Science.gov

Sample records for affect customer satisfaction

  1. Beef customer satisfaction: factors affecting consumer evaluations of clod steaks.

    PubMed

    Goodson, K J; Morgan, W W; Reagan, J O; Gwartney, B L; Courington, S M; Wise, J W; Savell, J W

    2002-02-01

    customer satisfaction of the clod steak. Flavor Like was the sensory trait most highly correlated to Overall Like, followed by Tenderness, Flavor Amount, and Juiciness. Flavor Like was the first variable to enter into the stepwise regression equation for predicting Overall Like, followed by Tenderness and Flavor Amount. For the clod steak, it is likely that preparation techniques that improve flavor without reducing tenderness positively affect customer satisfaction.

  2. Customer Satisfaction with Public Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Elia, George; Rodger, Eleanor Jo

    1996-01-01

    Surveys conducted in 142 urban public libraries examined customer satisfaction, comparisons with other libraries, and factors affecting satisfaction. Overall, customers were satisfied with their libraries but experienced different levels of satisfaction based on convenience, availability of materials and information, and services facilitating…

  3. A modified dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy approach to modeling customer satisfaction for affective design.

    PubMed

    Kwong, C K; Fung, K Y; Jiang, Huimin; Chan, K Y; Siu, Kin Wai Michael

    2013-01-01

    Affective design is an important aspect of product development to achieve a competitive edge in the marketplace. A neural-fuzzy network approach has been attempted recently to model customer satisfaction for affective design and it has been proved to be an effective one to deal with the fuzziness and non-linearity of the modeling as well as generate explicit customer satisfaction models. However, such an approach to modeling customer satisfaction has two limitations. First, it is not suitable for the modeling problems which involve a large number of inputs. Second, it cannot adapt to new data sets, given that its structure is fixed once it has been developed. In this paper, a modified dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy approach is proposed to address the above mentioned limitations. A case study on the affective design of mobile phones was conducted to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. Validation tests were conducted and the test results indicated that: (1) the conventional Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) failed to run due to a large number of inputs; (2) the proposed dynamic neural-fuzzy model outperforms the subtractive clustering-based ANFIS model and fuzzy c-means clustering-based ANFIS model in terms of their modeling accuracy and computational effort.

  4. A Modified Dynamic Evolving Neural-Fuzzy Approach to Modeling Customer Satisfaction for Affective Design

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, C. K.; Fung, K. Y.; Jiang, Huimin; Chan, K. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Affective design is an important aspect of product development to achieve a competitive edge in the marketplace. A neural-fuzzy network approach has been attempted recently to model customer satisfaction for affective design and it has been proved to be an effective one to deal with the fuzziness and non-linearity of the modeling as well as generate explicit customer satisfaction models. However, such an approach to modeling customer satisfaction has two limitations. First, it is not suitable for the modeling problems which involve a large number of inputs. Second, it cannot adapt to new data sets, given that its structure is fixed once it has been developed. In this paper, a modified dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy approach is proposed to address the above mentioned limitations. A case study on the affective design of mobile phones was conducted to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methodology. Validation tests were conducted and the test results indicated that: (1) the conventional Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) failed to run due to a large number of inputs; (2) the proposed dynamic neural-fuzzy model outperforms the subtractive clustering-based ANFIS model and fuzzy c-means clustering-based ANFIS model in terms of their modeling accuracy and computational effort. PMID:24385884

  5. Measuring Customer Satisfaction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-01

    HSC/DR-TM-94-0001 Measuring Customer Satisfaction MAN MSTENE August 1994 DTIC DEC 23 1994 Capt Eileen G. Ancman Approved for Public Release...REPORT DATE 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Aug 1994 Final June 1994 - Aug 1994 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Measuring Customer Satisfaction IN...8217,’ Codes Avail anod or MEASURING CUSTOMER SATISFACTION BY CAPT EILEEN ANCMAN HSCIXRS BROOKS AFB TX AUGUST 1994 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION

  6. A Measurement of Civil Engineering Customer Satisfaction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    16 Response to Complaints .................................. 17 Measuring Customer Satisfaction .............................. 19...primarily because customer satisfaction is difficult to measure. There are no formal mechanisms for measuring customer satisfaction or identifying the...for measuring customer satisfaction (2:101-102). Many service writers, such as Peters and Czepiel, offer the success stories of some of America’s

  7. Employee and customer satisfaction in healthcare.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Todd; Wood, Ben D

    2010-01-01

    There were multiple factors identified in a literature review that have a relationship to customer satisfaction, customer loyalty, employee satisfaction, and links between employee and customer satisfaction. Some of the factors identified were communication, wait times, perceived value, trust, dissatisfaction with management, changes in the workplace, vision,and fun at work. Managers must identify these topics to ensure customer satisfaction, customer loyalty,and employee satisfaction which will ultimately have a positive impact on their organizations.

  8. Customer Satisfaction with Training Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulder, Martin

    2001-01-01

    A model for evaluating customer satisfaction with training programs was tested with training purchasers. The model confirmed two types of projects: training aimed at achieving learning results and at changing job performance. The model did not fit for training intended to support organizational change. (Contains 31 references.) (SK)

  9. Store manager performance and satisfaction: effects on store employee performance and satisfaction, store customer satisfaction, and store customer spending growth.

    PubMed

    Netemeyer, Richard G; Maxham, James G; Lichtenstein, Donald R

    2010-05-01

    Based on emotional contagion theory and the value-profit chain literatures, the present study posits a number of hypotheses that show how managers in the small store, small number of employees retail context may affect store employees, customers, and potentially store performance. With data from 306 store managers, 1,615 store customer-contact employees, and 57,656 customers of a single retail chain, the authors examined relationships among store manager job satisfaction and job performance, store customer-contact employee job satisfaction and job performance, customer satisfaction with the retailer, and a customer-spending-based store performance metric (customer spending growth over a 2-year period). Via path analysis, several hypothesized direct and interaction relations among these constructs are supported. The results suggest implications for academic researchers and retail managers.

  10. An Overview of Customer Satisfaction Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hom, Willard

    This document is a report on how California community colleges can incorporate customer satisfaction models and theories from business to better serve students. Emphasis is given to two levels of customer satisfaction: macro- and micro-models. Macro-models look at how customer satisfaction relates to other elements or priorities of community…

  11. A Simulation Model for Measuring Customer Satisfaction through Employee Satisfaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zondiros, Dimitris; Konstantopoulos, Nikolaos; Tomaras, Petros

    2007-12-01

    Customer satisfaction is defined as a measure of how a firm's product or service performs compared to customer's expectations. It has long been a subject of research due to its importance for measuring marketing and business performance. A lot of models have been developed for its measurement. This paper propose a simulation model using employee satisfaction as one of the most important factors leading to customer satisfaction (the others being expectations and disconfirmation of expectations). Data obtained from a two-year survey in customers of banks in Greece were used. The application of three approaches regarding employee satisfaction resulted in greater customer satisfaction when there is serious effort to keep employees satisfied.

  12. 48 CFR 11.203 - Customer satisfaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Customer satisfaction. 11... PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 11.203 Customer satisfaction. Acquisition organizations shall communicate with customers to determine how well the requirements...

  13. Measuring Customer Satisfaction with Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, Tracey M.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the measurement of customer satisfaction with public school districts based on collaborative efforts generated by the Florida Schoolyear 2000 Initiative. Describes implementing customer satisfaction surveys in Florida, explains the testing of the surveys with businesses and parents, and discusses trends in performance improvement. (LRW)

  14. Beef customer satisfaction: factors affecting consumer evaluations of calcium chloride-injected top sirloin steaks when given instructions for preparation.

    PubMed

    Behrends, J M; Goodson, K J; Koohmaraie, M; Shackelford, S D; Wheeler, T L; Morgan, W W; Reagan, J O; Gwartney, B L; Wise, J W; Savell, J W

    2005-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate whether instructions can help consumers properly prepare top sirloin steaks and to evaluate the use of calcium chloride injection to decrease the sensitivity of top sirloin steaks to degree of doneness, thereby improving customer satisfaction ratings. An in-home study evaluated top sirloin steaks (gluteus medius) as influenced by calcium chloride injection (injected vs. noninjected), consumer segment (beef loyalists = heavy consumers of beef, budget rotators = cost-driven and split meat consumption between beef and chicken, and variety rotators = higher incomes and education and split meat consumption among beef, poultry, and other foods), degree of doneness, cooking method, and instructions (given vs. not given). Consumers evaluated overall like, tenderness, juiciness, flavor like, and flavor amount using 10-point scales. Beef loyalists consistently rated steaks higher for overall like, juiciness, and flavor when instructions were provided (P < 0.05) and rated top sirloin steaks higher for overall like and tenderness when given instructions for grilling (P < 0.05). Budget rotators and variety rotators rated steaks differently among cooking methods (P < 0.05). Correlation and stepwise regression analyses indicated that flavor like was the most highly correlated with overall like, followed by tenderness, flavor amount, and juiciness. Calcium chloride injection had no effect on consumers' likes or dislikes or on tenderness (P < 0.05). For top sirloin steaks, it was likely that preparation played a major role in consumer satisfaction, and beef loyalists benefited the most from providing cooking instructions.

  15. Comprehensive Family Services and customer satisfaction outcomes.

    PubMed

    Huebner, Ruth A; Jones, Blake L; Miller, Viola P; Custer, Melba; Critchfield, Becky

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive Family Services (CFS) is a strengths-based and partnership-oriented approach to casework implemented through multiple initiatives. This study examines the relationship between the practice of CFS and satisfaction of clients, foster parents, and community partners. CFS indicators are paired with statewide customer satisfaction survey results. CFS practices are associated with significantly higher customer satisfaction that improved over time for all groups. Although causality cannot be determined, the relationship is consistent, robust, and meaningful.

  16. The hidden competencies of healthcare: why self-esteem, accountability, and professionalism may affect hospital customer satisfaction scores.

    PubMed

    Decker, P J

    1999-01-01

    Data from 103 for-profit, nonprofit, and government-owned hospitals, spread across about half of the United States clearly show that there are common elements and several core competencies in all hospitals, some probably driven by JCAHO accreditation standards, but others coming from universal experience stemming from the changes in healthcare. The common competencies that are not, in my opinion, driven directly by the JCAHO standards include professionalism, accountability, self-esteem, customer service/focus, communication, information management/using data in decision making, and teamwork. There are several possible connections among the core competencies that suggest that the effects of accountability and possibly self-esteem on such outcomes as patient satisfaction and quality of care should be the subject of more research in healthcare settings. There are, however, several possible interventions to increase the core competency base of any hospital, which can be applied without this research. Executives and managers who attempt to measure and change these common competencies through selection, assessment, organizational system change, or reward and compensation systems will change the competence base of their workforce in critical areas needed in the future healthcare economy. Using a competence model incorporating these competencies may change the culture of the organization toward that which will be needed for survival in the twenty-first century.

  17. Analysis of Customer Loyalty through Total Quality Service, Customer Relationship Management and Customer Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binsar Kristian P., Feliks Anggia; Panjaitan, Hotman

    2014-01-01

    This research talks about total quality service and customer relationship management effects toward customer satisfaction and its impact on customer loyalty. Fast food restaurant KFC, always strives to continue to make improvements in total quality service, so that customer satisfaction can be maintained, which in turn will have an impact on…

  18. The silent customers: measuring customer satisfaction in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Kleinsorge, I K; Koenig, H F

    1991-12-01

    Nursing home administrators concerned with customer satisfaction and quality of care need a tool to assess and monitor ongoing satisfaction of nursing home residents and family members. The authors report a preliminary effort to develop such a survey using focus groups.

  19. NRMRL/TTSD CUSTOMER SATISFACTION FOCUS GROUP

    EPA Science Inventory

    TTB uses a variety of technology transfer products and tools to communicate risk and information about technologies and research. TTB has begun a project to use EPA's generic Customer Satisfaction Survey Information Collection Request (ICR) to determine satisfaction with their pr...

  20. Comprehensive Family Services and Customer Satisfaction Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Ruth A.; Jones, Blake L.; Miller, Viola P.; Custer, Melba; Critchfield, Becky

    2006-01-01

    Comprehensive Family Services (CFS) is a strengths-based and partnership-oriented approach to casework implemented through multiple initiatives. This study examines the relationship between the practice of CFS and satisfaction of clients, foster parents, and community partners. CFS indicators are paired with statewide customer satisfaction survey…

  1. 26 CFR 801.4 - Customer satisfaction measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Customer satisfaction measures. 801.4 Section... REVENUE SERVICE § 801.4 Customer satisfaction measures. The customer satisfaction goals and... may be employed to gather data regarding customer satisfaction. Information to measure...

  2. 39 CFR 3055.90 - Reporting of customer satisfaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reporting of customer satisfaction. 3055.90... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.90 Reporting of customer satisfaction. For... report, unless a more frequent filing is specifically indicated, addressing customer...

  3. 26 CFR 801.4 - Customer satisfaction measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Customer satisfaction measures. 801.4 Section... REVENUE SERVICE § 801.4 Customer satisfaction measures. The customer satisfaction goals and... may be employed to gather data regarding customer satisfaction. Information to measure...

  4. AFMC Customer Satisfaction Study at the Air Logistics Centers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    information. 4. A majority of the organizations have a formalized procedure for measuring customer satisfaction data to drive continuous...importance of measuring customer satisfaction is obvious. “The fundamental reason customer satisfaction is important to your organization is because it...for Business Improvement. 26th Int. Conf. Information Technology Interfaces ITI, 2000. 134 135 Hodgkiss and Capisit. Measuring customer satisfaction : practices

  5. 39 CFR 3055.90 - Reporting of customer satisfaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reporting of customer satisfaction. 3055.90 Section 3055.90 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL SERVICE PERFORMANCE AND CUSTOMER SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.90 Reporting of customer satisfaction....

  6. 39 CFR 3055.90 - Reporting of customer satisfaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reporting of customer satisfaction. 3055.90 Section 3055.90 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL SERVICE PERFORMANCE AND CUSTOMER SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.90 Reporting of customer satisfaction....

  7. 39 CFR 3055.90 - Reporting of customer satisfaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reporting of customer satisfaction. 3055.90 Section 3055.90 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL SERVICE PERFORMANCE AND CUSTOMER SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.90 Reporting of customer satisfaction....

  8. 48 CFR 11.203 - Customer satisfaction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Customer satisfaction. 11.203 Section 11.203 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ACQUISITION PLANNING DESCRIBING AGENCY NEEDS Using and Maintaining Requirements Documents 11.203 Customer...

  9. 2004 DTIC Customer Satisfaction Survey Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    Support Recommending DTIC Products/Services to Colleagues 8 Delivery Processes 9 Part III: DTIC Offerings 10 Online Services Usage...Profile 10 DTIC’s Online Services Overall Satisfaction and Performance 10 DTIC’s Other Products and Services Usage Profile 12 DTIC’s...User Comments 22 Customer Service Issues 22 Improvements of Products, Services, Customer Care 23 Online Services 23 Quality

  10. Reinventing information services to increase customer satisfaction

    SciTech Connect

    Madison, J.E.

    1993-12-01

    In this paper, the author presents her view of the role of an information service and proposes means of improving information customer service and satisfaction. The emphasis of the paper is on placing the primary value on the information customer rather than on the information itself. After receiving a request for information, the information service should strive for speed and accuracy of service to provide full-text sources in a language and format convenient to the customer. The author stresses that information professionals need to re-evaluate their roles to correctly assess and rectify customers` information deficiencies.

  11. 77 FR 61623 - Proposed Renewal of Information Collection: 1090-0007, American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Government Customer Satisfaction Surveys AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, National... collection for the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Government Customer Satisfaction Surveys to... Richard_Tate@nbc.gov . Individuals providing comments should reference Customer Satisfaction Surveys...

  12. Customer Satisfaction with Air Force Civil Engineering Support

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    fundamentals of customer satisfaction . It also includes managing the customer’s expectations through advertising and product literature, as well as...civil engineering customer service unit as well as customer satisfaction (McKnight and Parker, 1983:107-109). Interestingly, the most frequently...that satisfaction with Air Force life impacts civil engineering customer satisfaction , this factor is clearly outside the realm of control by civil

  13. Customer satisfaction in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Kelly

    2004-02-01

    Patient satisfaction is not merely a "smile and be nice" set of behaviors. It is a philosophy that is founded in the concept that the patient's experience of care is important and ultimately translates into their actual response to care. The improved response to care that patients exhibit makes patient satisfaction important from a clinical vantage point. That point alone is enough to justify implementation of and commitment to a customer satisfaction program. There are, however, other compelling reasons also. Customer satisfaction has profound ramifications for the financial status of the institution and for its professional reputation in the community. The caregivers who participate in a system of good customer satisfaction experience fewer malpractice suits than their counterparts. And they enjoy a work environment that is more stable and pleasant than other institutions. The implementation of a meaningful customer service program is a huge task. It is a fundamental culture change that requires vision, long-term commitment, and constant surveillance. The single most critical factor in the successful implementation of a program that produces all the gains that it promises is leadership. Leadership must set the stage, create the atmosphere,demand that staff meet expectations, reward success, provide an example,and shape the new culture. Without strong, clear leadership, any customer service initiative will be simply a hospital-wide exercise, and those staff members who harbor a cynical viewpoint will be proved right in the end.One major difference between a successful customer service initiative and an unsuccessful one is the level of sincerity the hospital and its staff have about the care they express for their patients. If the whole process is merely an exercise to improve scores, the success will be limited and without deep roots. If the push is to establish an atmosphere of genuine care and interest for patients, however, the results are more meaningful

  14. Parent Satisfaction and Information (A Customer Satisfaction Survey).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuck, Kathy D.

    The District of Columbia public schools sought to obtain an index of "customer satisfaction" from its parents through a study designed to examine their perceptions of their children's schools and school experiences. A survey was developed and pilot tested to ensure content validity and reliability. The survey focused on five areas: (1)…

  15. FY2001 Customer Satisfaction Survey Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    Commercial Telephone” and “Defense Switched Network (DSN) Line." 1 in 8 preferred “Email” and 1 in 8 preferred “Internet/ Online Services .” 1 in 12 preferred...to the 2001 Customer Satisfaction Survey reported using the following DTIC Online Services : Overall Usage Profile: 6 in 10 Users reported using Public

  16. A customer satisfaction model for a utility service industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, Jastini Mohd; Nawawi, Mohd Kamal Mohd; Ramli, Razamin

    2016-08-01

    This paper explores the effect of Image, Customer Expectation, Perceived Quality and Perceived Value on Customer Satisfaction, and to investigate the effect of Image and Customer Satisfaction on Customer Loyalty of mobile phone provider in Malaysia. The result of this research is based on data gathered online from international students in one of the public university in Malaysia. Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling (PLS-SEM) has been used to analyze the data that have been collected from the international students' perceptions. The results found that Image and Perceived Quality have significant impact on Customer Satisfaction. Image and Customer Satisfaction ware also found to have significantly related to Customer Loyalty. However, no significant impact has been found between Customer Expectation with Customer Satisfaction, Perceived Value with Customer Satisfaction, and Customer Expectation with Perceived Value. We hope that the findings may assist the mobile phone provider in production and promotion of their services.

  17. Measuring Customer Satisfaction. A Central Texas JTPA Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angel, P. Linda

    A study was conducted to determine the baseline by which to measure expected improvements in customer satisfaction for Central Texas Job Training Partnership (JTPA) programs. The survey was designed to facilitate assessment of the current level of customer satisfaction with service delivery and influences on customer satisfaction. Data were…

  18. 77 FR 12073 - Proposed Renewal of Information Collection: American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-28

    ... Office of the Secretary Proposed Renewal of Information Collection: American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Government Customer Satisfaction Survey AGENCY: National Business Center, Federal Consulting... concerning the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) Government Customer Satisfaction Survey....

  19. MedlinePlus: The ForeSee Customer Satisfaction Survey

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/survey/foreseesurvey.html The ForeSee Customer Satisfaction Survey To use the sharing features on this ... and MedlinePlus en español. NLM uses the ForeSee Customer Satisfaction Survey to measure online user satisfaction. The survey ...

  20. 77 FR 36568 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request: Generic Customer Satisfaction Surveys

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request: Generic Customer Satisfaction... information: Title of Proposal: Generic--Customer Satisfaction Surveys. OMB Control Number, if applicable... our customers. HUD will conduct various customer satisfaction surveys to gather feedback and...

  1. Mechanisms linking employee affective delivery and customer behavioral intentions.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wei-Chi; Huang, Yin-Mei

    2002-10-01

    Past empirical evidence has indicated that employee affective delivery can influence customer reactions (e.g., customer satisfaction, service quality evaluation). This study extends previous research by empirically examining mediating processes underlying the relationship between employee affective delivery and customer behavioral intentions. Data were collected from 352 employee-customer pairs in 169 retail shoe stores in Taiwan. Results showed that the influence of employee affective delivery on customers' willingness to return to the store and pass positive comments to friends was indirect through the mediating processes of customer in-store positive moods and perceived friendliness. The study also indicated that employee affective delivery influences customers' time spent in store, which, in turn, influences customer behavioral intentions.

  2. Measuring Customer Satisfaction: Practices of Leading Military and Commercial Service Organizations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-09-01

    sectors. The purpose of the study was to assess the applicability of a general set of guidelines on measuring customer satisfaction for service...organizations. This study discusses customer satisfaction, the importance of measuring customer satisfaction , guidelines regarding customer satisfaction, and...the establishment of a general set of guidelines for measuring customer satisfaction . Universally applicable guidelines are listed and situationally

  3. Customer service providers' attitudes relating to customer service and customer satisfaction in the customer-server exchange.

    PubMed

    Susskind, Alex M; Kacmar, K Michele; Borchgrevink, Carl P

    2003-02-01

    The authors proposed and tested a model describing the relationship between customer service providers' perceptions and attitudes toward their service-related duties and their customers' perceptions of satisfaction with their service experiences. Results indicated that the perception of having standards for service delivery in an organization is strongly related to line-level employees' perceptions of support from coworkers and supervisors. Perceived support from coworkers was significantly related to service providers' customer orientation, whereas perceived support from supervisors showed a weaker relationship to a customer orientation. Ultimately, service providers' customer orientation was strongly related to customers' satisfaction with service. Finally, a set of post hoc analyses indicated that coworker and supervisory support explained a greater proportion of incremental variance in the model than did perceived organizational support alone.

  4. Customer emotion regulation in the service interactions: its relationship to employee ingratiation, satisfaction and loyalty intentions.

    PubMed

    Medler-Liraz, Hana; Yagil, Dana

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have explored emotional regulation on the part of service employees, and its antecedents. However, customers' emotional regulation in general, and how it is affected by service employee behavior in particular, have received only scant attention. The present article explores a model suggesting that service employees' ingratiatory behavior relates to customer emotion regulation strategies, which in turn are related to customer satisfaction and loyalty. The model was tested with 131 service employee-customer dyads. The results show that service employee ingratiation was positively related to customers' deep acting but not related to surface acting. Customers' deep acting was positively related to their satisfaction. A positive relationship was found between customer satisfaction and loyalty.

  5. [Tangibles as predictors of customer satisfaction in sports services].

    PubMed

    Mañas Rodríguez, Miguel A; Giménez Guerrero, Guadalupe; Muyor Rodríguez, José María; Martínez Tur, Vicente; Moliner Cantos, Carolina P

    2008-05-01

    This study investigates the power of tangible dimensions of service quality to predict customer satisfaction. For this purpose, we statistically controlled the effects of dimensions of service quality that describe social interaction between employees and customers, both functionally and relationally. A field survey was conducted with the participation of 556 customers of a sports centre. The results showed that tangible dimensions of service quality predicted an additional and significant amount of customer satisfaction variance, beyond the effects of service quality of the social interaction. The article concludes with the discussion of the implications of these results.

  6. Employee satisfaction as it relates to customer service.

    PubMed

    Hall, F

    1998-02-01

    Employees are often the forgotten customer in health care organizations. Satisfied employees are productive employees, which leads to obtaining long-term satisfied customers. Negative employees can discourage customers and destroy the integrity of an organization's culture. Long-term customers are critical for the survival of health care organizations for the year 2000 and beyond. Excellent service will be the only differentiation between a good and an excellent health care company. The article describes the current status of employees satisfaction at Columbia Centennial Medical Center and steps to be taken toward increasing satisfaction in the future.

  7. Improving Customer Satisfaction in an R and D Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Anita; Liou, Y. H. Andrew

    1998-01-01

    Satisfying customer needs is critical to the sustained competitive advantage of service suppliers. It is therefore important to understand the types of customer needs which, if fulfilled or exceeded, add value and contribute to overall customer satisfaction. This study identifies the needs of various research and development (R&D) customers who contract for engineering and design support services. The Quality Function Deployment (QFD) process was used to organize and translate each customer need into performance measures that, if implemented, can improve customer satisfaction. This study also provides specific performance measures that will more accurately guide the efforts of the engineering supplier. These organizations can either implement the QFD methodology presented herein or extract a few performance measures that are specific to the quality dimensions in need of improvement. Listening to 'what' customers talk about is a good first start.

  8. 77 FR 61777 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Generic Customer Satisfaction Surveys

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... customer satisfaction surveys to gather feedback and data directly from our customers to determine the kind... lists the following information: Title of Proposed: Generic Customer Satisfaction Surveys. OMB Approval... this data directly from our customers. HUD will conduct various customer satisfaction surveys to...

  9. Running Head: Improving Pharmacy Customer Satisfaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-29

    and friends; I am truly blessed to have them all in my life . 71 Pharmacy Satisfaction 3 F7 Abstract F The primary objective of this study was to...the purpose of this project satisfaction was focused on patient’s expectations, and their perspective. Doucette (2003) would agree as well , stating...Tricare Extra 7 0.5 Tricare for Life 167 11.1 Tricare Plus 9 0.6 Medicare 154 10.3 Other 57 3.8 n = 1500 Pharmacy Satisfaction 31 1] Table 7. Pharmacy

  10. 78 FR 38809 - Agency Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker)) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker)) Activity....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Generic Clearance for NCA, and IG Customer Satisfaction Surveys. OMB Control... 12862, Setting Customer Service Standards, requires Federal agencies and Departments to identify...

  11. Measuring Air Force Contracting Customer Satisfaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Customer Relationship Management CS Contracting Specialist DAU Defense Acquisition University DFARS Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement...firm’s market research budget (Olsen, Witell & Gustafsson, 2014). With all the research and popularity surrounding Customer Relationship Management (CRM...Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington, VA 22202-4302, and to the Office of Management and Budget, Paperwork

  12. Quality assessment in nursing home facilities: measuring customer satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Mostyn, M M; Race, K E; Seibert, J H; Johnson, M

    2000-01-01

    A national study designed to assess the reliability and validity of a nursing home customer satisfaction survey is summarized. One hundred fifty-nine facilities participated, each responsible for the distribution and collection of 200 questionnaires randomly sent to the home of the resident's responsible party. A total of 9053 completed questionnaires were returned, for an average adjusted response rate of 53%. The factor analysis identified 4 scales: Comfort and Cleanliness, Nursing, Food Services, and Facility Care and Services, each with high reliability. Based on a multiple regression analysis, the scales were shown to have good criterion-related validity, accounting for 64% of the variance in overall quality ratings. Comparisons based on select characteristics indicated significantly different satisfaction ratings among facilities. The results are interpreted as providing evidence for the construct validity of a multidimensional customer satisfaction scale with measured reliability and criterion-related validity. Moreover, the scale can be used to differentiate satisfaction levels among facilities.

  13. 76 FR 71997 - Proposed Renewal of Information Collection: 1090-0008 American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-21

    ... Satisfaction Index (ACSI) E-Government Web Site Customer Satisfaction Surveys AGENCY: National Business Center...@nbc.gov . Individuals providing comments should reference Web site Customer Satisfaction Surveys. FOR... required to obtain a benefit. Title: American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) E-Government Web...

  14. Measuring Customer Satisfaction in Summer Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzo-Navarro, Mercedes; Pedraja-Iglesias, Marta; Rivera-Torres, M. Pilar

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The recent changes that have occurred in the Spanish university teaching environment, such as growing competition, have caused these courses to become an important differentiating element of what is offered by each university. Therefore, the authors propose to delve deeper into the relationship existing between satisfaction and the intent…

  15. Measuring Customer Satisfaction in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldridge, Susan; Rowley, Jennifer

    1998-01-01

    A student satisfaction survey in a British college used input from the student charter and delivered questionnaires on paper at one campus (289 responses) and through an intranet at another (71 responses). Issues identified were embedded in the college's quality framework. (SK)

  16. The Impact of IT Capability on Employee Capability, Customer Value, Customer Satisfaction, and Business Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chae, Ho-Chang

    2009-01-01

    This study empirically examines the impact of IT capability on firms' performance and evaluates whether firms' IT capabilities play a role in improving employee capability, customer value, customer satisfaction, and ultimately business performance. The results were based on comparing the business performance of the IT leader companies with that of…

  17. Assessing customer satisfaction for improving NOAA's climate products and services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, J. C.; Hawkins, M. D.; Timofeyeva, M. M.

    2009-12-01

    NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) Climate Services Division (CSD) is developing a comprehensive climate user requirements process with the ultimate goal of producing climate services that meet the needs of NWS climate information users. An important part of this effort includes engaging users through periodical surveys conducted by the Claes Fornell International (CFI) Group using the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI). The CFI Group conducted a Climate Services Satisfaction (CSS) Survey in May of 2009 to measure customer satisfaction with current products and services and to gain insight on areas for improvement. The CSS Survey rates customer satisfaction on a range of NWS climate services data and products, including Climate Prediction Center (CPC) outlooks, drought monitoring, and ENSO monitoring and forecasts, as well as NWS local climate data services. In addition, the survey assesses the users of the products to give the NWS insight into its climate customer base. The survey also addresses specific topics such as NWS forecast category names, probabilistic nature of climate products, and interpretation issues. The survey results identify user requirements for improving existing NWS climate services and introducing new ones. CSD will merge the survey recommendations with available scientific methodologies and operational capabilities to develop requirements for improved climate products and services. An overview of the 2009 survey results will be presented, such as users' satisfaction with the accuracy, reliability, display and functionality of products and services.

  18. [Customer and patient satisfaction. An appropriate management tool in hospitals?].

    PubMed

    Pawils, S; Trojan, A; Nickel, S; Bleich, C

    2012-09-01

    Recently, the concept of patient satisfaction has been established as an essential part of the quality management of hospitals. Despite the concept's lack of theoretical and methodological foundations, patient surveys on subjective hospital experiences contribute immensely to the improvement of hospitals. What needs to be considered critically in this context is the concept of customer satisfaction for patients, the theoretical integration of empirical results, the reduction of false satisfaction indications and the application of risk-adjusted versus naïve benchmarking of data. This paper aims to contribute to the theoretical discussion of the topic and to build a basis for planning methodologically sound patient surveys.

  19. The Relationship between Earned Value Management Metrics and Customer Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumer, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Information Technology (IT) products have a high rate of failure. Only 25% of IT projects were completed within budget and schedule, and 15% of completed projects were not operational. Researchers have not investigated the success of project management systems from the perspective of customer satisfaction. In this quantitative study, levels of…

  20. Customer-oriented medical records can promote patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, R S

    1988-04-01

    The customer-oriented medical record helps promote patient satisfaction by providing a mechanism to monitor and document quality of care from the patient's perspective. Information that should be contained in the record includes the following: Personal and family information. Reasons for selecting the provider. Reasons for patient visit. Patient requests and responses thereto. Provider and staff observations. Patient feedback. Summaries of previous visits. Record of progress made. In addition to promoting patient satisfaction, the customer-oriented medical record provides a data base for analyzing the current market that can be used in designing marketing communications to attract new patients. It also contributes to provider success by reminding care givers of their commitment to patient satisfaction, motivating them to be sensitive to patients' needs and expectations, and helping them to personalize the care experience.

  1. A Brand Loyalty Model Utilizing Team Identification and Customer Satisfaction in the Licensed Sports Product Industry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Soonhwan; Shin, Hongbum; Park, Jung-Jun; Kwon, Oh-Ryun

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among the attitudinal brand loyalty variables (i.e., cognitive, affective, and conative components), team identification, and customer satisfaction by developing a structural equation model, based on Oliver's (1997) attitudinal brand loyalty model. The results of this study confirmed…

  2. Quality and customer satisfaction: A case study in Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcellos, Paulo Fernando Pinto

    The dissertation deals with the case of CEEE-Companhia Estadual de Energia Eletrica, an electric power utility located in Rio Grande do Sul, the southernmost state of Brazil. Customer satisfaction with the services provided by CEEE is investigated within three groups of consumers: residential, commercial, and industrial. The purpose of the dissertation is to find answers to the following research questions: (1) What is service quality in public utilities, and particularly in an electric power company? (2) What service quality dimensions do customers want to be provided and favor the most? (3) How does the market measure service quality? (4) What should be done by companies, and particularly by an electric utility monopoly, to increase the performance of the rendered service? (5) How does this impact customer satisfaction, retention, and intention to recommend? and (6) How do we start a company-wide quality program provided that the resources are scarce and therefore priorities should be set forth? To investigate the posed questions, the study begins with an exploratory survey of CEEE's Board. The survey is followed by qualitative research of the three customer groups. After qualitative analysis of the data is concluded, questionnaires for the quantitative research, as well as hypothetical models, are developed. Dillman's "Total Design Method" is used to design the questionnaires. The basic ACSI (American Customer Satisfaction Model) is used to approach customer satisfaction. Data are processed by PLS (Partial Least Squares) which follows the procedure developed at the National Quality Research Center of the University of Michigan Business School. In summary, commercial customers are the most dissatisfied with the services provided by CEEE, while residential customers are the most satisfied. To improve quality, priority should be placed on commercial customers and include efforts to improve productivity gains throughout the company. Also, CEEE's image should be

  3. 78 FR 69703 - 10-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Generic Customer Satisfaction Surveys; Physical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 10-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Generic Customer Satisfaction... Customer Satisfaction Surveys Physical Inspection Alignment Pilot Program--Expansion Announcement....

  4. The importance of measuring customer satisfaction in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Turriziani, Adriana; Attanasio, Gennaro; Scarcella, Francesco; Sangalli, Luisa; Scopa, Anna; Genualdo, Alessandra; Quici, Stefano; Nazzicone, Giulia; Ricciotti, Maria Adelaide; La Commare, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    In the last decades, palliative care has been more and more focused on the evaluation of patients' and families' satisfaction with care. However, the evaluation of customer satisfaction in palliative care presents a number of issues such as the presence of both patients and their families, the frail condition of the patients and the complexity of their needs, and the lack of standard quality indicators and appropriate measurement tools. In this manuscript, we critically review existing evidence and literature on the evaluation of satisfaction in the palliative care context. Moreover, we provide - as a practical example - the preliminary results of our experience in this setting with the development of a dedicated tool for the measurement of satisfaction.

  5. Using Customer Satisfaction for Measuring the Effectiveness of Integrated Product Teams.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    address the importance of measuring customer satisfaction and its effect on the business world as well as the Department of Defense. Also, in order to...actively address customer satisfaction in the course of daily business. The reasons for measuring customer satisfaction can be categorized along...1993: 15). It should be evident from the preceding discussion that measuring customer satisfaction is done to improve processes, better satisfy

  6. 75 FR 38775 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Generic Clearance for Customer Satisfaction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-06

    ...; Generic Clearance for Customer Satisfaction Research AGENCY: U.S. Census Bureau. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Bureau is requesting an extension of the generic clearance to conduct customer satisfaction research... on feedback from its various customer satisfaction research efforts. Each research design is...

  7. 78 FR 56229 - Information Collection; DigitalGov Customer Satisfaction Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... ADMINISTRATION Information Collection; DigitalGov Customer Satisfaction Survey AGENCY: Office of Citizen Services... regarding the DigitalGov Web site Customer Satisfaction Survey. DATES: Submit comments on or before November... Customer Satisfaction Survey by any of the following methods: Regulations.gov :...

  8. 78 FR 73238 - Currently Approved Information Collection: Comment Request for Customer Satisfaction and Opinion...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-05

    ... United States Mint Currently Approved Information Collection: Comment Request for Customer Satisfaction... United States Mint customer satisfaction and opinion surveys and focus group interviews. DATES: Written... States Mint products, and to determine the level of satisfaction of United States Mint customers and...

  9. 75 FR 35093 - Submission for Review: Customer Satisfaction Surveys, OMB Control No. 3206-0236.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Customer Satisfaction Surveys, OMB Control No. 3206-0236. AGENCY: U.S... on a revised information collection request (ICR) 3206-0236, Customer Satisfaction Surveys. As... performance in providing services. Customer satisfaction surveys are valuable tools to gather information...

  10. 75 FR 3539 - Agency Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker)) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker)) Activity.... National Cemetery Administration Mail Surveys a. Next of Kin National Customer Satisfaction Survey (Mail to... National Customer Satisfaction Survey (Mail to 5,000 respondents/30 minutes per survey) = 2,500 hours. ]...

  11. 17 CFR 300.400 - Satisfaction of customer claims for standardized options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Satisfaction of customer... CORPORATION Closeout Or Completion of Open Contractual Commitments § 300.400 Satisfaction of customer claims... behalf of customers in satisfaction of claims pursuant to section 7(b)(1) of the Act. (f) In no...

  12. 49 CFR 579.5 - Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction campaigns, consumer advisories, and other communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction... General § 579.5 Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction campaigns, consumer advisories, and other... to NHTSA a copy of each communication relating to a customer satisfaction campaign, consumer...

  13. 78 FR 60020 - Proposed Collection: Comment Request for Voluntary Customer Satisfaction Surveys

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... Bureau of the Fiscal Service Proposed Collection: Comment Request for Voluntary Customer Satisfaction... Customer Satisfaction Survey. DATES: Written comments should be received on or before November 30, 2013 to...: Title: Voluntary Customer Satisfaction Survey to Implement Executive Order 12862 OMB Number:...

  14. 76 FR 17189 - Revision to Currently Approved Information Collection: Comment Request for Customer Satisfaction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... United States Mint customer satisfaction and opinion surveys and focus group interviews. DATES: Written...); YPollard@usmint.treas.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: United States Mint customer satisfaction and... States Mint products, and to determine the level of satisfaction of United States Mint customers and...

  15. A green vehicle routing problem with customer satisfaction criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afshar-Bakeshloo, M.; Mehrabi, A.; Safari, H.; Maleki, M.; Jolai, F.

    2016-08-01

    This paper develops an MILP model, named Satisfactory-Green Vehicle Routing Problem. It consists of routing a heterogeneous fleet of vehicles in order to serve a set of customers within predefined time windows. In this model in addition to the traditional objective of the VRP, both the pollution and customers' satisfaction have been taken into account. Meanwhile, the introduced model prepares an effective dashboard for decision-makers that determines appropriate routes, the best mixed fleet, speed and idle time of vehicles. Additionally, some new factors evaluate the greening of each decision based on three criteria. This model applies piecewise linear functions (PLFs) to linearize a nonlinear fuzzy interval for incorporating customers' satisfaction into other linear objectives. We have presented a mixed integer linear programming formulation for the S-GVRP. This model enriches managerial insights by providing trade-offs between customers' satisfaction, total costs and emission levels. Finally, we have provided a numerical study for showing the applicability of the model.

  16. A cross-lagged test of the association between customer satisfaction and employee job satisfaction in a relational context.

    PubMed

    Zablah, Alex R; Carlson, Brad D; Donavan, D Todd; Maxham, James G; Brown, Tom J

    2016-05-01

    Due to its practical importance, the relationship between customer satisfaction and frontline employee (FLE) job satisfaction has received significant attention in the literature. Numerous studies to date confirm that the constructs are related and rely on this empirical finding to infer support for the "inside-out" effect of FLE job satisfaction on customer satisfaction. In doing so, prior studies ignore the possibility that-as suggested by the Service Profit Chain's satisfaction mirror-a portion of the observed empirical effect may be due to the "outside-in" impact of customer satisfaction on FLE job satisfaction. Consequently, both the magnitude and direction of the causal relationship between the constructs remain unclear. To address this oversight, this study builds on multisource data, including longitudinal satisfaction data provided by 49,242 customers and 1,470 FLEs from across 209 retail stores, to examine the association between FLE job satisfaction and customer satisfaction in a context where service relationships are the norm. Consistent with predictions rooted in social exchange theory, the results reveal that (a) customer satisfaction and FLE job satisfaction are reciprocally related; (b) the outside-in effect of customer satisfaction on FLE job satisfaction is predominant (i.e., larger in magnitude than the inside-out effect); and (c) customer engagement determines the extent of this outside-in predominance. Contrary to common wisdom, the study's findings suggest that, in relational contexts, incentivizing FLEs to satisfy customers may prove to be more effective for enhancing FLE and customer outcomes than direct investments in FLE job satisfaction. (PsycINFO Database Record

  17. Healthscape role towards customer satisfaction in private healthcare.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Debajani; Ghosh, Tathagata

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to identify the motives that enforce consumers to find out the major determinants that frame healthscape in private healthcare service that leads to their satisfaction in a developing country like India. Design/methodology/approach - The generic motive dimensions are identified using an exploratory factor analysis. Next the reliability and validity of the factors are established followed by regression analysis using SPSS 20.0 s/w. Findings - This paper identifies six healthscape motives in the private healthcare sector named as service personnel conduct and cleanliness, service delivery and facilities, ambience, location and look, appealing decoration, and upgraded safety service, out of which only service delivery, ambience, location, and decorations contribute the most to build customer satisfaction as per their significance value. Research limitations/implications - The various dimensions of healthcare motives should be viewed as the levers of improving hospitals' service quality in the minds of its present and future customers. This finding can offer valuable insight to the forthcoming as well as existing developer who are planning to have their healthcare service presence in India. Practical implications - This study suggests some important strategic guidelines for service positioning and market segmentation of healthcare services as per customer requirements. In the recent past, availing services from hospitals were purely utilitarian in nature. Customers were more inclined to get proper and timely services and cared more about the service quality of the healthcare service provider. Originality/value - This paper is among the few works done on understanding private healthcare service delivery process in India and customer satisfaction level from those Hospitals. This study addresses the gap by identifying a set of dimensions that are relevant to customers for a unique healthcare experience.

  18. An empirical research on customer satisfaction study: a consideration of different levels of performance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu-Cheng; Wang, Yu-Che; Lu, Shu-Chiung; Hsieh, Yi-Fang; Chien, Chih-Hung; Tsai, Sang-Bing; Dong, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    Customer satisfaction is the key factor for successful and depends highly on the behaviors of frontline service providers. Customers should be managed as assets, and that customers vary in their needs, preferences, and buying behavior. This study applied the Taiwan Customer Satisfaction Index model to a tourism factory to analyze customer satisfaction and loyalty. We surveyed 242 customers served by one tourism factory organizations in Taiwan. A partial least squares was performed to analyze and test the theoretical model. The results show that perceived quality had the greatest influence on the customer satisfaction for satisfied and dissatisfied customers. In addition, in terms of customer loyalty, the customer satisfaction is more important than image for satisfied and dissatisfied customers. The contribution of this paper is to propose two satisfaction levels of CSI models for analyzing customer satisfaction and loyalty, thereby helping tourism factory managers improve customer satisfaction effectively. Compared with traditional techniques, we believe that our method is more appropriate for making decisions about allocating resources and for assisting managers in establishing appropriate priorities in customer satisfaction management.

