisted of 15 individuals with expertise in pharmacology, drug information, biomedical informatics, and clinical decision support. Workgroup members met via webinar from January 2013 to February 2014. Two in-person meetings were conducted in May and September 2013 to reach consensus on recommendations. Results We developed expert-consensus answers to three key questions: 1) What is the best approach to evaluate DDI evidence?; 2) What evidence is required for a DDI to be applicable to an entire class of drugs?; and 3) How should a structured evaluation process be vetted and validated? Conclusion Evidence-based decision support for DDIs requires consistent application of transparent and systematic methods to evaluate the evidence. Drug information systems that implement these recommendations should be able to provide higher quality information about DDIs in drug compendia and clinical decision support tools. PMID:25556085

  18. Assessing an Adolescent's Capacity for Autonomous Decision-Making in Clinical Care.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Pierre-André; Blum, Robert Wm; Benaroyo, Lazare; Zermatten, Jean; Baltag, Valentina

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide policy guidance on how to assess the capacity of minor adolescents for autonomous decision-making without a third party authorization, in the field of clinical care. In June 2014, a two-day meeting gathered 20 professionals from all continents, working in the field of adolescent medicine, neurosciences, developmental and clinical psychology, sociology, ethics, and law. Formal presentations and discussions were based on a literature search and the participants' experience. The assessment of adolescent decision-making capacity includes the following: (1) a review of the legal context consistent with the principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child; (2) an empathetic relationship between the adolescent and the health care professional/team; (3) the respect of the adolescent's developmental stage and capacities; (4) the inclusion, if relevant, of relatives, peers, teachers, or social and mental health providers with the adolescent's consent; (5) the control of coercion and other social forces that influence decision-making; and (6) a deliberative stepwise appraisal of the adolescent's decision-making process. This stepwise approach, already used among adults with psychiatric disorders, includes understanding the different facets of the given situation, reasoning on the involved issues, appreciating the outcomes linked with the decision(s), and expressing a choice. Contextual and psychosocial factors play pivotal roles in the assessment of adolescents' decision-making capacity. The evaluation must be guided by a well-established procedure, and health professionals should be trained accordingly. These proposals are the first to have been developed by a multicultural, multidisciplinary expert panel. PMID:26281798

  19. Studies of foetuses from cows clinically affected with bovine leucosis.

    PubMed

    Kono, Y; Sentsui, H; Arai, K; Irishio, W; Fujigaki, A

    1983-10-01

    Five foetuses at varying stages of gestation were recovered from cows showing clinical signs of infection with bovine leukaemia virus (BLV). No pathological changes were found in the foetuses although BLV was isolated from 2 of these foetuses. No antibody to BLV could be detected by virus-neutralisation or immunodiffusion (ID) techniques in these two foetuses, although neutralising antibody alone was detected in one of the other 3 foetuses which were all negative for virus. PMID:6316629

  20. Trial of telemedicine for patients on home ventilator support: feasibility, confidence in clinical management and use in medical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Casavant, David W; McManus, Michael L; Parsons, Susan K; Zurakowski, David; Graham, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    We investigated whether telemedicine (videoconferencing) was feasible in patients with special care needs on home ventilation, whether it affected the confidence of families about the clinical management of their child, and whether it supported clinical decision-making. Videoconferencing software was provided free for 14 families who had a computer and webcam. Families completed questionnaires about clinical management before the addition of telemedicine and 2-3 months after they had used telemedicine. They also completed a questionnaire about their experience with videoconferencing. There were 27 telemedicine encounters during the 9-month study. Families reported higher confidence in clinical care with telemedicine compared to telephone. They also reported that the videoconferencing was high-quality, easy to use, and did not increase their telecommunication costs. The telemedicine encounters supported clinical decision-making, especially in patients with active clinical problems or when the patient was acutely ill. The telemedicine encounters prevented the need for 23 clinic visits, three emergency room visits, and probably one hospital admission. Although the study was small, videoconferencing appears useful in the management of medically fragile patients on home ventilator support, producing high levels of family confidence in clinical management and value to clinicians in their decision-making. PMID:25316042

  1. Patient characteristics affecting attendance at general outpatient clinics.

    PubMed Central

    McClure, R J; Newell, S J; Edwards, S

    1996-01-01

    A study was carried out to identify the characteristics of children who do not attend appointments at general outpatient clinics. Over six months, 359 children who had an appointment at a general clinic were studied using a questionnaire given to parents (74% response rate) and by inspection of case notes. Based on their first appointment in the study period, children were divided into 'attenders' (n = 262) and 'non-attenders' (n = 97) for analysis. Non-attenders were significantly more likely to have one or more of the following characteristics: lower social class, poorer housing, unmarried parent(s) (56% v 33%), longer journey to clinic (35 v 27.6 minutes), more appointments per year (4.2 v 3.3), poorer past attendance record, and received their appointment by post (76% v 44%). Surprisingly parents of non-attenders rated their children to have a significantly more severe illness than those who attended. These results suggest that attendance is primarily determined by social and logistical factors as well as appointment details, rather than illness severity. PMID:8660073

  2. The influence of providing a clinical practice guideline on dental students' decision making.

    PubMed

    van der Sanden, Wil J M; Mettes, Dirk G; Plasschaert, Alphons J M; Mulder, Jan; Verdonschot, Emiel H

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of the provision of a clinical practice guideline (CPG) on dental students' decisions to remove asymptomatic, impacted lower third molars. All dental students, who in 2001 were in the 3rd, 4th or 5th (final) year of their study at the Nijmegen College of Dental Sciences, were invited to participate. A pre-test-post-test control group design was used. Given 36 patient cases, all dental students were asked to assess the need for removal of asymptomatic, impacted lower third molars. All pre-test respondents were randomly allocated to the control or intervention group. After the provision of a CPG to the intervention group, both groups were asked to assess the same cases again. Frequencies of decisions to remove the third molars were calculated. Chi-square tests and anova were used to test the influence of study year and gender on the drop-out rate and on the effect of the provision of a CPG on students' treatment decisions. The decrease in indications to remove third molars by the intervention group was statistically significant (P < 0.05). In the control group, no significant decrease was observed. It was concluded that the provision of a CPG significantly influences dental students' decision making about treatment in a third-molar decision task. Students who used the CPG showed more guideline-conformed decision making. PMID:14717683

  3. Decision theory and the evaluation of risks and benefits of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Bernabe, Rosemarie D C; van Thiel, Ghislaine J M W; Raaijmakers, Jan A M; van Delden, Johannes J M

    2012-12-01

    Research ethics committees (RECs) are tasked to assess the risks and the benefits of a clinical trial. In previous studies, it was shown that RECs find this task difficult, if not impossible, to do. The current approaches to benefit-risk assessment (i.e. Component Analysis and the Net Risk Test) confound the various risk-benefit tasks, and as such, make balancing impossible. In this article, we show that decision theory, specifically through the expected utility theory and multiattribute utility theory, enable for an explicit and ethically weighted risk-benefit evaluation. This makes a balanced ethical justification possible, and thus a more rationally defensible decision making. PMID:22819925

  4. Advancing clinical decision support using lessons from outside of healthcare: an interdisciplinary systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Greater use of computerized decision support (DS) systems could address continuing safety and quality problems in healthcare, but the healthcare field has struggled to implement DS technology. This study surveys DS experience across multiple non-healthcare disciplines for new insights that are generalizable to healthcare provider decisions. In particular, it sought design principles and lessons learned from the other disciplines that could inform efforts to accelerate the adoption of clinical decision support (CDS). Methods Our systematic review drew broadly from non-healthcare databases in the basic sciences, social sciences, humanities, engineering, business, and defense: PsychINFO, BusinessSource Premier, Social Sciences Abstracts, Web of Science, and Defense Technical Information Center. Because our interest was in DS that could apply to clinical decisions, we selected articles that (1) provided a review, overview, discussion of lessons learned, or an evaluation of design or implementation aspects of DS within a non-healthcare discipline and (2) involved an element of human judgment at the individual level, as opposed to decisions that can be fully automated or that are made at the organizational level. Results Clinical decisions share some similarities with decisions made by military commanders, business managers, and other leaders: they involve assessing new situations and choosing courses of action with major consequences, under time pressure, and with incomplete information. We identified seven high-level DS system design features from the non-healthcare literature that could be applied to CDS: providing broad, system-level perspectives; customizing interfaces to specific users and roles; making the DS reasoning transparent; presenting data effectively; generating multiple scenarios covering disparate outcomes (e.g., effective; effective with side effects; ineffective); allowing for contingent adaptations; and facilitating collaboration. The

  5. Patient-oriented Computerized Clinical Guidelines for Mobile Decision Support in Gestational Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Rigla, Mercedes; Martínez-Sarriegui, Iñaki; Shalom, Erez; Peleg, Mor; Broens, Tom; Pons, Belén; Caballero-Ruíz, Estefanía; Gómez, Enrique J.; Hernando, M. Elena

    2014-01-01

    The risks associated with gestational diabetes (GD) can be reduced with an active treatment able to improve glycemic control. Advances in mobile health can provide new patient-centric models for GD to create personalized health care services, increase patient independence and improve patients’ self-management capabilities, and potentially improve their treatment compliance. In these models, decision-support functions play an essential role. The telemedicine system MobiGuide provides personalized medical decision support for GD patients that is based on computerized clinical guidelines and adapted to a mobile environment. The patient’s access to the system is supported by a smartphone-based application that enhances the efficiency and ease of use of the system. We formalized the GD guideline into a computer-interpretable guideline (CIG). We identified several workflows that provide decision-support functionalities to patients and 4 types of personalized advice to be delivered through a mobile application at home, which is a preliminary step to providing decision-support tools in a telemedicine system: (1) therapy, to help patients to comply with medical prescriptions; (2) monitoring, to help patients to comply with monitoring instructions; (3) clinical assessment, to inform patients about their health conditions; and (4) upcoming events, to deal with patients’ personal context or special events. The whole process to specify patient-oriented decision support functionalities ensures that it is based on the knowledge contained in the GD clinical guideline and thus follows evidence-based recommendations but at the same time is patient-oriented, which could enhance clinical outcomes and patients’ acceptance of the whole system. PMID:24876573

  6. Patient-oriented Computerized Clinical Guidelines for Mobile Decision Support in Gestational Diabetes.

    PubMed

    García-Sáez, Gema; Rigla, Mercedes; Martínez-Sarriegui, Iñaki; Shalom, Erez; Peleg, Mor; Broens, Tom; Pons, Belén; Caballero-Ruíz, Estefanía; Gómez, Enrique J; Hernando, M Elena

    2014-03-01

    The risks associated with gestational diabetes (GD) can be reduced with an active treatment able to improve glycemic control. Advances in mobile health can provide new patient-centric models for GD to create personalized health care services, increase patient independence and improve patients' self-management capabilities, and potentially improve their treatment compliance. In these models, decision-support functions play an essential role. The telemedicine system MobiGuide provides personalized medical decision support for GD patients that is based on computerized clinical guidelines and adapted to a mobile environment. The patient's access to the system is supported by a smartphone-based application that enhances the efficiency and ease of use of the system. We formalized the GD guideline into a computer-interpretable guideline (CIG). We identified several workflows that provide decision-support functionalities to patients and 4 types of personalized advice to be delivered through a mobile application at home, which is a preliminary step to providing decision-support tools in a telemedicine system: (1) therapy, to help patients to comply with medical prescriptions; (2) monitoring, to help patients to comply with monitoring instructions; (3) clinical assessment, to inform patients about their health conditions; and (4) upcoming events, to deal with patients' personal context or special events. The whole process to specify patient-oriented decision support functionalities ensures that it is based on the knowledge contained in the GD clinical guideline and thus follows evidence-based recommendations but at the same time is patient-oriented, which could enhance clinical outcomes and patients' acceptance of the whole system. PMID:24876573

  7. Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) for preventive management of COPD patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of information and communication technologies to manage chronic diseases allows the application of integrated care pathways, and the optimization and standardization of care processes. Decision support tools can assist in the adherence to best-practice medicine in critical decision points during the execution of a care pathway. Objectives The objectives are to design, develop, and assess a clinical decision support system (CDSS) offering a suite of services for the early detection and assessment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which can be easily integrated into a healthcare providers' work-flow. Methods The software architecture model for the CDSS, interoperable clinical-knowledge representation, and inference engine were designed and implemented to form a base CDSS framework. The CDSS functionalities were iteratively developed through requirement-adjustment/development/validation cycles using enterprise-grade software-engineering methodologies and technologies. Within each cycle, clinical-knowledge acquisition was performed by a health-informatics engineer and a clinical-expert team. Results A suite of decision-support web services for (i) COPD early detection and diagnosis, (ii) spirometry quality-control support, (iii) patient stratification, was deployed in a secured environment on-line. The CDSS diagnostic performance was assessed using a validation set of 323 cases with 90% specificity, and 96% sensitivity. Web services were integrated in existing health information system platforms. Conclusions Specialized decision support can be offered as a complementary service to existing policies of integrated care for chronic-disease management. The CDSS was able to issue recommendations that have a high degree of accuracy to support COPD case-finding. Integration into healthcare providers' work-flow can be achieved seamlessly through the use of a modular design and service-oriented architecture that connect to existing health

  8. Improving Decision Making about Genetic Testing in the Clinic: An Overview of Effective Knowledge Translation Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Légaré, France; Robitaille, Hubert; Gane, Claire; Hébert, Jessica; Labrecque, Michel; Rousseau, François

    2016-01-01

    Background Knowledge translation (KT) interventions are attempts to change behavior in keeping with scientific evidence. While genetic tests are increasingly available to healthcare consumers in the clinic, evidence about their benefits is unclear and decisions about genetic testing are thus difficult for all parties. Objective We sought to identify KT interventions that involved decisions about genetic testing in the clinical context and to assess their effectiveness for improving decision making in terms of behavior change, increased knowledge and wellbeing. Methods We searched for trials assessing KT interventions in the context of genetic testing up to March 2014 in all systematic reviews (n = 153) published by two Cochrane review groups: Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) and Consumers and Communication. Results We retrieved 2473 unique trials of which we retained only 28 (1%). Two EPOC reviews yielded two trials of KT interventions: audit and feedback (n = 1) and educational outreach (n = 1). Both targeted health professionals and the KT intervention they assessed was found to be effective. Four Consumers and Communication reviews yielded 26 trials: decision aids (n = 15), communication of DNA-based disease risk estimates (n = 7), personalized risk communication (n = 3) and mobile phone messaging (n = 1). Among these, 25 trials targeted only health consumers or patients and the KT interventions were found to be effective in four trials, partly effective in seven, and ineffective in four. Lastly, only one trial targeted both physicians and patients and was found to be effective. Conclusions More research on the effectiveness of KT interventions regarding genetic testing in the clinical context may contribute to patients making informed value-based decisions and drawing the maximum benefit from clinical applications of genetic and genomic innovations. PMID:26938633

  9. Anterior and posterior subareas of the dorsolateral frontal cortex in socially relevant decisions based on masked affect expressions

    PubMed Central

    Prochnow, Denise; Brunheim, Sascha; Kossack, Hannes; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Markowitsch, Hans J.; Seitz, Rüdiger J.

    2015-01-01

    Socially-relevant decisions are based on clearly recognizable but also not consciously accessible affective stimuli. We studied the role of the dorsolateral frontal cortex (DLFC) in decision-making on masked affect expressions using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Our paradigm permitted us to capture brain activity during a pre-decision phase when the subjects viewed emotional expressions below the threshold of subjective awareness, and during the decision phase, which was based on verbal descriptions as the choice criterion. Using meta-analytic connectivity modeling, we found that the preparatory phase of the decision was associated with activity in a right-posterior portion of the DLFC featuring co-activations in the left-inferior frontal cortex. During the subsequent decision a right-anterior and more dorsal portion of the DLFC became activated, exhibiting a different co-activation pattern. These results provide evidence for partially independent sub-regions within the DLFC, supporting the notion of dual associative processes in intuitive judgments. PMID:26236464

  10. Clinical decision support for whole genome sequence information leveraging a service-oriented architecture: a prototype.

    PubMed

    Welch, Brandon M; Rodriguez-Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information could soon be routinely available to clinicians to support the personalized care of their patients. At such time, clinical decision support (CDS) integrated into the clinical workflow will likely be necessary to support genome-guided clinical care. Nevertheless, developing CDS capabilities for WGS information presents many unique challenges that need to be overcome for such approaches to be effective. In this manuscript, we describe the development of a prototype CDS system that is capable of providing genome-guided CDS at the point of care and within the clinical workflow. To demonstrate the functionality of this prototype, we implemented a clinical scenario of a hypothetical patient at high risk for Lynch Syndrome based on his genomic information. We demonstrate that this system can effectively use service-oriented architecture principles and standards-based components to deliver point of care CDS for WGS information in real-time. PMID:25954430

  11. Emotion and decision-making: affect-driven belief systems in anxiety and depression

    PubMed Central

    Paulus, Martin P.; Yu, Angela J.

    2012-01-01

    Emotion processing and decision-making are integral aspects of daily life. However, our understanding of the interaction between these constructs is limited. In this review, we summarize theoretical approaches to the link between emotion and decision-making, and focus on research with anxious or depressed individuals that reveals how emotions can interfere with decision-making. We integrate the emotional framework based on valence and arousal with a Bayesian approach to decision-making in terms of probability and value processing. We then discuss how studies of individuals with emotional dysfunctions provide evidence that alterations of decision-making can be viewed in terms of altered probability and value computation. We argue that the probabilistic representation of belief states in the context of partially observable Markov decision processes provides a useful approach to examine alterations in probability and value representation in individuals with anxiety and depression and outline the broader implications of this approach. PMID:22898207

  12. Risks, dangers and competing clinical decisions on venous thromboembolism prophylaxis in hospital care.

    PubMed

    Boiko, Olga; Sheaff, Rod; Child, Susan; Gericke, Christian A

    2014-07-01

    Drawing on wider sociologies of risk, this article examines the complexity of clinical risks and their management, focusing on risk management systems, expert decision-making and safety standards in health care. At the time of this study preventing venous thromboembolism (VTE) among in-patients was one of the top priorities for hospital safety in the English National Health Service (NHS). An analysis of 50 interviews examining hospital professionals' perceptions about VTE risks and prophylaxis illuminates how National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) guidelines influenced clinical decision-making in four hospitals in one NHS region. We examine four themes: the identification of new risks, the institutionalisation and management of risk, the relationship between risk and danger and the tensions between risk management systems and expert decision-making. The implementation of NICE guidelines for VTE prevention extended managerial control over risk management but some irreducible clinical dangers remained that were beyond the scope of the new VTE risk management systems. Linking sociologies of risk with the realities of hospital risk management reveals the capacity of these theories to illuminate both the possibilities and the limits of managerialism in health care. PMID:24635764

  13. The Use of Intuition in Homeopathic Clinical Decision Making: An Interpretative Phenomenological Study

    PubMed Central

    Brien, Sarah; Dibb, Bridget; Burch, Alex

    2011-01-01

    While intuition plays a role in clinical decision making within conventional medicine, little is understood about its use in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate intuition from the perspective of homeopathic practitioners; its' manifestation, how it was recognized, its origins and when it was used within daily clinical practice. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with clinically experienced non-National Health Service (NHS) UK homeopathic practitioners. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyze the data. Homeopaths reported many similarities with conventional medical practitioner regarding the nature, perceived origin and manifestation of their intuitions in clinical practice. Intuition was used in two key aspects of the consultation: (i) to enhance the practitioner-patient relationship, these were generally trusted; and (ii) intuitions relating to the prescribing decision. Homeopaths were cautious about these latter intuitions, testing any intuitive thoughts through deductive reasoning before accepting them. Their reluctance is not surprising given the consequences for patient care, but we propose this also reflects homeopaths' sensitivity to the academic and medical mistrust of both homeopathy and intuition. This study is the first to explore the use of intuition in decision making in any form of complementary medicine. The similarities with conventional practitioners may provide confidence in validating intuition as a legitimate part of the decision making process for these specific practitioners. Further work is needed to elucidate if these findings reflect intuitive use in clinical practice of other CAM practitioners in both private and NHS (i.e., time limited) settings. PMID:19773389

  14. EVIDENCE AND CLINICAL DECISIONS: Asking the Right Questions to Obtain Clinically Useful Answers

    PubMed Central

    Proffit, William R.

    2013-01-01

    Orthodontists need to know the effectiveness, efficiency and predictability of treatment approaches and methods, which can be learned only by carefully studying and evaluating treatment outcomes. The best data for outcomes come from randomized clinical trials (RCTs), but retrospective data can provide satisfactory evidence if the subjects were a well-defined patient group, all the patients were accounted for, and the percentages of patients with various possible outcomes are presented along with measures of the central tendency and variation. Meta-analysis of multiple RCTs done in a similar way and systematic reviews of the literature can strengthen clinically-useful evidence, but reviews that are too broadly based are more likely to blur than clarify the information clinicians need. Reviews that are tightly focused on seeking the answer to specific clinical questions and evaluating the quality of the evidence available to answer the question are much more likely to provide clinically useful data. PMID:24198455

  15. Designing a Clinical Framework to Guide Gross Motor Intervention Decisions for Infants and Young Children with Hypotonia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darrah, Johanna; O'Donnell, Maureen; Lam, Joyce; Story, Maureen; Wickenheiser, Diane; Xu, Kaishou; Jin, Xiaokun

    2013-01-01

    Clinical practice frameworks are a valuable component of clinical education, promoting informed clinical decision making based on the best available evidence and/or clinical experience. They encourage standardized intervention approaches and evaluation of practice. Based on an international project to support the development of an enhanced service…

  16. Clinical Decision-Making in Community Children’s Mental Health: Using Innovative Methods to Compare Clinicians With and Without Training in Evidence-Based Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Baker-Ericzén, Mary J.; Jenkins, Melissa M.; Park, Soojin; Garland, Ann F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Mental health professionals’ decision-making practice is an area of increasing interest and importance, especially in the pediatric research and clinical communities. Objective The present study explored the role of prior training in evidence-based treatments on clinicians’ assessment and treatment formulations using case vignettes. Specifically, study aims included using the Naturalistic Decision Making (NDM) cognitive theory to 1) examine potential associations between EBT training and decision-making processes (novice versus expert type), and 2) explore how client and family contextual information affects clinical decision-making. Methods Forty-eight clinicians across two groups (EBT trained=14, Not EBT trained=34) participated. Clinicians were comparable on professional experience, demographics, and discipline. The quasi-experimental design used an analog “think aloud” method where clinicians read case vignettes about a child with disruptive behavior problems and verbalized case conceptualization and treatment planning out-loud. Responses were coded according to NDM theory. Results MANOVA results were significant for EBT training status such that EBT trained clinicians’ displayed cognitive processes more closely aligned with “expert” decision-makers and non-EBT trained clinicians’ decision processes were more similar to “novice” decision-makers, following NDM theory. Non-EBT trained clinicians assigned significantly more diagnoses, provided less detailed treatment plans and discussed fewer EBTs. Parent/family contextual information also appeared to influence decision-making. Conclusion This study offers a preliminary investigation of the possible broader impacts of EBT training and potential associations with development of expert decision-making skills. Targeting clinicians’ decision-making may be an important avenue to pursue within dissemination-implementation efforts in mental health practice. PMID:25892901

  17. Young Children's Affective Decision-Making in a Gambling Task: Does Difficulty in Learning the Gain/Loss Schedule Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Shan; Wei, Yonggang; Bai, Junjie; Lin, Chongde; Li, Hong

    2009-01-01

    This research investigated the development of affective decision-making (ADM) during early childhood, in particular role of difficulty in learning a gain/loss schedule. In Experiment 1, we administrated the Children's Gambling Task (CGT) to 60 Chinese children aged 3 and 4, replicating the results obtained by Kerr and Zelazo [Kerr, A., & Zelazo,…

  18. Radiation Treatment in Older Patients: A Framework for Clinical Decision Making

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Grace L.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2014-01-01

    In older patients, radiation treatment plays a vital role in curative and palliative cancer therapy. Radiation treatment recommendations should be informed by a comprehensive, personalized risk-benefit assessment that evaluates treatment efficacy and toxicity. We review several clinical factors that distinctly affect efficacy and toxicity of radiation treatment in older patients. First, locoregional tumor behavior may be more indolent in older patients for some disease sites but more aggressive for other sites. Assessment of expected locoregional relapse risk informs the magnitude and timeframe of expected radiation treatment benefits. Second, assessment of the competing cancer versus noncancer mortality and morbidity risks contextualizes cancer treatment priorities holistically within patients' entire spectrum and time course of health needs. Third, assessment of functional reserve helps predict patients' acute treatment tolerance, differentiating those patients who are unlikely to benefit from treatment or who are at high risk for treatment complications. Potential radiation treatment options include immediate curative treatment, delayed curative treatment, and no treatment, with additional consideration given to altered radiation target, dose, or sequencing with chemotherapy and/or surgery. Finally, when cure is not feasible, palliative radiation therapy remains valuable for managing symptoms and achieving meaningful quality-of-life improvements. Our proposed decision-making framework integrates these factors to help radiation oncologists formulate strategic treatment recommendations within a multidisciplinary context. Future research is still needed to identify how advanced technologies can be judiciously applied in curative and palliative settings to enhance risk-benefit profiles of radiation treatment in older patients and more accurately quantify treatment efficacy in this group. PMID:25071132

  19. Multi-site evaluation of a clinical decision support system for radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, Ruchi; DeMarco, John; Kessel, Kerstin; Liu, Brent J.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed an imaging informatics based decision support system that learns from retrospective treatment plans to provide recommendations for healthy tissue sparing to prospective incoming patients. This system incorporates a model of best practices from previous cases, specific to tumor anatomy. Ultimately, our hope is to improve clinical workflow efficiency, patient outcomes and to increase clinician confidence in decision-making. The success of such a system depends greatly on the training dataset, which in this case, is the knowledge base that the data-mining algorithm employs. The size and heterogeneity of the database is essential for good performance. Since most institutions employ standard protocols and practices for treatment planning, the diversity of this database can be greatly increased by including data from different institutions. This work presents the results of incorporating cross-country, multi-institutional data into our decision support system for evaluation and testing.

  20. Clinical Decision Support using a Terminology Server to improve Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Jimenez, Alba; Moreno-Conde, Alberto; Martínez-García, Alicia; Marín-León, Ignacio; Medrano-Ortega, Francisco Javier; Parra-Calderón, Carlos L

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) are software applications that support clinicians in making healthcare decisions providing relevant information for individual patients about their specific conditions. The lack of integration between CDSS and Electronic Health Record (EHR) has been identified as a significant barrier to CDSS development and adoption. Andalusia Healthcare Public System (AHPS) provides an interoperable health information infrastructure based on a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA) that eases CDSS implementation. This paper details the deployment of a CDSS jointly with the deployment of a Terminology Server (TS) within the AHPS infrastructure. It also explains a case study about the application of decision support to thromboembolism patients and its potential impact on improving patient safety. We will apply the inSPECt tool proposal to evaluate the appropriateness of alerts in this scenario. PMID:25991120

  1. Clinical Instructors' Perceptions of the Importance of Affective Behaviors in Undergraduate Athletic Training Clinical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokris, Rebecca L.

    2012-01-01

    The affective domain represents a set of learning objectives that are difficult to assess and instruct. Affective behaviors consist of different attributes such as interpersonal relationships, professionalism, trust, empathy, and integrity to name a few. This study surveyed athletic training clinical instructors' perception of the importance…

  2. May tropospheric noise in satellite radar data affect decision making results?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloutsos, Aristeidis; Bekri, Eleni; Moschas, Fanis; Saltogianni, Vasso; Stiros, Stathis; Yannopoulos, Panayotis

    2015-04-01

    Meteorological and air pollution conditions affect the satellite positioning signals. To investigate the uncertainty introduced in these signals in various meteorological and air pollution conditions, an array of GPS/GNSS stations and another of meteorological and air pollution stations has been established. The study area is expanded next to Patraikos and Corinth Gulf (NW Peloponnisos, Greece), which is characterized by high variability sequences from hot to cold weather, low to high relative humidity and clear to cloudy or/and Sahara dusty atmosphere, as a result of the particular geographical and topographical features of the study area. The GNSS recordings from several stations with very high vertical separation (with altitude up to 1600m and with a gradient of up to 20%) are analyzed in order to control in some extend both the vertical and the horizontal variability of the atmospheric effects, as well as the noise of geodetic recordings. Then, the GPS results will be combined with meteorological and atmospheric pollution data, as well as satellite radar data, in order to evaluate the enhanced troposphere noise in satellite radar and to estimate the magnitude of uncertainty that may cause alterations to decision making results in the management of water and other natural resources. This project takes advantage of GPS stations established in wider study area in the framework of the Corinth Rift Laboratory (http://crlab.eu/) in conjunction to the air pollution and meteorological monitoring stations of the Environmental Engineering Laboratory of the Department of Civil Engineering of the University of Patras. Regarding GPS stations, the project has been partly funded by the PLATO Project of the Greek Secretariat for Research and Technology.

  3. Factors Affecting Faculty Members' Decision to Teach or Not to Teach Online in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhen, Yurui; Garthwait, Abigail; Pratt, Phillip

    2008-01-01

    This study identified the important factors influencing faculty members' decision to use or not to use any form of online course management applications (OCMA) in higher education. A polynomial logistic analysis led to a statistical-artifact hypothesis: factors did exist that correlated faculty members' technology adoption decisions. Motivational…

  4. Factors Affecting Parental Decision-Making Regarding Interventions for Their Child with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebert, Elizabeth Baltus

    2014-01-01

    Due to the numerous interventions available for children with autism, parents are faced with challenging decisions regarding treatments from the time of diagnosis and throughout their child's life. This exploratory qualitative study investigated the reasons behind parents' decisions about interventions for their child with autism.…

  5. Decision making and senior management: the implementation of change projects covering clinical management in SUS hospitals.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, José Márcio da Cunha; Gomes, Romeu

    2016-08-01

    This paper analyses the decision making process for senior management in public hospitals that are a part of the National Health Service in Brazil (hereafter SUS) in relation to projects aimed at changing clinical management. The methodological design of this study is qualitative in nature taking a hermeneutics-dialectics perspective in terms of results. Hospital directors noted that clinical management projects changed the state of hospitals through: improving their organizations, mobilizing their staff in order to increase a sense of order and systemizing actions and available resources. Technical rationality was the principal basis used in the decision making process for managers. Due to the reality of many hospitals having fragmented organizations, this fact impeded the use of aspects related to rationality, such as economic and financial factors in the decision making process. The incremental model and general politics also play a role in this area. We concluded that the decision making process embraces a large array of factors including rational aspects such as the use of management techniques and the ability to analyze, interpret and summarize. It also incorporates subjective elements such as how to select values and dealing with people's working experiences. We recognized that management problems are wide in scope, ambiguous, complex and do not come with a lot of structure in practice. PMID:27557021

  6. Lung Cancer Assistant: a hybrid clinical decision support application for lung cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Sesen, M. Berkan; Peake, Michael D.; Banares-Alcantara, Rene; Tse, Donald; Kadir, Timor; Stanley, Roz; Gleeson, Fergus; Brady, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are becoming the model of care for cancer patients worldwide. While MDTs have improved the quality of cancer care, the meetings impose substantial time pressure on the members, who generally attend several such MDTs. We describe Lung Cancer Assistant (LCA), a clinical decision support (CDS) prototype designed to assist the experts in the treatment selection decisions in the lung cancer MDTs. A novel feature of LCA is its ability to provide rule-based and probabilistic decision support within a single platform. The guideline-based CDS is based on clinical guideline rules, while the probabilistic CDS is based on a Bayesian network trained on the English Lung Cancer Audit Database (LUCADA). We assess rule-based and probabilistic recommendations based on their concordances with the treatments recorded in LUCADA. Our results reveal that the guideline rule-based recommendations perform well in simulating the recorded treatments with exact and partial concordance rates of 0.57 and 0.79, respectively. On the other hand, the exact and partial concordance rates achieved with probabilistic results are relatively poorer with 0.27 and 0.76. However, probabilistic decision support fulfils a complementary role in providing accurate survival estimations. Compared to recorded treatments, both CDS approaches promote higher resection rates and multimodality treatments. PMID:24990290

  7. A Legal Framework to Enable Sharing of Clinical Decision Support Knowledge and Services across Institutional Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Hongsermeier, Tonya; Maviglia, Saverio; Tsurikova, Lana; Bogaty, Dan; Rocha, Roberto A.; Goldberg, Howard; Meltzer, Seth; Middleton, Blackford

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the CDS Consortium (CDSC) is to assess, define, demonstrate, and evaluate best practices for knowledge management and clinical decision support in healthcare information technology at scale – across multiple ambulatory care settings and Electronic Health Record technology platforms. In the course of the CDSC research effort, it became evident that a sound legal foundation was required for knowledge sharing and clinical decision support services in order to address data sharing, intellectual property, accountability, and liability concerns. This paper outlines the framework utilized for developing agreements in support of sharing, accessing, and publishing content via the CDSC Knowledge Management Portal as well as an agreement in support of deployment and consumption of CDSC developed web services in the context of a research project under IRB oversight. PMID:22195151

  8. How Qualitative Research Informs Clinical and Policy Decision Making in Transplantation: A Review.

    PubMed

    Tong, Allison; Morton, Rachael L; Webster, Angela C

    2016-09-01

    Patient-centered care is no longer just a buzzword. It is now widely touted as a cornerstone in delivering quality care across all fields of medicine. However, patient-centered strategies and interventions necessitate evidence about patients' decision-making processes, values, priorities, and needs. Qualitative research is particularly well suited to understanding the experience and perspective of patients, donors, clinicians, and policy makers on a wide range of transplantation-related topics including organ donation and allocation, adherence to prescribed therapy, pretransplant and posttransplant care, implementation of clinical guidelines, and doctor-patient communication. In transplantation, evidence derived from qualitative research has been integrated into strategies for shared decision-making, patient educational resources, process evaluations of trials, clinical guidelines, and policies. The aim of this article is to outline key concepts and methods used in qualitative research, guide the appraisal of qualitative studies, and assist clinicians to understand how qualitative research may inform their practice and policy. PMID:27479165

  9. The perils of meta-regression to identify clinical decision support system success factors

    PubMed Central

    Fillmore, Christopher L.; Rommel, Casey A.; Welch, Brandon M.; Zhang, Mingyuan; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2016-01-01

    Clinical decision support interventions are typically heterogeneous in nature, making it difficult to identify why some interventions succeed while others do not. One approach to identify factors important to the success of health information systems is the use of meta-regression techniques, in which potential explanatory factors are correlated with the outcome of interest. This approach, however, can result in misleading conclusions due to several issues. In this manuscript, we present a cautionary case study in the context of clinical decision support systems to illustrate the limitations of this type of analysis. We then discuss implications and recommendations for future work aimed at identifying success factors of medical informatics interventions. In particular, we identify the need for head-to-head trials in which the importance of system features is directly evaluated in a prospective manner. PMID:25998518

  10. WHAT ARE 'BEST INTERESTS'? A CRITICAL EVALUATION OF 'BEST INTERESTS' DECISION-MAKING IN CLINICAL PRACTICE.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Helen J

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining the patient's consent is usually a prerequisite of any clinical intervention. However, some cognitively impaired patients may not be able to give valid consent. Following years of consultation and legislative review, the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) provides a statutory framework of 'best interests' decision-making on behalf of incapacitated individuals. However, confusion over the meaning and application of the 'best interests' standard persists. This paper explores the variation in judicial interpretation of the standard and the complexities of best interests decision-making in clinical practice. Prevailing confusion and risk-aversive practices mean that the rights and interests of cognitively impaired individuals continue to be compromised, with evidence to suggest that 'best interests' may be conflated with the clinician's evaluation of 'best medical interests'. PMID:26979251

  11. Clinical judgment and decision making in wound assessment and management: is experience enough?

    PubMed

    Logan, Gemma

    2015-03-01

    The assessment and management of wounds forms a large proportion of community nurses' workload, often requiring judgment and decision-making in complex, challenging and uncertain circumstances. The processes through which nurses form judgments and make decisions within this context are reviewed in this article against existing theories on these on these subjects. There is variability in wound assessment and management practice which may be attributed to uncertainties within the context, a lack of knowledge in appropriate treatment choices and the inability to correctly value the importance of the clinical information presented. Nurses may be required to draw on intuition to guide their judgments and decision-making by association with experience and expertise. In addition, a step-by-step analytical approach underpinned by an evidence base may be required to ensure accuracy in practice. Developing an understanding of the different theories of judgment and decision-making may facilitate nurses' abilities to reflect on their own decision tasks, thereby enhancing the care provided. PMID:25790510

