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Sample records for affect colony morphology

  1. Colony formation and morphology in Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Kurtti, T J; Munderloh, U G; Johnson, R C; Ahlstrand, G G

    1987-11-01

    Two strains of Borrelia burgdorferi, B31 and 297, formed colonies when plated onto Barbour-Stoenner-Kelly medium solidified with agarose (1.3%) and incubated in a candle jar at 34 degrees C. Colonies differing in morphology were observed in both strains after 2 to 3 weeks of incubation. Strain B31 colonies were either compact, round (mean diameter, 0.43 mm), and restricted to the surface of the agarose medium or diffuse (mean diameter, 1.80 mm) and penetrating into the solid medium. Strain 297 colonies (mean diameter, 1.43 mm) either showed a raised center surrounded by a diffuse ring of spirochetes or consisted of numerous small spirochetal aggregates. Both colony types expanded into the agarose medium. Scanning electron and light microscopy confirmed that the colonies were formed by spirochetes. Twisted tangles of intertwined spirochetes were visible on the surface, with numerous spherical bodies among them, especially in the central regions. At the periphery, the borreliae were more loosely packed, and individual coils were discernible. PMID:3693538

  2. Modelling the morphology of migrating bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, A.; Tokihiro, T.; Badoual, M.; Grammaticos, B.

    2010-08-01

    We present a model which aims at describing the morphology of colonies of Proteus mirabilis and Bacillus subtilis. Our model is based on a cellular automaton which is obtained by the adequate discretisation of a diffusion-like equation, describing the migration of the bacteria, to which we have added rules simulating the consolidation process. Our basic assumption, following the findings of the group of Chuo University, is that the migration and consolidation processes are controlled by the local density of the bacteria. We show that it is possible within our model to reproduce the morphological diagrams of both bacteria species. Moreover, we model some detailed experiments done by the Chuo University group, obtaining a fine agreement.

  3. Disruption of the pdhB Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Gene Affects Colony Morphology, In Vitro Growth and Cell Invasiveness of Mycoplasma agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Shivanand; Rosengarten, Renate; Chopra-Dewasthaly, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of available substrates, the metabolic potential and the growth rates of bacteria can play significant roles in their pathogenicity. This study concentrates on Mycoplasma agalactiae, which causes significant economic losses through its contribution to contagious agalactia in small ruminants by as yet unknown mechanisms. This lack of knowledge is primarily due to its fastidious growth requirements and the scarcity of genetic tools available for its manipulation and analysis. Transposon mutagenesis of M. agalactiae type strain PG2 resulted in several disruptions throughout the genome. A mutant defective in growth in vitro was found to have a transposon insertion in the pdhB gene, which encodes a component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex. This growth difference was quite significant during the actively dividing logarithmic phase but a gradual recovery was observed as the cells approached stationary phase. The mutant also exhibited a different and smaller colony morphology compared to the wild type strain PG2. For complementation, pdhAB was cloned downstream of a strong vpma promoter and upstream of a lacZ reporter gene in a newly constructed complementation vector. When transformed with this vector the pdhB mutant recovered its normal growth and colony morphology. Interestingly, the pdhB mutant also had significantly reduced invasiveness in HeLa cells, as revealed by double immunofluorescence staining. This deficiency was recovered in the complemented strain, which had invasiveness comparable to that of PG2. Taken together, these data indicate that pyruvate dehydrogenase might be an important player in infection with and colonization by M. agalactiae. PMID:25799063

  4. The affect of low-coherent light on microbial colony forming ability and morphology of some gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Denis E.; Tuchina, Elena S.; Chernova, Julia A.; Podshibyakin, Dmitry; Rudik, Dmitry V.; Samsonova, Maria; Gromov, Igor; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2005-06-01

    Gram-negative E. coli, gram-positive facultative anaerobe cocci Staphylococcus lugdensis, Micrococcus halobius, and Stomatococcus mucilaginosus as subjects of study were chosen. LEDs with spectrum maxima at 405 nm (without any exogenous sensitizer) and 660 nm (in conjunction with methylene blue) and power densities of 23 mW/cm2 and 5.7 mW/cm2 accordingly as continuous light sources were chosen. Photosensitized light's affect by methylene blue was studied on E. coli only. The original scheme of experiment set up was developed. It permits one to increase expositions quantity in each experiment for more certain trend's construction over dose curves and decrease parasite flora sowing. As a result of accomplished studies it was established that blue low-coherent light have unalike weak light's dose depending suppressing effect on cocci whereas red low-coherent light have a moderate dose-depended suppressing effect at low irradiation doses and a moderate dose-depended stimulating effect at high irradiation doses on sensitized by MeBlue E. coli. For all ofthis, but Staphylococcus morphology changes were observed.

  5. Genetic diversity affects colony survivorship in commercial honey bee colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarpy, David R.; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Pettis, Jeffrey S.

    2013-08-01

    Honey bee ( Apis mellifera) queens mate with unusually high numbers of males (average of approximately 12 drones), although there is much variation among queens. One main consequence of such extreme polyandry is an increased diversity of worker genotypes within a colony, which has been shown empirically to confer significant adaptive advantages that result in higher colony productivity and survival. Moreover, honey bees are the primary insect pollinators used in modern commercial production agriculture, and their populations have been in decline worldwide. Here, we compare the mating frequencies of queens, and therefore, intracolony genetic diversity, in three commercial beekeeping operations to determine how they correlate with various measures of colony health and productivity, particularly the likelihood of queen supersedure and colony survival in functional, intensively managed beehives. We found the average effective paternity frequency ( m e ) of this population of honey bee queens to be 13.6 ± 6.76, which was not significantly different between colonies that superseded their queen and those that did not. However, colonies that were less genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e ≤ 7.0) were 2.86 times more likely to die by the end of the study when compared to colonies that were more genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e > 7.0). The stark contrast in colony survival based on increased genetic diversity suggests that there are important tangible benefits of increased queen mating number in managed honey bees, although the exact mechanism(s) that govern these benefits have not been fully elucidated.

  6. Genetic diversity affects colony survivorship in commercial honey bee colonies.

    PubMed

    Tarpy, David R; Vanengelsdorp, Dennis; Pettis, Jeffrey S

    2013-08-01

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) queens mate with unusually high numbers of males (average of approximately 12 drones), although there is much variation among queens. One main consequence of such extreme polyandry is an increased diversity of worker genotypes within a colony, which has been shown empirically to confer significant adaptive advantages that result in higher colony productivity and survival. Moreover, honey bees are the primary insect pollinators used in modern commercial production agriculture, and their populations have been in decline worldwide. Here, we compare the mating frequencies of queens, and therefore, intracolony genetic diversity, in three commercial beekeeping operations to determine how they correlate with various measures of colony health and productivity, particularly the likelihood of queen supersedure and colony survival in functional, intensively managed beehives. We found the average effective paternity frequency (m e ) of this population of honey bee queens to be 13.6 ± 6.76, which was not significantly different between colonies that superseded their queen and those that did not. However, colonies that were less genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e  ≤ 7.0) were 2.86 times more likely to die by the end of the study when compared to colonies that were more genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e  > 7.0). The stark contrast in colony survival based on increased genetic diversity suggests that there are important tangible benefits of increased queen mating number in managed honey bees, although the exact mechanism(s) that govern these benefits have not been fully elucidated. PMID:23728203

  7. Genetic diversity affects colony survivorship in commercial honey bee colonies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) queens mate with unusually high numbers of males (average of approximately 12 drones), although there is much variation among queens. One main consequence of such extreme polyandry is an increased diversity of worker genotypes within a colony, which has been shown empirica...

  8. Fractal scaling of microbial colonies affects growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Károlyi, György

    2005-03-01

    The growth dynamics of filamentary microbial colonies is investigated. Fractality of the fungal or actinomycetes colonies is shown both theoretically and in numerical experiments to play an important role. The growth observed in real colonies is described by the assumption of time-dependent fractality related to the different ages of various parts of the colony. The theoretical results are compared to a simulation based on branching random walks.

  9. [Morphological diversity of Pandorina morum (Mull.) Vory (Volvocaceae) colonies].

    PubMed

    Voĭtekhovskiĭ, Iu L

    2001-01-01

    Morphological variability of polyhedral colonies of green algae (Volvocaceae) were studied using some elements of combinative theory of polyhedron and the theory of diophantine equations. These colonies are considered as results of self-organization according to topological regularities of sphere dissection by convex polygons. It was shown that in three-dimensional Euclidean space for each colony of Pandorina morum (Müll.) Bory only three different forms are possible. One of them has no plane of symmetry and, thus, has two enantiomorphous varieties. It is suggested that frequency spectrum of forms can be used as potential indicator of environment pollution. PMID:11605552

  10. Defect-Mediated Morphologies in Growing Cell Colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doostmohammadi, Amin; Thampi, Sumesh P.; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2016-07-01

    Morphological trends in growing colonies of living cells are at the core of physiological and evolutionary processes. Using active gel equations, which include cell division, we show that shape changes during the growth can be regulated by the dynamics of topological defects in the orientation of cells. The friction between the dividing cells and underlying substrate drives anisotropic colony shapes toward more isotropic morphologies, by mediating the number density and velocity of topological defects. We show that the defects interact with the interface at a specific interaction range, set by the vorticity length scale of flows within the colony, and that the cells predominantly reorient parallel to the interface due to division-induced active stresses.

  11. Bacterial Colony: First Report of Donut Colony Morphology among Diphtheroids Isolated in Blood

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of diphtheroids in human clinical specimens is not uncommon. Several studies have highlighted the significance of these bacteria in human infection, which morphologically resemble Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Previous studies have noted that occurrence of these bacteria in specimens like the blood should not be ignored as they can result in serious infections like endocarditis and sepsis among debilitated individuals, including the neonates. We report isolation of diphtheroid bacterium in blood from a case of septicaemia showing donut colony morphology. PMID:26677424

  12. Substrate Stiffness Affects Human Keratinocyte Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zarkoob, Hoda; Bodduluri, Sandeep; Ponnaluri, Sailahari V.; Selby, John C.; Sander, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Restoration of epidermal organization and function in response to a variety of pathophysiological insults is critically dependent on coordinated keratinocyte migration, proliferation, and stratification during the process of wound healing. These processes are mediated by the reconfiguration of both cell-cell (desmosomes, adherens junctions) and cell-matrix (focal adhesions, hemidesmosomes) junctions and the cytoskeletal filament networks that they serve to interconnect. In this study, we investigated the role of substrate elasticity (stiffness) on keratinocyte colony formation in vitro during the process of nascent epithelial sheet formation as triggered by the calcium switch model of keratinocyte culture. Keratinocytes cultured on pepsin digested type I collagen coated soft (nominal E = 1.2 kPa) polyacrylamide gels embedded with fluorescent microspheres exhibited (i) smaller spread contact areas, (ii) increased migration velocities, and (iii) increased rates of colony formation with more cells per colony than did keratinocytes cultured on stiff (nominal E = 24 kPa) polyacrylamide gels. As assessed by tracking of embedded microsphere displacements, keratinocytes cultured on soft substrates generated large local substrate deformations that appeared to recruit adjacent keratinocytes into joining an evolving colony. Together with the observed differences in keratinocyte kinematics and substrate deformations, we developed two ad hoc analyses, termed distance rank (DR) and radius of cooperativity (RC), that help to objectively ascribe what we perceive as increasingly cooperative behavior of keratinocytes cultured on soft versus stiff gels during the process of colony formation. We hypothesize that the differences in keratinocyte colony formation observed in our experiments could be due to cell-cell mechanical signaling generated via local substrate deformations that appear to be correlated with the increased expression of β4 integrin within keratinocytes positioned

  13. Morphological Instabilities in a Growing Yeast Colony: Experiment and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sams, Thomas; Sneppen, Kim; Jensen, Mogens H.; Ellegaard, Clive; Christensen, Bjørn Eggert; Thrane, Ulf

    1997-07-01

    We study the growth of colonies of the yeast Pichia membranaefaciens on agarose film. The growth conditions are controlled in a setup where nutrients are supplied through an agarose film suspended over a solution of nutrients. As the thickness of the agarose film is varied, the morphology of the front of the colony changes. The growth of the front is modeled by coupling it to a diffusive field of inhibitory metabolites. Qualitative agreement with experiments suggests that such a coupling is responsible for the observed instability of the front.

  14. Fitness of Isogenic Colony Morphology Variants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Murine Airway Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rakhimova, Elza; Munder, Antje; Wiehlmann, Lutz; Bredenbruch, Florian; Tümmler, Burkhard

    2008-01-01

    Chronic lung infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa are associated with the diversification of the persisting clone into niche specialists and morphotypes, a phenomenon called ‘dissociative behaviour’. To explore the potential of P. aeruginosa to change its morphotype by single step loss-of–function mutagenesis, a signature-tagged mini-Tn5 plasposon library of the cystic fibrosis airway isolate TBCF10839 was screened for colony morphology variants under nine different conditions in vitro. Transposon insertion into 1% of the genome changed colony morphology into eight discernable morphotypes. Half of the 55 targets encode features of primary or secondary metabolism whereby quinolone production was frequently affected. In the other half the transposon had inserted into genes of the functional categories transport, regulation or motility/chemotaxis. To mimic dissociative behaviour of isogenic strains in lungs, pools of 25 colony morphology variants were tested for competitive fitness in an acute murine airway infection model. Six of the 55 mutants either grew better or worse in vivo than in vitro, respectively. Metabolic proficiency of the colony morphology variant was a key determinant for survival in murine airways. The most common morphotype of self-destructive autolysis did unexpectedly not impair fitness. Transposon insertions into homologous genes of strain PAO1 did not reproduce the TBCF10839 mutant morphotypes for 16 of 19 examined loci pointing to an important role of the genetic background on colony morphology. Depending on the chosen P. aeruginosa strain, functional genome scans will explore other areas of the evolutionary landscape. Based on our discordant findings of mutant phenotypes in P. aeruginosa strains PAO1, PA14 and TBCF10839, we conclude that the current focus on few reference strains may miss modes of niche adaptation and dissociative behaviour that are relevant for the microevolution of complex traits in the wild. PMID:18301762

  15. Characteristics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts exhibiting rough colonies and pseudohyphal morphology with respect to alcoholic fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Vanda Renata; Bassi, Ana Paula Guarnieri; da Silva, Jessica Carolina Gomes; Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra Regina

    2013-01-01

    Among the native yeasts found in alcoholic fermentation, rough colonies associated with pseudohyphal morphology belonging to the species Saccharomyces cerevisiae are very common and undesirable during the process. The aim of this work was to perform morphological and physiological characterisations of S. cerevisiae strains that exhibited rough and smooth colonies in an attempt to identify alternatives that could contribute to the management of rough colony yeasts in alcoholic fermentation. Characterisation tests for invasiveness in Agar medium, killer activity, flocculation and fermentative capacity were performed on 22 strains (11 rough and 11 smooth colonies). The effects of acid treatment at different pH values on the growth of two strains (“52” - rough and “PE-02” - smooth) as well as batch fermentation tests with cell recycling and acid treatment of the cells were also evaluated. Invasiveness in YPD Agar medium occurred at low frequency; ten of eleven rough yeasts exhibited flocculation; none of the strains showed killer activity; and the rough strains presented lower and slower fermentative capacities compared to the smooth strains in a 48-h cycle in a batch system with sugar cane juice. The growth of the rough strain was severely affected by the acid treatment at pH values of 1.0 and 1.5; however, the growth of the smooth strain was not affected. The fermentative efficiency in mixed fermentation (smooth and rough strains in the same cell mass proportion) did not differ from the efficiency obtained with the smooth strain alone, most likely because the acid treatment was conducted at pH 1.5 in a batch cell-recycle test. A fermentative efficiency as low as 60% was observed with the rough colony alone. PMID:24688501

  16. Early Developmental Program Shapes Colony Morphology in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Mamou, Gideon; Malli Mohan, Ganesh Babu; Rouvinski, Alex; Rosenberg, Alex; Ben-Yehuda, Sigal

    2016-01-01

    Summary When grown on a solid surface, bacteria form highly organized colonies, yet little is known about the earliest stages of colony establishment. Following Bacillus subtilis colony development from a single progenitor cell, a sequence of highly ordered spatiotemporal events was revealed. Colony was initiated by the formation of leading-cell chains, deriving from the colony center and extending in multiple directions, typically in a “Y-shaped” structure. By eradicating particular cells during these early stages, we could influence the shape of the resulting colony and demonstrate that Y-arm extension defines colony size. A mutant in ymdB encoding a phosphodiesterase displayed unordered developmental patterns, indicating a role in guiding these initial events. Finally, we provide evidence that intercellular nanotubes contribute to proper colony formation. In summary, we reveal a “construction plan” for building a colony and provide the initial molecular basis for this process. PMID:26904951

  17. Clinorotation affects soybean seedling morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilaire, Emmanuel; Guikema, James A.; Brown, Christopher S.

    1995-01-01

    Although spaceflight does not appear to significantly affect seed germination, it can influence subsequent plant growth. On STS-3 and SL-2, decreased growth (measured as plant length, fresh weight, and dry weight) was noted for pine, oat, and mung bean. In the CHROMEX-01 and 02 experiments with Haplopappus and in the CHROMEX-03 experiment with Arabidopsis, enhanced root growth was noted in the space-grown plants. In the CHROMEX-04 experiments with wheat, both leaf fresh weight and leaf area were diminished in the space-grown plants but there was no difference in total plant height (CS Brown, HG Levine, and AD Krikorian, unpublished data). These data suggest that microgravity impacts growth by whole plant partitioning of the assimilates. The objective of the present study was to determine the influence of clinorotation on the growth and the morphology of soybean seedlings grown in the Biological Research In Canister (BRIC) flight hardware. This experiment provided baseline data for a spaceflight experiment (BRIC-3) flown on STS-63 (February 3-11, 1995).

  18. Effects of media, atmosphere, and incubation time on colonial morphology of Arcanobacterium haemolyticum.

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, L A; Wu, W K; Larson, A M; Gavin, S E; Fine, J S; Coyle, M B

    1993-01-01

    Arcanobacterium haemolyticum causes pharyngitis as well as skin and other wound infections. Although it is a beta-hemolytic organism, the hemolysis is less well defined than that of beta-hemolytic streptococci and may be overlooked in cultures with heavy growth of commensal throat flora. To determine whether routine throat culture conditions are sufficient to produce recognizable colonies of A. haemolyticum, the morphology of six distinct strains was studied after various combinations of incubation time, medium, and atmosphere. The agar media, containing 5% sheep blood, were Trypticase soy agar, Columbia agar, and heart infusion agar. Cultures were incubated in ambient air, 6 to 8% CO2, or an anaerobic atmosphere. Cultures were compared after 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation for colony size, clarity and size of hemolytic zone, and macroscopic evidence of agar pitting. A minimum of 48 h was needed for expression of beta-hemolysis and pitting. Trypticase soy agar was the superior medium and CO2 was the superior atmosphere for beta-hemolysis. Agar pitting was not significantly affected by variations in medium or atmosphere. Strains differed in their expression of hemolysis and production of pits at 48 h. After 72 h of incubation, beta-hemolysis and pitting were visible in over 96% of culture observations. PMID:8308114

  19. Patterns of morphological integration in marine modular organisms: supra-module organization in branching octocoral colonies.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Juan Armando; Lasker, Howard R

    2003-01-01

    Despite the relative simplicity of their modular growth, marine invertebrates such as arborescent gorgonian octocorals (Octocorallia: Cnidaria) generate complex colonial forms. Colony form in these taxa is a consequence of modular (polyp) replication, and if there is a tight integration among modular and supramodular traits (e.g. polyp aperture, inter-polyp spacing, branch thickness, internode and branch length), then changes at the module level may lead to changes in colony architecture. Alternatively, different groups of traits may evolve semi-independently (or conditionally independent). To examine the patterns of integration among morphological traits in Caribbean octocorals, we compared five morphological traits across 21 species, correcting for the effects of phylogenetic relationships among the taxa. Graphical modelling and phylogenetic independence contrasts among the five morphological characters indicate two groups of integrated traits based on whether they were polyp- or colony-level traits. Although all characters exhibited bivariate associations, multivariate analyses (partial correlation coefficients) showed the strongest integration among the colony-level characters (internode distance and branch length). It is a quantitative demonstration that branching characters within the octocorals studied are independent of characters of the polyps. Despite the universally recognized modularity of octocorals at the level of polyps, branching during colony development may represent an emergent level of integration and modularity. PMID:14561292

  20. Factors affecting spermatozoa morphology in beef bulls

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate factors affecting sperm morphology of bulls (n=908) collected at 320 days of age. Bulls were a composite breed (50% Red Angus, 25% Charolais, and 25% Tarentaise) born from 2002 to 2008 to dams fed levels of feed during mid and late gestation that were expe...

  1. Relationship between phase variation in colony morphology, intrastrain variation in cell wall physiology, and nasopharyngeal colonization by Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Weiser, J N; Markiewicz, Z; Tuomanen, E I; Wani, J H

    1996-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae undergoes phase variation in colony morphology, which has been implicated as a factor in the pathogenesis of pneumococcal disease. Phenotypic differences between opaque and transparent colony forms correlate with differences in rates of autolysis. This study examined whether differences in autolysis are caused by differences in expression of the major amidase, LytA, or the structure of its peptidoglycan substrate. No significant difference was detected by high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis of stem peptides released after treatment of purified peptidoglycan with amidase. Differences in the rate of digestion of purified cell walls, furthermore, did not correlate with susceptibility to autolysis. Lower levels of autolysis in opaque variants, however, was associated with decreased levels of immunodetectable LytA on colony immunoblots and Western blots (immunoblots). Diminished cell-surface-associated LytA in opaque variants was also demonstrated by whole-cell inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Since transparent variants have been shown both to colonize the nasopharynx more efficiently in an animal model and to express more surface-exposed LytA, it was determined whether LytA contributes to colonization in a neonatal rat model of pneumococcal carriage. Defined mutants in the lytA gene were used to show that there was no significant contribution by LytA to nasopharyngeal colonization in this model. Although the expression of LytA was shown to undergo phase variation in association with colony morphology, lytA mutants are still capable of phenotypic variation in colony morphology, which suggests that other factors are responsible for intrastrain differences which affect colonization. PMID:8675333

  2. Quantification of morphology of bacterial colonies using laser scatter measurements and solid element optical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas; Bayraktar, Bülent; Venkatapathi, Murugesan; Hirleman, E. Dan; Bhunia, Arun K.; Robinson, J. Paul; Hassler, Richard; Smith, Linda; Rajwa, Bartek

    2007-02-01

    Traditional biological and chemical methods for pathogen identification require complicated sample preparation for reliable results. Optical scattering technology has been used for identification of bacterial cells in suspension, but with only limited success. Our published reports have demonstrated that scattered light based identification of Listeria colonies growing on solid surfaces is feasible with proper pattern recognition tools. Recently we have extended this technique to classification of other bacterial genera including, Salmonella, Bacillus, and Vibrio. Our approach may be highly applicable to early detection and classification of pathogens in food-processing industry and in healthcare. The unique scattering patterns formed by colonies of different species are created through differences in colony microstructure (on the order of wavelength used), bulk optical properties, and the macroscopic morphology. While it is difficult to model the effect on scatter-signal patterns owing to the microstructural changes, the influence of bulk optical properties and overall shape of colonies can be modeled using geometrical optics. Our latest research shows that it is possible to model the scatter pattern of bacterial colonies using solid-element optical modeling software (TracePro), and theoretically assess changes in macro structure and bulk refractive indices. This study allows predicting the theoretical limits of resolution and sensitivity of our detection and classification methods. Moreover, quantification of changes in macro morphology and bulk refractive index provides an opportunity to study the response of colonies to various reagents and antibiotics.

  3. Current status and future prospects of using advanced computer-based methods to study bacterial colonial morphology.

    PubMed

    Bae, Euiwon; Kim, Huisung; Rajwa, Bartek; Thomas, John G; Robinson, J Paul

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advancement of recent molecular technologies, culturing is still considered the gold standard for microbial sample analysis. Here we review three different bacterial colony-based screening modalities that provide significant information beyond the simple shape and color of the colony. The plate imaging technique provides numeration and quantitative spectral reflectance information for each colony, while Raman spectroscopic analysis of bacteria colonies relates the Raman-shifted peaks to specific chemical bonding. Finally, the elastic-light-scatter technique provides a volumetric interaction of the whole colony through laser-bacteria interactions, instantly capturing the morphological traits of the colony and allowing quantitative classifications. PMID:26582139

  4. Insights on Coral Adaptation from Polyp and Colony Morphology, Skeletal Density Banding and Carbonate Depositional Facies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oehlert, A. M.; Hill, C. A.; Piggot, A. M.; Fouke, B. W.

    2008-12-01

    As one of the core reservoirs of primary production in the world's oceans, tropical coral reefs support a complex ecosystem that directly impacts over ninety percent of marine organisms at some point in their life cycle. Corals themselves are highly complex organisms and exhibit a range of growth forms that range from branching to massive, foliaceous, columnar, encrusting, free living and laminar coralla. Fierce competition over scarce resources available to each individual coral species creates niche specialization. Throughout the Phanerozic geological record, this has driven speciation events and created distinct skeletal growth morphologies that have differential abilities in feeding strategy. In turn, this has presumably led to the development of niche specialization that can be quantitatively measured through hierarchical morphological differences from the micrometer to the meter scale. Porter (1976) observed significant differences in skeletal morphology between Caribbean coral species that reflects an adaptive geometry based on feeding strategy. Within the Montastraea species complex there are four major morphologies; columnar, bouldering, irregular mounding, and skirted. Each morphotype can be found forming high abundance along the bathymetric gradient of coral reefs that grow along the leeward coast of Curacao, Netherlands Antilles. We have undertaken a study to determine the relative relationships amongst coral morphology, skeletal density and feeding strategy by comparing the morphometric measurements of individual polyps as well as the entire colony along spatial and bathymetric gradients. Polyp diameter, mouth size, interpolyp area, and interpolyp distance were measured from high-resolution images taken on a stereoscope, and evaluated with AxioVision image analysis software. These high-resolution optical analyses have also revealed new observations regarding folded tissue structures of the outer margin of polyps in the Montastrea complex. Skeletal

  5. Burkholderia cenocepacia ShvR-regulated genes that influence colony morphology, biofilm formation, and virulence.

    PubMed

    Subramoni, Sujatha; Nguyen, David T; Sokol, Pamela A

    2011-08-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia is an opportunistic pathogen that primarily infects cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Previously, we reported that ShvR, a LysR regulator, influences colony morphology, virulence, and biofilm formation and regulates the expression of an adjacent 24-kb genomic region encoding 24 genes. In this study, we report the functional characterization of selected genes in this region. A Tn5 mutant with shiny colony morphology was identified with a polar mutation in BCAS0208, predicted to encode an acyl-coenzyme A dehydrogenase. Mutagenesis of BCAS0208 and complementation analyses revealed that BCAS0208 is required for rough colony morphology, biofilm formation, and virulence on alfalfa seedlings. It was not possible to complement with BCAS0208 containing a mutation in the catalytic site. BCAS0201, encoding a putative flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent oxidoreductase, and BCAS0207, encoding a putative citrate synthase, do not influence colony morphology but are required for optimum levels of biofilm formation and virulence. Both BCAS0208 and BCAS0201 contribute to pellicle formation, although individual mutations in each of these genes had no appreciable effect on pellicle formation. A mutant with a polar insertion in BCAS0208 was significantly less virulent in a rat model of chronic lung infection as well as in the alfalfa model. Genes in this region were shown to influence utilization of branched-chain fatty acids, tricarboxylic acid cycle substrates, l-arabinose, and branched-chain amino acids. Together, our data show that the ShvR-regulated genes BCAS0208 to BCAS0201 are required for the rough colony morphotype, biofilm and pellicle formation, and virulence in B. cenocepacia. PMID:21690240

  6. Grazer-induced morphological defense in Scenedesmus obliquus is affected by competition against Microcystis aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuexia; Wang, Jun; Lu, Yichun; Chen, Qinwen; Yang, Zhou

    2015-01-01

    The green alga Scenedesmus is known for its phenotypic plasticity in response to grazing risk. However, the benefits of colony formation induced by infochemicals from zooplankton should come with costs. That is, a tradeoff in benefit-to-cost ratios is likely under complex environmental conditions. In this study, we hypothesized that the coexistence of Scenedesmus and its competitors decreases the formation of anti-grazer colonies in Scenedesmus. Results demonstrated that the presence of a competitor Microcystis aeruginosa inhibited inducible defensive colony formation of Scenedesmus obliquus, and the established defensive colonies negatively affected the competitive ability of S. obliquus. The proportion of induced defensive colonies in cultures was dependent on the relative abundance of competitors. Under low competition intensity, large amount of eight-celled colonies were formed but at the cost of decreased competitive inhibition on M. aeruginosa. By contrast, defensive colony formation of S. obliquus slacked in the presence of high competition intensity to maintain a high displacement rate (competitive ability). In conclusion, S. obliquus exhibited different responses to potential grazing pressure under different intensities of competition, i.e., Scenedesmus morphological response to grazing infochemicals was affected by competition against Microcystis. PMID:26224387

  7. Emerging morphologies in round bacterial colonies: comparing volumetric versus chemotactic expansion.

    PubMed

    Giverso, Chiara; Verani, Marco; Ciarletta, Pasquale

    2016-06-01

    Biological experiments performed on living bacterial colonies have demonstrated the microbial capability to develop finger-like shapes and highly irregular contours, even starting from an homogeneous inoculum. In this work, we study from the continuum mechanics viewpoint the emergence of such branched morphologies in an initially circular colony expanding on the top of a Petri dish coated with agar. The bacterial colony expansion, based on either a source term, representing volumetric mitotic processes, or a nonconvective mass flux, describing chemotactic expansion, is modeled at the continuum scale. We demonstrate that the front of the colony is always linearly unstable, having similar dispersion curves to the ones characterizing branching instabilities. We also perform finite element simulations, which not only prove the emergence of branching, but also highlight dramatic differences between the two mechanisms of colony expansion in the nonlinear regime. Furthermore, the proposed combination of analytical and numerical analysis allowed studying the influence of different model parameters on the selection of specific patterns. A very good agreement has been found between the resulting simulations and the typical structures observed in biological assays. Finally, this work provides a new interpretation of the emergence of branched patterns in living aggregates, depicted as the results of a complex interplay among chemical, mechanical and size effects. PMID:26296713

  8. Intrinsic colony conditions affect the provisioning and oviposition process in the stingless bee Melipona scutellaris.

    PubMed

    Pereira, R A; Morais, M M; Nascimento, F S; Bego, L R

    2009-01-01

    The cell provisioning and oviposition process (POP) is a unique characteristic of stingless bees (Meliponini), in which coordinated interactions between workers and queen regulate the filling of brood cells with larval resources and subsequent egg laying. Environmental conditions seem to regulate reproduction in stingless bees; however, little is known about how the amount of food affects quantitative sequences of the process. We examined intrinsic variables by comparing three colonies in distinct conditions (strong, intermediate and weak state). We predicted that some of these variables are correlated with temporal events of POP in Melipona scutellaris colonies. The results demonstrated that the strong colony had shorter periods of POP. PMID:19554772

  9. Clonal Diversification and Changes in Lipid Traits and Colony Morphology in Mycobacterium abscessus Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Park, In Kwon; Hsu, Amy P; Tettelin, Hervé; Shallom, Shamira J; Drake, Steven K; Ding, Li; Wu, Un-In; Adamo, Nick; Prevots, D Rebecca; Olivier, Kenneth N; Holland, Steven M; Sampaio, Elizabeth P; Zelazny, Adrian M

    2015-11-01

    The smooth-to-rough colony morphology shift in Mycobacterium abscessus has been implicated in loss of glycopeptidolipid (GPL), increased pathogenicity, and clinical decline in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. However, the evolutionary phenotypic and genetic changes remain obscure. Serial isolates from nine non-CF patients with persistent M. abscessus infection were characterized by colony morphology, lipid profile via thin-layer chromatography and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), sequencing of eight genes in the GPL locus, and expression level of fadD23, a key gene involved in the biosynthesis of complex lipids. All 50 isolates were typed as M. abscessus subspecies abscessus and were clonally related within each patient. Rough isolates, all lacking GPL, predominated at later disease stages, some showing variation within rough morphology. While most (77%) rough isolates harbored detrimental mutations in mps1 and mps2, 13% displayed previously unreported mutations in mmpL4a and mmpS4, the latter yielding a putative GPL precursor. Two isolates showed no deleterious mutations in any of the eight genes sequenced. Mixed populations harboring different GPL locus mutations were detected in 5 patients, demonstrating clonal diversification, which was likely overlooked by conventional acid-fast bacillus (AFB) culture methods. Our work highlights applications of MALDI-TOF MS beyond identification, focusing on mycobacterial lipids relevant in virulence and adaptation. Later isolates displayed accumulation of triacylglycerol and reduced expression of fadD23, sometimes preceding rough colony onset. Our results indicate that clonal diversification and a shift in lipid metabolism, including the loss of GPL, occur during chronic lung infection with M. abscessus. GPL loss alone may not account for all traits associated with rough morphology. PMID:26292297

  10. Morphological analysis of Bacillux polymyxa colonies: digital image analysis in wide-field microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Lina M.; Plata G., Arturo; Rincón C., Giovanna; Gutiérrez A., Henry; Plata, Alexandra

    2013-11-01

    In the last twenty years the growth of bacterial colonies has been studied experimentally using images with different growth patterns, but the resolution of those images is in areas of tenths of microns without range information. On the other hand, theoretical studies considering the bacteria as systems with collective behavior controlled by a reduced number of parameters have been developed. The present work aims to study morphological and dynamic growth of Bacillus polymyxa colonies by the technique of digital image analysis in wide-field microscopy, which provides high resolution, both in texture and topography. Getting a three-dimensional behavior of dynamic biological systems is useful to create structures and materials with different physical and biological properties for industrial applications.

  11. Homoplasious colony morphology and mito-nuclear phylogenetic discordance among Eastern Pacific octocorals.

    PubMed

    Ament-Velásquez, Sandra L; Breedy, Odalisca; Cortés, Jorge; Guzman, Hector M; Wörheide, Gert; Vargas, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    Octocorals are a diverse and ecologically important group of cnidarians. However, the phylogenetic relationships of many octocoral groups are not well understood and are based mostly on mitochondrial sequence data. In addition, the discovery and description of new gorgonian species displaying unusual or intermediate morphologies and uncertain phylogenetic affinities further complicates the study of octocoral systematics and raises questions about the role played by processes such as plasticity, crypsis, and convergence in the evolution of this group of organisms. Here, we use nuclear (i.e. 28S rDNA) and mitochondrial (mtMutS) markers and a sample of Eastern Pacific gorgonians thought to be remarkable from a morphological point of view to shed light on the morphological diversification among these organisms. Our study reveals the loss of the anastomosed colony morphology in two unrelated lineages of the seafan genus Pacifigorgia and offers strong evidence for the independent evolution of a whip-like morphology in two lineages of Eastern Pacific Leptogorgia. Additionally, our data revealed one instance of mito-nuclear discordance in the genera Leptogorgia and Eugorgia, which may be the results of incomplete lineage sorting or ancient hybridization-introgression events. Our study stresses the importance of comprehensive taxonomic sampling and the use of independent sources of evidence to address the phylogenetic relationships and clarifying the evolution of octocorals. PMID:26953740

  12. Spatiotemporal dynamics of black-tailed prairie dog colonies affected by plague

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Augustine, D.J.; Matchett, M.R.; Toombs, T.P.; Cully, J.F., Jr.; Johnson, T.L.; Sidle, John G.

    2008-01-01

    Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are a key component of the disturbance regime in semi-arid grasslands of central North America. Many studies have compared community and ecosystem characteristics on prairie dog colonies to grasslands without prairie dogs, but little is known about landscape-scale patterns of disturbance that prairie dog colony complexes may impose on grasslands over long time periods. We examined spatiotemporal dynamics in two prairie dog colony complexes in southeastern Colorado (Comanche) and northcentral Montana (Phillips County) that have been strongly influenced by plague, and compared them to a complex unaffected by plague in northwestern Nebraska (Oglala). Both plague-affected complexes exhibited substantial spatiotemporal variability in the area occupied during a decade, in contrast to the stability of colonies in the Oglala complex. However, the plague-affected complexes differed in spatial patterns of colony movement. Colonies in the Comanche complex in shortgrass steppe shifted locations over a decade. Only 10% of the area occupied in 1995 was still occupied by prairie dogs in 2006. In 2005 and 2006 respectively, 74 and 83% of the total area of the Comanche complex occurred in locations that were not occupied in 1995, and only 1% of the complex was occupied continuously over a decade. In contrast, prairie dogs in the Phillips County complex in mixed-grass prairie and sagebrush steppe primarily recolonized previously occupied areas after plague-induced colony declines. In Phillips County, 62% of the area occupied in 1993 was also occupied by prairie dogs in 2004, and 12% of the complex was occupied continuously over a decade. Our results indicate that plague accelerates spatiotemporal movement of prairie dog colonies, and have significant implications for landscape-scale effects of prairie dog disturbance on grassland composition and productivity. These findings highlight the need to combine landscape-scale measures of

  13. Regularity in budding mode and resultant growth morphology of the azooxanthellate colonial scleractinian Tubastraea coccinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sentoku, A.; Ezaki, Y.

    2012-03-01

    Scleractinia exhibit a variety of growth forms, whether zooxanthellate or azooxanthellate, according to factors that control asexual reproduction and ensuing coral growth. The azooxanthellate branching scleractinian Dendrophyllia arbuscula shows regular modes of budding in terms of the locations of budding sites, the orientations of directive septa, and the inclination angle of budding throughout colonial growth. This study reports that such regularities are also found in the apparently different growth form of the massive dendrophylliid Tubastraea coccinea, which shows the following growth features: (1) the offsets (lateral corallites) always occur near four primary septa, except the two directive primary septa, meaning that the lateral corallites do not appear in the sectors of the two directive septa; (2) the two directive septa in lateral corallites tend to be oriented subperpendicular to the growth direction of the parental corallites; (3) the lateral corallites grow approximately diagonally upwards; and (4) these regularities are seen in the axial and derived lateral corallites among all generations during colony growth. Large differences in growth form are found between the branching D. arbuscula and massive T. coccinea, irrespective of the presence of specific regularities. It is likely that subtle modifications of certain parameters (e.g., budding interval, branch length, corallite size, and inclination angle of lateral corallites) have a strong effect on the overall growth morphology. A precise understanding of such regularities, which occur regardless of generation or taxonomic position, would contribute to understanding the "shape-controlling mechanism" of corals, which are an archetypal modular organism.

  14. Computational image analysis of colony and nuclear morphology to evaluate human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Kazuaki; Saitoh, Noriko; Goldberg, Ilya G; Sakamoto, Chiyomi; Yasuda, Yoko; Yoshida, Yoshinori; Yamanaka, Shinya; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive evaluation of cell reprogramming by advanced image analysis is required to maintain the quality of cells intended for regenerative medicine. Here, we constructed living and unlabelled colony image libraries of various human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines for supervised machine learning pattern recognition to accurately distinguish bona fide iPSCs from improperly reprogrammed cells. Furthermore, we found that image features for efficient discrimination reside in cellular components. In fact, extensive analysis of nuclear morphologies revealed dynamic and characteristic signatures, including the linear form of the promyelocytic leukaemia (PML)-defined structure in iPSCs, which was reversed to a regular sphere upon differentiation. Our data revealed that iPSCs have a markedly different overall nuclear architecture that may contribute to highly accurate discrimination based on the cell reprogramming status. PMID:25385348

  15. Quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast colonies growing on solid medium: the eccentricity and Fourier indices.

    PubMed

    Gil de Prado, Elena; Rivas, Eva-María; de Silóniz, María-Isabel; Diezma, Belén; Barreiro, Pilar; Peinado, José M

    2014-11-01

    The colony shape of four yeast species growing on agar medium was measured for 116 days by image analysis. Initially, all the colonies are circular, with regular edges. The loss of circularity can be quantitatively estimated by the eccentricity index, Ei , calculated as the ratio between their orthogonal vertical and horizontal diameters. Ei can increase from 1 (complete circularity) to a maximum of 1.17-1.30, depending on the species. One colony inhibits its neighbour only when it has reached a threshold area. Then, Ei of the inhibited colony increases proportionally to the area of the inhibitory colony. The initial distance between colonies affects those threshold values but not the proportionality, Ei /area; this inhibition affects the shape but not the total surface of the colony. The appearance of irregularities in the edges is associated, in all the species, not with age but with nutrient exhaustion. The edge irregularity can be quantified by the Fourier index, Fi , calculated by the minimum number of Fourier coefficients that are needed to describe the colony contour with 99% fitness. An ad hoc function has been developed in Matlab v. 7.0 to automate the computation of the Fourier coefficients. In young colonies, Fi has a value between 2 (circumference) and 3 (ellipse). These values are maintained in mature colonies of Debaryomyces, but can reach values up to 14 in Saccharomyces. All the species studied showed the inhibition of growth in facing colony edges, but only three species showed edge irregularities associated with substrate exhaustion. PMID:25100432

  16. Biological Relevance of Colony Morphology and Phenotypic Switching by Burkholderia pseudomallei▿

    PubMed Central

    Chantratita, Narisara; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Boonbumrung, Khaemaporn; Tiyawisutsri, Rachaneeporn; Vesaratchavest, Mongkol; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Chierakul, Wirongrong; Wongratanacheewin, Surasakdi; Pukritiyakamee, Sasithorn; White, Nicholas J.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2007-01-01

    Melioidosis is a notoriously protracted illness and is difficult to cure. We hypothesize that the causative organism, Burkholderia pseudomallei, undergoes a process of adaptation involving altered expression of surface determinants which facilitates persistence in vivo and that this is reflected by changes in colony morphology. A colony morphotyping scheme and typing algorithm were developed using clinical B. pseudomallei isolates. Morphotypes were divided into seven types (denoted I to VII). Type I gave rise to other morphotypes (most commonly type II or III) by a process of switching in response to environmental stress, including starvation, iron limitation, and growth at 42°C. Switching was associated with complex shifts in phenotype, one of which (type I to type II) was associated with a marked increase in production of factors putatively associated with in vivo concealment. Isogenic types II and III, derived from type I, were examined using several experimental models. Switching between isogenic morphotypes occurred in a mouse model, where type II appeared to become adapted for persistence in a low-virulence state. Isogenic type II demonstrated a significant increase in intracellular replication fitness compared with parental type I after uptake by epithelial cells in vitro. Isogenic type III demonstrated a higher replication fitness following uptake by macrophages in vitro, which was associated with a switch to type II. Mixed B. pseudomallei morphologies were common in individual clinical specimens and were significantly more frequent in samples of blood, pus, and respiratory secretions than in urine and surface swabs. These findings have major implications for therapeutics and vaccine development. PMID:17114252

  17. Modelled drift patterns of fish larvae link coastal morphology to seabird colony distribution.

    PubMed

    Sandvik, Hanno; Barrett, Robert T; Erikstad, Kjell Einar; Myksvoll, Mari S; Vikebø, Frode; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Anker-Nilssen, Tycho; Lorentsen, Svein-Håkon; Reiertsen, Tone K; Skarðhamar, Jofrid; Skern-Mauritzen, Mette; Systad, Geir Helge

    2016-01-01

    Colonial breeding is an evolutionary puzzle, as the benefits of breeding in high densities are still not fully explained. Although the dynamics of existing colonies are increasingly understood, few studies have addressed the initial formation of colonies, and empirical tests are rare. Using a high-resolution larval drift model, we here document that the distribution of seabird colonies along the Norwegian coast can be explained by variations in the availability and predictability of fish larvae. The modelled variability in concentration of fish larvae is, in turn, predicted by the topography of the continental shelf and coastline. The advection of fish larvae along the coast translates small-scale topographic characteristics into a macroecological pattern, viz. the spatial distribution of top-predator breeding sites. Our findings provide empirical corroboration of the hypothesis that seabird colonies are founded in locations that minimize travel distances between breeding and foraging locations, thereby enabling optimal foraging by central-place foragers. PMID:27173005

  18. Modelled drift patterns of fish larvae link coastal morphology to seabird colony distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandvik, Hanno; Barrett, Robert T.; Erikstad, Kjell Einar; Myksvoll, Mari S.; Vikebø, Frode; Yoccoz, Nigel G.; Anker-Nilssen, Tycho; Lorentsen, Svein-Håkon; Reiertsen, Tone K.; Skarðhamar, Jofrid; Skern-Mauritzen, Mette; Systad, Geir Helge

    2016-05-01

    Colonial breeding is an evolutionary puzzle, as the benefits of breeding in high densities are still not fully explained. Although the dynamics of existing colonies are increasingly understood, few studies have addressed the initial formation of colonies, and empirical tests are rare. Using a high-resolution larval drift model, we here document that the distribution of seabird colonies along the Norwegian coast can be explained by variations in the availability and predictability of fish larvae. The modelled variability in concentration of fish larvae is, in turn, predicted by the topography of the continental shelf and coastline. The advection of fish larvae along the coast translates small-scale topographic characteristics into a macroecological pattern, viz. the spatial distribution of top-predator breeding sites. Our findings provide empirical corroboration of the hypothesis that seabird colonies are founded in locations that minimize travel distances between breeding and foraging locations, thereby enabling optimal foraging by central-place foragers.

  19. Modelled drift patterns of fish larvae link coastal morphology to seabird colony distribution

    PubMed Central

    Sandvik, Hanno; Barrett, Robert T.; Erikstad, Kjell Einar; Myksvoll, Mari S.; Vikebø, Frode; Yoccoz, Nigel G.; Anker-Nilssen, Tycho; Lorentsen, Svein-Håkon; Reiertsen, Tone K.; Skarðhamar, Jofrid; Skern-Mauritzen, Mette; Systad, Geir Helge

    2016-01-01

    Colonial breeding is an evolutionary puzzle, as the benefits of breeding in high densities are still not fully explained. Although the dynamics of existing colonies are increasingly understood, few studies have addressed the initial formation of colonies, and empirical tests are rare. Using a high-resolution larval drift model, we here document that the distribution of seabird colonies along the Norwegian coast can be explained by variations in the availability and predictability of fish larvae. The modelled variability in concentration of fish larvae is, in turn, predicted by the topography of the continental shelf and coastline. The advection of fish larvae along the coast translates small-scale topographic characteristics into a macroecological pattern, viz. the spatial distribution of top-predator breeding sites. Our findings provide empirical corroboration of the hypothesis that seabird colonies are founded in locations that minimize travel distances between breeding and foraging locations, thereby enabling optimal foraging by central-place foragers. PMID:27173005

  20. Colony morphology variation of Burkholderia pseudomallei is associated with antigenic variation and O-polysaccharide modification.

    PubMed

    Wikraiphat, Chanthiwa; Saiprom, Natnaree; Tandhavanant, Sarunporn; Heiss, Christian; Azadi, Parastoo; Wongsuvan, Gumphol; Tuanyok, Apichai; Holden, Matthew T G; Burtnick, Mary N; Brett, Paul J; Peacock, Sharon J; Chantratita, Narisara

    2015-05-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a CDC tier 1 select agent that causes melioidosis, a severe disease in humans and animals. Persistent infections are common, and there is currently no vaccine available. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a potential vaccine candidate. B. pseudomallei expresses three serologically distinct LPS types. The predominant O-polysaccharide (OPS) is an unbranched heteropolymer with repeating d-glucose and 6-deoxy-l-talose residues in which the 6-deoxy-l-talose residues are variably replaced with O-acetyl and O-methyl modifications. We observed that primary clinical B. pseudomallei isolates with mucoid and nonmucoid colony morphologies from the same sample expressed different antigenic types distinguishable using an LPS-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb). MAb-reactive (nonmucoid) and nonreactive (mucoid) strains from the same patient exhibited identical LPS banding patterns by silver staining and indistinguishable genotypes. We hypothesized that LPS antigenic variation reflected modification of the OPS moieties. Mutagenesis of three genes involved in LPS synthesis was performed in B. pseudomallei K96243. Loss of MAb reactivity was observed in both wbiA (encoding a 2-O-acetyltransferase) and wbiD (putative methyl transferase) mutants. The structural characteristics of the OPS moieties from isogenic nonmucoid strain 4095a and mucoid strain 4095c were further investigated. Utilizing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we found that B. pseudomallei 4095a and 4095c OPS antigens exhibited substitution patterns that differed from the prototypic OPS structure. Specifically, 4095a lacked 4-O-acetylation, while 4095c lacked both 4-O-acetylation and 2-O-methylation. Our studies indicate that B. pseudomallei OPS undergoes antigenic variation and suggest that the 9D5 MAb recognizes a conformational epitope that is influenced by both O-acetyl and O-methyl substitution patterns. PMID:25776750

  1. Legacy effects of colonial millponds on floodplain sedimentation, bank erosion, and channel morphology, MID-Atlantic, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, E.R.; Hupp, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    Many rivers and streams of the Mid-Atlantic Region, United States (U.S.) have been altered by postcolonial floodplain sedimentation (legacy sediment) associated with numerous milldams. Little Conestoga Creek, Pennsylvania, a tributary to the Susquehanna River and the Chesapeake Bay, is one of these streams. Floodplain sedimentation rates, bank erosion rates, and channel morphology were measured annually during 2004-2007 at five sites along a 28-km length of Little Conestoga Creek with nine colonial era milldams (one dam was still in place in 2007). This study was part of a larger cooperative effort to quantify floodplain sedimentation, bank erosion, and channel morphology in a high sediment yielding region of the Chesapeake Bay watershed. Data from the five sites were used to estimate the annual volume and mass of sediment stored on the floodplain and eroded from the banks for 14 segments along the 28-km length of creek. A bank and floodplain reach based sediment budget (sediment budget) was constructed for the 28 km by summing the net volume of sediment deposited and eroded from each segment. Mean floodplain sedimentation rates for Little Conestoga Creek were variable, with erosion at one upstream site (-5 mm/year) to deposition at the other four sites (highest = 11 mm/year) despite over a meter of floodplain aggradation from postcolonial sedimentation. Mean bank erosion rates range between 29 and 163 mm/year among the five sites. Bank height increased 1 m for every 10.6 m of channel width, from upstream to downstream (R2 = 0.79, p < 0.0001) resulting in progressively lowered hydraulic connectivity between the channel and the floodplain. Floodplain sedimentation and bank erosion rates also appear to be affected by the proximity of the segments to one existing milldam, which promotes deposition upstream and scouring downstream. The floodplain and bank along the 28-km reach produced a net mean sediment loss of 5,634 Mg/year for 2004-2007, indicating that bank

  2. Pupal cocoons affect sanitary brood care and limit fungal infections in ant colonies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The brood of ants and other social insects is highly susceptible to pathogens, particularly those that penetrate the soft larval and pupal cuticle. We here test whether the presence of a pupal cocoon, which occurs in some ant species but not in others, affects the sanitary brood care and fungal infection patterns after exposure to the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium brunneum. We use a) a comparative approach analysing four species with either naked or cocooned pupae and b) a within-species analysis of a single ant species, in which both pupal types co-exist in the same colony. Results We found that the presence of a cocoon did not compromise fungal pathogen detection by the ants and that species with cocooned pupae increased brood grooming after pathogen exposure. All tested ant species further removed brood from their nests, which was predominantly expressed towards larvae and naked pupae treated with the live fungal pathogen. In contrast, cocooned pupae exposed to live fungus were not removed at higher rates than cocooned pupae exposed to dead fungus or a sham control. Consistent with this, exposure to the live fungus caused high numbers of infections and fungal outgrowth in larvae and naked pupae, but not in cocooned pupae. Moreover, the ants consistently removed the brood prior to fungal outgrowth, ensuring a clean brood chamber. Conclusion Our study suggests that the pupal cocoon has a protective effect against fungal infection, causing an adaptive change in sanitary behaviours by the ants. It further demonstrates that brood removal–originally described for honeybees as “hygienic behaviour”–is a widespread sanitary behaviour in ants, which likely has important implications on disease dynamics in social insect colonies. PMID:24125481

  3. Pavilion Lake Microbialites: Morphological, Molecular and Biochemical Evidence for a Cold-Water Transition to Colonial Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Lim, Darlene; Laval, Bernard; Turse, Carol; António, Marina Resendes de Sousa; Chan, Olivia; Pointing, Stephen B.; Brady, Allyson; Reid, Donnie; Irwin, Louis N.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of microbialite structures in a freshwater, dimictic mid-latitude lake and their establishment after the last ice age about 10,000 years ago is puzzling. Freshwater calcite microbialites at Pavilion Lake, British Columbia, Canada, consist of a complex community of microorganisms that collectively form large, ordered structured aggregates. This distinctive assemblage of freshwater calcite microbialites was studied through standard microbial methods, morphological observations, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis, DNA sequencing and the identification of quorum sensing molecules. Our results suggest that the microbialites may represent a transitional form from the exclusively prokaryotic colonial precursors of stromatolites to the multicellular organismic aggregates that give rise to coral reefs. PMID:25371330

  4. Pavilion lake microbialites: morphological, molecular and biochemical evidence for a cold-water transition to colonial aggregates.

    PubMed

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Lim, Darlene; Laval, Bernard; Turse, Carol; António, Marina Resendes de Sousa; Chan, Olivia; Pointing, Stephen B; Brady, Allyson; Reid, Donnie; Irwin, Louis N

    2012-01-01

    The presence of microbialite structures in a freshwater, dimictic mid-latitudelake and their establishment after the last ice age about 10,000 years ago is puzzling.Freshwater calcite microbialites at Pavilion Lake, British Columbia, Canada, consist of acomplex community of microorganisms that collectively form large, ordered structuredaggregates. This distinctive assemblage of freshwater calcite microbialites was studied through standard microbial methods, morphological observations, phospholipid fatty acid(PLFA) analysis, DNA sequencing and the identification of quorum sensing molecules.Our results suggest that the microbialites may represent a transitional form from theexclusively prokaryotic colonial precursors of stromatolites to the multicellular organismicaggregates that give rise to coral reefs. PMID:25371330

  5. Acaricide treatment affects viral dynamics in Varroa destructor-infested honey bee colonies via both host physiology and mite control.

    PubMed

    Locke, Barbara; Forsgren, Eva; Fries, Ingemar; de Miranda, Joachim R

    2012-01-01

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) colonies are declining, and a number of stressors have been identified that affect, alone or in combination, the health of honey bees. The ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, honey bee viruses that are often closely associated with the mite, and pesticides used to control the mite population form a complex system of stressors that may affect honey bee health in different ways. During an acaricide treatment using Apistan (plastic strips coated with tau-fluvalinate), we analyzed the infection dynamics of deformed wing virus (DWV), sacbrood virus (SBV), and black queen cell virus (BQCV) in adult bees, mite-infested pupae, their associated Varroa mites, and uninfested pupae, comparing these to similar samples from untreated control colonies. Titers of DWV increased initially with the onset of the acaricide application and then slightly decreased progressively coinciding with the removal of the Varroa mite infestation. This initial increase in DWV titers suggests a physiological effect of tau-fluvalinate on the host's susceptibility to viral infection. DWV titers in adult bees and uninfested pupae remained higher in treated colonies than in untreated colonies. The titers of SBV and BQCV did not show any direct relationship with mite infestation and showed a variety of possible effects of the acaricide treatment. The results indicate that other factors besides Varroa mite infestation may be important to the development and maintenance of damaging DWV titers in colonies. Possible biochemical explanations for the observed synergistic effects between tau-fluvalinate and virus infections are discussed. PMID:22020517

  6. The Importance of Microbes in Nutrition and Health of Honey Bee Colonies Part-2: Factors Affecting the Microbial Community in Honey Bee Colonies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Honey bee colonies have innumerable symbiotic bacteria and fungi that are essential to the health of the colony. In the first part of this series, we discussed the importance of microbes in maintaining the health of honey bee colonies. The bacteria, yeasts and molds that live in a healthy colony a...

  7. Personality and morphological traits affect pigeon survival from raptor attacks.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carlos D; Cramer, Julia F; Pârâu, Liviu G; Miranda, Ana C; Wikelski, Martin; Dechmann, Dina K N

    2015-01-01

    Personality traits have recently been shown to impact fitness in different animal species, potentially making them similarly relevant drivers as morphological and life history traits along the evolutionary pathways of organisms. Predation is a major force of natural selection through its deterministic effects on individual survival, but how predation pressure has helped to shape personality trait selection, especially in free-ranging animals, remains poorly understood. We used high-precision GPS tracking to follow whole flocks of homing pigeons (Columba livia) with known personalities and morphology during homing flights where they were severely predated by raptors. This allowed us to determine how the personality and morphology traits of pigeons may affect their risk of being predated by raptors. Our survival model showed that individual pigeons, which were more tolerant to human approach, slower to escape from a confined environment, more resistant to human handling, with larger tarsi, and with lighter plumage, were more likely to be predated by raptors. We provide rare empirical evidence that the personality of prey influences their risk of being predated under free-ranging circumstances. PMID:26489437

  8. Personality and morphological traits affect pigeon survival from raptor attacks

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Carlos D.; Cramer, Julia F.; Pârâu, Liviu G.; Miranda, Ana C.; Wikelski, Martin; Dechmann, Dina K. N.

    2015-01-01

    Personality traits have recently been shown to impact fitness in different animal species, potentially making them similarly relevant drivers as morphological and life history traits along the evolutionary pathways of organisms. Predation is a major force of natural selection through its deterministic effects on individual survival, but how predation pressure has helped to shape personality trait selection, especially in free-ranging animals, remains poorly understood. We used high-precision GPS tracking to follow whole flocks of homing pigeons (Columba livia) with known personalities and morphology during homing flights where they were severely predated by raptors. This allowed us to determine how the personality and morphology traits of pigeons may affect their risk of being predated by raptors. Our survival model showed that individual pigeons, which were more tolerant to human approach, slower to escape from a confined environment, more resistant to human handling, with larger tarsi, and with lighter plumage, were more likely to be predated by raptors. We provide rare empirical evidence that the personality of prey influences their risk of being predated under free-ranging circumstances. PMID:26489437

  9. Colony pace: a life-history trait affecting social insect epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Buechel, Séverine Denise; Schmid-Hempel, Paul

    2016-01-13

    Among colonies of social insects, the worker turnover rate (colony 'pace') typically shows considerable variation. This has epidemiological consequences for parasites, because in 'fast-paced' colonies, with short-lived workers, the time of parasite residence in a given host will be reduced, and further transmission may thus get less likely. Here, we test this idea and ask whether pace is a life-history strategy against infectious parasites. We infected bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) with the infectious gut parasite Crithidia bombi, and experimentally manipulated birth and death rates to mimic slow and fast pace. We found that fewer workers and, importantly, fewer last-generation workers that are responsible for rearing sexuals were infected in colonies with faster pace. This translates into increased fitness in fast-paced colonies, as daughter queens exposed to fewer infected workers in the nest are less likely to become infected themselves, and have a higher chance of founding their own colonies in the next year. High worker turnover rate can thus act as a strategy of defence against a spreading infection in social insect colonies. PMID:26763696

  10. Monomorphic ants undergo within-colony morphological changes along the metal-pollution gradient.

    PubMed

    Grześ, Irena M; Okrutniak, Mateusz; Woch, Marcin W

    2015-04-01

    In ants, intra and inter-colony variation in body size can be considerable, even in monomorphic species. It has been previously shown that size-related parameters can be environmentally sensitive. The shape of the body size distribution curve is, however, rarely investigated. In this study, we measured head widthes of the black garden ant Lasius niger workers using digital methods. The ants were sampled from 51 colonies originating from 19 sites located along a metal pollution gradient, established in a former mining area in Poland. Total zinc concentrations in random samples of small invertebrates were used as a measure of site pollution levels. We found that the skewness of head size distribution grows significantly in line with the pollution level of the site, ranging from values slightly below zero (about -0.5) in the least polluted site up to a positive value (about 1.5) in the most polluted site. This result indicates that the frequency of small ants grows as pollution levels increase. The coefficient of variation, as well as the measures of central tendency, was not related to the pollution level. Four hypotheses explaining the obtained results are proposed. The bias towards the higher frequency of small workers may result from energy limitation and/or metal toxicity, but may also have an adaptive function. PMID:25395324

  11. Combined pesticide exposure severely affects individual- and colony-level traits in bees

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Richard J.; Ramos-Rodriguez, Oscar; Raine, Nigel E.

    2012-01-01

    Reported widespread declines of wild and managed insect pollinators have serious consequences for global ecosystem services and agricultural production1-3. Bees contribute around 80% of insect pollination, so it is imperative we understand and mitigate the causes of current declines4-6. Recent studies have implicated the role of pesticides as exposure to these chemicals has been associated with changes in bee behaviour7-11 and reductions in colony queen production12. However the key link between changes in individual behaviour and consequent impact at the colony level has not been shown. Social bee colonies depend on the collective performance of numerous individual workers. So whilst field-level pesticide concentrations can have a subtle/sublethal effect at the individual level8, it is not known whether bee societies can buffer such effects or if it results in a severe cumulative effect at the colony level. Furthermore, widespread agricultural intensification means bees are exposed to numerous pesticides when foraging13-15, yet the possible combinatorial effects of pesticide exposure have rarely been investigated16,17. Here we show that chronic exposure of bumblebees to two pesticides (neonicotinoid and pyrethroid) at concentrations that could approximate field-level exposure impairs natural foraging behaviour and increases worker mortality leading to significant reductions in brood development and colony success. We found worker foraging performance, particularly pollen collecting efficiency, was significantly reduced with observed knock-on effects for forager recruitment, worker losses and overall worker productivity. Moreover, we provide evidence that combinatorial exposure to pesticides increases the propensity of colonies to fail. PMID:23086150

  12. Effects of flow and colony morphology on the thermal boundary layer of corals

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Isabel M.; Kühl, Michael; Larkum, Anthony W. D.; Ralph, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal microenvironment of corals and the thermal effects of changing flow and radiation are critical to understanding heat-induced coral bleaching, a stress response resulting from the destruction of the symbiosis between corals and their photosynthetic microalgae. Temperature microsensor measurements at the surface of illuminated stony corals with uneven surface topography (Leptastrea purpurea and Platygyra sinensis) revealed millimetre-scale variations in surface temperature and thermal boundary layer (TBL) that may help understand the patchy nature of coral bleaching within single colonies. The effect of water flow on the thermal microenvironment was investigated in hemispherical and branching corals (Porites lobata and Stylophora pistillata, respectively) in a flow chamber experiment. For both coral types, the thickness of the TBL decreased exponentially from 2.5 mm at quasi-stagnant flow (0.3 cm s−1), to 1 mm at 5 cm s−1, with an exponent approximately 0.5 consistent with predictions from the heat transfer theory for simple geometrical objects and typical of laminar boundary layer processes. Measurements of mass transfer across the diffusive boundary layer using O2 microelectrodes revealed a greater exponent for mass transfer when compared with heat transfer, indicating that heat and mass transfer at the surface of corals are not exactly analogous processes. PMID:21602322

  13. Morphologic, Phylogenetic and Chemical Characterization of a Brackish Colonial Picocyanobacterium (Coelosphaeriaceae) with Bioactive Properties.

    PubMed

    Häggqvist, Kerstin; Toruńska-Sitarz, Anna; Błaszczyk, Agata; Mazur-Marzec, Hanna; Meriluoto, Jussi

    2016-04-01

    Despite their cosmopolitan distribution, knowledge on cyanobacteria in the family Coelosphaeriaceae is limited. In this study, a single species culture of a coelosphaeran cyanobacterium isolated from a brackish rock pool in the Baltic Sea was established. The strain was characterized by morphological features, partial 16S rRNA sequence and nonribosomal oligopeptide profile. The bioactivity of fractionated extracts against several serine proteases, as well as protein-serine/threonine phosphatases was studied. Phylogenetic analyses of the strain suggested a close relationship with Snowella litoralis, but its morphology resembled Woronichinia compacta. The controversial morphologic and phylogenetic results demonstrated remaining uncertainties regarding species division in this cyanobacteria family. Chemical analyses of the strain indicated production of nonribosomal oligopeptides. In fractionated extracts, masses and ion fragmentation spectra of seven possible anabaenopeptins were identified. Additionally, fragmentation spectra of cyanopeptolin-like peptides were collected in several of the fractions. The nonribosomal oligopeptide profile adds another potential identification criterion in future inter- and intraspecies comparisons of coelosphaeran cyanobacteria. The fractionated extracts showed significant activity against carboxypeptidase A and trypsin. Inhibition of these important metabolic enzymes might have impacts at the ecosystem level in aquatic habitats with high cyanobacteria densities. PMID:27077885

  14. Morphologic, Phylogenetic and Chemical Characterization of a Brackish Colonial Picocyanobacterium (Coelosphaeriaceae) with Bioactive Properties

    PubMed Central

    Häggqvist, Kerstin; Toruńska-Sitarz, Anna; Błaszczyk, Agata; Mazur-Marzec, Hanna; Meriluoto, Jussi

    2016-01-01

    Despite their cosmopolitan distribution, knowledge on cyanobacteria in the family Coelosphaeriaceae is limited. In this study, a single species culture of a coelosphaeran cyanobacterium isolated from a brackish rock pool in the Baltic Sea was established. The strain was characterized by morphological features, partial 16S rRNA sequence and nonribosomal oligopeptide profile. The bioactivity of fractionated extracts against several serine proteases, as well as protein-serine/threonine phosphatases was studied. Phylogenetic analyses of the strain suggested a close relationship with Snowella litoralis, but its morphology resembled Woronichinia compacta. The controversial morphologic and phylogenetic results demonstrated remaining uncertainties regarding species division in this cyanobacteria family. Chemical analyses of the strain indicated production of nonribosomal oligopeptides. In fractionated extracts, masses and ion fragmentation spectra of seven possible anabaenopeptins were identified. Additionally, fragmentation spectra of cyanopeptolin-like peptides were collected in several of the fractions. The nonribosomal oligopeptide profile adds another potential identification criterion in future inter- and intraspecies comparisons of coelosphaeran cyanobacteria. The fractionated extracts showed significant activity against carboxypeptidase A and trypsin. Inhibition of these important metabolic enzymes might have impacts at the ecosystem level in aquatic habitats with high cyanobacteria densities. PMID:27077885

  15. Spatiotemporal dynamics of black-tailed prairie dog colonies affected by plague

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) are a key component of the disturbance regime in semi-arid grasslands of central North America. Many studies have compared community and ecosystem characteristics on prairie dog colonies to grasslands without prairie dogs, but little is known about la...