  19. The effect of proposed software products' features on the satisfaction and dissatisfaction of potential customers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Azham; Mkpojiogu, Emmanuel O. C.; Yusof, Muhammad Mat

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the effect of proposed software products features on the satisfaction and dissatisfaction of potential customers of proposed software products. Kano model's functional and dysfunctional technique was used along with Berger et al.'s customer satisfaction coefficients. The result shows that only two features performed the most in influencing the satisfaction and dissatisfaction of would-be customers of the proposed software product. Attractive and one-dimensional features had the highest impact on the satisfaction and dissatisfaction of customers. This result will benefit requirements analysts, developers, designers, projects and sales managers in preparing for proposed products. Additional analysis showed that the Kano model's satisfaction and dissatisfaction scores were highly related to the Park et al.'s average satisfaction coefficient (r=96%), implying that these variables can be used interchangeably or in place of one another to elicit customer satisfaction. Furthermore, average satisfaction coefficients and satisfaction and dissatisfaction indexes were all positively and linearly correlated.

  20. Customer Satisfaction Assessment at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dale N.; Sours, Mardell L.

    2000-03-20

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing and implementing a customer satisfaction assessment program (CSAP) to assess the quality of research and development provided by the laboratory. We present the customer survey component of the PNNL CSAP. The customer survey questionnaire is composed of 2 major sections, Strategic Value and Project Performance. The Strategic Value section of the questionnaire consists of 5 questions that can be answered with a 5 point Likert scale response. These questions are designed to determine if a project is directly contributing to critical future national needs. The Project Performance section of the questionnaire consists of 9 questions that can be answered with a 5 point Likert scale response. These questions determine PNNL performance in meeting customer expectations. Many approaches could be used to analyze customer survey data. We present a statistical model that can accurately capture the random behavior of customer survey data. The properties of this statistical model can be used to establish a "gold standard'' or performance expectation for the laboratory, and then assess progress. The gold standard is defined from input from laboratory management --- answers to 4 simple questions, in terms of the information obtained from the CSAP customer survey, define the standard: *What should the average Strategic Value be for the laboratory project portfolio? *What Strategic Value interval should include most of the projects in the laboratory portfolio? *What should average Project Performance be for projects with a Strategic Value of about 2? *What should average Project Performance be for projects with a Strategic Value of about 4? We discuss how to analyze CSAP customer survey data with this model. Our discussion will include "lessons learned" and issues that can invalidate this type of assessment.

  1. 17 CFR 300.400 - Satisfaction of customer claims for standardized options.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Satisfaction of customer... CORPORATION Closeout Or Completion of Open Contractual Commitments § 300.400 Satisfaction of customer claims... direct payment procedure pursuant to section 10 of the Act, in satisfaction of a claim based...

  2. 76 FR 44351 - Proposed Renewal of Information Collection: 1090-0008, American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... Satisfaction Index (ACSI) E-Government Website Customer Satisfaction Survey AGENCY: National Business Center... Website Customer Satisfaction Survey used by numerous Federal agencies to continuously assess and improve..., or via e-mail to Richard_Tate@nbc.gov . Individuals providing comments should reference...

  3. Determinants of customer satisfaction with hospitals: a managerial model.

    PubMed

    Andaleeb, S S

    1998-01-01

    States that rapid changes in the environment have exerted significant pressures on hospitals to incorporate patient satisfaction in their strategic stance and quest for market share and long-term viability. This study proposes and tests a five-factor model that explains considerable variation in customer satisfaction with hospitals. These factors include communication with patients, competence of the staff, their demeanour, quality of the facilities, and perceived costs; they also represent strategic concepts that managers can address in their bid to remain competitive. A probability sample was selected and a multiple regression model used to test the hypotheses. The results indicate that all five variables were significant in the model and explained 62 per cent of the variation in the dependent variable. Managerial implications of the proposed model are discussed.

  4. Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Network (EREN): Customer satisfaction survey

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.V.; Henderson, D.P.

    1996-04-22

    The Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Network (EREN) Customer Satisfaction Survey was developed and executed in support of EREN`s continuous quality improvement (CQI) plan. The study was designed to provide information about the demographic make up of EREN users, the value or benefits they derive from EREN, the kinds and quality of services they want, their levels of satisfaction with existing services, their preferences in both the sources of service and the means of delivery, and to provide benchmark data for the establishment of continuous quality improvement measures. The survey was performed by soliciting voluntary participation from members of the EREN Users Group. It was executed in two phases; the first being conducted by phone using a randomly selected group; and the second being conducted electronically and which was open to all of the remaining members of the Users Group. The survey results are described.

  5. Student Satisfaction with Canadian Music Programmes: The Application of the American Customer Satisfaction Model in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serenko, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to empirically investigate several antecedents and consequences of student satisfaction (SS) with Canadian university music programmes as well as to measure students' level of programme satisfaction. For this, the American Customer Satisfaction Model was tested through a survey of 276 current Canadian music students.…

  6. Moderating effect of nurses' customer-oriented perception between organizational citizenship behaviors and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching Sheng; Chang, Hae Ching

    2010-08-01

    This study investigates whether organizational citizenship behaviors enhance job satisfaction among nursing personnel, while exploring whether customer-oriented perception has a moderating effect between nursing personnel's organizational citizenship behaviors and job satisfaction.The authors used a cross-sectional survey sent to 500 nurses with 232 valid responses. According to the research findings, nurses' organizational citizenship behaviors have a positive and significant influence on job satisfaction. Results also indicated that the moderating effect of nurses' customer-oriented perception on the relationship between their organizational citizenship behaviors and job satisfaction was stronger for high customer-oriented perception than it was low customer-oriented perception.

  7. 77 FR 64382 - Agency Information Collection (Nation-Wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activities Under OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Nation-Wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activities Under OMB....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys, VA Forms 10-1465- 2 through...

  8. 77 FR 3843 - Agency Information Collection (Board of Veterans' Appeals Customer Satisfaction With Hearing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Board of Veterans' Appeals Customer Satisfaction With Hearing... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Board of Veterans' Appeals Customer Satisfaction with Hearing Survey, VA Form 0745. OMB Control Number: 2900-0548. Type of Review: Extension of...

  9. 76 FR 70827 - Proposed Information Collection (Board of Veterans' Appeals Customer Satisfaction With Hearing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Board of Veterans' Appeals Customer Satisfaction With Hearing... techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title: Board of Veterans' Appeals Customer Satisfaction with Hearing Survey Card, VA Form 0745. OMB Control Number: 2900-0548. Type of Review:...

  10. 75 FR 25320 - Agency Information Collection (Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activities Under OMB...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activities Under OMB... INFORMATION: Title: Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys, VA Forms 1465-2 through 1465-4. OMB...

  11. 39 CFR 3050.53 - Information on customer satisfaction and retail access. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Information on customer satisfaction and retail access. 3050.53 Section 3050.53 Postal Service POSTAL REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PERIODIC REPORTING § 3050.53 Information on customer satisfaction and retail access....

  12. 75 FR 9277 - Proposed Information Collection (Nation-Wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activity: Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Nation-Wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activity: Comment.... Title: Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys, VA Forms 1465-2 through 1465-4. OMB Control...

  13. 78 FR 69643 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Generic Clearance for Customer Satisfaction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... extension of the generic clearance to conduct customer satisfaction research which may be in the form of... customer satisfaction research efforts. Each research design is reviewed for content, utility, and user... Census Bureau Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Generic Clearance for...

  14. 77 FR 2349 - Proposed Information Collection (Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activity: Comment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys) Activity: Comment... forms of information technology. Title: Nation-wide Customer Satisfaction Surveys, VA Forms 10-1465-...

  15. An Electronic Service Quality Reference Model for Designing E-Commerce Websites Which Maximizes Customer Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaheen, Amer N.

    2011-01-01

    This research investigated Electronic Service Quality (E-SQ) features that contribute to customer satisfaction in an online environment. The aim was to develop an approach which improves E-CRM processes and enhances online customer satisfaction. The research design adopted mixed methods involving qualitative and quantitative methods to…

  16. 1997 Customer Satisfaction Survey Report: How Do We Measure Up? Technical Report. Survey Report, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thurgood, Lori; Fink, Steven; Bureika, Rita; Scott, Julie; Salvucci, Sameena

    The 1997 National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) Customer Satisfaction survey was conducted to find out whether the NCES as an agency was responding to the needs of customers and to identify areas for improvement. Federal, state, and local education officials and academic researchers were asked about their satisfaction with NCES products…

  17. Change leadership behaviors to change performance results: the foundation of top customer satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Stephanie G

    2002-01-01

    Raising customer satisfaction in health-care organizations has been a priority for the past 5 years or more. Articles and books continue to be written on the topic and speeches and presentations are given to eager audiences of professionals who have a deep desire to improve customer satisfaction. Yet research indicates that customer satisfaction, on average, in the health-care industry barely has improved. This column will examine why some organizations, using the same best practice techniques and approaches for top customer satisfaction, achieve wonderful results as most others achieve meager results, at best. The answer to achieving top customer satisfaction lies in the leadership of the organization. When leaders change their thinking and behaviors, results will change.

  18. Understanding the relationship between Kano model's customer satisfaction scores and self-stated requirements importance.

    PubMed

    Mkpojiogu, Emmanuel O C; Hashim, Nor Laily

    2016-01-01

    Customer satisfaction is the result of product quality and viability. The place of the perceived satisfaction of users/customers for a software product cannot be neglected especially in today competitive market environment as it drives the loyalty of customers and promotes high profitability and return on investment. Therefore understanding the importance of requirements as it is associated with the satisfaction of users/customers when their requirements are met is worth the pain considering. It is necessary to know the relationship between customer satisfactions when their requirements are met (or their dissatisfaction when their requirements are unmet) and the importance of such requirement. So many works have been carried out on customer satisfaction in connection with the importance of requirements but the relationship between customer satisfaction scores (coefficients) of the Kano model and users/customers self-stated requirements importance have not been sufficiently explored. In this study, an attempt is made to unravel the underlying relationship existing between Kano model's customer satisfaction indexes and users/customers self reported requirements importance. The results of the study indicate some interesting associations between these considered variables. These bivariate associations reveal that customer satisfaction index (SI), and average satisfaction coefficient (ASC) and customer dissatisfaction index (DI) and average satisfaction coefficient (ASC) are highly correlated (r = 96 %) and thus ASC can be used in place of either SI or DI in representing customer satisfaction scores. Also, these Kano model's customer satisfaction variables (SI, DI, and ASC) are each associated with self-stated requirements importance (IMP). Further analysis indicates that the value customers or users place on requirements that are met or on features that are incorporated into a product influences the level of satisfaction such customers derive from the product. The

  19. The efficacy of staff training on improving internal customer satisfaction in a rural health setting.

    PubMed

    Hartley, R; Turner, R

    1995-09-01

    The NSW Health Department is 3 years into its customer satisfaction initiative. North West Health Service, one of the largest rural health districts, was among the first centres to embrace the customer satisfaction philosophy starting with compulsory training of all staff. This paper reports on changes in staff morale (internal satisfaction) as a result of that training. The data suggest that training per se has had minimal effect and argues for management development, particularly regarding leadership, rather than fiscal skills.

  20. CSI Index Of Customer's Satisfaction Applied In The Area Of Public Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poliaková, Adela

    2015-06-01

    In Western countries, the new visions are applied in quality control for an integrated public transport system. Public transport puts the customer at the centre of our decision making in achieving customer satisfaction with provided service. Sustainable surveys are kept among customers. A lot of companies are collecting huge databases containing over 30,000 voices of customers, which demonstrates the current satisfaction levels across the public transport service. Customer satisfaction with a provided service is a difficult task. In this service, the quality criteria are not clearly defined, and it is therefore difficult to define customer satisfaction. The paper introduces a possibility of CSI index application in conditions of the Slovak Republic transport area.

  1. Personality Polygenes, Positive Affect, and Life Satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Alexander; Baselmans, Bart M L; Hofer, Edith; Yang, Jingyun; Okbay, Aysu; Lind, Penelope A; Miller, Mike B; Nolte, Ilja M; Zhao, Wei; Hagenaars, Saskia P; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Matteson, Lindsay K; Snieder, Harold; Faul, Jessica D; Hartman, Catharina A; Boyle, Patricia A; Tiemeier, Henning; Mosing, Miriam A; Pattie, Alison; Davies, Gail; Liewald, David C; Schmidt, Reinhold; De Jager, Philip L; Heath, Andrew C; Jokela, Markus; Starr, John M; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Johannesson, Magnus; Cesarini, David; Hofman, Albert; Harris, Sarah E; Smith, Jennifer A; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Schmidt, Helena; Smith, Jacqui; Iacono, William G; McGue, Matt; Bennett, David A; Pedersen, Nancy L; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Deary, Ian J; Martin, Nicholas G; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bartels, Meike; Luciano, Michelle

    2016-10-01

    Approximately half of the variation in wellbeing measures overlaps with variation in personality traits. Studies of non-human primate pedigrees and human twins suggest that this is due to common genetic influences. We tested whether personality polygenic scores for the NEO Five-Factor Inventory (NEO-FFI) domains and for item response theory (IRT) derived extraversion and neuroticism scores predict variance in wellbeing measures. Polygenic scores were based on published genome-wide association (GWA) results in over 17,000 individuals for the NEO-FFI and in over 63,000 for the IRT extraversion and neuroticism traits. The NEO-FFI polygenic scores were used to predict life satisfaction in 7 cohorts, positive affect in 12 cohorts, and general wellbeing in 1 cohort (maximal N = 46,508). Meta-analysis of these results showed no significant association between NEO-FFI personality polygenic scores and the wellbeing measures. IRT extraversion and neuroticism polygenic scores were used to predict life satisfaction and positive affect in almost 37,000 individuals from UK Biobank. Significant positive associations (effect sizes <0.05%) were observed between the extraversion polygenic score and wellbeing measures, and a negative association was observed between the polygenic neuroticism score and life satisfaction. Furthermore, using GWA data, genetic correlations of -0.49 and -0.55 were estimated between neuroticism with life satisfaction and positive affect, respectively. The moderate genetic correlation between neuroticism and wellbeing is in line with twin research showing that genetic influences on wellbeing are also shared with other independent personality domains.

  2. Targeting, Segmenting and Positioning the Market for College Students to Increase Customer Satisfaction and Overall Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have explored the relationship between marketing efforts and firm financial performance. Studies have looked at potential lifetime value of customers, to demonstrate the value of keeping customers. Various other studies have looked at the relationship between customer satisfaction and firm performance. However, few studies have…

  3. Financial health and customer satisfaction in private health care providers in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Schiozer, Rafael Felipe; Saito, Cristiana Checchia; Saito, Richard

    2011-11-01

    This paper analyzes the relationship between the financial health and organizational form of private health care providers in Brazil. It also examines the major determinants of customer satisfaction associated with the provider's organizational form. An adjusted Altman's z-score is used as an indicator of financial health. A proxy variable based on customer complaints filed at the Brazilian National Agency for Supplementary Health is used as an indicator for customer satisfaction. The study uses a sample of 270 private health care providers and their operations over the period 2003-2005. Panel data analysis includes control variables related to market, operations, and management. Principal results indicate that: (1) private health care providers benefit from economies of scale; (2) self-funded health plans have better financial health; (3) spending on marketing does not have a significant impact on customer satisfaction in Brazil; (4) weak empirical evidence exists showing that good financial performance enhances customer's satisfaction.

  4. Emergency department patient satisfaction: customer service training improves patient satisfaction and ratings of physician and nurse skill.

    PubMed

    Mayer, T A; Cates, R J; Mastorovich, M J; Royalty, D L

    1998-01-01

    Customer service initiatives in healthcare have become a popular way of attempting to improve patient satisfaction. This study investigates the effect of clinically focused customer service training on patient satisfaction in the setting of a 62,000-visit emergency department and level I trauma center. Analysis of patient complaints, patient compliments, and a statistically verified patient-satisfaction survey indicate that (1) all 14 key quality characteristics identified in the survey increased dramatically in the study period; (2) patient complaints decreased by over 70 percent from 2.6 per 1,000 emergency department (ED) visits to 0.6 per 1,000 ED visits following customer service training; and (3) patient compliments increased more than 100 percent from 1.1 per 1,000 ED visits to 2.3 per 1,000 ED visits. The most dramatic improvement in the patient satisfaction survey came in ratings of skill of the emergency physician, likelihood of returning, skill of the emergency department nurse, and overall satisfaction. These results show that clinically focused customer service training improves patient satisfaction and ratings of physician and nurse skill. They also suggest that such training may offer a substantial competitive market advantage, as well as improve the patients' perception of quality and outcome.

  5. From slogans to strategy: a workable approach to customer satisfaction and retention.

    PubMed

    Timm, P R

    1997-01-01

    Too many organizations confuse slogans, good intentions, or mechanical phrases with customer service. Most recognize that the most powerful way to prosper in today's economy is to enhance customer satisfaction and loyalty. But customer service has little to do with mottos, slogans, or mechanical phrases. The real management challenge lies in translating the slogans into employee actions that create customer satisfaction and loyalty--in creating a strategy for ensuring good service intentions and exceptional service results. This article shows a logical, theoretically sound approach to building and implementing what I call an E-Plus Customer Satisfaction strategy. Incidentally, I use the term "customer" throughout this article, but I recognize that we have different terms in various organizations. So feel free to substitute "patient", "guest", "client", or any other synonym. The principles are the same.

  6. [2011 Shanghai customer satisfaction report of DSA/X-ray equipment's after-service].

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Qian, Jianguo; Cao, Shaoping; Zheng, Yunxin; Xu, Zitian; Wang, Lijun

    2012-11-01

    To improve the manufacturer's medical equipment after-sale service, the fifth Shanghai zone customer satisfaction survey was launched by the end of 2011. The DSA/X-ray equipment was setup as an independent category for the first time. From the survey we can show that the DSA/X-ray equipment's CSI is higher than last year, the customer satisfaction scores of preventive maintenance and service contract are lower than others, and CSI of local brand is lower than imported brand.

  7. Emotion Analysis of Telephone Complaints from Customer Based on Affective Computing

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Shuangping; Dai, Yonghui; Ji, Jun; Wang, Jinzhao; Sun, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Customer complaint has been the important feedback for modern enterprises to improve their product and service quality as well as the customer's loyalty. As one of the commonly used manners in customer complaint, telephone communication carries rich emotional information of speeches, which provides valuable resources for perceiving the customer's satisfaction and studying the complaint handling skills. This paper studies the characteristics of telephone complaint speeches and proposes an analysis method based on affective computing technology, which can recognize the dynamic changes of customer emotions from the conversations between the service staff and the customer. The recognition process includes speaker recognition, emotional feature parameter extraction, and dynamic emotion recognition. Experimental results show that this method is effective and can reach high recognition rates of happy and angry states. It has been successfully applied to the operation quality and service administration in telecom and Internet service company. PMID:26633967

  8. Emotion Analysis of Telephone Complaints from Customer Based on Affective Computing.

    PubMed

    Gong, Shuangping; Dai, Yonghui; Ji, Jun; Wang, Jinzhao; Sun, Hai

    2015-01-01

    Customer complaint has been the important feedback for modern enterprises to improve their product and service quality as well as the customer's loyalty. As one of the commonly used manners in customer complaint, telephone communication carries rich emotional information of speeches, which provides valuable resources for perceiving the customer's satisfaction and studying the complaint handling skills. This paper studies the characteristics of telephone complaint speeches and proposes an analysis method based on affective computing technology, which can recognize the dynamic changes of customer emotions from the conversations between the service staff and the customer. The recognition process includes speaker recognition, emotional feature parameter extraction, and dynamic emotion recognition. Experimental results show that this method is effective and can reach high recognition rates of happy and angry states. It has been successfully applied to the operation quality and service administration in telecom and Internet service company.

  9. A research model of health-care competition and customer satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Asoh, Derek A; Rivers, Patrick A

    2007-11-01

    In all industries, competition among businesses has long been encouraged as a mechanism to increase value for customers. In other words, competition ensures the provision of better products and services to satisfy the needs of customers. Various perspectives of competition, the nature of service quality, health-care system costs and customer satisfaction in health care are examined. A model of the relationship among these variables is developed. The model depicts customer satisfaction as an outcome measure directly dependent on competition. Quality of care and health-care system costs, while also directly dependent on competition, are considered as determinants of customer satisfaction as well. The model is discussed in the light of propositions for empirical research.

  10. The Link between Organizational Learning Culture and Customer Satisfaction: Confirming Relationship and Exploring Moderating Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantouvakis, Angelos; Bouranta, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to develop a theoretical framework and conduct an empirical study across different service sectors to investigate the inter-relationships between organizational learning culture, employee job satisfaction and their impact on customer satisfaction. It also aims to examine an individual-level variable (educational…

  11. [Customer satisfaction study in two roman hospitals: comparison between "cook & serve" and "cook & chill"].

    PubMed

    Perata, E; Ferrari, P; Tarsitani, G

    2005-01-01

    We studied patient's satisfaction rate for hospital dishes comparing "cook & chill" method with "cook & serve". As principal instrument we used a comparative questionnaire, anonymous and self-compiled, which is able to evaluate the differences of customer satisfaction's rate between the two methods.

  12. Applying Customer Satisfaction Theory to Community College Planning of Counseling Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hom, Willard C.

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses a framework in which a researcher may apply a customer satisfaction model to the planning of counseling services at the community college level. It also reviews some historical work on satisfaction research with the unique environment of student services in two-year colleges. The article suggests that readers could benefit…

  13. Practical marketing for dentistry. 3. Relationship marketing and patient/customer satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Ball, R

    1996-06-22

    In this article, we look at the philosophy of customer focus and value, and how dental practices can produce and deliver high customer value and satisfaction, to retain as well as attract their customers-the patients. Total quality concepts will also be discussed in the context of their relationship with marketing activities. In all cases, where 'customer' is referenced, this means 'patient' in the context of a dentistry, since patients are the customers, their requirements must be considered in targeting the marketing of a dental practice.

  14. Measurement of Civil Engineering Customer Satisfaction in Tactical Air Command: A Prototype Evaluation Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    The CE organization here at Myrtle Beach AFB does a very good job. Luke does well for having so many "chiefs" to keep happy and the largest customer...BUREAU OF STANDARDS- 1963-A_ . -_- ’II I-F MEASUREMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IN TACTICAL AIR COMMAND: A PROTOTYPE EVALUATION PROGRAM...Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio dhi ot tro Lwnivi tca1li! 111 . . AFIT/GEM/DEM/86S-23 MEASUREMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IN

  15. Keeping the customer satisfied: issues in the interpretation and use of patient satisfaction surveys.

    PubMed

    Scott, A; Smith, R D

    1994-12-01

    Patient satisfaction and customer focus are increasingly important objectives set for health services. The patient satisfaction survey is becoming the main method of assessing this aspect of health care. In competitive environments, those institutions that show that they respond to consumers' needs are in a better position to attract funding. The use of patient satisfaction surveys in quality assurance-type activities is also increasing. In these contexts, however, the way in which patient satisfaction surveys should be interpreted and used to maximise the satisfaction of patients has received little critical attention. Problems in interpreting the results of satisfaction surveys arise from the weak conceptual foundation of patient satisfaction, which has been well documented in the literature. The objective of this paper is to show that using current formulations of patient satisfaction surveys in quality assurance-type activities and competitive environments may not lead to the maximisation of patients' satisfaction with health services. If the satisfaction of patients is to be maximised then it is necessary to extend the current conceptual basis of patient satisfaction to recognise explicitly the decision-making contexts in which the results will be used. This paper identifies the manner by which this extension should occur by considering some of the problems and pitfalls of interpreting and using the results of surveys to maximise patients' satisfaction.

  16. Customer satisfaction in medical service encounters -- a comparison between obstetrics and gynecology patients and general medical patients.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ching-Sheng; Weng, Hui-Ching; Chang, Hsin-Hsin; Hsu, Tsuen-Ho

    2006-03-01

    This study is concerned with the "service encounter", and seeks to describe, by use of the Service Encounter Evaluation Model, how the processes involved in the service encounter affect customer satisfaction. Its findings have implications for management practice and research directions, and recommendations are made. With the implementation of a national health insurance scheme, an ever-prospering economy and continually improving educational levels in Taiwan, demand among citizens for good health and medical care is ever increasing. Obstetrics and gynecology patients often differ greatly from general patients, in terms of their moods and emotions. This research involved an empirical study, whose subjects were 590 customers of general clinics and 339 customers of gynecology clinics, in various medical centers in southern Taiwan. By factor analysis, the study established four influencing factors, which were "Medical professionals", "Nursing professionals", "Service personnel" and "Space and facilities". Using the Linear Structural Relation Model (LISREL), it found that medical professionals, nursing professionals, service personnel and space and facilities were effective predictors of medical treatment satisfaction. We also found that the greatest positive impact on overall medical treatment satisfaction resulted from rises in satisfaction with medical professionals, but that the least impact was achieved in relation to service personnel in the general and gynecology clinics.

  17. Student Satisfaction and the Customer Focus in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mark, Eddie

    2013-01-01

    Advocating a customer focus, the Total Quality Management model of leadership has led to success in raising performance levels throughout various manufacturing and service industries. Many education stakeholders, however, are resistant to the notion that postsecondary students benefit from being treated like customers. While many critics oppose…

  18. Customer satisfaction survey with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

    PubMed

    Koh, Young Rae; Kim, Shine Young; Kim, In Suk; Chang, Chulhun L; Lee, Eun Yup; Son, Han Chul; Kim, Hyung Hoi

    2014-09-01

    We performed customer satisfaction surveys for physicians and nurses regarding clinical laboratory services, and for outpatients who used phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level to evaluate our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Thus, we wish to share our experiences with the customer satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. Board members of our laboratory designed a study procedure and study population, and developed two types of questionnaire. A satisfaction survey for clinical laboratory services was conducted with 370 physicians and 125 nurses by using an online or paper questionnaire. The satisfaction survey for phlebotomy services was performed with 347 outpatients who received phlebotomy services by using computer-aided interviews. Mean satisfaction scores of physicians and nurses was 58.1, while outpatients' satisfaction score was 70.5. We identified several dissatisfactions with our clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services. First, physicians and nurses were most dissatisfied with the specimen collection and delivery process. Second, physicians and nurses were dissatisfied with phlebotomy services. Third, molecular genetic and cytogenetic tests were found more expensive than other tests. This study is significant in that it describes the first reference survey that offers a survey procedure and questionnaire to assess customer satisfaction with clinical laboratory and phlebotomy services at a tertiary care unit level.

  19. Linking functional and relational service quality to customer satisfaction and loyalty: differences between men and women.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hernández, Rosa M; Martínez-Tur, Vicente; Peiró, José M; Moliner, Carolina

    2010-04-01

    This study assessed differences between men and women in the association of perceptions of service quality with customer evaluations. Functional (efficiency with which the service is delivered) and relational (customers' emotional benefits, beyond the core performance, related to the social interaction of customers with employees) dimensions of service quality were measured as well as customer satisfaction and loyalty. The sample of 277 customers (191 men, 86 women), surveyed in 29 Mexican hotels, had a mean age of 38.1 yr. (SD=9.7) for men and 34.5 yr. (SD=11.0) for women. To be eligible for survey, customers had to have spent at least one night in the hotel in question. Analysis indicated that the women and men differed in the association of functional and relational dimensions of service quality with their satisfaction and loyalty. Functional service quality was higher for the men than the women, while relational service quality showed greater predictive power for women than for men, although these accounted for only 4% of the customers' satisfaction variance and 6% of the loyalty variance.

  20. The interplay between customer participation and difficulty of design examples in the online designing process and its effect on customer satisfaction: mediational analyses.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Chi; Chen, Hui-Yun; Huang, I-Chiang

    2009-04-01

    In the current consumer-centric economy, consumers increasingly desire the opportunity to design their own products in order to express more effectively their self-image. Mass customization, based on efficient and flexible modulization designs, has provided individualized products to satisfy this desire. This work presents an experiment employed to demonstrate that customer participation leads to higher satisfaction. Specifically, the increment in customer satisfaction due to participation is greater when an easy example is provided than when either no example or a difficult one is provided. Additionally, self-congruity plays a mediating role on the customer participation-satisfaction relationship, and this mediating effect varies across different levels of the design example provided in the design process. When an easy design example is present, customer participation has a direct effect on satisfaction, in addition to the indirect effect of self-congruity. When a difficult example is provided, customer participation does not have incremental effects on either self-congruity or customer satisfaction. Finally, when no design example is shown to customers, contrary to our expectation, participation still enhances customer satisfaction due to an increased sense of self-congruity.

  1. Choice, perceived control, and customer satisfaction: the psychology of online service recovery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Chi

    2008-06-01

    Service failures and consequent recoveries have been identified as critical determinants of customer retention. Therefore, effective service recovery programs warrant further exploration, particularly in the online shopping environment, where consumers can receive immediate and tangible service recovery. The results of the present study suggest that by providing a choice of recovery options, customers' sense of control is increased, as is their satisfaction with the particular recovery efforts and their overall satisfaction with the entire service experience. Also, service importance accentuated the impact of choice on perceived control. Specifically, when the service was of greater importance, giving customers a choice of recovery options augmented customers' sense of control more than when the service was of lesser importance. The implications of the findings are also discussed.

  2. FY 2002 Customer Satisfaction & Top 200 Users Survey Composite Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-11-01

    3 § Global Customer Service Performance Rating Review 5 § DTIC Online Services 8...Service Performance § DTIC Online Services § Other DTIC Products and Services § User Demographics § Communication/Access and Information Requirements...respondents would recommend DTIC’s products and services to colleagues. (Reference Figure 4) Online Services (Public STINET, Secure STINET, Web-Enabled

  3. 49 CFR 579.5 - Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction campaigns, consumer advisories, and other communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction campaigns, consumer advisories, and other communications. 579.5 Section 579.5 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) REPORTING OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS ABOUT POTENTIAL...

  4. 49 CFR 579.5 - Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction campaigns, consumer advisories, and other communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction campaigns, consumer advisories, and other communications. 579.5 Section 579.5 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) REPORTING OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS ABOUT POTENTIAL...

  5. 49 CFR 579.5 - Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction campaigns, consumer advisories, and other communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction campaigns, consumer advisories, and other communications. 579.5 Section 579.5 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) REPORTING OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS ABOUT POTENTIAL...

  6. 49 CFR 579.5 - Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction campaigns, consumer advisories, and other communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Notices, bulletins, customer satisfaction campaigns, consumer advisories, and other communications. 579.5 Section 579.5 Transportation Other... OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) REPORTING OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATIONS ABOUT POTENTIAL...

  7. 75 FR 65040 - Submission for Review: Customer Satisfaction Surveys, OMB Control No. 3206-0236

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-21

    ... MANAGEMENT Submission for Review: Customer Satisfaction Surveys, OMB Control No. 3206-0236 AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: 30-Day Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) offers the general public and other Federal agencies the opportunity to...

  8. Approaching Error-Free Customer Satisfaction through Process Change and Feedback Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berglund, Kristin M.; Ludwig, Timothy D.

    2009-01-01

    Employee-based errors result in quality defects that can often impact customer satisfaction. This study examined the effects of a process change and feedback system intervention on error rates of 3 teams of retail furniture distribution warehouse workers. Archival records of error codes were analyzed and aggregated as the measure of quality. The…

  9. Assessing Customer Satisfaction at the NIST Research Library: Essential Tool for Future Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Rosa; Allmang, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes a campus-wide customer satisfaction survey undertaken by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Research Library in 2007. The methodology, survey instrument, data analysis, results, and actions taken in response to the survey are described. The outcome and recommendations will guide the library both…

  10. SY 2008-09 Customer Satisfaction Survey Results (Full Report). DoDEA Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense Education Activity, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) Customer Satisfaction Survey is a biennial survey administered by DoDEA to parents and students to monitor DoDEA's success in meeting students' needs. The survey is administered every other year to sponsors with children in pre-kindergarten--12th grade and to students in grades 4-12. For the…

  11. SY 2010-11 Customer Satisfaction Survey Results (Full Report). DoDEA Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense Education Activity, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) Customer Satisfaction Survey is a biennial survey administered by DoDEA to parents and students to monitor DoDEA's success in meeting students' needs. The survey is administered every other year to sponsors with children in pre-kindergarten-12th grade and to students in grades 4-12. For the…

  12. Beef customer satisfaction: USDA quality grade and marination effects on consumer evaluations of top round steaks.

    PubMed

    Behrends, J M; Goodson, K J; Koohmaraie, M; Shackelford, S D; Wheeler, T L; Morgan, W W; Reagan, J O; Gwartney, B L; Wise, J W; Savell, J W

    2005-03-01

    An in-home beef study evaluated consumer ratings of top round steaks (semimembranosus) as influenced by USDA quality grade (top Choice or high Select), city (Chicago or Philadelphia), consumer segment (beef loyalists = heavy consumers of beef; budget rotators = cost-driven and split meat consumption between beef and chicken; and variety rotators = higher incomes and education and split meat consumption among beef, poultry, and other foods), degree of doneness, cooking method, and marination. Consumers evaluated each steak for overall like, tenderness, juiciness, flavor like, and flavor amount using 10-point scales (1 = dislike extremely, not at all tender, not at all juicy, dislike extremely, and none at all to 10 = like extremely, extremely tender, extremely juicy, like extremely, and an extreme amount of flavor, respectively). Quality grade affected several consumer sensory traits, with top Choice receiving higher (P < or = 0.004) tenderness, juiciness, and flavor like scores than high Select. Consumers in Chicago rated steaks cooked "medium and less" higher for overall like, tenderness, juiciness, flavor like, and flavor amount than those in Philadelphia (city x degree of doneness; P < or = 0.020). Steaks braised by customers in Philadelphia received among the highest scores for overall like, tenderness, juiciness, flavor like, and flavor amount compared with any cooking method used by customers in Chicago (cooking method x city; P < or = 0.026). Overall like and flavor amount ratings were least (P < 0.05) for steaks that were marinated and cooked to "medium and less" degree of doneness (marination x degree of doneness; P < or = 0.014). Braised steaks received among the highest values for overall like, tenderness, juiciness, flavor like, and flavor amount when cooked to "medium and less" or "medium well and more" (cooking method x degree of doneness; P < or = 0.008). Correlation and stepwise regression analysis indicated that flavor like was pivotal in customers

  13. [Analysis of on-call consultations with clinical pathologists--identification of customer's satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Yanai, M

    2000-09-01

    One aspect whereby effectiveness of clinical pathologists can be measured is customer service and satisfaction. Clinical pathologist should identify their customers, their processes and procedures to meet these needs to the customer's satisfaction. To identify customer's satisfaction, the records of on-call consultations with clinical pathologists were analyzed. Between January 1996 and December 1998, 1327 consultations were recorded, 40% of which were consultations from physicians, 50% from medical technologists. Physicians requested interpretation of laboratory data obtained, and clinical knowledge mainly concerning the microbiology and hematology during office hours. On holidays, physicians needed help performing emergency tests such as Gram stain and Wright-Giemsa stain. During office hours, medical technologists requested clinical information concerning patients in whom unreasonable data would be reported and the contact to the clinical side. Furthermore, technologists inquired about the methodology of laboratory tests during day duty on holidays. These results indicated that the clinical pathologist in our hospital could satisfy the customer(physicians and medical technologists), by providing 1) a wide range of clinical knowledge concerning not only the laboratory medicine but clinical medicine including therapeutics, 2) capability of performing emergency tests such as Gram stain and Wright-Giemsa stain, and 3) capability of interpreting the results obtained. Although these would not be adopted in every hospital, every clinical pathologist should examine his role in the hospital.

  14. Customer satisfaction planning and industrial engineering move hospital towards in-house stockless program.

    PubMed

    Burton, R; Mauk, D

    1993-03-01

    By integrating customer satisfaction planning and industrial engineering techniques when examining internal costs and efficiencies, materiel managers are able to better realize what concepts will best meet their customers' needs. Defining your customer(s), applying industrial engineering techniques, completing work sampling studies, itemizing recommendations and benefits to each alternative, performing feasibility and cost-analysis matrixes and utilizing resources through productivity monitoring will get you on the right path toward selecting concepts to use. This article reviews the above procedures as they applied to one hospital's decision-making process to determine whether to incorporate a stockless inventory program. Through an analysis of customer demand, the hospital realized that stockless was the way to go, but not by outsourcing the function--the hospital incorporated an in-house stockless inventory program.

  15. Customer care. Patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting.

    PubMed

    Doering, G T

    1998-09-01

    The focus of the study was to prioritize six emergency medical service treatment factors in terms of their impact upon patient satisfaction in the prehospital setting. The six treatment areas analyzed were: EMS response time; medical care provided on scene; explanation of care by the provider; the provider's ability to reduce patient anxiety; the provider's ability to meet the patient's non-medical needs; and the level of courtesy/politeness shown by the EMS provider toward the patient. Telephone interviews were conducted with both patients and bystanders to obtain their perception of how well the system met their needs. The study analyzed how the six issues were rated and then evaluated the impact an individual's low score in a category had on that person's overall rating of the service provided. The overall satisfaction rating is not a calculated score, but an overall score specified by the respondent. The effect each issue had on the respondent's overall rating was determined by averaging the overall ratings for a category's low scorers, averaging the overall ratings for high scorers and then measuring the difference. Results of the study indicate that the factor with the greatest negative impact on patient satisfaction came from a perceived lack of crew courtesy and politeness. Respondents who indicated a fair to poor score in this category decreased their overall score by 60.2%. Ratings in other categories yielded the following results: When respondents rated the response time as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed an 18.4% decrease. When respondents rated the quality of medical care as fair to poor, their average overall rating showed a decrease of 22.6%. When the crew's ability to explain what was happening to the patient was rated as fair to poor, the average overall score dropped 33.6%. When the EMT's and medic's ability to reduce the patient's anxiety was rated fair to poor, average overall score declined by 32.6%. Finally, when the crew

  16. [A cross-level analysis of the links between service quality and disconfirmation of expectations and customer satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Hernández, Rosa M; Martínez-Tur, Vicente; González-Morales, M Gloria; Ramos, José; Peiró, José M

    2009-08-01

    This article examines links between disconfirmation of expectations and functional and relational service quality perceived by employees and customer satisfaction. A total of 156 employees, who were working in 52 work units, participated in the research study. In addition, 517 customers who were assisted by these work units were surveyed. Using a cross-level approach, we used a random coefficient model to test the aforementioned relationships. A strong relationship between disconfirmation of expectations and customer satisfaction was observed. Also, the results confirmed that functional service quality maintains an additional and significant association with customer satisfaction. In contrast, there were no significant relationships between relational service quality and customer satisfaction. The article concludes with a discussion of these results.

  17. Beyond Customer Satisfaction: Reexamining Customer Loyalty to Evaluate Continuing Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyt, Jeff E.; Howell, Scott L.

    2011-01-01

    This article provides questionnaire items and a theoretical model of factors predictive of customer loyalty for use by administrators to determine ways to increase repeat purchasing in their continuing education programs. Prior studies in the literature are discussed followed by results of applying the model at one institution and a discussion of…

  18. Health worker (internal customer) satisfaction and motivation in the public sector in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Agyepong, Irene Akua; Anafi, Patricia; Asiamah, Ebenezer; Ansah, Evelyn K; Ashon, Daniel A; Narh-Dometey, Christiana

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes factors affecting health worker motivation and satisfaction in the public sector in Ghana. The data are from a survey of public sector health care providers carried out in January 2002 and repeated in August 2003 using an interviewer administered structured questionnaire. It is part of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) effort in the health sector in the Greater Accra region of Ghana. Workplace obstacles identified that caused dissatisfaction and de-motivated staff in order of the most frequently mentioned were low salaries such that obtaining basic necessities of daily living becomes a problem; lack of essential equipment, tools and supplies to work with; delayed promotions; difficulties and inconveniences with transportation to work; staff shortages; housing, additional duty allowances and in-service (continuous) training. Others included children's education, vehicles to work with such as ambulances and pickups, staff transfer procedures, staff pre-service education inadequate for job requirements, and the effect of the job on family and other social factors. There were some differences in the percentages of staff selecting a given workplace obstacle between the purely rural districts, the highly urbanized Accra metropolis and the districts that were a mixture of urbanized and rural. It is unlikely that the Ghana Health Service can provide high quality of care to its end users (external customers) if workplace obstacles that de-motivate staff (internal customers) and negatively influence their performance are not properly recognized and addressed as a complex of inter-related problems producing a common result--dissatisfied poorly motivated staff and resulting poor quality services.

  19. [Customer satisfaction in home care: methodological issues based on a survey carried out in Lazio].

    PubMed

    Pasquarella, A; Marceca, M; Casagrande, S; Gentile, D; Zeppilli, D; Buonaiuto, N; Cozzolino, M; Guasticchi, G

    2007-01-01

    Home care customer satisfaction has been, until now, rarely evaluated. After illustrating the main italian regional surveys on this issue, the article presents a customer satisfaction survey carried out in the district of Civitavecchia (Local Health Unit 'Rome F'), Lazio, regarding 30 home care beneficiaries. Methodological aspects emerging from the survey are basically focused on: advantages and disadvantages of quantitative and qualitative approaches (possibly associated each other); main criteria of eligibility of people selected for interviewing, both patients or caregivers; conditions that maximize answers reliability, including training on interviewers. Authors highlight opportunity of using such kind of survey, integrated with other different tools, into a systemic vision, for promoting management changes coming from suggested problems, aimed at total quality management.

  20. Web Evaluation at the US National Institutes of Health: Use of the American Customer Satisfaction Index Online Customer Survey

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Elliot R; Feldman, Sue; Love, Cynthia B; Rodrigues, Dennis; Malamud, Mark; Lagana, Marie; Crafts, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Background The National Institutes of Health (NIH), US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), realized the need to better understand its Web users in order to help assure that websites are user friendly and well designed for effective information dissemination. A trans-NIH group proposed a trans-NIH project to implement an online customer survey, known as the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) survey, on a large number of NIH websites—the first “enterprise-wide” ACSI application, and probably the largest enterprise Web evaluation of any kind, in the US government. The proposal was funded by the NIH Evaluation Set-Aside Program for two years at a cost of US $1.5 million (US $1.275 million for survey licenses for 60 websites at US $18,000 per website; US $225,000 for a project evaluation contractor). Objective The overall project objectives were to assess the value added to the participating NIH websites of using the ACSI online survey, identify any NIH-wide benefits (and limitations) of the ACSI, ascertain any new understanding about the NIH Web presence based on ACSI survey results, and evaluate the effectiveness of a trans-NIH approach to Web evaluation. This was not an experimental study and was not intended to evaluate the ACSI survey methodology, per se, or the impacts of its use on customer satisfaction with NIH websites. Methods The evaluation methodology included baseline pre-project websites profiles; before and after email surveys of participating website teams; interviews with a representative cross-section of website staff; observations of debriefing meetings with website teams; observations at quarterly trans-NIH Web staff meetings and biweekly trans-NIH leadership team meetings; and review and analysis of secondary data. Results Of the original 60 NIH websites signed up, 55 implemented the ACSI survey, 42 generated sufficient data for formal reporting of survey results for their sites, and 51 completed the final project survey. A

  1. DoDEA 2010-11 Customer Satisfaction Survey. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Defense Education Activity, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Every two years the Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) administers the DoDEA Customer Satisfaction Survey (CSS) to all parents with children attending DoDEA schools and all 4th-12th grade students enrolled in a DoDEA school. Parents were asked to complete one survey for each school in which they had a child enrolled. The purpose of…

  2. Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Network (EREN) customer satisfaction survey, 1997. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.V.; Henderson, D.P.