  12. The anatomy of clinical decision-making in multidisciplinary cancer meetings

    PubMed Central

    Soukup, Tayana; Petrides, Konstantinos V.; Lamb, Benjamin W.; Sarkar, Somita; Arora, Sonal; Shah, Sujay; Darzi, Ara; Green, James S. A.; Sevdalis, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the UK, treatment recommendations for patients with cancer are routinely made by multidisciplinary teams in weekly meetings. However, their performance is variable. The aim of this study was to explore the underlying structure of multidisciplinary decision-making process, and examine how it relates to team ability to reach a decision. This is a cross-sectional observational study consisting of 1045 patient reviews across 4 multidisciplinary cancer teams from teaching and community hospitals in London, UK, from 2010 to 2014. Meetings were chaired by surgeons. We used a validated observational instrument (Metric for the Observation of Decision-making in Cancer Multidisciplinary Meetings) consisting of 13 items to assess the decision-making process of each patient discussion. Rated on a 5-point scale, the items measured quality of presented patient information, and contributions to review by individual disciplines. A dichotomous outcome (yes/no) measured team ability to reach a decision. Ratings were submitted to Exploratory Factor Analysis and regression analysis. The exploratory factor analysis produced 4 factors, labeled “Holistic and Clinical inputs” (patient views, psychosocial aspects, patient history, comorbidities, oncologists’, nurses’, and surgeons’ inputs), “Radiology” (radiology results, radiologists’ inputs), “Pathology” (pathology results, pathologists’ inputs), and “Meeting Management” (meeting chairs’ and coordinators’ inputs). A negative cross-loading was observed from surgeons’ input on the fourth factor with a follow-up analysis showing negative correlation (r = −0.19, P < 0.001). In logistic regression, all 4 factors predicted team ability to reach a decision (P < 0.001). Hawthorne effect is the main limitation of the study. The decision-making process in cancer meetings is driven by 4 underlying factors representing the complete patient profile and contributions to case review by all core

  13. A programmable rules engine to provide clinical decision support using HTML forms.

    PubMed

    Heusinkveld, J; Geissbuhler, A; Sheshelidze, D; Miller, R

    1999-01-01

    The authors have developed a simple method for specifying rules to be applied to information on HTML forms. This approach allows clinical experts, who lack the programming expertise needed to write CGI scripts, to construct and maintain domain-specific knowledge and ordering capabilities within WizOrder, the order-entry and decision support system used at Vanderbilt Hospital. The clinical knowledge base maintainers use HTML editors to create forms and spreadsheet programs for rule entry. A test environment has been developed which uses Netscape to display forms; the production environment displays forms using an embedded browser. PMID:10566470

  14. Editorial: The search for core symptoms - will this help clinical decision-making?

    PubMed

    Frazier Norbury, Courtenay

    2016-08-01

    Diagnosis is an important component of our clinical roles, and should also lead to particular treatment pathways. The diagnostic process may be challenged by co-occurring deficits that are neither specific nor universal to the diagnosis under consideration and may well be evident across a range of other clinical conditions. How important is it to refine our instruments so that they measure unique symptoms? Will this alter or improve intervention choices? This Editorial focuses on the extent to which fine tuning diagnostic instruments improves our decisions about treatment, in the context of articles published in this issue of JCPP. PMID:27445109

  15. Governance for clinical decision support: case studies and recommended practices from leading institutions

    PubMed Central

    Sittig, Dean F; Ash, Joan S; Bates, David W; Feblowitz, Joshua; Fraser, Greg; Maviglia, Saverio M; McMullen, Carmit; Nichol, W Paul; Pang, Justine E; Starmer, Jack; Middleton, Blackford

    2011-01-01

    Objective Clinical decision support (CDS) is a powerful tool for improving healthcare quality and ensuring patient safety; however, effective implementation of CDS requires effective clinical and technical governance structures. The authors sought to determine the range and variety of these governance structures and identify a set of recommended practices through observational study. Design Three site visits were conducted at institutions across the USA to learn about CDS capabilities and processes from clinical, technical, and organizational perspectives. Based on the results of these visits, written questionnaires were sent to the three institutions visited and two additional sites. Together, these five organizations encompass a variety of academic and community hospitals as well as small and large ambulatory practices. These organizations use both commercially available and internally developed clinical information systems. Measurements Characteristics of clinical information systems and CDS systems used at each site as well as governance structures and content management approaches were identified through extensive field interviews and follow-up surveys. Results Six recommended practices were identified in the area of governance, and four were identified in the area of content management. Key similarities and differences between the organizations studied were also highlighted. Conclusion Each of the five sites studied contributed to the recommended practices presented in this paper for CDS governance. Since these strategies appear to be useful at a diverse range of institutions, they should be considered by any future implementers of decision support. PMID:21252052

  16. A collaborative teaching strategy for enhancing learning of evidence-based clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Scott, P J; Altenburger, P A; Kean, J

    2011-01-01

    The educational literature cites a lack of student motivation to learn how to use research evidence in clinical decision-making because the students do not observe clinicians using evidence. This lack of motivation presents a challenge to educators as they seek to instill the value of evidence-based clinical decision-making (EBCD) in students. One problem is that students in entry-level programs do not have the experience needed to know what to look for, and secondly, clinical decision-making is contextually based in a patient problem. Our approach offers one solution to bridging the gap between classroom teaching and real-world implementation of EBCD through a three-phase collaborative approach. Occupational and physical therapy students are partnered with clinicians to find and appraise evidence to answer the real-world questions posed by these therapists. This paper describes the implementation of the partnership, teaching/learning outcomes, logistics, and implications for clinicians. We found this approach increased student motivation and greatly enhanced the learning experience. Future directions include implementing a framework which allows for the assessment of the strategy on the facility and creates opportunities to integrate the use of EBCD in all aspects of facility practice. PMID:21927777

  17. A study of clinical decision making by certified registered nurse anesthetists.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Michael J; Faut-Callahan, Margaret; Hicks, Frank D

    2002-10-01

    Anesthesia outcomes and related risk factors have been studied for more than 100 years. Varying sample sizes and research methods have been used, with research findings that were open to multiple interpretations. Research with closed malpractice claims demonstrates that American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status II patients undergoing elective procedures are most likely to experience damaging events intraoperatively with resultant postoperative adverse outcomes. The process of care, including clinical decision making, contributes to adverse outcomes. Clinical decision making can be difficult to assess and measure. In this study, the cognitive psychology framework of information-processing theory and literature pertaining to the use of heuristics, or rules of thumb, and clinical biases, were used to analyze cases from the AANA Foundation closed malpractice claims database. This database contains more than 300 files involving St Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Company-covered CRNAs from across the United States. These files were analyzed by 10 CRNA investigators on the AANA Closed Claims research team. Variables such as inadequate preinduction activities, e.g., incomplete preanesthetic assessments, and use of cognitive biases and inaccurate probability estimation were associated with adverse outcomes in this research sample. Teaching of decision science in basic and continuing nurse anesthesia education is advocated. PMID:12425129

  18. Development and validation of a tool to measure self-confidence and anxiety in nursing students during clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    White, Krista A

    2014-01-01

    Clinical decision making (CDM) is a cornerstone skill for nurses. Self-confidence and anxiety affect the learning and adeptness of CDM. This study aimed to develop and test a quantitative tool to assess undergraduate nursing students' self-confidence and anxiety during CDM. The 27-item Nursing Anxiety and Self-Confidence with Clinical Decision Making (NASC-CDM) scale is a 6-point, Likert-type tool with two subscales. Two samples of prelicensure associate and baccalaureate nursing students participated in the pilot (n = 303) and main testing (n = 242) phases of the study. Construct validity assessment, using exploratory factor analysis, produced a stable three-dimensional scale. Convergent validity assessment produced positive, moderate, and statistically significant correlations of the tool sub-scales with two existing instruments. Internal consistency reliability was assessed for each subscale (self-confidence, α = .97; anxiety, α = .96). The NASC-CDM scale may be a useful assessment tool for nurse educators to help novice clinicians improve CDM skills. PMID:24256004

  19. Multisite Exploration of Clinical Decision-Making for Antibiotic Use by Emergency Medicine Providers Using Quantitative and Qualitative Methods

    PubMed Central

    Gudger, Glencora; Armstrong, Paige; Brooks, Gillian; Hinds, Pamela; Bhat, Rahul; Moran, Gregory J.; Schwartz, Lisa; Cosgrove, Sara E.; Klein, Eili Y.; Rothman, Richard E.; Rand, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore current practices and decision-making regarding antimicrobial prescribing among Emergency Department (ED) clinical providers. Methods We conducted a survey of ED providers recruited from eight sites in three cities. Using purposeful sampling, we then recruited 21 providers for in-depth interviews. Additionally, we observed ten patient-provider interactions at one of the ED sites. SAS 9.3 was used for descriptive and predictive statistics. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analyzed using a thematic, constructivist approach with consensus coding using NVivo 10.0. Field and interview notes collected during the observational study were aligned with themes identified through individual interviews. Results Of 150 survey respondents, 76% agreed or strongly agreed antibiotics are overused in the ED, while half believed they personally did not overprescribe. Eighty nine percent used a smartphone or tablet in the ED for antibiotic prescribing decisions. Several significant differences were found between attending and resident physicians. Interview analysis identified 42 codes aggregated into the following themes: (1) resource and environmental factors that affect care; (2) access to and quality of care received outside of the ED consult; (3) patient-provider relationships; (4) clinical inertia; and (5) local knowledge generation. The observational study revealed limited patient understanding of antibiotic use. Providers relied heavily upon diagnostics and provided limited education to patients. Most patients denied a priori expectations of being prescribed antibiotics. Conclusions Patient, provider, and healthcare system factors should be considered when designing interventions to improve antimicrobial stewardship in the ED setting. PMID:25111919

  20. Interoperability of clinical decision-support systems and electronic health records using archetypes: a case study in clinical trial eligibility.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Mar; Maldonado, Jose A; Martínez-Salvador, Begoña; Boscá, Diego; Robles, Montserrat

    2013-08-01

    Clinical decision-support systems (CDSSs) comprise systems as diverse as sophisticated platforms to store and manage clinical data, tools to alert clinicians of problematic situations, or decision-making tools to assist clinicians. Irrespective of the kind of decision-support task CDSSs should be smoothly integrated within the clinical information system, interacting with other components, in particular with the electronic health record (EHR). However, despite decades of developments, most CDSSs lack interoperability features. We deal with the interoperability problem of CDSSs and EHRs by exploiting the dual-model methodology. This methodology distinguishes a reference model and archetypes. A reference model is represented by a stable and small object-oriented model that describes the generic properties of health record information. For their part, archetypes are reusable and domain-specific definitions of clinical concepts in the form of structured and constrained combinations of the entities of the reference model. We rely on archetypes to make the CDSS compatible with EHRs from different institutions. Concretely, we use archetypes for modelling the clinical concepts that the CDSS requires, in conjunction with a series of knowledge-intensive mappings relating the archetypes to the data sources (EHR and/or other archetypes) they depend on. We introduce a comprehensive approach, including a set of tools as well as methodological guidelines, to deal with the interoperability of CDSSs and EHRs based on archetypes. Archetypes are used to build a conceptual layer of the kind of a virtual health record (VHR) over the EHR whose contents need to be integrated and used in the CDSS, associating them with structural and terminology-based semantics. Subsequently, the archetypes are mapped to the EHR by means of an expressive mapping language and specific-purpose tools. We also describe a case study where the tools and methodology have been employed in a CDSS to support

  1. Genetic and Clinical Factors Affecting Plasma Clozapine Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Edman, Gunnar; Bertilsson, Leif; Hukic, Dzana Sudic; Lavebratt, Catharina; Eriksson, Sven V.; Ösby, Urban

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess (1) the variance of plasma clozapine levels; (2) the relative importance of sex, smoking habits, weight, age, and specific genetic variants of cytochrome P450 1A2 (CYP1A2), uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A4 (UGT1A4), and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MDR1) on plasma levels of clozapine; and (3) the relation between plasma clozapine levels, fasting glucose levels, and waist circumference. Method: There were 113 patients on clozapine treatment recruited from psychosis outpatient clinics in Stockholm County, Sweden. Patients had genotype testing for single nucleotide polymorphisms: 2 in MDR1, 3 in CYP1A2, and 1 in UGT1A4. Multiple and logistic regression were used to analyze the relations. Results: There was a wide variation in plasma concentrations of clozapine (mean = 1,615 nmol/L, SD = 1,354 nmol/L), with 37% of the samples within therapeutic range (1,100–2,100 nmol/L). Smokers had significantly lower plasma clozapine concentrations than nonsmokers (P ≤ .03). There was a significant association between the rs762551 A allele of CYP1A2 and lower plasma clozapine concentration (P ≤ .05). Increased fasting glucose level was 3.7-fold more frequent in CC and CA genotypes than AA genotype (odds ratio = 0.27; 95% confidence interval, 0.10–0.72). There was no significant relation between higher fasting glucose levels, larger waist circumference, and higher clozapine levels. Conclusions: It is difficult to predict plasma clozapine concentration, even when known individual and genetic factors are considered. Therefore, therapeutic drug monitoring is recommended in patients who are treated with clozapine. PMID:26137357

  2. Take a stand on your decisions, or take a sit: posture does not affect risk preferences in an economic task

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Megan K.

    2014-01-01

    Physiological and emotional states can affect our decision-making processes, even when these states are seemingly insignificant to the decision at hand. We examined whether posture and postural threat affect decisions in a non-related economic domain. Healthy young adults made a series of choices between economic lotteries in various conditions, including changes in body posture (sitting vs. standing) and changes in elevation (ground level vs. atop a 0.8-meter-high platform). We compared three metrics between conditions to assess changes in risk-sensitivity: frequency of risky choices, and parameter fits of both utility and probability weighting parameters using cumulative prospect theory. We also measured skin conductance level to evaluate physiological response to the postural threat. Our results demonstrate that body posture does not significantly affect decision making. Secondly, despite increased skin conductance level, economic risk-sensitivity was unaffected by increased threat. Our findings indicate that economic choices are fairly robust to the physiological and emotional changes that result from posture or postural threat. PMID:25083345

  3. Client Preferences Affect Treatment Satisfaction, Completion, and Clinical Outcome: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Bennett, Charles B.; Trentacosta, Christopher J.; McLear, Caitlin

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of client preferences on treatment satisfaction, completion, and clinical outcome. Our search of the literature resulted in 34 empirical articles describing 32 unique clinical trials that either randomized some clients to an active choice condition (shared decision making condition or choice of treatment) or assessed client preferences. Clients who were involved in shared decision making, chose a treatment condition, or otherwise received their preferred treatment evidenced higher treatment satisfaction (ESd = .34; p < .001), increased completion rates (ESOR = 1.37; ESd = .17; p < .001), and superior clinical outcome (ESd = .15; p < .0001), compared to clients who were not involved in shared decision making, did not choose a treatment condition, or otherwise did not receive their preferred treatment. Although the effect sizes are modest in magnitude, they were generally consistent across several potential moderating variables including study design (preference versus active choice), psychoeducation (informed versus uninformed), setting (inpatient versus outpatient), client diagnosis (mental health versus other), and unit of randomization (client versus provider). Our findings highlight the clinical benefit of assessing client preferences, providing treatment choices when two or more efficacious options are available, and involving clients in treatment-related decisions when treatment options are not available. PMID:25189522

  4. Formative Evaluation of Clinician Experience with Integrating Family History-Based Clinical Decision Support into Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Doerr, Megan; Edelman, Emily; Gabitzsch, Emily; Eng, Charis; Teng, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Family health history is a leading predictor of disease risk. Nonetheless, it is underutilized to guide care and, therefore, is ripe for health information technology intervention. To fill the family health history practice gap, Cleveland Clinic has developed a family health history collection and clinical decision support tool, MyFamily. This report describes the impact and process of implementing MyFamily into primary care, cancer survivorship and cancer genetics clinics. Ten providers participated in semi-structured interviews that were analyzed to identify opportunities for process improvement. Participants universally noted positive effects on patient care, including increases in quality, personalization of care and patient engagement. The impact on clinical workflow varied by practice setting, with differences observed in the ease of integration and the use of specific report elements. Tension between the length of the report and desired detail was appreciated. Barriers and facilitators to the process of implementation were noted, dominated by the theme of increased integration with the electronic medical record. These results fed real-time improvement cycles to reinforce clinician use. This model will be applied in future institutional efforts to integrate clinical genomic applications into practice and may be useful for other institutions considering the implementation of tools for personalizing medical management. PMID:25563219

  5. Reproductive Ethics in Commercial Surrogacy: Decision-Making in IVF Clinics in New Delhi, India.

    PubMed

    Tanderup, Malene; Reddy, Sunita; Patel, Tulsi; Nielsen, Birgitte Bruun

    2015-09-01

    As a neo-liberal economy, India has become one of the new health tourism destinations, with commercial gestational surrogacy as an expanding market. Yet the Indian Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) Bill has been pending for five years, and the guidelines issued by the Indian Council of Medical Research are somewhat vague and contradictory, resulting in self-regulated practices of fertility clinics. This paper broadly looks at clinical ethics in reproduction in the practice of surrogacy and decision-making in various procedures. Through empirical research in New Delhi, the capital of India, from December 2011 to November 2012, issues of decision-making on embryo transfer, fetal reduction, and mode of delivery were identified. Interviews were carried out with doctors in eighteen ART clinics, agents from four agencies, and fourteen surrogates. In aiming to fulfil the commissioning parents' demands, doctors were willing to go to the greatest extent possible in their medical practice. Autonomy and decision-making regarding choice of the number of embryos to transfer and the mode of delivery lay neither with commissioning parents nor surrogate mothers but mostly with doctors. In order to ensure higher success rates, surrogates faced the risk of multiple pregnancy and fetal reduction with little information regarding the risks involved. In the globalized market of commercial surrogacy in India, and with clinics compromising on ethics, there is an urgent need for formulation of regulative law for the clinical practice and maintenance of principles of reproductive ethics in order to ensure that the interests of surrogate mothers are safeguarded. PMID:26133889

  6. Clinical Decision Support Tools for Osteoporosis Disease Management: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Straus, Sharon E.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Studies indicate a gap between evidence and clinical practice in osteoporosis management. Tools that facilitate clinical decision making at the point of care are promising strategies for closing these practice gaps. OBJECTIVE To systematically review the literature to identify and describe the effectiveness of tools that support clinical decision making in osteoporosis disease management. DATA SOURCES Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and EBM Reviews (CDSR, DARE, CCTR, and ACP J Club), and contact with experts in the field. REVIEW METHODS Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in any language from 1966 to July 2006 investigating disease management interventions in patients at risk for osteoporosis. Outcomes included fractures and bone mineral density (BMD) testing. Two investigators independently assessed articles for relevance and study quality, and extracted data using standardized forms. RESULTS Of 1,246 citations that were screened for relevance, 13 RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Reported study quality was generally poor. Meta-analysis was not done because of methodological and clinical heterogeneity; 77% of studies included a reminder or education as a component of their intervention. Three studies of reminders plus education targeted to physicians and patients showed increased BMD testing (RR range 1.43 to 8.67) and osteoporosis medication use (RR range 1.60 to 8.67). A physician reminder plus a patient risk assessment strategy found reduced fractures [RR 0.58, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.37 to 0.90] and increased osteoporosis therapy (RR 2.44, CI 1.43 to 4.17). CONCLUSION Multi-component tools that are targeted to physicians and patients may be effective for supporting clinical decision making in osteoporosis disease management. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11606-008-0812-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18836782

  7. Clinical Recommendations in Medical Practice: A Proposed Framework to Reduce Bias and Improve the Quality of Medical Decisions.

    PubMed

    Alfandre, David

    2016-01-01

    Patients rely on, benefit from, and are strongly influenced by physicians' recommendations. In spite of the centrality and importance of physicians' recommendations to clinical care, there is only a scant literature describing the conceptual process of forming a clinical recommendation, and no discrete professional standards for making individual clinical recommendations. Evidence-based medicine and shared decision making together are intended to improve medical decision making, but there has been limited attention to how a recommendation is discretely formulated from either of those processes or how patients' preferences ought to be considered and how much weight they should hold. Moreover, physicians' bias has been reported to strongly influence how a recommendation is derived, thereby undermining the quality of healthcare decisions and patients' trust. To demonstrate a potential for improving the quality of decisions, this article proposes a conceptual framework for how physicians should reach a clinical recommendation and apply the process in practice. For preference-sensitive clinical decisions-that is, clinical decisions when patients' values and preferences are relevant-the process for reaching a recommendation should be transparent to patients and should be based solely on the medical evidence and patients' values and preferences. When patients' preferences for care do not prioritize health, physicians decide whether their recommendation will prioritize a welfare-enhancing versus an autonomy-enhancing approach. When there are gaps in understanding how physicians derive their clinical recommendations and how to further improve the quality of the decisions, the author calls for further empiric research. PMID:27045301

  8. Physician Attitudes toward Adopting Genome-Guided Prescribing through Clinical Decision Support.

    PubMed

    Overby, Casey Lynnette; Erwin, Angelika Ludtke; Abul-Husn, Noura S; Ellis, Stephen B; Scott, Stuart A; Obeng, Aniwaa Owusu; Kannry, Joseph L; Hripcsak, George; Bottinger, Erwin P; Gottesman, Omri

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed physician attitudes toward adopting genome-guided prescribing through clinical decision support (CDS), prior to enlisting in the Clinical Implementation of Personalized Medicine through Electronic Health Records and Genomics pilot pharmacogenomics project (CLIPMERGE PGx). We developed a survey instrument that includes the Evidence Based Practice Attitude Scale, adapted to measure attitudes toward adopting genome-informed interventions (EBPAS-GII). The survey also includes items to measure physicians' characteristics (awareness, experience, and perceived usefulness), attitudes about personal genome testing (PGT) services, and comfort using technology. We surveyed 101 General Internal Medicine physicians from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai (ISMMS). The majority were residency program trainees (~88%). Prior to enlisting into CLIPMERGE PGx, most physicians were aware of and had used decision support aids. Few physicians, however, were aware of and had used genome-guided prescribing. The majority of physicians viewed decision support aids and genotype data as being useful for making prescribing decisions. Most physicians had not heard of, but were willing to use, PGT services and felt comfortable interpreting PGT results. Most physicians were comfortable with technology. Physicians who perceived genotype data to be useful in making prescribing decisions, had more positive attitudes toward adopting genome-guided prescribing through CDS. Our findings suggest that internal medicine physicians have a deficit in their familiarity and comfort interpreting and using genomic information. This has reinforced the importance of gathering feedback and guidance from our enrolled physicians when designing genome-guided CDS and the importance of prioritizing genomic medicine education at our institutions. PMID:25562141

  9. Oxygen desaturation during night sleep affects decision-making in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Delazer, Margarete; Zamarian, Laura; Frauscher, Birgit; Mitterling, Thomas; Stefani, Ambra; Heidbreder, Anna; Högl, Birgit

    2016-08-01

    This study assessed decision-making and its associations with executive functions and sleep-related factors in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Thirty patients with untreated obstructive sleep apnea and 20 healthy age- and education-matched controls performed the Iowa Gambling Task, a decision-making task under initial ambiguity, as well as an extensive neuropsychological test battery. Patients, but not controls, also underwent a detailed polysomnographic assessment. Results of group analyses showed that patients performed at the same level of controls on the Iowa Gambling Task. However, the proportion of risky performers was significantly higher in the patient group than in the control group. Decision-making did not correlate with executive functions and subjective ratings of sleepiness, whereas there was a significant positive correlation between advantageous performance on the Iowa Gambling Task and percentage of N2 sleep, minimal oxygen saturation, average oxygen saturation and time spent below 90% oxygen saturation level. Also, the minimal oxygen saturation accounted for 27% of variance in decision-making. In conclusion, this study shows that a subgroup of patients with obstructive sleep apnea may be at risk of disadvantageous decision-making under ambiguity. Among the sleep-related factors, oxygen saturation is a significant predictor of advantageous decision-making. PMID:26899164

  10. Factors affecting elementary principals' and teachers' decisions to support outdoor field trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, Michael Joseph

    Outdoor field trips are recommended in science education reform, yet they are not frequently taken. Barriers may prevent elementary public school teachers from participating in outdoor field trips (Mirka, 1973; Falk & Balling, 1979; Ham, 1988; Orion, 1993). To determine what would increase students' attendance at a nature preserve, factors that may affect elementary private and public school principals' and teachers' decisions to support field trips were identified and compared. Private school principals supported field trips. They believed field trips were safe, and easy to arrange, and that the field trips helped students experience culture in the community. Experienced public school principals who were supportive and believed field trips should be required believed field trips fit into the teacher's lesson plan and were taken for enrichment. Public school principals who were less experienced with field trips believed field trips should be extracurricular. They believed that field trips served as a reward, and that they needed more information. They did not support field trips. Private school teachers believed that field trips did not have overly demanding administrative concerns. They believed field trips were safe, easy to arrange, and were supported by their administrator. Public school teachers who supported field trips and believed field trips should be required were white, female, experienced, and older. They believed that field trips were safe, easy to arrange, enjoyable, and that they had enough help to conduct trips. Public school teachers who may not support trips had administrative concerns, and they did not believe field trips met the needs of students. These were male, white or non-white, young or middle-aged, and less experienced. They may believe field trips are a waste of time and money. They believed they had a nonsupportive administrator. Money for transportation was a barrier for older public school teachers and principals. No improvement on

  11. Exploring Decision-Making of HIV-Infected Hispanics and African Americans Participating in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Goba, Migdalia V.; Dominguez, Dinora C.; Stoll, Pamela; Grady, Christine; Ramos, Catalina; Mican, JoAnn M.

    2011-01-01

    Underrepresentation of HIV-infected Hispanics and African Americans in clinical trials seriously limits our understanding of the benefits and risks of treatment in these populations. This qualitative study examined factors that racial/ethnic minority patients consider when making decisions regarding research participation. Thirty-five HIV-infected Hispanic and African American patients enrolled in clinical research protocols at the National Institutes of Health were recruited to participate in focus groups and in-depth interviews. The sample of mostly men (n = 22), had a mean age of 45, nearly equal representation of race/ethnicity, and diagnosed 2 to 22 years ago. Baseline questionnaires included demographics and measures of social support and acculturation. Interviewers had similar racial/ethnic, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds as the participants. Four major themes around participants’ decisions to enroll in clinical trials emerged: Enhancers, Barriers, Beliefs, and Psychosocial Context. Results may help researchers develop strategies to facilitate inclusion of HIV-infected Hispanics and African Americans into clinical trials. PMID:21256054

  12. Students' stereotypes of patients as barriers to clinical decision-making.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S M; Kurtz, M E; Tomlinson, T; Howe, K R

    1986-09-01

    The ability to formulate quick, accurate clinical judgments is stressed in medical training. Speed is usually an asset when a physician sorts through his biomedical knowledge, but it is often a liability when the physician assesses the sociocultural context of a clinical encounter. At the Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, a study was designed which graphically illustrated to beginning students that unconscious sociocultural stereotypes may influence clinical decision-making. Three entering classes of students were shown a videotape depicting five simulated patients (attractive black woman, attractive white woman, professional man, middle-aged housewife, and elderly man), each presenting with the same physical complaint. Elements of positive and negative stereotypes were incorporated into each of the portrayals, and the students rated these patients on positive and negative characteristics. The results suggested that the students attributed both positive and negative characteristics to patients on the basis of irrelevant characteristics, such as attractiveness, and with little further justification for their attributions. Such stereotypic generalizations held by students may become barriers to the students' objective clinical decision-making. PMID:3755759

  13. Integrating Clinical Decision Support into EMR and PHR: a Case Study Using Anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Chackery, Dave-Gregory; Keshavjee, Karim; Mirza, Kashif; Ghany, Ahmad; Holbrook, Anne M

    2015-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) for atrial fibrillation is expected to ease the implementation of often-complex guidelines for atrial fibrillation and anticoagulation. Most clinical decision support systems (CDSS) for anticoagulation are stand-alone systems that do not integrate with electronic medical records (EMR). We have developed an architecture that consists of a computerized CDS that can integrate with multiple EMRs and multiple patient health records (PHRs). The design process revealed some significant issues that were resolved through systematic business/clinical analysis and creative clinical design in the diagnostic and treatment domains. Key issues identified and resolved include: 1) how to correctly allocate existing patients into various CDSS states (e.g., MAINTENANCE, HOLD, DISCONTINUE, etc), 2) identify when a patient becomes eligible for CDSS guidance over time, 3) how the CDSS maintains information about the patient's anticoagulation state and 4) how to transform vague human-readable concepts to explicit computable concepts. The management of anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation is no easy task and we believe our architecture will improve patient care at all levels and ultimately better balance the reduction of stroke risk while minimizing harms from major bleeding. In addition, the architecture presented is scalable to other treatment guidelines and is scalable to multiple EMRs and PHRs, making it suitable for use in a platform approach. PMID:25676955

  14. A Framework for Usable and Effective Clinical Decision Support: Experience from the iCPR Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kannry, Joseph; McCullagh, Lauren; Kushniruk, Andre; Mann, Devin; Edonyabo, Daniel; McGinn, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The promise of Clinical Decision Support (CDS) has always been to transform patient care and improve patient outcomes through the delivery of timely and appropriate recommendations that are patient specific and, more often than not, are appropriately actionable. However, the users of CDS—providers—are frequently bombarded with inappropriate and inapplicable CDS that often are not informational, not integrated into the workflow, not patient specific, and that may present out of date and irrelevant recommendations. Methods: The integrated clinical prediction rule (iCPR) project was a randomized clinical trial (RCT) conducted to determine if a novel form of CDS, i.e., clinical prediction rules (CPRs), could be efficiently integrated into workflow and result in changes in outcomes (e.g., antibiotic ordering) when embedded within a commercial electronic health record (EHR). We use the lessons learned from the iCPR project to illustrate a framework for constructing usable, useful, and effective actionable CDS while employing off-the-shelf functionality in a production system. Innovations that make up the framework combine the following: (1) active and actionable decision support, (2) multiple rounds of usability testing with iterative development for user acceptance, (3) numerous context sensitive triggers, (4) dedicated training and support for users of the CDS tool for user adoption, and (5) support from clinical and administrative leadership. We define “context sensitive triggers” as being workflow events (i.e., context) that result in a CDS intervention. Discussion: Success of the framework can be measured by CDS adoption (i.e., intervention is being used), acceptance (compliance with recommendations), and clinical outcomes (where appropriate). This framework may have broader implications for the deployment of Health Information Technology (HIT). Results and Conclusion: iCPR was well adopted(57.4% of users) and accepted (42.7% of users

  15. The Utilization of a Clinical Decision Support System to Manage Adult Type 2 Diabetes: A Correlational Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faught, I. Charie

    2012-01-01

    While the Institute of Medicine (2001) has promoted health information technology to improve the process of care such as compliance with clinical practice guidelines and quicker access to clinical information, diagnostic tests, and treatment results, very little was known about how a clinical decision support system can contribute to diabetes…

  16. Electronic medication ordering with integrated drug database and clinical decision support system.

    PubMed

    Cufar, Andreja; Droljc, Anže; Orel, Andrej

    2012-01-01

    Medication errors have been identified as one of the most important causes of adverse drug events. Computerized physician order-entry (CPOE) systems, coupled with decision support (Medication allergy checking, drug interactions, and dose calculations), are considered to be appropriate solutions for reducing medication errors and standardizing care. It is quite useful if clinical information system (CIS) supports order sets, which help with standardizing care, preventing omission errors, and expediting the ordering process. Order sets are predefined groups of orders pertinent to one or more specific clinical conditions or diagnoses. The article describes how a clinical information system can be used to support medication process (prescribing, ordering, dispensing, administration and monitoring) and offer participating medical teams real time warnings and key information regarding medications and patient status, thus reducing medication errors. Integrated electronic prescribing support system benefits for total parenteral nutrition (TPN) are discussed at the end. PMID:22874280

  17. Clinical Decisions: Determining When to Save or Remove an Ailing Implant.

    PubMed

    Tarnow, Dennis P; Chu, Stephen J; Fletcher, Paul D

    2016-04-01

    The basis for the decision to either save or remove an ailing implant is multifactorial, and, as such, it has become one of the more controversial topics in the field of dental implantology. While bone lost to peri-implant disease can now be augmented with increasing predictability, the degree of success still varies depending on the size and configuration of the osseous defect. Concurrently, with the development of improved high-reverse torque instrumentation, minimally invasive techniques can be used to easily remove an implant that is malpositioned, causing an esthetic problem, or showing advanced bone loss. Any eventual decision regarding the retention or removal of an ailing implant must also be balanced with the desires of the patient, who typically will have already invested significant time and money to have the implant initially placed and restored. This article will present the variables involved in the decision-making process for when to save or remove an ailing implant. Clinical examples illustrating the management for these factors will be offered, providing clinicians a variety of alternatives available for managing different clinical circumstances that may be encountered. PMID:27136118

  18. A UMLS-based Knowledge Acquisition Tool for Rule-based Clinical Decision Support System Development

    PubMed Central

    Achour, Soumeya L.; Dojat, Michel; Rieux, Claire; Bierling, Philippe; Lepage, Eric

    2001-01-01

    Decision support systems in the medical field have to be easily modified by medical experts themselves. The authors have designed a knowledge acquisition tool to facilitate the creation and maintenance of a knowledge base by the domain expert and its sharing and reuse by other institutions. The Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) contains the domain entities and constitutes the relations repository from which the expert builds, through a specific browser, the explicit domain ontology. The expert is then guided in creating the knowledge base according to the pre-established domain ontology and condition–action rule templates that are well adapted to several clinical decision-making processes. Corresponding medical logic modules are eventually generated. The application of this knowledge acquisition tool to the construction of a decision support system in blood transfusion demonstrates the value of such a pragmatic methodology for the design of rule-based clinical systems that rely on the highly progressive knowledge embedded in hospital information systems. PMID:11418542

  19. Understanding the impact of economic evidence on clinical decision making: a discrete choice experiment in cardiology.