  16. Morphological and molecular characterization of a sexually reproducing colony of the booklouse Liposcelis bostrychophila (Psocodea: Liposcelididae) found in Arizona

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qianqian; Kučerová, Zuzana; Perlman, Steve J.; Opit, George P.; Mockford, Edward L.; Behar, Adi; Robinson, Wyatt E.; Stejskal, Václav; Li, Zhihong; Shao, Renfu

    2015-01-01

    The booklouse, Liposcelis bostrychophila, is a worldwide pest of stored products. For decades, only thelytokous parthenogenetic reproduction was documented in L. bostrychophila. Male L. bostrychophila were first found in Hawaii in 2002. In 2009, a sexual strain was found in Arizona. We examined the morphology of both males and females of the Arizona strain and compared the Arizona sexual strain with the Hawaii sexual strain and the parthenogenetic strains of L. bostrychophila. The sexual and parthenogenetic strains show some differences in eye morphology. To examine the relationship between sexual and asexual lineages, we sequenced the mitochondrial 12S and 16S ribosomal RNA genes of males and females from the Arizona strain. Phylogenetic analyses of L. bostrychophila individuals revealed that: 1) the sexually reproducing colony found in Arizona contains two closely related mitochondrial DNA haplotypes – one present in only females and the other in both males and females; and 2) the Arizona sexual strain was most closely related to a parthenogenetic strain in Illinois. We detected Rickettsia in all of the parthenogenetic individuals we checked but not in any Arizona sexual individuals. Further evidence is required to establish whether the presence of Rickettsia is linked to asexual reproduction in Liposcelis. PMID:26013922

  17. Temperature affects the silicate morphology in a diatom

    PubMed Central

    Javaheri, N.; Dries, R.; Burson, A.; Stal, L. J.; Sloot, P. M. A.; Kaandorp, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Silica deposition by diatoms, a common component of the phytoplankton, has attracted considerable interest given the importance in ecology and materials science. There has recently been a great deal of research into the biological control of biosilicifcation, yet the in vivo physical and chemical effects have not been quantitatively investigated. We have grown the marine diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana in batch culture at three temperatures (14o, 18o, and 23 °C). We observed three distinct temperature-dependent growth phases. The morphology of silica was investigated using scanning electron microscopy followed by image analysis and supervised learning. The silica in the valves of the same species showed different structures: a mesh-like pattern in silicon-rich cultures and a tree-like pattern in silicon-limited cultures. Moreover, temperature affected this silica pattern, especially in silicon-limited cultures. We conclude that cells grown at 14 °C and 18 °C divide more successfully in Si-limited conditions by developing a tree-like pattern (lower silicification). PMID:26113515

  18. Myoblasts from affected and non-affected FSHD muscles exhibit morphological differentiation defects

    PubMed Central

    Barro, Marietta; Carnac, Gilles; Flavier, Sébastien; Mercier, Jacques; Vassetzky, Yegor; Laoudj-Chenivesse, Dalila

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is a muscular hereditary disease with a prevalence of 1 in 20,000 caused by a partial deletion of a subtelomeric repeat array on chromosome 4q. However, very little is known about the pathogenesis as well as the molecular and biochemical changes linked to the progressive muscle degeneration observed in these patients. Several studies have investigated possible pathophysiological pathways in FSHD myoblasts and mature muscle cells but some of these reports were apparently in contradiction. The discrepancy between these studies may be explained by differences between the sources of myoblasts. Therefore, we decided to thoroughly analyze affected and unaffected muscles from patients with FSHD in terms of vulnerability to oxidative stress, differentiation capacity and morphological abnormalities. We have established a panel of primary myoblast cell cultures from patients affected with FSHD and matched healthy individuals. Our results show that primary myoblasts are more susceptible to an induced oxidative stress than control myoblasts. Moreover, we demonstrate that both types of FSHD primary myoblasts differentiate into multi-nucleated myotubes, which present morphological abnormalities. Whereas control myoblasts fuse to form branched myotubes with aligned nuclei, FSHD myoblasts fuse to form either thin and branched myotubes with aligned nuclei or large myotubes with random nuclei distribution. In conclusion, we postulate that these abnormalities could be responsible for muscle weakness in patients with FSHD and provide an important marker for FSHD myoblasts. PMID:18505476

  19. A morphologically specialized soldier caste improves colony defense in a neotropical eusocial bee

    PubMed Central

    Grüter, Christoph; Menezes, Cristiano; Imperatriz-Fonseca, Vera L.; Ratnieks, Francis L. W.

    2012-01-01

    Division of labor among workers is common in insect societies and is thought to be important in their ecological success. In most species, division of labor is based on age (temporal castes), but workers in some ants and termites show morphological specialization for particular tasks (physical castes). Large-headed soldier ants and termites are well-known examples of this specialization. However, until now there has been no equivalent example of physical worker subcastes in social bees or wasps. Here we provide evidence for a physical soldier subcaste in a bee. In the neotropical stingless bee Tetragonisca angustula, nest defense is performed by two groups of guards, one hovering near the nest entrance and the other standing on the wax entrance tube. We show that both types of guards are 30% heavier than foragers and of different shape; foragers have relatively larger heads, whereas guards have larger legs. Low variation within each subcaste results in negligible size overlap between guards and foragers, further indicating that they are distinct physical castes. In addition, workers that remove garbage from the nest are of intermediate size, suggesting that they might represent another unrecognized caste. Guards or soldiers are reared in low but sufficient numbers (1–2% of emerging workers), considering that <1% usually perform this task. When challenged by the obligate robber bee Lestrimelitta limao, an important natural enemy, larger workers were able to fight for longer before being defeated by the much larger robber. This discovery opens up opportunities for the comparative study of physical castes in social insects, including the question of why soldiers appear to be so much rarer in bees than in ants or termites. PMID:22232688

  20. SEASON OF DELTAMETHRIN APPLICATION AFFECTS FLEA AND PLAGUE CONTROL IN WHITE-TAILED PRAIRIE DOG (CYNOMYS LEUCURUS) COLONIES, COLORADO, USA.

    PubMed

    Tripp, Daniel W; Streich, Sean P; Sack, Danielle A; Martin, Daniel J; Griffin, Karen A; Miller, Michael W

    2016-07-01

    In 2008 and 2009, we evaluated the duration of prophylactic deltamethrin treatments in white-tailed prairie dog ( Cynomys leucurus ) colonies and compared effects of autumn or spring dust application in suppressing flea numbers and plague. Plague occurred before and during our experiment. Overall, flea abundance tended to increase from May or June to September, but it was affected by deltamethrin treatment and plague dynamics. Success in trapping prairie dogs (animals caught/trap days) declined between June and September at all study sites. However, by September trap success on dusted sites (19%; 95% confidence interval [CI] 16-22%) was about 15-fold greater than on undusted control sites (1%; CI 0.3-4%; P≤0.0001). Applying deltamethrin dust as early as 12 mo prior seemed to afford some protection to prairie dogs. Our data showed that dusting even a portion of a prairie dog colony can prolong its persistence despite epizootic plague. Autumn dusting may offer advantages over spring in suppressing overwinter or early-spring flea activity, but timing should be adjusted to precede the annual decline in aboveground activity for hibernating prairie dog species. Large colony complexes or collections of occupied but fragmented habitat may benefit from dusting some sites in spring and others in autumn to maximize flea suppression in a portion of the complex or habitat year-round. PMID:27195680

  1. Phenotypic Heterogeneity Affects Stenotrophomonas maltophilia K279a Colony Morphotypes and β-Lactamase Expression

    PubMed Central

    Abda, Ebrahim M.; Krysciak, Dagmar; Krohn-Molt, Ines; Mamat, Uwe; Schmeisser, Christel; Förstner, Konrad U.; Schaible, Ulrich E.; Kohl, Thomas A.; Nieman, Stefan; Streit, Wolfgang R.

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity at the cellular level in response to various stresses, e.g., antibiotic treatment has been reported for a number of bacteria. In a clonal population, cell-to-cell variation may result in phenotypic heterogeneity that is a mechanism to survive changing environments including antibiotic therapy. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia has been frequently isolated from cystic fibrosis patients, can cause numerous infections in other organs and tissues, and is difficult to treat due to antibiotic resistances. S. maltophilia K279a produces the L1 and L2 β-lactamases in response to β-lactam treatment. Here we report that the patient isolate S. maltophilia K279a diverges into cellular subpopulations with distinct but reversible morphotypes of small and big colonies when challenged with ampicillin. This observation is consistent with the formation of elongated chains of bacteria during exponential growth phase and the occurrence of mainly rod-shaped cells in liquid media. RNA-seq analysis of small versus big colonies revealed differential regulation of at least seven genes among the colony morphotypes. Among those, blaL1 and blaL2 were transcriptionally the most strongly upregulated genes. Promoter fusions of blaL1 and blaL2 genes indicated that expression of both genes is also subject to high levels of phenotypic heterogeneous expression on a single cell level. Additionally, the comE homolog was found to be differentially expressed in homogenously versus heterogeneously blaL2 expressing cells as identified by RNA-seq analysis. Overexpression of comE in S. maltophilia K279a reduced the level of cells that were in a blaL2-ON mode to 1% or lower. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that S. maltophilia K279a populations develop phenotypic heterogeneity in an ampicillin challenged model. This cellular variability is triggered by regulation networks including blaL1, blaL2, and comE. PMID:26696982

  2. Phenotypic Heterogeneity Affects Stenotrophomonas maltophilia K279a Colony Morphotypes and β-Lactamase Expression.

    PubMed

    Abda, Ebrahim M; Krysciak, Dagmar; Krohn-Molt, Ines; Mamat, Uwe; Schmeisser, Christel; Förstner, Konrad U; Schaible, Ulrich E; Kohl, Thomas A; Nieman, Stefan; Streit, Wolfgang R

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity at the cellular level in response to various stresses, e.g., antibiotic treatment has been reported for a number of bacteria. In a clonal population, cell-to-cell variation may result in phenotypic heterogeneity that is a mechanism to survive changing environments including antibiotic therapy. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia has been frequently isolated from cystic fibrosis patients, can cause numerous infections in other organs and tissues, and is difficult to treat due to antibiotic resistances. S. maltophilia K279a produces the L1 and L2 β-lactamases in response to β-lactam treatment. Here we report that the patient isolate S. maltophilia K279a diverges into cellular subpopulations with distinct but reversible morphotypes of small and big colonies when challenged with ampicillin. This observation is consistent with the formation of elongated chains of bacteria during exponential growth phase and the occurrence of mainly rod-shaped cells in liquid media. RNA-seq analysis of small versus big colonies revealed differential regulation of at least seven genes among the colony morphotypes. Among those, bla L1 and bla L2 were transcriptionally the most strongly upregulated genes. Promoter fusions of bla L1 and bla L2 genes indicated that expression of both genes is also subject to high levels of phenotypic heterogeneous expression on a single cell level. Additionally, the comE homolog was found to be differentially expressed in homogenously versus heterogeneously bla L2 expressing cells as identified by RNA-seq analysis. Overexpression of comE in S. maltophilia K279a reduced the level of cells that were in a bla L2-ON mode to 1% or lower. Taken together, our data provide strong evidence that S. maltophilia K279a populations develop phenotypic heterogeneity in an ampicillin challenged model. This cellular variability is triggered by regulation networks including bla L1, bla L2, and comE. PMID:26696982

  3. How Word Frequency Affects Morphological Processing in Monolinguals and Bilinguals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehtonen, Minna; Laine, Matti

    2003-01-01

    The present study investigated processing of morphologically complex words in three different frequency ranges in monolingual Finnish speakers and Finnish-Swedish bilinguals. By employing a visual lexical decision task, we found a differential pattern of results in monolinguals vs. bilinguals. Monolingual Finns seemed to process low frequency and…

  4. Factors Affecting the Acquisition of Plural Morphology in Jordanian Arabic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albirini, Abdulkafi

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the development of plural morphology in Jordanian Arab children, and explores the role of the predictability, transparency, productivity, and frequency of different plural forms in determining the trajectory that children follow in acquiring this complex inflectional system. The study also re-examines the development of the…

  5. Altered Competitive Fitness, Antimicrobial Susceptibility, and Cellular Morphology in a Triclosan-Induced Small-Colony Variant of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Sarah; Latimer, Joe; Bazaid, Abdulrahman

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can produce small-colony variants (SCVs) that express various phenotypes. While their significance is unclear, SCV propagation may be influenced by relative fitness, antimicrobial susceptibility, and the underlying mechanism. We have investigated triclosan-induced generation of SCVs in six S. aureus strains, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Parent strains (P0) were repeatedly passaged on concentration gradients of triclosan using a solid-state exposure system to generate P10. P10 was subsequently passaged without triclosan to generate X10. Susceptibility to triclosan and 7 antibiotics was assessed at all stages. For S. aureus ATCC 6538, SCVs were further characterized by determining microbicide susceptibility and competitive fitness. Cellular morphology was examined using electron microscopy, and protein expression was evaluated through proteomics. Triclosan susceptibility in all SCVs (which could be generated from 4/6 strains) was markedly decreased, while antibiotic susceptibility was significantly increased in the majority of cases. An SCV of S. aureus ATCC 6538 exhibited significantly increased susceptibility to all tested microbicides. Cross-wall formation was impaired in this bacterium, while expression of FabI, a target of triclosan, and IsaA, a lytic transglycosylase involved in cell division, was increased. The P10 SCV was 49% less fit than P0. In summary, triclosan exposure of S. aureus produced SCVs in 4/6 test bacteria, with decreased triclosan susceptibility but with generally increased antibiotic susceptibility. An SCV derived from S. aureus ATCC 6538 showed reduced competitive fitness, potentially due to impaired cell division. In this SCV, increased FabI expression could account for reduced triclosan susceptibility, while IsaA may be upregulated in response to cell division defects. PMID:26033734

  6. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase φ Regulates Paxillin Tyrosine Phosphorylation and Mediates Colony-Stimulating Factor 1-Induced Morphological Changes in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pixley, Fiona J.; Lee, Pierre S. W.; Condeelis, John S.; Stanley, E. Richard

    2001-01-01

    Removal of colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1) causes macrophages to round up and to increase their expression of protein tyrosine phosphatase φ (PTPφ). This is accompanied by the disruption of focal complexes and the formation of ruffles. Here we have overexpressed wild-type (WT) PTPφ and a phosphatase-inactive (C325S) mutant in a macrophage cell line in the presence and absence of CSF-1. In the presence of CSF-1, WT PTPφ induces cell rounding and ruffle formation, while C325S PTPφ has no effect. In contrast, in CSF-1-starved cells, C325S PTPφ behaves in a dominant negative fashion, preventing rounding and ruffling. Furthermore, C325S PTPφ increases adhesion in cycling cells, while WT PTPφ enhances motility. In WT PTPφ-overexpressing cells, the focal contact protein paxillin is selectively depleted from focal complexes and specifically dephosphorylated on tyrosine. In contrast, paxillin is hyperphosphorylated in C325S PTPφ-expressing cells. Moreover, a complex containing PTPφ, paxillin, and a paxillin-associated tyrosine kinase, Pyk2, can be immunoprecipitated from macrophage lysates, and the catalytic domain of PTPφ selectively binds paxillin and Pyk2 in vitro. Although PTPφ and Pyk2 do not colocalize with paxillin in focal complexes, all three proteins are colocalized in dorsal ruffles. The results suggest that paxillin is dephosphorylated by PTPφ in dorsal ruffles, using Pyk2 as a bridging molecule, resulting in a reduced pool of tyrosine-phosphorylated paxillin available for incorporation into focal complexes, thereby mediating CSF-1 regulation of macrophage morphology, adhesion, and motility. PMID:11238916

  7. Clinorotation affects morphology and ethylene production in soybean seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilaire, E.; Peterson, B. V.; Guikema, J. A.; Brown, C. S.; Sager, J. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The microgravity environment of spaceflight influences growth, morphology and metabolism in etiolated germinating soybean. To determine if clinorotation will similarly impact these processes, we conducted ground-based studies in conjunction with two space experiment opportunities. Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) seeds were planted within BRIC (Biological Research In Canister) canisters and grown for seven days at 20 degrees C under clinorotation (1 rpm) conditions or in a stationary upright mode. Gas samples were taken daily and plants were harvested after seven days for measurement of growth and morphology. Compared to the stationary upright controls, plants exposed to clinorotation exhibited increased root length (125% greater) and fresh weight (42% greater), whereas shoot length and fresh weight decreased by 33% and 16% respectively. Plants grown under clinorotation produced twice as much ethylene as the stationary controls. Seedlings treated with triiodo benzoic acid (TIBA), an auxin transport inhibitor, under clinorotation produced 50% less ethylene than the untreated control subjected to the same gravity treatment, whereas a treatment with 2,4-D increased ethylene by five-fold in the clinorotated plants. These data suggest that slow clinorotation influences biomass partitioning and ethylene production in etiolated soybean plants.

  8. Tunable Cosolvent Annealing Affects on Block Copolymer Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotrik, Kevin; Son, Jeong Gon; Hannon, Adam; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo; Ross, Caroline

    2011-03-01

    Being able to precisely and reproducibly control block copolymer (BCP) morphology is of interest for lithographic applications due to the techniques ability to result in feature sizes ranging from 10-100nm. We explore the morphological phase behavior that thin films (30-40nm) of poly(styrene-b-dimethylsiloxane) (PS-PDMS, 45kg/mol, ~ 0.26 segmental Flory-Huggins interaction parameter) exhibit under different cosolvent vapors of toluene and heptane. Variation in the solvent conditions results in selective swelling of the different blocks of the copolymer depending on relative Hildebrand solubility parameters (e.g. PS- 18.5, toluene-18.3 (MPa)1/2) resulting in cylinders, spheres, lamella, and perforatted lamella self-assembled features which can be revealed by selectively etching the PS with an oxygen plasma (50W CF4). Here we describe precision solvent vapor control while doing in situ spectral reflectometry (230-1500nm) to track swelling of the BCP films as a function of time to gain insight into this BCP system.

  9. Factors affecting the acquisition of plural morphology in Jordanian Arabic.

    PubMed

    Albirini, Abdulkafi

    2015-07-01

    This study investigates the development of plural morphology in Jordanian Arab children, and explores the role of the predictability, transparency, productivity, and frequency of different plural forms in determining the trajectory that children follow in acquiring this complex inflectional system. The study also re-examines the development of the notion of default over several years. Sixty Jordanian children, equally divided among six age groups (three to eight years), completed an oral real-word pluralization task and a nonsense-word pluralization task. The findings indicate that feminine sound plurals are acquired before and extended to the other plural forms. Productivity and frequency seem to shape the acquisition patterns among younger children, but predictability becomes more critical at a later age. Younger children use the most productive plural as the default form, but older children tend to use two default forms based on frequency distributions in the adult language. The theoretical implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:25158792

  10. How Morphology Affects Singlet Fission in Crystalline Tetracene.

    PubMed

    Piland, Geoffrey B; Bardeen, Christopher J

    2015-05-21

    The dependence of exciton dynamics on the crystalline morphology of tetracene is investigated using time-resolved photoluminescence. Single crystals exhibit relatively slow singlet decays with times that range from 130 to 300 ps depending on the sample. This decay has an activation energy of ∼450 cm(-1) over the temperature range of 200-400 K. Single-crystal samples also exhibit more pronounced quantum beats due to the triplet pair spin coherences. Polycrystalline thin films grown by thermal evaporation have singlet decay times on the order of 70-90 ps with a much weaker temperature dependence. Many thin-film samples also exhibit a red-shifted excimer-like emission. When a polycrystalline thin film is thermally annealed to produce larger crystal domains, single-crystal behavior is recovered. We hypothesize that the different dynamics arise from the ability of singlet excitons in the thin films to sample regions with defects or packing motifs that accelerate singlet fission. PMID:26263258

  11. Habitat use affects morphological diversification in dragon lizards

    PubMed Central

    COLLAR, D C; SCHULTE, J A; O’MEARA, B C; LOSOS, J B

    2010-01-01

    Habitat use may lead to variation in diversity among evolutionary lineages because habitats differ in the variety of ways they allow for species to make a living. Here, we show that structural habitats contribute to differential diversification of limb and body form in dragon lizards (Agamidae). Based on phylogenetic analysis and ancestral state reconstructions for 90 species, we find that multiple lineages have independently adopted each of four habitat use types: rock-dwelling, terrestriality, semi-arboreality and arboreality. Given these reconstructions, we fit models of evolution to species’ morphological trait values and find that rock-dwelling and arboreality limit diversification relative to terrestriality and semi-arboreality. Models preferred by Akaike information criterion infer slower rates of size and shape evolution in lineages inferred to occupy rocks and trees, and model-averaged rate estimates are slowest for these habitat types. These results suggest that ground-dwelling facilitates ecomorphological differentiation and that use of trees or rocks impedes diversification. PMID:20345808

  12. Population growth of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) in honey bee colonies is affected by the number of foragers with mites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Varroa mites are a serious pest of honey bees and the leading cause of colony losses. Varroa have relatively low reproductive rates, so populations should not increase rapidly, but often they do. Other factors might contribute to the growth of Varroa populations including mite migration into colonie...

  13. Global History. A Curriculum Guide. Third Semester. Theme VI: Nineteenth Century Imperialism Affected the Imperial Powers and the Colonies. Student Worksheets. Experimental Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    The worksheets contained in this bulletin are designed for use in conjunction with the teaching strategies for Theme VI entitled, "Nineteenth Century Imperialism Affected the Imperial Powers and the Colonies." The worksheets correspond to specific teaching strategies with accompanying questions on the appropriate strategy page. Included are…

  14. Global History. A Curriculum Guide. Third Semester. Theme VI: Nineteenth Century Imperialism Affected the Imperial Powers and the Colonies. Teacher Strategies. Experimental Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    Designed to assist teachers and supervisors in the implementation of the global history course, this bulletin presents learning activities which include the rationale, performance objectives, and teaching strategies related to Theme VI entitled, "Nineteenth Century Imperialism Affected the Imperial Powers and the Colonies." This theme has seven…

  15. Spatio-temporal morphology changes in and quenching effects on the 2D spreading dynamics of cell colonies in both plain and methylcellulose-containing culture media.

    PubMed

    Muzzio, N E; Pasquale, M A; Huergo, M A C; Bolzán, A E; González, P H; Arvia, A J

    2016-06-01

    To deal with complex systems, microscopic and global approaches become of particular interest. Our previous results from the dynamics of large cell colonies indicated that their 2D front roughness dynamics is compatible with the standard Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) or the quenched KPZ equations either in plain or methylcellulose (MC)-containing gel culture media, respectively. In both cases, the influence of a non-uniform distribution of the colony constituents was significant. These results encouraged us to investigate the overall dynamics of those systems considering the morphology and size, the duplication rate, and the motility of single cells. For this purpose, colonies with different cell populations (N) exhibiting quasi-circular and quasi-linear growth fronts in plain and MC-containing culture media are investigated. For small N, the average radial front velocity and its change with time depend on MC concentration. MC in the medium interferes with cell mitosis, contributes to the local enlargement of cells, and increases the distribution of spatio-temporal cell density heterogeneities. Colony spreading in MC-containing media proceeds under two main quenching effects, I and II; the former mainly depending on the culture medium composition and structure and the latter caused by the distribution of enlarged local cell domains. For large N, colony spreading occurs at constant velocity. The characteristics of cell motility, assessed by measuring their trajectories and the corresponding velocity field, reflect the effect of enlarged, slow-moving cells and the structure of the medium. Local average cell size distribution and individual cell motility data from plain and MC-containing media are qualitatively consistent with the predictions of both the extended cellular Potts models and the observed transition of the front roughness dynamics from a standard KPZ to a quenched KPZ. In this case, quenching effects I and II cooperate and give rise to the quenched

  16. Comparison of reagent-impregnated paper strips and conventional tests for distinguishing Escherichia from Aerobacter: correlation with colonial morphology.

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, D; Wolfe, M W

    1968-10-01

    The means for distinguishing Escherichia from Aerobacter (Enterobacter) differ in laboratories and range from complete dependence on colonial reactions on typical gram-negative media to reliance on one or more of the classical indole, methyl red, Voges-Proskauer, citrate (IMViC) parameters. Three colonial types (one prejudged as Escherichia) of lactose-positive rods were catalogued on each of the most commonly used selective media, MacConkey Agar, Endo Agar, and E M B Agar. Each cultural type was presumptively diagnosed and then compared with the expected outcome of individual IMViC tests. The distribution of preliminary identifications was similar from growth patterns on MacConkey Agar and E M B Agar, but it differed markedly from Endo Agar. When organisms initially diagnosed by cultural methods were compared by single IMViC tests, it was found that for each colonial type one of the biochemical parameters was best suited. Thus, for those types initially considered Escherichia, the methyl red or Voges-Proskauer test results agreed most consistently; for other types, the citrate reaction was most satisfactory. In addition, when newly formulated reagent-impregnated paper strip methods for indole, Voges-Proskauer, and citrate were evaluated and compared to the standard methods, agreement was 97% for indole, 90% for Voges-Proskauer, and 95% for Simmons' citrate. PMID:4879210

  17. Colony Size Affects the Efficacy of Bait Containing Chlorfluazuron Against the Fungus-Growing Termite Macrotermes gilvus (Blattodea: Termitidae).

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Chen; Neoh, Kok-Boon; Lee, Chow-Yang

    2014-12-01

    The efficacy of chitin synthesis inhibitors (CSIs) against fungus-growing termites is known to vary. In this study, 0.1% chlorfluazuron (CFZ) cellulose bait was tested against medium and large field colonies of Macrotermes gilvus (Hagen). The termite mounds were dissected to determine the health of the colony. Individual termites (i.e., workers and larvae) and fungus combs were subjected to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis to detect the presence of CFZ. In this study, 540.0 ± 25.8 g (or equivalent to 540.0 ± 25.8 mg active ingredient) and 680.0 ± 49.0 g (680.0 ± 49.0 mg active ingredient) of bait matrix were removed by the medium- and large-sized colonies, respectively, after baiting. All treated medium-sized colonies were moribund. The dead termites were scattered in the mound, larvae were absent, population size had decreased by 90%, and the queens appeared unhealthy. In contrast, no or limited effects were found in large-sized colonies. Only trace amounts of CFZ were detected in workers, larvae, and fungus combs, and the population of large-sized colonies had declined by only up to 40%. This might be owing to the presence of large amount of basidiomycete fungus and a drastic decrease of CFZ content per unit fungus comb (a main food source of larvae) in the large-sized colonies, and hence reduced the toxic effect and longer time is required to accumulate the lethal dose in larvae. Nevertheless, we do not deny the possibility of CSI bait eliminating or suppressing the higher termite if the test colonies could pick up adequate lethal dose by installing more bait stations and prolonging the baiting period. PMID:26470081

  18. Cyclic Di-GMP Phosphodiesterases RmdA and RmdB Are Involved in Regulating Colony Morphology and Development in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Travis D.; Ryu, Min-Hyung; Sullivan, Matthew J.; Johnson, Ryan C.; Klena, Nikolai T.; Geiger, Robert M.; Gomelsky, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) regulates numerous processes in Gram-negative bacteria, yet little is known about its role in Gram-positive bacteria. Here we characterize two c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases from the filamentous high-GC Gram-positive actinobacterium Streptomyces coelicolor, involved in controlling colony morphology and development. A transposon mutation in one of the two phosphodiesterase genes, SCO0928, hereby designated rmdA (regulator of morphology and development A), resulted in decreased levels of spore-specific gray pigment and a delay in spore formation. The RmdA protein contains GGDEF-EAL domains arranged in tandem and possesses c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity, as is evident from in vitro enzymatic assays using the purified protein. RmdA contains a PAS9 domain and is a hemoprotein. Inactivation of another GGDEF-EAL-encoding gene, SCO5495, designated rmdB, resulted in a phenotype identical to that of the rmdA mutant. Purified soluble fragment of RmdB devoid of transmembrane domains also possesses c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity. The rmdA rmdB double mutant has a bald phenotype and is impaired in aerial mycelium formation. This suggests that RmdA and RmdB functions are additive and at least partially overlapping. The rmdA and rmdB mutations likely result in increased local pools of intracellular c-di-GMP, because intracellular c-di-GMP levels in the single mutants did not differ significantly from those of the wild type, whereas in the double rmdA rmdB mutant, c-di-GMP levels were 3-fold higher than those in the wild type. This study highlights the importance of c-di-GMP-dependent signaling in actinomycete colony morphology and development and identifies two c-di-GMP phosphodiesterases controlling these processes. PMID:22753061

  19. How orthographic transparency affects morphological processing in young readers with and without reading disability.

    PubMed

    Lázaro, Miguel; García, Laura; Burani, Cristina

    2015-10-01

    This study investigates how orthographic modifications to the stems of complex words affect morphological processing in proficient young Spanish readers and children with reading deficits. In a definition task all children, irrespective of their reading skill, were worse at defining derived words that had an orthographic alteration of the base stem than words with no orthographic alteration. In a go/no-go lexical decision task, an interaction between base frequency and orthographic alteration was found: base frequency affected derived words with no orthographic alteration more than words with alterations, irrespective of reading skill. Overall, results show that all children benefit from a high frequency base, skilled children outperform children with reading deficits and morphological processing is affected by orthographic alterations similarly in proficient and impaired readers. PMID:25899060

  20. Population growth of Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) in honey bee colonies is affected by the number of foragers with mites.

    PubMed

    DeGrandi-Hoffman, Gloria; Ahumada, Fabiana; Zazueta, Victor; Chambers, Mona; Hidalgo, Geoffrey; deJong, Emily Watkins

    2016-05-01

    Varroa mites are a serious pest of honey bees and the leading cause of colony losses. Varroa have relatively low reproductive rates, so populations should not increase rapidly, but often they do. Other factors might contribute to the growth of varroa populations including mite migration into colonies on foragers from other hives. We measured the proportion of foragers carrying mites on their bodies while entering and leaving hives, and determined its relationship to the growth of varroa populations in those hives at two apiary sites. We also compared the estimates of mite population growth with predictions from a varroa population dynamics model that generates estimates of mite population growth based on mite reproduction. Samples of capped brood and adult bees indicated that the proportion of brood cells infested with mites and adult bees with phoretic mites was low through the summer but increased sharply in the fall especially at site 1. The frequency of capturing foragers with mites on their bodies while entering or leaving hives also increased in the fall. The growth of varroa populations at both sites was not significantly related to our colony estimates of successful mite reproduction, but instead to the total number of foragers with mites (entering and leaving the colony). There were more foragers with mites at site 1 than site 2, and mite populations at site 1 were larger especially in the fall. The model accurately estimated phoretic mite populations and infested brood cells until November when predictions were much lower than those measured in colonies. The rapid growth of mite populations particularly in the fall being a product of mite migration rather than mite reproduction only is discussed. PMID:26910522

  1. Colony morphology and transcriptome profiling of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and its mutants deficient in alginate or all EPS synthesis under controlled matric potentials

    PubMed Central

    Gulez, Gamze; Altıntaş, Ali; Fazli, Mustafa; Dechesne, Arnaud; Workman, Christopher T; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Smets, Barth F

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida is a versatile bacterial species adapted to soil and its fluctuations. Like many other species living in soil, P. putida often faces water limitation. Alginate, an exopolysaccharide (EPS) produced by P. putida, is known to create hydrated environments and alleviate the effect of water limitation. In addition to alginate, P. putida is capable of producing cellulose (bcs), putida exopolysaccharide a (pea), and putida exopolysaccharide b (peb). However, unlike alginate, not much is known about their roles under water limitation. Hence, in this study we examined the role of different EPS components under mild water limitation. To create environmentally realistic water limited conditions as observed in soil, we used the Pressurized Porous Surface Model. Our main hypothesis was that under water limitation and in the absence of alginate other exopolysaccharides would be more active to maintain homeostasis. To test our hypothesis, we investigated colony morphologies and whole genome transcriptomes of P. putida KT2440 wild type and its mutants deficient in synthesis of either alginate or all known EPS. Overall our results support that alginate is an important exopolysaccharide under water limitation and in the absence of alginate other tolerance mechanisms are activated. PMID:24912454

  2. Urban habitat complexity affects species richness but not environmental filtering of morphologically-diverse ants

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Michael A.; Christie, Fiona J.; Hahs, Amy K.; Livesley, Stephen J.

    2015-01-01

    Habitat complexity is a major determinant of structure and diversity of ant assemblages. Following the size-grain hypothesis, smaller ant species are likely to be advantaged in more complex habitats compared to larger species. Habitat complexity can act as an environmental filter based on species size and morphological traits, therefore affecting the overall structure and diversity of ant assemblages. In natural and semi-natural ecosystems, habitat complexity is principally regulated by ecological successions or disturbance such as fire and grazing. Urban ecosystems provide an opportunity to test relationships between habitat, ant assemblage structure and ant traits using novel combinations of habitat complexity generated and sustained by human management. We sampled ant assemblages in low-complexity and high-complexity parks, and high-complexity woodland remnants, hypothesizing that (i) ant abundance and species richness would be higher in high-complexity urban habitats, (ii) ant assemblages would differ between low- and high-complexity habitats and (iii) ants living in high-complexity habitats would be smaller than those living in low-complexity habitats. Contrary to our hypothesis, ant species richness was higher in low-complexity habitats compared to high-complexity habitats. Overall, ant assemblages were significantly different among the habitat complexity types investigated, although ant size and morphology remained the same. Habitat complexity appears to affect the structure of ant assemblages in urban ecosystems as previously observed in natural and semi-natural ecosystems. However, the habitat complexity filter does not seem to be linked to ant morphological traits related to body size. PMID:26528416

  3. Urban habitat complexity affects species richness but not environmental filtering of morphologically-diverse ants.

    PubMed

    Ossola, Alessandro; Nash, Michael A; Christie, Fiona J; Hahs, Amy K; Livesley, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Habitat complexity is a major determinant of structure and diversity of ant assemblages. Following the size-grain hypothesis, smaller ant species are likely to be advantaged in more complex habitats compared to larger species. Habitat complexity can act as an environmental filter based on species size and morphological traits, therefore affecting the overall structure and diversity of ant assemblages. In natural and semi-natural ecosystems, habitat complexity is principally regulated by ecological successions or disturbance such as fire and grazing. Urban ecosystems provide an opportunity to test relationships between habitat, ant assemblage structure and ant traits using novel combinations of habitat complexity generated and sustained by human management. We sampled ant assemblages in low-complexity and high-complexity parks, and high-complexity woodland remnants, hypothesizing that (i) ant abundance and species richness would be higher in high-complexity urban habitats, (ii) ant assemblages would differ between low- and high-complexity habitats and (iii) ants living in high-complexity habitats would be smaller than those living in low-complexity habitats. Contrary to our hypothesis, ant species richness was higher in low-complexity habitats compared to high-complexity habitats. Overall, ant assemblages were significantly different among the habitat complexity types investigated, although ant size and morphology remained the same. Habitat complexity appears to affect the structure of ant assemblages in urban ecosystems as previously observed in natural and semi-natural ecosystems. However, the habitat complexity filter does not seem to be linked to ant morphological traits related to body size. PMID:26528416

  4. Colonial America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Web Feet K-8, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Presents resources for grades K-8, on the subject of Colonial America. Describes Web sites; CD-ROMs and software; videos; books; audios; magazines; and professional resources. Includes two articles, "Native Americans in the Colonies," and "The Golden Age of Pirates," which also highlight resources. Presents a Web activity focusing on daily life in…

  5. Hydrogeologic factors affecting cavern morphology within rocks of Mississippian age in northwestern Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Fanning, B.J. . Dept. of Geology); Brahana, J.V. . Geological Survey)

    1993-02-01

    Cavern development within rocks of Mississippian age in northwestern Arkansas is associated with two Pleistocene erosional features, the Boston Mountains Plateau and the Springfield Plateau. Each plateau is characterized by a distinct stratigraphic sequence with unique lithologies. Cavern morphology (both cross-sectional and planimetric) in each plateau is the result of the complex interaction of numerous hydrogeologic factors. Four of the most dominant factors which affect cavern morphology appear to be: (1) composition and continuity of the confining units; (2) percentage of noncarbonate components in rocks of the cavern-forming interval; (3) nature and distribution of ground-water recharge to the cavern-forming interval; and (4) nature and distribution of fractures within the cavern-forming interval. Network maze patterns typically develop in the Pitkin Limestone, the formation in which most caverns form beneath the Boston Mountains Plateau. The Pitkin, a bioclastic limestone, is confined above by siltstones of the Cane Hill member of the Hale Formation and below by shales of the Fayetteville Formation. The maze pattern indicates that these caverns probably were formed by dissolution of the rock matrix by diffuse recharge moving vertically through leaky confining units. Single rooms are the dominant cavern morphology in the chert-dominated Boone Formation of the Springfield Plateau. Where the concentration of chert is greater than 50 percent, the Boone lacks structural integrity and fails to develop well-integrated conduit networks. Point recharge features in outcrop areas of the Boone Formation are not visible in most of the Springfield Plateau because the insoluble residuum masks the upper bedrock surface. Where the Boone Formation is less than 7 meters thick, surface karst features are more prevalent.

  6. Aircraft noise exposure affects rat behavior, plasma norepinephrine levels, and cell morphology of the temporal lobe*

    PubMed Central

    Di, Guo-qing; Zhou, Bing; Li, Zheng-guang; Lin, Qi-li

    2011-01-01

    In order to investigate the physiological effects of airport noise exposure on organisms, in this study, we exposed Sprague-Dawley rats in soundproof chambers to previously recorded aircraft-related noise for 65 d. For comparison, we also used unexposed control rats. Noise was arranged according to aircraft flight schedules and was adjusted to its weighted equivalent continuous perceived noise levels (L WECPN) of 75 and 80 dB for the two experimental groups. We examined rat behaviors through an open field test and measured the concentrations of plasma norepinephrine (NE) by high performance liquid chromatography-fluorimetric detection (HPLC-FLD). We also examined the morphologies of neurons and synapses in the temporal lobe by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results showed that rats exposed to airport noise of 80 dB had significantly lower line crossing number (P<0.05) and significantly longer center area duration (P<0.05) than control animals. After 29 d of airport noise exposure, the concentration of plasma NE of exposed rats was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05). We also determined that the neuron and synapsis of the temporal lobe of rats showed signs of damage after aircraft noise of 80 dB exposure for 65 d. In conclusion, exposing rats to long-term aircraft noise affects their behaviors, plasma NE levels, and cell morphology of the temporal lobe. PMID:22135145

  7. Aircraft noise exposure affects rat behavior, plasma norepinephrine levels, and cell morphology of the temporal lobe.

    PubMed

    Di, Guo-Qing; Zhou, Bing; Li, Zheng-Guang; Lin, Qi-Li

    2011-12-01

    In order to investigate the physiological effects of airport noise exposure on organisms, in this study, we exposed Sprague-Dawley rats in soundproof chambers to previously recorded aircraft-related noise for 65 d. For comparison, we also used unexposed control rats. Noise was arranged according to aircraft flight schedules and was adjusted to its weighted equivalent continuous perceived noise levels (L(WECPN)) of 75 and 80 dB for the two experimental groups. We examined rat behaviors through an open field test and measured the concentrations of plasma norepinephrine (NE) by high performance liquid chromatography-fluorimetric detection (HPLC-FLD). We also examined the morphologies of neurons and synapses in the temporal lobe by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Our results showed that rats exposed to airport noise of 80 dB had significantly lower line crossing number (P<0.05) and significantly longer center area duration (P<0.05) than control animals. After 29 d of airport noise exposure, the concentration of plasma NE of exposed rats was significantly higher than that of the control group (P<0.05). We also determined that the neuron and synapsis of the temporal lobe of rats showed signs of damage after aircraft noise of 80 dB exposure for 65 d. In conclusion, exposing rats to long-term aircraft noise affects their behaviors, plasma NE levels, and cell morphology of the temporal lobe. PMID:22135145

  8. SAMM50 Affects Mitochondrial Morphology through the Association of Drp1 in Mammalian Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuo; Gao, Yali; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Han; Pan, Shiyi; Wang, Xiaoli; Du, Shiming; Deng, Zixin; Wang, Lianrong; Song, Zhiyin; Chen, Shi

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial fission and fusion activities are important for cell survival and function. Drp1 is a GTPase protein responsible for mitochondrial division, and SAMM50 is responsible for protein sorting and assembly. We demonstrated that SAMM50 overexpression results in Drp1-dependent mitochondrial fragmentation in HeLa cells. However, the mitochondrial fragmentation induced by SAMM50 overexpression could be reversed through co-expression with MFN2. Furthermore, SAMM50 interacts with Drp1 both in vivo and in vitro. The mitochondria in SAMM50 knockdown HeLa cells displayed a swollen phenotype, and the levels of the SAM complex and OPA1, along with the mitochondrial Drp1 levels, significantly decreased. In addition, mitochondrial inheritance was impaired in SAMM50 silenced cells. These results suggest that SAMM50 affects the Drp1-dependent mitochondrial morphology. PMID:27059175

  9. Targeted overexpression of the two colony-stimulating factor-1 isoforms in osteoblasts differentially affects bone loss in ovariectomized mice

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Gang-Qing; Wu, Jian-Jun; Ovadia, Shira; Troiano, Nancy; Sun, Ben Hua; Insogna, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF1) is one of two cytokines required for normal osteoclastogenesis. There are two major isoforms of CSF1, the cell-surface or membrane-bound isoform (mCSF1) and soluble CSF1 (sCSF1). Whether these isoforms serve nonredundant functions in bone is unclear. To explore this question, we generated transgenic mice expressing human sCSF1, human mCSF1, or both (s/mCSF1) in osteoblasts using the 2.3-kb rat αI-collagen promoter. Bone density determined by peripheral quantitative computed tomography was significantly reduced in mCSF1, sCSF1, and s/mCSF1 transgenic mice compared with wild-type animals. When analyzed by sex, sCSF1, and s/mCSF1, female animals but not mCSF1 female mice were found to have greater bone loss than their male littermates (−20 vs. −9.2%; P < 0.05 for sCSF1 and −21.6 vs. −11.2% for s/mCSF1; P < 0.01). By breeding CSF1 isoform-selective transgenic mice to an op/op background, mice were generated in which a single CSF1 isoform was the only source of the cytokine (sCSF1op/op and mCSF1op/op). Unlike osteoblast-targeted overexpression of mCSF1, selective transgenic expression of sCSF1 did not completely correct the op/op phenotype in 5-mo-old animals. Interestingly, compared with sham-ovariectomized mice of the same genotype, ovariectomy in sCSF1op/op mice led to a greater loss of spinal bone mineral density (22.1%) than was seen in either mCSF1op/op mice (12.9%) or in wild-type animals (10.9%). Our findings support the conclusion that sCSF1 and mCSF1 serve nonredundant functions in bone and that sCSF1 may play a role in mediating estrogen-deficiency bone loss. PMID:19141689

  10. Carbon availability affects diurnally controlled processes and cell morphology of Cyanothece 51142.

    PubMed

    Stöckel, Jana; Elvitigala, Thanura R; Liberton, Michelle; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photoautotrophs notable for their ability to utilize atmospheric CO2 as the major source of carbon. The prospect of using cyanobacteria to convert solar energy and high concentrations of CO2 efficiently into biomass and renewable energy sources has sparked substantial interest in using flue gas from coal-burning power plants as a source of inorganic carbon. However, in order to guide further advances in this area, a better understanding of the metabolic changes that occur under conditions of high CO2 is needed. To determine the effect of high CO2 on cell physiology and growth, we analyzed the global transcriptional changes in the unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece 51142 grown in 8% CO2-enriched air. We found a concerted response of genes related to photosynthesis, carbon metabolism, respiration, nitrogen fixation, ribosome biosynthesis, and the synthesis of nucleotides and structural cell wall polysaccharides. The overall response to 8% CO2 in Cyanothece 51142 involves different strategies, to compensate for the high C/N ratio during both phases of the diurnal cycle. Our analyses show that high CO2 conditions trigger the production of carbon-rich compounds and stimulate processes such as respiration and nitrogen fixation. In addition, we observed that high levels of CO2 affect fundamental cellular processes such as cell growth and dramatically alter the intracellular morphology. This study provides novel insights on how diurnal and developmental rhythms are integrated to facilitate adaptation to high CO2 in Cyanothece 51142. PMID:23457634

  11. Carbon Availability Affects Diurnally Controlled Processes and Cell Morphology of Cyanothece 51142

    PubMed Central

    Stöckel, Jana; Elvitigala, Thanura R.; Liberton, Michelle; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photoautotrophs notable for their ability to utilize atmospheric CO2 as the major source of carbon. The prospect of using cyanobacteria to convert solar energy and high concentrations of CO2 efficiently into biomass and renewable energy sources has sparked substantial interest in using flue gas from coal-burning power plants as a source of inorganic carbon. However, in order to guide further advances in this area, a better understanding of the metabolic changes that occur under conditions of high CO2 is needed. To determine the effect of high CO2 on cell physiology and growth, we analyzed the global transcriptional changes in the unicellular diazotrophic cyanobacterium Cyanothece 51142 grown in 8% CO2-enriched air. We found a concerted response of genes related to photosynthesis, carbon metabolism, respiration, nitrogen fixation, ribosome biosynthesis, and the synthesis of nucleotides and structural cell wall polysaccharides. The overall response to 8% CO2 in Cyanothece 51142 involves different strategies, to compensate for the high C/N ratio during both phases of the diurnal cycle. Our analyses show that high CO2 conditions trigger the production of carbon-rich compounds and stimulate processes such as respiration and nitrogen fixation. In addition, we observed that high levels of CO2 affect fundamental cellular processes such as cell growth and dramatically alter the intracellular morphology. This study provides novel insights on how diurnal and developmental rhythms are integrated to facilitate adaptation to high CO2 in Cyanothece 51142. PMID:23457634

  12. Hippocampal morphology is differentially affected by reproductive experience in the mother.

    PubMed

    Pawluski, Jodi L; Galea, Liisa A M

    2006-01-01

    Pregnancy and mothering result in a number of hormonal, neurological, and behavioral changes that are necessary to ensure reproductive success. With subsequent reproductive experience (multiparity and mothering), further neurological and behavioral changes may result. Recent research has shown that previous motherhood enhances both hippocampus-dependent learning and memory and long-term potentiation (LTP); together with decreases in hippocampus volumes during pregnancy it is suggested that the hippocampus is affected by pregnancy and/or mothering. The present experiment aimed to investigate the effect of reproductive experience (nulli, primi-, and multiparity and mothering) on dendritic morphology in the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus. Brains were stained with a modified version of the single-section Golgi impregnation technique, and dendritic length, number of branch points, and spine density was analyzed for apical and basal regions of CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons. Primiparity and/or mothering resulted in dendritic remodeling in both the CA1 and CA3 hippocampal regions, and multiparity resulted in enhanced spine density in the basal CA1 region, which was positively correlated with number of male pups in a litter. These findings point to the effect of reproductive experience and offspring on plasticity in the hippocampus, an area not traditionally associated with motherhood. PMID:16216005

  13. MeCP2 Affects Skeletal Muscle Growth and Morphology through Non Cell-Autonomous Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Francesco; Tirone, Mario; Bellini, Elisa; Campana, Lara; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Brunelli, Silvia; Landsberger, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an autism spectrum disorder mainly caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene and affecting roughly 1 out of 10.000 born girls. Symptoms range in severity and include stereotypical movement, lack of spoken language, seizures, ataxia and severe intellectual disability. Notably, muscle tone is generally abnormal in RTT girls and women and the Mecp2-null mouse model constitutively reflects this disease feature. We hypothesized that MeCP2 in muscle might physiologically contribute to its development and/or homeostasis, and conversely its defects in RTT might alter the tissue integrity or function. We show here that a disorganized architecture, with hypotrophic fibres and tissue fibrosis, characterizes skeletal muscles retrieved from Mecp2-null mice. Alterations of the IGF-1/Akt/mTOR pathway accompany the muscle phenotype. A conditional mouse model selectively depleted of Mecp2 in skeletal muscles is characterized by healthy muscles that are morphologically and molecularly indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice raising the possibility that hypotonia in RTT is mainly, if not exclusively, mediated by non-cell autonomous effects. Our results suggest that defects in paracrine/endocrine signaling and, in particular, in the GH/IGF axis appear as the major cause of the observed muscular defects. Remarkably, this is the first study describing the selective deletion of Mecp2 outside the brain. Similar future studies will permit to unambiguously define the direct impact of MeCP2 on tissue dysfunctions. PMID:26098633

  14. MeCP2 Affects Skeletal Muscle Growth and Morphology through Non Cell-Autonomous Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Conti, Valentina; Gandaglia, Anna; Galli, Francesco; Tirone, Mario; Bellini, Elisa; Campana, Lara; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Rovere-Querini, Patrizia; Brunelli, Silvia; Landsberger, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is an autism spectrum disorder mainly caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene and affecting roughly 1 out of 10.000 born girls. Symptoms range in severity and include stereotypical movement, lack of spoken language, seizures, ataxia and severe intellectual disability. Notably, muscle tone is generally abnormal in RTT girls and women and the Mecp2-null mouse model constitutively reflects this disease feature. We hypothesized that MeCP2 in muscle might physiologically contribute to its development and/or homeostasis, and conversely its defects in RTT might alter the tissue integrity or function. We show here that a disorganized architecture, with hypotrophic fibres and tissue fibrosis, characterizes skeletal muscles retrieved from Mecp2-null mice. Alterations of the IGF-1/Akt/mTOR pathway accompany the muscle phenotype. A conditional mouse model selectively depleted of Mecp2 in skeletal muscles is characterized by healthy muscles that are morphologically and molecularly indistinguishable from those of wild-type mice raising the possibility that hypotonia in RTT is mainly, if not exclusively, mediated by non-cell autonomous effects. Our results suggest that defects in paracrine/endocrine signaling and, in particular, in the GH/IGF axis appear as the major cause of the observed muscular defects. Remarkably, this is the first study describing the selective deletion of Mecp2 outside the brain. Similar future studies will permit to unambiguously define the direct impact of MeCP2 on tissue dysfunctions. PMID:26098633

  15. Alpha-Synuclein affects neurite morphology, autophagy, vesicle transport and axonal degeneration in CNS neurons

    PubMed Central

    Koch, J C; Bitow, F; Haack, J; d'Hedouville, Z; Zhang, J-N; Tönges, L; Michel, U; Oliveira, L M A; Jovin, T M; Liman, J; Tatenhorst, L; Bähr, M; Lingor, P

    2015-01-01

    Many neuropathological and experimental studies suggest that the degeneration of dopaminergic terminals and axons precedes the demise of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, which finally results in the clinical symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD). The mechanisms underlying this early axonal degeneration are, however, still poorly understood. Here, we examined the effects of overexpression of human wildtype alpha-synuclein (αSyn-WT), a protein associated with PD, and its mutant variants αSyn-A30P and -A53T on neurite morphology and functional parameters in rat primary midbrain neurons (PMN). Moreover, axonal degeneration after overexpression of αSyn-WT and -A30P was analyzed by live imaging in the rat optic nerve in vivo. We found that overexpression of αSyn-WT and of its mutants A30P and A53T impaired neurite outgrowth of PMN and affected neurite branching assessed by Sholl analysis in a variant-dependent manner. Surprisingly, the number of primary neurites per neuron was increased in neurons transfected with αSyn. Axonal vesicle transport was examined by live imaging of PMN co-transfected with EGFP-labeled synaptophysin. Overexpression of all αSyn variants significantly decreased the number of motile vesicles and decelerated vesicle transport compared with control. Macroautophagic flux in PMN was enhanced by αSyn-WT and -A53T but not by αSyn-A30P. Correspondingly, colocalization of αSyn and the autophagy marker LC3 was reduced for αSyn-A30P compared with the other αSyn variants. The number of mitochondria colocalizing with LC3 as a marker for mitophagy did not differ among the groups. In the rat optic nerve, both αSyn-WT and -A30P accelerated kinetics of acute axonal degeneration following crush lesion as analyzed by in vivo live imaging. We conclude that αSyn overexpression impairs neurite outgrowth and augments axonal degeneration, whereas axonal vesicle transport and autophagy are severely altered. PMID:26158517

  16. Phenomena affecting morphology of microporous poly(acrylonitrile) prepared via phase separation from solution

    SciTech Connect

    Legasse, R.R.; Weagley, R.J.; Leslie, P.K.; Schneider, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper is concerned with controlling the morphology of microporous polymers prepared via thermal demixing of solutions. 2 wt % solutions of poly(acrylonitrile) in maleic anhydride, a poor solvent, are first cooled to produce separated polymer-rich and solvent-rich phases. Removing the solvent by freeze drying then produces a microporous material having a density of 33 mg/cm{sup 3}, a void fraction of 97%, and a pore size of about 10 {mu}m. We find that the morphology cannot be explained by existing models, which focus on phase diagrams and kinetics of phase transformations during cooling of the solution. In conflict with those models, we find that two radically different morphologies can be produced even when the polymer concentration and cooling path are held strictly constant. A hypothesis that polymer degradation causes the different morphologies is not supported by GPC, {sup 13}C NMR, and FTIR experiments. Instead, we offer evidence that the different microporous morphologies are caused by different polymer conformations in solutions having the same concentration and temperature. 11 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Insights into Embryo Defenses of the Invasive Apple Snail Pomacea canaliculata: Egg Mass Ingestion Affects Rat Intestine Morphology and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, Eduardo J.; Heras, Horacio

    2014-01-01

    Background The spread of the invasive snail Pomacea canaliculata is expanding the rat lungworm disease beyond its native range. Their toxic eggs have virtually no predators and unusual defenses including a neurotoxic lectin and a proteinase inhibitor, presumably advertised by a warning coloration. We explored the effect of egg perivitellin fluid (PVF) ingestion on the rat small intestine morphology and physiology. Methodology/Principal Findings Through a combination of biochemical, histochemical, histopathological, scanning electron microscopy, cell culture and feeding experiments, we analyzed intestinal morphology, growth rate, hemaglutinating activity, cytotoxicity and cell proliferation after oral administration of PVF to rats. PVF adversely affects small intestine metabolism and morphology and consequently the standard growth rate, presumably by lectin-like proteins, as suggested by PVF hemaglutinating activity and its cytotoxic effect on Caco-2 cell culture. Short-term effects of ingested PVF were studied in growing rats. PVF-supplemented diet induced the appearance of shorter and wider villi as well as fused villi. This was associated with changes in glycoconjugate expression, increased cell proliferation at crypt base, and hypertrophic mucosal growth. This resulted in a decreased absorptive surface after 3 days of treatment and a diminished rat growth rate that reverted to normal after the fourth day of treatment. Longer exposure to PVF induced a time-dependent lengthening of the small intestine while switching to a control diet restored intestine length and morphology after 4 days. Conclusions/Significance Ingestion of PVF rapidly limits the ability of potential predators to absorb nutrients by inducing large, reversible changes in intestinal morphology and growth rate. The occurrence of toxins that affect intestinal morphology and absorption is a strategy against predation not recognized among animals before. Remarkably, this defense is rather similar to

  18. Morphological characterization of keratoconus-affected human corneas by SHG imaging and correlation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mercatelli, R.; Ratto, F.; Tatini, F.; Rossi, F.; Menabuoni, L.; Nicoletti, R.; Pini, R.; Pavone, Frederick; Cicchi, R.

    2016-03-01

    Keratoconus is an ophthalmic disease in which the cornea acquires an abnormal conical shape that prevents the correct focusing on the retina, causing visual impairment. The late diagnosis of keratoconus is among the principal causes of corneal transplantation surgery. In this study, we characterize the morphology of keratoconic corneas by means of the correlation of SHG images, finding that keratoconus can be diagnosed by analyzing the inclination of lamellae below Bowman's membrane. In addition, imaging performed with both sagittal and "en face" geometry demonstrated that this morphological features can be highlighted both ex vivo and in vivo.

  19. Glufosinate does not affect floral morphology and pollen viability in glufosinate-resistant cotton (Gossypium hirsutum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies were conducted to determine whether glufosinate treatments to glufosinate-resistant cotton caused changes in floral morphology, pollen viability, and seed set. Four glufosinate treatments were included: (1) glufosinate applied postemergence over the top (POST) at the four-leaf stage, (2) glu...

  20. How Will Climate Change Affect Channel Morphology and Salmonid Habitat in Mountain Basins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffington, J. M.; Goode, J.

    2010-12-01

    Riverine habitat for salmonids is intimately linked to channel morphology and fluvial processes (channel hydraulics, sediment transport and scour regime) which are, in turn, controlled by watershed hydrology and erosional processes that input sediment to the fluvial system. Climate change has the potential to alter the timing, magnitude, and style of sediment and water inputs to mountain rivers. Channel response to these changes may range from small-scale adjustments of channel characteristics (e.g., width, depth, grain size, scour depth) to larger-scale changes in channel type (e.g., metamorphosis from a pool-riffle channel to a plane-bed morphology). Identifying which parts of the river network will remain relatively stable in response to climate change, and which are likely to cross critical morphologic and scour thresholds is important for predicting effects on salmonid populations. Toward this end, a regime framework is presented for predicting the relative degree of morphologic stability and scour potential in different physiographic settings (different water and sediment regimes). Digital elevation models are used to explore the spatial distribution of these conditions and potential consequences for salmonid habitat across the landscape. Results suggest that the potential for scour and morphologic variability are strongly influenced by hydroclimate; snowmelt channels are relatively stable across floods of different magnitude, while rainfall-dominated channels are more variable and less stable. Transitional changes in hydrologic regime (mixed rain and snow) have the greatest potential for altering geomorphic conditions and salmonid habitat. However, the vulnerability of salmonids to climate-driven changes in scour regime depend on the species and its life history (i.e., depth to which eggs are buried and timing of incubation relative to scouring flows). Overall, the regime approach provides a useful first-order assessment of channel condition and response

  1. Nanoscale Roughness and Morphology Affect the IsoElectric Point of Titania Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Francesca; Vyas, Varun; Podestà, Alessandro; Milani, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    We report on the systematic investigation of the role of surface nanoscale roughness and morphology on the charging behaviour of nanostructured titania (TiO2) surfaces in aqueous solutions. IsoElectric Points (IEPs) of surfaces have been characterized by direct measurement of the electrostatic double layer interactions between titania surfaces and the micrometer-sized spherical silica probe of an atomic force microscope in NaCl aqueous electrolyte. The use of a colloidal probe provides well-defined interaction geometry and allows effectively probing the overall effect of nanoscale morphology. By using supersonic cluster beam deposition to fabricate nanostructured titania films, we achieved a quantitative control over the surface morphological parameters. We performed a systematical exploration of the electrical double layer properties in different interaction regimes characterized by different ratios of characteristic nanometric lengths of the system: the surface rms roughness Rq, the correlation length ξ and the Debye length λD. We observed a remarkable reduction by several pH units of IEP on rough nanostructured surfaces, with respect to flat crystalline rutile TiO2. In order to explain the observed behavior of IEP, we consider the roughness-induced self-overlap of the electrical double layers as a potential source of deviation from the trend expected for flat surfaces. PMID:23874708

  2. Morphology of leukocytes from cats affected with alpha-mannosidosis and mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI).

    PubMed

    Alroy, J; Freden, G O; Goyal, V; Raghavan, S S; Schunk, K L

    1989-07-01

    The morphology and ultrastructure of circulating white blood cells from six Persian and from five Russian Blue/Siamese cats deficient in lysosomal activity of alpha-mannosidase and arylsulfatase B, respectively, were studied and compared to cells from corresponding normal and carrier cats. In cats with mannosidosis, light microscopic examination revealed vacuoles in lymphocytes and monocytes, whereas electron microscopic studies demonstrated additional vacuoles in neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. In cats with mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI), vacuoles containing metachromatic granules were observed in lymphocytes, neutrophils, eosinophils, and monocytes. Ultrastructural studies of these cells identified the accumulation of fibrillar material, which often was associated with lamellated membrane structures. PMID:2503918

  3. MOBP levels are regulated by Fyn kinase and affect the morphological differentiation of oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Isabelle; Müller, Christina; Luhmann, Heiko J; White, Robin

    2016-03-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating glial cells of the central nervous system (CNS). Myelin is formed by extensive wrapping of oligodendroglial processes around axonal segments, which ultimately allows a rapid saltatory conduction of action potentials within the CNS and sustains neuronal health. The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Fyn is an important signaling molecule in oligodendrocytes. It controls the morphological differentiation of oligodendrocytes and is an integrator of axon-glial signaling cascades leading to localized synthesis of myelin basic protein (MBP), which is essential for myelin formation. The abundant myelin-associated oligodendrocytic basic protein (MOBP) resembles MBP in several aspects and has also been reported to be localized as mRNA and translated in the peripheral myelin compartment. The signals initiating local MOBP synthesis are so far unknown and the cellular function of MOBP remains elusive. Here, we show, by several approaches in cultured primary oligodendrocytes, that MOBP synthesis is stimulated by Fyn activity. Moreover, we reveal a new function for MOBP in oligodendroglial morphological differentiation. PMID:26801084

  4. Oxidation rate of iron sulfides as affected by surface area, morphology, oxygen concentration and autotrophic bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, C.E.

    1984-05-01

    The relationship between surface area and rate of oxidation of Fe sulphides (pyrite and marcasite) separated from Texas lignite was studied. The reaction kinetics with respect to Fe sulphide morphology and particle size were evaluated. The oxygen concentration and the presence of autotrophic Fe and S-oxidizing bacteria (thiobacillus ferro-oxidans) on the rate of oxidation were also evaluated. The formation of sulphate from Fe sulphide was selected to measure the rate of oxidation. Relative reaction rates for different morphological forms of Fe sulphide were: marcasite > framboidal pyrite > massive pyrite. As the surface area of pyrite doubled, reaction rate increased by a factor of 1.5. Sulphate production for the 5 to 2 ..mu..m fraction was twice that of the 50 to 20 ..mu..m fraction. Reaction rate was approximately fivefold greater for non-inoculated treatments at 20% O/sub 2/ compared with 0% O/sub 2/ and was approximately ninefold greater for the same treatment inoculated with T. ferro-oxidans.

  5. Eutrophication of Typical Chinese Shallow Lakes as affected by Hydrologic Characteristics and Lake-Basin Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Xu, Q.; Xi, B.; Wang, X.; Li, W.; Ji, D.; Jiang, T.

    2013-12-01

    The region below midstream of the Yangtze River is one of the areas in China that have a highest density of lakes, in particular shallow lakes. It has five nationally well-known freshwater lakes with largest sizes, namely the Poyang Lake, Doingting Lake, Taihu Lake, Chaohu Lake, and Hongze Lake. This region has 138 lakes with a water surface area of 10 km2 or larger. However, approximately 70% of the large- to medium-sized lakes in the eastern plains of China have been altered from pristine into reservoir-like conditions. Previous studies indicate that hydrologic characteristics and lake-basin morphology likely have important effects on the water quality (or eutrophication) of shallow lakes. However, little is known about quantitative relations among lake water quality, lake-basin morphology, and hydrologic characteristics. The objective of this study was to determine such quantitative relations using data on water quality, water ecology, hydrology, and basin morphology. The data were collected from 2008 to 2011 for ninety shallow lakes in the eastern plains of China. The results indicate that total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentrations decreased with increase of water depth. TN and TP concentrations in the lakes with a water depth of greater than 2m were less than those in the lakes with a water depth less than 2m. In addition, Chl-a concentration in the lakes with a surface area less than 25 km2 increased with the increase of relative water depth (Zr), whereas Chl-a concentration in the lakes with a surface area greater than 25 km2 decreased with the increase of Zr. Further, as influenced by hydrologic characteristics, the lakes in the upper reaches of the Yangtze River tended to have a better water quality than the lakes in the lower reaches, while the lakes that are hydraulically connected with the Yangtze River tended to have a better water quality than the lakes that are hydraulically disconnected from the river.

  6. Individual experience and evolutionary history of predation affect expression of heritable variation in fish personality and morphology

    PubMed Central

    Dingemanse, Niels J.; Van der Plas, Fons; Wright, Jonathan; Réale, Denis; Schrama, Maarten; Roff, Derek A.; Van der Zee, Els; Barber, Iain

    2009-01-01

    Predation plays a central role in evolutionary processes, but little is known about how predators affect the expression of heritable variation, restricting our ability to predict evolutionary effects of predation. We reared families of three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus from two populations—one with a history of fish predation (predator sympatric) and one without (predator naive)—and experimentally manipulated experience of predators during ontogeny. For a suite of ecologically relevant behavioural (‘personality’) and morphological traits, we then estimated two key variance components, additive genetic variance (VA) and residual variance (VR), that jointly shape narrow-sense heritability (h2= VA/(VA + VR)). Both population and treatment differentially affected VA versus VR, hence h2, but only for certain traits. The predator-naive population generally had lower VA and h2 values than the predator-sympatric population for personality behaviours, but not morphological traits. Values of VR and h2 were increased for some, but decreased for other personality traits in the predator-exposed treatment. For some personality traits, VA and h2 values were affected by treatment in the predator-naive population, but not in the predator-sympatric population, implying that the latter harboured less genetic variation for behavioural plasticity. Replication and experimental manipulation of predation regime are now needed to confirm that these population differences were related to variation in predator-induced selection. Cross-environment genetic correlations (rA) were tight for most traits, suggesting that predator-induced selection can affect the evolution of the same trait expressed in the absence of predators. The treatment effects on variance components imply that predators can affect evolution, not only by acting directly as selective agents, but also by influencing the expression of heritable variation. PMID:19129142

  7. Real-Time Observation on Evolution of Droplets Morphology Affected by Electric Current Pulse in Al-Bi Immiscible Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing; Wang, Tongmin; Cao, Fei; Fu, Hongwang; Fu, Yanan; Xie, Honglan; Xiao, Tiqiao

    2013-05-01

    The evolution of Bi-rich droplets morphology in a solidifying Al-Bi immiscible alloy was directly observed using a synchrotron microradiography technique. The electric current pulse (ECP) was applied to control the solidification process of Al-Bi immiscible alloy. It was found that the electromagnetic pinch force and Marangoni force induced by ECP and temperature gradient, respectively, can significantly affect the distribution of Bi-rich droplets. The electromagnetic pinch force drove the droplets from the center to side; meanwhile, the Marangoni force lifted the droplets from the bottom to the top. As a result, the droplets finally distributed with a manner of "inverted triangle."

  8. Developmental Trenbolone Exposure Affects Adult Breeding Behavior, Fecundity and Morphology of Xenopus tropicalis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trenbolone acetate is a synthetic androgen used as a growth promoter in the cattle industry. Its metabolite 17â-trenbolone (17â-T) has been detected downstream from cattle feedlots. It could be a concern to wildlife near these areas as previous studies show 17â-T exposure affects...

  9. Determination of stability of Brucella abortus RB51 by use of genomic fingerprint, oxidative metabolism, and colonial morphology and differentiation of strain RB51 from B. abortus isolates from bison and elk.

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, A E; Ewalt, D R; Cheville, N F; Thoen, C O; Payeur, J B

    1996-01-01

    Brucella abortus RB51 and isolates from cattle, bison, and elk were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and standard techniques for biotyping Brucella species, which included biochemical, morphological, and antigenic techniques, phage susceptibility, and antibiotic resistance. The objectives were to ascertain the stability of RB51 and to differentiate RB51 from other brucellae. Genomic restriction endonuclease patterns produced by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis demonstrated a unique fingerprint for RB51 relative to other brucellae. Comparisons of the oxidative metabolic profiles of RB51 after time in vivo (14 weeks) and in vitro (75 passages) showed no change in characteristic patterns of oxygen uptake on selected amino acid and carbohydrate substrates. Strain RB51 was biotyped as a typical rough B. abortus biovar 1 (not strain 19) after animal passage or a high number of passages in vitro and remained resistant to rifampin or penicillin and susceptible to tetracycline. No reactions with A or M antiserum or with a monoclonal antibody to the O antigen of Brucella lipopolysaccharides were detected; however, RB51 agglutinated with R antiserum. The results indicate that the genomic fingerprint and rough colonial morphology of RB51 are stable characteristics and can be used to differentiate this vaccine strain from Brucella isolates from cattle, bison, and elk. PMID:8904427

  10. Morphology of weld heat-affected zone liquation cracking in Ta-modified cast alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    West, S.L.; Baeslack, W.A. . Dept. of Welding Engineering); Kelly, T.J. . Aircraft Engine Business Group)

    1989-11-01

    The authors' discuss some problems involved in the use of alloy 718 which is a precipitation-hardenable, nickel-base superalloy developed in the early 1960s for medium temperature (540-705{sup 0}C) aerospace applications. The use of Nb as a substitute for Al and Ti leads to a susceptibility to liquation cracking in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ). This problem is discussed in detail in the article.

  11. Factors Affecting the Morphology of Pb-Based Glass Frit Coated with Ag Material Prepared by Electroless Silver Plating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bei; Gan, Weiping; Zhou, Jian; Li, Yingfen; Lin, Tao; Liu, Xiaogang

    2014-05-01

    Pb-based glass frit coated with nanosilver material for Si solar cell applications has been directly prepared by electroless silver plating. Activation of the glass frit was accomplished by using glycol, with the aim of reducing the silver ions to elemental silver on the surface of the glass frit. Electroless silver plating onto the glass frit was successfully realized using two kinds of electroless plating bath. However, the morphology of the composite powder greatly affected the modality, sheet resistance, series resistance, and photoelectric conversion efficiency of the conducting silver films. We found that the activation temperature affected the number and distribution of silver nanoparticles. Meanwhile, the average grain size of the silver particles and the silver content in the Pb-based glass frit coated with Ag material could be controlled by adjusting the pH value and loading capacity, respectively, during plating.