    1997-07-01

    the EREN Customer Satisfaction Survey 1997 was designed to follow up the results of the 1995-96 Surveys, enabling comparison to the 1995- 96 baseline, and to provide additional qualitative feedback about EREN. Both the 1995-96 and 1997 Surveys had these objectives: Identify and define actual EREN users; Determine the value or benefits derived from the use of EREN; Determine the kind and quality of services that users want; Determine the users` levels of satisfaction with existing services; Determine users` preferences in both the sources of service and means of delivery; and Establish continuous quality improvement measures. This report presents the methodology used, scope and limitations of the study, description of the survey instrument, and findings regarding demographics, technical capabilities, usage patterns, general use, importance of and satisfaction with resources, and additional information and comments.

  3. Proactive patient rounding to increase customer service and satisfaction on an orthopaedic unit.

    PubMed

    Tea, Christine; Ellison, Michael; Feghali, Fadia

    2008-01-01

    Customer service and patient satisfaction have become increasingly important in the healthcare industry. Given limited resources and a myriad of choices, on which facets of patient satisfaction should healthcare providers focus? An analysis of 40,000 observations across 4 hospitals found 1 important intervention: timely staff responsiveness. Using the Plan-Do-Check-Act (PDCA) quality methodology, the goal was set to improve staff responsiveness to orthopaedic patient needs and requests, thus improving patient satisfaction. A model to improve staff responsiveness was systematically developed and implemented. The I Care Rounding model places the emphasis on proactively meeting patient needs through hourly rounding, rather than caregivers providing care in a reactionary mode. After full implementation, positive improvement was demonstrated.

  4. Center to Advance Palliative Care palliative care clinical care and customer satisfaction metrics consensus recommendations.

    PubMed

    Weissman, David E; Morrison, R Sean; Meier, Diane E

    2010-02-01

    Data collection and analysis are vital for strategic planning, quality improvement, and demonstration of palliative care program impact to hospital administrators, private funders and policymakers. Since 2000, the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) has provided technical assistance to hospitals, health systems and hospices working to start, sustain, and grow nonhospice palliative care programs. CAPC convened a consensus panel in 2008 to develop recommendations for specific clinical and customer metrics that programs should track. The panel agreed on four key domains of clinical metrics and two domains of customer metrics. Clinical metrics include: daily assessment of physical/psychological/spiritual symptoms by a symptom assessment tool; establishment of patient-centered goals of care; support to patient/family caregivers; and management of transitions across care sites. For customer metrics, consensus was reached on two domains that should be tracked to assess satisfaction: patient/family satisfaction, and referring clinician satisfaction. In an effort to ensure access to reliably high-quality palliative care data throughout the nation, hospital palliative care programs are encouraged to collect and report outcomes for each of the metric domains described here.

  5. An experimental investigation of justice-based service recovery on customer satisfaction, loyalty, and word-of-mouth intentions.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Terri; Nieman-Gonder, Jennifer M; Andreoli, Nicole A; Trimarco-Beta, Darlene

    2006-12-01

    Service recovery is related to many important organizational outcomes such as customer satisfaction, loyalty, and profitability. Within the theoretical framework of organizational justice, an experiment using a simulated "live" service failure was used to assess the effects of justice-based service-recovery strategies on customer satisfaction, loyalty, positive word-of-mouth intentions, and negative word-of-mouth intentions. Analysis indicated that strategies including interactional justice, distributive justice, and a combination of these were equally effective in maintaining customer satisfaction, loyalty, and positive word of mouth, and minimizing negative word of mouth after a service failure. No support for the service recovery paradox, that is, increased satisfaction following service failure and recovery compared to never having a problem, was found. Satisfaction and loyalty for those in the failure conditions were equal to, although not higher than, in the no-failure control condition. Practical implications for organizational practices are discussed.

  6. Materialism, affective states, and life satisfaction: case of Croatia.

    PubMed

    Lipovčan, Ljiljana Kaliterna; Prizmić-Larsen, Zvjezdana; Brkljačić, Tihana

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of studies have used Material Values Scale (MVS) to assess beliefs about importance to own material things. The aims of this study were to validate the MVS scale and to explore the relationships between materialistic values and well-being of Croatian citizens. The study was carried out on a representative sample of N = 1129 Croatian citizens. We used the short 9-item version of the MVS, life satisfaction rating, ratings of two positive (Positive affect) and four negative emotions (Negative affect) over the past month, and demographic variables (age, gender, income). The original dimensionality of the MVS was not confirmed; confirmatory factor analyses yielded two instead of three factors, Happiness and Centrality/Success. When controlled for income, gender and age, the Happiness dimension predicted Life satisfaction and both Positive and Negative affect, indicating that people who believed that the material goods in ones life leads to happiness reported to have lower life satisfaction, lower level of positive affect and higher level of negative affect over the past month. The Centrality/Success dimension was positively related to Positive affect, indicating that the belief that possessions play a central role in enjoyment leads to more frequent experiences of happiness and satisfaction over the past month.

  7. [Customer satisfaction with a quality management system according to DIN EN ISO 9001:2000: Increase in the satisfaction of cooperating clinics].

    PubMed

    Beholz, Sven; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The evaluation of customers' satisfaction is elementary for any quality management system. In our university cardiac surgery unit that has been certified according to DIN EN ISO 9001:2000 the influence of repeated evaluation of the referring physicians' satisfaction conducted in the course of three consecutive years on structures and processes in the scope of the quality management system was examined. Customers' satisfaction with the possibility of access to the department could be increased by targeted interventions. Further interventions in the field of documentation led to a measurable increase in satisfaction with postoperative communication. Repeated annual evaluation of the satisfaction of referring physicians has proved to be a valuable tool in the process of continuous quality improvement.

  8. Links among high-performance work environment, service quality, and customer satisfaction: an extension to the healthcare sector.

    PubMed

    Scotti, Dennis J; Harmon, Joel; Behson, Scott J

    2007-01-01

    Healthcare managers must deliver high-quality patient services that generate highly satisfied and loyal customers. In this article, we examine how a high-involvement approach to the work environment of healthcare employees may lead to exceptional service quality, satisfied patients, and ultimately to loyal customers. Specifically, we investigate the chain of events through which high-performance work systems (HPWS) and customer orientation influence employee and customer perceptions of service quality and patient satisfaction in a national sample of 113 Veterans Health Administration ambulatory care centers. We present a conceptual model for linking work environment to customer satisfaction and test this model using structural equations modeling. The results suggest that (1) HPWS is linked to employee perceptions of their ability to deliver high-quality customer service, both directly and through their perceptions of customer orientation; (2) employee perceptions of customer service are linked to customer perceptions of high-quality service; and (3) perceived service quality is linked with customer satisfaction. Theoretical and practical implications of our findings, including suggestions of how healthcare managers can implement changes to their work environments, are discussed.

  9. Questionnaire survey of customer satisfaction for product categories towards certification of ergonomic quality in design.

    PubMed

    Mochimaru, Masaaki; Takahashi, Miwako; Hatakenaka, Nobuko; Horiuchi, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Customer satisfaction was surveyed for 6 product categories (consumer electronics, daily commodities, home equipment, information systems, cars, and health appliances) by questionnaires based on the Analytic Hierarchy Process. Analyzing weight of evaluation factors, the 6 product categories were reorganized into 4 categories, those were related to 4 aspects in daily living that formed by two axes: home living - mobility life and healthy life - active communication. It was found that consumers were attracted by the actual user test by public institutes for all product categories. The certification based on the design process standard established by authorities, such as EQUID was the second best attractor for consumers.

  10. Organizational climate configurations: relationships to collective attitudes, customer satisfaction, and financial performance.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Mathis; Ostroff, Cheri; Shmulyian, Svetlana; Kinicki, Angelo

    2009-05-01

    Research on organizational climate has tended to focus on independent dimensions of climate rather than studying the total social context as configurations of multiple climate dimensions. The authors examined relationships between configurations of unit-level climate dimensions and organizational outcomes. Three profile characteristics represented climate configurations: (1) elevation, or the mean score across climate dimensions; (2) variability, or the extent to which scores across dimensions vary; and (3) shape, or the pattern of the dimensions. Across 2 studies (1,120 employees in 120 bank branches and 4,317 employees in 86 food distribution stores), results indicated that elevation was related to collective employee attitudes and service perceptions, while shape was related to customer satisfaction and financial performance. With respect to profile variability, results were mixed. The discussion focuses on future directions for taking a configural approach to organizational climate.

  11. [Measurement of customer satisfaction and participation of citizens in improving the quality of healthcare services.].

    PubMed

    Degrassi, Flori; Sopranzi, Cristina; Leto, Antonella; Amato, Simona; D'Urso, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Managing quality in health care whilst ensuring equity is a fundamental aspect of the provision of services by healthcare organizations. Measuring perceived quality of care is an important tool for evaluating the quality of healthcare delivery in that it allows the implementation of corrective actions to meet the healthcare needs of patients. The Rome B (ASL RMB) local health authority adopted the UNI EN 10006:2006 norms as a management tool, therefore introducing the evaluation of customer satisfaction as an opportunity to involve users in the creation of quality healthcare services with and for the citizens. This paper presents the activities implemented and the results achieved with regards to shared and integrated continuous improvement of services.

  12. Appreciation and Life Satisfaction: Does Appreciation Uniquely Predict Life Satisfaction above Gender, Coping Skills, Self-Esteem, and Positive Affectivity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halle, Joshua Solomon

    2015-01-01

    The primary purpose of this research was to examine whether appreciation explains variance in life satisfaction after controlling for gender, positive affectivity, self-esteem, and coping skills. Two hundred ninety-eight undergraduates went to the informed consent page of the online survey composed of the Appreciation Scale, the Satisfaction With…

  13. Investigation on the Influence of the Brand Image of Higher Educational Institutions on Satisfaction and Customer Lifetime Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Chin-Tsu; Chen, Chun-Fu

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to discuss the relationships among the brand image of universities (external variables), university satisfaction (mediating variables) and customer lifetime value (internal variables). The findings can serve as a reference for higher educational institutions in strengthening their advantages and overcoming their shortcomings, as…

  14. Factors affecting allied health faculty job satisfaction: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Romig, Barbara; O'Sullivan Maillet, Julie; Denmark, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    Evidence in the literature suggests job satisfaction can make a difference in keeping qualified workers on the job, but little research has been conducted focusing specifically on allied health faculty. In order to attract and retain top quality faculty, colleges and universities should understand the variables impacting faculty satisfaction and develop a plan to enhance satisfaction. An integrative literature review (CINHAL, ERIC, Journal of Allied Health, Chronicle of Higher Education, Research in Higher Education, and current books on job satisfaction) of faculty job satisfaction and dissatisfaction produced a variety of publications presenting the key determinants of job satisfaction by allied health faculty in the United States. The purpose of the analysis was to examine the various factors that influence job satisfaction, especially by allied health faculty, in institutions of higher education in the U.S. The procedure used for this analysis consisted of reviewing allied health and higher education faculty studies to identify factors influencing job satisfaction, research questions, sample size reported, instruments used for measurement of job satisfaction, and job satisfaction results. While the theoretical models of allied health and higher education faculty job satisfaction exist separately in the literature, their remarkable similarities permit the prospect of a contemporary framework of the essential components of job satisfaction. Potential opportunities for continuing research on the personal and professional variables impacting job satisfaction of allied health faculty and similar disciplines are presented.

  15. Improvement in cost-effectiveness and customer satisfaction by a quality management system according to EN ISO 9001:2000.

    PubMed

    Beholz, Sven; Konertz, Wolfgang

    2005-12-01

    The implementation of a quality management system (QMS) according to EN ISO 9001:2000 has proven to be possible for cardiac surgery departments. However, it remains unclear if a QMS can help to improve quality as indicated by cost-effectiveness and customer satisfaction. To control costs for medical goods and laboratory investigations an internal control system for the allocation of resources was implemented. Laboratory costs and medical goods per open heart procedure were investigated in the years 2000 to 2003. In terms of customer satisfaction, repeated questionnaire-based evaluation of referring physicians was obtained from 2001 to 2003 and the influence of repeated interventions on various aspects of communications was investigated. Costs of medical goods could be reduced by 6.1%, and for laboratory investigations by 35% per operation. Additionally, customer satisfaction could be increased efficiently with respect to accessibility and postoperative communication. By the introduction of a process based QMS, efficient control of the costs of medical goods and laboratory investigations could be achieved. Once a year repeat evaluation of satisfaction of advising physicians has proven to be a valuable tool in the process of continuous improvement.

  16. [Evaluation of customer satisfaction with the hospital catering system in the city of Palermo (Italy)].

    PubMed

    Firenze, Alberto; Morici, Mariagrazia; Calamus, Giuseppe; Gelsomino, Viviana; Aprea, Luigi; Di Benedetto, Antonino; Muangala, Muana A Luila; Centineo, Giovanni; Romano, Nino

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate patients' customer satisfaction with the hospital catering services of two public hospitals and one private sector hospital in the city of Palermo (Italy). A multiple choice questionnaire was administered by face-to-face interview to 207 of 227 hospitalized patients. Positive responses regarding the perceived quality of food were given especially by patients of the private sector hospital, 80% of which reported being satisfied with the catering service. A higher percentage of patients in the private sector hospital were satisfied with the food distribution modalities with respect to the two public hospitals. Only 3% of patients in the private sector hospital required their families to bring food from home, with respect to 7.9% and 30% respectively in the two public hospitals. Private sector patients also reported appreciating the wide availability of food and the help given by health care workers (79% vs a mean of 55% in the two public hospitals). No differences were found amongst hospitals with regards to the hygienic characteristics of meals. The results of this study indicate the need to make changes in the management of the catering service of one of the involved public hospitals especially.

  17. [Customer satisfaction analysis in women attending an organized mammographic screening. Pilot study at Trento].

    PubMed

    Della Sala, W; Tognotti, F; Pellegrini, M; Bernardi, D; Gentilini, M; Piffer, S

    2005-01-01

    Present paper reports on the results of a pilot customer satisfaction study carried out on 1.720 consecutive women (18.7 with spontaneous access) attended senology department (Trento and Borgo) in the context of a organized mammography screening programme, started in October 2000. Data were collected by a questionnarie filled by the women after mammography. 4.3% of the invited women reported the receiving the letter late, 0.9% considered it inaccurate, 7.2% had some problems for getting a new date for test, 1.8% of the whole sample reported some problems for external access and 2.2% for internal access to health facilities; 1.9% perceived waiting room as not friendly. The welcoming by the personnel is judged quite well, only 0.6% complained about it. Trento centre, is more efficient than Borgo. In 21.7% of the cases the mammography has been performed within next 30 minutes of the fixed time and in 7.9% besides that. 36.8% of the whole sample perceived mammography as tiresome and 4.1% as painful. The percentage of women reporting mammography disconforting increase, in Trento sample, according the education level as previously reported. The data about perceived quality are satisfactory, on the whole. Anyway it would be opportune to contain the waiting time.

  18. Beef customer satisfaction: cooking method and degree of doneness effects on the top round steak.

    PubMed

    Neely, T R; Lorenzen, C L; Miller, R K; Tatum, J D; Wise, J W; Taylor, J F; Buyck, M J; Reagan, J O; Savell, J W

    1999-03-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the consumer-controlled factors of cooking method and degree of doneness on Top Choice, Low Choice, High Select, and Low Select top round steaks. The in-home product test was conducted in Chicago, Houston, Philadelphia, and San Francisco. Consumers (n = 2,212) evaluated each top round steak for overall like (OLIKE), tenderness (TEND), juiciness (JUIC), flavor desirability (DFLAV), and flavor intensity (IFLAV) using 23-point hedonic scales. Stir-frying, braising, and simmering and stewing consistently produced higher consumer attribute ratings. There were clear OLIKE rating differences (P = .0001) for top round steaks among the four cities. The highest ratings were given by consumers in Houston, and the lowest ratings were given by consumers in Philadelphia (P < .05). There were two interactions for OLIKE: USDA quality grade x degree of doneness (P = .002) and degree of doneness x cooking method (P = .02). Higher ratings generally were given to steaks cooked to medium rare or less or to very well degrees of doneness. Stir-frying, braising, and simmering and stewing were preferred at lower degrees of doneness. Customer satisfaction with the top round steak is very dependent on how it is cooked and by whom it is consumed.

  19. Improving customer satisfaction and quality: hospitals recognized by J.D. power and associates share insights on meeting patient and employee needs.

    PubMed

    2003-08-01

    For 35 years, J.D. Power and Associates has presented its much-coveted awards recognizing product and service quality and customer satisfaction in a variety of industries. This year, the company added a new category: hospitals. To better understand patients' reactions to their hospital experiences, the company looked at five key drivers of customer satisfaction: dignity and respect, speed and efficiency, comfort, information and communication, and emotional support. This issue looks at five hospitals recognized by the company for their service excellence and why they emphasize employee satisfaction as well as patient satisfaction.

  20. Acts of kindness and acts of novelty affect life satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Kathryn E; Bardi, Anat

    2010-01-01

    The present experiment was designed to establish the effects of acts of kindness and acts of novelty on life satisfaction. Participants aged 18-60 took part on a voluntary basis. They were randomly assigned to perform either acts of kindness, acts of novelty, or no acts on a daily basis for 10 days. Their life satisfaction was measured before and after the 10-day experiment. As expected, performing acts of kindness or acts of novelty resulted in an increase in life satisfaction.

  1. Global life satisfaction predicts ambulatory affect, stress, and cortisol in daily life in working adults.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Joshua M; Zawadzki, Matthew J; Juth, Vanessa; Sciamanna, Christopher N

    2017-04-01

    Global life satisfaction has been linked with long-term health advantages, yet how life satisfaction impacts the trajectory of long-term health is unclear. This paper examines one such possible mechanism-that greater life satisfaction confers momentary benefits in daily life that accumulate over time. A community sample of working adults (n = 115) completed a measure of life satisfaction and then three subsequent days of ecological momentary assessment surveys (6 times/day) measuring affect (i.e., emotional valence, arousal), and perceived stress, and also provided salivary cortisol samples. Multilevel models indicated that people with higher (vs. lower) levels of life satisfaction reported better momentary affect, less stress, marginally lower momentary levels and significantly altered diurnal slopes of cortisol. Findings suggest individuals with high global life satisfaction have advantageous daily experiences, providing initial evidence for potential mechanisms through which global life satisfaction may help explain long-term health benefits.

  2. Beef customer satisfaction: cooking method and degree of doneness effects on the top sirloin steak.

    PubMed

    Savell, J W; Lorenzen, C L; Neely, T R; Miller, R K; Tatum, J D; Wise, J W; Taylor, J F; Buyck, M J; Reagan, J O

    1999-03-01

    The objective of this research was to evaluate the consumer-controlled factors of cooking method and degree of doneness on Top Choice, Low Choice, High Select, and Low Select top sirloin steaks. The in-home product test was conducted in Chicago, Houston, Philadelphia, and San Francisco. Consumers (n = 2,212) evaluated each top sirloin steak for overall like (OLIKE), tenderness (TEND), juiciness (JUIC), flavor desirability (DFLAV), and flavor intensity (IFLAV) using 23-point hedonic scales. Top sirloin steaks, regardless of city, were consistently cooked to well done or higher degrees of doneness. Dry-heat methods such as outdoor grilling, broiling, and indoor grilling were the most frequent cooking methods used. Four significant interactions existed for OLIKE: USDA quality grade x cooking method (P = .02), city x cooking method (P = .0001), city x degree of doneness (P = .01), and cooking method x degree of doneness (P = .009). Greater differences were found between cooking methods within USDA quality grade than between USDA quality grades within cooking method. Consumers in Houston rated steaks cooked by outdoor grilling higher than those from the other cities, and steaks cooked by indoor grilling were rated the highest among all cooking methods by consumers in Chicago. In Chicago, steaks cooked to more advanced degrees of doneness tended to receive higher ratings, but few differences between degrees of doneness in the other three cities were detected. For outdoor grilling, broiling, and pan-frying, the trend was for OLIKE ratings to decline as degree of doneness increased. The lowest customer satisfaction ratings tended to be given to top sirloin steaks cooked to more advanced degrees of doneness, and consumers most frequently cooked steaks to at least the well done stage. Consumer information programs or the development of postmortem techniques that would ensure acceptable palatability of top sirloin steaks may need to be developed.

  3. Beef customer satisfaction: role of cut, USDA quality grade, and city on in-home consumer ratings.

    PubMed

    Neely, T R; Lorenzen, C L; Miller, R K; Tatum, J D; Wise, J W; Taylor, J F; Buyck, M J; Reagan, J O; Savell, J W

    1998-04-01

    An in-home beef study evaluated consumer ratings from moderate-to-heavy beef users as influenced by cut (top loin, top sirloin, and top round steaks), USDA quality grade (Top Choice, Low Choice, High Select, and Low Select), and city (Chicago, Houston, Philadelphia, and San Francisco). Consumers (n = 2,212) evaluated each steak for overall like (OLIKE), tenderness (TEND), juiciness (JUIC), flavor desirability (DFLAV), and flavor intensity (IFLAV) using 23-point hedonic scales (23 = like extremely, extremely tender, extremely juicy, like extremely, and an extreme amount of flavor; 1 = dislike extremely, not at all tender, not at all juicy, dislike extremely, and no flavor at all). A USDA grade x cut interaction existed for OLIKE (P < .05). Consumers rated top loin steaks highest (P < .05) in OLIKE and ranked Top Choice highest of all steaks (P < .05). Within the top loin, consumers were not (P > .05) able to distinguish OLIKE differences between Low Choice and High Select or between High Select and Low Select. For OLIKE, top sirloin was rated intermediate (P < .05) of the three cuts, and consumers were not able to detect (P > .05) USDA quality grade differences. For OLIKE, top round was the lowest-rated (P < .05) cut. However, consumers preferred (OLIKE, P < .05) Top Choice to the other USDA grades offered. Grade and city interacted to affect TEND, JUIC, DFLAV, and IFLAV. The cut x city interaction was significant for all palatability attributes. Cut and city affected customer satisfaction more than USDA quality grade. Tenderness and flavor were important and equal contributors to OLIKE, r = .85 and r = .86, respectively.

  4. Customer Loyalty and Customer Relationship Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pengwei; Li, Min; Jiao, Xiaojing; Zhou, Ruijin

    The contemporary company attaches great importance to marketing relationship and customer relations is the core of this relationship. Further, customer satisfaction and loyalty is the core of the customer relationship management. Sometimes, high customer satisfaction causes low profit because enterprises do not realize that strengthening the loyalty of the aimed customer is the key of customer relationship management.

  5. Customer satisfaction survey with the National Vaccine Cold Chain Delivery Service.

    PubMed

    Meara, M O; Morrissey, Y; Corcoran, B

    2009-05-01

    In 2008 the Health Service Executive (HSE) carried out a survey to assess general practitioners (GPs) satisfaction with the National Vaccine Cold Chain Service. This survey found high levels of satisfaction (> 90%) with the service. Over half of those surveyed had used the vaccine returns service with the majority (89.2%) finding it good or very good.

  6. "You've Gotta Keep the Customer Satisfied": Assessing Client Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andert, Jeffery N.; And Others

    To better understand factors contributing to an identified early attrition rate for families referred to a child guidance clinic, a procedure was developed for assessing their satisfaction with clinic services. Brief Client Satisfaction Questionnaires (N=3) were developed to assess clients' attitudes and reactions to an initial screening and…

  7. Customer satisfaction and consumer responsibility: toward an alternative model of medical service quality.

    PubMed

    Pinto, M B; Barber, J C

    1999-01-01

    In the increasingly competitive environment of medical services and patient care, physicians feel a strong pressure for increasing efforts to improve patient satisfaction with the goal of creating a loyal patient base. These steps to promote patient satisfaction have typically involved developing new programs and services, as medical offices seek to attract and keep their patients by continually enhancing service features. While patient satisfaction is a worthy goal, this paper argues that we often make mistakes and incur expensive costs in pursuing satisfaction as an end unto itself. This paper proposes an alternative model, based on creating a doctor-patient therapeutic alliance which has the dual benefits of enhancing patient satisfaction while improving the critical personal relationship between doctors and their patients, so necessary for the delivery of optimal care.

  8. Beef customer satisfaction: trained sensory panel ratings and Warner-Bratzler shear force values.

    PubMed

    Lorenzen, C L; Miller, R K; Taylors, J F; Neely, T R; Tatum, J D; Wise, J W; Buyek, M J; Reagan, J O; Savell, J W

    2003-01-01

    Trained sensory panel ratings and Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBS) values from the Beef Customer Satisfaction study are reported. Carcasses were chosen to fit into USDA quality grades of Top Choice (upper two-thirds of USDA Choice), Low Choice, High Select, and Low Select. A trained, descriptive attribute panel evaluated top loin, top sirloin, and top round steaks for muscle fiber tenderness, connective tissue amount, overall tenderness, juiciness, flavor intensity, cooked beef flavor intensity, and cooked beef fat flavor intensity. Four steaks from each of the three cuts from each carcass were assigned randomly to one of four cooking endpoint temperature treatments (60, 65, 70, or 75 degrees C) for WBS determination. For all trained panel measures of tenderness and WBS, regardless of USDA quality grade, top loin steaks were rated higher than top sirloin steaks, which were rated higher than top round steaks (P < 0.05). There were significant interactions between USDA quality grade and cut for most of the trained sensory panel traits: USDA quality grade influenced ratings for top loin steaks more than ratings for top round steaks or top sirloin steaks. Three interactions were significant for WBS values: USDA quality grade x endpoint temperature (P = 0.02), USDA quality grade x cut (P = 0.0007), and cut x endpoint temperature (P = 0.0001). With the exception of High Select, WBS values increased (P < 0.05) for each grade with increasing endpoint temperature. Choice top loin and top round steaks had lower (P < 0.05) WBS values than Select steaks of the same cut; however, only Top Choice top sirloin steaks differed (P < 0.05) from the other USDA grades. As endpoint temperatures increased, WBS values for top sirloin steaks increased substantially compared to the other cuts. When cooked to 60 degrees C, top sirloin steaks were closer to top loin steaks in WBS values, when cooked to 75 degrees C, top sirloin steaks were closer to top round steaks in WBS values. Simple

  9. Social-Cognitive Factors Affecting Clients' Career and Life Satisfaction after Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verbruggen, Marijke; Sels, Luc

    2010-01-01

    This study examines factors affecting clients' career and life satisfaction in the first 6 months after having participated in career counseling. In particular, we tested a large subset of the recent social-cognitive model of work satisfaction of Lent and Brown using a longitudinal data set of 195 former counseling clients. Our results showed that…

  10. Factors affecting household satisfaction with electricity supply in rural India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aklin, Michaël; Cheng, Chao-Yo; Urpelainen, Johannes; Ganesan, Karthik; Jain, Abhishek

    2016-11-01

    Electricity is an important component of socio-economic development, but most studies of household electricity access focus exclusively on the presence or absence of a connection. Here we reach beyond connectivity by examining the relationship between various dimensions of the quality of electricity supply and a household's subjective satisfaction with their electricity or lighting situation. Studying the results from a survey of 8,568 households in six large, energy-poor states from northern, central and eastern India, we find that household satisfaction responds strongly to the average hours of electricity available on a typical day. The positive effect of increasing the number of hours per day by one standard deviation on satisfaction is almost as large as that of electrifying a non-electrified household. These findings underscore the importance of moving from counting electricity connections to enhancing the quality of electricity supply.

  11. Factors Affecting Perceived Satisfaction with Facebook in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanthawongs, Penjuree; Kanthawongs, Penjira; Chitcharoen, Chaisak

    2016-01-01

    [For full proceedings, see ED571332.]The aim of this study is to explore the impact of perspectives on Facebook in education and relational commitment towards perceived satisfaction with Facebook. The sample included 157 students of two private universities in Bangkok and Pathum Thani province of Thailand during April to May of academic year 2015…

  12. Patient is king. Studies define customers' satisfaction and the means to improve it.

    PubMed

    Kertesz, L

    1996-04-29

    It's being called a new age of healthcare consumerism. Researchers are compiling hard data on outcomes as well as launching sweeping surveys in the less tangible area of consumer satisfaction. The focus of all this activity is the patient.

  13. Implementing patient satisfaction survey findings into a customer service action plan.

    PubMed

    Luallin, Meryl D

    2004-01-01

    Patient satisfaction surveys have become popular gauges of practice efficiency and are among the markers used by third-party payers to measure health-care quality. Although surveys may yield valuable information for providers to improve their services, these results most often are assigned a low priority and not applied in actual practice. This article briefly outlines the basic features of a patient satisfaction survey and details specific steps that managers may follow to implement their findings.

  14. Positive and negative affect, life satisfaction, and coping with stress by attachment styles in Turkish students.

    PubMed

    Deniz, M Engin; Işik, Erkan

    2010-10-01

    The purpose was to investigate positive and negative affect, life satisfaction, and coping with stress in relation to attachment styles. Undergraduate students (N=421) completed the Relationship Scales Questionnaire, the Positive and Negative Affect Scale, the Satisfaction With Life Scale, and the Coping with Stress Scale. Results indicated that secure attachment style was the unique predictor of positive affect while fearful and preoccupied attachment styles significantly predicted negative affect. Regarding life satisfaction, a positive correlation with secure attachment style and a negative correlation with fearful and preoccupied styles were seen. However, the unique predictor of life satisfaction was preoccupied attachment style. In terms of coping with stress, there was no significant association between attachment variables and avoidance coping style, but significant links were observed between problem-focused coping and dismissing, and fearful and preoccupied attachment styles.

  15. 75 FR 57470 - Clinical Center; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Customer and Other Partners Satisfaction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... collaborating commercial enterprises, small businesses, regulators, and other organizations. The annual reporting burden is as follows: FY 2010 Number of Frequency of Average time Annual hour Customer respondents... Number of Frequency of Average time Annual hour Customer respondents response per response...

  16. Customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS): climate satisfaction evaluation based on subjective perception.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Ping; Yang, Shing-Ru; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Climate not only influences the behavior of people in urban environments but also affects people's schedules and travel plans. Therefore, providing people with appropriate long-term climate evaluation information is crucial. Therefore, we developed an innovative climate assessment system based on field investigations conducted in three cities located in Northern, Central, and Southern Taiwan. The field investigations included the questionnaire surveys and climate data collection. We first analyzed the relationship between the participants and climate parameters comprising physiologically equivalent temperature, air temperature, humidity, wind speed, solar radiation, cloud cover, and precipitation. Second, we established the neutral value, comfort range, and dissatisfied range of each parameter. Third, after verifying that the subjects' perception toward the climate parameters vary based on individual preferences, we developed the customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS) approach, which featured functions such as personalized and default climate suitability information to be used by users exhibiting varying demands. Finally, we performed calculations using the climate conditions of two cities during the past 10 years to demonstrate the performance of the CRACS approach. The results can be used as a reference when planning activities in the city or when organizing future travel plans. The flexibility of the assessment system enables it to be adjusted for varying regions and usage characteristics.

  17. Customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS): climate satisfaction evaluation based on subjective perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tzu-Ping; Yang, Shing-Ru; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Climate not only influences the behavior of people in urban environments but also affects people's schedules and travel plans. Therefore, providing people with appropriate long-term climate evaluation information is crucial. Therefore, we developed an innovative climate assessment system based on field investigations conducted in three cities located in Northern, Central, and Southern Taiwan. The field investigations included the questionnaire surveys and climate data collection. We first analyzed the relationship between the participants and climate parameters comprising physiologically equivalent temperature, air temperature, humidity, wind speed, solar radiation, cloud cover, and precipitation. Second, we established the neutral value, comfort range, and dissatisfied range of each parameter. Third, after verifying that the subjects' perception toward the climate parameters vary based on individual preferences, we developed the customized rating assessment of climate suitability (CRACS) approach, which featured functions such as personalized and default climate suitability information to be used by users exhibiting varying demands. Finally, we performed calculations using the climate conditions of two cities during the past 10 years to demonstrate the performance of the CRACS approach. The results can be used as a reference when planning activities in the city or when organizing future travel plans. The flexibility of the assessment system enables it to be adjusted for varying regions and usage characteristics.

  18. What 'really' affects health professions students' satisfaction with their educational experience? Implications for practice and research.

    PubMed

    El Ansari, Walid; Oskrochi, Reza

    2004-11-01

    Student satisfaction has been widely recognised as an indicator of the quality of the students' learning and teaching experience. The aim of the study was to explore the extent to which student satisfaction is influenced by 13 demographic- and educational-related variables. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken (18-item questionnaire, 1660 questionnaires). Principal component analysis categorised the 18 items into four learning and teaching dimensions. Each of the 13 variables was analysed for its influence on student satisfaction generally and on the four dimensions individually, before and after controlling for all the other variables. After controlling for all the variables, none of the demographic characteristics was associated with satisfaction. Most of the educational variables exercised their own independent and significant effects on general satisfaction and on satisfaction with the four individual dimensions. Collectively, decreased satisfaction was associated with being a pre registration, full-time student, usually with A level entry qualifications, attending term two modules whose assessment/s comprised combined strategies. Decreased satisfaction was also significantly associated with larger class sizes as regards the student numbers and with attaining lower grades in the assessments. The demographic variables were not as influential as the educational ones as regards the affects on students' satisfaction. The implications of the findings for research and practice are discussed.

  19. Combined effects of positive and negative affectivity and job satisfaction on job performance and turnover intentions.

    PubMed

    Bouckenooghe, Dave; Raja, Usman; Butt, Arif Nazir

    2013-01-01

    Capturing data from employee-supervisor dyads (N = 321) from eight organizations in Pakistan, including human service organizations, an electronics assembly plant, a packaging material manufacturing company, and a small food processing plant, we used moderated regression analysis to examine whether the relationships between trait affect (positive affectivity [PA] and negative affectivity [NA]) and two key work outcome variables (job performance and turnover) are contingent upon the level of job satisfaction. We applied the Trait Activation Theory to explain the moderating effect of job satisfaction on the relationship between affect and performance and between affect and turnover. Overall, the data supported our hypotheses. Positive and negative affectivity influenced performance and the intention to quit, and job satisfaction moderated these relationships. We discuss in detail the results of these findings and their implications for research and practice.

  20. Patients' satisfaction: customer relationship management as a new opportunity for quality improvement in thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Rocco, Gaetano; Brunelli, Alessandro

    2012-11-01

    Clinical and nonclinical indicators of performance are meant to provide the surgeon with tools to identify weaknesses to be improved. The World Health Organization's Performance Evaluation Systems represent a multidimensional approach to quality measurement based on several categories made of different indicators. Indicators for patient satisfaction may include overall perceived quality, accessibility, humanization and patient involvement, communication, and trust in health care providers. Patient satisfaction is included among nonclinical indicators of performance in thoracic surgery and is increasingly recognized as one of the outcome measures for delivered quality of care.

  1. Customer Satisfaction: Communication Training and the Help-Desk Hot-Line.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Charla L. Markham

    A study examined the impact of a communication training program on the productivity ratings and end-user satisfaction ratings of User Support Professionals (USPs). Subjects, 30 USPs whose training level qualified them to respond to problem solving calls received by a large centralized Help-desk facility located in the southwestern part of the…

  2. Customer Satisfaction Perceptions of Dislocated Workers Served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washburn, Dava Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of satisfaction of dislocated workers served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium. Four WIN Job Centers participated in this study: Northeast Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Corinth, Northwest Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Oxford,…

  3. Water conservation quantities vs customer opinion and satisfaction with water efficient appliances in Miami, Florida.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mengshan; Tansel, Berrin

    2013-10-15

    During 2006-2007, Miami-Dade County, Florida, USA, provided incentives for low income and senior residents in single family homes for retrofitting with high efficiency fixtures. The participating residences were retrofitted with high-efficiency toilets, showerheads, and aerators. In 2012, a telephone survey was conducted to evaluate the satisfaction of the participants and the associated effects on water conservation practices. This study evaluates the attitudes and opinions of the participants relative to water use efficiency measures and the actual reduction in water consumption characteristics of the participating households. The participant characteristics were analyzed to identify correlations between the socio-demographic factors, program satisfaction and actual water savings. Approximately 65.5% of the survey respondents reported changes in their water use habits and 76.6% reported noticeable reduction in their water bills. The analyses showed that the satisfaction levels of the participants were closely correlated with the actual water savings. The results also showed that satisfaction level along with water saving potential (i.e., implementation of water efficiency devices) or change of water use habits has provided positive synergistic effect on actual water savings. The majority of the participants surveyed (81.3-89.1%) reported positive attitudes for water conservation incentive program and the benefits of the high efficiency fixtures.

  4. Los Angeles OneSource System Youth Participant Customer Satisfaction Survey, 2010-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heisley, Deborah D.; Moore, Richard W.; Patch, Robin N.

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, Los Angeles OneSource Centers offer low-income youth ages 14-21 services aimed at improving educational achievement, enhancing job skills, and preparing for college. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the youths' satisfaction with services received at 14 OneSource Centers throughout…

  5. A Longitudinal Sociological Monitoring of Customers' Satisfaction with the Quality of Educational Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaidukova, G. N.

    2014-01-01

    Research data on levels of satisfaction with educational services in a Russian university show room for improvement in such areas as vocational guidance work; range of opportunities in the choice of specialization and optional disciplines; availability of academic and methodological literature; the quality of food services; and amount of practical…

  6. [2011 after-service customer satisfaction survey of monitoring devices in Shanghai area].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijun; Li, Bin; Qian, Jianguo; Cao, Shaoping; He, Dehua; Zheng, Yunxin

    2013-01-01

    In 2011, Shanghai Medical Equipment Management Quality Control Center launched the fifth after-sale service satisfaction survey for medical devices in Shanghai area. There are 8 classes medical devices involving in the survey. This paper demonstrates the investigation results of monitoring devices which are from different manufacturers.

  7. An investigation on pharmacy functions and services affecting satisfaction of patients with prescriptions in community pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Hidehiko; Nakajima, Fumio; Tada, Yuichirou; Yoshikawa, Emi; Iwahashi, Yoshiki; Fujita, Kenji; Hayase, Yukitoshi

    2009-05-01

    Various functions expected by patient expects are needed with progress in the system for separation of dispensing and prescribing functions. In this investigation, the relationship between patient satisfaction and pharmacy function were analyzed quantitatively. A questionnaire survey was conducted in 178 community pharmacies. Questions on pharmacy functions and services totaled 87 items concerning information service, amenities, safety, personnel training, etc. The questionnaires for patients had five-grade scales and composed 11 items (observed variables). Based on the results, "the percentage of satisfied patients" was determined. Multivariate analysis was performed to investigate the relationship between patient satisfaction and pharmacy functions or services provided, to confirm patient's evaluation of the pharmacy, and how factors affected comprehensive satisfaction. In correlation analysis, "the number of pharmacists" and "comprehensive satisfaction" had a negative correlation. Other interesting results were obtained. As a results of factor analysis, three latent factors were obtained: the "human factor," "patients' convenience," and "environmental factor," Multiple regression analysis showed that the "human factor" affected "comprehensive satisfaction" the most. Various pharmacy functions and services influence patient satisfaction, and improvement in their quality increases patient satisfaction. This will result in the practice of patient-centered medicine.

  8. Affective and instrumental communication in primary care interactions: predicting the satisfaction of nursing staff and patients.

    PubMed

    Haskard, Kelly B; DiMatteo, M Robin; Heritage, John

    2009-01-01

    Verbal and nonverbal communication between nursing staff and patients has received scant research attention. This study examined patients' and nursing staff members' global affective and instrumental communication, mutual influence, and relationship to postvisit satisfaction. This study employed ratings of videotaped primary care visits of 81 nursing staff members with 235 patients, and assessed communication in 2 channels: nonverbal visual and speech including vocal tone. Communication channel differences and prediction of patient satisfaction were examined. The visual and vocal communication of nursing staff members and patients robustly predicted each other's satisfaction and reflected their own satisfaction with the dyadic visit. Affect was communicated more clearly through the speech with vocal tone channel, whereas instrumental communication was stronger in visual nonverbal behavior. Patients' and nursing staff members' behaviors of pleasantness and involvement frequently co-occurred.

  9. An examination of blood center structure and hospital customer satisfaction: what can centralized and decentralized blood centers learn from each other?

    PubMed

    Carden, Robert; DelliFraine, Jami L

    2005-01-01

    The cost of blood and blood products has increased rapidly over the last several years while the supply of available blood donors has simultaneously decreased. Higher blood costs and donor shortages have put a strain on the relationship between blood suppliers and their hospital customers. This study examines the association between blood center centralization or decentralization and several aspects of hospital satisfaction. Centralized and decentralized blood centers have significant differences in various aspects of hospital customer satisfaction. Advantages and disadvantages of the two structures are discussed, as well as areas for future research.

  10. Identifying the factors that affect the job satisfaction of early career Notre Dame graduate physiotherapists.

    PubMed

    Bacopanos, Eleni; Edgar, Susan

    2016-01-18

    Objective Previous studies have highlighted the short career intentions and high attrition rates of physiotherapists from the profession. The aim of the present study was to examine the job satisfaction and attrition rates of early career physiotherapists graduating from one Western Australian university.Methods A self-administered online survey was conducted of 157 Notre Dame physiotherapy graduates (2006-2012), incorporating a job satisfaction rating scale.Results Results showed that lowered job satisfaction was related to working in the cardiorespiratory area of physiotherapy and working in multiple jobs since graduation. The majority of graduates did not predict a long-term career in physiotherapy, highlighting a lack of career progression and limited scope of practice as influential factors.Conclusions Job satisfaction in early career physiotherapists varies across different clinical areas of practice related to several factors, including challenge and flexibility. New roles in the profession, including extended scope roles, may impact on the future job satisfaction of physiotherapists. Further studies are needed to explore the effect of these roles on workforce trends, including attrition rates.What is known about the topic? Physiotherapists predict careers of 10 years or less on entry into the profession. No previous studies have explored the individual factors influencing job satisfaction in early career physiotherapists across different clinical settings.What does this paper add? This study highlights specific factors influencing the job satisfaction of early career physiotherapists, including clinical area of practice. Physiotherapists working in the cardiorespiratory area were less satisfied, as were physiotherapists undertaking multiple positions since graduation.What are the implications for practitioners? This study informs employers and workforce planners on the factors affecting job satisfaction in early career physiotherapists. In addition

  11. The affective profiles in the USA: happiness, depression, life satisfaction, and happiness-increasing strategies.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Erica; Sailer, Uta; Al Nima, Ali; Rosenberg, Patricia; Andersson Arntén, Ann-Christine; Archer, Trevor; Garcia, Danilo

    2013-01-01

    Background. The affective profiles model categorizes individuals as self-fulfilling (high positive affect, low negative affect), high affective (high positive affect, high negative affect), low affective (low positive affect, low negative affect), and self-destructive (low positive affect, high negative affect). The model has been used extensively among Swedes to discern differences between profiles regarding happiness, depression, and also life satisfaction. The aim of the present study was to investigate such differences in a sample of residents of the USA. The study also investigated differences between profiles with regard to happiness-increasing strategies. Methods. In Study I, 900 participants reported affect (Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule; PANAS) and happiness (Happiness-Depression Scale). In Study II, 500 participants self-reported affect (PANAS), life satisfaction (Satisfaction With Life Scale), and how often they used specific strategies to increase their own happiness (Happiness-Increasing Strategies Scales). Results. The results showed that, compared to the other profiles, self-fulfilling individuals were less depressed, happier, and more satisfied with their lives. Nevertheless, self-destructive individuals were more depressed, unhappier, and less satisfied than all other profiles. The self-fulfilling individuals tended to use strategies related to agentic (e.g., instrumental goal-pursuit), communal (e.g., social affiliation), and spiritual (e.g., religion) values when pursuing happiness. Conclusion. These differences suggest that promoting positive emotions can positively influence a depressive-to-happy state as well as increasing life satisfaction. Moreover, the present study shows that pursuing happiness through strategies guided by agency, communion, and spirituality is related to a self-fulfilling experience described as high positive affect and low negative affect.

