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Sample records for affect heart function

  1. How Do Cognitive Function and Knowledge Affect Heart Failure Self-Care?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickson, Victoria Vaughan; Lee, Christopher S.; Riegel, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Despite extensive patient education, few heart failure (HF) patients master self-care. Impaired cognitive function may explain why patient education is ineffective. A concurrent triangulation mixed methods design was used to explore how knowledge and cognitive function influence HF self-care. A total of 41 adults with HF participated in interviews…

  2. Affecting Rhomboid-3 Function Causes a Dilated Heart in Adult Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lin; Lee, Teresa; Lin, Na; Wolf, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Drosophila is a well recognized model of several human diseases, and recent investigations have demonstrated that Drosophila can be used as a model of human heart failure. Previously, we described that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used to rapidly examine the cardiac function in adult, awake flies. This technique provides images that are similar to echocardiography in humans, and therefore we postulated that this approach could be combined with the vast resources that are available in the fly community to identify new mutants that have abnormal heart function, a hallmark of certain cardiovascular diseases. Using OCT to examine the cardiac function in adult Drosophila from a set of molecularly-defined genomic deficiencies from the DrosDel and Exelixis collections, we identified an abnormally enlarged cardiac chamber in a series of deficiency mutants spanning the rhomboid 3 locus. Rhomboid 3 is a member of a highly conserved family of intramembrane serine proteases and processes Spitz, an epidermal growth factor (EGF)–like ligand. Using multiple approaches based on the examination of deficiency stocks, a series of mutants in the rhomboid-Spitz–EGF receptor pathway, and cardiac-specific transgenic rescue or dominant-negative repression of EGFR, we demonstrate that rhomboid 3 mediated activation of the EGF receptor pathway is necessary for proper adult cardiac function. The importance of EGF receptor signaling in the adult Drosophila heart underscores the concept that evolutionarily conserved signaling mechanisms are required to maintain normal myocardial function. Interestingly, prior work showing the inhibition of ErbB2, a member of the EGF receptor family, in transgenic knock-out mice or individuals that received herceptin chemotherapy is associated with the development of dilated cardiomyopathy. Our results, in conjunction with the demonstration that altered ErbB2 signaling underlies certain forms of mammalian cardiomyopathy, suggest that an

  3. CNS-disease affecting the heart: brain-heart disorders.

    PubMed

    Finsterer, Josef; Wahbi, Karim

    2014-10-15

    There are a number of hereditary and non-hereditary central nervous system (CNS) disorders, which directly or indirectly affect the heart (brain-heart disorders). The most well-known of these CNS-disorders are epilepsy, stroke, subarachanoid bleeding, bacterial meningitis, and head injury. In addition, a number of hereditary and non-hereditary neurodegenerative disorders may impair cardiac functions. Affection of the heart may manifest as arrhythmias, cardiomyopathy, or autonomic dysfunction. Rarer cardiac complications of CNS disorders include heart failure, systolic or diastolic dysfunction, myocardial infarction, arterial hypertension, or pulmonary hypertension. Cardiomyopathy induced by hereditary CNS disease mainly include stress-induced myocardial dysfunction, known as Takotsubo syndrome (TTS). CNS disease triggering TTS includes epilepsy, ischemic stroke, subarachnoid bleeding, or PRES syndrome. Arrhythmias induced by hereditary CNS disease include supraventricular or ventricular arrhythmias leading to palpitations, dizziness, vertigo, fainting, syncope, (near) sudden cardiac death, or sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Appropriate management of cardiac involvement in CNS-disorders is essential to improve outcome of affected patients. PMID:25034054

  4. The Genetic Response to Short-term Interventions Affecting Cardiovascular Function: Rationale and Design of the HAPI Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Braxton D.; McArdle, Patrick F.; Shen, Haiqing; Rampersaud, Evadnie; Pollin, Toni I.; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Jaquish, Cashell; Douglas, Julie A.; Roy-Gagnon, Marie-Hélène; Sack, Paul; Naglieri, Rosalie; Hines, Scott; Horenstein, Richard B.; Chang, Yen-Pei C.; Post, Wendy; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Brereton, Nga Hong; Pakyz, Ruth E.; Sorkin, John; Damcott, Coleen M.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Mangano, Charles; Corretti, Mary; Vogel, Robert; Herzog, William; Weir, Matthew R.; Peyser, Patricia A.; Shuldiner, Alan R.

    2008-01-01

    Background The etiology of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is multifactorial. Efforts to identify genes influencing CVD risk have met with limited success to date, likely due to the small effect sizes of common CVD risk alleles and the presence of gene by gene and gene by environment interactions. Methods The Heredity and Phenotype Intervention (HAPI) Heart Study was initiated in 2002 to measure the cardiovascular response to four short-term interventions affecting cardiovascular risk factors and to identify the genetic and environmental determinants of these responses. The measurements included blood pressure responses to the cold pressor stress test and to a high salt diet, triglyceride excursion in response to a high fat challenge, and response in platelet aggregation to aspirin therapy. Results The interventions were carried out in 868 relatively healthy Amish adults from large families. The heritabilities of selected response traits for each intervention ranged from 8–38%, suggesting that some of the variation associated with response to each intervention can be attributed to the additive effects of genes. Conclusions Identifying these response genes may identify new mechanisms influencing CVD and may lead to individualized preventive strategies and improved early detection of high-risk individuals. PMID:18440328

  5. Right heart function in COPD.

    PubMed

    Macnee, William

    2010-06-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a common complication in patients with severe hypoxic COPD, but the elevation in pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) is usually relatively mild, although its presence indicates a poor prognosis. A minority of patients have severe pulmonary hypertension, whose prognosis is very poor with the development of right heart failure. Pulmonary hypertension in COPD is thought to result from hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction leading to structural remodeling of all layers of the pulmonary arterial walls. The simple hypothesis that hypoxemia in patients with chronic lung disease results in pulmonary hypertension, which adversely affects right ventricular function and hence increases morbidity and decreases exercise tolerance, leading to the development of peripheral edema and increased mortality, is still somewhat controversial. Whether therapeutic interventions that directly affect PAP or right ventricular function have a significant effect on long-term survival in patients with pulmonary hypertension secondary to hypoxic lung disease is still a matter of debate. Furthermore, whether such interventions will have an effect on symptoms or exercise tolerance remains unproven. Present therapies are limited to the correction of hypoxemia over the long term, which has been shown to have proven benefits on survival. Further studies are required of more specific pulmonary vasodilators or therapies to improve right ventricular function in these patients. PMID:20496299

  6. Diastolic Function in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kovács, Sándor J

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure has reached epidemic proportions, and diastolic heart failure or heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) constitutes about 50% of all heart failure admissions. Long-term prognosis of both reduced ejection fraction heart failure and HFpEF are similarly dismal. No pharmacologic agent has been developed that actually treats or repairs the physiologic deficit(s) responsible for HFpEF. Because the physiology of diastole is both subtle and counterintuitive, its role in heart failure has received insufficient attention. In this review, the focus is on the physiology of diastole in heart failure, the dominant physiologic laws that govern the process in all hearts, how all hearts work as a suction pump, and, therefore, the elucidation and characterization of what actually is meant by “diastolic function”. The intent is for the reader to understand what diastolic function actually is, what it is not, and how to measure it. Proper measurement of diastolic function requires one to go beyond the usual E/A, E/E′, etc. phenomenological metrics and employ more rigorous causality (mathematical modeling) based parameters of diastolic function. The method simultaneously provides new physiologic insight into the meaning of in vivo “equilibrium volume” of the left ventricle (LV), longitudinal versus transverse volume accommodation of the chamber, diastatic “ringing” of the mitral annulus, and the mechanism of L-wave generation, as well as availability of a load-independent index of diastolic function (LIIDF). One important consequence of understanding what diastolic function is, is the recognition that all that current therapies can do is basically alter the load, rather than actually “repair” the functional components (chamber stiffness, chamber relaxation). If beneficial (biological/structural/metabolic) remodeling due to therapy does manifest ultimately as improved diastolic function, it is due to resumption of normal physiology (as in

  7. Heart Disease Affects Women of All Ages

    MedlinePlus

    ... 64 have a heart attack. About half of women who have a heart attack before age 65 die within 8 years. Heart ... have another within 6 years. About half of women who have a heart attack will be disabled with heart failure within 6 ...

  8. Chamber identity programs drive early functional partitioning of the heart.

    PubMed

    Mosimann, Christian; Panáková, Daniela; Werdich, Andreas A; Musso, Gabriel; Burger, Alexa; Lawson, Katy L; Carr, Logan A; Nevis, Kathleen R; Sabeh, M Khaled; Zhou, Yi; Davidson, Alan J; DiBiase, Anthony; Burns, Caroline E; Burns, C Geoffrey; MacRae, Calum A; Zon, Leonard I

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate heart muscle (myocardium) develops from the first heart field (FHF) and expands by adding second heart field (SHF) cells. While both lineages exist already in teleosts, the primordial contributions of FHF and SHF to heart structure and function remain incompletely understood. Here we delineate the functional contribution of the FHF and SHF to the zebrafish heart using the cis-regulatory elements of the draculin (drl) gene. The drl reporters initially delineate the lateral plate mesoderm, including heart progenitors. Subsequent myocardial drl reporter expression restricts to FHF descendants. We harnessed this unique feature to uncover that loss of tbx5a and pitx2 affect relative FHF versus SHF contributions to the heart. High-resolution physiology reveals distinctive electrical properties of each heart field territory that define a functional boundary within the single zebrafish ventricle. Our data establish that the transcriptional program driving cardiac septation regulates physiologic ventricle partitioning, which successively provides mechanical advantages of sequential contraction. PMID:26306682

  9. Right heart structural and functional remodeling in athletes.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Antonello; La Gerche, Andrè; Golia, Enrica; Teske, Arco J; Bossone, Eduardo; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Calabrò, Raffaele; Baggish, Aaron L

    2015-01-01

    Long-term intensive exercise training programs lead to numerous progressive cardiac adaptations, which are collectively termed "athlete's heart." Noninvasive diagnostic techniques, such as color Doppler echocardiography, have been widely used in the analysis of the athlete's heart. Initial experiences focused mainly on left heart adaptations to training. However, in recent years, substantial structural and functional adaptations of the right heart have been documented. The present review article focuses on recent data defining right heart adaptation to short- and long-term periods of exercise training. Right ventricular (RV) morphology and function may be more profoundly affected by intense exercise and, in some cases, functional recovery may be incomplete. Moreover, there is speculation that such changes may represent a substrate for proarrhythmic RV remodeling in some highly trained athletes, even in the absence of a known familial redisposition.

  10. Regenerating functional heart tissue for myocardial repair

    PubMed Central

    Alcon, Andre; Bozkulak, Esra Cagavi; Qyang, Yibing

    2012-01-01

    Heart disease is one of the leading causes of death worldwide and the number of patients with the disease is likely to grow with the continual decline in health for most of the developed world. Heart transplantation is one of the only treatment options for heart failure due to an acute myocardial infarction, but limited donor supply and organ rejection limit its widespread use. Cellular cardiomyoplasty, or cellular implantation, combined with various tissue-engineering methods aims to regenerate functional heart tissue. This review highlights the numerous cell sources that have been used to regenerate the heart as well as cover the wide range of tissue-engineering strategies that have been devised to optimize the delivery of these cells. It will probably be a long time before an effective regenerative therapy can make a serious impact at the bedside. PMID:22388688

  11. Functional Assessment for Congenital Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Significant improvement in survival of children with congenital cardiac malformations has resulted in an increasing population of adolescent and adult patients with congenital heart disease. Of the long-term cardiac problems, ventricular dysfunction remains an important issue of concern. Despite corrective or palliative repair of congenital heart lesions, the right ventricle, which may be the subpulmonary or systemic ventricular chamber, and the functional single ventricle are particularly vulnerable to functional impairment. Regular assessment of cardiac function constitutes an important aspect in the long-term follow up of patients with congenital heart disease. Echocardiography remains the most useful imaging modality for longitudinal monitoring of cardiac function. Conventional echocardiographic assessment has focused primarily on quantification of changes in ventricular size and blood flow velocities during the cardiac cycles. Advances in echocardiographic technologies including tissue Doppler imaging and speckle tracking echocardiography have enabled direct interrogation of myocardial deformation. In this review, the issues of ventricular dysfunction in congenital heart disease, conventional echocardiographic and novel myocardial deformation imaging techniques, and clinical applications of these techniques in the functional assessment of congenital heart disease are discussed. PMID:24653734

  12. ON THE BIOMECHANICS OF HEART VALVE FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Michael S.; Merryman, W. David; Schmidt, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Heart valves (HVs) are fluidic control components of the heart that ensure unidirectional blood flow during the cardiac cycle. However, this description does not adequately describe the biomechanical ramifications of their function in that their mechanics are multi-modal. Moreover, they must replicate their cyclic function over an entire lifetime, with an estimated total functional demand of least 3×109 cycles. The focus of the present review is on the functional biomechanics of heart valves. Thus, the focus of the present review is on functional biomechanics, referring primarily to biosolid as well as several key biofluid mechanical aspects underlying heart valve physiological function. Specifically, we refer to the mechanical behaviors of the extra-cellular matrix structural proteins, underlying cellular function, and their integrated relation to the major aspects of valvular hemodynamic function. While we focus on the work from the author’s laboratories, relevant works of other investigators have been included whenever appropriate. We conclude with a summary of important future trends. PMID:19540499

  13. My head says yes but my heart says no: cognitive and affective attraction as a function of similarity to the ideal self.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Kenneth C; Gaertner, Lowell; Insko, Chester A

    2003-06-01

    The authors hypothesized that similarity to the ideal self (IS) simultaneously generates attraction and repulsion. Attraction research has suggested that a person likes individuals who are similar to his or her IS. Social comparison research has suggested that upward social comparison threatens self-evaluation. In Experiment 1, attraction to a partner increased and then decreased as the partner became more similar to and then surpassed the participant's IS. In Experiment 2, the cognitive and affective components of attraction increased and decreased, respectively, as the partner approached and surpassed the participant's IS to the extent that the dimension of comparison was meaningful and participants andicipated meeting their partner. Similarity to the IS generates opposing cognitive and affective reactions when the self-evaluative threat of upward comparison intensifies. PMID:12793585

  14. Sperm function in affective illness.

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, J; Winokur, A; Levin, R

    1981-04-01

    There is evidence for functional changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of patients with affective disorders. Little is known concerning spermatogenesis or sperm function in depressed men. We systematically evaluated the sperm indices in a group of depressed males complaining of diminished libido, and a healthy control group. No differences were noted in sperm parameters between the groups.

  15. Optical investigation of functional structures in isolated perfused pig heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauh, Robert; Boehnert, Markus; Mahlke, Christine; Kessler, Manfred D.

    2000-11-01

    Light scattering in tissue of mammals and humans is affected by subcellular structures. Since these structures correlate well with the status of cells and tissue, light scattering seems to be ideal for monitoring of functional tissue state. By use of EMPHO SSK Oxyscan we investigated functional parameters in a novel kind of isolated perfused pig heart model. In this perfusion model we use organs obtained by the local slaughterhouse that are reanimated at our institute by application of a heart-lung machine. By creating 3D-images of tissue scattering we found an interesting relation between anatomical structures of myocardium and the 3D-images. Additionally, we detected coherence between backscattered light intensity and functional tissue status. Furthermore, we got a sight into the redox state of cytochrome aa3, b and c by creating difference spectra. We believe that this new kind of tissue imaging method will give us the opportunity to get new insights into myocardial function.

  16. Rbfox2 function in RNA metabolism is impaired in hypoplastic left heart syndrome patient hearts

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Sunil K.; Deshmukh, Vaibhav; Nutter, Curtis A.; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Jin, Wenhao; Wadhwa, Lalita; Abata, Joshua; Ricci, Marco; Lincoln, Joy; Martin, James F.; Yeo, Gene W.; Kuyumcu-Martinez, Muge N.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is a fatal congenital heart disease in which the left side of the heart is underdeveloped, impairing the systemic circulation. Underdeveloped left ventricle exerts biomechanical stress on the right ventricle that can progress into heart failure. Genome-wide transcriptome changes have been identified at early stages in the right ventricle (RV) of infants with HLHS, although the molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the RNA binding protein Rbfox2, which is mutated in HLHS patients, is a contributor to transcriptome changes in HLHS patient RVs. Our results indicate that majority of transcripts differentially expressed in HLHS patient hearts have validated Rbfox2 binding sites. We show that Rbfox2 regulates mRNA levels of targets with 3’UTR binding sites contributing to aberrant gene expression in HLHS patients. Strikingly, the Rbfox2 nonsense mutation identified in HLHS patients truncates the protein, impairs its subcellular distribution and adversely affects its function in RNA metabolism. Overall, our findings uncover a novel role for Rbfox2 in controlling transcriptome in HLHS. PMID:27485310

  17. Interplay between cardiac function and heart development.

    PubMed

    Andrés-Delgado, Laura; Mercader, Nadia

    2016-07-01

    Mechanotransduction refers to the conversion of mechanical forces into biochemical or electrical signals that initiate structural and functional remodeling in cells and tissues. The heart is a kinetic organ whose form changes considerably during development and disease. This requires cardiomyocytes to be mechanically durable and able to mount coordinated responses to a variety of environmental signals on different time scales, including cardiac pressure loading and electrical and hemodynamic forces. During physiological growth, myocytes, endocardial and epicardial cells have to adaptively remodel to these mechanical forces. Here we review some of the recent advances in the understanding of how mechanical forces influence cardiac development, with a focus on fluid flow forces. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  18. Methods to assess Drosophila heart development, function and aging

    PubMed Central

    Ocorr, Karen; Vogler, Georg; Bodmer, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the Drosophila heart has become an established model of many different aspects of human cardiac disease. This model has allowed identification of disease-causing mechanisms underlying congenital heart disease and cardiomyopathies and has permitted the study underlying genetic, metabolic and age-related contributions to heart function. In this review we discuss methods currently employed in the analysis of the Drosophila heart structure and function, such as optical methods to infer heart function and performance, electrophysiological and mechanical approaches to characterize cardiac tissue properties, and conclude with histological techniques used in the study of heart development and adult structure. PMID:24727147

  19. The Impact of Family Functioning on Caregiver Burden among Caregivers of Veterans with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Crystal Dea

    2010-01-01

    A cross-sectional study of 76 family caregivers of older veterans with congestive heart failure utilized the McMaster model of family functioning to examine the impact of family functioning variables (problem solving, communication, roles, affective responsiveness, and affective involvement) on caregiver burden dimensions (relationship burden,…

  20. [Association between function of selenium and heart disease].

    PubMed

    Hiraoka, Yuji

    2016-07-01

    An excessive oxidative stress is considered to be responsible for the development and progression of heart disease. Deficiency of trace elements with antioxidative activities is present in patients with heart disease. Selenium (Se) is an integral part of the enzyme glutathione peroxidase(GPx), one of the central players of the heart's antioxidant system, and it's deficiency is implicated in certain types of heart disease. Our study suggests that myocardial oxidative stress in chronic heart failure may be augmented at least in part by concomitant GPx deficiency, and that the administration of Se could rescue the exhaustion of this selenoprotein, resulting in improved left ventricular function. PMID:27455811

  1. Structure and function relationship of human heart from DENSE MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, Abbas N.; Gharib, Morteza

    2007-03-01

    The study here, suggests a macroscopic structure for the Left Ventricle (LV), based on the heart kinematics which is obtained through imaging. The measurement of the heart muscle deformation using the Displacement ENcoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) MRI, which describes the heart kinematics in the Lagrangian frame work, is used to determine the high resolution patterns of true myocardial strain. Subsequently, the tangential Shortening Index (SI) and the thickening of the LV wall are calculated for each data point. Considering the heart as a positive-displacement pump, the contribution of each segment of LV in the heart function, can be determined by the SI and thickening of the wall in the same portion. Hence the SI isosurfaces show the extent and spatial distribution of the heart activity and reveals its macro structure. The structure and function of the heart are, therefore, related which in turn results in a macroscopic model for the LV. In particular, it was observed that the heart functionality is not uniformly distributed in the LV, and the regions with greater effect on the pumping process, form a band which wraps around the heart. These results, which are supported by the established histological evidence, may be considered as a landmark in connecting the structure and function of the heart through imaging. Furthermore, the compatibility of this model with microscopic observations about the fiber direction is investigated. This method may be used for planning as well as post evaluation of the ventriculoplasty.

  2. Protective Mechanisms of Mitochondria and Heart Function in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Tocchetti, Carlo G.; Bhatt, Niraj; Paolocci, Nazareno; Cortassa, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The heart depends on continuous mitochondrial ATP supply and maintained redox balance to properly develop force, particularly under increased workload. During diabetes, however, myocardial energetic-redox balance is perturbed, contributing to the systolic and diastolic dysfunction known as diabetic cardiomyopathy (DC). Critical Issues: How these energetic and redox alterations intertwine to influence the DC progression is still poorly understood. Excessive bioavailability of both glucose and fatty acids (FAs) play a central role, leading, among other effects, to mitochondrial dysfunction. However, where and how this nutrient excess affects mitochondrial and cytoplasmic energetic/redox crossroads remains to be defined in greater detail. Recent Advances: We review how high glucose alters cellular redox balance and affects mitochondrial DNA. Next, we address how lipid excess, either stored in lipid droplets or utilized by mitochondria, affects performance in diabetic hearts by influencing cardiac energetic and redox assets. Finally, we examine how the reciprocal energetic/redox influence between mitochondrial and cytoplasmic compartments shapes myocardial mechanical activity during the course of DC, focusing especially on the glutathione and thioredoxin systems. Future Directions: Protecting mitochondria from losing their ability to generate energy, and to control their own reactive oxygen species emission is essential to prevent the onset and/or to slow down DC progression. We highlight mechanisms enforced by the diabetic heart to counteract glucose/FAs surplus-induced damage, such as lipid storage, enhanced mitochondria-lipid droplet interaction, and upregulation of key antioxidant enzymes. Learning more on the nature and location of mechanisms sheltering mitochondrial functions would certainly help in further optimizing therapies for human DC. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1563–1586. PMID:25674814

  3. [Heart and evolution--form and function of all mammalian hearts are identical].

    PubMed

    Meijler, Frits L; Meijler, Theo Dirk

    2009-01-01

    The 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin this year (2009) is a perfect reason to focus on the evolution of the mammalian heart. All life on earth is the result of a process called evolution. The human being is a product of evolution and has all the characteristics of a mammal. Size, form and function of the mammalian heart may be viewed in relation to evolution. All morphological and functional properties of the heart in all currently existing mammalian species are practically identical. This implies that during the eons in which all mammals had to adapt to climate and geological changes by which they differentiated into almost limitless varieties, whether they be mice, whales or humans, the heart hardly, if at all, participated in this process and remained unaffected. This must lead to the conclusion that the heart of the first mammals on earth was already well equipped to fulfil the functional demands of all future mammalian species.

  4. Placebo Sleep Affects Cognitive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draganich, Christina; Erdal, Kristi

    2014-01-01

    The placebo effect is any outcome that is not attributed to a specific treatment but rather to an individual's mindset (Benson & Friedman, 1996). This phenomenon can extend beyond its typical use in pharmaceutical drugs to involve aspects of everyday life, such as the effect of sleep on cognitive functioning. In 2 studies examining whether…

  5. A family with a dystrophin gene mutation specifically affecting dystrophin expression in the heart

    SciTech Connect

    Muntoni, F.; Davies, K.; Dubowitz, V.

    1994-09-01

    We recently described a family with X-linked dilated cardiomyopathy where a large deletion in the muscle promoter region of the dystrophin gene was associated with a severe dilated cardiomyopathy in absence of clinical skeletal muscle involvement. The deletion removed the entire muscle promoter region, the first muscle exon and part of intron 1. The brain and Purkinje cell promoters were not affected by the deletion. Despite the lack of both the muscle promoter and the first muscle exon, dystrophin was detected immunocytochemically in relative high levels in the skeletal muscle of the affected males. We have now found that both the brain and Purkinje cell promoters were transcribed at high levels in the skeletal muscle of these individuals. This phenomenon, that does not occur in normal skeletal muscle, indicates that these two isoforms, physiologically expressed mainly in the central nervous system, can be transcribed and be functionally active in skeletal muscle under specific circumstances. Contrary to what is observed in skeletal muscle, dystrophin was not detected in the heart of one affected male using immunocytochemistry and an entire panel of anti-dystrophin antibodies. This was most likely the cause for the pronounced cardiac fibrosis observed and eventually responsible for the severe cardiac involvement invariably seen in seven affected males. In conclusion, the mutation of the muscle promoter, first muscle exon and part of intron 1 specifically affected expression of dystrophin in the heart. We believe that this deletion removes sequences involved in regulation of dystrophin expression in the heart and are at the moment characterizing other families with X-linked cardiomyopathy secondary to a dystrophinopathy.

  6. Structure and function of the hearts of lizards and snakes.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Bjarke; Moorman, Antoon F M; Wang, Tobias

    2014-05-01

    With approximately 7000 species, snakes and lizards, collectively known as squamates, are by far the most species-rich group of reptiles. It was from reptile-like ancestors that mammals and birds evolved and squamates can be viewed as phylogenetically positioned between them and fishes. Hence, their hearts have been studied for more than a century yielding insights into the group itself and into the independent evolution of the fully divided four-chambered hearts of mammals and birds. Structurally the heart is complex and debates persist on rudimentary issues such as identifying structures critical to understanding ventricle function. In seeking to resolve these controversies we have generated three-dimensional (3D) models in portable digital format (pdf) of the anaconda and anole lizard hearts ('typical' squamate hearts) and the uniquely specialized python heart with comprehensive annotations of structures and cavities. We review the anatomy and physiology of squamate hearts in general and emphasize the unique features of pythonid and varanid lizard hearts that endow them with mammal-like blood pressures. Excluding pythons and varanid lizards it is concluded that the squamate heart has a highly consistent design including a disproportionately large right side (systemic venous) probably due to prevailing pulmonary bypass (intraventricular shunting). Unfortunately, investigations on rudimentary features are sparse. We therefore point out gaps in our knowledge, such as the size and functional importance of the coronary vasculature and of the first cardiac chamber, the sinus venosus, and highlight areas with implications for vertebrate cardiac evolution.

  7. Factors affecting heart rate variability in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Cabal, L A; Siassi, B; Zanini, B; Hodgman, J E; Hon, E E

    1980-01-01

    Neonatal heart rate variability (NHRV) was studied in 92 preterm infants (birth weight, 750 to 2,500 gm; gestational age, 28 to 36 weeks). Each infant was monitored continuously during the first 6 hours and for one hour at 24, 48, and 168 hours of life. During each hour NHRV was quantified and related to the following parameters: sex, gestational age, postnatal age, heart rate, and the presence and severity of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). NHRV in healthy preterm infants was inversely related to heart rate level and directly related to the infant's postnatal age. In healthy babies with gestations of 30 to 36 weeks there was no significant correlation between NHRV and gestation. Decrease in NHRV was significantly related to the severity of RDS, and the reappearance of NHRV in infants with RDS was associated with a good prognosis. Decreased NHRV significantly differentiated the infants with RDS who survived after the fifth hour of life. The data reveal that NHRV (1) should be corrected for heart rate level and postnatal age; (2) is decreased in RDS; and (3) can be used as an indicator of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants with RDS.

  8. [Function of cannabinoids in heart failure].

    PubMed

    Rudź, Radosław; Baranowska, Urszula; Malinowska, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Cannabinoids, substances derived from Cannabis sativa, have been used by humans as therapeutic agents for thousands of years. They act through the cannabinoid CB(1), CB(2), vanilloid TRPV1, and the as yet undefined putative endothelial cannabinoid receptors. Intensive research on the influence of cannabinoids on the cardiovascular system has been conducted since the 1990s after the discovery that cannabinoids are involved in hypotension connected with septic, cardiogenic, and hemorrhagic shock. One cannot exclude the future possibility of using cannabinoids as new therapeutic agents in diseases of the cardiovascular system. In the present paper the mechanisms of cannabinoids on heart failure are described. In the acute phase of myocardial infarction, cannabinoids protect the endothelium of coronary vessels and decrease the heart's necrotic area and the risk of arrhythmia. Cannabinoids also act in the chronic phase of myocardial infarction in the process of the heart remodeling. However, the present knowledge of the effects of cannabinoids on the acute and chronic phases of myocardial infarction and the possibility of using these agents in cardiovascular disease therapy is still insufficient. PMID:18464680

  9. Resveratrol Reverses Functional Chagas Heart Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mata-Santos, Hilton; Vicentino, Amanda R. R.; Feijó, Daniel F.; Meyer-Fernandes, José R.; Paula-Neto, Heitor A.; Medei, Emiliano; Bozza, Marcelo T.; Lannes-Vieira, Joseli; Paiva, Claudia N.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy (CCC) develops years after acute infection by Trypanosoma cruzi and does not improve after trypanocidal therapy, despite reduction of parasite burden. During disease, the heart undergoes oxidative stress, a potential causative factor for arrhythmias and contractile dysfunction. Here we tested whether antioxidants/ cardioprotective drugs could improve cardiac function in established Chagas heart disease. We chose a model that resembles B1-B2 stage of human CCC, treated mice with resveratrol and performed electrocardiography and echocardiography studies. Resveratrol reduced the prolonged PR and QTc intervals, increased heart rates and reversed sinus arrhythmia, atrial and atrioventricular conduction disorders; restored a normal left ventricular ejection fraction, improved stroke volume and cardiac output. Resveratrol activated the AMPK-pathway and reduced both ROS production and heart parasite burden, without interfering with vascularization or myocarditis intensity. Resveratrol was even capable of improving heart function of infected mice when treatment was started late after infection, while trypanocidal drug benznidazole failed. We attempted to mimic resveratrol’s actions using metformin (AMPK-activator) or tempol (SOD-mimetic). Metformin and tempol mimicked the beneficial effects of resveratrol on heart function and decreased lipid peroxidation, but did not alter parasite burden. These results indicate that AMPK activation and ROS neutralization are key strategies to induce tolerance to Chagas heart disease. Despite all tissue damage observed in established Chagas heart disease, we found that a physiological dysfunction can still be reversed by treatment with resveratrol, metformin and tempol, resulting in improved heart function and representing a starting point to develop innovative therapies in CCC. PMID:27788262

  10. [Heart functions in monkeys during a 2-week antiorthostatic hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotov, V. P.; Convertino, V.; Korol'kov, V. I.; Latham, R.; Trambovetskii, E. V.; Fanton, J.; Crisman, R.; Truzhennikov, A. N.; Evert, D.; Nosovskii, A. M.; Conolly, J.

    1996-01-01

    Dynamics of the left heart ventricular muscle contractility and compliance was studied in 4 monkeys in the head down position (antiorthostatic hypokinesia) with the body angle 10 during 2 weeks. Functional tests on a tilt table and under two conditions of centrifuge rotation were performed prior to and after the antiorthostatic hypokinesia. No changes in the left heart ventricular muscle contractility was found. However, the sensitivity level of the baroreflex control decreased. Compliance of the left heart myocardial fibre increased in the first hours and days of the antiorthostatic hypokinesia.

  11. Association of the Functional MICA-129 Polymorphism With the Severity of Chronic Chagas Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ayo, Christiane Maria; Oliveira, Amanda Priscila de; Camargo, Ana Vitória da Silveira; Mattos, Cinara Cássia Brandão de; Bestetti, Reinaldo Bulgarelli; Mattos, Luiz Carlos de

    2015-10-15

    MICA-129 polymorphism affects the binding affinity of MICA molecules with the NKG2D receptor and influences effector cell function. The genotype met/met was associated with the severity of left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) in patients with chronic Chagas heart disease, while the val/val genotype was associated with the absence of LVSD.

  12. A Methodology for Quantifying Heart Function in the Embryonic Zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Brennan; Garrity, Deborah; Dasi, Lakshmi

    2012-11-01

    Several studies have linked epigenetic factors such as blood flow dynamics and cardiac function to proper heart development. To better understand this process, it is essential to develop robust quantitative methods to investigate the blood dynamics and wall kinematics in vivo. Here, we develop a methodology that can be used throughout the early stages of development which requires no specialized equipment other than a bright field microscope and high-speed camera. We use the embryonic zebrafish as our model due to its superb optical access and widespread acceptance as a powerful model for human heart development. Using these methods, we quantify blood flow rates, stroke volume, cardiac output, ejection fraction, and other important parameters related to heart function. We also investigate the pumping mechanics from heart tube to looped configuration. We show that although the mechanism changes fundamentally, it does so in a continuous fashion that can incorporate combined pumping mechanisms at intermediate stages. This work provides a basis for quantitatively comparing normal and abnormal heart development, and may help us gain a better understanding of congenital heart defects. Funded by NSF.

  13. The Living Heart Project: A robust and integrative simulator for human heart function

    PubMed Central

    Baillargeon, Brian; Rebelo, Nuno; Fox, David D.; Taylor, Robert L.; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    The heart is not only our most vital, but also our most complex organ: Precisely controlled by the interplay of electrical and mechanical fields, it consists of four chambers and four valves, which act in concert to regulate its filling, ejection, and overall pump function. While numerous computational models exist to study either the electrical or the mechanical response of its individual chambers, the integrative electro-mechanical response of the whole heart remains poorly understood. Here we present a proof-of-concept simulator for a four-chamber human heart model created from computer topography and magnetic resonance images. We illustrate the governing equations of excitation-contraction coupling and discretize them using a single, unified finite element environment. To illustrate the basic features of our model, we visualize the electrical potential and the mechanical deformation across the human heart throughout its cardiac cycle. To compare our simulation against common metrics of cardiac function, we extract the pressure-volume relationship and show that it agrees well with clinical observations. Our prototype model allows us to explore and understand the key features, physics, and technologies to create an integrative, predictive model of the living human heart. Ultimately, our simulator will open opportunities to probe landscapes of clinical parameters, and guide device design and treatment planning in cardiac diseases such as stenosis, regurgitation, or prolapse of the aortic, pulmonary, tricuspid, or mitral valve. PMID:25267880

  14. The Living Heart Project: A robust and integrative simulator for human heart function.

    PubMed

    Baillargeon, Brian; Rebelo, Nuno; Fox, David D; Taylor, Robert L; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-11-01

    The heart is not only our most vital, but also our most complex organ: Precisely controlled by the interplay of electrical and mechanical fields, it consists of four chambers and four valves, which act in concert to regulate its filling, ejection, and overall pump function. While numerous computational models exist to study either the electrical or the mechanical response of its individual chambers, the integrative electro-mechanical response of the whole heart remains poorly understood. Here we present a proof-of-concept simulator for a four-chamber human heart model created from computer topography and magnetic resonance images. We illustrate the governing equations of excitation-contraction coupling and discretize them using a single, unified finite element environment. To illustrate the basic features of our model, we visualize the electrical potential and the mechanical deformation across the human heart throughout its cardiac cycle. To compare our simulation against common metrics of cardiac function, we extract the pressure-volume relationship and show that it agrees well with clinical observations. Our prototype model allows us to explore and understand the key features, physics, and technologies to create an integrative, predictive model of the living human heart. Ultimately, our simulator will open opportunities to probe landscapes of clinical parameters, and guide device design and treatment planning in cardiac diseases such as stenosis, regurgitation, or prolapse of the aortic, pulmonary, tricuspid, or mitral valve. PMID:25267880

  15. A functional genetic study identifies HAND1 mutations in septation defects of the human heart.

    PubMed

    Reamon-Buettner, Stella Marie; Ciribilli, Yari; Traverso, Ilaria; Kuhls, Beate; Inga, Alberto; Borlak, Juergen

    2009-10-01

    Heart and neural crest derivatives expressed 1 (HAND1) is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor essential for mammalian heart development. Absence of Hand1 in mice results in embryonal lethality, as well as in a wide spectrum of cardiac abnormalities including failed cardiac looping, defective chamber septation and impaired ventricular development. Therefore, Hand1 is a strong candidate for the many cardiac malformations observed in human congenital heart disease (CHD). Recently, we identified a loss-of-function frameshift mutation (p.A126fs) in the bHLH domain of HAND1 frequent in hypoplastic hearts. This finding prompted us to continue our search for HAND1 gene mutations in a different cohort of malformed hearts affected primarily by septation defects. Indeed, in tissue samples of septal defects, we detected 32 sequence alterations leading to amino acid change, of which 12 are in the bHLH domain of HAND1. Interestingly, 10 sequence alterations, such as p.L28H and p.L138P, had been identified earlier in hypoplastic hearts, but the frequent p.A126fs mutation was absent except in one aborted case with ventricular septal defect and outflow tract abnormalities. Functional studies in yeast and mammalian cells enabled translation of sequence alterations to HAND1 transcriptional activity, which was reduced or abolished by certain mutations, notably p.L138P. Our results suggest that HAND1 may also be affected in septation defects of the human hearts, and thus has a broader role in human heart development and CHD.

  16. Renal Function and Genetic Polymorphisms in Pediatric Heart Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Feingold, Brian; Brooks, Maria M; Zeevi, Adriana; Ohmann, Erin L.; Burckart, Gilbert J.; Ferrell, Robert E.; Chinnock, Richard; Canter, Charles; Addonizio, Linda; Bernstein, Daniel; Kirklin, James K.; Naftel, David C.; Webber, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Common genetic variations influence rejection, infection, drug metabolism, and side effect profiles after pediatric heart transplantation. Reports in adults suggest that genetic background may influence post-transplant renal function. In this multicenter study we investigated the association of genetic polymorphisms (GP) in a panel of candidate genes on renal function in 453 pediatric heart transplant recipients. Methods We performed genotyping for functional GPs in 19 candidate genes. Renal function was determined annually after transplantation by calculation of glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Mixed effects and Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess recipient characteristics and the effect of GPs on longitudinal eGFR and time to eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2. Results Mean age at transplantation was 6.2 ± 6.1 years and mean follow-up was 5.1 ± 2.5 years. Older age at transplant and black race were independently associated with post-transplant renal dysfunction. In univariate analyses, FASL (C-843T) T allele (p=0.014) and HO-1 (A326G) G allele (p=0.0017) were associated with decreased renal function. After adjusting for age and race, these associations were attenuated [FASL (p=0.075), HO-1 (p=0.053)]. We found no associations of other GPs, including GPs in TGFβ1, CYP3A5, ABCB1, and ACE, with post-transplant renal function. Conclusions In this multicenter, large sample of pediatric heart transplant recipients we found no strong associations between GPs in 19 candidate genes and post-transplant renal function. Our findings contradict reported associations of CYP3A5 and TGFβ1 with renal function and suggest that genotyping for these GPs will not facilitate individualized immunosuppression for the purpose of protecting renal function after pediatric heart transplantation. PMID:22789135

  17. Do Bells Affect Behaviour and Heart Rate Variability in Grazing Dairy Cows?

    PubMed Central

    Johns, Julia; Patt, Antonia; Hillmann, Edna

    2015-01-01

    In alpine regions cows are often equipped with bells. The present study investigated the impact of wearing a bell on behaviour and heart rate variability in dairy cows. Nineteen non-lactating Brown-Swiss cows with bell experience were assigned to three different treatments. For 3 days each, cows were equipped with no bell (control), with a bell with inactivated clapper (silent bell) or with a functional bell (functional bell). The bells weighed 5.5 kg and had frequencies between 532 Hz and 2.8 kHz and amplitudes between 90 and 113 dB at a distance of 20 cm. Data were collected on either the first and third or on all 3 days of each treatment. Whereas duration of rumination was reduced with a functional bell and a silent bell compared with no bell, feeding duration was reduced with a silent bell and was intermediate with a functional bell. Head movements were reduced when wearing a silent bell compared with no bell and tended to be reduced when wearing a functional compared to no bell. With a functional bell, lying duration was reduced by almost 4 hours on the third day of treatment compared with the first day with a functional bell and compared with no bell or a silent bell. All additional behavioural measures are consistent with the hypothesis of a restriction in the behaviour of the cows wearing bells, although this pattern did not reach significance. There was no treatment effect on heart rate variability, suggesting that the bells did not affect vago-sympathetic balance. An effect of experimental day was found for only 1 out of 10 behavioural parameters, as shown by a decrease in lying with a functional bell on day 3. The results indicate behavioural changes in the cows wearing a bell over 3 days, without indication of habituation to the bell. Altogether, the behavioural changes suggest that the behaviour of the cows was disturbed by wearing a bell. If long-lasting, these effects may have implications for animal welfare. PMID:26110277

  18. Functions of miRNAs during Mammalian Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Shun; Jiao, Kai

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play essential roles during mammalian heart development and have emerged as attractive therapeutic targets for cardiovascular diseases. The mammalian embryonic heart is mainly derived from four major cell types during development. These include cardiomyocytes, endocardial cells, epicardial cells, and neural crest cells. Recent data have identified various miRNAs as critical regulators of the proper differentiation, proliferation, and survival of these cell types. In this review, we briefly introduce the contemporary understanding of mammalian cardiac development. We also focus on recent developments in the field of cardiac miRNAs and their functions during the development of different cell types. PMID:27213371

  19. The Effects of Heart Failure on Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Udani, Suneel M; Koyner, Jay L

    2010-01-01

    Summary Heart-kidney interactions have been increasingly recognized by clinicians and researchers involved in the study and treatment of heart failure and kidney disease. A classification system has been developed to categorize the different manifestations of cardiac and renal dysfunction. Recent work has highlighted the significant negative prognostic effect of worsening renal function on outcomes for individuals with heart failure. The etiology of the concomitant cardiac and renal dysfunction remains unclear; however, increasing evidence supports alternatives to the established theory of underfilling, including effects of venous congestion and changes in intra-abdominal pressure. Conventional therapy focuses on blockade of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system with expanding use of direct renin and aldosterone antagonists. Novel therapeutic interventions using extracorporeal therapy and antagonists of the adenosine pathway show promise and require further investigation. PMID:20621250

  20. Relationship between obesity, negative affect and basal heart rate in predicting heart rate reactivity to psychological stress among adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Park, Andres E.; Huynh, Pauline; Schell, Anne M.; Baker, Laura A.

    2015-01-01

    Reduced cardiovascular responses to psychological stressors have been found to be associated with both obesity and negative affect in adults, but have been less well studied in children and adolescent populations. These findings have most often been interpreted as reflecting reduced sympathetic nervous system response, perhaps associated with heightened baseline sympathetic activation among the obese and those manifesting negative affect. However, obesity and negative affect may themselves be correlated, raising the question of whether they both independently affect cardiovascular reactivity. The present study thus examined the separate effects of obesity and negative affect on both cardiovascular and skin conductance responses to stress (e.g., during a serial subtraction math task) in adolescents, while controlling for baseline levels of autonomic activity during rest. Both obesity and negative affect had independent and negative associations with cardiovascular reactivity, such that reduced stress responses were apparent for obese adolescents and those with high levels of negative affect. In contrast, neither obesity nor negative affect was related to skin conductance responses to stress, implicating specifically noradrenergic mechanisms rather than sympathetic mechanisms generally as being deficient. Moreover, baseline heart rate was unrelated to obesity in this sample, which suggests that heightened baseline of sympathetic activity is not necessary for the reduced cardiovascular reactivity to stress. PMID:26049136

  1. Relationship between obesity, negative affect and basal heart rate in predicting heart rate reactivity to psychological stress among adolescents.

    PubMed

    Park, Andres E; Huynh, Pauline; Schell, Anne M; Baker, Laura A

    2015-08-01

    Reduced cardiovascular responses to psychological stressors have been found to be associated with both obesity and negative affect in adults, but have been less well studied in children and adolescent populations. These findings have most often been interpreted as reflecting reduced sympathetic nervous system response, perhaps associated with heightened baseline sympathetic activation among the obese and those manifesting negative affect. However, obesity and negative affect may themselves be correlated, raising the question of whether they both independently affect cardiovascular reactivity. The present study thus examined the separate effects of obesity and negative affect on both cardiovascular and skin conductance responses to stress (e.g., during a serial subtraction math task) in adolescents, while controlling for baseline levels of autonomic activity during rest. Both obesity and negative affect had independent and negative associations with cardiovascular reactivity, such that reduced stress responses were apparent for obese adolescents and those with high levels of negative affect. In contrast, neither obesity nor negative affect was related to skin conductance responses to stress, implicating specifically noradrenergic mechanisms rather than sympathetic mechanisms generally as being deficient. Moreover, baseline heart rate was unrelated to obesity in this sample, which suggests that heightened baseline of sympathetic activity is not necessary for the reduced cardiovascular reactivity to stress.

  2. Exploring Heart and Lung Function in Space: ARMS Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuipers, Andre; Cork, Michael; LeGouic, Marine

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced Respiratory Monitoring System (ARMS) is a suite of monitoring instruments and supplies used to study the heart, lungs, and metabolism. Many experiments sponsored by the European Space Agency (ESA) will be conducted using ARMS during STS-107. The near-weightless environment of space causes the body to undergo many physiological adaptations, and the regulation of blood pressure is no exception. Astronauts also experience a decrease in blood volume as an adaptation to microgravity. Reduced blood volume may not provide enough blood pressure to the head during entry or landing. As a result, astronauts often experience light-headedness, and sometimes even fainting, when they stand shortly after returning to Earth. To help regulate blood pressure and heart rate, baroreceptors, sensors located in artery walls in the neck and near the heart, control blood pressure by sending information to the brain and ensuring blood flow to organs. These mechanisms work properly in Earth's gravity but must adapt in the microgravity environment of space. However, upon return to Earth during entry and landing, the cardiovascular system must readjust itself to gravity, which can cause fluctuation in the control of blood pressure and heart rate. Although the system recovers in hours or days, these occurrences are not easily predicted or understood - a puzzle investigators will study with the ARMS equipment. In space, researchers can focus on aspects of the cardiovascular system normally masked by gravity. The STS-107 experiments using ARMS will provide data on how the heart and lungs function in space, as well as how the nervous system controls them. Exercise will also be combined with breath holding and straining (the Valsalva maneuver) to test how heart rate and blood pressure react to different stresses. This understanding will improve astronauts' cardiopulmonary function after return to Earth, and may well help Earthbound patients who experience similar effects after long

  3. [The Starr-Edwards heart valve: one of the oldest mechanical heart valves still functioning today].

    PubMed

    Schoenaker, Michiel H; van Wetten, Herbert B; Morshuis, Wim J

    2015-01-01

    In the 1960s, the Starr-Edwards valve was the first artificial heart valve to be successfully implanted in humans. This valve has now been in use for decades with outstanding results: patients whose life expectancy had previously been short acquired a good prognosis with this development. Nowadays the Starr-Edwards valve is not used anymore, but patients are being described today in whom these valves are still functioning well after more than 40 years.

  4. A patient with heart failure and worsening kidney function.

    PubMed

    Sarnak, Mark J

    2014-10-01

    There is high prevalence of CKD, defined by reduced GFR, in patients with heart failure. Reduced kidney function is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in this patient population. The cardiorenal syndrome (CRS) involves a bidirectional relationship between the heart and kidneys whereby dysfunction in either may exacerbate the function of the other, but this syndrome has been difficult to precisely define because it has many complex physiologic, biochemical, and hormonal abnormalities. The pathophysiology of CRS is not completely understood, but potential mechanisms include reduced kidney perfusion due to decreased forward flow, increased right ventricular and venous pressure, and neurohormonal adaptations. Treatment options include inotropic medications; diuretics; ultrafiltration; and medications, such as β-blockers, inhibitors of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and more novel treatments that focus on unique aspects of the pathophysiology. Recent observational studies suggest that treatments that result in a decrease in venous pressure and lead to hemoconcentration may be associated with improved outcomes. Patients with CRS that is not responsive to medical interventions should be considered for ventricular assist devices, heart transplantation, or combined heart and kidney transplantation.

  5. Stability and function of glycosaminoglycans in porcine bioprosthetic heart valves

    PubMed Central

    Lovekamp, Joshua J.; Simionescu, Dan T.; Mercuri, Jeremy J.; Zubiate, Brett; Sacks, Michael S.; Vyavahare, Narendra R.

    2007-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are important structural and functional components in native aortic heart valves and in glutaraldehyde (Glut)-fixed bioprosthetic heart valves (BHVs). However, very little is known about the fate of GAGs within the extracellular matrix of BHVs and their contribution to BHV longevity. BHVs used in heart valve replacement surgery have limited durability due to mechanical failure and pathologic calcification. In the present study we bring evidence for the dramatic loss of GAGs from within the BHV cusp structure during storage in saline and both short- and long-term Glut fixation. In order to gain insight into role of GAGs, we compared properties of fresh and Glut-fixed porcine heart valve cusps before and after complete GAG removal. GAG removal resulted in significant morphological and functional tissue alterations, including decreases in cuspal thickness, reduction of water content and diminution of rehydration capacity. By virtue of this diminished hydration, loss of GAGs also greatly increased the ‘‘with-curvature’’ flexural rigidity of cuspal tissue. However, removal of GAGs did not alter calcification potential of BHV cups when implanted in the rat subdermal model. Controlling the extent of pre-implantation GAG degradation in BHVs and development of improved GAG crosslinking techniques are expected to improve the mechanical durability of future cardiovascular bioprostheses. PMID:16144707

  6. Functional engineered human cardiac patches prepared from nature's platform improve heart function after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingjie; Yang, Hui; Bai, Aobing; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xiuya; Wang, Xinhong; Mao, Yishen; Lu, Chao; Qian, Ruizhe; Guo, Feng; Ding, Tianling; Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Sifeng; Zhang, Jianyi; Liu, Chen; Sun, Ning

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of induced pluripotent stem cells and directed differentiation techniques, it is now feasible to derive individual-specific cardiac cells for human heart tissue engineering. Here we report the generation of functional engineered human cardiac patches using human induced pluripotent stem cells-derived cardiac cells and decellularized natural heart ECM as scaffolds. The engineered human cardiac patches can be tailored to any desired size and shape and exhibited normal contractile and electrical physiology in vitro. Further, when patching on the infarct area, these patches improved heart function of rats with acute myocardial infarction in vivo. These engineered human cardiac patches can be of great value for normal and disease-specific heart tissue engineering, drug screening, and meet the demands for individual-specific heart tissues for personalized regenerative therapy of myocardial damages in the future. PMID:27509303

  7. Functional engineered human cardiac patches prepared from nature's platform improve heart function after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingjie; Yang, Hui; Bai, Aobing; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xiuya; Wang, Xinhong; Mao, Yishen; Lu, Chao; Qian, Ruizhe; Guo, Feng; Ding, Tianling; Chen, Haiyan; Chen, Sifeng; Zhang, Jianyi; Liu, Chen; Sun, Ning

    2016-10-01

    With the advent of induced pluripotent stem cells and directed differentiation techniques, it is now feasible to derive individual-specific cardiac cells for human heart tissue engineering. Here we report the generation of functional engineered human cardiac patches using human induced pluripotent stem cells-derived cardiac cells and decellularized natural heart ECM as scaffolds. The engineered human cardiac patches can be tailored to any desired size and shape and exhibited normal contractile and electrical physiology in vitro. Further, when patching on the infarct area, these patches improved heart function of rats with acute myocardial infarction in vivo. These engineered human cardiac patches can be of great value for normal and disease-specific heart tissue engineering, drug screening, and meet the demands for individual-specific heart tissues for personalized regenerative therapy of myocardial damages in the future.

  8. Heart Rate Variability – a Tool to Differentiate Positive and Negative Affective States in Pigs?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The causal neurophysiological processes, such as autonomic nervous system activity, that mediate behavioral and physiological reactivity to an environment have largely been ignored. Heart rate variability (HRV) analysis is a clinical diagnostic tool used to assess affective states (stressful and ple...

  9. Ethanol exposure alters early cardiac function in the looping heart: a mechanism for congenital heart defects?

    PubMed

    Karunamuni, Ganga; Gu, Shi; Doughman, Yong Qiu; Peterson, Lindsy M; Mai, Katherine; McHale, Quinn; Jenkins, Michael W; Linask, Kersti K; Rollins, Andrew M; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-02-01

    Alcohol-induced congenital heart defects are frequently among the most life threatening and require surgical correction in newborns. The etiology of these defects, collectively known as fetal alcohol syndrome, has been the focus of much study, particularly involving cellular and molecular mechanisms. Few studies have addressed the influential role of altered cardiac function in early embryogenesis because of a lack of tools with the capability to assay tiny beating hearts. To overcome this gap in our understanding, we used optical coherence tomography (OCT), a nondestructive imaging modality capable of micrometer-scale resolution imaging, to rapidly and accurately map cardiovascular structure and hemodynamics in real time under physiological conditions. In this study, we exposed avian embryos to a single dose of alcohol/ethanol at gastrulation when the embryo is sensitive to the induction of birth defects. Late-stage hearts were analyzed using standard histological analysis with a focus on the atrio-ventricular valves. Early cardiac function was assayed using Doppler OCT, and structural analysis of the cardiac cushions was performed using OCT imaging. Our results indicated that ethanol-exposed embryos developed late-stage valvuloseptal defects. At early stages, they exhibited increased regurgitant flow and developed smaller atrio-ventricular cardiac cushions, compared with controls (uninjected and saline-injected embryos). The embryos also exhibited abnormal flexion/torsion of the body. Our evidence suggests that ethanol-induced alterations in early cardiac function have the potential to contribute to late-stage valve and septal defects, thus demonstrating that functional parameters may serve as early and sensitive gauges of cardiac normalcy and abnormalities.

  10. Tetradecylthioacetic acid increases fat metabolism and improves cardiac function in experimental heart failure.

    PubMed

    Øie, Erik; Berge, Rolf K; Ueland, Thor; Dahl, Christen P; Edvardsen, Thor; Beitnes, Jan Otto; Bohov, Pavol; Aukrust, Pål; Yndestad, Arne

    2013-02-01

    Changes in myocardial metabolism, including a shift from fatty acid to glucose utilization and changes in fatty acid availability and composition are characteristics of heart failure development. Tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) is a fatty acid analogue lacking the ability to undergo mitochondrial β-oxidation. TTA promotes hepatic proliferation of mitochondria and peroxisomes and also decreases serum triglycerides and cholesterol in animals. We investigated the effect of TTA, in combination with a high-fat or regular diet, in a rat model of post-myocardial infarction heart failure. TTA had a beneficial effect on cardiac function in post-myocardial infarction heart failure without affecting myocardial remodeling. These effects of TTA on myocardial function were accompanied by decreased free fatty acids in plasma, increased myocardial proportion of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and a decreased proportion of n-6 PUFA. Myocardial enzyme gene expression during TTA treatment suggested that the increase in n-3 PUFA could reflect increased n-3 PUFA synthesis and inadequately increased n-3 PUFA β-oxidation. Based on our data, it is unlikely that the changes are secondary to alterations in other tissues as plasma and liver showed an opposite pattern with decreased n-3 PUFA during TTA treatment. The present study suggests that TTA may improve myocardial function in heart failure, potentially involving its ability to decrease the availability of FFA and increase the myocardial proportion of n-3 PUFA. PMID:23266898

  11. Functional evolution of cardiac microRNAs in heart development and functions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chen-Ching; Chang, Yao-Ming; Pan, Cheng-Tsung; Chen, Chien-Chang; Ling, Li; Tsao, Ku-Chi; Yang, Ruey-Bing; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of endogenous small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression either by degrading target mRNAs or by suppressing protein translation. miRNAs have been found to be involved in many biological processes, such as development, differentiation, and growth. However, the evolution of miRNA regulatory functions and networks has not been well studied. In this study, we conducted a cross-species analysis to study the evolution of cardiac miRNAs and their regulatory functions and networks. We found that conserved cardiac miRNA target genes have maintained highly conserved cardiac functions. Additionally, most of cardiac miRNA target genes in human with annotations of cardiac functions evolved from the corresponding homologous targets, which are also involved in heart development-related functions. On the basis of these results, we investigated the functional evolution of cardiac miRNAs and presented a functional evolutionary map. From this map, we identified the evolutionary time at which the cardiac miRNAs became involved in heart development or function and found that the biological processes of heart development evolved earlier than those of heart functions, for example, heart contraction/relaxation or cardiac hypertrophy. Our study of the evolution of the cardiac miRNA regulatory networks revealed the emergence of new regulatory functional branches during evolution. Furthermore, we discovered that early evolved cardiac miRNA target genes tend to participate in the early stages of heart development. This study sheds light on the evolution of developmental features of genes regulated by cardiac miRNAs.

  12. A ubiquitous splice variant and a common polymorphism affect heterologous expression of recombinant human SCN5A heart sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Makielski, Jonathan C; Ye, Bin; Valdivia, Carmen R; Pagel, Matthew D; Pu, Jielin; Tester, David J; Ackerman, Michael J

    2003-10-31

    Amino acid sequence variations in SCN5A are known to affect function of wild-type channels and also those with coexisting mutations; therefore, it is important to know the exact sequence and function of channels most commonly present in human myocardium. SCN5A was analyzed in control panels of human alleles, demonstrating that the existing clones (hH1, hH1a, hH1b) each contained a rare variant and thus none represented the common sequence. Confirming prior work, the H558R polymorphism was present in approximately 30% of subjects. Quantitative mRNA analysis from human hearts showed that a shorter 2015 amino acid splice variant lacking glutamine at position 1077 (Q1077del) made up 65% of the transcript in every heart examined. Age, sex, race, or structural heart disease did not affect this proportion of Q1077del. Estimated population frequencies for the four common variants were 25% SCN5A, 10% [H558R], 45% [Q1077del], and 20% [H558R;Q1077del], where the reference sequence SCN5A is GenBank AC137587. When expressed in HEK-293 cells, these common variants had a more positive mid-point of the voltage dependence of inactivation than the standard clone hH1. Also, channels containing Q1077 expressed smaller currents. When H558R was present with Q1077 ([H558R]), current expression was profoundly reduced despite normal trafficking to the cell surface. Thus, four variant sequences for SCN5A are commonly present in human myocardium and they exhibit functional differences among themselves and with the previous standard clone. These results have implications for the choice of background sequence for experiments with heterologous expression systems, and possibly implications for electrophysiological function in vivo. PMID:14500339

  13. MELAS syndrome and cardiomyopathy: linking mitochondrial function to heart failure pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ying-Han R; Yogasundaram, Haran; Parajuli, Nirmal; Valtuille, Lucas; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure remains an important clinical burden, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in its pathogenesis. The heart has a high metabolic demand, and mitochondrial function is a key determinant of myocardial performance. In mitochondrial disorders, hypertrophic remodeling is the early pattern of cardiomyopathy with progression to dilated cardiomyopathy, conduction defects and ventricular pre-excitation occurring in a significant proportion of patients. Cardiac dysfunction occurs in approximately a third of patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, a stereotypical example of a mitochondrial disorder leading to a cardiomyopathy. We performed unique comparative ultrastructural and gene expression in a MELAS heart compared with non-failing controls. Our results showed a remarkable increase in mitochondrial inclusions and increased abnormal mitochondria in MELAS cardiomyopathy coupled with variable sarcomere thickening, heterogeneous distribution of affected cardiomyocytes and a greater elevation in the expression of disease markers. Investigation and management of patients with mitochondrial cardiomyopathy should follow the well-described contemporary heart failure clinical practice guidelines and include an important role of medical and device therapies. Directed metabolic therapy is lacking, but current research strategies are dedicated toward improving mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial disorders. PMID:26712328

  14. MELAS syndrome and cardiomyopathy: linking mitochondrial function to heart failure pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ying-Han R; Yogasundaram, Haran; Parajuli, Nirmal; Valtuille, Lucas; Sergi, Consolato; Oudit, Gavin Y

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure remains an important clinical burden, and mitochondrial dysfunction plays a key role in its pathogenesis. The heart has a high metabolic demand, and mitochondrial function is a key determinant of myocardial performance. In mitochondrial disorders, hypertrophic remodeling is the early pattern of cardiomyopathy with progression to dilated cardiomyopathy, conduction defects and ventricular pre-excitation occurring in a significant proportion of patients. Cardiac dysfunction occurs in approximately a third of patients with mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) syndrome, a stereotypical example of a mitochondrial disorder leading to a cardiomyopathy. We performed unique comparative ultrastructural and gene expression in a MELAS heart compared with non-failing controls. Our results showed a remarkable increase in mitochondrial inclusions and increased abnormal mitochondria in MELAS cardiomyopathy coupled with variable sarcomere thickening, heterogeneous distribution of affected cardiomyocytes and a greater elevation in the expression of disease markers. Investigation and management of patients with mitochondrial cardiomyopathy should follow the well-described contemporary heart failure clinical practice guidelines and include an important role of medical and device therapies. Directed metabolic therapy is lacking, but current research strategies are dedicated toward improving mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial disorders.

  15. Gap junction modulation and its implications for heart function

    PubMed Central

    Kurtenbach, Stefan; Kurtenbach, Sarah; Zoidl, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction communication (GJC) mediated by connexins is critical for heart function. To gain insight into the causal relationship of molecular mechanisms of disease pathology, it is important to understand which mechanisms contribute to impairment of gap junctional communication. Here, we present an update on the known modulators of connexins, including various interaction partners, kinases, and signaling cascades. This gap junction network (GJN) can serve as a blueprint for data mining approaches exploring the growing number of publicly available data sets from experimental and clinical studies. PMID:24578694

  16. Heart and brain interconnection - clinical implications of changes in brain function during heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Seok; Kim, Jae-Joong

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a highly prevalent disorder worldwide and, consequently, a burden on the healthcare systems of many nations. Although the effects of HF are systemic, many therapeutic targets are focused on cardiac dysfunction. The brain is closely related to the heart, but there are few reports on the relationship between these organs. We describe the effects of the brain on HF progression. Specific brain regions control sympathetic drive and neurohumoral factors, which play an important role in disease exacerbation. In addition, we review some of our previous studies on deranged cerebral metabolism and reduced cerebral blood flow during HF. Although the reasons underlying these effects during HF remain uncertain, we propose plausible mechanisms for these phenomena. In addition, the clinical implications of such conditions in terms of predicting prognosis are discussed. Finally, we investigate cognitive impairment in patients with HF. Cognitive impairment through cerebral infarction or hypoperfusion is associated with adverse outcomes, including death. This brief review of brain function during the development of HF should assist with future strategies to better manage patients with this condition.

  17. Does lung diffusion impairment affect exercise capacity in patients with heart failure?

    PubMed Central

    Agostoni, P G; Bussotti, M; Palermo, P; Guazzi, M

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is a relation between impairment of lung diffusion and reduced exercise capacity in chronic heart failure. Design: 40 patients with heart failure in stable clinical condition and 40 controls participated in the study. All subjects underwent standard pulmonary function tests plus measurements of resting lung diffusion (carbon monoxide transfer, Tlco), pulmonary capillary volume (Vc), and membrane resistance (Dm), and maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing. In 20 patients and controls, the following investigations were also done: (1) resting and constant work rate Tlco; (2) maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing with inspiratory O2 fractions of 0.21 and 0.16; and (3) rest and peak exercise blood gases. The other subjects underwent Tlco, Dm, and Vc measurements during constant work rate exercise. Results: In normoxia, exercise induced reductions of haemoglobin O2 saturation never occurred. With hypoxia, peak exercise uptake (peak V̇o2) decreased from (mean (SD)) 1285 (395) to 1081 (396) ml/min (p < 0.01) in patients, and from 1861 (563) to 1771 (457) ml/min (p < 0.05) in controls. Resting Tlco correlated with peak V̇o2 in heart failure (normoxia < hypoxia). In heart failure patients and normal subjects, Tlco and peak V̇o2 correlated with O2 arterial content at rest and during peak exercise in both normoxia and hypoxia. Tlco, Vc, and Dm increased during exercise. The increase in Tlco was greater in patients who had a smaller reduction of exercise capacity with hypoxia. Alveolar–arterial O2 gradient at peak correlated with exercise capacity in heart failure during normoxia and, to a greater extent, during hypoxia. Conclusions: Lung diffusion impairment is related to exercise capacity in heart failure. PMID:12381630

  18. Treadmill performance and cardiac function in selected patients with coronary heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    McKirnan, M.D.; Sullivan, M.; Jensen, D.; Froelicher, V.F.