    PubMed

    Torbica, Aleksandra; Fattore, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    The present study aims to evaluate the impact of cost-effectiveness information on clinical decision making using discrete choice experiment (DCE) methodology. Data were collected through a self-completed questionnaire administered to Italian cardiologists in June 2007 (n = 129 respondents, 1143 observations). The questionnaire asked clinicians to make choices between paired scenarios, across which three key dimensions were identified and varied: (1) quality of clinical evidence, (2) size of health gain (reduction of relative and absolute risk), and (3) economic impact (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio). A random effects probit model was used to estimate clinicians' preferences for the different dimensions, while the heterogeneity of preferences was tested in a model with interaction terms. Dominance tests were used to assess the consistency of responses. The results indicate that Italian cardiologists regard economic impact (cost-effectiveness) as an important factor in their decision making. Economic evidence is valued more highly among clinicians with a higher self-assessed level of knowledge regarding economic evaluation techniques, as well as among younger professionals (age<45). While relevant study limitations should be acknowledged, our results suggest that DCEs can be used to elicit clinicians' decision-making criteria and to inform the allocation of resources for future research in a logical manner. Italian cardiologists appear to take cost-effectiveness information into account when deciding whether to use new treatments. PMID:20207466

  20. Development of a formal structure for clinical management decisions: a mathematical analysis.

    PubMed

    Card, W I

    1975-01-01

    Decision theory and the calculating power of the computer now enables us to contemplate the development of formal methods for making decisions about clinical management. In the simplest model, it is first necessary to define all treatment decisions as an exhaustive and mutually exclusive set and similarly to define the set of consequences or outcomes of treatment. The probability of each outcome conditional on treatment has to be estimated and this consequent state of health has to be quantified as a utility. Possible methods of estimating utilities of states of health are discussed and the construction of a unidimensional utility function based on a sequence of wagers. The states of health consequent on severe brain damage can only be described multidimensionally and the model has to be extended to include this case. While such a model would allow simple treatment decisions to be formalized, it could not decide whether the cost of treatment was worth while nor whether it would pay to carry out further investigative tests and thus buy more evidence. If these additional variables are to be included in the model, it is necessary to introduce the motion of an equivalence between monetary values and utilities. This implies attaching a monetary value to any given state of health. PMID:1045996

  1. [Human body meridian spatial decision support system for clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Wu, Dehua

    2016-01-01

    The spatial position and distribution of human body meridian are expressed limitedly in the decision support system (DSS) of acupuncture and moxibustion at present, which leads to the failure to give the effective quantitative analysis on the spatial range and the difficulty for the decision-maker to provide a realistic spatial decision environment. Focusing on the limit spatial expression in DSS of acupuncture and moxibustion, it was proposed that on the basis of the geographic information system, in association of DSS technology, the design idea was developed on the human body meridian spatial DSS. With the 4-layer service-oriented architecture adopted, the data center integrated development platform was taken as the system development environment. The hierarchical organization was done for the spatial data of human body meridian via the directory tree. The structured query language (SQL) server was used to achieve the unified management of spatial data and attribute data. The technologies of architecture, configuration and plug-in development model were integrated to achieve the data inquiry, buffer analysis and program evaluation of the human body meridian spatial DSS. The research results show that the human body meridian spatial DSS could reflect realistically the spatial characteristics of the spatial position and distribution of human body meridian and met the constantly changeable demand of users. It has the powerful spatial analysis function and assists with the scientific decision in clinical treatment and teaching of acupuncture and moxibustion. It is the new attempt to the informatization research of human body meridian. PMID:26946752

  2. Clinical evaluation of the DIABETES expert system for decision support by multiple regimen insulin dose adjustment.

    PubMed

    Ambrosiadou, B V; Goulis, D G; Pappas, C

    1996-01-01

    A performance evaluation of the DIABETES rule-based expert system prototype for clinical decision making is presented. The system facilitates multiple insulin regimen and dose adjustment of insulin dependent Type I or II diabetic patients. The study was performed on 600 subjects from two diabetological centres and three diabetological offices of Greek hospitals. The responses of the attendant medical doctors were compared with those of the DIABETES system, with the aid of a specifically devised valuation range (0-5 degrees, 0 indicating full agreement and 5 full disagreement). The capabilities and the weakness of the system in terms of its practicality for decision support in assisting therapy of diabetes mellitus by blood glucose monitoring and subsequent insulin dose adjustment are discussed. The potential benefits of decision support systems for diabetic patient management are seen to be the cost saving they provide in terms of man-hours of verbal instruction by medical experts, the support in terms of objective and consistent decision making, as well as the recording of medical knowledge in the ill-defined field of insulin administration, thus aiding the education and training of medical personnel. PMID:8646833

  3. Time Devours Things: How Impulsivity and Time Affect Temporal Decisions in Pathological Gamblers

    PubMed Central

    Grecucci, Alessandro; Giorgetta, Cinzia; Rattin, Andrea; Guerreschi, Cesare; Sanfey, Alan G.; Bonini, Nicolao

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with several psychiatric disorders in which the loss of control of a specific behavior determines the syndrome itself. One particularly interesting population characterized by reported high impulsivity and problematic decision-making are those diagnosed with pathological gambling. However the association between impulsivity and decision making in pathological gambling has been only partially confirmed until now. We tested 23 normal controls and 23 diagnosed pathological gamblers in an intertemporal choice task, as well as other personality trait measurements. Results showed that gamblers scored higher on impulsivity questionnaires, and selected a higher percentage of impatient choices (higher percentage of smaller, sooner rewards), when compared to normal controls. Moreover, gamblers were faster in terms of reaction times at selecting the smaller, sooner options and discounted rewards more rapidly over time. Importantly, regression analyses clarified that self-reported measures of impulsivity played a significant role in biasing decisions towards small but more rapidly available rewards. In the present study we found evidence for impulsivity in personality traits and decisions in pathological gamblers relative to controls. We conclude by speculating on the need to incorporate impulsivity and decision biases in the conceptualization of pathological gambling for a better understanding and treatment of this pathology. PMID:25296184

  4. Impact of Nonvascular Thoracic MR Imaging on the Clinical Decision Making of Thoracic Surgeons: A 2-year Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Ackman, Jeanne B; Gaissert, Henning A; Lanuti, Michael; Digumarthy, Subba R; Shepard, Jo-Anne O; Halpern, Elkan F; Wright, Cameron D

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To determine the impact of nonvascular thoracic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging on the clinical decision making and diagnostic certainty of thoracic surgeons. Materials and Methods Seven thoracic surgeons at Massachusetts General Hospital, an academic quaternary referral hospital, participated in this 2-year, prospective, institution review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant pre- and post-MR imaging survey study after completing a one-time demographic survey. Between July 16, 2013, and July 13, 2015, each time a thoracic surgeon ordered a nonvascular thoracic MR imaging study via radiology order entry, he or she was sent a link to the pre-test survey that ascertained the clinical rationale for MR imaging, the clinical management plan if MR imaging was not an option, and pre-test diagnostic certainty. Upon completion of the MR imaging report, the surgeon was sent a link to the post-test survey assessing if/how MR imaging changed clinical management, the surgeon's comfort with the clinical management plan, and post-test diagnostic certainty. Data were analyzed with Student t, Wilcoxon, and McNemar tests. Results A total of 99 pre- and post-test surveys were completed. Most MR imaging studies (64 of 99 [65%]) were requested because of indeterminate computed tomographic findings. The use of MR imaging significantly reduced the number of planned surgical interventions (P < .001), modified the surgical approach in 54% (14 of 26) of surgical cases, and increased surgeon comfort with the patient management plan in 95% (94 of 99) of cases. Increased diagnostic certainty as a result of MR imaging was highly significant (P < .0001). In 21% (21 of 99) of cases, definitive MR imaging results warranted no further follow-up or clinical care. Conclusion In appropriate cases, assessment with nonvascular thoracic MR imaging substantially affects the clinical decision making and diagnostic certainty of thoracic surgeons. (©) RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available

  5. External factors affecting decision-making and use of evidence in an Australian public health policy environment.

    PubMed

    Zardo, Pauline; Collie, Alex; Livingstone, Charles

    2014-05-01

    This study examined external factors affecting policy and program decision-making in a specific public health policy context: injury prevention and rehabilitation compensation in the Australian state of Victoria. The aim was twofold: identify external factors that affect policy and program decision-making in this specific context; use this evidence to inform targeting of interventions aimed at increasing research use in this context. Qualitative interviews were undertaken from June 2011 to January 2012 with 33 employees from two state government agencies. Key factors identified were stakeholder feedback and action, government and ministerial input, legal feedback and action, injured persons and the media. The identified external factors were able to significantly influence policy and program decision-making processes: acting as both barriers and facilitators, depending on the particular issue at hand. The factors with the most influence were the Minister and government, lawyers, and agency stakeholders, particularly health providers, trade unions and employer groups. This research revealed that interventions aimed at increasing use of research in this context must target and harness the influence of these groups. This research provides critical insights for researchers seeking to design interventions to increase use of research in policy environments and influence decision-making in Victorian injury prevention and rehabilitation compensation. PMID:24632115

  6. To Push or Not to Push? Affective Influences on Moral Judgment Depend on Decision Frame

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pastotter, Bernhard; Gleixner, Sabine; Neuhauser, Theresa; Bauml, Karl-Heinz T.

    2013-01-01

    People's moods can influence moral judgment. Such influences may arise because moods affect moral emotion, or because moods affect moral thought. The present study provides evidence that, at least in the footbridge dilemma, moods affect moral thought. The results of two experiments are reported in which, after induction of positive, negative, or…

  7. Factors Affecting the Corporate Decision-Making Process of Air Transport Manufacturers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollila, R. G.; Hill, J. D.; Noton, B. R.; Duffy, M. A.; Epstein, M. M.

    1976-01-01

    Fuel economy is a pivotal question influencing the future sale and utilization of commercial aircraft. The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Program Office has a program intended to accelerate the readiness of advanced technologies for energy efficient aircraft. Because the decision to develop a new airframe or engine is a major financial hazard for manufacturers, it is important to know what factors influence the decision making process. A method is described for identifying and ranking individuals and organizations involved at each stage of commercial air transport development, and the barriers that must be overcome in adopting new technologies.

  8. Test Case Selection in Pre-Deployment Testing of Complex Clinical Decision Support Systems.

    PubMed

    Tso, Geoffrey J; Yuen, Kaeli; Martins, Susana; Tu, Samson W; Ashcraft, Michael; Heidenreich, Paul; Hoffman, Brian B; Goldstein, Mary K

    2016-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) systems with complex logic are being developed. Ensuring the quality of CDS is imperative, but there is no consensus on testing standards. We tested ATHENA-HTN CDS after encoding updated hypertension guidelines into the system. A logic flow and a complexity analysis of the encoding were performed to guide testing. 100 test cases were selected to test the major pathways in the CDS logic flow, and the effectiveness of the testing was analyzed. The encoding contained 26 decision points and 3120 possible output combinations. The 100 cases selected tested all of the major pathways in the logic, but only 1% of the possible output combinations. Test case selection is one of the most challenging aspects in CDS testing and has a major impact on testing coverage. A test selection strategy should take into account the complexity of the system, identification of major logic pathways, and available resources. PMID:27570678

  9. Test Case Selection in Pre-Deployment Testing of Complex Clinical Decision Support Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tso, Geoffrey J.; Yuen, Kaeli; Martins, Susana; Tu, Samson W.; Ashcraft, Michael; Heidenreich, Paul; Hoffman, Brian B.; Goldstein, Mary K.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) systems with complex logic are being developed. Ensuring the quality of CDS is imperative, but there is no consensus on testing standards. We tested ATHENA-HTN CDS after encoding updated hypertension guidelines into the system. A logic flow and a complexity analysis of the encoding were performed to guide testing. 100 test cases were selected to test the major pathways in the CDS logic flow, and the effectiveness of the testing was analyzed. The encoding contained 26 decision points and 3120 possible output combinations. The 100 cases selected tested all of the major pathways in the logic, but only 1% of the possible output combinations. Test case selection is one of the most challenging aspects in CDS testing and has a major impact on testing coverage. A test selection strategy should take into account the complexity of the system, identification of major logic pathways, and available resources. PMID:27570678

  10. Perforated mucinous cystadenoma of the vermiform appendix: an overview in reasoning clinical decisions

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Iordanis N; Christodoulou, Spyridon; Kokoropoulos, Panayiotis; Konstantudakis, George; Economopoulos, Nikolaos; Leontara, Vassilia

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in the management of appendiceal mucinous neoplasms (AMN) such as peritonectomy combined with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy have introduced new standards of care. However, many dilemmas are encountered in decision making as in the following patient. A 74-year-old woman was admitted with an appendiceal cystadenoma found in a preadmission CT scan. However, the tumour was not documented by the in hospital investigation due to its perforation and its reduction in size. Consequently, a series of management dilemmas were encountered that were solved by cautious evaluation of the pre and peroperative findings. She was submitted to a right hemicolectomy. A spontaneous perforation was suspected, but the accurate diagnosis was documented postoperatively by histopathology. This paradigm motivated this review which concluded that reasoning clinical decisions in the light of recent advances and appropriate care based on the disease-stage are essential for an optimal outcome in the management of AMN. PMID:22689271

  11. Assessing the Clinical Impact of Risk Prediction Models With Decision Curves: Guidance for Correct Interpretation and Appropriate Use.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Kathleen F; Brown, Marshall D; Zhu, Kehao; Janes, Holly

    2016-07-20

    The decision curve is a graphical summary recently proposed for assessing the potential clinical impact of risk prediction biomarkers or risk models for recommending treatment or intervention. It was applied recently in an article in Journal of Clinical Oncology to measure the impact of using a genomic risk model for deciding on adjuvant radiation therapy for prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy. We illustrate the use of decision curves for evaluating clinical- and biomarker-based models for predicting a man's risk of prostate cancer, which could be used to guide the decision to biopsy. Decision curves are grounded in a decision-theoretical framework that accounts for both the benefits of intervention and the costs of intervention to a patient who cannot benefit. Decision curves are thus an improvement over purely mathematical measures of performance such as the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. However, there are challenges in using and interpreting decision curves appropriately. We caution that decision curves cannot be used to identify the optimal risk threshold for recommending intervention. We discuss the use of decision curves for miscalibrated risk models. Finally, we emphasize that a decision curve shows the performance of a risk model in a population in which every patient has the same expected benefit and cost of intervention. If every patient has a personal benefit and cost, then the curves are not useful. If subpopulations have different benefits and costs, subpopulation-specific decision curves should be used. As a companion to this article, we released an R software package called DecisionCurve for making decision curves and related graphics. PMID:27247223

  12. Comparison of Computer-based Clinical Decision Support Systems and Content for Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, M.; Wright, A.; Burton, M.; Fraser, G.; Krall, M.; Maviglia, S.; Mohammed-Rajput, N.; Simonaitis, L.; Sonnenberg, F.; Middleton, B.

    2011-01-01

    Background Computer-based clinical decision support (CDS) systems have been shown to improve quality of care and workflow efficiency, and health care reform legislation relies on electronic health records and CDS systems to improve the cost and quality of health care in the United States; however, the heterogeneity of CDS content and infrastructure of CDS systems across sites is not well known. Objective We aimed to determine the scope of CDS content in diabetes care at six sites, assess the capabilities of CDS in use at these sites, characterize the scope of CDS infrastructure at these sites, and determine how the sites use CDS beyond individual patient care in order to identify characteristics of CDS systems and content that have been successfully implemented in diabetes care. Methods We compared CDS systems in six collaborating sites of the Clinical Decision Support Consortium. We gathered CDS content on care for patients with diabetes mellitus and surveyed institutions on characteristics of their site, the infrastructure of CDS at these sites, and the capabilities of CDS at these sites. Results The approach to CDS and the characteristics of CDS content varied among sites. Some commonalities included providing customizability by role or user, applying sophisticated exclusion criteria, and using CDS automatically at the time of decision-making. Many messages were actionable recommendations. Most sites had monitoring rules (e.g. assessing hemoglobin A1c), but few had rules to diagnose diabetes or suggest specific treatments. All sites had numerous prevention rules including reminders for providing eye examinations, influenza vaccines, lipid screenings, nephropathy screenings, and pneumococcal vaccines. Conclusion Computer-based CDS systems vary widely across sites in content and scope, but both institution-created and purchased systems had many similar features and functionality, such as integration of alerts and reminders into the decision-making workflow of the

  13. Development and impact of computerised decision support systems for clinical management of depression: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Triñanes, Yolanda; Atienza, Gerardo; Louro-González, Arturo; de-las-Heras-Liñero, Elena; Alvarez-Ariza, María; Palao, Diego J

    2015-01-01

    One of the proposals for improving clinical practice is to introduce computerised decision support systems (CDSS) and integrate these with electronic medical records. Accordingly, this study sought to systematically review evidence on the effectiveness of CDSS in the management of depression. A search was performed in Medline, EMBASE and PsycInfo, in order to do this. The quality of quantitative studies was assessed using the SIGN method, and qualitative studies using the CASPe checklist. Seven studies were identified (3 randomised clinical trials, 3 non-randomised trials, and one qualitative study). The CDSS assessed incorporated content drawn from guidelines and other evidence-based products. In general, the CDSS had a positive impact on different aspects, such as the screening and diagnosis, treatment, improvement in depressive symptoms and quality of life, and referral of patients. The use of CDSS could thus serve to optimise care of depression in various scenarios by providing recommendations based on the best evidence available and facilitating decision-making in clinical practice. PMID:25500093

  14. Teaching clinical decision-making to pediatric residents in an era of managed care.

    PubMed

    Chessare, J B

    1998-04-01

    The growth of managed care has brought a new focus on physician competency in the appropriate use of resources to help patients. The community of pediatric educators must improve residency curricula and teaching methodologies to ensure that graduates of their programs can effectively and efficiently meet the needs of children and their families. The educational approach in many pediatric residency programs is an implicit apprenticeship model, with which the residents follow the actions of attending physicians with little attention to scrutiny of the clinical evidence for and against diagnostic and treatment strategies. Evidence-based medicine stresses to the trainee the importance of the evaluation of evidence from clinical research and cautions against the use of intuition, unsystematic clinical experience, and untested pathophysiologic reasoning as sufficient for medical decision-making. Managed care also has helped to create a heightened awareness of the need to educate residents to incorporate the preferences of patients and families into diagnostic and treatment decisions. Trainees must know how to balance their duty to maximize the health of populations at the lowest resource use with their duty to each individual patient and family. Changes in the residency curriculum will bring change in educational settings and the structure of rotations. Potential barriers to implementation will include the need for faculty development and financial resources for information technology. PMID:9544180

  15. Early Experiences from a guideline-based computerized clinical decision support for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Valladares, Carlos; Corbal, Iago; Anani, Nadim; Koch, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects 1-2% of the population. Twenty percent of all strokes are caused by AF. In this study, we represented the clinical knowledge in the European Society of Cardiology guideline using Guideline Definition Language (GDL), a format that binds openEHR archetypes, rule languages, and reference terminologies together. The computerized guidelines are applied to electronic health record (EHR) data retrospectively in order to identify possible gaps between current clinical practice and optimal care recommended by the evidence-based guidelines. Treatment compliance is checked in two patient groups: one received treatment from a cardiologist who is responsible for AF treatment in the region (n=514) and the other was a much larger patient group from the whole region (n=8130). The compliance checking shows the cardiologist group has substantially higher percentage of compliant treatment compared with that of the general population group. Based on this important finding, we are now implementing at-point-of-care clinical decision support reusing the same computerized guideline knowledge in GDL format in order to increase the guideline adherence of the treatment. PMID:23920553

  16. Relative Saliency in Change Signals Affects Perceptual Comparison and Decision Processes in Change Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Cheng-Ta

    2011-01-01

    Change detection requires perceptual comparison and decision processes on different features of multiattribute objects. How relative salience between two feature-changes influences the processes has not been addressed. This study used the systems factorial technology to investigate the processes when detecting changes in a Gabor patch with visual…

  17. Subjective Variables Affecting Funding Decisions by Federal Research & Development Agencies: The Grantsmanship Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapek, Raymond A.

    1984-01-01

    There are many misconceptions about how funding decisions are made within federal agencies. Observations of how bias creeps into an otherwise objective evaluation process are presented, and hints are offered on improving the probability of receiving federal support. (Author/MLW)

  18. Inferential Judgments Affecting the Decision-Making Process in the Attorney General's Commission on Pornography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gouran, Dennis S.

    Although the Attorney General's Commission on Pornography, also known as the Meese Commission, has been criticized excessively at times for threatening freedom of speech and press and individual rights to privacy, an analysis of its "Final Report" reveals numerous deficiencies in the Commission's decision-making process. These deficiencies,…

  19. Does the Availability of Parental Health Insurance Affect the College Enrollment Decision of Young Americans?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Juergen; Hall, Diane M. Harnek; Rhoads, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The present study examines whether the college enrollment decision of young individuals (student full-time, student part-time, and non-student) depends on health insurance coverage via a parent's family health plan. Our findings indicate that the availability of parental health insurance can have significant effects on the probability that a young…

  20. Factors Affecting Long-Term-Care Residents' Decision-Making Processes as They Formulate Advance Directives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Heather C.; McColl, Mary Ann; Gilbert, Julie; Wong, Jiahui; Murray, Gale; Shortt, Samuel E. D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe factors contributing to the decision-making processes of elderly persons as they formulate advance directives in long-term care. Design and Methods: This study was qualitative, based on grounded theory. Recruitment was purposive and continued until saturation was reached. Nine residents of a…

  1. IMPACT: How ORE Findings Have Affected Decisions in Austin and Beyond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, David, Ed.; Ligon, Glynn, Ed.

    Over the years, findings of the Office of Research and Evaluation (ORE) of the Austin (Texas) Independent School District (AISD) have had a significant impact on decisions made in the district and sometimes beyond it. The ORE's impact in the AISD is reviewed in 16 areas. Some of the major findings are summarized: (1) ORE studies of retention in…

  2. Plant-mediated decisions by an herbivore affect oviposition pattern and subsequent egg parasitism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Natural enemies are important mortality factors for herbivores and thus may influence herbivore population dynamics. In response to natural enemy pressure, herbivores can alter life history decisions, such as oviposition behavior, so that offspring are protected from natural enemies. One such stra...

  3. Does Family Group Decision Making Affect Child Welfare Outcomes? Findings from a Randomized Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berzin, Stephanie Cosner; Cohen, Ed; Thomas, Karen; Dawson, William C.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the evaluation of two family group decision-making programs administered under the California Title IV-E Waiver Demonstration Project. This is the only evaluation using random assignment to examine FGDM. Overall, results did not indicate more positive outcomes for children receiving the intervention, but did indicate that…

  4. Age Differences in Affective Decision Making as Indexed by Performance on the Iowa Gambling Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cauffman, Elizabeth; Shulman, Elizabeth P.; Steinberg, Laurence; Claus, Eric; Banich, Marie T.; Graham, Sandra; Woolard, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary perspectives on age differences in risk taking, informed by advances in developmental neuroscience, have emphasized the need to examine the ways in which emotional and cognitive factors interact to influence decision making. In the present study, a diverse sample of 901 individuals between the ages of 10 and 30 were administered a…

  5. Sources of non-compliance with clinical practice guidelines in trauma triage: a decision science study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background United States trauma system guidelines specify when to triage patients to specialty centers. Nonetheless, many eligible patients are not transferred as per guidelines. One possible reason is emergency physician decision-making. The objective of the study was to characterize sensory and decisional determinants of emergency physician trauma triage decision-making. Methods We conducted a decision science study using a signal detection theory-informed approach to analyze physician responses to a web-based survey of 30 clinical vignettes of trauma cases. We recruited a national convenience sample of emergency medicine physicians who worked at hospitals without level I/II trauma center certification. Using trauma triage guidelines as our reference standard, we estimated physicians’ perceptual sensitivity (ability to discriminate between patients who did and did not meet guidelines for transfer) and decisional threshold (tolerance for false positive or false negative decisions). Results We recruited 280 physicians: 210 logged in to the website (response rate 74%) and 168 (80%) completed the survey. The regression coefficient on American College of Surgeons – Committee on Trauma (ACS-COT) guidelines for transfer (perceptual sensitivity) was 0.77 (p<0.01, 95% CI 0.68 – 0.87) indicating that the probability of transfer weakly increased as the ACS-COT guidelines would recommend transfer. The intercept (decision threshold) was 1.45 (p<0.01, 95% CI 1.27 – 1.63), indicating that participants had a conservative threshold for transfer, erring on the side of not transferring patients. There was significant between-physician variability in perceptual sensitivity and decisional thresholds. No physician demographic characteristics correlated with perceptual sensitivity, but men and physicians working at non-trauma centers without a trauma-center affiliation had higher decisional thresholds. Conclusions On a case vignette-based questionnaire, both sensory and

  6. Translating shared decision-making into health care clinical practices: Proof of concepts

    PubMed Central

    Légaré, France; Elwyn, Glyn; Fishbein, Martin; Frémont, Pierre; Frosch, Dominick; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Kenny, David A; Labrecque, Michel; Stacey, Dawn; St-Jacques, Sylvie; van der Weijden, Trudy

    2008-01-01

    Background There is considerable interest today in shared decision-making (SDM), defined as a decision-making process jointly shared by patients and their health care provider. However, the data show that SDM has not been broadly adopted yet. Consequently, the main goal of this proposal is to bring together the resources and the expertise needed to develop an interdisciplinary and international research team on the implementation of SDM in clinical practice using a theory-based dyadic perspective. Methods Participants include researchers from Canada, US, UK, and Netherlands, representing medicine, nursing, psychology, community health and epidemiology. In order to develop a collaborative research network that takes advantage of the expertise of the team members, the following research activities are planned: 1) establish networking and on-going communication through internet-based forum, conference calls, and a bi-weekly e-bulletin; 2) hold a two-day workshop with two key experts (one in theoretical underpinnings of behavioral change, and a second in dyadic data analysis), and invite all investigators to present their views on the challenges related to the implementation of SDM in clinical practices; 3) conduct a secondary analyses of existing dyadic datasets to ensure that discussion among team members is grounded in empirical data; 4) build capacity with involvement of graduate students in the workshop and online forum; and 5) elaborate a position paper and an international multi-site study protocol. Discussion This study protocol aims to inform researchers, educators, and clinicians interested in improving their understanding of effective strategies to implement shared decision-making in clinical practice using a theory-based dyadic perspective. PMID:18194521

  7. Integrating complex business processes for knowledge-driven clinical decision support systems.

    PubMed

    Kamaleswaran, Rishikesan; McGregor, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents in detail the component of the Complex Business Process for Stream Processing framework that is responsible for integrating complex business processes to enable knowledge-driven Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) recommendations. CDSSs aid the clinician in supporting the care of patients by providing accurate data analysis and evidence-based recommendations. However, the incorporation of a dynamic knowledge-management system that supports the definition and enactment of complex business processes and real-time data streams has not been researched. In this paper we discuss the process web service as an innovative method of providing contextual information to a real-time data stream processing CDSS. PMID:23366138

  8. Laboratory Medicine in the Clinical Decision Support for Treatment of Hypercholesterolemia: Pharmacogenetics of Statins.

    PubMed

    Ruaño, Gualberto; Seip, Richard; Windemuth, Andreas; Wu, Alan H B; Thompson, Paul D

    2016-09-01

    Statin responsiveness is an area of great research interest given the success of the drug class in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia and in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Interrogation of the patient's genome for gene variants will eventually guide anti-hyperlipidemic intervention. In this review, we discuss methodological approaches to discover genetic markers predictive of class-wide and drug-specific statin efficacy and safety. Notable pharmacogenetic findings are summarized from hypothesis-free genome wide and hypothesis-led candidate gene association studies. Physiogenomic models and clinical decision support systems will be required for DNA-guided statin therapy to reach practical use in medicine. PMID:27514463

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the vagina: an overview for radiologists with emphasis on clinical decision making*

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Daian Miranda; Bezerra, Régis Otaviano França; Ortega, Cinthia Denise; Blasbalg, Roberto; Viana, Públio César Cavalcante; de Menezes, Marcos Roberto; Rocha, Manoel de Souza

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is a method with high contrast resolution widely used in the assessment of pelvic gynecological diseases. However, the potential of such method to diagnose vaginal lesions is still underestimated, probably due to the scarce literature approaching the theme, the poor familiarity of radiologists with vaginal diseases, some of them relatively rare, and to the many peculiarities involved in the assessment of the vagina. Thus, the authors illustrate the role of magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of vaginal diseases and the main relevant findings to be considered in the clinical decision making process. PMID:26379324

  10. Performance of online drug information databases as clinical decision support tools in infectious disease medication management.

    PubMed

    Polen, Hyla H; Zapantis, Antonia; Clauson, Kevin A; Clauson, Kevin Alan; Jebrock, Jennifer; Paris, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Infectious disease (ID) medication management is complex and clinical decision support tools (CDSTs) can provide valuable assistance. This study evaluated scope and completeness of ID drug information found in online databases by evaluating their ability to answer 147 question/answer pairs. Scope scores produced highest rankings (%) for: Micromedex (82.3), Lexi-Comp/American Hospital Formulary Service (81.0), and Medscape Drug Reference (81.0); lowest includes: Epocrates Online Premium (47.0), Johns Hopkins ABX Guide (45.6), and PEPID PDC (40.8). PMID:18999059

  11. Clinical decision support, systems methodology, and telemedicine: their role in the management of chronic disease.

    PubMed

    Carson, E R; Cramp, D G; Morgan, A; Roudsari, A V

    1998-06-01

    In this paper, the design and evaluation of decision support systems, including those incorporating a telematic component, are considered. It is argued that effective design and evaluation are dependent upon the adoption of appropriate methodology set firmly within a systemic framework. Systems modeling is proposed as an approach to system design, with evaluation adopting an approach incorporating evaluability analysis and formative and summative evaluation, including the use of stakeholder matrix analysis. The relevance of such systemic methodology is demonstrated in the context of diabetes and end-stage renal disease as examples of the generic clinical problem of the management of chronic disease. PMID:10719517

  12. A Component-Based Evaluation Protocol for Clinical Decision Support Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Febretti, Alessandro; Lopez, Karen D.; Stifter, Janet; Johnson, Andrew E.; Keenan, Gail M.; Wilkie, Diana J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present our experience in designing and applying an evaluation protocol for assessing usability of a clinical decision support (CDS) system. The protocol is based on component-based usability testing, cognitive interviewing, and a rigorous coding scheme cross-referenced to a component library. We applied this protocol to evaluate alternate designs of a CDS interface for a nursing plan of care tool. The protocol allowed us to aggregate and analyze usability data at various granularity levels, supporting both validation of existing components and providing guidance for targeted redesign.

  13. Pharmacists’ Perceptions of the Influence of Interactions with the Pharmaceutical Industry on Clinical Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Tejani, Aaron M; Loewen, Peter; Bachand, Richard; Harder, Curtis K

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of literature examining the perceptions of Canadian pharmacists toward drug promotion by the pharmaceutical industry and pharmacist–industry interactions. Objectives: To determine whether hospital pharmacists perceive their interactions with the pharmaceutical industry as influencing their clinical decision-making or that of their colleagues and whether hospital pharmacists perceive that interactions with the pharmaceutical industry create a conflict of interest. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of the complete sample of hospital pharmacists practising in 3 large health authorities in a single Canadian province was conducted from February to April 2010. Results: A total of 224 responses were received from the approximately 480 pharmacists in the target health authorities (response rate approximately 47%). Fifty-eight percent of respondents (127/218) did not believe that information received at industry-sponsored events influenced their clinical decision-making. Most (142/163 [87%]) disagreed that small gifts influenced their clinical decision-making, whereas responses were divided for large gifts. Respondents were also divided on the issue of whether their interactions created conflicts of interest, with most of those who had received gifts agreeing that large gifts would create a conflict of interest (134/163 [82%]) whereas small gifts would not (100/163 [61%]). There were positive correlations between respondents’ beliefs about their own susceptibility to influence from sponsored events or receipt of small or large gifts and the susceptibility of others, but 22% of respondents (28/127) expressed a different perception about sponsored events, all believing themselves to be less influenced than their colleagues. Only 6% (4/64) of those who received large gifts and 4% (5/142) of those who received small gifts and felt they were not influenced by these gifts reported that it was likely others would be influenced by the receipt of

  14. Mobile Clinical Decision Support Systems in Our Hands - Great Potential but also a Concern.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin

    2016-01-01

    Due to the powerful computer resources as well as the availability of today's mobile devices, a special field of mobile systems for clinical decision support in medicine has been developed. The benefits of these applications (systems) are: availability of necessary hardware (mobile phones, tablets and phablets are widespread, and can be purchased at a relatively affordable price), availability of mobile applications (free or for a "small" amount of money) and also mobile applications are tailored for easy use and save time of clinicians in their daily work. In these systems lies a huge potential, and certainly a great economic benefit, so this issue must be approached multidisciplinary. PMID:27350467

  15. Implementation of a Clinical Decision Support Alert for the Management of Clostridium difficile Infection

    PubMed Central

    Revolinski, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are common in hospitalized patients and can result in significant morbidity and mortality. It is imperative to optimize the management of C. difficile infections to help minimize disease complications. Antimicrobial stewardship techniques including guidelines, order sets and other clinical decision support functionalities may be utilized to assist with therapy optimization. We implemented a novel alert within our electronic medical record to direct providers to the C. difficile order set in order to assist with initiating therapy consistent with institutional guideline recommendations. The alert succeeded in significantly increasing order set utilization, but guideline compliance was unchanged. PMID:27025646

  16. Clinical decision making in response to performance validity test failure in a psychiatric setting.

    PubMed

    Marcopulos, Bernice A; Caillouet, Beth A; Bailey, Christopher M; Tussey, Chriscelyn; Kent, Julie-Ann; Frederick, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the clinical utility of a performance validity test (PVT) for screening consecutive referrals (N = 436) to a neuropsychology service at a state psychiatric hospital treating both civilly committed and forensic patients. We created a contingency table with Test of Memory Malingering (TOMM) pass/fail (355/81) and secondary gain present/absent (181/255) to examine pass rates associated with patient demographic, clinical and forensic status characteristics. Of the 81 failed PVTs, 48 had secondary gain defined as active criminal legal charges; 33 failed PVTs with no secondary gain. These individuals tended to be older, female, Caucasian, and civilly committed compared with the group with secondary gain who failed. From estimations of TOMM False Positive Rate and True Positive Rate we estimated base rates of neurocognitive malingering for our clinical population using the Test Validation Summary (TVS; Frederick & Bowden, 2009 ). Although PVT failure is clearly more common in a group with secondary gain (31%), there were a number of false positives (11%). Clinical ratings of patients without gain who failed suggested cognitive deficits, behavioral issues, and inattention. Low scores on PVTs in the absence of secondary gain provide useful information on test engagement and can inform clinical decisions about testing. PMID:24678658

  17. Does family group decision making affect child welfare outcomes? Findings from a randomized control study.

    PubMed

    Berzin, Stephanie Cosner; Cohen, Ed; Thomas, Karen; Dawson, William C

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the evaluation of two family group decision-making programs (FGDM; Fresno n = 60; Riverside n = 50) administered under the California Title IV-E Waiver Demonstration Project. This is the only evaluation using random assignment to examine FGDM. Overall, results did not indicate more positive outcomes for children receiving the intervention, but did indicate that children were not worse than those receiving traditional services; outcomes examined were related to child safety, placement stability, and permanence. PMID:19391466

  18. Ethics of Clinical Decision-Making for Older Drivers: Reporting Health-Related Driving Risk.

    PubMed

    Mazer, Barbara; Laliberté, Maude; Hunt, Matthew; Lemoignan, Josée; Gélinas, Isabelle; Vrkljan, Brenda; Naglie, Gary; Marshall, Shawn

    2016-06-01

    The number of older drivers will continue to increase as the population ages. Health care professionals have the responsibility of providing care and maintaining confidentiality for their patients while ensuring public safety. This article discusses the ethics of clinical decision-making pertaining to reporting health-related driving risk of older drivers to licensing authorities. Ethical considerations inherent in reporting driving risk, including autonomy, confidentiality, therapeutic relationships, and the uncertainty about determining individual driving safety and risk, are discussed. We also address the moral agency of reporting health-related driving risk and raise the question of whose responsibility it is to report. Issues of uncertainty surrounding clinical reasoning and concepts related to risk assessment are also discussed. Finally, we present two case studies to illustrate some of the issues and challenges faced by health care professionals as they seek to balance their responsibilities for their patients while ensuring road safety for all citizens. PMID:27117942

  19. Extraction Of Adverse Events From Clinical Documents To Support Decision Making Using Semantic Preprocessing.

    PubMed

    Gaebel, Jan; Kolter, Till; Arlt, Felix; Denecke, Kerstin

    2015-01-01

    Clinical documentation is usually stored in unstructured format in electronic health records (EHR). Processing the information is inconvenient and time consuming and should be enhanced by computer systems. In this paper, a rule-based method is introduced that identifies adverse events documented in the EHR that occurred during treatment. For this purpose, clinical documents are transformed into a semantic structure from which adverse events are extracted. The method is evaluated in a user study with neurosurgeons. In comparison to a bag of word classification using support vector machines, our approach achieved comparably good results of 65% recall and 78% precision. In conclusion, the rule-based method generates promising results that can support physicians' decision making. Because of the structured format the data can be reused for other purposes as well. PMID:26262330

  20. Modeling the costs of clinical decision support for genomic precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Mathias, Patrick C; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Shirts, Brian H

    2016-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) within the electronic health record represents a promising mechanism to provide important genomic findings within clinical workflows. To better understand the current and possible future costs of genomic CDS, we leveraged our local CDS experience to assemble a simple model with inputs such as initial cost and numbers of patients, rules, and institutions. Our model assumed efficiencies of scale and allowed us to perform a one-way sensitivity analysis of the impact of each model input. The number of patients with genomic results per institution was the only single variable that could decrease the cost of CDS per useful alert below projected genomic sequencing costs. Because of the prohibitive upfront cost of sequencing large numbers of individuals, increasing the number of institutions using genomic CDS and improving the efficiency of sharing CDS infrastructure represent the most promising paths to making genomic CDS cost-effective. PMID:27570652

  1. Clinician Perspectives on the Quality of Patient Data Used for Clinical Decision Support: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, James L.; Ash, Joan S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Clinical decision support (CDS), defined broadly as patient-specific information and knowledge provided at the point of care, depends on a foundation of high quality electronic patient data. Little is known about how clinicians perceive the quality and value of data used to support CDS within an electronic health record (EHR) environment. Methods: During a three-year research study, we collected ethnographic data from ten diverse organizations, including community hospitals, academic medical centers and ambulatory clinics. Results: An in-depth analysis of the theme “data as a foundation for CDS” yielded a descriptive framework incorporating five subthemes related to data quality: completeness, accessibility, context specificity, accuracy, and reliability. Conclusion: We identified several multi-dimensional models that might be used to conceptualize data quality characteristics for future research. These results could provide new insights to system designers and implementers on the importance clinicians place on specific data quality characteristics regarding electronic patient data for CDS. PMID:23304409

  2. Modeling the costs of clinical decision support for genomic precision medicine

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Patrick C.; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter; Shirts, Brian H.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) within the electronic health record represents a promising mechanism to provide important genomic findings within clinical workflows. To better understand the current and possible future costs of genomic CDS, we leveraged our local CDS experience to assemble a simple model with inputs such as initial cost and numbers of patients, rules, and institutions. Our model assumed efficiencies of scale and allowed us to perform a one-way sensitivity analysis of the impact of each model input. The number of patients with genomic results per institution was the only single variable that could decrease the cost of CDS per useful alert below projected genomic sequencing costs. Because of the prohibitive upfront cost of sequencing large numbers of individuals, increasing the number of institutions using genomic CDS and improving the efficiency of sharing CDS infrastructure represent the most promising paths to making genomic CDS cost-effective. PMID:27570652

  3. Multidisciplinary Modelling of Symptoms and Signs with Archetypes and SNOMED-CT for Clinical Decision Support.

    PubMed

    Marco-Ruiz, Luis; Maldonado, J Alberto; Karlsen, Randi; Bellika, Johan G

    2015-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) help to improve health care and reduce costs. However, the lack of knowledge management and modelling hampers their maintenance and reuse. Current EHR standards and terminologies can allow the semantic representation of the data and knowledge of CDSS systems boosting their interoperability, reuse and maintenance. This paper presents the modelling process of respiratory conditions' symptoms and signs by a multidisciplinary team of clinicians and information architects with the help of openEHR, SNOMED and clinical information modelling tools for a CDSS. The information model of the CDSS was defined by means of an archetype and the knowledge model was implemented by means of an SNOMED-CT based ontology. PMID:25991115

  4. Implementing clinical practice guidelines about health promotion and disease prevention through shared decision making.

