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Sample records for affect gas transport

  1. Fluoride inhibits root water transport and affects leaf expansion and gas exchange in aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kamaluddin, Mohammed; Zwiazek, Janusz J.

    2003-03-01

    The effects of sodium fluoride (0.3, 5 and 10 mM NaF) on root hydraulic conductivity, and gas exchange processes were examined in aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) seedlings grown in solution culture. A long-term exposure of roots to NaF significantly decreased root hydraulic conductivity (Lp) and stomatal conductance ( gs). Root absorbed NaF significantly affected electrolyte leakage in leaf tissues and substantially restricted leaf expansion. NaF did not significantly affect leaf chlorophyll contents but decreased net photosynthesis (Pn). A short-term exposure of excised roots to 5 mM NaF and KF significantly decreased root water flow (Qv) with a concomitant decline in root respiration and reduced gs when applied through intact roots or excised stems. The same molar concentration of NaCl also decreased Qv and gs in intact seedlings, but to a lesser extent than NaF or KF, and did not significantly affect root respiration. The results suggest that fluoride metabolically inhibited Qv or Lp, probably by affecting water channel activity. We suggest that the metabolic inhibition of Lp by root-absorbed fluoride affected gas exchange and leaf expansion in aspen seedlings.

  2. Alaska Natural Gas Transportation System

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, V.T.

    1984-04-27

    The proven reserves of natural gas in Prudhoe Bay remain the single largest block of reserves under US control. The sponsors of the Alaska Natural Gas Transportation System, including The Williams Companies, remain convinced that Alaskan gas will be increasingly important to meet future needs here in the lower 48 states. Both Canada and the US will increasingly have to turn to more costly supplies of gas as the closer, traditional areas of gas supply are exhausted. A principal motivation for Canada's participation in the ANGTS was the prospect of a jointly sponsored pipeline through Canada which would facilitate bringing frontier gas to market - through the so-called Dempster lateral. The high cost of transportation systems in the Artic necessitates pipelines with large capacities in order to minimize the cost of transportation per unit of gas delivered. It is clear that Canada still strongly supports the ANGTS project as a means of opening up the frontier resources of both Alaska and Canada.

  3. Costs to transport natural gas

    SciTech Connect

    Leibson, I.; Davenport, S.T.; Muenzier, M.H.

    1987-04-01

    Relative Economics are discussed for transporting natural gas by four ways: converting to LNG and using LNG tankers, as a gas using on-land and subsea pipelines, converting to methanol and using conventional tankers, and compressing and using tankers with pressurized containers. Distances and routes are important factors when determining cost. Specific examples are given for transportation between : Arabian Gulf and Europe, Africa and Europe, and Islands separated by short distances.

  4. Small agricultural impoundments affect pollutant transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-03-01

    Reservoirs created by dams intercept runoff from upslope areas and thus are often sinks for fertilizers and other pollutants that would otherwise flow downstream. Most studies of solute transport through impoundments have focused on large, long-lived systems. However, small impoundments, such as those created for irrigation or livestock watering, are common in agricultural regions, and their total global surface area is comparable to that of large reservoirs. As these small systems mature, the impoundments fill with sediment, creating ecosystems with wetland-like characteristics. Because dams that create these small impoundments are more likely to be degraded, poorly maintained, or removed by their owners, it is important to understand how changes in such systems may affect pollutant transport.

  5. Convert natural gas into clean transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Agee, M.A.

    1997-03-01

    A new process economically converts natural gas into synthetic transportation fuels that are free of sulfur, metals, aromatics and are clear in appearance. The process, developed by Syntroleum Corp., is energy self-sufficient and can be implemented in sizes small enough to fit a large number of the world`s gas fields. The process is described.

  6. Conditions and processes affecting radionuclide transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simmons, Ardyth M.; Neymark, Leonid A.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding of unsaturated-zone transport is based on laboratory and field-scale experiments. Fractures provide advective transport pathways. Sorption and matrix diffusion may contribute to retardation of radionuclides. Conversely, sorption onto mobile colloids may enhance radionuclide transport.

  7. Hot Gas Desulfurization Using Transport Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Moorehead, E.L.

    1996-12-31

    Sierra Pacific Power Company is building a 100 MW, IGCC power plant based on KRW fluid bed gasifier technology that utilizes transport reactors for hot gas desulfurization and sorbent regeneration. Use of a transport absorber avoids the need for pre-filtration of dust-laden gasifier effluent, while a transport regenerator allows for the use of 100% air without the need for heat exchange equipment. Selection of transport reactors for hot gas desulfurization using a proprietary sorbent, based on testing performed in a transport reactor test unit (TRTU) at the M. W. Kellogg Technology Development Center and in a fixed bed reactor at Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), is outlined. The results obtained in these two test facilities and reasons for selecting transport reactors for the IGCC power plant in preference to either fixed bed or fluidized bed reactors are discussed. This paper reviews the evolution of the hot gas desulfurization system designs and includes selected results on H{sub 2}S absorption and regeneration of sulfided sorbent over several absorption/regeneration cycles conducted in the TRTU and the METC fixed bed reactor. The original design for the Sierra Pacific Project was based on fixed bed reactors with zinc ferrite as the sorbent. Owing to the high steam requirements of this sorbent, zinc titanate was selected and tested in a fixed bed reactor and was found unacceptable due to loss of strength on cyclic absorption/regeneration operation. Another sorbent evaluated was Z-Sorb{reg_sign}, a proprietary sorbent developed by Phillips Petroleum Company, was found to have excellent sulfur capacity, structural strength and regenerability. Steam was found unsuitable as fixed bed regenerator diluent, this results in a requirement for a large amount of inert gas, whereas a transport regenerator requires no diluent. The final Sierra design features transport reactors for both desulfurization and regeneration steps using neat air. 3 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Gas transport across hyperthin membranes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minghui; Janout, Vaclav; Regen, Steven L

    2013-12-17

    The use of organic polymeric membranes to separate gaseous mixtures provides an attractive alternative to other methods such as selective adsorption and cryogenic distillation. The primary advantages of membrane-based separations are their relative energy efficiency and lower costs. Because the flux of a gas across a membrane is inversely proportional to the membrane's thickness, this method relies on fabricating membranes that are as thin as possible. However, as researchers have tried to produce "hyperthin" membranes (less than 100 nm), these membranes often form defects and lose their permeation selectivity. In this Account, we review some of the progress in our laboratories at Lehigh University to create hyperthin membranes with high permeation selectivities. We focus special attention on gaseous permeants that are relevant for the production of clean energy (H2 and CO2 formed from CH4) and the reduction of global warming (CO2 and N2, the major components of flue gas). Our studies make extensive use of Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) methods and porous surfactants derived from calix[6]arenes. We specially designed each surfactant to form cohesive monolayers and multilayers, and we introduced a "gluing" technique, where we cross-link porous surfactants containing quaternary ammonium groups ionically with polymeric counterions. Using ellipsometry, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, monolayer isotherm, surface viscosity, and permeation measurements, we have characterized these hyperthin films. While molecular sieving appears to make a significant contribution to the permeation selectivity of some of these membranes, solution-diffusion pathways predominate. We also describe initial studies in which we formed hyperthin films from poly(ethylene glycol)-based polyelectrolytes using layer-by-layer deposition (LbL) methods. We have found remarkably high H2/CO2 and CO2/N2 permeation selectivities with these LB- and LbL-based hyperthin membranes. These

  9. Physics of gas breakdown for ion beam transport in gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, C. L.; Poukey, J. W.; Hinshelwood, D. D.; Rose, D. V.; Hubbard, R. F.; Lampe, M.; Neri, J. M.; Ottinger, P. F.; Slinker, S. P.; Stephanakis, S. J.

    1993-05-01

    Detailed analysis, experiments, and computer simulations are producing a new understanding of gas breakdown during intense ion beam transport in neutral gas. Charge neutralization of beam micro-clumps is shown to limit the net clump potentials to a non-zero value (pi)(sub min), which can lead to divergence growth and axial energy spreading. At pressures approximately greater than 1 Torr, plasma shielding should substantially reduce this effect. Current neutralization has been studied in experiments on the GAMBLE 2 accelerator. The importance of fast electrons (knockons and runaways) has been established in IPROP simulations, which are in agreement with the experiments. For light ion fusion parameters with pressures approximately greater than 1 Torr, very small net current fractions (much less than 1%) appear feasible, permitting ballistic transport in gas. Self-pinched requires higher net current fractions (greater than or equal to 2%) and preliminary IPROP code results indicate that this appears achievable for small-radius intense beams in lower pressure gases (approximately less than 1 Torr). Several self-pinched transport concepts look promising. The importance of these results for both light ion fusion and heavy ion fusion is discussed.

  10. The Effect of Microstructure on Firn Gas Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keegan, Kaitlin M.

    The processes affecting gas transport through the firn column are important to understand in order to accurately interpret climate records from ice cores. Historically, density measurements have been used to estimate open and closed porosity in the firn layers to inform firn densification models. These densification models directly affect the gas-age ice-age calculation that is used to determine the offset between ice and air bubble proxies of the ice core climate records. Through studies of firn microstructure, we hope to learn more about pore geometry and ultimately how gas transports through firn layers. Such studies will directly influence our understanding of the gas-age ice-age difference. In this thesis, we present three examples of firn microstructure affecting the gas transport through the firn column, in ways that are inconsistent with the current understanding of the firn column. First, we examine the effect melt layers found in firn cores from dry snow region of Greenland. From permeability measurements, we find that the assumption that these melt layers are impermeable, or at least disrupt gas transport, to be incorrect. We compare the melt layers found at NEEM to other Greenlandic firn cores, to reveal that a widespread melt event occurred in 1889 and that warm temperatures combined with black carbon deposition due to forest fires were the cause of such event. The second example we examine is the lock-in zone of the NEEM firn column. We find that the lock-in depth of the NEEM firn to consist of 4.5 m of low permeability firn layers, unlike the single impermeable firn layer that is typically described. This extended lock-in depth of the NEEM lock-in zone helps in the understanding of a NEEM firn air campaign that requires a diffusion term within the lock-in zone, because the extended lock-in depth is capable of allowing a small amount of diffusion through the layers. Lastly, we examine the effect of impurities in the firn layers and their ability to

  11. Soil water repellency affects production and transport of CO2 and CH4 in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanek, Emilia; Qassem, Khalid

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture is known to be vital in controlling both the production and transport of C gases in soil. Water availability regulates the decomposition rates of soil organic matter by the microorganisms, while the proportion of water/air filled pores controls the transport of gases within the soil and at the soil-atmosphere interface. Many experimental studies and process models looking at soil C gas fluxes assume that soil water is uniformly distributed and soil is easily wettable. Most soils, however, exhibit some degree of soil water repellency (i.e. hydrophobicity) and do not wet spontaneously when dry or moderately moist. They have restricted infiltration and conductivity of water, which also results in extremely heterogeneous soil water distribution. This is a world-wide occurring phenomenon which is particularly common under permanent vegetation e.g. forest, grass and shrub vegetation. This study investigates the effect of soil water repellency on microbial respiration, CO2 transport within the soil and C gas fluxes between the soil and the atmosphere. The results from the field monitoring and laboratory experiments show that soil water repellency results in non-uniform water distribution in the soil which affects the CO2 and CH4 gas fluxes. The main conclusion from the study is that water repellency not only affects the water relations in the soil, but has also a great impact on greenhouse gas production and transport and therefore should be included as an important parameter during the sites monitoring and modelling of gas fluxes.

  12. Analysis of glycylsarcosine transport by lobster intestine using gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Maria L; Lane, Amy L; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography was used to measure transepithelial transport of glycylsarcosine (Gly-Sar) by perfused lobster (Homarus americanus) intestine. Unidirectional and net fluxes of dipeptide across the tissue and luminal factors affecting their magnitude and direction were characterized by perfusing the lumen with the dipeptide and measuring its appearance in saline on the serosal side of the organ. Transmural transport of 10 mM Gly-Sar resulted in serosal accumulation of only the dipeptide; no appearance of corresponding monomeric amino acids glycine or sarcosine was observed. Carrier-mediated and diffusional transmural intestinal transport of Gly-Sar was estimated at 1-15 mM luminal concentrations and followed a curvilinear equation providing a K m = 0.44 ± 0.17 mM, a J max = 1.27 ± 0.12 nmol cm(-2) min(-1), and a diffusional coefficient = 0.026 ± 0.008 nmol cm(-2) min(-1) mM(-1). Unidirectional mucosal to serosal and serosal to mucosal fluxes of 10 mM Gly-Sar provided a significant (p < 0.05) net absorptive flux toward the serosa of 3.54 ± 0.77 nmol cm(-2) min(-1), further supporting carrier-mediated dipeptide transport across the gut. Alkaline (pH 8.5) luminal pH more than doubled transmural Gly-Sar transport as compared to acidic (pH 5.5) luminal pH, while luminal amino acid-metal chelates (e.g., Leu-Zn-Leu), and high concentrations of amino acids alone significantly (p < 0.001) reduced intestinal Gly-Sar transfer by inhibiting carrier transport of the dipeptide. Proposed mechanisms accounting for intestinal dipeptide transport and luminal factors affecting this process are discussed.

  13. Analysis of glycylsarcosine transport by lobster intestine using gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Maria L; Lane, Amy L; Ahearn, Gregory A

    2015-01-01

    Gas chromatography was used to measure transepithelial transport of glycylsarcosine (Gly-Sar) by perfused lobster (Homarus americanus) intestine. Unidirectional and net fluxes of dipeptide across the tissue and luminal factors affecting their magnitude and direction were characterized by perfusing the lumen with the dipeptide and measuring its appearance in saline on the serosal side of the organ. Transmural transport of 10 mM Gly-Sar resulted in serosal accumulation of only the dipeptide; no appearance of corresponding monomeric amino acids glycine or sarcosine was observed. Carrier-mediated and diffusional transmural intestinal transport of Gly-Sar was estimated at 1-15 mM luminal concentrations and followed a curvilinear equation providing a K m = 0.44 ± 0.17 mM, a J max = 1.27 ± 0.12 nmol cm(-2) min(-1), and a diffusional coefficient = 0.026 ± 0.008 nmol cm(-2) min(-1) mM(-1). Unidirectional mucosal to serosal and serosal to mucosal fluxes of 10 mM Gly-Sar provided a significant (p < 0.05) net absorptive flux toward the serosa of 3.54 ± 0.77 nmol cm(-2) min(-1), further supporting carrier-mediated dipeptide transport across the gut. Alkaline (pH 8.5) luminal pH more than doubled transmural Gly-Sar transport as compared to acidic (pH 5.5) luminal pH, while luminal amino acid-metal chelates (e.g., Leu-Zn-Leu), and high concentrations of amino acids alone significantly (p < 0.001) reduced intestinal Gly-Sar transfer by inhibiting carrier transport of the dipeptide. Proposed mechanisms accounting for intestinal dipeptide transport and luminal factors affecting this process are discussed. PMID:25260349

  14. Granular transport in driven granular gas.

    PubMed

    Noirhomme, M; Opsomer, E; Vandewalle, N; Ludewig, F

    2015-02-01

    We numerically and theoretically investigate the behavior of a granular gas driven by asymmetric plates. The injection of energy in the dissipative system differs from one side to the opposite one. We prove that the dynamical clustering which is expected for such a system is affected by the asymmetry. As a consequence, the cluster position can be fully controlled. This property could lead to various applications in the handling of granular materials in low-gravity environment. Moreover, the dynamical cluster is characterized by natural oscillations which are also captured by a model. These oscillations are mainly related to the cluster size, thus providing an original way to probe the clustering behavior.

  15. How is Order 636 affecting the gas distribution industry

    SciTech Connect

    Margossian, K.M. )

    1993-12-01

    This paper is part of a six part series on how interstate gas pipelines have been affected by Order 636. These papers are written in an interview format with different individuals representing the pipeline, natural gas, utility, and regulatory side of this new regulation. The issues deal with how it has affected these industries; how the relationships have changed between suppliers, marketers, distributors, etc.; the risks now involved in marketing, shipping, and buying gas products; and new technology developments have resulted to comply with the new regulations. This paper is an interview with Kenneth M. Magossian, president and chief operating officer of Commonwealth Gas Co. and Hopkinton LNG Corp.

  16. RAETRAD MODEL OF RADON GAS GENERATION, TRANSPORT, AND INDOOR ENTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the theoretical basis, implementation, and validation of the Radon Emanation and Transport into Dwellings (RAETRAD) model, a conceptual and mathematical approach for simulating radon (222Rn) gas generation and transport from soils and building foundations to ...

  17. Experimental gas-solid vertical transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Kuo Ming

    1987-05-01

    Gas-solid transport in dilute and dense phase conveying is studied. A new experimental system for vertical pneumatic conveying incorporates a screw feeder for dilute transport and an L-valve for dense flow. For measuring solid volume fractions a novel method using an x-ray densitometer was developed. The pressure in the system was measured using a strip chart recorder (SCR) and a manometer. The solids flux was estimated by collecting the particles from the system for a known time. The porosity and pressure drop data in the fully developed region were translated into drag coefficients and friction factors. The drag coefficients are in reasonable agreement with literature values. The friction factors with the wall were sometimes negative, reflecting downward flow, as observed in two-dimensional studies. Four available hydrodynamic models for vertical pneumatic conveying were used to predict the porosity and the pressure for the experimental conditions. Experimental data for porosity and pressure agree well with theoretical predictions. However, the predictions from the relative velocity model were in the best agreement for pressure drop values.

  18. Gas transport and vesicularity in low-viscosity liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioli, Laura; Bonadonna, Costanza; Abdulkareem, Lokman; Azzopardi, Barry; Phillips, Jeremy

    2010-05-01

    that gas is mainly transported by large, conduit-size bubbles rising in a microvesicular liquid. Coalescence processes occur throughout the whole column, and are strongly affected by bubble size, shearing and flow dynamics. Increasing gas fluxes increases frequency and length of the large bubbles but does not affect the concentration of small bubbles in the liquid matrix. Scaling of these experiments suggest that these conditions could be met in low viscosity, crystal-poor magmas and we therefore suggest that this dynamics could also characterize two-phase flow in open conduit mafic systems.

  19. Lateral gas transport in soil adjacent to an old landfill: factors governing gas migration.

    PubMed

    Christophersen, M; Kjeldsen, P

    2001-12-01

    Field experiments investigating lateral gas transport in soil adjacent to an old landfill in Denmark during a one-year period were conducted. A significant seasonal variation, with low concentrations of methane and high concentrations of carbon dioxide in the summer, caused by methane oxidation was observed. There was a good correlation between pressure above the barometric pressure and the methane concentration in the soil, indicating that advective flow was the controlling process. This was confirmed by calculations. Diurnal measurement during a drop in barometric pressure showed that lateral migration of landfill gas was a very dynamic system and the concentrations of LFG at a specific place and depth changed dramatically within a very short time. The experiments showed that change in barometric pressure was an important factor affecting gas migration at the Skellingsted landfill in Denmark.

  20. Cryogenic Transport of High-Pressure-System Recharge Gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ungar, Eugene K,; Ruemmele, Warren P.; Bohannon, Carl

    2010-01-01

    A method of relatively safe, compact, efficient recharging of a high-pressure room-temperature gas supply has been proposed. In this method, the gas would be liquefied at the source for transport as a cryogenic fluid at or slightly above atmospheric pressure. Upon reaching the destination, a simple heating/expansion process would be used to (1) convert the transported cryogenic fluid to the room-temperature, high-pressure gaseous form in which it is intended to be utilized and (2) transfer the resulting gas to the storage tank of the system to be recharged. In conventional practice for recharging high-pressure-gas systems, gases are transported at room temperature in high-pressure tanks. For recharging a given system to a specified pressure, a transport tank must contain the recharge gas at a much higher pressure. At the destination, the transport tank is connected to the system storage tank to be recharged, and the pressures in the transport tank and the system storage tank are allowed to equalize. One major disadvantage of the conventional approach is that the high transport pressure poses a hazard. Another disadvantage is the waste of a significant amount of recharge gas. Because the transport tank is disconnected from the system storage tank when it is at the specified system recharge pressure, the transport tank still contains a significant amount of recharge gas (typically on the order of half of the amount transported) that cannot be used. In the proposed method, the cryogenic fluid would be transported in a suitably thermally insulated tank that would be capable of withstanding the recharge pressure of the destination tank. The tank would be equipped with quick-disconnect fluid-transfer fittings and with a low-power electric heater (which would not be used during transport). In preparation for transport, a relief valve would be attached via one of the quick-disconnect fittings (see figure). During transport, the interior of the tank would be kept at a near

  1. Low Voltage Gas Transport TE CO(2) Laser.

    PubMed

    Seguin, H J; Sedgwick, G

    1972-04-01

    The constructional and operational aspects of a low voltage transversely excited gas transport CO(2) laser are presented. This compact device incorporates a recirculating wind tunnel type geometry and possesses features of the gas dynamic, gas transport, and TEA lasers. The structure with an active length of 36 cm produced a cw power of approximately 200 W at an over-all system efficiency of 5% using a discharge potential of 1200 V.

  2. Gas gathering and transportation issues in Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Pitner, S.L.

    1997-12-31

    The Texas Railroad Commission was established in 1891 to prevent waste of the states oil and gas. The Commission regulates both oil and gas from the time the well permit is granted until it is used. In 1995 the Commission was reorganized with increased emphasis on natural gas issues. The Gas Services Division was formed to address the growing importance of natural gas to the state. The significant aspects of this new division are discussed.

  3. Impact of compression on gas transport in non-woven gas diffusion layers of high temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froning, Dieter; Yu, Junliang; Gaiselmann, Gerd; Reimer, Uwe; Manke, Ingo; Schmidt, Volker; Lehnert, Werner

    2016-06-01

    Gas transport in non-woven gas diffusion layers of a high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell was calculated with the Lattice Boltzmann method. The underlying micro structure was taken from two sources. A real micro structure was analyzed in the synchrotron under the impact of a compression mask mimicking the channel/rib structure of a flow field. Furthermore a stochastic geometry model based on synchrotron X-ray tomography studies was applied. The effect of compression is included in the stochastic model. Gas transport in these micro structures was simulated and the impact of compression was analyzed. Fiber bundles overlaying the micro structure were identified which affect the homogeneity of the gas flow. There are significant deviations between the impact of compression on effective material properties for this type of gas diffusion layers and the Kozeny-Carman equation.

  4. Feed gas contaminant removal in ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Underwood, Richard Paul; Makitka, III, Alexander; Carolan, Michael Francis

    2012-04-03

    An oxygen ion transport membrane process wherein a heated oxygen-containing gas having one or more contaminants is contacted with a reactive solid material to remove the one or more contaminants. The reactive solid material is provided as a deposit on a support. The one or more contaminant compounds in the heated oxygen-containing gas react with the reactive solid material. The contaminant-depleted oxygen-containing gas is contacted with a membrane, and oxygen is transported through the membrane to provide transported oxygen.

  5. Natural gas gathering and transportation issues, 1998 Texas perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Kitchens, R.L.

    1998-12-31

    In 1996 and 1997, the natural gas industry was intensely focused on the debate surrounding proposed new rules governing the gathering and transportation of natural gas in Texas by the Railroad Commission. This paper reviews that debate and several other regulatory issues that could impact the natural gas and gas processing industries over the next few years. In addition to the review of the Code of Conduct, this paper focuses on results of the informal complaint process, implementation of new legislation requiring the approval of construction of sour gas pipelines and several other natural gas related issues.

  6. Ion transport membrane reactor systems and methods for producing synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect

    Repasky, John Michael

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments of the present invention provide cost-effective systems and methods for producing a synthesis gas product using a steam reformer system and an ion transport membrane (ITM) reactor having multiple stages, without requiring inter-stage reactant injections. Embodiments of the present invention also provide techniques for compensating for membrane performance degradation and other changes in system operating conditions that negatively affect synthesis gas production.

  7. Molecular dynamics studies on nanoscale gas transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barisik, Murat

    Three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of nanoscale gas flows are studied to reveal surface effects. A smart wall model that drastically reduces the memory requirements of MD simulations for gas flows is introduced. The smart wall molecular dynamics (SWMD) represents three-dimensional FCC walls using only 74 wall Molecules. This structure is kept in the memory and utilized for each gas molecule surface collision. Using SWMD, fluid behavior within nano-scale confinements is studied for argon in dilute gas, dense gas, and liquid states. Equilibrium MD method is employed to resolve the density and stress variations within the static fluid. Normal stress calculations are based on the Irving-Kirkwood method, which divides the stress tensor into its kinetic and virial parts. The kinetic component recovers pressure based on the ideal gas law. The particle-particle virial increases with increased density, while the surface-particle virial develops due to the surface force field effects. Normal stresses within nano-scale confinements show anisotropy induced primarily by the surface force-field and local variations in the fluid density near the surfaces. For dilute and dense gas cases, surface-force field that extends typically 1nm from each wall induces anisotropic normal stress. For liquid case, this effect is further amplified by the density fluctuations that extend beyond the three field penetration region. Outside the wall force-field penetration and density fluctuation regions the normal stress becomes isotropic and recovers the thermodynamic pressure, provided that sufficiently large force cut-off distances are utilized in the computations. Next, non-equilibrium SWMD is utilized to investigate the surface-gas interaction effects on nanoscale shear-driven gas flows in the transition and free molecular flow regimes. For the specified surface properties and gas-surface pair interactions, density and stress profiles exhibit a universal behavior inside the

  8. ANALYSIS OF ESTUARINE TRACER-GAS TRANSPORT AND DESORPTION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bales, Jerad D.; Holley, Edward R.

    1987-01-01

    The riverine tracer-gas technique provides a direct, reach-averaged measure of gas exchange, is fairly simple to implement, and is widely accepted for determining reaeration-rate coefficients in rivers. The method, however, is not directly applicable to flows having vertical density gradients. Consequently, studies were undertaken to develop and evaluate methods for obtaining surface-exchange coefficients from estuarine tracer-gas data. Reasonable estimates of the desorption coefficient (within 50 percent of the correct value) were obtained when an analytical solution of the transport equation was compared with data from a numerically simulated continuous release of tracer gas.

  9. Tau phosphorylation affects its axonal transport and degradation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Cuchillo-Ibáñez, Inmaculada; Noble, Wendy; Nyenya, Fanon; Anderton, Brian H.; Hanger, Diane P.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated forms of microtubule-associated protein tau accumulate in neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease. To investigate the effects of specific phosphorylated tau residues on its function, wild type or phosphomutant tau was expressed in cells. Elevated tau phosphorylation decreased its microtubule binding and bundling, and increased the number of motile tau particles, without affecting axonal transport kinetics. In contrast, reducing tau phosphorylation enhanced the amount of tau bound to microtubules and inhibited axonal transport of tau. To determine whether differential tau clearance is responsible for the increase in phosphomimic tau, we inhibited autophagy in neurons which resulted in a 3-fold accumulation of phosphomimic tau compared with wild type tau, and endogenous tau was unaffected. In autophagy-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, but not in neurons, proteasomal degradation of phosphomutant tau was also reduced compared with wild type tau. Therefore, autophagic and proteasomal pathways are involved in tau degradation, with autophagy appearing to be the primary route for clearing phosphorylated tau in neurons. Defective autophagy might contribute to the accumulaton of tau in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23601672

  10. Noble Gas Tracing of Fluid Transport in Shale Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, J. E.; Gardner, W. P.; Kuhlman, K. L.; Robinson, D. G.; Bauer, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate fluid transport mechanisms in a shale reservoir using natural noble gas tracers. Noble gas tracing is promising due to sensitivity of transport to: pore structure and sizes; phase partitioning between groundwater and liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing and creation of surface area. A time-series of over thirty wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells with different oil-to-gas ratios, along with production data (i.e., flowrate and pressure). Tracer and production data sets can be combined to infer production flow regimes, to estimate reservoir transport parameters, and to improve forecasts of production decline. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Feed gas contaminant control in ion transport membrane systems

    DOEpatents

    Carolan, Michael Francis; Minford, Eric; Waldron, William Emil

    2009-07-07

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising an enclosure having an interior and an interior surface, inlet piping having an internal surface and adapted to introduce a heated feed gas into the interior of the enclosure, and outlet piping adapted to withdraw a product gas from the interior of the enclosure; one or more planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the enclosure, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide material; and a preheater adapted to heat a feed gas to provide the heated feed gas to the inlet piping, wherein the preheater comprises an interior surface. Any of the interior surfaces of the enclosure, the inlet piping, and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining. Alternatively, any of the interior surfaces of the inlet piping and the preheater may be lined with a copper-containing metal lining and the enclosure may comprise copper.

  12. Hot-Gas Filter Testing with a Transport Reactor Gasifier

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, M.L.; Hajicek, D.R.

    2002-09-18

    Today, coal supplies over 55% of the electricity consumed in the United States and will continue to do so well into the next century. One of the technologies being developed for advanced electric power generation is an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system that converts coal to a combustible gas, cleans the gas of pollutants, and combusts the gas in a gas turbine to generate electricity. The hot exhaust from the gas turbine is used to produce steam to generate more electricity from a steam turbine cycle. The utilization of advanced hot-gas particulate and sulfur control technologies together with the combined power generation cycles make IGCC one of the cleanest and most efficient ways available to generate electric power from coal. One of the strategic objectives for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) IGCC research and development program is to develop and demonstrate advanced gasifiers and second-generation IGCC systems. Another objective is to develop advanced hot-gas cleanup and trace contaminant control technologies. One of the more recent gasification concepts to be investigated is that of the transport reactor gasifier, which functions as a circulating fluid-bed gasifier while operating in the pneumatic transport regime of solid particle flow. This gasifier concept provides excellent solid-gas contacting of relatively small particles to promote high gasification rates and also provides the highest coal throughput per unit cross-sectional area of any other gasifier, thereby reducing capital cost of the gasification island.

  13. Assimilate transport in phloem sets conditions for leaf gas exchange.

    PubMed

    Nikinmaa, Eero; Hölttä, Teemu; Hari, Pertti; Kolari, Pasi; Mäkelä, Annikki; Sevanto, Sanna; Vesala, Timo

    2013-03-01

    Carbon uptake and transpiration in plant leaves occurs through stomata that open and close. Stomatal action is usually considered a response to environmental driving factors. Here we show that leaf gas exchange is more strongly related to whole tree level transport of assimilates than previously thought, and that transport of assimilates is a restriction of stomatal opening comparable with hydraulic limitation. Assimilate transport in the phloem requires that osmotic pressure at phloem loading sites in leaves exceeds the drop in hydrostatic pressure that is due to transpiration. Assimilate transport thus competes with transpiration for water. Excess sugar loading, however, may block the assimilate transport because of viscosity build-up in phloem sap. Therefore, for given conditions, there is a stomatal opening that maximizes phloem transport if we assume that sugar loading is proportional to photosynthetic rate. Here we show that such opening produces the observed behaviour of leaf gas exchange. Our approach connects stomatal regulation directly with sink activity, plant structure and soil water availability as they all influence assimilate transport. It produces similar behaviour as the optimal stomatal control approach, but does not require determination of marginal cost of water parameter. PMID:22934921

  14. Essays on alternative energy policies affecting the US transportation sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rear, Eric G.

    This dissertation encompasses three essays evaluating the impacts of different policies targeting the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, fuel demands, etc. of the transportation sector. Though there are some similarities across the three chapters, each essay stands alone as an independent work. The 2010 US EPA MARKAL model is used in each essay to evaluate policy effects. Essay 1 focuses on the recent increases in Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards, and the implications of a "rebound effect." These increases are compared to a carbon tax generating similar reductions in system-wide emissions. As anticipated, the largest reductions in fuel use by light-duty vehicles (LDV) and emissions are achieved under CAFE. Consideration of the rebound effect does little to distort CAFE benefits. Our work validates many economists' belief that a carbon tax is a more efficient approach. However, because the tax takes advantage of cheaper abatement opportunities in other sectors, reductions in transportation emissions will be much lower than what we observe with CAFE. Essay 2 compares CAFE increases with what some economists suggest would be a much more "efficient" alternative -- a system-wide oil tax internalizing some environmental externalities. Because oil taxes are likely to be implemented in addition to CAFE standards, we consider a combined policy case reflecting this. Our supplementary analysis approximates the appropriate tax rates to produce similar reductions in oil demands as CAFE (CAFE-equivalent tax rates). We discover that taxes result in greater and more cost-effective reductions in system-wide emissions and net oil imports than CAFE. The current fuel tax system is compared to three versions of a national vehicle miles traveled (VMT) tax charged to all LDVs in Essay 3. VMT taxes directly charge motorists for each mile driven and help to correct the problem of eroding tax revenues given the failure of today's fuel taxes to adjust with inflation. Results

  15. Multimodel analysis of anisotropic diffusive tracer-gas transport in a deep arid unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, Christopher T.; Walvoord, Michelle Ann; Andraski, Brian J.; Striegl, Rob; Stonestrom, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Gas transport in the unsaturated zone affects contaminant flux and remediation, interpretation of groundwater travel times from atmospheric tracers, and mass budgets of environmentally important gases. Although unsaturated zone transport of gases is commonly treated as dominated by diffusion, the characteristics of transport in deep layered sediments remain uncertain. In this study, we use a multimodel approach to analyze results of a gas-tracer (SF6) test to clarify characteristics of gas transport in deep unsaturated alluvium. Thirty-five separate models with distinct diffusivity structures were calibrated to the tracer-test data and were compared on the basis of Akaike Information Criteria estimates of posterior model probability. Models included analytical and numerical solutions. Analytical models provided estimates of bulk-scale apparent diffusivities at the scale of tens of meters. Numerical models provided information on local-scale diffusivities and feasible lithological features producing the observed tracer breakthrough curves. The combined approaches indicate significant anisotropy of bulk-scale diffusivity, likely associated with high-diffusivity layers. Both approaches indicated that diffusivities in some intervals were greater than expected from standard models relating porosity to diffusivity. High apparent diffusivities and anisotropic diffusivity structures were consistent with previous observations at the study site of rapid lateral transport and limited vertical spreading of gas-phase contaminants. Additional processes such as advective oscillations may be involved. These results indicate that gases in deep, layered unsaturated zone sediments can spread laterally more quickly, and produce higher peak concentrations, than predicted by homogeneous, isotropic diffusion models.

  16. Transformative Reduction of Transportation Greenhouse Gas Emissions. Opportunities for Change in Technologies and Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vimmerstedt, Laura; Brown, Austin; Newes, Emily; Markel, Tony; Schroeder, Alex; Zhang, Yimin; Chipman, Peter; Johnson, Shawn

    2015-04-30

    The transportation sector is changing, influenced by concurrent, ongoing, dynamic trends that could dramatically affect the future energy landscape, including effects on the potential for greenhouse gas emissions reductions. Battery cost reductions and improved performance coupled with a growing number of electric vehicle model offerings are enabling greater battery electric vehicle market penetration, and advances in fuel cell technology and decreases in hydrogen production costs are leading to initial fuel cell vehicle offerings. Radically more efficient vehicles based on both conventional and new drivetrain technologies reduce greenhouse gas emissions per vehicle-mile. Net impacts also depend on the energy sources used for propulsion, and these are changing with increased use of renewable energy and unconventional fossil fuel resources. Connected and automated vehicles are emerging for personal and freight transportation systems and could increase use of low- or non-emitting technologies and systems; however, the net effects of automation on greenhouse gas emissions are uncertain. The longstanding trend of an annual increase in transportation demand has reversed for personal vehicle miles traveled in recent years, demonstrating the possibility of lower-travel future scenarios. Finally, advanced biofuel pathways have continued to develop, highlighting low-carbon and in some cases carbon-negative fuel pathways. We discuss the potential for transformative reductions in petroleum use and greenhouse gas emissions through these emerging transportation-sector technologies and trends and present a Clean Transportation Sector Initiative scenario for such reductions, which are summarized in Table ES-1.

  17. Seismic reflection characteristics of naturally-induced subsidence affecting transportation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Steeples, D.W.

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflections have been used effectively to investigate sinkholes formed from the dissolution of a bedded salt unit found throughout most of Central Kansas. Surface subsidence can have devastating effects on transportation structures. Roads, rails, bridges, and pipelines can even be dramatically affected by minor ground instability. Areas susceptible to surface subsidence can put public safety at risk. Subsurface expressions significantly larger than surface depressions are consistently observed on seismic images recorded over sinkholes in Kansas. Until subsidence reaches the ground surface, failure appears to be controlled by compressional forces evidenced by faults with reverse orientation. Once a surface depression forms or dissolution of the salt slows or stops, subsidence structures are consistent with a tensional stress environment with prevalent normal faults. Detecting areas of rapid subsidence potential, prior to surface failure, is the ultimate goal of any geotechnical survey where the ground surface is susceptible to settling. Seismic reflection images have helped correlate active subsidence to dormant paleofeatures, project horizontal growth of active sinkholes based on subsurface structures, and appraise the risk of catastrophic failure. ?? China University of Geosciences (Wuhan) and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2009.

  18. Methane transport and emissions from soil as affected by water table and vascular plants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The important greenhouse gas (GHG) methane is produced naturally in anaerobic wetland soils. By affecting the production, oxidation and transport of methane to the atmosphere, plants have a major influence upon the quantities emitted by wetlands. Different species and functional plant groups have been shown to affect these processes differently, but our knowledge about how these effects are influenced by abiotic factors such as water regime and temperature remains limited. Here we present a mesocosm experiment comparing eight plant species for their effects on internal transport and overall emissions of methane under contrasting hydrological conditions. To quantify how much methane was transported internally through plants (the chimney effect), we blocked diffusion from the soil surface with an agar seal. Results We found that graminoids caused higher methane emissions than forbs, although the emissions from mesocosms with different species were either lower than or comparable to those from control mesocosms with no plant (i.e. bare soil). Species with a relatively greater root volume and a larger biomass exhibited a larger chimney effect, though overall methane emissions were negatively related to plant biomass. Emissions were also reduced by lowering the water table. Conclusions We conclude that plant species (and functional groups) vary in the degree to which they transport methane to the atmosphere. However, a plant with a high capacity to transport methane does not necessarily emit more methane, as it may also cause more rhizosphere oxidation of methane. A shift in plant species composition from graminoids to forbs and/or from low to high productive species may lead to reduction of methane emissions. PMID:24010540

  19. Reactive Transport Modeling of Vadose Zone Contamination: Feedback between Reactions and Gas-Phase Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K.

    2007-05-01

    The unsaturated zone acts as a buffer zone for contaminants on their way to the water table but can also attenuate the emission of contaminants leaving the subsurface environment through the gas phase. A reactive transport model that includes multicomponent gas transport has been developed to investigate the processes that contribute to the generation and attenuation of contaminants in the unsaturated zone. In particular, the model is suitable to study the feedback processes between advective-diffusive gas transport and geochemical reactions. The model is also able to estimate diffusive and advective contributions to gas transport in multicomponent systems. Two model applications are presented that investigate gas transport and reactions in mine tailings and at a site with organic contamination. In mine tailings, atmospheric oxygen transported into the sediment column is consumed in the oxidation of sulfide minerals. Gas volume loss caused by the consumption of atmospheric oxygen drives advective fluxes. In the absence of carbonate minerals, the advective component accounts for 16 % of the net oxygen flux into the column, while, in a carbonate-rich system, advection accounts for 10 % of the net oxygen flux. Dissolution of carbonate minerals has a moderating effect on advective gas transport since carbon dioxide can partially compensate for the depletion of oxygen. At an oil spill site, volatilization and degradation of organic contaminants cause advective and diffusive fluxes of organic vapors away from the source zone. At early stages, volatilization dominates and oxidation of these organic vapors attenuates the emission of contaminants to the atmosphere. The contribution of advection to organic vapor fluxes is significant initially but decreases with time. At later stages, the oil source becomes depleted of its most volatile fraction, and anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds and heavier n-alkanes results in the production of methane. Up to 15 % of methane

  20. Gas and liquid transport in steady-state aqueous foam.

    PubMed

    Feitosa, K; Durian, D J

    2008-07-01

    Experiments are performed on the transport of gas and liquid in a column of aqueous foam maintained in steady state by a constant gas flux at the bottom. We measure vertical profiles of the bubble velocities, the bubble radii, and the liquid fraction, for four different gas fluxes. In steady state the bubbles move upwards with constant speed equal to the measured gas flux, which accounts for all transport of gas. The bubbles also coarsen by gas diffusion at a rate that depends on liquid fraction. Away from the bottom, the Plateau border radii are constant. Therefore capillary effects are negligible and the steady-state liquid-fraction profile is set chiefly by the balance of viscous forces and gravity. The flow within the Plateau borders may be modeled with a no-slip boundary condition for our system. These findings provide a simple description of steady-state foams via the coarsening and drainage equations, which can be combined and solved analytically for bubble radius and liquid-fraction profiles.

  1. Role of naturally occurring gas hydrates in sediment transport

    SciTech Connect

    McIver, R.D.

    1982-06-01

    Naturally occurring gas hydrates have the potential to store enormous volumes of both gas and water in semi-solid form in ocean-bottom sediments and then to release that gas and water when the hydrate's equilibrium condition are disturbed. Therefore, hydrates provide a potential mechanism for transporting large volumes of sediments. Under the combined low bottom-water temperatures and moderate hydrostatic pressures that exist over most of the continental slopes and all of the continental rises and abyssal plains, hydrocarbon gases at or near saturation in the interstitial waters of the near-bottom sediments will form hydrates. The gas can either be autochthonous, microbially produced gas, or allochthonous, catagenic gas from deeper sediments. Equilibrium conditions that stabilize hydrated sediments may be disturbed, for example, by continued sedimentation or by lowering of sea level. In either case, some of the solid gas-water matrix decomposes. Released gas and water volume exceeds the volume occupied by the hydrate, so the internal pressure rises - drastically if large volumes of hydrate are decomposed. Part of the once rigid sediment is converted to a gas- and water-rich, relatively low density mud. When the internal pressure, due to the presence of the compressed gas or to buoyancy, is sufficiently high, the overlying sediment may be lifted and/or breached, and the less dense, gas-cut mud may break through. Such hydrate-related phenomena can cause mud diapirs, mud volcanos, mud slides, or turbidite flows, depending on sediment configuration and bottom topography. 4 figures.

  2. Research on gas transport in chimneys: a progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hearst, J.R.

    1986-03-18

    The results of the AGRINI and TIERRA experiments have led us to study three general topics: collapse phenomenology, CO/sub 2/ content measurement, and gas transport in chimneys. Our results so far are fragmentary, but we have been able to come to some tentative conclusions: (1) a layer of strong material between depths of 24 and 32 m, and perhaps some relatively strong material deeper, may have caused the AGRINI crater shape. This layer was absent at the nearby LABAN and CROWDIE events. We were unable to locate the layer with a surface penetrometer or surface seismic methods, but it may be possible to measure strength vs depth in situ by examining the penetration depth of a projectile. (2) We can probably improve our knowledge of the in situ CO/sub 2/ content by calibrating a commercial carbon/oxygen logging system for NTS conditions. (3) It is possible to measure the response of the gas in a chimney to changes in atmospheric pressure. There can be significantly different gas transport in chimneys with the same pressure response, depending on the porosity and the distribution of the porosity. It is possible to perform an inexpensive experiment to study the gas transport in an existing chimney.

  3. Impurity transport through a strongly interacting bosonic quantum gas

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T. H.; Clark, S. R.; Bruderer, M.; Jaksch, D.

    2011-08-15

    Using near-exact numerical simulations, we study the propagation of an impurity through a one-dimensional Bose lattice gas for varying bosonic interaction strengths and filling factors at zero temperature. The impurity is coupled to the Bose gas and confined to a separate tilted lattice. The precise nature of the transport of the impurity is specific to the excitation spectrum of the Bose gas, which allows one to measure properties of the Bose gas nondestructively, in principle, by observing the impurity; here we focus on the spatial and momentum distributions of the impurity as well as its reduced density matrix. For instance, we show it is possible to determine whether the Bose gas is commensurately filled as well as the bandwidth and gap in its excitation spectrum. Moreover, we show that the impurity acts as a witness to the crossover of its environment from the weakly to the strongly interacting regime, i.e., from a superfluid to a Mott insulator or Tonks-Girardeau lattice gas, and the effects on the impurity in both of these strongly interacting regimes are clearly distinguishable. Finally, we find that the spatial coherence of the impurity is related to its propagation through the Bose gas.

  4. Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

    1992-05-01

    Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

  5. Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

    1992-01-01

    Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

  6. Possible Pathways for Increasing Natural Gas Use for Transportation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Zigler, B.

    2014-10-01

    A collaborative partnership of DOE National Laboratories is working with DOE to identify critical RD&D needs to significantly increase the speed and breadth of NG uptake into the transportation sector. Drivers for increased utilization of natural gas for transportation are discussed. Key needs in research, development, and deployment are proposed, as well as possible pathways to address those needs. This presentation is intended to serve as a catalyst to solicit input from stakeholders regarding what technical areas they deem the most important.

  7. TRANSPORTER POLYMORPHISMS AFFECT NORMAL PHYSIOLOGY, DISEASES, AND PHARMACOTHERAPY

    PubMed Central

    Sissung, Tristan M.; Troutman, Sarah M.; Campbell, Tessa J; Pressler, Heather M.; Sung, Hyeyoung; Bates, Susan E.; Figg, William D.

    2014-01-01

    Drug transporters mediate the movement of endobiotics and xenobiotics across biological membranes in multiple organs and in most tissues. As such, they are involved in physiology, development of disease, drug pharmacokinetics, and ultimately the clinical response to myriad medications. Genetic variants in transporters cause population-specific differences in drug transport and are responsible for considerable inter-individual variation in physiology and pharmacotherapy. The purpose of this review is to provide a broad overview of how inherited variants in transporters are associated with disease etiology, disease state, and the pharmacological treatment of diseases. Given that there are thousands of published papers related to the interplay between transporter genetics and medicine, this review will provide examples that exemplify the broader focus of the literature. PMID:22284781

  8. Transport coefficients of solid particles immersed in a viscous gas.

    PubMed

    Garzó, Vicente; Fullmer, William D; Hrenya, Christine M; Yin, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Transport properties of a suspension of solid particles in a viscous gas are studied. The dissipation in such systems arises from two sources: inelasticity in particle collisions and viscous dissipation due to the effect of the gas phase on the particles. Here we consider a simplified case in which the mean relative velocity between the gas and solid phases is taken to be zero, such that "thermal drag" is the only remaining gas-solid interaction. Unlike the previous, more general, treatment of the drag force [Garzó et al., J. Fluid Mech. 712, 129 (2012)]JFLSA70022-112010.1017/jfm.2012.404, here we take into account contributions to the (scaled) transport coefficients η^{*} (shear viscosity), κ^{*} (thermal conductivity), and μ^{*} (Dufour-like coefficient) coming from the temperature dependence of the (dimensionless) friction coefficient γ^{*} characterizing the amplitude of the drag force. At moderate densities, the thermal drag model (which is based on the Enskog kinetic equation) is solved by means of the Chapman-Enskog method and the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients are determined in terms of the coefficient of restitution, the solid volume fraction, and the friction coefficient. The results indicate that the effect of the gas phase on η^{*} and μ^{*} is non-negligible (especially in the case of relatively dilute systems) while the form of κ^{*} is the same as the one obtained in the dry granular limit. Finally, as an application of these results, a linear stability analysis of the hydrodynamic equations is carried out to analyze the conditions for stability of the homogeneous cooling state. A comparison with direct numerical simulations shows a good agreement for conditions of practical interest. PMID:26871141

  9. Transport coefficients of solid particles immersed in a viscous gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzó, Vicente; Fullmer, William D.; Hrenya, Christine M.; Yin, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Transport properties of a suspension of solid particles in a viscous gas are studied. The dissipation in such systems arises from two sources: inelasticity in particle collisions and viscous dissipation due to the effect of the gas phase on the particles. Here we consider a simplified case in which the mean relative velocity between the gas and solid phases is taken to be zero, such that "thermal drag" is the only remaining gas-solid interaction. Unlike the previous, more general, treatment of the drag force [Garzó et al., J. Fluid Mech. 712, 129 (2012)], 10.1017/jfm.2012.404, here we take into account contributions to the (scaled) transport coefficients η* (shear viscosity), κ* (thermal conductivity), and μ* (Dufour-like coefficient) coming from the temperature dependence of the (dimensionless) friction coefficient γ* characterizing the amplitude of the drag force. At moderate densities, the thermal drag model (which is based on the Enskog kinetic equation) is solved by means of the Chapman-Enskog method and the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients are determined in terms of the coefficient of restitution, the solid volume fraction, and the friction coefficient. The results indicate that the effect of the gas phase on η* and μ* is non-negligible (especially in the case of relatively dilute systems) while the form of κ* is the same as the one obtained in the dry granular limit. Finally, as an application of these results, a linear stability analysis of the hydrodynamic equations is carried out to analyze the conditions for stability of the homogeneous cooling state. A comparison with direct numerical simulations shows a good agreement for conditions of practical interest.

  10. Transport coefficients of solid particles immersed in a viscous gas.

    PubMed

    Garzó, Vicente; Fullmer, William D; Hrenya, Christine M; Yin, Xiaolong

    2016-01-01

    Transport properties of a suspension of solid particles in a viscous gas are studied. The dissipation in such systems arises from two sources: inelasticity in particle collisions and viscous dissipation due to the effect of the gas phase on the particles. Here we consider a simplified case in which the mean relative velocity between the gas and solid phases is taken to be zero, such that "thermal drag" is the only remaining gas-solid interaction. Unlike the previous, more general, treatment of the drag force [Garzó et al., J. Fluid Mech. 712, 129 (2012)]JFLSA70022-112010.1017/jfm.2012.404, here we take into account contributions to the (scaled) transport coefficients η^{*} (shear viscosity), κ^{*} (thermal conductivity), and μ^{*} (Dufour-like coefficient) coming from the temperature dependence of the (dimensionless) friction coefficient γ^{*} characterizing the amplitude of the drag force. At moderate densities, the thermal drag model (which is based on the Enskog kinetic equation) is solved by means of the Chapman-Enskog method and the Navier-Stokes transport coefficients are determined in terms of the coefficient of restitution, the solid volume fraction, and the friction coefficient. The results indicate that the effect of the gas phase on η^{*} and μ^{*} is non-negligible (especially in the case of relatively dilute systems) while the form of κ^{*} is the same as the one obtained in the dry granular limit. Finally, as an application of these results, a linear stability analysis of the hydrodynamic equations is carried out to analyze the conditions for stability of the homogeneous cooling state. A comparison with direct numerical simulations shows a good agreement for conditions of practical interest.

  11. Upscaling momentum and mass transport under Knudsen and binary diffusion gas slip conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes-Parada, F. J.; Lasseux, D.

    2015-12-01

    Modeling of gas phase flow in porous media is relevant as it is present in a wide variety of applications ranging from nanofluidic systems to subsurface contaminant transport. In this work, we derive a macroscopic model to study slightly compressible gas flow in porous media for conditions in which the tangential fluid velocity undergoes a slip at the solid interface due to Knudsen effects and to mass diffusion in binary conditions. To this end, we use the method of volume averaging to derive the governing equations at the Darcy scale for both mass and momentum transport. The momentum transport model consists on a modification to Darcy's law due to mass dispersion and to total density gradients. For mass transport, the resulting model is the conventional convection-dispersion equation with two correction terms, one affecting convective transport and the second one affecting mass dispersion due to gas compressibility. The macroscopic model reduces to the one reported by Altevogt et al. (2003) for the case in which gas slip is only due to a concentration gradient and to the one by Lasseux et al. (2014) under Knudsen slip conditions. The model is written in terms of effective-medium coefficients that can be predicted from solving the associated closure problems in representative unit cells. For conditions in which the Péclet number is much greater than one and when the Knudsen number is not exceedingly small compared to the unity, our computations show that the predictions of the longitudinal dispersion may reach an error as high as 60% compared to the predictions obtained by ignoring gas slip. Altevogt A.S., Rolston D.E., Whitaker S. New equations for binary gas transport in porous media, Part 1: equation development. Advances in Water Resources, Vol. 26, 695-715, 2003. Lasseux D., Valdés-Parada F.J., Ochoa-Tapia J.A., Goyeau B. A macroscopic model for slightly compressible gas slip-flow in homogeneous porous media. Physics of Fluids, Vol. 26, 053102, 2014.

  12. 75 FR 2126 - Regulations Governing the Conduct of Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Regulations Governing the Conduct of Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects; Notice of Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects Open Season Pre... season for an Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Project. The Workshop is being hosted by the...

  13. Transport of a lattice gas under continuous measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Hil F. H.; Patil, Yogesh Sharad; Madjarov, Ivaylo S.; Chen, Huiyao Y.; Vengalattore, Mukund

    2016-05-01

    The act of measurement has a profound consequence on a quantum system. While this backaction has hitherto been discussed as a limitation to the precision of measurements, it is increasingly being appreciated that measurement backaction is a powerful means of quantum control. We have previously demonstrated that backaction from position measurement can modify the coherent tunneling rate of a lattice gas through the Quantum Zeno effect. By suitably designing measurement landscapes we can control the transport properties of the lattice gas. We describe a quantitative study of lattice gas dynamics under continuous quantum measurement in the context of a quantum to classical transition where the atom dynamics goes from a quantum walk at low measurement strengths to classical diffusion at high measurement strengths. We further discuss the prospect of using disorder measurement landscapes to realize a new form of Anderson localization. This work is supported by the ARO MURI on non-equilibrium dynamics.

  14. Gas transport in branched airways during high-frequency ventilation.

    PubMed

    Scherer, P W; Haselton, F R; Seybert, J R

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical model of high-frequency ventilation (HFV) is presented based on the physical convective exchange process that occurs due to the irreversibility of gas velocity profiles in oscillatory flow through the bronchial airways. Mass transport during the convective exchange process can be characterized by a convective exchange length, LE, which depends only on the irreversibility of bronchial velocity profiles and can be measured by the experimental technique of photographic flow visualization in bronchial tree models. Using the exchange length and the molecular diffusivity, a simple model of overall bronchial mass transfer is developed. The model allows a prediction of the mean gas concentration profiles along the airways, the site of maximum mass transfer resistance, and overall flow rate of the gas of interest in or out of the lung as functions of the parameters of HFV. The results predicted by the model agree with the limited experimental data available for animals and humans. For normal unassisted ventilation, total bronchial cross-sectional area around the 15th Weibel bronchial generation is predicted to be the single most important parameter in controlling the total gas transport rate along the airways. For the breathing of room air, values of the respiratory quotient around 0.78 are predicted, which are insensitive to VT and f. The model represents a fruitful combination of fluid mechanical theory and experiment with physiologic data to yield new and deeper insight into the operation of the human respiratory system during HFV and normal breathing.

  15. Gas transport through magma near the percolation threshold (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llewellin, E. W.; Blower, J.; Leslie, D.

    2009-12-01

    Explosive silicic eruptions may simultaneously produce both tube pumice - containing highly-elongate vesicles - and pumice containing sub-spherical vesicles. This has been cited as evidence for strain localization within the volcanic conduit: in a relatively-undeformed axial ‘plug’ bubbles are spherical (regime 1) whilst near the conduit margin rapidly-shearing magma bears elongate bubbles (regime 2). Published numerical studies support this model and indicate that bubbly-magma rheology or viscous heating may be responsible for strain localization. The difference in bubble morphology in these two regimes has important consequences for magma permeability. We present the results of fluid dynamic simulations which quantify the anisotropy of permeability in regime 2 as a function of gas volume fraction and bubble aspect ratio. In this regime, we find that vertical permeability may be many times greater than radial permeability, and that permeability anisotropy is most pronounced near the percolation threshold. We further use a network model to quantify the development of permeability in regime 1. In the case where the predominantly vertical expansion of the magma is slow compared with bubble relaxation time, we find that permeability is, again, anisotropic, but that radial permeability dominates. This effect is also most pronounced near the percolation threshold, and percolation is expected to occur radially before vertical percolation occurs. Our findings imply that gas transport in regime 1 is predominantly radial, whilst vertical gas transport is favoured in regime 2. Consequently, near the percolation threshold, conditions are appropriate for effective degassing of the central magma plug as gas permeates radially to the conduit margin and then vertically upwards. Repeated cycles of percolation, radial gas loss and densification may degas the central magma plug without the development of large gas volume fractions.

  16. Reactive Gas transport in soil: Kinetics versus Local Equilibrium Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geistlinger, Helmut; Jia, Ruijan

    2010-05-01

    Gas transport through the unsaturated soil zone was studied using an analytical solution of the gas transport model that is mathematically equivalent to the Two-Region model. The gas transport model includes diffusive and convective gas fluxes, interphase mass transfer between the gas and water phase, and biodegradation. The influence of non-equilibrium phenomena, spatially variable initial conditions, and transient boundary conditions are studied. The objective of this paper is to compare the kinetic approach for interphase mass transfer with the standard local equilibrium approach and to find conditions and time-scales under which the local equilibrium approach is justified. The time-scale of investigation was limited to the day-scale, because this is the relevant scale for understanding gas emission from the soil zone with transient water saturation. For the first time a generalized mass transfer coefficient is proposed that justifies the often used steady-state Thin-Film mass transfer coefficient for small and medium water-saturated aggregates of about 10 mm. The main conclusion from this study is that non-equilibrium mass transfer depends strongly on the temporal and small-scale spatial distribution of water within the unsaturated soil zone. For regions with low water saturation and small water-saturated aggregates (radius about 1 mm) the local equilibrium approach can be used as a first approximation for diffusive gas transport. For higher water saturation and medium radii of water-saturated aggregates (radius about 10 mm) and for convective gas transport, the non-equilibrium effect becomes more and more important if the hydraulic residence time and the Damköhler number decrease. Relative errors can range up to 100% and more. While for medium radii the local equilibrium approach describes the main features both of the spatial concentration profile and the time-dependence of the emission rate, it fails completely for larger aggregates (radius about 100 mm

  17. Benthic processes affecting contaminant transport in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuwabara, James S.; Topping, Brent R.; Carter, James L.; Carlson, Rick A; Parchaso, Francis; Fend, Steven V.; Stauffer-Olsen, Natalie; Manning, Andrew J.; Land, Jennie M.

    2016-09-30

    Executive SummaryMultiple sampling trips during calendar years 2013 through 2015 were coordinated to provide measurements of interdependent benthic processes that potentially affect contaminant transport in Upper Klamath Lake (UKL), Oregon. The measurements were motivated by recognition that such internal processes (for example, solute benthic flux, bioturbation and solute efflux by benthic invertebrates, and physical groundwater-surface water interactions) were not integrated into existing management models for UKL. Up until 2013, all of the benthic-flux studies generally had been limited spatially to a number of sites in the northern part of UKL and limited temporally to 2–3 samplings per year. All of the benthic invertebrate studies also had been limited to the northern part of the lake; however, intensive temporal (weekly) studies had previously been completed independent of benthic-flux studies. Therefore, knowledge of both the spatial and temporal variability in benthic flux and benthic invertebrate distributions for the entire lake was lacking. To address these limitations, we completed a lakewide spatial study during 2013 and a coordinated temporal study with weekly sampling of benthic flux and benthic invertebrates during 2014. Field design of the spatially focused study in 2013 involved 21 sites sampled three times as the summer cyanobacterial bloom developed (that is, May 23, June 13, and July 3, 2013). Results of the 27-week, temporally focused study of one site in 2014 were summarized and partitioned into three periods (referred to herein as pre-bloom, bloom and post-bloom periods), each period involving 9 weeks of profiler deployments, water column and benthic sampling. Partitioning of the pre-bloom, bloom, and post-bloom periods were based on water-column chlorophyll concentrations and involved the following date intervals, respectively: April 15 through June 10, June 17 through August 13, and August 20 through October 16, 2014. To examine

  18. Field measurements of tracer gas transport by barometric pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Lagus, P.L.; McKinnis, W.B.; Hearst, J.R.; Burkhard, N.R.; Smith, C.F.

    1994-07-28

    Vertical gas motions induced by barometric pressure variations can carry radioactive gases out of the rubblized region produced by an underground nuclear explosion, through overburden rock, into the atmosphere. To better quantify transit time and amount of transport, field experiments were conducted at two sites on Pahute Mesa, Kapelli and Tierra, where radioactive gases had been earlier detected in surface cracks. At each site, two tracer gases were injected into the rubblized chimney 300-400 m beneath the surface and their arrival was monitored by concentration measurements in gas samples extracted from shallow collection holes. The first ``active`` tracer was driven by a large quantity of injected air; the second ``passive`` tracer was introduced with minimal gas drive to observe the natural transport by barometric pumping. Kapelli was injected in the fall of 1990, followed by Tierra in the fall of 1991. Data was collected at both sites through the summer of 1993. At both sites, no surface arrival of tracer was observed during the active phase of the experiment despite the injection of several million cubic feet of air, suggesting that cavity pressurization is likely to induce horizontal transport along high permeability layers rather than vertical transport to the surface. In contrast, the vertical pressure gradients associated with barometric pumping brought both tracers to the surface in comparable concentrations within three months at Kapelli, whereas 15 months elapsed before surface arrival at Tierra. At Kapelli, a quasisteady pumping regime was established, with tracer concentrations in effluent gases 1000 times smaller than concentrations thought to exist in the chimney. Tracer concentrations observed at Tierra were typically an order of magnitude smaller. Comparisons with theoretical calculations suggest that the gases are traveling through {approximately}1 millimeter vertical fractures spaced 2 to 4 meters apart. 6 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Kinetically influenced terms for solute transport affected by heterogeneous and homogeneous classical reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper extends a four-step derivation procedure, previously presented for cases of transport affected by surface reactions, to transport problems involving homogeneous reactions. Derivations for these classes of reactions are used to illustrate the manner in which mathematical differences between reaction classes are reflected in the mathematical derivation procedures required to identify kinetically influenced terms. Simulation results for a case of transport affected by a single solution phase complexation reaction and for a case of transport affected by a precipitation-dissolution reaction are used to demonstrate the nature of departures from equilibrium-controlled transport as well as the use of kinetically influenced terms in determining criteria for the applicability of the local equilibrium assumption. A final derivation for a multireaction problem demonstrates the application of the generalized procedure to a case of transport affected by reactions of several classes. -from Author

  20. Chemical factors affecting fission product transport in severe LMFBR accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Wichner, R.P.; Jolley, R.L.; Gat, U.; Rodgers, B.R.

    1984-10-01

    This study was performed as a part of a larger evaluation effort on LMFBR accident, source-term estimation. Purpose was to provide basic chemical information regarding fission product, sodium coolant, and structural material interactions required to perform estimation of fission product transport under LMFBR accident conditions. Emphasis was placed on conditions within the reactor vessel; containment vessel conditions are discussed only briefly.

  1. Fuel-mix, fuel efficiency, and transport demand affect prospects for biofuels in northern Europe.

    PubMed

    Bright, Ryan M; Strømman, Anders Hammer

    2010-04-01

    Rising greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the road transport sector represents a difficult mitigation challenge due to a multitude of intricate factors, namely the dependency on liquid energy carriers and infrastructure lock-in. For this reason, low-carbon renewable energy carriers, particularly second generation biofuels, are often seen as a prominent candidate for realizing reduced emissions and lowered oil dependency over the medium- and long-term horizons. However, the overarching question is whether advanced biofuels can be an environmentally effective mitigation strategy in the face of increasing consumption and resource constraints. Here we develop both biofuel production and road transport consumption scenarios for northern Europe-a region with a vast surplus of forest bioenergy resources-to assess the potential role that forest-based biofuels may play over the medium- and long-term time horizons using an environmentally extended, multiregion input-output model. Through scenarios, we explore how evolving vehicle technologies and consumption patterns will affect the mitigation opportunities afforded by any future supply of forest biofuels. We find that in a scenario involving ambitious biofuel targets, the size of the GHG mitigation wedge attributed to the market supply of biofuels is severely reduced under business-as-usual growth in consumption in the road transport sector. Our results indicate that climate policies targeting the road transport sector which give high emphases to reducing demand (volume), accelerating the deployment of more fuel-efficient vehicles, and promoting altered consumption patterns (structure) can be significantly more effective than those with single emphasis on expanded biofuel supply. PMID:20163088

  2. Fuel-mix, fuel efficiency, and transport demand affect prospects for biofuels in northern Europe.

    PubMed

    Bright, Ryan M; Strømman, Anders Hammer

    2010-04-01

    Rising greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the road transport sector represents a difficult mitigation challenge due to a multitude of intricate factors, namely the dependency on liquid energy carriers and infrastructure lock-in. For this reason, low-carbon renewable energy carriers, particularly second generation biofuels, are often seen as a prominent candidate for realizing reduced emissions and lowered oil dependency over the medium- and long-term horizons. However, the overarching question is whether advanced biofuels can be an environmentally effective mitigation strategy in the face of increasing consumption and resource constraints. Here we develop both biofuel production and road transport consumption scenarios for northern Europe-a region with a vast surplus of forest bioenergy resources-to assess the potential role that forest-based biofuels may play over the medium- and long-term time horizons using an environmentally extended, multiregion input-output model. Through scenarios, we explore how evolving vehicle technologies and consumption patterns will affect the mitigation opportunities afforded by any future supply of forest biofuels. We find that in a scenario involving ambitious biofuel targets, the size of the GHG mitigation wedge attributed to the market supply of biofuels is severely reduced under business-as-usual growth in consumption in the road transport sector. Our results indicate that climate policies targeting the road transport sector which give high emphases to reducing demand (volume), accelerating the deployment of more fuel-efficient vehicles, and promoting altered consumption patterns (structure) can be significantly more effective than those with single emphasis on expanded biofuel supply.

  3. Radionuclide Gas Transport through Nuclear Explosion-Generated Fracture Networks.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Amy B; Stauffer, Philip H; Knight, Earl E; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N

    2015-01-01

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. Seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable. PMID:26676058

  4. Radionuclide Gas Transport through Nuclear Explosion-Generated Fracture Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-01-01

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. Seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable. PMID:26676058

  5. Radionuclide Gas Transport through Nuclear Explosion-Generated Fracture Networks.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Amy B; Stauffer, Philip H; Knight, Earl E; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N

    2015-12-17

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. Seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable.

  6. Radionuclide Gas Transport through Nuclear Explosion-Generated Fracture Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-12-01

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. Seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable.

  7. Radionuclide gas transport through nuclear explosion-generated fracture networks

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-12-17

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gas breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. In conclusion, seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable.

  8. Technology assessment of future intercity passenger transporation systems. Volume 2: Identification of issues affecting intercity transportation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Papers on major issues and trends that affect the future of intercity transportation are presented. Specific areas covered include: political, social, technological, institutional, and economic mechanisms, the workings of which determine how future intercity transporation technologies will evolve and be put into service; the major issues of intercity transportation from the point of view of reform, including candidate transporation technologies; and technical analysis of trends affecting the evolution of intercity transportation technologies.

  9. Evolution of natural gas composition: Predictive multi-phase reaction-transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ortoleva, P.J.; Chang, K.A.; Maxwell, J.M.

    1995-12-31

    A computational modeling approach is used to investigate reaction and transport processes affecting natural gas composition over geological time. Three basic stages are integrated -- gas generation from organic solids or liquids, interactions during source rock expulsion to the reservoir and reactions within the reservoir. Multi-phase dynamics is handled by solving the fully coupled problem of phase-to-phase transfer, intra-phase organic and inorganic reactions and redox and other reactions between fluid phase molecules and minerals. Effects of capillarity and relative permeability are accounted for. Correlations will be determined between gas composition, temperature history, the mineralogy of rocks with which the gas was in contact and the composition of source organic phases. Questions of H{sub 2}S scavenging by oxidizing minerals and the production or removal of CO{sub 2} are focused upon. Our three spatial dimensional, reaction-transport simulation approach has great promise for testing general concepts and as a practical tool for the exploration and production of natural gas.

  10. Benthic processes affecting contaminant transport in Upper Klamath Lake, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuwabara, James S.; Topping, Brent R.; Carter, James L.; Carlson, Rick A; Parchaso, Francis; Fend, Steven V.; Stauffer-Olsen, Natalie; Manning, Andrew J.; Land, Jennie M.