    1984-02-01

    To investigate the cardiac determinants of treadmill performance in patients able to exercise to volitional fatigue, 88 patients with coronary heart disease free of angina pectoris were tested. The exercise tests included supine bicycle radionuclide ventriculography, thallium scintigraphy and treadmill testing with expired gas analysis. The number of abnormal Q wave locations, ejection fraction, end-diastolic volume, cardiac output, exercise-induced ST segment depression and thallium scar and ischemia scores were the cardiac variables considered. Rest and exercise ejection fractions were highly correlated to thallium scar score (r . -0.72 to -0.75, p less than 0.001), but not to maximal oxygen consumption (r . 0.19 to 0.25, p less than 0.05). Fifty-five percent of the variability in predicting treadmill time or estimated maximal oxygen consumption was explained by treadmill test-induced change in heart rate (39%), thallium ischemia score (12%) and cardiac output at rest (4%). The change in heart rate induced by the treadmill test explained only 27% of the variability in measured maximal oxygen consumption. Myocardial damage predicted ejection fraction at rest and the ability to increase heart rate with treadmill exercise appeared as an essential component of exercise capacity. Exercise capacity was only minimally affected by asymptomatic ischemia and was relatively independent of ventricular function.

  19. Cybersickness provoked by head-mounted display affects cutaneous vascular tone, heart rate and reaction time.

    PubMed

    Nalivaiko, Eugene; Davis, Simon L; Blackmore, Karen L; Vakulin, Andrew; Nesbitt, Keith V

    2015-11-01

    Evidence from studies of provocative motion indicates that motion sickness is tightly linked to the disturbances of thermoregulation. The major aim of the current study was to determine whether provocative visual stimuli (immersion into the virtual reality simulating rides on a rollercoaster) affect skin temperature that reflects thermoregulatory cutaneous responses, and to test whether such stimuli alter cognitive functions. In 26 healthy young volunteers wearing head-mounted display (Oculus Rift), simulated rides consistently provoked vection and nausea, with a significant difference between the two versions of simulation software (Parrot Coaster and Helix). Basal finger temperature had bimodal distribution, with low-temperature group (n=8) having values of 23-29 °C, and high-temperature group (n=18) having values of 32-36 °C. Effects of cybersickness on finger temperature depended on the basal level of this variable: in subjects from former group it raised by 3-4 °C, while in most subjects from the latter group it either did not change or transiently reduced by 1.5-2 °C. There was no correlation between the magnitude of changes in the finger temperature and nausea score at the end of simulated ride. Provocative visual stimulation caused prolongation of simple reaction time by 20-50 ms; this increase closely correlated with the subjective rating of nausea. Lastly, in subjects who experienced pronounced nausea, heart rate was elevated. We conclude that cybersickness is associated with changes in cutaneous thermoregulatory vascular tone; this further supports the idea of a tight link between motion sickness and thermoregulation. Cybersickness-induced prolongation of reaction time raises obvious concerns regarding the safety of this technology. PMID:26340855

  20. Cybersickness provoked by head-mounted display affects cutaneous vascular tone, heart rate and reaction time.

    PubMed

    Nalivaiko, Eugene; Davis, Simon L; Blackmore, Karen L; Vakulin, Andrew; Nesbitt, Keith V

    2015-11-01

    Evidence from studies of provocative motion indicates that motion sickness is tightly linked to the disturbances of thermoregulation. The major aim of the current study was to determine whether provocative visual stimuli (immersion into the virtual reality simulating rides on a rollercoaster) affect skin temperature that reflects thermoregulatory cutaneous responses, and to test whether such stimuli alter cognitive functions. In 26 healthy young volunteers wearing head-mounted display (Oculus Rift), simulated rides consistently provoked vection and nausea, with a significant difference between the two versions of simulation software (Parrot Coaster and Helix). Basal finger temperature had bimodal distribution, with low-temperature group (n=8) having values of 23-29 °C, and high-temperature group (n=18) having values of 32-36 °C. Effects of cybersickness on finger temperature depended on the basal level of this variable: in subjects from former group it raised by 3-4 °C, while in most subjects from the latter group it either did not change or transiently reduced by 1.5-2 °C. There was no correlation between the magnitude of changes in the finger temperature and nausea score at the end of simulated ride. Provocative visual stimulation caused prolongation of simple reaction time by 20-50 ms; this increase closely correlated with the subjective rating of nausea. Lastly, in subjects who experienced pronounced nausea, heart rate was elevated. We conclude that cybersickness is associated with changes in cutaneous thermoregulatory vascular tone; this further supports the idea of a tight link between motion sickness and thermoregulation. Cybersickness-induced prolongation of reaction time raises obvious concerns regarding the safety of this technology.

  1. Functional evaluation of rat hearts transplanted after preservation in a high-pressure gaseous mixture of carbon monoxide and oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Hatayama, Naoyuki; Inubushi, Masayuki; Naito, Munekazu; Hirai, Shuichi; Jin, Yong-Nan; Tsuji, Atsushi B.; Seki, Kunihiro; Itoh, Masahiro; Saga, Tsuneo; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2016-01-01

    We recently succeeded in resuscitating an extracted rat heart following 24–48 hours of preservation in a high-pressure gaseous mixture of carbon monoxide (CO) and oxygen (O2). This study aimed to examine the function of rat hearts transplanted after being preserved in the high-pressure CO and O2 gas mixture. The hearts of donor rats were preserved in a chamber filled with CO and O2 under high pressure for 24 h (CO24h) or 48 h at 4 °C. For the positive control (PC) group, hearts immediately extracted from donor rats were used for transplantation. The preserved hearts were transplanted into recipient rats by heterotopic cervical heart transplantation. CO toxicity does not affect the grafts or the recipients. Light microscopy and [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed that there were no significant differences in the size of the myocardial infarction or apoptosis of myocardial cells in post-transplant hearts between the PC and CO24h groups. Furthermore, at 100 days after the transplantation, the heart rate, weight and histological staining of the post-transplanted hearts did not differ significantly between the PC and CO24h groups. These results indicate that the function of rat hearts is well preserved after 24 hours of high-pressure preservation in a CO and O2 gas mixture. Therefore, high-pressure preservation in a gas mixture can be a useful method for organ preservation. PMID:27562456

  2. Fish Consumption, Sleep, Daily Functioning, and Heart Rate Variability

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anita L.; Dahl, Lisbeth; Olson, Gina; Thornton, David; Graff, Ingvild E.; Frøyland, Livar; Thayer, Julian F.; Pallesen, Staale

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: This study investigated the effects of fatty fish on sleep, daily functioning and biomarkers such as heart rate variability (HRV), vitamin D status (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3) + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) in red blood cells. Moreover the relationship among sleep, daily functioning, HRV, vitamin D status, and levels of EPA+DHA was investigated. Methods: Ninety-five male forensic patients from a secure forensic inpatient facility in the USA were randomly assigned into a Fish or a Control group. The Fish group received Atlantic salmon three times per week from September to February, and the Control group was provided an alternative meal (e.g., chicken, pork, beef), but with the same nutritional value as their habitual diet, three times per week during the same period. Sleep (sleep latency, sleep efficiency, actual sleep time, and actual wake time), self-perceived sleep quality and daily functioning, as well as vitamin D status, EPA+DHA, and HRV, were assessed pre- and post-intervention period. Results: There was a significant increase in sleep latency from pre- to post-test in the Control group. The Fish group reported better daily functioning than the Control group during post-test. Fish consumption throughout the wintertime had also an effect on resting HRV and EPA+DHA, but not on vitamin D status. However, at post-test, the vitamin D status in the Fish group was still closer to the level regarded as optimal compared to the Control group. Vitamin D status correlated negatively with actual wake time and positively with sleep efficiency during pre-test, as well as positively with daily functioning and sleep quality during post-test. Finally, HRV correlated negatively with sleep latency and positively with daily functioning. Conclusions: Fish consumption seemed to have a positive impact on sleep in general and also on daily functioning, which may be related to vitamin D status and HRV. Citation

  3. The Ubiquitin-Like SUMO System and Heart Function: From Development to Disease.

    PubMed

    Mendler, Luca; Braun, Thomas; Müller, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    SUMOylation is a ubiquitin-related transient posttranslational modification pathway catalyzing the conjugation of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) proteins (SUMO1, SUMO2, and SUMO3) to lysine residues of proteins. SUMOylation targets a wide variety of cellular regulators and thereby affects a multitude of different cellular processes. SUMO/sentrin-specific proteases are able to remove SUMOs from targets, contributing to a tight control of SUMOylated proteins. Genetic and cell biological experiments indicate a critical role of balanced SUMOylation/deSUMOylation for proper cardiac development, metabolism, and stress adaptation. Here, we review the current knowledge about SUMOylation/deSUMOylation in the heart and provide an integrated picture of cardiac functions of the SUMO system under physiologic or pathologic conditions. We also describe potential therapeutic approaches targeting the SUMO machinery to combat heart disease.

  4. Dynamic heart-in-thorax phantom for functional SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Celler, A.; Lyster, D.; Farncombe, T.

    1996-12-31

    We have designed and built a dynamic heart-in-thorax phantom to be used as a primary tool during the experimental verification of the performance of the quantitative dynamic functional imaging method we are developing for standard rotating single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) cameras. The phantom consists of two independent parts (i) a dynamic heart model with the possibility of mounting {open_quotes}defects{close_quotes} inside it and (ii) a non-uniform thorax model with lungs and spinal cord, and uses the fact that the washout of a tracer by dilution is governed by a linear first order equation, the same type of equation as is used to model time-activity distribution in myocardial viability studies. Tests of the dynamic performance of the phantom in planar scanning mode have confirmed the validity of these assumptions. Also the preliminary results obtained in SPECT mode show that the values of characteristic times could be experimentally determined and that these values agreed well with the values preset on the phantom. We consider that the phantom is ready for extensive use in studies into development of the dynamic SPECT method.

  5. Autonomic functions in acrocyanosis assessed by heart rate variability

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Sedat; Yokuşoğlu, Mehmet; Çınar, Muhammet; Şimşek, İsmail; Baysan, Oben; Öz, Bilgehan Savaş; Erdem, Hakan; Pay, Salih; Dinç, Ayhan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the autonomic activity of patients with acrocyanosis by using heart rate variability indices. Material and Methods The study group consisted of 24 patients with acrocyanosis and the control group contained 22 sex- and age-matched healthy subjects. All subjects underwent 24-hour Holter monitoring. Among the heart rate variability (HRV) parameters, time-domain and frequency-domain indices were analysed. Results The time-domain indices of HRV indicating global autonomic functions were found to be increased, and indices indicating parasympathetic activity showed a significant decrease in the patient group. Power-spectral analysis of HRV revealed that the low frequency and high frequency power were higher in the patient group than in controls. However, the ratio of Low Frequency/High Frequency was found to be lower in the patient group than in controls. Conclusion In acrocyanosis, both sympathetic and parasympathetic systems seem to be disrupted. Therefore, we may conclude that acrocyanosis may be resulted of systemic autonomic imbalance rather than pure sympathetic over-activation. Also, these results suggest that acrocyanosis is not a localised disorder; on the contrary, it is associated with various abnormalities of the systemic autonomic nervous system.

  6. Predictors of cognitive/affective and somatic depression in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Seo, Yaewon; Yates, Bernice; Dizona, Paul; Laframboise, Louise; Norman, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    The effects of depression on patients with heart failure (HF) are substantial, yet the predictors remain unclear. The predictors of cognitive/affective and somatic depression in stable HF patients were studied. Using a cross-sectional design, 150 HF outpatients were recruited at two mid-Western HF clinics. Predictors included dyspnea with activities of daily living, family and friend social support, and loneliness; age and gender were control variables. All constructs were measured using standardized instruments. Structural equation modeling (SEM) showed that cognitive/affective depression was predicted by greater dyspnea and loneliness, whereas somatic depression was predicted by more dyspnea and friend support. Also, greater dyspnea was related to more loneliness and less friend support; less friend support was related to loneliness. Women reported more dyspnea and loneliness. Since cognitive/affective and somatic depression have different predictors, further study is warranted to identify HF patients at risk for depression and to establish interventions targeted at improving depression.

  7. Dietary Nitrate and Skeletal Muscle Contractile Function in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Coggan, Andrew R; Peterson, Linda R

    2016-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients suffer from exercise intolerance that diminishes their ability to perform normal activities of daily living and hence compromises their quality of life. This is due largely to detrimental changes in skeletal muscle mass, structure, metabolism, and function. This includes an impairment of muscle contractile performance, i.e., a decline in the maximal force, speed, and power of muscle shortening. Although numerous mechanisms underlie this reduction in contractility, one contributing factor may be a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability. Consistent with this, recent data demonstrate that acute ingestion of NO3 (-)-rich beetroot juice, a source of NO via the NO synthase-independent enterosalivary pathway, markedly increases maximal muscle speed and power in HF patients. This review discusses the role of muscle contractile dysfunction in the exercise intolerance characteristic of HF, and the evidence that dietary NO3 (-) supplementation may represent a novel and simple therapy for this currently underappreciated problem. PMID:27271563

  8. Attachment Status Affects Heart Rate Responses to Experimental Ostracism in Inpatients with Depression

    PubMed Central

    De Rubeis, Jannika; Sütterlin, Stefan; Lange, Diane; Pawelzik, Markus; van Randenborgh, Annette; Victor, Daniela; Vögele, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Depression is assumed to be both a risk factor for rejection and a result of it, and as such constitutes an important factor in rejection research. Attachment theory has been applied to understand psychological disorders, such as depression, and can explain individual differences in responses to rejection. Research on autonomic nervous system activity to rejection experiences has been contradictory, with opposing strings of argumentation (activating vs. numbing). We investigated autonomic nervous system-mediated peripheral physiological responses (heart rate) to experimentally manipulated ostracism (Cyberball) in 97 depressed patients with organized (n = 52) and disorganized attachment status (n = 45). Controlling for baseline mean heart rate levels, depressed patients with disorganized attachment status responded to ostracism with significantly higher increases in heart rate than depressed patients with organized attachment status (p = .029; ηp2 = .051). These results suggest that attachment status may be a useful indicator of autonomic responses to perceived social threat, which in turn may affect the therapeutic process and the patient-therapist relationship. PMID:26943924

  9. Attachment Status Affects Heart Rate Responses to Experimental Ostracism in Inpatients with Depression.

    PubMed

    De Rubeis, Jannika; Sütterlin, Stefan; Lange, Diane; Pawelzik, Markus; van Randenborgh, Annette; Victor, Daniela; Vögele, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Depression is assumed to be both a risk factor for rejection and a result of it, and as such constitutes an important factor in rejection research. Attachment theory has been applied to understand psychological disorders, such as depression, and can explain individual differences in responses to rejection. Research on autonomic nervous system activity to rejection experiences has been contradictory, with opposing strings of argumentation (activating vs. numbing). We investigated autonomic nervous system-mediated peripheral physiological responses (heart rate) to experimentally manipulated ostracism (Cyberball) in 97 depressed patients with organized (n = 52) and disorganized attachment status (n = 45). Controlling for baseline mean heart rate levels, depressed patients with disorganized attachment status responded to ostracism with significantly higher increases in heart rate than depressed patients with organized attachment status (p = .029; ηp2 = .051). These results suggest that attachment status may be a useful indicator of autonomic responses to perceived social threat, which in turn may affect the therapeutic process and the patient-therapist relationship.

  10. Attachment Status Affects Heart Rate Responses to Experimental Ostracism in Inpatients with Depression.

    PubMed

    De Rubeis, Jannika; Sütterlin, Stefan; Lange, Diane; Pawelzik, Markus; van Randenborgh, Annette; Victor, Daniela; Vögele, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Depression is assumed to be both a risk factor for rejection and a result of it, and as such constitutes an important factor in rejection research. Attachment theory has been applied to understand psychological disorders, such as depression, and can explain individual differences in responses to rejection. Research on autonomic nervous system activity to rejection experiences has been contradictory, with opposing strings of argumentation (activating vs. numbing). We investigated autonomic nervous system-mediated peripheral physiological responses (heart rate) to experimentally manipulated ostracism (Cyberball) in 97 depressed patients with organized (n = 52) and disorganized attachment status (n = 45). Controlling for baseline mean heart rate levels, depressed patients with disorganized attachment status responded to ostracism with significantly higher increases in heart rate than depressed patients with organized attachment status (p = .029; ηp2 = .051). These results suggest that attachment status may be a useful indicator of autonomic responses to perceived social threat, which in turn may affect the therapeutic process and the patient-therapist relationship. PMID:26943924

  11. Can Particulate Pollution Affect Lung Function in Healthy Adults?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Accompanying editorial to paper from Harvard by Rice et al. entitled "Long-Term Exposure to Traffic Emissions and Fine Particulate Matter and Lung Function Decline in the Framingham Heart StudyBy almost any measure the Clean Air Act and its amendments has to be considered as one...

  12. Dynamic heart phantom with functional mitral and aortic valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannelli, Claire; Moore, John; McLeod, Jonathan; Ceh, Dennis; Peters, Terry

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac valvular stenosis, prolapse and regurgitation are increasingly common conditions, particularly in an elderly population with limited potential for on-pump cardiac surgery. NeoChord©, MitraClipand numerous stent-based transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) devices provide an alternative to intrusive cardiac operations; performed while the heart is beating, these procedures require surgeons and cardiologists to learn new image-guidance based techniques. Developing these visual aids and protocols is a challenging task that benefits from sophisticated simulators. Existing models lack features needed to simulate off-pump valvular procedures: functional, dynamic valves, apical and vascular access, and user flexibility for different activation patterns such as variable heart rates and rapid pacing. We present a left ventricle phantom with these characteristics. The phantom can be used to simulate valvular repair and replacement procedures with magnetic tracking, augmented reality, fluoroscopy and ultrasound guidance. This tool serves as a platform to develop image-guidance and image processing techniques required for a range of minimally invasive cardiac interventions. The phantom mimics in vivo mitral and aortic valve motion, permitting realistic ultrasound images of these components to be acquired. It also has a physiological realistic left ventricular ejection fraction of 50%. Given its realistic imaging properties and non-biodegradable composition—silicone for tissue, water for blood—the system promises to reduce the number of animal trials required to develop image guidance applications for valvular repair and replacement. The phantom has been used in validation studies for both TAVI image-guidance techniques1, and image-based mitral valve tracking algorithms2.

  13. American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7: Avoiding Heart Failure and Preserving Cardiac Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Folsom, Aaron R.; Shah, Amil M.; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Roetker, Nicholas S.; Alonso, Alvaro; Avery, Christy L.; Miedema, Michael D.; Konety, Suma; Chang, Patricia P.; Solomon, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Many people may underappreciate the role of lifestyle in avoiding heart failure. We estimated whether greater adherence in middle age to American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 guidelines -- on smoking, body mass, physical activity, diet, cholesterol, blood pressure, and glucose -- is associated with lower lifetime risk of heart failure and greater preservation of cardiac structure and function in old age. METHODS We studied the population-based Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study cohort of 13,462 adults aged 45-64 years in 1987-89. From the 1987-89 risk factor measurements, we created a Life’s Simple 7 score (range 0-14, giving 2 points for ideal, 1 point for intermediate, and 0 points for poor components). We identified 2,218 incident heart failure events using surveillance of hospital discharge and death codes through 2011. In addition, in 4,855 participants free of clinical cardiovascular disease in 2011-13, we performed echocardiography from which we quantified left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic dysfunction. RESULTS One in four participants (25.5%) developed heart failure through age 85. Yet, this lifetime heart failure risk was 14.4% for those with a middle-age Life’s Simple 7 score of 10-14 (optimal), 26.8% for a score of 5-9 (average), and 48.6% for a score of 0-4 (inadequate). Among those with no clinical cardiovascular event, the prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy in late life was approximately 40% as common, and diastolic dysfunction was approximately 60% as common, among those with an optimal middle-age Life’s Simple 7 score compared with an inadequate score. CONCLUSIONS Greater achievement of American Heart Association’s Life’s Simple 7 in middle-age is associated with a lower lifetime occurrence of heart failure and greater preservation of cardiac structure and function. PMID:25908393

  14. A phenotypic in vitro model for the main determinants of human whole heart function.

    PubMed

    Stancescu, Maria; Molnar, Peter; McAleer, Christopher W; McLamb, William; Long, Christopher J; Oleaga, Carlota; Prot, Jean-Matthieu; Hickman, James J

    2015-08-01

    This article details the construction and testing of a phenotypic assay system that models in vivo cardiac function in a parallel in vitro environment with human stem cell derived cardiomyocytes. The major determinants of human whole-heart function were experimentally modeled by integrating separate 2D cellular systems with BioMicroelectromechanical Systems (BioMEMS) constructs. The model features a serum-free defined medium to enable both acute and chronic evaluation of drugs and toxins. The integration of data from both systems produced biologically relevant predictions of cardiac function in response to varying concentrations of selected drugs. Sotalol, norepinephrine and verapamil were shown to affect the measured parameters according to their specific mechanism of action, in agreement with clinical data. This system is applicable for cardiac side effect assessment, general toxicology, efficacy studies, and evaluation of in vitro cellular disease models in body-on-a-chip systems.

  15. A phenotypic in vitro model for the main determinants of human whole heart function

    PubMed Central

    Stancescu, Maria; Molnar, Peter; McAleer, Christopher W.; McLamb, William; Long, Christopher J.; Oleaga, Carlota; Prot, Jean-Matthieu; Hickman, James J.

    2015-01-01

    This article details the construction and testing of a phenotypic assay system that models in vivo cardiac function in a parallel in vitro environment with human stem cell derived cardiomyocytes. The major determinants of human whole-heart function were experimentally modeled by integrating separate 2D cellular systems with BioMicroelectromechanical Systems (BioMEMS) constructs. The model featured a serum-free defined medium to enable both acute and chronic evaluation of drugs and toxins. The integration of data from both systems produced biologically relevant predictions of cardiac function in response to varying concentrations of selected drugs. Sotalol, norepinephrine and verapamil were shown to affect the measured parameters according to their specific mechanism of action, in agreement with clinical data. This system is applicable for cardiac side effect assessment, general toxicology, efficacy studies, and evaluation of in vitro cellular disease models in body-on-a-chip systems. PMID:25978005

  16. Rescue of heart lipoprotein lipase-knockout mice confirms a role for triglyceride in optimal heart metabolism and function.

    PubMed

    Khan, Raffay S; Lin, Yan; Hu, Yunying; Son, Ni-Huiping; Bharadwaj, Kalyani G; Palacios, Carla; Chokshi, Aalap; Ji, Ruiping; Yu, Shuiqing; Homma, Sunichi; Schulze, P Christian; Tian, Rong; Goldberg, Ira J

    2013-12-01

    Hearts utilize fatty acids as a primary source of energy. The sources of those lipids include free fatty acids and lipoprotein triglycerides. Deletion of the primary triglyceride-hydrolyzing enzyme lipoprotein lipase (LPL) leads to cardiac dysfunction. Whether heart LPL-knockout (hLPL0) mice are compromised due a deficiency in energetic substrates is unknown. To test whether alternative sources of energy will prevent cardiac dysfunction in hLPL0 mice, two different models were used to supply nonlipid energy. 1) hLPL0 mice were crossed with mice transgenically expressing GLUT1 in cardiomyocytes to increase glucose uptake into the heart; this cross-corrected cardiac dysfunction, reduced cardiac hypertrophy, and increased myocardial ATP. 2) Mice were randomly assigned to a sedentary or training group (swimming) at 3 mo of age, which leads to increased skeletal muscle production of lactate. hLPL0 mice had greater expression of the lactate transporter monocarboxylate transporter-1 (MCT-1) and increased cardiac lactate uptake. Compared with hearts from sedentary hLPL0 mice, hearts from trained hLPL0 mice had adaptive hypertrophy and improved cardiac function. We conclude that defective energy intake and not the reduced uptake of fat-soluble vitamins or cholesterol is responsible for cardiac dysfunction in hLPL0 mice. In addition, our studies suggest that adaptations in cardiac metabolism contribute to the beneficial effects of exercise on the myocardium of patients with heart failure. PMID:24085031

  17. Miniature implantable instrument measures and transmits heart function data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. D.

    1971-01-01

    Heart diameter is derived from measured transit time of 2.25 MHz ultrasonic pulse between two piezoelectric crystals attached to diametrically opposite heart surfaces. Miniature instrument implanted in chest telemeters information to external receiver-converter. System permits continual dimensional data recording taken from awake animals during long-term experiments.

  18. Eplerenone in chronic heart failure with depressed systolic function.

    PubMed

    Volterrani, Maurizio; Iellamo, Ferdinando

    2015-12-01

    Eplerenone is a selective mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist that has been recently included in the treatment of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) and reduced systolic function. This brief review aims to summarize current evidence on the role of eplerenone in the therapy of patients with CHF. In the EPHESUS trial, 6632 post-myocardial infarction patients with ejection fraction (EF) <40% and clinical HF signs were randomized to eplerenone or placebo added to standard therapy 3 to 14 days after the event. After a 16 month follow-up period, eplerenone given early (<7 days) reduced the primary endpoints of all-cause mortality by 15% and cardiovascular death or cardiovascular hospitalization by 13%. In the subsequent EMPHASIS-HF trial, the efficacy and tolerability of eplerenone were tested in patients with mild CHF (NYHA functional class II) and EF ≤ 30% or between 30 and 35% with QRS duration >130 ms. After a median follow-up of 21 months eplerenone significantly reduced (by 37%) the primary composite outcome of risk of death from CV causes and first hospitalization for HF. Based on the above findings, the addition of eplerenone to standard therapy, at doses to be titrated from 25 to 50mg per day, is currently recommended in CHF patients with functional classes II to IV closely resembling those enrolled in these large clinical trials, with adequate monitoring for side effects (mainly hyperkalemia and renal failure). Whether the same beneficial effects of eplerenone extend to CHF patients with mild symptoms and no additional risk factors are unknown.

  19. Hemodynamics of a functional centrifugal-flow total artificial heart with functional atrial contraction in goats.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Takuya; Shiraishi, Yasuyuki; Sano, Kyosuke; Taira, Yasunori; Tsuboko, Yusuke; Yamada, Akihiro; Miura, Hidekazu; Katahira, Shintaro; Akiyama, Masatoshi; Saiki, Yoshikatsu; Yambe, Tomoyuki

    2016-03-01

    Implantation of a total artificial heart (TAH) is one of the therapeutic options for the treatment of patients with end-stage biventricular heart failure. There is no report on the hemodynamics of the functional centrifugal-flow TAH with functional atrial contraction (fCFTAH). We evaluated the effects of pulsatile flow by atrial contraction in acute animal models. The goats received fCFTAH that we created from two centrifugal-flow ventricular assist devices. Some hemodynamic parameters maintained acceptable levels: heart rate 115.5 ± 26.3 bpm, aortic pressure 83.5 ± 10.1 mmHg, left atrial pressure 18.0 ± 5.9 mmHg, pulmonary pressure 28.5 ± 9.7 mmHg, right atrial pressure 13.6 ± 5.2 mmHg, pump flow 4.0 ± 1.1 L/min (left) 3.9 ± 1.1 L/min (right), and cardiac index 2.13 ± 0.14 L/min/m(2). fCFTAH with atrial contraction was able to maintain the TAH circulation by forming a pulsatile flow in acute animal experiments. Taking the left and right flow rate balance using the low internal pressure loss of the VAD pumps may be easier than by other pumps having considerable internal pressure loss. We showed that the remnant atrial contraction effected the flow rate change of the centrifugal pump, and the atrial contraction waves reflected the heart rate. These results indicate that remnant atria had the possibility to preserve autonomic function in fCFTAH. We may control fCFTAH by reflecting the autonomic function, which is estimated with the flow rate change of the centrifugal pump.

  20. Heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation enhances cardiac function and longevity.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Zachary A; Hsieh, Jo-Lin; Li, Andrew; Wang, William; Bhatt, Dhelni T; Lee, Angela; Kim, Sae Yeon; Fan, David; Shah, Veevek; Siddiqui, Emaad; Ragam, Radhika; Park, Kristen; Ardeshna, Dev; Park, Kunwoo; Wu, Rachel; Parikh, Hardik; Parikh, Ayush; Lin, Yuh-Ru; Park, Yongkyu

    2015-09-01

    Downregulation of Rpd3, a homologue of mammalian Histone Deacetylase 1 (HDAC1), extends lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster. Once revealed that long-lived fruit flies exhibit limited cardiac decline, we investigated whether Rpd3 downregulation would improve stress resistance and/or lifespan when targeted in the heart. Contested against three different stressors (oxidation, starvation and heat), heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation significantly enhanced stress resistance in flies. However, these higher levels of resistance were not observed when Rpd3 downregulation was targeted in other tissues or when other long-lived flies were tested in the heart-specific manner. Interestingly, the expressions of anti-aging genes such as sod2, foxo and Thor, were systemically increased as a consequence of heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation. Showing higher resistance to oxidative stress, the heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation concurrently exhibited improved cardiac functions, demonstrating an increased heart rate, decreased heart failure and accelerated heart recovery. Conversely, Rpd3 upregulation in cardiac tissue reduced systemic resistance against heat stress with decreased heart function, also specifying phosphorylated Rpd3 levels as a significant modulator. Continual downregulation of Rpd3 throughout aging increased lifespan, implicating that Rpd3 deacetylase in the heart plays a significant role in cardiac function and longevity to systemically modulate the fly's response to the environment.

  1. Heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation enhances cardiac function and longevity

    PubMed Central

    Kopp, Zachary A.; Hsieh, Jo-Lin; Li, Andrew; Wang, William; Bhatt, Dhelni T.; Lee, Angela; Kim, Sae Yeon; Fan, David; Shah, Veevek; Siddiqui, Emaad; Ragam, Radhika; Park, Kristen; Ardeshna, Dev; Park, Kunwoo; Wu, Rachel; Parikh, Hardik; Parikh, Ayush; Lin, Yuh-Ru; Park, Yongkyu

    2015-01-01

    Downregulation of Rpd3, a homologue of mammalian Histone Deacetylase 1 (HDAC1), extends lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster. Once revealed that long-lived fruit flies exhibit limited cardiac decline, we investigated whether Rpd3 downregulation would improve stress resistance and/or lifespan when targeted in the heart. Contested against three different stressors (oxidation, starvation and heat), heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation significantly enhanced stress resistance in flies. However, these higher levels of resistance were not observed when Rpd3 downregulation was targeted in other tissues or when other long-lived flies were tested in the heart-specific manner. Interestingly, the expressions of anti-aging genes such as sod2, foxo and Thor, were systemically increased as a consequence of heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation. Showing higher resistance to oxidative stress, the heart-specific Rpd3 downregulation concurrently exhibited improved cardiac functions, demonstrating an increased heart rate, decreased heart failure and accelerated heart recovery. Conversely, Rpd3 upregulation in cardiac tissue reduced systemic resistance against heat stress with decreased heart function, also specifying phosphorylated Rpd3 levels as a significant modulator. Continual downregulation of Rpd3 throughout aging increased lifespan, implicating that Rpd3 deacetylase in the heart plays a significant role in cardiac function and longevity to systemically modulate the fly's response to the environment. PMID:26399365

  2. Association between Functional Variables and Heart Failure after Myocardial Infarction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Polegato, Bertha F.; Minicucci, Marcos F.; Azevedo, Paula S.; Gonçalves, Andréa F.; Lima, Aline F.; Martinez, Paula F.; Okoshi, Marina P.; Okoshi, Katashi; Paiva, Sergio A. R.; Zornoff, Leonardo A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart failure prediction after acute myocardial infarction may have important clinical implications. Objective To analyze the functional echocardiographic variables associated with heart failure in an infarction model in rats. Methods The animals were divided into two groups: control and infarction. Subsequently, the infarcted animals were divided into groups: with and without heart failure. The predictive values were assessed by logistic regression. The cutoff values predictive of heart failure were determined using ROC curves. Results Six months after surgery, 88 infarcted animals and 43 control animals were included in the study. Myocardial infarction increased left cavity diameters and the mass and wall thickness of the left ventricle. Additionally, myocardial infarction resulted in systolic and diastolic dysfunction, characterized by lower area variation fraction values, posterior wall shortening velocity, E-wave deceleration time, associated with higher values of E / A ratio and isovolumic relaxation time adjusted by heart rate. Among the infarcted animals, 54 (61%) developed heart failure. Rats with heart failure have higher left cavity mass index and diameter, associated with worsening of functional variables. The area variation fraction, the E/A ratio, E-wave deceleration time and isovolumic relaxation time adjusted by heart rate were functional variables predictors of heart failure. The cutoff values of functional variables associated with heart failure were: area variation fraction < 31.18%; E / A > 3.077; E-wave deceleration time < 42.11 and isovolumic relaxation time adjusted by heart rate < 69.08. Conclusion In rats followed for 6 months after myocardial infarction, the area variation fraction, E/A ratio, E-wave deceleration time and isovolumic relaxation time adjusted by heart rate are predictors of heart failure onset. PMID:26815462

  3. Factors affecting nurses' intent to assess for depression in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Lea, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The association between depression and cardiovascular disease has been well established and has been shown to decrease patients' quality of life and increase the risk of mortality, frequency and duration of hospitalization, and health care costs. The inpatient setting provides a potentially valuable opportunity to assess and treat depression among patients with acute cardiac illness, allowing for daily monitoring of treatment side effects. Although systematic depression screening appears to be feasible, efficient, and well accepted on inpatient cardiac units, the current lack of consistent inpatient assessment for depression in heart failure patients suggests the presence of barriers influencing the effective diagnosis and treatment of depression among inpatients with heart failure. The theory of planned behavior describes the cognitive mechanism by which behavioral intent is formed, giving some insight into how nurses' attitudes and beliefs affect their performance of routine depression screening. In addition, application of this cognitive theory suggests that nurses may be influenced to adopt more positive attitudes and beliefs about depression through educational intervention, leading to greater likelihood of routine assessment for depression, ultimately leading to more timely diagnosis and treatment and improved patient outcomes.

  4. Factors affecting nurses' intent to assess for depression in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Lea, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The association between depression and cardiovascular disease has been well established and has been shown to decrease patients' quality of life and increase the risk of mortality, frequency and duration of hospitalization, and health care costs. The inpatient setting provides a potentially valuable opportunity to assess and treat depression among patients with acute cardiac illness, allowing for daily monitoring of treatment side effects. Although systematic depression screening appears to be feasible, efficient, and well accepted on inpatient cardiac units, the current lack of consistent inpatient assessment for depression in heart failure patients suggests the presence of barriers influencing the effective diagnosis and treatment of depression among inpatients with heart failure. The theory of planned behavior describes the cognitive mechanism by which behavioral intent is formed, giving some insight into how nurses' attitudes and beliefs affect their performance of routine depression screening. In addition, application of this cognitive theory suggests that nurses may be influenced to adopt more positive attitudes and beliefs about depression through educational intervention, leading to greater likelihood of routine assessment for depression, ultimately leading to more timely diagnosis and treatment and improved patient outcomes. PMID:25280199

  5. Factors affecting regional pulmonary blood flow in chronic ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pistolesi, M.; Miniati, M.; Bonsignore, M.; Andreotti, F.; Di Ricco, G.; Marini, C.; Rindi, M.; Biagini, A.; Milne, E.N.; Giuntini, C.

    1988-07-01

    To assess the effect of left heart disease on pulmonary blood flow distribution, we measured mean pulmonary arterial and wedge pressures, cardiac output, pulmonary vascular resistance, pulmonary blood volume, and arterial oxygen tension before and after treatment in 13 patients with longstanding ischemic heart failure and pulmonary edema. Pulmonary edema was evaluated by a radiographic score, and regional lung perfusion was quantified on a lung scan by the upper to lower third ratio (U:L ratio) of pulmonary blood flow per unit of lung volume. In all cases, redistribution of lung perfusion toward the apical regions was observed; this pattern was not affected by treatment. After treatment, pulmonary vascular pressures, resistance, and edema were reduced, while pulmonary blood volume did not change. At this time, pulmonary vascular resistance showed a positive correlation with the U:L ratio (r = 0.78; P less than 0.01), whereas no correlation was observed between U:L ratio and wedge pressure, pulmonary edema, or arterial oxygen tension. Hence, redistribution of pulmonary blood flow, in these patients, reflects chronic structural vascular changes prevailing in the dependent lung regions.

  6. Mast cells regulate myofilament calcium sensitization and heart function after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ngkelo, Anta; Richart, Adèle; Kirk, Jonathan A; Bonnin, Philippe; Vilar, Jose; Lemitre, Mathilde; Marck, Pauline; Branchereau, Maxime; Le Gall, Sylvain; Renault, Nisa; Guerin, Coralie; Ranek, Mark J; Kervadec, Anaïs; Danelli, Luca; Gautier, Gregory; Blank, Ulrich; Launay, Pierre; Camerer, Eric; Bruneval, Patrick; Menasche, Philippe; Heymes, Christophe; Luche, Elodie; Casteilla, Louis; Cousin, Béatrice; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kass, David A; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-06-27

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) is a severe ischemic disease responsible for heart failure and sudden death. Inflammatory cells orchestrate postischemic cardiac remodeling after MI. Studies using mice with defective mast/stem cell growth factor receptor c-Kit have suggested key roles for mast cells (MCs) in postischemic cardiac remodeling. Because c-Kit mutations affect multiple cell types of both immune and nonimmune origin, we addressed the impact of MCs on cardiac function after MI, using the c-Kit-independent MC-deficient (Cpa3(Cre/+)) mice. In response to MI, MC progenitors originated primarily from white adipose tissue, infiltrated the heart, and differentiated into mature MCs. MC deficiency led to reduced postischemic cardiac function and depressed cardiomyocyte contractility caused by myofilament Ca(2+) desensitization. This effect correlated with increased protein kinase A (PKA) activity and hyperphosphorylation of its targets, troponin I and myosin-binding protein C. MC-specific tryptase was identified to regulate PKA activity in cardiomyocytes via protease-activated receptor 2 proteolysis. This work reveals a novel function for cardiac MCs modulating cardiomyocyte contractility via alteration of PKA-regulated force-Ca(2+) interactions in response to MI. Identification of this MC-cardiomyocyte cross-talk provides new insights on the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the cardiac contractile machinery and a novel platform for therapeutically addressable regulators.

  7. Mast cells regulate myofilament calcium sensitization and heart function after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ngkelo, Anta; Richart, Adèle; Kirk, Jonathan A; Bonnin, Philippe; Vilar, Jose; Lemitre, Mathilde; Marck, Pauline; Branchereau, Maxime; Le Gall, Sylvain; Renault, Nisa; Guerin, Coralie; Ranek, Mark J; Kervadec, Anaïs; Danelli, Luca; Gautier, Gregory; Blank, Ulrich; Launay, Pierre; Camerer, Eric; Bruneval, Patrick; Menasche, Philippe; Heymes, Christophe; Luche, Elodie; Casteilla, Louis; Cousin, Béatrice; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kass, David A; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-06-27

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) is a severe ischemic disease responsible for heart failure and sudden death. Inflammatory cells orchestrate postischemic cardiac remodeling after MI. Studies using mice with defective mast/stem cell growth factor receptor c-Kit have suggested key roles for mast cells (MCs) in postischemic cardiac remodeling. Because c-Kit mutations affect multiple cell types of both immune and nonimmune origin, we addressed the impact of MCs on cardiac function after MI, using the c-Kit-independent MC-deficient (Cpa3(Cre/+)) mice. In response to MI, MC progenitors originated primarily from white adipose tissue, infiltrated the heart, and differentiated into mature MCs. MC deficiency led to reduced postischemic cardiac function and depressed cardiomyocyte contractility caused by myofilament Ca(2+) desensitization. This effect correlated with increased protein kinase A (PKA) activity and hyperphosphorylation of its targets, troponin I and myosin-binding protein C. MC-specific tryptase was identified to regulate PKA activity in cardiomyocytes via protease-activated receptor 2 proteolysis. This work reveals a novel function for cardiac MCs modulating cardiomyocyte contractility via alteration of PKA-regulated force-Ca(2+) interactions in response to MI. Identification of this MC-cardiomyocyte cross-talk provides new insights on the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating the cardiac contractile machinery and a novel platform for therapeutically addressable regulators. PMID:27353089

  8. Genome-wide compendium and functional assessment of in vivo heart enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Dickel, Diane E.; Barozzi, Iros; Zhu, Yiwen; Fukuda-Yuzawa, Yoko; Osterwalder, Marco; Mannion, Brandon J.; May, Dalit; Spurrell, Cailyn H.; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Pickle, Catherine S.; Lee, Elizabeth; Garvin, Tyler H.; Kato, Momoe; Akiyama, Jennifer A.; Afzal, Veena; Lee, Ah Young; Gorkin, David U.; Ren, Bing; Rubin, Edward M.; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-genome sequencing is identifying growing numbers of non-coding variants in human disease studies, but the lack of accurate functional annotations prevents their interpretation. We describe the genome-wide landscape of distant-acting enhancers active in the developing and adult human heart, an organ whose impairment is a predominant cause of mortality and morbidity. Using integrative analysis of >35 epigenomic data sets from mouse and human pre- and postnatal hearts we created a comprehensive reference of >80,000 putative human heart enhancers. To illustrate the importance of enhancers in the regulation of genes involved in heart disease, we deleted the mouse orthologs of two human enhancers near cardiac myosin genes. In both cases, we observe in vivo expression changes and cardiac phenotypes consistent with human heart disease. Our study provides a comprehensive catalogue of human heart enhancers for use in clinical whole-genome sequencing studies and highlights the importance of enhancers for cardiac function. PMID:27703156

  9. Executive Dysfunction is Independently Associated with Reduced Functional Independence in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Colbert, Lisa H.; Josephson, Richard; van Dulmen, Manfred; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives To examine the independent association between executive function with instrumental activities of daily living and health behaviors in older adults with heart failure. Background Executive function is an important contributor to functional independence as it consists of cognitive processes needed for decision-making, planning, organizing, and behavioral monitoring. Impairment in this domain is common in heart failure patients and associated with reduced performance of instrumental activities of daily living in many medical and neurological populations. However, the contribution of executive functions to functional independence and healthy lifestyle choices in heart failure patients has not been fully examined. Design Cross-sectional analyses. Methods 175 heart failure patients completed a neuropsychological battery and echocardiogram. Participants also completed the Lawton-Brody instrumental activities of daily living scale and reported current cigarette use. Results Hierarchical regressions revealed reduced executive function was independently associated with worse instrumental activity of daily living performance with a specific association for decreased ability to manage medications. Partial correlations showed executive dysfunction was associated with current cigarette use. Conclusions Our findings suggest that executive dysfunction is associated with poorer functional independence and contributes to unhealthy behaviors in heart failure. Future studies should examine whether heart failure patients benefit from formal organization schemae (i.e., pill organizers) to maintain independence. Relevance to Clinical Practice Screening of executive function in heart failure patients may provide key insight into their ability to perform daily tasks, including management of treatment recommendations. PMID:23650879

  10. Assessment of systolic and diastolic function in heart failure using ambulatory monitoring with acoustic cardiography.

    PubMed

    Dillier, Roger; Zuber, Michel; Arand, Patricia; Erne, Susanne; Erne, Paul

    2011-08-01

    INTRODUCTION. The circadian variation of heart function and heart sounds in patients with and without heart failure (HF) is poorly understood. We hypothesized HF patients would exhibit less circadian variation with worsened cardiac function and sleep apnea. METHODS. We studied 67 HF patients (age 67.4 ± 8.2 years; 42% acute HF) and 63 asymptomatic control subjects with no history of HF (age 61.6 ± 7.7 years). Subjects wore a heart sound/ECG/respiratory monitor. The data were analyzed for sleep apnea, diastolic heart sounds, and systolic time intervals. RESULTS. The HF group had significantly greater prevalence of the third heart sound and prolongation of electro-mechanical activation time, while the control group had an age-related increase in the prevalence of the fourth heart sound. The control group showed more circadian variation in cardiac function. The HF subjects had more sleep apnea and higher occurrence of heart rate non-dipping. CONCLUSIONS. The control subjects demonstrated an increasing incidence of diastolic dysfunction with age, while systolic function was mostly unchanged with aging. Parameters related to systolic function were significantly worse in the HF group with little diurnal variation, indicating a constant stimulation of sympathetic tone in HF and reduction of diurnal regulation. PMID:21361859

  11. Worsening renal function in heart failure: the need for a consensus definition.

    PubMed

    Sheerin, Noella J; Newton, Phillip J; Macdonald, Peter S; Leung, Dominic Y C; Sibbritt, David; Spicer, Stephen Timothy; Johnson, Kay; Krum, Henry; Davidson, Patricia M

    2014-07-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure is a common cause of hospitalisation. This is a period of vulnerability both in altered pathophysiology and also the potential for iatrogenesis due to therapeutic interventions. Renal dysfunction is often associated with heart failure and portends adverse outcomes. Identifying heart failure patients at risk of renal dysfunction is important in preventing progression to chronic kidney disease or worsening renal function, informing adjustment to medication management and potentially preventing adverse events. However, there is no working or consensus definition in international heart failure management guidelines for worsening renal function. In addition, there appears to be no concordance or adaptation of chronic kidney disease guidelines by heart failure guideline development groups for the monitoring of chronic kidney disease in heart failure. Our aim is to encourage the debate for an agreed definition given the prognostic impact of worsening renal function in heart failure. We present the case for the uptake of the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria for acute kidney injury with some minor alterations. This has the potential to inform study design and meta-analysis thereby building the knowledgebase for guideline development. Definition consensus supports data element, clinical registry and electronic algorithm innovation as instruments for quality improvement and clinical research for better patient outcomes. In addition, we recommend all community managed heart failure patients have their baseline renal function classified and routinely monitored in accordance with established renal guidelines to help identify those at increased risk for worsening renal function or progression to chronic kidney disease.

  12. Heart rate, body temperature and physical activity are variously affected during insulin treatment in alloxan-induced type 1 diabetic rat.

    PubMed

    Howarth, F C; Jacobson, M; Shafiullah, M; Ljubisavljevic, M; Adeghate, E

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is associated with a variety of cardiovascular complications including impaired cardiac muscle function. The effects of insulin treatment on heart rate, body temperature and physical activity in the alloxan (ALX)-induced diabetic rat were investigated using in vivo biotelemetry techniques. The electrocardiogram, physical activity and body temperature were recorded in vivo with a biotelemetry system for 10 days before ALX treatment, for 20 days following administration of ALX (120 mg/kg) and thereafter, for 15 days whilst rats received daily insulin. Heart rate declined rapidly after administration of ALX. Pre-ALX heart rate was 321+/-9 beats per minute, falling to 285+/-12 beats per minute 15-20 days after ALX and recovering to 331+/-10 beats per minute 5-10 days after commencement of insulin. Heart rate variability declined and PQ, QRS and QT intervals were prolonged after administration of ALX. Physical activity and body temperature declined after administration of ALX. Pre-ALX body temperature was 37.6+/-0.1 °C, falling to 37.3+/-0.1 °C 15-20 days after ALX and recovering to 37.8+/-0.1 °C 5-10 days after commencement insulin. ALX-induced diabetes is associated with disturbances in heart rhythm, physical activity and body temperature that are variously affected during insulin treatment.

  13. [The effect of argan oil on heart function during ischemia and reperfusion].

    PubMed

    Benajiba, N; Morel, S; De Leiris, J; Boucher, F; Charrouf, Z; Mokhtar, N; Aguenaou, H

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of organ oil on isolated heart function before and after ischemia and on the activity of cardiac antioxidant enzymes. 16 Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups; control group and treated group receiving 5 mL/kg/day of organ oil. After 8 weeks of treatment, hearts were perfused and subjected to a global ischemia followed by reperfusion. Activity of cardiac antioxidant enzymes was assessed in freeze-clamped hearts at the end of reperfusion. Results showed that organ oil induces: 1--damage to heart function during the preischemic period, 2--decreased functional recovery during reperfusion and 3--significant increase in catalase activity. It seems that, in our experimental conditions, organ oil increases heart sensitivity to ischemia and reperfusion. However, the mechanism involved has yet to be understood.

  14. Structure and function of gap junction proteins: role of gap junction proteins in embryonic heart development.

    PubMed

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular (cell-to-cell) communication is a crucial and complex mechanism during embryonic heart development. In the cardiovascular system, the beating of the heart is a dynamic and key regulatory process, which is functionally regulated by the coordinated spread of electrical activity through heart muscle cells. Heart tissues are composed of individual cells, each bearing specialized cell surface membrane structures called gap junctions that permit the intercellular exchange of ions and low molecular weight molecules. Gap junction channels are essential in normal heart function and they assist in the mediated spread of electrical impulses that stimulate synchronized contraction (via an electrical syncytium) of cardiac tissues. This present review describes the current knowledge of gap junction biology. In the first part, we summarise some relevant biochemical and physiological properties of gap junction proteins, including their structure and function. In the second part, we review the current evidence demonstrating the role of gap junction proteins in embryonic development with particular reference to those involved in embryonic heart development. Genetics and transgenic animal studies of gap junction protein function in embryonic heart development are considered and the alteration/disruption of gap junction intercellular communication which may lead to abnormal heart development is also discussed.

  15. Positive and negative affective processing exhibit dissociable functional hubs during the viewing of affective pictures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenhai; Li, Hong; Pan, Xiaohong

    2015-02-01

    Recent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies using graph theory metrics have revealed that the functional network of the human brain possesses small-world characteristics and comprises several functional hub regions. However, it is unclear how the affective functional network is organized in the brain during the processing of affective information. In this study, the fMRI data were collected from 25 healthy college students as they viewed a total of 81 positive, neutral, and negative pictures. The results indicated that affective functional networks exhibit weaker small-worldness properties with higher local efficiency, implying that local connections increase during viewing affective pictures. Moreover, positive and negative emotional processing exhibit dissociable functional hubs, emerging mainly in task-positive regions. These functional hubs, which are the centers of information processing, have nodal betweenness centrality values that are at least 1.5 times larger than the average betweenness centrality of the network. Positive affect scores correlated with the betweenness values of the right orbital frontal cortex (OFC) and the right putamen in the positive emotional network; negative affect scores correlated with the betweenness values of the left OFC and the left amygdala in the negative emotional network. The local efficiencies in the left superior and inferior parietal lobe correlated with subsequent arousal ratings of positive and negative pictures, respectively. These observations provide important evidence for the organizational principles of the human brain functional connectome during the processing of affective information.

  16. STUDIES IN RESUSCITATION: I. THE GENERAL CONDITIONS AFFECTING RESUSCITATION, AND THE RESUSCITATION OF THE BLOOD AND OF THE HEART

    PubMed Central

    Pike, F. H.; Guthrie, C. C.; Stewart, G. N.

    1908-01-01

    Our results may be briefly summarized: 1. Blood, when defibrinated, soon loses its power to maintain the activity of the higher nervous centers, and its nutritive properties for all tissues quickly diminish. 2. Artificial fluids, as a substitute for blood, are not satisfactory. 3. The proper oxygenation of the blood is an indispensable adjunct in the resuscitation of an animal. 4. The heart usually continues to beat for some minutes after it ceases to affect a mercury manometer, and resuscitation of it within this period by extra-thoracic massage and artificial respiration is sometimes successful. 5. Resuscitation of the heart by direct massage is the most certain method at our command. 6. A proper blood-pressure is an indispensable condition for the continued normal activity of the heart. 7. Anæsthetics, hemorrhage and induced currents applied to the heart render resuscitation more difficult than asphyxia alone. PMID:19867138

  17. [Comparative evaluation of the cardiac functional reserve in operated and nonoperated congenital heart defect patients].

    PubMed

    Gritsenko, V V; Gavrilenkov, V I; Mochalov, O Iu

    1981-02-01

    The functional cardiac reserve was studied in 26 non-operated and 42 operated patients with congenital heart diseases. The ratio of the maximum utilization of oxygen (VO2 max) to the heart volume (HV) was shown to be an objective quantitative index of the functional cardiac reserve. The authors believe that the value of the functional cardiac reserve may be used for the determination of risk as well as for the assessment of the rehabilitation of the rehabilitation significance of operations in patients with congenital heart diseases. PMID:7233699

  18. Muscular contraction mode differently affects autonomic control during heart rate matched exercise.

    PubMed

    Weippert, Matthias; Behrens, Martin; Gonschorek, Ray; Bruhn, Sven; Behrens, Kristin

    2015-01-01

    The precise contributions of afferent feedback to cardiovascular and respiratory responses to exercise are still unclear. The aim of this crossover study was to assess whether and how autonomic cardiovascular and respiratory control differed in response to dynamic (DYN) and isometric contractions (ISO) at a similar, low heart rate (HR) level. Therefore, 22 healthy males (26.7 ± 3.6 yrs) performed two kinds of voluntary exercises at similar HR: ISO and DYN of the right quadriceps femoris muscle. Although HR was eqivalent (82 ± 8 bpm for DYN and ISO, respectively), rating of exertion, blood pressures, and rate pressure product were higher, whereas breathing frequency, minute ventilation, oxygen uptake and carbon dioxide output were significantly lower during ISO. Tidal volume, end-tidal partial pressures of O2 and CO2, respiratory exchange ratio and capillary blood lactate concentration were comparable between both contraction modes. Heart rate variability (HRV) indicators, SDNN, HF-Power and LF-Power, representing both vagal and sympathetic influences, were significantly higher during ISO. Sample entropy, a non-linear measure of HRV was also significantly affected by contraction mode. It can be concluded that, despite the same net effect on HR, the quality of cardiovascular control during low intensity exercise is significantly different between DYN and ISO. HRV analysis indicated a sympatho-vagal coactivation during ISO. Whether mechanoreceptor feedback alone, a change in central command, or the interaction of both mechanisms is the main contributor of the distinct autonomic responses to the different exercise modes remains to be elucidated.

  19. Loss of the AE3 Cl−/HCO−3 exchanger in mice affects rate-dependent inotropy and stress-related AKT signaling in heart

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Vikram; Lorenz, John N.; Lasko, Valerie M.; Nieman, Michelle L.; Al Moamen, Nabeel J.; Shull, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    Cl−/HCO−3 exchangers are expressed abundantly in cardiac muscle, suggesting that HCO−3 extrusion serves an important function in heart. Mice lacking Anion Exchanger Isoform 3 (AE3), a major cardiac Cl−/HCO−3 exchanger, appear healthy, but loss of AE3 causes decompensation in a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) model. Using intra-ventricular pressure analysis, in vivo pacing, and molecular studies we identified physiological and biochemical changes caused by loss of AE3 that may contribute to decompensation in HCM. AE3-null mice had normal cardiac contractility under basal conditions and after β-adrenergic stimulation, but pacing of hearts revealed that frequency-dependent inotropy was blunted, suggesting that AE3-mediated HCO−3 extrusion is required for a robust force-frequency response (FFR) during acute biomechanical stress in vivo. Modest changes in expression of proteins that affect Ca2+-handling were observed, but Ca2+-transient analysis of AE3-null myocytes showed normal twitch-amplitude and Ca2+-clearance. Phosphorylation and expression of several proteins implicated in HCM and FFR, including phospholamban (PLN), myosin binding protein C, and troponin I were not altered in hearts of paced AE3-null mice; however, phosphorylation of Akt, which plays a central role in mechanosensory signaling, was significantly higher in paced AE3-null hearts than in wild-type controls and phosphorylation of AMPK, which is affected by Akt and is involved in energy metabolism and some cases of HCM, was reduced. These data show loss of AE3 leads to impaired rate-dependent inotropy, appears to affect mechanical stress-responsive signaling, and reduces activation of AMPK, which may contribute to decompensation in heart failure. PMID:24427143

  20. Still Heart Encodes a Structural HMT, SMYD1b, with Chaperone-Like Function during Fast Muscle Sarcomere Assembly.

    PubMed

    Prill, Kendal; Windsor Reid, Pamela; Wohlgemuth, Serene L; Pilgrim, David B

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate sarcomere is a complex and highly organized contractile structure whose assembly and function requires the coordination of hundreds of proteins. Proteins require proper folding and incorporation into the sarcomere by assembly factors, and they must also be maintained and replaced due to the constant physical stress of muscle contraction. Zebrafish mutants affecting muscle assembly and maintenance have proven to be an ideal tool for identification and analysis of factors necessary for these processes. The still heart mutant was identified due to motility defects and a nonfunctional heart. The cognate gene for the mutant was shown to be smyd1b and the still heart mutation results in an early nonsense codon. SMYD1 mutants show a lack of heart looping and chamber definition due to a lack of expression of heart morphogenesis factors gata4, gata5 and hand2. On a cellular level, fast muscle fibers in homozygous mutants do not form mature sarcomeres due to the lack of fast muscle myosin incorporation by SMYD1b when sarcomeres are first being assembled (19hpf), supporting SMYD1b as an assembly protein during sarcomere formation. PMID:26544721

  1. Immune cell function assay in pediatric heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Wong, Man-Shun; Boucek, Robert; Kemna, Mariska; Rutledge, Joe; Law, Yuk

    2014-08-01

    The ImmuKnow ICFA reports ex vivo CD4 lymphocyte activation to quantify immunosuppression. Limited organ and age-specific data exist for pediatric heart transplant recipients. We sought to examine their normative values and ICFA's association with rejection/infection. A total of 380 ICFAs from 58 heart transplant recipients (6.5/recipient) were studied retrospectively. The median age at the time of their first ICFA was 5.3 yr (IQR 2.4-12.1 yr). ICFA levels during immunologic stability (n = 311) were a median of 305 (IQR: 172-483) and mean of 353 (s.d. ± 224) ng ATP/mL. ICFA levels trended lower with advancing age. ICFA levels during immunologic stability increased over time from transplant after the first six months but were not correlated with calcineurin inhibitor levels or the type used. There is no association between ICFA values during stability and rejection (median 368 ATP ng/mL; IQR 153-527) or infection (median 293 ATP ng/mL; IQR 198-432). In contrast to the manufacturer's suggested ranges, the immunologic stable ranges in pediatric cardiac recipients were very different. ICFA values during immunologic stability are related to time from transplant in pediatric heart recipients. ICFA's ability to discriminate rejection or infection from immunologic stability was not demonstrated.

  2. Targeted mutation of plakoglobin in mice reveals essential functions of desmosomes in the embryonic heart

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Plakoglobin (gamma-catenin), a member of the armadillo family of proteins, is a constituent of the cytoplasmic plaque of desmosomes as well as of other adhering cell junctions, and is involved in anchorage of cytoskeletal filaments to specific cadherins. We have generated a null mutation of the plakoglobin gene in mice. Homozygous -/- mutant animals die between days 12-16 of embryogenesis due to defects in heart function. Often, heart ventricles burst and blood floods the pericard. This tissue instability correlates with the absence of desmosomes in heart, but not in epithelia organs. Instead, extended adherens junctions are formed in the heart, which contain desmosomal proteins, i.e., desmoplakin. Thus, plakoglobin is an essential component of myocardiac desmosomes and seems to play a crucial role in the sorting out of desmosomal and adherens junction components, and consequently in the architecture of intercalated discs and the stabilization of heart tissue. PMID:8858175

  3. Affect integration and reflective function: clarification of central conceptual issues.

    PubMed

    Solbakken, Ole André; Hansen, Roger Sandvik; Monsen, Jon Trygve

    2011-07-01

    The importance of affect regulation, modulation or integration for higher-order reflection and adequate functioning is increasingly emphasized across different therapeutic approaches and theories of change. These processes are probably central to any psychotherapeutic endeavor, whether explicitly conceptualized or not, and in recent years a number of therapeutic approaches have been developed that explicitly target them as a primary area of change. However, there still is important lack of clarity in the field regarding the understanding and operationalization of affect integration, particularly when it comes to specifying underlying mechanisms, the significance of different affect states, and the establishment of operational criteria for measurement. The conceptual relationship between affect integration and reflective function thus remains ambiguous. The present article addresses these topics, indicating ways in which a more complex and exhaustive understanding of integration of affect, cognition and behavior can be attained.

  4. Lateralized Resting-State Functional Brain Network Organization Changes in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Park, Bumhee; Roy, Bhaswati; Woo, Mary A.; Palomares, Jose A.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Harper, Ronald M.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients show brain injury in autonomic, affective, and cognitive sites, which can change resting-state functional connectivity (FC), potentially altering overall functional brain network organization. However, the status of such connectivity or functional organization is unknown in HF. Determination of that status was the aim here, and we examined region-to-region FC and brain network topological properties across the whole-brain in 27 HF patients compared to 53 controls with resting-state functional MRI procedures. Decreased FC in HF appeared between the caudate and cerebellar regions, olfactory and cerebellar sites, vermis and medial frontal regions, and precentral gyri and cerebellar areas. However, increased FC emerged between the middle frontal gyrus and sensorimotor areas, superior parietal gyrus and orbito/medial frontal regions, inferior temporal gyrus and lingual gyrus/cerebellar lobe/pallidum, fusiform gyrus and superior orbitofrontal gyrus and cerebellar sites, and within vermis and cerebellar areas; these connections were largely in the right hemisphere (p<0.005; 10,000 permutations). The topology of functional integration and specialized characteristics in HF are significantly changed in regions showing altered FC, an outcome which would interfere with brain network organization (p<0.05; 10,000 permutations). Brain dysfunction in HF extends to resting conditions, and autonomic, cognitive, and affective deficits may stem from altered FC and brain network organization that may contribute to higher morbidity and mortality in the condition. Our findings likely result from the prominent axonal and nuclear structural changes reported earlier in HF; protecting neural tissue may improve FC integrity, and thus, increase quality of life and reduce morbidity and mortality. PMID:27203600

  5. How Does Maternal Employment Affect Children's Socioemotional Functioning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Gigi

    2015-01-01

    The maternal employment becomes an irreversible trend across the globe. The effect of maternal employment on children's socioemotional functioning is so pervasive that it warrants special attention to investigate into the issue. A trajectory of analytical framework of how maternal employment affects children's socioemotional functioning originates…

  6. Hemidesmus indicus and Hibiscus rosa-sinensis Affect Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in Isolated Rat Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Vinoth Kumar Megraj; Balaraman, R.; Pancza, Dezider; Ravingerová, Táňa

    2011-01-01

    Hemidesmus indicus (L.) R. Br. (HI) and Hibiscus rosa-sinensis L. (HRS) are widely used traditional medicine. We investigated cardioprotective effects of these plants applied for 15 min at concentrations of 90, 180, and 360 μg/mL in Langendorff-perfused rat hearts prior to 25-min global ischemia/120-min reperfusion (I/R). Functional recovery (left ventricular developed pressure—LVDP, and rate of development of pressure), reperfusion arrhythmias, and infarct size (TTC staining) served as the endpoints. A transient increase in LVDP (32%–75%) occurred at all concentrations of HI, while coronary flow (CF) was significantly increased after HI 180 and 360. Only a moderate increase in LVDP (21% and 55%) and a tendency to increase CF was observed at HRS 180 and 360. HI and HRS at 180 and 360 significantly improved postischemic recovery of LVDP. Both the drugs dose-dependently reduced the numbers of ectopic beats and duration of ventricular tachycardia. The size of infarction was significantly decreased by HI 360, while HRS significantly reduced the infarct size at all concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, it can be concluded that HI might cause vasodilation, positive inotropic effect, and cardioprotection, while HRS might cause these effects at higher concentrations. However, further study is needed to elucidate the exact mechanism of their actions. PMID:20953394

  7. Cardiac and coronary function in the Langendorff-perfused mouse heart model.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, Melissa E; Willems, Laura; Hack, Benjamin A; Peart, Jason N; Headrick, John P

    2009-01-01

    The Langendorff mouse heart model is widely employed in studies of myocardial function and responses to injury (e.g. ischaemia). Nonetheless, marked variability exists in its preparation and functional properties. We examined the impact of early growth (8, 16, 20 and 24 weeks), sex, perfusion fluid [Ca(2+)] and pacing rate on contractile function and responses to 20 min ischaemia followed by 45 min reperfusion. We also assessed the impact of strain, and tested the utility of the model in studying coronary function. Under normoxic conditions, hearts from 8-week-old male C57BL/6 mice (2 mm free perfusate [Ca(2+)], 420 beats min(-1)) exhibited 145 +/- 2 mmHg left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP). Force development declined by approximately 15% (126 +/- 5 mmHg) with a reduction in free [Ca(2+)] to 1.35 mm, and by 25% (108 +/- 3 mmHg) with increased pacing to 600 beats min(-1). While elevated heart rate failed to modify ischaemic outcome, the lower [Ca(2+)] significantly improved contractile recovery (by >30%). We detected minimal sex-dependent differences in normoxic function between 8 and 24 weeks, although age modified contractile function in males (increased LVDP at 24 versus 8 weeks) but not females. Both male and female hearts exhibited age-related reductions in ischaemic tolerance, with a significant decline in recovery evident at 16 weeks in males and later, at 20-24 weeks, in females (versus recoveries in hearts at 8 weeks). Strain also modified tolerance to ischaemia, with similar responses in hearts from C57BL/6, 129/sv, Quackenbush Swiss and FVBN mice, but substantially greater tolerance in BALB/c hearts. In terms of vascular function, baseline coronary flow (20-25 ml min(-1) g(-1)) was 50-60% of maximally dilated flows, and coronary reactive and functional hyperaemic responses were pronounced (up to 4-fold elevations in flow in hearts lacking ventricular balloons). These data indicate that attention to age (and sex) of mice will reduce variability in

  8. Toad heart utilizes exclusively slow skeletal muscle troponin T: an evolutionary adaptation with potential functional benefits.