  12. 78 FR 66750 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request; Customer and Other Partners Satisfaction Surveys

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... for the proper performance of the function of the agency, including whether the information will have... surveys are voluntary and necessary for the proper performance of Clinical Center functions and will... documents, mailed electronically or collected via the web or by telephone from customers....

  13. Basic Skills for 100% Customer Satisfaction at First Chicago Corporation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center--Resources for Education, Des Plaines, IL.

    This document is the final report of a demonstration project during which the corporation First Chicago/NBD and a local education agency developed and delivered basic skills training to the corporation's nonexempt work force. The report describes the following key project activities: basic skill needs analyses for various customer services…

  14. Perceived Career Compromise, Affect and Work-Related Satisfaction in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaousides, Theodore; Jome, LaRae

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of career compromise on positive affect (PA), negative affect (NA), and work-related satisfaction (WRS). Career compromise refers to the modification of occupational preferences under pressing external circumstances [Gottfredson, L. S. (1981). Circumscription and compromise: A…

  15. Surveying your internal customers.

    PubMed

    Weir, V L

    1998-06-01

    Internal customers often are overlooked when business techniques are applied. By applying common external customer satisfaction survey techniques to internal business functions, one hospital identified areas for improvement.

  16. Using Research Case Studies in eCommerce Marketing Courses: Customer Satisfaction at Point-of-Purchase and Post-Purchase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nawi, Noorshella Che; Fong, Michelle; Tatnall, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a research case study of Internet apparel marketing by small businesses in Malaysia which can beneficially be included in postgraduate business courses for understanding the importance of measuring customer satisfaction at point-of-purchase and post-purchase in online purchases. The sample size in this research is 154…

  17. The effects of exercise on body satisfaction and affect.

    PubMed

    Lepage, Marie L; Crowther, Janis H

    2010-03-01

    This research used ecological momentary assessment to examine the effects of exercise on state body dissatisfaction and affect in 33 undergraduate females with high trait body dissatisfaction and 28 with low trait body dissatisfaction who exercised at least three times weekly. Trait body dissatisfaction was investigated as a moderator of the effects of exercise as well as different motivations for exercise. Results indicated all participants experienced lower state body dissatisfaction and negative affect and greater positive affect post-exercise. Trait body dissatisfaction moderated the association between motivations and exercise effects. Appearance and weight motivations were related to higher state body dissatisfaction for all individuals. Fitness and health motivations were related to higher state body dissatisfaction for high trait body dissatisfied individuals and lower state body dissatisfaction for low trait body dissatisfied individuals. Thus, although exercise has positive effects on body dissatisfaction and affect for high frequency exercisers, their exercise motivations impact these effects.

  18. Satisfaction with care in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kirchgessner, J; Perera-Chang, M; Klinkner, G; Soley, I; Marcelli, D; Arkossy, O; Stopper, A; Kimmel, P L

    2006-10-01

    Patient satisfaction is an important aspect of dialysis care, only recently evaluated in clinical studies. We developed a tool to assess peritoneal dialysis (PD) customer satisfaction, and sought to evaluate and validate the Customer Satisfaction Questionnaire (CSQ), quantifying PD patient satisfaction. The CSQ included questions regarding administrative issues, Delivery Service, PD Training, Handling Requests, and transportation. The study was performed using interviews in all Hungarian Fresenius Medical Care dialysis centers offering PD. CSQ results were compared with psychosocial measures to identify if patient satisfaction was associated with perception of social support and illness burden, or depression. We assessed CSQ internal consistency and validity. Factor analysis explored potential underlying dimensions of the CSQ. One hundred and thirty-three patients treated with PD for end-stage renal disease for more than 3 months were interviewed. The CSQ had high internal consistency. There was high patient satisfaction with customer service. PD patient satisfaction scores correlated with quality of life (QOL) and social support measures, but not with medical or demographic factors, or depressive affect. The CSQ is a reliable tool to assess PD customer satisfaction. PD patient satisfaction is associated with perception of QOL. Efforts to improve customer satisfaction may improve PD patients' quantity as well as QOL.

  19. Factors Affecting Perceived Learning, Satisfaction, and Quality in the Online MBA: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sebastianelli, Rose; Swift, Caroline; Tamimi, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    The authors examined how six factors related to content and interaction affect students' perceptions of learning, satisfaction, and quality in online master of business administration (MBA) courses. They developed three scale items to measure each factor. Using survey data from MBA students at a private university, the authors estimated structural…

  20. The interaction of borderline personality disorder symptoms and relationship satisfaction in predicting affect.

    PubMed

    Kuhlken, Katherine; Robertson, Christopher; Benson, Jessica; Nelson-Gray, Rosemery

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that stable, marital relationships may have overall prognostic significance for individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD); however, research focused on the impact of nonmarital, and perhaps short-term, romantic relationships is lacking. Thus, the primary goal of this study was to examine the impact of the interaction of BPD symptoms and relationship satisfaction on state negative affect in college undergraduates. It was predicted that individuals who scored higher on measures of BPD symptoms and who were in a satisfying romantic relationship would report less negative affect than comparable individuals in a less satisfying romantic relationship. Questionnaires assessing BPD symptoms, relationship satisfaction, and negative affect were administered to 111 women, the majority of whom then completed daily measures of relationship satisfaction and negative affect over a 2-week follow-up period. Hierarchical multiple regression and hierarchical linear modeling were used to test the hypotheses. The interaction of BPD symptoms with relationship satisfaction was found to significantly predict anger, as measured at one time point, suggesting that satisfying romantic relationships may be a protective factor for individuals scoring high on measures of BPD symptoms with regard to anger.

  1. Investigating the Relationship among Internet Addiction, Positive and Negative Affects, and Life Satisfaction in Turkish Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telef, Bülent Baki

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the relationships between Internet addiction and the areas of life satisfaction and positive or negative affects in Turkish adolescents. The research sample comprised 358 students studying in the sixth, seventh and eighth grades at four different middle schools in Canakkale city centre during the 2012-2013 academic year, of…

  2. Hand Anthropometry and SMS Satisfaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, Vimala; Yeow, Paul H. P.

    The effect of hand anthropometry on Short Message Service (SMS) satisfaction was investigated using structured questionnaire interviews with 110 subjects, aged between 17-25 years old. Hand size was measured to assess its effect on mobile phone design factors satisfaction whereas thumb circumference and length were measured for keypad design factors. Small hand-sized subjects were found to be more satisfied with mobile phone dimensions than large hand-sized subjects. Thumb circumference significantly affects users` satisfaction towards key size and space between keys whereas thumb length significantly affects keypad layout satisfaction. Both thumb circumference and length significantly correlate negatively with the corresponding keypad design factors. Results confirm that hand anthropometry do affect users messaging satisfaction. These findings should prove useful to mobile phone designers who could look into the possibility of designing customized mobile phones that cater to large hand and thumb sized users, so as to increase their subjective satisfaction.

  3. Analysis of factors affecting satisfaction level on problem based learning approach using structural equation modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Nur Farahin Mee; Zahid, Zalina

    2014-12-01

    Nowadays, in the job market demand, graduates are expected not only to have higher performance in academic but they must also be excellent in soft skill. Problem-Based Learning (PBL) has a number of distinct advantages as a learning method as it can deliver graduates that will be highly prized by industry. This study attempts to determine the satisfaction level of engineering students on the PBL Approach and to evaluate their determinant factors. The Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was used to investigate how the factors of Good Teaching Scale, Clear Goals, Student Assessment and Levels of Workload affected the student satisfaction towards PBL approach.

  4. Relationship Satisfaction, Affectivity, and Gay-Specific Stressors in Same-Sex Couples Joined in Civil Unions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todosijevic, Jelica; Rothblum, Esther D.; Solomon, Sondra E.

    2005-01-01

    Relationship satisfaction, affect, and stress were examined in 313 same-sex couples who had had civil unions in Vermont during the first year of this legislation. Similarity between partners on age and on positive/negative affectivity was related to relationship satisfaction whereas there was no association with similarity in income, education,…

  5. The influence of trait-negative affect and compassion satisfaction on compassion fatigue in Australian nurses.

    PubMed

    Craigie, Mark; Osseiran-Moisson, Rebecca; Hemsworth, David; Aoun, Samar; Francis, Karen; Brown, Janie; Hegney, Desley; Rees, Clare

    2016-01-01

    For this study, we examined the nature of the unique relationships trait-negative affect and compassion satisfaction had with compassion fatigue and its components of secondary traumatic stress and burnout in 273 nurses from 1 metropolitan tertiary acute hospital in Western Australia. Participants completed the Professional Quality of Life Scale (Stamm, 2010), Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (Lovibond & Lovibond, 2004), and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (Spielberger, Gorsuch, Lushene, Vagg, & Jacobs, 1983). Bivariate correlation and hierarchical regression analyses were performed to examine and investigate 4 hypotheses. The results demonstrate a clear differential pattern of relationships with secondary traumatic stress and burnout for both trait-negative affect and compassion satisfaction. Trait-negative affect was clearly the more important factor in terms of its contribution to overall compassion fatigue and secondary traumatic stress. In contrast, compassion satisfaction's unique protective relationship only related to burnout, and not secondary traumatic stress. The results are therefore consistent with the view that compassion satisfaction may be an important internal resource that protects against burnout, but is not directly influential in protecting against secondary traumatic stress for nurses working in an acute-care hospital environment. With the projected nursing workforce shortages in Australia, it is apparent that a further understanding is warranted of how such personal variables may work as protective and risk factors.

  6. How instant messaging affects the satisfaction of virtual interpersonal behavior of Taiwan junior high school students.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Huang; Sun, Ya-Chung; Lee, Yueh-Chiang; Wu, Shih-Chia

    2007-01-01

    Although Instant Messaging (IM) has established itself as one of the most popular modes of communication, little empirical research has explored how adolescents are affected by its use to satisfy their virtual interpersonal relationships. This research investigates cause and effect in the satisfaction of these relationships among adolescents in both their real and virtual life by using IM. Data were collected from 401 junior high school students via a questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, factor analysis, and SEM analysis methods were used to analyze the data. Primary findings indicate that (1) there is significant cause and effect on the adolescents' satisfaction with their interpersonal relationships between their real life and the virtual world (via IM); and (2) adolescents may enhance their interpersonal behavior by using IM, leading to an increase in satisfaction with their interpersonal relationships in the virtual world.

  7. Customer needs, expectations, and satisfaction with clinical neurophysiology services in Ireland: a case for tele-neurophysiology development.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimons, M; Ronan, L; Murphy, K; Browne, G; Connolly, S; McMenamin, J; Delanty, N

    2004-01-01

    Although equitable access to services should be based on need, geographical location of patients and their clinicians can give rise to inequalities in healthcare delivery. Development of tele-medicine services can improve equity of access. The specialty of Clinical Neurophysiology (CN), currently under-developed in Ireland provides an example of such potential. This study aimed to determine the needs, expectations, and satisfaction of CN customers, namely patients and referring clinicians. The goal was to examine geographical impediments to access that might be addressed by the introduction of tele-neurophysiology. Two customer surveys were conducted: CN referring clinicians and CN patients. Thirty-one North Western Health Board (NWHB) consultant clinicians responded to a postal survey. Distance and delays caused by long waiting lists were felt to deter or make CN referral irrelevant. Ninety-seven percent believed the lack of a local service negatively impacts on patient management and 93% would welcome the introduction of a tele-neurophysiology service. The geographical location of patient's residence and/or the location of the referring clinician's practice influenced waiting lists for CN. Fifty-eight (105/182) percent of patients living in a region with a CN service compared to 39% (50/128) of those living in a region with no service received an appointment within one month. In addition to the current insufficient CN service capacity in Ireland, these surveys highlighted geographical inequities. Tele-neurophysiology has the potential to speed-up diagnosis, result in more patients being appropriately investigated and be fairer to patients.

  8. Donating blood for research: a potential method for enhancing customer satisfaction of permanently deferred blood donors

    PubMed Central

    Waller, Daniel; Thijsen, Amanda; Garradd, Allira; Hayman, Jane; Smith, Geoff

    2017-01-01

    Background Each year, a large number of individuals in Australia are deferred from donating blood. A deferral may have a negative impact on donor satisfaction and subsequent word-of-mouth communication. The Australian Red Cross Blood Service (the Blood Service) is, therefore, investigating options for managing service interactions with deferred donors to maintain positive relationships. While public research institutes in Australia have established independent research donor registries, other countries provide programmes allowing deferred donors to donate blood for research via blood collection agencies. This study examined attitudes towards donating blood for research use in a sample of permanently deferred Australian donors. Materials and methods Donors permanently deferred because of a risk of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (n=449) completed a postal survey that examined attitudes towards research donation. Results The majority of participants were interested in donating blood for research (96%), and joining a registry of research donors (93%). Participants preferred to donate for transfusion or clinical research, and were willing to travel large distances. Results indicated that positive attitudes towards the Blood Service would be extended if the opportunity to donate blood was provided. These findings indicate a desire for continued engagement with the Blood Service despite deferral. Discussion Donating blood for research is a potential way of maintaining positive relationships with permanently deferred donors which also benefits the health research community. Through maintaining positive relationships with deferred donors, positive word-of-mouth activity can be stimulated. Further work is needed to determine the feasibility of implementing research donation through the Blood Service in Australia. PMID:26674813

  9. Determinants of customer satisfaction with the health care system, with the possibility to choose a personal physician and with a family doctor in a transition country.

    PubMed

    Kersnik, J

    2001-08-01

    Many Eastern and Central European counties are reforming their health care systems. The aim of this study was to determine customer satisfaction with a reformed health care system, with the possibility of free choice of a family physician and patient satisfaction with the family physician in Slovenia and their major determinants. We used a postal survey of the patients who attended their family physician's offices during the study period. We obtained an 84% response rate. Some 72.9% of the respondents were satisfied with the current organisation of health care services, 95.5% of the respondents were satisfied with the possibility of choosing their own family physician and 58% of participants were very satisfied with the level of care received from their personal family practitioners. It was shown that higher patient satisfaction with the family physician was the most powerful predictor of patients' satisfaction with the health care system. The results show that health care reform in Slovenia has a positive impact on the consumers' perceptions of health care quality, measured in terms of consumer satisfaction with the health care system, the possibility to choose a family physician and the overall satisfaction with the family physician.

  10. Identification with the retail organization and customer-perceived employee similarity: effects on customer spending.

    PubMed

    Netemeyer, Richard G; Heilman, Carrie M; Maxham, James G

    2012-09-01

    Two constructs important to academicians and managers are the degree to which employees and customers identify with an organization, employee organizational identification (employee OI) and customer-company identification (customer identification), respectively. This research examines the effects of these identification constructs and the related construct of customer perceived similarity to employees on customer spending. Via a 1-year multilevel study of 12,047 customers and 1,464 store employees (sales associates) covering 212 stores of a specialty apparel retailer, our study contributes to the literature in 2 critical ways. First, we expand the theoretical network of employee OI and customer identification by examining the related construct of a customer's perceived similarity to store employees. We examine the incremental (not fully mediated) main and interaction effects of customer-perceived similarity to employees and employee OI on customer spending. Second, we examine the effect of customer identification on customer spending relative to the effect of customer satisfaction on customer spending. Thus, our study also contributes by demonstrating a potential complementary route to achieve customer spending (customer identification), a route that may be more readily affected by management than the efforts required for a sustained increase in customer satisfaction. Implications for academics and managers are offered.

  11. To empower or not to empower your sales force? An empirical examination of the influence of leadership empowerment behavior on customer satisfaction and performance.

    PubMed

    Ahearne, Michael; Mathieu, John; Rapp, Adam

    2005-09-01

    This research focuses on the impact of leadership empowerment behavior (LEB) on customer service satisfaction and sales performance, as mediated by salespeople's self-efficacy and adaptability. Moreover, the authors propose an interactive relationship whereby LEB will be differentially effective as a function of employees' empowerment readiness. The authors' hypotheses are tested using survey data from a sample of 231 salespeople in the pharmaceutical field, along with external ratings of satisfaction from 864 customers and archival sales performance information. Results indicated that contrary to popular belief, employees with low levels of product/industry knowledge and low experience benefit the most from leadership behaviors that are empowering, whereas high-knowledge and experienced employees reap no clear benefit. The authors conclude with directions for future research and application.

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Contributing Factors Affecting Patient Satisfaction in Family Medicine Service Clinics at Brooke Army Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-06

    an effort to control for these well researched and published factors contribution to overall patient satisfaction . Problem Statement As more...Established Patient | 3=Routine Appointment Factors Affecting Patient Satisfaction 63 4= Wellness Appointment 5=First Appointment with PCM 6...came for this visit addressed to your satisfaction ?93S7 CO Yes, completely CD Yes, somewhat CD No 33. How well organized was the clinic you vlslted

  13. Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment: Affective Commitment Predictors in a Group of Professionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, Maria Santa

    Job satisfaction and organizational commitment have long been identified as relevant factors for the well-being of individuals within an organization and the success of the organization itself. As the well-being can be, in principle, considered as emergent from the influence of a number of factors, the main goal of a theory of organizations is to identify these factors and the role they can play. In this regard job satisfaction and organizational commitment have been often identified with structural factors allowing an organization to be considered as a system, or a wholistic entity, rather than a simple aggregate of individuals. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that job satisfaction has a significant, direct effect on determining individuals' attachment to an organization and a significant but indirect effect on their intention to leave a company. However, a complete assessment of the role of these factors in establishing and keeping the emergence of an organization is still lacking, due to shortage of measuring instruments and to practical difficulties in interviewing organization members. The present study aims to give a further contribution to what is currently known about the relationship between job satisfaction and affective commitment by using a group of professionals, all at management level. A questionnaire to measure these constructs, following a pilot study, was designed and administered to 1042 participants who were all professionals and had the title of industrial manager or director. The factors relating to job satisfaction and the predictive value of these factors (to predict an employee's emotional involvement with their organization) were simultaneously tested by a confirmative factorial model. The results were generalized with a multi-sample procedure by using models of structural equations. This procedure was used to check whether these factors could be considered or not as causes producing the measured affective commitment. The results

  14. Measuring patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Levin, Roger

    2005-03-01

    Many businesses use customer satisfaction surveys successfully. You may notice that you find one in almost every restaurant or hotel room. I do not think it is a coincidence that the hotel industry provides some of the finest customer service available. When it comes to providing excellent customer service, dental practices can learn from businesses that regularly assess customer satisfaction.

  15. The Mediation Effect of School Satisfaction in the Relationship between Teacher Support, Positive Affect and Life Satisfaction in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Telef, Bülent Baki; Arslan, Gökmen; Mert, Abdullah; Kalafat, Sezai

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the relationships among teacher support, positive emotions, school satisfaction and life satisfaction in adolescences. The study had the participation of 344 adolescents from different socio-economic levels studying in the sixth, seventh and eighth grades of three public middle schools in the province of…

  16. Maintaining Life Satisfaction in Adolescence: Affective Mediators of the Influence of Perceived Emotional Intelligence on Overall Life Satisfaction Judgments in a Two-Year Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Álvarez, Nicolás; Extremera, Natalio; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to the psychological processes underlying the improvement in mood states and human well-being, particularly during adolescence. Theoretical and empirical research suggests that emotional skills may play a role in enhancing perceived well-being; however, the mechanisms involved in during adolescence are unclear. The purpose of this study was to extend understanding by investigating the potential mediators of the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and life satisfaction in a 2-years study. Participants were 269 high school students (145 girls and 124 boys) who completed the self-report perceived emotional intelligence (PEI) Scale, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale three times at 1-year intervals. The three-step longitudinal design corroborated earlier research indicating that positive and negative affect mediate the relationships between EI and life satisfaction. Students with high PEI tended to have more positive experiences and fewer negative experiences, which contributed to their greater life satisfaction. No sex differences were found in the multi-group analyses, suggesting that the causal relationships are similar in both sexes. These findings extend our understanding of the complex network of relationships involving PEI and life satisfaction in adolescence. Implications and limitations of the findings are discussed. PMID:26834654

  17. Maintaining Life Satisfaction in Adolescence: Affective Mediators of the Influence of Perceived Emotional Intelligence on Overall Life Satisfaction Judgments in a Two-Year Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Álvarez, Nicolás; Extremera, Natalio; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Much attention has been paid to the psychological processes underlying the improvement in mood states and human well-being, particularly during adolescence. Theoretical and empirical research suggests that emotional skills may play a role in enhancing perceived well-being; however, the mechanisms involved in during adolescence are unclear. The purpose of this study was to extend understanding by investigating the potential mediators of the relationship between emotional intelligence (EI) and life satisfaction in a 2-years study. Participants were 269 high school students (145 girls and 124 boys) who completed the self-report perceived emotional intelligence (PEI) Scale, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale three times at 1-year intervals. The three-step longitudinal design corroborated earlier research indicating that positive and negative affect mediate the relationships between EI and life satisfaction. Students with high PEI tended to have more positive experiences and fewer negative experiences, which contributed to their greater life satisfaction. No sex differences were found in the multi-group analyses, suggesting that the causal relationships are similar in both sexes. These findings extend our understanding of the complex network of relationships involving PEI and life satisfaction in adolescence. Implications and limitations of the findings are discussed.

  18. A Correlational Study of How Airline Customer Service and Consumer Perception of Airline Customer Service Affect the Air Rage Phenomenon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, Joyce A.

    2007-01-01

    Between 1995 and 2000, customer service declined throughout the airline industry, as reported in February 2001 by the U.S. Department of Transportation (2001). One of the biggest problems today within the airline industry is the constant complaining from customers regarding the deterioraton of service (McCollough, Berry, & Yadav, 2000). Since 1995, unfortunately no airline has been immune from service deterioration, as reported by the Airline Quality Rating, an annual report by two airline industry experts who analyzed Department of Transportation statistics (Harrison & Kleinsasser, 1999). The airline' refusal to recognize the issue of customer service has perpetuated an environment that has become dangerous and detrimental to the traveling public as well as to airline employees, which in turn has fueled a new phenomenon, now referred to as "air rage".

  19. S-shape relationship between customer satisfaction and willingness to pay premium prices for high quality cured pork products in Spain.

    PubMed

    Cotes-Torres, Alejandro; Muñoz-Gallego, Pablo A; Cotes-Torres, José Miguel

    2012-03-01

    This paper explores 2 different probabilistic models explaining willingness to pay premium prices for high-quality cured products from the swine industry. Seven cured pork products (sausage, fuet, ham, loin, shoulder, salami and pepperoni) were studied in 9 food-stores in Valladolid, Spain. Consumers of the products were interviewed (686 completed surveys). It was found by using mixed effect statistical models that the relationship between willingness to pay a premium price and customer satisfaction had nonlinear behavior, following an S-shape with inverted slope which was the first empirical evidence of this type of behavior in meat products in real market conditions. It was also established that the interaction between satisfaction and current expenditure on the product was significant and indispensable for explaining consumers' willingness to pay premium price for cured pork products.

  20. Affective profiles in Italian high school students: life satisfaction, psychological well-being, self-esteem, and optimism

    PubMed Central

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Bucci, Ornella

    2015-01-01

    The affective profiles model distinguishes between individuals who are self-fulfilling (high positive affect, low negative affect), high affective (high positive affect, high negative affect), low affective (low positive affect, low negative affect), and self-destructive (low positive affect, high negative affect). The literature shows that the affective profiles model has been used with Swedish people in particular in order to determine differences among profiles in relation to life satisfaction, psychological well-being, self-esteem, and optimism. The present research investigated these differences in Italian high school students. Two studies were conducted: the first with 156 Italian high school students and the second with 148 Italian high school students. The first study analyzed differences among affective profiles with regard to life satisfaction and psychological well-being while the second study analyzed differences among affective profiles with regard to self-esteem and optimism. In the first study, the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), the Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Meaningful Life Measure were administered to the participants. In the second study, the PANAS, the Self-Esteem Scale, the Life Orientation Test-revised were administered to the participants. The results of the first study showed that, with respect to the other profiles, the self-fulfilling participants had greater life satisfaction and psychological well-being. The results of the second study showed that, with respect to the other profiles, the self-fulfilling participants had higher self-esteem and optimism. These results revealed differences among affective profiles regarding life satisfaction, psychological well-being, self-esteem, and optimism in the Italian context as well thereby offering new possibilities for cross-cultural research and for enhancing self-fulfilling profiles. PMID:26388814

  1. Affective profiles in Italian high school students: life satisfaction, psychological well-being, self-esteem, and optimism.

    PubMed

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Bucci, Ornella

    2015-01-01

    The affective profiles model distinguishes between individuals who are self-fulfilling (high positive affect, low negative affect), high affective (high positive affect, high negative affect), low affective (low positive affect, low negative affect), and self-destructive (low positive affect, high negative affect). The literature shows that the affective profiles model has been used with Swedish people in particular in order to determine differences among profiles in relation to life satisfaction, psychological well-being, self-esteem, and optimism. The present research investigated these differences in Italian high school students. Two studies were conducted: the first with 156 Italian high school students and the second with 148 Italian high school students. The first study analyzed differences among affective profiles with regard to life satisfaction and psychological well-being while the second study analyzed differences among affective profiles with regard to self-esteem and optimism. In the first study, the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS), the Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Meaningful Life Measure were administered to the participants. In the second study, the PANAS, the Self-Esteem Scale, the Life Orientation Test-revised were administered to the participants. The results of the first study showed that, with respect to the other profiles, the self-fulfilling participants had greater life satisfaction and psychological well-being. The results of the second study showed that, with respect to the other profiles, the self-fulfilling participants had higher self-esteem and optimism. These results revealed differences among affective profiles regarding life satisfaction, psychological well-being, self-esteem, and optimism in the Italian context as well thereby offering new possibilities for cross-cultural research and for enhancing self-fulfilling profiles.

  2. Retaining customers in a managed care market. Hospitals must understand the connection between patient satisfaction, loyalty, retention, and revenue.

    PubMed

    Gemme, E M

    1997-01-01

    Traditionally, health care patients have been treated by health care professionals as people with needs rather than as customers with options. Although managed care has restricted patient choice, choice has not been eliminated. The premise of this article is that patients are primary health care consumers. Adopting such a premise and developing an active customer retention program can help health care organizations change their culture for the better, which may lead to higher customer retention levels and increased revenues. Customer retention programs based on service excellence that empower employees to provide excellent care can eventually lead to a larger market share for health care organizations trying to survive this era of intense competition.

  3. Effects of service provider attitudes and employment status on citizenship behaviors and customers' attitudes and loyalty behavior.

    PubMed

    Payne, Stephanie C; Webber, Sheila Simsarian

    2006-03-01

    The relationship among job satisfaction, affective commitment, service-oriented organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs), customer satisfaction, and customer loyalty were examined for a sample of 249 hairstylists and 1 of their corresponding customers. Employee satisfaction was positively related to service-oriented OCBs, customer satisfaction, and customer loyalty, whereas affective commitment was not related to these outcomes. The extent to which the predictor variables interacted with one another and the role of employment status on these relationships was also explored. High levels of job satisfaction or affective commitment resulted in more service-oriented OCBs for employees and self-employed workers, whereas high levels of both resulted in more service-oriented OCBs for owners.

  4. Measuring Satisfaction in the Program Manager, Procuring Contracting Officer Relationship

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    44 5. Attaining Customer Satisfaction * 44 6. Inhibitors of Customer Satisfaction 45 Vlll 7. Measuring Customer Satisfaction 47 a. Preconditions...customer satisfaction issues, there has been little research to determine the optimal method for measuring customer satisfaction in the PM - PCO...business. As a result, for Executive departments of the Federal Government, measuring customer satisfaction is no longer the exception but the rule

  5. A Hybrid Model for Research on Subjective Well-Being: Examining Common- and Component-Specific Sources of Variance in Life Satisfaction, Positive Affect, and Negative Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busseri, Michael; Sadava, Stanley; DeCourville, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    The primary components of subjective well-being (SWB) include life satisfaction (LS), positive affect (PA), and negative affect (NA). There is little consensus, however, concerning how these components form a model of SWB. In this paper, six longitudinal studies varying in demographic characteristics, length of time between assessment periods,…

  6. Patient satisfaction and service quality in the formation of customers' future purchase intentions in competitive health service settings.

    PubMed

    Baker, T L; Taylor, S A

    1997-01-01

    The following study provides evidence that the relationship between quality perceptions and satisfaction judgements in the formation of future purchase intentions may be very different in health service settings relative to other service settings. The study investigates Taylor and Baker's (1994) assertion that satisfaction judgements moderate the quality-->purchase intention relationship by testing the research model in both for-profit and not-for-profit hospital settings. The results of this study first support the growing view that satisfaction judgements are more closely related to outcome behaviors than quality perceptions in hospital settings. The results further support the assertion that the formation of important consumer outcomes, such as future purchase intentions, appears to be different for health services. Thus, health service managers are cautioned to empirically test models in the literature specific to their own competitive setting. The managerial and research implications of the reported study are presented and discussed.

  7. Engaging the Student as a Customer: A Relationship Marketing Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, Jana Lay-Hwa.

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly organizations are recognizing the value of establishing close relationships with their customers. Despite this, research has not deeply explored how the intangible aspects of relational exchange such as customer satisfaction, as well as affective commitment, calculative commitment, and trust, combine to determine loyalty in the…

  8. Customer Satisfaction versus Infrastructural Facilities in the Realm of Higher Education--A Case Study of Sri Venkateswara University Tirupati

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janardhana, G.; Rajasekhar, Mamilla

    2012-01-01

    This article analyses the levels of students' satisfaction and how institution provides infrastructure facilities in the field of higher education. Infrastructure is the fastest growing segment of the higher education scenario. Universities play a very vital role in a country in terms of their potential. It contributes to employment and growth.…

  9. An Examination of the Joint Effects of Affective Experiences and Job Beliefs on Job Satisfaction and Variations in Affective Experiences over Time.

    PubMed

    Weiss; Nicholas; Daus

    1999-04-01

    This study investigated the joint influences of episodic levels of pleasant mood at work and beliefs about one's job on judgments of job satisfaction, as well as examining the prediction of the patterns of affective states over time. Twenty-four managerial workers completed a diary during work hours which required them to report their mood state at four different times during the workday. The diaries were completed for 16 workdays. At a separate time they completed a measure of overall satisfaction, a Valence-Instrumentality-Expectancy (VIE) measure of beliefs about the job and two dispositional variables, dispositional happiness and affect intensity. Results showed that average levels of pleasant mood over the 16 days and VIE beliefs about the job made significant and independent contributions to the prediction of overall job satisfaction and did so over and above the contribution of dispositional happiness. Results also indicated that individual differences in affective intensity predicted the variability of pleasant mood over time as well as mean levels of mood activation. Finally, spectral analyses applied to the series of mood observations showed that the variability over time in the series of mood observations showed two definite cycles, one corresponding to a daily cycle and one corresponding to a two-period oscillation in mood. Results are discussed in terms of the joint influences of affective experiences and job beliefs on job attitudes and the importance of studying affect over time independent of job satisfaction. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  10. Effects of Caregiver Burden and Satisfaction on Affect of Older End Stage Renal Disease Patients and their Spouses

    PubMed Central

    Wilson-Genderson, Maureen; Pruchno, Rachel A.; Cartwright, Francine P.

    2009-01-01

    Analyses examine the extent to which a two-factor model of affect explains how the burdens and satisfactions experienced by caregivers influence their own well-being and that of the spouses for whom they provide care. Using data from 315 older patients with End Stage Renal Disease and their spouses, we extend tests of Lawton et al.'s (1991) two-factor model both longitudinally and dyadically. Multilevel modeling analyses partially support the two-factor model. Consistent with the model, mean caregiver burden has a stronger effect on both caregiver and patient negative affect than does mean caregiver satisfaction. Contrary to the model, mean caregiver satisfaction has an effect on caregiver positive affect that is similar to that of mean caregiver burden, and it has no effect on patient positive affect. Time-varying effects of caregiver burden are consistent with the two-factor model for caregiver but not patient negative affect. Time-varying effects of caregiver satisfaction are not consistent with the two-factor model for either patients or caregivers. Results highlight the powerful role of caregiver burden for both caregivers and patients and suggest important new directions for conducting health-related research with late-life marital dyads. PMID:20025409

  11. Yes, but are they happy? Effects of trait self-control on affective well-being and life satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Wilhelm; Luhmann, Maike; Fisher, Rachel R; Vohs, Kathleen D; Baumeister, Roy F

    2014-08-01

    Does trait self-control (TSC) predict affective well-being and life satisfaction--positively, negatively, or not? We conducted three studies (Study 1: N = 414, 64% female, Mage = 35.0 years; Study 2: N = 208, 66% female, Mage = 25.24 years; Study 3: N = 234, 61% female, Mage = 34.53 years). The key predictor was TSC, with affective well-being and life satisfaction ratings as key outcomes. Potential explanatory constructs including goal conflict, goal balancing, and emotional distress also were investigated. TSC is positively related to affective well-being and life satisfaction, and managing goal conflict is a key as to why. All studies, moreover, showed that the effect of TSC on life satisfaction is at least partially mediated by affect. Study 1's correlational study established the effect. Study 2's experience sampling approach demonstrated that compared to those low in TSC, those high in TSC experience higher levels of momentary affect even as they experience desire, an effect partially mediated through experiencing lower conflict and emotional distress. Study 3 found evidence for the proposed mechanism--that TSC may boost well-being by helping people avoid frequent conflict and balance vice-virtue conflicts by favoring virtues. Self-control positively contributes to happiness through avoiding and dealing with motivational conflict.

  12. Students-as-Customers' Satisfaction, Predictive Retention with Marketing Implications: The Case of Malaysian Higher Education Business Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Stephen; Yeo, Amy Chu-May

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate two areas of interest: first, to determine business student customer satisfiers that could be contributors to students' current and predicted retention in a higher educational institution (HEI) and second, to use these satisfiers to inform HEI marketing planning. Design/Methodology/Approach: The…

  13. Positive and Negative Affectivity as Mediator and Moderator of the Relationship between Optimism and Life Satisfaction in Turkish University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kapikiran, Necla Acun

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to examine the mediator and moderator role of positive and negative affectivity variables on the relationship between optimism and life satisfaction in university students. 397 university students, ranging in age from 18 to 27 (M = 20.98), attending different departments of the Faculty of Education, at Pamukkale…

  14. Differences in Affect, Life Satisfaction, and Depression between Successfully and Unsuccessfully Rehabilitated Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, Martha H.; Holbert, Donald

    2009-01-01

    This study assessed whether persons with spinal cord injuries who were successfully rehabilitated differed from those who were not with regard to positive and negative affect, life satisfaction, and depression. An ex post facto research design compared persons with spinal cord injuries who were previously employed with persons with spinal cord…

  15. Factors Affecting Motivation and Job Satisfaction of Academic Staff of Universities in South-South Geopolitical Zone of Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osakwe, Regina N.

    2014-01-01

    This study determined the factors affecting motivation and job satisfaction of non-management academic staff of universities in South-South geopolitical zone of Nigeria. It employed an expost-facto research design. Three research questions and two hypotheses were raised for the study. A sample of four hundred and fifty non-management academic…

  16. Procrastination, Self-Regulation Failure, Academic Life Satisfaction, and Affective Well-Being: Underregulation or Misregulation Form

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balkis, Murat; Duru, Erdinç

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the role of self-regulation failure in procrastination. In addition, it also aimed to investigate the effects of procrastination on affective well-being and academic life satisfaction. Three hundred and twenty-eight undergraduate students participated in the study. The most obvious finding emerging from this…

  17. Customer Service: Another Side of TQM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirkin, Arlene Farber

    1993-01-01

    Focuses on the customer satisfaction element of Total Quality Management (TQM) in libraries, including definition of the terms customer and customer satisfaction, determining customer expectations, complaint systems, keeping customers, and empowerment of staff. Appendices list approaches libraries and other organizations have used to improve…

  18. Do Learning Approaches of Medical Students Affect Their Satisfaction with Problem-Based Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurpinar, Erol; Kulac, Esin; Tetik, Cihat; Akdogan, Ilgaz; Mamakli, Sumer

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the satisfaction of medical students with problem-based learning (PBL) and their approaches to learning to investigate the effect of learning approaches on their levels of satisfaction. The study group was composed of medical students from three different universities, which apply PBL at different levels…

  19. Health Care Management Courses in Greek Universities: A First Attempt to Establish Factors Affecting Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kotsifos, Vangelis; Alegakis, Athanasios; Philalithis, Anastas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The object of this study is to formulate, establish and apply a suitable and reliable tool for measuring the course experience satisfaction of Master graduates. A questionnaire was formulated, based on similar tools, and adjusted to the reality of Hellenic Higher Education, in order to measure the satisfaction of graduates in three Master…

  20. When Being Able Is Not Enough. The Combined Value of Positive Affect and Self-Efficacy for Job Satisfaction in Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Angelica; Pazzaglia, Francesca; Ronconi, Lucia

    2010-01-01

    This study examines how good strategies and praxis interplay with positive affect and self-efficacy to determine a teacher's job satisfaction, in the hypothesis that teaching effectively does not in itself guarantee satisfaction: positive affect and self-efficacy beliefs are needed. Self-assessment scales, designed to assess the use of efficient…

  1. Estimating the influence of life satisfaction and positive affect on later income using sibling fixed effects.

    PubMed

    De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Oswald, Andrew J

    2012-12-04

    The question of whether there is a connection between income and psychological well-being is a long-studied issue across the social, psychological, and behavioral sciences. Much research has found that richer people tend to be happier. However, relatively little attention has been paid to whether happier individuals perform better financially in the first place. This possibility of reverse causality is arguably understudied. Using data from a large US representative panel, we show that adolescents and young adults who report higher life satisfaction or positive affect grow up to earn significantly higher levels of income later in life. We focus on earnings approximately one decade after the person's well-being is measured; we exploit the availability of sibling clusters to introduce family fixed effects; we account for the human capacity to imagine later socioeconomic outcomes and to anticipate the resulting feelings in current well-being. The study's results are robust to the inclusion of controls such as education, intelligence quotient, physical health, height, self-esteem, and later happiness. We consider how psychological well-being may influence income. Sobel-Goodman mediation tests reveal direct and indirect effects that carry the influence from happiness to income. Significant mediating pathways include a higher probability of obtaining a college degree, getting hired and promoted, having higher degrees of optimism and extraversion, and less neuroticism.

  2. 78 FR 46594 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Aviation Security Customer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... OMB Review: Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement Passenger Survey AGENCY.... Information Collection Requirement Title: Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement...; Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement Passenger Survey. TSA, with OMB's...

  3. 75 FR 29567 - Extension of Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Aviation Security Customer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    .... The collection involves surveying travelers to measure customer satisfaction of aviation security in...; Aviation Security Customer Satisfaction Performance Measurement Passenger Survey. TSA, with OMB's approval... to continue to assess customer satisfaction in an effort to more efficiently manage...

  4. 78 FR 3499 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request on Information Collection Tools Relating to Customer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... Customer Satisfaction Surveys AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request... comments concerning an existing Customer Satisfaction Surveys previously approved under OMB approval number..., reporting, and record-keeping requirements: Title: IRS Customer Satisfaction Surveys. OMB Number:...

  5. [Factors affecting subjective satisfaction with verbal communication among the disabled elderly and their family caregivers].

    PubMed

    Miura, Hiroko; Arai, Yumiko; Yamasaki, Kiyoko

    2005-05-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate satisfaction with verbal communication among the disabled elderly and their family caregivers; and to find the significantly influential factors of satisfaction with verbal communication. The subjects were 85 disabled elderly and 85 family caregivers. For the disabled elderly, satisfaction with verbal communication, demographic, and physical factors were examined using an interview survey. For the caregivers, satisfaction with verbal communication, demographic factors, and some factors related caregiving were examined using a self-administered questionnaire. In the disabled elderly, 82.4% were satisfied with their verbal communication while 55.3% of family caregivers were satisfied. Satisfaction with verbal communication between the disabled elderly and their caregivers showed low agreement (kappa = 0.17). Bivariate analysis revealed that satisfaction with verbal communication of the disabled elderly was significantly related to ADL (p < 0.01), dysphagia risk (p < 0.05), and ability of comprehension (p < 0.05) while satisfaction with verbal communication of caregivers was significantly related to the gender of the disabled elderly and caregivers' burden. Furthermore, multiple regression analysis showed that the factor most related to satisfaction with verbal communication for the disabled elderly was ability of comprehension (p value = 0.032, odds ratio = 2.960), and the most related factor for their caregivers was the burden evaluated by J-ZBI_8 (p value = 0.004, odds ratio = 0.842). These results suggest that satisfaction with verbal communication of the disabled elderly disagrees with that of the family caregivers, and that some related factors for the disabled elderly are different from those in their family caregivers.

  6. Analysis on factors affecting household customers decision in using electricity at peak time and its correlation towards saving electricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasasa, Linus; Marbun, Parlin; Mariza, Ita

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study and analyse the factors affecting customer decisions in using electricity at peak-load hours (between 17.00 to 22.00 WIB) and their behaviors towards electricity conservation in Indonesian household. The underlying rationale is to influence a reduction in energy consumption by stimulating energy saving behaviors, thereby reducing the impact of energy use on the environment. How is the correlation between the decisions in using electricity during peak load hours with the household customer's behavior towards saving electricity? The primary data is obtained by distributing questionnaires to customers of PT. PLN Jakarta Raya and Tangerang Distribution from Household segment. The data is analysed using the Structural Equation Model (SEM) and AMOS Software. The research is finding that all factors (Personal, Social, PLN Services, Psychological, and Cultural) are positively influence customer decision in using electricity at peak load hours. There is a correlation between the decisions in using electricity during peak load hours with the household customer's behavior towards saving electricity.

  7. Product Variety, Consumer Preferences, and Web Technology: Can the Web of Data Reduce Price Competition and Increase Customer Satisfaction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hepp, Martin

    E-Commerce on the basis of current Web technology has created fierce competition with a strong focus on price. Despite a huge variety of offerings and diversity in the individual preferences of consumers, current Web search fosters a very early reduction of the search space to just a few commodity makes and models. As soon as this reduction has taken place, search is reduced to flat price comparison. This is unfortunate for the manufacturers and vendors, because their individual value proposition for a particular customer may get lost in the course of communication over the Web, and it is unfortunate for the customer, because he/she may not get the most utility for the money based on her/his preference function. A key limitation is that consumers cannot search using a consolidated view on all alternative offers across the Web. In this talk, I will (1) analyze the technical effects of products and services search on the Web that cause this mismatch between supply and demand, (2) evaluate how the GoodRelations vocabulary and the current Web of Data movement can improve the situation, (3) give a brief hands-on demonstration, and (4) sketch business models for the various market participants.

