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Sample records for affect disease susceptibility

  1. Genetic Factors Affecting Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Rezazadeh, Maryam; Khorrami, Aziz; Yeghaneh, Tarlan; Talebi, Mahnaz; Kiani, Seyed Jalal; Heshmati, Yaser; Gharesouran, Jalal

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease is considered a progressive brain disease in the older population. Late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) as a multifactorial dementia has a polygenic inheritance. Age, environment, and lifestyle along with a growing number of genetic factors have been reported as risk factors for LOAD. Our aim was to present results of LOAD association studies that have been done in northwestern Iran, and we also explored possible interactions with apolipoprotein E (APOE) status. We re-evaluated the association of these markers in dominant, recessive, and additive models. In all, 160 LOAD and 163 healthy control subjects of Azeri Turkish ethnicity were studied. The Chi-square test with Yates' correction and Fisher's exact test were used for statistical analysis. A Bonferroni-corrected p value, based on the number of statistical tests, was considered significant. Our results confirmed that chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2), estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1), toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF α), APOE, bridging integrator 1 (BIN1), and phosphatidylinositol-binding clathrin assembly protein (PICALM) are LOAD susceptibility loci in Azeri Turk ancestry populations. Among them, variants of CCR2, ESR1, TNF α, and APOE revealed associations in three different genetic models. After adjusting for APOE, the association (both allelic and genotypic) with CCR2, BIN1, and ESRα (PvuII) was evident only among subjects without the APOE ε4, whereas the association with CCR5, without Bonferroni correction, was significant only among subjects carrying the APOE ε4 allele. This result is an evidence of a synergistic and antagonistic effect of APOE on variant associations with LOAD. PMID:26553058

  2. FACTORS AFFECTING SUSCEPTIBILITY OF THE CORAL MONTASTRAEA FAVEOLATE TO BLACK-BAND DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Black-band disease affects many species of tropical reef-building corals, but it is unclear what factors contribute to the disease-susceptibility of individual corals or how the disease is transmitted between colonies. Studies have suggested that the ability of black-band disease...

  3. Susceptibility to Ticks and Lyme Disease Spirochetes Is Not Affected in Mice Coinfected with Nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Maaz, Denny; Rausch, Sebastian; Richter, Dania; Krücken, Jürgen; Kühl, Anja A.; Demeler, Janina; Blümke, Julia; Matuschka, Franz-Rainer; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Small rodents serve as reservoir hosts for tick-borne pathogens, such as the spirochetes causing Lyme disease. Whether natural coinfections with other macroparasites alter the success of tick feeding, antitick immunity, and the host's reservoir competence for tick-borne pathogens remains to be determined. In a parasitological survey of wild mice in Berlin, Germany, approximately 40% of Ixodes ricinus-infested animals simultaneously harbored a nematode of the genus Heligmosomoides. We therefore aimed to analyze the immunological impact of the nematode/tick coinfection as well as its effect on the tick-borne pathogen Borrelia afzelii. Hosts experimentally coinfected with Heligmosomoides polygyrus and larval/nymphal I. ricinus ticks developed substantially stronger systemic type 2 T helper cell (Th2) responses, on the basis of the levels of GATA-3 and interleukin-13 expression, than mice infected with a single pathogen. During repeated larval infestations, however, anti-tick Th2 reactivity and an observed partial immunity to tick feeding were unaffected by concurrent nematode infections. Importantly, the strong systemic Th2 immune response in coinfected mice did not affect susceptibility to tick-borne B. afzelii. An observed trend for decreased local and systemic Th1 reactivity against B. afzelii in coinfected mice did not result in a higher spirochete burden, nor did it facilitate bacterial dissemination or induce signs of immunopathology. Hence, this study indicates that strong systemic Th2 responses in nematode/tick-coinfected house mice do not affect the success of tick feeding and the control of the causative agent of Lyme disease. PMID:26883594

  4. Susceptibility to Ticks and Lyme Disease Spirochetes Is Not Affected in Mice Coinfected with Nematodes.

    PubMed

    Maaz, Denny; Rausch, Sebastian; Richter, Dania; Krücken, Jürgen; Kühl, Anja A; Demeler, Janina; Blümke, Julia; Matuschka, Franz-Rainer; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Georg; Hartmann, Susanne

    2016-05-01

    Small rodents serve as reservoir hosts for tick-borne pathogens, such as the spirochetes causing Lyme disease. Whether natural coinfections with other macroparasites alter the success of tick feeding, antitick immunity, and the host's reservoir competence for tick-borne pathogens remains to be determined. In a parasitological survey of wild mice in Berlin, Germany, approximately 40% of Ixodes ricinus-infested animals simultaneously harbored a nematode of the genus Heligmosomoides We therefore aimed to analyze the immunological impact of the nematode/tick coinfection as well as its effect on the tick-borne pathogen Borrelia afzelii Hosts experimentally coinfected with Heligmosomoides polygyrus and larval/nymphal I. ricinus ticks developed substantially stronger systemic type 2 T helper cell (Th2) responses, on the basis of the levels of GATA-3 and interleukin-13 expression, than mice infected with a single pathogen. During repeated larval infestations, however, anti-tick Th2 reactivity and an observed partial immunity to tick feeding were unaffected by concurrent nematode infections. Importantly, the strong systemic Th2 immune response in coinfected mice did not affect susceptibility to tick-borne B. afzelii An observed trend for decreased local and systemic Th1 reactivity against B. afzelii in coinfected mice did not result in a higher spirochete burden, nor did it facilitate bacterial dissemination or induce signs of immunopathology. Hence, this study indicates that strong systemic Th2 responses in nematode/tick-coinfected house mice do not affect the success of tick feeding and the control of the causative agent of Lyme disease. PMID:26883594

  5. Genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci affecting susceptibility to Marek's disease virus induced tumors in F2 intercross chickens.

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo, R L; Bacon, L D; Liu, H C; Witter, R L; Groenen, M A; Hillel, J; Cheng, H H

    1998-01-01

    Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease caused by the MD virus (MDV), which costs the poultry industry nearly $1 billion annually. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting MD susceptibility, the inbred lines 6(3) (MD resistant) and 7(2) (MD susceptible) were mated to create more than 300 F2 chickens. The F2 chickens were challenged with MDV JM strain, moderately virulent) at 1 wk of age and assessed for MD susceptibility. The QTL analysis was divided into three stages. In stage 1, 65 DNA markers selected from the chicken genetic maps were typed on the 40 most MD-susceptible and the 40 most MD-resistant F2 chickens, and 21 markers residing near suggestive QTL were revealed by analysis of variance (ANOVA). In stage 2, the suggestive markers plus available flanking markers were typed on 272 F2 chickens, and three suggestive QTL were identified by ANOVA. In stage 3, using the interval mapping program Map Manager and permutation tests, two significant and two suggestive MD QTL were identified on four chromosomal subregions. Three to five loci collected explained between 11 and 23% of the phenotypic MD variation, or 32-68% of the genetic variance. This study constitutes the first report in the domestic chicken on the mapping of non-major histocompatibility complex QTL affecting MD susceptibility. PMID:9475745

  6. Allelic and copy-number variations of FcγRs affect granulocyte function and susceptibility for autoimmune blistering diseases.

    PubMed

    Recke, Andreas; Vidarsson, Gestur; Ludwig, Ralf J; Freitag, Miriam; Möller, Steffen; Vonthein, Reinhard; Schellenberger, Julia; Haase, Ozan; Görg, Siegfried; Nebel, Almut; Flachsbart, Friederike; Schreiber, Stefan; Lieb, Wolfgang; Gläser, Regine; Benoit, Sandrine; Sárdy, Miklós; Eming, Rüdiger; Hertl, Michael; Zillikens, Detlef; König, Inke R; Schmidt, Enno; Ibrahim, Saleh

    2015-07-01

    Low-affinity Fcγ receptors (FcγR) bridge innate and adaptive immune responses. In many autoimmune diseases, these receptors act as key mediators of the pathogenic effects of autoantibodies. Genes encoding FcγR exhibit frequent variations in sequence and gene copy number that influence their functional properties. FcγR variations also affect the susceptibility to systemic autoimmunity, e.g. systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis. This raises the question whether FcγR variations are also associated with organ-specific autoimmunity, particularly autoantibody-mediated diseases, such as subepidermal autoimmune blistering diseases (AIBD). A multitude of evidence suggests a pathogenic role of neutrophil granulocyte interaction with autoantibodies via FcγR. In a two-stage study, we analyzed whether the FcγR genotype affects neutrophil function and mRNA expression, and consequently, bullous pemphigoid (BP) disease risk. We compared this to findings in pemphigus vulgaris/foliaceus (PV/PF), two Fc-independent AIBDs. Our results indicate that both allele and copy number variation of FcγR genes affect FcγR mRNA expression and reactive oxygen species (ROS) release by granulocytes. Susceptibility of BP was associated with FcγR genotypes that led to a decreased ROS release by neutrophils, indicating an unexpected protective role for these cells. BP and PV/PF differed substantially regarding the FcγR genotype association patterns, pointing towards different disease etiologies. PMID:26032265

  7. The Use of Kosher Phenotyping for Mapping QTL Affecting Susceptibility to Bovine Respiratory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Eitam, Harel; Yishay, Moran; Schiavini, Fausta; Soller, Morris; Bagnato, Alessandro; Shabtay, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in feedlot cattle, caused by multiple pathogens that become more virulent in response to stress. As clinical signs often go undetected and various preventive strategies failed, identification of genes affecting BRD is essential for selection for resistance. Selective DNA pooling (SDP) was applied in a genome wide association study (GWAS) to map BRD QTLs in Israeli Holstein male calves. Kosher scoring of lung adhesions was used to allocate 122 and 62 animals to High (Glatt Kosher) and Low (Non-Kosher) resistant groups, respectively. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip according to the Infinium protocol. Moving average of -logP was used to map QTLs and Log drop was used to define their boundaries (QTLRs). The combined procedure was efficient for high resolution mapping. Nineteen QTLRs distributed over 13 autosomes were found, some overlapping previous studies. The QTLRs contain polymorphic functional and expression candidate genes to affect kosher status, with putative immunological and wound healing activities. Kosher phenotyping was shown to be a reliable means to map QTLs affecting BRD morbidity. PMID:27077383

  8. The Use of Kosher Phenotyping for Mapping QTL Affecting Susceptibility to Bovine Respiratory Disease.

    PubMed

    Lipkin, Ehud; Strillacci, Maria Giuseppina; Eitam, Harel; Yishay, Moran; Schiavini, Fausta; Soller, Morris; Bagnato, Alessandro; Shabtay, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in feedlot cattle, caused by multiple pathogens that become more virulent in response to stress. As clinical signs often go undetected and various preventive strategies failed, identification of genes affecting BRD is essential for selection for resistance. Selective DNA pooling (SDP) was applied in a genome wide association study (GWAS) to map BRD QTLs in Israeli Holstein male calves. Kosher scoring of lung adhesions was used to allocate 122 and 62 animals to High (Glatt Kosher) and Low (Non-Kosher) resistant groups, respectively. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina BovineHD BeadChip according to the Infinium protocol. Moving average of -logP was used to map QTLs and Log drop was used to define their boundaries (QTLRs). The combined procedure was efficient for high resolution mapping. Nineteen QTLRs distributed over 13 autosomes were found, some overlapping previous studies. The QTLRs contain polymorphic functional and expression candidate genes to affect kosher status, with putative immunological and wound healing activities. Kosher phenotyping was shown to be a reliable means to map QTLs affecting BRD morbidity. PMID:27077383

  9. Pre-treating channel catfish with copper sulfate affects susceptibility to columnaris disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Columnaris disease is one of the most important bacterial diseases of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, commercially grown in the US. This disease can greatly diminish the profitability of aquaculture operations by large-scale mortality events, particularly in the fingerling production phase. ...

  10. Estrogen Receptor Alpha (ESR1) Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) Affect Malignant Melanoma Susceptibility and Disease Course

    PubMed Central

    Glatthaar, Hanna; Katto, Judith; Vogt, Thomas; Mahlknecht, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of malignant melanoma in the developed world is continuously increasing. We conducted a case–control study in order to evaluate the association between each of the four estrogen receptor alpha polymorphisms (ESR1 single-nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs] +2464C/T, −4576A/C, +1619A/G, and +6362C/T) and malignant melanoma susceptibility and disease course. The study population consisted of 205 Caucasian patients who were diagnosed as having malignant melanoma and 208 healthy Caucasian controls. Through DNA genotyping, we identified a SNP-dependent malignant melanoma susceptibility as well as a SNP-dependent effect on the course of disease and response to therapy. PMID:26949342

  11. Immunogenetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility of Humans and Rodents to Hantaviruses and the Clinical Course of Hantaviral Disease in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Charbonnel, Nathalie; Pagès, Marie; Sironen, Tarja; Henttonen, Heikki; Vapalahti, Olli; Mustonen, Jukka; Vaheri, Antti

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed the associations of immunity-related genes with susceptibility of humans and rodents to hantaviruses, and with severity of hantaviral diseases in humans. Several class I and class II HLA haplotypes were linked with severe or benign hantavirus infections, and these haplotypes varied among localities and hantaviruses. The polymorphism of other immunity-related genes including the C4A gene and a high-producing genotype of TNF gene associated with severe PUUV infection. Additional genes that may contribute to disease or to PUUV infection severity include non-carriage of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) allele 2 and IL-1β (-511) allele 2, polymorphisms of plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1) and platelet GP1a. In addition, immunogenetic studies have been conducted to identify mechanisms that could be linked with the persistence/clearance of hantaviruses in reservoirs. Persistence was associated during experimental infections with an upregulation of anti-inflammatory responses. Using natural rodent population samples, polymorphisms and/or expression levels of several genes have been analyzed. These genes were selected based on the literature of rodent or human/hantavirus interactions (some Mhc class II genes, Tnf promoter, and genes encoding the proteins TLR4, TLR7, Mx2 and β3 integrin). The comparison of genetic differentiation estimated between bank vole populations sampled over Europe, at neutral and candidate genes, has allowed to evidence signatures of selection for Tnf, Mx2 and the Drb Mhc class II genes. Altogether, these results corroborated the hypothesis of an evolution of tolerance strategies in rodents. We finally discuss the importance of these results from the medical and epidemiological perspectives. PMID:24859344

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Factors Affecting Breast Cancer Susceptibility
    Suzanne. E. Fenton
    US EPA, ORD, MD-67 NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

    Breast cancer is still the most common malignancy afflicting women in the Western world. Alt...

  13. Dietary sodium selenite affects host intestinal and systemic immune response and disease susceptibility to necrotic enteritis in commercial broilers.

    PubMed

    Xu, S Z; Lee, S H; Lillehoj, H S; Bravo, D

    2015-01-01

    1. This study was to evaluate the effects of supplementary dietary selenium (Se) given as sodium selenite on host immune response against necrotic enteritis (NE) in commercial broiler chickens. 2. Chicks were fed from hatching on a non-supplemented diet or diets supplemented with different levels of Se (0.25, 0.50, and 1.00 Se mg/kg). To induce NE, broiler chickens were orally infected with Eimeria maxima at 14 d of age and then with Clostridium perfringens 4 d later using our previously established NE disease model. 3. NE-associated clinical signs and host protective immunity were determined by body weight changes, intestinal lesion scores, and serum antibodies against α-toxin and necrotic enteritis B (NetB) toxin. The effects of dietary Se on the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines e.g., interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8LITAF (lipopolysaccharide-induced TNFα-factor), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) SF15, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), glutathione peroxidase 7 (GPx7), and avian β-defensins (AvBD) 6, 8, and 13 (following NE infection) were analysed in the intestine and spleen. 4. The results showed that dietary supplementation of newly hatched broiler chicks with 0.25 Se mg/kg from hatch significantly reduced NE-induced gut lesions compared with infected birds given a non-supplemented diet. The levels of serum antibody against the NetB toxin in the chicks fed with 0.25 and 0.50 mg/kg Se were significantly higher than the non-supplemented control group. The transcripts for IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, iNOS, LITAF, and GPx7, as well as AvBD6, 8, and 13 were increased in the intestine and spleen of Se-supplemented groups, whereas transcript for TNFSF15 was decreased in the intestine. 5. It was concluded that dietary supplementation with optimum levels of Se exerted beneficial effects on host immune response to NE and reduced negative consequence of NE-induced immunopathology. PMID:25387235

  14. Overexpression of cotton GhMKK4 enhances disease susceptibility and affects abscisic acid, gibberellin and hydrogen peroxide signalling in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuzhen; Zhang, Liang; Lu, Wenjing; Wang, Xiuling; Wu, Chang-Ai; Guo, Xingqi

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are involved in plant development, stress responses and hormonal signal transduction. MAPK kinases (MAPKKs), as the key nodes in these cascades, link MAPKs and MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs). In this study, GhMKK4, a novel group C MAPKK gene from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), was isolated and identified. Its expression can be induced by various stresses and signalling molecules. The overexpression of GhMKK4 in Nicotiana benthamiana enhanced its susceptibility to bacterial and fungal pathogens, but had no significant effects on salt or drought tolerance. Notably, the overexpressing plants showed increased sensitivity to abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellin A3 (GA3), and ABA and gibberellin (GA) signalling were affected on infection with Ralstonia solanacearum bacteria. Furthermore, the overexpressing plants showed more reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and stronger inhibition of catalase (CAT), a ROS-scavenging enzyme, than control plants after salicylic acid (SA) treatment. Interestingly, two genes encoding ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (SAMDC), the key enzymes in polyamine synthesis, exhibited reduced R. solanacearum-induced expression in overexpressing plants. These findings broaden our knowledge about the functions of MAPKKs in diverse signalling pathways and the negative regulation of disease resistance in the cotton crop. PMID:23980654

  15. Water chemistry affects catfish susceptibility to columnaris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While columnaris disease has been well-studied, little is known about how specific water chemistries can affect attachment. Recent studies in our labs offer new insight on this subject. Well waters from the USDA/ARS Stuttgart National Aquaculture Research Center (SNARC; Stuttgart, Arkansas) and fr...

  16. Water hardness affects catfish susceptibility to columnaris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Columnaris disease can cause tremendous losses of freshwater fish. While it has been studied exhaustively, little is known about its affinity to specific water chemistries that affects attachment. Recent studies in our labs have illuminated this subject. In the first experiment, two waters were ...

  17. Water Temperature Affects Susceptibility to Ranavirus.

    PubMed

    Brand, Mabre D; Hill, Rachel D; Brenes, Roberto; Chaney, Jordan C; Wilkes, Rebecca P; Grayfer, Leon; Miller, Debra L; Gray, Matthew J

    2016-06-01

    The occurrence of emerging infectious diseases in wildlife populations is increasing, and changes in environmental conditions have been hypothesized as a potential driver. For example, warmer ambient temperatures might favor pathogens by providing more ideal conditions for propagation or by stressing hosts. Our objective was to determine if water temperature played a role in the pathogenicity of an emerging pathogen (ranavirus) that infects ectothermic vertebrate species. We exposed larvae of four amphibian species to a Frog Virus 3 (FV3)-like ranavirus at two temperatures (10 and 25°C). We found that FV3 copies in tissues and mortality due to ranaviral disease were greater at 25°C than at 10°C for all species. In a second experiment with wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus), we found that a 2°C change (10 vs. 12°C) affected ranaviral disease outcomes, with greater infection and mortality at 12°C. There was evidence that 10°C stressed Cope's gray tree frog (Hyla chrysoscelis) larvae, which is a species that breeds during summer-all individuals died at this temperature, but only 10% tested positive for FV3 infection. The greater pathogenicity of FV3 at 25°C might be related to faster viral replication, which in vitro studies have reported previously. Colder temperatures also may decrease systemic infection by reducing blood circulation and the proportion of phagocytes, which are known to disseminate FV3 through the body. Collectively, our results indicate that water temperature during larval development may play a role in the emergence of ranaviruses. PMID:27283058

  18. Population screening for genetic susceptibility to disease.

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, A.

    1995-01-01

    Genetic screening for susceptibility to common diseases, such as the common cancers, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, may soon be technically feasible. Commercial interests should not be allowed to introduce such screening before proper evaluation or without adequate counselling and support. The evaluation of such testing should include psychosocial and medical outcomes and outcomes for those given low risks as well as high risks. These tests may distract attention away from environmental factors contributing to disease, for which social and political measures may be more appropriate than individualised susceptibility screening and lifestyle modification. PMID:7613325

  19. Homeostasis, Inflammation, and Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Kotas, Maya E.; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2015-01-01

    While modernization has dramatically increased lifespan, it has also witnessed the increasing prevalence of diseases such as obesity, hypertension and type 2 diabetes. Such chronic, acquired diseases result when normal physiologic control goes awry and may thus be viewed as failures of homeostasis. However, while nearly every process in human physiology relies on homeostatic mechanisms for stability, only some have demonstrated vulnerability to dysregulation. Additionally, chronic inflammation is a common accomplice of the diseases of homeostasis, yet the basis for this connection is not fully understood. Here we review the design of homeostatic systems and discuss universal features of control circuits that operate at the cellular, tissue and organismal levels. We suggest a framework for classification of homeostatic signals that is based on different classes of homeostatic variables they report on. Finally, we discuss how adaptability of homeostatic systems with adjustable set points creates vulnerability to dysregulation and disease. This framework highlights the fundamental parallels between homeostatic and inflammatory control mechanisms and provides a new perspective on the physiological origin of inflammation. PMID:25723161

  20. Genetic susceptibility to autoimmune liver disease.

    PubMed

    Mattner, Jochen

    2011-01-27

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) are considered as putative autoimmune diseases of the liver. Whereas strong evidence that bacterial infection may trigger PBC exists, the etiologies for PSC and AIH remain unknown. Although there have been significant discoveries of genetic polymorphisms that may underlie the susceptibility to these liver diseases, their associations with environmental triggers and the subsequent implications have been difficult to elucidate. While single nucleotide polymorphisms within the negative costimulatory molecule cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) have been suggested as genetic susceptibility factors for all three disorders, we discuss the implications of CTLA-4 susceptibility alleles mainly in the context of PBC, where Novosphingobium aromaticivorans, an ubiquitous alphaproteobacterium, has recently been specifically associated with the pathogenesis of this devastating liver disease. Ultimately, the discovery of infectious triggers of PBC may expand the concept of genetic susceptibility in immune-mediated liver diseases from the concept of aberrant immune responses against self-antigens to insufficient and/or inappropriate immunological defense mechanisms allowing microbes to cross natural barriers, establish infection and damage respective target organs. PMID:21307981

  1. Pretreating channel catfish with copper sulfate affects susceptibility to columnaris

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Columnaris disease is a costly bacterial disease of commercially grown channel catfish. Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of pre-exposing channel catfish fingerlings to 0, 1/2, 1, or 2 times the recommended copper sulfate rate for 24 hours on their susceptibility to columnaris...

  2. Behavioural phenotypes predict disease susceptibility and infectiousness.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Alessandra; Kirschman, Lucas; Warne, Robin W

    2016-08-01

    Behavioural phenotypes may provide a means for identifying individuals that disproportionally contribute to disease spread and epizootic outbreaks. For example, bolder phenotypes may experience greater exposure and susceptibility to pathogenic infection because of distinct interactions with conspecifics and their environment. We tested the value of behavioural phenotypes in larval amphibians for predicting ranavirus transmission in experimental trials. We found that behavioural phenotypes characterized by latency-to-food and swimming profiles were predictive of disease susceptibility and infectiousness defined as the capacity of an infected host to transmit an infection by contacts. While viral shedding rates were positively associated with transmission, we also found an inverse relationship between contacts and infections. Together these results suggest intrinsic traits that influence behaviour and the quantity of pathogens shed during conspecific interactions may be an important contributor to ranavirus transmission. These results suggest that behavioural phenotypes provide a means to identify individuals more likely to spread disease and thus give insights into disease outbreaks that threaten wildlife and humans. PMID:27555652

  3. Common variants in CASP3 confer susceptibility to Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Kouichi; Buns, Jane C.; Shimizu, Chisato; Hamada, Hiromichi; Honda, Takafumi; Terai, Masaru; Honda, Akihito; Takeuchi, Takashi; Shibuta, Shoichi; Suenaga, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Higashi, Kouji; Yasukawa, Kumi; Suzuki, Yoichi; Sasago, Kumiko; Kemmotsu, Yasushi; Takatsuki, Shinichi; Saji, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Nagai, Toshiro; Hamamoto, Kunihiro; Kishi, Fumio; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Sato, Yoshitake; Newburger, Jane W.; Baker, Annette L.; Shulman, Stanford T.; Rowley, Anne H.; Yashiro, Mayumi; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Fujino, Akihiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Kawasaki, Tomisaku; Hata, Akira; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2010-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD; OMIM 611775) is an acute vasculitis syndrome which predominantly affects small- and medium-sized arteries of infants and children. Epidemiological data suggest that host genetics underlie the disease pathogenesis. Here we report that multiple variants in the caspase-3 gene (CASP3) that are in linkage disequilibrium confer susceptibility to KD in both Japanese and US subjects of European ancestry. We found that a G to A substitution of one commonly associated SNP located in the 5′ untranslated region of CASP3 (rs72689236; P = 4.2 × 10−8 in the Japanese and P = 3.7 × 10−3 in the European Americans) abolished binding of nuclear factor of activated T cells to the DNA sequence surrounding the SNP. Our findings suggest that altered CASP3 expression in immune effecter cells influences susceptibility to KD. PMID:20423928

  4. Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals and Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Schug, Thaddeus T.; Janesick, Amanda; Blumberg, Bruce; Heindel, Jerrold J.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental chemicals have significant impacts on biological systems. Chemical exposures during early stages of development can disrupt normal patterns of development and thus dramatically alter disease susceptibility later in life. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) interfere with the body's endocrine system and produce adverse developmental, reproductive, neurological, cardiovascular, metabolic and immune effects in humans. A wide range of substances, both natural and man-made, are thought to cause endocrine disruption, including pharmaceuticals, dioxin and dioxin-like compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, DDT and other pesticides, and components of plastics such as bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates. EDCs are found in many everyday products– including plastic bottles, metal food cans, detergents, flame retardants, food additives, toys, cosmetics, and pesticides. EDCs interfere with the synthesis, secretion, transport, activity, or elimination of natural hormones. This interference can block or mimic hormone action, causing a wide range of effects. This review focuses on the mechanisms and modes of action by which EDCs alter hormone signaling. It also includes brief overviews of select disease endpoints associated with endocrine disruption. PMID:21899826

  5. New common variants affecting susceptibility to basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Simon N; Sulem, Patrick; Masson, Gisli; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jakobsdottir, Margret; Sigurdsson, Asgeir; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Scherer, Dominique; Hemminki, Kari; Rudnai, Peter; Gurzau, Eugene; Koppova, Kvetoslava; Botella-Estrada, Rafael; Soriano, Virtudes; Juberias, Pablo; Saez, Berta; Gilaberte, Yolanda; Fuentelsaz, Victoria; Corredera, Cristina; Grasa, Matilde; Höiom, Veronica; Lindblom, Annika; Bonenkamp, Johannes J; van Rossum, Michelle M; Aben, Katja K H; de Vries, Esther; Santinami, Mario; Di Mauro, Maria G; Maurichi, Andrea; Wendt, Judith; Hochleitner, Pia; Pehamberger, Hubert; Gudmundsson, Julius; Magnusdottir, Droplaug N; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Holm, Hilma; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Frigge, Michael L; Blondal, Thorarinn; Saemundsdottir, Jona; Bjarnason, Hjördis; Kristjansson, Kristleifur; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Okamoto, Ichiro; Rivoltini, Licia; Rodolfo, Monica; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Hansson, Johan; Nagore, Eduardo; Mayordomo, José I; Kumar, Rajiv; Karagas, Margaret R; Nelson, Heather H; Gulcher, Jeffrey R; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Olafsson, Jon H; Kong, Augustine; Stefansson, Kari

    2009-08-01

    In a follow-up to our previously reported genome-wide association study of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), we describe here several new susceptibility variants. SNP rs11170164, encoding a G138E substitution in the keratin 5 (KRT5) gene, affects risk of BCC (OR = 1.35, P = 2.1 x 10(-9)). A variant at 9p21 near CDKN2A and CDKN2B also confers susceptibility to BCC (rs2151280[C]; OR = 1.19, P = 6.9 x 10(-9)), as does rs157935[T] at 7q32 near the imprinted gene KLF14 (OR = 1.23, P = 5.7 x 10(-10)). The effect of rs157935[T] is dependent on the parental origin of the risk allele. None of these variants were found to be associated with melanoma or fair-pigmentation traits. A melanoma- and pigmentation-associated variant in the SLC45A2 gene, L374F, is associated with risk of both BCC and squamous cell carcinoma. Finally, we report conclusive evidence that rs401681[C] in the TERT-CLPTM1L locus confers susceptibility to BCC but protects against melanoma. PMID:19578363

  6. Reconfiguring phosphorylation signaling by genetic polymorphisms affects cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongbo; Cheng, Han; Pan, Zhicheng; Ren, Jian; Liu, Zexian; Xue, Yu

    2015-06-01

    Large-scale sequencing has characterized an enormous number of genetic variations (GVs), and the functional analysis of GVs is fundamental to understanding differences in disease susceptibility and therapeutic response among and within populations. Using a combination of a sequence-based predictor with known phosphorylation and protein-protein interaction information, we computationally detected 9606 potential phosSNPs (phosphorylation-related single nucleotide polymorphisms), including 720 known, disease-associated SNPs that dramatically modify the human phosSNP-associated kinase-substrate network. Further analyses demonstrated that the proteins in the network are heavily associated in various signaling and cancer pathways, while cancer genes and drug targets are significantly enriched. We re-constructed four population-specific kinase-substrate networks and found that several inherited disease or cancer genes, such as IRS1, RAF1, and EGFR, were differentially regulated by phosSNPs. Thus, phosSNPs may influence disease susceptibility and be involved in cancer development by reconfiguring phosphorylation networks in different populations. Moreover, by systematically characterizing potential phosphorylation-related cancer mutations (phosCMs) in 12 types of cancers, we observed that both types of GVs preferentially occur in the known cancer genes, while a considerable number of phosphorylated proteins, especially those over-representing cancer genes, contain both phosSNPs and phosCMs. Furthermore, it was observed that phosSNPs were significantly enriched in amplification genes identified from breast cancers and tyrosine kinase circuits of lung cancers. Taken together, these results should prove helpful for further elucidation of the functional impacts of disease-associated SNPs. PMID:25722345

  7. Iron Deprivation Affects Drug Susceptibilities of Mycobacteria Targeting Membrane Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Rahul; Hameed, Saif; Fatima, Zeeshan

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) acquired by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) through continuous deployment of antitubercular drugs warrants immediate search for novel targets and mechanisms. The ability of MTB to sense and become accustomed to changes in the host is essential for survival and confers the basis of infection. A crucial condition that MTB must surmount is iron limitation, during the establishment of infection, since iron is required by both bacteria and humans. This study focuses on how iron deprivation affects drug susceptibilities of known anti-TB drugs in Mycobacterium smegmatis, a “surrogate of MTB.” We showed that iron deprivation leads to enhanced potency of most commonly used first line anti-TB drugs that could be reverted upon iron supplementation. We explored that membrane homeostasis is disrupted upon iron deprivation as revealed by enhanced membrane permeability and hypersensitivity to membrane perturbing agent leading to increased passive diffusion of drug and TEM images showing detectable differences in cell envelope thickness. Furthermore, iron seems to be indispensable to sustain genotoxic stress suggesting its possible role in DNA repair machinery. Taken together, we for the first time established a link between cellular iron and drug susceptibility of mycobacteria suggesting iron as novel determinant to combat MDR. PMID:26779346

  8. A seasnake's colour affects its susceptibility to algal fouling

    PubMed Central

    Shine, R.; Brischoux, F.; Pile, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    Evolutionary transitions from terrestrial to aquatic life modify selective forces on an animal's coloration. For example, light penetrates differently through water than air, and a new suite of predators and visual backgrounds changes the targets of selection. We suggest that an aquatic animal's coloration may also affect its susceptibility to algal fouling. In a colour-polymorphic field population of seasnakes (Emydocephalus annulatus) in New Caledonia, black individuals supported higher algal cover than did banded conspecifics. In experimental tests, black snake models (plastic tubes) accumulated more algae than did banded models. Algal cover substantially reduced snake activity (in the field) and swimming speeds (in the laboratory). Effects of algal cover on a snake's hydrodynamic efficiency and/or its rate of cutaneous gas exchange thus may impose selection on the colours of aquatic organisms. PMID:20375055

  9. Perceptual Load Affects Eyewitness Accuracy and Susceptibility to Leading Questions.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Gillian; Greene, Ciara M

    2016-01-01

    Load Theory (Lavie, 1995, 2005) states that the level of perceptual load in a task (i.e., the amount of information involved in processing task-relevant stimuli) determines the efficiency of selective attention. There is evidence that perceptual load affects distractor processing, with increased inattentional blindness under high load. Given that high load can result in individuals failing to report seeing obvious objects, it is conceivable that load may also impair memory for the scene. The current study is the first to assess the effect of perceptual load on eyewitness memory. Across three experiments (two video-based and one in a driving simulator), the effect of perceptual load on eyewitness memory was assessed. The results showed that eyewitnesses were less accurate under high load, in particular for peripheral details. For example, memory for the central character in the video was not affected by load but memory for a witness who passed by the window at the edge of the scene was significantly worse under high load. High load memories were also more open to suggestion, showing increased susceptibility to leading questions. High visual perceptual load also affected recall for auditory information, illustrating a possible cross-modal perceptual load effect on memory accuracy. These results have implications for eyewitness memory researchers and forensic professionals. PMID:27625628

  10. Perceptual Load Affects Eyewitness Accuracy and Susceptibility to Leading Questions

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Gillian; Greene, Ciara M.

    2016-01-01

    Load Theory (Lavie, 1995, 2005) states that the level of perceptual load in a task (i.e., the amount of information involved in processing task-relevant stimuli) determines the efficiency of selective attention. There is evidence that perceptual load affects distractor processing, with increased inattentional blindness under high load. Given that high load can result in individuals failing to report seeing obvious objects, it is conceivable that load may also impair memory for the scene. The current study is the first to assess the effect of perceptual load on eyewitness memory. Across three experiments (two video-based and one in a driving simulator), the effect of perceptual load on eyewitness memory was assessed. The results showed that eyewitnesses were less accurate under high load, in particular for peripheral details. For example, memory for the central character in the video was not affected by load but memory for a witness who passed by the window at the edge of the scene was significantly worse under high load. High load memories were also more open to suggestion, showing increased susceptibility to leading questions. High visual perceptual load also affected recall for auditory information, illustrating a possible cross-modal perceptual load effect on memory accuracy. These results have implications for eyewitness memory researchers and forensic professionals. PMID:27625628

  11. Cardiovascular Disease Susceptibility and Resistance in Circumpolar Inuit Populations.

    PubMed

    Tvermosegaard, Maria; Dahl-Petersen, Inger K; Nielsen, Nina Odgaard; Bjerregaard, Peter; Jørgensen, Marit Eika

    2015-09-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major public health issue in indigenous populations in the Arctic. These diseases have emerged concomitantly with profound social changes over the past 60 years. The aim of this study was to summarize the literature on CVD risk among Arctic Inuit. Literature on prevalence, incidence, and time trends for CVD and its risk factors in Arctic Inuit populations was reviewed. Most evidence supports a similar incidence of coronary heart disease and a higher incidence of cerebrovascular disease among Arctic Inuit than seen in western populations. Factors that may increase CVD risk include aging of the population, genetic susceptibility, and a rapid increase in obesity, diabetes, and hypertension in parallel with decreasing physical activity and deterioration of the lipid profile. In contrast, and of great importance, there has been a decrease in smoking and alcohol intake (at least documented in Greenland), and contaminant levels are declining. Although there have been marked socioeconomic and dietary changes, it remains unsolved and to some extent controversial how this may have influenced cardiovascular risk among Arctic Inuit. The increase in life expectancy, in combination with improved prognosis for patients with manifest CVD, will inevitably lead to a large increase in absolute numbers of individuals affected by CVD in Arctic Inuit populations, exacerbated by the rise in most CVD risk factors over the past decades. For preventive purposes and for health care planning, it is crucial to carefully monitor disease incidence and trends in risk factors in these vulnerable Arctic populations. PMID:26239003

  12. THE THRESHOLD OF GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY TO MAREK'S DISEASE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The threshold of genetic susceptibility to Marek’s disease (MD) varies between lines of chickens due to genomic differences between the lines. For instance, one inbred line, 63, has a high threshold of susceptibility to MD, whereas another inbred line, 72, has a low threshold; both of the lines were...

  13. Smoking: effects on multiple sclerosis susceptibility and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Wingerchuk, Dean M

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with both genetic and environmental factors that influence disease susceptibility. Exposure to cigarette smoke is emerging as a viable environmental risk factor for MS that contributes to both increased disease susceptibility and more rapid disease advancement. The relative risk for MS development is approximately 1.5 for smokers compared with nonsmokers. Furthermore, there may be important interactions between smoking, an individual's genetic background, and other environmental risk exposures. This review summarizes the current evidence supporting the association of smoking with MS risk and disease course, with additional comments on causation. PMID:22276073

  14. Novel Disease Susceptibility Factors for Fungal Necrotrophic Pathogens in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    García-Andrade, Javier; Angulo, Carlos; Neumetzler, Lutz; Persson, Staffan; Vera, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Host cells use an intricate signaling system to respond to invasions by pathogenic microorganisms. Although several signaling components of disease resistance against necrotrophic fungal pathogens have been identified, our understanding for how molecular components and host processes contribute to plant disease susceptibility is rather sparse. Here, we identified four transcription factors (TFs) from Arabidopsis that limit pathogen spread. Arabidopsis mutants defective in any of these TFs displayed increased disease susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea and Plectosphaerella cucumerina, and a general activation of non-immune host processes that contribute to plant disease susceptibility. Transcriptome analyses revealed that the mutants share a common transcriptional signature of 77 up-regulated genes. We characterized several of the up-regulated genes that encode peptides with a secretion signal, which we named PROVIR (for provirulence) factors. Forward and reverse genetic analyses revealed that many of the PROVIRs are important for disease susceptibility of the host to fungal necrotrophs. The TFs and PROVIRs identified in our work thus represent novel genetic determinants for plant disease susceptibility to necrotrophic fungal pathogens. PMID:25830627

  15. Lipoprotein metabolism differs between Marek's disease susceptible and resistant chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens caused by MD virus and has an important impact on the poultry industry worldwide.There have been reports showing different physiological characteristics between MD susceptible and resistant chickens. However, little is known about whe...

  16. Neuroendocrine host factors and inflammatory disease susceptibility.

    PubMed Central

    Ligier, S; Sternberg, E M

    1999-01-01

    The etiology of autoimmune diseases is multifactorial, resulting from a combination of genetically predetermined host characteristics and environmental exposures. As the term autoimmune implies, immune dysfunction and dysregulated self-tolerance are key elements in the pathophysiology of all these diseases. The neuroendocrine and sympathetic nervous systems are increasingly recognized as modulators of the immune response at the levels of both early inflammation and specific immunity. As such, alterations in their response represent a potential mechanism by which pathologic autoimmunity may develop. Animal models of autoimmune diseases show pre-existing changes in neuroendocrine responses to a variety of stimuli, and both animal and human studies have shown altered stress responses in the setting of active immune activation. The potential role of the neuroendocrine system in linking environmental exposures and autoimmune diseases is 2-fold. First, it may represent a direct target for toxic compounds. Second, its inadequate function may result in the inappropriate response of the immune system to an environmental agent with immunogenic properties. This article reviews the relationship between autoimmune diseases and the neuroendocrine system and discusses the difficulties and pitfalls of investigating a physiologic response that is sensitive to such a multiplicity of environmental exposures. PMID:10502534

  17. Schizophrenia susceptibility alleles are enriched for alleles that affect gene expression in adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Alexander L; Jones, Lesley; Moskvina, Valentina; Kirov, George; Gejman, Pablo V; Levinson, Douglas F; Sanders, Alan R; Purcell, Shaun; Visscher, Peter M; Craddock, Nick; Owen, Michael J; Holmans, Peter; O’Donovan, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    It is widely thought that alleles that influence susceptibility to common diseases, including schizophrenia, will frequently do so through effects on gene expression. Since only a small proportion of the genetic variance for schizophrenia has been attributed to specific loci, this remains an unproven hypothesis. The International Schizophrenia Consortium (ISC) recently reported a substantial polygenic contribution to that disorder, and that schizophrenia risk alleles are enriched among SNPs selected for marginal evidence for association (p<0.5) from genome wide association studies (GWAS). It follows that if schizophrenia susceptibility alleles are enriched for those that affect gene expression, those marginally associated SNPs which are also eQTLs should carry more true association signals compared with SNPs which are not. To test this, we identified marginally associated (p<0.5) SNPs from two of the largest available schizophrenia GWAS datasets. We assigned eQTL status to those SNPs based upon an eQTL dataset derived from adult human brain. Using the polygenic score method of analysis reported by the ISC, we observed and replicated the observation that higher probability cis-eQTLs predicted schizophrenia better than those with a lower probability for being a cis-eQTL. Our data support the hypothesis that alleles conferring risk of schizophrenia are enriched among those that affect gene expression. Moreover, our data show that notwithstanding the likely developmental origin of schizophrenia, studies of adult brain tissue can in principle allow relevant susceptibility eQTLs to be identified. PMID:21339752

  18. Global change and human susceptibility to disease

    SciTech Connect

    Daily, G.C.; Ehrlich, P.R.

    1996-12-31

    Although the loss of good health is inherently unpredictable, human behavior at the individual and societal levels profoundly influences the incidence and evolution of disease. In this review, the authors define the human epidemiological environment and describe key biophysical, economic, sociocultural, and political factors that shape it. The potential impact upon the epidemiological environment of biophysical aspects of global change--changes in the size; mobility, and geographic distribution of the human population; land conversion; agricultural intensification; and climate change--is then examined. Human vulnerability to disease is strongly and deleteriously influenced by many of these ongoing, intensifying alterations. The authors then examine threats to human defenses against disease, including immune suppression, loss of biodiversity and indigenous knowledge, and the evolution of antibiotic resistance. Effective responses will require greatly enhanced attention by and collaboration among experts in diverse academic disciplines, in the private sector, and in government worldwide. 157 refs.

  19. IL18 Gene Variants Influence the Susceptibility to Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leon Rodriguez, Daniel A; Carmona, F. David; Echeverría, Luis Eduardo; González, Clara Isabel; Martin, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is a parasitic disorder caused by the infection with the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. According to the World Health Organization, more than six million people are currently infected in endemic regions. Genetic factors have been proposed to influence predisposition to infection and development of severe clinical phenotypes like chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy (CCC). Interleukin 18 (IL18) encodes a proinflammatory cytokine that has been proposed to be involved in controlling T. cruzi infection. In this study, we analyzed the possible role of six IL18 gene variants (rs5744258, rs360722, rs2043055, rs187238, rs1946518 and rs360719), which cover most of the variation within the locus, in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi and/or CCC. In total, 1,171 individuals from a Colombian region endemic for Chagas disease, classified as seronegative (n = 595), seropositive asymptomatic (n = 175) and CCC (n = 401), were genotyped using TaqMan probes. Significant associations with T. cruzi infection were observed when comparing seronegative and seropositive individuals for rs187238 (P = 2.18E-03, OR = 0.77), rs360719 (P = 1.49E-03, OR = 0.76), rs2043055 (P = 2.52E-03, OR = 1.29), and rs1946518 (P = 0.0162, OR = 1.22). However, dependence analyses suggested that the association was mainly driven by the polymorphism rs360719. This variant is located within the promoter region of the IL18 gene, and it has been described that it creates a binding site for the transcription factor OCT-1 affecting IL-18 expression levels. In addition, no evidence of association was observed between any of the analyzed IL18 gene polymorphisms and the development of CCC. In summary, our data suggest that genetic variation within the promoter region of IL18 is directly involved in the susceptibility to infection by T. cruzi, which provides novel insight into disease pathophysiology and adds new perspectives to achieve a more effective disease control. PMID:27027876

  20. GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY IN PARKINSON’S DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Bras, Jose Miguel; Singleton, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    It is hoped that an understanding of the genetic basis of Parkinson’s disease (PD) will lead to an appreciation of the molecular pathogenesis of disease, which in turn will highlight potential points of therapeutic intervention. It is also hoped that such an understanding will allow identification of individuals at risk for disease prior to the onset of motor symptoms. A large amount of work has already been performed in the identification of genetic risk factors for PD and some of this work, particularly those efforts that focus on genes implicated in monogenic forms of PD, have been successful, although hard won. A new era of gene discovery has begun, with the application of genome wide association studies; these promise to facilitate the identification of common genetic risk loci for complex genetic diseases. This is the first of several high throughput technologies that promise to shed light on the (likely) myriad genetic factors involved in this complex, late-onset neurodegenerative disorder. PMID:19063963

  1. The effects of inbreeding on disease susceptibility: Gyrodactylus turnbulli infection of guppies, Poecilia reticulata.

    PubMed

    Smallbone, Willow; van Oosterhout, Cock; Cable, Jo

    2016-08-01

    Inbreeding can threaten population persistence by reducing disease resistance through the accelerated loss of gene diversity (i.e. heterozygosity). Such inbreeding depression can affect many different fitness-related traits, including survival, reproductive success, and parasite susceptibility. Empirically quantifying the effects of inbreeding on parasite resistance is therefore important for ex-situ conservation of vertebrates. The present study evaluates the disease susceptibility of individuals bred under three different breeding regimes (inbred, crossed with full siblings; control, randomly crossed mating; and fully outbred). Specifically, we examined the relationship between inbreeding coefficient (F-coefficient) and susceptibility to Gyrodactylus turnbulli infection in a live bearing vertebrate, the guppy Poecilia reticulata. Host-breeding regime significantly affected the trajectories of parasite population growth on individual fish. Inbred fish showed significantly higher mean parasite intensity than fish from the control and outbred breeding regimes, and in addition, inbred fish were slower in purging their gyrodactylid infections. We discuss the role of inbreeding on the various arms of the immune system, and argue that the increased disease susceptibility of inbred individuals could contribute to the extinction vortex. This is one of the first studies to quantify the effects of inbreeding and breeding regime on disease susceptibility in a captive bred vertebrate of wild origin, and it highlights the risks faced by small (captive-bred) populations when exposed to their native parasites. PMID:27130704

  2. Blue Journal Conference. Aging and Susceptibility to Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thannickal, Victor J.; Murthy, Mahadev; Balch, William E.; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Meiners, Silke; Eickelberg, Oliver; Selman, Moisés; Pardo, Annie; White, Eric S.; Levy, Bruce D.; Busse, Paula J.; Tuder, Rubin M.; Antony, Veena B.; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2015-01-01

    The aging of the population in the United States and throughout the developed world has increased morbidity and mortality attributable to lung disease, while the morbidity and mortality from other prevalent diseases has declined or remained stable. Recognizing the importance of aging in the development of lung disease, the American Thoracic Society (ATS) highlighted this topic as a core theme for the 2014 annual meeting. The relationship between aging and lung disease was discussed in several oral symposiums and poster sessions at the annual ATS meeting. In this article, we used the input gathered at the conference to develop a broad framework and perspective to stimulate basic, clinical, and translational research to understand how the aging process contributes to the onset and/or progression of lung diseases. A consistent theme that emerged from the conference was the need to apply novel, systems-based approaches to integrate a growing body of genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic data and elucidate the relationship between biologic hallmarks of aging, altered lung function, and increased susceptibility to lung diseases in the older population. The challenge remains to causally link the molecular and cellular changes of aging with age-related changes in lung physiology and disease susceptibility. The purpose of this review is to stimulate further research to identify new strategies to prevent or treat age-related lung disease. PMID:25590812

  3. Ethylene signalling affects susceptibility of tomatoes to Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Marvasi, Massimiliano; Noel, Jason T; George, Andrée S; Farias, Marcelo A; Jenkins, Keith T; Hochmuth, George; Xu, Yimin; Giovanonni, Jim J; Teplitski, Max

    2014-01-01

    Fresh fruits and vegetables are increasingly recognized as important reservoirs of human pathogens, and therefore, significant attention has been directed recently to understanding mechanisms of the interactions between plants and enterics, like Salmonella. A screen of tomato cultivars for their susceptibility to Salmonella revealed significant differences in the ability of this human pathogen to multiply within fruits; expression of the Salmonella genes (cysB, agfB, fadH) involved in the interactions with tomatoes depended on the tomato genotype and maturity stage. Proliferation of Salmonella was strongly reduced in the tomato mutants with defects in ethylene synthesis, perception and signal transduction. While mutation in the ripening-related ethylene receptor Nr resulted only in a modest reduction in Salmonella numbers within tomatoes, strong inhibition of the Salmonella proliferation was observed in rin and nor tomato mutants. RIN and NOR are regulators of ethylene synthesis and ripening. A commercial tomato variety heterozygous for rin was less susceptible to Salmonella under the greenhouse conditions but not when tested in the field over three production seasons. PMID:24888884

  4. Affective cycling in thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Tapp, A.

    1988-05-01

    Depression in an elderly man with primary recurrent unipolar depression responded to radioactive iodine treatment of a thyrotoxic nodule, without the addition of psychotropic medications. Two months later, manic symptoms developed concomitant with the termination of the hyperthyroid state secondary to the radioactive iodine treatment. Clinical implications of these findings in relation to the possible mechanism of action of thyroid hormones on affective cycling are discussed.

  5. Explaining affective linkages in teams: individual differences in susceptibility to contagion and individualism-collectivism.

    PubMed

    Ilies, Remus; Wagner, David T; Morgeson, Frederick P

    2007-07-01

    To expand on the understanding of how affective states are linked within teams, the authors describe a longitudinal study examining the linkages between team members' affective states over time. In a naturalistic team performance setting, they found evidence that the average affective state of the other team members was related to an individual team member's affect over time, even after controlling for team performance. In addition, they found that these affective linkages were moderated by individual differences in susceptibility to emotional contagion and collectivistic tendencies such that the strength of the linkage was stronger for those high in susceptibility and those with collectivistic tendencies. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:17638471

  6. Genetic Susceptibility to Interstitial Lung Disease Associated with Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tochimoto, Akiko; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Yamanaka, Hisashi

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease that is characterized by tissue fibrosis, microvasculopathy, and autoimmunity. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is a common complication of SSc and is one of the frequent causes of mortality in SSc. Although the exact etiology of SSc remains unknown, clinical and experimental investigations have suggested that genetic and environmental factors are relevant to the pathogenesis of SSc and SSc-ILD. More than 30 genes have been identified as susceptibility loci for SSc, most of which are involved in immune regulation and inflammation. It is thought that the key pathogenesis of SSc-ILD is caused by the release of profibrotic mediators such as transforming growth factor β1 and connective tissue growth factor from lung cells induced by a persistent damage. This review presents the genetic susceptibility to SSc-ILD, including human leukocyte antigen and non-human leukocyte antigen genes, especially focusing on connective tissue growth factor. PMID:26997879

  7. Susceptibility to disease varies with ontogeny and immunocompetence in a threatened amphibian.

    PubMed

    Abu Bakar, Amalina; Bower, Deborah S; Stockwell, Michelle P; Clulow, Simon; Clulow, John; Mahony, Michael J

    2016-08-01

    Ontogenetic changes in disease susceptibility have been demonstrated in many vertebrate taxa, as immature immune systems and limited prior exposure to pathogens can place less developed juveniles at a greater disease risk. By causing the disease chytridiomycosis, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) infection has led to the decline of many amphibian species. Despite increasing knowledge on how Bd varies in its effects among species, little is known on the interaction between susceptibility and development within host species. We compared the ontogenetic susceptibility of post-metamorphic green and golden bell frogs Litoria aurea to chytridiomycosis by simultaneously measuring three host-pathogen responses as indicators of the development of the fungus-infection load, survival rate, and host immunocompetence-following Bd exposure in three life stages (recently metamorphosed juveniles, subadults, adults) over 95 days. Frogs exposed to Bd as recently metamorphosed juveniles acquired higher infection loads and experienced lower immune function and lower survivorship than subadults and adults, indicating an ontogenetic decline in chytridiomycosis susceptibility. By corresponding with an intrinsic developmental maturation in immunocompetence seen in uninfected frogs, we suggest these developmental changes in host susceptibility in L. aurea may be immune mediated. Consequently, the physiological relationship between ontogeny and immunity may affect host population structure and demography through variation in life stage survival, and understanding this can shape management targets for effective amphibian conservation. PMID:27021312

  8. Senescence affects endothelial cells susceptibility to dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    AbuBakar, Sazaly; Shu, Meng-Hooi; Johari, Jefree; Wong, Pooi-Fong

    2014-01-01

    Alteration in the endothelium leading to increased vascular permeability contributes to plasma leakage seen in dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). An earlier study showed that senescent endothelial cells (ECs) altered the ECs permeability. Here we investigated the susceptibility of senescing human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to dengue virus infection and determined if dengue virus infection induces HUVECs senescence. Our results suggest that DENV type-2 (DENV-2) foci forming unit (FFU) and extracellular virus RNA copy number were reduced by at least 35% and 85% in infection of the intermediate young and early senescent HUVECs, respectively, in comparison to infection of young HUVECs. No to low infectivity was recovered from infection of late senescent HUVECs. DENV infection also increases the percentage of HUVECs expressing senescence-associated (SA)-β-gal, cells arrested at the G2/M phase or 4N DNA content stage and cells with enlarged morphology, indicative of senescing cells. Alteration of HUVECs morphology was recorded using impedance-based real-time cell analysis system following DENV-2 infection. These results suggest that senescing HUVECs do not support DENV infection and DENV infection induces HUVECs senescence. The finding highlights the possible role of induction of senescence in DENV infection of the endothelial cells. PMID:24782642

  9. Projections of climate conditions that increase coral disease susceptibility and pathogen abundance and virulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, Jeffrey; van Hooidonk, Ruben; Eakin, C. Mark; Puotinen, Marjetta; Garren, Melissa; Williams, Gareth; Heron, Scott F.; Lamb, Joleah; Weil, Ernesto; Willis, Bette; Harvell, C. Drew

    2015-07-01

    Rising sea temperatures are likely to increase the frequency of disease outbreaks affecting reef-building corals through impacts on coral hosts and pathogens. We present and compare climate model projections of temperature conditions that will increase coral susceptibility to disease, pathogen abundance and pathogen virulence. Both moderate (RCP 4.5) and fossil fuel aggressive (RCP 8.5) emissions scenarios are examined. We also compare projections for the onset of disease-conducive conditions and severe annual coral bleaching, and produce a disease risk summary that combines climate stress with stress caused by local human activities. There is great spatial variation in the projections, both among and within the major ocean basins, in conditions favouring disease development. Our results indicate that disease is as likely to cause coral mortality as bleaching in the coming decades. These projections identify priority locations to reduce stress caused by local human activities and test management interventions to reduce disease impacts.

  10. Genetic susceptibility testing for neurodegenerative diseases: Ethical and practice issues

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, J. Scott; Uhlmann, Wendy R.

    2013-01-01

    As the genetics of neurodegenerative disease become better understood, opportunities for genetic susceptibility testing for at-risk individuals will increase. Such testing raises important ethical and practice issues related to test access, informed consent, risk estimation and communication, return of results, and policies to prevent genetic discrimination. The advent of direct-to-consumer genetic susceptibility testing for various neurodegenerative disorders (including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and certain prion diseases) means that ethical and practical challenges must be faced not only in traditional research and clinical settings, but also in broader society. This review addresses several topics relevant to the development and implementation of genetic susceptibility tests across research, clinical, and consumer settings; these include appropriate indications for testing, the implications of different methods for disclosing test results, clinical versus personal utility of risk information, psychological and behavioral responses to test results, testing of minors, genetic discrimination, and ethical dilemmas posed by whole-genome sequencing. We also identify future areas of likely growth in the field, including pharmacogenomics and genetic screening for individuals considering or engaged in activities that pose elevated risk of brain injury (e.g., football players, military personnel). APOE gene testing for risk of Alzheimer’s disease is used throughout as an instructive case example, drawing upon the authors’ experience as investigators in a series of multisite randomized clinical trials that have examined the impact of disclosing APOE genotype status to interested individuals (e.g., first-degree relatives, persons with mild cognitive impairment). PMID:23583530

  11. Antisense downregulation of polyphenol oxidase results in enhanced disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Thipyapong, Piyada; Hunt, Michelle D; Steffens, John C

    2004-11-01

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs; EC 1.14.18.1 or EC 1.10.3.2) catalyze the oxidation of phenolics to quinones, highly reactive intermediates whose secondary reactions are responsible for much of the oxidative browning that accompanies plant senescence, wounding, and responses to pathogens. To assess the impact of PPO expression on resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato we introduced a chimeric antisense potato PPO cDNA into tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.). Oxidation of caffeic acid, the dominant o-diphenolic aglycone of tomato foliage, was decreased ca. 40-fold by antisense expression of PPO. All members of the PPO gene family were downregulated: neither immunoreactive PPO nor PPO-specific mRNA were detectable in the transgenic plants. In addition, the antisense PPO construct suppressed inducible increases in PPO activity. Downregulation of PPO in antisense plants did not affect growth, development, or reproduction of greenhouse-grown plants. However, antisense PPO expression dramatically increased susceptibility to P. syringae expressing the avirulence gene avrPto in both Pto and pto backgrounds. In a compatible (pto) interaction, plants constitutively expressing an antisense PPO construct exhibited a 55-fold increase in bacterial growth, three times larger lesion area, and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. In an incompatible (Pto) interaction, antisense PPO plants exhibited 100-fold increases in bacterial growth and ten times more lesions cm(-2) than nontransformed plants. Although it is not clear whether hypersusceptibility of antisense plants is due to low constitutive PPO levels or failure to induce PPO upon infection, these findings suggest a critical role for PPO-catalyzed phenolic oxidation in limiting disease development. As a preliminary effort to understand the role of induced PPO in limiting disease development, we also examined the response of PPO promoter::beta-glucuronidase constructs when plants are challenged with P

  12. Testing candidate genes that may affect susceptibility to leprosy.

    PubMed

    Cervino, A C; Curnow, R N

    1997-12-01

    Several statistical methods have been used to search familial data sets for marker alleles associated with the occurrence of a disease. In the present paper, a recently developed method is used to re-analyze published data on leprosy and candidate genes at the HLA loci. This new method of analysis, the randomization transmission disequilibrium test (TDT), confirmed previous conclusions that there was no significant evidence against random transmission at the HLA-A locus but significant positive association with the HLA-DR2 allele. The randomization TDT detected significant protective associations, that had not previously been found, with alleles HLA-B8 in Egyptian families and HLA-B21 (current nomenclature B x 4901, 5001-5002) in South Indian families, highlighting a major advantage of permutation tests in analyzing candidate gene loci with rare alleles. These findings provide evidence that HLA class I restricted T lymphocytes may be of protective importance in leprosy. PMID:9465154

  13. Neprilysin Confers Genetic Susceptibility to Alzheimer's Disease in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Zhen; Bi, Rui; Zhang, Deng-Feng; Li, Guo-Dong; Ma, Xiao-Hong; Fang, Yiru; Li, Tao; Zhang, Chen; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease, with increasing incidence all over the world. Amyloid-β (Aβ) was considered to be the original cause to AD, and many reported pathogenic or risk genes for AD were located in the Aβ generation and degradation pathways. Neprilysin (NEP), insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), and matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) are the most important Aβ-degrading proteases. Accumulating genetic evidence suggested that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of these genes confer susceptibility to AD in Caucasian populations. In this study, we screened eight SNPs within these three Aβ-degrading protease genes in 1475 individuals of two independent Han Chinese case-control cohorts. SNP rs1816558 of NEP was found to be significantly associated with AD after adjustment for ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOEε4) and the Bonferroni correction. The remaining variants were not associated with risk of AD in Han Chinese sample set. Further data mining revealed that messenger RNA (mRNA) level of NEP substantially increased during the development of AD and was positively correlated with APP expression. The combined results indicated that NEP confers genetic susceptibility to AD in Han Chinese populations. PMID:26362309

  14. Hydrological - pathological interactions: disease susceptibility, tree decline and ecohydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, S. E.; Levin, S. A.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Gilligan, C.

    2010-12-01

    Changing frequencies and altered ranges of plant disease are highlighted as a major risk associated with global climate change. The role of changing temperature in driving changes in disease risk has been well highlighted, but the influence of variability in rainfall has received less attention, despite the importance of surface moisture for spread of foliar pathogens, of soil moisture for the increase of root rots, and the role of drought and plant water potential in predisposing plants to stem-disease. Here we present a simple stochastic approach to link ecohydrological predictions of soil- and plant-water potentials to the risk of pathogen disease and resulting plant stress. The approach is applicable both to pathogens which require high soil moisture content to grow within their hosts, and to host plants whose susceptibility to pathogens increases during periods of drought. The results offer a framework to link climatic and edaphic drivers to the risk of disease, and highlight the complexity of interrelationships between climatic and pathogenic drivers of tree decline.

  15. Modern approaches to understanding stress and disease susceptibility: A review with special emphasis on respiratory disease

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Palok; Potter, Andrew A; Griebel, Philip J

    2009-01-01

    Studies in animals and humans link both physical and psychological stress with an increased incidence and severity of respiratory infections. For this manuscript we define stress as the physiological responses an individual undergoes while adjusting to a continually changing environment. It is known that stressors of various types (psychological/physical) can alter the physiological levels of certain hormones, chemokines and cytokines. These alterations send information to the central nervous system to take necessary action which then sends messages to appropriate organs/tissues/cells to respond. These messages can either activate or suppress the immune system as needed and failure to compensate for this by the body can lead to serious health-related problems. Little is known how stress affects disease susceptibility, yet understanding this mechanism is important for developing effective treatments, and for improving health and food quality. The current review focuses on (a) the effects of psychological stressors in humans and animals, (b) various methodologies employed to understand stress responses and their outcomes, and (c) the current status of the attempts to correlate stress and disease with respiratory disease as model system. The methodologies included in this review span traditional epidemiological, behavioral and immunological studies to current high throughput genomic, proteomic, metabolomic/metabonomic approaches. With the advent of various newer omics and bioinformatics methodologies we postulate that it will become feasible to understand the mechanisms through which stress can influence disease onset. Although the literature in this area is limited because of the infancy of this research area, the objective of this review is to illustrate the power of new approaches to address complex biological questions. These new approaches will also aid in our understanding how these processes are related to the dynamics and kinetics of changes in expression of

  16. Polymorphisms in pattern recognition receptors and their relationship to infectious disease susceptibility in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), including Toll-like receptors (TLRs), are censoring receptors for molecules derived from bacteria, viruses, and fungi. The PRR system is a prerequisite for proper responses to pathogens, for example by cytokine production, resulting in pathogen eradication. Many cases of polymorphisms in PRR genes affecting the immune response and disease susceptibility are known in humans and mice. Methods We surveyed polymorphisms in pig genes encoding PRRs and investigated the relationship between some of the detected polymorphisms and molecular function or disease onset. Results Nonsynonymous polymorphisms abounded in pig TLR genes, particularly in the region corresponding to the ectodomains of TLRs expressed on the cell surface. Intracellular TLRs such as TLR3, TLR7, and TLR8, and other intracellular PRRs, such as the peptidoglycan receptor NOD2 and viral RNA receptors RIG-I and MDA5, also possessed nonsynonymous polymorphisms. Several of the polymorphisms influenced molecular functions such as ligand recognition. Polymorphisms in the PRR genes may be related to disease susceptibility in pigs: pigs with a particular allele of TLR2 showed an increased tendency to contract pneumonia. Conclusions We propose the possibility of pig breeding aimed at disease resistance by the selection of PRR gene alleles that affect pathogen recognition. PMID:21645307

  17. Consanguinity and susceptibility to infectious diseases in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Emily J.; Frodsham, Angela J.; Zhang, Lyna; Hill, Adrian V.S.; Amos, William

    2009-01-01

    Studies of animal populations suggest that low genetic heterozygosity is an important risk factor for infection by a diverse range of pathogens, but relatively little research has looked to see whether similar patterns exist in humans. We have used microsatellite genome screen data for tuberculosis (TB), hepatitis and leprosy to test the hypothesis that inbreeding depression increases risk of infection. Our results indicate that inbred individuals are more common among our infected cases for TB and hepatitis, but only in populations where consanguineous marriages are common. No effect was found either for leprosy, which is thought to be oligogenic, or for hepatitis in Italy where consanguineous marriages are rare. Our results suggest that consanguinity is an important risk factor in susceptibility to infectious diseases in humans. PMID:19324620

  18. Do Variants Associated with Susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer and Type 2 Diabetes Reciprocally Affect Risk?

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lang; Rabe, Kari G.; Petersen, Gloria M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Although type 2 diabetes mellitus is a known risk factor for pancreatic cancer, the existence of shared genetic susceptibility is largely unknown. We evaluated whether any reported genetic risk variants of either disease found by genome-wide association studies reciprocally confer susceptibility. Methods Data that were generated in previous genome-wide association studies (GENEVA Type 2 Diabetes; PanScan) were obtained through the National Institutes of Health database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP). Using the PanScan datasets, we tested for association of 38 variants within 37 genomic regions known to be susceptibility factors for type 2 diabetes. We further examined whether type 2 diabetes variants predispose to pancreatic cancer risk stratified by diabetes status. Correspondingly, we examined the association of fourteen pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants within eight genomic regions in the GENEVA Type 2 Diabetes dataset. Results Four plausible associations of diabetes variants and pancreatic cancer risk were detected at a significance threshold of p = 0.05, and one pancreatic cancer susceptibility variant was associated with diabetes risk at threshold of p = 0.05, but none remained significant after correction for multiple comparisons. Conclusion Currently identified GWAS susceptibility variants are unlikely to explain the potential shared genetic etiology between Type 2 diabetes and pancreatic cancer. PMID:25658847

  19. DISEASE-SPECIFIC SUSCEPTIBILITY TO ACUTE OZONE-INDUCED INJURY AND INFLAMMATION IN EIGHT RAT STRAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Susceptibility to environmental pollutant-induced injuries may be influenced by presence of disease and genetic make-up. To identify disease-specific susceptibility phenotype, we used eight rat strains with or without genetic cardiovascular disease. Male 12-15 wk old Sprague Dawl...

  20. Morphogenic regulator EFG1 affects the drug susceptibilities of pathogenic Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Tulika; Hameed, Saif; Manoharlal, Raman; Biswas, Sudipta; Mukhopadhyay, Chinmay K; Goswami, Shyamal K; Prasad, Rajendra

    2010-08-01

    This study shows that the morphogenic regulator EFG1 level affects the drug susceptibilities of Candida albicans when grown on solid growth media. The Deltaefg1 mutant showed sensitivity particularly to those drugs that target ergosterol or its metabolism. Efg1p disruption showed a gene-dosage effect on drug susceptibilities and resulted in enhanced susceptibility to drugs in the homozygous mutant as compared with the wild type, heterozygous and revertant strains. The enhanced sensitivity to drugs was independent of the status of ATP-binding cassette and MFS multidrug efflux pumps of C. albicans. The Deltaefg1 mutant displayed increased membrane fluidity that coincided with the downregulation of ERG11 and upregulation of OLE1 and ERG3, leading to enhanced passive diffusion of drugs. Interestingly, Deltaefg1 mutant cells displayed enhanced levels of endogenous ROS levels. Notably, the higher levels of ROS in the Deltaefg1 mutant could be reversed by the addition of antioxidants. However, the restoration of ROS levels did not reverse the drug sensitivities of the Deltaefg1 mutant. Taken together, we, for the first time, establish a new role to EFG1 in affecting the drug susceptibilities of C. albicans cells, independent of ROS and known drug efflux mechanisms. PMID:20491944

  1. The heterogeneity of lung macrophages in the susceptibility to disease.

    PubMed

    Morales-Nebreda, Luisa; Misharin, Alexander V; Perlman, Harris; Budinger, G R Scott

    2015-09-01

    Alveolar macrophages are specialised resident phagocytes in the alveolus, constituting the first line of immune cellular defence in the lung. As the lung microenvironment is challenged and remodelled by inhaled pathogens and air particles, so is the alveolar macrophage pool altered by signals that maintain and/or replace its composition. The signals that induce the recruitment of circulating monocytes to the injured lung, as well as their distinct gene expression profile and susceptibility to epigenetic reprogramming by the local environment remain unclear. In this review, we summarise the unique characteristics of the alveolar macrophage pool ontogeny, phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity during homeostasis, tissue injury and normal ageing. We also discuss new evidence arising from recent studies where investigators described how the epigenetic landscape drives the specific gene expression profile of alveolar macrophages. Altogether, new analysis of macrophages by means of "omic" technologies will allow us to identify key pathways by which these cells contribute to the development and resolution of lung disease in both mice and humans. PMID:26324812

  2. A transcriptional network underlies susceptibility to kidney disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Laouari, Denise; Burtin, Martine; Phelep, Aurélie; Bienaime, Frank; Noel, Laure-Hélène; Lee, David C; Legendre, Christophe; Friedlander, Gérard; Pontoglio, Marco; Terzi, Fabiola

    2012-01-01

    The molecular networks that control the progression of chronic kidney diseases (CKD) are poorly defined. We have recently shown that the susceptibility to development of renal lesions after nephron reduction is controlled by a locus on mouse chromosome 6 and requires epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. Here, we identified microphthalmia-associated transcription factor A (MITF-A), a bHLH-Zip transcription factor, as a modifier of CKD progression. Sequence analysis revealed a strain-specific mutation in the 5′ UTR that decreases MITF-A protein synthesis in lesion-prone friend virus B NIH (FVB/N) mice. More importantly, we dissected the molecular pathway by which MITF-A modulates CKD progression. MITF-A interacts with histone deacetylases to repress the transcription of TGF-α, a ligand of EGFR, and antagonizes transactivation by its related partner, transcription factor E3 (TFE3). Consistent with the key role of this network in CKD, Tgfa gene inactivation protected FVB/N mice from renal deterioration after nephron reduction. These data are relevant to human CKD, as we found that the TFE3/MITF-A ratio was increased in patients with damaged kidneys. Our study uncovers a novel transcriptional network and unveils novel potential prognostic and therapeutic targets for preventing human CKD progression. PMID:22711280

  3. Prion protein gene sequence and chronic wasting disease susceptibility in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus)

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Adam L; Kelly, Amy C; Green, Michelle L; Shelton, Paul; Novakofski, Jan; Mateus-Pinilla, Nohra E

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The sequence of the prion protein gene (PRNP) affects susceptibility to spongiform encephalopathies, or prion diseases in many species. In white-tailed deer, both coding and non-coding single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified in this gene that correlate to chronic wasting disease (CWD) susceptibility. Previous studies examined individual nucleotide or amino acid mutations; here we examine all nucleotide polymorphisms and their combined effects on CWD. A 626 bp region of PRNP was examined from 703 free-ranging white-tailed deer. Deer were sampled between 2002 and 2010 by hunter harvest or government culling in Illinois and Wisconsin. Fourteen variable nucleotide positions were identified (4 new and 10 previously reported). We identified 68 diplotypes comprised of 24 predicted haplotypes, with the most common diplotype occurring in 123 individuals. Diplotypes that were found exclusively among positive or negative animals were rare, each occurring in less than 1% of the deer studied. Only one haplotype (C, odds ratio 0.240) and 2 diplotypes (AC and BC, odds ratios of 0.161 and 0.108 respectively) has significant associations with CWD resistance. Each contains mutations (one synonymous nucleotide 555C/T and one nonsynonymous nucleotide 286G/A) at positions reported to be significantly associated with reduced CWD susceptibility. Results suggest that deer populations with higher frequencies of haplotype C or diplotypes AC and BC might have a reduced risk for CWD infection – while populations with lower frequencies may have higher risk for infection. Understanding the genetic basis of CWD has improved our ability to assess herd susceptibility and direct management efforts within CWD infected areas. PMID:26634768

  4. Prion protein gene sequence and chronic wasting disease susceptibility in white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus).

    PubMed

    Brandt, Adam L; Kelly, Amy C; Green, Michelle L; Shelton, Paul; Novakofski, Jan; Mateus-Pinilla, Nohra E

    2015-01-01

    The sequence of the prion protein gene (PRNP) affects susceptibility to spongiform encephalopathies, or prion diseases in many species. In white-tailed deer, both coding and non-coding single nucleotide polymorphisms have been identified in this gene that correlate to chronic wasting disease (CWD) susceptibility. Previous studies examined individual nucleotide or amino acid mutations; here we examine all nucleotide polymorphisms and their combined effects on CWD. A 626 bp region of PRNP was examined from 703 free-ranging white-tailed deer. Deer were sampled between 2002 and 2010 by hunter harvest or government culling in Illinois and Wisconsin. Fourteen variable nucleotide positions were identified (4 new and 10 previously reported). We identified 68 diplotypes comprised of 24 predicted haplotypes, with the most common diplotype occurring in 123 individuals. Diplotypes that were found exclusively among positive or negative animals were rare, each occurring in less than 1% of the deer studied. Only one haplotype (C, odds ratio 0.240) and 2 diplotypes (AC and BC, odds ratios of 0.161 and 0.108 respectively) has significant associations with CWD resistance. Each contains mutations (one synonymous nucleotide 555C/T and one nonsynonymous nucleotide 286G/A) at positions reported to be significantly associated with reduced CWD susceptibility. Results suggest that deer populations with higher frequencies of haplotype C or diplotypes AC and BC might have a reduced risk for CWD infection--while populations with lower frequencies may have higher risk for infection. Understanding the genetic basis of CWD has improved our ability to assess herd susceptibility and direct management efforts within CWD infected areas. PMID:26634768

  5. Susceptibility to gingivitis: a way to predict periodontal disease?

    PubMed

    Trombelli, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    Clinical studies suggest that gingival inflammatory response to plaque accumulation may vary between individuals. Evidence seems to indicate that there is an association between susceptibility to gingivitis and susceptibility to periodontitis. Recently, among participants in a large scale experimental gingivitis trial, we were able to identify and characterize subjects that differ significantly in their gingival inflammatory response to plaque accumulation. Research efforts are being focused on the effect of genetic, anatomic and environmental host-related factors which may be implicated in the pathogenesis of the gingival inflammatory process, and whether susceptibility to periodontitis and susceptibility to gingivitis may partly share common risk factors. In this respect, it is possible that identification of factors related to increased susceptibility to gingivitis may help identify, at an early age, subjects at risk of periodontitis. PMID:15646584

  6. Degenerative disease affecting the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Eadie, M J

    1974-03-01

    The term "degenerative disease" is one which is rather widely used in relation to the nervous system and yet one which is rarely formally and carefully defined. The term appears to be applied to disorders of the nervous system which often occur in later life and which are of uncertain cause. In the Shorter Oxford Dictionary the word degeneration is defined as "a change of structure by which an organism, or an organ, assumes the form of a lower type". However this is not quite the sense in which the word is applied in human neuropathology, where it is conventional to restrict the use of the word to those organic disorders which are of uncertain or poorly understood cause and in which there is a deterioration or regression in the level of functioning of the nervous system. The concept of degenerative disorder is applied to other organs as well as to the brain, and as disease elsewhere in the body may affect the nervous system, it seems reasonable to include within the topic of degenerative disorder affecting the nervous system those conditions in which the nervous system is involved as a result of primary degenerations in other parts of the body. PMID:25026144

  7. Sublethal concentrations of ichthyotoxic alga Prymnesium parvum affect rainbow trout susceptibility to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Nikolaj Gedsted; Lorenzen, Ellen; Snogdal Boutrup, Torsten; Hansen, Per Juel; Lorenzen, Niels

    2016-01-13

    Ichthyotoxic algal blooms are normally considered a threat to maricultured fish only when blooms reach lethal cell concentrations. The degree to which sublethal algal concentrations challenge the health of the fish during blooms is practically unknown. In this study, we analysed whether sublethal concentrations of the ichthyotoxic alga Prymnesium parvum affect the susceptibility of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV). During exposure to sublethal algal concentrations, the fish increased production of mucus on their gills. When fish were exposed to the algae for 12 h prior to the addition of virus, a marginal decrease in the susceptibility to VHSV was observed compared to fish exposed to VHSV without algae. If virus and algae were added simultaneously, inclusion of the algae increased mortality by 50% compared to fish exposed to virus only, depending on the experimental setup. We concluded that depending on the local exposure conditions, sublethal concentrations of P. parvum could affect susceptibility of fish to infectious agents such as VHSV. PMID:26758652

  8. A combined oral contraceptive affects mucosal SHIV susceptibility factors in a pigtail macaque model

    PubMed Central

    Ostergaard, Sharon Dietz; Butler, Katherine; Ritter, Jana M.; Johnson, Ryan; Sanders, Jeanine; Powell, Nathaniel; Lathrop, George; Zaki, Sherif R.; McNicholl, Janet M.; Kersh, Ellen N.