    2016-09-30

    Executive SummaryMultiple sampling trips during calendar years 2013 through 2015 were coordinated to provide measurements of interdependent benthic processes that potentially affect contaminant transport in Upper Klamath Lake (UKL), Oregon. The measurements were motivated by recognition that such internal processes (for example, solute benthic flux, bioturbation and solute efflux by benthic invertebrates, and physical groundwater-surface water interactions) were not integrated into existing management models for UKL. Up until 2013, all of the benthic-flux studies generally had been limited spatially to a number of sites in the northern part of UKL and limited temporally to 2–3 samplings per year. All of the benthic invertebrate studies also had been limited to the northern part of the lake; however, intensive temporal (weekly) studies had previously been completed independent of benthic-flux studies. Therefore, knowledge of both the spatial and temporal variability in benthic flux and benthic invertebrate distributions for the entire lake was lacking. To address these limitations, we completed a lakewide spatial study during 2013 and a coordinated temporal study with weekly sampling of benthic flux and benthic invertebrates during 2014. Field design of the spatially focused study in 2013 involved 21 sites sampled three times as the summer cyanobacterial bloom developed (that is, May 23, June 13, and July 3, 2013). Results of the 27-week, temporally focused study of one site in 2014 were summarized and partitioned into three periods (referred to herein as pre-bloom, bloom and post-bloom periods), each period involving 9 weeks of profiler deployments, water column and benthic sampling. Partitioning of the pre-bloom, bloom, and post-bloom periods were based on water-column chlorophyll concentrations and involved the following date intervals, respectively: April 15 through June 10, June 17 through August 13, and August 20 through October 16, 2014. To examine

  11. The antiepileptic drug phenytoin affects sodium transport in toad epithelium.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Mennickent, Sigrid; Norris, Beryl; Cárdenas, Hernan

    2006-01-01

    The effects of phenytoin on isolated Pleurodema thaul toad skin were investigated. Low (micromolar) concentrations of the antiepileptic agent applied to the outside surface of the toad epithelium increased the electrical parameters (short-circuit current and potential difference) by over 40%, reflecting stimulation of Na(+) transport, whereas higher (millimolar concentrations, outside and inside surface) decreased both electric parameters, the effect being greater at the inside surface (40% and 80% decrease, respectively). The amiloride test showed that the stimulatory effect was accompanied by an increase and the inhibitory effect by a decrease in the sodium electromotive force (ENa). It is concluded that the drug interaction with membrane lipid bilayers might result in a distortion of the lipid-protein interface contributing to disturbance of Na(+) epithelial channel activity. After applying the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase blocker ouabain and replacing the Na(+) ions in the outer Ringer's solution by choline, it was concluded that both active and passive transport are involved in sodium absorption, although active transport predominates. PMID:16314149

  12. Liquid water transport in fuel cell gas diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazylak, Aimy Ming Jii

    Liquid water management has a major impact on the performance and durability of the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a PEMFC provides pathways for mass, heat, and electronic transport to and from the catalyst layers and bipolar plates. When the GDL becomes flooded with liquid water, the PEMFC undergoes mass transport losses that can lead to decreased performance and durability. The work presented in this thesis includes contributions that provide insight into liquid water transport behaviour in and on the surface of the GDL, as well as insight into how future GDLs could be designed to enhance water management. The effects of compression on liquid water transport in the GDL and on the microstructure of the GDL are presented. It was found that compressed regions of the GDL provided preferential locations for water breakthrough, while scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging revealed irreversible damage to the GDL due to compression at typical fuel cell assembly pressures. The dynamic behaviour of droplet emergence and detachment in a simulated gas flow channel are also presented. It was found that on an initially dry and hydrophobic GDL, small droplets emerged and detached quickly from the GDL surface. However, over time, this water transport regime transitioned into that of slug formation and channel flooding. It was observed that after being exposed to a saturated environment, the GDL surface became increasingly prone to droplet pinning, which ultimately hindered droplet detachment and encouraged slug formation. A pore network model featuring invasion percolation with trapping was employed to evaluate the breakthrough pattern predictions of designed porous media. These designed pore networks consisted of randomized porous media with applied diagonal and radial gradients. Experimental microfluidic pore networks provided validation for the designed networks. Diagonal biasing provided a means of directing water

  13. Noble gas transport during devolatilization of oceanic crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, C.; Smye, A.; Shuster, D. L.; Parman, S. W.; Kelley, S. P.; Hesse, M. A.; Cooper, R. F.

    2014-12-01

    Here we examine the role of slab dehydration in determining the elemental pattern of recycled noble gases. As a first step, we apply newly reported measurements of He-Ne-Ar (light noble gases) solubility and diffusivity in amphibole to parameterize a 1D diffusive-reaction transport model that simulates noble gas behavior during fluid loss from down-going oceanic crust. Recent experiments demonstrate that noble gases are highly soluble in ring-structured minerals, such as amphibole and other common hydrothermal products in slabs [1]. These results suggest that ring-structured minerals have the potential to strongly influence the budget of noble gases input into subduction zones and the elemental fractionations associated with volatile loss from slabs New measurements of He-Ne-Ar solubility in a suite of amphiboles have been completed utilizing the methodology described in [1]. These new measurements confirm that all light noble gases are highly soluble in amphibole, and that noble gas solubility correlates with the availability of unoccupied ring sites. New experimental measurements of He and Ne diffusivity have also been completed using a step-degassing approach at the Berkeley Geochronology Center. These measurements suggest that vacant ring sites in amphibole act to slow noble gas diffusion. We combine the newly acquired He and Ne diffusivity measurements with literature values for Ar diffusivity [2] to parameterize the diffusive-reaction transport model. Application of these data to the diffusive-reaction transport model yields several new insights. The relative mobility of Ne compared to Ar allows for efficient extraction of Ne from "hot" slabs by shallow depths (<50 km), while Ar is effectively retained to deeper depths, potentially past sub-arc conditions. Noble gas partition coefficients sharply increase with depth, following their increasing non-ideality in supercritical fluids, causing noble gases to partition back into minerals from any fluids retained in

  14. Seasonal difference in brain serotonin transporter binding predicts symptom severity in patients with seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Mc Mahon, Brenda; Andersen, Sofie B; Madsen, Martin K; Hjordt, Liv V; Hageman, Ida; Dam, Henrik; Svarer, Claus; da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Baaré, William; Madsen, Jacob; Hasholt, Lis; Holst, Klaus; Frokjaer, Vibe G; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2016-05-01

    Cross-sectional neuroimaging studies in non-depressed individuals have demonstrated an inverse relationship between daylight minutes and cerebral serotonin transporter; this relationship is modified by serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region short allele carrier status. We here present data from the first longitudinal investigation of seasonal serotonin transporter fluctuations in both patients with seasonal affective disorder and in healthy individuals. Eighty (11)C-DASB positron emission tomography scans were conducted to quantify cerebral serotonin transporter binding; 23 healthy controls with low seasonality scores and 17 patients diagnosed with seasonal affective disorder were scanned in both summer and winter to investigate differences in cerebral serotonin transporter binding across groups and across seasons. The two groups had similar cerebral serotonin transporter binding in the summer but in their symptomatic phase during winter, patients with seasonal affective disorder had higher serotonin transporter than the healthy control subjects (P = 0.01). Compared to the healthy controls, patients with seasonal affective disorder changed their serotonin transporter significantly less between summer and winter (P < 0.001). Further, the change in serotonin transporter was sex- (P = 0.02) and genotype- (P = 0.04) dependent. In the patients with seasonal affective disorder, the seasonal change in serotonin transporter binding was positively associated with change in depressive symptom severity, as indexed by Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression - Seasonal Affective Disorder version scores (P = 0.01). Our findings suggest that the development of depressive symptoms in winter is associated with a failure to downregulate serotonin transporter levels appropriately during exposure to the environmental stress of winter, especially in individuals with high predisposition to affective disorders.media-1vid110.1093/brain/aww043_video_abstractaww043_video

  15. Seasonal difference in brain serotonin transporter binding predicts symptom severity in patients with seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Mc Mahon, Brenda; Andersen, Sofie B; Madsen, Martin K; Hjordt, Liv V; Hageman, Ida; Dam, Henrik; Svarer, Claus; da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Baaré, William; Madsen, Jacob; Hasholt, Lis; Holst, Klaus; Frokjaer, Vibe G; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2016-05-01

    Cross-sectional neuroimaging studies in non-depressed individuals have demonstrated an inverse relationship between daylight minutes and cerebral serotonin transporter; this relationship is modified by serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region short allele carrier status. We here present data from the first longitudinal investigation of seasonal serotonin transporter fluctuations in both patients with seasonal affective disorder and in healthy individuals. Eighty (11)C-DASB positron emission tomography scans were conducted to quantify cerebral serotonin transporter binding; 23 healthy controls with low seasonality scores and 17 patients diagnosed with seasonal affective disorder were scanned in both summer and winter to investigate differences in cerebral serotonin transporter binding across groups and across seasons. The two groups had similar cerebral serotonin transporter binding in the summer but in their symptomatic phase during winter, patients with seasonal affective disorder had higher serotonin transporter than the healthy control subjects (P = 0.01). Compared to the healthy controls, patients with seasonal affective disorder changed their serotonin transporter significantly less between summer and winter (P < 0.001). Further, the change in serotonin transporter was sex- (P = 0.02) and genotype- (P = 0.04) dependent. In the patients with seasonal affective disorder, the seasonal change in serotonin transporter binding was positively associated with change in depressive symptom severity, as indexed by Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression - Seasonal Affective Disorder version scores (P = 0.01). Our findings suggest that the development of depressive symptoms in winter is associated with a failure to downregulate serotonin transporter levels appropriately during exposure to the environmental stress of winter, especially in individuals with high predisposition to affective disorders.media-1vid110.1093/brain/aww043_video_abstractaww043_video_abstract.

  16. Effects of atmospheric pressures on gas transport in the vadose zone

    SciTech Connect

    Massmann, J. ); Farrier, D.F. )

    1992-03-01

    Temporal variations in barometric pressure due to weather patterns may induce air intrusion into the subsurface. This air intrusion can affect monitoring activities aimed at characterizing the composition and movement of gases in the vadose zone. Expressions are presented to estimate gas fluxes due to the combined effects of Knudsen diffusion, multicomponent molecular diffusion, and viscous flow. These expressions are used to evaluate the validity of the single-component advection-dispersion equation for simulating gas transport in the presence of atmospheric pressure variations. The single-component equation provides reasonable results when used to simulate transport in media with relatively high gas permeability. Computer simulations of vertical transport at sites with homogeneous soils indicate that fresh' air can migrate several meters into the subsurface during a typical barometric pressure cycle. Horizontal pressure gradients can develop at sites with near-surface heterogeneities. These gradients may cause fresh air to intrude meters or tens of meters into the vadose zone during a storm event.

  17. Gibberellins inhibit adventitious rooting in hybrid aspen and Arabidopsis by affecting auxin transport.

    PubMed

    Mauriat, Mélanie; Petterle, Anna; Bellini, Catherine; Moritz, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of processes involved in adventitious rooting is important to improve both fundamental understanding of plant physiology and the propagation of numerous plants. Hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloïdes) plants overexpressing a key gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis gene (AtGA20ox1) grow rapidly but have poor rooting efficiency, which restricts their clonal propagation. Therefore, we investigated the molecular basis of adventitious rooting in Populus and the model plant Arabidopsis. The production of adventitious roots (ARs) in tree cuttings is initiated from the basal stem region, and involves the interplay of several endogenous and exogenous factors. The roles of several hormones in this process have been characterized, but the effects of GAs have not been fully investigated. Here, we show that a GA treatment negatively affects the numbers of ARs produced by wild-type hybrid aspen cuttings. Furthermore, both hybrid aspen plants and intact Arabidopsis seedlings overexpressing AtGA20ox1, PttGID1.1 or PttGID1.3 genes (with a 35S promoter) produce few ARs, although ARs develop from the basal stem region of hybrid aspen and the hypocotyl of Arabidopsis. In Arabidopsis, auxin and strigolactones are known to affect AR formation. Our data show that the inhibitory effect of GA treatment on adventitious rooting is not mediated by perturbation of the auxin signalling pathway, or of the strigolactone biosynthetic and signalling pathways. Instead, GAs appear to act by perturbing polar auxin transport, in particular auxin efflux in hybrid aspen, and both efflux and influx in Arabidopsis.

  18. Radionuclide gas transport through nuclear explosion-generated fracture networks

    DOE PAGES

    Jordan, Amy B.; Stauffer, Philip H.; Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Anderson, Dale N.

    2015-12-17

    Underground nuclear weapon testing produces radionuclide gases which may seep to the surface. Barometric pumping of gas through explosion-fractured rock is investigated using a new sequentially-coupled hydrodynamic rock damage/gas transport model. Fracture networks are produced for two rock types (granite and tuff) and three depths of burial. The fracture networks are integrated into a flow and transport numerical model driven by surface pressure signals of differing amplitude and variability. There are major differences between predictions using a realistic fracture network and prior results that used a simplified geometry. Matrix porosity and maximum fracture aperture have the greatest impact on gasmore » breakthrough time and window of opportunity for detection, with different effects between granite and tuff simulations highlighting the importance of accurately simulating the fracture network. In particular, maximum fracture aperture has an opposite effect on tuff and granite, due to different damage patterns and their effect on the barometric pumping process. From stochastic simulations using randomly generated hydrogeologic parameters, normalized detection curves are presented to show differences in optimal sampling time for granite and tuff simulations. In conclusion, seasonal and location-based effects on breakthrough, which occur due to differences in barometric forcing, are stronger where the barometric signal is highly variable.« less

  19. Unified account of gas pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions: Chinese transportation 1978-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xi; Chen, G. Q.

    2010-09-01

    To facilitate the aggregation of both quantity and quality of waste emissions, the concept of chemical exergy combining the first and second laws of thermodynamics is introduced for a unified account of gas pollutants and greenhouse gases, by a case study for the Chinese transportation system 1978-2004 with main gas pollutants of NO, SO2, CO and main greenhouse gases of CO2 and CH4. With chemical exergy emission factors concretely estimated, the total emission as well as emission intensity by exergy of the overall transportation system and of its four modes of highways, railways, waterways and civil aviation are accounted in full detail and compared with those by the conventionally prevailing metrics of mass, with essential implications for environmental policy making.

  20. 75 FR 15336 - Regulations Governing the Conduct of Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... Natural Gas Transportation Projects March 18, 2010. AGENCY: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. ACTION... amendments are required in order to make clear to prospective applicants for an Alaska natural gas... prospective shippers of an Alaska natural gas transportation project by eliminating any uncertainties...

  1. Bioinspired gas bubble spontaneous and directional transportation effects in an aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Wang, Jingming; Yang, Zhongjia; Liu, Meng; Zhang, Jingjing; Jiang, Lei

    2015-04-01

    A series of well-ordered, 3D gradient porous interconnected network surfaces composed of micro-nano hierarchical geometries is constructed on a copper wire. A continuous gas film can be trapped around its interface in an aqueous medium acting as an effective channel for gas transportation. Driving by the difference of the Laplace pressure, gas bubbles can be transported spontaneously and directionally.

  2. 75 FR 26745 - ONEOK Gas Transportation, LLC; Notice of Baseline Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission ONEOK Gas Transportation, LLC; Notice of Baseline Filing May 5, 2010. Take notice that on April 28, 2010, ONEOK Gas Transportation, LLC (OGT) submitted its baseline filing of its Statement of Operating Conditions for transportation services provided under section 311(a)(2) of...

  3. Temperature-dependent gas transport performance of vertically aligned carbon nanotube/parylene composite membranes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A novel composite membrane consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and parylene was successfully fabricated. Seamless filling of the spaces in CNT forests with parylene was achieved by a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique and followed with the Ar/O2 plasma etching to expose CNT tips. Transport properties of various gases through the CNT/parylene membranes were explored. And gas permeances were independent on feed pressure in accordance with the Knudsen model, but the permeance values were over 60 times higher than that predicted by the Knudsen diffusion kinetics, which was attributed to specular momentum reflection inside smooth CNT pores. Gas permeances and enhancement factors over the Knudsen model firstly increased and then decreased with rising temperature, which confirmed the existence of non-Knudsen transport. And surface adsorption diffusion could affect the gas permeance at relatively low temperature. The gas permeance of the CNT/parylene composite membrane could be improved by optimizing operating temperature. PMID:25246864

  4. Temperature-dependent gas transport performance of vertically aligned carbon nanotube/parylene composite membranes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Yang, Junhe; Wang, Xianying; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Guangping

    2014-01-01

    A novel composite membrane consisting of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and parylene was successfully fabricated. Seamless filling of the spaces in CNT forests with parylene was achieved by a low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique and followed with the Ar/O2 plasma etching to expose CNT tips. Transport properties of various gases through the CNT/parylene membranes were explored. And gas permeances were independent on feed pressure in accordance with the Knudsen model, but the permeance values were over 60 times higher than that predicted by the Knudsen diffusion kinetics, which was attributed to specular momentum reflection inside smooth CNT pores. Gas permeances and enhancement factors over the Knudsen model firstly increased and then decreased with rising temperature, which confirmed the existence of non-Knudsen transport. And surface adsorption diffusion could affect the gas permeance at relatively low temperature. The gas permeance of the CNT/parylene composite membrane could be improved by optimizing operating temperature. PMID:25246864

  5. Reactive Transport Modeling of Acid Gas Generation and Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    G. Zhahg; N. Spycher; E. Sonnenthal; C. Steefel

    2005-01-25

    Pulvirenti et al. (2004) recently conducted a laboratory evaporation/condensation experiment on a synthetic solution of primarily calcium chloride. This solution represents one potential type of evaporated pore water at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a site proposed for geologic storage of high-level nuclear waste. These authors reported that boiling this solution to near dryness (a concentration factor >75,000 relative to actual pore waters) leads to the generation of acid condensate (pH 4.5) presumably due to volatilization of HCl (and minor HF and/or HNO{sub 3}). To investigate the various processes taking place, including boiling, gas transport, and condensation, their experiment was simulated by modifying an existing multicomponent and multiphase reactive transport code (TOUGHREACT). This code was extended with a Pitzer ion-interaction model to deal with high ionic strength. The model of the experiment was set-up to capture the observed increase in boiling temperature (143 C at {approx}1 bar) resulting from high concentrations of dissolved salts (up to 8 m CaCl{sub 2}). The computed HCI fugacity ({approx} 10{sup -4} bars) generated by boiling under these conditions is not sufficient to lower the pH of the condensate (cooled to 80 and 25 C) down to observed values unless the H{sub 2}O mass fraction in gas is reduced below {approx}10%. This is because the condensate becomes progressively diluted by H{sub 2}O gas condensation. However, when the system is modeled to remove water vapor, the computed pH of instantaneous condensates decreases to {approx}1.7, consistent with the experiment (Figure 1). The results also show that the HCl fugacity increases, and calcite, gypsum, sylvite, halite, MgCl{sub 2}4H{sub 2}O and CaCl{sub 2} precipitate sequentially with increasing concentration factors.

  6. Impact of Adsorption on Gas Transport in Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tianhao; Zhang, Dongxiao

    2016-01-01

    Given the complex nature of the interaction between gas and solid atoms, the development of nanoscale science and technology has engendered a need for further understanding of gas transport behavior through nanopores and more tractable models for large-scale simulations. In the present paper, we utilize molecular dynamic simulations to demonstrate the behavior of gas flow under the influence of adsorption in nano-channels consisting of illite and graphene, respectively. The results indicate that velocity oscillation exists along the cross-section of the nano-channel, and the total mass flow could be either enhanced or reduced depending on variations in adsorption under different conditions. The mechanisms can be explained by the extra average perturbation stress arising from density oscillation via the novel perturbation model for micro-scale simulation, and approximated via the novel dual-region model for macro-scale simulation, which leads to a more accurate permeability correction model for industrial applications than is currently available. PMID:27020130

  7. 30 CFR 250.120 - How does injecting, storing, or treating gas affect my royalty payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How does injecting, storing, or treating gas... Performance Standards § 250.120 How does injecting, storing, or treating gas affect my royalty payments? (a... and treat it at an off-lease or off-unit location, you must pay royalties when the gas is...

  8. Economics of liquefied natural gas production, transport and distribution for end use as a transportation fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, R.E.; Sutton, H.E.

    1994-12-31

    Natural gas vehicles have been operating in the United States for over 30 years. With few exceptions, these vehicles are owned and operated by local gas utilities that utilize the natural gas in the compressed form (CNG), at pressures of up to 3,600 psi. However, the limited range, system weight and the high cost of fueling facilities presents a serious handicap for these compressed fuel systems. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) automotive fuel systems, on the other hand, are a relatively new player in the emerging clean fuels market. While the technical feasibility, safety, and operational suitability of LNG fuel systems have been demonstrated during the past 20 years, in a variety of test projects including automotive, marine, aviation, and rail systems, little has been done to commercialize or promote this technology. Recent independent cost comparisons and technical evaluations have been conducted by several major transit organizations and national truck fleets with interesting results. They have concluded that LNG automotive fuel systems can meet the performance and operational criteria of their gasoline and diesel fuel systems without compromising vehicle range or imposing unacceptable weight and payload penalties on their vehicles. The purpose of this paper is to further define the economics of LNG production, transportation and distribution costs. The liquefaction of natural gas is a mature technology and was first accomplished by Faraday in 1855. The first large scale plants were installed in the United States in 1941 and this paper provides a summary of the issues and costs associated with the procurement, installation, and operation of modern day natural gas liquefaction systems. There are no technical barriers to building LNG plants where needed. In addition to these {open_quotes}peak shaving{close_quotes} liquefaction plants, operated by utilities, there are many liquefaction plants owned and operated by the industrial gas business sector.

  9. The antiepileptic drug carbamazepine affects sodium transport in toad epithelium.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Mennickent, Sigrid; Norris, Beryl; Cardenas, Hernán

    2006-09-01

    The present work investigates the effects of the antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) on sodium transport in the isolated skin of the toad Pleurodema thaul. A submaximal concentration of the drug (0.2 mM) applied to the outer surface of the epithelium increased the electrical parameters short-circuit current (Isc) and potential difference (PD) by over 28%, whereas only a higher concentration (1 mM) induced over a 45% decrease in these parameters when applied to the inner surface. The amiloride test showed that the outer surface stimulatory effect was accompanied by an increase and the inner surface inhibitory effect by a decrease in the sodium electromotive force (ENa). Exploration of these effects of CBZ on the outer surface showed that 0.2 mM increased net Na+ (22Na) influx by 20% and 0.6 mM CBZ decreased Na+ mucosa-serosa flux by 19%, a result in agreement with the finding that higher concentrations of CBZ applied to the inner surface not only decreased ENa but also sodium conductance (GNa). PMID:16542818

  10. Universal spin transport in a strongly interacting Fermi gas.

    PubMed

    Sommer, Ariel; Ku, Mark; Roati, Giacomo; Zwierlein, Martin W

    2011-04-14

    Transport of fermions, particles with half-integer spin, is central to many fields of physics. Electron transport runs modern technology, defining states of matter such as superconductors and insulators, and electron spin is being explored as a new carrier of information. Neutrino transport energizes supernova explosions following the collapse of a dying star, and hydrodynamic transport of the quark-gluon plasma governed the expansion of the early Universe. However, our understanding of non-equilibrium dynamics in such strongly interacting fermionic matter is still limited. Ultracold gases of fermionic atoms realize a pristine model for such systems and can be studied in real time with the precision of atomic physics. Even above the superfluid transition, such gases flow as an almost perfect fluid with very low viscosity when interactions are tuned to a scattering resonance. In this hydrodynamic regime, collective density excitations are weakly damped. Here we experimentally investigate spin excitations in a Fermi gas of (6)Li atoms, finding that, in contrast, they are maximally damped. A spin current is induced by spatially separating two spin components and observing their evolution in an external trapping potential. We demonstrate that interactions can be strong enough to reverse spin currents, with components of opposite spin reflecting off each other. Near equilibrium, we obtain the spin drag coefficient, the spin diffusivity and the spin susceptibility as a function of temperature on resonance and show that they obey universal laws at high temperatures. In the degenerate regime, the spin diffusivity approaches a value set by [planck]/m, the quantum limit of diffusion, where [planck]/m is Planck's constant divided by 2π and m the atomic mass. For repulsive interactions, our measurements seem to exclude a metastable ferromagnetic state.

  11. Prospects of and Problems in Using Natural Gas for Motor Transport in RUSSIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikishev, E.; Ivanov, A.; Anisimov, I.; Chainikov, D.

    2016-08-01

    This article is devoted to increasing the use of natural gas in Russia as a measure to decrease the negative influence of motor transport on the environment. A brief analysis of the global fleet of natural gas vehicles is provided above. The documents accepted in Russia to promote public awareness of compressed natural gas in transport are submitted. The basic reasons keeping the growth of natural gas vehicle fleets in Russia consist of weak branching of refuelling stations; difficulty in determining the actual amount of compressed natural gas required; and control methods of the consumption of gas fuel. The offers promoting the growth of the fleet of natural gas vehicles are given.

  12. Unconventional Shale-Gas Resource Systems and Processes Affecting Gas Generation, Retention, Storage, and Flow Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarvie, D. M.; Philp, R. P.; Jarvie, B. M.

    2009-04-01

    Geochemical and petrophysical characterization of various shale-gas systems in the U.S. indicates a variety of unconventional shale-gas system types. The most basic distinction is gas type: biogenic and thermogenic, although there can also be mixtures of the two gas types. Thermogenic shale-gas systems are further segregated into various sub-types depending on geochemistry and geology. The shale-gas system categories are: (1) high thermal maturity shale; (2) low thermal maturity shales; (3) mixed lithology intra-formational systems containing shale, sands, and silts; (4) inter-formational systems where gas is generated in a mature shale and stored in a less mature shale, and (5) mixed systems. A key difference among these shale-gas systems are initial gas flow rates. High thermal maturity systems tend to have much higher gas flow rates than low maturity systems because of gas charge and storage mechanisms. Certainly other non-geochemical factors, such as shale mineralogy, are extremely important in being able to stimulate these shales to flow gas. Geochemical comparison of the Antrim Shale (Michigan Basin), New Albany Shale (Illinois Basin), and Barnett Shale (Fort Worth Basin) are used to illustrate these different systems as well as other systems. These systems show significant differences in gas type, organic richness, thermal maturity, and gas flow rates. Gas flow rates are then dependent upon the amount of gas stored (or generated) and the ability to release gas from adsorption sites as well as connecting to micro-reservoir compartments.

  13. Stochastic method for modeling of the rarefied gas transport coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudyak, V. Ya; Lezhnev, E. V.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose an algorithm for computation of the transport coefficients of rarefied gas, which is based on stochastic modeling of phase trajectories considered molecular system. The hard spheres potential is used. The number of operations is proportional to the number of used molecules. Naturally in this algorithm the conservation laws are performed. The efficiency of the algorithm is demonstrated by the calculation of the viscosity and diffusion coefficients of several noble gases (argon, neon, xenon, krypton). It was shown that the algorithm accuracy of the order of 1-2% can be obtained by using a relatively small number of molecules. The accuracy dependence on the number of used molecules, statistics (number of the used phase trajectories) and calculation time was analyzed.

  14. Multidimensional modeling of pyrolysis gas transport inside orthotropic charring ablators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Haoyue

    During hypersonic atmospheric entry, spacecraft are exposed to enormous aerodynamic heat. To prevent the payload from overheating, charring ablative materials are favored to be applied as the heat shield at the exposing surface of the vehicle. Accurate modeling not only prevents mission failures, but also helps reduce cost. Existing models were mostly limited to one-dimensional and discrepancies were shown against measured experiments and flight-data. To help improve the models and analyze the charring ablation problems, a multidimensional material response module is developed, based on a finite volume method framework. The developed computer program is verified through a series of test-cases, and through code-to-code comparisons with a validated code. Several novel models are proposed, including a three-dimensional pyrolysis gas transport model and an orthotropic material model. The effects of these models are numerically studied and demonstrated to be significant.

  15. Element variations in rhyolitic magma resulting from gas transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlo, K.; Tuffen, H.; Smith, V. C.; Castro, J. M.; Pyle, D. M.; Mather, T. A.; Geraki, K.

    2013-11-01

    Tuffisite veins are glass-filled fractures formed when magma fragments during degassing within the conduit. These veins form transient channels through which exsolved gases can escape from magma. The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which chemical heterogeneity within the melt results from gas transport, and assess how this can be used to study magma degassing. Two tuffisite veins from contrasting rhyolitic eruptions at Torfajökull (Iceland) and Chaitén (Chile) were studied in detail. The tuffisite vein from Torfajökull is from a shallow dissected conduit (∼70 ka) that fed a degassed lava flow, while the sample from Chaitén was a bomb ejected during the waning phases of Plinian activity in May 2008. The results of detailed in situ chemical analyses (synchrotron XRF, FTIR, LA-ICP-MS) show that in both veins larger vesiculated fragments are enriched in volatile elements (Torfajökull: H, Li, Cl; Chaitén: Li, Cl, Cu, Zn, As, Sn, Sb) compared to the host, while the surrounding smaller particles are depleted in the Torfajökull vein (Li, Cl, Zn, Br, Rb, Pb), but enriched in the Chaitén vein (K, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Sb, Pb). The lifespans of both veins and the fluxes of gas and particles through them can be estimated using diffusion profiles and enrichment factors. The Torfajökull vein had a longer lifespan (∼a day) and low particle velocities (∼cm/s), while the Chaitén vein was shorter lived (<1 h) with a high gas velocity (∼m/s). These differences are consistent with the contrasting eruption mechanisms (effusive vs. explosive). The amount of magma that degassed through the Chaitén vein is more than ten times the volume of the vein itself, requiring the vein to tap into pre-exsolved gas pockets. This study highlights that tuffisite veins are highly efficient gas pathways and thereby impart chemical diversity in volatile elements on the melt.

  16. Impurity Transport in a Simulated Gas Target Divertor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blush, L. M.; Luckhardt, S.; Seraydarian, R.; Whyte, D.; Conn, R. W.; Schmitz, L.

    1997-11-01

    Previous simulated gas target divertor experiments in the PISCES-A linear plasma device (n <= 3 × 10^19 m-3, kTe <= 20 eV) indicated enhanced impurity retention near the target in comparison to a high recycling divertor regime. A 1 1\\over2-D fluid modeling code suggested that impurities are impeded from transporting away from the target by friction with the neutral and ionized hydrogen. In recent experiments with a PISCES-A ``slot-type'' divertor configuration, we have implemented a spectroscopic detection system to measure the axial density profiles of several impurity charge states. Moreover, we envision adding two extended cylindrical baffles spanning a pumped vacuum section to achieve strong differential pumping. This arrangement will isolate the plasma source from the gas target region and allow us to seed the background hydrogen plasma with higher impurities concentrations and investigate a regime dominated by impurity radiation. In preliminary design experiments, PISCES-A was successfully operated with an electrically isolated, copper baffle (d=5 cm, l=33.5 cm) mounted to reduce the vacuum conductance between the source and target regions. This work supported by US-DoE contract DE-FG03-95ER-54301.

  17. Experimental parameters affecting hypercoulometric response in gas-phase coulometry.

    PubMed

    Ciccioli, P; Hayes, J M

    1985-01-01

    The response of an electron-capture detector designed for coulometric response was examined as a function of solute, pulse interval, carrier-gas type, solute amount, carrier-gas flow rate, and chromatographic-peak profile. For CCl3F, it was shown that the average numbers of electrons absorbed per molecule ranged from 1.0 to 4.1, varying primarily with pulse interval but also displaying a complex dependence on sample amount. Comparison of these results with theoretical expectations leads to the conclusion that a 1:1 "coulometric response" may not be observed under certain operating conditions. Because the specific conditions required depend on many variables, including, to some extent, sample amount, true coulometric operation of an electron-capture detector is difficult to establish and maintain. Effects which may contribute to the production of hypercoulometric response are critically discussed.

  18. Role of transportation in the persuasion process: cognitive and affective responses to antidrug narratives.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Smita C; Greene, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    This study examined transportation effects of first- and third-person narratives as well as the role of transportation in the persuasion process. In particular, the authors evaluated the role of transportation in affecting cognitive and affective responses. Last, they addressed the relation between (a) cognitive and affective responses and (b) antidrug expectancies. Participants were 500 undergraduate students at a large northern university in the United Kingdom who were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 conditions: first- or third-person narratives on cocaine use. The results demonstrated that there was no difference between first- and third-person narratives in terms of transportation. However, overall, greater transportation was associated with more favorable cognitive responses, and more favorable cognitive response was associated with stronger anticocaine expectancies. In terms of affective responses, results indicated the mediating role of sadness and contentment in the association between transportation and anticocaine expectancies. In particular, increased transportation was associated with greater sadness and lower contentment. Lower sadness and contentment were associated with stronger anticocaine expectancies. Important theoretical and empirical implications are discussed.

  19. Transport by gas-phase diffusion: lessons learned from the hen's egg.

    PubMed

    Rahn, H; Paganelli, C V

    1985-01-01

    Diffusive gas transport obeys laws which differ from those of convective transport. Diffusive gas transport can be described as an elite transport system because it not only distinguishes between O2, CO2, and water vapor molecules, but it is also influenced by barometric pressure and the presence of particular inert gas species. In the presence of air binary diffusion coefficients are applicable, but in the presence of He or SF6 effective diffusion coefficients must be used. By contrast, convective transport is an egalitarian transport system which conveys O2, CO2, and water vapor without discrimination at any altitude or in the presence of any inert gas mixture. Experiments in progress offer the opportunity to delineate for the first time precise diffusion-perfusion ratios and their effects upon the gas-space O2 and CO2 tensions.

  20. Relationship between Microtubule Network Structure and Intracellular Transport in Cultured Endothelial Cells Affected by Shear Stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Susumu; Ikezawa, Kenji; Ikeda, Mariko; Tanishita, Kazuo

    Endothelial cells (ECs) that line the inner surface of blood vessels are barriers to the transport of various substances into or from vessel walls, and are continuously exposed to shear stress induced by blood flow in vivo. Shear stress affects the cytoskeleton (e.g., microtubules, microfilaments, intermediate filaments), and affects the transport of macromolecules. Here, the relationship between the microtubule network structure and this transport process for albumin uptake within cultured aortic endothelial cells affected by shear stress was studied. Based on fluorescent images of albumin uptake obtained by using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), both the microtubule network and albumin uptake in ECs were disrupted by colchicine and were affected by shear stress loading.

  1. Surfactant control of gas transport and reactions at the surface of sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Chan; Burden, Daniel K; Nathanson, Gilbert M

    2009-02-17

    ) and its H(3)O(+) and H(2)O reaction partners. However, these same alcohol molecules assist HCl dissociation because the alcohol OH groups provide extra interfacial protonation sites. Interestingly, butanol does not impede water evaporation, in part because the butyl chains pack much more loosely than insoluble, long-chain surfactants. Through these investigations, we hope to gain insight into the mechanisms by which surfactants on sulfuric acid and other aqueous solutions affect transport and reactivity at the gas-liquid interface.

  2. Surfactant control of gas transport and reactions at the surface of sulfuric acid.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Chan; Burden, Daniel K; Nathanson, Gilbert M

    2009-02-17

    ) and its H(3)O(+) and H(2)O reaction partners. However, these same alcohol molecules assist HCl dissociation because the alcohol OH groups provide extra interfacial protonation sites. Interestingly, butanol does not impede water evaporation, in part because the butyl chains pack much more loosely than insoluble, long-chain surfactants. Through these investigations, we hope to gain insight into the mechanisms by which surfactants on sulfuric acid and other aqueous solutions affect transport and reactivity at the gas-liquid interface. PMID:19119820

  3. Investigating the role of gas bubble formation and entrapment in contaminated aquifers: Reactive transport modelling.

    PubMed

    Amos, Richard T; Ulrich Mayer, K

    2006-09-10

    In many natural and contaminated aquifers, geochemical processes result in the production or consumption of dissolved gases. In cases where methanogenesis or denitrification occurs, the production of gases may result in the formation and growth of gas bubbles below the water table. Near the water table, entrapment of atmospheric gases during water table rise may provide a significant source of O(2) to waters otherwise depleted in O(2). Furthermore, the presence of bubbles will affect the hydraulic conductivity of an aquifer, resulting in changes to the groundwater flow regime. The interactions between physical transport, biogeochemical processes, and gas bubble formation, entrapment and release is complex and requires suitable analysis tools. The objective of the present work is the development of a numerical model capable of quantitatively assessing these processes. The multicomponent reactive transport code MIN3P has been enhanced to simulate bubble growth and contraction due to in-situ gas production or consumption, bubble entrapment due to water table rise and subsequent re-equilibration of the bubble with ambient groundwater, and permeability changes due to trapped gas phase saturation. The resulting formulation allows for the investigation of complex geochemical systems where microbially mediated redox reactions both produce and consume gases as well as affect solution chemistry, alkalinity, and pH. The enhanced model has been used to simulate processes in a petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated aquifer where methanogenesis is an important redox process. The simulations are constrained by data from a crude oil spill site near Bemidji, MN. Our results suggest that permeability reduction in the methanogenic zone due to in-situ formation of gas bubbles, and dissolution of entrapped atmospheric bubbles near the water table, both work to attenuate the dissolved gas plume emanating from the source zone. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that under the given

  4. Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions Trading. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Steve Winkelman; Tim Hargrave; Christine Vanderlan

    1999-10-01

    The authors conclude in this report that an upstream system would ensure complete regulatory coverage of transportation sector emissions in an efficient and feasible manner, and as such represents a key component of a national least-cost GHG emissions abatement strategy. The broad coverage provided by an upstream system recommends this approach over vehicle-maker based approaches, which would not cover emissions from heavy-duty vehicles and the aviation, marine and off-road sub-sectors. The on-road fleet approach unfairly and inefficiently burdens vehicle manufacturers with responsibility for emissions that they cannot control. A new vehicles approach would exclude emissions from vehicles on the road prior to program inception. The hybrid approach faces significant technical and political complications, and it is not clear that the approach would actually change behavior among vehicle makers and users, which is its main purpose. They also note that a trading system would fail to encourage many land use and infrastructure measures that affect VMT growth and GHG emissions. They recommend that this market failure be addressed by complementing the trading system with a program specifically targeting land use- and infrastructure-related activities. A key issue that must be addressed in designing a national GHG control strategy is whether or not it is necessary to guarantee GHG reductions from the transport sector. Neither an upstream system nor a downstream approach would do so, since both would direct capital to the least-cost abatement opportunities wherever they were found. They review two reasons why it may be desirable to force transportation sector reductions: first, that the long-term response to climate change will require reductions in all sectors; and second, the many ancillary benefits associated with transportation-related, and especially VMT-related, emissions reduction activities. If policy makers find it desirable to establish transportation

  5. 75 FR 6370 - Regulations Governing the Conduct of Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Regulations Governing the Conduct of Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects; Notice of Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects Open Season Pre-Filing Workshop... hold a workshop on the procedures and process for holding and commenting on an open season for...

  6. 75 FR 8329 - Regulations Governing the Conduct of Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... comments. Absent unusual circumstances, FERC will act on the open season plan within 60 days of its... Energy Regulatory Commission Regulations Governing the Conduct of Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects; Notice of Rescheduled Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects Open Season...

  7. Biochar pyrolyzed at two temperatures affects Escherichia coli transport through a sandy soil.

    PubMed

    Bolster, Carl H; Abit, Sergio M

    2012-01-01

    The incorporation of biochar into soils has been proposed as a means to sequester carbon from the atmosphere. An added environmental benefit is that biochar has also been shown to increase soil retention of nutrients, heavy metals, and pesticides. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether biochar amendments affect the transport of Escherichia coli through a water-saturated soil. We looked at the transport of three E. coli isolates through 10-cm columns packed with a fine sandy soil amended with 2 or 10% (w/w) poultry litter biochar pyrolyzed at 350 or 700°C. For all three isolates, mixing the high-temperature biochar at a rate of 2% into the soil had no impact on transport behavior. When added at a rate of 10%, a reduction of five orders of magnitude in the amount of E. coli transported through the soil was observed for two of the isolates, and a 60% reduction was observed for the third isolate. Mixing the low-temperature biochar into the soil resulted in enhanced transport through the soil for two of the isolates, whereas no significant differences in transport behavior were observed between the low-temperature and high-temperature biochar amendments for one isolate. Our results show that the addition of biochar can affect the retention and transport behavior of E. coli and that biochar application rate, biochar pyrolysis temperature, and bacterial surface characteristics were important factors determining the transport of E. coli through our test soil. PMID:22218181

  8. Radon as a tracer of biogenic gas equilibration and transport from methane-saturated sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martens, Christopher S.; Chanton, Jeffrey P.

    1989-01-01

    Data on Rn-222 activity in methane-rich gas bubbles from anoxic coastal sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina, were used to determine gas equilibration with pore waters and the rates of ebullitive stripping and transport of gases to overlying waters and the atmosphere. Results showed that, during summer months, the bubble ebullition process strips and transports 1.9-4.8 percent/day of the standing crop of radon (and, by inference, other gases equilibrated with gas bubbles) in surface sediments of Cape Lookout Bight to the troposphere. Thus, the ebullitive mode of gas transport represents an effective mechanism for delivering reduced biogenic gases directly to the atmosphere.

  9. Ozone gas affects the physical and chemical properties of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ozone can oxidize hydroxyl groups present at C2, C3, and C6 positions on the starch molecule and affect its physicochemical properties. In this experiment, bread wheat flour and isolated wheat starch were treated with ozone gas (1,500 ppm, gas flow rate 2.5 L/minutes) for 45 minutes and 30 minutes, ...

  10. 30 CFR 250.120 - How does injecting, storing, or treating gas affect my royalty payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How does injecting, storing, or treating gas... SHELF General Performance Standards § 250.120 How does injecting, storing, or treating gas affect my... CFR 550.119, you must pay royalty before injecting it into the storage reservoir. (c) If you...

  11. Pulse exposure of cultured rat neurons to aluminum-maltol affected the axonal transport system.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Y; Nakamura, Y; Miyamae, Y; Hashimoto, R; Takeda, M

    1998-08-01

    Although chronic aluminum neurotoxicity has been well established, the mechanism of the toxicity has not been elucidated yet. In order to simplify the study of the aluminum neurotoxicity, we employed the pulse exposure of cultured rat cortical neurons to 250 microM aluminum-maltol for 1 h at the early stage (6 h after plating), which resulted in abnormal distribution of neurofilament L (NFL) and fast axonal transported proteins, whereas the axonal transport of tubulin, actin, and clathrin were not impaired. Otherwise, the pulse exposure of neurons at the late stage (4 days after plating) to the same concentration of aluminum-maltol did not affect the cell morphology and the distribution of NFL. The pulse exposure of cultured neurons to aluminum-maltol at the early stage might affect the axonal transport system of NFL and fast axonal transported proteins. PMID:9756345

  12. The hydrology of northern peatlands as affected by biogenic gas: Current developments and research needs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberry, D.O.; Glaser, P.H.; Siegel, D.I.

    2006-01-01

    Recent research indicates that accumulation and release of biogenic gas from northern peatlands may substantially affect future climate. Sudden release of free-phase gas bubbles into the atmosphere may preclude the conversion of methane to carbon dioxide in the uppermost oxic layer of the peat, resulting in greater contribution of methane to the atmosphere than is currently estimated. The hydrology of these peatlands also affects and is affected by this process, especially when gas is released suddenly and episodically. Indirect hydrological evidence indicates that ebullitive gas releases are relatively frequent in some peatlands and time-averaged rates may be significantly greater than diffusive releases. Estimates of free-phase gas contained in peat have ranged from 0 to nearly 20% of the peat volume. Abrupt changes in the volume of gas may alter hydraulic gradients and movement of water and solutes in peat, which in turn could alter composition and fluxes of the gas. Peat surfaces also move vertically and horizontally in response to accumulation and release of free-phase gas. Future research should address the distribution, temporal variability, and relative significance of ebullition in peatlands and the consequent hydrological responses to these gas-emission events. Copyright ?? 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Gas Transport Parameters for Landfill Cover Soils: Effects of Soil Compaction and Water Blockages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramarachchi, P. N.; Hamamoto, S.; Kawamoto, K.; Nawagamuwa, U.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2009-12-01

    Recently, landfill sites have been emerging in greenhouse warming scenarios as a significant source of atmospheric CH4. landfill management strategies have mainly addressed the problem of preventing groundwater contamination and reduction of leachate generation. Being one of the largest source of anthropogenic CH4 emission , the final cover system should also be designed for minimizing the biogas migration into the atmosphere or the areas surrounding the landfill. Compared to the intensive research efforts on hydraulic performances of landfill final cover soil , there are few studies about gas transport characteristics of landfill cover soils. Therefore, the effects of soil physical properties such as bulk density (i.e., compaction level), soil particle size and water blockage effects on the gas exchange in t highly compacted final cover soil are largely unknown. The gas exchange through the final cover soils is controlled by advective and diffusive gas transport. Air permeability (ka) governs the advective gas transport while the soil-gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) governs diffusive gas transport . In this study, the effects of compaction level and water blockage effects on ka and Dp for two landfill final cover soils were investigated. The disturbed soil samples were taken from landfill final covers in Japan and Sri Lanka. A compaction tests were performed for the soil samples with two different size fractions (< 35 mm and < 2.0 mm). In the compaction tests at field water content , the soil samples were repacked into soil cores (i.d. 15-cm, length 12-cm) at two different compaction levels (2700 kN/m2 and 600 kN/m2). After the compaction tests, ka and Dp were measured and then samples were saturated and subsequently drained at different soil-water matric potential (pF; pF equals to log(-ɛ) where ɛ is soil-water matric potential in cm H2O) of 1.5, 2.0, 3.0, 4.1, and with air-dried (pF 6.0) and oven-dried (pF 6.9) conditions. Results showed that measured Dp values

  14. Bioinspired gas bubble spontaneous and directional transportation effects in an aqueous medium.

    PubMed

    Ma, Rui; Wang, Jingming; Yang, Zhongjia; Liu, Meng; Zhang, Jingjing; Jiang, Lei

    2015-04-01

    A series of well-ordered, 3D gradient porous interconnected network surfaces composed of micro-nano hierarchical geometries is constructed on a copper wire. A continuous gas film can be trapped around its interface in an aqueous medium acting as an effective channel for gas transportation. Driving by the difference of the Laplace pressure, gas bubbles can be transported spontaneously and directionally. PMID:25688855

  15. TRU waste transportation -- The flammable gas generation problem

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, M.J.; Kosiewicz, S.T.

    1997-11-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has imposed a flammable gas (i.e., hydrogen) concentration limit of 5% by volume on transuranic (TRU) waste containers to be shipped using the TRUPACT-II transporter. This concentration is the lower explosive limit (LEL) in air. This was done to minimize the potential for loss of containment during a hypothetical 60 day period. The amount of transuranic radionuclide that is permissible for shipment in TRU waste containers has been tabulated in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP, 1) to conservatively prevent accumulation of hydrogen above this 5% limit. Based on the SARP limitations, approximately 35% of the TRU waste stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab (INEEL), Los Alamos National Lab (LANL), and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) cannot be shipped in the TRUPACT-II. An even larger percentage of the TRU waste drums at the Savannah River Site (SRS) cannot be shipped because of the much higher wattage loadings of TRU waste drums in that site`s inventory. This paper presents an overview of an integrated, experimental program that has been initiated to increase the shippable portion of the Department of Energy (DOE) TRU waste inventory. In addition, the authors will estimate the anticipated expansion of the shippable portion of the inventory and associated cost savings. Such projection should provide the TRU waste generating sites a basis for developing their TRU waste workoff strategies within their Ten Year Plan budget horizons.

  16. A Case Study of Trace Gas Transports at the Tropopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeler, B.; Offermann, D.; Hoffmann, L.; Riese, M.

    The CRISTA experiment provided global measurements of atmospheric trace gases in the stratosphere and upper troposphere during its second mission in August 1997. A new data product was recently developed, yielding water vapor mixing ratios in the upper troposphere and around the tropopause. The high data density of CRISTA enables an efficient assimilation of the water vapor field (by means of the NCAR ROSE CTM). From these data turbulent trace gas fluxes (v'') are derived. The global distribution of the H2 O fluxes is found highly structured at a given pressure level. Zonal means of fluxes indicate transport barriers at the equator and near the tropopause. This is compared to the effective diffusivities Kef f of Haynes and Shuckburgh (2000). General agreement is obtained. There is one important discrepancy, though: The effective diffusivities show a transequatorial "turbulent bridge" at about 12km. This "bridge" is also seen in the CRISTA H2 O data, but at considerably higher altitude. This finding is confirmed by CFC11 and O3 data from CRISTA, and by O3 data from UARS. Implication for the interhemispheric exchange of air pollutants is discussed.

  17. Facilities, breed and experience affect ease of sheep handling: the livestock transporter's perspective.

    PubMed

    Burnard, C L; Pitchford, W S; Hocking Edwards, J E; Hazel, S J

    2015-08-01

    An understanding of the perceived importance of a variety of factors affecting the ease of handling of sheep and the interactions between these factors is valuable in improving profitability and welfare of the livestock. Many factors may contribute to animal behaviour during handling, and traditionally these factors have been assessed in isolation under experimental conditions. A human social component to this phenomenon also exists. The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the importance of a variety of factors affecting ease of handling, and the interactions between these from the perspective of the livestock transporter. Qualitative interviews were used to investigate the factors affecting sheep behaviour during handling. Interview transcripts underwent thematic analysis. Livestock transporters discussed the effects of attitudes and behaviours towards sheep, helpers, facilities, distractions, environment, dogs and a variety of sheep factors including breed, preparation, experience and sex on sheep behaviour during handling. Transporters demonstrated care and empathy and stated that patience and experience were key factors determining how a person might deal with difficult sheep. Livestock transporters strongly believed facilities (ramps and yards) had the greatest impact, followed by sheep experience (naivety of the sheep to handling and transport) and breed. Transporters also discussed the effects of distractions, time of day, weather, dogs, other people, sheep preparation, body condition and sheep sex on ease of handling. The concept of individual sheep temperament was indirectly expressed.

  18. Facilities, breed and experience affect ease of sheep handling: the livestock transporter's perspective.

    PubMed

    Burnard, C L; Pitchford, W S; Hocking Edwards, J E; Hazel, S J

    2015-08-01

    An understanding of the perceived importance of a variety of factors affecting the ease of handling of sheep and the interactions between these factors is valuable in improving profitability and welfare of the livestock. Many factors may contribute to animal behaviour during handling, and traditionally these factors have been assessed in isolation under experimental conditions. A human social component to this phenomenon also exists. The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the importance of a variety of factors affecting ease of handling, and the interactions between these from the perspective of the livestock transporter. Qualitative interviews were used to investigate the factors affecting sheep behaviour during handling. Interview transcripts underwent thematic analysis. Livestock transporters discussed the effects of attitudes and behaviours towards sheep, helpers, facilities, distractions, environment, dogs and a variety of sheep factors including breed, preparation, experience and sex on sheep behaviour during handling. Transporters demonstrated care and empathy and stated that patience and experience were key factors determining how a person might deal with difficult sheep. Livestock transporters strongly believed facilities (ramps and yards) had the greatest impact, followed by sheep experience (naivety of the sheep to handling and transport) and breed. Transporters also discussed the effects of distractions, time of day, weather, dogs, other people, sheep preparation, body condition and sheep sex on ease of handling. The concept of individual sheep temperament was indirectly expressed. PMID:25874817

  19. Coupling of hydrologic transport and chemical reactions in a stream affected by acid mine drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kimball, B.A.; Broshears, R.E.; Bencala, K.E.; McKnight, Diane M.

    1994-01-01

    Experiments in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream, examined the coupling of hydrologic transport to chemical reactions affecting metal concentrations. Injection of LiCl as a conservative tracer was used to determine discharge and residence time along a 1497-m reach. Transport of metals downstream from inflows of acidic, metal-rich water was evaluated based on synoptic samples of metal concentrations and the hydrologic characteristics of the stream. Transport of SO4 and Mn was generally conservative, but in the subreaches most affected by acidic inflows, transport was reactive. Both 0.1-??m filtered and particulate Fe were reactive over most of the stream reach. Filtered Al partitioned to the particulate phase in response to high instream concentrations. Simulations that accounted for the removal of SO4, Mn, Fe, and Al with first-order reactions reproduced the steady-state profiles. The calculated rate constants for net removal used in the simulations embody several processes that occur on a stream-reach scale. The comparison between rates of hydrologie transport and chemical reactions indicates that reactions are only important over short distances in the stream near the acidic inflows, where reactions occur on a comparable time scale with hydrologic transport and thus affect metal concentrations.

  20. Incinerator operating conditions affect combustion gas levels of dioxins, furans

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    New research shows levels of dioxins and furans can be minimized by good combustion practices at a garbage-burning incinerator, according to results of the Combustion and Emissions Research Project at the VICON Incinerator Facility. The project focused on how a wide range of combustion conditions and different types of refuse quality affected the amount of dioxins and furans formed and destroyed during the combustion process. The results of the research show concentrations of dioxins and furans among the lowest measured at any incinerator. Tests were conducted over a broad range of operating conditions, with furnace temperatures as low as 1300 degrees and as high as 1900 degrees Fahrenheit. The only increase in dioxins and furans during testing occurred when incinerator temperatures were reduced below 1500 degrees Fahrenheit.

  1. Reduced soil wettability can affect greenhouse gas fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanek, Emilia; Qassem, Khalid

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture is known to be an important factor affecting the carbon (C) dynamics in soils including decomposition of organic matter and exchange of gases like CO2 and CH4 between the soil and the atmosphere. Most studies and process models looking at the soil C dynamics assume, however, that soils are easily wettable and water is relatively uniformly distributed within the soil pores. Most soils, however, do not wet spontaneously when dry or moderately moist, but instead exhibit some degree of soil water repellency (i.e. hydrophobicity), which can restrict infiltration and conductivity of water for weeks or months. This is world-wide occurring phenomenon which affects all soil textural types but is particularly common under permanent vegetation e.g. forest, grass and shrub vegetation. Soil water repellency is most profound during drier seasons, when the soil moisture content is relatively low. Although prolonged contact with water can gradually decrease water repellency, some soils do not recover to being completely wettable even after very wet winter months or substantial rainfall events. It has been recognized that with the predicted climatic changes the phenomenon of soil water repellency will become even more pronounced and severe, additionally it may occur in the areas and climatic zones where the effect have not been currently recognized. One of the main implications of soil water repellency is restricted water infiltration and reduced conductivity, which results in reduced soil water availability for plants and soil biota, even after prolonged periods of rainfall. As the process of C mineralization and consequently CO2 efflux from soil is driven by the accessibility of organic matter to decomposing organisms, which in turn is directly dependent on (i) soil moisture and (ii) soil temperature it is, therefore hypothesised that carbon decomposition and CO2 efflux in water repellent soils will also be affected when soil in the water repellent state. The CO2

  2. Natural gas transport by plastic pipes. (Latest citations from the Compendex database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of plastic piping to transport natural gas or liquid propane gas. The interaction between gas odorants and plastic pipe, the effects of aging on plastic pipe used to transport gas, and pipe failure analyses are examined. Bending, joining, and repair methods are discussed. Composite reinforced plastic pipes and plastic coated pipes are considered. Polyethylene and epoxy composites are among the materials discussed. Gas main upgrading projects that replaced old pipes with plastic ones are briefly cited. (Contains a minimum of 88 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  3. The physical basis for gas transport through polar firn: a case study at Summit, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, A. C.; Albert, M. R.

    2013-06-01

    Compared to other natural porous materials, relatively little is known about the physical nature of polar firn. This intricate network of ice and pore space that comprises the top 60-100 m of the polar ice sheets is the framework that forms the natural archive of past climate information. Despite the many implications for ice core interpretation, direct measurements of physical properties throughout the firn column are limited. Models of gas transport through firn are used to interpret in-situ chemical data which is retrieved to analyze past atmospheric composition. These traditional models treat the firn as a "black box," with gas transport parameters tuned to match gas concentrations with depth to known atmospheric histories. Though this method has been largely successful and provided very useful insights, there are still many questions and uncertainties to be addressed. This work seeks to understand the impact of firn structure on gas transport in firn from a first principles standpoint through direct measurements of permeability, gas diffusivity and microstructure. The relationships between gas transport properties and microstructure will be characterized and compared to existing relationships for general porous media. Direct measurements of gas diffusivity are compared to diffusivities deduced from models based on firn air chemical sampling. Our comparison illuminates the primary importance of including microstructural parameters, beyond just porosity or density, in mass transport modeling, and it provides insights about the nature of gas transport throughout the firn column. Guidance is provided for development of next-generation firn air transport models.

  4. Natural gas: Marine transportation. (Latest citations from Oceanic Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, and operation of ships for the transport of liquified natural gas. Topics include safety devices, materials handling equipment for loading and unloading liquified natural gas, new hull and vessel designs, gas turbine propulsion systems, cargo tank designs and requirements, and liguid load dynamics. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. On the Reverse Asymmetric Gas Transport Effect in the Polymer Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurchatov, I. M.; Laguntsov, N. I.; Skuridin, I. E.

    In this paper, change of gas permeability value, depending on orientation of polymer gas membrane, in a wide pressure range was investigated. Consistent patterns of asymmetric gas transfer through the PVTMS-membrane were established experimentally. Reverse asymmetric transport effect was observed, wherein the permeability from the direction of porous support prevails at the permeability from the direction of selective non-porous layer.

  6. Natural gas: Marine transportation. (Latest citations from Oceanic Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, and operation of ships for the transport of liquified natural gas. Topics include safety devices, materials handling equipment for loading and unloading liquified natural gas, new hull and vessel designs, gas turbine propulsion systems, cargo tank designs and requirements, and liguid load dynamics. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. Do volcanic emissions affect carbon gas fluxes in peatlands?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Nicola; Delmelle, Pierre; Toet, Sylvia; Gauci, Vincent; Ineson, Phil

    2010-05-01

    Recently, a link has been suggested between volcanic deposition of SO4 and the suppression of CH4 emissions in northern peatlands (Gauci et al., 2008). This link stems from the widely accepted idea that acid rain SO4 additions to peatlands can cause a shift in microbial communities as SO4 reducing bacteria out-compete methanogens for substrates, which results in a suppression of CH4 emission. However, volcanic emissions contain besides S other chemically reactive species that are potentially harmful to the environment. In particular, gaseous and particulate F emissions from volcanoes constitute a steady or intermittent source of F emission and deposition into the environment both close to the source and within fallout range of large eruptions. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of volcanic depositions of SO4, both alone and in combination with F, on CH4 emission in peatlands. Peat mesocosms collected from Pennine uplands in the UK were treated with weekly pulses of Na2SO4 and NaF over 20 weeks in doses of 74 kg SO4/ ha and 13.5 and 135 kg F /ha. CH4 emissions were measured at regular intervals by taking headspace samples, which were analysed by GC-FID. CO2 fluxes were also measured using a portable Infra Red Gas Analyser (IRGA). No significant differences in CH4 and CO2 emissions were observed for any of the treatments when compared to the controls, which had only received deionised water. These findings are in contrast with previous studies where SO4 reduces CH4 emission in peatlands. The reason for this is unclear but may be due to the heterogeneous nature of peat soils. An alternative explanation relates to the previous history of the soils used in the mesocosms which are known to have been previously exposed to large volumes of anthropogenic S pollution. This may have caused microbial communities to evolve and become acclimatised to high levels of S addition. In either case, the assumption that CH4 suppression in peatlands occurs upon

  8. Trace gas observations over rural Virginia: Photochemistry and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallock-Waters, Kristen Anne

    Current understanding of photochemistry and acid deposition and the ability to model how species interact in the atmosphere and evaluate emissions inventories are limited by the availability of trace gas measurements. To address the deficiency in air quality data for the U.S. mid-Atlantic region, observations of O3, CO, SO2, NO, total nitrate (HNO3 vapor + particulate nitrate), and NOy (the sum of NO, NO2, HNO3, particulate nitrate, HONO, HO2NO2, N2O5, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), and organic nitrates) were made at Shenandoah National Park-Big Meadows from 1995-1997. Diurnal, seasonal, and interannual variability in the trace gas species and correlations between pairs of pollutants are examined. A comparison of the 1995-1997 CO observations with measurements from the same site during 1988-1989 indicates a 5 ppbv yr-1 decreasing trend in CO concentration over the 9-year period. The observed decrease in CO is consistent with reported emissions reductions. Despite the observed decrease in CO and estimated reductions in anthropogenic hydrocarbon emissions, O3 concentrations indicate no statistically significant trend over 1987-1997, suggesting reductions in anthropogenic emissions of oxides of nitrogen are key to mitigating regional smog formation. From July-December 1997, measurements of NOx (NO + NO 2) were also made. Slopes of O3 versus NOy-NO x decrease from about 5 mol/mol during July through early September to 0.4 mol/mol in mid-September, indicating a rapid seasonal transition from NOx-limited to hydrocarbon-limited O3 production conditions. Total nitrate represented 20-50% of total NOy during most of this study. Deposition of HNO3 and particulate nitrate may contribute substantially to nitrogen loading to the Chesapeake Bay. Based on the average 1995-1997 total nitrate concentration, dry deposition of nitrate to the Chesapeake Bay is estimated at 118 × 109 g N yr-1, about 19% of the estimated total anthropogenic nitrogen loading to the Bay. As a rural and

  9. X-ray computed tomography studies of gas storage and transport in Devonian shales

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, X.; Miao, P.; Watson, A.T. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Pepin, G.P.; Moss, R.M. ); Semmelbeck, M. )

    1994-07-01

    Devonian shales and other unconventional resources can be highly fractured and may have significant amounts of gas stored by adsorption. Conventional experiments are not well suited for characterizing the properties important for describing gas storage and transport in these media. Here, X-ray computed tomography scanning is used to determine gas storage in dynamic gas flow experiments on Devonian shale samples. Several important properties are obtained from these experiments, including fracture widths, adsorption isotherms, and matrix porosities and permeabilities.

  10. Oocyte aging-induced Neuronatin (NNAT) hypermethylation affects oocyte quality by impairing glucose transport in porcine

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ying-Ying; Chen, Li; Wang, Tao; Nie, Zheng-Wen; Zhang, Xia; Miao, Yi-Liang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation plays important roles in regulating many physiological behaviors; however, few studies were focused on the changes of DNA methylation during oocyte aging. Early studies showed that some imprinted genes’ DNA methylation had been changed in aged mouse oocytes. In this study, we used porcine oocytes to test the hypothesis that oocyte aging would alter DNA methylation pattern of genes and disturb their expression in age oocytes, which affected the developmental potential of oocytes. We compared several different types of genes and found that the expression and DNA methylation of Neuronatin (NNAT) were disturbed in aged oocytes significantly. Additional experiments demonstrated that glucose transport was impaired in aged oocytes and injection of NNAT antibody into fresh oocytes led to the same effects on glucose transport. These results suggest that the expression of NNAT was declined by elevating DNA methylation, which affected oocyte quality by decreasing the ability of glucose transport in aged oocytes. PMID:27782163

  11. Near-surface physics during convection affecting air-water gas transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fredriksson, S. T.; Arneborg, L.; Nilsson, H.; Handler, R. A.

    2016-05-01

    The gas flux at the water surface is affected by physical processes including turbulence from wind shear, microscale wave breaking, large-scale breaking, and convection due to heat loss at the surface. The main route in the parameterizations of the gas flux has been to use the wind speed as a proxy for the gas flux velocity, indirectly taking into account the dependency of the wind shear and the wave processes. The interest in the contributions from convection processes has increased as the gas flux from inland waters (with typically lower wind and sheltered conditions) now is believed to play a substantial role in the air-water gas flux budget. The gas flux is enhanced by convection through the mixing of the mixed layer as well as by decreasing the diffusive boundary layer thickness. The direct numerical simulations performed in this study are shown to be a valuable tool to enhance the understanding of this flow configuration often present in nature.

  12. Connexin-deficiency affects expression levels of glial glutamate transporters within the cerebrum.

    PubMed

    Unger, Tina; Bette, Stefanie; Zhang, Jiong; Theis, Martin; Engele, Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    The glial glutamate transporter subtypes, GLT-1/EAAT-2 and GLAST/EAAT-1 clear the bulk of extracellular glutamate and are severely dysregulated in various acute and chronic brain diseases. Despite the previous identification of several extracellular factors modulating glial glutamate transporter expression, our knowledge of the regulatory network controlling glial glutamate transport in health and disease still remains incomplete. In studies with cultured cortical astrocytes, we previously obtained evidence that glial glutamate transporter expression is also affected by gap junctions/connexins. To assess whether gap junctions would likewise control the in vivo expression of glial glutamate transporters, we have now assessed their expression levels in brains of conditional Cx43 knockout mice, total Cx30 knockouts, as well as Cx43/Cx30 double knockouts. We found that either knocking out Cx30, Cx43, or both increases GLT-1/EAAT-2 protein levels in the cerebral cortex to a similar extent. By contrast, GLAST/EAAT-1 protein levels maximally increased in cerebral cortices of Cx30/Cx43 double knockouts, implying that gap junctions differentially affect the expression of GLT-1/EAAT-2 and GLAST/EAAT-1. Quantitative PCR analysis further revealed that increases in glial glutamate transporter expression are brought about by transcriptional and translational/posttranslational processes. Moreover, GLT-1/EAAT-2- and GLAST/EAAT-1 protein levels remained unchanged in the hippocampi of Cx43/Cx30 double knockouts when compared to Cx43fl/fl controls, indicating brain region-specific effects of gap junctions on glial glutamate transport. Since astrocytic gap junction coupling is affected in various forms of brain injuries, our findings point to gap junctions/connexins as important regulators of glial glutamate turnover in the diseased cerebral cortex.

  13. DIRECT COMPARISON OF KINETIC AND LOCAL EQUILIBRIUM FORMULATIONS FOR SOLUTE TRANSPORT AFFECTED BY SURFACE REACTIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bahr, Jean M.; Rubin, Jacob

    1987-01-01

    Modeling transport of reacting solutes in porous media often requires a choice between models based on the local equilibrium assumption (LEA) and models involving reaction kinetics. Direct comparison of the mathematical formulations for these two types of transport models can aid in this choice. For cases of transport affected by surface reaction, such a comparison is made possible by a new derivation procedure. This procedure yields a kinetics-based formulation that is the sum of the LEA formulation and one or more kinetically influenced terms. The dimensionless form of the new kinetics-based formulation facilitates identification of critical parameter groupings which control the approach to transport behavior consistent with LEA model predictions. Results of numerical experiments demonstrate that criteria for LEA applicability can be expressed conveniently in terms of these parameter groupings. The derivation procedure is demonstrated for examples of surface reactions including first-order reversible sorption, Langmuir-type kinetics and binary, homovalent ion exchange.

  14. Mutations in the white gene of Drosophila melanogaster affecting ABC transporters that determine eye colouration.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, S M; Brooker, M R; Gill, T R; Cox, G B; Howells, A J; Ewart, G D

    1999-07-15

    The white, brown and scarlet genes of Drosophila melanogaster encode proteins which transport guanine or tryptophan (precursors of the red and brown eye colour pigments) and belong to the ABC transporter superfamily. Current models envisage that the white and brown gene products interact to form a guanine specific transporter, while white and scarlet gene products interact to form a tryptophan transporter. In this study, we report the nucleotide sequence of the coding regions of five white alleles isolated from flies with partially pigmented eyes. In all cases, single amino acid changes were identified, highlighting residues with roles in structure and/or function of the transporters. Mutations in w(cf) (G589E) and w(sat) (F590G) occur at the extracellular end of predicted transmembrane helix 5 and correlate with a major decrease in red pigments in the eyes, while brown pigments are near wild-type levels. Therefore, those residues have a more significant role in the guanine transporter than the tryptophan transporter. Mutations identified in w(crr) (H298N) and w(101) (G243S) affect amino acids which are highly conserved among the ABC transporter superfamily within the nucleotide binding domain. Both cause substantial and similar decreases of red and brown pigments indicating that both tryptophan and guanine transport are impaired. The mutation identified in w(Et87) alters an amino acid within an intracellular loop between transmembrane helices 2 and 3 of the predicted structure. Red and brown pigments are reduced to very low levels by this mutation indicating this loop region is important for the function of both guanine and tryptophan transporters. PMID:10407069

  15. How technology and price affect US tight gas potential. Part 1. Technology of tight gas production

    SciTech Connect

    Veatch, R.W. Jr.; Baker, O.

    1983-01-01

    The tight gas resource in the US currently is estimated at 900 tcf, of which 600 tcf is considered technically recoverable. This gas is found in basins that cover a prospective area of one million square miles (one million sections). Of these, ca 120,000 sections are potentially productive. The tight gas picture is composed of many different and often complex reservoirs, ranging from the shallow horizons of the Northern Great Plains to the deep formations of the Rocky Mountains. These reservoirs range from the blanket-like formations that cover wide geographical areas to the highly lenticular zones such as those common to the Mesa Verde. The one thing they have in common is microdarcy permeabilities. A good perspective of the challenge is obvious when such permeability values are realized to be similar to that of cement normally used for oil and gas well casing strings. The advanced technology presumes improved exploration knowledge, longer fractures, higher fracture conductivity, and a higher density of well development. Advanced technology is particularly necessary for lenticular reservoirs which contain ca 40% of the recoverable gas.

  16. Ion transport membrane module and vessel system with directed internal gas flow

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Michael Jerome; Ohrn, Theodore R.; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2010-02-09

    An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an inlet adapted to introduce gas into the interior of the vessel, an outlet adapted to withdraw gas from the interior of the vessel, and an axis; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region; and (c) one or more gas flow control partitions disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and adapted to change a direction of gas flow within the vessel.