    PubMed

    Feng, Han-Zhong; Chen, Xuequn; Hossain, M Moazzem; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2012-08-24

    The three isoforms of vertebrate troponin T (TnT) are normally expressed in a muscle type-specific manner. Here we report an exception that the cardiac muscle of toad (Bufo) expresses exclusively slow skeletal muscle TnT (ssTnT) together with cardiac forms of troponin I and myosin as determined using immunoblotting, cDNA cloning, and/or LC-MS/MS. Using RT-PCR and 3'- and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends on toad cardiac mRNA, we cloned full-length cDNAs encoding two alternatively spliced variants of ssTnT. Expression of the cloned cDNAs in Escherichia coli confirmed that the toad cardiac muscle expresses solely ssTnT, predominantly the low molecular weight variant with the exon 5-encoded NH(2)-terminal segment spliced out. Functional studies were performed in ex vivo working toad hearts and compared with the frog (Rana) hearts. The results showed that toad hearts had higher contractile and relaxation velocities and were able to work against a significantly higher afterload than that of frog hearts. Therefore, the unique evolutionary adaptation of utilizing exclusively ssTnT in toad cardiac muscle corresponded to a fitness value from improving systolic function of the heart. The data demonstrated a physiological importance of the functional diversity of TnT isoforms. The structure-function relationship of TnT may be explored for the development of new treatment of heart failure.

  9. Toad heart utilizes exclusively slow skeletal muscle troponin T: an evolutionary adaptation with potential functional benefits.

    PubMed

    Feng, Han-Zhong; Chen, Xuequn; Hossain, M Moazzem; Jin, Jian-Ping

    2012-08-24

    The three isoforms of vertebrate troponin T (TnT) are normally expressed in a muscle type-specific manner. Here we report an exception that the cardiac muscle of toad (Bufo) expresses exclusively slow skeletal muscle TnT (ssTnT) together with cardiac forms of troponin I and myosin as determined using immunoblotting, cDNA cloning, and/or LC-MS/MS. Using RT-PCR and 3'- and 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends on toad cardiac mRNA, we cloned full-length cDNAs encoding two alternatively spliced variants of ssTnT. Expression of the cloned cDNAs in Escherichia coli confirmed that the toad cardiac muscle expresses solely ssTnT, predominantly the low molecular weight variant with the exon 5-encoded NH(2)-terminal segment spliced out. Functional studies were performed in ex vivo working toad hearts and compared with the frog (Rana) hearts. The results showed that toad hearts had higher contractile and relaxation velocities and were able to work against a significantly higher afterload than that of frog hearts. Therefore, the unique evolutionary adaptation of utilizing exclusively ssTnT in toad cardiac muscle corresponded to a fitness value from improving systolic function of the heart. The data demonstrated a physiological importance of the functional diversity of TnT isoforms. The structure-function relationship of TnT may be explored for the development of new treatment of heart failure. PMID:22778265

  10. Longitudinal renal function in pediatric heart transplant recipients: 20-years experience.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Punkaj; Rettiganti, Mallikarjuna; Gossett, Jeffrey M; Gardner, Megan; Bryant, Janet C; Noel, Tommy R; Knecht, Kenneth R

    2015-03-01

    This study was initiated to assess the temporal trends of renal function, and define risk factors associated with worsening renal function in pediatric heart transplant recipients in the immediate post-operative period. We performed a single-center retrospective study in children ≤18 yr receiving OHT (1993-2012). The AKIN's validated, three-tiered AKI staging system was used to categorize the degree of WRF. One hundred sixty-four patients qualified for inclusion. Forty-seven patients (28%) were classified as having WRF after OHT. Nineteen patients (11%) required dialysis after heart transplantation. There was a sustained and steady improvement in renal function in children following heart transplantation in all age groups, irrespective of underlying disease process. The significant factors associated with risk of WRF included body surface area (OR: 1.89 for 0.5 unit increase, 95% CI: 1.29-2.76, p = 0.001) and use of ECMO prior to and/or after heart transplantation (OR: 3.50, 95% CI: 1.51-8.13, p = 0.004). Use of VAD prior to heart transplantation was not associated with WRF (OR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.17-1.51, p = 0.22). On the basis of these data, we demonstrate that worsening renal function improves early after orthotopic heart transplantation.

  11. Targeting the autonomic nervous system: measuring autonomic function and novel devices for heart failure management.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hitesh C; Rosen, Stuart D; Lindsay, Alistair; Hayward, Carl; Lyon, Alexander R; di Mario, Carlo

    2013-12-10

    Neurohumoral activation, in which enhanced activity of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) is a key component, plays a pivotal role in heart failure. The neurohumoral system affects several organs and currently our knowledge of the molecular and systemic pathways involved in the neurohumoral activation is incomplete. All the methods of assessing the degree of activation of the autonomic system have limitations and they are not interchangeable. The methods considered include noradrenaline spillover, microneurography, radiotracer imaging and analysis of heart rate and blood pressure (heart rate variability, baroreceptor sensitivity, heart rate turbulence). Despite the difficulties, medications that affect the ANS have been shown to improve mortality in heart failure and the mechanism is related to attenuation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and stimulation of the parasympathetic nervous system. However, limitations of compliance with medication, side effects and inadequate SNS attenuation are issues of concern with the pharmacological approach. The newer device based therapies for sympathetic modulation are showing encouraging results. As they directly influence the autonomic nervous system, more mechanistic information can be gleaned if appropriate investigations are performed at the time of the outcome trials. However, clinicians should be reminded that the ANS is an evolutionary survival mechanism and therefore there is a need to proceed with caution when trying to completely attenuate its effects. So our enthusiasm for the application of these devices in heart failure should be controlled, especially as none of the devices have trial data powered to assess effects on mortality or cardiovascular events.

  12. Temporal cohesion of the structural, functional and molecular characteristics of the developing zebrafish heart.

    PubMed

    Matrone, Gianfranco; Wilson, Kathryn S; Mullins, John J; Tucker, Carl S; Denvir, Martin A

    2015-06-01

    Heart formation is a complex, dynamic and highly coordinated process of molecular, morphogenetic and functional factors with each interacting and contributing to formation of the mature organ. Cardiac abnormalities in early life can be lethal in mammals but not in the zebrafish embryo which has been widely used to study the developing heart. While early cardiac development in the zebrafish has been well characterized, functional changes during development and how these relate to architectural, cellular and molecular aspects of development have not been well described previously. To address this we have carefully characterised cardiac structure, function, cardiomyocyte proliferation and cardiac-specific gene expression between 48 and 120 hpf in the zebrafish. We show that the zebrafish heart increases in volume and changes shape significantly between 48 and 72 hpf accompanied by a 40% increase in cardiomyocyte number. Between 96 and 120 hpf, while external heart expansion slows, there is rapid formation of a mature and extensive trabecular network within the ventricle chamber. While ejection fraction does not change during the course of development other determinants of contractile function increase significantly particularly between 72 and 96 hpf leading to an increase in cardinal vein blood flow. This study has revealed a number of novel aspects of cardiac developmental dynamics with striking temporal orchestration of structure and function within the first few days of development. These changes are associated with changes in expression of developmental and maturational genes. This study provides important insights into the complex temporal relationship between structure and function of the developing zebrafish heart.

  13. Strategies to Enhance the Effectiveness of Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Ischemic Heart Diseases Affecting the Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khatiwala, Roshni

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial infarctions and chronic ischemic heart disease both commonly and disproportionately affect elderly patients more than any other patient population. Despite available treatments, heart tissue is often permanently damaged as a result of cardiac injury. This review aims to summarize recent literature proposing the use of modified autologous adult stem cells to promote healing of post-infarct cardiac tissue. This novel cellular treatment involves isolation of adult stem cells from the patient, in vitro manipulation of these stem cells, and subsequent transplantation back into the patient’s own heart to accelerate healing. One of the hindrances affecting this process is that cardiac issues are increasingly common in elderly patients, and stem cells recovered from their tissues tend to be pre-senescent or already in senescence. As a result, harsh in vitro manipulations can cause the aged stem cells to undergo massive in vivo apoptosis after transplantation. The consensus in literature is that inhibition or reversal of senescence onset in adult stem cells would be of utmost benefit. In fact, it is believed that this strategy may lower stem cell mortality and coerce aged stem cells into adopting more resilient phenotypes similar to that of their younger counterparts. This review will discuss a selection of the most efficient and most-recent strategies used experimentally to enhance the effectiveness of current stem cell therapies for ischemic heart diseases. PMID:26779896

  14. Assessment of cardiac autonomic functions by heart rate recovery, heart rate variability and QT dynamicity parameters in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Dural, Muhammet; Kabakcı, Giray; Cınar, Neşe; Erbaş, Tomris; Canpolat, Uğur; Gürses, Kadri Murat; Tokgözoğlu, Lale; Oto, Ali; Kaya, Ergün Barış; Yorgun, Hikmet; Sahiner, Levent; Dağdelen, Selçuk; Aytemir, Kudret

    2014-04-01

    Cardiovascular complications are the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in acromegaly. However, there is little data regarding cardiac autonomic functions in these patients. Herein, we aimed to investigate several parameters of cardiac autonomic functions in patients with acromegaly compared to healthy subjects. We enrolled 20 newly diagnosed acromegalic patients (55% female, age:45.7 ± 12.6 years) and 32 age- and gender-matched healthy subjects. All participants underwent 24 h Holter recording. Heart rate recovery (HRR) indices were calculated by subtracting 1st, 2nd and 3rd minute heart rates from maximal heart rate. All patients underwent heart rate variability (HRV) and QT dynamicity analysis. Baseline characteristics were similar except diabetes mellitus and hypertension among groups. Mean HRR1 (29.2 ± 12.3 vs 42.6 ± 6.5, p = 0.001), HRR2 (43.5 ± 15.6 vs 61.1 ± 10.8, p = 0.001) and HRR3 (46.4 ± 16.2 vs 65.8 ± 9.8, p = 0.001) values were significantly higher in control group. HRV parameters as, SDNN [standard deviation of all NN intervals] (p = 0.001), SDANN [SD of the 5 min mean RR intervals] (p = 0.001), RMSSD [root square of successive differences in RR interval] (p = 0.001), PNN50 [proportion of differences in successive NN intervals >50 ms] (p = 0.001) and high-frequency [HF] (p = 0.001) were significantly decreased in patients with acromegaly; but low frequency [LF] (p = 0.046) and LF/HF (p = 0.001) were significantly higher in acromegaly patients. QTec (p = 0.009), QTac/RR slope (p = 0.017) and QTec/RR slope (p = 0.01) were significantly higher in patients with acromegaly. Additionally, there were significant negative correlation of disease duration with HRR2, HRR3, SDNN, PNN50, RMSSD, variability index. Our study results suggest that cardiac autonomic functions are impaired in patients with acromegaly. Further large scale studies are needed to exhibit the prognostic significance of impaired autonomic functions in patients with

  15. Importance of anemia in the chronic Cardiorenal syndrome: Effects on renal function after heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Libório, Alexandre Braga; Uchoa, Russian Soares; Aragão, Alessa Peixoto; de Sousa Neto, João David; Valdivia, Juan Miguel Cosquillo; de Alencar Matos, Filipe; Mont’Alverne, Ricardo Everton Dias; de Sá Filho, Francisco Ivan Benício; Mejia, Juan Alberto Cosquillo

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Cardiorenal syndrome has been recently divided into 5 categories, according to acute or chronic evolution and primary organ dysfunction. Anemia can also accompany this disorder, leading to a more complex situation. This study aims to analyze the renal outcomes of patients, specifically patients with chronic Cardiorenal syndrome, with or without anemia, long-term after heart transplantation. Material/Methods This was a retrospective cohort study on chronic Cardiorenal syndrome patients submitted to heart transplantation. Patients were divided according to presence of anemia and renal dysfunction before heart transplantation. Results A total of 108 patients (92 males) with the mean age of 45±12 years were included. The etiologies of the heart failure were hypertensive dilated myocardiopathy (66%), ischemic (14%) and Chagasic (12%). Before the heart transplantation, 51 patients had an eGFR less than 60 mL/min. From these, 24 had concomitant anemia. One year after the transplantation, patients with previous isolated renal dysfunction ameliorates eGFR (45±11 vs. 65±26 mL/min, p<0.001), while those patients with previous renal dysfunction and anemia presented no improvement (eGFR 44±14 vs. 47±13 mL/min, p=0.619) 1 year after heart transplantation. Moreover, higher hemoglobin was an independent predictor of eGFR improvement after heart transplantation when associated with previous renal dysfunction (OR 1.8; CI 1.2–3.6, p<0.01 for each hemoglobin increment of 1 g/dL). Conclusions Patients with isolated Cardiorenal syndrome presented partial renal function recovery after heart transplantation, while the presence of cardiorenal anemia was a marker of renal function non-recovery 1 year after heart transplantation. PMID:23018354

  16. Respiratory muscle function and exercise intolerance in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jorge P; Chiappa, Gaspar R; Neder, J Alberto; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2009-06-01

    Inspiratory muscle weakness (IMW) is prevalent in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) caused by left ventricular systolic dysfunction, which contributes to reduced exercise capacity and the presence of dyspnea during daily activities. Inspiratory muscle strength (estimated by maximal inspiratory pressure) has independent prognostic value in CHF. Overall, the results of trials with inspiratory muscle training (IMT) indicate that this intervention improves exercise capacity and quality of life, particularly in patients with CHF and IMW. Some benefit from IMT may be accounted for by the attenuation of the inspiratory muscle metaboreflex. Moreover, IMT results in improved cardiovascular responses to exercise and to those obtained with standard aerobic training. These findings suggest that routine screening for IMW is advisable in patients with CHF, and specific IMT and/or aerobic training are of practical value in the management of these patients. PMID:19486593

  17. Respiratory muscle function and exercise intolerance in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Jorge P; Chiappa, Gaspar R; Neder, J Alberto; Frankenstein, Lutz

    2009-06-01

    Inspiratory muscle weakness (IMW) is prevalent in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) caused by left ventricular systolic dysfunction, which contributes to reduced exercise capacity and the presence of dyspnea during daily activities. Inspiratory muscle strength (estimated by maximal inspiratory pressure) has independent prognostic value in CHF. Overall, the results of trials with inspiratory muscle training (IMT) indicate that this intervention improves exercise capacity and quality of life, particularly in patients with CHF and IMW. Some benefit from IMT may be accounted for by the attenuation of the inspiratory muscle metaboreflex. Moreover, IMT results in improved cardiovascular responses to exercise and to those obtained with standard aerobic training. These findings suggest that routine screening for IMW is advisable in patients with CHF, and specific IMT and/or aerobic training are of practical value in the management of these patients.

  18. Heart visualization based on hybrid transfer function using size and gradient.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yong; Liu, Yixuan; Wang, Kuanquan

    2014-01-01

    Having the ability to visualize the heart clearly and precisely would be beneficial for pathology research, presurgical planning, and clinical approaches. Multi-dimensional transfer functions were employed to improve the overall performance of images. To provide a satisfactory visualization quality on the shape and boundaries of the heart, a new hybrid transfer function combining structure size with gradient was designed to highlight the area of the heart. Initially, a histogram of gradient and histogram of size was computed and then classification was performed for providing the spatial information. Finally, several hybrid strategies were presented for the design of the transfer function, including opacity and color. By experimental evaluation, the proposed hybrid transfer function visualized the cardiac outline and internal structure more clearly and easily.

  19. Functional and structural regeneration in the axolotl heart (Ambystoma mexicanum) after partial ventricular amputation.

    PubMed

    Cano-Martínez, Agustina; Vargas-González, Alvaro; Guarner-Lans, Verónica; Prado-Zayago, Esteban; León-Oleda, Martha; Nieto-Lima, Betzabé

    2010-01-01

    "In the present study we evaluated the effect of partial ventricular amputation (PVA) in the heart of the adult urodele amphibian (Ambystoma mexicanum) in vivo on spontaneous heart contractile activity recorded in vitro in association to the structural recovery at one, five, 30 and 90 days after injury. One day after PVA, ventricular-tension (VT) (16 ± 3%), atrium-tension (AT) (46 ± 4%) and heart rate (HR) (58+10%) resulted lower in comparison to control hearts. On days five, 30 and 90 after damage, values achieved a 61 ± 5, 93 ± 3, and 98 ± 5% (VT), 60 ± 4, 96 ± 3 and 99 ± 5% (AT) and 74 ± 5, 84 ± 10 and 95 ± 10% (HR) of the control values, respectively. Associated to contractile activity recovery we corroborated a gradual tissue restoration by cardiomyocyte proliferation. Our results represent the first quantitative evidence about the recovery of heart of A. mexicanum restores its functional capacity concomitantly to the structural recovery of the myocardium by proliferation of cardiomyocytes after PVA. These properties make the heart of A. mexicanum a potential model to study the mechanisms underlying heart regeneration in adult vertebrates in vivo.

  20. Arginylation regulates myofibrils to maintain heart function and prevent dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kurosaka, Satoshi; Leu, N. Adrian; Pavlov, Ivan; Han, Xuemei; Ribeiro, Paula Aver Bretanha; Xu, Tao; Bunte, Ralph; Saha, Sougata; Wang, Junling; Cornachione, Anabelle; Mai, Wilfried; Yates, John R; Rassier, Dilson E.; Kashina, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Protein arginylation mediated by arginyltransferase (ATE1) is essential for heart formation during embryogenesis, however its cell-autonomous role in cardiomyocytes and the differentiated heart muscle has never been investigated. To address this question, we generated cardiac muscle-specific Ate1 knockout mice, in which Ate1 deletion was driven by α-myosin heavy chain promoter (αMHC-Ate1 mouse). These mice were initially viable, but developed severe cardiac contractility defects, dilated cardiomyopathy, and thrombosis over time, resulting in high rates of lethality after 6 months of age. These symptoms were accompanied by severe ultrastructural defects in cardiac myofibrils, seen in the newborns and far preceding the onset of cardiomyopathy, suggesting that these defects were primary and likely underlay the development of the future heart defects. Several major sarcomeric proteins were arginylated in vivo. Moreover, Ate1 deletion in the hearts resulted in a significant reduction of active and passive myofibril forces, suggesting that arginylation is critical for both myofibril structural integrity and contractility. Thus, arginylation is essential for maintaining the heart function by regulation of the major myofibril proteins and myofibril forces, and its absence in the heart muscle leads to progressive heart failure through cardiomyocyte-specific defects. PMID:22626847

  1. Heart wall myofibers are arranged in minimal surfaces to optimize organ function

    PubMed Central

    Savadjiev, Peter; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Bakermans, Adrianus J.; Piuze, Emmanuel; Zucker, Steven W.; Siddiqi, Kaleem

    2012-01-01

    Heart wall myofibers wind as helices around the ventricles, strengthening them in a manner analogous to the reinforcement of concrete cylindrical columns by spiral steel cables [Richart FE, et al. (1929) Univ of Illinois, Eng Exp Stn Bull 190]. A multitude of such fibers, arranged smoothly and regularly, contract and relax as an integrated functional unit as the heart beats. To orchestrate this motion, fiber tangling must be avoided and pumping should be efficient. Current models of myofiber orientation across the heart wall suggest groupings into sheets or bands, but the precise geometry of bundles of myofibers is unknown. Here we show that this arrangement takes the form of a special minimal surface, the generalized helicoid [Blair DE, Vanstone JR (1978) Minimal Submanifolds and Geodesics 13–16], closing the gap between individual myofibers and their collective wall structure. The model holds across species, with a smooth variation in its three curvature parameters within the myocardial wall providing tight fits to diffusion magnetic resonance images from the rat, the dog, and the human. Mathematically it explains how myofibers are bundled in the heart wall while economizing fiber length and optimizing ventricular ejection volume as they contract. The generalized helicoid provides a unique foundation for analyzing the fibrous composite of the heart wall and should therefore find applications in heart tissue engineering and in the study of heart muscle diseases. PMID:22645368

  2. Effects of freeze-dried red wine on cardiac function and ECG of the Langendorff-perfused rat heart.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Antonella; Fusi, Fabio; Gorelli, Beatrice; Sgaragli, Giampietro; Saponara, Simona

    2014-02-01

    The effect of freeze-dried red wine (FDRW) on cardiac function and electrocardiogram (ECG) in Langendorff-isolated rat hearts was investigated. FDRW significantly decreased left ventricular pressure and coronary perfusion pressure, the latter being dependent on the activation of both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and eNOS. FDRW did not affect the QRS and QT interval in the ECG, although at 56 μg of gallic acid equivalents/mL, it prolonged PQ interval and induced a second-degree atrioventricular block in 3 out of 6 hearts. This is the first study demonstrating that at concentrations resembling a moderate consumption of red wine, FDRW exhibited negative inotropic and coronary vasodilating activity leaving unaltered ECG, whereas at very high concentrations, it induced arrhythmogenic effects.

  3. [Anesthesiological management in transplantation of the heart after temporary mechanical substitution of its function].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, I A; Piliaeva, I E; Matveev, Iu G; Kormer, A Ia

    1994-01-01

    The first experience of anesthesiological management of three two-step orthotopic heart transplantations is reviewed. As the first step of surgical treatment one recipient was implanted an artificial heart "POISK-IOM" (Russia), in 2 other patients left ventricular bypass was achieved using a "Biopump" ("Biomedics", USA). Anesthesia techniques, methods of infusion-transfusion therapy, and other components of intraoperative management are described. Hemodynamics, donor heart function recovery, and other homeostasis parameters have been analysed. It has been noted that high doses of fentanyl in combination with ketamine and diazepam ensured satisfactory course of general anesthesia. There were no cases of intraoperative lethality. A more complex aspect of anesthesiological management was correction of various homeostasis disturbances which progressed during surgery in patients with left ventricular bypass. In two cases the intraoperative period was characterized by the onset of multiorgan failure (heart, respiratory, renal failure, metabolic disorders, coagulopathy), which played a negative part for the postoperative period of heart transplantations. It is concluded that prediction of possible complications during temporary mechanical replacement of the cardiac function and timely determination of contraindications for the second step of two-step heart transplantations are the most important trends of investigations for anesthesiologists, intensive care specialists, and transplantologists. PMID:8010503

  4. How national policy affects the care of patients who suffer a heart attack.

    PubMed

    Green, Meryl

    In October 2008 the Department of Health published the National Infarct Angioplasty Project (NIAP), reviewing its guidance on the treatment of a heart attack. This was framed to update previous 2000 guidance from the National Service Framework for coronary heart disease, and highlighted the need for specialised services and 24-hour care. Recommendations included the need for appropriate assessment/investigation and immediate transfer to a cardiac catheterisation laboratory for primary angioplasty within 120 minutes of calling for professional help. Cardiac services are currently undergoing review, and a significant number of new cardiac catheterisation laboratories are being established throughout the country to accommodate the needs of this client group. This article discusses whether 24-hour care is feasible, cost-effective and realistic for the NHS to manage, as well as analysing policy guidelines in relation to the treatment of heart attack.

  5. Heterogeneity and Function of KATP Channels in Canine Hearts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai Xia; Silva, Jonathan R.; Lin, Yu-Wen; Verbsky, John W.; Lee, Urvi S.; Kanter, Evelyn M.; Yamada, Kathryn A.; Schuessler, Richard B.; Nichols, Colin G.

    2013-01-01

    Background The concept that pore-forming Kir6.2 and regulatory SUR2A subunits form cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels is challenged by recent reports that SUR1 is predominant in mouse atrial KATP channels. Objective To assess SUR subunit composition of KATP channels and consequence of KATP activation for action potential duration (APD) in dog heart. Methods Patch-clamp techniques were used on isolated dog cardiomyocytes to investigate KATP channel properties. Dynamic current-clamp, by injection of a linear K+ conductance to simulate activation of the native current, was employed to study consequences of KATP activation on APD. Results Metabolic inhibitor (MI)-activated current was not significantly different from pinacidil (SUR2A-specific)-activated current, and both currents were larger than diazoxide (SUR1- specific)-activated current, in both atrium and ventricle. Mean KATP conductance (activated by MI) did not differ significantly between chambers although, within the ventricle, both MI-induced and pinacidil-induced currents tended to decrease from epicardium to endocardium. Dynamic current-clamp results indicate that myocytes with longer baseline APDs are more susceptible to injected “KATP” current, a result reproduced in silico using a canine AP model to simulate Epi and Endo (HRd). Conclusions Even a small fraction of KATP activation significantly shortens APD in a manner that depends on existing heterogeneity in KATP current and APD. PMID:23871704

  6. Psychosocial issues affecting adults with congenital heart disease: one patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Livecchi, Tracy A

    2004-12-01

    This article addresses a number of psychosocial issues that advance practice nurses and other health care providers should be aware of when working with patients who have congenital heart disease. If not properly addressed, particularly during adolescence, these issues can have a strong impact on a person's medical care and over-all quality of life. This article includes information from medical literature, conversations with adult patients, and my own experiences as both a patient with congenital heart disease and as a clinical social worker.

  7. Ablation of swallowing-induced atrial tachycardia affects heart rate variability: a case report.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Rintaro; Fukamizu, Seiji; Ishikawa, Tae; Hayashi, Takekuni; Komiyama, Kota; Tanabe, Yasuhiro; Tejima, Tamotsu; Kobayashi, Yoichi; Sakurada, Harumizu

    2014-05-01

    A 47-year-old man underwent slow pathway ablation for slow-fast atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia. Following the procedure, he felt palpitations while swallowing, and swallowing-induced atrial tachycardia was diagnosed. Swallowing-induced atrial tachycardia arose from the right atrium-superior vena cava junction and was cured by catheter ablation. After the procedure, the patient's heart rate variability changed significantly, indicating suppression of parasympathetic nerve activity. In this case, swallowing-induced atrial tachycardia was related to the vagal nerve reflex. Analysis of heart rate variability may be helpful in elucidating the mechanism of swallowing-induced atrial tachycardia.

  8. MR evaluation of cardiovascular physiology in congenital heart disease: flow and function.

    PubMed

    Weber, Oliver M; Higgins, Charles B

    2006-01-01

    Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has become the method of choice in the evaluation of a number of questions in congenital heart disease. In addition to morphology, modern CMR techniques allow the visualization of function and flow in a temporally resolved manner. Among the pathologies where these methods play a major role are shunts, septal defects, aortic coarctation, anomalies of the pulmonary arteries, and valvular regurgitation. This paper explains the basics of functional and flow encoded CMR and discusses their application in the assessment of several types of congenital heart disease.

  9. The Use of Heart Rate Variability as a Novel Method to Differentiate between Affective States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The major goal of animal welfare scientists is to determine when animals are experiencing a state of good welfare or poor welfare. The goal of this research was to determine if measures of heart rate variability can be used to differentiate whether animals are experiencing ‘unpleasant’ versus ‘pleas...

  10. Psychosocial problems of donor heart recipients adversely affecting quality of life.

    PubMed

    Bunzel, B; Wollenek, G; Grundböck, A

    1992-10-01

    Heart transplantation has become an accepted therapy for patients suffering from terminal heart disease for whom neither standard forms of medication nor the usual surgery are of any benefit. Although results regarding postoperative quantity and quality of life are encouraging, it must not be overlooked that the patient and his family face, and have to overcome, profound psychosocial problems. The main stressors were identified in interviews with 47 heart transplant patients. The main preoperative problems were: the way of being informed about the diagnosis, the waiting period for transplantation, anguishing doubts about the decision to have a transplant, being a body without heart ('zombie'), guilt and shame regarding the donor, the reactions of others. Postoperatively the patients have to cope with: re-entering social systems, reactions of friends, neighbours and colleagues, rejection episodes, death of a fellow patient, the need to redesign family life. All the problems reported by the patients interviewed are discussed regarding their psychosocial implications, and hints are given on how to minimize them. PMID:1299462

  11. Drug-like actions of autoantibodies against receptors of the autonomous nervous system and their impact on human heart function

    PubMed Central

    Herda, LR; Felix, SB; Boege, F

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies against cholinergic and adrenergic receptors (adrenoceptors) are frequent in serum of patients with chronic heart failure. Their prevalence is associated with Chagas' disease, idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and ischaemic heart disease. Among the epitopes targeted are first and second extracellular loops of the β-adrenergic (β-adrenoceptor) and M2 muscarinic receptor. β1-adrenoceptor autoantibodies affect radioligand binding and cardiomyocyte function similar to agonists. Corresponding rodent immunizations induce symptoms compatible with chronic heart failure that are reversible upon removal of the antibodies, transferable via the serum and abrogated by adrenergic antagonists. In DCM patients, prevalence and stimulatory efficacy of β1-adrenoceptor autoantibodies are correlated to the decline in cardiac function, ventricular arrhythmia and higher incidence of cardiac death. In conclusion, such autoantibodies seem to cause or promote chronic human left ventricular dysfunction by acting on their receptor targets in a drug-like fashion. However, the pharmacology of this interaction is poorly understood. It is unclear how the autoantibodies trigger changes in receptor activity and second messenger coupling and how that is related to the pathogenesis and severity of the associated diseases. Here, we summarize the available evidence regarding these issues and discuss these findings in the light of recent knowledge about the conformational activation of the human β2-adrenoceptor and the properties of bona fide cardiopathogenic autoantibodies derived from immune-adsorption therapy of DCM patients. These considerations might contribute to the conception of therapy regimen aimed at counteracting or neutralizing cardiopathogenic receptor autoantibodies. PMID:22220626

  12. Effect of Ivabradine on Endothelial Function in Diastolic and Right Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Orea-Tejeda, Arturo; Balderas-Muñoz, Karla; Castillo-Martínez, Lilia; Infante-Vázquez, Oscar; Martínez Memije, Raúl; Keirns-Davis, Candace; Dorantes-García, Joel; Narváez-David, René; Vázquez-Ortíz, Zuilma

    2013-01-01

    Background. Ivabradine is an If ion current inhibitor that has proved to reduce mortality in patients with systolic heart failure by slowing heart rate without decreasing myocardial contractility. Photoplethysmography is a simple, low-cost optical technique that can evaluate vascular function and detect changes in blood flow, pulse, and swelling of tissular microvascular space. Objective. To evaluate the effect of ivabradine on endothelial function by photoplethysmography in diastolic and right heart failure patients. Methodology. 15 patients were included (mean age of 78.1 ± 9.2 years) with optimally treated diastolic and right heart failure. They underwent photoplethysmography before and after induced ischemia to evaluate the wave blood flow on the finger, using the maximum amplitude time/total time (MAT/TT) index. Two measurements were made before and after oral Ivabradine (mean 12.5 mg a day during 6 months of followup). Results. In the study group, the MAT/TT index was 29.1 ± 2.2 versus 24.3 ± 3.2 (P = 0.05) in basal recording and 30.4 ± 2.1 versus 23.3 ± 2.9 (P = 0.002), before versus after ischemia and before versus after Ivabradine intervention, respectively. Conclusions. Ivabradine administration improves endothelial function (shear stress) in diastolic and right heart failure patients. PMID:24222884

  13. Classroom Has a Heart: Teachers and Students Affective Alignment in a Persian Heritage Language Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atoofi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    This research study investigated how the teachers and students at a Persian heritage language class acknowledged and modified their affective behavior based on the affective feedback they received from one another. The notion that interactants can modify their affective output in such fashion is referred in the literature as affective alignment…

  14. Hearts and Minds: The Priority of Affective versus Cognitive Factors in Person Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Kari; Hippel, William von

    1995-01-01

    In two experiments, affect-based and cognition-based attitudes toward a person were induced by varying sequence of affective and cognitive information presented to subjects while holding content constant. Results indicated affect-based attitudes were most effectively changed by affective persuasive appeals, whether these appeals were produced by…

  15. Pharmacological inhibition of IK1 by PA-6 in isolated rat hearts affects ventricular repolarization and refractoriness.

    PubMed

    Skarsfeldt, Mark A; Carstensen, Helena; Skibsbye, Lasse; Tang, Chuyi; Buhl, Rikke; Bentzen, Bo H; Jespersen, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The inwardly rectifying potassium current (IK 1) conducted through Kir2.X channels contribute to repolarization of the cardiac action potential and to stabilization of the resting membrane potential in cardiomyocytes. Our aim was to investigate the effect of the recently discovered IK 1 inhibitor PA-6 on action potential repolarization and refractoriness in isolated rat hearts. Transiently transfected HEK-293 cells expressing IK 1 were voltage-clamped with ramp protocols. Langendorff-perfused heart experiments were performed on male Sprague-Dawley rats, effective refractory period, Wenckebach cycle length, and ventricular effective refractory period were determined following 200 nmol/L PA-6 perfusion. 200 nmol/L PA-6 resulted in a significant time-latency in drug effect on the IK 1 current expressed in HEK-293 cells, giving rise to a maximal effect at 20 min. In the Langendorff-perfused heart experiments, PA-6 prolonged the ventricular action potential duration at 90% repolarization (from 41.8 ± 6.5 msec to 72.6 ± 21.1 msec, 74% compared to baseline, P < 0.01, n = 6). In parallel, PA-6 significantly prolonged the ventricular effective refractory period compared to baseline (from 34.8 ± 4.6 msec to 58.1 ± 14.7 msec, 67%, P < 0.01, n = 6). PA-6 increased the short-term beat-to-beat variability and ventricular fibrillation was observed in two of six hearts. Neither atrial ERP nor duration of atrial fibrillation was altered following PA-6 application. The results show that pharmacological inhibition of cardiac IK 1 affects ventricular action potential repolarization and refractoriness and increases the risk of ventricular arrhythmia in isolated rat hearts. PMID:27117805

  16. Pharmacological inhibition of IK1 by PA-6 in isolated rat hearts affects ventricular repolarization and refractoriness.

    PubMed

    Skarsfeldt, Mark A; Carstensen, Helena; Skibsbye, Lasse; Tang, Chuyi; Buhl, Rikke; Bentzen, Bo H; Jespersen, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The inwardly rectifying potassium current (IK 1) conducted through Kir2.X channels contribute to repolarization of the cardiac action potential and to stabilization of the resting membrane potential in cardiomyocytes. Our aim was to investigate the effect of the recently discovered IK 1 inhibitor PA-6 on action potential repolarization and refractoriness in isolated rat hearts. Transiently transfected HEK-293 cells expressing IK 1 were voltage-clamped with ramp protocols. Langendorff-perfused heart experiments were performed on male Sprague-Dawley rats, effective refractory period, Wenckebach cycle length, and ventricular effective refractory period were determined following 200 nmol/L PA-6 perfusion. 200 nmol/L PA-6 resulted in a significant time-latency in drug effect on the IK 1 current expressed in HEK-293 cells, giving rise to a maximal effect at 20 min. In the Langendorff-perfused heart experiments, PA-6 prolonged the ventricular action potential duration at 90% repolarization (from 41.8 ± 6.5 msec to 72.6 ± 21.1 msec, 74% compared to baseline, P < 0.01, n = 6). In parallel, PA-6 significantly prolonged the ventricular effective refractory period compared to baseline (from 34.8 ± 4.6 msec to 58.1 ± 14.7 msec, 67%, P < 0.01, n = 6). PA-6 increased the short-term beat-to-beat variability and ventricular fibrillation was observed in two of six hearts. Neither atrial ERP nor duration of atrial fibrillation was altered following PA-6 application. The results show that pharmacological inhibition of cardiac IK 1 affects ventricular action potential repolarization and refractoriness and increases the risk of ventricular arrhythmia in isolated rat hearts.

  17. B lymphocytes trigger monocyte mobilization and impair heart function after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Zouggari, Yasmine; Ait-Oufella, Hafid; Bonnin, Philippe; Simon, Tabassome; Sage, Andrew P; Guérin, Coralie; Vilar, José; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Laurans, Ludivine; Dumeau, Edouard; Kotti, Salma; Bruneval, Patrick; Charo, Israel F; Binder, Christoph J; Danchin, Nicolas; Tedgui, Alain; Tedder, Thomas F; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Mallat, Ziad

    2013-10-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is a severe ischemic disease responsible for heart failure and sudden death. Here, we show that after acute myocardial infarction in mice, mature B lymphocytes selectively produce Ccl7 and induce Ly6C(hi) monocyte mobilization and recruitment to the heart, leading to enhanced tissue injury and deterioration of myocardial function. Genetic (Baff receptor deficiency) or antibody-mediated (CD20- or Baff-specific antibody) depletion of mature B lymphocytes impeded Ccl7 production and monocyte mobilization, limited myocardial injury and improved heart function. These effects were recapitulated in mice with B cell-selective Ccl7 deficiency. We also show that high circulating concentrations of CCL7 and BAFF in patients with acute myocardial infarction predict increased risk of death or recurrent myocardial infarction. This work identifies a crucial interaction between mature B lymphocytes and monocytes after acute myocardial ischemia and identifies new therapeutic targets for acute myocardial infarction. PMID:24037091

  18. B lymphocytes trigger monocyte mobilization and impair heart function after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zouggari, Yasmine; Ait-Oufella, Hafid; Bonnin, Philippe; Simon, Tabassome; Sage, Andrew P; Guérin, Coralie; Vilar, José; Caligiuri, Giuseppina; Tsiantoulas, Dimitrios; Laurans, Ludivine; Dumeau, Edouard; Kotti, Salma; Bruneval, Patrick; Charo, Israel F; Binder, Christoph J; Danchin, Nicolas; Tedgui, Alain; Tedder, Thomas F; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Mallat, Ziad

    2014-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is a severe ischemic disease responsible for heart failure and sudden death. Here, we show that after acute myocardial infarction in mice, mature B lymphocytes selectively produce Ccl7 and induce Ly6Chi monocyte mobilization and recruitment to the heart, leading to enhanced tissue injury and deterioration of myocardial function. Genetic (Baff receptor deficiency) or antibody-mediated (CD20- or Baff-specific antibody) depletion of mature B lymphocytes impeded Ccl7 production and monocyte mobilization, limited myocardial injury and improved heart function. These effects were recapitulated in mice with B cell–selective Ccl7 deficiency. We also show that high circulating concentrations of CCL7 and BAFF in patients with acute myocardial infarction predict increased risk of death or recurrent myocardial infarction. This work identifies a crucial interaction between mature B lymphocytes and monocytes after acute myocardial ischemia and identifies new therapeutic targets for acute myocardial infarction. PMID:24037091

  19. Impact of cold ischemia on mitochondrial function in porcine hearts and blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Wiedemann, Dominik; Schachner, Thomas; Bonaros, Nikolaos; Dorn, Melissa; Andreas, Martin; Kocher, Alfred; Kuznetsov, Andrey V

    2013-11-07

    The effects of cold storage using Custodiol® (Histidine-Tryptophan-Ketoglutarate, HTK) or isotonic saline solution on mitochondrial function in hearts (left and rights ventricles) and various blood vessels of pigs were investigated. Hearts, saphenous veins, internal-mammary-arteries and aortas of male landrace pigs were harvested and exposed to cold ischemia in either saline or Custodiol-HTK solution. Mitochondrial function was measured in situ in permeabilized fibers by high-resolution respirometry. Mitochondrial respiratory capacities (maximal respiration rates) were similar in the right and left ventricle in controls and after 14 h of cold storage were significantly better preserved in Custodiol-HTK than in saline solution. Mitochondrial respiration rates in various blood vessels including aorta, arteries and veins were less than 5% of myocardium rates. In contrast to the pig heart, in some blood vessels, like veins, mitochondrial function remained stable even after 24 h of cold ischemia. HTK-Custodiol protection of mitochondrial function after prolonged cold ischemia was observed in the myocardium but not in blood vessels. HTK-Custodiol solution thus offers significant protection of myocardial mitochondria against cold ischemic injury and can be used as efficient preservation solution in organ transplantation but probably has no benefit for blood vessels preservation. Analysis of mitochondrial function can be used as a valuable approach for the assessment of cold ischemic injury in various tissues including pig heart and various blood vessels.

  20. Intravenous AAV8 Encoding Urocortin-2 Increases Function of the Failing Heart in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lai, N. Chin; Gao, Mei Hua; Giamouridis, Dimosthenis; Suarez, Jorge; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Parikh, Jay; Hightower, Stephen; Guo, Tracy; Dillmann, Wolfgang; Kim, Young-Chul; Diaz-Juarez, Julieta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Urocortin-2 (UCn2) peptide infusion increases cardiac function in patients with heart failure, but chronic peptide infusion is cumbersome, is costly, and provides only short-term benefits. Gene transfer would circumvent these shortcomings. We previously showed that a single intravenous (IV) injection of AAV8.UCn2 increases plasma UCn2 and left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic function for at least 7 months in normal mice. Here we test the hypothesis that IV delivery of AAV8.UCn2 increases function of the failing heart. Myocardial infarction (MI, by coronary ligation) was used to induce heart failure, which was assessed by echocardiography 3 weeks after MI. Mice with LV ejection fraction (EF) <25% received IV delivery of AAV8.UCn2 (5×1011 gc) or saline, and 5 weeks later echocardiography showed increased LV EF in mice that received UCn2 gene transfer (p=0.01). In vivo physiological studies showed a 2-fold increase in peak rate of LV pressure development (LV +dP/dt; p<0.0001) and a 1.6-fold increase in peak rate of LV pressure decay (LV −dP/dt; p=0.0007), indicating increased LV systolic and diastolic function in treated mice. UCn2 gene transfer was associated with increased peak systolic Ca2+ transient amplitude and rate of Ca2+ decline and increased SERCA2a expression. In addition, UCn2 gene transfer reduced Thr286 phosphorylation of Cam kinase II, and increased expression of cardiac myosin light chain kinase, findings that would be anticipated to increase function of the failing heart. We conclude that a single IV injection of AAV8.UCn2 increases function of the failing heart. The simplicity of IV injection of a vector encoding a gene with beneficial paracrine effects to increase cardiac function is an attractive potential clinical strategy. PMID:25760560

  1. The cAMP-binding Popdc proteins have a redundant function in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Thomas; Simrick, Subreena L.; Poon, Kar Lai; Schindler, Roland F.R.

    2014-01-01

    Popdc (Popeye-domain-containing) genes encode membrane-bound proteins and are abundantly present in cardiac myocytes and in skeletal muscle fibres. Functional analysis of Popdc1 (Bves) and Popdc2 in mice and of popdc2 in zebrafish revealed an overlapping role for proper electrical conduction in the heart and maintaining structural integrity of skeletal muscle. Popdc proteins mediate cAMP signalling and modulate the biological activity of interacting proteins. The two-pore channel TREK-1 interacts with all three Popdc proteins. In Xenopus oocytes, the presence of Popdc proteins causes an enhanced membrane transport leading to an increase in TREK-1 current, which is blocked when cAMP levels are increased. Another important Popdc-interacting protein is caveolin 3, and the loss of Popdc1 affects caveolar size. Thus a family of membrane-bound cAMP-binding proteins has been identified, which modulate the subcellular localization of effector proteins involved in organizing signalling complexes and assuring proper membrane physiology of cardiac myocytes. PMID:24646234

  2. Cognitive function in the affective disorders: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bulbena, A; Berrios, G E

    1993-01-01

    A prospective, controlled study of 50 subjects confirmed claims that major depression or mania may cause temporary disorders of attention, memory, visuo-spatial function, and choice reaction time, and cause-independently of medication-the appearance of glabellar tap, positive hand-face test, nuchocephalic reflex, and graphesthesia. On follow-up, all these phenomena either disappeared or markedly improved. Age and age of onset, but not pre-morbid intelligence or history of ECT, seemed to modulate the severity of the cognitive impairment. Presence of delusions predicted poor (but reversible) visuo-spatial function. Cognitive impairment accompanied by reversible soft neurological signs was more marked but patients thus affected surprisingly showed lower depressive scores; this was interpreted as representing a secondary, 'organic' form of affective disorder (i.e. a behavioural phenocopy of depression) characterised by a reduced capacity to experience depressive symptoms and by little improvement at follow-up.

  3. Atrial BNP endocrine function during chronic unloading of the normal canine heart.

    PubMed

    Lisy, Ondrej; Redfield, Margaret M; Schirger, John A; Burnett, John C

    2005-01-01

    The goal of the study was to define the effect of chronic unloading of the normal heart on atrial endocrine function with a focus on brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), specifically addressing the role of load and neurohumoral stimulation. Although produced primarily by atrial myocardium in the normal heart, controversy persists with regard to load-dependent vs. neurohumoral mechanisms controlling atrial BNP synthesis and storage. We used a unique canine model of chronic unloading of the heart produced by thoracic inferior vena caval constriction (TIVCC), which also resulted in activation of plasma endothelin (ET-1), ANG II, and norepinephrine (NE), known activators of BNP synthesis, compared with sham. TIVCC was produced by banding of the inferior vena cava for 10 days (n = 6), whereas in control (n = 5) the band was not constricted (sham). In a third group (n = 7), the band was released on day 11, thus acutely reloading the heart. Chronic TIVCC decreased cardiac output and right atrial pressure with a decrease in atrial mass index consistent with atrial atrophy. Atrial BNP mRNA decreased compared with sham. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed an increase in BNP in atrial granules consistent with increased storage. Acute reloading increased cardiac filling pressures and resulted in an increase in plasma BNP. We conclude that chronic unloading of the normal heart results in atrial atrophic remodeling and in suppression of atrial BNP mRNA despite intense stimulation by ET, ANG II, and NE, underscoring the primacy of load in the control of atrial endocrine function and structure.

  4. The Association Between Periodontal Disease and Kidney Function Decline in African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Grubbs, Vanessa; Vittinghoff, Eric; Beck, James D.; Kshirsagar, Abhijit V.; Wang, Wei; Griswold, Michael E.; Powe, Neil R.; Correa, Adolfo; Young, Bessie

    2015-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains a prevalent public health problem that disproportionately affects African Americans, despite intense efforts targeting traditional risk factors. Periodontal disease, a chronic bacterial infection of the oral cavity, is both common and modifiable and has been implicated as a novel potential CKD risk factor. We sought to examine to what extent periodontal disease is associated with kidney function decline. Methods Retrospective cohort study of 699 African American participants with preserved kidney function defined by an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) >60ml/min/1.73m2 at baseline who underwent complete dental examinations as part of the Dental-Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study (1996–1998) and subsequently enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study (2000–2004). Using multivariable Poisson regression we examined the association of periodontal disease (severe vs. non-severe) with incident CKD defined as incident eGFR<60ml/min/1.73m2 and rapid (5% annualized) eGFR decline at follow-up among those with preserved eGFR at baseline. Results Mean age at baseline was 65.4 years (SD 5.2) and 16.3% (n=114) had severe periodontal disease. There were 21 cases (3.0%) of incident CKD after a mean follow-up of 4.8 (SD 0.6) years. Compared to participants with non-severe periodontal disease, those with severe periodontal disease had a 4-fold greater rate of incident CKD [adjusted incidence rate ratio 4.18, 95% CI (1.68 – 10.39), p=0.002]. Conclusion Severe periodontal disease is prevalent among a population at high-risk for CKD and is associated with clinically significant kidney function decline. Further research is needed to determine if periodontal disease treatment alters the trajectory of renal deterioration. PMID:26110451

  5. Effects of microgravity on interstitial muscle receptors affecting heart rate and blood pressure during static exercise.

    PubMed

    Essfeld, D; Baum, K; Hoffmann, U; Stegemann, J

    1993-09-01

    Afferent nerve fibers from receptors situated in the interstitium of skeletal muscles can induce cardiovascular reflexes. It has been shown that these interstitial muscle receptors are also sensitive to the local state of hydration: increased heart rates and blood pressure values were seen during dynamic and static exercise after local dehydration on earth. Since weightlessness leads to a persisting fluid loss in the lower part of the body, we hypothesized that leg exercise in space would augment heart rate and blood pressure responses to a similar extent as during local, interstitial dehydration on earth. Initial measurements during weightlessness were obtained in one subject after 6 days of space flight. Heart rate and blood pressure responses to light static foot plantar flexion (18% of maximal voluntary contraction) were recorded in two sessions. To eliminate the influence of muscle perfusion, exercise was performed during a period of arterial occlusion obtained by means of pneumatic cuffs at mid-thigh level. Identical protocols were used in the pre- and postflight controls, which were performed both in the sitting posture and in a -90 degrees tilted sitting posture assumed 30-40 min before arterial occlusion. During weightlessness the exercise responses of heart rate and systolic and diastolic blood pressure closely followed the tracings obtained with the tilted sitting posture on ground. The response amplitudes in these states of reduced lower limb volumes (about 20/min and 20 mmHg, respectively) exceeded the responses in the supine position by a factor of at least 2.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Changes in extracellular muscle volume affect heart rate and blood pressure responses to static exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, K.; Essfeld, D.; Stegemann, J.

    To investigate the effect of μg-induced peripheral extracellular fluid reductions on heart rate and blood pressure during isometric exercise, six healthy male subjects performed three calf ergometer test with different extracellular volumes of working muscles. In all tests, body positions during exercise were identical (supine with the knee joint flexed to 900). After a pre-exercise period of 25 min, during which calf volumes were manipulated, subjects had to counteract an external force of 180 N for 5 min. During the pre-exercise period three different protocols were applied. Test A: Subjects rested in the exercise position; test B: Body position was the same as in A but calf volume was increased by venous congestion (cuffs inflated to 80 mm Hg); test C: Calf volumes were decreased by a negative hydrostatic pressure (calves about 40 cm above heart level with the subjects supine). To clamp the changed calf volumes in tests B and C, cuffs were inflated to 300 mm Hg 5 min before the onset of exercise. This occlusion was maintained until termination of exercise. Compared to tests A and B, the reduced volume of test C led to significant increases in heart rate and blood pressure during exercise. Oxygen uptake did not exceed resting levels in B and C until cuffs were deflated, indicating that exclusively calf muscles contributed to the neurogenic peripheral drive. It is concluded that changes in extracellular muscle volume have to be taken into account when comparing heart rate and blood pressure during lg- and μg- exercise.

  7. Preliminary investigation of cardiopulmonary function in stroke patients with stable heart failure and exertional dyspnea

    PubMed Central

    Liaw, Mei-Yun; Wang, Lin-Yi; Pong, Ya-Ping; Tsai, Yu-Chin; Huang, Yu-Chi; Yang, Tsung-Hsun; Lin, Meng-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between pulmonary function, respiratory muscle strength, perceived dyspnea, degree of fatigue, and activity of daily living with motor function and neurological status in stroke patients with stable congestive heart failure (CHF). This was a cohort study in a tertiary care medical center. Stroke patients with CHF and exertional dyspnea (New York Heart Association class I–III) were recruited. The baseline characteristics included duration of disease, Brunnstrom stage, spirometry, resting heart rate, resting oxyhemoglobin saturation (SpO2), maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), Borg scale, fatigue scale, and Barthel index. A total of 47 stroke patients (24 males, 23 females, mean age 65.9 ± 11.5 years) were included. The average Brunnstrom stages of affected limbs were 3.6 ± 1.3 over the proximal parts and 3.5 ± 1.4 over the distal parts of upper limbs, and 3.9 ± 0.9 over lower limbs. The average forced vital capacity (FVC) was 2.0 ± 0.8 L, with a predicted FVC% of 67.9 ± 18.8%, forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) of 1.6 ± 0.7 L, predicted FEV1% of 70.6 ± 20.1%, FEV1/FVC of 84.2 ± 10.5%, and maximum mid-expiratory flow of 65.4 ± 29.5%. The average MIP and MEP were −52.9 ± 33.3 cmH2O and 60.8 ± 29.0 cmH2O, respectively. The Borg scale was 1.5 ± 0.8. MIP was negatively associated with the average Brunnstrom stage of the proximal (r = −0.318, P < 0.05) and distal (r = −0.391, P < 0.01) parts of the upper extremities and lower extremities (r = −0.288, P < 0.05), FVC (r = −0.471, P < 0.01), predicted FVC% (r = −0.299, P < 0.05), and FEV1 (r = −0.397, P < 0.01). MEP was positively associated with average Brunnstrom stage of the distal area of the upper extremities (r = 0.351, P < 0.05), FVC (r = 0.526, P < 0

  8. Freshly isolated mitochondria from failing human hearts exhibit preserved respiratory function.

    PubMed

    Cordero-Reyes, Andrea M; Gupte, Anisha A; Youker, Keith A; Loebe, Matthias; Hsueh, Willa A; Torre-Amione, Guillermo; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Hamilton, Dale J

    2014-03-01

    In heart failure mitochondrial dysfunction is thought to be responsible for energy depletion and contractile dysfunction. The difficulties in procuring fresh left ventricular (LV) myocardium from humans for assessment of mitochondrial function have resulted in the reliance on surrogate markers of mitochondrial function and limited our understanding of cardiac energetics. We isolated mitochondria from fresh LV wall tissue of patients with heart failure and reduced systolic function undergoing heart transplant or left ventricular assist device placement, and compared their function to mitochondria isolated from the non-failing LV (NFLV) wall tissue with normal systolic function from patients with pulmonary hypertension undergoing heart-lung transplant. We performed detailed mitochondrial functional analyses using 4 substrates: glutamate-malate (GM), pyruvate-malate (PM) palmitoyl carnitine-malate (PC) and succinate. NFLV mitochondria showed preserved respiratory control ratios and electron chain integrity with only few differences for the 4 substrates. In contrast, HF mitochondria had greater respiration with GM, PM and PC substrates and higher electron chain capacity for PM than for PC. Surprisingly, HF mitochondria had greater respiratory control ratios and lower ADP-independent state 4 rates than NFLV mitochondria for GM, PM and PC substrates demonstrating that HF mitochondria are capable of coupled respiration ex vivo. Gene expression studies revealed decreased expression of key genes in pathways for oxidation of both fatty acids and glucose. Our results suggest that mitochondria from the failing LV myocardium are capable of tightly coupled respiration when isolated and supplied with ample substrates. Thus energy starvation in the failing heart may be the result of dysregulation of metabolic pathways, impaired substrate supply or reduced mitochondrial number but not the result of reduced mitochondrial electron transport capacity. PMID:24412531

  9. Capturing structure and function in an embryonic heart with biophotonic tools

    PubMed Central

    Karunamuni, Ganga H.; Gu, Shi; Ford, Matthew R.; Peterson, Lindsy M.; Ma, Pei; Wang, Yves T.; Rollins, Andrew M.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-01-01

    Disturbed cardiac function at an early stage of development has been shown to correlate with cellular/molecular, structural as well as functional cardiac anomalies at later stages culminating in the congenital heart defects (CHDs) that present at birth. While our knowledge of cellular and molecular steps in cardiac development is growing rapidly, our understanding of the role of cardiovascular function in the embryo is still in an early phase. One reason for the scanty information in this area is that the tools to study early cardiac function are limited. Recently developed and adapted biophotonic tools may overcome some of the challenges of studying the tiny fragile beating heart. In this chapter, we describe and discuss our experience in developing and implementing biophotonic tools to study the role of function in heart development with emphasis on optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT can be used for detailed structural and functional studies of the tubular and looping embryo heart under physiological conditions. The same heart can be rapidly and quantitatively phenotyped at early and again at later stages using OCT. When combined with other tools such as optical mapping (OM) and optical pacing (OP), OCT has the potential to reveal in spatial and temporal detail the biophysical changes that can impact mechanotransduction pathways. This information may provide better explanations for the etiology of the CHDs when interwoven with our understanding of morphogenesis and the molecular pathways that have been described to be involved. Future directions for advances in the creation and use of biophotonic tools are discussed. PMID:25309451

  10. Capturing structure and function in an embryonic heart with biophotonic tools.

    PubMed

    Karunamuni, Ganga H; Gu, Shi; Ford, Matthew R; Peterson, Lindsy M; Ma, Pei; Wang, Yves T; Rollins, Andrew M; Jenkins, Michael W; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-01-01

    Disturbed cardiac function at an early stage of development has been shown to correlate with cellular/molecular, structural as well as functional cardiac anomalies at later stages culminating in the congenital heart defects (CHDs) that present at birth. While our knowledge of cellular and molecular steps in cardiac development is growing rapidly, our understanding of the role of cardiovascular function in the embryo is still in an early phase. One reason for the scanty information in this area is that the tools to study early cardiac function are limited. Recently developed and adapted biophotonic tools may overcome some of the challenges of studying the tiny fragile beating heart. In this chapter, we describe and discuss our experience in developing and implementing biophotonic tools to study the role of function in heart development with emphasis on optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCT can be used for detailed structural and functional studies of the tubular and looping embryo heart under physiological conditions. The same heart can be rapidly and quantitatively phenotyped at early and again at later stages using OCT. When combined with other tools such as optical mapping (OM) and optical pacing (OP), OCT has the potential to reveal in spatial and temporal detail the biophysical changes that can impact mechanotransduction pathways. This information may provide better explanations for the etiology of the CHDs when interwoven with our understanding of morphogenesis and the molecular pathways that have been described to be involved. Future directions for advances in the creation and use of biophotonic tools are discussed. PMID:25309451

  11. High fat fed heart failure animals have enhanced mitochondrial function and acyl-coa dehydrogenase activities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have previously shown that administration of high fat in heart failure (HF) increased mitochondrial respiration and did not alter left ventricular (LV) function. PPARalpha is a nuclear transcription factor that activates expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake and utilization. We hypoth...

  12. There is a fire burning in my heart: the role of causal attribution in affect transfer.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Masanori; Aarts, Henk; Oikawa, Haruka

    2011-01-01

    The role of causal attribution in affect transfer of primes was addressed by examining the consequences of explicit evaluation of primes within the framework of the affect misattribution procedure (AMP; Payne, Cheng, Govorun, & Stewart, 2005). We reasoned that affect transfer occurs when primed affect remains diffuse and not bound to a specific object, hence capable of freely colouring subsequent evaluations of ambiguous objects. Accordingly, we propose that when people explicitly evaluate the prime, affect is clearly bound to the prime and becomes less capable of influencing subsequent judgements. Supporting this notion, affect transfer in the AMP was observed when participants ignored the primes, thereby keeping the primed affect relatively unbound. However, this effect disappeared when participants explicitly evaluated the primes before target stimuli were presented. Implications of these findings in determining how and when affect arising from one object carries over to another is discussed.

  13. Electrophysiological Remodeling in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanggan; Hill, Joseph A.

    2010-01-01

    Heart failure affects nearly 6 million Americans, with a half-million new cases emerging each year. Whereas up to 50% of heart failure patients die of arrhythmia, the diverse mechanisms underlying heart failure-associated arrhythmia are poorly understood. As a consequence, effectiveness of antiarrhythmic pharmacotherapy remains elusive. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of heart failure-associated molecular events impacting the electrical function of the myocardium. We approach this from an anatomical standpoint, summarizing recent insights gleaned from pre-clinical models and discussing their relevance to human heart failure. PMID:20096285

  14. Functional properties and responses to ischaemia-reperfusion in Langendorff perfused mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Headrick, J P; Peart, J; Hack, B; Flood, A; Matherne, G P

    2001-11-01

    Despite minimal model characterisation Langendorff perfused murine hearts are increasingly employed in cardiovascular research, and particularly in studies of myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion. Reported contractility remains poor and ischaemic recoveries variable. We characterised function in C57/BL6 mouse hearts using a ventricular balloon or apicobasal displacement and assessed responses to 10-30 min global ischaemia. We examined the functional effects of pacing, ventricular balloon design, perfusate filtration, [Ca(2+)] and temperature. Contractility was high in isovolumically functioning mouse hearts (measured as the change in pressure with time (+dP/dt), 6000-7000 mmHg s(-1)) and was optimal at a heart rate of approximately 420 beats min(-1), with the vasculature sub-maximally dilated, and the cellular energy state high. Post-ischaemic recovery (after 40 min reperfusion) was related to the ischaemic duration: developed pressure recovered by 82 +/- 5 %, 73 +/- 4 %, 68 +/- 3 %, 57 +/- 2 % and 41 +/- 5 % after 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 min ischaemia, respectively. Ventricular compliance and elastance were both reduced post-ischaemia. Post-ischaemic recoveries were lower in the apicobasal model (80 +/- 4 %, 58 +/- 7 %, 40 +/- 3 %, 32 +/- 7 % and 25 +/- 5 %) despite greater reflow and lower metabolic rate (pre-ischaemic myocardial O(2) consumption (V(O2,myo)) 127 +/- 15 vs. 198 +/- 17 microl O(2) min(-1) g(-1)), contracture, enzyme and purine efflux. Electrical pacing slowed recovery in both models, small ventricular balloons (unpressurised volumes < 50-60 microl) artificially depressed ventricular function and recovery from ischaemia, and failure to filter the perfusion fluid to < 0.45 microm depressed pre- and post-ischaemic function. With attention to these various experimental factors, the buffer perfused isovolumically contracting mouse heart is shown to be stable and highly energized, and to possess a high level of contractility. The isovolumic model is more

  15. Combined non-adaptive light and smell stimuli lowered blood pressure, reduced heart rate and reduced negative affect.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shan; Jacob, Tim J C

    2016-03-15

    Bright light therapy has been shown to have a positive impact on seasonal affective disorder (SAD), depression and anxiety. Smell has also has been shown to have effects on mood, stress, anxiety and depression. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the combination of light and smell in a non-adaptive cycle. Human subjects were given smell (lemon, lavender or peppermint) and light stimuli in a triangular wave (60scycle) for 15min. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored before and after each session for 5 consecutive days and a Profile of Mood States (POMS) test was administered before and after the sensory stimulation on days 1, 3 and 5. The light-smell stimulus lowered blood pressure, both systolic and diastolic, and reduced heart rate for all odours compared to control. Of the two sensory stimuli, the odour stimulus contributed most to this effect. The different aromas in the light-smell combinations could be distinguished by their different effects on the mood factors with lemon inducing the greatest mood changes in Dejection-Depression, Anger-Hostility, Tension-Anxiety. In conclusion, combined light and smell stimulation was effective in lowering blood pressure, reducing heart rate and improving mood. The combination was more effective than either smell or light stimuli alone, suggesting that a light-smell combination would be a more robust and efficacious alternative treatment for depression, anxiety and stress. PMID:26780148

  16. Combined non-adaptive light and smell stimuli lowered blood pressure, reduced heart rate and reduced negative affect.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shan; Jacob, Tim J C

    2016-03-15

    Bright light therapy has been shown to have a positive impact on seasonal affective disorder (SAD), depression and anxiety. Smell has also has been shown to have effects on mood, stress, anxiety and depression. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the combination of light and smell in a non-adaptive cycle. Human subjects were given smell (lemon, lavender or peppermint) and light stimuli in a triangular wave (60scycle) for 15min. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored before and after each session for 5 consecutive days and a Profile of Mood States (POMS) test was administered before and after the sensory stimulation on days 1, 3 and 5. The light-smell stimulus lowered blood pressure, both systolic and diastolic, and reduced heart rate for all odours compared to control. Of the two sensory stimuli, the odour stimulus contributed most to this effect. The different aromas in the light-smell combinations could be distinguished by their different effects on the mood factors with lemon inducing the greatest mood changes in Dejection-Depression, Anger-Hostility, Tension-Anxiety. In conclusion, combined light and smell stimulation was effective in lowering blood pressure, reducing heart rate and improving mood. The combination was more effective than either smell or light stimuli alone, suggesting that a light-smell combination would be a more robust and efficacious alternative treatment for depression, anxiety and stress.