    2015-01-01

    Background Injectable hormonal contraception may increase women’s risk of HIV acquisition, and can affect biological risk factors in animal models of HIV. We established, for the first time, a model to investigate whether combined oral contraceptives (COC) alter SHIV susceptibility in macaques. Methods Seven pigtail macaques were administered a monophasic levonorgestrel (LNG)/ethinyl estradiol (EE) COC at 33% or 66% of the human dose for 60 days. Menstrual cycling, vaginal epithelial thickness and other SHIV susceptibility factors were monitored for a mean of 18 weeks. Results Mean vaginal epithelial thicknesses was 290.8 μm at baseline and 186.2 μm during COC (p=0.0141, Mann Whitney test). Vaginal pH decreased from 8.5 during to 6.5 post- treatment (0.0176 two-tailed t-test). Measured microflora was unchanged. Conclusions COC caused thinning of the vaginal epithelium and vaginal pH changes, which may increase SHIV susceptibility. 0.033 mg LNG + 0.0066 mg EE appeared effective in suppressing ovulation. PMID:25536296

  9. Fine mapping of the chromosome 3p susceptibility locus in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, J; Lynch, N; Daniels, S; Bridger, S; Macpherson, A; Stokkers, P; Forbes, A; Lennard-Jones, J; Mathew, C; Curran, M; Schreiber, S

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Genetic predisposition for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been demonstrated by epidemiological and genetic linkage studies. Genetic linkage of IBD to chromosome 3 has been observed previously. A high density analysis of chromosome 3p was performed to confirm prior linkages and elucidate potential genetic associations.
METHODS—Forty three microsatellite markers on chromosome 3 were genotyped in 353 affected sibling pairs of North European Caucasian extraction (average marker density 2 cM in the linkage interval). Marker order was defined by genetic and radiation hybrid techniques.
RESULTS—The maximum single point logarithm of odds (LOD) score was observed for Crohn's disease at D3S3591. Peak multipoint LOD scores of 1.65 and 1.40 for the IBD phenotype were observed near D3S1304 (distal 3p) and near D3S1283 in the linkage region previously reported. Crohn's disease contributed predominantly to the linkage. The transmission disequilibrium test showed significant evidence of association (p=0.009) between allele 4 of D3S1076 and the IBD phenotype (51 transmitted v 28 non-transmitted). Two known polymorphisms in the CCR2 and CCR5 genes were analysed, neither of which showed significant association with IBD. Additional haplotype associations were observed in the vicinity of D3S1076.
CONCLUSIONS—This study provides confirmatory linkage evidence for an IBD susceptibility locus on chromosome 3p and suggests that CCR2 and CCR5 are unlikely to be major susceptibility loci for IBD. The association findings in this region warrant further investigation.


Keywords: inflammatory bowel disease; fine mapping; chromosome 3 PMID:11156639

  10. SUSCEPTIBILITY TO OZONE-INDUCED INJURY AND ANTIOXIDANT COMPENSATION IN RAT MODELS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased oxidative stress and compromised antioxidant status are common pathologic factors of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). It is hypothesized that individuals with chronic CVD are more susceptible to environmental exposures due to underlying oxidative stress. To determine the ...

  11. Treatment of affective disorders in cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Mavrides, Nicole; Nemeroff, Charles B.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD) commonly have syndromal major depression, and depression has been associated with an increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Prevalence of depression is between 17% and 47% in CVD patients. Pharmacologic and psychotherapeutic interventions have long been studied, and in general are safe and somewhat efficacious in decreasing depressive symptoms in patients with CVD. The impact on cardiac outcomes remains unclear. The evidence from randomized controlled clinical trials indicates that antidepressants, especially selective serotonin uptake inhibitors, are overwhelmingly safe, and likely to be effective in the treatment of depression in patients with CVD. This review describes the prevalence of depression in patients with CVD, the physiological links between depression and CVD, the treatment options for affective disorders, and the clinical trials that demonstrate efficacy and safety of antidepressant medications and psychotherapy in this patient population. Great progress has been made in understanding potential mediators between major depressive disorder and CVD—both health behaviors and shared biological risks such as inflammation. PMID:26246788

  12. Barley disease susceptibility factor RACB acts in epidermal cell polarity and positioning of the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Scheler, Björn; Schnepf, Vera; Galgenmüller, Carolina; Ranf, Stefanie; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    RHO GTPases are regulators of cell polarity and immunity in eukaryotes. In plants, RHO-like RAC/ROP GTPases are regulators of cell shaping, hormone responses, and responses to microbial pathogens. The barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) RAC/ROP protein RACB is required for full susceptibility to penetration by Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei (Bgh), the barley powdery mildew fungus. Disease susceptibility factors often control host immune responses. Here we show that RACB does not interfere with early microbe-associated molecular pattern-triggered immune responses such as the oxidative burst or activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases. RACB also supports rather than restricts expression of defence-related genes in barley. Instead, silencing of RACB expression by RNAi leads to defects in cell polarity. In particular, initiation and maintenance of root hair growth and development of stomatal subsidiary cells by asymmetric cell division is affected by silencing expression of RACB. Nucleus migration is a common factor of developmental cell polarity and cell-autonomous interaction with Bgh. RACB is required for positioning of the nucleus near the site of attack from Bgh. We therefore suggest that Bgh profits from RACB’s function in cell polarity rather than from immunity-regulating functions of RACB. PMID:27056842

  13. Barley disease susceptibility factor RACB acts in epidermal cell polarity and positioning of the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Scheler, Björn; Schnepf, Vera; Galgenmüller, Carolina; Ranf, Stefanie; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2016-05-01

    RHO GTPases are regulators of cell polarity and immunity in eukaryotes. In plants, RHO-like RAC/ROP GTPases are regulators of cell shaping, hormone responses, and responses to microbial pathogens. The barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) RAC/ROP protein RACB is required for full susceptibility to penetration by Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei (Bgh), the barley powdery mildew fungus. Disease susceptibility factors often control host immune responses. Here we show that RACB does not interfere with early microbe-associated molecular pattern-triggered immune responses such as the oxidative burst or activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases. RACB also supports rather than restricts expression of defence-related genes in barley. Instead, silencing of RACB expression by RNAi leads to defects in cell polarity. In particular, initiation and maintenance of root hair growth and development of stomatal subsidiary cells by asymmetric cell division is affected by silencing expression of RACB. Nucleus migration is a common factor of developmental cell polarity and cell-autonomous interaction with Bgh RACB is required for positioning of the nucleus near the site of attack from Bgh We therefore suggest that Bgh profits from RACB's function in cell polarity rather than from immunity-regulating functions of RACB. PMID:27056842

  14. LTP3 contributes to disease susceptibility in Arabidopsis by enhancing abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shan; Guo, Wenya; Feng, Wen; Liu, Liang; Song, Xiaorui; Chen, Jian; Hou, Wei; Zhu, Hongxia; Tang, Saijun; Hu, Jian

    2016-04-01

    Several plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) act positively in plant disease resistance. Here, we show that LTP3 (At5g59320), a pathogen and abscisic acid (ABA)-induced gene, negatively regulates plant immunity in Arabidopsis. The overexpression of LTP3 (LTP3-OX) led to an enhanced susceptibility to virulent bacteria and compromised resistance to avirulent bacteria. On infection of LTP3-OX plants with Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, genes involved in ABA biosynthesis, NCED3 and AAO3, were highly induced, whereas salicylic acid (SA)-related genes, ICS1 and PR1, were down-regulated. Accordingly, in LTP3-OX plants, we observed increased ABA levels and decreased SA levels relative to the wild-type. We also showed that the LTP3 overexpression-mediated enhanced susceptibility was partially dependent on AAO3. Interestingly, loss of function of LTP3 (ltp3-1) did not affect ABA pathways, but resulted in PR1 gene induction and elevated SA levels, suggesting that LTP3 can negatively regulate SA in an ABA-independent manner. However, a double mutant consisting of ltp3-1 and silent LTP4 (ltp3/ltp4) showed reduced susceptibility to Pseudomonas and down-regulation of ABA biosynthesis genes, suggesting that LTP3 acts in a redundant manner with its closest homologue LTP4 by modulating the ABA pathway. Taken together, our data show that LTP3 is a novel negative regulator of plant immunity which acts through the manipulation of the ABA-SA balance. PMID:26123657

  15. Lateral organ boundaries 1 is a disease susceptibility gene for citrus bacterial canker disease.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Junli; Jia, Hongge; Sosso, Davide; Li, Ting; Frommer, Wolf B; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F; Wang, Nian; Jones, Jeffrey B

    2014-01-28

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) disease occurs worldwide and incurs considerable costs both from control measures and yield losses. Bacteria that cause CBC require one of six known type III transcription activator-like (TAL) effector genes for the characteristic pustule formation at the site of infection. Here, we show that Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri strain Xcc306, with the type III TAL effector gene pthA4 or with the distinct yet biologically equivalent gene pthAw from strain XccA(w), induces two host genes, CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1, in a TAL effector-dependent manner. CsLOB1 is a member of the Lateral Organ Boundaries (LOB) gene family of transcription factors, and CsSWEET1 is a homolog of the SWEET sugar transporter and rice disease susceptibility gene. Both TAL effectors drive expression of CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1 promoter reporter gene fusions when coexpressed in citrus or Nicotiana benthamiana. Artificially designed TAL effectors directed to sequences in the CsLOB1 promoter region, but not the CsSWEET1 promoter, promoted pustule formation and higher bacterial leaf populations. Three additional distinct TAL effector genes, pthA*, pthB, and pthC, also direct pustule formation and expression of CsLOB1. Unlike pthA4 and pthAw, pthB and pthC do not promote the expression of CsSWEET1. CsLOB1 expression was associated with the expression of genes associated with cell expansion. The results indicate that CBC-inciting species of Xanthomonas exploit a single host disease susceptibility gene by altering the expression of an otherwise developmentally regulated gene using any one of a diverse set of TAL effector genes in the pathogen populations. PMID:24474801

  16. Lateral organ boundaries 1 is a disease susceptibility gene for citrus bacterial canker disease

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Junli; Jia, Hongge; Sosso, Davide; Li, Ting; Frommer, Wolf B.; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F.; Wang, Nian; Jones, Jeffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) disease occurs worldwide and incurs considerable costs both from control measures and yield losses. Bacteria that cause CBC require one of six known type III transcription activator-like (TAL) effector genes for the characteristic pustule formation at the site of infection. Here, we show that Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri strain Xcc306, with the type III TAL effector gene pthA4 or with the distinct yet biologically equivalent gene pthAw from strain XccAw, induces two host genes, CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1, in a TAL effector-dependent manner. CsLOB1 is a member of the Lateral Organ Boundaries (LOB) gene family of transcription factors, and CsSWEET1 is a homolog of the SWEET sugar transporter and rice disease susceptibility gene. Both TAL effectors drive expression of CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1 promoter reporter gene fusions when coexpressed in citrus or Nicotiana benthamiana. Artificially designed TAL effectors directed to sequences in the CsLOB1 promoter region, but not the CsSWEET1 promoter, promoted pustule formation and higher bacterial leaf populations. Three additional distinct TAL effector genes, pthA*, pthB, and pthC, also direct pustule formation and expression of CsLOB1. Unlike pthA4 and pthAw, pthB and pthC do not promote the expression of CsSWEET1. CsLOB1 expression was associated with the expression of genes associated with cell expansion. The results indicate that CBC-inciting species of Xanthomonas exploit a single host disease susceptibility gene by altering the expression of an otherwise developmentally regulated gene using any one of a diverse set of TAL effector genes in the pathogen populations. PMID:24474801

  17. Susceptible period of socio-emotional development affected by constant exposure to daylight.

    PubMed

    Koshiba, Mamiko; Senoo, Aya; Karino, Genta; Ozawa, Simpei; Tanaka, Ikuko; Honda, Yoshiko; Usui, Setsuo; Kodama, Tohru; Mimura, Koki; Nakamura, Shun; Kunikata, Tetsuya; Yamanouchi, Hideo; Tokuno, Hironobu

    2015-04-01

    As a diurnal experimental primate, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) has recently contributed to numerous kinds of studies of neurobiological psychiatry as an essential pre-clinical model. The marmoset matures sexually within one or two years after birth. Thus, we can observe how the primate learns and develops psycho-cognitive functions through experiences in experimental environment for a much shorter period compared to that of humans. Longer daylight exposure may affect psychological development of children. In our research, we focus on raising marmosets under constant daylight from birth until various ages. In order to quantitatively evaluate the development of higher-ordered psychological functions, we designed a system of socio-behavioral tests and multivariate correlation analysis methods based on principal component analysis. With reference to the call and typical body movement expressed during a particular social context, we statistically inferred the emotional features of the subjects. In the current literature, we review our published results showing increased alert behaviors by constant light, and then, attempted to extend our additional analysis to seek age-dependent susceptibility to constant light. We then present the neurobiological mechanisms with reference to previous research reports. The current review suggests possible existence of a susceptible period earlier than three to five month-old in the environment-induced developmental disorder model, supposedly like attention deficit hyperactive disorders (ADHD) or oppositional defiant disorder (ODD). PMID:25305341

  18. Different Mechanisms for Heterogeneity in Leprosy Susceptibility Can Explain Disease Clustering within Households

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Egil; De Vlas, Sake; Meima, Abraham; Habbema, Dik; Richardus, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The epidemiology of leprosy is characterized by heterogeneity in susceptibility and clustering of disease within households. We aim to assess the extent to which different mechanisms for heterogeneity in leprosy susceptibility can explain household clustering as observed in a large study among contacts of leprosy patients. We used a microsimulation model, parameterizing it with data from over 20,000 contacts of leprosy patients in Bangladesh. We simulated six mechanisms producing heterogeneity in susceptibility: (1) susceptibility was allocated at random to persons (i.e. no additional mechanism), (2) a household factor, (3, 4) a genetic factor (dominant or recessive), or (5, 6) half a household factor and half genetic. We further assumed that a fraction of 5%, 10%, and 20% of the population was susceptible, leading to a total of 18 scenarios to be fitted to the data. We obtained an acceptable fit for each of the six mechanisms, thereby excluding none of the possible underlying mechanisms for heterogeneity of susceptibility to leprosy. However, the distribution of leprosy among contacts did differ between mechanisms, and predicted trends in the declining leprosy case detection were dependent on the assumed mechanism, with genetic-based susceptibility showing the slowest decline. Clustering of leprosy within households is partially caused by an increased transmission within households independent of the leprosy susceptibility mechanism. Even a large and detailed data set on contacts of leprosy patients could not unequivocally reveal the mechanism most likely responsible for heterogeneity in leprosy susceptibility. PMID:21124916

  19. Antagonism between phytohormone signalling underlies the variation in disease susceptibility of tomato plants under elevated CO2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuai; Li, Xin; Sun, Zenghui; Shao, Shujun; Hu, Lingfei; Ye, Meng; Zhou, Yanhong; Xia, Xiaojian; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Increasing CO2 concentrations ([CO2]) have the potential to disrupt plant–pathogen interactions in natural and agricultural ecosystems, but the research in this area has often produced conflicting results. Variations in phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signalling could be associated with variations in the responses of pathogens to plants grown under elevated [CO2]. In this study, interactions between tomato plants and three pathogens with different infection strategies were compared. Elevated [CO2] generally favoured SA biosynthesis and signalling but repressed the JA pathway. The exposure of plants to elevated [CO2] revealed a lower incidence and severity of disease caused by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and by Pseudomonas syringae, whereas plant susceptibility to necrotrophic Botrytis cinerea increased. The elevated [CO2]-induced and basal resistance to TMV and P. syringae were completely abolished in plants in which the SA signalling pathway nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related genes 1 (NPR1) had been silenced or in transgenic plants defective in SA biosynthesis. In contrast, under both ambient and elevated [CO2], the susceptibility to B. cinerea highly increased in plants in which the JA signalling pathway proteinase inhibitors (PI) gene had been silenced or in a mutant affected in JA biosynthesis. However, plants affected in SA signalling remained less susceptible to this disease. These findings highlight the modulated antagonistic relationship between SA and JA that contributes to the variation in disease susceptibility under elevated [CO2]. This information will be critical for investigating how elevated CO2 may affect plant defence and the dynamics between plants and pathogens in both agricultural and natural ecosystems. PMID:25657213

  20. Susceptibility of selected potato varieties to zebra chip potato disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zebra chip (ZC), an emerging and serious disease of potato has caused millions of dollars in losses to the potato industry in the United States, Mexico, Central America, and New Zealand. The disease has recently been associated with a previously undescribed species of liberibacter tentatively named ...

  1. A long noncoding RNA associated with susceptibility to celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Rubio, Ainara; Fernandez-Jimenez, Nora; Kratchmarov, Radomir; Luo, Xiaobing; Bhagat, Govind; Green, Peter H R; Schneider, Robert; Kiledjian, Megerditch; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Ghosh, Sankar

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have implicated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) as regulators of many important biological processes. Here we report on the identification and characterization of a lncRNA, lnc13, that harbors a celiac disease-associated haplotype block and represses expression of certain inflammatory genes under homeostatic conditions. Lnc13 regulates gene expression by binding to hnRNPD, a member of a family of ubiquitously expressed heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). Upon stimulation, lnc13 levels are reduced, thereby allowing increased expression of the repressed genes. Lnc13 levels are significantly decreased in small intestinal biopsy samples from patients with celiac disease, which suggests that down-regulation of lnc13 may contribute to the inflammation seen in this disease. Furthermore, the lnc13 disease-associated variant binds hnRNPD less efficiently than its wild-type counterpart, thus helping to explain how these single-nucleotide polymorphisms contribute to celiac disease. PMID:27034373

  2. A practical approach to diseases affecting dentate nuclei.

    PubMed

    Khadilkar, S; Jaggi, S; Patel, B; Yadav, R; Hanagandi, P; Faria do Amaral, L L

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of diseases affect the dentate nuclei. When faced with the radiological demonstration of signal changes in the dentate nuclei, radiologists and clinical neurologists have to sieve through the many possibilities, which they do not encounter on a regular basis. This task can be challenging, and therefore, developing a clinical, radiological, and laboratory approach is important. Information on the topic is scattered and the subject has not yet been reviewed. In this review, a combined clinicoradiological approach is presented. The signal changes in T1, T2, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR), diffusion, susceptibility weighted, and gadolinium-enhanced images can give specific or highly suggestive patterns, which are illustrated. The role of computed tomography (CT) in the diagnostic process is discussed. Specific radiological patterns do not exist in a significant proportion of patients where the clinical and laboratory analysis becomes important. In this review, we group the clinical constellations to narrow down the differential diagnosis and highlight the diagnostic clinical signs, such as tendon xanthomas and Kayser-Fleischer rings. As will be seen, a number of these conditions are potentially reversible, and hence, their early diagnosis is desirable. Finally, key diagnostic tests and available therapies are outlined. The practical approach thus begins with the radiologist and winds its way through the clinician, towards carefully selected diagnostic tests defining the therapy options. PMID:26577296

  3. ENHANCED DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY 1 and SALICYLIC ACID act redundantly to regulate resistance gene-mediated signaling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance (R) protein–associated pathways are well known to participate in defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. Salicylic acid (SA) and its associated proteinaceous signaling components, including enhanced disease susceptibility 1 (EDS1), non–race-specific disease resistance 1 (NDR1), ...

  4. Diseases and Causes of Death in European Bats: Dynamics in Disease Susceptibility and Infection Rates

    PubMed Central

    Mühldorfer, Kristin; Speck, Stephanie; Kurth, Andreas; Lesnik, René; Freuling, Conrad; Müller, Thomas; Kramer-Schadt, Stephanie; Wibbelt, Gudrun

    2011-01-01

    Background Bats receive increasing attention in infectious disease studies, because of their well recognized status as reservoir species for various infectious agents. This is even more important, as bats with their capability of long distance dispersal and complex social structures are unique in the way microbes could be spread by these mammalian species. Nevertheless, infection studies in bats are predominantly limited to the identification of specific pathogens presenting a potential health threat to humans. But the impact of infectious agents on the individual host and their importance on bat mortality is largely unknown and has been neglected in most studies published to date. Methodology/Principal Findings Between 2002 and 2009, 486 deceased bats of 19 European species (family Vespertilionidae) were collected in different geographic regions in Germany. Most animals represented individual cases that have been incidentally found close to roosting sites or near human habitation in urban and urban-like environments. The bat carcasses were subjected to a post-mortem examination and investigated histo-pathologically, bacteriologically and virologically. Trauma and disease represented the most important causes of death in these bats. Comparative analysis of pathological findings and microbiological results show that microbial agents indeed have an impact on bats succumbing to infectious diseases, with fatal bacterial, viral and parasitic infections found in at least 12% of the bats investigated. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate the importance of diseases and infectious agents as cause of death in European bat species. The clear seasonal and individual variations in disease prevalence and infection rates indicate that maternity colonies are more susceptible to infectious agents, underlining the possible important role of host physiology, immunity and roosting behavior as risk factors for infection of bats. PMID:22216354

  5. rs10865331 associated with susceptibility and disease severity of ankylosing spondylitis in a Taiwanese population.

    PubMed

    Wen, Ya-Feng; Wei, James Cheng-Chung; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Wong, Henry Sung-Ching; Wong, Ruey-Hong; Ikegawa, Shiro; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a highly familial rheumatic disorder and is considered as a chronic inflammatory disease. Genetic factors are involved in the pathogenesis of AS. To identify genes which render people susceptible to AS in a Taiwanese population, we selected six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) which were associated with AS in European descendants and Han Chinese. To assess whether the six SNPs contributed to AS susceptibility and severity in Taiwanese population, 475 AS patients fulfilling the modified New York Criteria and 527 healthy subjects were recruited. We found that rs10865331 was significantly associated with AS susceptibility and with Bath AS Function Index (BASFI). The AA and AG genotypes of rs10865331 were also significantly associated with a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Our findings provided evidence that rs10865331 is associated AS susceptibility and with disease activity (BASFI) in a Taiwanese population. PMID:25184745

  6. rs10865331 Associated with Susceptibility and Disease Severity of Ankylosing Spondylitis in a Taiwanese Population

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Hung-Yi; Wong, Henry Sung-Ching; Wong, Ruey-Hong; Ikegawa, Shiro; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2014-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a highly familial rheumatic disorder and is considered as a chronic inflammatory disease. Genetic factors are involved in the pathogenesis of AS. To identify genes which render people susceptible to AS in a Taiwanese population, we selected six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from previous genome-wide association studies (GWASs) which were associated with AS in European descendants and Han Chinese. To assess whether the six SNPs contributed to AS susceptibility and severity in Taiwanese population, 475 AS patients fulfilling the modified New York Criteria and 527 healthy subjects were recruited. We found that rs10865331 was significantly associated with AS susceptibility and with Bath AS Function Index (BASFI). The AA and AG genotypes of rs10865331 were also significantly associated with a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Our findings provided evidence that rs10865331 is associated AS susceptibility and with disease activity (BASFI) in a Taiwanese population. PMID:25184745

  7. Paratuberculosis (Johne's disease) in cattle and other susceptible species.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, R W; Collins, M T; Koets, A P; McGuirk, S M; Roussel, A J

    2012-01-01

    Paratuberculosis (Johne's disease) is a widespread and costly disease. This consensus statement will summarize recommendations regarding diagnosis, control, and treatment of Johne's disease in cattle and other species. Each section of recommendations is followed by a statement that subjectively characterizes the strength of the supporting evidence. The role played by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in the pathogenesis has been a matter of controversy for many years. This statement concludes with an assessment of the evidence in favor of MAP as a potential zoonotic pathogen. PMID:23106497

  8. Bipolar disorder: idioms of susceptibility and disease and the role of 'genes' in illness explanations.

    PubMed

    Baart, Ingrid; Widdershoven, Guy

    2013-11-01

    This qualitative study explores (1) how members of the Dutch Association for People with Bipolar Disorder explain the affliction of bipolar disorder; (2) the relationship between genetic, environmental and personal factors in these explanations and (3) the relationship between illness explanations, self-management and identity. A total of 40 participants took part in seven different focus group discussions. The results demonstrate that there are two different explanatory idioms, each one centred around an opposing concept, that is, susceptibility and disease. Individuals who construct explanations around the concept of 'disease' attach more importance to 'genes and chemicals' than to environmental components in the onset of the disorder, whereas individuals adhering to the central concept of 'susceptibility' tend to do this much less. Compared with individuals using the 'susceptibility' idiom, those who use a 'disease' idiom tend to observe fewer possibilities for self-management and are less inclined to construct normalcy through a quest for personal growth. Stories of suffering seem more integral to the 'disease' idiom than to the 'susceptibility' idiom. The 'disease' idiom seems less integrated in a contemporary surveillance psychiatric discourse than the 'susceptibility' idiom; however, both vocabularies can offer normative constraints. PMID:23382566

  9. Heart Disease Affects Women of All Ages

    MedlinePlus

    ... percent of smokers begin before age 18. Middle-Aged Women: At menopause, a woman's heart disease risk ... risk of developing high blood pressure for women aged 55 is about 90 percent. Beginning at age ...

  10. How sex and age affect immune responses, susceptibility to infections, and response to vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Giefing-Kröll, Carmen; Berger, Peter; Lepperdinger, Günter; Grubeck-Loebenstein, Beatrix

    2015-01-01

    Do men die young and sick, or do women live long and healthy? By trying to explain the sexual dimorphism in life expectancy, both biological and environmental aspects are presently being addressed. Besides age-related changes, both the immune and the endocrine system exhibit significant sex-specific differences. This review deals with the aging immune system and its interplay with sex steroid hormones. Together, they impact on the etiopathology of many infectious diseases, which are still the major causes of morbidity and mortality in people at old age. Among men, susceptibilities toward many infectious diseases and the corresponding mortality rates are higher. Responses to various types of vaccination are often higher among women thereby also mounting stronger humoral responses. Women appear immune-privileged. The major sex steroid hormones exhibit opposing effects on cells of both the adaptive and the innate immune system: estradiol being mainly enhancing, testosterone by and large suppressive. However, levels of sex hormones change with age. At menopause transition, dropping estradiol potentially enhances immunosenescence effects posing postmenopausal women at additional, yet specific risks. Conclusively during aging, interventions, which distinctively consider the changing level of individual hormones, shall provide potent options in maintaining optimal immune functions. PMID:25720438

  11. Genetics of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: From susceptibility and nutrient interactions to management.

    PubMed

    Ravi Kanth, Vishnubhotla Venkata; Sasikala, Mitnala; Sharma, Mithun; Rao, Padaki Nagaraja; Reddy, Duvvuru Nageshwar

    2016-07-18

    Genetics plays an important role in determining the susceptibility of an individual to develop a disease. Complex, multi factorial diseases of modern day (diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and obesity) are a result of disparity between the type of food consumed and genes, suggesting that food which does not match the host genes is probably one of the major reasons for developing life style diseases. Non-alcoholic fatty liver is becoming a global epidemic leading to substantial morbidity. While various genotyping approaches such as whole exome sequencing using next generation sequencers and genome wide association studies have identified susceptibility loci for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) including variants in patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 genes apart from others; nutrient based studies emphasized on a combination of vitamin D, E and omega-3 fatty acids to manage fatty liver disease. However majority of the studies were conducted independent of each other and very few studies explored the interactions between the genetic susceptibility and nutrient interactions. Identifying such interactions will aid in optimizing the nutrition tailor made to an individual's genetic makeup, thereby aiding in delaying the onset of the disease and its progression. The present topic focuses on studies that identified the genetic susceptibility for NAFLD, nutritional recommendations, and their interactions for better management of NAFLD. PMID:27458502

  12. Genetics of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: From susceptibility and nutrient interactions to management

    PubMed Central

    Ravi Kanth, Vishnubhotla Venkata; Sasikala, Mitnala; Sharma, Mithun; Rao, Padaki Nagaraja; Reddy, Duvvuru Nageshwar

    2016-01-01

    Genetics plays an important role in determining the susceptibility of an individual to develop a disease. Complex, multi factorial diseases of modern day (diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and obesity) are a result of disparity between the type of food consumed and genes, suggesting that food which does not match the host genes is probably one of the major reasons for developing life style diseases. Non-alcoholic fatty liver is becoming a global epidemic leading to substantial morbidity. While various genotyping approaches such as whole exome sequencing using next generation sequencers and genome wide association studies have identified susceptibility loci for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) including variants in patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 genes apart from others; nutrient based studies emphasized on a combination of vitamin D, E and omega-3 fatty acids to manage fatty liver disease. However majority of the studies were conducted independent of each other and very few studies explored the interactions between the genetic susceptibility and nutrient interactions. Identifying such interactions will aid in optimizing the nutrition tailor made to an individual’s genetic makeup, thereby aiding in delaying the onset of the disease and its progression. The present topic focuses on studies that identified the genetic susceptibility for NAFLD, nutritional recommendations, and their interactions for better management of NAFLD. PMID:27458502

  13. Natural Antibodies as Rheostats for Susceptibility to Chronic Diseases in the Aged.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Thomas L

    2016-01-01

    Natural antibodies are spontaneously produced in the absence of infection or immunization, and are both anti-microbial and autoreactive. Autoreactive natural antibodies can bind noxious molecules, such as those involved in clinical situations of atherosclerosis (oxLDL), malignancy (NGcGM3), and neurodegeneration (amyloid, tau) and can affect the fate of their targets or the cells bearing them to maintain homeostasis. Clinically relevant natural antibodies have been shown to decline with advancing age in those few situations where measurements have been made. Consistent with this, human B-1 cells that are thought to be responsible for generating natural antibodies also decline with advancing age. These findings together suggest that an age-related decline in amount or efficacy of homeostatic natural antibodies is associated with relative loss of protection against molecules involved in several diseases whose incidence rises in the older age population, and that those individuals experiencing greatest loss are at greatest risk. In this view, natural antibodies act as rheostats for susceptibility to several age-related diseases. These considerations suggest that administration of natural antibodies, or of factors that maintain B-1 cells and/or enhance production of natural antibodies by B-1 cells, may serve to counteract the onset or progression of age-related chronic illness. PMID:27092140

  14. Natural Antibodies as Rheostats for Susceptibility to Chronic Diseases in the Aged

    PubMed Central

    Rothstein, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    Natural antibodies are spontaneously produced in the absence of infection or immunization, and are both anti-microbial and autoreactive. Autoreactive natural antibodies can bind noxious molecules, such as those involved in clinical situations of atherosclerosis (oxLDL), malignancy (NGcGM3), and neurodegeneration (amyloid, tau) and can affect the fate of their targets or the cells bearing them to maintain homeostasis. Clinically relevant natural antibodies have been shown to decline with advancing age in those few situations where measurements have been made. Consistent with this, human B-1 cells that are thought to be responsible for generating natural antibodies also decline with advancing age. These findings together suggest that an age-related decline in amount or efficacy of homeostatic natural antibodies is associated with relative loss of protection against molecules involved in several diseases whose incidence rises in the older age population, and that those individuals experiencing greatest loss are at greatest risk. In this view, natural antibodies act as rheostats for susceptibility to several age-related diseases. These considerations suggest that administration of natural antibodies, or of factors that maintain B-1 cells and/or enhance production of natural antibodies by B-1 cells, may serve to counteract the onset or progression of age-related chronic illness. PMID:27092140

  15. Genetic susceptibility to infectious diseases: big is beautiful, but will bigger be even better?

    PubMed Central

    Burgner, David; Jamieson, Sarra E; Blackwell, Jenefer M

    2006-01-01

    Summary Genetic epidemiology, including twin studies, provides robust evidence that genetic variation in human populations contributes to susceptibility to infectious disease. One of the major limitations of studies that attempt to identify the genes and mechanisms that underlie this susceptibility has been lack of power caused by small sample size. With the development of novel technologies, burgeoning information on the human genome, the HapMap project, and human genetic diversity, we are at the beginning of a new era in the study of the genetics of complex diseases. This review looks afresh at the epidemiological evidence that supports a role for genetics in susceptibility to infectious disease, examines the somewhat limited achievements to date, and discusses current advances in methodology and technology that will potentially lead to translational data in the future. PMID:17008174

  16. Genetic susceptibility to infectious diseases: big is beautiful, but will bigger be even better?

    PubMed

    Burgner, David; Jamieson, Sarra E; Blackwell, Jenefer M

    2006-10-01

    Genetic epidemiology, including twin studies, provides robust evidence that genetic variation in human populations contributes to susceptibility to infectious disease. One of the major limitations of studies that attempt to identify the genes and mechanisms that underlie this susceptibility has been lack of power caused by small sample size. With the development of novel technologies, burgeoning information on the human genome, the HapMap project, and human genetic diversity, we are at the beginning of a new era in the study of the genetics of complex diseases. This review looks afresh at the epidemiological evidence that supports a role for genetics in susceptibility to infectious disease, examines the somewhat limited achievements to date, and discusses current advances in methodology and technology that will potentially lead to translational data in the future. PMID:17008174

  17. Susceptibility of Different Potato Cultivars to Purple Top Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2002, Columbia Basin potato growers in Washington and Oregon began to experience serious outbreaks of potato purple top disease that have caused significant yield losses and reductions in tuber quality. It was determined that the beet leafhopper-transmitted virescence agent (BLTVA) phytoplasma is...

  18. Protein tyrosine phosphatase variants in human hereditary disorders and disease susceptibilities.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Wiljan J A J; Pulido, Rafael

    2013-10-01

    Reversible tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins is a key regulatory mechanism to steer normal development and physiological functioning of multicellular organisms. Phosphotyrosine dephosphorylation is exerted by members of the super-family of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) enzymes and many play such essential roles that a wide variety of hereditary disorders and disease susceptibilities in man are caused by PTP alleles. More than two decades of PTP research has resulted in a collection of PTP genetic variants with corresponding consequences at the molecular, cellular and physiological level. Here we present a comprehensive overview of these PTP gene variants that have been linked to disease states in man. Although the findings have direct bearing for disease diagnostics and for research on disease etiology, more work is necessary to translate this into therapies that alleviate the burden of these hereditary disorders and disease susceptibilities in man. PMID:23707412

  19. Interactions of warming and exposure affect susceptibility to parasite infection in a temperate fish species.

    PubMed

    Sheath, Danny J; Andreou, Demetra; Britton, J Robert

    2016-09-01

    Predicting how elevated temperatures from climate change alter host-parasite interactions requires understandings of how warming affects host susceptibility and parasite virulence. Here, the effect of elevated water temperature and parasite exposure level was tested on parasite prevalence, abundance and burden, and on fish growth, using Pomphorhynchus laevis and its fish host Squalius cephalus. At 60 days post-exposure, prevalence was higher at the elevated temperature (22 °C) than ambient temperature (18 °C), with infections achieved at considerably lower levels of exposure. Whilst parasite number was significantly higher in infected fish at 22 °C, both mean parasite weight and parasite burden was significantly higher at 18 °C. There were, however, no significant relationships between fish growth rate and temperature, parasite exposure, and the infection parameters. Thus, whilst elevated temperature significantly influenced parasite infection rates, it also impacted parasite development rates, suggesting warming could have complex implications for parasite dynamics and host resistance. PMID:27225942

  20. Increased susceptibility to fungal disease accompanies adaptation to drought in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Niamh B; Rest, Joshua S; Franks, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated adaptive evolutionary responses to climate change, but little is known about how these responses may influence ecological interactions with other organisms, including natural enemies. We used a resurrection experiment in the greenhouse to examine the effect of evolutionary responses to drought on the susceptibility of Brassica rapa plants to a fungal pathogen, Alternaria brassicae. In agreement with previous studies in this population, we found an evolutionary shift to earlier flowering postdrought, which was previously shown to be adaptive. Here, we report the novel finding that postdrought descendant plants were also more susceptible to disease, indicating a rapid evolutionary shift to increased susceptibility. This was accompanied by an evolutionary shift to increased specific leaf area (thinner leaves) following drought. We found that flowering time and disease susceptibility displayed plastic responses to experimental drought treatments, but that this plasticity did not match the direction of evolution, indicating that plastic and evolutionary responses to changes in climate can be opposed. The observed evolutionary shift to increased disease susceptibility accompanying adaptation to drought provides evidence that even if populations can rapidly adapt in response to climate change, evolution in other traits may have ecological effects that could make species more vulnerable. PMID:26648585

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for bovine respiratory disease: getting more from diagnostic results.

    PubMed

    Lubbers, Brian V; Turnidge, John

    2015-02-01

    Bovine respiratory disease (BRD) is one of the most common diseases of cattle worldwide. Given the significant bacterial component of this disease, antimicrobial agents remain one of the mainstays of therapy. However, the potential welfare and economic impact resulting from the selection of inappropriate antimicrobial therapy for BRD poses significant risks to both animal and animal owner. To determine the 'best' antimicrobial agent for a specific case, the decision-making process needs to incorporate all available evidence, often including the results of bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. While antimicrobial susceptibility testing can be a valuable diagnostic tool, integrating the test results into the clinical decision making process can be a challenging experience. This review details the process by which interpretive criteria for susceptibility tests are developed. Principles for how to best integrate antimicrobial susceptibility testing, both at the individual animal test and aggregate test levels, into the clinical decision making process are discussed. Non-traditional testing methodologies and how they may improve susceptibility testing in the future are also reviewed. PMID:25582794

  2. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Potential Susceptibility Loci for Hirschsprung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Cheong, Hyun Sub; Sul, Jae Hoon; Seo, Jeong-Meen; Kim, Dae-Yeon; Oh, Jung-Tak; Park, Kwi-Won; Kim, Hyun-Young; Jung, Soo-Min; Jung, Kyuwhan; Cho, Min Jeng; Bae, Joon Seol; Shin, Hyoung Doo

    2014-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is a congenital and heterogeneous disorder characterized by the absence of intramural nervous plexuses along variable lengths of the hindgut. Although RET is a well-established risk factor, a recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) of HSCR has identified NRG1 as an additional susceptibility locus. To discover additional risk loci, we performed a GWAS of 123 sporadic HSCR patients and 432 unaffected controls using a large-scale platform with coverage of over 1 million polymorphic markers. The result was that our study replicated the findings of RET-CSGALNACT2-RASGEF1A genomic region (rawP = 5.69×10−19 before a Bonferroni correction; corrP = 4.31×10−13 after a Bonferroni correction) and NRG1 as susceptibility loci. In addition, this study identified SLC6A20 (adjP = 2.71×10−6), RORA (adjP = 1.26×10−5), and ABCC9 (adjP = 1.86×10−5) as new potential susceptibility loci under adjusting the already known loci on the RET-CSGALNACT2-RASGEF1A and NRG1 regions, although none of the SNPs in these genes passed the Bonferroni correction. In further subgroup analysis, the RET-CSGALNACT2-RASGEF1A genomic region was observed to have different significance levels among subgroups: short-segment (S-HSCR, corrP = 1.71×10−5), long-segment (L-HSCR, corrP = 6.66×10−4), and total colonic aganglionosis (TCA, corrP>0.05). This differential pattern in the significance level suggests that other genomic loci or mechanisms may affect the length of aganglionosis in HSCR subgroups during enteric nervous system (ENS) development. Although functional evaluations are needed, our findings might facilitate improved understanding of the mechanisms of HSCR pathogenesis. PMID:25310821

  3. Rodent models of cardiopulmonary disease: their potential applicability in studies of air pollutant susceptibility.

    PubMed Central

    Kodavanti, U P; Costa, D L; Bromberg, P A

    1998-01-01

    The mechanisms by which increased mortality and morbidity occur in individuals with preexistent cardiopulmonary disease following acute episodes of air pollution are unknown. Studies involving air pollution effects on animal models of human cardiopulmonary diseases are both infrequent and difficult to interpret. Such models are, however, extensively used in studies of disease pathogenesis. Primarily they comprise those developed by genetic, pharmacologic, or surgical manipulations of the cardiopulmonary system. This review attempts a comprehensive description of rodent cardiopulmonary disease models in the context of their potential application to susceptibility studies of air pollutants regardless of whether the models have been previously used for such studies. The pulmonary disease models include bronchitis, emphysema, asthma/allergy, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, interstitial fibrosis, and infection. The models of systemic hypertension and congestive heart failure include: those derived by genetics (spontaneously hypertensive, Dahl S. renin transgenic, and other rodent models); congestive heart failure models derived by surgical manipulations; viral myocarditis; and cardiomyopathy induced by adriamycin. The characteristic pathogenic features critical to understanding the susceptibility to inhaled toxicants are described. It is anticipated that this review will provide a ready reference for the selection of appropriate rodent models of cardiopulmonary diseases and identify not only their pathobiologic similarities and/or differences to humans but also their potential usefulness in susceptibility studies. Images Figure 2 PMID:9539009

  4. Metabolic Profiling of Xylem Sap from Pierce’s Disease Resistant and Susceptible Grapevines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pierce’s Disease (PD) of grapevines is caused by a gram-negative, xylem-limited bacterium Xylella fastidiosa (Xf). All Vitis vinifera-based cultivars are highly susceptible to Xf infection. However, some grape species from the southern United States such as V. arizonica, V. Shuttleworthii, and Musca...

  5. A Unique Wheat Disease Resistance-like Gene Governs Effector-Induced Susceptibility to Necrotrophic pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant disease resistance is often conferred by genes with nucleotide binding site and leucine-rich repeat NBS-LRR) or serine/threonine protein kinase (S/TPK) domains. Much less is known about mechanisms of susceptibility, particularly to necrotrophic fungal pathogens. The pathogens that cause the di...

  6. ALTERED HEPATIC GENE EXPRESSION IN MORBIDLY OBESE WOMEN AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR SUSCEPTIBILITY TO OTHER DISEASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study was to determine the molecular bases of disordered hepatic function and disease susceptibility in obesity. We compared global gene expression in liver biopsies from morbidly obese (MO) women undergoing gastric bypass (GBP) surgery with that of women un...

  7. The genetics of bone mass and susceptibility to bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Karasik, David; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Johnson, Mark L

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mass and an increased risk of fracture. Genetic factors, environmental factors and gene-environment interactions all contribute to a person's lifetime risk of developing an osteoporotic fracture. This Review summarizes key advances in understanding of the genetics of bone traits and their role in osteoporosis. Candidate-gene approaches dominated this field 20 years ago, but clinical and preclinical genetic studies published in the past 5 years generally utilize more-sophisticated and better-powered genome-wide association studies (GWAS). High-throughput DNA sequencing, large genomic databases and improved methods of data analysis have greatly accelerated the gene-discovery process. Linkage analyses of single-gene traits that segregate in families with extreme phenotypes have led to the elucidation of critical pathways controlling bone mass. For example, components of the Wnt-β-catenin signalling pathway have been validated (in both GWAS and functional studies) as contributing to various bone phenotypes. These notable advances in gene discovery suggest that the next decade will witness cataloguing of the hundreds of genes that influence bone mass and osteoporosis, which in turn will provide a roadmap for the development of new drugs that target diseases of low bone mass, including osteoporosis. PMID:27052486

  8. Use of sample pooling in a genome-wide association study identifies chromosomal regions affecting incidence of bovine respiratory disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesize that genome-wide association (GWA) based on high-density SNP arrays can be used to identify chromosomal regions affecting disease incidence using a case/control type approach. However, the large sample size required to map a lowly heritable trait like susceptibility to bovine respirat...

  9. Androgen receptor polyglutamine repeat number: models of selection and disease susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Calen P; Crespi, Bernard J

    2013-01-01

    Variation in polyglutamine repeat number in the androgen receptor (AR CAGn) is negatively correlated with the transcription of androgen-responsive genes and is associated with susceptibility to an extensive list of human disease. Only a small portion of the heritability for many of these diseases is explained by conventional SNP-based genome-wide association studies, and the forces shaping AR CAGn among humans remains largely unexplored. Here, we propose evolutionary models for understanding selection at the AR CAG locus, namely balancing selection, sexual conflict, accumulation-selection, and antagonistic pleiotropy. We evaluate these models by examining AR CAGn-linked susceptibility to eight extensively studied diseases representing the diverse physiological roles of androgens, and consider the costs of these diseases by their frequency and fitness effects. Five diseases could contribute to the distribution of AR CAGn observed among contemporary human populations. With support for disease susceptibilities associated with long and short AR CAGn, balancing selection provides a useful model for studying selection at this locus. Gender-specific differences AR CAGn health effects also support this locus as a candidate for sexual conflict over repeat number. Accompanied by the accumulation of AR CAGn in humans, these models help explain the distribution of repeat number in contemporary human populations. PMID:23467468

  10. NLRP3 rs35829419 polymorphism is associated with increased susceptibility to multiple diseases in humans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Fan, H W; Zhang, J Z; Wang, Y M; Xing, H J

    2015-01-01

    Using a meta-analysis framework, we investigated the association between the NLRP3 rs35829419 polymorphism and increased susceptibility to diverse diseases in humans. Relevant published studies were identified through a comprehensive and systematic electronic search, using the following scientific literature databases: Science Citation Index, the Cochrane Library, PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Current Contents Index, Chinese Biomedical, the Chinese Journal Full-Text, and the Weipu Journal. Statistical analysis of data extracted from the selected high quality studies was performed using the Version 12.0 STATA software. A total of 13 case-control studies met our stringent inclusion and exclusion criteria for the present meta-analysis. These 13 high quality studies contained relevant information on 7719 patients with various diseases and 7094 healthy controls. Our meta-analysis results showed that the NLRP3 gene rs35829419 C>A polymorphism was associated with a significantly increased risk of developing multiple diseases in humans under 5 genetic models (all P < 0.05). Data stratification and subgroup analysis based on the disease type revealed that rs35829419 C>A carriers displayed a markedly increase susceptibility to leprosy, colorectal cancer, HIV-1 infection, rheumatoid arthritis, abdominal aortic aneurysms, inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis, and atopic dermatitis. In summary, our meta-analysis results revealed the first identified strong correlation between the NLRP3 rs35829419 polymorphism and increased susceptibility to various diseases in humans. PMID:26535712

  11. Androgen receptor polyglutamine repeat number: models of selection and disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Calen P; Crespi, Bernard J

    2013-02-01

    Variation in polyglutamine repeat number in the androgen receptor (AR CAGn) is negatively correlated with the transcription of androgen-responsive genes and is associated with susceptibility to an extensive list of human disease. Only a small portion of the heritability for many of these diseases is explained by conventional SNP-based genome-wide association studies, and the forces shaping AR CAGn among humans remains largely unexplored. Here, we propose evolutionary models for understanding selection at the AR CAG locus, namely balancing selection, sexual conflict, accumulation-selection, and antagonistic pleiotropy. We evaluate these models by examining AR CAGn-linked susceptibility to eight extensively studied diseases representing the diverse physiological roles of androgens, and consider the costs of these diseases by their frequency and fitness effects. Five diseases could contribute to the distribution of AR CAGn observed among contemporary human populations. With support for disease susceptibilities associated with long and short AR CAGn, balancing selection provides a useful model for studying selection at this locus. Gender-specific differences AR CAGn health effects also support this locus as a candidate for sexual conflict over repeat number. Accompanied by the accumulation of AR CAGn in humans, these models help explain the distribution of repeat number in contemporary human populations. PMID:23467468

  12. Biofilm Matrix Composition Affects the Susceptibility of Food Associated Staphylococci to Cleaning and Disinfection Agents

    PubMed Central

    Fagerlund, Annette; Langsrud, Solveig; Heir, Even; Mikkelsen, Maria I.; Møretrø, Trond

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are frequently isolated from food processing environments, and it has been speculated whether survival after cleaning and disinfection with benzalkonium chloride (BC)-containing disinfectants is due to biofilm formation, matrix composition, or BC efflux mechanisms. Out of 35 food associated staphylococci, eight produced biofilm in a microtiter plate assay and were identified as Staphylococcus capitis (2), S. cohnii, S. epidermidis, S. lentus (2), and S. saprophyticus (2). The eight biofilm producing strains were characterized using whole genome sequencing. Three of these strains contained the ica operon responsible for production of a polysaccharide matrix, and formed a biofilm which was detached upon exposure to the polysaccharide degrading enzyme Dispersin B, but not Proteinase K or trypsin. These strains were more tolerant to the lethal effect of BC both in suspension and biofilm than the remaining five biofilm producing strains. The five BC susceptible strains were characterized by lack of the ica operon, and their biofilms were detached by Proteinase K or trypsin, but not Dispersin B, indicating that proteins were major structural components of their biofilm matrix. Several novel cell wall anchored repeat domain proteins with domain structures similar to that of MSCRAMM adhesins were identified in the genomes of these strains, potentially representing novel mechanisms of ica-independent biofilm accumulation. Biofilms from all strains showed similar levels of detachment after exposure to alkaline chlorine, which is used for cleaning in the food industry. Strains with qac genes encoding BC efflux pumps could grow at higher concentrations of BC than strains without these genes, but no differences were observed at biocidal concentrations. In conclusion, the biofilm matrix of food associated staphylococci varies with respect to protein or polysaccharide nature, and this may affect the sensitivity toward a commonly used disinfectant. PMID:27375578

  13. Biofilm Matrix Composition Affects the Susceptibility of Food Associated Staphylococci to Cleaning and Disinfection Agents.

    PubMed

    Fagerlund, Annette; Langsrud, Solveig; Heir, Even; Mikkelsen, Maria I; Møretrø, Trond

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci are frequently isolated from food processing environments, and it has been speculated whether survival after cleaning and disinfection with benzalkonium chloride (BC)-containing disinfectants is due to biofilm formation, matrix composition, or BC efflux mechanisms. Out of 35 food associated staphylococci, eight produced biofilm in a microtiter plate assay and were identified as Staphylococcus capitis (2), S. cohnii, S. epidermidis, S. lentus (2), and S. saprophyticus (2). The eight biofilm producing strains were characterized using whole genome sequencing. Three of these strains contained the ica operon responsible for production of a polysaccharide matrix, and formed a biofilm which was detached upon exposure to the polysaccharide degrading enzyme Dispersin B, but not Proteinase K or trypsin. These strains were more tolerant to the lethal effect of BC both in suspension and biofilm than the remaining five biofilm producing strains. The five BC susceptible strains were characterized by lack of the ica operon, and their biofilms were detached by Proteinase K or trypsin, but not Dispersin B, indicating that proteins were major structural components of their biofilm matrix. Several novel cell wall anchored repeat domain proteins with domain structures similar to that of MSCRAMM adhesins were identified in the genomes of these strains, potentially representing novel mechanisms of ica-independent biofilm accumulation. Biofilms from all strains showed similar levels of detachment after exposure to alkaline chlorine, which is used for cleaning in the food industry. Strains with qac genes encoding BC efflux pumps could grow at higher concentrations of BC than strains without these genes, but no differences were observed at biocidal concentrations. In conclusion, the biofilm matrix of food associated staphylococci varies with respect to protein or polysaccharide nature, and this may affect the sensitivity toward a commonly used disinfectant. PMID:27375578

  14. HLA non-class II genes may confer type I diabetes susceptibility in a Mapuche (Amerindian) affected family.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Bravo, Francisco; Martinez-Laso, Jorge; Martin-Villa, Jose M; Moscoso, Juan; Moreno, Almudena; Serrano-Vela, Juan I; Zamora, Jorge; Asenjo, Silvia; Gleisner, Andrea; Arnaiz-Villena, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    A rare case of type I diabetes is studied in an Amerindian (Mapuche) family from Chile, analyzing glutamic acid decarboxylase, islet-cell autoantibodies and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes. The affected sib is the only one that has one specific HLA haplotype combination that differs from the other sibs only in the HLA class I genes. It is concluded that HLA diabetes susceptibility factors may be placed outside the class II region or even that susceptibility factors do not exist in the HLA region in this Amerindian family. PMID:16473308

  15. Isolation Method (direct plating or enrichment) does not affect Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Campylobacter from Chicken Carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine if Campylobacter isolation method influenced antimicrobial susceptibility results, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of nine antimicrobials were compared for 291 pairs of Campylobacter isolates recovered from chicken carcass rinse samples using direct plating and an enrichment...

  16. Spread of infectious diseases in a hyperbolic reaction-diffusion susceptible-infected-removed model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbera, Elvira; Consolo, Giancarlo; Valenti, Giovanna

    2013-11-01

    A one-dimensional hyperbolic reaction-diffusion model of epidemics is developed to describe the dynamics of diseases spread occurring in an environment where three kinds of individuals mutually interact: the susceptibles, the infectives, and the removed. It is assumed that the disease is transmitted from the infected population to the susceptible one according to a nonlinear convex incidence rate. The model, based upon the framework of extended thermodynamics, removes the unphysical feature of instantaneous diffusive effects, which is typical of parabolic models. Linear stability analyses are performed to study the nature of the equilibrium states against uniform and nonuniform perturbations. Emphasis is given to the occurrence of Hopf and Turing bifurcations, which break the temporal and the spatial symmetry of the system, respectively. The existence of traveling wave solutions connecting two steady states is also discussed. The governing equations are also integrated numerically to validate the analytical results and to characterize the spatiotemporal evolution of diseases.

  17. Evolution, revolution and heresy in the genetics of infectious disease susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2012-01-01

    Infectious pathogens have long been recognized as potentially powerful agents impacting on the evolution of human genetic diversity. Analysis of large-scale case–control studies provides one of the most direct means of identifying human genetic variants that currently impact on susceptibility to particular infectious diseases. For over 50 years candidate gene studies have been used to identify loci for many major causes of human infectious mortality, including malaria, tuberculosis, human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, bacterial pneumonia and hepatitis. But with the advent of genome-wide approaches, many new loci have been identified in diverse populations. Genome-wide linkage studies identified a few loci, but genome-wide association studies are proving more successful, and both exome and whole-genome sequencing now offer a revolutionary increase in power. Opinions differ on the extent to which the genetic component to common disease susceptibility is encoded by multiple high frequency or rare variants, and the heretical view that most infectious diseases might even be monogenic has been advocated recently. Review of findings to date suggests that the genetic architecture of infectious disease susceptibility may be importantly different from that of non-infectious diseases, and it is suggested that natural selection may be the driving force underlying this difference. PMID:22312051

  18. The role of male disease susceptibility in the evolution of haplodiploid insect societies.

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Sean; Beshers, Samuel N.

    2004-01-01

    Heterozygosity at loci affecting resistance against parasites can benefit host fitness. We predict that, in haplodiploid species, haploid males will suffer decreased parasite resistance relative to diploid females. We suggest that elevated susceptibility in haploid males has shaped the evolution of social behaviour in haplodiploid species. Male susceptibility will select for behavioural adaptations that limit males' exposure to pathogens and that limit male transmission of pathogens within and between colonies. The relatedness-asymmetry hypothesis that has been advanced to explain female-only workers does not make these predictions. We review the relevant evidence for genetic effects on parasite resistance in insects and summarize empirical evidence that relates to the haploid-susceptibility hypothesis. PMID:15255054

  19. Meningococcal disease: history, epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, antimicrobial susceptibility and prevention.

    PubMed

    Manchanda, V; Gupta, S; Bhalla, P

    2006-01-01

    Meningoccocal disease has repeatedly caused outbreaks worldwide. There has been sudden surge of cases of meningococcemia and meningococcal meningitis in early 2005 in Delhi, India and neighboring states of Uttar Pradesh and Haryana. As of June 17, 2005, 429 probable cases of meningococcal disease have been reported in Delhi out of which 128 cases have revealed microbiological evidence of Neisseria meningitidis. It is possible that the number of cases was in excess of the numbers notified. During this episode drug susceptibility testing by MIC method (E-test) using break points recently recommended by NCCLS/CLSI, revealed that all isolates were sensitive to penicillin, ampicillin, rifampicin and ceftriaxone. As regards to ciprofloxacin, about two third of the isolates tested were found to be 'non-susceptible' (MIC =0.03microg/mL- 0.190microg/mL). All the isolates were found resistant to cotrimoxazole (MIC> 16microg/mL). Repeated outbreaks, decreased susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, which is commonly used for chemoprophylaxis of meningococcal disease, highlights the need for a constant surveillance system. Present review deals with various aspects of Neisseria meningitidis and meningococcal disease in view of recent episode. PMID:16505549

  20. Sex differences in metabolic aging of the brain: insights into female susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liqin; Mao, Zisu; Woody, Sarah K; Brinton, Roberta D

    2016-06-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding of clinical aspects of sex differences in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the underlying mechanisms, for instance, how sex modifies AD risk and why the female brain is more susceptible to AD, are not clear. The purpose of this study is to elucidate sex disparities in brain aging profiles focusing on 2 major areas-energy and amyloid metabolism-that are most significantly affected in preclinical development of AD. Total RNA isolated from hippocampal tissues of both female and male 129/C57BL/6 mice at ages of 6, 9, 12, or 15 months were comparatively analyzed by custom-designed Taqman low-density arrays for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction detection of a total of 182 genes involved in a broad spectrum of biological processes modulating energy production and amyloid homeostasis. Gene expression profiles revealed substantial differences in the trajectory of aging changes between female and male brains. In female brains, 44.2% of genes were significantly changed from 6 months to 9 months and two-thirds showed downregulation. In contrast, in male brains, only 5.4% of genes were significantly altered at this age transition. Subsequent changes in female brains were at a much smaller magnitude, including 10.9% from 9 months to 12 months and 6.1% from 12 months to 15 months. In male brains, most changes occurred from 12 months to 15 months and the majority were upregulated. Furthermore, gene network analysis revealed that clusterin appeared to serve as a link between the overall decreased bioenergetic metabolism and increased amyloid dyshomeostasis associated with the earliest transition in female brains. Together, results from this study indicate that: (1) female and male brains follow profoundly dissimilar trajectories as they age; (2) female brains undergo age-related changes much earlier than male brains; (3) early changes in female brains signal the onset of a hypometabolic phenotype at risk for AD. These

  1. Skeletal muscle fiber type: using insights from muscle developmental biology to dissect targets for susceptibility and resistance to muscle disease.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Jared; Maves, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Skeletal muscle fibers are classified into fiber types, in particular, slow twitch versus fast twitch. Muscle fiber types are generally defined by the particular myosin heavy chain isoforms that they express, but many other components contribute to a fiber's physiological characteristics. Skeletal muscle fiber type can have a profound impact on muscle diseases, including certain muscular dystrophies and sarcopenia, the aging-induced loss of muscle mass and strength. These findings suggest that some muscle diseases may be treated by shifting fiber type characteristics either from slow to fast, or fast to slow phenotypes, depending on the disease. Recent studies have begun to address which components of muscle fiber types mediate their susceptibility or resistance to muscle disease. However, for many diseases it remains largely unclear why certain fiber types are affected. A substantial body of work has revealed molecular pathways that regulate muscle fiber type plasticity and early developmental muscle fiber identity. For instance, recent studies have revealed many factors that regulate muscle fiber type through modulating the activity of the muscle regulatory transcription factor MYOD1. Future studies of muscle fiber type development in animal models will continue to enhance our understanding of factors and pathways that may provide therapeutic targets to treat muscle diseases. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:518-534. doi: 10.1002/wdev.230 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27199166

  2. Rotenone Susceptibility Phenotype in Olfactory Derived Patient Cells as a Model of Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, M; Shan, J; Matigian, N; Todorovic, M; Cook, A L; Ravishankar, S; Dong, L F; Neuzil, J; Silburn, P; Mackay-Sim, A; Mellick, G D; Wood, S A

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is a complex age-related neurodegenerative disorder. Approximately 90% of Parkinson's disease cases are idiopathic, of unknown origin. The aetiology of Parkinson's disease is not fully understood but increasing evidence implies a failure in fundamental cellular processes including mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress. To dissect the cellular events underlying idiopathic Parkinson's disease, we use primary cell lines established from the olfactory mucosa of Parkinson's disease patients. Previous metabolic and transcriptomic analyses identified deficiencies in stress response pathways in patient-derived cell lines. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these deficiencies manifested as increased susceptibility, as measured by cell viability, to a range of extrinsic stressors. We identified that patient-derived cells are more sensitive to mitochondrial complex I inhibition and hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress, than controls. Exposure to low levels (50 nM) of rotenone led to increased apoptosis in patient-derived cells. We identified an endogenous deficit in mitochondrial complex I in patient-derived cells, but this did not directly correlate with rotenone-sensitivity. We further characterized the sensitivity to rotenone and identified that it was partly associated with heat shock protein 27 levels. Finally, transcriptomic analysis following rotenone exposure revealed that patient-derived cells express a diminished response to rotenone-induced stress compared with cells from healthy controls. Our cellular model of idiopathic Parkinson's disease displays a clear susceptibility phenotype to mitochondrial stress. The determination of molecular mechanisms underpinning this susceptibility may lead to the identification of biomarkers for either disease onset or progression. PMID:27123847

  3. Analysis on the susceptibility genes in two chinese pedigrees with familial Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changshui; Xu, Jun; Zhang, Yanmin; Ma, Jianjun; Kawakami, Hideshi; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Kamada, Masaki

    2010-01-01

    Objective. To screen the susceptibility genes in Chinese pedigrees with early-onset familial Parkinson's disease (FPD). Methods. Fifty-one genomic DNA samples extracted from two Chinese pedigrees with FPD, the alpha-synuclein genes (SNCA), the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2(LRRK2), PINK1(PTEN-induced putative kinase 1), PARK7(Protein DJ1), PARK2(Parkinson juvenile disease protein 2), the glucocerebrosidase (GBA), and ATP(Ezrin-binding protein PACE-1), were sequenced by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The gene dose of SNCA was checked. Results. There were only two missense mutations observed, respectively, at exon 5 of LRRK2 and exon 10 of PARK2, and both were enrolled in SNPs. Conclusion. No meaningful mutations could be detected, and other susceptibility genes should be detected in FDP patients in China. PMID:21188226

  4. Staphylococcus aureus SrrAB Affects Susceptibility to Hydrogen Peroxide and Co-Existence with Streptococcus sanguinis.

    PubMed

    Oogai, Yuichi; Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a pathogen and a commensal bacterial species that is found in humans. Bacterial two-component systems (TCSs) sense and respond to environmental stresses, which include antimicrobial agents produced by other bacteria. In this study, we analyzed the relation between the TCS SrrAB and susceptibility to the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) that is produced by Streptococcus sanguinis, which is a commensal oral streptococcus. An srrA-inactivated S. aureus mutant demonstrated low susceptibility to the H2O2 produced by S. sanguinis. We investigated the expression of anti-oxidant factors in the mutant. The expression of katA in the mutant was significantly higher than in the wild-type (WT) in the presence or absence of 0.4 mM H2O2. The expression of dps in the mutant was significantly increased compared with the WT in the presence of H2O2 but not in the absence of H2O2. A katA or a dps-inactivated mutant had high susceptibility to H2O2 compared with WT. In addition, we found that the nitric oxide detoxification protein (flavohemoglobin: Hmp), which is regulated by SrrAB, was related to H2O2 susceptibility. The hmp-inactivated mutant had slightly lower susceptibility to the H2O2 produced by S. sanguinis than did WT. When a srrA-inactivated mutant or the WT were co-cultured with S. sanguinis, the population percentage of the mutant was significantly higher than the WT. In conclusion, SrrAB regulates katA, dps and hmp expression and affects H2O2 susceptibility. Our findings suggest that SrrAB is related in vivo to the co-existence of S. aureus with S. sanguinis. PMID:27441894

  5. Staphylococcus aureus SrrAB Affects Susceptibility to Hydrogen Peroxide and Co-Existence with Streptococcus sanguinis

    PubMed Central

    Oogai, Yuichi; Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Komatsuzawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a pathogen and a commensal bacterial species that is found in humans. Bacterial two-component systems (TCSs) sense and respond to environmental stresses, which include antimicrobial agents produced by other bacteria. In this study, we analyzed the relation between the TCS SrrAB and susceptibility to the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) that is produced by Streptococcus sanguinis, which is a commensal oral streptococcus. An srrA-inactivated S. aureus mutant demonstrated low susceptibility to the H2O2 produced by S. sanguinis. We investigated the expression of anti-oxidant factors in the mutant. The expression of katA in the mutant was significantly higher than in the wild-type (WT) in the presence or absence of 0.4 mM H2O2. The expression of dps in the mutant was significantly increased compared with the WT in the presence of H2O2 but not in the absence of H2O2. A katA or a dps-inactivated mutant had high susceptibility to H2O2 compared with WT. In addition, we found that the nitric oxide detoxification protein (flavohemoglobin: Hmp), which is regulated by SrrAB, was related to H2O2 susceptibility. The hmp-inactivated mutant had slightly lower susceptibility to the H2O2 produced by S. sanguinis than did WT. When a srrA-inactivated mutant or the WT were co-cultured with S. sanguinis, the population percentage of the mutant was significantly higher than the WT. In conclusion, SrrAB regulates katA, dps and hmp expression and affects H2O2 susceptibility. Our findings suggest that SrrAB is related in vivo to the co-existence of S. aureus with S. sanguinis. PMID:27441894

  6. Soybean seed composition as affected by drought and Phomopsis in phomopsis susceptible and resistant genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limited research has been done on the effect of phomopsis on seed composition in the Early Soybean Production System (ESPS). The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of phomopsis on seed protein, oil, fatty acid, sugars, and minerals in phomopsis susceptible, moderately resistant, a...

  7. Meta-analysis of 74,046 individuals identifies 11 new susceptibility loci for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lambert, J C; Ibrahim-Verbaas, C A; Harold, D; Naj, A C; Sims, R; Bellenguez, C; DeStafano, A L; Bis, J C; Beecham, G W; Grenier-Boley, B; Russo, G; Thorton-Wells, T A; Jones, N; Smith, A V; Chouraki, V; Thomas, C; Ikram, M A; Zelenika, D; Vardarajan, B N; Kamatani, Y; Lin, C F; Gerrish, A; Schmidt, H; Kunkle, B; Dunstan, M L; Ruiz, A; Bihoreau, M T; Choi, S H; Reitz, C; Pasquier, F; Cruchaga, C; Craig, D; Amin, N; Berr, C; Lopez, O L; De Jager, P L; Deramecourt, V; Johnston, J A; Evans, D; Lovestone, S; Letenneur, L; Morón, F J; Rubinsztein, D C; Eiriksdottir, G; Sleegers, K; Goate, A M; Fiévet, N; Huentelman, M W; Gill, M; Brown, K; Kamboh, M I; Keller, L; Barberger-Gateau, P; McGuiness, B; Larson, E B; Green, R; Myers, A J; Dufouil, C; Todd, S; Wallon, D; Love, S; Rogaeva, E; Gallacher, J; St George-Hyslop, P; Clarimon, J; Lleo, A; Bayer, A; Tsuang, D W; Yu, L; Tsolaki, M; Bossù, P; Spalletta, G; Proitsi, P; Collinge, J; Sorbi, S; Sanchez-Garcia, F; Fox, N C; Hardy, J; Deniz Naranjo, M C; Bosco, P; Clarke, R; Brayne, C; Galimberti, D; Mancuso, M; Matthews, F; Moebus, S; Mecocci, P; Del Zompo, M; Maier, W; Hampel, H; Pilotto, A; Bullido, M; Panza, F; Caffarra, P; Nacmias, B; Gilbert, J R; Mayhaus, M; Lannefelt, L; Hakonarson, H; Pichler, S; Carrasquillo, M M; Ingelsson, M; Beekly, D; Alvarez, V; Zou, F; Valladares, O; Younkin, S G; Coto, E; Hamilton-Nelson, K L; Gu, W; Razquin, C; Pastor, P; Mateo, I; Owen, M J; Faber, K M; Jonsson, P V; Combarros, O; O'Donovan, M C; Cantwell, L B; Soininen, H; Blacker, D; Mead, S; Mosley, T H; Bennett, D A; Harris, T B; Fratiglioni, L; Holmes, C; de Bruijn, R F; Passmore, P; Montine, T J; Bettens, K; Rotter, J I; Brice, A; Morgan, K; Foroud, T M; Kukull, W A; Hannequin, D; Powell, J F; Nalls, M A; Ritchie, K; Lunetta, K L; Kauwe, J S; Boerwinkle, E; Riemenschneider, M; Boada, M; Hiltuenen, M; Martin, E R; Schmidt, R; Rujescu, D; Wang, L S; Dartigues, J F; Mayeux, R; Tzourio, C; Hofman, A; Nöthen, M M; Graff, C; Psaty, B M; Jones, L; Haines, J L; Holmans, P A; Lathrop, M; Pericak-Vance, M A; Launer, L J; Farrer, L A; van Duijn, C M; Van Broeckhoven, C; Moskvina, V; Seshadri, S; Williams, J; Schellenberg, G D; Amouyel, P

    2013-12-01

    Eleven susceptibility loci for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) were identified by previous studies; however, a large portion of the genetic risk for this disease remains unexplained. We conducted a large, two-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry. In stage 1, we used genotyped and imputed data (7,055,881 SNPs) to perform meta-analysis on 4 previously published GWAS data sets consisting of 17,008 Alzheimer's disease cases and 37,154 controls. In stage 2, 11,632 SNPs were genotyped and tested for association in an independent set of 8,572 Alzheimer's disease cases and 11,312 controls. In addition to the APOE locus (encoding apolipoprotein E), 19 loci reached genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) in the combined stage 1 and stage 2 analysis, of which 11 are newly associated with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24162737

  8. EXPERIMENTAL INDUCTION OF CHRONIC PULMONARY DISEASE IN GENETICALLY SUSCEPTIBLE RAT MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory



    Experimental induction of chronic pulmonary disease in genetically susceptible rat model. M.C.Schladweiler, BS 1, A.D.Ledbetter 1, K.E.Pinkerton, PhD 2, K.R.Smith, PhD 2, P.S.Gilmour, PhD 1, P.A.Evansky 1, D.L.Costa, ScD 1, W.P.Watkinson, PhD 1, J.P.Nolan 1 and U.P.Kodava...

  9. Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Disease due to IL-12Rβ1 Deficiency in Three Iranian Children

    PubMed Central

    SARRAFZADEH, Shokouh Azam; MAHLOOJIRAD, Maryam; NOURIZADEH, Maryam; CASANOVA, Jean-Laurent; POURPAK, Zahra; BUSTAMANTE, Jacinta; MOIN, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD) is a rare inheritance syndrome, characterized by a disseminated infection with mycobacterium in children following BCG vaccination at birth. Regarding the vaccination program in Iran, it may consider as a public health problem. The pathogenesis of MSMD is dependent on either insufficient production of IFN-gamma (γ) or inadequate response to it. Here, we want to introduce three cases including two siblings and one girl from two unrelated families with severe mycobacterial infections referred to Immunology, Asthma and Allergy Research Institute (IAARI), from 2013 to 2015; their MSMD was confirmed by both cytokine assessment and genetic analysis. Regarding the clinical features of the patients, cell proliferation against a mitogen and BCG antigen was ordered in a lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) setting. ELISA was performed for the measurement of IL-12p70 and IFN-γ in whole blood samples activated by BCG + recombinant human IFN-γ and BCG + recombinant human IL-12, respectively. In contrast to mitogen, the antigen-dependent proliferation activity of the patients’ leukocytes was significantly lower than that in normal range. We identified a homozygous mutation in IL12RB1 gene for two kindred who had a homozygous mutation affecting an essential splice site. For the third patient, a novel frameshift deletion in IL12RB1 gene was found. The genetic study results confirmed the impaired function of stimulated lymphocytes to release IFN-γ following stimulation with BCG+IL-12 while the response to rhIFN-γ for IL-12p70 production was relatively intact. Our findings show that cellular and molecular assessments are needed for precise identification of immunodeficiency disorders especially those without clear-cut diagnostic criteria. PMID:27141500

  10. Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Disease due to IL-12Rβ1 Deficiency in Three Iranian Children

    PubMed Central

    SARRAFZADEH, Shokouh azam; MAHLOOJIRAD, Maryam; NOURIZADEH, Maryam; CASANOVA, Jean-Laurent; POURPAK, Zahra; BUSTAMANTE, Jacinta; MOIN, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD) is a rare inheritance syndrome, characterized by a disseminated infection with mycobacterium in children following BCG vaccination at birth. Regarding the vaccination program in Iran, it may consider as a public health problem. The pathogenesis of MSMD is dependent on either insufficient production of IFN-gamma (γ) or inadequate response to it. Here, we want to introduce three cases including two siblings and one girl from two unrelated families with severe mycobacterial infections referred to Immunology, Asthma and Allergy Research Institute (IAARI), from 2013 to 2015; their MSMD was confirmed by both cytokine assessment and genetic analysis. Regarding the clinical features of the patients, cell proliferation against a mitogen and BCG antigen was ordered in a lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) setting. ELISA was performed for the measurement of IL-12p70 and IFN- γ in whole blood samples activated by BCG + recombinant human IFN-γ and BCG + recombinant human IL-12, respectively. In contrast to mitogen, the antigen-dependent proliferation activity of the patients’ leukocytes was significantly lower than that in normal range. We identified a homozygous mutation in IL12RB1 gene for two kindred who had a homozygous mutation affecting an essential splice site. For the third patient, a novel frameshift deletion in IL12RB1 gene was found. The genetic study results confirmed the impaired function of stimulated lymphocytes to release IFN-γ following stimulation with BCG+IL-12 while the response to rhIFN-γ for IL-12p70 production was relatively intact. Our findings show that cellular and molecular assessments are needed for precise identification of immunodeficiency disorders especially those without clear-cut diagnostic criteria. PMID:27114990

  11. Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Disease due to IL-12Rβ1 Deficiency in Three Iranian Children.

    PubMed

    Sarrafzadeh, Shokouh Azam; Mahloojirad, Maryam; Nourizadeh, Maryam; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Pourpak, Zahra; Bustamante, Jacinta; Moin, Mostafa

    2016-03-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial diseases (MSMD) is a rare inheritance syndrome, characterized by a disseminated infection with mycobacterium in children following BCG vaccination at birth. Regarding the vaccination program in Iran, it may consider as a public health problem. The pathogenesis of MSMD is dependent on either insufficient production of IFN-gamma (γ) or inadequate response to it. Here, we want to introduce three cases including two siblings and one girl from two unrelated families with severe mycobacterial infections referred to Immunology, Asthma and Allergy Research Institute (IAARI), from 2013 to 2015; their MSMD was confirmed by both cytokine assessment and genetic analysis. Regarding the clinical features of the patients, cell proliferation against a mitogen and BCG antigen was ordered in a lymphocyte transformation test (LTT) setting. ELISA was performed for the measurement of IL-12p70 and IFN-γ in whole blood samples activated by BCG + recombinant human IFN-γ and BCG + recombinant human IL-12, respectively. In contrast to mitogen, the antigen-dependent proliferation activity of the patients' leukocytes was significantly lower than that in normal range. We identified a homozygous mutation in IL12RB1 gene for two kindred who had a homozygous mutation affecting an essential splice site. For the third patient, a novel frameshift deletion in IL12RB1 gene was found. The genetic study results confirmed the impaired function of stimulated lymphocytes to release IFN-γ following stimulation with BCG+IL-12 while the response to rhIFN-γ for IL-12p70 production was relatively intact. Our findings show that cellular and molecular assessments are needed for precise identification of immunodeficiency disorders especially those without clear-cut diagnostic criteria. PMID:27141500

  12. THE MITOCHONDRIAL PARADIGM FOR CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY AND CELLULAR FUNCTION: A COMPLEMENTARY CONCEPT TO MENDELIAN GENETICS

    PubMed Central

    Kryzwanski, David M.; Moellering, Douglas; Fetterman, Jessica L.; Dunham-Snary, Kimberly J.; Sammy, Melissa J.; Ballinger, Scott W.