  17. Operational Challenges in Gas-To-Liquid (GTL) Transportation Through Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS)

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin A. Chukwu; Santanu Khataniar; Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar

    2006-06-30

    Oil production from Alaskan North Slope oil fields has steadily declined. In the near future, ANS crude oil production will decline to such a level (200,000 to 400,000 bbl/day) that maintaining economic operation of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) will require pumping alternative products through the system. Heavy oil deposits in the West Sak and Ugnu formations are a potential resource, although transporting these products involves addressing important sedimentation issues. One possibility is the use of Gas-to-Liquid (GTL) technology. Estimated recoverable gas reserves of 38 trillion cubic feet (TCF) on the North Slope of Alaska can be converted to liquid with GTL technology and combined with the heavy oils for a product suitable for pipeline transport. Issues that could affect transport of this such products through TAPS include pumpability of GTL and crude oil blends, cold restart of the pipeline following a prolonged winter shutdown, and solids deposition inside the pipeline. This study examined several key fluid properties of GTL, crude oil and four selected blends under TAPS operating conditions. Key measurements included Reid Vapor Pressure, density and viscosity, PVT properties, and solids deposition. Results showed that gel strength is not a significant factor for the ratios of GTL-crude oil blend mixtures (1:1; 1:2; 1:3; 1:4) tested under TAPS cold re-start conditions at temperatures above - 20 F, although Bingham fluid flow characteristics exhibited by the blends at low temperatures indicate high pumping power requirements following prolonged shutdown. Solids deposition is a major concern for all studied blends. For the commingled flow profile studied, decreased throughput can result in increased and more rapid solid deposition along the pipe wall, resulting in more frequent pigging of the pipeline or, if left unchecked, pipeline corrosion.

  18. Transport of fission products with a helium gas-jet at TRIGA-SPEC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eibach, M.; Beyer, T.; Blaum, K.; Block, M.; Eberhardt, K.; Herfurth, F.; Geppert, C.; Ketelaer, J.; Ketter, J.; Krämer, J.; Krieger, A.; Knuth, K.; Nagy, Sz.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Smorra, C.

    2010-02-01

    A helium gas-jet system for the transport of fission products from the research reactor TRIGA Mainz has been developed, characterized and tested within the TRIGA-SPEC experiment. For the first time at TRIGA Mainz carbon aerosol particles have been used for the transport of radionuclides from a target chamber with high efficiency. The radionuclides have been identified by means of γ-spectroscopy. Transport time, efficiency as well as the absolute number of transported radionuclides for several species have been determined. The design and the characterization of the gas-jet system are described and discussed.

  19. Decreased vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) and dopamine transporter (DAT) function in knockout mice affects aging of dopaminergic systems

    PubMed Central

    Hall, F. S.; Itokawa, K.; Schmitt, A.; Moessner, R.; Sora, I.; Lesch, K. P.; Uhl, G. R.

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is accumulated and compartmentalized by the dopamine transporter (DAT; SLC3A6) and the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; SLC18A2). These transporters work at the plasma and vesicular membranes of dopaminergic neurons, respectively, and thus regulate levels of DA in neuronal compartments that include the extravesicular cytoplasmic compartment. DA in this compartment has been hypothesized to contribute to oxidative damage that can reduce the function of dopaminergic neurons in aging brains and may contribute to reductions in dopaminergic neurochemical markers, locomotor behavior and responses to dopaminergic drugs that are found in aged animals. The studies reported here examined aged mice with heterozygous deletions of VMAT2 or of DAT, which each reduce transporter expression to about 50% of levels found in wild-type (WT) mice. Aged mice displayed reduced locomotor responses under a variety of circumstances, including in response to locomotor stimulants, as well as changes in monoamine levels and metabolites in a regionally dependent manner. Several effects of aging were more pronounced in heterozygous VMAT2 knockout (KO) mice, including aging induced reductions in locomotion and reduced locomotor responses to cocaine. By contrast, some effects of aging were reduced or not observed in heterozygous DAT KO mice. These findings support the idea that altered DAT and VMAT2 expression affect age-related changes in dopaminergic function. These effects are most likely mediated by alterations in DA compartmentalization, and might be hypothesized to be more exacerbated by other factors that affect the metabolism of cytosolic DA. PMID:23978383

  20. Vadose zone attenuation of organic compounds at a crude oil spill site - interactions between biogeochemical reactions and multicomponent gas transport.

    PubMed

    Molins, S; Mayer, K U; Amos, R T; Bekins, B A

    2010-03-01

    and vadose zone carbon balance. Overall, the model was successful in capturing the complex interactions between biogeochemical reactions and multicomponent gas transport processes. However, despite employing a process-based modeling approach, honoring observed parameter ranges, and generally obtaining good agreement between field observations and model simulations, accurate quantification of natural attenuation rates remains difficult. The modeling results are affected by uncertainties regarding gas phase saturations, tortuosities, and the magnitude of CH(4) and CO(2) flux from the smear zone. These findings highlight the need to better delineate gas fluxes at the model boundaries, which will help constrain contaminant degradation rates, and ultimately source zone longevity.

  1. Vadose zone attenuation of organic compounds at a crude oil spill site - Interactions between biogeochemical reactions and multicomponent gas transport

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molins, S.; Mayer, K.U.; Amos, R.T.; Bekins, B.A.

    2010-01-01

    balance. Overall, the model was successful in capturing the complex interactions between biogeochemical reactions and multicomponent gas transport processes. However, despite employing a process-based modeling approach, honoring observed parameter ranges, and generally obtaining good agreement between field observations and model simulations, accurate quantification of natural attenuation rates remains difficult. The modeling results are affected by uncertainties regarding gas phase saturations, tortuosities, and the magnitude of CH4 and CO2 flux from the smear zone. These findings highlight the need to better delineate gas fluxes at the model boundaries, which will help constrain contaminant degradation rates, and ultimately source zone longevity. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Modeling of Gas Production from Shale Reservoirs Considering Multiple Transport Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chaohua; Wei, Mingzhen; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Gas transport in unconventional shale strata is a multi-mechanism-coupling process that is different from the process observed in conventional reservoirs. In micro fractures which are inborn or induced by hydraulic stimulation, viscous flow dominates. And gas surface diffusion and gas desorption should be further considered in organic nano pores. Also, the Klinkenberg effect should be considered when dealing with the gas transport problem. In addition, following two factors can play significant roles under certain circumstances but have not received enough attention in previous models. During pressure depletion, gas viscosity will change with Knudsen number; and pore radius will increase when the adsorption gas desorbs from the pore wall. In this paper, a comprehensive mathematical model that incorporates all known mechanisms for simulating gas flow in shale strata is presented. The objective of this study was to provide a more accurate reservoir model for simulation based on the flow mechanisms in the pore scale and formation geometry. Complex mechanisms, including viscous flow, Knudsen diffusion, slip flow, and desorption, are optionally integrated into different continua in the model. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of different mechanisms on the gas production. The results showed that adsorption and gas viscosity change will have a great impact on gas production. Ignoring one of following scenarios, such as adsorption, gas permeability change, gas viscosity change, or pore radius change, will underestimate gas production.

  3. Modeling of Gas Production from Shale Reservoirs Considering Multiple Transport Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chaohua; Wei, Mingzhen; Liu, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Gas transport in unconventional shale strata is a multi-mechanism-coupling process that is different from the process observed in conventional reservoirs. In micro fractures which are inborn or induced by hydraulic stimulation, viscous flow dominates. And gas surface diffusion and gas desorption should be further considered in organic nano pores. Also, the Klinkenberg effect should be considered when dealing with the gas transport problem. In addition, following two factors can play significant roles under certain circumstances but have not received enough attention in previous models. During pressure depletion, gas viscosity will change with Knudsen number; and pore radius will increase when the adsorption gas desorbs from the pore wall. In this paper, a comprehensive mathematical model that incorporates all known mechanisms for simulating gas flow in shale strata is presented. The objective of this study was to provide a more accurate reservoir model for simulation based on the flow mechanisms in the pore scale and formation geometry. Complex mechanisms, including viscous flow, Knudsen diffusion, slip flow, and desorption, are optionally integrated into different continua in the model. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of different mechanisms on the gas production. The results showed that adsorption and gas viscosity change will have a great impact on gas production. Ignoring one of following scenarios, such as adsorption, gas permeability change, gas viscosity change, or pore radius change, will underestimate gas production. PMID:26657698

  4. Purge gas protected transportable pressurized fuel cell modules and their operation in a power plant

    DOEpatents

    Zafred, P.R.; Dederer, J.T.; Gillett, J.E.; Basel, R.A.; Antenucci, A.B.

    1996-11-12

    A fuel cell generator apparatus and method of its operation involves: passing pressurized oxidant gas and pressurized fuel gas into modules containing fuel cells, where the modules are each enclosed by a module housing surrounded by an axially elongated pressure vessel, and where there is a purge gas volume between the module housing and pressure vessel; passing pressurized purge gas through the purge gas volume to dilute any unreacted fuel gas from the modules; and passing exhaust gas and circulated purge gas and any unreacted fuel gas out of the pressure vessel; where the fuel cell generator apparatus is transportable when the pressure vessel is horizontally disposed, providing a low center of gravity. 11 figs.

  5. Transport and Storage Research Program. Gas Research Institute: Status report-1989 projects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    The 1989 status report of the Gas Research Institute Transport and Storage Research Subprogram describes the tactical objectives, major accomplishments and strategies, and provides contract status reports for projects within these project areas: Construction and Maintenance, Metering and Operations, Plastic and Advanced Distribution Piping Materials, Residential/Commercial Interior Distribution Systems, Gas Storage Technology, Transmission Piping Systems, and Advanced Transport and Sensor-Based Systems.

  6. Psychostimulants affect dopamine transmission through both dopamine transporter-dependent and independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    dela Peña, Ike; Gevorkiana, Ruzanna; Shi, Wei-Xing

    2015-01-01

    The precise mechanisms by which cocaine and amphetamine-like psychostimulants exert their reinforcing effects are not yet fully defined. It is widely believed, however, that these drugs produce their effects by enhancing dopamine neurotransmission in the brain, especially in limbic areas such as the nucleus accumbens, by inducing dopamine transporter-mediated reverse transport and/or blocking dopamine reuptake though the dopamine transporter. Here, we present the evidence that aside from dopamine transporter, non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanisms also participate in psychostimulant-induced dopamine release and contribute to the behavioral effects of these drugs, such as locomotor activation and reward. Accordingly, psychostimulants could increase norepinephrine release in the prefrontal cortex, the latter then alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons resulting in changes in action potential-dependent dopamine release. These alterations would further affect the temporal pattern of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, thereby modifying information processing in that area. Hence, a synaptic input to a nucleus accumbens neuron may be enhanced or inhibited by dopamine depending on its temporal relationship to dopamine release. Specific temporal patterns of dopamine release may also be required for certain forms of synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens. Together, these effects induced by psychostimulants, mediated through a non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanism involving norepinephrine and the prefrontal cortex, may also contribute importantly to the reinforcing properties of these drugs. PMID:26209364

  7. Psychostimulants affect dopamine transmission through both dopamine transporter-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    dela Peña, Ike; Gevorkiana, Ruzanna; Shi, Wei-Xing

    2015-10-01

    The precise mechanisms by which cocaine and amphetamine-like psychostimulants exert their reinforcing effects are not yet fully defined. It is widely believed, however, that these drugs produce their effects by enhancing dopamine neurotransmission in the brain, especially in limbic areas such as the nucleus accumbens, by inducing dopamine transporter-mediated reverse transport and/or blocking dopamine reuptake though the dopamine transporter. Here, we present the evidence that aside from dopamine transporter, non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanisms also participate in psychostimulant-induced dopamine release and contribute to the behavioral effects of these drugs, such as locomotor activation and reward. Accordingly, psychostimulants could increase norepinephrine release in the prefrontal cortex, the latter then alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons resulting in changes in action potential-dependent dopamine release. These alterations would further affect the temporal pattern of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, thereby modifying information processing in that area. Hence, a synaptic input to a nucleus accumbens neuron may be enhanced or inhibited by dopamine depending on its temporal relationship to dopamine release. Specific temporal patterns of dopamine release may also be required for certain forms of synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens. Together, these effects induced by psychostimulants, mediated through a non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanism involving norepinephrine and the prefrontal cortex, may also contribute importantly to the reinforcing properties of these drugs. PMID:26209364

  8. Natural Gas Transportation - Infrastructure Issues and Operational Trends

    EIA Publications

    2001-01-01

    This report examines how well the current national natural gas pipeline network has been able to handle today's market demand for natural gas. In addition, it identifies those areas of the country where pipeline utilization is continuing to grow rapidly and where new pipeline capacity is needed or is planned over the next several years.

  9. Probabilities of adverse weather affecting transport in Europe: climatology and scenarios up to the 2050s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajda, A.; Tuomenvirta, H.; Jokinen, P.; Luomaranta, A.; Makkonen, L.; Tikanmäki, M.; Groenemeijer, P.; Saarikivi, P.; Michaelides, S.; Papadakis, M.; Tymvios, F.; Athanasatos, S.

    2012-04-01

    This paper provides the first comprehensive climatology of the adverse and extreme weather events affecting the European transport system by estimating the frequency (or probability) of phenomena for the present climate (1971-2000) and an overview of the projected changes in some of these extremes in the future climate until the 2050s. The research was carried out within the framework of the EWENT Project that addresses the European Union (EU) policies and strategies related to climate change, with a particular focus on extreme weather impacts on the EU transportation system. This project is funded by the Seventh Framework Programme (Transports, call ID FPT7-TPT-2008-RTD-1). The analyzed phenomena are wind, snow, blizzards, heavy precipitation, cold spells and heat waves. In addition, reduced visibility conditions determined by fog and dust events, small-scale phenomena affecting the transport system, such as thunderstorms, lightning, large hail and tornadoes and events damaging infrastructure of the transport system, have been considered. Frequency and probability analysis of past and present ex¬tremes were performed using observational and atmospheric reanalysis data. Future changes in the probability of severe events were assessed based on six regional climate model simulations produced in the FP6 ENSEMBLES project (http://www.ensembles-eu.org/). To facilitate the assessment of impacts and consequences of extreme phenomena on a continental level, the WP2 Deliverable introduces a regionalization of the European extreme phenomena, defining the climate zones with similarities in extreme phenomena. The projected changes as well as large natural variability in weather extremes on the transportation network will have impacts of both signs. The decline of extreme cold and snowfall over most of the continent implies a positive impact on road, rail, inland water and air transportation, e.g., by reducing snow removal. However, even with a general decreasing trend in

  10. Gas transport in unsaturated porous media: the adequacy of Fick's law

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorstenson, D.C.; Pollock, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    The increasing use of natural unsaturated zones as repositories for landfills and disposal sites for hazardous wastes (chemical and radioactive) requires a greater understanding of transport processes in the unsaturated zone. For volatile constituents an important potential transport mechanism is gaseous diffusion. Diffusion, however, cannot be treated as an independent isolated transport mechanism. A complete understanding of multicomponent gas transport in porous media (unsaturated zones) requires a knowledge of Knudsen transport, the molecular and nonequimolar components of diffusive flux, and viscous (pressure driven) flux. This review presents a brief discussion of the underlying principles and interrelationships among each of the above flux mechanisms. -from Authors

  11. Changes in U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Infrastructure in 2004

    EIA Publications

    2005-01-01

    This report looks at the level of growth that occurred within the U.S. natural gas transportation network during 2004. In addition, it includes discussion and an analysis of recent gas pipeline development activities and an examination of additional projects proposed for completion over the next several years.

  12. 30 CFR 75.1106-2 - Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... compressed gas cylinders; requirements. 75.1106-2 Section 75.1106-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1106-2 Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas...

  13. 30 CFR 75.1106-2 - Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... compressed gas cylinders; requirements. 75.1106-2 Section 75.1106-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1106-2 Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas...

  14. Water Transport Characteristics of Gas Diffusion Layer in a PEM Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Damle, Ashok S; Cole, J Vernon

    2008-11-01

    A presentation addressing the following: Water transport in PEM Fuel Cells - a DoE Project 1. Gas Diffusion Layer--Role and Characteristics 2. Capillary Pressure Determinations of GDL Media 3. Gas Permeability Measurements of GDL Media 4. Conclusions and Future Activities

  15. 30 CFR 75.1106-2 - Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... compressed gas cylinders; requirements. 75.1106-2 Section 75.1106-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1106-2 Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1106-2 - Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... compressed gas cylinders; requirements. 75.1106-2 Section 75.1106-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1106-2 Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas...

  17. 30 CFR 75.1106-2 - Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas cylinders; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... compressed gas cylinders; requirements. 75.1106-2 Section 75.1106-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Fire Protection § 75.1106-2 Transportation of liquefied and nonliquefied compressed gas...

  18. Water and greenhouse gas tradeoffs associated with a transition to a low carbon transportation system

    EPA Science Inventory

    Transportation fuels are heavily dominated by the use of petroleum, but concerns over oil depletion, energy security, and greenhouse gas emissions from petroleum combustion are driving the search for alternatives. As we look to shift away from petroleum-based transportation fuels...

  19. Methodology for in situ gas sampling, transport and laboratory analysis of gases from stranded cetaceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Díaz, Óscar; Saavedra, Pedro; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Jepson, Paul D.; Mazzariol, Sandro; di Guardo, Giovanni; Fernández, Antonio

    2011-12-01

    Gas-bubble lesions were described in cetaceans stranded in spatio-temporal concordance with naval exercises using high-powered sonars. A behaviourally induced decompression sickness-like disease was proposed as a plausible causal mechanism, although these findings remain scientifically controversial. Investigations into the constituents of the gas bubbles in suspected gas embolism cases are highly desirable. We have found that vacuum tubes, insulin syringes and an aspirometer are reliable tools for in situ gas sampling, storage and transportation without appreciable loss of gas and without compromising the accuracy of the analysis. Gas analysis is conducted by gas chromatography in the laboratory. This methodology was successfully applied to a mass stranding of sperm whales, to a beaked whale stranded in spatial and temporal association with military exercises and to a cetacean chronic gas embolism case. Results from the freshest animals confirmed that bubbles were relatively free of gases associated with putrefaction and consisted predominantly of nitrogen.

  20. Methodology for in situ gas sampling, transport and laboratory analysis of gases from stranded cetaceans

    PubMed Central

    de Quirós, Yara Bernaldo; González-Díaz, Óscar; Saavedra, Pedro; Arbelo, Manuel; Sierra, Eva; Sacchini, Simona; Jepson, Paul D.; Mazzariol, Sandro; Di Guardo, Giovanni; Fernández, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Gas-bubble lesions were described in cetaceans stranded in spatio-temporal concordance with naval exercises using high-powered sonars. A behaviourally induced decompression sickness-like disease was proposed as a plausible causal mechanism, although these findings remain scientifically controversial. Investigations into the constituents of the gas bubbles in suspected gas embolism cases are highly desirable. We have found that vacuum tubes, insulin syringes and an aspirometer are reliable tools for in situ gas sampling, storage and transportation without appreciable loss of gas and without compromising the accuracy of the analysis. Gas analysis is conducted by gas chromatography in the laboratory. This methodology was successfully applied to a mass stranding of sperm whales, to a beaked whale stranded in spatial and temporal association with military exercises and to a cetacean chronic gas embolism case. Results from the freshest animals confirmed that bubbles were relatively free of gases associated with putrefaction and consisted predominantly of nitrogen. PMID:22355708

  1. State policies affecting natural gas consumption (Notice of inquiry issued on August 14, 1992)

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, R.; Kamphuis-Zatopa, W.

    1993-03-25

    On August 14, 1992, the United States Department of Energy issued a Request for Comments Concerning State Policies Affecting Natural Gas Consumption. This Notice of (NOI) noted the increasing significance of the role played by states and sought to gain better understanding of how state policies impact the gas industry. The general trend toward a. more competitive marketplace for natural gas, as well as recent regulatory and legislative changes at the Federal level, are driving State regulatory agencies to reevaluate how they regulate natural gas. State action is having a significant impact on the use of natural gas for generating electricity, as well as affecting the cost-effective trade-off between conservation expenditures and gas use. Additionally, fuel choice has an impact upon the environment and national energy security. In light of these dimensions, the Department of Energy initiated this study of State regulation. The goals of this NOI are: (1) help DOE better understand the impact of State policies on the efficient use of gas; (2) increase the awareness of the natural gas industry and Federal and State officials to the important role of State policies and regulations; (3) create an improved forum for dialogue on State and Federal natural gas issues; and, (4) develop a consensus on an analytical agenda that would be most helpful in addressing the regulatory challenges faced by the States. Ninety-seven parties filed comments, and of these ninety-seven, fifteen parties filed reply comments. Appendix One lists these parties. This report briefly syntheses the comments received. The goal is to assist parties to judging the extent of consensus on the problems posed and the remedies suggested, aid in identifying future analytical analyses, and assist parties in assessing differences in strategies and regulatory philosophies which shape these issues and their resolution.

  2. (220)Rn/(222)Rn isotope pair as a natural proxy for soil gas transport.

    PubMed

    Huxol, Stephan; Brennwald, Matthias S; Henneberger, Ruth; Kipfer, Rolf

    2013-12-17

    Radon (Rn) is a naturally occurring radioactive noble gas, which is ubiquitous in soil gas. Especially, its long-lived isotope (222)Rn (half-life: 3.82 d) gained widespread acceptance as a tracer for gas transport in soils, while the short-lived (220)Rn (half-life: 55.6 s) found less interest in environmental studies. However, in some cases, the application of (222)Rn as a tracer in soil gas is complex as its concentrations can be influenced by changes of the transport conditions or of the (222)Rn production of the soil material. Due to the different half-lives of (220)Rn and (222)Rn, the distances that can be traveled by the respective isotopes before decay differ significantly, with (220)Rn migrating over much shorter distances than (222)Rn. Therefore, the soil gas concentrations of (220)Rn and (222)Rn are influenced by processes on different length scales. In laboratory experiments in a sandbox, we studied the different transport behaviors of (220)Rn and (222)Rn resulting from changing the boundary conditions for diffusive transport and from inducing advective gas movements. From the results gained in the laboratory experiments, we propose the combined analysis of (220)Rn and (222)Rn to determine gas transport processes in soils. In a field study on soil gases in the cover soil of a capped landfill we applied the combined analysis of (220)Rn and (222)Rn in soil gas for the first time and showed the feasibility of this approach to characterize soil gas transport processes.

  3. Overview of U.S. Legislation and Regulations Affecting Offshore Natural Gas and Oil Activity

    EIA Publications

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a summary of the legislative and regulatory regime that affects natural gas and oil exploration and production in offshore regions of the United States. It discusses the role and importance of these areas as well as the competing interests surrounding ownership, production, exploration and conservation.

  4. Interacting Physical and Biological Processes Affecting Nutrient Transport Through Human Dominated Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finlay, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Human activities increasingly dominate biogeochemical cycles of limiting nutrients on Earth. Urban and agricultural landscapes represent the largest sources of excess nutrients that drive water quality degradation. The physical structure of both urban and agricultural watersheds has been extensively modified, and these changes have large impacts on water and nutrient transport. Despite strong physical controls over nutrient transport in human dominated landscapes, biological processes play important roles in determining the fates of both nitrogen and phosphorus. This talk uses examples from research in urban and agricultural watersheds in the Midwestern USA to illustrate interactions of physical and biological controls over nutrient cycles that have shifted nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) sources and cycling in unexpected ways in response to management changes. In urban watersheds, efforts to improve water quality have been hindered by legacy sources of phosphorus added to storm water through transport to drainage systems by vegetation. Similarly, reductions in field erosion in agricultural watersheds have not led to major reductions in phosphorus transport, because of continued release of biological sources of P. Where management of phosphorus has been most effective in reducing eutrophication of lakes, decreases in N removal processes have led to long term increases in N concentration and transport. Together, these examples show important roles for biological processes affecting nutrient movement in highly modified landscapes. Consideration of the downstream physical and biological responses of management changes are thus critical toward identification of actions that will most effectively reduce excess nutrients watersheds and coastal zones.

  5. Gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating of water and trichloroethene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hegele, P. R.; Mumford, K. G.

    2014-09-01

    The effective remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones using in situ thermal treatment requires successful capture of gas that is produced. Replicate electrical resistance heating experiments were performed in a thin bench-scale apparatus, where water was boiled and pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) trichloroethene (TCE) and water were co-boiled in unconsolidated silica sand. Quantitative light transmission visualization was used to assess gas production and transport mechanisms. In the water boiling experiments, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the gas phase into connected channels were observed at critical gas saturations of Sgc = 0.233 ± 0.017, which allowed for continuous gas transport out of the sand. In experiments containing a colder region above a target heated zone, condensation prevented the formation of steam channels and discrete gas clusters that mobilized into colder regions were trapped soon after discontinuous transport began. In the TCE-water experiments, co-boiling at immiscible fluid interfaces resulted in discontinuous gas transport above the DNAPL pool. Redistribution of DNAPL was also observed above the pool and at the edge of the vapor front that propagated upwards through colder regions. These results suggest that the subsurface should be heated to water boiling temperatures to facilitate gas transport from specific locations of DNAPL to extraction points and reduce the potential for DNAPL redistribution. Decreases in electric current were observed at the onset of gas phase production, which suggests that coupled electrical current and temperature measurements may provide a reliable metric to assess gas phase development.

  6. Gas production and transport during bench-scale electrical resistance heating of water and trichloroethene.

    PubMed

    Hegele, P R; Mumford, K G

    2014-09-01

    The effective remediation of chlorinated solvent source zones using in situ thermal treatment requires successful capture of gas that is produced. Replicate electrical resistance heating experiments were performed in a thin bench-scale apparatus, where water was boiled and pooled dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) trichloroethene (TCE) and water were co-boiled in unconsolidated silica sand. Quantitative light transmission visualization was used to assess gas production and transport mechanisms. In the water boiling experiments, nucleation, growth and coalescence of the gas phase into connected channels were observed at critical gas saturations of Sgc=0.233±0.017, which allowed for continuous gas transport out of the sand. In experiments containing a colder region above a target heated zone, condensation prevented the formation of steam channels and discrete gas clusters that mobilized into colder regions were trapped soon after discontinuous transport began. In the TCE-water experiments, co-boiling at immiscible fluid interfaces resulted in discontinuous gas transport above the DNAPL pool. Redistribution of DNAPL was also observed above the pool and at the edge of the vapor front that propagated upwards through colder regions. These results suggest that the subsurface should be heated to water boiling temperatures to facilitate gas transport from specific locations of DNAPL to extraction points and reduce the potential for DNAPL redistribution. Decreases in electric current were observed at the onset of gas phase production, which suggests that coupled electrical current and temperature measurements may provide a reliable metric to assess gas phase development. PMID:25084057

  7. Light-induced phenomena in one-component gas: The transport phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chermyaninov, I. V.; Chernyak, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    The article presents the theory of transport processes in a one-component gas located in the capillary under the action of resonant laser radiation and the temperature and pressure gradients. The expressions for the kinetic coefficients determining heat and mass transport in the gas are obtained on the basis of the modified Boltzmann equations for the excited and unexcited particles. The Onsager reciprocal relations for cross kinetic coefficients are proven for all Knudsen numbers and for any law interaction of gas particles with each other and boundary surface. Light-induced phenomena associated with the possible non-equilibrium stationary states of system are analyzed.

  8. Appraisal of transport and deformation in shale reservoirs using natural noble gas tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, Jason E.; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Robinson, David G.; Bauer, Stephen J.; Gardner, William Payton

    2015-09-01

    This report presents efforts to develop the use of in situ naturally-occurring noble gas tracers to evaluate transport mechanisms and deformation in shale hydrocarbon reservoirs. Noble gases are promising as shale reservoir diagnostic tools due to their sensitivity of transport to: shale pore structure; phase partitioning between groundwater, liquid, and gaseous hydrocarbons; and deformation from hydraulic fracturing. Approximately 1.5-year time-series of wellhead fluid samples were collected from two hydraulically-fractured wells. The noble gas compositions and isotopes suggest a strong signature of atmospheric contribution to the noble gases that mix with deep, old reservoir fluids. Complex mixing and transport of fracturing fluid and reservoir fluids occurs during production. Real-time laboratory measurements were performed on triaxially-deforming shale samples to link deformation behavior, transport, and gas tracer signatures. Finally, we present improved methods for production forecasts that borrow statistical strength from production data of nearby wells to reduce uncertainty in the forecasts.

  9. Oxygen transport membrane based advanced power cycle with low pressure synthesis gas slip stream

    DOEpatents

    Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Kelly, Sean M.

    2016-09-27

    A method and system for generating electrical power in which a high pressure synthesis gas stream generated in a gasifier is partially oxidized in an oxygen transport membrane based reactor, expanded and thereafter, is combusted in an oxygen transport membrane based boiler. A low pressure synthesis gas slip stream is split off downstream of the expanders and used as the source of fuel in the oxygen transport membrane based partial oxidation reactors to allow the oxygen transport membrane to operate at low fuel pressures with high fuel utilization. The combustion within the boiler generates heat to raise steam to in turn generate electricity by a generator coupled to a steam turbine. The resultant flue gas can be purified to produce a carbon dioxide product.

  10. Transport of root-derived CO2 via the transpiration stream affects aboveground tree physiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloemen, J.; McGuire, M. A.; Aubrey, D. P.; Teskey, R. O.; Steppe, K.

    2012-04-01

    Recent research on soil CO2 efflux has shown that belowground autotrophic respiration is largely underestimated using classical net CO2 flux measurements. Aubrey & Teskey (2009) found that in forest ecosystems a substantial portion of the CO2 released from root respiration remained within the root system and was transported aboveground in the stem via the transpiration stream. The magnitude of this upward movement of CO2 from belowground tissues suggested important implications for how we measure above- and belowground respiration. If a considerable fraction of root-respired CO2 is transported aboveground, where it might be fixed in woody and leaf tissues, then we are routinely underestimating the amount of C needed to sustain belowground tissues. In this study, we infused 13C labeled water into the base of field-grown poplar trees as a surrogate for root-respired CO2 to investigate the possible role of root-derived CO2 as substrate for carbon fixation. The label was transported upwards from the base of the tree toward the top. During its ascent, the 13C label was removed from the transpiration stream and fixed by chlorophyll-containing woody (young bark and xylem) and leaf (petiole) tissues. Moreover, based on 13C analysis of gas samples, we observed that up to 88 ± 0.10 % of the label applied was lost to the atmosphere by stem and branch efflux higher in the trees. Given that one-half of root-respired CO2 may follow this internal flux pathway (Aubrey & Teskey, 2009), we calculated that up to 44% of the root-respired CO2 could diffuse to the atmosphere once transported to the stem and branches. Thus, a large portion of CO2 that diffuses out of aboveground tissues may actually result from root respiration. Our results show that CO2 originating belowground can be transported internally to aboveground parts of trees, where it will have an important impact on tree physiology. Internal transport of CO2 indicates that the gas exchange approach to estimating above- and

  11. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Driven by the Transportation of Goods Associated with French Consumption.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Troy R; Dente, Sebastien M R

    2010-11-15

    The transportation of goods plays a significant role in the overall greenhouse gas emissions from consumption. This study investigates the connections between French household consumption and production and transportation-related emissions throughout product supply chains. Here a two-region, environmentally extended input-output model is combined with a novel detailed, physical-unit transportation model to examine the connection between product, location of production, choice of transport mode, and greenhouse gas emissions. Total emissions associated with French household consumption are estimated to be 627 MtCO2e, or 11 tCO2e per capita. Of these, 3% are associated with the transportation of goods within France and 10% with transport of goods outside or into France. We find that most transport originating in northern Europe is by road, whereas most transport from other regions is conducted by sea and ocean transport. Rail, inland water, and air transportation play only a minor role in terms of mass, tonne-kilometers, and greenhouse gas emissions. By product, transport of coal and coke and intermediate goods make the largest contribution to overall freight transport emissions associated with French household consumption. In terms of mass, most goods are transported by road while in terms of tonne-kilometers, sea and ocean transport plays the largest role. Road transport contributes the highest share to the transport of all goods with the exceptions of coal and coke and petroleum. We examine the potential for emissions reductions associated with shifting 10% of direct imports by air freight to sea and ocean or road transport and find that the potential reductions are less than 0.03% of total emissions associated with French consumption. We also consider shifting 10% of direct imports by road transport to rail or inland water and find potential reductions on the order of 0.4−0.5% of the total or 3−4% of the freight transport emissions associated with French

  12. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Driven by the Transportation of Goods Associated with French Consumption.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Troy R; Dente, Sebastien M R

    2010-11-15

    The transportation of goods plays a significant role in the overall greenhouse gas emissions from consumption. This study investigates the connections between French household consumption and production and transportation-related emissions throughout product supply chains. Here a two-region, environmentally extended input-output model is combined with a novel detailed, physical-unit transportation model to examine the connection between product, location of production, choice of transport mode, and greenhouse gas emissions. Total emissions associated with French household consumption are estimated to be 627 MtCO2e, or 11 tCO2e per capita. Of these, 3% are associated with the transportation of goods within France and 10% with transport of goods outside or into France. We find that most transport originating in northern Europe is by road, whereas most transport from other regions is conducted by sea and ocean transport. Rail, inland water, and air transportation play only a minor role in terms of mass, tonne-kilometers, and greenhouse gas emissions. By product, transport of coal and coke and intermediate goods make the largest contribution to overall freight transport emissions associated with French household consumption. In terms of mass, most goods are transported by road while in terms of tonne-kilometers, sea and ocean transport plays the largest role. Road transport contributes the highest share to the transport of all goods with the exceptions of coal and coke and petroleum. We examine the potential for emissions reductions associated with shifting 10% of direct imports by air freight to sea and ocean or road transport and find that the potential reductions are less than 0.03% of total emissions associated with French consumption. We also consider shifting 10% of direct imports by road transport to rail or inland water and find potential reductions on the order of 0.4−0.5% of the total or 3−4% of the freight transport emissions associated with French

  13. Advances in Understanding Sorption and Transport Processes Affecting the Fate of Environmental Pollutants in the Subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karapanagioti, H. K.; Werner, D.; Werth, C.

    2012-04-01

    The results of a call for a special issue that is now in press by the Journal of Contaminant Hydrology will be presented. This special issue is edited by the authors and is entitled "Sorption and Transport Processes Affecting the Fate of Environmental Pollutants in the Subsurface". A short abstract of each paper will be presented along with the most interesting results. Nine papers were accepted. Pollutants studied include: biocolloids, metals (arsenic, chromium, nickel), organic compounds such as hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, micropollutants (PAHs, PCBs), pesticides (glyphosate, 2,4-D). Findings presented in the papers include a modified batch reactor system to study equilibrium-reactive transport problems of metals. Column studies along with theoretical approximations evaluate the combined effects of grain size and pore water velocity on the transport in water saturated porous media of three biocolloids. A polluted sediment remediation method is evaluated considering site-specific conditions through monitoring results and modelling. A field study points to glogging and also sorption as mechanisms affecting the effectiveness of sub-surface flow constructed wetlands. A new isotherm model combining modified traditionally used isotherms is proposed that can be used to simulate pH-dependent metal adsorption. Linear free energy relationships (LFERs) demonstrate ability to predict slight isotope shifts into the groundwater due to sorption. Possible modifications that improve the reliability of kinetic models and parameter values during the evaluation of experiments that assess the sorption of pesticides on soils are tested. Challenges in selecting groundwater pollutant fate and transport models that account for the effect of grain-scale sorption rate limitations are evaluated based on experimental results and are discussed based on the Damköhler number. Finally, a thorough review paper presents the impact of mineral micropores on the transport and fate of

  14. Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor System for Converting Natural Gas to Hydrogen and Synthesis Gas for Liquid Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Air Products and Chemicals

    2008-09-30

    An Air Products-led team successfully developed ITM Syngas technology from the concept stage to a stage where a small-scale engineering prototype was about to be built. This technology produces syngas, a gas containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen, by reacting feed gas, primarily methane and steam, with oxygen that is supplied through an ion transport membrane. An ion transport membrane operates at high temperature and oxygen ions are transported through the dense membrane's crystal lattice when an oxygen partial pressure driving force is applied. This development effort solved many significant technical challenges and successfully scaled-up key aspects of the technology to prototype scale. Throughout the project life, the technology showed significant economic benefits over conventional technologies. While there are still on-going technical challenges to overcome, the progress made under the DOE-funded development project proved that the technology was viable and continued development post the DOE agreement would be warranted.

  15. Spin-dependent transport in a magnetic two-dimensional electron gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorchkova, I. P.; Kikkawa, J. M.; Samarth, N.; Awschalom, D. D.

    1998-07-01

    Magneto-transport and magneto-optical probes are used to interrogate spin-dependent transport in magnetic heterostructures wherein a two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) is exchange-coupled to local moments. At low temperatures, the significant s-d exchange-enhanced spin splitting in these “magnetic” 2DEGs is responsible for the observation of unusual transport properties such as a complete spin polarization of the gas at large Landau level filling factors and a pronounced, non-monotonic background magneto-resistance. Magneto-transport measurements of gated samples performed in a parallel field geometry are used to systematically study the variation of the magneto-resistance with sheet concentration, yielding new insights into the dependence of spin transport on the Fermi energy of the majority spin carriers.

  16. Experimental analyses of the major parameters affecting the intensity of outbursts of coal and gas.

    PubMed

    Nie, W; Peng, S J; Xu, J; Liu, L R; Wang, G; Geng, J B

    2014-01-01

    With an increase in mining depth and production, the intensity and frequency of outburst of coal and gas have a tendency to increase. Estimating the intensity of outbursts of coal and gas plays an important role because of its relation with the risk value. In this paper, we described the semiquantitative relations between major parameters and intensity of outburst based on physical experiments. The results showed increment of geostress simulated by horizontal load (from 1.4, 2.4, 3.2, to 3.4 MPa) or vertical load (from 2, 3, 3.6, to 4 MPa) improved the relative intensity rate (3.763-7.403% and 1.273-7.99%); the increment of porosity (from 1.57, 2.51, 3, to 3.6%) improved the relative intensity rate from 3.8 to 13.8%; the increment of gas pressure (from 0, 0.5, 0.65, 0.72, 1, to 1.5 Mpa) induced the relative intensity rate to decrease from 38.22 to 0%; the increment of water content (from 0, 2, 4, to 8%) caused the relative intensity rate to drop from 5.425 to 0.5%. Furthermore, sensitivity and range analysis evaluates coupled factors affecting the relative intensity. In addition, the distinction with initiation of outburst of coal and gas affected by these parameters is discussed by the relative threshold of gas content rate.

  17. Experimental Analyses of the Major Parameters Affecting the Intensity of Outbursts of Coal and Gas

    PubMed Central

    Nie, W.; Peng, S. J.; Xu, J.; Liu, L. R.; Wang, G.; Geng, J. B.

    2014-01-01

    With an increase in mining depth and production, the intensity and frequency of outburst of coal and gas have a tendency to increase. Estimating the intensity of outbursts of coal and gas plays an important role because of its relation with the risk value. In this paper, we described the semiquantitative relations between major parameters and intensity of outburst based on physical experiments. The results showed increment of geostress simulated by horizontal load (from 1.4, 2.4, 3.2, to 3.4 MPa) or vertical load (from 2, 3, 3.6, to 4 MPa) improved the relative intensity rate (3.763–7.403% and 1.273–7.99%); the increment of porosity (from 1.57, 2.51, 3, to 3.6%) improved the relative intensity rate from 3.8 to 13.8%; the increment of gas pressure (from 0, 0.5, 0.65, 0.72, 1, to 1.5 Mpa) induced the relative intensity rate to decrease from 38.22 to 0%; the increment of water content (from 0, 2, 4, to 8%) caused the relative intensity rate to drop from 5.425 to 0.5%. Furthermore, sensitivity and range analysis evaluates coupled factors affecting the relative intensity. In addition, the distinction with initiation of outburst of coal and gas affected by these parameters is discussed by the relative threshold of gas content rate. PMID:25162042

  18. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation: Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-01

    Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  19. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Effects of the Built Environment on Transportation. Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Other Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; Dunphy, R. T.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-15

    Planning initiatives in many regions and communities aim to reduce transportation energy use, decrease emissions, and achieve related environmental benefits by changing land use. This report reviews and summarizes findings from existing literature on the relationship between the built environment and transportation energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, identifying results trends as well as potential future actions. The indirect influence of federal transportation and housing policies, as well as the direct impact of municipal regulation on land use are examined for their effect on transportation patterns and energy use. Special attention is given to the 'four D' factors of density, diversity, design and accessibility. The report concludes that policy-driven changes to the built environment could reduce transportation energy and GHG emissions from less than 1% to as much as 10% by 2050, the equivalent of 16%-18% of present-day urban light-duty-vehicle travel. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  20. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-12-31

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The .experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated.

  1. Analysis of volatile phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The .experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at three depths in the shallow soil column; barometric pressure, rainfall and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis of the data sets has shown that the gas phase radon activities under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been demonstrated.

  2. METHANOL PRODUCTION FROM BIOMASS AND NATURAL GAS AS TRANSPORTATION FUEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two processes are examined for production of methanol. They are assessed against the essential requirements of a future alternative fuel for road transport: that it (i) is producible in amounts comparable to the 19 EJ of motor fuel annually consumed in the U.S., (ii) minimizes em...

  3. [How do transport and metabolism affect the biological effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons?].

    PubMed

    Bekki, Kanae; Toriba, Akira; Tang, Ning; Kameda, Takayuki; Takigami, Hidetaka; Suzuki, Go; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), some of which are carcinogenic/mutagenic, are generated by combustion of fossil fuels and also released through tanker or oilfield accident to cause a large scale environmental pollution. PAHs concentration in China is especially high in East Asia because of many kinds of generation sources such as coal heating systems, vehicles and factories without exhaust gas/particulate treatment systems. So, the atmospheric pollution caused by PAHs in China has been seriously concerned from the view point of health effects. Like yellow sand and sulfur oxide, PAHs exhausted in China are also transported to Japan. Additionally, strongly mutagenic nitrated PAHs (NPAHs), estrogenic/antiestrogenic PAH hydroxides (PAHOHs) and reactive oxygen species-producing PAH quinones (PAHQs) are formed from PAHs by the chemical reaction during the transport. Furthermore these PAHOHs and PAHQs are produced by the metabolism in animal body. In the biological activities caused by the above PAH derivatives, the structure-activity relationship was observed. In this review, our recent results on the generation of PAH derivatives by atmospheric transport and metabolism are reported. Also, the existing condition of PAHs as atmospheric pollutants is considered.

  4. Unified Measurement System with Suction Control for Gas Transport Parameters in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, K.; Rouf, M. A.; Hamamoto, S.; Sakaki, T.; Komatsu, T.; Moldrup, P.

    2010-12-01

    Pore geometric parameters including pore size distribution, total and air-filled porosities, pore tortuosity and connectivity strongly influence air flow in porous media, and, thus, characterize gas transport parameters such as gas diffusion coefficient Dp and air permeability ka. In this study, the gas transport parameters were measured for porous media with varying textures under repeated drying and wetting cycles using a newly-developed measurement system, and the hysteretic behaviors in the gas transport parameters were examined. A unified measurement system with suction control (UMS_SC) was developed for measuring soil water characteristics curve and gas transport parameters sequentially under drying and wetting cycles. It consisted of a porous plate, diffusion chamber, sample ring (15 cm in inner diameter and 12 cm in height), tensiometer, soil moisture sensor, oxygen electrodes and air pressure gauges. Soil water characteristics curve and gas transport parameters (gas diffusion coefficient Dp and air permeability ka) for differently textured materials including sand, molten slag , and a mixture material of MS and volcanic ash soil were measured under repeated drying and wetting cycles. The measurement for each porous material was initiated from a full saturation and suction head was increased/decreased in steps in the drainage/wetting cycles. Moreover, independent measurements of Dp and ka were carried out for repacked air-dried samples using a cylindrical mold (15 cm in inner diameter and 12 cm in height) in order to obtain the Dp and ka values at a full dry condition. The newly-developed UMS_SC performed well for the applied suction head less than 50 cm of water with corresponding saturation of roughly 0.3-0.5. The gas transport parameters were well measured at each suction head level under repeated drying and wetting cycles, and the measured gas transport parameters including the independent measurements were verified by literature data as well as

  5. Kinetics of hot-gas desulfurization sorbents for transport reactors

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. Kwon

    2000-01-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at elevated temperatures. Various metal oxide sorbents are formulated with metal oxides such as Fe, Co, Zn, and Ti. Initial reaction kinetics of formulated sorbents with hydrogen sulfide is studied in the presence of various amounts of moisture and hydrogen at various reaction temperatures. The objectives of this research are to study initial reaction kinetics for a sorbent-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to investigate effects of concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, and moisture on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents, to understand effects of space time of reaction gas mixtures on initial reaction kinetics of the sorbent-hydrogen sulfide system, and to evaluate effects of temperature and sorbent amounts on dynamic absorption of H{sub 2}S into sorbents. Experimental data on initial reaction kinetics of hydrogen sulfide with metal oxide sorbents were obtained with a 0.83-cm{sup 3} differential reactor. The reactivity of MCRH-67 sorbent and AHI-1 was examined. These sorbents were obtained from the Research Triangle Institute (RTI). The sorbents in the form of 70 {micro}m particles are reacted with 1,000--4,000 ppm hydrogen sulfide at 450--600 C. The range of space time of reaction gas mixtures is 0.03--0.09 s. The range of reaction duration is 4--14,400 s.

  6. Energy policy act transportation study: Interim report on natural gas flows and rates

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-17

    This report, Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates, is the second in a series mandated by Title XIII, Section 1340, ``Establishment of Data Base and Study of Transportation Rates,`` of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102--486). The first report Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Availability of Data and Studies, was submitted to Congress in October 1993; it summarized data and studies that could be used to address the impact of legislative and regulatory actions on natural gas transportation rates and flow patterns. The current report presents an interim analysis of natural gas transportation rates and distribution patterns for the period from 1988 through 1994. A third and final report addressing the transportation rates and flows through 1997 is due to Congress in October 2000. This analysis relies on currently available data; no new data collection effort was undertaken. The need for the collection of additional data on transportation rates will be further addressed after this report, in consultation with the Congress, industry representatives, and in other public forums.

  7. Breathing hypoxic gas affects the physiology as well as the diving behaviour of tufted ducks.

    PubMed

    Halsey, Lewis G; Butler, Patrick J; Woakes, Anthony J

    2005-01-01

    We measured the effects of exposure to hypoxia (15% and 11% oxygen) and hypercapnia (up to 4.5% carbon dioxide) on rates of respiratory gas exchange both between and during dives in tufted ducks, Aythya fuligula, to investigate to what extent these may explain changes in diving behaviour. As found in previous studies, the ducks decreased dive duration (t(d)) and increased surface duration when diving from a hypoxic or hypercapnic gas mix. In the hypercapnic conditions, oxygen consumption during the dive cycle was not affected. Oxygen uptake between dives was reduced by only 17% when breathing a hypoxic gas mix of 11% oxygen. However, estimates of the rate of oxygen metabolism during the foraging periods of dives decreased nearly threefold in 11% oxygen. Given that tufted ducks normally dive well within their aerobic dive limits and that they significantly reduced their t(d) during hypoxia, it is not at all clear why they make this physiological adjustment. PMID:15778946

  8. 40 CFR 60.5400 - What equipment leak standards apply to affected facilities at an onshore natural gas processing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... affected facilities at an onshore natural gas processing plant? 60.5400 Section 60.5400 Protection of... NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production, Transmission... natural gas processing plant? This section applies to the group of all equipment, except...

  9. 40 CFR 60.5400 - What equipment leak standards apply to affected facilities at an onshore natural gas processing...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... affected facilities at an onshore natural gas processing plant? 60.5400 Section 60.5400 Protection of... NEW STATIONARY SOURCES Standards of Performance for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production, Transmission... natural gas processing plant? This section applies to the group of all equipment, except...

  10. Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acids Affect Electrolyte Transport in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells: Dependence on Cyclooxygenase and Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Nüsing, Rolf M.; Schweer, Horst; Fleming, Ingrid; Zeldin, Darryl C.; Wegmann, Markus

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the effects of epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) on ion transport in the polarized renal distal tubular cell line, MDCK C7. Of the four EET regioisomers (5,6-EET, 8,9-EET, 11,12-EET, and 14,15-EET) studied, only apical, but not basolateral, application of 5,6-EET increased short circuit current (Isc) with kinetics similar to those of arachidonic acid. The ion transport was blocked by preincubation with the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin or with the chloride channel blocker NPPB. Further, both a Cl−-free bath solution and the Ca2+ antagonist verapamil blocked 5,6-EET-induced ion transport. Although the presence of the PGE2 receptors EP2, EP3, and EP4 was demonstrated, apically added PGE2 was ineffective and basolaterally added PGE2 caused a different kinetics in ion transport compared to 5,6-EET. Moreover, PGE2 sythesis in MDCK C7 cells was unaffected by 5,6-EET treatment. GC/MS/MS analysis of cell supernatants revealed the presence of the biologically inactive 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE1 in 5,6-EET-treated cells, but not in control cells. Indomethacin suppressed the formation of 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE1. 5,6-epoxy-PGE1 the precursor of 5,6-dihydroxy-PGE1, caused a similar ion transport as 5,6-EET. Cytochrome P450 enzymes homolog to human CYP2C8, CYP2C9, and CYP2J2 protein were detected immunologically in the MDCK C7 cells. Our findings suggest that 5,6-EET affects Cl-transport in renal distal tubular cells independent of PGE2 but by a mechanism, dependent on its conversion to 5,6-epoxy-PGE1 by cyclooxygenase. We suggest a role for this P450 epoxygenase product in the regulation of electrolyte transport, especially as a saluretic compound acting from the luminal side of tubular cells in the mammalian kidney. PMID:17494091

  11. MR Imaging of Apparent 3He Gas Transport in Narrow Pipes and Rodent Airways

    PubMed Central

    Minard, Kevin R.; Jacob, Richard E.; Laicher, Gernot; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Corley, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    High sensitivity makes hyperpolarized 3He an attractive signal source for visualizing gas flow with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Its rapid Brownian motion, however, can blur observed flow lamina and alter measured diffusion rates when excited nuclei traverse shear-induced velocity gradients during data acquisition. Here, both effects are described analytically, and predicted values for measured transport during laminar flow through a straight, 3.2-mm-diameter pipe are validated using two-dimensional (2D) constant-time images of different binary gas mixtures. Results show explicitly how measured transport in narrow conduits is characterized by apparent values that depend on underlying gas dynamics and imaging time. In ventilated rats, this is found to obscure acquired airflow images. Nevertheless, flow splitting at airway branches is still evident and use of 3D vector flow mapping is shown to reveal surprising detail that highlights the correlation between gas dynamics and lung structure. PMID:18667344

  12. MR Imaging of Apparent 3He Gas Transport in Narrow Pipes and Rodent Airways

    SciTech Connect

    Minard, Kevin R.; Jacob, Rick E.; Laicher, Gernot; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Corley, Richard A.

    2008-10-01

    High sensitivity makes hyperpolarized 3He an attractive signal source for visualizing gas flow with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Its rapid Brownian motion, however, can blur observed flow lamina and alter measured diffusion rates when excited nuclei traverse shear-induced velocity gradients during data acquisition. Here, both effects are described analytically, and predicted values for measured transport during laminar flow through a straight, 3.2-mm-diameter pipe are validated using two-dimensional (2D) constant-time images of different binary gas mixtures. Results show explicitly how measured transport in narrow conduits is characterized by apparent values that depend on underlying gas dynamics and imaging time. In ventilated rats, this is found to obscure acquired airflow images. Flow splitting at airway branches is still evident, however, and use of 3D vector flow mapping is shown to provide a quantitative view of pulmonary gas supply that highlights the correlation of airflow dynamics with lung structure.

  13. Transport Membrane Condenser for Water and Energy Recovery from Power Plant Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Dexin Wang

    2012-03-31

    The new waste heat and water recovery technology based on a nanoporous ceramic membrane vapor separation mechanism has been developed for power plant flue gas application. The recovered water vapor and its latent heat from the flue gas can increase the power plant boiler efficiency and reduce water consumption. This report describes the development of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in details for power plant flue gas application. The two-stage TMC design can achieve maximum heat and water recovery based on practical power plant flue gas and cooling water stream conditions. And the report includes: Two-stage TMC water and heat recovery system design based on potential host power plant coal fired flue gas conditions; Membrane performance optimization process based on the flue gas conditions, heat sink conditions, and water and heat transport rate requirement; Pilot-Scale Unit design, fabrication and performance validation test results. Laboratory test results showed the TMC system can exact significant amount of vapor and heat from the flue gases. The recovered water has been tested and proved of good quality, and the impact of SO{sub 2} in the flue gas on the membrane has been evaluated. The TMC pilot-scale system has been field tested with a slip stream of flue gas in a power plant to prove its long term real world operation performance. A TMC scale-up design approach has been investigated and an economic analysis of applying the technology has been performed.

  14. Effects of oil on internal gas transport, radial oxygen loss, gas films and bud growth in Phragmites australis

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Jean; Keep, Rory; Armstrong, William

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Oil pollution of wetlands is a world-wide problem but, to date, research has concentrated on its influences on salt marsh rather than freshwater plant communities. The effects of water-borne light oils (liquid paraffin and diesel) were investigated on the fresh/brackish wetland species Phragmites australis in terms of routes of oil infiltration, internal gas transport, radial O2 loss (ROL), underwater gas films and bud growth. Methods Pressure flow resistances of pith cavities of nodes and aerenchyma of leaf sheaths, with or without previous exposure to oil, were recorded from flow rates under applied pressure. Convective flows were measured from living excised culms with oiled and non-oiled nodes and leaf sheaths. The effect of oil around culm basal nodes on ROL from rhizome and root apices was measured polarographically. Surface gas films on submerged shoots with and without oil treatment were recorded photographically. Growth and emergence of buds through water with and without an oil film were measured. Key Results Internodes are virtually impermeable, but nodes of senesced and living culms are permeable to oils which can block pith cavity diaphragms, preventing flows at applied pressures of 1 kPa, natural convective transport to the rhizome, and greatly decreasing ROL to phyllospheres and rhizospheres. Oil infiltrating or covering living leaf sheaths prevents humidity-induced convection. Oil displaces surface gas films from laminae and leaf sheaths. Buds emerge only a few centimetres through oil and die. Conclusions Oil infiltrates the gas space system via nodal and leaf sheath stomata, reducing O2 diffusion and convective flows into the rhizome system and decreasing oxygenation of phyllospheres and rhizospheres; underwater gas exchange via gas films will be impeded. Plants can be weakened by oil-induced failure of emerging buds. Plants will be most at risk during the growing season. PMID:18996951

  15. Unifying diffusion and seepage for nonlinear gas transport in multiscale porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hongqing; Wang, Yuhe; Wang, Jiulong; Li, Zhengyi

    2016-09-01

    We unify the diffusion and seepage process for nonlinear gas transport in multiscale porous media via a proposed new general transport equation. A coherent theoretical derivation indicates the wall-molecule and molecule-molecule collisions drive the Knudsen and collective diffusive fluxes, and constitute the system pressure across the porous media. A new terminology, nominal diffusion coefficient can summarize Knudsen and collective diffusion coefficients. Physical and numerical experiments show the support of the new formulation and provide approaches to obtain the diffusion coefficient and permeability simultaneously. This work has important implication for natural gas extraction and greenhouse gases sequestration in geological formations.

  16. Defective copper transport in the copt5 mutant affects cadmium tolerance.

    PubMed

    Carrió-Seguí, Angela; Garcia-Molina, Antoni; Sanz, Amparo; Peñarrubia, Lola

    2015-03-01

    Cadmium toxicity interferes with essential metal homeostasis, which is a problem for both plant nutrition and the consumption of healthy food by humans. Copper uptake is performed by the members of the Arabidopsis high affinity copper transporter (COPT) family. One of the members, COPT5, is involved in copper recycling from the vacuole toward the cytosolic compartment. We show herein that copt5 mutants are more sensitive to cadmium stress than wild-type plants, as indicated by reduced growth. Exacerbated cadmium toxicity in copt5 mutants is due specifically to altered copper traffic through the COPT5 transporter. Three different processes which have been shown to affect cadmium tolerance are altered in copt5 mutants. First, ethylene biosynthesis diminishes under copper deficiency and, in the presence of cadmium, ethylene production diminishes further. Copper deficiency responses are also attenuated under cadmium treatment. Remarkably, while copt5 roots present higher oxidative stress toxicity symptoms than controls, aerial copt5 parts display lower oxidative stress, as seen by reduced cadmium delivery to shoots. Taken together, these results demonstrate that copper transport plays a key role in cadmium resistance, and suggest that oxidative stress triggers an NADPH oxidase-mediated signaling pathway, which contributes to cadmium translocation and basal plant resistance. The slightly lower cadmium levels that reach aerial parts in the copt5 mutants, irrespective of the copper content in the media, suggest a new biotechnological approach to minimize toxic cadmium entry into food chains.

  17. Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.

    2012-12-01

    Use of both natural gas and renewable energy has grown significantly in recent years. Both forms of energy have been touted as key elements of a transition to a cleaner and more secure energy future, but much of the current discourse considers each in isolation or concentrates on the competitive impacts of one on the other. This paper attempts, instead, to explore potential synergies of natural gas and renewable energy in the U.S. electric power and transportation sectors.

  18. PARTICLE TRANSPORTATION AND DEPOSITION IN HOT GAS FILTER VESSELS - A COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2002-07-01

    In this project, a computational modeling approach for analyzing flow and ash transport and deposition in filter vessels was developed. An Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for studying hot-gas filtration process was established. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of gas flows in the filter vessel, and makes use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the particle transport and deposition. Particular attention was given to the Siemens-Westinghouse filter vessel at Power System Development Facility in Wilsonville in Alabama. Details of hot-gas flow in this tangential flow filter vessel are evaluated. The simulation results show that the rapidly rotation flow in the spacing between the shroud and the vessel refractory acts as cyclone that leads to the removal of a large fraction of the larger particles from the gas stream. Several alternate designs for the filter vessel are considered. These include a vessel with a short shroud, a filter vessel with no shroud and a vessel with a deflector plate. The hot-gas flow and particle transport and deposition in various vessels are evaluated. The deposition patterns in various vessels are compared. It is shown that certain filter vessel designs allow for the large particles to remain suspended in the gas stream and to deposit on the filters. The presence of the larger particles in the filter cake leads to lower mechanical strength thus allowing for the back-pulse process to more easily remove the filter cake. A laboratory-scale filter vessel for testing the cold flow condition was designed and fabricated. A laser-based flow visualization technique is used and the gas flow condition in the laboratory-scale vessel was experimental studied. A computer model for the experimental vessel was also developed and the gas flow and particle transport patterns are evaluated.

  19. Study of effective transport properties of fresh and aged gas diffusion layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosomoiu, Magdalena; Tsotridis, Georgios; Bednarek, Tomasz

    2015-07-01

    Gas diffusion layers (GDLs) play an important role in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) for the diffusion of reactant and the removal of product water. In the current study fresh and aged GDLs (Sigracet® GDL34BC) were investigated by X-ray computed tomography to obtain a representative 3D image of the real GDL structure. The examined GDL samples are taken from areas located under the flow channel and under the land. Additionally, a brand new Sigracet® GDL34BC was taken as a reference sample in order to find out the impact of fuel cell assembly on GDL. The produced 3D image data were used to calculate effective transport properties such as thermal and electrical conductivity, diffusivity, permeability and capillary pressure curves of the dry and partially saturated GDL. The simulation indicates flooding by product water occurs at contact angles lower than 125° depending on sample porosity. In addition, GDL anisotropy significantly affects the permeability as well as thermal and electrical conductivities. The calculated material bulk properties could be next used as input for CFD modelling of PEM fuel cells where GDL is usually assumed layer-like and homogeneous. Tensor material parameters allow to consider GDL anisotropy and lead to more realistic results.

  20. Trace gas exchanges and transports over the Amazonian rain forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garstang, Michael; Greco, Steve; Scala, John; Harriss, Robert; Browell, Edward; Sachse, Glenn; Simpson, Joanne; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Torres, Arnold

    1986-01-01

    Early results are presented from a program to model deep convective transport of chemical species by means of in situ data collection and numerical models. Data were acquired during the NASA GTE Amazon Boundary Layer Experiment in July-August 1985. Airborne instrumentation, including a UV-DIAL system, collected data on the O3, CO, NO, temperature and water vapor profiles from the surface to 400 mb altitude, while GOES imagery tracked convective clouds over the study area. A two-dimensional cloud model with small amplitude random temperature fluctuations at low levels, which simulated thermals, was used to describe the movements of the chemical species sensed in the convective atmosphere. The data was useful for evaluating the accuracy of the cloud model, which in turn was effective in describing the circulation of the chemical species.

  1. Current developments affecting future availability of oil and gas in the free world

    SciTech Connect

    Borg, I.Y.

    1981-03-17

    This review focuses on developments during the last 18 months likely to affect the availability of oil and gas in coming decades. These developments include new discoveries (Hibernia, Beaufort Sea, Ivory Coast, the Western and Eastern Overthrust Belts, and the Gulf of Suez). They also include new energy policies of both producer and consumer nations that will ultimately affect supply. New policies and a rapidly increasing domestic demand may stabilize Mexico's exports at their present level, even if production reaches 4 to 5 million barrels per day (b/d). Canada's new policy toward foreign oil companies operating within her borders may well stifle exploration and investment in both oil and tar sand deposits. OPEC contract and pricing schemes are profoundly altering distribution systems and markets. OPEC plans to allocate oil arbitrarily in times of shortage could disrupt the industrial world. Inability to reassign oil contracted for from OPEC nations is forcing buyers to increase storage capacity. The oil inventories reported are not equivalent to availability, since 50 to 90% is essentially unavailable. Thus, stock equivalent to 110 days of imports may include only a few weeks of primary usable stocks. Only Sweden and South Africa have federally owned oil reserves that could meet demand for periods of months or years. Natural gas from the USSR will probably comprise 30% of Western Europe's total supply in the 1990s, if plans to import gas from the Yamal Peninsula come to fruition. Soviet gas is seen as an acceptable alternative to undependable OPEC oil supplies and similarly unreliable gas supplies from North Africa. However, the proposed, increased dependency on the USSR may add a new dimension to Soviet and Western European politics.

  2. Analysis of volatile-phase transport in soils using natural radon gas as a tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.; Thomas, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    We have conducted a field study of soil gas transport processes using radon gas as a naturally occurring tracer. The experiment monitored soil gas radon activity, soil moisture, and soil temperature at depth; barometric pressure, rainfall, and wind speed were monitored at the soil surface. Linear and multiple regression analysis under natural environmental conditions are influenced by soil moisture content, barometric pressure variations, soil temperature, and soil structure. The effect of wind speed on subsurface radon activities under our field conditions has not been observed. 25 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Role of plant-mediated gas transport in CH4 emissions from Phragmites-dominated peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, Merit; Ingwersen, Joachim; van den Elzen, Eva; Lamers, Leon P. M.; Streck, Thilo

    2016-04-01

    A large part of the methane (CH4) produced in peatlands is directly oxidized and the extent of its oxidation depends on the gas transport pathway. In wetland ecosystems, CH4 can be transported from the soil to the atmosphere via diffusion, ebullition and via aerenchyma of roots and stems of vascular plants. Compared to other wetland plants, the very common species Phragmites australis (Common reed) appears to have a high ability to transport gases between the soil and atmosphere. The gas exchange within Phragmites plants takes place via convective flow through the culm, which is believed to be achieved by a humidity-induced pressure gradient and is more than 5-times as efficient as diffusion. By this mechanism, CH4 surpasses the upper (oxic) soil layers and therefore oxidation of CH4 may well be reduced. On the other hand, transport of oxygen in Phragmites plants tends to enhance O2concentration in the rhizosphere, which will foster CH4oxidation in deeper soil layers. It is therefore unknown whether humidity-induced convection leads to higher or lower overall CH4 emission in Phragmites, which is essential to understand their role in the emissions from these very common peatland types. To investigate whether this internal gas transport mechanism of reed promotes or reduces CH4 fluxes to the atmosphere, we conducted manipulative field experiments in a large Phragmites peatland in South-West Germany in October 2014 and July 2015. Using large chambers, we compared CH4 fluxes from intact plots, plots with cut reed, and plots with cut + sealed reed to exclude gas transport through the plants. Additionally, pore water samples from the plots were analyzed for possible changes in soil chemistry due to the change of oxygen transport into the soil by the treatments. Based on our results, we will explain the potential role of rhizosphere oxygenation and convective flow on CH4 emissions from Phragmites-dominated peatlands in relation to other environmental condition.

  4. Factors affecting gas migration and contaminant redistribution in heterogeneous porous media subject to electrical resistance heating.

    PubMed

    Munholland, Jonah L; Mumford, Kevin G; Kueper, Bernard H

    2016-01-01

    A series of intermediate-scale laboratory experiments were completed in a two-dimensional flow cell to investigate gas production and migration during the application of electrical resistance heating (ERH) for the removal of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Experiments consisted of heating water in homogeneous silica sand and heating 270 mL of trichloroethene (TCE) and chloroform (CF) DNAPL pools in heterogeneous silica sands, both under flowing groundwater conditions. Spatial and temporal distributions of temperature were measured using thermocouples and observations of gas production and migration were collected using front-face image capture throughout the experiments. Post-treatment soil samples were collected and analyzed to assess DNAPL removal. Results of experiments performed in homogeneous sand subject to different groundwater flow rates showed that high groundwater velocities can limit subsurface heating rates. In the DNAPL pool experiments, temperatures increased to achieve DNAPL-water co-boiling, creating estimated gas volumes of 131 and 114 L that originated from the TCE and CF pools, respectively. Produced gas migrated vertically, entered a coarse sand lens and subsequently migrated laterally beneath an overlying capillary barrier to outside the heated treatment zone where 31-56% of the original DNAPL condensed back into a DNAPL phase. These findings demonstrate that layered heterogeneity can potentially facilitate the transport of contaminants outside the treatment zone by mobilization and condensation of gas phases during ERH applications. This underscores the need for vapor phase recovery and/or control mechanisms below the water table during application of ERH in heterogeneous porous media during the co-boiling stage, which occurs prior to reaching the boiling point of water.

  5. Factors affecting gas migration and contaminant redistribution in heterogeneous porous media subject to electrical resistance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munholland, Jonah L.; Mumford, Kevin G.; Kueper, Bernard H.

    2016-01-01

    A series of intermediate-scale laboratory experiments were completed in a two-dimensional flow cell to investigate gas production and migration during the application of electrical resistance heating (ERH) for the removal of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Experiments consisted of heating water in homogeneous silica sand and heating 270 mL of trichloroethene (TCE) and chloroform (CF) DNAPL pools in heterogeneous silica sands, both under flowing groundwater conditions. Spatial and temporal distributions of temperature were measured using thermocouples and observations of gas production and migration were collected using front-face image capture throughout the experiments. Post-treatment soil samples were collected and analyzed to assess DNAPL removal. Results of experiments performed in homogeneous sand subject to different groundwater flow rates showed that high groundwater velocities can limit subsurface heating rates. In the DNAPL pool experiments, temperatures increased to achieve DNAPL-water co-boiling, creating estimated gas volumes of 131 and 114 L that originated from the TCE and CF pools, respectively. Produced gas migrated vertically, entered a coarse sand lens and subsequently migrated laterally beneath an overlying capillary barrier to outside the heated treatment zone where 31-56% of the original DNAPL condensed back into a DNAPL phase. These findings demonstrate that layered heterogeneity can potentially facilitate the transport of contaminants outside the treatment zone by mobilization and condensation of gas phases during ERH applications. This underscores the need for vapor phase recovery and/or control mechanisms below the water table during application of ERH in heterogeneous porous media during the co-boiling stage, which occurs prior to reaching the boiling point of water.

  6. Factors affecting gas migration and contaminant redistribution in heterogeneous porous media subject to electrical resistance heating.