    PubMed

    Politi, Mary C; Wolin, Kathleen Y; Légaré, France

    2013-06-01

    Clinical practice guidelines aim to improve the health of patients by guiding individual care in clinical settings. Many guidelines specifically about health promotion or primary disease prevention are beginning to support informed patient choice, and suggest that clinicians and patients engage in shared discussions to determine how best to tailor guidelines to individuals. However, guidelines generally do not address how to translate evidence from the population to the individual in clinical practice, or how to engage patients in these discussions. In addition, they often fail to reconcile patients' preferences and social norms with best evidence. Shared decision making (SDM) is one solution to bridge guidelines about health promotion and disease prevention with clinical practice. SDM describes a collaborative process between patients and their clinicians to reach agreement about a health decision involving multiple medically appropriate treatment options. This paper discusses: 1) a brief overview of SDM; 2) the potential role of SDM in facilitating the implementation of prevention-focused practice guidelines for both preference-sensitive and effective care decisions; and 3) avenues for future empirical research to test how best to engage individual patients and clinicians in these complex discussions about prevention guidelines. We suggest that SDM can provide a structure for clinicians to discuss clinical practice guidelines with patients in a way that is evidence-based, patient-centered, and incorporates patients' preferences. In addition to providing a model for communicating about uncertainty at the individual level, SDM can provide a platform for engaging patients in a conversation. This process can help manage patients' and clinicians' expectations about health behaviors. SDM can be used even in situations with strong evidence for benefits at the level of the population, by helping patients and clinicians prioritize behaviors during time-pressured medical

  5. Factors affecting the decision to hospitalise children admitted to the emergency department due to non-fatal suicide attempts by pills

    PubMed Central

    Gokalp, Gamze; Anil, Murat; Bal, Alkan; Bicilioglu, Yuksel; Kamit Can, Fulya; Anil, Ayse Berna

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Suicide attempts (SAs) in the paediatric age group represent an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to examine the factors affecting the decision to hospitalize children with a diagnosis of non-fatal SA by pills. Methods: Children <18 years of age admitted with SA by pills during 2014 were evaluated retrospectively. Patients were divided into two groups: Group-I comprised hospitalised patients and Group-II included those who were discharged from the PED. These two groups were compared in terms of clinical and demographic characteristics recorded upon PED admission. Results: A total of 196 patients were included in the study. The number of pills taken for self-poisoning in Group-I (median: 20 pills) was higher than that in Group-II (median: 12 pills) (p < 0.001), and the rate of pathological findings during the first paediatric psychiatric consultation was higher in Group-I (91.1%) than in the Group-II (54.8%) (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Factors affecting the disposition decision in cases of children who performed non-fatal SA via pills included the amount of medication taken for the suicide attempt and the presence of psychiatric disorders, as determined by a paediatric psychiatrist during the acute phase. PMID:27375723

  6. The effect of the first office blood pressure reading on hypertension-related clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Oladipo, Idris; Ayoade, Adedokun

    2012-09-01

    The effect of the first office blood pressure reading (FBPR) on hypertension-related decisions was evaluated using blood pressure (BP) readings taken with the BpTRU BPM-100 device. BP readings were grouped into three pairs: (1) single readings (first and second readings), (2) computed average of three readings (one including and one excluding the first reading), and (3) computed average of five readings (one including and one excluding the first reading). Categorisation of BP readings under JNC-7 classes and distribution into < 140/90 and ≥ 140/90 mmHg groups were selected as parameters guiding hypertension-related decisions. Readings including FBPR had strong positive correlations to those excluding FBPR (Pearson's correlation coefficient ranged from 0.86-1.00). Also, FBPR-included and FBPR-excluded readings did not differ statistically in JNC-7 categorisation or distribution into < 140/90 or ≥ 140/90 mmHg groups. Our findings suggest that exclusion of FBPR may have no significant impact on hypertension-related clinical decisions. PMID:23044502

  7. Which factors play a role in clinical decision-making in subfertility?

    PubMed

    van der Steeg, Jan W; Steures, Pieternel; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Habbema, J Dik F; Bossuyt, Patrick M M; Hompes, Peter G A; van der Veen, Fulco; Mol, Ben W J

    2006-04-01

    Sixteen vignettes of subfertile couples were constructed by varying fertility history, post-coital test, sperm motility, FSH concentration and Chlamydia antibody titre (CAT). Thirty-five gynaecologists estimated probabilities of treatment-independent pregnancy, intrauterine insemination (IUI) and IVF. Thereafter, they chose IUI, IVF or no treatment. The relative contribution of each factor to probability estimates and to subsequent treatment decisions was calculated. Duration of subfertility and maternal age were the most important contributors for gynaecologists' estimates of treatment-independent pregnancy [relative contribution (RC) 41, 26%]. Maternal age and FSH concentration were the most important contributors in the estimates for IUI (RC: 51, 25%) and for IVF (RC: 64, 31%). The decision to start IVF was mainly determined by maternal age, duration of subfertility, FSH concentration and CAT. The relative contribution of maternal age and duration of subfertility was in concordance with existing prediction models, whereas previous pregnancy and FSH concentration were under- and overestimated respectively. In conclusion, maternal age, duration of subfertility and FSH concentration are the main factors in clinical decision-making in subfertility. Gynaecologists overestimate the importance of FSH concentration, but underestimate that of a previous pregnancy, as compared with their importance reported in prediction models and guidelines. PMID:16740221

  8. Application of a diagnosis-based clinical decision guide in patients with neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neck pain (NP) is a common cause of disability. Accurate and efficacious methods of diagnosis and treatment have been elusive. A diagnosis-based clinical decision guide (DBCDG; previously referred to as a diagnosis-based clinical decision rule) has been proposed which attempts to provide the clinician with a systematic, evidence-based guide in applying the biopsychosocial model of care. The approach is based on three questions of diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to present the prevalence of findings using the DBCDG in consecutive patients with NP. Methods Demographic, diagnostic and baseline outcome measure data were gathered on a cohort of NP patients examined by one of three examiners trained in the application of the DBCDG. Results Data were gathered on 95 patients. Signs of visceral disease or potentially serious illness were found in 1%. Centralization signs were found in 27%, segmental pain provocation signs were found in 69% and radicular signs were found in 19%. Clinically relevant myofascial signs were found in 22%. Dynamic instability was found in 40%, oculomotor dysfunction in 11.6%, fear beliefs in 31.6%, central pain hypersensitivity in 4%, passive coping in 5% and depression in 2%. Conclusion The DBCDG can be applied in a busy private practice environment. Further studies are needed to investigate clinically relevant means to identify central pain hypersensitivity, oculomotor dysfunction, poor coping and depression, correlations and patterns among the diagnostic components of the DBCDG as well as inter-examiner reliability, validity and efficacy of treatment based on the DBCDG. PMID:21871119

  9. Analysis on factors affecting household customers decision in using electricity at peak time and its correlation towards saving electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasasa, Linus; Marbun, Parlin; Mariza, Ita

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study and analyse the factors affecting customer decisions in using electricity at peak-load hours (between 17.00 to 22.00 WIB) and their behaviors towards electricity conservation in Indonesian household. The underlying rationale is to influence a reduction in energy consumption by stimulating energy saving behaviors, thereby reducing the impact of energy use on the environment. How is the correlation between the decisions in using electricity during peak load hours with the household customer's behavior towards saving electricity? The primary data is obtained by distributing questionnaires to customers of PT. PLN Jakarta Raya and Tangerang Distribution from Household segment. The data is analysed using the Structural Equation Model (SEM) and AMOS Software. The research is finding that all factors (Personal, Social, PLN Services, Psychological, and Cultural) are positively influence customer decision in using electricity at peak load hours. There is a correlation between the decisions in using electricity during peak load hours with the household customer's behavior towards saving electricity.

  10. A Tribute to Charlie Chaplin: Induced Positive Affect Improves Reward-Based Decision-Learning in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ridderinkhof, K. Richard; van Wouwe, Nelleke C.; Band, Guido P. H.; Wylie, Scott A.; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; van Hees, Pieter; Buitenweg, Jessika; van de Vijver, Irene; van den Wildenberg, Wery P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Reward-based decision-learning refers to the process of learning to select those actions that lead to rewards while avoiding actions that lead to punishments. This process, known to rely on dopaminergic activity in striatal brain regions, is compromised in Parkinson’s disease (PD). We hypothesized that such decision-learning deficits are alleviated by induced positive affect, which is thought to incur transient boosts in midbrain and striatal dopaminergic activity. Computational measures of probabilistic reward-based decision-learning were determined for 51 patients diagnosed with PD. Previous work has shown these measures to rely on the nucleus caudatus (outcome evaluation during the early phases of learning) and the putamen (reward prediction during later phases of learning). We observed that induced positive affect facilitated learning, through its effects on reward prediction rather than outcome evaluation. Viewing a few minutes of comedy clips served to remedy dopamine-related problems associated with frontostriatal circuitry and, consequently, learning to predict which actions will yield reward. PMID:22707944

  11. A tribute to charlie chaplin: induced positive affect improves reward-based decision-learning in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ridderinkhof, K Richard; van Wouwe, Nelleke C; Band, Guido P H; Wylie, Scott A; Van der Stigchel, Stefan; van Hees, Pieter; Buitenweg, Jessika; van de Vijver, Irene; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M

    2012-01-01

    Reward-based decision-learning refers to the process of learning to select those actions that lead to rewards while avoiding actions that lead to punishments. This process, known to rely on dopaminergic activity in striatal brain regions, is compromised in Parkinson's disease (PD). We hypothesized that such decision-learning deficits are alleviated by induced positive affect, which is thought to incur transient boosts in midbrain and striatal dopaminergic activity. Computational measures of probabilistic reward-based decision-learning were determined for 51 patients diagnosed with PD. Previous work has shown these measures to rely on the nucleus caudatus (outcome evaluation during the early phases of learning) and the putamen (reward prediction during later phases of learning). We observed that induced positive affect facilitated learning, through its effects on reward prediction rather than outcome evaluation. Viewing a few minutes of comedy clips served to remedy dopamine-related problems associated with frontostriatal circuitry and, consequently, learning to predict which actions will yield reward. PMID:22707944

  12. Affect of the unconscious: visually suppressed angry faces modulate our decisions.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Jorge; Pajtas, Petra E; Mahon, Bradford Z; Nakayama, Ken; Caramazza, Alfonso

    2013-03-01

    Emotional and affective processing imposes itself over cognitive processes and modulates our perception of the surrounding environment. In two experiments, we addressed the issue of whether nonconscious processing of affect can take place even under deep states of unawareness, such as those induced by interocular suppression techniques, and can elicit an affective response that can influence our understanding of the surrounding environment. In Experiment 1, participants judged the likeability of an unfamiliar item--a Chinese character--that was preceded by a face expressing a particular emotion (either happy or angry). The face was rendered invisible through an interocular suppression technique (continuous flash suppression; CFS). In Experiment 2, backward masking (BM), a less robust masking technique, was used to render the facial expressions invisible. We found that despite equivalent phenomenological suppression of the visual primes under CFS and BM, different patterns of affective processing were obtained with the two masking techniques. Under BM, nonconscious affective priming was obtained for both happy and angry invisible facial expressions. However, under CFS, nonconscious affective priming was obtained only for angry facial expressions. We discuss an interpretation of this dissociation between affective processing and visual masking techniques in terms of distinct routes from the retina to the amygdala. PMID:23224765

  13. Functional Assessment of Genetic Variants with Outcomes Adapted to Clinical Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Thouvenot, Pierre; Ben Yamin, Barbara; Fourrière, Lou; Lescure, Aurianne; Boudier, Thomas; Del Nery, Elaine; Chauchereau, Anne; Goldgar, David E.; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Nicolas, Alain; Millot, Gaël A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the medical effect of an ever-growing number of human variants detected is a long term challenge in genetic counseling. Functional assays, based on in vitro or in vivo evaluations of the variant effects, provide essential information, but they require robust statistical validation, as well as adapted outputs, to be implemented in the clinical decision-making process. Here, we assessed 25 pathogenic and 15 neutral missense variants of the BRCA1 breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility gene in four BRCA1 functional assays. Next, we developed a novel approach that refines the variant ranking in these functional assays. Lastly, we developed a computational system that provides a probabilistic classification of variants, adapted to clinical interpretation. Using this system, the best functional assay exhibits a variant classification accuracy estimated at 93%. Additional theoretical simulations highlight the benefit of this ready-to-use system in the classification of variants after functional assessment, which should facilitate the consideration of functional evidences in the decision-making process after genetic testing. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the system with the classification of siRNAs tested for human cell growth inhibition in high throughput screening. PMID:27272900

  14. Functional Assessment of Genetic Variants with Outcomes Adapted to Clinical Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Thouvenot, Pierre; Ben Yamin, Barbara; Fourrière, Lou; Lescure, Aurianne; Boudier, Thomas; Del Nery, Elaine; Chauchereau, Anne; Goldgar, David E; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Nicolas, Alain; Millot, Gaël A

    2016-06-01

    Understanding the medical effect of an ever-growing number of human variants detected is a long term challenge in genetic counseling. Functional assays, based on in vitro or in vivo evaluations of the variant effects, provide essential information, but they require robust statistical validation, as well as adapted outputs, to be implemented in the clinical decision-making process. Here, we assessed 25 pathogenic and 15 neutral missense variants of the BRCA1 breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility gene in four BRCA1 functional assays. Next, we developed a novel approach that refines the variant ranking in these functional assays. Lastly, we developed a computational system that provides a probabilistic classification of variants, adapted to clinical interpretation. Using this system, the best functional assay exhibits a variant classification accuracy estimated at 93%. Additional theoretical simulations highlight the benefit of this ready-to-use system in the classification of variants after functional assessment, which should facilitate the consideration of functional evidences in the decision-making process after genetic testing. Finally, we demonstrate the versatility of the system with the classification of siRNAs tested for human cell growth inhibition in high throughput screening. PMID:27272900

  15. [The role of PET/CT in decision-making during cancer treatment. Clinical experience].

    PubMed

    Sinkó, Dániel; Landherr, László

    2012-12-01

    Nowadays PET/CT examinations have got more and more important role during cancer treatment. It has importance not only in diagnostic examination and staging but also in the radiation planning process and measuring the therapeutic effect. From November 2006 to November 2010 there were 153 PET/CT examinations requested by the Oncology Outpatient Clinic, Uzsoki Hospital. Nine patients were excluded from the examination. In the clinical trial we have aimed to measure what the correlation between the oncologists' questions and the PET/CT results was, in how many cases the PET/CT had influence on therapeutic decision-making. In the case of the patients waiting for the operation we compared the results of the pathological examinations to the results of the PET/CT. The oncologists got the expected answers in 79 cases, while in 45 cases the answers were negative. In 10 cases there were no definite answers. Ten cases proved to be false negative or false positive based on the later pathological examination. As a result of the PET/CT findings the originally planned therapeutic decisions or the therapies in process have been modified in 77 cases. To sum up, the PET/CT gave the expected answers to the oncologists' questions in more than half of the cases (54.9%) and modified the originally prescribed therapy in 53.5% of the cases. PMID:23236592

  16. Using statistical process control to make data-based clinical decisions.

    PubMed Central

    Pfadt, A; Wheeler, D J

    1995-01-01

    Applied behavior analysis is based on an investigation of variability due to interrelationships among antecedents, behavior, and consequences. This permits testable hypotheses about the causes of behavior as well as for the course of treatment to be evaluated empirically. Such information provides corrective feedback for making data-based clinical decisions. This paper considers how a different approach to the analysis of variability based on the writings of Walter Shewart and W. Edwards Deming in the area of industrial quality control helps to achieve similar objectives. Statistical process control (SPC) was developed to implement a process of continual product improvement while achieving compliance with production standards and other requirements for promoting customer satisfaction. SPC involves the use of simple statistical tools, such as histograms and control charts, as well as problem-solving techniques, such as flow charts, cause-and-effect diagrams, and Pareto charts, to implement Deming's management philosophy. These data-analytic procedures can be incorporated into a human service organization to help to achieve its stated objectives in a manner that leads to continuous improvement in the functioning of the clients who are its customers. Examples are provided to illustrate how SPC procedures can be used to analyze behavioral data. Issues related to the application of these tools for making data-based clinical decisions and for creating an organizational climate that promotes their routine use in applied settings are also considered. PMID:7592154

  17. Decision support systems for clinical radiological practice — towards the next generation

    PubMed Central

    Stivaros, S M; Gledson, A; Nenadic, G; Zeng, X-J; Keane, J; Jackson, A

    2010-01-01

    The huge amount of information that needs to be assimilated in order to keep pace with the continued advances in modern medical practice can form an insurmountable obstacle to the individual clinician. Within radiology, the recent development of quantitative imaging techniques, such as perfusion imaging, and the development of imaging-based biomarkers in modern therapeutic assessment has highlighted the need for computer systems to provide the radiological community with support for academic as well as clinical/translational applications. This article provides an overview of the underlying design and functionality of radiological decision support systems with examples tracing the development and evolution of such systems over the past 40 years. More importantly, we discuss the specific design, performance and usage characteristics that previous systems have highlighted as being necessary for clinical uptake and routine use. Additionally, we have identified particular failings in our current methodologies for data dissemination within the medical domain that must be overcome if the next generation of decision support systems is to be implemented successfully. PMID:20965900

  18. Decisions in complex clinical situations: Prevalence and factors associated in general public.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Martinez, Maria D; Luna, Aurelio; Perez-Carceles, Maria D

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have focused on advanced directives. However, the type of treatment that citizens would choose in critical health situations and whether their decision varies with their sociodemographic characteristics and their experiences of life both within and outside the family context, are unknown. This study analyzes the factors associated with choosing or refusing life support treatment in hypothetical situations of differing clinical complexity. This transversal descriptive study was carried out by questionnaires given to 1051 participants from primary care centres. The Life Support Preferences Questionnaire (LSPQ) used to assess preferences of life-sustaining treatment, describes six scenarios with different prognoses. Analysis of the sociodemographic characteristics and life experiences of the subjects led to the following findings. In situations of very severe prognosis, treatment is mostly rejected. When there is chance of recovery, treatment is mostly accepted, especially in the least aggressive cases and when deciding for another person. A greater propensity to reject treatment was observed among subjects over 55 years, those in poor health and those who had observed a terminal illness in a family member. Practising Catholics are more likely to accept treatment in all medical situations described. Preferences for life support treatment are linked to sociodemographic characteristics and life experiences of patients. Physicians should bear in mind these characteristics when confronted with critical clinical situations, involving difficult decisions. PMID:26952384

  19. Can Psychological, Social and Demographical Factors Predict Clinical Characteristics Symptomatology of Bipolar Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    Maciukiewicz, Malgorzata; Pawlak, Joanna; Kapelski, Pawel; Łabędzka, Magdalena; Skibinska, Maria; Zaremba, Dorota; Leszczynska-Rodziewicz, Anna; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Hauser, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia (SCH) is a complex, psychiatric disorder affecting 1 % of population. Its clinical phenotype is heterogeneous with delusions, hallucinations, depression, disorganized behaviour and negative symptoms. Bipolar affective disorder (BD) refers to periodic changes in mood and activity from depression to mania. It affects 0.5-1.5 % of population. Two types of disorder (type I and type II) are distinguished by severity of mania episodes. In our analysis, we aimed to check if clinical and demographical characteristics of the sample are predictors of symptom dimensions occurrence in BD and SCH cases. We included total sample of 443 bipolar and 439 schizophrenia patients. Diagnosis was based on DSM-IV criteria using Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. We applied regression models to analyse associations between clinical and demographical traits from OPCRIT and symptom dimensions. We used previously computed dimensions of schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder as quantitative traits for regression models. Male gender seemed protective factor for depression dimension in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder sample. Presence of definite psychosocial stressor prior disease seemed risk factor for depressive and suicidal domain in BD and SCH. OPCRIT items describing premorbid functioning seemed related with depression, positive and disorganised dimensions in schizophrenia and psychotic in BD. We proved clinical and demographical characteristics of the sample are predictors of symptom dimensions of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. We also saw relation between clinical dimensions and course of disorder and impairment during disorder. PMID:26646576

  20. Clinical decision aids for chest pain in the emergency department: identifying low-risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Alley, William; Mahler, Simon A

    2015-01-01

    Chest pain is one of the most common presenting complaints in the emergency department, though only a small minority of patients are subsequently diagnosed with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). However, missing the diagnosis has potential for significant morbidity and mortality. ACS presentations can be atypical, and their workups are often prolonged and costly. In order to risk-stratify patients and better direct the workup and care given, many decision aids have been developed. While each may have merit in certain clinical settings, the most useful aid in the emergency department is one that finds all cases of ACS while also identifying a substantial subset of patients at low risk who can be discharged without stress testing or coronary angiography. This review describes several of the chest pain decision aids developed and studied through the recent past, starting with the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction (TIMI) risk score and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) scores, which were developed as prognostic aids for patients already diagnosed with ACS, then subsequently validated in the undifferentiated chest pain population. Asia-Pacific Evaluation of Chest Pain Trial (ASPECT); Accelerated Diagnostic Protocol to Assess Patients With Chest Pain Symptoms Using Contemporary Troponins (ADAPT); North American Chest Pain Rule (NACPR); and History, Electrocardiogram, Age, Risk factors, Troponin (HEART) score have been developed exclusively for use in the undifferentiated chest pain population as well, with improved performance compared to their predecessors. This review describes the relative merits and limitations of these decision aids so that providers can determine which tool fits the needs of their clinical practice setting. PMID:27147894

  1. Affective dysregulation and reality distortion: a 10-year prospective study of their association and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    van Rossum, Inge; Dominguez, Maria-de-Gracia; Lieb, Roselind; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; van Os, Jim

    2011-05-01

    Evidence from clinical patient populations indicates that affective dysregulation is strongly associated with reality distortion, suggesting that a process of misassignment of emotional salience may underlie this connection. To examine this in more detail without clinical confounds, affective regulation-reality distortion relationships, and their clinical relevance, were examined in a German prospective cohort community study. A cohort of 2524 adolescents and young adults aged 14-24 years at baseline was examined by experienced psychologists. Presence of psychotic experiences and (hypo)manic and depressive symptoms was assessed at 2 time points (3.5 and up to 10 years after baseline) using the Munich-Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Associations were tested between level of affective dysregulation on the one hand and incidence of psychotic experiences, persistence of these experiences, and psychotic Impairment on the other. Most psychotic experiences occurred in a context of affective dysregulation, and bidirectional dose-response was apparent with greater level of both affective dysregulation and psychotic experiences. Persistence of psychotic experiences was progressively more likely with greater level of (hypo)manic symptoms (odds ratio [OR] trend=1.51, P<.001) and depressive symptoms (OR trend=1.15, P=.012). Similarly, psychotic experiences of clinical relevance were progressively more likely to occur with greater level of affective dysregulation (depressive symptoms: OR trend=1.28, P=.002; (hypo)manic symptoms: OR trend=1.37, P=.036). Correlated genetic liabilities underlying affective and nonaffective psychotic syndromes may be expressed as correlated dimensions in the general population. Also, affective dysregulation may contribute causally to the persistence and clinical relevance of reality distortion, possibly by facilitating a mechanism of aberrant salience attribution. PMID:19793794

  2. A Proposed Clinical Decision Support Architecture Capable of Supporting Whole Genome Sequence Information

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Brandon M.; Rodriguez Loya, Salvador; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-01-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information may soon be widely available to help clinicians personalize the care and treatment of patients. However, considerable barriers exist, which may hinder the effective utilization of WGS information in a routine clinical care setting. Clinical decision support (CDS) offers a potential solution to overcome such barriers and to facilitate the effective use of WGS information in the clinic. However, genomic information is complex and will require significant considerations when developing CDS capabilities. As such, this manuscript lays out a conceptual framework for a CDS architecture designed to deliver WGS-guided CDS within the clinical workflow. To handle the complexity and breadth of WGS information, the proposed CDS framework leverages service-oriented capabilities and orchestrates the interaction of several independently-managed components. These independently-managed components include the genome variant knowledge base, the genome database, the CDS knowledge base, a CDS controller and the electronic health record (EHR). A key design feature is that genome data can be stored separately from the EHR. This paper describes in detail: (1) each component of the architecture; (2) the interaction of the components; and (3) how the architecture attempts to overcome the challenges associated with WGS information. We believe that service-oriented CDS capabilities will be essential to using WGS information for personalized medicine. PMID:25411644

  3. A proposed clinical decision support architecture capable of supporting whole genome sequence information.

    PubMed

    Welch, Brandon M; Loya, Salvador Rodriguez; Eilbeck, Karen; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2014-04-01

    Whole genome sequence (WGS) information may soon be widely available to help clinicians personalize the care and treatment of patients. However, considerable barriers exist, which may hinder the effective utilization of WGS information in a routine clinical care setting. Clinical decision support (CDS) offers a potential solution to overcome such barriers and to facilitate the effective use of WGS information in the clinic. However, genomic information is complex and will require significant considerations when developing CDS capabilities. As such, this manuscript lays out a conceptual framework for a CDS architecture designed to deliver WGS-guided CDS within the clinical workflow. To handle the complexity and breadth of WGS information, the proposed CDS framework leverages service-oriented capabilities and orchestrates the interaction of several independently-managed components. These independently-managed components include the genome variant knowledge base, the genome database, the CDS knowledge base, a CDS controller and the electronic health record (EHR). A key design feature is that genome data can be stored separately from the EHR. This paper describes in detail: (1) each component of the architecture; (2) the interaction of the components; and (3) how the architecture attempts to overcome the challenges associated with WGS information. We believe that service-oriented CDS capabilities will be essential to using WGS information for personalized medicine. PMID:25411644

  4. Recommended practices for computerized clinical decision support and knowledge management in community settings: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify recommended practices for computerized clinical decision support (CDS) development and implementation and for knowledge management (KM) processes in ambulatory clinics and community hospitals using commercial or locally developed systems in the U.S. Methods Guided by the Multiple Perspectives Framework, the authors conducted ethnographic field studies at two community hospitals and five ambulatory clinic organizations across the U.S. Using a Rapid Assessment Process, a multidisciplinary research team: gathered preliminary assessment data; conducted on-site interviews, observations, and field surveys; analyzed data using both template and grounded methods; and developed universal themes. A panel of experts produced recommended practices. Results The team identified ten themes related to CDS and KM. These include: 1) workflow; 2) knowledge management; 3) data as a foundation for CDS; 4) user computer interaction; 5) measurement and metrics; 6) governance; 7) translation for collaboration; 8) the meaning of CDS; 9) roles of special, essential people; and 10) communication, training, and support. Experts developed recommendations about each theme. The original Multiple Perspectives framework was modified to make explicit a new theoretical construct, that of Translational Interaction. Conclusions These ten themes represent areas that need attention if a clinic or community hospital plans to implement and successfully utilize CDS. In addition, they have implications for workforce education, research, and national-level policy development. The Translational Interaction construct could guide future applied informatics research endeavors. PMID:22333210

  5. Lung cancer patients' decisions about clinical trials and the theory of planned behavior.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Gwendolyn P; Pratt, Christie L; Bryant-George, Kathy; Caraway, Vicki D; Paternoster, Bonnie; Roldan, Tere; Shaffer, Andrea; Shimizu, Cynthia O; Vaughn, Elizabeth J; Williams, Charles; Bepler, Gerold

    2011-12-01

    The theory of planned behavior explores the relationship between behavior, beliefs, attitudes, and intentions presupposing that behavioral intention is influenced by a person's attitude about the behavior and beliefs about whether individuals, who are important to them, approve or disapprove of the behavior (subjective norm). An added dimension to the theory is the idea of perceived behavioral control, or the belief that one has control over performing the behavior. The theory of planned behavior suggests that people may make greater efforts to perform a behavior if they feel they have a high level of control over it. In this examination of data, we explored the application of the theory of planned behavior to patient's decisions about participating in a clinic trial. Twelve respondents in this study had previously participated in a clinical trial for lung cancer and nine respondents had declined a clinical trial for lung cancer. The data were analyzed with regard to the four constructs associated with the theory of planned behavior: behavioral intention, attitude, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control. Results indicate that the theory of planned behavior may be a useful tool to examine psychosocial needs in relation to behavioral intention of clinical trial participation. PMID:20949381

  6. Pilot Program Using Medical Simulation in Clinical Decision-Making Training for Internal Medicine Interns

    PubMed Central

    Miloslavsky, Eli M.; Hayden, Emily M.; Currier, Paul F.; Mathai, Susan K.; Contreras-Valdes, Fernando; Gordon, James A.

    2012-01-01

    Background The use of high-fidelity medical simulation in cognitive skills training within internal medicine residency programs remains largely unexplored. Objective To design a pilot study to introduce clinical decision-making training using simulation into a large internal medicine residency program, explore the practicability of using junior and senior residents as facilitators, and examine the feasibility of using the program to improve interns' clinical skills. Methods Interns on outpatient rotations participated in a simulation curriculum on a voluntary basis. The curriculum consisted of 8 cases focusing on acute clinical scenarios encountered on the wards. One-hour sessions were offered twice monthly from August 2010 to February 2011. Internal medicine residents and simulation faculty served as facilitators. Results A total of 36 of 75 total interns volunteered to participate in the program, with 42% attending multiple sessions. Of all participants, 88% rated the sessions as “excellent,” 97% felt that the program improved their ability to function as an intern and generate a plan, and 81% reported improvement in differential diagnosis skills. Conclusions Simulation training was well received by the learners and improved self-reported clinical skills. Using residents as facilitators, supervised by faculty, was well received by the learners and enabled the implementation of the curriculum in a large training program. Simulation can provide opportunities for deliberate practice, and learners perceive this modality to be effective. PMID:24294427

  7. Myocardial strain imaging: how useful is it in clinical decision making?

    PubMed Central

    Smiseth, Otto A.; Torp, Hans; Opdahl, Anders; Haugaa, Kristina H.; Urheim, Stig

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial strain is a principle for quantification of left ventricular (LV) function which is now feasible with speckle-tracking echocardiography. The best evaluated strain parameter is global longitudinal strain (GLS) which is more sensitive than left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) as a measure of systolic function, and may be used to identify sub-clinical LV dysfunction in cardiomyopathies. Furthermore, GLS is recommended as routine measurement in patients undergoing chemotherapy to detect reduction in LV function prior to fall in LVEF. Intersegmental variability in timing of peak myocardial strain has been proposed as predictor of risk of ventricular arrhythmias. Strain imaging may be applied to guide placement of the LV pacing lead in patients receiving cardiac resynchronization therapy. Strain may also be used to diagnose myocardial ischaemia, but the technology is not sufficiently standardized to be recommended as a general tool for this purpose. Peak systolic left atrial strain is a promising supplementary index of LV filling pressure. The strain imaging methodology is still undergoing development, and further clinical trials are needed to determine if clinical decisions based on strain imaging result in better outcome. With this important limitation in mind, strain may be applied clinically as a supplementary diagnostic method. PMID:26508168

  8. Clinical decision support systems for improving diagnostic accuracy and achieving precision medicine.

    PubMed

    Castaneda, Christian; Nalley, Kip; Mannion, Ciaran; Bhattacharyya, Pritish; Blake, Patrick; Pecora, Andrew; Goy, Andre; Suh, K Stephen

    2015-01-01

    , and logistical concerns. Ensuring data security and protection of patient rights while simultaneously facilitating standardization is paramount to maintaining public support. The capabilities of supercomputing need to be applied strategically. A standardized, methodological implementation must be applied to developed artificial intelligence systems with the ability to integrate data and information into clinically relevant knowledge. Ultimately, the integration of bioinformatics and clinical data in a clinical decision support system promises precision medicine and cost effective and personalized patient care. PMID:25834725

  9. Design, Development, and Initial Evaluation of a Terminology for Clinical Decision Support and Electronic Clinical Quality Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yanhua; Staes, Catherine J; Shields, David E; Kandula, Vijay; Welch, Brandon M; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2015-01-01

    When coupled with a common information model, a common terminology for clinical decision support (CDS) and electronic clinical quality measurement (eCQM) could greatly facilitate the distributed development and sharing of CDS and eCQM knowledge resources. To enable such scalable knowledge authoring and sharing, we systematically developed an extensible and standards-based terminology for CDS and eCQM in the context of the HL7 Virtual Medical Record (vMR) information model. The development of this terminology entailed three steps: (1) systematic, physician-curated concept identification from sources such as the Health Information Technology Standards Panel (HITSP) and the SNOMED-CT CORE problem list; (2) concept de-duplication leveraging the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) MetaMap and Metathesaurus; and (3) systematic concept naming using standard terminologies and heuristic algorithms. This process generated 3,046 concepts spanning 68 domains. Evaluation against representative CDS and eCQM resources revealed approximately 50–70% concept coverage, indicating the need for continued expansion of the terminology. PMID:26958220

  10. Design, Development, and Initial Evaluation of a Terminology for Clinical Decision Support and Electronic Clinical Quality Measurement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yanhua; Staes, Catherine J; Shields, David E; Kandula, Vijay; Welch, Brandon M; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2015-01-01

    When coupled with a common information model, a common terminology for clinical decision support (CDS) and electronic clinical quality measurement (eCQM) could greatly facilitate the distributed development and sharing of CDS and eCQM knowledge resources. To enable such scalable knowledge authoring and sharing, we systematically developed an extensible and standards-based terminology for CDS and eCQM in the context of the HL7 Virtual Medical Record (vMR) information model. The development of this terminology entailed three steps: (1) systematic, physician-curated concept identification from sources such as the Health Information Technology Standards Panel (HITSP) and the SNOMED-CT CORE problem list; (2) concept de-duplication leveraging the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) MetaMap and Metathesaurus; and (3) systematic concept naming using standard terminologies and heuristic algorithms. This process generated 3,046 concepts spanning 68 domains. Evaluation against representative CDS and eCQM resources revealed approximately 50-70% concept coverage, indicating the need for continued expansion of the terminology. PMID:26958220

  11. Usability Testing and Adaptation of the Pediatric Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Clinical Decision Support Tool

    PubMed Central

    Furberg, Robert D; Bagwell, Jacqueline E; LaBresh, Kenneth A

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is 1 of the leading causes of death, years of life lost, and disability-adjusted years of life lost worldwide. CVD prevention for children and teens is needed, as CVD risk factors and behaviors beginning in youth contribute to CVD development. In 2012, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute released their “Integrated Guidelines for Cardiovascular Health and Risk Reduction in Children and Adolescents” for clinicians, describing CVD risk factors they should address with patients at primary care preventative visits. However, uptake of new guidelines is slow. Clinical decision support (CDS) tools can improve guideline uptake. In this paper, we describe our process of testing and adapting a CDS tool to help clinicians evaluate patient risk, recommend behaviors to prevent development of risk, and complete complex calculations to determine appropriate interventions as recommended by the guidelines, using a user-centered design approach. Objective The objective of the study was to assess the usability of a pediatric CVD risk factor tool by clinicians. Methods The tool was tested using one-on-one in-person testing and a “think aloud” approach with 5 clinicians and by using the tool in clinical practice along with formal usability metrics with 14 pediatricians. Thematic analysis of the data from the in-person testing and clinical practice testing identified suggestions for change in 3 major areas: user experience, content refinement, and technical deployment. Descriptive statistical techniques were employed to summarize users’ overall experience with the tool. Results Data from testers showed that general reactions toward the CDS tool were positive. Clinical practice testers suggested revisions to make the application more user-friendly, especially for clinicians using the application on the iPhone, and called for refining recommendations to be more succinct and better tailored to the patient. Tester feedback was

  12. Prenatal genetic testing: an investigation of determining factors affecting the decision-making process.

    PubMed

    Pivetti, Monica; Melotti, Giannino

    2013-02-01

    Despite the increase in popularity of prenatal genetic testing, relatively little is known about the role psychological factors play in the decision-making process. In this analogue study, a sample of Italian female university students was used to investigate determining factors that predict the intention of undergoing prenatal genetic testing. Structural Equation Modelling was used to describe the dynamic interplay between knowledge, beliefs, attitudes and health-related behaviour such as prenatal genetic testing. Following the Theory of Reasoned Action, three dimensions predicted the intention to undergo prenatal genetic testing: the need for more scientific information, a positive attitude towards genetic testing, and the inclination to terminate pregnancy after receiving a positive test result. Results showed that less religious women tended to be more in favour of prenatal tests and in undertaking such tests. This preliminary study provides genetic counsellors and policy makers with a clearer picture of their clients' motives and attitudes behind the decision-making process of prenatal genetic testing, contributing to improving both the communication process between counsellors and their clients and the organization of genetic services. PMID:22477148

  13. Epistemic motivation affects the processing of negative emotional stimuli in interpersonal decisions

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhenyu; Ruz, María; Zhao, Zhiying; Zheng, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The present electrophysiological study investigated the role of the need for cognitive closure (NFC) in emotional processing. The NFC is conceptualized as an epistemic motive that is related to how and why people seek out information in social environments. Event-related potentials were recorded while individuals with high NFC (i.e., low epistemic motivation) or low NFC (i.e., high epistemic motivation) performed a modified Ultimatum Game, in which the emotions of happy or angry game agents were employed to predict their most likely offer. High-NFC participants more closely adhered to the decisions rules of the game than low-NFC individuals did. The electrophysiological results showed that the dispositional NFC modified early perceptual components (N170, N200, and P200). The potentials showed that high-NFC subjects had a processing bias to angry faces, whereas low-NFC individuals exhibited no such effects. These findings indicated that high-NFC individuals were more sensitive to negative emotional stimuli than low-NFC individuals in an interpersonal decision-making task. PMID:26257698

  14. Referring periodontal patients: clinical decision making by dental and dental hygiene students.

    PubMed

    Williams, Karen B; Burgardt, Grayson J; Rapley, John W; Bray, Kimberly K; Cobb, Charles M

    2014-03-01

    Referral of periodontal patients requires development of a complex set of decision making skills. This study was conducted to determine criteria used by dental and dental hygiene students regarding the referral of periodontal patients for specialty care. Using mixed methods, a thirteen-item survey was developed to elicit the students' perceptions of their knowledge, confidence regarding managing patients, and clinical reasoning related to periodontal patients. The instrument was administered during the summer prior to (T1) and at the end of the students' final year (T2) of training. Seventy-nine dental students (81 percent of total class) and thirty dental hygiene students (83 percent of total class) completed T1. At T2, forty-two dental (44 percent of total class) and twenty-six dental hygiene students (87 percent of total class) completed the questionnaire. While 90 percent of dental and 96 percent of dental hygiene respondents reported a willingness to refer patients with active disease to specialists, only 40 percent of dental and 36 percent of dental hygiene respondents reported confidence in diagnosing, treating, and appropriately referring such patients. The students' ability to recognize critical disease and risk factors influencing referral was good; however, clinical application of that knowledge indicated a gap between knowledge and applied reasoning. The students' attitudes about the importance of periodontal disease and their perceived competence to identify critical disease risk factors were not significantly related (p>0.05) to correct clinical decisions in the case scenarios. The study concludes that dental and dental hygiene curricula should emphasize both the acquisition and application of knowledge regarding criteria for referral of periodontal patients. PMID:24609346

  15. Emotion, rationality, and decision-making: how to link affective and social neuroscience with social theory

    PubMed Central

    Verweij, Marco; Senior, Timothy J.; Domínguez D., Juan F.; Turner, Robert

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we argue for a stronger engagement between concepts in affective and social neuroscience on the one hand, and theories from the fields of anthropology, economics, political science, and sociology on the other. Affective and social neuroscience could provide an additional assessment of social theories. We argue that some of the most influential social theories of the last four decades—rational choice theory, behavioral economics, and post-structuralism—contain assumptions that are inconsistent with key findings in affective and social neuroscience. We also show that another approach from the social sciences—plural rationality theory—shows greater compatibility with these findings. We further claim that, in their turn, social theories can strengthen affective and social neuroscience. The former can provide more precise formulations of the social phenomena that neuroscientific models have targeted, can help neuroscientists who build these models become more aware of their social and cultural biases, and can even improve the models themselves. To illustrate, we show how plural rationality theory can be used to further specify and test the somatic marker hypothesis. Thus, we aim to accelerate the much-needed merger of social theories with affective and social neuroscience. PMID:26441506

  16. The evaluation of a rectal cancer decision aid and the factors influencing its implementation in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer is common in North America. Two surgical options exist for rectal cancer patients: low anterior resection with re-establishment of bowel continuity, and abdominoperineal resection with a permanent stoma. A rectal cancer decision aid was developed using the International Patient Decision Aid Standards to facilitate patients being more actively involved in making this decision with the surgeon. The overall aim of this study is to evaluate this decision aid and explore barriers and facilitators to implementing in clinical practice. Methods First, a pre- and post- study will be guided by the Ottawa Decision Support Framework. Eligible patients from a colorectal cancer center include: 1) adult patients diagnosed with rectal cancer, 2) tumour at a maximum of 10 cm from anal verge, and 3) surgeon screened candidates eligible to consider both low anterior resection and abdominoperineal resection. Patients will be given a paper-version and online link to the decision aid to review at home. Using validated tools, the primary outcomes will be decisional conflict and knowledge of surgical options. Secondary outcomes will be patient’s preference, values associated with options, readiness for decision-making, acceptability of the decision aid, and feasibility of its implementation in clinical practice. Proposed analysis includes paired t-test, Wilcoxon, and descriptive statistics. Second, a survey will be conducted to identify the barriers and facilitators of using the decision aid in clinical practice. Eligible participants include Canadian surgeons working with rectal cancer patients. Surgeons will be given a pre-notification, questionnaire, and three reminders. The survey package will include the patient decision aid and a facilitators and barriers survey previously validated among physicians and nurses. Principal component analysis will be performed to determine common themes, and logistic regression will be used to identify variables

  17. Cervical dilatation and grade of doctor affects the interval between decision and result of fetal scalp blood sampling in labour.