    2013-01-01

    While there is general agreement that cardiovascular disease (CVD) development is influenced by a combination of genetic, environmental, and behavioral contributors, the actual mechanistic basis of how these factors initiate or promote CVD development in some individuals while others with identical risk profiles do not, is not clearly understood. This review considers the potential role for mitochondrial genetics and function in determining CVD susceptibility from the standpoint that the original features that molded cellular function were based upon mitochondrial-nuclear relationships established millions of years ago and were likely refined during prehistoric environmental selection events that today, are largely absent. Consequently, contemporary risk factors that influence our susceptibility to a variety of age-related diseases, including CVD were probably not part of the dynamics that defined the processes of mitochondrial – nuclear interaction, and thus, cell function. In this regard, the selective conditions that contributed to cellular functionality and evolution should be given more consideration when interpreting and designing experimental data and strategies. Finally, future studies that probe beyond epidemiologic associations are required. These studies will serve as the initial steps for addressing the provocative concept that contemporary human disease susceptibility is the result of selection events for mitochondrial function that increased chances for prehistoric human survival and reproductive success. PMID:21647091

  13. Gene-Wide Analysis Detects Two New Susceptibility Genes for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Harold, Denise; Jones, Lesley; Holmans, Peter; Gerrish, Amy; Vedernikov, Alexey; Richards, Alexander; DeStefano, Anita L.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A.; Naj, Adam C.; Sims, Rebecca; Jun, Gyungah; Bis, Joshua C.; Beecham, Gary W.; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Russo, Giancarlo; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Denning, Nicola; Smith, Albert V.; Chouraki, Vincent; Thomas, Charlene; Ikram, M. Arfan; Zelenika, Diana; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Schmidt, Helena; Kunkle, Brian; Dunstan, Melanie L.; Vronskaya, Maria; Johnson, Andrew D.; Ruiz, Agustin; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Reitz, Christiane; Pasquier, Florence; Hollingworth, Paul; Hanon, Olivier; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Campion, Dominique; Crane, Paul K.; Baldwin, Clinton; Becker, Tim; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cruchaga, Carlos; Craig, David; Amin, Najaf; Berr, Claudine; Lopez, Oscar L.; De Jager, Philip L.; Deramecourt, Vincent; Johnston, Janet A.; Evans, Denis; Lovestone, Simon; Letenneur, Luc; Hernández, Isabel; Rubinsztein, David C.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Sleegers, Kristel; Goate, Alison M.; Fiévet, Nathalie; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Gill, Michael; Brown, Kristelle; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Keller, Lina; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; McGuinness, Bernadette; Larson, Eric B.; Myers, Amanda J.; Dufouil, Carole; Todd, Stephen; Wallon, David; Love, Seth; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Gallacher, John; George-Hyslop, Peter St; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleo, Alberto; Bayer, Anthony; Tsuang, Debby W.; Yu, Lei; Tsolaki, Magda; Bossù, Paola; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Proitsi, Petra; Collinge, John; Sorbi, Sandro; Garcia, Florentino Sanchez; Fox, Nick C.; Hardy, John; Naranjo, Maria Candida Deniz; Bosco, Paolo; Clarke, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Siciliano, Gabriele; Moebus, Susanne; Mecocci, Patrizia; Zompo, Maria Del; Maier, Wolfgang; Hampel, Harald; Pilotto, Alberto; Frank-García, Ana; Panza, Francesco; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Caffarra, Paolo; Nacmias, Benedetta; Perry, William; Mayhaus, Manuel; Lannfelt, Lars; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pichler, Sabrina; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Ingelsson, Martin; Beekly, Duane; Alvarez, Victoria; Zou, Fanggeng; Valladares, Otto; Younkin, Steven G.; Coto, Eliecer; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Gu, Wei; Razquin, Cristina; Pastor, Pau; Mateo, Ignacio; Owen, Michael J.; Faber, Kelley M.; Jonsson, Palmi V.; Combarros, Onofre; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Soininen, Hilkka; Blacker, Deborah; Mead, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H.; Bennett, David A.; Harris, Tamara B.; Fratiglioni, Laura; Holmes, Clive; de Bruijn, Renee F. A. G.; Passmore, Peter; Montine, Thomas J.; Bettens, Karolien; Rotter, Jerome I.; Brice, Alexis; Morgan, Kevin; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Kukull, Walter A.; Hannequin, Didier; Powell, John F.; Nalls, Michael A.; Ritchie, Karen; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Kauwe, John S. K.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Boada, Mercè; Hiltunen, Mikko; Martin, Eden R.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rujescu, Dan; Dartigues, Jean-François; Mayeux, Richard; Tzourio, Christophe; Hofman, Albert; Nöthen, Markus M.; Graff, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Lathrop, Mark; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Launer, Lenore J.; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Farrer, Lindsay A.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Ramirez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease is a common debilitating dementia with known heritability, for which 20 late onset susceptibility loci have been identified, but more remain to be discovered. This study sought to identify new susceptibility genes, using an alternative gene-wide analytical approach which tests for patterns of association within genes, in the powerful genome-wide association dataset of the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project Consortium, comprising over 7 m genotypes from 25,580 Alzheimer's cases and 48,466 controls. Principal Findings In addition to earlier reported genes, we detected genome-wide significant loci on chromosomes 8 (TP53INP1, p = 1.4×10−6) and 14 (IGHV1-67 p = 7.9×10−8) which indexed novel susceptibility loci. Significance The additional genes identified in this study, have an array of functions previously implicated in Alzheimer's disease, including aspects of energy metabolism, protein degradation and the immune system and add further weight to these pathways as potential therapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24922517

  14. Comparisons of protein profiles of beech bark disease resistant and susceptible American beech (Fagus grandifolia)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Beech bark disease is an insect-fungus complex that damages and often kills American beech trees and has major ecological and economic impacts on forests of the northeastern United States and southeastern Canadian forests. The disease begins when exotic beech scale insects feed on the bark of trees, and is followed by infection of damaged bark tissues by one of the Neonectria species of fungi. Proteomic analysis was conducted of beech bark proteins from diseased trees and healthy trees in areas heavily infested with beech bark disease. All of the diseased trees had signs of Neonectria infection such as cankers or fruiting bodies. In previous tests reported elsewhere, all of the diseased trees were demonstrated to be susceptible to the scale insect and all of the healthy trees were demonstrated to be resistant to the scale insect. Sixteen trees were sampled from eight geographically isolated stands, the sample consisting of 10 healthy (scale-resistant) and 6 diseased/infested (scale-susceptible) trees. Results Proteins were extracted from each tree and analysed in triplicate by isoelectric focusing followed by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Gels were stained and protein spots identified and intensity quantified, then a statistical model was fit to identify significant differences between trees. A subset of BBD differential proteins were analysed by mass spectrometry and matched to known protein sequences for identification. Identified proteins had homology to stress, insect, and pathogen related proteins in other plant systems. Protein spots significantly different in diseased and healthy trees having no stand or disease-by-stand interaction effects were identified. Conclusions Further study of these proteins should help to understand processes critical to resistance to beech bark disease and to develop biomarkers for use in tree breeding programs and for the selection of resistant trees prior to or in early stages of BBD development in stands. Early

  15. Simulated microgravity affects ciprofloxacin susceptibility and expression of acrAB-tolC genes in E. coli ATCC25922.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingxin; Li, Chenglin; Zheng, Yanhua; Si, Shaoyan; Shi, Yuhua; Huang, Yuling; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cui, Yan; Cui, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    As a representative fluoroquinolone antibacterial, ciprofloxacin is frequently used to treat infections caused by bacteria such as E. coli. It is much meaningful to explore ciprofloxacin susceptibility and investigate a possible mechanism of drug susceptibility changes in E. coli ATCC25922 exposed to the environmental stress of simulated microgravity. The subculture of E. coli lasted for 7 days under simulated microgravity conditions (SMG) and normal microgravity (NG) conditions. On the 8th day, the cultures were divided into three groups: (1) NG group (continuous NG cultures); (2) SMG group (continuous SMG cultures); (3) SMCNG group (simulated microgravity change into normal gravity cultures). Ciprofloxacin (a final concentration of 0.125 μg/ml) sensitivity and expression of acrAB-tolC genes were detected in E. coli cells. The count and percentage of viable cells in the SMG cultures bacteria exposed to ciprofloxacin were higher than that in NG cultures and reduced to the levels of NG group when they were subcultivated from SMG to NG. The expressions of efflux pump genes (acrA, acrB and tolC) were upregulated in SMG culture and downregulated to the levels of NG group when they were subcultivated from SMG to NG. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and expression of acrAB-tolC genes in E. coli could be reversibly affected by SMG conditions. Over expression of efflux pump genes acrAB-tolC perhaps played an important role in decreased CIP susceptibility under SMG. PMID:26339360

  16. Simulated microgravity affects ciprofloxacin susceptibility and expression of acrAB-tolC genes in E. coli ATCC25922

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Bingxin; Li, Chenglin; Zheng, Yanhua; Si, Shaoyan; Shi, Yuhua; Huang, Yuling; Zhang, Jianzhong; Cui, Yan; Cui, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    As a representative fluoroquinolone antibacterial, ciprofloxacin is frequently used to treat infections caused by bacteria such as E. coli. It is much meaningful to explore ciprofloxacin susceptibility and investigate a possible mechanism of drug susceptibility changes in E. coli ATCC25922 exposed to the environmental stress of simulated microgravity. The subculture of E. coli lasted for 7 days under simulated microgravity conditions (SMG) and normal microgravity (NG) conditions. On the 8th day, the cultures were divided into three groups: (1) NG group (continuous NG cultures); (2) SMG group (continuous SMG cultures); (3) SMCNG group (simulated microgravity change into normal gravity cultures). Ciprofloxacin (a final concentration of 0.125 μg/ml) sensitivity and expression of acrAB-tolC genes were detected in E. coli cells. The count and percentage of viable cells in the SMG cultures bacteria exposed to ciprofloxacin were higher than that in NG cultures and reduced to the levels of NG group when they were subcultivated from SMG to NG. The expressions of efflux pump genes (acrA, acrB and tolC) were upregulated in SMG culture and downregulated to the levels of NG group when they were subcultivated from SMG to NG. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin and expression of acrAB-tolC genes in E. coli could be reversibly affected by SMG conditions. Over expression of efflux pump genes acrAB-tolC perhaps played an important role in decreased CIP susceptibility under SMG. PMID:26339360

  17. GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS AFFECTING SUSCEPTIBILITY TO MERCURY NEUROTOXICITY IN CHILDREN: SUMMARY FINDINGS FROM THE CASA PIA CHILDREN's AMALGAM CLINICAL TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Woods, James S.; Heyer, Nicholas J.; Russo, Joan E.; Martin, Michael D.; Farin, Federico M.

    2014-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is neurotoxic, and children may be particularly susceptible to this effect. A current major challenge is identification of children who may be uniquely susceptible to Hg toxicity because of genetic predisposition. We examined the possibility that common genetic variants that are known to affect neurologic functions or Hg handling in adults would modify the adverse neurobehavioral effects of Hg exposure in children. Three hundred thirty subjects who participated as children in the recently completed Casa Pia Clinical Trial of Dental Amalgams in Children were genotyped for 27 variants of 13 genes that are reported to affect neurologic functions and/or Hg disposition in adults. Urinary Hg concentrations, reflecting Hg exposure from any source, served as the Hg exposure index. Regression modeling strategies were employed to evaluate potential associations between allelic status for individual genes or combinations of genes, Hg exposure, and neurobehavioral test outcomes assessed at baseline and for 7 subsequent years during the clinical trial. Among boys, significant modification of Hg effects on neurobehavioral outcomes over a broad range of neurologic domains was observed with variant genotypes for 4 of 13 genes evaluated. Modification of Hg effects on a more limited number of neurobehavioral outcomes was also observed for variants of another 8 genes. Cluster analyses suggested some genes interacting in common processes to affect Hg neurotoxicity. In contrast, significant modification of Hg effects on neurobehavioral functions among girls with the same genotypes was substantially more limited. These observations suggest increased susceptibility to the adverse neurobehavioral effects of Hg among children, particularly boys, with genetic variants that are relatively common to the general human population. These findings advance public health goals to identify factors underlying susceptibility to Hg toxicity and may contribute to strategies for preventing

  18. Food, nutrients and nutraceuticals affecting the course of inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Uranga, José Antonio; López-Miranda, Visitación; Lombó, Felipe; Abalo, Raquel

    2016-08-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (ulcerative colitis; Crohn's disease) are debilitating relapsing inflammatory disorders affecting the gastrointestinal tract, with deleterious effect on quality of life, and increasing incidence and prevalence. Mucosal inflammation, due to altered microbiota, increased intestinal permeability and immune system dysfunction underlies the symptoms and may be caused in susceptible individuals by different factors (or a combination of them), including dietary habits and components. In this review we describe the influence of the Western diet, obesity, and different nutraceuticals/functional foods (bioactive peptides, phytochemicals, omega 3-polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamin D, probiotics and prebiotics) on the course of IBD, and provide some hints that could be useful for nutritional guidance. Hopefully, research will soon offer enough reliable data to slow down the spread of the disease and to make diet a cornerstone in IBD therapy. PMID:27267792

  19. TagSNP analyses of the PON gene cluster: effects on PON1 activity, LDL oxidative susceptibility, and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Christopher S; Heagerty, Patrick J; Hatsukami, Thomas S; Richter, Rebecca J; Ranchalis, Jane; Lewis, Julieann; Bacus, Tamara J; McKinstry, Laura A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Rieder, Mark; Nickerson, Deborah; Furlong, Clement E; Chait, Alan; Jarvik, Gail P

    2006-05-01

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity is consistently predictive of vascular disease, although the genotype at four functional PON1 polymorphisms is not. To address this inconsistency, we investigated the role of all common PON1 genetic variability, as measured by tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (tagSNPs), in predicting PON1 activity for phenylacetate hydrolysis, LDL susceptibility to oxidation ex vivo, plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels, and carotid artery disease (CAAD) status. The biological goal was to establish whether additional common genetic variation beyond consideration of the four known functional SNPs improves prediction of these phenotypes. PON2 and PON3 tagSNPs were secondarily evaluated. Expanded analysis of an additional 26 tagSNPs found evidence of previously undescribed common PON1 polymorphisms that affect PON1 activity independently of the four known functional SNPs. PON1 activity was not significantly correlated with LDL oxidative susceptibility, but genotypes at the PON1(-108) promoter polymorphism and several other PON1 SNPs were. Neither PON1 activity nor PON1 genotype was significantly correlated with plasma Hcy levels. This study revealed previously undetected common functional PON1 polymorphisms that explain 4% of PON1 activity and a high rate of recombination in PON1, but the sum of the common PON1 locus variation does not explain the relationship between PON1 activity and CAAD. PMID:16474172

  20. Visual field asymmetry in facial affect perception: moderating effects of hypnosis, hypnotic susceptibility level, absorption, and sustained attentional abilities.

    PubMed

    Crawford, H J; Harrison, D W; Kapelis, L

    1995-05-01

    Effects of hypnotic level, affect valence and cerebral asymmetry on reaction time (RT) in the discrimination of Ekman and Friesen's (1978) stimuli of angry and happy faces were studied in counterbalanced conditions of waking and hypnosis. Assessed previously on two hypnotic susceptibility scales [Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility; Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale, Form C (SHSSC)], non-depressed subjects were 16 low (0-4 SHSSC) and 17 highly (10-12 SHSSC) hypnotizable, right-handed college students. Subjects were required to identify affects of faces, presented tachistoscopically to left (LVF) or right (RVF) visual fields, by using a forced-choice RT paradigm. Highs were significantly faster than lows in angry and happy affect recognition. Hypnosis had no significant effects. For highs only, angry emotional valence was identified faster when presented to the right hemisphere (LVF), but there were no significant hemispheric effects for happy emotional valence. For lows there were no hemispheric differences. Gender was a nonsignificant factor. Significant correlations showed that faster reaction times to angry and happy stimuli, in both LVF and RVF in waking and hypnosis, were obtained by subjects who reported more deeply absorbed and extremely focused and sustained attention on the Tellegen (1982) Absorption Scale and a subscale of the Differential Attentional Processes Inventory (Grumbles & Crawford, 1981). Vividness of Visual Imagery Questionnaire (Marks, 1973) and Affect Intensity Measure (Larsen, 1985), in general, did not correlate with RTs. The potential role of the fronto-limbic attentional system in the recognition of external visual sensory affect is discussed. PMID:7591508

  1. Energy metabolism affects susceptibility of A. gambiae mosquitoes to Plasmodium infection

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Jose Henrique M.; Gonçalves, Renata L.S.; Oliveira, Giselle A.; Oliveira, Pedro L.; Oliveira, Marcus F.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies showed that A. gambiae L35 females, which are refractory (R) to Plasmodium infection, express higher levels of genes involved in redox-metabolism and mitochondrial respiration than susceptible (S) G3 females. Our studies revealed that R females have reduced longevity, faster utilization of lipid reserves, impaired mitochondrial State-3 respiration, increased rate of mitochondrial electron leak and higher expression levels of several glycolytic enzyme genes. Furthermore, when State-3 respiration was reduced in S females by silencing expression of the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), hydrogen peroxide generation was higher and the mRNA levels of lactate dehydrogenase increased in the midgut, while the prevalence and intensity of P. berghei infection were significantly reduced. We conclude that there are broad metabolic differences between R and S An. gambiae mosquitoes that influence their susceptibility to Plasmodium infection. PMID:21320598

  2. Final Technical Report for the grant entitled "Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation"

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, William, F., Ph.D., D.Sc.

    2006-11-22

    The goal of this proposal was to test the hypothesis that mice heterozygous for the Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS1) gene are genetically susceptible to low doses of ionizing radiation. The rationale for this is that patients with NBS are radiation sensitive, because of defects in cellular responses to radiation induced genetic damage and haploinsufficiency at this genetic locus provides the potential for genetic susceptibility to low doses of ionizing radiation. Wild type and heterozygous NBS1 mice were irradiated and followed over their lifetime for radiation induced genomic instability, carcinogenesis and non-specific life shortening. No differences in cytogenetic damage, cancer induction or life span were observed between the hypomorphic mice indicating that genetic imbalance at the NBS1 loci does not modulate low dose radiation sensitivity.

  3. Energy metabolism affects susceptibility of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes to Plasmodium infection.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Jose Henrique M; Gonçalves, Renata L S; Oliveira, Giselle A; Oliveira, Pedro L; Oliveira, Marcus F; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2011-06-01

    Previous studies showed that Anopheles gambiae L3-5 females, which are refractory (R) to Plasmodium infection, express higher levels of genes involved in redox-metabolism and mitochondrial respiration than susceptible (S) G3 females. Our studies revealed that R females have reduced longevity, faster utilization of lipid reserves, impaired mitochondrial state-3 respiration, increased rate of mitochondrial electron leak and higher expression levels of several glycolytic enzyme genes. Furthermore, when state-3 respiration was reduced in S females by silencing expression of the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT), hydrogen peroxide generation was higher and the mRNA levels of lactate dehydrogenase increased in the midgut, while the prevalence and intensity of Plasmodium berghei infection were significantly reduced. We conclude that there are broad metabolic differences between R and S An. gambiae mosquitoes that influence their susceptibility to Plasmodium infection. PMID:21320598

  4. Factors affecting the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of zirconium in 90% nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    U-bend, C-ring, and slow strain-rate tests have been performed to evaluate the effects of texture, stress, surface conditions, heat treatment, electrochemical potential, and strain rate on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of zirconium in 90% nitric acid at room temperatures. It has been shown that careful control of texture, surface condition (scratching, cleaning and oxide coating), and/or applied stress can effectively lead to the prevention of SCC of zirconium in 90% HNO/sub 3/. Heat treating at 760/sup 0/C, 880/sup 0/C, or 1000/sup 0/C does not seem to improve the SCC resistance. However, if the potential of zirconium is maintained at 500 mV/sub SCE/ or lower, or 200 ppm of HF is added, zirconium's SCC susceptibility in 90% HNO/sub 3/ is eliminated. In the case of adding HF, zirconium sponge must also be added in order to avoid high corrosion rates. The mechanism for SCC of zirconium in 90% HNO/sub 3/ appears to be stress assisted local anodic dissolution, since the highest susceptibility is observed at strain rate = 7.5 x 10/sup -7//sec, and, at a higher or lower strain rate the susceptibility decreases. There is additional evidence to support this mechanism.

  5. Complement genetics and susceptibility to inflammatory disease. Lessons from genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    de Córdoba, Santiago Rodríguez

    2016-06-01

    Different genome-wide linkage and association studies performed during the last 15 years have associated mutations and polymorphisms in complement genes with different diseases characterized by tissue damage and inflammation. These are complex disorders in which genetically susceptible individuals usually develop the pathology as a consequence of environmental triggers. Although complement dysregulation is a common feature of these pathologies, how the disease phenotype is determined is only partly understood. One way to advance understanding is to focus the research in the analysis of the peculiar genotype-phenotype correlations that characterize some of these diseases. I will review here how understanding the functional consequences of these disease-associated complement genetic variants is providing us with novel insights into the underpinning complement biology and a better knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying each of these pathologies. These advances have important therapeutic and diagnostic implications. PMID:26004345

  6. ITPKC functional polymorphism associated with Kawasaki disease susceptibility and formation of coronary artery aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Gunji, Tomohiko; Burns, Jane C; Shimizu, Chisato; Newburger, Jane W; Yashiro, Mayumi; Nakamura, Yoshikazu; Yanagawa, Hiroshi; Wakui, Keiko; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kishi, Fumio; Hamamoto, Kunihiro; Terai, Masaru; Sato, Yoshitake; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Saji, Tsutomu; Nariai, Akiyoshi; Kaburagi, Yoichi; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Suzuki, Kyoko; Tanaka, Takeo; Nagai, Toshiro; Cho, Hideo; Fujino, Akihiro; Sekine, Akihiro; Nakamichi, Reiichiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Kawasaki, Tomisaku; Nakamura, Yusuke; Hata, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is a pediatric systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology for which a genetic influence is suspected. We identified a functional SNP (itpkc_3) in the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate 3-kinase C (ITPKC) gene on chromosome 19q13.2 that is significantly associated with Kawasaki disease susceptibility and also with an increased risk of coronary artery lesions in both Japanese and US children. Transfection experiments showed that the C allele of itpkc_3 reduces splicing efficiency of the ITPKC mRNA. ITPKC acts as a negative regulator of T-cell activation through the Ca2+/NFAT signaling pathway, and the C allele may contribute to immune hyper-reactivity in Kawasaki disease. This finding provides new insights into the mechanisms of immune activation in Kawasaki disease and emphasizes the importance of activated T cells in the pathogenesis of this vasculitis. PMID:18084290

  7. Latin America: native populations affected by early onset periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Nowzari, Hessam; Botero, Javier Enrique

    2011-06-01

    Millions of individuals are affected by early onset periodontal disease in Latin America, a continent that includes more than 20 countries. The decision-makers claim that the disease is not commonly encountered. In 2009, 280,919 authorized immigrants were registered in the United States versus 5,460,000 unauthorized (2,600,000 in California). The objective of the present article is to raise awareness about the high prevalence of the disease among Latin Americans and the good prognosis of preventive measures associated with minimal financial cost. PMID:21823496

  8. Case-parental control method in the search for disease-susceptibility genes

    SciTech Connect

    Khoury, M.J. )

    1994-08-01

    Historically, the search for disease-susceptibility genes has taken on two approaches, the linkage approach, traditionally the domain of the geneticist, and the association approach, traditionally the domain of the epidemiologist. The problem with association studies has been the choice of an appropriate control group with which cases can be compared with respect to the allelic distribution. The choice of appropriate controls has been extensively discussed in the epidemiology literature. To deal with confounding due to population stratification, sibling controls have been used as one group to adjust for genetic background. In the approach discussed by Knapp et al and Schaid and Sommer, the control group is a fictitious group formed by the parental alleles (at the locus of interest) that have not been transmitted to the proband. Cases and controls can then be compared with respect to the distribution of marker alleles at this locus, and measures of relative risk (haplotype or genotype relative risks) can be derived. The use of parental controls can provide a valuable method to search for disease-susceptibility genes for common diseases and to look for evidence of genotype-environment interaction. It is hoped that this methodology will be increasingly used in genetic-epidemiologic studies of disease.

  9. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of Toll-like receptors and susceptibility to infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Skevaki, C; Pararas, M; Kostelidou, K; Tsakris, A; Routsias, J G

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are the best-studied family of pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), whose task is to rapidly recognize evolutionarily conserved structures on the invading microorganisms. Through binding to these patterns, TLRs trigger a number of proinflammatory and anti-microbial responses, playing a key role in the first line of defence against the pathogens also promoting adaptive immunity responses. Growing amounts of data suggest that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on the various human TLR proteins are associated with altered susceptibility to infection. This review summarizes the role of TLRs in innate immunity, their ligands and signalling and focuses on the TLR SNPs which have been linked to infectious disease susceptibility. PMID:25560985

  10. Integrating genomic and clinical medicine: Searching for susceptibility genes in complex lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    DESAI, ANKIT A.; HYSI, PIRRO; GARCIA, JOE G. N.

    2011-01-01

    The integration of molecular, genomic, and clinical medicine in the post-genome era provides the promise of novel information on genetic variation and pathophysiologic cascades. The current challenge is to translate these discoveries rapidly into viable biomarkers that identify susceptible populations and into the development of precisely targeted therapies. In this article, we describe the application of comparative genomics, microarray platforms, genetic epidemiology, statistical genetics, and bioinformatic approaches within examples of complex pulmonary pathobiology. Our search for candidate genes, which are gene variations that drive susceptibility to and severity of enigmatic acute and chronic lung disorders, provides a logical framework to understand better the evolution of genomic medicine. The dissection of the genetic basis of complex diseases and the development of highly individualized therapies remain lofty but achievable goals. PMID:18355765

  11. Genetic susceptibility of impulse control and related behavior in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Eun; Jeon, Beom S

    2014-01-01

    The human impulsivity-related trait has a complex background that is influenced by genetic and non-genetic factors. Impulsivity-related genetic factors have been evaluated in the field of psychiatry previously. Many previous reports have suggested that genetic variants associated with the hyperstimulation of the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems may have main roles in impulsivity. Although impulse control and related behaviors (ICRBs) in Parkinson's disease (PD) are now recognized as important nonmotor symptoms, ICRBs has seldom been evaluated for its genetic susceptibility in PD. This review will address genetic studies on ICRBs in the general population and PD. Although this trait has genetic susceptibility in part, it should not be crooked. PMID:24613866

  12. A cyst nematode effector binds to diverse plant proteins, increases nematode susceptibility and affects root morphology.

    PubMed

    Pogorelko, Gennady; Juvale, Parijat S; Rutter, William B; Hewezi, Tarek; Hussey, Richard; Davis, Eric L; Mitchum, Melissa G; Baum, Thomas J

    2016-08-01

    Cyst nematodes are plant-parasitic roundworms that are of significance in many cropping systems around the world. Cyst nematode infection is facilitated by effector proteins secreted from the nematode into the plant host. The cDNAs of the 25A01-like effector family are novel sequences that were isolated from the oesophageal gland cells of the soybean cyst nematode (Heterodera glycines). To aid functional characterization, we identified an orthologous member of this protein family (Hs25A01) from the closely related sugar beet cyst nematode H. schachtii, which infects Arabidopsis. Constitutive expression of the Hs25A01 CDS in Arabidopsis plants caused a small increase in root length, accompanied by up to a 22% increase in susceptibility to H. schachtii. A plant-expressed RNA interference (RNAi) construct targeting Hs25A01 transcripts in invading nematodes significantly reduced host susceptibility to H. schachtii. These data document that Hs25A01 has physiological functions in planta and a role in cyst nematode parasitism. In vivo and in vitro binding assays confirmed the specific interactions of Hs25A01 with an Arabidopsis F-box-containing protein, a chalcone synthase and the translation initiation factor eIF-2 β subunit (eIF-2bs), making these proteins probable candidates for involvement in the observed changes in plant growth and parasitism. A role of eIF-2bs in the mediation of Hs25A01 virulence function is further supported by the observation that two independent eIF-2bs Arabidopsis knock-out lines were significantly more susceptible to H. schachtii. PMID:26575318

  13. N-cadherin haploinsufficiency affects cardiac gap junctions and arrhythmic susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jifen; Levin, Mark D; Xiong, Yanming; Petrenko, Nataliya; Patel, Vickas V.; Radice, Glenn L.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiac-specific deletion of the murine gene (Cdh2) encoding the cell adhesion molecule, N-cadherin, results in disassembly of the intercalated disc (ICD) structure and sudden arrhythmic death. Connexin 43 (Cx43)-containing gap junctions are significantly reduced in the heart after depleting N-cadherin, therefore we hypothesized that animals expressing half the normal levels of N-cadherin would exhibit an intermediate phenotype. We examined the effect of N-cadherin haploinsufficiency on Cx43 expression and susceptibility to induced arrhythmias in mice either wild-type or heterozygous for the Cx43 (Gja1)-null allele. An increase in hypophosphorylated Cx43 accompanied by a modest decrease in total Cx43 protein levels was observed in the N-cadherin heterozygous mice. Consistent with these findings N-cadherin heterozygotes exhibited increased susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias compared to wild-type mice. Quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy revealed a reduction in size of large Cx43-containing plaques in the N-cadherin heterozygous animals compared to wild-type. Gap junctions were further decreased in number and size in the N-cad/Cx43 compound heterozygous mice with increased arrhythmic susceptibility compared to the single mutants. The scaffold protein, ZO-1, was reduced at the ICD in N-cadherin heterozygous cardiomyocytes providing a possible explanation for the reduction in Cx43 plaque size. These data provide further support for the intimate relationship between N-cadherin and Cx43 in the heart, and suggest that germline mutations in the human N-cadherin (Cdh2) gene may predispose patients to increased risk of cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:18201716

  14. A unique wheat disease resistance-like gene governs effector-triggered susceptibility to necrotrophic pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Faris, Justin D.; Zhang, Zengcui; Lu, Huangjun; Lu, Shunwen; Reddy, Leela; Cloutier, Sylvie; Fellers, John P.; Meinhardt, Steven W.; Rasmussen, Jack B.; Xu, Steven S.; Oliver, Richard P.; Simons, Kristin J.; Friesen, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    Plant disease resistance is often conferred by genes with nucleotide binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) or serine/threonine protein kinase (S/TPK) domains. Much less is known about mechanisms of susceptibility, particularly to necrotrophic fungal pathogens. The pathogens that cause the diseases tan spot and Stagonospora nodorum blotch on wheat produce effectors (host-selective toxins) that induce susceptibility in wheat lines harboring corresponding toxin sensitivity genes. The effector ToxA is produced by both pathogens, and sensitivity to ToxA is governed by the Tsn1 gene on wheat chromosome arm 5BL. Here, we report the cloning of Tsn1, which was found to have disease resistance gene-like features, including S/TPK and NBS-LRR domains. Mutagenesis revealed that all three domains are required for ToxA sensitivity, and hence disease susceptibility. Tsn1 is unique to ToxA-sensitive genotypes, and insensitive genotypes are null. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis indicated that Tsn1 arose in the B-genome diploid progenitor of polyploid wheat through a gene-fusion event that gave rise to its unique structure. Although Tsn1 is necessary to mediate ToxA recognition, yeast two-hybrid experiments suggested that the Tsn1 protein does not interact directly with ToxA. Tsn1 transcription is tightly regulated by the circadian clock and light, providing further evidence that Tsn1-ToxA interactions are associated with photosynthesis pathways. This work suggests that these necrotrophic pathogens may thrive by subverting the resistance mechanisms acquired by plants to combat other pathogens. PMID:20624958

  15. Vitamin d and susceptibility of chronic lung diseases: role of epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Sundar, Isaac K; Rahman, Irfan

    2011-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is linked to accelerated decline in lung function, increased inflammation, and reduced immunity in chronic lung diseases. Epidemiological studies have suggested that vitamin D insufficiency is associated with low lung function in susceptible subjects who are exposed to higher levels of environmental agents (airborne particulates). Recent studies have highlighted the role of vitamin D and vitamin D receptor (VDR) in regulation of several genes that are involved in inflammation, immunity, cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Vitamin D has also been implicated in reversal of steroid resistance and airway remodeling, which are the hallmarks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and severe asthma. VDR protein level is decreased in lungs of patients with COPD. VDR deficient mice develop an abnormal lung phenotype with characteristics of COPD, such as airspace enlargement and decline in lung function associated with increased lung inflammatory cellular influx, and immune-lymphoid aggregates formation. Dietary vitamin D may regulate epigenetic events, in particular on genes which are responsible for COPD susceptibility. Active metabolite of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) plays an essential role in cellular metabolism and differentiation via its nuclear receptor (VDR) that cooperates with several other chromatin modification enzymes (histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases), thereby mediating complex epigenetic events in vitamin D signaling and metabolism. This review provides an update on the current knowledge and understanding on vitamin D, and susceptibility of chronic lung diseases in relation to the possible role of epigenetics in its molecular action. Understanding the molecular epigenetic mechanism of vitamin D/VDR would provide rationale for dietary vitamin D-mediated intervention in prevention and management of chronic lung diseases linked with vitamin D deficiency. PMID:21941510

  16. How Porin Heterogeneity and Trade-Offs Affect the Antibiotic Susceptibility of Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Ferenci, Thomas; Phan, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Variations in porin proteins are common in Gram-negative pathogens. Altered or absent porins reduce access of polar antibiotics across the outer membrane and can thus contribute to antibiotic resistance. Reduced permeability has a cost however, in lowering access to nutrients. This trade-off between permeability and nutritional competence is the source of considerable natural variation in porin gate-keeping. Mutational changes in this trade-off are frequently selected, so susceptibility to detergents and antibiotics is polymorphic in environmental isolates as well as pathogens. Understanding the mechanism, costs and heterogeneity of antibiotic exclusion by porins will be crucial in combating Gram negative infections. PMID:26506392

  17. Host Genetic Factors Affect Susceptibility to Norovirus Infections in Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Nordgren, Johan; Nitiema, Léon W.; Ouermi, Djeneba; Simpore, Jacques; Svensson, Lennart

    2013-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) constitutes the second most common viral pathogen causing pediatric diarrhea after rotavirus. In Africa, diarrhea is a major health problem in children, and yet few studies have been performed regarding NoV. The association of histo-blood group antigens (HBGA) and susceptibility to NoV infection is well established in Caucasian populations with non-secretors being resistant to many common NoV strains. No study regarding HBGA and NoV susceptibility has yet been performed in Africa. We collected 309 stool and 208 saliva samples from diarrheal children in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; May 2009 to March 2010. NoV was detected using real-time PCR, and genotyped by sequencing. Saliva samples were ABO, Lewis and secretor phenotyped using in house ELISA assays. NoV was detected in 12% (n = 37) of the samples. The genotype diversity was unusually large; overall the 37 positive samples belonged to 14 genotypes. Only children <2 years of age were NoV positive and the GII.4 NoVs were more frequent in the late dry season (Jan-May). NoV infections were observed less in children with the secretor-negative phenotype or blood group A (OR 0.18; p = 0.012 and OR 0.31; p = 0.054; respectively), with two non-secretors infected with genotypes GII.7 and GII.4 respectively. Lewis-negative (Lea−b−) children, representing 32% of the study population, were susceptible to GII, but were not infected with any NoV GI. GII.4 strains preferentially infected children with blood group B whereas secretor-positive children with blood group O were infected with the largest variety of genotypes. This is the first study identifying host genetic factors associated with susceptibility to NoV in an African population, and suggests that while the non-secretor phenotype provides protection; the Lewis b antigen is not necessary for GII infection. PMID:23894502

  18. Executive Summary: Variation in Susceptibility to Ozone-Induced Health Effects in Rodent Models of Cardiometabolic Disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seven million premature deaths occur annually due to air pollution worldwide, of which ~80% are attributed to exacerbation of cardiovascular disease (CVD}, necessitating greater attention to understanding the causes of susceptibility to air pollution in this sector of population....

  19. Identification of RNF213 as a Susceptibility Gene for Moyamoya Disease and Its Possible Role in Vascular Development

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Satoru; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro; Takagi, Yasushi; Harada, Kouji H.; Fujiyama, Asao; Herzig, Roman; Krischek, Boris; Zou, Liping; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kitakaze, Masafumi; Miyamoto, Susumu; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Hashimoto, Nobuo; Koizumi, Akio

    2011-01-01

    Background Moyamoya disease is an idiopathic vascular disorder of intracranial arteries. Its susceptibility locus has been mapped to 17q25.3 in Japanese families, but the susceptibility gene is unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Genome-wide linkage analysis in eight three-generation families with moyamoya disease revealed linkage to 17q25.3 (P<10-4). Fine mapping demonstrated a 1.5-Mb disease locus bounded by D17S1806 and rs2280147. We conducted exome analysis of the eight index cases in these families, with results filtered through Ng criteria. There was a variant of p.N321S in PCMTD1 and p.R4810K in RNF213 in the 1.5-Mb locus of the eight index cases. The p.N321S variant in PCMTD1 could not be confirmed by the Sanger method. Sequencing RNF213 in 42 index cases confirmed p.R4810K and revealed it to be the only unregistered variant. Genotyping 39 SNPs around RNF213 revealed a founder haplotype transmitted in 42 families. Sequencing the 260-kb region covering the founder haplotype in one index case did not show any coding variants except p.R4810K. A case-control study demonstrated strong association of p.R4810K with moyamoya disease in East Asian populations (251 cases and 707 controls) with an odds ratio of 111.8 (P = 10−119). Sequencing of RNF213 in East Asian cases revealed additional novel variants: p.D4863N, p.E4950D, p.A5021V, p.D5160E, and p.E5176G. Among Caucasian cases, variants p.N3962D, p.D4013N, p.R4062Q and p.P4608S were identified. RNF213 encodes a 591-kDa cytosolic protein that possesses two functional domains: a Walker motif and a RING finger domain. These exhibit ATPase and ubiquitin ligase activities. Although the mutant alleles (p.R4810K or p.D4013N in the RING domain) did not affect transcription levels or ubiquitination activity, knockdown of RNF213 in zebrafish caused irregular wall formation in trunk arteries and abnormal sprouting vessels. Conclusions/Significance We provide evidence suggesting, for the first time, the involvement

  20. Susceptibility to predation affects trait-mediated indirect interactions by reversing interspecific competition.

    PubMed

    Mowles, Sophie L; Rundle, Simon D; Cotton, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies indicate that the behavioral responses of prey to the presence of predators can have an important role in structuring assemblages through trait-mediated indirect interactions. Few studies, however, have addressed how relative susceptibility to predation influences such interactions. Here we examine the effect of chemical cues from the common shore crab Carcinus maenas on the foraging behavior of two common intertidal gastropod molluscs. Of the two model consumers studied, Littorina littorea is morphologically more vulnerable to crab predation than Gibbula umbilicalis, and it exhibited greater competitive ability in the absence of predation threat. However, Littorina demonstrated a greater anti-predator response when experimentally exposed to predation cues, resulting in a lower level of foraging. This reversed the competitive interaction, allowing Gibbula substantially increased access to shared resources. Our results demonstrate that the susceptibility of consumers to predation can influence species interactions, and suggest that inter-specific differences in trait-mediated indirect interactions are another mechanism through which non-consumptive predator effects may influence trophic interactions. PMID:21857993

  1. Susceptibility to Predation Affects Trait-Mediated Indirect Interactions by Reversing Interspecific Competition

    PubMed Central

    Mowles, Sophie L.; Rundle, Simon D.; Cotton, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous studies indicate that the behavioral responses of prey to the presence of predators can have an important role in structuring assemblages through trait-mediated indirect interactions. Few studies, however, have addressed how relative susceptibility to predation influences such interactions. Here we examine the effect of chemical cues from the common shore crab Carcinus maenas on the foraging behavior of two common intertidal gastropod molluscs. Of the two model consumers studied, Littorina littorea is morphologically more vulnerable to crab predation than Gibbula umbilicalis, and it exhibited greater competitive ability in the absence of predation threat. However, Littorina demonstrated a greater anti-predator response when experimentally exposed to predation cues, resulting in a lower level of foraging. This reversed the competitive interaction, allowing Gibbula substantially increased access to shared resources. Our results demonstrate that the susceptibility of consumers to predation can influence species interactions, and suggest that inter-specific differences in trait-mediated indirect interactions are another mechanism through which non-consumptive predator effects may influence trophic interactions. PMID:21857993

  2. Analysis of HLA-DP association with beryllium disease susceptibility in pooled exposed populations

    SciTech Connect

    Cesare Saltini, Massimo Amicosante

    2009-12-19

    Berylliosis or Chronic Beryllium Disease is a chronic granulomatous disorder primarily involving the lung associated with the exposition to low doses of Beryllium (Be) in the workplace. Berylliosis risk has been associated with the presence of a glutamate at position 69 of the HLA-DP beta chain (HLA-DPbetaGlu69) that is expressed in about 97% of disease cases and in 27% of the unaffected Be-exposed controls (p<0.0001) (Richeldi et al. Science 1993; 262: 242-244.12). Since this first observation of an immunogenetic association between berylliosis and HLA-DPbetaGlu69 a number of studies have confirmed the role of this marker as the primary gene of susceptibility of berylliosis (Richeldi et al Am J Ind Med. 1997; 32:337-40; Wang et al J. Immunol. 1999; 163: 1647-53; Saltini et al Eur Respir J. 2001 18:677-84; Rossman et al Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2002 165:788-94). Moreover, a structure/function interaction between HLA-DP molecules carrying Glu69 and beryllium in driving and developing the immune response against beryllium itself has been observed as: (1) Be-specific T-cells clones obtained from berylliosis patients recognize beryllium as antigen only when presented in the context of the HLA-DP{beta}Glu69 molecules but not in the context of HLA-DP allelic variants carrying Lys69 (Lombardi G et al. J Immunol 2001; 166: 3549-3555), and (2) beryllium presents an affinity for the HLA-DP2, carrying the berylliosis marker of susceptibility HLA-DPGlu69, from 40 to 100 times higher that the HLA-DP molecule carrying Lys69 (Amicosante M. et al Hum. Immunol. 2001; 62: 686-93). However, although the immunogenetic studies performed have been addressed a number of different questions about the genetic association between berylliosis and/or beryllium sensitization, exposure levels to beryllium and HLA markers, a number of questions are still open in the field mainly due to the limitation imposed by the low number of subjects carrying berylliosis or beryllium sensitization enrolled

  3. The 5p12 breast cancer susceptibility locus affects MRPS30 expression in estrogen-receptor positive tumors

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, David A.; Fiorito, Elisa; Nord, Silje; Van Loo, Peter; Alnæs, Grethe Grenaker; Fleischer, Thomas; Tost, Jorg; Vollan, Hans Kristian Moen; Tramm, Trine; Overgaard, Jens; Bukholm, Ida R; Hurtado, Antoni; Balmain, Allan; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified numerous loci linked to breast cancer susceptibility, but the mechanism by which variations at these loci influence susceptibility is usually unknown. Some variants are only associated with particular clinical subtypes of breast cancer. Understanding how and why these variants influence subtype-specific cancer risk contributes to our understanding of cancer etiology. We conducted a genome-wide expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL) study in a discovery set of 287 breast tumors and 97 normal mammary tissue samples and a replication set of 235 breast tumors. We found that the risk-associated allele of rs7716600 in the 5p12 estrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive) susceptibility locus was associated with elevated expression of the nearby gene MRPS30 exclusively in ER-positive tumors. We replicated this finding in 235 independent tumors. Further, we showed the rs7716600 risk genotype was associated with decreased MRPS30 promoter methylation exclusively in ER-positive breast tumors. In vitro studies in MCF-7 cells carrying the protective genotype showed that estrogen stimulation decreased MRPS30 promoter chromatin availability and mRNA levels. In contrast, in 600MPE cells carrying the risk genotype, estrogen increased MRPS30 expression and did not affect promoter availability. Our data suggest the 5p12 risk allele affects MRPS30 expression in estrogen-responsive tumor cells after tumor initiation by a mechanism affecting chromatin availability. These studies emphasize that the genetic architecture of breast cancer is context-specific, and integrated analysis of gene expression and chromatin remodeling in normal and tumor tissues will be required to explain the mechanisms of risk alleles. PMID:24388359

  4. The effect of weld Heat-Affected zone (HAZ) liquation kinetics on the hot cracking susceptibility of alloy 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, B.; Thompson, R. G.

    1993-06-01

    A delay in grain boundary liquation was observed in the subsolidus portion of the weld heat affected zone (HAZ) of alloy 718 for the solution-treated material. However, for the homogenized or the homogenized and aged alloy, an instantaneous liquation of the grain boundaries occurred in the subsolidus HAZ. The above difference in the grain boundary liquation kinetics may account for the greater hot-cracking susceptibility of the homogenized or the homogenized and aged alloy compared to that of the solution-treated alloy. Existing models of grain boundary liquation are used to explain the observed kinetic effects associated with liquation in the subsolidus HAZ of alloy 718.

  5. The effect of weld heat-affected zone (HAZ) liquation kinetics on the hot cracking susceptibility of alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishnan, B.; Thompson, R.G. . Department of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-06-01

    A delay in grain boundary liquation was observed in the subsolidus portion of the weld heat affected zone (HAZ) of alloy 718 for the solution-treated material. However, for the homogenized and aged alloy, an instantaneous liquation of the grain boundaries occurred in the subsolidus HAZ. The above difference in the grain boundary liquation kinetics may account for the greater hot-cracking susceptibility of the homogenized or the homogenized and aged alloy compared to that of the solution-treated alloy. Existing models of grain boundary liquation are used to explain the observed kinetic effects associated with liquation in the subsolidus HAZ of alloy 718.

  6. Genomewide Linkage Study in 1,176 Affected Sister Pair Families Identifies a Significant Susceptibility Locus for Endometriosis on Chromosome 10q26

    PubMed Central

    Treloar, Susan A.; Wicks, Jacqueline; Nyholt, Dale R.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Bahlo, Melanie; Smith, Vicki; Dawson, Gary; Mackay, Ian J.; Weeks, Daniel E.; Bennett, Simon T.; Carey, Alisoun; Ewen-White, Kelly R.; Duffy, David L.; O’Connor, Daniel T.; Barlow, David H.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Kennedy, Stephen H.

    2005-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common gynecological disease that affects up to 10% of women in their reproductive years. It causes pelvic pain, severe dysmenorrhea, and subfertility. The disease is defined as the presence of tissue resembling endometrium in sites outside the uterus. Its cause remains uncertain despite >50 years of hypothesis-driven research, and thus the therapeutic options are limited. Disease predisposition is inherited as a complex genetic trait, which provides an alternative route to understanding the disease. We seek to identify susceptibility loci, using a positional-cloning approach that starts with linkage analysis to identify genomic regions likely to harbor these genes. We conducted a linkage study of 1,176 families (931 from an Australian group and 245 from a U.K. group), each with at least two members—mainly affected sister pairs—with surgically diagnosed disease. We have identified a region of significant linkage on chromosome 10q26 (maximum LOD score [MLS] of 3.09; genomewide P = .047) and another region of suggestive linkage on chromosome 20p13 (MLS = 2.09). Minor peaks (with MLS > 1.0) were found on chromosomes 2, 6, 7, 8, 12, 14, 15, and 17. This is the first report of linkage to a major locus for endometriosis. The findings will facilitate discovery of novel positional genetic variants that influence the risk of developing this debilitating disease. Greater understanding of the aberrant cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the etiology and pathophysiology of endometriosis should lead to better diagnostic methods and targeted treatments. PMID:16080113

  7. Response to infections in persons with asthma and atopic disease: epiphenomenon or reflection of host susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    James, Kristina M.; Peebles, R. Stokes; Hartert, Tina V.

    2012-01-01

    Associations between respiratory infections and asthma inception and exacerbations are well established. Infant respiratory syncytial virus and rhinovirus infections are known to be associated with an increased risk of asthma development, and among children with prevalent asthma, 85% of asthma exacerbations are associated with viral infections. However, the exact nature of this relationship remains unclear. Is the increase in severity of infections an epiphenomenon, meaning respiratory infections just appear more severe in individuals with underlying respiratory disease, or instead a reflection of altered host susceptibility among persons with asthma and atopic disease? The main focus of this review is to summarize the available levels of evidence supporting or refuting the notion that persons with asthma or atopic disease have an altered susceptibility to selected pathogens, as well as discussing the biological mechanism(s) that might explain such associations. Finally, we will outline areas in need of further research, as understanding the relationships between infections and asthma has important implications for both asthma prevention and treatment, including potential new pathways that might target host immune response to select pathogens. PMID:22846746

  8. Family-based association analysis implicates IL-4 in susceptibility to Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    Burns, JC; Shimizu, C; Shike, H; Newburger, JW; Sundel, RP; Baker, AL; Matsubara, T; Ishikawa, Y; Brophy, VA; Cheng, S; Grow, MA; Steiner, LL; Kono, N; Cantor, RM

    2010-01-01

    Several compelling lines of evidence suggest an important influence of genetic variation in susceptibility to Kawasaki disease (KD), an acute vasculitis that causes coronary artery aneurysms in children. We performed a family-based genotyping study to test for association between KD and 58 genes involved in cardiovascular disease and inflammation. By analysis of a cohort of 209 KD trios using the transmission disequilibrium test, we documented the asymmetric transmission of five alleles including the interleukin-4 (IL-4) C(−589)T allele (P = 0.03). Asymmetric transmission of the IL-4 C(−589)T was replicated in a second, independent cohort of 60 trios (P = 0.05, combined P = 0.002). Haplotypes of alleles in IL-4, colony-stimulating factor 2 (CSF2), IL-13, and transcription factor 7 (TCF7), all located in the interleukin gene cluster on 5q31, were also asymmetrically transmitted. The reported associations of KD with atopic dermatitis and allergy, elevated serum IgE levels, eosinophilia, and increased circulating numbers of monocyte/macrophages expressing the low-affinity IgE receptor (FCεR2) may be related to effects of IL-4. Thus, the largest family-based genotyping study of KD patients to date suggests that genetic variation in the IL-4 gene, or regions linked to IL-4, plays an important role in KD pathogenesis and disease susceptibility. PMID:15889128

  9. Identification of mutations in Colombian patients affected with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Uribe, Alfredo; Mateus, Heidi Eliana; Prieto, Juan Carlos; Palacios, Maria Fernanda; Ospina, Sandra Yaneth; Pasqualim, Gabriela; da Silveira Matte, Ursula; Giugliani, Roberto

    2015-12-15

    Fabry Disease (FD) is an X-linked inborn error of glycosphingolipid catabolism, caused by a deficiency of the lisosomal α-galactosidase A (AGAL). The disorder leads to a vascular disease secondary to the involvement of kidney, heart and the central nervous system. The mutation analysis is a valuable tool for diagnosis and genetic counseling. Although more than 600 mutations have been identified, most mutations are private. Our objective was to describe the analysis of nine Colombian patients with Fabry disease by automated sequencing of the seven exons of the GLA gene. Two novel mutations were identified in two patients affected with the classical subtype of FD, in addition to other 6 mutations previously reported. The present study confirms the heterogeneity of mutations in Fabry disease and the importance of molecular analysis for genetic counseling, female heterozygotes detection as well as therapeutic decisions. PMID:26297554

  10. Graft-versus-host disease affecting oral cavity. A review

    PubMed Central

    Margaix-Muñoz, Maria; Bagán, José V.; Jiménez, Yolanda; Sarrión, María-Gracia; Poveda-Roda, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is one of the most frequent and serious complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and is regarded as the leading cause of late mortality unrelated to the underlying malignant disease. GVHD is an autoimmune and alloimmune disorder that usually affects multiple organs and tissues, and exhibits a variable clinical course. It can manifest in either acute or chronic form. The acute presentation of GVHD is potentially fatal and typically affects the skin, gastrointestinal tract and liver. The chronic form is characterized by the involvement of a number of organs, including the oral cavity. Indeed, the oral cavity may be the only affected location in chronic GVHD. The clinical manifestations of chronic oral GVHD comprise lichenoid lesions, hyperkeratotic plaques and limited oral aperture secondary to sclerosis. The oral condition is usually mild, though moderate to severe erosive and ulcerated lesions may also be seen. The diagnosis is established from the clinical characteristics, though confirmation through biopsy study is sometimes needed. Local corticosteroids are the treatment of choice, offering overall response rates of close to 50%. Extracorporeal photopheresis and systemic corticosteroids in turn constitute second line treatment. Oral chronic GVHD is not considered a determinant factor for patient survival, which is close to 52% five years after diagnosis of the condition. Key words:Chronic graft-versus-host disease, oral chronic graft-versus-host disease, pathogenics, management, survival. PMID:25810826

  11. Graft-versus-host disease affecting oral cavity. A review.

    PubMed

    Margaix-Muñoz, Maria; Bagán, José V; Jiménez, Yolanda; Sarrión, María-Gracia; Poveda-Roda, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is one of the most frequent and serious complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and is regarded as the leading cause of late mortality unrelated to the underlying malignant disease. GVHD is an autoimmune and alloimmune disorder that usually affects multiple organs and tissues, and exhibits a variable clinical course. It can manifest in either acute or chronic form. The acute presentation of GVHD is potentially fatal and typically affects the skin, gastrointestinal tract and liver. The chronic form is characterized by the involvement of a number of organs, including the oral cavity. Indeed, the oral cavity may be the only affected location in chronic GVHD. The clinical manifestations of chronic oral GVHD comprise lichenoid lesions, hyperkeratotic plaques and limited oral aperture secondary to sclerosis. The oral condition is usually mild, though moderate to severe erosive and ulcerated lesions may also be seen. The diagnosis is established from the clinical characteristics, though confirmation through biopsy study is sometimes needed. Local corticosteroids are the treatment of choice, offering overall response rates of close to 50%. Extracorporeal photopheresis and systemic corticosteroids in turn constitute second line treatment. Oral chronic GVHD is not considered a determinant factor for patient survival, which is close to 52% five years after diagnosis of the condition. Key words:Chronic graft-versus-host disease, oral chronic graft-versus-host disease, pathogenics, management, survival. PMID:25810826

  12. Factors affecting the stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of zirconium in 90% nitric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, T.L.

    1988-10-01

    U-band, C-ring, and slow strain rate tests were performed to evaluate the effects of texture, stress, surface condition, heat treatments electrochemical potential, and strain rate on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of zirconium in 90% nitric acid at room temperature. Careful control of texture, surface condition (scratching, cleaning, and oxide coating), and/or applied stress was shown to effectively lead to the prevention of SCC of zirconium in 90% HNO/sub 3/. Heat treating at 760, 880, or 1000 C does not seem to improve the SCC resistance. However, if the potential of zirconium is maintained at 500 mV/sub SCE/ or lower, or 200 ppm of HF is added, zirconium's SCC susceptibility in 90% HNO/sub 3/ is eliminated. When adding HF, zirconium sponge must also be added to avoid corrosion rates.

  13. Expression of HSV-1 Receptors in EBV-Associated Lymphoproliferative Disease Determines Susceptibility to Oncolytic HSV

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pin-Yi; Currier, Mark A; Hansford, Loen; Kaplan, David; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Uchida, Hiroaki; Goins, William F.; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Mo, Xiaokui; Cripe, Timothy P

    2012-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) after hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation remains a life-threatening complication. Expression of the virus-encoded gene product, EBER, has been shown to prevent apoptosis via blockade of PKR activation. Because PKR is a major cellular defense against Herpes simplex virus, and oncolytic HSV-1 (oHSV) mutants have shown promising anti-tumor efficacy in preclinical models, we sought to determine whether EBV-LPD cells are susceptible to infection by oHSVs. We tested three primary EBV-infected lymphocyte cell cultures from neuroblastoma (NB) patients as models of naturally acquired EBV-LPD. NB12 was most susceptible, NB122R was intermediate, and NB88R2 was essentially resistant. Despite EBER expression, PKR was activated by oHSV infection. Susceptibility to oHSV correlated with the expression of the HSV receptor, nectin-1. The resistance of NB88R2 was reversed by exogenous nectin-1 expression, whereas down-regulation of nectin-1 on NB12 decreased viral entry. Xenografts derived from the EBV-LPDs exhibited only mild (NB12) or no (NB88R2) response to oHSV injection, compared with a neuroblastoma cell line that showed a significant response. We conclude that EBV-LPDs are relatively resistant to oHSV virotherapy, in some cases due to low virus receptor expression but also due to intact anti-viral PKR signaling. PMID:23254370

  14. Reduced immune function predicts disease susceptibility in frogs infected with a deadly fungal pathogen

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Anna E.; Terrell, Kimberly A.; Gratwicke, Brian; Mattheus, Nichole M.; Augustine, Lauren; Fleischer, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between amphibian immune function and disease susceptibility is of primary concern given current worldwide declines linked to the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). We experimentally infected lowland leopard frogs (Lithobates yavapaiensis) with Bd to test the hypothesis that infection causes physiological stress and stimulates humoral and cell-mediated immune function in the blood. We measured body mass, the ratio of circulating neutrophils to lymphocytes (a known indicator of physiological stress) and plasma bacterial killing ability (BKA; a measure of innate immune function). In early exposure (1–15 days post-infection), stress was elevated in Bd-positive vs. Bd-negative frogs, whereas other metrics were similar between the groups. At later stages (29–55 days post-infection), stress was increased in Bd-positive frogs with signs of chytridiomycosis compared with both Bd-positive frogs without disease signs and uninfected control frogs, which were similar to each other. Infection decreased growth during the same period, demonstrating that sustained resistance to Bd is energetically costly. Importantly, BKA was lower in Bd-positive frogs with disease than in those without signs of chytridiomycosis. However, neither group differed from Bd-negative control frogs. The low BKA values in dying frogs compared with infected individuals without disease signs suggests that complement activity might signify different immunogenetic backgrounds or gene-by-environment interactions between the host, Bd and abiotic factors. We conclude that protein complement activity might be a useful predictor of Bd susceptibility and might help to explain differential disease outcomes in natural amphibian populations. PMID:27293759

  15. Reduced immune function predicts disease susceptibility in frogs infected with a deadly fungal pathogen.

    PubMed

    Savage, Anna E; Terrell, Kimberly A; Gratwicke, Brian; Mattheus, Nichole M; Augustine, Lauren; Fleischer, Robert C

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between amphibian immune function and disease susceptibility is of primary concern given current worldwide declines linked to the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). We experimentally infected lowland leopard frogs (Lithobates yavapaiensis) with Bd to test the hypothesis that infection causes physiological stress and stimulates humoral and cell-mediated immune function in the blood. We measured body mass, the ratio of circulating neutrophils to lymphocytes (a known indicator of physiological stress) and plasma bacterial killing ability (BKA; a measure of innate immune function). In early exposure (1-15 days post-infection), stress was elevated in Bd-positive vs. Bd-negative frogs, whereas other metrics were similar between the groups. At later stages (29-55 days post-infection), stress was increased in Bd-positive frogs with signs of chytridiomycosis compared with both Bd-positive frogs without disease signs and uninfected control frogs, which were similar to each other. Infection decreased growth during the same period, demonstrating that sustained resistance to Bd is energetically costly. Importantly, BKA was lower in Bd-positive frogs with disease than in those without signs of chytridiomycosis. However, neither group differed from Bd-negative control frogs. The low BKA values in dying frogs compared with infected individuals without disease signs suggests that complement activity might signify different immunogenetic backgrounds or gene-by-environment interactions between the host, Bd and abiotic factors. We conclude that protein complement activity might be a useful predictor of Bd susceptibility and might help to explain differential disease outcomes in natural amphibian populations. PMID:27293759

  16. ATP-sensitive K+ channel knockout induces cardiac proteome remodeling predictive of heart disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Arrell, D Kent; Zlatkovic, Jelena; Kane, Garvan C; Yamada, Satsuki; Terzic, Andre

    2009-10-01

    Forecasting disease susceptibility requires detection of maladaptive signatures prior to onset of overt symptoms. A case-in-point are cardiac ATP-sensitive K+ (K(ATP)) channelopathies, for which the substrate underlying disease vulnerability remains to be identified. Resolving molecular pathobiology, even for single genetic defects, mandates a systems platform to reliably diagnose disease predisposition. High-throughput proteomic analysis was here integrated with network biology to decode consequences of Kir6.2 K(ATP) channel pore deletion. Differential two-dimensional gel electrophoresis reproducibly resolved >800 protein species from hearts of asymptomatic wild-type and Kir6.2-knockout counterparts. K(ATP) channel ablation remodeled the cardiac proteome, significantly altering 71 protein spots, from which 102 unique identities were assigned following hybrid linear ion trap quadrupole-Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry. Ontological annotation stratified the K(ATP) channel-dependent protein cohort into a predominant bioenergetic module (63 resolved identities), with additional focused sets representing signaling molecules (6), oxidoreductases (8), chaperones (6), and proteins involved in catabolism (6), cytostructure (8), and transcription and translation (5). Protein interaction mapping, in conjunction with expression level changes, localized a K(ATP) channel-associated subproteome within a nonstochastic scale-free network. Global assessment of the K(ATP) channel deficient environment verified the primary impact on metabolic pathways and revealed overrepresentation of markers associated with cardiovascular disease. Experimental imposition of graded stress precipitated exaggerated structural and functional myocardial defects in the Kir6.2-knockout, decreasing survivorship and validating the forecast of disease susceptibility. Proteomic cartography thus provides an integral view of molecular remodeling in the heart induced by K(ATP) channel deletion, establishing a

  17. How do economic crises affect migrants’ risk of infectious disease? A systematic-narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Karanikolos, Marina; Williams, Gemma; Mladovsky, Philipa; King, Lawrence; Pharris, Anastasia; Suk, Jonathan E.; Hatzakis, Angelos; McKee, Martin; Noori, Teymur; Stuckler, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is not well understood how economic crises affect infectious disease incidence and prevalence, particularly among vulnerable groups. Using a susceptible-infected-recovered framework, we systematically reviewed literature on the impact of the economic crises on infectious disease risks in migrants in Europe, focusing principally on HIV, TB, hepatitis and other STIs. Methods: We conducted two searches in PubMed/Medline, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar, websites of key organizations and grey literature to identify how economic changes affect migrant populations and infectious disease. We perform a narrative synthesis in order to map critical pathways and identify hypotheses for subsequent research. Results: The systematic review on links between economic crises and migrant health identified 653 studies through database searching; only seven met the inclusion criteria. Fourteen items were identified through further searches. The systematic review on links between economic crises and infectious disease identified 480 studies through database searching; 19 met the inclusion criteria. Eight items were identified through further searches. The reviews show that migrant populations in Europe appear disproportionately at risk of specific infectious diseases, and that economic crises and subsequent responses have tended to exacerbate such risks. Recessions lead to unemployment, impoverishment and other risk factors that can be linked to the transmissibility of disease among migrants. Austerity measures that lead to cuts in prevention and treatment programmes further exacerbate infectious disease risks among migrants. Non-governmental health service providers occasionally stepped in to cater to specific populations that include migrants. Conclusions: There is evidence that migrants are especially vulnerable to infectious disease during economic crises. Ring-fenced funding of prevention programs, including screening and treatment, is important for

  18. Dissecting the Genetic Susceptibility to Graves’ Disease in a Cohort of Patients of Italian Origin

    PubMed Central

    Lombardi, Angela; Menconi, Francesca; Greenberg, David; Concepcion, Erlinda; Leo, Marenza; Rocchi, Roberto; Marinó, Michele; Keddache, Mehdi; Tomer, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Graves’ disease (GD) is an autoimmune oligogenic disorder with a strong hereditary component. Several GD susceptibility genes have been identified and confirmed during the last two decades. However, there are very few studies that evaluated susceptibility genes for GD in specific geographic subsets. Previously, we mapped a new locus on chromosome 3q that was unique to GD families of Italian origin. In the present study, we used association analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) at the 3q locus in a cohort of GD patients of Italian origin in order to prioritize the best candidates among the known genes in this locus to choose the one(s) best supported by the association. DNA samples were genotyped using the Illumina GoldenGate genotyping assay analyzing 690 SNP in the linked 3q locus covering all 124 linkage disequilibrium blocks in this locus. Candidate non-HLA (human-leukocyte-antigen) genes previously reported to be associated with GD and/or other autoimmune disorders were analyzed separately. Three SNPs in the 3q locus showed a nominal association (p < 0.05): rs13097181, rs763313, and rs6792646. Albeit these could not be further validated by multiple comparison correction, we were prioritizing candidate genes at a locus already known to harbor a GD-related gene, not hypothesis testing. Moreover, we found significant associations with the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) gene, the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) gene, and the thyroglobulin (TG) gene. In conclusion, we identified three SNPs on chromosome 3q that may map a new GD susceptibility gene in this region which is unique to the Italian population. Furthermore, we confirmed that the TSHR, the CTLA-4, and the TG genes are associated with GD in Italians. Our findings highlight the influence of ethnicity and geographic variations on the genetic susceptibility to GD. PMID:27014188

  19. Dissecting the Genetic Susceptibility to Graves' Disease in a Cohort of Patients of Italian Origin.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Angela; Menconi, Francesca; Greenberg, David; Concepcion, Erlinda; Leo, Marenza; Rocchi, Roberto; Marinó, Michele; Keddache, Mehdi; Tomer, Yaron

    2016-01-01

    Graves' disease (GD) is an autoimmune oligogenic disorder with a strong hereditary component. Several GD susceptibility genes have been identified and confirmed during the last two decades. However, there are very few studies that evaluated susceptibility genes for GD in specific geographic subsets. Previously, we mapped a new locus on chromosome 3q that was unique to GD families of Italian origin. In the present study, we used association analysis of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) at the 3q locus in a cohort of GD patients of Italian origin in order to prioritize the best candidates among the known genes in this locus to choose the one(s) best supported by the association. DNA samples were genotyped using the Illumina GoldenGate genotyping assay analyzing 690 SNP in the linked 3q locus covering all 124 linkage disequilibrium blocks in this locus. Candidate non-HLA (human-leukocyte-antigen) genes previously reported to be associated with GD and/or other autoimmune disorders were analyzed separately. Three SNPs in the 3q locus showed a nominal association (p < 0.05): rs13097181, rs763313, and rs6792646. Albeit these could not be further validated by multiple comparison correction, we were prioritizing candidate genes at a locus already known to harbor a GD-related gene, not hypothesis testing. Moreover, we found significant associations with the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) gene, the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) gene, and the thyroglobulin (TG) gene. In conclusion, we identified three SNPs on chromosome 3q that may map a new GD susceptibility gene in this region which is unique to the Italian population. Furthermore, we confirmed that the TSHR, the CTLA-4, and the TG genes are associated with GD in Italians. Our findings highlight the influence of ethnicity and geographic variations on the genetic susceptibility to GD. PMID:27014188

  20. Toxoplasmosis and Polygenic Disease Susceptibility Genes: Extensive Toxoplasma gondii Host/Pathogen Interactome Enrichment in Nine Psychiatric or Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Carter, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is not only implicated in schizophrenia and related disorders, but also in Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, cancer, cardiac myopathies, and autoimmune disorders. During its life cycle, the pathogen interacts with ~3000 host genes or proteins. Susceptibility genes for multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression, childhood obesity, Parkinson's disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (P  from  8.01E − 05  (ADHD)  to  1.22E − 71) (multiple sclerosis), and autism (P = 0.013), but not anorexia or chronic fatigue are highly enriched in the human arm of this interactome and 18 (ADHD) to 33% (MS) of the susceptibility genes relate to it. The signalling pathways involved in the susceptibility gene/interactome overlaps are relatively specific and relevant to each disease suggesting a means whereby susceptibility genes could orient the attentions of a single pathogen towards disruption of the specific pathways that together contribute (positively or negatively) to the endophenotypes of different diseases. Conditional protein knockdown, orchestrated by T. gondii proteins or antibodies binding to those of the host (pathogen derived autoimmunity) and metabolite exchange, may contribute to this disruption. Susceptibility genes may thus be related to the causes and influencers of disease, rather than (and as well as) to the disease itself. PMID:23533776

  1. Affected-sib-pair analyses reveal support of prior evidence for a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder, on 21q

    SciTech Connect

    Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Badner, J.A.; Goldin, L.R.

    1996-06-01

    In 22 multiplex pedigrees screened for linkage to bipolar disorder, by use of 18 markers on chromosome 21q, single-locus affected-sib-pair (ASP) analysis detected a high proportion (57%-62%) of alleles shared identical by descent (IBD), with P values of .049-.0008 on nine marker loci. Multilocus ASP analyses revealed locus trios in the distal region between D21S270 and D21S171, with excess allele sharing (nominal P values <.01) under two affection-status models, ASM I (bipolars and schizoaffectives) and ASM II (ASM I plus recurrent unipolars). In addition, under ASM I, the proximal interval spanned by D21S1436 and D21S65 showed locus trios with excess allele sharing (nominal P values of .03-.0003). These findings support prior evidence that a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder is on 21q. 38 refs., 4 tabs.

  2. Shallow Landslide Susceptibility Mapping for Selected Areas in the Philippines Severely affected by Super Typhoon Haiyan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix, Raquel; Rabonza, Maricar; Ortiz, Iris Jill; Alejandrino, Ian Kaye; Aquino, Dakila; Narod Eco, Rodrigo; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo

    2014-05-01

    Super Typhoon Haiyan, considered as one of the most powerful storms recorded in 2013, devastated the central Philippines region on 8 November 2013. In its wake, Haiyan left 6,190 fatalities, 28,626 injured and 1,785 missing, as well as damage amounting to more than USD 823 million. To mitigate damage from similar events in the future, it is imperative to characterize hazards associated with tropical cyclones such as those brought by Haiyan, with detailed studies of storm surges, landslides and floods. Although strong winds and powerful storm surges up 15-17 feet were the primary causes of damage, landslides studies are also vital in the rehabilitation of typhoon damaged areas. Cities and municipalities of Leyte (7,246.7 sq. km) and Samar (13,121 sq. km) provinces, the heaviest cities area during the onslaught of Haiyan, require detailed and up-to-date hazard maps for their rebuilding and disaster mitigation programs. In order to delineate areas susceptible to rainfall induced shallow landslides, Stability INdex MAPping (SINMAP) software was used over a 6-meter Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR)-derived DEM grid. Soil calibration parameters from previous studies were used as parameter input to generate a worst-case scenario hazard map of the two provinces. Topographic, hydrologic and soil parameters (cohesion, angle of friction, bulk density and hydraulic conductivity) were used for each pixel of a given digital elevation model (DEM) grid to compute for the corresponding factor of safety. The landslide maps generated using SINMAP are found to be consistent with the landslide inventory derived from high-resolution satellite imagery 2003-2013. The landslide susceptibility classification found in the landslide hazard maps are useful to identify no-build zones, areas that can be built upon but with slope intervention and monitoring as well as places that are safe from shallow landslides. These maps complement the debris flow and structurally-controlled landslide hazard maps

  3. A single gene of a commensal microbe affects host susceptibility to enteric infection.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mi Young; Min, Kyung Bae; Lee, Kang-Mu; Yoon, Yujin; Kim, Yaeseul; Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Keehoon; Chun, Jongsik; Kim, Byung-Yong; Yoon, Seok-Hwan; Lee, Insuk; Kim, Chan Yeong; Yoon, Sang Sun

    2016-01-01

    Indigenous microbes inside the host intestine maintain a complex self-regulating community. The mechanisms by which gut microbes interact with intestinal pathogens remain largely unknown. Here we identify a commensal Escherichia coli strain whose expansion predisposes mice to infection by Vibrio cholerae, a human pathogen. We refer to this strain as 'atypical' E. coli (atEc) because of its inability to ferment lactose. The atEc strain is resistant to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and proliferates extensively in antibiotic-treated adult mice. V. cholerae infection is more severe in neonatal mice transplanted with atEc compared with those transplanted with a typical E. coli strain. Intestinal ROS levels are decreased in atEc-transplanted mice, favouring proliferation of ROS-sensitive V. cholerae. An atEc mutant defective in ROS degradation fails to facilitate V. cholerae infection when transplanted, suggesting that host infection susceptibility can be regulated by a single gene product of one particular commensal species. PMID:27173141

  4. Diffusion tensor imaging in Alzheimer's disease and affective disorders.

    PubMed

    Teipel, Stefan J; Walter, Martin; Likitjaroen, Yuttachai; Schönknecht, Peter; Gruber, Oliver

    2014-09-01

    The functional organization of the brain in segregated neuronal networks has become a leading paradigm in the study of brain diseases. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) allows testing the validity and clinical utility of this paradigm on the structural connectivity level. DTI in Alzheimer's disease (AD) suggests a selective impairment of intracortical projecting fiber tracts underlying the functional disorganization of neuronal networks supporting memory and other cognitive functions. These findings have already been tested for their utility as clinical markers of AD in large multicenter studies. Affective disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BP), show a high comorbidity with AD in geriatric populations and may even have a pathogenetic overlap with AD. DTI studies in MDD and BP are still limited to small-scale monocenter studies, revealing subtle abnormalities in cortico-subcortial networks associated with affect regulation and reward/aversion control. The clinical utility of these findings remains to be further explored. The present paper presents the methodological background of diffusion imaging, including DTI and diffusion spectrum imaging, and discusses key findings in AD and affective disorders. The results of our review strongly point toward the necessity of large-scale multicenter multimodal transnosological networks to study the structural and functional basis of neuronal disconnection underlying different neuropsychiatric diseases. PMID:24595744

  5. Fahr disease: use of susceptibility-weighted imaging for diagnostic dilemma with magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Solak, Aynur; Genc, Berhan; Kulu, Ugur

    2015-01-01

    Fahr disease (FD) is a well-defined rare neurodegenerative disease that is characterized by idiopathic bilateral symmetric extensive striopallidodentate calcifications. The patients may present with diverse manifestations, most commonly movement disorder, cognitive impairment, and ataxia. Computed tomography (CT) is considered to be critical for accurate diagnosis because it is difficult to reliably identify calcifications by routine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a relatively new 3D gradient-echo (GE) MR sequence with special phase and magnitude processing. SWI phase images can recognize calcifications definitively with higher sensitivity compared to other MRI sequences. In this article, we present two cases of FD with different manifestations and neuroimaging in different age groups and genders, which were diagnosed by SWI and confirmed with CT, and we discuss the contribution of SWI in the diagnosis of FD. In conclusion, we suggest integrating SWI with MRI protocol to identify calcifications in suspicion of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26435928

  6. Application of artificial photoperiod in fish: a factor that increases susceptibility to infectious diseases?

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Ariel; Campos, Victor; Yañez, Francisco; Alveal, Katherine; Gutiérrez, Pamela; Rivas, Meyling; Contreras, Nancy; Klempau, Alfredo; Fernandez, Italo; Oyarzun, Ciro

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes and evaluates the mortality associated with the potential stressor effect induced by application of artificial photoperiods in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). After application of artificial photoperiods, high mortalities of trout subjected to this management were recorded (36% in LD 14:10 and 25% in LD 24:0) as compared to controls (7%). The recorded signology related to diseased trout included darkening, lethargy and erratic swimming. Among the morphological changes, skin lesions and ulcerative-type necrosis could be observed. Blood tests, histopathology and isolation of pathogens identified as Flavobacterium psychrophilum, associated with Aeromonas, Pseudomonas and Saprolegnia sp., were performed. The application of artificial photoperiods suggests that fish may be more susceptible to opportunistic diseases; thus, it is advisable to emphasize preventive measures in fish subjected to this management. PMID:22160663

  7. Characterizing iron deposition in Parkinson's disease using susceptibility-weighted imaging: an in vivo MR study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiuquan; Zhang, Yanling; Wang, Jian; Cai, Ping; Luo, Chunxia; Qian, Zhongming; Dai, Yongming; Feng, Hua

    2010-05-12

    Brain-iron deposition has been proposed to play an important role in the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of characterizing iron deposition in PD using susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI), and to investigate the correlation of brain-iron accumulation with the clinical status in patients with PD. Forty patients with PD without dementia and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls underwent high-resolution susceptibility-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. The phase shift values of the bilateral red nucleus (RN), substantia nigra (SN), caudate nucleus (CA), globus pallidus (GP), putamen (PU), thalamus (TH) and frontal white matter (FWM) were examined for their relationship with the clinical status. The iron concentrations of the regions involved in PD, such as the SN, increased more significantly, while those in other regions of interest (ROI) did not elevate significantly. No correlation between the increase of the iron concentrations of the SN and duration of PD was observed. PD, however, was closely associated with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor score (UPDRS-III). No significant differences were found between earlier-onset and later-onset PD patients in terms of the iron concentrations of the SN. Brain-iron concentration can be evaluated by SWI. Also, the brain-iron concentration in the SN correlated with UPDRS motor score, indicating that iron concentration can function as an in vivo biomarker to objectively evaluate the status of PD. PMID:20303339

  8. Introgression and susceptibility to disease in a wild population of rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Currens, K.P.; Hemmingsen, A.R.; French, R.A.; Buchanan, D.V.; Schreck, C.B.; Li, H.W.