  12. Deiodinase knockdown affects zebrafish eye development at the level of gene expression, morphology and function.

    PubMed

    Houbrechts, Anne M; Vergauwen, Lucia; Bagci, Enise; Van Houcke, Jolien; Heijlen, Marjolein; Kulemeka, Bernard; Hyde, David R; Knapen, Dries; Darras, Veerle M

    2016-03-15

    Retinal development in vertebrates relies extensively on thyroid hormones. Their local availability is tightly controlled by several regulators, including deiodinases (Ds). Here we used morpholino technology to explore the roles of Ds during eye development in zebrafish. Transcriptome analysis at 3 days post fertilization (dpf) revealed a pronounced effect of knockdown of both T4-activating Ds (D1D2MO) or knockdown of T3-inactivating D3 (D3bMO) on phototransduction and retinoid recycling. This was accompanied by morphological defects (studied from 1 to 7 dpf) including reduced eye size, disturbed retinal lamination and strong reduction in rods and all four cone types. Defects were more prominent and persistent in D3-deficient fish. Finally, D3-deficient zebrafish larvae had disrupted visual function at 4 dpf and were less sensitive to a light stimulus at 5 dpf. These data demonstrate the importance of TH-activating and -inactivating Ds for correct zebrafish eye development, and point to D3b as a central player. PMID:26802877

  13. Rearing conditions differently affect the motor performance and cerebellar morphology of prenatally stressed juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Ulupinar, Emel; Erol, Kevser; Ay, Hakan; Yucel, Ferruh

    2015-02-01

    The cerebellum is one of the most vulnerable parts of the brain to environmental changes. In this study, the effect of diverse environmental rearing conditions on the motor performances of prenatally stressed juvenile rats and its reflection to the cerebellar morphology were investigated. Prenatally stressed Wistar rats were grouped according to different rearing conditions (Enriched=EC, Standard=SC and Isolated=IC) after weaning. Six weeks later, male and female offspring from different litters were tested behaviorally. In rotarod and string suspension tests, females gained better scores than males. Significant gender and housing effects were observed especially on the motor functions requiring fine skills with the best performance by enriched females, but the worst by enriched males. The susceptibility of cerebellar macro- and micro-neurons to environmental conditions was compared using stereological methods. In female groups, no differences were observed in the volume proportions of cerebellar layers, soma sizes and the numerical densities of granule or Purkinje cells. However, a significant interaction between housing and gender was observed in the granule to Purkinje cell ratio of males, due to the increased numerical densities of the granule cells in enriched males. These data imply that proper functioning of the cerebellum relies on its well organized and evolutionarily conserved structure and circuitry. Although early life stress leads to long term behavioral and neurobiological consequences in the offspring, diverse rearing conditions can alter the motor skills of animals and synaptic connectivity between Purkinje and granular cells in a gender dependent manner. PMID:25315128

  14. Methyl jasmonate affects morphology, number and activity of endoplasmic reticulum bodies in Raphanus sativus root cells.

    PubMed

    Gotté, Maxime; Ghosh, Rajgourab; Bernard, Sophie; Nguema-Ona, Eric; Vicré-Gibouin, Maïté; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko; Driouich, Azeddine

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) bodies are ER-derived structures that are found in Brassicaceae species and thought to play a role in defense. Here, we have investigated the occurrence, distribution and function of ER bodies in root cells of Raphanus sativus using a combination of microscopic and biochemical methods. We have also assessed the response of ER bodies to methyl jasmonate (MeJA), a phytohormone that mediates plant defense against wounding and pathogens. Our results show that (i) ER bodies do occur in different root cell types from the root cap region to the differentiation zone; (ii) they do accumulate a PYK10-like protein similar to the major marker protein of ER bodies that is involved in defense in Arabidopsis thaliana; and (iii) treatment of root cells with MeJA causes a significant increase in the number of ER bodies and the activity of β-glucosidases. More importantly, MeJA was found to induce the formation of very long ER bodies that results from the fusion of small ones, a phenomenon that has not been reported in any other study so far. These findings demonstrate that MeJA impacts the number and morphology of functional ER bodies and stimulates ER body enzyme activities, probably to participate in defense responses of radish root. They also suggest that these structures may provide a defensive system specific to root cells. PMID:25305245

  15. Element distribution and morphology of spotted golden goatfish fish scales as affected by demineralisation.

    PubMed

    Chuaychan, Sira; Benjakul, Soottawat; Nuthong, Pornpot

    2016-04-15

    Scales of spotted golden goatfish were subjected to non-collagenous protein removal followed by demineralisation with hydrochloric acid at different concentrations (0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1 M) for various times (30, 60 and 90 min). The morphology and element composition/distribution of scales from spotted golden goatfish as influenced by demineralisation conditions were determined. The appropriate demineralisation was pertained using 0.75 M hydrochloric acid for 30 min, in which the ash content was 0.62% (dry weight basis). The scales having non-collagenous protein removal with, and without, subsequent demineralisation were analysed for element content using X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Images of different scales were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX). Based on the images, an external layer rich in inorganic elements was removed. Most of Ca and P were eliminated with the coincidental increases in organic substances (C, N and O) after demineralisation. Demineralisation therefore mainly removed the external layer of scales, which facilitated the further extraction of collagen or gelatin. PMID:26617021

  16. Morphological Characteristics of Maize Canopy Development as Affected by Increased Plant Density

    PubMed Central

    Song, Youhong; Rui, Yukui; Bedane, Guta; Li, Jincai

    2016-01-01

    Improving crop productivity through higher plant density requires a detailed understanding of organ development in response to increased interplant competition. The objective of this paper is thus to investigate the characteristics of organ development under increased interplant competition. A field experiment was conducted to investigate organ development across 4 maize plant densities i.e. 2, 6, 12 and 20 plants m–2 (referred to PD2, PD6, PD12 and PD20 respectively). In response to increased interplant competition, lengths of both laminae and sheaths increased in lower phytomers, but decreased in upper phytomers. Sheath extension appeared to be less sensitive to increased interplant competition than lamina extension. Extension of laminae and internodes responded to increased plant density as soon as onset of mild interplant competition, but did not respond any further to severe competition. Both lamina width and internode diameter were reduced due to a smaller growth rate in response to increased plant density. Overall, this study identified that organ expansion rate can be taken as the key morphological factor to determine the degree of interplant competition. PMID:27129101

  17. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci Affecting Biochemical and Morphological Fruit Properties in Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.).

    PubMed

    Toppino, Laura; Barchi, Lorenzo; Lo Scalzo, Roberto; Palazzolo, Eristanna; Francese, Gianluca; Fibiani, Marta; D'Alessandro, Antonietta; Papa, Vincenza; Laudicina, Vito A; Sabatino, Leo; Pulcini, Laura; Sala, Tea; Acciarri, Nazzareno; Portis, Ezio; Lanteri, Sergio; Mennella, Giuseppe; Rotino, Giuseppe L

    2016-01-01

    Eggplant berries are a source of health-promoting metabolites including antioxidant and nutraceutical compounds, mainly anthocyanins and chlorogenic acid; however, they also contain some anti-nutritional compounds such as steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGA) and saponins, which are responsible for the bitter taste of the flesh and with potential toxic effects on humans. Up to now, Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) for the metabolic content are far from being characterized in eggplant, thus hampering the application of breeding programs aimed at improving its fruit quality. Here we report on the identification of some QTL for the fruit metabolic content in an F2 intraspecific mapping population of 156 individuals, obtained by crossing the eggplant breeding lines "305E40" × "67/3." The same population was previously employed for the development of a RAD-tag based linkage map and the identification of QTL associated to morphological and physiological traits. The mapping population was biochemically characterized for both fruit basic qualitative data, like dry matter, °Brix, sugars, and organic acids, as well as for health-related compounds such chlorogenic acid, (the main flesh monomeric phenol), the two peel anthocyanins [i.e., delphinidin-3-rutinoside (D3R) and delphinidin-3-(p- coumaroylrutinoside)-5-glucoside (nasunin)] and the two main steroidal glycoalkaloids, solasonine, and solamargine. For most of the traits, one major QTL (PVE ≥10%) was spotted and putative orthologies with other Solanaceae crops are discussed. The present results supply valuable information to eggplant breeders on the inheritance of key fruit quality traits, thus providing potential tools to assist future breeding programs. PMID:26973692

  18. Bisphenol A affects placental layers morphology and angiogenesis during early pregnancy phase in mice.

    PubMed

    Tait, Sabrina; Tassinari, Roberta; Maranghi, Francesca; Mantovani, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a widespread endocrine disrupter mainly used in food contact plastics. Much evidence supports the adverse effects of BPA, particularly on susceptible groups such as pregnant women. The present study considered placental development - relevant for pregnancy outcomes and fetal nutrition/programming - as a potential target of BPA. Pregnant CD-1 mice were administered per os with vehicle, 0.5 (BPA05) or 50 mg kg(-1) (BPA50) body weight day(-1) of BPA, from gestational day (GD) 1 to GD11. At GD12, BPA50 induced significant degeneration and necrosis of giant cells, increased vacuolization in the junctional zone in the absence of glycogen accumulation and reduction of the spongiotrophoblast layer. In addition, BPA05 induced glycogen depletion as well as significant nuclear accumulation of β-catenin in trophoblasts of labyrinthine and spongiotrophoblast layers, supporting the activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Transcriptomic analysis indicated that BPA05 promoted and BPA50 inhibited blood vessel development and branching; morphologically, maternal vessels were narrower in BPA05 placentas, whereas embryonic and maternal vessels were irregularly dilated in the labyrinth of BPA50 placentas. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction evidenced an estrogen receptor β induction by BPA50, which did not correspond to downstream genes activation; indeed, the transcription factor binding sites analysis supported the AhR/Arnt complex as regulator of BPA50-modulated genes. Conversely, Creb appeared as the main transcription factor regulating BPA05-modulated genes. Embryonic structures (head, forelimb) showed divergent perturbations upon BPA05 or BPA50 exposure, potentially related to unbalanced embryonic nutrition and/or to modulation of genes involved in embryo development. Our findings support placenta as an important target of BPA, even at environmentally relevant dose levels. PMID:26063408

  19. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci Affecting Biochemical and Morphological Fruit Properties in Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.)

    PubMed Central

    Toppino, Laura; Barchi, Lorenzo; Lo Scalzo, Roberto; Palazzolo, Eristanna; Francese, Gianluca; Fibiani, Marta; D'Alessandro, Antonietta; Papa, Vincenza; Laudicina, Vito A.; Sabatino, Leo; Pulcini, Laura; Sala, Tea; Acciarri, Nazzareno; Portis, Ezio; Lanteri, Sergio; Mennella, Giuseppe; Rotino, Giuseppe L.

    2016-01-01

    Eggplant berries are a source of health-promoting metabolites including antioxidant and nutraceutical compounds, mainly anthocyanins and chlorogenic acid; however, they also contain some anti-nutritional compounds such as steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGA) and saponins, which are responsible for the bitter taste of the flesh and with potential toxic effects on humans. Up to now, Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) for the metabolic content are far from being characterized in eggplant, thus hampering the application of breeding programs aimed at improving its fruit quality. Here we report on the identification of some QTL for the fruit metabolic content in an F2 intraspecific mapping population of 156 individuals, obtained by crossing the eggplant breeding lines “305E40” × “67/3.” The same population was previously employed for the development of a RAD-tag based linkage map and the identification of QTL associated to morphological and physiological traits. The mapping population was biochemically characterized for both fruit basic qualitative data, like dry matter, °Brix, sugars, and organic acids, as well as for health-related compounds such chlorogenic acid, (the main flesh monomeric phenol), the two peel anthocyanins [i.e., delphinidin-3-rutinoside (D3R) and delphinidin-3-(p- coumaroylrutinoside)-5-glucoside (nasunin)] and the two main steroidal glycoalkaloids, solasonine, and solamargine. For most of the traits, one major QTL (PVE ≥10%) was spotted and putative orthologies with other Solanaceae crops are discussed. The present results supply valuable information to eggplant breeders on the inheritance of key fruit quality traits, thus providing potential tools to assist future breeding programs. PMID:26973692

  20. [MORPHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF RAT MUCOUS MEMBRANE OF THE TONGUE EARLY AFFECTED BY ACRYLIC RESIN MONOMER].

    PubMed

    Davydenko, V; Nidzelskiy, M; Starchenko, I; Davydenko, A; Kuznetsov, V

    2016-03-01

    Base materials, made on the basis of various derivatives of acrylic and methacrylic acids, have been widely used in prosthetic dentistry. Free monomer, affecting the tissues of prosthetic bed and the whole body, is always found in dentures. Therefore, study of the effect of acrylic resins' monomer on mucous membrane of the tongue is crucial. Rat tongue is very similar to human tongue, and this fact has become the basis for selecting these animals to be involved into the experiment. The paper presents the findings related to the effect of "Ftoraks" base acrylic resin monomer on the state of rat mucous membrane of the tongue and its regeneration. The microscopy has found that the greatest changes in the mucous membrane of the tongue occur on day 3 and 7 day after applying the monomer and are of erosive and inflammatory nature. Regeneration of tongue epithelium slows down. PMID:27119844

  1. spn-F encodes a novel protein that affects oocyte patterning and bristle morphology in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Abdu, Uri; Bar, Dikla; Schüpbach, Trudi

    2006-04-01

    The anteroposterior and dorsoventral axes of the Drosophila embryo are established during oogenesis through the activities of Gurken (Grk), a Tgfalpha-like protein, and the Epidermal growth factor receptor (Egfr). spn-F mutant females produce ventralized eggs similar to the phenotype produced by mutations in the grk-Egfr pathway. We found that the ventralization of the eggshell in spn-F mutants is due to defects in the localization and translation of grk mRNA during mid-oogenesis. Analysis of the microtubule network revealed defects in the organization of the microtubules around the oocyte nucleus. In addition, spn-F mutants have defective bristles. We cloned spn-F and found that it encodes a novel coiled-coil protein that localizes to the minus end of microtubules in the oocyte, and this localization requires the microtubule network and a Dynein heavy chain gene. We also show that Spn-F interacts directly with the Dynein light chain Ddlc-1. Our results show that we have identified a novel protein that affects oocyte axis determination and the organization of microtubules during Drosophila oogenesis. PMID:16540510

  2. Lipid Biosynthetic Genes Affect Candida albicans Extracellular Vesicle Morphology, Cargo, and Immunostimulatory Properties

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Julie M.; Espadas, Javier; Luque-Garcia, Jose; Reynolds, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Microbial secretion is integral for regulating cell homeostasis as well as releasing virulence factors during infection. The genes encoding phosphatidylserine synthase (CHO1) and phosphatidylserine decarboxylase (PSD1 and PSD2) are Candida albicans genes involved in phospholipid biosynthesis, and mutations in these genes affect mitochondrial function, cell wall thickness, and virulence in mice. We tested the roles of these genes in several agar-based secretion assays and observed that the cho1Δ/Δ and psd1Δ/Δ psd2Δ/Δ strains manifested less protease and phospholipase activity. Since extracellular vesicles (EVs) are surrounded by a lipid membrane, we investigated the effects of these mutations on EV structure, composition, and biological activity. The cho1Δ/Δ mutant releases EVs comparable in size to wild-type EVs, but EVs from the psd1Δ/Δ psd2Δ/Δ strain are much larger than those from the wild type, including a population of >100-nm EVs not observed in the EVs from the wild type. Proteomic analysis revealed that EVs from both mutants had a significantly different protein cargo than that of EVs from the wild type. EVs were tested for their ability to activate NF-κB in bone marrow-derived macrophage cells. While wild-type and psd1Δ/Δ psd2Δ/Δ mutant-derived EVs activated NF-κB, the cho1Δ/Δ mutant-derived EV did not. These studies indicate that the presence and absence of these C. albicans genes have qualitative and quantitative effects on EV size, composition, and immunostimulatory phenotypes that highlight a complex interplay between lipid metabolism and vesicle production. PMID:26024904

  3. Dietary inulin affects the morphology but not the sodium-dependent glucose and glutamine transport in the jejunum of broilers.

    PubMed

    Rehman, H; Rosenkranz, C; Böhm, J; Zentek, J

    2007-01-01

    Inulin, a prebiotic, is a fermentable oligosaccharide that may affect the intestinal mucosal architecture and the electrophysiological parameters. The effects of a diet with added inulin were tested on the jejunal morphology and electrogenic transport of Glc and Gln from the jejunal mucosa in broilers. Short-circuit current and transmucosal tissue resistance of jejunal flaps were measured in Ussing chambers. The feeding experiment was carried out in broilers (n = 40) using 1% inulin with an application period of 5 wk. The inulin-containing diet resulted in longer jejunal villi (P < 0.05) and deeper crypts (P < 0.01) than in control birds without affecting villus:crypt depth. Basal short-circuit current value remained unaffected by dietary treatment. Inulin supplementation did not modify the electrogenic transport of Glc and Gln in the jejunal mucosa. The basal value of transmucosal tissue resistance was significantly lower (P < 0.001) in the inulin-fed group compared with the control group. In conclusion, inulin supplementation affected the jejunal mucosal architecture but did not modify the electrogenic transport of Glc and amino acid under present experimental condition. PMID:17179425

  4. Plectin isoform P1b and P1d deficiencies differentially affect mitochondrial morphology and function in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Lilli; Kuznetsov, Andrey V.; Grimm, Michael; Zeöld, Anikó; Fischer, Irmgard; Wiche, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Plectin, a versatile 500-kDa cytolinker protein, is essential for muscle fiber integrity and function. The most common disease caused by mutations in the human plectin gene, epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD), is characterized by severe skin blistering and progressive muscular dystrophy. Besides displaying pathological desmin-positive protein aggregates and degenerative changes in the myofibrillar apparatus, skeletal muscle specimens of EBS-MD patients and plectin-deficient mice are characterized by massive mitochondrial alterations. In this study, we demonstrate that structural and functional alterations of mitochondria are a primary aftermath of plectin deficiency in muscle, contributing to myofiber degeneration. We found that in skeletal muscle of conditional plectin knockout mice (MCK-Cre/cKO), mitochondrial content was reduced, and mitochondria were aggregated in sarcoplasmic and subsarcolemmal regions and were no longer associated with Z-disks. Additionally, decreased mitochondrial citrate synthase activity, respiratory function and altered adenosine diphosphate kinetics were characteristic of plectin-deficient muscles. To analyze a mechanistic link between plectin deficiency and mitochondrial alterations, we comparatively assessed mitochondrial morphology and function in whole muscle and teased muscle fibers of wild-type, MCK-Cre/cKO and plectin isoform-specific knockout mice that were lacking just one isoform (either P1b or P1d) while expressing all others. Monitoring morphological alterations of mitochondria, an isoform P1b-specific phenotype affecting the mitochondrial fusion–fission machinery and manifesting with upregulated mitochondrial fusion-associated protein mitofusin-2 could be identified. Our results show that the depletion of distinct plectin isoforms affects mitochondrial network organization and function in different ways. PMID:26019234

  5. Plectin isoform P1b and P1d deficiencies differentially affect mitochondrial morphology and function in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Winter, Lilli; Kuznetsov, Andrey V; Grimm, Michael; Zeöld, Anikó; Fischer, Irmgard; Wiche, Gerhard

    2015-08-15

    Plectin, a versatile 500-kDa cytolinker protein, is essential for muscle fiber integrity and function. The most common disease caused by mutations in the human plectin gene, epidermolysis bullosa simplex with muscular dystrophy (EBS-MD), is characterized by severe skin blistering and progressive muscular dystrophy. Besides displaying pathological desmin-positive protein aggregates and degenerative changes in the myofibrillar apparatus, skeletal muscle specimens of EBS-MD patients and plectin-deficient mice are characterized by massive mitochondrial alterations. In this study, we demonstrate that structural and functional alterations of mitochondria are a primary aftermath of plectin deficiency in muscle, contributing to myofiber degeneration. We found that in skeletal muscle of conditional plectin knockout mice (MCK-Cre/cKO), mitochondrial content was reduced, and mitochondria were aggregated in sarcoplasmic and subsarcolemmal regions and were no longer associated with Z-disks. Additionally, decreased mitochondrial citrate synthase activity, respiratory function and altered adenosine diphosphate kinetics were characteristic of plectin-deficient muscles. To analyze a mechanistic link between plectin deficiency and mitochondrial alterations, we comparatively assessed mitochondrial morphology and function in whole muscle and teased muscle fibers of wild-type, MCK-Cre/cKO and plectin isoform-specific knockout mice that were lacking just one isoform (either P1b or P1d) while expressing all others. Monitoring morphological alterations of mitochondria, an isoform P1b-specific phenotype affecting the mitochondrial fusion-fission machinery and manifesting with upregulated mitochondrial fusion-associated protein mitofusin-2 could be identified. Our results show that the depletion of distinct plectin isoforms affects mitochondrial network organization and function in different ways. PMID:26019234

  6. Predictive markers of honey bee colony collapse

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Managed honey bee colonies are currently affected by abrupt depopulation during winter and many factors are suspected to be involved, either alone or in combination. Pathogens are considered as principal actors, contributing to weaken colony health and leaving room for secondary infections. In parti...

  7. Exploration versus exploitation in polydomous ant colonies.

    PubMed

    Cook, Zoe; Franks, Daniel W; Robinson, Elva J H

    2013-04-21

    In socially foraging species resource information can be shared between individuals, increasing foraging success. In ant colonies, nestmate recruitment allows high exploitation rates at known resources however, to maximise foraging efficiency this must be balanced with searching for new resources. Many ant species form colonies inhabiting two or more spatially separated but socially connected nests: this type of organisation is known as polydomy. Polydomous colonies may benefit from increased foraging efficiency by carrying out dispersed-central place foraging. However, decentralisation of the colony may affect recruitment success by limiting interaction between ants based in separate nests. We use an agent-based model which compares the foraging success of monodomous and polydomous colonies in different food environments, incorporating recruitment through pheromone trails and group foraging. In contrast to previous results we show that polydomy is beneficial in some but not all cases. Polydomous colonies discover resources at a higher rate, making them more successful when food is highly dispersed, but their relative success can be lowered by limitations on recruitment success. Monodomous colonies can have higher foraging efficiency than polydomous colonies by exploiting food more rapidly. The results show the importance of interactions between recruitment strategy, colony size, and colony organisation. PMID:23380232

  8. Swarming Ring Patterns in Bacterial Colonies Exposed to Ultraviolet Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Delprato, Anna M.; Samadani, Azadeh; Kudrolli, A.; Tsimring, L. S.

    2001-10-08

    We report a novel morphological transition in a Bacillus subtilis colony initially growing under ambient conditions, after ultraviolet radiation exposure. The bacteria in the central regions of the colonies are observed to migrate towards the colony edge forming a ring during uniform spatial exposure. When the radiation is switched off, the colonies were observed to grow both inward into the evacuated regions as well as outward indicating that the pattern is not formed due to depletion of nutrients at the center of the colony. We also propose a reaction-diffusion model in which waste-limited chemotaxis initiated by the UV radiation leads to the observed phenomenology.

  9. The Amana Colonies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilja, Marilyn

    Designed for use in Iowa elementary schools, this unit introduces students to Iowa's Amana Colonies. Four lessons cover the history and cultural heritage of the colonies, daily life in historical times, daily life in modern times, and the colonies as a corporate museum. Throughout the lessons, emphasis is placed on the values and organization of…

  10. Genotype-environment interactions affecting preflowering physiological and morphological traits of Brassica rapa grown in two watering regimes.

    PubMed

    El-Soda, Mohamed; Boer, Martin P; Bagheri, Hedayat; Hanhart, Corrie J; Koornneef, Maarten; Aarts, Mark G M

    2014-02-01

    Plant growth and productivity are greatly affected by drought, which is likely to become more threatening with the predicted global temperature increase. Understanding the genetic architecture of complex quantitative traits and their interaction with water availability may lead to improved crop adaptation to a wide range of environments. Here, the genetic basis of 20 physiological and morphological traits is explored by describing plant performance and growth in a Brassica rapa recombinant inbred line (RIL) population grown on a sandy substrate supplemented with nutrient solution, under control and drought conditions. Altogether, 54 quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified, of which many colocated in 11 QTL clusters. Seventeen QTL showed significant QTL-environment interaction (Q×E), indicating genetic variation for phenotypic plasticity. Of the measured traits, only hypocotyl length did not show significant genotype-environment interaction (G×E) in both environments in all experiments. Correlation analysis showed that, in the control environment, stomatal conductance was positively correlated with total leaf dry weight (DW) and aboveground DW, whereas in the drought environment, stomatal conductance showed a significant negative correlation with total leaf DW and aboveground DW. This correlation was explained by antagonistic fitness effects in the drought environment, controlled by a QTL cluster on chromosome A7. These results demonstrate that Q×E is an important component of the genetic variance and can play a great role in improving drought tolerance in future breeding programmes. PMID:24474811

  11. Reaction-diffusion modelling of bacterial colony patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimura, Masayasu; Sakaguchi, Hideo; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2000-07-01

    It is well known from experiments that bacterial species Bacillus subtilis exhibit various colony patterns. These are essentially classified into five types in the morphological diagram, depending on the substrate softness and nutrient concentration. (A) diffusion-limited aggregation-like; (B) Eden-like; (C) concentric ring-like; (D) disk-like; and (E) dense branching morphology-like. There arises the naive question of whether the diversity of colony patterns observed in experiments is caused by different effects or governed by the same underlying principles. Our research has led us to propose reaction-diffusion models to describe the morphological diversity of colony patterns except for Eden-like ones.

  12. Form and metabolic scaling in colonial animals.

    PubMed

    Hartikainen, Hanna; Humphries, Stuart; Okamura, Beth

    2014-03-01

    Benthic colonial organisms exhibit a wide variation in size and shape and provide excellent model systems for testing the predictions of models that describe the scaling of metabolic rate with organism size. We tested the hypothesis that colony form will influence metabolic scaling and its derivatives by characterising metabolic and propagule production rates in three species of freshwater bryozoans that vary in morphology and module organisation and which demonstrate two- and three-dimensional growth forms. The results were evaluated with respect to predictions from two models for metabolic scaling. Isometric metabolic scaling in two-dimensional colonies supported predictions of a model based on dynamic energy budget theory (DEB) and not those of a model based on fractally branching supply networks. This metabolic isometry appears to be achieved by equivalent energy budgets of edge and central modules, in one species (Cristatella mucedo) via linear growth and in a second species (Lophopus crystallinus) by colony fission. Allometric scaling characterised colonies of a three-dimensional species (Fredericella sultana), also providing support for the DEB model. Isometric scaling of propagule production rates for C. mucedo and F. sultana suggests that the number of propagules produced in colonies increases in direct proportion with the number of modules within colonies. Feeding currents generated by bryozoans function in both food capture and respiration, thus linking metabolic scaling with dynamics of self-shading and resource capture. Metabolic rates fundamentally dictate organismal performance (e.g. growth, reproduction) and, as we show here, are linked with colony form. Metabolic profiles and associated variation in colony form should therefore influence the outcome of biotic interactions in habitats dominated by colonial animals and may drive patterns of macroevolution. PMID:24265433

  13. Predictive Markers of Honey Bee Colony Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Dainat, Benjamin; Evans, Jay D.; Chen, Yan Ping; Gauthier, Laurent; Neumann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Across the Northern hemisphere, managed honey bee colonies, Apis mellifera, are currently affected by abrupt depopulation during winter and many factors are suspected to be involved, either alone or in combination. Parasites and pathogens are considered as principal actors, in particular the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor, associated viruses and the microsporidian Nosema ceranae. Here we used long term monitoring of colonies and screening for eleven disease agents and genes involved in bee immunity and physiology to identify predictive markers of honeybee colony losses during winter. The data show that DWV, Nosema ceranae, Varroa destructor and Vitellogenin can be predictive markers for winter colony losses, but their predictive power strongly depends on the season. In particular, the data support that V. destructor is a key player for losses, arguably in line with its specific impact on the health of individual bees and colonies. PMID:22384162

  14. Scanning electron microscope study of Pseudomonas putida colonies.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, J A

    1985-01-01

    Pseudomonas putida colonies were examined by scanning electron microscope. A variety of cell morphologies, multicellular arrangements, and extracellular materials were observed in the fixed material. Different regions of a single colony showed characteristic organizations of these architectural elements. In some cases, the detailed microstructure of the fixed colony surfaces observed by scanning electron microscopy could be correlated with macroscopic patterns visualized by histochemical staining and surface relief photography of live colonies. Extracellular materials were seen to extend onto the agar surface beyond the boundaries of the cell mass, and the final structures of these materials, after fixation and desiccation, were colony specific. The significance of these features of colony microstructure for formulating hypotheses about the control of colony morphogenesis is discussed. Images PMID:4066611

  15. Recruitment strategies and colony size in ants.

    PubMed

    Planqué, Robert; van den Berg, Jan Bouwe; Franks, Nigel R

    2010-01-01

    Ants use a great variety of recruitment methods to forage for food or find new nests, including tandem running, group recruitment and scent trails. It has been known for some time that there is a loose correlation across many taxa between species-specific mature colony size and recruitment method. Very small colonies tend to use solitary foraging; small to medium sized colonies use tandem running or group recruitment whereas larger colonies use pheromone recruitment trails. Until now, explanations for this correlation have focused on the ants' ecology, such as food resource distribution. However, many species have colonies with a single queen and workforces that grow over several orders of magnitude, and little is known about how a colony's organization, including recruitment methods, may change during its growth. After all, recruitment involves interactions between ants, and hence the size of the colony itself may influence which recruitment method is used--even if the ants' behavioural repertoire remains unchanged. Here we show using mathematical models that the observed correlation can also be explained by recognizing that failure rates in recruitment depend differently on colony size in various recruitment strategies. Our models focus on the build up of recruiter numbers inside colonies and are not based on optimality arguments, such as maximizing food yield. We predict that ant colonies of a certain size should use only one recruitment method (and always the same one) rather than a mix of two or more. These results highlight the importance of the organization of recruitment and how it is affected by colony size. Hence these results should also expand our understanding of ant ecology. PMID:20694195

  16. Recruitment Strategies and Colony Size in Ants

    PubMed Central

    Planqué, Robert; van den Berg, Jan Bouwe; Franks, Nigel R.

    2010-01-01

    Ants use a great variety of recruitment methods to forage for food or find new nests, including tandem running, group recruitment and scent trails. It has been known for some time that there is a loose correlation across many taxa between species-specific mature colony size and recruitment method. Very small colonies tend to use solitary foraging; small to medium sized colonies use tandem running or group recruitment whereas larger colonies use pheromone recruitment trails. Until now, explanations for this correlation have focused on the ants' ecology, such as food resource distribution. However, many species have colonies with a single queen and workforces that grow over several orders of magnitude, and little is known about how a colony's organization, including recruitment methods, may change during its growth. After all, recruitment involves interactions between ants, and hence the size of the colony itself may influence which recruitment method is used—even if the ants' behavioural repertoire remains unchanged. Here we show using mathematical models that the observed correlation can also be explained by recognizing that failure rates in recruitment depend differently on colony size in various recruitment strategies. Our models focus on the build up of recruiter numbers inside colonies and are not based on optimality arguments, such as maximizing food yield. We predict that ant colonies of a certain size should use only one recruitment method (and always the same one) rather than a mix of two or more. These results highlight the importance of the organization of recruitment and how it is affected by colony size. Hence these results should also expand our understanding of ant ecology. PMID:20694195

  17. Direct and indirect sonication affect differently the microstructure and the morphology of ZnO nanoparticles: Optical behavior and its antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Sharifalhoseini, Zahra; Entezari, Mohammad H; Jalal, Razieh

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, the sono-synthesis of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) was performed by simple, low-cost, and the environmentally friendly method. The synthesis of zinc oxide as an antibacterial agent was performed by an ultrasonic bath (low intensity) for the indirect sonication and a horn system (high intensity) for the direct sonication. The samples synthesized by these two kinds of sonication were compared with each other. Crystallographic structures and the morphologies of the resultant powders were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The XRD patterns showed that both ZnO samples were crystallized in their pure phase. The TEM images confirmed that the morphologies of the products were completely different from each other. Based on the obtained analysis, the probable growth mechanisms were proposed for crystallization of both samples. The antibacterial activity of the synthesized species was evaluated by the colony count method against Escherichia coli O157:H7. Moreover, the optical behavior of the samples was studied by UV-vis spectroscopy and the variation of the ZnO band gap was compared. PMID:26186868

  18. A metagenomic survey of microbes in honey bee colony collapse disorder

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), honey bee colonies inexplicably lose all of their workers. CCD has resulted in a loss of 50-90% of colonies in beekeeping operations across the United States. The observation that irradiated combs from affected colonies can be repopulated with naïve bees suggests a...

  19. Monitoring of soil water storage along elevation transech on morphological diverse study-sites affected by soil erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaksik, Ondrej; Kodesova, Radka; Nikodem, Antonin; Fer, Miroslav; Klement, Ales; Kratina, Josef

    2015-04-01

    Soil water availability is one of the key factors determining plant growth. Spatial distribution of soil water content is influenced by many factors. For the field-scale, one of the most important factors is terrain and its shape. The goal of our study was to characterize soil water storage within the soil profile with respect to terrain attributes. Two morphologically diverse study sites were chosen, in order to monitor soil water storage during vegetation season. The first site Brumovice in located in the Southern Moravian Region. The original soil unit was Haplic Chernozem developed on loess, which was gradually degraded by soil erosion. In the steepest parts, due to substantial loss of soil material, soil is transformed to Regosol. As a result of consequently sedimentation of previously eroded material in toe slopes and terrain depressions colluvial soils are formed. The second site Vidim is placed in the Central Bohemia. Dominant soil unit in wider area is Haplic Luvisol on loess loam. Similar process of progressive soil transformation was identified. On each study site, two elevation transects were delimited, where each consists of 5 monitoring spots. Access tubes were installed in order to measure soil moisture in six different depths (10, 20, 30 40, 60 a 100 cm) using Profile Probe PR2. The monitoring was conducted during vegetation season: April - July 2012 in Brumovice and May - July 2013 in Vidim. The average soil water contents were calculated for following three layers: topsoil A (0-20 cm), subsoil B (20-40cm), and substrate (40-100cm). The soil water storage within the soil profile was also expressed. Sensors TMS3 were also used for continual soil water content monitoring in the depth of 0-15 cm. In addition undisturbed soil samples were taken from topsoil to measure soil hydraulic properties using the multistep outflow experiment. Data were used to assess retention ability of erosion affected soils. The soil water storage and particularly average

  20. Registration of Colony Switchgrass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Colony (Reg. No. __________, PI 658520) is a lowland cytotype of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) developed and released by the USDA-ARS and North Carolina Agricultural Research Service. Colony was developed from three cycles of selection with random cross pollination occurring in cycle 0, index se...

  1. Triclosan-Induced Aminoglycoside-Tolerant Listeria monocytogenes Isolates Can Appear as Small-Colony Variants

    PubMed Central

    Kastbjerg, Vicky G.; Hein-Kristensen, Line

    2014-01-01

    Exposure of the human food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to sublethal concentrations of triclosan can cause resistance to several aminoglycosides. Aminoglycoside-resistant isolates exhibit two colony morphologies: normal-size and pinpoint colonies. The purposes of the present study were to characterize the small colonies of L. monocytogenes and to determine if specific genetic changes could explain the triclosan-induced aminoglycoside resistance in both pinpoint and normal-size isolates. Isolates from the pinpoint colonies grew poorly under aerated conditions, but growth was restored by addition of antibiotics. Pinpoint isolates had decreased hemolytic activity under stagnant conditions and a changed spectrum of carbohydrate utilization compared to the wild type and isolates from normal-size colonies. Genome sequence comparison revealed that all seven pinpoint isolates had a mutation in a heme gene, and addition of heme caused the pinpoint isolates to revert to normal colony size. Triclosan-induced gentamicin-resistant isolates had mutations in several different genes, and it cannot be directly concluded how the different mutations caused gentamicin resistance. However, since many of the mutations affected proteins involved in respiration, it seems likely that the mutations affected the active transport of the antibiotic and thereby caused resistance by decreasing the amount of aminoglycoside that enters the bacterial cell. Our study emphasizes that triclosan likely has more targets than just fabI and that exposure to triclosan can cause resistance to antibiotics that enters the cell via active transport. Further studies are needed to elucidate if L. monocytogenes pinpoint isolates could have any clinical impact, e.g., in persistent infections. PMID:24637686

  2. Erythropoietin administration alone or in combination with endurance training affects neither skeletal muscle morphology nor angiogenesis in healthy young men.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Mads S; Vissing, Kristian; Thams, Line; Sieljacks, Peter; Dalgas, Ulrik; Nellemann, Birgitte; Christensen, Britt

    2014-10-01

    The aim was to investigate the ability of an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA), alone or in combination with endurance training, to induce changes in human skeletal muscle fibre and vascular morphology. In a comparative study, 36 healthy untrained men were randomly dispersed into the following four groups: sedentary-placebo (SP, n = 9); sedentary-ESA (SE, n = 9); training-placebo (TP, n = 10); or training-ESA (TE, n = 8). The ESA or placebo was injected once weekly. Training consisted of progressive bicycling three times per week for 10 weeks. Before and after the intervention period, muscle biopsies and magnetic resonance images were collected from the thigh muscles, blood was collected, body composition measured and endurance exercise performance evaluated. The ESA treatment (SE and TE) led to elevated haematocrit, and both ESA treatment and training (SE, TP and TE) increased maximal O2 uptake. With regard to skeletal muscle morphology, TP alone exhibited increases in whole-muscle cross-sectional area and fibre diameter of all fibre types. Also exclusively for TP was an increase in type IIa fibres and a corresponding decrease in type IIx fibres. Furthermore, an overall training effect (TP and TE) was statistically demonstrated in whole-muscle cross-sectional area, muscle fibre diameter and type IIa and type IIx fibre distribution. With regard to muscle vascular morphology, TP and TE both promoted a rise in capillary to muscle fibre ratio, with no differences between the two groups. There were no effects of ESA treatment on any of the muscle morphological parameters. Despite the haematopoietic effects of ESA, we provide novel evidence that endurance training rather than ESA treatment induces adaptational changes in angiogenesis and muscle morphology. PMID:25128327

  3. Colony patterning and collective hyphal growth of filamentous fungi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Shu

    2002-11-01

    Colony morphology of wild and mutant strains of Aspergillus nidulans at various nutrient and agar levels was investigated. Two types of colony patterning were found for these strains. One type produced uniform colonies at all nutrient and agar levels tested, and the other exhibited morphological change into disordered ramified colonies at low nutrient levels. Both types showed highly condensed compact colonies at high nutrient levels on low agar media that was highly diffusive. Disordered colonies were found to develop with low hyphal extension rates at low nutrient levels. To understand basic pattern selection rules, a colony model with three parameters, i.e., the initial nutrient level and the step length of nutrient random walk as the external parameters, and the frequency of nutrient uptake as an internal parameter, was constructed. At low nutrient levels, with decreasing nutrient uptake frequency under diffusive conditions, the model colony exhibited onsets of disordered ramification. Further, in the growth process of A. nidulans, reduction of hyphal extension rate due to a population effect of hyphae was found when hyphae form three-dimensional dense colonies, as compared to the case in which hyphal growth was restricted into two-dimensional space. A hyphal population effect was introduced in the colony model. Thickening of colony periphery due to the population effect became distinctive as the nutrient diffusion effect was raised at high nutrient levels with low hyphal growth rate. It was considered that colony patterning and onset of disorder were strongly governed by the combination of nutrient diffusion and hyphal growth rate.

  4. Plastic hatching timing by red-eyed treefrog embryos interacts with larval predator identity and sublethal predation to affect prey morphology but not performance.

    PubMed

    Touchon, Justin C; Wojdak, Jeremy M

    2014-01-01

    Many animals respond to predation risk by altering their morphology, behavior, or life-history. We know a great deal about the cues prey respond to and the changes to prey that can be induced by predation risk, but less is known about how plastic responses to predators may be affected by separate plastic responses occurring earlier in life, particularly during the embryonic period. Embryos of a broad array of taxa can respond to egg- or larval-stage risks by altering hatching timing, which may alter the way organisms respond to future predators. Using the red-eyed treefrog (Agalychnis callidryas), a model for understanding the effects of plasticity across life-stages, we assessed how the combined effects of induced variation in the timing of embryo hatching and variation in the larval predator community impacted tadpole morphology, pigmentation and swimming performance. We found that A. callidryas tadpoles developed deeper tail muscles and fins and darker pigmentation in response to fish predators, either when alone or in diverse community with other predators. Tadpoles altered morphology much less so to dragonfly naiads or water bugs. Interestingly, morphological responses to predators were also affected by induced differences in hatching age, with early and late-hatched tadpoles exhibiting different allometric relationships between tail height and body length in different predator environments. Beyond induced morphological changes, fish predators often damaged tadpoles' tails without killing them (i.e., sublethal predation), but these tadpoles swam equally quickly to those with fully intact tails. This was due to the fact that tadpoles with more damaged tails increased tail beats to achieve equal swimming speed. This study demonstrates that plastic phenotypic responses to predation risk can be influenced by a complex combination of responses to both the embryo and larval environments, but also that prey performance can be highly resilient to sublethal predation

  5. Plastic Hatching Timing by Red-Eyed Treefrog Embryos Interacts with Larval Predator Identity and Sublethal Predation to Affect Prey Morphology but Not Performance

    PubMed Central

    Touchon, Justin C.; Wojdak, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Many animals respond to predation risk by altering their morphology, behavior, or life-history. We know a great deal about the cues prey respond to and the changes to prey that can be induced by predation risk, but less is known about how plastic responses to predators may be affected by separate plastic responses occurring earlier in life, particularly during the embryonic period. Embryos of a broad array of taxa can respond to egg- or larval-stage risks by altering hatching timing, which may alter the way organisms respond to future predators. Using the red-eyed treefrog (Agalychnis callidryas), a model for understanding the effects of plasticity across life-stages, we assessed how the combined effects of induced variation in the timing of embryo hatching and variation in the larval predator community impacted tadpole morphology, pigmentation and swimming performance. We found that A. callidryas tadpoles developed deeper tail muscles and fins and darker pigmentation in response to fish predators, either when alone or in diverse community with other predators. Tadpoles altered morphology much less so to dragonfly naiads or water bugs. Interestingly, morphological responses to predators were also affected by induced differences in hatching age, with early and late-hatched tadpoles exhibiting different allometric relationships between tail height and body length in different predator environments. Beyond induced morphological changes, fish predators often damaged tadpoles’ tails without killing them (i.e., sublethal predation), but these tadpoles swam equally quickly to those with fully intact tails. This was due to the fact that tadpoles with more damaged tails increased tail beats to achieve equal swimming speed. This study demonstrates that plastic phenotypic responses to predation risk can be influenced by a complex combination of responses to both the embryo and larval environments, but also that prey performance can be highly resilient to sublethal predation

  6. Effect of ZnO morphology on affecting bactericidal property of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene biocomposite.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajeev Kumar; Agarwal, Meenakshi; Balani, Kantesh

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial infection of implants can be controlled by selective trapping of bacteria, followed with consequent killing by targeted antibacterial agents. Herein, the role of various ZnO morphologies, viz. micro-rods (R), nanoparticles (NP), and micro-disks (D) on antibacterial efficacy of ZnO via release of Zn(2+) and H2O2 is assessed, both as isolated powders and via incorporating them in cytocompatible ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). Though ZnO is antibacterial, interestingly, all ZnO morphologies elicited a supportive growth of gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) in culture medium (until 28-35μg/ml). But, all ZnO morphologies did elicit bactericidal effect on gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus or Staphylococcus epidermidis) both in culture medium (for 0-2.5μg/ml) or when incorporated (5-20wt.%) into UHMWPE. The bactericidal mechanisms were quantified for various ZnO morphologies via: (i) H2O2 production, (ii) Zn(2+) release, and (iii) the presence of surface oxygen vacancies. On one hand, where only ZnO(NP) elicited release of H2O2 in the absence of light, maximum Zn(2+) release was elicited by ZnO(D). Interestingly, when ZnO is incorporated as reinforcement (5-20wt.%), its antibacterial action against E. coli was vividly observed due to selective proliferation of bacteria only on friendly UHMWPE matrix. Hence, luring bacteria on affable UHMWPE surface can be complemented with their targeted killing by ZnO present in composite. PMID:26952491

  7. The Colonial Adult Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Huey B.

    1975-01-01

    The adult evening schools of colonial America served a mixed clientele and provided instruction in a variety of subjects. Although most historians have described evening schoolmasters as incompetent frauds, research indicates that such descriptions are generally unjust and unfounded. (NHM)

  8. Robotic space colonies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schenker, P.; Easter, R.; Rodriguez, G.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reviews recent advances in these technologies, with a particular focus on experimental state-of-the-art robot work crew system demonstrations at JPL, that are being conducted now to begin to realize the futuristic robotic colony vision.

  9. The Absence of Pupylation (Prokaryotic Ubiquitin-Like Protein Modification) Affects Morphological and Physiological Differentiation in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Seghezzi, Nicolas; Duchateau, Magalie; Gominet, Myriam; Kofroňová, Olga; Benada, Oldřich; Mazodier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protein turnover is essential in all living organisms for the maintenance of normal cell physiology. In eukaryotes, most cellular protein turnover involves the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, in which proteins tagged with ubiquitin are targeted to the proteasome for degradation. In contrast, most bacteria lack a proteasome but harbor proteases for protein turnover. However, some actinobacteria, such as mycobacteria, possess a proteasome in addition to these proteases. A prokaryotic ubiquitination-like tagging process in mycobacteria was described and was named pupylation: proteins are tagged with Pup (prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein) and directed to the proteasome for degradation. We report pupylation in another actinobacterium, Streptomyces coelicolor. Both the morphology and life cycle of Streptomyces species are complex (formation of a substrate and aerial mycelium followed by sporulation), and these bacteria are prolific producers of secondary metabolites with important medicinal and agricultural applications. The genes encoding the pupylation system in S. coelicolor are expressed at various stages of development. We demonstrated that pupylation targets numerous proteins and identified 20 of them. Furthermore, we established that abolition of pupylation has substantial effects on morphological and metabolic differentiation and on resistance to oxidative stress. In contrast, in most cases, a proteasome-deficient mutant showed only modest perturbations under the same conditions. Thus, the phenotype of the pup mutant does not appear to be due solely to defective proteasomal degradation. Presumably, pupylation has roles in addition to directing proteins to the proteasome. IMPORTANCE Streptomyces spp. are filamentous and sporulating actinobacteria, remarkable for their morphological and metabolic differentiation. They produce numerous bioactive compounds, including antifungal, antibiotic, and antitumor compounds. There is therefore considerable interest in

  10. Geometry and mechanics of growing bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Zhihong; Pearce, Daniel; Sengupta, Anupam; Giomi, Luca

    Bacterial colonies are abundant on living and non-living surfaces, and are known to mediate a broad range of processes in ecology, medicine and industry. Although extensively researched - from single cells up to the population levels - a comprehensive biophysical picture, highlighting the cell-to-colony dynamics, is still lacking. Here, using numerical and analytical models, we study the mechanics of self-organization leading to the colony morphology of cells growing on a substrate with free boundary. We consider hard rods to mimic the growth of rod-shaped non-motile cells, and show that the colony, as a whole, does not form an ordered nematic phase, nor does it result in a purely disordered (isotropic) phase. Instead, different sizes of domains, in which cells are highly aligned at specific orientations, are found. The distribution of the domain sizes follows an exponential relation - indicating the existence of a characteristic length scale that determines the domain size relative to that of the colony. A continuum theory, based on the hydrodynamics of liquid crystals, is built to account for these phenomena, and is applied to describe the buckling transition from a planar to three-dimensional (3D) colony. The theory supports preliminary experiments conducted with different strains of rod shaped bacterial cells, and reveals that the buckling transition can be regulated by varying the cell stiffness and aspect ratio. This work proposes that, in addition to biochemical pathways, the spatio-temporal organization in microbial colonies is significantly tuned by the biomechanical and geometric properties of the microbes in consideration.

  11. Extended incubation affects larval morphology, hatching success and starvation resistance in a terrestrially spawning fish, Galaxias maculatus (Jenyns 1842).

    PubMed

    Semmens, D; Swearer, S E

    2011-10-01

    The effect of extended incubation (delayed hatching) on larval morphology in the terrestrially spawning common galaxias Galaxias maculatus was investigated by inducing larvae to hatch 1 and 2 weeks after the normal 2 week incubation period. After 1 week of extended incubation, larvae were larger (longer in standard length, L(S), and greater in body depth) compared to controls (larvae that experienced normal incubation durations). After 2 weeks of extended incubation, larvae were smaller (shorter in L(S) and smaller in body depth) than larvae that experienced 1 week of extended incubation. Furthermore, eye area increased while yolk-sac size decreased monotonically with increasing incubation duration. These results suggest that larvae experiencing long periods of extended incubation are using somatic tissue to meet their metabolic demands. Larvae that experienced 2 weeks of extended incubation succumbed to starvation sooner than control larvae, but hatching success was not significantly different. Temperature mediated the effect of extended incubation on the morphology of larvae at hatching, most likely, through its effects on developmental rate and efficiency of yolk utilization. This study demonstrates some of the consequences of terrestrial spawning with extended incubation, which will assist in determining why this intriguing behaviour has evolved several times in a diverse range of taxa. PMID:21967585

  12. The Identification of Transposon-Tagged Mutations in Essential Genes That Affect Cell Morphology in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chun, K. T.; Goebl, M. G.

    1996-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reproduces by budding, and many genes are required for proper bud development. Mutations in some of these genes cause cells to die with an unusual terminal morphology--elongated or otherwise aberrantly shaped buds. To gain insight into bud development, we set out to identify novel genes that encode proteins required for proper bud morphogenesis. Previous studies screened collections of conditional mutations to identify genes required for essential functions, including bud formation. However, genes that are not susceptible to the generation of mutations that cause a conditional phenotype will not be identified in such screens. To identify a more comprehensive collection of mutants, we used transposon mutagenesis to generate a large collection of lethal disruption mutations. This collection was used to identify 209 mutants with disruptions that cause an aberrant terminal bud morphology. The disruption mutations in 33 of these mutants identify three previously uncharacterized genes as essential, and the mutant phenotypes suggest roles for their products in bud morphogenesis. PMID:8770583

  13. Colony Collapse Disorder: A Descriptive Study

    PubMed Central

    vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D.; Saegerman, Claude; Mullin, Chris; Haubruge, Eric; Nguyen, Bach Kim; Frazier, Maryann; Frazier, Jim; Cox-Foster, Diana; Chen, Yanping; Underwood, Robyn; Tarpy, David R.; Pettis, Jeffery S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Over the last two winters, there have been large-scale, unexplained losses of managed honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies in the United States. In the absence of a known cause, this syndrome was named Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) because the main trait was a rapid loss of adult worker bees. We initiated a descriptive epizootiological study in order to better characterize CCD and compare risk factor exposure between populations afflicted by and not afflicted by CCD. Methods and Principal Findings Of 61 quantified variables (including adult bee physiology, pathogen loads, and pesticide levels), no single measure emerged as a most-likely cause of CCD. Bees in CCD colonies had higher pathogen loads and were co-infected with a greater number of pathogens than control populations, suggesting either an increased exposure to pathogens or a reduced resistance of bees toward pathogens. Levels of the synthetic acaricide coumaphos (used by beekeepers to control the parasitic mite Varroa destructor) were higher in control colonies than CCD-affected colonies. Conclusions/Significance This is the first comprehensive survey of CCD-affected bee populations that suggests CCD involves an interaction between pathogens and other stress factors. We present evidence that this condition is contagious or the result of exposure to a common risk factor. Potentially important areas for future hypothesis-driven research, including the possible legacy effect of mite parasitism and the role of honey bee resistance to pesticides, are highlighted. PMID:19649264

  14. Colony types and virulence traits of Legionella feeleii determined by exopolysaccharide materials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Changle; Saito, Mitsumasa; Ogawa, Midori; Yoshida, Shin-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Legionella feeleii is a Gram-negative pathogenic bacterium that causes Pontiac fever and pneumonia in humans. When L. feeleii serogroup 1 (ATCC 35072) was cultured on BCYE agar plates, two types of colonies were observed and exhibited differences in color, opacity and morphology. Since the two colony types are white rugose and brown translucent, they were termed as white rugose L. feeleii (WRLf) and brown translucent L. feeleii (BTLf), respectively. They exhibited different growth capacities in BYE broth in vitro, and it was found that WRLf could transform to BTLf. Under the electron microscope, it was observed that WRLf secreted materials which could be stained with ruthenium red, which was absent in BTLf. When U937 macrophages and HeLa cells were infected with the bacteria, WRLf manifested stronger internalization ability than BTLf. Intracellular growth in murine macrophages and Acanthamoeba cells was affected by the level of initial phagocytosis. WRLf was more resistant to human serum bactericidal action than BTLf. After being inoculated to guinea pigs, both organisms caused fever in the animals. These results suggest that ruthenium red-stained materials secreted in the surroundings may play a crucial role in determining L. feeleii colony morphology and virulence traits. PMID:27190244

  15. Predicting Honeybee Colony Failure: Using the BEEHAVE Model to Simulate Colony Responses to Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    To simulate effects of pesticides on different honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) life stages, we used the BEEHAVE model to explore how increased mortalities of larvae, in-hive workers, and foragers, as well as reduced egg-laying rate, could impact colony dynamics over multiple years. Stresses were applied for 30 days, both as multiples of the modeled control mortality and as set percentage daily mortalities to assess the sensitivity of the modeled colony both to small fluctuations in mortality and periods of low to very high daily mortality. These stresses simulate stylized exposure of the different life stages to nectar and pollen contaminated with pesticide for 30 days. Increasing adult bee mortality had a much greater impact on colony survival than mortality of bee larvae or reduction in egg laying rate. Importantly, the seasonal timing of the imposed mortality affected the magnitude of the impact at colony level. In line with the LD50, we propose a new index of “lethal imposed stress”: the LIS50 which indicates the level of stress on individuals that results in 50% colony mortality. This (or any LISx) is a comparative index for exploring the effects of different stressors at colony level in model simulations. While colony failure is not an acceptable protection goal, this index could be used to inform the setting of future regulatory protection goals. PMID:26444386

  16. Diffusion-limited growth in bacterial colony formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Mitsugu; Fujikawa, Hiroshi

    1990-09-01

    Colonies of bacterial species called Bacillus subtilis have been found to grow two-dimensionally and self-similarly on agar plates through diffusion-limited processes in a nutrient concentration field. We obtained a fractal dimension of the colony patterns of D=1.73±0.02, very close to that of the two-dimensional DLA model, and confirmed the existence of the screening effect of protruding main branches against inner ones in a colony, the repulsion between two neighboring colonies and the tendency to grow toward nutrient. These effects are all characteristic of the pattern formation in a Laplacian field. This finding implies the importance of physical properties of the environment for the morphology of bacterial colonies in general.

  17. Cortisol affects tight junction morphology between pavement cells of rainbow trout gills in single-seeded insert culture.

    PubMed

    Sandbichler, Adolf Michael; Farkas, Julia; Salvenmoser, Willi; Pelster, Bernd

    2011-12-01

    A primary culture system of rainbow trout gill pavement cells grown on permeable support (single-seeded insert, SSI) was used to examine histological and physiological changes induced by the addition of the corticosteroid hormone cortisol. Pavement cell epithelia were cultured under symmetrical conditions (L15 apical/L15 basolateral) and developed a high transepithelial resistance (TER, 6.84 ± 1.99 kΩ cm(2), mean ± SEM) with a low phenol red diffusion rate (PRD, 0.15 ± 0.03 μmol l(-1)/day). Addition of cortisol to the basolateral compartment increased TER twofold and reduced PRD threefold over a 5-day period. A similar increase in TER could be seen after 24 h apical freshwater (FW) in control cultures. In cortisol-treated cultures FW exposure did not change TER, but PRD increased significantly. Histochemical staining of the cytoskeleton of cells in SSI culture revealed a morphological partitioning into a single mucosal layer of polarized, polygonal cells featuring cortical F-actin rings which were comparable to F-actin rings of epithelial cells on the lamellar and filamental surface, and several unorganized serosal layers of cells with F-actin stress fibers. Addition of cortisol increased cell density by 18% and in the mucosal layer it led to smaller, less polygonal cells with increased height and increased cell contact area. In transmission electron microscopic images two pairs of cytoplasmatic electron-dense structures confining the zonula occludens apically and basally toward the zonula adhaerens were found. Addition of cortisol increased the distance between those paired structures, hence led to deeper tight junctions. The cortisol-induced increase in barrier properties, therefore, involves a structural fortification of the tight junctions which was not generally modified by a short 24-h apical freshwater stress. These results identify cortisol as a regulator of tight junction morphology between pavement cells of euryhaline fish such as the

  18. Bud endophytes of Scots pine produce adenine derivatives and other compounds that affect morphology and mitigate browning of callus cultures.

    PubMed

    Pirttilä, Anna Maria; Joensuu, Päivi; Pospiech, Helmut; Jalonen, Jorma; Hohtola, Anja

    2004-06-01

    Endophytes are found in meristematic bud tissues of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) especially prior to growth, which would suggest their involvement in growth of the bud. To test this hypothesis, production of phytohormones by two bacterial (Methylobacterium extorquens, Pseudomonas synxantha) and one fungal endophyte (Rhodotorula minuta) was studied by mass spectrometry. The most common gibberellins, auxins, or cytokinins were not detected in the fractions studied. Instead, M. extorquens and R. minuta produced adenine derivatives that may be used as precursors in cytokinin biosynthesis. A plant tissue culture medium was conditioned with the endophytes, and pine tissue cultures were started on the media. Tetracycline inhibited callus production, which was restored on the endophyte-conditioned media. In addition, conditioning mitigated browning of the Scots pine explants. However, a decrease in tissue size was observed on the endophyte-conditioned media. Addition of adenosine monophosphate in the plant culture medium restored callus production and increased growth of the tissues, but had no effect on browning. Therefore, production of adenine ribosides by endophytes may play some role in the morphological effect observed in the pine tissues. PMID:15153198

  19. CebR as a master regulator for cellulose/cellooligosaccharide catabolism affects morphological development in Streptomyces griseus.

    PubMed

    Marushima, Kazuya; Ohnishi, Yasuo; Horinouchi, Sueharu

    2009-10-01

    Streptomyces griseus mutants exhibiting deficient glucose repression of beta-galactosidase activity on lactose-containing minimal medium supplemented with a high concentration of glucose were isolated. One of these mutants had a 12-bp deletion in cebR, which encodes a LacI/GalR family regulator. Disruption of cebR in the wild-type strain caused the same phenotype as the mutant, indicating that CebR is required for glucose repression of beta-galactosidase activity. Recombinant CebR protein bound to a 14-bp inverted-repeat sequence (designated the CebR box) present in the promoter regions of cebR and the putative cellobiose utilization operon, cebEFG-bglC. The DNA-binding activity of CebR was impaired by cellooligosaccharides, including cellobiose, cellotriose, cellotetraose, cellopentaose, and cellohexaose. In agreement with this observation, transcription from the cebE and cebR promoters was greatly enhanced by the addition of cellobiose to the medium. Seven other genes containing one or two CebR boxes in their upstream regions were found in the S. griseus genome. Five of these genes encode putative secreted proteins: two cellulases, a cellulose-binding protein, a pectate lyase, and a protein of unknown function. These five genes and cebEFG-bglC were transcribed at levels 4 to 130 times higher in the DeltacebR mutant than in the wild-type strain, as determined by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. These findings indicate that CebR is a master regulator of cellulose/cellooligosaccharide catabolism. Unexpectedly, the DeltacebR mutant formed very few aerial hyphae on lactose-containing medium, demonstrating a link between carbon source utilization and morphological development. PMID:19648249

  20. Colonial American Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeomans, Donald K.

    2007-12-01

    While a foundation of German scientific methods enabled the rapid growth of North American Astronomy in the nineteenth century, during the seventeenth and most of the eighteenth centuries, the colonial men of science looked only to the English mother country for scientific patronage and guidance. An essay on fundamental astronomy appeared in one of the annual colonial almanacs as early as 1656, telescopic observations were made about 1660 and the first original colonial astronomical work was published by Thomas Danforth on the comet of 1664. By 1671 the Copernican ideas were so espoused at Harvard College that a physics class refused to read a Ptolemaic textbook when it was assigned to them by a senior instructor. At least in the Cambridge-Boston area, contemporary colonialist had access to the most recent scientific publications from the mother country. Observations of the great comet of 1680 by the Almanac maker, John Foster, reached Isaac Newton and were used and gratefully acknowledged in his Principia. During the seventeenth century the colonial interest in astronomy was more intense than it was for other sciences but colonists still occupied a position in the scientific backwater when compared with contemporary European scientists. Nevertheless, the science of astronomy was successfully transplanted from England to North America in the seventeenth century.

  1. The Colonial Inheritance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Jack

    As the American nation developed through periods of rapid change and great cultural diversity, the American public school system served as a primary souce of national unity. The roots of comprehensive public education in America can be traced to the educational system developed by 17th century Puritan colonials. Although one of the central…

  2. Sailing to the Colonies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Dorothy S.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a class activity designed to foster an understanding of rules, develop analytical skills, and introduce students to early colonial history. Divides the class into groups who are sailing to the New World, and presents them with ethical and practical problems to be solved on board the ship. (RW)

  3. Branching instability in expanding bacterial colonies

    PubMed Central

    Giverso, Chiara; Verani, Marco; Ciarletta, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Self-organization in developing living organisms relies on the capability of cells to duplicate and perform a collective motion inside the surrounding environment. Chemical and mechanical interactions coordinate such a cooperative behaviour, driving the dynamical evolution of the macroscopic system. In this work, we perform an analytical and computational analysis to study pattern formation during the spreading of an initially circular bacterial colony on a Petri dish. The continuous mathematical model addresses the growth and the chemotactic migration of the living monolayer, together with the diffusion and consumption of nutrients in the agar. The governing equations contain four dimensionless parameters, accounting for the interplay among the chemotactic response, the bacteria–substrate interaction and the experimental geometry. The spreading colony is found to be always linearly unstable to perturbations of the interface, whereas branching instability arises in finite-element numerical simulations. The typical length scales of such fingers, which align in the radial direction and later undergo further branching, are controlled by the size parameters of the problem, whereas the emergence of branching is favoured if the diffusion is dominant on the chemotaxis. The model is able to predict the experimental morphologies, confirming that compact (resp. branched) patterns arise for fast (resp. slow) expanding colonies. Such results, while providing new insights into pattern selection in bacterial colonies, may finally have important applications for designing controlled patterns. PMID:25652464

  4. Perinatal exposure to bisphenol-A inhibits synaptogenesis and affects the synaptic morphological development in offspring male mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaohong; Xie, Lingdan; Hong, Xing; Ruan, Qin; Lu, Hongfei; Zhang, Qin; Zhang, Guangxia; Liu, Xingyi

    2013-05-01

    Our previous study indicated that perinatal exposure to low-dose BPA, one of the most common environmental endocrine disrupters, alters behavioral development in offspring mice. Given that synaptic structure of the hippocampus is closely related to behaviors, in the present study, we examined the effects of perinatal exposure to BPA (0.04, 0.4, and 4.0 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) on the synaptic density and the synaptic structural modification of pyramidal cells in hippocampus region CA1 and the expressions of synaptic proteins such as synapsin I and PSD-95 and glutamate NMDA and AMPA receptors in male offspring mice on postnatal day (PND) 14, 21, and 56. The results of electron microscope measurement showed that BPA significantly reduced the numeric synaptic density and altered the structural modification of synaptic interface of pyramidal cells with the enlarged synaptic cleft, the shortened active zone, and the thinned postsynaptic density (PSD) on PND 14, 21, and 56 and the increased curvature of synaptic interface on PND 14 and 21. Further analyses of Western blot indicated that BPA markedly reduced the levels of synapsin I and PSD-95 on PND 14, 21, and 56 and down-regulated NMDA receptor subunit NR1 and AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 during development and young adulthood. These results suggest that perinatal exposure to low level of BPA inhibits synaptogenesis and affects synaptic structural modification after birth. The reduced expressions of synaptic proteins synapsin I and PSD-95 and glutamate NMDA and AMPA receptors may be involved in the negative changes in the synaptic plasticity. PMID:23490186

  5. Barrier Island Morphology and Sediment Characteristics Affect the Recovery of Dune Building Grasses following Storm-Induced Overwash

    PubMed Central

    Brantley, Steven T.; Bissett, Spencer N.; Young, Donald R.; Wolner, Catherine W. V.; Moore, Laura J.

    2014-01-01

    Barrier islands are complex and dynamic systems that provide critical ecosystem services to coastal populations. Stability of these systems is threatened by rising sea level and the potential for coastal storms to increase in frequency and intensity. Recovery of dune-building grasses following storms is an important process that promotes topographic heterogeneity and long-term stability of barrier islands, yet factors that drive dune recovery are poorly understood. We examined vegetation recovery in overwash zones on two geomorphically distinct (undisturbed vs. frequently overwashed) barrier islands on the Virginia coast, USA. We hypothesized that vegetation recovery in overwash zones would be driven primarily by environmental characteristics, especially elevation and beach width. We sampled species composition and environmental characteristics along a continuum of disturbance from active overwash zones to relict overwash zones and in adjacent undisturbed environments. We compared species assemblages along the disturbance chronosequence and between islands and we analyzed species composition data and environmental measurements with Canonical Correspondence Analysis to link community composition with environmental characteristics. Recovering and geomorphically stable dunes were dominated by Ammophila breviligulata Fernaud (Poaceae) on both islands while active overwash zones were dominated by Spartina patens (Aiton) Muhl. (Poaceae) on the frequently disturbed island and bare sand on the less disturbed island. Species composition was associated with environmental characteristics only on the frequently disturbed island (p = 0.005) where A. breviligulata was associated with higher elevation and greater beach width. Spartina patens, the second most abundant species, was associated with larger sediment grain size and greater sediment size distribution. On the less frequently disturbed island, time since disturbance was the only factor that affected community

  6. Waterlogging in late dormancy and the early growth phase affected root and leaf morphology in Betula pendula and Betula pubescens seedlings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ai-Fang; Roitto, Marja; Sutinen, Sirkka; Lehto, Tarja; Heinonen, Jaakko; Zhang, Gang; Repo, Tapani

    2016-01-01

    The warmer winters of the future will increase snow-melt frequency and rainfall, thereby increasing the risk of soil waterlogging and its effects on trees in winter and spring at northern latitudes. We studied the morphology of roots and leaves of 1-year-old silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) and pubescent birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.) seedlings exposed to waterlogging during dormancy or at the beginning of the growing season in a growth-chamber experiment. The experiment included 4-week dormancy (Weeks 1-4), a 4-week early growing season (Weeks 5-8) and a 4-week late growing season (Weeks 9-12). The treatments were: (i) no waterlogging, throughout the experiment ('NW'); (ii) 4-week waterlogging during dormancy (dormancy waterlogging 'DW'); (iii) 4-week waterlogging during the early growing season (growth waterlogging 'GW'); and (iv) 4-week DW followed by 4-week GW during the early growing season ('DWGW'). Dormancy waterlogging affected the roots of silver birch and GW the roots and leaf characteristics of both species. Leaf area was reduced in both species by GW and DWGW. In pubescent birch, temporarily increased formation of thin roots was seen in root systems of GW seedlings, which suggests an adaptive mechanism with respect to excess soil water. Additionally, the high density of non-glandular trichomes and their increase in DWGW leaves were considered possible morphological adaptations to excess water in the soil, as was the constant density of stem lenticels during stem-diameter growth. The higher density in glandular trichomes of DWGW silver birch suggests morphological acclimation in that species. The naturally low density of non-glandular trichomes, low density of stem lenticels in waterlogged seedlings and decrease in root growth seen in DWGW and DW silver birch seedlings explain, at least partly, why silver birch grows more poorly relative to pubescent birch in wet soils. PMID:26420790

  7. Growing Yeast into Cylindrical Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Vulin, Clément; Di Meglio, Jean-Marc; Lindner, Ariel B.; Daerr, Adrian; Murray, Andrew; Hersen, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms often form complex multicellular assemblies such as biofilms and colonies. Understanding the interplay between assembly expansion, metabolic yield, and nutrient diffusion within a freely growing colony remains a challenge. Most available data on microorganisms are from planktonic cultures, due to the lack of experimental tools to control the growth of multicellular assemblies. Here, we propose a method to constrain the growth of yeast colonies into simple geometric shapes such as cylinders. To this end, we designed a simple, versatile culture system to control the location of nutrient delivery below a growing colony. Under such culture conditions, yeast colonies grow vertically and only at the locations where nutrients are delivered. Colonies increase in height at a steady growth rate that is inversely proportional to the cylinder radius. We show that the vertical growth rate of cylindrical colonies is not defined by the single-cell division rate, but rather by the colony metabolic yield. This contrasts with cells in liquid culture, in which the single-cell division rate is the only parameter that defines the population growth rate. This method also provides a direct, simple method to estimate the metabolic yield of a colony. Our study further demonstrates the importance of the shape of colonies on setting their expansion. We anticipate that our approach will be a starting point for elaborate studies of the population dynamics, evolution, and ecology of microbial colonies in complex landscapes. PMID:24853750

  8. Information use in colonial living.

    PubMed

    Evans, Julian C; Votier, Stephen C; Dall, Sasha R X

    2016-08-01

    Despite the fact that many animals live in groups, there is still no clear consensus about the ecological or evolutionary mechanisms underlying colonial living. Recently, research has suggested that colonies may be important as sources of social information. The ready availability of information from conspecifics allows animals to make better decisions about avoiding predators, reducing brood parasitism, migratory phenology, mate choice, habitat choice and foraging. These choices can play a large part in the development and maintenance of colonies. Here we review the types of information provided by colonial animals and examine the different ways in which decision-making in colonies can be enhanced by social information. We discuss what roles information might take in the evolution, formation and maintenance of colonies. In the process, we illustrate that information use permeates all aspects of colonial living. PMID:25882618

  9. Colony image acquisition and genetic segmentation algorithm and colony analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. X.