  8. Affects of Provider Type on Patient Satisfaction, Productivity and Cost Efficiency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-25

    however, few studies have addressed the military health care system. Operational commitments and practice patterns make the military health care...that prompted this study are changes in the MTF reimbursement Provider Type 9 system, rising costs of health care, and the limited studies that are...satisfaction outcomes. Section IV deals with patient satisfaction. Section I Theorectical Background Donabedian (1966) described quality health care

  9. Satisfaction = Revenue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johannesen, Rhonda

    1999-01-01

    Colleges and universities are turning increasingly to private real estate and property management companies to boost customer satisfaction with, and income from, student housing. Issues to be considered are examined, including the market profile, facility types and needs, maintenance and housekeeping, communications technology, complementary…

  10. Factors affecting job satisfaction and their correlation with educational standards among dental assistants.

    PubMed

    Al Jazairy, Yousra H; Halawany, Hassan Suliman; Hussainan, Nawaf Al; Maflehi, Nassr Al; Abraham, Nimmi Biju; Jacob, Vimal

    2014-01-01

    A disparity exists in the educational qualifications of dental assistants working in various public and private institutions in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of professional and personal characteristics on job satisfaction among dental assistants. A cross-sectional survey was performed among dental assistants using a 24-item self-administered questionnaire. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between overall job satisfaction and other variables. The overall response rate was 72.1%. Factor analysis suggested that five underlying factors were related to job satisfaction. The mean score for overall job satisfaction was 3.86 (satisfied) out of 5. Among the work environment factors, the highest mean score, 4.26 (satisfied), was obtained for quality of service, and the lowest mean score, 2.78 (neutral), was obtained for the perception of income. The income and general prospects of the profession was significantly associated with overall job satisfaction. This study suggests that for dental assistants, professional and personal life, quality of service, perception of income and prestige and self-respect are important factors for job satisfaction. Despite differences in professional formation standards, in general, the study participants were considerably satisfied with their jobs.

  11. Customer social network affects marketing strategy: A simulation analysis based on competitive diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Rui; Wu, Jiawen; Du, Helen S.

    2017-03-01

    To explain the competition phenomenon and results between QQ and MSN (China) in the Chinese instant messaging software market, this paper developed a new population competition model based on customer social network. The simulation results show that the firm whose product with greater network externality effect will gain more market share than its rival when the same marketing strategy is used. The firm with the advantage of time, derived from the initial scale effect will become more competitive than its rival when facing a group of common penguin customers within a social network, verifying the winner-take-all phenomenon in this case.

  12. Job Satisfaction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    well include an "overall, global or unidimensional component" (p 184) but that additional specific factors were also evident, ie. "job satisfaction is...between a person’s life style and organisational structure. They hypothesised that job satisfaction may be adversely affected if there is any significant...between job satisfaction and an independent life style, and; thirdly, that "job satisfac- tion is maximispd when the individual places a high value

  13. 77 FR 26043 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed collection; Comments Requested: CRS Customer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ...; Proposed collection; Comments Requested: CRS Customer Satisfaction Survey ACTION: 60-Day notice of..., and vested formal and informal community leaders. Abstract: The CRS `Customer Satisfaction...

  14. Factors Affecting Patient Satisfaction With Emergency Department Care: An Italian Rural Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Gabriele; Vencia, Francesco; Mecheroni, Silvana; Dionisi, Susanna; Baragatti, Lorenzo; Nante, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the emergency department satisfaction is strictly linked to the role of the nurses, namely the first interface between patients and hospital services. Objectives: The purpose of the study was to identify areas of emergency nursing activity associated with minor or major patient satisfaction. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted from December 2010 - May 2011, in the rural hospital of Orbetello, Tuscany (Italy). Convenience sampling was used to select patients, namely patients presenting at the emergency unit in the study period. The Consumer Emergency Care Satisfaction Scale was used to collect information on two structured subscale (Caring and Teaching). Results: 259 questionnaire were collected. Analysis indicated that only two characteristics significantly influenced overall satisfaction: “receiving continuous information from personnel about delay” positively effect (OR=7.98; p=0.022) while “waiting time for examination” had a negative effect (OR 0.42; p=0.026) Conclusions: The study was the first conduced in Italy using this instrument that enabled to obtain much important information about patient satisfaction with nursing care received in the emergency department. The results showing improvements must be related to educational aspects, such as explaining patients the colour waiting list, and communication towards patients, such as informing about emergences that cause queue. PMID:25946915

  15. How Interactive Video (ITV) Web-Enhanced Format Affects Instructional Strategy and Instructor Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Catrina V.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the quality of technology associated with interactive video (ITV) classes in distance education programs and the resulting satisfaction of the instructors teaching this format. The participants were full time instructors of a rural community college that used the ITV format. Community college ITV instructors are…

  16. Ways by Which Comparable Income Affects Life Satisfaction in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheung, Chau-kiu; Leung, Kwan-kwok

    2008-01-01

    Proponents of social equality attribute low life satisfaction to income inequality in society, an inequality which occurs when most people have relatively low income and only a few have high income. In contrast, range-frequency theory and other social comparison theories predict that when most people have low income, they are satisfied because of…

  17. Contact isolation for infection control in hospitalized patients: is patient satisfaction affected?

    PubMed

    Gasink, Leanne B; Singer, Karyn; Fishman, Neil O; Holmes, William C; Weiner, Mark G; Bilker, Warren B; Lautenbach, Ebbing

    2008-03-01

    The effects of contact isolation on patient satisfaction are unknown. We performed a cross-sectional survey and found that most patients lack education and knowledge regarding isolation but feel that it improves their care. In multivariable analysis, isolated patients were not less satisfied with inpatient care than were nonisolated patients.

  18. Factors Affecting the Job Satisfaction of Latino/a Immigrants in the Midwest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdivia, Corinne; Flores, Lisa Y.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the job satisfaction of 253 Latino/a newcomers in three rural communities in the Midwest. Specifically, the authors explored the effects of ethnic identity, Anglo acculturation, Latino/a acculturation, perceptions of the community (social relations, discrimination/racism, and language pressures), job tenure, work hours, and…

  19. Does the etiology affect the outcome and satisfaction rates of penile prosthesis implantation surgery?

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Ibrahim Halil; Arslan, Burak; Kozacioglu, Zafer; Yonguc, Tarik; Degirmenci, Tansu; Gunlusoy, Bulent; Minareci, Suleyman

    2014-11-01

    Our aim was to compare the outcomes and satisfaction rates of men undergoing penile prostheses implantation (PPI) secondary to radical prostatectomy (RP) and other causes of vasculogenic erectile dysfunction (ED). A total of 142 patients, of whom 60 underwent PPI due to ED following RP (Group 1) and 82 underwent PPI due to ED with other vasculogenic causes (Group 2) were included in this study. The preoperative erectile status was evaluated with the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). The satisfaction of patients and partners were evaluated by a telephone interview using Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction (EDITS) questionnaire and Erectile Dysfunction Inventory of Treatment Satisfaction Partner Survey. Preoperative mean IIEF scores were significantly lower in Group 1 (17.5 ± 6.4 vs. 24.2 ± 5.1, p = 0.01). For Groups 1 and 2, the mean EDITS scores of the patients were 58 ± 10 and 71 ± 8, respectively, and that for the partners were 46 ± 8 and 65 ± 7, respectively. Group 1 had significantly lower scores both for the EDITS and the EDITS Partner Survey (p = 0.03, p = 0.01, respectively). Patients who had undergone RP and their partners were found to have lower satisfaction rates compared to patients with other causes of vasculogenic ED who had penile implant surgery. From this point of view, it is important to know the patient's expectations about the treatment outcomes and a preoperative psychological and sexual counseling should be managed for possible treatment alternatives after RP.

  20. Does better for the environment mean less tasty? Offering more climate-friendly meals is good for the environment and customer satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Visschers, Vivianne H M; Siegrist, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Food consumption comprises a significant portion of the total environmental impact of households. One way to reduce this impact may be to offer consumers more climate-friendly meal choices, such as when eating out. However, the environmental benefits of such an intervention will depend on not only consumers' liking of the climate-friendlier meals, but also on the perceived environmental impact. We therefore investigated the relationship between the global warming potential (GWP) of and consumers' liking of meals in two field studies in the same restaurant. Visitors to the restaurant were asked to rate the taste of the meal they had just consumed. These taste ratings were then related to the meals' GWP and number of purchases. In the second study, an intervention was tested consisting of a climate-friendly choice label and information posters. Contrary to expectations, it was found in both studies that the GWP of the meals was unrelated to the taste or the number of purchases. Offering more climate-friendly meals did not change consumer satisfaction. As expected, the introduction of the climate-friendly choice label increased the number of climate-friendly meal purchases. Therefore, offering more climate-friendly meals with a climate-friendly choice label can affect consumers' meal choices, but not their preferences or satisfaction, which is beneficial for the climate, consumers and gastronomic establishments.

  1. Factors affecting the job satisfaction levels and quit intentions of academic nurses.

    PubMed

    Altuntaş, Serap

    2014-04-01

    The descriptively designed study was conducted in order to determine academic nurses' job satisfaction levels, intention of leaving job and effective reasons. The study was implemented in 10 nursing schools offering postgraduate and doctoral education in Turkey, and data was collected from academics working in these schools who agreed to participate in the study. After obtaining the required approval from the ethics committees and institutional permissions, data was collected from 248 academic nurses using a personal information form and a "Job Satisfaction Scale" between June 2009 and January 2010. The data was analyzed by frequency and percentage distribution, using Cronbach's Alpha coefficient, ANOVA, Qui-Square and Tukey's HSD test for advanced analysis methods with SPSS 11.5 statistics packet software. This study concludes that academic nurses are moderately satisfied with their jobs. In addition, job satisfaction was found to be lower among research assistants, assistant professors, nurses with less than 10 years of academic experience, nurses who have completed their doctorate dissertations, or who are working on appointment or contract basis.

  2. Optical design of a novel instrument that uses the Hartmann-Shack sensor and Zernike polynomials to measure and simulate customized refraction correction surgery outcomes and patient satisfaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuoka, Fatima M. M.; Matos, Luciana; Cremasco, Antonio; Numajiri, Mirian; Marcato, Rafael; Oliveira, Otavio G.; Sabino, Luis G.; Castro N., Jarbas C.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Carvalho, Luis A. V.

    2016-03-01

    An optical system that conjugates the patient's pupil to the plane of a Hartmann-Shack (HS) wavefront sensor has been simulated using optical design software. And an optical bench prototype is mounted using mechanical eye device, beam splitter, illumination system, lenses, mirrors, mirrored prism, movable mirror, wavefront sensor and camera CCD. The mechanical eye device is used to simulate aberrations of the eye. From this device the rays are emitted and travelled by the beam splitter to the optical system. Some rays fall on the camera CCD and others pass in the optical system and finally reach the sensor. The eye models based on typical in vivo eye aberrations is constructed using the optical design software Zemax. The computer-aided outcomes of each HS images for each case are acquired, and these images are processed using customized techniques. The simulated and real images for low order aberrations are compared using centroid coordinates to assure that the optical system is constructed precisely in order to match the simulated system. Afterwards a simulated version of retinal images is constructed to show how these typical eyes would perceive an optotype positioned 20 ft away. Certain personalized corrections are allowed by eye doctors based on different Zernike polynomial values and the optical images are rendered to the new parameters. Optical images of how that eye would see with or without corrections of certain aberrations are generated in order to allow which aberrations can be corrected and in which degree. The patient can then "personalize" the correction to their own satisfaction. This new approach to wavefront sensing is a promising change in paradigm towards the betterment of the patient-physician relationship.

  3. The Freedom to Pursue Happiness: Belief in Free Will Predicts Life Satisfaction and Positive Affect among Chinese Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunkai; Wang, Song; Zhao, Yajun; Kong, Feng; Li, Jingguang

    2017-01-01

    A small amount of research has examined the association between the belief in free will and subjective well-being (SWB) among Western laypersons from individualist cultures. However, no study has examined this association among participants from collectivist cultures (e.g., Eastern Asian cultures). Therefore, in this study, we explored this association among two large, independent cohorts of Chinese adolescents (N1 = 1,660; N2 = 639; high school students). The belief in free will was measured by a self-reported questionnaire (Cohorts 1 and 2) and a two-alternative forced choice question regarding the existence of free will (Cohort 2). SWB included cognitive well-being (life satisfaction) and affective well-being (positive and negative affect) in both cohorts. Data analyses indicated that a stronger belief in free will was consistently associated with higher life satisfaction and positive affect in both cohorts. Our investigation provides evidence supporting the cultural generality of the positive effects of believing in free will on SWB. PMID:28101072

  4. The Freedom to Pursue Happiness: Belief in Free Will Predicts Life Satisfaction and Positive Affect among Chinese Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunkai; Wang, Song; Zhao, Yajun; Kong, Feng; Li, Jingguang

    2016-01-01

    A small amount of research has examined the association between the belief in free will and subjective well-being (SWB) among Western laypersons from individualist cultures. However, no study has examined this association among participants from collectivist cultures (e.g., Eastern Asian cultures). Therefore, in this study, we explored this association among two large, independent cohorts of Chinese adolescents (N1 = 1,660; N2 = 639; high school students). The belief in free will was measured by a self-reported questionnaire (Cohorts 1 and 2) and a two-alternative forced choice question regarding the existence of free will (Cohort 2). SWB included cognitive well-being (life satisfaction) and affective well-being (positive and negative affect) in both cohorts. Data analyses indicated that a stronger belief in free will was consistently associated with higher life satisfaction and positive affect in both cohorts. Our investigation provides evidence supporting the cultural generality of the positive effects of believing in free will on SWB.

  5. Client Preferences Affect Treatment Satisfaction, Completion, and Clinical Outcome: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Bennett, Charles B.; Trentacosta, Christopher J.; McLear, Caitlin

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of client preferences on treatment satisfaction, completion, and clinical outcome. Our search of the literature resulted in 34 empirical articles describing 32 unique clinical trials that either randomized some clients to an active choice condition (shared decision making condition or choice of treatment) or assessed client preferences. Clients who were involved in shared decision making, chose a treatment condition, or otherwise received their preferred treatment evidenced higher treatment satisfaction (ESd = .34; p < .001), increased completion rates (ESOR = 1.37; ESd = .17; p < .001), and superior clinical outcome (ESd = .15; p < .0001), compared to clients who were not involved in shared decision making, did not choose a treatment condition, or otherwise did not receive their preferred treatment. Although the effect sizes are modest in magnitude, they were generally consistent across several potential moderating variables including study design (preference versus active choice), psychoeducation (informed versus uninformed), setting (inpatient versus outpatient), client diagnosis (mental health versus other), and unit of randomization (client versus provider). Our findings highlight the clinical benefit of assessing client preferences, providing treatment choices when two or more efficacious options are available, and involving clients in treatment-related decisions when treatment options are not available. PMID:25189522

  6. Do reports on drinking water quality affect customers' concerns? Experiments in report content.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Branden B

    2003-10-01

    The Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1996 required U.S. utilities to report on drinking water quality to their customers annually, beginning in fall 1999, on the assumption that such reports would alert them to quality problems and perhaps mobilize pressure for improvement. A random sample of New Jersey customers read alternative versions of a water quality report, in an experiment on reactions to water quality information under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) rules. Experiment design was 2 x 3 + 1: two versions each--one with, one without, a violation of a health standard--of a report that was (1) Qualitative (without water quality numbers, thus not meeting USEPA rules); (2) Basic, with minimal information meeting the rules; or (3) Extended, adding reading aids and utility performance information; plus a control instrument without any hypothetical report. Results of ANOVA suggest the reports will have less effect than hoped or feared. These manipulations were successful: people reading the Qualitative versions were less likely to say that the report gave the amounts of substances found in the water, and those reading Violation versions were more likely to report a violation of a health standard. The main differences in responses to the report involved the judged adequacy of the information, and to a lesser extent responses on a Concern scale (constructed from measures of concern, judged risk, clean-up intentions, distrust of utility information, and doubt that the utility was doing all it could to improve water quality). Overall judgments of water quality and utility performance did not change, either relative to the controls or in before versus after responses. Qualitative reports performed worse than others, confirming the decision to have utilities report actual contaminant levels. Extended reports did only slightly better than the Basic versions on these measures. Many respondents had trouble identifying the presence or absence of substance

  7. Money and happiness: rank of income, not income, affects life satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Christopher J; Brown, Gordon D A; Moore, Simon C

    2010-04-01

    Does money buy happiness, or does happiness come indirectly from the higher rank in society that money brings? We tested a rank-income hypothesis, according to which people gain utility from the ranked position of their income within a comparison group. The rank hypothesis contrasts with traditional reference-income hypotheses, which suggest that utility from income depends on comparison to a social reference-group norm. We found that the ranked position of an individual's income predicts general life satisfaction, whereas absolute income and reference income have no effect. Furthermore, individuals weight upward comparisons more heavily than downward comparisons. According to the rank hypothesis, income and utility are not directly linked: Increasing an individual's income will increase his or her utility only if ranked position also increases and will necessarily reduce the utility of others who will lose rank.

  8. Shame, Catastrophizing, and Negative Partner Responses Are Associated With Lower Sexual and Relationship Satisfaction and More Negative Affect in Men With Peyronie's Disease.

    PubMed

    Davis, Seth; Ferrar, Saskia; Sadikaj, Gentiana; Binik, Yitzchak; Carrier, Serge

    2017-04-03

    Peyronie's disease (PD) has a negative impact on men's sexual functioning and quality of life, but little is known about why some men cope better than others and what the effects of PD are on their relationships. The aims of the present study were to describe negative affect, pain, and relationship and sexual satisfaction in men with PD, and to explore their psychosocial correlates. Participants were 110 men diagnosed with PD. All men completed questionnaires. The main outcome measures were as follows: Global Measure of Sexual Satisfaction, Dyadic Adjustment Scale, McGill Pain Questionnaire, and Negative Affect Scale. The predictor variables were the following: Experience of Shame Scale, Body Esteem Scale, Body Image Self-Consciousness Scale, Index of Male Genital Image, a modified Pain Catastrophizing Scale, and a modified Multidimensional Pain Inventory. Although men with PD had mean sexual/relationship satisfaction and negative affect scores indicating mild impairment, there was a wide range of variation, with 42% to 52% scoring in the clinical range. Catastrophizing was significantly associated with reduced sexual satisfaction and increased negative affect and pain. Shame was also associated with increased negative affect. The significant associations of relationship satisfaction were partner responses and shame. Given the lack of curative treatment in PD, understanding why some men cope better than others may guide therapy. Shame, catastrophizing, and partner responses may be important therapeutic targets.

  9. A prospective, longitudinal, descriptive study of the effect of a customized wheelchair cushion on clinical variables, satisfaction, and functionality among patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Vilchis-Aranguren, Rodrigo; Gayol-Mérida, Diana; Quinzaños-Fresnedo, Jimena; Pérez-Zavala, Ramiro; Galíndez-Novoa, Carmen

    2015-02-01

    The Instituto Nacional de Rehabilitación (Rehabilitation National Institute) (INR) developed a prototype wheelchair cushion (INR cushion) designed to adjust to the anthropometry of the user's ischiogluteal area and prevent pressure ulcer formation while maintaining or promoting functionality. A prospective, longitudinal, descriptive study was conducted from February 2010 to February 2011 to evaluate the effect of using the INR cushion on clinical variables, functionality, and user satisfaction. Sixteen patients were recruited (9 male, 7 female, average age 31.8 [range 22-47] years, average body mass index 25 [range 22-34], average time in a wheelchair 10.1 [range 3-26] years) who met the study protocol inclusion criteria of being pressure ulcer-free for at least 6 months and capable of propulsion and transfer without assistance, chronic spinal cord injury (>2 years), and without chronic-degenerative diseases or cognitive problems. Each participant received the cushion for a 2-month evaluation. Eight clinical variables were assessed: trunk control, posture, spasticity, transfer capacity, comfort, skin reaction, propulsion capacity, and pressure release capacity. The clinical assessment was performed using validated scales and instruments: Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), Functional Independence Measure™ (FIM), Norton Scale, and assessment of skin reaction. Interface pressures were measured using force sensing array, and participants completed a structured interview to assess user expectation, perceived functionality, perceived quality, and likelihood of recommending the device. Two patients withdrew due to appointment conflicts; of the remaining 14, significant differences between the user's experience with other products and the INR were found with regard to pressure redistribution (P = 0.012); all participants but 1 graded the INR as good in all interview categories. No participants developed a pressure ulcer during the study. The customized cushion was

  10. Exploring the effects of individual customer incivility encounters on employee incivility: the moderating roles of entity (in)civility and negative affectivity.

    PubMed

    Walker, David D; van Jaarsveld, Danielle D; Skarlicki, Daniel P

    2014-01-01

    Incivility between customers and employees is common in many service organizations. These encounters can have negative outcomes for employees, customers, and the organization. To date, researchers have tended to study incivility as an aggregated and accumulated phenomenon (entity perspective). In the present study, we examined incivility as it occurs during a specific service encounter (event perspective) alongside the entity perspective. Using a mixed-method multilevel field study of customer service interactions, we show that individual customer incivility encounters (i.e., events) trigger employee incivility as a function of the employee's overall accumulated impression of the (in)civility in his or her customer interactions, such that the effects are more pronounced among employees who generally perceive their customer interactions to be more versus less civil. We also find that these interactive effects occur only among employees who are lower (vs. higher) in negative affectivity. Our results show that, in order to expand the understanding of customer incivility, it is important to study the incivility encounter, the social context in which negative customer interactions occur, and individual differences.

  11. Grantee Satisfaction Survey. Final Report, August 2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) is the national indicator of customer evaluations of the quality of goods and services available to U.S. residents. Since 1994, it has served as a uniform, cross-industry/government measure of customer satisfaction. A total of 10 groups, composed of eight program offices, EDFacts Coordinators, and…

  12. Examining Correlates of Part-Time Faculty Affective Commitment and Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duhn, Samantha Tiffany

    2013-01-01

    Changes in a multitude of factors including the economy, student enrollment, university goals and policies, and the available talent pool have created an imbalance in the supply and demand for qualified part-time faculty. The unmet demand has prompted university leaders to seek an understanding of part-time faculty affective commitment, job…

  13. 39 CFR 3055.92 - Customer Experience Measurement Surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. 3055.92... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.92 Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. (a... instrument including: (1) A description of the customer type targeted by the survey; (2) The number...

  14. 39 CFR 3055.92 - Customer Experience Measurement Surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. 3055.92... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.92 Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. (a... instrument including: (1) A description of the customer type targeted by the survey; (2) The number...

  15. 39 CFR 3055.92 - Customer Experience Measurement Surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. 3055.92... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.92 Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. (a... instrument including: (1) A description of the customer type targeted by the survey; (2) The number...

  16. 39 CFR 3055.92 - Customer Experience Measurement Surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. 3055.92... SATISFACTION REPORTING Reporting of Customer Satisfaction § 3055.92 Customer Experience Measurement Surveys. (a... instrument including: (1) A description of the customer type targeted by the survey; (2) The number...

  17. Understanding customer experience.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Christopher; Schwager, Andre

    2007-02-01

    Anyone who has signed up for cell phone service, attempted to claim a rebate, or navigated a call center has probably suffered from a company's apparent indifference to what should be its first concern: the customer experiences that culminate in either satisfaction or disappointment and defection. Customer experience is the subjective response customers have to direct or indirect contact with a company. It encompasses every aspect of an offering: customer care, advertising, packaging, features, ease of use, reliability. Customer experience is shaped by customers' expectations, which largely reflect previous experiences. Few CEOs would argue against the significance of customer experience or against measuring and analyzing it. But many don't appreciate how those activities differ from CRM or just how illuminating the data can be. For instance, the majority of the companies in a recent survey believed they have been providing "superior" experiences to customers, but most customers disagreed. The authors describe a customer experience management (CEM) process that involves three kinds of monitoring: past patterns (evaluating completed transactions), present patterns (tracking current relationships), and potential patterns (conducting inquiries in the hope of unveiling future opportunities). Data are collected at or about touch points through such methods as surveys, interviews, focus groups, and online forums. Companies need to involve every function in the effort, not just a single customer-facing group. The authors go on to illustrate how a cross-functional CEM system is created. With such a system, companies can discover which customers are prospects for growth and which require immediate intervention.

  18. Associations among Overt and Relational Victimization and Adolescents' Satisfaction with Friends: The Moderating Role of the Need for Affective Relationships with Friends

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gini, Gianluca

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the relationships among overt and relational victimization and adolescents' satisfaction with friends. We also tested the influence of the need for affective relationships with friends. A total of 409 Italian adolescent boys and girls (age range = 14-16, M = 15.02 years, SD = 2.58) completed a self-report measure of…

  19. The Mediator Roles of Life Satisfaction and Self-Esteem between the Affective Components of Psychological Well-Being and the Cognitive Symptoms of Problematic Internet Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senol-Durak, Emre; Durak, Mithat

    2011-01-01

    The factors associated with cognitions about problematic Internet use have been empirically tested in various studies. The aim of the present study was to examine the mediator roles of both life satisfaction and self-esteem between affective components of subjective well-being and cognitions about problematic Internet use. For this purpose, the…

  20. Faculty and Administrators at Nova Southeastern University Respond to a Winter Term 2000 Office of Grants and Contracts Customer Satisfaction Survey. Research and Planning Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacFarland, Thomas W.

    In 1996, the Office of Grants and Contracts at Nova Southeastern University (Florida) began a reporting process to determine the extent of constituent satisfaction with its services. This study, performed in the year 2000, repeated the established reporting process. The invited sample of 532 included full-time faculty, administrators, selected…

  1. Job attitudes, job satisfaction, and job affect: A century of continuity and of change.

    PubMed

    Judge, Timothy A; Weiss, Howard M; Kammeyer-Mueller, John D; Hulin, Charles L

    2017-03-01

    Over the past 100 years, research on job attitudes has improved in the sophistication of methods and in the productive use of theory as a basis for fundamental research into questions of work psychology. Early research incorporated a diversity of methods for measuring potential predictors and outcomes of job attitudes. Over time, methods for statistically assessing these relationships became more rigorous, but the field also became narrower. In recent years, developments in theory and methodology have reinvigorated research, which now addresses a rich panoply of topics related to the daily flow of affect, the complexity of personal motives and dispositions, and the complex interplay of attitude objects and motivation in shaping behavior. Despite these apparent changes, a review of the concepts and substantive arguments that underpin this literature have remained remarkably consistent. We conclude by discussing how we expect that these major themes will be addressed in the future, emphasizing topics that have proven to be enduring guides for understanding the ways that people construe and react to their appraisals of their work. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Life satisfaction and self-efficacy in patients affected by a first stroke living in Kuwait: a two-phase study.

    PubMed

    Omu, Onutobor; Reynolds, Frances

    2013-08-01

    Life satisfaction and self-efficacy are important aspects of stroke rehabilitation. Previous research focuses on Western stroke survivors, neglecting the stroke experience in the Middle East. This research was conducted in Kuwait and entailed both quantitative and qualitative phases to obtain a more comprehensive, clinically relevant understanding of self-efficacy and life satisfaction during stroke rehabilitation in this culture. The aims were to: 1) investigate the relationships between self-efficacy and life satisfaction in female patients affected by stroke (Phase 1); and 2) explore health professionals' views regarding the importance of self-efficacy and possible strategies for enhancing self-efficacy during rehabilitation, through semi-structured interviews (Phase 2). Significant correlations were found between patients' general self-efficacy, and psychosocial adaptation self-efficacy following stroke. Self-efficacy (both general and psychosocial adaptation) showed significant correlations with life satisfaction post-stroke. Health professionals (more than half of whom were physiotherapists) recognised the importance of self-efficacy within stroke rehabilitation and identified five main ways to increase self-efficacy during stroke rehabilitation. These were to: 1) motivate and encourage patients; 2) provide more education about stroke and rehabilitation; 3) identify change; 4) offer a high-quality environment and therapy; and 5) set goals. In conclusion, psychosocial self-efficacy was identified as having a stronger relationship to life satisfaction compared with general self-efficacy within this sample of Kuwaiti female patients. Health professionals suggested various strategies for enhancing self-efficacy and thereby life satisfaction post-stroke during the rehabilitation process in Kuwait. Despite the collectivist culture of Kuwait, the findings indicate that the patient's own confidence and sense of responsibility for progress may be relevant to

  3. Analysis on online word-of-mouth of customer satisfaction in cultural and creative industries of Taiwan: using crafts as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Li-Fen; Shaw, Jing-Chi; Wang, Pei-Wen; Shih, Meng-Long; Yang, Min-Chieh

    2011-10-01

    This study aims to analyze customers' online word-of-mouth for crafts in Cultural and Creative Industries of Taiwan, and extracts articles from Yahoo and Wretch Blogs by the online writing mining technique. The research scope is from Jan. 1, 2008 to Dec. 31, 2010. The subjects include 2457 valid articles on customers' online word-of-mouth regarding the craft industry of Taiwan. Findings demonstrate that, regarding online word-of-mouth, the most important word-of-mouth items of ceramics, stone craft, wood craft manufacturing, and metal craft is decoration and display of surroundings; while brand is valued in glass craft; and the most important item for consumers of paper craft is cultural characteristics of handicrafts.

  4. Business office customer service units pay dividends.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, K R

    1996-05-01

    Business office managers, pressured to meet cash collection goals, sometimes fail to plan and implement restructuring and training initiatives that would improve customer relations. Even when customers complain about poor service, little may be done to address those concerns. But savvy business office managers are realizing that the potential benefits of forming a dedicated customer service unit within the business office include a well-run, customer-focused operation and improved customer satisfaction.

  5. Job insecurity and employability in fixed-term contractors, agency workers, and permanent workers: associations with job satisfaction and affective organizational commitment.

    PubMed

    De Cuyper, Nele; Notelaers, Guy; De Witte, Hans

    2009-04-01

    This study investigates how job insecurity and employability relate to job satisfaction and affective organizational commitment in permanent workers, fixed-term contract workers, and temporary agency workers. The authors hypothesized that (a) job insecurity relates negatively to job satisfaction and affective organizational commitment, and this relationship is strongest in permanent workers and weakest in temporary agency workers; and that (b) employability relates positively to job satisfaction and negatively to affective organizational commitment, and this relationship is strongest in temporary agency workers and weakest in permanent workers. Hypotheses were tested in workers (permanent: n = 329; fixed term; n = 160; temporary agency: n = 89) from 23 Belgian organizations. The results show that job insecurity related negatively to the outcomes for permanent workers and temporary agency workers. This relationship was not significant for fixed-term contract workers. Employability related negatively to the outcomes for fixed-term contract workers and temporary agency workers, and this relationship was not significant for permanent workers. The 3 groups had different interpretations of what constitutes a stressor and about what signals a good employment relationship.

  6. 77 FR 41798 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection, Comments Requested: CRS Customer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-16

    ... Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection, Comments Requested: CRS Customer Satisfaction Survey... effectiveness of service deliverables rendered. (2) Title of the Form/Collection: CRS--Customer Satisfaction... advocacy organizations, and vested formal and informal community leaders. Abstract: The CRS...

  7. Marriage Preparation: Factors Associated with Consumer Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Mary N.; Lyster, Rosanne Farnden

    1992-01-01

    Evaluated marriage preparation program to determine overall consumer satisfaction with the program, satisfaction with specific content areas, and extent to which consumer characteristics affected satisfaction ratings. Results of survey of 196 couples revealed high overall satisfaction levels, variability in satisfaction by content area, and…

  8. Ready: how to keep your customers coming back.

    PubMed

    Eliscu, A T

    2000-01-01

    Customer service is a major, but often overlooked, issue in health care today. While other industries and organizations recognize how good customer relations can affect long-term success, many health care providers have yet to learn this valuable lesson. The Ritz-Carlton, which won the prestigious Baldridge Award for service, has a well-earned reputation for excellent customer service. Like health care providers, this hotel industry icon hires hourly workers, puts them in uniform and has them work in teams. Unlike health care, however, The Ritz-Carlton seems to be able to generate a much higher level of customer satisfaction. How? This chapter illustrates the techniques the hotel chain uses to accomplish its goal and how these important tools can apply to the health care industry.

  9. Importance Has Been Considered in Satisfaction Evaluation: An Experimental Examination of Locke's Range-of-Affect Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Chia-huei; Yao, Grace

    2007-01-01

    Importance weighting is a common practice in quality of life (QOL) measurement research. Based on the widespread idea that important domains should make a greater contribution to individuals' QOL total score, the weighting procedure of multiplying item satisfaction by an item's importance has been adopted in many QOL instruments. Locke's [1969,…

  10. Teacher Satisfaction with School and Psychological Well-Being Affects Their Readiness to Help Children with Mental Health Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisask, Merike; Värnik, Peeter; Värnik, Airi; Apter, Alan; Balazs, Judit; Balint, Maria; Bobes, Julio; Brunner, Romuald; Corcoran, Paul; Cosman, Doina; Feldman, Dana; Haring, Christian; Kahn, Jean-Pierre; Poštuvan, Vita; Tubiana, Alexandra; Sarchiapone, Marco; Wasserman, Camilla; Carli, Vladimir; Hoven, Christina W.; Wasserman, Danuta

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In support of a whole-school approach to mental health promotion, this study was conducted to find out whether and how significantly teachers' satisfaction with school and their subjective psychological well-being are related to the belief that they can help pupils with mental health problems. Design: Cross-sectional data were collected…

  11. [Quality of health care services as perceived by the customers: issues of method or context?].

    PubMed

    Necozione, S; Masedu, F; Cofini, V; di Orio, F

    2002-01-01

    Customer satisfaction is considered an important indicator of the quality of care. Its definition as well as the identification of the variables which affect it, rise many cultural and methodological issues. In order to give a contribution to the debate on such topics, we compared the patients' satisfaction detected before and after the transferral of the San Salvatore Hospital of L'Aquila to new and functional structures. The comparison aimed at evaluating the methodological and cultural entailments involved in customers satisfaction surveys, which focus the improvements in terms of health care as well as variation of satisfaction. The presence of contradictory elements in the expression of the satisfaction referred to the technical and informative aspects, seems to indicate that patients can express an high satisfaction degree independently from the real professional and technical quality performed. Such evidences, that anyway must be interpreted according with the methodological cautions of a non validated questionnaire, should foster stronger efforts in promoting sanitary education of the customers, devoted to the specific rights involved, as well as in making use of rigorous methodologies to detect the phenomenon.

  12. Factors affecting job satisfaction of Aboriginal mental health workers working in community mental health in rural and remote New South Wales.

    PubMed

    Cosgrave, Catherine; Maple, Myfanwy; Hussain, Rafat

    2016-12-05

    Objective The aim of the present study was to identify factors affecting the job satisfaction and subsequent retention of Aboriginal mental health workers (AMHWs).Methods Five AMHWs working in New South Wales (NSW) for NSW Health in rural and remote community mental health (CMH) services participated in in-depth, semi-structured interviews to understand how employment and rural living factors affected workers' decisions to stay or leave their CMH positions.Results Using a constructivist grounded theory analysis, three aspects negatively impacting the job satisfaction of AMHWs were identified: (1) difficulties being accepted into the team and organisation; (2) culturally specific work challenges; and (3) professional differences and inequality.Conclusions Policy and procedural changes to the AMHW training program may address the lower remuneration and limited career opportunities identified with regard to the Bachelor Health Sciences (Mental Health) qualification. Delivering training to increase levels of understanding about the AMHW training program, and cultural awareness generally, to CMH staff and NSW Health management may assist in addressing the negative team, organisational and cultural issues identified.What is known about the topic? The Bachelor Health Sciences (Mental Health) qualification and traineeship pathway undertaken by AMHWs differs significantly from that of other health professionals working in NSW Health's CMH services. The health workforce literature identifies that each health professional group has its own culture and specific values and that forming and maintaining a profession-specific identity is an extremely important aspect of job satisfaction for health workers.What does the paper add? AMHWs working in rural and remote NSW CMH services commonly experience low levels of job satisfaction, especially while undertaking the embedded training program. Of particular concern is the health sciences qualification not translating into NSW Health

  13. Focusing on customer service.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    This booklet is devoted to a consideration of how good customer service in family planning programs can generate demand for products and services, bring customers back, and reduce costs. Customer service is defined as increasing client satisfaction through continuous concern for client preferences, staff accountability to clients, and respect for the rights of clients. Issues discussed include the introduction of a customer service approach and gaining staff commitment. The experience of PROSALUD in Bolivia in recruiting appropriate staff, supervising staff, soliciting client feedback, and marketing services is offered as an example of a successful customer service approach. The key customer service functions are described as 1) establishing a welcoming atmosphere, 2) streamlining client flow, 3) personalizing client services, and 4) organizing and providing clear information to clients. The role of the manager in developing procedures is explored, and the COPE (Client-Oriented Provider-Efficient) process is presented as a good way to begin to make improvements. Techniques in staff training in customer service include brainstorming, role playing, using case studies (examples of which are provided), and engaging in practice sessions. Training also leads to the development of effective customer service attitudes, and the differences between these and organizational/staff-focused attitudes are illustrated in a chart. The use of communication skills (asking open-ended questions, helping clients express their concerns, engaging in active listening, and handling difficult situations) is considered. Good recovery skills are important when things go wrong. Gathering and using client feedback is the next topic considered. This involves identifying, recording, and discussing customer service issues as well as taking action on these issues and evaluating the results. The booklet ends by providing a sample of customer service indicators, considering the maintenance of a

  14. Headquarters Air Force Material Command Customer Relationship Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    levels. It provides a baseline against which to “ measuring customer satisfaction and benchmarking your agency scores across government and industry...by a section on measuring customer satisfaction . The chapter concluded with a brief chronology on AFMC’s initiatives and efforts to date...tremendous exposure to experts in measuring customer satisfaction . One example was the Perseus company, which specialized in online survey

  15. Resident trainees do not affect patient satisfaction in an outpatient gastroenterology clinic: A prospective study conducted in a Canadian gastroenterology clinic

    PubMed Central

    Brahmania, Mayur; Young, Madison; Muthiah, Chetty; Ilnyckyj, Alexandra; Duerksen, Donald; Moffatt, Dana C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is little literature regarding how a gastroenterology trainee affects a patient’s interpretation of care during outpatient clinic visits. Improving patient satisfaction is desirable and benefits may include enhanced patient compliance as well as providing trainees with areas for improvement. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate patient satisfaction in an outpatient gastroenterology clinic when seen by a trainee and attending physician versus an attending physician alone. The secondary objective was to evaluate physician characteristics that play a role in creating a positive clinical experience. METHODS: A randomized prospective survey study was conducted over an 11-month period (July 2012 to June 2013) at St Boniface Hospital (Winnipeg, Manitoba). Two gastroenterology fellows (postgraduate year 4 and 5) and nine internal medicine residents (postgraduate year 1 to 3) comprised the ‘trainee’ role, while three academic clinicians comprised the ‘attending’ role. Patients included individuals seen for an initial consultation and were >18 years of age. RESULTS: A total of 211 patients comprised the final study group, with 118 in the attending group and 93 in the trainee group. In univariate analysis, patients more often had a very good experience when seen by an attending physician alone versus a trainee and attending physician (73% versus 56%; P=0.016); however, on multivariate analysis, there was no significant difference in patient satisfaction (OR 0.89; P=0.931). Physician factors found to be associated with high patient satisfaction on multivariate analysis included: addressing all patient concerns (OR 27.56; P=0.021); giving the patient a preliminary diagnosis (OR 78.02; P=0.006); and feeling the physician was thorough (OR 72.53; P=0.029). CONCLUSIONS: The present study did not reveal a difference in patient satisfaction if a patient sees an attending physician alone or with a trainee. Moreover, to improve patient satisfaction in a gastroenterology

  16. Does personality moderate reaction and adaptation to major life events? Analysis of life satisfaction and affect in an Australian national sample

    PubMed Central

    Anusic, Ivana; Yap, Stevie C. Y.; Lucas, Richard E.

    2014-01-01

    We used a nationally representative panel of Australian households to replicate a study by Yap et al. (2012) that evaluated how life satisfaction changed following major life events and the extent to which personality moderated those changes. We replicated the protective function of marriage but found that long-term declines that follow widowhood mostly reflect normative changes. In addition, we found that people reported slight decreases in positive affect following marriage and childbirth, an increase in positive affect following widowhood, and a slight increase in negative affect following childbirth, relative to normative trajectories. The Big Five did not moderate response to life events in a way that is consistent with past theory and research. PMID:25419012

  17. Total Quality Management (TQM): Training Module on "Focus on the Customer."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leigh, David

    This module for a 1-semester Total Quality Management (TQM) course for high school or community college students discusses the concepts of customer satisfaction, customer surveys, and quality functional deployment. The concept of customer satisfaction begins with identifying the customer. Surveys are suggested as one way that students can learn…

  18. 76 FR 2395 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Customer/Partner...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... on voluntary customer satisfaction service surveys to implement Executive Order 12862. DATES: Submit... Collection; Comment Request; Customer/Partner Service Surveys AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... of information technology. Customer/Partner Service Surveys (OMB Control Number...

  19. 77 FR 20887 - Proposed Information Collection (National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... solicits comments on the information needed to measure customer satisfaction with delivered products and... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey) Activity...: Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) National Acquisition Center Customer Response Survey, VA Form 0863....

  20. Factors affecting job satisfaction and retention of medical laboratory professionals in seven countries of Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Marinucci, Francesco; Majigo, Mtebe; Wattleworth, Matthew; Paterniti, Antonio Damiano; Hossain, Mian Bazle; Redfield, Robert

    2013-08-17

    Effective implementation and sustainability of quality laboratory programmes in Sub-Saharan Africa relies on the development of appropriate staff retention strategies. Assessing the factors responsible for job satisfaction and retention is key for tailoring specific interventions aiming at improving the overall impact of health programmes. A survey was developed to assess these factors among 224 laboratorians working in the laboratory programme the University of Maryland implemented in seven Sub-Saharan African countries. Lack of professional development was the major reason for leaving the previous job for 28% of interviewees who changed jobs in the past five years. Professional development/training opportunities was indicated by almost 90% (195/224) of total interviewees as the most important or a very important factor for satisfaction at their current job. Similarly, regular professional development/opportunities for training was the highest rated incentive to remain at their current job by 80% (179/224). Laboratory professionals employed in the private sector were more likely to change jobs than those working in the public sector (P = 0.002). The findings were used for developing specific strategies for human resources management, in particular targeting professional development, aiming at improving laboratory professionals within the University of Maryland laboratory programme and hence its long-term sustainability.

  1. Factors affecting job satisfaction and retention of medical laboratory professionals in seven countries of Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Effective implementation and sustainability of quality laboratory programmes in Sub-Saharan Africa relies on the development of appropriate staff retention strategies. Assessing the factors responsible for job satisfaction and retention is key for tailoring specific interventions aiming at improving the overall impact of health programmes. A survey was developed to assess these factors among 224 laboratorians working in the laboratory programme the University of Maryland implemented in seven Sub-Saharan African countries. Lack of professional development was the major reason for leaving the previous job for 28% of interviewees who changed jobs in the past five years. Professional development/training opportunities was indicated by almost 90% (195/224) of total interviewees as the most important or a very important factor for satisfaction at their current job. Similarly, regular professional development/opportunities for training was the highest rated incentive to remain at their current job by 80% (179/224). Laboratory professionals employed in the private sector were more likely to change jobs than those working in the public sector (P = 0.002). The findings were used for developing specific strategies for human resources management, in particular targeting professional development, aiming at improving laboratory professionals within the University of Maryland laboratory programme and hence its long-term sustainability. PMID:23958152

  2. Customer care in the NHS.

    PubMed

    Ruddick, Fred

    2015-01-20

    Viewing individuals in need of NHS care as customers has the potential to refocus the way their care is delivered. This article highlights some of the benefits of reframing the nurse-patient relationship in terms of customer care, and draws parallels between good customer care and the provision of high quality patient care in the NHS. It explores lessons to be learned from those who have studied the customer experience, which can be adapted to enhance the customer care experience within the health service. Developing professional expertise in the knowledge and skills that underpin good-quality interpersonal encounters is essential to improve the customer experience in health care and should be prioritised alongside the development of more technical skills. Creating a culture where emotional intelligence, caring and compassion are essential requirements for all nursing staff will improve patient satisfaction.