    1997-01-01

    We examined susceptibility of wild rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss from the Metolius River, a tributary of the Deschutes River, Oregon, to genetic introgression and ceratomyxosis as a result of stocking nonnative hatchery rainbow trout. Ceratomyxa shasta, an enzootic myxosporean parasite that can be lethal to nonnative hatchery rainbow trout, might have been limiting the interbreeding of hatchery and wild rainbow trout in the river. However, rainbow trout from the Metolius River had allozyme frequencies intermediate between those of wild and hatchery fish at LDH-B2* and sSOD-1*, two diagnostic genetic loci that allow the inland subspecies of rainbow trout to be distinguished from hatchery strains of coastal origin. They also had notable frequencies of ADA-1*85, an allele documented in hatchery rainbow trout but rarely seen in wild populations. We also found that rainbow trout in the Metolius River averaged 138.9 scales in the lateral series, intermediate between the counts for 9 coastal or nonnative hatchery populations, which always had fewer than 140 scales, and 10 inland populations, which always had more than 140 scales. Disease challenges revealed that rainbow trout from the Metolius River had much greater susceptibility to C. shasta than rainbow trout from the Deschutes River, which have genetic resistance to the lethal disease. Based on these data, we concluded that introgression with nonnative hatchery rainbow trout has reduced the abilities of wild rainbow trout in the Metolius River to survive when conditions for ceratomyxosis infection occur.

  9. Facial Affect Processing and Depression Susceptibility: Cognitive Biases and Cognitive Neuroscience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bistricky, Steven L.; Ingram, Rick E.; Atchley, Ruth Ann

    2011-01-01

    Facial affect processing is essential to social development and functioning and is particularly relevant to models of depression. Although cognitive and interpersonal theories have long described different pathways to depression, cognitive-interpersonal and evolutionary social risk models of depression focus on the interrelation of interpersonal…

  10. Diet-induced obesity and kidney disease - In search of a susceptible mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wicks, Shawna E; Nguyen, Trang-Tiffany; Breaux, Chelsea; Kruger, Claudia; Stadler, Krisztian

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and metabolic syndrome are independent risk factors for chronic kidney disease, even without diabetes or hyperglycemia. Here, we compare two mouse models that are susceptible to diet-induced obesity: the relatively renal injury resistant C57BL/6J strain and the DBA2/J strain which is more sensitive to renal injury. Our studies focused on characterizing the effects of high fat diet feeding on renal oxidative stress, albuminuria, fibrosis and podocyte loss/insulin resistance. While the C57BL/6J strain does not develop significant pathological changes in the kidney, at least on lard based diets within the time frame investigated, it does show increased renal iNOS and nitrotyrosine levels and elevated mitochondrial respiration which may be indicative of mitochondrial lipid overfueling. Restricting the high fat diet to decrease adiposity decreased the levels of cellular oxidative stress markers, indicating that adiposity-related proinflammatory changes such as increased iNOS levels may trigger similar responses in the kidney. Mitochondrial respiration remained higher, suggesting that eating excess lipids, despite normal adiposity may still lead to renal mitochondrial overfueling. In comparison, DBA/2J mice developed albuminuria on similar diets, signs of fibrosis, oxidative stress, early signs of podocyte loss (evaluated by the markers podocin and WT-1) and podocyte insulin resistance (unable to phosphorylate their glomerular Akt when insulin was given). To summarize, while the C57BL/6J strain is not particularly susceptible to renal disease, changes in its mitochondrial lipid handling combined with the easy availability of transgenic technology may be an advantage to design new knockout models related to mitochondrial lipid metabolism. The DBA/2J model could serve as a basis for studying podocyte insulin resistance and identifying early renal markers in obesity before more severe kidney disease develops. Based on our observations, we encourage further critical

  11. Screening the Budding Yeast Genome Reveals Unique Factors Affecting K2 Toxin Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Servienė, Elena; Lukša, Juliana; Orentaitė, Irma

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding how biotoxins kill cells is of prime importance in biomedicine and the food industry. The budding yeast (S. cerevisiae) killers serve as a convenient model to study the activity of biotoxins consistently supplying with significant insights into the basic mechanisms of virus-host cell interactions and toxin entry into eukaryotic target cells. K1 and K2 toxins are active at the cell wall, leading to the disruption of the plasma membrane and subsequent cell death by ion leakage. K28 toxin is active in the cell nucleus, blocking DNA synthesis and cell cycle progression, thereby triggering apoptosis. Genome-wide screens in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae identified several hundred effectors of K1 and K28 toxins. Surprisingly, no such screen had been performed for K2 toxin, the most frequent killer toxin among industrial budding yeasts. Principal Findings We conducted several concurrent genome-wide screens in S. cerevisiae and identified 332 novel K2 toxin effectors. The effectors involved in K2 resistance and hypersensitivity largely map in distinct cellular pathways, including cell wall and plasma membrane structure/biogenesis and mitochondrial function for K2 resistance, and cell wall stress signaling and ion/pH homeostasis for K2 hypersensitivity. 70% of K2 effectors are different from those involved in K1 or K28 susceptibility. Significance Our work demonstrates that despite the fact that K1 and K2 toxins share some aspects of their killing strategies, they largely rely on different sets of effectors. Since the vast majority of the host factors identified here is exclusively active towards K2, we conclude that cells have acquired a specific K2 toxin effectors set. Our work thus indicates that K1 and K2 have elaborated different biological pathways and provides a first step towards the detailed characterization of K2 mode of action. PMID:23227207

  12. Unraveling a Multifactorial Late-Onset Disease: From Genetic Susceptibility to Disease Mechanisms for Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Swaroop, Anand; Chew, Emily Y.; Rickman, Catherine Bowes; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.

    2012-01-01

    Aging-associated neurodegenerative diseases significantly influence the quality of life of affected individuals. Genetic approaches, combined with genomic technology, have provided powerful insights into common late-onset diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Here, we discuss current findings on the genetics of AMD to highlight areas of rapid progress and new challenges. We also attempt to integrate available genetic and biochemical data with cellular pathways involved in aging to formulate an integrated model of AMD pathogenesis. PMID:19405847

  13. A pathway-based analysis provides additional support for an immune-related genetic susceptibility to Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Holmans, Peter; Moskvina, Valentina; Jones, Lesley; Sharma, Manu; Vedernikov, Alexey; Buchel, Finja; Sadd, Mohamad; Bras, Jose M.; Bettella, Francesco; Nicolaou, Nayia; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Mittag, Florian; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Schulte, Claudia; Durr, Alexandra; Guerreiro, Rita; Hernandez, Dena; Brice, Alexis; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Majamaa, Kari; Gasser, Thomas; Heutink, Peter; Wood, Nicholas W.; Martinez, Maria; Singleton, Andrew B.; Nalls, Michael A.; Hardy, John; Morris, Huw R.; Williams, Nigel M.; Arepalli, Sampath; Barker, Roger; Barrett, Jeffrey; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Berendse, Henk W.; Berg, Daniela; Bhatia, Kailash; de Bie, Rob M.A.; Biffi, Alessandro; Bloem, Bas; Brice, Alexis; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Bonin, Michael; Bras, Jose M.; Brockmann, Kathrin; Brooks, Janet; Burn, David J.; Charlesworth, Gavin; Chen, Honglei; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Chong, Sean; Clarke, Carl E.; Cookson, Mark R.; Cooper, Jonathan M.; Corvol, Jen-Christophe; Counsell, Carl; Damier, Philippe; Dartigues, Jean Francois; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Deuschl, Günther; Dexter, David T.; van Dijk, Karin D.; Dillman, Allissa; Durif, Frank; Durr, Alexandra; Edkins, Sarah; Evans, Jonathan R.; Foltynie, Thomas; Gao, Jianjun; Gardner, Michelle; Gasser, Thomas; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Goate, Alison; Gray, Emma; Guerreiro, Rita; Gústafsson, Ómar; Hardy, John; Harris, Clare; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heutink, Peter; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Hofman, Albert; Hollenbeck, Albert; Holmans, Peter; Holton, Janice; Hu, Michele; Huber, Heiko; Hudson, Gavin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Illig, Thomas; Langford, Cordelia; Lees, Andrew; Lesage, Suzanne; Lichtner, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Lopez, Grisel; Lorenz, Delia; Martinez, Maria; McNeill, Alisdair; Moorby, Catriona; Moore, Matthew; Morris, Huw; Morrison, Karen E.; Moskvina, Valentina; Mudanohwo, Ese; Nalls, Michael A.; Pearson, Justin; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Pétursson, Hjörvar; Plagnol, Vincent; Pollak, Pierre; Post, Bart; Potter, Simon; Ravina, Bernard; Revesz, Tamas; Riess, Olaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rizzu, Patrizia; Ryten, Mina; Saad, Mohamad; Sawcer, Stephen; Schapira, Anthony; Scheffer, Hans; Sharma, Manu; Shaw, Karen; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Shoulson, Ira; Schulte, Claudia; Sidransky, Ellen; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Singleton, Andrew B.; Smith, Colin; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Stefánsson, Kári; Steinberg, Stacy; Stockton, Joanna D.; Sveinbjornsdottir, Sigurlaug; Talbot, Kevin; Tanner, Carlie M.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Tison, François; Trabzuni, Daniah; Traynor, Bryan J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Velseboer, Daan; Vidailhet, Marie; Walker, Robert; van de Warrenburg, Bart; Wickremaratchi, Mirdhu; Williams, Nigel; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; Wood, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease affecting 1–2% in people >60 and 3–4% in people >80. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have now implicated significant evidence for association in at least 18 genomic regions. We have studied a large PD-meta analysis and identified a significant excess of SNPs (P < 1 × 10−16) that are associated with PD but fall short of the genome-wide significance threshold. This result was independent of variants at the 18 previously implicated regions and implies the presence of additional polygenic risk alleles. To understand how these loci increase risk of PD, we applied a pathway-based analysis, testing for biological functions that were significantly enriched for genes containing variants associated with PD. Analysing two independent GWA studies, we identified that both had a significant excess in the number of functional categories enriched for PD-associated genes (minimum P = 0.014 and P = 0.006, respectively). Moreover, 58 categories were significantly enriched for associated genes in both GWA studies (P < 0.001), implicating genes involved in the ‘regulation of leucocyte/lymphocyte activity’ and also ‘cytokine-mediated signalling’ as conferring an increased susceptibility to PD. These results were unaltered by the exclusion of all 178 genes that were present at the 18 genomic regions previously reported to be strongly associated with PD (including the HLA locus). Our findings, therefore, provide independent support to the strong association signal at the HLA locus and imply that the immune-related genetic susceptibility to PD is likely to be more widespread in the genome than previously appreciated. PMID:23223016

  14. GENOMIC IDENTIFICATION OF POTENTIAL RISK FACTORS DURING ACETAMINOPHEN-INDUCED LIVER DISEASE IN SUSCEPTIBLE AND RESISTANT STRAINS OF MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drug-induced liver disease (DILD) continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality and impair new drug development. Mounting evidence suggests that DILD is a complex, multifactorial disease in which no one factor is likely to be an absolute indicator of susceptibility. As a...

  15. PNPLA3 148M Carriers with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Have Higher Susceptibility to Hepatic Steatosis and Higher Liver Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Mancina, Rosellina Margherita; Spagnuolo, Rocco; Milano, Marta; Brogneri, Simona; Morrone, Attilio; Cosco, Cristina; Lazzaro, Veronica; Russo, Cristina; Ferro, Yvelise; Pingitore, Piero; Pujia, Arturo; Montalcini, Tiziana; Doldo, Patrizia; Garieri, Pietro; Piodi, Luca; Caprioli, Flavio; Valenti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are characterized by chronic relapsing inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and encompass Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. IBD are often associated with extraintestinal manifestations affecting multiple organs including the liver. Increased levels of serum aminotransferases, possibly related to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, constitute one of the most frequently described IBD-related liver diseases. The PNPLA3 I148M substitution is a major common genetic determinant of hepatic fat content and progression to chronic liver disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether carriers of PNPLA3 148M allele with IBD have higher risk of liver steatosis and increase in transaminases levels. Methods: The PNPLA3 I148M (rs738409) genotype was performed by Taqman assays in 158 individuals from Southern Italy (namely, Catanzaro cohort) and in 207 individuals from Northern Italy (namely, Milan cohort) with a definite diagnosis of IBD. Demographic and clinical data and also alanine transaminase levels were collected for both cohorts. The Catanzaro cohort underwent liver evaluation by sonography and liver stiffness and controlled attenuation parameter measurements by transient elastography. Results: Here, we show for the first time that carriers of the PNPLA3 148M allele with IBD have a greater risk of hepatic steatosis (odds ratio, 2.9, and confidence interval, 1.1–7.8), higher controlled attenuation parameter values (P = 0.029), and increased circulating alanine transaminase (P = 0.035) in the Catanzaro cohort. We further confirm the higher alanine transaminase levels in the Milan cohort (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Our results show that PNPLA3 148M carriers with IBD have higher susceptibility to hepatic steatosis and liver damage. PMID:26355465

  16. Convergent Genetic and Expression Datasets Highlight TREM2 in Parkinson's Disease Susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guiyou; Liu, Yongquan; Jiang, Qinghua; Jiang, Yongshuai; Feng, Rennan; Zhang, Liangcai; Chen, Zugen; Li, Keshen; Liu, Jiafeng

    2016-09-01

    A rare TREM2 missense mutation (rs75932628-T) was reported to confer a significant Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk. A recent study indicated no evidence of the involvement of this variant in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here, we used the genetic and expression data to reinvestigate the potential association between TREM2 and PD susceptibility. In stage 1, using 10 independent studies (N = 89,157; 8787 cases and 80,370 controls), we conducted a subgroup meta-analysis. We identified a significant association between rs75932628 and PD (P = 3.10E-03, odds ratio (OR) = 3.88, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.58-9.54) in No-Northern Europe subgroup, and significantly increased PD risks (P = 0.01 for Mann-Whitney test) in No-Northern Europe subgroup than in Northern Europe subgroup. In stage 2, we used the summary results from a large-scale PD genome-wide association study (GWAS; N = 108,990; 13,708 cases and 95,282 controls) to search for other TREM2 variants contributing to PD susceptibility. We identified 14 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with PD within 50-kb upstream and downstream range of TREM2. In stage 3, using two brain expression GWAS datasets (N = 773), we identified 6 of the 14 SNPs regulating increased expression of TREM2. In stage 4, using the whole human genome microarray data (N = 50), we further identified significantly increased expression of TREM2 in PD cases compared with controls in human prefrontal cortex. In summary, convergent genetic and expression datasets demonstrate that TREM2 is a potent risk factor for PD and may be a therapeutic target in PD and other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26365049

  17. African origins and chronic kidney disease susceptibility in the human immunodeficiency virus era.

    PubMed

    Kasembeli, Alex N; Duarte, Raquel; Ramsay, Michèle; Naicker, Saraladevi

    2015-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem worldwide with the estimated incidence growing by approximately 6% annually. There are striking ethnic differences in the prevalence of CKD such that, in the United States, African Americans have the highest prevalence of CKD, four times the incidence of end stage renal disease when compared to Americans of European ancestry suggestive of genetic predisposition. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are the major causes of CKD. HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is an irreversible form of CKD with considerable morbidity and mortality and is present predominantly in people of African ancestry. The APOL1 G1 and G2 alleles were more strongly associated with the risk for CKD than the previously examined MYH9 E1 risk haplotype in individuals of African ancestry. A strong association was reported in HIVAN, suggesting that 50% of African Americans with two APOL1 risk alleles, if untreated, would develop HIVAN. However these two variants are not enough to cause disease. The prevailing belief is that modifying factors or second hits (including genetic hits) underlie the pathogenesis of kidney disease. This work reviews the history of genetic susceptibility of CKD and outlines current theories regarding the role for APOL1 in CKD in the HIV era. PMID:25949944

  18. African origins and chronic kidney disease susceptibility in the human immunodeficiency virus era

    PubMed Central

    Kasembeli, Alex N; Duarte, Raquel; Ramsay, Michèle; Naicker, Saraladevi

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major public health problem worldwide with the estimated incidence growing by approximately 6% annually. There are striking ethnic differences in the prevalence of CKD such that, in the United States, African Americans have the highest prevalence of CKD, four times the incidence of end stage renal disease when compared to Americans of European ancestry suggestive of genetic predisposition. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are the major causes of CKD. HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is an irreversible form of CKD with considerable morbidity and mortality and is present predominantly in people of African ancestry. The APOL1 G1 and G2 alleles were more strongly associated with the risk for CKD than the previously examined MYH9 E1 risk haplotype in individuals of African ancestry. A strong association was reported in HIVAN, suggesting that 50% of African Americans with two APOL1 risk alleles, if untreated, would develop HIVAN. However these two variants are not enough to cause disease. The prevailing belief is that modifying factors or second hits (including genetic hits) underlie the pathogenesis of kidney disease. This work reviews the history of genetic susceptibility of CKD and outlines current theories regarding the role for APOL1 in CKD in the HIV era. PMID:25949944

  19. The reproduction in women affected by cooley disease

    PubMed Central

    Pafumi, Carlo; Leanza, Vito; Coco, Luana; Vizzini, Stefania; Ciotta, Lilliana; Messina, Alessandra; Leanza, Gianluca; Zarbo, Giuseppe; D'Agati, Alfio; Palumbo, Marco Antonio; Iemmola, Alessandra; Gulino, Ferdinando Antonio; Teodoro, Maria Cristina; Attard, Matthew; Plesca, Alina Cristina; Soares, Catarina; Kouloubis, Nina; Chammas, Mayada

    2011-01-01

    The health background management and outcomes of 5 pregnancies in 4 women affected by Cooley Disease, from Paediatric Institute of Catania University, are described, considering the preconceptual guidances and cares for such patients. These patients were selected among a group of 100 thalassemic women divided into three subgroups, according to their first and successive menstruation characteristics: i) patients with primitive amenorrhoea, ii) patients with secondary amenorrhoea and iii) patients with normal menstruation. Only one woman, affected by primitive amenorrhoea, needed the induction of ovulation. A precise and detailed pre-pregnancy assessment was effected before each conception. This was constituted by a series of essays, including checks for diabetes and hypothyroidism, for B and C hepatitis and for blood group antibodies. Moreover were evaluated: cardiac function, rubella immunity and transaminases. Other pregnancy monitoring, and cares during labour and delivery were effected according to usual obstetrics practice. All the women were in labour when she were 38 week pregnant, and the outcome were five healthy babies born at term, weighting between 2600 and 3200gs. The only complication was the Caesarean section. The improvements of current treatments, especially in the management of iron deposits, the prolongation of survival rate, will result in a continuous increase of pregnancies in thalassemic women. Pregnancy is now a real possibility for women affected by such disease. We are furthermore studying the possibility to collect the fetus' umbilical cord blood, after the delivery, to attempt eterologus transplantation to his mother trying to get a complete marrow reconstitution. PMID:22184526

  20. Sleep deprivation does not affect neuronal susceptibility to mild traumatic brain injury in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Aimee M; Stephenson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mild and moderate traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) (and concussion) occur frequently as a result of falls, automobile accidents, and sporting activities, and are a major cause of acute and chronic disability. Fatigue and excessive sleepiness are associated with increased risk of accidents, but it is unknown whether prior sleep debt also affects the pathophysiological outcome of concussive injury. Using the “dark neuron” (DN) as a marker of reversible neuronal damage, we tested the hypothesis that acute (48 hours) total sleep deprivation (TSD) and chronic sleep restriction (CSR; 10 days, 6-hour sleep/day) affect DN formation following mild TBI in the rat. TSD and CSR were administered using a walking wheel apparatus. Mild TBI was administered under anesthesia using a weight-drop impact model, and the acute neuronal response was observed without recovery. DNs were detected using standard bright-field microscopy with toluidine blue stain following appropriate tissue fixation. DN density was low under home cage and sleep deprivation control conditions (respective median DN densities, 0.14% and 0.22% of neurons), and this was unaffected by TSD alone (0.1%). Mild TBI caused significantly higher DN densities (0.76%), and this was unchanged by preexisting acute or chronic sleep debt (TSD, 0.23%; CSR, 0.7%). Thus, although sleep debt may be predicted to increase the incidence of concussive injury, the present data suggest that sleep debt does not exacerbate the resulting neuronal damage. PMID:26124685

  1. Susceptibility of South Korea to hydrologic extremes affecting the global food system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puma, M. J.; Chon, S. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Food security in South Korea is closely linked to trade in the global food system. The country's production of major grains declined from 5.8 million metric tons (mmt) in 1998 to 4.8 mmt in 2014, which coincided with a shift in grain self sufficiency from 43% down to 24% over this same period. Many factors led to these changes, including reductions in domestic agricultural land, governmental policies supporting industry over agriculture, and a push towards trade liberalization. South Korea's self sufficiency is now one of the lowest among Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries, leaving it vulnerable to disruptions in the global food system. Here we explore this vulnerability by assessing how global trade disruptions would affect Korea's food security. We impose historical extreme drought and flood events that would possibly affect today's major food producing regions concurrently. Next we compute food supply deficits in South Korea that might result from these events. Our analyses provide a framework for formulating domestic food policies to enhance South Korea's food security in the increasingly fragile global food system.

  2. Sleep deprivation does not affect neuronal susceptibility to mild traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Caron, Aimee M; Stephenson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mild and moderate traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) (and concussion) occur frequently as a result of falls, automobile accidents, and sporting activities, and are a major cause of acute and chronic disability. Fatigue and excessive sleepiness are associated with increased risk of accidents, but it is unknown whether prior sleep debt also affects the pathophysiological outcome of concussive injury. Using the "dark neuron" (DN) as a marker of reversible neuronal damage, we tested the hypothesis that acute (48 hours) total sleep deprivation (TSD) and chronic sleep restriction (CSR; 10 days, 6-hour sleep/day) affect DN formation following mild TBI in the rat. TSD and CSR were administered using a walking wheel apparatus. Mild TBI was administered under anesthesia using a weight-drop impact model, and the acute neuronal response was observed without recovery. DNs were detected using standard bright-field microscopy with toluidine blue stain following appropriate tissue fixation. DN density was low under home cage and sleep deprivation control conditions (respective median DN densities, 0.14% and 0.22% of neurons), and this was unaffected by TSD alone (0.1%). Mild TBI caused significantly higher DN densities (0.76%), and this was unchanged by preexisting acute or chronic sleep debt (TSD, 0.23%; CSR, 0.7%). Thus, although sleep debt may be predicted to increase the incidence of concussive injury, the present data suggest that sleep debt does not exacerbate the resulting neuronal damage. PMID:26124685

  3. Association of Dopamine Beta-Hydroxylase (DBH) Polymorphisms with Susceptibility to Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Peng; Yu, Yun-xia; Bao, Jing-xi

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to explore the association between 2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) gene (rs1611115 and rs732833) and the susceptibility to Parkinson’s disease (PD). Material/Methods Polymerase chain reaction direct sequencing (PCR-DS) was used to test the genotypes of DBH polymorphisms in 95 PD patients and 100 healthy examinees frequency-matched with the former by age and sex. The genotype and allele distribution differences between the case and control groups were analyzed by chi-square test, and the relative risk of PD in southern Chinese populations was expressed by odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was also checked by chi-square test. Results The genotype and allele distribution frequencies in rs1611115 were obviously different between PD patients and the healthy control group (P<0.05). The TT genotype may lead to a 2.95 times higher risk of PD occurrence compared with the common genotype CC (OR=2.95, 95%CI=1.02–8.51), and the C allele increased risk of onset of PD (OR=1.81, 95%CI=1.17–2.82). Cognition of the PD patients was different between CC and CT+TT genotypes of rs1611115 (P=0.047). Conclusions DBH rs1611115 polymorphism was likely to be associated with the susceptibility to PD, but we did not find that rs732833 is a susceptibility marker for PD. PMID:27177268

  4. Association of Dopamine Beta-Hydroxylase (DBH) Polymorphisms with Susceptibility to Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Shao, Peng; Yu, Yun-Xia; Bao, Jing-Xi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to explore the association between 2 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) gene (rs1611115 and rs732833) and the susceptibility to Parkinson's disease (PD). MATERIAL AND METHODS Polymerase chain reaction direct sequencing (PCR-DS) was used to test the genotypes of DBH polymorphisms in 95 PD patients and 100 healthy examinees frequency-matched with the former by age and sex. The genotype and allele distribution differences between the case and control groups were analyzed by chi-square test, and the relative risk of PD in southern Chinese populations was expressed by odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) was also checked by chi-square test. RESULTS The genotype and allele distribution frequencies in rs1611115 were obviously different between PD patients and the healthy control group (P<0.05). The TT genotype may lead to a 2.95 times higher risk of PD occurrence compared with the common genotype CC (OR=2.95, 95%CI=1.02-8.51), and the C allele increased risk of onset of PD (OR=1.81, 95%CI=1.17-2.82). Cognition of the PD patients was different between CC and CT+TT genotypes of rs1611115 (P=0.047). CONCLUSIONS DBH rs1611115 polymorphism was likely to be associated with the susceptibility to PD, but we did not find that rs732833 is a susceptibility marker for PD. PMID:27177268

  5. Association of Common Variants in the Glucocerebrosidase Gene with High Susceptibility to Parkinson's Disease among Chinese.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiong; Bao, Qiong-Qiong; Zhuang, Xiao-Sai; Gan, Shi-Rui; Zhao, Dan; Liu, Yun; Hu, Qiao; Chen, Ying; Zhu, Feiyan; Wang, Lian; Wang, Ning

    2012-12-31

    The genetic variants in glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene have been previously examined as potential susceptibility factors for Parkinson's disease (PD). Although of great interest, possible role of GBA gene in PD has not been well investigated in eastern Chinese population. To explore this association, we conducted a genetic screen of three common GBA variants (p.L444P, p.N370S, and p.R120W) in a casecontrol cohort comprised of 638 subjects of Chinese ethnicity. In order to provide a more precise estimate of this association, a meta-analysis was performed. We found that the GBA p.L444P allele was significantly more frequent (P = 0.001) in the PD patients (6/195 = 3.08%) than in the controls (0/443). The p.L444P mutation, but not p.N370S and p.R120W, was found to be associated with PD. Combined analysis including all previously published ancestral Chinese data yielded a highly significant association between the GBA gene and an increased risk for PD (OR = 8.13, 95% CI, 4.43-14.92, P < 0.00001). Our study suggests that the GBA gene may be a susceptibility gene for PD in the Chinese population. Efforts to elucidate in detail this interesting and biologically plausible genetic association are warranted. PMID:23286447

  6. State-dependent changes of prefrontal-posterior coupling in the context of affective processing: susceptibility to humor.

    PubMed

    Papousek, Ilona; Reiser, Eva M; Weiss, Elisabeth M; Fink, Andreas; Samson, Andrea C; Lackner, Helmut K; Schulter, Günter

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether interindividual differences in the coupling or decoupling of prefrontal and posterior cortices during the exposure to social-emotional information may predict an individual's positive emotional responsiveness. Susceptibility to humor was assessed in a behavioral paradigm several weeks after the EEG recordings. State-dependent changes of prefrontal-posterior EEG beta coherence were recorded during stimulation with other people's auditory expressions of cheerfulness and sadness. Greater decreases of coherence during the stimulation with positive affect expressions prospectively predicted greater positive emotional responsiveness, indicated by higher amusement ratings in response to cartoons and higher scores in a questionnaire measure of exhilarability. Greater increases of coherence during the stimulation with negative affect expressions did not predict perceived funniness but were related to shorter response latencies to the amusement ratings. The results further support the notion that a more loose prefrontal-posterior coupling may be related to loosening of control of the prefrontal cortex over incoming emotional information and, thus, to a propensity to deeper emotional involvement and a greater impact of perceptual input, whereas increased prefrontal-posterior coupling may be related to strong control and the propensity to protect oneself from becoming emotionally affected. PMID:23208750

  7. Black leaf streak disease affects starch metabolism in banana fruit.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Lorenzo de Amorim; Castelan, Florence Polegato; Shitakubo, Renata; Hassimotto, Neuza Mariko Aymoto; Purgatto, Eduardo; Chillet, Marc; Cordenunsi, Beatriz Rosana

    2013-06-12

    Black leaf streak disease (BLSD), also known as black sigatoka, represents the main foliar disease in Brazilian banana plantations. In addition to photosynthetic leaf area losses and yield losses, this disease causes an alteration in the pre- and postharvest behavior of the fruit. The aim of this work was to investigate the starch metabolism of fruits during fruit ripening from plants infected with BLSD by evaluating carbohydrate content (i.e., starch, soluble sugars, oligosaccharides, amylose), phenolic compound content, phytohormones, enzymatic activities (i.e., starch phosphorylases, α- and β-amylase), and starch granules. The results indicated that the starch metabolism in banana fruit ripening is affected by BLSD infection. Fruit from infested plots contained unusual amounts of soluble sugars in the green stage and smaller starch granules and showed a different pattern of superficial degradation. Enzymatic activities linked to starch degradation were also altered by the disease. Moreover, the levels of indole-acetic acid and phenolic compounds indicated an advanced fruit physiological age for fruits from infested plots. PMID:23692371

  8. Mud crab susceptibility to disease from white spot syndrome virus is species-dependent

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Based on a report for one species (Scylla serrata), it is widely believed that mud crabs are relatively resistant to disease caused by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). We tested this hypothesis by determining the degree of susceptibility in two species of mud crabs, Scylla olivacea and Scylla paramamosain, both of which were identified by mitochondrial 16 S ribosomal gene analysis. We compared single-dose and serial-dose WSSV challenges on S. olivacea and S. paramamosain. Findings In a preliminary test using S. olivacea alone, a dose of 1 × 106 WSSV copies/g gave 100% mortality within 7 days. In a subsequent test, 17 S. olivacea and 13 S. paramamosain were divided into test and control groups for challenge with WSSV at 5 incremental, biweekly doses starting from 1 × 104 and ending at 5 × 106 copies/g. For 11 S. olivacea challenged, 3 specimens died at doses between 1 × 105 and 5 × 105 copies/g and none died for 2 weeks after the subsequent dose (1 × 106 copies/g) that was lethal within 7 days in the preliminary test. However, after the final challenge on day 56 (5 × 106 copies/g), the remaining 7 of 11 S. olivacea (63.64%) died within 2 weeks. There was no mortality in the buffer-injected control crabs. For 9 S. paramamosain challenged in the same way, 5 (55.56%) died after challenge doses between 1 × 104 and 5 × 105 copies/g, and none died for 2 weeks after the challenge dose of 1 × 106 copies/g. After the final challenge (5 × 106 copies/g) on day 56, no S. paramamosain died during 2 weeks after the challenge, and 2 of 9 WSSV-infected S. paramamosain (22.22%) remained alive together with the control crabs until the end of the test on day 106. Viral loads in these survivors were low when compared to those in the moribund crabs. Conclusions S. olivacea and S. paramamosain show wide variation in response to challenge with WSSV. S. olivacea and S. paramamosain are susceptible to white spot disease, and S. olivacea is more susceptible than S

  9. Guava diseases in Hawaii and the characterization of Pestalotiopsis spp. affecting guava

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guava (Psidium guajava L.), one of the most widely grown plants in the tropics, is very susceptible to disease which can decrease its marketability. Leaf and fruit spot diseases commonly occur on guava grown in Hawaii. A disease survey was conducted on more than 50 accessions grown at the USDA/ARS T...

  10. Genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci affecting susceptibility in chicken to develop pulmonary hypertension syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rabie, T S K M; Crooijmans, R P M A; Bovenhuis, H; Vereijken, A L J; Veenendaal, T; van der Poel, J J; Van Arendonk, J A M; Pakdel, A; Groenen, M A M

    2005-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS), also referred to as ascites syndrome, is a growth-related disorder of chickens frequently observed in fast-growing broilers with insufficient pulmonary vascular capacity at low temperature and/or at high altitude. A cross between two genetically different broiler dam lines that originated from the White Plymouth Rock breed was used to produce a three-generation population. This population was used for the detection and localization of quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting PHS-related traits. Ten full-sib families consisting of 456 G2 birds were typed with 420 microsatellite markers covering 24 autosomal chromosomes. Phenotypic observations were collected on 4202 G3 birds and a full-sib across family regression interval mapping approach was used to identify QTL. There was statistical evidence for QTL on chicken chromosome 2 (GGA2), GGA4 and GGA6. Suggestive QTL were found on chromosomes 5, 8, 10, 27 and 28. The most significant QTL were located on GGA2 for right and total ventricular weight as percentage of body weight (%RV and %TV respectively). A related trait, the ratio of right ventricular weight as percentage to total ventricular weight (RATIO), reached the suggestive threshold on this chromosome. All three QTL effects identified on GGA2 had their maximum test statistic in the region flanked by markers MCW0185 and MCW0245 (335-421 cM). PMID:16293119

  11. The Impact of Fusarium Mycotoxins on Human and Animal Host Susceptibility to Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Antonissen, Gunther; Martel, An; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Verbrugghe, Elin; Vandenbroucke, Virginie; Li, Shaoji; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Van Immerseel, Filip; Croubels, Siska

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of food and feed with mycotoxins is a worldwide problem. At present, acute mycotoxicosis caused by high doses is rare in humans and animals. Ingestion of low to moderate amounts of Fusarium mycotoxins is common and generally does not result in obvious intoxication. However, these low amounts may impair intestinal health, immune function and/or pathogen fitness, resulting in altered host pathogen interactions and thus a different outcome of infection. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the impact of Fusarium mycotoxin exposure on human and animal host susceptibility to infectious diseases. On the one hand, exposure to deoxynivalenol and other Fusarium mycotoxins generally exacerbates infections with parasites, bacteria and viruses across a wide range of animal host species. Well-known examples include coccidiosis in poultry, salmonellosis in pigs and mice, colibacillosis in pigs, necrotic enteritis in poultry, enteric septicemia of catfish, swine respiratory disease, aspergillosis in poultry and rabbits, reovirus infection in mice and Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus infection in pigs. However, on the other hand, T-2 toxin has been shown to markedly decrease the colonization capacity of Salmonella in the pig intestine. Although the impact of the exposure of humans to Fusarium toxins on infectious diseases is less well known, extrapolation from animal models suggests possible exacerbation of, for instance, colibacillosis and salmonellosis in humans, as well. PMID:24476707

  12. Low disease-causing threshold in a frog species susceptible to chytridiomycosis.

    PubMed

    Stockwell, Michelle P; Garnham, James I; Bower, Deborah S; Clulow, John; Mahony, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    A simple diagnosis of the presence or absence of an infection is an uninformative metric when individuals differ considerably in their tolerance to different infection loads or resistance to rates of disease progression. Models that incorporate the relationship between the progression of the infection with the potential alternate outcomes provide a far more powerful predictive tool than diagnosis alone. The global decline of amphibians has been amplified by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, a pathogen that can cause the fatal disease chytridiomycosis. We measured the infection load and observed signs of disease in Litoria aurea Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to quantify the dissimilarity between the infection loads of L. aurea that showed signs associated with chytridiomycosis and those that did not. Litoria aurea had a 78% probability of developing chytridiomycosis past a threshold of 68 zoospore equivalents (ZE) per swab and chytridiomycosis occurred within a variable range of 0.5-490 ZE. Studies should incorporate a species-specific threshold as a predictor of chytridiomycosis, rather than a binary diagnosis. Measures of susceptibility to chytridiomycosis must account not only for the ability of B. dendrobatidis to increase its abundance on the skin of amphibians but also to determine how each species tolerates these infection loads. PMID:27190153

  13. Neonatal dexamethasone treatment increases susceptibility to experimental autoimmune disease in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Bakker, J M; Kavelaars, A; Kamphuis, P J; Cobelens, P M; van Vugt, H H; van Bel, F; Heijnen, C J

    2000-11-15

    Major concern has emerged about the possible long term adverse effects of glucocorticoid treatment, which is frequently used for the prevention of chronic lung disease in preterm infants. Here we show that neonatal glucocorticoid treatment of rats increases the severity (p< or = 0.01) and incidence (p< or =0.01) of the inflammatory autoimmune disease experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in adult life. In search of possible mechanisms responsible for the increased susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, we investigated the reactivity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and of immune cells in adult rats after neonatal glucocorticoid treatment. We observed that neonatal glucocorticoid treatment reduces the corticosterone response after an LPS challenge in adult rats (p< or =0.001). Interestingly, LPS-stimulated macrophages of glucocorticoid-treated rats produce less TNF-alpha and IL-1beta in adult life than control rats (p<0.05). In addition, splenocytes obtained from adult rats express increased mRNA levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IFN-gamma (p<0.01) and TNF-beta (p<0.05) after neonatal glucocorticoid treatment. Apparently, neonatal glucocorticoid treatment has permanent programming effects on endocrine as well as immune functioning in adult life. In view of the frequent clinical application of glucocorticoids to preterm infants, our data demonstrate that neonatal glucocorticoid treatment may be a risk factor for the development of (auto)immune disease in man. PMID:11067955

  14. The impact of Fusarium mycotoxins on human and animal host susceptibility to infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Antonissen, Gunther; Martel, An; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Verbrugghe, Elin; Vandenbroucke, Virginie; Li, Shaoji; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Van Immerseel, Filip; Croubels, Siska

    2014-02-01

    Contamination of food and feed with mycotoxins is a worldwide problem. At present, acute mycotoxicosis caused by high doses is rare in humans and animals. Ingestion of low to moderate amounts of Fusarium mycotoxins is common and generally does not result in obvious intoxication. However, these low amounts may impair intestinal health, immune function and/or pathogen fitness, resulting in altered host pathogen interactions and thus a different outcome of infection. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the impact of Fusarium mycotoxin exposure on human and animal host susceptibility to infectious diseases. On the one hand, exposure to deoxynivalenol and other Fusarium mycotoxins generally exacerbates infections with parasites, bacteria and viruses across a wide range of animal host species. Well-known examples include coccidiosis in poultry, salmonellosis in pigs and mice, colibacillosis in pigs, necrotic enteritis in poultry, enteric septicemia of catfish, swine respiratory disease, aspergillosis in poultry and rabbits, reovirus infection in mice and Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus infection in pigs. However, on the other hand, T-2 toxin has been shown to markedly decrease the colonization capacity of Salmonella in the pig intestine. Although the impact of the exposure of humans to Fusarium toxins on infectious diseases is less well known, extrapolation from animal models suggests possible exacerbation of, for instance, colibacillosis and salmonellosis in humans, as well. PMID:24476707

  15. Identification of genetic variants associated with susceptibility to West Nile virus neuroinvasive disease.

    PubMed

    Long, D; Deng, X; Singh, P; Loeb, M; Lauring, A S; Seielstad, M

    2016-07-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) infection results in a diverse spectrum of outcomes, and host genetics are likely to influence susceptibility to neuroinvasive disease (West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND)). We performed whole-exome sequencing of 44 individuals with WNND and identified alleles associated with severe disease by variant filtration in cases, kernel association testing in cases and controls and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) imputation into a larger cohort of WNND cases and seropositive controls followed by genome-wide association analysis. Variant filtration prioritized genes based on the enrichment of otherwise rare variants, but did not unambiguously implicate variants shared by a majority of cases. Kernel association demonstrated enrichment for risk and protective alleles in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A and HLA-DQB1 loci that have well understood roles in antiviral immunity. Two loci, HERC5 and an intergenic region between CD83 and JARID2, were implicated by multiple imputed SNPs and exceeded genome-wide significance in a discovery cohort (n=862). SNPs at two additional loci, TFCP2L1 and CACNA1H, achieved genome-wide significance after association testing of directly genotyped and imputed SNPs in a discovery cohort (n=862) and a separate replication cohort (n=1387). The context of these loci suggests that immunoregulatory, ion channel and endothelial barrier functions may be important elements of the host response to WNV. PMID:27170560

  16. Common polygenic variation in coeliac disease and confirmation of ZNF335 and NIFA as disease susceptibility loci

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Ciara; Quinn, Emma M; Ryan, Anthony W; Conroy, Judith; Trimble, Valerie; Mahmud, Nasir; Kennedy, Nicholas; Corvin, Aiden P; Morris, Derek W; Donohoe, Gary; O'Morain, Colm; MacMathuna, Padraic; Byrnes, Valerie; Kiat, Clifford; Trynka, Gosia; Wijmenga, Cisca; Kelleher, Dermot; Ennis, Sean; Anney, Richard JL; McManus, Ross

    2016-01-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated disease triggered by the ingestion of gluten. It has an estimated prevalence of approximately 1% in European populations. Specific HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles are established coeliac susceptibility genes and are required for the presentation of gliadin to the immune system resulting in damage to the intestinal mucosa. In the largest association analysis of CD to date, 39 non-HLA risk loci were identified, 13 of which were new, in a sample of 12 014 individuals with CD and 12 228 controls using the Immunochip genotyping platform. Including the HLA, this brings the total number of known CD loci to 40. We have replicated this study in an independent Irish CD case–control population of 425 CD and 453 controls using the Immunochip platform. Using a binomial sign test, we show that the direction of the effects of previously described risk alleles were highly correlated with those reported in the Irish population, (P=2.2 × 10−16). Using the Polygene Risk Score (PRS) approach, we estimated that up to 35% of the genetic variance could be explained by loci present on the Immunochip (P=9 × 10−75). When this is limited to non-HLA loci, we explain a maximum of 4.5% of the genetic variance (P=3.6 × 10−18). Finally, we performed a meta-analysis of our data with the previous reports, identifying two further loci harbouring the ZNF335 and NIFA genes which now exceed genome-wide significance, taking the total number of CD susceptibility loci to 42. PMID:25920553

  17. Common polygenic variation in coeliac disease and confirmation of ZNF335 and NIFA as disease susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Ciara; Quinn, Emma M; Ryan, Anthony W; Conroy, Judith; Trimble, Valerie; Mahmud, Nasir; Kennedy, Nicholas; Corvin, Aiden P; Morris, Derek W; Donohoe, Gary; O'Morain, Colm; MacMathuna, Padraic; Byrnes, Valerie; Kiat, Clifford; Trynka, Gosia; Wijmenga, Cisca; Kelleher, Dermot; Ennis, Sean; Anney, Richard J L; McManus, Ross

    2016-02-01

    Coeliac disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated disease triggered by the ingestion of gluten. It has an estimated prevalence of approximately 1% in European populations. Specific HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 alleles are established coeliac susceptibility genes and are required for the presentation of gliadin to the immune system resulting in damage to the intestinal mucosa. In the largest association analysis of CD to date, 39 non-HLA risk loci were identified, 13 of which were new, in a sample of 12,014 individuals with CD and 12 228 controls using the Immunochip genotyping platform. Including the HLA, this brings the total number of known CD loci to 40. We have replicated this study in an independent Irish CD case-control population of 425 CD and 453 controls using the Immunochip platform. Using a binomial sign test, we show that the direction of the effects of previously described risk alleles were highly correlated with those reported in the Irish population, (P=2.2 × 10(-16)). Using the Polygene Risk Score (PRS) approach, we estimated that up to 35% of the genetic variance could be explained by loci present on the Immunochip (P=9 × 10(-75)). When this is limited to non-HLA loci, we explain a maximum of 4.5% of the genetic variance (P=3.6 × 10(-18)). Finally, we performed a meta-analysis of our data with the previous reports, identifying two further loci harbouring the ZNF335 and NIFA genes which now exceed genome-wide significance, taking the total number of CD susceptibility loci to 42. PMID:25920553

  18. Interleukin 10 promoter region polymorphisms and susceptibility to advanced alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Grove, J; Daly, A; Bassendine, M; Gilvarry, E; Day, C

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The factors determining why less than 10% of heavy drinkers develop advanced alcoholic liver disease (ALD) remain elusive, although genetic factors may be important. Interleukin 10 (IL-10) is an important cytokine with anti-inflammatory, anti-immune, and antifibrotic functions. Several polymorphisms have been identified in the IL-10 promoter and recent evidence suggests that some of these may have functional effects on IL-10 secretion.
AIMS—To test the hypothesis that IL-10 promoter region polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility to ALD.
METHODS—The allele frequencies for the two single base pair substitutions at positions −627 (C→A) and −1117 (A→G) in the IL-10 promoter were determined in 287 heavy drinkers with biopsy proved advanced ALD, 107 heavy drinkers with no evidence of liver disease or steatosis only on biopsy, and 227 local healthy volunteers.
RESULTS—At position −627, 50% of patients with advanced ALD had a least one A allele compared with 33% of controls (p<0.0001) and 34% of drinkers with no or mild disease (p=0.017). At position −1117, the slight excess of the A allele in drinkers with advanced disease was because of linkage disequilibrium between the A alleles at the two sites.
CONCLUSIONS—Among heavy drinkers, possession of the A allele at position −627 in the IL-10 promoter is associated with an increased risk of advanced liver disease. This is consistent with recent functional data that the −627*A allele is associated with low IL-10 expression which will favour inflammatory, immune mediated, and profibrotic mechanisms of alcohol related liver injury.


Keywords: ethyl alcohol; cirrhosis; interleukin 10; genetic polymorphism PMID:10716685

  19. Dihydrolipoic but not alpha-lipoic acid affects susceptibility of eukaryotic cells to bacterial invasion.

    PubMed

    Bozhokina, Ekaterina; Khaitlina, Sofia; Gamaley, Irina

    2015-05-01

    Sensitivity of eukaryotic cells to facultative pathogens can depend on physiological state of host cells. Previously we have shown that pretreatment of HeLa cells with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) makes the cells 2-3-fold more sensitive to invasion by the wild-type Serratia grimesii and recombinant Escherichia coli expressing gene of actin-specific metalloprotease grimelysin [1]. To evaluate the impact of chemically different antioxidants, in the present work we studied the effects of α-Lipoic acid (LA) and dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA) on efficiency of S. grimesii and recombinant E. coli expressing grimelysin gene to penetrate into HeLa and CaCo cells. Similarly to the effect of NAC, pretreatment of HeLa and CaCo cells with 0.6 or 1.25 mM DHLA increased the entry of grimelysin producing bacteria by a factor of 2.5 and 3 for the wild-type S. grimesii and recombinant E. coli, respectively. In contrast, pretreatment of the cells with 0.6 or 1.25 mM LA did not affect the bacteria uptake. The increased invasion of HeLa and CaCo cells correlated with the enhanced expression of E-cadherin and β-catenin genes, whereas expression of these genes in the LA-treated cells was not changed. Comparison of these results suggests that it is sulfhydryl group of DHLA that promotes efficient modification of cell properties assisting bacterial uptake. We assume that the NAC- and DHLA-induced stimulation of the E-cadherin-catenin pathway contributes to the increased internalization of the grimelysin producing bacteria within transformed cells. PMID:25817791

  20. The contribution of natural selection to present-day susceptibility to chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Brinkworth, Jessica F; Barreiro, Luis B

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases have been the focus of many genome-wide association studies (GWAS) because they represent a significant cause of illness and morbidity, and many are heritable. Almost a decade of GWAS studies suggests that the pathological inflammation associated with these diseases is controlled by a limited number of networked immune system genes. Chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases are enigmatic from an evolutionary perspective because they exert a negative affect on reproductive fitness. The persistence of these conditions may be partially explained by the important roles the implicated immune genes play in pathogen defense and other functions thought to be under strong natural selection in humans. The evolutionary reasons for chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disease persistence and uneven distribution across populations are the focus of this review. PMID:25458997

  1. CYSTIC FIBROSIS: AN INHERITED DISEASE AFFECTING MUCIN-PRODUCING ORGANS

    PubMed Central

    Ehre, Camille; Ridley, Caroline; Thornton, David J

    2014-01-01

    Our current understanding of cystic fibrosis (CF) has revealed that the biophysical properties of mucus play a considerable role in the pathogenesis of the disease in view of the fact that most mucus-producing organs are affected in CF patients. In this review, we discuss the potential causal relationship between altered cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function and the production of mucus with abnormal biophysical properties in the intestine and lungs, highlighting what has been learned from cell cultures and animal models that mimic CF pathogenesis. A similar cascade of events, including mucus obstruction, infection and inflammation, is common to all epithelia affected by impaired surface hydration. Hence, the main structural components of mucus, namely the polymeric, gel-forming mucins, are critical to the onset of the disease. Defective CFTR leads to epithelial surface dehydration, altered pH/electrolyte composition and mucin concentration. Further, it can influence mucin transition from the intracellular to extracellular environment, potentially resulting in aberrant mucus gel formation. While defective HCO3− production has long been identified as a feature of CF, it has only recently been considered as a key player in the transition phase of mucins. We conclude by examining the influence of mucins on the biophysical properties of CF sputum and discuss existing and novel therapies aimed at removing mucus from the lungs. PMID:24685676

  2. Neural activities during affective processing in people with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tatia M C; Sun, Delin; Leung, Mei-Kei; Chu, Leung-Wing; Keysers, Christian

    2013-03-01

    This study examined brain activities in people with Alzheimer's disease when viewing happy, sad, and fearful facial expressions of others. A functional magnetic resonance imaging and a voxel-based morphometry methodology together with a passive viewing of emotional faces paradigm were employed to compare the affective processing in 12 people with mild Alzheimer's disease and 12 matched controls. The main finding was that the clinical participants showed reduced activations in regions associated with the motor simulation system (the ventral premotor cortex) and in regions associated with emotional simulation-empathy (the anterior insula and adjacent frontal operculum). This regional decline in blood oxygen level-dependent signals appeared to be lateralized in the left hemisphere and was not related to any structural degeneration in the clinical participants. Furthermore, the regions that showed changes in neural activity differed for the 3 emotional facial expressions studied. Findings of our study indicate that neural changes in regions associated with the motor and emotional simulation systems might play an important role in the development of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:22840336

  3. Foot-and-mouth disease in the Americas: epidemiology and ecologic changes affecting distribution.

    PubMed

    Saraiva, Victor

    2004-10-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease(FMD) was first recorded in South America (SA) circa 1870, in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in Uruguay, and in southern Brazil as a result of the introduction of cattle from Europe during the early days of colonization. Livestock production to trade with neighboring countries was established in the La Plata Region, and the trade of livestock and products with Chile, northeastern and central western states of Brazil, to Peru, Bolivia, and Paraguay spread FMD, which reached Venezuela and Colombia in the 1950s and finally Ecuador in 1961. The traditional forms of livestock husbandry influence the diffusion and maintenance of the FMD virus (FMDV) in different areas. Cattle production in SA depends mainly on a strong relation between cattle-calf operations and fattening operations in a complementary cycle, revealing the vulnerability and susceptibility of these areas to FMDV. Understanding the relationship between time-space behavior of the disease and the forms of production defines the FMD ecosystems, a key concept to elaborating the control/eradication strategies of national FMD eradication programs, which must be modified when trade opportunities between zones of differing sanitary status change. The role of other susceptible species besides bovines, including wildlife, in maintaining and spreading FMDV has been the subject of several studies, but in SA, bovines are so far considered to determine disease presentation. Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) have been implicated in the spread of the disease between farms in at least one case in Brazil. Sheep are almost on a par with bovine in terms of number, especially in the Southern Cone, but their role in the maintenance of infection is not considered important, possibly owing to rearing practices. Camelid populations in the Andean region do not play an important role in the maintenance of FMD, because of short persistence of infection and low population densities in these species. The importance of wildlife

  4. The effects of Myxobolus cerebralis on the physiological performance of whirling disease resistant and susceptible strains of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Fetherman, Eric R; Winkelman, Dana L; Schisler, George J; Myrick, Christopher A

    2011-12-01

    The development of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss strains that are resistant to whirling disease has shown promise as a management tool for populations in areas where Myxobolus cerebralis is present. However, the physiological effects of the disease on characteristics necessary for fish survival in natural river conditions have not been tested in many of these strains. Five rainbow trout strains were evaluated for their swimming ability and growth characteristics in relation to M. cerebralis exposure: the resistant German rainbow trout (GR) strain (Hofer strain), the susceptible Colorado River rainbow trout (CRR) strain, and three intermediate (hybrid) strains (F1 = GR x CRR; F2 = F1 x F1; B2 = backcross of F1 x CRR). Three broad response patterns among strain and exposure were evident in our study. First, exposure metrics, growth performance, and swimming ability differed among strains. Second, exposure to the parasite did not necessarily produce differences in growth or swimming ability. Exposure to M. cerebralis did not affect batch weight for any strain, and critical swimming velocity did not differ between exposed and unexposed families. Third, although exposure did not necessarily affect growth or swimming ability, individuals that exhibited clinical deformities did show reduced growth and swimming performance; fish with clinical deformities were significantly smaller and had lower critical swimming velocities than exposed fish without clinical deformities. Research and management have focused on GR x CRR hybrid strains; however, given the performance of the GR strain in our study, it should not be discounted as a potential broodstock. Additional field trials comparing the GR and F1 strains should be conducted before wholesale adoption of the GR strain to reestablish rainbow trout populations in Colorado. PMID:22372244

  5. Differences in susceptibility of Arabidopsis ecotypes to crown gall disease may result from a deficiency in T-DNA integration.

    PubMed Central

    Nam, J; Matthysse, A G; Gelvin, S B

    1997-01-01

    We show that among ecotypes of Arabidopsis, there is considerable variation in their susceptibility to crown gall disease. Differences in susceptibility are heritable and, in one ecotype, segregate as a single major contributing locus. In several ecotypes, recalcitrance to tumorigenesis results from decreased binding of Agrobacterium to inoculated root explants. The recalcitrance of another ecotype occurs at a late step in T-DNA transfer. Transient expression of a T-DNA-encoded beta-glucuronidase gusA gene is efficient, but the ecotype is deficient in crown gall tumorigenesis, transformation to kanamycin resistance, and stable GUS expression. This ecotype is also more sensitive to gamma radiation than is a susceptible ecotype. DNA gel blot analysis showed that after infection by Agrobacterium, less T-DNA was integrated into the genome of the recalcitrant ecotype than was integrated into the genome of a highly susceptible ecotype. PMID:9090878

  6. Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines Mediates trans-Infection of HIV-1 from Red Blood Cells to Target Cells and Affects HIV-AIDS Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    He, Weijing; Neil, Stuart; Kulkarni, Hemant; Wright, Edward; Agan, Brian K.; Marconi, Vincent C.; Dolan, Matthew J.; Weiss, Robin A.; Ahuja, Sunil K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Duffy antigen receptor for chemokines (DARC) expressed on red blood cells (RBCs) influences plasma levels of HIV-1-suppressive and proinflammatory chemokines such as CCL5/RANTES. DARC is also the RBC receptor for Plasmodium vivax. Africans with DARC −46C/C genotype, which confers a DARC-negative phenotype, are resistant to vivax malaria. Here, we show that HIV-1 attaches to RBCs via DARC, effecting trans-infection of target cells. In African Americans, DARC −46C/C is associated with 40% increase in the odds of acquiring HIV-1. If extrapolated to Africans, ∼11% of the HIV-1 burden in Africa may be linked to this genotype. After infection occurs, however, DARC-negative RBC status is associated with slower disease progression. Furthermore, the disease-accelerating effect of a previously described CCL5 polymorphism is evident only in DARC-expressing and not in DARC-negative HIV-infected individuals. Thus, DARC influences HIV/AIDS susceptibility by mediating trans-infection of HIV-1 and by affecting both chemokine-HIV interactions and chemokine-driven inflammation. PMID:18621010

  7. Molecular characterization of a long range haplotype affecting protein yield and mastitis susceptibility in Norwegian Red cattle

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous fine mapping studies in Norwegian Red cattle (NRC) in the region 86-90.4 Mb on Bos taurus chromosome 6 (BTA6) has revealed a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for protein yield (PY) around 88 Mb and a QTL for clinical mastitis (CM) around 90 Mb. The close proximity of these QTLs may partly explain the unfavorable genetic correlation between these two traits in NRC. A long range haplotype covering this region was introduced into the NRC population through the importation of a Holstein-Friesian bull (1606 Frasse) from Sweden in the 1970s. It has been suggested that this haplotype has a favorable effect on milk protein content but an unfavorable effect on mastitis susceptibility. Selective breeding for milk production traits is likely to have increased the frequency of this haplotype in the NRC population. Results Association mapping for PY and CM in NRC was performed using genotypes from 556 SNPs throughout the region 86-97 Mb on BTA6 and daughter-yield-deviations (DYDs) from 2601 bulls made available from the Norwegian dairy herd recording system. Highest test scores for PY were found for single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within and surrounding the genes CSN2 and CSN1S2, coding for the β-casein and αS2-casein proteins. High coverage re-sequencing by high throughput sequencing technology enabled molecular characterization of a long range haplotype from 1606 Frasse encompassing these two genes. Haplotype analysis of a large number of descendants from this bull indicated that the haplotype was not markedly disrupted by recombination in this region. The haplotype was associated with both increased milk protein content and increased susceptibility to mastitis, which might explain parts of the observed genetic correlation between PY and CM in NRC. Plausible causal polymorphisms affecting PY were detected in the promoter region and in the 5'-flanking UTR of CSN1S2. These polymorphisms could affect transcription or translation of CSN1S2 and thereby

  8. CD40: Novel Association with Crohn's Disease and Replication in Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Alcina, Antonio; Teruel, María; Díaz-Gallo, Lina M.; Gómez-García, María; López-Nevot, Miguel A.; Rodrigo, Luis; Nieto, Antonio; Cardeña, Carlos; Alcain, Guillermo; Díaz-Rubio, Manuel; de la Concha, Emilio G.; Fernandez, Oscar; Arroyo, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Background A functional polymorphism located at −1 from the start codon of the CD40 gene, rs1883832, was previously reported to disrupt a Kozak sequence essential for translation. It has been consistently associated with Graves' disease risk in populations of different ethnicity and genetic proxies of this variant evaluated in genome-wide association studies have shown evidence of an effect in rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility. However, the protective allele associated with Graves' disease or rheumatoid arthritis has shown a risk role in MS, an effect that we aimed to replicate in the present work. We hypothesized that this functional polymorphism might also show an association with other complex autoimmune condition such as inflammatory bowel disease, given the CD40 overexpression previously observed in Crohn's disease (CD) lesions. Methodology Genotyping of rs1883832C>T was performed in 1564 MS, 1102 CD and 969 ulcerative colitis (UC) Spanish patients and in 2948 ethnically matched controls by TaqMan chemistry. Principal Findings The observed effect of the minor allele rs1883832T was replicated in our independent Spanish MS cohort [p = 0.025; OR (95% CI) = 1.12 (1.01–1.23)]. The frequency of the minor allele was also significantly higher in CD patients than in controls [p = 0.002; OR (95% CI) = 1.19 (1.06–1.33)]. This increased predisposition was not detected in UC patients [p = 0.5; OR (95% CI) = 1.04 (0.93–1.17)]. Conclusion The impact of CD40 rs1883832 on MS and CD risk points to a common signaling shared by these autoimmune conditions. PMID:20634952

  9. Genetic Predictions of Prion Disease Susceptibility in Carnivore Species Based on Variability of the Prion Gene Coding Region

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Paula; Campbell, Lauren; Skogtvedt, Susan; Griffin, Karen A.; Arnemo, Jon M.; Tryland, Morten; Girling, Simon; Miller, Michael W.; Tranulis, Michael A.; Goldmann, Wilfred

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian species vary widely in their apparent susceptibility to prion diseases. For example, several felid species developed prion disease (feline spongiform encephalopathy or FSE) during the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) epidemic in the United Kingdom, whereas no canine BSE cases were detected. Whether either of these or other groups of carnivore species can contract other prion diseases (e.g. chronic wasting disease or CWD) remains an open question. Variation in the host-encoded prion protein (PrPC) largely explains observed disease susceptibility patterns within ruminant species, and may explain interspecies differences in susceptibility as well. We sequenced and compared the open reading frame of the PRNP gene encoding PrPC protein from 609 animal samples comprising 29 species from 22 genera of the Order Carnivora; amongst these samples were 15 FSE cases. Our analysis revealed that FSE cases did not encode an identifiable disease-associated PrP polymorphism. However, all canid PrPs contained aspartic acid or glutamic acid at codon 163 which we propose provides a genetic basis for observed susceptibility differences between canids and felids. Among other carnivores studied, wolverine (Gulo gulo) and pine marten (Martes martes) were the only non-canid species to also express PrP-Asp163, which may impact on their prion diseases susceptibility. Populations of black bear (Ursus americanus) and mountain lion (Puma concolor) from Colorado showed little genetic variation in the PrP protein and no variants likely to be highly resistant to prions in general, suggesting that strain differences between BSE and CWD prions also may contribute to the limited apparent host range of the latter. PMID:23236380

  10. Loss of Function in Mlo Orthologs Reduces Susceptibility of Pepper and Tomato to Powdery Mildew Disease Caused by Leveillula taurica

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zheng; Pavan, Stefano; Matsuda, Yoshinori; Toyoda, Hideyoshi; Wolters, Anne-Marie A.; Visser, Richard G. F.; Bai, Yuling

    2013-01-01

    Powdery mildew disease caused by Leveillula taurica is a serious fungal threat to greenhouse tomato and pepper production. In contrast to most powdery mildew species which are epiphytic, L. taurica is an endophytic fungus colonizing the mesophyll tissues of the leaf. In barley, Arabidopsis, tomato and pea, the correct functioning of specific homologues of the plant Mlo gene family has been found to be required for pathogenesis of epiphytic powdery mildew fungi. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the Mlo genes in susceptibility to the endophytic fungus L. taurica. In tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), a loss-of-function mutation in the SlMlo1 gene results in resistance to powdery mildew disease caused by Oidium neolycopersici. When the tomato Slmlo1 mutant was inoculated with L. taurica in this study, it proved to be less susceptible compared to the control, S. lycopersicum cv. Moneymaker. Further, overexpression of SlMlo1 in the tomato Slmlo1 mutant enhanced susceptibility to L. taurica. In pepper, the CaMlo2 gene was isolated by applying a homology-based cloning approach. Compared to the previously identified CaMlo1 gene, the CaMlo2 gene is more similar to SlMlo1 as shown by phylogenetic analysis, and the expression of CaMlo2 is up-regulated at an earlier time point upon L. taurica infection. However, results of virus-induced gene silencing suggest that both CaMlo1 and CaMlo2 may be involved in the susceptibility of pepper to L. taurica. The fact that overexpression of CaMlo2 restored the susceptibility of the tomato Slmlo1 mutant to O. neolycopersici and increased its susceptibility to L. taurica confirmed the role of CaMlo2 acting as a susceptibility factor to different powdery mildews, though the role of CaMlo1 as a co-factor for susceptibility cannot be excluded. PMID:23923019

  11. Genetic variation in SIRT1 affects susceptibility of lung squamous cell carcinomas in former uranium miners from the Colorado plateau

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Shuguang; Picchi, Maria A.; Liu, Yushi; Thomas, Cynthia L.; Willis, Derall G.; Bernauer, Amanda M.; Carr, Teara G.; Mabel, Padilla T.; Han, Younghun; Amos, Christopher I.; Lin, Yong; Stidley, Christine A.; Gilliland, Frank D.; Jacobson, Marty R.; Belinsky, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of underground miners suggested that occupational exposure to radon causes lung cancer with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) as the predominant histological type. However, the genetic determinants for susceptibility of radon-induced SCC in miners are unclear. Double-strand breaks induced by radioactive radon daughters are repaired primarily by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) that is accompanied by the dynamic changes in surrounding chromatin, including nucleosome repositioning and histone modifications. Thus, a molecular epidemiological study was conducted to assess whether genetic variation in 16 genes involved in NHEJ and related histone modification affected susceptibility for SCC in radon-exposed former miners (267 SCC cases and 383 controls) from the Colorado plateau. A global association between genetic variation in the haplotype block where SIRT1 resides and the risk for SCC in miners (P = 0.003) was identified. Haplotype alleles tagged by the A allele of SIRT1 rs7097008 were associated with increased risk for SCC (odds ratio = 1.69, P = 8.2×10−5) and greater survival in SCC cases (hazard ratio = 0.79, P = 0.03) in miners. Functional validation of rs7097008 demonstrated that the A allele was associated with reduced gene expression in bronchial epithelial cells and compromised DNA repair capacity in peripheral lymphocytes. Together, these findings substantiate genetic variation in SIRT1 as a risk modifier for developing SCC in miners and suggest that SIRT1 may also play a tumor suppressor role in radon-induced cancer in miners. PMID:23354305

  12. The tomato xylem sap protein XSP10 is required for full susceptibility to Fusarium wilt disease.

    PubMed

    Krasikov, Vladimir; Dekker, Henk L; Rep, Martijn; Takken, Frank L W

    2011-01-01

    XSP10 is an abundant 10 kDa protein found in the xylem sap of tomato. The protein displays structural similarity to plant lipid transfer proteins (LTPs). LTPs are involved in various physiological processes, including disease resistance, and some are able to bind and transfer diverse lipid molecules. XSP10 abundance in xylem sap declines upon infection with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol), implying involvement of XSP10 in the plant-pathogen interaction. Here, the biochemical characterization of XSP10 with respect to fatty acid-binding properties is reported; a weak but significant binding to saturated fatty acids was found. Furthermore, XSP10-silenced tomato plants were engineered and it was found that these plants exhibited reduced disease symptom development upon infection with a virulent strain of Fol. Interestingly, the reduced symptoms observed did not correlate with an altered expression profile for known reporter genes of plant defence (PR-1 and WIPI). This work demonstrates that XSP10 has lipid-binding properties and is required for full susceptibility of tomato to Fusarium wilt. PMID:20974736

  13. Sociality and health: impacts of sociality on disease susceptibility and transmission in animal and human societies

    PubMed Central

    Kappeler, Peter M.; Cremer, Sylvia; Nunn, Charles L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces a theme issue presenting the latest developments in research on the impacts of sociality on health and fitness. The articles that follow cover research on societies ranging from insects to humans. Variation in measures of fitness (i.e. survival and reproduction) has been linked to various aspects of sociality in humans and animals alike, and variability in individual health and condition has been recognized as a key mediator of these relationships. Viewed from a broad evolutionary perspective, the evolutionary transitions from a solitary lifestyle to group living have resulted in several new health-related costs and benefits of sociality. Social transmission of parasites within groups represents a major cost of group living, but some behavioural mechanisms, such as grooming, have evolved repeatedly to reduce this cost. Group living also has created novel costs in terms of altered susceptibility to infectious and non-infectious disease as a result of the unavoidable physiological consequences of social competition and integration, which are partly alleviated by social buffering in some vertebrates. Here, we define the relevant aspects of sociality, summarize their health-related costs and benefits, and discuss possible fitness measures in different study systems. Given the pervasive effects of social factors on health and fitness, we propose a synthesis of existing conceptual approaches in disease ecology, ecological immunology and behavioural neurosciences by adding sociality as a key factor, with the goal to generate a broader framework for organismal integration of health-related research. PMID:25870402

  14. Examining ERBB2 as a candidate gene for susceptibility to leprosy (Hansen's disease) in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Sérgio Ricardo Fernandes; Jamieson, Sarra Elisabeth; Dupnik, Kathryn Margaret; Monteiro, Glória Regina; Nobre, Maurício Lisboa; Dias, Márcia Sousa; Trindade Neto, Pedro Bezerra; Queiroz, Maria do Carmo Palmeira; Gomes, Carlos Eduardo Maia; Blackwell, Jenefer Mary; Jeronimo, Selma Maria Bezerra

    2014-04-01

    Leprosy remains prevalent in Brazil. ErbB2 is a receptor for leprosy bacilli entering Schwann cells, which mediates Mycobacterium leprae-induced demyelination and the ERBB2 gene lies within a leprosy susceptibility locus on chromosome 17q11-q21. To determine whether polymorphisms at the ERBB2 locus contribute to this linkage peak, three haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tag-SNPs) (rs2517956, rs2952156, rs1058808) were genotyped in 72 families (208 cases; 372 individuals) from the state of Pará (PA). All three tag-SNPs were associated with leprosy per se [best SNP rs2517959 odds ratio (OR) = 2.22; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.37-3.59; p = 0.001]. Lepromatous (LL) (OR = 3.25; 95% CI 1.37-7.70; p = 0.007) and tuberculoid (TT) (OR = 1.79; 95% CI 1.04-3.05; p = 0.034) leprosy both contributed to the association, which is consistent with the previous linkage to chromosome 17q11-q21 in the population from PA and supports the functional role of ErbB2 in disease pathogenesis. To attempt to replicate these findings, six SNPs (rs2517955, rs2517956, rs1810132, rs2952156, rs1801200, rs1058808) were genotyped in a population-based sample of 570 leprosy cases and 370 controls from the state of Rio Grande do Norte (RN) and the results were analysed using logistic regression analysis. However, none of the associations were replicated in the RN sample, whether analysed for leprosy per se, LL leprosy, TT leprosy, erythema nodosum leprosum or reversal reaction conditions. The role of polymorphisms at ERBB2 in controlling susceptibility to leprosy in Brazil therefore remains unclear. PMID:24676663

  15. VKORC1 and CD-14 genetic polymorphisms associate with susceptibility to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jian; Zhang, Zhiguo; Ge, Yuanyuan; Zhen, Juan; Leng, Jiyan; Wang, Jianmeng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the associations of VKORC1 rs2359612 and rs9923231 and CD-14 rs2569190 with susceptibility to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases (CCVD). Methods: A case-control study was conducted with 614 cases of CCVD patients selected at our hospital between January 2011 and June 2012 as case group and 590 healthy individuals participating physical examination during the same period as control group. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay was used to detect genotypes of VKORC1 and CD-14 genetic polymorphisms. SHEsis software was used to conduct haplotype analysis and logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for CCVD. Results: The genotype and allele frequencies of VKORC1 rs2359612 and rs9923231 and CD-14 rs2569190 between the case and control groups were statistically different (all P<0.05). Haplotype analysis showed that the frequencies of CAT and TAT haplotypes were significantly higher while the frequencies of TAC and TGC haplotypes were significantly lower in the case group than those in the control group (P = 0.013, 0.029, 0.019 and 0.042, respectively). Logistic regression analysis showed that age, systolic pressure, smoking history and VKORC1 rs2359612 maybe risk factors for CCVD; and body mass index (BMI), diastolic pressure and VKORC1 rs9923231 may be protective factors for CCVD (all P<0.05). Conclusion: VKORC1 rs2359612 and rs9923231, and CD-14 rs2569190 might associate with susceptibility to CCVD. CAT and TAT haplotypes may be risk factors while TAC and TGC haplotype may be protective factors for CCVD. PMID:26884960

  16. How does the treadmill affect gait in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Bello, Olalla; Fernandez-Del-Olmo, Miguel

    2012-02-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is clinically characterized by symptoms of akinesia, rigidity, and resting tremor, which are related to a dopaminergic deficiency of the nigrostriatal pathway. Disorders of gait are common symptoms of PD that affect the quality of life in these patients. One of the main focuses of physical rehabilitation in PD is to improve the gait deficits in the patients. In the last decade, a small number of studies have investigated the use of the treadmill for the rehabilitation of gait in PD patients. Although, the results of these studies are promising, the mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effect of the treadmill in PD are still largely unknown. This paper reviews 10 years of investigation of treadmill training in PD, focusing on the possible mechanisms involved in the therapeutic effect of the treadmill. Understanding these mechanisms may improve the prescription and design of physical therapy programs for PD patients. PMID:21762092

  17. Genetic susceptibility to chronic wasting disease in free-ranging white-tailed deer: complement component C1q and Prnp polymorphisms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanchong, Julie A.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Scribner, Kim T.; Libants, Scot V.; Johnson, Chad; Aiken, Judd M.; Langenberg, Julia A.; Samuel, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    The genetic basis of susceptibility to chronic wasting disease (CWD) in free-ranging cervids is of great interest. Association studies of disease susceptibility in free-ranging populations, however, face considerable challenges including: the need for large sample sizes when disease is rare, animals of unknown pedigree create a risk of spurious results due to population admixture, and the inability to control disease exposure or dose. We used an innovative matched case–control design and conditional logistic regression to evaluate associations between polymorphisms of complement C1q and prion protein (Prnp) genes and CWD infection in white-tailed deer from the CWD endemic area in south-central Wisconsin. To reduce problems due to admixture or disease-risk confounding, we used neutral genetic (microsatellite) data to identify closely related CWD-positive (n = 68) and CWD-negative (n = 91) female deer to serve as matched cases and controls. Cases and controls were also matched on factors (sex, location, age) previously demonstrated to affect CWD infection risk. For Prnp, deer with at least one Serine (S) at amino acid 96 were significantly less likely to be CWD-positive relative to deer homozygous for Glycine (G). This is the first characterization of genes associated with the complement system in white-tailed deer. No tests for association between any C1q polymorphism and CWD infection were significant at p < 0.05. After controlling for Prnp, we found weak support for an elevated risk of CWD infection in deer with at least one Glycine (G) at amino acid 56 of the C1qC gene. While we documented numerous amino acid polymorphisms in C1q genes none appear to be strongly associated with CWD susceptibility.

  18. Wild rodents as a model to discover genes and pathways underlying natural variation in infectious disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Turner, Andrew K; Paterson, Steve

    2013-04-01

    Individuals vary in their susceptibility to infectious disease and it is now well established that host genetic factors form a major component of this variation. The discovery of genes underlying susceptibility has the potential to lead to improved disease control, through the identification and management of vulnerable individuals and the discovery of novel therapeutic targets. Laboratory rodents have proved invaluable for ascertaining the function of genes involved in immunity to infection. However, these captive animals experience conditions very different to the natural environment, lacking the genetic diversity and environmental pressures characteristic of natural populations, including those of humans. It has therefore often proved difficult to translate basic laboratory research to the real world. In order to further our understanding of the genetic basis of infectious disease resistance, and the evolutionary forces that drive variation in susceptibility, we propose that genetic research traditionally conducted on laboratory animals is expanded to the more ecologically valid arena of natural populations. In this article we highlight the potential of using wild rodents as a new resource for biomedical research, to link the functional genetic knowledge gained from laboratory rodents with the variation in infectious disease susceptibility observed in humans and other natural populations. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd. PMID:23550923

  19. Quantitative evaluation of DNA methylation patterns for ALVEs and TVB genes in a neoplastic disease susceptible and resistant chicken model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chicken endogenous virus, ALVE (Avian Leukosis Virus subgroup E), is inherited as LTR (long terminal repeat) retrotransposons, which is negatively correlated with fitness and disease resistance, and any changes in DNA methylation pattern may thus contribute to the susceptibility to neoplastic diseas...

  20. Susceptibility of white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) to experimental infection with epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus serotype 7

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the fall of 2006, in Israel, epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) serotype 7 was the cause of an intense and widespread epizootic in domestic cattle that resulted in significant economic losses for the dairy industry. The susceptibility of potential North American vector and ruminant ho...

  1. Genome-wide copy number variant analysis in inbred chicken lines with different susceptibility to Marek’s disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Breeding of genetically resistant chickens to Marek’s disease (MD) is a vital strategy to poultry health. To find the markers underlying the genetic resistance to MD, copy number variation (CNV) was examined in inbred MD-resistant and -susceptible chicken lines. A total of 45 CNVs were found in four...

  2. Modulation of microRNAs in two genetically disparate chicken lines showing different necrotic enteritis disease susceptibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) play a critical role in post-transcriptional regulation by influencing the 3'-UTR of target genes. Using two inbred White Leghorn chicken lines, line 6.3 and line 7.2 showing Marek’s disease-resistant and -susceptible phenotypes, respectively, we used small RNA high-throughput sequ...