    2012-01-01

    Colony anaysis is used in a large number of engineerings such as food, dairy, beverages, hygiene, environmental monitoring, water, toxicology, sterility testing. In order to reduce laboring and increase analysis acuracy, many researchers and developers have made efforts for image analysis systems. The main problems in the systems are image acquisition, image segmentation and image analysis. In this paper, to acquire colony images with good quality, an illumination box was constructed. In the box, the distances between lights and dishe, camra lens and lights, and camera lens and dishe are adjusted optimally. In image segmentation, It is based on a genetic approach that allow one to consider the segmentation problem as a global optimization,. After image pre-processing and image segmentation, the colony analyses are perfomed. The colony image analysis consists of (1) basic colony parameter measurements; (2) colony size analysis; (3) colony shape analysis; and (4) colony surface measurements. All the above visual colony parameters can be selected and combined together, used to make a new engineeing parameters. The colony analysis can be applied into different applications.

  10. Fever in honeybee colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starks, P. T.; Blackie, Caroline A.; Seeley, Thomas D.

    Honeybees, Apis spp., maintain elevated temperatures inside their nests to accelerate brood development and to facilitate defense against predators. We present an additional defensive function of elevating nest temperature: honeybees generate a brood-comb fever in response to colonial infection by the heat-sensitive pathogen Ascosphaera apis. This response occurs before larvae are killed, suggesting that either honeybee workers detect the infection before symptoms are visible, or that larvae communicate the ingestion of the pathogen. This response is a striking example of convergent evolution between this "superorganism" and other fever-producing animals.

  11. Effect of time on colony odour stability in the ant Formica exsecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, S. J.; Shemilt, S.; Drijfhout, F. P.

    2012-04-01

    Among social insects, maintaining a distinct colony profile allows individuals to distinguish easily between nest mates and non-nest mates. In ants, colony-specific profiles can be encoded within their cuticular hydrocarbons, and these are influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. Using nine monogynous Formica exsecta ant colonies, we studied the stability of their colony-specific profiles at eight time points over a 4-year period. We found no significant directional change in any colony profile, suggesting that genetic factors are maintaining this stability. However, there were significant short-term effects of season that affected all colony profiles in the same direction. Despite these temporal changes, no significant change in the profile variation within colonies was detected: each colony's profile responded in similar manner between seasons, with nest mates maintaining closely similar profiles, distinct from other colonies. These findings imply that genetic factors may help maintain the long-term stability of colony profile, but environmental factors can influence the profiles over shorter time periods. However, environmental factors do not contribute significantly to the maintenance of diversity among colonies, since all colonies were affected in a similar way.

  12. Colony image acquisition and segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. X.

    2007-12-01

    For counting of both colonies and plaques, there is a large number of applications including food, dairy, beverages, hygiene, environmental monitoring, water, toxicology, sterility testing, AMES testing, pharmaceuticals, paints, sterile fluids and fungal contamination. Recently, many researchers and developers have made efforts for this kind of systems. By investigation, some existing systems have some problems. The main problems are image acquisition and image segmentation. In order to acquire colony images with good quality, an illumination box was constructed as: the box includes front lightning and back lightning, which can be selected by users based on properties of colony dishes. With the illumination box, lightning can be uniform; colony dish can be put in the same place every time, which make image processing easy. The developed colony image segmentation algorithm consists of the sub-algorithms: (1) image classification; (2) image processing; and (3) colony delineation. The colony delineation algorithm main contain: the procedures based on grey level similarity, on boundary tracing, on shape information and colony excluding. In addition, a number of algorithms are developed for colony analysis. The system has been tested and satisfactory.

  13. Concentration of Fibrin and Presence of Plasminogen Affect Proliferation, Fibrinolytic Activity, and Morphology of Human Fibroblasts and Keratinocytes in 3D Fibrin Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Reinertsen, Erik; Skinner, Michael; Wu, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Fibrin is a hemostatic protein found in the clotting cascade. It is used in the operating room to stop bleeding and deliver cells and growth factors to heal wounds. However, formulations of clinically approved fibrin are optimized for hemostasis, and the extent to which biochemical and physical cues in fibrin mediate skin cell behavior is not fully understood nor utilized in the design of biomaterials. To determine if the concentration of fibrinogen and the presence of plasminogen affect cell behavior relevant to wound healing, we fabricated three-dimensional fibrin constructs made from 5, 10, or 20 mg/mL of clinical fibrin or plasminogen-depleted (PD) fibrin. We cultured dermal fibroblasts or epidermal keratinocytes in these constructs. Fibroblasts proliferated similarly in both types of fibrin, but keratinocytes proliferated more in low concentrations of clinical fibrin and less in PD fibrin. Clinical fibrin constructs with fibroblasts were less stiff and degraded faster than PD fibrin constructs with fibroblasts. Similarly, keratinocytes degraded clinical fibrin, but not PD fibrin. Fibroblast spreading varied with fibrin concentration in both types of fibrin. In conclusion, the concentration of fibrinogen and the presence of plasminogen affect fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation, morphology, and fibrin degradation. Creating materials with heterogeneous regions of fibrin formulations and concentrations could be a novel strategy for controlling the phenotype of encapsulated fibroblasts and keratinocytes, and the subsequent biomechanical properties of the construct. However, other well-investigated aspects of wound healing remain to be utilized in the design of fibrin biomaterials, such as autocrine and paracrine signaling between fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and immune cells. PMID:24738616

  14. Clostridium botulinum type C hemagglutinin affects the morphology and viability of cultured mammalian cells via binding to the ganglioside GM3.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Yo; Iwamori, Masao; Matsumura, Takuhiro; Yutani, Masahiro; Amatsu, Sho; Fujinaga, Yukako

    2015-09-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin is conventionally divided into seven serotypes, designated A-G, and is produced as large protein complexes through associations with non-toxic components, such as hemagglutinin (HA) and non-toxic non-HA. These non-toxic proteins dramatically enhance the oral toxicity of the toxin complex. HA is considered to have a role in toxin transport through the intestinal epithelium by carbohydrate binding and epithelial barrier-disrupting activity. Type A and B HAs disrupt E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion, and, in turn, the intercellular epithelial barrier. Type C HA (HA/C) disrupts the barrier function by affecting cell morphology and viability, the mechanism of which remains unknown. In this study, we identified GM3 as the target molecule of HA/C. We found that sialic acid binding of HA is essential for the activity. It was abolished when cells were pre-treated with an inhibitor of ganglioside synthesis. Consistent with this, HA/C bound to a-series gangliosides in a glycan array. In parallel, we isolated clones resistant to HA/C activity from a susceptible mouse fibroblast strain. These cells lacked expression of ST-I, the enzyme that transfers sialic acid to lactosylceramide to yield GM3. These clones became sensitive to HA/C activity when GM3 was expressed by transfection with the ST-I gene. The sensitivity of fibroblasts to HA/C was reduced by expressing ganglioside synthesis genes whose products utilize GM3 as a substrate and consequently generate other a-series gangliosides, suggesting a GM3-specific mechanism. Our results demonstrate that HA/C affects cells in a GM3-dependent manner. PMID:26077172

  15. A single early postnatal estradiol injection affects morphology and gene expression of the ovary and parametrial adipose tissue in adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Alexanderson, Camilla; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Kullberg, Joel; Nilsson, Staffan; Levin, Max; Cajander, Stefan; Lönn, Lars; Lönn, Malin; Holmäng, Agneta

    2010-10-01

    Events during early life can affect reproductive and metabolic functions in adulthood. We evaluated the programming effects of a single early postnatal estradiol injection (within 3h after birth) in female rats. We assessed ovarian and parametrial adipose tissue morphology, evaluated gene expression related to follicular development and adipose tissue metabolism, and developed a non-invasive volumetric estimation of parametrial adipose tissue by magnetic resonance imaging. Estradiol reduced ovarian weight, increased antral follicle size and number of atretic antral follicles, and decreased theca interna thickness in atretic antral follicles. Adult estradiol-injected rats also had malformed vaginal openings and lacked corpora lutea, confirming anovulation. Estradiol markedly reduced parametrial adipose tissue mass. Adipocyte size was unchanged, suggesting reduced adipocyte number. Parametrial adipose tissue lipoprotein lipase activity was increased. In ovaries, estradiol increased mRNA expression of adiponectin, complement component 3, estrogen receptor α, and glucose transporter 3 and 4; in parametrial adipose tissue, expression of complement component 3 was increased, expression of estrogen receptor α was decreased, and expression of leptin, lipoprotein lipase, and hormone-sensitive lipase was unaffected. These findings suggest that early postnatal estradiol exposure of female rats result in long-lasting effects on the ovary and parametrial adipose tissue at adult age. PMID:19857573

  16. Mps1 (Monopolar Spindle 1) Protein Inhibition Affects Cellular Growth and Pro-Embryogenic Masses Morphology in Embryogenic Cultures of Araucaria angustifolia (Araucariaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Douétts-Peres, Jackellinne C.; Cruz, Marco Antônio L.; Reis, Ricardo S.; Heringer, Angelo S.; de Oliveira, Eduardo A. G.; Elbl, Paula M.; Floh, Eny I. S.; Silveira, Vanildo

    2016-01-01

    Somatic embryogenesis has been shown to be an efficient tool for studying processes based on cell growth and development. The fine regulation of the cell cycle is essential for proper embryo formation during the process of somatic embryogenesis. The aims of the present work were to identify and perform a structural and functional characterization of Mps1 and to analyze the effects of the inhibition of this protein on cellular growth and pro-embryogenic mass (PEM) morphology in embryogenic cultures of A. angustifolia. A single-copy Mps1 gene named AaMps1 was retrieved from the A. angustifolia transcriptome database, and through a mass spectrometry approach, AaMps1 was identified and quantified in embryogenic cultures. The Mps1 inhibitor SP600125 (10 μM) inhibited cellular growth and changed PEMs, and these effects were accompanied by a reduction in AaMps1 protein levels in embryogenic cultures. Our work has identified the Mps1 protein in a gymnosperm species for the first time, and we have shown that inhibiting Mps1 affects cellular growth and PEM differentiation during A. angustifolia somatic embryogenesis. These data will be useful for better understanding cell cycle control during somatic embryogenesis in plants. PMID:27064899

  17. Post-Colonial Theory and Action Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Jim B.; Harding, Kelly J.

    2011-01-01

    This essay explores connections between post-colonial theory and action research. Post-colonial theory is committed to addressing the plague of colonialism. Action research, at its core, promises to problematize uncontested "colonial" hegemonies of any form. Both post-colonial theory and action research engage dialogic, critically reflective and…

  18. Group G streptococcal epizootic in a closed cat colony.

    PubMed Central

    Tillman, P C; Dodson, N D; Indiveri, M

    1982-01-01

    An epizootic of beta-hemolytic Lancefield group G streptococcal infections occurred in a specific-pathogen-free colony of laboratory cats. A total of 19 out of 68 animals in a single building were affected over a 10-day period. Clinical signs included fever, depression, lymphadenopathy, pharyngitis, and submandibular edema. The organism was recovered from the pharynx in two of five clinically normal cats from the affected building. Cultures from 12 animals in the same colony but housed in unaffected buildings were negative. Two doses of long-acting penicillin G 72 h apart stopped the outbreak and resulted in negative cultures for previously affected animals. Three months later, two new cases occurred in the same building. The disease was finally eradicated from the colony by depopulating the affected building. PMID:7161373

  19. Student Discipline in Colonial America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petry, John R.

    The basis for the severe discipline imposed on school children in colonial America, especially in the Puritan colonies, was the belief in original sin. The child was regarded as being born in sin and thus depraved and prone to sin. The purpose of education was to enable children to read the Bible and thus change the behavior which otherwise would…

  20. mGluR5 Positive and Negative Allosteric Modulators Differentially Affect Dendritic Spine Density and Morphology in the Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    LaCrosse, Amber L.; Taylor, Sara B.; Nemirovsky, Natali E.; Gass, Justin T.; Olive, M. Foster

    2015-01-01

    Positive and negative allosteric modulators (PAMs and NAMs, respectively) of type 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR5) are currently being investigated as novel treatments for neuropsychiatric diseases including drug addiction, schizophrenia, and Fragile X syndrome. However, only a handful of studies have examined the effects of mGluR5 PAMs or NAMs on the structural plasticity of dendritic spines in otherwise naïve animals, particularly in brain regions mediating executive function. In the present study, we assessed dendritic spine density and morphology in pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) after repeated administration of either the prototypical mGluR5 PAM 3-cyano-N-(1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5-yl)benzamide (CDPPB, 20 mg/kg), the clinically utilized mGluR5 NAM 1-(3-chlorophenyl)-3-(3-methyl-5-oxo-4H-imidazol-2-yl)urea (fenobam, 20 mg/kg), or vehicle in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Following once daily treatment for 10 consecutive days, coronal brain sections containing the mPFC underwent diolistic labeling and 3D image analysis of dendritic spines. Compared to vehicle treated animals, rats administered fenobam exhibited significant increases in dendritic spine density and the overall frequency of spines with small (<0.2 μm) head diameters, decreases in frequency of spines with medium (0.2–0.4 μm) head diameters, and had no changes in frequency of spines with large head diameters (>0.4 μm). Administration of CDPPB had no discernable effects on dendritic spine density or morphology, and neither CDPPB nor fenobam had any effect on spine length or volume. We conclude that mGluR5 PAMs and NAMs differentially affect mPFC dendritic spine structural plasticity in otherwise naïve animals, and additional studies assessing their effects in combination with cognitive or behavioral tasks are needed. PMID:25921744

  1. Ammonia emissions from seabird colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackall, Trevor D.; Wilson, Linda J.; Theobald, Mark R.; Milford, Celia; Nemitz, Eiko; Bull, Jennifer; Bacon, Philip J.; Hamer, Keith C.; Wanless, Sarah; Sutton, Mark A.

    2007-05-01

    Ammonia emissions were measured from two entire seabird colonies with contrasting species assemblages, to ascertain the ammonia volatilisation potentials among seabird species in relation to their nesting behaviour. Emissions were calculated from downwind plume measurements of ammonia concentration using both inverse dispersion and tracer ratio methods. Measured colony emissions ranged 1-90 kg NH3 hour-1, and equated to 16 and 36% volatilization of excreted nitrogen for colonies dominated by ground/burrow nesting and bare rock nesting birds, respectively. The results were applied in a bioenergetics model with a global seabird database. Seabird colonies are found to represent the largest point sources of ammonia globally (up to ~6 Gg NH3 colony-1 year-1). Moreover the largest emissions occur mainly in remote environments with otherwise low NH3 emissions. These ammonia ``hot spots'' explain significant perturbations of the nitrogen cycle in these regions and add ~20% to oceanic ammonia emissions south of latitude 45°S.

  2. Morphological adaptation of rumen papillae during the dry period and early lactation as affected by rate of increase of concentrate allowance.

    PubMed

    Dieho, K; Bannink, A; Geurts, I A L; Schonewille, J T; Gort, G; Dijkstra, J

    2016-03-01

    . Microscopic morphology was affected by sampling day, but neither by concentrate treatment nor by their interaction, with a decrease in papilla and epithelium thickness during the lactation. In conclusion, the rumen papillae respond to changes in FOM intake and the magnitude of this response depends on the rate of increase of FOM intake. This response in surface area of the rumen papillae potentially facilitates the absorption of the volatile fatty acids. PMID:26805997

  3. Geographic structure of adelie penguin populations: overlap in colony-specific foraging areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ainley, D.G.; Ribic, C.A.; Ballard, G.; Heath, S.; Gaffney, I.; Karl, B.J.; Barton, K.J.; Wilson, P.R.; Webb, S.

    2004-01-01

    the study, when foraging trips of the large colony were very long, parents lost mass, and chick meals were smaller. In light of existing data on prey abundance in neritic waters in Antarctica suggesting that krill are relatively evenly distributed and in high abundance in the Southern Ross Sea, we conclude that penguins depleted or changed the availability of their prey, that the degree of alteration was a function of colony size, and that the large colony affected the location (and perhaps ultimately the size) of foraging areas for the smaller colonies. It appears, therefore, that foraging dynamics play a role in the geographic structuring of colonies in this species. ?? 2004 by the Ecological Society of America.

  4. Trade-offs limiting the evolution of coloniality: ecological displacement rates used to measure small costs

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Kiyoko; Sterner, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Multicellular organisms that benefit from division of labour are presumably descended from colonial species that initially derived benefits from larger colony size, before the evolution of specialization. Life in a colony can have costs as well as benefits, but these can be hard to measure. We measured physiological costs to life in a colony using a novel method based on population dynamics, comparing growth rates of unicells and kairomone-induced colonies of a green alga Desmodesmus subspicatus against a reference co-occurring species. Coloniality negatively affected growth during the initial log growth phase, while no adverse effect was detected under nutrient-limited competitive conditions. The results point to costs associated with traits involved in rapid growth rather than those associated with efficient growth under resource scarcity. Some benefits of coloniality (e.g. defence from herbivory) may be different from when this trait evolved, but our approach shows how costs would have depended on conditions. PMID:20739317

  5. Chemotactic-based adaptive self-organization during colonial development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Inon; Czirók, Andras; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    1996-02-01

    Bacterial colonies have developed sophisticated modes of cooperative behavior which enable them to respond to adverse growth conditions. It has been shown that such behavior can be manifested in the development of complex colonial patterns. Certain bacterial species exhibit formation of branching patterns during colony development. Here we present a generic model to describe such patterning of swimming (tumbling) bacteria on agar surfaces. The model incorporates: (1) food diffusion, (2) reproduction and sporulation of the cells, (3) movement of the bacterial cells within a self-produced wetting fluid and (4) chemotactic signaling. As a plausible explanation for transitions between different branching morphologies, we propose an interplay between chemotaxis towards food, self-produced short range chemoattractant and long range chemorepellent.

  6. Indians and Southern Colonial Statutes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawashima, Yasuhide

    1974-01-01

    Southern statutes, with their dual nature of uniformity and diversity, were doubtlessly an essential source of law for the examination of complex legal relations between American Indians and Anglo Americans in the colonial South. (FF)

  7. Egg storage duration and hatch window affect gene expression of nutrient transporters and intestine morphological parameters of early hatched broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, S; Gursel, I; Bilgen, G; Izzetoglu, G T; Horuluoglu, B H; Gucluer, G

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, researchers have given emphasis on the differences in physiological parameters between early and late hatched chicks within a hatch window. Considering the importance of intestine development in newly hatched chicks, however, changes in gene expression of nutrient transporters in the jejunum of early hatched chicks within a hatch window have not been studied yet. This study was conducted to determine the effects of egg storage duration before incubation and hatch window on intestinal development and expression of PepT1 (H+-dependent peptide transporter) and SGLT1 (sodium-glucose co-transporter) genes in the jejunum of early hatched broiler chicks within a 30 h of hatch window. A total of 1218 eggs obtained from 38-week-old Ross 308 broiler breeder flocks were stored for 3 (ES3) or 14 days (ES14) and incubated at the same conditions. Eggs were checked between 475 and 480 h of incubation and 40 chicks from each egg storage duration were weighed; chick length and rectal temperature were measured. The chicks were sampled to evaluate morphological parameters and PepT1 and SGLT1 expression. The remaining chicks that hatched between 475 and 480 h were placed back in the incubator and the same measurements were conducted with those chicks at the end of hatch window at 510 h of incubation. Chick length, chick dry matter content, rectal temperature and weight of small intestine segments increased, whereas chick weight decreased during the hatch window. The increase in the jejunum length and villus width and area during the hatch window were higher for ES3 than ES14 chicks. PepT1 expression was higher for ES3 chicks compared with ES14. There was a 10.2 and 17.6-fold increase in PepT1 and SGLT1 expression of ES3 chicks at the end of hatch window, whereas it was only 2.3 and 3.3-fold, respectively, for ES14 chicks. These results suggested that egg storage duration affected development of early hatched chicks during 30 h of hatch window. It can be concluded that

  8. The effect of controlled floods on decadal-scale changes in channel morphology and fine sediment storage in a debris-fan affected river canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, E. R.; Grams, P. E.; Schmidt, J. C.

    2013-12-01

    In 2011, a large magnitude flow release from Flaming Gorge Reservoir resulted in the third highest recorded discharge of the Green River downstream from Flaming Gorge Dam subsequent to its closure in 1963. Following this event, we made measurements of channel geometry, tracer gravel displacement, and sandbar sedimentology at four long-term monitoring reaches within the Canyon of Lodore in Dinosaur National Monument, Colorado. Here we integrate these data with nearly two decades of channel monitoring at these sites, encompassing five controlled floods, and providing a coarse resolution, but coherent, picture of channel response and changes in fine sediment storage in a canyon-bound river. We discuss these results in the context of long-term monitoring of controlled flood response along the Colorado River in Marble and Grand Canyons, Arizona. In Canyon of Lodore, moderate, short-duration controlled floods have had little effect on channel morphology or fine sediment storage. Alternatively, higher magnitude floods approaching the pre-dam mean annual flood, such as in 1999 and 2011, tended to be long duration and scoured fine sediment from the channel bed, in some places up to 5 m, while building eddy sandbars to within a meter of flood stage. This resulted in a net export of sediment from the monitored reaches. Between floods, eddy sand bars erode and the pools fill with fine sediment. We have observed only minor erosion or reworking of gravel bars and channel margin deposits stabilized by vegetation encroachment. The Green River in Canyon of Lodore is a scaled-down version of the Colorado River in debris fan-affected Marble and Grand Canyons. Both rivers now exist in varying degrees of sediment deficit due to upstream reservoirs. Coarse sediment from debris fans and hillslopes limits vertical incision and channel migration, focusing the post-dam geomorphic response to sediment imbalance on fine sediment located in eddy sandbars, pools, and channel margin deposits. In

  9. Effect of formic acid formulations on honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies and influence of colony and ambient conditions on formic acid concentration in the hive.

    PubMed

    Ostermann, David J; Currie, Robert W

    2004-10-01

    The interaction between the effects of varroa, Varroa destructor Anderson & Trueman, and formic acid treatments on colonies of honey bees, Apis mellifera L., were examined in two field experiments. In experiment 1, colonies with low varroa levels were exposed to two different slow-release formulations and compared with untreated colonies. In experiment 2, colonies inoculated with varroa and uninoculated colonies were exposed to a slow-release formulation, a pour-on formulation, or were left untreated. The effects of treatments, hive temperature, and hive relative humidity on formic acid concentration in hive air also were examined. Slow-release formic acid application improved colony development in colonies that had been inoculated with varroa. However, in uninoculated colonies where the mean abundance of varroa was low, slow-release formic acid application suppressed colony development. The pour-on application did not have a negative impact on worker population growth in uninoculated colonies, but also it was not as effective as the slow-release treatment in improving population growth in varroa-inoculated colonies. Equivalent volumes of acid applied in pour-on and slow-release formulations provided the same cumulative dose in hive air but differed in the daily pattern of formic acid release. Colonies that were not inoculated with varroa had higher concentrations of formic acid in hive air than colonies that were inoculated with varroa on three of the five pour-on application dates. The data suggest that reductions in worker population and/or activity caused by varroa can interact with ambient conditions to affect the volatilization or sorption of formic acid in the hive. PMID:15568335

  10. Characterization of Small-Colony Variants of Enterococcus faecalis Isolated from Chickens with Amyloid Arthropathy▿

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Andreas; Chadfield, Mark S.; Christensen, Jens P.; Christensen, Henrik; Bisgaard, Magne

    2008-01-01

    In this study we report the isolation and characterization of normal-sized and small-colony variants of Enterococcus faecalis from outbreaks of amyloid arthropathy in chickens. Postmortem examinations of 59 chickens revealed orange deposits in the knee joints, typical for amyloid arthropathy. Bacterial cultures from 102 joints and 43 spleens exhibited pure (n = 88) and mixed (n = 11) cultures of normal (n = 60) and pinpoint (n = 28) colonies of E. faecalis. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of 62 isolates demonstrated seven different band patterns with at most two band size variations, and multilocus sequence typing demonstrated two different sequence types, sharing six out of seven alleles, suggesting a close evolutionary relationship between isolates obtained from four outbreaks. In addition, all isolates were clonally related to an amyloid arthropathy reference strain from The Netherlands, previously shown to be globally dispersed. Initial investigation of the isolated small-colony variant phenotype revealed no difference in whole-cell protein profiling between normal and pinpoint colonies. However, the pinpoint colony isolates appeared to be more virulent in an in vivo challenge model in chickens than their normal-sized-colony counterparts. In addition, pinpoint morphology and associated slow growth were expressed without reversion after in vitro and in vivo passage, suggesting a genuine altered phenotype, and in some instances normal colonies converted to pinpoint morphology postinfection. In conclusion, small-colony variants of E. faecalis are described for the first time from veterinary clinical sources and in relation to amyloid arthropathy in chickens. PMID:18579713

  11. Pattern Formation of Bacterial Colonies by Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokita, Rie; Katoh, Takaki; Maeda, Yusuke; Wakita, Jun-ichi; Sano, Masaki; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2009-07-01

    We have studied the morphological diversity and change in bacterial colonies, using the bacterial species Escherichia coli, as a function of both agar concentration Ca and nutrient concentration Cn. We observed various colony patterns, classified them into four types by pattern characteristics and established a morphological diagram by dividing it into four regions. They are regions A [diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA)-like], B (Eden-like), C (concentric-ring), and D (fluid-spreading). In particular, we have observed a concentric-ring colony growth for E. coli. We focused on the periodic growth in region C and obtained the following results: (i) A colony grows cyclically with the growing front repeating an advance (migration phase) and a momentary rest (consolidation phase) alternately. (ii) The growth width L and the bulge width W in one cycle decrease asymptotically to certain values, when Ca is increased. (iii) L does not depend on Cn, while W is an increasing function of Cn. Plausible mechanisms are proposed to explain the experimental results, by comparing them with those obtained for other bacterial species such as Proteus mirabilis and Bacillus subtilis.

  12. Active mechanics and geometry of adherent cells and cell colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya

    2014-03-01

    Measurements of traction stresses exerted by adherent cells or cell colonies on elastic substrates have yielded new insight on how the mechanical and geometrical properties of the substrate regulate cellular force distribution, mechanical energy, spreading, morphology or stress ber architecture. We have developed a generic mechanical model of adherent cells as an active contractile gel mechanically coupled to an elastic substrate and to neighboring cells in a tissue. The contractile gel model accurately predicts the distribution of cellular and traction stresses as observed in single cell experiments, and captures the dependence of cell shape, traction stresses and stress ber polarization on the substrate's mechanical and geometrical properties. The model further predicts that the total strain energy of an adherent cell is solely regulated by its spread area, in agreement with recent experiments on micropatterned substrates with controlled geometry. When used to describe the behavior of colonies of adherent epithelial cells, the model demonstrates the crucial role of the mechanical cross-talk between intercellular and extracellular adhesion in regulating traction force distribution. Strong intercellular mechanical coupling organizes traction forces to the colony periphery, whereas weaker intercellular coupling leads to the build up of traction stresses at intercellular junctions. Furthermore, in agreement with experiments on large cohesive keratinocyte colonies, the model predicts a linear scaling of traction forces with the colony size. This scaling suggests the emergence of an effective surface tension as a scale-free material property of the adherent tissue, originating from actomyosin contractility.

  13. Sexual Reproductive Biology of a Colonial Rotifer Sinantherina socialis (Rotifera: Monogononta): Do mating strategies vary between colonial and solitary rotifer species?

    PubMed Central

    Rico-Martínez, Roberto; Walsh, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    In many aquatic invertebrates including monogonont rotifers, sex provides genetic variation and dormant stages that allows dispersal in time and space. While the reproductive biology of some solitary monogonont rotifer species is known, little is known concerning mating behaviors in colonial rotifers. Coloniality poses unique challenges to the typical mating behavior of solitary rotifers. For instance, most species engage in circling behavior, where the male swims in close proximity to the female. In colonial forms, access to a particular female may be hindered by nearby colony mates. Here we provide descriptions of (1) male morphology, (2) mating behavior, and (3) types of eggs of the widespread colonial rotifer Sinantherina socialis, and discuss modifications in mating strategies as a consequence of coloniality. Two important differences from mating patterns documented in solitary rotifers were found in S. socialis. First, duration of circling phase of mating is protracted for males encountering small colonies of females as compared to solitary females. Males encountering single females removed from their colonies behave similarly to those of solitary species. Second, duration of copulation in S. socialis is the shortest reported for any rotifer species. Endogamy might occur in this species as sons copulate with their sisters and mothers, at least under laboratory conditions. Examples of behaviour in linked video clips. PMID:24932095

  14. Sexual Reproductive Biology of a Colonial Rotifer Sinantherina socialis (Rotifera: Monogononta): Do mating strategies vary between colonial and solitary rotifer species?

    PubMed

    Rico-Martínez, Roberto; Walsh, Elizabeth J

    2013-12-01

    In many aquatic invertebrates including monogonont rotifers, sex provides genetic variation and dormant stages that allows dispersal in time and space. While the reproductive biology of some solitary monogonont rotifer species is known, little is known concerning mating behaviors in colonial rotifers. Coloniality poses unique challenges to the typical mating behavior of solitary rotifers. For instance, most species engage in circling behavior, where the male swims in close proximity to the female. In colonial forms, access to a particular female may be hindered by nearby colony mates. Here we provide descriptions of (1) male morphology, (2) mating behavior, and (3) types of eggs of the widespread colonial rotifer Sinantherina socialis, and discuss modifications in mating strategies as a consequence of coloniality. Two important differences from mating patterns documented in solitary rotifers were found in S. socialis. First, duration of circling phase of mating is protracted for males encountering small colonies of females as compared to solitary females. Males encountering single females removed from their colonies behave similarly to those of solitary species. Second, duration of copulation in S. socialis is the shortest reported for any rotifer species. Endogamy might occur in this species as sons copulate with their sisters and mothers, at least under laboratory conditions. Examples of behaviour in linked video clips. PMID:24932095

  15. Zimbabwe Colonial and Post-Colonial Language Policy and Planning Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makoni, Sinfree B.; Dube, Busi; Mashiri, Pedzisai

    2006-01-01

    This monograph focuses on the development of colonial and post-colonial language policies and practices in Zimbabwe, attributing changes to evolving philosophies and politics in colonial and post-colonial Zimbabwe. In colonial Zimbabwe, we argue that the language policies had as one of their key objectives the development of a bilingual white…

  16. Exposure to coal combustion residues during metamorphosis elevates corticosterone content and adversely affects oral morphology, growth, and development in Rana sphenocephala

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.D.; Peterson, V.A.; Mendonca, M.T.

    2009-01-15

    Coal combustion residues (CCRs) are documented to negatively impact oral morphology, growth, and development in larval amphibians. It is currently unclear what physiological mechanisms may mediate these effects. Corticosterone, a glucocorticoid hormone, is a likely mediator because when administered exogenously it, like CCRs, also negatively influences oral morphology, growth, and development in larval amphibians. In an attempt to identify if corticosterone mediates these effects, we raised larval Southern Leopard Frogs, Rana sphenocephala, on either sand or CCR substrate and documented effects of sediment type on whole body corticosterone, oral morphology, and time to and mass at key metamorphic stages. Coal combustion residue treated tadpoles contained significantly more corticosterone than controls throughout metamorphosis. However, significantly more oral abnormalities occurred early in metamorphosis when differences in corticosterone levels between treatments were minimal. Overall, CCR-treated tadpoles took significantly more time to transition between key stages and gained less mass between stages than controls, but these differences between treatments decreased during later stages when corticosterone differences between treatments were greatest. Our results suggest endogenous increase in corticosterone content and its influence on oral morphology, growth and development is more complex than previously thought.

  17. Translucent Colony Form of the Gram-Negative, Levan-Producing Bacterium, Aerobacter levanicum

    PubMed Central

    Takeshita, Masaru

    1973-01-01

    A spontaneously occurring variation of Aerobacter levanicum, affecting the appearance of colonies on sucrose agar (opaque to translucent colony form), has been observed and studied. This appears to be a mutation that is accompanied by a significant increase in levansucrase (EC 2.4.1.10) activity, in levan production, and by a change in some of the properties of levansucrase. PMID:4745425

  18. Lymphocyte culture: induction of colonies by conditioned medium from human lymphoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, R M; Goust, J M; Fudenberg, H H

    1977-12-01

    The presence of phytohemagglutinin or pokeweed mitogen in cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in agar is known to stimulate the formation of lymphoid colonies. We now report that similar colonies can be induced in the absence of plant lectins upon addition of filtered and ultracentrifuged conditioned medium (CM) obtained from certain human lymphoblastoid cell lines. Colony formation required at least 6 X 10(5) mononuclear cells per milliliter, and optimum results were obtained at concentrations of 1 X 10(6) cells/ml in the presence of 20% CM (50-500 colonies per 10(6) cells cultured). Individual cells within colonies displayed uniform morphological characteristics of lymphoid cells, and the majority formed rosettes with sheep erythrocytes, suggesting that they were of T-cell type. PMID:303689

  19. Secreted gingipains from Porphyromonas gingivalis colonies exert potent immunomodulatory effects on human gingival fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Khalaf, Atika; Khalaf, Hazem

    2015-09-01

    Periodontal pathogens, including Porphyromonas gingivalis, can form biofilms in dental pockets and cause inflammation, which is one of the underlying mechanisms involved in the development of periodontal disease, ultimately leading to tooth loss. Although P. gingivalis is protected in the biofilm, it can still cause damage and modulate inflammatory responses from the host, through secretion of microvesicles containing proteinases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of cysteine proteinases in P. gingivalis colony growth and development, and subsequent immunomodulatory effects on human gingival fibroblast. By comparing the wild type W50 with its gingipain deficient strains we show that cysteine proteinases are required by P. gingivalis to form morphologically normal colonies. The lysine-specific proteinase (Kgp), but not arginine-specific proteinases (Rgps), was associated with immunomodulation. P. gingivalis with Kgp affected the viability of gingival fibroblasts and modulated host inflammatory responses, including induction of TGF-β1 and suppression of CXCL8 and IL-6 accumulation. These results suggest that secreted products from P. gingivalis, including proteinases, are able to cause damage and significantly modulate the levels of inflammatory mediators, independent of a physical host-bacterial interaction. This study provides new insight of the pathogenesis of P. gingivalis and suggests gingipains as targets for diagnosis and treatment of periodontitis. PMID:26302843

  20. Disturbance Driven Colony Fragmentation as a Driver of a Coral Disease Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Marilyn E.; Smith, Tyler B.; Correa, Adrienne M. S.; Vega-Thurber, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    In September of 2010, Brewer's Bay reef, located in St. Thomas (U.S. Virgin Islands), was simultaneously affected by abnormally high temperatures and the passage of a hurricane that resulted in the mass bleaching and fragmentation of its coral community. An outbreak of a rapid tissue loss disease among coral colonies was associated with these two disturbances. Gross lesion signs and lesion progression rates indicated that the disease was most similar to the Caribbean coral disease white plague type 1. Experiments indicated that the disease was transmissible through direct contact between colonies, and five-meter radial transects showed a clustered spatial distribution of disease, with diseased colonies being concentrated within the first meter of other diseased colonies. Disease prevalence and the extent to which colonies were bleached were both significantly higher on unattached colony fragments than on attached colonies, and disease occurred primarily on fragments found in direct contact with sediment. In contrast to other recent studies, disease presence was not related to the extent of bleaching on colonies. The results of this study suggest that colony fragmentation and contact with sediment played primary roles in the initial appearance of disease, but that the disease was capable of spreading among colonies, which suggests secondary transmission is possible through some other, unidentified mechanism. PMID:23437335

  1. Environmental stability and morphologic variation in the bryozoan Homotrypa obliqua

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M.M. Jr

    1985-01-01

    Bryozoans as colonial organisms permit the separation of environmental and genetic contributions to morphologic variation. Previous analyses attempted to establish the effects of environmental stability on the partitioning of morphologic variation. Regrettably they utilized multiple species in different environments. To test this model definitively, colonies of the Ordovician bryozoan Homotrypa obliqua were sampled from paleoenvironments of different stabilities from Cincinnati. The Corryville and Fairmount beds provided ten colonies on which measures of zooecial shape and spacing on and between monticules were made. ANOVA and discriminant function analysis revealed that colonies from the deeper more stable environment of the Corryville beds exhibit more between colony variation. Colonies from the less stable Fairmount beds show relatively more within colony variation. This difference most likely results from less microenvironmental perturbation and/or greater within genotype developmental regulation in colonies from more stable environments. This is confirmed by correlation coefficient matrices that show biologically expected interdependence between characters only in the Corryville colonies. Thus, the partitioning of morphologic variation is a useful tool for predicting paleoenvironmental stability.

  2. Chronic sublethal stress causes bee colony failure

    PubMed Central

    Bryden, John; Gill, Richard J; Mitton, Robert A A; Raine, Nigel E; Jansen, Vincent A A; Hodgson, David

    2013-01-01

    Current bee population declines and colony failures are well documented yet poorly understood and no single factor has been identified as a leading cause. The evidence is equivocal and puzzling: for instance, many pathogens and parasites can be found in both failing and surviving colonies and field pesticide exposure is typically sublethal. Here, we investigate how these results can be due to sublethal stress impairing colony function. We mathematically modelled stress on individual bees which impairs colony function and found how positive density dependence can cause multiple dynamic outcomes: some colonies fail while others thrive. We then exposed bumblebee colonies to sublethal levels of a neonicotinoid pesticide. The dynamics of colony failure, which we observed, were most accurately described by our model. We argue that our model can explain the enigmatic aspects of bee colony failures, highlighting an important role for sublethal stress in colony declines. PMID:24112478

  3. Colonial and post-colonial aspects of Australian identity.

    PubMed

    Tranter, Bruce; Donoghue, Jed

    2007-06-01

    Since the 1988 Bicentennial and the 2001 centenary of federation celebrations colonial images have flourished in Australia, highlighting the roles of convicts and free settlers during early colonization. Old sites, such as Port Arthur have been re-invigorated, and in 2004 Tasmanians celebrated the bicentenary of 'white' settlement. However, social scientists have given little attention to the role of colonial and post-colonial figures and myths as aspects of Australian national identity. We seek to address this issue by examining how convicts, free settlers, bushrangers and ANZACs are associated with contemporary identity in Australia. We examine evidence from the 2003 Australian Survey of Social Attitudes and find that historical figures such as the ANZACs and post-World War II immigrants comprise important aspects of national identity. A substantial majority of Australians judged ANZACs to be important, countering recent claims of the 'demise of the digger'. Sporting heroes are also at the core of Australian identity. Colonial figures appear to be far less important, although views on national identity vary according to social location. In particular, left-wing, university educated, younger, postmaterialist Australians view convicts and bushrangers as relatively important, indicating the salience of the larrikin in Australian identity. PMID:17610618

  4. Paenibacillus dendritiformis Bacterial Colony Growth Depends on Surfactant but Not on Bacterial Motion▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Be'er, Avraham; Smith, Rachel S.; Zhang, H. P.; Florin, E.-L.; Payne, Shelley M.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2009-01-01

    Most research on growing bacterial colonies on agar plates has concerned the effect of genetic or morphotype variation. Some studies have indicated that there is a correlation between microscopic bacterial motion and macroscopic colonial expansion, especially for swarming strains, but no measurements have been obtained for a single strain to relate the microscopic scale to the macroscopic scale. We examined here a single strain (Paenibacillus dendritiformis type T; tip splitting) to determine both the macroscopic growth of colonies and the microscopic bacterial motion within the colonies. Our multiscale measurements for a variety of growth conditions revealed that motion on the microscopic scale and colonial growth are largely independent. Instead, the growth of the colony is strongly affected by the availability of a surfactant that reduces surface tension. PMID:19617369

  5. Virus-induced gene silencing of PEAM4 affects floral morphology by altering the expression pattern of PsSOC1a and PsPVP in pea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhe-Hao; Jia, Fei-Fei; Hu, Jiang-Qin; Pang, Ji-Liang; Xu, Lei; Wang, Li-Lin

    2014-01-15

    pea-MADS4 (PEAM4) regulates floral morphology in Pisum sativum L., however, its molecular mechanisms still remain unclear. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a recently developed reverse genetic approach that facilities an easier and more rapid study of gene functions. In this study, the PEAM4 gene was effectively silenced by VIGS using a pea early browning virus (PEBV) in wild type pea JI992. The infected plants showed abnormal phenotypes, as the floral organs, especially the sepals and petals changed in both size and shape, which made the corolla less closed. The petals changed in morphology and internal symmetry with, the stamens reduced and carpel dehisced. Larger sepals and longer tendrils with small cauline leaves appeared, with some sepals turning into bracts, and secondary inflorescences with fused floral organs were formed, indicating a flower-to-inflorescence change. The infected plants also displayed a delayed and prolonged flowering time. The PEAM4-VIGS plants with altered floral morphology were similar to the pim (proliferating inflorescence meristem) mutant and also mimicked the phenotypes of ap1 mutants in Arabidopsis. The expression pattern of the homologous genes PsSOC1a and PsSVP, which were involved in flowering time and florescence morphological control downstream of PEAM4, were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR and mRNA in situ hybridization. PsSOC1a and PsSVP were ectopically expressed and enhanced in the floral meristems from PEAM4-silenced plants. Our data suggests that PEAM4 may have a similar molecular mechanism as AtAP1, which inhibits the expression of PsSOC1a and PsSVP in the floral meristem from the early stages of flower development. As such, in this way PEAM4 plays a crucial role in maintaining floral organ identity and flower development in pea. PMID:24331430

  6. MORPHOLOGY AND ECOLOGY OF OLTMANNSIELLA VIRIDA, SP. NOV. (CHLOROPHYCEAE: VOLVOCALES)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new quadriflagellate green alga is described from temperate coastal waters. It occurs primarily as four-celled colonies, and its ultrastructure and general morphology place it in the Dunalliellaceae (order Volvocales, class Chlorophyceae). Oltmannsiella virida grows well in sal...

  7. The Vine and Olive Colony.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albinski, Nan Bowman

    1985-01-01

    Traces the historical sources of "Some Plant Olive Trees," a utopian novel by Emma Gelders Sterne, which offers a fictional account of the Vine and Olive colony, one of the most colorful yet least known utopian communities of the nineteenth century. (AYC)

  8. Comparison of the morphology of alkali–silica gel formed in limestones in concrete affected by the so-called alkali–carbonate reaction (ACR) and alkali–silica reaction (ASR)

    SciTech Connect

    Grattan-Bellew, P.E.; Chan, Gordon

    2013-05-15

    The morphology of alkali–silica gel formed in dolomitic limestone affected by the so-called alkali–carbonate reaction (ACR) is compared to that formed in a siliceous limestone affected by alkali–silica reaction (ASR). The particle of dolomitic limestone was extracted from the experimental sidewalk in Kingston, Ontario, Canada that was badly cracked due to ACR. The siliceous limestone particle was extracted from a core taken from a highway structure in Quebec, affected by ASR. Both cores exhibited marked reaction rims around limestone particles. The aggregate particles were polished and given a light gold coating in preparation for examination in a scanning electron microscope. The gel in the ACR aggregate formed stringers between the calcite crystals in the matrix of the rock, whereas gel in ASR concrete formed a thick layer on top of the calcite crystals, that are of the same size as in the ACR aggregate.

  9. How language affects children's use of derivational morphology in visual word and pseudoword processing: evidence from a cross-language study

    PubMed Central

    Casalis, Séverine; Quémart, Pauline; Duncan, Lynne G.

    2015-01-01

    Developing readers have been shown to rely on morphemes in visual word recognition across several naming, lexical decision and priming experiments. However, the impact of morphology in reading is not consistent across studies with differing results emerging not only between but also within writing systems. Here, we report a cross-language experiment involving the English and French languages, which aims to compare directly the impact of morphology in word recognition in the two languages. Monolingual French-speaking and English-speaking children matched for grade level (Part 1) and for age (Part 2) participated in the study. Two lexical decision tasks (one in French, one in English) featured words and pseudowords with exactly the same structure in each language. The presence of a root (R+) and a suffix ending (S+) was manipulated orthogonally, leading to four possible combinations in words (R+S+: e.g., postal; R+S−: e.g., turnip; R−S+: e.g., rascal; and R-S-: e.g., bishop) and in pseudowords (R+S+: e.g., pondal; R+S−: e.g., curlip; R−S+: e.g., vosnal; and R−S−: e.g., hethop). Results indicate that the presence of morphemes facilitates children's recognition of words and impedes their ability to reject pseudowords in both languages. Nevertheless, effects extend across accuracy and latencies in French but are restricted to accuracy in English, suggesting a higher degree of morphological processing efficiency in French. We argue that the inconsistencies found between languages emphasize the need for developmental models of word recognition to integrate a morpheme level whose elaboration is tuned by the productivity and transparency of the derivational system. PMID:25932018

  10. Foveal Morphology Affects Self-Perceived Visual Function and Treatment Response in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration: A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Subhi, Yousif; Henningsen, Gitte Ø.; Larsen, Charlotte T.; Sørensen, Mette S.; Sørensen, Torben L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the relationship between foveal morphology and self-perceived visual function in patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and whether foveal characteristics are associated with Ranibizumab treatment response on the self-perceived visual function. Methods This prospective cohort study included patients with newly diagnosed neovascular AMD found eligible for treatment with Ranibizumab. Foveal morphology of both eyes was assessed using spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and all patients were interviewed using the 39-item National Eye Institute Visual Function Questionnaire (VFQ). Patients were re-interviewed 3 and 12 months after initiation of treatment with Ranibizumab. We evaluated foveal morphology at baseline in relation to VFQ scores at baseline and clinically meaningful changes in VFQ after 3 and 12 months. Results VFQ scores correlated with central foveal thickness, central foveal thickness of neuroretina (CFN), foveal RPE elevation, foveal integrity of the photoreceptor inner segment/outer segment junction (IS/OS), and external limiting membrane. In a multiple linear regression model, only best-corrected visual acuity of the better eye (p<0.001) and the IS/OS status in the better eye (p = 0.012) remained significant (Adjusted R2 = 0.418). Lower baseline VFQ and a baseline CFN within 170–270 µm in the better eye were both associated with a clinically meaningful increase in the VFQ scores after 3 and 12 months. An absent foveal IS/OS band in the better eye was associated with a clinically meaningful decrease in the VFQ scores at 12 months. Conclusions Foveal morphology in the better eye influences the self-perceived visual function in patients with neovascular AMD and possesses a predictive value for change in the self-perceived visual function at 3 and 12 months after initiation of treatment. These findings may help clinicians provide patients more individualized information of their disease

  11. Lubricating bacteria model for the growth of bacterial colonies exposed to ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Shengli; Zhang Lei; Liang Run; Zhang Erhu; Liu Yachao; Zhao Shumin

    2005-11-01

    In this paper, we study the morphological transition of bacterial colonies exposed to ultraviolet radiation by modifying the bacteria model proposed by Delprato et al. Our model considers four factors: the lubricant fluid generated by bacterial colonies, a chemotaxis initiated by the ultraviolet radiation, the intensity of the ultraviolet radiation, and the bacteria's two-stage destruction rate with given radiation intensities. Using this modified model, we simulate the ringlike pattern formation of the bacterial colony exposed to uniform ultraviolet radiation. The following is shown. (1) Without the UV radiation the colony forms a disklike pattern and reaches a constant front velocity. (2) After the radiation is switched on, the bacterial population migrates to the edge of the colony and forms a ringlike pattern. As the intensity of the UV radiation is increased the ring forms faster and the outer velocity of the colony decreases. (3) For higher radiation intensities the total population decreases, while for lower intensities the total population increases initially at a small rate and then decreases. (4) After the UV radiation is switched off, the bacterial population grows both outward as well as into the inner region, and the colony's outer front velocity recovers to a constant value. All these results agree well with the experimental observations [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 158102 (2001)]. Along with the chemotaxis, we find that lubricant fluid and the two-stage destruction rate are critical to the dynamics of the growth of the bacterial colony when exposed to UV radiation, and these were not previously considered.

  12. Periodic Colony Formation by Bacterial Species Bacillus subtilis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakita, Jun-ichi; Shimada, Hirotoshi; Itoh, Hiroto; Matsuyama, Tohey; Matsushita, Mitsugu

    2001-03-01

    We have investigated the periodic colony growth of bacterial species Bacillus subtilis. A colony grows cyclically with the interface repeating an advance (migration phase) and a rest (consolidation phase) alternately on a surface of semi-solid agar plate under appropriate environmental conditions, resulting in a concentric ring-like colony. It was found from macroscopic observations that the characteristic quantities for the periodic growth such as the migration time, the consolidation time and the terrace spacing do not depend so much on nutrient concentration Cn, but do on agar concentration Ca. The consolidation time was a weakly increasing function of Ca, while the migration time and the terrace spacing were, respectively, weakly and strongly decreasing function of Ca. Overall, the cycle (migration-plus-consolidation) time seems to be constant, and does not depend so much on both Cn and Ca. Microscopically, bacterial cells inside the growing front of a colony keep increasing their population during both migration and consolidation phases. It was also confirmed that their secreting surfactant called surfactin does not affect their periodic growth qualitatively, i.e., mutant cells which cannot secrete surfactin produce a concentric ring-like colony. All these results suggest that the diffusion of the nutrient and the surfactin are irrelevant to their periodic growth.

  13. Effect of colony size and surrounding substrate on corals experiencing a mild bleaching event on Heron Island reef flat (southern Great Barrier Reef, Australia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, J. C.; Gomez-Cabrera, M. Del C.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.

    2009-12-01

    In January-May 2006, Heron Island in the Great Barrier Reef experienced a mild bleaching event. The effect of colony size, morphology and surrounding substrate on the extent of bleaching was explored. In contrast with previous studies, colony size did not influence bleaching sensitivity, suggesting that there may be a threshold of light and temperature stress beyond which size plays a role. Also contrasting with previous studies, massive corals were more affected by bleaching than branching corals. Massive corals surrounded by sand were more affected than the ones surrounded by rubble or dead coral. It is hypothesized that light reflectance from sand increases stress levels experienced by the colonies. This effect is maximized in massive corals as opposed to branching corals that form dense thickets on Heron Island. These results emphasize the importance of the ecological dynamics of coral communities experiencing low, moderate and high levels of bleaching for the understanding of how coral communities may change under the stress of climate change.

  14. Massive Diversification in Aging Colonies of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Ruf, Claude; Garfa-Traoré, Meriem; Collin, Valérie; Cordier, Corinne; Franceschi, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary success of bacteria depends greatly on their capacity to continually generate phenotypic diversity. Structured environments are particularly favorable for diversification because of attenuated clonal interference, which renders selective sweeps nearly impossible and enhances opportunities for adaptive radiation. We examined at the microscale level the emergence and the spatial and temporal dynamics of phenotypic diversity and their underlying causes in Escherichia coli colonies. An important dynamic heterogeneity in the growth, metabolic activity, morphology, gene expression patterns, stress response induction, and death patterns among cells within colonies was observed. Genetic analysis indicated that the phenotypic variation resulted mostly from mutations and that indole production, oxidative stress, and the RpoS-regulated general stress response played an important role in the generation of diversity. We observed the emergence and persistence of phenotypic variants within single colonies that exhibited variable fitness compared to the parental strain. Some variants showed improved capacity to produce biofilms, whereas others were able to use different nutrients or to tolerate antibiotics or oxidative stress. Taken together, our data show that bacterial colonies provide an ecological opportunity for the generation and maintenance of vast phenotypic diversity, which may increase the probability of population survival in unpredictable environments. PMID:24982303

  15. Colony Polymerase Chain Reaction with Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Murray, Johanne M; Watson, Adam T; Carr, Antony M

    2016-01-01

    When screening a large number of individual Schizosaccharomyces pombe strains by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a rapid "colony PCR" approach may be used. Numerous colony PCR protocols are available, and fundamental to them all is that the colony must be fresh (grown overnight) and that as few cells as possible are used. In this protocol, we present three reliable methods for preparing S. pombe cells for colony PCR. PMID:27140919

  16. Study of budding yeast colony formation and its characterizations by using circular granular cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprianti, D.; Haryanto, F.; Purqon, A.; Khotimah, S. N.; Viridi, S.

    2016-03-01

    Budding yeast can exhibit colony formation in solid substrate. The colony of pathogenic budding yeast can colonize various surfaces of the human body and medical devices. Furthermore, it can form biofilm that resists drug effective therapy. The formation of the colony is affected by the interaction between cells and with its growth media. The cell budding pattern holds an important role in colony expansion. To study this colony growth, the molecular dynamic method was chosen to simulate the interaction between budding yeast cells. Every cell was modelled by circular granular cells, which can grow and produce buds. Cohesion force, contact force, and Stokes force govern this model to mimic the interaction between cells and with the growth substrate. Characterization was determined by the maximum (L max) and minimum (L min) distances between two cells within the colony and whether two lines that connect the two cells in the maximum and minimum distances intersect each other. Therefore, it can be recognized the colony shape in circular, oval, and irregular shapes. Simulation resulted that colony formation are mostly in oval shape with little branch. It also shows that greater cohesion strength obtains more compact colony formation.

  17. Impact of Chronic Neonicotinoid Exposure on Honeybee Colony Performance and Queen Supersedure

    PubMed Central

    Sandrock, Christoph; Tanadini, Matteo; Tanadini, Lorenzo G.; Fauser-Misslin, Aline; Potts, Simon G.; Neumann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background Honeybees provide economically and ecologically vital pollination services to crops and wild plants. During the last decade elevated colony losses have been documented in Europe and North America. Despite growing consensus on the involvement of multiple causal factors, the underlying interactions impacting on honeybee health and colony failure are not fully resolved. Parasites and pathogens are among the main candidates, but sublethal exposure to widespread agricultural pesticides may also affect bees. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate effects of sublethal dietary neonicotinoid exposure on honeybee colony performance, a fully crossed experimental design was implemented using 24 colonies, including sister-queens from two different strains, and experimental in-hive pollen feeding with or without environmentally relevant concentrations of thiamethoxam and clothianidin. Honeybee colonies chronically exposed to both neonicotinoids over two brood cycles exhibited decreased performance in the short-term resulting in declining numbers of adult bees (−28%) and brood (−13%), as well as a reduction in honey production (−29%) and pollen collections (−19%), but colonies recovered in the medium-term and overwintered successfully. However, significantly decelerated growth of neonicotinoid-exposed colonies during the following spring was associated with queen failure, revealing previously undocumented long-term impacts of neonicotinoids: queen supersedure was observed for 60% of the neonicotinoid-exposed colonies within a one year period, but not for control colonies. Linked to this, neonicotinoid exposure was significantly associated with a reduced propensity to swarm during the next spring. Both short-term and long-term effects of neonicotinoids on colony performance were significantly influenced by the honeybees’ genetic background. Conclusions/Significance Sublethal neonicotinoid exposure did not provoke increased winter losses. Yet

  18. Tsunami Affected Farmland Extraction Using Morphological Profiles (MPs) Method by Satellite Images Including SAR and Visible Near-Infrared Band Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Y.

    2015-04-01

    The agricultural fields along the coast were submerged under the sea water after the 2011 off the Pacific Coast of Tohoku Japan Tsunami. The conventional method of detecting Tsunami reached area by SAR satellite data is to compare the data obtained between previous to and after the Tsunami. However such kind of SAR data should be prepared prior to the natural disaster, but in many disaster cases, people have often encountered difficulties in finding such kind of data observed in advance in some regions. Therefore it is desirable to find a way to detect the flood suffering farmlands caused by a Tsunami, using only data observed after the disaster event. The morphological profiles (MPs) method are tested using ALOS/PALSAR and AVNIR-2 data. This MPs method is proposed as the tool for extracting information about the size, shape and the orientation of structures in single-band remote sensing images and has been improved to establish the extended morphological profiles(EMP) dealing with full-spectral information in the multi-/hyper-spectral data (Benediktsson, J.A. et al.,2003,2005). The author's work is intended to apply this MPs method to combined single polarization SAR data and visual and near-infrared bands data. The results approximately coincide with the farmland regions actually reached by the Tsunami. This MPs method requires only data once obtained soon after a disaster, light computer resources and very short turnaround time. It should be suitable for the detection of Tsunami reached areas or tidal wave reached areas, caused by a Typhoon for example, using satellite data only once obtained after a disaster.

  19. Trade-offs in the evolution of bumblebee colony and body size: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Cueva Del Castillo, Raúl; Sanabria-Urbán, Salomón; Serrano-Meneses, Martín Alejandro

    2015-09-01

    Trade-offs between life-history traits - such as fecundity and survival - have been demonstrated in several studies. In eusocial insects, the number of organisms and their body sizes can affect the fitness of the colony. Large-than-average body sizes as well as more individuals can improve a colony's thermoregulation, foraging efficiency, and fecundity. However, in bumblebees, large colonies and large body sizes depend largely on high temperatures and a large amount of food resources. Bumblebee taxa can be found in temperate and tropical regions of the world and differ markedly in their colony sizes and body sizes. Variation in colony size and body size may be explained by the costs and benefits associated with the evolutionary history of each species in a particular environment. In this study, we explored the effect of temperature and precipitation (the latter was used as an indirect indicator of food availability) on the colony and body size of twenty-one bumblebee taxa. A comparative analysis controlling for phylogenetic effects as well as for the body size of queens, workers, and males in bumblebee taxa from temperate and tropical regions indicated that both temperature and precipitation affect colony and body size. We found a negative association between colony size and the rainiest trimester, and a positive association between the colony size and the warmest month of the year. In addition, male bumblebees tend to evolve larger body sizes in places where the rain occurs mostly in the summer and the overall temperature is warmer. Moreover, we found a negative relationship between colony size and body sizes of queens, workers, and males, suggesting potential trade-offs in the evolution of bumblebee colony and body size. PMID:26445652

  20. Spatial patterns in ant colonies.

    PubMed

    Theraulaz, Guy; Bonabeau, Eric; Nicolis, Stamatios C; Solé, Ricard V; Fourcassié, Vincent; Blanco, Stéphane; Fournier, Richard; Joly, Jean-Louis; Fernández, Pau; Grimal, Anne; Dalle, Patrice; Deneubourg, Jean-Louis

    2002-07-23

    The origins of large-scale spatial patterns in biology have been an important source of theoretical speculation since the pioneering work by Turing (1952) on the chemical basis of morphogenesis. Knowing how these patterns emerge and their functional role is important to our understanding of the evolution of biocomplexity and the role played by self organization. However, so far, conclusive evidence for local activation-long-range inhibition mechanisms in real biological systems has been elusive. Here a well-defined experimental and theoretical analysis of the pattern formation dynamics exhibited by clustering behavior in ant colonies is presented. These experiments and a simple mathematical model show that these colonies do indeed use this type of mechanism. All microscopic variables have been measured and provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, for this type of self-organized behavior in complex biological systems, supporting early conjectures about its role in the organization of insect societies. PMID:12114538

  1. One Kilogram Interstellar Colony Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mole, A.

    Small interstellar colony probes based on nanotechnology will become possible long before giant multi-generation ships become affordable. A beam generator and magnetic sail can accelerate a one kg probe to .1 c, braking via the interstellar field can decelerate it, and the field in a distant solar system can allow it to maneuver to an extrasolar planet. A heat shield is used for landing and nanobots emerge to build ever-larger robots and construct colony infrastructure. Humans can then be generated from genomes stored as data in computer memory. Technology is evolving towards these capabilities and should reach the required level in fifty years. The plan appears to be affordable, with the principal cost being the beam generator, estimated at $17 billion.

  2. Nest- and colony-mate recognition in polydomous colonies of meat ants ( Iridomyrmex purpureus)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Wilgenburg, E.; Ryan, D.; Morrison, P.; Marriott, P. J.; Elgar, M. A.

    2006-07-01

    Workers of polydomous colonies of social insects must recognize not only colony-mates residing in the same nest but also those living in other nests. We investigated the impact of a decentralized colony structure on colony- and nestmate recognition in the polydomous Australian meat ant ( Iridomyrmex purpureus). Field experiments showed that ants of colonies with many nests were less aggressive toward alien conspecifics than those of colonies with few nests. In addition, while meat ants were almost never aggressive toward nestmates, they were frequently aggressive when confronted with an individual from a different nest within the same colony. Our chemical analysis of the cuticular hydrocarbons of workers using a novel comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography technique that increases the number of quantifiable compounds revealed both colony- and nest-specific patterns. Combined, these data indicate an incomplete transfer of colony odor between the nests of polydomous meat ant colonies.

  3. Inadvertent Propagation of Factor VII Deficiency in a Canine Mucopolysaccharidosis Type I Research Breeding Colony

    PubMed Central

    Carlstrom, Lucas P; Jens, Jackie K; Dobyns, Marley E; Passage, Merry; Dickson, Patricia I; Ellinwood, N Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Issues of cost and genetics can result in inbreeding of canine genetic disease colonies. Beagles often are used to maintain such colonies, providing stock for outcrosses. Factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a hemostatic disorder found at increased frequency in beagles and has been characterized at the DNA level. Deficiency of FVII presents obstacles in colonies founded with beagles. An initial finding of a FVII-deficient pup from a longstanding colony prompted us to evaluate FVII deficiency fully in this colony. Current and archival records and tissues were used to reconstruct the colony pedigree, assess the contribution from beagles, and test samples to document the source and frequency of the mutant FVII allele. As part of this study we developed a PCR-based diagnostic assay that was simpler than what was previously available. Pedigree analysis revealed a founder effect implicating beagles that led to high frequency (55%) of the mutant allele. In addition, affected animals were identified. The complete picture of the clinical effect within the colony remains unclear, but unusual neonatal presentations, including hemoabdomen, have occurred in pups affected with FVII deficiency. Use of a PCR-based diagnostic assay to screen all potential beagle breeding stock will prevent similar occurrences of FVII deficiency in future canine research colonies. PMID:19712579

  4. Exploration adjustment by ant colonies

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    How do animals in groups organize their work? Division of labour, i.e. the process by which individuals within a group choose which tasks to perform, has been extensively studied in social insects. Variability among individuals within a colony seems to underpin both the decision over which tasks to perform and the amount of effort to invest in a task. Studies have focused mainly on discrete tasks, i.e. tasks with a recognizable end. Here, we study the distribution of effort in nest seeking, in the absence of new nest sites. Hence, this task is open-ended and individuals have to decide when to stop searching, even though the task has not been completed. We show that collective search effort declines when colonies inhabit better homes, as a consequence of a reduction in the number of bouts (exploratory events). Furthermore, we show an increase in bout exploration time and a decrease in bout instantaneous speed for colonies inhabiting better homes. The effect of treatment on bout effort is very small; however, we suggest that the organization of work performed within nest searching is achieved both by a process of self-selection of the most hard-working ants and individual effort adjustment. PMID:26909180

  5. Exploration adjustment by ant colonies.

    PubMed

    Doran, Carolina; Stumpe, Martin C; Sendova-Franks, Ana; Franks, Nigel R

    2016-01-01

    How do animals in groups organize their work? Division of labour, i.e. the process by which individuals within a group choose which tasks to perform, has been extensively studied in social insects. Variability among individuals within a colony seems to underpin both the decision over which tasks to perform and the amount of effort to invest in a task. Studies have focused mainly on discrete tasks, i.e. tasks with a recognizable end. Here, we study the distribution of effort in nest seeking, in the absence of new nest sites. Hence, this task is open-ended and individuals have to decide when to stop searching, even though the task has not been completed. We show that collective search effort declines when colonies inhabit better homes, as a consequence of a reduction in the number of bouts (exploratory events). Furthermore, we show an increase in bout exploration time and a decrease in bout instantaneous speed for colonies inhabiting better homes. The effect of treatment on bout effort is very small; however, we suggest that the organization of work performed within nest searching is achieved both by a process of self-selection of the most hard-working ants and individual effort adjustment. PMID:26909180

  6. Diet complexity in early life affects survival in released pheasants by altering foraging efficiency, food choice, handling skills and gut morphology.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Mark A; Sage, Rufus; Madden, Joah R

    2015-11-01

    Behavioural and physiological deficiencies are major reasons why reintroduction programmes suffer from high mortality when captive animals are used. Mitigation of these deficiencies is essential for successful reintroduction programmes. Our study manipulated early developmental diet to better replicate foraging behaviour in the wild. Over 2 years, we hand-reared 1800 pheasants (Phasianus colchicus), from 1 day old, for 7 weeks under different dietary conditions. In year one, 900 pheasants were divided into three groups and reared with (i) commercial chick crumb, (ii) crumb plus 1% live mealworm or (iii) crumb plus 5% mixed seed and fruit. In year two, a further 900 pheasants were divided into two groups and reared with (i) commercial chick crumb or (ii) crumb plus a combination of 1% mealworm and 5% mixed seed and fruit. In both years, the commercial chick crumb acted as a control treatment, whilst those with live prey and mixed seeds and fruits mimicking a more naturalistic diet. After 7 weeks reared on these diets, pheasants were released into the wild. Postrelease survival was improved with exposure to more naturalistic diets prior to release. We identified four mechanisms to explain this. Pheasants reared with more naturalistic diets (i) foraged for less time and had a higher likelihood of performing vigilance behaviours, (ii) were quicker at handling live prey items, (iii) were less reliant on supplementary feed which could be withdrawn and (iv) developed different gut morphologies. These mechanisms allowed the pheasants to (i) reduce the risk of predation by reducing exposure time whilst foraging and allowing more time to be vigilant; (ii) be better at handling and discriminating natural food items and not be solely reliant on supplementary feed; and (iii) have a better gut system to cope with the natural forage after the cessation of supplementary feeding in the spring. Learning food discrimination, preference and handling skills by the provision of a more

  7. Deadly competition between sibling bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Be'Er, Avraham

    2011-03-01

    As a result of stress due to nutrient limitation or antibiotics, competing individual bacteria within a single colony may lyse sibling cells to release nutrients (cannibalism) or DNA (fratricide). However, we have recently shown that competition is not limited to individuals, but can occur at the colony level [A. Be'er et al., PNAS 106, 428 (2009); A. Be'er et al., PNAS 107, 6258 (2010).] In response to the presence of an encroaching sibling colony, Paenibacillus dendritiformis bacteria secrete a lethal protein, lysing cells at the interface between the colonies. Analysis of the proteins secreted by these competing sibling colonies, combined with a mathematical model, shows how colonies maintain their growth by self-regulating the secretion of two proteins: subtilisin (a well-known growth promoter), and Slf (a previously unknown protein, which is lethal). The results also explain why a single colony is not inhibited by its own secretions.

  8. An Analysis of Factors Affecting Genotyping Success from Museum Specimens Reveals an Increase of Genetic and Morphological Variation during a Historical Range Expansion of a European Spider

    PubMed Central

    Krehenwinkel, Henrik; Pekar, Stano

    2015-01-01

    Natural history collections house an enormous amount of plant and animal specimens, which constitute a promising source for molecular analyses. Storage conditions differ among taxa and can have a dramatic effect on the success of DNA work. Here, we analyze the feasibility of DNA extraction from ethanol preserved spiders (Araneae). We tested genotyping success using several hundred specimens of the wasp spider, Argiope bruennichi, deposited in two large German natural history collections. We tested the influence of different factors on the utility of specimens for genotyping. Our results show that not the specimen’s age, but the museum collection is a major predictor of genotyping success. These results indicate that long term storage conditions should be optimized in natural history museums to assure the utility of collections for DNA work. Using historical material, we also traced historical genetic and morphological variation in the course of a poleward range expansion of A. bruennichi by comparing contemporary and historical specimens from a native and an invasive population in Germany. We show that the invasion of A. bruennichi is tightly correlated with an historical increase of genetic and phenotypic variation in the invasive population. PMID:26309219

  9. Natural polyamines and synthetic analogs modify the growth and the morphology of Pyrus communis pollen tubes affecting ROS levels and causing cell death.