    PubMed

    Rimmer, Stephanie; Roberts, Stephen A; Heazell, Alexander E P

    2016-08-01

    Fetal scalp blood sampling (FSBS) is used to provide information regarding fetal acid-base status during labour. This study assessed the interval between the decision to perform the procedure and obtaining the result and evaluated whether it is affected by cervical dilatation or the experience of the doctor. The median time for FSBS was 10 min. When cervical dilatation was ≤4 cm samples took approximately 30% longer to obtain. After adjustment for dilation, there were no significant differences between different grades of doctors. FSBS is shorter than previously reported; clinicians should be aware that procedures in early labour take longer to complete. PMID:26399279

  18. Actionable clinical decisions based on comprehensive genomic evaluation in asymptomatic adults

    PubMed Central

    Pillar, Nir; Isakov, Ofer; Weissglas-Volkov, Daphna; Botchan, Shay; Friedman, Eitan; Arber, Nadir; Shomron, Noam

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing (WES) arises as a new approach in diagnosing individuals affected by multigenic and complex phenotypes. Herein, we aim to examine whether WES is useful in screening asymptomatic individuals for actionable interventions, which has not yet been established. Twenty-five healthy adults underwent WES, bioinformatics, and manual curation of their exomes. Six participants (24%) harbored significant, management-changing variants in cancer predisposition genes, American College of Medical Genetics, and genomics reportable cardiac diseases and pharmacogenomic biomarkers that have led to clinical recommendations and interventions. Furthermore, more than 80% of the participants (21) carried 1–3 genetic variants with an associated clinical guideline for an altered drug dosing or administration based on the FDA’s table of pharmacogenomics. These results support WES potential not only to answer specific diagnostic questions presented by the relevant personal and/or family history but also to uncover clinically important genetic findings unrelated to the primary indication for sequencing. PMID:26436109

  19. Data Mining for Understanding and Improving Decision-making Affecting Ground Delay Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Deepak; Wang, Yao; Sridhar, Banavar

    2013-01-01

    The continuous growth in the demand for air transportation results in an imbalance between airspace capacity and traffic demand. The airspace capacity of a region depends on the ability of the system to maintain safe separation between aircraft in the region. In addition to growing demand, the airspace capacity is severely limited by convective weather. During such conditions, traffic managers at the FAA's Air Traffic Control System Command Center (ATCSCC) and dispatchers at various Airlines' Operations Center (AOC) collaborate to mitigate the demand-capacity imbalance caused by weather. The end result is the implementation of a set of Traffic Flow Management (TFM) initiatives such as ground delay programs, reroute advisories, flow metering, and ground stops. Data Mining is the automated process of analyzing large sets of data and then extracting patterns in the data. Data mining tools are capable of predicting behaviors and future trends, allowing an organization to benefit from past experience in making knowledge-driven decisions.

  20. Comparing social factors affecting recommender decisions in online and educational social network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MartÍn, Estefanía; Hernán-Losada, Isidoro; Haya, Pablo A.

    2016-01-01

    In the educational context, there is an increasing interest in learning networks. Recommender systems (RSs) can play an important role in achieving educational objectives. Although we can find many papers focused on recommendation techniques and algorithms, in general, less attention has been dedicated to social factors that influence the recommendation process. This process could be improved if we had a deeper understanding of the social factors that influence the quality or validity of a suggestion made by the RS. This work elucidates and analyses the social factors that influence the design and decision-making process of RSs. We conducted a survey in which 126 undergraduate students were asked to extract which are the main factors for improving suggestions when they are interacting with an Online Social Network (OSN) or in an Educational Social Network (ESN). The results show that different factors have to be considered depending on the type of network.

  1. Optimization of the decision-making process for the selection of therapeutics to undergo clinical testing for spinal cord injury in the North American Clinical Trials Network.

    PubMed

    Guest, James; Harrop, James S; Aarabi, Bizhan; Grossman, Robert G; Fawcett, James W; Fehlings, Michael G; Tator, Charles H

    2012-09-01

    The North American Clinical Trials Network (NACTN) includes 9 clinical centers funded by the US Department of Defense and the Christopher Reeve Paralysis Foundation. Its purpose is to accelerate clinical testing of promising therapeutics in spinal cord injury (SCI) through the development of a robust interactive infrastructure. This structure includes key committees that serve to provide longitudinal guidance to the Network. These committees include the Executive, Data Management, and Neurological Outcome Assessments Committees, and the Therapeutic Selection Committee (TSC), which is the subject of this manuscript. The NACTN brings unique elements to the SCI field. The Network's stability is not restricted to a single clinical trial. Network members have diverse expertise and include experts in clinical care, clinical trial design and methodology, pharmacology, preclinical and clinical research, and advanced rehabilitation techniques. Frequent systematic communication is assigned a high value, as is democratic process, fairness and efficiency of decision making, and resource allocation. This article focuses on how decision making occurs within the TSC to rank alternative therapeutics according to 2 main variables: quality of the preclinical data set, and fit with the Network's aims and capabilities. This selection process is important because if the Network's resources are committed to a therapeutic, alternatives cannot be pursued. A proposed methodology includes a multicriteria decision analysis that uses a Multi-Attribute Global Inference of Quality matrix to quantify the process. To rank therapeutics, the TSC uses a series of consensus steps designed to reduce individual and group bias and limit subjectivity. Given the difficulties encountered by industry in completing clinical trials in SCI, stable collaborative not-for-profit consortia, such as the NACTN, may be essential to clinical progress in SCI. The evolution of the NACTN also offers substantial

  2. Affective Priming in a Lexical Decision Task: Is There an Effect of Words' Concreteness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferré, Pilar; Sánchez-Casas, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Affective priming occurs when responses to a target are facilitated when it is preceded by a prime congruent in valence. We conducted two experiments in order to test whether this is a genuine emotional effect or rather it can be accounted for by semantic relatedness between primes and targets. With this aim, semantic relatedness and emotional…

  3. How Will Welfare Reform Affect Childbearing and Family Structure Decisions? Discussion Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, H. Elizabeth; Plotnick, Robert D.; Jeong, Se-Ook

    This paper summarizes changes in key elements of welfare policy and in closely related policies on child support enforcement and sex education and family planning programs. Drawing on a conceptual framework that highlights how incentives created by public policy can affect demographic behaviors, the paper concludes that, as Congress intended,…

  4. Orbitofrontal or accumbens dopamine depletion does not affect risk-based decision making in rats.

    PubMed

    Mai, Bettina; Hauber, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Considerable evidence has implicated dopamine (DA) signals in target regions of midbrain DA neurons such as the medial prefrontal cortex or the core region of the nucleus accumbens in controlling risk-based decision-making. However, to date little is known about the contribution of DA in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and the medial shell region of the nucleus accumbens (AcbS) to risk-based decision-making. Here we examined in rats the effects of 6-hydroxydopamine-induced DA depletions of the OFC and AcbS on risky choice using an instrumental two-lever choice task that requires the assessment of fixed within-session reward probabilities that were shifted across subsequent sessions, i.e., rats had to choose between two levers, a small/certain lever that delivered one certain food reward (one pellet at p = 1) and a large/risky lever that delivered a larger uncertain food reward with decreasing probabilities across subsequent sessions (four pellets at p = 0.75, 0.5, 0.25, 0.125, 0.0625). Results show that systemic administration of amphetamine or cocaine increased the preference for the large/risky lever. Results further demonstrate that, like sham controls, rats with OFC or AcbS DA depletion were sensitive to changes in probabilities for obtaining the large/risky reward across sessions and displayed probabilistic discounting. These findings point to the view that the basal capacity to evaluate the magnitude and likelihood of rewards associated with alternative courses of action as well as long-term changes of reward probabilities does not rely on DA input to the AcbS or OFC. PMID:25860659

  5. Data Mining for Understanding and Impriving Decision-Making Affecting Ground Delay Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulkarni, Deepak; Wang, Yao Xun; Sridhar, Banavar

    2013-01-01

    The continuous growth in the demand for air transportation results in an imbalance between airspace capacity and traffic demand. The airspace capacity of a region depends on the ability of the system to maintain safe separation between aircraft in the region. In addition to growing demand, the airspace capacity is severely limited by convective weather. During such conditions, traffic managers at the FAA's Air Traffic Control System Command Center (ATCSCC) and dispatchers at various Airlines' Operations Center (AOC) collaborate to mitigate the demand-capacity imbalance caused by weather. The end result is the implementation of a set of Traffic Flow Management (TFM) initiatives such as ground delay programs, reroute advisories, flow metering, and ground stops. Data Mining is the automated process of analyzing large sets of data and then extracting patterns in the data. Data mining tools are capable of predicting behaviors and future trends, allowing an organization to benefit from past experience in making knowledge-driven decisions. The work reported in this paper is focused on ground delay programs. Data mining algorithms have the potential to develop associations between weather patterns and the corresponding ground delay program responses. If successful, they can be used to improve and standardize TFM decision resulting in better predictability of traffic flows on days with reliable weather forecasts. The approach here seeks to develop a set of data mining and machine learning models and apply them to historical archives of weather observations and forecasts and TFM initiatives to determine the extent to which the theory can predict and explain the observed traffic flow behaviors.

  6. icuARM-An ICU Clinical Decision Support System Using Association Rule Mining

    PubMed Central

    Chanani, Nikhil; Venugopalan, Janani; Maher, Kevin; Wang, May Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    The rapid development of biomedical monitoring technologies has enabled modern intensive care units (ICUs) to gather vast amounts of multimodal measurement data about their patients. However, processing large volumes of complex data in real-time has become a big challenge. Together with ICU physicians, we have designed and developed an ICU clinical decision support system icuARM based on associate rule mining (ARM), and a publicly available research database MIMIC-II (Multi-parameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II) that contains more than 40,000 ICU records for 30,000+patients. icuARM is constructed with multiple association rules and an easy-to-use graphical user interface (GUI) for care providers to perform real-time data and information mining in the ICU setting. To validate icuARM, we have investigated the associations between patients' conditions such as comorbidities, demographics, and medications and their ICU outcomes such as ICU length of stay. Coagulopathy surfaced as the most dangerous co-morbidity that leads to the highest possibility (54.1%) of prolonged ICU stay. In addition, women who are older than 50 years have the highest possibility (38.8%) of prolonged ICU stay. For clinical conditions treatable with multiple drugs, icuARM suggests that medication choice can be optimized based on patient-specific characteristics. Overall, icuARM can provide valuable insights for ICU physicians to tailor a patient's treatment based on his or her clinical status in real time. PMID:27170860

  7. Longitudinal feasibility of MINDSET: a clinic decision aid for epilepsy self-management.

    PubMed

    Begley, Charles; Shegog, Ross; Harding, Angelique; Goldsmith, Corey; Hope, Omotola; Newmark, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the development and feasibility of the longitudinal version of MINDSET, a clinical tool to assist patients and health-care providers in epilepsy self-management. A previous study described the feasibility of using MINDSET to identify and prioritize self-management issues during a clinic visit. This paper describes the development of the longitudinal version of MINDSET and feasibility test over multiple visits with a printed action plan for goal setting and the capacity for monitoring changes in self-management. Feasibility was assessed based on 1) postvisit patient and provider interviews addressing ease of use and usefulness, patient/provider communication, and shared decision-making and 2) the capacity of the tool to monitor epilepsy characteristics and self-management over time. Results indicate MINDSET feasibility for 1) identifying and facilitating discussion of self-management issues during clinic visits, 2) providing a printable list of prioritized issues and tailored self-management goals, and 3) tracking changes in epilepsy characteristics and self-management over time. PMID:25705825

  8. icuARM-An ICU Clinical Decision Support System Using Association Rule Mining.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chih-Wen; Chanani, Nikhil; Venugopalan, Janani; Maher, Kevin; Wang, May Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    The rapid development of biomedical monitoring technologies has enabled modern intensive care units (ICUs) to gather vast amounts of multimodal measurement data about their patients. However, processing large volumes of complex data in real-time has become a big challenge. Together with ICU physicians, we have designed and developed an ICU clinical decision support system icuARM based on associate rule mining (ARM), and a publicly available research database MIMIC-II (Multi-parameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II) that contains more than 40,000 ICU records for 30,000+patients. icuARM is constructed with multiple association rules and an easy-to-use graphical user interface (GUI) for care providers to perform real-time data and information mining in the ICU setting. To validate icuARM, we have investigated the associations between patients' conditions such as comorbidities, demographics, and medications and their ICU outcomes such as ICU length of stay. Coagulopathy surfaced as the most dangerous co-morbidity that leads to the highest possibility (54.1%) of prolonged ICU stay. In addition, women who are older than 50 years have the highest possibility (38.8%) of prolonged ICU stay. For clinical conditions treatable with multiple drugs, icuARM suggests that medication choice can be optimized based on patient-specific characteristics. Overall, icuARM can provide valuable insights for ICU physicians to tailor a patient's treatment based on his or her clinical status in real time. PMID:27170860

  9. Using clinical decision support as a means of implementing a universal postpartum depression screening program.

    PubMed

    Loudon, Holly; Nentin, Farida; Silverman, Michael E

    2016-06-01

    A major barrier to the diagnosis of postpartum depression (PPD) includes symptom detection. The lack of awareness and understanding of PPD among new mothers, the variability in clinical presentation, and the various diagnostic strategies can increase this further. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of adding clinical decision support (CDS) to the electronic health record (EHR) as a means of implementing a universal standardized PPD screening program within a large, at high risk, population. All women returning to the Mount Sinai Hospital OB/GYN Ambulatory Practice for postpartum care between 2010 and 2013 were presented with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) in response to a CDS "hard stop" built into the EHR. Of the 2102 women who presented for postpartum care, 2092 women (99.5 %) were screened for PPD in response to a CDS hard stop module. Screens were missing on ten records (0.5 %) secondary to refusal, language barrier, or lack of clarity in the EHR. Technology is becoming increasingly important in addressing the challenges faced by health care providers. While the identification of PPD has become the recent focus of public health concerns secondary to the significant social burden, numerous barriers to screening still exist within the clinical setting. The utility of adding CDS in the form of a hard stop, requiring clinicians to enter a standardized PPD mood assessment score to the patient EHR, offers a sufficient way to address a primary barrier to PPD symptom identification at the practitioner level. PMID:26669601

  10. The Arden Syntax standard for clinical decision support: experiences and directions.

    PubMed

    Samwald, Matthias; Fehre, Karsten; de Bruin, Jeroen; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter

    2012-08-01

    Arden Syntax is a widely recognized standard for representing clinical and scientific knowledge in an executable format. It has a history that reaches back until 1989 and is currently maintained by the Health Level 7 (HL7) organization. We created a production-ready development environment, compiler, rule engine and application server for Arden Syntax. Over the course of several years, we have applied this Arden - Syntax - based CDS system in a wide variety of clinical problem domains, such as hepatitis serology interpretation, monitoring of nosocomial infections or the prediction of metastatic events in melanoma patients. We found the Arden Syntax standard to be very suitable for the practical implementation of CDS systems. Among the advantages of Arden Syntax are its status as an actively developed HL7 standard, the readability of the syntax, and various syntactic features such as flexible list handling. A major challenge we encountered was the technical integration of our CDS systems in existing, heterogeneous health information systems. To address this issue, we are currently working on incorporating the HL7 standard GELLO, which provides a standardized interface and query language for accessing data in health information systems. We hope that these planned extensions of the Arden Syntax might eventually help in realizing the vision of a global, interoperable and shared library of clinical decision support knowledge. PMID:22342733

  11. Autonomy, religion and clinical decisions: findings from a national physician survey

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, R E; Curlin, F A

    2010-01-01

    Background Patient autonomy has been promoted as the most important principle to guide difficult clinical decisions. To examine whether practising physicians indeed value patient autonomy above other considerations, physicians were asked to weight patient autonomy against three other criteria that often influence doctors’ decisions. Associations between physicians’ religious characteristics and their weighting of the criteria were also examined. Methods Mailed survey in 2007 of a stratified random sample of 1000 US primary care physicians, selected from the American Medical Association masterfile. Physicians were asked how much weight should be given to the following: (1) the patient’s expressed wishes and values, (2) the physician’s own judgment about what is in the patient’s best interest, (3) standards and recommendations from professional medical bodies and (4) moral guidelines from religious traditions. Results Response rate 51% (446/879). Half of physicians (55%) gave the patient’s expressed wishes and values “the highest possible weight”. In comparative analysis, 40% gave patient wishes more weight than the other three factors, and 13% ranked patient wishes behind some other factor. Religious doctors tended to give less weight to the patient’s expressed wishes. For example, 47% of doctors with high intrinsic religious motivation gave patient wishes the “highest possible weight”, versus 67% of those with low (OR 0.5; 95% CI 0.3 to 0.8). Conclusions Doctors believe patient wishes and values are important, but other considerations are often equally or more important. This suggests that patient autonomy does not guide physicians’ decisions as much as is often recommended in the ethics literature. PMID:19332575

  12. A secure communication using cascade chaotic computing systems on clinical decision support.

    PubMed

    Koksal, Ahmet Sertol; Er, Orhan; Evirgen, Hayrettin; Yumusak, Nejat

    2016-06-01

    Clinical decision support systems (C-DSS) provide supportive tools to the expert for the determination of the disease. Today, many of the support systems, which have been developed for a better and more accurate diagnosis, have reached a dynamic structure due to artificial intelligence techniques. However, in cases when important diagnosis studies should be performed in secret, a secure communication system is required. In this study, secure communication of a DSS is examined through a developed double layer chaotic communication system. The developed communication system consists of four main parts: random number generator, cascade chaotic calculation layer, PCM, and logical mixer layers. Thanks to this system, important patient data created by DSS will be conveyed to the center through a secure communication line. PMID:25992507

  13. An Investigation of Factors Influencing Nurses' Clinical Decision-Making Skills.

    PubMed

    Wu, Min; Yang, Jinqiu; Liu, Lingying; Ye, Benlan

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the influencing factors on nurses' clinical decision-making (CDM) skills. A cross-sectional nonexperimental research design was conducted in the medical, surgical, and emergency departments of two university hospitals, between May and June 2014. We used a quantile regression method to identify the influencing factors across different quantiles of the CDM skills distribution and compared the results with the corresponding ordinary least squares (OLS) estimates. Our findings revealed that nurses were best at the skills of managing oneself. Educational level, experience, and the total structural empowerment had significant positive impacts on nurses' CDM skills, while the nurse-patient relationship, patient care and interaction, formal empowerment, and information empowerment were negatively correlated with nurses' CDM skills. These variables explained no more than 30% of the variance in nurses' CDM skills and mainly explained the lower quantiles of nurses' CDM skills distribution. PMID:26906246

  14. Statistics for critical clinical decision making based on readings of pairs of implanted sensors.

    PubMed

    Schmidtke, D W; Pishko, M V; Quinn, C P; Heller, A

    1996-09-01

    Low error rates are essential if lives of patients are to depend on readings of implanted sensors, such as glucose sensors in insulin-dependent diabetic patients. To verify the operation and to calibrate on demand an implanted sensor, it is necessary that calibration through a single, independent measurement involving withdrawal of only one sample of blood and its independent analysis be feasible. Such a one-point calibration must be accurate. Borrowing from nuclear reactor safety assurance, where a likelihood ratio test is applied to readings of pairs of pressure sensors for shutdown/no shutdown decisions, we apply a similar test to sensor pairs implanted in rats. We show, for five sets of glucose sensor pairs, calibrated in vivo by withdrawal of a single sample of blood, that application of the likelihood ratio test increases the fraction of the clinically correct readings from 92.4% for their averaged readings to 98.8%. PMID:8794921

  15. Recurrent Neural Networks in Computer-Based Clinical Decision Support for Laryngopathies: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Szkoła, Jarosław; Pancerz, Krzysztof; Warchoł, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of this paper is to give the basis for creating a computer-based clinical decision support (CDS) system for laryngopathies. One of approaches which can be used in the proposed CDS is based on the speech signal analysis using recurrent neural networks (RNNs). RNNs can be used for pattern recognition in time series data due to their ability of memorizing some information from the past. The Elman networks (ENs) are a classical representative of RNNs. To improve learning ability of ENs, we may modify and combine them with another kind of RNNs, namely, with the Jordan networks. The modified Elman-Jordan networks (EJNs) manifest a faster and more exact achievement of the target pattern. Validation experiments were carried out on speech signals of patients from the control group and with two kinds of laryngopathies. PMID:22007195

  16. Service oriented architecture for clinical decision support: a systematic review and future directions.

    PubMed

    Loya, Salvador Rodriguez; Kawamoto, Kensaku; Chatwin, Chris; Huser, Vojtech

    2014-12-01

    The use of a service-oriented architecture (SOA) has been identified as a promising approach for improving health care by facilitating reliable clinical decision support (CDS). A review of the literature through October 2013 identified 44 articles on this topic. The review suggests that SOA related technologies such as Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) and Service Component Architecture (SCA) have not been generally adopted to impact health IT systems' performance for better care solutions. Additionally, technologies such as Enterprise Service Bus (ESB) and architectural approaches like Service Choreography have not been generally exploited among researchers and developers. Based on the experience of other industries and our observation of the evolution of SOA, we found that the greater use of these approaches have the potential to significantly impact SOA implementations for CDS. PMID:25325996

  17. Protein source and choice of anticoagulant decisively affect nanoparticle protein corona and cellular uptake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöttler, S.; Klein, Katja; Landfester, K.; Mailänder, V.

    2016-03-01

    Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance of the choice of protein source used for in vitro protein corona analysis is concisely investigated. Major and decisive differences in cellular uptake of a polystyrene nanoparticle incubated in fetal bovine serum, human serum, human citrate and heparin plasma are reported. Furthermore, the protein compositions are determined for coronas formed in the respective incubation media. A strong influence of heparin, which is used as an anticoagulant for plasma generation, on cell interaction is demonstrated. While heparin enhances the uptake into macrophages, it prevents internalization into HeLa cells. Taken together we can give the recommendation that human plasma anticoagulated with citrate seems to give the most relevant results for in vitro studies of nanoparticle uptake.Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance

  18. Factors Affecting Career Decision-Making: Further Validation of the O'Neil Career-Sex Role Model and the Career Factor Checklist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meinecke, Christine; O'Neil, James M.

    Many correlates of vocational choice have been suggested by career development theorists. A career decision-making model developed by O'Neil, Meeker, and Borgers suggests six factors (individual, societal, familial, socioeconomic, situational, psychosocial-emotional) that affect both sex role socialization and career decision-making. The validity…

  19. A Conceptual Framework for Decision-making Support in Uncertainty- and Risk-based Diagnosis of Rare Clinical Cases by Specialist Physicians.

    PubMed

    Santos, Adriano A; Moura, J Antão B; de Araújo, Joseana Macêdo Fechine Régis

    2015-01-01

    Mitigating uncertainty and risks faced by specialist physicians in analysis of rare clinical cases is something desired by anyone who needs health services. The number of clinical cases never seen by these experts, with little documentation, may introduce errors in decision-making. Such errors negatively affect well-being of patients, increase procedure costs, rework, health insurance premiums, and impair the reputation of specialists and medical systems involved. In this context, IT and Clinical Decision Support Systems (CDSS) play a fundamental role, supporting decision-making process, making it more efficient and effective, reducing a number of avoidable medical errors and enhancing quality of treatment given to patients. An investigation has been initiated to look into characteristics and solution requirements of this problem, model it, propose a general solution in terms of a conceptual risk-based, automated framework to support rare-case medical diagnostics and validate it by means of case studies. A preliminary validation study of the proposed framework has been carried out by interviews conducted with experts who are practicing professionals, academics, and researchers in health care. This paper summarizes the investigation and its positive results. These results motivate continuation of research towards development of the conceptual framework and of a software tool that implements the proposed model. PMID:26262173

  20. Exploring use of images in clinical articles for decision support in evidence-based medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antani, Sameer; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Li, Jiang; Srinivasan, Balaji V.; Thoma, George R.

    2008-01-01

    Essential information is often conveyed pictorially (images, illustrations, graphs, charts, etc.) in biomedical publications. A clinician's decision to access the full text when searching for evidence in support of clinical decision is frequently based solely on a short bibliographic reference. We seek to automatically augment these references with images from the article that may assist in finding evidence. In a previous study, the feasibility of automatically classifying images by usefulness (utility) in finding evidence was explored using supervised machine learning and achieved 84.3% accuracy using image captions for modality and 76.6% accuracy combining captions and image data for utility on 743 images from articles over 2 years from a clinical journal. Our results indicated that automatic augmentation of bibliographic references with relevant images was feasible. Other research in this area has determined improved user experience by showing images in addition to the short bibliographic reference. Multi-panel images used in our study had to be manually pre-processed for image analysis, however. Additionally, all image-text on figures was ignored. In this article, we report on developed methods for automatic multi-panel image segmentation using not only image features, but also clues from text analysis applied to figure captions. In initial experiments on 516 figure images we obtained 95.54% accuracy in correctly identifying and segmenting the sub-images. The errors were flagged as disagreements with automatic parsing of figure caption text allowing for supervised segmentation. For localizing text and symbols, on a randomly selected test set of 100 single panel images our methods reported, on the average, precision and recall of 78.42% and 89.38%, respectively, with an accuracy of 72.02%.

  1. Cognitive and affective components of Theory of Mind in preschoolers with oppositional defiance disorder: Clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    de la Osa, Nuria; Granero, Roser; Domenech, Josep Maria; Shamay-Tsoory, Simone; Ezpeleta, Lourdes

    2016-07-30

    The goal of the study was to examine the affective-cognitive components of Theory of Mind (ToM), in a community sample of 538 preschoolers, and more specifically in a subsample of 40 children diagnosed with ODD. The relationship between affective and cognitive ToM and some ODD clinical characteristics was examined. Children were assessed with structured diagnostic interviews and dimensional measures of psychopathology, impairment and unemotional traits. A measure based on eye-gaze was used to assess ToM. Mixed analysis of variance compared the mean cognitive versus affective scale scores and the between-subjects factor ODD. The association between ToM-scores and clinical measures was assessed through correlation models. Execution and reaction time to emotional and cognitive components of ToM tasks are different at age 5 in normally developing children. Oppositional Defiant children had slower response time when performing the affective mentalizing condition than children without the disorder. The correlation matrix between ToM-scores and clinical measures showed specific associations depending on the impaired ToM aspect and the psychological domain. Results may have clinical implications for the prevention and management of ODD. PMID:27173657

  2. The Affective Reactivity Index: A Concise Irritability Scale for Clinical and Research Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stringaris, Argyris; Goodman, Robert; Ferdinando, Sumudu; Razdan, Varun; Muhrer, Eli; Leibenluft, Ellen; Brotman, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Irritable mood has recently become a matter of intense scientific interest. Here, we present data from two samples, one from the United States and the other from the United Kingdom, demonstrating the clinical and research utility of the parent- and self-report forms of the Affective Reactivity Index (ARI), a concise dimensional measure…

  3. ZNF804A variants confer risk for heroin addiction and affect decision making and gray matter volume in heroin abusers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Zhao, Li-Yan; Wang, Gui-Bin; Yue, Wei-Hua; He, Yong; Shu, Ni; Lin, Qi-Xiang; Wang, Fan; Li, Jia-Li; Chen, Na; Wang, Hui-Min; Kosten, Thomas R; Feng, Jia-Jia; Wang, Jun; Tang, Yu-De; Liu, Shu-Xue; Deng, Gui-Fa; Diao, Gan-Huan; Tan, Yun-Long; Han, Hong-Bin; Lin, Lu; Shi, Jie

    2016-05-01

    Drug addiction shares common neurobiological pathways and risk genes with other psychiatric diseases, including psychosis. One of the commonly identified risk genes associated with broad psychosis has been ZNF804A. We sought to test whether psychosis risk variants in ZNF804A increase the risk of heroin addiction by modulating neurocognitive performance and gray matter volume (GMV) in heroin addiction. Using case-control genetic analysis, we compared the distribution of ZNF804A variants (genotype and haplotype) in 1035 heroin abusers and 2887 healthy subjects. We also compared neurocognitive performance (impulsivity, global cognitive ability and decision-making ability) in 224 subjects and GMV in 154 subjects based on the ZNF804A variants. We found significant differences in the distribution of ZNF804A intronic variants (rs1344706 and rs7597593) allele and haplotype frequencies between the heroin and control groups. Decision-making impairment was worse in heroin abusers who carried the ZNF804A risk allele and haplotype. Subjects who carried more risk alleles and haplotypes of ZNF804A had greater GMV in the bilateral insular cortex, right temporal cortex and superior parietal cortex. The interaction between heroin addiction and ZNF804A variants affected GMV in the left sensorimotor cortex. Our findings revealed several ZNF804A variants that were significantly associated with the risk of heroin addiction, and these variants affected decision making and GMV in heroin abusers compared with controls. The precise neural mechanisms that underlie these associations are unknown, which requires future investigations of the effects of ZNF804A on both dopamine neurotransmission and the relative increases in the volume of various brain areas. PMID:25708696

  4. Factors affecting the decision to undergo risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy among women with BRCA gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongwon; Kang, Eunyoung; Hwang, Euijun; Sun, Young; Hwang, Yoonsun; Yom, Cha Kyong; Kim, Kidong; No, Jae Hong; Kim, Yong-Beom; Kim, Sung-Won

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to identify factors that affect the decision to undergo risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) in BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations carriers in South Korea. The medical records of 124 women who had been found to have BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation at our institution between May 2003 and December 2011 were reviewed. The carriers were divided into RRSO and non-RRSO groups for comparison of their clinicopathologic, socio-economic, and psychosocial factors. Of the 71 carriers eligible for RRSO, 21 had undergone RRSO. In univariate analysis, classification of carriers into 3 groups by decade of life (4th, 5th, or 6th and later decade) and subsequent analysis revealed that 52.6% of carriers in the 5th decade had undergone RRSO, a rate significantly higher than that of the other age groups (p = 0.007). The RRSO rate was higher in carriers with a personal history of breast cancer than in those without (39.2% vs. 5.0%, p = 0.004), in carriers with a family history of breast cancer than in those without (35.5% vs. 11.8%, p = 0.065), and in carriers with a family history of ovarian cancer than in those carriers without a family history (66.7% vs. 24.2%, p = 0.016). Multivariate analysis identified age and personal history of breast cancer as independent factors affecting the decision to undergo RRSO. Age and personal history of breast cancer are important factors in the decision to undergo, and should thus be considered when counseling BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. PMID:23504064

  5. Comparison of Decision-Assist and Clinical Judgment of Experts for Prediction of Lifesaving Interventions.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Colin F; Gao, Cheng; Hu, Peter F; Anazodo, Amechi; Chen, Hegang; Dinardo, Theresa; Imle, P Cristina; Hartsky, Lauren; Stephens, Christopher; Menaker, Jay; Fouche, Yvette; Murdock, Karen; Galvagno, Samuel; Alcorta, Richard; Shackelford, Stacy

    2015-03-01

    Early recognition of hemorrhage during the initial resuscitation of injured patients is associated with improved survival in both civilian and military casualties. We tested a transfusion and lifesaving intervention (LSI) prediction algorithm in comparison with clinical judgment of expert trauma care providers. We collected 15 min of pulse oximeter photopletysmograph waveforms and extracted features to predict LSIs. We compared this with clinical judgment of LSIs by individual categories of prehospital providers, nurses, and physicians and a combined judgment of all three providers using the Area Under Receiver Operating Curve (AUROC). We obtained clinical judgment of need for LSI from 405 expert clinicians in135 trauma patients. The pulse oximeter algorithm predicted transfusion within 6 h (AUROC, 0.92; P < 0.003) more accurately than either physicians or prehospital providers and as accurately as nurses (AUROC, 0.76; P = 0.07). For prediction of surgical procedures, the algorithm was as accurate as the three categories of clinicians. For prediction of fluid bolus, the diagnostic algorithm (AUROC, 0.9) was significantly more accurate than prehospital providers (AUROC, 0.62; P = 0.02) and nurses (AUROC, 0.57; P = 0.04) and as accurate as physicians (AUROC, 0.71; P = 0.06). Prediction of intubation by the algorithm (AUROC, 0.92) was as accurate as each of the three categories of clinicians. The algorithm was more accurate (P < 0.03) for blood and fluid prediction than the combined clinical judgment of all three providers but no different from the clinicians in the prediction of surgery (P = 0.7) or intubation (P = 0.8). Automated analysis of 15 min of pulse oximeter waveforms predicts the need for LSIs during initial trauma resuscitation as accurately as judgment of expert trauma clinicians. For prediction of emergency transfusion and fluid bolus, pulse oximetry features were more accurate than these experts. Such automated decision support could assist

  6. Characterizing the Access of Clinical Decision Support Offered by Immunization Information System in Minnesota

    PubMed Central

    Rajamani, Sripriya; Bieringer, Aaron; Muscoplat, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Healthy People 2020 aims to improve population health by increasing immunization rates to decrease vaccine-preventable infectious diseases. Amongst the many strategies, role of immunization information systems (IIS) are recognized by studies and taskforce reports. IIS are unique in their offering of clinical decision support for immunizations (CDSi) which are utilized by healthcare providers. Federal initiatives such as Meaningful Use (MU) and Affordable Care Act (ACA) aim to improve immunization rates through use of technology and expanding access to immunization services respectively. MU, the Electronic Health Record (EHR) incentive program includes use of IIS CDSi functionality as part of Stage 3. It is essential to understand access and use patterns of IIS CDSi, so as to utilize it better to improve immunization services. Objectives: To understand the utilization of clinical decision support for immunizations (CDSi) offered by immunization information system in Minnesota and to analyze the variability of its use across providers and EHR implementations. Methods: IIS in Minnesota (Minnesota Immunization Information Connection: MIIC) offers CDSi that is accessed through EHRs and branded as Alternate Access (AA). Data from MIIC and technical documents were reviewed to create details on organizations which implemented AA functionality. Data on EHR adoption in clinics and local health departments was obtained from Minnesota eHealth assessment reports. Data on access were tracked from January 2015 through mid-October 2015 through weekly specialized reports to track the queries by organization, volume and day of the week. Data were analyzed, findings were synthesized and reviewed with subject matter experts. Results: Currently 25 healthcare systems/organizations which represent 599 individual provider sites have implemented the AA functionality. Analysis of their EHR platform pointed to two EHRs (Epic and PH-Doc) as dominant products in Minnesota for