  3. New susceptibility loci associated with kidney disease in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sandholm, Niina; Salem, Rany M; McKnight, Amy Jayne; Brennan, Eoin P; Forsblom, Carol; Isakova, Tamara; McKay, Gareth J; Williams, Winfred W; Sadlier, Denise M; Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; Swan, Elizabeth J; Palmer, Cameron; Boright, Andrew P; Ahlqvist, Emma; Deshmukh, Harshal A; Keller, Benjamin J; Huang, Huateng; Ahola, Aila J; Fagerholm, Emma; Gordin, Daniel; Harjutsalo, Valma; He, Bing; Heikkilä, Outi; Hietala, Kustaa; Kytö, Janne; Lahermo, Päivi; Lehto, Markku; Lithovius, Raija; Osterholm, Anne-May; Parkkonen, Maija; Pitkäniemi, Janne; Rosengård-Bärlund, Milla; Saraheimo, Markku; Sarti, Cinzia; Söderlund, Jenny; Soro-Paavonen, Aino; Syreeni, Anna; Thorn, Lena M; Tikkanen, Heikki; Tolonen, Nina; Tryggvason, Karl; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Wadén, Johan; Gill, Geoffrey V; Prior, Sarah; Guiducci, Candace; Mirel, Daniel B; Taylor, Andrew; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Rossing, Peter; Tarnow, Lise; Ladenvall, Claes; Alhenc-Gelas, François; Lefebvre, Pierre; Rigalleau, Vincent; Roussel, Ronan; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Maestroni, Anna; Maestroni, Silvia; Falhammar, Henrik; Gu, Tianwei; Möllsten, Anna; Cimponeriu, Danut; Ioana, Mihai; Mota, Maria; Mota, Eugen; Serafinceanu, Cristian; Stavarachi, Monica; Hanson, Robert L; Nelson, Robert G; Kretzler, Matthias; Colhoun, Helen M; Panduru, Nicolae Mircea; Gu, Harvest F; Brismar, Kerstin; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Hadjadj, Samy; Marre, Michel; Groop, Leif; Lajer, Maria; Bull, Shelley B; Waggott, Daryl; Paterson, Andrew D; Savage, David A; Bain, Stephen C; Martin, Finian; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Godson, Catherine; Florez, Jose C; Groop, Per-Henrik; Maxwell, Alexander P

    2012-09-01

    Diabetic kidney disease, or diabetic nephropathy (DN), is a major complication of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that requires dialysis treatment or kidney transplantation. In addition to the decrease in the quality of life, DN accounts for a large proportion of the excess mortality associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Whereas the degree of glycemia plays a pivotal role in DN, a subset of individuals with poorly controlled T1D do not develop DN. Furthermore, strong familial aggregation supports genetic susceptibility to DN. However, the genes and the molecular mechanisms behind the disease remain poorly understood, and current therapeutic strategies rarely result in reversal of DN. In the GEnetics of Nephropathy: an International Effort (GENIE) consortium, we have undertaken a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of T1D DN comprising ~2.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) imputed in 6,691 individuals. After additional genotyping of 41 top ranked SNPs representing 24 independent signals in 5,873 individuals, combined meta-analysis revealed association of two SNPs with ESRD: rs7583877 in the AFF3 gene (P = 1.2 × 10(-8)) and an intergenic SNP on chromosome 15q26 between the genes RGMA and MCTP2, rs12437854 (P = 2.0 × 10(-9)). Functional data suggest that AFF3 influences renal tubule fibrosis via the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1) pathway. The strongest association with DN as a primary phenotype was seen for an intronic SNP in the ERBB4 gene (rs7588550, P = 2.1 × 10(-7)), a gene with type 2 diabetes DN differential expression and in the same intron as a variant with cis-eQTL expression of ERBB4. All these detected associations represent new signals in the pathogenesis of DN. PMID:23028342

  4. New Susceptibility Loci Associated with Kidney Disease in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Forsblom, Carol; Isakova, Tamara; McKay, Gareth J.; Williams, Winfred W.; Sadlier, Denise M.; Mäkinen, Ville-Petteri; Swan, Elizabeth J.; Palmer, Cameron; Boright, Andrew P.; Ahlqvist, Emma; Deshmukh, Harshal A.; Keller, Benjamin J.; Huang, Huateng; Ahola, Aila J.; Fagerholm, Emma; Gordin, Daniel; Harjutsalo, Valma; He, Bing; Heikkilä, Outi; Hietala, Kustaa; Kytö, Janne; Lahermo, Päivi; Lehto, Markku; Lithovius, Raija; Österholm, Anne-May; Parkkonen, Maija; Pitkäniemi, Janne; Rosengård-Bärlund, Milla; Saraheimo, Markku; Sarti, Cinzia; Söderlund, Jenny; Soro-Paavonen, Aino; Syreeni, Anna; Thorn, Lena M.; Tikkanen, Heikki; Tolonen, Nina; Tryggvason, Karl; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Wadén, Johan; Gill, Geoffrey V.; Prior, Sarah; Guiducci, Candace; Mirel, Daniel B.; Taylor, Andrew; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Parving, Hans-Henrik; Rossing, Peter; Tarnow, Lise; Ladenvall, Claes; Alhenc-Gelas, François; Lefebvre, Pierre; Rigalleau, Vincent; Roussel, Ronan; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Maestroni, Anna; Maestroni, Silvia; Falhammar, Henrik; Gu, Tianwei; Möllsten, Anna; Cimponeriu, Danut; Ioana, Mihai; Mota, Maria; Mota, Eugen; Serafinceanu, Cristian; Stavarachi, Monica; Hanson, Robert L.; Nelson, Robert G.; Kretzler, Matthias; Colhoun, Helen M.; Panduru, Nicolae Mircea; Gu, Harvest F.; Brismar, Kerstin; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Hadjadj, Samy; Marre, Michel; Groop, Leif; Lajer, Maria; Bull, Shelley B.; Waggott, Daryl; Paterson, Andrew D.; Savage, David A.; Bain, Stephen C.; Martin, Finian; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Godson, Catherine; Florez, Jose C.; Groop, Per-Henrik; Maxwell, Alexander P.

    2012-01-01

    Diabetic kidney disease, or diabetic nephropathy (DN), is a major complication of diabetes and the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that requires dialysis treatment or kidney transplantation. In addition to the decrease in the quality of life, DN accounts for a large proportion of the excess mortality associated with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Whereas the degree of glycemia plays a pivotal role in DN, a subset of individuals with poorly controlled T1D do not develop DN. Furthermore, strong familial aggregation supports genetic susceptibility to DN. However, the genes and the molecular mechanisms behind the disease remain poorly understood, and current therapeutic strategies rarely result in reversal of DN. In the GEnetics of Nephropathy: an International Effort (GENIE) consortium, we have undertaken a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of T1D DN comprising ∼2.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) imputed in 6,691 individuals. After additional genotyping of 41 top ranked SNPs representing 24 independent signals in 5,873 individuals, combined meta-analysis revealed association of two SNPs with ESRD: rs7583877 in the AFF3 gene (P = 1.2×10−8) and an intergenic SNP on chromosome 15q26 between the genes RGMA and MCTP2, rs12437854 (P = 2.0×10−9). Functional data suggest that AFF3 influences renal tubule fibrosis via the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1) pathway. The strongest association with DN as a primary phenotype was seen for an intronic SNP in the ERBB4 gene (rs7588550, P = 2.1×10−7), a gene with type 2 diabetes DN differential expression and in the same intron as a variant with cis-eQTL expression of ERBB4. All these detected associations represent new signals in the pathogenesis of DN. PMID:23028342

  5. Analysis of HLA and disease susceptibility: Chromosome 6 genes and sex influence long-QT phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Weitkamp, L.R.; Moss, A.J.; Hall, W.J.; Robinson, J.L.; Guttormsen, S.A.; Lewis, R.A.; MacCluer, J.W.; Schwartz, P.J.; Locati, E.H.; Tzivoni, D.

    1994-12-01

    The long-QT (LQT) syndrome is a genetically complex disorder that is characterized by syncope and fatal ventricular arrhythmias. LQT syndrome, as defined by a prolonged electrocardiographic QT interval, has a higher incidence in females than in males and does not exhibit Mendelian transmission patterns in all families. Among those families that are nearly consistent with Mendelian transmission, linkage between a locus for LQT syndrome and the H-ras-1 locus on the short arm of chromosome 11 has been reported in some families but not in others. Earlier analyses suggesting that LQT syndrome might be caused by a gene in the HLA region of chromosome 6 were not confirmed by standard linkage analyses. Here, we present an analysis of HLA haplotype sharing among affected pedigree members, showing an excess of haplotype sharing in a previously published Japanese pedigree and possibly also in 15 families of European descent. The haplotypes shared by affected individuals derive from both affected and unaffected parents. In an analysis of independent (unrelated) HLA haplotypes, we also found a nonrandom distribution of HLA-DR genes in LQT syndrome patients compared with controls, suggesting an association between the LQT phenotype and specific HLA-DR genes. Our data indicate that DR2 has a protective effect and, particularly in males, that DR7 may increase susceptibility to the LQT syndrome. Thus, LQT syndrome may be influenced by genes on chromosomes 11 and 6, possibly with a sex-specific effect. These results provide a model for an effect of HLA-region genes inherited from either parent on the expression of an illness that may be determined principally by alleles at loci not linked to HLA.

  6. Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Mutations Affecting the Interleukin-10 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Glocker, Erik-Oliver; Kotlarz, Daniel; Boztug, Kaan; Gertz, E. Michael; Schäffer, Alejandro A.; Noyan, Fatih; Perro, Mario; Diestelhorst, Jana; Allroth, Anna; Murugan, Dhaarini; Hätscher, Nadine; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Sauer, Martin; Kreipe, Hans; Lacher, Martin; Nustede, Rainer; Woellner, Cristina; Baumann, Ulrich; Salzer, Ulrich; Koletzko, Sibylle; Shah, Neil; Segal, Anthony W.; Sauerbrey, Axel; Buderus, Stephan; Snapper, Scott B.; Grimbacher, Bodo; Klein, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND The molecular cause of inflammatory bowel disease is largely unknown. METHODS We performed genetic-linkage analysis and candidate-gene sequencing on samples from two unrelated consanguineous families with children who were affected by early-onset inflammatory bowel disease. We screened six additional patients with early-onset colitis for mutations in two candidate genes and carried out functional assays in patients’ peripheral-blood mononuclear cells. We performed an allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation in one patient. RESULTS In four of nine patients with early-onset colitis, we identified three distinct homozygous mutations in genes IL10RA and IL10RB, encoding the IL10R1 and IL10R2 proteins, respectively, which form a heterotetramer to make up the interleukin-10 receptor. The mutations abrogate interleukin-10–induced signaling, as shown by deficient STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) phosphorylation on stimulation with interleukin-10. Consistent with this observation was the increased secretion of tumor necrosis factor α and other proinflammatory cytokines from peripheral-blood mononuclear cells from patients who were deficient in IL10R subunit proteins, suggesting that interleukin-10–dependent “negative feedback” regulation is disrupted in these cells. The allogeneic stem-cell transplantation performed in one patient was successful. CONCLUSIONS Mutations in genes encoding the IL10R subunit proteins were found in patients with early-onset enterocolitis, involving hyperinflammatory immune responses in the intestine. Allogeneic stem-cell transplantation resulted in disease remission in one patient. PMID:19890111

  7. A Statistical Model for Assessing Genetic Susceptibility as a Risk Factor in Multifactorial Diseases: Lessons from Occupational Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Demchuk, Eugene; Yucesoy, Berran; Johnson, Victor J.; Andrew, Michael; Weston, Ainsley; Germolec, Dori R.; De Rosa, Christopher T.; Luster, Michael I.

    2007-01-01

    Background Incorporating the influence of genetic variation in the risk assessment process is often considered, but no generalized approach exists. Many common human diseases such as asthma, cancer, and cardiovascular disease are complex in nature, as they are influenced variably by environmental, physiologic, and genetic factors. The genetic components most responsible for differences in individual disease risk are thought to be DNA variants (polymorphisms) that influence the expression or function of mediators involved in the pathological processes. Objective The purpose of this study was to estimate the combinatorial contribution of multiple genetic variants to disease risk. Methods We used a logistic regression model to help estimate the joint contribution that multiple genetic variants would have on disease risk. This model was developed using data collected from molecular epidemiology studies of allergic asthma that examined variants in 16 susceptibility genes. Results Based on the product of single gene variant odds ratios, the risk of developing asthma was assigned to genotype profiles, and the frequency of each profile was estimated for the general population. Our model predicts that multiple disease variants broaden the risk distribution, facilitating the identification of susceptible populations. This model also allows for incorporation of exposure information as an independent variable, which will be important for risk variants associated with specific exposures. Conclusion The present model provided an opportunity to estimate the relative change in risk associated with multiple genetic variants. This will facilitate identification of susceptible populations and help provide a framework to model the genetic contribution in probabilistic risk assessment. PMID:17384770

  8. The Moroccan Genetic Disease Database (MGDD): a database for DNA variations related to inherited disorders and disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Charoute, Hicham; Nahili, Halima; Abidi, Omar; Gabi, Khalid; Rouba, Hassan; Fakiri, Malika; Barakat, Abdelhamid

    2014-03-01

    National and ethnic mutation databases provide comprehensive information about genetic variations reported in a population or an ethnic group. In this paper, we present the Moroccan Genetic Disease Database (MGDD), a catalogue of genetic data related to diseases identified in the Moroccan population. We used the PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases to identify available articles published until April 2013. The Database is designed and implemented on a three-tier model using Mysql relational database and the PHP programming language. To date, the database contains 425 mutations and 208 polymorphisms found in 301 genes and 259 diseases. Most Mendelian diseases in the Moroccan population follow autosomal recessive mode of inheritance (74.17%) and affect endocrine, nutritional and metabolic physiology. The MGDD database provides reference information for researchers, clinicians and health professionals through a user-friendly Web interface. Its content should be useful to improve researches in human molecular genetics, disease diagnoses and design of association studies. MGDD can be publicly accessed at http://mgdd.pasteur.ma. PMID:23860041

  9. Comparative pathobiology of β-amyloid and the unique susceptibility of humans to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Rebecca F; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Farberg, Aaron S; Dooyema, Jeromy; Ciliax, Brian; Preuss, Todd M; Neubert, Thomas A; Ghiso, Jorge A; LeVine, Harry; Walker, Lary C

    2016-08-01

    The misfolding and accumulation of the protein fragment β-amyloid (Aβ) is an early and essential event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Despite close biological similarities among primates, humans appear to be uniquely susceptible to the profound neurodegeneration and dementia that characterize AD, even though nonhuman primates deposit copious Aβ in senile plaques and cerebral amyloid-β angiopathy as they grow old. Because the amino acid sequence of Aβ is identical in all primates studied to date, we asked whether differences in the properties of aggregated Aβ might underlie the vulnerability of humans and the resistance of other primates to AD. In a comparison of aged squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) and humans with AD, immunochemical and mass spectrometric analyses indicate that the populations of Aβ fragments are largely similar in the 2 species. In addition, Aβ-rich brain extracts from the brains of aged squirrel monkeys and AD patients similarly seed the deposition of Aβ in a transgenic mouse model. However, the epitope exposure of aggregated Aβ differs in sodium dodecyl sulfate-stable oligomeric Aβ from the 2 species. In addition, the high-affinity binding of (3)H Pittsburgh Compound B to Aβ is significantly diminished in tissue extracts from squirrel monkeys compared with AD patients. These findings support the hypothesis that differences in the pathobiology of aggregated Aβ among primates are linked to post-translational attributes of the misfolded protein, such as molecular conformation and/or the involvement of species-specific cofactors. PMID:27318146

  10. Differential susceptibility to motor impulsivity among functional subtypes of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Scott A; van den Wildenberg, Wery; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Claassen, Daniel O; Wooten, George F; Manning, Carol A

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Parkinson’s disease patients with predominant postural instability and gait difficulties (PIGD) may experience unique cognitive difficulties compared to patients with tremor predominant (TD) symptoms. PIGD patients are also at high risk for falling, and some of the worst fallers seem to react impulsively to their environment. We tested the hypothesis that PIGD patients show poorer control over motor impulses compared to TD patients. Methods 34 PD participants were divided into predominant PIGD (n=17) or TD (n=17) functional subtypes based on their presenting symptoms in their optimally treated motor state. All participants performed a speeded reaction task that quantified motor impulsivity and the proficiency of inhibiting prepotent motor impulses. Results The groups showed similar reaction times, but compared to TD patients, PIGD patients made significantly more impulsive motor errors. Notably, when the initial impulsive erroneous response was avoided, PIGD and TD groups were similar in their ability to suppress the incorrect motor impulse from further interfering with the selection of a correct action. Conclusions PD patients with PIGD predominant symptoms show greater susceptibility to acting on prepotent motor impulses compared to TD patients. This finding may have direct implications for fall risk and also points to dissociable neurocognitive pathologies in TD and PIGD subtypes. Clinically, the use of specific cognitive instruments to assess the expression and inhibition of motor impulses may help identify PD patients who have difficulty ‘thinking before they leap’ and are at high risk of falling. PMID:22917670

  11. Relationships of OPG Genetic Polymorphisms with Susceptibility to Cardiovascular Disease: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Song, De-Hua; Zhou, Peng-Zhen; Xiu, Xiao-Lin; Zhou, Guang-Hui; Sun, Yu-Xia; Song, Chun

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The aim of this meta-analysis was to determine whether genetic polymorphisms in the osteoprotegerin (OPG) gene contribute to increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). MATERIAL AND METHODS Electronic databases were searched carefully without any language restriction. Analyses of data were conducted using STATA software. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were also calculated. RESULTS Seven clinical case-control studies that enrolled 1170 CVD patients and 1194 healthy subjects were included. The results indicated that OPG gene polymorphism might be closely associated with susceptibility to CVD, especially for rs2073617 T>C and rs2073618 G>C polymorphisms. Ethnicity-stratified analysis indicated that genetic polymorphism in the OPG were closely related with the pathogenesis of CVD among Asians (all P<0.001), but no obvious relationship was found among Caucasians (all P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS Our meta-analysis provided quantitative evidence that OPG gene polymorphism may be closely related to an increased risk of CVD, especially for rs2073617 T>C and rs2073618 G>C polymorphisms. PMID:27068490

  12. Susceptibility Loci for Pigmentation and Melanoma in Relation to Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Nalls, Michael; Gao, Xiang; Huang, Xuemei; Han, Jiali; Singleton, Andrew B.; Chen, Honglei

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients have a lower risk for most types of cancer except for melanoma, which has a modest positive association with PD. Pigmentation genes has been hypothesized to contribute to this association. We therefore examined whether genetic susceptibility loci for pigmentation or melanoma were associated with PD risk in two large independent datasets. In the Parkinson’s Genes and Environment (PAGE) Study, we examined 11 SNPs identified from previous GWAS studies of pigmentation or melanoma in relation to PD among 808 PD cases and 1,623 controls; further, we also examined the colors of hair, eye, or skin, and melanoma in relation to PD. In the International Parkinson’s Disease Genomic Consortium (IPDGC), we examined a broader selection of 360 pigmentation or melanoma GWAS SNPs in relation to PD among 5,333 PD cases and 12,019 controls. All participants were non-Hispanic Whites. As expected, in the PAGE study, most SNPs were associated with one or more pigmentation phenotypes. However, neither these SNPs nor pigmentation phenotypes were associated with PD risk after Bonferroni correction with the exception of rs4911414 at the ASIP gene (P=0.001). A total of 18 PD cases (2.2%) and 26 controls (1.6%) had a diagnosis of melanoma with an odds ratio of 1.3 (95% confidence interval: 0.7-2.4). In the IPDGC analysis, none of the 360 SNPs, including rs4911414, were associated with PD risk after adjusting for multiple comparisons. In conclusion, we did not find significant associations between GWAS SNPs of pigmentation or melanoma and the risk for PD. PMID:24439955

  13. The Y chromosome as a regulatory element shaping immune cell transcriptomes and susceptibility to autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Case, Laure K; Wall, Emma H; Dragon, Julie A; Saligrama, Naresha; Krementsov, Dimitry N; Moussawi, Mohamad; Zachary, James F; Huber, Sally A; Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P; Teuscher, Cory

    2013-09-01

    Understanding the DNA elements that constitute and control the regulatory genome is critical for the appropriate therapeutic management of complex diseases. Here, using chromosome Y (ChrY) consomic mouse strains on the C57BL/6J (B6) background, we show that susceptibility to two diverse animal models of autoimmune disease, experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) and experimental myocarditis, correlates with the natural variation in copy number of Sly and Rbmy multicopy ChrY genes. On the B6 background, ChrY possesses gene regulatory properties that impact genome-wide gene expression in pathogenic CD4(+) T cells. Using a ChrY consomic strain on the SJL background, we discovered a preference for ChrY-mediated gene regulation in macrophages, the immune cell subset underlying the EAE sexual dimorphism in SJL mice, rather than CD4(+) T cells. Importantly, in both genetic backgrounds, an inverse correlation exists between the number of Sly and Rbmy ChrY gene copies and the number of significantly up-regulated genes in immune cells, thereby supporting a link between copy number variation of Sly and Rbmy with the ChrY genetic element exerting regulatory properties. Additionally, we show that ChrY polymorphism can determine the sexual dimorphism in EAE and myocarditis. In humans, an analysis of the CD4(+) T cell transcriptome from male multiple sclerosis patients versus healthy controls provides further evidence for an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of gene regulation by ChrY. Thus, as in Drosophila, these data establish the mammalian ChrY as a member of the regulatory genome due to its ability to epigenetically regulate genome-wide gene expression in immune cells. PMID:23800453

  14. Return of research results from pharmacogenomic versus disease susceptibility studies: what’s drugs got to do with it?

    PubMed Central

    Dressler, Lynn G

    2012-01-01

    One of the most controversial ethical issues in genomics research is the return of individual research results to research subjects. As new technologies, including whole-genome sequencing, provide an increased opportunity for researchers to find clinically relevant research results, the questions related to if, when and how individual research results should be returned become more central to the ethical conduct of genomic research. In the absence of federal guidance on this issue, many groups and individuals have developed recommendations and suggestions to address these questions. Most of these recommendations have focused on the return of individual results from disease susceptibility studies. However, in addition to predicting the development of disease, genomic research also includes predicting an individual’s response to drugs, especially the risk of developing adverse events. This article evaluates and compares the return of individual research results from disease susceptibility studies versus pharmacogenomic studies. PMID:22676197

  15. Susceptibility to infection and pathogenicity of White Spot Disease (WSD) in non-model crustacean host taxa from temperate regions.

    PubMed

    Bateman, K S; Tew, I; French, C; Hicks, R J; Martin, P; Munro, J; Stentiford, G D

    2012-07-01

    Despite almost two decades since its discovery, White Spot Disease (WSD) caused by White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) is still considered the most significant known pathogen impacting the sustainability and growth of the global penaeid shrimp farming industry. Although most commonly associated with penaeid shrimp farmed in tropical regions, the virus is also able to infect, cause disease and kill a wide range of other decapod crustacean hosts from temperate regions, including lobsters, crabs, crayfish and shrimp. For this reason, WSSV has recently been listed in European Community Council Directive 2006/88. Using principles laid down by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) we applied an array of diagnostic approaches to provide a definitive statement on the susceptibility to White Spot Syndrome Virus (WSSV) infection in seven ecologically or economically important crustacean species from Europe. We chose four marine species: Cancer pagurus, Homarus gammarus, Nephrops norvegicus and Carcinus maenas; one estuarine species, Eriocheir sinensis and two freshwater species, Austropotamobius pallipes and Pacifastacus leniusculus. Exposure trials based upon natural (feeding) and artificial (intra-muscular injection) routes of exposure to WSSV revealed universal susceptibility to WSSV infection in these hosts. However, the relative degree of susceptibility (measured by progression of infection to disease, and mortality) varied significantly between host species. In some instances (Type 1 hosts), pathogenesis mimicked that observed in penaeid shrimp hosts whereas in other examples (Types 2 and 3 hosts), infection did not readily progress to disease, even though hosts were considered as infected and susceptible according to accepted principles. Results arising from challenge studies are discussed in relation to the potential risk posed to non-target hosts by the inadvertent introduction of WSSV to European waters via trade. Furthermore, we highlight the potential for

  16. Genetic susceptibility, colony size, and water temperature drive white-pox disease on the coral Acropora palmata.

    PubMed

    Muller, Erinn M; van Woesik, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Outbreaks of coral diseases are one of the greatest threats to reef corals in the Caribbean, yet the mechanisms that lead to coral diseases are still largely unknown. Here we examined the spatial-temporal dynamics of white-pox disease on Acropora palmata coral colonies of known genotypes. We took a Bayesian approach, using Integrated Nested Laplace Approximation algorithms, to examine which covariates influenced the presence of white-pox disease over seven years. We showed that colony size, genetic susceptibility of the coral host, and high-water temperatures were the primary tested variables that were positively associated with the presence of white-pox disease on A. palmata colonies. Our study also showed that neither distance from previously diseased individuals, nor colony location, influenced the dynamics of white-pox disease. These results suggest that white-pox disease was most likely a consequence of anomalously high water temperatures that selectively compromised the oldest colonies and the most susceptible coral genotypes. PMID:25372835

  17. Recombination affects accumulation of damaging and disease-associated mutations in human populations.

    PubMed

    Hussin, Julie G; Hodgkinson, Alan; Idaghdour, Youssef; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; Goulet, Jean-Philippe; Gbeha, Elias; Hip-Ki, Elodie; Awadalla, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Many decades of theory have demonstrated that, in non-recombining systems, slightly deleterious mutations accumulate non-reversibly, potentially driving the extinction of many asexual species. Non-recombining chromosomes in sexual organisms are thought to have degenerated in a similar fashion; however, it is not clear the extent to which damaging mutations accumulate along chromosomes with highly variable rates of crossing over. Using high-coverage sequencing data from over 1,400 individuals in the 1000 Genomes and CARTaGENE projects, we show that recombination rate modulates the distribution of putatively deleterious variants across the entire human genome. Exons in regions of low recombination are significantly enriched for deleterious and disease-associated variants, a signature varying in strength across worldwide human populations with different demographic histories. Regions with low recombination rates are enriched for highly conserved genes with essential cellular functions and show an excess of mutations with demonstrated effects on health, a phenomenon likely affecting disease susceptibility in humans. PMID:25685891

  18. Interleukin-18 genetic polymorphisms contribute differentially to the susceptibility to Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Su-Jun; Zhang, Li; Lu, Wei; Wang, Lu; Chen, Lei; Zhu, Zhen; Zhu, Hai-Hang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the correlation between interleukin-18 (IL-18) gene polymorphisms and the risk of developing Crohn’s disease (CD). METHODS: The PubMed, CISCOM, CINAHL, Web of Science, EBSCO, Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CBM databases were searched without any language restrictions using combinations of keywords relating to CD and IL-18 for relevant articles published before November 1st, 2013. Screening of the published studies retrieved from searches was based on our stringent inclusion and exclusion criteria and resulted in seven eligible studies for meta-analysis. A meta-analysis was conducted using a random-effects model with STATA 12.0 software. Crude odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were calculated. RESULTS: Seven case-control studies, with a total of 1930 CD cases and 1930 healthy subjects, met our inclusion criteria. The results of our meta-analysis indicated that the IL-18 rs1946518 A>C and rs187238 G>C polymorphisms may correlate with an increased risk of CD under five genetic models (all P < 0.05). Furthermore, we observed positive associations between the IL-18 rs360718 A>C polymorphism and CD risk under three genetic models (C allele vs A allele: OR = 2.03, 95%CI: 1.20-3.43, P = 0.008; CC vs AA+AC: OR = 2.39, 95%CI: 1.2-4.43, P = 0.006; CC vs AC: OR = 2.31, 95%CI: 1.22-4.38, P = 0.010). However, such associations were not found for the IL-18 rs917997 C>T, codon 35 A>C and rs1946519 G>T polymorphisms (all P > 0.05). A subgroup analysis was conducted to investigate the effect of ethnicity on an individual’s susceptibility to CD. Our results revealed positive correlations between IL-18 genetic polymorphisms and an increased risk of CD among Asians and Africans (all P < 0.05), but not among Caucasians (all P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: This meta-analysis indicated that the IL-18 rs1946518 A>C, rs187238 G>C and rs360718 A>C polymorphisms may contribute to susceptibility to CD, especially among Asians and Africans. These

  19. Subthalamic nucleus stimulation affects incentive salience attribution in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Serranová, Tereza; Jech, Robert; Dušek, Petr; Sieger, Tomáš; Růžička, Filip; Urgošík, Dušan; Růžička, Evžen

    2011-10-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) can induce nonmotor side effects such as behavioral and mood disturbances or body weight gain in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. We hypothesized that some of these problems could be related to an altered attribution of incentive salience (ie, emotional relevance) to rewarding and aversive stimuli. Twenty PD patients (all men; mean age ± SD, 58.3 ± 6 years) in bilateral STN DBS switched ON and OFF conditions and 18 matched controls rated pictures selected from the International Affective Picture System according to emotional valence (unpleasantness/pleasantness) and arousal on 2 independent visual scales ranging from 1 to 9. Eighty-four pictures depicting primary rewarding (erotica and food) and aversive fearful (victims and threat) and neutral stimuli were selected for this study. In the STN DBS ON condition, the PD patients attributed lower valence scores to the aversive pictures compared with the OFF condition (P < .01) and compared with controls (P < .01). The difference between the OFF condition and controls was less pronounced (P < .05). Furthermore, postoperative weight gain correlated with arousal ratings from the food pictures in the STN DBS ON condition (P < .05 compensated for OFF condition). Our results suggest that STN DBS increases activation of the aversive motivational system so that more relevance is attributed to aversive fearful stimuli. In addition, STN DBS-related sensitivity to food reward stimuli cues might drive DBS-treated patients to higher food intake and subsequent weight gain. PMID:21780183

  20. A Review of Factors Affecting Vaccine Preventable Disease in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Michael SL

    2014-01-01

    Japan is well known as a country with a strong health record. However its incidence rates of vaccine preventable diseases (VPD) such as hepatitis B, measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella remain higher than other developed countries. This article reviews the factors that contribute to the high rates of VPD in Japan. These include historical and political factors that delayed the introduction of several important vaccines until recently. Access has also been affected by vaccines being divided into government-funded “routine” (eg, polio, pertussis) and self-pay “voluntary” groups (eg, hepatitis A and B). Routine vaccines have higher rates of administration than voluntary vaccines. Administration factors include differences in well child care schedules, the approach to simultaneous vaccination, vaccination contraindication due to fever, and vaccination spacing. Parental factors include low intention to fully vaccinate their children and misperceptions about side effects and efficacy. There are also provider knowledge gaps regarding indications, adverse effects, interval, and simultaneous vaccination. These multifactorial issues combine to produce lower population immunization rates and a higher incidence of VPD than other developed countries. This article will provide insight into the current situation of Japanese vaccinations, the issues to be addressed and suggestions for public health promotion. PMID:25628969

  1. How does smoking affect olfaction in Parkinson's disease?

    PubMed

    Moccia, Marcello; Picillo, Marina; Erro, Roberto; Vitale, Carmine; Amboni, Marianna; Palladino, Raffaele; Cioffi, Dante Luigi; Barone, Paolo; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa

    2014-05-15

    Smoke-induced upper airway damage and Parkinson's disease (PD) can be considered independent risk factors for smell impairment. Interestingly, cigarette smoking has been strongly associated with reduced risk of PD and, therefore, has been suggested to have neuroprotective effects. Our pilot study aimed to evaluate the relationship between smoking and olfaction in PD patients and matched controls. Sixty-eight PD patients and 61 healthy controls were categorized in relation to PD diagnosis and current smoking status, and evaluated by means of the Italian version of the University of Pennsylvania 40-item Smell Identification Test (UPSIT-40). ANOVA analysis with post-hoc Bonferroni correction showed that non-smoker controls presented a higher UPSIT-40 total score than smoker controls (p<0.001), non-smoker PD patients (p<0.001) and smoker PD patients (p<0.001). In this view, smoking seems to affect olfaction in controls but not in PD patients, and no significant differences were found when comparing smoker controls, smoker PD patients and non-smoker PD patients. Several epidemiological studies showed a negative effect of smoking on olfaction in the general population. Otherwise the sense of smell is similar in smoker and non-smoker PD patients. These results suggest that PD and smoking are not independent risk factors for impairment of sense of smell, but they might variably interact. PMID:24655736

  2. Hsp70-2 gene polymorphism: susceptibility implication in Tunisian patients with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a multifactorial disease where genetic and environmental factors interact in complex ways to cause the disease. Heat shock protein genes are involved in the progress of CAD. This implies that genetic variants of Hsp70–2 genes might contribute to the development of the CAD. Aim of study The aim of this study was to characterize statistical correlation of linkage between lipid profiles, polymorphism PstI site of Hsp70–2 gene and CAD. Patients and methods This study was carried out on Tunisian patients with CAD recruited from Hospital of Fattouma Bourguiba of Monastir-Tunisia. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction enzymes were used to determine the genotypic distributions in 252 unrelated patients and 151 healthy control subjects. Further, ApoA-I and ApoB as well as the serum total of cholesterol, HDL, triglyceride, and hs-CRP levels were measured. Results We showed a decreased level of ApoA-I, whereas the levels of each of ApoB and hs-CRP were increased in patients with CAD compared with control group. In addition our studies of a polymorphic PstI site of Hsp70-2 gene at position 1267 of the Hsp70–2 gene have revealed that the allelic frequency of P2 was significantly more frequent in CAD patients than controls group (p=0.007, OR=1.495). The genotypic distribution showed a high incidence of P2/P2 genotype in CAD patients (0.190) compared to healthy control (0.009) with reach significant difference (p=0.006). The P2 carriers showed a significantly increased of Total-Cholesterol (CT) and C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels in CAD patients (p=0.008 and p=0.018, respectively). Conclusion The high incidence of P2-Hsp70-2 genotype in CAD patients and the significantly association of P2/P2 genotype with elevated Total Cholesterol and hs-CRP levels, supported that P2–Hsp70–2 genotype has susceptibility implication in CAD and could increased the risk of CAD in Tunisian population. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for

  3. Prevalence of putative virulence factors and antimicrobial susceptibility of Enterococcus faecalis isolates from patients with dental Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Salah, Randa; Dar-Odeh, Najla; Abu Hammad, Osama; Shehabi, Asem A

    2008-01-01

    Background This study investigated the prevalence of Enterococcus faecalis, its putative virulence factors and antimicrobial susceptibility in individuals with and without dental diseases. A total of 159 oral rinse specimens were collected from patients (n = 109) suffering from dental diseases and healthy controls (n = 50). Results E. faecalis was detected using only culture in 8/109 (7.3%) of the patients with various types of dental diseases, whereas no E. faecalis was found in the healthy controls weather using both culture and PCR. Phenotype characterizations of the 8 E. faecalis isolates indicated that 25% of the isolates produced haemolysin and 37.5% produced gelatinase. Most important virulence genes; collagen binding protein (ace) and endocarditis antigen (efaA) were present in all 8 E. faecalis isolates, while haemolysin activator gene (cylA) was detected only in 25% of isolates, and all isolates were negative for esp gene. All E. faecalis isolates were 100% susceptible to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, vancomycin, and teicoplanin, and to less extent to erythromycin (62.5%). Conclusion This study shows that all E. faecalis isolates were recovered only from patients with dental diseases especially necrotic pulps, and all isolates carried both collagen binding protein and endocarditis antigen genes and highly susceptible to frequently used antimicrobial drugs in Jordan. PMID:18513445

  4. Fine mapping of the gene for susceptibility to black spot disease in Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai).

    PubMed

    Terakami, Shingo; Moriya, Shigeki; Adachi, Yoshihiko; Kunihisa, Miyuki; Nishitani, Chikako; Saito, Toshihiro; Abe, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2016-03-01

    Black spot disease, which is caused by the Japanese pear pathotype of the filamentous fungus Alternaria alternata (Fries) Keissler, is one of the most harmful diseases in Japanese pear cultivation. We mapped a gene for susceptibility to black spot disease in the Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) cultivar 'Kinchaku' (Aki gene) at the top of linkage group 11, similar to the positions of the susceptibility genes Ani in 'Osa Nijisseiki' and Ana in 'Nansui'. Using synteny-based marker enrichment, we developed novel apple SSR markers in the target region. We constructed a fine map of linkage group 11 of 'Kinchaku' and localized the Aki locus within a 1.5-cM genome region between SSR markers Mdo.chr11.28 and Mdo.chr11.34. Marker Mdo.chr11.30 co-segregated with Aki in all 621 F1 plantlets of a 'Housui' × 'Kinchaku' cross. The physical size of the Aki region, which includes three markers (Mdo.chr11.28, Mdo.chr11.30, and Mdo.chr11.34), was estimated to be 250 Kb in the 'Golden Delicious' apple genome and 107 Kb in the 'Dangshansuli' Chinese pear genome. Our results will help to identify the candidate gene for susceptibility to black spot disease in Japanese pear. PMID:27162498

  5. Fine mapping of the gene for susceptibility to black spot disease in Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai)

    PubMed Central

    Terakami, Shingo; Moriya, Shigeki; Adachi, Yoshihiko; Kunihisa, Miyuki; Nishitani, Chikako; Saito, Toshihiro; Abe, Kazuyuki; Yamamoto, Toshiya

    2016-01-01

    Black spot disease, which is caused by the Japanese pear pathotype of the filamentous fungus Alternaria alternata (Fries) Keissler, is one of the most harmful diseases in Japanese pear cultivation. We mapped a gene for susceptibility to black spot disease in the Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) cultivar ‘Kinchaku’ (Aki gene) at the top of linkage group 11, similar to the positions of the susceptibility genes Ani in ‘Osa Nijisseiki’ and Ana in ‘Nansui’. Using synteny-based marker enrichment, we developed novel apple SSR markers in the target region. We constructed a fine map of linkage group 11 of ‘Kinchaku’ and localized the Aki locus within a 1.5-cM genome region between SSR markers Mdo.chr11.28 and Mdo.chr11.34. Marker Mdo.chr11.30 co-segregated with Aki in all 621 F1 plantlets of a ‘Housui’ × ‘Kinchaku’ cross. The physical size of the Aki region, which includes three markers (Mdo.chr11.28, Mdo.chr11.30, and Mdo.chr11.34), was estimated to be 250 Kb in the ‘Golden Delicious’ apple genome and 107 Kb in the ‘Dangshansuli’ Chinese pear genome. Our results will help to identify the candidate gene for susceptibility to black spot disease in Japanese pear. PMID:27162498

  6. Longevity of animals under reactive oxygen species stress and disease susceptibility due to global warming.

    PubMed

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Panda, Sumana Kumari; Hati, Akshaya Kumar; Mohanty, Bobllina; Mohapatra, Manoj Kumar; Kanungo, Shyama; Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda

    2016-02-26

    The world is projected to experience an approximate doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentration in the next decades. Rise in atmospheric CO2 level as one of the most important reasons is expected to contribute to raise the mean global temperature 1.4 °C-5.8 °C by that time. A survey from 128 countries speculates that global warming is primarily due to increase in atmospheric CO2 level that is produced mainly by anthropogenic activities. Exposure of animals to high environmental temperatures is mostly accompanied by unwanted acceleration of certain biochemical pathways in their cells. One of such examples is augmentation in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent increase in oxidation of lipids, proteins and nucleic acids by ROS. Increase in oxidation of biomolecules leads to a state called as oxidative stress (OS). Finally, the increase in OS condition induces abnormality in physiology of animals under elevated temperature. Exposure of animals to rise in habitat temperature is found to boost the metabolism of animals and a very strong and positive correlation exists between metabolism and levels of ROS and OS. Continuous induction of OS is negatively correlated with survivability and longevity and positively correlated with ageing in animals. Thus, it can be predicted that continuous exposure of animals to acute or gradual rise in habitat temperature due to global warming may induce OS, reduced survivability and longevity in animals in general and poikilotherms in particular. A positive correlation between metabolism and temperature in general and altered O2 consumption at elevated temperature in particular could also increase the risk of experiencing OS in homeotherms. Effects of global warming on longevity of animals through increased risk of protein misfolding and disease susceptibility due to OS as the cause or effects or both also cannot be ignored. Therefore, understanding the physiological impacts of global warming in relation to

  7. Longevity of animals under reactive oxygen species stress and disease susceptibility due to global warming

    PubMed Central

    Paital, Biswaranjan; Panda, Sumana Kumari; Hati, Akshaya Kumar; Mohanty, Bobllina; Mohapatra, Manoj Kumar; Kanungo, Shyama; Chainy, Gagan Bihari Nityananda

    2016-01-01

    The world is projected to experience an approximate doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentration in the next decades. Rise in atmospheric CO2 level as one of the most important reasons is expected to contribute to raise the mean global temperature 1.4 °C-5.8 °C by that time. A survey from 128 countries speculates that global warming is primarily due to increase in atmospheric CO2 level that is produced mainly by anthropogenic activities. Exposure of animals to high environmental temperatures is mostly accompanied by unwanted acceleration of certain biochemical pathways in their cells. One of such examples is augmentation in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent increase in oxidation of lipids, proteins and nucleic acids by ROS. Increase in oxidation of biomolecules leads to a state called as oxidative stress (OS). Finally, the increase in OS condition induces abnormality in physiology of animals under elevated temperature. Exposure of animals to rise in habitat temperature is found to boost the metabolism of animals and a very strong and positive correlation exists between metabolism and levels of ROS and OS. Continuous induction of OS is negatively correlated with survivability and longevity and positively correlated with ageing in animals. Thus, it can be predicted that continuous exposure of animals to acute or gradual rise in habitat temperature due to global warming may induce OS, reduced survivability and longevity in animals in general and poikilotherms in particular. A positive correlation between metabolism and temperature in general and altered O2 consumption at elevated temperature in particular could also increase the risk of experiencing OS in homeotherms. Effects of global warming on longevity of animals through increased risk of protein misfolding and disease susceptibility due to OS as the cause or effects or both also cannot be ignored. Therefore, understanding the physiological impacts of global warming in relation to

  8. Rotenone Susceptibility Phenotype in Olfactory Derived Patient Cells as a Model of Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Matigian, N.; Todorovic, M.; Cook, A. L.; Ravishankar, S.; Dong, L. F.; Neuzil, J.; Silburn, P.; Mackay-Sim, A.; Mellick, G. D.; Wood, S. A.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a complex age-related neurodegenerative disorder. Approximately 90% of Parkinson’s disease cases are idiopathic, of unknown origin. The aetiology of Parkinson’s disease is not fully understood but increasing evidence implies a failure in fundamental cellular processes including mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress. To dissect the cellular events underlying idiopathic Parkinson’s disease, we use primary cell lines established from the olfactory mucosa of Parkinson’s disease patients. Previous metabolic and transcriptomic analyses identified deficiencies in stress response pathways in patient-derived cell lines. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these deficiencies manifested as increased susceptibility, as measured by cell viability, to a range of extrinsic stressors. We identified that patient-derived cells are more sensitive to mitochondrial complex I inhibition and hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress, than controls. Exposure to low levels (50 nM) of rotenone led to increased apoptosis in patient-derived cells. We identified an endogenous deficit in mitochondrial complex I in patient-derived cells, but this did not directly correlate with rotenone-sensitivity. We further characterized the sensitivity to rotenone and identified that it was partly associated with heat shock protein 27 levels. Finally, transcriptomic analysis following rotenone exposure revealed that patient-derived cells express a diminished response to rotenone-induced stress compared with cells from healthy controls. Our cellular model of idiopathic Parkinson’s disease displays a clear susceptibility phenotype to mitochondrial stress. The determination of molecular mechanisms underpinning this susceptibility may lead to the identification of biomarkers for either disease onset or progression. PMID:27123847

  9. Linkage Analysis in Autoimmune Addison’s Disease: NFATC1 as a Potential Novel Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Anna L.; Bøe Wolff, Anette; MacArthur, Katie; Weaver, Jolanta U.; Vaidya, Bijay; Erichsen, Martina M.; Darlay, Rebecca; Husebye, Eystein S.; Cordell, Heather J.; Pearce, Simon H. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Autoimmune Addison’s disease (AAD) is a rare, highly heritable autoimmune endocrinopathy. It is possible that there may be some highly penetrant variants which confer disease susceptibility that have yet to be discovered. Methods DNA samples from 23 multiplex AAD pedigrees from the UK and Norway (50 cases, 67 controls) were genotyped on the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array. Linkage analysis was performed using Merlin. EMMAX was used to carry out a genome-wide association analysis comparing the familial AAD cases to 2706 UK WTCCC controls. To explore some of the linkage findings further, a replication study was performed by genotyping 64 SNPs in two of the four linked regions (chromosomes 7 and 18), on the Sequenom iPlex platform in three European AAD case-control cohorts (1097 cases, 1117 controls). The data were analysed using a meta-analysis approach. Results In a parametric analysis, applying a rare dominant model, loci on chromosomes 7, 9 and 18 had LOD scores >2.8. In a non-parametric analysis, a locus corresponding to the HLA region on chromosome 6, known to be associated with AAD, had a LOD score >3.0. In the genome-wide association analysis, a SNP cluster on chromosome 2 and a pair of SNPs on chromosome 6 were associated with AAD (P <5x10-7). A meta-analysis of the replication study data demonstrated that three chromosome 18 SNPs were associated with AAD, including a non-synonymous variant in the NFATC1 gene. Conclusion This linkage study has implicated a number of novel chromosomal regions in the pathogenesis of AAD in multiplex AAD families and adds further support to the role of HLA in AAD. The genome-wide association analysis has also identified a region of interest on chromosome 2. A replication study has demonstrated that the NFATC1 gene is worthy of future investigation, however each of the regions identified require further, systematic analysis. PMID:26042420

  10. Can Genetic Analysis of Putative Blood Alzheimer's Disease Biomarkers Lead to Identification of Susceptibility Loci?

    PubMed

    Barber, Robert C; Phillips, Nicole R; Tilson, Jeffrey L; Huebinger, Ryan M; Shewale, Shantanu J; Koenig, Jessica L; Mitchel, Jeffrey S; O'Bryant, Sid E; Waring, Stephen C; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Chasse, Scott; Wilhelmsen, Kirk C

    2015-01-01

    Although 24 Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk loci have been reliably identified, a large portion of the predicted heritability for AD remains unexplained. It is expected that additional loci of small effect will be identified with an increased sample size. However, the cost of a significant increase in Case-Control sample size is prohibitive. The current study tests whether exploring the genetic basis of endophenotypes, in this case based on putative blood biomarkers for AD, can accelerate the identification of susceptibility loci using modest sample sizes. Each endophenotype was used as the outcome variable in an independent GWAS. Endophenotypes were based on circulating concentrations of proteins that contributed significantly to a published blood-based predictive algorithm for AD. Endophenotypes included Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein 1 (MCP1), Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 (VCAM1), Pancreatic Polypeptide (PP), Beta2 Microglobulin (B2M), Factor VII (F7), Adiponectin (ADN) and Tenascin C (TN-C). Across the seven endophenotypes, 47 SNPs were associated with outcome with a p-value ≤1x10(-7). Each signal was further characterized with respect to known genetic loci associated with AD. Signals for several endophenotypes were observed in the vicinity of CR1, MS4A6A/MS4A4E, PICALM, CLU, and PTK2B. The strongest signal was observed in association with Factor VII levels and was located within the F7 gene. Additional signals were observed in MAP3K13, ZNF320, ATP9B and TREM1. Conditional regression analyses suggested that the SNPs contributed to variation in protein concentration independent of AD status. The identification of two putatively novel AD loci (in the Factor VII and ATP9B genes), which have not been located in previous studies despite massive sample sizes, highlights the benefits of an endophenotypic approach for resolving the genetic basis for complex diseases. The coincidence of several of the endophenotypic signals with known AD loci may point to novel

  11. Gene by Environment Interaction Linking the Chromosome 15q25 Locus With Cigarette Consumption and Lung Cancer Susceptibility--Are African American Affected Differently?

    PubMed

    Hopkins, R J; Young, R P

    2016-02-01

    The majority of lung cancer cases result from complex interactions between smoking exposure, genetic susceptibility and a person's immune response to chronic inflammation or lung remodelling. Epidemiological studies confirm that susceptibility to developing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), especially emphysema, is also closely linked to lung cancer susceptibility. Genetic epidemiology studies have consistently reported associations between the chromosome 15q25 locus with lung cancer and COPD. In addition, studies show this locus to be independently associated with cigarette consumption and nicotine addiction in a dose-response manner, primarily at lower levels of cigarette consumption. Studies that measure both cigarette consumption and lung function, together with extensive genotype analysis, will be needed to further unravel these complex relationships. PMID:27014742

  12. Deep sequencing of citrus affected by graft-transmissible diseases of unknown etiology leads to discovery of two novel viruses.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus is susceptible to graft-transmissible disease agents and to a number of arthropod-transmitted pathogens. Citrus cultivars vary greatly in susceptibility or tolerance to these pathogens. Furthermore, pathogenicity amongst pathogen strains also varies. Established tests for known disease agent...

  13. Genome-Wide Mapping of Susceptibility to Coronary Artery Disease Identifies a Novel Replicated Locus on Chromosome 17

    PubMed Central

    Peden, John F; Olsson, Per G; Clarke, Robert; Hellenius, Mai-Lis; Rust, Stephan; Lagercrantz, Jacob; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Schulte, Helmut; Carey, Alisoun; Olsson, Gunnar; Assmann, Gerd; Tognoni, Gianni; Collins, Rory; Hamsten, Anders; Watkins, Hugh

    2006-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of death world-wide, and most cases have a complex, multifactorial aetiology that includes a substantial heritable component. Identification of new genes involved in CAD may inform pathogenesis and provide new therapeutic targets. The PROCARDIS study recruited 2,658 affected sibling pairs (ASPs) with onset of CAD before age 66 y from four European countries to map susceptibility loci for CAD. ASPs were defined as having CAD phenotype if both had CAD, or myocardial infarction (MI) phenotype if both had a MI. In a first study, involving a genome-wide linkage screen, tentative loci were mapped to Chromosomes 3 and 11 with the CAD phenotype (1,464 ASPs), and to Chromosome 17 with the MI phenotype (739 ASPs). In a second study, these loci were examined with a dense panel of grid-tightening markers in an independent set of families (1,194 CAD and 344 MI ASPs). This replication study showed a significant result on Chromosome 17 (MI phenotype; p = 0.009 after adjustment for three independent replication tests). An exclusion analysis suggests that further genes of effect size λsib > 1.24 are unlikely to exist in these populations of European ancestry. To our knowledge, this is the first genome-wide linkage analysis to map, and replicate, a CAD locus. The region on Chromosome 17 provides a compelling target within which to identify novel genes underlying CAD. Understanding the genetic aetiology of CAD may lead to novel preventative and/or therapeutic strategies. PMID:16710446

  14. Association between TLR2 and TLR4 Gene Polymorphisms and the Susceptibility to Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiuping; Zhang, Wei; Han, Zelong; Liu, Side

    2015-01-01

    Background The associations between toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and toll-like receptor 4(TLR4) polymorphisms and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) susceptibility remain controversial. A meta-analysis was performed to assess these associations. Methods A systematic search was performed to identify all relevant studies relating TLR2 and TLR4 polymorphisms and IBD susceptibility. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Subgroup analyses were performed by ethnicity and publication quality. Results Thirty-eight eligible studies, assessing 10970 cases and 7061 controls were included. No TLR2 Arg677Trp polymorphism was found. No significant association was observed between TLR2 Arg753Gln polymorphism and Crohn’s disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) in all genetic models. Interestingly, TLR4 Asp299Gly polymorphism was significantly associated with increased risk of CD and UC in all genetic models, except for the additive one in CD. In addition, a statistically significant association between TLR4 Asp299Gly polymorphism and IBD was observed among high quality studies evaluating Caucasians, but not Asians. Associations between TLR4 Thr399Ile polymorphisms and CD risk were found only in the allele and dominant models. The TLR4 Thr399Ile polymorphism was associated with UC risk in pooled results as well as subgroup analysis of high quality publications assessing Caucasians, in allele and dominant models. Conclusions The meta-analysis provides evidence that TLR2 Arg753Gln is not associated with CD and UC susceptibility in Asians; TLR4 Asp299Gly is associated with CD and UC susceptibility in Caucasians, but not Asians. TLR4 Thr399Ile may be associated with IBD susceptibility in Caucasians only. Additional well-powered studies of Asp299Gly and other TLR4 variants are warranted. PMID:26023918

  15. Differential susceptibility in youth: evidence that 5-HTTLPR x positive parenting is associated with positive affect ‘for better and worse'

    PubMed Central

    Hankin, B L; Nederhof, E; Oppenheimer, C W; Jenness, J; Young, J F; Abela, J R Z; Smolen, A; Ormel, J; Oldehinkel, A J

    2011-01-01

    Positive affect has been implicated in the phenomenological experience of various psychiatric disorders, vulnerability to develop psychopathology and overall socio-emotional functioning. However, developmental influences that may contribute to positive affect have been understudied. Here, we studied youths' 5-HTTLPR genotype and rearing environment (degree of positive and supportive parenting) to investigate the differential susceptibility hypothesis (DSH) that youth carrying short alleles of 5-HTTLPR would be more influenced and responsive to supportive and unsupportive parenting, and would exhibit higher and lower positive affect, respectively. Three independent studies tested this gene–environment interaction (GxE) in children and adolescents (age range 9–15 years; total N=1874). In study 1 (N=307; 54% girls), positive/supportive parenting was assessed via parent report, in study 2 (N=197; 58% girls) via coded observations of parent–child interactions in the laboratory and in study 3 (N=1370; 53% girls) via self report. Results from all the three studies showed that youth homozygous for the functional short allele of 5-HTTLPR were more responsive to parenting as environmental context in a ‘for better and worse' manner. Specifically, the genetically susceptible youth (that is, S'S' group) who experienced unsupportive, non-positive parenting exhibited low levels of positive affect, whereas higher levels of positive affect were reported by genetically susceptible youth under supportive and positive parenting conditions. These GxE findings are consistent with the DSH and may inform etiological models and interventions in developmental psychopathology focused on positive emotion, parenting and genetic susceptibility. PMID:22833190

  16. The Quorum Sensing Inhibitor Hamamelitannin Increases Antibiotic Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms by Affecting Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis and eDNA Release

    PubMed Central

    Brackman, Gilles; Breyne, Koen; De Rycke, Riet; Vermote, Arno; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Meyer, Evelyne; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Coenye, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections has become increasingly challenging due to the rapid emergence and dissemination of methicillin-resistant strains. In addition, S. aureus reside within biofilms at the site of infection. Few novel antibacterial agents have been developed in recent years and their bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity results in selective pressure, inevitably inducing antimicrobial resistance. Consequently, innovative antimicrobials with other modes of action are urgently needed. One alternative approach is targeting the bacterial quorum sensing (QS) system. Hamamelitannin (2′,5-di-O-galloyl-d-hamamelose; HAM) was previously suggested to block QS through the TraP QS system and was shown to increase S. aureus biofilm susceptibility towards vancomycin (VAN) although mechanistic insights are still lacking. In the present study we provide evidence that HAM specifically affects S. aureus biofilm susceptibility through the TraP receptor by affecting cell wall synthesis and extracellular DNA release of S. aureus. We further provide evidence that HAM can increase the susceptibility of S. aureus biofilms towards different classes of antibiotics in vitro. Finally, we show that HAM increases the susceptibility of S. aureus to antibiotic treatment in in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans and mouse mammary gland infection models. PMID:26828772

  17. Impaired Antiviral Stress Granule and IFN-β Enhanceosome Formation Enhances Susceptibility to Influenza Infection in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Alan C-Y; Parsons, Kristy; Moheimani, Fatemeh; Knight, Darryl A; Hansbro, Philip M; Fujita, Takashi; Wark, Peter A

    2016-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a serious lung disease that progressively worsens lung function. Those affected are highly susceptible to influenza virus infections that result in exacerbations with exaggerated symptoms with increased mortality. The mechanisms underpinning this increased susceptibility to infection in COPD are unclear. In this study, we show that primary bronchial epithelial cells (pBECs) from subjects with COPD have impaired induction of type I IFN (IFN-β) and lead to heightened viral replication after influenza viral infection. COPD pBECs have reduced protein levels of protein kinase (PK) R and decreased formation of PKR-mediated antiviral stress granules, which are critical in initiating type I IFN inductions. In addition, reduced protein expression of p300 resulted in decreased activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 and subsequent formation of IFN-β enhanceosome in COPD pBECs. The decreased p300 induction was the result of enhanced levels of microRNA (miR)-132. Ectopic expression of PKR or miR-132 antagomiR alone failed to restore IFN-β induction, whereas cotreatment increased antiviral stress granule formation, induction of p300, and IFN-β in COPD pBECs. This study reveals that decreased induction of both PKR and p300 proteins contribute to impaired induction of IFN-β in COPD pBECs upon influenza infection. PMID:26807508

  18. Genetic variants in PLCB4/PLCB1 as susceptibility loci for coronary artery aneurysm formation in Kawasaki disease in Han Chinese in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ying-Ju; Chang, Jeng-Sheng; Liu, Xiang; Tsang, Hsinyi; Chien, Wen-Kuei; Chen, Jin-Hua; Hsieh, Hsin-Yang; Hsueh, Kai-Chung; Shiao, Yi-Tzone; Li, Ju-Pi; Lin, Cheng-Wen; Lai, Chih-Ho; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Lin, Ting-Hsu; Liao, Chiu-Chu; Huang, Shao-Mei; Lan, Yu-Ching; Ho, Tsung-Jung; Liang, Wen-Miin; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Lin, Jung-Chun; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute, inflammatory, and self-limited vasculitis affecting infants and young children. Coronary artery aneurysm (CAA) formation is the major complication of KD and the leading cause of acquired cardiovascular disease among children. To identify susceptible loci that might predispose patients with KD to CAA formation, a genome-wide association screen was performed in a Taiwanese KD cohort. Patients with both KD and CAA had longer fever duration and delayed intravenous immunoglobulin treatment time. After adjusting for these factors, 100 susceptibility loci were identified. Four genes were identified from a single cluster of 35 using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) Knowledge Base. Silencing KCNQ5, PLCB1, PLCB4, and PLCL1 inhibited the effect of lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial cell inflammation with varying degrees of proinflammatory cytokine expression. PLCB1 showed the most significant inhibition. Endothelial cell inflammation was also inhibited by using a phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor. The single nucleotide polymorphism rs6140791 was identified between PLCB4 and PLCB1. Plasma PLC levels were higher in patients with KD and CC+CG rs6140791genotypes, and these genotypes were more prevalent in patients with KD who also had CAA. Our results suggest that polymorphism of the PLCB4/B1 genes might be involved in the CAA pathogenesis of KD. PMID:26434682

  19. Dissection of a Complex Disease Susceptibility Region Using a Bayesian Stochastic Search Approach to Fine Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Chris; Cutler, Antony J; Pontikos, Nikolas; Pekalski, Marcin L; Burren, Oliver S; Cooper, Jason D; García, Arcadio Rubio; Ferreira, Ricardo C; Guo, Hui; Walker, Neil M; Smyth, Deborah J; Rich, Stephen S; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Sawcer, Stephen J; Ban, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Identification of candidate causal variants in regions associated with risk of common diseases is complicated by linkage disequilibrium (LD) and multiple association signals. Nonetheless, accurate maps of these variants are needed, both to fully exploit detailed cell specific chromatin annotation data to highlight disease causal mechanisms and cells, and for design of the functional studies that will ultimately be required to confirm causal mechanisms. We adapted a Bayesian evolutionary stochastic search algorithm to the fine mapping problem, and demonstrated its improved performance over conventional stepwise and regularised regression through simulation studies. We then applied it to fine map the established multiple sclerosis (MS) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) associations in the IL-2RA (CD25) gene region. For T1D, both stepwise and stochastic search approaches identified four T1D association signals, with the major effect tagged by the single nucleotide polymorphism, rs12722496. In contrast, for MS, the stochastic search found two distinct competing models: a single candidate causal variant, tagged by rs2104286 and reported previously using stepwise analysis; and a more complex model with two association signals, one of which was tagged by the major T1D associated rs12722496 and the other by rs56382813. There is low to moderate LD between rs2104286 and both rs12722496 and rs56382813 (r2 ≃ 0:3) and our two SNP model could not be recovered through a forward stepwise search after conditioning on rs2104286. Both signals in the two variant model for MS affect CD25 expression on distinct subpopulations of CD4+ T cells, which are key cells in the autoimmune process. The results support a shared causal variant for T1D and MS. Our study illustrates the benefit of using a purposely designed model search strategy for fine mapping and the advantage of combining disease and protein expression data. PMID:26106896

  20. Dissection of a Complex Disease Susceptibility Region Using a Bayesian Stochastic Search Approach to Fine Mapping.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Chris; Cutler, Antony J; Pontikos, Nikolas; Pekalski, Marcin L; Burren, Oliver S; Cooper, Jason D; García, Arcadio Rubio; Ferreira, Ricardo C; Guo, Hui; Walker, Neil M; Smyth, Deborah J; Rich, Stephen S; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Sawcer, Stephen J; Ban, Maria; Richardson, Sylvia; Todd, John A; Wicker, Linda S

    2015-06-01

    Identification of candidate causal variants in regions associated with risk of common diseases is complicated by linkage disequilibrium (LD) and multiple association signals. Nonetheless, accurate maps of these variants are needed, both to fully exploit detailed cell specific chromatin annotation data to highlight disease causal mechanisms and cells, and for design of the functional studies that will ultimately be required to confirm causal mechanisms. We adapted a Bayesian evolutionary stochastic search algorithm to the fine mapping problem, and demonstrated its improved performance over conventional stepwise and regularised regression through simulation studies. We then applied it to fine map the established multiple sclerosis (MS) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) associations in the IL-2RA (CD25) gene region. For T1D, both stepwise and stochastic search approaches identified four T1D association signals, with the major effect tagged by the single nucleotide polymorphism, rs12722496. In contrast, for MS, the stochastic search found two distinct competing models: a single candidate causal variant, tagged by rs2104286 and reported previously using stepwise analysis; and a more complex model with two association signals, one of which was tagged by the major T1D associated rs12722496 and the other by rs56382813. There is low to moderate LD between rs2104286 and both rs12722496 and rs56382813 (r2 ≃ 0:3) and our two SNP model could not be recovered through a forward stepwise search after conditioning on rs2104286. Both signals in the two variant model for MS affect CD25 expression on distinct subpopulations of CD4+ T cells, which are key cells in the autoimmune process. The results support a shared causal variant for T1D and MS. Our study illustrates the benefit of using a purposely designed model search strategy for fine mapping and the advantage of combining disease and protein expression data. PMID:26106896

  1. Molecular epidemiology of penicillin-non-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates from children with invasive pneumococcal disease in Germany.

    PubMed

    Reinert, R R; van der Linden, M; Seegmüller, I; Al-Lahham, A; Siedler, A; Weissmann, B; Toschke, A M; von Kries, R

    2007-04-01

    A population-based nationwide surveillance of antibiotic resistance associated with invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in children and adolescents (aged<16 years) was performed in Germany between 1997 and 2004. In total, 1517 isolates were collected, of which 5.1% and 1.1% were intermediately- or fully-resistant, respectively, to penicillin G. During the 8-year study period, an increase in resistance to both penicillin G and erythromycin A was observed, and the frequency of isolates exhibiting reduced susceptibility to penicillin G or erythromycin A increased from 1.4% and 11.1%, respectively, in 1997, to 8.7% and 29.0%, respectively, in 2004. Among the penicillin non-susceptible pneumococcal isolates, serotypes 14 (24.5% of isolates), 23F (16.0%) and 6B (16.0%) were found most frequently. Multilocus sequence typing of 58 (62%) penicillin G non-susceptible isolates revealed that sequence type (ST) 156 (Spain9V-3 clone) and its single-locus variant ST 557 were widespread in Germany. Moreover, 17 new penicillin G non-susceptible STs were defined for the first time. The study illustrated the genetic heterogeneity of antibiotic-resistant pneumococcal isolates in Germany. PMID:17359319

  2. Linking Susceptibility to Infectious Diseases to Immune System Abnormalities among HIV-Exposed Uninfected Infants.

    PubMed

    Ruck, Candice; Reikie, Brian A; Marchant, Arnaud; Kollmann, Tobias R; Kakkar, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) infants experience increased overall mortality from infectious causes when compared to HIV-unexposed uninfected (HU) infants. This is the case in both the resource-rich and resource-limited settings. Here, we explore the concept that specific types of infectious diseases that are more common among HEU infants could provide clues as to the potential underlying immunological abnormalities. The most commonly reported infections in HEU vs. HU infants are caused by encapsulated bacteria, suggesting the existence of a less effective humoral (antibody, complement) immune response. Decreased transplacental transfer of protective maternal antibodies has consistently been observed among HEU newborns, suggesting that this may indeed be one of the key drivers of their susceptibility to infections with encapsulated bacteria. Reassuringly, HEU humoral response to vaccination appears to be well conserved. While there appears to be an increase in overall incidence of acute viral infections, no specific pattern of acute viral infections has emerged; and although there is evidence of increased chronic viral infection from perinatal transmission of hepatitis C and cytomegalovirus, no data exist to suggest an increase in adverse outcomes. Thus, no firm conclusions about antiviral effector mechanisms can be drawn. However, the most unusual of reported infections among the HEU have been opportunistic infections, suggesting the possibility of underlying defects in CD4 helper T cells and overall immune regulatory function. This may relate to the observation that the immunological profile of HEUs indicates a more activated T cell profile as well as a more inflammatory innate immune response. However, both of these observations appear transient, marked in early infancy, but no longer evident later in life. The causes of these early-life changes in immune profiles are likely multifactorial and may be related to in utero exposure to HIV, but also to increased

  3. Linking Susceptibility to Infectious Diseases to Immune System Abnormalities among HIV-Exposed Uninfected Infants

    PubMed Central

    Ruck, Candice; Reikie, Brian A.; Marchant, Arnaud; Kollmann, Tobias R.; Kakkar, Fatima

    2016-01-01

    HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) infants experience increased overall mortality from infectious causes when compared to HIV-unexposed uninfected (HU) infants. This is the case in both the resource-rich and resource-limited settings. Here, we explore the concept that specific types of infectious diseases that are more common among HEU infants could provide clues as to the potential underlying immunological abnormalities. The most commonly reported infections in HEU vs. HU infants are caused by encapsulated bacteria, suggesting the existence of a less effective humoral (antibody, complement) immune response. Decreased transplacental transfer of protective maternal antibodies has consistently been observed among HEU newborns, suggesting that this may indeed be one of the key drivers of their susceptibility to infections with encapsulated bacteria. Reassuringly, HEU humoral response to vaccination appears to be well conserved. While there appears to be an increase in overall incidence of acute viral infections, no specific pattern of acute viral infections has emerged; and although there is evidence of increased chronic viral infection from perinatal transmission of hepatitis C and cytomegalovirus, no data exist to suggest an increase in adverse outcomes. Thus, no firm conclusions about antiviral effector mechanisms can be drawn. However, the most unusual of reported infections among the HEU have been opportunistic infections, suggesting the possibility of underlying defects in CD4 helper T cells and overall immune regulatory function. This may relate to the observation that the immunological profile of HEUs indicates a more activated T cell profile as well as a more inflammatory innate immune response. However, both of these observations appear transient, marked in early infancy, but no longer evident later in life. The causes of these early-life changes in immune profiles are likely multifactorial and may be related to in utero exposure to HIV, but also to increased

  4. iGWAS: Integrative Genome-Wide Association Studies of Genetic and Genomic Data for Disease Susceptibility Using Mediation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Tsung; Liang, Liming; Moffatt, Miriam F; Cookson, William O C M; Lin, Xihong

    2015-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been a standard practice in identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for disease susceptibility. We propose a new approach, termed integrative GWAS (iGWAS) that exploits the information of gene expressions to investigate the mechanisms of the association of SNPs with a disease phenotype, and to incorporate the family-based design for genetic association studies. Specifically, the relations among SNPs, gene expression, and disease are modeled within the mediation analysis framework, which allows us to disentangle the genetic effect on a disease phenotype into two parts: an effect mediated through a gene expression (mediation effect, ME) and an effect through other biological mechanisms or environment-mediated mechanisms (alternative effect, AE). We develop omnibus tests for the ME and AE that are robust to underlying true disease models. Numerical studies show that the iGWAS approach is able to facilitate discovering genetic association mechanisms, and outperforms the SNP-only method for testing genetic associations. We conduct a family-based iGWAS of childhood asthma that integrates genetic and genomic data. The iGWAS approach identifies six novel susceptibility genes (MANEA, MRPL53, LYCAT, ST8SIA4, NDFIP1, and PTCH1) using the omnibus test with false discovery rate less than 1%, whereas no gene using SNP-only analyses survives with the same cut-off. The iGWAS analyses further characterize that genetic effects of these genes are mostly mediated through their gene expressions. In summary, the iGWAS approach provides a new analytic framework to investigate the mechanism of genetic etiology, and identifies novel susceptibility genes of childhood asthma that were biologically meaningful. PMID:25997986

  5. iGWAS: Integrative Genome-Wide Association Studies of Genetic and Genomic Data for Disease Susceptibility Using Mediation Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yen-Tsung; Liang, Liang; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Cookson, William O. C. M.; Lin, Xihong

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been a standard practice in identifying single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for disease susceptibility. We propose a new approach, termed integrative GWAS (iGWAS) that exploits the information of gene expressions to investigate the mechanisms of the association of SNPs with a disease phenotype, and to incorporate the family-based design for genetic association studies. Specifically, the relations among SNPs, gene expression, and disease are modeled within the mediation analysis framework, which allows us to disentangle the genetic effect on a disease phenotype into two parts: an effect mediated through a gene expression (mediation effect, ME) and an effect through other biological mechanisms or environment-mediated mechanisms (alternative effect, AE). We develop omnibus tests for the ME and AE that are robust to underlying true disease models. Numerical studies show that the iGWAS approach is able to facilitate discovering genetic association mechanisms, and outperforms the SNP-only method for testing genetic associations. We conduct a family-based iGWAS of childhood asthma that integrates genetic and genomic data. The iGWAS approach identifies six novel susceptibility genes (MANEA, MRPL53, LYCAT, ST8SIA4, NDFIP1, and PTCH1) using the omnibus test with false discovery rate less than 1%, whereas no gene using SNP-only analyses survives with the same cut-off. The iGWAS analyses further characterize that genetic effects of these genes are mostly mediated through their gene expressions. In summary, the iGWAS approach provides a new analytic framework to investigate the mechanism of genetic etiology, and identifies novel susceptibility genes of childhood asthma that were biologically meaningful. PMID:25997986

  6. Two-locus admixture linkage analysis of bipolar and unipolar affective disorder supports the presence of susceptibility loci on chromosomes 11p15 and 21q22

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, C.; Kalsi, G.; O`Neill, J.

    1997-02-01

    Following a report of a linkage study that yielded evidence for a susceptibility locus for bipolar affective disorder on the long arm of chromosome 21, we studied 23 multiply affected pedigrees collected from Iceland and the UK, using the markers PFKL, D21S171, and D21S49. Counting only bipolar cases as affected, a two-point LOD of 1.28 was obtained using D21S171 ({theta} = 0.01, {alpha} = 0.35), with three Icelandic families producing LODs of 0.63, 0.62, and 1.74 (all at {theta} = 0.0). Affected sib pair analysis demonstrated increased allele sharing at D21S171 (P = 0.001) when unipolar cases were also considered affected. The same set of pedigrees had previously been typed for a tyrosine hydroxylase gene (TH) polymorphism at 11p15 and had shown some moderate evidence for linkage. When information from TH and the 21q markers was combined in a two-locus admixture analysis, an overall admixture LOD of 3.87 was obtained using the bipolar affection model. Thus the data are compatible with the hypothesis that a locus at or near TH influences susceptibility in some pedigrees, while a locus near D21S171 is active in others. Similar analyses in other datasets should be carried out to confirm or refute our tentative finding. 66 refs., 3 tabs.

  7. Disease painting or painting disease: how does illness and hospitalisation affect children's artistry?

    PubMed

    Bayrakci, Benan; Forouz, Aria; Sahin, Ahmet B; Abali, Mustafa; Aliyeva, Gyulten Z

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous speculations about famous artists and how their perception was affected by their medical conditions. In this study, we examined how illness and hospitalisation affect children's art. A total of 157 paintings by 122 hospitalised children were interpreted by three reputed artists. Works of ill children were compared with those of a control group from an international art exhibition. We also comment on how diseases influenced the technique of famous artists to further examine the possible impact of illness on the artistry of hospitalised children. Developmental delay in painting was evident in the study group. Use of ready-made schemas was a common practice (55%). 56% of the work from patients older than eight years failed in perspective and site perception. The theme in 89% of the drawings had no human figures. Projection of self sufferings, prominent elementary lines, and reflection of distorted perception could be clearly recognised in various study materials; anxiety about assigned surgery was exhibited by scribbling. There exists a close relationship between medicine and humanities. The interpretation of fine art from a medical perspective may help to increase our appreciation of the suffering of an individual. It is obvious that diseases change the artistic style and inner perspective. The question is how do healthcare specialists view this? PMID:20120269

  8. Infectious Diseases Affect Marine Fisheries and Aquaculture Economics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Harvell, C. Drew; Conrad, Jon M.; Friedman, Carolyn S.; Kent, Michael L.; Kuris, Armand M.; Powell, Eric N.; Rondeau, Daniel; Saksida, Sonja M.

    2015-01-01

    Seafood is a growing part of the economy, but its economic value is diminished by marine diseases. Infectious diseases are common in the ocean, and here we tabulate 67 examples that can reduce commercial species' growth and survivorship or decrease seafood quality. These impacts seem most problematic in the stressful and crowded conditions of aquaculture, which increasingly dominates seafood production as wild fishery production plateaus. For instance, marine diseases of farmed oysters, shrimp, abalone, and various fishes, particularly Atlantic salmon, cost billions of dollars each year. In comparison, it is often difficult to accurately estimate disease impacts on wild populations, especially those of pelagic and subtidal species. Farmed species often receive infectious diseases from wild species and can, in turn, export infectious agents to wild species. However, the impact of disease export on wild fisheries is controversial because there are few quantitative data demonstrating that wild species near farms suffer more from infectious diseases than those in other areas. The movement of exotic infectious agents to new areas continues to be the greatest concern.

  9. Infectious diseases affect marine fisheries and aquaculture economics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.; Harvell, C. Drew; Conrad, Jon M.; Friedman, Carolyn S.; Kent, Michael L.; Kuris, Armand M.; Powell, Eric N.; Rondeau, Daniel; Saksida, Sonja M.

    2015-01-01

    Seafood is a growing part of the economy, but its economic value is diminished by marine diseases. Infectious diseases are common in the ocean, and here we tabulate 67 examples that can reduce commercial species' growth and survivorship or decrease seafood quality. These impacts seem most problematic in the stressful and crowded conditions of aquaculture, which increasingly dominates seafood production as wild fishery production plateaus. For instance, marine diseases of farmed oysters, shrimp, abalone, and various fishes, particularly Atlantic salmon, cost billions of dollars each year. In comparison, it is often difficult to accurately estimate disease impacts on wild populations, especially those of pelagic and subtidal species. Farmed species often receive infectious diseases from wild species and can, in turn, export infectious agents to wild species. However, the impact of disease export on wild fisheries is controversial because there are few quantitative data demonstrating that wild species near farms suffer more from infectious diseases than those in other areas. The movement of exotic infectious agents to new areas continues to be the greatest concern.