    PubMed

    Aloisi, Iris; Cai, Giampiero; Tumiatti, Vincenzo; Minarini, Anna; Del Duca, Stefano

    2015-10-01

    Polyamines (PAs) are small molecules necessary for pollen maturation and tube growth. Their role is often controversial, since they may act as pro-survival factors as well as factors promoting Programmed Cell Death (PCD). The aim of the present work was to evaluate the effect of exogenous PAs on the apical growth of pear (Pyrus communis) pollen tube and to understand if PAs and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are interconnected in the process of tip-growth. In the present study besides natural PAs, also aryl-substituted spermine and methoctramine (Met 6-8-6) analogs were tested. Among the natural PAs, Spm showed strongest effects on tube growth. Spm entered through the pollen tube tip, then diffused in the sub-apical region that underwent drastic morphological changes, showing enlarged tip. Analogs were mostly less efficient than natural PAs but BD23, an asymmetric synthetic PAs bearing a pyridine ring, showed similar effects. These effects were related to the ability of PAs to cause the decrease of ROS level in the apical zone, leading to cell death, counteracted by the caspase-3 inhibitor Ac-DEVD-CHO (DEVD). In conclusions, ROS are essential for pollen germination and a strict correlation between ROS regulation and PA concentration is reported. Moreover, an imbalance between ROS and PAs can be detrimental thereby driving pollen toward cell death. PMID:26398794

  10. An Analysis of Factors Affecting Genotyping Success from Museum Specimens Reveals an Increase of Genetic and Morphological Variation during a Historical Range Expansion of a European Spider.

    PubMed

    Krehenwinkel, Henrik; Pekar, Stano

    2015-01-01

    Natural history collections house an enormous amount of plant and animal specimens, which constitute a promising source for molecular analyses. Storage conditions differ among taxa and can have a dramatic effect on the success of DNA work. Here, we analyze the feasibility of DNA extraction from ethanol preserved spiders (Araneae). We tested genotyping success using several hundred specimens of the wasp spider, Argiope bruennichi, deposited in two large German natural history collections. We tested the influence of different factors on the utility of specimens for genotyping. Our results show that not the specimen's age, but the museum collection is a major predictor of genotyping success. These results indicate that long term storage conditions should be optimized in natural history museums to assure the utility of collections for DNA work. Using historical material, we also traced historical genetic and morphological variation in the course of a poleward range expansion of A. bruennichi by comparing contemporary and historical specimens from a native and an invasive population in Germany. We show that the invasion of A. bruennichi is tightly correlated with an historical increase of genetic and phenotypic variation in the invasive population. PMID:26309219

  11. Inactivation of the ampDE Operon Increases Transcription of algD and Affects Morphology and Encystment of Azotobacter vinelandii

    PubMed Central

    Núñez, Cinthia; Moreno, Soledad; Cárdenas, Luis; Soberón-Chávez, Gloria; Espín, Guadalupe

    2000-01-01

    Transcription of algD, encoding GDP-mannose dehydrogenase, the key enzyme in the alginate biosynthetic pathway, is highly regulated in Azotobacter vinelandii. We describe here the characterization of a Tn5 insertion mutant (AC28) which shows a higher level of expression of an algD::lacZ fusion. AC28 cells were morphologically abnormal and unable to encyst. The cloning and nucleotide sequencing of the Tn5-disrupted locus in AC28 revealed an operon homologous to the Escherichia coli ampDE operon. Tn5 was located within the ampD gene, encoding a cytosolic N-acetyl-anhydromuramyl-l-alanine amidase that participates in the intracellular recycling of peptidoglycan fragments. The ampE gene encodes a transmembrane protein, but the function of the protein is not known. We constructed strains carrying ampD or ampE mutations and one with an ampDE deletion. The strain with a deletion of the ampDE operon showed a phenotype similar to that of mutant AC28. The present work demonstrates that both alginate production and bacterial encystment are greatly influenced by the bacterial ability to recycle its cell wall. PMID:10940024

  12. Redox signaling in colonial hydroids: many pathways for peroxide.

    PubMed

    Blackstone, Neil W; Bivins, Matthew J; Cherry, Kimberly S; Fletcher, Robert E; Geddes, Gabrielle C

    2005-01-01

    Studies of mitochondrial redox signaling predict that the colonial hydroids Eirene viridula and Podocoryna carnea should respond to manipulations of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Both species encrust surfaces with feeding polyps connected by networks of stolons; P. carnea is more 'sheet-like' with closely spaced polyps and short stolons, while E. viridula is more 'runner-like' with widely spaced polyps and long stolons. Treatment with the chemical antioxidant vitamin C diminishes ROS in mitochondrion-rich epitheliomuscular cells (EMCs) and produces phenotypic effects (sheet-like growth) similar to uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. In peripheral stolon tips, treatment with vitamin C triggers a dramatic increase of ROS that is followed by tissue death and stolon regression. The enzymatic anti-oxidant catalase is probably not taken up by the colony but, rather, converts hydrogen peroxide in the medium to water and oxygen. Exogenous catalase does not affect ROS in mitochondrion-rich EMCs, but does increase the amounts of ROS emitted from peripheral stolons, resulting in rapid, runner-like growth. Treatment with exogenous hydrogen peroxide increases ROS levels in stolon tips and results in somewhat faster colony growth. Finally, untreated colonies of E. viridula exhibit higher levels of ROS in stolon tips than untreated colonies of P. carnea. ROS may participate in a number of putative signaling pathways: (1) high levels of ROS may trigger cell and tissue death in peripheral stolon tips; (2) more moderate levels of ROS in stolon tips may trigger outward growth, inhibit branching and, possibly, mediate the redox signaling of mitochondrion-rich EMCs; and (3) ROS may have an extra-colony function, perhaps in suppressing the growth of bacteria. PMID:15634856

  13. Morphological plasticity in a calcifying modular organism: evidence from an in situ transplant experiment in a natural CO2 vent system

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Chiara; Cocito, Silvia; Gambi, Maria Cristina; Taylor, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding is currently limited of the biological processes underlying the responses of modular organisms to climate change and the potential to adapt through morphological plasticity related to their modularity. Here, we investigate the effects of ocean acidification and seawater warming on the growth, life history and morphological plasticity in the modular bryozoan Calpensia nobilis using transplantation experiments in a shallow Mediterranean volcanic CO2 vents system that simulates pH values expected for the year 2100. Colonies exposed at vent sites grew at approximately half the rate of those from the control site. Between days 34 and 48 of the experiment, they reached a possible ‘threshold’, due to the combined effects of exposure time and pH. Temperature did not affect zooid length, but longer zooids with wider primary orifices occurred in low pH conditions close to the vents. Growth models describing colony development under different environmental scenarios suggest that stressed colonies of C. nobilis reallocate metabolic energy to the consolidation and strengthening of existing zooids. This is interpreted as a change in life-history strategy to support persistence under unfavourable environmental conditions. Changes in the skeletal morphology of zooids evident in C. nobilis during short-time (87 days) exposure experiments reveal morphological plasticity that may indicate a potential to adapt to the more acidic Mediterranean predicted for the future. PMID:26064601

  14. Experimental sand burial affects seedling survivorship, morphological traits, and biomass allocation of Ulmus pumila var. sabulosa in the Horqin Sandy Land, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jiao; Busso, Carlos Alberto; Jiang, Deming; Musa, Ala; Wu, Dafu; Wang, Yongcui; Miao, Chunping

    2016-07-01

    As a native tree species, Ulmus pumila var. sabulosa (sandy elm) is widely distributed in the Horqin Sandy Land, China. However, seedlings of this species have to withstand various depths of sand burial after emergence because of increasing soil degradation, which is mainly caused by overgrazing, climate change, and wind erosion. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the changes in its survivorship, morphological traits, and biomass allocation when seedlings were buried at different burial depths: unburied controls and seedlings buried vertically up to 33, 67, 100, or 133 % of their initial mean seedling height. The results showed that partial sand burial treatments (i.e., less than 67 % burial) did not reduce seedling survivorship, which still reached 100 %. However, seedling mortality increased when sand burial was equal to or greater than 100 %. In comparison with the control treatment, seedling height and stem diameter increased at least by 6 and 14 % with partial burial, respectively. In the meantime, seedling taproot length, total biomass, and relative mass growth rates were at least enhanced by 10, 15.6, and 27.6 %, respectively, with the partial sand burial treatment. Furthermore, sand burial decreased total leaf area and changed biomass allocation in seedlings, partitioning more biomass to aboveground organs (e.g., leaves) and less to belowground parts (roots). Complete sand burial after seedling emergence inhibited its re-emergence and growth, even leading to death. Our findings indicated that seedlings of sandy elm showed some resistance to partial sand burial and were adapted to sandy environments from an evolutionary perspective. The negative effect of excessive sand burial after seedling emergence might help in understanding failures in recruitments of sparse elm in the study region.

  15. Holotransformations of bacterial colonies and genome cybernetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Tenenbaum, Adam; Shochet, Ofer; Avidan, Orna

    1994-01-01

    We present a study of colony transformations during growth of Bacillus subtilis under adverse environmental conditions. It is a continuation of our pilot study of “Adaptive self-organization during growth of bacterial colonies” (Physica A 187 (1992) 378). First we identify and describe the transformations pathway, i.e. the excitation of the branching modes from Bacillus subtilis 168 (grown under diffusion limited conditions) and the phase transformations between the tip-splitting phase (phase T) and the chiral phase (phase C) which belong to the same mode. This pathway shows the evolution of complexity as the bacteria are exposed to adverse growth conditions. We present the morphology diagram of phases T and C as a function of agar concentration and pepton level. As expected, the growth of phase T is ramified (fractal-like or DLA-like) at low pepton level (about 1 g/1) and turns compact at high pepton level (about 10 g/1). The growth of phase C is also ramified at low pepton level and turns denser and finally compact as the pepton level increases. Generally speaking, the colonies develop more complex patterns and higher micro-level organization for more adverse environments. We use the growth velocity as a response function to describe the growth. At low agar concentration (and low pepton level) phase C grows faster than phase T, and for a high agar concentration (about 2%) phase T grows faster. We observe colony transformations between the two phases (phase transformations). They are found to be consistent with the “fastest growing morphology” selection principle adopted from azoic systems. The transformations are always from the slower phase to the faster one. Hence, we observe T→ C transformations at low agar concentrations and C→ T transformations at high agar concentrations. We have observed both localized and extended transformations. Usually, the transformations are localized for more adverse growth conditions, and extended for growth conditions

  16. Genetic organization of pha gene locus affects phaC expression, poly(hydroxyalkanoate) composition and granule morphology in Pseudomonas corrugata.

    PubMed

    Solaiman, Daniel K Y; Ashby, Richard D; Licciardello, Grazia; Catara, Vittoria

    2008-02-01

    The complete sequence of the pha locus responsible for the biosynthesis of poly(hydroxyalkanoates) (PHAs) in Pseudomonas corrugata 388 was determined. As with the other known pseudomonad pha gene loci, the one in P. corrugata 388 also consists of phaC1 (1,680 bps; PHA synthase 1), phaZ (858 bp; PHA depolymerase) and phaC2 (1,683 bp; PHA synthase 2) genes. A BLAST search showed that the nucleotide sequences of these genes and the amino-acid sequences of their respective gene products are homologous to those of P. corrugata CFBP5454 and P. mediterranea CFBP5447. A putative intrinsic transcription terminator consisting of a dyad symmetry (24 bp; Delta G = -41.8 kcals) that precedes a stretch of dA residues was located in the phaC1-phaZ intergenic region. P. corrugata mutant-clones XI 32-1 and XI 32-4 were constructed in which this intergenic region was replaced with a selectable kanamycin-resistance gene. These mutant clones when grown on oleic acid for 48 h showed 4.7-to 7.0-fold increases of phaC1 and phaC2 relative expression in comparison to the initial inoculants, whereas the parental strain showed only 1.2- to 1.4-fold increases. Furthermore, in comparison to parental P. corrugata with only a few large PHA inclusion bodies, the mutants grown on oleic acid produce numerous smaller PHA granules that line the periphery of the cells. With glucose as a substrate, XI 32-1 and XI 32-4 clones produce mcl-PHA with a high content (26-31 mol%) of the mono-unsaturated 3-hydroxydodecenoate as a repeat-unit monomer. Our results show for the first time the effects of the phaC1-phaZ intergenic region on the substrate-dependent temporal expression of phaC1 and phaC2 genes, the repeat-unit composition of mcl-PHA, and the morphology of the PHA granules. PMID:17987331

  17. Surveys of murre colony attendance in the northern Gulf of Alaska following the Exxon Valdez oil spill

    SciTech Connect

    Erikson, D.E.

    1995-12-31

    Field surveys were conducted in July and August 1991 on 32 of the 36 murre (Uria spp.) colonies in the northern Gulf of Alaska to assess colony attendance (number of birds present at a colony) two years after the exxon Valdez oil spill. The surveys focused on murre colonies because murres represented 74% of the recovered seabird carcasses and because it had claimed that there was large-scale mortality of murres, leading to 60% to 70% decreases at some large colonies and population recovery periods of 20 to 70 years. Murres were present at all 32 colonies, and colony attendance estimates were generally similar to those from historical (prespill) surveys, particularly for those colonies in the direct path of the spill, i.e., the Barren Islands and Chiswell islands. Colony attendance levels in 1991 do not support the contention that murre colony attendance in the study area was drastically lower than historical levels. When colonies were grouped according to risk of oil exposure, the mean changes in attendance between 1991 and historical murre surveys did not differ significantly among the groups. Factors that could account for the observed similarity of 1991 and historical murre counts despite the high estimated mortality are (1) overestimation of mortality or (2) replacement of lost breeders through either recruitment of formerly nonbreeding individuals into the breeding population at spill-affected colonies or immigration of murres form nonaffected colonies. The findings of this study suggest that impacts of the Exxon Valdez oil spill on murre colony attendance in the northern Gulf of alaska were relatively short-term. 118 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. High-Throughput Method for Automated Colony and Cell Counting by Digital Image Analysis Based on Edge Detection

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Priya

    2016-01-01

    Counting cells and colonies is an integral part of high-throughput screens and quantitative cellular assays. Due to its subjective and time-intensive nature, manual counting has hindered the adoption of cellular assays such as tumor spheroid formation in high-throughput screens. The objective of this study was to develop an automated method for quick and reliable counting of cells and colonies from digital images. For this purpose, I developed an ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge and a CellProfiler Pipeline Cell Colony Counting, and compared them to other open-source digital methods and manual counts. The ImageJ macro Cell Colony Edge is valuable in counting cells and colonies, and measuring their area, volume, morphology, and intensity. In this study, I demonstrate that Cell Colony Edge is superior to other open-source methods, in speed, accuracy and applicability to diverse cellular assays. It can fulfill the need to automate colony/cell counting in high-throughput screens, colony forming assays, and cellular assays. PMID:26848849

  19. Assessment of Chronic Sublethal Effects of Imidacloprid on Honey Bee Colony Health

    PubMed Central

    Dively, Galen P.; Embrey, Michael S.; Kamel, Alaa; Hawthorne, David J.; Pettis, Jeffery S.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present results of a three-year study to determine the fate of imidacloprid residues in hive matrices and to assess chronic sublethal effects on whole honey bee colonies fed supplemental pollen diet containing imidacloprid at 5, 20 and 100 μg/kg over multiple brood cycles. Various endpoints of colony performance and foraging behavior were measured during and after exposure, including winter survival. Imidacloprid residues became diluted or non-detectable within colonies due to the processing of beebread and honey and the rapid metabolism of the chemical. Imidacloprid exposure doses up to 100 μg/kg had no significant effects on foraging activity or other colony performance indicators during and shortly after exposure. Diseases and pest species did not affect colony health but infestations of Varroa mites were significantly higher in exposed colonies. Honey stores indicated that exposed colonies may have avoided the contaminated food. Imidacloprid dose effects was delayed later in the summer, when colonies exposed to 20 and 100 μg/kg experienced higher rates of queen failure and broodless periods, which led to weaker colonies going into the winter. Pooled over two years, winter survival of colonies averaged 85.7, 72.4, 61.2 and 59.2% in the control, 5, 20 and 100 μg/kg treatment groups, respectively. Analysis of colony survival data showed a significant dose effect, and all contrast tests comparing survival between control and treatment groups were significant, except for colonies exposed to 5 μg/kg. Given the weight of evidence, chronic exposure to imidacloprid at the higher range of field doses (20 to 100 μg/kg) in pollen of certain treated crops could cause negative impacts on honey bee colony health and reduced overwintering success, but the most likely encountered high range of field doses relevant for seed-treated crops (5 μg/kg) had negligible effects on colony health and are unlikely a sole cause of colony declines. PMID:25786127

  20. Assessment of chronic sublethal effects of imidacloprid on honey bee colony health.

    PubMed

    Dively, Galen P; Embrey, Michael S; Kamel, Alaa; Hawthorne, David J; Pettis, Jeffery S

    2015-01-01

    Here we present results of a three-year study to determine the fate of imidacloprid residues in hive matrices and to assess chronic sublethal effects on whole honey bee colonies fed supplemental pollen diet containing imidacloprid at 5, 20 and 100 μg/kg over multiple brood cycles. Various endpoints of colony performance and foraging behavior were measured during and after exposure, including winter survival. Imidacloprid residues became diluted or non-detectable within colonies due to the processing of beebread and honey and the rapid metabolism of the chemical. Imidacloprid exposure doses up to 100 μg/kg had no significant effects on foraging activity or other colony performance indicators during and shortly after exposure. Diseases and pest species did not affect colony health but infestations of Varroa mites were significantly higher in exposed colonies. Honey stores indicated that exposed colonies may have avoided the contaminated food. Imidacloprid dose effects was delayed later in the summer, when colonies exposed to 20 and 100 μg/kg experienced higher rates of queen failure and broodless periods, which led to weaker colonies going into the winter. Pooled over two years, winter survival of colonies averaged 85.7, 72.4, 61.2 and 59.2% in the control, 5, 20 and 100 μg/kg treatment groups, respectively. Analysis of colony survival data showed a significant dose effect, and all contrast tests comparing survival between control and treatment groups were significant, except for colonies exposed to 5 μg/kg. Given the weight of evidence, chronic exposure to imidacloprid at the higher range of field doses (20 to 100 μg/kg) in pollen of certain treated crops could cause negative impacts on honey bee colony health and reduced overwintering success, but the most likely encountered high range of field doses relevant for seed-treated crops (5 μg/kg) had negligible effects on colony health and are unlikely a sole cause of colony declines. PMID:25786127

  1. Conceptual design of a lunar colony

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, C. (Editor); Hohmann, E. (Editor)

    1972-01-01

    A systems engineering study is presented for a proposed lunar colony. The lunar colony was to grow from an existent, 12-man, earth-dependent lunar surface base and was to utilize lunar resources, becoming as earth-independent as possible. An in-depth treatment of some of the aspects of the lunar colony was given. We have found that the use of lunar resources is feasible for oxygen production (both for breathing and for space tug fuel), food production, and building materials. A program is outlined for recycling waste materials developed at the colony as well as a full program for growth and research activity of the colony to a level of 180 colonists. Recommendations for the lunar colony are given.

  2. COMPARISON OF TAXONOMIC, COLONY MORPHOTYPE AND PCR-RFLP METHODS TO CHARACTERIZE MICROFUNGAL DIVERSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared three methods for estimating fungal species diversity in soil samples. A rapid screening method based on gross colony morphological features and color reference standards was compared with traditional fungal taxonomic methods and PCR-RFLP for estimation of ecological ...

  3. Immigrants are attracted by local pre-breeders and recruits in a seabird colony.

    PubMed

    Szostek, K Lesley; Schaub, Michael; Becker, Peter H

    2014-09-01

    Immigration is a major demographic factor shaping population dynamics. However, due to methodological difficulties, the extent of immigration and factors affecting immigration are insufficiently studied. This is also true for seabird colonies. We estimated annual immigration based on a long-term study of a colony of common terns Sterna hirundo marked with transponders, using a Bayesian integrated population model that links colony size and productivity with individual life histories. Strong annual fluctuations in the number of immigrants were found. To identify whether colony-specific covariates influenced immigration, we related the number of immigrants to various proxy variables for breeding site quality, specifically colony size, productivity, number of local subadults and local recruits. Numbers of local recruits and local subadults showed strong positive correlations with number of immigrants. We found that variation in immigration rate had strongly contributed to variation in colony growth rate, more so than variation in local recruitment or adult survival. Collectively, results suggest that immigration strongly affects colony growth rate, that the driving force behind immigration is natal dispersal and that immigrants were attracted by local recruits. PMID:24460741

  4. Morphology and enzyme production of Trichoderma reesei Rut C-30 are affected by the physical and structural characteristics of cellulosic substrates.

    PubMed

    Peciulyte, Ausra; Anasontzis, George E; Karlström, Katarina; Larsson, Per Tomas; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2014-11-01

    The industrial production of cellulolytic enzymes is dominated by the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei (anamorph of Hypocrea jecorina). In order to develop optimal enzymatic cocktail, it is of importance to understand the natural regulation of the enzyme profile as response to the growth substrate. The influence of the complexity of cellulose on enzyme production by the microorganisms is not understood. In the present study we attempted to understand how different physical and structural properties of cellulose-rich substrates affected the levels and profiles of extracellular enzymes produced by T. reesei. Enzyme production by T. reesei Rut C-30 was studied in submerged cultures on five different cellulose-rich substrates, namely, commercial cellulose Avicel® and industrial-like cellulosic pulp substrates which consist mainly of cellulose, but also contain residual hemicellulose and lignin. In order to evaluate the hydrolysis of the substrates by the fungal enzymes, the spatial polymer distributions were characterised by cross-polarisation magic angle spinning carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (CP/MAS (13)C-NMR) in combination with spectral fitting. Proteins in culture supernatants at early and late stages of enzyme production were labeled by Tandem Mass Tags (TMT) and protein profiles were analysed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001304. In total 124 proteins were identified and quantified in the culture supernatants, including cellulases, hemicellulases, other glycoside hydrolases, lignin-degrading enzymes, auxiliary activity 9 (AA9) family (formerly GH61), supporting activities of proteins and enzymes acting on cellulose, proteases, intracellular proteins and several hypothetical proteins. Surprisingly, substantial differences in the enzyme profiles were found even though there were minor differences in the chemical composition between the cellulose-rich substrates

  5. Identifying Colonial Discourses in Inupiat Young People's Narratives as a Way to Understand the No Future of Inupiat Youth Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wexler, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Alaska Native youth suffer disproportionately from suicide. Some researchers explain this by pointing to social disintegration brought on by rapid social change, but few make the connection to an ongoing colonialism explicit. This paper articulates some of the ways that colonial discourses affect Inupiat young people's self-conceptions, perceived…

  6. Hindu Responses to Darwinism: Assimilation and Rejection in a Colonial and Post-Colonial Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenzie Brown, C.

    2010-06-01

    Hindu responses to Darwinism, like Christian, have run the gamut from outright rejection to fairly robust but limited accommodations of the Darwinian perspective. Despite certain features of Hindu thought such as the enormous time-scales of traditional cosmogonies that may suggest considerable affinity with modern notions of organic evolution, more often than not traditional assumptions have worked against deep engagement with Darwinism, allowing only for superficial assimilation at best. Three fundamental factors have affected Hindu responses to Darwinism: the great diversity within the tradition spanning evolutionist and creationist perspectives, the encounter with Darwinism in the late nineteenth century as part of an alien culture, and the fact that this encounter occurred within a colonial context. This essay explores the complex interactions of these three factors, beginning with the diversity within the ancient and classical cosmological traditions, followed by consideration of colonial developments and the emergence of four representative Hindu approaches to Darwinism: Modern Vedic Evolutionism, Anthropic Vedic Evolutionism, Reactionary Vedic Evolutionism, and Modern Vedic Creationism. The essay concludes by discussing various epistemological issues in the attempts of modern Hindu apologists to legitimize Vedic world views. These issues include the appeal to modern science to confirm traditional ideals and values, while simultaneously subordinating scientific method to spiritual means of knowledge, or rejecting scientific methodology with its inbuilt skepticism entirely.

  7. Variable Cell Morphology Approach for Individual-Based Modeling of Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Storck, Tomas; Picioreanu, Cristian; Virdis, Bernardino; Batstone, Damien J.

    2014-01-01

    An individual-based, mass-spring modeling framework has been developed to investigate the effect of cell properties on the structure of biofilms and microbial aggregates through Lagrangian modeling. Key features that distinguish this model are variable cell morphology described by a collection of particles connected by springs and a mechanical representation of deformable intracellular, intercellular, and cell-substratum links. A first case study describes the colony formation of a rod-shaped species on a planar substratum. This case shows the importance of mechanical interactions in a community of growing and dividing rod-shaped cells (i.e., bacilli). Cell-substratum links promote formation of mounds as opposed to single-layer biofilms, whereas filial links affect the roundness of the biofilm. A second case study describes the formation of flocs and development of external filaments in a mixed-culture activated sludge community. It is shown by modeling that distinct cell-cell links, microbial morphology, and growth kinetics can lead to excessive filamentous proliferation and interfloc bridging, possible causes for detrimental sludge bulking. This methodology has been extended to more advanced microbial morphologies such as filament branching and proves to be a very powerful tool in determining how fundamental controlling mechanisms determine diverse microbial colony architectures. PMID:24806936

  8. The global distribution of ammonia emissions from seabird colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddick, S. N.; Dragosits, U.; Blackall, T. D.; Daunt, F.; Wanless, S.; Sutton, M. A.

    2012-08-01

    Seabird colonies represent a significant source of atmospheric ammonia (NH3) in remote maritime systems, producing a source of nitrogen that may encourage plant growth, alter terrestrial plant community composition and affect the surrounding marine ecosystem. To investigate seabird NH3 emissions on a global scale, we developed a contemporary seabird database including a total seabird population of 261 million breeding pairs. We used this in conjunction with a bioenergetics model to estimate the mass of nitrogen excreted by all seabirds at each breeding colony. The results combined with the findings of mid-latitude field studies of volatilization rates estimate the global distribution of NH3 emissions from seabird colonies on an annual basis. The largest uncertainty in our emission estimate concerns the potential temperature dependence of NH3 emission. To investigate this we calculated and compared temperature independent emission estimates with a maximum feasible temperature dependent emission, based on the thermodynamic dissociation and solubility equilibria. Using the temperature independent approach, we estimate global NH3 emissions from seabird colonies at 404 Gg NH3 per year. By comparison, since most seabirds are located in relatively cold circumpolar locations, the thermodynamically dependent estimate is 136 Gg NH3 per year. Actual global emissions are expected to be within these bounds, as other factors, such as non-linear interactions with water availability and surface infiltration, moderate the theoretical temperature response. Combining sources of error from temperature (±49%), seabird population estimates (±36%), variation in diet composition (±23%) and non-breeder attendance (±13%), gives a mid estimate with an overall uncertainty range of NH3 emission from seabird colonies of 270 [97-442] Gg NH3 per year. These emissions are environmentally relevant as they primarily occur as "hot-spots" in otherwise pristine environments with low anthropogenic

  9. Scanning electron microscopy as a tool for the analysis of colony architecture produced by phenotypic switching of a human pathogenic yeast Candida tropicalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlaneto, M. C.; Andrade, C. G. T. J.; Aragão, P. H. A.; França, E. J. G.; Moralez, A. T. P.; Ferreira, L. C. S.

    2012-07-01

    Candida tropicalis has been identified as one of the most prevalent pathogenic yeast species of the Candida-non-albicans group. Phenotypic switching is a biological phenomenon related to the occurrence of spontaneous emergence of colonies with different morphologies that provides variability within colonizing populations in order to adapt to different environments. Currently, studies of the microstructure of switching variant colonies are not subject of extensive research. SEM analysis was used to verify the architecture of whole Candida colonies. The strain 49/07 exhibited a hemispherical shape character, while the strain 335/07 showed a volcano shape with mycelated-edge colony. The ring switch variant is characterized by a highly wrinkled centre and an irregular periphery. The rough phenotype exhibited a three-dimensional architecture and was characterized by the presence of deep central and peripheral depressions areas. The ultrastructural analysis also allowed the observation of the arrangement of individual cells within the colonies. The whole smooth colony consisted entirely of yeast cells. Differently, aerial filaments were found all around the colony periphery of the volcano shape colony. For this colony type the mycelated-edge consisted mainly of hyphae, although yeast cells are also seen. The ring and rough colonies phenotypes comprised mainly yeast cells with the presence of extracellular material connecting neighbouring cells. This study has shown that SEM can be used effectively to examine the microarchitecture of colonies morphotypes of the yeast C. tropicalis and further our understanding of switching event in this pathogen.

  10. Botryllus schlosseri (Tunicata) whole colony irradiation: Do senescent zooid resorption and immunological resorption involve similar recognition events

    SciTech Connect

    Rinkevich, B.; Weissman, I.L. )

    1990-02-01

    The colonial tunicate Botryllus schlosseri undergoes cyclic blastogenesis where feeding zooids are senescened and resorbed and a new generation of zooids takes over the colony. When non-identical colonies come into direct contact, they either reject each other or fuse. Fusion is usually followed by the resorption of one of the partners in the chimera (immunological resorption). The striking morphological similarities between the two resorption phenomena suggest that both may involve tissue destruction following self-nonself recognition events. Here we attempt to modify these two events by whole colony gamma irradiation assays. Three sets of experiments were performed: (1) different doses of whole colony irradiation for determination of irradiation effects (110 colonies); (2) pairs of irradiated-nonirradiated isografts of clonal replicates for the potential of reconstruction of the irradiated partners (23 pairs); (3) chimeras of irradiated-nonirradiated partners for analysis of resorption hierarchy. Mortality increased with the irradiation dose. All colonies exposed to more than 5,000 rads died within 19 days, while no colony died below 2,000 rads. The average mortality periods, in days, for doses of 6,000-8,000, 5,000, and 2,500-4,000 rads were 14.4 +/- 3.1 (n = 24), 19.8 +/- 6.0 (n = 15), and 19.6 + 5.1 (n = 22), respectively. Younger colonies (3-6 months old) may survive radiation better than older ones (more than 13 months). Many morphological alterations were recorded in irradiated colonies: ampullar contraction and/or dilation, accumulation of pigment cells within ampullae, abnormal bleeding from blood vessels, sluggish blood circulation, necrotic zones, reduction in bud number, and irregularities in zooid and system structures. With doses of 3,000-4,000 rads and above, irradiation arrested the formation of new buds and interrupted normal takeover.

  11. Hegemony and Accommodation in the History Curriculum in Colonial Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mafela, Lily

    2014-01-01

    A reanalysis of colonial education is necessary in order to highlight its multifaceted and hybrid nature in specific colonial contexts. Although in general, colonial education served the socio-political needs of the colonial machinery, the colonial government's hegemonic authority over the school curriculum did not operate as a totalising…

  12. Colonies in engineered articular cartilage express superior differentiation.

    PubMed

    Selvaratnam, L; Abd Rahim, S; Kamarul, T; Chan, K Y; Sureshan, S; Penafort, R; Ng, C L L

    2005-07-01

    In view of poor regeneration potential of the articular cartilage, in-vitro engineering of cartilage tissue offers a promising option for progressive joint disease. This study aims to develop a biologically engineered articular cartilage for autologous transplantation. The initial work involved determination of chondrocyte yield and viability, and morphological analysis. Cartilage was harvested from the knee, hip and shoulder joints of adult New Zealand white rabbits and chondrocytes were isolated by enzymatic digestion of the extra-cellular matrix before serial cultivation in DMEM/Ham's F12 media as monolayer cultures. No differences were noted in cell yield. Although chondrocytes viability was optimal (>93%) following harvest from native cartilage, their viability tended to be lowered on passaging. Chondrocytes aggregated in isogenous colonies comprising ovoid cells with intimate intracellular contacts and readily exhibited Safranin-O positive matrix; features typically associated with articular cartilage in-vivo. However, chondrocytes also existed concurrently in scattered bipolar/multipolar forms lacking Safranin-O expression. Therefore, early data demonstrated successful serial culture of adult chondrocytes with differentiated morphology seen in established chondrocyte colonies synthesizing matrix proteoglycans. PMID:16381284

  13. [Notes about other epidemics in Colonial Chile].

    PubMed

    Laval, Enrique

    2015-10-01

    In chronicles or in the historiography of the Colony in Chile there are few references about epidemics different to smallpox; like typhus, typhoid fever, dysentery, etc. Almost all, fast spreading in the country and some with high lethality, which led to overflowing the capacity of hospitals in the Chilean colonial period. PMID:26633117

  14. Colonial America: A Course of Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Sondra; Stephens, Mark

    This illustrated unit of study can be incorporated into regular social studies courses in elementary classrooms. The unit focuses on life in the 13 original colonies from the settlement period to the Revolutionary War. Activities are provided to help students learn the names and locations of the colonies. A highlight of the unit is a study of the…

  15. Pathogen webs in collapsing honey bee colonies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized symptoms of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new o...

  16. Colony Collapse Disorder: A descriptive studey

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the last two winters, there have been large-scale, unexplained losses of managed honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies in the United States. In the absence of a known cause, this syndrome was named Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) because the main trait was a rapid loss of adult worker bees. We ...

  17. Post-Colonial Recovering and Healing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weenie, Angelina

    Notions of white supremacy, racism, sexism, and patriarchy constitute the power relationships and hierarchical structures of colonialism. Power is accessed when certain cultural forms are made to prevail over others, thus producing racialized and marginalized identities. The will to control what is different is the main tenet of colonialism.…

  18. Colonial American Literature: A Guide to Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Noate, Judith, Comp.

    This handout is a guide to library resources in the J. Murrey Atkins Library at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte for the study of colonial American literature. The guide is intended to help readers find sources of criticism on colonial and revolutionary literature. It explains important reference sources in the Atkins library reference…

  19. Education in Colonial Africa: The German Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    vanderPloeg, Arie J.

    1977-01-01

    Examines the introduction and growth of state-supported schools in two German colonies in Africa, Kamerun and Deutsch Ostafrika, describes African reaction to and utilization of them, assesses, from the colonial perspective, why such schools were introduced and what they were intended to accomplish, and examines the reasons for their differential…

  20. Musical morphology.

    PubMed

    Chakravarty, M Mallar; Vuust, Peter

    2009-07-01

    Morphologic measures have long been used to determine the patho-anatomical signature of different neurologic disorders. However, these measures can also be used to determine effects of specific learning tasks and quantifiable human abilities on cerebral structure. Musicians provide interesting opportunities for this type of analysis as their various skills, such as rhythmic ability and pitch and harmony discrimination (acquired through years of practicing and playing) can be quantified and compared using distinct morphologic analyses. Here, we review magnetic resonance imaging-based morphologic analyses in the music and neuroscience literature and provide some results from our own analysis of rhythmic ability in a cohort of musicians. PMID:19673757

  1. Bio-physical modeling of time-resolved forward scattering by Listeria colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Euiwon; Banada, Padmapriya P.; Bhunia, Arun K.; Hirleman, E. Daniel

    2006-10-01

    We have developed a detection system and associated protocol based on optical forward scattering where the bacterial colonies of various species and strains growing on solid nutrient surfaces produced unique scatter signatures. The aim of the present investigation was to develop a bio-physical model for the relevant phenomena. In particular, we considered time-varying macroscopic morphological properties of the growing colonies and modeled the scattering using scalar diffraction theory. For the present work we performed detailed studies with three species of Listeria; L. innocua, L. monocytogenes, and L. ivanovii. The baseline experiments involved cultures grown on brain heart infusion (BHI) agar and the scatter images were captured every six hours for an incubation period of 42 hours. The morphologies of the colonies were studied by phase contrast microscopy, including measurement of the diameter of the colony. Growth curves, represented by colony diameter as a function of time, were compared with the time-evolution of scattering signatures. Similar studies were carried out with L. monocytogenes grown on different substrates. Non-dimensionalizing incubation time in terms of the time to reach stationary phase was effective in reducing the dimensionality of the model. Bio-physical properties of the colony such as diameter, bacteria density variation, surface curvature/profile, and transmission coefficient are important parameters in predicting the features of the forward scattering signatures. These parameters are included in a baseline model that treats the colony as a concentric structure with radial variations in phase modulation. In some cases azimuthal variations and random phase inclusions were included as well. The end result is a protocol (growth media, incubation time and conditions) that produces reproducible and distinguishable scatter patterns for a variety of harmful food borne pathogens in a short period of time. Further, the bio-physical model we

  2. Hydrodynamics of bacterial colonies: A model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lega, J.; Passot, T.

    2003-03-01

    We propose a hydrodynamic model for the evolution of bacterial colonies growing on soft agar plates. This model consists of reaction-diffusion equations for the concentrations of nutrients, water, and bacteria, coupled to a single hydrodynamic equation for the velocity field of the bacteria-water mixture. It captures the dynamics inside the colony as well as on its boundary and allows us to identify a mechanism for collective motion towards fresh nutrients, which, in its modeling aspects, is similar to classical chemotaxis. As shown in numerical simulations, our model reproduces both usual colony shapes and typical hydrodynamic motions, such as the whirls and jets recently observed in wet colonies of Bacillus subtilis. The approach presented here could be extended to different experimental situations and provides a general framework for the use of advection-reaction-diffusion equations in modeling bacterial colonies.

  3. Formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christoph A; Lin, Yen Ting; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2015-09-01

    Many organisms form colonies for a transient period of time to withstand environmental pressure. Bacterial biofilms are a prototypical example of such behavior. Despite significant interest across disciplines, physical mechanisms governing the formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies are still poorly understood. Starting from a kinetic description of motile and interacting cells we derive a hydrodynamic equation for their density on a surface, where most of the kinetic coefficients are estimated from experimental data for N. gonorrhoeae bacteria. We use it to describe the formation of multiple colonies with sizes consistent with experimental observations. Finally, we show how the changes in the cell-to-cell interactions lead to the dissolution of the bacterial colonies. The successful application of kinetic theory to a complex far from equilibrium system such as formation and dissolution of living bacterial colonies potentially paves the way for the physical quantification of the initial stages of biofilm formation. PMID:26465495

  4. Formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Christoph A.; Lin, Yen Ting; Biais, Nicolas; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2015-09-01

    Many organisms form colonies for a transient period of time to withstand environmental pressure. Bacterial biofilms are a prototypical example of such behavior. Despite significant interest across disciplines, physical mechanisms governing the formation and dissolution of bacterial colonies are still poorly understood. Starting from a kinetic description of motile and interacting cells we derive a hydrodynamic equation for their density on a surface, where most of the kinetic coefficients are estimated from experimental data for N. gonorrhoeae bacteria. We use it to describe the formation of multiple colonies with sizes consistent with experimental observations. Finally, we show how the changes in the cell-to-cell interactions lead to the dissolution of the bacterial colonies. The successful application of kinetic theory to a complex far from equilibrium system such as formation and dissolution of living bacterial colonies potentially paves the way for the physical quantification of the initial stages of biofilm formation.

  5. Response Ant Colony Optimization of end milling surface roughness.

    PubMed

    Kadirgama, K; Noor, M M; Abd Alla, Ahmed N

    2010-01-01

    Metal cutting processes are important due to increased consumer demands for quality metal cutting related products (more precise tolerances and better product surface roughness) that has driven the metal cutting industry to continuously improve quality control of metal cutting processes. This paper presents optimum surface roughness by using milling mould aluminium alloys (AA6061-T6) with Response Ant Colony Optimization (RACO). The approach is based on Response Surface Method (RSM) and Ant Colony Optimization (ACO). The main objectives to find the optimized parameters and the most dominant variables (cutting speed, feedrate, axial depth and radial depth). The first order model indicates that the feedrate is the most significant factor affecting surface roughness. PMID:22294914

  6. Transatlantic abundance of the N2-fixing colonial cyanobacterium Trichodesmium.

    PubMed

    Davis, Cabell S; McGillicuddy, Dennis J

    2006-06-01

    Colonial diazotrophic cyanobacteria of the genus Trichodesmium are thought to play a significant role in the input of new nitrogen to upper layers of the tropical and subtropical oceanic ecosystems that cover nearly half of Earth's surface. Here we describe results of a transatlantic survey in which a noninvasive underwater digital microscope (the video plankton recorder), was towed across the North Atlantic at 6 meters per second while undulating between the surface and 130 meters. Colony abundance had a basin-scale trend, a clear association with anticyclonic eddies, and was not affected by hurricane-forced mixing. Subsurface abundance was higher than previously reported, which has important implications for the global ocean nitrogen cycle. PMID:16763148

  7. Response Ant Colony Optimization of End Milling Surface Roughness

    PubMed Central

    Kadirgama, K.; Noor, M. M.; Abd Alla, Ahmed N.

    2010-01-01

    Metal cutting processes are important due to increased consumer demands for quality metal cutting related products (more precise tolerances and better product surface roughness) that has driven the metal cutting industry to continuously improve quality control of metal cutting processes. This paper presents optimum surface roughness by using milling mould aluminium alloys (AA6061-T6) with Response Ant Colony Optimization (RACO). The approach is based on Response Surface Method (RSM) and Ant Colony Optimization (ACO). The main objectives to find the optimized parameters and the most dominant variables (cutting speed, feedrate, axial depth and radial depth). The first order model indicates that the feedrate is the most significant factor affecting surface roughness. PMID:22294914

  8. Public health developments in colonial Malaya: colonialism and the politics of prevention.

    PubMed Central

    Manderson, L

    1999-01-01

    In both African and Asian colonies until the late 19th century, colonial medicine operated pragmatically to meet the medical needs first of colonial officers and troops, immigrant settlers, and laborers responsible for economic development, then of indigenous populations when their ill health threatened the well-being of the expatriate population. Since the turn of the century, however, the consequences of colonial expansion and development for indigenous people's health had become increasingly apparent, and disease control and public health programs were expanded in this light. These programs increased government surveillance of populations at both community and household levels. As a consequence, colonial states extended institutional oversight and induced dependency through public health measures. Drawing on my own work on colonial Malaya, I illustrate developments in public health and their links to the moral logic of colonialism and its complementarity to the political economy. PMID:9987478

  9. Parasitoids and competitors influence colony-level responses in the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdiabadi, Natasha J.; Kawazoe, Elizabeth A.; Gilbert, Lawrence E.

    2004-11-01

    Social insect colonies respond to challenges set by a variable environment by reallocating work among colony members. In many social insects, such colony-level task allocation strategies are achieved through individual decisions that produce a self-organized adapting group. We investigated colony responses to parasitoids and native ant competitors in the red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta). Parasitoid flies affected fire ants by decreasing the proportion of workers engaged in foraging. Competitors also altered colony-level behaviours by reducing the proportion of foraging ants and by increasing the proportion of roaming majors, whose role is colony defence. Interestingly, the presence of both parasitism and competition almost always had similar effects on task allocation in comparison to each of the biotic factors on its own. Thus, our study uniquely demonstrates that the interactive effect of both parasitism and competition is not necessarily additive, implying that these biotic factors alter colony behaviour in distinct ways. More generally, our work demonstrates the importance of studying the dynamics of species interactions in a broader context.

  10. Differentiation of sugar assimilation characteristics and colony phenotypes in pathogenic and commensal oral candidal isolates.

    PubMed

    Hellstein, J H; Fotos, P G; Law, S S; Kovacevic, M; Carriere, K C

    1993-08-01

    A comparison of sugar assimilation patterns has been made using 72 oral candidal isolates recovered from diseased and non-diseased patients. Significant differences were demonstrated between isolates recovered from diseased versus healthy mouths. In addition, significant changes in colony phenotype (switch frequency and morphologic predominance) were found to relate to predictive data generated from carbon source utilization data. These results suggest that biochemical properties and colony phenotypic characteristics may hold promise in predicting the behavior of oral candidal isolates in disease. PMID:8229869

  11. Uniform modeling of bacterial colony patterns with varying nutrient and substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarcz, Deborah; Levine, Herbert; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Ariel, Gil

    2016-04-01

    Bacteria develop complex patterns depending on growth condition. For example, Bacillus subtilis exhibit five different patterns depending on substrate hardness and nutrient concentration. We present a unified integro-differential model that reproduces the entire experimentally observed morphology diagram at varying nutrient concentrations and substrate hardness. The model allows a comprehensive and quantitative comparison between experimental and numerical variables and parameters, such as colony growth rate, nutrient concentration and diffusion constants. As a result, the role of the different physical mechanisms underlying and regulating the growth of the colony can be evaluated.

  12. Sperm Shape (Morphology): Does It Affect Fertility?

    MedlinePlus

    ... decide whether a couple should use in vitro fertilization (IVF) to attempt a pregnancy. It is best ... genetic material. Once the sperm enters the egg, fertilization has a good chance of taking place. However, ...

  13. Coral colony tissue damage in six species of reef-building corals: partial mortality in relation with depth and surface area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesters, Erik H.; Wesseling, Ineke; Bak, Rolf P. M.

    1997-05-01

    Partial mortality and its relation with colony size was assessed in colonies of 6 species of reef-building corals (Scleractinia) at three sites in 2 depth zones, reef terrace (7 m) and fore-reef slope (18 m), on the fringing reefs of Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles. Partial mortality is manifest on coral colonies as tissue lesions which have not been closed by the surrounding tissue. Two types of lesions were distinguished: (1) Type I lesions, completely enclosed by living tissue, and (2) Type II lesions, not completely surrounded by tissue and open to the edge of the colony. These lesion types differed in occurrence and lesion size-frequency distributions, as well as in relation to variation in colony surface area and morphology. The percentage of undamaged colonies decreased with increasing colony size and lesion number increased logarithmically with colony surface area. Larger colonies have little chance to escape partial mortality. The abundance of Type I lesions was significantly less on the reef slope, while the number of Type II lesions was greater. This is probably caused by a relative increase of the colony circumference because colony height is reduced on the reef slope. Median lesion sizes ranged from 0.5 to 3 cm 2 for Type I lesions and from 2 to 60 cm 2 for Type I1 lesions. Type I1 lesions covered a much larger colony area than Type I lesions, suggesting that bottom-associated causes are relatively important with respect to partial mortality. Species and colonies with large circumference relative to total colony surface area, such as plate-like and small colonies, were particularly susceptible to partial mortality by Type II lesions. Whole-colony mortality rate of small juvenile corals was very high, but dropped abruptly with increasing size, probably at the time that growth direction changes from horizontal to vertical. This `escape in height' makes corals less susceptible to partial mortality and represents an important life history characteristic

  14. Measuring activity in ant colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, C.; Fernández, J.; Pérez-Penichet, C.; Altshuler, E.

    2006-12-01

    Ants, as paradigm of social insects, have become a recurrent example of efficient problem solvers via self-organization. In spite of the simple behavior of each individual, the colony as a whole displays "swarm intelligence:" the organization of ant trails for foraging is a typical output of it. But conventional techniques of observation can hardly record the amount of data needed to get a detailed understanding of self-organization of ant swarms in the wild. Here we are presenting a measurement system intended to monitor ant activity in the field comprising massive data acquisition and high sensitivity. A central role is played by an infrared sensor devised specifically to monitor relevant parameters to the activity of ants through the exits of the nest, although other sensors detecting temperature and luminosity are added to the system. We study the characteristics of the activity sensor and its performance in the field. Finally, we present massive data measured at one exit of a nest of Atta insularis, an ant endemic to Cuba, to illustrate the potential of our system.

  15. New “missing link” genus of the colonial volvocine green algae gives insights into the evolution of oogamy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The evolution of oogamy from isogamy, an important biological event, can be summarized as follows: morphologically similar gametes (isogametes) differentiated into small “male” and large “female” motile gametes during anisogamy, from which immotile female gametes (eggs) evolved. The volvocine green algae represent a model lineage to study this type of sex evolution and show two types of gametic unions: conjugation between isogametes outside the parental colonies (external fertilization during isogamy) and fertilization between small motile gametes (sperm) and large gametes (eggs) inside the female colony (internal fertilization during anisogamy and oogamy). Although recent cultural studies on volvocine algae revealed morphological diversity and molecular genetic data of sexual reproduction, an intermediate type of union between these two gametic unions has not been identified. Results We identified a novel colonial volvocine genus, Colemanosphaera, which produces bundles of spindle-shaped male gametes through successive divisions of colonial cells. Obligately anisogamous conjugation between male and female motile gametes occurred outside the female colony (external fertilization during anisogamy). This new genus contains 16- or 32-celled spheroidal colonies similar to those of the volvocine genera Yamagishiella and Eudorina. However, Colemanosphaera can be clearly distinguished from these two genera based on its sister phylogenetic position to the enigmatic flattened colonial volvocine Platydorina and external fertilization during anisogamy. Two species of Colemanosphaera were found in a Japanese lake; these species are also distributed in European freshwaters based on a published sequence of an Austrian strain and the original description of Pandorina charkowiensis from Ukraine. Conclusions Based on phylogeny and morphological data, this novel genus exhibits a missing link between Platydorina and the typical spheroidal colonial volvocine members

  16. Colony Foundation in an Oceanic Seabird.

    PubMed

    Munilla, Ignacio; Genovart, Meritxell; Paiva, Vitor H; Velando, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Seabirds are colonial vertebrates that despite their great potential for long-range dispersal and colonization are reluctant to establish in novel locations, often recruiting close to their natal colony. The foundation of colonies is therefore a rare event in most seabird species and little is known about the colonization process in this group. The Cory's shearwater (Calonectris diomedea) is a pelagic seabird that has recently established three new colonies in Galicia (NE Atlantic) thus expanding its distribution range 500 km northwards. This study aimed to describe the establishment and early progress of the new Galician populations and to determine the genetic and morphometric characteristics of the individuals participating in these foundation events. Using 10 microsatellite loci, we tested the predictions supported by different seabird colonization models. Possibly three groups of non-breeders, adding up to around 200 birds, started visiting the Galician colonies in the mid 2000's and some of them eventually laid eggs and reproduced, thus establishing new breeding colonies. The Galician populations showed a high genetic diversity and a frequency of private alleles similar to or even higher than some of the large historical populations. Most individuals were assigned to several Atlantic populations and a few (if any) to Mediterranean colonies. Our study suggests that a large and admixed population is settling in Galicia, in agreement with predictions from island metapopulation models of colonization. Multiple source colonies imply that some birds colonizing Galicia were dispersing from very distant colonies (> 1500 km). Long-distance colonizations undertaken by relatively large and admixed groups of colonizers can help to explain the low levels of genetic structure over vast areas that are characteristic of most oceanic seabird species. PMID:26909694

  17. Colony Foundation in an Oceanic Seabird

    PubMed Central

    Munilla, Ignacio; Genovart, Meritxell; Paiva, Vitor H.; Velando, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Seabirds are colonial vertebrates that despite their great potential for long-range dispersal and colonization are reluctant to establish in novel locations, often recruiting close to their natal colony. The foundation of colonies is therefore a rare event in most seabird species and little is known about the colonization process in this group. The Cory’s shearwater (Calonectris diomedea) is a pelagic seabird that has recently established three new colonies in Galicia (NE Atlantic) thus expanding its distribution range 500 km northwards. This study aimed to describe the establishment and early progress of the new Galician populations and to determine the genetic and morphometric characteristics of the individuals participating in these foundation events. Using 10 microsatellite loci, we tested the predictions supported by different seabird colonization models. Possibly three groups of non-breeders, adding up to around 200 birds, started visiting the Galician colonies in the mid 2000’s and some of them eventually laid eggs and reproduced, thus establishing new breeding colonies. The Galician populations showed a high genetic diversity and a frequency of private alleles similar to or even higher than some of the large historical populations. Most individuals were assigned to several Atlantic populations and a few (if any) to Mediterranean colonies. Our study suggests that a large and admixed population is settling in Galicia, in agreement with predictions from island metapopulation models of colonization. Multiple source colonies imply that some birds colonizing Galicia were dispersing from very distant colonies (> 1500 km). Long-distance colonizations undertaken by relatively large and admixed groups of colonizers can help to explain the low levels of genetic structure over vast areas that are characteristic of most oceanic seabird species. PMID:26909694

  18. Measurement of soil bacterial colony temperatures and isolation of a high heat-producing bacterium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The cellular temperatures of microorganisms are considered to be the same as those of their surroundings because the cellular volume is too small to maintain a cellular temperature that is different from the ambient temperature. However, by forming a colony or a biofilm, microorganisms may be able to maintain a cellular temperature that is different from the ambient temperature. In this study, we measured the temperatures of bacterial colonies isolated from soils using an infrared imager and investigated the thermogenesis by a bacterium that increases its colony temperature. Results The temperatures of some colonies were higher or lower than that of the surrounding medium. A bacterial isolate with the highest colony temperature was identified as Pseudomonas putida. This bacterial isolate had an increased colony temperature when it grew at a temperature suboptimal for its growth. Measurements of heat production using a microcalorimeter showed that the temperature of this extraordinary, microcalorimetrically determined thermogenesis corresponded with the thermographically observed increase in bacterial colony temperature. When investigating the effects of the energy source on this thermal behavior, we found that heat production by this bacterium increased without additional biomass production at a temperature suboptimal for its growth. Conclusions We found that heat production by bacteria affected the bacterial colony temperature and that a bacterium identified as Pseudomonas putida could maintain a cellular temperature different from the ambient temperature, particularly at a sub-optimal growth temperature. The bacterial isolate P. putida KT1401 increased its colony temperature by an energy-spilling reaction when the incubation temperature limited its growth. PMID:23497132

  19. Effects of Wintering Environment and Parasite–Pathogen Interactions on Honey Bee Colony Loss in North Temperate Regions

    PubMed Central

    Currie, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    Extreme winter losses of honey bee colonies are a major threat to beekeeping but the combinations of factors underlying colony loss remain debatable. We monitored colonies in two environments (colonies wintered indoors or outdoors) and characterized the effects of two parasitic mites, seven viruses, and Nosema on honey bee colony mortality and population loss over winter. Samples were collected from two locations within hives in fall, mid-winter and spring of 2009/2010. Although fall parasite and pathogen loads were similar in outdoor and indoor-wintered colonies, the outdoor-wintered colonies had greater relative reductions in bee population score over winter. Seasonal patterns in deformed wing virus (DWV), black queen cell virus (BQCV), and Nosema level also differed with the wintering environment. DWV and Nosema levels decreased over winter for indoor-wintered colonies but BQCV did not. Both BQCV and Nosema concentration increased over winter in outdoor-wintered colonies. The mean abundance of Varroa decreased and concentration of Sacbrood virus (SBV), Kashmir bee virus (KBV), and Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) increased over winter but seasonal patterns were not affected by wintering method. For most viruses, either entrance or brood area samples were reasonable predictors of colony virus load but there were significant season*sample location interactions for Nosema and BQCV, indicating that care must be taken when selecting samples from a single location. For Nosema spp., the fall entrance samples were better predictors of future infestation levels than were fall brood area samples. For indoor-wintered colonies, Israeli acute paralysis virus IAPV concentration was negatively correlated with spring population size. For outdoor-wintered hives, spring Varroa abundance and DWV concentration were positively correlated with bee loss and negatively correlated with spring population size. Multivariate analyses for fall collected samples indicated higher DWV was

  20. Effects of Wintering Environment and Parasite-Pathogen Interactions on Honey Bee Colony Loss in North Temperate Regions.

    PubMed

    Desai, Suresh D; Currie, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Extreme winter losses of honey bee colonies are a major threat to beekeeping but the combinations of factors underlying colony loss remain debatable. We monitored colonies in two environments (colonies wintered indoors or outdoors) and characterized the effects of two parasitic mites, seven viruses, and Nosema on honey bee colony mortality and population loss over winter. Samples were collected from two locations within hives in fall, mid-winter and spring of 2009/2010. Although fall parasite and pathogen loads were similar in outdoor and indoor-wintered colonies, the outdoor-wintered colonies had greater relative reductions in bee population score over winter. Seasonal patterns in deformed wing virus (DWV), black queen cell virus (BQCV), and Nosema level also differed with the wintering environment. DWV and Nosema levels decreased over winter for indoor-wintered colonies but BQCV did not. Both BQCV and Nosema concentration increased over winter in outdoor-wintered colonies. The mean abundance of Varroa decreased and concentration of Sacbrood virus (SBV), Kashmir bee virus (KBV), and Chronic bee paralysis virus (CBPV) increased over winter but seasonal patterns were not affected by wintering method. For most viruses, either entrance or brood area samples were reasonable predictors of colony virus load but there were significant season*sample location interactions for Nosema and BQCV, indicating that care must be taken when selecting samples from a single location. For Nosema spp., the fall entrance samples were better predictors of future infestation levels than were fall brood area samples. For indoor-wintered colonies, Israeli acute paralysis virus IAPV concentration was negatively correlated with spring population size. For outdoor-wintered hives, spring Varroa abundance and DWV concentration were positively correlated with bee loss and negatively correlated with spring population size. Multivariate analyses for fall collected samples indicated higher DWV was

  1. Evolutional Ant Colony Method Using PSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morii, Nobuto; Aiyoshi, Eitarou

    The ant colony method is one of heuristic methods capable of solving the traveling salesman problem (TSP), in which a good tour is generated by the artificial ant's probabilistic behavior. However, the generated tour length depends on the parameter describing the ant's behavior, and the best parameters corresponding to the problem to be solved is unknown. In this technical note, the evolutional strategy is presented to find the best parameter of the ant colony by using Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) in the parameter space. Numerical simulations for benchmarks demonstrate effectiveness of the evolutional ant colony method.

  2. Nosema spp. infection and its negative effects on honey bees (Apis mellifera iberiensis) at the colony level

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Nosemosis caused by the microsporidia Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae are among the most common pathologies affecting adult honey bees. N. apis infection has been associated with a reduced lifespan of infected bees and increased winter mortality, and its negative impact on colony strength and productivity has been described in several studies. By contrast, when the effects of nosemosis type C, caused by N. ceranae infection, have been analysed at the colony level, these studies have largely focused on collapse as a response to infection without addressing the potential sub-clinical effects on colony strength and productivity. Given the spread and prevalence of N. ceranae worldwide, we set out here to characterize the sub-clinical and clinical signs of N. ceranae infection on colony strength and productivity. We evaluated the evolution of 50 honey bee colonies naturally infected by Nosema (mainly N. ceranae) over a one year period. Under our experimental conditions, N. ceranae infection was highly pathogenic for honey bee colonies, producing significant reductions in colony size, brood rearing and honey production. These deleterious effects at the colony level may affect beekeeping profitability and have serious consequences on pollination. Further research is necessary to identify possible treatments or beekeeping techniques that will limit the rapid spread of this dangerous emerging disease. PMID:23574888

  3. Role of gas vesicles and intra-colony spaces during the process of algal bloom formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongsheng; Zheng, Binghui; Jiang, Xia; Zheng, Hao

    2013-06-01

    Aggregation morphology, vertical distribution, and algal density were analyzed during the algal cell floating process in three environments. The role of gas vesicles and intra-colony spaces was distinguished by algal blooms treated with ultrasonic waves and high pressure. Results demonstrated that the two buoyancy providers jointly provide buoyancy for floating algal cells. The results were also confirmed by force analysis. In the simulation experiment, the buoyancy acting on algal cells was greater than its gravity at sample ports 2 and 3 of a columnar-cultivated cell vessel, and intra-colony spaces were not detected. In Taihu Lake, gas vesicle buoyancy was notably less than total algal cell gravity. Buoyancy provided by intra-colony spaces exceeded total algal cell gravity at the water surface, but not at other water depths. In the Daning River, total buoyancies provided by the two buoyancy providers were less than total algal cell gravity at different water depths. PMID:23833817

  4. Influence of Honey Bee Genotype and Wintering Method on Wintering Performance of Varroa destructor (Parasitiformes: Varroidae)-Infected Honey Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Colonies in a Northern Climate.

    PubMed

    Bahreini, Rassol; Currie, Robert W

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a cooperative breeding program designed to enhance winter survival of honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) when exposed to high levels of varroa (Varroa destructor Anderson and Trueman) in outdoor-wintered and indoor-wintered colonies. Half of the colonies from selected and unselected stocks were randomly assigned to be treated with late autumn oxalic acid treatment or to be left untreated. Colonies were then randomly assigned to be wintered either indoors (n = 37) or outdoors (n = 40). Late autumn treatment with oxalic acid did not improve wintering performance. However, genotype of bees affected colony survival and the proportion of commercially viable colonies in spring, as indicated by greater rates of colony survival and commercially viable colonies for selected stock (43% survived and 33% were viable) in comparison to unselected stock (19% survived and 9% were viable) across all treatment groups. Indoor wintering improved spring bee population score, proportion of colonies surviving, and proportion of commercially viable colonies relative to outdoor wintering (73% of selected stock and 41% of unselected stock survived during indoor wintering). Selected stock showed better "tolerance" to varroa as the selected stock also maintained higher bee populations relative to unselected stock. However, there was no evidence of "resistance" in selected colonies (reduced mite densities). Collectively, this experiment showed that breeding can improve tolerance to varroa and this can help minimize colony loss through winter and improve colony wintering performance. Overall, colony wintering success of both genotypes of bees was better when colonies were wintered indoors than when colonies were wintered outdoors. PMID:26470288

  5. Optical image acquisition system for colony analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weixing; Jin, Wenbiao

    2006-02-01

    For counting of both colonies and plaques, there is a large number of applications including food, dairy, beverages, hygiene, environmental monitoring, water, toxicology, sterility testing, AMES testing, pharmaceuticals, paints, sterile fluids and fungal contamination. Recently, many researchers and developers have made efforts for this kind of systems. By investigation, some existing systems have some problems since they belong to a new technology product. One of the main problems is image acquisition. In order to acquire colony images with good quality, an illumination box was constructed as: the box includes front lightning and back lightning, which can be selected by users based on properties of colony dishes. With the illumination box, lightning can be uniform; colony dish can be put in the same place every time, which make image processing easy. A digital camera in the top of the box connected to a PC computer with a USB cable, all the camera functions are controlled by the computer.

  6. Application of continuous monitoring of honeybee colonies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Monitoring physical variables associated with honey bee colonies, including weight, temperature, humidity, respiratory gases, vibration, acoustics and forager traffic, in a continuous manner is becoming feasible for most researchers as the cost and size of electronic sensors and dataloggers decrease...

  7. Identification of a Colonial Chordate Histocompatibility Gene

    PubMed Central

    Voskoboynik, Ayelet; Newman, Aaron M.; Corey, Daniel M.; Sahoo, Debashis; Pushkarev, Dmitry; Neff, Norma F.; Passarelli, Benedetto; Koh, Winston; Ishizuka, Katherine J.; Palmeri, Karla J.; Dimov, Ivan K.; Keasar, Chen; Fan, H. Christina; Mantalas, Gary L.; Sinha, Rahul; Penland, Lolita; Quake, Stephen R.; Weissman, Irving L.

    2013-01-01

    Histocompatibility is the basis by which multicellular organisms of the same species distinguish self from non-self. Relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying histocompatibility reactions in lower organisms. Botryllus schlosseri is a colonial urochordate, a sister group of vertebrates, that exhibits a genetically determined natural transplantation reaction, whereby self-recognition between colonies leads to formation of parabionts with a common vasculature, whereas rejection occurs between incompatible colonies. Using genetically defined lines, whole-transcriptome sequencing, and genomics, we identified a single gene that encodes self/non-self and determines “graft” outcomes in this organism. This gene is significantly upregulated in colonies poised to undergo fusion or rejection, is highly expressed in the vasculature, and is functionally linked to histocompatibility outcomes. These findings establish a platform for advancing the science of allorecognition. PMID:23888037

  8. Bacterial colony counting by Convolutional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Alessandro; Lombardi, Stefano; Signoroni, Alberto

    2015-08-01

    Counting bacterial colonies on microbiological culture plates is a time-consuming, error-prone, nevertheless fundamental task in microbiology. Computer vision based approaches can increase the efficiency and the reliability of the process, but accurate counting is challenging, due to the high degree of variability of agglomerated colonies. In this paper, we propose a solution which adopts Convolutional Neural Networks (CNN) for counting the number of colonies contained in confluent agglomerates, that scored an overall accuracy of the 92.8% on a large challenging dataset. The proposed CNN-based technique for estimating the cardinality of colony aggregates outperforms traditional image processing approaches, becoming a promising approach to many related applications. PMID:26738016

  9. Pathogen Webs in Collapsing Honey Bee Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Cornman, R. Scott; Tarpy, David R.; Chen, Yanping; Jeffreys, Lacey; Lopez, Dawn; Pettis, Jeffery S.; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Evans, Jay D.

    2012-01-01

    Recent losses in honey bee colonies are unusual in their severity, geographical distribution, and, in some cases, failure to present recognized characteristics of known disease. Domesticated honey bees face numerous pests and pathogens, tempting hypotheses that colony collapses arise from exposure to new or resurgent pathogens. Here we explore the incidence and abundance of currently known honey bee pathogens in colonies suffering from Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), otherwise weak colonies, and strong colonies from across the United States. Although pathogen identities differed between the eastern and western United States, there was a greater incidence and abundance of pathogens in CCD colonies. Pathogen loads were highly covariant in CCD but not control hives, suggesting that CCD colonies rapidly become susceptible to a diverse set of pathogens, or that co-infections can act synergistically to produce the rapid depletion of workers that characterizes the disorder. We also tested workers from a CCD-free apiary to confirm that significant positive correlations among pathogen loads can develop at the level of individual bees and not merely as a secondary effect of CCD. This observation and other recent data highlight pathogen interactions as important components of bee disease. Finally, we used deep RNA sequencing to further characterize microbial diversity in CCD and non-CCD hives. We identified novel strains of the recently described Lake Sinai viruses (LSV) and found evidence of a shift in gut bacterial composition that may be a biomarker of CCD. The results are discussed with respect to host-parasite interactions and other environmental stressors of honey bees. PMID:22927991

  10. QUANTITATIVE MORPHOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract: In toxicology, the role of quantitative assessment of brain morphology can be understood in the context of two types of treatment-related alterations. One type of alteration is specifically associated with treatment and is not observed in control animals. Measurement ...

  11. The influence of fire-coral colony size and agonistic behaviour of territorial damselfish on associated coral reef fish communities.