  3. Do it right this time: the role of employee service recovery performance in customer-perceived justice and customer loyalty after service failures.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hui

    2007-03-01

    Integrating justice and customer service literatures, this research examines the role of customer service employees' behaviors of handling customer complaints, or service recovery performance (SRP), in conveying a just image of service organizations and achieving desirable customer outcomes. Results from a field study and a laboratory study demonstrate that the dimensions of SRP--making an apology, problem solving, being courteous, and prompt handling--positively influenced customer satisfaction and then customer repurchase intent through the mediation of customer-perceived justice. In addition, service failure severity and repeated failures reduced the positive impact of some dimensions of SRP on customer satisfaction, and customer-perceived justice again mediated these moderated effects.

  4. A customer oriented systematic framework to extract business strategy in Indian electricity services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satapathy, Suchismita; Mishra, Pravudatta

    2013-11-01

    Competition in the electric service industry is highlighting the importance of a number of issues affecting the nature and quality of customer service. The quality of service(s) provided to electricity customers may be enhanced by competition, if doing so offers service suppliers a competitive advantage. On the other hand, service quality offered to some consumers could decline if utilities focus their attention on those customers most likely to exercise choice, while reducing effort and investment to serve customers less likely to choose alternatives. Service quality is defined as the way in which the utility interacts with and responds to the needs of its customers. To achieve maximum consumer satisfaction in electricity service, This paper has designed a framework by QFD by measuring service quality of electricity utility sector in ANN and also find interrelationship between these design requirements by ISM.

  5. 2003 DTIC Customer Satisfaction Survey Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-01

    etc. The 2003 CS survey results on the effectiveness of corporate communication show a similar pattern of responses in comparison to last year’s...normalized)” column in the tables for quantitative results at Appendix B. Comparative Analysis on Effectiveness of Corporate Communication FY 2001 Users

  6. Sharpen customer service skills with PCRAFT Pursuit.

    PubMed

    Dologite, Kimberly A; Willner, Kathleen C; Klepeiss, Debra J; York, Susan A; Cericola, Lisa M

    2003-01-01

    Traditional approaches to teaching customer service skills do not involve participant interaction, nor do they provide a fun and relaxed atmosphere for learning. This article describes the development of PCRAFT Pursuit, an innovative game used to teach customer service skills. The development process began with concerns identified through patient satisfaction surveys. The implementation of this game became an integral component of education to improve customer service skills of staff throughout the hospital network.

  7. Staff Satisfaction with Administration as a Measure of Consumer Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanguma, Jesus; Luster, Jane Nell

    The school district in this study, "Special School District" (SSD), is under the administration of the Louisiana State Department of education and thus classified as a Louisiana state agency required to conform to the mandate that state agencies have performance indicators, including one for customer satisfaction. For the SSD, customer…

  8. 77 FR 49831 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection, Comments Requested; Customer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... Requested; Customer Satisfaction Assessment ACTION: 30-day notice of information collection under review... submission of responses. Overview of This Information Collection 1. Type of information collection: Customer survey. 2. The title of the form/collection: Customer Satisfaction Assessment. 3. The agency form...

  9. 76 FR 8371 - Notice Correction; Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer Satisfaction Surveys (NCI) The Federal Register notice published on... Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer Satisfaction Survey (NCI)'' was submitted with errors. The submission ] is now being presented as a generic submission which will include multiple customer...

  10. 77 FR 36293 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection, Comments Requested: Customer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... Requested: Customer Satisfaction Assessment ACTION: 60-day notice of information collection under review... responses. Overview of This Information Collection 1. Type of information collection: Customer survey. 2. The title of the form/collection: Customer Satisfaction Assessment. 3. The agency form number, if...

  11. Improving managed care value through customer service.

    PubMed

    Tomczyk, Dennis J

    2002-06-01

    The ability of managed care providers to deliver high-quality customer service to managed care customers depends on their adoption of basic customer-service principles. To apply these principles effectively, providers need to understand and work to exceed the particular needs and expectations of these customers, which include boards of directors, senior executives, physicians, healthcare providers, clinical and patient financial services managers and staff, employers, brokers, and patients. Although these needs and expectations can be predicted to some extent, providers would be wise to implement regular surveys of customers and an open procedure for soliciting customer feedback about service issues. Better customer service for the broad range of managed care customers translates into higher levels of employer and patient satisfaction, which ultimately benefits providers.

  12. Against customer service.

    PubMed

    Trotter, G

    1998-01-01

    This essay examines the nature of service in medicine and the relationship between service and profit. "Customer service medicine" is identified with the interrelated views that 1) profit is or ought to be healthcare's fundamental concern and 2) the quality of medical service corresponds to the degree to which it produces a feeling of approval in patients. This position is contrasted with the more traditional "beneficence model," which holds that 1) service ought to be healthcare's fundamental concern and 2) the proper criterion of quality medical service is the alleviation, mitigation, or prevention of the human suffering that occasions illness. Five shortcomings in the customer service model are identified: 1) customer service advocates often appeal to an unsound "efficiency argument"; 2) the prioritization of profit over service will vitiate patients' legitimate trust in healthcare; 3) the prioritization of profit converts medicine from a "practice" into an "instrumental activity"; 4) the prioritization of profit countervails the values of continuity and thoroughness; and 5) the notion of service as customer satisfaction derives more from the exigencies of turning a profit than from an analysis of sick persons' needs.

  13. Achieving patient satisfaction: resolving patient complaints.

    PubMed

    Oxler, K F

    1997-07-01

    Patients demand to be active participants on and partners with the health care team to design their care regimen. Patients bring unique perceptions and expectations and use these to evaluate service quality and satisfaction. If customer satisfaction is not achieved and a patient complaint results, staff must have the skills to respond and launch a service recovery program. Service recovery, when done with style and panache, can retain loyal customers. Achieving patient satisfaction and resolving patient complaints require commitment from top leadership and commitment from providers to dedicate the time to understand their patients' needs.

  14. Job Satisfaction Among Army Pharmacists.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    American Journal ofPharmaceutical Ednesti™ 52 (1988): Curtis, Frederic R "Job Stress, Job Satisfaction , Anxiety, Depression, and Life Happiness Among... satisfaction , 63 percent answered "very often" or "pretty often" when asked how often they left work with a good feeling that they had done something well ...myriad of unique work factors without parallel in the civilian sector that may affect quality of life , and potentially job satisfaction : deployments

  15. User Satisfaction Affecting the Acceptance of an E-Learning Platform as a Mean for the Development of the Human Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capece, Guendalina; Campisi, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to explore how satisfaction--from employees' view--using e-learning technology influences organisational learning effectiveness. To this aim, the level of satisfaction using an e-learning platform as a complementary instrument of training and education is measured in a multinational company operating in the energy sector. Our…

  16. How Does Target Know so Much about Its Customers? Utilizing Customer Analytics to Make Marketing Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Hope B.; Craciun, Georgiana; Powell, Allison M.

    2014-01-01

    Every time shoppers make a purchase at a store or browse a Web site, customer behavior is tracked, analyzed, and perhaps shared with other businesses. Target Corporation is a leader in analyzing vast amounts of data to identify buying patterns, improve customer satisfaction, predict future trends, select promotional strategies, and increase…

  17. Electricity Customers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page discusses key sectors and how they use electricity. Residential, commercial, and industrial customers each account for roughly one-third of the nation’s electricity use. The transportation sector also accounts for a small fraction of electricity.

  18. Custom microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The goals of this program are to develop custom microcircuit technology, also known as Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) technology, for use in flight and ground programs. Supporting this effort are activities to investigate the effects of the space environment, and particularly ionizing radiation, on microcircuits and to develop a space qualification methodology. Another aspect of the program emphasizes innovative applications of custom microcircuit technology to image and signal processing and communications.

  19. Ensuring patient satisfaction in medical groups.

    PubMed

    Choong, P

    2000-01-01

    Delivering satisfaction to patients has become increasingly important among professionals in the medical community. However, administrators in medical group practices charged with the task of nurturing customer satisfaction are often required to allocate their limited funds across an array of initiatives intended to ensure the delivery of the right amount and types of services to improve satisfaction among their customers. This requires the ability to locate areas that yield the greatest response per unit of investment. This paper shows that the impact of attribute performance on satisfaction is asymmetric. Positive attribute performance is shown to have a smaller impact on satisfaction than negative attribute performance. The paper also discusses how an understanding of this asymmetry will enable administrators to allocate their resources more wisely as they decide whether to maintain or increase attribute-level performance.

  20. Hedging customers.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Ravi; Glazer, Rashi

    2003-05-01

    You are a marketing director with $5 million to invest in customer acquisition and retention. Which customers do you acquire, and which do you retain? Up to a point, the choice is obvious: Keep the consistent big spenders and lose the erratic small ones. But what about the erratic big spenders and the consistent small ones? It's often unclear whether you should acquire or retain them and at what cost. Businesses have begun dealing with unpredictable customer behavior by following the practices of sophisticated investors who own portfolios comprising dozens of stocks with different, indeed divergent, histories and prospects. Each portfolio is diversified so as to produce the investor's desired returns at the particular level of uncertainty he or she can tolerate. Customers, too, are assets--risky assets. As with stocks, the cost of acquiring them is supposed to reflect the cash-flow values they are likely to generate. The authors explain how to construct a portfolio based on the notion that a customer's risk-adjusted lifetime value depends on its anticipated effect on the riskiness of the group it is joining. They also show how this approach was used to identify the best prospects for Myron Corporation, a global leader in the personalized business-gift industry. The concept of risk-adjusted lifetime value has a transforming power: For companies that rely on it, product managers will be replaced by customer managers, and the current method of accounting for profit and loss--which is by product--will be replaced by one that determines each customer's P&L. Once adjusted for risk, those P&Ls will become the firm's key performance and operational metric.

  1. The Customer Service Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Chip R.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses ways to embed customer service learning and customer loyalty including making customers think, examining every aspect of customers' service encounters with staff, providing follow-up, making learning fun, and involving customers in your business. (JOW)

  2. Employee retention: a customer service approach.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Richard F

    2002-01-01

    Employee retention is a huge problem. There are staff shortages in radiology because not enough people are entering the profession; too many people are leaving the profession for retirement, higher-paying jobs or jobs with less stress; and there are not enough opportunities for career advancement. Staff shortages are exacerbated by difficulty in retaining people who enter the profession. While much work has been focused on recruitment and getting more people "in the front door," I suggest that the bulk of future efforts be focused on employee retention and "closing the back door." Employee retention must be an ongoing process, not a program. Approaches to employee retention that focus on external things, i.e., things that the company can do to or for the employee, generally are not successful. The truth is that employee retention processes must focus on what the employee gets out of the job. The process must be a benefits-based approach that helps employees answer the question, "What's in it for me?" The retention processes must be ongoing and integrated into the daily culture of the company. The best way to keep your employees is to treat them like customers. Customer service works for external customers. We treat them nicely. We work to satisfy them. We help them achieve their goals. Why not do the same for our employees? If positive customer service policies and practices can satisfy and keep external customers, why not adapt these policies and practices for employees? And, there is a service/satisfaction link between employee retention and higher levels of customer satisfaction. Customers prefer dealing with the same employees over and over again. Employee turnover destroys a customer's confidence in the company. Just like a customer does not want to have to "train and educate" a new provider, they do not want to do the same for your "revolving door" employees. So, the key is to keep employees so they in turn will help you keep your customers. Because the

  3. Customer Expectations: Concepts and Reality for Academic Library Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millson-Martula, Christopher; Menon, Vanaja

    1995-01-01

    Academic libraries should focus on their users as customers and develop programs to meet expectations. Discusses gaps between expectations and management's perception of expectations and suggests strategies for enhancing satisfaction, communication, and management. (AEF)

  4. Customer service in health care: a new era.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg, B

    1997-01-01

    Intensified competition in healthcare is stimulating an enhanced focus on consumer satisfaction. Critical barriers to customer service are being dismantled and hospitals are instituting comprehensive models to promote consumer-oriented environments.

  5. Assessing the Effects of Service Quality of Government and Student Satisfaction in Education’s Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwaningsih, D.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the research is to analyze how the service quality of Indonesian government affect student’s satisfaction in the education field. Data collection was conducted in September 2016 through distributing questionnaires to 132 students at private universities in south Tangerang city. Sampling used incidental sampling method, while data analysis is descriptive, qualitative and quantitative, which were analyzed with the Importance Performance Analysis. The survey results revealed that the satisfaction level of the students of South Tangerang good enough to service of the Government in higher education sector with a value of 83.61 using Customer Satisfaction Index (CSI). Nevertheless, there are several factors that should be prioritized for immediate enhanced, namely: government’s ability to respond effectively to solve the problems in the academic world, fairness of the government in providing assistance to both state and private universities and attention of the government to higher education.

  6. Process Improvement: Customer Service.

    PubMed

    Cull, Donald

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing the comment section of patient satisfaction surveys, Clark Memorial Hospital in Jeffersonville, IN went through a thoughtful process to arrive at an experience that patients said they wanted. Two Lean Six Sigma tools were used--the Voice of the Customer (VoC) and the Affinity Diagram. Even when using these tools, a facility will not be able to accomplish everything the patient may want. Guidelines were set and rules were established for the Process Improvement Team in order to lessen frustration, increase focus, and ultimately be successful. The project's success is driven by the team members carrying its message back to their areas. It's about ensuring that everyone is striving to improve the patients' experience by listening to what they say is being done right and what they say can be done better. And then acting on it.

  7. US Geological Survey customers speak out

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillespie, S.; Snyder, G.

    1995-01-01

    Provides results of a customer survey carried out in 1994 by the US Geological Survey. Uses of cartographic products are classified, as are application areas, accuracy satisfaction, media, Digital Line Graph requirements in update, and frequency of product use. USGS responses and plans for the future are noted. -M.Blakemore

  8. Customer care.

    PubMed

    Kay, E J

    2003-03-22

    Everyone who is in business knows that the most important thing one can achieve is attracting and retaining customers. Now, before the BDJ is bombarded with complaints about ivory-tower academics talking theoretically about something of which they have no experience, I need to tell you that I do have real, live practical experience of business. Okay, it's not a business to do with dentistry, it's a business to do with horses, but nevertheless, it is a business and the basic premises of businesses apply to both dentistry and to riding stables. Remarkably also, there are a number of interesting analogies between running a riding school and running a dental practice!

  9. Establishing a Companywide Customer Orientation through Persuasive Internal Marketing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Kathleen K.; Enis, Ben

    1990-01-01

    Argues that applying persuasion strategies to internal marketing efforts can facilitate the adoption of a customer orientation among employees and elicit greater commitment to the company and its goals. Examines four specific persuasion strategies: defining the customer satisfaction link; encouraging self-efficacy; providing rewards; and creating…

  10. Interpreting School Satisfaction Data from a Marketing Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandiani, John A.; James, Brad C.; Banks, Steven M.

    This paper presents results of a customer satisfaction survey of Vermont elementary and secondary public schools concerning satisfaction with mental health services during the 1996-97 school year. Analysis of completed questionnaires (N=233) are interpreted from a marketing perspective. Findings are reported for: (1) treated prevalence of…

  11. The effect of employee job satisfaction on program participation rates in the Virginia WIC Program (Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children).

    PubMed

    Chance, K G; Green, C G

    2001-01-01

    Many researchers have shown a link between employee job satisfaction and customer satisfaction in the private sector. Customer satisfaction is the end result of whether the particular service and/or a product meet the customer's needs. The purpose of this research project was to assess the level of employee job satisfaction in the Virginia WIC Program and to determine whether a correlation exists between the level of employee job satisfaction and program participation rates. The results of this study showed that high levels of employee job satisfaction were positively correlated to high program participation rates in the Virginia WIC Program.

  12. The utility and its customer: A complex relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Covelli, L.; Williams, M.V.

    1994-11-01

    Developing methods of tracking customer satisfaction for utilities presents major problems since the customer reacts to the utility on many different levels. The more obvious are in relation to the product (energy) and the services the company provides. More recently there has been talk of the {open_quotes}brand{close_quotes} elements of the company-customer relationship. Ontario Hydro (OH) has developed a method utilizing four separate domains for measuring and tracking customer satisfaction: product, service, competitiveness, and institutional relationships. Ontario Hydro conducted a survey of over 1200 residential customers. The respondents received a detailed in-person survey of their estimation of the importance of specific aspects of customer service and their view of Ontario Hydro`s performance on those same issues. The data yielded 28 factors covered a large variety of separate concerns: customer service, and treatment of customers to export policy. OH concluded that the utility`s relationship with its customer is more complex than the susual customer-vendor interaction. A utility not only provides a product and a service, it has a institutional personality and provides an absolutely necessary product under an exclusive franchise and executes government policy as a regulated monopoly. It was found that customers are sensitive to all of these attributes.

  13. Custom controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butell, Bart

    1996-02-01

    Microsoft's Visual Basic (VB) and Borland's Delphi provide an extremely robust programming environment for delivering multimedia solutions for interactive kiosks, games and titles. Their object oriented use of standard and custom controls enable a user to build extremely powerful applications. A multipurpose, database enabled programming environment that can provide an event driven interface functions as a multimedia kernel. This kernel can provide a variety of authoring solutions (e.g. a timeline based model similar to Macromedia Director or a node authoring model similar to Icon Author). At the heart of the kernel is a set of low level multimedia components providing object oriented interfaces for graphics, audio, video and imaging. Data preparation tools (e.g., layout, palette and Sprite Editors) could be built to manage the media database. The flexible interface for VB allows the construction of an infinite number of user models. The proliferation of these models within a popular, easy to use environment will allow the vast developer segment of 'producer' types to bring their ideas to the market. This is the key to building exciting, content rich multimedia solutions. Microsoft's VB and Borland's Delphi environments combined with multimedia components enable these possibilities.

  14. Patient satisfaction: what works in radiology.

    PubMed

    Lester, B

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, patient satisfaction in healthcare has been criticized as much as poor customer satisfaction in other industries. Many times, the financial problems that exist are used as an excuse for poor patient satisfaction. This excuse can never justify treating a patient rudely or with disrespect. Patients are the essence of why we exist in radiology. Their increasing scrutiny--over the care they receive and the services we provide--will significantly impact the future of healthcare in the United States. Healthcare employees need to focus on teamwork and respect for patients as well as co-workers as foundations for improving patient satisfaction. True leaders will set the mood of the healthcare facility by "practicing what they preach." Some basic rules to follow to improve customer satisfaction include listening to employees, recognizing exceptional behavior, correcting negative behavior, communicating expectations to employees and listening to patients' needs and concerns. The secret to successful patient satisfaction is not only exceeding the expectations of our patients, but also exceeding the expectations of our employees who take care of patients.

  15. Service quality, trust, and patient satisfaction in interpersonal-based medical service encounters

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Interaction between service provider and customer is the primary core of service businesses of different natures, and the influence of trust on service quality and customer satisfaction could not be ignored in interpersonal-based service encounters. However, lack of existing literature on the correlation between service quality, patient trust, and satisfaction from the prospect of interpersonal-based medical service encounters has created a research gap in previous studies. Therefore, this study attempts to bridge such a gap with an evidence-based practice study. Methods We adopted a cross-sectional design using a questionnaire survey of outpatients in seven medical centers of Taiwan. Three hundred and fifty copies of questionnaire were distributed, and 285 valid copies were retrieved, with a valid response rate of 81.43%. The SPSS 14.0 and AMOS 14.0 (structural equation modeling) statistical software packages were used for analysis. Structural equation modeling clarifies the extent of relationships between variables as well as the chain of cause and effect. Restated, SEM results do not merely show empirical relationships between variables when defining the practical situation. For this reason, SEM was used to test the hypotheses. Results Perception of interpersonal-based medical service encounters positively influences service quality and patient satisfaction. Perception of service quality among patients positively influences their trust. Perception of trust among patients positively influences their satisfaction. Conclusions According to the findings, as interpersonal-based medical service encounters will positively influence service quality and patient satisfaction, and the differences for patients’ perceptions of the professional skill and communication attitude of personnel in interpersonal-based medical service encounters will influence patients’ overall satisfaction in two ways: (A) interpersonal-based medical service encounter directly

  16. Modeling and simulation of queuing system for customer service improvement: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Tan Chai; Hong, Chai Weng; Hawari, Nurul Nazihah

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to develop a queuing model at UniMall by using discrete event simulation approach in analyzing the service performance that affects customer satisfaction. The performance measures that considered in this model are such as the average time in system, the total number of student served, the number of student in waiting queue, the waiting time in queue as well as the maximum length of buffer. ARENA simulation software is used to develop a simulation model and the output is analyzed. Based on the analysis of output, it is recommended that management of UniMall consider introducing shifts and adding another payment counter in the morning.

  17. Internal Branding: Using Performance Technology To Create an Organization Focused on Customer Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosti, Donald T.; Stotz, Rodger

    2000-01-01

    Presents a performance technology approach to revenue enhancement, with the goal of improving customer retention through building customer value. Topics include internal branding, a way to make sure that what the company delivers matches what's promised in the advertising; product versus service brands; and customer satisfaction, including…

  18. Talking about Customer Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Mary; Axelroth, Joan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses customer service in information centers and how to define it. Topics include the effects of competition, that give customers more choices; defining customers, and defining services; communications; physical environment; change, in customers and in technology; measuring customer service; and evaluating policies and procedures. (LRW)

  19. The linkage between employee and patient satisfaction in home healthcare.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Robert J; Marren, Joan M; Davin, Denise M; Morgan, Cynthia J

    2009-01-01

    Greater accountability for patient outcomes, reduced reimbursement, and a protracted nursing shortage have made employee and patient satisfaction results central performance metrics and strategic imperatives in healthcare. Key questions are whether the two interact and if so, how can that relationship be leveraged to obtain maximum gains in both employee and patient satisfaction. This article examines the experience of a large, nonprofit home care agency in exploring these issues. The agency found that organizational commitment to patient care and customer service are fundamental to patient satisfaction. The more employees perceived that the organization is focused on quality and customers, the more patient satisfaction increased. Among nurses, work-life balance, fair compensation, and regard for employees all influenced patient satisfaction.

  20. Interpreting time series of patient satisfaction: macro vs. micro components.

    PubMed

    Frank, Björn; Sudo, Shuichi; Enkawa, Takao

    2009-01-01

    Recent research discovered that economic processes influence national averages of customer satisfaction. Using time-series data from Japanese and South Korean hospitals, we conducted principal component regression analyses to examine whether these findings are transferable to patient satisfaction. Our results reveal that aggregate income has a positive impact and economic expectations have a negative impact on patient satisfaction. Further analyses demonstrate that these strong economic influences make it difficult for hospital managers to use patient satisfaction scores to assess the performance impact of their customer-oriented actions. In order to improve performance evaluations based on patient surveys, we thus recommend managers to remove economic influences from time-series of patient satisfaction.

  1. Leadership and satisfaction in change commitment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi-Feng

    2011-06-01

    Managerial transformational leadership skills may directly influence banking counter staff toward change commitment and improve job satisfaction and service quality, or the influence instead may be mediated by change commitment. For a sample comprised of 246 managers from four large Taiwanese banks, the following path relationships were tested: (1) the association of transformational leadership with change commitment, (2) the association of change commitment with job satisfaction, and (3) the direct or indirect (through the mediation of change commitment) effect of transformational leadership on job satisfaction. Regression was utilized to gain insight into the effects of transformational leadership and change commitment on job satisfaction. Transformational leadership may foster change by providing psychological support to the banking counter staff, enabling them to use their skills to meet the needs of individual customers in response to complex environments.

  2. Blended learning positively affects students' satisfaction and the role of the tutor in the problem-based learning process: results of a mixed-method evaluation.

    PubMed

    Woltering, Vanessa; Herrler, Andreas; Spitzer, Klaus; Spreckelsen, Cord

    2009-12-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an established didactic approach in medical education worldwide. The impact of PBL depends on the tutors' quality and the students' motivation. To enhance students' motivation and satisfaction and to overcome the problems with the changing quality of tutors, online learning and face-to-face classes were systematically combined resulting in a blended learning scenario (blended problem-based learning--bPBL). The study aims at determining whether bPBL increases the students' motivation and supports the learning process with respect to the students' cooperation, their orientation, and more reliable tutoring. The blended PBL was developed in a cooperation of students and teachers. The well-established Seven Jump-scheme of PBL was carefully complemented by eLearning modules. On the first training day of bPBL the students start to work together with the online program, but without a tutor, on the final training day the tutor participates in the meeting for additional help and feedback. The program was evaluated by a mixed-method study. The traditional PBL course was compared with the blended PBL by means of qualitative and quantitative questionnaires, standardized group interviews, and students' test results. In addition log-files were analyzed. A total of 185 third-year students and 14 tutors took part in the study. Motivation, subjective learning gains and satisfaction achieved significantly higher ratings by the bPBL students compared with the students learning by traditional PBL. The tutors' opinion and the test results showed no differences between the groups. Working with the web-based learning environment was assessed as very good by the students. According to the log-file analysis, the web-based learning module was frequently used and improved the cooperation during the self-directed learning.

  3. AutoMOPS- B2B and B2C in mask making: Mask manufacturing performance and customer satisfaction improvement through better information flow management using generic models and standardized languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filies, Olaf; de Ridder, Luc; Rodriguez, Ben; Kujiken, Aart

    2002-03-01

    Semiconductor manufacturing has become a global business, in which companies of different size unite in virtual enterprises to meet new opportunities. Therefore Mask manufacturing is a key business, but mask ordering is a complex process and is always critical regarding design to market time, even though mask complexity and customer base are increasing using a wide variety of different mask order forms which are frequently faulty and very seldom complete. This is effectively blocking agile manufacturing and can tie wafer fabs to a single mask The goal of the project is elimination of the order verification through paperless, electronically linked information sharing/exchange between chip design, mask production and production stages, which will allow automation of the mask preparation. To cover these new techniques and their specifications as well as the common ones with automated tools a special generic Meta-model will be generated, based on the current standards for mask specifications, including the requirements from the involved partners (Alcatel Microelectronics, Altis, Compugraphics, Infineon, Nimble, Sigma-C), the project works out a pre-normative standard. The paper presents the current status of work. This work is partly funded by the Commission of the European Union under the Fifth Framework project IST-1999-10332 AutoMOPS.

  4. Do Customers Flee From HIV? A Survey of HIV Stigma and Its Potential Economic Consequences on Small Businesses in Tshwane (Pretoria), South Africa.

    PubMed

    Chao, Li-Wei; Szrek, Helena; Leite, Rui; Ramlagan, Shandir; Peltzer, Karl

    2017-01-01

    HIV stigma and discrimination affect care-seeking behavior and may also affect entrepreneurial activity. We interview 2382 individuals in Pretoria, South Africa, and show that respondents believe that businesses with known HIV+ workers may lose up to half of their customers, although the impact depends on the type of business. Survey respondents' fear of getting HIV from consuming everyday products sold by the business-despite a real infection risk of zero-was a major factor driving perceived decline in customers, especially among food businesses. Respondents' perceptions of the decline in overall life satisfaction when one gets sick from HIV and the respondent's dislike of people with HIV were also important predictors of potential customer exit. We suggest policy mechanisms that could improve the earnings potential of HIV+ workers: reducing public health scare tactics that exacerbate irrational fear of HIV infection risk and enriching public health education about HIV and ARVs to improve perceptions about people with HIV.

  5. The role of personal self-regulation and regulatory teaching to predict motivational-affective variables, achievement, and satisfaction: a structural model

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Jesus; Zapata, Lucía; Martínez-Vicente, Jose M.; Sander, Paul; Cardelle-Elawar, María

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation examines how personal self-regulation (presage variable) and regulatory teaching (process variable of teaching) relate to learning approaches, strategies for coping with stress, and self-regulated learning (process variables of learning) and, finally, how they relate to performance and satisfaction with the learning process (product variables). The objective was to clarify the associative and predictive relations between these variables, as contextualized in two different models that use the presage-process-product paradigm (the Biggs and DEDEPRO models). A total of 1101 university students participated in the study. The design was cross-sectional and retrospective with attributional (or selection) variables, using correlations and structural analysis. The results provide consistent and significant empirical evidence for the relationships hypothesized, incorporating variables that are part of and influence the teaching–learning process in Higher Education. Findings confirm the importance of interactive relationships within the teaching–learning process, where personal self-regulation is assumed to take place in connection with regulatory teaching. Variables that are involved in the relationships validated here reinforce the idea that both personal factors and teaching and learning factors should be taken into consideration when dealing with a formal teaching–learning context at university. PMID:25964764

  6. The role of personal self-regulation and regulatory teaching to predict motivational-affective variables, achievement, and satisfaction: a structural model.

    PubMed

    De la Fuente, Jesus; Zapata, Lucía; Martínez-Vicente, Jose M; Sander, Paul; Cardelle-Elawar, María

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation examines how personal self-regulation (presage variable) and regulatory teaching (process variable of teaching) relate to learning approaches, strategies for coping with stress, and self-regulated learning (process variables of learning) and, finally, how they relate to performance and satisfaction with the learning process (product variables). The objective was to clarify the associative and predictive relations between these variables, as contextualized in two different models that use the presage-process-product paradigm (the Biggs and DEDEPRO models). A total of 1101 university students participated in the study. The design was cross-sectional and retrospective with attributional (or selection) variables, using correlations and structural analysis. The results provide consistent and significant empirical evidence for the relationships hypothesized, incorporating variables that are part of and influence the teaching-learning process in Higher Education. Findings confirm the importance of interactive relationships within the teaching-learning process, where personal self-regulation is assumed to take place in connection with regulatory teaching. Variables that are involved in the relationships validated here reinforce the idea that both personal factors and teaching and learning factors should be taken into consideration when dealing with a formal teaching-learning context at university.

  7. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients’ expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved. PMID:25419410

  8. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients' expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved.

  9. Gender Differences in Job Satisfaction, Satisfaction with Society and Satisfaction from their Salary in Greek Civil Servants who are working under conditions of Labour—Intensive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonakas, Nikolaos; Mironaki, Amalia

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study is to determine empirically the existence of differences in three dimensions of satisfaction in Greek civil servants' gender, when they work under conditions of stress and tension. The three dimensions of satisfaction selected to be considered were job satisfaction, satisfaction with society and satisfaction from their salary. For this a two parts questionnaire was used. The first part included, besides sex and socially demographic characteristics of employees and the second part consisted of the above aspects of satisfaction. Used a sample of 290 employees and a factor analysis was conducted on the results of the questionnaire. The central question of this paper was whether the strength of the force of better wage, compared with the average civil servant, affects a different way to meet women and men's satisfaction who work under working conditions—intensity. The main finding of this study was the existence differences between women and men in the dimension of satisfaction from the salary.

  10. Improving Internal Customer Service

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    sector to find a morse comprehensive model. , , /, v-/ii viii IMPROVING INTERNAL CUSTOMER SERVICE I. Introduction Backgro’rnd More and more American...service, but this research is mostly limited to the general issue of customer service and external customers in regard to the civilian sector of business...the focus is on what quality customer service is, both internal and external, and why customer service is so important today. Second, the dimensions of

  11. The seven common pitfalls of customer service in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Rene T

    2015-01-01

    Operating simultaneously like a repair shop, prison, and hotel, hospitals are prone to seven common pitfalls in customer service. Patient care is often fragmented, inscrutable, inflexible, insensitive, reactive, myopic, and unsafe. Hospitals are vying to be more high-tech, rather than high-touch even though staff engagement with patients rather than facilities and equipment strongly influence patient satisfaction. Unless processes, policies, and people are made customer-centered, the high quality of the hospital's human and hardware resources will not translate into high patient satisfaction and patient loyalty.

  12. Clarifying the Link Between Job Satisfaction and Absenteeism: The Role of Guilt Proneness.

    PubMed

    Schaumberg, Rebecca L; Flynn, Francis J

    2017-03-09

    We propose that the relationship between job satisfaction and absenteeism depends partly on guilt proneness. Drawing on withdrawal and process models of absenteeism, we argue that job satisfaction predicts absences for employees who are low (but not high) in guilt proneness because low guilt-prone people's behaviors are governed more by fulfilling their own egoistic desires than by fulfilling others' normative expectations. We find support for this prediction in a sample of customer service agents working for a major telecommunications company and a sample of working adults employed in a range of industries. In each study, we use measures of employees' guilt proneness and job satisfaction to predict their subsequent workplace absences. In Study 2, we extend our hypothesis tests to 2 traits that are conceptually comparable to guilt proneness (i.e., moral identity and agreeableness), showing that these traits similarly moderate the relationship between job satisfaction and absenteeism. We discuss the implications of these findings for extant models of absenteeism and research on moral affectivity in the workplace. (PsycINFO Database Record

  13. Patient satisfaction: focusing on "excellent".

    PubMed

    Otani, Koichiro; Waterman, Brian; Faulkner, Kelly M; Boslaugh, Sarah; Burroughs, Thomas E; Dunagan, W Claiborne

    2009-01-01

    In an emerging competitive market such as healthcare, managers should focus on achieving excellent ratings to distinguish their organization from others. When it comes to customer loyalty, "excellent" has a different meaning. Customers who are merely satisfied often do not come back. The purpose of this study was to find out what influences adult patients to rate their overall experience as "excellent." The study used patient satisfaction data collected from one major academic hospital and four community hospitals. After conducting a multiple logistic regression analysis, certain attributes were shown to be more likely than others to influence patients to rate their experiences as excellent. The study revealed that staff care is the most influential attribute, followed by nursing care. These two attributes are distinctively stronger drivers of overall satisfaction than are the other attributes studied (i.e., physician care, admission process, room, and food). Staff care and nursing care are under the control of healthcare managers. If improvements are needed, they can be accomplished through training programs such as total quality management or continuous quality improvement, through which staff employees and nurses learn to be sensitive to patients' needs. Satisfying patients' needs is the first step toward having loyal patients, so hospitals that strive to ensure their patients are completely satisfied are more likely to prosper.

  14. The Satisfaction With Life Scale.

    PubMed

    Diener, E; Emmons, R A; Larsen, R J; Griffin, S

    1985-02-01

    This article reports the development and validation of a scale to measure global life satisfaction, the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS). Among the various components of subjective well-being, the SWLS is narrowly focused to assess global life satisfaction and does not tap related constructs such as positive affect or loneliness. The SWLS is shown to have favorable psychometric properties, including high internal consistency and high temporal reliability. Scores on the SWLS correlate moderately to highly with other measures of subjective well-being, and correlate predictably with specific personality characteristics. It is noted that the SWLS is Suited for use with different age groups, and other potential uses of the scale are discussed.

  15. Developing a customer-service and cost-effectiveness team.

    PubMed

    Haynie, L; Garrett, B

    1999-01-01

    A healthcare organization in northeast Georgia developed a team approach to meet the challenge of unacceptable customer service scores, improve numerous system inefficiencies, promote staff accountability, and maintain an emphasis on cost-effective and efficient utilization of resources. This article describes the development of a team comprising a variety of staff members to support all managers in this effort. The outcome was an improvement in customer satisfaction scores from the lower half of the survey database to the top third.

  16. Improving customer service. It's not just what's in the box.

    PubMed

    Redling, Robert

    2003-08-01

    Patient satisfaction scores can plummet when medical emergencies throw schedules into disarray or a receptionist ignores a patient at the front desk. Patients' expectations of good customer service have been shaped by technological conveniences and the concerted efforts of retailers, restaurants and other service providers. Physician leaders and administrators can improve customer service by paying more attention to organizational culture, physician behavior, staff incentives, hiring practices and team-building.

  17. Perceived Structure and Achievement Goals as Predictors of Students' Self-Regulated Learning and Affect and the Mediating Role of Competence Need Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mouratidis, Athanasios; Vansteenkiste, Maarten; Michou, Aikaterini; Lens, Willy

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the extent to which perceived structure and personal achievement goals could explain students' effective learning strategies and affect-related experiences in a sample of Greek adolescent students (N = 606; 45.4% males; mean age: M = 15.05, SD = 1.43). Having controlled for students' social desirability responses, we used…

  18. Rural Teacher Satisfaction: An Analysis of Beliefs and Attitudes of Rural Teachers' Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huysman, John T.

    2008-01-01

    This study analyzed teachers' beliefs and attitudes affecting job satisfaction in one small, rural Florida school district. This mixed methods study included a self-administered survey of Likert-type items measuring 20 factors for job satisfaction and individual semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Several issues related to dissatisfaction…

  19. Research on Job Satisfaction of Elementary and High School Teachers and Strategies to Increase Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuming, Xu; Jiliang, Shen

    2007-01-01

    Job satisfaction is an important topic in teacher education research. Exploring the issue of teacher job satisfaction helps us gain a deeper understanding of teachers' mental state, such as their occupational attitudes, zeal for teaching, and work enthusiasm, which affects the quality of teaching and education. From an examination of teachers' job…

  20. I want products my own way, but which way? The effects of different product categories and cues on customer responses to Web-based customizations.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Chi; Chen, Hui-Yun

    2009-02-01

    Mass customization is a strategy that has been adopted by companies to tailor their products in order to match customer needs more precisely. Therefore, to fully capture the value of mass customization, it is crucial to explore how customers react to mass customization. In previous studies, an implied premise has been that consumers are keen to embrace customized products, and this assumption has also been treated by firms as a prerequisite for successful mass customization strategies. However, an undesirable complexity may result from difficult configuration processes that may intimidate and confuse some customers. Hence, this study explores strategies that marketers can employ to facilitate the customization process. Specifically, this study investigates how to enhance customer satisfaction and purchase decision toward customized products by providing cues compatible with the product category. It is hypothesized that for search products, customers rely more on intrinsic cues when making configuration decisions. On the other hand, for experience products, customers perceive extrinsic cues to be more valuable in assisting them to make configuration decisions. The results suggest that consumers tend to respond more favorably toward customized search products when intrinsic cues are provided than when extrinsic or irrelevant ones are provided. In contrast, when customizing experience products, customers tend to depend more on extrinsic cues than on intrinsic or irrelevant ones.

  1. Fostering employee service creativity: Joint effects of customer empowering behaviors and supervisory empowering leadership.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuntao; Liao, Hui; Chuang, Aichia; Zhou, Jing; Campbell, Elizabeth M

    2015-09-01

    Integrating insights from the literature on customers' central role in service and the literature on employee creativity, we offer theoretical and empirical account of how and when customer empowering behaviors can motivate employee creativity during service encounters and, subsequently, influence customer satisfaction with service experience. Using multilevel, multisource, experience sampling data from 380 hairstylists matched with 3550 customers in 118 hair salons, we found that customer empowering behaviors were positively related to employee creativity and subsequent customer satisfaction via employee state promotion focus. Results also showed that empowering behaviors from different agents function synergistically in shaping employee creativity: supervisory empowering leadership strengthened the indirect effect of customer empowering behaviors on employee creativity via state promotion focus.

  2. Modeling the customer in electronic commerce.

    PubMed

    Helander, M G; Khalid, H M

    2000-12-01

    This paper reviews interface design of web pages for e-commerce. Different tasks in e-commerce are contrasted. A systems model is used to illustrate the information flow between three subsystems in e-commerce: store environment, customer, and web technology. A customer makes several decisions: to enter the store, to navigate, to purchase, to pay, and to keep the merchandize. This artificial environment must be designed so that it can support customer decision-making. To retain customers it must be pleasing and fun, and create a task with natural flow. Customers have different needs, competence and motivation, which affect decision-making. It may therefore be important to customize the design of the e-store environment. Future ergonomics research will have to investigate perceptual aspects, such as presentation of merchandize, and cognitive issues, such as product search and navigation, as well as decision making while considering various economic parameters. Five theories on e-commerce research are presented.

  3. When customers exhibit verbal aggression, employees pay cognitive costs.

    PubMed

    Rafaeli, Anat; Erez, Amir; Ravid, Shy; Derfler-Rozin, Rellie; Treister, Dorit Efrat; Scheyer, Ravit

    2012-09-01

    In 4 experimental studies, we show that customer verbal aggression impaired the cognitive performance of the targets of this aggression. In Study 1, customers' verbal aggression reduced recall of customers' requests. Study 2 extended these findings by showing that customer verbal aggression impaired recognition memory and working memory among employees of a cellular communication provider. In Study 3, the ability to take another's perspective attenuated the negative effects of customer verbal aggression on participants' cognitive performance. Study 4 linked customer verbal aggression to quality of task performance, showing a particularly negative influence of aggressive requests delivered by high-status customers. Together, these studies suggest that the effects of even minor aggression from customers can strongly affect the immediate cognitive performance of customer service employees and reduce their task performance. The implications for research on aggression and for the practice of customer service are discussed.

  4. When the customer shouldn't be king: antecedents and consequences of sexual harassment by clients and customers.

    PubMed

    Gettman, Hilary J; Gelfand, Michele J

    2007-05-01

    Much of the work in today's service industries requires women to deal with people outside of their organizations, namely, customers and clients, yet research on sexual harassment has focused almost exclusively on sexual harassment within organizations. Because the threat of harassment also operates at the boundaries of organizations, our existing models based solely on harassment inside organizations may be too restricted to adequately explain the harassment experiences of women in today's economy. To address this, the authors introduce a theoretical model of the antecedents and consequences of sexual harassment by clients and customers (CSH) and describe 2 field studies conducted to test components of the model. In Study 1, they developed a model of antecedents and consequences of CSH and illustrated that certain contextual factors (client power and gender composition of the client base) affect levels of CSH and that CSH is related to a number of job and psychological outcomes among professional women. Study 2 revealed that CSH is related to lower job satisfaction among nonprofessional women, above and beyond that which is accounted for by internal sexual harassment. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

  5. Age can make a difference in patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    2007-04-01

    A survey demonstrates that not all patients will perceive the care they receive in the same manner. Learning facts like these about your customers will help you improve your patient satisfaction efforts. Young adult patients are the least likely to be satisfied and do not understand the necessity of long waits. Building loyalty with younger patients can pay dividends for years to come. Breaking down satisfaction survey data into subpopulations can help point out the areas in which you need to improve.

  6. Managing customer service.

    PubMed

    Paget, Zoe

    2015-02-28

    Zoe Paget is the customer services manager at YourVets. Her role includes managing the company's call centre, social media marketing, working with the marketing department to develop customer care initiatives and reporting service levels to the company's directors.

  7. Assessing Parent Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleminshaw, Helen; Guidubaldi, John

    Although actual or projected satisfaction with parenting is important in determining whether a couple will become parents and how large their family will be, only minimal research has assessed parental satisfaction. The Cleminshaw-Guidubaldi Parent Satisfaction Scale, a 50-item Likert-type instrument designed to measure components of satisfaction…

  8. Teaching Satisfaction Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Chung-Lim; Au, Wing-Tung

    2006-01-01

    The present study proposes a teaching satisfaction measure and examines the validity of its scores. The measure is based on the Life Satisfaction Scale (LSS). Scores on the five-item Teaching Satisfaction Scale (TSS) were validated on a sample of 202 primary and secondary school teachers and favorable psychometric properties were found. As…

  9. Customer delight and demand management: can they be integrated?

    PubMed

    Willis, A K

    1996-11-01

    This article will supply methods of becoming trading partners in today's global market and will provide world-class approaches to improved responsiveness and customer satisfaction. Guidelines and actual how-to's for implementing and managing a customer-driven supply chain will be offered. Examples will be given of how both large and small organizations have increased profitability by eliminating non-value-added paperwork, improved their ability to respond to customer demand, and reduced procurement cycle times along the entire supply chain.

  10. The internal customer.

    PubMed

    Labovitz, G H; Lowenhaupt, M

    1993-01-01

    To realize the full potential of CQI, the needs of internal customers throughout the health care organization must be met. This is best done through a collaborative customer-supplier dialogue, where suppliers take the initiative to understand their internal customers' needs and make their own requirements clear. Unfortunately, physicians--the most critical group of internal customers--are unaccustomed to collaborative efforts and are often unwilling to participate in CQI training. The solution is to use the customer-supplier dialogue to understand physicians' unique needs so that they can be trained effectively and drawn into the CQI process.