  17. Alterations in left ventricular diastolic function in conscious dogs with pacing-induced heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    Komamura, K; Shannon, R P; Pasipoularides, A; Ihara, T; Lader, A S; Patrick, T A; Bishop, S P; Vatner, S F

    1992-01-01

    We investigated in conscious dogs (a) the effects of heart failure induced by chronic rapid ventricular pacing on the sequence of development of left ventricular (LV) diastolic versus systolic dysfunction and (b) whether the changes were load dependent or secondary to alterations in structure. LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction were evident within 24 h after initiation of pacing and occurred in parallel over 3 wk. LV systolic function was reduced at 3 wk, i.e., peak LV dP/dt fell by -1,327 +/- 105 mmHg/s and ejection fraction by -22 +/- 2%. LV diastolic dysfunction also progressed over 3 wk of pacing, i.e., tau increased by +14.0 +/- 2.8 ms and the myocardial stiffness constant by +6.5 +/- 1.4, whereas LV chamber stiffness did not change. These alterations were associated with increases in LV end-systolic (+28.6 +/- 5.7 g/cm2) and LV end-diastolic stresses (+40.4 +/- 5.3 g/cm2). When stresses and heart rate were matched at the same levels in the control and failure states, the increases in tau and myocardial stiffness were no longer observed, whereas LV systolic function remained depressed. There were no increases in connective tissue content in heart failure. Thus, pacing-induced heart failure in conscious dogs is characterized by major alterations in diastolic function which are reversible with normalization of increased loading condition. Images PMID:1601992

  18. Alterations in left ventricular diastolic function in conscious dogs with pacing-induced heart failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komamura, K.; Shannon, R. P.; Pasipoularides, A.; Ihara, T.; Lader, A. S.; Patrick, T. A.; Bishop, S. P.; Vatner, S. F.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated in conscious dogs (a) the effects of heart failure induced by chronic rapid ventricular pacing on the sequence of development of left ventricular (LV) diastolic versus systolic dysfunction and (b) whether the changes were load dependent or secondary to alterations in structure. LV systolic and diastolic dysfunction were evident within 24 h after initiation of pacing and occurred in parallel over 3 wk. LV systolic function was reduced at 3 wk, i.e., peak LV dP/dt fell by -1,327 +/- 105 mmHg/s and ejection fraction by -22 +/- 2%. LV diastolic dysfunction also progressed over 3 wk of pacing, i.e., tau increased by +14.0 +/- 2.8 ms and the myocardial stiffness constant by +6.5 +/- 1.4, whereas LV chamber stiffness did not change. These alterations were associated with increases in LV end-systolic (+28.6 +/- 5.7 g/cm2) and LV end-diastolic stresses (+40.4 +/- 5.3 g/cm2). When stresses and heart rate were matched at the same levels in the control and failure states, the increases in tau and myocardial stiffness were no longer observed, whereas LV systolic function remained depressed. There were no increases in connective tissue content in heart failure. Thus, pacing-induced heart failure in conscious dogs is characterized by major alterations in diastolic function which are reversible with normalization of increased loading condition.

  19. Age-associated pro-inflammatory remodeling and functional phenotype in the heart and large arteries.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingyi; Shah, Ajay M

    2015-06-01

    The aging population is increasing dramatically. Aging-associated stress simultaneously drives proinflammatory remodeling, involving angiotensin II and other factors, in both the heart and large arteries. The structural remodeling and functional changes that occur with aging include cardiac and vascular wall stiffening, systolic hypertension and suboptimal ventricular-arterial coupling, features that are often clinically silent and thus termed a silent syndrome. These age-related effects are the result of responses initiated by cardiovascular proinflammatory cells. Local proinflammatory signals are coupled between the heart and arteries due to common mechanical and humoral messengers within a closed circulating system. Thus, targeting proinflammatory signaling molecules would be a promising approach to improve age-associated suboptimal ventricular-arterial coupling, a major predisposing factor for the pathogenesis of clinical cardiovascular events such as heart failure.

  20. Cardiosphere-derived cell sheet primed with hypoxia improves left ventricular function of chronically infarcted heart.

    PubMed

    Hosoyama, Tohru; Samura, Makoto; Kudo, Tomoaki; Nishimoto, Arata; Ueno, Koji; Murata, Tomoaki; Ohama, Takashi; Sato, Koichi; Mikamo, Akihito; Yoshimura, Koichi; Li, Tao-Sheng; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2015-01-01

    Cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs) isolated from postnatal heart tissue are a convenient and efficientresource for the treatment of myocardial infarction. However, poor retention of CDCs in infarcted hearts often causes less than ideal therapeutic outcomes. Cell sheet technology has been developed as a means of permitting longer retention of graft cells, and this therapeutic strategy has opened new avenues of cell-based therapy for severe ischemic diseases. However, there is still scope for improvement before this treatment can be routinely applied in clinical settings. In this study, we investigated whether hypoxic preconditioning enhances the therapeutic efficacy of CDC monolayer sheets. To induce hypoxia priming, CDC monolayer sheets were placed in an incubator adjusted to 2% oxygen for 24 hours, and then preconditioned mouse CDC sheets were implanted into the infarcted heart of old myocardial infarction mouse models. Hypoxic preconditioning of CDC sheets remarkably increased the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor through the PI3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway. Implantation of preconditioned CDC sheets improved left ventricular function inchronically infarcted hearts and reduced fibrosis. The therapeutic efficacy of preconditioned CDC sheets was higher than the CDC sheets that were cultured under normaxia condition. These results suggest that hypoxic preconditioning augments the therapeutic angiogenic and anti-fibrotic activity of CDC sheets. A combination of cell sheets and hypoxic preconditioning offers an attractive therapeutic protocol for CDC transplantation into chronically infarcted hearts. PMID:26885271

  1. Alterations in left ventricular diastolic function in chronic ischemic heart failure. Assessment by radionuclide angiography.

    PubMed

    Bareiss, P; Facello, A; Constantinesco, A; Demangeat, J L; Brunot, B; Arbogast, R; Roul, G

    1990-02-01

    Using radionuclide angiography at rest, we studied several parameters of left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in 60 patients divided into three groups, a control group (G1) of 15 patients and two groups of patients with chronic ischemic heart disease and previous anterior wall myocardial infarction but without aneurysm or dyskinetic wall motion, a second group (G2) of 23 patients with no history of heart failure, and a third group (G3) of 22 patients in New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II or III of heart failure. Ejection fraction, peak emptying, and peak filling rates, in addition to times to reach peak rates, were evaluated after constructing a global time-activity curve and its first time derivative. In addition, we computed the first time-derivative curves for each image pixel and obtained functional images (MIN/MAX images) representing the distribution of times to peak emptying or filling rates Using a left ventricular region of interest, time histograms were generated, and indexes of dispersion of times to peak rates, defined as the full width at half maximum of the histograms, were obtained. Significant (p less than or equal to 0.01) differences were observed among all groups for ejection fraction, peak emptying rate, and peak filling rate. The decrease of the peak filling rate still remained significant from group G1 to group G3 even after adjustment for differences in ejection fraction and heart rate. Peak filling rate was linearly correlated with ejection fraction in the population with ischemic heart disease (G2 + G3) (r = 0.68, p less than or equal to 0.0001).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2297884

  2. Biomarkers of renal injury and function: diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic implications in heart failure.

    PubMed

    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Ruilope, Luis M; Maisel, Alan S; Damman, Kevin

    2016-09-01

    Heart failure guidelines suggest evaluating renal function as a routine work-up in every patient with heart failure. Specifically, it is advised to calculate glomerular filtration rate and determine blood urea nitrogen. The reason for this is that renal impairment and worsening renal function (WRF) are common in heart failure, and strongly associate with poor outcome. Renal function, however, consists of more than glomerular filtration alone, and includes tubulointerstitial damage and albuminuria. For each of these renal entities, different biomarkers exist that have been investigated in heart failure. Hypothetically, and in parallel to data in nephrology, these markers may aid in the diagnosis of renal dysfunction, or for risk stratification, or could help in therapeutic decision-making. However, as reviewed in the present manuscript, while these markers may carry prognostic information (although not always additive to established markers of renal function), their role in predicting WRF is limited at best. More importantly, none of these markers have been evaluated as a therapeutic target nor have their serial values been used to guide therapy. The evidence is most compelling for the oldest-serum creatinine (in combination with glomerular filtration rate)-but even for this biomarker, evidence to guide therapy to improve outcome is circumstantial at best. Although many new renal biomarkers have emerged at the horizon, they have only limited usefulness in clinical practice until thoroughly and prospectively studied. For now, routine measurement of (novel) renal biomarkers can help to determine cardiovascular risk, but there is no role for these biomarkers to change therapy to improve clinical outcome in heart failure.

  3. Factors affecting sexual function in menopause: A review article.

    PubMed

    Nazarpour, Soheila; Simbar, Masoumeh; Tehrani, Fahimeh Ramezani

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to systematically review the articles on factors affecting sexual function during menopause. Searching articles indexed in Pubmed, Science Direct, Iranmedex, EMBASE, Scopus, and Scientific Information Database databases, a total number of 42 studies published between 2003 and 2013 were selected. Age, estrogen deficiency, type of menopause, chronic medical problems, partner's sex problems, severity of menopause symptoms, dystocia history, and health status were the physical factors influencing sexual function of menopausal women. There were conflicting results regarding the amount of androgens, hormonal therapy, exercise/physical activity, and obstetric history. In the mental-emotional area, all studies confirmed the impact of depression and anxiety. Social factors, including smoking, alcohol consumption, the quality of relationship with husband, partner's loyalty, sexual knowledge, access to health care, a history of divorce or the death of a husband, living apart from a spouse, and a negative understanding of women's health were found to affect sexual function; however, there were conflicting results regarding the effects of education, occupation, socioeconomic status, marital duration, and frequency of sexual intercourse. PMID:27590367

  4. Microbial composition affects the functioning of estuarine sediments

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Heather E; Martiny, Jennifer BH

    2013-01-01

    Although microorganisms largely drive many ecosystem processes, the relationship between microbial composition and their functioning remains unclear. To tease apart the effects of composition and the environment directly, microbial composition must be manipulated and maintained, ideally in a natural ecosystem. In this study, we aimed to test whether variability in microbial composition affects functional processes in a field setting, by reciprocally transplanting riverbed sediments between low- and high-salinity locations along the Nonesuch River (Maine, USA). We placed the sediments into microbial ‘cages' to prevent the migration of microorganisms, while allowing the sediments to experience the abiotic conditions of the surroundings. We performed two experiments, short- (1 week) and long-term (7 weeks) reciprocal transplants, after which we assayed a variety of functional processes in the cages. In both experiments, we examined the composition of bacteria generally (targeting the 16S rDNA gene) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) specifically (targeting the dsrAB gene) using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). In the short-term experiment, sediment processes (CO2 production, CH4 flux, nitrification and enzyme activities) depended on both the sediment's origin (reflecting differences in microbial composition between salt and freshwater sediments) and the surrounding environment. In the long-term experiment, general bacterial composition (but not SRB composition) shifted in response to their new environment, and this composition was significantly correlated with sediment functioning. Further, sediment origin had a diminished effect, relative to the short-term experiment, on sediment processes. Overall, this study provides direct evidence that microbial composition directly affects functional processes in these sediments. PMID:23235294

  5. Arginase induction and activation during ischemia and reperfusion and functional consequences for the heart

    PubMed Central

    Schlüter, Klaus-Dieter; Schulz, Rainer; Schreckenberg, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Induction and activation of arginase is among the fastest responses of the heart to ischemic events. Induction of arginase expression and enzyme activation under ischemic conditions shifts arginine consumption from nitric oxide formation (NO) to the formation of ornithine and urea. In the heart such a switch in substrate utilization reduces the impact of the NO/cGMP-pathway on cardiac function that requires intact electromechanical coupling but at the same time it induces ornithine-dependent pathways such as the polyamine metabolism. Both effects significantly reduce the recovery of heart function during reperfusion and thereby limits the success of reperfusion strategies. In this context, changes in arginine consumption trigger cardiac remodeling in an unfavorable way and increases the risk of arrhythmia, specifically in the initial post-ischemic period in which arginase activity is dominating. However, during the entire ischemic period arginase activation might be a meaningful adaptation that is specifically relevant for reperfusion following prolonged ischemic periods. Therefore, a precise understanding about the underlying mechanism that leads to arginase induction as well as of it's mechanistic impact on post-ischemic hearts is required for optimizing reperfusion strategies. In this review we will summarize our current understanding of these processes and give an outlook about possible treatment options for the future. PMID:25814956

  6. Acute heart inflammation: ultrastructural and functional aspects of macrophages elicited by Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Rossana C N

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The heart is the main target organ of the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas' disease, a significant public health issue and still a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Latin America. During the acute disease, tissue damage in the heart is related to the intense myocardium parasitism. To control parasite multiplication, cells of the monocytic lineage are highly mobilized. In response to inflammatory and immune stimulation, an intense migration and extravasation of monocytes occurs from the bloodstream into heart. Monocyte differentiation leads to the formation of tissue phagocytosing macrophages, which are strongly activated and direct host defence. Newly elicited monocyte-derived macrophages both undergo profound physiological changes and display morphological heterogeneity that greatly differs from originally non-inflammatory macrophages, and underlie their functional activities as potent inflammatory cells. Thus, activated macrophages play a critical role in the outcome of parasite infection. This review covers functional and ultrastructural aspects of heart inflammatory macrophages triggered by the acute Chagas' disease, including recent discoveries on morphologically distinct, inflammation-related organelles, termed lipid bodies, which are actively formed in vivo within macrophages in response to T. cruzi infection. These findings are defining a broader role for lipid bodies as key markers of macrophage activation during innate immune responses to infectious diseases and attractive targets for novel anti-inflammatory therapies. Modulation of macrophage activation may be central in providing therapeutic benefits for Chagas' disease control. PMID:18624767

  7. Coronary artery disease affects cortical circuitry associated with brain-heart integration during volitional exercise.

    PubMed

    Norton, Katelyn N; Badrov, Mark B; Barron, Carly C; Suskin, Neville; Heinecke, Armin; Shoemaker, J Kevin

    2015-08-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that coronary artery disease (CAD) alters the cortical circuitry associated with exercise. Observations of changes in heart rate (HR) and in cortical blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) images were made in 23 control subjects [control; 8 women; 63 ± 11 yr; mean arterial pressure (MAP): 90 ± 9 mmHg] (mean ± SD) and 17 similarly aged CAD patients (4 women; 59 ± 9 yr; MAP: 87 ± 10 mmHg). Four repeated bouts each of 30%, 40%, and 50% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) force (LAB session), and seven repeated bouts of isometric handgrip (IHG) at 40% MVC force (fMRI session), were performed, with each contraction lasting 20 s and separated by 40 s of rest. There was a main effect of group (P = 0.03) on HR responses across all IHG intensities. Compared with control, CAD demonstrated less task-dependent deactivation in the posterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex, and reduced activation in the right anterior insula, bilateral precentral cortex, and occipital lobe (P < 0.05). When correlated with HR, CAD demonstrated reduced activation in the bilateral insula and posterior cingulate cortex, and reduced deactivation in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, and bilateral precentral cortex (P < 0.05). The increased variability in expected autonomic regions and decrease in total cortical activation in response to the IHG task are associated with a diminished HR response to volitional effort in CAD. Therefore, relative to similarly aged and healthy individuals, CAD impairs the heart rate response and modifies the cortical patterns associated with cardiovascular control during IHG.

  8. Emotional Processing in High-Functioning Autism--Physiological Reactivity and Affective Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolte, Sven; Feineis-Matthews, Sabine; Poustka, Fritz

    2008-01-01

    This study examined physiological response and affective report in 10 adult individuals with autism and 10 typically developing controls. An emotion induction paradigm using stimuli from the International Affective Picture System was applied. Blood pressure, heart and self-ratings of experienced valence (pleasure), arousal and dominance (control)…

  9. Trbp regulates heart function through miRNA-mediated Sox6 repression

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jian; Chen, Jinghai; Wang, Yanqun; Kataoka, Masaharu; Ma, Lixin; Zhou, Pingzhu; Hu, Xiaoyun; Lin, Zhiqiang; Nie, Mao; Deng, Zhong-Liang; Pu, William T; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is associated with altered expression of genes encoding contractile proteins. Here we show that Trbp (Tarbp2), an RNA binding protein, is required for normal heart function. Cardiac-specific inactivation of Trbp (TrbpcKO) caused progressive cardiomyopathy and lethal heart failure. Trbp loss of function resulted in upregulation of Sox6, repression of genes encoding normal cardiac slow-twitch myofiber proteins, and pathologically increased expression of skeletal fast-twitch myofiber genes. Remarkably, knockdown of Sox6 fully rescued the Trbp mutant phenotype, whereas Sox6 overexpression phenocopied the TrbpcKO phenotype. Trbp inactivation was mechanistically linked to Sox6 upregulation through altered processing of miR-208a, which is a direct inhibitor of Sox6. Transgenic overexpression of miR-208a sufficiently repressed Sox6, restored the balance of fast- and slow- twitch myofiber gene expression, and rescued cardiac function in TrbpcKO mice. Together, our studies reveal a novel Trbp-mediated microRNA processing mechanism in regulating a linear genetic cascade essential for normal heart function. PMID:26029872

  10. [The effect of transvenous laser therapy on lipid peroxidation function in patients with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Vakhliaev, V D; Smirnova, I E; Uchaĭkina, L V; Barsel', V A; Aksiutina, M S; Matveeva, S A; Paramonova, M A; Shchedrina, I S; Syrkin, A L

    1992-07-01

    The papers deals with changes in the levels of lipid peroxidation products in patients with stable angina of effort, which occurred with intravenous helium-neon blood irradiation. The therapy was highly effective in patients with lower functional classes and persons with normal circulation, resulting in a reduction in lipid peroxidation intensity. Predictors are recommended to determine the efficiency and expediency of laser therapy in patients with coronary heart disease. PMID:1487878

  11. Effects of nocturnal oxygen therapy on heart function in SDB patients undergoing dialysis.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Fumitaka; Furumatsu, Yoshiyuki; Yurugi, Takatomi; Amari, Yoshifumi; Iida, Takeshi; Uehara, Mitsuru; Fukunaga, Megumu

    2015-06-01

    There is a close relationship between sleep disordered breathing (SDB) and heart failure. We performed home oxygen therapy (HOT) in patients with SAS undergoing dialysis, and investigated its effects on the heart function. The subjects were 10 SDB patients on dialysis. On retiring at night, oxygen was transnasally administered at 1.0 L/min. The human atrial natriuretic peptide (hANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), total protein, Alb, cholesterol and phosphorus levels were measured before the start of oxygen therapy and after 6 weeks. The mean SpO2 increased from 93.5% [91.5, 97.0] to 96.3% [94.8, 97.4] (median [interquartile range]) (p = 0.015). The hANP (p = 0.0039), BNP (p = 0.0098) and serum Alb (p = 0.015) levels significantly improved. There were no significant changes in the cholesterol, phosphorus or total protein levels. These results suggest that nocturnal oxygen therapy improves indices of heart failure, contributing to the prevention and treatment of heart failure in dialysis patients with SDB.

  12. SRC-2 Coactivator Deficiency Decreases Functional Reserve in Response to Pressure Overload of Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Reineke, Erin L.; York, Brian; Stashi, Erin; Chen, Xian; Tsimelzon, Anna; Xu, Jianming; Newgard, Christopher B.; Taffet, George E.; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Entman, Mark L.; O’Malley, Bert W.

    2012-01-01

    A major component of the cardiac stress response is the simultaneous activation of several gene regulatory networks. Interestingly, the transcriptional regulator steroid receptor coactivator-2, SRC-2 is often decreased during cardiac failure in humans. We postulated that SRC-2 suppression plays a mechanistic role in the stress response and that SRC-2 activity is an important regulator of the adult heart gene expression profile. Genome-wide microarray analysis, confirmed with targeted gene expression analyses revealed that genetic ablation of SRC-2 activates the “fetal gene program” in adult mice as manifested by shifts in expression of a) metabolic and b) sarcomeric genes, as well as associated modulating transcription factors. While these gene expression changes were not accompanied by changes in left ventricular weight or cardiac function, imposition of transverse aortic constriction (TAC) predisposed SRC-2 knockout (KO) mice to stress-induced cardiac dysfunction. In addition, SRC-2 KO mice lacked the normal ventricular hypertrophic response as indicated through heart weight, left ventricular wall thickness, and blunted molecular signaling known to activate hypertrophy. Our results indicate that SRC-2 is involved in maintenance of the steady-state adult heart transcriptional profile, with its ablation inducing transcriptional changes that mimic a stressed heart. These results further suggest that SRC-2 deletion interferes with the timing and integration needed to respond efficiently to stress through disruption of metabolic and sarcomeric gene expression and hypertrophic signaling, the three key stress responsive pathways. PMID:23300926

  13. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B Alex; Jetten, Anton M; Austin, Christopher P; Tice, Raymond R

    2013-05-25

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR.

  14. Bisphenol A affects androgen receptor function via multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Christina; Goodwin, Bonnie; Shockley, Keith; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Norris, John; Merrick, B. Alex; Jetten, Anton M.; Austin, Christopher, P.; Tice, Raymond R.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), is a well-known endocrine disruptor compound (EDC) that affects the normal development and function of the female and male reproductive system, however the mechanisms of action remain unclear. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of how BPA may affect ten different nuclear receptors, stable cell lines containing individual nuclear receptor ligand binding domain (LBD)-linked to the β-Gal reporter were examined by a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) format in the Tox21 Screening Program of the NIH. The results showed that two receptors, estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and androgen receptor (AR), are affected by BPA in opposite direction. To confirm the observed effects of BPA on ERα and AR, we performed transient transfection experiments with full-length receptors and their corresponding response elements linked to luciferase reporters. We also included in this study two BPA analogs, bisphenol AF (BPAF) and bisphenol S (BPS). As seen in African green monkey kidney CV1 cells, the present study confirmed that BPA and BPAF act as ERα agonists (half maximal effective concentration EC50 of 10-100 nM) and as AR antagonists (half maximal inhibitory concentration IC50 of 1-2 μM). Both BPA and BPAF antagonized AR function via competitive inhibition of the action of synthetic androgen R1881. BPS with lower estrogenic activity (EC50 of 2.2 μM), did not compete with R1881 for AR binding, when tested at 30 μM. Finally, the effects of BPA were also evaluated in a nuclear translocation assays using EGPF-tagged receptors. Similar to 17β-estradiol (E2) which was used as control, BPA was able to enhance ERα nuclear foci formation but at a 100-fold higher concentration. Although BPA was able to bind AR, the nuclear translocation was reduced. Furthermore, BPA was unable to induce functional foci in the nuclei and is consistent with the transient transfection study that BPA is unable to activate AR. PMID:23562765

  15. Radiation from wireless technology affects the blood, the heart, and the autonomic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Havas, Magda

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to electrosmog generated by electric, electronic, and wireless technology is accelerating to the point that a portion of the population is experiencing adverse reactions when they are exposed. The symptoms of electrohypersensitivity (EHS), best described as rapid aging syndrome, experienced by adults and children resemble symptoms experienced by radar operators in the 1940s to the 1960s and are well described in the literature. An increasingly common response includes clumping (rouleau formation) of the red blood cells, heart palpitations, pain or pressure in the chest accompanied by anxiety, and an upregulation of the sympathetic nervous system coincident with a downregulation of the parasympathetic nervous system typical of the "fight-or-flight" response. Provocation studies presented in this article demonstrate that the response to electrosmog is physiologic and not psychosomatic. Those who experience prolonged and severe EHS may develop psychologic problems as a consequence of their inability to work, their limited ability to travel in our highly technologic environment, and the social stigma that their symptoms are imagined rather than real.

  16. Ultraviolet Radiation Affects Thoratec HeartMate II Driveline Mechanical Properties: A Pilot Experiment.

    PubMed

    Evans, Annicka C; Wright, G Andrew; McCandless, Sean P; Stoker, Sandi; Miller, Dylan; Reid, Bruce B; Horne, Benjamin D; Afshar, Kia; Kfoury, Abdallah G

    2015-01-01

    Longevity and quality of life for left ventricular assist device (LVAD) patients are plagued by driveline exit site infections. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation, a current treatment in wound healing clinics, could potentially treat LVAD exit site infections. However, the effect of UV radiation on the tensile properties of HeartMate II (HMII) driveline material is unknown. The sleeve of a single HMII driveline was distributed into six exposure groups (n = 10/group). The six groups were further divided into two treatment cohorts designed to replicate wound treatment schedules of postimplant LVAD patients. Strip biaxial tensile tests were performed on both unexposed and exposed samples to analyze changes in material elasticity (Young's modulus), point of deformation (yield strength), and breaking point. Our data suggest that UV exposure changes the elasticity of the HMII driveline. However, the material endured aberrantly large forces and the properties remained within the safety threshold of device performance. This study warrants further examination of the effect of UV light on driveline material, to determine safety, reliability, and efficacy of UV treatment on exit site infections.

  17. Diosmin pretreatment improves cardiac function and suppresses oxidative stress in rat heart after ischemia/reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Senthamizhselvan, Oomaidurai; Manivannan, Jeganathan; Silambarasan, Thangarasu; Raja, Boobalan

    2014-08-01

    Reperfusion of ischemic tissue leads to the generation of oxygen derived free radicals which plays an important role in cellular damage. Objective of the current study is to evaluate the cardio-protective and antioxidant effect of diosmin on ischemia-reperfusion related cardiac dysfunction, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Diosmin (50 and 100 mg/kg body weight (bw)) was given every day to the rats orally throughout the experimental period. Ischemia/reperfusion protocol was carried out ex vivo using langendorff perfusion method and the cardiac functional recovery was assessed in terms of percentage rate pressure product. Coronary effluents of LDH and CK-MB activities, antioxidant enzyme activities, lipid peroxidation products, activity of TCA cycle enzymes were evaluated. Moreover, in vitro superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical scavenging potential of diosmin was also quantified. Finally, quantitative real-time PCR was used for assessing Bcl-2 mRNA expression in heart. Cardiac functional recovery was impaired after reperfusion compared with continuously perfused heart. It was significantly prevented by diosmin treatment. Impaired antioxidant enzyme activities and elevated lipid peroxidation products level were also significantly suppressed. The activity of TCA cycle enzymes was protected against reperfusion stress. Down regulated Bcl-2 was also significantly increased. This study concluded that diosmin pretreatment prevents all the impaired patterns including cardiac function, oxidative stress and apoptosis associated with reperfusion in control heart by its antioxidant role.

  18. Can lifestyle modification affect men’s erectile function?

    PubMed Central

    Hehemann, Marah C.

    2016-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common condition affecting millions of men worldwide. The pathophysiology and epidemiologic links between ED and risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) are well-established. Lifestyle modifications such as smoking cessation, weight reduction, dietary modification, physical activity, and psychological stress reduction have been increasingly recognized as foundational to the prevention and treatment of ED. The aim of this review is to outline behavioral choices which may increase ones risk of developing ED, to present relevant studies addressing lifestyle factors correlated with ED, and to highlight proposed mechanisms for intervention aimed at improving erectile function in men with ED. These recommendations can provide a framework for counseling patients with ED about lifestyle modification. PMID:27141445

  19. Dehydration affects brain structure and function in healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kempton, Matthew J; Ettinger, Ulrich; Foster, Russell; Williams, Steven C R; Calvert, Gemma A; Hampshire, Adam; Zelaya, Fernando O; O'Gorman, Ruth L; McMorris, Terry; Owen, Adrian M; Smith, Marcus S

    2011-01-01

    It was recently observed that dehydration causes shrinkage of brain tissue and an associated increase in ventricular volume. Negative effects of dehydration on cognitive performance have been shown in some but not all studies, and it has also been reported that an increased perceived effort may be required following dehydration. However, the effects of dehydration on brain function are unknown. We investigated this question using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 10 healthy adolescents (mean age = 16.8, five females). Each subject completed a thermal exercise protocol and nonthermal exercise control condition in a cross-over repeated measures design. Subjects lost more weight via perspiration in the thermal exercise versus the control condition (P < 0.0001), and lateral ventricle enlargement correlated with the reduction in body mass (r = 0.77, P = 0.01). Dehydration following the thermal exercise protocol led to a significantly stronger increase in fronto-parietal blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) response during an executive function task (Tower of London) than the control condition, whereas cerebral perfusion during rest was not affected. The increase in BOLD response after dehydration was not paralleled by a change in cognitive performance, suggesting an inefficient use of brain metabolic activity following dehydration. This pattern indicates that participants exerted a higher level of neuronal activity in order to achieve the same performance level. Given the limited availability of brain metabolic resources, these findings suggest that prolonged states of reduced water intake may adversely impact executive functions such as planning and visuo-spatial processing.

  20. Dehydration affects brain structure and function in healthy adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kempton, Matthew J; Ettinger, Ulrich; Foster, Russell; Williams, Steven C R; Calvert, Gemma A; Hampshire, Adam; Zelaya, Fernando O; O'Gorman, Ruth L; McMorris, Terry; Owen, Adrian M; Smith, Marcus S

    2011-01-01

    It was recently observed that dehydration causes shrinkage of brain tissue and an associated increase in ventricular volume. Negative effects of dehydration on cognitive performance have been shown in some but not all studies, and it has also been reported that an increased perceived effort may be required following dehydration. However, the effects of dehydration on brain function are unknown. We investigated this question using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 10 healthy adolescents (mean age = 16.8, five females). Each subject completed a thermal exercise protocol and nonthermal exercise control condition in a cross-over repeated measures design. Subjects lost more weight via perspiration in the thermal exercise versus the control condition (P < 0.0001), and lateral ventricle enlargement correlated with the reduction in body mass (r = 0.77, P = 0.01). Dehydration following the thermal exercise protocol led to a significantly stronger increase in fronto-parietal blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) response during an executive function task (Tower of London) than the control condition, whereas cerebral perfusion during rest was not affected. The increase in BOLD response after dehydration was not paralleled by a change in cognitive performance, suggesting an inefficient use of brain metabolic activity following dehydration. This pattern indicates that participants exerted a higher level of neuronal activity in order to achieve the same performance level. Given the limited availability of brain metabolic resources, these findings suggest that prolonged states of reduced water intake may adversely impact executive functions such as planning and visuo-spatial processing. PMID:20336685

  1. Functional roles affect diversity-succession relationships for boreal beetles.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Heloise; Johansson, Therese; Stenbacka, Fredrik; Hjältén, Joakim

    2013-01-01

    Species diversity commonly increases with succession and this relationship is an important justification for conserving large areas of old-growth habitats. However, species with different ecological roles respond differently to succession. We examined the relationship between a range of diversity measures and time since disturbance for boreal forest beetles collected over a 285 year forest chronosequence. We compared responses of "functional" groups related to threat status, dependence on dead wood habitats, diet and the type of trap in which they were collected (indicative of the breadth of ecologies of species). We examined fits of commonly used rank-abundance models for each age class and traditional and derived diversity indices. Rank abundance distributions were closest to the Zipf-Mandelbrot distribution, suggesting little role for competition in structuring most assemblages. Diversity measures for most functional groups increased with succession, but differences in slopes were common. Evenness declined with succession; more so for red-listed species than common species. Saproxylic species increased in diversity with succession while non-saproxylic species did not. Slopes for fungivores were steeper than other diet groups, while detritivores were not strongly affected by succession. Species trapped using emergence traps (log specialists) responded more weakly to succession than those trapped using flight intercept traps (representing a broader set of ecologies). Species associated with microhabitats that accumulate with succession (fungi and dead wood) thus showed the strongest diversity responses to succession. These clear differences between functional group responses to forest succession should be considered in planning landscapes for optimum conservation value, particularly functional resilience.

  2. Changes in Depressive Symptoms and Mortality in Patients with Heart Failure: Effects of Cognitive-Affective and Somatic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Boyoung; Moser, Debra K.; Pelter, Michele M.; Nesbitt, Thomas S.; Dracup, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Objective Depression is an independent predictor of adverse outcomes in patients with heart failure (HF). However, the effect of changes in cognitive-affective and somatic symptoms on mortality of HF patients is not known. The purpose of this study was to examine whether changes in cognitive-affective and somatic depressive symptoms over time were associated with mortality in HF. Methods In this secondary analysis of data from the REMOTE-HF clinical trial, we analyzed data from 457 HF patients (39% female, mean [SD] age, 65.6 [12.8] years) who survived at least 1 year and repeated the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) at 1 year. Cognitive-affective and somatic depression scores were calculated, respectively, based on published PHQ-9 factor models. Using Cox proportional-hazards regression analyses, we evaluated the effect of changes in cognitive-affective and somatic symptoms from baseline to 1 year on cardiac and all-cause deaths. Results Controlling for baseline depression scores and other patient characteristics, the change in somatic symptoms was associated with increased risk of cardiac death during the subsequent 1-year period (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.07 – 1.44, p = .005), but the change in cognitive-affective symptoms was not (HR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.81 – 1.08, p = .38). Similar results were found for all-cause mortality. Conclusions Worsening somatic depressive symptoms, not cognitive-affective symptoms, are independently associated with increased mortality of HF patients. The findings suggest that routine and ongoing assessment of somatic depressive symptoms in HF patients may help clinicians identify patients at increased risk for adverse outcomes. PMID:26230482

  3. Silver nanoparticles administered to chicken affect VEGFA and FGF2 gene expression in breast muscle and heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotowy, Anna; Sawosz, Ewa; Pineda, Lane; Sawosz, Filip; Grodzik, Marta; Chwalibog, André

    2012-07-01

    Nanoparticles of colloidal silver (AgNano) can influence gene expression. Concerning trials of AgNano application in poultry nutrition, it is useful to reveal whether they affect the expression of genes crucial for bird development. AgNano were administered to broiler chickens as a water solution in two concentrations (10 and 20 ppm). After dissection of the birds, breast muscles and hearts were collected. Gene expression of FGF2 and VEGFA on the mRNA and protein levels were evaluated using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods. The results for gene expression in the breast muscle revealed changes on the mRNA level ( FGF2 was up-regulated, P < 0.05) but not on the protein level. In the heart, 20 ppm of silver nanoparticles in drinking water increased the expression of VEGFA ( P < 0.05), at the same time decreasing FGF2 expression both on the transcriptional and translational levels. Changes in the expression of these genes may lead to histological changes, but this needs to be proven using histological and immunohistochemical examination of tissues. In general, we showed that AgNano application in poultry feeding influences the expression of FGF2 and VEGFA genes on the mRNA and protein levels in growing chicken.

  4. Posture and Gender Differentially Affect Heart Rate Variability of Symptomatic Mitral Valve Prolapse and Normal Adults

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chien-Jung; Chen, Ya-Chu; Lee, Chih-Hsien; Yang, Ing-Fang; Yang, Ten-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart rate variability (HRV) has been shown to be a useful measure of autonomic activity in healthy and mitral valve prolapsed (MVP) subjects. However, the effects of posture and gender on HRV in symptomatic MVP and normal adults had not been elucidated in Taiwan. Methods A total of 118 MVP patients (7 males, 39 ± 7 years old; and 111 females, 42 ± 13 years old) and 148 healthy control (54 males, 28 ± 4 years old; and 94 females, 26 ± 6 years old) were investigated. The diagnosis of MVP was confirmed by cross-sectional echocardiography. A locally developed Taiwanese machine was used to record the HRV parameters for MVP and control groups in three stationary positions. Thereafter, the HRV time-domain parameters, and the frequency-domain parameters derived from fast Fourier transform or autoregressive methods were analyzed. Results The MVP group showed a decrease in time domain parameters and obtunded postural effects on frequency domain parameters moreso than the control group. Though the parasympathetic tone was dominant in female (higher RMSSD, nHF and lower nLF vs. male), the sympathetic outflow was higher in MVP female (lower SDNN, NN50 and higher nLF vs. normal female). While the parasympathetic activity was lower in male, sympathetic outflow was dominant in MVP male (lower nHF and higher nLF vs. normal male). Conclusions Both MVP female and male subjects had elevated levels of sympathetic outflow. The obtunded postural effects on frequency domain measures testified to the autonomic dysregulation of MVP subjects. PMID:27471360

  5. Sympathetic hyperactivity differentially affects skeletal muscle mass in developing heart failure: role of exercise training.

    PubMed

    Bacurau, Aline V N; Jardim, Maíra A; Ferreira, Julio C B; Bechara, Luiz R G; Bueno, Carlos R; Alba-Loureiro, Tatiana C; Negrao, Carlos E; Casarini, Dulce E; Curi, Rui; Ramires, Paulo R; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Brum, Patricia C

    2009-05-01

    Sympathetic hyperactivity (SH) is a hallmark of heart failure (HF), and several lines of evidence suggest that SH contributes to HF-induced skeletal myopathy. However, little is known about the influence of SH on skeletal muscle morphology and metabolism in a setting of developing HF, taking into consideration muscles with different fiber compositions. The contribution of SH on exercise tolerance and skeletal muscle morphology and biochemistry was investigated in 3- and 7-mo-old mice lacking both alpha(2A)- and alpha(2C)-adrenergic receptor subtypes (alpha(2A)/alpha(2C)ARKO mice) that present SH with evidence of HF by 7 mo. To verify whether exercise training (ET) would prevent skeletal muscle myopathy in advanced-stage HF, alpha(2A)/alpha(2C)ARKO mice were exercised from 5 to 7 mo of age. At 3 mo, alpha(2A)/alpha(2C)ARKO mice showed no signs of HF and preserved exercise tolerance and muscular norepinephrine with no changes in soleus morphology. In contrast, plantaris muscle of alpha(2A)/alpha(2C)ARKO mice displayed hypertrophy and fiber type shift (IIA --> IIX) paralleled by capillary rarefaction, increased hexokinase activity, and oxidative stress. At 7 mo, alpha(2A)/alpha(2C)ARKO mice displayed exercise intolerance and increased muscular norepinephrine, muscular atrophy, capillary rarefaction, and increased oxidative stress. ET reestablished alpha(2A)/alpha(2C)ARKO mouse exercise tolerance to 7-mo-old wild-type levels and prevented muscular atrophy and capillary rarefaction associated with reduced oxidative stress. Collectively, these data provide direct evidence that SH is a major factor contributing to skeletal muscle morphological changes in a setting of developing HF. ET prevented skeletal muscle myopathy in alpha(2A)/alpha(2C)ARKO mice, which highlights its importance as a therapeutic tool for HF.

  6. To what extent does urbanisation affect fragmented grassland functioning?

    PubMed

    van der Walt, L; Cilliers, S S; Kellner, K; Du Toit, M J; Tongway, D

    2015-03-15

    Urbanisation creates altered environments characterised by increased human habitation, impermeable surfaces, artificial structures, landscape fragmentation, habitat loss, resulting in different resource loss pathways. The vulnerable Rand Highveld Grassland vegetation unit in the Tlokwe Municipal area, South Africa, has been extensively affected and transformed by urbanisation, agriculture, and mining. Grassland fragments in urban areas are often considered to be less species rich and less functional than in the more untransformed or "natural" exurban environments, and are therefore seldom a priority for conservation. Furthermore, urban grassland fragments are often being more intensely managed than exurban areas, such as consistent mowing in open urban areas. Four urbanisation measures acting as indicators for patterns and processes associated with urban areas were calculated for matrix areas surrounding each selected grassland fragment to quantify the position of each grassland remnant along an urbanisation gradient. The grassland fragments were objectively classified into two classes of urbanisation, namely "exurban" and "urban" based on the urbanisation measure values. Grazing was recorded in some exurban grasslands and mowing in some urban grassland fragments. Unmanaged grassland fragments were present in both urban and exurban areas. Fine-scale biophysical landscape function was determined by executing the Landscape Function Analysis (LFA) method. LFA assesses fine-scale landscape patchiness (entailing resource conserving potential and erosion resistance) and 11 soil surface indicators to produce three main LFA parameters (stability, infiltration, and nutrient cycling), which indicates how well a system is functioning in terms of fine-scale biophysical soil processes and characteristics. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of urbanisation and associated management practices on fine-scale biophysical landscape function of urban and exurban

  7. To what extent does urbanisation affect fragmented grassland functioning?

    PubMed

    van der Walt, L; Cilliers, S S; Kellner, K; Du Toit, M J; Tongway, D

    2015-03-15

    Urbanisation creates altered environments characterised by increased human habitation, impermeable surfaces, artificial structures, landscape fragmentation, habitat loss, resulting in different resource loss pathways. The vulnerable Rand Highveld Grassland vegetation unit in the Tlokwe Municipal area, South Africa, has been extensively affected and transformed by urbanisation, agriculture, and mining. Grassland fragments in urban areas are often considered to be less species rich and less functional than in the more untransformed or "natural" exurban environments, and are therefore seldom a priority for conservation. Furthermore, urban grassland fragments are often being more intensely managed than exurban areas, such as consistent mowing in open urban areas. Four urbanisation measures acting as indicators for patterns and processes associated with urban areas were calculated for matrix areas surrounding each selected grassland fragment to quantify the position of each grassland remnant along an urbanisation gradient. The grassland fragments were objectively classified into two classes of urbanisation, namely "exurban" and "urban" based on the urbanisation measure values. Grazing was recorded in some exurban grasslands and mowing in some urban grassland fragments. Unmanaged grassland fragments were present in both urban and exurban areas. Fine-scale biophysical landscape function was determined by executing the Landscape Function Analysis (LFA) method. LFA assesses fine-scale landscape patchiness (entailing resource conserving potential and erosion resistance) and 11 soil surface indicators to produce three main LFA parameters (stability, infiltration, and nutrient cycling), which indicates how well a system is functioning in terms of fine-scale biophysical soil processes and characteristics. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of urbanisation and associated management practices on fine-scale biophysical landscape function of urban and exurban

  8. Hypothermic continuous machine perfusion improves metabolic preservation and functional recovery in heart grafts.

    PubMed

    Van Caenegem, Olivier; Beauloye, Christophe; Vercruysse, Jonathan; Horman, Sandrine; Bertrand, Luc; Bethuyne, Noëlla; Poncelet, Alain J; Gianello, Pierre; Demuylder, Peter; Legrand, Eric; Beaurin, Gwen; Bontemps, Françoise; Jacquet, Luc M; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis

    2015-02-01

    The number of heart transplants is decreasing due to organ shortage, yet the donor pool could be enlarged by improving graft preservation. Hypothermic machine perfusion (MP) has been shown to improve kidney, liver, or lung graft preservation. Sixteen pig hearts were recovered following cardioplegia and randomized to two different groups of 4-hour preservation using either static cold storage (CS) or MP (Modified LifePort© System, Organ Recovery Systems, Itasca, Il). The grafts then underwent reperfusion on a Langendorff for 60 min. Energetic metabolism was quantified at baseline, postpreservation, and postreperfusion by measuring lactate and high-energy phosphates. The contractility index (CI) was assessed both in vivo prior to cardioplegia and during reperfusion. Following reperfusion, the hearts preserved using CS exhibited higher lactate levels (56.63 ± 23.57 vs. 11.25 ± 3.92 μmol/g; P < 0.001), increased adenosine monophosphate/adenosine triphosphate (AMP/ATP) ratio (0.4 ± 0.23 vs. 0.04 ± 0.04; P < 0.001), and lower phosphocreatine/creatine (PCr/Cr) ratio (33.5 ± 12.6 vs. 55.3 ± 5.8; P <0.001). Coronary flow was similar in both groups during reperfusion (107 ± 9 vs. 125 + /-9 ml/100 g/min heart; P = ns). CI decreased in the CS group, yet being well-preserved in the MP group. Compared with CS, MP resulted in improved preservation of the energy state and more successful functional recovery of heart graft.

  9. Remote at-home detection and monitoring of functional chronotropic incompetence in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Katra, Rodolphe P; Chakravarthy, Niranjan; Libbus, Imad

    2011-02-01

    Chronotropic incompetence (CI) is common in heart failure (HF) patients and is associated with worsening outcome. Detecting and tracking functional CI during activities of daily living could provide insight into its contribution to HF symptoms and facilitate effective HF patient management. HF patients (n = 180, NYHA Class III/IV, ejection fraction (EF) ≤40%) were enrolled in a multi-center prospective monitoring study and had an external multi-sensor system applied to the chest and replaced weekly during a 90-day study. Medical information was collected at baseline and study close. Heart rate, respiration, activity, and body fluid data from the system were transmitted at regular intervals and used for offline analysis. Patients were primarily male (70%), with 61 ± 13 years mean age, 25 ± 5 kg/m(2) BMI, and 28 ± 7% EF. By correlating age-adjusted activity level and heart rate adaptation with a proprietary algorithm, functional CI was detected in 45% and ruled out in 29% of patients under conditions of daily living. In the remaining patients (26%), functional CI assessment was indeterminate due to insufficient age-adjusted activity level. Functional CI and No-CI groups were not significantly different in terms of baseline demographics, characteristics or HF outcome over the study period. β-blocker use was 16% in the CI group and 82% in the no-CI group (p < 0.001), and therefore, could not explain the manifestation of functional CI. This proof-of-concept study suggests that a chronotropic response that may be functionally debilitating during activities of daily living in HF patients can be detected and tracked in a point-of-care telemonitoring approach using a non-invasive, adherent device. PMID:20931310

  10. Integrating Negative Affect Measures in a Measurement Model: Assessing the Function of Negative Affect as Interference to Self-Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magno, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated the composition of negative affect and its function as inhibitory to thought processes such as self-regulation. Negative affect in the present study were composed of anxiety, worry, thought suppression, and fear of negative evaluation. These four factors were selected based on the criteria of negative affect by…

  11. Does Ramadan Fasting Adversely Affect Cognitive Function in Young Females?

    PubMed Central

    Ghayour Najafabadi, Mahboubeh; Rahbar Nikoukar, Laya; Memari, Amir; Ekhtiari, Hamed; Beygi, Sara

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of Ramadan fasting on cognitive function in 17 female athletes. Data were obtained from participants of two fasting (n = 9) and nonfasting (n = 8) groups at three periods of the study (before Ramadan, at the third week in Ramadan, and after Ramadan). Digit span test (DST) and Stroop color test were employed to assess short-term memory and inhibition/cognitive flexibility at each time point. There were no significant changes for DST and Stroop task 1 in both groups, whereas Stroop task 2 and task 3 showed significant improvements in Ramadan condition (p < 0.05). Interference indices did not change significantly across the study except in post-Ramadan period of fasting group (p < 0.05). Group × week interaction was significant only for error numbers (p < 0.05). Athletes in nonfasting showed a significant decrease in number of errors in Ramadan compared to baseline (p < 0.05). The results suggest that Ramadan fasting may not adversely affect cognitive function in female athletes. PMID:26697263

  12. Diadenosine tetra- and pentaphosphates affect contractility and bioelectrical activity in the rat heart via P2 purinergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Pustovit, Ksenia B; Kuzmin, Vladislav S; Abramochkin, Denis V

    2016-03-01

    Diadenosine polyphosphates (Ap(n)As) are endogenously produced molecules which have been identified in various tissues of mammalian organism, including myocardium. Ap(n)As contribute to the blood clotting and are also widely accepted as regulators of blood vascular tone. Physiological role of Ap(n)As in cardiac muscle has not been completely elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of diadenosine tetra- (Ap4A) and penta- (Ap5A) polyphosphates on contractile function and action potential (AP) waveform in rat supraventricular and ventricular myocardium. We have also demonstrated the effects of A4pA and Ap5A in myocardial sleeves of pulmonary veins (PVs), which play a crucial role in genesis of atrial fibrillation. APs were recorded with glass microelectrodes in multicellular myocardial preparations. Contractile activity was measured in isolated Langendorff-perfused rat hearts. Both Ap4A and Ap5A significantly reduced contractility of isolated Langendorff-perfused heart and produced significant reduction of AP duration in left and right auricle, interatrial septum, and especially in right ventricular wall myocardium. Ap(n)As also shortened APs in rat pulmonary veins and therefore may be considered as potential proarrhythmic factors. Cardiotropic effects of Ap4A and Ap5A were strongly antagonized by selective blockers of P2 purine receptors suramin and pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid (PPADS), while P1 blocker DPCPX was not effective. We conclude that Ap(n)As may be considered as new class of endogenous cardioinhibitory compounds. P2 purine receptors play the central role in mediation of Ap4A and Ap5A inhibitory effects on electrical and contractile activity in different regions of the rat heart. PMID:26680209

  13. Changes in expression of a functional G sub i protein in cultured rat heart cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, I.S.; Gaa, S.T.; Rogers, T.B. )

    1988-07-01

    The muscarinic cholinergic agonist, carbachol, and pertussis toxin were used to examine the functional status of the guanine nucleotide-binding protein that inhibits adenylate cyclase (G{sub i}) in cultured neonatal rat heart myocytes. The isoproterenol stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity in myocyte membranes and adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation in intact cells (4 days in culture) were insensitive to carbachol. However, in cells cultured for 11 days, carbachol inhibited isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation by 30%. Angiotensin II (ANG II) was also found to inhibit isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP accumulation in day 11 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Pertussis toxin treatment reversed the inhibitory effects of both ANG II and carbachol, suggesting a role for G{sub i} in the process. Carbachol binding to membranes from day 4 cells was relatively insensitive to guanine nucleotides when compared with binding to membranes from day 11 or adult cells. Furthermore, pertussis toxin-mediated {sup 32}P incorporation into a 39- to 41-kDa substrate in day 11 membranes was increased 3.2-fold over that measured in day 4 membranes. These findings support the view that, although G{sub i} is expressed, it is nonfunctional in 4-day-old cultured neonatal rat heart myocytes and acquisition of functional G{sub i} is dependent on culture conditions. Furthermore, the ANG II receptor can couple to G{sub i} in heart.

  14. Functional Roles Affect Diversity-Succession Relationships for Boreal Beetles

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, Heloise; Johansson, Therese; Stenbacka, Fredrik; Hjältén, Joakim

    2013-01-01

    Species diversity commonly increases with succession and this relationship is an important justification for conserving large areas of old-growth habitats. However, species with different ecological roles respond differently to succession. We examined the relationship between a range of diversity measures and time since disturbance for boreal forest beetles collected over a 285 year forest chronosequence. We compared responses of “functional” groups related to threat status, dependence on dead wood habitats, diet and the type of trap in which they were collected (indicative of the breadth of ecologies of species). We examined fits of commonly used rank-abundance models for each age class and traditional and derived diversity indices. Rank abundance distributions were closest to the Zipf-Mandelbrot distribution, suggesting little role for competition in structuring most assemblages. Diversity measures for most functional groups increased with succession, but differences in slopes were common. Evenness declined with succession; more so for red-listed species than common species. Saproxylic species increased in diversity with succession while non-saproxylic species did not. Slopes for fungivores were steeper than other diet groups, while detritivores were not strongly affected by succession. Species trapped using emergence traps (log specialists) responded more weakly to succession than those trapped using flight intercept traps (representing a broader set of ecologies). Species associated with microhabitats that accumulate with succession (fungi and dead wood) thus showed the strongest diversity responses to succession. These clear differences between functional group responses to forest succession should be considered in planning landscapes for optimum conservation value, particularly functional resilience. PMID:23977350

  15. Impact of chronic systolic heart failure on lung structure-function relationships in large airways.

    PubMed

    Chase, Steven C; Wheatley, Courtney M; Olson, Lyle J; Beck, Kenneth C; Wentz, Robert J; Snyder, Eric M; Taylor, Bryan J; Johnson, Bruce D

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure (HF) is often associated with pulmonary congestion, reduced lung function, abnormal gas exchange, and dyspnea. We tested whether pulmonary congestion is associated with expanded vascular beds or an actual increase in extravascular lung water (EVLW) and how airway caliber is affected in stable HF Subsequently we assessed the influence of an inhaled short acting beta agonist (SABA). Thirty-one HF (7F; age, 62 ± 11 years; ht. 175 ± 9 cm; wt. 91 ± 17 kg; LVEF, 28 ± 15%) and 29 controls (11F; age; 56 ± 11 years; ht. 174 ± 8 cm; wt. 77 ± 14 kg) completed the study. Subjects performed PFTs and a chest computed tomography (CT) scan before and after SABA CT measures of attenuation, skew, and kurtosis were obtained from areas of lung tissue to assess EVLW Airway luminal areas and wall thicknesses were also measured : CT tissue density suggested increased EVLW in HF without differences in the ratio of airway wall thickness to luminal area or luminal area to TLC (skew: 2.85 ± 1.08 vs. 2.11 ± 0.79, P < 0.01; Kurtosis: 15.5 ± 9.5 vs. 9.3 ± 5.5 P < 0.01; control vs. HF). PFTs were decreased in HF at baseline (% predicted FVC:101 ± 15% vs. 83 ± 18%, P < 0.01;FEV1:103 ± 15% vs. 82 ± 19%, P < 0.01;FEF25-75: 118 ± 36% vs. 86 ± 36%, P < 0.01; control vs. HF). Airway luminal areas, but not CT measures, were correlated with PFTs at baseline. The SABA cleared EVLW and decreased airway wall thickness but did not change luminal area. Patients with HF had evidence of increased EVLW, but not an expanded bronchial circulation. Airway caliber was maintained relative to controls, despite reductions in lung volume and flow rates. SABA improved lung function, primarily by reducing EVLW.

  16. In Sickness and in Health: a Literature Review about Function of Social Support within Anxiety and Heart Disease Association

    PubMed Central

    Zarbo, Cristina; Compare, Angelo; Baldassari, Elena; Bonardi, Alberto; Romagnoni, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    A narrative review of the major evidence concerning the relationship between anxiety, social support and cardiac disease was conducted. Literature demonstrates that a strict relationship between anxiety, social support and cardiac disease outcomes subsists. However, the function of social support within anxiety and heart disease association remains unclear and needs to further researches to be established. Moreover evidence suggests that it’s the quality of close relationships to play an important role in affecting psychological and physiological health status. The main components that the literature suggests for a better quality of social support and close relationship, and the main assessment measure are presented. Evidence about cardiac rehabilitation programs and the need to assess and intervene on psychological and psychosocial factors is discussed. PMID:24403952

  17. Extraction of heart rate from functional near-infrared spectroscopy in infants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdue, Katherine L.; Westerlund, Alissa; McCormick, Sarah A.; Nelson, Charles A.

    2014-06-01

    Changes in heart rate are a useful physiological measure in infant studies. We present an algorithm for calculating the heart rate (HR) from oxyhemoglobin pulsation in functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) signals. The algorithm is applied to data collected from 10 infants, and the HR derived from the fNIRS signals is compared against the HR as calculated by electrocardiography. We show high agreement between the two HR signals for all infants (r>0.90), and also compare stimulus-related HR responses as measured by the two methods and find good agreement despite high levels of movement in the infants. This algorithm can be used to measure changes in HR in infants participating in fNIRS studies without the need for additional HR sensors.

  18. Activation of AMPK by Metformin Improves Left Ventricular Function and Survival in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gundewar, Susheel; Calvert, John W.; Jha, Saurabh; Toedt-Pingel, Iris; Ji, Sang Yong; Nunez, Denise; Ramachandran, Arun; Anaya-Cisneros, Mauricio; Tian, Rong; Lefer, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical studies have reported that the widely used anti-hyperglycemic drug metformin significantly reduces cardiac risk factors and improves clinical outcomes in patients with heart failure. The mechanisms by which metformin exerts these cardioprotective effects remain unclear and may be independent of anti-hyperglycemic effects. We tested the hypothesis that chronic activation of AMPK with low-dose metformin exerts beneficial effects on cardiac function and survival in in vivo murine models of heart failure. Mice were subjected to permanent left coronary artery (LCA) occlusion or to 60 min LCA occlusion followed by reperfusion for 4 wks. High-resolution, two-dimensional echocardiography was performed at baseline and 4 wk post myocardial infarction to assess left ventricular (LV) dimensions and function. Metformin (125 μg/kg) administered to mice at ischemia and then daily, improved survival by 47% (p < 0.05 vs. vehicle) at 4 wk following permanent LCA occlusion. Additionally, metformin given at reperfusion and then daily, preserved LV dimensions and LV ejection fraction (p < 0.01 vs. vehicle) at 4 wk. The improvement in cardiac structure and function was associated with increases in AMPK and eNOS phosphorylation as well as increased PGC-1α expression in cardiac myocytes. Furthermore, metformin significantly improved myocardial cell mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis compared to vehicle. The cardioprotective effects of metformin were ablated in mice lacking functional AMPK or eNOS. This study demonstrates that metformin significantly improves left ventricular function and survival via activation of AMPK and its downstream mediators, eNOS and PGC-1α in a murine model of heart failure. PMID:19096023

  19. Single photon emission computed tomography of the heart: a functional image

    SciTech Connect

    Itti, R.; Casset, D.; Philippe, L.; Brochier, M.

    1987-01-01

    Images of radioactive tracer uptake are mainly functional images since the tracer distribution may directly be related to the regional variations in function, such as myocardial perfusion in the case of thallium-201 single photon tomography. Combination of pictures obtained in different physiological conditions (stress-rest, for instance) enhance the functional aspects of these studies. For gated cardiac blood pool images, on the contrary, labelling of the circulating blood pool using technetium-99m provides morphological pictures of the heart chambers and function can only be derived from the dynamic analysis of the image sequence recorded at the successive phases of the cardiac cycle. The technique of thick slice tomography preserves the relationship between count rates and local volumes of radioactive blood. Parametric imaging therefore applies to tomography as well as to plane projections. In the simplest case reconstruction of the extreme phases of the heart beat, end-diastole and end-systole may be sufficient. But to achieve more sophisticated functional analysis such as Fourier phase mapping, reconstruction of the whole cardiac cycle is necessary.