  10. Serum Leukocyte Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor A3 (LILRA3) Is Increased in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis and Is a Strong Independent Indicator of Disease Severity; 6.7kbp LILRA3 Gene Deletion Is Not Associated with Diseases Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    An, Hongyan; Lim, Chai; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Vollmer-Conna, Ute; Rawlinson, William; Bryant, Katherine; Tedla, Nicodemus

    2016-01-01

    Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor A3 (LILRA3) is a soluble immune regulatory molecule primarily expressed by monocytes and macrophages. A homozygous 6.7kbp LILRA3 gene deletion that removes the first seven of its eight exons is predicted to lead to lack of LILRA3 protein, although this has not been experimentally confirmed. Moreover, there are conflicting results with regards to the link between the LILRA3 homozygous genetic deletion and susceptibility to multiple sclerosis (MS) in different European populations. The aim of this study was to investigate whether LILRA3 gene deletion is associated with MS susceptibility in a North American cohort of European ancestry and assess if serum LILRA3 protein level is a marker of clinical subtype and/or disease severity in MS. A total of 456 patients with MS and 99 unrelated healthy controls were genotyped for the 6.7kbp LILRA3 gene deletion and levels of LILRA3 protein in sera determined by in-house sandwich ELISA. We showed that LILRA3 gene deletion was not associated with MS susceptibility and did not affect the age of disease onset, clinical subtype or disease severity. However, we discovered for the first time that homozygous LILRA3 gene deletion results in lack of production of LILRA3 protein. Importantly, LILRA3 protein level was significantly increased in sera of patients with MS when compared with control subjects, particularly in more severe type primary progressive MS. Multiple regression analysis showed that LILRA3 level in serum was one of the strongest independent markers of disease severity in MS, which potentially can be used as a diagnostic marker. PMID:26871720

  11. TNF-α gene polymorphisms: association with disease susceptibility and response to anti-TNF-α treatment in psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Murdaca, Giuseppe; Gulli, Rossella; Spanò, Francesca; Lantieri, Francesca; Burlando, Martina; Parodi, Aurora; Mandich, Paola; Puppo, Francesco

    2014-10-01

    The tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) gene has been proposed as a major candidate gene in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). TNF-α is a therapeutic target for patients responding poorly to conventional treatments. We investigated the role of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at positions -238, -308, and +489 of the TNF-α gene in the genetic susceptibility to PsA, in the severity of the disease, and, finally, in the response to TNF-α inhibitors (adalimumab, etanercept, or infliximab). Fifty-seven Caucasian PsA patients and 155 healthy matched controls were studied. The SNP +489 variant allele A was significantly associated with PsA susceptibility (P=0.0136) and severity of clinical (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score, American College of Rheumatology criteria, Disease Activity Score 28, and Disability Index Health Assessment Questionnaire) and laboratory (C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate) parameters (P-values ranging from 0.016 to 2.908 × 10(-12)). The difference in severity was accounted for by the differences between the AA and GA genotypes with respect to the GG genotype. The SNP +489A allele shows a trend of association with the response to PsA treatment with etanercept. These findings suggest a role of the SNP +489A allele in the susceptibility and severity of PsA. PMID:24594669

  12. Identification of Genetic Loci Affecting the Severity of Symptoms of Hirschsprung Disease in Rats Carrying Ednrbsl Mutations by Quantitative Trait Locus Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Torigoe, Daisuke; Lei, Chuzhao; Lan, Xianyong; Chen, Hong; Sasaki, Nobuya; Wang, Jinxi; Agui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Hirschsprung’s disease (HSCR) is a congenital disease in neonates characterized by the absence of the enteric ganglia in a variable length of the distal colon. This disease results from multiple genetic interactions that modulate the ability of enteric neural crest cells to populate developing gut. We previously reported that three rat strains with different backgrounds (susceptible AGH-Ednrbsl/sl, resistant F344-Ednrbsl/sl, and LEH-Ednrbsl/sl) but the same null mutation of Ednrb show varying severity degrees of aganglionosis. This finding suggests that strain-specific genetic factors affect the severity of HSCR. Consistent with this finding, a quantitative trait locus (QTL) for the severity of HSCR on chromosome (Chr) 2 was identified using an F2 intercross between AGH and F344 strains. In the present study, we performed QTL analysis using an F2 intercross between the susceptible AGH and resistant LEH strains to identify the modifier/resistant loci for HSCR in Ednrb-deficient rats. A significant locus affecting the severity of HSCR was also detected within the Chr 2 region. These findings strongly suggest that a modifier gene of aganglionosis exists on Chr 2. In addition, two potentially causative SNPs (or mutations) were detected upstream of a known HSCR susceptibility gene, Gdnf. These SNPs were possibly responsible for the varied length of gut affected by aganglionosis. PMID:25790447

  13. High temperature and temperature variation undermine future disease susceptibility in a population of the invasive garden ant Lasius neglectus.

    PubMed

    Pamminger, Tobias; Steier, Thomas; Tragust, Simon

    2016-06-01

    Environmental temperature and temperature variation can have strong effects on the outcome of host-parasite interactions. Whilst such effects have been reported for different host systems, long-term consequences of pre-infection temperatures on host susceptibility and immunity remain understudied. Here, we show that experiencing both a biologically relevant increase in temperature and temperature variation undermines future disease susceptibility of the invasive garden ant Lasius neglectus when challenged with a pathogen under a constant temperature regime. In light of the economic and ecological importance of many social insects, our results emphasise the necessity to take the hosts' temperature history into account when studying host-parasite interactions under both natural and laboratory conditions, especially in the face of global change. PMID:27206570

  14. Associations between HIF-1α polymorphisms C1772T and G1790A and susceptibility to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Wei, W T; Li, B; Chen, M; Jia, H R; Zhang, H X

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we examined whether hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) polymorphisms are associated with the susceptibility to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). One hundred and twenty patients with COPD and 112 healthy controls were recruited from the Han population in Southern China. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was used to assess the C1772T and G1790A polymorphisms in the HIF-1α gene, and differences in genotypes between the 2 groups were compared. No significant difference in the distribution of the C1772T polymorphism was observed between COPD cases and healthy controls (P > 0.05). In contrast, the distribution of the G1790A polymorphism was significantly different between the 2 groups (P < 0.05). Our results indicated that the HIF-1α G1790A polymorphism was associated with an increased susceptibility to COPD in Han subjects from Southern China. PMID:26782374

  15. High temperature and temperature variation undermine future disease susceptibility in a population of the invasive garden ant Lasius neglectus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamminger, Tobias; Steier, Thomas; Tragust, Simon

    2016-06-01

    Environmental temperature and temperature variation can have strong effects on the outcome of host-parasite interactions. Whilst such effects have been reported for different host systems, long-term consequences of pre-infection temperatures on host susceptibility and immunity remain understudied. Here, we show that experiencing both a biologically relevant increase in temperature and temperature variation undermines future disease susceptibility of the invasive garden ant Lasius neglectus when challenged with a pathogen under a constant temperature regime. In light of the economic and ecological importance of many social insects, our results emphasise the necessity to take the hosts' temperature history into account when studying host-parasite interactions under both natural and laboratory conditions, especially in the face of global change.

  16. Abnormalities in the handling of intracellular bacteria in Crohn's disease: a link between infectious etiology and host genetic susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Anne-Lise; Darfeuille-Michaud, Arlette

    2008-01-01

    The etiology of Crohn's disease (CD) is still poorly understood, but recent advances have highlighted the importance of the innate immune system and the critical relationship between the gut flora and the intestinal mucosa. Several combinations of genetic factors predisposing to CD have been described, with the most significant replicable associations including genes for intracellular receptors of bacterial cell walls (NOD2/CARD15) and for bacterial clearance and antigen processing via autophagy (ATG16L1 and IRGM). One theoretical link between susceptibility genes NOD2/CARD15, ATG16L1, and IRGM is that CD is primarily induced by the presence of a dysfunctional immunological response to persistent infection by intracellular bacterial pathogens such as Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis or adherent-invasive Escherichia coli, both first-rank candidates on the basis of host genetic susceptibility, which concerns impaired functions in the defense against intracellular bacteria. PMID:18726145

  17. Melaleuca quinquenervia plants differ in susceptibility towards fungus Puccinia psidii infection and disease development.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Puccinia psidii (rust fungus) attacks immature healthy foliage of Melaleuca quinquenervia (melaleuca), an invasive plant in southern Florida, U.S.A. Melaleuca plants grown under same growing conditions manifest either susceptible or resistant reactions towards this fungus. We hypothesize that the va...

  18. Cardiovascular Disease as a Risk Factor for Enhanced Susceptibility to Air Pollutants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse health effects caused by airborne particular matter (PM) are restricted primarily to susceptible populations. The actual risk of anyone individual is quite small, but because of the large number of exposed people, the overall population risk is significant. Ferreting out ...

  19. Antimicrobial Drug Susceptibility of Bacteria Isolated from Disease Processes in Cattle, Horses, Dogs and Cats

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, J. F.; Gannon, V. P.; Kittler, G.; Hlywka, G.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented of antimicrobial disc diffusion susceptibility testing on commonly isolated bacterial pathogens made at the Ontario Veterinary College Diagnostic Bacteriology Laboratory in 1981 and 1982. Nearly 2 000 isolates from horses, cattle, dogs and cats were tested. Comparison of resistance in the same bacterial species isolated from different animal species showed significant differences between some of the same antibiotics. PMID:17422428

  20. COMPARATIVE PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF STEM TISSUE AND XYLEM SAP FROM PIERCE'S DISEASE RESISTANT AND SUSCEPTIBLE GRAPEVINES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Analyses of host plant resistance / susceptibility mechanisms to Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) infection are critical for understanding host-pathogen interactions. Proteomic analyses of stem tissue and xylem sap samples were initiated to complement genomic approaches employed in elucidating Pierce’s Dise...

  1. Environmental factors affecting inflammatory bowel disease: have we made progress?

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is only partially understood; various environmental and host (e.g. genetic, epithelial, immune, and nonimmune) factors are involved. The critical role for environmental factors is strongly supported by recent worldwide trends in IBD epidemiology. One important environmental factor is smoking. A meta-analysis partially confirms previous findings that smoking was found to be protective against ulcerative colitis and, after the onset of the disease, might improve its course, decreasing the need for colectomy. In contrast, smoking increases the risk of developing Crohn's disease and aggravates its course. The history of IBD is dotted by cyclic reports on the isolation of specific infectious agents responsible for Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. The more recently published cold chain hypothesis is providing an even broader platform by linking dietary factors and microbial agents. An additional, recent theory has suggested a breakdown in the balance between putative species of 'protective' versus 'harmful' intestinal bacteria - this concept has been termed dysbiosis resulting in decreased bacterial diversity. Other factors such as oral contraceptive use, appendectomy, dietary factors (e.g. refined sugar, fat, and fast food), perinatal events, and childhood infections have also been associated with both diseases, but their role is more controversial. Nonetheless, there is no doubt that economic development, leading to improved hygiene and other changes in lifestyle ('westernized lifestyle') may play a role in the increase in IBD. This review article focuses on the role of environmental factors in the pathogenesis and progression of IBDs. PMID:19786744

  2. Temporal transcriptome changes induced by MDV in Marek's disease-resistant and -susceptible inbred chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mareks disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease in chickens caused by Marek's disease virus (MDV) and characterized by T cell lymphoma and infiltration of lymphoid cells into various organs such as liver, spleen, peripheral nerves and muscle. Resistance to MD and disease risk have long been tho...

  3. Dissecting direct and indirect genetic effects on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Siedlinski, Mateusz; Tingley, Dustin; Lipman, Peter J; Cho, Michael H; Litonjua, Augusto A; Sparrow, David; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A; Anderson, Wayne; Kong, Xiangyang; Rennard, Stephen I; Beaty, Terri H; Hokanson, John E; Crapo, James D; Lange, Christoph; Silverman, Edwin K

    2013-04-01

    Cigarette smoking is the major environmental risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Genome-wide association studies have provided compelling associations for three loci with COPD. In this study, we aimed to estimate direct, i.e., independent from smoking, and indirect effects of those loci on COPD development using mediation analysis. We included a total of 3,424 COPD cases and 1,872 unaffected controls with data on two smoking-related phenotypes: lifetime average smoking intensity and cumulative exposure to tobacco smoke (pack years). Our analysis revealed that effects of two linked variants (rs1051730 and rs8034191) in the AGPHD1/CHRNA3 cluster on COPD development are significantly, yet not entirely, mediated by the smoking-related phenotypes. Approximately 30% of the total effect of variants in the AGPHD1/CHRNA3 cluster on COPD development was mediated by pack years. Simultaneous analysis of modestly (r (2) = 0.21) linked markers in CHRNA3 and IREB2 revealed that an even larger (~42%) proportion of the total effect of the CHRNA3 locus on COPD was mediated by pack years after adjustment for an IREB2 single nucleotide polymorphism. This study confirms the existence of direct effects of the AGPHD1/CHRNA3, IREB2, FAM13A and HHIP loci on COPD development. While the association of the AGPHD1/CHRNA3 locus with COPD is significantly mediated by smoking-related phenotypes, IREB2 appears to affect COPD independently of smoking. PMID:23299987

  4. Dissecting direct and indirect genetic effects on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Siedlinski, Mateusz; Tingley, Dustin; Lipman, Peter J.; Cho, Michael H.; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Sparrow, David; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A.; Anderson, Wayne; Kong, Xiangyang; Rennard, Stephen I.; Beaty, Terri H.; Hokanson, John E.; Crapo, James D.; Lange, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the major environmental risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Genome-wide association studies have provided compelling associations for three loci with COPD. In this study, we aimed to estimate direct, i.e., independent from smoking, and indirect effects of those loci on COPD development using mediation analysis. We included a total of 3,424 COPD cases and 1,872 unaffected controls with data on two smoking-related phenotypes: lifetime average smoking intensity and cumulative exposure to tobacco smoke (pack years). Our analysis revealed that effects of two linked variants (rs1051730 and rs8034191) in the AGPHD1/CHRNA3 cluster on COPD development are significantly, yet not entirely, mediated by the smoking-related phenotypes. Approximately 30 % of the total effect of variants in the AGPHD1/CHRNA3 cluster on COPD development was mediated by pack years. Simultaneous analysis of modestly (r2 = 0.21) linked markers in CHRNA3 and IREB2 revealed that an even larger (~42 %) proportion of the total effect of the CHRNA3 locus on COPD was mediated by pack years after adjustment for an IREB2 single nucleotide polymorphism. This study confirms the existence of direct effects of the AGPHD1/CHRNA3, IREB2, FAM13A and HHIP loci on COPD development. While the association of the AGPHD1/CHRNA3 locus with COPD is significantly mediated by smoking-related phenotypes, IREB2 appears to affect COPD independently of smoking. PMID:23299987

  5. Quantitation of Marek’s disease virus in vaccinated population of resistant and susceptible chicken samples using real-time PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chicken caused by cell-associated alpha-herpesvirus, known as Marek’s disease virus (MDV). MD virus load in challenged chickens has been well studied, but the difference between the virus load in vaccinated MD resistant and susceptible chicken...

  6. A Common Polymorphism in EC-SOD Affects Cardiopulmonary Disease Risk by Altering Protein Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Hartney, John M.; Stidham, Timothy; Goldstrohm, David A.; Oberley-Deegan, Rebecca E.; Weaver, Michael R.; Valnickova-Hansen, Zuzana; Scavenius, Carsten; Benninger, Richard K.P.; Leahy, Katelyn F.; Johnson, Richard; Gally, Fabienne; Kosmider, Beata; Zimmermann, Angela K.; Enghild, Jan J.; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Bowler, Russell P.

    2014-01-01

    Background The enzyme extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD; SOD3) is a major antioxidant defense in lung and vasculature. A nonsynonomous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in EC-SOD (rs1799895) leads to an arginine to glycine (Arg->Gly) amino acid substitution at position 213 (R213G) in the heparin-binding domain (HBD). In recent human genetic association studies, this SNP attenuates the risk of lung disease, yet paradoxically increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Methods and Results Capitalizing on the complete sequence homology between human and mouse in the HBD, we created an analogous R213G SNP knockin mouse. The R213G SNP did not change enzyme activity, but shifted the distribution of EC-SOD from lung and vascular tissue to extracellular fluid (e.g. bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma). This shift reduces susceptibility to lung disease (lipopolysaccharide-induced lung injury) and increases susceptibility to cardiopulmonary disease (chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension). Conclusions We conclude that EC-SOD provides optimal protection when localized to the compartment subjected to extracellular oxidative stress: thus, the redistribution of EC-SOD from the lung and pulmonary circulation to the extracellular fluids is beneficial in alveolar lung disease but detrimental in pulmonary vascular disease. These findings account for the discrepant risk associated with R213G in humans with lung diseases compared with cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25085920

  7. How urbanization affects the epidemiology of emerging infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Neiderud, Carl-Johan

    2015-01-01

    The world is becoming more urban every day, and the process has been ongoing since the industrial revolution in the 18th century. The United Nations now estimates that 3.9 billion people live in urban centres. The rapid influx of residents is however not universal and the developed countries are already urban, but the big rise in urban population in the next 30 years is expected to be in Asia and Africa. Urbanization leads to many challenges for global health and the epidemiology of infectious diseases. New megacities can be incubators for new epidemics, and zoonotic diseases can spread in a more rapid manner and become worldwide threats. Adequate city planning and surveillance can be powerful tools to improve the global health and decrease the burden of communicable diseases. PMID:26112265

  8. Factors Affecting the Efficacy of Recombinant Marek's Disease Vaccine Protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many factors have the potential to influence the efficacy of Marek's disease (MD) vaccination. Some of these factors include maternal antibody, vaccine dose, age of birds at vaccination or challenge, challenge virus strain and genetic background of chickens. The objective of this study was to evalua...

  9. Endophytic bacteria in potato tubers affected by zebra chip disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato zebra chip disease (ZCD) could drastically reduce quality and value of all market classes of potato, costing growers and processors millions of dollars in losses in North America. Endophytic bacteria colonize the internal tissue and could have both positive and negative effects on host plants...

  10. Concomitant gastroparesis negatively affects children with functional gallbladder disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether concomitant gastroparesis and biliary dyskinesia (BD) occur in children, and if so, to determine whether concomitant gastroparesis affects clinical outcome in children with BD. We conducted a retrospective chart review of children with BD (ejecti...

  11. Semantic Trouble Sources and Their Repair in Conversations Affected by Parkinson's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saldert, Charlotta; Ferm, Ulrika; Bloch, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is known that dysarthria arising from Parkinson's disease may affect intelligibility in conversational interaction. Research has also shown that Parkinson's disease may affect cognition and cause word-retrieval difficulties and pragmatic problems in the use of language. However, it is not known whether or how these…

  12. Seroprevalence of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Susceptible Wildlife in Israel.

    PubMed

    Elnekave, Ehud; King, Roni; van Maanen, Kees; Shilo, Hila; Gelman, Boris; Storm, Nick; Klement, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) epidemics recur in Israel almost every year. Wild even-toed ungulates are seldom affected during these epidemics. The seroprevalence of FMD in wild ungulates during 2000 and 2005-2013 was estimated using anti-non-structural proteins ELISA. Overall, 209 samples were tested, comprising sera of 120 wild boar (Sus scrofa lybicus), 64 mountain gazelles (Gazella gazella gazella), 6 water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis), and 19 Persian fallow deer (Dama dama mesopotamica). None of the tested animals presented clinical signs of FMD during blood collection. Sixteen samples [7.7% (95% confidence interval (CI95%) = 4.4-12.1%)] were found to be seropositive. Fifteen out of 120 samples (12.5%) from wild boar were seropositive, compared with only 1 out of 89 samples (1.1%) from all other species combined (Fisher's exact test: p = 0.003). Most of the positive samples obtained from wild boar [13/15 (86.7%)] were collected during 2007, and analysis was restricted to that year and species only. The seroprevalence of FMD in this species during 2007 was estimated at 54.2% (CI95% = 32.8-74.5%; n = 24). A significant infection cluster, comprising nine seropositive samples collected in three different locations, was identified in the north-eastern part of Israel. These findings indicate that wild boar was affected during the 2007 FMD epidemic, even though wild boar presenting FMD typical clinical signs were not observed during that year. The actual role of wild boar in the spread of FMD virus in this epidemic, however, could not be determined. The negligible seroprevalence of FMD found for all other surveillance years indicates that ongoing circulation of FMD among wildlife in Israel is unlikely. It is concluded that while the role of wildlife species in the dynamics of FMD in Israel is usually limited, there might be occasions, in which wildlife plays a part in the spread of the virus. PMID:27200364

  13. Seroprevalence of Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Susceptible Wildlife in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Elnekave, Ehud; King, Roni; van Maanen, Kees; Shilo, Hila; Gelman, Boris; Storm, Nick; Klement, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) epidemics recur in Israel almost every year. Wild even-toed ungulates are seldom affected during these epidemics. The seroprevalence of FMD in wild ungulates during 2000 and 2005–2013 was estimated using anti-non-structural proteins ELISA. Overall, 209 samples were tested, comprising sera of 120 wild boar (Sus scrofa lybicus), 64 mountain gazelles (Gazella gazella gazella), 6 water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis), and 19 Persian fallow deer (Dama dama mesopotamica). None of the tested animals presented clinical signs of FMD during blood collection. Sixteen samples [7.7% (95% confidence interval (CI95%) = 4.4–12.1%)] were found to be seropositive. Fifteen out of 120 samples (12.5%) from wild boar were seropositive, compared with only 1 out of 89 samples (1.1%) from all other species combined (Fisher’s exact test: p = 0.003). Most of the positive samples obtained from wild boar [13/15 (86.7%)] were collected during 2007, and analysis was restricted to that year and species only. The seroprevalence of FMD in this species during 2007 was estimated at 54.2% (CI95% = 32.8–74.5%; n = 24). A significant infection cluster, comprising nine seropositive samples collected in three different locations, was identified in the north-eastern part of Israel. These findings indicate that wild boar was affected during the 2007 FMD epidemic, even though wild boar presenting FMD typical clinical signs were not observed during that year. The actual role of wild boar in the spread of FMD virus in this epidemic, however, could not be determined. The negligible seroprevalence of FMD found for all other surveillance years indicates that ongoing circulation of FMD among wildlife in Israel is unlikely. It is concluded that while the role of wildlife species in the dynamics of FMD in Israel is usually limited, there might be occasions, in which wildlife plays a part in the spread of the virus. PMID:27200364

  14. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Affect Disease Outcomes via Macrophage Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Guoping; Ge, Menghua; Qiu, Guanguan; Shu, Qiang; Xu, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent and self-renewable cells that reside in almost all postnatal tissues. In recent years, many studies have reported the effect of MSCs on the innate and adaptive immune systems. MSCs regulate the proliferation, activation, and effector function of T lymphocytes, professional antigen presenting cells (dendritic cells, macrophages, and B lymphocytes), and NK cells via direct cell-to-cell contact or production of soluble factors including indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, prostaglandin E2, tumor necrosis factor-α stimulated gene/protein 6, nitric oxide, and IL-10. MSCs are also able to reprogram macrophages from a proinflammatory M1 phenotype toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype capable of regulating immune response. Because of their capacity for differentiation and immunomodulation, MSCs have been used in many preclinical and clinical studies as possible new therapeutic agents for the treatment of autoimmune, degenerative, and inflammatory diseases. In this review, we discuss the central role of MSCs in macrophage polarization and outcomes of diseases such as wound healing, brain/spinal cord injuries, and diseases of heart, lung, and kidney in animal models. PMID:26257791

  15. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Affect Disease Outcomes via Macrophage Polarization.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guoping; Ge, Menghua; Qiu, Guanguan; Shu, Qiang; Xu, Jianguo

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent and self-renewable cells that reside in almost all postnatal tissues. In recent years, many studies have reported the effect of MSCs on the innate and adaptive immune systems. MSCs regulate the proliferation, activation, and effector function of T lymphocytes, professional antigen presenting cells (dendritic cells, macrophages, and B lymphocytes), and NK cells via direct cell-to-cell contact or production of soluble factors including indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, prostaglandin E2, tumor necrosis factor-α stimulated gene/protein 6, nitric oxide, and IL-10. MSCs are also able to reprogram macrophages from a proinflammatory M1 phenotype toward an anti-inflammatory M2 phenotype capable of regulating immune response. Because of their capacity for differentiation and immunomodulation, MSCs have been used in many preclinical and clinical studies as possible new therapeutic agents for the treatment of autoimmune, degenerative, and inflammatory diseases. In this review, we discuss the central role of MSCs in macrophage polarization and outcomes of diseases such as wound healing, brain/spinal cord injuries, and diseases of heart, lung, and kidney in animal models. PMID:26257791

  16. Dietary vitamin K and therapeutic warfarin alter susceptibility to vascular calcification in experimental chronic kidney disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is cardiovascular disease (CVD), with vascular calcification (VC) being a key modifier of disease progression. A local regulator of vascular calcification is vitamin K. This gamma-glutamyl carboxylase substrate is an essential ...

  17. ALS Patient Stem Cells for Unveiling Disease Signatures of Motoneuron Susceptibility: Perspectives on the Deadly Mitochondria, ER Stress and Calcium Triad

    PubMed Central

    Kaus, Anjoscha; Sareen, Dhruv

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a largely sporadic progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting upper and lower motoneurons (MNs) whose specific etiology is incompletely understood. Mutations in superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TARDBP/TDP-43) and C9orf72, have been identified in subsets of familial and sporadic patients. Key associated molecular and neuropathological features include ubiquitinated TDP-43 inclusions, stress granules, aggregated dipeptide proteins from mutant C9orf72 transcripts, altered mitochondrial ultrastructure, dysregulated calcium homeostasis, oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and an unfolded protein response (UPR). Such impairments have been documented in ALS animal models; however, whether these mechanisms are initiating factors or later consequential events leading to MN vulnerability in ALS patients is debatable. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are a valuable tool that could resolve this “chicken or egg” causality dilemma. Relevant systems for probing pathophysiologically affected cells from large numbers of ALS patients and discovering phenotypic disease signatures of early MN susceptibility are described. Performing unbiased ‘OMICS and high-throughput screening in relevant neural cells from a cohort of ALS patient iPSCs, and rescuing mitochondrial and ER stress impairments, can identify targeted therapeutics for increasing MN longevity in ALS. PMID:26635528

  18. Host and Potential Vector Susceptibility to an Emerging Orbivirus in the United States: Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Virus Serotype 6.

    PubMed

    Ruder, M G; Stallknecht, D E; Allison, A B; Mead, D G; Carter, D L; Howerth, E W

    2016-05-01

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease viruses (EHDVs) are orbiviruses transmitted byCulicoidesbiting midges to domestic and wild ruminants. EHDV-1 and EHDV-2 are endemic in the United States, where epizootic hemorrhagic disease is the most significant viral disease of white-tailed deer (WTD;Odocoileus virginianus) and reports of epizootic hemorrhagic disease in cattle are increasing. In 2006, a reassortant EHDV-6 was isolated from dead WTD in Indiana and has been detected each subsequent year over a wide geographic region. Since EHDV-6 is not a historically endemic serotype in the United States, it is important to understand infection outcome in potential hosts. Specifically, we aimed to evaluate the pathogenicity of the virus in 2 primary US ruminant hosts (WTD and cattle) and the susceptibility of a confirmed US vector (Culicoides sonorensis). Five WTD and 4 cattle were inoculated with >10(6)TCID50EHDV-6 by intradermal and subcutaneous injection. All 5 WTD exhibited moderate to severe disease, and 3 died. Viremia was first detected 3 to 5 days postinfection (dpi) with surviving animals seroconverting by 10 dpi. Two of 4 inoculated cattle had detectable viremia, 5 to 10 dpi and 7 to 24 dpi, respectively. No clinical, hematologic, or pathologic abnormalities were observed. Antibodies were detected by 10 dpi in 3 of 4 cows.C. sonorensiswere fed on WTD blood spiked with EHDV-6 and held for 4 to 14 days postfeeding at 25°C. From 4 to 14 days postfeeding, 19 of 171 midges were virus isolation positive and 6 of 171 had ≥10(2.7)TCID50EHDV-6. Although outcomes varied, these studies demonstrate the susceptibility of ruminant and vector hosts in the United States for this recently emerged EHDV serotype. PMID:26459518

  19. Vector-borne pathogens: New and emerging arboviral diseases affecting public health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dengue and Zika have quickly become two of the most important vector-borne diseases affecting Public health around the world. This presentation will introduce vector-borne diseases and all the vectors implicated. A focus will be made on the most important arboviral diseases (Zika and dengue) describ...

  20. Prenatal ethanol exposure programs an increased susceptibility of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in female adult offspring rats

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Lang; Liu, Zhongfen; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Li; Wang, Linlong; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-15

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) induces dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia in fetus and adult offspring. However, whether PEE increases the susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in offspring and its underlying mechanism remain unknown. This study aimed to demonstrate an increased susceptibility to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD and its intrauterine programming mechanisms in female rat offspring with PEE. Rat model of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) was established by PEE, the female fetus and adult offspring that fed normal diet (ND) or HFD were sacrificed. The results showed that, in PEE + ND group, serum corticosterone (CORT) slightly decreased and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and glucose increased with partial catch-up growth; In PEE + HFD group, serum CORT decreased, while serum IGF-1, glucose and triglyceride (TG) increased, with notable catch-up growth, higher metabolic status and NAFLD formation. Enhanced liver expression of the IGF-1 pathway, gluconeogenesis, and lipid synthesis as well as reduced expression of lipid output were accompanied in PEE + HFD group. In PEE fetus, serum CORT increased while IGF-1 decreased, with low body weight, hyperglycemia, and hepatocyte ultrastructural changes. Hepatic IGF-1 expression as well as lipid output was down-regulated, while lipid synthesis significantly increased. Based on these findings, we propose a “two-programming” hypothesis for an increased susceptibility to HFD-induced NAFLD in female offspring of PEE. That is, the intrauterine programming of liver glucose and lipid metabolic function is “the first programming”, and postnatal adaptive catch-up growth triggered by intrauterine programming of GC-IGF1 axis acts as “the second programming”. - Highlights: • Prenatal ethanol exposure increase the susceptibility of NAFLD in female offspring. • Prenatal ethanol exposure reprograms fetal liver’s glucose and lipid metabolism . • Prenatal ethanol exposure cause

  1. [Familial incidence of affective diseases in patients with anorexia nervosa].

    PubMed

    Herpertz-Dahlmann, B

    1988-03-01

    Analysis of family history information about first-, second- and third-degree relatives of 45 anorectic patients and 38 control subjects with different types of neurosis showed significantly more depression and eating disorders in the families of the anorectic group. Our data revealed the same prevalence of psychiatric disorders in general for both groups; the alcoholism rate was higher in the anorectic group without a statistic significance. These findings might provide further evidence of a possible genetic relationship between anorexia nervosa and affective illness. PMID:3388987

  2. Coral disease in the Indian Ocean: taxonomic susceptibility, spatial distribution and the role of host density on the prevalence of white syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Jean-Paul A; Frisch, Ashley J

    2010-02-24

    Coral diseases, such as white diseases and white syndrome (WS), have caused widespread damage to coral reefs throughout the Caribbean and are increasing in prevalence on Pacific Ocean reefs. The current study confirms that WS is also present on coral reefs in the Indian Ocean and tests whether patterns in taxonomic susceptibility and spatial variability conform to patterns of WS reported in the Pacific Ocean. Underwater surveys at 19 sites around Christmas and Cocos Islands revealed that WS primarily affects Acropora plate corals (A. clathrata, A. cytherea and A. hyacinthus), and prevalence of WS varied significantly across all 3 spatial scales investigated (island, exposure and depth). Approximately 13.0% (range = 0 to 43% per site) of plate corals at Christmas Island sites exhibited WS compared to <1% at the Cocos Islands. At Christmas Island, WS prevalence was greater in shallow (31.5%) than in deeper water (6.7%) and greatest on the northern (leeward) side of the island (31.5%) compared to the more exposed coastlines (0 to 1.5%). Importantly, the spatial distribution of WS was positively correlated with host density, but not with hard coral cover, suggesting a role of host density in WS outbreaks. Overall the present study has established that WS is impacting remote, near-pristine reefs in the Indian Ocean. However, the highly variable spatial distribution of WS illustrates that patterns in disease prevalence, and the subsequent impact on coral reefs, can be location- or region-specific. PMID:20391907

  3. Tobacco susceptibility to Potato virus Y(NTN) infection is affected by grafting and endogenous cytokinin content.

    PubMed

    Spoustová, Petra; Hýsková, Veronika; Müller, Karel; Schnablová, Renata; Ryšlavá, Helena; Čeřovská, Noemi; Malbeck, Jiří; Cvikrová, Milena; Synková, Helena

    2015-06-01

    Faster or stronger response to pathogen occurs if plants undergo prior priming. Cytokinins seem to be also involved in plant priming and in response to pathogens. Susceptibility to Potato virus Y(NTN) (PVY(NTN)) was studied in transgenic cytokinin overproducing (Pssu-ipt) tobacco and compared with nontransgenic plants. Since cytokinin overproduction inhibits development of plant roots and grafting overcomes this limitation, both types were grown as rooted and/or grafted plants to check also the effect of grafting. Control rooted tobacco (C), the most susceptible to PVY(NTN), showed always symptoms during the infection together with the rising virus content and a systemic response, such as accumulation of H2O2, salicylic acid (SA) and other phenolic acids, and stress-induced enzyme activities. In transgenic and grafted plants, the response to PVY(NTN) was dependent on protective mechanisms activated prior to the inoculation. In Pssu-ipt tobacco, cytokinin active forms and SA contents exceeded manifold their content in C. Grafting promoted the accumulation of phenolics, but SA, and stimulated peroxidase activities. Thus, the pre-infection barrier established in both transgenic and grafted plants helped to suppress partly the virus multiplication and resulted in milder symptom development. However, only the synergic effect of both grafting and the high cytokinins led to PVY(NTN) tolerance in transgenic grafts. Possible mechanisms were discussed. PMID:25900563

  4. Analysis of ADRB2 (Arg16Gly) Gene Variant with Susceptibility, Pharmacogenetic Response and Disease Severity in South Indian Asthmatics.

    PubMed

    Bandaru, Srinivas; Akka, Jyothy; Marri, Vijaya Kumar; Alvala, Mallika; Ponnala, Deepika; Mundluru, Hema Prasad

    2015-12-01

    β2-Adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) plays a crucial role in asthma pathophysiology by regulating, processes of the lung function, and clinical response to bronchodilators. The +46G>A- Gly16Arg polymorphism in the gene encoding β2 adrenergic receptor (ADRB2) has been associated with receptor non-responsiveness after β2-agonist exposure. In the present study, we sought to evaluate the possible association of Gly16Arg polymorphism with asthma susceptibility, pharmacogenetic response to Salbutamol, and varying degrees of disease severity. Three hundred ninety-eight clinically diagnosed patients and 456 healthy controls were enrolled for the study. Patients were classified into severity classes according to Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines. To assess bronchodilator response, spirometry was performed before and 15 min after Salbutamol (200 μg) delivery. Responders to Salbutamol were categorized if percentage reversibility was greater than or equal to 12% in them, while those showing reversibility less than 12% were classified as non-responders. Genotyping was carried out by ARMS-PCR technique. Statistical methods were applied to test for the significance of the results. In the present study, there was lack of significant association of polymorphism with disease susceptibility as well as with bronchodilator response. The polymorphism was not associated with mild and moderate asthma subtypes; however, there was a notable association with severe asthma subtype. In addition, the polymorphism was associated with severe asthma compared to subtypes of mild and moderate asthma combined. In a South Indian population, the ADRB2 Arg/Gly may not form a susceptible variant to develop asthma nor can be a standard predictive marker to bronchodilator response; nevertheless, the patterns in asthma severity can be predicted by analyzing this variant. PMID:26071206

  5. Association of MCP-1-2518A/G polymorphism with susceptibility to autoimmune diseases: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Deng, Chuiwen; Hu, Chaojun; Li, Jing; Wen, Xiaoting; Wu, Ziyan; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Fengchun; Li, Yongzhe

    2016-05-01

    We performed a meta-analysis to estimate whether combined evidence shows the association between the MCP-1-2518A/G polymorphism and susceptibility to autoimmune diseases. Relevant articles dated to July 2014 were acquired from the PubMed, EMBASE, ISI, and CNKI databases. The number of the genotypes and/or alleles for the MCP-1-2518A/G in cases and control subjects was extracted, and statistical analysis was conducted using STATA 11.2 software. Summary odds ratios (ORs) with their 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CIs) were used to calculate the risk of autoimmune diseases with the MCP-1-2518A/G. Significant increased risk of autoimmune diseases could be found for A allele vs. G allele (OR = 1.616, 95 % CI 1.027-2.542, P = 0.038) and AA + AG vs. GG (OR = 1.616, 95 % CI 1.027-2.542, P = 0.038) in Asian patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and for A allele vs. G allele (OR = 1.383, 95 % CI 1.142-1.676, P = 0.022) and AA vs. AG + GG (OR = 1.575, 95 % CI 1.361-1.823, P < 0.001) in European patients with Crohn's disease (CD). In addition, when comparison of European patients with lupus nephritis (LN) and without LN, significant association between patients with LN and without LN also could be found for AA vs. AG + GG (OR = 0.713, 95 % CI 0.545-0.933, P = 0.014). This meta-analysis showed that the MCP-1-2518-A allele confers susceptibility to Asian patients with RA and European patients with CD. PMID:26318885

  6. Potassium permanganate elicits a shift of the external fish microbiome and increases host susceptibility to columnaris disease.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Haitham H; Arias, Covadonga R

    2015-01-01

    The external microbiome of fish is thought to benefit the host by hindering the invasion of opportunistic pathogens and/or stimulating the immune system. Disruption of those microbial communities could increase susceptibility to diseases. Traditional aquaculture practices include the use of potent surface-acting disinfectants such as potassium permanganate (PP, KMnO4) to treat external infections. This study evaluated the effect of PP on the external microbiome of channel catfish and investigated if dysbiosis leads to an increase in disease susceptibility. Columnaris disease, caused by Flavobacterium columnare, was used as disease model. Four treatments were compared in the study: (I) negative control (not treated with PP nor challenged with F. columnare), (II) treated but not challenged, (III) not treated but challenged, and (IV) treated and challenged. Ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) and pyrosequencing were used to analyze changes in the external microbiome during the experiment. Exposure to PP significantly disturbed the external microbiomes and increased catfish mortality following the experimental challenge. Analysis of similarities of RISA profiles showed statistically significant changes in the skin and gill microbiomes based on treatment and sampling time. Characterization of the microbiomes using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing confirmed the disruption of the skin microbiome by PP at different phylogenetic levels. Loss of diversity occurred during the study, even in the control group, but was more noticeable in fish subjected to PP than in those challenged with F. columnare. Fish treated with PP and challenged with the pathogen exhibited the least diverse microbiome at the end of the study. PMID:26170019

  7. Meta-analysis of 74,046 individuals identifies 11 new susceptibility loci for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Jean-Charles; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A; Harold, Denise; Naj, Adam C; Sims, Rebecca; Bellenguez, Céline; Jun, Gyungah; DeStefano, Anita L; Bis, Joshua C; Beecham, Gary W; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Russo, Giancarlo; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A; Jones, Nicola; Smith, Albert V; Chouraki, Vincent; Thomas, Charlene; Ikram, M Arfan; Zelenika, Diana; Vardarajan, Badri N; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Gerrish, Amy; Schmidt, Helena; Kunkle, Brian; Dunstan, Melanie L; Ruiz, Agustin; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Choi, Seung-Hoan; Reitz, Christiane; Pasquier, Florence; Hollingworth, Paul; Ramirez, Alfredo; Hanon, Olivier; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Campion, Dominique; Crane, Paul K; Baldwin, Clinton; Becker, Tim; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cruchaga, Carlos; Craig, David; Amin, Najaf; Berr, Claudine; Lopez, Oscar L; De Jager, Philip L; Deramecourt, Vincent; Johnston, Janet A; Evans, Denis; Lovestone, Simon; Letenneur, Luc; Morón, Francisco J; Rubinsztein, David C; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Sleegers, Kristel; Goate, Alison M; Fiévet, Nathalie; Huentelman, Matthew J; Gill, Michael; Brown, Kristelle; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Keller, Lina; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; McGuinness, Bernadette; Larson, Eric B; Green, Robert; Myers, Amanda J; Dufouil, Carole; Todd, Stephen; Wallon, David; Love, Seth; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Gallacher, John; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleo, Alberto; Bayer, Anthony; Tsuang, Debby W; Yu, Lei; Tsolaki, Magda; Bossù, Paola; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Proitsi, Petroula; Collinge, John; Sorbi, Sandro; Sanchez-Garcia, Florentino; Fox, Nick C; Hardy, John; Deniz Naranjo, Maria Candida; Bosco, Paolo; Clarke, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Galimberti, Daniela; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Matthews, Fiona; Moebus, Susanne; Mecocci, Patrizia; Zompo, Maria Del; Maier, Wolfgang; Hampel, Harald; Pilotto, Alberto; Bullido, Maria; Panza, Francesco; Caffarra, Paolo; Nacmias, Benedetta; Gilbert, John R; Mayhaus, Manuel; Lannfelt, Lars; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pichler, Sabrina; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Ingelsson, Martin; Beekly, Duane; Alvarez, Victoria; Zou, Fanggeng; Valladares, Otto; Younkin, Steven G; Coto, Eliecer; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L; Gu, Wei; Razquin, Cristina; Pastor, Pau; Mateo, Ignacio; Owen, Michael J; Faber, Kelley M; Jonsson, Palmi V; Combarros, Onofre; O’Donovan, Michael C; Cantwell, Laura B; Soininen, Hilkka; Blacker, Deborah; Mead, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H; Bennett, David A; Harris, Tamara B; Fratiglioni, Laura; Holmes, Clive; de Bruijn, Renee F A G; Passmore, Peter; Montine, Thomas J; Bettens, Karolien; Rotter, Jerome I; Brice, Alexis; Morgan, Kevin; Foroud, Tatiana M; Kukull, Walter A; Hannequin, Didier; Powell, John F; Nalls, Michael A; Ritchie, Karen; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Kauwe, John S K; Boerwinkle, Eric; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Boada, Mercè; Hiltunen, Mikko; Martin, Eden R; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rujescu, Dan; Wang, Li-san; Dartigues, Jean-François; Mayeux, Richard; Tzourio, Christophe; Hofman, Albert; Nöthen, Markus M; Graff, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M; Jones, Lesley; Haines, Jonathan L; Holmans, Peter A; Lathrop, Mark; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Launer, Lenore J; Farrer, Lindsay A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Moskvina, Valentina; Seshadri, Sudha; Williams, Julie; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Amouyel, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Eleven susceptibility loci for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) were identified by previous studies; however, a large portion of the genetic risk for this disease remains unexplained. We conducted a large, two-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry. In stage 1, we used genotyped and imputed data (7,055,881 SNPs) to perform meta-analysis on 4 previously published GWAS data sets consisting of 17,008 Alzheimer’s disease cases and 37,154 controls. In stage 2,11,632 SNPs were genotyped and tested for association in an independent set of 8,572 Alzheimer’s disease cases and 11,312 controls. In addition to the APOE locus (encoding apolipoprotein E), 19 loci reached genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8) in the combined stage 1 and stage 2 analysis, of which 11 are newly associated with Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:24162737

  8. Association of interleukin-16 polymorphisms with disease progression and susceptibility in endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Azimzadeh, P; Khorram Khorshid, H R; Akhondi, M M; Shirazi, A

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin-16 (IL-16) is a multifunctional pro-inflammatory cytokine that was previously found in association with complex disorders, and it is now cleared that this cytokine plays a critical role in regulation of cellular functions such as homoeostasis. Due to the complexity of endometriosis and its resemblance to cancer, we designed present case-control study to determine the effects of genetic polymorphisms of the human IL-16 gene on Iranian women's susceptibility to endometriosis. A total of 126 patients with endometriosis (stages I-IV) and 144 healthy women as control group were recruited to the study. We genotyped four single nucleotide polymorphisms of IL-16 gene (rs11556218 T>G, rs4778889 T>C, rs4072111 C>T and rs1131445 C>T). Genotyping was performed using PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism. Our results showed that genotype distribution in two exonic polymorphisms including rs11556218 and rs4072111 was significantly different between Endometriosis patients and healthy individuals (P < 0.05). We have also found an association between rs4072111 and rs1131445 with progression to the severe stages (III-IV) of endometriosis (P < 0.05). Finally, we may conclude that IL-16 gene polymorphisms are highly associated with increased risk of endometriosis and could be considered as a susceptibility factor for endometriosis. PMID:27484651

  9. Examination of Susceptibility to Libby Amphibole Asbestos-Induced Injury in Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although cardiovascular disease (CVD) is considered a risk factor for the exacerbation of air pollution health effects, no studies have been done assessing the influence of the disease on the development of lung injury induced by asbestos exposure. In this study we examined lung ...

  10. Gene–Environment Interactions and Susceptibility to Metabolic Syndrome and Other Chronic Diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is an intrinsic complexity in the pathogenesis of common diseases. The concept of gene–environment interaction is receiving support from emerging evidence coming primarily from studies involving diet and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and its various risk factors. The accumulating evidence shows...

  11. Functional variants regulating LGALS1 (Galectin 1) expression affect human susceptibility to influenza A(H7N9)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Jie; Cheng, Zhongshan; Yang, Shigui; Chu, Hin; Fan, Yanhui; Li, Cun; Wong, Bosco Ho-Yin; Zheng, Shufa; Zhu, Yixin; Yu, Fei; Wang, Yiyin; Liu, Xiaoli; Gao, Hainv; Yu, Liang; Tang, Linglin; Cui, Dawei; Hao, Ke; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma′en; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Song, You-Qiang; To, Kelvin Kai-Wang; Sham, Pak Chung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-01-01

    The fatality of avian influenza A(H7N9) infection in humans was over 30%. To identify human genetic susceptibility to A(H7N9) infection, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) involving 102 A(H7N9) patients and 106 heavily-exposed healthy poultry workers, a sample size critically restricted by the small number of human A(H7N9) cases. To tackle the stringent significance cutoff of GWAS, we utilized an artificial imputation program SnipSnip to improve the association signals. In single-SNP analysis, one of the top SNPs was rs13057866 of LGALS1. The artificial imputation (AI) identified three non-genotyped causal variants, which can be represented by three anchor/partner SNP pairs rs13057866/rs9622682 (AI P = 1.81 × 10−7), rs4820294/rs2899292 (2.13 × 10−7) and rs62236673/rs2899292 (4.25 × 10−7) respectively. Haplotype analysis of rs4820294 and rs2899292 could simulate the signal of a causal variant. The rs4820294/rs2899292 haplotype GG, in association with protection from A(H7N9) infection (OR = 0.26, P = 5.92 × 10−7) correlated to significantly higher levels of LGALS1 mRNA (P = 0.050) and protein expression (P = 0.025) in lymphoblast cell lines. Additionally, rs4820294 was mapped as an eQTL in human primary monocytes and lung tissues. In conclusion, functional variants of LGALS1 causing the expression variations are contributable to the differential susceptibility to influenza A(H7N9). PMID:25687228

  12. Factors affecting susceptibility to RNA interference in Haemonchus contortus and in vivo silencing of an H11 aminopeptidase gene.

    PubMed

    Samarasinghe, Buddhini; Knox, David P; Britton, Collette

    2011-01-01

    Gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) has been applied very successfully to Caenorhabditis elegans to study gene function but has proven less effective in parasitic nematodes. In the sheep gastrointestinal nematode Haemonchus contortus, previous studies demonstrated reproducible silencing of β-tubulin but not of other genes targeted. Here we aimed to examine whether the level of target transcript or site of gene expression influence susceptibility to RNAi by soaking. Target genes represented by a high number of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the H. contortus L3 stage were not reproducibly silenced. In contrast, four out of six genes putatively expressed in the intestine, excretory cell or amphids were consistently silenced by RNAi. This suggests that genes expressed in sites accessible to the environment are more likely to be susceptible to RNAi by soaking. Silenced genes included those encoding the highly protective gut aminopeptidase H11, secretory protein Hc-ASP-1, β-tubulin and homologues of aquaporin and RNA helicase. To determine whether RNAi silencing of H11 could mimic H11 vaccination in reducing worm and egg counts, we examined the in vivo effects of H11 RNAi. This is the first, to our knowledge, in vivo study of RNAi in an animal parasitic nematode. RNAi of the H11 gene in infective larvae prior to infection resulted in a 57% reduction in faecal egg count (FEC), 40% reduction in worm burden and 64% decrease in aminopeptidase activity compared with pre-soaking in control dsRNA. Thus, in this study we have established that RNAi is a valid and feasible approach to identify essential gene function. However, using current methods, this may be limited to genes expressed in accessible sites. PMID:20699100

  13. Effect of selection for resistance and susceptibility to viral diseases on concentrations of dopamine and immunological parameters in six-week-old chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    White Leghorn chickens were inbred respectively from their parent lines, which were diversely selected for resistance (line 63) or susceptibility (lines 72 and 15I5) to Marek's disease and lymphoid leukosis. The differences in disease resistance may have been due to differential regulations of immun...

  14. Susceptibility of Different Mouse Wild Type Strains to Develop Diet-Induced NAFLD/AFLD-Associated Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fengler, Vera H. I.; Macheiner, Tanja; Kessler, Sonja M.; Czepukojc, Beate; Gemperlein, Katja; Müller, Rolf; Kiemer, Alexandra K.; Magnes, Christoph; Haybaeck, Johannes; Lackner, Carolin; Sargsyan, Karine

    2016-01-01

    Although non-alcoholic and alcoholic fatty liver disease have been intensively studied, concerning pathophysiological mechanisms are still incompletely understood. This may be due to the use of different animal models and resulting model-associated variation. Therefore, this study aimed to compare three frequently used wild type mouse strains in their susceptibility to develop diet-induced features of non-alcoholic/alcoholic fatty liver disease. Fatty liver disease associated clinical, biochemical, and histological features in C57BL/6, CD-1, and 129Sv WT mice were induced by (i) high-fat diet feeding, (ii) ethanol feeding only, and (iii) the combination of high-fat diet and ethanol feeding. Hepatic and subcutaneous adipose lipid profiles were compared in CD-1 and 129Sv mice. Additionally hepatic fatty acid composition was determined in 129Sv mice. In C57BL/6 mice dietary regimens resulted in heterogeneous hepatic responses, ranging from pronounced steatosis and inflammation to a lack of any features of fatty liver disease. Liver-related serum biochemistry showed high deviations within the regimen groups. CD-1 mice did not exhibit significant changes in metabolic and liver markers and developed no significant steatosis or inflammation as a response to dietary regimens. Although 129Sv mice showed no weight gain, this strain achieved most consistent features of fatty liver disease, apparent from concentration alterations of liver-related serum biochemistry as well as moderate steatosis and inflammation as a result of all dietary regimens. Furthermore, the hepatic lipid profile as well as the fatty acid composition of 129Sv mice were considerably altered, upon feeding the different dietary regimens. Accordingly, diet-induced non-alcoholic/alcoholic fatty liver disease is most consistently promoted in 129Sv mice compared to C57BL/6 and CD-1 mice. As a conclusion, this study demonstrates the importance of genetic background of used mouse strains for modeling diet

  15. Executive Summary: Official American Thoracic Society/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Infectious Diseases Society of America Clinical Practice Guidelines: Treatment of Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Nahid, Payam; Dorman, Susan E; Alipanah, Narges; Barry, Pennan M; Brozek, Jan L; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Chaisson, Lelia H; Chaisson, Richard E; Daley, Charles L; Grzemska, Malgosia; Higashi, Julie M; Ho, Christine S; Hopewell, Philip C; Keshavjee, Salmaan A; Lienhardt, Christian; Menzies, Richard; Merrifield, Cynthia; Narita, Masahiro; O'Brien, Rick; Peloquin, Charles A; Raftery, Ann; Saukkonen, Jussi; Schaaf, H Simon; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Starke, Jeffrey R; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Vernon, Andrew

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and Infectious Diseases Society of America jointly sponsored the development of this guideline for the treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis, which is also endorsed by the European Respiratory Society and the US National Tuberculosis Controllers Association. Representatives from the American Academy of Pediatrics, the Canadian Thoracic Society, the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, and the World Health Organization also participated in the development of the guideline. This guideline provides recommendations on the clinical and public health management of tuberculosis in children and adults in settings in which mycobacterial cultures, molecular and phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, and radiographic studies, among other diagnostic tools, are available on a routine basis. For all recommendations, literature reviews were performed, followed by discussion by an expert committee according to the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Given the public health implications of prompt diagnosis and effective management of tuberculosis, empiric multidrug treatment is initiated in almost all situations in which active tuberculosis is suspected. Additional characteristics such as presence of comorbidities, severity of disease, and response to treatment influence management decisions. Specific recommendations on the use of case management strategies (including directly observed therapy), regimen and dosing selection in adults and children (daily vs intermittent), treatment of tuberculosis in the presence of HIV infection (duration of tuberculosis treatment and timing of initiation of antiretroviral therapy), as well as treatment of extrapulmonary disease (central nervous system, pericardial among other sites) are provided. The development of more potent and better-tolerated drug regimens, optimization of drug exposure for the

  16. Demographic, socioeconomic and environmental changes affecting circulation of neglected tropical diseases in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abou-El-Naga, Iman F

    2015-11-01

    Egypt has been plagued by many neglected tropical diseases since Pharaonic time. These diseases are Schistosomiasis, soil-transmitted helminthiasis, lymphatic filariasis, leishmaniasis and fascioliasis beside the epidermal parasitic skin diseases. Indeed, theses diseases still persist as public health problem in the country by the influence of demographic, socioeconomic and environmental obstacles. This study seeks for understanding the contribution of each factor in each obstacle in neglected tropical diseases perpetuation which in turn could help the governorate in planning integrated control strategies. It was found that poverty, unregulated urbanization and inadequate sanitation are important socioeconomic factors that have great effect on the transmission dynamics of the diseases. The environmental factors which affect the epidemiology of these diseases in the country are scarcity of water, construction of dams, land reclamation for agriculture beside the climate factors. Unfortunately, the panic increase in the population growth rate minimizes the efforts done by the governorate to elevate the public health services. These conditions also affect the transmission of epidermal parasitic skin diseases including scabies, head lice and hookworm-related cutaneous larva migrans. The control programs and the recommendations to combat the diseases were discussed. The present study showed that the ecological factors affecting each neglected tropical disease in Egypt are somewhat similar which makes it worthy to develop an integrated control approaches aiming at improving the leading factors of neglected tropical diseases circulation in the country. PMID:26614986

  17. Susceptibility of Marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) to Monkeypox Virus: A Low Dose Prospective Model for Monkeypox and Smallpox Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mucker, Eric M.; Chapman, Jennifer; Huzella, Louis M.; Huggins, John W.; Shamblin, Joshua; Robinson, Camenzind G.; Hensley, Lisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Although current nonhuman primate models of monkeypox and smallpox diseases provide some insight into disease pathogenesis, they require a high titer inoculum, use an unnatural route of infection, and/or do not accurately represent the entire disease course. This is a concern when developing smallpox and/or monkeypox countermeasures or trying to understand host pathogen relationships. In our studies, we altered half of the test system by using a New World nonhuman primate host, the common marmoset. Based on dose finding studies, we found that marmosets are susceptible to monkeypox virus infection, produce a high viremia, and have pathological features consistent with smallpox and monkeypox in humans. The low dose (48 plaque forming units) required to elicit a uniformly lethal disease and the extended incubation (preclinical signs) are unique features among nonhuman primate models utilizing monkeypox virus. The uniform lethality, hemorrhagic rash, high viremia, decrease in platelets, pathology, and abbreviated acute phase are reflective of early-type hemorrhagic smallpox. PMID:26147658

  18. Genes within the Idd5 and Idd9/11 Diabetes Susceptibility Loci affect the Pathogenic Activity of B-cells in NOD mice1

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Pablo A.; Chapman, Harold D.; Stolp, Jessica; Johnson, Ellis; Cox, S. Lewis; Hunter, Kara; Wicker, Linda S.; Serreze, David V.

    2010-01-01

    Autoreactive T-cells clearly mediate the pancreatic β cell destruction causing Type 1 diabetes (T1D)2. However, studies in NOD mice indicate that B-cells also contribute to pathogenesis since their ablation by introduction of an Igμnull mutation elicits T1D resistance. T1D susceptibility is restored in NOD.Igμnull mice that are irradiated and reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow (SBM) plus NOD B-cells, but not SBM alone. Thus, we hypothesized some non-MHC T1D susceptibility (Idd) genes contribute to disease by allowing development of pathogenic B-cells. Supporting this hypothesis was the finding, that unlike those from NOD donors, engraftment with B-cells from H2g7 MHC matched, but T1D-resistant, NOR mice failed to restore full disease susceptibility in NOD.Igμnull recipients. T1D resistance in NOR mice is mainly encoded within the Idd13, Idd5.2 and Idd9/11 loci. B-cells from NOD congenic stocks containing Idd9/11 or Idd5.1/5.2 resistance loci respectively derived from the NOR or C57BL/10 strains were characterized by suppressed diabetogenic activity. Immature autoreactive B-cells in NOD mice have an impaired ability to be rendered anergic upon antigen engagement. Interestingly, both Idd5.1/5.2 and Idd9/11 resistance loci were found to normalize this B-cell tolerogenic process, which may represent a mechanism contributing to the inhibition of T1D. PMID:17082619

  19. SUSCEPTIBILITY TO ATHEROSCLEROSIS IN AORTAS AND CORONARY ARTERIES OF SWINE WITH VON WILLEBRAND'S DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of coronary and aortic atherosclerosis was determined after balloon catheter injury of coronary arteries and administration of an atherogenic diet in normal pigs and pigs that were homozygous and heterozygous for von Willebrand's disease. Coronary atherosclerosis ...

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility monitoring of respiratory tract pathogens isolated from diseased cattle and pigs across Europe: the VetPath study.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Anno; Thomas, Valérie; Simjee, Shabbir; Moyaert, Hilde; El Garch, Farid; Maher, Kirsty; Morrissey, Ian; Butty, Pascal; Klein, Ulrich; Marion, Hervé; Rigaut, Delphine; Vallé, Michel

    2014-08-01

    VetPath is an ongoing pan-European antibiotic susceptibility monitoring programme collecting pathogens from diseased antimicrobial non-treated cattle, pigs and poultry. In the current study, 1001 isolates from cattle and pig respiratory tract infections were tested for their antimicrobial susceptibilities. Non-replicate lung samples or nasopharyngeal/nasal swabs were collected from animals with acute clinical signs in 11 countries during 2002-2006. Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica from cattle and P. multocida, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Streptococcus suis from pigs were isolated by standard methods. S. suis was also isolated from meningitis cases. MICs of 16 antibiotics were assessed centrally by broth microdilution following CLSI recommendations. Results were interpreted using CLSI breakpoints where available. P. multocida (231) and M. haemolytica (138) isolates were all susceptible to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftiofur, enrofloxacin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Resistance to florfenicol and spectinomycin was 0.4% and 3.5% in P. multocida, respectively, and absent in M. haemolytica isolates. Tetracycline resistance was 5.7% and 14.6% for P. multocida and M. haemolytica. In pigs, 230 P. multocida, 220 A. pleuropneumoniae and 182 S. suis isolates were recovered. Resistance to amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ceftiofur, enrofloxacin, florfenicol, tiamulin and tilmicosin was absent or <1%. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistance was 3-6% and tetracycline resistance varied from 14.7% in A. pleuropneumoniae to 81.8% in S. suis. In conclusion, low resistance to antibiotics with defined clinical breakpoints, except for tetracycline, was observed among the major respiratory tract pathogens recovered from cattle and pigs. Since for approximately half of the antibiotics in this panel no CLSI-defined breakpoints were available, setting of the missing veterinary breakpoints is important. PMID:24837878

  1. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Novel Susceptibility Genes Associated with Coronary Artery Aneurysm Formation in Kawasaki Disease

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Mindy Ming-Huey; Huang, Ying-Hsien; Yu, Hong-Ren; Huang, Fu-Chen; Jiao, Fuyong; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Andrade, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) or Kawasaki syndrome is known as a vasculitis of small to medium-sized vessels, and coronary arteries are predominantly involved in childhood. Generally, 20–25% of untreated with IVIG and 3–5% of treated KD patients have been developed coronary artery lesions (CALs), such as dilatation and aneurysm. Understanding how coronary artery aneurysms (CAAs) are established and maintained in KD patients is therefore of great importance. Upon our previous genotyping data of 157 valid KD subjects, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been conducted among 11 (7%) CAA-developed KD patients to reveal five significant genetic variants passed pre-defined thresholds and resulted in two novel susceptibility protein-coding genes, which are NEBL (rs16921209 (P = 7.44 × 10−9; OR = 32.22) and rs7922552 (P = 8.43 × 10−9; OR = 32.0)) and TUBA3C (rs17076896 (P = 8.04 × 10−9; OR = 21.03)). Their known functions have been reported to associate with cardiac muscle and tubulin, respectively. As a result, this might imply their putative roles of establishing CAAs during KD progression. Additionally, various model analyses have been utilized to determine dominant and recessive inheritance patterns of identified susceptibility mutations. Finally, all susceptibility genes hit by significant genetic variants were further investigated and the top three representative gene-ontology (GO) clusters were regulation of cell projection organization, neuron recognition, and peptidyl-threonine phosphorylation. Our results help to depict the potential routes of the pathogenesis of CAAs in KD patients and will facilitate researchers to improve the diagnosis and prognosis of KD in personalized medicine. PMID:27171184

  2. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Novel Susceptibility Genes Associated with Coronary Artery Aneurysm Formation in Kawasaki Disease.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ho-Chang; Li, Sung-Chou; Guo, Mindy Ming-Huey; Huang, Ying-Hsien; Yu, Hong-Ren; Huang, Fu-Chen; Jiao, Fuyong; Kuo, Hsing-Chun; Andrade, Jorge; Chan, Wen-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) or Kawasaki syndrome is known as a vasculitis of small to medium-sized vessels, and coronary arteries are predominantly involved in childhood. Generally, 20-25% of untreated with IVIG and 3-5% of treated KD patients have been developed coronary artery lesions (CALs), such as dilatation and aneurysm. Understanding how coronary artery aneurysms (CAAs) are established and maintained in KD patients is therefore of great importance. Upon our previous genotyping data of 157 valid KD subjects, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been conducted among 11 (7%) CAA-developed KD patients to reveal five significant genetic variants passed pre-defined thresholds and resulted in two novel susceptibility protein-coding genes, which are NEBL (rs16921209 (P = 7.44 × 10-9; OR = 32.22) and rs7922552 (P = 8.43 × 10-9; OR = 32.0)) and TUBA3C (rs17076896 (P = 8.04 × 10-9; OR = 21.03)). Their known functions have been reported to associate with cardiac muscle and tubulin, respectively. As a result, this might imply their putative roles of establishing CAAs during KD progression. Additionally, various model analyses have been utilized to determine dominant and recessive inheritance patterns of identified susceptibility mutations. Finally, all susceptibility genes hit by significant genetic variants were further investigated and the top three representative gene-ontology (GO) clusters were regulation of cell projection organization, neuron recognition, and peptidyl-threonine phosphorylation. Our results help to depict the potential routes of the pathogenesis of CAAs in KD patients and will facilitate researchers to improve the diagnosis and prognosis of KD in personalized medicine. PMID:27171184

  3. Prenatal ethanol exposure programs an increased susceptibility of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in female adult offspring rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Lang; Liu, Zhongfen; Gong, Jun; Zhang, Li; Wang, Linlong; Magdalou, Jacques; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2014-01-15

    Prenatal ethanol exposure (PEE) induces dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia in fetus and adult offspring. However, whether PEE increases the susceptibility to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in offspring and its underlying mechanism remain unknown. This study aimed to demonstrate an increased susceptibility to high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD and its intrauterine programming mechanisms in female rat offspring with PEE. Rat model of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) was established by PEE, the female fetus and adult offspring that fed normal diet (ND) or HFD were sacrificed. The results showed that, in PEE+ND group, serum corticosterone (CORT) slightly decreased and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and glucose increased with partial catch-up growth; In PEE+HFD group, serum CORT decreased, while serum IGF-1, glucose and triglyceride (TG) increased, with notable catch-up growth, higher metabolic status and NAFLD formation. Enhanced liver expression of the IGF-1 pathway, gluconeogenesis, and lipid synthesis as well as reduced expression of lipid output were accompanied in PEE+HFD group. In PEE fetus, serum CORT increased while IGF-1 decreased, with low body weight, hyperglycemia, and hepatocyte ultrastructural changes. Hepatic IGF-1 expression as well as lipid output was down-regulated, while lipid synthesis significantly increased. Based on these findings, we propose a "two-programming" hypothesis for an increased susceptibility to HFD-induced NAFLD in female offspring of PEE. That is, the intrauterine programming of liver glucose and lipid metabolic function is "the first programming", and postnatal adaptive catch-up growth triggered by intrauterine programming of GC-IGF1 axis acts as "the second programming". PMID:24275070

  4. HLA and Celiac Disease Susceptibility: New Genetic Factors Bring Open Questions about the HLA Influence and Gene-Dosage Effects

    PubMed Central

    Medrano, Luz María; Dema, Bárbara; López-Larios, Arturo; Maluenda, Carlos; Bodas, Andrés; López-Palacios, Natalia; Figueredo, M. Ángeles; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; Núñez, Concepción

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder triggered after gluten ingestion in genetically susceptible individuals. The major genetic determinants are HLA-DQA1*05 and HLA-DQB1*02, which encode the DQ2 heterodimer. These alleles are commonly inherited in cis with DRB1*03∶01, which is associated with numerous immune-related disorders, in some cases contributing with a different amount of risk depending on the haplotype context. We aimed at investigating those possible differences involving DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes in CD susceptibility. A family (274 trios) and a case-control sample (369 CD cases/461 controls) were analyzed. DRB1*03∶01-carrying individuals were classified according to the haplotype present (ancestral haplotype (AH) 8.1, AH 18.2 or non-conserved haplotype) after genotyping of HLA-DRB1, -DQA1, -DQB1, -B8, TNF -308, TNF -376 and the TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. We observe that the AH 8.1 confers higher risk than the remaining DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes, and this effect only involves individuals possessing a single copy of DQB1*02. CD risk for these individuals is similar to the one conferred by inherit DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 in trans. It seems that an additional CD susceptibility factor is present in the AH 8.1 but not in other DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes. This factor could be shared with individuals possessing DQ2.5 trans, according to the similar risk observed in those two groups of individuals. PMID:23119005

  5. HLA and celiac disease susceptibility: new genetic factors bring open questions about the HLA influence and gene-dosage effects.

    PubMed

    Medrano, Luz María; Dema, Bárbara; López-Larios, Arturo; Maluenda, Carlos; Bodas, Andrés; López-Palacios, Natalia; Figueredo, M Ángeles; Fernández-Arquero, Miguel; Núñez, Concepción

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder triggered after gluten ingestion in genetically susceptible individuals. The major genetic determinants are HLA-DQA1*05 and HLA-DQB1*02, which encode the DQ2 heterodimer. These alleles are commonly inherited in cis with DRB1*03∶01, which is associated with numerous immune-related disorders, in some cases contributing with a different amount of risk depending on the haplotype context. We aimed at investigating those possible differences involving DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes in CD susceptibility. A family (274 trios) and a case-control sample (369 CD cases/461 controls) were analyzed. DRB1*03∶01-carrying individuals were classified according to the haplotype present (ancestral haplotype (AH) 8.1, AH 18.2 or non-conserved haplotype) after genotyping of HLA-DRB1, -DQA1, -DQB1, -B8, TNF -308, TNF -376 and the TNFa and TNFb microsatellites. We observe that the AH 8.1 confers higher risk than the remaining DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes, and this effect only involves individuals possessing a single copy of DQB1*02. CD risk for these individuals is similar to the one conferred by inherit DQA1*05 and DQB1*02 in trans. It seems that an additional CD susceptibility factor is present in the AH 8.1 but not in other DRB1*03∶01-carrying haplotypes. This factor could be shared with individuals possessing DQ2.5 trans, according to the similar risk observed in those two groups of individuals. PMID:23119005

  6. Multiple independent variants in 6q21-22 associated with susceptibility to celiac disease in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations.

    PubMed

    Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Bevova, Marianna R; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Monsuur, Alienke; Koskinen, Lotta L E; van't Slot, Ruben; Mulder, Chris; Mearin, M Luisa; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma R; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle; Kere, Juha; Mäki, Markku; Wijmenga, Cisca; Saavalainen, Päivi

    2011-06-01

    Celiac disease is an inflammatory enteropathy caused by intolerance to gluten. Previous linkage studies in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations have revealed a locus on chromosome 6q21-22 conferring susceptibility to celiac disease. This locus has previously been implicated in susceptibility to other autoimmune diseases such as Crohn's disease and type 1 diabetes. We performed fine mapping on 446 independent individuals with celiac disease and 641 controls of Dutch origin, testing 872 tagging SNPs in a 22 Mb region of chromosome 6. The 12 most promising SNPs were followed up in 2071 individuals from 284 Finnish and 357 Hungarian celiac disease families to identify risk variants in this region. Multiple markers in the region were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Dutch material. Two SNPs, rs9391227 and rs4946111, were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Finnish population. The association to rs9391227 represents the strongest association signal found in the Finnish (P = 0.003, OR 0.66) as well as the combined Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations (P = 3.6 × 10(-5), OR 0.76). The rs9391227 is situated downstream of the HECT domain and ankyrin repeat containing, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (HACE1) gene and is contained within a region of strong linkage disequilibrium enclosing HACE1. Two additional, independent, susceptibility variants in the 6q21-22 region were also found in a meta-analysis of the three populations. The 6q21-22 region was confirmed as a celiac disease susceptibility locus and harbors multiple independent associations, some of which may implicate ubiquitin-pathways in celiac disease susceptibility. PMID:21326284

  7. Multiple independent variants in 6q21-22 associated with susceptibility to celiac disease in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations

    PubMed Central

    Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Bevova, Marianna R; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Monsuur, Alienke; Koskinen, Lotta LE; Slot, Ruben van't; Mulder, Chris; Mearin, M Luisa; Korponay-Szabo, Ilma R; Kaukinen, Katri; Kurppa, Kalle; Kere, Juha; Mäki, Markku; Wijmenga, Cisca; Saavalainen, Päivi

    2011-01-01

    Celiac disease is an inflammatory enteropathy caused by intolerance to gluten. Previous linkage studies in the Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations have revealed a locus on chromosome 6q21-22 conferring susceptibility to celiac disease. This locus has previously been implicated in susceptibility to other autoimmune diseases such as Crohn's disease and type 1 diabetes. We performed fine mapping on 446 independent individuals with celiac disease and 641 controls of Dutch origin, testing 872 tagging SNPs in a 22 Mb region of chromosome 6. The 12 most promising SNPs were followed up in 2071 individuals from 284 Finnish and 357 Hungarian celiac disease families to identify risk variants in this region. Multiple markers in the region were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Dutch material. Two SNPs, rs9391227 and rs4946111, were significantly associated with celiac disease in the Finnish population. The association to rs9391227 represents the strongest association signal found in the Finnish (P=0.003, OR 0.66) as well as the combined Dutch, Finnish and Hungarian populations (P=3.6 × 10−5, OR 0.76). The rs9391227 is situated downstream of the HECT domain and ankyrin repeat containing, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (HACE1) gene and is contained within a region of strong linkage disequilibrium enclosing HACE1. Two additional, independent, susceptibility variants in the 6q21-22 region were also found in a meta-analysis of the three populations. The 6q21-22 region was confirmed as a celiac disease susceptibility locus and harbors multiple independent associations, some of which may implicate ubiquitin-pathways in celiac disease susceptibility. PMID:21326284

  8. Histopathologic changes in disease-resistant-line and sdisease-susceptible-line juvenile rainbow trout experimentally infected with Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A challenge to genetically selecting fish for disease resistance is an incomplete understanding of how phenotypic selection affects innate immunity at the host-pathogen level. The objective of this study was to explore if tissue damage and cellular inflammatory response was associated with survival...

  9. Grape Cultivar and Sap Culture Conditions Affect the Development of Xylella fastidiosa Phenotypes Associated with Pierce's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hao, Lingyun; Zaini, Paulo A; Hoch, Harvey C; Burr, Thomas J; Mowery, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium in plant hosts and causes Pierce's disease (PD) of grapevines, which differ in susceptibility according to the Vitis species (spp.). In this work we compared X. fastidiosa biofilm formation and population dynamics when cultured in xylem saps from PD-susceptible and -resistant Vitis spp. under different conditions. Behaviors in a closed-culture system were compared to those in different sap-renewal cultures that would more closely mimic the physicochemical environment encountered in planta. Significant differences in biofilm formation and growth in saps from PD-susceptible and -resistant spp. were only observed using sap renewal culture. Compared to saps from susceptible V. vinifera, those from PD-resistant V. aestivalis supported lower titers of X. fastidiosa and less biofilm and V. champinii suppressed both growth and biofilm formation, behaviors which are correlated with disease susceptibility. Furthermore, in microfluidic chambers X. fastidiosa formed thick mature biofilm with three-dimensional (3-D) structures, such as pillars and mounds, in saps from all susceptible spp. In contrast, only small aggregates of various shapes were formed in saps from four out of five of the resistant spp.; sap from the resistant spp. V. mustangensis was an exception in that it also supported thick lawns of biofilm but not the above described 3-D structures typically seen in a mature biofilm from the susceptible saps. Our findings provide not only critical technical information for future bioassays, but also suggest further understanding of PD susceptibility. PMID:27508296

  10. Grape Cultivar and Sap Culture Conditions Affect the Development of Xylella fastidiosa Phenotypes Associated with Pierce's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hoch, Harvey C.; Burr, Thomas J.; Mowery, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is a xylem-limited bacterium in plant hosts and causes Pierce’s disease (PD) of grapevines, which differ in susceptibility according to the Vitis species (spp.). In this work we compared X. fastidiosa biofilm formation and population dynamics when cultured in xylem saps from PD-susceptible and -resistant Vitis spp. under different conditions. Behaviors in a closed-culture system were compared to those in different sap-renewal cultures that would more closely mimic the physicochemical environment encountered in planta. Significant differences in biofilm formation and growth in saps from PD-susceptible and -resistant spp. were only observed using sap renewal culture. Compared to saps from susceptible V. vinifera, those from PD-resistant V. aestivalis supported lower titers of X. fastidiosa and less biofilm and V. champinii suppressed both growth and biofilm formation, behaviors which are correlated with disease susceptibility. Furthermore, in microfluidic chambers X. fastidiosa formed thick mature biofilm with three-dimensional (3-D) structures, such as pillars and mounds, in saps from all susceptible spp. In contrast, only small aggregates of various shapes were formed in saps from four out of five of the resistant spp.; sap from the resistant spp. V. mustangensis was an exception in that it also supported thick lawns of biofilm but not the above described 3-D structures typically seen in a mature biofilm from the susceptible saps. Our findings provide not only critical technical information for future bioassays, but also suggest further understanding of PD susceptibility. PMID:27508296

  11. Susceptibility of Candida albicans biofilms to caspofungin and anidulafungin is not affected by metabolic activity or biomass production.