  11. Predicting health plan member retention from satisfaction surveys: the moderating role of intention and complaint voicing.

    PubMed

    Huppertz, John W

    2008-01-01

    Many health plans have tried to increase member retention by improving their scores on customer satisfaction surveys. However, prior research has demonstrated weak relationships between member satisfaction and retention, suggesting that other variables are needed to understand how satisfaction impacts member retention. In a longitudinal study 4,806 health plan members who completed satisfaction surveys were re-assessed three years later; we compared measures of satisfaction, intention, and complaining behavior from voluntary disenrollees and retained members. The relationship between satisfaction and retention was moderated by members' intentions to disenroll. The findings suggest that health plans can enhance the predictive validity of their satisfaction surveys by including measures of both satisfaction and intentions.

  12. By Any Other Name, They're Still Our Customers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandy, John H.

    1997-01-01

    Considers the use of the phrase "customer service" with reference to libraries and their users' needs, expectations, and satisfaction. Librarians' perceptions of those being served, and the public's view of library workers, are discussed, and a sidebar examines the history of fee-based subscription libraries. (LRW)

  13. Automatically Grading Customer Confidence in a Formal Specification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shukur, Zarina; Burke, Edmund; Foxley, Eric

    1999-01-01

    Describes an automatic grading system for a formal methods computer science course that is able to evaluate a formal specification written in the Z language. Quality is measured by considering first, specification correctness (syntax, semantics, and satisfaction of customer requirements), and second, specification maintainability (comparison of…

  14. The Student Is Not the Customer--An Alternative Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay, Darlene; Daniel, Harold

    2001-01-01

    Investigates some of the reasons that institutions of higher education should not regard the student as the customer, asserting that it may cause institutions to focus on short-term, narrow student satisfaction rather than meeting the long-term needs of an entire range of stakeholders. Presents an alternative paradigm, the student as collaborative…

  15. Analyzing Food-Related Life Satisfaction and other Predictors of Life Satisfaction in Central Chile.

    PubMed

    Schnettler, Berta; Lobos, Germán; Orellana, Ligia; Grunert, Klaus; Sepúlveda, José; Mora, Marcos; Denegri, Marianela; Miranda, Horacio

    2015-06-17

    This study aimed to assess the effect of satisfaction with food-related life on life satisfaction among inhabitants of the main municipalities of central Chile. A survey was applied to a sample of 1,277 people, distributed proportionally by municipality. The questionnaire included the following scales: SWLS (Satisfaction with Life Scale), SWFL (Satisfaction with Food-related Life) and the Health-Related Quality of Life Index (HRQOL). Questions were asked regarding eating habits inside and outside the home, time available for meals at home, the assessment of five sources of happiness and the demographic characteristics of those surveyed. An ordered logit model was proposed, in which the dependent variable was satisfaction with life. Satisfaction with life was significantly related to the respondent's socioeconomic status, self-perception of health, degree of satisfaction with food-related life, monthly food expenditure, time available for supper with the family (p < .01); gender, self-reported number of days affected by mental health problems, frequency of supper with the family, the degree of agreement with respect to family being an important source of happiness (p < .05); and family size and frequency of food consumption in fast food outlets (p < .10). Satisfaction with life in the study sample is related to aspects associated with health, family and eating, and the family interaction associated with eating may play an important role in overall satisfaction with life.

  16. Electric retail market options: The customer perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, S.W.; Hillsman, E.L.

    1995-07-01

    This report describes various options that are now available for retail electric customers, or that may become available during the next few years as the electric utility industry restructures. These options include different ways of meeting demand for energy services, different providers of service or points of contact with providers, and different pricing structures for purchased services. Purpose of this document is to examine these options from the customer`s perspective: how might being a retail electric customer in 5--10 years differ from now? Seizing opportunities to reduce cost of electric service is likely to entail working with different service providers; thus, transaction costs are involved. Some of the options considered are speculative. Some transitional options include relocation, customer-built/operated transmission lines, municipalization, self-generation, and long-term contracts with suppliers. All these may change or diminish in a restructured industry. Brokers seem likely to become more common unless restructuring takes the form of mandatory poolcos (wholesale). Some options appear robust, ie, they are likely to become more common regardless of how restructuring is accomplished: increased competition among energy carriers (gas vs electric), real-time pricing, etc. This report identified some of the qualitative differences among the various options. For customers using large amounts of electricity, different alternatives are likely to affect greatly service price, transaction costs, tailoring service to customer preferences, and risks for customer. For retail customers using small amounts of electricity, there may be little difference among the options except service price.

  17. The influence of status on satisfaction with relative rewards

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Konstanze; von Essen, Emma; Fliessbach, Klaus; Falk, Armin

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates how induced relative status affects satisfaction with different relative payoffs. We find that participants with lower status are more satisfied with disadvantageous payoff inequalities than equal or higher status participants. In contrast, when receiving an advantageous payoff, status does not affect satisfaction. Our findings suggest that relative social status has important implications for the acceptance of income inequalities. PMID:24198802

  18. Assessment of Self-Esteem and Satisfaction in Amputee Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spencer, C. D.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The study involving six single and multiple amputee children (10 to 14 years old) was conducted to provide information on how situations affect the self esteem of amputee children, how situations affect satisfaction with their prostheses, and the relationship between amputee self esteem and their satisfaction with their prosthetic device.…

  19. Becoming a Parent and Relationship Satisfaction: A Longitudinal Dyadic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keizer, Renske; Schenk, Niels

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the extent to which women's and men's relationship satisfaction within couples is similarly or differently affected by becoming a parent and the extent to which changes in work hours and hours spent on household labor affect a person's own and his or her spouse's relationship satisfaction across the transition to…

  20. Schoolwork as Products, Professors as Customers: A Practical Teaching Approach in Business Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Charles R.; Tian, Robert G.

    2002-01-01

    In a marketing course, students used the principles of product, price, place, and promotion to market their course work to the professor/customer. Assessment of 357 students over 4 semesters showed this experiential method resulted in higher achievement and greater understanding of customer expectations and satisfaction. (SK)

  1. The Customer Is Always Right: What the Business World Can Teach Us about Problem Patrons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Rebecca

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of problem patrons in libraries focuses on how businesses handle customer complaints, namely regarding them as opportunities to improve customer service and satisfaction. Suggests libraries need to provide channels for patrons to make complaints, follow up on them, and train staff to deal with user dissatisfaction. (Author/LRW)

  2. Creating customer-oriented employees: the case in home health care.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, K D; Ingram, T N

    1991-06-01

    Little empirical research has examined the organizational factors that influence the extent to which health care providers engage in customer-oriented behaviors. The authors examine the influence of role ambiguity, role conflict, and job satisfaction on the customer-oriented behaviors of home health care representatives. Managerial implications based on the study findings are discussed.

  3. Effect of E-Service Quality on Customer Online Repurchase Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Tung-Hsuan

    2012-01-01

    In the early years of online retailing, having an online presence and low prices were believed to be key drivers of success. More recently, electronic service quality has become essential as an online marketing strategy. Online stores provide higher service quality to create online customer loyalty, improve customer satisfaction, and keep a…

  4. Enhancing library services: an exploration in meeting customer needs through total quality management.

    PubMed

    Cundari, L; Stutz, K

    1995-01-01

    Total Quality Management (TQM) is a process which focuses on understanding customer needs and improving customer service and satisfaction. A TQM committee was created at the Devereux Foundation's Professional Library to assess user satisfaction and make recommendations for improving library services to better meet consumer needs. The committee distributed a satisfaction survey to 156 of the most likely library users and 84 (54%) were returned. Overall, survey results indicate that most consumers are satisfied with the materials and services provided by the Professional Library. Recommendations for improving library services and strategies for implementing these recommendations are discussed.

  5. Clients' Satisfaction with Monopolistic Services and Commitment to the Organization: A University Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, James L.; Cunningham, Brent J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between monopolistic service providers and customer satisfaction and commitment. The authors investigated how the ethical perceptions of service consumers, their perceptions of service quality, and satisfaction effect commitment to the long-term relationship with monopolistic service providers. Results…

  6. Participation Behaviour among International Students: The Role of Satisfaction with Service Augmentation and Brand Choice Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elsharnouby, Tamer H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to integrate service marketing and higher education (HE) literature to develop and test a model that links customer participation behaviour with student overall satisfaction that stems from satisfaction with service augmentation elements. It also examines the influence of brand choice attainment on both…

  7. The Importance of Institutional Image to Student Satisfaction and Loyalty within Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert M.; Mazzarol, Timothy William

    2009-01-01

    This paper outlines the findings of a study employing a partial least squares (PLS) structural equation methodology to test a customer satisfaction model of the drivers of student satisfaction and loyalty in higher education settings. Drawing upon a moderately large sample of students enrolled in four "types" of Australian universities,…

  8. Disconfirmation Theory: An Approach to Student Satisfaction Assessment in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Kathy Kramer; Shemwell, Donald W.

    This study investigated student satisfaction at a comprehensive regional university using a questionnaire grounded in the disconfirmation theory of customer satisfaction. A total of 165 students enrolled in business courses were surveyed at the beginning of the semester regarding their expectations of the university, with 104 students completing…

  9. Measuring Customer Satisfaction and Quality of Service in Special Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Marilyn Domas; Abels, Eileen G.; Nitecki, Danuta

    This project tested the appropriateness of SERVQUAL (i.e., an instrument widely used in the service industry for assessing service quality based on repeated service encounters rather than a particular service encounter) to measure service quality in special libraries and developed a modified version for special libraries. SERVQUAL is based on an…

  10. The case for customer loyalty.

    PubMed

    Sturm, Arthur C

    2004-09-01

    How does customer loyalty grow? Through good customer experiences. Yet some organizations seem to genuinely fail to understand that they can keep or lose a customer in the proverbial blink of an eye. And in this era of increasing customer demands across all industries, it's important that healthcare financial managers understand the correlation between customer loyalty and customer experience.

  11. Developing customer databases.

    PubMed

    Rao, S K; Shenbaga, S

    2000-01-01

    There is a growing consensus among pharmaceutical companies that more product and customer-specific approaches to marketing and selling a new drug can result in substantial increases in sales. Marketers and researchers taking a proactive micro-marketing approach to identifying, profiling, and communicating with target customers are likely to facilitate such approaches and outcomes. This article provides a working framework for creating customer databases that can be effectively mined to achieve a variety of such marketing and sales force objectives.

  12. How Does Satisfaction Translate into Performance? An Examination of Commitment and Cultural Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jin; Zheng, Wei

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to add new insights into the mechanism through which job satisfaction relates to job performance. Affective commitment was tested as a potential mediator between job satisfaction and job performance, and traditionality was used as a potential moderator between job satisfaction and affective commitment. A survey study…

  13. Marital satisfaction and adherence to religion

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, F; Neisani Samani, L; Fatemi, N; Ta’avoni, S; Abolghasemi, J

    2015-01-01

    Background: One of the most important determinants of health and marital satisfaction, the family and religious adherence can be effective because religion includes guidelines for life and providing a system of beliefs and values make these features can affect family life. Approach: This descriptive research - an analysis performed to assess the level of satisfaction of 47 questionnaires marital satisfaction questionnaire whose validity and reliability were evaluated and a couple of them asked to assess adherence to religion. The study population included 382 couples in Tehran that a cluster of 22 districts of Tehran were the selected. To analyze the data, ANOVA, Chi-square, and Pearson correlation coefficient using the software SPSS (version 22) became all tests were performed at the 5% level. Results: The data showed that the average age is 34 for women and 38 years for men and the majority of couples are in appropriate level in religiosity (40.5 percent). The results showed a main direct relation among religiosity and marital satisfaction of men and women (p ≤ 0.001). The correlation among religiosity and marital satisfaction of women r = 0.271 and this factor in men r = 0.200 was obtained indicating a direct relationship was significant. Conclusion: couples who were both committed to religion, their marital satisfaction score was more than couples without adherence to religion, and thus promoting religious beliefs and commitment can increase their marital satisfaction in couples. PMID:28316734

  14. Courtesy in caring. The patient as customer.

    PubMed

    DeBaca, V

    1990-01-01

    If you were paying $500 a night for a hotel room,. would you be happy if you were told you would be sharing it with a stranger? While such a question cannot be literally asked about a hospital experience, metaphorically it can be--and is--asked every time a patient enters a hospital. The idea of patient-as-consumer is not longer just another trendy concept but an integral part of the way many hospitals do business, and it's the hospital manager's responsibility to ensure the customer's satisfaction.

  15. Assessment of Consumers' Satisfaction with the Automotive Product Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amineh, Hadi; Kosach, Nataliya

    2016-01-01

    Relevance of article is caused by the fact that customer's satisfaction currently serves as the mechanism allowing the carmakers to be competitive in the market. The paper describes issues of assessment of the quality of products manufactured by automobile companies. The assessment is based on widely applicable complex characteristics of the…

  16. Modeling factors explaining physicians’ satisfaction with competence

    PubMed Central

    Lepnurm, Rein; Dobson, Roy Thomas; Peña-Sánchez, Juan-Nicolás; Nesdole, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Recognition explained 60.2% of the variation in Satisfaction with Competence, controlling for years in practice, self-reported health and duties of physicians. Conclusion: Satisfaction with Competence could be affected by excessive accumulation of duties, concerns about quality, efficiency, access, excessive distress, inadequate coping abilities, personal satisfaction with life as a physician, challenges in managing practices and persistent inequities among physicians. PMID:27092256

  17. Satisfaction with healthcare services among free clinic patients.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Akiko; Ashby, Jeanie; Myers, Kyl; Nourian, Maziar M; Christensen, Nancy

    2015-02-01

    Free clinics provide free or reduced fee health services to the un- or under-insured. Patient engagement is important to understand patients' needs and to improve healthcare systems. There are few studies that examined patient engagement and satisfaction among the underserved and how patients perceive the quality of healthcare services in a free clinic setting. This study examined free clinic patients' satisfaction in order to better understand how free clinic patients perceive quality of healthcare services. English or Spanish speaking patients (N = 351), aged 18 years or older completed a self-administered survey using standardized measures of patient satisfaction and health status. Additional questions of patient satisfaction and experience with healthcare which fit a free clinic setting were developed. While the satisfaction with interpreter services was overall high, there were potential issues of a family member as an interpreter and unmet needs for interpreter services. Participants reported different levels of patient satisfaction by three language categories: native English speakers, non-native English speakers, and Spanish speakers. Health status is an important indicator to determine patient satisfaction. To improve patient satisfaction and engagement among free clinic patients, factors such as: quality of a family interpreter, unmet needs for interpreter services, social support, and health education programs may need to be considered. The differences in these three language groups indicate that not all free clinic patients may be combined together into a general category of free clinic patients. It may be necessary to provide customized treatment for each of these groups.

  18. Job satisfaction and subjective well-being among Czech nurses.

    PubMed

    Gurková, Elena; Haroková, Sylvie; Džuka, Jozef; Žiaková, Katarína

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between domains of the job satisfaction and components of subjective well-being in nurses. A convenience sample of hospital nurses was recruited from six hospitals in Czech Republic. Data were collected using a set of questionnaires that included the McCloskey/Mueller Satisfaction Scale, the Positive Affect Scale, the Negative Affect Scale and the Personal Well-being Index. We confirmed low association between job satisfaction and subjective well-being of nurses. Satisfaction with extrinsic rewards, co-workers and family/work balance accounted for only a small percentage of variance in cognitive component of subjective well-being. Positive affect was predicted by interaction opportunities and scheduling. Negative affect was predicted by interaction opportunities and scheduling and intention to leave the actual workplace. Low percentage of the variance suggests that subjective well-being is not strongly influenced by job satisfaction.

  19. Job and career satisfaction among staff nurses: effects of job setting and environment.

    PubMed

    Shaver, Katherine H; Lacey, Linda M

    2003-03-01

    Just as customer satisfaction is the key to retaining customers, satisfaction with job and career choices are important for keeping staff nurses on the job. The roles of employment setting, job commitment, tenure, years until retirement, short staffing, and patient load in predicting satisfaction were assessed for RN and LPN staff nurses. Results show that when RNs and LPNs feel short staffing interferes with their ability to meet patient care needs, they are also less satisfied with both their job and their career. In order not to exacerbate the current nursing shortage, employers must find ways to ensure adequate staffing to keep staff nurses satisfied and on the job.

  20. Customer orientation among employees in public administration: a transnational, longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Korunka, Christian; Scharitzer, Dieter; Carayon, Pascale; Hoonakker, Peter; Sonnek, Angelika; Sainfort, Francois

    2007-05-01

    The relation between ergonomic principles and quality management initiatives, both, in the private and public sector, has received increasing attention in the recent years. Customer orientation among employees is not only an important quality principle, but also an essential prerequisite for customer satisfaction, especially in service organizations. In this context, the objective of introducing new public management (NPM) in public-service organizations is to increase customer orientation among employees who are at the forefront of service providing. In this study, we developed a short scale to measure perceived customer orientation. In two separate longitudinal studies carried out in Austria and the US, we analyzed changes in customer orientation resulting from the introduction of NPM. In both organizations, we observed a significant increase in customer orientation. Perceived customer orientation was related to job characteristics, organizational characteristics and employee quality of working life. Creating positive influences on these characteristics within the framework of an organizational change process has positive effects on employee customer orientation.

  1. Sexual Satisfaction of infertile couples assessed using the Golombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS)

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Mayumi; Hamatani, Toshio; Ishikawa, Shoko; Kuji, Naoaki; Ohta, Hiroaki; Matsui, Hideo; Yoshimura, Yasunori

    2014-01-01

    Recently, infertility treatment-related psychological effects are receiving increased attention. However, whether sexual satisfaction is reduced amongst infertile couples remains to be elucidated. In this study, sexual satisfaction of Japanese infertile couples was assessed using a validated questionnaire designed to assess the male and female partner individually, and the couple as a whole for the first time. This study randomly included 170 infertile couples seen at the outpatient clinic and 170 couples that had recently achieved spontaneous pregnancy. All couples were given the Japanese version of the Golombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction (GRISS). In couples aged 35 years or older, the male partners showed significantly worse sexual satisfaction scores than the female partners. Sexual satisfaction also deteriorated with therapeutic interventions, with mental factors affected more than physical factors. Therapeutic interventions such as timed sexual intercourse and assisted reproductive technology were considered emotionally stressful for infertile couples, with sexual satisfaction accordingly lower in this group than in couples achieving spontaneous pregnancy. GRISS successfully evaluated lower sexual satisfaction associated with infertility, and hence is a useful tool for identifying couples whose sexual satisfaction could be enhanced by counselling or other stress-reduction modalities. PMID:24902628

  2. Customized Training Marketing Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lay, Ted

    This report outlines Oregon's Lane Community College's (LCC's) plan for marketing its customized training program for business, community organizations, public agencies, and their employees. Following a mission statement for the customized training program, a brief analysis is provided of the economic environment; of competition from educational…

  3. Customer Relationship Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fayerman, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Presents an approach increasingly employed by businesses to track and respond to their customers to provide better and faster services: customer relationship management. Discusses its applicability to the operations of higher education and institutional research and the role it plays in the knowledge management framework. (EV)

  4. British Sign Name Customs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Linda; Sutton-Spence, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Research presented here describes the sign names and the customs of name allocation within the British Deaf community. While some aspects of British Sign Language sign names and British Deaf naming customs differ from those in most Western societies, there are many similarities. There are also similarities with other societies outside the more…

  5. Keeping Your Customers Satisfied.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maurer, Mary E.

    1996-01-01

    Notes that because child care is a customer-service business with many of the same requirements as any retail business, it is important that providers communicate clearly, help their customers (especially parents), and understand their needs. Offers suggestions for meeting parents' needs and making them feel like active participants in their…

  6. Neonatal intensive care: satisfaction measured from a parent's perspective.

    PubMed

    Conner, J M; Nelson, E C

    1999-01-01

    Health care systems today are complex, technically proficient, competitive, and market-driven. One outcome of this environment is the recent phenomenon in the health care field of "consumerism." Strong emphasis is placed on customer service, with organized efforts to understand, measure, and meet the needs of customers served. The purpose of this article is to describe the current understanding and measurement of parent needs and expectations with neonatal intensive care services from the time the expectant parents enter the health care system for the birth through the discharge process and follow-up care. Through literature review, 11 dimensions of care were identified as important to parents whose infants received neonatal intensive care: assurance, caring, communication, consistent information, education, environment, follow-up care, pain management, participation, proximity, and support. Five parent satisfaction questionnaires-the Parent Feedback Questionnaire, Neonatal Index of Parent Satisfaction, Inpatient Parent Satisfaction-Children's Hospital Minneapolis, Picker Institute-Inpatient Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Survey, and the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit-Parent Satisfaction Form-are critically reviewed for their ability to measure parent satisfaction within the framework of the neonatal care delivery process. An immense gap was found in our understanding about what matters most and when to parents going through the neonatal intensive care experience. Additional research is required to develop comprehensive parent satisfaction surveys that measure parent perceptions of neonatal care within the framework of the care delivery process.

  7. Employee engagement and job satisfaction in the information technology industry.

    PubMed

    Kamalanabhan, T J; Sai, L Prakash; Mayuri, Duggirala

    2009-12-01

    Employee engagement has been identified as being important to employee productivity and performance. Measures of employee engagement and job satisfaction in the context of information technology (IT) were developed to explore how employee engagement affects perceived job satisfaction. In a sample of IT professionals (N = 159), controlling for age, sex, job tenure, and marital status, employee engagement had a significant and positive correlation with job satisfaction.

  8. The coming battle for customer information.

    PubMed

    Hagel, J; Rayport, J F

    1997-01-01

    Companies collect information about customers to target valuable prospects more effectively, tailor their offerings to individual needs, improve customer satisfaction, and identify opportunities for new products or services. But managers' efforts to capture such information may soon be thwarted. The authors believe that consumers are going to take ownership of information about themselves and start demanding value in exchange for it. As a result, negotiating with customers for information will become costly and complex. How will that happen? Consumers are realizing that they get very little in exchange for the information they divulge so freely through their commercial transactions and survey responses. Now new technologies such as smart cards, World Wide Web browsers, and personal financial management software are allowing consumers to view comprehensive profiles of their commercial activities-- and to choose whether or not to release that information to companies. Their decision will hinge, in large part, on what vendors offer them in return for the data. Consumers will be unlikely to bargain with vendors on their own, however. The authors anticipate that companies they call infomediaries will broker information to businesses on consumers' behalf. In essence, infomediaries will be the catalyst for people to start demanding value in exchange for information about themselves. And most other companies will need to rethink how they obtain information and what they do with it if they want to find new customers and serve them better.

  9. Patient Satisfaction by Design.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Karen

    2016-11-01

    The concept of the patient experience as it relates to patient satisfaction is a complex dynamic. It is a dynamic that is becoming increasingly more important as patients are faced with multiple choices for their hearing and balance care. As reimbursement and performance policies have become more normative within health care, patient satisfaction has become a metric to measure quality. Patient satisfaction is no longer contained to just the interaction with the audiologist. It extends to the entire experience-the staff, the service, the product, and other factors. Many practices fail to capitalize on one of the primary components of the patient experience-office design. This article discusses the role of evidence-based design in facility planning as it relates to patient satisfaction. It will illustrate how design principles and ideal attributes may be used to send conscious and subconscious cues that will motivate staff, facilitate patient-centered care, and ultimately increase patient satisfaction.

  10. Customer Communication Document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This procedure communicates to the Customers of the Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division (AR&SD) Dynamics Systems Test Branch (DSTB) how to obtain services of the Six-Degrees-Of-Freedom Dynamic Test System (SDTS). The scope includes the major communication documents between the SDTS and its Customer. It established the initial communication and contact points as well as provides the initial documentation in electronic media for the customer. Contact the SDTS Manager (SM) for the names of numbers of the current contact points.

  11. The Impact of e-Customer Relationship Marketing in Hotel Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Irene

    The present research investigates the extent to which Greek hotels had developed the electronic customer relationship marketing (E-CRM). The study verifies the practices that frequently appear in relationship marketing process within online operations or whether their Internet presence mainly depends on the basic actions of "supplying information" and "reservations". Also, it investigates the effects of e-CRM system on customer loyalty and satisfaction as well as the impact of relationship marketing practices to customer retention and acquisition. They have understood the importance of using electronic channels instead of traditional ones to implement their marketing strategies. Thus, e-crm system has assisted hotel business to manage more effectively their reservations and serve their customers as fast and as effective as possible. They did not seem to apply many of the relationship marketing strategies to emphasize customer retention and continual satisfaction because of difficulties in staff training.

  12. How a Supportive Partner May Increase Relationship Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Duncan

    2006-01-01

    The way in which satisfaction with a romantic relationship may be affected by how supportive a partner is and how constructively they deal with conflict in that relationship was examined in young adults. Both greater support and less conflict were found to be independently associated with relationship satisfaction, implying that both are necessary…

  13. Factors Leading to Students' Satisfaction in the Higher Learning Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siming, Luo; Niamatullah; Gao, Jianying; Xu, Dan; Shaf, Khurrum

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing need to understand factors that affect satisfaction of students with learning. This study will explore the relationship between student satisfaction and teacher-student relationship, teacher preparedness, campus support facilities and experiences provided by the institute to the students. Study is a necessary activity that…

  14. Age, Health and Life Satisfaction among Older Europeans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angelini, Viola; Cavapozzi, Danilo; Corazzini, Luca; Paccagnella, Omar

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we investigate how age affects the self-reported level of life satisfaction among the elderly in Europe. By using a vignette approach, we find evidence that age influences life satisfaction through two counterbalancing channels. On the one hand, controlling for the effects of all other variables, the own perceived level of life…

  15. Manage marketing by the customer equity test.

    PubMed

    Blattberg, R C; Deighton, J

    1996-01-01

    Managers have recently begun to think of good marketing as good conversation, as a process of drawing customers into progressively more satisfying relationships with a company. And just as the art of conversation follows two steps--first striking up a conversation with a likely partner and then maintaining the flow--so the new marketing naturally divides itself into the work of customer acquisition and the work of customer retention. But how can managers determine the optimal balance between spending on acquisition and spending on retention? Robert Blattberg and John Deighton use decision calculus to help managers answer that question. That is, they ask managers to approach the large, complex problem through several smaller, more manageable questions on the same topic. Then they use a formal model to turn those smaller judgments into an answer to the larger question. The ultimate goal, the authors say, is to grow the company's customer equity the sum of all the conversations-to its fullest potential. Recognizing that managers must constantly reassess the spending points determined by the decision-calculus model, the authors also provide a series of guidelines and suggestions to help frame the issues that affect acquisition, retention, and customer equity. When managers strive to grow customer equity rather than a brand's sales or profits, they put a primary indicator of the health of the business at the fore front of their strategic thinking: the quality of customer relationships.

  16. Marketing health services: the engineering of satisfaction.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, R S

    1984-12-01

    Service marketing is the engineering of satisfaction, and the key to success is to identify and influence potential customers' expectations and then to fulfill those expectations. Patient satisfaction largely determines both a program's revenues and expenditures and the effectiveness of care received by patients. A program's ability to satisfy patients rests upon three basic elements: research, design, and communication. Research should be on two levels. The first is basic market assessment and analysis, and should reveal overall market potential by focusing on consumers' expectations, unmet needs, and level of satisfaction. From this stage of research, the organization should be able to identify current programs that are secure and stable, those which have significant growth potential, those which are threatened by competition, and those which have little future. This research also should indicate the potential for new programs and for new markets for existing programs. The second level of research focuses on a specific program (whether current or proposed) and is the basis for program design. The organization can tailor the program to consumers' expectations in everything from services provided to price of parking and other amenities. Research also provides a basis for communications. Not only can communications influence a potential customer to try a provider, but also care providers can use communications during and after the service experience to reinforce what might have been a casual decision. Ideally, all communication that occurs between patients and providers should serve marketing as well as diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. It can shape patients' expectations, reinforce satisfaction when those expectations have been fulfilled, and convey the provider's caring and concern.

  17. Large Customers (DR Sellers)

    SciTech Connect

    Kiliccot, Sila

    2011-10-25

    State of the large customers for demand response integration of solar and wind into electric grid; openADR; CAISO; DR as a pseudo generation; commercial and industrial DR strategies; California regulations

  18. A customer service journey.

    PubMed

    VanDecandelaere, Traci

    2012-01-01

    Converting security team members from simple rule enforcers to superior customer service providers required changes in leadership attitudes, rules, training, and other security traditions, but it has paid off in staff performance and recognition, according to the author.

  19. The customer has escaped.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Paul F; Cespedes, Frank V

    2003-11-01

    Every company makes choices about the channels it will use to go to market. Traditionally, the decision to sell through a discount superstore or a pricey boutique, for instance, was guided by customer demographics. A company would identify a target segment of buyers and go with the channel that could deliver them. It was a fair assumption that certain customer types were held captive by certain channels--if not from cradle to grave, then at least from initial consideration to purchase. The problem, the authors say, is that today's customers have become unfettered. As their channel options have proliferated, they've come to recognize that different channels serve their needs better at different points in the buying process. The result is "value poaching." For example, certain channels hope to use higher margin sales to cover the cost of providing expensive high-touch services. Potential customers use these channels to do research, then leap to a cheaper channel when it's time to buy. Customers now hunt for bargains more aggressively; they've become more sophisticated about how companies market to them; and they are better equipped with information and technology to make advantageous decisions. What does this mean for your go-to-market strategy? The authors urge companies to make a fundamental shift in mind-set toward designing for buyer behaviors, not customer segments. A company should design pathways across channels to help its customers get what they need at each stage of the buying process--through one channel or another. Customers are not mindful of channel boundaries--and you shouldn't be either. Instead, they are mindful of the value of individual components in your channels--and you should be, too.

  20. Sexual disclosures: connections to relational satisfaction and closeness.

    PubMed

    Coffelt, Tina A; Hess, Jon A

    2014-01-01

    This study examines sexual communication by describing the content of sexual disclosures within marital relationships and assessing the association between sexual disclosures and relational outcomes, specifically relational satisfaction and closeness. A survey administered to 293 married individuals (58% female) who had an average age of 40 years (range = 20-73), 13.7 years of marriage (range = 1 month to 54 years), and who reported high levels of relational satisfaction assessed the relation between the content of sexual disclosures and satisfaction and closeness. While sexual disclosures are made infrequently, positive affect and sexual preferences are disclosed more than negative topics and disclosing sexual information is positively related to relationship satisfaction, rρ(280) =.26, p <.001; and closeness, rs(280) =.475, p <.01. Therapists can use these findings to show clients the positive relation between revealing sexual information and relationship satisfaction and closeness, as reported by individuals experiencing relationship satisfaction.

  1. Management support and perceived consumer satisfaction in skilled nursing facilities.

    PubMed

    Metlen, Scott; Eveleth, Daniel; Bailey, Jeffrey J

    2005-08-01

    How managers 'manage' employees influences important firm outcomes. Heskett, Sasser, and Schlesinger contend that the level of internal support for service workers will influence consumer satisfaction. This study empirically explores how skilled nursing facility (SNF) managers affect consumer satisfaction by encouraging employee effectiveness and listening to employees to determine how to improve employee effectiveness. We extend previous research by proposing management as a form of internal support and demonstrating its relationship to service process integration, as a distinct form of internal support. The results of our individual-level investigation of 630 nursing assistants from 45 SNFs provide support for our two-part hypothesis. First, active management support and process integration, as elements of internal support, do lead to increased employee satisfaction and employee effectiveness. Second, the increased employee satisfaction and effectiveness was positively related to consumer satisfaction, as evaluated by the service workers. Thus, there is a positive influence of management's internal support of nursing assistants on perceived consumer satisfaction.

  2. The Effects of Need Satisfaction on EFL Online Learner Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Po-Hsuan; Adesope, Olusola

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the effects of need satisfaction (autonomy, competence, and relatedness) on English as a foreign language (EFL) online learner satisfaction and validated the Chinese versions of the need satisfaction scale (NSS) and online learner satisfaction scale (OLSS). We collected data from a questionnaire administered to 199 EFL students…

  3. Life Satisfaction in Persons with Lacunar Infarction--A Comparative Analysis of Two Measures of Life Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsson, G-B.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    A study of 76 Swedish patients (ages 40-86) with lacunar infarctions used a life satisfaction questionnaire to investigate whether the patients were satisfied and how their life situation was affected by the infarction. Results found that the questionnaire was not an effective instrument for measuring life satisfaction in this population. (CR)

  4. Homeopathy satisfaction in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudian, Ahmad; Sadri, Gholamhosein

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patient satisfaction is a key indicator of the quality and effectiveness of a therapeutic method. Assessing the satisfaction of patients undergoing homeopathic therapy is essential in the early steps of educating the community, if suitable outcomes are to be achieved. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 2008 on 125 patients from the city of Isfahan. Patients aged above 15 years who had referred to the homeopathic practitioners and received homeopathic drugs for at least three times were randomly selected and included in the study. Patient satisfaction was assessed in three main areas (general health, physician performance, and symptoms relief) using a valid questionnaire. The results were compared with those of a similar study conducted in 2004 on 240 patients. Results: Mean score of satisfaction with homeopathic treatment was 77.48 ± 6.36 out of 100. In 2004, it was 77.4 ± 8.13. Median age was 36.41 ± 11.25 years. Median time of therapy was 16.80 ± 17.94 months. The highest level of satisfaction was related to relief of symptoms. Satisfaction of physician performance and improvement of general health came next. The degree of satisfaction with therapy was not significant between the different groups with regard to their sex and different levels of education, but there was significant difference in the duration of treatment. The four symptoms that showed better improvement in 2008 were headache, gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances, fatigue, and insomnia. Conclusions: After using homeopathy for several years, patients’ satisfaction was found to be still high. Shifting the area of satisfaction from general health to relief of symptoms could be related to physicians’ experiments for remedy selection. Scientific centers should do more surveys about the effectiveness of homeopathic treatment. Integration of homeopathy with medicine may bring in more success at less cost. It seems rational to support homeopathy

  5. Faculty Satisfaction in Academic Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyquist, Julie G.; Hitchcock, Maurice A.; Teherani, Arianne

    2000-01-01

    Describes the challenges and elements of satisfaction in academic medicine. Proposes a model of academic faculty satisfaction which postulates that organizational, job-related, and personal factors combine to develop self-knowledge, social knowledge, and satisfaction with outcomes of productivity, retention, and learner-patient satisfaction. (DB)

  6. Main Factors of Job Satisfaction among Primary School Educators: Factor Analysis of the Greek Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saiti, Anna

    2007-01-01

    Job satisfaction is an important issue, but remains a complex one as it is difficult to measure. A wide range of factors such as the working environment, its manner of organisation, demography and individual circumstances, etc., can substantially affect the level of job satisfaction attained by individuals. Job satisfaction and the teaching…

  7. Changes in Situational and Dispositional Factors as Predictors of Job Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Anita C.; Semmer, Norbert K.

    2013-01-01

    Arguably, job satisfaction is one of the most important variables with regard to work. When explaining job satisfaction, research usually focuses on predictor variables in terms of levels but neglects growth rates. Therefore it remains unclear how potential predictors evolve over time and how their development affects job satisfaction. Using…

  8. Towards a Citizen-Centered E-Government: Exploring Citizens' Satisfaction with E-Government in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Jianchuan

    2013-01-01

    E-government research has been practical and utilitarian, lacking theoretical concerns. Based on the literature of customer satisfaction with private-sector services, citizen/user satisfaction with public services, and information systems management, this study systematically investigates the following factors and their effects on citizen…

  9. The Effects of Lecturer Commitment on Student Perceptions of Teaching Quality and Student Satisfaction in Chinese Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiao, Jian; Wilkins, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Student satisfaction has become an important concept in higher education because students are paying higher tuition fees and increasingly seeing themselves as customers and because satisfaction is commonly used as an indicator of quality by quality assurance agencies and the compilers of rankings and league tables. In business organisations, it…

  10. Post sex affectionate exchanges promote sexual and relationship satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Muise, Amy; Giang, Elaine; Impett, Emily A

    2014-10-01

    The current research examined the role of post sex affection in promoting sexual and relationship satisfaction in ongoing romantic partnerships. Since romantic partners view the period after engaging in sex as an important time for bonding and intimacy, we sought to determine if and how the duration and quality of post sex affection might promote satisfaction in romantic relationships. In two studies, we tested the link between post sex affectionate behavior (e.g., cuddling, caressing, shared intimacy) and sexual and relationship satisfaction. In Study 1, a cross-sectional survey of individuals in romantic relationships (N = 335), duration of post sex affection was associated with higher sexual satisfaction and, in turn, higher relationship satisfaction. In Study 2, a daily experience study of 101 established couples (N = 202) with a 3-month follow-up, day-to-day changes in post sex affection duration and quality were associated with both partners' sexual and relationship satisfaction, and engaging in longer and more satisfying post sex affection over the course of the study was associated with higher relationship and sexual satisfaction 3 months later. In general, the pattern of results was consistent for men and women, but the association between the duration of post sex affection and relationship satisfaction was stronger for women than for men (Study 1) and women, but not men, felt more sexually satisfied when their partner reported higher quality post sex affection (Study 2). The findings suggest that the period after sex is a critical time for promoting satisfaction in intimate bonds.

  11. Smart customers, dumb companies.

    PubMed

    Locke, C

    2000-01-01

    Customers today are being bombarded with an overwhelming array of choices. To alleviate customer frustration, say Steven Cristol and Peter Sealey in Simplicity Marketing, companies should stop creating new brands and product extensions. Better to consolidate product and service functions by following a four R approach: replace, repackage, reposition, and replenish. That's an outmoded, dictatorial view of markets, says Christopher Locke. Far from being stymied by choices, customers are rapidly becoming smarter than the companies that pretend to serve them. In this networked economy, people are talking among themselves, and that changes everything. Locke predicts we'll see a growing number of well-defined micromarkets--groups of customers converging in real time around entertaining and knowledgeable voices--such as NPR's car guys and the Motley Fool investment site. "Micromedia" Web sites will replace traditional advertising because they'll provide credible user-supplied news about products and services. Locke contends that an open exchange of information solves the "problem" of choice much better than manipulative strategies like simplicity or even permission marketing. Companies can participate in micromarkets through what Locke dubs "gonzo marketing." If Ford, for example, discovers that a subset of its employees are organic gardeners, it may offer support to a big independent organic-gardening Web site with donations and employee volunteers. This marketing effort would be driven not by advertising managers but by people with genuine interest in each micromarket, so it would have credibility with customers. With gonzo marketing, both companies and their markets will benefit.

  12. The role of acceptance and job control in mental health, job satisfaction, and work performance.

    PubMed

    Bond, Frank W; Bunce, David

    2003-12-01

    Acceptance, the willingness to experience thoughts, feelings, and physiological sensations without having to control them or let them determine one's actions, is a major individual determinant of mental health and behavioral effectiveness in a more recent theory of psychopathology. This 2-wave panel study examined the ability of acceptance also to explain mental health, job satisfaction, and performance in the work domain. The authors hypothesized that acceptance would predict these 3 outcomes 1 year later in a sample of customer service center workers in the United Kingdom (N = 412). Results indicated that acceptance predicted mental health and an objective measure of performance over and above job control, negative affectivity, and locus of control. These beneficial effects of having more job control were enhanced when people had higher levels of acceptance. The authors discuss the theoretical and practical relevance of this individual characteristic to occupational health and performance.

  13. The role of service recovery in HMO satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Sarel, D; Marmorstein, H

    1999-01-01

    Complaint handling and service recovery by HMOs may be more efficient to implement and more determinant of customer satisfaction and retention than other approaches such as improving access to care. The current findings are consistent with research on recovery efforts in other industries. Complaint handling systems must achieve rapid and comprehensive identification and resolution of HMO member problems. Both cultural change and appropriate incentives to re-educate employees within HMO organizations are additional requisites to effective service recovery. The benefits to the HMO of expenditures on service recovery should be more immediate and sustainable than the benefits derived from other methods of increasing member satisfaction.

  14. The Study on the Preferences of Customer Personal Values with Chinese Culture Background in Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi; Zhao, Hong; Yang, Yue

    Customer personal values are the important factors which affect customer behaviors, and they guide and decide the customer's attitudes and behaviors on the products or the services. The paper thinks there are only several important customer personal values to guide customer's decisions, and these values will have -strong cultural differences. This study focuses on discussing the preferences of customer personal values with Chinese culture background when customers consume service and analyzes on the customer preferences of customer personal values with the deep interview method. After interviewing 16 responders with the semi-structured questionnaires, the study finds out some interesting results: (1) Some customers have recognized the existent of customer personal values, even though customer perceived values still have the strong influences on customer behaviors. (2) As they pursue to high quality lives, customers enjoy the lives in easy and pleasure way and care about the safe of the family. Quick response, simple and professional services contribute to enhance the experiences of easy and pleasure lives. (3) Non-rational consumers need the respect from the staff and the companies seriously. In comparison, the rational customers care less about the respect. (4) The sociable requirements have become a common consuming psychology of the customers. More and more customers try to gain the friends by consuming some services. (5) The preferences of customer personal values have a close relationship with the Chinese culture, such as collective values, family conception and "face" culture. The results benefit for service companies improving service brands and service quality.

  15. Patient Satisfaction with the Family Physician Program in Sabzevar, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Alireza; Raeissi, Pouran; Saffari, Ehsan; Reissi, Nahid

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Patient satisfaction with the family physician program is an important factor for more favorable treatment results. Evaluation of patient satisfaction improves the services and approximates them to patient’s preferences. The family physician program has been executed since late March, 2005 in Iran. This study aimed to measure patient satisfaction with family physician services and determines factors affecting the level of satisfaction in order to propose appropriate suggestions for providing medical services based on patients’ expectations. Methods: Forty-one centers provide healthcare services in rural and urban areas. The participants in this study comprised 1263 people. The data were collected by an inventory with 11 items about demographic specifications, waiting time and the importance of physician’s sex and 40 items for assessing the level of patient satisfaction. Results: A total of 1199 patients participated in the current study, 72.1% of them were female and 19.6% waited 10-20 minutes for receiving services. About 55.72% of the participants chose high and very high for the items of the inventory. Total satisfaction with the family physician program decreased with age (p-value= 0.029).Moreover, total satisfaction did not show any significant differences in different groups in terms of sex, place of residence, education level and marital status. Also family physicians’ sex did not affect patient satisfaction significantly. Based on results of regression model, an increase in patients’ age by one year decreased their satisfaction by 0.12 and level of satisfaction in rural patients was lower than that in urban patients by 7.93. Conclusions: The level of patient satisfaction with family physician services was moderate, which mostly arose from the components of the family physician program and services such as the waiting time, costs, welfare facilities, accessibility and the service-providing team rather than patients

  16. Customer Loyalty in Virtual Environments: An Empirical Study in e-Bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Yu; Lee, Gin-Yuan; Ho, Yung-Ching

    2009-08-01

    The advent of e-commerce has increased the importance of consumer financing operations. Internet banking helps banks to develop relationship marketing, thus improve customer loyalty. This study proposes a research framework to examine the relationships among e-service quality, customer satisfaction, customer trust and e-loyalty in e-bank in Taiwan. Data are collected through a survey using a structured questionnaire. The 442 valid respondents who have experience with e-bank are analyzed by partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) method. The managerial implication is e-bank must focus on e-service quality to increase customer satisfaction and trust for obtaining the e-loyalty.

  17. Customer requirements process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Yvonne; Falsetti, Christine M.

    1991-01-01

    Customer requirements are presented through three viewgraphs. One graph presents the range of services, which include requirements management, network engineering, operations, and applications support. Another viewgraph presents the project planning process. The third viewgraph presents the programs and/or projects actively supported including life sciences, earth science and applications, solar system exploration, shuttle flight engineering, microgravity science, space physics, and astrophysics.