  20. Functional Effects of Delivering Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Seeded Biological Sutures to an Infarcted Heart.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Katrina J; Favreau, John T; Guyette, Jacques P; Tao, Ze-Wei; Coffin, Spencer T; Cunha-Gavidia, Anny; D'Amore, Brian; Perreault, Luke R; Fitzpatrick, John P; DeMartino, Angelica; Gaudette, Glenn R

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has the potential to improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI); however, existing methods to deliver cells to the myocardium, including intramyocardial injection, suffer from low engraftment rates. In this study, we used a rat model of acute MI to assess the effects of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC)-seeded fibrin biological sutures on cardiac function at 1 week after implant. Biological sutures were seeded with quantum dot (Qdot)-loaded hMSCs for 24 h before implantation. At 1 week postinfarct, the heart was imaged to assess mechanical function in the infarct region. Regional parameters assessed were regional stroke work (RSW) and systolic area of contraction (SAC) and global parameters derived from the pressure waveform. MI (n = 6) significantly decreased RSW (0.026 ± 0.011) and SAC (0.022 ± 0.015) when compared with sham operation (RSW: 0.141 ± 0.009; SAC: 0.166 ± 0.005, n = 6) (p < 0.05). The delivery of unseeded biological sutures to the infarcted hearts did not change regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted hearts (RSW: 0.032 ± 0.004, SAC: 0.037 ± 0.008, n = 6). The delivery of hMSC-seeded sutures exerted a trend toward increase of regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted heart (RSW: 0.057 ± 0.011; SAC: 0.051 ± 0.014, n = 6). Global function showed no significant differences between any group (p > 0.05); however, there was a trend toward improved function with the addition of either unseeded or seeded biological suture. Histology demonstrated that Qdot-loaded hMSCs remained present in the infarcted myocardium after 1 week. Analysis of serial sections of Masson's trichrome staining revealed that the greatest infarct size was in the infarct group (7.0% ± 2.2%), where unseeded (3.8% ± 0.6%) and hMSC-seeded (3.7% ± 0.8%) suture groups maintained similar infarct sizes. Furthermore, the remaining suture area was

  1. Functional Effects of Delivering Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Seeded Biological Sutures to an Infarcted Heart

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Katrina J.; Favreau, John T.; Guyette, Jacques P.; Tao, Ze-Wei; Coffin, Spencer T.; Cunha-Gavidia, Anny; D'Amore, Brian; Perreault, Luke R.; Fitzpatrick, John P.; DeMartino, Angelica; Gaudette, Glenn R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stem cell therapy has the potential to improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI); however, existing methods to deliver cells to the myocardium, including intramyocardial injection, suffer from low engraftment rates. In this study, we used a rat model of acute MI to assess the effects of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC)-seeded fibrin biological sutures on cardiac function at 1 week after implant. Biological sutures were seeded with quantum dot (Qdot)-loaded hMSCs for 24 h before implantation. At 1 week postinfarct, the heart was imaged to assess mechanical function in the infarct region. Regional parameters assessed were regional stroke work (RSW) and systolic area of contraction (SAC) and global parameters derived from the pressure waveform. MI (n = 6) significantly decreased RSW (0.026 ± 0.011) and SAC (0.022 ± 0.015) when compared with sham operation (RSW: 0.141 ± 0.009; SAC: 0.166 ± 0.005, n = 6) (p < 0.05). The delivery of unseeded biological sutures to the infarcted hearts did not change regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted hearts (RSW: 0.032 ± 0.004, SAC: 0.037 ± 0.008, n = 6). The delivery of hMSC-seeded sutures exerted a trend toward increase of regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted heart (RSW: 0.057 ± 0.011; SAC: 0.051 ± 0.014, n = 6). Global function showed no significant differences between any group (p > 0.05); however, there was a trend toward improved function with the addition of either unseeded or seeded biological suture. Histology demonstrated that Qdot-loaded hMSCs remained present in the infarcted myocardium after 1 week. Analysis of serial sections of Masson's trichrome staining revealed that the greatest infarct size was in the infarct group (7.0% ± 2.2%), where unseeded (3.8% ± 0.6%) and hMSC-seeded (3.7% ± 0.8%) suture groups maintained similar infarct sizes. Furthermore, the remaining suture area

  2. Functional Effects of Delivering Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Seeded Biological Sutures to an Infarcted Heart

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Katrina J.; Favreau, John T.; Guyette, Jacques P.; Tao, Ze-Wei; Coffin, Spencer T.; Cunha-Gavidia, Anny; D'Amore, Brian; Perreault, Luke R.; Fitzpatrick, John P.; DeMartino, Angelica; Gaudette, Glenn R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Stem cell therapy has the potential to improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI); however, existing methods to deliver cells to the myocardium, including intramyocardial injection, suffer from low engraftment rates. In this study, we used a rat model of acute MI to assess the effects of human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC)-seeded fibrin biological sutures on cardiac function at 1 week after implant. Biological sutures were seeded with quantum dot (Qdot)-loaded hMSCs for 24 h before implantation. At 1 week postinfarct, the heart was imaged to assess mechanical function in the infarct region. Regional parameters assessed were regional stroke work (RSW) and systolic area of contraction (SAC) and global parameters derived from the pressure waveform. MI (n = 6) significantly decreased RSW (0.026 ± 0.011) and SAC (0.022 ± 0.015) when compared with sham operation (RSW: 0.141 ± 0.009; SAC: 0.166 ± 0.005, n = 6) (p < 0.05). The delivery of unseeded biological sutures to the infarcted hearts did not change regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted hearts (RSW: 0.032 ± 0.004, SAC: 0.037 ± 0.008, n = 6). The delivery of hMSC-seeded sutures exerted a trend toward increase of regional mechanical function compared with the infarcted heart (RSW: 0.057 ± 0.011; SAC: 0.051 ± 0.014, n = 6). Global function showed no significant differences between any group (p > 0.05); however, there was a trend toward improved function with the addition of either unseeded or seeded biological suture. Histology demonstrated that Qdot-loaded hMSCs remained present in the infarcted myocardium after 1 week. Analysis of serial sections of Masson's trichrome staining revealed that the greatest infarct size was in the infarct group (7.0% ± 2.2%), where unseeded (3.8% ± 0.6%) and hMSC-seeded (3.7% ± 0.8%) suture groups maintained similar infarct sizes. Furthermore, the remaining suture area

  3. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    SciTech Connect

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-15

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 {mu}m, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 {mu}m diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 {mu}m was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  4. Eprosartan improves cardiac function in swine working heart model of ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Weymann, Alexander; Sabashnikov, Anton; Patil, Nikhil P.; Konertz, Wolfgang; Modersohn, Diethelm; Dohmen, Pascal M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Eprosartan is an angiotensin II receptor antagonist used as an antihypertensive. We sought to evaluate the regional effect of Eprosartan on postinfarct ventricular remodeling and myocardial function in an isolated swine working heart model of ischemia-reperfusion injury. Material/Methods 22 swine hearts were perfused with the Langendorff perfusion apparatus under standard experimental conditions. Myocardial ischemia was induced by a 10-min left anterior descending artery ligation. Hearts were reperfused with either saline (control group, n=11), or Eprosartan (treatment group, n=11). Left ventricular pressure (LVP) and regional heart parameters such as intramyocardial pressure (IMP), wall thickening rate (WTh), and pressure-length-loops (PLL) were measured at baseline and after 30 min of reperfusion. Results Measured parameters were statistically similar between the 2 groups at baseline. The administration of Eprosartan led to a significantly better recovery of IMP and WTh: 44.4±2.5 mmHg vs. 51.2±3.3 mmHg, p<0.001 and 3.8±0.4 μm vs. 4.4±0.3 μm, p=0.001, respectively. PLL were also significantly higher in the treatment group following reperfusion (21694±3259 units vs. 31267±3429 units, p<0.01). There was no difference in the LVP response to Eprosartan versus controls (63.6±3.0 mmHg vs. 62.5±3.1 mmHg, p=0.400). Conclusions Pre-treatment with Eprosartan is associated with a significant improvement in regional cardiac function under ischemic conditions. Pharmacological treatment with eprosartan may exert a direct cardioprotective effect on ischemic myocardium. PMID:24762635

  5. X-ray intravital microscopy for functional imaging in rat hearts using synchrotron radiation coronary microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umetani, K.; Fukushima, K.

    2013-03-01

    An X-ray intravital microscopy technique was developed to enable in vivo visualization of the coronary, cerebral, and pulmonary arteries in rats without exposure of organs and with spatial resolution in the micrometer range and temporal resolution in the millisecond range. We have refined the system continually in terms of the spatial resolution and exposure time. X-rays transmitted through an object are detected by an X-ray direct-conversion type detector, which incorporates an X-ray SATICON pickup tube. The spatial resolution has been improved to 6 μm, yielding sharp images of small arteries. The exposure time has been shortened to around 2 ms using a new rotating-disk X-ray shutter, enabling imaging of beating rat hearts. Quantitative evaluations of the X-ray intravital microscopy technique were extracted from measurements of the smallest-detectable vessel size and detection of the vessel function. The smallest-diameter vessel viewed for measurements is determined primarily by the concentration of iodinated contrast material. The iodine concentration depends on the injection technique. We used ex vivo rat hearts under Langendorff perfusion for accurate evaluation. After the contrast agent is injected into the origin of the aorta in an isolated perfused rat heart, the contrast agent is delivered directly into the coronary arteries with minimum dilution. The vascular internal diameter response of coronary arterial circulation is analyzed to evaluate the vessel function. Small blood vessels of more than about 50 μm diameters were visualized clearly at heart rates of around 300 beats/min. Vasodilation compared to the control was observed quantitatively using drug manipulation. Furthermore, the apparent increase in the number of small vessels with diameters of less than about 50 μm was observed after the vasoactive agents increased the diameters of invisible small blood vessels to visible sizes. This technique is expected to offer the potential for direct

  6. Cognitive function, stress hormones, heart rate and nutritional status during simulated captivity in military survival training.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Harris R; Farina, Emily K; Caldwell, John; Williams, Kelly W; Thompson, Lauren A; Niro, Philip J; Grohmann, Kyle A; McClung, James P

    2016-10-15

    Stress influences numerous psychological and physiological processes, and its effects have practical implications in a variety of professions and real-world activities. However, few studies have concurrently assessed multiple behavioral, hormonal, nutritional and heart-rate responses of humans to acute, severe stress. This investigation simultaneously assessed cognitive, affective, hormonal, and heart-rate responses induced by an intensely stressful real-world environment designed to simulate wartime captivity. Sixty males were evaluated during and immediately following participation in U.S. Army Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape (SERE) school, three weeks of intense but standardized training for Soldiers at risk of capture. Simulated captivity and intense mock interrogations degraded grammatical reasoning (p<0.005), sustained-attention (p<0.001), working memory (p<0.05) and all aspects of mood assessed by the Profile of Mood States (POMS) questionnaire: Tension/Anxiety, Depression/Dejection, Anger/Hostility, Vigor/Activity, Fatigue/Inertia; Confusion/Bewilderment, and Total Mood Disturbance (p<0.001) It also elevated heart rate (p<0.001); increased serum and salivary cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-s) (p<0.01); elevated serum epinephrine, norepinephrine, and soluble transferrin receptors (sTfR) (p<0.01); increased salivary neuropeptide-Y (NPY) (p<0.001); and decreased serum prolactin and serum and salivary testosterone (p<0.001). Partial recovery was observed immediately after training, but stress-induced changes, particularly in body weight and several of the biomarkers, persisted. This study demonstrates that when individuals were exposed to realistic and controlled simulated captivity, cognition, mood, stress hormones, nutritional status and heart rate are simultaneously altered, and each of these subsequently recovers at different rates. PMID:27374427

  7. Cognitive Function in Ambulatory Patients with Systolic Heart Failure: Insights from the Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction (WARCEF) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Susan; Ye, Siqin; Qian, Min; Sanford, Alexandra R.; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Mann, Douglas L.; Levin, Bruce; Pullicino, Patrick M.; Freudenberger, Ronald S.; Teerlink, John R.; Mohr, J. P.; Labovitz, Arthur J.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Estol, Conrado J.; Lok, Dirk J.; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D.; Thompson, John L. P.; Homma, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine whether cognitive function in stable outpatients with heart failure (HF) is affected by HF severity. A retrospective, cross-sectional analysis was performed using data from 2, 043 outpatients with systolic HF and without prior stroke enrolled in the Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction (WARCEF) Trial. Multivariable regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between cognitive function measured using the Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE) and markers of HF severity (left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF], New York Heart Association [NYHA] functional class, and 6-minute walk distance). The mean (SD) for the MMSE was 28.6 (2.0), with 64 (3.1%) of the 2,043 patients meeting the cut-off of MMSE <24 that indicates need for further evaluation of cognitive impairment. After adjustment for demographic and clinical covariates, 6-minute walk distance (β-coefficient 0.002, p<0.0001), but not LVEF or NYHA functional class, was independently associated with the MMSE as a continuous measure. Age, education, smoking status, body mass index, and hemoglobin level were also independently associated with the MMSE. In conclusion, six-minute walk distance, but not LVEF or NYHA functional class, was an important predictor of cognitive function in ambulatory patients with systolic heart failure. PMID:25426862

  8. Cognitive function in ambulatory patients with systolic heart failure: insights from the warfarin versus aspirin in reduced cardiac ejection fraction (WARCEF) trial.

    PubMed

    Graham, Susan; Ye, Siqin; Qian, Min; Sanford, Alexandra R; Di Tullio, Marco R; Sacco, Ralph L; Mann, Douglas L; Levin, Bruce; Pullicino, Patrick M; Freudenberger, Ronald S; Teerlink, John R; Mohr, J P; Labovitz, Arthur J; Lip, Gregory Y H; Estol, Conrado J; Lok, Dirk J; Ponikowski, Piotr; Anker, Stefan D; Thompson, John L P; Homma, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine whether cognitive function in stable outpatients with heart failure (HF) is affected by HF severity. A retrospective, cross-sectional analysis was performed using data from 2, 043 outpatients with systolic HF and without prior stroke enrolled in the Warfarin versus Aspirin in Reduced Cardiac Ejection Fraction (WARCEF) Trial. Multivariable regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between cognitive function measured using the Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE) and markers of HF severity (left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF], New York Heart Association [NYHA] functional class, and 6-minute walk distance). The mean (SD) for the MMSE was 28.6 (2.0), with 64 (3.1%) of the 2,043 patients meeting the cut-off of MMSE <24 that indicates need for further evaluation of cognitive impairment. After adjustment for demographic and clinical covariates, 6-minute walk distance (β-coefficient 0.002, p<0.0001), but not LVEF or NYHA functional class, was independently associated with the MMSE as a continuous measure. Age, education, smoking status, body mass index, and hemoglobin level were also independently associated with the MMSE. In conclusion, six-minute walk distance, but not LVEF or NYHA functional class, was an important predictor of cognitive function in ambulatory patients with systolic heart failure. PMID:25426862

  9. A loss-of-function mutation in the binding domain of HAND1 predicts hypoplasia of the human hearts.

    PubMed

    Reamon-Buettner, Stella Marie; Ciribilli, Yari; Inga, Alberto; Borlak, Juergen

    2008-05-15

    Hypoplasia of the human heart is the most severe form of congenital heart disease (CHD) and usually lethal during early infancy. It is a leading cause of neonatal loss, especially in infants diagnosed with hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS), a condition where the left side of the heart including the aorta, aortic valve, left ventricle (LV) and mitral valve are underdeveloped. The molecular causes of HLHS are unclear, but the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor heart and neural crest derivatives expressed 1 (Hand1), may be a candidate culprit for this condition. The absence of Hand1 in mice resulted in the failure of rightward looping of the heart tube, a severely hypoplastic LV and outflow tract abnormalities. Nonetheless, no HAND1 mutations associated with human CHD have been reported so far. We sequenced the human HAND1 gene in heart tissues derived from 31 unrelated patients diagnosed with hypoplastic hearts. We detected in 24 of 31 hypoplastic ventricles, a common frameshift mutation (A126fs) in the bHLH domain, which is necessary for DNA binding and combinatorial interactions. The resulting mutant protein, unlike wild-type (wt) HAND1, was unable to modulate transcription of reporter constructs containing specific DNA-binding sites. Thus, in hypoplastic human hearts HAND1 function is impaired.

  10. Overexpression of glutathione peroxidase attenuates myocardial remodeling and preserves diastolic function in diabetic heart.

    PubMed

    Matsushima, Shouji; Kinugawa, Shintaro; Ide, Tomomi; Matsusaka, Hidenori; Inoue, Naoki; Ohta, Yukihiro; Yokota, Takashi; Sunagawa, Kenji; Tsutsui, Hiroyuki

    2006-11-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the structural and functional abnormalities of diabetic heart. Glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) is a critical antioxidant enzyme that removes H(2)O(2) in both the cytosol and mitochondia. We hypothesized that the overexpression of GSHPx gene could attenuate left ventricular (LV) remodeling in diabetes mellitus (DM). We induced DM by injection of streptozotocin (160 mg/kg ip) in male GSHPx transgenic mice (TG+DM) and nontransgenic wildtype littermates (WT+DM). GSHPx activity was higher in the hearts of TG mice compared with WT mice, with no significant changes in other antioxidant enzymes. LV thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances measured in TG+DM at 8 wk were significantly lower than those in WT+DM (58 +/- 3 vs. 71 +/- 5 nmol/g, P < 0.05). Heart rate and aortic blood pressure were comparable between groups. Systolic function was preserved normal in WT+DM and TG+DM mice. In contrast, diastolic function was impaired in WT+DM and was improved in TG+DM as assessed by the deceleration time of peak velocity of transmitral diastolic flow and the time needed for relaxation of 50% maximal LV pressure to baseline value (tau; 13.5 +/- 1.2 vs. 8.9 +/- 0.7 ms, P < 0.01). The TG+DM values were comparable with those of WT+Control (tau; 7.8 +/- 0.2 ms). Improvement of LV diastolic function was accompanied by the attenuation of myocyte hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and apoptosis. Overexpression of GSHPx gene ameliorated LV remodeling and diastolic dysfunction in DM. Therapies designed to interfere with oxidative stress might be beneficial to prevent cardiac abnormalities in DM. PMID:16844917

  11. Microvascular function at the margins of early experimental myocardial infarcts in isolated rabbit hearts.

    PubMed

    Sage, M D; Gavin, J B

    1986-01-01

    Injection of low-viscosity resin was used to identify in situ functional blood vessels at the margins of developing regional myocardial infarcts. The ventral interventricular branch (VIB) of the left coronary artery was occluded for 0-240 min in 20 isolated perfused rabbit hearts. After perfusion fixation with glutaraldehyde, resin was injected into the coronary arteries--that injected into the VIB contained dispersed lead dioxide and that injected into the remainder of the heart contained Fat Red 7B dye. This allowed macroscopic and microscopic identification of functional blood vessels. Following transmural freeze fracture, left ventricles were examined using back-scattered electron imaging in a scanning electron microscope. Close to 60% of capillaries in nonischemic myocardium allowed the passage of resin. Thirty minutes of ischemia produced a hyperemic increase to 80%-90% in the proportion of filled vessels. After 60 min, however, a severe reperfusion defect corresponding to the "no-reflow" phenomenon had developed, with virtually all vessels collapsed and less than 10% functional. Among the structurally normal myocytes adjacent to the infarct margin there was a significant reduction (to 30%-40%) in the proportion of functional capillaries. This was due to groups of dilated vessels which were not accessible to arterial supply. Although these marginal "low-flow" regions were of small volume at any one point in time, they seem likely to contribute to the progression of ischemic necrosis, and are probably nonfunctional due to the compression of their venous drainage traversing the infarct.

  12. Heart failure.

    PubMed

    2014-12-15

    Essential facts Heart failure affects about 900,000 people in the UK. The condition can affect people of all ages, but it is more common in older people, with more than half of all patients over the age of 75. It is caused by the heart failing to pump enough blood around the body at the right pressure, usually because the heart muscle has become too weak or stiff to work properly. Acute heart failure, which occurs when symptoms develop quickly, is the leading cause of hospital admission in people over 65. PMID:25492766

  13. Oncometabolite d-2-hydroxyglutarate impairs α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and contractile function in rodent heart.

    PubMed

    Karlstaedt, Anja; Zhang, Xiaotian; Vitrac, Heidi; Harmancey, Romain; Vasquez, Hernan; Wang, Jing Han; Goodell, Margaret A; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich

    2016-09-13

    Hematologic malignancies are frequently associated with cardiac pathologies. Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in a subset of acute myeloid leukemia patients, causing metabolic and epigenetic derangements. We have now discovered that altered metabolism in leukemic cells has a profound effect on cardiac metabolism. Combining mathematical modeling and in vivo as well as ex vivo studies, we found that increased amounts of the oncometabolite d-2-hydroxyglutarate (D2-HG), produced by IDH2 mutant leukemic cells, cause contractile dysfunction in the heart. This contractile dysfunction is associated with impaired oxidative decarboxylation of α-ketoglutarate, a redirection of Krebs cycle intermediates, and increased ATP citrate lyase (ACL) activity. Increased availability of D2-HG also leads to altered histone methylation and acetylation in the heart. We propose that D2-HG promotes cardiac dysfunction by impairing α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase and induces histone modifications in an ACL-dependent manner. Collectively, our results highlight the impact of cancer cell metabolism on function and metabolism of the heart. PMID:27582470

  14. CAROTID CHEMORECEPTOR ABLATION IMPROVES SURVIVAL IN HEART FAILURE: RESCUING AUTONOMIC CONTROL OF CARDIORESPIRATORY FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Del Rio, Rodrigo; Marcus, Noah J.; Schultz, Harold D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We investigated whether selective ablation of the carotid body (CB) chemoreceptors improves cardiorespiratory control and survival during heart failure. Background Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a recognized health problem worldwide, and novel treatments are needed to better improve life quality and decrease mortality. Enhanced carotid chemoreflex drive from the CB is thought to contribute significantly to autonomic dysfunction, abnormal breathing patterns, and increased mortality in heart failure. Methods CHF was induced by coronary ligation in rats. Selective CB denervation (CBD) was performed to remove carotid chemoreflex drive in the CHF state (16 weeks post MI). Indices of autonomic and respiratory function were assessed in CB intact and CBD animals. CBD at 2 weeks post-MI was performed to evaluate whether early targeted CB ablation decreases the progression of left ventricular dysfunction, cardiac remodeling and arrhythmic episodes and improves survival. Results CHF rats developed increased CB chemoreflex drive and chronic central pre-sympathetic neuronal activation, increased indices of elevated sympathetic outflow, increased breathing variability and apnea incidence, and desensitization of the baroreflex. Selective CB ablation reduced the central pre-sympathetic neuronal activation by 40%, normalized indices of sympathetic outflow and baroreflex sensitivity, and reduced the incidence of apneas in CHF animals from 16.8 ± 1.8 events/h to 8.0 ± 1.4 events/h. Remarkably, when CB ablation was performed early, cardiac remodeling, deterioration of left ventricle ejection fraction, and cardiac arrhythmias were reduced. Most importantly, the rats that underwent early CB ablation exhibited an 85% survival rate compared to 45% survival in CHF rats without the intervention. Conclusion Carotid chemoreceptors play a seminal role in the pathogenesis of heart failure and their targeted ablation might be of therapeutic value to reduce cardiorespiratory

  15. Left Atrial Size and Function in a Canine Model of Chronic Atrial Fibrillation and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Adam; Kusunose, Kenya; Qamruddin, Salima; Rodriguez, L. Leonardo; Mazgalev, Todor N.; Griffin, Brian P.; Van Wagoner, David R.; Zhang, Youhua; Popović, Zoran B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Our aim was to assess how atrial fibrillation (AF) induction, chronicity, and RR interval irregularity affect left atrial (LA) function and size in the setting of underlying heart failure (HF), and to determine whether AF effects can be mitigated by vagal nerve stimulation (VNS). Methods HF was induced by 4-weeks of rapid ventricular pacing in 24 dogs. Subsequently, AF was induced and maintained by atrial pacing at 600 bpm. Dogs were randomized into control (n = 9) and VNS (n = 15) groups. In the VNS group, atrioventricular node fat pad stimulation (310 μs, 20 Hz, 3–7 mA) was delivered continuously for 6 months. LA volume and LA strain data were calculated from bi-weekly echocardiograms. Results RR intervals decreased with HF in both groups (p = 0.001), and decreased further during AF in control group (p = 0.014), with a non-significant increase in the VNS group during AF. LA size increased with HF (p<0.0001), with no additional increase during AF. LA strain decreased with HF (p = 0.025) and further decreased after induction of AF (p = 0.0001). LA strain decreased less (p = 0.001) in the VNS than in the control group. Beat-by-beat analysis showed a curvilinear increase of LA strain with longer preceding RR interval, (r = 0.45, p <0.0001) with LA strain 1.1% higher (p = 0.02) in the VNS-treated animals, independent of preceding RR interval duration. The curvilinear relationship between ratio of preceding and pre-preceding RR intervals, and subsequent LA strain was weaker, (r = 0.28, p = 0.001). However, VNS-treated animals again had higher LA strain (by 2.2%, p = 0.002) independently of the ratio of preceding and pre-preceding RR intervals. Conclusions In the underlying presence of pacing-induced HF, AF decreased LA strain, with little impact on LA size. LA strain depends on the preceding RR interval duration. PMID:26771573

  16. Associated Clinical and Laboratory Markers of Donor on Allograft Function After Heart Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Braulio, Renato; Sanches, Marcelo Dias; Teixeira Junior, Antonio Lúcio; Costa, Paulo Henrique Nogueira; Moreira, Maria da Consolação Vieira; Rocha, Monaliza Angela; de Andrade, Silvio Amadeu; Gelape, Cláudio Léo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Primary graft dysfunction is a major cause of mortality after heart transplantation. Objective To evaluate correlations between donor-related clinical/biochemical markers and the occurrence of primary graft dysfunction/clinical outcomes of recipients within 30 days of transplant. Methods The prospective study involved 43 donor/recipient pairs. Data collected from donors included demographic and echocardiographic information, noradrenaline administration rates and concentrations of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptors (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2), interleukins (IL-6 and IL-10), monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, C-reactive protein and cardiac troponin I. Data collected from recipients included operating, cardiopulmonary bypass, intensive care unit and hospitalization times, inotrope administration and left/right ventricular function through echocardiography. Results Recipients who developed moderate/severe left ventricular dysfunction had received organs from significantly older donors (P =0.020). Recipients from donors who required moderate/high doses of noradrenaline (>0.23 µg/kg/min) around harvesting time exhibited lower post-transplant ventricular ejection fractions (P =0.002) and required longer CPB times (P =0.039). Significantly higher concentrations of sTNFR1 (P =0.014) and sTNFR2 (P =0.030) in donors were associated with reduced intensive care unit times (≤5 days) in recipients, while higher donor IL-6 (P =0.029) and IL-10 (P =0.037) levels were correlated with reduced hospitalization times (≤25 days) in recipients. Recipients who required moderate/high levels of noradrenaline for weaning off cardiopulmonary bypass were associated with lower donor concentrations of sTNFR2 (P =0.028) and IL-6 (P =0.001). Conclusion High levels of sTNFR1, sTNFR2, IL-6 and IL-10 in donors were associated with enhanced evolution in recipients. Allografts from older donors, or from those treated with noradrenaline doses >0.23 µg/kg/min, were more frequently

  17. Functional role of voltage gated Ca2+ channels in heart automaticity

    PubMed Central

    Mesirca, Pietro; Torrente, Angelo G.; Mangoni, Matteo E.

    2015-01-01

    Pacemaker activity of automatic cardiac myocytes controls the heartbeat in everyday life. Cardiac automaticity is under the control of several neurotransmitters and hormones and is constantly regulated by the autonomic nervous system to match the physiological needs of the organism. Several classes of ion channels and proteins involved in intracellular Ca2+ dynamics contribute to pacemaker activity. The functional role of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in heart automaticity and impulse conduction has been matter of debate for 30 years. However, growing evidence shows that VGCCs are important regulators of the pacemaker mechanisms and play also a major role in atrio-ventricular impulse conduction. Incidentally, studies performed in genetically modified mice lacking L-type Cav1.3 (Cav1.3−/−) or T-type Cav3.1 (Cav3.1−/−) channels show that genetic inactivation of these channels strongly impacts pacemaking. In cardiac pacemaker cells, VGCCs activate at negative voltages at the beginning of the diastolic depolarization and importantly contribute to this phase by supplying inward current. Loss-of-function of these channels also impairs atrio-ventricular conduction. Furthermore, inactivation of Cav1.3 channels promotes also atrial fibrillation and flutter in knockout mice suggesting that these channels can play a role in stabilizing atrial rhythm. Genomic analysis demonstrated that Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels are widely expressed in pacemaker tissue of mice, rabbits and humans. Importantly, human diseases of pacemaker activity such as congenital bradycardia and heart block have been attributed to loss-of-function of Cav1.3 and Cav3.1 channels. In this article, we will review the current knowledge on the role of VGCCs in the generation and regulation of heart rate and rhythm. We will discuss also how loss of Ca2+ entry through VGCCs could influence intracellular Ca2+ handling and promote atrial arrhythmias. PMID:25698974

  18. Functional morphology and patterns of blood flow in the heart of Python regius.

    PubMed

    Starck, J Matthias

    2009-06-01

    Brightness-modulated ultrasonography, continuous-wave Doppler, and pulsed-wave Doppler-echocardiography were used to analyze the functional morphology of the undisturbed heart of ball pythons. In particular, the action of the muscular ridge and the atrio-ventricular valves are key features to understand how patterns of blood flow emerge from structures directing blood into the various chambers of the heart. A step-by-step image analysis of echocardiographs shows that during ventricular diastole, the atrio-ventricular valves block the interventricular canals so that blood from the right atrium first fills the cavum venosum, and blood from the left atrium fills the cavum arteriosum. During diastole, blood from the cavum venosum crosses the muscular ridge into the cavum pulmonale. During middle to late systole the muscular ridge closes, thus prohibiting further blood flow into the cavum pulmonale. At the same time, the atrio-ventricular valves open the interventricular canal and allow blood from the cavum arteriosum to flow into the cavum venosum. In the late phase of ventricular systole, all blood from the cavum pulmonale is pressed into the pulmonary trunk; all blood from the cavum venosum is pressed into both aortas. Quantitative measures of blood flow volume showed that resting snakes bypass the pulmonary circulation and shunt about twice the blood volume into the systemic circulation as into the pulmonary circulation. When digesting, the oxygen demand of snakes increased tremendously. This is associated with shunting more blood into the pulmonary circulation. The results of this study allow the presentation of a detailed functional model of the python heart. They are also the basis for a functional hypothesis of how shunting is achieved. Further, it was shown that shunting is an active regulation process in response to changing demands of the organism (here, oxygen demand). Finally, the results of this study support earlier reports about a dual pressure

  19. Heart-function studies in dogs after acute gamma irradiation of the precordium

    SciTech Connect

    Durakovic

    1986-05-01

    In order to study the development of post-irradiation cardiac dysfunction, we irradiated the precordia of 18 adult beagle dogs were irradiated with 30, 60, or 100 Gy of Co-60 photons, and cardiac histology, electrocardiograms, Tc-99, pyrophosphate cardiac tissue distribution, and serial left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) were measured. Although the electrocardiograms and tissue distribution of Tc-99m were unaffected by these dose levels, the LVEF was reduced by day 58 for all the irradiated dogs. The delay in the onset of cardiac-function impairment parallels the delay in the onset of fibrosis in irradiated hearts.

  20. Functional and antiischemic effects of luteolin-7-glucoside in isolated rabbit hearts.

    PubMed

    Rump, A F; Schüssler, M; Acar, D; Cordes, A; Theisohn, M; Rösen, R; Klaus, W; Fricke, U

    1994-10-01

    1. The functional effects of the flavonoid luteolin-7-glucoside (LUT) were investigated in Langendorff-rabbit hearts perfused at constant pressure. Repetitive myocardial ischemia was induced by coronary artery ligature and quantified from NADH-fluorescence photography. 2. LUT significantly enhanced left ventricular pressure and the global and relative coronary flow (= global coronary flow/pressure-rate product). 3. LUT significantly diminished epicardial NADH-fluorescence area and intensity. 4. LUT is an inodilator possessing cardioprotective properties. These might be related to an improvement of myocardial perfusion and/or to free radical scavenging properties.

  1. Functional and antiischemic effects of luteolin-7-glucoside in isolated rabbit hearts.

    PubMed

    Rump, A F; Schüssler, M; Acar, D; Cordes, A; Theisohn, M; Rösen, R; Klaus, W; Fricke, U

    1994-10-01

    1. The functional effects of the flavonoid luteolin-7-glucoside (LUT) were investigated in Langendorff-rabbit hearts perfused at constant pressure. Repetitive myocardial ischemia was induced by coronary artery ligature and quantified from NADH-fluorescence photography. 2. LUT significantly enhanced left ventricular pressure and the global and relative coronary flow (= global coronary flow/pressure-rate product). 3. LUT significantly diminished epicardial NADH-fluorescence area and intensity. 4. LUT is an inodilator possessing cardioprotective properties. These might be related to an improvement of myocardial perfusion and/or to free radical scavenging properties. PMID:7875536

  2. Cardiac I-1c overexpression with reengineered AAV improves cardiac function in swine ischemic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Fish, Kenneth M; Tilemann, Lisa; Rapti, Kleopatra; Aguero, Jaume; Santos-Gallego, Carlos G; Lee, Ahyoung; Karakikes, Ioannis; Xie, Chaoqin; Akar, Fadi G; Shimada, Yuichi J; Gwathmey, Judith K; Asokan, Aravind; McPhee, Scott; Samulski, Jade; Samulski, Richard Jude; Sigg, Daniel C; Weber, Thomas; Kranias, Evangelia G; Hajjar, Roger J

    2014-12-01

    Cardiac gene therapy has emerged as a promising option to treat advanced heart failure (HF). Advances in molecular biology and gene targeting approaches are offering further novel options for genetic manipulation of the cardiovascular system. The aim of this study was to improve cardiac function in chronic HF by overexpressing constitutively active inhibitor-1 (I-1c) using a novel cardiotropic vector generated by capsid reengineering of adeno-associated virus (BNP116). One month after a large anterior myocardial infarction, 20 Yorkshire pigs randomly received intracoronary injection of either high-dose BNP116.I-1c (1.0 × 10(13) vector genomes (vg), n = 7), low-dose BNP116.I-1c (3.0 × 10(12) vg, n = 7), or saline (n = 6). Compared to baseline, mean left ventricular ejection fraction increased by 5.7% in the high-dose group, and by 5.2% in the low-dose group, whereas it decreased by 7% in the saline group. Additionally, preload-recruitable stroke work obtained from pressure-volume analysis demonstrated significantly higher cardiac performance in the high-dose group. Likewise, other hemodynamic parameters, including stroke volume and contractility index indicated improved cardiac function after the I-1c gene transfer. Furthermore, BNP116 showed a favorable gene expression pattern for targeting the heart. In summary, I-1c overexpression using BNP116 improves cardiac function in a clinically relevant model of ischemic HF. PMID:25023328

  3. Strategies for tissue engineering cardiac constructs to affect functional repair following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Ye, Kathy Yuan; Black, Lauren Deems

    2011-10-01

    Tissue-engineered cardiac constructs are a high potential therapy for treating myocardial infarction. These therapies have the ability to regenerate or recreate functional myocardium following the infarction, restoring some of the lost function of the heart and thereby preventing congestive heart failure. Three key factors to consider when developing engineered myocardial tissue include the cell source, the choice of scaffold, and the use of biomimetic culture conditions. This review details the various biomaterials and scaffold types that have been used to generate engineered myocardial tissues as well as a number of different methods used for the fabrication and culture of these constructs. Specific bioreactor design considerations for creating myocardial tissue equivalents in vitro, such as oxygen and nutrient delivery as well as physical stimulation, are also discussed. Lastly, a brief overview of some of the in vivo studies that have been conducted to date and their assessment of the functional benefit in repairing the injured heart with engineered myocardial tissue is provided.

  4. Functional improvement and maturation of rat and human engineered heart tissue by chronic electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Hirt, Marc N; Boeddinghaus, Jasper; Mitchell, Alice; Schaaf, Sebastian; Börnchen, Christian; Müller, Christian; Schulz, Herbert; Hubner, Norbert; Stenzig, Justus; Stoehr, Andrea; Neuber, Christiane; Eder, Alexandra; Luther, Pradeep K; Hansen, Arne; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    Spontaneously beating engineered heart tissue (EHT) represents an advanced in vitro model for drug testing and disease modeling, but cardiomyocytes in EHTs are less mature and generate lower forces than in the adult heart. We devised a novel pacing system integrated in a setup for videooptical recording of EHT contractile function over time and investigated whether sustained electrical field stimulation improved EHT properties. EHTs were generated from neonatal rat heart cells (rEHT, n=96) or human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived cardiomyocytes (hEHT, n=19). Pacing with biphasic pulses was initiated on day 4 of culture. REHT continuously paced for 16-18 days at 0.5Hz developed 2.2× higher forces than nonstimulated rEHT. This was reflected by higher cardiomyocyte density in the center of EHTs, increased connexin-43 abundance as investigated by two-photon microscopy and remarkably improved sarcomere ultrastructure including regular M-bands. Further signs of tissue maturation include a rightward shift (to more physiological values) of the Ca(2+)-response curve, increased force response to isoprenaline and decreased spontaneous beating activity. Human EHTs stimulated at 2Hz in the first week and 1.5Hz thereafter developed 1.5× higher forces than nonstimulated hEHT on day 14, an ameliorated muscular network of longitudinally oriented cardiomyocytes and a higher cytoplasm-to-nucleus ratio. Taken together, continuous pacing improved structural and functional properties of rEHTs and hEHTs to an unprecedented level. Electrical stimulation appears to be an important step toward the generation of fully mature EHT.

  5. Congenital Heart Disease Genetics Uncovers Context-Dependent Organization and Function of Nucleoporins at Cilia.

    PubMed

    Del Viso, Florencia; Huang, Fang; Myers, Jordan; Chalfant, Madeleine; Zhang, Yongdeng; Reza, Nooreen; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Lusk, C Patrick; Khokha, Mustafa K

    2016-09-12

    Human genomics is identifying candidate genes for congenital heart disease (CHD), but discovering the underlying mechanisms remains challenging. In a patient with CHD and heterotaxy (Htx), a disorder of left-right patterning, we previously identified a duplication in Nup188. However, a mechanism to explain how a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) could cause Htx/CHD was undefined. Here, we show that knockdown of Nup188 or its binding partner Nup93 leads to a loss of cilia during embryonic development while leaving NPC function largely intact. Many data, including the localization of endogenous Nup188/93 at cilia bases, support their direct role at cilia. Super-resolution imaging of Nup188 shows two barrel-like structures with dimensions and organization incompatible with an NPC-like ring, arguing against a proposed "ciliary pore complex." We suggest that the nanoscale organization and function of nucleoporins are context dependent in a way that is required for the structure of the heart. PMID:27593162

  6. Bone Marrow-Derived Progenitor Cells Are Functionally Impaired in Ischemic Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Nollet, Evelien; Hoymans, Vicky Y; Rodrigus, Inez R; De Bock, Dina; Dom, Marc; Vanassche, Bruno; Van Hoof, Viviane O M; Cools, Nathalie; Van Ackeren, Katrijn; Wouters, Kristien; Vermeulen, Katrien; Vrints, Christiaan J; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline M

    2016-08-01

    To determine whether the presence of ischemic heart disease (IHD) per se, or rather the co-presence of heart failure (HF), is the primum movens for less effective stem cell products in autologous stem cell therapy, we assessed numbers and function of bone marrow (BM)-derived progenitor cells in patients with coronary artery disease (n = 17), HF due to ischemic cardiomyopathy (n = 8), non-ischemic HF (n = 7), and control subjects (n = 11). Myeloid and erythroid differentiation capacity of BM-derived mononuclear cells was impaired in patients with underlying IHD but not with non-ischemic HF. Migration capacity decreased with increasing IHD severity. Hence, IHD, with or without associated cardiomyopathy, is an important determinant of progenitor cell function. No depletion of hematopoietic and endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) within the BM was observed, while circulating EPC numbers were increased in the presence of IHD, suggesting active recruitment. The observed myelosuppression was not driven by inflammation and thus other mechanisms are at play. PMID:27456951

  7. Congenital Heart Disease Genetics Uncovers Context-Dependent Organization and Function of Nucleoporins at Cilia.

    PubMed

    Del Viso, Florencia; Huang, Fang; Myers, Jordan; Chalfant, Madeleine; Zhang, Yongdeng; Reza, Nooreen; Bewersdorf, Joerg; Lusk, C Patrick; Khokha, Mustafa K

    2016-09-12

    Human genomics is identifying candidate genes for congenital heart disease (CHD), but discovering the underlying mechanisms remains challenging. In a patient with CHD and heterotaxy (Htx), a disorder of left-right patterning, we previously identified a duplication in Nup188. However, a mechanism to explain how a component of the nuclear pore complex (NPC) could cause Htx/CHD was undefined. Here, we show that knockdown of Nup188 or its binding partner Nup93 leads to a loss of cilia during embryonic development while leaving NPC function largely intact. Many data, including the localization of endogenous Nup188/93 at cilia bases, support their direct role at cilia. Super-resolution imaging of Nup188 shows two barrel-like structures with dimensions and organization incompatible with an NPC-like ring, arguing against a proposed "ciliary pore complex." We suggest that the nanoscale organization and function of nucleoporins are context dependent in a way that is required for the structure of the heart.

  8. Engineering the heart: Evaluation of conductive nanomaterials for improving implant integration and cardiac function

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jin; Chen, Jun; Sun, Hongyu; Qiu, Xiaozhong; Mou, Yongchao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yuwei; Li, Xia; Han, Yao; Duan, Cuimi; Tang, Rongyu; Wang, Chunlan; Zhong, Wen; Liu, Jie; Luo, Ying; (Mengqiu) Xing, Malcolm; Wang, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, carbon nanotubes together with other types of conductive materials have been used to enhance the viability and function of cardiomyocytes in vitro. Here we demonstrated a paradigm to construct ECTs for cardiac repair using conductive nanomaterials. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were incorporated into gelatin hydrogel scaffolds to construct three-dimensional ECTs. We found that SWNTs could provide cellular microenvironment in vitro favorable for cardiac contraction and the expression of electrochemical associated proteins. Upon implantation into the infarct hearts in rats, ECTs structurally integrated with the host myocardium, with different types of cells observed to mutually invade into implants and host tissues. The functional measurements showed that SWNTs were essential to improve the performance of ECTs in inhibiting pathological deterioration of myocardium. This work suggested that conductive nanomaterials hold therapeutic potential in engineering cardiac tissues to repair myocardial infarction. PMID:24429673

  9. Engineering the heart: Evaluation of conductive nanomaterials for improving implant integration and cardiac function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jin; Chen, Jun; Sun, Hongyu; Qiu, Xiaozhong; Mou, Yongchao; Liu, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yuwei; Li, Xia; Han, Yao; Duan, Cuimi; Tang, Rongyu; Wang, Chunlan; Zhong, Wen; Liu, Jie; Luo, Ying; (Mengqiu) Xing, Malcolm; Wang, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    Recently, carbon nanotubes together with other types of conductive materials have been used to enhance the viability and function of cardiomyocytes in vitro. Here we demonstrated a paradigm to construct ECTs for cardiac repair using conductive nanomaterials. Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were incorporated into gelatin hydrogel scaffolds to construct three-dimensional ECTs. We found that SWNTs could provide cellular microenvironment in vitro favorable for cardiac contraction and the expression of electrochemical associated proteins. Upon implantation into the infarct hearts in rats, ECTs structurally integrated with the host myocardium, with different types of cells observed to mutually invade into implants and host tissues. The functional measurements showed that SWNTs were essential to improve the performance of ECTs in inhibiting pathological deterioration of myocardium. This work suggested that conductive nanomaterials hold therapeutic potential in engineering cardiac tissues to repair myocardial infarction.

  10. Unique functions of Gata4 in mouse liver induction and heart development.

    PubMed

    Borok, Matthew J; Papaioannou, Virginia E; Sussel, Lori

    2016-02-15

    Gata4 and Gata6 are closely related transcription factors that are essential for the development of a number of embryonic tissues. While they have nearly identical DNA-binding domains and similar patterns of expression, Gata4 and Gata6 null embryos have strikingly different embryonic lethal phenotypes. To determine whether the lack of redundancy is due to differences in protein function or Gata4 and Gata6 expression domains, we generated mice that contained the Gata6 cDNA in place of the Gata4 genomic locus. Gata4(Gata6/Gata6) embryos survived through embryonic day (E)12.5 and successfully underwent ventral folding morphogenesis, demonstrating that Gata6 is able to replace Gata4 function in extraembryonic tissues. Surprisingly, Gata6 is unable to replace Gata4 function in the septum transversum mesenchyme or the epicardium, leading to liver agenesis and lethal heart defects in Gata4(Gata6/Gata6) embryos. These studies suggest that Gata4 has evolved distinct functions in the development of these tissues that cannot be performed by Gata6, even when it is provided in the identical expression domain. Our work has important implications for the respective mechanisms of Gata function during development, as well as the functional evolution of these essential transcription factors.

  11. [Effect of ATP infusion on heart function in the post-perfusion period after aortocoronary bypass surgery in patients with chronic ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Darbinian, T M; Chernikov, V S; Apasov, K T; Vlasov, G P; Garsevanov, G

    1993-01-01

    Using thermodilution technique, 110 patients have been examined during aortocoronary bypass surgery. Cardiac output, pump coefficient, cardiac index, stroke index, mean and edge pulmonary pressure, and other parameters of peripheral hemodynamics have been determined. At the end of the operation upon heart function recovery the test patients were administered intravenously a 1% ATP solution at a dose of 0.05 and 0.025 mg/kg/min. In control patients inotropic drugs were not used, cardiac function recovered spontaneously. A thorough clinical analysis of central hemodynamic data in the control and test groups has been performed. A number of positive effects of intravenous 1% ATP solution in the postperfusion period have been revealed. The data obtained indicate that myocardium protection during heart arrest is insufficient and an additional administration of substrates that form energy and recover adequate coronary flow and oxygen consumption is necessary upon heart function recovery in all the cases. The first results of intravenous ATP administration make it possible to consider the above technique absolutely safe and especially useful for the improvement fo some central hemodynamic parameters. PMID:8185070

  12. Hemodynamic and neurochemical determinates of renal function in chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Cameron; Cherney, David Z I; Parker, Andrea B; Mak, Susanna; Floras, John S; Al-Hesayen, Abdul; Parker, John D

    2016-01-15

    Abnormal renal function is common in acute and chronic congestive heart failure (CHF) and is related to the severity of congestion. However, treatment of congestion often leads to worsening renal function. Our objective was to explore basal determinants of renal function and their response to hemodynamic interventions. Thirty-seven patients without CHF and 59 patients with chronic CHF (ejection fraction; 23 ± 8%) underwent right heart catheterization, measurements of glomerular filtration rate (GFR; inulin) and renal plasma flow (RPF; para-aminohippurate), and radiotracer estimates of renal sympathetic activity. A subset (26 without, 36 with CHF) underwent acute pharmacological intervention with dobutamine or nitroprusside. We explored the relationship between baseline and drug-induced hemodynamic changes and changes in renal function. In CHF, there was an inverse relationship among right atrial mean pressure (RAM) pressure, RPF, and GFR. By contrast, mean arterial pressure (MAP), cardiac index (CI), and measures of renal sympathetic activity were not significant predictors. In those with CHF there was also an inverse relationship among the drug-induced changes in RAM as well as pulmonary artery mean pressure and the change in GFR. Changes in MAP and CI did not predict the change in GFR in those with CHF. Baseline values and changes in RAM pressure did not correlate with GFR in those without CHF. In the CHF group there was a positive correlation between RAM pressure and renal sympathetic activity. There was also an inverse relationship among RAM pressure, GFR, and RPF in patients with chronic CHF. The observation that acute reductions in RAM pressure is associated with an increase in GFR in patients with CHF has important clinical implications.

  13. SUMO-1 gene transfer improves cardiac function in a large-animal model of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Tilemann, Lisa; Lee, Ahyoung; Ishikawa, Kiyotake; Aguero, Jaume; Rapti, Kleopatra; Santos-Gallego, Carlos; Kohlbrenner, Erik; Fish, Kenneth M; Kho, Changwon; Hajjar, Roger J

    2013-11-13

    Recently, the impact of small ubiquitin-related modifier 1 (SUMO-1) on the regulation and preservation of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium adenosine triphosphatase (SERCA2a) function was discovered. The amount of myocardial SUMO-1 is decreased in failing hearts, and its knockdown results in severe heart failure (HF) in mice. In a previous study, we showed that SUMO-1 gene transfer substantially improved cardiac function in a murine model of pressure overload-induced HF. Toward clinical translation, we evaluated in this study the effects of SUMO-1 gene transfer in a swine model of ischemic HF. One month after balloon occlusion of the proximal left anterior descending artery followed by reperfusion, the animals were randomized to receive either SUMO-1 at two doses, SERCA2a, or both by adeno-associated vector type 1 (AAV1) gene transfer via antegrade coronary infusion. Control animals received saline infusions. After gene delivery, there was a significant increase in the maximum rate of pressure rise [dP/dt(max)] that was most pronounced in the group that received both SUMO-1 and SERCA2a. The left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) improved after high-dose SUMO-1 with or without SERCA2a gene delivery, whereas there was a decline in LVEF in the animals receiving saline. Furthermore, the dilatation of LV volumes was prevented in the treatment groups. SUMO-1 gene transfer therefore improved cardiac function and stabilized LV volumes in a large-animal model of HF. These results support the critical role of SUMO-1 in SERCA2a function and underline the therapeutic potential of SUMO-1 for HF patients.

  14. Abdominal obesity and structure and function of the heart in healthy male Koreans: The ARIRANG study.

    PubMed

    Son, Jung-Woo; Sung, Joong Kyung; Lee, Jun-Won; Youn, Young Jin; Ahn, Min-Soo; Ahn, Sung Gyun; Yoo, Byung-Su; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Junghan; Koh, Sang Baek; Kim, Jang-Young

    2016-09-01

    Although central obesity is a more powerful predictor of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than general obesity, there is limited information on structural and functional changes of the heart in central obesity. Therefore, we evaluated the association between abdominal obesity and geometric and functional changes of the heart in healthy males. A total of 1460 healthy males aged 40 to 70 years without known CVD from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study on Atherosclerosis Risk of Rural Areas in the Korean General Population were included. All individuals underwent conventional 2-dimensional echocardiography and tissue Doppler imaging to measure left atrial (LA) and left ventricle (LV) geometry and function. Increasing tertiles of waist circumference (WC) were associated with stepwise increases in LA volume, LV end-diastolic dimension, LV mass to height, deceleration time of E wave, and lower E/A ratio (all P trends <0.001). In multivariable logistic regression models, the odds ratios for LA enlargement, LV hypertrophy, LV enlargement, and diastolic dysfunction comparing the upper tertile of WC (>89 cm) to the lowest tertile (<82 cm) were 2.81 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.24-3.54), 3.65 (95% CI 2.54-5.26), 4.23 (95% CI 2.61-6.87), and 1.75 (95% CI 1.37-2.22), respectively. LV ejection fraction and relative wall thickness were not increased with increasing WC. The association between WC and LA enlargement, LV enlargement, and diastolic dysfunction persisted after stratification by body mass index tertiles. Central obesity may be a stronger predictor than general obesity of geometric and functional changes in the LV and LA. PMID:27684832

  15. Effects of Type 2 Diabetes on Brain Structure and Cognitive Function: African American–Diabetes Heart Study MIND

    PubMed Central

    Whitlow, C.T.; Sink, K.M.; Divers, J.; Smith, S.C.; Xu, J.; Palmer, N.D.; Hugenschmidt, C.E.; Williamson, J.D.; Bowden, D.W.; Freedman, B.I.; Maldjian, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Rates of type 2 diabetes are higher among African Americans compared with individuals of European ancestry. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the relationship between MR imaging measures of brain structure (volume of GM, WM, WM lesions) and cognitive function in a population of African Americans with type 2 diabetes. These MR imaging measures of brain structure are affected by type 2 diabetes–associated macrovascular and microvascular disease and may be associated with performance on tasks of cognitive function in the understudied African American population. MATERIALS AND METHODS African Americans with type 2 diabetes enrolled in the African American–Diabetes Heart Study MIND study (n = 263) were evaluated across a broad range of cognitive domains and imaged with brain MR imaging. Associations between cognitive parameters and MR imaging measures of whole-brain GM, WM, and WM lesion volumes were assessed by using adjusted multivariate models. RESULTS Lower GM volume was associated with poorer performance on measures of general cognitive function, working memory, and executive function. Higher WM lesion volume was associated with poorer performance on a smaller subset of cognitive domains compared with GM volume but included aspects of working memory and executive function. There were no statistically significant associations with WM volume. CONCLUSIONS Markers of cortical atrophy and WM lesion volume are associated with cognitive function in African Americans with type 2 diabetes. These associations are described in an African American cohort with disease control similar to that of individuals of European ancestry, rather than underserved African Americans with poor access to health care. Interventions to reduce cortical atrophy and WM disease may improve cognitive outcomes in this understudied population. PMID:26206811

  16. Functional characteristics and molecular identification of swelling-activated chloride conductance in adult rabbit heart ventricles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingdong; Wu, Xiangqiong; Cui, Tianpen

    2008-02-01

    Outwardly rectifying swelling-activated chloride conductance (ICl,Swell) in rabbit heart plays a critical role in cardioprotection following ischemic preconditioning (IP). But the functional characterization and molecular basis of this chloride conductance in rabbit heart ventricular myocytes is not clear. Candidate chloride channel clones (e.g. ClC-2, ClC-3, ClC-4 and ClC-5) were determined using RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Whole cell ICl,Swell was recorded from isolated rabbit ventricular myocytes using patch clamp techniques during hypo-osmotic stress. The inhibitory effects of 4,4' isothiocyanato-2,2-disulfonic acid (DIDS), 5-nitro-2(3-phenylroylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) and indanyloxyacetic acid 94 (IAA-94) on ICl,Swell were examined. The expected size of PCR products for ClC-2, ClC-3 and ClC-4 but not for ClC-5 was obtained. ClC-2 and ClC-3 expression was confirmed by automated fluorescent DNA sequencing. RT-PCR and Western blot showed that ClC-4 was expressed in abundance and ClC-2 was expressed at somewhat lower levels. The biological and pharmacological properties of I(Cl,Swell), including outward rectification, activation due to cell volume change, sensitivity to DIDS, IAA-94 and NPPB were identical to those known properties of ICl,Swell in exogenously expressed systems and other mammals hearts. It was concluded that ClC-3 or ClC-4 might be responsible for the outwardly rectifying part of ICl,Swell and may be the molecular targets of cardioprotection associated with ischemic preconditioning or hypo-osmotic shock. PMID:18278453

  17. Effect and clinical prediction of worsening renal function in acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Breidthardt, Tobias; Socrates, Thenral; Noveanu, Markus; Klima, Theresia; Heinisch, Corinna; Reichlin, Tobias; Potocki, Mihael; Nowak, Albina; Tschung, Christopher; Arenja, Nisha; Bingisser, Roland; Mueller, Christian

    2011-03-01

    We aimed to establish the prevalence and effect of worsening renal function (WRF) on survival among patients with acute decompensated heart failure. Furthermore, we sought to establish a risk score for the prediction of WRF and externally validate the previously established Forman risk score. A total of 657 consecutive patients with acute decompensated heart failure presenting to the emergency department and undergoing serial creatinine measurements were enrolled. The potential of the clinical parameters at admission to predict WRF was assessed as the primary end point. The secondary end point was all-cause mortality at 360 days. Of the 657 patients, 136 (21%) developed WRF, and 220 patients had died during the first year. WRF was more common in the nonsurvivors (30% vs 41%, p = 0.03). Multivariate regression analysis found WRF to independently predict mortality (hazard ratio 1.92, p <0.01). In a single parameter model, previously diagnosed chronic kidney disease was the only independent predictor of WRF and achieved an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.60. After the inclusion of the blood gas analysis parameters into the model history of chronic kidney disease (hazard ratio 2.13, p = 0.03), outpatient diuretics (hazard ratio 5.75, p <0.01), and bicarbonate (hazard ratio 0.91, p <0.01) were all predictive of WRF. A risk score was developed using these predictors. On receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the Forman and Basel prediction rules achieved an area under the curve of 0.65 and 0.71, respectively. In conclusion, WRF was common in patients with acute decompensated heart failure and was linked to significantly worse outcomes. However, the clinical parameters failed to adequately predict its occurrence, making a tailored therapy approach impossible.

  18. Soluble Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2 in Human Heart Failure: Relation with Myocardial Function and Clinical Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Epelman, Slava; Shrestha, Kevin; Troughton, Richard W.; Francis, Gary S.; Sen, Subha; Klein, Allan L.; Tang, W .H. Wilson

    2011-01-01

    Objective Angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is an endogenous counter-regulator of the renin-angiotensin system. The relationship between soluble ACE2 (sACE2), myocardial function, and clinical outcomes in patients with chronic systolic heart failure is not well established. Methods We measured sACE2 activity in 113 patients with chronic systolic heart failure (left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] ≤ 35%, NYHA class II-IV). Comprehensive echocardiography was performed at the time of blood sampling. We prospectively examined adverse clinical events (death, cardiac transplant, and heart failure hospitalizations) over 34 ± 17 months. Results Patients who had higher sACE2 plasma activity were more likely to have a lower LVEF (Spearman’s r= −0.36, p <0.001), greater RV systolic dysfunction (r=0.33, p<0.001), higher estimated pulmonary artery systolic pressure (r=0.35, p=0.002), larger LV end diastolic diameter (r=0.23, p=0.02), and higher plasma NT-proBNP levels (r=0.35, p<0.001). sACE2 was less associated with diastolic dysfunction (r=0.19, p=0.05), and was similar between patients with ischemic and non-ischemic cardiomyopathies. There was no relationship between sACE2 activity and markers of systemic inflammation. After adjusting for NT-proBNP and LVEF, sACE2 activity remained an independent predictor of adverse clinical events (HR=1.7 [95% CI: 1.1 – 2.6], p=0.018). Conclusions Elevated plasma sACE2 activity was associated with greater severity of myocardial dysfunction and was an independent predictor of adverse clinical events. PMID:19700132

  19. Outcomes and worsening renal function in patients hospitalized with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Kavita; Hill, Terence; Grams, Morgan; Daya, Natalie R; Hays, Allison G; Fine, Derek; Thiemann, David R; Weiss, Robert G; Tedford, Ryan J; Kass, David A; Schulman, Steven P; Russell, Stuart D

    2015-11-15

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) has been described as a disease of elderly subjects with female predominance and hypertension. Our clinical experience suggests patients with HFpEF from an urban population are far more heterogenous, with greater co-morbidities and significant inhospital morbidity. There are limited data on the hospitalization course and outcomes in acute decompensated HFpEF. Hospitalizations for acute heart failure at our institution from July 2011 to June 2012 were identified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes and physician review for left ventricular ejection fraction ≥50% and were reviewed for patient characteristics and clinical outcomes. Worsening renal function (WRF) was defined as creatinine increase of ≥0.3 mg/dl by 72 hours after admission. Hospital readmission and mortality data were captured from electronic medical records and the Social Security Death Index. Of 434 heart failure admissions, 206 patients (47%) with HFpEF were identified. WRF developed in 40%, the highest reported in HFpEF to date, and was associated with higher blood pressure and lower volume of diuresis. Compared to previous reports, hospitalized patients with HFpEF were younger (mean age 63.2 ± 13.6 years), predominantly black (74%), and had more frequent and severe co-morbidities: hypertension (89%), diabetes (56%), and chronic kidney disease (55%). There were no significant differences in 1- and 12-month outcomes by gender, race, or WRF. In conclusion, we found hospitalized patients with HFpEF from an urban population develop a high rate of WRF are younger than previous cohorts, often black, and have greater co-morbidities than previously described.

  20. Abnormal calcium homeostasis in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is related to both reduced contractile function and incomplete relaxation: an electromechanically detailed biophysical modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Adeniran, Ismail; MacIver, David H.; Hancox, Jules C.; Zhang, Henggui

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) accounts for about 50% of heart failure cases. It has features of incomplete relaxation and increased stiffness of the left ventricle. Studies from clinical electrophysiology and animal experiments have found that HFpEF is associated with impaired calcium homeostasis, ion channel remodeling and concentric left ventricle hypertrophy (LVH). However, it is still unclear how the abnormal calcium homeostasis, ion channel and structural remodeling affect the electro-mechanical dynamics of the ventricles. In this study we have developed multiscale models of the human left ventricle from single cells to the 3D organ, which take into consideration HFpEF-induced changes in calcium handling, ion channel remodeling and concentric LVH. Our simulation results suggest that at the cellular level, HFpEF reduces the systolic calcium level resulting in a reduced systolic contractile force, but elevates the diastolic calcium level resulting in an abnormal residual diastolic force. In our simulations, these abnormal electro-mechanical features of the ventricular cells became more pronounced with the increase of the heart rate. However, at the 3D organ level, the ejection fraction of the left ventricle was maintained due to the concentric LVH. The simulation results of this study mirror clinically observed features of HFpEF and provide new insights toward the understanding of the cellular bases of impaired cardiac electromechanical functions in heart failure. PMID:25852567

  1. Carotid body denervation improves autonomic and cardiac function and attenuates disordered breathing in congestive heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Noah J; Rio, Rodrigo; Schultz, Evan P; Xia, Xiao-Hong; Schultz, Harold D

    2014-01-01

    In congestive heart failure (CHF), carotid body (CB) chemoreceptor activity is enhanced and is associated with oscillatory (Cheyne–Stokes) breathing patterns, increased sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and increased arrhythmia incidence. We hypothesized that denervation of the CB (CBD) chemoreceptors would reduce SNA, reduce apnoea and arrhythmia incidence and improve ventricular function in pacing-induced CHF rabbits. Resting breathing, renal SNA (RSNA) and arrhythmia incidence were measured in three groups of animals: (1) sham CHF/sham–CBD (sham–sham); (2) CHF/sham–CBD (CHF–sham); and (3) CHF/CBD (CHF–CBD). Chemoreflex sensitivity was measured as the RSNA and minute ventilatory () responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia. Respiratory pattern was measured by plethysmography and quantified by an apnoea–hypopnoea index, respiratory rate variability index and the coefficient of variation of tidal volume. Sympatho-respiratory coupling (SRC) was assessed using power spectral analysis and the magnitude of the peak coherence function between tidal volume and RSNA frequency spectra. Arrhythmia incidence and low frequency/high frequency ratio of heart rate variability were assessed using ECG and blood pressure waveforms, respectively. RSNA and responses to hypoxia were augmented in CHF–sham and abolished in CHF–CBD animals. Resting RSNA was greater in CHF–sham compared to sham–sham animals (43 ± 5% max vs. 23 ± 2% max, P < 0.05), and this increase was not found in CHF–CBD animals (25 ± 1% max, P < 0.05 vs. CHF–sham). Low frequency/high frequency heart rate variability ratio was similarly increased in CHF and reduced by CBD (P < 0.05). Respiratory rate variability index, coefficient of variation of tidal volume and apnoea–hypopnoea index were increased in CHF–sham animals and reduced in CHF–CBD animals (P < 0.05). SRC (peak coherence) was increased in CHF–sham animals (sham–sham 0.49 ± 0.05; CHF–sham 0.79

  2. Isolation and expansion of functionally-competent cardiac progenitor cells directly from heart biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Darryl R; Kizana, Eddy; Terrovitis, John; Barth, Andreas S.; Zhang, Yiqiang; Smith, Rachel Ruckdeschel; Miake, Junichiro; Marbán, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    The adult heart contains reservoirs of progenitor cells that express embryonic and stem cell-related antigens. While these antigenically-purified cells are promising candidates for autologous cell therapy, clinical application is hampered by their limited abundance and tedious isolation methods. Methods that involve an intermediate cardiosphere-forming step have proven successful and are being tested clinically, but it is unclear whether the cardiosphere step is necessary. Accordingly, we investigated the molecular profile and functional benefit of cells that spontaneously emigrate from cardiac tissue in primary culture. Adult Wistar-Kyoto rat hearts were minced, digested and cultured as separate anatomical regions. Loosely-adherent cells that surround the plated tissue were harvested weekly for a total of five harvests. Genetic lineage tracing demonstrated that a small proportion of the direct outgrowth from cardiac samples originates from myocardial cells. This outgrowth contains sub-populations of cells expressing embryonic (SSEA-1) and stem cell-related antigens (c-Kit, abcg2) that varied with time in culture but not with the cardiac chamber of origin. This direct outgrowth, and its expanded progeny, underwent marked in vitro angiogenic/cardiogenic differentiation and cytokine secretion (IGF-1, VGEF). In vivo effects included long-term functional benefits as gauged by MRI following cell injection in a rat model of myocardial infarction. Outgrowth cells afforded equivalent functional benefits to cardiosphere-derived cells, which require more processing steps to manufacture. These results provide the basis for a simplified and efficient process to generate autologous cardiac progenitor cells (and mesenchymal supporting cells) to augment clinically-relevant approaches for myocardial repair. PMID:20211627

  3. Heart Failure Functional Class Associated with Depression Severity But Not Anxiety Severity

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Etem; Cay, Serkan; Sensoy, Baris; Murat, Sani; Oksuz, Fatih; Cankurt, Tayyar; Ali Mendi, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    Background Depression and anxiety are common in heart failure (HF) patients and associated with adverse clinical outcomes. However, there are little or no published data that focuses on the relationship between these commonly observed situations and HF classes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between these psychiatric co-morbidities and HF symptom classes. As a second objective of our study, the associations between patient characteristics and depression severity were also assessed. Methods Our study enrolled a total of 420 HF study participants. The severity of depressive and anxiety symptoms was evaluated by Beck’s depression and anxiety. The measured total scores were used to grade depression severity and anxiety as minimal/mild and moderate/severe. Results According to NYHA Functional Classification, 228 patients (51%) had class I symptoms, 101 (23%) had class II symptoms, 31 (7%) had class III symptoms, and class IV symptoms were noted in the remaining 60 patients (19%). The mean Beck’s depression and anxiety scores were 12.4 ± 11.1 and 13.4 ± 9.0, respectively. While no association between HF symptom classes and anxiety severity was observed, a significant positive relation between HF symptom class and depression score was found. Conclusions The results of our study suggested that HF symptom class was positively associated with severity of depression. On the other hand, there was no association between HF symptom class and anxiety score in a wide population of heart failure patients. PMID:27122931

  4. Perturbations of heart development and function in cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells with trisomy 21.