    PubMed

    Leal, Isabela Carolina Silva; de Araújo, Maria Elisabeth; da Cunha, Simone Rabelo; Pereira, Pedro Henrique Cipresso

    2015-07-01

    Branching hydrocorals from the genus Millepora play an important ecological role in South Atlantic reefs, where branching scleractinian corals are absent. Previous studies have shown a high proportion of reef fish species using branching fire-coral colonies as shelter, breeding, and feeding sites. However, the effects of Millepora spp. colony size and how the agonistic behaviour of a competitive damselfish affect the associated reef fish community are still unknown. The present study examined how fire-coral colony volume and the presence of a highly territorial and aggressive damselfish (Brazilian endemic Stegastes fuscus) affects the reef fish community associated with the fire-coral Millepora alcicornis. M. alcicornis colonies were surveyed from September 2012 to April 2013 at Tamandaré Reefs off Northeast Brazil. Our results show that the abundance and richness of coral associated fish was positively correlated with M. alcicornis coral colony volume. Additionally, behaviour of S. fuscus, the most abundant reef fish species found associated with fire-coral colonies (almost 57% of the fish community), was also influenced by fire-coral colony volume. There was a clear trend of increased agonistic behaviour and feeding on coral polyps as colony volume increased. This trend was reversed for the non-occupational swimming category, which decreased as M. alcicornis colony volume increased. Behavioural ontogenetic changes were also detected for S. fuscus individuals. Juveniles mainly showed two distinct behaviours: sheltered on coral branches and feeding on coral polyps. In contrast, adults presented greater equitability among the behavioural categories, mostly non-occupational swimming around coral colonies and agonistic behaviour. Lastly, S. fuscus individuals actively defended fire-coral colonies from intruders. A large number of agonistic interactions occurred against potential food competitors, which were mainly roving herbivores, omnivores, and sessile

  12. The Relationship between Canopy Cover and Colony Size of the Wood Ant Formica lugubris - Implications for the Thermal Effects on a Keystone Ant Species

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Huei; Robinson, Elva J. H.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change may affect ecosystems and biodiversity through the impacts of rising temperature on species’ body size. In terms of physiology and genetics, the colony is the unit of selection for ants so colony size can be considered the body size of a colony. For polydomous ant species, a colony is spread across several nests. This study aims to clarify how climate change may influence an ecologically significant ant species group by investigating thermal effects on wood ant colony size. The strong link between canopy cover and the local temperatures of wood ant’s nesting location provides a feasible approach for our study. Our results showed that nests were larger in shadier areas where the thermal environment was colder and more stable compared to open areas. Colonies (sum of nests in a polydomous colony) also tended to be larger in shadier areas than in open areas. In addition to temperature, our results supported that food resource availability may be an additional factor mediating the relationship between canopy cover and nest size. The effects of canopy cover on total colony size may act at the nest level because of the positive relationship between total colony size and mean nest size, rather than at the colony level due to lack of link between canopy cover and number of nests per colony. Causal relationships between the environment and the life-history characteristics may suggest possible future impacts of climate change on these species. PMID:25551636

  13. Spleen volume varies with colony size and parasite load in a colonial bird.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Charles R; Bomberger Brown, Mary

    2002-01-01

    Comparisons across bird species have indicated that those more exposed to parasites and pathogens invest more in immunological defence, as measured by spleen size. We investigated how spleen volume varied with colony size, parasite load and an individual's colony-size history in the cliff swallow, Petrochelidon pyrrhonota, a colonial passerine bird of North America. We used a sample of over 1700 birds that had all died during a period of inclement weather in 1996. We experimentally manipulated ectoparasitism by fumigating nests in some colonies prior to the bad weather. Birds from parasite-free colonies had significantly smaller spleens than those from naturally infested sites; spleen volume did not differ between the sexes and did not vary with age. Mean spleen volume increased significantly with the colony size at a site prior to the bad weather in 1996 and at the site in 1995, both measures of colony size being indices of ectoparasitism at a site. An individual's history of breeding-colony size (defined as the average colony size it had occupied in years prior to 1996) had no association with its spleen size. The results are consistent with parasite-induced splenomegaly whenever birds are exposed to large numbers of ectoparasites. The results do not support spleen size as being a signal of differential life-history investment in immunological defence among individuals and thus run counter to interpretations from recent cross-species comparisons. PMID:12079660

  14. Spleen volume varies with colony size and parasite load in a colonial bird.

    PubMed

    Brown, Charles R; Bomberger Brown, Mary

    2002-07-01

    Comparisons across bird species have indicated that those more exposed to parasites and pathogens invest more in immunological defence, as measured by spleen size. We investigated how spleen volume varied with colony size, parasite load and an individual's colony-size history in the cliff swallow, Petrochelidon pyrrhonota, a colonial passerine bird of North America. We used a sample of over 1700 birds that had all died during a period of inclement weather in 1996. We experimentally manipulated ectoparasitism by fumigating nests in some colonies prior to the bad weather. Birds from parasite-free colonies had significantly smaller spleens than those from naturally infested sites; spleen volume did not differ between the sexes and did not vary with age. Mean spleen volume increased significantly with the colony size at a site prior to the bad weather in 1996 and at the site in 1995, both measures of colony size being indices of ectoparasitism at a site. An individual's history of breeding-colony size (defined as the average colony size it had occupied in years prior to 1996) had no association with its spleen size. The results are consistent with parasite-induced splenomegaly whenever birds are exposed to large numbers of ectoparasites. The results do not support spleen size as being a signal of differential life-history investment in immunological defence among individuals and thus run counter to interpretations from recent cross-species comparisons. PMID:12079660

  15. One's Colonies: a virtual reality environment of oriental residences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Catherine

    2013-03-01

    This paper is a statement about my virtual reality environment project, One's Colonies, and a description of the creative process of the project. I was inspired by the buildings in my hometown-Taiwan, which is really different from the architectural style in the United States. By analyzing the unique style of dwellings in Taiwan, I want to demonstrate how the difference between geography, weather and culture change the appearance of the living space. Through this project I want to express the relationship between architectural style and cultural difference, and how the emotional condition or characteristics of the residents are affected by their residencies.

  16. Switching of the rotational direction of rhizoidal colonies in a newly isolated Bacillus mycoides strain Ko01.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Courtney; Masuda, Hisako

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus mycoides are known to form rhizoidal colonies on solid medium. In this study, a new strain of B. mycoides, strain Ko01, was isolated from soil. Genetic and growth patterns indicated that this strain belongs to subgroup II of the B. cereus group. Strain Ko01 forms extensive rhizoidal colonies with predictable directions of rotation. The concentration of the agar, and not the chemical composition, altered the direction of the colony rotation, switching from counterclockwise to clockwise. Agar concentration-dependent switching of rotation direction was unique to strain Ko01 and was not seen in colonies of other B. mycoides strains that were tested. Factors affecting colony chirality patterns appeared to be variable among B. mycoides strains. This feature can be used for the classification of B. mycoides strains. PMID:27118071

  17. A drowned Mesozoic bird breeding colony from the Late Cretaceous of Transylvania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyke, Gareth; Vremir, Mátyás; Kaiser, Gary; Naish, Darren

    2012-06-01

    Despite a rapidly improving fossil record, the reproductive biology of Mesozoic birds remains poorly known: only a handful of undisputed, isolated Cretaceous eggs (some containing embryonic remains) are known. We report here the first fossil evidence for a breeding colony of Mesozoic birds, preserved at the Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) Oarda de Jos (Od) site in the Sebeş area of Transylvania, Romania. A lens of calcareous mudstone with minimum dimensions of 80 cm length, 50 cm width and 20 cm depth contains thousands of tightly packed, morphologically homogenous eggshell fragments, seven near-complete eggs and neonatal and adult avialan skeletal elements. Eggshell forms 70-80 % of the matrix, and other fossils are entirely absent. The bones exhibit clear characters of the Cretaceous avialan clade Enantiornithes, and the eggshell morphology is also consistent with this identification. Both taphonomy and lithology show that the components of this lens were deposited in a single flood event, and we conclude that it represents the drowned remains of a larger enantiornithine breeding colony, swamped by rising water, washed a short distance and deposited in a shallow, low-energy pond. The same fate often befalls modern bird colonies. Such a large concentration of breeding birds suggests aquatic feeding in this species, augments our understanding of enantiornithine biology and shows that colonial nesting was not unique to crown birds.

  18. Caste totipotency and conflict in a large-colony social insect.

    PubMed Central

    Strassmann, Joan E; Sullender, Barry W; Queller, David C

    2002-01-01

    In most social insects with large, complex colonies workers and queens are morphologically quite distinct. This means that caste determination must occur prior to adulthood. However workers and queens in the swarm-founding epiponine wasps are often morphologically indistinguishable, or nearly so, suggesting that caste determination in these wasps could be quite different. To determine the extent of caste lability in the epiponine, Parachartergus colobopterus, we removed all the queens from one colony and all but one from another colony. Worker aggression diminished after queen removal. A week later the colony with no queens had a new, young cohort of mated queens. These must have been either adults or pupae at the time of queen removal, and so could not have been fed any differently from workers. Relatedness patterns confirmed that these new queens would normally have been workers and not queens. A model of inclusive fitness interests shows that workers ought to suppress new queen production, except at low queen numbers, a prediction supported by our empirical results. The patterns of social conflict over queenship resulting from swarm founding in a many-queen society may help to explain the unusually weak caste differentiation in the epiponines. PMID:11839195

  19. Volumetric mapping of tubeworm colonies in Kagoshima Bay through autonomous robotic surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maki, Toshihiro; Kume, Ayaka; Ura, Tamaki

    2011-07-01

    We developed and tested a comprehensive method for measuring the three-dimensional distribution of tubeworm colonies using an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). We derived volumetric measurements such as the volume, area, average height, and number of tubes for colonies of Lamellibrachia satsuma, the world's shallowest-dwelling vestimentiferan tubeworm discovered at a depth of 82 m, at the Haorimushi site in Kagoshima Bay, Japan, by processing geometric and visual data obtained through low-altitude surveys using the AUV Tri-Dog 1. According to the results, the tubeworm colonies cover an area of 151.9 m 2, accounting for 5.8% of the observed area (2600 m 2). The total number of tubes was estimated to be 99,500. Morphological parameters such as area, volume, and average height were estimated for each colony. On the basis of average height, colonies could be clearly separated into two groups, short (0.1-0.3 m) and tall (0.6-0.7 m), independent of the area.

  20. Phenotypic analysis of bacterial colonies using laser light scatter and pattern-recognition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajwa, Bartek; Bayraktar, Bulent; Banada, Padmapriya P.; Huff, Karleigh; Bae, Euiwon; Hirleman, E. Daniel; Bhunia, Arun K.; Robinson, J. Paul

    2008-02-01

    The formation of bacterial colonies and biofilms requires coordinated gene expression, regulated cell differentiation, autoaggregation, and intercellular communication. Therefore colonies of bacteria have been recognized as multicellular organisms or "superorganisms." It has consequently been postulated that the phenotype of colonies formed by microorganisms can be automatically recognized and classified using optical systems capable of collecting information related to cellular pattern formation and morphology of colonies. Recently we have reported a first practical implementation of such a system, capable of noninvasive, label-free classification and recognition of pathogenic Listeria species. The design employed computer-vision and pattern-recognition techniques to classify scatter patterns produced by bacterial colonies irradiated with laser light. Herein we report our efforts to extend this system to other genera of bacteria such as Salmonella, Vibrio, Staphylococcus, and E. coli. Application of orthogonal moments, as well as texture descriptors for image feature extraction, provides high robustness in the presence of noise. An improved pattern classification scheme based on an SVM algorithm provides better results than the previously employed neural network system. Low error rates determined by cross-validation, reproducibility of the measurements, and overall robustness of the recognition system prove that the proposed technology can be implemented in automated devices for bacterial detection.

  1. Subsocial behaviour and brood adoption in mixed-species colonies of two theridiid spiders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinsted, Lena; Agnarsson, Ingi; Bilde, Trine

    2012-12-01

    Cooperation and group living often evolves through kin selection. However, associations between unrelated organisms, such as different species, can evolve if both parties benefit from the interaction. Group living is rare in spiders, but occurs in cooperative, permanently social spiders, as well as in territorial, colonial spiders. Mixed species spider colonies, involving closely related species, have rarely been documented. We examined social interactions in newly discovered mixed-species colonies of theridiid spiders on Bali, Indonesia. Our aim was to test the degree of intra- and interspecific tolerance, aggression and cooperation through behavioural experiments and examine the potential for adoption of foreign brood. Morphological and genetic analyses confirmed that colonies consisted of two related species Chikunia nigra (O.P. Cambridge, 1880) new combination (previously Chrysso nigra) and a yet undescribed Chikunia sp. Females defended territories and did not engage in cooperative prey capture, but interestingly, both species seemed to provide extended maternal care of young and indiscriminate care for foreign brood. Future studies may reveal whether these species adopt only intra-specific young, or also inter-specifically. We classify both Chikunia species subsocial and intra- and interspecifically colonial, and discuss the evolutionary significance of a system where one or both species may potentially benefit from mutual tolerance and brood adoption.

  2. Mountain Plover responses to deltamethrin treatments on prairie dog colonies in Montana.

    PubMed

    Dinsmore, Stephen J

    2013-03-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides containing deltamethrin provide broad spectrum insect control that can adversely affect food supplies of insectivorous birds. I hypothesized that this could result in lowered nest survival for a ground-nesting insectivorous bird, the Mountain Plover (Charadrius montanus), which preferentially nests on prairie dog colonies. I studied Mountain Plover nest survival in 2003-2010 at a small cluster of black-tailed prairie dog (Cynomys ludovicianus) colonies in north-central Montana. Three colonies were treated with deltamethrin to control fleas and limit the spread of plague; four untreated colonies served as controls. I monitored 412 plover nests during the 8 year study (264 on treatment colonies and 148 on control colonies) and found a strong negative effect of deltamethrin treatments on nest survival (β(Dust) = -1.24, 95 % CI was -2.00 to -0.48) in the years following the actual treatment (2004-2006). I conclude that the observed treatment effect most likely occurred because of changes in insect (food) availability for the plover, and this in turn lowered nest survival because adults spent more time off nests or switched to less desirable insect prey. These results lend support to the need to consider the indirect effects of insecticide treatments on non-target species and suggest a potential conflict in current plague management strategies for prairie dogs. PMID:23269563

  3. Scatter factor influences the formation of prostate epithelial cell colonies on bone marrow stroma in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lang, S H; Clarke, N W; George, N J; Testa, N G

    1999-06-01

    Prostate cancer metastases form selectively in the bone marrow. Previously we demonstrated motility was important for the formation of primary prostatic epithelial cell colonies in bone marrow stroma (BMS) co-culture. In this study we looked at the influence of motility factors on the colony formation of epithelial cells derived from benign (bPEC) or malignant (mPEC) prostate tissue. After 7 days co-culture we found that anti-scatter factor consistently inhibited prostate epithelial cell colony formation on BMS (7/7 mPEC and 4/7 bPEC samples showed significant inhibition). Antibodies against bFGF and 5T4 did not significantly affect colony formation. Addition of fibroblast conditioned media (derived from benign prostates) to co-cultures stimulated the colony formation of bPEC (170%) and mPEC (252%). This stimulation was eliminated by depletion of SF from the conditioned media. Immunohistochemical staining found c-Met expression in 5/6 bPEC cultures and 7/9 mPEC cultures. When grown in BMS co-culture expression of c-Met was positive in 3/6 bPEC and 2/7 mPEC samples. In conclusion, scatter factor influences the in vitro formation of prostate epithelial cell colonies on BMS co-culture. PMID:10545020

  4. Influence of pesticide residues on honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colony health in France.

    PubMed

    Chauzat, Marie-Pierre; Carpentier, Patrice; Martel, Anne-Claire; Bougeard, Stéphanie; Cougoule, Nicolas; Porta, Philippe; Lachaize, Julie; Madec, François; Aubert, Michel; Faucon, Jean-Paul

    2009-06-01

    A 3-yr field survey was carried out in France, from 2002 to 2005, to study honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colony health in relation to pesticide residues found in the colonies. This study was motivated by recent massive losses of honey bee colonies, and our objective was to examine the possible relationship between low levels of pesticide residues in apicultural matrices (honey, pollen collected by honey bees, beeswax) and colony health as measured by colony mortality and adult and brood population abundance. When all apicultural matrices were pooled together, the number of pesticide residue detected per sampling period (four sampling periods per year) and per apiary ranged from 0 to 9, with the most frequent being two (29.6%). No pesticide residues were detected during 12.7% of the sampling periods. Residues of imidacloprid and 6- chloronicotinic acid were the most frequently detected in pollen loads, honey, and honey bee matrices. Several pairs of active ingredients were present concurrently within honey bees and in pollen loads but not in beeswax and honey samples. No statistical relationship was found between colony mortality and pesticide residues. When pesticide residues from all matrices were pooled together, a mixed model analysis did not show a significant relationship between the presence of pesticide residues and the abundance of brood and adults, and no statistical relationship was found between colony mortality and pesticide residues. Thus, although certain pesticide residues were detected in apicultural matrices and occasionally with another pesticide residual, more work is needed to determine the role these residues play in affecting colony health. PMID:19508759

  5. Abiotic factors in colony formation: effects of nutrition and light on extracellular polysaccharide production and cell aggregates of Microcystis aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhen; Kong, Fanxiang

    2013-07-01

    Colony morphology is important for Microcystis to sustain a competitive advantage in eutrophic lakes. The mechanism of colony formation in Microcystis is currently unclear. Extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) has been reported to play an important role in cell aggregate formation of some phytoplankton. Microcystis aeruginosa was cultivated under varied abiotic conditions, including different nutrient, light, and temperature conditions, to investigate their effects on EPS production and morphological change. The results show that nutrient concentration and light intensity have great effects on EPS productionin M. aeruginosa. There was a considerable increase in EPS production after M. aeruginosa was cultivated in adjusted culture conditions similar to those present in the field (28.9 mg C/L, 1.98 mg N/L, 0.65 mg P/L, light intensity: 100 μmol/(m2 · s)). These results indicate that abiotic factors might be one of the triggers for colony formation in Microcystis.

  6. Morphological Alteration and Survival of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Soil Microcosms.

    PubMed

    Kamjumphol, Watcharaporn; Chareonsudjai, Pisit; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol; Chareonsudjai, Sorujsiri

    2015-11-01

    The resilience of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, was evaluated in control soil microcosms and in soil microcosms containing NaCl or FeSO4 at 30°C. Iron (Fe(II)) promoted the growth of B. pseudomallei during the 30-day observation, contrary to the presence of 1.5% and 3% NaCl. Scanning electron micrographs of B. pseudomallei in soil revealed their morphological alteration from rod to coccoid and the formation of microcolonies. The smallest B. pseudomallei cells were found in soil with 100 μM FeSO4 compared with in the control soil or soil with 0.6% NaCl (P < 0.05). The colony count on Ashdown's agar and bacterial viability assay using the LIVE/DEAD(®) BacLight(™) stain combined with flow cytometry showed that B. pseudomallei remained culturable and viable in the control soil microcosms for at least 120 days. In contrast, soil with 1.5% NaCl affected their culturability at day 90 and their viability at day 120. Our results suggested that a low salinity and iron may influence the survival of B. pseudomallei and its ability to change from a rod-like to coccoid form. The morphological changes of B. pseudomallei cells may be advantageous for their persistence in the environment and may increase the risk of their transmission to humans. PMID:26324731

  7. The taxonomic identity of the cosmopolitan prymnesiophyte Phaeocystis: a morphological and ecophysiological approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, M. E. M.; Lancelot, C.; Brandini, F. P.; Sakshaug, E.; John, D. M.

    1994-04-01

    Phaeocystis species diversity has been reviewed by comparing the morphological and physiological characteristics of Phaeocystis cells and colonies of different geographical origin. These analyses gave evidence for four Phaeocystis species: P. globosa, P. scrobiculata, P. pouchetii and one undefined antarctic species, distinguishing themselves by colony and single cell morphology and temperature tolerance. Typical colonial shape constitutes the most apparent morphological characteristics distinguishing P. pouchetii from P. globosa. Differences between colonies referable to pouchetii and globosa can be confirmed on the basis of variation in temperature and light requirements, as well as morphological descriptions of palmelloid stages, e.g. colony shape and size, organisation of the cells inside the colonies. The most striking features of the motile single cell are the thread-like appendages, which are much longer than the cell itself, the organic scales covering the cells, varying in shape and size, the haptonema and the flagella. On this basis, previous Phaeocystis records were analysed and the geographical distribution of the genus reported. There was no evidence for strain specific elemental composition or photosynthesis or growth performance of cells and colonies. This indicates that more elaborate molecular and biochemical analyses are required to identify different species. Possible opportunities available through modern chemical and molecular biological advances are described.

  8. Parasitism and phenotypic change in colonial hosts.

    PubMed

    Hartikainen, Hanna; Fontes, Inês; Okamura, Beth

    2013-09-01

    Changes in host phenotype are often attributed to manipulation that enables parasites to complete trophic transmission cycles. We characterized changes in host phenotype in a colonial host–endoparasite system that lacks trophic transmission (the freshwater bryozoan Fredericella sultana and myxozoan parasite Tetracapsuloides bryosalmonae). We show that parasitism exerts opposing phenotypic effects at the colony and module levels. Thus, overt infection (the development of infectious spores in the host body cavity) was linked to a reduction in colony size and growth rate, while colony modules exhibited a form of gigantism. Larger modules may support larger parasite sacs and increase metabolite availability to the parasite. Host metabolic rates were lower in overtly infected relative to uninfected hosts that were not investing in propagule production. This suggests a role for direct resource competition and active parasite manipulation (castration) in driving the expression of the infected phenotype. The malformed offspring (statoblasts) of infected colonies had greatly reduced hatching success. Coupled with the severe reduction in statoblast production this suggests that vertical transmission is rare in overtly infected modules. We show that although the parasite can occasionally infect statoblasts during overt infections, no infections were detected in the surviving mature offspring, suggesting that during overt infections, horizontal transmission incurs a trade-off with vertical transmission. PMID:23965820

  9. Ant colony optimization algorithm for continuous domains based on position distribution model of ant colony foraging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liqiang; Dai, Yuntao; Gao, Jinyu

    2014-01-01

    Ant colony optimization algorithm for continuous domains is a major research direction for ant colony optimization algorithm. In this paper, we propose a distribution model of ant colony foraging, through analysis of the relationship between the position distribution and food source in the process of ant colony foraging. We design a continuous domain optimization algorithm based on the model and give the form of solution for the algorithm, the distribution model of pheromone, the update rules of ant colony position, and the processing method of constraint condition. Algorithm performance against a set of test trials was unconstrained optimization test functions and a set of optimization test functions, and test results of other algorithms are compared and analyzed to verify the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:24955402

  10. Genetic diversity within honeybee colonies prevents severe infections and promotes colony growth.

    PubMed Central

    Tarpy, David R

    2003-01-01

    Multiple mating by social insect queens increases the genetic diversity among colony members, thereby reducing intracolony relatedness and lowering the potential inclusive fitness gains of altruistic workers. Increased genetic diversity may be adaptive, however, by reducing the prevalence of disease within a nest. Honeybees, whose queens have the highest levels of multiple mating among social insects, were investigated to determine whether genetic variation helps to prevent chronic infections. I instrumentally inseminated honeybee queens with semen that was either genetically similar (from one male) or genetically diverse (from multiple males), and then inoculated their colonies with spores of Ascosphaera apis, a fungal pathogen that kills developing brood. I show that genetically diverse colonies had a lower variance in disease prevalence than genetically similar colonies, which suggests that genetic diversity may benefit colonies by preventing severe infections. PMID:12596763

  11. Sub-lethal effects of dietary neonicotinoid insecticide exposure on honey bee queen fecundity and colony development

    PubMed Central

    Wu-Smart, Judy; Spivak, Marla

    2016-01-01

    Many factors can negatively affect honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) health including the pervasive use of systemic neonicotinoid insecticides. Through direct consumption of contaminated nectar and pollen from treated plants, neonicotinoids can affect foraging, learning, and memory in worker bees. Less well studied are the potential effects of neonicotinoids on queen bees, which may be exposed indirectly through trophallaxis, or food-sharing. To assess effects on queen productivity, small colonies of different sizes (1500, 3000, and 7000 bees) were fed imidacloprid (0, 10, 20, 50, and 100 ppb) in syrup for three weeks. We found adverse effects of imidacloprid on queens (egg-laying and locomotor activity), worker bees (foraging and hygienic activities), and colony development (brood production and pollen stores) in all treated colonies. Some effects were less evident as colony size increased, suggesting that larger colony populations may act as a buffer to pesticide exposure. This study is the first to show adverse effects of imidacloprid on queen bee fecundity and behavior and improves our understanding of how neonicotinoids may impair short-term colony functioning. These data indicate that risk-mitigation efforts should focus on reducing neonicotinoid exposure in the early spring when colonies are smallest and queens are most vulnerable to exposure. PMID:27562025

  12. Colonies of Bumble Bees (Bombus impatiens) Produce Fewer Workers, Less Bee Biomass, and Have Smaller Mother Queens Following Fungicide Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bernauer, Olivia M.; Gaines-Day, Hannah R.; Steffan, Shawn A.

    2015-01-01

    Bees provide vital pollination services to the majority of flowering plants in both natural and agricultural systems. Unfortunately, both native and managed bee populations are experiencing declines, threatening the persistence of these plants and crops. Agricultural chemicals are one possible culprit contributing to bee declines. Even fungicides, generally considered safe for bees, have been shown to disrupt honey bee development and impair bumble bee behavior. Little is known, however, how fungicides may affect bumble bee colony growth. We conducted a controlled cage study to determine the effects of fungicide exposure on colonies of a native bumble bee species (Bombus impatiens). Colonies of B. impatiens were exposed to flowers treated with field-relevant levels of the fungicide chlorothalonil over the course of one month. Colony success was assessed by the number and biomass of larvae, pupae, and adult bumble bees. Bumble bee colonies exposed to fungicide produced fewer workers, lower total bee biomass, and had lighter mother queens than control colonies. Our results suggest that fungicides negatively affect the colony success of a native bumble bee species and that the use of fungicides during bloom has the potential to severely impact the success of native bumble bee populations foraging in agroecosystems. PMID:26463198

  13. Colonies of Bumble Bees (Bombus impatiens) Produce Fewer Workers, Less Bee Biomass, and Have Smaller Mother Queens Following Fungicide Exposure.

    PubMed

    Bernauer, Olivia M; Gaines-Day, Hannah R; Steffan, Shawn A

    2015-01-01

    Bees provide vital pollination services to the majority of flowering plants in both natural and agricultural systems. Unfortunately, both native and managed bee populations are experiencing declines, threatening the persistence of these plants and crops. Agricultural chemicals are one possible culprit contributing to bee declines. Even fungicides, generally considered safe for bees, have been shown to disrupt honey bee development and impair bumble bee behavior. Little is known, however, how fungicides may affect bumble bee colony growth. We conducted a controlled cage study to determine the effects of fungicide exposure on colonies of a native bumble bee species (Bombus impatiens). Colonies of B. impatiens were exposed to flowers treated with field-relevant levels of the fungicide chlorothalonil over the course of one month. Colony success was assessed by the number and biomass of larvae, pupae, and adult bumble bees. Bumble bee colonies exposed to fungicide produced fewer workers, lower total bee biomass, and had lighter mother queens than control colonies. Our results suggest that fungicides negatively affect the colony success of a native bumble bee species and that the use of fungicides during bloom has the potential to severely impact the success of native bumble bee populations foraging in agroecosystems. PMID:26463198

  14. Sub-lethal effects of dietary neonicotinoid insecticide exposure on honey bee queen fecundity and colony development.

    PubMed

    Wu-Smart, Judy; Spivak, Marla

    2016-01-01

    Many factors can negatively affect honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) health including the pervasive use of systemic neonicotinoid insecticides. Through direct consumption of contaminated nectar and pollen from treated plants, neonicotinoids can affect foraging, learning, and memory in worker bees. Less well studied are the potential effects of neonicotinoids on queen bees, which may be exposed indirectly through trophallaxis, or food-sharing. To assess effects on queen productivity, small colonies of different sizes (1500, 3000, and 7000 bees) were fed imidacloprid (0, 10, 20, 50, and 100 ppb) in syrup for three weeks. We found adverse effects of imidacloprid on queens (egg-laying and locomotor activity), worker bees (foraging and hygienic activities), and colony development (brood production and pollen stores) in all treated colonies. Some effects were less evident as colony size increased, suggesting that larger colony populations may act as a buffer to pesticide exposure. This study is the first to show adverse effects of imidacloprid on queen bee fecundity and behavior and improves our understanding of how neonicotinoids may impair short-term colony functioning. These data indicate that risk-mitigation efforts should focus on reducing neonicotinoid exposure in the early spring when colonies are smallest and queens are most vulnerable to exposure. PMID:27562025

  15. A novel method for exploring elemental composition of microbial communities: laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry of intact bacterial colonies.

    PubMed

    Latimer, Joe; Stokes, Sarah L; Graham, Alison I; Bunch, Josephine; Jackson, Rachel J; McLeod, Cameron W; Poole, Robert K

    2009-12-01

    Bacterial colonies are spatially complex structures whose physiology is profoundly dependent on interactions between cells and with the underlying semi-solid substratum. Here, we use bacterial colonies as a model of a microbial community to evaluate the potential of laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to delineate elemental distributions within colonies with minimal pre-treatment. To reduce water content of the colony and limit undesirable absorption of laser energy, we compared methods of preparing 24h-old colonies of Escherichia coli TG1 on agar for laser ablation. Colonies on excised agar segments dried on chromatography paper were superior to colonies dried in a dessicator or by prolonged incubation, with respect to signal magnitude, signal:noise ratio and background signal. Having optimised laser scan speed (10 microm s(-1)) and laser beam diameter (100 microm), further improvements were achieved by growing colonies on nylon membranes over agar, which were then transferred to the ablation chamber without further treatment. Repeated line rasters across individual membrane-supported colonies yielded three-dimensional elemental maps of colonies, revealing a convex morphology consistent with visual inspection. By normalising isotope counts for P, Mn, Zn, Fe and Ca against Mg, the most abundant cellular divalent cation, we sought elemental heterogeneity within the colony. The normalised concentration of Mn in the perimeter was higher than in the colony interior, whereas the converse was true for Ca. LA-ICP-MS is a novel and powerful method for probing elemental composition and organisation within microbial communities and should find numerous applications in, for example, biofilm studies. PMID:19835915

  16. Collecting live ant specimens (colony sampling).

    PubMed

    Smith, Chris R; Tschinkel, Walter R

    2009-07-01

    Because of the great diversity of ants, it is difficult to give a single protocol for the collection of live specimens. Ant body size can be very small or extremely large; the ants can be hard or soft, sting or spray toxic chemicals, live in the open or in hard-to-reach places; and colony size can range from tens of individuals to millions. Thus, collection techniques must be tailored to each particular species. In particular, caution must always be taken when dealing with stinging species, and symptoms and basic first-aid measures, especially for the treatment of anaphylactic shock, should be reviewed before beginning fieldwork. Nonetheless, many species are collectable as whole colonies. This protocol reviews some basic techniques for collecting ground-nesting species and describes how to collect whole live colonies (with queens), which are necessary for long-term laboratory studies and addressing questions of social organization and ecology. PMID:20147204

  17. The History of Libraries from the Colonial Period of a Country to Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yocklunn, John

    An overview of libraries in developing nations examines in general terms their historical development during their colonial and post-independence periods and discusses the more salient factors affecting development. These factors include language, distribution of population, topography, poor communication, level of formal education, illiteracy,…

  18. Growth of a radiation-transformed clone of C3H 1OT1/2 cells into melanin-producing colonies

    SciTech Connect

    Szekely, J.G.; Raaphorst, G.P.; Lobreau, A.U.; Azzam, E.I.; Vadasz, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    When R25, a radiation-transformed clone of C3H 1OT1/2 cells, was plated in soft agarose, a fraction of the colonies became pigmented. The morphologies of the white and dark colonies and their cells were compared by optical, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The transformed R25 cells had apparently differentiated into melanin-producing cells in the soft agarose, with the white colonies containing actively growing cells having only a few melanosomes, and the dark colonies being made up of stationary-phase cells filled with electronopaque melanosomes. Exposure of the R25 cells to 4.0 Gy of X-rays decreased the percentage of dark colonies, while exposure to 1% DMSO had no effect.

  19. Monoclonal origin of B lymphocyte colony-forming cells in spleen colonies formed by multipotential hemopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Lala, PK; Johnson, GR

    1978-01-01

    Spleen colonies produced by transplanting lethally irradiated mice with either 12 day fetal liver or adult bone marrow cells were found to contain B- lymphocyte colony-forming cells (BL-CFC) . The proportion of BL-CFC positive spleen colonies did not increase substantially between 8 and 14 days after transplantation, the range being 18-45 percent. However, the absolute number of BL-CFC per spleen colony varied considerably (between 1 and 10,318), although the majority of colonies contained less than 200 BL-CFC. Irrespective of the time after transplantation, smaller spleen colonies were found to have a higher frequency of BL-CFC than larger spleen colonies. To determine the possible clonal origin of BL-CFC from spleen colony- forming unit (CFU-S), CBA mice were injected with equal numbers of CBA and CBA T(6)/T(6) fetal liver or adult bone marrow cells. Analysis of 7-15-day spleen colonies demonstrated that 90 percent were either exclusively T(6) positive or T(6) negative and approximately equal numbers ofboth colony types were observed. B-lymphocyte colonies were grown and successfully karyotyped from 19 spleen colonies. When compared with the original spleen colony karyotype the B-lymphocyte colony cells karyotype was identical in all 19 cases. In 3 of the 19 colonies analyzed a mixture of T(6) positive and T(6) negative karyotypes was present and identical proportions of the karyotypes were present in the pooled B-lymphocyte colony cells and spleen colony cells. The data indicate that the B-lymphocyte colony-forming cells detected in spleen colonies are genuine members of the hemopoietic clone derived from the initiating hemopoietic stem cell (CFU-S). PMID:309918

  20. Behavioral Modulation of Infestation by Varroa destructor in Bee Colonies. Implications for Colony Stability.

    PubMed

    de Figueiró Santos, Joyce; Coelho, Flávio Codeço; Bliman, Pierre-Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) has become a global problem for beekeepers and for the crops that depend on bee pollination. While many factors are known to increase the risk of colony collapse, the ectoparasitic mite Varroa destructor is considered to be the most serious one. Although this mite is unlikely to cause the collapse of hives itself, it is the vector for many viral diseases which are among the likely causes for Colony Collapse Disorder. The effects of V. destructor infestation differ from one part of the world to another, with greater morbidity and higher colony losses in European honey bees (EHB) in Europe, Asia and North America. Although this mite has been present in Brazil for many years, there have been no reports of colony losses amongst Africanized Honey Bees (AHB). Studies carried out in Mexico have highlighted different behavioral responses by the AHB to the presence of the mite, notably as far as grooming and hygienic behavior are concerned. Could these explain why the AHB are less susceptible to Colony Collapse Disorder? In order to answer this question, we have developed a mathematical model of the infestation dynamics to analyze the role of resistance behavior by bees in the overall health of the colony, and as a consequence, its ability to face epidemiological challenges. PMID:27583438

  1. Metatranscriptomic analyses of honey bee colonies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Honey bees face numerous biotic threats from viruses to bacteria, fungi, protists, and mites. Here we describe a thorough analysis of microbes harbored by worker honey bees collected from field colonies in geographically distinct regions of Turkey. Turkey is one of the World’s most important centers...

  2. Colonialism and Native American Literature: Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Jack

    1987-01-01

    The literature of the Native Peoples of North America is gaining interest with an increasing number of persons; however, recent articles fail to view this literature holistically and within a realistic cultural, historical, and social context. A history of Native American literature and the impact of colonialism is included. (JMM)

  3. Education and Evangelism in the English Colonies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watras, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    This article considers two related educational endeavors of the Massachusetts colony. The first is the colonists' efforts to pass their religious traditions to their children. The second is the effort of missionaries to spread the Christian faith to Native Americans. In both cases, the colonists wanted their children and the American Indians to…

  4. English Literatures in Post-Colonial Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dass, Rozita

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of a vibrant literary, culture and arts scene promotes Singapore's claims as a hub for arts and culture in the Asian region, and as a global arts city by the 21st century. The richness and variety of Singapore literature from the early post-colonial years are evident in the evolution of a Singapore literary culture. The diaspora of…

  5. Colonial Continuities and Educational Inequalities in Indonesia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Harold F., Jr.

    This paper explores the effect of 350 years of Dutch colonial rule upon Indonesian educational policies and the resulting regional inequalities in education. It was Dutch policy not to educate most of the children from the poorer social classes, but to use education to maintain and strengthen the existing social structure. Education was also used…

  6. Project Final Report: HPC-Colony II

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Terry R; Kale, Laxmikant V; Moreira, Jose

    2013-11-01

    This report recounts the HPC Colony II Project which was a computer science effort funded by DOE's Advanced Scientific Computing Research office. The project included researchers from ORNL, IBM, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The topic of the effort was adaptive system software for extreme scale parallel machines. A description of findings is included.

  7. Colonial Newspaper Reaction to the Somerset Decision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Patricia

    To examine colonial American press coverage of the British court decision to free American slave James Somerset, a study was conducted to clarify why the decision worked as a victory for British abolitionists but was usually cited even in post-Revolution America in the passage of increasingly oppressive slave legislation. Twenty-three of the…

  8. Order and instabilities in dense bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsimring, Lev

    2012-02-01

    The structure of cell colonies is governed by the interplay of many physical and biological factors, ranging from properties of surrounding media to cell-cell communication and gene expression in individual cells. The biomechanical interactions arising from the growth and division of individual cells in confined environments are ubiquitous, yet little work has focused on this fundamental aspect of colony formation. By combining experimental observations of growing monolayers of non-motile strain of bacteria Escherichia coli in a shallow microfluidic chemostat with discrete-element simulations and continuous theory, we demonstrate that expansion of a dense colony leads to rapid orientational alignment of rod-like cells. However, in larger colonies, anisotropic compression may lead to buckling instability which breaks perfect nematic order. Furthermore, we found that in shallow cavities feedback between cell growth and mobility in a confined environment leads to a novel cell streaming instability. Joint work with W. Mather, D. Volfson, O. Mondrag'on-Palomino, T. Danino, S. Cookson, and J. Hasty (UCSD) and D. Boyer, S. Orozco-Fuentes (UNAM, Mexico).

  9. The Sphere of Women in Colonial America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Robert

    This project is a unit of six lessons designed to study and understand the roles and expectations of women in the colonial period. The unit provides an historical perspective on those expectations, examines how both men and women viewed the sphere of women, and how enlightened thought on this topic began to emerge during this revolutionary time.…

  10. A Bicentennial Without a Puerto Rican Colony

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Piri

    1975-01-01

    The United States revolution of 1776 is said to lose validity in light of Puerto Rico's colonial situation under American rule. The plight of the Puerto Rican people is compared to that of the Euro-American settlers under the thumb-screw of British imperialism. (Author/AM)

  11. Medical management: from colony to community.

    PubMed

    Aldenkamp, Albert P

    2010-12-01

    In this article the development from the colonies founded in the 19th century to the current situation is discussed. Future development is not to simply follow the slogan 'to the community' translated as 'epilepsy must be treated in general hospitals' but to preserve epileptology as specialized care with 'centres of excellence' orchestrated by coupling epilepsy centres with academical neurology. PMID:21074458

  12. Considerations for lunar colony communications systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowling, Richard P.

    1992-01-01

    This paper addresses system aspects of communications for a lunar colony. Human factors are particularly noted. The practical aspects of communications infrastructure are emphasized rather than specific technologies. Communications needs for mission support and morale are discussed along with potential means of satisfying them. Problem areas are identified and some possible solutions are considered.

  13. Detection of Campylobacter Colonies using Hyperspectral Imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isolation and detection of Campylobacter in foods via direct plating involves lengthy laboratory procedures including enrichments and microaerobic incubations, which take several days to a week. The incubation time for growing Campylobacter colonies in agar media is typically 24 hours to 48 hours. F...

  14. Chiral pattern formation in compact microbial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Kirill; Bino George, Ashish

    Chirality is ubiquitous in biology from single molecules to entire populations. Yet, we are still lacking a detailed understanding of how chiral patterns emerge from cell competition and growth, even in simple microbial colonies. Although many microbes grow as dense colonies with no apparent chirality, recent experiments with Escherichia coli have demonstrated that internal dynamics in such populations can be in fact chiral. We show that there is a unique way to extend the commonly-used reaction-diffusion models of colony growth to account for the emergent chirality. This new model connects microscopic and macroscopic chirality and explains the origin of logarithmic spirals separating different sub-populations in a colony. We also show that chirality is substantially enhanced by the cooperation among the cells at the expansion frontier. In heterogeneous populations composed of strains with different chiralities and growth rates, our model predicts a very rich set of possible dynamics. For example, different chiralities can result in either sharp boundaries between the strains or promote their intermixing depending on the preferred twisting directions of the strains.

  15. Production of workers, queens and males in Plebeia remota colonies (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponini), a stingless bee with reproductive diapause.

    PubMed

    Alves, D A; Imperatriz-Fonseca, V L; Santos-Filho, P S

    2009-01-01

    Queen, male and worker production was studied during one year in three Plebeia remota colonies from Atlantic Rainforest in Cunha, São Paulo State, and two from a subtropical Araucaria forest in Prudentópolis, Paraná State. All the colonies were kept in São Paulo city during our study. Plebeia remota has reproductive diapause during autumn and winter, which makes its biology of special interest. Brood production begins before spring, renewing the colony cycle. We sampled brood combs monthly in these five colonies. The number of cells in each comb varied significantly with time of the year; the smallest brood combs appear to be a consequence of reduced food availability. However, worker, queen and male frequencies did not differ significantly in time, and this presumably is due to the fact that they all are necessary for the growth, maintenance and reproduction of the colony. Although some molecular, morphological and behavioral differences have been detected in several studies comparing populations from Cunha and from Prudentópolis, we did not find significant differences between the colonies from these two localities in number of brood cells and worker, queen and male production. PMID:19554766

  16. Colony Fusion in a Parthenogenetic Ant, Pristomyrmex punctatus

    PubMed Central

    Satow, Show; Satoh, Toshiyuki; Hirota, Tadao

    2013-01-01

    In the ant Pristomyrmex punctatus Smith (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), all young workers lay a small number of eggs parthenogenetically. Some colonies consist of monoclonal individuals that provide high inclusive fitness, according to the kin selection theory. However, in some populations, a majority of the colonies contain multiple lineages. Intracolonial genetic variation of parthenogenetic ants cannot be explained by the multiple mating of single founderesses or by the foundation of a colony by multiple foundresses, which are the usual causes of genetically diverse colonies in social insects. Here, we hypothesized that the fusion of established colonies might facilitate the formation of multiclonal colonies. Colony fusion decreases indirect benefits because of the reduction in intracolonial relatedness. However, when suitable nesting places for overwintering are scarce, colony fusion provides a strategy for the survival of colonies. Here, ants derived from different colonies were allowed to encounter one another in a container with just one nesting place. Initially, high aggression was observed; however, after several days, no aggression was observed and the ants shared the nest. When the fused colonies were allowed to transfer to two alternative nests, ants from different colonies occupied the same nest. This study highlights the importance of limiting the number of nesting places in order to understand the genetic diversity of parthenogenetic ant colonies. PMID:23895053

  17. Effects of Three Volatile Oxylipins on Colony Development in Two Species of Fungi and on Drosophila Larval Metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guohua; Padhi, Sally; Lee, Samantha; Hung, Richard; Zhao, Guozhu; Bennett, Joan W

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of three volatile oxylipins on colony development in two fungi and on Drosophila larval metamorphosis. Using an airborne exposure technique, three common and volatile oxylipins (1-octen-3-ol, (E)-2-hexenal, and 1-hexanol) were compared for their effects on spore germination and colony growth in Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum, as well as for their effects on the morphogenesis of larvae of Drosophila melanogaster. Conidia of both A. niger and P. chrysogenum plated in the presence of low concentrations (50 ppm) of these three volatile organic compounds (VOCs) formed fewer colony-forming units (CFUs) and exhibited reduced radial growth of colonies as compared to controls. When A. niger and P. chrysogenum spores were germinated in the presence of the enantiomers of 1-octen-3-ol, (R)-(-)-1-octen-3-ol had the greatest impact on colony morphology (decreased sporulation and colony diameter), while (S)-(+)-1-octen-3-ol and the racemic form yielded similar morphological changes but to a lesser extent. In addition, Drosophila larvae exposed to vapors of these oxylipins exhibited serious delays in metamorphosis and toxic effects on pupae and adult stages. Low concentration of these three VOCs can significantly inhibit the formation of CFUs and the growth of fungi. (R)-(-)-1-octen-3-ol imposed the greatest impact on fungal morphology compared to (S)-(+)-1-octen-3-ol and the racemic form. The three volatile oxylipins could also delay the metamorphosis of Drosophila and impose toxic effects on its pupae and adult stages. PMID:26126831

  18. Nest-size and colony characteristics of wading birds in selected Atlantic Coast colonies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaver, D.L.; Osborn, R.G.; Custer, T.W.

    1980-01-01

    Nests of 5 species of wading birds were identified and marked during the breeding season at 6 locations from Massachusetts to North Carolina. At the end of the breeding season 12 characteristics of nest-site location were measured. Nest locations were mapped to examine dispersion and nearest neighbor relationships. Multivariate analyses were used to describe and compare sites and species.....We found that variations in nest-sites between colonies were greater than between species; colonies differed mainly in the variety and size of vegetation; birds preferred to nest in vegetation that offered relatively stable nest-sites; and the dispersion of nests in the colonies was related to vegetative patterns. The interaction of these factors with the number of bird species and the abundance of birds in the colony seemed to determine whether nest-sites were stratified, segregated or randomly distributed.

  19. Nest site and colony characteristics of wading birds in selected atlantic coast colonies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beaver, D.L.; Osborn, R.G.; Custer, T.W.

    1980-01-01

    Nests of 5 spp. of wading birds [Egretta thula, Plegadis falcinellus, Florida caerulea, casmerodius albus and Hydranassa tricolor] were identified and marked during the breeding season at 6 locations from Maccachusetts [USA] to North Carolina [USA]. At the end of the breeding season, 12 characteristics of nest-site location were measured. Nest locations were mapped to examine dispersion and nearest neighbor relationships. Multivariate analysis were used to describe and compare sites and species. Variations in nest-sites between colonies were greater than between species; colonies differed mainly in the variety and size of vegetation. Birds preferred to nest in vegetation that offered relatively stable nest sites, and the dispersion of nests in the colonies was related to vegetative patterns. The interaction of these factors with the number of bird species and the abundance of birds in the colony determined whether nest sites were stratified, segregated or randomly distributed.

  20. Reproduction, mortality, and heavy metal concentrations in great blue herons from three colonies in Washington and Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Henny, C.J.; Anderson, A.; Fitzner, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    We collected eggs in nests, hatchlings and eggs with advanced embryos on the ground, and prefledgling young of Great Blue Herons (Ardea herodias) at three nesting colonies in Washington and Idaho. Intact fish were also collected on the ground at the Idaho colony. The Ft. Lewis colony near Puget Sound in Washington and the Lake Chatcolet colony in northern Idaho were located near areas extensively polluted with heavy metals from minning or smelting activities. The Hanford Reservation colony near Richland, Washington was located some distance from point sources of heavy metal pollution. Heavy metals in heron samples were generally low and were all below concentrations known to induce mortality or adversely affect reproductive success. The elevated copper in one of three prefledglings from Ft. Lewis paralleled that found in an occasional nestling of several species of birds in other studies; the significance of this relationship is unclear. Breeding herons apparently fed near their colonies in areas removed from the sites of heaviest contamination, but birds in the Lake Chatcolet colony were preying on fish containing as much as 6 mu-g/g lead.

  1. Stable genetic diversity despite parasite and pathogen spread in honey bee colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara, Laura; Muñoz, Irene; Cepero, Almudena; Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Serrano, José; Higes, Mariano; De la Rúa, Pilar

    2015-10-01

    In the last decades, the rapid spread of diseases, such as varroosis and nosemosis, associated with massive honey bee colonies mortality around the world has significantly decreased the number and size of honey bee populations and possibly their genetic diversity. Here, we compare the genetic diversity of Iberian honey bee colonies in two samplings performed in 2006 and 2010 in relation to the presence of the pathogenic agents Nosema apis, Nosema ceranae, and Varroa destructor in order to determine whether parasite and pathogen spread in honey bee colonies reflects changes in genetic diversity. We found that the genetic diversity remained similar, while the incidence of N. ceranae increased and the incidence of N. apis and V. destructor decreased slightly. These results indicate that the genetic diversity was not affected by the presence of these pathogenic agents in the analyzed period. However, the two groups of colonies with and without Nosema/Varroa detected showed significant genetic differentiation (G test). A detailed analysis of the allelic segregation of microsatellite loci in Nosema/Varroa-negative colonies and parasitized ones revealed two outlier loci related to genes involved in immune response.

  2. Be meek or be bold? A colony-level behavioural syndrome in ants

    PubMed Central

    Bengston, S. E.; Dornhaus, A.

    2014-01-01

    Consistent individual variation in animal behaviour is nearly ubiquitous and has important ecological and evolutionary implications. Additionally, suites of behavioural traits are often correlated, forming behavioural syndromes in both humans and other species. Such syndromes are often described by testing for variation in traits across commonly described dimensions (e.g. aggression and neophobia), independent of whether this variation is ecologically relevant to the focal species. Here, we use a variety of ecologically relevant behavioural traits to test for a colony-level behavioural syndrome in rock ants (Temnothorax rugatulus). Specifically, we combine field and laboratory assays to measure foraging effort, how colonies respond to different types of resources, activity level, response to threat and aggression level. We find evidence for a colony level syndrome that suggests colonies consistently differ in coping style—some are more risk-prone, whereas others are more risk-averse. Additionally, by collecting data across the North American range of this species, we show that environmental variation may affect how different populations maintain consistent variation in colony behaviour. PMID:25100691

  3. Stable genetic diversity despite parasite and pathogen spread in honey bee colonies.

    PubMed

    Jara, Laura; Muñoz, Irene; Cepero, Almudena; Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Serrano, José; Higes, Mariano; De la Rúa, Pilar

    2015-10-01

    In the last decades, the rapid spread of diseases, such as varroosis and nosemosis, associated with massive honey bee colonies mortality around the world has significantly decreased the number and size of honey bee populations and possibly their genetic diversity. Here, we compare the genetic diversity of Iberian honey bee colonies in two samplings performed in 2006 and 2010 in relation to the presence of the pathogenic agents Nosema apis, Nosema ceranae, and Varroa destructor in order to determine whether parasite and pathogen spread in honey bee colonies reflects changes in genetic diversity. We found that the genetic diversity remained similar, while the incidence of N. ceranae increased and the incidence of N. apis and V. destructor decreased slightly. These results indicate that the genetic diversity was not affected by the presence of these pathogenic agents in the analyzed period. However, the two groups of colonies with and without Nosema/Varroa detected showed significant genetic differentiation (G test). A detailed analysis of the allelic segregation of microsatellite loci in Nosema/Varroa-negative colonies and parasitized ones revealed two outlier loci related to genes involved in immune response. PMID:26306398

  4. A Quantitative Model of Honey Bee Colony Population Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, David S.; Myerscough, Mary R.; Barron, Andrew B.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2006 the rate of honey bee colony failure has increased significantly. As an aid to testing hypotheses for the causes of colony failure we have developed a compartment model of honey bee colony population dynamics to explore the impact of different death rates of forager bees on colony growth and development. The model predicts a critical threshold forager death rate beneath which colonies regulate a stable population size. If death rates are sustained higher than this threshold rapid population decline is predicted and colony failure is inevitable. The model also predicts that high forager death rates draw hive bees into the foraging population at much younger ages than normal, which acts to accelerate colony failure. The model suggests that colony failure can be understood in terms of observed principles of honey bee population dynamics, and provides a theoretical framework for experimental investigation of the problem. PMID:21533156

  5. Influence of task switching costs on colony homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Jeanson, Raphaël; Lachaud, Jean-Paul

    2015-06-01

    In social insects, division of labour allows colonies to optimise the allocation of workers across all available tasks to satisfy colony requirements. The maintenance of stable conditions within colonies (homeostasis) requires that some individuals move inside the nest to monitor colony needs and execute unattended tasks. We developed a simple theoretical model to explore how worker mobility inside the nest and task switching costs influence the maintenance of stable levels of task-associated stimuli. Our results indicate that worker mobility in large colonies generates important task switching costs and is detrimental to colony homeostasis. Our study suggests that the balance between benefits and costs associated with the mobility of workers patrolling inside the nest depends on colony size. We propose that several species of ants with diverse life-history traits should be appropriate to test the prediction that the proportion of mobile workers should vary during colony ontogeny. PMID:26040241

  6. Influence of task switching costs on colony homeostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanson, Raphaël; Lachaud, Jean-Paul

    2015-06-01

    In social insects, division of labour allows colonies to optimise the allocation of workers across all available tasks to satisfy colony requirements. The maintenance of stable conditions within colonies (homeostasis) requires that some individuals move inside the nest to monitor colony needs and execute unattended tasks. We developed a simple theoretical model to explore how worker mobility inside the nest and task switching costs influence the maintenance of stable levels of task-associated stimuli. Our results indicate that worker mobility in large colonies generates important task switching costs and is detrimental to colony homeostasis. Our study suggests that the balance between benefits and costs associated with the mobility of workers patrolling inside the nest depends on colony size. We propose that several species of ants with diverse life-history traits should be appropriate to test the prediction that the proportion of mobile workers should vary during colony ontogeny.

  7. Monoclonal infection involving Mycobacterium avium presenting with three distinct colony morphotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, E L; Zywno-van Ginkel, S; Rastogi, N; Barrow, W W

    1996-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that polyclonal infections may play an important role in multiple drug resistance in Mycobacterium avium infections. We report here on the isolation of a single M. avium strain that appeared to have smooth colony morphology upon initial isolation on a Lowenstein-Jensen slant. Primary subculture onto Middlebrook 7H10, however, revealed three distinct morphotypes representing smooth opaque (SmO), smooth transparent (SmT), and rough (Rg) colony morphologies. All three morphotypes were identified as M. avium by standard biochemical procedures, Genprobe analysis, and mycolic acid patterns. Subsequent restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, using SalI- and PvuII-digested genomic DNA, revealed identical patterns for hybridization with the IS1245 probe. Thin-layer chromatographic analysis of lipids from the three morphotypes revealed that only the SmT morphotype possessed what appeared to be lipid components similar to, but unlike, previously described serovar-specific glycopeptidolipid antigens. Further analysis of internally radiolabeled deacylated lipids from the SmT morphotype, by high-performance liquid chromatography and thin-layer chromatography, disclosed that some of these components can be internally radiolabeled with [14C] phenylalanine and [14C]mannose. These results suggest that these components are structurally similar to previously described glycopeptidolipid antigens. This is apparently the first report of a monoclonal infection involving a single strain of M. avium presenting with all three colony morphotypes, SmO, SmT, and Rg. PMID:8880503

  8. Oversea Education and British Colonial Education 1929-63.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Clive

    2003-01-01

    Focuses on an early twentieth century journal called "Oversea Education," designed to increase communication among British colonies, particularly for education, based on William Ormsby Gore's travels among the colonies. Describes Frank Ward's editorial work that championed the rights of colonial subjects to have better educational policy. (KDR)

  9. A Post-Colonial Reading of Affirmative Action in Fiji.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puamau, Priscilla Qolisaya

    2001-01-01

    Presents a post-colonial reading of affirmative action (AA) policies in Fiji, arguing that AA was a deliberate response by various predominantly indigenous Fijian post-colonial governments to counter the effects of a discriminatory colonial history that produced significant educational and employment inequality. Analyzes the mixed outcomes of AA…

  10. Before 1776: The Massachusetts Bay Colony from Founding to Revolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruenbaum, Thelma

    Designed for use at 4th-through-10th-grade level, this short history of the Massachusetts Bay Colony provides a view of colonial life style and culture prior to the American Revolution. The first sections discuss the Puritan migration and early settlement around Boston. Descriptions of colonial housing, furniture, food, clothing, clothing styles,…

  11. Brazilian Higher Education from a Post-Colonial Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leite, Denise

    2010-01-01

    This article examines Brazilian higher education (HE) politics from a post-colonial perspective. The term "post-colonial" originally referred to a historical period of colonial empires established by European nations. Nowadays, the term commonly distinguishes a field of contemporary studies of "defamiliarisation of the imperial North" made up of…

  12. Australia and France on Fire: An Anti-Colonial Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dei, George Sefa; Kempf, Arlo

    2006-01-01

    Professor George Sefa Dei has written and taught extensively in the fields of anti-colonialism and anti-racism. His latest work on the subject is "Anti-Colonialism and Education: The Politics of Resistance," co-edited with Arlo Kempf for Sense Publishers (2006). Dei and Kempf are also co-authoring a forthcoming volume on anti-colonial theory. Arlo…

  13. Deformed wing virus implicated in overwintering honeybee colony losses.

    PubMed

    Highfield, Andrea C; El Nagar, Aliya; Mackinder, Luke C M; Noël, Laure M-L J; Hall, Matthew J; Martin, Stephen J; Schroeder, Declan C

    2009-11-01

    The worldwide decline in honeybee colonies during the past 50 years has often been linked to the spread of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and its interaction with certain honeybee viruses. Recently in the United States, dramatic honeybee losses (colony collapse disorder) have been reported; however, there remains no clear explanation for these colony losses, with parasitic mites, viruses, bacteria, and fungal diseases all being proposed as possible candidates. Common characteristics that most failing colonies share is a lack of overt disease symptoms and the disappearance of workers from what appears to be normally functioning colonies. In this study, we used quantitative PCR to monitor the presence of three honeybee viruses, deformed wing virus (DWV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), and black queen cell virus (BQCV), during a 1-year period in 15 asymptomatic, varroa mite-positive honeybee colonies in Southern England, and 3 asymptomatic colonies confirmed to be varroa mite free. All colonies with varroa mites underwent control treatments to ensure that mite populations remained low throughout the study. Despite this, multiple virus infections were detected, yet a significant correlation was observed only between DWV viral load and overwintering colony losses. The long-held view has been that DWV is relatively harmless to the overall health status of honeybee colonies unless it is in association with severe varroa mite infestations. Our findings suggest that DWV can potentially act independently of varroa mites to bring about colony losses. Therefore, DWV may be a major factor in overwintering colony losses. PMID:19783750

  14. Deformed Wing Virus Implicated in Overwintering Honeybee Colony Losses ▿

    PubMed Central

    Highfield, Andrea C.; El Nagar, Aliya; Mackinder, Luke C. M.; Noël, Laure M.-L. J.; Hall, Matthew J.; Martin, Stephen J.; Schroeder, Declan C.

    2009-01-01

    The worldwide decline in honeybee colonies during the past 50 years has often been linked to the spread of the parasitic mite Varroa destructor and its interaction with certain honeybee viruses. Recently in the United States, dramatic honeybee losses (colony collapse disorder) have been reported; however, there remains no clear explanation for these colony losses, with parasitic mites, viruses, bacteria, and fungal diseases all being proposed as possible candidates. Common characteristics that most failing colonies share is a lack of overt disease symptoms and the disappearance of workers from what appears to be normally functioning colonies. In this study, we used quantitative PCR to monitor the presence of three honeybee viruses, deformed wing virus (DWV), acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV), and black queen cell virus (BQCV), during a 1-year period in 15 asymptomatic, varroa mite-positive honeybee colonies in Southern England, and 3 asymptomatic colonies confirmed to be varroa mite free. All colonies with varroa mites underwent control treatments to ensure that mite populations remained low throughout the study. Despite this, multiple virus infections were detected, yet a significant correlation was observed only between DWV viral load and overwintering colony losses. The long-held view has been that DWV is relatively harmless to the overall health status of honeybee colonies unless it is in association with severe varroa mite infestations. Our findings suggest that DWV can potentially act independently of varroa mites to bring about colony losses. Therefore, DWV may be a major factor in overwintering colony losses. PMID:19783750

  15. An individual-based modeling approach to simulate the effects of cellular nutrient competition on Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 colony behavior and interactions in aerobic structured food systems.

    PubMed

    Tack, Ignace L M M; Logist, Filip; Noriega Fernández, Estefanía; Van Impe, Jan F M

    2015-02-01

    Traditional kinetic models in predictive microbiology reliably predict macroscopic dynamics of planktonically-growing cell cultures in homogeneous liquid food systems. However, most food products have a semi-solid structure, where microorganisms grow locally in colonies. Individual colony cells exhibit strongly different and non-normally distributed behavior due to local nutrient competition. As a result, traditional models considering average population behavior in a homogeneous system do not describe colony dynamics in full detail. To incorporate local resource competition and individual cell differences, an individual-based modeling approach has been applied to Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 colonies, considering the microbial cell as modeling unit. The first contribution of this individual-based model is to describe single colony growth under nutrient-deprived conditions. More specifically, the linear and stationary phase in the evolution of the colony radius, the evolution from a disk-like to branching morphology, and the emergence of a starvation zone in the colony center are simulated and compared to available experimental data. These phenomena occur earlier at more severe nutrient depletion conditions, i.e., at lower nutrient diffusivity and initial nutrient concentration in the medium. Furthermore, intercolony interactions have been simulated. Higher inoculum densities lead to stronger intercolony interactions, such as colony merging and smaller colony sizes, due to nutrient competition. This individual-based model contributes to the elucidation of characteristic experimentally observed colony behavior from mechanistic information about cellular physiology and interactions. PMID:25500383

  16. Colony Rheology: Active Arthropods Generate Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Karen; Mann, Michael; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2015-03-01

    Hydrodynamic-like flows are observed in biological systems as varied as bacteria, insects, birds, fish, and mammals. Both the phenomenology (e.g. front instabilities, milling motions) and the interaction types (hydrodynamic, direct contact, psychological, excluded-volume) strongly vary between systems, but a question common to all of them is to understand the role of particle-scale fluctuations in controlling large-scale rheological behaviors. We will address these questions through experiments on a new system, Tyrolichus casei (cheese mites), which live in dense, self-mixing colonies composed of a mixture of living mites and inert flour/detritus. In experiments performed in a Hele-Shaw geometry, we observe that the rheology of a colony is strongly dependent on the relative concentration of active and inactive particles. In addition to spreading flows, we also observe that the system can generate convective circulation and auto-compaction.

  17. [Yeast Communities of Formica aquilonia Colonies].

    PubMed

    Maksimova, A; Glushakova, A M; Kachalkin, A V; Chernov, I Yu; Panteleeva, S N; Reznikova, Zh I

    2016-01-01

    Yeast abundance and species diversity in the colonies of Formica aquilonia ants in birch-pine forbs forest, Novosibirsk oblast, Russia, was studied. The average yeast number in the anthill material was 10³-10⁴CFU/g, reaching 10⁵ CFU/g in the hatching chambers. Typical litter species (Trichosporon monilfiforme and Cystofilobasidium capitatum) were predominant in soil and litter around the anthills. Apart from these species, ascomycete species of the family Debaryomycetaceae, Debaryomyces hansenii and Schwanniomyces vanrijiae, were predominant in the anthill material. Yeast population of the ants consisted exclusively of the members of these two species. Thus, highly specific yeast communities formed in the colonies of Formica aquilonia ants differ from the communities of surrounding soil. These differences are an instance of environment-forming activity of the ants. PMID:27301134

  18. Ant colony optimization and stochastic gradient descent.

    PubMed

    Meuleau, Nicolas; Dorigo, Marco

    2002-01-01

    In this article, we study the relationship between the two techniques known as ant colony optimization (ACO) and stochastic gradient descent. More precisely, we show that some empirical ACO algorithms approximate stochastic gradient descent in the space of pheromones, and we propose an implementation of stochastic gradient descent that belongs to the family of ACO algorithms. We then use this insight to explore the mutual contributions of the two techniques. PMID:12171633

  19. FY005 Accomplishments for Colony Project

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T; Kale, L; Moreira, J; Mendes, C; Chakravorty, S; Inglett, T; Tauferner, A

    2005-07-05

    The Colony Project is developing operating system and runtime system technology to enable efficient general purpose environments on tens of thousands of processors. To accomplish this, we are investigating memory management techniques, fault management strategies, and parallel resource management schemes. Recent results show promising findings for scalable strategies based on processor virtualization, in-memory checkpointing, and parallel aware modifications to full featured operating systems.

  20. Sarcoptic mange in captive maras: the first known outbreak and complete recovery with colony-wide acaricide treatment

    PubMed Central

    KIM, Kyoo-Tae; LEE, Seung-Hun; KWAK, Dongmi

    2015-01-01

    Among 16 maras housed as a colony at a zoo, 2 initially showed generalized dermal lesions on the legs, head and abdomen. Approximately 1 month later, following completion of therapy with amitraz, 6 maras in the same colony, including the 2 previously diseased animals, showed dermal lesions with severe alopecia and crusting. Sarcoptic mange was diagnosed on skin scrapings on the basis of morphological criteria. The mites were highly mobile and abundant in all cases, and no other causative agents were detected. Colony-wide treatment with ivermectin and prednisolone was administered weekly for a total of 4 treatments. After therapy was completed in all cohabitants, follow-up scrapings were negative for Sarcoptes scabiei. This report describes the first known outbreak of sarcoptic mange in captive maras and successful treatment with acaricides. PMID:25648673

  1. Sarcoptic mange in captive maras: the first known outbreak and complete recovery with colony-wide acaricide treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoo-Tae; Lee, Seung-Hun; Kwak, Dongmi

    2015-05-01

    Among 16 maras housed as a colony at a zoo, 2 initially showed generalized dermal lesions on the legs, head and abdomen. Approximately 1 month later, following completion of therapy with amitraz, 6 maras in the same colony, including the 2 previously diseased animals, showed dermal lesions with severe alopecia and crusting. Sarcoptic mange was diagnosed on skin scrapings on the basis of morphological criteria. The mites were highly mobile and abundant in all cases, and no other causative agents were detected. Colony-wide treatment with ivermectin and prednisolone was administered weekly for a total of 4 treatments. After therapy was completed in all cohabitants, follow-up scrapings were negative for Sarcoptes scabiei. This report describes the first known outbreak of sarcoptic mange in captive maras and successful treatment with acaricides. PMID:25648673

  2. Rapid behavioral maturation accelerates failure of stressed honey bee colonies.

    PubMed

    Perry, Clint J; Søvik, Eirik; Myerscough, Mary R; Barron, Andrew B

    2015-03-17

    Many complex factors have been linked to the recent marked increase in honey bee colony failure, including pests and pathogens, agrochemicals, and nutritional stressors. It remains unclear, however, why colonies frequently react to stressors by losing almost their entire adult bee population in a short time, resulting in a colony population collapse. Here we examine the social dynamics underlying such dramatic colony failure. Bees respond to many stressors by foraging earlier in life. We manipulated the demography of experimental colonies to induce precocious foraging in bees and used radio tag tracking to examine the consequences of precocious foraging for their performance. Precocious foragers completed far fewer foraging trips in their life, and had a higher risk of death in their first flights. We constructed a demographic model to explore how this individual reaction of bees to stress might impact colony performance. In the model, when forager death rates were chronically elevated, an increasingly younger forager force caused a positive feedback that dramatically accelerated terminal population decline in the colony. This resulted in a breakdown in division of labor and loss of the adult population, leaving only brood, food, and few adults in the hive. This study explains the social processes that drive rapid depopulation of a colony, and we explore possible strategies to prevent colony failure. Understanding the process of colony failure helps identify the most effective strategies to improve colony resilience. PMID:25675508

  3. Rapid behavioral maturation accelerates failure of stressed honey bee colonies

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Clint J.; Myerscough, Mary R.; Barron, Andrew B.

    2015-01-01

    Many complex factors have been linked to the recent marked increase in honey bee colony failure, including pests and pathogens, agrochemicals, and nutritional stressors. It remains unclear, however, why colonies frequently react to stressors by losing almost their entire adult bee population in a short time, resulting in a colony population collapse. Here we examine the social dynamics underlying such dramatic colony failure. Bees respond to many stressors by foraging earlier in life. We manipulated the demography of experimental colonies to induce precocious foraging in bees and used radio tag tracking to examine the consequences of precocious foraging for their performance. Precocious foragers completed far fewer foraging trips in their life, and had a higher risk of death in their first flights. We constructed a demographic model to explore how this individual reaction of bees to stress might impact colony performance. In the model, when forager death rates were chronically elevated, an increasingly younger forager force caused a positive feedback that dramatically accelerated terminal population decline in the colony. This resulted in a breakdown in division of labor and loss of the adult population, leaving only brood, food, and few adults in the hive. This study explains the social processes that drive rapid depopulation of a colony, and we explore possible strategies to prevent colony failure. Understanding the process of colony failure helps identify the most effective strategies to improve colony resilience. PMID:25675508

  4. The induction of transformed-like morphology and enhanced growth in Syrian hamster embryo cells grown at acidic pH.

    PubMed

    LeBoeuf, R A; Kerckaert, G A

    1986-09-01

    The effect of the pH, Na+ concentration and osmolality of the culture medium on early passage Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) clonal cell proliferation was examined. The pH of the medium was adjusted from 6.49 to 7.45 by addition of different amounts of NaHCO3 to the medium and incubating the cell cultures in a fixed atmosphere of 10% CO2/90% air. Our results indicate that clonal SHE cell proliferation is optimal at pH 6.65-6.80 while plating efficiency is independent of pH between 6.65 and 7.45. Adjustment of Na+ to that concentration in the medium (3450 p.p.m., 0.15 M) of the greatest NaHCO3 addition caused a moderate depression of cell proliferation over the entire pH series. Adjusting the osmolality of the culture medium to a constant value of 338 mOsm/kg did not alter the pH effect on cell proliferation. The pH of the medium also affected cellular and colony morphology. Below pH 6.90 there was an increase in the number of colonies which exhibited a transformed-like morphology ('altered' colonies). The 'altered' phenotype was characterized by a multilayered, criss-cross pattern of growth throughout the colony. This phenotype was stable upon sub-cloning into pH 6.65 medium but was reversible if sub-cloned into pH 7.36 medium. The induction of 'altered' colonies at low pH could be partially suppressed by Na+ or osmolality adjustment. These results are discussed in terms of optimizing growth conditions for SHE cells in order to enhance their usefulness for cell transformation studies. The induction of 'altered' colonies by low pH is also discussed relative to the involvement of pH regulation in tumor-promoter and growth-factor action on cells in culture. PMID:3742717

  5. Scaling of Traction Stresses with Size of Cohesive Cell Colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz, Aaron F.; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Che, Yonglu; Marchetti, M. Christina; Horsley, Valerie; Dufresne, Eric R.