  7. Patient involvement in decision-making: a cross-sectional study in a Malaysian primary care clinic

    PubMed Central

    Ambigapathy, Ranjini; Ng, Chirk Jenn

    2016-01-01

    Objective Shared decision-making has been advocated as a useful model for patient management. In developing Asian countries such as Malaysia, there is a common belief that patients prefer a passive role in clinical consultation. As such, the objective of this study was to determine Malaysian patients’ role preference in decision-making and the associated factors. Design A cross-sectional study. Setting Study was conducted at an urban primary care clinic in Malaysia in 2012. Participants Patients aged >21 years were chosen using systematic random sampling. Methods Consenting patients answered a self-administered questionnaire, which included demographic data and their preferred and actual role before and after consultation. Doctors were asked to determine patients’ role preference. The Control Preference Scale was used to assess patients’ role preference. Primary outcome Prevalence of patients’ preferred role in decision-making. Secondary outcomes (1) Actual role played by the patient in decision-making. (2) Sociodemographic factors associated with patients’ preferred role in decision-making. (3) Doctors’ perception of patients’ involvement in decision-making. Results The response rate was 95.1% (470/494). Shared decision-making was preferred by 51.9% of patients, followed by passive (26.3%) and active (21.8%) roles in decision-making. Higher household income was significantly associated with autonomous role preference (p=0.018). Doctors’ perception did not concur with patients’ preferred role. Among patients whom doctors perceived to prefer a passive role, 73.5% preferred an autonomous role (p=0.900, κ=0.006). Conclusions The majority of patients attending the primary care clinic preferred and played an autonomous role in decision-making. Doctors underestimated patients’ preference to play an autonomous role. PMID:26729393

  8. The cognitive processes underlying affective decision-making predicting adolescent smoking behaviors in a longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Lin; Koritzky, Gilly; Johnson, C. Anderson; Bechara, Antoine

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between three different cognitive processes underlying the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) and adolescent smoking behaviors in a longitudinal study. We conducted a longitudinal study of 181 Chinese adolescents in Chengdu City, China. The participants were followed from 10th to 11th grade. When they were in the 10th grade (Time 1), we tested these adolescents' decision-making using the IGT and working memory capacity using the Self-ordered Pointing Test (SOPT). Self-report questionnaires were used to assess school academic performance and smoking behaviors. The same questionnaires were completed again at the 1-year follow-up (Time 2). The Expectancy-Valence (EV) Model was applied to distill the IGT performance into three different underlying psychological components: (i) a motivational component which indicates the subjective weight the adolescents assign to gains vs. losses; (ii) a learning-rate component which indicates the sensitivity to recent outcomes vs. past experiences; and (iii) a response component which indicates how consistent the adolescents are between learning and responding. The subjective weight to gains vs. losses at Time 1 significantly predicted current smokers and current smoking levels at Time 2, controlling for demographic variables and baseline smoking behaviors. Therefore, by decomposing the IGT into three different psychological components, we found that the motivational process of weight gain vs. losses may serve as a neuropsychological marker to predict adolescent smoking behaviors in a general youth population. PMID:24101911

  9. A Diffusion Model Analysis of Decision Biases Affecting Delayed Recognition of Emotional Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, Holly J.; Spaniol, Julia; Patel, Ronak; Voss, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Previous empirical work suggests that emotion can influence accuracy and cognitive biases underlying recognition memory, depending on the experimental conditions. The current study examines the effects of arousal and valence on delayed recognition memory using the diffusion model, which allows the separation of two decision biases thought to underlie memory: response bias and memory bias. Memory bias has not been given much attention in the literature but can provide insight into the retrieval dynamics of emotion modulated memory. Participants viewed emotional pictorial stimuli; half were given a recognition test 1-day later and the other half 7-days later. Analyses revealed that emotional valence generally evokes liberal responding, whereas high arousal evokes liberal responding only at a short retention interval. The memory bias analyses indicated that participants experienced greater familiarity with high-arousal compared to low-arousal items and this pattern became more pronounced as study-test lag increased; positive items evoke greater familiarity compared to negative and this pattern remained stable across retention interval. The findings provide insight into the separate contributions of valence and arousal to the cognitive mechanisms underlying delayed emotion modulated memory. PMID:26784108

  10. Post-Decision Wagering Affects Metacognitive Awareness of Emotional Stimuli: An Event Related Potential Study.

    PubMed

    Wierzchoń, Michał; Wronka, Eligiusz; Paulewicz, Borysław; Szczepanowski, Remigiusz

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigated metacognitive awareness of emotional stimuli and its psychophysiological correlates. We used a backward masking task presenting participants with fearful or neutral faces. We asked participants for face discrimination and then probed their metacognitive awareness with confidence rating (CR) and post-decision wagering (PDW) scales. We also analysed psychophysiological correlates of awareness with event-related potential (ERP) components: P1, N170, early posterior negativity (EPN), and P3. We have not observed any differences between PDW and CR conditions in the emotion identification task. However, the "aware" ratings were associated with increased accuracy performance. This effect was more pronounced in PDW, especially for fearful faces, suggesting that emotional stimuli awareness may be enhanced by monetary incentives. EEG analysis showed larger N170, EPN and P3 amplitudes in aware compared to unaware trials. It also appeared that both EPN and P3 ERP components were more pronounced in the PDW condition, especially when emotional faces were presented. Taken together, our ERP findings suggest that metacognitive awareness of emotional stimuli depends on the effectiveness of both early and late visual information processing. Our study also indicates that awareness of emotional stimuli can be enhanced by the motivation induced by wagering. PMID:27490816

  11. Epilepsy Surgery: Factors That Affect Patient Decision-Making in Choosing or Deferring a Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christopher Todd; Mani, Ram; Lawler, Kathy; Pollard, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Surgical resection for well-selected patients with refractory epilepsy provides seizure freedom approximately two-thirds of the time. Despite this, many good candidates for surgery, after a presurgical workup, ultimately do not consent to a procedure. The reasons why patients decline potentially effective surgery are not completely understood. We explored the socio cultural, medical, personal, and psychological differences between candidates who chose (n = 23) and those who declined surgical intervention (n = 9). We created a novel questionnaire addressing a range of possible factors important in patient decision making. We found that patients who declined surgery were less bothered by their epilepsy (despite comparable severity), more anxious about surgery, and less likely to listen to their doctors (and others) and had more comorbid psychiatric disease. Patients who chose surgery were more embarrassed by their seizures, more interested in being “seizure-free”, and less anxious about specific aspects of surgery. Patient attitudes, beliefs, and anxiety serve as barriers to ideal care. These results can provide opportunities for education, treatment, and intervention. Additionally, patients who fit a profile of someone who is likely to defer surgery may not be appropriate for risky and expensive presurgical testing. PMID:24159385

  12. Protein source and choice of anticoagulant decisively affect nanoparticle protein corona and cellular uptake.

    PubMed

    Schöttler, S; Klein, Katja; Landfester, K; Mailänder, V

    2016-03-14

    Protein adsorption on nanoparticles has been a focus of the field of nanocarrier research in the past few years and more and more papers are dealing with increasingly detailed lists of proteins adsorbed to a plethora of nanocarriers. While there is an urgent need to understand the influence of this protein corona on nanocarriers' interactions with cells the strong impact of the protein source on corona formation and the consequence for interaction with different cell types are factors that are regularly neglected, but should be taken into account for a meaningful analysis. In this study, the importance of the choice of protein source used for in vitro protein corona analysis is concisely investigated. Major and decisive differences in cellular uptake of a polystyrene nanoparticle incubated in fetal bovine serum, human serum, human citrate and heparin plasma are reported. Furthermore, the protein compositions are determined for coronas formed in the respective incubation media. A strong influence of heparin, which is used as an anticoagulant for plasma generation, on cell interaction is demonstrated. While heparin enhances the uptake into macrophages, it prevents internalization into HeLa cells. Taken together we can give the recommendation that human plasma anticoagulated with citrate seems to give the most relevant results for in vitro studies of nanoparticle uptake. PMID:26804616

  13. Post-Decision Wagering Affects Metacognitive Awareness of Emotional Stimuli: An Event Related Potential Study

    PubMed Central

    Wierzchoń, Michał; Wronka, Eligiusz; Paulewicz, Borysław; Szczepanowski, Remigiusz

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigated metacognitive awareness of emotional stimuli and its psychophysiological correlates. We used a backward masking task presenting participants with fearful or neutral faces. We asked participants for face discrimination and then probed their metacognitive awareness with confidence rating (CR) and post-decision wagering (PDW) scales. We also analysed psychophysiological correlates of awareness with event-related potential (ERP) components: P1, N170, early posterior negativity (EPN), and P3. We have not observed any differences between PDW and CR conditions in the emotion identification task. However, the "aware" ratings were associated with increased accuracy performance. This effect was more pronounced in PDW, especially for fearful faces, suggesting that emotional stimuli awareness may be enhanced by monetary incentives. EEG analysis showed larger N170, EPN and P3 amplitudes in aware compared to unaware trials. It also appeared that both EPN and P3 ERP components were more pronounced in the PDW condition, especially when emotional faces were presented. Taken together, our ERP findings suggest that metacognitive awareness of emotional stimuli depends on the effectiveness of both early and late visual information processing. Our study also indicates that awareness of emotional stimuli can be enhanced by the motivation induced by wagering. PMID:27490816

  14. The 2013 symposium on pathology data integration and clinical decision support and the current state of field

    PubMed Central

    Baron, Jason M.; Dighe, Anand S.; Arnaout, Ramy; Balis, Ulysses J.; Black-Schaffer, W. Stephen; Carter, Alexis B.; Henricks, Walter H.; Higgins, John M.; Jackson, Brian R.; Kim, JiYeon; Klepeis, Veronica E.; Le, Long P.; Louis, David N.; Mandelker, Diana; Mermel, Craig H.; Michaelson, James S.; Nagarajan, Rakesh; Platt, Mihae E.; Quinn, Andrew M.; Rao, Luigi; Shirts, Brian H.; Gilbertson, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pathologists and informaticians are becoming increasingly interested in electronic clinical decision support for pathology, laboratory medicine and clinical diagnosis. Improved decision support may optimize laboratory test selection, improve test result interpretation and permit the extraction of enhanced diagnostic information from existing laboratory data. Nonetheless, the field of pathology decision support is still developing. To facilitate the exchange of ideas and preliminary studies, we convened a symposium entitled: Pathology data integration and clinical decision support. Methods: The symposium was held at the Massachusetts General Hospital, on May 10, 2013. Participants were selected to represent diverse backgrounds and interests and were from nine different institutions in eight different states. Results: The day included 16 plenary talks and three panel discussions, together covering four broad areas. Summaries of each presentation are included in this manuscript. Conclusions: A number of recurrent themes emerged from the symposium. Among the most pervasive was the dichotomy between diagnostic data and diagnostic information, including the opportunities that laboratories may have to use electronic systems and algorithms to convert the data they generate into more useful information. Differences between human talents and computer abilities were described; well-designed symbioses between humans and computers may ultimately optimize diagnosis. Another key theme related to the unique needs and challenges in providing decision support for genomics and other emerging diagnostic modalities. Finally, many talks relayed how the barriers to bringing decision support toward reality are primarily personnel, political, infrastructural and administrative challenges rather than technological limitations. PMID:24672737

  15. She left, he left: how employment and satisfaction affect women's and men's decisions to leave marriages.

    PubMed

    Sayer, Liana C; England, Paula; Allison, Paul D; Kangas, Nicole

    2011-05-01

    Studies examining determinants of divorce have largely ignored differences between factors that elevate wives' and husbands' initiation of divorce. The authors use longitudinal data and a latent class model embedded in a competing-risks event history model to assess distinct predictors of wives and husbands leaving marriages. They find that when men are not employed, either spouse is more likely to leave. When wives report better-than-average marital satisfaction, their employment affects neither spouse's exit. However, when wives report below-average marital satisfaction, their employment makes it more likely they will leave. The authors' findings suggest that theories of divorce require "gendering" to reflect asymmetric gender change. PMID:21932472

  16. Clinical decision-making: midwifery students' recognition of, and response to, post partum haemorrhage in the simulation environment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background This paper reports the findings of a study of how midwifery students responded to a simulated post partum haemorrhage (PPH). Internationally, 25% of maternal deaths are attributed to severe haemorrhage. Although this figure is far higher in developing countries, the risk to maternal wellbeing and child health problem means that all midwives need to remain vigilant and respond appropriately to early signs of maternal deterioration. Methods Simulation using a patient actress enabled the research team to investigate the way in which 35 midwifery students made decisions in a dynamic high fidelity PPH scenario. The actress wore a birthing suit that simulated blood loss and a flaccid uterus on palpation. The scenario provided low levels of uncertainty and high levels of relevant information. The student's response to the scenario was videoed. Immediately after, they were invited to review the video, reflect on their performance and give a commentary as to what affected their decisions. The data were analysed using Dimensional Analysis. Results The students' clinical management of the situation varied considerably. Students struggled to prioritise their actions where more than one response was required to a clinical cue and did not necessarily use mnemonics as heuristic devices to guide their actions. Driven by a response to single cues they also showed a reluctance to formulate a diagnosis based on inductive and deductive reasoning cycles. This meant they did not necessarily introduce new hypothetical ideas against which they might refute or confirm a diagnosis and thereby eliminate fixation error. Conclusions The students response demonstrated that a number of clinical skills require updating on a regular basis including: fundal massage technique, the use of emergency standing order drugs, communication and delegation of tasks to others in an emergency and working independently until help arrives. Heuristic devices helped the students to evaluate their

  17. Privacy-Preserving Patient-Centric Clinical Decision Support System on Naïve Bayesian Classification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ximeng; Lu, Rongxing; Ma, Jianfeng; Chen, Le; Qin, Baodong

    2016-03-01

    Clinical decision support system, which uses advanced data mining techniques to help clinician make proper decisions, has received considerable attention recently. The advantages of clinical decision support system include not only improving diagnosis accuracy but also reducing diagnosis time. Specifically, with large amounts of clinical data generated everyday, naïve Bayesian classification can be utilized to excavate valuable information to improve a clinical decision support system. Although the clinical decision support system is quite promising, the flourish of the system still faces many challenges including information security and privacy concerns. In this paper, we propose a new privacy-preserving patient-centric clinical decision support system, which helps clinician complementary to diagnose the risk of patients' disease in a privacy-preserving way. In the proposed system, the past patients' historical data are stored in cloud and can be used to train the naïve Bayesian classifier without leaking any individual patient medical data, and then the trained classifier can be applied to compute the disease risk for new coming patients and also allow these patients to retrieve the top- k disease names according to their own preferences. Specifically, to protect the privacy of past patients' historical data, a new cryptographic tool called additive homomorphic proxy aggregation scheme is designed. Moreover, to leverage the leakage of naïve Bayesian classifier, we introduce a privacy-preserving top- k disease names retrieval protocol in our system. Detailed privacy analysis ensures that patient's information is private and will not be leaked out during the disease diagnosis phase. In addition, performance evaluation via extensive simulations also demonstrates that our system can efficiently calculate patient's disease risk with high accuracy in a privacy-preserving way. PMID:26960216

  18. Clinical Performance and Management Outcomes with the DecisionDx-UM Gene Expression Profile Test in a Prospective Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Plasseraud, Kristen Meldi; Tsai, Tony; Shildkrot, Yevgeniy; Middlebrook, Brooke; Maetzold, Derek; Wilkinson, Jeff; Stone, John; Johnson, Clare; Oelschlager, Kristen; Aaberg, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    Uveal melanoma management is challenging due to its metastatic propensity. DecisionDx-UM is a prospectively validated molecular test that interrogates primary tumor biology to provide objective information about metastatic potential that can be used in determining appropriate patient care. To evaluate the continued clinical validity and utility of DecisionDx-UM, beginning March 2010, 70 patients were enrolled in a prospective, multicenter, IRB-approved study to document patient management differences and clinical outcomes associated with low-risk Class 1 and high-risk Class 2 results indicated by DecisionDx-UM testing. Thirty-seven patients in the prospective study were Class 1 and 33 were Class 2. Class 1 patients had 100% 3-year metastasis-free survival compared to 63% for Class 2 (log rank test p = 0.003) with 27.3 median follow-up months in this interim analysis. Class 2 patients received significantly higher-intensity monitoring and more oncology/clinical trial referrals compared to Class 1 patients (Fisher's exact test p = 2.1 × 10−13 and p = 0.04, resp.). The results of this study provide additional, prospective evidence in an independent cohort of patients that Class 1 and Class 2 patients are managed according to the differential metastatic risk indicated by DecisionDx-UM. The trial is registered with Clinical Application of DecisionDx-UM Gene Expression Assay Results (NCT02376920). PMID:27446211

  19. Clinical Performance and Management Outcomes with the DecisionDx-UM Gene Expression Profile Test in a Prospective Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Plasseraud, Kristen Meldi; Cook, Robert W; Tsai, Tony; Shildkrot, Yevgeniy; Middlebrook, Brooke; Maetzold, Derek; Wilkinson, Jeff; Stone, John; Johnson, Clare; Oelschlager, Kristen; Aaberg, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    Uveal melanoma management is challenging due to its metastatic propensity. DecisionDx-UM is a prospectively validated molecular test that interrogates primary tumor biology to provide objective information about metastatic potential that can be used in determining appropriate patient care. To evaluate the continued clinical validity and utility of DecisionDx-UM, beginning March 2010, 70 patients were enrolled in a prospective, multicenter, IRB-approved study to document patient management differences and clinical outcomes associated with low-risk Class 1 and high-risk Class 2 results indicated by DecisionDx-UM testing. Thirty-seven patients in the prospective study were Class 1 and 33 were Class 2. Class 1 patients had 100% 3-year metastasis-free survival compared to 63% for Class 2 (log rank test p = 0.003) with 27.3 median follow-up months in this interim analysis. Class 2 patients received significantly higher-intensity monitoring and more oncology/clinical trial referrals compared to Class 1 patients (Fisher's exact test p = 2.1 × 10(-13) and p = 0.04, resp.). The results of this study provide additional, prospective evidence in an independent cohort of patients that Class 1 and Class 2 patients are managed according to the differential metastatic risk indicated by DecisionDx-UM. The trial is registered with Clinical Application of DecisionDx-UM Gene Expression Assay Results (NCT02376920). PMID:27446211

  20. Selection of diagnostic tests for clinical decision making and translation to a problem oriented medical record.

    PubMed

    Realdi, Giuseppe; Previato, Lorenzo; Vitturi, Nicola

    2008-07-01

    The leading function of the physician is the clinical reasoning, which involves appropriate investigation of the problems of the patient, formulation of a diagnostic suspect based on the patient's symptoms and signs, gathering of additional relevant information, to select necessary tests and administration of the most suitable therapy. The problems of the patient are expressed by symptoms or signs or abnormal test results, requested for a variety of reasons. The entire scientific, as well as diagnostic approach, is based on three steps: to stumble in a problem; to try a solution through a hypothesis; to disprove or to prove the hypothesis by a process of criticism. Clinicians use the information obtained from the history and physical examination to estimate initial (or pre-test) probability and then use the results from tests and other diagnostic procedures to modify this probability until the post-test probability is such that the suspected diagnosis is either confirmed or ruled out. When the pre-test probability of disease is high, tests characterized by high specificity will be preferred, in order to confirm the diagnostic suspect. When the pre-test probability of disease is low, a test with high sensitivity is advisable to exclude the hypothetical disease. The above mentioned process of decision making has been transferred to a problem oriented medical record that is currently employed in our Clinic. PMID:18420030

  1. Clinical Decision Support for the Classification of Diabetic Retinopathy: A Comparison of Manual and Automated Results.

    PubMed

    Mitsch, Christoph; Fehre, Karsten; Prager, Sonja; Scholda, Christoph; Kriechbaum, Katharina; Wrba, Thomas; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    The management of diabetic retinopathy, a frequent ophthalmological manifestation of diabetes mellitus, consists of regular examinations and a standardized, manual classification of disease severity, which is used to recommend re-examination intervals. To evaluate the feasibility and safety of implementing automated, guideline-based diabetic retinopathy (DR) grading into clinical routine by applying established clinical decision support (CDS) technology. We compared manual with automated classification that was generated using medical documentation and an Arden server with a specific medical logic module. Of 7169 included eyes, 47% (n=3373) showed inter-method classification agreement, specifically 29.4% in mild DR, 38.3% in moderate DR, 27.6% in severe DR, and 65.7% in proliferative DR. We demonstrate that the implementation of a CDS system for automated disease severity classification in diabetic retinopathy is feasible but also that, due to the highly individual nature of medical documentation, certain important criteria for the used electronic health record system need to be met in order to achieve reliable results. PMID:27139380

  2. Clinical Decision Support Alert Appropriateness: A Review and Proposal for Improvement

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Allison B.; Thomas, Eric J.; Krousel-Wood, Marie; Sittig, Dean F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many healthcare providers are adopting clinical decision support (CDS) systems to improve patient safety and meet meaningful use requirements. Computerized alerts that prompt clinicians about drug-allergy, drug-drug, and drug-disease warnings or provide dosing guidance are most commonly implemented. Alert overrides, which occur when clinicians do not follow the guidance presented by the alert, can hinder improved patient outcomes. Methods We present a review of CDS alerts and describe a proposal to develop novel methods for evaluating and improving CDS alerts that builds upon traditional informatics approaches. Our proposal incorporates previously described models for predicting alert overrides that utilize retrospective chart review to determine which alerts are clinically relevant and which overrides are justifiable. Results Despite increasing implementations of CDS alerts, detailed evaluations rarely occur because of the extensive labor involved in manual chart reviews to determine alert and response appropriateness. Further, most studies have solely evaluated alert overrides that are appropriate or justifiable. Our proposal expands the use of web-based monitoring tools with an interactive dashboard for evaluating CDS alert and response appropriateness that incorporates the predictive models. The dashboard provides 2 views, an alert detail view and a patient detail view, to provide a full history of alerts and help put the patient's events in context. Conclusion The proposed research introduces several innovations to address the challenges and gaps in alert evaluations. This research can transform alert evaluation processes across healthcare settings, leading to improved CDS, reduced alert fatigue, and increased patient safety. PMID:24940129

  3. A framework for genomic biomarker actionability and its use in clinical decision making

    PubMed Central

    Janku, Filip; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; Munoz, Javier; Schwab, Richard; Subbiah, Vivek; Rodon, Jordi; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2014-01-01

    The increasing scope and availability of genetic testing options for patients suffering from cancer has raised questions about how to use results of molecular diagnostics to inform patient care. For some biomarkers (e.g. BRAF mutations in melanoma), standards exist that outline treatments for individuals harboring aberrations in the biomarker; however for the vast majority of genomic abnormalities, few guidelines exist. Clinical decision making and the therapeutic approach for a patient with a given cancer characterized by aberrations in different genes may be aided by the use of a biomarker actionability framework that provides levels of evidence regarding whether and how a molecular abnormality can be considered a therapeutically relevant biomarker. A gene may be considered theoretically actionable if it has a basis of actionability, such that clinically available drugs can target a gene product that drives the cancer or is differentially expressed in tumor versus normal elements. Herein, we discuss a possible framework for developing guidelines for actionability, as they relate to genomically-based cancer therapeutics. PMID:25593991

  4. Clinical decision support for imaging in the era of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Hanna M; Mills, Angela M; Khorasani, Ramin; Langlotz, Curtis P

    2012-12-01

    Imaging clinical decision support (CDS) systems provide evidence for or against imaging procedures ordered within a computerized physician order entry system at the time of the image order. Depending on the pertinent clinical history provided by the ordering clinician, CDS systems can optimize imaging by educating providers on appropriate image order entry and by alerting providers to the results of prior, potentially relevant imaging procedures, thereby reducing redundant imaging. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) has expedited the adoption of computerized physician order entry and CDS systems in health care through the creation of financial incentives and penalties to promote the "meaningful use" of health IT. Meaningful use represents the latest logical next step in a long chain of legislation promoting the areas of appropriate imaging utilization, accurate reporting, and IT. It is uncertain if large-scale implementation of imaging CDS will lead to improved health care quality, as seen in smaller settings, or to improved patient outcomes. However, imaging CDS enables the correlation of existing imaging evidence with outcome measures, including morbidity, mortality, and short-term imaging-relevant management outcomes (eg, biopsy, chemotherapy). The purposes of this article are to review the legislative sequence relevant to imaging CDS and to give guidance to radiology practices focused on quality and financial performance improvement during this time of accelerating regulatory change. PMID:23206649

  5. [Adequacy of clinical interventions in patients with advanced and complex disease. Proposal of a decision making algorithm].

    PubMed

    Ameneiros-Lago, E; Carballada-Rico, C; Garrido-Sanjuán, J A; García Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    Decision making in the patient with chronic advanced disease is especially complex. Health professionals are obliged to prevent avoidable suffering and not to add any more damage to that of the disease itself. The adequacy of the clinical interventions consists of only offering those diagnostic and therapeutic procedures appropriate to the clinical situation of the patient and to perform only those allowed by the patient or representative. In this article, the use of an algorithm is proposed that should serve to help health professionals in this decision making process. PMID:25666087

  6. A clinical decision aid for the selection of antithrombotic therapy for the prevention of stroke due to atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    LaHaye, Stephen Andrew; Gibbens, Sabra Lynn; Ball, David Gerald Andrew; Day, Andrew George; Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Skanes, Allan Cameron

    2012-01-01

    Aims The availability of new antithrombotic agents, each with a unique efficacy and bleeding profile, has introduced a considerable amount of clinical uncertainty with physicians. We have developed a clinical decision aid in order to assist clinicians in determining an optimal antithrombotic regime for the prevention of stroke in patients who are newly diagnosed with non-valvular atrial fibrillation. Methods and results The CHA2DS2-VASc and HAS-BLED scoring systems were used to assess patients’ baseline risks of stroke and major bleeding, respectively. The relative risks of stroke and major bleeding for each antithrombotic agent were then used to identify the agent associated with the lowest net risk. Individual patient factors such as the treatment threshold, bleeding ratio, and cost threshold modified the recommendations in order to generate a final recommendation. By considering both patient factors and clinical research concurrently, this clinical decision aid is able to provide specific advice to clinicians regarding an optimal stroke prevention strategy. The resulting treatment recommendation tables are consistent with the recommendations of the European Society of Cardiology and Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines, which can be incorporated into either a paper-based or electronic format to allow clinicians to have decision support at the point of care. Conclusion The use of a clinical decision aid that considers both patient factors and evidence-based medicine will serve to bridge the knowledge gap and provide practical guidance to clinicians in the prevention of stroke due to atrial fibrillation. PMID:22752615

  7. Eliminating Healthcare Disparities Via Mandatory Clinical Decision Support: The Venous Thromboembolism (VTE) Example

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Brandyn D.; Haider, Adil H.; Streiff, Michael B.; Lehmann, Christoph U.; Kraus, Peggy S.; Hobson, Deborah B.; Kraenzlin, Franca S.; Zeidan, Amer M.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Haut, Elliott R.

    2014-01-01

    Background All hospitalized patients should be assessed for VTE risk factors and prescribed appropriate prophylaxis. To improve best-practice VTE prophylaxis prescription for all hospitalized patients, we implemented a mandatory computerized clinical decision support (CCDS) tool. The tool requires completion of checklists to evaluate VTE risk factors and contraindications to pharmacologic prophylaxis, and then recommends the risk-appropriate VTE prophylaxis regimen. Objectives To examine the effect of a quality improvement intervention on race- and gender-based healthcare disparities across two distinct clinical services. Research Design Retrospective cohort study of a quality improvement intervention Subjects 1942 hospitalized medical patients and 1599 hospitalized adult trauma patients Measures Proportion of patients prescribed risk-appropriate, best-practice VTE prophylaxis Results Racial disparities existed in prescription of best-practice VTE prophylaxis in the pre-implementation period between black and white patients on both the trauma (70.1% vs. 56.6%, p=0.025) and medicine (69.5% vs. 61.7%, p=0.015) services. After implementation of the CCDS tool, compliance improved for all patients and disparities in best-practice prophylaxis prescription between black and white patients were eliminated on both services: trauma (84.5% vs. 85.5%, p=0.99) and medicine (91.8% vs. 88.0%, p=0.082). Similar findings were noted for gender disparities in the trauma cohort. Conclusions Despite the fact that risk-appropriate prophylaxis should be prescribed equally to all hospitalized patients regardless of race and gender, practice varied widely prior to our quality improvement intervention. Our CCDS tool eliminated racial disparities in VTE prophylaxis prescription across two distinct clinical services. Health information technology approaches to care standardization are effective to eliminate healthcare disparities. PMID:25373403

  8. Supporting clinical decision making during deep brain stimulation surgery by means of a stochastic dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamintziou, Sofia D.; Tsirogiannis, George L.; Stathis, Pantelis G.; Tagaris, George A.; Boviatsis, Efstathios J.; Sakas, Damianos E.; Nikita, Konstantina S.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. During deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD), microelectrode recording (MER) in conjunction with functional stimulation techniques are commonly applied for accurate electrode implantation. However, the development of automatic methods for clinical decision making has to date been characterized by the absence of a robust single-biomarker approach. Moreover, it has only been restricted to the framework of MER without encompassing intraoperative macrostimulation. Here, we propose an integrated series of novel single-biomarker approaches applicable to the entire electrophysiological procedure by means of a stochastic dynamical model. Approach. The methods are applied to MER data pertinent to ten DBS procedures. Considering the presence of measurement noise, we initially employ a multivariate phase synchronization index for automatic delineation of the functional boundaries of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) and determination of the acceptable MER trajectories. By introducing the index into a nonlinear stochastic model, appropriately fitted to pre-selected MERs, we simulate the neuronal response to periodic stimuli (130 Hz), and examine the Lyapunov exponent as an indirect indicator of the clinical effectiveness yielded by stimulation at the corresponding sites. Main results. Compared with the gold-standard dataset of annotations made intraoperatively by clinical experts, the STN detection methodology demonstrates a false negative rate of 4.8% and a false positive rate of 0%, across all trajectories. Site eligibility for implantation of the DBS electrode, as implicitly determined through the Lyapunov exponent of the proposed stochastic model, displays a sensitivity of 71.43%. Significance. The suggested comprehensive method exhibits remarkable performance in automatically determining both the acceptable MER trajectories and the optimal stimulation sites, thereby having the potential to accelerate precise

  9. Formative assessment and design of a complex clinical decision support tool for pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sundas; McCullagh, Lauren; Press, Anne; Kharche, Manish; Schachter, Andy; Pardo, Salvatore; McGinn, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Electronic health record (EHR)-based clinical decision support (CDS) tools are rolled out with the urgency to meet federal requirements without time for usability testing and refinement of the user interface. As part of a larger project to design, develop and integrate a pulmonary embolism CDS tool for emergency physicians, we conducted a formative assessment to determine providers' level of interest and input on designs and content. This was a study to conduct a formative assessment of emergency medicine (EM) physicians that included focus groups and key informant interviews. The focus of this study was twofold, to determine the general attitude towards CDS tool integration and the ideal integration point into the clinical workflow. To accomplish this, we first approached EM physicians in a focus group, then, during key informant interviews, we presented workflow designs and gave a scenario to help the providers visualise how the CDS tool works. Participants were asked questions regarding the trigger location, trigger words, integration into their workflow, perceived utility and heuristic of the tool. Results from the participants' survey responses to trigger location, perceived utility and efficiency, indicated that the providers felt the tool would be more of a hindrance than an aid. However, some providers commented that they had not had exposure to CDS tools but had used online calculators, and thought the tools would be helpful at the point-of-care if integrated into the EHR. Furthermore, there was a preference for an order entry wireframe. This study highlights several factors to consider when designing CDS tools: (1) formative assessment of EHR functionality and clinical environment workflow, (2) focus groups and key informative interviews to incorporate providers' perceptions of CDS and workflow integration and/or (3) the demonstration of proposed workflows through wireframes to help providers visualise design concepts. PMID:26718820

  10. Clinical benefits of a multivariable prediction model for bladder cancer: a decision analytic approach

    PubMed Central

    Vickers, Andrew J; Cronin, Angel M; Kattan, Michael W; Gonen, Mithat; Scardino, Peter T; Milowsky, Matthew I.; Dalbagni, Guido; Bochner, Bernard H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Multivariable prediction models have been shown to predict cancer outcomes more accurately than cancer stage. The effects on clinical management are unclear. We aimed to determine whether a published multivariable prediction model for bladder cancer (“bladder nomogram”) improves medical decision making, using referral for adjuvant chemotherapy as a model. Methods We analyzed data from an international cohort study of 4462 patients undergoing cystectomy without chemotherapy 1969 – 2004. The number of patients eligible for chemotherapy was determined using pathologic stage criteria (lymph node positive or stage pT3 or pT4), and for three cut-offs on the bladder nomogram (10%, 25% and 70% risk of recurrence with surgery alone). The number of recurrences was calculated by applying a relative risk reduction to eligible patients' baseline risk. Clinical net benefit was then calculated by combining recurrences and treatments, weighting the latter by a factor related to drug tolerability. Results A nomogram cut-off outperformed pathologic stage for chemotherapy for every scenario of drug effectiveness and tolerability. For a drug with a relative risk of 0.80, where clinicians would treat no more than 20 patients to prevent one recurrence, use of the nomogram was equivalent to a strategy that resulted in 60 fewer chemotherapy treatments per 1000 patients without any increase in recurrence rates. Conclusions Referring cystectomy patients to adjuvant chemotherapy on the basis of a multivariable model is likely to lead to better patient outcomes than the use of pathological stage. Further research is warranted to evaluate the clinical effects of multivariable prediction models. PMID:19823979

  11. High Prevalence and Clinical Relevance of Genes Affected by Chromosomal Breaks in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, Evert; Dijkstra, Maurits J. J.; Krijgsman, Oscar; Sie, Daoud; Haan, Josien C.; Traets, Joleen J. H.; van de Wiel, Mark A.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Carvalho, Beatriz; Ylstra, Bauke; Abeln, Sanne; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Fijneman, Remond J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer is caused by somatic DNA alterations such as gene point mutations, DNA copy number aberrations (CNA) and structural variants (SVs). Genome-wide analyses of SVs in large sample series with well-documented clinical information are still scarce. Consequently, the impact of SVs on carcinogenesis and patient outcome remains poorly understood. This study aimed to perform a systematic analysis of genes that are affected by CNA-associated chromosomal breaks in colorectal cancer (CRC) and to determine the clinical relevance of recurrent breakpoint genes. Methods Primary CRC samples of patients with metastatic disease from CAIRO and CAIRO2 clinical trials were previously characterized by array-comparative genomic hybridization. These data were now used to determine the prevalence of CNA-associated chromosomal breaks within genes across 352 CRC samples. In addition, mutation status of the commonly affected APC, TP53, KRAS, PIK3CA, FBXW7, SMAD4, BRAF and NRAS genes was determined for 204 CRC samples by targeted massive parallel sequencing. Clinical relevance was assessed upon stratification of patients based on gene mutations and gene breakpoints that were observed in >3% of CRC cases. Results In total, 748 genes were identified that were recurrently affected by chromosomal breaks (FDR <0.1). MACROD2 was affected in 41% of CRC samples and another 169 genes showed breakpoints in >3% of cases, indicating that prevalence of gene breakpoints is comparable to the prevalence of well-known gene point mutations. Patient stratification based on gene breakpoints and point mutations revealed one CRC subtype with very poor prognosis. Conclusions We conclude that CNA-associated chromosomal breaks within genes represent a highly prevalent and clinically relevant subset of SVs in CRC. PMID:26375816

  12. The Need for Clinical Decision Support Integrated with the Electronic Health Record for the Clinical Application of Whole Genome Sequencing Information

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Brandon M.; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2013-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is rapidly approaching widespread clinical application. Technology advancements over the past decade, since the first human genome was decoded, have made it feasible to use WGS for clinical care. Future advancements will likely drive down the price to the point wherein WGS is routinely available for care. However, were this to happen today, most of the genetic information available to guide clinical care would go unused due to the complexity of genetics, limited physician proficiency in genetics, and lack of genetics professionals in the clinical workforce. Furthermore, these limitations are unlikely to change in the future. As such, the use of clinical decision support (CDS) to guide genome-guided clinical decision-making is imperative. In this manuscript, we describe the barriers to widespread clinical application of WGS information, describe how CDS can be an important tool for overcoming these barriers, and provide clinical examples of how genome-enabled CDS can be used in the clinical setting. PMID:25411643

  13. Endoscopic and Clinical Factors Affecting the Prognosis of Colorectal Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection-Related Perforation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong-Uk; Choi, Yunsik; Lee, Ho-Su; Lee, Hyo Jeong; Park, Sang Hyoung; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Yoon, Soon Man; Kim, Kyung-Jo; Ye, Byong Duk; Myung, Seung-Jae; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Kim, Jin-Ho; Byeon, Jeong-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Although colorectal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD)-related perforation is not uncommon, the factors affecting clinical outcomes after perforation have not been investigated. This study was designed to investigate the factors influencing the clinical course of ESD-related colon perforation. Methods Forty-three patients with colorectal ESD-related perforation were evaluated. The perforations were classified as endoscopic or radiologic perforations. The patients’ medical records and endoscopic pictures were analyzed. Results The clinical outcomes were assessed by the duration of nil per os, intravenous antibiotics administration, and hospital stays, which were 2.7±1.5, 4.9±2.3, and 5.1±2.3 days, respectively. Multivariate analyses revealed that a larger tumor size, ESD failure, specific endoscopists, and abdominal pain were independently related to a poorer outcome. The time between perforation and clipping was 15.8±25.4 minutes in the endoscopic perforation group. The multivariate analysis of this group indicated that delayed clipping, specific endoscopists, and abdominal pain were independently associated with poorer outcomes. Conclusions Tumor size, ESD failure, abdominal pain, and the endoscopist were factors that affected the clinical outcomes of patients with colorectal ESD-related perforation. The time between the perforation and clipping was an additional factor influencing the clinical course of endoscopic perforation. Decreasing this time period may improve outcomes. PMID:26780090

  14. Clinical use of coping in affective disorder, a critical review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background The relationship between life stressors, coping and affective disorder is interesting when predicting onset of a affective disorder and relapse of mood episodes. Methods A litteratur review of cross-sectional and longitudinal studies concerning coping and affective disorder in adults including a Medline and Embase search was conducted. Results 11 cross-sectional studies and 17 longitudinal studies concerning affective disorder and coping were found, among these, two studies include patients with bipolar disorder exclusively. Only four studies elucidate whether emotion-oriented and/or avoidance coping styles are associated with a higher risk of developing affective disorder, so this hypothesis remains unclear. Most studies shows that emotion-oriented and avoidance coping strategies are associated with relapse of depressive episodes. Conversely, problem-focused and task-oriented coping seem to be associated with a good outcome. Conclusion There is a gap between coping theory and clinical use of coping and the clinical relevance of coping is, though promising, still unclear. In future research it is recommended to concentrate on development of a semi-structured interview combining coping style, life events and personality traits. PMID:16212656

  15. Survivor needs or logistical convenience? Factors shaping decisions to deliver relief to earthquake-affected communities, Pakistan 2005-06.