    PubMed

    Marcos-Zambrano, Laura Judith; Escribano, Pilar; Bouza, Emilio; Guinea, Jesús

    2016-02-01

    Micafungin is more active against biofilms with high metabolic activity; however, it is unknown whether this observation applies to caspofungin and anidulafungin and whether it is also dependent on the biomass production. We compare the antifungal activity of anidulafungin, caspofungin, and micafungin against preformed Candida albicans biofilms with different degrees of metabolic activity and biomass production from 301 isolates causing fungemia in patients admitted to Gregorio Marañon Hospital (January 2007 to September 2014). Biofilms were classified as having low, moderate, or high metabolic activity according XTT reduction assay or having low, moderate, or high biomass according to crystal violet assay. Echinocandin MICs for planktonic and sessile cells were measured using the EUCAST E.Def 7.2 procedure and XTT reduction assay, respectively. Micafungin showed the highest activity against biofilms classified according to the metabolic activity and biomass production (P < .001). The activity of caspofungin and anidulafungin was not dependent on the metabolic activity of the biofilm or the biomass production. These observations were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. None of the echinocandins produced major changes in the structure of biofilms with low metabolic activity and biomass production when compared with the untreated biofilms. However, biofilm with high metabolic activity or high biomass production was considerably more susceptible to micafungin; this effect was not shown by caspofungin or anidulafungin. PMID:26543157

  12. Growth, biofilm formation, antifungal susceptibility and oxidative stress resistance of Candida glabrata are affected by different glucose concentrations.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzu Shan; Desa, Mohd Nasir Mohd; Sandai, Doblin; Chong, Pei Pei; Than, Leslie Thian Lung

    2016-06-01

    Glucose is an important fuel source to support many living organisms. Its importance in the physiological fitness and pathogenicity of Candida glabrata, an emerging human fungal pathogen has not been extensively studied. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of glucose on the growth, biofilm formation, antifungal susceptibility and oxidative stress resistance of C. glabrata. In addition, its effect on the expression of a putative high affinity glucose sensor gene, SNF3 was also investigated. Glucose concentrations were found to exert effects on the physiological responses of C. glabrata. The growth rate of the species correlated positively to the amount of glucose. In addition, low glucose environments were found to induce C. glabrata to form biofilm and resist amphotericin B. Conversely, high glucose environments promoted oxidative stress resistance of C. glabrata. The expression of CgSNF3 was found to be significantly up-regulated in low glucose environments. The expression of SNF3 gene in clinical isolates was found to be higher compared to ATCC laboratory strains in low glucose concentrations, which may explain the better survivability of clinical isolates in the low glucose environment. These observations demonstrated the impact of glucose in directing the physiology and virulence fitness of C. glabrata through the possible modulation by SNF3 as a glucose sensor, which in turn aids the species to adapt, survive and thrive in hostile host environment. PMID:26358577

  13. Disclosing the disclosure: Factors associated with communicating the results of genetic susceptibility testing for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ashida, Sato; Koehly, Laura M.; Roberts, J. Scott; Chen, Clara A.; Hiraki, Susan; Green, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored the extent to which recipients of genetic susceptibility testing for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) communicated their results to others. It also examined demographic characteristics, along with beliefs about AD, associated with such communication. Participants (N = 271) in a randomized clinical trial involving genetic testing for Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene variants among first-degree relatives of AD patients reported their communication behaviors 6 weeks after the results disclosure. Information on beliefs about AD and genetic testing was collected at baseline. Eighty-two percent of participants receiving APOE genotype information shared their results with someone. Specifically, 64% shared with family members, 51% with spouse or significant others, 35% with friends, and 12% with health care professionals. Greater AD treatment optimism was associated with communicating results to family (OR=1.43), spouse (OR=1.62), friends (OR =1.81), and health care professionals (OR=2.20). Lower perceived risk (OR=0.98) and higher perceived importance of genetics in the development of AD (OR=1.93) were associated with results communication in general. Lower perceived drawbacks of AD genetic testing was associated with results communication to friends (OR=0.65). Beliefs about AD risks and causes, genetic testing, and development of treatments may partly determine the interpersonal communication patterns of genetic susceptibility test results. PMID:20029710

  14. Transgenic shRNA pigs reduce susceptibility to foot and mouth disease virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shengwei; Qiao, Jun; Fu, Qiang; Chen, Chuangfu; Ni, Wei; Wujiafu, Sai; Ma, Shiwei; Zhang, Hui; Sheng, Jingliang; Wang, Pengyan; Wang, Dawei; Huang, Jiong; Cao, Lijuan; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is an economically devastating viral disease leading to a substantial loss to the swine industry worldwide. A novel alternative strategy is to develop pigs that are genetically resistant to infection. Here, we produce transgenic (TG) pigs that constitutively expressed FMDV-specific short interfering RNA (siRNA) derived from small hairpin RNA (shRNA). In vitro challenge of TG fibroblasts showed the shRNA suppressed viral growth. TG and non-TG pigs were challenged by intramuscular injection with 100 LD50 of FMDV. High fever, severe clinical signs of foot-and-mouth disease and typical histopathological changes were observed in all of the non-TG pigs but in none of the high-siRNA pigs. Our results show that TG shRNA can provide a viable tool for producing animals with enhanced resistance to FMDV. PMID:26090904

  15. Distinct host cell proteins incorporated by SIV replicating in CD4+ T Cells from natural disease resistant versus non-natural disease susceptible hosts

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Enveloped viruses including the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replicating within host cells acquire host proteins upon egress from the host cells. A number of studies have catalogued such host proteins, and a few have documented the potential positive and negative biological functions of such host proteins. The studies conducted herein utilized proteomic analysis to identify differences in the spectrum of host proteins acquired by a single source of SIV replicating within CD4+ T cells from disease resistant sooty mangabeys and disease susceptible rhesus macaques. Results While a total of 202 host derived proteins were present in viral preparations from CD4+ T cells from both species, there were 4 host-derived proteins that consistently and uniquely associated with SIV replicating within CD4+ T cells from rhesus macaques but not sooty mangabeys; and, similarly, 28 host-derived proteins that uniquely associated with SIV replicating within CD4+ T cells from sooty mangabeys, but not rhesus macaques. Of interest was the finding that of the 4 proteins uniquely present in SIV preparations from rhesus macaques was a 26 S protease subunit 7 (MSS1) that was shown to enhance HIV-1 'tat" mediated transactivation. Among the 28 proteins found in SIV preparations from sooty mangabeys included several molecules associated with immune function such as CD2, CD3ε, TLR4, TLR9 and TNFR and a bioactive form of IL-13. Conclusions The finding of 4 host proteins that are uniquely associated with SIV replicating within CD4+ T cells from disease susceptible rhesus macaques and 28 host proteins that are uniquely associated with SIV replicating within CD4+ T cells from disease resistant sooty mangabeys provide the foundation for determining the potential role of each of these unique host-derived proteins in contributing to the polarized clinical outcome in these 2 species of nonhuman primates. PMID:21162735

  16. Histopathology of crustose coralline algae affected by white band and white patch diseases

    PubMed Central

    Meistertzheim, Anne-Leila; Steneck, Robert S.; Nugues, Maggy M.

    2015-01-01

    Crustose coralline algae (CCA) are major benthic calcifiers that play crucial roles in marine ecosystems, particularly coral reefs. Over the past two decades, epizootics have been reported for several CCA species on coral reefs worldwide. However, their causes remain often unknown in part because few studies have investigated CCA pathologies at a microscopic scale. We studied the cellular changes associated with two syndromes: Coralline White Band Syndrome (CWBS) and Coralline White Patch Disease (CWPD) from samples collected in Curaçao, southern Caribbean. Healthy-looking tissue of diseased CCA did not differ from healthy tissue of healthy CCA. In diseased tissues of both pathologies, the three characteristic cell layers of CCA revealed cells completely depleted of protoplasmic content, but presenting an intact cell wall. In addition, CWBS showed a transition area between healthy and diseased tissues consisting of cells partially deprived of protoplasmic material, most likely corresponding to the white band characterizing the disease at the macroscopic level. This transition area was absent in CWPD. Regrowth at the lesion boundary were sometimes observed in both syndromes. Tissues of both healthy and diseased CCA were colonised by diverse boring organisms. Fungal infections associated with the diseased cells were not seen. However, other bioeroders were more abundant in diseased vs healthy CCA and in diseased vs healthy-looking tissues of diseased CCA. Although their role in the pathogenesis is unclear, this suggests that disease increases CCA susceptibility to bioerosion. Further investigations using an integrated approach are needed to carry out the complete diagnosis of these diseases. PMID:26157617

  17. Decision Aids for Multiple-Decision Disease Management as Affected by Weather Input Errors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many disease management decision support systems (DSS) rely, exclusively or in part, on weather inputs to calculate an indicator for disease hazard. Error in the weather inputs, typically due to forecasting, interpolation or estimation from off-site sources, may affect model calculations and manage...

  18. Genetic variants of MAOB affect serotonin level and specific behavioral attributes to increase autism spectrum disorder (ASD) susceptibility in males.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Barnali; Verma, Deepak; Karmakar, Arijit; Jaiswal, Preeti; Sanyal, Aritrika; Paul, Debarshi; Sinha, Swagata; Singh, Asem Surindro; Guhathakurta, Subhrangshu; Roychowdhury, Anirban; Panda, Chinmoy Kumar; Ghosh, Saurabh; Mohanakumar, Kochupurackal P; Mukhophadhyay, Kanchan; Rajamma, Usha

    2016-11-01

    Serotonergic system participates in various developmental processes and modulation of behaviour. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is characterized by a range of behavioral symptoms scaling from mild to severe. Abnormal 5-HT synthesis and signalling, platelet hyperserotonemia and amelioration of repetitive behaviours by SSRI are some of the key findings, which reinforced the hypothesis that serotonergic genes might act as ASD susceptible genes. Therefore, genes encoding monoamine oxidases A/B (MAOA/MAOB) received special attention as these genes are located on the X-chromosome and the gene products are responsible for 5-HT degradation. In the present study, we conducted population-based association analysis of eight markers of MAOB with ASD in a study cohort of 203 cases and 236 controls form India and examined its effect on platelet 5-HT content and behaviour. Gender-specific changes were observed for the contrasting LD between pair of markers among cases and controls. Case-control analysis demonstrated over-distribution of major C allele of rs2283728 and rs2283727 in male and female ASD cases respectively. Haplotypic distribution and interaction among markers showed more robust effect in male cases. Interestingly, male ASD cases displayed higher platelet 5-HT content in comparison to the respective controls. Quantitative trait analysis revealed significant correlation of genetic variants and haplotypes of MAOB markers, rs1799836 and rs6324 with increased platelet 5-HT level and CARS scores for specific behavioral symptoms respectively in males. This study suggests that MAOB increases ASD risk in males, possibly through its sex-specific regulatory effect on 5-HT metabolism and behavior. PMID:27381555

  19. Standardization of Operator-Dependent Variables Affecting Precision and Accuracy of the Disk Diffusion Method for Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing.

    PubMed

    Hombach, Michael; Maurer, Florian P; Pfiffner, Tamara; Böttger, Erik C; Furrer, Reinhard

    2015-12-01

    Parameters like zone reading, inoculum density, and plate streaking influence the precision and accuracy of disk diffusion antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST). While improved reading precision has been demonstrated using automated imaging systems, standardization of the inoculum and of plate streaking have not been systematically investigated yet. This study analyzed whether photometrically controlled inoculum preparation and/or automated inoculation could further improve the standardization of disk diffusion. Suspensions of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213 of 0.5 McFarland standard were prepared by 10 operators using both visual comparison to turbidity standards and a Densichek photometer (bioMérieux), and the resulting CFU counts were determined. Furthermore, eight experienced operators each inoculated 10 Mueller-Hinton agar plates using a single 0.5 McFarland standard bacterial suspension of E. coli ATCC 25922 using regular cotton swabs, dry flocked swabs (Copan, Brescia, Italy), or an automated streaking device (BD-Kiestra, Drachten, Netherlands). The mean CFU counts obtained from 0.5 McFarland standard E. coli ATCC 25922 suspensions were significantly different for suspensions prepared by eye and by Densichek (P < 0.001). Preparation by eye resulted in counts that were closer to the CLSI/EUCAST target of 10(8) CFU/ml than those resulting from Densichek preparation. No significant differences in the standard deviations of the CFU counts were observed. The interoperator differences in standard deviations when dry flocked swabs were used decreased significantly compared to the differences when regular cotton swabs were used, whereas the mean of the standard deviations of all operators together was not significantly altered. In contrast, automated streaking significantly reduced both interoperator differences, i.e., the individual standard deviations, compared to the standard deviations for the manual method, and the mean of

  20. Susceptibility based upon Chemical Interaction with Disease Processes: Potential Implications for Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    One of the challenges facing toxicology and risk assessment is that numerous host and environmental factors may modulate vulnerability and risk. An area of increasing interest is the potential for chemicals to interact with background aging and disease processes, an interaction...

  1. ATG16L1: A multifunctional susceptibility factor in Crohn disease

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Mohammad; Ammitzboell, Mette; Nys, Kris; Seidelin, Jakob Benedict; Nielsen, Ole Haagen

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variations in the autophagic pathway influence genetic predispositions to Crohn disease. Autophagy, the major lysosomal pathway for degrading and recycling cytoplasmic material, constitutes an important homeostatic cellular process. Of interest, single-nucleotide polymorphisms in ATG16L1 (autophagy-related 16-like 1 [S. cerevisiae]), a key component in the autophagic response to invading pathogens, have been associated with an increased risk of developing Crohn disease. The most common and well-studied genetic variant of ATG16L1 (rs2241880; leading to a T300A conversion) exhibits a strong association with risk for developing Crohn disease. The rs2241880 variant plays a crucial role in pathogen clearance, resulting in imbalanced cytokine production, and is linked to other biological processes, such as the endoplasmic reticulum stress/unfolded protein response. In this review, we focus on the importance of ATG16L1 and its genetic variant (T300A) within the elementary biological processes linked to Crohn disease. PMID:25906181

  2. Susceptibility of Different Potato Cultivars to Purple Top Disease in the Columbia Basin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 2002, Columbia Basin potato growers in Washington and Oregon have experienced serious outbreaks of potato purple top disease that caused significant yield losses and a reduction in tuber quality. The beet leafhopper-transmitted virescence agent (BLTVA) phytoplasma is the causal agent of the di...

  3. EFFECTS OF PHOSGENE EXPOSURE ON BACTERIAL VIRAL AND NEOPLASTIC LUNG DISEASE SUSCEPTIBILITY IN MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of phosgene inhalation exposure on host resistance models representative of bacterial, viral, and neoplastic lung diseases were assessed. ingle 4 h exposure to concentrations of phosgene of 0.025 ppm and above significantly enhanced mortality due to aerosol infection ...

  4. Susceptibility of Different Potato Plant Growth Stages to Purple Top Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 2002, potato growers in the Columbia Basin of Washington and Oregon have experienced outbreaks of potato purple top disease that have caused significant yield losses and reductions in tuber quality. It was determined that the beet leafhopper-transmitted virescence agent (BLTVA) phytoplasma is ...

  5. Cuticles of European and American lobsters harbor diverse bacterial species and differ in disease susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Whitten, Miranda M A; Davies, Charlotte E; Kim, Anita; Tlusty, Michael; Wootton, Emma C; Chistoserdov, Andrei; Rowley, Andrew F

    2014-01-01

    Diseases of lobster shells have a significant impact on fishing industries but the risk of disease transmission between different lobster species has yet to be properly investigated. This study compared bacterial biofilm communities from American (Homarus americanus) and European lobsters (H. gammarus), to assess both healthy cuticle and diseased cuticle during lesion formation. Culture-independent molecular techniques revealed diversity in the bacterial communities of cuticle biofilms both within and between the two lobster species, and identified three bacterial genera associated with shell lesions plus two putative beneficial bacterial species (detected exclusively in healthy cuticle or healing damaged cuticle). In an experimental aquarium shared between American and European lobsters, heterospecific transmission of potentially pathogenic bacteria appeared to be very limited; however, the claws of European lobsters were more likely to develop lesions when reared in the presence of American lobsters. Aquarium biofilms were also examined but revealed no candidate pathogens for environmental transmission. Aquimarina sp. ‘homaria’ (a potential pathogen associated with a severe epizootic form of shell disease) was detected at a much higher prevalence among American than European lobsters, but its presence correlated more with exacerbation of existing lesions rather than with lesion initiation. PMID:24817518

  6. Susceptibility of Cattle to First-Passage Intracerebral Inoculation with Chronic Wasting Disease Agent from Elk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle could be exposed to chronic wasting disease (CWD) from infected farmed or free-ranging cervids. The purpose of this study was to assess the transmissibility of CWD derived from elk to cattle. Intracerebral inoculation of calves (n=14) of approximately 3 months of age was done with 1 ml of a...

  7. CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES, SUSCEPTIBILITY TO OXIDATIVE INJURY AND COMPENSATORY MECHANISMS: INSIGHTS FROM RODENT MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the number one cause for human mortality and nearly 25% of the population develops chronic CVD at an age of 65 years or older. Environmental and genetic interactions govern pathogenesis. Increased oxidative stress and compromised antioxidant stat...

  8. Modulation of microrna in two genetically disparate chicken lines showing different necrotic enteritis disease susceptibility

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Necrotic enteritis (NE) is a re-emerging disease as a result of an increased restriction on the use of antibiotics in poultry. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathology of NE are unclear. Therefore, we carried out small RNA transcriptome analysis in an experimentally induced NE m...

  9. SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS ARE SUSCEPTIBLE TO AIRWAY DISEASE INDUCED BY SULFUR DIOXIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rodent models of chronic pulmonary diseases induced by sulfur dioxide (SO2), elastase or tobacco smoke have limited utility because of their lack of chronicity of inflammation, and they demonstrate limited sensitivity to a given experimental manipulation. We hypothesized that dis...

  10. Susceptibility of cattle to the agent of chronic wasting disease from elk after intracranial inoculation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cattle could be exposed to the agent of chronic wasting disease (CWD) through contact with infected farmed or free-ranging cervids or exposure to contaminated premises. The purpose of this study was to assess the potential for CWD derived from elk to transmit to cattle after intracranial inoculation...

  11. Differential serotonergic mediation of aggression in roosters selected for resistance and susceptibility to Marek's disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a primary regulating neurotransmitter involved in aggressive and impulsive behaviors in mammals. Previous studies have also demonstrated the function of serotonergic system in regulating aggression is affected by both genetic and environmental factors. The serotonergic system m...

  12. Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease: genetic, immunological, and clinical features of inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2014-12-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) is a rare condition characterized by predisposition to clinical disease caused by weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as BCG vaccines and environmental mycobacteria, in otherwise healthy individuals with no overt abnormalities in routine hematological and immunological tests. MSMD designation does not recapitulate all the clinical features, as patients are also prone to salmonellosis, candidiasis and tuberculosis, and more rarely to infections with other intramacrophagic bacteria, fungi, or parasites, and even, perhaps, a few viruses. Since 1996, nine MSMD-causing genes, including seven autosomal (IFNGR1, IFNGR2, STAT1, IL12B, IL12RB1, ISG15, and IRF8) and two X-linked (NEMO, and CYBB) genes have been discovered. The high level of allelic heterogeneity has already led to the definition of 18 different disorders. The nine gene products are physiologically related, as all are involved in IFN-γ-dependent immunity. These disorders impair the production of (IL12B, IL12RB1, IRF8, ISG15, NEMO) or the response to (IFNGR1, IFNGR2, STAT1, IRF8, CYBB) IFN-γ. These defects account for only about half the known MSMD cases. Patients with MSMD-causing genetic defects may display other infectious diseases, or even remain asymptomatic. Most of these inborn errors do not show complete clinical penetrance for the case-definition phenotype of MSMD. We review here the genetic, immunological, and clinical features of patients with inborn errors of IFN-γ-dependent immunity. PMID:25453225

  13. Systemic autoimmune disease induced by dendritic cells that have captured necrotic but not apoptotic cells in susceptible mouse strains.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang; Chan, Kwok-Wah; Trendell-Smith, Nigel J; Wu, Adrian; Tian, Lina; Lam, Audrey C; Chan, Albert K; Lo, Chi-Kin; Chik, Stanley; Ko, King-Hung; To, Christina K W; Kam, Siu-Kee; Li, Xiao-Song; Yang, Cui-Hong; Leung, Suet Yi; Ng, Mun-Hon; Stott, David I; MacPherson, G Gordon; Huang, Fang-Ping

    2005-11-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disorder of a largely unknown etiology. Anti-double-stranded (ds) DNA antibodies are a classic hallmark of the disease, although the mechanism underlying their induction remains unclear. We demonstrate here that, in both lupus-prone and normal mouse strains, strong anti-dsDNA antibody responses can be induced by dendritic cells (DC) that have ingested syngeneic necrotic (DC/nec), but not apoptotic (DC/apo), cells. Clinical manifestations of lupus were evident, however, only in susceptible mouse strains, which correlate with the ability of DC/nec to release IFN-gamma and to induce the pathogenic IgG2a anti-dsDNA antibodies. Injection of DC/nec not only accelerated disease progression in the MRL/MpJ-lpr/lpr lupus-prone mice but also induced a lupus-like disease in the MRL/MpJ-+/+ wild-type control strain. Immune complex deposition was readily detectable in the kidneys, and the mice developed proteinuria. Strikingly, female MRL/MpJ-+/+ mice that had received DC/nec, but not DC/apo, developed a 'butterfly' facial lesion resembling a cardinal feature of human SLE. Our study therefore demonstrates that DC/nec inducing a Th1 type of responses, which are otherwise tightly regulated in a normal immune system, may play a pivotal role in SLE pathogenesis. PMID:16224814

  14. Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease: genetic, immunological, and clinical features of inborn errors of IFN-γ immunity

    PubMed Central

    Bustamante, Jacinta; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) is a rare condition characterized by predisposition to clinical disease caused by weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as BCG vaccines and environmental mycobacteria, in otherwise healthy individuals with no overt abnormalities in routine hematological and immunological tests. MSMD designation does not recapitulate all the clinical features, as patients are also prone to salmonellosis, candidiasis and tuberculosis, and more rarely to infections with other intramacrophagic bacteria, fungi, or parasites, and even, perhaps, a few viruses. Since 1996, nine MSMD-causing genes, including seven autosomal (IFNGR1, IFNGR2, STAT1, IL12B, IL12RB1, ISG15, and IRF8) and two X-linked (NEMO, CYBB) genes have been discovered. The high level of allelic heterogeneity has already led to the definition of 18 different disorders. The nine gene products are physiologically related, as all are involved in IFN-γ-dependent immunity. These disorders impair the production of (IL12B, IL12RB1, IRF8, ISG15, NEMO) or the response to (IFNGR1, IFNGR2, STAT1, IRF8, CYBB) IFN-γ. These defects account for only about half the known MSMD cases. Patients with MSMD-causing genetic defects may display other infectious diseases, or even remain asymptomatic. Most of these inborn errors do not show complete clinical penetrance for the case-definition phenotype of MSMD. We review here the genetic, immunological, and clinical features of patients with inborn errors of IFN-γ-dependent immunity. PMID:25453225

  15. Chronic wasting disease (CWD) susceptibility of several North American rodents that are sympatric with cervid CWD epidemics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heisey, D.M.; Mickelsen, N.A.; Schneider, J.R.; Johnson, C.J.; Langenberg, J.A.; Bochsler, P.N.; Keane, D.P.; Barr, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a highly contagious always fatal neurodegenerative disease that is currently known to naturally infect only species of the deer family, Cervidae. CWD epidemics are occurring in free-ranging cervids at several locations in North America, and other wildlife species are certainly being exposed to infectious material. To assess the potential for transmission, we intracerebrally inoculated four species of epidemic-sympatric rodents with CWD. Transmission was efficient in all species; the onset of disease was faster in the two vole species than the two Peromyscus spp. The results for inocula prepared from CWD-positive deer with or without CWD-resistant genotypes were similar. Survival times were substantially shortened upon second passage, demonstrating adaptation. Unlike all other known prion protein sequences for cricetid rodents that possess asparagine at position 170, our red-backed voles expressed serine and refute previous suggestions that a serine in this position substantially reduces susceptibility to CWD. Given the scavenging habits of these rodent species, the apparent persistence of CWD prions in the environment, and the inevitable exposure of these rodents to CWD prions, our intracerebral challenge results indicate that further investigation of the possibility of natural transmission is warranted. Copyright ?? 2010, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Observations on macrolide resistance and susceptibility testing performance in field isolates collected from clinical bovine respiratory disease cases.

    PubMed

    DeDonder, Keith D; Harhay, Dayna M; Apley, Michael D; Lubbers, Brian V; Clawson, Michael L; Schuller, Gennie; Harhay, Gregory P; White, Brad J; Larson, Robert L; Capik, Sarah F; Riviere, Jim E; Kalbfleisch, Ted; Tessman, Ronald K

    2016-08-30

    The objectives of this study were; first, to describe gamithromycin susceptibility of Mannheimia haemolytica, Pasteurella multocida, and Histophilus somni isolated from cattle diagnosed with bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and previously treated with either gamithromycin for control of BRD (mass medication=MM) or sham-saline injected (control=CON); second, to describe the macrolide resistance genes present in genetically typed M. haemolytica isolates; third, use whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to correlate the phenotypic resistance and genetic determinants for resistance among M. haemolytica isolates. M. haemolytica (n=276), P. multocida (n=253), and H. somni (n=78) were isolated from feedlot cattle diagnosed with BRD. Gamithromycin susceptibility was determined by broth microdilution. Whole-genome sequencing was utilized to determine the presence/absence of macrolide resistance genes and to genetically type M. haemolytica. Generalized linear mixed models were built for analysis. There was not a significant difference between MM and CON groups in regards to the likelihood of culturing a resistant isolate of M. haemolytica or P. multocida. The likelihood of culturing a resistant isolate of M. haemolytica differed significantly by state of origin in this study. A single M. haemolytica genetic subtype was associated with an over whelming majority of the observed resistance. H. somni isolation counts were low and statistical models would not converge. Phenotypic resistance was predicted with high sensitivity and specificity by WGS. Additional studies to elucidate the relationships between phenotypic expression of resistance/genetic determinants for resistance and clinical response to antimicrobials are necessary to inform judicious use of antimicrobials in the context of relieving animal disease and suffering. PMID:27527782

  17. Replication of GWAS Coding SNPs Implicates MMEL1 as a Potential Susceptibility Locus among Saudi Arabian Celiac Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Saadah, Omar I; Shaik, Noor Ahmad; Banaganapalli, Babajan; Salama, Mohammed A; Al-Harthi, Sameer E; Wang, Jun; Shawoosh, Harbi A; Alghamdi, Sharifa A; Bin-Taleb, Yagoub Y; Alhussaini, Bakr H; Elango, Ramu; Al-Aama, Jumana Y

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a gluten intolerance disorder, was implicated to have 57 genetic susceptibility loci for Europeans but not for culturally and geographically distinct ethnic populations like Saudi Arabian CD patients. Therefore, we genotyped Saudi CD patients and healthy controls for three polymorphisms, that is, Phe196Ser in IRAK1, Trp262Arg in SH2B3, and Met518Thr in MMEL1 genes. Single locus analysis identified that carriers of the 518 Thr/Thr (MMEL1) genotype conferred a 1.6-fold increased disease risk compared to the noncarriers (OR = 2.6; 95% CI: 1.22-5.54; P < 0.01). This significance persisted even under allelic (OR = 1.55; 95% CI: 1.05-2.28; P = 0.02) and additive (OR = 0.35; 95% CI: 0.17-0.71; P = 0.03) genetic models. However, frequencies for Trp262Arg (SH2B3) and Phe196Ser (IRAK1) polymorphisms were not significantly different between patients and controls. The overall best MDR model included Met518Thr and Trp262Arg polymorphisms, with a maximal testing accuracy of 64.1% and a maximal cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10 (P = 0.0156). Allelic distribution of the 518 Thr/Thr polymorphism in MMEL1 primarily suggests its independent and synergistic contribution towards CD susceptibility among Saudi patients. Lack of significant association of IRAK and SH2B3 gene polymorphisms in Saudi patients but their association in European groups suggests the genetic heterogeneity of CD. PMID:26843707

  18. Replication of GWAS Coding SNPs Implicates MMEL1 as a Potential Susceptibility Locus among Saudi Arabian Celiac Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Saadah, Omar I.; Shaik, Noor Ahmad; Banaganapalli, Babajan; Salama, Mohammed A.; Al-Harthi, Sameer E.; Wang, Jun; Shawoosh, Harbi A.; Alghamdi, Sharifa A.; Bin-Taleb, Yagoub Y.; Alhussaini, Bakr H.; Elango, Ramu; Al-Aama, Jumana Y.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD), a gluten intolerance disorder, was implicated to have 57 genetic susceptibility loci for Europeans but not for culturally and geographically distinct ethnic populations like Saudi Arabian CD patients. Therefore, we genotyped Saudi CD patients and healthy controls for three polymorphisms, that is, Phe196Ser in IRAK1, Trp262Arg in SH2B3, and Met518Thr in MMEL1 genes. Single locus analysis identified that carriers of the 518 Thr/Thr (MMEL1) genotype conferred a 1.6-fold increased disease risk compared to the noncarriers (OR = 2.6; 95% CI: 1.22–5.54; P < 0.01). This significance persisted even under allelic (OR = 1.55; 95% CI: 1.05–2.28; P = 0.02) and additive (OR = 0.35; 95% CI: 0.17–0.71; P = 0.03) genetic models. However, frequencies for Trp262Arg (SH2B3) and Phe196Ser (IRAK1) polymorphisms were not significantly different between patients and controls. The overall best MDR model included Met518Thr and Trp262Arg polymorphisms, with a maximal testing accuracy of 64.1% and a maximal cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10 (P = 0.0156). Allelic distribution of the 518 Thr/Thr polymorphism in MMEL1 primarily suggests its independent and synergistic contribution towards CD susceptibility among Saudi patients. Lack of significant association of IRAK and SH2B3 gene polymorphisms in Saudi patients but their association in European groups suggests the genetic heterogeneity of CD. PMID:26843707

  19. Genetic polymorphism of MMP family and coronary disease susceptibility: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Shi, Jingpu; Fu, Lingyu; Wang, Hailong; Zhou, Bo; Wu, Xiaomei

    2012-03-01

    The issue that genetic polymorphism of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family is in association with coronary disease is controversial. So we did a meta-analysis to clarify it clearly. We made a literature search of PubMed, the Web of Science, and Cochrane Collaboration's database to identify eligible reports. The methodological quality of each included studies was assessed. We calculated the pooled ORs with their 95%CI for each genetic polymorphism in STATA 11 software. Separate analysis was performed to address the consistency of results across the subgroup with different continents. A total of 39 studies were included, with a sample of 42269 individuals. This meta-analysis provided evidence that genetic polymorphism of MMP1-1607 1G/2G, MMP3-Gly45lys, MMP3-376 G/C, MMP3-1171 5A/6A, MMP9-1562 C/T and MMP9-R279Q have a small to medium effect on incidence of coronary disease. There was no evidence that MMP1-519 A/G, MMP1-340 T/C and MMP2-1306 C/T polymorphism could increase risk of coronary disease. Results from subgroup analysis supported a relation between MMP3-1711 5A allele, MMP9-1562 C allele and coronary disease especially in Asian population. The results provide moderate association between the six common genetic polymorphism of matrix metalloproteinase family and coronary disease. However, the challenge for researcher is identifying separate effect on different races. PMID:22226810

  20. Discrimination and evocation of affectively intoned speech in patients with right parietal disease.

    PubMed

    Tucker, D M; Watson, R T; Heilman, K M

    1977-10-01

    Patients with right parietal disease have disturbed comprehension of affective speech. Ability to discriminate affective speech (make same/different discriminations) and ability to repeat emotionally bland sentences with affective tones were tested in three groups of subjects--patients with right parietal dysfunction and neglect, conduction aphasics with left hemispheric lesions, and patients without intracranial disease. Patients with right parietal dysfunction performed significantly poorer than did aphasic controls on both a recognition and discrimination task. Patients with right parietal dysfunction also scored poorer on the evocative task than the nonaphasic controls. PMID:561908

  1. Hypothesis: Do miRNAs Targeting the Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 Gene (LRRK2) Influence Parkinson's Disease Susceptibility?

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Şenay Görücü; Geyik, Sırma; Neyal, Ayşe Münife; Soko, Nyarai D; Bozkurt, Hakan; Dandara, Collet

    2016-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a frequently occurring neurodegenerative motor disorder adversely impacting global health. There is a paucity of biomarkers and diagnostics that can forecast susceptibility to PD. A new research frontier for PD pathophysiology is the study of variations in microRNA (miRNA) expression whereby miRNAs serve as "upstream regulators" of gene expression in relation to functioning of the dopamine neuronal pathways. Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2) is a frequently studied gene in PD. Little is known about the ways in which expression of miRNAs targeting LRKK2 impact PD susceptibility. In a sample of 204 unrelated subjects (102 persons with PD and 102 healthy controls), we report here candidate miRNA expression in whole blood samples as measured by real-time PCR (hsa-miR-4671-3p, hsa-miR-335-3p, hsa-miR-561-3p, hsa-miR-579-3p, and hsa-miR-3143) that target LRRK2. Using step-wise logistic regression, and controlling for covariates such as age, gender, PD disease severity, concomitant medications, and co-morbidity, we found that the combination of has-miR-335-3p, has-miR-561-3p, and has-miR-579-3p account for 50% of the variation in regards to PD susceptibility (p < 0.0001). Notably, the hsa-miR-561-3p expression was the most robust predictor of PD in both univariate and multivariate analyses (p < 0.001). Moreover, the biological direction (polarity) of the association was plausible in that the candidate miRNAs displayed a diminished expression in patients. This is consistent with the hypothesis that decreased levels of miRNAs targeting LRRK2 might result in a gain of function for LRRK2, and by extension, loss of neuronal viability. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first clinical association study of the above candidate miRNAs' expression in PD using peripheral samples. These observations may guide future clinical diagnostics research on PD. PMID:27093107

  2. [Susceptibilities of bacteria isolated from patients with lower respiratory infectious diseases to antibacterial agents (2011)].

    PubMed

    Goto, Hajime; Iwasaki, Mitsuhiro

    2015-04-01

    From October 2011 to September 2012, we collected the specimen from 316 patients with lower respiratory tract infections in 16 institutions in Japan, and investigated the susceptibilities of isolated bacteria to various antibacterial agents and patients' characteristics. All of 357 strains that were isolated from specimen (mainly from sputum) and assumed to be bacteria causing in infection, were examined. The isolated bacteria were: Staphylococcus aureus 51, Streptococcus pneumoniae 73, Haemophilus influenzae 88, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (non-mucoid) 34, P. aeruginosa (mucoid) 9, Klebsiella pneumoniae 21, and Moraxella catarrhalis 33. Of 51 S. aureus strains, those with 2 μg/mL or less of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-susceptible S. aureus: MSSA) and those with 4 μg/mL or more of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-resistant S. aureus: MRSA) were 31 (60.8%) and 20 (39.2%) strains, respectively. Against MSSA, imipenem had the most potent antibacterial activity and inhibited the growth of all strains at 0.063 μg/mL or less. Against MRSA, vancomycin showed the potent activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 1 μg/mL. Linezolid also showed the great activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 2 μg/mL. Carbapenems and penems showed the most potent activities against S. pneumoniae and panipenem inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.125 μg/mL. Imipenem and faropenem also had a preferable activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.5 and 1 μg/mL, respectively. In contrast, there were high-resistant strains (MIC: > 128 μg/mL) for erythromycin (53.4%) and clindamycin (3 5.6%). Against H. influenzae, levofloxacin showed the most potent activity and its MIC90 was 0.063 μg/mL or less. Ciprofloxacin showed the most potent activity against P. aeruginosa (mucoid) and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 2 μg/mL or less. Against the non-mucoid type of P. aeruginosa, tobramycin had the most potent activity and its MIC90 was 2

  3. [Susceptibilities of bacteria isolated from patients with lower respiratory infectious diseases to antibacterial agents (2009)].

    PubMed

    Goto, Hajime; Kumagai, Shigeru

    2015-02-01

    From October 2009 to September 2010, we collected the specimen from 432 patients with lower respiratory tract infections in 16 institutions in Japan, and investigated the susceptibilities of isolated bacteria to various antibacterial agents and patients' characteristics. All of 479 strains that were isolated from specimen (mainly from sputum) and assumed to be bacteria causing in infection, were examined. The isolated bacteria were: Staphylococcus aureus 90, Streptococcus pneumoniae 74, Haemophilus influenzae 82, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (non-mucoid) 60, P. aeruginosa (mucoid) 31, Klebsiella pneumoniae 41, and Moraxella catarrhalis 34. Of 90 S. aureus strains, those with 2 μg/mL or less of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-susceptible S. aureus: MSSA) and those with 4 μg/mL or more of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-resistant S. aureus: MRSA) were 43 (47.8%) and 47 (52.2%) strains, respectively. Against MSSA, imipenem had the most potent antibacterial activity and inhibited the growth of all strains at 0.063 μg/mL or less. Against MRSA, vancomycin and arbekacin showed the potent activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 2 and 4 μg/mL, respectively. Linezolid also showed the great activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 2 μg/mL. Carbapenems and penems showed the most potent activities against S. pneumoniae and panipenem inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.125 μg/mL. Imipenem and faropenem also had a preferable activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.25 and 0.5 μg/mL, respectively. In contrast, there were high-resistant strains (MIC: > 128 μg/mL) for erythromycin (51.4%) and clindamycin (35.1%). Against H. influenzae, levofloxacin showed the most potent activity and its MIC90 was 0.063 μg/mL or less. Meropenem showed the most potent activity against P. aeruginosa (mucoid) and its MIC90 was 1 μg/mL. Against the non-mucoid type of P. aeruginosa, tobramycin had the most potent activity and its MIC90 was 2

  4. [Susceptibilities of bacteria isolated from patients with lower respiratory infectious diseases to antibacterial agents (2010)].

    PubMed

    Goto, Hajime; Iwasaki, Mitsuhiro

    2015-04-01

    From October 2010 to September 2011, we collected the specimen from 361 patients with lower respiratory tract infections in 16 institutions in Japan, and investigated the susceptibilities of isolated bacteria to various antibacterial agents and patients' characteristics. All of 399 strains that were isolated from specimen (mainly from sputum) and assumed to be bacteria causing in infection, were examined. The isolated bacteria were: Staphylococcus aureus 70, Streptococcus pneumoniae 65, Haemophilus influenzae 72, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (non-mucoid) 47, P. aeruginosa (mucoid) 14, Klebsiella pneumoniae 30, and Moraxella catarrhalis 39. Of 70 S. aureus strains, those with 2 μg/mL or less of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-susceptible S. aureus: MSSA) and those with 4 μg/mL or more of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-resistant S. aureus: MRSA) were 45 (64.3%) and 25 (35.7%) strains, respectively. Against MSSA, imipenem had the most potent antibacterial activity and inhibited the growth of all strains at 0.063 μg/mL or less. Against MRSA, vancomycin and arbekacin showed the potent activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 2 μg/mL. Linezolid also showed the great activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 2 μg/mL. Carbapenems and penems showed the most potent activities against S. pneumoniae and panipenem inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.125 μg/mL. Imipenem and faropenem also had a preferable activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.5 and 1 μg/mL, respectively. In contrast, there were high-resistant strains (MIC: > 128 μg/mL) for erythromycin (44.6%) and clindamycin (24.6%). Against H. influenzae, levofloxacin showed the most potent activity and its MIC90 was 0.063 μg/mL or less. Meropenem showed the most potent activity against P. aeruginosa (mucoid) and its MIC90 was 0.5 μg/mL. Against the non-mucoid type of P. aeruginosa, tobramycin had the most potent activity and its MIC90 was 2 μg/mL. Against K

  5. [Susceptibilities of bacteria isolated from patients with lower respiratory infectious diseases to antibiotics (2006)].

    PubMed

    Goto, Hajime; Takeda, Hideki; Kawai, Shin; Suwabe, Akira; Watanabe, Suguru; Okazaki, Mitsuhiro; Ashino, Yugo; Shimada, Kaoru; Aoki, Nobuki; Sato, Tetsuo; Honma, Yasuo; Mori, Takeshi; Kudo, Kouichiro; Sugiyama, Haruhito; Kondo, Shigemi; Tanaka, Tsukasa; Kido, Kenji; Yoshimura, Kunihiko; Oguri, Toyoko; Yamamoto, Makoto; Nakamori, Yoshitaka; Inoue, Hiroshi; Yamauchi, Kohei; Sumitomo, Midori; Endo, Shigeatsu; Nakadate, Toshihide; Oka, Mikio; Kobashi, Yoshihiro; Saita, Naoki; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kondou, Akira; Matsuda, Junichi; Nakano, Michiko; Kohno, Shigeru; Oikawa, Satoru

    2013-12-01

    From October 2006 to September 2007, we collected the specimen from 356 patients with lower respiratory tract infections in 14 institutions in Japan, and investigated the susceptibilities of isolated bacteria to various antibacterial agents and patients' characteristics. Of 414 strains that were isolated from specimen (mainly from sputum) and assumed to be bacteria causing in infection, 407 strains were examined. The isolated bacteria were: Staphylococcus aureus 64, Streptococcus pneumoniae 96, Haemophilus influenzae 87, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (non-mucoid) 52, P. aeruginosa (mucoid) 11, Klebsiella pneumoniae 20, and Moraxella catarrhalis 44. Of 64 S. aureus strains, those with 2 microg/ml or less of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-susceptible S. aureus: MSSA) and those with 4 microg/ml or more of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-resistant S. aureus: MRSA) were 27 (42.2%) and 37 (57.8%) strains, respectively. Against MSSA, imipenem had the most potent antibacterial activity and inhibited the growth of all strains at 0.063 microg/ml or less. Against MRSA, vancomycin and linezolid showed the most potent activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 1 microg/ml. Carbapenems showed the most potent activities against S. pneumoniae and in particular, panipenem inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.063 microg/ml or less. Imipenem and faropenem also had a preferable activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.125 and 0.5 microg/ml, respectively. In contrast, there were high-resistant strains (MIC: over 128 microg/ml) for erythromycin (45.8%) and clindamycin (20.8%). Against H. influenzae, levofloxacin showed the most potent activity and its MIC90 was 0.063 microg/ml or less. Meropenem showed the most potent activity against P. aeruginosa (mucoid) and its MIC90 was 0.5 microg/ml. Against P. aeruginosa (non-mucoid), tobramycin had the most potent activity and its MIC90 was 2 microg/ml. Against K. pneumoniae, cefozopran was the most potent activity

  6. [Susceptibilities of bacteria isolated from patients with lower respiratory infectious diseases to antibacterial agents (2008)].

    PubMed

    Goto, Hajime; Iwasaki, Mitsuhiro

    2015-02-01

    From October 2008 to September 2009, we collected the specimen from 374 patients with lower respiratory tract infections in 15 institutions in Japan, and investigated the susceptibilities of isolated bacteria to various antibacterial agents and patients' characteristics. Of 423 strains that were isolated from specimen (mainly from sputum) and assumed to be bacteria causing in infection, 421 strains were examined. The isolated bacteria were: Staphylococcus aureus 78, Streptococcus pneumoniae 78, Haemophilus influenzae 89, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (non-mucoid) 61, P. aeruginosa (mucoid) 19, Klebsiella pneumoniae 28, and Moraxella catarrhalis 32. Of 78 S. aureus strains, those with 2 μg/mL or less of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-susceptible S. aureus: MSSA) and those with 4 μg/mL or more of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-resistant S. aureus: MRSA) were 34 (43.6%) and 44 (56.4%) strains, respectively. Against MSSA, imipenem had the most potent antibacterial activity and inhibited the growth of all strains at 0.063 μg/mL or less. Against MRSA vancomycin and arbekacin showed the potent activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 1 and 2 μg/mL, respectively. Linezolid also showed the great activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 1 μg/mL. Carbapenems and penems showed the most potent activities against S. pneumoniae and panipenem inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.125 μg/mL. Imipenem and faropenem also had a preferable activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.25 and 1 μg/mL, respectively. In contrast, there were high-resistant strains (MIC: > 128 μg/mL) for erythromycin (43.6%) and clindamycin (19.2%). Against H. influenzae, levofloxacin showed the most potent activity and its MIC90 was 0.063 μg/mL or less. Tobramycin showed the most potent activity against P. aeruginosa (mucoid) and its MIC90 was 2 μg/mL. Against the non-mucoid type of P. aeruginosa, tobramycin and ciprofloxacin had the most potent activity

  7. [Susceptibilities of bacteria isolated from patients with lower respiratory infectious diseases to antibacterial agents (2007)].

    PubMed

    Goto, Hajime; Iwasaki, Mitsuhiro

    2015-02-01

    From October 2007 to September 2008, we collected the specimen from 362 patients with lower respiratory tract infections in 14 institutions in Japan, and investigated the susceptibilities of isolated bacteria to various antibacterial agents and patients' characteristics. Of 413 strains that were isolated from specimen (mainly from sputum) and assumed to be bacteria causing in infection, 412 strains were examined. The isolated bacteria were: Staphylococcus aureus 65, Streptococcus pneumoniae 90, Haemophilus influenzae 88, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (non-mucoid) 53, P. aeruginosa (mucoid) 13, Klebsiella pneumoniae 19, and Moraxella catarrhalis 41. Of 65 S. aureus strains, those with 2 μg/mL or less of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-susceptible S. aureus: MSSA) and those with 4 μg/mL or more of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-resistant S. aureus: MRSA) were 38 (58.5%) and 27 (41.5%) strains, respectively. Against MSSA, imipenem had the most potent antibacterial activity and inhibited the growth of all strains at 0.063 μg/mL or less. Against MRSA, vancomycin and arbekacin showed the most potent activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 2 μg/mL. Linezolid also showed the same activity as them. Carbapenems and penems showed the most potent activities against S. pneumoniae and in particular, panipenem inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.063 μg/mL or less. Imipenem and faropenem also had a preferable activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.25 and 1 μg/mL, respectively. In contrast, there were high-resistant strains (MIC: over 128 μg/mL) for erythromycin (38.2%) and clindamycin (18.0%). Against H. influenzae, levofloxacin showed the most potent activity and its MIC90 was 0.063 μg/mL or less. Meropenem showed the most potent activity against P. aeruginosa (mucoid) and its MIC90 was 0.5 μg/mL. Against P. aeruginosa (non-mucoid), tobramycin had the most potent activity and its MIC90 was 2 μg/mL. Against K. pneumoniae, cefozopran had

  8. [Susceptibilities of bacteria isolated from patients with lower respiratory infectious diseases to antibiotics (2005)].

    PubMed

    Goto, Hajime; Takeda, Hideki; Kawai, Shin; Watanabe, Suguru; Okazaki, Mitsuhiro; Shimada, Kaoru; Nakano, Kunio; Yokouchi, Hiroshi; Mori, Takeshi; Igari, Jun; Oguri, Toyoko; Yamamoto, Makoto; Kudo, Kolichiro; Kobayashi, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Tsukasa; Yoshimura, Kunihiko; Kawabata, Masaaki; Nakamori, Yoshitaka; Sumitomo, Midori; Inoue, Hiroshi; Nakadate, Toshihide; Suwabe, Akira; Ashino, Yugo; Aoki, Nobuki; Honma, Yasuo; Suzuki, Yasutoshi; Karasawa, Yasuo; Oka, Mikio; Kobashi, Yoshihiro; Kohno, Shigeru; Hirakata, Yoichi; Kondou, Akira; Matsuda, Junichi; Nakano, Michiko; Oikawa, Satoru

    2008-08-01

    From October 2005 to September 2006, we collected the specimen from 366 patients with lower respiratory tract infections in 12 institutions in Japan, and investigated the susceptibilities of isolated bacteria to various antibacterial agents and patients' characteristics. Of 411 strains that were isolated from specimen (mainly from sputum) and assumed to be bacteria causing in infection, 406 strains were examined. The isolated bacteria were: Staphylococcus aureus 70, Streptococcus pneumoniae 85, Haemophilus influenzae 78, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (non-mucoid) 46, P. aeruginosa (mucoid) 14, Klebsiella pneumoniae 21, and Moraxella subgenus Branhamella catarrhalis 40. Of 70 S. aureus strains, those with 2 microg/ml or less of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-susceptible S. aureus: MSSA) and those with 4 microg/ml or more of MIC of oxacillin (methicillin-resistant S. aureus: MRSA) were 38 (54.3%) and 32 (45.7%) strains, respectively. Against MSSA, imipenem had the most potent antibacterial activity and inhibited the growth of 37 strains (97.4%) at 0.063 microg/ml or less. Against MRSA, arbekacin and vancomycin showed the most potent activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 1 microg/ml. Carbapenems showed the most potent activities against S. pneumoniae and in particular, panipenem inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.063 microg/ml or less. Faropenem also had a preferable activity and inhibited the growth of all the strains at 0.25 microg/ml. In contrast, there were high-resistant strains (MIC: over 128 microg/ml) for erythromycin (38.1%) and clindamycin (22.6%). Against H. influenzae, levofloxacin showed the most potent activity and its MIC90 was 0.063 microg/ml or less. Meropenem showed the most potent activity against P. aeruginosa (mucoid) and its MIC90 was 0.5 microg/ml. Against P. aeruginosa (non-mucoid), arbekacin had the most potent activity and its MIC90 was 8 microg/ml. Against K. pneumoniae, cefozopran was the most potent activity and

  9. Quantitative Evaluation of DNA Methylation Patterns for ALVE and TVB Genes in a Neoplastic Disease Susceptible and Resistant Chicken Model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Ying; Zhang, Huanmin; Tian, Fei; Bacon, Larry; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Wensheng; Song, Jiuzhou

    2008-01-01

    Chicken endogenous viruses, ALVE (Avian Leukosis Virus subgroup E), are inherited as LTR (long terminal repeat) retrotransposons, which are negatively correlated with disease resistance, and any changes in DNA methylation may contribute to the susceptibility to neoplastic disease. The relationship between ALVE methylation status and neoplastic disease in the chicken is undefined. White Leghorn inbred lines 72 and 63 at the ADOL have been respectively selected for resistance and susceptibility to tumors that are induced by avian viruses. In this study, the DNA methylation patterns of 3∼6 CpG sites of four conserved regions in ALVE, including one unique region in ALVE1, the promoter region in the TVB (tumor virus receptor of ALV subgroup B, D and E) locus, were analyzed in the two lines using pyrosequencing methods in four tissues, i.e., liver, spleen, blood and hypothalamus. A significant CpG hypermethylation level was seen in line 72 in all four tissues, e.g., 91.86±1.63% for ALVE region2 in blood, whereas the same region was hemimethylated (46.16±2.56%) in line 63. CpG methylation contents of the ALVE regions were significantly lower in line 63 than in line 72 in all tissues (P<0.01) except the ALVE region 3/4 in liver. RNA expressions of ALVE regions 2 and 3 (PPT-U3) were significantly higher in line 63 than in line 72 (P<0.01). The methylation levels of six recombinant congenic strains (RCSs) closely resembled to the background line 63 in ALVE-region 2, which imply the methylation pattern of ALVE-region 2 may be a biomarker in resistant disease breeding. The methylation level of the promoter region in the TVB was significantly different in blood (P<0.05) and hypothalamus (P<0.0001), respectively. Our data disclosed a hypermethylation pattern of ALVE that may be relevant for resistance against ALV induced tumors in chickens. PMID:18320050

  10. Combined analysis of genome-wide association studies for Crohn disease and psoriasis identifies seven shared susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Ellinghaus, David; Ellinghaus, Eva; Nair, Rajan P; Stuart, Philip E; Esko, Tõnu; Metspalu, Andres; Debrus, Sophie; Raelson, John V; Tejasvi, Trilokraj; Belouchi, Majid; West, Sarah L; Barker, Jonathan N; Kõks, Sulev; Kingo, Külli; Balschun, Tobias; Palmieri, Orazio; Annese, Vito; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H Erich; Kabesch, Michael; Trembath, Richard C; Mathew, Christopher G; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Weidinger, Stephan; Nikolaus, Susanna; Schreiber, Stefan; Elder, James T; Weichenthal, Michael; Nothnagel, Michael; Franke, Andre

    2012-04-01

    Psoriasis (PS) and Crohn disease (CD) have been shown to be epidemiologically, pathologically, and therapeutically connected, but little is known about their shared genetic causes. We performed meta-analyses of five published genome-wide association studies on PS (2,529 cases and 4,955 controls) and CD (2,142 cases and 5,505 controls), followed up 20 loci that showed strongest evidence for shared disease association and, furthermore, tested cross-disease associations for previously reported PS and CD risk alleles in additional 6,115 PS cases, 4,073 CD cases, and 10,100 controls. We identified seven susceptibility loci outside the human leukocyte antigen region (9p24 near JAK2, 10q22 at ZMIZ1, 11q13 near PRDX5, 16p13 near SOCS1, 17q21 at STAT3, 19p13 near FUT2, and 22q11 at YDJC) shared between PS and CD with genome-wide significance (p < 5 × 10(-8)) and confirmed four already established PS and CD risk loci (IL23R, IL12B, REL, and TYK2). Three of the shared loci are also genome-wide significantly associated with PS alone (10q22 at ZMIZ1, p(rs1250544) = 3.53 × 10(-8), 11q13 near PRDX5, p(rs694739) = 3.71 × 10(-09), 22q11 at YDJC, p(rs181359) = 8.02 × 10(-10)). In addition, we identified one susceptibility locus for CD (16p13 near SOCS1, p(rs4780355) = 4.99 × 10(-8)). Refinement of association signals identified shared genome-wide significant associations for exonic SNPs at 10q22 (ZMIZ1) and in silico expression quantitative trait locus analyses revealed that the associations at ZMIZ1 and near SOCS1 have a potential functional effect on gene expression. Our results show the usefulness of joint analyses of clinically distinct immune-mediated diseases and enlarge the map of shared genetic risk loci. PMID:22482804

  11. Early environmental factors, alteration of epigenetic marks and metabolic disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Portha, B; Fournier, A; Kioon, M D Ah; Mezger, V; Movassat, J

    2014-02-01

    The environmental conditions that are experienced in early life can profoundly influence human biology and long-term health. Early-life nutrition and stress are among the best documented examples of such conditions because they influence the adult risk of developing metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) and cardiovascular diseases. It is now becoming increasingly accepted that environmental compounds including nutrients can produce changes in the genome activity that in spite of not altering DNA sequence can produce important, stable and transgenerational alterations in the phenotype. Epigenetic changes, in particular DNA methylation and histone acetylation/methylation, provide a 'memory' of developmental plastic responses to early environment and are central to the generation of phenotypes and their stability throughout the life course. Their effects may only become manifest later in life, e.g. in terms of altered responses to environmental challenges. PMID:24139903

  12. Central histamine H3 receptor signaling negatively regulates susceptibility to autoimmune inflammatory disease of the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Teuscher, Cory; Subramanian, Meena; Noubade, Rajkumar; Gao, Jian Feng; Offner, Halina; Zachary, James F.; Blankenhorn, Elizabeth P.

    2007-01-01

    Histamine (HA), a biogenic amine with a broad spectrum of activities in both physiological and pathological settings, plays a key regulatory role in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, the autoimmune model of multiple sclerosis. HA exerts its effect through four G protein-coupled receptors designated HA receptor H1, H2, H3, and H4. We report here that, compared with wild-type animals, mice with a disrupted HA H3 receptor (H3RKO), the expression of which is normally confined to cells of the nervous system, develop more severe disease and neuroinflammation. We show that this effect is associated with dysregulation of blood–brain barrier permeability and increased expression of MIP-2, IP-10, and CXCR3 by peripheral T cells. Our data suggest that pharmacological targeting of the H3R may be useful in preventing the development and formation of new lesions in multiple sclerosis, thereby significantly limiting the progression of the disease. PMID:17548817

  13. Relationship between hearing threshold at the affected and unaffected ear in unilateral Meniere's disease.

    PubMed

    Albera, Roberto; Canale, Andrea; Cassandro, Claudia; Albera, Andrea; Sammartano, Azia Maria; Dagna, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss in Menière's disease has been described to affect above all low frequencies (upward curve) with a tendency to become irreversible and non-fluctuating at the higher frequencies (peaked curve) over time. The aim of the study was to determine the effects of MD on hearing function on the basis of differences existing between the affected and the unaffected ear in a group of patients affected by definite unilateral MD and whose contralateral ear was not affected by any disease other than age-related hearing loss (ARHL). Following this procedure we have also evaluated the possible effects of age and disease duration on hearing loss in MD. The study group consisted of 86 subjects affected by definite unilateral MD. In our sample a peaked audiometric curve characterized the affected ears; however, the result after subtracting the normal ear hearing threshold was an upward sloping curve, which highlighted the greater suffering at the lower frequencies. On the basis of differences existing between affected and unaffected ear, our data suggest that threshold evolution is more related to disease duration rather than to age. PMID:25552243

  14. Rare variants in the TREX1 gene and susceptibility to autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Barizzone, Nadia; Monti, Sara; Mellone, Simona; Godi, Michela; Marchini, Maurizio; Scorza, Raffaella; Danieli, Maria G; D'Alfonso, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    TREX1 (DNase III) is an exonuclease involved in response to oxidative stress and apoptosis. Heterozygous mutations in TREX1 were previously observed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS). We performed a mutational analysis of the TREX1 gene on three autoimmune diseases: SLE (210 patients) and SS (58 patients), to confirm a TREX1 involvement in the Italian population, and systemic sclerosis (SSc, 150 patients) because it shares similarities with SLE (presence of antinuclear antibodies and connective tissue damage). We observed 7 variations; two of these are novel nonsynonymous variants (p.Glu198Lys and p.Met232Val). They were detected in one SS and in one SSc patient, respectively, and in none of the 200 healthy controls typed in this study and of the 1712 published controls. In silico analysis predicts a possibly damaging role on protein function for both variants. The other 5 variations are synonymous and only one of them is novel (p.Pro48Pro). This study contributes to the demonstration that TREX1 is involved in autoimmune diseases and proposes that the spectrum of involved autoimmune diseases can be broader and includes SSc. We do not confirm a role of TREX1 variants in SLE. PMID:24224166

  15. Rare Variants in the TREX1 Gene and Susceptibility to Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Monti, Sara; Mellone, Simona; Godi, Michela; Marchini, Maurizio; Scorza, Raffaella; Danieli, Maria G.; D'Alfonso, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    TREX1 (DNase III) is an exonuclease involved in response to oxidative stress and apoptosis. Heterozygous mutations in TREX1 were previously observed in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Sjögren's syndrome (SS). We performed a mutational analysis of the TREX1 gene on three autoimmune diseases: SLE (210 patients) and SS (58 patients), to confirm a TREX1 involvement in the Italian population, and systemic sclerosis (SSc, 150 patients) because it shares similarities with SLE (presence of antinuclear antibodies and connective tissue damage). We observed 7 variations; two of these are novel nonsynonymous variants (p.Glu198Lys and p.Met232Val). They were detected in one SS and in one SSc patient, respectively, and in none of the 200 healthy controls typed in this study and of the 1712 published controls. In silico analysis predicts a possibly damaging role on protein function for both variants. The other 5 variations are synonymous and only one of them is novel (p.Pro48Pro). This study contributes to the demonstration that TREX1 is involved in autoimmune diseases and proposes that the spectrum of involved autoimmune diseases can be broader and includes SSc. We do not confirm a role of TREX1 variants in SLE. PMID:24224166

  16. AB062. Identification of disease susceptibility genes in Filipino SSPE patients

    PubMed Central

    Silao, Catherine Lynn; Lukban, Marissa; Salonga, Aida; Sanchez-Gan, Benilda; Lu, Martha; Pipo-Deveza, Judy; Nevado, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Background Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease resulting from long-term persistence of the measles virus in the brain. Host genetic factors contributing to SSPE predisposition were investigated in the study. Methods Microarray technology, genotyping of candidate genes and whole genome expression profiling were done to determine the genes and pathways that are associated to the development of SSPE in Filipinos. Results Significant association was observed in MXA variants. Polymorphisms tested in the IL-4, IL-10, IFN- γ and IRF-1 genes did not show significant association. Differential expression analysis between patients and controls showed altered expression in 851 probes majority of which were underexpressed in SSPE patients. Functional annotation of the genes showed that many are immunity-related and are particularly involved in viral response. Comparison of expression levels between patients in remission (stage 1) and diseased patients (stages 2, 3, and 4) revealed 496 differentially expressed probes, 138 were downregulated in diseased patients. Most of these genes have immune response function particularly involved in viral response. More importantly, significant differentially expressed genes with no a priori association with SSPE were identified in the pathway analysis. Conclusions Results of the study provided additional evidence that the host immune response has a key role in SSPE etiology. It is recommended that further investigation be done to test for association of the differentially expressed genes with SSPE risk either by genotyping or functional analysis.

  17. Comprehensive Search for Alzheimer Disease Susceptibility Loci in the APOE Region

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Gyungah; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Buros, Jacqueline; Yu, Chang-En; Hawk, Michele V.; Dombroski, Beth A.; Crane, Paul K.; Larson, Eric B.; Mayeux, Richard; Haines, Jonathan L.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Farrer, Lindsay A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of risk and age at onset (AAO) of Alzheimer disease (AD) with single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the chromosome 19 region including apolipoprotein E (APOE) and a repeat-length polymorphism in TOMM40 (poly-T, rs10524523). Design Conditional logistic regression models and survival analysis. Setting Fifteen genome-wide association study data sets assembled by the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium. Participants Eleven thousand eight hundred forty AD cases and 10 931 cognitively normal elderly controls. Main Outcome Measures Association of AD risk and AAO with genotyped and imputed SNPs located in an 800-Mb region including APOE in the entire Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium data set and with the TOMM40 poly-T marker genotyped in a subset of 1256 cases and 1605 controls. Results In models adjusting for APOE ε4, no SNPs in the entire region were significantly associated with AAO at P<.001. Rs10524523 was not significantly associated with AD or AAO in models adjusting for APOE genotype or within the subset of ε3/ε3 subjects. Conclusions APOE alleles ε2, ε3, and ε4 account for essentially all the inherited risk of AD associated with this region. Other variants including a poly-T track in TOMM40 are not independent risk or AAO loci. PMID:22869155

  18. A comparison of the pulmonary defenses against streptococcal infection in rats and mice following O3 exposure: Differences in disease susceptibility and neutrophil recruitment

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, M.I.; Selgrade, M.K. )

    1993-12-01

    Ozone (O3) exposure reduces alveolar macrophage (AM) phagocytosis in mice and increases their susceptibility to Streptococcus zooepidemicus. O3 exposure also decreases AM phagocytosis in rats but does not result in mortality to infection. To investigate the mechanism of disease protection in rats, antibacterial defenses of two strains of mice and F344 rats were compared. O3 exposure (3 hr, 0.4 or 0.8 ppm) and infection with S. zooepidemicus resulted in a dose-dependent proliferation of bacteria in the lungs of mice and high mortality. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) were observed in severely affected individuals 2 or more days postinfection and did not alter the fatal infection. In contrast, microbial inactivation was only impaired in O3-exposed rat lungs during the first 48 hr after infection. In these animals PMNs could be isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid between 6 and 48 hr postinfection with the peak response occurring at 24 hr. Pretreatment with anti-PMN serum eliminated the neutrophil influx and impaired further the bactericidal activity in ozone-exposed rats. The results suggest that inhaled streptococci are cleared normally from the mouse lung by AMs. Following exposure to O3, AM phagocytosis is reduced and the mice develop a fatal infection. The persistence of bacteria in the lungs of O3-exposed rats triggers a transient influx of PMNs whose appearance corresponds with elimination of the bacteria. Differences in antimicrobial defenses between various experimental species and humans need to be better understood in order to predict effects of air pollutants on susceptibility to infection in man.

  19. Effects of Arsenite Exposure during Fetal Development on Energy Metabolism and Susceptibility to Diet-Induced Fatty Liver Disease in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ditzel, Eric J.; Nguyen, Thu; Parker, Patricia; Camenisch, Todd D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic exposure to arsenicals at various life stages and across a range of exposures has been implicated in cardiometabolic and liver disease, but disease predisposition from developmental exposures remains unclear. Objectives In utero and post-weaning exposure to trivalent arsenic (AsIII) was examined on the background of a Western-style diet to determine whether AsIII exposure affects metabolic disease. Methods Male Swiss Webster mice were exposed to 100 ppb AsIII in utero, after weaning, or both. Ad libitum access to a Western-style diet was provided after weaning, and the plasma metabolome, liver histopathology, liver enzyme activity, and gene expression were analyzed. Results Hepatic lipid composition and histopathology revealed that developmental AsIII exposure exacerbated Western-style diet–induced fatty liver disease. Continuous AsIII exposure increased cardiometabolic risk factors including increased body weight, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia, and plasma triglycerides. AsIII exposure produced a decrease in the intermediates of glycolysis and the TCA cycle while increasing ketones. Hepatic isocitrate dehydrogenase activity was also decreased, which confirmed disruption of the TCA cycle. Developmental AsIII exposure increased the expression of genes involved in fatty acid synthesis, lipogenesis, inflammation, and packaging of triglycerides, suggesting an increased acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) load. Conclusions In utero and continuous early-life exposure to AsIII disrupted normal metabolism and elevated the risk for fatty liver disease in mice maintained on a high-fat diet. Our findings suggest that individuals exposed to AsIII during key developmental periods and who remain exposed to AsIII on the background of a Western-style diet may be at increased risk for metabolic disease later in life. Citation Ditzel EJ, Nguyen T, Parker P, Camenisch TD. 2016. Effects of arsenite exposure during fetal development on energy metabolism and

  20. Genetics and Beyond – The Transcriptome of Human Monocytes and Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Tanja; Wild, Philipp; Szymczak, Silke; Rotival, Maxime; Schillert, Arne; Castagne, Raphaele; Maouche, Seraya; Germain, Marine; Lackner, Karl; Rossmann, Heidi; Eleftheriadis, Medea; Sinning, Christoph R.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Lubos, Edith; Mennerich, Detlev; Rust, Werner; Perret, Claire; Proust, Carole; Nicaud, Viviane; Loscalzo, Joseph; Hübner, Norbert; Tregouet, David; Münzel, Thomas; Ziegler, Andreas; Tiret, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    Background Variability of gene expression in human may link gene sequence variability and phenotypes; however, non-genetic variations, alone or in combination with genetics, may also influence expression traits and have a critical role in physiological and disease processes. Methodology/Principal Findings To get better insight into the overall variability of gene expression, we assessed the transcriptome of circulating monocytes, a key cell involved in immunity-related diseases and atherosclerosis, in 1,490 unrelated individuals and investigated its association with >675,000 SNPs and 10 common cardiovascular risk factors. Out of 12,808 expressed genes, 2,745 expression quantitative trait loci were detected (P<5.78×10−12), most of them (90%) being cis-modulated. Extensive analyses showed that associations identified by genome-wide association studies of lipids, body mass index or blood pressure were rarely compatible with a mediation by monocyte expression level at the locus. At a study-wide level (P<3.9×10−7), 1,662 expression traits (13.0%) were significantly associated with at least one risk factor. Genome-wide interaction analyses suggested that genetic variability and risk factors mostly acted additively on gene expression. Because of the structure of correlation among expression traits, the variability of risk factors could be characterized by a limited set of independent gene expressions which may have biological and clinical relevance. For example expression traits associated with cigarette smoking were more strongly associated with carotid atherosclerosis than smoking itself. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that the monocyte transcriptome is a potent integrator of genetic and non-genetic influences of relevance for disease pathophysiology and risk assessment. PMID:20502693

  1. Identification of novel susceptibility loci for Guam neurodegenerative disease: challenges of genome scans in genetic isolates

    PubMed Central

    Sieh, Weiva; Choi, Yoonha; Chapman, Nicola H.; Craig, Ulla-Katrina; Steinbart, Ellen J.; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Oyanagi, Kiyomitsu; Garruto, Ralph M.; Bird, Thomas D.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Wijsman, Ellen M.

    2009-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/parkinsonism–dementia complex (ALS/PDC) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease found in the Chamorro people of Guam and other Pacific Island populations. The etiology is unknown, although both genetic and environmental factors appear important. To identify loci for ALS/PDC, we conducted both genome-wide linkage and association analyses, using approximately 400 microsatellite markers, in the largest sample assembled to date, comprising a nearly complete sample of all living and previously sampled deceased cases. A single, large, complex pedigree was ascertained from a village on Guam, with smaller families and a case–control sample ascertained from the rest of Guam by population-based neurological screening and archival review. We found significant evidence for two regions with novel ALS/PDC loci on chromosome 12 and supportive evidence for the involvement of the MAPT region on chromosome 17. D12S1617 on 12p gave the strongest evidence of linkage (maximum LOD score, Zmax = 4.03) in our initial scan, with additional support in the complete case–control sample in the form of evidence of allelic association at this marker and another nearby marker. D12S79 on 12q also provided significant evidence of linkage (Zmax = 3.14) with support from flanking markers. Our results suggest that ALS/PDC may be influenced by as many as three loci, while illustrating challenges that are intrinsic in genetic analyses of isolated populations, as well as analytical strategies that are useful in this context. Elucidation of the genetic basis of ALS/PDC should improve our understanding of related neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, frontotemporal dementia and ALS. PMID:19567404

  2. Gene-environment Interaction Models to Unmask Susceptibility Mechanisms in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Vivian P.; Ko, Novie; Holman, Theodore R.; Manning-Boğ, Amy B.

    2014-01-01

    Lipoxygenase (LOX) activity has been implicated in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, but its effects in Parkinson's disease (PD) pathogenesis are less understood. Gene-environment interaction models have utility in unmasking the impact of specific cellular pathways in toxicity that may not be observed using a solely genetic or toxicant disease model alone. To evaluate if distinct LOX isozymes selectively contribute to PD-related neurodegeneration, transgenic (i.e. 5-LOX and 12/15-LOX deficient) mice can be challenged with a toxin that mimics cell injury and death in the disorder. Here we describe the use of a neurotoxin, 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), which produces a nigrostriatal lesion to elucidate the distinct contributions of LOX isozymes to neurodegeneration related to PD. The use of MPTP in mouse, and nonhuman primate, is well-established to recapitulate the nigrostriatal damage in PD. The extent of MPTP-induced lesioning is measured by HPLC analysis of dopamine and its metabolites and semi-quantitative Western blot analysis of striatum for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of dopamine. To assess inflammatory markers, which may demonstrate LOX isozyme-selective sensitivity, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Iba-1 immunohistochemistry are performed on brain sections containing substantia nigra, and GFAP Western blot analysis is performed on striatal homogenates. This experimental approach can provide novel insights into gene-environment interactions underlying nigrostriatal degeneration and PD. PMID:24430802

  3. Low brain ascorbic acid increases susceptibility to seizures in mouse models of decreased brain ascorbic acid transport and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Warner, Timothy A; Kang, Jing-Qiong; Kennard, John A; Harrison, Fiona E

    2015-02-01

    Seizures are a known co-occurring symptom of Alzheimer's disease, and they can accelerate cognitive and neuropathological dysfunction. Sub-optimal vitamin C (ascorbic acid) deficiency, that is low levels that do not lead the sufferer to present with clinical signs of scurvy (e.g. lethargy, hemorrhage, hyperkeratosis), are easily obtainable with insufficient dietary intake, and may contribute to the oxidative stress environment of both Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy. The purpose of this study was to test whether mice that have diminished brain ascorbic acid in addition to carrying human Alzheimer's disease mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin 1 (PSEN1) genes, had altered electrical activity in the brain (electroencephalography; EEG), and were more susceptible to pharmacologically induced seizures. Brain ascorbic acid was decreased in APP/PSEN1 mice by crossing them with sodium vitamin C transporter 2 (SVCT2) heterozygous knockout mice. These mice have an approximately 30% decrease in brain ascorbic acid due to lower levels of SVCT2 that supplies the brain with ASC. SVCT2+/-APP/PSEN1 mice had decreased ascorbic acid and increased oxidative stress in brain, increased mortality, faster seizure onset latency following treatment with kainic acid (10 mg/kg i.p.), and more ictal events following pentylenetetrazol (50 mg/kg i.p.) treatment. Furthermore, we report the entirely novel phenomenon that ascorbic acid deficiency alone increased the severity of kainic acid- and pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures. These data suggest that avoiding ascorbic acid deficiency may be particularly important in populations at increased risk for epilepsy and seizures, such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25616451

  4. Associations between APOE Genotypes and Disease Susceptibility, Joint Damage and Lipid Levels in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Maehlen, Marthe T.; Provan, Sella A.; de Rooy, Diederik P. C.; van der Helm - van Mil, Annette H. M.; Krabben, Annemarie; Saxne, Tore; Lindqvist, Elisabet; Semb, Anne Grete; Uhlig, Till; van der Heijde, Désirée; Mero, Inger Lise; Olsen, Inge C.; Kvien, Tore K.; Lie, Benedicte A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotypes are associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and lipid levels. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an association has been found with disease activity. We examined the associations between APOE genotypes and disease susceptibility and markers of disease severity in RA, including radiographic joint damage, inflammatory markers, lipid levels and cardiovascular markers. Method A Norwegian cohort of 945 RA patients and 988 controls were genotyped for two APOE polymorphisms. We examined longitudinal associations between APOE genotypes and C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) as well as hand radiographs (van der Heijde Sharp Score(SHS)) in 207 patients with 10 year longitudinal data. Lipid levels, cardiovascular markers and history of CVD were compared across genotypes in a cross sectional study of 136 patients. Longitudinal radiological data of cohorts from Lund and Leiden were available for replication. (N = 935, with 4799 radiographs). Results In the Norwegian cohort, associations between APOE genotypes and total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoproteins (LDL) were observed (ε2<ε3/ε3<ε4, p = 0.03 and p = 0.02, respectively). No association was present for acute phase reactant or CVD markers, but a longitudinal linear association between APOE genotypes and radiographic joint damage was observed (p = 0.007). No association between APOE genotypes and the severity of joint destruction was observed in the Lund and Leiden cohorts, and a meta- analysis combining all data was negative. Conclusion APOE genotypes are associated with lipid levels in patients with RA, and may contribute to dyslipidemia in some patients. APOE genotypes are not consistently associated with markers of inflammation or joint destruction in RA. PMID:23613766

  5. Task- and resting-state functional connectivity of brain regions related to affection and susceptible to concurrent cognitive demand

    PubMed Central

    Kellermann, Tanja S.; Caspers, Svenja; Fox, Peter T.; Zilles, Karl; Roski, Christian; Laird, Angela R.; Turetsky, Bruce I.; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2016-01-01

    A recent fMRI-study revealed neural responses for affective processing of stimuli for which overt attention irrespective of stimulus valence was required in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and bilateral amygdala (AMY): activation decreased with increasing cognitive demand. To further characterize the network putatively related to this attenuation, we here characterized these regions with respect to their functional properties and connectivity patterns in task-dependent and task-independent states. All experiments of the BrainMap database activating the seed regions OFC and bilateral AMY were identified. Their functional characteristics were quantitatively inferred using the behavioral meta-data of the retrieved experiments. Task-dependent functional connectivity was characterized by meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM) of significant co-activations with these seed regions. Task-independent resting-state functional connectivity analysis in a sample of 100 healthy subjects complemented these analyses. All three seed regions co-activated with subgenual cingulum (SGC), precuneus (PCu) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc) in the task-dependent MACM analysis. Task-independent resting-state connectivity revealed significant coupling of the seeds only with the SGC, but not the PCu and the NAcc. The former region (SGC) moreover was shown to feature significant resting-state connectivity with all other regions implicated in the network connected to regions where emotional processing may be modulated by a cognitive distractor. Based on its functional profile and connectivity pattern, we suggest that the SGC might serve as a key hub in the identified network, as such linking autobiographic information [PCu], reward [NAcc], (reinforce) values [OFC] and emotional significance [AMY]. Such a role, in turn, may allow the SGC to influence the OFC and AMY to modulate affective processing. PMID:23370055

  6. Linkage analyses of chromosome 18 markers do not identify a major susceptibility locus for bipolar affective disorder in the Old Order Amish

    SciTech Connect

    Pauls, D.L.; Paul, S.M. |; Allen, C.R.