    2012-02-01

    We explore the mechanical properties of colonies of cohesive cells adherent on soft substrates. Specifically, we image the spatial distribution of traction stresses exerted by colonies of primary mouse keratinocytes on fibronectin-coated silicone gels. These cells have strong cell-cell adhesions mediated by E-cadherin. We observe that the work performed by a colony on its substrate is concentrated at the colony's periphery. The total work is strongly correlated to the geometrical size of the colony but not to number of cells. In other words, the mechanical output of a large single cell mimics that of a cohesive colony with the same overall size. We compare our findings to a recent theoretical model that treats the cohesive colony as an active gel.

  6. Excrement from Heron colonies for environmental assessment of toxic elements.

    PubMed

    Fitzner, R E; Rickard, W H; Hinds, W T

    1982-12-01

    Excrement cast from Great Blue Heron nests was collected during the nesting period of 1978 from four colonies in Washington and Idaho. Cheesecloth strips placed on the ground beneath the nests served as excrement collecting devices. Chemical analysis for lead, mercury and cadmium were performed on dried samples. Lead was the most abundant trace metal found in heron debris. The Idaho colony at Lake Chatcolet had an average concentration of 46 ppm in the beneath-nest samples and 6 ppm in control samples. A heron colony near Tacoma, Washington had beneath-nest samples averaging 28 ppm and control samples averaging 20 ppm. Two colonies located in the interior region of Washington had substantially lower concentrations of lead. The difference observed between colonies was attributed to their associations with a polluted watershed (Chatcolet colony) an interstate highway (Tacoma colony) and an unpopulated largely agricultural area (inland Washington). PMID:24264121

  7. A morphological study of the changes in the ultrastructure of a bacterial biofilm disrupted by an ac corona discharge in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Olga; Rybalchenko, Oksana; Astafiev, Alexander; Orlova, Olga; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly; Kapustina, Valentina

    2016-08-01

    The morphology of bacterial cells and biofilms subjected to a low frequency (˜105 Hz) ac (˜10-1 A) corona discharge was investigated using electron microscopy. A low-frequency ac corona discharge in air is shown to have a bactericidal and bacteriostatic effect on Escherichia coli M17 culture at both the cellular and population levels. Corona exposure inhibits the formation of a microbial community and results in the destruction of formed biofilms. This paper presents data on changes in the ultrastructure of cells and biofilms after corona treatment. Our results suggest that the E. coli M17 cells inside biofilms are affected with results similar to sub-lethal and lethal thermal exposure. Some of the biological aspects of colony and biofilm cells death are evaluated. Morphological changes in the ultrastructure of the biofilms under corona treatment are described. Our results indicate that the heating effect is the main factor responsible for the corona-induced inactivation of bacteria.

  8. Anemonefish depletion reduces survival, growth, reproduction and fishery productivity of mutualistic anemone-anemonefish colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, Ashley J.; Rizzari, Justin R.; Munkres, Katherine P.; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A.

    2016-06-01

    Intimate knowledge of both partners in a mutualism is necessary to understand the ecology and evolution of each partner, and to manage human impacts that asymmetrically affect one of the partners. Although anemonefishes and their host anemones are iconic mutualists and widely sought by ornamental fisheries, the degree to which anemones depend on anemonefishes, and thus the colony-level effects of collecting anemonefishes, is not well understood. We tracked the size and abundance of anemone Entacmaea quadricolor and anemonefish Amphiprion melanopus colonies for 3 yr after none, some, or all of the resident anemonefish were experimentally removed. Total and partial removal of anemonefish had rapid and sustained negative effects on growth, reproduction and survival of anemones, as well as cascading effects on recruitment and productivity of anemonefish in the remaining colony. As predicted, total removal of anemonefish caused acute declines in size and abundance of anemones, although most anemone colonies (76 %) slowly resumed growth and reproduction after the arrival of anemonefish recruits, which subsequently grew and defended the hosts. Partial removal of anemonefish had similar but typically less severe effects on anemones. Remarkably, the colony-level effects on anemones and anemonefish were proportional to the size and number of anemonefish that were experimentally removed. In particular, anemone survival and anemonefish productivity were highest when one or more adult anemonefish remained in the colony, suggesting that adult fish not only enhanced the protection of anemones, but also increased the recruitment and/or survival of conspecifics. We conclude that the relationship between E. quadricolor and A. melanopus is not only obligate, but also demographically rigid and easily perturbed by anemonefish fisheries. Clearly, these two species must be managed together as a unit and with utmost precaution. To this end, we propose several tangible management actions

  9. Pollen foraging in colonies of Melipona bicolor (Apidae, Meliponini): effects of season, colony size and queen number.

    PubMed

    Hilário, S D; Imperatriz-Fonseca, V L

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the ratio between the number of pollen foragers and the total number of bees entering colonies of Melipona bicolor, a facultative polygynous species of stingless bees. The variables considered in our analysis were: seasonality, colony size and the number of physogastric queens in each colony. The pollen forager ratios varied significantly between seasons; the ratio was higher in winter than in summer. However, colony size and number of queens per colony had no significant effect. We conclude that seasonal differences in pollen harvest are related to the production of sexuals and to the number of individuals and their body size. PMID:19554765

  10. Twenty Four-Hour Exposure to a 0.12 THz Electromagnetic Field Does Not Affect the Genotoxicity, Morphological Changes, or Expression of Heat Shock Protein in HCE-T Cells.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shin; Narita, Eijiro; Shimizu, Yoko; Shiina, Takeo; Taki, Masao; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the cellular effects of terahertz (THz) exposure, human corneal epithelial (HCE-T) cells derived from human eye were exposed to 0.12 THz radiation at 5 mW/cm² for 24 h, then the genotoxicity, morphological changes, and heat shock protein (Hsp) expression of the cells were examined. There was no statistically significant increase in the micronucleus (MN) frequency of cells exposed to 0.12 THz radiation compared with sham-exposed controls and incubator controls, whereas the MN frequency of cells treated with bleomycin for 1 h (positive control) did increase significantly. Similarly, there were no significant morphological changes in cells exposed to 0.12 THz radiation compared to sham-exposed controls and incubator controls, and Hsp expression (Hsp27, Hsp70, and Hsp90α) was also not significantly different between the three treatments. These results indicate that exposure to 0.12 THz radiation using the present conditions appears to have no or very little effect on MN formation, morphological changes, and Hsp expression in cells derived from human eye. PMID:27527204

  11. Twenty Four-Hour Exposure to a 0.12 THz Electromagnetic Field Does Not Affect the Genotoxicity, Morphological Changes, or Expression of Heat Shock Protein in HCE-T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Shin; Narita, Eijiro; Shimizu, Yoko; Shiina, Takeo; Taki, Masao; Shinohara, Naoki; Miyakoshi, Junji

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the cellular effects of terahertz (THz) exposure, human corneal epithelial (HCE-T) cells derived from human eye were exposed to 0.12 THz radiation at 5 mW/cm2 for 24 h, then the genotoxicity, morphological changes, and heat shock protein (Hsp) expression of the cells were examined. There was no statistically significant increase in the micronucleus (MN) frequency of cells exposed to 0.12 THz radiation compared with sham-exposed controls and incubator controls, whereas the MN frequency of cells treated with bleomycin for 1 h (positive control) did increase significantly. Similarly, there were no significant morphological changes in cells exposed to 0.12 THz radiation compared to sham-exposed controls and incubator controls, and Hsp expression (Hsp27, Hsp70, and Hsp90α) was also not significantly different between the three treatments. These results indicate that exposure to 0.12 THz radiation using the present conditions appears to have no or very little effect on MN formation, morphological changes, and Hsp expression in cells derived from human eye. PMID:27527204

  12. Intraspecific Variation among Social Insect Colonies: Persistent Regional and Colony-Level Differences in Fire Ant Foraging Behavior.

    PubMed

    Bockoven, Alison A; Wilder, Shawn M; Eubanks, Micky D

    2015-01-01

    Individuals vary within a species in many ecologically important ways, but the causes and consequences of such variation are often poorly understood. Foraging behavior is among the most profitable and risky activities in which organisms engage and is expected to be under strong selection. Among social insects there is evidence that within-colony variation in traits such as foraging behavior can increase colony fitness, but variation between colonies and the potential consequences of such variation are poorly documented. In this study, we tested natural populations of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, for the existence of colony and regional variation in foraging behavior and tested the persistence of this variation over time and across foraging habitats. We also reared single-lineage colonies in standardized environments to explore the contribution of colony lineage. Fire ants from natural populations exhibited significant and persistent colony and regional-level variation in foraging behaviors such as extra-nest activity, exploration, and discovery of and recruitment to resources. Moreover, colony-level variation in extra-nest activity was significantly correlated with colony growth, suggesting that this variation has fitness consequences. Lineage of the colony had a significant effect on extra-nest activity and exploratory activity and explained approximately half of the variation observed in foraging behaviors, suggesting a heritable component to colony-level variation in behavior. PMID:26197456

  13. Intraspecific Variation among Social Insect Colonies: Persistent Regional and Colony-Level Differences in Fire Ant Foraging Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Bockoven, Alison A.; Wilder, Shawn M.; Eubanks, Micky D.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals vary within a species in many ecologically important ways, but the causes and consequences of such variation are often poorly understood. Foraging behavior is among the most profitable and risky activities in which organisms engage and is expected to be under strong selection. Among social insects there is evidence that within-colony variation in traits such as foraging behavior can increase colony fitness, but variation between colonies and the potential consequences of such variation are poorly documented. In this study, we tested natural populations of the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta, for the existence of colony and regional variation in foraging behavior and tested the persistence of this variation over time and across foraging habitats. We also reared single-lineage colonies in standardized environments to explore the contribution of colony lineage. Fire ants from natural populations exhibited significant and persistent colony and regional-level variation in foraging behaviors such as extra-nest activity, exploration, and discovery of and recruitment to resources. Moreover, colony-level variation in extra-nest activity was significantly correlated with colony growth, suggesting that this variation has fitness consequences. Lineage of the colony had a significant effect on extra-nest activity and exploratory activity and explained approximately half of the variation observed in foraging behaviors, suggesting a heritable component to colony-level variation in behavior. PMID:26197456

  14. Effects of colony composition and food type on nutrient distribution in colonies of Monomorium orientale (Hymenoptera: formicidae).

    PubMed

    Loke, Pooi-Yen; Lee, Chow-Yang

    2006-02-01

    Monomorium orientale Mayr (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) is a common structure- and food-infesting ant in Asia. There is only limited information on the biology and habits of this species, especially on the preferred foods and distribution of nutrients in colonies. We conducted a laboratory study on the distribution of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids, which were represented by respective food sources, in M. orientale colonies. Three colony conditions were applied: normal, with a balanced ratio of castes, queenless (only workers and brood), and broodless (only queens and workers). Food sources were stained to track the flow of the respective food in the colonies. Results revealed that carbohydrates had rapid distribution, with > 60% of the colony indicated in 24 h, in all colony conditions. Queens in all colonies did not feed on protein. Protein showed a more delayed distribution in the brood in all colony conditions; < 10% of the colony fed on protein by 24 h. Only queens in broodless colonies showed signs of feeding on lipid, with < 10% indicated in 24 h. Workers in all colonies fed on lipid as soon as it was delivered, whereas the brood only began to reveal feeding response after 24 h. PMID:16573333

  15. Traveling waves, two-phase fingers, and eutectic colonies in thin-sample directional solidification of a ternary eutectic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akamatsu, Silvère; Faivre, Gabriel

    2000-04-01

    We present an experimental investigation of the morphological transition of lamellar eutectic growth fronts called ``formation of eutectic colonies'' by the method of thin-sample directional solidification of a transparent model alloy, CBr4-C2Cl6. This morphological transition is due to the presence in the melt of traces of chemical components other than those of the base binary alloy (impurities). In this study, we use naphthalene as an impurity. The formation of eutectic colonies has generally been viewed as an impurity-driven Mullins-Sekerka instability of the envelope of the lamellar front. This traditional view neglects the strong interaction existing between the Mullins-Sekerka process and the dynamics of the lamellar pattern. This investigation brings to light several original features of the formation of eutectic colonies, in particular, the emission of long-wavelength traveling waves, and the appearance of dendritelike structures called two-phase fingers, which are connected with this interaction. We study the part played by these phenomena in the transition to eutectic colonies as a function of the impurity concentration. Recent theoretical results on the linear stability of ternary lamellar eutectic fronts [Plapp and Karma, Phys. Rev. E 60, 6865 (1999)] shed light on some aspects of the observed phenomena.

  16. [FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIATION IN BRYOZOAN COLONY: A PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS].

    PubMed

    Kutyumov, V A; Maltseva, A L; Kotenko, N; Ostrovsky, A N

    2016-01-01

    Bryozoans are typical modular organisms. They consist of repetitive structural units, the zooids. Bryozoan colonies grow by zooidal budding, with the distribution pattern of the budding loci underlying the diversity of colony forms. Budding is usually restricted to the zooids at the periphery of the colony, which form a "growing edge" or local terminal growth zones. Non-budding parts of the colony can be functionally subdivided, too. In many species colonies consists of regular, often repetitive zones of feeding and non-feeding modules, associated with a periodical degeneration and regeneration of the polypide, retractile tentacle crown with a gut and the accompanying musculature. So, there is functional differentiation in bryozoan colonies but its mechanisms are unknown. Presumably, budding and/or polypide recycling in different colony parts are induced or inhibited by certain determinants of functional specialization. An effective tool of their identification is the comparison of proteomes of functionally different zones. Here we report the results of proteomic analysis of three bryozoan species from the White Sea, which have a different colony form: Flustrellidra hispida, Terminoflustra membranaceotruncata and Securiflustra securifrons. Using differential two-dimensional electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), we compared proteomes of the growing edge and the zones consisting of feeding and non-feeding zooids in these species. We estimated the overall proteome variability, revealed proteins whose relative abundance gradually changed along the proximal-distal colony axis and suggested that they might be involved in the functional differentiation of the colony. PMID:27220253

  17. Wading birds as biological indicators 1975 colony survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Osborn, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    The suitability of wading birds (herons and their allies) as biological indicators in the coastal environment were studied in 1975 by 8 teams of investigators which located and censused 198 colonies along the Atlantic coast from Maine to Florida [USA]. Over 1/4 million breeding birds [Ardea herodias, Butorides virescens, Florida caerulea, Bubulcus ibis, Dichromanassa rufescens, Casmerodius albus, Egretta thula, Hydranassa tricolor, Nycticorax nycticorax, Nyctanassa violacea, Mycteria americana, Plegadis falcinellus, Eudocimus albus and Ajaia ajaja] were censused. The number of species in colonies ranged from 1-11. The number of 1- and 2-spp. colonies increased from Florida to Maine. Colony size decreased from Florida to Maine. Wading bird colony sites are generally active each year and the number of colonies may have recently increased in some areas of the coast. Species composition and total population of colonies fluctuate from year to year. The breeding population of wading birds was correlated with the area of coastal wetlands by state. Five teams of investigators studied the reproductive biology of 9 spp. in 13 colonies. Mean clutch size, the percentage of nests in which 1 or more eggs hatched and the overall percentage of eggs that hatched differed among colonies for some species, but no latitudinal gradient was found in any of these characteristics for any species. The use of wading birds to their full potential as biological indicators requires further exploration: survey and reproductive success methods need to be tested, the survey of colonies repeated, available historical information assembled and habitat requirements measured.

  18. Venomous protease of aphid soldier for colony defense.

    PubMed

    Kutsukake, Mayako; Shibao, Harunobu; Nikoh, Naruo; Morioka, Mizue; Tamura, Tomohiro; Hoshino, Tamotsu; Ohgiya, Satoru; Fukatsu, Takema

    2004-08-01

    In social aphids, morphological, behavioral, and physiological differences between soldiers and normal insects are attributed to differences in gene expression between them, because they are clonal offspring parthenogenetically produced by the same mothers. By using cDNA subtraction, we identified a soldier-specific cysteine protease of the family cathepsin B in a social aphid, Tuberaphis styraci, with a second-instar soldier caste. The cathepsin B gene was specifically expressed in soldiers and first-instar nymphs destined to be soldiers. The cathepsin B protein was preferentially produced in soldiers and showed a protease activity typical of cathepsin B. The cathepsin B mRNA and protein were localized in the midgut of soldiers. For colony defense, soldiers attack enemies with their stylet, which causes paralysis and death of the victims. Notably, after soldiers attacked moth larvae, the cathepsin B protein was detected from the paralyzed larvae. Injection of purified recombinant cathepsin B protein certainly killed the recipient moth larvae. From these results, we concluded that the cathepsin B protein is a major component of the aphid venom produced by soldiers of T. styraci. Soldier-specific expression of the cathepsin B gene was found in other social aphids of the genus Tuberaphis. The soldier-specific cathepsin B gene showed an accelerated molecular evolution probably caused by the action of positive selection, which had been also known from venomous proteins of other animals. PMID:15277678

  19. Phase transition of traveling waves in bacterial colony pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakano, Joe Yuichiro; Komoto, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Yukio

    2004-05-01

    Depending on the growth condition, bacterial colonies can exhibit different morphologies. Many previous studies have used reaction diffusion equations to reproduce spatial patterns. They have revealed that nonlinear reaction term can produce diverse patterns as well as nonlinear diffusion coefficient. Typical reaction term consists of nutrient consumption, bacterial reproduction, and sporulation. Among them, the functional form of sporulation rate has not been biologically investigated. Here we report experimentally measured sporulation rate. Then, based on the result, a reaction diffusion model is proposed. One-dimensional simulation showed the existence of traveling wave solution. We study the wave form as a function of the initial nutrient concentration and find two distinct types of solution. Moreover, transition between them is very sharp, which is analogous to phase transition. The velocity of traveling wave also shows sharp transition in nonlinear diffusion model, which is consistent with the previous experimental result. The phenomenon can be explained by separatrix in reaction term dynamics. Results of two-dimensional simulation are also shown and discussed.

  20. Spatiotemporal evolution of bacterial biofilm colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilking, James; Koehler, Stephan; Sinha, Naveen; Seminara, Agnese; Brenner, Michael; Weitz, David

    2014-03-01

    Many bacteria on earth live in surface-attached communities known as biofilms. Gene expression in a biofilm is typically varied, resulting in a variety of phenotypes within a single film. These phenotypes play a critical role in biofilm physiology and development. We use time-resolved, wide-field fluorescence microscopy to image triple-labeled fluorescent Bacillus Subtilis colonies grown on agar to determine in a non-invasive fashion the evolving phenotypes. We infer their transition rates from the resulting spatiotemporal maps of gene expression. Moreover, we correlate these transition rates with local measurements of nutrient concentration to determine the influence of extracellular signals on gene expression.

  1. Enhanced ant colony optimization for multiscale problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Nan; Fish, Jacob

    2016-03-01

    The present manuscript addresses the issue of computational complexity of optimizing nonlinear composite materials and structures at multiple scales. Several solutions are detailed to meet the enormous computational challenge of optimizing nonlinear structures at multiple scales including: (i) enhanced sampling procedure that provides superior performance of the well-known ant colony optimization algorithm, (ii) a mapping-based meshing of a representative volume element that unlike unstructured meshing permits sensitivity analysis on coarse meshes, and (iii) a multilevel optimization procedure that takes advantage of possible weak coupling of certain scales. We demonstrate the proposed optimization procedure on elastic and inelastic laminated plates involving three scales.

  2. Combined Final Report for Colony II Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kale, Laxmikant; Jones, Terry; Moreira, Jose

    2013-10-23

    (This report was originally submmited by the lead PI (Terry Jones, ORNL) on October 22, 2013 to the program manager, Lucy Nowell. It is being submitted from University of Illinois in accordance with instructions). HPC Colony II seeks to provide portable performance for leadership class machines. Our strategy is based on adaptive system software that aims to make the intelligent decisions necessary to allow domain scientists to safely focus on their task at hand and allow the system software stack to adapt their application to the underlying architecture. This report describes the research undertaken towards these objectives and the results obtained over the performance period of the project.

  3. Intercellular Genomics of Subsurface Microbial Colonies

    SciTech Connect

    Ortoleva, Peter; Tuncay, Kagan; Gannon, Dennis; Meile, Christof

    2007-02-14

    This report summarizes progress in the second year of this project. The objective is to develop methods and software to predict the spatial configuration, properties and temporal evolution of microbial colonies in the subsurface. To accomplish this, we integrate models of intracellular processes, cell-host medium exchange and reaction-transport dynamics on the colony scale. At the conclusion of the project, we aim to have the foundations of a predictive mathematical model and software that captures the three scales of these systems – the intracellular, pore, and colony wide spatial scales. In the second year of the project, we refined our transcriptional regulatory network discovery (TRND) approach that utilizes gene expression data along with phylogenic similarity and gene ontology analyses and applied it successfully to E.coli, human B cells, and Geobacter sulfurreducens. We have developed a new Web interface, GeoGen, which is tailored to the reconstruction of microbial TRNs and solely focuses on Geobacter as one of DOE’s high priority microbes. Our developments are designed such that the frameworks for the TRND and GeoGen can readily be used for other microbes of interest to the DOE. In the context of modeling a single bacterium, we are actively pursuing both steady-state and kinetic approaches. The steady-state approach is based on a flux balance that uses maximizing biomass growth rate as its objective, subjected to various biochemical constraints, for the optimal values of reaction rates and uptake/release of metabolites. For the kinetic approach, we use Karyote, a rigorous cell model developed by us for an earlier DOE grant and the DARPA BioSPICE Project. We are also investigating the interplay between bacterial colonies and environment at both pore and macroscopic scales. The pore scale models use detailed representations for realistic porous media accounting for the distribution of grain size whereas the macroscopic models employ the Darcy-type flow

  4. The effect of species and colony size on the bleaching response of reef-building corals in the Florida Keys during the 2005 mass bleaching event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandt, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding the variation in coral bleaching response is necessary for making accurate predictions of population changes and the future state of reefs in a climate of increasing thermal stress events. Individual coral colonies, belonging to inshore patch reef communities of the Florida Keys, were followed through the 2005 mass bleaching event. Overall, coral bleaching patterns followed an index of accumulated thermal stress more closely than in situ temperature measurements. Eight coral species ( Colpophyllia natans, Diploria strigosa, Montastraea cavernosa, M. faveolata, Porites astreoides, P. porites, Siderastrea siderea, and Stephanocoenia intersepta), representing >90% of the coral colonies studied, experienced intense levels of bleaching, but responses varied. Bleaching differed significantly among species: Colpophyllia natans and Diploria strigosa were most susceptible to thermal stress, while Stephanocoenia intersepta was the most tolerant. For colonies of C. natans, M. faveolata, and S. siderea, larger colonies experienced more extensive bleaching than smaller colonies. The inshore patch reef communities of the Florida Keys have historically been dominated by large colonies of Montastraea sp. and Colpophyllia natans. These results provide evidence that colony-level differences can affect bleaching susceptibility in this habitat and suggest that the impact of future thermal stress events may be biased toward larger colonies of dominant reef-building species. Predicted increases in the frequency of mass bleaching and subsequent mortality may therefore result in significant structural shifts of these ecologically important communities.

  5. First recorded loss of an emperor penguin colony in the recent period of Antarctic regional warming: implications for other colonies.

    PubMed

    Trathan, Philip N; Fretwell, Peter T; Stonehouse, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    In 1948, a small colony of emperor penguins Aptenodytes forsteri was discovered breeding on Emperor Island (67° 51' 52″ S, 68° 42' 20″ W), in the Dion Islands, close to the West Antarctic Peninsula (Stonehouse 1952). When discovered, the colony comprised approximately 150 breeding pairs; these numbers were maintained until 1970, after which time the colony showed a continuous decline. By 1999 there were fewer than 20 pairs, and in 2009 high-resolution aerial photography revealed no remaining trace of the colony. Here we relate the decline and loss of the Emperor Island colony to a well-documented rise in local mean annual air temperature and coincident decline in seasonal sea ice duration. The loss of this colony provides empirical support for recent studies (Barbraud & Weimerskirch 2001; Jenouvrier et al 2005, 2009; Ainley et al 2010; Barber-Meyer et al 2005) that have highlighted the vulnerability of emperor penguins to changes in sea ice duration and distribution. These studies suggest that continued climate change is likely to impact upon future breeding success and colony viability for this species. Furthermore, a recent circumpolar study by Fretwell & Trathan (2009) highlighted those Antarctic coastal regions where colonies appear most vulnerable to such changes. Here we examine which other colonies might be at risk, discussing various ecological factors, some previously unexplored, that may also contribute to future declines. The implications of this are important for future modelling work and for understanding which colonies actually are most vulnerable. PMID:21386883

  6. COVASIAM: an Image Analysis Method That Allows Detection of Confluent Microbial Colonies and Colonies of Various Sizes for Automated Counting

    PubMed Central

    Corkidi, G.; Diaz-Uribe, R.; Folch-Mallol, J. L.; Nieto-Sotelo, J.

    1998-01-01

    In this work we introduce the confluent and various sizes image analysis method (COVASIAM), an automated colony count technique that uses digital imaging technology for detection and separation of confluent microbial colonies and colonies of various sizes growing on petri dishes. The proposed method takes advantage of the optical properties of the surfaces of most microbial colonies. Colonies in the petri dish are epi-illuminated in order to direct the reflection of concentrated light coming from a halogen lamp towards an image-sensing device. In conjunction, a multilevel threshold algorithm is proposed for colony separation and counting. These procedures improved the quantification of colonies showing confluence or differences in size. We tested COVASIAM with a sample set of microorganisms that form colonies with contrasting physical properties: Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Aspergillus nidulans, Escherichia coli, Azotobacter vinelandii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Rhizobium etli. These physical properties range from smooth to hairy, from bright to opaque, and from high to low convexities. COVASIAM estimated an average of 95.47% (ς = 8.55%) of the manually counted colonies, while an automated method based on a single-threshold segmentation procedure estimated an average of 76% (ς = 16.27) of the manually counted colonies. This method can be easily transposed to almost every image-processing analyzer since the procedures to compile it are generically standard. PMID:9546177

  7. First Recorded Loss of an Emperor Penguin Colony in the Recent Period of Antarctic Regional Warming: Implications for Other Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Trathan, Philip N.; Fretwell, Peter T.; Stonehouse, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    In 1948, a small colony of emperor penguins Aptenodytes forsteri was discovered breeding on Emperor Island (67° 51′ 52″ S, 68° 42′ 20″ W), in the Dion Islands, close to the West Antarctic Peninsula (Stonehouse 1952). When discovered, the colony comprised approximately 150 breeding pairs; these numbers were maintained until 1970, after which time the colony showed a continuous decline. By 1999 there were fewer than 20 pairs, and in 2009 high-resolution aerial photography revealed no remaining trace of the colony. Here we relate the decline and loss of the Emperor Island colony to a well-documented rise in local mean annual air temperature and coincident decline in seasonal sea ice duration. The loss of this colony provides empirical support for recent studies (Barbraud & Weimerskirch 2001; Jenouvrier et al 2005, 2009; Ainley et al 2010; Barber-Meyer et al 2005) that have highlighted the vulnerability of emperor penguins to changes in sea ice duration and distribution. These studies suggest that continued climate change is likely to impact upon future breeding success and colony viability for this species. Furthermore, a recent circumpolar study by Fretwell & Trathan (2009) highlighted those Antarctic coastal regions where colonies appear most vulnerable to such changes. Here we examine which other colonies might be at risk, discussing various ecological factors, some previously unexplored, that may also contribute to future declines. The implications of this are important for future modelling work and for understanding which colonies actually are most vulnerable. PMID:21386883

  8. Hepatic Lipidosis in a Research Colony of Big Brown Bats (Eptesicus fuscus)

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Jessica M; Treuting, Piper M; Brabb, Thea; Miller, Kimberly E; Covey, Ellen; Lencioni, Karen L

    2015-01-01

    During a nearby construction project, a sudden decrease in food intake and guano production occurred in an outdoor colony of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), and one animal was found dead. Investigation revealed that the project was generating a large amount of noise and vibration, which disturbed the bats’ feeding. Consequently the bats were moved into an indoor enclosure away from the construction noises, and the colony resumed eating. Over the next 3 wk, additional animals presented with clinical signs of lethargy, weight loss, ecchymoses, and icterus and were necropsied. Gross necropsy of the affected bats revealed large, pale yellow to tan, friable livers with rounded edges that floated when placed in 10% neutral-buffered formalin. Some bats had ecchymoses on the webbing and skin and gross perirenal hemorrhage. Histologic examination showed hepatic and renal tubular lipidosis. The clinical and pathologic signs of hemorrhage and icterus were suggestive of hepatic failure. Hepatic lipidosis was attributed to stress and inappetence associated with environmental perturbations. Once the environmental stressor was removed, the colony morbidity and mortality decreased. However, 2 y later, a series of new environmental stressors triggered additional deaths associated with hepatic lipidosis. Over a 9-y period, 21 cases of hepatic lipidosis were diagnosed in this bat colony. PMID:25926399

  9. An outbreak of Chlamydophila psittaci in an outdoor colony of Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus).

    PubMed

    Jencek, Jacqueline E; Beaufrère, Hugues; Tully, Thomas N; Garner, Michael M; Dunker, Freeland H; Baszler, Timothy V

    2012-12-01

    An outbreak of Chlamydophila psittaci occurred in an outdoor colony of 63 Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus) at the San Francisco Zoo. Affected penguins presented with inappetence, lethargy, and light green urates. Hematologic and serum biochemical findings were consistent with chronic inflammation. Penguins did not respond to initial supportive and antimicrobial therapy, and 3 died. Necropsy results of the 3 birds revealed hepatomegaly and splenomegaly, and histologic lesions included necrotizing hepatitis, splenitis, and vasculitis. Chlamydophila psittaci infection was confirmed by results of Gimenez staining, immunohistochemistry, and tissue polymerase chain reaction assay. As additional birds continued to present with similar clinical signs, the entire colony of penguins was prophylactically treated with a 30-day minimum course of doxycycline, administered orally or intramuscularly or as a combination of both. Despite treatment, 9 additional penguins died during a 3-month period. Pathologic results from these birds revealed renal and visceral gout (n = 4), cardiac insufficiency (n = 2), sepsis from a suspected esophageal perforation (n = 2), and no gross lesions (n = 1). During the outbreak, 4 birds presented with seizures, 5 developed dermatitis, and nearly 90% of birds in the colony showed severe keratoconjunctivitis, believed to be related to drug therapy with doxycycline. We report the clinical and pathologic features of Chlamydophila psittaci infection in an outdoor colony of penguins and the associated challenges of treatment. PMID:23409434

  10. Hepatic Lipidosis in a Research Colony of Big Brown Bats (Eptesicus fuscus).

    PubMed

    Snyder, Jessica M; Treuting, Piper M; Brabb, Thea; Miller, Kimberly E; Covey, Ellen; Lencioni, Karen L

    2015-04-01

    During a nearby construction project, a sudden decrease in food intake and guano production occurred in an outdoor colony of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), and one animal was found dead. Investigation revealed that the project was generating a large amount of noise and vibration, which disturbed the bats' feeding. Consequently the bats were moved into an indoor enclosure away from the construction noises, and the colony resumed eating. Over the next 3 wk, additional animals presented with clinical signs of lethargy, weight loss, ecchymoses, and icterus and were necropsied. Gross necropsy of the affected bats revealed large, pale yellow to tan, friable livers with rounded edges that floated when placed in 10% neutral-buffered formalin. Some bats had ecchymoses on the webbing and skin and gross perirenal hemorrhage. Histologic examination showed hepatic and renal tubular lipidosis. The clinical and pathologic signs of hemorrhage and icterus were suggestive of hepatic failure. Hepatic lipidosis was attributed to stress and inappetence associated with environmental perturbations. Once the environmental stressor was removed, the colony morbidity and mortality decreased. However, 2 y later, a series of new environmental stressors triggered additional deaths associated with hepatic lipidosis. Over a 9-y period, 21 cases of hepatic lipidosis were diagnosed in this bat colony. PMID:25926399

  11. Disrupting the Coloniality of Being: Toward De-Colonial Ontologies in Philosophy of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Troy A.

    2012-01-01

    This essay works to bridge conversations in philosophy of education with decolonial theory. The author considers Margonis' (1999, 2011a, b) use of Rousseau (1979) and Heidegger (1962) in developing an ontological attitude that counters social hierarchies and promotes anti-colonial relations. While affirming this effort, the essay outlines a…

  12. Entombed pollen: A new condition in honey bee colonies associated with increased risk of colony mortality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we describe a new phenomenon, entombed pollen, which is highly associated with increased colony mortality. Entombed pollen appears as sunken, wax-covered cells amidst “normal”, uncapped cells of stored pollen, and the pollen contained within these cells is brick red in color. There appears to b...

  13. Genetic Diversity in Laboratory Colonies of Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) including a Nondiapause Colony

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory-reared western corn rootworms, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera, from colonies maintained at the North Central Agricultural Research Laboratory (NCARL) in Brookings, SD, are used extensively by many researchers in studies of the biology, ecology, behavior, and genetics of this major insect ...

  14. Stable isotope enrichment in laboratory ant colonies: effects of colony age, metamorphosis, diet, and fat storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecologists use stable isotopes to infer diets and trophic levels of animals in food webs, yet some assumptions underlying these inferences have not been thoroughly tested. We used laboratory-reared colonies of Solenopsis invicta Buren (Formicidae: Solenopsidini) to test the effects of metamorphosis,...

  15. Image feature extraction based multiple ant colonies cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhilong; Yang, Weiping; Li, Jicheng

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a novel image feature extraction algorithm based on multiple ant colonies cooperation. Firstly, a low resolution version of the input image is created using Gaussian pyramid algorithm, and two ant colonies are spread on the source image and low resolution image respectively. The ant colony on the low resolution image uses phase congruency as its inspiration information, while the ant colony on the source image uses gradient magnitude as its inspiration information. These two ant colonies cooperate to extract salient image features through sharing a same pheromone matrix. After the optimization process, image features are detected based on thresholding the pheromone matrix. Since gradient magnitude and phase congruency of the input image are used as inspiration information of the ant colonies, our algorithm shows higher intelligence and is capable of acquiring more complete and meaningful image features than other simpler edge detectors.

  16. Recent trends in non-invasive in situ techniques to monitor bacterial colonies in solid (model) food

    PubMed Central

    Lobete, María M.; Fernandez, Estefania Noriega; Van Impe, Jan F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic cells typically found in liquid systems, are routinely used for building predictive models or assessing the efficacy of food preserving technologies. However, freely suspended cells often show different susceptibility to environmental hurdles than colony cells in solid matrices. Limited oxygen, water and nutrient availability, metabolite accumulation and physical constraints due to cell immobilization in the matrix, are main factors affecting cell growth. Moreover, intra- and inter-colony interactions, as a consequence of the initial microbial load in solid systems, may affect microbial physiology. Predictive food microbiology approaches are moving toward a more realistic resemblance to food products, performing studies in structured solid systems instead of liquids. Since structured systems promote microbial cells to become immobilized and grow as colonies, it is essential to study the colony behavior, not only for food safety assurance systems, but also for understanding cell physiology and optimizing food production processes in solid matrices. Traditionally, microbial dynamics in solid systems have been assessed with a macroscopic approach by applying invasive analytical techniques; for instance, viable plate counting, which yield information about overall population. In the last years, this approach is being substituted by more mechanistically inspired ones at mesoscopic (colony) and microscopic (cell) levels. Therefore, non-invasive and in situ monitoring is mandatory for a deeper insight into bacterial colony dynamics. Several methodologies that enable high-throughput data collection have been developed, such as microscopy-based techniques coupled with image analysis and OD-based measurements in microplate readers. This research paper provides an overview of non-invasive in situ techniques to monitor bacterial colonies in solid (model) food and emphasizes their advantages and inconveniences in terms of accuracy, performance and output information

  17. Morphological evolution of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.; Heap, Sara R.; Malumuth, Eliot M.; Hill, Robert S.; Smith, Eric P.

    1997-05-01

    Recent studies of the Hubble Deep Field (Abraham et al. 1996) [1] and Medium Deep Survey (Driver, Windhorst & Griffiths 1995) [6] find that the frequency of irregular/peculiar/merger systems rises with increasing redshift. However, this finding must be carefully interpreted in light of UV images of low-redshift galaxies obtained by the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (Stecher et al. 1992) [9]. These UV images imply that K-correction effects may be at least partially responsible for the apparent increase in Irr galaxies with redshift. To assess the degree to which there is an overabundance of Irregular galaxies (relative to the present epoch), we must understand the degree to which the K-correction biases morphological studies. We demonstrate the importance of the morphological K-correction to the classification schemes used in the HDF. We find that high-redshift spiral galaxies are misclassified as Irr galaxies, while Elliptical/S0 galaxies, should not be affected substantially. We have been granted 40 orbits in Cycle 7 with STIS to place these conclusions on a statistical basis.

  18. A catalog of Louisiana's nesting seabird colonies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fontenot, William R.; Cardiff, Steve W.; DeMay, Richard A.; Dittmann, Donna L.; Hartley, Stephen B.; Jeske, Clinton W.; Lorenz, Nicole; Michot, Thomas C.; Purrington, Robert Dan; Seymour, Michael; Vermillion, William G.

    2012-01-01

    collective habitats which comprise Louisiana's now fragile coastal zone have taken major hits from commercial/residential, oil & gas, and other industrial development, primarily in the form of coastal erosion exacerbated by these and other factors (Portnoy 1978, Spendelow and Patton 1988, Martin and Lester 1990, Green, et al. 2006). Moreover, during this same period, both geologic subsidence rates (Tornqvist et al. 2008) and mean sea-level (Tornqvist et al. 2002) have increased, along with significant tropical storm activity; all of which have combined to impact available marsh, barrier island, beach, and dredge spoil nesting habitat for waterbirds, especially seabirds, throughout the coastal zone of Louisiana. The primary objective of this publication is to detail those coastal Louisiana colonial seabird nesting sites for which we have reasonably accurate data, in a tabular, site-by-site format. All major survey (1976-2008) data of site-by-site seabird species counts, as well as several smaller data sets, referred to in the site history tables as “miscellaneous observations” obtained during the May-June seabird breeding period, are included. It is our hope that these data will provide a dependable foundation from which future colonial seabird nesting surveys might be planned and carried out, as well as showcase the importance of coastal Louisiana's seabird rookeries, and contribute to their conservation.

  19. Altruistic colony defense by menopausal female insects.

    PubMed

    Uematsu, Keigo; Kutsukake, Mayako; Fukatsu, Takema; Shimada, Masakazu; Shibao, Harunobu

    2010-07-13

    Recent studies have suggested that an extended postreproductive life span, such as life after menopause in human females, will evolve when the indirect (kin-selected) fitness benefits from altruistic behavior are greater than the direct fitness benefits from continuing reproduction. Under some conditions in which postreproductive altruism is more beneficial and/or continuing reproduction is more costly, the postreproductive life span can be shaped by natural selection. However, indirect fitness benefits during postreproductive survival have been documented mainly in intelligent mammals such as humans and cetaceans, in which elder females possess enhanced social knowledge through learning. Here we show that postreproductive females of the gall-forming aphid Quadrartus yoshinomiyai (Nipponaphidini) can gain indirect fitness benefits through their altruistic colony defense. These females cease reproduction around the time of gall opening and defend the colony by sticking themselves to intruding predators with a waxy secretion that is accumulated in their body with aging. Our results suggest that the presence of an age-related trait for altruistic behavior promotes the evolution of postreproductive altruism in this social insect via kin selection under natural selection imposed by predators. PMID:20619817

  20. Morphological and genetic diversity of Briareum (Anthozoa: Octocorallia) from the Ryukyu Archipelago, Japan.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yu; Reimer, James Davis

    2014-10-01

    The primary problem hindering the study of octocorals is the disordered situation regarding their taxonomy, chiefly caused by insufficient knowledge of valid morphological taxonomic characters. Briareum is an octocoral genus found in the Atlantic and Pacific in shallow tropical and subtropical waters, and occurs in both encrusting and branching colony forms. Their simple morphology and morphological plasticity have hindered taxonomic understanding of this genus. In this study three morphologically distinct types (= type-1, -2, and -3) of Briareum from the Ryukyu Archipelago and their genetic diversity were examined. Colony, anthostele morphology, and sclerite length were examined for each type. Four molecular markers (mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1, mitochondrial mismatch repair gene, nuclear 18S ribosomal DNA, internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2)) were used to evaluate molecular phylogenetic status of these variations. Although one morphological type ("deep" small colonies, = type-3) showed small differences in nuclear ITS2 sequences compared to the other two types, the remaining types had identical sequences for all molecular markers examined. The results suggest extremely low genetic diversity despite highly variable morphology of Briareum species in Okinawa. Nevertheless, considering the distribution patterns and discontinuous morphology of type-3 compared to the other two morphotypes, genetic isolation of type-3 is plausible. In Briareum, small variances in nuclear ITS2 sequences of type-3 may have much more importance than in molecular phylogenies of other octocorals. Further phylogenetic investigations and comparison with Briareum specimens from other regions are necessary to conclusively taxonomically identify the three types. PMID:25284389

  1. Hierarchy length in orphaned colonies of the ant Temnothorax nylanderi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinze, J.

    2008-08-01

    Workers of the ant Temnothorax nylanderi form dominance orders in orphaned colonies in which only one or a few top-ranking workers begin to produce males from unfertilized eggs. Between one and 11 individuals initiated 80% of all aggression in 14 queenless colonies. As predicted from inclusive fitness models (Molet M, van Baalen M, Monnin T, Insectes Soc 52:247 256, 2005), hierarchy length was found to first increase with colony size and then to level off at larger worker numbers. The frequency and skew of aggression decreased with increasing size, indicating that rank orders are less pronounced in larger colonies.

  2. Improved Ant Colony Clustering Algorithm and Its Performance Study.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Clustering analysis is used in many disciplines and applications; it is an important tool that descriptively identifies homogeneous groups of objects based on attribute values. The ant colony clustering algorithm is a swarm-intelligent method used for clustering problems that is inspired by the behavior of ant colonies that cluster their corpses and sort their larvae. A new abstraction ant colony clustering algorithm using a data combination mechanism is proposed to improve the computational efficiency and accuracy of the ant colony clustering algorithm. The abstraction ant colony clustering algorithm is used to cluster benchmark problems, and its performance is compared with the ant colony clustering algorithm and other methods used in existing literature. Based on similar computational difficulties and complexities, the results show that the abstraction ant colony clustering algorithm produces results that are not only more accurate but also more efficiently determined than the ant colony clustering algorithm and the other methods. Thus, the abstraction ant colony clustering algorithm can be used for efficient multivariate data clustering. PMID:26839533

  3. Ant- and Ant-Colony-Inspired ALife Visual Art.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Gary; Machado, Penousal

    2015-01-01

    Ant- and ant-colony-inspired ALife art is characterized by the artistic exploration of the emerging collective behavior of computational agents, developed using ants as a metaphor. We present a chronology that documents the emergence and history of such visual art, contextualize ant- and ant-colony-inspired art within generative art practices, and consider how it relates to other ALife art. We survey many of the algorithms that artists have used in this genre, address some of their aims, and explore the relationships between ant- and ant-colony-inspired art and research on ant and ant colony behavior. PMID:26280070

  4. Improved Ant Colony Clustering Algorithm and Its Performance Study

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Clustering analysis is used in many disciplines and applications; it is an important tool that descriptively identifies homogeneous groups of objects based on attribute values. The ant colony clustering algorithm is a swarm-intelligent method used for clustering problems that is inspired by the behavior of ant colonies that cluster their corpses and sort their larvae. A new abstraction ant colony clustering algorithm using a data combination mechanism is proposed to improve the computational efficiency and accuracy of the ant colony clustering algorithm. The abstraction ant colony clustering algorithm is used to cluster benchmark problems, and its performance is compared with the ant colony clustering algorithm and other methods used in existing literature. Based on similar computational difficulties and complexities, the results show that the abstraction ant colony clustering algorithm produces results that are not only more accurate but also more efficiently determined than the ant colony clustering algorithm and the other methods. Thus, the abstraction ant colony clustering algorithm can be used for efficient multivariate data clustering. PMID:26839533

  5. Colony site dynamics and habitat use in Atlantic coast seabirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erwin, R.M.; Galli, J.; Burger, J.

    1981-01-01

    Seabird colony sizes and movements were documented in the DelMarVa coastal region in 1976-1977 and in New Jersey in 1978-1979. Most colonies were found on marsh and dredge deposition islands and on barrier island beaches. For the 'traditionally' beach-nesting Herring Gull, Common Tern, and Black Skimmer, larger, more stable colonies were found on barrier beaches than on marsh islands. In marsh habitats, rates of colony-site change of marshnesting Forster's Tern and Laughing Gulls were similar to those of the former beach nesters. Several adaptations have evolved in marsh specialists to cope with a high risk of reproductive failure due to flooding, but both Herring Gulls and Common Terns also appear to be very adaptable in nesting under various habitat conditions. New colonies and those abandoned between years may be pioneering attempts by younger or inexperienced birds, because they are often smaller than persistent colonies, although patterns differ among areas and habitats. Colony-site dynamics are complex and result from many selective factors including competition, predation, physical changes in site structure, and flooding. The invasion of Herring Gulls into marshes along the mid-Atlantic coast has had an impact on new colony-site choice by associated seabirds. Calculating colony-site turnover rates allows for comparisons among species, habitats, and regions and may give useful insights into habitat quality and change and alternative nesting strategies

  6. Varroa-Virus Interaction in Collapsing Honey Bee Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Roy M.; Nielsen, Steen L.; Kryger, Per

    2013-01-01

    Varroa mites and viruses are the currently the high-profile suspects in collapsing bee colonies. Therefore, seasonal variation in varroa load and viruses (Acute-Kashmir-Israeli complex (AKI) and Deformed Wing Virus (DWV)) were monitored in a year-long study. We investigated the viral titres in honey bees and varroa mites from 23 colonies (15 apiaries) under three treatment conditions: Organic acids (11 colonies), pyrethroid (9 colonies) and untreated (3 colonies). Approximately 200 bees were sampled every month from April 2011 to October 2011, and April 2012. The 200 bees were split to 10 subsamples of 20 bees and analysed separately, which allows us to determine the prevalence of virus-infected bees. The treatment efficacy was often low for both treatments. In colonies where varroa treatment reduced the mite load, colonies overwintered successfully, allowing the mites and viruses to be carried over with the bees into the next season. In general, AKI and DWV titres did not show any notable response to the treatment and steadily increased over the season from April to October. In the untreated control group, titres increased most dramatically. Viral copies were correlated to number of varroa mites. Most colonies that collapsed over the winter had significantly higher AKI and DWV titres in October compared to survivors. Only treated colonies survived the winter. We discuss our results in relation to the varroa-virus model developed by Stephen Martin. PMID:23526946

  7. Spontaneous diseases in a closed colony of Praomys (Mastomys) natalensis

    PubMed Central

    Snell, K. C.; Stewart, H. L.

    1975-01-01

    In comparison with other rodents, the mastomys is unique as regards the patterns of neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases that it develops, some of which may constitute suitable animal models for corresponding diseases of man. Among the spontaneous diseases commonly encountered in necropsies of 600 mastomys maintained in a closed colony were: (1) degenerative joint disease of diarthroses and interventricular disks, which develops regularly in the second year of life; (2) renal disease, a type of immune-complex glomerulonephritis, affecting approximately 80% of mastomys in the age bracket 18-36 months; (3) thymomas and thymic hyperplasia affecting 30% of mastomys by the time they are 2 years old or older; (4) a combination of thymoma and polymyositis in a mastomys showing serum-globulin reactivity, presumably auto-antibody against striated muscle; (5) beginning before the age of 1 year, replacement of the normal cell population of the lymphoid tissues by plasma cells, and intense plasma cell infiltration at many other organ and tissue sites; (6) haematopoietic neoplasms, without leukaemic blood, in 10% of mastomys; and (7) histamine-producing argyrophilic carcinoid tumours of the glandular stomach in approximately 60% of old male and 30% of old female mastomys. Additionally, other neoplasms not infrequently encountered in mastomys rarely occur in other rodent species; conversely some neoplasms commonly found in other rodents, including especially tumours of the lung and mammary gland and leukaemia, are rare or absent in mastomys. PMID:1085220

  8. Growth Characteristics, Bile Sensitivity, and Freeze Damage in Colonial Variants of Lactobacillus acidophilus†

    PubMed Central

    Klaenhammer, T. R.; Kleeman, E. G.

    1981-01-01

    Rough (R) and smooth (S) colonial variants were isolated from a heterogeneous culture of Lactobacillus acidophilus RL8K. R and S types were stable upon repeated transfer on agar, but revertant colonies did appear after broth transfers. When propagated in commercial MRS broth, R and S cultures showed similar growth characteristics, and both cell types were insensitive to freezing and frozen storage at −20°C. Alternatively, during growth in scratch MRS broth, R cultures shifted to a reduced rate of growth during the late logarithmic phase. R cells grown under these conditions were susceptible to death by freezing and injury at −20°C. Microscopically, R cells were observed as long gram-positive rods with small nonstainable blebs protruding from the cell wall. In bile sensitivity studies of R and S cells plated on MRS agar plus oxgall, the S culture was resistant to 1% bile, whereas the R culture was sensitive to 0.6% bile. Differences in the bile resistance and freeze damage of R and S cells suggest that colonial and cellular morphologies are important considerations for the selection of Lactobacillus strains as dietary adjuncts and for the development of growth conditions for preparing frozen concentrated cultures from either cell type. Images PMID:16345799

  9. Spatial Arrangement of Legionella Colonies in Intact Biofilms from a Model Cooling Water System

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Michael; Ross, Kirstin; Bentham, Richard

    2013-01-01

    There is disagreement among microbiologists about whether Legionella requires a protozoan host in order to replicate. This research sought to determine where in biofilm Legionellae are found and whether all biofilm associated Legionella would be located within protozoan hosts. While it is accepted that Legionella colonizes biofilm, its life cycle and nutritional fastidiousness suggest that Legionella employs multiple survival strategies to persist within microbial systems. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) demonstrated an undulating biofilm surface architecture and a roughly homogenous distribution of heterotrophic bacteria with clusters of protozoa. Legionella displayed 3 distinct spatial arrangements either contained within or directly associated with protozoa, or dispersed in loosely associated clusters or in tightly packed aggregations of cells forming dense colonial clusters. The formation of discreet clusters of tightly packed Legionella suggests that colony formation is influenced by specific environmental conditions allowing for limited extracellular replication. This work represents the first time that an environmentally representative, multispecies biofilm containing Legionella has been fluorescently tagged and Legionella colony morphology noted within a complex microbial system. PMID:24826074

  10. Quantitative spectral light scattering polarimetry for monitoring fractal growth pattern of Bacillus thuringiensis bacterial colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Paromita; Soni, Jalpa; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Sengupta, Tapas K.

    2013-02-01

    It is of considerable current interest to develop various methods which help to understand and quantify the cellular association in growing bacterial colonies and is also important in terms of detection and identification of a bacterial species. A novel approach is used here to probe the morphological structural changes occurring during the growth of the bacterial colony of Bacillus thuringiensis under different environmental conditions (in normal nutrient agar, in presence of glucose - acting as additional nutrient and additional 3mM arsenate as additional toxic material). This approach combines the quantitative Mueller matrix polarimetry to extract intrinsic polarization properties and inverse analysis of the polarization preserving part of the light scattering spectra to determine the fractal parameter H (Hurst exponent) using Born approximation. Interesting differences are observed in the intrinsic polarization parameters and also in the Hurst exponent, which is a measurement of the fractality of a pattern formed by bacteria while growing as a colony. These findings are further confirmed with optical microscopic studies of the same sample and the results indicate a very strong and distinct dependence on the environmental conditions during growth, which can be exploited to quantify different bacterial species and their growth patterns.

  11. Pattern formation in a growing bacterial colony facilitated by extra-cellular polymeric substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Pushpita; Mondal, Jagannath; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert

    2015-03-01

    Self-organization in bacterial colony is quite pervasive and diverse phenomena. Bacteria are known to self-organize into multicellular communities, commonly known as biofilms, in which microbial cells live in close association with a solid surface and are embedded in a self-produced extracellular polymeric substances(EPS). In such dense systems mechanical interactions among the structural components can be expected to significantly contribute to the morphological properties. By a simple particle-based simulation model of nonmotile rod-shaped bacterial cells and EPS secreted in a growing colony, we investigate how the combined mechanical effects can give rise naturally spatial heterogeneity observed in a biofilm. In our individual-based simulation model all the components interact mechanically via repulsive forces by pushing each other away as bacterial cells grow and divide consuming diffusing nutrient and produce EPS. We show that mechanical interactions control the collective behavior of the system, particularly, we show that the presence of non-adsorbing EPS leads spontaneous aggregation of bacterial cells by depletion attraction and generates phase separated patterns in a nonequilibrium growing colony.

  12. Motion analysis and ultrastructural study of a colonial diatom, Bacillaria paxillifer.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Nozomi; Suetomo, Yasutaka; Yoshihisa, Tohru; Sonobe, Seiji

    2016-06-01

    The pennate diatom, Bacillaria paxillifer, forms a colony in which adjacent cells glide smoothly and almost continuously, yet no obvious apparatus driving the movement, such as flagella or cilia, is observed. Thus far, neither the mechanism nor physiological significance of this movement has been well understood. Here, we report quantitative analysis of the gliding motion of B. paxillifer and morphological analysis of this diatom with light and electron microscopes. The gliding of pairs of adjacent B. paxillifer cells in a colony was cyclic with rather constant periods while the average gliding period varied from a few seconds to multiples of 10 s among colonies. The gliding was compromised reversibly by inhibitors for actin and myosin, suggesting involvement of the actomyosin system. Indeed, we observed two closely apposed actin bundles near the raphe by fluorescence-labeled phalloidin staining. Using electron microscopy, we observed filamentous structures that resemble the actin bundles seen with fluorescence microscopy, and we also found novel electron-dense structures located between the plasma membrane and these actin-like filaments. From these and other observations, we suggest that B. paxillifer also uses actin bundles and propose a putative myosin as a molecular motor in the gliding of unicellular diatoms. PMID:26754563

  13. Spatial arrangement of legionella colonies in intact biofilms from a model cooling water system.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Michael; Ross, Kirstin; Bentham, Richard

    2013-01-01

    There is disagreement among microbiologists about whether Legionella requires a protozoan host in order to replicate. This research sought to determine where in biofilm Legionellae are found and whether all biofilm associated Legionella would be located within protozoan hosts. While it is accepted that Legionella colonizes biofilm, its life cycle and nutritional fastidiousness suggest that Legionella employs multiple survival strategies to persist within microbial systems. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) demonstrated an undulating biofilm surface architecture and a roughly homogenous distribution of heterotrophic bacteria with clusters of protozoa. Legionella displayed 3 distinct spatial arrangements either contained within or directly associated with protozoa, or dispersed in loosely associated clusters or in tightly packed aggregations of cells forming dense colonial clusters. The formation of discreet clusters of tightly packed Legionella suggests that colony formation is influenced by specific environmental conditions allowing for limited extracellular replication. This work represents the first time that an environmentally representative, multispecies biofilm containing Legionella has been fluorescently tagged and Legionella colony morphology noted within a complex microbial system. PMID:24826074

  14. Mesenchymal stromal cells, colony-forming unit fibroblasts, from bone marrow of untreated advanced breast and lung cancer patients suppress fibroblast colony formation from healthy marrow.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Erica Leonor; Labovsky, Vivian; La Russa, Vincent; Vallone, Valeria Fernández; Honegger, Alba Elizabeth; Belloc, Carlos Gabriel; Wen, Huei Chi; Bordenave, Raúl Horacio; Bullorsky, Eduardo Oscar; Feldman, Leonardo; Chasseing, Norma Alejandra

    2010-03-01

    We have shown that bone marrow (BM) from untreated advanced lung and breast cancer patients (LCP and BCP) have a reduced number of colony-forming unit fibroblasts (CFU-Fs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Factors that regulate the proliferation and differentiation of CFU-F are produced by the patients' BM microenvironment. We have now examined whether conditioned media (CM) from patients' CFU-F-derived stromal cells also inhibits the colony-forming efficiency (CFE) of CFU-F in primary cultures from healthy volunteers (HV)-BM. Thus the number and proliferation potential of HV-CFU-F were also found to be decreased and similar to colony numbers and colony size of patients' CFU-F. Stromal cells from both of these types of colonies appeared relatively larger and lacked the characteristic spindle morphology typically seen in healthy stromal cells. We developed an arbitrary mesenchymal stromal cell maturational index by taking three measures consisting of stromal cell surface area, longitudinal and horizontal axis. All stromal indices derived from HV-CFU-F grown in patients' CM were similar to those from stromal elements derived from patients' CFU-F. These indices were markedly higher than stromal indices typical of HV-CFU-F cultured in healthy CM or standard medium [alpha-medium plus 20% heat-inactivated fetal bovine serum (FBS)]. Patients' CM had increased concentrations of the CFU-F inhibitor, GM-CSF, and low levels of bFGF and Dkk-1, strong promoters of self-renewal of MSCs, compared to the levels quantified in CM from HV-CFU-F. Moreover, the majority of patients' MSCs were unresponsive in standard medium and healthy CM to give CFU-F, indicating that the majority of mesenchymal stromal cells from patients' CFU-F are locked in maturational arrest. These results show that alterations of GM-CSF, bFGF, and Dkk-1 are associated with deficient cloning and maturation arrest of CFU-F. Defective autocrine and paracrine mechanisms may be involved in the BM microenvironments of

  15. Mutations in the Borrelia burgdorferi Flagellar Type III Secretion System Genes fliH and fliI Profoundly Affect Spirochete Flagellar Assembly, Morphology, Motility, Structure, and Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lihui; Zhao, Xiaowei; Liu, Jun; Norris, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi migrates to distant sites in the tick vectors and mammalian hosts through robust motility and chemotaxis activities. FliH and FliI are two cytoplasmic proteins that play important roles in the type III secretion system (T3SS)-mediated export and assembly of flagellar structural proteins. However, detailed analyses of the roles of FliH and FliI in B. burgdorferi have not been reported. In this study, fliH and fliI transposon mutants were utilized to dissect the mechanism of the Borrelia type III secretion system. The fliH and fliI mutants exhibited rod-shaped or string-like morphology, greatly reduced motility, division defects (resulting in elongated organisms with incomplete division points), and noninfectivity in mice by needle inoculation. Mutants in fliH and fliI were incapable of translational motion in 1% methylcellulose or soft agar. Inactivation of either fliH or fliI resulted in the loss of the FliH-FliI complex from otherwise intact flagellar motors, as determined by cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). Flagellar assemblies were still present in the mutant cells, albeit in lower numbers than in wild-type cells and with truncated flagella. Genetic complementation of fliH and fliI mutants in trans restored their wild-type morphology, motility, and flagellar motor structure; however, full-length flagella and infectivity were not recovered in these complemented mutants. Based on these results, disruption of either fliH or fliI in B. burgdorferi results in a severe defect in flagellar structure and function and cell division but does not completely block the export and assembly of flagellar hook and filament proteins. PMID:25968649

  16. Internal Colonialism and Native Americans: Indian Labor in the United States from 1871 to World War II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Cardell K.

    1984-01-01

    The major factor affecting Indian labor in the latter half of the nineteenth century was corporate colonialism. The demise of tribal societies is directly tied to the invasion of the railroad, coal, cattle, and oil industries on the reservations. The colonization of Indian lands was another important factor. (RM)

  17. Recent advances in morphological cell image analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shengyong; Zhao, Mingzhu; Wu, Guang; Yao, Chunyan; Zhang, Jianwei

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes the recent advances in image processing methods for morphological cell analysis. The topic of morphological analysis has received much attention with the increasing demands in both bioinformatics and biomedical applications. Among many factors that affect the diagnosis of a disease, morphological cell analysis and statistics have made great contributions to results and effects for a doctor. Morphological cell analysis finds the cellar shape, cellar regularity, classification, statistics, diagnosis, and so forth. In the last 20 years, about 1000 publications have reported the use of morphological cell analysis in biomedical research. Relevant solutions encompass a rather wide application area, such as cell clumps segmentation, morphological characteristics extraction, 3D reconstruction, abnormal cells identification, and statistical analysis. These reports are summarized in this paper to enable easy referral to suitable methods for practical solutions. Representative contributions and future research trends are also addressed. PMID:22272215

  18. Ant Colonies Do Not Trade-Off Reproduction against Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Scheuerlein, Alexander; Heinze, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The question on how individuals allocate resources into maintenance and reproduction is one of the central questions in life history theory. Yet, resource allocation into maintenance on the organismic level can only be measured indirectly. This is different in a social insect colony, a “superorganism” where workers represent the soma and the queen the germ line of the colony. Here, we investigate whether trade-offs exist between maintenance and reproduction on two levels of biological organization, queens and colonies, by following single-queen colonies of the ant Cardiocondyla obscurior throughout the entire lifespan of the queen. Our results show that maintenance and reproduction are positively correlated on the colony level, and we confirm results of an earlier study that found no trade-off on the individual (queen) level. We attribute this unexpected outcome to the existence of a positive feedback loop where investment into maintenance (workers) increases the rate of resource acquisition under laboratory conditions. Even though food was provided ad libitum, variation in productivity among the colonies suggests that resources can only be utilized and invested into additional maintenance and reproduction by the colony if enough workers are available. The resulting relationship between per-capita and colony productivity in our study fits well with other studies conducted in the field, where decreasing per-capita productivity and the leveling off of colony productivity have been linked to density dependent effects due to competition among colonies. This suggests that the absence of trade-offs in our laboratory study might also be prevalent under natural conditions, leading to a positive association of maintenance, (= growth) and reproduction. In this respect, insect colonies resemble indeterminate growing organisms. PMID:26383861

  19. Ant Colonies Do Not Trade-Off Reproduction against Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Boris H; Schrempf, Alexandra; Scheuerlein, Alexander; Heinze, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The question on how individuals allocate resources into maintenance and reproduction is one of the central questions in life history theory. Yet, resource allocation into maintenance on the organismic level can only be measured indirectly. This is different in a social insect colony, a "superorganism" where workers represent the soma and the queen the germ line of the colony. Here, we investigate whether trade-offs exist between maintenance and reproduction on two levels of biological organization, queens and colonies, by following single-queen colonies of the ant Cardiocondyla obscurior throughout the entire lifespan of the queen. Our results show that maintenance and reproduction are positively correlated on the colony level, and we confirm results of an earlier study that found no trade-off on the individual (queen) level. We attribute this unexpected outcome to the existence of a positive feedback loop where investment into maintenance (workers) increases the rate of resource acquisition under laboratory conditions. Even though food was provided ad libitum, variation in productivity among the colonies suggests that resources can only be utilized and invested into additional maintenance and reproduction by the colony if enough workers are available. The resulting relationship between per-capita and colony productivity in our study fits well with other studies conducted in the field, where decreasing per-capita productivity and the leveling off of colony productivity have been linked to density dependent effects due to competition among colonies. This suggests that the absence of trade-offs in our laboratory study might also be prevalent under natural conditions, leading to a positive association of maintenance, (= growth) and reproduction. In this respect, insect colonies resemble indeterminate growing organisms. PMID:26383861

  20. Population dynamics of Hawaiian seabird colonies vulnerable to sea-level rise.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Jeff S; Reynolds, Michelle H; Seavy, Nathaniel E; Krause, Crystal M

    2012-08-01

    Globally, seabirds are vulnerable to anthropogenic threats both at sea and on land. Seabirds typically nest colonially and show strong fidelity to natal colonies, and such colonies on low-lying islands may be threatened by sea-level rise. We used French Frigate Shoals, the largest atoll in the Hawaiian Archipelago, as a case study to explore the population dynamics of seabird colonies and the potential effects sea-level rise may have on these rookeries. We compiled historic observations, a 30-year time series of seabird population abundance, lidar-derived elevations, and aerial imagery of all the islands of French Frigate Shoals. To estimate the population dynamics of 8 species of breeding seabirds on Tern Island from 1980 to 2009, we used a Gompertz model with a Bayesian approach to infer population growth rates, density dependence, process variation, and observation error. All species increased in abundance, in a pattern that provided evidence of density dependence. Great Frigatebirds (Fregata minor), Masked Boobies (Sula dactylatra), Red-tailed Tropicbirds (Phaethon rubricauda), Spectacled Terns (Onychoprion lunatus), and White Terns (Gygis alba) are likely at carrying capacity. Density dependence may exacerbate the effects of sea-level rise on seabirds because populations near carrying capacity on an island will be more negatively affected than populations with room for growth. We projected 12% of French Frigate Shoals will be inundated if sea level rises 1 m and 28% if sea level rises 2 m. Spectacled Terns and shrub-nesting species are especially vulnerable to sea-level rise, but seawalls and habitat restoration may mitigate the effects of sea-level rise. Losses of seabird nesting habitat may be substantial in the Hawaiian Islands by 2100 if sea levels rise 2 m. Restoration of higher-elevation seabird colonies represent a more enduring conservation solution for Pacific seabirds. PMID:22624702

  1. Population dynamics of Hawaiian seabird colonies vulnerable to sea-level rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hatfield, Jeff S.; Reynolds, Michelle H.; Seavy, Nathaniel E.; Krause, Crystal M.

    2012-01-01

    Globally, seabirds are vulnerable to anthropogenic threats both at sea and on land. Seabirds typically nest colonially and show strong fidelity to natal colonies, and such colonies on low-lying islands may be threatened by sea-level rise. We used French Frigate Shoals, the largest atoll in the Hawaiian Archipelago, as a case study to explore the population dynamics of seabird colonies and the potential effects sea-level rise may have on these rookeries. We compiled historic observations, a 30-year time series of seabird population abundance, lidar-derived elevations, and aerial imagery of all the islands of French Frigate Shoals. To estimate the population dynamics of 8 species of breeding seabirds on Tern Island from 1980 to 2009, we used a Gompertz model with a Bayesian approach to infer population growth rates, density dependence, process variation, and observation error. All species increased in abundance, in a pattern that provided evidence of density dependence. Great Frigatebirds (Fregata minor), Masked Boobies (Sula dactylatra), Red-tailed Tropicbirds (Phaethon rubricauda), Spectacled Terns (Onychoprion lunatus), and White Terns (Gygis alba) are likely at carrying capacity. Density dependence may exacerbate the effects of sea-level rise on seabirds because populations near carrying capacity on an island will be more negatively affected than populations with room for growth. We projected 12% of French Frigate Shoals will be inundated if sea level rises 1 m and 28% if sea level rises 2 m. Spectacled Terns and shrub-nesting species are especially vulnerable to sea-level rise, but seawalls and habitat restoration may mitigate the effects of sea-level rise. Losses of seabird nesting habitat may be substantial in the Hawaiian Islands by 2100 if sea levels rise 2 m. Restoration of higher-elevation seabird colonies represent a more enduring conservation solution for Pacific seabirds.