  18. Customizing Group Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambliss, Catherine; Oxman, Elaine

    The group therapy context provides unparalleled opportunities for cost effective learning. However, within group meetings, therapists must strive to tailor psychological services to address the particular needs of individual patients. Creative means of customizing patients experiences within group are needed in order to address consumer needs…

  19. Custom uniform source system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcom, John L.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose and scope of this final report is to provide information on the Custom Uniform Source System (CSTM-USS-4000). The report includes documentation and summaries of the results for the work performed under the contract. The Annex contain laboratory test findings, photographs, and drawings of the sphere system.

  20. Chippewa Customs. Reprint Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Densmore, Frances

    Using information obtained between 1907 and 1925 from members of the Chippewa tribe, the Bureau of American Ethnology, and the United States National Museum, the book describes various Chippewa customs. Information, collected on six reservations in Minnesota and Wisconsin and the Manitou Rapids Reserve in Ontario, Canada, is provided concerning…

  1. Family Customs and Traditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacGregor, Cynthia

    Recognizing the importance of maintaining open communication with immediate and extended family members, this book provides a compilation of ideas for family traditions and customs that are grounded in compassion and human kindness. The traditions were gathered from families in the United States and Canada who responded to advertisements in…

  2. Chinese Festivals and Customs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Sandra Aili

    Traditional festivals and customs of the Chinese people are described in this publication which can be used with secondary level students. In the margins of the text are numbers which indicate slides and cultural objects that relate to the text. The text, however, can be used without the slides and objects. The following festivals are described:…

  3. Students as Customers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuthbert, Rob

    2010-01-01

    The idea that students might be treated as customers triggers academics' antipathy, which in turn can lead to managerial irritation and political frustration. There are different discourses which barely overlap as their protagonists speak past one another. This article argues that these differences can be reconciled by re-conceiving the…

  4. Linking hospital security to customer service: making the case for 'world class' security.

    PubMed

    Hill, Scott A

    2011-01-01

    The reluctance of many hospitals today to invest money and resources into security and safety while at the same time promoting customer good will is a fallacy that has to be corrected, according to the author. He demonstrates how high customer satisfaction scores, as well as regulatory compliance, can only be achieved if a hospital takes the steps necessary to provide adequate safety and security to patients, visitors, physicians and to all who come to the hospital.

  5. The consumer revolution arrives. Using smart customer service to attract, educate, & retain satisfied members & lower costs.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, K

    1994-06-01

    Across the country, managed care organizations pursue ways to enhance customer service and maintain member satisfaction, without breaking the bank by authorizing unnecessary services. One method gaining popularity is reducing customer demand for inappropriate services through education. Approaches include welcome-to-the-plan calls, member education, automated and in-person answer lines, and 24-hour telephone coverage. Several firms have recognized the need for such services, and offer them to HMOs on an outsourcing basis, with generally positive results.

  6. The consumer revolution arrives. Using smart customer service to attract, educate & retain satisfied members & lower costs.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, K

    1994-06-01

    Across the country, managed care organizations pursue ways to enhance customer service and maintain member satisfaction, without breaking the bank by authorizing unnecessary services. One method gaining popularity is reducing customer demand for inappropriate services through education. Approaches include welcome-to-the-plan calls, member education, automated and in-person answer lines, and 24-hour telephone coverage. Several firms have recognized the need for such services, and offer them to HMOs on an outsourcing basis, with generally positive results.

  7. Innovative product design based on comprehensive customer requirements of different cognitive levels.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolong; Zhao, Wu; Zheng, Yake; Wang, Rui; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    To improve customer satisfaction in innovative product design, a topology structure of customer requirements is established and an innovative product approach is proposed. The topology structure provides designers with reasonable guidance to capture the customer requirements comprehensively. With the aid of analytic hierarchy process (AHP), the importance of the customer requirements is evaluated. Quality function deployment (QFD) is used to translate customer requirements into product and process design demands and pick out the technical requirements which need urgent improvement. In this way, the product is developed in a more targeted way to satisfy the customers. the theory of innovative problems solving (TRIZ) is used to help designers to produce innovative solutions. Finally, a case study of automobile steering system is used to illustrate the application of the proposed approach.

  8. Innovative Product Design Based on Comprehensive Customer Requirements of Different Cognitive Levels

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wu; Zheng, Yake; Wang, Rui; Wang, Chen

    2014-01-01

    To improve customer satisfaction in innovative product design, a topology structure of customer requirements is established and an innovative product approach is proposed. The topology structure provides designers with reasonable guidance to capture the customer requirements comprehensively. With the aid of analytic hierarchy process (AHP), the importance of the customer requirements is evaluated. Quality function deployment (QFD) is used to translate customer requirements into product and process design demands and pick out the technical requirements which need urgent improvement. In this way, the product is developed in a more targeted way to satisfy the customers. the theory of innovative problems solving (TRIZ) is used to help designers to produce innovative solutions. Finally, a case study of automobile steering system is used to illustrate the application of the proposed approach. PMID:25013862

  9. The development and validation of the Incivility from Customers Scale.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Nicole L; Holmvall, Camilla M

    2013-07-01

    Scant research has examined customers as sources of workplace incivility, despite evidence suggesting that mistreatment is more common from organizational outsiders, including customers, than from organizational members (Grandey, Kern, & Frone, 2007; Schat & Kelloway, 2005). As an important step in extending the literature on customer incivility, we conducted two studies to develop and validate a measure of this construct. Study 1 used focus groups of retail and restaurant employees (n = 30) to elicit a list of uncivil customer behaviors, based on which we wrote initial scale items. Study 2 used a correlational survey design (n = 439) to pare down the number of scale items to 10 and to garner reliability and validity evidence for the scale. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses show that the scale is unidimensional and distinguishable from measures of the related, but distinct, constructs of interpersonal justice and psychological aggression from customers. Reliability analyses show that the scale is internally consistent. Significant correlations between the scale and individuals' job satisfaction, turnover intentions, and general and job-specific psychological strain provide evidence of criterion-related validity. Hierarchical regression analyses show that the scale significantly predicts three of four organizational and personal strain outcomes over and above a workplace incivility measure adapted for customer incivility, providing some evidence of incremental validity. Limitations and future research directions are discussed.

  10. The Separate Constructs of Communication Satisfaction and Job Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregson, Terry

    1991-01-01

    A random sample of 889 certified public accountants was administered modified versions of the Job Descriptive Index and the Downs and Hazen Communication Satisfaction Questionnaire. There were 310 (35 percent) usable questionnaires returned. Factor analysis indicated that the accountants viewed job satisfaction and communication satisfaction as…

  11. Does psychological need satisfaction perceived online enhance well-being?

    PubMed

    Wang, Ligang; Tao, Ting; Fan, Chunlei; Gao, Wenbin

    2015-09-01

    The Internet has been building a new context, in which adolescents and young people complete their academic tasks, do their work, engage in social interaction, and even conduct anonymous identity experimentation. Therefore, it becomes very significant to assess psychological need satisfaction online, and to relate it to well-being. This study investigated the influence on well-being of psychological need satisfaction perceived online and the regulatory role in this relationship of psychological need satisfaction perceived in daily life. A total of 1,727 students from junior and senior high schools and universities in China were surveyed using the Basic Psychological Needs in General scale, the Basic Psychological Needs in the Online World scale, and the Index of Well-Being, Index of General Affect scale. The mean age of the adolescent sample was 17.47 years (ranging from 12.50 to 25.42 years). The results indicated that both need satisfaction perceived online and that perceived in daily life positively predicted psychological well-being, and psychological need satisfaction in daily life qualified the association between psychological need satisfaction perceived online and well-being. In particular, students who perceived higher psychological need satisfaction in daily life were found to benefit from psychological need satisfaction perceived online, but students with low psychological need satisfaction perceived in daily life did not. We suggest that people who perceive lower basic need satisfaction in daily life are more likely to use the Internet for socioaffective regulation and to consider cyberspace as a new world. Thus, need satisfaction perceived online may not transform into "real" happiness.

  12. Customization of biomedical terminologies.

    PubMed

    Homo, Julien; Dupuch, Laëtitia; Benbrahim, Allel; Grabar, Natalia; Dupuch, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Within the biomedical area over one hundred terminologies exist and are merged in the Unified Medical Language System Metathesaurus, which gives over 1 million concepts. When such huge terminological resources are available, the users must deal with them and specifically they must deal with irrelevant parts of these terminologies. We propose to exploit seed terms and semantic distance algorithms in order to customize the terminologies and to limit within them a semantically homogeneous space. An evaluation performed by a medical expert indicates that the proposed approach is relevant for the customization of terminologies and that the extracted terms are mostly relevant to the seeds. It also indicates that different algorithms provide with similar or identical results within a given terminology. The difference is due to the terminologies exploited. A special attention must be paid to the definition of optimal association between the semantic similarity algorithms and the thresholds specific to a given terminology.

  13. Partnership with the customer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trachta, Gregory S.

    1992-01-01

    This discussion will recount some historical observations about establishing partnerships with the customer. It suggests that such partnerships are established as the natural evolutionary product of a continuous improvement culture. Those are warm, ethereal terms about a topic that some people think already suffers from an excess of hot air. We will focus on some real-world activities and workplace artifacts to show there are substantive concepts behind the TQM buzzwords.

  14. College Faculty and Job Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diener, Thomas

    Attitudes of 277 faculty members about their work were surveyed in 1983. Herzberg and colleagues' theory that work satisfaction stems from the work itself and dissatisfaction from the work environment was also explored. Attention was directed to attitudes toward work, job stress, overall job satisfaction, and chief job satisfactions and…

  15. Geography of European Life Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of studies analyze life satisfaction at individual and/or country level. This study contributes with analysis of life satisfaction at the (sub-national) province level across multiple countries. The purpose of this study is to call attention to spatial aspects of life satisfaction. Literature does not discuss the fact that life…

  16. Job Satisfaction and Race Among Military Enlistees.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    and life satisfaction may be directly, as well as reciprocally related. (see Figure 1.1). This diagram indicates that life satisfaction is determined...scope variables : autonom.x, skill variety, feed- back from the job, task identity, and task significance, as well as life satisfaction . The existence...The Measurement of job satisfaction ...................... 13 3. Relationship between job satisfaction and life satisfaction

  17. Predicting Job Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blai, Boris, Jr.

    Psychological theories about human motivation and accommodation to environment can be used to achieve a better understanding of the human factors that function in the work environment. Maslow's theory of human motivational behavior provided a theoretical framework for an empirically-derived method to predict job satisfaction and explore the…

  18. Determinants of Community Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ladewig, Howard; McCann, Glenn C.

    Data taken from the Regional Technical Cooperative Project S-79 ("Rural Development and the Quality of Life in the Rural South") were used to assess the effects of objective conditions and subjective experiences on community satisfaction among a sample of 1,783 open-country household heads or spouses of household heads living in low…

  19. Employer Satisfaction Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, William A.

    A three-part, state-wide survey was conducted in Spring 1979, to determine employer satisfaction with the vocational programs offered at Hawaii's high schools and community colleges. Three populations were involved in the survey: (1) the personnel directors of 29 firms representing approximately 25% of the businesses in Hawaii with 250 or more…

  20. Scientists and Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermanowicz, Joseph C.

    2003-01-01

    Presents results from in-depth interviews in which respondents at a range of U.S. universities provided detailed accounts of their experience in, and identification with, academe. Studies satisfaction from the angle of the self-doubts scientists have about their work and careers, and investigates how self-doubts may systematically differ across…

  1. The Satisfactions of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisner, Elliot

    2006-01-01

    A noted educator reflects on six satisfactions that he experienced during his career in teaching: introducing students to great ideas, getting a foothold on immortality, improvising on the job, enjoying teaching as a meaningful aesthetic experience, sharing your love of what you teach, and knowing you made a difference in a student's life.

  2. Repeat Customer Success in Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, Melissa M.; Traub, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Four multi-session research-based programs were offered by two Extension specialist in one rural Missouri county. Eleven participants who came to multiple Extension programs could be called "repeat customers." Based on the total number of participants for all four programs, 25% could be deemed as repeat customers. Repeat customers had…

  3. The art of customer service.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jeni

    2007-10-01

    Strategies for improving the consumer service skills of finance staff include: Hire employees who have a customer service background. Work with your human resources department to provide customer service training. Monitor new hires extensively. Offer front-end employees scripted language for situations they may face on the job. Measure the quality of customer service provided. Provide incentives for performance.

  4. Workload and the trajectory of marital satisfaction in newlyweds: job satisfaction, gender, and parental status as moderators.

    PubMed

    van Steenbergen, Elianne F; Kluwer, Esther S; Karney, Benjamin R

    2011-06-01

    Stress, on average, is bad for relationships. Yet stress at work is not always associated with negative relationship outcomes. The premise of the current study was that associations between workload and trajectories of marital satisfaction depend on circumstances that may constrain or facilitate partners' ability to negotiate their multiple roles. We hypothesized that the covariance between changes in workload and marital satisfaction over time should be moderated by (a) the extent to which spouses like their work, (b) their parental status, and (c) their gender. Analyses drawing upon eight waves of data on workload, work satisfaction, and marital satisfaction from 169 newlywed couples assessed over four years confirmed these predictions. Specifically, across couples, demands at work covaried positively with marital satisfaction for spouses who were more satisfied with their jobs. For nonparent couples, increases in husbands' workload covaried with increases in marital satisfaction for both spouses. For parent couples, however, increases in husbands' workload covaried with declines in marital satisfaction for both spouses. Unexpectedly, for parent couples, increases in wives' workload corresponded with increased marital satisfaction. Finally, consistent with predictions, wives were more affected by their husbands' workload than vice versa. Thus, tension between work and marriage is not inevitable, instead depending on circumstances that facilitate or impair performance in multiple roles. Couples, employers, and practitioners should recognize the role that external circumstances play in determining how work and marital life interact.

  5. Comparison of students' foodservice satisfaction between Korea and US

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Eunkyung; Chun, Youngah; Joo, Nami

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzes important factors of foodservice in school through comparison of students' satisfaction of using foodservice in Korea and US in order to meet students' expectations. The survey was composed of 4 categories including menu, service, hygiene, and facility and it was carried out in both countries to evaluate satisfaction. First, comparison of satisfaction between two countries was made using t-test. Secondly, multiple regression was performed to identify factors affecting satisfaction. As a result Korean students were more satisfied than American students in all aspects. However, regardless of nationality, the top three factors affecting the students' satisfaction were the same. The predictors were food taste (Korean 0.375 and American 0.350), menu variety (Korean 0.305 and American 0.278), and service line (Korean 0.226 and American 0.192). Despite the similarity of the predicators, it can be concluded that the difference in satisfaction level between the two nationscan be explained by the approaches to create comfortable and acceptable changes in schools' foodservice. Korea has been increasing the foodservice quality based on their objectives to provide students comfortable and positive environment when eating nutritious meals. However, US have made their main objectives on making changes to decrease youth obesity. Foodservice improvements according to continuous evaluations and surveys are necessary in order to increase students' satisfaction. PMID:23422683

  6. Workforce issues and consumer satisfaction in Medicaid personal assistance services.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Wayne L; Wiener, Joshua M; Khatutsky, Galina

    2006-01-01

    This study used a survey of older people and younger persons with disabilities who were receiving Medicaid-financed home and community-based services (HCBS) to assess the effect of workforce issues on consumer satisfaction. We found that recruitment problems had very strong negative and significant effects on consumer satisfaction. An interruption in service was a more important and significant indicator of consumer dissatisfaction than not having the same worker over time. We also found that problems with worker training and respect and treatment of consumers strongly and significantly affected satisfaction with paid care. Efforts to improve workforce issues are needed to improve the quality of care of these services.

  7. Undergraduate Orientations towards Higher Education in Germany and England: Problematizing the Notion of "Student as Customer"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Richard

    2017-01-01

    There is a great deal of discussion in the academic literature around how the current conditions in higher education frame students as customers. Observers are of the view that rankings and marketing, an increased focus on student satisfaction, and particularly tuition fees, encourage an instrumental, passive attitude towards a university…

  8. Customer Service Training for Public Services Staff at Temple University's Central Library System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, Gwen

    Arguing that good interpersonal interactions between library staff and their patrons is a major determinant of overall patron satisfaction, this paper describes Temple University's customer service training program for its public services staff. Dubbed the "A+ Service" program, the program focuses on six aspects of library service: (1)…

  9. Marketing through Online Leadership to Retain Invisible Customers: Perceptions of Online Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kibiloski, F. Terry.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative study examined the relationship between student perceived leadership styles of online university instructors, and the perceived customer satisfaction and retention of online students. Specifically, the four goals of this study were to determine: (a) students' perception of their online instructor's leadership style, (b) if…

  10. Listening to Students: Customer Journey Mapping at Birmingham City University Library and Learning Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Judith; Eade, Eleanor

    2013-01-01

    Birmingham City University's Library and Learning Resources' strategic aim is to improve student satisfaction. A key element is the achievement of the Customer Excellence Standard. An important component of the standard is the mapping of services to improve quality. Library and Learning Resources has developed a methodology to map these…

  11. To Customize or Not to Customize? Exploring Science Teacher Customization in an Online Lesson Portal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littenberg-Tobias, Joshua; Beheshti, Elham; Staudt, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    New technologies are increasingly giving science teachers the ability to access and customize science lessons. However, there is substantial debate in the literature about whether and under what conditions teacher customization benefit student learning. In this study, we examined teacher customization of inquiry-based science lessons from an…

  12. An Examination of Factors Contributing to Student Satisfaction in Armenian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martirosyan, Nara

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate factors that affect student satisfaction in college environment in Armenian Higher Educational Institutions (AHEIs). Design/methodology/approach: This study used an "ex-post facto," non-experimental approach to investigate factors that affected student satisfaction in college…

  13. Who's your best customer?

    PubMed

    MacStravic, S

    1998-01-01

    Conventional wisdom holds that the best customers and prospects for managed care are the healthiest consumers. This is true only because of the meager extent to which premiums can be adjusted for varying risk among individuals. If a decent health/risk adjustment system were used, the best consumers for managed care to go after would be the highest-risk, highest users of health care, provided only that risk and use can be improved. The healthiest consumers have both the least potential for improvement and the least reasons for loyalty.

  14. The mismanagement of customer loyalty.

    PubMed

    Reinartz, Werner; Kumar, V

    2002-07-01

    Who wouldn't want loyal customers? Surely they should cost less to serve, they'd be willing to pay more than other customers, and they'd actively market your company by word of mouth, right? Maybe not. Careful study of the relationship between customer loyalty and profits plumbed from 16,000 customers in four companies' databases tells a different story. The authors found no evidence to support any of these claims. What they did find was that the link between customers and profitability was more complicated because customers fall into four groups, not two. Simply put: Not all loyal customers are profitable, and not all profitable customers are loyal. Traditional tools for segmenting customers do a poor job of identifying that latter group, causing companies to chase expensively after initially profitable customers who hold little promise of future profits. The authors suggest an alternative approach, based on well-established "event-history modeling" techniques, that more accurately predicts future buying probabilities. Armed with such a tool, marketers can correctly identify which customers belong in which category and market accordingly. The challenge in managing customers who are profitable but disloyal--the "butterflies"--is to milk them for as much as you can while they're buying from you. A softly-softly approach is more appropriate for the profitable customers who are likely to stay loyal--your "true friends." As for highly loyal but not very profitable customers--the "barnacles"--you need to find out if they have the potential to spend more than they currently do. And, of course, for the "strangers"--those who generate no loyalty and no profits--the answer is simple: Identify early and don't invest anything.

  15. Impact of patient satisfaction ratings on physicians and clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Zgierska, Aleksandra; Rabago, David; Miller, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    Background Although patient satisfaction ratings often drive positive changes, they may have unintended consequences. Objective The study reported here aimed to evaluate the clinician-perceived effects of patient satisfaction ratings on job satisfaction and clinical care. Methods A 26-item survey, developed by a state medical society in 2012 to assess the effects of patient satisfaction surveys, was administered online to physician members of a state-level medical society. Respondents remained anonymous. Results One hundred fifty five physicians provided responses (3.9% of the estimated 4,000 physician members of the state-level medical society, or approximately 16% of the state’s emergency department [ED] physicians). The respondents were predominantly male (85%) and practicing in solo or private practice (45%), hospital (43%), or academia (15%). The majority were ED (57%), followed by primary care (16%) physicians. Fifty-nine percent reported that their compensation was linked to patient satisfaction ratings. Seventy-eight percent reported that patient satisfaction surveys moderately or severely affected their job satisfaction; 28% had considered quitting their job or leaving the medical profession. Twenty percent reported their employment being threatened because of patient satisfaction data. Almost half believed that pressure to obtain better scores promoted inappropriate care, including unnecessary antibiotic and opioid prescriptions, tests, procedures, and hospital admissions. Among 52 qualitative responses, only three were positive. Conclusion These pilot-level data suggest that patient satisfaction survey utilization may promote, under certain circumstances, job dissatisfaction, attrition, and inappropriate clinical care among some physicians. This is concerning, especially in the context of the progressive incorporation of patient satisfaction ratings as a quality-of-care metric, and highlights the need for a rigorous evaluation of the optimal methods

  16. Satisfaction of Elderly Hearing Aid Users.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, Lorena; Ribas, Angela; Almeida, Gleide; Luz, Idalina

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The impact of auditory sensory deprivation in the life of an individual is enormous because it not only affects one's ability to properly understand auditory information, but also the way people relate to their environment and their culture. The monitoring of adult and elderly subjects with hearing loss is intended to minimize the difficulties and handicaps that occur as a consequence of this pathology. Objective To evaluate the level of user satisfaction with hearing aids. Methods A clinical and experimental study involving 91 elderly hearing aid users. We used the questionnaire Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life to determine the degree of the satisfaction provided by hearing aids. We evaluated mean global score, subscales, as well as the variables time to use, age, and degree of hearing loss. Results Mean global score was 4.73, the score for Positive Effects 5.45, Negative Factors 3.2, demonstrating that they were satisfied; Services and Costs 5.98: very satisfied ; 3.65 Personal Image: dissatisfied. We observed statistically significant difference for the time of hearing aid use, age, and degree of hearing loss. Conclusion The SADL is a tool, simple and easy to apply and in this study we can demonstrate the high degree of satisfaction with the hearing aids by the majority of the sample collected, increasing with time of use and a greater degree of hearing loss.

  17. Satisfaction of Elderly Hearing Aid Users

    PubMed Central

    Kozlowski, Lorena; Ribas, Angela; Almeida, Gleide; Luz, Idalina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The impact of auditory sensory deprivation in the life of an individual is enormous because it not only affects one's ability to properly understand auditory information, but also the way people relate to their environment and their culture. The monitoring of adult and elderly subjects with hearing loss is intended to minimize the difficulties and handicaps that occur as a consequence of this pathology. Objective To evaluate the level of user satisfaction with hearing aids. Methods A clinical and experimental study involving 91 elderly hearing aid users. We used the questionnaire Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life to determine the degree of the satisfaction provided by hearing aids. We evaluated mean global score, subscales, as well as the variables time to use, age, and degree of hearing loss. Results Mean global score was 4.73, the score for Positive Effects 5.45, Negative Factors 3.2, demonstrating that they were satisfied; Services and Costs 5.98: very satisfied ; 3.65 Personal Image: dissatisfied. We observed statistically significant difference for the time of hearing aid use, age, and degree of hearing loss. Conclusion The SADL is a tool, simple and easy to apply and in this study we can demonstrate the high degree of satisfaction with the hearing aids by the majority of the sample collected, increasing with time of use and a greater degree of hearing loss. PMID:28050214

  18. Naval Outpatient Medical Care and Services: A Comparison of the Perceptions of Satisfaction Held by Sub-Groupings of a Beneficiary Population

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    services and providers. How does the medical community find out how well it is meeting the needs of its customers? In general, patient satisfaction is the...PERCEPTIONS OF SATISFACTION HELD BY SUB-GROUPINGS OF A BENEFICIARY POPULATION 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) LCDR John A. Rooney 13a. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED...OUTPATIENT MEDICAL CARE AND SERVICES: A COMPARISON OF THE PERCEPTIONS OF SATISFACTION HELD BY SUB-GROUPINGS OF A BENEFICIARY POPULATION A Graduate Research

  19. Life Satisfaction and the Pursuit of Happiness on Twitter

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao; Srinivasan, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    Life satisfaction refers to a somewhat stable cognitive assessment of one’s own life. Life satisfaction is an important component of subjective well being, the scientific term for happiness. The other component is affect: the balance between the presence of positive and negative emotions in daily life. While affect has been studied using social media datasets (particularly from Twitter), life satisfaction has received little to no attention. Here, we examine trends in posts about life satisfaction from a two-year sample of Twitter data. We apply a surveillance methodology to extract expressions of both satisfaction and dissatisfaction with life. A noteworthy result is that consistent with their definitions trends in life satisfaction posts are immune to external events (political, seasonal etc.) unlike affect trends reported by previous researchers. Comparing users we find differences between satisfied and dissatisfied users in several linguistic, psychosocial and other features. For example the latter post more tweets expressing anger, anxiety, depression, sadness and on death. We also study users who change their status over time from satisfied with life to dissatisfied or vice versa. Noteworthy is that the psychosocial tweet features of users who change from satisfied to dissatisfied are quite different from those who stay satisfied over time. Overall, the observations we make are consistent with intuition and consistent with observations in the social science research. This research contributes to the study of the subjective well being of individuals through social media. PMID:26982323

  20. Life Satisfaction and the Pursuit of Happiness on Twitter.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chao; Srinivasan, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    Life satisfaction refers to a somewhat stable cognitive assessment of one's own life. Life satisfaction is an important component of subjective well being, the scientific term for happiness. The other component is affect: the balance between the presence of positive and negative emotions in daily life. While affect has been studied using social media datasets (particularly from Twitter), life satisfaction has received little to no attention. Here, we examine trends in posts about life satisfaction from a two-year sample of Twitter data. We apply a surveillance methodology to extract expressions of both satisfaction and dissatisfaction with life. A noteworthy result is that consistent with their definitions trends in life satisfaction posts are immune to external events (political, seasonal etc.) unlike affect trends reported by previous researchers. Comparing users we find differences between satisfied and dissatisfied users in several linguistic, psychosocial and other features. For example the latter post more tweets expressing anger, anxiety, depression, sadness and on death. We also study users who change their status over time from satisfied with life to dissatisfied or vice versa. Noteworthy is that the psychosocial tweet features of users who change from satisfied to dissatisfied are quite different from those who stay satisfied over time. Overall, the observations we make are consistent with intuition and consistent with observations in the social science research. This research contributes to the study of the subjective well being of individuals through social media.

  1. 75 FR 6790 - Interagency Guidance on Response Programs for Unauthorized Access to Customer Information and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... information systems and types of customer information affected; (b) notify the institution's primary Federal... Customer Information and Customer Notice AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury. ACTION... comment on proposed and continuing information collections, as required by the Paperwork Reduction Act...

  2. Adopting customers' empowerment and social networks to encourage participations in e-health services.

    PubMed

    Anshari, Muhammad; Almunawar, Mohammad Nabil; Low, Patrick Kim Cheng; Wint, Zaw; Younis, Mustafa Z

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present an e-health model that embeds empowerment and social network intervention that may extend the role of customers in health care settings. A 25-item Likert-type survey instrument was specifically developed for this study and administered to a sample of 108 participants in Indonesia from October to November 2012. The data were analyzed to provide ideas on how to move forward with the e-health initiative as a means to improve e-health services. The survey revealed that there is a high demand for customers' empowerment and involvement in social networks to improve their health literacy and customer satisfaction. Regardless of the limitations of the study, the participants have responded with great support for the abilities of the prototype systems drawn from the survey. The survey results were used as requirements to develop a system prototype that incorporates the expectations of the people. The prototype (namely Clinic 2.0) was derived from the model and confirmed from the survey. Participants were selected to use the system for three months, after which we measured its impact towards their health literacy and customer satisfaction. The results show that the system intervention through Clinic 2.0 leads to a high level of customer satisfaction and health literacy.

  3. One-to-one modeling and simulation: a new approach in customer relationship management for grocery retail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baydar, Cem M.

    2002-03-01

    The ever-increasing competition in retail industry puts pressure on retailers to deal with their customers more efficiently. Currently most companies use Customer Relationship Management (CRM) systems to maximize the customer satisfaction level by trying to understand more about their behaviors. However, one disadvantage of the current approaches is that they focus on the segmentation of customers into homogenous groups and they disregard examining the one-to-one relationship of each individual's behavior toward each product. Therefore, individual behavior cannot be captured in detail. Modeling individual behavior for each product enables several strategies of pricing by keeping the customer satisfaction at the maximum level. One example is offering a personal discount on a particular item to a customer who is price sensitive to that particular product. Therefore, you can still sell other products at the non-discounted level to this customer by keeping him satisfied. In this paper, individual pricing approach is discussed. The aim of this study is to develop a conceptual framework to analyze the feasibility of individual pricing. Customer behaviors can be modeled individually with respect to each product for a grocery store. Several factors can be used to determine these behaviors such as customer's need, brand loyalty and price sensitivity. Each customer can be modeled as an adaptive agent using qualitative descriptions of behaviors (i.e., highly price sensitive). Then, the overall shopping behavior can be simulated using a multi-agent Monte-Carlo simulation. It is expected that with this approach, retailers will be able to determine better strategies to obtain more profits, better sales and better customer satisfaction.

  4. Buffering the negative effects of employee surface acting: the moderating role of employee-customer relationship strength and personalized services.

    PubMed

    Wang, Karyn L; Groth, Markus

    2014-03-01

    The impact of emotional labor on customer outcomes is gaining considerable attention in the literature, with research suggesting that the authenticity of emotional displays may positively impact customer outcomes. However, research investigating the impact of more inauthentic emotions on service delivery outcomes is mixed (see Chi, Grandey, Diamond, & Krimmel, 2011). This study explores 2 potential reasons for why the service outcomes of inauthentic emotions are largely inconsistent: the impact of distinct surface acting strategies and the role of service delivery context. Drawing on social-functional theories of emotions, we surveyed 243 dyads of employees and customers from a wide variety of services to examine the links between employee surface acting and customer service satisfaction, and whether this relationship is moderated by relationship strength and service personalization. Our findings suggest that faking positive emotions has no bearing on service satisfaction, but suppressing negative emotions interacts with contextual factors to predict customers' service satisfaction, in line with social-functional theories of emotions. Specifically, customers who know the employee well are less sensitive to the negative effects of suppressed negative emotions, and customers in highly personalized service encounters are more sensitive to the negative effects of suppressed negative emotions. We conclude with a discussion of theoretical and practical implications.

  5. Patients'/Clients' Expectation Toward and Satisfaction from Pharmacy Services

    PubMed Central

    Ayalew, Mohammed Biset; Taye, Kaleab; Asfaw, Daniel; Lemma, Bethlehem; Dadi, Filagot; Solomon, Habtamu; Tazeze, Haile; Tsega, Bayew

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Satisfaction is becoming a popular health-care quality indicator as it reflects the reality of service or care provided. The aim of this study was to assess the level of patients' expectation toward and satisfaction from pharmacy service provided and to identify associated factor that might affect their expectation and satisfaction. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 287 patients, who were served in five pharmacies of Gondar University Hospital in May 2015. Data regarding socio-demographic characteristics and parameters that measure patients' expectation and satisfaction were collected through interview using the Amharic version of the questionnaire. Data were entered into SPSS version 21, and descriptive statistics, cross-tabs, and binary logistic regressions were utilized. P < 0.05 was used to declare association. Findings: Among 287 respondents involved in the study, 149 (51.9%) claimed to be satisfied with the pharmacy service and setting. Two hundred and twenty-nine (79.4%) respondents have high expectation toward gaining good services. Even though significant association was observed between the pharmacy type and patients level of satisfaction, sociodemographic characteristics of a patient were not found to predict the level of satisfaction. There is a higher level of expectation among study participants who earn higher income per month (>(2000 Ethiopian birr [ETB]) than those who get less income (<1000 ETB). Conclusion: Although patients have a higher level of expectation toward pharmacy services, their satisfaction from the service was found to be low. PMID:28331862

  6. Mobility disability and life satisfaction in elderly people.

    PubMed

    Mollaoğlu, Mukadder; Tuncay, Fatma Özkan; Fertelli, Tülay Kars

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this descriptive and analytical study is to examine mobility disability and life satisfaction in elderly people living in nursing home residences and analyze the relationship between them. The study was conducted over 78 elderly people in two nursing home residences. The data of this study were obtained through a personal information form (PIF), the Rivermead mobility index (RMI) and the life satisfaction scale (LSS). It was detected that life satisfaction levels of elderly people were average, a great majority of them went through mobility disability and there was a significant correlation between mobility and life satisfaction. It was established that in elderly people mobility was affected by the age, gender and chronic diseases while life satisfaction was related to age, education level and health perception level. Disability is a factor that has a significant effect on the life satisfaction of elderly people. The findings of this study will be useful for planning interventions to improve mobility and satisfaction with life among nursing home elders in Turkey.

  7. The Relationship Between Attachment Styles and Lifestyle With Marital Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Korosh; Samavi, Abdolvahab; Ghazavi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Background Marital satisfaction is one of the deepest and the most basic human pleasures and should be established within the family environment; if not, couples might suffer emotionally. Several factors are involved, including attachment and lifestyle. Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between styles of attachment and lifestyle with marital satisfaction. Materials and Methods The population in this study included all of the Bandar Abbas oil refining (BAOR) company employees, for a total of 292 people (146 couples). They were selected by multistage random sampling. The enrich marital satisfaction scale was used to measure marital satisfaction, the Collins and read’s revised adult attachment scale (RAAS) for adult attachment to determine attachment style, and the life style questionnaire (LSQ) for lifestyle. This research was a descriptive-correlative one, and for the data analysis, we used Pearson’s correlation factor and multivariable regression. Results The results indicate that attachment style and lifestyle factors can predict marital satisfaction. There was also a meaningful negative relationship between insecure attachment avoidant and insecure attachment anxious-ambivalent styles and marital satisfaction. However, there was no meaningful relationship between secure attachment style and marital satisfaction. Conclusions The results showed that the early relationship within the family environment supports a certain attachment style and the effects of the avoidant insecure and ambivalent insecure styles affect the interpersonal relations of the couples in adulthood. The effect of attachment styles on interpersonal relations is far greater than that of lifestyle. PMID:27433349

  8. Predictive Systems for Customer Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, Ravi; Albert, Sam; Singh, Vinod Kumar; Kannan, Pallipuram V.

    With the coming of age of web as a mainstream customer service channel, B2C companies have invested substantial resources in enhancing their web presence. Today customers can interact with a company, not only through the traditional phone channel but also through chat, email, SMS or web self-service. Each of these channels is best suited for some services and ill-matched for others. Customer service organizations today struggle with the challenge of delivering seamlessly integrated services through these different channels. This paper will evaluate some of the key challenges in multi-channel customer service. It will address the challenge of creating the right channel mix i.e. providing the right choice of channels for a given customer/behavior/issue profile. It will also provide strategies for optimizing the performance of a given channel in creating the right customer experience.

  9. Measuring patient satisfaction with the Polish version of the Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scale.

    PubMed

    Gutysz-Wojnicka, Aleksandra; Dyk, Danuta; Cudak, Edyta; Ozga, Dorota

    2013-06-01

    The measurement of patients' satisfaction is increasingly becoming legal and ethical duty of healthcare providers worldwide. Till now, there were no validated, widely available Polish scales to assess patients' satisfaction with nursing care. The aim of this study was to assess the experiences and satisfaction with nursing care of patients hospitalized in surgical and nonsurgical wards in Poland using Polish version of the Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scale. This is a multicentre, cross-sectional, descriptive study. Eight hospitals were qualified to participate in a convenience manner. The correlations between variables were analysed using the Mann-Whitney or the Kruskal-Wallis tests. In the case of a significant correlation, the Dunn's test was used to conduct multiple comparisons for the group of variables. A significance of α = 0.05 was assumed for the tests. A total 918 patients participated in the study, and 787 (85.72%) questionnaires were correctly filled out. The average result on the 'experience' scale was 73.22 (Me 73.07) and on the 'satisfaction' scale, 74.98 (Me 76.31). Education levels did not affect the experiences of nursing care levels p = 0.2204 and satisfaction with nursing care p = 0.1075. Patient age had a statistically significant impact on the results of the 'experiences of nursing care' scale p = 0.0005 and the 'satisfaction with nursing' scale p = 0.0194. The experiences of nursing care (p = 0.0002) and patients satisfaction (p = 0.0000) were significantly higher in surgical wards than in nonsurgical wards. The experiences of nursing care were significantly lower in the university hospital than in provincial hospitals (p = 0.0374) and district hospitals (p = 0.0183). A comparison of patient satisfaction with nursing in various hospitals shows that patients were most satisfied in district hospitals (average 78.10, Me 82.89), followed by provincial hospitals (average 72.11, Me 76.31) and the university hospital (average 70.64, Me 71.05).

  10. Customized ATP towpreg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandusky, Donald A.; Marchello, Joseph M.; Baucom, Robert M.; Johnston, Norman J.

    Automated tow placement (ATP) utilizes robotic technology to lay down adjacent polymer-matrix-impregnated carbon fiber tows on a tool surface. Consolidation and cure during ATP requires that void elimination and polymer matrix adhesion be accomplished in the short period of heating and pressure rolling that follows towpreg ribbon placement from the robot head to the tool. This study examined the key towpreg ribbon properties and dimensions which play a significant role in ATP. Analysis of the heat transfer process window indicates that adequate heating can be achieved at lay down rates as high as 1 m/sec. While heat transfer did not appear to be the limiting factor, resin flow and fiber movement into tow lap gaps could be. Accordingly, consideration was given to towpreg ribbon having uniform yet non-rectangular cross sections. Dimensional integrity of the towpreg ribbon combined with customized ribbon architecture offer great promise for processing advances in ATP of high performance composites.

  11. Facets of career satisfaction for women physicians in the United States: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rizvi, Rabab; Raymer, Lindsay; Kunik, Mark; Fisher, Joslyn

    2012-01-01

    Women make up a growing proportion of the physician workforce, and their career satisfaction may affect their health. The authors hypothesized that many facets adversely affecting career satisfaction in women physicians were extrinsic, therefore, preventable or modifiable. The authors conducted a systematic review of the literature in English published through February 2010 to examine facets of career satisfaction of U.S. women physicians. The authors used the women physician AND job satisfaction OR career satisfaction Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms, and reviewed bibliographies of key articles to ensure inclusion of relevant studies. The authors used the "Strengthening the Reporting of Observation Studies in Epidemiology" quality tool. Of an initial 1,000 studies, only 30 met the inclusion criteria. Facets reported most frequently to influence career satisfaction for women physicians were income/prestige, practice characteristics, and personal/family characteristics. Overall, career satisfaction for women and men physicians was 73.4% (range = 56.4% to 90%) and 73.2% (range = 59% to 90%), respectively. When compared with men, women physicians were more concerned with perceived lack of time for relationships with patients, colleagues, and family; less satisfied with mentoring relationships and support from all sources; and less satisfied with career-advancement opportunities, recognition, and salary. Career satisfaction can affect health, as well as health and safety of patients. Many factors adversely affecting career satisfaction for women physicians are extrinsic and, therefore, modifiable.

  12. A compass for customer needs.

    PubMed

    Hines, J D; Murray, M

    1998-02-01

    Baldor Electric uses a tool it calls the value formula to help teach its employees to look at their work through the eyes of the customer. In fact, the goal of the value improvement process is to focus everyone on customer value, and the employees, by going through five training courses, learn how improving quality and service and reducing cost and time lead to higher value for the customer.

  13. The role of brand trust in male customers' relationship to luxury brands.

    PubMed

    Hur, Won-Moo; Kim, Minsung; Kim, Hanna

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the role of brand trust in customers' luxury brand consumption behavior. Perceived value and brand satisfaction were presented within a framework as antecedents of brand trust, while brand loyalty and brand risk were presented as consequences. A face-to-face survey was administered to a sample (N = 400) of men between 25 and 54 years of age who had purchased luxury brand and non-luxury brand suits within the previous three months. The results showed the greater the hedonic value on brand satisfaction, the greater the influence of brand satisfaction on brand trust, and the greater was the effect of brand trust on brand loyalty for luxury brands as compared with non-luxury brands. Similar patterns are identified between luxury and non-luxury brands for the positive relationship between utilitarian value and brand satisfaction and the negative relationship between brand trust and brand risk.

  14. The moderators of patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Jessie L

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which Department of Defense (DOD) active duty patient sociodemographic, health status, geographic location, and utilization factors, predict overall patient satisfaction with health care in military facilities. A theoretical framework developed from patient satisfaction and social identity theories and from previous empirical findings was used to develop a model to predict patient satisfaction and delineate moderating variables. The major finding indicated in this study was the significance of patients' characteristics in moderating their satisfaction. Principal components factor analysis and hierarchical linear regression revealed that patient specific factors predicted patients' satisfaction after controlling for factors depicting patients' evaluations of health system characteristics. Patient specific factors provided added, although very minimal, explanatory value to the determination of patients' satisfaction. The study findings can aid in the development of targeted, objectively prioritized programs of improvement and marketing by ranking variables using patients' passively derived importance schema.

  15. Conflict Management Styles and Job Satisfaction by Organizational Level and Status in a Private University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Irene Ana

    2011-01-01

    Effective handling of conflict can result in effective teamwork and leadership, higher morale, increased productivity, satisfied customers, and satisfied employees. Ineffective conflict management styles in the workplace can lead to low levels of job satisfaction, resulting in high levels of turnover. Research indicates that the economic cost to…

  16. Improving Service Delivery: Investigating the Role of Information Sharing, Job Characteristics, and Employee Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bontis, Nick; Richards, David; Serenko, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to propose and test a model designed to investigate the impact of job characteristics, employee satisfaction, and information sharing on two key indicators of quality service delivery, such as worker perceptions of their efficiency and customer focus. Design/methodology/approach: During the project, 9,060…

  17. Understanding the Factors That Influence Student Satisfaction with the Undergraduate Business Major

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Melanie Beth; Haug, James C.; Huckabee, W. Allen

    2016-01-01

    A survey was administered to undergraduate business students to gain insight into 34 factors influencing satisfaction, divided into curriculum matters, interaction between faculty and students, and activities beyond coursework. Students expressed a desire for experienced faculty, degree customization, and career paths through internships, with…

  18. Examining Antecedents of Satisfaction for Marketing/Management Students in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fine, Monica B.; Clark, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Marketing and management departments preach a continual discourse about the importance of feedback from customers. Yet many business schools do not take the time to develop their own student satisfaction surveys to provide the departments with useful feedback. Business schools are constantly forced to compete with other colleges and often other…

  19. Austin Community College Management Response to Employee Satisfaction Survey, Spring 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin Community Coll., TX.

    Findings from an Employee Satisfaction Survey conducted in spring 2000 at Austin Community College (ACC) (Texas) indicate that: (1) staff in many areas need customer service training; (2) telephones are not used effectively by many offices; (3) many areas are not able to respond quickly to the needs of college staff; and (4) 18 highly used areas…

  20. The Influence of Changing Nurse Documentation Practices Have on Patient Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blaney, Charon D.

    2012-01-01

    Health care leaders in the 21st century face challenges that stem from issues concerning quality care in a cost efficient environment while maintaining customer satisfaction. Technology has played a vital part in offering more advanced diagnostic and surgical equipment. The proliferation of technology has resulted in documentation at the…