    1995-09-01

    Previously reported linkage of bipolar affective disorder to DNA markers in the pericentromeric region of chromosome 18 was reexamined in a larger homogeneous sample of Old Order Amish families. Four markers (D18S21, D18S53, D18S44, and D18S40) were examined in three kindreds containing 31 bipolar I (BP I) individuals. Although linkage findings were replicated in the one previously studied Amish pedigree containing four BP I individuals, linkage to this region was excluded in the larger sample. If a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder is located in this region of chromosome 18, it is of minor significance in this population. 40 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  7. Large-scale association analyses identifies 13 new susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Schunkert, Heribert; König, Inke R.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Holm, Hilma; Preuss, Michael; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Barbalic, Maja; Gieger, Christian; Absher, Devin; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Allayee, Hooman; Altshuler, David; Anand, Sonia S.; Andersen, Karl; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Ardissino, Diego; Ball, Stephen G.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Barnes, Timothy A.; Becker, Diane M.; Becker, Lewis C.; Berger, Klaus; Bis, Joshua C.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Boerwinkle, Eric; Braund, Peter S.; Brown, Morris J.; Burnett, Mary Susan; Buysschaert, Ian; Carlquist, Cardiogenics, John F.; Chen, Li; Cichon, Sven; Codd, Veryan; Davies, Robert W.; Dedoussis, George; Dehghan, Abbas; Demissie, Serkalem; Devaney, Joseph M.; Do, Ron; Doering, Angela; Eifert, Sandra; El Mokhtari, Nour Eddine; Ellis, Stephen G.; Elosua, Roberto; Engert, James C.; Epstein, Stephen E.; Faire, Ulf de; Fischer, Marcus; Folsom, Aaron R.; Freyer, Jennifer; Gigante, Bruna; Girelli, Domenico; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gulcher, Jeffrey R.; Halperin, Eran; Hammond, Naomi; Hazen, Stanley L.; Hofman, Albert; Horne, Benjamin D.; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jones, Gregory T.; Jukema, J.Wouter; Kaiser, Michael A.; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kastelein, John J.P.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kong, Augustine; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lambrechts, Diether; Leander, Karin; Lettre, Guillaume; Li, Mingyao; Lieb, Wolfgang; Linsel-Nitschke, Patrick; Loley, Christina; Lotery, Andrew J.; Mannucci, Pier M.; Maouche, Seraya; Martinelli, Nicola; McKeown, Pascal P.; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Merlini, Pier Angelica; Mooser, Vincent; Morgan, Thomas; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Muhlestein, Joseph B.; Münzel, Thomas; Musunuru, Kiran; Nahrstaedt, Janja; Nelson, Christopher P.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Olivieri, Oliviero; Patel, Riyaz S.; Patterson, Chris C.; Peters, Annette; Peyvandi, Flora; Qu, Liming; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Rader, Daniel J.; Rallidis, Loukianos S.; Rice, Catherine; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Rubin, Diana; Salomaa, Veikko; Sampietro, M. Lourdes; Sandhu, Manj S.; Schadt, Eric; Schäfer, Arne; Schillert, Arne; Schreiber, Stefan; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David S.; Sivananthan, Mohan; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Smith, Albert; Smith, Tamara B.; Snoep, Jaapjan D.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spertus, John A.; Stark, Klaus; Stirrups, Kathy; Stoll, Monika; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Rij, Andre M.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Wareham, Nick J.; Wells, George A.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wild, Philipp S.; Willenborg, Christina; Witteman, Jaqueline C. M.; Wright, Benjamin J.; Ye, Shu; Zeller, Tanja; Ziegler, Andreas; Cambien, Francois; Goodall, Alison H.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Quertermous, Thomas; März, Winfried; Hengstenberg, Christian; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Hall, Alistair S.; Deloukas, Panos; Thompson, John R.; Stefansson, Kari; Roberts, Robert; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; McPherson, Ruth; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J.

    2011-01-01

    We performed a meta-analysis of 14 genome-wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD) comprising 22,233 cases and 64,762 controls of European descent, followed by genotyping of top association signals in 60,738 additional individuals. This genomic analysis identified 13 novel loci harboring one or more SNPs that were associated with CAD at P<5×10−8 and confirmed the association of 10 of 12 previously reported CAD loci. The 13 novel loci displayed risk allele frequencies ranging from 0.13 to 0.91 and were associated with a 6 to 17 percent increase in the risk of CAD per allele. Notably, only three of the novel loci displayed significant association with traditional CAD risk factors, while the majority lie in gene regions not previously implicated in the pathogenesis of CAD. Finally, five of the novel CAD risk loci appear to have pleiotropic effects, showing strong association with various other human diseases or traits. PMID:21378990

  8. Large-scale association analysis identifies 13 new susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Schunkert, Heribert; König, Inke R; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P; Assimes, Themistocles L; Holm, Hilma; Preuss, Michael; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Barbalic, Maja; Gieger, Christian; Absher, Devin; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Allayee, Hooman; Altshuler, David; Anand, Sonia S; Andersen, Karl; Anderson, Jeffrey L; Ardissino, Diego; Ball, Stephen G; Balmforth, Anthony J; Barnes, Timothy A; Becker, Diane M; Becker, Lewis C; Berger, Klaus; Bis, Joshua C; Boekholdt, S Matthijs; Boerwinkle, Eric; Braund, Peter S; Brown, Morris J; Burnett, Mary Susan; Buysschaert, Ian; Carlquist, John F; Chen, Li; Cichon, Sven; Codd, Veryan; Davies, Robert W; Dedoussis, George; Dehghan, Abbas; Demissie, Serkalem; Devaney, Joseph M; Diemert, Patrick; Do, Ron; Doering, Angela; Eifert, Sandra; Mokhtari, Nour Eddine El; Ellis, Stephen G; Elosua, Roberto; Engert, James C; Epstein, Stephen E; de Faire, Ulf; Fischer, Marcus; Folsom, Aaron R; Freyer, Jennifer; Gigante, Bruna; Girelli, Domenico; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gulcher, Jeffrey R; Halperin, Eran; Hammond, Naomi; Hazen, Stanley L; Hofman, Albert; Horne, Benjamin D; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jones, Gregory T; Jukema, J Wouter; Kaiser, Michael A; Kaplan, Lee M; Kastelein, John J P; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kong, Augustine; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lambrechts, Diether; Leander, Karin; Lettre, Guillaume; Li, Mingyao; Lieb, Wolfgang; Loley, Christina; Lotery, Andrew J; Mannucci, Pier M; Maouche, Seraya; Martinelli, Nicola; McKeown, Pascal P; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Merlini, Pier Angelica; Mooser, Vincent; Morgan, Thomas; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Muhlestein, Joseph B; Münzel, Thomas; Musunuru, Kiran; Nahrstaedt, Janja; Nelson, Christopher P; Nöthen, Markus M; Olivieri, Oliviero; Patel, Riyaz S; Patterson, Chris C; Peters, Annette; Peyvandi, Flora; Qu, Liming; Quyyumi, Arshed A; Rader, Daniel J; Rallidis, Loukianos S; Rice, Catherine; Rosendaal, Frits R; Rubin, Diana; Salomaa, Veikko; Sampietro, M Lourdes; Sandhu, Manj S; Schadt, Eric; Schäfer, Arne; Schillert, Arne; Schreiber, Stefan; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Schwartz, Stephen M; Siscovick, David S; Sivananthan, Mohan; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Smith, Albert; Smith, Tamara B; Snoep, Jaapjan D; Soranzo, Nicole; Spertus, John A; Stark, Klaus; Stirrups, Kathy; Stoll, Monika; Tang, W H Wilson; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Uitterlinden, Andre G; van Rij, Andre M; Voight, Benjamin F; Wareham, Nick J; Wells, George A; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wild, Philipp S; Willenborg, Christina; Witteman, Jaqueline C M; Wright, Benjamin J; Ye, Shu; Zeller, Tanja; Ziegler, Andreas; Cambien, Francois; Goodall, Alison H; Cupples, L Adrienne; Quertermous, Thomas; März, Winfried; Hengstenberg, Christian; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ouwehand, Willem H; Hall, Alistair S; Deloukas, Panos; Thompson, John R; Stefansson, Kari; Roberts, Robert; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; O'Donnell, Christopher J; McPherson, Ruth; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J

    2011-04-01

    We performed a meta-analysis of 14 genome-wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD) comprising 22,233 individuals with CAD (cases) and 64,762 controls of European descent followed by genotyping of top association signals in 56,682 additional individuals. This analysis identified 13 loci newly associated with CAD at P < 5 × 10⁻⁸ and confirmed the association of 10 of 12 previously reported CAD loci. The 13 new loci showed risk allele frequencies ranging from 0.13 to 0.91 and were associated with a 6% to 17% increase in the risk of CAD per allele. Notably, only three of the new loci showed significant association with traditional CAD risk factors and the majority lie in gene regions not previously implicated in the pathogenesis of CAD. Finally, five of the new CAD risk loci appear to have pleiotropic effects, showing strong association with various other human diseases or traits. PMID:21378990

  9. Genetic association of cyclooxygenase-2 gene polymorphisms with Parkinson’s disease susceptibility in Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yi; Wu, Yuquan; Li, Yansheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the genetic association of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2) gene promoter region polymorphisms with Parkinson’s disease (PD) susceptibility in Chinese Han population. Methods: The genotyping of COX2 gene polymorphisms was conducted by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) in 122 patients with PD and 120 healthy persons. The association strength of gene polymorphism with disease was measured by odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) calculated using χ2 test which also evaluated the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) of gene polymorphism in controls. The linkage disequilibrium and haplotype were also analyzed as evidence in the analysis of association. Results: On condition that the genotypes distributions of COX2 -1290A>G, -1195G>A, -765G>C in the control group all conformed to HWE, however, only the homozygous genotype AA of -1195G>A polymorphism showed an association with PD (OR=0.432, 95% CI=0.196-0.950). In addition, in haplotype analysis, G-A-C haplotype frequency in cases was significantly lower than the controls, compared with the common haplotype A-G-G (P=0.031, OR=0.375, 95% CI=0.149-0.940). Conclusions: COX2 -1195G>A polymorphism might play a protective role in the onset of PD and G-A-C haplotype in this three promoter region polymorphisms also showed a negative association. PMID:26722563

  10. Investigation of cerebral iron deposition in aged patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease using susceptibility-weighted imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yin; Liu, Jun; Liu, Huanghui; Liao, Yunjie; Cao, Lu; Ye, Bin; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate focal iron deposition level in the brain in patients with ischemic cerebrovascular disease and its correlation with cerebral small vessel disease imaging markers. Patients and methods Seventy-four patients with first-ever transient ischemic attack (median age: 69 years; 30 males and 44 females) and 77 patients with positive ischemic stroke history (median age: 72 years; 43 males and 34 females) were studied retrospectively. On phase image of susceptibility-weighted imaging and regions of interest were manually drawn at the bilateral head of the caudate nucleus, lenticular nucleus (LN), thalamus (TH), frontal white matter, and occipital white matter. The correlation between iron deposition level and the clinical and imaging variables was also investigated. Results Iron deposition level at LN was significantly higher in patients with previous stroke history. It linearly correlated with the presence and number of cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) but not with white matter hyperintensity and lacunar infarct. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that deep structure CMBs were the most relevant in terms of iron deposition at LN. Conclusion Iron deposition at LN may increase in cases of more severe ischemia in aged patients with transient ischemic attack, and it may be an imaging marker for CMB of ischemic origin. PMID:27574434

  11. Molecular and bioenergetic differences between cells with African versus European inherited mitochondrial DNA haplogroups: implications for population susceptibility to diseases.

    PubMed

    Kenney, M Cristina; Chwa, Marilyn; Atilano, Shari R; Falatoonzadeh, Payam; Ramirez, Claudio; Malik, Deepika; Tarek, Mohamed; Del Carpio, Javier Cáceres; Nesburn, Anthony B; Boyer, David S; Kuppermann, Baruch D; Vawter, Marquis P; Jazwinski, S Michal; Miceli, Michael V; Wallace, Douglas C; Udar, Nitin

    2014-02-01

    The geographic origins of populations can be identified by their maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups. This study compared human cybrids (cytoplasmic hybrids), which are cell lines with identical nuclei but mitochondria from different individuals with mtDNA from either the H haplogroup or L haplogroup backgrounds. The most common European haplogroup is H while individuals of maternal African origin are of the L haplogroup. Despite lower mtDNA copy numbers, L cybrids had higher expression levels for nine mtDNA-encoded respiratory complex genes, decreased ATP (adenosine triphosphate) turnover rates and lower levels of reactive oxygen species production, parameters which are consistent with more efficient oxidative phosphorylation. Surprisingly, GeneChip arrays showed that the L and H cybrids had major differences in expression of genes of the canonical complement system (5 genes), dermatan/chondroitin sulfate biosynthesis (5 genes) and CCR3 (chemokine, CC motif, receptor 3) signaling (9 genes). Quantitative nuclear gene expression studies confirmed that L cybrids had (a) lower expression levels of complement pathway and innate immunity genes and (b) increased levels of inflammation-related signaling genes, which are critical in human diseases. Our data support the hypothesis that mtDNA haplogroups representing populations from different geographic origins may play a role in differential susceptibilities to diseases. PMID:24200652

  12. Molecular and Bioenergetic Differences between Cells with African versus European Inherited Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroups: Implications for Population Susceptibility to Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, M. Cristina; Chwa, Marilyn; Atilano, Shari R.; Falatoonzadeh, Payam; Ramirez, Claudio; Malik, Deepika; Tarek, Mohamed; Cáceres del Carpio, Javier; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Boyer, David S.; Kuppermann, Baruch D.; Vawter, Marquis P.; Jazwinski, S. Michal; Miceli, Michael V.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Udar, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    The geographic origins of populations can be identified by their maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups. This study compared human cybrids (cytoplasmic hybrids), which are cell lines with identical nuclei but mitochondria from different individuals with mtDNA from either the H haplogroup or L haplogroup backgrounds. The most common European haplogroup is H while individuals of maternal African origin are of the L haplogroup. Despite lower mtDNA copy numbers, L cybrids had higher expression levels for nine mtDNA-encoded respiratory complex genes, decreased ATP turnover rates and lower levels of ROS production, parameters which are consistent with more efficient oxidative phosphorylation. Surprisingly, GeneChip arrays showed that the L and H cybrids had major differences in expression of genes of the canonical complement system (5 genes), dermatan/chondroitin sulfate biosynthesis (5 genes) and CCR3 signaling (9 genes). Quantitative nuclear gene expression studies confirmed that L cybrids had (a) lower expression levels of complement pathway and innate immunity genes and (b) increased levels of inflammation-related signaling genes, which are critical in human diseases. Our data support the hypothesis that mtDNA haplogroups representing populations from different geographic origins may play a role in differential susceptibilities to diseases. PMID:24200652

  13. [Correlation between the genetic polymorphisms of apolipoprotein M with the susceptibility to rheumatic diseases of Chinese Han populastion in Lanzhou].

    PubMed

    Li, Meiyong; Guo, Xinling; Li, Qiannan; You, Chongge

    2016-08-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the genetic polymorphisms of apolipoprotein M (ApoM) and the susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS) among Chinese Han population in Lanzhou. Methods Primers for the two single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites (rs805296 and rs805297) in ApoM gene were designed and their genotyping methods of polymerase chain reaction-high resolution melting (PCR-HRM) assay were established. Case-control studies were performed among the 599 cases of RA, 194 cases of SLE, 179 cases of AS and 273 matched healthy controls to analyze the correlations between the two SNPs and the susceptibility to rheumatic diseases. Results The genotype frequencies of rs805296 were AA 87.0%, AG 12.7%, GG 0.3% in RA cases, AA 84.5%, AG 15.0%, GG 0.5% in SLE cases, AA 91.6%, AG 7.3%, GG 1.1% in AS cases, AA 85.0%, AG 15.0%, GG 0% in healthy controls. The ones of rs805297 were GG 38.2%, GT 51.8%, TT 10.0% in RA cases, GG 44.3%, GT 45.4%, TT 10.3% in SLE cases, GG 37.4%, GT 47.5%, TT 15.1% in AS cases, GG 40.7%, GT 46.1%, TT 13.2% in healthy controls. Statistical analyses showed that only the genotype distribution of rs805296 was significantly different between the AS cases and the healthy controls. Under the dominant model, the G allele carriers of rs805296 (AG heterozygote and GG homozygote) were found to significantly decrease the risk for AS development. Conclusion The established PCR-HRM genotyping assays in the present study can successfully achieve the molecular diagnosis of the two SNPs sites (rs805296 and rs805297) from clinical samples, and the study found a significant association between the SNP of rs805296 and the susceptibility to AS among Chinese Han population in Lanzhou. PMID:27412944

  14. Genetic variants of CDH13 determine the susceptibility to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in a Chinese population

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yi-ming; Zhang, Jin-long; Xu, Si-cheng; Ye, Ren-song; Xu, Dan; Zhang, You; Zhang, Yan-Jie; Chen, Yu-long; Liu, Yu-lan; Su, Zhi-guang

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Adiponectin has been implicated in the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The CDH13 gene encodes T-cadherin that is an adiponectin receptor, and genetic variants of CDH13 determine blood adiponectin levels. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of CDH13 variants on COPD susceptibility in a Chinese population. Methods: Ten single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in CDH13 were screened using the SNaPshot method in 279 COPD patients and 367 control subjects. Association of genotypes or haplotypes constructed from these loci with COPD was analyzed in different genetic models. Results: Among the 10 SNPs tested, rs4783244 and rs12922394 exhibited significant differences in allele or genotype frequencies between COPD patients and control subjects, whereas 8 other SNPs did not. The minor allele T was associated with decreased risk of COPD in the recessive model at rs4783244 (OR=0.42, P=0.023) and in the dominant model at rs12922394 (OR=0.70, P=0.022). The genotype TT at either rs4783244 or rs12922394 was associated with a significantly low level of plasma adiponectin when compared to genotypes GG and CC (P<0.05). Haplotypes GC in block 1 (rs4783244-rs12922394) as well as GTAC and ATGT in block 3 (rs4783266-rs11640522-rs11646849-rs11860282) significantly increased the risk of COPD, whereas haplotypes TT in block 1, TG in block 2 (rs11646011- rs11640875) and ATGC in block 3 were protective against COPD. Conclusion: CDH13 genetic variants determine Chinese individuals' susceptibility to COPD and thus are efficient genetic biomarkers for early detection of COPD. PMID:26806298

  15. A TNF Variant that Associates with Susceptibility to Musculoskeletal Disease Modulates Thyroid Hormone Receptor Binding to Control Promoter Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kiss-Toth, Endre; Harlock, Edward; Lath, Darren; Quertermous, Thomas; Wilkinson, J. Mark

    2013-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a powerful pro-inflammatory cytokine and immuno-regulatory molecule, and modulates susceptibility to musculoskeletal diseases. Several meta-analyses and replicated association studies have implicated the minor ‘A’ variant within the TNF promoter single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs361525 (-238A/G) as a risk allele in joint related disorders, including psoriatic and juvenile idiopathic arthritis, and osteolysis after joint arthroplasty. Here we characterized the effect of this variant on TNF promoter function. A transcriptional reporter, encoding the -238A variant of the TNF promoter, resulted in 2.2 to 2.8 times greater transcriptional activation versus the ‘G’ variant in murine macrophages when stimulated with pro-inflammatory stimuli. Bioinformatic analysis predicted a putative binding site for thyroid hormone receptor (TR) for the -238A but not the -238G allele. Overexpression of TR-α induced promoter expression 1.8-fold in the presence of the ‘A’ allele only. TR-α expression both potentiated and sensitized the -238A response to LPS or a titanium particulate stimulus, whilst siRNA knockdown of either THRA or THRB impaired transcriptional activation for the -238A variant only. This effect was independent of receptor-ligand binding of triiodothyronine. Immunohistochemical analysis of osteolysis interface membranes from patients undergoing revision surgery confirmed expression of TR-α within osteoclast nuclei at the resorption surface. The ‘A’ allele at rs361525 confers increased transcriptional activation of the TNF promoter and influences susceptibility to several arthritic conditions. This effect is modulated, at least in part, by binding of TR, which both sensitizes and potentiates transcriptional activation of the ‘A’ variant independent of its endogenous ligand. PMID:24069456

  16. Multistudy Fine Mapping of Chromosome 2q Identifies XRCC5 as a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Susceptibility Gene

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, Craig P.; Pillai, Sreekumar G.; Zhu, Guohua; Lomas, David A.; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; DeMeo, Dawn L.; Klanderman, Barbara J.; Lazarus, Ross; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Sparrow, David; Reilly, John J.; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M. A.; Donner, Claudio F.; Levy, Robert D.; Make, Barry J.; Paré, Peter D.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wouters, Emiel F. M.; Scholand, Mary Beth; Coon, Hilary; Hoidal, John; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Several family-based studies have identified genetic linkage for lung function and airflow obstruction to chromosome 2q. Objectives: We hypothesized that merging results of high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mapping in four separate populations would lead to the identification of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) susceptibility genes on chromosome 2q. Methods: Within the chromosome 2q linkage region, 2,843 SNPs were genotyped in 806 COPD cases and 779 control subjects from Norway, and 2,484 SNPs were genotyped in 309 patients with severe COPD from the National Emphysema Treatment Trial and 330 community control subjects. Significant associations from the combined results across the two case-control studies were followed up in 1,839 individuals from 603 families from the International COPD Genetics Network (ICGN) and in 949 individuals from 127 families in the Boston Early-Onset COPD Study. Measurements and Main Results: Merging the results of the two case-control analyses, 14 of the 790 overlapping SNPs had a combined P < 0.01. Two of these 14 SNPs were consistently associated with COPD in the ICGN families. The association with one SNP, located in the gene XRCC5, was replicated in the Boston Early-Onset COPD Study, with a combined P = 2.51 × 10−5 across the four studies, which remains significant when adjusted for multiple testing (P = 0.02). Genotype imputation confirmed the association with SNPs in XRCC5. Conclusions: By combining data from COPD genetic association studies conducted in four independent patient samples, we have identified XRCC5, an ATP-dependent DNA helicase, as a potential COPD susceptibility gene. PMID:20463177

  17. Genetic basis of differences in myxospore count between whirling disease-resistant and -susceptible strains of rainbow trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fetherman, Eric R.; Winkelman, Dana L.; Schisler, George J.; Antolin, Michael F.

    2012-01-01

    We used a quantitative genetics approach and estimated broad sense heritability (h2b) of myxospore count and the number of genes involved in myxospore formation to gain a better understanding of how resistance to Myxobolus cerebralis, the parasite responsible for whirling disease, is inherited in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. An M. cerebralis-resistant strain of rainbow trout, the German Rainbow (GR), and a wild, susceptible strain of rainbow trout, the Colorado River Rainbow (CRR), were spawned to create 3 intermediate crossed populations (an F1 cross, F2 intercross, and a B2 backcross between the F1 and the CRR). Within each strain or cross, h2b was estimated from the between-family variance of myxospore counts using full-sibling families. Estimates of h2b and average myxospore counts were lowest in the GR strain, F1 cross, and F2 intercross (h2b = 0.34, 0.42, and 0.34; myxospores fish−1 = 275, 9566, and 45780, respectively), and highest in the B2 backcross and CRR strain (h2b = 0.93 and 0.89; myxospores fish−1 = 97865 and 187595, respectively). Comparison of means and a joint-scaling test suggest that resistance alleles arising from the GR strain are dominant to susceptible alleles from the CRR strain. Resistance was retained in the intermediate crosses but decreased as filial generation number increased (F2) or backcrossing occurred (B2). The estimated number of segregating loci responsible for differences in myxospore count in the parental strains was 9 ± 5. Our results indicate that resistance to M. cerebralis is a heritable trait within these populations and would respond to either artificial selection in hatcheries or natural selection in the wild.

  18. Analysis of human chromosome 21 for a locus conferring susceptibility to Hirschsprung Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bolk, S.; Duggan, D.J.; Chakravarti, A.

    1994-09-01

    It has been estimated that approximately 5% of patients diagnosed with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), or aganglionic megacolon, have trisomy 21. Since the incidence of Hirschsprung disease is 1/5000 live births and the incidence of trisomy 21 is approximately 1/1000 live births, the observed occurrence of HSCR in trisomy 21 is fifty times higher than expected. We propose that at least one locus on chromosome 21 predisposes to HSCR. Although at fifty times elevated risk, only 1% of Down Syndrome cases have HSCR. Thus additional genes or genetic events are necessary for HSCR to manifest in patients with trisomy 21. Based on segregation analysis, Badner et al. postulated that recessive genes may be responsible for up to 80% of HSCR. We postulate that at least one such gene is on chromosome 21 and increased homozygosity for common recessive HSCR mutations may be one cause for the elevated risk of HSCR in cases of trisomy 21. To map such a chromosome 21 locus, we are searching for segments of human chromosome 21 which are identical by descent from the parent in whom non-disjunction occurred. These segments will arise either from meiosis I (followed by a crossover between the centromere and the locus) or from meiosis II (followed by no crossovers). Nine nuclear families with a proband diagnosed with HSCR and Down Syndrome have been genotyped for 18 microsatellite markers spanning human chromosome 21q. In all nine cases analyzed thus far, trisomy 21 resulted from maternal non-disjunction at meiosis I. At this point no single IBD region is apparent. Therefore, additional families are being ascertained and additional markers at high density are being genotyped to map the HSCR locus.

  19. Defined Nutrient Diets Alter Susceptibility to Clostridium difficile Associated Disease in a Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Zaenker, Edna I.; Bolick, David T.; Kolling, Glynis L.; van Opstal, Edward; Noronha, Francisco J. D.; De Medeiros, Pedro H. Q. S.; Rodriguez, Raphael S.; Lima, Aldo A.; Guerrant, Richard L.; Warren, Cirle A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Clostridium difficile is a major identifiable and treatable cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Poor nutritional status contributes to mortality through weakened host defenses against various pathogens. The primary goal of this study was to assess the contribution of a reduced protein diet to the outcomes of C. difficile infection in a murine model. Methods C57BL/6 mice were fed a traditional house chow or a defined diet with either 20% protein or 2% protein and infected with C. difficile strain VPI10463. Animals were monitored for disease severity, clostridial shedding and fecal toxin levels. Select intestinal microbiota were measured in stool and C. difficile growth and toxin production were quantified ex vivo in intestinal contents from untreated or antibiotic-treated mice fed with the different diets. Results C. difficile infected mice fed with defined diets, particularly (and unexpectedly) with protein deficient diet, had increased survival, decreased weight loss, and decreased overall disease severity. C. difficile shedding and toxin in the stool of the traditional diet group was increased compared with either defined diet 1 day post infection. Mice fed with traditional diet had an increased intestinal Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio following antibiotic exposure compared with either a 2% or 20% protein defined nutrient diet. Ex vivo inoculation of cecal contents from antibiotic-treated mice showed decreased toxin production and C. difficile growth in both defined diets compared with a traditional diet. Conclusions Low protein diets, and defined nutrient diets in general, were found to be protective against CDI in mice. Associated diet-induced alterations in intestinal microbiota may influence colonization resistance and clostridial toxin production in a defined nutrient diet compared to a traditional diet, leading to increased survival. However, mechanisms which led to survival differences between 2% and 20% protein defined nutrient diets

  20. Landscape-Level Variation in Disease Susceptibility Related to Shallow-Water Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Breitburg, Denise L.; Hondorp, Darryl; Audemard, Corinne; Carnegie, Ryan B.; Burrell, Rebecca B.; Trice, Mark; Clark, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Diel-cycling hypoxia is widespread in shallow portions of estuaries and lagoons, especially in systems with high nutrient loads resulting from human activities. Far less is known about the effects of this form of hypoxia than deeper-water seasonal or persistent low dissolved oxygen. We examined field patterns of diel-cycling hypoxia and used field and laboratory experiments to test its effects on acquisition and progression of Perkinsus marinus infections in the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, as well as on oyster growth and filtration. P. marinus infections cause the disease known as Dermo, have been responsible for declines in oyster populations, and have limited success of oyster restoration efforts. The severity of diel-cycling hypoxia varied among shallow monitored sites in Chesapeake Bay, and average daily minimum dissolved oxygen was positively correlated with average daily minimum pH. In both field and laboratory experiments, diel-cycling hypoxia increased acquisition and progression of infections, with stronger results found for younger (1-year-old) than older (2-3-year-old) oysters, and more pronounced effects on both infections and growth found in the field than in the laboratory. Filtration by oysters was reduced during brief periods of exposure to severe hypoxia. This should have reduced exposure to waterborne P. marinus, and contributed to the negative relationship found between hypoxia frequency and oyster growth. Negative effects of hypoxia on the host immune response is, therefore, the likely mechanism leading to elevated infections in oysters exposed to hypoxia relative to control treatments. Because there is considerable spatial variation in the frequency and severity of hypoxia, diel-cycling hypoxia may contribute to landscape-level spatial variation in disease dynamics within and among estuarine systems. PMID:25671595

  1. Landscape-level variation in disease susceptibility related to shallow-water hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Breitburg, Denise L; Hondorp, Darryl; Audemard, Corinne; Carnegie, Ryan B; Burrell, Rebecca B; Trice, Mark; Clark, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Diel-cycling hypoxia is widespread in shallow portions of estuaries and lagoons, especially in systems with high nutrient loads resulting from human activities. Far less is known about the effects of this form of hypoxia than deeper-water seasonal or persistent low dissolved oxygen. We examined field patterns of diel-cycling hypoxia and used field and laboratory experiments to test its effects on acquisition and progression of Perkinsus marinus infections in the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, as well as on oyster growth and filtration. P. marinus infections cause the disease known as Dermo, have been responsible for declines in oyster populations, and have limited success of oyster restoration efforts. The severity of diel-cycling hypoxia varied among shallow monitored sites in Chesapeake Bay, and average daily minimum dissolved oxygen was positively correlated with average daily minimum pH. In both field and laboratory experiments, diel-cycling hypoxia increased acquisition and progression of infections, with stronger results found for younger (1-year-old) than older (2-3-year-old) oysters, and more pronounced effects on both infections and growth found in the field than in the laboratory. Filtration by oysters was reduced during brief periods of exposure to severe hypoxia. This should have reduced exposure to waterborne P. marinus, and contributed to the negative relationship found between hypoxia frequency and oyster growth. Negative effects of hypoxia on the host immune response is, therefore, the likely mechanism leading to elevated infections in oysters exposed to hypoxia relative to control treatments. Because there is considerable spatial variation in the frequency and severity of hypoxia, diel-cycling hypoxia may contribute to landscape-level spatial variation in disease dynamics within and among estuarine systems. PMID:25671595

  2. Deficiency of the Planar Cell Polarity Protein Vangl2 in Podocytes Affects Glomerular Morphogenesis and Increases Susceptibility to Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rocque, Brittany L.; Babayeva, Sima; Li, Jane; Leung, Vicki; Nezvitsky, Lisa; Cybulsky, Andrey V.; Gros, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling pathway is crucial for tissue morphogenesis. Van Gogh-like protein 2 (Vangl2) is central in the PCP pathway; in mice, Vangl2 loss is embryonically lethal because of neural tube defects, and mutations in Vangl2 are associated with human neural tube defects. In the kidney, PCP signaling may be important for tubular morphogenesis and organization of glomerular epithelial cells (podocytes) along the glomerular basement membrane. Podocyte cell protrusions (foot processes) are critical for glomerular permselectivity; loss of foot process architecture results in proteinuria and FSGS. Previously, we showed a profound effect of PCP signaling on podocyte shape, actin rearrangement, cell motility, and nephrin endocytosis. To test our hypothesis that the PCP pathway is involved in glomerular development and function and circumvent lethality of the ubiquitous Vangl2 mutation in the Looptail mouse, we generated a mouse model with a podocyte-specific ablation of the Vangl2 gene. We report here that podocyte-specific deletion of Vangl2 leads to glomerular maturation defects in fetal kidneys. In adult mice, we detected significantly smaller glomeruli, but it did not affect glomerular permselectivity in aging animals. However, in the context of glomerular injury induced by injection of antiglomerular basement membrane antibody, deletion of Vangl2 resulted in exacerbation of injury and accelerated progression to chronic segmental and global glomerular sclerosis. Our results indicate that Vangl2 function in podocytes is important for glomerular development and protects against glomerular injury in adult animals. PMID:25145929

  3. FBXW7 and USP7 regulate CCDC6 turnover during the cell cycle and affect cancer drugs susceptibility in NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Merolla, Francesco; Poser, Ina; Visconti, Roberta; Ilardi, Gennaro; Paladino, Simona; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Guggino, Gianluca; Monaco, Roberto; Colecchia, David; Monaco, Guglielmo; Cerrato, Aniello; Chiariello, Mario; Denning, Krista; Claudio, Pier Paolo; Staibano, Stefania; Celetti, Angela

    2015-01-01

    CCDC6 gene product is a pro-apoptotic protein substrate of ATM, whose loss or inactivation enhances tumour progression. In primary tumours, the impaired function of CCDC6 protein has been ascribed to CCDC6 rearrangements and to somatic mutations in several neoplasia. Recently, low levels of CCDC6 protein, in NSCLC, have been correlated with tumor prognosis. However, the mechanisms responsible for the variable levels of CCDC6 in primary tumors have not been described yet. We show that CCDC6 turnover is regulated in a cell cycle dependent manner. CCDC6 undergoes a cyclic variation in the phosphorylated status and in protein levels that peak at G2 and decrease in mitosis. The reduced stability of CCDC6 in the M phase is dependent on mitotic kinases and on degron motifs that are present in CCDC6 and direct the recruitment of CCDC6 to the FBXW7 E3 Ubl. The de-ubiquitinase enzyme USP7 appears responsible of the fine tuning of the CCDC6 stability, affecting cells behaviour and drug response. Thus, we propose that the amount of CCDC6 protein in primary tumors, as reported in lung, may depend on the impairment of the CCDC6 turnover due to altered protein-protein interaction and post-translational modifications and may be critical in optimizing personalized therapy. PMID:25885523

  4. CO2 and fertility affect growth and reproduction but not susceptibility to aphids in field grown Solanum ptycanthum

    SciTech Connect

    Long, T.M.

    1995-09-01

    In general, C3 annual plants respond positively in terms of growth, reproduction and biomass accrued when grown under elevated levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide. However, most studies documenting this response have been conducted in growth chambers where plants can be reared under conditions free form environmental stressors such as nutrient and water constraints, UV exposure and damage from pests. During the 1993 fieldseason, I grew 200 individuals of Solanum ptycanthum in an array of 10 outdoor, open-topped CO2 enclosures (5 @ 700 ppm CO2) at the University of Michigan Biological Station in Pellston, MI. Half of the plants were grown in a 50;50 mix of native C-horizon soil and topsoil (low fertility); the other half were grown in 100% topsoil (high-fertility). Plants were censused throughout the growing season for flower and fruit production, growth rate and degree of infestation of aphids. Fertility and CO2 both significantly affected production of flowers and fruits, but only fertility was significantly related to vegetative growth. Aphid infestation varied significantly among enclosures, but was not related to CO2 or fertility.

  5. Differential expression of Toll-like receptor pathway genes in chicken embryo fibroblasts from chickens resistant and susceptible to Marek’s disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway is one of the innate immune defense mechanisms against pathogens in vertebrates and invertebrates. However, the role of TLR in non-MHC genetic resistance or susceptibility to Marek’s disease (MD) in the chicken is yet to be elucidated. Chicken embryo fi...

  6. Ecological Immunology through the Lens of Exercise Immunology: New Perspective on the Links between Physical Activity and Immune Function and Disease Susceptibility in Wild Animals.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, Jacintha G B; Matson, Kevin D

    2016-08-01

    Locomotion and other physical activities by free-living animals may influence immune function and disease susceptibility. This influence may be a consequence of energetic trade-offs or other mechanisms that are often, but not always, inseparably linked to an animal's life history (e.g., flight and migration). Ecological immunology has mainly focused on these life-history trade-offs, overlooking the possible effects of physical activity per se on immune function and disease susceptibility. In this review, we explore the field of exercise immunology, which examines the impact of exercise on immune function and disease susceptibility in humans, with the aim of presenting new perspectives that might be transferable to ecological immunology. First, we explore key concepts in exercise immunology that could be extended to animals. Next, we investigate the concept "exercise" in animals, and propose the use of "physical activity" instead. We briefly discuss methods used in animals to quantify physical activity in terms of energy expenditure and summarize several examples of animals engaging in physical activity. Then, we highlight potential consequences of physical activity on immune function and disease susceptibility in animals, together with an overview of animal studies that examine these links. Finally, we explore and discuss the potential for incorporating perspectives from exercise immunology into ecological immunology. Such integration could help advance our understanding of human and animal health and contribute new ideas to budding "One Health" initiatives. PMID:27252202

  7. Genetic Susceptibility to Chagas Disease: An Overview about the Infection and about the Association between Disease and the Immune Response Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ayo, Christiane Maria; Dalalio, Márcia Machado de Oliveira; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila; Reis, Pâmela Guimarães; Jarduli, Luciana Ribeiro; Alves, Hugo Vicentin; Sell, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    Chagas disease, which is caused by the flagellate parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, affects 8–10 million people in Latin America. The disease is endemic and is characterised by acute and chronic phases that develop in the indeterminate, cardiac, and/or gastrointestinal forms. The immune response during human T. cruzi infection is not completely understood, despite its role in driving the development of distinct clinical manifestations of chronic infection. Polymorphisms in genes involved in the innate and specific immune response are being widely studied in order to clarify their possible role in the occurrence or severity of disease. Here we review the role of classic and nonclassic MHC, KIR, and cytokine host genetic factors on the infection by T. cruzi and the clinical course of Chagas disease. PMID:24069594

  8. Stratification by CARD15 variant genotype in a genome-wide search for inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Sarah H; Hampe, Jochen; White, Ray; Mathew, Christopher G; Curran, Mark E; Schreiber, Stefan

    2003-11-01

    Previously we have conducted a genome-wide search for inflammatory bowel disease susceptibility loci in a large European cohort. Results from this study demonstrated suggestive evidence of linkage to loci at chromosomes 1q, 6p, and 10p and replicated linkages on chromosomes 12 and 16. Recently, NOD2/CARD15 on chromosome 16q12 has been found to be strongly associated with Crohn's disease. In order to determine if there are other loci in the genome that interact with the three associated functional variants in CARD15 (R702W, G908R, 1007fs), we have stratified our large inflammatory bowel disease genome scan cohort by dividing pedigrees into two groups stratified by CARD15 variant genotype. The two pedigree groups were analysed using non-parametric allele sharing methods. The group of pedigrees that contained one of the three CARD15 variants had two suggestive linkage results occurring in 6p (lod = 3.06 at D6S197, IBD phenotype) and 10p (lod=2.29 at D10S197, CD phenotype). In addition, at 16q12 where CARD15 is located, the original genome scan had a peak lod score of 2.18 at D16S415 (CD phenotype). The stratified pedigree cohort containing one of three CARD15 variants had a peak lod score of 0.90 at D16S415 (CD phenotype), accounting for approximately less than half of the genetic evidence for linkage at this locus. This result is in agreement with the existence of a substantial number of private variants at the NOD2/CARD15 locus. Interaction with NOD2/CARD15 needs to be considered in future gene identification efforts on chromosomes 6 and 10. PMID:13680363

  9. CLU rs9331888 Polymorphism Contributes to Alzheimer's Disease Susceptibility in Caucasian But Not East Asian Populations.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuyan; Li, Xuling; Ma, Guoda; Jiang, Yongshuai; Liao, Mingzhi; Feng, Rennan; Zhang, Liangcai; Liu, Jiafeng; Wang, Guangyu; Zhao, Bin; Jiang, Qinghua; Li, Keshen; Liu, Guiyou

    2016-04-01

    Large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified three single nucleotide polymorphisms rs11136000, rs2279590, and rs9331888 in CLU gene to be significantly associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in Caucasian ancestry. Both rs11136000 and rs2279590 variants were successfully replicated in Asian population. However, previous studies reported either a weak association or no association between rs9331888 polymorphism and AD in Asian population. Here, we searched the PubMed, AlzGene, and Google Scholar databases. We selected 12 independent studies that evaluated the association between the rs9331888 polymorphism and AD using a case-control design. Using an additive model, we did not identify significant heterogeneity among these 12 studies. We observed significant association between rs9331888 polymorphism and AD in pooled populations (P = 2.26E - 07, odds ratio (OR) = 1.10, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.14). In subgroup analysis, we did not identify significant heterogeneity in both Asian and Caucasian populations. We identified significant association in Caucasian population (P = 1.67E - 08, OR = 1.13, 95 % CI 1.08-1.18) but not in East Asian population (P = 0.49, OR = 1.02, 95 % CI 0.96-1.10). PMID:25633098

  10. The energy cost of action potential propagation in dopamine neurons: clues to susceptibility in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Pissadaki, Eleftheria K.; Bolam, J. Paul

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) are uniquely sensitive to degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD) and its models. Although a variety of molecular characteristics have been proposed to underlie this sensitivity, one possible contributory factor is their massive, unmyelinated axonal arbor that is orders of magnitude larger than other neuronal types. We suggest that this puts them under such a high energy demand that any stressor that perturbs energy production leads to energy demand exceeding supply and subsequent cell death. One prediction of this hypothesis is that those dopamine neurons that are selectively vulnerable in PD will have a higher energy cost than those that are less vulnerable. We show here, through the use of a biology-based computational model of the axons of individual dopamine neurons, that the energy cost of axon potential propagation and recovery of the membrane potential increases with the size and complexity of the axonal arbor according to a power law. Thus SNc dopamine neurons, particularly in humans, whose axons we estimate to give rise to more than 1 million synapses and have a total length exceeding 4 m, are at a distinct disadvantage with respect to energy balance which may be a factor in their selective vulnerability in PD. PMID:23515615

  11. Kinase-KCC2 coupling: Cl- rheostasis, disease susceptibility, therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Kahle, Kristopher T; Delpire, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The intracellular concentration of Cl(-) ([Cl(-)]i) in neurons is a highly regulated variable that is established and modulated by the finely tuned activity of the KCC2 cotransporter. Despite the importance of KCC2 for neurophysiology and its role in multiple neuropsychiatric diseases, our knowledge of the transporter's regulatory mechanisms is incomplete. Recent studies suggest that the phosphorylation state of KCC2 at specific residues in its cytoplasmic COOH terminus, such as Ser940 and Thr906/Thr1007, encodes discrete levels of transporter activity that elicit graded changes in neuronal Cl(-) extrusion to modulate the strength of synaptic inhibition via Cl(-)-permeable GABAA receptors. In this review, we propose that the functional and physical coupling of KCC2 to Cl(-)-sensitive kinase(s), such as the WNK1-SPAK kinase complex, constitutes a molecular "rheostat" that regulates [Cl(-)]i and thereby influences the functional plasticity of GABA. The rapid reversibility of (de)phosphorylation facilitates regulatory precision, and multisite phosphorylation allows for the control of KCC2 activity by different inputs via distinct or partially overlapping upstream signaling cascades that may become more or less important depending on the physiological context. While this adaptation mechanism is highly suited to maintaining homeostasis, its adjustable set points may render it vulnerable to perturbation and dysregulation. Finally, we suggest that pharmacological modulation of this kinase-KCC2 rheostat might be a particularly efficacious strategy to enhance Cl(-) extrusion and therapeutically restore GABA inhibition. PMID:26510764

  12. Host range susceptibility of Enterococcus sp. strains isolated from diseased turbot: possible routes of infection.

    PubMed Central

    Romalde, J L; Magariños, B; Nuñez, S; Barja, J L; Toranzo, A E

    1996-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to assess the pathogenicity of Enterococcus sp. strains isolated from diseased turbot for several fish species (turbot, salmon, trout, and seabream), as well as for mice. The intraperitoneal injection assays indicated that the tested strains showed host specificity for turbot, with a high degree of virulence (50% lethal dose of 10(4) cells per g of fish). The Spanish Enterococcus sp. isolates were nonpathogenic for the other fish species studied and for mice. The possible routes of infection were determined by bath exposure (with and without prior abrasion of the skin) and by intragastric inoculations with food and feces contaminated with the pathogen. The bath challenges indicated that the Enterococcus isolates were able to overcome the defense mechanisms present on the surface of the turbot only if the skin was abraded prior to the exposure. The antibacterial activities of components of a glycoprotein nature present in the turbot skin mucus are probably responsible in part for the resistance in noninjured fish to infection. On the other hand, we demonstrated the capacity of this pathogen to overcome adverse conditions in the stomachs of fish when associated with food or fecal material, since it is able to establish an infective state and to produce mortalities after 16 to 20 days postingestion. From all of these findings, we can conclude that horizontal transmissions through water and the fecal-oral route are the main avenues of infection of turbot streptococcosis. PMID:8593061

  13. Immune response and mechanical stress susceptibility in diseased oysters, Crassostrea virginica.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Steven B; Sunila, Inke; Wikfors, Gary H

    2012-01-01

    Eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, naturally infected with the parasite Perkinsus marinus were subjected to a mechanical stress by centrifugation, and immune parameters, pathological conditions, and gene expression of selected transcripts were compared to uninfected controls. Immune parameters were assessed by flow cytometry, pathology and parasites by histotechnology and fluid thioglycollate assays, and gene expression by quantitative RT-PCR. Irrespective of mechanical stress, an increased number of hemocytes were observed in P. marinus-infected oysters that corresponded to increased expression of genes that have been shown to be involved in inflammation and apoptosis, two processes associated with regulating immune cell populations. Mechanically stressed, diseased oysters showed histological gill abnormalities and aggregations of hemocytes in tissues not seen in stressed, uninfected oysters. Expression of a high-mobility group protein and hemocyte phagocytosis were significantly upregulated upon mechanical stress only in uninfected oysters. The results of this study demonstrate the role of inflammation in the oyster immune response including possible underlying molecular mechanisms. Furthermore, this study highlights the importance of considering mechanical stressors when characterizing oyster immune function. PMID:21853237

  14. Translational neurophysiology in sheep: measuring sleep and neurological dysfunction in CLN5 Batten disease affected sheep

    PubMed Central

    Perentos, Nicholas; Martins, Amadeu Q.; Watson, Thomas C.; Bartsch, Ullrich; Mitchell, Nadia L.; Palmer, David N.; Jones, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Creating valid mouse models of slowly progressing human neurological diseases is challenging, not least because the short lifespan of rodents confounds realistic modelling of disease time course. With their large brains and long lives, sheep offer significant advantages for translational studies of human disease. Here we used normal and CLN5 Batten disease affected sheep to demonstrate the use of the species for studying neurological function in a model of human disease. We show that electroencephalography can be used in sheep, and that longitudinal recordings spanning many months are possible. This is the first time such an electroencephalography study has been performed in sheep. We characterized sleep in sheep, quantifying characteristic vigilance states and neurophysiological hallmarks such as sleep spindles. Mild sleep abnormalities and abnormal epileptiform waveforms were found in the electroencephalographies of Batten disease affected sheep. These abnormalities resemble the epileptiform activity seen in children with Batten disease and demonstrate the translational relevance of both the technique and the model. Given that both spontaneous and engineered sheep models of human neurodegenerative diseases already exist, sheep constitute a powerful species in which longitudinal in vivo studies can be conducted. This will advance our understanding of normal brain function and improve our capacity for translational research into neurological disorders. PMID:25724202

  15. Translational neurophysiology in sheep: measuring sleep and neurological dysfunction in CLN5 Batten disease affected sheep.

    PubMed

    Perentos, Nicholas; Martins, Amadeu Q; Watson, Thomas C; Bartsch, Ullrich; Mitchell, Nadia L; Palmer, David N; Jones, Matthew W; Morton, A Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    Creating valid mouse models of slowly progressing human neurological diseases is challenging, not least because the short lifespan of rodents confounds realistic modelling of disease time course. With their large brains and long lives, sheep offer significant advantages for translational studies of human disease. Here we used normal and CLN5 Batten disease affected sheep to demonstrate the use of the species for studying neurological function in a model of human disease. We show that electroencephalography can be used in sheep, and that longitudinal recordings spanning many months are possible. This is the first time such an electroencephalography study has been performed in sheep. We characterized sleep in sheep, quantifying characteristic vigilance states and neurophysiological hallmarks such as sleep spindles. Mild sleep abnormalities and abnormal epileptiform waveforms were found in the electroencephalographies of Batten disease affected sheep. These abnormalities resemble the epileptiform activity seen in children with Batten disease and demonstrate the translational relevance of both the technique and the model. Given that both spontaneous and engineered sheep models of human neurodegenerative diseases already exist, sheep constitute a powerful species in which longitudinal in vivo studies can be conducted. This will advance our understanding of normal brain function and improve our capacity for translational research into neurological disorders. PMID:25724202

  16. Elevated depressive affect is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes among African Americans with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Michael J.; Kimmel, Paul L.; Greene, Tom; Gassman, Jennifer J.; Wang, Xuelei; Brooks, Deborah H.; Charleston, Jeanne; Dowie, Donna; Thornley-Brown, Denyse; Cooper, Lisa A.; Bruce, Marino A.; Kusek, John W.; Norris, Keith C.; Lash, James P.

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the impact of elevated depressive affect on health outcomes among participants with hypertensive chronic kidney disease in the African-American Study of Kidney Disease and Hypertension (AASK) Cohort Study. Elevated depressive affect was defined by Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II) thresholds of 11 or more, above 14, and by 5-Unit increments in the score. Cox regression analyses were used to relate cardiovascular death/hospitalization, doubling of serum creatinine/end-stage renal disease, overall hospitalization, and all-cause death to depressive affect evaluated at baseline, the most recent annual visit (time-varying), or average from baseline to the most recent visit (cumulative). Among 628 participants at baseline, 42% had BDI-II scores of 11 or more and 26% had a score above 14. During a 5-year follow-up, the cumulative incidence of cardiovascular death/hospitalization was significantly greater for participants with baseline BDI-II scores of 11 or more compared with those with scores <11. The baseline, time-varying, and cumulative elevated depressive affect were each associated with a significant higher risk of cardiovascular death/hospitalization, especially with a time-varying BDI-II score over 14 (adjusted HR 1.63) but not with the other outcomes. Thus, elevated depressive affect is associated with unfavorable cardiovascular outcomes in African Americans with hypertensive chronic kidney disease. PMID:21633409

  17. Modulation of microRNAs in two genetically disparate chicken lines showing different necrotic enteritis disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Hue; Hong, Yeong Ho; Lillehoj, Hyun S

    2014-05-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) play a critical role in post-transcriptional regulation by influencing the 3'-UTR of target genes. Using two inbred White Leghorn chicken lines, line 6.3 and line 7.2 showing Marek's disease-resistant and -susceptible phenotypes, respectively, we used small RNA high-throughput sequencing (HTS) to investigate whether miRNAs are differently expressed in these two chicken lines after inducing necrotic enteritis (NE). The 12 miRNAs, selected from the most down-regulated or up-regulated miRNAs following NE induction, were confirmed by their expressions in real-time PCR. Among these miRNAs, miR-215, miR-217, miR-194, miR-200a, miR-200b, miR-216a, miR-216b, and miR-429 were highly expressed in intestine derived from line 7.2, whereas, miR-1782 and miR-499 were down-regulated. In spleen, miR-34b and miR-1684 were the most up-regulated miRNAs in line 6.3. Notably, five out of six target genes, CXCR5, BCL2, GJA1, TCF12, and TAB3 were differentially expressed between line 6.3 and line 7.2, and showed suppression in the MD-susceptible chicken line. Their expression levels were conversely correlated with those of miRNA obtained from both HTS and quantitative real-time PCR. These results suggest that some miRNAs are differentially altered in response to NE and they modulate the expression of their target genes in the two inbred lines. Collectively, HTS analysis of intestinal miRNAs from NE-afflicted inbred chickens showing different disease phenotypes led to the identification of host immunity genes regulated by miRNA. Future studies of the function of these miRNAs and their target genes in the host will lead to enhanced understanding of molecular mechanisms controlling host-pathogen interaction in NE. PMID:24629767

  18. Evidence for a NOD2-independent susceptibility locus for inflammatory bowel disease on chromosome 16p

    PubMed Central

    Hampe, Jochen; Frenzel, Henning; Mirza, Muddassar M.; Croucher, Peter J. P.; Cuthbert, Andrew; Mascheretti, Silvia; Huse, Klaus; Platzer, Matthias; Bridger, Stephen; Meyer, Birgit; Nürnberg, Peter; Stokkers, Pieter; Krawczak, Michael; Mathew, Christopher G.; Curran, Mark; Schreiber, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    Heritable predisposition to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been demonstrated by epidemiological and genetic analysis. Linkage of IBD to broad regions of chromosome 16 has been established by analysis of multiple populations. NOD2, located on proximal 16q, was recently identified as an IBD gene. As the linkage regions on chromosome 16 are large, we have investigated the possibility that NOD2 is not the only IBD gene located on this chromosome. A high-density experiment using 39 microsatellite markers was performed to identify additional regions of association, and to indicate areas of interest for further investigation. A triple-peaked configuration of the linkage curve with peak logarithm of odds (lod) scores of 2.7, 3.2, and 3.1 was observed on proximal 16p, proximal 16q, and central 16q, respectively. The cohort was stratified by coding individuals carrying the NOD2 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)8 and SNP13 “unknown.” Significance at the central peak, corresponding to the genomic location of NOD2, then decreased from 3.2 to 1.2. The maximal lod scores on the proximal p-arm (lod = 2.1) and central q-arm (lod = 2.6) changed only moderately. An exploratory association analysis (TRANSMIT) yielded a strong lead at D16S3068 (P = 0.00028). The region around this marker was further investigated by using anonymous SNPs. An associated haplotype containing three SNPs was identified (peak significance P = 0.00027, IBD phenotype). On stratification based on NOD2 genotype, this significance increased to P = 0.0001. These results confirm the importance of NOD2 and provide evidence for a second IBD gene located on chromosome 16p. PMID:11752413

  19. Susceptibility Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... page helpful? Also known as: Sensitivity Testing; Drug Resistance Testing; Culture and Sensitivity; C & S; Antimicrobial Susceptibility Formal name: Bacterial and Fungal Susceptibility Testing Related tests: Urine Culture ; ...

  20. Effect of genetic variation in the MHC Class II DRB region on resistance and susceptibility to Johne's disease in endangered Indian Jamunapari goats.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Singh, S V; Singh, M K; Saxena, V K; Horin, P; Singh, A V; Sohal, J S

    2012-08-01

    The pathogenesis of Johne's disease (JD), caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is complex and has not been completely understood yet. In the present study, we analysed the polymorphism in the exon-2 of the caprine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) Class II DRB region and its association with resistance or susceptibility to JD. A total of 203 Jamunapari goats, which is an Indian endangered breed highly susceptible to JD, kept at a single farm were studied. On the basis of clinical signs, microscopic examination, faecal culture, ELISA and diagnostic PCR, 60 and 143 goats were classified as resistant and susceptible to JD, respectively. PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) with two enzymes, PstI and TaqI, was used to assess variation in the DRB gene(s) in all 203 goats studied. Two di-allelic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), here referred as 'P' and 'T', were tested. In each of them, three genotypes were found in the group analysed. The minimum allele frequencies (MAFs) were 0.233 and 0.486 for the P and T SNPs, respectively. Statistically significant associations between alleles, individual genotypes and composed genotypes of both SNPs were found. The frequency of p and t alleles, of individual pp and tt and of composed pptt genotypes were significantly higher (P(corr) < 0.001) in the 'resistant' group as compared to the 'susceptible' group, while the P and T alleles were associated with susceptibility (P(corr) < 0.001). In heterozygous genotypes, susceptibility was dominant over resistance. The effects of both SNP on resistance and susceptibility were comparable and composed heterozygous genotypes showed intermediate levels of susceptibility in terms of the odds ratio and P-values calculated. PMID:22321606

  1. Overexpression of RANKL in osteoblasts: a possible mechanism of susceptibility to bone disease in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Delion, Martial; Braux, Julien; Jourdain, Marie-Laure; Guillaume, Christine; Bour, Camille; Gangloff, Sophie; Pimpec-Barthes, Françoise Le; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Jacquot, Jacky; Velard, Frédéric

    2016-09-01

    Bone fragility and loss are a significant cause of morbidity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and the lack of effective therapeutic options means that treatment is more often palliative rather than curative. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of CF-related bone disease (CFBD) is necessary to develop new therapies. Defective CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein and chronic inflammation in bone are important components of the CFBD development. The receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) drive the regulation of bone turnover. To investigate their roles in CFBD, we evaluated the involvement of defective CFTR in their production level in CF primary human osteoblasts with and without inflammatory stimulation, in the presence or not of pharmacological correctors of the CFTR. No major difference in cell ultrastructure was noted between cultured CF and non-CF osteoblasts, but a delayed bone matrix mineralization was observed in CF osteoblasts. Strikingly, resting CF osteoblasts exhibited strong production of RANKL protein, which was highly localized at the cell membrane and was enhanced in TNF (TNF-α) or IL-17-stimulated conditions. Under TNF stimulation, a defective response in OPG production was observed in CF osteoblasts in contrast to the elevated OPG production of non-CF osteoblasts, leading to an elevated RANKL-to-OPG protein ratio in CF osteoblasts. Pharmacological inhibition of CFTR chloride channel conductance in non-CF osteoblasts replicated both the decreased OPG production and the enhanced RANKL-to-OPG ratio. Interestingly, using CFTR correctors such as C18, we significantly reduced the production of RANKL by CF osteoblasts, in both resting and TNF-stimulated conditions. In conclusion, the overexpression of RANKL and high membranous RANKL localization in osteoblasts are related to defective CFTR, and may worsen bone resorption, leading to bone loss in patients with CF. Targeting

  2. A combined analysis of D22S278 marker alleles in affected sib-pairs: Support for a susceptibility locus for schizophrenia at chromosome 22q12

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, M.; Vallada, H.; Collier, D.

    1996-02-16

    Several groups have reported weak evidence for linkage between schizophrenia and genetic markers located on chromosome 22q using the lod score method of analysis. However these findings involved different genetic markers and methods of analysis, and so were not directly comparable. To resolve this issue we have performed a combined analysis of genotypic data from the marker D22S278 in multiply affected schizophrenic families derived from 11 independent research groups worldwide. This marker was chosen because it showed maximum evidence for linkage in three independent datasets. Using the affected sib-pair method as implemented by the program ESPA, the combined dataset showed 252 alleles shared compared with 188 alleles not shared (chi-square 9.31, 1df, P = 0.001) where parental genotype data was completely known. When sib-pairs for whom parental data was assigned according to probability were included the number of alleles shared was 514.1 compared with 437.8 not shared (chi-square 6.12, 1df, P = 0.006). Similar results were obtained when a likelihood ratio method for sib-pair analysis was used. These results indicate that there may be a susceptibility locus for schizophrenia at 22q12. 27 refs., 3 tabs.

  3. Examining the role of components of Slc11a1 (Nramp1) in the susceptibility of New Zealand sea lions (Phocarctos hookeri) to disease.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Amy J; Pearson, John; Chilvers, B Louise; Kennedy, Martin A; Gemmell, Neil J

    2015-01-01

    The New Zealand sea lion (NZSL, Phocarctos hookeri) is a Threatened marine mammal with a restricted distribution and a small, declining, population size. The species is susceptible to bacterial pathogens, having suffered three mass mortality events since 1998. Understanding the genetic factors linked to this susceptibility is important in mitigating population decline. The gene solute carrier family 11 member a1 (Slc11a1) plays an important role in mammalian resistance or susceptibility to a wide range of bacterial pathogens. At present, Slc11a1 has not been characterised in many taxa, and despite its known roles in mediating the effects of infectious disease agents, has not been examined as a candidate gene in susceptibility or resistance in any wild population of conservation concern. Here we examine components of Slc11a1 in NZSLs and identify: i) a polymorphic nucleotide in the promoter region; ii) putative shared transcription factor binding motifs between canids and NZSLs; and iii) a conserved polymorphic microsatellite in the first intron of Slc11a1, which together suggest conservation of Slc11a1 gene structure in otariids. At the promoter polymorphism, we demonstrate a shift away from normal allele frequency distributions and an increased likelihood of death from infectious causes with one allelic variant. While this increased likelihood is not statistically significant, lack of significance is potentially due to the complexity of genetic susceptibility to disease in wild populations. Our preliminary data highlight the potential significance of this gene in disease resistance in wild populations; further exploration of Slc11a1 will aid the understanding of susceptibility to infection in mammalian species of conservation significance. PMID:25874773

  4. Examining the Role of Components of Slc11a1 (Nramp1) in the Susceptibility of New Zealand Sea Lions (Phocarctos hookeri) to Disease

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Amy J.; Pearson, John; Chilvers, B. Louise; Kennedy, Martin A.; Gemmell, Neil J.

    2015-01-01

    The New Zealand sea lion (NZSL, Phocarctos hookeri) is a Threatened marine mammal with a restricted distribution and a small, declining, population size. The species is susceptible to bacterial pathogens, having suffered three mass mortality events since 1998. Understanding the genetic factors linked to this susceptibility is important in mitigating population decline. The gene solute carrier family 11 member a1 (Slc11a1) plays an important role in mammalian resistance or susceptibility to a wide range of bacterial pathogens. At present, Slc11a1 has not been characterised in many taxa, and despite its known roles in mediating the effects of infectious disease agents, has not been examined as a candidate gene in susceptibility or resistance in any wild population of conservation concern. Here we examine components of Slc11a1 in NZSLs and identify: i) a polymorphic nucleotide in the promoter region; ii) putative shared transcription factor binding motifs between canids and NZSLs; and iii) a conserved polymorphic microsatellite in the first intron of Slc11a1, which together suggest conservation of Slc11a1 gene structure in otariids. At the promoter polymorphism, we demonstrate a shift away from normal allele frequency distributions and an increased likelihood of death from infectious causes with one allelic variant. While this increased likelihood is not statistically significant, lack of significance is potentially due to the complexity of genetic susceptibility to disease in wild populations. Our preliminary data highlight the potential significance of this gene in disease resistance in wild populations; further exploration of Slc11a1 will aid the understanding of susceptibility to infection in mammalian species of conservation significance. PMID:25874773

  5. Duration of treatment and activation of α1-containing GABAA receptors variably affect the level of anxiety and seizure susceptibility after diazepam withdrawal in rats.

    PubMed

    Kovačević, Jovana; Timić, Tamara; Tiruveedhula, Veera V; Batinić, Bojan; Namjoshi, Ojas A; Milić, Marija; Joksimović, Srđan; Cook, James M; Savić, Miroslav M

    2014-05-01

    Long-term use of benzodiazepine-type drugs may lead to physical dependence, manifested by withdrawal syndrome after abrupt cessation of treatment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of duration of treatment, as well as the role of α1-containing GABAA receptors, in development of physical dependence to diazepam, assessed through the level of anxiety and susceptibility to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures, 24h after withdrawal from protracted treatment in rats. Withdrawal of 2mg/kg diazepam after 28, but not after 14 or 21 days of administration led to an anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze. Antagonism of the diazepam effects at α1-containing GABAA receptors, achieved by daily administration of the neutral modulator βCCt (5mg/kg), did not affect the anxiety level during withdrawal. An increased susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizures was observed during diazepam withdrawal after 21 and 28 days of treatment. Daily co-administration of βCCt further decreased the PTZ-seizure threshold after 21 days of treatment, whilst it prevented the diazepam withdrawal-elicited decrease of the PTZ threshold after 28 days of treatment. In conclusion, the current study suggests that the role of α1-containing GABAA receptors in mediating the development of physical dependence may vary based on the effect being studied and duration of protracted treatment. Moreover, the present data supports previous findings that the lack of activity at α1-containing GABAA receptors is not sufficient to eliminate physical dependence liability of ligands of the benzodiazepine type. PMID:24695241

  6. Mutant Huntingtin Does Not Affect the Intrinsic Phenotype of Human Huntington’s Disease T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, James R. C.; Träger, Ulrike; Andre, Ralph; Tabrizi, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease is a fatal neurodegenerative condition caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. The peripheral innate immune system is dysregulated in Huntington’s disease and may contribute to its pathogenesis. However, it is not clear whether or to what extent the adaptive immune system is also involved. Here, we carry out the first comprehensive investigation of human ex vivo T lymphocytes in Huntington’s disease, focusing on the frequency of a range of T lymphocyte subsets, as well as analysis of proliferation, cytokine production and gene transcription. In contrast to the innate immune system, the intrinsic phenotype of T lymphocytes does not appear to be affected by the presence of mutant huntingtin, with Huntington’s disease T lymphocytes exhibiting no significant functional differences compared to control cells. The transcriptional profile of T lymphocytes also does not appear to be significantly affected, suggesting that peripheral immune dysfunction in Huntington’s disease is likely to be mediated primarily by the innate rather than the adaptive immune system. This study increases our understanding of the effects of Huntington’s disease on peripheral tissues, while further demonstrating the differential effects of the mutant protein on different but related cell types. Finally, this study suggests that the potential use of novel therapeutics aimed at modulating the Huntington’s disease innate immune system should not be extended to include the adaptive immune system. PMID:26529236

  7. Genetic Factors That Affect Risk of Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Anstee, Quentin M; Seth, Devanshi; Day, Christopher P

    2016-06-01

    Genome-wide association studies and candidate gene studies have informed our understanding of factors contributing to the well-recognized interindividual variation in the progression and outcomes of alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. We discuss the mounting evidence for shared modifiers and common pathophysiological processes that contribute to development of both diseases. We discuss the functions of proteins encoded by risk variants of genes including patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2, as well as epigenetic factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. We also discuss important areas of future genetic research and their potential to affect clinical management of patients. PMID:26873399

  8. Complex interplay between neutral and adaptive evolution shaped differential genomic background and disease susceptibility along the Italian peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Sazzini, Marco; Gnecchi Ruscone, Guido Alberto; Giuliani, Cristina; Sarno, Stefania; Quagliariello, Andrea; De Fanti, Sara; Boattini, Alessio; Gentilini, Davide; Fiorito, Giovanni; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Boiardi, Luigi; Croci, Stefania; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Mantovani, Vilma; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Matullo, Giuseppe; Salvarani, Carlo; Franceschi, Claudio; Pettener, Davide; Garagnani, Paolo; Luiselli, Donata

    2016-01-01

    The Italian peninsula has long represented a natural hub for human migrations across the Mediterranean area, being involved in several prehistoric and historical population movements. Coupled with a patchy environmental landscape entailing different ecological/cultural selective pressures, this might have produced peculiar patterns of population structure and local adaptations responsible for heterogeneous genomic background of present-day Italians. To disentangle this complex scenario, genome-wide data from 780 Italian individuals were generated and set into the context of European/Mediterranean genomic diversity by comparison with genotypes from 50 populations. To maximize possibility of pinpointing functional genomic regions that have played adaptive roles during Italian natural history, our survey included also ~250,000 exomic markers and ~20,000 coding/regulatory variants with well-established clinical relevance. This enabled fine-grained dissection of Italian population structure through the identification of clusters of genetically homogeneous provinces and of genomic regions underlying their local adaptations. Description of such patterns disclosed crucial implications for understanding differential susceptibility to some inflammatory/autoimmune disorders, coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes of diverse Italian subpopulations, suggesting the evolutionary causes that made some of them particularly exposed to the metabolic and immune challenges imposed by dietary and lifestyle shifts that involved western societies in the last centuries. PMID:27582244

  9. Complex interplay between neutral and adaptive evolution shaped differential genomic background and disease susceptibility along the Italian peninsula.

    PubMed

    Sazzini, Marco; Gnecchi Ruscone, Guido Alberto; Giuliani, Cristina; Sarno, Stefania; Quagliariello, Andrea; De Fanti, Sara; Boattini, Alessio; Gentilini, Davide; Fiorito, Giovanni; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Boiardi, Luigi; Croci, Stefania; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Mantovani, Vilma; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Matullo, Giuseppe; Salvarani, Carlo; Franceschi, Claudio; Pettener, Davide; Garagnani, Paolo; Luiselli, Donata

    2016-01-01

    The Italian peninsula has long represented a natural hub for human migrations across the Mediterranean area, being involved in several prehistoric and historical population movements. Coupled with a patchy environmental landscape entailing different ecological/cultural selective pressures, this might have produced peculiar patterns of population structure and local adaptations responsible for heterogeneous genomic background of present-day Italians. To disentangle this complex scenario, genome-wide data from 780 Italian individuals were generated and set into the context of European/Mediterranean genomic diversity by comparison with genotypes from 50 populations. To maximize possibility of pinpointing functional genomic regions that have played adaptive roles during Italian natural history, our survey included also ~250,000 exomic markers and ~20,000 coding/regulatory variants with well-established clinical relevance. This enabled fine-grained dissection of Italian population structure through the identification of clusters of genetically homogeneous provinces and of genomic regions underlying their local adaptations. Description of such patterns disclosed crucial implications for understanding differential susceptibility to some inflammatory/autoimmune disorders, coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes of diverse Italian subpopulations, suggesting the evolutionary causes that made some of them particularly exposed to the metabolic and immune challenges imposed by dietary and lifestyle shifts that involved western societies in the last centuries. PMID:27582244

  10. Susceptibility of chicken lymphoid cells to infectious bursal disease virus does not correlate with the presence of specific binding sites.

    PubMed

    Nieper, H; Müller, H

    1996-06-01

    Pathogenic serotype 1 strains of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) replicate efficiently in lymphoid cells of the bursa of Fabricius of chicken. Lymphoid cells in other organs are not susceptible. Apathogenic serotype 2 strains do not replicate in lymphoid bursa cells or in other lymphoid cells. Chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF), however, efficiently replicate strains of either serotype. Binding studies showed that strains of both IBDV serotypes bind to lymphoid cells isolated from the bursa, thymus or spleen, indicating that restriction of IBDV replication to lymphoid B cells is not determined by the presence of specific receptor sites. The specificity of binding was demonstrated by saturation and competition experiments. These revealed the presence of different receptors: CEF had receptors common to both serotypes and specific ones for each serotype. Receptor sites common to both serotypes were also present on lymphoid cells; however, additional serotype-specific sites were only demonstrated for the apathogenic serotype 2 strain. Strains of both serotypes specifically bound to proteins with molecular masses of 40 kDa and 46 kDa, exposed on the surface of CEF and lymphoid cells. Competition experiments indicated that these proteins might represent the common receptor sites of IBDV. PMID:8683211

  11. Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Prion Pathology in Medulla Oblongata—Possible Routes of Infection and Host Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Iacono, Diego; Ferrari, Sergio; Gelati, Matteo; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Mariotto, Sara; Monaco, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), the most frequent human prion disorder, is characterized by remarkable phenotypic variability, which is influenced by the conformation of the pathologic prion protein and the methionine/valine polymorphic codon 129 of the prion protein gene. While the etiology of sCJD remains unknown, it has been hypothesized that environmental exposure to prions might occur through conjunctival/mucosal contact, oral ingestion, inhalation, or simultaneous involvement of the olfactory and enteric systems. We studied 21 subjects with definite sCJD to assess neuropathological involvement of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and other medullary nuclei and to evaluate possible associations with codon 129 genotype and prion protein conformation. The present data show that prion protein deposition was detected in medullary nuclei of distinct sCJD subtypes, either valine homozygous or heterozygous at codon 129. These findings suggest that an “environmental exposure” might occur, supporting the hypothesis that external sources of contamination could contribute to sCJD in susceptible hosts. Furthermore, these novel data could shed the light on possible causes of sCJD through a “triple match” hypothesis that identify environmental exposure, host genotype, and direct exposure of specific anatomical regions as possible pathogenetic factors. PMID:26457299

  12. TM6SF2 E167K Variant, a Novel Genetic Susceptibility Variant, Contributing to Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li-Zhen; Xia, Harry Hua-Xiang; Xin, Yong-Ning; Lin, Zhong-Hua; Xuan, Shi-Ying

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common causes of liver dysfunction worldwide, and its prevalence is highly associated with genetic susceptibility. The transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2 (TM6SF2) E167K variant represents a general genetic determinant of hepatic triglyceride content and lobular inflammation, and its presence appears to be directly involved in the pathogenesis and development of NAFLD. Although this variant appears to be a novel powerful modifier in the development of NAFLD, whether it is associated with an increased risk of NAFLD-related liver fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains to be determined. The aim of this review is to describe the functions of the TM6SF2 E167K variant and its association with NAFLD, with particular emphasis on the underlying mechanisms of its role in the development and progression of NAFLD. Additionally, the links between the TM6SF2 E167K variant and NAFLD-related liver fibrosis and HCC will be discussed. PMID:26807382

  13. A bivariate genome-wide association study identifies ADAM12 as a novel susceptibility gene for Kashin-Beck disease

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Jingcan; Wang, Wenyu; Wen, Yan; Xiao, Xiao; He, Awen; Guo, Xiong; Yang, Tielin; Liu, Xiaogang; Shen, Hui; Chen, Xiangding; Tian, Qing; Deng, Hong-Wen; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Kashin-Beck disease (KBD) is a chronic osteoarthropathy, which manifests as joint deformities and growth retardation. Only a few genetic studies of growth retardation associated with the KBD have been carried out by now. In this study, we conducted a two-stage bivariate genome-wide association study (BGWAS) of the KBD using joint deformities and body height as study phenotypes, totally involving 2,417 study subjects. Articular cartilage specimens from 8 subjects were collected for immunohistochemistry. In the BGWAS, ADAM12 gene achieved the most significant association (rs1278300 p-value = 9.25 × 10−9) with the KBD. Replication study observed significant association signal at rs1278300 (p-value = 0.007) and rs1710287 (p-value = 0.002) of ADAM12 after Bonferroni correction. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly decreased expression level of ADAM12 protein in the KBD articular cartilage (average positive chondrocyte rate = 47.59 ± 7.79%) compared to healthy articular cartilage (average positive chondrocyte rate = 64.73 ± 5.05%). Our results suggest that ADAM12 gene is a novel susceptibility gene underlying both joint destruction and growth retardation of the KBD. PMID:27545300

  14. Polymorphism of VEGF gene in susceptibility to chronic immune-mediated inflammatory diseases: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ni; Chen, Zijia; Xue, Zhifeng; Zhu, Yuelan

    2015-08-01

    Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an important angiogenic factor and may be connected with chronic immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) to some extent. However, previous researches about the relationship between the +405G>C (dbSNP: rs2010963) polymorphism in VEGF gene and the risk of IMIDs are controversial and inconsistent. So we conducted this meta-analysis to assess whether the relationship between the +405G>C polymorphism in the 5'-UTR region of VEGF gene and IMID susceptibility exists. Methods Our literature search was conducted on the PubMed, Embase, Web of science, Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Chinese Biomedical databases to retrieve for eligible studies. Odds ratios as well as their 95 % confidence intervals were utilized to deduce the possible relationship. Results A total number of 5175 patients with IMIDs and 7069 healthy controls from 27 case-control studies were included. For the overall eligible data collected in our meta-analysis, there was no marked relationship between +405G>C polymorphism and the risk of IMIDs. However, subgroup analysis by ethnicity suggested that +405C allele could be a protective factor for IMIDs in Asians, whereas an opposite conclusion was drawn in Caucasians. Conclusion Thus, we may come to the conclusion that the VEGF +405G>C polymorphism could be associated with IMIDs, and the correlation might vary with ethnic groups. PMID:26007152

  15. Dynamics of a Mathematical Model for Tuberculosis with Variability in Susceptibility and Disease Progressions Due to Difference in Awareness Level

    PubMed Central

    Okuonghae, Daniel; Ikhimwin, Bernard O.

    2016-01-01

    This work extends a mathematical model for the transmission dynamics of tuberculosis that examined the impact of certain factors on tuberculosis case detection (Okuonghae and Omosigho, 2011). The extended model now classifies the latently infected individuals by their level of tuberculosis awareness (as was done for the susceptible sub-population) and further expands the number of key factors that can positively affect the tuberculosis case detection rate. The effect of these identified factors on the associated reproduction number of the model is considered. It is shown that the system can undergo the phenomenon of backward bifurcation when the associated reproduction number of the model is less than unity; in a special case, the effect of exogenous re-infection on the backward bifurcation phenomenon is significantly dictated by the level of awareness of the latently infected individuals. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of the model showed the effect of key identified factors on the dynamics of tuberculosis while suggesting a serious concentration on tuberculosis awareness programmes, active case finding strategies and use of active cough identification for identifying likely TB cases and sustaining awareness campaigns over a long period of time. PMID:26858691

  16. Lesion simulating disease 1 and enhanced disease susceptibility 1 differentially regulate UV-C-induced photooxidative stress signalling and programmed cell death in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wituszyńska, Weronika; Szechyńska-Hebda, Magdalena; Sobczak, Mirosław; Rusaczonek, Anna; Kozłowska-Makulska, Anna; Witoń, Damian; Karpiński, Stanisław

    2015-02-01

    As obligate photoautotrophs, plants are inevitably exposed to ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Because of stratospheric ozone depletion, UV has become more and more dangerous to the biosphere. Therefore, it is important to understand UV perception and signal transduction in plants. In the present s