    PubMed

    Munholland, Jonah L; Mumford, Kevin G; Kueper, Bernard H

    2016-01-01

    A series of intermediate-scale laboratory experiments were completed in a two-dimensional flow cell to investigate gas production and migration during the application of electrical resistance heating (ERH) for the removal of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Experiments consisted of heating water in homogeneous silica sand and heating 270 mL of trichloroethene (TCE) and chloroform (CF) DNAPL pools in heterogeneous silica sands, both under flowing groundwater conditions. Spatial and temporal distributions of temperature were measured using thermocouples and observations of gas production and migration were collected using front-face image capture throughout the experiments. Post-treatment soil samples were collected and analyzed to assess DNAPL removal. Results of experiments performed in homogeneous sand subject to different groundwater flow rates showed that high groundwater velocities can limit subsurface heating rates. In the DNAPL pool experiments, temperatures increased to achieve DNAPL-water co-boiling, creating estimated gas volumes of 131 and 114 L that originated from the TCE and CF pools, respectively. Produced gas migrated vertically, entered a coarse sand lens and subsequently migrated laterally beneath an overlying capillary barrier to outside the heated treatment zone where 31-56% of the original DNAPL condensed back into a DNAPL phase. These findings demonstrate that layered heterogeneity can potentially facilitate the transport of contaminants outside the treatment zone by mobilization and condensation of gas phases during ERH applications. This underscores the need for vapor phase recovery and/or control mechanisms below the water table during application of ERH in heterogeneous porous media during the co-boiling stage, which occurs prior to reaching the boiling point of water. PMID:26638038

  7. Inhibition of ABC transport proteins by oil sands process affected water.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Hattan A; Saunders, David M V; Al-Mousa, Ahmed; Alcorn, Jane; Pereira, Alberto S; Martin, Jonathan W; Giesy, John P; Wiseman, Steve B

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporter proteins is important for detoxification of xenobiotics. For example, ABC transporters from the multidrug-resistance protein (MRP) subfamily are important for excretion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their metabolites. Effects of chemicals in the water soluble organic fraction of relatively fresh oil sands process affected water (OSPW) from Base Mine Lake (BML-OSPW) and aged OSPW from Pond 9 (P9-OSPW) on the activity of MRP transporters were investigated in vivo by use of Japanese medaka at the fry stage of development. Activities of MRPs were monitored by use of the lipophilic dye calcein, which is transported from cells by ABC proteins, including MRPs. To begin to identify chemicals that might inhibit activity of MRPs, BML-OSPW and P9-OSPW were fractionated into acidic, basic, and neutral fractions by use of mixed-mode sorbents. Chemical compositions of fractions were determined by use of ultrahigh resolution orbitrap mass spectrometry in ESI(+) and ESI(-) mode. Greater amounts of calcein were retained in fry exposed to BML-OSPW at concentration equivalents greater than 1× (i.e., full strength). The neutral and basic fractions of BML-OSPW, but not the acidic fraction, caused greater retention of calcein. Exposure to P9-OSPW did not affect the amount of calcein in fry. Neutral and basic fractions of BML-OSPW contained relatively greater amounts of several oxygen-, sulfur, and nitrogen-containing chemical species that might inhibit MRPs, such as O(+), SO(+), and NO(+) chemical species, although secondary fractionation will be required to conclusively identify the most potent inhibitors. Naphthenic acids (O2(-)), which were dominant in the acidic fraction, did not appear to be the cause of the inhibition. This is the first study to demonstrate that chemicals in the water soluble organic fraction of OSPW inhibit activity of this important class of proteins. However, aging of OSPW attenuates

  8. Inhibition of ABC transport proteins by oil sands process affected water.

    PubMed

    Alharbi, Hattan A; Saunders, David M V; Al-Mousa, Ahmed; Alcorn, Jane; Pereira, Alberto S; Martin, Jonathan W; Giesy, John P; Wiseman, Steve B

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily of transporter proteins is important for detoxification of xenobiotics. For example, ABC transporters from the multidrug-resistance protein (MRP) subfamily are important for excretion of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their metabolites. Effects of chemicals in the water soluble organic fraction of relatively fresh oil sands process affected water (OSPW) from Base Mine Lake (BML-OSPW) and aged OSPW from Pond 9 (P9-OSPW) on the activity of MRP transporters were investigated in vivo by use of Japanese medaka at the fry stage of development. Activities of MRPs were monitored by use of the lipophilic dye calcein, which is transported from cells by ABC proteins, including MRPs. To begin to identify chemicals that might inhibit activity of MRPs, BML-OSPW and P9-OSPW were fractionated into acidic, basic, and neutral fractions by use of mixed-mode sorbents. Chemical compositions of fractions were determined by use of ultrahigh resolution orbitrap mass spectrometry in ESI(+) and ESI(-) mode. Greater amounts of calcein were retained in fry exposed to BML-OSPW at concentration equivalents greater than 1× (i.e., full strength). The neutral and basic fractions of BML-OSPW, but not the acidic fraction, caused greater retention of calcein. Exposure to P9-OSPW did not affect the amount of calcein in fry. Neutral and basic fractions of BML-OSPW contained relatively greater amounts of several oxygen-, sulfur, and nitrogen-containing chemical species that might inhibit MRPs, such as O(+), SO(+), and NO(+) chemical species, although secondary fractionation will be required to conclusively identify the most potent inhibitors. Naphthenic acids (O2(-)), which were dominant in the acidic fraction, did not appear to be the cause of the inhibition. This is the first study to demonstrate that chemicals in the water soluble organic fraction of OSPW inhibit activity of this important class of proteins. However, aging of OSPW attenuates

  9. Rapid vertical trace gas transport by an isolated midlatitude thunderstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauf, Thomas; Schulte, Peter; Alheit, Reiner; Schlager, Hans

    1995-11-01

    During the cloud dynamics and chemistry field experiment CLEOPATRA in the summer of 1992 in southern Germany, the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) (German Aerospace Research Establishment) research aircraft Falcon traversed four times the anvil of a severe, isolated thunderstorm. The first two traverses were at 8 km altitude and close to the anvil cloud base, while the second two traverses were at 10 km. During the 8-km traverse, measured ozone mixing ratios dropped by 13 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) from the ambient cloud free environment to the anvil cloud, while water vapor increased by 0.3 g kg-1. At the 10-km traverses, ozone dropped by 25 ppbv, while water vapor increased by 0.18 g kg-1. Three-dimensional numerical thunderstorm simulations were performed to understand the cause of these changes. The simulations included the transport of two chemical inert tracers. Ozone was assumed to be one of them. The initial ozone profile was composed from an ozone routine sounding and the in situ Falcon measurements prior to the thunderstorm development. The second tracer is typical for a surface released pollutant with a nonzero, constant value in the boundary layer but zero above it. The redistribution of both tracers by the storm is calculated and compared with the observations. For the anvil penetration at 10 km, the calculated difference in ozone mixing ratios is 21 ppbv, while for water vapor an increase of 0.25 g kg-1 was found, in good agreement with the observations. To validate the model results, the radar reflectivity was calculated from simulated fields of cloud water, rain, graupel, hail, and snow and ice crystals and compared with observed values. With respect to maximum reflectivity values and spatial scales, again, excellent agreement was achieved. It is concluded that the rapid transport from the boundary layer directly into the anvil level is the most likely cause of the observed ozone decrease and water vapor increase

  10. FACTORS IN GEOTROPOSPHERIC PARTICLE-GAS TRANSPORT OF SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) can exist in solid, liquid, or gas phases under ambient environmental conditions. The geotropospheric transport of SVOCs varies according to the particle type. Two classes of SVOCs and two types of particles were analyzed to determine possib...

  11. Evaluation of soil-gas transport of organic chemicals into residential buildings: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, A.T.; Garbesi, K.; Sextro, R.G.; Daisey, J.M.

    1988-06-01

    This investigation consisted of theoretical, laboratory, and field study phases with the overall objective of determining the importance of pressure-driven flow of soil gas in the transport of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from soil into a house. In the first phase, the mechanisms of advection, diffusion, and retardation of VOC in soil were evaluated. Using the theory of fluid mechanics and empirical for equilibrium partitioning of VOC among gas, aqueous, and solid phase of soil, a one-dimensional advection-diffusion equation or the transport of gas-phase VOC through soil was developed. An experimental apparatus and method were developed for the direct observation of pressure-driven transport of VOC through soil under controlled laboratory conditions. The retardation of sulfur hexafluoride (SF/sub 6/) and hexafluorobenzene with respect to the flow of the bulk gas was measured in soil-column experiments using different soils and soil-moisture conditions. The results were in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Since SF/sub 6/ was not lost by sorption to soil, it was selected for use as a tracer gas in the field study to study the advective flow of soil gas. The overall objective of the investigation was directly addressed by the field study. This study was conducted at a house which has a basement and which was located adjacent to a covered municipal landfill. The soil at the site was characterized, pressure coupling between the basement and surrounding soil was measured, the entry rate of soil gas as a function of basement depressurization was measured, and VOC in soil gas, indoor air and outdoor air were quantified. 46 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Life-cycle assessment of diesel, natural gas and hydrogen fuel cell bus transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ally, Jamie; Pryor, Trevor

    The Sustainable Transport Energy Programme (STEP) is an initiative of the Government of Western Australia, to explore hydrogen fuel cell technology as an alternative to the existing diesel and natural gas public transit infrastructure in Perth. This project includes three buses manufactured by DaimlerChrysler with Ballard fuel cell power sources operating in regular service alongside the existing natural gas and diesel bus fleets. The life-cycle assessment (LCA) of the fuel cell bus trial in Perth determines the overall environmental footprint and energy demand by studying all phases of the complete transportation system, including the hydrogen infrastructure, bus manufacturing, operation, and end-of-life disposal. The LCAs of the existing diesel and natural gas transportation systems are developed in parallel. The findings show that the trial is competitive with the diesel and natural gas bus systems in terms of global warming potential and eutrophication. Emissions that contribute to acidification and photochemical ozone are greater for the fuel cell buses. Scenario analysis quantifies the improvements that can be expected in future generations of fuel cell vehicles and shows that a reduction of greater than 50% is achievable in the greenhouse gas, photochemical ozone creation and primary energy demand impact categories.

  13. Growth dynamics and gas transport mechanism of nanobubbles in graphene liquid cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dongha; Park, Jong Bo; Kim, Yong-Jin; Kim, Sang Jin; Kang, Jin Hyoun; Lee, Bora; Cho, Sung-Pyo; Hong, Byung Hee; Novoselov, Konstantin S

    2015-02-02

    Formation, evolution and vanishing of bubbles are common phenomena in nature, which can be easily observed in boiling or falling water, carbonated drinks, gas-forming electrochemical reactions and so on. However, the morphology and the growth dynamics of the bubbles at nanoscale have not been fully investigated owing to the lack of proper imaging tools that can visualize nanoscale objects in the liquid phase. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the nanobubbles in water encapsulated by graphene membrane can be visualized by in-situ ultra-high vacuum transmission electron microscopy. Our microscopic results indicate two distinct growth mechanisms of merging nanobubbles and the existence of a critical radius of nanobubbles that determines the unusually long stability of nanobubbles. Interestingly, the gas transport through ultrathin water membranes at nanobubble interface is free from dissolution, which is clearly different from conventional gas transport that includes condensation, transmission and evaporation.

  14. Construction and operation of a gas transport CO/sub 2/ laser

    SciTech Connect

    Gutu, I.; Udrea, M.V.; Dumitras, D.C.; Draganescu, V.; WANG Zheen; ZHA Hongkui; CHENG Zhaogu

    1986-01-01

    The construction and operation of a CO/sub 2/ gas transport laser with cylindrical geometry is presented. The aim of this work is the achievement of small-size and small-weight gas transport lasers at high output level. We have accomplished this by using a single metallic cylinder for the electric discharge, recirculation, and the cooling of the gas mixture. More than 1-kW of laser power was obtained from a 1.45 m long, 0.59 m diameter laser weighing about 180 kg. Typical parameters were: 40 Torr pressure, CO/sub 2/: N/sub 2/: He = 1.: 8:11, discharge current 8 A, 12% efficiency, 28 x 22 mm/sup 2/ laser spot.

  15. Event-based stormwater quality and quantity loadings from elevated urban infrastructure affected by transportation.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, John J; Hird, Jonathan P; Cartledge, Frank K; Tittlebaum, Marty E

    2005-01-01

    Urban-rainfall runoff affected by transportation is a complex matrix of a very wide gradation of particulate matter (< 1 to > 10 000 microm) and dissolved inorganic and organic constituents. Particulate matter transported by rainfall runoff can be a significant vector for many reactive particulate-bound constituents, particularly metal elements. The water quality and hydrology of nine events from a representative elevated section of Interstate 10 (I-10) (eastbound average daily traffic load of 70 400 vehicles) in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, were characterized and compared with respect to the passage of each hydrograph. Residence time on the paved concrete surface was less than 30 minutes for all events. Results indicate that event-mean concentrations (EMCs) of particulate matter as total-suspended solids (TSS) (138 to 561 mg/L) and chemical-oxygen demand (COD) (128 to 1440 mg/L) were greater than those found in untreated municipal wastewater from the same service area. Particulate-matter dissolution and COD partitioned as a function of pH, pavement residence time, and organic content. In general, delivery of mass for aggregate indices, such as particulate matter (measured as TSS) and COD mass, were driven by the hydrology of the event, while concentrations of aggregate-constituent measurements, such as total-dissolved solids (TDS), illustrated an exponential-type decline during the rising limb of the hydrograph. Despite the short residence times, wide solids gradation, partitioning, and complexity of the rainfall-runoff chemistry, conductivity and dissolved solids were strongly correlated. Characterization of the transport and loads of constituents in urban-rainfall runoff, as a function of hydrology, is a necessary first step when considering treatability, structural or nonstructural controls, and mass trading for discharges from paved infrastructure. PMID:16121503

  16. Lactate kinetics of rainbow trout during graded exercise: do catheters affect the cost of transport?

    PubMed

    Teulier, Loïc; Omlin, Teye; Weber, Jean-Michel

    2013-12-15

    Changes in lactate kinetics as a function of exercise intensity have never been measured in an ectotherm. Continuous infusion of a tracer is necessary to quantify rates of lactate appearance (Ra) and disposal (Rd), but it requires double catheterization, which could interfere with swimming. Using rainbow trout, our goals were to: (1) determine the potential effects of catheters and blood sampling on metabolic rate (O2), total cost of transport (TCOT), net cost of transport (NCOT) and critical swimming speed (Ucrit), and (2) monitor changes in lactate fluxes during prolonged, steady-state swimming or graded swimming from rest to Ucrit. This athletic species maintains high baseline lactate fluxes of 24 μmol kg(-1) min(-1) that are only increased at intensities >2.4 body lengths (BL) s(-1) or 85% Ucrit. As the fish reaches Ucrit, Ra is more strongly stimulated (+67% to 40.4 μmol kg(-1) min(-1)) than Rd (+41% to 34.7 μmol kg(-1) min(-1)), causing a fourfold increase in blood lactate concentration. Without this stimulation of Rd during intense swimming, lactate accumulation would double. By contrast, steady-state exercise at 1.7 BL s(-1) increases lactate fluxes to ~30 μmol kg(-1) min(-1), with a trivial mismatch between Ra and Rd that only affects blood concentration minimally. Results also show that the catheterizations and blood sampling needed to measure metabolite kinetics in exercising fish have no significant impact on O2 or TCOT. However, these experimental procedures affect locomotion energetics by increasing NCOT at high speeds and by decreasing Ucrit.

  17. Aquaporin-9 and urea transporter-A gene deletions affect urea transmembrane passage in murine hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Jelen, Sabina; Gena, Patrizia; Lebeck, Janne; Rojek, Aleksandra; Praetorius, Jeppe; Frøkiaer, Jørgen; Fenton, Robert A; Nielsen, Søren; Calamita, Giuseppe; Rützler, Michael

    2012-12-01

    In mammals, the majority of nitrogen from protein degradation is disposed of as urea. Several studies have partly characterized expression of urea transporters (UTs) in hepatocytes, where urea is produced. Nevertheless, the contribution of these proteins to hepatocyte urea permeability (P(urea)) and their role in liver physiology remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to biophysically examine hepatocyte urea transport. We hypothesized that the water, glycerol, and urea channel aquaporin-9 (AQP9) is involved in hepatocyte urea release. Stopped-flow light-scattering measurements determined that the urea channel inhibitors phloretin and dimethylurea reduced urea permeability of hepatocyte basolateral membranes by 70 and 40%, respectively. In basolateral membranes isolated from AQP9(-/-) and UT-A1/3(-/-) single-knockout and AQP9(-/-):UT-A1/3(-/-) double-knockout mice, P(urea) was decreased by 30, 40, and 76%, respectively, compared with AQP9(+/-):UT-A1/3(+/-) mice. However, expression analysis by RT-PCR did not identify known UT-A transcripts in liver. High-protein diet followed by 24-h fasting affected the concentrations of urea and ammonium ions in AQP9(-/-) mouse liver and plasma without generating an apparent tissue-to-plasma urea gradient. We conclude that AQP9 and unidentified UT-A urea channels constitute primary but redundant urea facilitators in murine hepatocytes.

  18. Exploring Factors Affecting Emergency Medical Services Staffs' Decision about Transporting Medical Patients to Medical Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Seyedin, Hesam; Jamshidi-Orak, Roohangiz

    2014-01-01

    Transfer of patients in medical emergency situations is one of the most important missions of emergency medical service (EMS) staffs. So this study was performed to explore affecting factors in EMS staffs' decision during transporting of patients in medical situations to medical facilities. The participants in this qualitative study consisted of 18 EMS staffs working in prehospital care facilities in Tehran, Iran. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews. The data were analyzed using a content analysis approach. The data analysis revealed the following theme: “degree of perceived risk in EMS staffs and their patients.” This theme consisted of two main categories: (1) patient's condition' and (2) the context of the EMS mission'. The patent's condition category emerged from “physical health statuses,” “socioeconomic statuses,” and “cultural background” subcategories. The context of the EMS mission also emerged from two subcategories of “characteristics of the mission” and EMS staffs characteristics'. EMS system managers can consider adequate technical, informational, financial, educational, and emotional supports to facilitate the decision making of their staffs. Also, development of an effective and user-friendly checklist and scoring system was recommended for quick and easy recognition of patients' needs for transportation in a prehospital situation. PMID:24891953

  19. Factors affecting pesticide occurrence and transport in a large Midwestern river basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crawford, Charles G.

    2001-01-01

    Several factors affect the occurrence and transport of pesticides in surface waters of the 29,400 km2 White River Basin in Indiana. A relationship was found between pesticide use and the average annual concentration of that pesticide in the White River, although this relationship varies for different classes of pesticides. About one percent of the mass applied of each of the commonly used agricultural herbicides was transported from the basin via the White River. Peak pesticide concentrations were typically highest in late spring or early summer and were associated with periods of runoff following application. Concentrations of diazinon were higher in an urban basin than in two agricultural basins, corresponding to the common use of this insecticide on lawns and gardens in urban areas. Concentrations of atrazine, a corn herbicide widely used in the White River Basin, were higher in an agricultural basin with permeable, well-drained soils, than in an agricultural basin with less permeable, more poorly drained soils. Although use of butylate and cyanazine was comparable in the White River Basin between 1992 and 1994, concentrations in the White River of butylate, which is incorporated into soil, were substantially less than for cyanazine, which is typically applied to the soil surface.

  20. Characterization of Gas Transport Properties of Fractured Rocks By Borehole and Chamber Tests.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimo, M.; Shimaya, S.; Maejima, T.

    2014-12-01

    Gas transport characteristics of fractured rocks is a great concern to variety of engineering applications such as underground storage of LPG, nuclear waste disposal, CCS and gas flooding in the oil field. Besides absolute permeability, relative permeability and capillary pressure as a function of water saturation have direct influences to the results of two phase flow simulation. However, number of the reported gas flow tests for fractured rocks are limited, therefore, the applicability of the conventional two-phase flow functions used for porous media, such as Mualem-van Genuchten model, to prediction of the gas transport in the fractured rock mass are not well understood. The authors conducted the two types of in-situ tests, with different scales, a borehole gas-injection test and a chamber gas-injection test in fractured granitic rock. These tests were conducted in the Cretaceous granitic rocks at the Namikata underground LPG storage cavern construction site in Ehime Prefecture in Japan, preceding to the cavern scale gas-tightness test. A borehole injection test was conducted using vertical and sub-vertical boreholes drilled from the water injection tunnel nearly at the depth of the top of the cavern, EL-150m. A new type downhole gas injection equipment that is capable to create a small 'cavern' within a borehole was developed. After performing a series of preliminary tests to investigate the hydraulic conductivity and gas-tightness, i.e. threshold pressure, gas injection tests were conducted under different gas pressure. Fig.1 shows an example of the test results From a chamber test using a air pressurizing chamber with volume of approximately166m3, the gas-tightness was confirmed within the uncertainty of 22Pa under the storage pressure of 0.7MPa, however, significant air leakage occurred possibly through an open fracture intersecting the chamber just after cavern pressure exceeds the initial hydrostatic pressure at the ceiling level of the chamber. Anomalies

  1. 3-D simulation of gases transport under condition of inert gas injection into goaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mao-Xi; Shi, Guo-Qing; Guo, Zhixiong; Wang, Yan-Ming; Ma, Li-Yang

    2016-02-01

    To prevent coal spontaneous combustion in mines, it is paramount to understand O2 gas distribution under condition of inert gas injection into goaf. In this study, the goaf was modeled as a 3-D porous medium based on stress distribution. The variation of O2 distribution influenced by CO2 or N2 injection was simulated based on the multi-component gases transport and the Navier-Stokes equations using Fluent. The numerical results without inert gas injection were compared with field measurements to validate the simulation model. Simulations with inert gas injection show that CO2 gas mainly accumulates at the goaf floor level; however, a notable portion of N2 gas moves upward. The evolution of the spontaneous combustion risky zone with continuous inert gas injection can be classified into three phases: slow inerting phase, rapid accelerating inerting phase, and stable inerting phase. The asphyxia zone with CO2 injection is about 1.25-2.4 times larger than that with N2 injection. The efficacy of preventing and putting out mine fires is strongly related with the inert gas injecting position. Ideal injections are located in the oxidation zone or the transitional zone between oxidation zone and heat dissipation zone.

  2. Cold flame on Biofilm - Transport of Plasma Chemistry from Gas to Liquid Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Michael

    2014-10-01

    One of the most active and fastest growing fields in low-temperature plasma science today is biological effects of gas plasmas and their translation in many challenges of societal importance such as healthcare, environment, agriculture, and nanoscale fabrication and synthesis. Using medicine as an example, there are already three FDA-approved plasma-based surgical procedures for tissue ablation and blood coagulation and at least five phase-II clinical trials on plasma-assisted wound healing therapies. A key driver for realizing the immense application potential of near room-temperature ambient pressure gas plasmas, commonly known as cold atmospheric plasmas or CAP, is to build a sizeable interdisciplinary knowledge base with which to unravel, optimize, and indeed design how reactive plasma species interact with cells and their key components such as protein and DNA. Whilst a logical objective, it is a formidable challenge not least since existing knowledge of gas discharges is largely in the gas-phase and therefore not directly applicable to cell-containing matters that are covered by or embedded in liquid (e.g. biofluid). Here, we study plasma inactivation of biofilms, a jelly-like structure that bacteria use to protect themselves and a major source of antimicrobial resistance. As 60--90% of biofilm is made of water, we develop a holistic model incorporating physics and chemistry in the upstream CAP-generating region, a plasma-exit region as a buffer for as-phase transport, and a downstream liquid region bordering the gas buffer region. A special model is developed to account for rapid chemical reactions accompanied the transport of gas-phase plasma species through the gas-liquid interface and for liquid-phase chemical reactions. Numerical simulation is used to illustrate how key reactive oxygen species (ROS) are transported into the liquid, and this is supported with experimental data of both biofilm inactivation using plasmas and electron spin spectroscopy (ESR

  3. Ssh4, Rcr2 and Rcr1 affect plasma membrane transporter activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kota, Jhansi; Melin-Larsson, Monika; Ljungdahl, Per O; Forsberg, Hanna

    2007-04-01

    Nutrient uptake in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a highly regulated process. Cells adjust levels of nutrient transporters within the plasma membrane at multiple stages of the secretory and endosomal pathways. In the absence of the ER-membrane-localized chaperone Shr3, amino acid permeases (AAP) inefficiently fold and are largely retained in the ER. Consequently, shr3 null mutants exhibit greatly reduced rates of amino acid uptake due to lower levels of AAPs in their plasma membranes. To further our understanding of mechanisms affecting AAP localization, we identified SSH4 and RCR2 as high-copy suppressors of shr3 null mutations. The overexpression of SSH4, RCR2, or the RCR2 homolog RCR1 increases steady-state AAP levels, whereas the genetic inactivation of these genes reduces steady-state AAP levels. Additionally, the overexpression of any of these suppressor genes exerts a positive effect on phosphate and uracil uptake systems. Ssh4 and Rcr2 primarily localize to structures associated with the vacuole; however, Rcr2 also localizes to endosome-like vesicles. Our findings are consistent with a model in which Ssh4, Rcr2, and presumably Rcr1, function within the endosome-vacuole trafficking pathway, where they affect events that determine whether plasma membrane proteins are degraded or routed to the plasma membrane.

  4. Preliminary assessment of the availability of U.S. natural gas resources to meet U.S. transportation energy demand.

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, M. K.; Moore, J. S.

    2002-03-04

    Recent studies have indicated that substitutes for conventional petroleum resources will be needed to meet U.S. transportation energy demand in the first half of this century. One possible substitute is natural gas which can be used as a transportation fuel directly in compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas vehicles or as resource fuel for the production of hydrogen for fuel cell vehicles. This paper contains a preliminary assessment of the availability of U.S. natural gas resources to meet future U.S. transportation fuel demand. Several scenarios of natural gas demand, including transportation demand, in the U.S. to 2050 are developed. Natural gas resource estimates for the U. S. are discussed. Potential Canadian and Mexican exports to the U.S. are estimated. Two scenarios of potential imports from outside North America are also developed. Considering all these potential imports, U.S. natural gas production requirements to 2050 to meet the demand scenarios are developed and compared with the estimates of U.S. natural gas resources. The comparison results in a conclusion that (1) given the assumptions made, there are likely to be supply constraints on the availability of U.S. natural gas supply post-2020 and (2) if natural gas use in transportation grows substantially, it will have to compete with other sectors of the economy for that supply-constrained natural gas.

  5. Switch-Loop Flexibility Affects Transport of Large Drugs by the Promiscuous AcrB Multidrug Efflux Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hi-jea; Müller, Reinke T.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug efflux transporters recognize a variety of structurally unrelated compounds for which the molecular basis is poorly understood. For the resistance nodulation and cell division (RND) inner membrane component AcrB of the AcrAB-TolC multidrug efflux system from Escherichia coli, drug binding occurs at the access and deep binding pockets. These two binding areas are separated by an 11-amino-acid-residue-containing switch loop whose conformational flexibility is speculated to be essential for drug binding and transport. A G616N substitution in the switch loop has a distinct and local effect on the orientation of the loop and on the ability to transport larger drugs. Here, we report a distinct phenotypical pattern of drug recognition and transport for the G616N variant, indicating that drug substrates with minimal projection areas of >70 Å2 are less well transported than other substrates. PMID:24914123

  6. Understanding how hydrodynamics affects particle transport in saturated fractures using modelling and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cianflone, S.; Lakhian, V.; Dickson, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Approximately 35% of Canadians and Americans utilize groundwater for drinking water and as such, it is essential to understand the mechanisms which may jeopardize this resource. Porous media aquifers typically provide significant removal of particulate contaminants (eg. viruses, bacteria); however, fractures in fractured rock aquifers and aquitards often provide pathways for particles to move in greater numbers and speed than in porous media. Thus, understanding flow and transport in fractures is important for the preservation and use of groundwater sources. Models based on coupling flow and transport equations can be used in understanding transport in fractures. Both experiments and simulations have shown that there are inconsistencies in current transport, attachment and detachment theory, particularly when particle size is varied. The assumption that hydrodynamic effects do not significantly affect transport of particles is likely untrue. As well, it has been shown that preferential flow paths occur in fractures, but the effects of path specific properties such as fracture geometry have yet to be thoroughly explored. It has been observed that eddies caused by local changes in geometry exist in fractures in the environment and models have demonstrated that such eddies will retard the flow of particles. In this work, two 2D fractures were randomly generated with a mean aperture of approximately 2mm. Finite element software, COMSOL Multiphysics, generated flow fields through the fractures by numerically solving the steady-state Navier-Stokes equation for varied flow rates. Eddies were observed in one of the fractures at both low (~1 m/day) and high (>100 m/day) velocities. A program was written using random walk particle tracking to simulate transport. Theories of attachment, detachment and matrix flow are not included in this model in order to isolate hydrodynamic forces. In combination with the modelling procedure, the two fractures were inscribed into pieces of

  7. Noble Gas Signatures in Antrim Shale Gas in the Michigan Basin - Assessing Compositional Variability and Transport Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, T.; Castro, M. C.; Ellis, B. R.; Hall, C. M.; Lohmann, K. C.; Bouvier, L.

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies in the Michigan Basin looked at the atmospheric and terrigenic noble gas signatures of deep brines to place constraints on the past thermal history of the basin and to assess the extent of vertical transport processes within this sedimentary system. In this contribution, we present noble gas data of shale gas samples from the Antrim shale formation in the Michigan Basin. The Antrim shale was one of the first economic shale-gas plays in the U.S. and has been actively developed since the 1980's. This study pioneers the use of noble gases in subsurface shale gas in the Michigan Basin to clarify the nature of vertical transport processes within the sedimentary sequence and to assess potential variability of noble gas signatures in shales. Antrim Shale gas samples were analyzed for all stable noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) from samples collected at depths between 300 and 500m. Preliminary results show R/Ra values (where R and Ra are the measured and atmospheric 3He/4He ratios, respectively) varying from 0.022 to 0.21. Although most samples fall within typical crustal R/Ra range values (~0.02-0.05), a few samples point to the presence of a mantle He component with higher R/Ra ratios. Samples with higher R/Ra values also display higher 20Ne/22Ne ratios, up to 10.4, and further point to the presence of mantle 20Ne. The presence of crustally produced nucleogenic 21Ne and radiogenic 40Ar is also apparent with 21Ne/22Ne ratios up to 0.033 and 40Ar/36Ar ratios up to 312. The presence of crustally produced 4He, 21Ne and 40Ar is not spatially homogeneous within the Antrim shale. Areas of higher crustal 4He production appear distinct to those of crustally produced 21Ne and 40Ar and are possibly related the presence of different production levels within the shale with varying concentrations of parent elements.

  8. Natural gas transport by plastic pipes. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of plastic piping to transport natural gas or liquid propane gas. The interaction between gas odorants and plastic pipe, the effects of aging on plastic pipe used to transport gas, and pipe failure analyses are examined. Bending, joining, and repair methods are discussed. Composite reinforced plastic pipes and plastic coated pipes are considered. Polyethylene and epoxy composites are among the materials discussed. Gas main upgrading projects that replaced old pipes with plastic ones are briefly cited. (Contains a minimum of 91 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  9. Natural gas transport by plastic pipes. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the use of plastic piping to transport natural gas or liquid propane gas. The interaction between gas odorants and plastic pipe, the effects of aging on plastic pipe used to transport gas, and pipe failure analyses are examined. Bending, joining, and repair methods are discussed. Composite reinforced plastic pipes and plastic coated pipes are considered. Polyethylene and epoxy composites are among the materials discussed. Gas main upgrading projects that replaced old pipes with plastic ones are briefly cited. (Contains a minimum of 89 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. Radiation-transport method to simulate noncontinuum gas flows for MEMS devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert

    2004-01-01

    A Micro Electro Mechanical System (MEMS) typically consists of micron-scale parts that move through a gas at atmospheric or reduced pressure. In this situation, the gas-molecule mean free path is comparable to the geometric features of the microsystem, so the gas flow is noncontinuum. When mean-free-path effects cannot be neglected, the Boltzmann equation must be used to describe the gas flow. Solution of the Boltzmann equation is difficult even for the simplest case because of its sevenfold dimensionality (one temporal dimension, three spatial dimensions, and three velocity dimensions) and because of the integral nature of the collision term. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is the method of choice to simulate high-speed noncontinuum flows. However, since DSMC uses computational molecules to represent the gas, the inherent statistical noise must be minimized by sampling large numbers of molecules. Since typical microsystem velocities are low (< 1 m/s) compared to molecular velocities ({approx}400 m/s), the number of molecular samples required to achieve 1% precision can exceed 1010 per cell. The Discrete Velocity Gas (DVG) method, an approach motivated by radiation transport, provides another way to simulate noncontinuum gas flows. Unlike DSMC, the DVG method restricts molecular velocities to have only certain discrete values. The transport of the number density of a velocity state is governed by a discrete Boltzmann equation that has one temporal dimension and three spatial dimensions and a polynomial collision term. Specification and implementation of DVG models are discussed, and DVG models are applied to Couette flow and to Fourier flow. While the DVG results for these benchmark problems are qualitatively correct, the errors in the shear stress and the heat flux can be order-unity even for DVG models with 88 velocity states. It is concluded that the DVG method, as described herein, is not sufficiently accurate to simulate the low-speed gas flows

  11. Treating cattle with antibiotics affects greenhouse gas emissions, and microbiota in dung and dung beetles.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Tobin J; Fierer, Noah; Hardwick, Bess; Simojoki, Asko; Slade, Eleanor; Taponen, Juhani; Viljanen, Heidi; Roslin, Tomas

    2016-05-25

    Antibiotics are routinely used to improve livestock health and growth. However, this practice may have unintended environmental impacts mediated by interactions among the wide range of micro- and macroorganisms found in agroecosystems. For example, antibiotics may alter microbial emissions of greenhouse gases by affecting livestock gut microbiota. Furthermore, antibiotics may affect the microbiota of non-target animals that rely on dung, such as dung beetles, and the ecosystem services they provide. To examine these interactions, we treated cattle with a commonly used broad-spectrum antibiotic and assessed downstream effects on microbiota in dung and dung beetles, greenhouse gas fluxes from dung, and beetle size, survival and reproduction. We found that antibiotic treatment restructured microbiota in dung beetles, which harboured a microbial community distinct from those in the dung they were consuming. The antibiotic effect on beetle microbiota was not associated with smaller size or lower numbers. Unexpectedly, antibiotic treatment raised methane fluxes from dung, possibly by altering the interactions between methanogenic archaea and bacteria in rumen and dung environments. Our findings that antibiotics restructure dung beetle microbiota and modify greenhouse gas emissions from dung indicate that antibiotic treatment may have unintended, cascading ecological effects that extend beyond the target animal.

  12. Treating cattle with antibiotics affects greenhouse gas emissions, and microbiota in dung and dung beetles.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Tobin J; Fierer, Noah; Hardwick, Bess; Simojoki, Asko; Slade, Eleanor; Taponen, Juhani; Viljanen, Heidi; Roslin, Tomas

    2016-05-25

    Antibiotics are routinely used to improve livestock health and growth. However, this practice may have unintended environmental impacts mediated by interactions among the wide range of micro- and macroorganisms found in agroecosystems. For example, antibiotics may alter microbial emissions of greenhouse gases by affecting livestock gut microbiota. Furthermore, antibiotics may affect the microbiota of non-target animals that rely on dung, such as dung beetles, and the ecosystem services they provide. To examine these interactions, we treated cattle with a commonly used broad-spectrum antibiotic and assessed downstream effects on microbiota in dung and dung beetles, greenhouse gas fluxes from dung, and beetle size, survival and reproduction. We found that antibiotic treatment restructured microbiota in dung beetles, which harboured a microbial community distinct from those in the dung they were consuming. The antibiotic effect on beetle microbiota was not associated with smaller size or lower numbers. Unexpectedly, antibiotic treatment raised methane fluxes from dung, possibly by altering the interactions between methanogenic archaea and bacteria in rumen and dung environments. Our findings that antibiotics restructure dung beetle microbiota and modify greenhouse gas emissions from dung indicate that antibiotic treatment may have unintended, cascading ecological effects that extend beyond the target animal. PMID:27226475

  13. The Integration of a Structural Water Gas Shift Catalyst with a Vanadium Alloy Hydrogen Transport Device

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Thomas; Argyle, Morris; Popa, Tiberiu

    2009-06-30

    This project is in response to a requirement for a system that combines water gas shift technology with separation technology for coal derived synthesis gas. The justification of such a system would be improved efficiency for the overall hydrogen production. By removing hydrogen from the synthesis gas stream, the water gas shift equilibrium would force more carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and maximize the total hydrogen produced. Additional benefit would derive from the reduction in capital cost of plant by the removal of one step in the process by integrating water gas shift with the membrane separation device. The answer turns out to be that the integration of hydrogen separation and water gas shift catalysis is possible and desirable. There are no significant roadblocks to that combination of technologies. The problem becomes one of design and selection of materials to optimize, or at least maximize performance of the two integrated steps. A goal of the project was to investigate the effects of alloying elements on the performance of vanadium membranes with respect to hydrogen flux and fabricability. Vanadium was chosen as a compromise between performance and cost. It is clear that the vanadium alloys for this application can be produced, but the approach is not simple and the results inconsistent. For any future contracts, large single batches of alloy would be obtained and rolled with larger facilities to produce the most consistent thin foils possible. Brazing was identified as a very likely choice for sealing the membranes to structural components. As alloying was beneficial to hydrogen transport, it became important to identify where those alloying elements might be detrimental to brazing. Cataloging positive and negative alloying effects was a significant portion of the initial project work on vanadium alloying. A water gas shift catalyst with ceramic like structural characteristics was the second large goal of the project. Alumina was added as a

  14. New Natural Gas Storage and Transportation Capabilities Utilizing Rapid Methane Hydrate Formation Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, T.D.; Taylor, C.E.; Bernardo, M.

    2010-01-01

    Natural gas (methane as the major component) is a vital fossil fuel for the United States and around the world. One of the problems with some of this natural gas is that it is in remote areas where there is little or no local use for the gas. Nearly 50 percent worldwide natural gas reserves of ~6,254.4 trillion ft3 (tcf) is considered as stranded gas, with 36 percent or ~86 tcf of the U.S natural gas reserves totaling ~239 tcf, as stranded gas [1] [2]. The worldwide total does not include the new estimates by U.S. Geological Survey of 1,669 tcf of natural gas north of the Arctic Circle, [3] and the U.S. ~200,000 tcf of natural gas or methane hydrates, most of which are stranded gas reserves. Domestically and globally there is a need for newer and more economic storage, transportation and processing capabilities to deliver the natural gas to markets. In order to bring this resource to market, one of several expensive methods must be used: 1. Construction and operation of a natural gas pipeline 2. Construction of a storage and compression facility to compress the natural gas (CNG) at 3,000 to 3,600 psi, increasing its energy density to a point where it is more economical to ship, or 3. Construction of a cryogenic liquefaction facility to produce LNG, (requiring cryogenic temperatures at <-161 °C) and construction of a cryogenic receiving port. Each of these options for the transport requires large capital investment along with elaborate safety systems. The Department of Energy's Office of Research and Development Laboratories at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is investigating new and novel approaches for rapid and continuous formation and production of synthetic NGHs. These synthetic hydrates can store up to 164 times their volume in gas while being maintained at 1 atmosphere and between -10 to -20°C for several weeks. Owing to these properties, new process for the economic storage and transportation of these synthetic hydrates could be envisioned

  15. Using a Gas-Phase Tracer Test to Characterize the Impact of Landfill Gas Generation on Advective-Dispersive Transport of VOCs in the Vadose Zone

    PubMed Central

    Monger, Gregg R.; Duncan, Candice Morrison; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    A gas-phase tracer test (GTT) was conducted at a landfill in Tucson, AZ, to help elucidate the impact of landfill gas generation on the transport and fate of chlorinated aliphatic volatile organic contaminants (VOCs). Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was used as the non-reactive gas tracer. Gas samples were collected from a multiport monitoring well located 15.2 m from the injection well, and analyzed for SF6, CH4, CO2, and VOCs. The travel times determined for SF6 from the tracer test are approximately two to ten times smaller than estimated travel times that incorporate transport by only gas-phase diffusion. In addition, significant concentrations of CH4 and CO2 were measured, indicating production of landfill gas. Based on these results, it is hypothesized that the enhanced rates of transport observed for SF6 are caused by advective transport associated with landfill gas generation. The rates of transport varied vertically, which is attributed to multiple factors including spatial variability of water content, refuse mass, refuse permeability, and gas generation. PMID:26380532

  16. Optimization problems in natural gas transportation systems. A state-of-the-art review

    SciTech Connect

    Ríos-Mercado, Roger Z.; Borraz-Sánchez, Conrado

    2015-03-24

    Our paper provides a review on the most relevant research works conducted to solve natural gas transportation problems via pipeline systems. The literature reveals three major groups of gas pipeline systems, namely gathering, transmission, and distribution systems. In this work, we aim at presenting a detailed discussion of the efforts made in optimizing natural gas transmission lines.There is certainly a vast amount of research done over the past few years on many decision-making problems in the natural gas industry and, specifically, in pipeline network optimization. In this work, we present a state-of-the-art survey focusing on specific categories that include short-term basis storage (line-packing problems), gas quality satisfaction (pooling problems), and compressor station modeling (fuel cost minimization problems). We also discuss both steady-state and transient optimization models highlighting the modeling aspects and the most relevant solution approaches known to date. Although the literature on natural gas transmission system problems is quite extensive, this is, to the best of our knowledge, the first comprehensive review or survey covering this specific research area on natural gas transmission from an operations research perspective. Furthermore, this paper includes a discussion of the most important and promising research areas in this field. Hence, our paper can serve as a useful tool to gain insight into the evolution of the many real-life applications and most recent advances in solution methodologies arising from this exciting and challenging research area of decision-making problems.

  17. Liquid natural gas as a transportation fuel in the heavy trucking industry. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Sutton, W.H.

    1997-06-30

    This report encompasses the second year of a proposed three year project with emphasis focused on fundamental research issues in Use of Liquid Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel in the Heavy Trucking Industry. These issues may be categorized as (1) direct diesel replacement with LNG fuel, and (2) long term storage/utilization of LNG vent gases produced by tank storage and fueling/handling operation. The results of this work are expected to enhance utilization of LNG as a transportation fuel. The paper discusses the following topics: (A) Fueling Delivery to the Engine, Engine Considerations, and Emissions: (1) Atomization and/or vaporization of LNG for direct injection diesel-type natural gas engines; (2) Fundamentals of direct replacement of diesel fuel by LNG in simulated combustion; (3) Distribution of nitric oxide and emissions formation from natural gas injection; and (B) Short and long term storage: (1) Modification by partial direct conversion of natural gas composition for improved storage characteristics; (2) LNG vent gas adsorption and recovery using activate carbon and modified adsorbents; (3) LNG storage at moderate conditions.

  18. Application of CFRP with High Hydrogen Gas Barrier Characteristics to Fuel Tanks of Space Transportation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonemoto, Koichi; Yamamoto, Yuta; Okuyama, Keiichi; Ebina, Takeo

    In the future, carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs) with high hydrogen gas barrier performance will find wide applications in all industrial hydrogen tanks that aim at weight reduction; the use of such materials will be preferred to the use of conventional metallic materials such as stainless steel or aluminum. The hydrogen gas barrier performance of CFRP will become an important issue with the introduction of hydrogen-fuel aircraft. It will also play an important role in realizing fully reusable space transportation system that will have high specific tensile CFRP structures. Such materials are also required for the manufacture of high-pressure hydrogen gas vessels for use in the fuel cell systems of automobiles. This paper introduces a new composite concept that can be used to realize CFRPs with high hydrogen gas barrier performance for applications in the cryogenic tanks of fully reusable space transportation system by the incorporation of a nonmetallic crystal layer, which is actually a dense and highly oriented clay crystal laminate. The preliminary test results show that the hydrogen gas barrier characteristics of this material after cryogenic heat shocks and cyclic loads are still better than those of other polymer materials by approximately two orders of magnitude.

  19. Does nitrogen gas bubbled through a low density polymer gel dosimeter solution affect the polymerization process?

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Gholami, Mehrdad; Pourfallah, Tayyeb Allahverdi; Keshtkar, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: On account of the lower electron density in the lung tissue, the dose distribution in the lung cannot be verified with the existing polymer gel dosimeters. Thus, the aims of this study are to make a low density polymer gel dosimeter and investigate the effect of nitrogen gas bubbles on the R2 responses and its homogeneity. Materials and Methods: Two different types of low density polymer gel dosimeters were prepared according to a composition proposed by De Deene, with some modifications. In the first type, no nitrogen gas was perfused through the gel solution and water. In the second type, to expel the dissolved oxygen, nitrogen gas was perfused through the water and gel solution. The post-irradiation times in the gels were 24 and 5 hours, respectively, with and without perfusion of nitrogen gas through the water and gel solution. Results: In the first type of gel, there was a linear correlation between the doses and R2 responses from 0 to 12 Gy. The fabricated gel had a higher dynamic range than the other low density polymer gel dosimeter; but its background R2 response was higher. In the second type, no difference in R2 response was seen in the dose ranges from 0 to 18 Gy. Both gels had a mass density between 0.35 and 0.45 g.cm-3 and CT values of about -650 to -750 Hounsfield units. Conclusion: It appeared that reactions between gelatin-free radicals and monomers, due to an increase in the gel temperature during rotation in the household mixer, led to a higher R2-background response. In the second type of gel, it seemed that the collapse of the nitrogen bubbles was the main factor that affected the R2-responses. PMID:26015914

  20. Coupling of radiation transport with the gas dynamics for HYLIFE-II analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.M.; Schrock, V.E.; Peterson, P.F.

    1994-11-01

    Gas dynamics in an inertial confinement fusion reactor involves extremely high energy and temperatures. In those temperature range, gaseous radiation can be critical to the dynamics phenomenon. This study presents a method that couples a one-dimensional radiation transfer model with an Eulerian gas dynamics code for HYLIFE-II studies. The results reveal that radiation modifies the shock interaction pattern drastically. Although there are more sophisticated methods of computing one-dimensional radiation transport than the model implemented in current study, the methodology used here is extendible to two-dimensional schemes.

  1. A lattice gas model for erosion and particles transport in a fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopard, Bastien; Masselot, Alexandre; Dupuis, Alexandre

    2000-07-01

    We consider a simple lattice gas model to simulate erosion, deposition and particle transport in a streaming fluid. In our approach, the fluid is described by a standard lattice Boltzmann model and the granular suspension by a multiparticle cellular automata. A good agreement is obtained between the predictions of the model and field measurements, as observed by analyzing the deposition patterns resulting from various snow and sand transport phenomena. In particular we study the case of ripples formation and simulate the scour appearing around a submarine pipe.

  2. Measuring spatially resolved gas transport and adsorption in coal using MRI.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, C; Bencsik, M

    2001-01-01

    The storage and transport of gases in coal is of tremendous importance in the utilisation of coalbeds, and in particular the recovery of methane. There is also increasing interest in the use of coal mines as sites for carbon dioxide sequestration to alleviate the potentially harmful effects of global warming. This paper demonstrates the use of magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the spatiotemporal dynamics of gas transport in coal. The presence of significant structural heterogeneities in the coal was observed. Dynamical effects displayed a broad range of time constants ranging from minutes to days. PMID:11445356

  3. Alpha-Synuclein affects neurite morphology, autophagy, vesicle transport and axonal degeneration in CNS neurons

    PubMed Central

    Koch, J C; Bitow, F; Haack, J; d'Hedouville, Z; Zhang, J-N; Tönges, L; Michel, U; Oliveira, L M A; Jovin, T M; Liman, J; Tatenhorst, L; Bähr, M; Lingor, P

    2015-01-01

    Many neuropathological and experimental studies suggest that the degeneration of dopaminergic terminals and axons precedes the demise of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, which finally results in the clinical symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD). The mechanisms underlying this early axonal degeneration are, however, still poorly understood. Here, we examined the effects of overexpression of human wildtype alpha-synuclein (αSyn-WT), a protein associated with PD, and its mutant variants αSyn-A30P and -A53T on neurite morphology and functional parameters in rat primary midbrain neurons (PMN). Moreover, axonal degeneration after overexpression of αSyn-WT and -A30P was analyzed by live imaging in the rat optic nerve in vivo. We found that overexpression of αSyn-WT and of its mutants A30P and A53T impaired neurite outgrowth of PMN and affected neurite branching assessed by Sholl analysis in a variant-dependent manner. Surprisingly, the number of primary neurites per neuron was increased in neurons transfected with αSyn. Axonal vesicle transport was examined by live imaging of PMN co-transfected with EGFP-labeled synaptophysin. Overexpression of all αSyn variants significantly decreased the number of motile vesicles and decelerated vesicle transport compared with control. Macroautophagic flux in PMN was enhanced by αSyn-WT and -A53T but not by αSyn-A30P. Correspondingly, colocalization of αSyn and the autophagy marker LC3 was reduced for αSyn-A30P compared with the other αSyn variants. The number of mitochondria colocalizing with LC3 as a marker for mitophagy did not differ among the groups. In the rat optic nerve, both αSyn-WT and -A30P accelerated kinetics of acute axonal degeneration following crush lesion as analyzed by in vivo live imaging. We conclude that αSyn overexpression impairs neurite outgrowth and augments axonal degeneration, whereas axonal vesicle transport and autophagy are severely altered. PMID:26158517

  4. Geochemical factors affecting radionuclide transport through near and far fields at a Low-Level Waste Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, D.I.; Seme, R.J.; Piepkho, M.G.

    1995-03-01

    The concentration of low-level waste (LLW) contaminants in groundwater is determined by the amount of contaminant present in the solid waste, rate of release from the waste and surrounding barriers, and a number of geochemical processes including adsorption, desorption, diffusion, precipitation, and dissolution. To accurately predict radionuclide transport through the subsurface, it is essential that the important geochemical processes affecting radionuclide transport be identified and, perhaps more importantly, accurately quantified and described in a mathematically defensible manner.

  5. Increased Seasonal Variation in Serotonin Transporter Binding in Seasonal Affective Disorder.

    PubMed

    Tyrer, Andrea E; Levitan, Robert D; Houle, Sylvain; Wilson, Alan A; Nobrega, José N; Meyer, Jeffrey H

    2016-09-01

    Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is highly prevalent with rates of 1-6% and greater prevalence at more extreme latitudes; however, there are almost no direct brain investigations of this disorder. In health, serotonin transporter binding potential (5-HTT BPND), an index of 5-HTT levels, is greater throughout the brain in fall-winter compared with spring-summer. We hypothesized that in SAD, this seasonal variation would be greater in brain regions containing structures that regulate affect such as the prefrontal and anterior cingulate cortices (PFC and ACC). Furthermore, given the dimensional nature of SAD symptoms, it was hypothesized that seasonal fluctuation of 5-HTT BPND in the PFC and ACC would be greatest in severe SAD. Twenty SAD and twenty healthy participants underwent [(11)C]DASB positron emission tomography scans in summer and winter to measure seasonal variation in [(11)C]DASB 5-HTT BPND. Seasonal increases in [(11)C]DASB 5-HTT BPND were greater in SAD compared with healthy in the PFC and ACC, primarily due to differences between severe SAD and healthy (severe SAD vs healthy; Mann-Whitney U, U=42.5 and 37.0, p=0.005 and 0.003, respectively; greater magnitude in severe SAD of 35.10 and 14.23%, respectively), with similar findings observed in other regions (U=40.0-62.0, p=0.004-0.048; greater magnitude in severe SAD of 13.16-17.49%). To our knowledge, this is the first brain biomarker identified in SAD. This creates a new opportunity for phase 0 studies to target this phenotype and optimize novel prevention/treatment strategies for SAD.

  6. Dust-storm dynamics over Sistan region, Iran: Seasonality, transport characteristics and affected areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashki, A.; Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Francois, P.; Kosmopoulos, P. G.; Legrand, M.

    2015-03-01

    The present work examines the seasonality, dust-plume altitudinal variation and affected areas for dust storms originated from the Sistan region, southeastern Iran during the summer (June-September) months of the period 2001-2012 synthesizing local meteorological records, satellite observations (TOMS, OMI, METEOSAT, MODIS) and HYSPLIT forward trajectories. Dust-storm days (356 in total) are associated with visibility below 1 km at Zabol, Iran meteorological station with higher frequency and intensity in June and July. Monthly-mean composite maps of TOMS and OMI AI show high (>3-3.5) values over Sistan and nearby downwind areas. HYSPLIT forward-trajectory analysis at 500 m for air masses originated from Sistan on the dust-storm days shows that they usually follow an anti-clockwise transport direction at elevations usually below 2 km, initially moving southwards and then shifting to east-northeast when they are approaching the Arabian Sea coast. This is the result of the influence of the local topography and formation of thermal low-pressure systems over the arid lands. It is found that in few cases the dust storms from Sistan affect central/south Arabian Sea and India, while they control the aerosol loading over northernmost Arabian Sea. The Infrared Difference Dust Index (IDDI) images, which represent brightness temperature reduction due to dust presence over land, are used at specific periods of persistent dust storms over Sistan, confirming the main pathways of the dust plumes and illustrating the importance of the region as one of the most active dust sources in southwest Asia.

  7. Food chain transport of nanoparticles affects behaviour and fat metabolism in fish.

    PubMed

    Cedervall, Tommy; Hansson, Lars-Anders; Lard, Mercy; Frohm, Birgitta; Linse, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Nano-sized (10(-9)-10(-7) m) particles offer many technical and biomedical advances over the bulk material. The use of nanoparticles in cosmetics, detergents, food and other commercial products is rapidly increasing despite little knowledge of their effect on organism metabolism. We show here that commercially manufactured polystyrene nanoparticles, transported through an aquatic food chain from algae, through zooplankton to fish, affect lipid metabolism and behaviour of the top consumer. At least three independent metabolic parameters differed between control and test fish: the weight loss, the triglycerides∶cholesterol ratio in blood serum, and the distribution of cholesterol between muscle and liver. Moreover, we demonstrate that nanoparticles bind to apolipoprotein A-I in fish serum in-vitro, thereby restraining them from properly utilising their fat reserves if absorbed through ingestion. In addition to the metabolic effects, we show that consumption of nanoparticle-containing zooplankton affects the feeding behaviour of the fish. The time it took the fish to consume 95% of the food presented to them was more than doubled for nanoparticle-exposed compared to control fish. Since many nano-sized products will, through the sewage system, end up in freshwater and marine habitats, our study provides a potential bioassay for testing new nano-sized material before manufacturing. In conclusion, our study shows that from knowledge of the molecular composition of the protein corona around nanoparticles it is possible to make a testable molecular hypothesis and bioassay of the potential biological risks of a defined nanoparticle at the organism and ecosystem level.

  8. Electronic transport properties of BN sheet on adsorption of ammonia (NH3) gas.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anurag; Bhat, Chetan; Jain, Sumit Kumar; Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Brajpuriya, Ranjeet

    2015-03-01

    We report the detection of ammonia gas through electronic and transport properties analysis of boron nitride sheet. The density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio approach has been used to calculate the electronic and transport properties of BN sheet in presence of ammonia gas. Analysis confirms that the band gap of the sheet increases due to presence of ammonia. Out of different positions, the bridge site is the most favorable position for adsorption of ammonia and the mechanism of interaction falls between weak electrostatic interaction and chemisorption. On relaxation, change in the bond angles of the ammonia molecule in various configurations has been reported with the distance between NH3 and the sheet. An increase in the transmission of electrons has been observed on increasing the bias voltage and I-V relationship. This confirms that, the current increases on applying the bias when ammonia is introduced while a very small current flows for pure BN sheet.

  9. Electronic transport properties of BN sheet on adsorption of ammonia (NH3) gas.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anurag; Bhat, Chetan; Jain, Sumit Kumar; Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Brajpuriya, Ranjeet

    2015-03-01

    We report the detection of ammonia gas through electronic and transport properties analysis of boron nitride sheet. The density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio approach has been used to calculate the electronic and transport properties of BN sheet in presence of ammonia gas. Analysis confirms that the band gap of the sheet increases due to presence of ammonia. Out of different positions, the bridge site is the most favorable position for adsorption of ammonia and the mechanism of interaction falls between weak electrostatic interaction and chemisorption. On relaxation, change in the bond angles of the ammonia molecule in various configurations has been reported with the distance between NH3 and the sheet. An increase in the transmission of electrons has been observed on increasing the bias voltage and I-V relationship. This confirms that, the current increases on applying the bias when ammonia is introduced while a very small current flows for pure BN sheet. PMID:25666919

  10. Simple and economic compressors for large-volume gas transport laser systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, H. J. J.; Dow, J.; Seguin, V. A.

    1983-10-01

    A simple and relatively inexpensive design is proposed for a large axial flow gas transport system for a high-power laser. The system can be easily assembled using standard low-cost commercially available blower blades and hubs injection-molded from high-strength plastics, such as polypropylene, delrin, fiberglass, and polyamid glass. Several gas transport systems of different sizes have been built using this approach, and all have demonstrated efficient trouble-free performance, provided the maximum tip speed specification has not been exceeded. It is also shown that the performance of the compressors can be further improved by incorporating a properly designed circular-to-rectangular transition section on each of the blower outputs as well as a venturi section on the inlets.

  11. Multiphase transport of gas and low loads of liquids in pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asante, Ben

    Multiphase flow of gas and low loads of liquids occurs frequently in natural gas gathering and transmission pipelines for both onshore and offshore operations. Literature and experimental investigations indicate that dispersed droplet and stratified flow patterns are obtained when gas and small quantities of liquids flow concurrently in a pipe. Very few correlations exist for the prediction of holdup and pressure drop for these systems and fewer still give satisfactory results. Experimental studies for air-oil and air-water systems flowing through small diameter plastic and steel horizontal pipes ranging in size from 1-inch to 3-inches were performed. The experiments were carried out at the multiphase flow laboratories of Imperial College in London and the University of Calgary in Canada. Data from actual operating gas pipeline systems transporting small amounts of hydrocarbon liquids were also evaluated. Based on the experimental results and the operating data, two approaches for modeling these systems are proposed: (1) A homogeneous approach for very low liquid loads (holdups up to 0.005), typical in gas transmission systems. A friction factor correlation based on the mixture Reynolds number and the holdup has been developed for this flow regime. (2) A mechanistic stratified two-phase approach for higher liquid loads (holdups greater than 0.005) usually found in gas gathering systems with consideration given to: (a) The reduction in the available flow area and extent of wetting of the pipe perimeter by the liquid film. The gas/liquid interface was observed to be either flat or carved. (b) The interfacial fiction factor between the liquid film and the gas. A new correlation based on the liquid and gas Reynolds numbers as well as the film thickness and hold up has been developed. This correlation has been successfully tested against both experimental and actual pipeline operating data.

  12. Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tight/shale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater: Background, base cases, shallow reservoirs, short-term gas, and water transport

    PubMed Central

    Reagan, Matthew T; Moridis, George J; Keen, Noel D; Johnson, Jeffrey N

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbon production from unconventional resources and the use of reservoir stimulation techniques, such as hydraulic fracturing, has grown explosively over the last decade. However, concerns have arisen that reservoir stimulation creates significant environmental threats through the creation of permeable pathways connecting the stimulated reservoir with shallower freshwater aquifers, thus resulting in the contamination of potable groundwater by escaping hydrocarbons or other reservoir fluids. This study investigates, by numerical simulation, gas and water transport between a shallow tight-gas reservoir and a shallower overlying freshwater aquifer following hydraulic fracturing operations, if such a connecting pathway has been created. We focus on two general failure scenarios: (1) communication between the reservoir and aquifer via a connecting fracture or fault and (2) communication via a deteriorated, preexisting nearby well. We conclude that the key factors driving short-term transport of gas include high permeability for the connecting pathway and the overall volume of the connecting feature. Production from the reservoir is likely to mitigate release through reduction of available free gas and lowering of reservoir pressure, and not producing may increase the potential for release. We also find that hydrostatic tight-gas reservoirs are unlikely to act as a continuing source of migrating gas, as gas contained within the newly formed hydraulic fracture is the primary source for potential contamination. Such incidents of gas escape are likely to be limited in duration and scope for hydrostatic reservoirs. Reliable field and laboratory data must be acquired to constrain the factors and determine the likelihood of these outcomes. Key Points: Short-term leakage fractured reservoirs requires high-permeability pathways Production strategy affects the likelihood and magnitude of gas release Gas release is likely short-term, without additional driving forces PMID

  13. Transcription factor organic cation transporter 1 (OCT-1) affects the expression of porcine Klotho (KL) gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiawei

    2016-01-01

    Klotho (KL), originally discovered as an aging suppressor, is a membrane protein that shares sequence similarity with the β-glucosidase enzymes. Recent reports showed Klotho might play a role in adipocyte maturation and systemic glucose metabolism. However, little is known about the transcription factors involved in regulating the expression of porcine KL gene. Deletion fragment analysis identified KL-D2 (−418 bp to −3 bp) as the porcine KL core promoter. MARC0022311SNP (A or G) in KL intron 1 was detected in Landrace × DIV pigs using the Porcine SNP60 BeadChip. The pGL-D2-A and pGL-D2-G were constructed with KL-D2 and the intron fragment of different alleles and relative luciferase activity of pGL3-D2-G was significantly higher than that of pGL3-D2-A in the PK cells and ST cells. This was possibly the result of a change in KL binding ability with transcription factor organic cation transporter 1 (OCT-1), which was confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP). Moreover, OCT-1 regulated endogenous KL expression by RNA interference experiments. Our study indicates SNP MARC0022311 affects porcine KL expression by regulating its promoter activity via OCT-1. PMID:27478698

  14. Transcription factor organic cation transporter 1 (OCT-1) affects the expression of porcine Klotho (KL) gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Jiawei; Li, Fenge

    2016-01-01

    Klotho (KL), originally discovered as an aging suppressor, is a membrane protein that shares sequence similarity with the β-glucosidase enzymes. Recent reports showed Klotho might play a role in adipocyte maturation and systemic glucose metabolism. However, little is known about the transcription factors involved in regulating the expression of porcine KL gene. Deletion fragment analysis identified KL-D2 (-418 bp to -3 bp) as the porcine KL core promoter. MARC0022311SNP (A or G) in KL intron 1 was detected in Landrace × DIV pigs using the Porcine SNP60 BeadChip. The pGL-D2-A and pGL-D2-G were constructed with KL-D2 and the intron fragment of different alleles and relative luciferase activity of pGL3-D2-G was significantly higher than that of pGL3-D2-A in the PK cells and ST cells. This was possibly the result of a change in KL binding ability with transcription factor organic cation transporter 1 (OCT-1), which was confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP). Moreover, OCT-1 regulated endogenous KL expression by RNA interference experiments. Our study indicates SNP MARC0022311 affects porcine KL expression by regulating its promoter activity via OCT-1. PMID:27478698

  15. Liquefied natural gas as a transportation fuel for heavy-duty trucks: Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    This document contains Volume 1 of a three-volume manual designed for use with a 2- to 3-day liquefied natural gas (LNG) training course. Transportation and off-road agricultural, mining, construction, and industrial applications are discussed. This volume provides a brief introduction to the physics and chemistry of LNG; an overview of several ongoing LNG projects, economic considerations, LNG fuel station technology, LNG vehicles, and a summary of federal government programs that encourage conversion to LNG.

  16. Barometric gas transport along faults and its application to nuclear test-ban monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Carrigan, C. R.; Heinle, R. A.; Hudson, G. B.; Nitao, J. J.; Zucca, J. J.

    1997-06-01

    Underground nuclear explosions produce a unique but evanescent set of radionuclide gases that potentially can be used in the context of an on-site, test-ban monitoring program to differentiate them from other detected events such as earthquakes or mining activity. In Part I of this report we describe an experiment to evaluate the upward transport of gases from an underground explosion using two gas tracers with very different diffusivities that were released in a 400- m-deep, chemical explosive detonation. The less diffusive (more massive) tracer was detected on a nearby geologic fault 50 days following the detonation while the more diffusive tracer was-- detected 375 days after release. Computer simulations indicate that the arrival time and the chromatographic behavior of transport are characteristic of barometrically induced flow in a fractured, porous matrix regime. For a hypothetical 1-kiloton fission explosion subject to the same weather and gas transport conditions of the chemical explosion, simulations predict the delectability of argon-37 after 80 days in spite of depletion by radioactive decay. Largely because of the earlier arrival of xenon-133, owing to its lower binary gas diffusivity, the exceedingly short lived isotope should also be detectable-arriving about 30 days earlier than argon. in Part II we consider that our prediction of the delectability of argon and xenon is based upon the small volume (0.00001 M3) sampling technique of the NPE tracer-gas sampling study while actual sampling for radionuclides would involve drawing much larger volume (possibly 0.1- 1 M3) gas samples from the near-surface.

  17. Fuel-cycle greenhouse gas emissions impacts of alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, M. Q.

    1998-12-16

    At an international conference on global warming, held in Kyoto, Japan, in December 1997, the United States committed to reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by 7% over its 1990 level by the year 2012. To help achieve that goal, transportation GHG emissions need to be reduced. Using Argonne's fuel-cycle model, I estimated GHG emissions reduction potentials of various near- and long-term transportation technologies. The estimated per-mile GHG emissions results show that alternative transportation fuels and advanced vehicle technologies can help significantly reduce transportation GHG emissions. Of the near-term technologies evaluated in this study, electric vehicles; hybrid electric vehicles; compression-ignition, direct-injection vehicles; and E85 flexible fuel vehicles can reduce fuel-cycle GHG emissions by more than 25%, on the fuel-cycle basis. Electric vehicles powered by electricity generated primarily from nuclear and renewable sources can reduce GHG emissions by 80%. Other alternative fuels, such as compressed natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas, offer limited, but positive, GHG emission reduction benefits. Among the long-term technologies evaluated in this study, conventional spark ignition and compression ignition engines powered by alternative fuels and gasoline- and diesel-powered advanced vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by 10% to 30%. Ethanol dedicated vehicles, electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, and fuel-cell vehicles can reduce GHG emissions by over 40%. Spark ignition engines and fuel-cell vehicles powered by cellulosic ethanol and solar hydrogen (for fuel-cell vehicles only) can reduce GHG emissions by over 80%. In conclusion, both near- and long-term alternative fuels and advanced transportation technologies can play a role in reducing the United States GHG emissions.

  18. Modeling of transport phenomena during gas hydrate decomposition by depressurization and/or thermal stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abendroth*, Sven; Klump, Jens; Thaler, Jan; Schicks, Judith M.

    2013-04-01

    In the context of the German joint project SUGAR (Submarine Gas Hydrate Reservoirs: exploration, extraction and transport) we conducted a series of experiments in the LArge Reservoir Simulator (LARS) at the German Research Centre of Geosciences Potsdam (Beeskow-Strauch et al., this volume). These experiments allow us to investigate the formation and dissociation of hydrates at large scale laboratory conditions. Processes inside LARS are modeled to study the effects of sediment properties as well as physical and chemical processes on parameters such as hydrate dissociation rate and methane production rate. The experimental results from LARS are used to provide details about processes inside the pressure vessel, validate the models through history matching, and feed back into the design of future experiments. In experiments in LARS the amount of methane produced from gas hydrates was much lower than expected. Previously published models predict a methane production rate higher than the observed in experiments and field studies (Uddin and Wright 2005; Uddin et al. 2010; Wright et al. 2011). The authors of the aforementioned studies point out that the current modeling approach overestimates the gas production rate when modeling gas production by depressurization. Uddin and Wright (2005) suggested that trapping of gas bubbles inside the porous medium is responsible for the reduced gas production rate. They point out that this behavior of multi-phase flow is not well explained by a "residual oil" model, but rather resembles a "foamy oil" model. Our study applies Uddin's (2010) "foamy oil" model and combines it with history matches of our experiments in LARS. First results indicate a better agreement between experimental and model results when using the "foamy oil" model instead of conventional models featuring gas flow in water. Further experiments with LARS, including hydrate dissociation by depressurization and thermal stimulation by in-situ combustion will be used to

  19. Ion Surfing: A new ion transport method for cryogenic gas catchers, simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Amanda; Bollen, Georg; Brodeur, Maxime; Morrissey, Dave; Pang, Gregory

    2011-10-01

    Gas cells are the tool of choice to thermalize fast rare ion beams produced at projectile fragmentation facilities. After passing through solid degraders, the residual kinetic energy of the ions is dissipated through collisions with the gas atoms and ionization. Previously, ions were directed through a gas cell along a descending electrostatic potential gradient called a ``drag field.'' Some cells apply a drag field over electrodes with alternating (RF) fields to prevent the rare ions from colliding with the walls. ``Ion surfing'' is a new method proposed by Bollen which replaces the drag field with a traveling wave superimposed with RF on numerous, thin electrodes. Large potential differences are no longer required for transport over long distances, and the traveling wave can transport ions at a greater speed. This method is being tested for the new cryogenic linear gas cell of the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory at Michigan State University. We will present the concept and simulation results. Work supported by the National Science Foundation and Department of Energy.

  20. Model simulation and experiments of flow and mass transport through a nano-material gas filter

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiaofan; Zheng, Zhongquan C.; Winecki, Slawomir; Eckels, Steve

    2013-11-01

    A computational model for evaluating the performance of nano-material packed-bed filters was developed. The porous effects of the momentum and mass transport within the filter bed were simulated. For the momentum transport, an extended Ergun-type model was employed and the energy loss (pressure drop) along the packed-bed was simulated and compared with measurement. For the mass transport, a bulk dsorption model was developed to study the adsorption process (breakthrough behavior). Various types of porous materials and gas flows were tested in the filter system where the mathematical models used in the porous substrate were implemented and validated by comparing with experimental data and analytical solutions under similar conditions. Good agreements were obtained between experiments and model predictions.

  1. Ozone affects gas exchange, growth and reproductive development in Brassica campestris (Wisconsin fast plants).

    PubMed

    Black, V J; Stewart, C A; Roberts, J A; Black, C R

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to ozone (O(3)) may affect vegetative and reproductive development, although the consequences for yield depend on the effectiveness of the compensatory processes induced. This study examined the impact on reproductive development of exposing Brassica campestris (Wisconsin Fast Plants) to ozone during vegetative growth. Plants were exposed to 70 ppb ozone for 2 d during late vegetative growth or 10 d spanning most of the vegetative phase. Effects on gas exchange, vegetative growth, reproductive development and seed yield were determined. Impacts on gas exchange and foliar injury were related to pre-exposure stomatal conductance. Exposure for 2 d had no effect on growth or reproductive characteristics, whereas 10-d exposure reduced vegetative growth and reproductive site number on the terminal raceme. Mature seed number and weight per pod and per plant were unaffected because seed abortion was reduced. The observation that mature seed yield per plant was unaffected by exposure during the vegetative phase, despite adverse effects on physiological, vegetative and reproductive processes, shows that indeterminate species such as B. campestris possess sufficient compensatory flexibility to avoid reductions in seed production. PMID:17803646

  2. Ozone affects gas exchange, growth and reproductive development in Brassica campestris (Wisconsin fast plants).

    PubMed

    Black, V J; Stewart, C A; Roberts, J A; Black, C R

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to ozone (O(3)) may affect vegetative and reproductive development, although the consequences for yield depend on the effectiveness of the compensatory processes induced. This study examined the impact on reproductive development of exposing Brassica campestris (Wisconsin Fast Plants) to ozone during vegetative growth. Plants were exposed to 70 ppb ozone for 2 d during late vegetative growth or 10 d spanning most of the vegetative phase. Effects on gas exchange, vegetative growth, reproductive development and seed yield were determined. Impacts on gas exchange and foliar injury were related to pre-exposure stomatal conductance. Exposure for 2 d had no effect on growth or reproductive characteristics, whereas 10-d exposure reduced vegetative growth and reproductive site number on the terminal raceme. Mature seed number and weight per pod and per plant were unaffected because seed abortion was reduced. The observation that mature seed yield per plant was unaffected by exposure during the vegetative phase, despite adverse effects on physiological, vegetative and reproductive processes, shows that indeterminate species such as B. campestris possess sufficient compensatory flexibility to avoid reductions in seed production.