    PubMed

    Bosman, Alexis; Letourneau, Audrey; Sartiani, Laura; Del Lungo, Martina; Ronzoni, Flavio; Kuziakiv, Rostyslav; Tohonen, Virpi; Zucchelli, Marco; Santoni, Federico; Guipponi, Michel; Dumevska, Biljana; Hovatta, Outi; Antonarakis, Stylianos E; Jaconi, Marisa E

    2015-05-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) occur in approximately 50% of patients with Down syndrome (DS); the mechanisms for this occurrence however remain unknown. In order to understand how these defects evolve in early development in DS, we focused on the earliest stages of cardiogenesis to ascertain perturbations in development leading to CHD. Using a trisomy 21 (T21) sibling human embryonic stem cell (hESC) model of DS, we show that T21-hESC display many significant differences in expression of genes and cell populations associated with mesodermal, and more notably, secondary heart field (SHF) development, in particular a reduced number of ISL1(+) progenitor cells. Furthermore, we provide evidence for two candidate genes located on chromosome 21, ETS2 and ERG, whose overexpression during cardiac commitment likely account for the disruption of SHF development, as revealed by downregulation or overexpression experiments. Additionally, we uncover an abnormal electrophysiological phenotype in functional T21 cardiomyocytes, a result further supported by mRNA expression data acquired using RNA-Seq. These data, in combination, revealed a cardiomyocyte-specific phenotype in T21 cardiomyocytes, likely due to the overexpression of genes such as RYR2, NCX, and L-type Ca(2+) channel. These results contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the development of CHD. Stem Cells 2015;33:1434-1446.

  5. [The function of the heart changes in implementation of the diving reactions in humans].

    PubMed

    Baranova, T I; Berlov, D N; Zavarina, L B; Minigalin, A D; Smith, N Y; Xu, S; Yanvareva, I N

    2015-03-01

    The changes of chronotropic function of the heart and of the myocardium in the implementation of the diving response in humans were studied by the electrocardiographic method. The study involved 80 students aged 18-20 years. Diving simulation was performed by immersing the face in cold water during breath-hold exhale. When the water temperature was 12.3 +/- 2.3 degrees C, average duration of apnea was 31 +/- 11 s. The oxygen content in the exhaled air after apnea was 98.8 +/- 8.7 mm Hg, carbon dioxide--49.1 +/- 3.5 mm Hg. It was observed slowing of the heart rate, mainly due to the increasing of diastole in 41 of the 80 surveyed during simulating diving. But it also can be observed symptoms of conduction deterioration: atrioventricular block type I (22% of reactive type and 29% of the highly reactive type subjects), and exceeds standards QTc-interval prolongation (at 7.5% of the subjects). These responses are adaptive in nature and disappear in the recovery process. But the fact abnormalities of conduction in the myocardium must be considered when using the diving reflex in medical practice, as may be due to a predisposition to a certain pathology of the cardiovascular system.

  6. Evaluation of renal function in elderly heart failure patients on ACE inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Jolobe, O

    1999-01-01

    A total of 187 heart failure patients aged 65-92 years, with pretreatment serum creatinine levels below 200 µmol/l, were monitored for more than 12 months on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor therapy. Optimal ACE inhibitor dosage was found in 27% of patients, while a significant deterioration in renal function, characterised by >20% increase in serum creatinine to >200 µmol/l, occurred in 25 patients. This was most closely attributable to ACE inhibitor treatment per se (implying co-existence of bilateral renal artery stenosis) in only four cases, including one in whom renal deterioration was reproducible on inadvertent rechallenge. In the other 21, renal deterioration was attributable to diuretic-related blood volume depletion (two cases), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (two cases), obstructive uropathy (two cases), preterminal renal shutdown (two cases), and the interaction between diuretic and ACE inhibitor dosage (including long-acting vs short-acting drugs) (13 cases). This study could serve as the basis for future comparisons of ACE-inhibitor-related renal deterioration when the entry requirement is optimal ACE inhibitor dosage.


Keywords: heart failure; elderly patients; angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors; renal deterioration PMID:10533630

  7. Concomitant gastroparesis negatively affects children with functional gallbladder disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether concomitant gastroparesis and biliary dyskinesia (BD) occur in children, and if so, to determine whether concomitant gastroparesis affects clinical outcome in children with BD. We conducted a retrospective chart review of children with BD (ejecti...

  8. The Interactive Effects of Cerebral Perfusion and Depression on Cognitive Function in Older Adults with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Garcia, Sarah; Josephson, Richard; van Dulmen, Manfred; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Depression is common among persons with heart failure (HF) and has been linked to cognitive impairment in this population. The mechanisms of this relationship are unclear, and the current study examined whether cerebral perfusion moderates the association between depressive symptomatology and cognitive impairment in patients with HF. Methods Persons with HF (N=89; 67.61 (SD = 11.78) years of age) completed neuropsychological testing and impedance cardiography. Depressive symptomatology was assessed using the Beck Depression Inventory-II and transcranial doppler was used to quantify cerebral perfusion. Results Depression was associated with reduced performance on tasks assessing attention/executive function (r=−0.28), language (r=−.0.30) and motor function (r=−.28) in unadjusted models (p-values < 0.05). Global cerebral blood flow was correlated with memory performance (r=0.22, p=.040) but not to other tasks. A moderation analysis was performed using hierarchical regression models for attention/executive function, memory, language, and motor function. For each model, medical and demographic characteristics were entered into the initial blocks, and the final block consisted of an interaction term between global cerebral blood flow velocity (CBF-V) and the BDI-II. The interaction between greater depressive symptomatology and decreased global CBF-V was associated with greater deficits in attention/executive function (β = .32, ΔR2 = .08, p = .003). Conclusion Depressive symptomatology and cerebral hypoperfusion interact to adversely affect cognitive performance in older adults with HF. Longitudinal studies are needed to clarify this relationship and elucidate subsequent neuropathology. PMID:23873714

  9. SUMO1 Affects Synaptic Function, Spine Density and Memory.

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Shinsuke; Lee, Linda; Knock, Erin; Srikumar, Tharan; Sakurai, Mikako; Hazrati, Lili-Naz; Katayama, Taiichi; Staniszewski, Agnieszka; Raught, Brian; Arancio, Ottavio; Fraser, Paul E

    2015-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modifier-1 (SUMO1) plays a number of roles in cellular events and recent evidence has given momentum for its contributions to neuronal development and function. Here, we have generated a SUMO1 transgenic mouse model with exclusive overexpression in neurons in an effort to identify in vivo conjugation targets and the functional consequences of their SUMOylation. A high-expressing line was examined which displayed elevated levels of mono-SUMO1 and increased high molecular weight conjugates in all brain regions. Immunoprecipitation of SUMOylated proteins from total brain extract and proteomic analysis revealed ~95 candidate proteins from a variety of functional classes, including a number of synaptic and cytoskeletal proteins. SUMO1 modification of synaptotagmin-1 was found to be elevated as compared to non-transgenic mice. This observation was associated with an age-dependent reduction in basal synaptic transmission and impaired presynaptic function as shown by altered paired pulse facilitation, as well as a decrease in spine density. The changes in neuronal function and morphology were also associated with a specific impairment in learning and memory while other behavioral features remained unchanged. These findings point to a significant contribution of SUMO1 modification on neuronal function which may have implications for mechanisms involved in mental retardation and neurodegeneration. PMID:26022678

  10. Mediastinal irradiation in a patient affected by lung carcinoma after heart transplantation: Helical tomotherapy versus three dimensional conformal radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Giugliano, Francesca M; Iorio, Vincenzo; Cammarota, Fabrizio; Toledo, Diego; Senese, Rossana; Francomacaro, Ferdinando; Muto, Matteo; Muto, Paolo

    2016-04-26

    Patients who have undergone solid organ transplants are known to have an increased risk of neoplasia compared with the general population. We report our experience using mediastinal irradiation with helical tomotherapy versus three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy to treat a patient with lung carcinoma 15 years after heart transplantation. Our dosimetric evaluation showed no particular difference between the techniques, with the exception of some organs. Mediastinal irradiation after heart transplantation is feasible and should be considered after evaluation of the risk. Conformal radiotherapy or intensity-modulated radiotherapy appears to be the appropriate treatment in heart-transplanted oncologic patients.

  11. The β2 Adrenergic Receptor Gln27Glu Polymorphism Affects Insulin Resistance in Patients with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Vardeny, Orly; Detry, Michelle A.; Moran, John J.M.; Johnson, Maryl R.; Sweitzer, Nancy K.

    2009-01-01

    Insulin resistance is prevalent in heart failure (HF) patients, and beta2 adrenergic receptors (β2-AR) are involved in glucose homeostasis. We hypothesized that β2-AR Gln27Glu and Arg16Gly polymorphisms affect insulin resistance in HF patients and explored if effects of β2-AR polymorphisms on glucose handling are modified by choice of beta blocker. We studied 30 non-diabetic adults with HF and a history of systolic dysfunction, 15 on metoprolol succinate and 15 on carvedilol. We measured fasting glucose, insulin, and insulin resistance, and determined β2-AR genotypes at codons 27 and 16. The cohort was insulin resistant with a mean HOMA-IR score of 3.4 (95%CI 2.3-4.5, normal value=1.0). Patients with the Glu27Glu genotype exhibited higher insulin and HOMA-IR compared to individuals carrying a Gln allele (p=0.019). Patients taking carvedilol demonstrated lower insulin resistance if also carrying a wild type allele at codon 27 (fasting insulin 9.8±10.5 versus 20.5±2.1 for variant, p=0.072, HOMA-IR 2.4±2.7 versus 5.1±0.6, p=0.074, respectively); those on metoprolol succinate had high insulin resistance irrespective of genotype. The β2-AR Glu27Glu genotype may be associated with higher insulin concentrations and insulin resistance in patients with HF. Future studies are needed to confirm whether treatment with carvedilol may be associated with decreased insulin and insulin resistance in β2-AR codon 27 Gln carriers. PMID:19034036

  12. Keeping the heart in balance: the functional interactions of myoglobin with nitrogen oxides.

    PubMed

    Flögel, Ulrich; Fago, Angela; Rassaf, Tienush

    2010-08-15

    Myoglobin (Mb) is an important intracellular oxygen-binding hemoprotein found in the cytoplasm of skeletal and cardiac muscle tissue playing a well-known role in O(2) storage and delivery. Within the last decade the knowledge about Mb's function has been considerably extended by the generation of myoglobin-deficient (myo(-/-)) mice, which for the first time enabled the analysis of Mb's role in physiology without pharmacological intervention. Utilizing the myo(-/-) mice, it has been demonstrated that beyond its function in O(2) supply Mb substantially contributes to nitric oxide (NO) homeostasis in the heart. By a dynamic cycle, in which a decrease in tissue O(2) tension drives the conversion of Mb from being a NO scavenger under normoxia to a NO producer during hypoxia, mitochondrial respiration is reversibly adapted to the intracellular O(2) tension. Therefore, Mb may act as an important O(2) sensor through which NO can regulate muscle energetics and function. As Mb is widespread throughout the fauna, the diverse oxygen-dependent interactions between Mb and nitrogen oxides may not only be of relevance for mammals but also for other vertebrates as evidenced by comparable phenotypes of 'artificial' (myo(-/-) mice) and 'natural' Mb knockouts (icefish and amphibians). In conclusion, it seems likely that Mb's multifunctional properties create an environment characterized by a tightly adapted aerobic mitochondrial respiration and low levels of free radicals, and thus serve an essential and beneficial role within the myocardium, which appears to be functionally important over a wide range of species. PMID:20675541

  13. The Additive Effects of Type-2 Diabetes on Cognitive Function in Older Adults with Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Alosco, Michael L.; Spitznagel, Mary Beth; van Dulmen, Manfred; Raz, Naftali; Cohen, Ronald; Sweet, Lawrence H.; Colbert, Lisa H.; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel; Rosneck, Jim; Gunstad, John

    2012-01-01

    Background. Medical comorbidity has been theorized to contribute to cognitive impairment in heart failure (HF) patients. Specifically, type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), a common coexisting condition among HF patients, may be an independent predictor of cognitive impairment. Nonetheless, the relationships between T2DM and other risk factors for cognitive impairment among persons with HF are unclear. Methods. Persons with HF (N = 169, 34.3% women, age 68.57 ± 10.28 years) completed neuropsychological testing within a framework of an ongoing study. History of T2DM, along with other medical characteristics, was ascertained through a review of participants' medical charts and self-report. Results. Many participants (34.9%) had a comorbid T2DM diagnosis. After adjustment for demographic and medical characteristics, HF patients with T2DM evidenced significantly greater impairments across multiple cognitive domains than HF patients without T2DM: λ = .92, F(5, 156) = 2.82, P = .018. Post hoc tests revealed significant associations between T2DM and attention (P = .003), executive function (P = .032), and motor functioning (P = .008). Conclusion. The findings suggest additive contributions of T2DM and HF to impairments in attention, executive function, and motor function. Future work is needed to elucidate the mechanisms by which T2DM exacerbates cognitive impairment in HF. PMID:22701196

  14. Keeping the heart in balance: the functional interactions of myoglobin with nitrogen oxides.

    PubMed

    Flögel, Ulrich; Fago, Angela; Rassaf, Tienush

    2010-08-15

    Myoglobin (Mb) is an important intracellular oxygen-binding hemoprotein found in the cytoplasm of skeletal and cardiac muscle tissue playing a well-known role in O(2) storage and delivery. Within the last decade the knowledge about Mb's function has been considerably extended by the generation of myoglobin-deficient (myo(-/-)) mice, which for the first time enabled the analysis of Mb's role in physiology without pharmacological intervention. Utilizing the myo(-/-) mice, it has been demonstrated that beyond its function in O(2) supply Mb substantially contributes to nitric oxide (NO) homeostasis in the heart. By a dynamic cycle, in which a decrease in tissue O(2) tension drives the conversion of Mb from being a NO scavenger under normoxia to a NO producer during hypoxia, mitochondrial respiration is reversibly adapted to the intracellular O(2) tension. Therefore, Mb may act as an important O(2) sensor through which NO can regulate muscle energetics and function. As Mb is widespread throughout the fauna, the diverse oxygen-dependent interactions between Mb and nitrogen oxides may not only be of relevance for mammals but also for other vertebrates as evidenced by comparable phenotypes of 'artificial' (myo(-/-) mice) and 'natural' Mb knockouts (icefish and amphibians). In conclusion, it seems likely that Mb's multifunctional properties create an environment characterized by a tightly adapted aerobic mitochondrial respiration and low levels of free radicals, and thus serve an essential and beneficial role within the myocardium, which appears to be functionally important over a wide range of species.

  15. Congestive Heart Failure With Apparently Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function: A 10-Year Observational Study.

    PubMed

    El-Menyar, Ayman; Shabana, Adel; Arabi, Abdulrahman; Al-Thani, Hassan; Asaad, Nidal; AlBinALi, Hajar; Singh, Rajvir; Gomaa, Mohammed; Gehani, A

    2015-09-01

    We analyzed the clinical presentation and outcomes (from 2003 to 2013) of heart failure (HF) with apparently normal systolic function (HFPEF). Based on the echocardiographic left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), patients were divided into 2 groups, group 1 (<50%) and group 2 (≥50%). Of 2212 patients with HF, 20% were in group 2. Patients in group 2 were more likely to be older, females, Arabs, hypertensive, and obese (P = .001). Patients in group 1 were mostly Asians and had more troponin-T positivity (P = .001). Inhospital cardiac arrest, shock, and deaths were significantly greater in group 1. On multivariate analysis, age, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, lack of on-admission β-blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors use were independent predictors of mortality. HFPEF is associated with less mortality compared to those who presented with reduced LVEF. On admission, use of evidence-based medications could in part predict this difference in the hospital outcome.

  16. Superior Cardiac Function Via Anaplerotic Pyruvate in the Immature Swine Heart After Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Reperfusion

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Aaron; Hyyti, Outi M.; Cohen, Gordon A.; Ning, Xue-Han; Sadilek, Martin; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2008-12-01

    Pyruvate produces inotropic responses in the adult reperfused heart. Pyruvate oxidation and anaplerotic entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) via carboxylation are linked to stimulation of contractile function. The goals of this study were to determine if these metabolic pathways operate and are maintained in the developing myocardium after reperfusion. Immature male swine (age 10-18 days) were subjected to cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Intracoronary infusion of [2]-13C-pyruvate (to achieve a final concentration of 8 mM) was given for 35 minutes starting either during weaning (Group I), after discontinuation (Group II) or without (Control) CPB. Hemodynamic data was collected. 13C NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the fraction of pyruvate entering the CAC via pyruvate carboxylation (PC) to total CAC entry (PC plus decarboxlyation via pyruvate dehydrogenase). Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to determine total glutamate enrichment.

  17. Regulation of pumping function of the heart in developing body under changing regimens of motor activity.

    PubMed

    Vafina, E Z; Abzalov, R A; Abzalov, N I; Nikitin, A S; Gulyakov, A A

    2014-06-01

    We analyzed parameters of the pumping function of the heart in rats subjected to enhanced motor activity after a preliminary 70-day hypokinesia under conditions of α- and β-adrenergic receptor stimulation with norepinephrine followed by blockade of β-adrenergic receptor with propranolol (obsidian) and α1-adrenergic receptors with doxazosin. After norepinephrine administration, the HR and cardiac output were higher in rats with enhanced physical activity after preliminary hypokinesia than in rats with low physical activity. After propranolol administration, stroke volume and cardiac output in 100-day-old rats with limited activity were lower, and HR higher was than in rats with enhanced physical activity after preliminary 70-day hypokinesia. After administration of doxazosin, rats with limited motor activity demonstrated more pronounced changes in HR than rats with enhanced physical activity after preliminary 70-day hypokinesia. PMID:24970234

  18. Regulation of pumping function of the heart in developing body under changing regimens of motor activity.

    PubMed

    Vafina, E Z; Abzalov, R A; Abzalov, N I; Nikitin, A S; Gulyakov, A A

    2014-06-01

    We analyzed parameters of the pumping function of the heart in rats subjected to enhanced motor activity after a preliminary 70-day hypokinesia under conditions of α- and β-adrenergic receptor stimulation with norepinephrine followed by blockade of β-adrenergic receptor with propranolol (obsidian) and α1-adrenergic receptors with doxazosin. After norepinephrine administration, the HR and cardiac output were higher in rats with enhanced physical activity after preliminary hypokinesia than in rats with low physical activity. After propranolol administration, stroke volume and cardiac output in 100-day-old rats with limited activity were lower, and HR higher was than in rats with enhanced physical activity after preliminary 70-day hypokinesia. After administration of doxazosin, rats with limited motor activity demonstrated more pronounced changes in HR than rats with enhanced physical activity after preliminary 70-day hypokinesia.

  19. What physicians need to know about renal function in outpatients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Waldum-Grevbo, Bård

    2015-01-01

    The majority of outpatients with heart failure (HF) have chronic kidney disease (CKD) as an important comorbidity. Both glomerular filtration rate and abnormal urinary albumin excretion are major predictors of outcome in HF patients. Despite this, patients with renal dysfunction have been systematically excluded from the large randomized HF trials. There is lack of evidence for optimal treatment in these cardiorenal patients and treatment nihilism may account in part for their bad prognosis. Identifying and monitoring the progression of renal disease and making an effort to preserve renal function should be an important task in the management of all patients with HF. In this review, the current understanding of the pathophysiology of renal dysfunction in outpatients with HF will be summarized. Furthermore, important principles of the identification and management of cardiorenal patients will be described in order to make the physician more capable of managing outpatients with HF and renal dysfunction. PMID:25966919

  20. Learning discriminative distance functions for valve retrieval and improved decision support in valvular heart disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Ingmar; Vitanovski, Dime; Ionasec, Razvan I.; Tsymal, Alexey; Georgescu, Bogdan; Zhou, Shaohua K.; Huber, Martin; Navab, Nassir; Hornegger, Joachim; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2010-03-01

    Disorders of the heart valves constitute a considerable health problem and often require surgical intervention. Recently various approaches were published seeking to overcome the shortcomings of current clinical practice,that still relies on manually performed measurements for performance assessment. Clinical decisions are still based on generic information from clinical guidelines and publications and personal experience of clinicians. We present a framework for retrieval and decision support using learning based discriminative distance functions and visualization of patient similarity with relative neighborhood graphsbased on shape and derived features. We considered two learning based techniques, namely learning from equivalence constraints and the intrinsic Random Forest distance. The generic approach enables for learning arbitrary user-defined concepts of similarity depending on the application. This is demonstrated with the proposed applications, including automated diagnosis and interventional suitability classification, where classification rates of up to 88.9% and 85.9% could be observed on a set of valve models from 288 and 102 patients respectively.

  1. Effects of chronic methamphetamine exposure on heart function in uninfected and retrovirus-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qianli; Montes, Sergio; Larson, Douglas F; Watson, Ronald R

    2002-07-12

    Methamphetamine (MA) increases catecholamine levels, which have detrimental effects on heart function through vasoconstriction, myocardial hypertrophy, and fibrosis. Murine retrovirus infection induces dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). The present study investigated the cardiovascular effects of chronic MA treatment on uninfected and retrovirus-infected mice. C57BL/6 mice were studied after 12 weeks treatment. The four study groups were (group I) uninfected, MA placebo; (group II) infected, MA placebo; (group III) uninfected, MA treatment; and (group IV) infected and MA treatment. MA injections were given i.p. once a day for 5 days/week with a increasing dose from 15 mg/kg to 40 mg/kg. Left ventricular mechanics were measured in situ a using Millar conductance catheter system for pressure-volume loop analysis. Cardiac pathology was determined with histological analysis. In the uninfected mice, the load independent contractile parameters, pre-load recruitable stroke work (PRSW) and dP/dt(max) vs. Ved, significantly decreased by 32% and 35% in MA treated mice when compared to the saline injected mice. In retrovirus-infected mice, although there were no significant difference in Ees, PRSW, and dP/dt(max) vs. Ved due to MA treatment, they were increased 45%, 15% and 42% respectively when compared to saline treated mice. No further lowered heart function during murine AIDS may be due to the counteraction of the retroviral DCM and the MA induced myocardial fibrosis and hypertrophy (thickening of the ventricular walls). This is supported by increases in the End-diastolic volume (Ved, 38%) and End-systolic volume (Ves, 84%) in the retrovirus-infected saline injected mice, the decreases of 33% and 17% in the uninfected MA-treated mice, but no significant changes in the retrovirus-infected MA treated mice when compared to uninfected saline injected mice. These data suggest that MA induced myocardial cellular changes compensate for retrovirus induced DCM. PMID:12084392

  2. Beating heart on a chip: a novel microfluidic platform to generate functional 3D cardiac microtissues.

    PubMed

    Marsano, Anna; Conficconi, Chiara; Lemme, Marta; Occhetta, Paola; Gaudiello, Emanuele; Votta, Emiliano; Cerino, Giulia; Redaelli, Alberto; Rasponi, Marco

    2016-02-01

    In the past few years, microfluidic-based technology has developed microscale models recapitulating key physical and biological cues typical of the native myocardium. However, the application of controlled physiological uniaxial cyclic strains on a defined three-dimension cellular environment is not yet possible. Two-dimension mechanical stimulation was particularly investigated, neglecting the complex three-dimensional cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. For this purpose, we developed a heart-on-a-chip platform, which recapitulates the physiologic mechanical environment experienced by cells in the native myocardium. The device includes an array of hanging posts to confine cell-laden gels, and a pneumatic actuation system to induce homogeneous uniaxial cyclic strains to the 3D cell constructs during culture. The device was used to generate mature and highly functional micro-engineered cardiac tissues (μECTs), from both neonatal rat and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM), strongly suggesting the robustness of our engineered cardiac micro-niche. Our results demonstrated that the cyclic strain was effectively highly uniaxial and uniformly transferred to cells in culture. As compared to control, stimulated μECTs showed superior cardiac differentiation, as well as electrical and mechanical coupling, owing to a remarkable increase in junction complexes. Mechanical stimulation also promoted early spontaneous synchronous beating and better contractile capability in response to electric pacing. Pacing analyses of hiPSC-CM constructs upon controlled administration of isoprenaline showed further promising applications of our platform in drug discovery, delivery and toxicology fields. The proposed heart-on-a-chip device represents a relevant step forward in the field, providing a standard functional three-dimensional cardiac model to possibly predict signs of hypertrophic changes in cardiac phenotype by mechanical and biochemical co-stimulation.

  3. Beating heart on a chip: a novel microfluidic platform to generate functional 3D cardiac microtissues.

    PubMed

    Marsano, Anna; Conficconi, Chiara; Lemme, Marta; Occhetta, Paola; Gaudiello, Emanuele; Votta, Emiliano; Cerino, Giulia; Redaelli, Alberto; Rasponi, Marco

    2016-02-01

    In the past few years, microfluidic-based technology has developed microscale models recapitulating key physical and biological cues typical of the native myocardium. However, the application of controlled physiological uniaxial cyclic strains on a defined three-dimension cellular environment is not yet possible. Two-dimension mechanical stimulation was particularly investigated, neglecting the complex three-dimensional cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. For this purpose, we developed a heart-on-a-chip platform, which recapitulates the physiologic mechanical environment experienced by cells in the native myocardium. The device includes an array of hanging posts to confine cell-laden gels, and a pneumatic actuation system to induce homogeneous uniaxial cyclic strains to the 3D cell constructs during culture. The device was used to generate mature and highly functional micro-engineered cardiac tissues (μECTs), from both neonatal rat and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CM), strongly suggesting the robustness of our engineered cardiac micro-niche. Our results demonstrated that the cyclic strain was effectively highly uniaxial and uniformly transferred to cells in culture. As compared to control, stimulated μECTs showed superior cardiac differentiation, as well as electrical and mechanical coupling, owing to a remarkable increase in junction complexes. Mechanical stimulation also promoted early spontaneous synchronous beating and better contractile capability in response to electric pacing. Pacing analyses of hiPSC-CM constructs upon controlled administration of isoprenaline showed further promising applications of our platform in drug discovery, delivery and toxicology fields. The proposed heart-on-a-chip device represents a relevant step forward in the field, providing a standard functional three-dimensional cardiac model to possibly predict signs of hypertrophic changes in cardiac phenotype by mechanical and biochemical co

  4. Functional and biochemical responses of cultured heart cells to angiotensin II

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, I.; Gaa, S.; Rogers, T.B.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have utilized a cultured neonatal rat heart myocyte system to study the molecular mechanisms involved in the stimulation of heart cells by angiotensin II (AII). The intact cultured cells, and membranes from these cells, have specific, high affinity receptors for /sup 125/I-AII and for an AII antagonist, /sup 125/I-Sar/sup 1/,Leu/sup 8/-AII. Binding affinity was in the nanomolar range and was inhibited by guanine nucleotides. Functional studies on intact, beating cells revealed a maximal increase in contractile frequency of 50%, observed at 5 nM AII, with half maximal effects noted at around 1 nM. These responses were reversible and specific as the antagonist, Sar/sup 1/, Ala/sup 8/-AII, inhibited AII-induced chronotropic stimulation. AII (100 nM) had no effect on basal adenylate cyclase activity (20 pmoles cAMP/mg prot/min at 2.5mM Mg/sup 2 +/) in cell membranes. Further, in membranes where cyclase activity was stimulated with isoproterenol (290 pmoles cAMP/mg prot/min at 2.5mM Mg/sup 2 +/), addition of AII had no effect. The cyclase-inhibitory muscarinic agonist, carbachol, also failed to reduce isoproterenol-stimulated activity. In preliminary work with the intact cells, AII again did not alter basal cAMP levels (3-10 pmoles cAMP/mg prot). However, the hormone increased isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP levels by almost 50%. These cells are an excellent system for correlating AII receptor binding with functional and biochemical responses.

  5. Thrombocytosis in the Setting of Isomerism and a Functionally Univentricular Heart

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Bodily isomerism, also known as heterotaxy, is a unique entity in which there is mirror imagery in various organ systems. Those with isomerism will often have congenital malformations of the heart requiring functionally univentricular palliation. Anecdotally, thrombocytosis has been noted with higher frequency in patients with isomerism. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of thrombocytosis at different stages and identify independent predictors of thrombocytosis. Methods We identified patients with isomerism and a functionally univentricular heart who received care at our institution between January 1998 and January 2014. Clinical data regarding these patients was collected via chart review. Platelet counts were collected before initial surgical palliation, the day prior to second surgical palliation, and the day prior to the third surgical palliation. Platelet counts from the first postoperative day following all three surgical palliations was also collected. Mean platelet counts were compared between consecutive stages as well as to the initial platelet count. The frequency of thrombocytosis was also calculated at each point with a binomial logistic regression conducted to determine independent risk factors of thrombocytosis at each time point. Results A total of 57 patients were included in the analysis. The mean platelet count before initial surgical palliation was 349.21 x 109/L and decreased with age. Thrombocytosis was noted in 15.8% prior to initial surgical palliation and 23.6% prior to second surgical palliation. Thrombocytosis was no longer noted after second surgical palliation. No independent risk factors for thrombocytosis were identified. Conclusion Thrombocytosis is not infrequent during the first year of life in those with isomerism. It is important to be vigilant of platelet counts in this population as thrombocytosis may lead to increased thromboembolic events, particularly in the setting of a Blalock-Taussig shunt

  6. Thrombocytosis in the Setting of Isomerism and a Functionally Univentricular Heart.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Rohit

    2015-11-19

    Introduction Bodily isomerism, also known as heterotaxy, is a unique entity in which there is mirror imagery in various organ systems. Those with isomerism will often have congenital malformations of the heart requiring functionally univentricular palliation. Anecdotally, thrombocytosis has been noted with higher frequency in patients with isomerism. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of thrombocytosis at different stages and identify independent predictors of thrombocytosis. Methods We identified patients with isomerism and a functionally univentricular heart who received care at our institution between January 1998 and January 2014. Clinical data regarding these patients was collected via chart review. Platelet counts were collected before initial surgical palliation, the day prior to second surgical palliation, and the day prior to the third surgical palliation. Platelet counts from the first postoperative day following all three surgical palliations was also collected. Mean platelet counts were compared between consecutive stages as well as to the initial platelet count. The frequency of thrombocytosis was also calculated at each point with a binomial logistic regression conducted to determine independent risk factors of thrombocytosis at each time point. Results A total of 57 patients were included in the analysis. The mean platelet count before initial surgical palliation was 349.21 x 10(9)/L and decreased with age. Thrombocytosis was noted in 15.8% prior to initial surgical palliation and 23.6% prior to second surgical palliation. Thrombocytosis was no longer noted after second surgical palliation. No independent risk factors for thrombocytosis were identified. Conclusion Thrombocytosis is not infrequent during the first year of life in those with isomerism. It is important to be vigilant of platelet counts in this population as thrombocytosis may lead to increased thromboembolic events, particularly in the setting of a Blalock-Taussig shunt

  7. Time of day affects heart rate recovery and variability after maximal exercise in pre-hypertensive men.

    PubMed

    Brito, Leandro; Peçanha, Tiago; Tinucci, Taís; Silva-Junior, Natan; Costa, Luiz; Forjaz, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate (HR) recovery (HRR) and variability (HRV) after exercise are non-invasive tools used to assess cardiac autonomic regulation and cardiovascular prognosis. Autonomic recovery is slower after evening than morning exercise in healthy individuals, but this influence is unknown in subjects with autonomic dysfunction, although it may affect prognostic evaluation. This study compared post-exercise HRR and HRV after maximal morning and evening exercise in pre-hypertensive men. Ten volunteers randomly underwent two maximal exercise tests conducted in the morning (8-10 a.m.) and evening (6-8 p.m.). HRR60s (HR reduction at 60 s of recovery - prognostic index), T30 (short-term time-constant of HRR - parasympathetic reactivation marker), rMSSD30s (square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent R-R intervals on subsequent 30 s segments - parasympathetic reactivation marker), and HRRτ (time constant of the first order exponential fitting of HRR - marker of sympathetic withdraw and parasympathetic reactivation) were measured. Paired t-test and two-way ANOVA were used. HRR60s and HRRτ were similar after exercise in the morning and evening (27 ± 7 vs. 29 ± 7 bpm, p = 0.111, and 79 ± 14 vs. 96 ± 29 s, p = 0.119, respectively). T30 was significantly greater after evening exercise (405 ± 215 vs. 295 ± 119 s, p = 0.002) and rMSSD30s was lower in the evening (main factor session, p = 0.009). In conclusion, in pre-hypertensive men, the prognostic index of HRR, HRR60s, is not affected by the time of day when exercise is conducted. However, post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation, evaluated by T30 and rMSSD30s, is blunted after evening exercise. PMID:26588261

  8. Morphology of the heart associated with its function as conceived by ancient Greeks.

    PubMed

    Mavrodi, Alexandra; Paraskevas, George

    2014-03-01

    According to their writings, ancient Greek physicians had explored the anatomy of the heart. Although pre-Hippocratic medicine, which relied on religion and mysticism, has nothing more to present than implausible theories and speculations, younger physicians thanks to their animal dissections were able to depict the heart with detail. Hippocratic "On the Heart", Aristotle's, Herophilus', Erasistratus' and Galen's writings provide us with the necessary data to take a look at the anatomy of the heart as it was described back then. Despite of some confusing passages in their writings and some erroneous notions, the heart was described with relative accuracy. In the years after antiquity and in the Middle Age the only information about the anatomy of the heart could be derived from the ancient Greek works and only anatomists of the Renaissance managed to displace them. In this paper we present the knowledge of all known ancient Greek physicians about the heart, with emphasis on its anatomy.

  9. Telomerase deficiency affects normal brain functions in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaehoon; Jo, Yong Sang; Sung, Young Hoon; Hwang, In Koo; Kim, Hyuk; Kim, Song-Yi; Yi, Sun Shin; Choi, June-Seek; Sun, Woong; Seong, Je Kyung; Lee, Han-Woong

    2010-02-01

    Telomerase maintains telomere structures and chromosome stability, and it is essential for preserving the characteristics of stem and progenitor cells. In the brain, the hippocampus and the olfactory bulbs are continuously supplied with neural stem and progenitor cells that are required for adult neurogenesis throughout the life. Therefore, we examined whether telomerase plays important roles in maintaining normal brain functions in vivo. Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) expression was observed in the hippocampus, the olfactory bulbs, and the cerebellum, but the telomerase RNA component (TERC) was not detected in hippocampus and olfactory bulbs. Interestingly, TERT-deficient mice exhibited significantly altered anxiety-like behaviors and abnormal olfaction measuring the functions of the hippocampus and the olfactory bulbs, respectively. However, the cerebellum-dependent behavior was not changed in these mutant mice. These results suggest that TERT is constitutively expressed in the hippocampus and the olfactory bulbs, and that it is important for regulating normal brain functions. PMID:19685288

  10. Fetal urinoma and prenatal hydronephrosis: how is renal function affected?

    PubMed Central

    Oktar, Tayfun; Salabaş, Emre; Kalelioğlu, İbrahim; Atar, Arda; Ander, Haluk; Ziylan, Orhan; Has, Recep; Yüksel, Atıl

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In our study, the functional prognosis of kidneys with prenatal urinomas were investigated. Material and methods: Between 2006 and 2010, fetal urinomas were detected in 19 fetuses using prenatal ultrasonography (US), and the medical records were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 19 cases, the follow-up data were available for 10 fetuses. The gestational age at diagnosis, prognosis of urinomas, clinical course and renal functions were recorded. Postnatal renal functions were assessed with renal scintigraphy. Results: Unilateral urinomas and increased parenchyma echogenicity in the ipsilateral kidney were detected in all of the fetuses. Of the 10 fetuses with follow-up data, the option of termination was offered in 6 cases of anhydramnios, including 3 cases with signs of infravesical obstruction (a possible posterior urethral valve (PUV) and poor prognostic factors and 3 cases with unilateral hydronephrosis and increased echogenicity in the contralateral kidney. Only one family agreed the termination. The other 5 fetuses died during the early postnatal period. The average postnatal follow-up period in the 4 surviving fetuses was 22.5 months (8–38 months). One patient with a PUV underwent ablation surgery during the early postnatal period. In the postnatal period, none of the 4 kidneys that were ipsilateral to the urinoma were functional on scintigraphic evaluation. The urinomas disappeared in 3 cases. Nephrectomy was performed in one case due to recurrent urinary tract infections. Conclusion: In our study, no function was detected in the ipsilateral kidney of surviving patients with urinomas. Upper urinary tract dilatation accompanied by a urinoma is a poor prognostic factor for renal function. PMID:26328088

  11. Correlations Between Echocardiographic Systolic and Diastolic Function with Cardiac Catheterization in Biventricular Congenital Heart Patients.

    PubMed

    Nadorlik, H; Stiver, C; Khan, S; Miao, Y; Holzer, R; Cheatham, J P; Cua, C L

    2016-04-01

    Newer echocardiographic techniques may allow for more accurate assessment of left ventricular (LV) function. Adult studies have correlated these echocardiographic measurements with invasive data, but minimal data exist in the pediatric congenital heart population. Purpose of this study was to evaluate which echocardiographic measurements correlated best with LV systolic and diastolic catheterization parameters. Patients with two-ventricle physiology who underwent simultaneous echocardiogram and cardiac catheterization were included. Images were obtained in the four-chamber view. LV systolic echocardiographic data included ejection fraction, displacement, tissue Doppler imaging (TDI) s' wave, global longitudinal strain, and strain rate (SR) s' wave. Diastolic echocardiographic data included mitral E and A waves, TDI e' and a' waves, and SRe' and SRa' waves. E/TDI e', TDI e'/TDI a', E/SRe', and SRe'/SRa' ratios were also calculated. Catheterization dP/dt was used as a marker for systolic function, and LV end-diastolic pressure (EDP) was used as a marker for diastolic function. Correlations of the echocardiographic and catheterization values were performed using Pearson correlation. Twenty-nine patients were included (14 females, 15 males). Median age at catheterization was 3.4 years (0.04-17.4 years). dP/dt was 1258 ± 353 mmHg/s, and LVEDP was 10.8 ± 2.4 mmHg. There were no significant correlations between catheterization dP/dt and systolic echocardiographic parameters. LVEDP correlated significantly with SRe' (r = -0.4, p = 0.03), SRa' (r = -0.4, p = 0.03), and E/SRe' (r = 0.5, p = 0.004). In pediatric congenital heart patients, catheterization dP/dt did not correlate with echocardiographic measurements of LV systolic function. Further studies are needed to determine which echocardiographic parameter best describes LV systolic function in this population. Strain rate analysis significantly correlated with LVEDP. Strain rate analysis should be considered as an

  12. Cardiac-Restricted Expression of VCP/TER94 RNAi or Disease Alleles Perturbs Drosophila Heart Structure and Impairs Function

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Meera C.; Blice-Baum, Anna C.; Sang, Tzu-Kang; Cammarato, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Valosin-containing protein (VCP) is a highly conserved mechanoenzyme that helps maintain protein homeostasis in all cells and serves specialized functions in distinct cell types. In skeletal muscle, it is critical for myofibrillogenesis and atrophy. However, little is known about VCP's role(s) in the heart. Its functional diversity is determined by differential binding of distinct cofactors/adapters, which is likely disrupted during disease. VCP mutations cause multisystem proteinopathy (MSP), a pleiotropic degenerative disorder that involves inclusion body myopathy. MSP patients display progressive muscle weakness. They also exhibit cardiomyopathy and die from cardiac and respiratory failure, which are consistent with critical myocardial roles for the enzyme. Nonetheless, efficient models to interrogate VCP in cardiac muscle remain underdeveloped and poorly studied. Here, we investigated the significance of VCP and mutant VCP in the Drosophila heart. Cardiac-restricted RNAi-mediated knockdown of TER94, the Drosophila VCP homolog, severely perturbed myofibrillar organization and heart function in adult flies. Furthermore, expression of MSP disease-causing alleles engendered cardiomyopathy in adults and structural defects in embryonic hearts. Drosophila may therefore serve as a valuable model for examining role(s) of VCP in cardiogenesis and for identifying novel heart-specific VCP interactions, which when disrupted via mutation, contribute to or elicit cardiac pathology. PMID:27500162

  13. SIRT1 Functions as an Important Regulator of Estrogen-Mediated Cardiomyocyte Protection in Angiotensin II-Induced Heart Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Tao; Ding, Ling; Ruan, Yang; Qin, Weiwei; Lin, Yajun; Xi, Chao; Lu, Yonggang; Dou, Lin; Zhu, Yuping; Cao, Yuan; Man, Yong; Bian, Yunfei; Wang, Shu; Xiao, Chuanshi; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Background. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a member of the sirtuin family, which could activate cell survival machinery and has been shown to be protective in regulation of heart function. Here, we determined the mechanism by which SIRT1 regulates Angiotensin II- (AngII-) induced cardiac hypertrophy and injury in vivo and in vitro. Methods. We analyzed SIRT1 expression in the hearts of control and AngII-induced mouse hypertrophy. Female C57BL/6 mice were ovariectomized and pretreated with 17β-estradiol to measure SIRT1 expression. Protein synthesis, cardiomyocyte surface area analysis, qRT-PCR, TUNEL staining, and Western blot were performed on AngII-induced mouse heart hypertrophy samples and cultured neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs) to investigate the function of SIRT1. Results. SIRT1 expression was slightly upregulated in AngII-induced mouse heart hypertrophy in vivo and in vitro, accompanied by elevated cardiomyocyte apoptosis. SIRT1 overexpression relieves AngII-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis. 17β-Estradiol was able to protect cardiomyocytes from AngII-induced injury with a profound upregulation of SIRT1 and activation of AMPK. Moreover, estrogen receptor inhibitor ICI 182,780 and SIRT1 inhibitor niacinamide could block SIRT1's protective effect. Conclusions. These results indicate that SIRT1 functions as an important regulator of estrogen-mediated cardiomyocyte protection during AngII-induced heart hypertrophy and injury. PMID:25614777

  14. Chemical Modifications that Affect Nutritional and Functional Properties of Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, T.; Kester, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses chemical alterations of selected amino acids resulting from environmental effects (photooxidations, pH extremes, thermally induced effects). Also dicusses use of intentional chemical derivatizations of various functional groups in amino acid residue side chains and how recombinant DNA techniques might be useful in structure/function…

  15. Drying process strongly affects probiotics viability and functionalities.

    PubMed

    Iaconelli, Cyril; Lemetais, Guillaume; Kechaou, Noura; Chain, Florian; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Langella, Philippe; Gervais, Patrick; Beney, Laurent

    2015-11-20

    Probiotic formulations are widely used and are proposed to have a variety of beneficial effects, depending on the probiotic strains present in the product. The impact of drying processes on the viability of probiotics is well documented. However, the impact of these processes on probiotics functionality remains unclear. In this work, we investigated variations in seven different bacterial markers after various desiccation processes. Markers were composed of four different viability evaluation (combining two growth abilities and two cytometric measurements) and in three in vitro functionalities: stimulation of IL-10 and IL-12 production by PBMCs (immunomodulation) and bacterial adhesion to hexadecane. We measured the impact of three drying processes (air-drying, freeze-drying and spray-drying), without the use of protective agents, on three types of probiotic bacteria: Bifidobacterium bifidum, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus zeae. Our results show that the bacteria respond differently to the three different drying processes, in terms of viability and functionality. Drying methods produce important variations in bacterial immunomodulation and hydrophobicity, which are correlated. We also show that adherence can be stimulated (air-drying) or inhibited (spray-drying) by drying processes. Results of a multivariate analysis show no direct correlation between bacterial survival and functionality, but do show a correlation between probiotic responses to desiccation-rewetting and the process used to dry the bacteria.

  16. [A failed improvement in pulmonary function and exercise capacity with carvedilol in congestive heart failure despite an excellent effect on left ventricular function].

    PubMed

    Guazzi, M; Pontone, G; Trevisi, N; Lomanto, M; Matturri, M; Agostoni, P

    1998-02-01

    This study was aimed at investigating in chronic heart failure (CHF) the effects that beta-blockade with carvedilol may have on lung function, and their relationship with left ventricular (LV) performance and peak exercise oxygen uptake (VO2p). CHF causes disturbances in ventilation and pulmonary gas transfer (stress failure of alveolar-capillary membrane) that participate in limiting VO2p. Carvedilol improves LV function and not VO2p. Twenty-one NYHA functional class II-III patients were randomized (2 to 1) to carvedilol (25 mg bid., 14 patients) or placebo (7 patients) for 6 months. Rest forced expiratory volume (FEV1), vital capacity (VC), total lung capacity (TLC), carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLCO), its alveolar-capillary membrane component (DM), pulmonary venous and transmitral flows (for monitoring changes in LV end-diastolic pressure, EDP), LV diastolic (EDD) and systolic (ESD) dimensions, stroke volume (SV), ejection fraction (EF), fiber shortening velocity (VCF) were measured at baseline and at 3 and 6 months. VO2p, peak ratio of dead space to tidal volume (VD/VTp), ventilatory equivalent for CO2 production (VE/VCO2), VO2 at anaerobic threshold (VO2at) were also determined. FEV1, VC, TLC, DLCO, DM were impaired in CHF compared to 14 volunteers, and did not vary with treatment. Carvedilol reduced EDP, EDD, ESD, and increased EF, SV, VCF, without affecting VO2p, VO2at, VD/VTp, VE/VCO2, at 3 and 6 months. Placebo was ineffective. In CHF, carvedilol exerts neutral effects on ventilation and pulmonary gas transfer and ameliorates LV function at rest. This proves that antifailure treatment may not be similarly effective on cardiac and pulmonary function; and does not contradict the possibility that persistence of lung impairment may contribute to lack of improvement in exercise performance with carvedilol.

  17. Genetic and functional analyses of ZIC3 variants in congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Jason; Tariq, Muhammad; Ware, Stephanie M.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in zinc-finger in cerebellum 3 (ZIC3) result in heterotaxy or isolated congenital heart disease (CHD). The majority of reported mutations cluster in zinc-finger domains. We previously demonstrated that many of these lead to aberrant ZIC3 subcellular trafficking. A relative paucity of N- and C-terminal mutations has, however, prevented similar analyses in these regions. Notably, an N-terminal polyalanine expansion was recently identified in a patient with VACTERL, suggesting a potentially distinct function for this domain. Here, we report ZIC3 sequencing results from 440 unrelated patients with heterotaxy and CHD, the largest cohort yet examined. Variants were identified in 5.2% of sporadic male cases. This rate exceeds previous estimates of 1% and has important clinical implications for genetic testing and risk-based counseling. Eight of 11 were novel, including 5 N-terminal variants. Subsequent functional analyses included 4 additional reported but untested variants. Aberrant cytoplasmic localization and decreased luciferase transactivation were observed for all zinc-finger variants, but not for downstream or in-frame upstream variants, including both analyzed polyalanine expansions. Collectively, these results expand the ZIC3 mutational spectrum, support a higher than expected prevalence in sporadic cases, and suggest alternative functions for terminal mutations, highlighting a need for further study of these domains. PMID:24123890

  18. Novel heart rate parameters for the assessment of autonomic nervous system function in premature infants.

    PubMed

    Lucchini, M; Fifer, W P; Sahni, R; Signorini, M G

    2016-09-01

    Autonomic nervous system (ANS) balance is a key factor in homeostatic control of cardiac activity, breathing and certain reflex reactions such as coughing, sneezing and swallowing and thus plays a crucial role for survival. ANS impairment has been related to many neonatal pathologies, including sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Moreover, some conditions have been identified as risk factors for SIDS, such as prone sleep position. There is an urgent need for timely and non-invasive assessment of ANS function in at-risk infants. Systematic measurement of heart rate variability (HRV) offers an optimal approach to access indirectly both sympathetic and parasympathetic influences on ANS functioning. In this paper, data from premature infants collected in a sleep physiology laboratory in the NICU are presented: traditional and novel approaches to HRV analyses are applied and compared in order to evaluate their relative merits in the assessment of ANS activity and the influence of sleep position. Indices from time domain and nonlinear approaches contributed as markers of physiological development in premature infants. Moreover, significant differences were observed as a function of sleep position. PMID:27480495

  19. Aerobic Exercise as an Adjunct Therapy for Improving Cognitive Function in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gary, Rebecca A.; Brunn, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Persons with heart failure (HF) are typically older and are at a much higher risk for developing cognitive impairment (CI) than persons without HF. Increasingly, CI is recognized as a significant, independent predictor of worse clinical outcomes, more frequent hospital readmissions, and higher mortality rates in persons with HF. CI can have devastating effects on ability to carry out HF effective self-care behaviors. If CI occurs, however, there are currently no evidence based guidelines on how to manage or improve cognitive function in this population. Improvement in cognition has been reported following some therapies in HF and is thought to be the consequence of enhanced cerebral perfusion and oxygenation, suggesting that CI may be amenable to intervention. Because there is substantial neuronal loss with dementia and no effective restorative therapies, interventions that slow, reverse, or prevent cognitive decline are essential. Aerobic exercise is documented to increase cerebral perfusion and oxygenation by promoting neuroplasticity and neurogenesis and, in turn, cognitive functioning. Few studies have examined exercise as a potential adjunct therapy for attenuating or alleviating cognitive decline in HF. In this review, the potential benefit of aerobic exercise on cognitive functioning in HF is presented along with future research directions. PMID:25105053

  20. Dynamic regulation of heart rate during acute hypotension: new insight into baroreflex function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, R.; Behbehani, K.; Crandall, C. G.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Levine, B. D.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    To examine the dynamic properties of baroreflex function, we measured beat-to-beat changes in arterial blood pressure (ABP) and heart rate (HR) during acute hypotension induced by thigh cuff deflation in 10 healthy subjects under supine resting conditions and during progressive lower body negative pressure (LBNP). The quantitative, temporal relationship between ABP and HR was fitted by a second-order autoregressive (AR) model. The frequency response was evaluated by transfer function analysis. Results: HR changes during acute hypotension appear to be controlled by an ABP error signal between baseline and induced hypotension. The quantitative relationship between changes in ABP and HR is characterized by a second-order AR model with a pure time delay of 0.75 s containing low-pass filter properties. During LBNP, the change in HR/change in ABP during induced hypotension significantly decreased, as did the numerator coefficients of the AR model and transfer function gain. Conclusions: 1) Beat-to-beat HR responses to dynamic changes in ABP may be controlled by an error signal rather than directional changes in pressure, suggesting a "set point" mechanism in short-term ABP control. 2) The quantitative relationship between dynamic changes in ABP and HR can be described by a second-order AR model with a pure time delay. 3) The ability of the baroreflex to evoke a HR response to transient changes in pressure was reduced during LBNP, which was due primarily to a reduction of the static gain of the baroreflex.

  1. Effects of moderate heart failure and functional overload on rat plantaris muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spangenburg, Espen E.; Lees, Simon J.; Otis, Jeff S.; Musch, Timothy I.; Talmadge, Robert J.; Williams, Jay H.

    2002-01-01

    It is thought that changes in sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) of skeletal muscle contribute to alterations in skeletal muscle function during congestive heart failure (CHF). It is well established that exercise training can improve muscle function. However, it is unclear whether similar adaptations will result from exercise training in a CHF patient. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether skeletal muscle during moderate CHF adapts to increased activity, utilizing the functional overload (FO) model. Significant increases in plantaris mass of the CHF-FO and sham-FO groups compared with the CHF and control (sham) groups were observed. Ca(2+) uptake rates were significantly elevated in the CHF group compared with all other groups. No differences were detected in Ca(2+) uptake rates between the CHF-FO, sham, and sham-FO groups. Increases in Ca(2+) uptake rates in moderate-CHF rats were not due to changes in SERCA isoform proportions; however, FO may have attenuated the CHF-induced increases through alterations in SERCA isoform expression. Therefore, changes in skeletal muscle Ca(2+) handling during moderate CHF may be due to alterations in regulatory mechanisms, which exercise may override, by possibly altering SERCA isoform expression.

  2. Non-Invasive Evaluation of Heart Function with Four-Dimensional Echocardiography

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ran; Zhu, Meihua; Sahn, David J.; Ashraf, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study is to assess the accuracy and feasibility of left ventricular systolic function determined by four-dimensional echocardiography (4DE). Methods Latex balloons were sewn into the left ventricle (LV) of 20 freshly harvested pig hearts which were then passively driven by a pulsatile pump apparatus. Global longitudinal strain (GLS), global circumferential strain (GCS), global area strain (GAS) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) derived from 4DEand two-dimensional echocardiography (2DE)-derived LVEF were quantified at different stroke volumes (SV) 30–70 ml and correlated with sonomicrometry data. Results In all comparisons, GLS, GCS, GAS, 2DE-LVEF, and 4DE-LVEF demonstrated strong correlations with sonomicrometry data (r = 0.77, r = 0.89, r = 0.79, r = 0.93, r = 0.96, all P <0.001). Bland-Altman analyses showed slight overestimations of echo-derived GLS, GCS, 2DE-LVEF and 3DE-LVEF over sonomicrometry values (bias = 2.88, bias = 3.99, bias = 3.37, bias = 2.78, respectively). Furthermore, there is better agreement between GCS, 4D LVEF and sonomicrometry values compared with GLS and 2D LVEF. Conclusion Four-dimensional echocardiography accurately assesses LV function. GCS derived by 4DE is a potential alternative parameter to quantify LV systolic function. PMID:27144844

  3. Heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  4. Expression and Function of Ccbe1 in the Chick Early Cardiogenic Regions Are Required for Correct Heart Development

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Elizabeth; Inácio, José Manuel; Belo, José António

    2014-01-01

    During the course of a differential screen to identify transcripts specific for chick heart/hemangioblast precursor cells, we have identified Ccbe1 (Collagen and calcium-binding EGF-like domain 1). While the importance of Ccbe1 for the development of the lymphatic system is now well demonstrated, its role in cardiac formation remained unknown. Here we show by whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis that cCcbe1 mRNA is initially detected in early cardiac progenitors of the two bilateral cardiogenic fields (HH4), and at later stages on the second heart field (HH9-18). Furthermore, cCcbe1 is expressed in multipotent and highly proliferative cardiac progenitors. We characterized the role of cCcbe1 during early cardiogenesis by performing functional studies. Upon morpholino-induced cCcbe1 knockdown, the chick embryos displayed heart malformations, which include aberrant fusion of the heart fields, leading to incomplete terminal differentiation of the cardiomyocytes. cCcbe1 overexpression also resulted in severe heart defects, including cardia bifida. Altogether, our data demonstrate that although cardiac progenitors cells are specified in cCcbe1 morphants, the migration and proliferation of cardiac precursors cells are impaired, suggesting that cCcbe1 is a key gene during early heart development. PMID:25545279

  5. SLE-associated risk factors affect DC function.

    PubMed

    Son, Myoungsun; Kim, Sun Jung; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Numerous risk alleles for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have now been identified. Analysis of the expression of genes with risk alleles in cells of hematopoietic origin demonstrates them to be most abundantly expressed in B cells and dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that these cell types may be the drivers of the inflammatory changes seen in SLE. DCs are of particular interest as they act to connect the innate and the adaptive immune response. Thus, DCs can transform inflammation into autoimmunity, and autoantibodies are the hallmark of SLE. In this review, we focus on mechanisms of tolerance that maintain DCs in a non-activated, non-immunogenic state. We demonstrate, using examples from our own studies, how alterations in DC function stemming from either DC-intrinsic abnormalities or DC-extrinsic regulators of function can predispose to autoimmunity.

  6. SLE-associated risk factors affect DC function.

    PubMed

    Son, Myoungsun; Kim, Sun Jung; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Numerous risk alleles for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have now been identified. Analysis of the expression of genes with risk alleles in cells of hematopoietic origin demonstrates them to be most abundantly expressed in B cells and dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that these cell types may be the drivers of the inflammatory changes seen in SLE. DCs are of particular interest as they act to connect the innate and the adaptive immune response. Thus, DCs can transform inflammation into autoimmunity, and autoantibodies are the hallmark of SLE. In this review, we focus on mechanisms of tolerance that maintain DCs in a non-activated, non-immunogenic state. We demonstrate, using examples from our own studies, how alterations in DC function stemming from either DC-intrinsic abnormalities or DC-extrinsic regulators of function can predispose to autoimmunity. PMID:26683148

  7. SLE-associated risk factors affect DC function

    PubMed Central

    Son, Myoungsun; Kim, Sun Jung; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    Numerous risk alleles for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have now been identified. Analysis of the expression of genes with risk alleles in cells of hematopoietic origin demonstrates them to be most abundantly expressed in B cells and dendritic cells (DCs), suggesting that these cell types may be the drivers of the inflammatory changes seen in SLE. DCs are of particular interest as they act to connect the innate and the adaptive immune response. Thus, DCs can transform inflammation into autoimmunity, and autoantibodies are the hallmark of SLE. In this review, we focus on mechanisms of tolerance that maintain DCs in a non-activated, non-immunogenic state. We demonstrate, using examples from our own studies, how alterations in DC function stemming from either DC-intrinsic abnormalities or DC-extrinsic regulators of function can predispose to autoimmunity. PMID:26683148

  8. Fluoroscopy-based method to determine heart geometry for functional imaging of cardiac electrical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanem, Raja N.; Ramanathan, Charulatha; Jia, Ping; Rudy, Yoram

    2003-05-01

    A fluoroscopy based method for determining heart surface geometry has been developed and validated in phantom and human studies. Biplane fluoroscopic projections were calibrated independently. The heart contour was segmented in each projection and corresponding contour points were matched using epipolar geometry. Points in 3D were reconstructed from the corresponding contour points using point reconstruction. B-splines were approximated from the reconstructed points and meshed to form the heart surface. The fluoroscopy-reconstructed heart was validated in a phantom and human study by comparison to CT imaging. Mean, minimum, maximum and standard deviation of the absolute distance errors were computed for the fluoroscopy-reconstructed heart relative to the CT heart. The mean absolute distance error for the phantom was 4mm. The mean absolute distance error for the human subject was 10 mm. In addition to validating the geometry, we also evaluated in the human subject the feasibility of noninvasive imaging of normal cardiac electrical activity on the fluoroscopy-reconstructed heart by comparing the results to those obtained on the CT heart. Noninvasive images on the fluoroscopy-reconstructed heart by showed close correlation with those obtained on the CT heart (CC=0.70).

  9. Prenatal drug exposure affects neonatal brain functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Salzwedel, Andrew P; Grewen, Karen M; Vachet, Clement; Gerig, Guido; Lin, Weili; Gao, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Prenatal drug exposure, particularly prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE), incurs great public and scientific interest because of its associated neurodevelopmental consequences. However, the neural underpinnings of PCE remain essentially uncharted, and existing studies in school-aged children and adolescents are confounded greatly by postnatal environmental factors. In this study, leveraging a large neonate sample (N = 152) and non-invasive resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared human infants with PCE comorbid with other drugs (such as nicotine, alcohol, marijuana, and antidepressant) with infants with similar non-cocaine poly drug exposure and drug-free controls. We aimed to characterize the neural correlates of PCE based on functional connectivity measurements of the amygdala and insula at the earliest stage of development. Our results revealed common drug exposure-related connectivity disruptions within the amygdala-frontal, insula-frontal, and insula-sensorimotor circuits. Moreover, a cocaine-specific effect was detected within a subregion of the amygdala-frontal network. This pathway is thought to play an important role in arousal regulation, which has been shown to be irregular in PCE infants and adolescents. These novel results provide the earliest human-based functional delineations of the neural-developmental consequences of prenatal drug exposure and thus open a new window for the advancement of effective strategies aimed at early risk identification and intervention.

  10. Prenatal drug exposure affects neonatal brain functional connectivity.

    PubMed

    Salzwedel, Andrew P; Grewen, Karen M; Vachet, Clement; Gerig, Guido; Lin, Weili; Gao, Wei

    2015-04-01

    Prenatal drug exposure, particularly prenatal cocaine exposure (PCE), incurs great public and scientific interest because of its associated neurodevelopmental consequences. However, the neural underpinnings of PCE remain essentially uncharted, and existing studies in school-aged children and adolescents are confounded greatly by postnatal environmental factors. In this study, leveraging a large neonate sample (N = 152) and non-invasive resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, we compared human infants with PCE comorbid with other drugs (such as nicotine, alcohol, marijuana, and antidepressant) with infants with similar non-cocaine poly drug exposure and drug-free controls. We aimed to characterize the neural correlates of PCE based on functional connectivity measurements of the amygdala and insula at the earliest stage of development. Our results revealed common drug exposure-related connectivity disruptions within the amygdala-frontal, insula-frontal, and insula-sensorimotor circuits. Moreover, a cocaine-specific effect was detected within a subregion of the amygdala-frontal network. This pathway is thought to play an important role in arousal regulation, which has been shown to be irregular in PCE infants and adolescents. These novel results provide the earliest human-based functional delineations of the neural-developmental consequences of prenatal drug exposure and thus open a new window for the advancement of effective strategies aimed at early risk identification and intervention. PMID:25855194

  11. Nuclear cyclophilins affect spliceosome assembly and function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Adams, B M; Coates, Miranda N; Jackson, S RaElle; Jurica, Melissa S; Davis, Tara L

    2015-07-15

    Cyclophilins are ubiquitously expressed proteins that bind to prolines and can catalyse cis/trans isomerization of proline residues. There are 17 annotated members of the cyclophilin family in humans, ubiquitously expressed and localized variously to the cytoplasm, nucleus or mitochondria. Surprisingly, all eight of the nuclear localized cyclophilins are found associated with spliceosomal complexes. However, their particular functions within this context are unknown. We have therefore adapted three established assays for in vitro pre-mRNA splicing to probe the functional roles of nuclear cyclophilins in the context of the human spliceosome. We find that four of the eight spliceosom-associated cyclophilins exert strong effects on splicing in vitro. These effects are dose-dependent and, remarkably, uniquely characteristic of each cyclophilin. Using both qualitative and quantitative means, we show that at least half of the nuclear cyclophilins can act as regulatory factors of spliceosome function in vitro. The present work provides the first quantifiable evidence that nuclear cyclophilins are splicing factors and provides a novel approach for future work into small molecule-based modulation of pre-mRNA splicing.

  12. Development of affective theory of mind across adolescence: disentangling the role of executive functions.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Nora C; Altgassen, Mareike; Phillips, Louise; Mahy, Caitlin E V; Kliegel, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Theory of mind, the ability to understand mental states, involves inferences about others' cognitive (cognitive theory of mind) and emotional (affective theory of mind) mental states. The current study explored the role of executive functions in developing affective theory of mind across adolescence. Affective theory of mind and three subcomponents of executive functions (inhibition, updating, and shifting) were measured. Affective theory of mind was positively related to age, and all three executive functions. Specifically, inhibition explained the largest amount of variance in age-related differences in affective theory of mind.

  13. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (ogg1) maintains the function of cardiac progenitor cells during heart formation in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lifeng; Zhou, Yong; Yu, Shanhe; Ji, Guixiang; Liu, Wei; Gu, Aihua

    2013-11-15

    Genomic damage may devastate the potential of progenitor cells and consequently impair early organogenesis. We found that ogg1, a key enzyme initiating the base-excision repair, was enriched in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. So far, little is known about DNA repair in cardiogenesis. Here, we addressed the critical role of ogg1 in cardiogenesis for the first time. ogg1 mainly expressed in the anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM), the primary heart tube, and subsequently the embryonic myocardium by in situ hybridisation. Loss of ogg1 resulted in severe cardiac morphogenesis and functional abnormalities, including the short heart length, arrhythmia, decreased cardiomyocytes and nkx2.5{sup +} cardiac progenitor cells. Moreover, the increased apoptosis and repressed proliferation of progenitor cells caused by ogg1 deficiency might contribute to the heart phenotype. The microarray analysis showed that the expression of genes involved in embryonic heart tube morphogenesis and heart structure were significantly changed due to the lack of ogg1. Among those, foxh1 is an important partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage. Our work demonstrates the requirement of ogg1 in cardiac progenitors and heart development in zebrafish. These findings may be helpful for understanding the aetiology of congenital cardiac deficits. - Highlights: • A key DNA repair enzyme ogg1 is expressed in the embryonic heart in zebrafish. • We found that ogg1 is essential for normal cardiac morphogenesis in zebrafish. • The production of embryonic cardiomyocytes requires appropriate ogg1 expression. • Ogg1 critically regulated proliferation of cardiac progenitor cells in zebrafish. • foxh1 is a partner of ogg1 in the cardiac development in response to DNA damage.