    PubMed

    Benini, Aldo; Conley, Charles; Dittemore, Brody; Waksman, Zachary

    2009-03-01

    In Bureaucratizing the Good Samaritan, Waters (2001) argues that bureaucratic rationality distracts humanitarian agencies from the needs of the people they are supposed to assist, in favour of other values that their institutional frameworks dictate. We test his claim by investigating the response to the Pakistan 2005 earthquake. One of us (Dittemore) worked with the United Nations Joint Logistics Centre in the theatre, managing a relief cargo shipment database. The response, known as 'Operation Winter Race', was hampered by extreme logistical challenges, but ultimately succeeded in averting a second disaster resulting from cold and starvation. We use statistical models to probe whether survivor needs significantly guided decisions to deliver relief to affected communities. Needs assessments remained incomplete and incoherent. We measure needs through proxy indicators and integrate them, on a Geographic Information System (GIS) platform, with logistics and relief delivery data. We find that, despite strong logistics effects, needs orientations were significant. However, the strength of decision factors varies between commodity types (food versus clothing and shelter versus reconstruction materials) as well as over the different phases of the response. This study confirms Thomas's observation that logistics databases are rich 'repositories of data that can be analyzed to provide post-event learning' (Thomas, 2003, p. 4). This article is an invitation for others to engage in creative humanitarian data management. PMID:18513312

  16. Cognitive and affective components of mental workload: Understanding the effects of each on human decision making behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nygren, Thomas E.

    1992-01-01

    Human factors and ergonomics researchers have recognized for some time the increasing importance of understanding the role of the construct of mental workload in flight research. Current models of mental workload suggest that it is a multidimensional and complex construct, but one that has proved difficult to measure. Because of this difficulty, emphasis has usually been placed on using direct reports through subjective measures such as rating scales to assess levels of mental workload. The NASA Task Load Index (NASA/TLX, Hart and Staveland) has been shown to be a highly reliable and sensitive measure of perceived mental workload. But a problem with measures like TLX is that there is still considerable disagreement as to what it is about mental workload that these subjective measures are actually measuring. The empirical use of subjective workload measures has largely been to provide estimates of the cognitive components of the actual mental workload required for a task. However, my research suggests that these measures may, in fact have greater potential in accurately assessing the affective components of workload. That is, for example, TLX may be more likely to assess the positive and negative feelings associated with varying workload levels, which in turn may potentially influence the decision making behavior that directly bears on performance and safety issues. Pilots, for example, are often called upon to complete many complex tasks that are high in mental workload, stress, and frustration, and that have significant dynamic decision making components -- often ones that involve risk as well.

  17. Target templates: the precision of mental representations affects attentional guidance and decision-making in visual search

    PubMed Central

    Hout, Michael C.; Goldinger, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    When people look for things in the environment, they use target templates—mental representations of the objects they are attempting to locate—to guide attention and to assess incoming visual input as potential targets. However, unlike laboratory participants, searchers in the real world rarely have perfect knowledge regarding the potential appearance of targets. In seven experiments, we examined how the precision of target templates affects the ability to conduct visual search. Specifically, we degraded template precision in two ways: 1) by contaminating searchers’ templates with inaccurate features, and 2) by introducing extraneous features to the template that were unhelpful. We recorded eye movements to allow inferences regarding the relative extents to which attentional guidance and decision-making are hindered by template imprecision. Our findings support a dual-function theory of the target template and highlight the importance of examining template precision in visual search. PMID:25214306

  18. Depression and Anxiety During Pregnancy: Evaluating the Literature in Support of Clinical Risk-Benefit Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Dalke, Katharine Baratz; Wenzel, Amy; Kim, Deborah R

    2016-06-01

    Depression and anxiety during pregnancy are common, and patients and providers are faced with complex decisions regarding various treatment modalities. A structured discussion of the risks and benefits of options with the patient and her support team is recommended to facilitate the decision-making process. This clinically focused review, with emphasis on the last 3 years of published study data, evaluates the major risk categories of medication treatments, namely pregnancy loss, physical malformations, growth impairment, behavioral teratogenicity, and neonatal toxicity. Nonpharmacological treatment options, including neuromodulation and psychotherapy, are also briefly reviewed. Specific recommendations, drawn from the literature and the authors' clinical experience, are also offered to help guide the clinician in decision-making. PMID:27091646

  19. An Automated System for Generating Situation-Specific Decision Support in Clinical Order Entry from Local Empirical Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klann, Jeffrey G.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical Decision Support is one of the only aspects of health information technology that has demonstrated decreased costs and increased quality in healthcare delivery, yet it is extremely expensive and time-consuming to create, maintain, and localize. Consequently, a majority of health care systems do not utilize it, and even when it is…

  20. An Exploration of the Relationship between Clinical Decision-Making Ability and Educational Preparation among New Graduate Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blount, Kamilah V.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of accelerated nursing direct entry master's programs on the development of clinical decision-making skills of new graduate nurses that completed the Performance Based Development System (PBDS) assessment during the study period of 2008-2012 at a healthcare organization. Healthcare today is practiced in a…

  1. Discussing End-of-Life Decisions in a Clinical Ethics Committee: An Interview Study of Norwegian Doctors' Experience.

    PubMed

    Bahus, Marianne K; Førde, Reidun

    2016-09-01

    With disagreement, doubts, or ambiguous grounds in end-of-life decisions, doctors are advised to involve a clinical ethics committee (CEC). However, little has been published on doctors' experiences with discussing an end-of-life decision in a CEC. As part of the quality assurance of this work, we wanted to find out if clinicians have benefited from discussing end-of-life decisions in CECs and why. We will disseminate some Norwegian doctors' experiences when discussing end-of-life decisions in CECs, based on semi-structured interviews with fifteen Norwegian physicians who had brought an end-of-life decision case to a CEC. Almost half of the cases involved conflicts with the patients' relatives. In a majority of the cases, there was uncertainty about what would be the ethically preferable solution. Reasons for referring the case to the CEC were to get broader illumination of the case, to get perspective from people outside the team, to get advice, or to get moral backing on a decision already made. A great majority of the clinicians reported an overall positive experience with the CECs' discussions. In cases where there was conflict, the clinicians reported less satisfaction with the CECs' discussions. The study shows that most doctors who have used a CEC in an end-of-life decision find it useful to have ethical and/or legal aspects illuminated, and to have the dilemma scrutinized from a new perspective. A systematic discussion seems to be significant to the clinicians. PMID:26922945

  2. Clinical information system services and capabilities desired for scalable, standards-based, service-oriented decision support: consensus assessment of the Health Level 7 clinical decision support Work Group.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Kensaku; Jacobs, Jason; Welch, Brandon M; Huser, Vojtech; Paterno, Marilyn D; Del Fiol, Guilherme; Shields, David; Strasberg, Howard R; Haug, Peter J; Liu, Zhijing; Jenders, Robert A; Rowed, David W; Chertcoff, Daryl; Fehre, Karsten; Adlassnig, Klaus-Peter; Curtis, A Clayton

    2012-01-01

    A standards-based, service-oriented architecture for clinical decision support (CDS) has the potential to significantly enhance CDS scalability and robustness. To enable such a CDS architecture, the Health Level 7 CDS Work Group reviewed the literature, hosted multi-stakeholder discussions, and consulted domain experts to identify and prioritize the services and capabilities required from clinical information systems (CISs) to enable service-oriented CDS. In addition, relevant available standards were identified. Through this process, ten CIS services and eight CIS capabilities were identified as being important for enabling scalable, service-oriented CDS. In particular, through a survey of 46 domain experts, five services and capabilities were identified as being especially critical: 1) the use of standard information models and terminologies; 2) the ability to leverage a Decision Support Service (DSS); 3) support for a clinical data query service; 4) support for an event subscription and notification service; and 5) support for a user communication service. PMID:23304315

  3. An ontology-driven, case-based clinical decision support model for removable partial denture design.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingxiao; Wu, Ji; Li, Shusen; Lyu, Peijun; Wang, Yong; Li, Miao

    2016-01-01

    We present the initial work toward developing a clinical decision support model for specific design of removable partial dentures (RPDs) in dentistry. We developed an ontological paradigm to represent knowledge of a patient's oral conditions and denture component parts. During the case-based reasoning process, a cosine similarity algorithm was applied to calculate similarity values between input patients and standard ontology cases. A group of designs from the most similar cases were output as the final results. To evaluate this model, the output designs of RPDs for 104 randomly selected patients were compared with those selected by professionals. An area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic (AUC-ROC) was created by plotting true-positive rates against the false-positive rate at various threshold settings. The precision at position 5 of the retrieved cases was 0.67 and at the top of the curve it was 0.96, both of which are very high. The mean average of precision (MAP) was 0.61 and the normalized discounted cumulative gain (NDCG) was 0.74 both of which confirmed the efficient performance of our model. All the metrics demonstrated the efficiency of our model. This methodology merits further research development to match clinical applications for designing RPDs. This paper is organized as follows. After the introduction and description of the basis for the paper, the evaluation and results are presented in Section 2. Section 3 provides a discussion of the methodology and results. Section 4 describes the details of the ontology, similarity algorithm, and application. PMID:27297679

  4. An ontology-driven, case-based clinical decision support model for removable partial denture design

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qingxiao; Wu, Ji; Li, Shusen; Lyu, Peijun; Wang, Yong; Li, Miao

    2016-01-01

    We present the initial work toward developing a clinical decision support model for specific design of removable partial dentures (RPDs) in dentistry. We developed an ontological paradigm to represent knowledge of a patient’s oral conditions and denture component parts. During the case-based reasoning process, a cosine similarity algorithm was applied to calculate similarity values between input patients and standard ontology cases. A group of designs from the most similar cases were output as the final results. To evaluate this model, the output designs of RPDs for 104 randomly selected patients were compared with those selected by professionals. An area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic (AUC-ROC) was created by plotting true-positive rates against the false-positive rate at various threshold settings. The precision at position 5 of the retrieved cases was 0.67 and at the top of the curve it was 0.96, both of which are very high. The mean average of precision (MAP) was 0.61 and the normalized discounted cumulative gain (NDCG) was 0.74 both of which confirmed the efficient performance of our model. All the metrics demonstrated the efficiency of our model. This methodology merits further research development to match clinical applications for designing RPDs. This paper is organized as follows. After the introduction and description of the basis for the paper, the evaluation and results are presented in Section 2. Section 3 provides a discussion of the methodology and results. Section 4 describes the details of the ontology, similarity algorithm, and application. PMID:27297679

  5. Clinical Decision Support Tools for Selecting Interventions for Patients with Disabling Musculoskeletal Disorders: A Scoping Review.

    PubMed

    Gross, Douglas P; Armijo-Olivo, Susan; Shaw, William S; Williams-Whitt, Kelly; Shaw, Nicola T; Hartvigsen, Jan; Qin, Ziling; Ha, Christine; Woodhouse, Linda J; Steenstra, Ivan A

    2016-09-01

    Purpose We aimed to identify and inventory clinical decision support (CDS) tools for helping front-line staff select interventions for patients with musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders. Methods We used Arksey and O'Malley's scoping review framework which progresses through five stages: (1) identifying the research question; (2) identifying relevant studies; (3) selecting studies for analysis; (4) charting the data; and (5) collating, summarizing and reporting results. We considered computer-based, and other available tools, such as algorithms, care pathways, rules and models. Since this research crosses multiple disciplines, we searched health care, computing science and business databases. Results Our search resulted in 4605 manuscripts. Titles and abstracts were screened for relevance. The reliability of the screening process was high with an average percentage of agreement of 92.3 %. Of the located articles, 123 were considered relevant. Within this literature, there were 43 CDS tools located. These were classified into 3 main areas: computer-based tools/questionnaires (n = 8, 19 %), treatment algorithms/models (n = 14, 33 %), and clinical prediction rules/classification systems (n = 21, 49 %). Each of these areas and the associated evidence are described. The state of evidentiary support for CDS tools is still preliminary and lacks external validation, head-to-head comparisons, or evidence of generalizability across different populations and settings. Conclusions CDS tools, especially those employing rapidly advancing computer technologies, are under development and of potential interest to health care providers, case management organizations and funders of care. Based on the results of this scoping review, we conclude that these tools, models and systems should be subjected to further validation before they can be recommended for large-scale implementation for managing patients with MSK disorders. PMID:26667939

  6. Role of negative affects in pathophysiology and clinical expression of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Muscatello, Maria Rosaria A; Bruno, Antonio; Scimeca, Giuseppe; Pandolfo, Gianluca; Zoccali, Rocco A

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is regarded as a multifactorial disease in which alterations in the brain-gut axis signaling play a major role. The biopsychosocial model applied to the understanding of IBS pathophysiology assumes that psychosocial factors, interacting with peripheral/central neuroendocrine and immune changes, may induce symptoms of IBS, modulate symptom severity, influence illness experience and quality of life, and affect outcome. The present review focuses on the role of negative affects, including depression, anxiety, and anger, on pathogenesis and clinical expression of IBS. The potential role of the autonomic nervous system, stress-hormone system, and immune system in the pathophysiology of both negative affects and IBS are taken into account. Psychiatric comorbidity and subclinical variations in levels of depression, anxiety, and anger are further discussed in relation to the main pathophysiological and symptomatic correlates of IBS, such as sensorimotor functions, gut microbiota, inflammation/immunity, and symptom reporting. PMID:24976697

  7. Role of negative affects in pathophysiology and clinical expression of irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Muscatello, Maria Rosaria A; Bruno, Antonio; Scimeca, Giuseppe; Pandolfo, Gianluca; Zoccali, Rocco A

    2014-06-28

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is regarded as a multifactorial disease in which alterations in the brain-gut axis signaling play a major role. The biopsychosocial model applied to the understanding of IBS pathophysiology assumes that psychosocial factors, interacting with peripheral/central neuroendocrine and immune changes, may induce symptoms of IBS, modulate symptom severity, influence illness experience and quality of life, and affect outcome. The present review focuses on the role of negative affects, including depression, anxiety, and anger, on pathogenesis and clinical expression of IBS. The potential role of the autonomic nervous system, stress-hormone system, and immune system in the pathophysiology of both negative affects and IBS are taken into account. Psychiatric comorbidity and subclinical variations in levels of depression, anxiety, and anger are further discussed in relation to the main pathophysiological and symptomatic correlates of IBS, such as sensorimotor functions, gut microbiota, inflammation/immunity, and symptom reporting. PMID:24976697

  8. Dose coefficients and derived guidance and clinical decision levels for contaminated wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bertelli, Luiz; Toohey, Richard E

    2009-01-01

    The NCRP Wound Model describing the retention of selected radionuclides at the site of a contaminated wound and their uptake into the transfer compartment has been combined with the ICRP element-specific systemic models for those radionuclides to derive dose coefficients for intakes via contaminated wounds. Those coefficients have been used to generate derived guidance levels (i.e., the activity in a wound that would result in an effective dose of 20 or 50 mSv, or in some cases, a committed organ equivalent dose of 500 mSv), and clinical decision levels (i.e., activity levels that would indicate the need for consideration of medical intervention to remove activity from the wound site or administration of decorporation therapy or both), typically set at 5 times the derived guidance levels. Data are provided for the radionuclides commonly encountered at nuclear power plants and nuclear weapons, fuel fabrication or recycling, waste disposal, medical and research facilities. These include: {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 131}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 210}Po, {sup 226,228}Ra, {sup 228,232}Th, {sup 235,238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238,239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242,244}Cm, and {sup 252}Cf.

  9. Clinical Decision Support System to Enhance Quality Control of Spirometry Using Information and Communication Technologies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We recently demonstrated that quality of spirometry in primary care could markedly improve with remote offline support from specialized professionals. It is hypothesized that implementation of automatic online assessment of quality of spirometry using information and communication technologies may significantly enhance the potential for extensive deployment of a high quality spirometry program in integrated care settings. Objective The objective of the study was to elaborate and validate a Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) for automatic online quality assessment of spirometry. Methods The CDSS was done through a three step process including: (1) identification of optimal sampling frequency; (2) iterations to build-up an initial version using the 24 standard spirometry curves recommended by the American Thoracic Society; and (3) iterations to refine the CDSS using 270 curves from 90 patients. In each of these steps the results were checked against one expert. Finally, 778 spirometry curves from 291 patients were analyzed for validation purposes. Results The CDSS generated appropriate online classification and certification in 685/778 (88.1%) of spirometry testing, with 96% sensitivity and 95% specificity. Conclusions Consequently, only 93/778 (11.9%) of spirometry testing required offline remote classification by an expert, indicating a potential positive role of the CDSS in the deployment of a high quality spirometry program in an integrated care setting. PMID:25600957

  10. A Clinical Decision Support System for Femoral Peripheral Arterial Disease Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yurtkuran, Alkın; Tok, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    One of the major challenges of providing reliable healthcare services is to diagnose and treat diseases in an accurate and timely manner. Recently, many researchers have successfully used artificial neural networks as a diagnostic assessment tool. In this study, the validation of such an assessment tool has been developed for treatment of the femoral peripheral arterial disease using a radial basis function neural network (RBFNN). A data set for training the RBFNN has been prepared by analyzing records of patients who had been treated by the thoracic and cardiovascular surgery clinic of a university hospital. The data set includes 186 patient records having 16 characteristic features associated with a binary treatment decision, namely, being a medical or a surgical one. K-means clustering algorithm has been used to determine the parameters of radial basis functions and the number of hidden nodes of the RBFNN is determined experimentally. For performance evaluation, the proposed RBFNN was compared to three different multilayer perceptron models having Pareto optimal hidden layer combinations using various performance indicators. Results of comparison indicate that the RBFNN can be used as an effective assessment tool for femoral peripheral arterial disease treatment. PMID:24382983

  11. Molecular profiling of liver tumors: classification and clinical translation for decision making.

    PubMed

    Pinyol, Roser; Nault, Jean Charles; Quetglas, Iris M; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Llovet, Josep M

    2014-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a complex disease with a dismal prognosis. Consequently, a translational approach is required to personalized clinical decision making to improve survival of HCC patients. Molecular signatures from cirrhotic livers and single nucleotide polymorphism have been linked with HCC occurrence. Identification of high-risk populations will be useful to design chemopreventive trials. In addition, molecular signatures derived from tumor and nontumor samples are associated with early tumor recurrence due to metastasis and late tumor recurrence due to de novo carcinogenesis after curative treatment, respectively. Identification of patients with a high risk of relapse will guide adjuvant randomized trials. The genetic landscape drawn by next-generation sequencing has highlighted the genomic diversity of HCC. Genetic drivers recurrently mutated belong to different signaling pathways including telomere maintenance, cell-cycle regulators, chromatin remodeling, Wnt/b-catenin, RAS/RAF/MAPK kinase, and AKT/mTOR pathway. These cancer genes will be ideally targeted by biotherapies as a paradigm of stratified medicine adapted to tumor biology. PMID:25369299

  12. Evolution of a knowledge base for a clinical decision support system encoded in the Arden Syntax.

    PubMed Central

    Jenders, R. A.; Huang, H.; Hripcsak, G.; Clayton, P. D.

    1998-01-01

    Clinical decision support systems (CDSS) are being used increasingly in medical practice. Thus, long-term maintenance of the knowledge bases (KB) of such systems becomes important. To quantify changes that occur as a KB evolves, we studied the KB at the Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center. This KB has a total of 229 Medical Logic Modules (MLMs) encoded in the Arden Syntax. Eliminating those never used in practice, we retrospectively analyzed 156 MLMs developed over 78 months. We noted 2020 distinct versions of these MLMs that included 5528 changed statements over time. These changes occurred primarily in the logic slot (38.7% of all changes), the action slot (17.8%), in queries (15.0%) and in the data slot exclusive of queries (12.4%). We conclude that long-term maintenance of a KB for a CDSS requires significant changes over time. We discuss the implications of these results for the design of KB editors for the Arden Syntax. PMID:9929281

  13. MACVIA clinical decision algorithm in adolescents and adults with allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Jean; Schünemann, Holger J; Hellings, Peter W; Arnavielhe, Sylvie; Bachert, Claus; Bedbrook, Anna; Bergmann, Karl-Christian; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Brozek, Jan; Calderon, Moises; Canonica, G Walter; Casale, Thomas B; Chavannes, Niels H; Cox, Linda; Chrystyn, Henry; Cruz, Alvaro A; Dahl, Ronald; De Carlo, Giuseppe; Demoly, Pascal; Devillier, Phillipe; Dray, Gérard; Fletcher, Monica; Fokkens, Wytske J; Fonseca, Joao; Gonzalez-Diaz, Sandra N; Grouse, Lawrence; Keil, Thomas; Kuna, Piotr; Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée; Lodrup Carlsen, Karin C; Meltzer, Eli O; Mullol, Jaoquim; Muraro, Antonella; Naclerio, Robert N; Palkonen, Susanna; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Price, David; Ryan, Dermot; Samolinski, Boleslaw; Scadding, Glenis K; Sheikh, Aziz; Spertini, François; Valiulis, Arunas; Valovirta, Erkka; Walker, Samantha; Wickman, Magnus; Yorgancioglu, Arzu; Haahtela, Tari; Zuberbier, Torsten

    2016-08-01

    The selection of pharmacotherapy for patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) depends on several factors, including age, prominent symptoms, symptom severity, control of AR, patient preferences, and cost. Allergen exposure and the resulting symptoms vary, and treatment adjustment is required. Clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) might be beneficial for the assessment of disease control. CDSSs should be based on the best evidence and algorithms to aid patients and health care professionals to jointly determine treatment and its step-up or step-down strategy depending on AR control. Contre les MAladies Chroniques pour un VIeillissement Actif en Languedoc-Roussillon (MACVIA-LR [fighting chronic diseases for active and healthy ageing]), one of the reference sites of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing, has initiated an allergy sentinel network (the MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel Network). A CDSS is currently being developed to optimize AR control. An algorithm developed by consensus is presented in this article. This algorithm should be confirmed by appropriate trials. PMID:27260321

  14. Impact of MammaPrint on Clinical Decision-Making in South African Patients with Early-Stage Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Heinrich; Kotze, Maritha J; Grant, Kathleen A; van der Merwe, Lize; Pienaar, Fredrieka M; Apffelstaedt, Justus P; Myburgh, Ettienne J

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of MammaPrint on treatment decision-making in patients with breast cancer. Clinicopathologic information of all breast cancer patients referred for MammaPrint testing in South Africa was collected from 2007 until 2014. A total of 107 patients (109 tumors) with estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor positive and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 negative tumors were selected with tumors ≥10 mm, or when 1-3 nodes were involved without extra-nodal extension. None of the clinical indicators correlated significantly with the MammaPrint risk classification, which changed the decision for adjuvant chemotherapy in 52% of patients. Of 60 patients who were clinically high risk, 62% had a low-risk MammaPrint result and of the 47 clinically low -risk patients 40% had a high-risk MammaPrint result. This study indicates that MammaPrint could reduce the need for adjuvant chemotherapy by 17% using the selection criteria stipulated. The significant impact on treatment decisions confirmed the clinical utility of MammaPrint independent of standard clinicopathologic risk factors as supported by long-term clinical outcome studies. PMID:27079770

  15. Emerging medical informatics with case-based reasoning for aiding clinical decision in multi-agent system.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying; Colloc, Joël; Jacquet-Andrieu, Armelle; Lei, Kai

    2015-08-01

    This research aims to depict the methodological steps and tools about the combined operation of case-based reasoning (CBR) and multi-agent system (MAS) to expose the ontological application in the field of clinical decision support. The multi-agent architecture works for the consideration of the whole cycle of clinical decision-making adaptable to many medical aspects such as the diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, therapeutic monitoring of gastric cancer. In the multi-agent architecture, the ontological agent type employs the domain knowledge to ease the extraction of similar clinical cases and provide treatment suggestions to patients and physicians. Ontological agent is used for the extension of domain hierarchy and the interpretation of input requests. Case-based reasoning memorizes and restores experience data for solving similar problems, with the help of matching approach and defined interfaces of ontologies. A typical case is developed to illustrate the implementation of the knowledge acquisition and restitution of medical experts. PMID:26133480

  16. Modeling the Innovation-Decision Process: Dissemination and Adoption of a Motivational Interviewing Preparatory Procedure In Addiction Outpatient Clinics.

    PubMed

    Walitzer, Kimberly S; Dermen, Kurt H; Barrick, Christopher; Shyhalla, Kathleen

    2015-10-01

    Widespread adoption of empirically-supported treatment innovations has the potential to improve effectiveness of treatment received by individuals with substance use disorders. However, the process of disseminating such innovations has been complex, slow, and difficult. We empirically describe the dissemination and adoption of a treatment innovation--an alcohol-treatment preparatory therapeutic procedure based on motivational interviewing (MI)--in the context of Rogers' (2003) five stages of innovation-decision process (knowledge, persuasion, decision, implementation and confirmation). To this end, 145 randomly-chosen outpatient addiction treatment clinics in New York State received an onsite visit from a project trainer delivering one of three randomly-assigned dissemination intensities: a 15-minute, a half-day or a full-day presentation. Across these clinics, 141 primary administrators and 837 clinicians completed questionnaires assessing aspects of five innovation-decision stages. At each clinic, questionnaire administration occurred immediately pre- and post-dissemination, as well as 1 and 6 months after dissemination. Consistent with Rogers' theory, earlier stages of the innovation-decision process predicted later stages. As hypothesized, dissemination intensity predicted clinicians' post-dissemination knowledge. Clinician baseline characteristics (including gender, pre-dissemination knowledge regarding the MI preparatory technique, education, case load, beliefs regarding the nature of alcohol problems, and beliefs and behavior with regard to therapeutic style) predicted knowledge and persuasion stage variables. One baseline clinic characteristic (i.e., clinic mean beliefs and behavior regarding an MI-consistent therapeutic style) predicted implementation stage variables. Findings suggest that dissemination strategies should accommodate clinician and clinic characteristics. PMID:25934460

  17. Cost-Effectiveness of Clinical Decision Support System in Improving Maternal Health Care in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Dalaba, Maxwell Ayindenaba; Akweongo, Patricia; Aborigo, Raymond Akawire; Saronga, Happiness Pius; Williams, John; Blank, Antje; Kaltschmidt, Jens; Sauerborn, Rainer; Loukanova, Svetla

    2015-01-01

    Objective This paper investigated the cost-effectiveness of a computer-assisted Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) in the identification of maternal complications in Ghana. Methods A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed in a before- and after-intervention study. Analysis was conducted from the provider’s perspective. The intervention area was the Kassena- Nankana district where computer-assisted CDSS was used by midwives in maternal care in six selected health centres. Six selected health centers in the Builsa district served as the non-intervention group, where the normal Ghana Health Service activities were being carried out. Results Computer-assisted CDSS increased the detection of pregnancy complications during antenatal care (ANC) in the intervention health centres (before-intervention= 9 /1,000 ANC attendance; after-intervention= 12/1,000 ANC attendance; P-value=0.010). In the intervention health centres, there was a decrease in the number of complications during labour by 1.1%, though the difference was not statistically significant (before-intervention =107/1,000 labour clients; after-intervention= 96/1,000 labour clients; P-value=0.305). Also, at the intervention health centres, the average cost per pregnancy complication detected during ANC (cost –effectiveness ratio) decreased from US$17,017.58 (before-intervention) to US$15,207.5 (after-intervention). Incremental cost –effectiveness ratio (ICER) was estimated at US$1,142. Considering only additional costs (cost of computer-assisted CDSS), cost per pregnancy complication detected was US$285. Conclusions Computer –assisted CDSS has the potential to identify complications during pregnancy and marginal reduction in labour complications. Implementing computer-assisted CDSS is more costly but more effective in the detection of pregnancy complications compared to routine maternal care, hence making the decision to implement CDSS very complex. Policy makers should however be guided by whether

  18. Instruments to assess the perception of physicians in the decision-making process of specific clinical encounters: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Légaré, France; Moher, David; Elwyn, Glyn; LeBlanc, Annie; Gravel, Karine

    2007-01-01

    Background The measurement of processes and outcomes that reflect the complexity of the decision-making process within specific clinical encounters is an important area of research to pursue. A systematic review was conducted to identify instruments that assess the perception physicians have of the decision-making process within specific clinical encounters. Methods For every year available up until April 2007, PubMed, PsycINFO, Current Contents, Dissertation Abstracts and Sociological Abstracts were searched for original studies in English or French. Reference lists from retrieved studies were also consulted. Studies were included if they reported a self-administered instrument evaluating physicians' perceptions of the decision-making process within specific clinical encounters, contained sufficient description to permit critical appraisal and presented quantitative results based on administering the instrument. Two individuals independently assessed the eligibility of the instruments and abstracted information on their conceptual underpinnings, main evaluation domain, development, format, reliability, validity and responsiveness. They also assessed the quality of the studies that reported on the development of the instruments with a modified version of STARD. Results Out of 3431 records identified and screened for evaluation, 26 potentially relevant instruments were assessed; 11 met the inclusion criteria. Five instruments were published before 1995. Among those published after 1995, five offered a corresponding patient version. Overall, the main evaluation domains were: satisfaction with the clinical encounter (n = 2), mutual understanding between health professional and patient (n = 2), mental workload (n = 1), frustration with the clinical encounter (n = 1), nurse-physician collaboration (n = 1), perceptions of communication competence (n = 2), degree of comfort with a decision (n = 1) and information on medication (n = 1). For most instruments (n = 10), some

  19. Enabling Cross-Platform Clinical Decision Support through Web-Based Decision Support in Commercial Electronic Health Record Systems: Proposal and Evaluation of Initial Prototype Implementations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingyuan; Velasco, Ferdinand T.; Musser, R. Clayton; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2013-01-01

    Enabling clinical decision support (CDS) across multiple electronic health record (EHR) systems has been a desired but largely unattained aim of clinical informatics, especially in commercial EHR systems. A potential opportunity for enabling such scalable CDS is to leverage vendor-supported, Web-based CDS development platforms along with vendor-supported application programming interfaces (APIs). Here, we propose a potential staged approach for enabling such scalable CDS, starting with the use of custom EHR APIs and moving towards standardized EHR APIs to facilitate interoperability. We analyzed three commercial EHR systems for their capabilities to support the proposed approach, and we implemented prototypes in all three systems. Based on these analyses and prototype implementations, we conclude that the approach proposed is feasible, already supported by several major commercial EHR vendors, and potentially capable of enabling cross-platform CDS at scale. PMID:24551426

  20. Enabling cross-platform clinical decision support through Web-based decision support in commercial electronic health record systems: proposal and evaluation of initial prototype implementations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mingyuan; Velasco, Ferdinand T; Musser, R Clayton; Kawamoto, Kensaku

    2013-01-01

    Enabling clinical decision support (CDS) across multiple electronic health record (EHR) systems has been a desired but largely unattained aim of clinical informatics, especially in commercial EHR systems. A potential opportunity for enabling such scalable CDS is to leverage vendor-supported, Web-based CDS development platforms along with vendor-supported application programming interfaces (APIs). Here, we propose a potential staged approach for enabling such scalable CDS, starting with the use of custom EHR APIs and moving towards standardized EHR APIs to facilitate interoperability. We analyzed three commercial EHR systems for their capabilities to support the proposed approach, and we implemented prototypes in all three systems. Based on these analyses and prototype implementations, we conclude that the approach proposed is feasible, already supported by several major commercial EHR vendors, and potentially capable of enabling cross-platform CDS at scale. PMID:24551426

  1. Correlation Between the Clinical Parameters and Tissue Phenotype in Patients Affected by Deep-Infiltrating Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Vinci, Giovanna; Arkwright, Sylviane; Audebourg, Anne; Radenen, Brigitte; Chapron, Charles; Borghese, Bruno; Dousset, Bertrand; Mehats, Celine; Vaiman, Daniel; Vacher-Lavenu, Marie-Cécile; Gogusev, Jean

    2016-09-01

    The current study aimed to identify and validate an applicable immunohistochemistry panel including Ki-67, c-MYC, estrogen receptor-α (ER-α), and progesterone receptor isoforms A/B (PR-A/B) in correlation with clinicopathological parameters in patients affected by deep infiltrating endometriosis. Tissue microarrays were prepared from a cohort of 113 patients. Phenotypic profile of the panel molecules was evaluated in glands and stroma in parallel with microvessels and stroma density measurements. Principal component analysis was performed on 8 immunohistochemical variables, 2 histological variables, and 8 subgroups of clinical parameters. The immunohistochemical profiling showed consistent Ki-67 immunostaining in 17.9% of the samples and c-MYC in 83.1%, while intense ER-α immunoreactivity was detected in 84% of the samples and PR-A/B isoforms in 24.1% of them. The combination of clinical parameters and tissue phenotype allowed a stratification of endometriosis-affected patients. Such novel phenotypical and clinical correlation could be helpful in the future studies for a better stratification of the disease aiming at a personalized patient care. PMID:26994067

  2. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency--clinical course and laboratory findings in eight affected animals.

    PubMed

    Müller, K E; Bernadina, W E; Kalsbeek, H C; Hoek, A; Rutten, V P; Wentink, G H

    1994-03-01

    The clinical course of Bovine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (BLAD) in eight Holstein Friesian cattle is described. Affected animals were presented with a history of poor thriving and recurrent bacterial infections. Five of these animals had to be killed because of severe respiratory disease shortly after admittance. Three affected animals survived calfhood only as a result of frequent antibacterial treatments. At one year of age, failure to thrive and stunted growth were still evident, but infections requiring antibiotic treatments occurred only sporadically. Clinical manifestations of BLAD were found in the digestive system (gingivitis, periodontitis, alveolar periostitis, diarrhoea), the respiratory system and the skin (impaired wound healing, chronic dermatitis). A leukocytosis based on a mature neutrophilia, which persisted during infection-free periods, was observed in all animals. Granulocytes were substantially deficient of beta 2-integrin expression on their membranes. Anaemia, which was noted in four animals, may be related to the Anaemia of Inflammatory Disease Complex (AID). The serum total protein content increased with time and was associated with elevated gamma-globulin levels. We suggest that, at a certain age, animals affected with BLAD are able to cope with environmental agents due to compensatory mechanisms of the immune system. PMID:8009815

  3. Bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency--clinical course and laboratory findings in eight affected animals.