  3. Identification of IAA transport inhibitors including compounds affecting cellular PIN trafficking by two chemical screening approaches using maize coleoptile systems.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takeshi; Matano, Naoyuki; Morishima, Taichi; Kakinuma, Chieko; Hayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Komano, Teruya; Kubo, Minoru; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Kamiya, Yuji; Koshiba, Tomokazu

    2012-10-01

    The monocot coleoptile tip region has been generally supposed to be the source of IAA to supply IAA to basal parts by the polar IAA transport system, which results in gravi- and phototropic curvature of coleoptiles. Based on this IAA transport system and gravitropism of maize coleoptiles, we have developed two screening methods to identify small molecules from a large chemical library that inhibit IAA transport. The methods detect molecules that affect (i) gravitropic curvature of coleoptiles; and (ii) the amount of IAA transported from the tip. From 10,000 chemicals, eight compounds were identified and categorized into two groups. Four chemicals in group A decreased IAA transport from the tip, and increased endogenous IAA levels in the tip. The structures of two compounds resembled that of 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA), but those of the other two differed from structures of known IAA transport inhibitors. Four chemicals in group B strongly inhibited IAA transport from the tip, but IAA levels at the tip were only slightly affected. At higher concentrations, group B compounds inhibited germination of Arabidopsis, similarly to brefeldin A (BFA). Analysis of the cellular distribution of PIN2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and PIN1-GFP in Arabidopsis revealed that one of the four chemicals in group B induced internalization of PIN1 and PIN2 proteins into vesicles smaller than BFA bodies, suggesting that this compound affects cellular vesicle trafficking systems related to PIN trafficking. The eight chemicals identified here will be a useful tool for understanding the mechanisms of IAA transport in plants. PMID:22875609

  4. Lung vitamin E transport processes are affected by both age and environmental oxidants in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Valacchi, Giuseppe . E-mail: gvalacchi@ucdavis.edu; Vasu, Vihas T.; Yokohama, Wallace; Corbacho, Ana M.; Phung, Anh; Lim, Yunsook; Aung, Hnin Hnin; Cross, Carroll E.; Davis, Paul A.

    2007-07-15

    Despite the physiological importance of alpha-tocopherol (AT), the molecular mechanisms involved in maintaining cellular and tissue tocopherol levels remain to be fully characterized. Scavenger receptor B1 (SRB1), one of a large family of scavenger receptors, has been shown to facilitate AT transfer from HDL to peripheral tissues via apo A-1-mediated processes and to be important in the delivery of AT to the lung cells. In the present studies the effects of age and two environmental oxidants ozone (O{sub 3}) (0.25 ppm 6 h/day) and cigarette smoke (CS) (60 mg/m{sup 3} 6 h/day) for 4 days on selected aspects of AT transport in murine lung tissues were assessed. While AT levels were 25% higher (p < 0.05) and 15% lower (p < 0.05) in plasma and lung tissue, respectively, in aged versus young mice, acute environmental exposure to O{sub 3} or CS at the doses used had no effect. Gene expression levels, determined by RT-PCR of AT transport protein (ATTP), SRB1, CD36, ATP binding cassette 3 (ABCA3) and ABCA1 and protein levels, determined by Western blots for SRB1, ATTP and ABCA1 were assessed. Aged mouse lung showed a lower levels of ATTP, ABCA3 and SRB1 and a higher level CD36 and ABCA1. Acute exposure to either O{sub 3} or CS induced declines in ATTP and SRB1 in both aged and young mice lung. CD36 increased in both young and aged mice lung upon exposure to O{sub 3} and CS. These findings suggest that both age and environmental oxidant exposure affect pathways related to lung AT homeostasis and do so in a way that favors declines in lung AT. However, given the approach taken, the effects cannot be traced to changes in these pathways or AT content in any specific lung associated cell type and thus highlight the need for further follow-up studies looking at specific lung associated cell types.

  5. "Who's been feeding in my bed?" Benthivorous fish affect fluvial sediment transport - fact or fairy tale?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Stephen; Pledger, Andrew; Smith, James; Toone, Julia

    2016-04-01

    Many species of fish are benthivorous - they forage for food in the river bed - and their foraging disturbs, displaces and sorts bed materials with implications for fluvial sediment transport. Flume experiments have confirmed that benthic foraging by Barbel (Barbus barbus (L.)) and Chub (Squalius cephalus (L.)) modifies the structure and topography of water-worked gravels, thereby increasing particle entrainment probabilities and the quantity of sediment mobilised during experimental high flows. Field experiments and observations have demonstrated the impact of foraging on patch-scale bed disturbance, gravel structure, grain displacements and grain-size sorting. Initial ex-situ experiments support the suggestion that in low gradient rivers, shoals of fish like Bream (Abramis brama (L.)) entrain fine bed sediments, adding a biotic surcharge to the suspended sediment flux and modifying bed topography. These results underpin a novel proposal: that there is an aggregate, cumulative effect of benthic foraging on fluvial sediment transport at larger scales, including at scales where the contribution to sediment movement and river channel behaviour generates management concerns. Evaluating this proposal is a long-term goal, which is based on two intermediate objectives: to develop deeper mechanistic understanding of foraging impacts and to establish the spatial and temporal extent of geomorphologically significant feeding behaviours in river systems. The latter is crucial because field data are currently limited to a single reach on one UK river. It is reasonable to hypothesise that foraging impacts are spatially and temporally widespread because obligate and opportunistic benthic feeding is common and fish feed throughout their life. However, the effectiveness of foraging as a geomorphological process is likely to vary with factors including substrate size, fish community composition, food availability, water temperature, river flows and seasonal changes in fish

  6. Proteomics of juvenile senegal sole (Solea senegalensis) affected by gas bubble disease in hyperoxygenated ponds.

    PubMed

    Salas-Leiton, E; Cánovas-Conesa, B; Zerolo, R; López-Barea, J; Cañavate, J P; Alhama, J

    2009-01-01

    Solea senegalensis is a commercial flat fish traditionally farmed in earth ponds in coastal wetlands that might also become important to more intensive aquaculture. Gas bubble disease (GBD) is a potential risk for outdoor fish farming, particularly in certain periods of the year, related to improper management leading to macroalgae blooms. Physical-chemical conditions inducing hyperoxia, including radiation, temperature, and high levels of dissolved oxygen, have been monitored in fish affected by GBD together with observed symptoms. Exophthalmia, subcutaneous emphysemas, obstruction of gill lamellae, hemorrhages, and anomalous swimming were the main effects of oxygen supersaturation. A proteomic study was carried out for the first time under aquaculture conditions and protein expression changes are described for fish that were subject to hyperoxic conditions. Proteins identified in gill of GBD-affected fish are related to oxidative alteration of cytoskeleton structure/function (beta-tubulin, beta-actin), motility (light myosin chain, alpha-tropomyosin), or regulatory pathways (calmodulin, Raf kinase inhibitor protein), reflecting the central role of gill in oxygen exchange. Hepatic proteins identified are related to protein oxidative damages (beta-globin, FABPs), protection from oxidative stress (DCXR, GNMT), and inflammatory response (C3), in agreement with the predominant metabolic role of liver. Comparison of protein expression patterns and protein identification are suggested as potentially specific hyperoxia biomarkers that would facilitate prevention of GBD outbreaks.

  7. Naphthenic acids inhibit root water transport, gas exchange and leaf growth in aspen (Populus tremuloides) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kamaluddin, M; Zwiazek, Janusz J

    2002-12-01

    Effects of sodium naphthenates (NAs) on root hydraulic conductivity (Lp) and gas exchange processes were examined in aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) seedlings grown in solution culture. Exposure of roots to NAs for 3-5 weeks significantly decreased Lp and stomatal conductance. Root-absorbed NAs also decreased leaf chlorophyll concentration, net photosynthesis and leaf growth. Short-term (< or = 2 h) exposure of excised roots to NAs significantly decreased root water flow (Qv) with a concomitant decline in root respiration. We conclude that NAs metabolically inhibited Lp, likely by affecting water channel activity, and that this inhibition could be responsible for the observed reductions in gas exchange and leaf growth.

  8. Revisiting low-fidelity two-fluid models for gas-solids transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adeleke, Najeem; Adewumi, Michael; Ityokumbul, Thaddeus

    2016-08-01

    Two-phase gas-solids transport models are widely utilized for process design and automation in a broad range of industrial applications. Some of these applications include proppant transport in gaseous fracking fluids, air/gas drilling hydraulics, coal-gasification reactors and food processing units. Systems automation and real time process optimization stand to benefit a great deal from availability of efficient and accurate theoretical models for operations data processing. However, modeling two-phase pneumatic transport systems accurately requires a comprehensive understanding of gas-solids flow behavior. In this study we discuss the prevailing flow conditions and present a low-fidelity two-fluid model equation for particulate transport. The model equations are formulated in a manner that ensures the physical flux term remains conservative despite the inclusion of solids normal stress through the empirical formula for modulus of elasticity. A new set of Roe-Pike averages are presented for the resulting strictly hyperbolic flux term in the system of equations, which was used to develop a Roe-type approximate Riemann solver. The resulting scheme is stable regardless of the choice of flux-limiter. The model is evaluated by the prediction of experimental results from both pneumatic riser and air-drilling hydraulics systems. We demonstrate the effect and impact of numerical formulation and choice of numerical scheme on model predictions. We illustrate the capability of a low-fidelity one-dimensional two-fluid model in predicting relevant flow parameters in two-phase particulate systems accurately even under flow regimes involving counter-current flow.

  9. Influence of the Gas-Water Interface on Transport of Microorganisms through Unsaturated Porous Media

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Jiamin; Wilson, John L.; Kieft, Thomas L.

    1994-01-01

    In this article, a new mechanism influencing the transport of microorganisms through unsaturated porous media is examined, and a new method for directly visualizing bacterial behavior within a porous medium under controlled chemical and flow conditions is introduced. Resting cells of hydrophilic and relatively hydrophobic bacterial strains isolated from groundwater were used as model microorganisms. The degree of hydrophobicity was determined by contact-angle measurements. Glass micromodels allowed the direct observation of bacterial behavior on a pore scale, and three types of sand columns with different gas saturations provided quantitative measurements of the observed phenomena on a porous medium scale. The reproducibility of each break-through curve was established in three to five repeated experiments. The data collected from the column experiments can be explained by phenomena directly observed in the micromodel experiments. The retention rate of bacteria is proportional to the gas saturation in porous media because of the preferential sorption of bacteria onto the gas-water interface over the solid-water interface. The degree of sorption is controlled mainly by cell surface hydrophobicity under the simulated groundwater conditions because of hydrophobic forces between the organisms and the interfaces. The sorption onto the gas-water interface is essentially irreversible because of capillary forces. This preferential and irreversible sorption at the gas-water interface strongly influences the movement and spatial distribution of microorganisms. Images PMID:16349180

  10. Influence of the Gas-Water Interface on Transport of Microorganisms through Unsaturated Porous Media.

    PubMed

    Wan, J; Wilson, J L; Kieft, T L

    1994-02-01

    In this article, a new mechanism influencing the transport of microorganisms through unsaturated porous media is examined, and a new method for directly visualizing bacterial behavior within a porous medium under controlled chemical and flow conditions is introduced. Resting cells of hydrophilic and relatively hydrophobic bacterial strains isolated from groundwater were used as model microorganisms. The degree of hydrophobicity was determined by contact-angle measurements. Glass micromodels allowed the direct observation of bacterial behavior on a pore scale, and three types of sand columns with different gas saturations provided quantitative measurements of the observed phenomena on a porous medium scale. The reproducibility of each break-through curve was established in three to five repeated experiments. The data collected from the column experiments can be explained by phenomena directly observed in the micromodel experiments. The retention rate of bacteria is proportional to the gas saturation in porous media because of the preferential sorption of bacteria onto the gas-water interface over the solid-water interface. The degree of sorption is controlled mainly by cell surface hydrophobicity under the simulated groundwater conditions because of hydrophobic forces between the organisms and the interfaces. The sorption onto the gas-water interface is essentially irreversible because of capillary forces. This preferential and irreversible sorption at the gas-water interface strongly influences the movement and spatial distribution of microorganisms.

  11. Intense ion beam transport in magnetic quadrupoles: Experiments on electron and gas effects

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P.A.; Molvik, A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Cohen, R.H.; Faltens, A.; Friedman, A.; Kireef Covo, M.; Lund, S.M.; Prost, L.; Vay, J-L.

    2004-12-03

    Heavy-ion induction linacs for inertial fusion energy and high-energy density physics have an economic incentive to minimize the clearance between the beam edge and the aperture wall. This increases the risk from electron clouds and gas desorbed from walls. We have measured electron and gas emission from 1 MeV K{sup +} incident on surfaces near grazing incidence on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL. Electron emission coefficients reach values >100, whereas gas desorption coefficients are near 10{sup 4}. Mitigation techniques are being studied: A bead-blasted rough surface reduces electron emission by a factor of 10 and gas desorption by a factor of 2. We also discuss the results of beam transport (of 0.03-0.18 A K{sup +}) through four pulsed room-temperature magnetic quadrupoles in the HCX at LBNL. Diagnostics are installed on HCX, between and within quadrupole magnets, to measure the beam halo loss, net charge and expelled ions, from which we infer gas density, electron trapping, and the effects of mitigation techniques. A coordinated theory and computational effort has made significant progress towards a self-consistent model of positive-ion beam and electron dynamics. We are beginning to compare experimental and theoretical results.

  12. Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting the Deployment of Larger Wind Turbines: Summary of Results

    SciTech Connect

    Cotrell, J.; Stehly, T.; Johnson, J.; Roberts, J. O.; Parker, Z.; Scott, G.; Heimiller, D.

    2014-01-01

    There is relatively little literature that characterizes transportation and logistics challenges and the associated effects on U.S. wind markets. The objectives of this study were to identify the transportation and logistics challenges, assess the associated impacts, and provide recommendations for strategies and specific actions to address the challenges. The authors primarily relied on interviews with wind industry project developers, original equipment manufacturers, and transportation and logistics companies to obtain the information and industry perspectives needed for this study. They also reviewed published literature on trends and developments in increasing wind turbine size, logistics, and transportation issues.

  13. Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion controls transient anomalous transport in alluvial aquifer-aquitard complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Green, Christopher T; Tick, Geoffrey R

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the role of the Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion in transient anomalous transport, which is one of the major knowledge gaps in anomalous transport, by combining Monte Carlo simulations and stochastic model analysis. Two alluvial settings containing either short- or long-connected hydrofacies are generated and used as media for flow and transport modeling. Numerical experiments show that 1) the Peclet number affects both the duration of the power-law segment of tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs) and the transition rate from anomalous to Fickian transport by determining the solute residence time for a given low-permeability layer, 2) mechanical dispersion has a limited contribution to the anomalous characteristics of late-time transport as compared to molecular diffusion due to an almost negligible velocity in floodplain deposits, and 3) the initial source dimensions only enhance the power-law tail of the BTCs at short travel distances. A tempered stable stochastic (TSS) model is then applied to analyze the modeled transport. Applications show that the time-nonlocal parameters in the TSS model relate to the Peclet number, Pe. In particular, the truncation parameter in the TSS model increases nonlinearly with a decrease in Pe due to the decrease of the mean residence time, and the capacity coefficient increases with an increase in molecular diffusion which is probably due to the increase in the number of immobile particles. The above numerical experiments and stochastic analysis therefore reveal that the Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion controls transient anomalous transport in alluvial aquifer-aquitard complexes.

  14. Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion controls transient anomalous transport in alluvial aquifer-aquitard complexes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhang, Yong; Green, Christopher T.; Tick, Geoffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the role of the Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion in transient anomalous transport, which is one of the major knowledge gaps in anomalous transport, by combining Monte Carlo simulations and stochastic model analysis. Two alluvial settings containing either short- or long-connected hydrofacies are generated and used as media for flow and transport modeling. Numerical experiments show that 1) the Peclet number affects both the duration of the power-law segment of tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs) and the transition rate from anomalous to Fickian transport by determining the solute residence time for a given low-permeability layer, 2) mechanical dispersion has a limited contribution to the anomalous characteristics of late-time transport as compared to molecular diffusion due to an almost negligible velocity in floodplain deposits, and 3) the initial source dimensions only enhance the power-law tail of the BTCs at short travel distances. A tempered stable stochastic (TSS) model is then applied to analyze the modeled transport. Applications show that the time-nonlocal parameters in the TSS model relate to the Peclet number, Pe. In particular, the truncation parameter in the TSS model increases nonlinearly with a decrease in Pe due to the decrease of the mean residence time, and the capacity coefficient increases with an increase in molecular diffusion which is probably due to the increase in the number of immobile particles. The above numerical experiments and stochastic analysis therefore reveal that the Peclet number as affected by molecular diffusion controls transient anomalous transport in alluvial aquifer–aquitard complexes.

  15. Optimization problems in natural gas transportation systems. A state-of-the-art review

    DOE PAGES

    Ríos-Mercado, Roger Z.; Borraz-Sánchez, Conrado

    2015-03-24

    Our paper provides a review on the most relevant research works conducted to solve natural gas transportation problems via pipeline systems. The literature reveals three major groups of gas pipeline systems, namely gathering, transmission, and distribution systems. In this work, we aim at presenting a detailed discussion of the efforts made in optimizing natural gas transmission lines.There is certainly a vast amount of research done over the past few years on many decision-making problems in the natural gas industry and, specifically, in pipeline network optimization. In this work, we present a state-of-the-art survey focusing on specific categories that include short-termmore » basis storage (line-packing problems), gas quality satisfaction (pooling problems), and compressor station modeling (fuel cost minimization problems). We also discuss both steady-state and transient optimization models highlighting the modeling aspects and the most relevant solution approaches known to date. Although the literature on natural gas transmission system problems is quite extensive, this is, to the best of our knowledge, the first comprehensive review or survey covering this specific research area on natural gas transmission from an operations research perspective. Furthermore, this paper includes a discussion of the most important and promising research areas in this field. Hence, our paper can serve as a useful tool to gain insight into the evolution of the many real-life applications and most recent advances in solution methodologies arising from this exciting and challenging research area of decision-making problems.« less

  16. Gas transport by thermal transpiration in micro-channels -- A numerical study

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.C.; Hudson, M.L.; Potter, D.L.; Bartel, T.J.

    1998-08-01

    A reliable micro gas pump is an essential element to the development of many micro-systems for chemical gas analyses. At Sandia, the authors are exploring a different pumping mechanism, gas transport by thermal transpiration. Thermal transpiration refers to the rarefied gas dynamics developed in a micro-channel with a longitudinal temperature gradient. To investigate the potential of thermal transpiration for gas pumping in micro-systems, the authors have performed simulations and model analysis to design micro-devices and to assess their design performance before the fabrication process. The effort is to apply ICARUS (a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code developed at Sandia) to characterize the fluid transport and evaluate the design performance. The design being considered has two plenums at different temperatures (hot and cold) separated by a micro-channel of 0.1 micron wide and 1 micron long. The temperature difference between the two plenums is 30 kelvin. ICARUS results, a quasi-steady analysis, predicts a net flow through the micro-channel with a velocity magnitude of about 0.4 m/s due to temperature gradient at the wall (thermal creep flow) at the early time. Later as the pressure builds up in the hot plenum, flow is reversed. Eventually when the system reaches steady state equilibrium, the net flow becomes zero. The thermal creep effect is compensated by the thermo-molecular pressure effect. This result demonstrates that it is important to include the thermo-molecular pressure effect when designing a pumping mechanism based on thermal transpiration. The DSMC technique can model this complex thermal transpiration problem.

  17. Describing and compensating gas transport dynamics for accurate instantaneous emission measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weilenmann, Martin; Soltic, Patrik; Ajtay, Delia

    Instantaneous emission measurements on chassis dynamometers and engine test benches are becoming increasingly usual for car-makers and for environmental emission factor measurement and calculation, since much more information about the formation conditions can be extracted than from the regulated bag measurements (integral values). The common exhaust gas analysers for the "regulated pollutants" (carbon monoxide, total hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxide, carbon dioxide) allow measurement at a rate of one to ten samples per second. This gives the impression of having after-the-catalyst emission information with that chronological precision. It has been shown in recent years, however, that beside the reaction time of the analysers, the dynamics of gas transport in both the exhaust system of the car and the measurement system last significantly longer than 1 s. This paper focuses on the compensation of all these dynamics convoluting the emission signals. Most analysers show linear and time-invariant reaction dynamics. Transport dynamics can basically be split into two phenomena: a pure time delay accounting for the transport of the gas downstream and a dynamic signal deformation since the gas is mixed by turbulence along the way. This causes emission peaks to occur which are smaller in height and longer in time at the sensors than they are after the catalyst. These dynamics can be modelled using differential equations. Both mixing dynamics and time delay are constant for modelling a raw gas analyser system, since the flow in that system is constant. In the exhaust system of the car, however, the parameters depend on the exhaust volume flow. For gasoline cars, the variation in overall transport time may be more than 6 s. It is shown in this paper how all these processes can be described by invertible mathematical models with the focus on the more complex case of the car's exhaust system. Inversion means that the sharp emission signal at the catalyst out location can be

  18. Radon as a natural tracer for gas transport within uranium waste rock piles.

    PubMed

    Silva, N C; Chagas, E G L; Abreu, C B; Dias, D C S; Lopez, D; Guerreiro, E T Z; Alberti, H L C; Braz, M L; Branco, O; Fleming, P

    2014-07-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) has been identified as the main cause for outflow of acid water and radioactive/non-radioactive contaminants. AMD encompasses pyrites oxidation when water and oxygen are available. AMD was identified in uranium waste rock piles (WRPs) of Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil-Caldas facility (Brazilian uranium mine), resulting in high costs for water treatment. AMD reduction is the main challenge, and scientific investigation has been conducted to understand oxygen and water transportation within WRPs, where 222Rn is used as natural tracer for oxygen transportation. The study consists of soil radon gas mapping in the top layer of WRP4 using active soil gas pumping, radon adsorption in active charcoal and 222Rn determination using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. A sampling network of 71 points was built where samples were collected at a depth of 40 cm. Soil radon gas concentration ranged from 33.7 to 1484.2 kBq m(-3) with mean concentration of 320.7±263.3 kBq m(-3). PMID:24729565

  19. Radon as a natural tracer for gas transport within uranium waste rock piles.

    PubMed

    Silva, N C; Chagas, E G L; Abreu, C B; Dias, D C S; Lopez, D; Guerreiro, E T Z; Alberti, H L C; Braz, M L; Branco, O; Fleming, P

    2014-07-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) has been identified as the main cause for outflow of acid water and radioactive/non-radioactive contaminants. AMD encompasses pyrites oxidation when water and oxygen are available. AMD was identified in uranium waste rock piles (WRPs) of Indústrias Nucleares do Brasil-Caldas facility (Brazilian uranium mine), resulting in high costs for water treatment. AMD reduction is the main challenge, and scientific investigation has been conducted to understand oxygen and water transportation within WRPs, where 222Rn is used as natural tracer for oxygen transportation. The study consists of soil radon gas mapping in the top layer of WRP4 using active soil gas pumping, radon adsorption in active charcoal and 222Rn determination using high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry. A sampling network of 71 points was built where samples were collected at a depth of 40 cm. Soil radon gas concentration ranged from 33.7 to 1484.2 kBq m(-3) with mean concentration of 320.7±263.3 kBq m(-3).

  20. Analysis of CO2 Separation from Flue Gas, Pipeline Transportation, and Sequestration in Coal

    SciTech Connect

    Eric P. Robertson

    2007-09-01

    This report was written to satisfy a milestone of the Enhanced Coal Bed Methane Recovery and CO2 Sequestration task of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration project. The report begins to assess the costs associated with separating the CO2 from flue gas and then injecting it into an unminable coal seam. The technical challenges and costs associated with CO2 separation from flue gas and transportation of the separated CO2 from the point source to an appropriate sequestration target was analyzed. The report includes the selection of a specific coal-fired power plant for the application of CO2 separation technology. An appropriate CO2 separation technology was identified from existing commercial technologies. The report also includes a process design for the chosen technology tailored to the selected power plant that used to obtain accurate costs of separating the CO2 from the flue gas. In addition, an analysis of the costs for compression and transportation of the CO2 from the point-source to an appropriate coal bed sequestration site was included in the report.

  1. Hybrid life-cycle assessment of natural gas based fuel chains for transportation.

    PubMed

    Strømman, Anders Hammer; Solli, Christian; Hertwich, Edgar G

    2006-04-15

    This research compares the use of natural gas, methanol, and hydrogen as transportation fuels. These three fuel chains start with the extraction and processing of natural gas in the Norwegian North Sea and end with final use in Central Europe. The end use is passenger transportation with a sub-compact car that has an internal combustion engine for the natural gas case and a fuel cell for the methanol and hydrogen cases. The life cycle assessment is performed by combining a process based life-cycle inventory with economic input-output data. The analysis shows that the potential climate impacts are lowest for the hydrogen fuel scenario with CO2 deposition. The hydrogen fuel chain scenario has no significant environmental disadvantage compared to the other fuel chains. Detailed analysis shows that the construction of the car contributes significantly to most impact categories. Finally, it is shown how the application of a hybrid inventory model ensures a more complete inventory description compared to standard process-based life-cycle assessment. This is particularly significant for car construction which would have been significantly underestimated in this study using standard process life-cycle assessment alone.

  2. LASER TRIGGERED GAS SWITCHES UTILIZING BEAM TRANSPORT THROUGH 1 MO-cm DEIONIZED WATER.

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, Joseph Ray; Lehr, Jane; Blickem, James R.; Wallace, Zachariah R.; Anaya, Victor Jr; Corley, John P; Lott, John; Hodge, Keith; Zameroski, Nathan D.

    2005-11-01

    We report on the successful attempts to trigger high voltage pressurized gas switches by utilizing beam transport through 1 MO-cm deionized water. The wavelength of the laser radiation was 532 nm. We have investigated Nd: YAG laser triggering of a 6 MV, SF6 insulated gas switch for a range of laser and switch parameters. Laser wavelength of 532 nm with nominal pulse lengths of 10 ns full width half maximum (FWHM) were used to trigger the switch. The laser beam was transported through 67 cm-long cell of 1 MO-cm deionized water constructed with anti reflection UV grade fused silica windows. The laser beam was then focused to form a breakdown arc in the gas between switch electrodes. Less than 10 ns jitter in the operation of the switch was obtained for laser pulse energies of between 80-110 mJ. Breakdown arcs more than 35 mm-long were produced by using a 70 cm focusing optic.

  3. Gas transport and control in thick-liquid inertial fusion power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debonnel, Christophe Sylvain

    Among the numerous potential routes to a commercial fusion power plant, the inertial path with thick-liquid protection is explored in this doctoral dissertation. Gas dynamics phenomena in such fusion target chambers have been investigated since the early 1990s with the help of a series of simulation codes known as TSUNAMI. For this doctoral work, the code was redesigned and rewritten entirely to enable the use of modern programming techniques, languages and software; improve its user-friendliness; and refine its ability to model thick-liquid protected chambers. The new ablation and gas dynamics code is named "Visual Tsunami" to emphasize its graphics-based pre- and post-processors. It is aimed at providing a versatile and user-friendly design tool for complex systems for which transient gas dynamics phenomena play a key role. Simultaneously, some of these improvements were implemented in a previous version of the code; the resulting code constitutes the version 2.8 of the TSUNAMI series. Visual Tsunami was used to design and model the novel Condensation Debris Experiment (CDE), which presents many aspects of a typical Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) system and has therefore been used to exercise the code. Numerical and experimental results are in good agreement. In a heavy-ion IFE target chamber, proper beam and target propagation set stringent requirements for the control of ablation debris transport in the target chamber and beam tubes. When the neutralized ballistic transport mode is employed, the background gas density should be adequately low and the beam tube metallic surfaces upstream of the neutralizing region should be free of contaminants. TSUNAMI 2.8 was used for the first simulation of gas transport through the complex geometry of the liquid blanket of a hybrid target chamber and beam lines. Concurrently, the feasibility of controlling the gas density was addressed with a novel beam tube design, which introduces magnetic shutters and a long low

  4. Gas Transport and Control in Thick-Liquid Inertial Fusion PowerPlants

    SciTech Connect

    Debonnel, Christophe Sylvain

    2006-01-01

    Among the numerous potential routes to a commercial fusion power plant, the inertial path with thick-liquid protection is explored in this doctoral dissertation. Gas dynamics phenomena in such fusion target chambers have been investigated since the early 1990s with the help of a series of simulation codes known as TSUNAMI. For this doctoral work, the code was redesigned and rewritten entirely to enable the use of modern programming techniques, languages and software; improve its user-friendliness; and refine its ability to model thick-liquid protected chambers. The new ablation and gas dynamics code is named “Visual Tsunami” to emphasize its graphics-based pre- and post-processors. It is aimed at providing a versatile and user-friendly design tool for complex systems for which transient gas dynamics phenomena play a key role. Simultaneously, some of these improvements were implemented in a previous version of the code; the resulting code constitutes the version 2.8 of the TSUNAMI series. Visual Tsunami was used to design and model the novel Condensation Debris Experiment (CDE), which presents many aspects of a typical Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) system and has therefore been used to exercise the code. Numerical and experimental results are in good agreement. In a heavy-ion IFE target chamber, proper beam and target propagation set stringent requirements for the control of ablation debris transport in the target chamber and beam tubes. When the neutralized ballistic transport mode is employed, the background gas density should be adequately low and the beam tube metallic surfaces upstream of the neutralizing region should be free of contaminants. TSUNAMI 2.8 was used for the first simulation of gas transport through the complex geometry of the liquid blanket of a hybrid target chamber and beam lines. Concurrently, the feasibility of controlling the gas density was addressed with a novel beam tube design, which introduces magnetic shutters and a long low

  5. Gas density does not affect pulmonary acoustic transmission in normal men.

    PubMed

    Mahagnah, M; Gavriely, N

    1995-03-01

    Fremitus, the transmission of sound and vibration from the mouth to the chest wall, has long been used clinically to examine the pulmonary system. Recently, modern technology has become available to measure the acoustic transfer function (TF) and transit times (TT) of the pulmonary system. Because sound speed is inversely proportional to the square root of gas density in free gas, but not in porous media, we measured the effect of air and Heliox (80% He-20% O2) breathing on pulmonary sound transmission in six healthy subjects to investigate the mechanism of sound transmission. Wide-band noise (75-2,000 Hz) was "injected" into the mouth and picked up over the trachea and chest wall. The averaged power spectra, TF, phase, and coherence were calculated using a fast Fourier transform-based algorithm. The phase data were used to calculate TT as a function of frequency. TF was found to consist of a low-pass filter property with essentially flat transmitted energy to 300 Hz and exponential decline to 600 Hz at the anterior right upper lobe (CR) and flat transmission to 100 Hz with exponential decline to 150 Hz at the right posterior base (BR). TF was not affected by breathing Heliox. The average TT values, calculated from the slopes of the averaged phase, were 1.5 +/- 0.5 ms for trachea to CR and 5.2 +/- 0.5 ms for trachea to BR transmission during air breathing. During Heliox breathing, the values of TT were 1.5 +/- 0.5 ms and 4.9 +/- 0.5 ms from the trachea to CR and from the trachea to BR locations, respectively. These results suggest that sound transmission in the respiratory system is dominated by wave propagation through the parenchymal porous structure. PMID:7775338

  6. Greenhouse gas simulations with a coupled meteorological and transport model: the predictability of CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polavarapu, Saroja M.; Neish, Michael; Tanguay, Monique; Girard, Claude; de Grandpré, Jean; Semeniuk, Kirill; Gravel, Sylvie; Ren, Shuzhan; Roche, Sébastien; Chan, Douglas; Strong, Kimberly

    2016-09-01

    A new model for greenhouse gas transport has been developed based on Environment and Climate Change Canada's operational weather and environmental prediction models. When provided with realistic posterior fluxes for CO2, the CO2 simulations compare well to NOAA's CarbonTracker fields and to near-surface continuous measurements, columns from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) and NOAA aircraft profiles. This coupled meteorological and tracer transport model is used to study the predictability of CO2. Predictability concerns the quantification of model forecast errors and thus of transport model errors. CO2 predictions are used to compute model-data mismatches when solving flux inversion problems and the quality of such predictions is a major concern. Here, the loss of meteorological predictability due to uncertain meteorological initial conditions is shown to impact CO2 predictability. The predictability of CO2 is shorter than that of the temperature field and increases near the surface and in the lower stratosphere. When broken down into spatial scales, CO2 predictability at the very largest scales is mainly due to surface fluxes but there is also some sensitivity to the land and ocean surface forcing of meteorological fields. The predictability due to the land and ocean surface is most evident in boreal summer when biospheric uptake produces large spatial gradients in the CO2 field. This is a newly identified source of uncertainty in CO2 predictions but it is expected to be much less significant than uncertainties in fluxes. However, it serves as an upper limit for the more important source of transport error and loss of predictability, which is due to uncertain meteorological analyses. By isolating this component of transport error, it is demonstrated that CO2 can only be defined on large spatial scales due to the presence of meteorological uncertainty. Thus, for a given model, there is a spatial scale below which fluxes cannot be inferred simply

  7. Blood lactate concentrations are mildly affected by mobile gas exchange measurements.

    PubMed

    Scharhag-Rosenberger, F; Wochatz, M; Otto, C; Cassel, M; Mayer, F; Scharhag, J

    2014-06-01

    We sought to investigate the effects of wearing a mobile respiratory gas analysis system during a treadmill test on blood lactate (bLa) concentrations and commonly applied bLa thresholds. A total of 16 recreational athletes (31±3 years, VO2max: 58±6 ml · min(-1) · kg(-1)) performed one multistage treadmill test with and one without gas exchange measurements (GEM and noGEM). The whole bLa curve, the lactate threshold (LT), the individual anaerobic thresholds according to Stegmann (IATSt) and Dickhuth (IATDi), and a fixed bLa concentration of 4 mmol ∙ l(-1) (OBLA) were evaluated. The bLa curve was shifted slightly leftward in GEM compared to noGEM (P<0.05), whereas the heart rate response was not different between conditions (P=0.89). There was no difference between GEM and noGEM for LT (2.61±0.34 vs. 2.64±0.39 m · s(-1), P=0.49) and IATSt (3.47±0.42 vs. 3.55±0.47 m · s(-1), P=0.12). However, IATDi (3.57±0.39 vs. 3.66±0.44 m · s(-1), P<0.01) and OBLA (3.85±0.46 vs. 3.96±0.47 m · s(-1), P<0.01) occurred at slower running velocities in GEM. The bLa response to treadmill tests is mildly affected by wearing a mobile gas analysis system. This also applies to bLa thresholds located at higher exercise intensities. While the magnitude of the effects is of little importance for recreational athletes, it might be relevant for elite athletes and scientific studies.

  8. GH-3PAD - a new numerical solver for multiphase transport in porous media - new insights on gas hydrate and free gas co-existence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burwicz, E.; Rupke, L.; Wallmann, K.

    2013-12-01

    Gas Hydrate-3 Phase Advanced Dynamics (GH-3PAD) code has been developed to study the geophysical and biochemical processes associated with gas hydrate as well as free methane gas formation and dissolution in marine sediments. Biochemical processes influencing in-situ organic carbon decay and, therefore, gas hydrate formation, such as Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane (AOM), sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis have been considered. The new model assumes a Lagrangian reference frame that is attached to the deposited sedimentary layers, which compact according to their individual lithological properties. Differential motion of the pore fluids and free gas is modeled as Darcy flow. Gas hydrate and free gas formation is either controlled by 1) instant gas hydrate crystallization assuming local thermodynamical equilibrium or by a 2) kinetically controlled rate of gas hydrate growth. The thermal evolution is computed from an energy equation that includes contributions from all phases present in the model (sediment grains, saline pore fluids, gas hydrate, and free gas). A first application of the GH-3PAD model has been the Blake Ridge Site, offshore South Carolina. Here seismic and well data points to the out-of-equilibrium co-existence of gas hydrate and free gas. It has been reported that these two distinct phases appear within sediment column with a gaseous phase tending to migrate upwards throughout the Gas Hydrate Stability Zone (GHSZ) until it reaches the seafloor despite relatively low gas hydrate content (4 - 7 vol. % after Paull et al., 1996). With the GH-3PAD model we quantify the complex transport- reaction processes that control three phase (gas hydrate, free gas, and dissolved CH4) out-of-equilibrium state. References: Paull C. K., Matsumoto R., Wallace P. J., 1996. 9. Site 997, Shipboard Scientific Party. Proceeding of the Ocean Drilling Program, Initial Reports, Vol. 164.

  9. Technical, economic, and environmental impact study of converting Uzbekistan transportation fleets to natural gas operation. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-30

    This study, conducted by Radian International, was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. The report assesses the feasibility (technical, economic and environmental) of converting the Uzbek transportation fleets to natural gas operation. The study focuses on the conversion of high fuel use vehicles and locomotives to liquefied natural gas (LNG) and the conversion of moderate fuel use veicles to compressed natural gas (CNG). The report is divided into the following sections: Executive Summary; (1.0) Introduction; (2.0) Country Background; (3.0) Characterization of Uzbek Transportation Fuels; (4.0) Uzbek Vehicle and Locomotive Fleet Characterization; (5.0) Uzbek Natural Gas Vehicle Conversion Shops; (6.0) Uzbek Natural Gas Infrastructure; (7.0) Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) for Vehicular Fuel in Uzbekistan; (8.0) Economic Feasibility Study; (9.0) Environmental Impact Analysis; References; Appendices A - S.

  10. Potassium nutrition and water availability affect phloem transport of photosynthetic carbon in eucalypt trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epron, Daniel; Cabral, Osvaldo; Laclau, Jean-Paul; Dannoura, Masako; Packer, Ana Paula; Plain, Caroline; Battie-Laclau, Patricia; Moreira, Marcelo; Trivelin, Paulo; Bouillet, Jean-Pierre; Gérant, Dominique; Nouvellon, Yann

    2015-04-01

    Potassium fertilisation strongly affects growth and carbon partitioning of eucalypt on tropical soil that are strongly weathered. In addition, potassium fertilization could be of great interest in mitigating the adverse consequences of drought in planted forests, as foliar K concentrations influence osmotic adjustment, stomatal regulation and phloem loading. Phloem is the main pathway for transferring photosynthate from source leaves to sink organs, thus controlling growth partitioning among the different tree compartments. But little is known about the effect of potassium nutrition on phloem transport of photosynthetic carbon and on the interaction between K nutrition and water availability. In situ 13C pulse labelling was conducted on tropical eucalypt trees (Eucalyptus grandis L.) grown in a trial plantation with plots in which 37% of throughfall were excluded (about 500 mm/yr) using home-made transparent gutters (-W) or not (+W) and plots that received 0.45 mol K m-2 applied as KCl three months after planting (+K) or not (-K). Three trees were labelled in each of the four treatments (+K+W, +K-W, -K+W and -K-W). Trees were labelled for one hour by injecting pure 13CO2 in a 27 m3 whole crown chamber. We estimated the velocity of carbon transfer in the trunk by comparing time lags between the uptake of 13CO2 and its recovery in trunk CO2 efflux recorded by off axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Research) in two chambers per tree, one just under the crown and one at the base of the trunk. We analyzed the dynamics of the label recovered in the foliage and in the phloem sap by analysing carbon isotope composition of bulk leaf organic matter and phloem extracts using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The velocity of carbon transfer in the trunk and the initial rate 13C disappearance from the foliage were much higher in +K trees than in -K trees with no significant effect of rainfall. The volumetric flow of phloem, roughly estimated by multiplying

  11. 40 CFR 60.5410 - How do I demonstrate initial compliance with the standards for my gas well affected facility, my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... affected facility, and my equipment leaks and sweetening unit affected facilities at onshore natural gas... Performance for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5410 How do I... at onshore natural gas processing plants? You must determine initial compliance with the...

  12. 40 CFR 60.5410 - How do I demonstrate initial compliance with the standards for my gas well affected facility, my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... affected facility, and my equipment leaks and sweetening unit affected facilities at onshore natural gas... Performance for Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production, Transmission and Distribution § 60.5410 How do I... at onshore natural gas processing plants? You must determine initial compliance with the...

  13. Natural gas: marine transportation. January 1974-November 1988 (Citations from Oceanic Abstracts). Report for January 1974-November 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the design, construction, and operation of ships for the transport of liquified natural gas. Topics include safety devices, materials handling equipment for loading and unloading liquified natural gas, new hull and vessel designs, gas-turbine propulsion systems, cargo tank designs and requirements, and liguid load dynamics. (This updated bibliography contains 349 citations, 50 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  14. Modelling gas transport in the shallow subsurface in the Maguelone field experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basirat, Farzad; Niemi, Auli; Perroud, Hervé; Lofi, Johanna; Denchik, Nataliya; Lods, Gérard; Pezard, Philippe; Sharma, Prabhakar; Fagerlund, Fritjof

    2013-04-01

    Developing reliable monitoring techniques to detect and characterize CO2 leakage in shallow subsurface is necessary for the safety of any GCS project. To test different monitoring techniques, shallow injection-monitoring experiment have and are being carried out at the Maguelone, along the Mediterranean lido of the Gulf of Lions, near Montpellier, France. This experimental site was developed in the context of EU FP7 project MUSTANG and is documented in Lofi et al. (2012). Gas injection experiments are being carried out and three techniques of pressure, electrical resistivity and seismic monitoring have been used to detect the nitrogen and CO2 release in the near surface environment. In the present work we use the multiphase and multicomponent TOUGH2/EOS7CA model to simulate the gaseous nitrogen and CO2 transport of the experiments carried out so far. The objective is both to gain understanding of the system performance based on the model analysis as well as to further develop and validate modelling approaches for gas transport in the shallow subsurface, against the well-controlled data sets. Numerical simulation can also be used for the prediction of experimental setup limitations. We expect the simulations to represent the breakthrough time for the different tested injection rates. Based on the hydrogeological formation data beneath the lido, we also expect the vertical heterogeneities in grain size distribution create an effective capillary barrier against upward gas transport in numerical simulations. Lofi J., Pezard P.A., Bouchette F., Raynal O., Sabatier P., Denchik N., Levannier A., Dezileau L., and Certain R. Integrated onshore-offshore geophysical investigation of a layered coastal aquifer, NW Mediterranean. Ground Water, (2012).

  15. Stoichiometry dependent electron transport and gas sensing properties of indium oxide nanowires.

    PubMed

    Gali, Pradeep; Sapkota, Gopal; Syllaios, A J; Littler, Chris; Philipose, U

    2013-06-01

    The effect of stoichiometry of single crystalline In2O3 nanowires on electrical transport and gas sensing was investigated. The nanowires were synthesized by vapor phase transport and had diameters ranging from 80 to 100 nm and lengths between 10 and 20 μm, with a growth direction of [001]. Transport measurements revealed n-type conduction, attributed to the presence of oxygen vacancies in the crystal lattice. As-grown In2O3 nanowires were shown to have a carrier concentration of ≈5 × 10(17) cm(-3), while nanowires that were annealed in wet O2 showed a reduced carrier concentration of less than 10(16) cm(-3). Temperature dependent conductivity measurements on the as-grown nanowires and analysis of the thermally activated Arrhenius conduction for the temperature range of 77-350 K yielded an activation energy of 0.12 eV. This is explained on the basis of carrier exchange that occurs between the surface states and the bulk of the nanowire, resulting in a depleted surface layer of thickness of the order of the Debye length (LD), estimated to be about 3-4 nm for the as-grown nanowires and about 10 times higher for the more stoichiometric nanowires. Significant changes in the electrical conductance of individual In2O3 nanowires were also observed within several seconds of exposure to NH3 and O2 gas molecules at room temperature, thus demonstrating the potential use of In2O3 nanowires as efficient miniaturized chemical sensors. The sensing mechanism is dominated by the nanowire channel conductance, and a simple energy band diagram is used to explain the change in conductivity when gas molecules adsorbed on the nanowire surface influence its electrical properties. Less stoichiometric nanowires were found to be more sensitive to oxidizing gases while more stoichiometric nanowires showed significantly enhanced response to reducing gases.

  16. Gas transport and bubble collapse in rhyolitic magma: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westrich, Henry R.; Eichelberger, John C.

    1994-12-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to test concepts of porous flow degassing of rhyolitic magma during ascent and of the subsequent collapse of vesicles in degassed magma to form obsidian. Dense, synthetically hydrated, natural glasses were pressurized under water-saturated conditions and then decompressed to achieve a range of porosities in the presence of a tracer vapor, D2O. Rapid isotopic exchange indicative of vapor transport rather than of simple diffusion occurred at a porosity >60 vol.%, in accord with earlier gas permeability measurements on cold natural samples. In another series of experiments, natural and synthetic pumices, vesiculated by degassing to atmospheric pressure, rapidly collapsed to dense glass on repressurization to the modest pressures prevailing in lava flows. No relict bubble textures remained. These results support the hypothesis that effusive eruptions result from the syneruptive escape of gas from permeable magmatic foam, and that a process analogous to welding yields dense lavas when such foams are extruded.

  17. Effect of gas flow on electronic transport in a DNA-decorated carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Poonam, P; Deo, N

    2011-05-20

    We calculate the two-time current correlation function using the experimental data of the current-time characteristics of the Gas-DNA-decorated carbon nanotube field effect transistor. The pattern of the correlation function is a measure of the sensitivity and selectivity of the sensors and suggest that these gas flow sensors may also be used as DNA sequence detectors. The system is modelled by a one-dimensional tight-binding Hamiltonian and we present analytical calculations of quantum electronic transport for the system using the time-dependent nonequilibrium Green's function formalism and the adiabatic expansion. The zeroth and first order contributions to the current I(0)(t) and I(1)(t) are calculated, where I(0)(t) is the Landauer formula. The formula for the time-dependent current is then used to compare the theoretical results with the experiment.

  18. A case study of electrostatic accidents in the process of oil-gas storage and transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yuqin; Wang, Diansheng; Liu, Jinyu; Gao, Jianshen

    2013-03-01

    Ninety nine electrostatic accidents were reviewed, based on information collected from published literature. All the accidents over the last 30 years occurred during the process of oil-gas storage and transportation. Statistical analysis of these accidents was performed based on the type of complex conditions where accidents occurred, type of tanks and contents, and type of accidents. It is shown that about 85% of the accidents occurred in tank farms, gas stations or petroleum refineries, and 96% of the accidents included fire or explosion. The fishbone diagram was used to summarize the effects and the causes of the effects. The results show that three major reasons were responsible for accidents, including improper operation during loading and unloading oil, poor grounding and static electricity on human bodies, which accounted for 29%, 24% and 13% of the accidents, respectively. Safety actions are suggested to help operating engineers to handle similar situations in the future.

  19. Peculiarities of the charge transport in the gas discharge electronic device with irradiated porous zeolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozturk, Sevgul; Koseoglu, Kivilcim; Ozer, Metin; Salamov, Bahtiyar G.

    2015-11-01

    The influence of pressure and β-radiation (1 kGy β doses) on the charge transport mechanism, charge trapping effects in porous zeolite surfaces and breakdown voltage (UB) are discussed in atmospheric microplasmas for the first time. This is due to exposure the zeolite cathode (ZC) to β-radiation resulting in substantial decreases in the UB, discharge currents and conductivity due to increase in porosity of the material. Results indicated that the enhancement of plasma light intensity and electron emission from the ZC surface with the release of trapped electrons which are captured by the defect centers following β-irradiation. The porosity of the ZC and radiation defect centers has significant influence on the charge transport of the microstructure and optical properties of the devices manufactured on its base. Thus, we confirm that the ZCir is a suitable cathode material for plasma light source, field emission displays, energy storage devices and low power gas discharge electronic devices.

  20. Explorations into thermodynamics analogies and critical points in reference to gas-solid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Wildman, D.; Tuba, S.T.; Klinzing, G.E.

    1984-01-01

    The use of analogies to explain transport processes is not new. The idea of borrowing concepts from thermodynamics and applying them to transport cases are also known. Experimental data from several investigators where the solid voidage has been determined experimentally have been analyzed to test the ability of a cubic van der Waals equation to represent the solid flow, gas flow and voidage. Using the van der Waals format phase diagrams have been constructed for a number of particulate systems which have been scrutinized. From this information the critical properties of the solids can be found. A generalized reduced properties plot has been constructed and has been shown to be unique in representing all the data. Exploration into the pressure drop domain has shown a relationship between the phase diagrams by an analytical approach. 9 references, 8 figures, 1 table.

  1. Explorations into thermodynamic analogies and critical points in reference to gas-solid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Klinzing, G.E.; Tuba, S.T.; Wildman, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    The use of analogies to explain transport processes is not new, nor is the idea of borrowing concepts from thermodynamics and applying them to transport phenomena. Experimental data from several investigations, where the solid voidage has been determined experimentally, have been analyzed to test the ability of a cubi van der Waals equation to represent the solid flow, gas flow, and voidage. Using the van der Waals format, phase diagrams have been constructed for a number of particulate systems. From this information, the critical properties of the solids can be found. A generalized reduced-properties plot seems to correlate the existing data satisfactorily. The same approach is pursued to interpret the pressure drop data.

  2. Explorations into thermodynamic analogies and critical points in reference to gas-solid transport

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Wildman, D.J.; Tuba, S.T.; Klinzing, G.E.

    1984-11-01

    The use of analogies to explain transport processes is not new, nor is the idea of borrowing concepts from thermodynamics and applying them to transport phenomena. Experimental data from several investigations, where the solid voidage has been determined experimentally, have been analyzed to test the ability of a cubic van der Waals equation to represent the solid flow, gas flow, and voidage. Using the van der Waals format, phase diagrams have been constructed for a number of particulate systems. From this information, the critical properties of the solids can be found. A generalized reduced-properties plot seems to correlate the existing data satisfactorily. The same approach is pursued to interpret the pressure drop data. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Estimation of rates of aerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation by simulation of gas transport in the unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lahvis, M.A.; Baehr, A.L.

    1996-01-01

    The distribution of oxygen and carbon dioxide gases in the unsaturated zone provides a geochemical signature of aerobic hydrocarbon degradation at petroleum product spill sites. The fluxes of these gases are proportional to the rate of aerobic biodegradation and are quantified by calibrating a mathematical transport model to the oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data. Reaction stoichiometry is assumed to convert the gas fluxes to a corresponding rate of hydrocarbon degradation. The method is applied at a gasoline spill site in Galloway Township, New Jersey, to determine the rate of aerobic degradation of hydrocarbons associated with passive and bioventing remediation field experiments. At the site, microbial degradation of hydrocarbons near the water table limits the migration of hydrocarbon solutes in groundwater and prevents hydrocarbon volatilization into the unsaturated zone. In the passive remediation experiment a site-wide degradation rate estimate of 34,400 g yr-1 (11.7 gal. yr-1) of hydrocarbon was obtained by model calibration to carbon dioxide gas concentration data collected in December 1989. In the bioventing experiment, degradation rate estimates of 46.0 and 47.9 g m-2 yr-1 (1.45 x 10-3 and 1.51 x 10-3 gal. ft.-2 yr-1) of hydrocarbon were obtained by model calibration to oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data, respectively. Method application was successful in quantifying the significance of a naturally occurring process that can effectively contribute to plume stabilization.

  4. Estimation of rates of aerobic hydrocarbon biodegradation by simulation of gas transport in the unsaturated zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahvis, Matthew A.; Baehr, Arthur L.

    1996-07-01

    The distribution of oxygen and carbon dioxide gases in the unsaturated zone provides a geochemical signature of aerobic hydrocarbon degradation at petroleum product spill sites. The fluxes of these gases are proportional to the rate of aerobic biodegradation and are quantified by calibrating a mathematical transport model to the oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data. Reaction stoichiometry is assumed to convert the gas fluxes to a corresponding rate of hydrocarbon degradation. The method is applied at a gasoline spill site in Galloway Township, New Jersey, to determine the rate of aerobic degradation of hydrocarbons associated with passive and bioventing remediation field experiments. At the site, microbial degradation of hydrocarbons near the water table limits the migration of hydrocarbon solutes in groundwater and prevents hydrocarbon volatilization into the unsaturated zone. In the passive remediation experiment a site-wide degradation rate estimate of 34,400 gyr-1 (11.7 gal. yr-1) of hydrocarbon was obtained by model calibration to carbon dioxide gas concentration data collected in December 1989. In the bioventing experiment, degradation rate estimates of 46.0 and 47.9 gm-2yr-1 (1.45×10-3 and 1.51×10-3 gal.ft.-2yr-1) of hydrocarbon were obtained by model calibration to oxygen and carbon dioxide gas concentration data, respectively. Method application was successful in quantifying the significance of a naturally occurring process that can effectively contribute to plume stabilization.

  5. Control of Chemical, Thermal, and Gas Transport Properties in Dense Phosphazene Polymer Membranes.

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher J. Orme; Frederick F. Stewart; Mark L. Stone; Mason K. Harrup; Thomas A. Luther; Eric S. Peterson

    2005-10-01

    Polyphosphazenes are hybrid polymers having organic pendant groups attached to an inorganic backbone. Phosphazene polymers can be tailored to specific applications through the attachment of a variety of different pendant groups to the phosphazene backbone. Applications for which these polymers have proven useful include solid polymer electrolytes for batteries and fuel cells, as well as, membranes for gas and liquid separations. In past work, phosphazene polymers have been synthesized using mixtures of pendant groups with differing chemical affinities. Specific ratios of hydrophobic and hydrophilic pendant groups were placed on the phosphazene backbone with a goal of demonstrating control of solubility, and therefore chemical selectivity. In this work, a series of phosphazene homo-polymers were synthesized having varying amounts of hydrophobic and hydrophilic character on each individual pendant group. Polymers were synthesized having a hydrophilic portion next to the polymer backbone and the hydrophobic portion on the terminal end of the pendant group. The effects of these combined hydrophobic/hydrophilic pendant groups on polymer morphology and gas transport properties are presented. The following data will be addressed: thermal characterization, pure gas permeability on seven gases (Ar, H2, O2, N2, CO2, and CH4 ), and ideal selectivity for the gas pairs: O2/N2, H2/CO2, CO2/H2, CO2/CH4 and CO2/N2.

  6. Miniband Transport in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas with a Strong Periodic Unidirectional Potential Modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lyo, Sungkwun K.; Pan, Wei

    2014-08-07

    In this paper, we study the Bloch oscillations of a two-dimensional electron gas with a strong periodic potential-modulation and miniband transport along the field at low temperatures, assuming a free motion in the transverse direction. The dependence of the current on the field, the electron density, and the temperature is investigated by using a relaxation-time approximation for inelastic scattering. Moreover, for a fixed total scattering rate, the field dependence of the current is sensitive to the ratio of the elastic and inelastic scattering rates in contrast with the recent result of a multiband but otherwise similar model with a weak potential modulation.

  7. Sensitivity analysis of the noble gas transport and fate model: CASCADR9

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, F.T.; Cawlfield, D.E.; Barker, L.E.

    1994-03-01

    CASCADR9 is a desert alluvial soil site-specific noble gas transport and fate model. Input parameters for CASCADR9 are: man-made source term, background concentration of radionuclides, radon half-life, soil porosity, period of barometric pressure wave, amplitude of barometric pressure wave, and effective eddy diffusivity. Using average flux, total flow, and radon concentration at the 40 day mark as output parameters, a sensitivity analysis for CASCADR9 is carried out, under a variety of scenarios. For each scenario, the parameter to which output parameters are most sensitive are identified.

  8. Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting the Deployment of Larger Wind Turbines: Summary of Results

    SciTech Connect

    J. Cotrell, T. Stehly, J. Johnson, J. O. Roberts, Z. Parker, G. Scott, and D. Heimiller

    2014-01-28

    The objectives of this study were to identify the transportation and logistics challenges, assess the associated impacts, and provide recommendations for strategies and specific actions to address the challenges.

  9. Viability of modelling gas transport in shallow injection-monitoring experiment field at Maguelone, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basirat, Farzad; Perroud, Hervé; Lofi, Johanna; Denchik, Nataliya; Lods, Gérard; Fagerlund, Fritjof; Sharma, Prabhakar; Pezard, Philippe; Niemi, Auli

    2015-04-01

    In this study, TOUGH2/EOS7CA model is used to simulate the shallow injection-monitoring experiment carried out at Maguelone, France, during 2012 and 2013. The possibility of CO2 leakage from storage reservoir to upper layers is one of the issues that need to be addressed in CCS projects. Developing reliable monitoring techniques to detect and characterize CO2 leakage is necessary for the safety of CO2 storage in reservoir formations. To test and cross-validate different monitoring techniques, a series of shallow gas injection-monitoring experiments (SIMEx) has been carried out at the Maguelone. The experimental site is documented in Lofi et al [2013]. At the site, a series of nitrogen and one CO2 injection experiment have been carried out during 2012-2013 and different monitoring techniques have been applied. The purpose of modelling is to acquire understanding of the system performance as well as to further develop and validate modelling approaches for gas transport in the shallow subsurface, against the well-controlled data sets. The preliminary simulation of the experiment including the simulation for the Nitrogen injection test in 2012 was presented in Basirat et al [2013]. In this work, the simulations represent the gaseous CO2 distribution and dissolved CO2 within range obtained by monitoring approaches. The Multiphase modelling in combination with geophysical monitoring can be used for process understanding of gas phase migration- and mass transfer processes resulting from gaseous CO2 injection. Basirat, F., A. Niemi, H. Perroud, J. Lofi, N. Denchik, G. Lods, P. Pezard, P. Sharma, and F. Fagerlund (2013), Modeling Gas Transport in the Shallow Subsurface in Maguelone Field Experiment, Energy Procedia, 40, 337-345. Lofi, J., P. Pezard, F. Bouchette, O. Raynal, P. Sabatier, N. Denchik, A. Levannier, L. Dezileau, and R. Certain (2013), Integrated Onshore-Offshore Investigation of a Mediterranean Layered Coastal Aquifer, Groundwater, 51(4), 550-561.

  10. Sodic soil properties and sunflower growth as affected by byproducts of flue gas desulfurization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinman; Bai, Zhongke; Yang, Peiling

    2012-01-01

    The main component of the byproducts of flue gas desulfurization (BFGD) is CaSO(4), which can be used to improve sodic soils. The effects of BFGD on sodic soil properties and sunflower growth were studied in a pot experiment. The experiment consisted of eight treatments, at four BFGD rates (0, 7.5, 15 and 22.5 t ha(-1)) and two leaching levels (750 and 1200 m(3) ha(-1)). The germination rate and yield of the sunflower increased, and the exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), pH and total dissolved salts (TDS) in the soils decreased after the byproducts were applied. Excessive BFGD also affected sunflower germination and growth, and leaching improved reclamation efficiency. The physical and chemical properties of the reclaimed soils were best when the byproducts were applied at 7.5 t ha(-1) and water was supplied at 1200 m(3)·ha(-1). Under these conditions, the soil pH, ESP, and TDS decreased from 9.2, 63.5 and 0.65% to 7.8, 2.8 and 0.06%, and the germination rate and yield per sunflower reached 90% and 36.4 g, respectively. Salinity should be controlled by leaching when sodic soils are reclaimed with BFGD as sunflower growth is very sensitive to salinity during its seedling stage. PMID:23285042

  11. Sodic Soil Properties and Sunflower Growth as Affected by Byproducts of Flue Gas Desulfurization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jinman; Bai, Zhongke; Yang, Peiling

    2012-01-01

    The main component of the byproducts of flue gas desulfurization (BFGD) is CaSO4, which can be used to improve sodic soils. The effects of BFGD on sodic soil properties and sunflower growth were studied in a pot experiment. The experiment consisted of eight treatments, at four BFGD rates (0, 7.5, 15 and 22.5 t ha−1) and two leaching levels (750 and 1200 m3 ha−1). The germination rate and yield of the sunflower increased, and the exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP), pH and total dissolved salts (TDS) in the soils decreased after the byproducts were applied. Excessive BFGD also affected sunflower germination and growth, and leaching improved reclamation efficiency. The physical and chemical properties of the reclaimed soils were best when the byproducts were applied at 7.5 t ha−1 and water was supplied at 1200 m3·ha−1. Under these conditions, the soil pH, ESP, and TDS decreased from 9.2, 63.5 and 0.65% to 7.8, 2.8 and 0.06%, and the germination rate and yield per sunflower reached 90% and 36.4 g, respectively. Salinity should be controlled by leaching when sodic soils are reclaimed with BFGD as sunflower growth is very sensitive to salinity during its seedling stage. PMID:23285042

  12. Corn Ethanol: The Surprisingly Effective Route for Natural Gas Consumption in the Transportation Sector

    SciTech Connect

    Szybist, James P.; Curran, Scott

    2015-05-01

    Proven reserves and production of natural gas (NG) in the United States have increased dramatically in the last decade, due largely to the commercialization of hydraulic fracturing. This has led to a plentiful supply of NG, resulting in a significantly lower cost on a gallon of gasoline-equivalent (GGE) basis. Additionally, NG is a domestic, non-petroleum source of energy that is less carbon-intensive than coal or petroleum products, and thus can lead to lower greenhouse gas emissions. Because of these factors, there is a desire to increase the use of NG in the transportation sector in the United States (U.S.). However, using NG directly in the transportation sector requires that several non-trivial challenges be overcome. One of these issues is the fueling infrastructure. There are currently only 1,375 NG fueling stations in the U.S. compared to 152,995 fueling stations for gasoline in 2014. Additionally, there are very few light-duty vehicles that can consume this fuel directly as dedicated or bi-fuel options. For example, in model year 2013Honda was the only OEM to offer a dedicated CNG sedan while a number of others offered CNG options as a preparation package for LD trucks and vans. In total, there were a total of 11 vehicle models in 2013 that could be purchased that could use natural gas directly. There are additional potential issues associated with NG vehicles as well. Compared to commercial refueling stations, the at-home refueling time for NG vehicles is substantial – a result of the small compressors used for home refilling. Additionally, the methane emissions from both refueling (leakage) and from tailpipe emissions (slip) from these vehicles can add to their GHG footprint, and while these emissions are not currently regulated it could be a barrier in the future, especially in scenarios with broad scale adoption of CNG vehicles. However, NG consumption already plays a large role in other sectors of the economy, including some that are important to

  13. 30 CFR 250.120 - How does injecting, storing, or treating gas affect my royalty payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sell the gas from the reservoir. (b) If you produce gas from an OCS lease and store it according to 30 CFR 550.119, you must pay royalty before injecting it into the storage reservoir. (c) If you produce... royalty payments? (a) If you produce gas from an OCS lease and inject it into a reservoir on the lease...

  14. 30 CFR 250.120 - How does injecting, storing, or treating gas affect my royalty payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sell the gas from the reservoir. (b) If you produce gas from an OCS lease and store it according to 30 CFR 550.119, you must pay royalty before injecting it into the storage reservoir. (c) If you produce... royalty payments? (a) If you produce gas from an OCS lease and inject it into a reservoir on the lease...

  15. The impact of ice layers on gas transport through firn at the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) site, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keegan, K.; Albert, M. R.; Baker, I.

    2014-10-01

    Typically, gas transport through firn is modeled in the context of an idealized firn column. However, in natural firn, imperfections are present, which can alter transport dynamics and therefore reduce the accuracy of reconstructed climate records. For example, ice layers have been found in several firn cores collected in the polar regions. Here, we examined the effects of two ice layers found in a NEEM, Greenland firn core on gas transport through the firn. These ice layers were found to have permeability values of 3.0 and 4.0 × 10-10 m2, and are therefore not impermeable layers. However, the shallower ice layer was found to be significantly less permeable than the surrounding firn, and can therefore retard gas transport. Large closed bubbles were found in the deeper ice layer, which will have an altered gas composition than that expected because they were closed near the surface after the water phase was present. The bubbles in this layer represent 12% of the expected closed porosity of this firn layer after the firn-ice transition depth is reached, and will therefore bias the future ice core gas record. The permeability and thickness of the ice layers at the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) site suggest that they do not disrupt the firn-air concentration profiles and that they do not need to be accounted for in gas transport models at NEEM.

  16. State policies affecting natural gas consumption (Notice of inquiry issued on August 14, 1992). Summary of comments

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, R.; Kamphuis-Zatopa, W.

    1993-03-25

    On August 14, 1992, the United States Department of Energy issued a Request for Comments Concerning State Policies Affecting Natural Gas Consumption. This Notice of (NOI) noted the increasing significance of the role played by states and sought to gain better understanding of how state policies impact the gas industry. The general trend toward a. more competitive marketplace for natural gas, as well as recent regulatory and legislative changes at the Federal level, are driving State regulatory agencies to reevaluate how they regulate natural gas. State action is having a significant impact on the use of natural gas for generating electricity, as well as affecting the cost-effective trade-off between conservation expenditures and gas use. Additionally, fuel choice has an impact upon the environment and national energy security. In light of these dimensions, the Department of Energy initiated this study of State regulation. The goals of this NOI are: (1) help DOE better understand the impact of State policies on the efficient use of gas; (2) increase the awareness of the natural gas industry and Federal and State officials to the important role of State policies and regulations; (3) create an improved forum for dialogue on State and Federal natural gas issues; and, (4) develop a consensus on an analytical agenda that would be most helpful in addressing the regulatory challenges faced by the States. Ninety-seven parties filed comments, and of these ninety-seven, fifteen parties filed reply comments. Appendix One lists these parties. This report briefly syntheses the comments received. The goal is to assist parties to judging the extent of consensus on the problems posed and the remedies suggested, aid in identifying future analytical analyses, and assist parties in assessing differences in strategies and regulatory philosophies which shape these issues and their resolution.

  17. Solid-state fermentation in rotating drum bioreactors: operating variables affect performance through their effects on transport phenomena.

    PubMed

    Stuart, D M; Mitchell, D A; Johns, M R; Litster, J D

    1999-05-20

    Aspergillus oryzae ACM 4996 was grown on an artificial gel-based substrate and on steamed wheat bran during solid-state fermentations in 18.7 L rotating drum bioreactors. For gel fermentations fungal growth decreased as rotational speed increased, presumably due to increased shear. For wheat bran fermentations fungal growth improved under agitated compared to static culture conditions, due to superior heat and mass transfer. We conclude that the effects of operational variables on the performance of SSF bioreactors are mediated by their effects on transport phenomena such as mixing, shear, heat transfer, and mass transfer within the substrate bed. In addition, the substrate characteristics affect the need for and the rates of these transport processes. Different transport phenomena may be rate limiting with different substrates. This work improves understanding of the effects of bioreactor operation on SSF performance. PMID:10099618

  18. Field-scale sulfur hexafluoride tracer experiment to understand long distance gas transport in the deep unsaturated zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walvoord, Michelle Ann; Andraski, Brian; Green, Christopher T.; Stonestrom, David A.; Striegl, Rob

    2014-01-01

    A natural gradient SF6 tracer experiment provided an unprecedented evaluation of long distance gas transport in the deep unsaturated zone (UZ) under controlled (known) conditions. The field-scale gas tracer test in the 110-m-thick UZ was conducted at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Amargosa Desert Research Site (ADRS) in southwestern Nevada. A history of anomalous (theoretically unexpected) contaminant gas transport observed at the ADRS, next to the first commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal facility in the United States, provided motivation for the SF6 tracer study. Tracer was injected into a deep UZ borehole at depths of 15 and 48 m, and plume migration was observed in a monitoring borehole 9 m away at various depths (0.5–109 m) over the course of 1 yr. Tracer results yielded useful information about gas transport as applicable to the spatial scales of interest for off-site contaminant transport in arid unsaturated zones. Modeling gas diffusion with standard empirical expressions reasonably explained SF6 plume migration, but tended to underpredict peak concentrations for the field-scale experiment given previously determined porosity information. Despite some discrepancies between observations and model results, rapid SF6 gas transport commensurate with previous contaminant migration was not observed. The results provide ancillary support for the concept that apparent anomalies in historic transport behavior at the ADRS are the result of factors other than nonreactive gas transport properties or processes currently in effect in the undisturbed UZ.