  2. Altered Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variants Induced by Exposure to Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maleki, Anis Rageh; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Tay, Sun Tee; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei primary diagnostic cultures demonstrate colony morphology variation associated with expression of virulence and adaptation proteins. This study aims to examine the ability of B. pseudomallei colony variants (wild type [WT] and small colony variant [SCV]) to survive and replicate intracellularly in A549 cells and to identify the alterations in the protein expression of these variants, post-exposure to the A549 cells. Intracellular survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed followed by proteomics analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. B. pseudomallei SCV survive longer than the WT. During post-exposure, among 259 and 260 protein spots of SCV and WT, respectively, 19 were differentially expressed. Among SCV post-exposure up-regulated proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (CbbA) and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were associated with adhesion and virulence. Among the down-regulated proteins, enolase (Eno) is implicated in adhesion and virulence. Additionally, post-exposure expression profiles of both variants were compared with pre-exposure. In WT pre- vs post-exposure, 36 proteins were differentially expressed. Of the up-regulated proteins, translocator protein, Eno, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk), ferritin Dps-family DNA binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase B were implicated in invasion and virulence. In SCV pre- vs post-exposure, 27 proteins were differentially expressed. Among the up-regulated proteins, flagellin, Eno, CbbA, Ndk and phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase have similarly been implicated in adhesion, invasion. Protein profiles differences post-exposure provide insights into association between morphotypic and phenotypic characteristics of colony variants, strengthening the role of B. pseudomallei morphotypes in pathogenesis of melioidosis. PMID:25996927

  3. Microtubules viewed as molecular ant colonies.

    PubMed

    Tabony, James

    2006-10-01

    Populations of ants and other social insects self-organize and develop 'emergent' properties through stigmergy in which individual ants communicate with one another via chemical trails of pheromones that attract or repulse other ants. In this way, sophisticated properties and functions develop. Under appropriate conditions, in vitro microtubule preparations, initially comprised of only tubulin and GTP, behave in a similar manner. They self-organize and develop other higher-level emergent phenomena by a process where individual microtubules are coupled together by the chemical trails they produce by their own reactive growing and shrinking. This behaviour is described and compared with the behaviour of ant colonies. Viewing microtubules as populations of molecular ants may provide new insights as to how the cytoskeleton may spontaneously develop high-level functions. It is plausible that such processes occur during the early stages of embryogenesis and in cells. PMID:16968217

  4. Concepts for an export oriented lunar colony

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Kent L.

    1990-12-01

    A model of a lunar domestic economy is presented which consists of 12 sectors, trading 21 goods and services. Material flow for operations and investments are balanced to minimize shortages and surpluses. Prices are formed by targeting a 15-35% return on assets for industry and a 15% after expenses income for labour. From this data, accounting statements, a 14 × 14 cash flow input/output matrix (consisting of 11 industrial sectors, labour, foreign trade and finance), and macroeconomic analyses are prepared which illuminate the most important links in the lunar economy. From this model conclusions are drawn regarding the matter of how best to lay the basis for sustainable colony growth and prosperity.

  5. Optic disc detection using ant colony optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcy A.; Monteiro, Fernando C.

    2012-09-01

    The retinal fundus images are used in the treatment and diagnosis of several eye diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. This paper proposes a new method to detect the optic disc (OD) automatically, due to the fact that the knowledge of the OD location is essential to the automatic analysis of retinal images. Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) is an optimization algorithm inspired by the foraging behaviour of some ant species that has been applied in image processing for edge detection. Recently, the ACO was used in fundus images to detect edges, and therefore, to segment the OD and other anatomical retinal structures. We present an algorithm for the detection of OD in the retina which takes advantage of the Gabor wavelet transform, entropy and ACO algorithm. Forty images of the retina from DRIVE database were used to evaluate the performance of our method.

  6. Primary lung neoplasia in a beagle colony.

    PubMed

    Hahn, F F; Muggenburg, B A; Griffith, W C

    1996-11-01

    As part of long-term pulmonary carcinogenesis studies in dogs, it is important to analyze the incidence of spontaneous lung neoplasia. Primary lung carcinoma incidence was determined in two control populations of Beagle dogs observed for their life spans. One population comprised 216 dogs (112 males and 104 females) that were controls for life span studies, and another comprised 182 dogs (50 males and 132 females) that were retirees from a breeding colony. Forty lung neoplasms were noted in the 398 dogs; 35 neoplasms were carcinomas classified as papillary adenocarcinoma (20), bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (9), adenosquamous carcinoma (5), or bronchial gland carcinoma (1). The other five neoplasms were a malignant fibrous histiocytoma, three adenomas, and a fibroma. The crude incidence of lung carcinomas averaged for both populations was 8.8% (35/398) and was dominated by a relatively high incidence of lung neoplasia in aged dogs, those dying after the median life span of 13.6 years. PMID:8952021

  7. Evaluation of counting error due to colony masking in bioaerosol sampling.

    PubMed

    Chang, C W; Hwang, Y H; Grinshpun, S A; Macher, J M; Willeke, K

    1994-10-01

    Colony counting error due to indistinguishable colony overlap (i.e., masking) was evaluated theoretically and experimentally. A theoretical model to predict colony masking was used to determine colony counting efficiency by Monte Carlo computer simulation of microorganism collection and development into CFU. The computer simulation was verified experimentally by collecting aerosolized Bacillus subtilis spores and examining micro- and macroscopic colonies. Colony counting efficiency decreased (i) with increasing density of collected culturable microorganisms, (ii) with increasing colony size, and (iii) with decreasing ability of an observation system to distinguish adjacent colonies as separate units. Counting efficiency for 2-mm colonies, at optimal resolution, decreased from 98 to 85% when colony density increased from 1 to 10 microorganisms cm-2, in contrast to an efficiency decrease from 90 to 45% for 5-mm colonies. No statistically significant difference (alpha = 0.05) between experimental and theoretical results was found when colony shape was used to estimate the number of individual colonies in a CFU. Experimental colony counts were 1.2 times simulation estimates when colony shape was not considered, because of nonuniformity of actual colony size and the better discrimination ability of the human eye relative to the model. Colony surface densities associated with high counting accuracy were compared with recommended upper plate count limits and found to depend on colony size and an observation system's ability to identify overlapped colonies. Correction factors were developed to estimate the actual number of collected microorganisms from observed colony counts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7986046

  8. Within-colony feeding selectivity by a corallivorous reef fish: foraging to maximize reward?

    PubMed Central

    Brooker, Rohan M; Jones, Geoffrey P; Munday, Philip L

    2013-01-01

    Foraging theory predicts that individuals should choose a prey that maximizes energy rewards relative to the energy expended to access, capture, and consume the prey. However, the relative roles of differences in the nutritive value of foods and costs associated with differences in prey accessibility are not always clear. Coral-feeding fishes are known to be highly selective feeders on particular coral genera or species and even different parts of individual coral colonies. The absence of strong correlations between the nutritional value of corals and prey preferences suggests other factors such as polyp accessibility may be important. Here, we investigated within-colony feeding selectivity by the corallivorous filefish, Oxymonacanthus longirostris, and if prey accessibility determines foraging patterns. After confirming that this fish primarily feeds on coral polyps, we examined whether fish show a preference for different parts of a common branching coral, Acropora nobilis, both in the field and in the laboratory experiments with simulated corals. We then experimentally tested whether nonuniform patterns of feeding on preferred coral species reflect structural differences between polyps. We found that O. longirostris exhibits nonuniform patterns of foraging in the field, selectively feeding midway along branches. On simulated corals, fish replicated this pattern when food accessibility was equal along the branch. However, when food access varied, fish consistently modified their foraging behavior, preferring to feed where food was most accessible. When foraging patterns were compared with coral morphology, fish preferred larger polyps and less skeletal protection. Our results highlight that patterns of interspecific and intraspecific selectivity can reflect coral morphology, with fish preferring corals or parts of coral colonies with structural characteristics that increase prey accessibility. PMID:24324862

  9. Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Morphotypes Show a Synchronized Metabolic Pattern after Acute Infection

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Ivo; Lalk, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Burkholderia pseudomallei is a water and soil bacterium and the causative agent of melioidosis. A characteristic feature of this bacterium is the formation of different colony morphologies which can be isolated from environmental samples as well as from clinical samples, but can also be induced in vitro. Previous studies indicate that morphotypes can differ in a number of characteristics such as resistance to oxidative stress, cellular adhesion and intracellular replication. Yet the metabolic features of B. pseudomallei and its different morphotypes have not been examined in detail so far. Therefore, this study aimed to characterize the exometabolome of B. pseudomallei morphotypes and the impact of acute infection on their metabolic characteristics. Methods and Principal Findings We applied nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-NMR) in a metabolic footprint approach to compare nutrition uptake and metabolite secretion of starvation induced morphotypes of the B. pseudomallei strains K96243 and E8. We observed gluconate production and uptake in all morphotype cultures. Our study also revealed that among all morphotypes amino acids could be classified with regard to their fast and slow consumption. In addition to these shared metabolic features, the morphotypes varied highly in amino acid uptake profiles, secretion of branched chain amino acid metabolites and carbon utilization. After intracellular passage in vitro or murine acute infection in vivo, we observed a switch of the various morphotypes towards a single morphotype and a synchronization of nutrient uptake and metabolite secretion. Conclusion To our knowledge, this study provides first insights into the basic metabolism of B. pseudomallei and its colony morphotypes. Furthermore, our data suggest, that acute infection leads to the synchronization of B. pseudomallei colony morphology and metabolism through yet unknown host signals and bacterial mechanisms. PMID:26943908

  10. Model Specification Searches Using Ant Colony Optimization Algorithms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcoulides, George A.; Drezner, Zvi

    2003-01-01

    Ant colony optimization is a recently proposed heuristic procedure inspired by the behavior of real ants. This article applies the procedure to model specification searches in structural equation modeling and reports the results. The results demonstrate the capabilities of ant colony optimization algorithms for conducting automated searches.

  11. Education "Reform" in Latino Detroit: Achievement Gap or Colonial Legacy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Sandra M.; Shields, Carolyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Using critical theory and an analysis of missionary reports and documentation describing education in colonial Puerto Rico and Mexico, the authors cross borders and time periods to socially and historically situate Spanish colonial educational methodologies and their contemporary use in one low-income Latino community in urban Detroit, Michigan.…

  12. Automatic counting and classification of bacterial colonies using hyperspectral imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Detection and counting of bacterial colonies on agar plates is a routine microbiology practice to get a rough estimate of the number of viable cells in a sample. There have been a variety of different automatic colony counting systems and software algorithms mainly based on color or gray-scale pictu...

  13. Mutanolysin enhancement of serogrouping of single colonies of streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Calandra, G B; Henson, C L

    1982-01-01

    Single colonies of beta-hemolytic streptococci could be grouped by antibody-coated latex bead agglutination or coagglutination with staphylococci coated with antibody after incubation of the colonies with mutanolysin. This simple and quick procedure provided an enzymatic means of enhancing the sensitivity of tests such as Phadebact and SeroSTAT. PMID:6764770

  14. 36 CFR 7.1 - Colonial National Historical Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Colonial National Historical... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.1 Colonial National Historical Park. (a... National Historical Park and no privately owned vessel shall be beached or landed on land within said...

  15. 36 CFR 7.1 - Colonial National Historical Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Colonial National Historical... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.1 Colonial National Historical Park. (a... National Historical Park and no privately owned vessel shall be beached or landed on land within said...

  16. 36 CFR 7.1 - Colonial National Historical Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Colonial National Historical... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.1 Colonial National Historical Park. (a... National Historical Park and no privately owned vessel shall be beached or landed on land within said...

  17. 36 CFR 7.1 - Colonial National Historical Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Colonial National Historical... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.1 Colonial National Historical Park. (a... National Historical Park and no privately owned vessel shall be beached or landed on land within said...

  18. 36 CFR 7.1 - Colonial National Historical Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Colonial National Historical... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.1 Colonial National Historical Park. (a... National Historical Park and no privately owned vessel shall be beached or landed on land within said...

  19. Colony strength and queen replacement in Melipona marginata (Apidae: Meliponini).

    PubMed

    Kleinert, A de M P

    2005-08-01

    Physogastric queens of Melipona marginata were removed from their colonies in order to verify the acceptance of a new queen by workers. Colony strength was evaluated according to queen oviposition rate and comb diameters. Replacement was observed seven times. Its occurrence and speed related positively to colony strength, independently of queen's age. In weak colonies, queen replacement was observed only once, following colony population increase that occurred after introduction of combs from another colony. Worker oviposition after queen removal was observed three times: in a strong colony with virgin queens and males, and in two of the weak colonies. In the first two or three days of new queen oviposition, during which most of the eggs were eaten by the queen, worker oviposition preceded almost all provisioning and oviposition processes (POPs). After this period, worker oviposition decreased until it reached around 25% of the POPs. Daily oviposition rate of young queens decreased or was even interrupted by hatching of their first brood. PMID:16341425

  20. Countering Coloniality in Educational Research: From Ownership to Answerability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    In this theoretical article, I argue for a relational stance on learning as a way of reckoning with educational research as part of the settler colonial structure of the United States. Because of my geopolitical location to the United States as a settler colony, I begin by contrasting the stances of anticolonial and decolonial. I then analyze the…

  1. Women in Sports and Games in the Colonial Period.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Reet A.

    The physical activities of women in the colonial period in the United States were limited. Social attitudes differed between the northern and southern colonies on appropriate activities for women. In the north it was not considered unseemly for women to participate in ice skating, while in the south women were encouraged to become good…

  2. Indian Education in the American Colonies, 1607-1783.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szasz, Margaret Connell

    Indian schooling in colonial America was continuously immersed in the exchange between cultures that involved religion, land ownership, disease, alcohol, and warfare, and was molded by trade in furs and hides, and Indian slaves. In the past two decades American scholars have begun to reinterpret colonial North American Indian history and the…

  3. Discover for Yourself: An Optimal Control Model in Insect Colonies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkel, Brian

    2013-01-01

    We describe the enlightening path of self-discovery afforded to the teacher of undergraduate mathematics. This is demonstrated as we find and develop background material on an application of optimal control theory to model the evolutionary strategy of an insect colony to produce the maximum number of queen or reproducer insects in the colony at…

  4. Allee effects and colony collapse disorder in honey bees

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We propose a mathematical model to quantify the hypothesis that a major ultimate cause of Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD) in honey bees is the presence of an Allee effect in the growth dynamics of honey bee colonies. In the model, both recruitment of adult bees as well as mortality of adult bees have...

  5. 'Administering the Medicine': Progressive Education, Colonialism, and the State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Joost

    2001-01-01

    Draws comparisons between the Australian education directors, Frank Tate and Jacques Henry Abendanon. Discusses educational reform issues based on racial contexts and social, political, and cultural aspects in the British colony of Victoria and the Dutch colony of Java. Concludes that, though their politcal contexts are different, their views are…

  6. Agricultural Societies in Colonial Western Australia in 1831-70.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the knowledge-diffusion activities of colonial agricultural societies in western Australia from their foundation in 1831-1870. States that from 1829 to 1850 British settlers belonged to a society of free citizens, while from 1851-1867 the settlement changed to a convict colony. (CMK)

  7. Slave Advertising in the Colonial Newspaper: Mirror to the Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Patricia

    To explore racial attitudes from the colonial period of the United States, a study examined advertising practices regarding announcements dealing with black slaves in colonial newspapers in Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Virginia, and South Carolina. Careful scrutiny revealed no relationship between the editorial stance of a…

  8. T-lymphocyte colonies in the lymphoproliferative disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Dao, C; Marie, J P; Bernadou, A; Bilski-Pasquier, G

    1978-01-01

    Human lymphocytes from peripheral blood, bone marrow spleen and lymph nodes were cultured. Continuous phytoheamagglutinin (PHA) stimulation was used, first during a 24 h liquid preincubation, then during a 5 day culture in methylcellulose. In normal donors a rapid colony formation took place, with a mean of 124+/-82 colonies per 1 times 10(5) preincubated lymphocytes. Cells from such colonies were studied by cytology, scanning electron microscopy and rosette formation techniques; arguments favour the hypothesis that these could be T lymphocytes. Neither granulocytes nor macrophages could be grown, and no lymphoid colony formation occurred without PHA stimulation. The same technique was applied to patients with various lymphoproliferative disorders. Significant colony suppression was observed in nearly every case of chronic lymphatic leukaemia; the number of colonies was reduced in some patients with acute lymphatic leukaemia, lymphosarcoma, dysglobulinaemia and Hodgkin's disease. This lymphoid culture method should be applied to a larger number of patients to determine whether it has a classification value and/or prognostic significance. When colonies were grown in pathological states, rosette formation was identical to that of normal donors; colony formation could be due to persisting normal lymphocytes. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:309852

  9. Modeling cell-matrix traction forces in Keratinocyte colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya

    2013-03-01

    Crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions plays an essential role in the mechanical function of tissues. The traction forces exerted by cohesive keratinocyte colonies with strong cell-cell adhesions are mostly concentrated at the colony periphery. In contrast, for weak cadherin-based intercellular adhesions, individual cells in a colony interact with their matrix independently, with a disorganized distribution of traction forces extending throughout the colony. In this talk I will present a minimal physical model of the colony as contractile elastic media linked by springs and coupled to an elastic substrate. The model captures the spatial distribution of traction forces seen in experiments. For cell colonies with strong cell-cell adhesions, the total traction force of the colony measured in experiments is found to scale with the colony's geometrical size. This scaling suggests the emergence of an effective surface tension of magnitude comparable to that measured for non-adherent, three-dimensional cell aggregates. The physical model supports the scaling and indicates that the surface tension may be controlled by acto-myosin contractility. Supported by the NSF through grant DMR-1004789. This work was done in collaboration with Aaron F. Mertz, Eric R. Dufresne and Valerie Horsley (Yale University) and M. Cristina Marchetti (Syracuse University).

  10. Education and National Personae in Portugal's Colonial and Postcolonial Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Errante, Antoinette

    1998-01-01

    Traces the evolution of Portuguese national identity, 1926-74, in relation to its African colonies, particularly Mozambique, to demonstrate that colonialism enforces values, identities, and "hierarchies of domination" within the colonizing society as well as between colonizers and colonized peoples. Examines the role of education in shaping and…

  11. The Political Economy of Colonial Education: Mozambique, 1930-1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Michael

    1987-01-01

    Under colonial fascism and during the revolutionary period leading to independence, the schooling of the African majority in Mozambique had no direct link with the economy, was more a mechanism of social control than of labor reproduction, and (in contrast to other African colonies) did not produce an African middle class supportive of the…

  12. The Education of Indentured Servants in Colonial America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snyder, Mark R.

    2007-01-01

    This article serves as a foundation for understanding the earliest form of technical instruction in colonial America. It is a synthesis of historical studies that have addresses the education of indentured servants and apprentices in colonial America. It defines indentured servitude and contrasts it with apprenticeship--a form of indentured…

  13. 21 CFR 866.2180 - Manual colony counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manual colony counter. 866.2180 Section 866.2180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2180 Manual colony...

  14. 21 CFR 866.2180 - Manual colony counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manual colony counter. 866.2180 Section 866.2180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2180 Manual colony...

  15. 21 CFR 866.2180 - Manual colony counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manual colony counter. 866.2180 Section 866.2180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2180 Manual colony...

  16. 21 CFR 866.2180 - Manual colony counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manual colony counter. 866.2180 Section 866.2180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2180 Manual colony...

  17. 21 CFR 866.2180 - Manual colony counter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manual colony counter. 866.2180 Section 866.2180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2180 Manual colony...

  18. Heralding the Other: Sousa, Simulacra, and Settler Colonialism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Matthew C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the role of music and music education in the perpetuation of settler colonialism (a particular colonial configuration predicated on the expulsion of indigenous people and occupation of indigenous land) within the United States. Using Baudrillard's notion of simulacra, or "false truths," to look at racialized…

  19. Estimating 3-dimensional colony surface area of field corals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Colony surface area is a critical descriptor for biological and physical attributes of reef-building (scleractinian, stony) corals. The three-dimensional (3D) size and structure of corals are directly related to many ecosystem values and functions. Most methods to estimate colony...

  20. Secondary biomarkers of insecticide-induced stress of honey bee colonies and their relevance for overwintering strength.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Jakob; Ruhnke, Haike; Milchreit, Kathrin; Kleebaum, Katharina; Franke, Monique; Mispagel, Sebastian; Bischoff, Gabriela; Kamp, Günter; Bienefeld, Kaspar

    2016-10-01

    The evaluation of pesticide side-effects on honeybees is hampered by a lack of colony-level bioassays that not only are sensitive to physiological changes, but also allow predictions about the consequences of exposure for longer-term colony productivity and survival. Here we measured 28 biometrical, biochemical and behavioural indicators in a field study with 63 colonies and 3 apiaries. Colonies were stressed in early summer by feeding them for five days with either the carbamate growth regulator fenoxycarb or the neurotoxic neonicotinoid imidacloprid, or left untreated. Candidate stress indicators were measured 8-64 days later. We determined which of the indicators were influenced by the treatments, and which could be used as predictors in regression analyses of overwintering strength. Among the indicators influenced by fenoxycarb were the amount of brood in colonies as well as the learning performance and 24h-memory of bees, and the concentration of the brood food component 10HDA in head extracts. Imidacloprid significantly affected honey production, total number of bees and activity of the immune-related enzyme phenoloxidase in forager bee extracts. Indicators predictive of overwintering strength but unrelated to insecticide feeding included vitellogenin titer and glucose oxidase-activity in haemolymph/whole body-extracts of hive bees. Apart from variables that were themselves components of colony strength (numbers of bees/brood cells), the only indicator that was both influenced by an insecticide and predictive of overwintering strength was the concentration of 10HDA in worker bee heads. Our results show that physiological and biochemical bioassays can be used to study effects of insecticides at the colony level and assess the vitality of bee colonies. At the same time, most bioassays evaluated here appear of limited use for predicting pesticide effects on colony overwintering strength, because those that were sensitive to the insecticides were not identical

  1. IMPACT OF COLONY MORPHOLOGIES AND DISINFECTION ON BIOLOGICAL CLOGGING IN POROUS MEDIA. (R825689C076)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. Large area magnetic micropallet arrays for cell colony sorting.

    PubMed

    Cox-Muranami, Wesley A; Nelson, Edward L; Li, G P; Bachman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A new micropallet array platform for adherent cell colony sorting has been developed. The platform consisted of thousands of square plastic pallets, 270 μm by 270 μm on each side, large enough to hold a single colony of cells. Each pallet included a magnetic core, allowing them to be collected with a magnet after being released using a microscope mounted laser system. The micropallets were patterned from 1002F epoxy resist and were fabricated on translucent, gold coated microscope slides. The gold layer was used as seed for electroplating the ferromagnetic cores within every individual pallet. The gold layer also facilitated the release of each micropallet during laser release. This array allows for individual observation, sorting and collection of isolated cell colonies for biological cell colony research. In addition to consistent release and recovery of individual colonies, we demonstrated stable biocompatibility and minimal loss in imaging quality compared to previously developed micropallet arrays. PMID:26606460

  3. An ant colony algorithm on continuous searching space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Jing; Cai, Chao

    2015-12-01

    Ant colony algorithm is heuristic, bionic and parallel. Because of it is property of positive feedback, parallelism and simplicity to cooperate with other method, it is widely adopted in planning on discrete space. But it is still not good at planning on continuous space. After a basic introduction to the basic ant colony algorithm, we will propose an ant colony algorithm on continuous space. Our method makes use of the following three tricks. We search for the next nodes of the route according to fixed-step to guarantee the continuity of solution. When storing pheromone, it discretizes field of pheromone, clusters states and sums up the values of pheromone of these states. When updating pheromone, it makes good resolutions measured in relative score functions leave more pheromone, so that ant colony algorithm can find a sub-optimal solution in shorter time. The simulated experiment shows that our ant colony algorithm can find sub-optimal solution in relatively shorter time.

  4. Leisure, economy and colonial urbanism: Darjeeling, 1835–1930

    PubMed Central

    BHATTACHARYA, NANDINI

    2013-01-01

    This article posits that the hill station of Darjeeling was a unique form of colonial urbanism. It shifts historiographical interest from major urban centres in colonial India (such as Bombay or Calcutta) and instead attempts a greater understanding of smaller urban centres. In the process, it also interrogates the category of hill stations, which have been understood as exotic and scenic sites rather than as towns that were integral to the colonial economy. In arguing that hill stations, particularly Darjeeling, were not merely the scenic and healthy ‘other’ of the clamorous, dirty and diseased plains of India, it refutes suggestions that the ‘despoiling’ or overcrowding of Darjeeling was incremental to the purposes of its establishment. Instead, it suggests that Darjeeling was part of the colonial mainstream; its urbanization and inclusion into the greater colonial economy was effected from the time of its establishment. Therefore, a constant tension between its exotic and its functional elements persisted throughout. PMID:24273391

  5. "Hanseniaspora uvarum" the ultrastructural morphology of a rare ascomycete, isolated from oral thrush.

    PubMed

    Emmanouil-Nikoloussi, E; Kanellaki-Kyparissi, M; Papavassiliou, P; Koliakos, K; Dermentzopoulou, M; Foroglou, C

    1994-01-01

    Superficial fungal infections, including oral thrush, often affect aged full denture wearers and many individuals over 65 years old. The aim of this study was to examine the ultrastructural morphology of a very rare yeast, named Hanseniaspora uvarum/guillermondi, member of the Ascomycetes family, whose pathogenesis and behaviour is not widely known. The yeast was isolated from whitish lesions of the buccal mucosa of an 70 years old woman. The specimen was collected with a mouth swab and cultured in Sabourauds-Dextrose agar. The identification of the organism was performed on the Api 20C Aux system. The yeast colonies, after fixation in glutaraldehyde 3% for 1 hour were immersed in OsO4 1% solution for 1 hour and were "in tissue" stained with uranyl acetate. Ultrathin sections, were observed with TEM Jeol C x 100. Our ultrastructural observations showed that this yeast had a thick cell wall in which the outer surface appeared fuzzy. In some yeasts we observed multilayered intracytoplasmic membrane a figure which is not described as far as we know in any yeast. Many vacuoles were frequently observed in the cytoplasm and especially in the center of the oval shaped cells. Bilateral budding which form ascospores is identical for the morphology of this yeast. PMID:7994154

  6. Morphological and Physiological Characterization of Listeria monocytogenes Subjected to High Hydrostatic Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ritz, M.; Tholozan, J. L.; Federighi, M.; Pilet, M. F.

    2001-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure is a new food preservation technology known for its capacity to inactivate spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms. That inactivation is usually assessed by the number of colonies growing on solid media after treatment. Under normal conditions the method does not permit recovery of damaged cells and may underestimate the number of cells that will remain viable and grow after a few days in high-pressure-processed foodstuffs. This study investigated the damage inflicted on Listeria monocytogenes cells treated by high pressure for 10 min at 400 MPa in pH 5.6 citrate buffer. Under these conditions, no cell growth occurred after 48 h on plate count agar. Scanning electron microscopy, light scattering by flow cytometry, and cell volume measurements were compared to evaluate the morphological changes in cells after pressurization. All these methods revealed that cellular morphology was not really affected. Esterase activity, as assessed either by enzymatic activity assays or by carboxy fluorescein diacetate fluorescence monitored by flow cytometry, was dramatically lowered, but not totally obliterated, under the effects of treatment. The measurement of propidium iodide uptake followed by flow cytometry demonstrated that membrane integrity was preserved in a small part of the population, although the membrane potential measured by analytical methods or evaluated by oxonol uptake was reduced from −86 to −5 mV. These results showed that such combined methods as fluorescent dyes monitored by flow cytometry and physiological activity measurements provide valuable indications of cellular viability. PMID:11319107

  7. Probabilistic dynamic deployment of wireless sensor networks by artificial bee colony algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Celal; Karaboga, Dervis; Gorkemli, Beyza

    2011-01-01

    As the usage and development of wireless sensor networks are increasing, the problems related to these networks are being realized. Dynamic deployment is one of the main topics that directly affect the performance of the wireless sensor networks. In this paper, the artificial bee colony algorithm is applied to the dynamic deployment of stationary and mobile sensor networks to achieve better performance by trying to increase the coverage area of the network. A probabilistic detection model is considered to obtain more realistic results while computing the effectively covered area. Performance of the algorithm is compared with that of the particle swarm optimization algorithm, which is also a swarm based optimization technique and formerly used in wireless sensor network deployment. Results show artificial bee colony algorithm can be preferable in the dynamic deployment of wireless sensor networks. PMID:22163942

  8. Involvement of allelopathy in the formation of monospecific colonies of ferns.

    PubMed

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi

    2015-05-01

    Some fern species often dominate plant communities by forming large monospecific colonies. However, the potential mechanism for this domination of the ferns remains obscure. Many plants secrete a wide range of compounds into the rhizosphere and change the chemical and physical properties of the rhizosphere soil. Through the secretion of compounds, such as allelopathic substances, plants inhibit the germination and growth of neighboring plants to compete more effectively for the resources. Ferns contain a variety of secondary metabolites and some of those compounds are released from the ferns into the rhizosphere soil, either as exudates from living ferns or by decomposition of fern residues in sufficient quantities to affect the germination and growth of neighboring plants as allelopathic substances. Therefore, allelopathic chemical interaction of the ferns with neighboring plants may play an important role in the formation of the monospecific colonies of the ferns. PMID:26058163

  9. Campylobacter fetus diarrhea in a Hutterite colony: epidemiological observations and typing of the causative organism.

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, R P; Strong, D; Taylor, D E; Salama, S M; Davidson, C; Tabor, H

    1994-01-01

    Following a case of Campylobacter fetus sepsis and meningitis in a 4-month-old female member of a Hutterite colony, an epidemiological investigation revealed at least 18 cases of diarrhea in other members of the colony. C. fetus was isolated from 7 of 15 fecal samples submitted from affected persons. A case control study suggested that persons who worked in the abattoir were 2.03 times more likely to have had diarrhea, but none of the risk factors studied were significant. The epicurve of the outbreak was inconclusive as to the likely mode of spread of C. fetus. All of the C. fetus strains isolated from the blood of the infant and from the fecal samples were the same by biochemical and antibiotic susceptibility tests. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that all isolates produced identical restriction endonuclease patterns and differed from other nonepidemiologically related strains of C. fetus. Images PMID:7910829

  10. Critical aspects of the Nosema spp. diagnostic sampling in honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies.

    PubMed

    Botías, Cristina; Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Meana, Aránzazu; Higes, Mariano

    2012-06-01

    Nosemosis is one of the most widespread of the adult honey bee diseases and causes major economic losses to beekeepers. Two microsporidia have been described infecting honey bees worldwide, Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae, whose seasonality and pathology differ markedly. An increasing prevalence of microsporidian infections in honey bees has been observed worldwide during the last years. Because nosemosis has detrimental effects on both strength and productivity of the infected colonies, an accurate and reliable method to evaluate the presence of Nosema in honey bee colonies is needed. In this study a high degree of variability in the detection of microsporidia depending on the random subsample analyzed was found, suggesting that both sample size and the time of collection (month and day of sampling) notably affect the diagnosis. PMID:22193523

  11. Relationships between virulence and morphological or serological properties of variants dissociated from serotype 1 Haemophilus paragallinarum strains.

    PubMed

    Sawata, A; Kume, K

    1983-07-01

    Relationships between morphological or serological properties and virulence were investigated in seven Haemophilus paragallinarum variants. The variants, originated from five serotype 1 strains, were classified into seven types on the basis of colony morphology and iridescence and the presence of variant-specific antigens. Smooth (S) and encapsulated organisms having variant-specific antigens and forming highly iridescent (ir+) colonies were highly virulent in vivo; slightly encapsulated organisms having variant-specific antigens and forming slightly iridescent (ir +/-) colonies were moderately virulent; and nonencapsulated or slightly encapsulated organisms with or without variant-specific antigens and forming noniridescent (ir-) or ir +/- colonies were avirulent. Virulence was well correlated with the amount of capsule substance containing hyaluronic acid. The evidence suggests that the presence of variant-specific agglutinogen L and hemagglutinin HA-L seem to be responsible for adherence or colonization, but not for virulence, of the organisms in chickens. PMID:6885991

  12. Relationships between virulence and morphological or serological properties of variants dissociated from serotype 1 Haemophilus paragallinarum strains.

    PubMed Central

    Sawata, A; Kume, K

    1983-01-01

    Relationships between morphological or serological properties and virulence were investigated in seven Haemophilus paragallinarum variants. The variants, originated from five serotype 1 strains, were classified into seven types on the basis of colony morphology and iridescence and the presence of variant-specific antigens. Smooth (S) and encapsulated organisms having variant-specific antigens and forming highly iridescent (ir+) colonies were highly virulent in vivo; slightly encapsulated organisms having variant-specific antigens and forming slightly iridescent (ir +/-) colonies were moderately virulent; and nonencapsulated or slightly encapsulated organisms with or without variant-specific antigens and forming noniridescent (ir-) or ir +/- colonies were avirulent. Virulence was well correlated with the amount of capsule substance containing hyaluronic acid. The evidence suggests that the presence of variant-specific agglutinogen L and hemagglutinin HA-L seem to be responsible for adherence or colonization, but not for virulence, of the organisms in chickens. PMID:6885991

  13. Iridovirus and Microsporidian Linked to Honey Bee Colony Decline

    PubMed Central

    Bromenshenk, Jerry J.; Henderson, Colin B.; Wick, Charles H.; Stanford, Michael F.; Zulich, Alan W.; Jabbour, Rabih E.; Deshpande, Samir V.; McCubbin, Patrick E.; Seccomb, Robert A.; Welch, Phillip M.; Williams, Trevor; Firth, David R.; Skowronski, Evan; Lehmann, Margaret M.; Bilimoria, Shan L.; Gress, Joanna; Wanner, Kevin W.; Cramer, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Background In 2010 Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), again devastated honey bee colonies in the USA, indicating that the problem is neither diminishing nor has it been resolved. Many CCD investigations, using sensitive genome-based methods, have found small RNA bee viruses and the microsporidia, Nosema apis and N. ceranae in healthy and collapsing colonies alike with no single pathogen firmly linked to honey bee losses. Methodology/Principal Findings We used Mass spectrometry-based proteomics (MSP) to identify and quantify thousands of proteins from healthy and collapsing bee colonies. MSP revealed two unreported RNA viruses in North American honey bees, Varroa destructor-1 virus and Kakugo virus, and identified an invertebrate iridescent virus (IIV) (Iridoviridae) associated with CCD colonies. Prevalence of IIV significantly discriminated among strong, failing, and collapsed colonies. In addition, bees in failing colonies contained not only IIV, but also Nosema. Co-occurrence of these microbes consistently marked CCD in (1) bees from commercial apiaries sampled across the U.S. in 2006–2007, (2) bees sequentially sampled as the disorder progressed in an observation hive colony in 2008, and (3) bees from a recurrence of CCD in Florida in 2009. The pathogen pairing was not observed in samples from colonies with no history of CCD, namely bees from Australia and a large, non-migratory beekeeping business in Montana. Laboratory cage trials with a strain of IIV type 6 and Nosema ceranae confirmed that co-infection with these two pathogens was more lethal to bees than either pathogen alone. Conclusions/Significance These findings implicate co-infection by IIV and Nosema with honey bee colony decline, giving credence to older research pointing to IIV, interacting with Nosema and mites, as probable cause of bee losses in the USA, Europe, and Asia. We next need to characterize the IIV and Nosema that we detected and develop management practices to reduce honey bee losses

  14. Morphologic and Gene Expression Criteria for Identifying Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wakao, Shohei; Kitada, Masaaki; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Ogura, Fumitaka; Murakami, Toru; Niwa, Akira; Dezawa, Mari

    2012-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be generated from somatic cells by the forced expression of four factors, Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc. While a great variety of colonies grow during induction, only a few of them develop into iPS cells. Researchers currently use visual observation to identify iPS cells and select colonies resembling embryonic stem (ES) cells, and there are no established objective criteria. Therefore, we exhaustively analyzed the morphology and gene expression of all the colonies generated from human fibroblasts after transfection with four retroviral vectors encoding individual factors (192 and 203 colonies in two experiments) and with a single polycistronic retroviral vector encoding all four factors (199 and 192 colonies in two experiments). Here we demonstrate that the morphologic features of emerged colonies can be categorized based on six parameters, and all generated colonies that could be passaged were classified into seven subtypes in colonies transfected with four retroviral vectors and six subtypes with a single polycistronic retroviral vector, both including iPS cell colonies. The essential qualifications for iPS cells were: cells with a single nucleolus; nucleus to nucleolus (N/Nls) ratio ∼2.19: cell size ∼43.5 µm2: a nucleus to cytoplasm (N/C) ratio ∼0.87: cell density in a colony ∼5900 cells/mm2: and number of cell layer single. Most importantly, gene expression analysis revealed for the first time that endogenous Sox2 and Cdx2 were expressed specifically in iPS cells, whereas Oct3/4 and Nanog, popularly used markers for identifying iPS cells, are expressed in colonies other than iPS cells, suggesting that Sox2 and Cdx2 are reliable markers for identifying iPS cells. Our findings indicate that morphologic parameters and the expression of endogenous Sox2 and Cdx2 can be used to accurately identify iPS cells. PMID:23272044

  15. Intra-individual variation in the vocalized frequency of the Taiwanese leaf-nosed bat, Hipposideros terasensis, influenced by conspecific colony members.

    PubMed

    Hiryu, Shizuko; Katsura, Koji; Nagato, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Hideo; Lin, Liang-Kong; Watanabe, Yoshiaki; Riquimaroux, Hiroshi

    2006-08-01

    We examined the intra-individual variation in resting frequency of the constant-frequency component of the second harmonic of the pulse (F (rest)) over 4 years in a laboratory colony of the Taiwanese leaf-nosed bat (Hipposideros terasensis). Patterns of change in F (rest) were observed when individuals were added to or removed from the colony so that we investigated whether F (rest) was affected by neighboring colony members. F (rest) of each bat continually showed a long-term gradual change throughout the year, and all bats in the colony increased or decreased their F (rest) in the same direction as a group non-seasonally. The greatest short-term changes were observed when new bats with a relatively low F (rest) joined the colony and F (rest) of new bats converged with those of the original colony members around 8 -16 days after their introduction. Conversely, a single individual showed sudden short-term decrease in F (rest) after its isolation from other colony members. These findings strongly indicate that F (rest) is flexible according to the presence of neighboring conspecific bats. We suggest that the audio-vocal feedback for conspecific pulses appears to be involved in the short- or long-term intra-individual variation in F (rest) other than factors previously thought such as age or season. PMID:16538514

  16. The effects of four insect growth-regulating (IGR) insecticides on honeybee (Apis mellifera L.) colony development, queen rearing and drone sperm production.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Helen M; Wilkins, Selwyn; Battersby, Alastair H; Waite, Ruth J; Wilkinson, David

    2005-10-01

    This study assessed the effects of exposure to IGRs on the long-term development of the honeybee colony, viability of queens and sperm production in drones and integrated the data into a honeybee population model. Colonies treated with diflubenzuron resulted in a short-term reduction in the numbers of adult bees and brood. Colonies treated with fenoxycarb declined during the season earlier and started the season slower. The number of queens that successfully mated and laid eggs was affected in the fenoxycarb treatment group but there were no significant differences in the drone sperm counts between the colonies. An existing honeybee population model was modified to include exposure to IGRs. In the model, fenoxycarb reduced the winter size of the colony, with the greatest effects following a June or an August application. Assuming a 'larvae per nurse bee' ratio of 1.5 for brood rearing capability, the reduction in winter size of a colony following a fenoxycarb application was at its worst about 8%. However, even if only those bees reared within 2 weeks of the IGR being applied are subject to premature ageing, this might significantly reduce the size of over-wintering colonies, and increase the chance of the bee population dwindling and dying in late winter or early spring. PMID:16160749

  17. Neonicotinoids impact bumblebee colony fitness in the field; a reanalysis of the UK's Food & Environment Research Agency 2012 experiment.

    PubMed

    Goulson, Dave

    2015-01-01

    The causes of bee declines remain hotly debated, particularly the contribution of neonicotinoid insecticides. In 2013 the UK's Food & Environment Research Agency made public a study of the impacts of exposure of bumblebee colonies to neonicotinoids. The study concluded that there was no clear relationship between colony performance and pesticide exposure, and the study was subsequently cited by the UK government in a policy paper in support of their vote against a proposed moratorium on some uses of neonicotinoids. Here I present a simple re-analysis of this data set. It demonstrates that these data in fact do show a negative relationship between both colony growth and queen production and the levels of neonicotinoids in the food stores collected by the bees. Indeed, this is the first study describing substantial negative impacts of neonicotinoids on colony performance of any bee species with free-flying bees in a field realistic situation where pesticide exposure is provided only as part of normal farming practices. It strongly suggests that wild bumblebee colonies in farmland can be expected to be adversely affected by exposure to neonicotinoids. PMID:25825679

  18. Evaluation of factors affecting the membrane filter technique for testing drinking water.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, S C; Williams, T J

    1982-01-01

    The following studies were done in response to questions regarding the adoption and use of the membrane filter (MF) technique for testing drinking water for the total coliform indicator group. A comparison with the most-probable-number technique showed that MF procedures with m-Endo agar LES were somewhat superior to the most-probable-number methods in terms of numbers of coliform organims recovered. Medium preparation and storage studies indicated that rehydration of m-Endo agar LES should be done with boiling water for less than 15 min, that m-Endo agar LES should not be exposed to light for more than 4 to 6 h, and that m-Endo agar LES plates may be used for up to 4 weeks and broth verification media for up to 3 weeks under given storage conditions. MF culture colonies were commonly found which did not produce sheen as expected for coliforms and yet were verified as coliforms. The occurrence and morphology of these atypical colonies were studied. Parallel inoculation of both lauryl tryptose (LT) and brilliant green bile (BGB) broth was found to be a better colony verification approach than recommended LT preenrichment before transfer to BGB. Comparison of parallel verification results indicated very little justification for the use of LT medium in MF verification procedures. In the case of overgrown or confluent cultures, the best coliform recoveries resulted from swabbing the MF plate and directly inoculating BGB medium with the swab. The occurrence of overgrowth was defined and evidence was collected suggesting that overgrowth is a function of sample holding time. Evaluation of routine test data and bacterial population reductions as a function of time indicated that nonquantitative recovery of coliforms may not be significantly affected for at least a 72-h sample holding time. PMID:6751233

  19. Characteristics of rat megakaryocyte colonies and their progenitors in agar culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kellar, K.L.; Rolovic, Z.; Evatt, B.L.; Sewell, E.T.

    1985-11-01

    The characteristics of megakaryocyte colonies that develop from megakaryocyte progenitors of rat bone marrow stimulated by rat spleen-conditioned medium (SCM) in agar culture were investigated. Colony frequency was optimal on day 7 and increased relative to both the number of cells plated and the concentration of SCM used. Colonies were categorized as small cell and big cell. Small-cell colonies had a greater proliferative potential, with a mean of 25 cells/colony. Big-cell colonies averaged 15 cells/colony. The ratio of big-cell to small-cell colonies was 0.69 +/- 0.29. Granulocyte-macrophage colonies, which were also stimulated by SCM, accounted for 70% +/- 15% of the total colonies in the cultures. Cytocidal experiments with tritiated thymidine reduced megakaryocyte colony formation by 45% and granulocyte-macrophage colony formation by 21%. The properties of rat, mouse, and human megakaryocyte progenitors as assayed in vitro are compared.

  20. Morphological and molecular analysis of Fusarium lateritium, the cause of gray necrosis of hazelnut fruit in Italy.

    PubMed

    Vitale, S; Santori, A; Wajnberg, E; Castagnone-Sereno, P; Luongo, L; Belisario, A

    2011-06-01

    Fusarium lateritium is a globally distributed plant pathogen. It was recently reported as the causal agent of nut gray necrosis (NGN) on hazelnut. Isolate characterization within F. lateritium was undertaken to investigate how morphological and molecular diversity was associated with host and geographic origin. Morphological studies combined with inter-simple-sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis, and phylogenetic analyses using translation elongation factor 1α (TEF-1α), β-tubulin genes, and nuclear ribosomal DNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences were conducted to resolve relationships among 32 F. lateritium isolates from NGN-affected hazelnut fruit, and 14 from other substrates or 8 from other hosts than hazelnut. Colonies of F. lateritium from hazelnut showed dark grayish-olive differing from the orange-yellow color of all other isolates from other hosts. Generally, isolates from NGN-affected fruit failed to produce sporodochia on carnation leaf agar. The influence of host and substrate on the genetic structure of F. lateritium was supported by ISSR and analyzed with principal coordinates analysis. A relationship between hazelnut and genetic variation was inferred. Phylogenetic analysis of ITS provided limited resolution while TEF-1α and β-tubulin analyses allowed a clear separation between the European and non-European F. lateritium isolates retrieved from GenBank, regardless of host. Though morphological traits of F. lateritium isolates from hazelnut were generally uniform in defining a typical morphogroup, they were not yet phylogenetically defined. In contrast, the typology related to slimy deep orange cultures, due to spore mass, grouped clearly separated from the other F. lateritium isolates and revealed a congruence between morphology and phylogeny. PMID:21261470

  1. Valleywide patterns of posteruption erosion and deposition in the South Fork Toutle River, Washington—evidence of valley morphology and hillslope-channel coupling affecting sediment supply, storage, and delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, J. J.; Mark, L.

    2009-12-01

    Following the May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, greatly elevated sediment loads issued from river valleys heavily impacted by the eruption. The extraordinary sediment loads resulted chiefly from erosion of thick deposits of fresh volcanic sediment. Within 5 years of the eruption, loads from some basins returned to pre-eruption levels, whereas in others they remain elevated after nearly 3 decades. In the South Fork Toutle (SFT) River basin on the volcano’s west flank, sediment loads remain highly variable and commonly are equivalent to or exceed those measured in the early 1980s. To gain insights on the sources of the sediment loads, their longevity, and the causes of their anomalously high variability compared to neighboring basins, we examined vertical topographic changes among a time-series of digital elevation models (DEMs; RMSE ˜3m) made from aerial photographs and lidar of the 50-km-long valley. The DEMs represent posteruption conditions in June 1980, 2000, and 2003. Our examination reveals patterns of erosion and deposition that appear to be controlled by valley morphology and hillslope-channel coupling. Between 1980 and 2000, erosion and deposition were focused in alternating reach-scale hotspots (˜3 km long). Within 15 km of the summit, long-term net channel deposition predominated, but sandwiched a 3-km-long reach of intense erosion. Net deposition proximal to the volcano was likely the result of persistent sediment influx from the high, steep flanks of the volcano, composed of unconsolidated, readily erodible sediment prone to mass wasting. Reach-scale deposition downstream of reach-scale erosion occurred in reaches of valley expansion, in valley embayments, and where channels abutted steep hillslopes. In the valley’s distal 10 km, where the channel is less directly connected to hillslopes, where hillslope sediment sources capable of channel replenishment are more limited, and where sediment removal outpaced upstream sediment input, long

  2. Pteridine levels and head weights are correlated with age and colony task in the honey bee, Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Rinkevich, Frank D; Margotta, Joseph W; Pittman, Jean M; Ottea, James A; Healy, Kristen B

    2016-01-01

    Background. The age of an insect strongly influences many aspects of behavior and reproduction. The interaction of age and behavior is epitomized in the temporal polyethism of honey bees in which young adult bees perform nurse and maintenance duties within the colony, while older bees forage for nectar and pollen. Task transition is dynamic and driven by colony needs. However, an abundance of precocious foragers or overage nurses may have detrimental effects on the colony. Additionally, honey bee age affects insecticide sensitivity. Therefore, determining the age of a set of individual honey bees would be an important measurement of colony health. Pteridines are purine-based pigment molecules found in many insect body parts. Pteridine levels correlate well with age, and wild caught insects may be accurately aged by measuring pteridine levels. The relationship between pteridines and age varies with a number of internal and external factors among many species. Thus far, no studies have investigated the relationship of pteridines with age in honey bees. Methods. We established single-cohort colonies to obtain age-matched nurse and forager bees. Bees of known ages were also sampled from colonies with normal demographics. Nurses and foragers were collected every 3-5 days for up to 42 days. Heads were removed and weighed before pteridines were purified and analyzed using previously established fluorometric methods. Results. Our analysis showed that pteridine levels significantly increased with age in a linear manner in both single cohort colonies and colonies with normal demography. Pteridine levels were higher in foragers than nurses of the same age in bees from single cohort colonies. Head weight significantly increased with age until approximately 28-days of age and then declined for both nurse and forager bees in single cohort colonies. A similar pattern of head weight in bees from colonies with normal demography was observed but head weight was highest in 8-day old

  3. Pteridine levels and head weights are correlated with age and colony task in the honey bee, Apis mellifera

    PubMed Central

    Rinkevich, Frank D.; Margotta, Joseph W.; Pittman, Jean M.; Ottea, James A.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The age of an insect strongly influences many aspects of behavior and reproduction. The interaction of age and behavior is epitomized in the temporal polyethism of honey bees in which young adult bees perform nurse and maintenance duties within the colony, while older bees forage for nectar and pollen. Task transition is dynamic and driven by colony needs. However, an abundance of precocious foragers or overage nurses may have detrimental effects on the colony. Additionally, honey bee age affects insecticide sensitivity. Therefore, determining the age of a set of individual honey bees would be an important measurement of colony health. Pteridines are purine-based pigment molecules found in many insect body parts. Pteridine levels correlate well with age, and wild caught insects may be accurately aged by measuring pteridine levels. The relationship between pteridines and age varies with a number of internal and external factors among many species. Thus far, no studies have investigated the relationship of pteridines with age in honey bees. Methods. We established single-cohort colonies to obtain age-matched nurse and forager bees. Bees of known ages were also sampled from colonies with normal demographics. Nurses and foragers were collected every 3–5 days for up to 42 days. Heads were removed and weighed before pteridines were purified and analyzed using previously established fluorometric methods. Results. Our analysis showed that pteridine levels significantly increased with age in a linear manner in both single cohort colonies and colonies with normal demography. Pteridine levels were higher in foragers than nurses of the same age in bees from single cohort colonies. Head weight significantly increased with age until approximately 28-days of age and then declined for both nurse and forager bees in single cohort colonies. A similar pattern of head weight in bees from colonies with normal demography was observed but head weight was highest in 8-day

  4. Between stigmatisation and regulation: prostitution in colonial Northern Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Tracol-Huynh, Isabelle

    2010-08-01

    Colonisation was a masculine adventure which took place in a distorted world full of 'welcoming' native women. The colonial encounter therefore was both racial and gendered: boundaries between European men and Vietnamese women were obvious. On the other hand the intimacy that resulted from this encounter blurred the racial boundaries that were the foundation of the colonial order. These boundaries had to be redrawn or sharpened. Focusing on French colonial northern Vietnam (Tonkin) this paper examines how the whole colonial encounter was embodied in the sexual encounter between European men and native women and how prostitution was an integral part of the colonial order. This analysis of the regulation of prostitution and its ambivalence reveals that the definition of prostitution and its treatment by the French colonial authorities was political, racial and therefore connected to a specific period. The political definition of prostitution in today's Vietnam is different from the colonial one. This shift reveals that prostitution is a pertinent vantage point from which one can study how a society apprehends itself and its own future. PMID:20364443

  5. The hyper-cube framework for ant colony optimization.

    PubMed

    Blum, Christian; Dorigo, Marco

    2004-04-01

    Ant colony optimization is a metaheuristic approach belonging to the class of model-based search algorithms. In this paper, we propose a new framework for implementing ant colony optimization algorithms called the hyper-cube framework for ant colony optimization. In contrast to the usual way of implementing ant colony optimization algorithms, this framework limits the pheromone values to the interval [0,1]. This is obtained by introducing changes in the pheromone value update rule. These changes can in general be applied to any pheromone value update rule used in ant colony optimization. We discuss the benefits coming with this new framework. The benefits are twofold. On the theoretical side, the new framework allows us to prove that in Ant System, the ancestor of all ant colony optimization algorithms, the average quality of the solutions produced increases in expectation over time when applied to unconstrained problems. On the practical side, the new framework automatically handles the scaling of the objective function values. We experimentally show that this leads on average to a more robust behavior of ant colony optimization algorithms. PMID:15376861

  6. Ecological Conditions Favoring Budding in Colonial Organisms under Environmental Disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Nakamaru, Mayuko; Takada, Takenori; Ohtsuki, Akiko; Suzuki, Sayaki U.; Miura, Kanan; Tsuji, Kazuki

    2014-01-01

    Dispersal is a topic of great interest in ecology. Many organisms adopt one of two distinct dispersal tactics at reproduction: the production of small offspring that can disperse over long distances (such as seeds and spawned eggs), or budding. The latter is observed in some colonial organisms, such as clonal plants, corals and ants, in which (super)organisms split their body into components of relatively large size that disperse to a short distance. Contrary to the common dispersal viewpoint, short-dispersal colonial organisms often flourish even in environments with frequent disturbances. In this paper, we investigate the conditions that favor budding over long-distance dispersal of small offspring, focusing on the life history of the colony growth and the colony division ratio. These conditions are the relatively high mortality of very small colonies, logistic growth, the ability of dispersers to peacefully seek and settle unoccupied spaces, and small spatial scale of environmental disturbance. If these conditions hold, budding is advantageous even when environmental disturbance is frequent. These results suggest that the demography or life history of the colony underlies the behaviors of the colonial organisms. PMID:24621824

  7. The colonial context of Filipino American immigrants' psychological experiences.

    PubMed

    David, E J R; Nadal, Kevin L

    2013-07-01

    Because of the long colonial history of Filipinos and the highly Americanized climate of postcolonial Philippines, many scholars from various disciplines have speculated that colonialism and its legacies may play major roles in Filipino emigration to the United States. However, there are no known empirical studies in psychology that specifically investigate whether colonialism and its effects have influenced the psychological experiences of Filipino American immigrants prior to their arrival in the United States. Further, there is no existing empirical study that specifically investigates the extent to which colonialism and its legacies continue to influence Filipino American immigrants' mental health. Thus, using interviews (N = 6) and surveys (N = 219) with Filipino American immigrants, two studies found that colonialism and its consequences are important factors to consider when conceptualizing the psychological experiences of Filipino American immigrants. Specifically, the findings suggest that (a) Filipino American immigrants experienced ethnic and cultural denigration in the Philippines prior to their U.S. arrival, (b) ethnic and cultural denigration in the Philippines and in the United States may lead to the development of colonial mentality (CM), and (c) that CM may have negative mental health consequences among Filipino American immigrants. The two studies' findings suggest that the Filipino American immigration experience cannot be completely captured by the voluntary immigrant narrative, as they provide empirical support to the notion that the Filipino American immigration experience needs to be understood in the context of colonialism and its most insidious psychological legacy- CM. PMID:23875854

  8. Dynamical Models of Task Organization in Social Insect Colonies.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yun; Theraulaz, Guy

    2016-05-01

    The organizations of insect societies, such as division of labor, task allocation, collective regulation, mass action responses, have been considered as main reasons for the ecological success. In this article, we propose and study a general modeling framework that includes the following three features: (a) the average internal response threshold for each task (the internal factor); (b) social network communications that could lead to task switching (the environmental factor); and (c) dynamical changes of task demands (the external factor). Since workers in many social insect species exhibit age polyethism, we also extend our model to incorporate age polyethism in which worker task preferences change with age. We apply our general modeling framework to the cases of two task groups: the inside colony task versus the outside colony task. Our analytical study of the models provides important insights and predictions on the effects of colony size, social communication, and age-related task preferences on task allocation and division of labor in the adaptive dynamical environment. Our study implies that the smaller size colony invests its resource for the colony growth and allocates more workers in the risky tasks such as foraging while the larger colony shifts more workers to perform the safer tasks inside the colony. Social interactions among different task groups play an important role in shaping task allocation depending on the relative cost and demands of the tasks. PMID:27125656

  9. Was Fundamental Education Another Form Of Colonialism?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watras, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    A description of the work of Pedro Tamesis Orata provides an opportunity to investigate the conflicts that can occur when educators seek to reduce poverty while trying to respect indigenous cultures. A native of the Philippines, Orata completed his doctoral studies at the Ohio State University in 1927. During US President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal, he accepted the position of school principal for the US Bureau of Indian Affairs. After World War II, he directed the spread of fundamental education through the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). In his final years, he returned to the Philippines where he began a movement to spread what were called self-help high schools. In these activities, Orata taught people to follow John Dewey's five steps of thinking while working to improve their standards of living. In the 1970s, educators, such as Paulo Freire, complained that problem-solving methods, similar to those Orata favored, reinforced the oppressive aspects of formerly colonial societies. While Freire may have been overly critical, conflicts among cultural orientations appear to be unavoidable. The hope behind this investigation is that the difficulties can be reduced when people understand the different forces that persist.

  10. How Can Bee Colony Algorithm Serve Medicine?

    PubMed Central

    Salehahmadi, Zeinab; Manafi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare professionals usually should make complex decisions with far reaching consequences and associated risks in health care fields. As it was demonstrated in other industries, the ability to drill down into pertinent data to explore knowledge behind the data can greatly facilitate superior, informed decisions to ensue the facts. Nature has always inspired researchers to develop models of solving the problems. Bee colony algorithm (BCA), based on the self-organized behavior of social insects is one of the most popular member of the family of population oriented, nature inspired meta-heuristic swarm intelligence method which has been proved its superiority over some other nature inspired algorithms. The objective of this model was to identify valid novel, potentially useful, and understandable correlations and patterns in existing data. This review employs a thematic analysis of online series of academic papers to outline BCA in medical hive, reducing the response and computational time and optimizing the problems. To illustrate the benefits of this model, the cases of disease diagnose system are presented. PMID:25489530

  11. Modeling the dynamics of ant colony optimization.

    PubMed

    Merkle, Daniel; Middendorf, Martin

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics of Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) algorithms is studied using a deterministic model that assumes an average expected behavior of the algorithms. The ACO optimization metaheuristic is an iterative approach, where in every iteration, artificial ants construct solutions randomly but guided by pheromone information stemming from former ants that found good solutions. The behavior of ACO algorithms and the ACO model are analyzed for certain types of permutation problems. It is shown analytically that the decisions of an ant are influenced in an intriguing way by the use of the pheromone information and the properties of the pheromone matrix. This explains why ACO algorithms can show a complex dynamic behavior even when there is only one ant per iteration and no competition occurs. The ACO model is used to describe the algorithm behavior as a combination of situations with different degrees of competition between the ants. This helps to better understand the dynamics of the algorithm when there are several ants per iteration as is always the case when using ACO algorithms for optimization. Simulations are done to compare the behavior of the ACO model with the ACO algorithm. Results show that the deterministic model describes essential features of the dynamics of ACO algorithms quite accurately, while other aspects of the algorithms behavior cannot be found in the model. PMID:12227995

  12. Robustness of Ant Colony Optimization to Noise.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Tobias; Kötzing, Timo; Krejca, Martin S; Sutton, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Recently, ant colony optimization (ACO) algorithms have proven to be efficient in uncertain environments, such as noisy or dynamically changing fitness functions. Most of these analyses have focused on combinatorial problems such as path finding. We rigorously analyze an ACO algorithm optimizing linear pseudo-Boolean functions under additive posterior noise. We study noise distributions whose tails decay exponentially fast, including the classical case of additive Gaussian noise. Without noise, the classical [Formula: see text] EA outperforms any ACO algorithm, with smaller [Formula: see text] being better; however, in the case of large noise, the [Formula: see text] EA fails, even for high values of [Formula: see text] (which are known to help against small noise). In this article, we show that ACO is able to deal with arbitrarily large noise in a graceful manner; that is, as long as the evaporation factor [Formula: see text] is small enough, dependent on the variance [Formula: see text] of the noise and the dimension n of the search space, optimization will be successful. We also briefly consider the case of prior noise and prove that ACO can also efficiently optimize linear functions under this noise model. PMID:26928850

  13. How can bee colony algorithm serve medicine?

    PubMed

    Salehahmadi, Zeinab; Manafi, Amir

    2014-07-01

    Healthcare professionals usually should make complex decisions with far reaching consequences and associated risks in health care fields. As it was demonstrated in other industries, the ability to drill down into pertinent data to explore knowledge behind the data can greatly facilitate superior, informed decisions to ensue the facts. Nature has always inspired researchers to develop models of solving the problems. Bee colony algorithm (BCA), based on the self-organized behavior of social insects is one of the most popular member of the family of population oriented, nature inspired meta-heuristic swarm intelligence method which has been proved its superiority over some other nature inspired algorithms. The objective of this model was to identify valid novel, potentially useful, and understandable correlations and patterns in existing data. This review employs a thematic analysis of online series of academic papers to outline BCA in medical hive, reducing the response and computational time and optimizing the problems. To illustrate the benefits of this model, the cases of disease diagnose system are presented. PMID:25489530

  14. Altruism and relatedness at colony foundation in social insects.

    PubMed

    Strassmann, J E

    1989-12-01

    Cooperative nest initiation in social insects is most easily explained when cooperating females are relatives, as is common in polistine wasps. However, recent research has revealed that unrelated ant queens also initiate colonies together. Reproductive dominance hierarchies are absent among unrelated foundresses, which contrasts with the rigid dominance hierarchies found among related foundresses. New field studies of joint nest founding among non-relatives show that cooperation is favored where colonies are clumped and brood raiding is common, so that attaining a large worker force quickly is critical to colony survival. These studies enrich our understanding of the role of relatedness in social groups. PMID:21227381

  15. Solving Integer Programming Problems by Using Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akay, Bahriye; Karaboga, Dervis

    This paper presents a study that applies the Artificial Bee Colony algorithm to integer programming problems and compares its performance with those of Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm variants and Branch and Bound technique presented to the literature. In order to cope with integer programming problems, in neighbour solution production unit, solutions are truncated to the nearest integer values. The experimental results show that Artificial Bee Colony algorithm can handle integer programming problems efficiently and Artificial Bee Colony algorithm can be considered to be very robust by the statistics calculated such as mean, median, standard deviation.

  16. Distribution and morphology of growth anomaliesin Acropora from the Indo-Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Aeby, G.S.; Coles, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    We assessed the distribution and prevalence of growth anomalies (GAs) in Acropora from French Frigate Shoals (Hawaii, USA), Johnston Atoll and Tutuila (American Samoa), developed a nomenclature for gross morphology, characterized GAs at the cellular level and obtained preliminary indices of their spatial patterns and progression within coral colonies. Acropora GAs were found in all 3 regions, but the distribution, variety and prevalence of Acropora GAs was highest in American Samoa. GAs were grouped into 7 gross morphologies (exophytic, bosselated, crateriform, nodular, vermiform, fimbriate or annular). On histology, GAs consisted of hyperplastic basal body wall (calicodermis, mesoglea and gastrodermis apposed to skeleton) with 3 distinct patterns of necrosis. There was no evidence of anaplasia or mitotic figures (common but not necessarily required morphologic indicators of neoplasia). Compared to normal tissues, GAs had significantly fewer polyps, zooxanthellae within the gastrodermis of the coenenchyme, mesenterial filaments and gonads but significantly more necrosis. On 2 colonies with GAs monitored at 2 points over 11 mo, numbers of GAs per colony increased from 0.9 to 3 times the original number seen, and significant clustering of GAs occurred within colonies. The evidence of GAs being true neoplasias (tumors) is mixed, so a cautionary approach is urged in use of morphologic terminology.

  17. Increased Inter-Colony Fusion Rates Are Associated with Reduced COI Haplotype Diversity in an Invasive Colonial Ascidian Didemnum vexillum

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kirsty F.; Stefaniak, Lauren; Saito, Yasunori; Gemmill, Chrissen E. C.; Cary, S. Craig; Fidler, Andrew E.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable progress in our understanding of the population genetic changes associated with biological invasions has been made over the past decade. Using selectively neutral loci, it has been established that reductions in genetic diversity, reflecting founder effects, have occurred during the establishment of some invasive populations. However, some colonial organisms may actually gain an ecological advantage from reduced genetic diversity because of the associated reduction in inter-colony conflict. Here we report population genetic analyses, along with colony fusion experiments, for a highly invasive colonial ascidian, Didemnum vexillum. Analyses based on mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) partial coding sequences revealed two distinct D. vexillum clades. One COI clade appears to be restricted to the probable native region (i.e., north-west Pacific Ocean), while the other clade is present in widely dispersed temperate coastal waters around the world. This clade structure was supported by 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence data, which revealed a one base-pair difference between the two clades. Recently established populations of D. vexillum in New Zealand displayed greatly reduced COI genetic diversity when compared with D. vexillum in Japan. In association with this reduction in genetic diversity was a significantly higher inter-colony fusion rate between randomly paired New Zealand D. vexillum colonies (80%, standard deviation ±18%) when compared with colonies found in Japan (27%, standard deviation ±15%). The results of this study add to growing evidence that for colonial organisms reductions in population level genetic diversity may alter colony interaction dynamics and enhance the invasive potential of newly colonizing species. PMID:22303442

  18. Temperature-mediated transitions between isometry and allometry in a colonial, modular invertebrate.

    PubMed

    Edmunds, Peter J

    2006-09-22

    The evolutionary success of animal design is strongly affected by scaling and virtually all metazoans are constrained by allometry. One body plan that appears to relax these constraints is a colonial modular (CM) design, in which modular iteration is hypothesized to support isometry and indeterminate colony size. In this study, growth rates of juvenile scleractinians (less than 40mm diameter) with a CM design were used to test this assertion using colony diameters recorded annually for a decade and scaling exponents (b) for growth calculated from double logarithmic plots of final versus initial diameters. For all juvenile corals, b differed significantly among years, with isometry (b=1) in 4 years, but positive allometry (b>1) in 5 years. The study years were characterized by differences in seawater temperature that were associated significantly with b for growth, with isometry in warm years but positive allometry in cool years. These results illustrate variable growth scaling in a CM taxon and suggest that the switch between scaling modes is mediated by temperature. For the corals studied, growth was not constrained by size, but this outcome was achieved through both isometry and positive allometry. Under cooler conditions, positive allometry may be beneficial as it represents a growth advantage that increases with size. PMID:16928628

  19. Dancing Bees Improve Colony Foraging Success as Long-Term Benefits Outweigh Short-Term Costs

    PubMed Central

    Schürch, Roger; Grüter, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Waggle dancing bees provide nestmates with spatial information about high quality resources. Surprisingly, attempts to quantify the benefits of this encoded spatial information have failed to find positive effects on colony foraging success under many ecological circumstances. Experimental designs have often involved measuring the foraging success of colonies that were repeatedly switched between oriented dances versus disoriented dances (i.e. communicating vectors versus not communicating vectors). However, if recruited bees continue to visit profitable food sources for more than one day, this procedure would lead to confounded results because of the long-term effects of successful recruitment events. Using agent-based simulations, we found that spatial information was beneficial in almost all ecological situations. Contrary to common belief, the benefits of recruitment increased with environmental stability because benefits can accumulate over time to outweigh the short-term costs of recruitment. Furthermore, we found that in simulations mimicking previous experiments, the benefits of communication were considerably underestimated (at low food density) or not detected at all (at medium and high densities). Our results suggest that the benefits of waggle dance communication are currently underestimated and that different experimental designs, which account for potential long-term benefits, are needed to measure empirically how spatial information affects colony foraging success. PMID:25141306

  20. Maternal Antibody Transmission in Relation to Mother Fluctuating Asymmetry in a Long-Lived Colonial Seabird: The Yellow-Legged Gull Larus michahellis

    PubMed Central

    Hammouda, Abdessalem; Selmi, Slaheddine; Pearce-Duvet, Jessica; Chokri, Mohamed Ali; Arnal, Audrey; Gauthier-Clerc, Michel; Boulinier, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Female birds transfer antibodies to their offspring via the egg yolk, thus possibly providing passive immunity against infectious diseases to which hatchlings may be exposed, thereby affecting their fitness. It is nonetheless unclear whether the amount of maternal antibodies transmitted into egg yolks varies with female quality and egg laying order. In this paper, we investigated the transfer of maternal antibodies against type A influenza viruses (anti-AIV antibodies) by a long-lived colonial seabird, the yellow-legged gull (Larus michahellis), in relation to fluctuating asymmetry in females, i.e. the random deviation from perfect symmetry in bilaterally symmetric morphological and anatomical traits. In particular, we tested whether females with greater asymmetry transmitted fewer antibodies to their eggs, and whether within-clutch variation in yolk antibodies varied according to the maternal level of fluctuating asymmetry. We found that asymmetric females were in worse physical condition, produced fewer antibodies, and transmitted lower amounts of antibodies to their eggs. We also found that, within a given clutch, yolk antibody level decreased with egg laying order, but this laying order effect was more pronounced in clutches laid by the more asymmetric females. Overall, our results support the hypothesis that maternal quality interacts with egg laying order in determining the amount of maternal antibodies transmitted to the yolks. They also highlight the usefulness of fluctuating asymmetry as a sensitive indicator of female quality and immunocompetence in birds. PMID:22590497