    PubMed

    Müller, K E; Bernadina, W E; Kalsbeek, H C; Hoek, A; Rutten, V P; Wentink, G H

    1994-07-01

    The clinical course of Bovine Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency (BLAD) in eight Holstein Friesian cattle is described. Affected animals were presented with a history of poor thriving and recurrent bacterial infections. Five of these animals had to be killed because of severe respiratory disease shortly after admittance. Three affected animals survived calfhood only as a result of frequent antibacterial treatments. At one year of age, failure to thrive and stunted growth were still evident, but infections requiring antibiotic treatments occurred only sporadically. Clinical manifestations of BLAD were found in the digestive system (gingivitis, periodontitis, alveolar periostitis, diarrhoea), the respiratory system and the skin (impaired wound healing, chronic dermatitis). A leukocytosis based on a mature neutrophilia, which persisted during infection-free periods, was observed in all animals. Granulocytes were substantially deficient of beta 2-integrin expression on their membranes. Anaemia, which was noted in four animals, may be related to the Anaemia of Inflammatory Disease Complex (AID). The serum total protein content increased with time and was associated with elevated gamma-globulin levels. We suggest that, at a certain age, animals affected with BLAD are able to cope with environmental agents due to compensatory mechanisms of the immune system. PMID:7985357

  4. Influence of the sFlt-1/PlGF Ratio on Clinical Decision-Making in Women with Suspected Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Evelyn; Schlembach, Dietmar; Ramoni, Angela; Langer, Elena; Bahlmann, Franz; Grill, Sabine; Schaffenrath, Helene; van der Does, Reinhard; Messinger, Diethelm; Verhagen-Kamerbeek, Wilma D. J.; Reim, Manfred; Hund, Martin; Stepan, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the influence of the soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1/placental growth factor ratio in physicians’ decision making in pregnant women with signs and symptoms of preeclampsia in routine clinical practice. Methods A multicenter, prospective, open, non-interventional study enrolled pregnant women presenting with preeclampsia signs and symptoms in several European perinatal care centers. Before the soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1/placental growth factor ratio result was known, physicians documented intended clinical procedures using an iPad® application (data locked/time stamped). After the result was available, clinical decisions were confirmed or revised and documented. An independent adjudication committee evaluated the appropriateness of decisions based on maternal/fetal outcomes. Clinician decision making with regard to hospitalization was the primary outcome. Results In 16.9% of mothers (20/118) the hospitalization decision was changed after knowledge of the ratio. In 13 women (11.0%), the initial decision to hospitalize was changed to no hospitalization. In seven women (5.9%) the revised decision was hospitalization. All revised decisions were considered appropriate by the panel of adjudicators (McNemar test; p < 0.0001). Conclusions The use of the soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1/placental growth factor test influenced clinical decision making towards appropriate hospitalization in a considerable proportion of women with suspected preeclampsia. This is the first study to demonstrate the impact of angiogenic biomarkers on decision making in a routine clinical practice. PMID:27243815

  5. A 2014 Medical Informatics Perspective on Clinical Decision Support Systems: Do We Hit The Ceiling of Effectiveness?

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, J.-B.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objective To summarize recent research and propose a selection of best papers published in 2013 in the field of computer-based decision support in health care. Method Two literature reviews were performed by the two section editors from bibliographic databases with a focus on clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) and computer provider order entry in order to select a list of candidate best papers to be peer-reviewed by external reviewers. Results The full review process highlighted three papers, illustrating current trends in the domain of clinical decision support. The first trend is the development of theoretical approaches for CDSSs, and is exemplified by a paper proposing the integration of family histories and pedigrees in a CDSS. The second trend is illustrated by well-designed CDSSs, showing good theoretical performances and acceptance, while failing to show a clinical impact. An example is given with a paper reporting on scorecards aiming to reduce adverse drug events. The third trend is represented by research works that try to understand the limits of CDSS use, for instance by analyzing interactions between general practitioners, patients, and a CDSS. Conclusions CDSSs can achieve good theoretical results in terms of sensibility and specificity, as well as a good acceptance, but evaluations often fail to demonstrate a clinical impact. Future research is needed to better understand the causes of this observation and imagine new effective solutions for CDSS implementation. PMID:25123737

  6. Transforming User Needs into Functional Requirements for an Antibiotic Clinical Decision Support System

    PubMed Central

    Bright, T.J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Many informatics studies use content analysis to generate functional requirements for system development. Explication of this translational process from qualitative data to functional requirements can strengthen the understanding and scientific rigor when applying content analysis in informatics studies. Objective To describe a user-centered approach transforming emergent themes derived from focus group data into functional requirements for informatics solutions and to illustrate these methods to the development of an antibiotic clinical decision support system (CDS). Methods The approach consisted of five steps: 1) identify unmet therapeutic planning information needs via Focus Group Study-I, 2) develop a coding framework of therapeutic planning themes to refine the domain scope to antibiotic therapeutic planning, 3) identify functional requirements of an antibiotic CDS system via Focus Group Study-II, 4) discover informatics solutions and functional requirements from coded data, and 5) determine the types of information needed to support the antibiotic CDS system and link with the identified informatics solutions and functional requirements. Results The coding framework for Focus Group Study-I revealed unmet therapeutic planning needs. Twelve subthemes emerged and were clustered into four themes; analysis indicated a need for an antibiotic CDS intervention. Focus Group Study-II included five types of information needs. Comments from the Barrier/Challenge to information access and Function/Feature themes produced three informatics solutions and 13 functional requirements of an antibiotic CDS system. Comments from the Patient, Institution, and Domain themes generated required data elements for each informatics solution. Conclusion This study presents one example explicating content analysis of focus group data and the analysis process to functional requirements from narrative data. Illustration of this 5-step method was used to develop an

  7. The ethics of forgoing life-sustaining treatment: theoretical considerations and clinical decision making.

    PubMed

    Welie, Jos Vm; Ten Have, Henk Amj

    2014-01-01

    Withholding or withdrawing a life-sustaining treatment tends to be very challenging for health care providers, patients, and their family members alike. When a patient's life seems to be nearing its end, it is generally felt that the morally best approach is to try a new intervention, continue all treatments, attempt an experimental course of action, in short, do something. In contrast to this common practice, the authors argue that in most instances, the morally safer route is actually to forgo life-sustaining treatments, particularly when their likelihood to effectuate a truly beneficial outcome has become small relative to the odds of harming the patient. The ethical analysis proceeds in three stages. First, the difference between neglectful omission and passive acquiescence is explained. Next, the two necessary conditions for any medical treatment, i.e., that it is medically indicated and that consent is obtained, are applied to life-sustaining interventions. Finally, the difference between withholding and withdrawing a life-sustaining treatment is discussed. In the second part of the paper the authors show how these theoretical-ethical considerations can guide clinical-ethical decision making. A case vignette is presented about a patient who cannot be weaned off the ventilator post-surgery. The ethical analysis of this case proceeds through three stages. First, it is shown that and why withdrawal of the ventilator in this case does not equate assistance in suicide or euthanasia. Next, the question is raised whether continued ventilation can be justified medically, or has become futile. Finally, the need for the health care team to obtain consent for the continuation of the ventilation is discussed. PMID:24618004

  8. Demographic and Clinical Findings in Pediatric Patients Affected by Organic Acidemia

    PubMed Central

    NAJAFI, Reza; HASHEMIPOUR, Mahin; MOSTOFIZADEH, Neda; GHAZAVI, Mohammadreza; NASIRI, Jafar; SHAHSANAI, Armindokht; FAMORI, Fatemeh; NAJAFI, Fatemeh; MOAFI, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objective Metabolic disorders, which involve many different organs, can be ascribed to enzyme deficiency or dysfunction and manifest with a wide range of clinical symptoms. This study evaluated some of the demographic and clinical findings in pediatric patients affected by organic acidemia. Materials & Methods This cross-sectional study was part of a larger study conducted in patients with metabolic disorders during a period of 7 years from 2007 to 2014 in Isfahan Province, Iran. Our study covered a wide range of cases from newborn infants (one-week old) to adolescents (children up to the age of 17 years). This study evaluated patients’ demographic information, history of disease, developmental and educational status, clinical and general conditions. Phone and in-person interviews were used to gather information. Results Out of 5100 patients screened in this study, 392 patients were affected by one of the different metabolic disorders and 167 individuals were diagnosed as organic acidemia. Propionic acidemia/methyl malonic acidemia (PA/MMA) was the most prevalent form of this metabolic disorder. The frequency of consanguinity was 84.7% in the group of patients. The mortality rate was 18.8% in patients with organic academia. Conclusion Each of the metabolic diseases, as a separate entity, is rare; nevertheless, in aggregate they have a somewhat high overall prevalence. These diseases result in mental and developmental disorders in the absence of quick diagnosis and initiation of treatment. Furthermore, more mutations should be identified in societies affected by consanguinity. Further research should also be conducted to determine worthwhile and more-efficient screening methods as well as long term neurological prognosis. PMID:27247587

  9. Graphic Warning Labels Elicit Affective and Thoughtful Responses from Smokers: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Abigail T.; Peters, Ellen; Strasser, Andrew A.; Emery, Lydia F.; Sheerin, Kaitlin M.; Romer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective Observational research suggests that placing graphic images on cigarette warning labels can reduce smoking rates, but field studies lack experimental control. Our primary objective was to determine the psychological processes set in motion by naturalistic exposure to graphic vs. text-only warnings in a randomized clinical trial involving exposure to modified cigarette packs over a 4-week period. Theories of graphic-warning impact were tested by examining affect toward smoking, credibility of warning information, risk perceptions, quit intentions, warning label memory, and smoking risk knowledge. Methods Adults who smoked between 5 and 40 cigarettes daily (N = 293; mean age = 33.7), did not have a contra-indicated medical condition, and did not intend to quit were recruited from Philadelphia, PA and Columbus, OH. Smokers were randomly assigned to receive their own brand of cigarettes for four weeks in one of three warning conditions: text only, graphic images plus text, or graphic images with elaborated text. Results Data from 244 participants who completed the trial were analyzed in structural-equation models. The presence of graphic images (compared to text-only) caused more negative affect toward smoking, a process that indirectly influenced risk perceptions and quit intentions (e.g., image->negative affect->risk perception->quit intention). Negative affect from graphic images also enhanced warning credibility including through increased scrutiny of the warnings, a process that also indirectly affected risk perceptions and quit intentions (e.g., image->negative affect->risk scrutiny->warning credibility->risk perception->quit intention). Unexpectedly, elaborated text reduced warning credibility. Finally, graphic warnings increased warning-information recall and indirectly increased smoking-risk knowledge at the end of the trial and one month later. Conclusions In the first naturalistic clinical trial conducted, graphic warning labels are more effective

  10. Effective NSAID treatment indicates that hyperprostaglandinism is affecting the clinical severity of childhood hypophosphatasia

    PubMed Central

    Girschick, HJ; Schneider, P; Haubitz, I; Hiort, O; Collmann, H; Beer, M; Shin, YS; Seyberth, HW

    2006-01-01

    Background Hypophosphatasia (HP) is an inborn error of bone metabolism characterized by a genetic defect in the gene encoding the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNSALP). There is a lack of knowledge as to how the variability and clinical severity of the HP phenotype (especially pain and walking impairment) are related to metabolic disturbances or impairments, subsequent to the molecular defect. Methods We analyzed the changes in clinical symptoms and the prostaglandin (PG) metabolism in response to treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in six children affected by childhood HP. In addition, by exposing HP fibroblasts to pyridoxal phosphate and/or calcium pyrophosphate in vitro, we analyzed whether the alterations in PG levels are sequelae related to the metabolic defect. Results Childhood HP patients, who often complain about pain in the lower limbs without evident fractures, have systemic hyperprostaglandinism. Symptomatic anti-inflammatory treatment with NSAIDs significantly improved pain-associated physical impairment. Calcium pyrophosphate, but not pyridoxal phosphate, induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene expression and PG production in HP and normal fibroblasts in vitro. Conclusion Clinical features of childhood HP related to pain in the lower legs may be, at least in part, sequelae related to elevated PG levels, secondary to the primary metabolic defect. Consequently, NSAID treatment does improve the clinical features of childhood HP. PMID:16803637

  11. Effort-Based Decision-Making Paradigms for Clinical Trials in Schizophrenia: Part 2—External Validity and Correlates.

    PubMed

    Horan, William P; Reddy, L Felice; Barch, Deanna M; Buchanan, Robert W; Dunayevich, Eduardo; Gold, James M; Marder, Steven R; Wynn, Jonathan K; Young, Jared W; Green, Michael F

    2015-09-01

    Effort-based decision making has strong conceptual links to the motivational disturbances that define a key subdomain of negative symptoms. However, the extent to which effort-based decision-making performance relates to negative symptoms, and other clinical and functionally important variables has yet to be systematically investigated. In 94 clinically stable outpatients with schizophrenia, we examined the external validity of 5 effort-based paradigms, including the Effort Expenditure for Rewards, Balloon Effort, Grip Strength Effort, Deck Choice Effort, and Perceptual Effort tasks. These tasks covered 3 types of effort: physical, cognitive, and perceptual. Correlations between effort related performance and 6 classes of variables were examined, including: (1) negative symptoms, (2) clinically rated motivation and community role functioning, (3) self-reported motivational traits, (4) neurocognition, (5) other psychiatric symptoms and clinical/demographic characteristics, and (6) subjective valuation of monetary rewards. Effort paradigms showed small to medium relationships to clinical ratings of negative symptoms, motivation, and functioning, with the pattern more consistent for some measures than others. They also showed small to medium relations with neurocognitive functioning, but were generally unrelated to other psychiatric symptoms, self-reported traits, antipsychotic medications, side effects, and subjective valuation of money. There were relatively strong interrelationships among the effort measures. In conjunction with findings from a companion psychometric article, all the paradigms warrant further consideration and development, and 2 show the strongest potential for clinical trial use at this juncture. PMID:26209546

  12. Effort-Based Decision-Making Paradigms for Clinical Trials in Schizophrenia: Part 2—External Validity and Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, L. Felice; Barch, Deanna M.; Buchanan, Robert W.; Dunayevich, Eduardo; Gold, James M.; Marder, Steven R.; Wynn, Jonathan K.; Young, Jared W.; Green, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Effort-based decision making has strong conceptual links to the motivational disturbances that define a key subdomain of negative symptoms. However, the extent to which effort-based decision-making performance relates to negative symptoms, and other clinical and functionally important variables has yet to be systematically investigated. In 94 clinically stable outpatients with schizophrenia, we examined the external validity of 5 effort-based paradigms, including the Effort Expenditure for Rewards, Balloon Effort, Grip Strength Effort, Deck Choice Effort, and Perceptual Effort tasks. These tasks covered 3 types of effort: physical, cognitive, and perceptual. Correlations between effort related performance and 6 classes of variables were examined, including: (1) negative symptoms, (2) clinically rated motivation and community role functioning, (3) self-reported motivational traits, (4) neurocognition, (5) other psychiatric symptoms and clinical/demographic characteristics, and (6) subjective valuation of monetary rewards. Effort paradigms showed small to medium relationships to clinical ratings of negative symptoms, motivation, and functioning, with the pattern more consistent for some measures than others. They also showed small to medium relations with neurocognitive functioning, but were generally unrelated to other psychiatric symptoms, self-reported traits, antipsychotic medications, side effects, and subjective valuation of money. There were relatively strong interrelationships among the effort measures. In conjunction with findings from a companion psychometric article, all the paradigms warrant further consideration and development, and 2 show the strongest potential for clinical trial use at this juncture. PMID:26209546

  13. Broad Clinical Involvement in a Family Affected by the Fragile X Premutation

    PubMed Central

    CHONCHAIYA, WEERASAK; UTARI, AGUSTINI; PEREIRA, GABRIELA MARQUES; TASSONE, FLORA; HESSL, DAVID; HAGERMAN, RANDI J.

    2009-01-01

    The mutations in the FMR1 gene have been described as a family of disorders called fragile X-associated disorders (FXD) including fragile X syndrome (FXS), fragile X-associated tremor/ ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), primary ovarian insufficiency and other problems associated with the premutation, such as hypothyroidism, hypertension, neuropathy, anxiety, depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorders and autism spectrum disorders. The premutation is relatively common in the general population affecting 1 of 130–250 female individuals and 1 of 250–800 male individuals. Therefore, to provide appropriate treatment and genetic counseling for all of the carriers and affected individuals in a family, a detailed family history that reviews many of the disorders that are related to both the premutation and the full mutation should be carried out as exemplified in these cases. To facilitate the integration of this knowledge into clinical practice, this is the first case report that demonstrates only premutation involvement across 3 generations. PMID:19996900

  14. Broad clinical involvement in a family affected by the fragile X premutation.

    PubMed

    Chonchaiya, Weerasak; Utari, Agustini; Pereira, Gabriela Marques; Tassone, Flora; Hessl, David; Hagerman, Randi J

    2009-12-01

    The mutations in the FMR1 gene have been described as a family of disorders called fragile X-associated disorders including fragile X syndrome, fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome, primary ovarian insufficiency, and other problems associated with the premutation, such as hypothyroidism, hypertension, neuropathy, anxiety, depression, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorders, and autism spectrum disorders. The premutation is relatively common in the general population affecting 1 of 130 to 250 female individuals and 1 of 250 to 800 male individuals. Therefore, to provide appropriate treatment and genetic counseling for all of the carriers and affected individuals in a family, a detailed family history that reviews many of the disorders that are related to both the premutation and the full mutation should be carried out as exemplified in these cases. To facilitate the integration of this knowledge into clinical practice, this is the first case report that demonstrates only premutation involvement across 3 generations. PMID:19996900

  15. A Clinical Decision Rule to Predict Adult Patients with Traumatic Intracranial Hemorrhage Who Do Not Require Intensive Care Unit Admission

    PubMed Central

    Nishijima, Daniel K.; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Echeverri, Angela; Holmes, James F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To derive a clinical decision rule to identify adult emergency department (ED) patients with traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (tICH) who are at low risk for requiring critical care resources during hospitalization. Methods This is a retrospective cohort study of patients (≥18 years) with tICH presenting to the ED. The need for intensive care unit (ICU) admission was defined as the presence of a critical care intervention including: intubation, neurosurgical intervention, blood product transfusion, vasopressor or inotrope administration, invasive monitoring for hemodynamic instability, emergent treatment for arrhythmia, therapeutic angiography, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The decision rule was derived using binary recursive partitioning. Results A total of 432 patients were identified (median age 48 years) of which 174 patients (40%) had a critical care intervention. We performed binary recursive partitioning with Classification and Regression Trees (CART) software to develop the clinical decision rule. Patients with a normal mental status (Glasgow Coma Score=15), isolated head injury, and age < 65 were considered low risk for a critical care intervention. The derived rule had a sensitivity of 98% (95% confidence interval [CI] 94–99), a specificity of 50% (95% CI 44–56), a positive predictive value of 57% (95% CI 51–62), and a negative predictive value of 97% (95% CI 93–99). The area under the curve for the decision rule was 0.74 (95% CI 0.70–0.77). Conclusions This clinical decision rule identifies low risk adult ED patients with tICH who do not need ICU admission. Further validation and refinement of these findings would allow for more appropriate ICU resource utilization. PMID:21839444

  16. Using a service oriented architecture approach to clinical decision support: performance results from two CDS Consortium demonstrations.

    PubMed

    Paterno, Marilyn D; Goldberg, Howard S; Simonaitis, Linas; Dixon, Brian E; Wright, Adam; Rocha, Beatriz H; Ramelson, Harley Z; Middleton, Blackford

    2012-01-01

    The Clinical Decision Support Consortium has completed two demonstration trials involving a web service for the execution of clinical decision support (CDS) rules in one or more electronic health record (EHR) systems. The initial trial ran in a local EHR at Partners HealthCare. A second EHR site, associated with Wishard Memorial Hospital, Indianapolis, IN, was added in the second trial. Data were gathered during each 6 month period and analyzed to assess performance, reliability, and response time in the form of means and standard deviations for all technical components of the service, including assembling and preparation of input data. The mean service call time for each period was just over 2 seconds. In this paper we report on the findings and analysis to date while describing the areas for further analysis and optimization as we continue to expand our use of a Services Oriented Architecture approach for CDS across multiple institutions. PMID:23304342

  17. Clinical decision making in a high-risk primary care environment: a qualitative study in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Heneghan, Carl; Thompson, Matthew; Balla, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Objective Examine clinical reasoning and decision making in an out of hours (OOH) primary care setting to gain insights into how general practitioners (GPs) make clinical decisions and manage risk in this environment. Design Semi-structured interviews using open-ended questions. Setting A 2-month qualitative interview study conducted in Oxfordshire, UK. Participants 21 GPs working in OOH primary care. Results The most powerful themes to emerge related to dealing with urgent potentially high-risk cases, keeping patients safe and responding to their needs, while trying to keep patients out of hospital and the concept of ‘fire fighting’. There were a number of well-defined characteristics that GPs reported making presentations easy or difficult to deal with. Severely ill patients were straightforward, while the older people, with complex multisystem diseases, were often difficult. GPs stopped collecting clinical information and came to clinical decisions when high-risk disease and severe illness requiring hospital attention has been excluded; they had responded directly to the patient's needs and there was a reliable safety net in place. Learning points that GPs identified as important for trainees in the OOH setting included the importance of developing rapport in spite of time pressures, learning to deal with uncertainty and learning about common presentations with a focus on critical cues to exclude severe illness. Conclusions The findings support suggestions that improvements in primary care OOH could be achieved by including automated and regular timely feedback system for GPs and individual peer and expert clinician support for GPs with regular meetings to discuss recent cases. In addition, trainee support and mentoring to focus on clinical skills, knowledge and risk management issues specific to OOH is currently required. Investigating the stopping rules used for diagnostic closure may provide new insights into the root causes of clinical error in such a

  18. Mentoring in the Clinical Setting to Improve Student Decision-Making Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stick-Mueller, Misty; Boesch, Ron; Silverman, Steven; Carpenter, Scott; Illingworth, Robert; Countryman, James

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The physician-intern relationship can be difficult to develop. A new chiropractic intern in a teaching clinic undergoes a major transition from classroom to clinical practice and must learn to turn classroom knowledge into clinical application. The ability to start formulating clinical techniques and apply them on a patient is…

  19. Implementation of Clinical Pharmacogenomics within a Large Health System: From Electronic Health Record Decision Support to Consultation Services.

    PubMed

    Hicks, J Kevin; Stowe, David; Willner, Marc A; Wai, Maya; Daly, Thomas; Gordon, Steven M; Lashner, Bret A; Parikh, Sumit; White, Robert; Teng, Kathryn; Moss, Timothy; Erwin, Angelika; Chalmers, Jeffrey; Eng, Charis; Knoer, Scott

    2016-08-01

    The number of clinically relevant gene-based guidelines and recommendations pertaining to drug prescribing continues to grow. Incorporating gene-drug interaction information into the drug-prescribing process can help optimize pharmacotherapy outcomes and improve patient safety. However, pharmacogenomic implementation barriers exist such as integration of pharmacogenomic results into electronic health records (EHRs), development and deployment of pharmacogenomic decision support tools to EHRs, and feasible models for establishing ambulatory pharmacogenomic clinics. We describe the development of pharmacist-managed pharmacogenomic services within a large health system. The Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium guidelines for HLA-B*57:01-abacavir, HLA-B*15:02-carbamazepine, and TPMT-thiopurines (i.e., azathioprine, mercaptopurine, and thioguanine) were systematically integrated into patient care. Sixty-three custom rules and alerts (20 for TPMT-thiopurines, 8 for HLA-B*57:01-abacavir, and 35 for HLA-B*15:02-anticonvulsants) were developed and deployed to the EHR for the purpose of providing point-of-care pharmacogenomic decision support. In addition, a pharmacist and physician-geneticist collaboration established a pharmacogenomics ambulatory clinic. This clinic provides genetic testing when warranted, result interpretation along with pharmacotherapy recommendations, and patient education. Our processes for developing these pharmacogenomic services and solutions for addressing implementation barriers are presented. PMID:27312955

  20. Use of conditional rule structure to automate clinical decision support: a comparison of artificial intelligence and deterministic programming techniques.

    PubMed

    Friedman, R H; Frank, A D

    1983-08-01

    A rule-based computer system was developed to perform clinical decision-making support within a medical information system, oncology practice, and clinical research. This rule-based system, which has been programmed using deterministic rules, possesses features of generalizability, modularity of structure, convenience in rule acquisition, explanability, and utility for patient care and teaching, features which have been identified as advantages of artificial intelligence (AI) rule-based systems. Formal rules are primarily represented as conditional statements; common conditions and actions are stored in system dictionaries so that they can be recalled at any time to form new decision rules. Important similarities and differences exist in the structure of this system and clinical computer systems utilizing artificial intelligence (AI) production rule techniques. The non-AI rule-based system possesses advantages in cost and ease of implementation. The degree to which significant medical decision problems can be solved by this technique remains uncertain as does whether the more complex AI methodologies will be required. PMID:6352165

  1. Randomised controlled trial of clinical decision support tools to improve learning of evidence based medicine in medical students

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Gabriel M; Johnston, Janice M; Tin, Keith Y K; Wong, Irene O L; Ho, Lai-Ming; Lam, Wendy W T; Lam, Tai-Hing

    2003-01-01

    Objective To assess the educational effectiveness on learning evidence based medicine of a handheld computer clinical decision support tool compared with a pocket card containing guidelines and a control. Design Randomised controlled trial. Setting University of Hong Kong, 2001. Participants 169 fourth year medical students. Main outcome measures Factor and individual item scores from a validated questionnaire on five key self reported measures: personal application and current use of evidence based medicine; future use of evidence based medicine; use of evidence during and after clerking patients; frequency of discussing the role of evidence during teaching rounds; and self perceived confidence in clinical decision making. Results The handheld computer improved participants' educational experience with evidence based medicine the most, with significant improvements in all outcome scores. More modest improvements were found with the pocket card, whereas the control group showed no appreciable changes in any of the key outcomes. No significant deterioration was observed in the improvements even after withdrawal of the handheld computer during an eight week washout period, suggesting at least short term sustainability of effects. Conclusions Rapid and convenient access to valid and relevant evidence on a portable computing device can improve learning in evidence based medicine, increase current and future use of evidence, and boost students' confidence in clinical decision making. PMID:14604933

  2. Design and Development of a Sharable Clinical Decision Support System Based on a Semantic Web Service Framework.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Gou, Ling; Tian, Yu; Li, Tian-Chang; Zhang, Mao; Li, Jing-Song

    2016-05-01

    Clinical decision support (CDS) systems provide clinicians and other health care stakeholders with patient-specific assessments or recommendations to aid in the clinical decision-making process. Despite their demonstrated potential for improving health care quality, the widespread availability of CDS systems has been limited mainly by the difficulty and cost of sharing CDS knowledge among heterogeneous healthcare information systems. The purpose of this study was to design and develop a sharable clinical decision support (S-CDS) system that meets this challenge. The fundamental knowledge base consists of independent and reusable knowledge modules (KMs) to meet core CDS needs, wherein each KM is semantically well defined based on the standard information model, terminologies, and representation formalisms. A semantic web service framework was developed to identify, access, and leverage these KMs across diverse CDS applications and care settings. The S-CDS system has been validated in two distinct client CDS applications. Model-level evaluation results confirmed coherent knowledge representation. Application-level evaluation results reached an overall accuracy of 98.66 % and a completeness of 96.98 %. The evaluation results demonstrated the technical feasibility and application prospect of our approach. Compared with other CDS engineering efforts, our approach facilitates system development and implementation and improves system maintainability, scalability and efficiency, which contribute to the widespread adoption of effective CDS within the healthcare domain. PMID:27002818

  3. Barriers to implementation of a computerized decision support system for depression: an observational report on lessons learned in "real world" clinical settings

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite wide promotion, clinical practice guidelines have had limited effect in changing physician behavior. Effective implementation strategies to date have included: multifaceted interventions involving audit and feedback, local consensus processes, marketing; reminder systems, either manual or computerized; and interactive educational meetings. In addition, there is now growing evidence that contextual factors affecting implementation must be addressed such as organizational support (leadership procedures and resources) for the change and strategies to implement and maintain new systems. Methods To examine the feasibility and effectiveness of implementation of a computerized decision support system for depression (CDSS-D) in routine public mental health care in Texas, fifteen study clinicians (thirteen physicians and two advanced nurse practitioners) participated across five sites, accruing over 300 outpatient visits on 168 patients. Results Issues regarding computer literacy and hardware/software requirements were identified as initial barriers. Clinicians also reported concerns about negative impact on workflow and the potential need for duplication during the transition from paper to electronic systems of medical record keeping. Conclusion The following narrative report based on observations obtained during the initial testing and use of a CDSS-D in clinical settings further emphasizes the importance of taking into account organizational factors when planning implementation of evidence-based guidelines or decision support within a system. PMID:19159458

  4. Personalised Medicine Possible With Real-Time Integration of Genomic and Clinical Data To Inform Clinical Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Turner, Maureen; Johnstone, Alice; Heffer, Leon; Rafael, Naomi; Bakker, Tim; Thorne, Natalie; Macciocca, Ivan; Gaff, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Despite widespread use of genomic sequencing in research, there are gaps in our understanding of the performance and provision of genomic sequencing in clinical practice. The Melbourne Genomics Health Alliance (the Alliance), has been established to determine the feasibility, performance and impact of using genomic sequencing as a diagnostic tool. The Alliance has partnered with BioGrid Australia to enable the linkage of genomic sequencing, clinical treatment and outcome data for this project. This integrated dataset of genetic, clinical and patient sourced information will be used by the Alliance to evaluate the potential diagnostic value of genomic sequencing in routine clinical practice. This project will allow the Alliance to provide recommendations to facilitate the integration of genomic sequencing into clinical practice to enable personalised disease treatment. PMID:26262351

  5. Emotion malleability beliefs, emotion regulation, and psychopathology: Integrating affective and clinical science.

    PubMed

    Kneeland, Elizabeth T; Dovidio, John F; Joormann, Jutta; Clark, Margaret S

    2016-04-01

    Beliefs that individuals hold about whether emotions are malleable or fixed, also referred to as emotion malleability beliefs, may play a crucial role in individuals' emotional experiences and their engagement in changing their emotions. The current review integrates affective science and clinical science perspectives to provide a comprehensive review of how emotion malleability beliefs relate to emotionality, emotion regulation, and specific clinical disorders and treatment. Specifically, we discuss how holding more malleable views of emotion could be associated with more active emotion regulation efforts, greater motivation to engage in active regulatory efforts, more effort expended regulating emotions, and lower levels of pathological distress. In addition, we explain how extending emotion malleability beliefs into the clinical domain can complement and extend current conceptualizations of major depressive disorder, social anxiety disorder, and generalized anxiety disorder. This may prove important given the increasingly central role emotion dysregulation has been given in conceptualization and intervention for these psychiatric conditions. Additionally, discussion focuses on how emotion beliefs could be more explicitly addressed in existing cognitive therapies. Promising future directions for research are identified throughout the review. PMID:27086086

  6. Usability of clinical decision support system as a facilitator for learning the assistive technology adaptation process.

    PubMed

    Danial-Saad, Alexandra; Kuflik, Tsvi; Weiss, Patrice L Tamar; Schreuer, Naomi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usability of Ontology Supported Computerized Assistive Technology Recommender (OSCAR), a Clinical Decision Support System (CDSS) for the assistive technology adaptation process, its impact on learning the matching process, and to determine the relationship between its usability and learnability. Two groups of expert and novice clinicians (total, n = 26) took part in this study. Each group filled out system usability scale (SUS) to evaluate OSCAR's usability. The novice group completed a learning questionnaire to assess OSCAR's effect on their ability to learn the matching process. Both groups rated OSCAR's usability as "very good", (M [SUS] = 80.7, SD = 11.6, median = 83.7) by the novices, and (M [SUS] = 81.2, SD = 6.8, median = 81.2) by the experts. The Mann-Whitney results indicated that no significant differences were found between the expert and novice groups in terms of OSCAR's usability. A significant positive correlation existed between the usability of OSCAR and the ability to learn the adaptation process (rs = 0.46, p = 0.04). Usability is an important factor in the acceptance of a system. The successful application of user-centered design principles during the development of OSCAR may serve as a case study that models the significant elements to be considered, theoretically and practically in developing other systems. Implications for Rehabilitation Creating a CDSS with a focus on its usability is an important factor for its acceptance by its users. Successful usability outcomes can impact the learning process of the subject matter in general, and the AT prescription process in particular. The successful application of User-Centered Design principles during the development of OSCAR may serve as a case study that models the significant elements to be considered, theoretically and practically. The study emphasizes the importance of close collaboration between the developers and

  7. Metabolic issues in patients affected by schizophrenia: clinical characteristics and medical management

    PubMed Central

    Ventriglio, Antonio; Gentile, Alessandro; Stella, Eleonora; Bellomo, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    Patients affected by psychotic disorders are more likely to develop high rates of co-morbidities, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemias, hypertension, metabolic syndrome, myocardial infarction, stroke etc., in the long-term. These morbidities have a significant impact on the life-expectancy of these patients. Patients with chronic psychoses show a 2–3-fold increased risk of death mostly from cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Although there may be an independent link, between schizophrenia and metabolic conditions the cardio-metabolic risk is mostly related to an unhealthy lifestyle and the usage of antipsychotic agents (especially Second Generation Antipsychotics or atypical) even when these remain effective treatments in the management of major psychoses. Recently, many international organizations have developed screening and monitoring guidelines for the control of modifiable risk factors in order to reduce the rate of co-morbidity and mortality among patients affected by schizophrenia. This paper is a review of current knowledge about the metabolic issues of patients affected by schizophrenia and describes clinical characteristics and medical management strategies for such conditions. PMID:26388714

  8. Helping patients make better decisions: how to apply behavioral economics in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, Maureen Reni; Spivey, Christy; Daniel, Kathy M

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians are committed to effectively educating patients and helping them to make sound decisions concerning their own health care. However, how do clinicians determine what is effective education? How do they present information clearly and in a manner that patients understand and can use to make informed decisions? Behavioral economics (BE) is a subfield of economics that can assist clinicians to better understand how individuals actually make decisions. BE research can help guide interactions with patients so that information is presented and discussed in a more deliberate and impactful way. We can be more effective providers of care when we understand the factors that influence how our patients make decisions, factors of which we may have been largely unaware. BE research that focuses on health care and medical decision making is becoming more widely known, and what has been reported suggests that BE interventions can be effective in the medical realm. The purpose of this article is to provide clinicians with an overview of BE decision science and derived practice strategies to promote more effective behavior change in patients. PMID:25378915

  9. How Performance Information Affects Human-Capital Investment Decisions: The Impact of Test-Score Labels on Educational Outcomes. NBER Working Paper No. 17120

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papay, John P.; Murnane, Richard J.; Willett, John B.

    2011-01-01

    Students receive abundant information about their educational performance, but how this information affects future educational-investment decisions is not well understood. Increasingly common sources of information are state-mandated standardized tests. On these tests, students receive a score and a label that summarizes their performance. Using a…

  10. Factors that Affect the Decision of Refugee and Immigrant Students to Pursue Higher Education in Tennessee: The Case of Egyptian, Somali, Kurdish and Mexican Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weldegebriel, Mengistu H.

    2011-01-01

    Refugee and immigrant students face challenges in pursuing higher education. This study examined factors that affect the decision of refugees and immigrant students to pursue higher education in Tennessee. The factors included cultural capital these students acquire from their parents and families; cultural difference they have with the mainstream…

  11. Can You Hear Me? The Right of Young Children to Participate in Decisions Affecting Them. Working Papers in Early Childhood Development, No. 36

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansdown, Gerison

    2005-01-01

    "Can You Hear Me? The Right of Young Children to Participate in Decisions Affecting Them" emphasises that participation enhances children's self-esteem and confidence, promotes their overall capacities, produces better outcomes, strengthens understanding of and commitment to democratic processes and protects children more effectively.…

  12. Clinical Integration and How It Affects Student Retention in Undergraduate Athletic Training Programs

    PubMed Central

    Young, Allison; Klossner, Joanne; Docherty, Carrie L; Dodge, Thomas M; Mensch, James M

    2013-01-01

    Context A better understanding of why students leave an undergraduate athletic training education program (ATEP), as well as why they persist, is critical in determining the future membership of our profession. Objective To better understand how clinical experiences affect student retention in undergraduate ATEPs. Design Survey-based research using a quantitative and qualitative mixed-methods approach. Setting Three-year undergraduate ATEPs across District 4 of the National Athletic Trainers' Association. Patients or Other Participants Seventy-one persistent students and 23 students who left the ATEP prematurely. Data Collection and Analysis Data were collected using a modified version of the Athletic Training Education Program Student Retention Questionnaire. Multivariate analysis of variance was performed on the quantitative data, followed by a univariate analysis of variance on any significant findings. The qualitative data were analyzed through inductive content analysis. Results A difference was identified between the persister and dropout groups (Pillai trace = 0.42, F1,92 = 12.95, P = .01). The follow-up analysis of variance revealed that the persister and dropout groups differed on the anticipatory factors (F1,92 = 4.29, P = .04), clinical integration (F1,92 = 6.99, P = .01), and motivation (F1,92 = 43.12, P = .01) scales. Several themes emerged in the qualitative data, including networks of support, authentic experiential learning, role identity, time commitment, and major or career change. Conclusions A perceived difference exists in how athletic training students are integrated into their clinical experiences between those students who leave an ATEP and those who stay. Educators may improve retention by emphasizing authentic experiential learning opportunities rather than hours worked, by allowing students to take on more responsibility, and by facilitating networks of support within clinical education experiences. PMID:23672327

  13. Analysis of donor heterogeneity as a factor affecting the clinical outcome of oocyte donation.

    PubMed

    Harris, Sarah E; Faddy, Malcolm; Levett, Stephen; Sharma, Vinay; Gosden, Roger

    2002-11-01

    This study investigated factors that may affect the clinical outcome of oocyte donation on the basis of data from a clinical programme involving 243 treatment cycles analysed retrospectively. In each cohort, oocytes were distributed randomly to one, two or three recipients, which enabled the outcomes in terms of pregnancy and live birth rates to be compared among donors. The results were compared with respect to age of the donor and recipient, number of oocytes collected, fertilization and cleavage rates, qualitative embryo criteria (morphological grade) and other clinical criteria. Most variables ha