  19. Analysis of matrix effects critical to microbial transport in organic waste-affected soils across laboratory and field scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unc, Adrian; Goss, Michael J.; Cook, Simon; Li, Xunde; Atwill, Edward R.; Harter, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Organic waste applications to soil (manure, various wastewaters, and biosolids) are among the most significant sources of bacterial contamination in surface and groundwater. Transport of bacteria through the vadose zone depends on flow path geometry and stability and is mitigated by interaction between soil, soil solution, air-water interfaces, and characteristics of microbial surfaces. After initial entry, the transport through soil depends on continued entrainment of bacteria and resuspension of those retained in the porous structure. We evaluated the retention of bacteria-sized artificial microspheres, varying in diameter and surface charge and applied in different suspending solutions, by a range of sieved soils contained in minicolumns, the transport of hydrophobic bacteria-sized microspheres through undisturbed soil columns as affected by waste type under simulated rainfall, and the field-scale transport of Enterococcus spp. to an unconfined sandy aquifer after the application of liquid manure. Microsphere retention reflected microsphere properties. The soil type and suspending solution affected retention of hydrophilic but not hydrophobic particles. Retention was not necessarily facilitated by manure-microsphere-soil interactions but by manure-soil interactions. Undisturbed column studies confirmed the governing role of waste type on vadose-zone microsphere transport. Filtration theory applied as an integrated analysis of transport across length scales showed that effective collision efficiency depended on the distance of travel. It followed a power law behavior with the power coefficient varying from ˜0.4 over short distances to >0.9 over 1 m (i.e., very little filtration for a finite fraction of biocolloids), consistent with reduced influence of soil solution and biocolloid properties at longer travel distances.

  20. How technology and price affect US tight gas potential. Part 2 (Conclusion). Economics of tight gas production

    SciTech Connect

    Veatch, R.W. Jr.; Baker, O.

    1983-04-01

    The amount of tight gas recoverable in the Lower 48 states depends on both improved technology and the price received for the gas. As either of these factors increases, operators will be able to produce lower quality reservoirs, thereby increasing the economically recoverable gas resources. A model used to estimate three major producing formations in the San Juan basin - the Dakota, Pictured Cliffs, and Mesa Verde - incorporates the physical steps in the exploration and development process for each field in the subbasin; investments, dry holes, production, and sales are properly scheduled to yield financial results as well as ultimate recovery. A second model simulates an exploration play in multiple basins, providing for scheduling investments in a number of basins over a period of years. Output includes annual production, cash flow, and profitability.

  1. Oxygen transport from the atmosphere to soil gas beneath a slab-on-grade foundation overlying petroleum-impacted soil.

    PubMed

    Lundegard, Paul D; Johnson, Paul C; Dahlen, Paul

    2008-08-01

    Modeling and field study results suggest that, in the case of a building overlying an aerobically biodegradable vapor source (i.e., petroleum-impacted soil), the significance of vapor intrusion into the building depends on the source vapor concentration, the relative position of the vapor source and building, and the rate of O2 transport from the atmosphere to the soil gas beneath the building. This work quantified the latter at a house having about a 250 m2 slab-on-grade foundation footprint. It was constructed on 1.5 m of clean fill overlying a petroleum hydrocarbon-impacted soil layer undergoing methanogenesis. Soil gas O2 and CH4 profiles adjacent to and beneath the foundation were measured and then the soil gas beneath the slab was rapidly displaced with N2. The natural replenishment of O2 was monitored for 90 days using in situ O2 sensors, and the responses with time were similar, independent of location. The O2 replenishment rate was about 2500 g-O2/d immediately after the N2 flood and then it declined to 200-500 g-O2/d over 30 days. Weather events affected the O2 replenishment rate; an increase occurred during a strong wind period (> 3 m/s), and a decrease occurred during a heavy rainfall event. The spatial and temporal patterns in the O2 sensor responses and quantified O2 replenishment rates could not be accounted for by simple mechanistic hypotheses involving lateral diffusion or advection through the bulk soil, and instead the data suggest rapid replenishment immediately below the foundation followed by downward diffusion.

  2. Modeling gravity effects on water retention and gas transport characteristics in plant growth substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamindu Deepagoda, T. K. K.; Jones, Scott B.; Tuller, Markus; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Kawamoto, Ken; Komatsu, Toshiko; Moldrup, Per

    2014-08-01

    Growing plants to facilitate life in outer space, for example on the International Space Station (ISS) or at planned deep-space human outposts on the Moon or Mars, has received much attention with regard to NASA’s advanced life support system research. With the objective of in situ resource utilization to conserve energy and to limit transport costs, native materials mined on Moon or Mars are of primary interest for plant growth media in a future outpost, while terrestrial porous substrates with optimal growth media characteristics will be useful for onboard plant growth during space missions. Due to limited experimental opportunities and prohibitive costs, liquid and gas behavior in porous substrates under reduced gravity conditions has been less studied and hence remains poorly understood. Based on ground-based measurements, this study examined water retention, oxygen diffusivity and air permeability characteristics of six plant growth substrates for potential applications in space, including two terrestrial analogs for lunar and Martian soils and four particulate substrates widely used in reduced gravity experiments. To simulate reduced gravity water characteristics, the predictions for ground-based measurements (1 - g) were scaled to two reduced gravity conditions, Martian gravity (0.38 - g) and lunar gravity (0.16 - g), following the observations in previous reduced gravity studies. We described the observed gas diffusivity with a recently developed model combined with a new approach that estimates the gas percolation threshold based on the pore size distribution. The model successfully captured measured data for all investigated media and demonstrated the implications of the poorly-understood shift in gas percolation threshold with improved gas percolation in reduced gravity. Finally, using a substrate-structure parameter related to the gaseous phase, we adequately described the air permeability under reduced gravity conditions.

  3. Gas tracer transport in a heterogeneous fracture in two-phase flow conditions. Experimental and modeling results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jódar, Jorge; Medina, Agustín; Carrera, Jesús

    2011-11-01

    Large amounts of gas can result from anaerobic corrosion of metals and from chemical and biological degradation of organic substances in underground repositories for radioactive waste. Gas generation may lead to the formation of a buoyant gas phase bubble (i.e. zone with increased gas saturation surrounded by water) and to the migration of radioactive gaseous species. In this situation, gaseous species migration is controlled by (1) advection, dispersion and diffusion within the gas bubble, and (2) dissolution in the water surrounding the gas bubble and diffusion of the dissolved species away from the interface. A number of gas tracer tests were performed in the framework of the GAs Migration (GAM) project to study the role played by dissolution/diffusion phenomena in gas transport. Tracers were selected to display a large range of solubility and diffusion coefficients, which should have led to significant chromatographic separation in the breakthrough curves (BTCs) of the tracers. However, measured BTCs displayed much smaller chromatographic separation than expected. These curves were interpreted using (1) a numerical model of multiphase flow and tracer transport in the fracture plane and diffusion into the immobile water, and (2) a simple two box model. Results showed that dissolution/diffusion into immobile water regions played a small role, and tailing appears to have been largely controlled by diffusion into dead gas volumes, such as boreholes.

  4. Noncontacting lateral transportation using gas squeeze film generated by flexural traveling waves--numerical analysis.

    PubMed

    Minikes, Adi; Bucher, Izhak

    2003-05-01

    This paper presents the theory describing the dynamical behavior of a noncontacting lateral transportation of planer objects by means of a gas squeeze film created by traveling flexural waves of a driving surface. An oscillating motion in the normal direction between two surfaces can generate a gas film with an average pressure higher than the surrounding. This load-carrying phenomenon arises from the fact that a viscous flow cannot be instantaneously squeezed; therefore, fast vibrations give rise to a cushioning effect. Equilibrium is established through a balance between viscous flow forces and compressibility forces. When the oscillatory motion between two surfaces creates traveling waves, lateral viscous forces are generated in addition to the normal levitation forces. These forces are produced as a result of nonuniform pressure gradients in the lateral direction between the surfaces. The combination of normal and lateral forces could be used for transporting objects without any direct contact with the driving surface. The numerical algorithm in this work couples the squeeze film phenomenon, which is represented by means of finite difference equations, to model a variant of the Reynolds equation, together with the equations describing the dynamics of the floating object. Numerical simulations are presented and investigated to highlight noteworthy topics.

  5. An analysis of pollutant gas transport and absorption in pulmonary airways.

    PubMed

    Grotberg, J B; Sheth, B V; Mockros, L F

    1990-05-01

    A mathematical model of ozone absorption, or for any soluble gas that has similar transport properties, is developed for a branching network of liquid-lined cylinders. In particular, we investigate specific flow regimes for finite length tubes where boundary layer phenomena and entrance effects exist in high Reynolds and Peclet (Pe) number airways. The smaller airways which have lower Reynolds and Peclet number flows are modelled by incorporating the detailed analysis found in [10] and modifying it for airways which have alveolated surfaces. We also consider a reacting gas and treat specific regimes where the reaction front is located at the air-liquid interface, within the liquid or at the liquid-tissue interface. Asymptotic methods are used in regions of the tracheobronchial tree where Pe much less than 1 and Pe much greater than 1. In addition, the fact that the radial transport parameter gamma much less than 1 for this toxin, and others such as nitrous oxides, is employed to simplify the analysis. The ozone concentrations, airway absorption and tissue dose are examined as a function of airway generation for several values of the governing parameters. The general result is a maximal dosing in airway generations 17 to 18 that is much larger (up to an order of magnitude) than the predictions of previous theories.

  6. Dietary inulin affects the morphology but not the sodium-dependent glucose and glutamine transport in the jejunum of broilers.

    PubMed

    Rehman, H; Rosenkranz, C; Böhm, J; Zentek, J

    2007-01-01

    Inulin, a prebiotic, is a fermentable oligosaccharide that may affect the intestinal mucosal architecture and the electrophysiological parameters. The effects of a diet with added inulin were tested on the jejunal morphology and electrogenic transport of Glc and Gln from the jejunal mucosa in broilers. Short-circuit current and transmucosal tissue resistance of jejunal flaps were measured in Ussing chambers. The feeding experiment was carried out in broilers (n = 40) using 1% inulin with an application period of 5 wk. The inulin-containing diet resulted in longer jejunal villi (P < 0.05) and deeper crypts (P < 0.01) than in control birds without affecting villus:crypt depth. Basal short-circuit current value remained unaffected by dietary treatment. Inulin supplementation did not modify the electrogenic transport of Glc and Gln in the jejunal mucosa. The basal value of transmucosal tissue resistance was significantly lower (P < 0.001) in the inulin-fed group compared with the control group. In conclusion, inulin supplementation affected the jejunal mucosal architecture but did not modify the electrogenic transport of Glc and amino acid under present experimental condition.

  7. Perturbation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport affects size of nucleus and nucleolus in human cells.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abira; Bhattacharjee, Chumki; Bhave, Madhura; Kailaje, Vaishali; Jain, Bhawik K; Sengupta, Isha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu

    2016-03-01

    Size regulation of human cell nucleus and nucleolus are poorly understood subjects. 3D reconstruction of live image shows that the karyoplasmic ratio (KR) increases by 30-80% in transformed cell lines compared to their immortalized counterpart. The attenuation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport causes the KR value to increase by 30-50% in immortalized cell lines. Nucleolus volumes are significantly increased in transformed cell lines and the attenuation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport causes a significant increase in the nucleolus volume of immortalized cell lines. A cytosol and nuclear fraction swapping experiment emphasizes the potential role of unknown cytosolic factors in nuclear and nucleolar size regulation.

  8. 50 CFR 29.21-9 - Rights-of-way for pipelines for the transportation of oil, natural gas, synthetic liquid or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... transportation of oil, natural gas, synthetic liquid or gaseous fuels, or any refined product produced therefrom... Regulations § 29.21-9 Rights-of-way for pipelines for the transportation of oil, natural gas, synthetic liquid... of oil, natural gas, synthetic liquid or gaseous fuels, or any refined product produced...

  9. 50 CFR 29.21-9 - Rights-of-way for pipelines for the transportation of oil, natural gas, synthetic liquid or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... transportation of oil, natural gas, synthetic liquid or gaseous fuels, or any refined product produced therefrom... Regulations § 29.21-9 Rights-of-way for pipelines for the transportation of oil, natural gas, synthetic liquid... of oil, natural gas, synthetic liquid or gaseous fuels, or any refined product produced...

  10. 50 CFR 29.21-9 - Rights-of-way for pipelines for the transportation of oil, natural gas, synthetic liquid or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... transportation of oil, natural gas, synthetic liquid or gaseous fuels, or any refined product produced therefrom... Regulations § 29.21-9 Rights-of-way for pipelines for the transportation of oil, natural gas, synthetic liquid... of oil, natural gas, synthetic liquid or gaseous fuels, or any refined product produced...

  11. Environmental factors influencing trace house gas production in permafrost-affected soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walz, Josefine; Knoblauch, Christian; Böhme, Luisa; Pfeiffer, Eva-Maria

    2016-04-01

    The permafrost-carbon feedback has been identified as a major feedback mechanism to climate change. Soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition in the active layer and thawing permafrost is an important source of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). Decomposability and potential CO2 and CH4 production are connected to the quality of SOM. SOM quality varies with vegetation composition, soil type, and soil depth. The regulating factors affecting SOM decomposition in permafrost landscapes are not well understood. Here, we incubated permafrost-affected soils from a polygonal tundra landscape in the Lena Delta, Northeast Siberia, to examine the influence of soil depth, oxygen availability, incubation temperature, and fresh organic matter addition on trace gas production. CO2 production was always highest in topsoil (0 - 10 cm). Subsoil (10 - 50 cm) and permafrost (50 - 90 cm) carbon did not differ significantly in their decomposability. Under anaerobic conditions, less SOM was decomposed than under aerobic conditions. However, in the absence of oxygen, CH4 can also be formed, which has a substantially higher warming potential than CO2. But, within the four-month incubation period (approximate period of thaw), methanogenesis played only a minor role with CH4 contributing 1-30% to the total anaerobic carbon release. Temperature and fresh organic matter addition had a positive effect on SOM decomposition. Across a temperature gradient (1, 4, 8°C) aerobic decomposition in topsoil was less sensitive to temperature than in subsoil or permafrost. The addition of labile plant organic matter (13C-labelled Carex aquatilis, a dominant species in the region) significantly increased overall CO2 production across different depths and temperatures. Partitioning the total amount of CO2 in samples amended with Carex material into SOM-derived CO2 and Carex-derived CO2, however, revealed that most of the additional CO2 could be assigned to the organic carbon from the amendment

  12. Wind driven vertical transport in a vegetated, wetland water column with air-water gas exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poindexter, C.; Variano, E. A.

    2010-12-01

    Flow around arrays of cylinders at low and intermediate Reynolds numbers has been studied numerically, analytically and experimentally. Early results demonstrated that at flow around randomly oriented cylinders exhibits reduced turbulent length scales and reduced diffusivity when compared to similarly forced, unimpeded flows (Nepf 1999). While horizontal dispersion in flows through cylinder arrays has received considerable research attention, the case of vertical dispersion of reactive constituents has not. This case is relevant to the vertical transfer of dissolved gases in wetlands with emergent vegetation. We present results showing that the presence of vegetation can significantly enhance vertical transport, including gas transfer across the air-water interface. Specifically, we study a wind-sheared air-water interface in which randomly arrayed cylinders represent emergent vegetation. Wind is one of several processes that may govern physical dispersion of dissolved gases in wetlands. Wind represents the dominant force for gas transfer across the air-water interface in the ocean. Empirical relationships between wind and the gas transfer coefficient, k, have been used to estimate spatial variability of CO2 exchange across the worlds’ oceans. Because wetlands with emergent vegetation are different from oceans, different model of wind effects is needed. We investigated the vertical transport of dissolved oxygen in a scaled wetland model built inside a laboratory tank equipped with an open-ended wind tunnel. Plastic tubing immersed in water to a depth of approximately 40 cm represented emergent vegetation of cylindrical form such as hard-stem bulrush (Schoenoplectus acutus). After partially removing the oxygen from the tank water via reaction with sodium sulfite, we used an optical probe to measure dissolved oxygen at mid-depth as the tank water re-equilibrated with the air above. We used dissolved oxygen time-series for a range of mean wind speeds to estimate the

  13. Large herbivore grazing affects the vegetation structure and greenhouse gas balance in a high arctic mire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, Julie Maria; Schmidt, Niels Martin; Christensen, Torben R.; Ström, Lena

    2015-04-01

    Herbivory is an important part of most ecosystems and affects the ecosystems’ carbon balance both directly and indirectly. Little is known about herbivory and its impact on the carbon balance in high arctic mire ecosystems. We hypothesized that trampling and grazing by large herbivores influences the vegetation density and composition and thereby also the carbon balance. In 2010, we established fenced exclosures in high arctic Greenland to prevent muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus) from grazing. During the growing seasons of 2011 to 2013 we measured CO2 and CH4 fluxes in these ungrazed blocks and compared them to blocks subjected to natural grazing. Additionally, we measured depth of the water table and active layer, soil temperature, and in 2011 and 2013 an inventory of the vegetation density and composition were made. In 2013 a significant decrease in total number of vascular plant (33-44%) and Eriophorum scheuchzeri (51-53%) tillers were found in ungrazed plots, the moss-layer and amount of litter had also increased substantially in these plots. This resulted in a significant decrease in net ecosystem uptake of CO2 (47%) and likewise a decrease in CH4 emission (44%) in ungrazed plots in 2013. While the future of the muskoxen in a changing arctic is unknown, this experiment points to a potentially large effect of large herbivores on the carbon balance in natural Arctic ecosystems. It thus sheds light on the importance of grazing mammals, and hence adds to our understanding of natural ecosystem greenhouse gas balance in the past and in the future.

  14. Mass-transport-controlled, large-area, uniform deposition of carbon nanofibers and their application in gas diffusion layers of fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xian; Xie, Zhiyong; Huang, Qizhong; Chen, Guofen; Hou, Ming; Yi, Baolian

    2015-05-01

    The effect of mass transport on the growth characteristics of large-area vapor-grown carbon nanofibers (CNFs) was investigated by adjusting the substrate deposition angle (α). The catalyst precursor solution was coated onto one side of a 2D porous carbon paper substrate via a decal printing method. The results showed that the CNFs were grown on only one side of the substrate and α was found to significantly affect the growth uniformity. At α = 0°, the growth thickness, the density, the microstructure and the yield of the CNF film were uniform across the substrate surface, whereas the growth uniformity decreased with increasing α, suggesting that the large-area CNF deposition processes were mass-transport-controlled. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of the gas diffusion processes revealed the homogeneous distributions of the carbon-source-gas concentration, pressure, and velocity near the substrate surface at α = 0°, which were the important factors in achieving the mass-transport-limited uniform CNF growth. The homogeneity of the field distributions decreased with increasing α, in accordance with the variation in the growth uniformity with α. When used as a micro-porous layer, the uniform CNF film enabled higher proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance in comparison with commercial carbon black by virtue of its improved electronic and mass-transport properties confirmed by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results. PMID:25865711

  15. Improving the accuracy of vehicle emissions profiles for urban transportation greenhouse gas and air pollution inventories.

    PubMed

    Reyna, Janet L; Chester, Mikhail V; Ahn, Soyoung; Fraser, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    Metropolitan greenhouse gas and air emissions inventories can better account for the variability in vehicle movement, fleet composition, and infrastructure that exists within and between regions, to develop more accurate information for environmental goals. With emerging access to high quality data, new methods are needed for informing transportation emissions assessment practitioners of the relevant vehicle and infrastructure characteristics that should be prioritized in modeling to improve the accuracy of inventories. The sensitivity of light and heavy-duty vehicle greenhouse gas (GHG) and conventional air pollutant (CAP) emissions to speed, weight, age, and roadway gradient are examined with second-by-second velocity profiles on freeway and arterial roads under free-flow and congestion scenarios. By creating upper and lower bounds for each factor, the potential variability which could exist in transportation emissions assessments is estimated. When comparing the effects of changes in these characteristics across U.S. cities against average characteristics of the U.S. fleet and infrastructure, significant variability in emissions is found to exist. GHGs from light-duty vehicles could vary by -2%-11% and CAP by -47%-228% when compared to the baseline. For heavy-duty vehicles, the variability is -21%-55% and -32%-174%, respectively. The results show that cities should more aggressively pursue the integration of emerging big data into regional transportation emissions modeling, and the integration of these data is likely to impact GHG and CAP inventories and how aggressively policies should be implemented to meet reductions. A web-tool is developed to aide cities in improving emissions uncertainty. PMID:25438089

  16. Improving the accuracy of vehicle emissions profiles for urban transportation greenhouse gas and air pollution inventories.

    PubMed

    Reyna, Janet L; Chester, Mikhail V; Ahn, Soyoung; Fraser, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    Metropolitan greenhouse gas and air emissions inventories can better account for the variability in vehicle movement, fleet composition, and infrastructure that exists within and between regions, to develop more accurate information for environmental goals. With emerging access to high quality data, new methods are needed for informing transportation emissions assessment practitioners of the relevant vehicle and infrastructure characteristics that should be prioritized in modeling to improve the accuracy of inventories. The sensitivity of light and heavy-duty vehicle greenhouse gas (GHG) and conventional air pollutant (CAP) emissions to speed, weight, age, and roadway gradient are examined with second-by-second velocity profiles on freeway and arterial roads under free-flow and congestion scenarios. By creating upper and lower bounds for each factor, the potential variability which could exist in transportation emissions assessments is estimated. When comparing the effects of changes in these characteristics across U.S. cities against average characteristics of the U.S. fleet and infrastructure, significant variability in emissions is found to exist. GHGs from light-duty vehicles could vary by -2%-11% and CAP by -47%-228% when compared to the baseline. For heavy-duty vehicles, the variability is -21%-55% and -32%-174%, respectively. The results show that cities should more aggressively pursue the integration of emerging big data into regional transportation emissions modeling, and the integration of these data is likely to impact GHG and CAP inventories and how aggressively policies should be implemented to meet reductions. A web-tool is developed to aide cities in improving emissions uncertainty.

  17. Yeast culture supplement during nursing and transport affects immunity and intestinal microbial ecology of weanling pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weaning and transport stress can have a negative impact on the piglet's immune system and intestinal microbiota. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of a yeast product on innate immunity and microbial ecology of the gastrointestinal tract following stress of weaning and trans...

  18. Intestinal microbial affects of yeast products on weaned and transport stressed pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Study objectives were to determine effects of a commercially available yeast product (XPC, Diamond-V Mills) and stress of transportation on total Enterobacteriaceae, Escherichia coli, coliforms, and Lactobacilli populations in the intestine of weaning pigs. In a RCB design with a 2 x 2 factorial ar...

  19. Nutrient transport in human annulus fibrosus is affected by compressive strain and anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Alicia R; Yuan, Tai-Yi; Huang, Chun-Yuh; Brown, Mark D; Gu, Wei Yong

    2012-12-01

    The avascular intervertebral disc (IVD) receives nutrition via transport from surrounding vasculature; poor nutrition is believed to be a main cause of disc degeneration. In this study, we investigated the effects of mechanical deformation and anisotropy on the transport of two important nutrients--oxygen and glucose--in human annulus fibrosus (AF). The diffusivities of oxygen and glucose were measured under three levels of uniaxial confined compression--0, 10, and 20%--and in three directions--axial, circumferential, and radial. The glucose partition coefficient was also measured at three compression levels. Results for glucose and oxygen diffusivity in AF ranged from 4.46 × 10(-7) to 9.77 × 10(-6) cm(2)/s and were comparable to previous studies; the glucose partition coefficient ranged from 0.71 to 0.82 and was also similar to previous results. Transport properties were found to decrease with increasing deformation, likely caused by fluid exudation during tissue compression and reduction in pore size. Furthermore, diffusivity in the radial direction was lower than in the axial or circumferential directions, indicating that nutrient transport in human AF is anisotropic. This behavior is likely a consequence of the layered structure and unique collagen architecture of AF tissue. These findings are important for better understanding nutritional supply in IVD and related disc degeneration.

  20. [Aero-transport of a MDR-TB affected patient with bio-containment systems].

    PubMed

    Lastilla, M; Bisetti, R; Autore, A; Aragonese, F; Di Stefano, M; Sarlo, O

    2007-01-01

    The Italian Air Force medical service, in order to attend to its duty, has to deal with the search, rescue and aero-medical evacuation of the wounded and sick. Due to the increase of air transportation, the likelihood of contracting disease, such as haemorrhagic fevers has risen and it is necessary to know how to treat a patient abroad suffering from severe infectious disease without running any risk either for the medical personnel or for the air crew. The military sanitary service of the Air Force has been preparing for this purpose through a meticulous preparation in Italy and in the USA in order to satisfy these need and through the use of stretchers specifically designed to transport highly contagious patients: Aircraft Transit Isolators (ATIs) and Stretcher Transit Isolators (STIs). These particular medical tools are provided by filter HEPA and they are completely insulated in a PVC envelope. The former (ATI) is used to transport the patient by airplane, the latter is used for road travel. Last January 24th the first real mission was performed transporting a severe TBC-MDR (case) from Alghero to Milan. All went well and the patient left the hospital of Sondalo two months later. PMID:17598993

  1. Runoff nutrient transport as affected by land application method, swine growth stage, and runoff rate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to measure the effects of slurry application method, swine growth stage, and flow rate on runoff nutrient transport. Swine slurry was obtained from production units containing grower pigs, finisher pigs, or sows and gilts. The swine slurry was applied using broadcast, disk, ...

  2. A mutation in protein phosphatase 2A regulatory subunit A affects auxin transport in Arabidopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbers, C.; DeLong, A.; Deruere, J.; Bernasconi, P.; Soll, D.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin controls processes such as cell elongation, root hair development and root branching. Tropisms, growth curvatures triggered by gravity, light and touch, are also auxin-mediated responses. Auxin is synthesized in the shoot apex and transported through the stem, but the molecular mechanism of auxin transport is not well understood. Naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) and other inhibitors of auxin transport block tropic curvature responses and inhibit root and shoot elongation. We have isolated a novel Arabidopsis thaliana mutant designated roots curl in NPA (rcn1). Mutant seedlings exhibit altered responses to NPA in root curling and hypocotyl elongation. Auxin efflux in mutant seedlings displays increased sensitivity to NPA. The rcn1 mutation was transferred-DNA (T-DNA) tagged and sequences flanking the T-DNA insert were cloned. Analysis of the RCN1 cDNA reveals that the T-DNA insertion disrupts a gene for the regulatory A subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A-A). The RCN1 gene rescues the rcn1 mutant phenotype and also complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PP2A-A mutation, tpd3-1. These data implicate protein phosphatase 2A in the regulation of auxin transport in Arabidopsis.

  3. [Aero-transport of a MDR-TB affected patient with bio-containment systems].

    PubMed

    Lastilla, M; Bisetti, R; Autore, A; Aragonese, F; Di Stefano, M; Sarlo, O

    2007-01-01

    The Italian Air Force medical service, in order to attend to its duty, has to deal with the search, rescue and aero-medical evacuation of the wounded and sick. Due to the increase of air transportation, the likelihood of contracting disease, such as haemorrhagic fevers has risen and it is necessary to know how to treat a patient abroad suffering from severe infectious disease without running any risk either for the medical personnel or for the air crew. The military sanitary service of the Air Force has been preparing for this purpose through a meticulous preparation in Italy and in the USA in order to satisfy these need and through the use of stretchers specifically designed to transport highly contagious patients: Aircraft Transit Isolators (ATIs) and Stretcher Transit Isolators (STIs). These particular medical tools are provided by filter HEPA and they are completely insulated in a PVC envelope. The former (ATI) is used to transport the patient by airplane, the latter is used for road travel. Last January 24th the first real mission was performed transporting a severe TBC-MDR (case) from Alghero to Milan. All went well and the patient left the hospital of Sondalo two months later.

  4. Simulation of gas phase transport of carbon-14 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, N.; Ross, B.

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated gas phase transport of Carbon-14 at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Three models were established to calculate travel time of Carbon-14 from the potential repository to the mountain surface: a geochemical model for retardation factors, a coupled gas-flow and heat transfer model for temperature and gas flow fields, and a particle tracker for travel time calculation. The simulations used three parallel, east-west cross-sections that were taken from the Sandia National Laboratories Interactive Graphics Information System (IGIS). Assuming that the repository is filled with 30- year-old waste at an initial areal power density of 57 kw/acre, we found that repository temperatures remain above 60??C for more than 10,000 years. For a tuff permeability of 10-7 cm2, Carbon-14 travel times to the surface are mostly less than 1,000 years, for particles starting at any time within the first 10,000 years. If the tuff permeability is 10-8 cm2, however, Carbon- 14 travel times to the surface range from 3,000 to 12,000 years, for particle starting within the 10,000 years.

  5. Alteration of natural (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface by gas transport and water infiltration.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Sophie; Sun, Yunwei; Purtschert, Roland; Raghoo, Lauren; Pili, Eric; Carrigan, Charles R

    2016-05-01

    High (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas is proposed as a key evidence for the detection of underground nuclear explosion by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. However, such a detection is challenged by the natural background of (37)Ar in the subsurface, mainly due to Ca activation by cosmic rays. A better understanding and improved capability to predict (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface and its spatial and temporal variability is thus required. A numerical model integrating (37)Ar production and transport in the subsurface is developed, including variable soil water content and water infiltration at the surface. A parameterized equation for (37)Ar production in the first 15 m below the surface is studied, taking into account the major production reactions and the moderation effect of soil water content. Using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, a realistic and comprehensive probability distribution of natural (37)Ar activity concentrations in soil gas is proposed, including the effects of water infiltration. Site location and soil composition are identified as the parameters allowing for a most effective reduction of the possible range of (37)Ar activity concentrations. The influence of soil water content on (37)Ar production is shown to be negligible to first order, while (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas and its temporal variability appear to be strongly influenced by transient water infiltration events. These results will be used as a basis for practical CTBTO concepts of operation during an OSI.

  6. Alteration of natural (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface by gas transport and water infiltration.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Sophie; Sun, Yunwei; Purtschert, Roland; Raghoo, Lauren; Pili, Eric; Carrigan, Charles R

    2016-05-01

    High (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas is proposed as a key evidence for the detection of underground nuclear explosion by the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. However, such a detection is challenged by the natural background of (37)Ar in the subsurface, mainly due to Ca activation by cosmic rays. A better understanding and improved capability to predict (37)Ar activity concentration in the subsurface and its spatial and temporal variability is thus required. A numerical model integrating (37)Ar production and transport in the subsurface is developed, including variable soil water content and water infiltration at the surface. A parameterized equation for (37)Ar production in the first 15 m below the surface is studied, taking into account the major production reactions and the moderation effect of soil water content. Using sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification, a realistic and comprehensive probability distribution of natural (37)Ar activity concentrations in soil gas is proposed, including the effects of water infiltration. Site location and soil composition are identified as the parameters allowing for a most effective reduction of the possible range of (37)Ar activity concentrations. The influence of soil water content on (37)Ar production is shown to be negligible to first order, while (37)Ar activity concentration in soil gas and its temporal variability appear to be strongly influenced by transient water infiltration events. These results will be used as a basis for practical CTBTO concepts of operation during an OSI. PMID:26939033

  7. Flow transport and gas mixing during invasive high frequency oscillatory ventilation.

    PubMed

    Alzahrany, Mohammed; Banerjee, Arindam; Salzman, Gary

    2014-06-01

    A large Eddy simulation (LES) based computational fluid dynamics study was performed to investigate gas transport and mixing in patient specific human lung models during high frequency oscillatory ventilation. Different pressure-controlled waveforms (sinusoidal, exponential and square) and ventilator frequencies (15, 10 and 6Hz) were used (tidal volume=50mL). The waveforms were created by solving the equation of motion subjected to constant lung wall compliance and flow resistance. Simulations were conducted with and without endotracheal tube to understand the effect of invasive management device. Variation of pressure-controlled waveform and frequency exhibits significant differences on counter flow pattern, which could lead to a significant impact on the gas mixing efficiency. Pendelluft-like flow was present for the sinusoidal waveform at all frequencies but occurred only at early inspiration for the square waveform at highest frequency. The square waveform was most efficient for gas mixing, resulting in the least wall shear stress on the lung epithelium layer thereby reducing the risk of barotrauma to both airways and the alveoli for patients undergoing therapy. PMID:24656889

  8. Better Understanding Transport Related Differences Between CCMs and Trace Gas Measurements With an Idealized Stratospheric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, E. A.; Moore, F. L.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Plummer, D. A.; Kolonjari, F.; Walker, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    We use a modified version of the tropical leaky pipe (TLP) model of the stratosphere to explore how well an idealized model can (1) reproduce global chemistry-climate model (CCM) output and (2) constrain transport characteristics necessary to replicate measurements of long-lived trace gases. The version of the TLP model we use includes the simulation of long-lived trace gases, such as SF6 and CO2, as well as photochemically active trace gases such as CFC-11, CFC-12 and N2O. The TLP model was found to accurately replicate trace gas output from the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM) for time-averaged profiles in the tropics and each extratropical region. With confidence that the TLP model could represent the basic transport features in CMAM we then used the TLP model to interpret differences between ACE satellite and balloon measurements and CMAM output. The TLP model is shown to uniquely determine mean circulation and recirculation (mixing between the extratropics and tropics) changes necessary for CMAM to more accurately simulate the measurements. This guidance on transport changes is novel, and cannot readily be obtained from direct comparison of CCM output with measurements. The TLP model can thus be used as a bridge between measurements and CCMs to allow more targeted modification of the CCMs than would otherwise be possible.

  9. Transport of manure-borne testosterone in soils affected by artificial rainfall events.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yong; Zhang, Tian C

    2016-04-15

    Information is very limited on fate and transport of steroidal hormones in soils. In this study, the rainfall simulation tests were conducted with a soil slab reactor to investigate the transport of manure-borne testosterone in a silty-clay loam soil under six controllable operation conditions (i.e., three rainfall intensities and two tillage practices). The properties [e.g., rainwater volume, particle size distribution (PSD)] of the slurry samples collected in runoff and leachate at different time intervals were measured; their correlation with the distribution of testosterone among runoff, leachate and soil matrix was analyzed. The results indicated that more than 88% of the testosterone was held by the applied manure and/or soil matrix even under the rainfall intensity of 100-year return frequency. The runoff facilitated testosterone transport through both dissolved and particle-associated phases, with the corresponding mass ratio being ∼7 to 3. Soil particles collected through runoff were mainly silt-sized aggregates (STA) and clays, indicating the necessity of using partially-dispersed soil particles as testing materials to conduct batch tests (e.g., sorption/desorption). No testosterone was detected at the soil depth >20 cm or in the leachate samples, indicating that transport of testosterone through the soil is very slow when there is no preferential flow. Tillage practice could impede the transport of testosterone in runoff. For the first time, results and the methodologies of this study allow one to quantify the hormone distribution among runoff, leachate and soil matrix at the same time and to obtain a comprehensive picture of the F/T of manure-borne testosterone in soil-water environments. PMID:26922564

  10. How Do Hydrodynamic Instabilities Affect 3D Transport in Geophysical Vortices?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, P.; Ozgokmen, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding three-dimensional (3D) transport in ocean eddies is important for processes at a variety of scales, ranging from plankton production to climate variability. It is well known that geophysical vortices are subject to various hydrodynamic instabilities. Yet the influence of these instabilities on 3D material transport in vortex systems is not well investigated. Focusing on barotropic, inertial and 3D instabilities, we analyze these instabilities with normal-mode method, and reproduce their characteristics via highly-resolved numerical simulations using a spectral element Navier-Stokes solver. By comparing the simulation results of stable and unstable vortices, we investigate the joint impacts of instabilities on 3D transport through three major aspects: (i) energy transfer, (ii) overturning transport of the secondary circulation, and (iii) rates of vertical exchange and mixing. It is found that instabilities can enhance local nonlinear interactions and cause the kinetic energy wavenumber spectrum to have slopes between the conventional -5/3 and -3 at inertial ranges. The cascade of a new quantity is proposed to explain these non-conventional slopes. One of our main results is the discovery of material exchange between the central vortex and satellite vortices through 3D pathways, called funnels. These funnels modify the concept of elliptic regions that can trap material when confined to 2D dynamics. Thus, we show that a family of vortices, created by the hydrodynamic instabilities of the initially unstable vortex, can still continue to operate in unity in order to complete the 3D transport in these systems. We also show that flow instabilities can double the magnitude of vertical velocity, increase the rate of vertical exchange by an order of magnitude and enhance mixing rate more than 100%.

  11. Transport of manure-borne testosterone in soils affected by artificial rainfall events.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yong; Zhang, Tian C

    2016-04-15

    Information is very limited on fate and transport of steroidal hormones in soils. In this study, the rainfall simulation tests were conducted with a soil slab reactor to investigate the transport of manure-borne testosterone in a silty-clay loam soil under six controllable operation conditions (i.e., three rainfall intensities and two tillage practices). The properties [e.g., rainwater volume, particle size distribution (PSD)] of the slurry samples collected in runoff and leachate at different time intervals were measured; their correlation with the distribution of testosterone among runoff, leachate and soil matrix was analyzed. The results indicated that more than 88% of the testosterone was held by the applied manure and/or soil matrix even under the rainfall intensity of 100-year return frequency. The runoff facilitated testosterone transport through both dissolved and particle-associated phases, with the corresponding mass ratio being ∼7 to 3. Soil particles collected through runoff were mainly silt-sized aggregates (STA) and clays, indicating the necessity of using partially-dispersed soil particles as testing materials to conduct batch tests (e.g., sorption/desorption). No testosterone was detected at the soil depth >20 cm or in the leachate samples, indicating that transport of testosterone through the soil is very slow when there is no preferential flow. Tillage practice could impede the transport of testosterone in runoff. For the first time, results and the methodologies of this study allow one to quantify the hormone distribution among runoff, leachate and soil matrix at the same time and to obtain a comprehensive picture of the F/T of manure-borne testosterone in soil-water environments.

  12. Drug membrane transporters and CYP3A4 are affected by hypericin, hyperforin or aristoforin in colon adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Šemeláková, M; Jendželovský, R; Fedoročko, P

    2016-07-01

    Our previous results have shown that the combination of hypericin-mediated photodynamic therapy (HY-PDT) at sub-optimal dose with hyperforin (HP) (compounds of Hypericum sp.), or its stable derivative aristoforin (AR) stimulates generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to antitumour activity. This enhanced oxidative stress evoked the need for an explanation for HY accumulation in colon cancer cells pretreated with HP or AR. Generally, the therapeutic efficacy of chemotherapeutics is limited by drug resistance related to the overexpression of drug efflux transporters in tumour cells. Therefore, the impact of non-activated hypericin (HY), HY-PDT, HP and AR on cell membrane transporter systems (Multidrug resistance-associated protein 1-MRP1/ABCC1, Multidrug resistance-associated protein 2-MRP2/ABCC2, Breast cancer resistance protein - BCRP/ABCG2, P-glycoprotein-P-gp/ABCC1) and cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) was evaluated. The different effects of the three compounds on their expression, protein level and activity was determined under specific PDT light (T0+, T6+) or dark conditions (T0- T6-). We found that HP or AR treatment affected the protein levels of MRP2 and P-gp, whereas HP decreased MRP2 and P-gp expression mostly in the T0+ and T6+ conditions, while AR decreased MRP2 in T0- and T6+. Moreover, HY-PDT treatment induced the expression of MRP1. Our data demonstrate that HP or AR treatment in light or dark PDT conditions had an inhibitory effect on the activity of individual membrane transport proteins and significantly decreased CYP3A4 activity in HT-29 cells. We found that HP or AR significantly affected intracellular accumulation of HY in HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. These results suggest that HY, HP and AR might affect the efficiency of anti-cancer drugs, through interaction with membrane transporters and CYP3A4. PMID:27261575

  13. Increased phloem transport of S-methylmethionine positively affects sulfur and nitrogen metabolism and seed development in pea plants.

    PubMed

    Tan, Qiumin; Zhang, Lizhi; Grant, Jan; Cooper, Pauline; Tegeder, Mechthild

    2010-12-01

    Seeds of grain legumes are important energy and food sources for humans and animals. However, the yield and quality of legume seeds are limited by the amount of sulfur (S) partitioned to the seeds. The amino acid S-methylmethionine (SMM), a methionine derivative, has been proposed to be an important long-distance transport form of reduced S, and we analyzed whether SMM phloem loading and source-sink translocation are important for the metabolism and growth of pea (Pisum sativum) plants. Transgenic plants were produced in which the expression of a yeast SMM transporter, S-Methylmethionine Permease1 (MMP1, YLL061W), was targeted to the phloem and seeds. Phloem exudate analysis showed that concentrations of SMM are elevated in MMP1 plants, suggesting increased phloem loading. Furthermore, expression studies of genes involved in S transport and metabolism in source organs, as well as xylem sap analyses, support that S uptake and assimilation are positively affected in MMP1 roots. Concomitantly, nitrogen (N) assimilation in root and leaf and xylem amino acid profiles were changed, resulting in increased phloem loading of amino acids. When investigating the effects of increased S and N phloem transport on seed metabolism, we found that protein levels were improved in MMP1 seeds. In addition, changes in SMM phloem loading affected plant growth and seed number, leading to an overall increase in seed S, N, and protein content in MMP1 plants. Together, these results suggest that phloem loading and source-sink partitioning of SMM are important for plant S and N metabolism and transport as well as seed set.

  14. 30 CFR 250.120 - How does injecting, storing, or treating gas affect my royalty payments?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How does injecting, storing, or treating gas... OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF General Performance Standards § 250.120 How does injecting, storing, or treating...) If you produce gas from an OCS lease and treat it at an off-lease or off-unit location, you must...

  15. Allocation, stress tolerance and carbon transport in plants: how does phloem physiology affect plant ecology?

    PubMed

    Savage, Jessica A; Clearwater, Michael J; Haines, Dustin F; Klein, Tamir; Mencuccini, Maurizio; Sevanto, Sanna; Turgeon, Robert; Zhang, Cankui

    2016-04-01

    Despite the crucial role of carbon transport in whole plant physiology and its impact on plant-environment interactions and ecosystem function, relatively little research has tried to examine how phloem physiology impacts plant ecology. In this review, we highlight several areas of active research where inquiry into phloem physiology has increased our understanding of whole plant function and ecological processes. We consider how xylem-phloem interactions impact plant drought tolerance and reproduction, how phloem transport influences carbon allocation in trees and carbon cycling in ecosystems and how phloem function mediates plant relations with insects, pests, microbes and symbiotes. We argue that in spite of challenges that exist in studying phloem physiology, it is critical that we consider the role of this dynamic vascular system when examining the relationship between plants and their biotic and abiotic environment. PMID:26147312

  16. Allocation, stress tolerance and carbon transport in plants: how does phloem physiology affect plant ecology?

    PubMed

    Savage, Jessica A; Clearwater, Michael J; Haines, Dustin F; Klein, Tamir; Mencuccini, Maurizio; Sevanto, Sanna; Turgeon, Robert; Zhang, Cankui

    2016-04-01

    Despite the crucial role of carbon transport in whole plant physiology and its impact on plant-environment interactions and ecosystem function, relatively little research has tried to examine how phloem physiology impacts plant ecology. In this review, we highlight several areas of active research where inquiry into phloem physiology has increased our understanding of whole plant function and ecological processes. We consider how xylem-phloem interactions impact plant drought tolerance and reproduction, how phloem transport influences carbon allocation in trees and carbon cycling in ecosystems and how phloem function mediates plant relations with insects, pests, microbes and symbiotes. We argue that in spite of challenges that exist in studying phloem physiology, it is critical that we consider the role of this dynamic vascular system when examining the relationship between plants and their biotic and abiotic environment.

  17. Wave-induced mass transport affects daily Escherichia coli fluctuations in nearshore water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ge, Zhongfu; Whitman, Richard L.; Nevers, Meredith B.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2012-01-01

    Characterization of diel variability of fecal indicator bacteria concentration in nearshore waters is of particular importance for development of water sampling standards and protection of public health. Significant nighttime increase in Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentration in beach water, previously observed at marine sites, has also been identified in summer 2000 from fixed locations in waist- and knee-deep waters at Chicago 63rd Street Beach, an embayed, tideless, freshwater beach with low currents at night (approximately 0.015 m s–1). A theoretical model using wave-induced mass transport velocity for advection was developed to assess the contribution of surface waves to the observed nighttime E. coli replenishment in the nearshore water. Using average wave conditions for the summer season of year 2000, the model predicted an amount of E. coli transported from water of intermediate depth, where sediment resuspension occurred intermittently, that would be sufficient to have elevated E. coli concentration in the surf and swash zones as observed. The nighttime replenishment of E. coli in the surf and swash zones revealed here is an important phase in the cycle of diel variations of E. coli concentration in nearshore water. According to previous findings in Ge et al. (Environ. Sci. Technol. 2010, 44, 6731–6737), enhanced current circulation in the embayment during the day tends to displace and deposit material offshore, which partially sets up the system by the early evening for a new period of nighttime onshore movement. This wave-induced mass transport effect, although facilitating a significant base supply of material shoreward, can be perturbed or significantly influenced by high currents (orders of magnitude larger than a typical wave-induced mass transport velocity), current-induced turbulence, and tidal forcing.

  18. Growth rate and nutrient limitation affect the transport of Rhodococcus sp. strain DN22 through sand.

    PubMed

    Priestley, James T; Coleman, Nicholas V; Duxbury, Trevor

    2006-12-01

    Rhodococcus strain DN22 grows on the nitramine explosive RDX as a sole nitrogen source, and is potentially useful for bioremediation of explosives-contaminated soil. In order for strain DN22 to be effectively applied in situ, inoculum cells must reach zones of RDX contamination via passive transport, a process that is difficult to predict at field-scale. We examined the effect of growth conditions on the transport of DN22 cells through sand columns, using chemostat-grown cultures. Strain DN22 formed smaller coccoid cells at low dilution rate (0.02 h(-1)) and larger rods at high dilution rate (0.1 h(-1)). Under all nutrient limitation conditions studied, smaller cells grown at low dilution rate were retained more strongly by sand columns than larger cells grown at high dilution rate. At a dilution rate of 0.05, cells from nitrate-limited cultures were retained more strongly than cells from RDX-limited or succinate-limited cultures. Breakthrough concentrations (C/C (0)) from sand columns ranged from 0.04 (nitrate-limited, D=0.02 h(-1)) to 0.98 (succinate-limited, D=0.1 h(-1)). The observed strong effect of culture conditions on transport of DN22 cells emphasizes the importance of physiology studies in guiding the development of bioremediation technologies.

  19. Mechanisms affecting the transport and retention of bacteria, bacteriophage and microspheres in laboratory-scale saturated fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seggewiss, G.; Dickson, S. E.

    2013-12-01

    Groundwater is becoming an increasingly important water source due to the ever-increasing demands from agricultural, residential and industrial consumers. In search of more secure sources, wells are routinely finished over large vertical depths in bedrock aquifers, creating new hydraulic pathways and thus increasing the risk of cross contamination. Moreover, hydraulic pathways are also being altered and created by increasing water withdrawal rates from these wells. Currently, it is not well understood how biological contaminants are transported through, and retained in, fractured media thereby making risk assessment and land use decisions difficult. Colloid transport within fractured rock is a complex process with several mechanisms affecting transport and retention, including: advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, diffusion, size exclusion, adsorption, and decay. Several researchers have investigated the transport of bacteria, bacteriophage, and microspheres (both carboxylated and plain) to evaluate the effects of surface properties and size on transport and retention. These studies have suggested that transport is highly dependent on the physico-chemical properties of the particle, the fracture, and the carrying fluid. However, these studies contain little detail regarding the specific mechanisms responsible for transport beyond speculating about their existence. Further, little work has been done to compare the transport of these particulate materials through the same fracture, allowing for direct observations based on particulate size and surface properties. This research examines the similarities and differences in transport and retention between four different particles through two different laboratory-scale, saturated fractures. This work is designed to explore the effects of particle size, surface properties, ionic strength of the carrying solution, and aperture field characteristics on transport and retention in single, saturated fractures. The particulates

  20. Deregulated Copper Transport Affects Arabidopsis Development Especially in the Absence of Environmental Cycles1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Andrés-Colás, Nuria; Perea-García, Ana; Puig, Sergi; Peñarrubia, Lola

    2010-01-01

    Copper is an essential cofactor for key processes in plants, but it exerts harmful effects when in excess. Previous work has shown that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) COPT1 high-affinity copper transport protein participates in copper uptake through plant root tips. Here, we show that COPT1 protein localizes to the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis cells and the phenotypic effects of transgenic plants overexpressing either COPT1 or COPT3, the latter being another high-affinity copper transport protein family member. Both transgenic lines exhibit increased endogenous copper levels and are sensitive to the copper in the growth medium. Additional phenotypes include decreased hypocotyl growth in red light and differentially affected flowering times depending on the photoperiod. Furthermore, in the absence of environmental cycles, such as light and temperature, the survival of plants overexpressing COPT1 or COPT3 is compromised. Consistent with altered circadian rhythms, the expression of the nuclear circadian clock genes CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED1 (CCA1) and LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) is substantially reduced in either COPT1- or COPT3-overexpressing plants. Copper affects the amplitude and the phase, but not the period, of the CCA1 and LHY oscillations in wild-type plants. Copper also drives a reduction in the expression of circadian clock output genes. These results reveal that the spatiotemporal control of copper transport is a key aspect of metal homeostasis that is required for Arabidopsis fitness, especially in the absence of environmental cues. PMID:20335405

  1. Hybrid Gas Sensing and Transport Properties of Few-Walled CNTs Decorated with Discrete SnO₂ Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Kamalakannan; Shanmugam, Ilango; Kamruddin, Mohammed; Tyagi, Ashok K

    2016-01-01

    CVD grown, few walled carbon nanotubes (FWCNTs) were quasi decorated with SnO₂nanoparticles (FWCNTs-SnO₂) and its gas sensing properties were analyzed with ammonia and ethanol. At room temperature FWCNTs-SnO₂show enhanced 'p type' gas sensing response than FWCNTs. Activation of SnO₂at high temperatures led to systematic changes in the sensing behavior towards 'n type' response. Temperature dependent transport behavior was found to be a one dimensional variable range hopping mechanism (1 D-VRH) for the FWCNTs and a 3D-VRH mechanism for the FWCNTs-SnO2. These temperature dependent gas transport and sensing properties elucidate the hybrid nature of the nanocomposite with novel characteristics. This also implies its importance as a potential gas sensor material. PMID:27398589

  2. Processes affecting the transport of nitrogen in groundwater and factors related to slope position

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate (NO3-) pollution of water resources has been a major problem for years, causing contaminated water supplies, harmful effects on human health, and widespread eutrophication of fresh water resources. The main objectives of this study were to: 1) understand the processes affecting NO3- transpor...

  3. Analysis of selected energy security issues related to US crude oil and natural gas exploration, development, production, transportation and processing. Final report, Task 13

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    In July 1989, President Bush directed the Secretary of Energy to initiate the development of a comprehensive National Energy Strategy (NES) built upon a national consensus. The overall principle for the NES, as defined by the President and articulated by the Economic Policy Council (EPC), is the continuation of the successful policy of market reliance, consistent with the following goals: Balancing of energy, economic, and environmental concerns; and reduced dependence by the US and its friends and allies on potentially unreliable energy suppliers. The analyses presented in this report draw upon a large body of work previously conducted for DOE/Office of Fossil Energy, the US Department of Interior/Minerals Management Service (DOI/MMS), and the Gas Research Institute (GRI), referenced throughout the text of this report. This work includes assessments in the following areas: the potential of advanced oil and gas extraction technologies as improved through R&D, along with the successful transfer of these technologies to the domestic petroleum industry; the economic and energy impacts of environmental regulations on domestic oil and gas exploration, production, and transportation; the potential of tax incentives to stimulate domestic oil and gas development and production; the potential environmental costs associated with various options for leasing for US oil and gas resources in the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS); and the economic impacts of environmental regulations affecting domestic crude oil refining.

  4. A sucrose transporter-interacting protein disulphide isomerase affects redox homeostasis and links sucrose partitioning with abiotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Eggert, Erik; Obata, Toshihiro; Gerstenberger, Anne; Gier, Konstanze; Brandt, Tobias; Fernie, Alisdair R; Schulze, Waltraud; Kühn, Christina

    2016-06-01

    Sucrose accumulation in leaves in response to various abiotic stresses suggests a specific role of this disaccharide for stress tolerance and adaptation. The high-affinity transporter StSUT1 undergoes substrate-induced endocytosis presenting the question as to whether altered sucrose accumulation in leaves in response to stresses is also related to enhanced endocytosis or altered activity of the sucrose transporter. StSUT1 is known to interact with several stress-inducible proteins; here we investigated whether one of the interacting candidates, StPDI1, affects its subcellular localization in response to stress: StPDI1 expression is induced by ER-stress and salt. Both proteins, StSUT1 and StPDI1, were found in the detergent resistant membrane (DRM) fraction, and this might affect internalization. Knockdown of StPDI1 expression severely affects abiotic stress tolerance of transgenic potato plants. Analysis of these plants does not reveal modified subcellular localization or endocytosis of StSUT1, but rather a disturbed redox homeostasis, reduced detoxification of reactive oxygen species and effects on primary metabolism. Parallel observations with other StSUT1-interacting proteins are discussed. The redox status in leaves seems to be linked to the sugar status in response to various stress stimuli and to play a role in stress tolerance. PMID:26670204

  5. Calcium transport in bovine rumen epithelium as affected by luminal Ca concentrations and Ca sources

    PubMed Central

    Schröder, Bernd; Wilkens, Mirja R; Ricken, Gundula E; Leonhard-Marek, Sabine; Fraser, David R; Breves, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative role of different segments of the gastrointestinal tract for Ca absorption, the respective mechanisms, and their regulation are not fully identified for ruminants, that is, cattle. In different in vitro experiments the forestomach wall has been demonstrated to be a major site for active Ca absorption in sheep and goats. In order to further clarify the role of the bovine rumen for Ca transport with special attention to luminal Ca concentrations, its ionic form, and pH, electrophysiological and unidirectional flux rate measurements were performed with isolated bovine rumen epithelial tissues. For Ca flux studies (Jms, Jsm) in vitro Ussing chamber technique was applied. Standard RT-PCR method was used to characterize TRPV6 and PMCA1 as potential contributors to transepithelial active Ca transport. At Ca concentrations of 1.2 mmol L−1 on both sides of the tissues, Jms were higher than Jsm resulting under some conditions in significant Ca net flux rates (Jnet), indicating the presence of active Ca transport. In the absence of an electrical gradient, Jnet could significantly be stimulated in the presence of luminal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs). Increasing the luminal Ca concentrations up to 11.2 mmol L−1 resulted in significant increases in Jms without influencing Jsm. Providing Ca in its form as respective chloride, formate, or propionate salts there was no significant effect on Jms. No transcripts specific for Ca channel TRPV6 could be demonstrated. Our results indicate different mechanisms for Ca absorption in bovine rumen as compared with those usually described for the small intestines. PMID:26564067

  6. Miniband Transport in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas with a Strong Periodic Unidirectional Potential Modulation

    DOE PAGES

    Lyo, Sungkwun K.; Pan, Wei

    2014-08-07

    In this paper, we study the Bloch oscillations of a two-dimensional electron gas with a strong periodic potential-modulation and miniband transport along the field at low temperatures, assuming a free motion in the transverse direction. The dependence of the current on the field, the electron density, and the temperature is investigated by using a relaxation-time approximation for inelastic scattering. Moreover, for a fixed total scattering rate, the field dependence of the current is sensitive to the ratio of the elastic and inelastic scattering rates in contrast with the recent result of a multiband but otherwise similar model with a weakmore » potential modulation.« less

  7. A demonstration of a whole core neutron transport method in a gas cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, K. J.; Rahnema, F.

    2013-07-01

    This paper illustrates a capability of the whole core transport method COMET. Building on previous works which demonstrated the accuracy of the method, this work serves to emphasize the robust capability of the method while also accentuating its efficiency. A set of core configurations is presented based on an operating gas-cooled thermal reactor, Japan's HTTR, and COMET determines the eigenvalue and fission density profile throughout each core configuration. Results for core multiplication factors are compared to MCNP for accuracy and also to compare runtimes. In all cases, the values given by COMET differ by those given by MCNP by less than the uncertainty inherent in the stochastic solution procedure, however, COMET requires runtimes shorter on the order of a few hundred. Figures are provided illustrating the whole core fission density profile, with segments of pins explicitly modeled individually, so that pin-level neutron flux behavior can be seen without any approximation due to simplification strategies such as homogenization. (authors)

  8. Factors Affecting the Corporate Decision-Making Process of Air Transport Manufacturers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ollila, R. G.; Hill, J. D.; Noton, B. R.; Duffy, M. A.; Epstein, M. M.

    1976-01-01

    Fuel economy is a pivotal question influencing the future sale and utilization of commercial aircraft. The NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency (ACEE) Program Office has a program intended to accelerate the readiness of advanced technologies for energy efficient aircraft. Because the decision to develop a new airframe or engine is a major financial hazard for manufacturers, it is important to know what factors influence the decision making process. A method is described for identifying and ranking individuals and organizations involved at each stage of commercial air transport development, and the barriers that must be overcome in adopting new technologies.

  9. Thermal and Colloid Related Processes and Uncertainty Affecting Plutonium Transport in NTS Groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolfsberg, A. V.; Lu, G.; Glascoe, L. G.; McGraw, M. M.; Olson, A. J.

    2001-12-01

    Field observations of plutonium migration away from the BENHAM underground nuclear test at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) have raised concerns regarding how much of the post-test inventory may actually be mobile and how far it can be expected to move. There are two key issues associated with the field observations. First, the highest concentration of plutonium was found in a well sampling a welded tuff aquifer more than 500 m above the BENHAM emplacement location. Second, plutonium is generally believed to be immobile in groundwater as a result of reactions with immobile minerals. To address the first issue, we simulate non-isothermal flow and transport in the collapsed cavity/chimney system that forms following an underground explosion. With this model, we demonstrate the feasibility of thermally induced, vertical migration of colloids to the upper aquifer in which plutonium was detected. The second component addresses the migration of plutonium in the fractured volcanic host rock between the source and the observation wells. The reactive transport model includes solute-colloid reactions, solute reactions with fracture coating minerals, diffusion of solutes from fractures into matrix material, and solute reactions with matrix minerals. With this model, we demonstrate that very low concentrations of plutonium at the observation well are feasible when colloid-facilitated solute transport processes are considered. However, this study also highlights a very large range in model result uncertainty resulting from uncertainty in aquifer properties and transport parameters. Uncertain parameters having the greatest impact on prediction uncertainty include fracture mineral reactive surface area, groundwater oxidation/reduction potential, reactive site concentration on colloids, kinetic rates of Pu-colloid reactions, and fracture porosity. This presentation will provide comparisons of the net impact of reducing uncertainty for several primary parameters. This work was performed

  10. From producer to consumer: greenhouse tomato quality as affected by variety, maturity stage at harvest, transport conditions, and supermarket storage.

    PubMed

    Verheul, Michèl J; Slimestad, Rune; Tjøstheim, Irene Holta

    2015-05-27

    Possible causes for differences in quality traits at the time of buying were studied in two widely different red tomato types. Three maturity stages were harvested from commercial greenhouses and transferred immediately to controlled environments simulating different storage, transport, and supermarket conditions. Results show significant differences in development of color, fruit firmness, contents of soluble solids (SSC), titratable acids (TTA), phenolics, and carotenoids from harvest to sale, as related to postharvest conditions. Fruit firmness, SSC, and TTA of vine-ripened red cherry tomatoes was 30, 55 and 11% higher than for those harvested at breakers and ripened to red. Temperature, light, UVC radiation, or ethylene during 4 days transport affected tomato quality traits, and differences persisted during 3 weeks of supermarket storage. Ethylene exposure gave a 3.7-fold increase in lycopene content in cherry tomatoes, whereas UVC hormesis revealed a 6-fold increase compared with the control. Results can be used to update recommendations concerning optimal handling. PMID:25916229

  11. From producer to consumer: greenhouse tomato quality as affected by variety, maturity stage at harvest, transport conditions, and supermarket storage.

    PubMed

    Verheul, Michèl J; Slimestad, Rune; Tjøstheim, Irene Holta

    2015-05-27

    Possible causes for differences in quality traits at the time of buying were studied in two widely different red tomato types. Three maturity stages were harvested from commercial greenhouses and transferred immediately to controlled environments simulating different storage, transport, and supermarket conditions. Results show significant differences in development of color, fruit firmness, contents of soluble solids (SSC), titratable acids (TTA), phenolics, and carotenoids from harvest to sale, as related to postharvest conditions. Fruit firmness, SSC, and TTA of vine-ripened red cherry tomatoes was 30, 55 and 11% higher than for those harvested at breakers and ripened to red. Temperature, light, UVC radiation, or ethylene during 4 days transport affected tomato quality traits, and differences persisted during 3 weeks of supermarket storage. Ethylene exposure gave a 3.7-fold increase in lycopene content in cherry tomatoes, whereas UVC hormesis revealed a 6-fold increase compared with the control. Results can be used to update recommendations concerning optimal handling.

  12. Building-Resolved CFD Simulations for Greenhouse Gas Transport and Dispersion over Washington DC / Baltimore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, K.; Lopez-Coto, I.; Ghosh, S.; Mueller, K.; Whetstone, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    The North-East Corridor project aims to use a top-down inversion methodology to quantify sources of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions over urban domains such as Washington DC / Baltimore with high spatial and temporal resolution. Atmospheric transport of tracer gases from an emission source to a tower mounted receptor are usually conducted using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. For such simulations, WRF employs a parameterized turbulence model and does not resolve the fine scale dynamics generated by the flow around buildings and communities comprising a large city. The NIST Fire Dynamics Simulator (FDS) is a computational fluid dynamics model that utilizes large eddy simulation methods to model flow around buildings at length scales much smaller than is practical with WRF. FDS has the potential to evaluate the impact of complex urban topography on near-field dispersion and mixing difficult to simulate with a mesoscale atmospheric model. Such capabilities may be important in determining urban GHG emissions using atmospheric measurements. A methodology has been developed to run FDS as a sub-grid scale model within a WRF simulation. The coupling is based on nudging the FDS flow field towards that computed by WRF, and is currently limited to one way coupling performed in an off-line mode. Using the coupled WRF / FDS model, NIST will investigate the effects of the urban canopy at horizontal resolutions of 10-20 m in a domain of 12 x 12 km. The coupled WRF-FDS simulations will be used to calculate the dispersion of tracer gases in the North-East Corridor and to evaluate the upwind areas that contribute to tower observations, referred to in the inversion community as influence functions. Results of this study will provide guidance regarding the importance of explicit simulations of urban atmospheric turbulence in obtaining accurate estimates of greenhouse gas emissions and transport.

  13. Pseudomonas fluorescens adhesion and transport through porous media are affected by lipopolysaccharide composition.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, V; Fletcher, M

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this work were (i) to use transposon mutagenesis to produce mutants of Pseudomonas fluorescens that were altered in adhesion ability and transport through porous media and (ii) to identify the alterations in surface characteristics that were responsible for the changes in attachment. Mutants of P. fluorescens were generated with TnphoA, which enabled identification of mutants that were altered in surface proteins. Transposon mutants were screened for alterations in adhesion ability by attachment assays on hydrophobic polystyrene and water-wettable polystyrene. Four TnphoA mutants with increased adhesion to the hydrophobic surface and decreased adhesion to the water-wettable surface were obtained. Transport of the strains through porous media was evaluated by passing suspensions of each mutant and the parent through columns containing quartz sand and determining the number of cells retained in the columns. The mutants all demonstrated increased adhesion and retention in the columns. Southern analysis demonstrated two types of mutants with separate transposon insertion sites. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the strains demonstrated that the O antigen on the lipopolysaccharide was either attenuated or absent. Lack of this polysaccharide, and the consequent increased exposure of the lipid moiety of the lipopolysaccharide, is probably responsible for the increase in adhesion to the hydrophobic substrata and retention in the sand column. This work combined with previous studies of attachment of P. fluorescens demonstrates that more than one type of polymer can mediate the adhesion of this organism to nonbiological surfaces. PMID:8572686

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhiza affects nickel translocation and expression of ABC transporter and metallothionein genes in Festuca arundinacea.

    PubMed

    Shabani, Leila; Sabzalian, Mohammad R; Mostafavi pour, Sodabeh

    2016-01-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are key microorganisms for enhancing phytoremediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals. In this study, the effects of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (AMF) Funneliformis mosseae (=Glomus mosseae) on physiological and molecular mechanisms involved in the nickel (Ni) tolerance of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea = Schedonorus arundinaceus) were investigated. Nickel addition had a pronounced negative effect on tall fescue growth and photosynthetic pigment contents, as well as on AMF colonization. Phosphorus content increased markedly in mycorrhizal plants (M) compared to non-inoculated (NM) ones. However, no significant difference was observed in root carbohydrate content between AMF-inoculated and non-inoculated plants. For both M and NM plants, Ni concentrations in shoots and roots increased according to the addition of the metal into soil, but inoculation with F. mosseae led to significantly lower Ni translocation from roots to the aboveground parts compared to non-inoculated plants. ABC transporter and metallothionein transcripts accumulated to considerably higher levels in tall fescue plants colonized by F. mosseae than in the corresponding non-mycorrhizal plants. These results highlight the importance of mycorrhizal colonization in alleviating Ni-induced stress by reducing Ni transport from roots to shoots of tall fescue plants.

  15. Geologic and societal factors affecting the international oceanic transport of aggregate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langer, W.H.

    1995-01-01

    Crushed stone and sand and gravel are the two main sources of natural aggregate, and together comprise approximately half the volume and tonnage of mined material in the United States. Natural aggregate is a bulky, heavy material without special or unique properties, and it is commonly used near its source of production to minimize haulage cost. However, remoteness is no longer an absolute disqualifier for the production of aggregate. Today interstate aggregate routinely is shipped hundreds of kilometers by rail and barge. In addition, during 1992, the United States imported 1,317,000 metric tons of aggregate from Canada and 1,531,000 metric tons from Mexico. A number of ports on the Atlantic Coast and Gulf Coast of the United States receive imports of crushed stone from foreign sources for transport to various parts of the eastern United States. These areas either lack adequate supplies of aggregate or are augmenting their supplies because they have difficulties meeting current demand. These difficulties may include poor stone quality, environmental permitting problems, or transportation. Certain societal and geologic conditions of New York City and Philadelphia along the Atlantic Coast, and Tampa and New Orleans along the Gulf Coast, are discussed to demonstrate the different combinations of issues that contribute to the economic viability of importing crushed stone. ?? 1995 Oxford University Press.

  16. Simulation of runaway electrons, transport affected by J-TEXT resonant magnetic perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Z. H.; Wang, X. H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Huang, D. W.; Sun, X. F.; Xu, T.; Zhuang, G.

    2016-09-01

    The topology of a magnetic field and transport properties of runaway electrons can be changed by a resonant magnetic perturbation field. The J-TEXT magnetic topology can be effectively altered via static resonant magnetic perturbation (SRMP) and dynamic resonant magnetic perturbation (DRMP). This paper studies the effect of resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) on the confinement of runaway electrons via simulating their drift orbits in the magnetic perturbation field and calculating the orbit losses for different runaway initial energies and different runaway electrons, initial locations. The model adopted is based on Hamiltonian guiding center equations for runaway electrons, and the J-TEXT magnetic turbulences and RMP are taken into account. The simulation indicates that the loss rate of runaway electrons is sensitive to the radial position of electrons. The loss of energetic runaway beam is dominated by the shrinkage of the confinement region. Outside the shrinkage region of the runaway electrons are lost rapidly. Inside the shrinkage region the runaway beam is confined very well and is less sensitive to the magnetic perturbation. The experimental result on the response of runaway transport to the application RMP indicates that the loss of runaway electrons is dominated by the shrinkage of the confinement region, other than the external magnetic perturbation.

  17. Chemical Potential of Triethylene Glycol Adsorbed on Surfaces Relevant to Gas Transport and Processing - Studies Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvamme, B.; Olsen, R.; Sjöblom, S.; Leirvik, K. N.; Kuznetsova, T.

    2014-12-01

    Natural gas will inevitably contain trace amounts of water and other impurities during different stages of processing and transport. Glycols, such as triethylene glycol (TEG), will in many cases follow the water. The glycol contents of the gas can originate from preceding glycol-drying units or it can be a residue from the direct injection of glycols used to prevent hydrate formation. Thus, it is important to know how glycol contents will affect the different paths leading to hydrate formation. Glycols may in some cases dominate the condensed water phase. If this occurs, it will lead to the well-documented shift in the hydrate stability curve, due to the altered activity of the water. A great deal of information on the molecular path of a glycol through the system can be obtained from calculating the chemical potential. Due to difficulties in measuring interfacial chemical potentials, these often need to be estimated using theoretical tools. We used molecular dynamics (MD) to study how TEG behaves in the vicinity of mineral surfaces such as calcite and hematite. Many methods exist for estimating chemical potentials based on MD trajectories. These include techniques such as free energy perturbation theory (FEP) and thermodynamic integration (TI). Such methods require sufficient sampling of configurations where free energy is to be estimated. Thus, it can be difficult to estimate chemical potentials on surfaces. There are several methods to circumvent this problem, such as blue moon sampling and umbrella sampling. These have been considered and the most important have been used to estimate chemical potentials of TEG adsorbed on the mineral surfaces. The resulting chemical potentials were compared to the chemical potential of TEG in bulk water, which was estimated using temperature thermodynamic integration.