  14. Assessment of the physiologic contribution of right atrial function to total right heart function in patients with and without pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sivak, Joseph A; Raina, Amresh; Forfia, Paul R

    2016-09-01

    Total right heart function requires normal function of both the right ventricle and the right atrium. However, the degree to which right atrial (RA) function and right ventricular (RV) function each contribute to total right heart function has not been quantified. In this study, we aimed to quantify the contribution of RA function to total right heart function in a group of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients compared to a cohort of normal controls without cardiovascular disease. The normal cohort comprised 35 subjects with normal clinical echocardiograms, while the PAH cohort included 37 patients, of whom 31 had echocardiograms before and after initiation of PAH-specific therapy. Total right heart function was measured via tricuspid annular plane excursion (TAPSE). TAPSE was broken down into two components, the excursion occurring during RA contraction (TAPSERA) and that occurring before RA contraction (TAPSERV). RA fractional area change (RA-FAC) was also compared between the two groups. In the PAH cohort, more than half of the total TAPSE occurred during atrial systole, compared to less than one-third in the normal cohort (51.0% vs. 32.1%; P < 0.0001). There was a significant correlation between RA-FAC and TAPSE in the PAH cohort but not in the normal cohort. TAPSE improved significantly in the posttreatment cohort (1.7 vs. 2.1 cm), but TAPSERA continued to account for about half of the total TAPSE after treatment. RA function accounts for a significantly greater proportion of total right heart function in patients with PAH than in normal subjects. PMID:27683609

  15. Assessment of the physiologic contribution of right atrial function to total right heart function in patients with and without pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sivak, Joseph A; Raina, Amresh; Forfia, Paul R

    2016-09-01

    Total right heart function requires normal function of both the right ventricle and the right atrium. However, the degree to which right atrial (RA) function and right ventricular (RV) function each contribute to total right heart function has not been quantified. In this study, we aimed to quantify the contribution of RA function to total right heart function in a group of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients compared to a cohort of normal controls without cardiovascular disease. The normal cohort comprised 35 subjects with normal clinical echocardiograms, while the PAH cohort included 37 patients, of whom 31 had echocardiograms before and after initiation of PAH-specific therapy. Total right heart function was measured via tricuspid annular plane excursion (TAPSE). TAPSE was broken down into two components, the excursion occurring during RA contraction (TAPSERA) and that occurring before RA contraction (TAPSERV). RA fractional area change (RA-FAC) was also compared between the two groups. In the PAH cohort, more than half of the total TAPSE occurred during atrial systole, compared to less than one-third in the normal cohort (51.0% vs. 32.1%; P < 0.0001). There was a significant correlation between RA-FAC and TAPSE in the PAH cohort but not in the normal cohort. TAPSE improved significantly in the posttreatment cohort (1.7 vs. 2.1 cm), but TAPSERA continued to account for about half of the total TAPSE after treatment. RA function accounts for a significantly greater proportion of total right heart function in patients with PAH than in normal subjects.

  16. Assessment of the physiologic contribution of right atrial function to total right heart function in patients with and without pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sivak, Joseph A.; Raina, Amresh

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Total right heart function requires normal function of both the right ventricle and the right atrium. However, the degree to which right atrial (RA) function and right ventricular (RV) function each contribute to total right heart function has not been quantified. In this study, we aimed to quantify the contribution of RA function to total right heart function in a group of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients compared to a cohort of normal controls without cardiovascular disease. The normal cohort comprised 35 subjects with normal clinical echocardiograms, while the PAH cohort included 37 patients, of whom 31 had echocardiograms before and after initiation of PAH-specific therapy. Total right heart function was measured via tricuspid annular plane excursion (TAPSE). TAPSE was broken down into two components, the excursion occurring during RA contraction (TAPSERA) and that occurring before RA contraction (TAPSERV). RA fractional area change (RA-FAC) was also compared between the two groups. In the PAH cohort, more than half of the total TAPSE occurred during atrial systole, compared to less than one-third in the normal cohort (51.0% vs. 32.1%; P < 0.0001). There was a significant correlation between RA-FAC and TAPSE in the PAH cohort but not in the normal cohort. TAPSE improved significantly in the posttreatment cohort (1.7 vs. 2.1 cm), but TAPSERA continued to account for about half of the total TAPSE after treatment. RA function accounts for a significantly greater proportion of total right heart function in patients with PAH than in normal subjects. PMID:27683609

  17. The effect of negative affect on cognition: Anxiety, not anger, impairs executive function.

    PubMed

    Shields, Grant S; Moons, Wesley G; Tewell, Carl A; Yonelinas, Andrew P

    2016-09-01

    It is often assumed that negative affect impairs the executive functions that underlie our ability to control and focus our thoughts. However, support for this claim has been mixed. Recent work has suggested that different negative affective states like anxiety and anger may reflect physiologically separable states with distinct effects on cognition. However, the effects of these 2 affective states on executive function have never been assessed. As such, we induced anxiety or anger in participants and examined the effects on executive function. We found that anger did not impair executive function relative to a neutral mood, whereas anxiety did. In addition, self-reports of induced anxiety, but not anger, predicted impairments in executive function. These results support functional models of affect and cognition, and highlight the need to consider differences between anxiety and anger when investigating the influence of negative affect on fundamental cognitive processes such as memory and executive function. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27100367

  18. Does prolonged cycling of moderate intensity affect immune cell function?

    PubMed Central

    Scharhag, J; Meyer, T; Gabriel, H; Schlick, B; Faude, O; Kindermann, W; Shephard, R

    2005-01-01

    Background: Prolonged exercise may induce temporary immunosuppression with a presumed increased susceptibility for infection. However, there are only few data on immune cell function after prolonged cycling at moderate intensities typical for road cycling training sessions. Methods: The present study examined the influence on immune cell function of 4 h of cycling at a constant intensity of 70% of the individual anaerobic threshold. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP), leukocyte and lymphocyte populations, activities of natural killer (NK), neutrophils, and monocytes were examined before and after exercise, and also on a control day without exercise. Results: Cycling for 4 h induced a moderate acute phase response with increases in IL-6 from 1.0 (SD 0.5) before to 9.6 (5.6) pg/ml 1 h after exercise and CRP from 0.5 (SD 0.4) before to 1.8 (1.3) mg/l 1 day after exercise. Although absolute numbers of circulating NK cells, monocytes, and neutrophils increased during exercise, on a per cell basis NK cell activity, neutrophil and monocyte phagocytosis, and monocyte oxidative burst did not significantly change after exercise. However, a minor effect over time for neutrophil oxidative burst was noted, tending to decrease after exercise. Conclusions: Prolonged cycling at moderate intensities does not seem to seriously alter the function of cells of the first line of defence. Therefore, the influence of a single typical road cycling training session on the immune system is only moderate and appears to be safe from an immunological point of view. PMID:15728699

  19. The influence of mean heart rate on measures of heart rate variability as markers of autonomic function: a model study.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Hung-Wen; Wang, Ti-Ho; Huang, Lu-Chou; Tso, Han-Wen; Kao, Tsair

    2003-07-01

    Some studies have demonstrated that the assessments of autonomic activities from the alterations of heart rate variations (HRVs) after autonomic blockade and during exercise of high intensity by the spectral analysis of HRV seemed inconsistent with actual situation. The inconsistency is probably caused by the contributions of fluctuating magnitudes and mean levels of autonomic activities on HRV having not been clarified. The alterations of HRV after autonomic blockade and during exercise of high intensity using a mathematical model were simulated. The autonomic activity in normal condition was assumed first according to some experimental evidence. Then autonomic activities after sympathetic blockade, vagal blockade and during exercise of high intensity were appropriately adjusted accordingly. The HRVs in response to these given autonomic activities were simulated. We found that the effect on HRV influenced by the mean level of autonomic activity is helpful to explain alterations of HRV in these conditions. After vagal blockade, a largely reduced low frequency (LF) power could be caused by the reduced mean heartbeat interval induced by a decreased mean level of vagal activity. Increased low and high frequency powers after sympathetic blockade could be caused by the increased mean heartbeat interval induced by a decreased mean level of sympathetic activity. A decreased LF power during exercise of high intensity, in addition to the withdrawal of vagal activity, could also be caused by the decreased mean heartbeat interval induced by an increased mean level of sympathetic activity.

  20. DiGeorge Syndrome Gene tbx1 Functions through wnt11r to Regulate Heart Looping and Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Choudhry, Priya; Trede, Nikolaus S.

    2013-01-01

    DiGeorge syndrome (DGS) is the most common microdeletion syndrome, and is characterized by congenital cardiac, craniofacial and immune system abnormalities. The cardiac defects in DGS patients include conotruncal and ventricular septal defects. Although the etiology of DGS is critically regulated by TBX1 gene, the molecular pathways underpinning TBX1's role in heart development are not fully understood. In this study, we characterized heart defects and downstream signaling in the zebrafish tbx1−/− mutant, which has craniofacial and immune defects similar to DGS patients. We show that tbx1−/− mutants have defective heart looping, morphology and function. Defective heart looping is accompanied by failure of cardiomyocytes to differentiate normally and failure to change shape from isotropic to anisotropic morphology in the outer curvatures of the heart. This is the first demonstration of tbx1's role in regulating heart looping, cardiomyocyte shape and differentiation, and may explain how Tbx1 regulates conotruncal development in humans. Next we elucidated tbx1's molecular signaling pathway guided by the cardiac phenotype of tbx1−/− mutants. We show for the first time that wnt11r (wnt11 related), a member of the non-canonical Wnt pathway, and its downstream effector gene alcama (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule a) regulate heart looping and differentiation similarly to tbx1. Expression of both wnt11r and alcama are downregulated in tbx1−/− mutants. In addition, both wnt11r−/− mutants and alcama morphants have heart looping and differentiation defects similar to tbx1−/− mutants. Strikingly, heart looping and differentiation in tbx1−/− mutants can be partially rescued by ectopic expression of wnt11r or alcama, supporting a model whereby heart looping and differentiation are regulated by tbx1 in a linear pathway through wnt11r and alcama. This is the first study linking tbx1 and non-canonical Wnt signaling and extends our

  1. Yersinia enterocolitica Affects Intestinal Barrier Function in the Colon.

    PubMed

    Hering, Nina A; Fromm, Anja; Kikhney, Judith; Lee, In-Fah M; Moter, Annette; Schulzke, Jörg D; Bücker, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Infection with Yersinia enterocolitica causes acute diarrhea in early childhood. A mouse infection model presents new findings on pathological mechanisms in the colon. Symptoms involve diarrhea with watery feces and weight loss that have their functional correlates in decreased transepithelial electrical resistance and increased fluorescein permeability. Y. enterocolitica was present within the murine mucosa of both ileum and colon. Here, the bacterial insult was of focal nature and led to changes in tight junction protein expression and architecture. These findings are in concordance with observations from former cell culture studies and suggest a leak flux mechanism of diarrhea.

  2. Catestatin improves post-ischemic left ventricular function and decreases ischemia/reperfusion injury in heart.

    PubMed

    Penna, Claudia; Alloatti, Giuseppe; Gallo, Maria Pia; Cerra, Maria Carmela; Levi, Renzo; Tullio, Francesca; Bassino, Eleonora; Dolgetta, Serena; Mahata, Sushil K; Tota, Bruno; Pagliaro, Pasquale

    2010-11-01

    The Chromogranin A (CgA)-derived anti-hypertensive peptide catestatin (CST) antagonizes catecholamine secretion, and is a negative myocardial inotrope acting via a nitric oxide-dependent mechanism. It is not known whether CST contributes to ischemia/reperfusion injury or is a component of a cardioprotective response to limit injury. Here, we tested whether CST by virtue of its negative inotropic activity improves post-ischemic cardiac function and cardiomyocyte survival. Three groups of isolated perfused hearts from adult Wistar rats underwent 30-min ischemia and 120-min reperfusion (I/R, Group 1), or were post-conditioned by brief ischemic episodes (PostC, 5-cycles of 10-s I/R at the beginning of 120-min reperfusion, Group 2), or with exogenous CST (75 nM for 20 min, CST-Post, Group-3) at the onset of reperfusion. Perfusion pressure and left ventricular pressure (LVP) were monitored. Infarct size was evaluated with nitroblue-tetrazolium staining. The CST (5 nM) effects were also tested in simulated ischemia/reperfusion experiments on cardiomyocytes isolated from young-adult rats, evaluating cell survival with propidium iodide labeling. Infarct size was 61 ± 6% of risk area in hearts subjected to I/R only. PostC reduced infarct size to 34 ± 5%. Infarct size in CST-Post was 36 ± 3% of risk area (P < 0.05 respect to I/R). CST-Post reduced post-ischemic rise of diastolic LVP, an index of contracture, and significantly improved post-ischemic recovery of developed LVP. In isolated cardiomyocytes, CST increased the cell viability rate by about 65% after simulated ischemia/reperfusion. These results suggest a novel cardioprotective role for CST, which appears mainly due to a direct reduction of post-ischemic myocardial damages and dysfunction, rather than to an involvement of adrenergic terminals and/or endothelium.

  3. Functional Impact of Ryanodine Receptor Oxidation on Intracellular Calcium Regulation in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Mazurek, Stefan R.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 ryanodine receptor (RyR2) serves as the major intracellular Ca2+ release channel that drives heart contraction. RyR2 is activated by cytosolic Ca2+ via the process of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR). To ensure stability of Ca2+ dynamics, the self-reinforcing CICR must be tightly controlled. Defects in this control cause sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ mishandling, which manifests in a variety of cardiac pathologies that include myocardial infarction and heart failure. These pathologies are also associated with oxidative stress. Given that RyR2 contains a large number of cysteine residues, it is no surprise that RyR2 plays a key role in the cellular response to oxidative stress. RyR’s many cysteine residues pose an experimental limitation in defining a specific target or mechanism of action for oxidative stress. As a result, the current understanding of redox-mediated RyR2 dysfunction remains incomplete. Several oxidative modifications, including S-glutathionylation and S-nitrosylation, have been suggested playing an important role in the regulation of RyR2 activity. Moreover, oxidative stress can increase RyR2 activity by forming disulfide bonds between two neighboring subunits (intersubunit cross-linking). Since intersubunit interactions within the RyR2 homotetramer complex dictate the channel gating, such posttranslational modification of RyR2 would have a significant impact on RyR2 function and Ca2+ regulation. This review summarizes recent findings on oxidative modifications of RyR2 and discusses contributions of these RyR2 modifications to SR Ca2+ mishandling during cardiac pathologies. PMID:27251471

  4. The Development of Functional Overreaching Is Associated with a Faster Heart Rate Recovery in Endurance Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Aubry, Anaël; Hausswirth, Christophe; Louis, Julien; Coutts, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the study was to investigate whether heart rate recovery (HRR) may represent an effective marker of functional overreaching (f-OR) in endurance athletes. Methods and Results Thirty-one experienced male triathletes were tested (10 control and 21 overload subjects) before (Pre), and immediately after an overload training period (Mid) and after a 2-week taper (Post). Physiological responses were assessed during an incremental cycling protocol to exhaustion, including heart rate, catecholamine release and blood lactate concentration. Ten participants from the overload group developed signs of f-OR at Mid (i.e. -2.1 ± 0.8% change in performance associated with concomitant high perceived fatigue). Additionally, only the f-OR group demonstrated a 99% chance of increase in HRR during the overload period (+8 ± 5 bpm, large effect size). Concomitantly, this group also revealed a >80% chance of decreasing blood lactate (-11 ± 14%, large), plasma norepinephrine (-12 ± 37%, small) and plasma epinephrine peak concentrations (-51 ± 22%, moderate). These blood measures returned to baseline levels at Post. HRR change was negatively correlated to changes in performance, peak HR and peak blood metabolites concentrations. Conclusion These findings suggest that i) a faster HRR is not systematically associated with improved physical performance, ii) changes in HRR should be interpreted in the context of the specific training phase, the athletes perceived level of fatigue and the performance response; and, iii) the faster HRR associated with f-OR may be induced by a decreased central command and by a lower chemoreflex activity. PMID:26488766

  5. Repeated Traumatic Brain Injury Affects Composite Cognitive Function in Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Friess, Stuart H.; Ichord, Rebecca N.; Ralston, Jill; Ryall, Karen; Helfaer, Mark A.; Smith, Colin

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cumulative effects of repetitive mild head injury in the pediatric population are unknown. We have developed a cognitive composite dysfunction score that correlates white matter injury severity in neonatal piglets with neurobehavioral assessments of executive function, memory, learning, and problem solving. Anesthetized 3- to 5-day-old piglets were subjected to single (n = 7), double one day apart (n = 7), and double one week apart (n = 7) moderate (190 rad/s) rapid non-impact axial rotations of the head and compared to instrumented shams (n = 7). Animals experiencing two head rotations one day apart had a significantly higher mortality rate (43%) compared to the other groups and had higher failures rates in visual-based problem solving compared to instrumented shams. White matter injury, assessed by β-APP staining, was significantly higher in the double one week apart group compared to that with single injury and sham. Worsening performance on cognitive composite score correlated well with increasing severity of white matter axonal injury. In our immature large animal model of TBI, two head rotations produced poorer outcome as assessed by neuropathology and neurobehavioral functional outcomes compared to that with single rotations. More importantly, we have observed an increase in injury severity and mortality when the head rotations occur 24 h apart compared to 7 days apart. These observations have important clinical translation to infants subjected to repeated inflicted head trauma. PMID:19275468

  6. hnRNP U protein is required for normal pre-mRNA splicing and postnatal heart development and function.

    PubMed

    Ye, Junqiang; Beetz, Nadine; O'Keeffe, Sean; Tapia, Juan Carlos; Macpherson, Lindsey; Chen, Weisheng V; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N; Maniatis, Tom

    2015-06-01

    We report that mice lacking the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP U) in the heart develop lethal dilated cardiomyopathy and display numerous defects in cardiac pre-mRNA splicing. Mutant hearts have disorganized cardiomyocytes, impaired contractility, and abnormal excitation-contraction coupling activities. RNA-seq analyses of Hnrnpu mutant hearts revealed extensive defects in alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding proteins known to be critical for normal heart development and function, including Titin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (Camk2d). Loss of hnRNP U expression in cardiomyocytes also leads to aberrant splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding the excitation-contraction coupling component Junctin. We found that the protein product of an alternatively spliced Junctin isoform is N-glycosylated at a specific asparagine site that is required for interactions with specific protein partners. Our findings provide conclusive evidence for the essential role of hnRNP U in heart development and function and in the regulation of alternative splicing.

  7. [Effects of xinshuaikang granule on cardiac function and atrial natriuretic polypeptide levels in rabbits with experimental congestive heart failure].

    PubMed

    Jin, X C; Sun, J Z; Wang, X

    1996-07-01

    Xinshuaikang (XSK) granule mainly consisted of Radix Ginseng, Aconifum carmichaeli, Ligustici wallichii, Semen Lepidii seu Descurainiae, etc. Thirty-five white rabbits of Japanese strain with big ears were used and five groups were divided randomly. The models of chronic heart failure (CHF) was made by injection of adriamycin through the marginal vein of rabbit's ear. Only one group without adriamycin injection was taken as blank group. After the making of models, Xinbao (XB) was used to treat one group which was regarded as control group, XSK was used to treat two model groups, one used higher dose, the other one used lower dose. Fifteen days was taken as a course of treatment. The results were: the body weight of all model groups was heavier than that without adriamycin. After a course of treatment, the body weight of the groups treated by XSK or XB decreased rapidly, the general conditions of the three groups were improved; the two drugs could reduce heart rate and enhance heart function, at the same time they reduced the level of atrial natriuretic polypeptide (ANP) in plasma. The best results was obtained in XSK group with higher dose, the effect of XSK group with lower dose was equivalent to that of XB group. Hence, XSK granule could enhance the CHF rabbits' heart function, improve their heart endocrine activity, this drug had a reliable effect on CHF.

  8. hnRNP U protein is required for normal pre-mRNA splicing and postnatal heart development and function

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Junqiang; Beetz, Nadine; O’Keeffe, Sean; Tapia, Juan Carlos; Macpherson, Lindsey; Chen, Weisheng V.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.; Maniatis, Tom

    2015-01-01

    We report that mice lacking the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein U (hnRNP U) in the heart develop lethal dilated cardiomyopathy and display numerous defects in cardiac pre-mRNA splicing. Mutant hearts have disorganized cardiomyocytes, impaired contractility, and abnormal excitation–contraction coupling activities. RNA-seq analyses of Hnrnpu mutant hearts revealed extensive defects in alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs encoding proteins known to be critical for normal heart development and function, including Titin and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (Camk2d). Loss of hnRNP U expression in cardiomyocytes also leads to aberrant splicing of the pre-mRNA encoding the excitation–contraction coupling component Junctin. We found that the protein product of an alternatively spliced Junctin isoform is N-glycosylated at a specific asparagine site that is required for interactions with specific protein partners. Our findings provide conclusive evidence for the essential role of hnRNP U in heart development and function and in the regulation of alternative splicing. PMID:26039991

  9. Neuroendocrine prediction of left ventricular function and heart failure after acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Richards, A; Nicholls, M; Yandle, T; Ikram, H; Espiner, E; Turner, J; Buttimore, R; Lainchbury, J; Elliott, J; Frampton, C; Crozier, I; Smyth, D

    1999-01-01

    independent predictor of left ventricular function, heart failure, or death over the subsequent 14 months, and superior to ANF, N-ANF, cGMP, and plasma catecholamines.

 Keywords: cardiac natriuretic peptides; noradrenaline; myocardial infarction; heart failure PMID:9922344

  10. Does vitamin C deficiency affect cognitive development and function?

    PubMed

    Hansen, Stine Normann; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-09-01

    Vitamin C is a pivotal antioxidant in the brain and has been reported to have numerous functions, including reactive oxygen species scavenging, neuromodulation, and involvement in angiogenesis. Absence of vitamin C in the brain has been shown to be detrimental to survival in newborn SVCT2(-/-) mice and perinatal deficiency have shown to reduce hippocampal volume and neuron number and cause decreased spatial cognition in guinea pigs, suggesting that maternal vitamin C deficiency could have severe consequences for the offspring. Furthermore, vitamin C deficiency has been proposed to play a role in age-related cognitive decline and in stroke risk and severity. The present review discusses the available literature on effects of vitamin C deficiency on the developing and aging brain with particular focus on in vivo experimentation and clinical studies.

  11. Does Vitamin C Deficiency Affect Cognitive Development and Function?

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Stine Normann; Tveden-Nyborg, Pernille; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin C is a pivotal antioxidant in the brain and has been reported to have numerous functions, including reactive oxygen species scavenging, neuromodulation, and involvement in angiogenesis. Absence of vitamin C in the brain has been shown to be detrimental to survival in newborn SVCT2(−/−) mice and perinatal deficiency have shown to reduce hippocampal volume and neuron number and cause decreased spatial cognition in guinea pigs, suggesting that maternal vitamin C deficiency could have severe consequences for the offspring. Furthermore, vitamin C deficiency has been proposed to play a role in age-related cognitive decline and in stroke risk and severity. The present review discusses the available literature on effects of vitamin C deficiency on the developing and aging brain with particular focus on in vivo experimentation and clinical studies. PMID:25244370

  12. Decomposition of Heart Rate Variability Spectrum into a Power-Law Function and a Residual Spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Jane; Kuo, Cheng-Deng

    2016-01-01

    The power spectral density (PSD) of heart rate variability (HRV) contains a power-law relationship that can be obtained by plotting the logarithm of PSD against the logarithm of frequency. The PSD of HRV can be decomposed mathematically into a power-law function and a residual HRV (rHRV) spectrum. Almost all rHRV measures are significantly smaller than their corresponding HRV measures except the normalized high-frequency power (nrHFP). The power-law function can be characterized by the slope and Y-intercept of linear regression. Almost all HRV measures except the normalized low-frequency power have significant correlations with the Y-intercept, while almost all rHRV measures except the total power [residual total power (rTP)] do not. Though some rHRV measures still correlate significantly with the age of the subjects, the rTP, high-frequency power (rHFP), nrHFP, and low-/high-frequency power ratio (rLHR) do not. In conclusion, the clinical significances of rHRV measures might be different from those of traditional HRV measures. The Y-intercept might be a better HRV measure for clinical use because it is independent of almost all rHRV measures. The rTP, rHFP, nrHFP, and rLHR might be more suitable for the study of age-independent autonomic nervous modulation of the subjects. PMID:27314001

  13. Assessing autonomic function by analysis of heart rate recovery from exercise in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Pierpont, Gordon L; Voth, Eric J

    2004-07-01

    Although delayed recovery of heart rate (HR) after exercise indicates poor prognosis, the relative role of parasympathetic reactivation versus sympathetic withdrawal in controlling exercise HR recovery remains controversial. Quantifying HR recovery is difficult because the rate of recovery varies with exercise level. This study develops a model of HR recovery applicable to multiple exercise levels simultaneously. Using the Levenberg-Marquardt method for nonlinear models, HR curves for 11 healthy volunteers recovering from 4 different levels of exercise were fit to equations incorporating 1 first-order time constant for parasympathetic reactivation and 1 for sympathetic withdrawal. Results provided time constants for parasympathetic reactivation of 44 +/- 37 seconds and for sympathetic withdrawal of 65 +/- 56 seconds. The model fit the HR recovery curves very closely, explaining 99.7 +/- 0.1% of the variance in the data. In conclusion, this study presents a unique method for quantitatively testing theories on the relative roles of sympathetic withdrawal and parasympathetic reactivation during recovery from exercise. It provides indexes of dynamic sympathetic and parasympathetic functions, with the parasympathetic system having a faster response time. It supports theories of coordinated interaction of parasympathetic reactivation and sympathetic withdrawal during exercise recovery and does not support using simple measures of exercise HR recovery as indexes of vagal function alone.

  14. Microwave influence on the isolated heart function. 1: Effect of modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Pakhomov, A.G.; Dubovick, B.V.; Degtyariov, I.G.; Pronkevich, A.N.

    1995-09-01

    Dependence of the microwave effect on modulation parameters (pulse width, duty ratio, and peak intensity) was studied in an isolated frog auricle preparation. The rate and amplitude of spontaneous auricle twitches were measured during and after a 2 min exposure to 915 or 885 MHz microwaves and were compared to preexposure values. The studied ranges of modulation parameters were: pulse width, 10{sup {minus}6}--10{sup {minus}2} s; duty ratio, 7:100000, and peak specific absorption rate, 100--3,000 W/kg. Combinations of the parameters were chosen by chance, and about 400 various exposure regimes were tested. The experiments established that no regime was effective unless the average microwave power was high enough to induce preparation heating (0.1--0.4 C). The twitch rate instantly increased, and the amplitude decreased, as the temperature rose; similar changes could be induced by equivalent conventional heating. the data provide evidence that the effect of short-term microwave exposure on the isolated heart pacemaker and contractile functions depends on pulse modulation just as much as modulation determines the average absorbed power. These functions demonstrated no specific dependence on exposure parameters such as frequency or power windows.

  15. Decomposition of Heart Rate Variability Spectrum into a Power-Law Function and a Residual Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jane; Kuo, Cheng-Deng

    2016-01-01

    The power spectral density (PSD) of heart rate variability (HRV) contains a power-law relationship that can be obtained by plotting the logarithm of PSD against the logarithm of frequency. The PSD of HRV can be decomposed mathematically into a power-law function and a residual HRV (rHRV) spectrum. Almost all rHRV measures are significantly smaller than their corresponding HRV measures except the normalized high-frequency power (nrHFP). The power-law function can be characterized by the slope and Y-intercept of linear regression. Almost all HRV measures except the normalized low-frequency power have significant correlations with the Y-intercept, while almost all rHRV measures except the total power [residual total power (rTP)] do not. Though some rHRV measures still correlate significantly with the age of the subjects, the rTP, high-frequency power (rHFP), nrHFP, and low-/high-frequency power ratio (rLHR) do not. In conclusion, the clinical significances of rHRV measures might be different from those of traditional HRV measures. The Y-intercept might be a better HRV measure for clinical use because it is independent of almost all rHRV measures. The rTP, rHFP, nrHFP, and rLHR might be more suitable for the study of age-independent autonomic nervous modulation of the subjects.

  16. Advanced Echocardiography in Adult Zebrafish Reveals Delayed Recovery of Heart Function after Myocardial Cryoinjury

    PubMed Central

    Kossack, Mandy; Juergensen, Lonny; Fuchs, Dieter; Katus, Hugo A.; Hassel, David

    2015-01-01

    Translucent zebrafish larvae represent an established model to analyze genetics of cardiac development and human cardiac disease. More recently adult zebrafish are utilized to evaluate mechanisms of cardiac regeneration and by benefiting from recent genome editing technologies, including TALEN and CRISPR, adult zebrafish are emerging as a valuable in vivo model to evaluate novel disease genes and specifically validate disease causing mutations and their underlying pathomechanisms. However, methods to sensitively and non-invasively assess cardiac morphology and performance in adult zebrafish are still limited. We here present a standardized examination protocol to broadly assess cardiac performance in adult zebrafish by advancing conventional echocardiography with modern speckle-tracking analyses. This allows accurate detection of changes in cardiac performance and further enables highly sensitive assessment of regional myocardial motion and deformation in high spatio-temporal resolution. Combining conventional echocardiography measurements with radial and longitudinal velocity, displacement, strain, strain rate and myocardial wall delay rates after myocardial cryoinjury permitted to non-invasively determine injury dimensions and to longitudinally follow functional recovery during cardiac regeneration. We show that functional recovery of cryoinjured hearts occurs in three distinct phases. Importantly, the regeneration process after cryoinjury extends far beyond the proposed 45 days described for ventricular resection with reconstitution of myocardial performance up to 180 days post-injury (dpi). The imaging modalities evaluated here allow sensitive cardiac phenotyping and contribute to further establish adult zebrafish as valuable cardiac disease model beyond the larval developmental stage. PMID:25853735

  17. CHANGES IN HEART RATE VARIABILITY AND LUNG FUNCTION OBSERVED IN NC PATROL TROOPERS EXPOSED TO PM AND AIR TOXICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in Heart Rate Variability and Lung Function in NC Patrol Troopers exposed to PM and Air Toxics

    Michael Riediker1, Wayne E Cascio1, Robert B Devlin2, Thomas Griggs1&4, Margaret Herbst1, Ronald W Williams3, Steve P McCorquodale4, Philip A Bromberg1
    1) University o...

  18. Light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) improves functional capacity in rats with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Capalonga, Lucas; Karsten, Marlus; Hentschke, Vítor Scotta; Rossato, Douglas Dalcin; Dornelles, Maurício Pinto; Sonza, Anelise; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Ferraresi, Cleber; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2016-07-01

    The syndrome of heart failure (HF) promotes central and peripheral dysfunctions that result in functional capacity decrease, leading to fatigue, dyspnea, and exercise intolerance. The use of light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) has shown good results reducing fatigue and exercise intolerance, when applied on skeletal muscles before or after exercises. Thereby, the aim of this study was to compare the effects of LEDT on functional capacity, aerobic power, and hemodynamic function in HF rats. Male Wistar rats (230-260 g) were randomly allocated into three experimental groups: Sham (n = 6), Control-HF (n = 4), and LEDT-HF (n = 6). The animals were subjected to an exercise performance test (ET) with gas analysis coupled in a metabolic chamber for rats performed two times (6 and 14 weeks after myocardial infarction). On the day after the baseline aerobic capacity test, the animals were submitted during 8 weeks to the phototherapy protocol, five times/week, 60 s of irradiation, 6 J delivered per muscle group. Statistical analysis was performed by one- and two-way ANOVAs with repeated measures and Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc tests (p ≤ 0.05). Comparing the percentage difference (Δ) between baseline and the final ET, there was no significant difference for the VO2max variable considering all groups. However, Sham and LEDT-HF groups showed higher relative values than the Control-HF group, respectively, for distance covered (27.7 and 32.5 %), time of exercise test (17.7 and 20.5 %), and speed (13.6 and 12.2 %). In conclusion, LEDT was able to increase the functional capacity evaluated by distance covered, time, and speed of exercise in rats with HF. PMID:27059227

  19. The Relationship of Metabolic Syndrome with Stress, Coronary Heart Disease and Pulmonary Function - An Occupational Cohort-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Nowobilski, Roman; Dropinski, Jerzy; Kotula-Horowitz, Katarzyna; Laskowicz, Bartosz; Stanisz, Andrzej; Lelakowski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Higher levels of stress impact the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and coronary heart disease. The association between MetS, impaired pulmonary function and low level of physical activity is still pending assessment in the subjects exposed to stress. The study aimed to examine whether higher levels of stress might be related to MetS and the plaque presence, as well as whether MetS might affect pulmonary function. Design and Methods The study embraced 235 police officers (mean age 40.97 years) from the south of Poland. The anthropometrics and biochemical variables were measured; MetS was diagnosed using the International Diabetes Federation criteria. Computed tomography coronary angiography of coronary arteries, exercise ECG, measurements of brachial flow-mediated dilation, and carotid artery intima-media thickness were completed. In order to measure the self-perception of stress, 10-item Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10) was applied. Pulmonary function and physical activity levels were also addressed. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were applied to determine the relationships between: 1/ incidence of coronary plaque and MetS per se, MetS components and the number of classical cardiovascular risk factors, 2/ perceived stress and MetS, 3/ MetS and pulmonary function parameters. Results Coronary artery atherosclerosis was less associated with MetS (OR = 2.62, 95%CI 1.24–5.52; p = 0.011) than with a co-existence of classical cardiovascular risk factors (OR = 5.67, 95% CI 1.07–29.85, p = 0.03; for 3 risk factors and OR = 9.05; 95% CI 1.24–66.23, p = 0.02; for 6 risk factors, respectively). Perceived stress increased MetS prevalence (OR = 1.07, 95% CI 1.03–1.13; p = 0.03), and impacted coronary plaque prevalence (OR = 1.05, 95% CI 1.001–1.10; p = 0.04). Leisure-time physical activity reduced the chances of developing MetS (OR = 0.98 95% CI 0.96–0.99; p = 0.02). MetS subjects had significantly lower values of certain

  20. [MORPHO-FUNCTIONAL CHANGES OF THYMUS TISSUES IN CHILDREN WITH CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Loginova, N P; Chetvertnykh, V A; Chemurziyeva, N V

    2016-01-01

    Biopsy specimens of the thymus were studied in children aged under 11 months (n = 77) with congenital heart defects and circulatory hypoxia of varying severity. Histological sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Shubich's method (to demonstrate mast cells). The expression of Ki-67, CD3 and CD34 was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The ultrastructure of thymic tissues was also examined. It was found that the severity of hypoxia determined the morphological changes in the organ associated with a development of large complex of tissue reactions. A disruption of internal structure and a loss of integrity of epithelio-reticular cells and thymocytes were demonstrated in ultrathin sections. Thymocyte proliferation index (Ki-67) and thymocytopoiesis intensity (CD3+) were reduced in all the zones of the thymus. The degree of hypoxia affected the redistribution of CD3+ lymphocytes leading to their accumulation in the medulla. The processes of endogenous regeneration took place which involved the cells of fibroblastic line and progenitor cells (CD34+) together with active formation of new blood vessels. These findings suggest that the morphological changes identified in the tissues of the thymus are a manifestation of tissue adaptation to hypoxia of varying severity under conditions of endogenous regeneration, simultaneously reflecting the processes of substitution cytogenesis. PMID:27487665

  1. [MORPHO-FUNCTIONAL CHANGES OF THYMUS TISSUES IN CHILDREN WITH CONGENITAL HEART DISEASE].

    PubMed

    Loginova, N P; Chetvertnykh, V A; Chemurziyeva, N V

    2016-01-01

    Biopsy specimens of the thymus were studied in children aged under 11 months (n = 77) with congenital heart defects and circulatory hypoxia of varying severity. Histological sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and Shubich's method (to demonstrate mast cells). The expression of Ki-67, CD3 and CD34 was assessed by immunohistochemistry. The ultrastructure of thymic tissues was also examined. It was found that the severity of hypoxia determined the morphological changes in the organ associated with a development of large complex of tissue reactions. A disruption of internal structure and a loss of integrity of epithelio-reticular cells and thymocytes were demonstrated in ultrathin sections. Thymocyte proliferation index (Ki-67) and thymocytopoiesis intensity (CD3+) were reduced in all the zones of the thymus. The degree of hypoxia affected the redistribution of CD3+ lymphocytes leading to their accumulation in the medulla. The processes of endogenous regeneration took place which involved the cells of fibroblastic line and progenitor cells (CD34+) together with active formation of new blood vessels. These findings suggest that the morphological changes identified in the tissues of the thymus are a manifestation of tissue adaptation to hypoxia of varying severity under conditions of endogenous regeneration, simultaneously reflecting the processes of substitution cytogenesis.

  2. Endocannabinoids affect the reproductive functions in teleosts and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Cottone, E; Guastalla, A; Mackie, K; Franzoni, M F

    2008-04-16

    Following the discovery in the brain of the bonyfish Fugu rubripes of two genes encoding for type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1A and CB1B), investigations on the phylogeny of these receptors have indicated that the cannabinergic system is highly conserved. Among the multiple functions modulated by cannabinoids/endocannabinoids through the CB1 receptors one of the more investigated is the mammalian reproduction. Therefore, since studies performed in animal models other than mammals might provide further insight into the biology of these signalling molecules, the major aim of the present paper was to review the comparative data pointing toward the endocannabinoid involvement in the reproductive control of non-mammalian vertebrates, namely bonyfish and amphibians. The expression and distribution of CB1 receptors were investigated in the CNS and gonads of two teleosts, Pelvicachromis pulcher and Carassius auratus as well as in the anuran amphibians Xenopus laevis and Rana esculenta. In general the large diffusion of neurons targeted by cannabinoids in both fish and amphibian forebrain indicate endocannabinoids as pivotal local messengers in several neural circuits involved in either sensory integrative activities, like the olfactory processes (in amphibians) and food response (in bonyfish), or neuroendocrine machinery (in both). By using immunohistochemistry for CB1 and GnRH-I, the codistribution of the two signalling molecules was found in the fish basal telencephalon and preoptic area, which are key centers for gonadotropic regulation in all vertebrates. A similar topographical codistribution was observed also in the septum of the telencephalon in Rana esculenta and Xenopus laevis. Interestingly, the double standard immunofluorescence on the same brain section, aided with a laser confocal microscope, showed that in anurans a subset of GnRH-I neurons exhibited also the CB1 immunostaining. The fact that CB1-LI-IR was found indeed in the FSH gonadotrophs of the Xenopus

  3. Consumption of bee pollen affects rat ovarian functions.

    PubMed

    Kolesarova, A; Bakova, Z; Capcarova, M; Galik, B; Juracek, M; Simko, M; Toman, R; Sirotkin, A V

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to examine possible effects of bee pollen added to the feed mixture (FM) on rat ovarian functions (secretion activity and apoptosis). We evaluated the bee pollen effect on the release of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and steroid hormones (progesterone and estradiol), as well as on the expression of markers of apoptosis (Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3) in rat ovarian fragments. Female rats (n = 15) were fed during 90 days by FM without or with rape seed bee pollen in dose either 3 kg/1000 kg FM or 5 kg/1000 kg FM. Fragments of ovaries isolated from rats of each group (totally 72 pieces) were incubated for 24 h. Hormonal secretion into the culture medium was detected by RIA. The markers of apoptosis were evaluated by Western blotting. It was observed that IGF-I release by rat ovarian fragments was significantly (p < 0.05) decreased; on the other hand, progesterone and estradiol secretion was increased after bee pollen treatment at dose 5 kg/1000 kg FM but not at 3 kg/1000 FM. Accumulation of Bcl-2 was increased by bee pollen added at 3 kg/1000 kg FM, but not at higher dose. Accumulation of Bax was increased in ovaries of rats fed by bee pollen at doses either 3 or 5 kg/1000 kg FM, whilst accumulation of caspase-3 increased after feeding with bee pollen at dose 5 kg/1000 kg FM, but not at 3 kg/1000 kg FM. Our results contribute to new insights regarding the effect of bee pollen on both secretion activity (release of growth factor IGF-I and steroid hormones progesterone and estradiol) and apoptosis (anti- and pro-apoptotic markers Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3). Bee pollen is shown to be a potent regulator of rat ovarian functions. PMID:23137268

  4. Mediastinal irradiation in a patient affected by lung carcinoma after heart transplantation: Helical tomotherapy versus three dimensional conformal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Iorio, Vincenzo; Cammarota, Fabrizio; Toledo, Diego; Senese, Rossana; Francomacaro, Ferdinando; Muto, Matteo; Muto, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Patients who have undergone solid organ transplants are known to have an increased risk of neoplasia compared with the general population. We report our experience using mediastinal irradiation with helical tomotherapy versus three‐dimensional conformal radiation therapy to treat a patient with lung carcinoma 15 years after heart transplantation. Our dosimetric evaluation showed no particular difference between the techniques, with the exception of some organs. Mediastinal irradiation after heart transplantation is feasible and should be considered after evaluation of the risk. Conformal radiotherapy or intensity‐modulated radiotherapy appears to be the appropriate treatment in heart‐transplanted oncologic patients. PMID:27148425

  5. Effect of in vivo heart irradiation on the development of antioxidant defenses and cardiac functions in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Benderitter, M.; Assem, M.; Maupoil, V.

    1995-10-01

    During radiotherapy of thoracic tumors, the heart is often included in the primary treatment volume, and chronic impairment of myocardial function occurs. The cellular biomolecules are altered directly by radiation or damaged indirectly by free radical production. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the biochemical and functional response of the rat heart to a single high dose of radiation. The effect of 20 Gy local X irradiation was determined in the heart of Wistar rats under general anesthesia. Mechanical performances were measured in vitro using an isolated perfused working heart model, and cardiac antioxidant defenses were also evaluated. Hearts were studied at 1 and 4 months after irradiation. This single dose of radiation induced a marked drop in the mechanical activity of the rat heart: aortic output was significantly reduced (18% less than control values) at 1 month postirradiation and remained depressed for the rest of the experimental period (21% less than control 4 months after treatment). This suggests the development of myocardial failure after irradiation. The decline of functional parameters was associated with changes in antioxidant defenses. The decrease in cardiac levels of vitamin E (-30%) was associated with an increase in the levels of Mn-SOD and glustathione peroxidase (+45.5% and +32%, respectively, at 4 months postirradiation). However, cardiac vitamin C and catalase levels remained constant. Since these antioxidant defenses were activated relatively long after irradiation, it is suggested that this was probable due to the production of free radical species associated with the development of inflammation. 49 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Functional and Electrical Integration of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes in a Myocardial Infarction Rat Heart.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Takahiro; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Pearson, James T; Fukushima, Satsuki; Saito, Atsuhiro; Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Sonobe, Takashi; Fujii, Yutaka; Yagi, Naoto; Astolfo, Alberto; Shirai, Mikiyasu; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    In vitro expanded beating cardiac myocytes derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC-CMs) are a promising source of therapy for cardiac regeneration. Meanwhile, the cell sheet method has been shown to potentially maximize survival, functionality, and integration of the transplanted cells into the heart. It is thus hypothesized that transplanted iPSC-CMs in a cell sheet manner may contribute to functional recovery via direct mechanical effects on the myocardial infarction (MI) heart. F344/NJcl-rnu/rnu rats were left coronary artery ligated (n = 30), followed by transplantation of Dsred-labeled iPSC-CM cell sheets of murine origin over the infarct heart surface. Effects of the treatment were assessed, including in vivo molecular/cellular evaluations using a synchrotron radiation scattering technique. Ejection fraction and activation recovery interval were significantly greater from day 3 onward after iPSC-CM transplantation compared to those after sham operation. A number of transplanted iPSC-CMs were present on the heart surface expressing cardiac myosin or connexin 43 over 2 weeks, assessed by immunoconfocal microscopy, while mitochondria in the transplanted iPSC-CMs gradually showed mature structure as assessed by electron microscopy. Of note, X-ray diffraction identified 1,0 and 1,1 equatorial reflections attributable to myosin and actin-myosin lattice planes typical of organized cardiac muscle fibers within the transplanted cell sheets at 4 weeks, suggesting cyclic systolic myosin mass transfer to actin filaments in the transplanted iPSC-CMs. Transplantation of iPSC-CM cell sheets into the heart yielded functional and electrical recovery with cyclic contraction of transplanted cells in the rat MI heart, indicating that this strategy may be a promising cardiac muscle replacement therapy.

  7. Ectomycorrhizal symbiosis affects functional diversity of rhizosphere fluorescent pseudomonads.

    PubMed

    Frey-Klett, Pascale; Chavatte, Michaël; Clausse, Marie-Lise; Courrier, Sébastien; Le Roux, Christine; Raaijmakers, Jos; Martinotti, Maria Giovanna; Pierrat, Jean-Claude; Garbaye, Jean

    2005-01-01

    Here we characterized the effect of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis on the genotypic and functional diversity of soil Pseudomonas fluorescens populations and analysed its possible consequences in terms of plant nutrition, development and health. Sixty strains of P. fluorescens were isolated from the bulk soil of a forest nursery, the ectomycorrhizosphere and the ectomycorrhizas of the Douglas fir (Pseudostuga menziesii) seedlings-Laccaria bicolor S238N. They were characterized in vitro with the following criteria: ARDRA, phosphate solubilization, siderophore, HCN and AIA production, genes of N2-fixation and antibiotic synthesis, in vitro confrontation with a range of phytopathogenic and ectomycorrhizal fungi, effect on the Douglas fir-L. bicolor symbiosis. For most of these criteria, we demonstrated that the ectomycorrhizosphere significantly structures the P. fluorescens populations and selects strains potentially beneficial to the symbiosis and to the plant. This prompts us to propose the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis as a true microbial complex where multitrophic interactions take place. Moreover it underlines the fact that this symbiosis has an indirect positive effect on plant growth, via its selective pressure on bacterial communities, in addition to its known direct positive effect. PMID:15720643

  8. Pathophysiology of Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Tanai, Edit; Frantz, Stefan

    2015-12-15

    Heart failure is considered an epidemic disease in the modern world affecting approximately 1% to 2% of adult population. It presents a multifactorial, systemic disease, in which--after cardiac injury--structural, neurohumoral, cellular, and molecular mechanisms are activated and act as a network to maintain physiological functioning. These coordinated, complex processes lead to excessive volume overload, increased sympathetic activity, circulation redistribution, and result in different, parallel developing clinical signs and symptoms. These signs and symptoms sum up to an unspecific clinical picture; thus invasive and noninvasive diagnostic tools are used to get an accurate diagnosis and to specify the underlying cause. The most important, outcome determining factor in heart failure is its constant progression. Constant optimizing of pharmatherapeutical regimes, novel targets, and fine regulation of these processes try to keep these compensatory mechanisms in a physiological range. Beside pharmacological therapy, interventional and surgical therapy options give new chances in the management of heart failure. For the optimization and establishment of these and novel therapeutical approaches, complete and comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanisms is essentially needed. Besides diagnosis and treatment, efforts should be made for better prevention in heart failure by treatment of risk factors, or identifying and following risk groups. This summary of the pathophysiology of heart failure tries to give a compact overview of basic mechanisms and of the novel unfolding, progressive theory of heart failure to contribute to a more comprehensive knowledge of the disease.

  9. Pathophysiology of Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Tanai, Edit; Frantz, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is considered an epidemic disease in the modern world affecting approximately 1% to 2% of adult population. It presents a multifactorial, systemic disease, in which--after cardiac injury--structural, neurohumoral, cellular, and molecular mechanisms are activated and act as a network to maintain physiological functioning. These coordinated, complex processes lead to excessive volume overload, increased sympathetic activity, circulation redistribution, and result in different, parallel developing clinical signs and symptoms. These signs and symptoms sum up to an unspecific clinical picture; thus invasive and noninvasive diagnostic tools are used to get an accurate diagnosis and to specify the underlying cause. The most important, outcome determining factor in heart failure is its constant progression. Constant optimizing of pharmatherapeutical regimes, novel targets, and fine regulation of these processes try to keep these compensatory mechanisms in a physiological range. Beside pharmacological therapy, interventional and surgical therapy options give new chances in the management of heart failure. For the optimization and establishment of these and novel therapeutical approaches, complete and comprehensive understanding of the underlying mechanisms is essentially needed. Besides diagnosis and treatment, efforts should be made for better prevention in heart failure by treatment of risk factors, or identifying and following risk groups. This summary of the pathophysiology of heart failure tries to give a compact overview of basic mechanisms and of the novel unfolding, progressive theory of heart failure to contribute to a more comprehensive knowledge of the disease. PMID:26756631

  10. Aluminum fluoride affects the structure and functions of cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Suwalsky, M; Norris, B; Villena, F; Cuevas, F; Sotomayor, P; Zatta, P

    2004-06-01

    No useful biological function for aluminum has been found. To the contrary, it might play an important role in several pathologies, which could be related to its interactions with cell membranes. On the other hand, fluoride is a normal component of body fluids, soft tissues, bones and teeth. Its sodium salt is frequently added to drinking water to prevent dental caries. However, large doses cause severe pathological alterations. In view of the toxicity of Al(3+) and F(-) ions, it was thought of interest to explore the damaging effects that AlF(3) might induce in cell membranes. With this aim, it was incubated with human erythrocytes, which were examined by phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy, and molecular models of biomembranes. The latter consisted of large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and bilayers of DMPC and dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DMPE) which were studied by fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, respectively. In order to understand the effects of AlF(3) on ion transport (principally sodium and chloride) we used the isolated toad skin to which electrophysiological measurements were applied. It was found that AlF(3) altered the shape of erythrocytes inducing the formation of echinocytes. This effect was explained by X-ray diffraction which revealed that AlF(3) perturbed the structure of DMPC, class of lipids located in the outer monolayer of the erythrocyte membrane. This result was confirmed by fluorescence spectroscopy on DMPC LUV. The biphasic (stimulatory followed by inhibitory) effects on the isolated skin suggested changes in apical Cl(-) secretion and moderate ATPase inactivation. PMID:15110101

  11. Neurology of Affective Prosody and Its Functional-Anatomic Organization in Right Hemisphere

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Elliott D.; Monnot, Marilee

    2008-01-01

    Unlike the aphasic syndromes, the organization of affective prosody in brain has remained controversial because affective-prosodic deficits may occur after left or right brain damage. However, different patterns of deficits are observed following left and right brain damage that suggest affective prosody is a dominant and lateralized function of…

  12. High saturated fat feeding prevents left ventricular dysfunction and enhances mitochondrial function in heart failure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accumulation of lipids in the heart is associated with contractile dysfunction, and has been proposed to be a causative factor in mitochondrial dysfunction. We have previously shown that administration of a high saturated fat diet in heart failure (HF) increased mitochondrial respiration and ETC com...

  13. Phosphate Ions Affect the Water Structure at Functionalized Membrane Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Aliyah; Imbrogno, Joseph; Belfort, Georges; Petersen, Poul B

    2016-09-01

    Antifouling surfaces improve function, efficiency, and safety in products such as water filtration membranes, marine vehicle coatings, and medical implants by resisting protein and biofilm adhesion. Understanding the role of water structure at these materials in preventing protein adhesion and biofilm formation is critical to designing more effective coatings. Such fouling experiments are typically performed under biological conditions using isotonic aqueous buffers. Previous studies have explored the structure of pure water at a few different antifouling surfaces, but the effect of electrolytes and ionic strength (I) on the water structure at antifouling surfaces is not well studied. Here sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy is used to characterize the interfacial water structure at poly(ether sulfone) (PES) and two surface-modified PES films in contact with 0.01 M phosphate buffer with high and low salt (Ionic strength, I= 0.166 and 0.025 M, respectively). Unmodified PES, commonly used as a filtration membrane, and modified PES with a hydrophobic alkane (C18) and with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were used. In the low ionic strength phosphate buffer, water was strongly ordered near the surface of the PEG-modified PES film due to exclusion of phosphate ions and the creation of a surface potential resulting from charge separation between phosphate anions and sodium cations. However, in the high ionic strength phosphate buffer, the sodium and potassium chloride (138 and 3 mM, respectively) in the phosphate buffered saline screened this charge and substantially reduced water ordering. A much smaller water ordering and subsequent reduction upon salt addition was observed for the C18-modified PES, and little water structure change was seen for the unmodified PES. The large difference in water structuring with increasing ionic strength between widely used phosphate buffer and phosphate buffered saline at the PEG interface demonstrates the importance of studying

  14. Familial Clustering of Executive Functioning in Affected Sibling Pair Families with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaats-Willemse, Dorine; Swaab-Barneveld, Hanna; De Sonneville, Leo; Buitelaar, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate familial clustering of executive functioning (i.e., response inhibition, fine visuomotor functioning, and attentional control) in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-affected sibling pairs. Method: Fifty-two affected sibling pairs aged 6 to 18 years and diagnosed with ADHD according to DSM-IV performed the…

  15. The cerebellum: its role in language and related cognitive and affective functions.

    PubMed

    De Smet, Hyo Jung; Paquier, Philippe; Verhoeven, Jo; Mariën, Peter

    2013-12-01

    The traditional view on the cerebellum as the sole coordinator of motor function has been substantially redefined during the past decades. Neuroanatomical, neuroimaging and clinical studies have extended the role of the cerebellum to the modulation of cognitive and affective processing. Neuroanatomical studies have demonstrated cerebellar connectivity with the supratentorial association areas involved in higher cognitive and affective functioning, while functional neuroimaging and clinical studies have provided evidence of cerebellar involvement in a variety of cognitive and affective tasks. This paper reviews the recently acknowledged role of the cerebellum in linguistic and related cognitive and behavioral-affective functions. In addition, typical cerebellar syndromes such as the cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome (CCAS) and the posterior fossa syndrome (PFS) will be briefly discussed and the current hypotheses dealing with the presumed neurobiological mechanisms underlying the linguistic, cognitive and affective modulatory role of the cerebellum will be reviewed.

  16. Using time-series intervention analysis to model cow heart rate affected by programmed audio and environmental/physiological

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research is the first use of the Box-Jenkins time-series models to describe changes in heart rate (HR) of free-ranging crossbred cows (Bos taurus) receiving both programmed audio cues from directional virtual fencing (DVFTM) devices and non-programmed environmental/physiological cues. The DVFT...

  17. Using time-series intervention analysis to model cow heart rate affected by programmed audio and environmental/physiological cues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This research is the first use of the Box-Jenkins time-series models to describe changes in heart rate (HR) of free-ranging crossbred cows (Bos taurus) receiving both programmed audio cues from directional virtual fencing (DVFTM) devices and non-programmed environmental/physiological cues. The DVFT...

  18. Cognitive Function in Heart Failure is Associated with Nonsomatic Symptoms of Depression but Not Somatic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Misty A. W.; Dolansky, Mary A.; Schaefer, Julie T.; Fulcher, Michael J.; Gunstad, John; Redle, Joseph D.; Josephson, Richard; Hughes, Joel W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with heart failure (HF) have high rates of cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms have been associated with greater cognitive impairments in HF; however, it is not known whether particular clusters of depressive symptoms are more detrimental to cognition than others. Objective To identify whether somatic and/or nonsomatic depressive symptom clusters were associated with cognitive function in persons with HF. Methods Participants were 326 HF patients (40.5% female, 26.7% race-ethnicity, aged 68.6±9.7 years). Depressive symptoms were measured using a depression questionnaire commonly used in medical populations: the Patient Health Questionnatire-9 (PHQ-9). Somatic and Nonsomatic subscales scores were created using previous factor analytic results. A neuropsychological battery tested attention, executive function, and memory. Composites were created using averages of age-adjusted scaled scores. Regressions adjusting for demographic and clinical factors were conducted. Results Regressions revealed that PHQ-9 Total was associated with Attention (β=−.14, p=.008) and Executive Function (β=−.17, p=.001). When analyzed separately, the Nonsomatic subscale – but not the Somatic symptoms subscale (ps ≥.092) – was associated with Attention scores (β=−.15, p=.004) and Memory (β=−.11, p=.044). Both Nonsomatic (β=−.18, p<.001) and Somatic symptoms (β=−.11, p=.048) were related to Executive Function. When included together, only the Nonsomatic symptom cluster was associated with Attention (β=−.15, p=.020) and Executive Function (β=−.19, p=.003). Conclusions Greater overall depressive symptom severity was associated with poorer performance on multiple cognitive domains, an effect driven primarily by the nonsomatic symptoms of depression. Clinical Implications These findings suggest that screening explicitly for nonsomatic depressive symptoms may be warranted and that the mechanisms underlying the

  19. Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate Targeting Myocardial Reactive Oxygen Species Production Improves Left Ventricular Remodeling and Function in Rats With Ischemic Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Fraccarollo, Daniela; Galuppo, Paolo; Neuser, Jonas; Bauersachs, Johann; Widder, Julian D

    2015-11-01

    Reduced nitric oxide bioavailability contributes to progression of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in ischemic heart failure. Clinical use of organic nitrates as nitric oxide donors is limited by development of nitrate tolerance and reactive oxygen species formation. We investigated the effects of long-term therapy with pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), an organic nitrate devoid of tolerance, in rats with congestive heart failure after extensive myocardial infarction. Seven days after coronary artery ligation, rats were randomly allocated to treatment with PETN (80 mg/kg BID) or placebo for 9 weeks. Long-term PETN therapy prevented the progressive left ventricular dilatation and improved left ventricular contractile function and relaxation in rats with congestive heart failure. Mitochondrial superoxide anion production was markedly increased in the failing left ventricular myocardium and nearly normalized by PETN treatment. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that PETN beneficially modulated the dysregulation of mitochondrial genes involved in energy metabolism, paralleled by prevention of uncoupling protein-3, thioredoxin-2, and superoxide dismutase-2 downregulation. Moreover, PETN provided a remarkable protective effect against reactive fibrosis in chronically failing hearts. Mechanistically, induction of heme oxygenase-1 by PETN prevented mitochondrial superoxide generation, NOX4 upregulation, and ensuing formation of extracellular matrix proteins in fibroblasts from failing hearts. In summary, PETN targeting reactive oxygen species generation prevented the changes of mitochondrial antioxidant enzymes and progressive fibrotic remodeling, leading to amelioration of cardiac functional performance. Therefore, PETN might be a promising therapeutic option in the treatment of ischemic heart diseases involving oxidative stress and impairment in nitric oxide bioactivity.

  20. Sequential delivery of angiogenic growth factors improves revascularization and heart function after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Awada, Hassan K.; Johnson, Noah R.; Wang, Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of ischemia through therapeutic angiogenesis faces significant challenges. Growth factor (GF)-based therapies can be more effective when concerns such as GF spatiotemporal presentation, bioactivity, bioavailability, and localization are addressed. During angiogenesis, vascular endothelial GF (VEGF) is required early to initiate neovessel formation while platelet-derived GF (PDGF-BB) is needed later to stabilize the neovessels. The spatiotemporal delivery of multiple bioactive GFs involved in angiogenesis, in a close mimic to physiological cues, holds great potential to treat ischemic diseases. To achieve sequential release of VEGF and PDGF, we embed VEGF in fibrin gel and PDGF in a heparin-based coacervate that is distributed in the same fibrin gel. In vitro, we show the benefits of this controlled delivery approach on cell proliferation, chemotaxis, and capillary formation. A rat myocardial infarction (MI) model demonstrated the effectiveness of this delivery system in improving cardiac function, ventricular wall thickness, angiogenesis, cardiac muscle survival, and reducing fibrosis and inflammation in the infarct zone compared to saline, empty vehicle, and free GFs. Collectively, our results show that this delivery approach mitigated the injury caused by MI and may serve as a new therapy to treat ischemic hearts pending further examination. PMID:25836592

  1. Longitudinal effects of social support on the health and functioning of older women with heart disease.

    PubMed

    Janevic, Mary R; Janz, Nancy K; Dodge, Julia A; Wang, Yue; Lin, Xihong; Clark, Noreen M

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the effects of: 1) four dimensions of social support, 2) the number of close social ties, and 3) marital status on the physical and psychological health and functioning of 471 women aged 60 years and over with heart disease. Linear mixed models were used to assess the impact of each baseline social relations predictor on health outcomes at four-, 12-, and 18-month follow-up intervals. A second set of models examined the association between change in support variables over time with concomitant change in health outcomes. Results indicated that baseline emotional/ informational support, positive social interaction, affectionate support, tangible support, number of close friends and relatives, and marital status all significantly predicted (p < .05) one or more health outcomes over time. Increases in positive social interaction and emotional support over time were significantly associated with concurrent improvement in all self-reported physical and psychological health outcomes. Interventions that enhance the availability of emotional/informational support and promote social interaction are needed for this population.

  2. Wavelet Based Method for Congestive Heart Failure Recognition by Three Confirmation Functions

    PubMed Central

    Daqrouq, K.; Dobaie, A.

    2016-01-01

    An investigation of the electrocardiogram (ECG) signals and arrhythmia characterization by wavelet energy is proposed. This study employs a wavelet based feature extraction method for congestive heart failure (CHF) obtained from the percentage energy (PE) of terminal wavelet packet transform (WPT) subsignals. In addition, the average framing percentage energy (AFE) technique is proposed, termed WAFE. A new classification method is introduced by three confirmation functions. The confirmation methods are based on three concepts: percentage root mean square difference error (PRD), logarithmic difference signal ratio (LDSR), and correlation coefficient (CC). The proposed method showed to be a potential effective discriminator in recognizing such clinical syndrome. ECG signals taken from MIT-BIH arrhythmia dataset and other databases are utilized to analyze different arrhythmias and normal ECGs. Several known methods were studied for comparison. The best recognition rate selection obtained was for WAFE. The recognition performance was accomplished as 92.60% accurate. The Receiver Operating Characteristic curve as a common tool for evaluating the diagnostic accuracy was illustrated, which indicated that the tests are reliable. The performance of the presented system was investigated in additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) environment, where the recognition rate was 81.48% for 5 dB. PMID:26949412

  3. Effect of Supine Posture on Airway Blood Flow and Pulmonary Function in Stable Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Ceridon, Maile L.; Morris, Norman R.; Olson, Thomas P.; Lalande, Sophie; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between body position, pulmonary function (PF) and bronchial blood flow (Qaw) in a group of heart failure (HF) and control subjects. Methods Thirty-six subjects were studied: 24 stable, ambulatory HF patients (HF: LVEF=27±6%, age=65±9yr) and 12 age- and sex-matched controls (CTRL: LVEF=60±7%, age=62±8yr). Measures of Q̇aw (soluble gas method) and PF were collected upright and following 30 min in the supine position. Results Q̇aw was similar between groups and remained unchanged with body position. Declines in forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) with the supine position were observed in both groups; declines in forced expiratory flow 25–75% (FEF25–75) and FEF 75% (FEF75) with the supine position were observed in the HF group only. Changes in Q̇aw were related to changes in PF only in the HF patient groups (ΔFVC, %predicted, r=−0.45, p<0.04, ΔFEV1 r=−0.61, p<0.01, ΔFEV1 %predicted, r=−0.45, p<0.04). Conclusion These data demonstrate that relationships between postural changes in Q̇aw and PF exist only in the HF population and that the bronchial circulation may contribute to postural PF decline in HF. PMID:21741500

  4. Microwave influence on the isolated heart function. 2: Combined effect of radiation and some drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Pakhomov, A.G.; Dubovick, B.V.; Degtyariov, I.G.; Pronkevich, A.N.