  18. Gas Transport and Density Control in the HYLIFE Heavy-Ion Beam Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Debonnel, Christophe S.; Welch, Dale R.; Rose, David V.; Lawrence, Simon S.Yu; Peterson, Per F

    2003-05-15

    The effective propagation and focusing of heavy-ion beams in the final-focus magnet region of inertial fusion target chambers require controlling the background gas density and pressure in the beam tubes. Liquid vortexes will coat the inside of the tubes next to the beam ports and will help eliminate the need for mechanical shutters to mitigate the venting of target chamber background gas into the final-focus magnet region. Before the neutralizing region, the beam space charge is high, and ablation and target debris deposition in the final-focus magnet region may cause voltage breakdown. Previous studies focused on evaluating the amount of target chamber debris reaching the entrance of the beam ports. The TSUNAMI code has now been used to assess the density, temperature, and velocity of the vortex debris transported {approx}3 m up the beam tubes and reaching the final-focus magnet region, assuming that the liquid vortexes are perfectly absorbing surfaces. To further mitigate debris deposition in the final-focus magnet region, and prevent voltage breakdown, a 'magnetic shutter' has been envisaged to divert the debris out of the final-focus region. This shutter will prevent the hot ablation debris from reaching the magnet region and, coupled to some ionizing scheme, will conveniently suppress early ingression of debris into the final-focus magnet region.

  19. Use of Gas Transported Reactants for Uranium Remediation in Vadose Zone Sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Szecsody, James E.; Zhong, Lirong; Truex, Michael J.; Resch, Charles T.; Williams, Mark D.

    2010-03-10

    This laboratory-scale investigation is focused on decreasing mobility of uranium in subsurface contaminated sediments in the vadose zone by in situ geochemical manipulation at low water content. This geochemical manipulation of the sediment surface phases included reduction, pH change (acidic and alkaline), and additions of chemicals (phosphate, ferric iron) to form specific precipitates. Reactants were advected into 1-D columns packed with Hanford 200 area U-contaminated sediment as a reactive gas (for CO2, NH3, H2S, SO2), with a 0.1% water content mist (for NaOH, Fe(III), HCl, PO4) and with a 1% water content foam (for PO4). Because uranium is present in the sediment in multiple phases, changes in U surface phases were evaluated with a series of liquid extractions that dissolve progressively less soluble phases and electron microbe identification of mineral phases. In terms of the short-term decrease in U mobility (in decreasing order), NH3, NaOH mist, CO2, HCl mist, and Fe(III) mist showed 20% to 35% change in U surface phases. The two reductive gas treatments (H2S and SO2) showed little change. For long-term decrease in U transport, mineral phases created that had low solubility (phosphates, silicates) were desired, so NH3, phosphates (mist and foam delivered), and NaOH mist showed the greatest formation of these minerals.

  20. Transport Properties of a Rarefied Ch4-N2 Gas Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokin, L. R.; Kalashnikov, A. N.

    2016-01-01

    The area of application of the rarefied neutral methane-nitrogen gas mixture is considered. Experimental data on the transport properties of this mixture and its components were analyzed and generalized on the basis of molecular-kinetic theory relations with the use of the potentials of pair uniform and cross interactions of CH4 and N2 molecules. The parameters of three spherical symmetric three-parameter m-6 Lennard-Jones interaction potentials with a repulsive branch of varying rigidity were determined with the use of the nonlinear weight method of least squares. Tables of reference data on the viscosity of the indicated mixture and the coefficients of interdiffusion of its components were calculated for the concentration range 0-1 at temperatures 100-1150 K. Estimates of the confidential errors in determining the properties of this mixture have been made with the use of the error matrix of parameters of the indicated potentials. The results of calculations were compared with the corresponding reference data obtained earlier for the CH4-N2 gas mixture.

  1. Probing laser induced metal vaporization by gas dynamics and liquid pool transport phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    DebRoy, T.; Basu, S.; Mundra, K. )

    1991-08-01

    During laser beam welding of many important engineering alloys, an appreciable amount of alloying element vaporization takes place from the weld pool surface. As a consequence, the composition of the solidified weld pool is often significantly different from that of the alloy being welded. Currently there is no comprehensive theoretical model to predict, from first principles, laser induced metal vaporization rates and the resulting weld pool composition changes. The weld pool heat transfer and fluid flow phenomena have been coupled with the velocity distribution functions of the gas molecules at various locations above the weld pool to determine the rates of the laser induced element vaporization for pure metals. The procedure allows for calculations of the condensation flux based on the equations of conservation of mass, momentum and energy in both the vapor and the liquid phases. Computed values of the rates of vaporization of pure metals were found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimentally determined values. The synthesis of the principles of gas dynamics and weld pool transport phenomena can serve as a basis for weld metal composition control.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of shale gas transport in organic nano-pores.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Xiao, Lizhi; Shan, Xiaowen; Guo, Long

    2014-01-01

    Permeability is a key parameter for investigating the flow ability of sedimentary rocks. The conventional model for calculating permeability is derived from Darcy's law, which is valid only for continuum flow in porous rocks. We discussed the feasibility of simulating methane transport characteristics in the organic nano-pores of shale through the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). As a first attempt, the effects of high Knudsen number and the associated slip flow are considered, whereas the effect of adsorption in the capillary tube is left for future work. Simulation results show that at small Knudsen number, LBM results agree well with Poiseuille's law, and flow rate (flow capacity) is proportional to the square of the pore scale. At higher Knudsen numbers, the relaxation time needs to be corrected. In addition, velocity increases as the slip effect causes non negligible velocities on the pore wall, thereby enhancing the flow rate inside the pore, i.e., the permeability. Therefore, the LBM simulation of gas flow characteristics in organic nano-pores provides an effective way of evaluating the permeability of gas-bearing shale. PMID:24784022

  3. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of shale gas transport in organic nano-pores.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoling; Xiao, Lizhi; Shan, Xiaowen; Guo, Long

    2014-01-01

    Permeability is a key parameter for investigating the flow ability of sedimentary rocks. The conventional model for calculating permeability is derived from Darcy's law, which is valid only for continuum flow in porous rocks. We discussed the feasibility of simulating methane transport characteristics in the organic nano-pores of shale through the Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). As a first attempt, the effects of high Knudsen number and the associated slip flow are considered, whereas the effect of adsorption in the capillary tube is left for future work. Simulation results show that at small Knudsen number, LBM results agree well with Poiseuille's law, and flow rate (flow capacity) is proportional to the square of the pore scale. At higher Knudsen numbers, the relaxation time needs to be corrected. In addition, velocity increases as the slip effect causes non negligible velocities on the pore wall, thereby enhancing the flow rate inside the pore, i.e., the permeability. Therefore, the LBM simulation of gas flow characteristics in organic nano-pores provides an effective way of evaluating the permeability of gas-bearing shale.

  4. Transport coefficients of a granular gas of inelastic rough hard spheres.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Gilberto M; Santos, Andrés; Garzó, Vicente

    2014-08-01

    The Boltzmann equation for inelastic and rough hard spheres is considered as a model of a dilute granular gas. In this model, the collisions are characterized by constant coefficients of normal and tangential restitution, and hence the translational and rotational degrees of freedom are coupled. A normal solution to the Boltzmann equation is obtained by means of the Chapman-Enskog method for states near the homogeneous cooling state. The analysis is carried out to first order in the spatial gradients of the number density, the flow velocity, and the granular temperature. The constitutive equations for the momentum and heat fluxes and for the cooling rate are derived, and the associated transport coefficients are expressed in terms of the solutions of linear integral equations. For practical purposes, a first Sonine approximation is used to obtain explicit expressions of the transport coefficients as nonlinear functions of both coefficients of restitution and the moment of inertia. Known results for purely smooth inelastic spheres and perfectly elastic and rough spheres are recovered in the appropriate limits.

  5. Electrical detection of spin transport in Si two-dimensional electron gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Li-Te; Fischer, Inga Anita; Tang, Jianshi; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Yu, Guoqiang; Fan, Yabin; Murata, Koichi; Nie, Tianxiao; Oehme, Michael; Schulze, Jörg; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-09-01

    Spin transport in a semiconductor-based two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) system has been attractive in spintronics for more than ten years. The inherent advantages of high-mobility channel and enhanced spin-orbital interaction promise a long spin diffusion length and efficient spin manipulation, which are essential for the application of spintronics devices. However, the difficulty of making high-quality ferromagnetic (FM) contacts to the buried 2DEG channel in the heterostructure systems limits the potential developments in functional devices. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate electrical detection of spin transport in a high-mobility 2DEG system using FM Mn-germanosilicide (Mn(Si0.7Ge0.3)x) end contacts, which is the first report of spin injection and detection in a 2DEG confined in a Si/SiGe modulation doped quantum well structure (MODQW). The extracted spin diffusion length and lifetime are l sf = 4.5 μm and {τ }{{s}}=16 {{ns}} at 1.9 K respectively. Our results provide a promising approach for spin injection into 2DEG system in the Si-based MODQW, which may lead to innovative spintronic applications such as spin-based transistor, logic, and memory devices.

  6. Electrical detection of spin transport in Si two-dimensional electron gas systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Li-Te; Fischer, Inga Anita; Tang, Jianshi; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Yu, Guoqiang; Fan, Yabin; Murata, Koichi; Nie, Tianxiao; Oehme, Michael; Schulze, Jörg; Wang, Kang L.

    2016-09-01

    Spin transport in a semiconductor-based two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) system has been attractive in spintronics for more than ten years. The inherent advantages of high-mobility channel and enhanced spin–orbital interaction promise a long spin diffusion length and efficient spin manipulation, which are essential for the application of spintronics devices. However, the difficulty of making high-quality ferromagnetic (FM) contacts to the buried 2DEG channel in the heterostructure systems limits the potential developments in functional devices. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate electrical detection of spin transport in a high-mobility 2DEG system using FM Mn-germanosilicide (Mn(Si0.7Ge0.3)x) end contacts, which is the first report of spin injection and detection in a 2DEG confined in a Si/SiGe modulation doped quantum well structure (MODQW). The extracted spin diffusion length and lifetime are l sf = 4.5 μm and {τ }{{s}}=16 {{ns}} at 1.9 K respectively. Our results provide a promising approach for spin injection into 2DEG system in the Si-based MODQW, which may lead to innovative spintronic applications such as spin-based transistor, logic, and memory devices.

  7. Subsurface fate and transport of cyanide species at a manufactured-gas plant site

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, R.S.; Dzombak, D.A.; Luthy, R.G.; Nakles, D.V.

    1999-10-01

    Cyanide is present at manufactured-gas plant (MGP) sites in oxide-box residuals, which were often managed on-site as fill during active operations. Cyanide can leach from these materials, causing groundwater contamination. Speciation, fate, and transport of cyanide in a sand-gravel aquifer underlying an MGP site in the upper Midwest region of the US were studied through characterization, monitoring, and modeling of a plume of cyanide-contaminated groundwater emanating from the site. Results indicate that cyanide in the groundwater is primarily in the form of iron-cyanide complexes (>98%), that these complexes are stable under the conditions of the aquifer, and that they are transported as nonreactive solutes in the sand-gravel aquifer material. Weak-acid-dissociable cyanide, which represents a minute fraction of total cyanide in the site groundwater, may undergo chemical-biological degradation in the sand-gravel aquifer. It seems that dilution may be the only natural attenuation mechanism for iron-cyanide complexes in sand-gravel aquifers at MGP sites.

  8. Electrical detection of spin transport in Si two-dimensional electron gas systems.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Te; Fischer, Inga Anita; Tang, Jianshi; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Yu, Guoqiang; Fan, Yabin; Murata, Koichi; Nie, Tianxiao; Oehme, Michael; Schulze, Jörg; Wang, Kang L

    2016-09-01

    Spin transport in a semiconductor-based two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) system has been attractive in spintronics for more than ten years. The inherent advantages of high-mobility channel and enhanced spin-orbital interaction promise a long spin diffusion length and efficient spin manipulation, which are essential for the application of spintronics devices. However, the difficulty of making high-quality ferromagnetic (FM) contacts to the buried 2DEG channel in the heterostructure systems limits the potential developments in functional devices. In this paper, we experimentally demonstrate electrical detection of spin transport in a high-mobility 2DEG system using FM Mn-germanosilicide (Mn(Si0.7Ge0.3)x) end contacts, which is the first report of spin injection and detection in a 2DEG confined in a Si/SiGe modulation doped quantum well structure (MODQW). The extracted spin diffusion length and lifetime are l sf = 4.5 μm and [Formula: see text] at 1.9 K respectively. Our results provide a promising approach for spin injection into 2DEG system in the Si-based MODQW, which may lead to innovative spintronic applications such as spin-based transistor, logic, and memory devices. PMID:27479155

  9. Colonic epithelial ion transport is not affected in patients with diverticulosis

    PubMed Central

    Osbak, Philip S; Bindslev, Niels; Poulsen, Steen S; Kaltoft, Nicolai; Tilotta, Maria C; Hansen, Mark B

    2007-01-01

    Background Colonic diverticular disease is a bothersome condition with an unresolved pathogenesis. It is unknown whether a neuroepithelial dysfunction is present. The aim of the study was two-fold; (1) to investigate colonic epithelial ion transport in patients with diverticulosis and (2) to adapt a miniaturized Modified Ussing Air-Suction (MUAS) chamber for colonic endoscopic biopsies. Methods Biopsies were obtained from the sigmoid part of the colon. 86 patients were included. All patients were referred for colonoscopy on suspicion of neoplasia and they were without pathological findings at colonoscopy (controls) except for diverticulosis in 22 (D-patients). Biopsies were mounted in MUAS chambers with an exposed area of 5 mm2. Electrical responses to various stimulators and inhibitors of ion transport were investigated together with histological examination. The MUAS chamber was easy to use and reproducible data were obtained. Results Median basal short circuit current (SCC) was 43.8 μA·cm-2 (0.8 – 199) for controls and 59.3 μA·cm-2 (3.0 – 177.2) for D-patients. Slope conductance was 77.0 mS·cm-2 (18.6 – 204.0) equal to 13 Ω·cm2 for controls and 96.6 mS·cm-2 (8.4 – 191.4) equal to 10.3 Ω·cm2 for D-patients. Stimulation with serotonin, theophylline, forskolin and carbachol induced increases in SCC in a range of 4.9 – 18.6 μA·cm-2, while inhibition with indomethacin, bumetanide, ouabain and amiloride decreased SCC in a range of 6.5 – 27.4 μA·cm-2, and all with no significant differences between controls and D-patients. Histological examinations showed intact epithelium and lamina propria before and after mounting for both types of patients. Conclusion We conclude that epithelial ion transport is not significantly altered in patients with diverticulosis and that the MUAS chamber can be adapted for studies of human colonic endoscopic biopsies. PMID:17888183

  10. Modeling of off-gas emissions from wood pellets during marine transportation.

    PubMed

    Pa, Ann; Bi, Xiaotao T

    2010-10-01

    After a fatal accident during the discharge of wood pellets at Helsingborg, emissions from pellets during marine transportation became a concern for the safe handling and storage of wood pellets. In this paper, a two-compartment model has been developed for the first time to predict the concentrations of CO, CO₂, CH₄, and O₂ inside the cargo ship and the time and rate of forced ventilation required before the safe entry into the stairway adjacent to the storage hatch. The hatch and stairway are treated as two perfectly mixed tanks. The gas exchange rate between these two rooms and the gas exchange rate with the atmosphere are fitted to satisfy a measured tracer final concentration of 33 p.p.m.v. in the stairway and an average final hatch to stairway CO, CO₂, and CH₄ concentration ratio of 1.62 based on measurement from five other hatch and stairway systems. The reaction kinetics obtained from a laboratory unit using a different batch of pellets, however, need to be scaled in order to bring the prediction to close agreement with onboard measured emission data at the end of voyage. Using the adjusted kinetic data, the model was able to predict the general trend of data recorded in the first 12.5 days of the voyage. Further validation, however, requires the data recorded over the whole journey. The model was applied to predict the effect of ocean temperature on the off-gas emissions and the buildup of concentrations in the hatch and stairway. For safe entry to the cargo ship, the current model predicted that a minimal ventilation rate of 4.4 hr⁻¹ is required for the stairway's CO concentration to lower to a safe concentration of 25 p.p.m.v. At 4.4 hr⁻¹, 10 min of ventilation time is required for the safe entry into the stairway studied.

  11. Modeling of off-gas emissions from wood pellets during marine transportation.

    PubMed

    Pa, Ann; Bi, Xiaotao T

    2010-10-01

    After a fatal accident during the discharge of wood pellets at Helsingborg, emissions from pellets during marine transportation became a concern for the safe handling and storage of wood pellets. In this paper, a two-compartment model has been developed for the first time to predict the concentrations of CO, CO₂, CH₄, and O₂ inside the cargo ship and the time and rate of forced ventilation required before the safe entry into the stairway adjacent to the storage hatch. The hatch and stairway are treated as two perfectly mixed tanks. The gas exchange rate between these two rooms and the gas exchange rate with the atmosphere are fitted to satisfy a measured tracer final concentration of 33 p.p.m.v. in the stairway and an average final hatch to stairway CO, CO₂, and CH₄ concentration ratio of 1.62 based on measurement from five other hatch and stairway systems. The reaction kinetics obtained from a laboratory unit using a different batch of pellets, however, need to be scaled in order to bring the prediction to close agreement with onboard measured emission data at the end of voyage. Using the adjusted kinetic data, the model was able to predict the general trend of data recorded in the first 12.5 days of the voyage. Further validation, however, requires the data recorded over the whole journey. The model was applied to predict the effect of ocean temperature on the off-gas emissions and the buildup of concentrations in the hatch and stairway. For safe entry to the cargo ship, the current model predicted that a minimal ventilation rate of 4.4 hr⁻¹ is required for the stairway's CO concentration to lower to a safe concentration of 25 p.p.m.v. At 4.4 hr⁻¹, 10 min of ventilation time is required for the safe entry into the stairway studied. PMID:20603277

  12. EXERCISE IN THE TERRESTRIAL CHRISTMAS ISLAND RED CRAB GECARCOIDEA NATALIS - BLOOD GAS TRANSPORT

    PubMed

    Adamczewska; Morris

    1994-03-01

    The respiratory and circulatory physiology of the terrestrial Christmas Island red crab Gecarcoidea natalis was investigated with respect to exercise in the context of its annual breeding migration. Red crabs were allowed to walk for predetermined periods of up to 45 min. During this exercise period, blood gas measurements were made on venous, pulmonary and arterial samples to assess the function of the lungs in gas exchange and the performance of the circulatory system in gas transport and to determine the role and importance of the haemocyanin. The lungs of G. natalis were very efficient at O2 uptake, pulmonary blood being 80­90 % saturated throughout the 45 min exercise period. The maximum O2-carrying capacity was 1.1 mmol l-1, and haemocyanin (Hc) delivered 86 % of oxygen in resting crabs and 97 % during exercise. Oxygen delivery to the tissues was diffusion-limited during exercise. Indirect evidence, from the changes in haemolymph pH during transit through the lungs, suggested that the lung is the site of CO2 excretion. The Bohr shift was high at high pH (pH 7.8­7.5, phi=-1.23) but decreased at low pH (pH 7.1­6.8, phi=-0.48). The decreased Hc affinity for O2 during the exercise period facilitated O2 delivery to the tissues without impairing O2 loading at the lungs. The decrease in pH was sufficient to explain the change of affinity of Hc for O2 during the exercise period. The marked acidosis (0.8 pH unit decrease) was largely metabolic in origin, especially during sustained locomotion, but less than could be predicted from concomitant lactate production.

  13. Transport Regimes of Air Masses Affecting the Tropospheric Composition of the Canadian and European Arctic During RACEPAC 2014 and NETCARE 2014/2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozem, H.; Hoor, P. M.; Koellner, F.; Kunkel, D.; Schneider, J.; Schulz, C.; Herber, A. B.; Borrmann, S.; Wendisch, M.; Ehrlich, A.; Leaitch, W. R.; Willis, M. D.; Burkart, J.; Thomas, J. L.; Abbatt, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic is warming much faster than any other place in the world and undergoes a rapid change dominated by a changing climate in this region. The impact of polluted air masses traveling to the Arctic from various remote sources significantly contributes to the observed climate change, in contrast there are additional local emission sources contributing to the level of pollutants (trace gases and aerosol). Processes affecting the emission and transport of these pollutants are not well understood and need to be further investigated. We present aircraft based trace gas measurements in the Arctic during RACEPAC (2014) and NETCARE (2014 and 2015) with the Polar 6 aircraft of Alfred Wegener Institute (AWI) covering an area from 134°W to 17°W and 68°N to 83°N. We focus on cloud, aerosol and general transport processes of polluted air masses into the high Arctic. Based on CO and CO2 measurements and kinematic 10-day back trajectories we analyze the transport regimes prevalent during spring (RACEPAC 2014 and NETCARE 2015) and summer (NETCARE 2014) in the observed region. Whereas the eastern part of the Canadian Arctic is affected by air masses with their origin in Asia, in the central and western parts of the Canadian and European Arctic air masses from North America are predominant at the time of the measurement. In general the more northern parts of the Arctic were relatively unaffected by pollution from mid-latitudes since air masses mostly travel within the polar dome, being quite isolated. Associated mixing ratios of CO and CO2 fit into the seasonal cycle observed at NOAA ground stations throughout the Arctic, but show a more mid-latitudinal characteristic at higher altitudes. The transition is remarkably sharp and allows for a chemical definition of the polar dome. At low altitudes, synoptic disturbances transport polluted air masses from mid-latitudes into regions of the polar dome. These air masses contribute to the Arctic pollution background, but also

  14. Estimating the health benefits from natural gas use in transport and heating in Santiago, Chile.

    PubMed

    Mena-Carrasco, Marcelo; Oliva, Estefania; Saide, Pablo; Spak, Scott N; de la Maza, Cristóbal; Osses, Mauricio; Tolvett, Sebastián; Campbell, J Elliott; Tsao, Tsao Es Chi-Chung; Molina, Luisa T

    2012-07-01

    Chilean law requires the assessment of air pollution control strategies for their costs and benefits. Here we employ an online weather and chemical transport model, WRF-Chem, and a gridded population density map, LANDSCAN, to estimate changes in fine particle pollution exposure, health benefits, and economic valuation for two emission reduction strategies based on increasing the use of compressed natural gas (CNG) in Santiago, Chile. The first scenario, switching to a CNG public transportation system, would reduce urban PM2.5 emissions by 229 t/year. The second scenario would reduce wood burning emissions by 671 t/year, with unique hourly emission reductions distributed from daily heating demand. The CNG bus scenario reduces annual PM2.5 by 0.33 μg/m³ and up to 2 μg/m³ during winter months, while the residential heating scenario reduces annual PM2.5 by 2.07 μg/m³, with peaks exceeding 8 μg/m³ during strong air pollution episodes in winter months. These ambient pollution reductions lead to 36 avoided premature mortalities for the CNG bus scenario, and 229 for the CNG heating scenario. Both policies are shown to be cost-effective ways of reducing air pollution, as they target high-emitting area pollution sources and reduce concentrations over densely populated urban areas as well as less dense areas outside the city limits. Unlike the concentration rollback methods commonly used in public policy analyses, which assume homogeneous reductions across a whole city (including homogeneous population densities), and without accounting for the seasonality of certain emissions, this approach accounts for both seasonality and diurnal emission profiles for both the transportation and residential heating sectors.

  15. Transport of Chemical Vapors from Subsurface Sources to Atmosphere as Affected by Shallow Subsurface and Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, A. K.; Smits, K. M.; Hosken, K.; Schulte, P.; Illangasekare, T. H.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the movement and modeling of chemical vapor through unsaturated soil in the shallow subsurface when subjected to natural atmospheric thermal and mass flux boundary conditions at the land surface is of importance to applications such as landmine detection and vapor intrusion into subsurface structures. New, advanced technologies exist to sense chemical signatures at the land/atmosphere interface, but interpretation of these sensor signals to make assessment of source conditions remains a challenge. Chemical signatures are subject to numerous interactions while migrating through the unsaturated soil environment, attenuating signal strength and masking contaminant source conditions. The dominant process governing movement of gases through porous media is often assumed to be Fickian diffusion through the air phase with minimal or no quantification of other processes contributing to vapor migration, such as thermal diffusion, convective gas flow due to the displacement of air, expansion/contraction of air due to temperature changes, temporal and spatial variations of soil moisture and fluctuations in atmospheric pressure. Soil water evaporation and interfacial mass transfer add to the complexity of the system. The goal of this work is to perform controlled experiments under transient conditions of soil moisture, temperature and wind at the land/atmosphere interface and use the resulting dataset to test existing theories on subsurface gas flow and iterate between numerical modeling efforts and experimental data. Ultimately, we aim to update conceptual models of shallow subsurface vapor transport to include conditionally significant transport processes and inform placement of mobile sensors and/or networks. We have developed a two-dimensional tank apparatus equipped with a network of sensors and a flow-through head space for simulation of the atmospheric interface. A detailed matrix of realistic atmospheric boundary conditions was applied in a series of

  16. Factors affecting mercury control in utility flue gas using sorbent injection

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, T.R.; Hargrove, O.W. Jr.; Richardson, C.F.; Chang, R.; Meserole, F.B.

    1997-12-31

    Mercury continues to be considered for possible regulation in the electric power industry under Title 3 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. This possibility has generated interest in assessing whether cost-effective technologies exist for removing mercury from fossil-fired flue gas. One promising approach involves the direct injection of mercury sorbents, such as activated carbon, into the flue gas. Although this method has been effective at removing mercury in municipal waste incinerators, tests conducted to date on utility fossil-fired boilers show that mercury removal is much more difficult in utility flue gas. EPRI is conducting research to investigate mercury removal using sorbents. Bench-scale and pilot-scale tests have been conducted to determine the ability of different sorbents to remove mercury in simulated and actual flue gas streams. Bench-scale tests have investigated the effect of various sorbent and flue gas parameters on sorbent performance. These data are being used to develop a theoretical model for predicting mercury removal by sorbents at different conditions. The possibility of regenerating and recycling sorbents is also being evaluated. This paper describes the results of parametric bench-scale and pilot-scale tests investigating the removal of mercuric chloride and elemental mercury by activated carbon. Results obtained to date indicate that the adsorption capacity of a given sorbent is dependent on many factors, including the type of mercury being adsorbed, flue gas composition, and adsorption temperature. These data provide insight into potential mercury adsorption mechanisms and suggest that the removal of mercury involves both physical and chemical mechanisms. Understanding these effects is important since the performance of a given sorbent could vary significantly from site-to-site depending on coal- or gas-matrix composition.

  17. Ocean plankton. Environmental characteristics of Agulhas rings affect interocean plankton transport.

    PubMed

    Villar, Emilie; Farrant, Gregory K; Follows, Michael; Garczarek, Laurence; Speich, Sabrina; Audic, Stéphane; Bittner, Lucie; Blanke, Bruno; Brum, Jennifer R; Brunet, Christophe; Casotti, Raffaella; Chase, Alison; Dolan, John R; d'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre; Grima, Nicolas; Guidi, Lionel; Hill, Christopher N; Jahn, Oliver; Jamet, Jean-Louis; Le Goff, Hervé; Lepoivre, Cyrille; Malviya, Shruti; Pelletier, Eric; Romagnan, Jean-Baptiste; Roux, Simon; Santini, Sébastien; Scalco, Eleonora; Schwenck, Sarah M; Tanaka, Atsuko; Testor, Pierre; Vannier, Thomas; Vincent, Flora; Zingone, Adriana; Dimier, Céline; Picheral, Marc; Searson, Sarah; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Acinas, Silvia G; Bork, Peer; Boss, Emmanuel; de Vargas, Colomban; Gorsky, Gabriel; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pesant, Stéphane; Sullivan, Matthew B; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Wincker, Patrick; Karsenti, Eric; Bowler, Chris; Not, Fabrice; Hingamp, Pascal; Iudicone, Daniele

    2015-05-22

    Agulhas rings provide the principal route for ocean waters to circulate from the Indo-Pacific to the Atlantic basin. Their influence on global ocean circulation is well known, but their role in plankton transport is largely unexplored. We show that, although the coarse taxonomic structure of plankton communities is continuous across the Agulhas choke point, South Atlantic plankton diversity is altered compared with Indian Ocean source populations. Modeling and in situ sampling of a young Agulhas ring indicate that strong vertical mixing drives complex nitrogen cycling, shaping community metabolism and biogeochemical signatures as the ring and associated plankton transit westward. The peculiar local environment inside Agulhas rings may provide a selective mechanism contributing to the limited dispersal of Indian Ocean plankton populations into the Atlantic.

  18. Parental vitamin deficiency affects the embryonic gene expression of immune-, lipid transport- and apolipoprotein genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skjærven, Kaja H.; Jakt, Lars Martin; Dahl, John Arne; Espe, Marit; Aanes, Håvard; Hamre, Kristin; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2016-10-01

    World Health Organization is concerned for parental vitamin deficiency and its effect on offspring health. This study examines the effect of a marginally dietary-induced parental one carbon (1-C) micronutrient deficiency on embryonic gene expression using zebrafish. Metabolic profiling revealed a reduced 1-C cycle efficiency in F0 generation. Parental deficiency reduced the fecundity and a total of 364 genes were differentially expressed in the F1 embryos. The upregulated genes (53%) in the deficient group were enriched in biological processes such as immune response and blood coagulation. Several genes encoding enzymes essential for the 1-C cycle and for lipid transport (especially apolipoproteins) were aberrantly expressed. We show that a parental diet deficient in micronutrients disturbs the expression in descendant embryos of genes associated with overall health, and result in inherited aberrations in the 1-C cycle and lipid metabolism. This emphasises the importance of parental micronutrient status for the health of the offspring.

  19. The outlook for aeronautics, 1980 - 2000 - Study report. [trends affecting civil air transportation and defense

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Trends in civil and military aviation in the period 1980-2000 are examined in terms of the role that NASA should play in aeronautical research and development during this period. Factors considered include the pattern of industry and government relationships, the character of the aircraft to be developed, and the technology advances that will be required as well as demographic, economic, and social factors. Trends are expressed in terms of the most probable developments in civil air transportation and air defense and several characteristically different directions for future development are defined. The longer term opportunities created by developments in air transporation extending into the next century are also examined. Within this framework, a preferred NASA role and a preferred set of objectives are formulated for the research and technology which should be undertaken by NASA during the period 1976-1985.

  20. Long-term transport behavior of psychoactive compounds in sewage-affected groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nham, Hang Thuy Thi; Greskowiak, Janek; Hamann, Enrico; Meffe, Raffaella; Hass, Ulrike; Massmann, Gudrun

    2016-09-01

    The present study provides a model-based characterization of the long-term transport behavior of five psychoactive compounds (meprobamate, pyrithyldione, primidone, phenobarbital and phenylethylmalonamide) introduced into groundwater via sewage irrigation in Berlin, Germany. Compounds are still present in the groundwater despite the sewage farm closure in the year 1980. Due to the limited information on (i) compound concentrations in the source water and (ii) substance properties, a total of 180 cross-sectional model realizations for each compound were carried out, covering a large range of possible parameter combinations. Results were compared with the present-day contamination patterns in the aquifer and the most likely scenarios were identified based on a number of model performance criteria. The simulation results show that (i) compounds are highly persistent under the present field conditions, and (ii) sorption is insignificant. Thus, back-diffusion from low permeability zones appears as the main reason for the compound retardation.

  1. Parental vitamin deficiency affects the embryonic gene expression of immune-, lipid transport- and apolipoprotein genes

    PubMed Central

    Skjærven, Kaja H.; Jakt, Lars Martin; Dahl, John Arne; Espe, Marit; Aanes, Håvard; Hamre, Kristin; Fernandes, Jorge M. O.

    2016-01-01

    World Health Organization is concerned for parental vitamin deficiency and its effect on offspring health. This study examines the effect of a marginally dietary-induced parental one carbon (1-C) micronutrient deficiency on embryonic gene expression using zebrafish. Metabolic profiling revealed a reduced 1-C cycle efficiency in F0 generation. Parental deficiency reduced the fecundity and a total of 364 genes were differentially expressed in the F1 embryos. The upregulated genes (53%) in the deficient group were enriched in biological processes such as immune response and blood coagulation. Several genes encoding enzymes essential for the 1-C cycle and for lipid transport (especially apolipoproteins) were aberrantly expressed. We show that a parental diet deficient in micronutrients disturbs the expression in descendant embryos of genes associated with overall health, and result in inherited aberrations in the 1-C cycle and lipid metabolism. This emphasises the importance of parental micronutrient status for the health of the offspring. PMID:27731423

  2. Initial Sediment Transport Model of the Mining-Affected Aries River Basin, Romania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedel, Michael J.; Linard, Joshua I.

    2008-01-01

    The Romanian government is interested in understanding the effects of existing and future mining activities on long-term dispersal, storage, and remobilization of sediment-associated metals. An initial Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model was prepared using available data to evaluate hypothetical failure of the Valea Sesei tailings dam at the Rosia Poieni mine in the Aries River basin. Using the available data, the initial Aries River Basin SWAT model could not be manually calibrated to accurately reproduce monthly streamflow values observed at the Turda gage station. The poor simulation of the monthly streamflow is attributed to spatially limited soil and precipitation data, limited constraint information due to spatially and temporally limited streamflow measurements, and in ability to obtain optimal parameter values when using a manual calibration process. Suggestions to improve the Aries River basin sediment transport model include accounting for heterogeneity in model input, a two-tier nonlinear calibration strategy, and analysis of uncertainty in predictions.

  3. Ocean plankton. Environmental characteristics of Agulhas rings affect interocean plankton transport.

    PubMed

    Villar, Emilie; Farrant, Gregory K; Follows, Michael; Garczarek, Laurence; Speich, Sabrina; Audic, Stéphane; Bittner, Lucie; Blanke, Bruno; Brum, Jennifer R; Brunet, Christophe; Casotti, Raffaella; Chase, Alison; Dolan, John R; d'Ortenzio, Fabrizio; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre; Grima, Nicolas; Guidi, Lionel; Hill, Christopher N; Jahn, Oliver; Jamet, Jean-Louis; Le Goff, Hervé; Lepoivre, Cyrille; Malviya, Shruti; Pelletier, Eric; Romagnan, Jean-Baptiste; Roux, Simon; Santini, Sébastien; Scalco, Eleonora; Schwenck, Sarah M; Tanaka, Atsuko; Testor, Pierre; Vannier, Thomas; Vincent, Flora; Zingone, Adriana; Dimier, Céline; Picheral, Marc; Searson, Sarah; Kandels-Lewis, Stefanie; Acinas, Silvia G; Bork, Peer; Boss, Emmanuel; de Vargas, Colomban; Gorsky, Gabriel; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Pesant, Stéphane; Sullivan, Matthew B; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Wincker, Patrick; Karsenti, Eric; Bowler, Chris; Not, Fabrice; Hingamp, Pascal; Iudicone, Daniele

    2015-05-22

    Agulhas rings provide the principal route for ocean waters to circulate from the Indo-Pacific to the Atlantic basin. Their influence on global ocean circulation is well known, but their role in plankton transport is largely unexplored. We show that, although the coarse taxonomic structure of plankton communities is continuous across the Agulhas choke point, South Atlantic plankton diversity is altered compared with Indian Ocean source populations. Modeling and in situ sampling of a young Agulhas ring indicate that strong vertical mixing drives complex nitrogen cycling, shaping community metabolism and biogeochemical signatures as the ring and associated plankton transit westward. The peculiar local environment inside Agulhas rings may provide a selective mechanism contributing to the limited dispersal of Indian Ocean plankton populations into the Atlantic. PMID:25999514

  4. Physical factors affecting the transport and fate of colloids in saturated porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Scott A.; Yates, Scott R.; Bettahar, Mehdi; Simunek, Jirka

    2002-12-01

    Saturated soil column experiments were conducted to explore the influence of colloid size and soil grain size distribution characteristics on the transport and fate of colloid particles in saturated porous media. Stable monodispersed colloids and porous media that are negatively charged were employed in these studies. Effluent colloid concentration curves and the final spatial distribution of retained colloids by the porous media were found to be highly dependent on the colloid size and soil grain size distribution. Relative peak effluent concentrations decreased and surface mass removal by the soil increased when the colloid size increased and the soil median grain size decreased. These observations were attributed to increased straining of the colloids; i.e., blocked pores act as dead ends for the colloids. When the colloid size is small relative to the soil pore sizes, straining becomes a less significant mechanism of colloid removal and attachment becomes more important. Mathematical modeling of the colloid transport experiments using traditional colloid attachment theory was conducted to highlight differences in colloid attachment and straining behavior and to identify parameter ranges that are applicable for attachment models. Simulated colloid effluent curves using fitted first-order attachment and detachment parameters were able to describe much of the effluent concentration data. The model was, however, less adequate at describing systems which exhibited a gradual approach to the peak effluent concentration and the spatial distribution of colloids when significant mass was retained in the soil. Current colloid filtration theory did not adequately predict the fitted first-order attachment coefficients, presumably due to straining in these systems.

  5. Amphetamine and methamphetamine differentially affect dopamine transporters in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, J Shawn; Larson, Gaynor A; Swant, Jarod; Sen, Namita; Javitch, Jonathan A; Zahniser, Nancy R; De Felice, Louis J; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2009-01-30

    The psychostimulants d-amphetamine (AMPH) and methamphetamine (METH) release excess dopamine (DA) into the synaptic clefts of dopaminergic neurons. Abnormal DA release is thought to occur by reverse transport through the DA transporter (DAT), and it is believed to underlie the severe behavioral effects of these drugs. Here we compare structurally similar AMPH and METH on DAT function in a heterologous expression system and in an animal model. In the in vitro expression system, DAT-mediated whole-cell currents were greater for METH stimulation than for AMPH. At the same voltage and concentration, METH released five times more DA than AMPH and did so at physiological membrane potentials. At maximally effective concentrations, METH released twice as much [Ca(2+)](i) from internal stores compared with AMPH. [Ca(2+)](i) responses to both drugs were independent of membrane voltage but inhibited by DAT antagonists. Intact phosphorylation sites in the N-terminal domain of DAT were required for the AMPH- and METH-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) and for the enhanced effects of METH on [Ca(2+)](i) elevation. Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II and protein kinase C inhibitors alone or in combination also blocked AMPH- or METH-induced Ca(2+) responses. Finally, in the rat nucleus accumbens, in vivo voltammetry showed that systemic application of METH inhibited DAT-mediated DA clearance more efficiently than AMPH, resulting in excess external DA. Together these data demonstrate that METH has a stronger effect on DAT-mediated cell physiology than AMPH, which may contribute to the euphoric and addictive properties of METH compared with AMPH.

  6. Weaning marginally affects glucose transporter (GLUT4) expression in calf muscles and adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Hocquette, J F; Castiglia-Delavaud, C; Graulet, B; Ferré, P; Picard, B; Vermorel, M

    1997-08-01

    The nutritional regulation of glucose transporter GLUT4 was studied in eight muscles and four adipose tissues from two groups of preruminant (PR) or ruminant (R) calves of similar age (170 d), empty body weight (194 kg) at slaughter, and level of net energy intake from birth onwards. Isocitrate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.41) activity in muscles was not different between PR and R except in masseter muscle from the cheek (+71% in R; P < 0.003), which becomes almost constantly active at weaning for food chewing. Basal and maximally-insulin-stimulated glucose transport rate (GTR) per g tissue wet weight in rectus abdominis muscle were significantly higher in R calves (+31 and 41% respectively; P < 0.05). GLUT4 protein contents did not differ in muscles from PR and R except in masseter (+74% in R; P < 0.05) indicating that the increased GTR in rectus abdominis cannot be accounted for by an enhanced GLUT4 expression. GLUT4 mRNA levels did not differ between the two groups of animals in all muscles suggesting a regulation of GLUT4 at the protein level in masseter. GLUT4 number expressed on a per cell basis was lower in adipose tissue from R calves (-39%; P < 0.05) and higher in internal than in peripheral adipose tissues. In summary, the regulation of GLUT4 in calves at weaning differs markedly from that previously described in rodents (for review, see Girard et al. 1992). Furthermore, significant inter-individual variations were shown for metabolic activities in muscle and for biochemical variables in adipose tissue.

  7. Experimental investigation of gas hydrate formation, plugging and transportability in partially dispersed and water continuous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayamohan, Prithvi

    As oil/gas subsea fields mature, the amount of water produced increases significantly due to the production methods employed to enhance the recovery of oil. This is true especially in the case of oil reservoirs. This increase in the water hold up increases the risk of hydrate plug formation in the pipelines, thereby resulting in higher inhibition cost strategies. A major industry concern is to reduce the severe safety risks associated with hydrate plug formation, and significantly extending subsea tieback distances by providing a cost effective flow assurance management/safety tool for mature fields. Developing fundamental understanding of the key mechanistic steps towards hydrate plug formation for different multiphase flow conditions is a key challenge to the flow assurance community. Such understanding can ultimately provide new insight and hydrate management guidelines to diminish the safety risks due to hydrate formation and accumulation in deepwater flowlines and facilities. The transportability of hydrates in pipelines is a function of the operating parameters, such as temperature, pressure, fluid mixture velocity, liquid loading, and fluid system characteristics. Specifically, the hydrate formation rate and plugging onset characteristics can be significantly different for water continuous, oil continuous, and partially dispersed systems. The latter is defined as a system containing oil/gas/water, where the water is present both as a free phase and partially dispersed in the oil phase (i.e., entrained water in the oil). Since hydrate formation from oil dispersed in water systems and partially dispersed water systems is an area which is poorly understood, this thesis aims to address some key questions in these systems. Selected experiments have been performed at the University of Tulsa flowloop to study the hydrate formation and plugging characteristics for the partially dispersed water/oil/gas systems as well as systems where the oil is completely dispersed

  8. Soil structure, colloids, and chemical transport as affected by short-term reducing conditions: a laboratory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de-Campos, A. B.; Mamedov, A. I.; Huang, C.; Wagner, L. E.

    2008-12-01

    Upland soils in the Midwestern US often undergo reducing conditions when soils are temporally flooded during the spring and remain water saturated for days or weeks. Short-term reducing conditions change the chemistry of the soil and may affect soil structure and solution chemical transport. The effects of short-term reducing conditions on chemical and physical properties of the soils, colloids, and associated chemical/nutrients transport are still not well understood and was the objective of our study. A biogeochemical reactor was built to achieve reducing conditions. Three cultivated and three uncultivated soils with different organic carbon contents were incubated in the reactor for 1 hour and 3 days under anaerobic conditions. Effects of the redox state on soil structure (pore size distribution) and drainable porosity, colloids mobility, and chemical transport were determined using high energy moisture characteristic and analytical methods. After each treatment, the soil solution was collected for redox potential (Eh), pH, and electrical conductivity (EC) measurements, and chemical analysis of metals (Ca, Mg, K), nutrients (N, P), and dissolved organic carbon. Strongly reducing conditions were achieved after 3 days of incubation and were followed by a decrease in soil porosity and an increase in pH, EC, clay dispersion, swelling, colloids mobility, and associated chemical transport. The trend for each soil depended on their initial structural stability and chemical properties. The structure of cultivated soils and the leaching of nutrients and carbon from uncultivated soils were more sensitive to the redox state. A strong correlation was found between changes in Eh and drainable porosity. The role of short-term reducing conditions on changes in redox sensitive elements, organic matter decomposition, pH, and EC and their influence on soil structure and soil particles or colloids/chemical transport for both soil groups are discussed in the paper. This study

  9. Analysis of factors affecting methane-gas recovery from six landfills. Final report Jul 90-Jul 91

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D.; Epperson, D.; Davis, L.; Peer, R.; Gray, W.

    1991-09-01

    The report gives results of a pilot study of six U.S. landfills that have methane (CH4) gas recovery systems. (NOTE: The study was a first step in developing a field testing program to gather data to identify key variables that affect CH4 generation and to develop an empirical model of CH4 generation based on those variables. The field test program development, in turn, is part of EPA/AEERL's research program aimed at improving global landfill CH4 emissions estimates.) To evaluate the effects of climate on CH4 production and recovery, the six sites represented a variety of moisture and temperature patterns (i.e., hot and wet, cool and wet, hot and dry). Landfill gas was tested at each landfill to evaluate the quality of the gas recovery data available at each. The testing included assessing the adequacy of on-site instrumentation and scanning the landfill surfaces for organic vapors that would indicate emissions of CH4. In addition, information on waste composition and landfill characteristics was sought for each landfill. Except for flow measurements, the test procedures selected were well suited to the types of gas recovery installations encountered at the landfills visited. Based on comparisons between EPA Reference Method 3C and instrument analyses of the landfill gas compositions, all on-site analysis instruments appeared to be operating with reasonable accuracy.

  10. A fully coupled model for water-gas-heat reactive transport with methane oxidation in landfill covers.

    PubMed

    Ng, C W W; Feng, S; Liu, H W

    2015-03-01

    Methane oxidation in landfill covers is a complex process involving water, gas and heat transfer as well as microbial oxidation. The coupled phenomena of microbial oxidation, water, gas, and heat transfer are not fully understood. In this study, a new model is developed that incorporates water-gas-heat coupled reactive transport in unsaturated soil with methane oxidation. Effects of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat are included. The model is calibrated using published data from a laboratory soil column test. Moreover, a series of parametric studies are carried out to investigate the influence of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat, initial water content on methane oxidation efficiency. Computed and measured results of gas concentration and methane oxidation rate are consistent. It is found that the coupling effects between water-gas-heat transfer and methane oxidation are significant. Ignoring microbial oxidation-generated water and heat can result in a significant difference in methane oxidation efficiency by 100%.

  11. A fully coupled model for water-gas-heat reactive transport with methane oxidation in landfill covers.

    PubMed

    Ng, C W W; Feng, S; Liu, H W

    2015-03-01

    Methane oxidation in landfill covers is a complex process involving water, gas and heat transfer as well as microbial oxidation. The coupled phenomena of microbial oxidation, water, gas, and heat transfer are not fully understood. In this study, a new model is developed that incorporates water-gas-heat coupled reactive transport in unsaturated soil with methane oxidation. Effects of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat are included. The model is calibrated using published data from a laboratory soil column test. Moreover, a series of parametric studies are carried out to investigate the influence of microbial oxidation-generated water and heat, initial water content on methane oxidation efficiency. Computed and measured results of gas concentration and methane oxidation rate are consistent. It is found that the coupling effects between water-gas-heat transfer and methane oxidation are significant. Ignoring microbial oxidation-generated water and heat can result in a significant difference in methane oxidation efficiency by 100%. PMID:25489976

  12. Permafrost problems as they affect gas pipelines (the frost heave problem)

    SciTech Connect

    Lipsett, G.B.

    1980-01-01

    The major problems associated with the construction of a large diameter gas pipeline in a permafrost region are outlined in this presentation. Data pertains to the design and construction of the Alaska Highway Gas Pipeline Project. One of the main problems is maintaining the permafrost in its frozen state. Large diameter pipelines operating at high capacity are heat generators. Therefore, it is necessary to refrigerate the gas to ensure that it remains below 0/sup 0/C at all points in the pipeline system. The pipeline also passes through unfrozen ground where the potential for frost heave exists. The conditions under which frost heave occurs are listed. The extent and location of potential frost heave problem areas must be determined and a frost heave prediction method must be established before construction begins. Another task involves development of design criteria for the pipeline/soil interaction analysis. Remedial methods for use during the operational phase are also discussed. (DMC)

  13. The Gas2 family protein Pigs is a microtubule +TIP that affects cytoskeleton organisation

    PubMed Central

    Girdler, Gemma C.; Applewhite, Derek A.; Perry, Wick M. G.; Rogers, Stephen L.; Röper, Katja

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Coordination between different cytoskeletal systems is crucial for many cell biological functions, including cell migration and mitosis, and also plays an important role during tissue morphogenesis. Proteins of the class of cytoskeletal crosslinkers, or cytolinkers, have the ability to interact with more than one cytoskeletal system at a time and are prime candidates to mediate any coordination. One such class comprises the Gas2-like proteins, combining a conserved calponin-homology-type actin-binding domain and a Gas2 domain predicted to bind microtubules (MTs). This domain combination is also found in spectraplakins, huge cytolinkers that play important roles in many tissues in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Here, we dissect the ability of the single Drosophila Gas2-like protein Pigs to interact with both actin and MT cytoskeletons, both in vitro and in vivo, and illustrate complex regulatory interactions that determine the localisation of Pigs to and its effects on the cytoskeleton. PMID:26585311

  14. The Gas2 family protein Pigs is a microtubule +TIP that affects cytoskeleton organisation.

    PubMed

    Girdler, Gemma C; Applewhite, Derek A; Perry, Wick M G; Rogers, Stephen L; Röper, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Coordination between different cytoskeletal systems is crucial for many cell biological functions, including cell migration and mitosis, and also plays an important role during tissue morphogenesis. Proteins of the class of cytoskeletal crosslinkers, or cytolinkers, have the ability to interact with more than one cytoskeletal system at a time and are prime candidates to mediate any coordination. One such class comprises the Gas2-like proteins, combining a conserved calponin-homology-type actin-binding domain and a Gas2 domain predicted to bind microtubules (MTs). This domain combination is also found in spectraplakins, huge cytolinkers that play important roles in many tissues in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Here, we dissect the ability of the single Drosophila Gas2-like protein Pigs to interact with both actin and MT cytoskeletons, both in vitro and in vivo, and illustrate complex regulatory interactions that determine the localisation of Pigs to and its effects on the cytoskeleton.

  15. Tracing natural gas transport into shallow groundwater using dissolved nitrogen and alkane chemistry in Parker County, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, T.; Nicot, J. P.; Mickler, P. J.; Darvari, R.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved methane in shallow groundwater drives public concern about the safety of hydraulic fracturing. We report dissolved alkane and nitrogen gas concentrations and their stable isotope values (δ13C and δ15N, respectively) from 208 water wells in Parker county, Texas. These data are used to differentiate 'stray' natural gas and low temperature microbial methane, and (2) estimate the ratio of stray gas to groundwater. The ratio of (gas-phase) stray natural gas to groundwater is estimated by correlating dissolved methane and nitrogen concentrations and dissolved nitrogen δ15N values. Our hypothesis is groundwater exposed to high volumes of stray natural gas have high dissolved methane concentrations and low dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values. Alternatively, groundwater exposed to low volumes of stray gas-phase natural gas have elevated dissolved methane, but the concentration of dissolved nitrogen and its d15N value is atmospheric. A cluster of samples in Parker county have high concentrations of dissolved methane (>10mg/L) with d13Cmethane and alkane ratios (C1/C2+C3) typical of natural gas from the Barnett Shale and the Strawn Formation. Coupling dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values with these results, we suggest that few of the wells in this cluster preserve large gas to water ratios. Many samples with high dissolved methane concentrations have atmospheric dissolved nitrogen concentrations and δ15N values, providing evidence against high flux natural gas transport into shallow groundwater. These results demonstrate that dissolved nitrogen chemistry, in addition to dissolved alkane and noble gas measurements, may be useful to discern sources of dissolved methane and estimate ratios of stray natural gas-water ratios.

  16. Staufen Recruitment into Stress Granules Does Not Affect Early mRNA Transport in Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, María G.; Tosar, Leandro J. Martinez; Loschi, Mariela; Pasquini, Juana M.; Correale, Jorge; Kindler, Stefan; Boccaccio, Graciela L.

    2005-01-01

    Staufen is a conserved double-stranded RNA-binding protein required for mRNA localization in Drosophila oocytes and embryos. The mammalian homologues Staufen 1 and Staufen 2 have been implicated in dendritic RNA targeting in neurons. Here we show that in rodent oligodendrocytes, these two proteins are present in two independent sets of RNA granules located at the distal myelinating processes. A third kind of RNA granules lacks Staufen and contains major myelin mRNAs. Myelin Staufen granules associate with microfilaments and microtubules, and their subcellular distribution is affected by polysome-disrupting drugs. Under oxidative stress, both Staufen 1 and Staufen 2 are recruited into stress granules (SGs), which are stress-induced organelles containing transiently silenced messengers. Staufen SGs contain the poly(A)-binding protein (PABP), the RNA-binding proteins HuR and TIAR, and small but not large ribosomal subunits. Staufen recruitment into perinuclear SGs is paralleled by a similar change in the overall localization of polyadenylated RNA. Under the same conditions, the distribution of recently transcribed and exported mRNAs is not affected. Our results indicate that Staufen 1 and Staufen 2 are novel and ubiquitous SG components and suggest that Staufen RNPs are involved in repositioning of most polysomal mRNAs, but not of recently synthesized transcripts, during the stress response. PMID:15525674

  17. Ammonia gas transport and reactions in unsaturated sediments: implications for use as an amendment to immobilize inorganic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Zhong, L; Szecsody, J E; Truex, M J; Williams, M D; Liu, Y

    2015-05-30

    Use of gas-phase amendments for in situ remediation of inorganic contaminants in unsaturated sediments of the vadose zone may be advantageous, but there has been limited development and testing of gas remediation technologies. Treatment with ammonia gas has a potential for use in treating inorganic contaminants (such as uranium) because it induces a high pore-water pH, causing mineral dissolution and subsequent formation of stable precipitates that decrease the mobility of some contaminants. For field application of this treatment, further knowledge of ammonia transport in porous media and the geochemical reactions induced by ammonia treatment is needed. Laboratory studies were conducted to support calculations needed for field treatment design, to quantify advective and diffusive ammonia transport in unsaturated sediments, to evaluate inter-phase (gas/sediment/pore water) reactions, and to study reaction-induced pore-water chemistry changes as a function of ammonia delivery conditions, such as flow rate, gas concentration, and water content. Uranium-contaminated sediment was treated with ammonia gas to demonstrate U immobilization. Ammonia gas quickly partitions into sediment pore water and increases the pH up to 13.2. Injected ammonia gas advection front movement can be reasonably predicted by gas flow rate and equilibrium partitioning. The ammonia gas diffusion rate is a function of the water content in the sediment. Sodium, aluminum, and silica pore-water concentrations increase upon exposure to ammonia and then decline as aluminosilicates precipitate when the pH declines due to buffering. Up to 85% of the water-leachable U was immobilized by ammonia treatment.

  18. Chemical form of selenium affects its uptake, transport, and glutathione peroxidase activity in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Jackson, Matthew I; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Combs, Gerald F

    2011-11-01

    Determining the effect of selenium (Se) chemical form on uptake, transport, and glutathione peroxidase activity in human intestinal cells is critical to assess Se bioavailability at nutritional doses. In this study, we found that two sources of L-selenomethionine (SeMet) and Se-enriched yeast each increased intracellular Se content more effectively than selenite or methylselenocysteine (SeMSC) in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. Interestingly, SeMSC, SeMet, and digested Se-enriched yeast were transported at comparable efficacy from the apical to basolateral sides, each being about 3-fold that of selenite. In addition, these forms of Se, whether before or after traversing from apical side to basolateral side, did not change the potential to support glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity. Although selenoprotein P has been postulated to be a key Se transport protein, its intracellular expression did not differ when selenite, SeMSC, SeMet, or digested Se-enriched yeast was added to serum-contained media. Taken together, our data show, for the first time, that the chemical form of Se at nutritional doses can affect the absorptive (apical to basolateral side) efficacy and retention of Se by intestinal cells; but that, these effects are not directly correlated to the potential to support GPx activity.

  19. Beyond affect: A role for genetic variation of the serotonin transporter in neural activation during a cognitive attention task

    PubMed Central

    Canli, Turhan; Omura, Kazufumi; Haas, Brian W.; Fallgatter, Andreas; Constable, R. Todd; Lesch, Klaus Peter

    2005-01-01

    Prior work has highlighted the role of genetic variation within the repetitive sequence in the transcriptional control region of the serotonin (5-HT) transporter gene (5-HTT, SLC6A4) in modulating amygdala and prefrontal activation to negative emotional stimuli. However, these studies have not explicitly tested the assumption that the control condition (neutral baseline) does not itself produce changes in activation as a function of 5-HTT genotype. Using a fixation baseline condition, we show that variation in 5-HTT genotype is associated with differential activation to negative, positive, and neutral stimuli in limbic, striatal, and cortical regions. We replicate earlier reports of increased amygdala activation to negative, relative to neutral, stimuli, but then show that these differences are driven by decreased activation to neutral stimuli, rather than increased activation to negative stimuli, in carriers of the 5-HTT short allele. Using high-resolution structural images and automated processes to test for brain volume and gray matter density, we further report significant differences, as a function of 5-HTT genotype, in frontal cortical regions, anterior cingulate, and cerebellum. These functional and structural differences suggest a much broader role for 5-HT transport efficiency in brain processes than previously thought. 5-HTT genotype affects neural systems controlling affective, cognitive, and motor processes. PMID:16093315

  20. Characterizing multiple timescales of stream and storage zone interaction that affect solute fate and transport in streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Choi, J.; Harvey, J.W.; Conklin, M.H.

    2000-01-01

    The fate of contaminants in streams and rivers is affected by exchange and biogeochemical transformation in slowly moving or stagnant flow zones that interact with rapid flow in the main channel. In a typical stream, there are multiple types of slowly moving flow zones in which exchange and transformation occur, such as stagnant or recirculating surface water as well as subsurface hyporheic zones. However, most investigators use transport models with just a single storage zone in their modeling studies, which assumes that the effects of multiple storage zones can be lumped together. Our study addressed the following question: Can a single-storage zone model reliably characterize the effects of physical retention and biogeochemical reactions in multiple storage zones? We extended an existing stream transport model with a single storage zone to include a second storage zone. With the extended model we generated 500 data sets representing transport of nonreactive and reactive solutes in stream systems that have two different types of storage zones with variable hydrologic conditions. The one storage zone model was tested by optimizing the lumped storage parameters to achieve a best fit for each of the generated data sets. Multiple storage processes were categorized as possessing I, additive; II, competitive; or III, dominant storage zone characteristics. The classification was based on the goodness of fit of generated data sets, the degree of similarity in mean retention time of the two storage zones, and the relative distributions of exchange flux and storage capacity between the two storage zones. For most cases (> 90%) the one storage zone model described either the effect of the sum of multiple storage processes (category I) or the dominant storage process (category III). Failure of the one storage zone model occurred mainly for category II, that is, when one of the storage zones had a much longer mean retention time (t(s) ratio > 5.0) and when the dominance of

  1. The transportation of fine arts materials aboard the space shuttle Columbia. GAS payload No. 481: Vertical horizons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kurtz, Ellery; Wishnow, Howard

    1988-01-01

    The Vertical Horizons experiment represents an initial investigation into the transportation of fine arts materials aboard a space shuttle. Within the confines of a GAS canister, artist quality fine arts materials were packaged and exposed to the rigors of space flight in an attempt to identify adverse effects.

  2. Natural gas: marine transportation. 1964-October, 1981 (citations from the NTIS Data Base). Report for 1964-Oct 81

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    Abstracts are presented of studies on various aspects of marine transportation of liquefied natural gas. This includes reports on forecasts, cargo tank design, terminal facilities, spills, safety aspects, special tanker design, and handling equipment. (This updated bibliography contains 162 citations, 19 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  3. Natural gas: marine transportation. 1964-June, 1980 (citations from the NTIS data base). Report for 1964-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Habercom, G.E. Jr

    1980-07-01

    Abstracts are presented of studies on various aspects of marine transportation of liquefied natural gas. This includes reports on forecasts, cargo tank design, terminal facilities, spills, safety aspects, special tanker design, and handling equipment. (This updated bibliography contains 143 citations, 8 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  4. 18 CFR 284.7 - Firm transportation service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Federal Register citations affecting § 284.7, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Firm transportation... AUTHORITIES CERTAIN SALES AND TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL GAS UNDER THE NATURAL GAS POLICY ACT OF 1978...

  5. 18 CFR 284.7 - Firm transportation service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Federal Register citations affecting § 284.7, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Firm transportation... AUTHORITIES CERTAIN SALES AND TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL GAS UNDER THE NATURAL GAS POLICY ACT OF 1978...

  6. 18 CFR 284.7 - Firm transportation service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Federal Register citations affecting § 284.7, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Firm transportation... AUTHORITIES CERTAIN SALES AND TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL GAS UNDER THE NATURAL GAS POLICY ACT OF 1978...

  7. Clinically used selective estrogen receptor modulators affect different steps of macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Suárez, María E.; Escolà-Gil, Joan C.; Pastor, Oscar; Dávalos, Alberto; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Lasunción, Miguel A.; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are widely prescribed drugs that alter cellular and whole-body cholesterol homeostasis. Here we evaluate the effect of SERMs on the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport (M-RCT) pathway, which is mediated by HDL. Treatment of human and mouse macrophages with tamoxifen, raloxifene or toremifene induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic vesicles of acetyl-LDL-derived free cholesterol. The SERMs impaired cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and HDL, and lowered ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. These effects were not altered by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 nor were they reproduced by 17β-estradiol. The treatment of mice with tamoxifen or raloxifene accelerated HDL-cholesteryl ester catabolism, thereby reducing HDL-cholesterol concentrations in serum. When [3H]cholesterol-loaded macrophages were injected into mice intraperitoneally, tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, decreased the [3H]cholesterol levels in serum, liver and feces. Both SERMs downregulated liver ABCG5 and ABCG8 protein expression, but tamoxifen reduced the capacity of HDL and plasma to promote macrophage cholesterol efflux to a greater extent than raloxifene. We conclude that SERMs interfere with intracellular cholesterol trafficking and efflux from macrophages. Tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, impair M-RCT in vivo. This effect is primarily attributable to the tamoxifen-mediated reduction of the capacity of HDL to promote cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. PMID:27601313

  8. Physical oceanographic processes affecting larval transport around and through North Carolina inlets

    SciTech Connect

    Pietrafesa, L.J.; Janowitz, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    Atlantic Spot, Flounder, Croaker and Menhaden all spawn in shelf waters of North Carolina during late fall to early winter. The juveniles use estuaries such as Pamlico Sound and the Cape Fear River as nurseries during their first winter and spring. Previous studies of recruitment into the estuaries through barrier island inlets or estarine mouths assume that the pre and post metamorphosed larvae enter the estuaries at the bottom of the water column and move upstream thereafter. The mechanisms were presumed tidal. The Pamlico Sound has several inlets, Oregon, Hatteras and ocracroke, through which larvae can enter not only during flood stages of the tide but also in the presence of favorable oceanic to estuary sea level pressure gradients. The Cape Fear River has a strong semi-diurnal tidal flow both flood and ebb and also responds vigorously to one-sided divergences and convergences at its mouth. Flow, looking out of the mouth, is in at the left and out on the right. The conclusions are that, in addition to flooding tides, non-local forcing at the estuary mouths can effect transport of larval fish through the estuary mouths, throughout the entire water column.

  9. Hydrostatic pressure affects selective tidal stream transport in the North Sea brown shrimp (Crangon crangon).

    PubMed

    Tielmann, Moritz; Reiser, Stefan; Hufnagl, Marc; Herrmann, Jens-Peter; Eckardt, André; Temming, Axel

    2015-10-01

    The brown shrimp (Crangon crangon) is a highly abundant invertebrate in the North Sea, with its life cycle stages ranging from deep offshore spawning to shallow onshore nursery areas. To overcome the long distances between these two habitats, brown shrimp are suspected to use selective tidal stream transport (STST), moving with the cyclic tide currents towards their preferred water depths. However, it is not known which stimulus actually triggers STST behavior in brown shrimp. In this work, we determined the influence of different hyperbaric pressures on STST behavior of juvenile brown shrimp. Brown shrimp activity was recorded in a hyperbaric pressure chamber that supplied constant and dynamic pressure conditions simulating different depths, with and without a tidal cycle. Subsequent wavelet and Fourier analysis were performed to determine the periodicity in the activity data. The results of the experiments show that STST behavior in brown shrimp varies with pressure and therefore with depth. We further show that STST behavior can be initiated by cyclic pressure changes. However, an interaction with one or more other environmental triggers remains possible. Furthermore, a security ebb-tide activity was identified that may serve to avoid potential stranding in shallow waters and is 'remembered' by shrimp for about 1.5 days without contact with tidal triggers.

  10. How imperfect interfaces affect the nonlinear transport properties in composite nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavanello, Fabio; Giordano, Stefano

    2013-04-01

    Nanomaterials composed of a population of particles dispersed in a matrix represent the building block for the next generation of several technologies: energy storage and conversion, thermal management, electronics, and photovoltaics. When interfaces between particles and matrix are imperfect, the size of the particles may strongly influence the effective linear and nonlinear response of the whole system. Here, we study these scale effects mainly focussing on the nonlinear transport behavior of composite structures. The theory is developed, in the framework of the electrical conductivity, for an arbitrary nonlinearity of the constituents; however, explicit results are discussed for Kerr-like nonlinear responses. Two kinds of imperfect interfaces are considered: the T-model and the Π-model, which represent a generalization of the classical schemes largely employed in literature, namely the low and the high conducting interface models. The dependence of the nonlinear effective properties on the size of the dispersed particles is explained through intrinsic length scales governing some universal scaling laws.

  11. Clinically used selective estrogen receptor modulators affect different steps of macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Suárez, María E; Escolà-Gil, Joan C; Pastor, Oscar; Dávalos, Alberto; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Lasunción, Miguel A; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego

    2016-09-07

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are widely prescribed drugs that alter cellular and whole-body cholesterol homeostasis. Here we evaluate the effect of SERMs on the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport (M-RCT) pathway, which is mediated by HDL. Treatment of human and mouse macrophages with tamoxifen, raloxifene or toremifene induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic vesicles of acetyl-LDL-derived free cholesterol. The SERMs impaired cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and HDL, and lowered ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. These effects were not altered by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 nor were they reproduced by 17β-estradiol. The treatment of mice with tamoxifen or raloxifene accelerated HDL-cholesteryl ester catabolism, thereby reducing HDL-cholesterol concentrations in serum. When [(3)H]cholesterol-loaded macrophages were injected into mice intraperitoneally, tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, decreased the [(3)H]cholesterol levels in serum, liver and feces. Both SERMs downregulated liver ABCG5 and ABCG8 protein expression, but tamoxifen reduced the capacity of HDL and plasma to promote macrophage cholesterol efflux to a greater extent than raloxifene. We conclude that SERMs interfere with intracellular cholesterol trafficking and efflux from macrophages. Tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, impair M-RCT in vivo. This effect is primarily attributable to the tamoxifen-mediated reduction of the capacity of HDL to promote cholesterol mobilization from macrophages.

  12. Clinically used selective estrogen receptor modulators affect different steps of macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Suárez, María E; Escolà-Gil, Joan C; Pastor, Oscar; Dávalos, Alberto; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco; Lasunción, Miguel A; Martínez-Botas, Javier; Gómez-Coronado, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are widely prescribed drugs that alter cellular and whole-body cholesterol homeostasis. Here we evaluate the effect of SERMs on the macrophage-specific reverse cholesterol transport (M-RCT) pathway, which is mediated by HDL. Treatment of human and mouse macrophages with tamoxifen, raloxifene or toremifene induced the accumulation of cytoplasmic vesicles of acetyl-LDL-derived free cholesterol. The SERMs impaired cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I and HDL, and lowered ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression. These effects were not altered by the antiestrogen ICI 182,780 nor were they reproduced by 17β-estradiol. The treatment of mice with tamoxifen or raloxifene accelerated HDL-cholesteryl ester catabolism, thereby reducing HDL-cholesterol concentrations in serum. When [(3)H]cholesterol-loaded macrophages were injected into mice intraperitoneally, tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, decreased the [(3)H]cholesterol levels in serum, liver and feces. Both SERMs downregulated liver ABCG5 and ABCG8 protein expression, but tamoxifen reduced the capacity of HDL and plasma to promote macrophage cholesterol efflux to a greater extent than raloxifene. We conclude that SERMs interfere with intracellular cholesterol trafficking and efflux from macrophages. Tamoxifen, but not raloxifene, impair M-RCT in vivo. This effect is primarily attributable to the tamoxifen-mediated reduction of the capacity of HDL to promote cholesterol mobilization from macrophages. PMID:27601313

  13. The sucrose transporter SlSUT2 from tomato interacts with brassinosteroid functioning and affects arbuscular mycorrhiza formation.

    PubMed

    Bitterlich, Michael; Krügel, Undine; Boldt-Burisch, Katja; Franken, Philipp; Kühn, Christina

    2014-06-01

    Mycorrhizal plants benefit from the fungal partners by getting better access to soil nutrients. In exchange, the plant supplies carbohydrates to the fungus. The additional carbohydrate demand in mycorrhizal plants was shown to be balanced partially by higher CO2 assimilation and increased C metabolism in shoots and roots. In order to test the role of sucrose transport for fungal development in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) tomato, transgenic plants with down-regulated expression of three sucrose transporter genes were analysed. Plants that carried an antisense construct of SlSUT2 (SlSUT2as) repeatedly exhibited increased mycorrhizal colonization and the positive effect of plants to mycorrhiza was abolished. Grafting experiments between transgenic and wild-type rootstocks and scions indicated that mainly the root-specific function of SlSUT2 has an impact on colonization of tomato roots with the AM fungus. Localization of SISUT2 to the periarbuscular membrane indicates a role in back transport of sucrose from the periarbuscular matrix into the plant cell thereby affecting hyphal development. Screening of an expression library for SlSUT2-interacting proteins revealed interactions with candidates involved in brassinosteroid (BR) signaling or biosynthesis. Interaction of these candidates with SlSUT2 was confirmed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Tomato mutants defective in BR biosynthesis were analysed with respect to mycorrhizal symbiosis and showed indeed decreased mycorrhization. This finding suggests that BRs affect mycorrhizal infection and colonization. If the inhibitory effect of SlSUT2 on mycorrhizal growth involves components of BR synthesis and of the BR signaling pathway is discussed.

  14. Net greenhouse gas emissions affected by sheep grazing under dryland cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheep grazing to control weeds during fallow may influence greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by consuming crop residue and returning feces and urine to the soil. We evaluated the effect of sheep grazing compared to herbicide application for weed control on soil temperature and water content at the 0- t...

  15. Dryland soil greenhouse gas emissions affected by cropping sequence and nitrogen fertilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Information is needed to mitigate dryland soil greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by using improved management practices. We quantified the effects of tillage and cropping sequence combination and N fertilization on dryland soil temperature and water content at the 0- to 15-cm depth and CO2, N2O, and CH...

  16. Net global warming potential and greenhouse gas intensity affected by cropping sequence and nitrogen fertilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little information is available about management practice effects on the net global warming potential (GWP) and greenhouse gas intensity (GHGI) under dryland cropping systems. We evaluated the effects of cropping sequences (conventional-tillage malt barley [Hordeum vulgaris L.]–fallow [CTB-F], no-ti...

  17. Soil greenhouse gas emissions affected by sheep grazing under dryland cropping systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheep grazing to control weeds during fallow may influence soil greenhouse gas (CO2, N2O, and CH4) emissions by consuming crop residue and returning feces and urine to the soil. An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of sheep grazing compared to herbicide application on soil temperature ...

  18. Sub-surface soil carbon changes affects biofuel greenhouse gas emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Changes in direct soil organic carbon (SOC) can have a major impact on overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from biofuels when using life-cycle assessment (LCA). Estimated changes in SOC, when accounted for in an LCA, are typically derived from near-surface soil depths (<30 cm). Changes in subsurf...

  19. Manure and inorganic N affect trace gas emissions under semi-arid irrigated corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Dairy manure is often applied to cropped soils as a substitute for inorganic N fertilizers, but the impacts of manure on soil greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes, yields and soil N are uncertain in the semi-arid western U.S. Soil carbon dioxide (CO2-C), methane (CH4-C), and nitrous oxide (N2O-N) emissions ...

  20. Sensitivity studies on parameters affecting gas release from an underground rock cavern

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, E.; Pruess, K.

    1990-01-01

    A series of numerical simulation experiments is performed to quantify the effects of the release and migration of non-condensible gas in water-saturated fractured rock formations. The relative importance of multiphase parameters such as relative permeability, capillary pressure, intrinsic permeability, and porosity on system behavior is studied. 10 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Measurement of a new parameter representing the gas transport properties of the catalyst layers of polymer electrolyte fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Iden, Hiroshi; Ohma, Atsushi; Tokunaga, Tomomi; Yokoyama, Kouji; Shinohara, Kazuhiko

    2016-05-14

    The optimization of the catalyst layers is necessary for obtaining a better fuel cell performance and reducing fuel cell cost. Although the ionomer coverage of the Pt catalyst is said to be a key parameter in this regard, the proportion of Pt either directly or indirectly covered by the ionomer is thought to be an important parameter with regard to gas transport (indirectly covered Pt: its gas transport paths are completely blocked by the ionomer even if it does not directly cover Pt). In this study, a new technique has been developed for evaluating the proportion of Pt covered indirectly or directly by the ionomer, which is defined as the "capped proportion", based on the carbon monoxide (CO) adsorption properties at different temperatures. The validity of the method was thoroughly examined by identifying the CO adsorption properties of the components of the catalyst layers. The capped proportion and oxygen transport resistance in the catalyst layers showed a good correlation, indicating that the capped proportion is a dominant factor of oxygen transport resistance. This technique thus enables the evaluation of the dominant factor of the gas transport properties of the catalyst layers. The method has another significant advantage in that it does not require a membrane electrode assembly, let alone electrochemical measurement, which should be helpful for catalyst layer optimization.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Major Factors Affecting Black Carbon Transport and Concentrations in the Unique Atmospheric Structures of Urban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Marissa Shuang

    Black carbon (BC) from vehicular emission in transportation is a principal component of particulate matters ≤ 2.5 mum (PM2.5). PM2.5 and other diesel emission pollutants (e.g., NOx) are regulated by the Clean Air Act (CAA) according to the National Ambient Air Quality standards (NAAQS). This doctoral dissertation details a study on transport behaviors of black carbon and PM2.5 from transportation routes, their relations with the atmospheric structure of an urban formation, and their relations with the use of biodiesel fuels. The results have implications to near-road risk assessment and to the development of sustainable transportation solutions in urban centers. The first part of study quantified near-roadside black carbon transport as a function of particulate matter (PM) size and composition, as well as microclimatic variables (temperature and wind fields) at the interstate highway I-75 in northern Cincinnati, Ohio. Among variables examined, wind speed and direction significantly affect the roadside transport of black carbon and hence its effective emission factor. Observed non-Gaussian dispersion occurred during low wind and for wind directions at acute angles or upwind to the receptors, mostly occurring in the morning hours. Meandering of air pollutant mass under thermal inversion is likely the driving force. In contrary, Gaussian distribution predominated in daytime of strong downwinds. The roles of urban atmospheric structure, wind fields, and the urban heat island (UHI) effects were further examined on pollutant dispersion and transport. Spatiotemporal variations of traffic flow, atmospheric structure, ambient temperature and PM2.5 concentration data from 14 EPA-certified NAAQS monitoring stations, were analyzed in relation to land-use in the Cincinnati metropolitan area. The results show a decade-long UHI effects with higher interior temperature than that in exurban, and a prominent nocturnal thermal inversion frequent in urban boundary layer. The

  3. Deep earthquakes beneath Mount St. Helens: Evidence for magmatic gas transport?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, C.S.; Zollweg, J.E.; Malone, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    Small-magnitude earthquakes began beneath Mount St. Helens 40 days before the eruption of 20 March 1982. Unlike earlier preeruption seismicity for this volcano, which had been limited to shallow events (less than 3 kilometers), many of these earthquakes were deep (between 5 and 11 kilometers). The location of these preeruptive events at such depth indicates that a larger volume of the volcanic system was affected prior to the 20 March eruption than prior to any of the earlier dome-building eruptions. The depth-time relation between the deep earthquakes and the explosive onset of the eruption is compatible with the upward migration of magmatic gas released from a separate deep reservoir.

  4. Sodium arsenite affects Na+ transport in the isolated skin of the toad Pleurodema thaul.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, Mario; Rivera, Cecilia; Norris, Beryl; Cárdenas, Hernán

    2007-01-01

    Arsenic, applied as sodium arsenite (As(III)) to either inner or outer surfaces of the isolated toad skin, dose-dependently decreased the short-circuit current (Isc), potential difference (PD) and sodium conductance (G(Na)) in the concentration range 1-1000 microM, with effects often lasting over 3 h. Maximal inhibitory effect was over 90% with an IC(50) of about 34 microM. Applied during amiloride block, As(III) did not change this effect. However, an increase in electric parameters was noted during the initial 30 min in 22 experiments, indicating a possible translocation of cytosolic protein kinase C (PKC) to the membrane within 15 min, thus stimulating sodium transport; this is followed by a progressive inhibition of kinase activity. Comparative effects of amiloride (8 microM), As(III) (100 microM, outer surface) and noradrenaline (NA, 10 microM, inner surface) showed a significant increase in the stimulatory effect of NA on the electric parameters, which could be the result of arsenite clustering of cell surface receptors and activation of ensuing cellular signal transduction pathways. Ouabain 5 microM, followed by As(III) 100 microM, also stimulated the skin response to NA (10 microM), although the duration of the two phases of the response was markedly shortened. The exact mechanism is still in doubt: however, As(III) increases cerebral metabolites of NA and ouabain can increase NA efflux from tissue slices. The amiloride test, performed with As(III) in the outer surface, confirmed significant decrease in all the parameters: the driving force (E(Na)), sodium conductance (G(Na)), and importantly, shunt conductance (G(sh)), due to the known fact that arsenic inhibits gap junctional intercellular communication. PMID:17055342

  5. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES AFFECTING RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AND BIOIMMOBILIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Joel E. Kostka; Lee Kerkhof; Kuk-Jeong Chin; Martin Keller; Joseph W. Stucki

    2011-06-15

    The objectives of this project were to: (1) isolate and characterize novel anaerobic prokaryotes from subsurface environments exposed to high levels of mixed contaminants (U(VI), nitrate, sulfate), (2) elucidate the diversity and distribution of metabolically active metal- and nitrate-reducing prokaryotes in subsurface sediments, and (3) determine the biotic and abiotic mechanisms linking electron transport processes (nitrate, Fe(III), and sulfate reduction) to radionuclide reduction and immobilization. Mechanisms of electron transport and U(VI) transformation were examined under near in situ conditions in sediment microcosms and in field investigations at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination predominated by uranium and nitrate. A total of 20 publications (16 published or 'in press' and 4 in review), 10 invited talks, and 43 contributed seminars/ meeting presentations were completed during the past four years of the project. PI Kostka served on one proposal review panel each year for the U.S. DOE Office of Science during the four year project period. The PI leveraged funds from the state of Florida to purchase new instrumentation that aided the project. Support was also leveraged by the PI from the Joint Genome Institute in the form of two successful proposals for genome sequencing. Draft genomes are now available for two novel species isolated during our studies and 5 more genomes are in the pipeline. We effectively addressed each of the three project objectives and research highlights are provided. Task I - Isolation and characterization of novel anaerobes: (1) A wide range of pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and denitrifying bacteria (32 strains) were isolated from subsurface sediments of the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination of uranium and nitrate. These isolates which are new

  6. 50 CFR 29.21-9 - Rights-of-way for pipelines for the transportation of oil, natural gas, synthetic liquid or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... transportation of oil, natural gas, synthetic liquid or gaseous fuels, or any refined product produced therefrom... Regulations § 29.21-9 Rights-of-way for pipelines for the transportation of oil, natural gas, synthetic liquid... Director of the Bureau of Land Management in accordance with regulations in 43 CFR part 2800. Any...

  7. Fusarium Oxysporum Volatiles Enhance Plant Growth Via Affecting Auxin Transport and Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bitas, Vasileios; McCartney, Nathaniel; Li, Ningxiao; Demers, Jill; Kim, Jung-Eun; Kim, Hye-Seon; Brown, Kathleen M; Kang, Seogchan

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have well-documented roles in plant-plant communication and directing animal behavior. In this study, we examine the less understood roles of VOCs in plant-fungal relationships. Phylogenetically and ecologically diverse strains of Fusarium oxysporum, a fungal species complex that often resides in the rhizosphere of assorted plants, produce volatile compounds that augment shoot and root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco. Growth responses of A. thaliana hormone signaling mutants and expression patterns of a GUS reporter gene under the auxin-responsive DR5 promoter supported the involvement of auxin signaling in F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement. In addition, 1-naphthylthalamic acid, an inhibitor of auxin efflux, negated F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement in both plants. Comparison of the profiles of volatile compounds produced by F. oxysporum strains that differentially affected plant growth suggests that the relative compositions of both growth inhibitory and stimulatory compounds may determine the degree of plant growth enhancement. Volatile-mediated signaling between fungi and plants may represent a potentially conserved, yet mostly overlooked, mechanism underpinning plant-fungus interactions and fungal niche adaption. PMID:26617587

  8. Fusarium Oxysporum Volatiles Enhance Plant Growth Via Affecting Auxin Transport and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bitas, Vasileios; McCartney, Nathaniel; Li, Ningxiao; Demers, Jill; Kim, Jung-Eun; Kim, Hye-Seon; Brown, Kathleen M.; Kang, Seogchan

    2015-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have well-documented roles in plant-plant communication and directing animal behavior. In this study, we examine the less understood roles of VOCs in plant-fungal relationships. Phylogenetically and ecologically diverse strains of Fusarium oxysporum, a fungal species complex that often resides in the rhizosphere of assorted plants, produce volatile compounds that augment shoot and root growth of Arabidopsis thaliana and tobacco. Growth responses of A. thaliana hormone signaling mutants and expression patterns of a GUS reporter gene under the auxin-responsive DR5 promoter supported the involvement of auxin signaling in F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement. In addition, 1-naphthylthalamic acid, an inhibitor of auxin efflux, negated F. oxysporum volatile-mediated growth enhancement in both plants. Comparison of the profiles of volatile compounds produced by F. oxysporum strains that differentially affected plant growth suggests that the relative compositions of both growth inhibitory and stimulatory compounds may determine the degree of plant growth enhancement. Volatile-mediated signaling between fungi and plants may represent a potentially conserved, yet mostly overlooked, mechanism underpinning plant-fungus interactions and fungal niche adaption. PMID:26617587

  9. ARF6-mediated endosomal transport of Telencephalin affects dendritic filopodia-to-spine maturation

    PubMed Central

    Raemaekers, Tim; Peric, Aleksandar; Baatsen, Pieter; Sannerud, Ragna; Declerck, Ilse; Baert, Veerle; Michiels, Christine; Annaert, Wim

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic filopodia are dynamic structures thought to be the precursors of spines during synapse development. Morphological maturation to spines is associated with the stabilization and strengthening of synapses, and can be altered in various neurological disorders. Telencephalin (TLN/intercellular adhesion molecule-5 (ICAM5)) localizes to dendritic filopodia, where it facilitates their formation/maintenance, thereby slowing spine morphogenesis. As spines are largely devoid of TLN, its exclusion from the filopodia surface appears to be required in this maturation process. Using HeLa cells and primary hippocampal neurons, we demonstrate that surface removal of TLN involves internalization events mediated by the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6), and its activator EFA6A. This endocytosis of TLN affects filopodia-to-spine transition, and requires Rac1-mediated dephosphorylation/release of actin-binding ERM proteins from TLN. At the somato-dendritic surface, TLN and EFA6A are confined to distinct, flotillin-positive membrane subdomains. The co-distribution of TLN with this lipid raft marker also persists during its endosomal targeting to CD63-positive late endosomes. This suggests a specific microenvironment facilitating ARF6-mediated mobilization of TLN that contributes to promotion of dendritic spine development. PMID:22781129

  10. H2O2-Induced Oxidative Stress Affects SO4= Transport in Human Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Rossana; Romano, Orazio; La Spada, Giuseppa; Marino, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to verify the effect of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on SO4= uptake through Band 3 protein, responsible for Cl-/HCO3- as well as for cell membrane deformability, due to its cross link with cytoskeletal proteins. The role of cytoplasmic proteins binding to Band 3 protein has been also considered by assaying H2O2 effects on hemoglobin-free resealed ghosts of erythrocytes. Oxidative conditions were induced by 30 min exposure of human erythrocytes to different H2O2 concentrations (10 to 300 μM), with or without GSH (glutathione, 2 mM) or curcumin (10 μM), compounds with proved antioxidant properties. Since SO4= influx through Band 3 protein is slower and better controllable than Cl- or HCO3- exchange, the rate constant for SO4= uptake was measured to prove anion transport efficiency, while MDA (malondialdehyde) levels and -SH groups were estimated to quantify the effect of oxidative stress. H2O2 induced a significant decrease in rate constant for SO4= uptake at both 100 and 300 μM H2O2. This reduction, observed in erythrocytes but not in resealed ghosts and associated to increase in neither MDA levels nor in -SH groups, was impaired by both curcumin and GSH, whereas only curcumin effectively restored H2O2-induced changes in erythrocytes shape. Our results show that: i) 30 min exposure to 300 μM H2O2 reduced SO4= uptake in human erythrocytes; ii) oxidative damage was revealed by the reduction in rate constant for SO4= uptake, but not by MDA or -SH groups levels; iii) the damage was produced via cytoplasmic components which cross link with Band 3 protein; iv) the natural antioxidant curcumin may be useful in protecting erythrocytes from oxidative injury; v) SO4= uptake through Band 3 protein may be reasonably suggested as a tool to monitor erythrocytes function under oxidative conditions possibly deriving from alcohol consumption, use of drugs, radiographic contrast media administration, hyperglicemia or neurodegenerative

  11. H2O2-Induced Oxidative Stress Affects SO4= Transport in Human Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Morabito, Rossana; Romano, Orazio; La Spada, Giuseppa; Marino, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to verify the effect of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on SO4= uptake through Band 3 protein, responsible for Cl-/HCO3- as well as for cell membrane deformability, due to its cross link with cytoskeletal proteins. The role of cytoplasmic proteins binding to Band 3 protein has been also considered by assaying H2O2 effects on hemoglobin-free resealed ghosts of erythrocytes. Oxidative conditions were induced by 30 min exposure of human erythrocytes to different H2O2 concentrations (10 to 300 μM), with or without GSH (glutathione, 2 mM) or curcumin (10 μM), compounds with proved antioxidant properties. Since SO4= influx through Band 3 protein is slower and better controllable than Cl- or HCO3- exchange, the rate constant for SO4= uptake was measured to prove anion transport efficiency, while MDA (malondialdehyde) levels and –SH groups were estimated to quantify the effect of oxidative stress. H2O2 induced a significant decrease in rate constant for SO4= uptake at both 100 and 300 μM H2O2. This reduction, observed in erythrocytes but not in resealed ghosts and associated to increase in neither MDA levels nor in –SH groups, was impaired by both curcumin and GSH, whereas only curcumin effectively restored H2O2-induced changes in erythrocytes shape. Our results show that: i) 30 min exposure to 300 μM H2O2 reduced SO4= uptake in human erythrocytes; ii) oxidative damage was revealed by the reduction in rate constant for SO4= uptake, but not by MDA or –SH groups levels; iii) the damage was produced via cytoplasmic components which cross link with Band 3 protein; iv) the natural antioxidant curcumin may be useful in protecting erythrocytes from oxidative injury; v) SO4= uptake through Band 3 protein may be reasonably suggested as a tool to monitor erythrocytes function under oxidative conditions possibly deriving from alcohol consumption, use of drugs, radiographic contrast media administration, hyperglicemia or

  12. H2O2-Induced Oxidative Stress Affects SO4= Transport in Human Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Rossana; Romano, Orazio; La Spada, Giuseppa; Marino, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to verify the effect of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on SO4= uptake through Band 3 protein, responsible for Cl-/HCO3- as well as for cell membrane deformability, due to its cross link with cytoskeletal proteins. The role of cytoplasmic proteins binding to Band 3 protein has been also considered by assaying H2O2 effects on hemoglobin-free resealed ghosts of erythrocytes. Oxidative conditions were induced by 30 min exposure of human erythrocytes to different H2O2 concentrations (10 to 300 μM), with or without GSH (glutathione, 2 mM) or curcumin (10 μM), compounds with proved antioxidant properties. Since SO4= influx through Band 3 protein is slower and better controllable than Cl- or HCO3- exchange, the rate constant for SO4= uptake was measured to prove anion transport efficiency, while MDA (malondialdehyde) levels and -SH groups were estimated to quantify the effect of oxidative stress. H2O2 induced a significant decrease in rate constant for SO4= uptake at both 100 and 300 μM H2O2. This reduction, observed in erythrocytes but not in resealed ghosts and associated to increase in neither MDA levels nor in -SH groups, was impaired by both curcumin and GSH, whereas only curcumin effectively restored H2O2-induced changes in erythrocytes shape. Our results show that: i) 30 min exposure to 300 μM H2O2 reduced SO4= uptake in human erythrocytes; ii) oxidative damage was revealed by the reduction in rate constant for SO4= uptake, but not by MDA or -SH groups levels; iii) the damage was produced via cytoplasmic components which cross link with Band 3 protein; iv) the natural antioxidant curcumin may be useful in protecting erythrocytes from oxidative injury; v) SO4= uptake through Band 3 protein may be reasonably suggested as a tool to monitor erythrocytes function under oxidative conditions possibly deriving from alcohol consumption, use of drugs, radiographic contrast media administration, hyperglicemia or neurodegenerative

  13. Spatial and intertemporal arbitrage in the California natural gas transportation and storage network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uria Martinez, Rocio

    Intertemporal and spatial price differentials should provide the necessary signals to allocate a commodity efficiently inside a network. This dissertation investigates the extent to which decisions in the California natural gas transportation and storage system are taken with an eye on arbitrage opportunities. Daily data about flows into and out of storage facilities in California over 2002-2006 and daily spreads on the NYMEX futures market are used to investigate whether the injection profile is consistent with the "supply-of-storage" curve first observed by Working for wheat. Spatial price differentials between California and producing regions fluctuate throughout the year, even though spot prices at trading hubs across North America are highly correlated. In an analysis of "residual supply", gas volumes directed to California are examined for the influence of those fluctuations in locational differentials. Daily storage decisions in California do seem to be influenced by a daily price signal that combines the intertemporal spread and the locational basis between California and the Henry Hub, in addition to strong seasonal and weekly cycles. The timing and magnitude of the response differs across storage facilities depending on the regulatory requirements they face and the type of customers they serve. In contrast, deviations in spatial price differentials from the levels dictated by relative seasonality in California versus competing regions do not trigger significant reallocations of flows into California. Available data for estimation of both the supply-of-storage and residual-supply curves aggregate the behavior of many individuals whose motivations and attentiveness to prices vary. The resulting inventory and flow profiles differ from those that a social planner would choose to minimize operating costs throughout the network. Such optimal allocation is deduced from a quadratic programming model, calibrated to 2004-2005, that acknowledges relative seasonality

  14. Vapour transport of rare earth elements (REE) in volcanic gas: Evidence from encrustations at Oldoinyo Lengai

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, C. D.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2008-10-01

    Fumarolic encrustations and natrocarbonatite lava from the active crater of Oldoinyo Lengai volcano, Tanzania, were sampled and analysed. Two types of encrustation were distinguished on the basis of their REE content, enriched (~ 2800-5600 × [REE chondrite]) and depleted (~ 100-200 × [REE chondrite]) relative to natrocarbonatite (1700-1900 × [REE chondrite]. REE-enriched encrustations line the walls of actively degassing fumaroles, whereas REE-depleted encrustations occur mainly along cracks in and as crusts on cooling natrocarbonatite lava flows; one of the low REE encrustation samples was a stalactite from the wall of a possible fumarole. The encrustations are interpreted to have different origins, the former precipitating from volcanic gas and the latter from meteoric/ground water converted to steam by the heat of the overlying lava flow(s). REE-profiles of encrustations and natrocarbonatite are parallel, suggesting that there was no preferential mobilization of specific REE by either volcanic vapour or meteoric water vapour. The elevated REE-content of the first group of encrustations suggests that direct REE-transport from natrocarbonatite to volcanic vapour is possible. The REE trends observed in samples precipitating directly from the volcanic vapour cannot be explained by dry volatility based on the available data as there is no evidence in the encrustation compositions of the greatly enhanced volatility predicted for Yb and Eu. The observed extreme REE-fractionation with steep La/Sm slopes parallel to those of the natrocarbonatite reflects solvation and complexation reactions in the vapour phase that did not discriminate amongst the different REE or similar transport of REE in both the natrocarbonatite magma and its exsolving vapour. The low concentrations of REE in the encrustations produced by meteoric vapour suggest that the temperature was too low or that this vapour did not contain the ligands necessary to permit significant mobilization of the REE.

  15. Microstructural analysis of mass transport phenomena in gas diffusion media for high current density operation in PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotaka, Toshikazu; Tabuchi, Yuichiro; Mukherjee, Partha P.

    2015-04-01

    Cost reduction is a key issue for commercialization of fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). High current density operation is a solution pathway. In order to realize high current density operation, it is necessary to reduce mass transport resistance in the gas diffusion media commonly consisted of gas diffusion layer (GDL) and micro porous layer (MPL). However, fundamental understanding of the underlying mass transport phenomena in the porous components is not only critical but also not fully understood yet due to the inherent microstructural complexity. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of electron and oxygen transport in the GDL and MPL is conducted experimentally and numerically with three-dimensional (3D) microstructural data to reveal the structure-transport relationship. The results reveal that the mass transport in the GDL is strongly dependent on the local microstructural variations, such as local pore/solid volume fractions and connectivity. However, especially in the case of the electrical conductivity of MPL, the contact resistance between carbon particles is the dominant factor. This suggests that reducing the contact resistance between carbon particles and/or the number of contact points along the transport pathway can improve the electrical conductivity of MPL.

  16. Poly-use multi-level sampling system for soil-gas transport analysis in the vadose zone.

    PubMed

    Nauer, Philipp A; Chiri, Eleonora; Schroth, Martin H

    2013-10-01

    Soil-gas turnover is important in the global cycling of greenhouse gases. The analysis of soil-gas profiles provides quantitative information on below-ground turnover and fluxes. We developed a poly-use multi-level sampling system (PMLS) for soil-gas sampling, water-content and temperature measurement with high depth resolution and minimal soil disturbance. It is based on perforated access tubes (ATs) permanently installed in the soil. A multi-level sampler allows extraction of soil-gas samples from 20 locations within 1 m depth, while a capacitance probe is used to measure volumetric water contents. During idle times, the ATs are sealed and can be equipped with temperature sensors. Proof-of-concept experiments in a field lysimeter showed good agreement of soil-gas samples and water-content measurements compared with conventional techniques, while a successfully performed gas-tracer test demonstrated the feasibility of the PMLS to determine soil-gas diffusion coefficients in situ. A field application of the PMLS to quantify oxidation of atmospheric CH4 in a field lysimeter and in the forefield of a receding glacier yielded activity coefficients and soil-atmosphere fluxes well in agreement with previous studies. With numerous options for customization, the presented tool extends the methodological choices to investigate soil-gas transport in the vadose zone. PMID:23962070

  17. Poly-use multi-level sampling system for soil-gas transport analysis in the vadose zone.

    PubMed

    Nauer, Philipp A; Chiri, Eleonora; Schroth, Martin H

    2013-10-01

    Soil-gas turnover is important in the global cycling of greenhouse gases. The analysis of soil-gas profiles provides quantitative information on below-ground turnover and fluxes. We developed a poly-use multi-level sampling system (PMLS) for soil-gas sampling, water-content and temperature measurement with high depth resolution and minimal soil disturbance. It is based on perforated access tubes (ATs) permanently installed in the soil. A multi-level sampler allows extraction of soil-gas samples from 20 locations within 1 m depth, while a capacitance probe is used to measure volumetric water contents. During idle times, the ATs are sealed and can be equipped with temperature sensors. Proof-of-concept experiments in a field lysimeter showed good agreement of soil-gas samples and water-content measurements compared with conventional techniques, while a successfully performed gas-tracer test demonstrated the feasibility of the PMLS to determine soil-gas diffusion coefficients in situ. A field application of the PMLS to quantify oxidation of atmospheric CH4 in a field lysimeter and in the forefield of a receding glacier yielded activity coefficients and soil-atmosphere fluxes well in agreement with previous studies. With numerous options for customization, the presented tool extends the methodological choices to investigate soil-gas transport in the vadose zone.

  18. Gas bubble transport and emissions for shallow peat from a northern peatland: The role of pressure changes and peat structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Slater, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Gas bubbles are an important pathway for methane release from peatlands. The mechanisms controlling gas bubble transport and emissions in peat remain uncertain. The effects of hydrostatic pressure and peat structure on the dynamics of gas bubbles in shallow peat were therefore tested in laboratory experiments. A peat monolith was retrieved from a raised bog and maintained in a saturated state. Three distinct layers were identified from noninvasive permittivity measurements supported by soil physical properties (porosity, bulk density). Phase I of the experiment involved monitoring for the accumulation of gas bubbles under steady pressure and temperature conditions. The data showed evidence for gas bubbles being impeded by a shallow semiconfining layer at depths between 10 and 15 cm. Visible gas bubbles observed on the side of the sample box were recorded over time to estimate changes in the vertical distribution of volumetric gas content. Porosity estimates derived using the Complex Refraction Index Model (CRIM) suggest that gas bubbles enlarge the pore space when the exerted pressure is high enough. Phase II involved triggering release of trapped bubbles by repeatedly increasing and decreasing hydrostatic pressure in an oversaturated condition. Comparison of changes in pressure head and methane density in the head space confirmed that the increasing buoyancy force during drops in pressure is more important for triggering ebullition than increasing mobility during increases in pressure. Our findings demonstrate the importance of changes in hydrostatic pressure on bubble size and variations in resistance of the peat fabric in regulating methane releases from peatlands.

  19. Correlation between gas compositions and physical phenomena affecting the reservoir fluid in Palinpinon geothermal field (Philippines)

    SciTech Connect

    D'More F.; Nuti, S.; Ruaya, J.R.; Ramos-Candelaria, M.N.; Seastres, J.S.

    1993-01-28

    Using thermodynamic gas equilibria to calculate temperature and steam fraction in the reservoir, three main physical phenomena due to exploitation of Palinpinon field are identified. 1) Pressure drawdown producing a local increase in the computed steam fraction, with the fluid maintaining high temperature values (close to 300°C). Strong decline in flow rate is observed. 2) Irreversible steam losses from the original high temperature liquid phase during its ascent through fractures in upper zones of the reservoir. Steam is generally lost at temperatures (e.g. 240°C) lower then those of the original aquifer. 3) Dilution and cooling effects due to reinjection fluid returns. These are function of the local geostructural conditions linking through fractures the injectors and production wells. The computed fraction of the recovered reinjected brine can in some case exceed 80% of the total produced fluid. At the same time the computed gas equilibration temperatures can decline from 280-300°C to as low as 215-220°C. Comparing these values with the well bottom measured temperatures, the proposed methodology based on gas chemistry gives more reliable temperature estimate than water chemistry based geothermometers for fluids with high fractions of injected brine.

  20. Research note: Postnatal development of electrolyte transport in calf rumen as affected by weaning time.

    PubMed

    Breves, G; Zitnan, R; Schröder, B; Winckler, C; Hagemeister, H; Failing, K; Voigt, J

    2002-10-01

    In a previous study we found a positive correlation between early weaning in calves and morphological parameters which were indicative of ruminal development, i.e. the length and width of the papillae. The objective of the present study was to determine to what extent this observation could be reflected by modulations of absorptive and secretory functions of the rumen mucosa. For this purpose the short-circuit currents (Isc) as a measure of electrogenic net ion fluxes and the transepithelial conductances (G(T)) as a measure of the overall tissue permeability were measured in vitro applying the Ussing-chamber technique. Simultaneously, the unidirectional flux rates of sodium and chloride across rumen wall epithelia were determined in the absence of electrochemical gradients. Under these conditions, significant positive net flux rates (Jnet) clearly indicate active mechanisms for electrolyte absorption. For the experiments 12 male Holstein calves 7 d of age were assigned to three groups of 4 animals each: milk group (I, slaughtered after 6 weeks of age), late weaning group (II, slaughtered after 9 weeks of age) and early weaning group (II, weaned after 6 weeks of age and slaughtered after 9 weeks of age). Whereas G(T) values remained unaffected by different age and feeding, Isc values were significantly affected by early weaning but were not influenced by age. Irrespective of weaning time active absorption of Na+ tended to be higher by about 60% in 9 weeks old animals. Active absorption of chloride was significantly increased in milk fed 9 weeke old calves and this effect was further stimulated by early weaning. In conclusion, the data show an increasing active Na+ absorption with age in calf rumen that could not be influenced by early weaning. Similarly, active Cl- absorption was initially increased during postnatal development and this effect could be stimulated further by early weaning.

  1. Groundwater contributions to metal transport in a small river affected by mining and smelting waste.

    PubMed

    Coynel, Alexandra; Schäfer, Jörg; Dabrin, Aymeric; Girardot, Naïg; Blanc, Gérard

    2007-08-01

    The Riou Mort watershed, strongly affected by former coal mining and Zn ore treatment, has been the major source of the historical polymetallic pollution of the Lot-Garonne-Gironde fluvial-estuarine system. Two decades after the end of ore treatment, the former industrial area still contributes important amounts of metals/metalloids from various, partly unidentified, sources to the downstream river system. This study presents the high spatial variability of metal/metalloid (Cd, Zn, As, Sb, U, V) concentrations in water and suspended particulate matter (SPM) from eight observation sites during a short, intense flood event. Despite important dilution effects, the observed concentration levels at the different sites suggested additional Cd and Zn inputs, probably from polluted groundwater. This formerly unknown metal source was then localized and characterized by sampling water and SPM along two longitudinal profiles during different hydrological situations. Groundwater inputs of "truly dissolved" (<0.02 microm) Cd and Zn occurred along approximately 200 m, contributing 43% and 28% to the total annual (2004) Cd and Zn fluxes in the Riou Mort River. The estimated groundwater concentrations of Cd and Zn (2500-6700 and 83,000-170,000 microg l(-1), respectively) in the source zone were consistent with values measured in samples from the near aquifer (5400-13,000 and 200,000-400,000 microg l(-1)). The present work induced concrete remediation actions (pumping and treatment of the polluted groundwater), that are expected to strongly reduce dissolved Cd and Zn emissions into the Riou Mort River.

  2. How dykes affect groundwater transport in the northern part of the Oslo Graben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsen, K. H.; Sydnes, M.; Gudmundsson, A.; Larsen, B. T.

    2003-04-01

    In many regions, thick and massif dykes, particularly those of dense basalt of low matrix permeability, are known to be barriers to transverse flow of groundwater. Other thick dykes, however, form in many magma injections, each of which may develop horizontal columnar joints on solidification. These dykes may be relatively permeable because of the columnar joints, and the same applies to many thin dykes. In some dykes, however, the columnar joints are partly, or entirely, filled with secondary minerals, in which case even thin dykes may be barriers to transverse groundwater flow. Because the dyke rock (e.g., basalt) has commonly very different mechanical properties from that of the host rock (granite, gneiss, sedimentary and pyroclastic rocks), stresses tend to concentrate at the contacts between dykes and host rocks and generate groundwater conduits. Thus, even those dykes that are barriers to transverse groundwater flow may be good conduits of dyke-parallel flow. In many areas, for example in Iceland and Tenerife (Canary Islands), dykes collect groundwater and may transport it over long distances. To explore the effects of dykes on groundwater flow in Norway, we made a study of nearly 300 dykes near Gran, in the northern and western part of the Oslo Graben in Southeast Norway. This is a NNE-trending 220 km long and 40-60 km wide graben which was active for approximately 60 Ma, from 305 Ma to 245 Ma. The graben is located in Precambrian basement rocks, mostly consisting of granites, gneisses and metasediments. In the area of Gran, however, the host rock consists primarily of shales, limestones and sandstones. Normal water yields in wells drilled in such rock types in Norway are between 300-5000 l/h, and the normal drill depth lies between 50-150 m. At Gran the depths of the wells range between 20-180 meters and the water yield ranges between 200-10000 l/h. The water in the area has a pH-value of approximately 7.3, which is good drinking water, the norm being 6

  3. Movement of NH₃ through the human urea transporter B: a new gas channel.

    PubMed

    Geyer, R Ryan; Musa-Aziz, Raif; Enkavi, Giray; Mahinthichaichan, P; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Boron, Walter F

    2013-06-15

    Aquaporins and Rh proteins can function as gas (CO₂ and NH₃) channels. The present study explores the urea, H₂O, CO₂, and NH₃ permeability of the human urea transporter B (UT-B) (SLC14A1), expressed in Xenopus oocytes. We monitored urea uptake using [¹⁴C]urea and measured osmotic water permeability (Pf) using video microscopy. To obtain a semiquantitative measure of gas permeability, we used microelectrodes to record the maximum transient change in surface pH (ΔpHS) caused by exposing oocytes to 5% CO₂/33 mM HCO₃⁻ (pHS increase) or 0.5 mM NH₃/NH₄⁺ (pHS decrease). UT-B expression increased oocyte permeability to urea by >20-fold, and Pf by 8-fold vs. H₂O-injected control oocytes. UT-B expression had no effect on the CO₂-induced ΔpHS but doubled the NH₃-induced ΔpHS. Phloretin reduced UT-B-dependent urea uptake (Jurea*) by 45%, Pf* by 50%, and (- ΔpHS*)NH₃ by 70%. p-Chloromercuribenzene sulfonate reduced Jurea* by 25%, Pf* by 30%, and (ΔpHS*)NH₃ by 100%. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of membrane-embedded models of UT-B identified the monomeric UT-B pores as the main conduction pathway for both H₂O and NH₃ and characterized the energetics associated with permeation of these species through the channel. Mutating each of two conserved threonines lining the monomeric urea pores reduced H₂O and NH₃ permeability. Our data confirm that UT-B has significant H₂O permeability and for the first time demonstrate significant NH₃ permeability. Thus the UTs become the third family of gas channels. Inhibitor and mutagenesis studies and results of MD simulations suggest that NH₃ and H₂O pass through the three monomeric urea channels in UT-B. PMID:23552862

  4. Movement of NH3 through the human urea transporter B: a new gas channel

    PubMed Central

    Musa-Aziz, Raif; Enkavi, Giray; Mahinthichaichan, P.; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Boron, Walter F.

    2013-01-01

    Aquaporins and Rh proteins can function as gas (CO2 and NH3) channels. The present study explores the urea, H2O, CO2, and NH3 permeability of the human urea transporter B (UT-B) (SLC14A1), expressed in Xenopus oocytes. We monitored urea uptake using [14C]urea and measured osmotic water permeability (Pf) using video microscopy. To obtain a semiquantitative measure of gas permeability, we used microelectrodes to record the maximum transient change in surface pH (ΔpHS) caused by exposing oocytes to 5% CO2/33 mM HCO3− (pHS increase) or 0.5 mM NH3/NH4+ (pHS decrease). UT-B expression increased oocyte permeability to urea by >20-fold, and Pf by 8-fold vs. H2O-injected control oocytes. UT-B expression had no effect on the CO2-induced ΔpHS but doubled the NH3-induced ΔpHS. Phloretin reduced UT-B-dependent urea uptake (Jurea*) by 45%, Pf* by 50%, and (−ΔpHS*)NH3 by 70%. p-Chloromercuribenzene sulfonate reduced Jurea* by 25%, Pf* by 30%, and (ΔpHS*)NH3 by 100%. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of membrane-embedded models of UT-B identified the monomeric UT-B pores as the main conduction pathway for both H2O and NH3 and characterized the energetics associated with permeation of these species through the channel. Mutating each of two conserved threonines lining the monomeric urea pores reduced H2O and NH3 permeability. Our data confirm that UT-B has significant H2O permeability and for the first time demonstrate significant NH3 permeability. Thus the UTs become the third family of gas channels. Inhibitor and mutagenesis studies and results of MD simulations suggest that NH3 and H2O pass through the three monomeric urea channels in UT-B. PMID:23552862

  5. An experimental trace gas investigation of fluid transport and mixing in a circular-to-rectangular transition duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reichert, B. A.; Hingst, W. R.; Okiishi, T. H.

    1991-01-01

    An ethylene trace gas technique was used to map out fluid transport and mixing within a circular to rectangular transition duct. Ethylene gas was injected at several points in a cross stream plane upstream of the transition duct. Ethylene concentration contours were determined at several cross stream measurement planes spaced axially within the duct. The flow involved a uniform inlet flow at a Mach number level of 0.5. Statistical analyses were used to quantitatively interpret the trace gas results. Also, trace gas data were considered along with aerodynamic and surface flow visualization results to ascertain transition duct flow phenomena. Convection of wall boundary layer fluid by vortices produced regions of high total pressure loss in the duct. The physical extent of these high loss regions is governed by turbulent diffusion.

  6. Electrification of the transportation sector offers limited country-wide greenhouse gas reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinrenken, Christoph J.; Lackner, Klaus S.

    2014-03-01

    Compared with conventional propulsion, plugin and hybrid vehicles may offer reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, regional air/noise pollution, petroleum dependence, and ownership cost. Comparing only plugins and hybrids amongst themselves, and focusing on GHG, relative merits of different options have been shown to be more nuanced, depending on grid-carbon-intensity, range and thus battery manufacturing and weight, and trip patterns. We present a life-cycle framework to compare GHG emissions for three drivetrains (plugin-electricity-only, gasoline-only-hybrid, and plugin-hybrid) across driving ranges and grid-carbon-intensities, for passenger cars, vans, buses, or trucks (well-to-wheel plus storage manufacturing). Parameter and model uncertainties are quantified via sensitivity analyses. We find that owing to the interplay of range, GHG/km, and portions of country-wide kms accessible to electrification, GHG reductions achievable from plugins (whether electricity-only or hybrids) are limited even when assuming low-carbon future grids. Furthermore, for policy makers considering GHG from electricity and transportation sectors combined, plugin technology may in fact increase GHG compared to gasoline-only-hybrids, regardless of grid-carbon-intensity.

  7. Bulk, surface, and gas-phase limited water transport in aerosol.

    PubMed

    Davies, James F; Haddrell, Allen E; Miles, Rachael E H; Bull, Craig R; Reid, Jonathan P

    2012-11-15

    The influence of solute species on mass transfer to and from aqueous aerosol droplets is investigated using an electrodynamic balance coupled with light scattering techniques. In particular, we explore the limitations imposed on water evaporation by slow bulk phase diffusion and by the formation of surface organic films. Measurements of evaporation from ionic salt solutions, specifically sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate, are compared with predictions from an analytical model framework, highlighting the uncertainties associated with quantifying gas diffusional transport. The influence of low solubility organic acids on mass transfer is reported and compared to both model predictions and previous work. The limiting value of the evaporation coefficient that can be resolved by this approach, when uncertainties in key thermophysical quantities are accounted for, is estimated. The limitation of slow bulk phase diffusion on the evaporation rate is investigated for gel and glass states formed during the evaporation of magnesium sulfate and sucrose droplets, respectively. Finally, the effect of surfactants on evaporation has been probed, with soluble surfactants (such as sodium dodecyl sulfate) leading to little or no retardation of evaporation through slowing of surface layer kinetics. PMID:23095147

  8. Transport Properties of He-N{sub 2} Binary Gas Mixtures for CBC Space Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tournier, Jean-Michel P.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2008-01-21

    In order to reduce the size and mass of the single-shaft turbo-machines, with little impact on the size of the heat transfer components in the CBC loop, He-Xe binary mixture with a molecular weight of 40 g/mole has been the working fluid of choice in space nuclear reactor power systems with Close Brayton Cycle (CBC) for energy conversion. This working fluid is also a suitable coolant for the fission reactors heat source designed with fast neutron energy spectra. For space nuclear reactors with thermal neutron energy spectra, however, the high capture neutron cross-section of Xe will reduce the beginning-of-life excess reactivity of the reactor, decreasing its effective operation lifetime. In addition, the neutron activation of Xe in the reactor will introduce a radioactivity source term in the CBC loop. Alternative working fluids with no activation concerns and comparable performance are N{sub 2} and the binary mixtures of He-N{sub 2}. This paper calculates the transport properties of these working fluids and compares their values to those of noble gas binary mixtures at the temperatures and pressures expected in CBC space reactor power system applications. Also investigated is the impact of using these working fluids on the pressure losses, heat transfer coefficient, and the aerodynamic loading of the blades in the CBC turbo-machines.

  9. Zebrafish ift57, ift88, and ift172 intraflagellar transport mutants disrupt cilia but do not affect hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Lunt, Shannon C; Haynes, Tony; Perkins, Brian D

    2009-07-01

    Cilia formation requires intraflagellar transport (IFT) proteins. Recent studies indicate that mammalian Hedgehog (Hh) signaling requires cilia. It is unclear, however, if the requirement for cilia and IFT proteins in Hh signaling represents a general rule for all vertebrates. Here we examine zebrafish ift57, ift88, and ift172 mutants and morphants for defects in Hh signaling. Although ift57 and ift88 mutants and morphants contained residual maternal protein, the cilia were disrupted. In contrast to previous genetic studies in mouse, mutations in zebrafish IFT genes did not affect the expression of Hh target genes in the neural tube and forebrain and had no quantitative effect on Hh target gene expression. Zebrafish IFT mutants also exhibited no dramatic changes in the craniofacial skeleton, somite formation, or motor neuron patterning. Thus, our data indicate the requirement for cilia in the Hh signal transduction pathway may not represent a universal mechanism in vertebrates.

  10. A study of the physical-chemical mechanisms and variables which affect the transport of inorganic and organic heterogeneous systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.A.; Zeltner, W.A.

    1990-07-01

    In order to model transport of dissolved ions in subsurface environments, one should understand how these ions interact with solid phase adsorbents. Our primary goal has been investigating the reaction mechanisms which affect microcontaminant partitioning between aqueous solutions and solid phase adsorbents, using goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) as a model adsorbent. Cylindrical internal reflection -- Fourier transform infrared (CIR-FTIR) spectroscopy has been developed as the primary technique for this study. Wet chemical adsorption studies, acoustophoresis and electrophoretic mobility have been used to obtain supporting information as needed. Phenol and o-nitrophenol did not adsorb to goethite. Benzoate, phthalate and p-hydroxybenzoate all adsorbed via a bidentate mechanism to two adjacent iron atoms, while salicylate and 2,4-dihydroxybenzoate formed a chelate complex to single iron atoms. Phosphate adsorption was predominately bidentate.

  11. Ammonia Gas Transport and Reactions in Unsaturated Sediments: Implications for Use as an Amendment to Immobilize Inorganic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Lirong; Szecsody, James E.; Truex, Michael J.; Williams, Mark D.; Liu, Yuanyuan

    2015-05-01

    Use of gas-phase amendments for in situ remediation of inorganic contaminants in unsaturated sediments of the vadose zone may be advantageous, but there has been limited development and testing of gas remediation technologies. Treatment with ammonia gas has been studied and has a potential for use in treating inorganic contaminants such as uranium because it induces a high pore-water pH causing mineral dissolution and subsequent formation of stable precipitates that decrease the mobility of some contaminants. For field application, knowledge of ammonia transport and the geochemical reactions induced by ammonia is needed. Laboratory studies were conducted to support calculations needed for field treatment design, to quantify advective and diffusive ammonia transport in unsaturated sediments, to evaluate reactions among gas, sediment, and water, and to study reaction-induced pore-water chemistry changes as a function of ammonia delivery conditions. Ammonia gas quickly partitions into sediment pore water and increases pH up to 13.2. Injected ammonia gas front movement can be reasonably predicted by gas flow rate and equilibrium partitioning. The ammonia gas diffusion rate is a function of the water content in the sediment. Measured diffusion front movement was 0.05, 0.03, and 0.02 cm/hr. in sediments with 2.0%, 8.7%, and 13.0% water content, respectively. Sodium, aluminum, and silica pore-water concentrations increase on exposure to ammonia and then decline as aluminosilicates precipitate with declining pH. When uranium is present in the sediment and pore water, up to 85% of the water-leachable uranium was immobilized by ammonia treatment.

  12. The cyclophilin A DIAGEOTROPICA gene affects auxin transport in both root and shoot to control lateral root formation.

    PubMed

    Ivanchenko, Maria G; Zhu, Jinsheng; Wang, Bangjun; Medvecká, Eva; Du, Yunlong; Azzarello, Elisa; Mancuso, Stefano; Megraw, Molly; Filichkin, Sergei; Dubrovsky, Joseph G; Friml, Jiří; Geisler, Markus

    2015-02-15

    Cyclophilin A is a conserved peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) best known as the cellular receptor of the immunosuppressant cyclosporine A. Despite significant effort, evidence of developmental functions of cyclophilin A in non-plant systems has remained obscure. Mutations in a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cyclophilin A ortholog, DIAGEOTROPICA (DGT), have been shown to abolish the organogenesis of lateral roots; however, a mechanistic explanation of the phenotype is lacking. Here, we show that the dgt mutant lacks auxin maxima relevant to priming and specification of lateral root founder cells. DGT is expressed in shoot and root, and localizes to both the nucleus and cytoplasm during lateral root organogenesis. Mutation of ENTIRE/IAA9, a member of the auxin-responsive Aux/IAA protein family of transcriptional repressors, partially restores the inability of dgt to initiate lateral root primordia but not the primordia outgrowth. By comparison, grafting of a wild-type scion restores the process of lateral root formation, consistent with participation of a mobile signal. Antibodies do not detect movement of the DGT protein into the dgt rootstock; however, experiments with radiolabeled auxin and an auxin-specific microelectrode demonstrate abnormal auxin fluxes. Functional studies of DGT in heterologous yeast and tobacco-leaf auxin-transport systems demonstrate that DGT negatively regulates PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux transporters by affecting their plasma membrane localization. Studies in tomato support complex effects of the dgt mutation on PIN expression level, expression domain and plasma membrane localization. Our data demonstrate that DGT regulates auxin transport in lateral root formation.

  13. Assessing factors affecting the thermal properties of a passive thermal refuge using three-dimensional hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Decker, Jeremy D.; Swain, Eric D.; Stith, Bradley M.; Langtimm, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Everglades restoration activities may cause changes to temperature and salinity stratification at the Port of the Islands (POI) marina, which could affect its suitability as a cold weather refuge for manatees. To better understand how the Picayune Strand Restoration Project (PSRP) may alter this important resource in Collier County in southwestern Florida, the USGS has developed a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the marina and canal system at POI. Empirical data suggest that manatees aggregate at the site during winter because of thermal inversions that provide warmer water near the bottom that appears to only occur in the presence of salinity stratification. To study these phenomena, the environmental fluid dynamics code simulator was used to represent temperature and salinity transport within POI. Boundary inputs were generated using a larger two-dimensional model constructed with the flow and transport in a linked overland-aquifer density-dependent system simulator. Model results for a representative winter period match observed trends in salinity and temperature fluctuations and produce temperature inversions similar to observed values. Modified boundary conditions, representing proposed PSRP alterations, were also tested to examine the possible effect on the salinity stratification and temperature inversion within POI. Results show that during some periods, salinity stratification is reduced resulting in a subsequent reduction in temperature inversion compared with the existing conditions simulation. This may have an effect on POI’s suitability as a passive thermal refuge for manatees and other temperature-sensitive species. Additional testing was completed to determine the important physical relationships affecting POI’s suitability as a refuge.

  14. Fate and transport of oil sand process-affected water into the underlying clay till: a field study.

    PubMed

    Abolfazlzadehdoshanbehbazari, Mostafa; Birks, S Jean; Moncur, Michael C; Ulrich, Ania C

    2013-08-01

    The South Tailings Pond (STP) is a ~2300-ha tailing pond operated by Suncor Energy Inc. that has received oil sand process-affected (PA) water and mature fine tailings since 2006. The STP is underlain by a clay till, which is in turn underlain by the Wood Creek Sand Channel (WCSC). The sandy deposits of the WCSC provide greater geotechnical stability but could act as a potential flow pathway for PA water to migrate off site and into the Athabasca River. Preliminary modeling of the STP suggests that PA water from the pond will infiltrate into the underlying sand channel, but the extent and development of this impact is still poorly understood. Suncor Energy Inc. built interception wells and a cut-off-wall to control any potential seepage. Here we present the results of an investigation of the fate and transport of PA water in clay till underlying a 10 m × 10 m infiltration pond that was constructed on the southeastern portion of the STP. The geochemistry of pore water in the till underlying the infiltration pond was determined prior to filling with process-affected water (2008) and two years after the infiltration pond was filled with PA waters (2010). Pore water was analyzed for metals, cations, anions, and isotopes ((2)H and (18)O). The distribution of conservative tracers ((18)O and chloride) indicated migration of the PA waters to approximately 0.9 m, but the migrations of major ions and metals were significantly delayed relative to this depth. Uptake of Na and Mo and release of Ca, Mg, Mn, Ba, and Sr suggest that adsorption and ion exchange reactions are the foremost attenuation processes controlling inorganic solutes transport.

  15. Fate and transport of oil sand process-affected water into the underlying clay till: A field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abolfazlzadehdoshanbehbazari, Mostafa; Birks, S. Jean; Moncur, Michael C.; Ulrich, Ania C.

    2013-08-01

    The South Tailings Pond (STP) is a ~ 2300-ha tailing pond operated by Suncor Energy Inc. that has received oil sand process-affected (PA) water and mature fine tailings since 2006. The STP is underlain by a clay till, which is in turn underlain by the Wood Creek Sand Channel (WCSC). The sandy deposits of the WCSC provide greater geotechnical stability but could act as a potential flow pathway for PA water to migrate off site and into the Athabasca River. Preliminary modeling of the STP suggests that PA water from the pond will infiltrate into the underlying sand channel, but the extent and development of this impact is still poorly understood. Suncor Energy Inc. built interception wells and a cut-off-wall to control any potential seepage. Here we present the results of an investigation of the fate and transport of PA water in clay till underlying a 10 m × 10 m infiltration pond that was constructed on the southeastern portion of the STP. The geochemistry of pore water in the till underlying the infiltration pond was determined prior to filling with process-affected water (2008) and two years after the infiltration pond was filled with PA waters (2010). Pore water was analyzed for metals, cations, anions, and isotopes (2H and 18O). The distribution of conservative tracers (18O and chloride) indicated migration of the PA waters to approximately 0.9 m, but the migrations of major ions and metals were significantly delayed relative to this depth. Uptake of Na and Mo and release of Ca, Mg, Mn, Ba, and Sr suggest that adsorption and ion exchange reactions are the foremost attenuation processes controlling inorganic solutes transport.

  16. Fate and transport of oil sand process-affected water into the underlying clay till: a field study.

    PubMed

    Abolfazlzadehdoshanbehbazari, Mostafa; Birks, S Jean; Moncur, Michael C; Ulrich, Ania C

    2013-08-01

    The South Tailings Pond (STP) is a ~2300-ha tailing pond operated by Suncor Energy Inc. that has received oil sand process-affected (PA) water and mature fine tailings since 2006. The STP is underlain by a clay till, which is in turn underlain by the Wood Creek Sand Channel (WCSC). The sandy deposits of the WCSC provide greater geotechnical stability but could act as a potential flow pathway for PA water to migrate off site and into the Athabasca River. Preliminary modeling of the STP suggests that PA water from the pond will infiltrate into the underlying sand channel, but the extent and development of this impact is still poorly understood. Suncor Energy Inc. built interception wells and a cut-off-wall to control any potential seepage. Here we present the results of an investigation of the fate and transport of PA water in clay till underlying a 10 m × 10 m infiltration pond that was constructed on the southeastern portion of the STP. The geochemistry of pore water in the till underlying the infiltration pond was determined prior to filling with process-affected water (2008) and two years after the infiltration pond was filled with PA waters (2010). Pore water was analyzed for metals, cations, anions, and isotopes ((2)H and (18)O). The distribution of conservative tracers ((18)O and chloride) indicated migration of the PA waters to approximately 0.9 m, but the migrations of major ions and metals were significantly delayed relative to this depth. Uptake of Na and Mo and release of Ca, Mg, Mn, Ba, and Sr suggest that adsorption and ion exchange reactions are the foremost attenuation processes controlling inorganic solutes transport. PMID:23752067

  17. Transportation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with transportation and energy use. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the implication of energy usage as it applies to the area of transportation. Some topics covered are efficiencies of various transportation…

  18. Vasomotor tone does not affect perfusion heterogeneity and gas exchange in normal primate lungs during normoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenny, R. W.; Robertson, H. T.; Hlastala, M. P.

    2000-01-01

    To determine whether vasoregulation is an important cause of pulmonary perfusion heterogeneity, we measured regional blood flow and gas exchange before and after giving prostacyclin (PGI(2)) to baboons. Four animals were anesthetized with ketamine and mechanically ventilated. Fluorescent microspheres were used to mark regional perfusion before and after PGI(2) infusion. The lungs were subsequently excised, dried inflated, and diced into approximately 2-cm(3) pieces (n = 1,208-1,629 per animal) with the spatial coordinates recorded for each piece. Blood flow to each piece was determined for each condition from the fluorescent signals. Blood flow heterogeneity did not change with PGI(2) infusion. Two other measures of spatial blood flow distribution, the fractal dimension and the spatial correlation, did not change with PGI(2) infusion. Alveolar-arterial O(2) differences did not change with PGI(2) infusion. We conclude that, in normal primate lungs during normoxia, vasomotor tone is not a significant cause of perfusion heterogeneity. Despite the heterogeneous distribution of blood flow, active regulation of regional perfusion is not required for efficient gas exchange.

  19. Implications for Ecosystem Services of Watershed Processes that affect the Transport and Transformations of Mercury in an Adirondack Stream Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, D. A.; Riva-Murray, K.; Bradley, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a potent neurotoxin that can affect the health of humans and wildlife through the ingestion of methyl Hg. Mercury contamination of ecosystems originates from human activities such as mining, coal burning and other industrial emissions, and the use of Hg-containing products. Natural sources such as volcanic and geothermal emissions and the weathering of Hg-bearing minerals also contribute to Hg contamination, but are believed to be minor sources in most ecosystems. Various ecosystem disturbances including fires, forest harvesting, and the submergence of land by impoundment may also contribute to Hg ecosystem contamination by mobilizing stores that have previously originated from the sources described above. Mercury from a mix of regional and global emissions sources is transported in the atmosphere to remote landscapes that are distant from local emissions sources. The Adirondacks of New York State is a forested, mountainous region characterized by abundant lakes and streams, and is distant from local emissions sources. Recreational fishing, wildlife viewing, hiking, and hunting are valued ecosystem services in this region. Here, we report on the relevance to ecosystem services of findings based on five years of Hg data collection of stream water, groundwater, invertebrates, and fish in the upper Hudson River basin in the central part of the Adirondack region. The New York State Dept. of Health has issued fish consumption advisories for the entire Adirondacks based on elevated levels previously measured in lakes and rivers of this region. Our work seeks improved understanding and models of the landscape sources and watershed processes that control the transformation of Hg to its methyl form (MeHg), the transport of MeHg to streams, and bioaccumulation of MeHg in aquatic food webs. Mean annual atmospheric Hg deposition was 6.3 μg/m2/yr during 2007-09, compared to mean annual filtered total Hg stream yields of 1.66 μg/m2/yr and filtered MeHg stream

  20. STP-ECRTS - THERMAL AND GAS ANALYSES FOR SLUDGE TRANSPORT AND STORAGE CONTAINER (STSC) STORAGE AT T PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    CROWE RD; APTHORPE R; LEE SJ; PLYS MG

    2010-04-29

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is responsible for the disposition of sludge contained in the six engineered containers and Settler tank within the 105-K West (KW) Basin. The STP is retrieving and transferring sludge from the Settler tank into engineered container SCS-CON-230. Then, the STP will retrieve and transfer sludge from the six engineered containers in the KW Basin directly into a Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSC) contained in a Sludge Transport System (STS) cask. The STSC/STS cask will be transported to T Plant for interim storage of the STSC. The STS cask will be loaded with an empty STSC and returned to the KW Basin for loading of additional sludge for transportation and interim storage at T Plant. CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) contracted with Fauske & Associates, LLC (FAI) to perform thermal and gas generation analyses for interim storage of STP sludge in the Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSCs) at T Plant. The sludge types considered are settler sludge and sludge originating from the floor of the KW Basin and stored in containers 210 and 220, which are bounding compositions. The conditions specified by CHPRC for analysis are provided in Section 5. The FAI report (FAI/10-83, Thermal and Gas Analyses for a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) at T Plant) (refer to Attachment 1) documents the analyses. The process considered was passive, interim storage of sludge in various cells at T Plant. The FATE{trademark} code is used for the calculation. The results are shown in terms of the peak sludge temperature and hydrogen concentrations in the STSC and the T Plant cell. In particular, the concerns addressed were the thermal stability of the sludge and the potential for flammable gas mixtures. This work was performed with preliminary design information and a preliminary software configuration.

  1. Multi-scale interactions affecting transport, storage, and processing of solutes and sediments in stream corridors (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.; Packman, A. I.

    2010-12-01

    Surface water and groundwater flow interact with the channel geomorphology and sediments in ways that determine how material is transported, stored, and transformed in stream corridors. Solute and sediment transport affect important ecological processes such as carbon and nutrient dynamics and stream metabolism, processes that are fundamental to stream health and function. Many individual mechanisms of transport and storage of solute and sediment have been studied, including surface water exchange between the main channel and side pools, hyporheic flow through shallow and deep subsurface flow paths, and sediment transport during both baseflow and floods. A significant challenge arises from non-linear and scale-dependent transport resulting from natural, fractal fluvial topography and associated broad, multi-scale hydrologic interactions. Connections between processes and linkages across scales are not well understood, imposing significant limitations on system predictability. The whole-stream tracer experimental approach is popular because of the spatial averaging of heterogeneous processes; however the tracer results, implemented alone and analyzed using typical models, cannot usually predict transport beyond the very specific conditions of the experiment. Furthermore, the results of whole stream tracer experiments tend to be biased due to unavoidable limitations associated with sampling frequency, measurement sensitivity, and experiment duration. We recommend that whole-stream tracer additions be augmented with hydraulic and topographic measurements and also with additional tracer measurements made directly in storage zones. We present examples of measurements that encompass interactions across spatial and temporal scales and models that are transferable to a wide range of flow and geomorphic conditions. These results show how the competitive effects between the different forces driving hyporheic flow, operating at different spatial scales, creates a situation

  2. On vertical variations of gas flow in protoplanetary disks and their impact on the transport of solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, E.

    2013-03-01

    A major uncertainty in accretion disk theory is the nature and properties of gas turbulence, which drives transport in protoplanetary disks. The commonly used viscous prescription for the Maxwell-Reynolds stress tensor gives rise to a meridional circulation where flow is outward near the midplane and inward away from it. This meridional circulation has been proposed as an explanation for the presence of high-temperature minerals (believed to be of inner solar system provenance) in comets. However, it has not been observed in simulations of magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) turbulence so far. In this study, we evaluate the extent to which the net transport of solids can be diagnostic of the existence of meridional circulation. To that end, we propose and motivate a prescription for MHD turbulence which has the same free parameters as the viscous one. We compare the effects of both prescriptions on the radial transport of small solid particles and find that their net, vertically integrated radial flux is actually quite insensitive to the flow structure for a given vertical average of the turbulence parameter α, which we explain. Given current uncertainties on disk turbulence, one-dimensional models are thus most appropriate to investigate radial transport of solids. A corollary is that the presence of high-temperature material in comets cannot be considered an unequivocal diagnostic of meridional circulation. In fact, we argue that outward transport in viscous disk models with inward net accretion is more properly attributed to turbulent diffusion rather than to the mean flows of the gas.

  3. Purge gas protected transportable pressurized fuel cell modules and their operation in a power plant

    DOEpatents

    Zafred, Paolo R.; Dederer, Jeffrey T.; Gillett, James E.; Basel, Richard A.; Antenucci, Annette B.

    1996-01-01

    A fuel cell generator apparatus and method of its operation involves: passing pressurized oxidant gas, (O) and pressurized fuel gas, (F), into fuel cell modules, (10 and 12), containing fuel cells, where the modules are each enclosed by a module housing (18), surrounded by an axially elongated pressure vessel (64), where there is a purge gas volume, (62), between the module housing and pressure vessel; passing pressurized purge gas, (P), through the purge gas volume, (62), to dilute any unreacted fuel gas from the modules; and passing exhaust gas, (82), and circulated purge gas and any unreacted fuel gas out of the pressure vessel; where the fuel cell generator apparatus is transpatable when the pressure vessel (64) is horizontally disposed, providing a low center of gravity.

  4. Transportation Energy Futures Series. Effects of Travel Reduction and Efficient Driving on Transportation. Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; DeFlorio, J.; McKenzie, E.; Tao, W.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-01

    Since the 1970s, numerous transportation strategies have been formulated to change the behavior of drivers or travelers by reducing trips, shifting travel to more efficient modes, or improving the efficiency of existing modes. This report summarizes findings documented in existing literature to identify strategies with the greatest potential impact. The estimated effects of implementing the most significant and aggressive individual driver behavior modification strategies range from less than 1% to a few percent reduction in transportation energy use and GHG emissions. Combined strategies result in reductions of 7% to 15% by 2030. Pricing, ridesharing, eco-driving, and speed limit reduction/enforcement strategies are widely judged to have the greatest estimated potential effect, but lack the widespread public acceptance needed to accomplish maximum results. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  5. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of Travel Reduction and Efficient Driving on Transportation: Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; DeFlorio, J.; McKenzie, E.; Tao, W.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2013-03-01

    Since the 1970s, numerous transportation strategies have been formulated to change the behavior of drivers or travelers by reducing trips, shifting travel to more efficient modes, or improving the efficiency of existing modes. This report summarizes findings documented in existing literature to identify strategies with the greatest potential impact. The estimated effects of implementing the most significant and aggressive individual driver behavior modification strategies range from less than 1% to a few percent reduction in transportation energy use and GHG emissions. Combined strategies result in reductions of 7% to 15% by 2030. Pricing, ridesharing, eco-driving, and speed limit reduction/enforcement strategies are widely judged to have the greatest estimated potential effect, but lack the widespread public acceptance needed to accomplish maximum results. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

  6. CASCADER: An M-chain gas-phase radionuclide transport and fate model. Volume 4 -- Users guide to CASCADR9

    SciTech Connect

    Cawlfield, D.E.; Emer, D.F.; Lindstrom, F.T.; Shott, G.J.

    1993-09-01

    Chemicals and radionuclides move either in the gas-phase, liquid-phase, or both phases in soils. They may be acted upon by either biological or abiotic processes through advection and/or dispersion. Additionally during the transport of parent and daughter radionuclides in soil, radionuclide decay may occur. This version of CASCADER called CASCADR9 starts with the concepts presented in volumes one and three of this series. For a proper understanding of how the model works, the reader should read volume one first. Also presented in this volume is a set of realistic scenarios for buried sources of radon gas, and the input and output file structure for CASCADER9.

  7. Simulation of electron beam formation and transport in a gas-filled electron-optical system with a plasma emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grishkov, A. A.; Kornilov, S. Yu.; Rempe, N. G.; Shidlovskiy, S. V.; Shklyaev, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    The results of computer simulations of the electron-optical system of an electron gun with a plasma emitter are presented. The simulations are performed using the KOBRA3-INP, XOOPIC, and ANSYS codes. The results describe the electron beam formation and transport. The electron trajectories are analyzed. The mechanisms of gas influence on the energy inhomogeneity of the beam and its current in the regions of beam primary formation, acceleration, and transport are described. Recommendations for optimizing the electron-optical system with a plasma emitter are presented.

  8. Heat and particle transport in a one-dimensional hard-point gas model with on-site potential

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lei

    2015-05-15

    Heat and particle transport in a one-dimensional hard-point gas of elastically colliding particles are studied. In the nonequal mass case, due to the presence of on-site potential, the heat conduction of the model obeys the Fourier law and all the transport coefficients asymptotically approach constants in the thermodynamic limit. The thermoelectric figure of merit ZT increases slowly with the system length L and is proportional to the height of the potential barriers H in high H regime. These findings may serve as a guide for future theoretical and experimental studies.

  9. Experimental investigation of gas hydrate formation, plugging and transportability in partially dispersed and water continuous systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayamohan, Prithvi

    As oil/gas subsea fields mature, the amount of water produced increases significantly due to the production methods employed to enhance the recovery of oil. This is true especially in the case of oil reservoirs. This increase in the water hold up increases the risk of hydrate plug formation in the pipelines, thereby resulting in higher inhibition cost strategies. A major industry concern is to reduce the severe safety risks associated with hydrate plug formation, and significantly extending subsea tieback distances by providing a cost effective flow assurance management/safety tool for mature fields. Developing fundamental understanding of the key mechanistic steps towards hydrate plug formation for different multiphase flow conditions is a key challenge to the flow assurance community. Such understanding can ultimately provide new insight and hydrate management guidelines to diminish the safety risks due to hydrate formation and accumulation in deepwater flowlines and facilities. The transportability of hydrates in pipelines is a function of the operating parameters, such as temperature, pressure, fluid mixture velocity, liquid loading, and fluid system characteristics. Specifically, the hydrate formation rate and plugging onset characteristics can be significantly different for water continuous, oil continuous, and partially dispersed systems. The latter is defined as a system containing oil/gas/water, where the water is present both as a free phase and partially dispersed in the oil phase (i.e., entrained water in the oil). Since hydrate formation from oil dispersed in water systems and partially dispersed water systems is an area which is poorly understood, this thesis aims to address some key questions in these systems. Selected experiments have been performed at the University of Tulsa flowloop to study the hydrate formation and plugging characteristics for the partially dispersed water/oil/gas systems as well as systems where the oil is completely dispersed

  10. Reduced Expression of the Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter and Neurotransmitter Content Affects Synaptic Vesicle Distribution and Shape in Mouse Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Hermann A.; Fonseca, Matheus de C.; Camargo, Wallace L.; Lima, Patrícia M. A.; Martinelli, Patrícia M.; Naves, Lígia A.; Prado, Vânia F.; Prado, Marco A. M.; Guatimosim, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    In vertebrates, nerve muscle communication is mediated by the release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine packed inside synaptic vesicles by a specific vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT). Here we used a mouse model (VAChT KDHOM) with 70% reduction in the expression of VAChT to investigate the morphological and functional consequences of a decreased acetylcholine uptake and release in neuromuscular synapses. Upon hypertonic stimulation, VAChT KDHOM mice presented a reduction in the amplitude and frequency of miniature endplate potentials, FM 1–43 staining intensity, total number of synaptic vesicles and altered distribution of vesicles within the synaptic terminal. In contrast, under electrical stimulation or no stimulation, VAChT KDHOM neuromuscular junctions did not differ from WT on total number of vesicles but showed altered distribution. Additionally, motor nerve terminals in VAChT KDHOM exhibited small and flattened synaptic vesicles similar to that observed in WT mice treated with vesamicol that blocks acetylcholine uptake. Based on these results, we propose that decreased VAChT levels affect synaptic vesicle biogenesis and distribution whereas a lower ACh content affects vesicles shape. PMID:24260111

  11. Reduced expression of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter and neurotransmitter content affects synaptic ve