    1995-09-01

    The combined effects of microwave radiation and some drugs were studied in an isolated frog auricle preparation. The experiments established that exposure to pulse-modulated 915 Mhz microwaves for up to 40 min had no effect on either the rate or the amplitude of spontaneous auricle twitches, unless the average absorbed power was high enough to produce preparation heating. Treatment of the preparation with saline containing (0.6--3.0) 10{sup {minus}5} M of propranolol or (0.5--1.5) 10{sup {minus}7} M of atropine altered neither its pacemaker nor its contractile functions; these drugs also had no effect when they were combined with nonthermal microwave irradiation. Caffeine (1 mM) strongly increased the average heart power, which was calculated as the product of twitch rate ad amplitude. The caffeine effect appeared to be significantly augmented (by about 15%, P<0.02) under exposure to burst-type pulsed microwaves (pulse width, 1.5 msec; pause, 2.5 msec; 8 pulses/burst, 16 bursts/s; average SAR, 8--10 W/kg). By itself, this modulation was not effective; the heating of the preparation and saline during exposure was approximately 0.1 C, which could not account for the detected changes. The experimental results demonstrate that caffeine treatment increases the microwave sensitivity of the frog auricle preparation and reveals primarily subthreshold, nonthermal microwave effect.

  5. Physiologically inspired cardiac scaffolds for tailored in vivo function and heart regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Nicholas J; Coulombe, Kareen L K

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering is well suited for the treatment of cardiac disease due to the limited regenerative capacity of native cardiac tissue and the loss of function associated with endemic cardiac pathologies, such as myocardial infarction and congenital heart defects. However, the physiological complexity of the myocardium imposes extensive requirements on tissue therapies intended for these applications. In recent years, the field of cardiac tissue engineering has been characterized by great innovation and diversity in the fabrication of engineered tissue scaffolds for cardiac repair and regeneration to address these problems. From early approaches that attempted only to deliver cardiac cells in a hydrogel vessel, significant progress has been made in understanding the role of each major component of cardiac living tissue constructs (namely cells, scaffolds, and signaling mechanisms) as they relate to mechanical, biological, and electrical in vivo performance. This improved insight, accompanied by modern material science techniques, allows for the informed development of complex scaffold materials that are optimally designed for cardiac applications. This review provides a background on cardiac physiology as it relates to critical cardiac scaffold characteristics, the degree to which common cardiac scaffold materials fulfill these criteria, and finally an overview of recent in vivo studies that have employed this type of approach. PMID:25970645

  6. The Role of Mitochondrial Functional Proteins in ROS Production in Ischemic Heart Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Haifeng; Yang, Yi; Zhao, Heng; Li, Xiuchuan; Yang, Dachun; Li, De; Yang, Yongjian

    2016-01-01

    Ischemic heart diseases (IHD) have become the leading cause of death around the world, killing more than 7 million people annually. In IHD, the blockage of coronary vessels will cause irreversible cell injury and even death. As the “powerhouse” and “apoptosis center” in cardiomyocytes, mitochondria play critical roles in IHD. Ischemia insult can reduce myocardial ATP content, resulting in energy stress and overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Thus, mitochondrial abnormality has been identified as a hallmark of multiple cardiovascular disorders. To date, many studies have suggested that these mitochondrial proteins, such as electron transport chain (ETC) complexes, uncoupling proteins (UCPs), mitochondrial dynamic proteins, translocases of outer membrane (Tom) complex, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), can directly or indirectly influence mitochondria-originated ROS production, consequently determining the degree of mitochondrial dysfunction and myocardial impairment. Here, the focus of this review is to summarize the present understanding of the relationship between some mitochondrial functional proteins and ROS production in IHD. PMID:27119006

  7. Wavelet Based Method for Congestive Heart Failure Recognition by Three Confirmation Functions.

    PubMed

    Daqrouq, K; Dobaie, A

    2016-01-01

    An investigation of the electrocardiogram (ECG) signals and arrhythmia characterization by wavelet energy is proposed. This study employs a wavelet based feature extraction method for congestive heart failure (CHF) obtained from the percentage energy (PE) of terminal wavelet packet transform (WPT) subsignals. In addition, the average framing percentage energy (AFE) technique is proposed, termed WAFE. A new classification method is introduced by three confirmation functions. The confirmation methods are based on three concepts: percentage root mean square difference error (PRD), logarithmic difference signal ratio (LDSR), and correlation coefficient (CC). The proposed method showed to be a potential effective discriminator in recognizing such clinical syndrome. ECG signals taken from MIT-BIH arrhythmia dataset and other databases are utilized to analyze different arrhythmias and normal ECGs. Several known methods were studied for comparison. The best recognition rate selection obtained was for WAFE. The recognition performance was accomplished as 92.60% accurate. The Receiver Operating Characteristic curve as a common tool for evaluating the diagnostic accuracy was illustrated, which indicated that the tests are reliable. The performance of the presented system was investigated in additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) environment, where the recognition rate was 81.48% for 5 dB. PMID:26949412

  8. High Resolution ECG for Evaluation of Heart Function During Exposure to Subacute Hypobaric Hypoxia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zupet, Petra; Finderle, Zarko; Schlegel, Todd T.; Princi, Tanja; Starc, Vito

    2010-01-01

    High altitude climbing presents a wide spectrum of health risks, including exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. Risks are also typically exacerbated by the difficulty in appropriately monitoring for early signs of organ dysfunction in remote areas. We investigated whether high resolution advanced ECG analysis might be helpful as a non-invasive and easy-to-use tool (e.g., instead of Doppler echocardiography) for evaluating early signs of heart overload in hypobaric hypoxia. Nine non-acclimatized healthy trained alpine rescuers (age 43.7 plus or minus 7.3 years) climbed in four days to the altitude of 4,200 m on Mount Ararat. Five-minute high-resolution 12-lead electrocardiograms (ECGs) were recorded (Cardiosoft) in each subject at rest in the supine position on different days but at the same time of day at four different altitudes: 400 m (reference altitude), 1,700 m, 3,200 m and 4,200 m. Changes in conventional and advanced resting ECG parameters, including in beat-to-beat QT and RR variability, waveform complexity, signal-averaged, high-frequency and spatial/spatiotemporal ECG was estimated by calculation of the regression coefficients in independent linear regression models. A p-value of less than 0.05 was adopted as statistically significant. As expected, the RR interval and its variability both decreased with increasing altitude, with trends k = -96 ms/1000 m with p = 0.000 and k = -9 ms/1000 m with p = 0.001, respectively. Significant changes were found in P-wave amplitude, which nearly doubled from the lowest to the highest altitude (k = 41.6 microvolt/1000 m with p = 0.000), and nearly significant changes in P-wave duration (k = 2.9 ms/1000 m with p = 0.059). Changes were less significant or non-significant in other studied parameters including those of waveform complexity, signal-averaged, high-frequency and spatial/spatiotemporal ECG. High resolution ECG analysis, particularly of the P wave, shows promise as a tool for monitoring early changes in heart function

  9. Effects of fixed-dose isosorbide dinitrate/hydralazine on diastolic function and exercise capacity in hypertension-induced diastolic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Richard M; De Silva, Deepa S; Sato, Kaori; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Sam, Flora

    2009-09-01

    Hypertension-induced diastolic heart failure accounts for a large proportion of all heart failure presentations. Hypertension also induces left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy. Fixed-dose isosorbide dinitrate/hydralazine (HISDN) decreased mortality in human systolic heart failure but it is unknown whether it improves maladaptive myocardial remodeling. We sought to test the hypothesis that chronic HISDN modulates LV hypertrophy and myocardial remodeling in hypertension-induced diastolic heart failure. FVB mice underwent either saline (n=18) or aldosterone (n=28) infusion. All underwent uninephrectomy and drank 1% salt water for 4 weeks. Mice were randomized after surgery to regular chow or chow containing HISDN (isosorbide dinitrate: 26 mg/kg per day; hydralazine: 50 mg/kg per day) for 4 weeks. Aldosterone infusion increased tail-cuff blood pressure (161+/-3 mm Hg) versus saline-infused mice (129+/-2 mm Hg). Aldosterone induced LV hypertrophy versus saline-infused mice (LV:body weight ratio: 4.2+/-0.1 versus 3.6+/-0.1 mg/g). HISDN attenuated the aldosterone-induced increased in systolic blood pressure (137+/-5 mm Hg) and also lowered blood pressure in saline-infused mice (114+/-2 mm Hg). However, HISDN did not cause LV hypertrophy regression in aldosterone-infused mice. Aldosterone increased LV end-diastolic dimensions that were not attenuated by HISDN. Similarly, neither aldosterone infusion nor HISDN affected LV end-systolic dimensions. LV ejection fraction and wet:dry lung ratio were not different between aldosterone-untreated and aldosterone-HISDN mice. However, mitral Doppler E/A ratio (a measure of diastolic function), exercise capacity, and plasma soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 levels were improved in aldosterone-HISDN hearts. In conclusion, fixed-dose HISDN improved hypertension, diastolic function, and exercise capacity and reduced soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 levels. There were no reductions in LV hypertrophy, cardiac fibrosis, or

  10. Long-term, regular remote ischemic preconditioning improves endothelial function in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Liang, Y; Li, Y P; He, F; Liu, X Q; Zhang, J Y

    2015-06-01

    Remote ischemic preconditioning (RIPre) can prevent myocardial injury. The purpose of this study was to assess the beneficial effects of long-term regular RIPre on human arteries. Forty patients scheduled for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery were assigned randomly to a RIPre group (n=20) or coronary heart disease (CHD) group (n=20). Twenty patients scheduled for mastectomy were enrolled as a control group. RIPre was achieved by occluding arterial blood flow 5 min with a mercury sphygmomanometer followed by a 5-min reperfusion period, and this was repeated 4 times. The RIPre procedure was repeated 3 times a day for 20 days. In all patients, arterial fragments discarded during surgery were collected to evaluate endothelial function by flow-mediated dilation (FMD), CD34(+) monocyte count, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS expression). Phosphorylation levels of STAT-3 and Akt were also assayed to explore the underlying mechanisms. Compared with the CHD group, long-term regular RIPre significantly improved FMD after 20 days (8.5±2.4 vs 4.9±4.2%, P<0.05) and significantly reduced troponin after CABG surgery (0.72±0.31 and 1.64±0.19, P<0.05). RIPre activated STAT-3 and increased CD34(+) endothelial progenitor cell counts found in arteries. Long-term, regular RIPre improved endothelial function in patients with CHD, possibly due to STAT-3 activation, and this may have led to an increase in endothelial progenitor cells.

  11. Correlation of coronary artery stenosis evaluation with left heart structure and function by multi-slice computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Song, L N; Cao, A D; Niu, Y J; Liu, N

    2014-08-07

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) evaluation of coronary artery stenosis on left heart structure and systolic function. Coronary artery CT angiography was performed in 200 patients diagnosed with coronary heart disease, and then according to the AHA coronary artery 17-segment fractionation method, the Gensini score (GS) was determined for every narrow segment, and one-stop assessment of the correlation between left heart structure and function was performed. After the grouping of GS quartiles from low to high, there were differences between different patients with regard to LVDD, LADD, LVEDV, LVESV, MM, LVEF, and FS, while no difference in SV and CO. GS showed linear negative correlation with LVEF and FS, and linear positive correlation with LVDD, LADD, LVEDV, LVESV, and MM, while no correlation with SV and CO. That is, GS of coronary artery stenosis was negatively correlated with left ventricular systolic function and positively correlated with myocardial mass. The narrower the coronary artery, the worse the cardiac function and the higher the myocardial hypertrophy. Coronary artery stenosis was one of the important causes of the decrease in left ventricular systolic function and cardiac remodeling.

  12. Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) mediates atrioventricular-node function and connexin 45 localization in the murine heart.

    PubMed

    Lim, Byung-Kwan; Xiong, Dingding; Dorner, Andrea; Youn, Tae-Jin; Yung, Aaron; Liu, Taylor I; Gu, Yusu; Dalton, Nancy D; Wright, Adam T; Evans, Sylvia M; Chen, Ju; Peterson, Kirk L; McCulloch, Andrew D; Yajima, Toshitaka; Knowlton, Kirk U

    2008-08-01

    The coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a transmembrane protein that belongs to the family of adhesion molecules. In the postnatal heart, it is localized predominantly at the intercalated disc, where its function is not known. Here, we demonstrate that a first degree or complete block of atrioventricular (AV) conduction developed in the absence of CAR in the adult mouse heart and that prolongation of AV conduction occurred in the embryonic heart of the global CAR-KO mouse. In the cardiac-specific CAR-KO (CAR-cKO) mouse, we observed the loss of connexin 45 localization to the cell-cell junctions of the AV node but preservation of connexin 40 and 43 in contracting myocardial cells and connexin 30.2 in the AV node. There was also a marked decrease in beta-catenin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) localization to the intercalated discs of CAR-cKO mouse hearts at 8 weeks before the mice developed cardiomyopathy at 21 weeks of age. We also found that CAR formed a complex with connexin 45 via its PSD-95/DigA/ZO-1-binding (PDZ-binding) motifs. We conclude that CAR expression is required for normal AV-node conduction and cardiac function. Furthermore, localization of connexin 45 at the AV-node cell-cell junction and of beta-catenin and ZO-1 at the ventricular intercalated disc are dependent on CAR.

  13. Roles of Sensory Nerves in the Regulation of Radiation-Induced Structural and Functional Changes in the Heart

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Tripathi, Preeti; Sharma, Sunil; Moros, Eduardo G.; Zheng, Junying; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Boerma, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a chronic severe side effect of radiation therapy of intrathoracic and chest wall tumors. The heart contains a dense network of sensory neurons that not only are involved in monitoring of cardiac events such as ischemia and reperfusion but also play a role in cardiac tissue homeostasis, preconditioning, and repair. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of sensory nerves in RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered capsaicin to permanently ablate sensory nerves, 2 weeks before local image-guided heart x-ray irradiation with a single dose of 21 Gy. During the 6 months of follow-up, heart function was assessed with high-resolution echocardiography. At 6 months after irradiation, cardiac structural and molecular changes were examined with histology, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analysis. Results: Capsaicin pretreatment blunted the effects of radiation on myocardial fibrosis and mast cell infiltration and activity. By contrast, capsaicin pretreatment caused a small but significant reduction in cardiac output 6 months after irradiation. Capsaicin did not alter the effects of radiation on cardiac macrophage number or indicators of autophagy and apoptosis. Conclusions: These results suggest that sensory nerves, although they play a predominantly protective role in radiation-induced cardiac function changes, may eventually enhance radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and mast cell activity.

  14. MicroRNA-133a engineered mesenchymal stem cells augment cardiac function and cell survival in the infarct heart

    PubMed Central

    Dakhlallah, Duaa; Zhang, Jianying; Yu, Lianbo; Marsh, Clay B.; Angelos, Mark G.; Khan, Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. The most common manifestation of cardiovascular disease is myocardial infarction (MI), which can ultimately lead to congestive heart failure (CHF). Cell therap (cardiomyoplasty) is a new potential therapeutic treatment alternative for the damaged heart. Recent preclinical and clinical studies have shown that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising cell type for cardiomyoplasty applications. However, a major limitation is the poor survival rate of transplanted stem cells in the infarcted heart. miR-133a is an abundantly expressed microRNA in the cardiac muscle and is down-regulated in patients with MI. We hypothesized that reprogramming MSCs using microRNA-mimics (double-stranded oligonucleotides) will improve survival of stem cells in the damaged heart. MSCs were transfected with miR-133a mimic and antagomirs and the levels of miR-133a were measured by qRT-PCR. Rat hearts were subjected to MI and MSCs transfected with miR-133a mimic or antagomir were implanted in the ischemic heart. Four weeks after MI, cardiac function, cardiac fibrosis, miR-133a levels and apoptosis related genes (Apaf-1, Capase-9 and Caspase-3) were measured in the heart. We found that transfecting MSCs with miR-133a mimic improves survival of MSCs as determined by the MTT assay. Similarly, transplantation of miR-133a mimic transfected MSCs in rat hearts subjected to MI led to a significant increase in cell engraftment, cardiac function and decreased fibrosis when compared with MSCs only or MI groups. At the molecular level, qRT-PCR data demonstrated a significant decrease in expression of the pro-apoptotic genes; Apaf-1, caspase-9 and caspase-3 in the miR-133a mimic transplanted group. Further, luciferase reporter assay confirmed that miR- 133a is a direct target for Apaf-1. Overall, bioengineering of stem cells through miRNAs manipulation could potentially improve the therapeutic outcome of

  15. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  16. Equestrian expertise affecting physical fitness, body compositions, lactate, heart rate and calorie consumption of elite horse riding players

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Bong-Ju; Jeon, Sang-Yong; Lim, Sung-Ro; Lee, Kyu-Eon; Jee, Hyunseok

    2015-01-01

    Horse riding (HR) is a sport harmonized with rider and horse. HR is renowned as an effective sport for young and old women and men. There is rare study regarding comparison between elite horse riders and amateurs. We aimed to investigate comprehensive ranges of parameters such as change of lactate, heart rate, calorie, VO2max, skeletal muscle mass, body water, body fat, etc between amateurs and professionals to emphasize HR not only as a sport training but also as a therapeutic aspect. We performed 3 experiments for comparing physical fitness, body compositions, lactate value, heart rate and calorie consumption change before and after riding between amateurs and elites. Around 3 yr riding experienced elites are preeminent at balance capability compared to 1 yr riding experienced amateurs. During 18 min horse riding, skeletal muscle mass and body fat were interestingly increased and decreased, respectively. Lactate response was more sensitive in elites rather than amateurs and its recovery was reversely reacted. Exercise intensity estimated from heart rate was significantly higher in elites (P<0.05). The similar pattern of calorie consumption during riding between amateurs and elites was shown. Horse riding possibly induces various physiological (muscle strength, balance, oxidative capability, flexibility, and metabolic control) changes within body and is thus highly recommended as combined exercise for women, children, and aged as therapeutic and leisure sport activity. PMID:26171385

  17. Prothrombotic SERPINC1 gene polymorphism may affect heparin sensitivity among different ethnicities of Chinese patients receiving heart surgery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiang; Ma, Hai-Ping; Ti, Ai Lai Ti Ta Lai; Zhang, Yong-Qiang; Zheng, Hong

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate a possible correlation between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the antithrombin (gene, SERPINC1, and perioperative sensitivity to heparin in patients receiving heart surgery. The SERPINC1 genotype and allele frequency, coagulation parameters 24 hours before and after surgery, and clinical findings were compared among 3 ethnic groups, Han, Uighur, and Kazakh, patientswho received heart surgery. In Han patients, longer coagulation time as well as higher heparin and protamine dosage was observed. SERPINC1 gene sequencing identified 2 mutations in exon 5, g.981A>G (rs5877) and g.1011A>G (rs5878). The minor allele frequency of allele (A>G) for rs5877 and rs5878 was higher in the Han patients and was significantly different among the ethnic groups (P = .004 and P = .006, respectively). The increased SERPINC1 SNP frequency among Han patients receiving heart surgery might contribute to the differences in their perioperative sensitivity to heparin.

  18. Right heart function deteriorates in breast cancer patients undergoing anthracycline-based chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Boczar, Kevin Emery; Aseyev, Olexiy; Sulpher, Jeffrey; Johnson, Christopher; Burwash, Ian G; Turek, Michele; Dent, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiotoxicity from anthracycline-based chemotherapy is an important cause of early and late morbidity and mortality in breast cancer patients. Left ventricular (LV) function is assessed for patients receiving anthracycline-based chemotherapy to identify cardiotoxicity. However, animal studies suggest that right ventricular (RV) function may be a more sensitive measure to detect LV dysfunction. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine if breast cancer patients undergoing anthracycline-based chemotherapy experience RV dysfunction. Methods Forty-nine breast cancer patients undergoing anthracycline-based chemotherapy at the Ottawa Hospital between November 2007 and March 2013 and who had 2 echocardiograms performed at least 3months apart were retrospectively identified. Right atrial area (RAA), right ventricular fractional area change (RV FAC) and RV longitudinal strain of the free wall (RV LSFW) were evaluated according to the American Society of Echocardiography guidelines. Results The majority (48/49) of patients were females with an average age of 53.4 (95% CI: 50.1–56.7years). From baseline to follow-up study, average LV ejection fraction (LVEF) decreased from 62.22 (95% CI: 59.1–65.4) to 57.4% (95% CI: 54.0–60.9) (P=0.04). During the same time period, the mean RAA increased from 12.1cm2 (95% CI: 11.1–13.0cm2) to 13.8cm2 (95% CI: 12.7–14.9cm2) (P=0.02), mean RV FAC decreased (P=0.01) from 48.3% (95% CI: 44.8–51.74) to 42.1% (95% CI: 38.5–45.6%), and mean RV LSFW worsened from −16.2% (95% CI: −18.1 to −14.4%) to −13.81% (95% CI: −15.1 to −12.5%) (P=0.04). Conclusion This study demonstrates that breast cancer patients receiving anthracycline-based chemotherapy experience adverse effects on both right atrial size and RV function. Further studies are required to determine the impact of these adverse effects on right heart function and whether this represents an earlier marker of cardiotoxicity. PMID:27457966

  19. Plasmid-based transient human stromal cell-derived factor-1 gene transfer improves cardiac function in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaman, S; Miller, T J; Pastore, J M; Kiedrowski, M; Aras, R; Penn, M S

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that transient stromal cell-derived factor-1 alpha (SDF-1) improved cardiac function when delivered via cell therapy in ischemic cardiomyopathy at a time remote from acute myocardial infarction (MI) rats. We hypothesized that non-viral gene transfer of naked plasmid DNA-expressing hSDF-1 could similarly improve cardiac function. To optimize plasmid delivery, we tested SDF-1 and luciferase plasmids driven by the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter with (pCMVe) or without (pCMV) translational enhancers or α myosin heavy chain (pMHC) promoter in a rodent model of heart failure. In vivo expression of pCMVe was 10-fold greater than pCMV and pMHC expression and continued over 30 days. We directly injected rat hearts with SDF-1 plasmid 1 month after MI and assessed heart function. At 4 weeks after plasmid injection, we observed a 35.97 and 32.65% decline in fractional shortening (FS) in control (saline) animals and pMHC-hSDF1 animals, respectively, which was sustained to 8 weeks. In contrast, we observed a significant 24.97% increase in animals injected with the pCMVe-hSDF1 vector. Immunohistochemistry of cardiac tissue revealed a significant increase in vessel density in the hSDF-1-treated animals compared with control animals. Increasing SDF-1 expression promoted angiogenesis and improved cardiac function in rats with ischemic heart failure along with evidence of scar remodeling with a trend toward decreased myocardial fibrosis. These data demonstrate that stand-alone non-viral hSDF-1 gene transfer is a strategy for improving cardiac function in ischemic cardiomyopathy. PMID:21472007

  20. Diuretics as pathogenetic treatment for heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Guglin, Maya

    2011-01-01

    Increased intracardiac filling pressure or congestion causes symptoms and leads to hospital admissions in patients with heart failure, regardless of their systolic function. A history of hospital admission, in turn, predicts further hospitalizations and morbidity, and a higher number of hospitalizations determine higher mortality. Congestion is therefore the driving force of the natural history of heart failure. Congestion is the syndrome shared by heart failure with preserved and reduced systolic function. These two conditions have almost identical morbidity, mortality, and survival because the outcomes are driven by congestion. A small difference in favor of heart failure with preserved systolic function comes from decreased ejection fraction and left ventricular remodeling which is only present in heart failure with decreased systolic function. The magnitude of this difference reflects the contribution of decreased systolic function and ventricular remodeling to the progression of heart failure. The only treatment available for congestion is fluid removal via diuretics, ultrafiltration, or dialysis. It is the only treatment that works equally well for heart failure with reduced and preserved systolic function because it affects congestion, the main pathogenetic feature of the disease. Diuretics are pathogenetic therapy for heart failure. PMID:21403798

  1. Residential Proximity to Major Roadways Is Not Associated with Cardiac Function in African Americans: Results from the Jackson Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Anne M.; Wellenius, Gregory A.; Wu, Wen-Chih; Hickson, DeMarc A.; Kamalesh, Masoor; Wang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), including heart failure, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly among African Americans. Exposure to ambient air pollution, such as that produced by vehicular traffic, is believed to be associated with heart failure, possibly by impairing cardiac function. We evaluated the cross-sectional association between residential proximity to major roads, a marker of long-term exposure to traffic-related pollution, and echocardiographic indicators of left and pulmonary vascular function in African Americans enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS): left ventricular ejection fraction, E-wave velocity, isovolumic relaxation time, left atrial diameter index, and pulmonary artery systolic pressure. We examined these associations using multivariable linear or logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. Of 4866 participants at study enrollment, 106 lived <150 m, 159 lived 150–299 m, 1161 lived 300–999 m, and 3440 lived ≥1000 m from a major roadway. We did not observe any associations between residential distance to major roads and these markers of cardiac function. Results were similar with additional adjustment for diabetes and hypertension, when considering varying definitions of major roadways, or when limiting analyses to those free from cardiovascular disease at baseline. Overall, we observed little evidence that residential proximity to major roads was associated with cardiac function among African Americans. PMID:27304962

  2. Training of affect recognition (TAR) in schizophrenia--impact on functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Sachs, G; Winklbaur, B; Jagsch, R; Lasser, I; Kryspin-Exner, I; Frommann, N; Wölwer, W

    2012-07-01

    Deficits in facial affect recognition as one aspect of social cognitive deficits are treatment targets to improve functional outcome in schizophrenia. According to preliminary results antipsychotics alone show little effects on affect recognition. A few randomized intervention studies have evaluated special psychosocial treatment programs on social cognition. In this study, the effects of a computer-based training of affect recognition were investigated as well as its impact on facial affect recognition and functional outcome, particularly on patients' quality of life. Forty clinically stabilized schizophrenic patients were randomized to a six-week training on affect recognition (TAR) or treatment as usual including occupational therapy (TAU) and completed pre- and post-treatment assessments of emotion recognition, cognition, quality of life and clinical symptoms. Between pre- and post treatment, the TAR group achieved significant improvements in facial affect recognition, in particular in recognizing sad faces and, in addition, in the quality of life domain social relationship. These changes were not found in the TAU group. Furthermore, the TAR training contributes to enhancing some aspects of cognitive functioning and negative symptoms. These improvements in facial affect recognition and quality of life were independent of changes in clinical symptoms and general cognitive functions. The findings support the efficacy of an affect recognition training for patients with schizophrenia and the generalization to social relationship. Further development is needed in the impact of a psychosocial intervention in other aspects of social cognition and functional outcome.

  3. Predicting the accuracy of facial affect recognition: the interaction of child maltreatment and intellectual functioning.

    PubMed

    Shenk, Chad E; Putnam, Frank W; Noll, Jennie G

    2013-02-01

    Previous research demonstrates that both child maltreatment and intellectual performance contribute uniquely to the accurate identification of facial affect by children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to extend this research by examining whether child maltreatment affects the accuracy of facial recognition differently at varying levels of intellectual functioning. A sample of maltreated (n=50) and nonmaltreated (n=56) adolescent females, 14 to 19 years of age, was recruited to participate in this study. Participants completed demographic and study-related questionnaires and interviews to control for potential psychological and psychiatric confounds such as symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, negative affect, and difficulties in emotion regulation. Participants also completed an experimental paradigm that recorded responses to facial affect displays starting in a neutral expression and changing into a full expression of one of six emotions: happiness, sadness, anger, disgust, fear, or surprise. Hierarchical multiple regression assessed the incremental advantage of evaluating the interaction between child maltreatment and intellectual functioning. Results indicated that the interaction term accounted for a significant amount of additional variance in the accurate identification of facial affect after controlling for relevant covariates and main effects. Specifically, maltreated females with lower levels of intellectual functioning were least accurate in identifying facial affect displays, whereas those with higher levels of intellectual functioning performed as well as nonmaltreated females. These results suggest that maltreatment and intellectual functioning interact to predict the recognition of facial affect, with potential long-term consequences for the interpersonal functioning of maltreated females.

  4. Predicting the accuracy of facial affect recognition: the interaction of child maltreatment and intellectual functioning.

    PubMed

    Shenk, Chad E; Putnam, Frank W; Noll, Jennie G

    2013-02-01

    Previous research demonstrates that both child maltreatment and intellectual performance contribute uniquely to the accurate identification of facial affect by children and adolescents. The purpose of this study was to extend this research by examining whether child maltreatment affects the accuracy of facial recognition differently at varying levels of intellectual functioning. A sample of maltreated (n=50) and nonmaltreated (n=56) adolescent females, 14 to 19 years of age, was recruited to participate in this study. Participants completed demographic and study-related questionnaires and interviews to control for potential psychological and psychiatric confounds such as symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, negative affect, and difficulties in emotion regulation. Participants also completed an experimental paradigm that recorded responses to facial affect displays starting in a neutral expression and changing into a full expression of one of six emotions: happiness, sadness, anger, disgust, fear, or surprise. Hierarchical multiple regression assessed the incremental advantage of evaluating the interaction between child maltreatment and intellectual functioning. Results indicated that the interaction term accounted for a significant amount of additional variance in the accurate identification of facial affect after controlling for relevant covariates and main effects. Specifically, maltreated females with lower levels of intellectual functioning were least accurate in identifying facial affect displays, whereas those with higher levels of intellectual functioning performed as well as nonmaltreated females. These results suggest that maltreatment and intellectual functioning interact to predict the recognition of facial affect, with potential long-term consequences for the interpersonal functioning of maltreated females. PMID:23036371

  5. Angiotensin-converting enzyme and matrix metalloproteinase inhibition with developing heart failure: comparative effects on left ventricular function and geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElmurray, J. H. 3rd; Mukherjee, R.; New, R. B.; Sampson, A. C.; King, M. K.; Hendrick, J. W.; Goldberg, A.; Peterson, T. J.; Hallak, H.; Zile, M. R.; Spinale, F. G.

    1999-01-01

    The progression of congestive heart failure (CHF) is left ventricular (LV) myocardial remodeling. The matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) contribute to tissue remodeling and therefore MMP inhibition may serve as a useful therapeutic target in CHF. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition favorably affects LV myocardial remodeling in CHF. This study examined the effects of specific MMP inhibition, ACE inhibition, and combined treatment on LV systolic and diastolic function in a model of CHF. Pigs were randomly assigned to five groups: 1) rapid atrial pacing (240 beats/min) for 3 weeks (n = 8); 2) ACE inhibition (fosinopril, 2.5 mg/kg b.i.d. orally) and rapid pacing (n = 8); 3) MMP inhibition (PD166793 2 mg/kg/day p.o.) and rapid pacing (n = 8); 4) combined ACE and MMP inhibition (2.5 mg/kg b.i.d. and 2 mg/kg/day, respectively) and rapid pacing (n = 8); and 5) controls (n = 9). LV peak wall stress increased by 2-fold with rapid pacing and was reduced in all treatment groups. LV fractional shortening fell by nearly 2-fold with rapid pacing and increased in all treatment groups. The circumferential fiber shortening-systolic stress relation was reduced with rapid pacing and increased in the ACE inhibition and combination groups. LV myocardial stiffness constant was unchanged in the rapid pacing group, increased nearly 2-fold in the MMP inhibition group, and was normalized in the ACE inhibition and combination treatment groups. Increased MMP activation contributes to the LV dilation and increased wall stress with pacing CHF and a contributory downstream mechanism of ACE inhibition is an effect on MMP activity.

  6. Functional imaging of murine hearts using accelerated self-gated UTE cine MRI.

    PubMed

    Motaal, Abdallah G; Noorman, Nils; de Graaf, Wolter L; Hoerr, Verena; Florack, Luc M J; Nicolay, Klaas; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a fast protocol for ultra-short echo time (UTE) Cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the beating murine heart. The sequence involves a self-gated UTE with golden-angle radial acquisition and compressed sensing reconstruction. The self-gated acquisition is performed asynchronously with the heartbeat, resulting in a randomly undersampled kt-space that facilitates compressed sensing reconstruction. The sequence was tested in 4 healthy rats and 4 rats with chronic myocardial infarction, approximately 2 months after surgery. As a control, a non-accelerated self-gated multi-slice FLASH sequence with an echo time (TE) of 2.76 ms, 4.5 signal averages, a matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 2 min 34 s per slice was used to obtain Cine MRI with 15 frames per heartbeat. Non-accelerated UTE MRI was performed with TE = 0.29 ms, a reconstruction matrix of 192 × 192, and an acquisition time of 3 min 47 s per slice for 3.5 averages. Accelerated imaging with 2×, 4× and 5× undersampled kt-space data was performed with 1 min, 30 and 15 s acquisitions, respectively. UTE Cine images up to 5× undersampled kt-space data could be successfully reconstructed using a compressed sensing algorithm. In contrast to the FLASH Cine images, flow artifacts in the UTE images were nearly absent due to the short echo time, simplifying segmentation of the left ventricular (LV) lumen. LV functional parameters derived from the control and the accelerated Cine movies were statistically identical.

  7. Morphological and functional changes in the rat heart after X irradiation: Strain differences

    SciTech Connect

    Yeung, T.K.; Lauk, S.; Simmonds, R.H.; Hopewell, J.W.; Trott, K.R. )

    1989-09-01

    The hearts of mature male rats of the Wistar and Sprague-Dawley strains were locally irradiated with single doses of 17.5 and 20.0 Gy of X rays, respectively. These two dose levels had previously been shown to result in a comparable latent period between irradiation and the death of rats of these two strains from cardiac failure. Morphological changes in the myocardium and modifications in cardiac function were assessed in the animals at 28, 70, and 100 days after irradiation. The first radiation-induced change which was observed in the myocardium was a rapid decline in capillary density and a loss of alkaline phosphatase activity by the capillary endothelial cells. The capillary density was reduced to approximately 50% of that of unirradiated control values at 28 days and to approximately 40% of the control values between 70 and 100 days after irradiation. The loss of enzyme activity was also detected at 28 days. Examination of histological sections showed an increase by 70 days in the areas with negative enzyme activity up to approximately 70% of the myocardium. The reduction in capillary density and the loss of enzyme activity occurred before any marked pathological changes were seen in the myocardium. The pathological lesions seen in the myocardium at 100 days after irradiation were qualitatively and quantitatively the same in the two strains of rat. Measurements of cardiac output in Sprague-Dawley rats showed a gradual decline in output after irradiation; however, measurements in Wistar rats showed a progressive increase in cardiac output over the same period of time. It was shown by rubidium extraction that there was an increase in the percentage of the total cardiac output distributed to the ventricular muscle of Sprague-Dawley rats, while similar measurements in Wistar rats showed no significant change.

  8. Augmented vagal heart rate modulation in active hypoestrogenic pre-menopausal women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Emma; Goodman, Jack M; Morris, Beverly L; Floras, John S; Harvey, Paula J

    2015-11-01

    Compared with eumenorrhoeic women, exercise-trained women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea (ExFHA) exhibit low heart rates (HRs) and absent reflex renin-angiotensin-system activation and augmentation of their muscle sympathetic nerve response to orthostatic stress. To test the hypothesis that their autonomic HR modulation is altered concurrently, three age-matched (pooled mean, 24 ± 1 years; mean ± S.E.M.) groups of women were studied: active with either FHA (ExFHA; n=11) or eumenorrhoeic cycles (ExOv; n=17) and sedentary with eumenorrhoeic cycles (SedOv; n=17). Blood pressure (BP), HR and HR variability (HRV) in the frequency domain were determined during both supine rest and graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -10, -20 and -40 mmHg). Very low (VLF), low (LF) and high (HF) frequency power spectra (ms(2)) were determined and, owing to skewness, log10-transformed. LF/HF ratio and total power (VLF + LF + HF) were calculated. At baseline, HR and systolic BP (SBP) were lower (P<0.05) and HF and total power were higher (P<0.05) in ExFHA than in eumenorrhoeic women. In all groups, LBNP decreased (P<0.05) SBP, HF and total power and increased (P<0.05) HR and LF/HF ratio. However, HF and total power remained higher (P<0.05) and HR, SBP and LF/HF ratio remained lower (P<0.05) in ExFHA than in eumenorrhoeic women, in whom measures did not differ (P>0.05). At each stage, HR correlated inversely (P<0.05) with HF. In conclusion, ExFHA women demonstrate augmented vagal yet unchanged sympathetic HR modulation, both at rest and during orthostatic stress. Although the role of oestrogen deficiency is unclear, these findings are in contrast with studies reporting decreased HRV in hypoestrogenic post-menopausal women.

  9. AMP-activated protein kinase alpha2 deficiency affects cardiac cardiolipin homeostasis and mitochondrial function

    PubMed Central

    Athéa, Yoni; Viollet, Benoît; Mateo, Philippe; Rousseau, Delphine; Novotova, Marta; Garnier, Anne; Vaulont, Sophie; Wilding, James R.; Grynberg, Alain; Veksler, Vladimir; Hoerter, Jacqueline; Ventura-Clapier, Renée

    2007-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays an important role in controlling energy homeostasis and is envisioned as a promising target to treat metabolic disorders. In the heart, AMPK is involved in short-term regulation and in transcriptional control of proteins involved in energy metabolism. Here, we investigated whether deletion of AMPKα2, the main cardiac catalytic isoform, alters mitochondrial function and biogenesis. Body weight, heart weight and AMPKα1 expression were similar in control littermate and AMPKa2−/− mice. Despite normal oxygen consumption in perfused hearts, maximal oxidative capacity, measured using saponin permeabilized cardiac fibers, was ≈30 % lower in AMPKa2−/− mice with octanoate, pyruvate or glutamate+malate but not with succinate as substrates, showing an impairment at complex-I of the respiratory chain. This effect was associated with a 25% decrease in mitochondrial cardiolipin content, the main mitochondrial membrane phospholipid that is crucial for complex-I activity, and by a 13% decrease in mitochondrial content of linoleic acid, the main fatty acid of cardiolipins. The decrease in cardiolipin content could be explained by mRNA down-regulation of rate limiting enzymes of both cardiolipin synthesis (CDS2) and remodeling (ALCAT1). These data reveal a new role for AMPKα2 subunit in the regulation of cardiac muscle oxidative capacity via cardiolipin homeostasis. PMID:17327449

  10. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  11. Lexical and Affective Prosody in Children with High-Functioning Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Ruth B.; Bemis, Rhyannon H.; Skwerer, Daniela Plesa; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the perception and production of lexical stress and processing of affective prosody in adolescents with high-functioning autism (HFA). We hypothesized preserved processing of lexical and affective prosody but atypical lexical prosody production. Method: Sixteen children with HFA and 15 typically developing (TD) peers…

  12. The effect of matrix stiffness of injectable hydrogels on the preservation of cardiac function after a heart attack.

    PubMed

    Plotkin, Marian; Vaibavi, Srirangam Ramanujam; Rufaihah, Abdul Jalil; Nithya, Venkateswaran; Wang, Jing; Shachaf, Yonatan; Kofidis, Theo; Seliktar, Dror

    2014-02-01

    This study compares the effect of four injectable hydrogels with different mechanical properties on the post-myocardial infarction left ventricle (LV) remodeling process. The bioactive hydrogels were synthesized from Tetronic-fibrinogen (TF) and PEG-fibrinogen (PF) conjugates; each hydrogel was supplemented with two levels of additional cross-linker to increase the matrix stiffness as measured by the shear storage modulus (G'). Infarcts created by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery in a rodent model were treated with the hydrogels, and all four treatment groups showed an increase in wall thickness, arterial density, and viable cardiac tissue in the peri-infarct areas of the LV. Echocardiography and hemodynamics data of the PF/TF treated groups showed significant improvement of heart function associated with the attenuated effects of the remodeling process. Multi-factorial regression analysis indicated that the group with the highest modulus exhibited the best rescue of heart function and highest neovascularization. The results of this study demonstrate that multiple properties of an injectable bioactive biomaterial, and notably the matrix stiffness, provide the multifaceted stimulation necessary to preserve cardiac function and prevent adverse remodeling following a heart attack.

  13. Distribution and function of biogenic amines in the heart of Nautilus pompilius L. (Cephalopoda, Tetrabranchiata).

    PubMed

    Springer, Jochen; Ruth, Peter; Beuerlein, Knut; Palus, Sandra; Schipp, Rudolf; Westermann, Bettina

    2005-06-01

    Biogenic amines (serotonin and catecholamines), play an important role in the control of the blood flow not only in vertebrates, but also in invertebrates such as cephalopods. In contrast to the well investigated hearts of the a 'modern', coleoid cephalopods, the innervation of the heart of the archaic Nautilus pompilius L. has not been studied in detail. In this study the distribution and effects of biogenic amines in the Nautilus heart were investigated. Serotonin and catecholamines were visualised by the glyxoylic acid induced fluorescence. High performance liquid chromatotography analysis was performed to discriminate between the catecholamines, which showed a high content of noradrenaline in the 4 auricles, the aorta and the ventricle, whereas the ventricle showed a high dopamine content. Adrenaline was found at a very low concentration in the ventricle. Serotonin and dopamine were also immunohistochemically localised to larger nerves and throughout the heart, respectively. In organ bath experiments, the auricles showed little spontaneous activity. After adding serotonin, they displayed rhythmical contractions, which were accelerated dose-dependently by noradrenaline. In summary, these data suggest an important role for biogenic amines in the control of the heart of Nautilus pompilius L., with serotonin possibly stimulating excitatory nerve fibres, whereas noradrenaline is likely to influence the muscle contraction itself.

  14. Skeletal muscle microvascular oxygenation dynamics in heart failure: exercise training and nitric oxide-mediated function.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Daniel M; Copp, Steven W; Holdsworth, Clark T; Ferguson, Scott K; McCullough, Danielle J; Behnke, Bradley J; Musch, Timothy I; Poole, David C

    2014-03-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) impairs nitric oxide (NO)-mediated regulation of skeletal muscle O2 delivery-utilization matching such that microvascular oxygenation falls faster (i.e., speeds PO2mv kinetics) during increases in metabolic demand. Conversely, exercise training improves (slows) muscle PO2mv kinetics following contractions onset in healthy young individuals via NO-dependent mechanisms. We tested the hypothesis that exercise training would improve contracting muscle microvascular oxygenation in CHF rats partly via improved NO-mediated function. CHF rats (left ventricular end-diastolic pressure = 17 ± 2 mmHg) were assigned to sedentary (n = 11) or progressive treadmill exercise training (n = 11; 5 days/wk, 6-8 wk, final workload of 60 min/day at 35 m/min; -14% grade downhill running) groups. PO2mv was measured via phosphorescence quenching in the spinotrapezius muscle at rest and during 1-Hz twitch contractions under control (Krebs-Henseleit solution), sodium nitroprusside (SNP; NO donor; 300 μM), and N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, nonspecific NO synthase blockade; 1.5 mM) superfusion conditions. Exercise-trained CHF rats had greater peak oxygen uptake and spinotrapezius muscle citrate synthase activity than their sedentary counterparts (p < 0.05 for both). The overall speed of the PO2mv fall during contractions (mean response time; MRT) was slowed markedly in trained compared with sedentary CHF rats (sedentary: 20.8 ± 1.4, trained: 32.3 ± 3.0 s; p < 0.05), and the effect was not abolished by L-NAME (sedentary: 16.8 ± 1.5, trained: 31.0 ± 3.4 s; p > 0.05). Relative to control, SNP increased MRT in both groups such that trained CHF rats had slower kinetics (sedentary: 43.0 ± 6.8, trained: 55.5 ± 7.8 s; p < 0.05). Improved NO-mediated function is not obligatory for training-induced improvements in skeletal muscle microvascular oxygenation (slowed PO2mv kinetics) following contractions onset in rats with CHF.

  15. A flexible home monitoring platform for patients affected by chronic heart failure directly integrated with the remote Hospital Information System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, Massimiliano; Bacchillone, Tony; Saponara, Sergio; Fanucci, Luca

    2011-05-01

    Today Chronic Heart Failure (CHF) represents one of leading cause of hospitalization among chronic disease, especially for elderly citizens, with a consequent considerable impact on patient quality of life, resources congestion and healthcare costs for the National Sanitary System. The current healthcare model is mostly in-hospital based and consists of periodic visits, but unfortunately it does not allow to promptly detect exacerbations resulting in a large number of rehospitalization. Recently physicians and administrators identify telemonitoring systems as a strategy able to provide effective and cost efficient healthcare services for CHF patients, ensuring early diagnosis and treatments in case of necessity. This work presents a complete and integrated ICT solution to improve the management of chronic heart failure through the remote monitoring of vital signs at patient home, able to connect in-hospital care of acute syndrome with out-of-hospital follow-up. The proposed platform represents the patient's interface, acting as link between biomedical sensors and the data collection point at the Hospital Information System (HIS) in order to handle in transparent way the reception, analysis and forwarding of the main physiological parameters.

  16. Viewing nature scenes positively affects recovery of autonomic function following acute-mental stress.

    PubMed

    Brown, Daniel K; Barton, Jo L; Gladwell, Valerie F

    2013-06-01

    A randomized crossover study explored whether viewing different scenes prior to a stressor altered autonomic function during the recovery from the stressor. The two scenes were (a) nature (composed of trees, grass, fields) or (b) built (composed of man-made, urban scenes lacking natural characteristics) environments. Autonomic function was assessed using noninvasive techniques of heart rate variability; in particular, time domain analyses evaluated parasympathetic activity, using root-mean-square of successive differences (RMSSD). During stress, secondary cardiovascular markers (heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure) showed significant increases from baseline which did not differ between the two viewing conditions. Parasympathetic activity, however, was significantly higher in recovery following the stressor in the viewing scenes of nature condition compared to viewing scenes depicting built environments (RMSSD; 50.0 ± 31.3 vs 34.8 ± 14.8 ms). Thus, viewing nature scenes prior to a stressor alters autonomic activity in the recovery period. The secondary aim was to examine autonomic function during viewing of the two scenes. Standard deviation of R-R intervals (SDRR), as change from baseline, during the first 5 min of viewing nature scenes was greater than during built scenes. Overall, this suggests that nature can elicit improvements in the recovery process following a stressor.

  17. [Evolution of mechanisms of Ca(2+)-signaling. Role of Ca2+ in regulation of specialized functions of cardiomyocytes in chronic heart diseases].

    PubMed

    Shemarova, I V; Nesterov, V P

    2014-01-01

    The review considers role of Ca2+ ions in regulation of specialized functions of cardiomyocytes (CM) in disturbances of heart activity. Problems of Ca(2+)-dependent signaling mechanisms leading to pathological hypertrophy, arrythmogenesis, and heart failure are elucidated. A particular attention is paid to analysis of Ca(2+)-dependent molecular mechanisms leading to remodeling of contractile proteins, apoptosis, or pathological growth of CM.

  18. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  19. Effect of hypokinesia on cardiac contractile function and nervous regulation of the heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyerson, F. Z.; Kapelko, V. I.; Gorina, M. S.; Shchegolkov, A. N.; Larinov, N. P.

    1980-01-01

    Longterm hypokinesia caused cardiac deadaptation in rabbits, which resulted in the diminishing of the left ventricular rate of contraction and relaxation, joined later by decreased vascular resistance. As a results, the ejection rate as well as stroke volume and cardiac output were normal. The decrease of the relaxation speed was more obvious at a high heart rate and results in shortening of the diastolic pause and diminishing of cardiac output. Hearts of the hypokinetic animals were characterized by normal maximal pressure developed by a unit of muccardial mass aorta clamping, decreased adrenoreactivity, and increased cholinoreactivity. This complex of changes is contrary to changes observed in adaptation to exercise, but is similar to changes observed in compensatory hypertrophy of the heart.

  20. Anatomic and functional imaging of congenital heart disease with digital subtraction angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Buonocore, E.; Pavlicek, W.; Modic, M.T.; Meaney, T.F.; O'Donovan, P.B.; Grossman, L.B.; Moodie, D.S.; Yiannikas, J.

    1983-06-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) of the heart was performed in 54 patients for the evaluation of congenital heart diagnostic images and accurate physiologic shunt data that compared favorably with catheter angiography and nuclear medicine studies. Retrospective analysis of this series of patients indicated that DSA studies contributed sufficient informantion to shorten significantly or modify cardiac catheterization in 85% (79/93) of the defects that were identified. Interatrial septal defects were particularly well diagnosed, with identification occurring in 10 of 10 cases, wheseas intraventricular septal defects were identified in only 6 of 9 patients. Evaluation of postsurgical patients was accurate in 19 of 20 cases.

  1. The mitochondrial uniporter controls fight or flight heart rate increases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuejin; Rasmussen, Tyler P; Koval, Olha M; Joiner, Mei-Ling A; Hall, Duane D; Chen, Biyi; Luczak, Elizabeth D; Wang, Qiongling; Rokita, Adam G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate increases are a fundamental adaptation to physiological stress, while inappropriate heart rate increases are resistant to current therapies. However, the metabolic mechanisms driving heart rate acceleration in cardiac pacemaker cells remain incompletely understood. The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) facilitates calcium entry into the mitochondrial matrix to stimulate metabolism. We developed mice with myocardial MCU inhibition by transgenic expression of a dominant-negative (DN) MCU. Here, we show that DN-MCU mice had normal resting heart rates but were incapable of physiological fight or flight heart rate acceleration. We found that MCU function was essential for rapidly increasing mitochondrial calcium in pacemaker cells and that MCU-enhanced oxidative phoshorylation was required to accelerate reloading of an intracellular calcium compartment before each heartbeat. Our findings show that MCU is necessary for complete physiological heart rate acceleration and suggest that MCU inhibition could reduce inappropriate heart rate increases without affecting resting heart rate. PMID:25603276

  2. The mitochondrial uniporter controls fight or flight heart rate increases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuejin; Rasmussen, Tyler P; Koval, Olha M; Joiner, Mei-Ling A; Hall, Duane D; Chen, Biyi; Luczak, Elizabeth D; Wang, Qiongling; Rokita, Adam G; Wehrens, Xander H T; Song, Long-Sheng; Anderson, Mark E

    2015-01-20

    Heart rate increases are a fundamental adaptation to physiological stress, while inappropriate heart rate increases are resistant to current therapies. However, the metabolic mechanisms driving heart rate acceleration in cardiac pacemaker cells remain incompletely understood. The mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) facilitates calcium entry into the mitochondrial matrix to stimulate metabolism. We developed mice with myocardial MCU inhibition by transgenic expression of a dominant-negative (DN) MCU. Here, we show that DN-MCU mice had normal resting heart rates but were incapable of physiological fight or flight heart rate acceleration. We found that MCU function was essential for rapidly increasing mitochondrial calcium in pacemaker cells and that MCU-enhanced oxidative phoshorylation was required to accelerate reloading of an intracellular calcium compartment before each heartbeat. Our findings show that MCU is necessary for complete physiological heart rate acceleration and suggest that MCU inhibition could reduce inappropriate heart rate increases without affecting resting heart rate.

  3. The expression of CG9940 affects the adaptation of cardiac function, mobility, and lifespan to exercise in aging Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wen, Deng-Tai; Zheng, Lan; Ni, Liu; Wang, Hui; Feng, Yue; Zhang, Min

    2016-10-01

    The CG9940 gene, which encodes the NAD(+) synthase protein in Drosophila, is conserved in human, zebra fish, and mosquito. NAD(+) synthase is a homodimer, which catalyzes the final step in de novo nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) biosynthesis, an amide transfer from either ammonia or glutamine to nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NaAD). Both the CG9940 and exercise are closely relative to NAD(+) level, and NAD(+) plays important roles not only in energy metabolism and mitochondrial functions but also in aging. In our study, the expression of CG9940 was changed by UAS/GAL4 system in Drosophila. Flies were trained by a training device. Cardiac function was analyzed by M-mode traces, climbing index was measured through negative geotaxis assay, and lifespan was measured via lifespan assays. The important new findings from our present study included the following: (1) the expression of the CG9940 could affect cardiac function, mobility, and lifespan in Drosophila. Over-expression of the CG9940 gene had positive effects on Drosophila, such as enhanced aging cardiac output, reduced heart failure, delayed age-related mobility decline, and prolonged lifespan, but lower-expression of the CG9940 had negative effects on them. (2) Different expressions of the CG9940 resulted in different influences on the adaptation of cardiac function, mobility, and lifespan to exercise in aging Drosophila. Both normal-expression and over-expression of the CG9940 resulted in positive influences on the adaptation of cardiac functions, mobility, and lifespan to exercise in aging Drosophila such as exercise slowed age-related decline of cardiac function, mobility and extent of lifespan in these flies, while lower-expression of the CG9940 led to negative impacts on the adaptation of mobility and lifespan to exercise in Drosophila. PMID:27448710

  4. The expression of CG9940 affects the adaptation of cardiac function, mobility, and lifespan to exercise in aging Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Wen, Deng-Tai; Zheng, Lan; Ni, Liu; Wang, Hui; Feng, Yue; Zhang, Min

    2016-10-01

    The CG9940 gene, which encodes the NAD(+) synthase protein in Drosophila, is conserved in human, zebra fish, and mosquito. NAD(+) synthase is a homodimer, which catalyzes the final step in de novo nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) biosynthesis, an amide transfer from either ammonia or glutamine to nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide (NaAD). Both the CG9940 and exercise are closely relative to NAD(+) level, and NAD(+) plays important roles not only in energy metabolism and mitochondrial functions but also in aging. In our study, the expression of CG9940 was changed by UAS/GAL4 system in Drosophila. Flies were trained by a training device. Cardiac function was analyzed by M-mode traces, climbing index was measured through negative geotaxis assay, and lifespan was measured via lifespan assays. The important new findings from our present study included the following: (1) the expression of the CG9940 could affect cardiac function, mobility, and lifespan in Drosophila. Over-expression of the CG9940 gene had positive effects on Drosophila, such as enhanced aging cardiac output, reduced heart failure, delayed age-related mobility decline, and prolonged lifespan, but lower-expression of the CG9940 had negative effects on them. (2) Different expressions of the CG9940 resulted in different influences on the adaptation of cardiac function, mobility, and lifespan to exercise in aging Drosophila. Both normal-expression and over-expression of the CG9940 resulted in positive influences on the adaptation of cardiac functions, mobility, and lifespan to exercise in aging Drosophila such as exercise slowed age-related decline of cardiac function, mobility and extent of lifespan in these flies, while lower-expression of the CG9940 led to negative impacts on the adaptation of mobility and lifespan to exercise in Drosophila.

  5. Perception of affective prosody in major depression: a link to executive functions?

    PubMed

    Uekermann, Jennifer; Abdel-Hamid, Mona; Lehmkämper, Caroline; Vollmoeller, Wolfgang; Daum, Irene

    2008-07-01

    Major depression is associated with impairments of executive functions and affect perception deficits, both being linked to dysfunction of fronto-subcortical networks. So far, little is known about the relationship between cognitive and affective deficits in major depression. In the present investigation, affect perception and executive functions were assessed in 29 patients with a diagnosis of major depression (Dep) and 29 healthy controls (HC). Both groups were comparable on IQ, age, and gender distribution. Depressed patients showed deficits of perception of affective prosody, which were significantly related to inhibition, set shifting, and working memory. Our findings suggest a significant association between cognitive deficits and affect perception impairments in major depression, which may be of considerable clinical relevance and might be addressed in treatment approaches. Future studies are desirable to investigate the nature of the association in more detail.

  6. Negative affect predicts social functioning across schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: Findings from an integrated data analysis.

    PubMed

    Grove, Tyler B; Tso, Ivy F; Chun, Jinsoo; Mueller, Savanna A; Taylor, Stephan F; Ellingrod, Vicki L; McInnis, Melvin G; Deldin, Patricia J

    2016-09-30

    Most people with a serious mental illness experience significant functional impairment despite ongoing pharmacological treatment. Thus, in order to improve outcomes, a better understanding of functional predictors is needed. This study examined negative affect, a construct comprised of negative emotional experience, as a predictor of social functioning across serious mental illnesses. One hundred twenty-seven participants with schizophrenia, 113 with schizoaffective disorder, 22 with psychosis not otherwise specified, 58 with bipolar disorder, and 84 healthy controls (N=404) completed self-report negative affect measures. Elevated levels of negative affect were observed in clinical participants compared with healthy controls. For both clinical and healthy control participants, negative affect measures were significantly correlated with social functioning, and consistently explained significant amounts of variance in functioning. For clinical participants, this relationship persisted even after accounting for cognition and positive/negative symptoms. The findings suggest that negative affect is a strong predictor of outcome across these populations and treatment of serious mental illnesses should target elevated negative affect in addition to cognition and positive/negative symptoms.

  7. Loss of the eIF2α kinase GCN2 protects mice from pressure overload induced congestive heart failure without affecting ventricular hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhongbing; Xu, Xin; Fassett, John; Kwak, Dongmin; Liu, Xiaoyu; Hu, Xinli; Wang, Huan; Guo, Haipeng; Xu, Dachun; Yan, Shuo; McFalls, Edward O.; Lu, Fei; Bache, Robert J.; Chen, Yingjie

    2016-01-01

    In response to a number of stresses, including nutrient deprivation, General Control Nonderepressible 2 kinase (GCN2) attenuates mRNA translation by phosphorylating eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2αSer51). Energy starvation is known to exacerbate congestive heart failure (CHF) and eIF2αSer51 phosphorylation is increased in the failing heart. However, the impact of GCN2 during the evolution of CHF has not been tested. In this study we examined the influence of GCN2 expression in response to a cardiac stress by inducing chronic pressure overload with Transverse Aortic Constriction (TAC) in Wild Type (WT) and GCN2 knockout (GCN2−/−) mice. Under basal conditions, GCN2−/− had normal LV structure or function but following TAC, demonstrated less contractile dysfunction, less increase of lung weight, less increase of lung inflammation and vascular remodeling, and less myocardial apoptosis and fibrosis compared with WT mice, despite an equivalent degree of LV hypertrophy. As expected, GCN2−/− attenuated TAC induced cardiac eif2αSer51 phosphorylation and preserved Sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (Serca2a) expression compared with WT mice. Interestingly, expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 was significantly elevated in GCN2−/− hearts, while in isolated neonatal cardiomyocytes, selective knockdown of GCN2 increased Bcl-2 protein expression and enhanced myocyte resistance to an apoptotic stress. Collectively, our data support the notion that GCN2 impairs the ventricular adaptation to chronic pressure overload by reducing Bcl-2 expression and increasing cardiomyocyte susceptibility to apoptotic stimuli. Our findings suggest that strategies to reduce GCN2 activity in cardiac tissue may be a novel approach to attenuate congestive heart failure development. PMID:24166753

  8. Linking and Psychological Functioning in a Chinese Sample: The Multiple Mediation of Response to Positive Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Hongfei; Li, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the associations between linking, response to positive affect, and psychological functioning in Chinese college students. The results of conducting multiple mediation analyses indicated that emotion- and self-focused positive rumination mediated the relationship between linking and psychological functioning, whereas…

  9. Comparison of muscle functional electrical stimulation to conventional bicycle exercise on endothelium and functional status indices in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Kossyvakis, Charalampos; Kaoukis, Andreas; Driva, Metaxia; Pappas, Loukas; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Ntzouvara, Olga; Karavidas, Apostolos; Pyrgakis, Vlasios; Rentoukas, Ilias; Aggeli, Constadina; Stefanadis, Christodoulos

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this prospective, open-label, cohort study was to compare the effect of muscle functional electrical stimulation (FES) on endothelial function to that of conventional bicycle training. Eligible patients were those with New York Heart Association class II or III heart failure symptoms and ejection fractions ≤ 0.35. Two physical conditioning programs were delivered: FES of the muscles of the lower limbs and bicycle training, each lasting for 6 weeks, with a 6-week washout period between them. Brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and other parameters were assessed before and after FES and the bicycle training program. FES resulted in a significant improvement in FMD, which increased from 5.9 ± 0.5% to 7.7 ± 0.5% (95% confidence interval for the difference 1.5% to 2.3%, p < 0.001). Bicycle training also resulted in a substantial improvement of endothelial function. FMD increased from 6.2 ± 0.4% to 9.2 ± 0.4% (95% confidence interval for the difference 2.5% to 3.5%, p < 0.001). FES was associated with a 41% relative increase in FMD, compared to 57% with bicycle exercise (95% confidence interval for the difference between the relative changes 1.2% to 30.5%, p = 0.034). This resulted in attaining a significantly higher FMD value after bicycle training compared to FES (9.2 ± 0.4% vs 7.7 ± 0.5%, p < 0.001). In conclusion, the effect of muscle FES in patients with heart failure on endothelial function, although not equivalent to that of conventional exercise, is substantial. Muscle FES protocols may prove very useful in the treatment of patients with heart failure who cannot or will not adhere to conventional exercise programs.

  10. Determining place and process: functional traits of ectomycorrhizal fungi that affect both community structure and ecosystem function.

    PubMed

    Koide, Roger T; Fernandez, Christopher; Malcolm, Glenna

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing interest amongst community ecologists in functional traits. Response traits determine membership in communities. Effect traits influence ecosystem function. One goal of community ecology is to predict the effect of environmental change on ecosystem function. Environmental change can directly and indirectly affect ecosystem function. Indirect effects are mediated through shifts in community structure. It is difficult to predict how environmental change will affect ecosystem function via the indirect route when the change in effect trait distribution is not predictable from the change in response trait distribution. When response traits function as effect traits, however, it becomes possible to predict the indirect effect of environmental change on ecosystem function. Here we illustrate four examples in which key attributes of ectomycorrhizal fungi function as both response and effect traits. While plant ecologists have discussed response and effect traits in the context of community structuring and ecosystem function, this approach has not been applied to ectomycorrhizal fungi. This is unfortunate because of the large effects of ectomycorrhizal fungi on ecosystem function. We hope to stimulate further research in this area in the hope of better predicting the ecosystem- and landscape-level effects of the fungi as influenced by changing environmental conditions.

  11. Lowering body weight in obese mice with diastolic heart failure improves cardiac insulin sensitivity and function: implications for the obesity paradox.

    PubMed

    Sankaralingam, Sowndramalingam; Abo Alrob, Osama; Zhang, Liyan; Jaswal, Jagdip S; Wagg, Cory S; Fukushima, Arata; Padwal, Raj S; Johnstone, David E; Sharma, Arya M; Lopaschuk, Gary D

    2015-05-01

    Recent studies suggest improved outcomes and survival in obese heart failure patients (i.e., the obesity paradox), although obesity and heart failure unfavorably alter cardiac function and metabolism. We investigated the effects of weight loss on cardiac function and metabolism in obese heart failure mice. Obesity and heart failure were induced by feeding mice a high-fat (HF) diet (60% kcal from fat) for 4 weeks, following which an abdominal aortic constriction (AAC) was produced. Four weeks post-AAC, mice were switched to a low-fat (LF) diet (12% kcal from fat; HF AAC LF) or maintained on an HF (HF AAC HF) for a further 10 weeks. After 18 weeks, HF AAC LF mice weighed less than HF AAC HF mice. Diastolic function was improved in HF AAC LF mice, while cardiac hypertrophy was decreased and accompanied by decreased SIRT1 expression, increased FOXO1 acetylation, and increased atrogin-1 expression compared with HF AAC HF mice. Insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation was increased in hearts from HF AAC LF mice, compared with HF AAC HF mice. Thus lowering body weight by switching to LF diet in obese mice with heart failure is associated with decreased cardiac hypertrophy and improvements in both cardiac insulin sensitivity and diastolic function, suggesting that weight loss does not negatively impact heart function in the setting of obesity.

  12. Remote heart function monitoring: role of the CardioMEMS HF System.

    PubMed

    Vanoli, Emilio; D'Elia, Emilia; La Rovere, Maria T; Gronda, Edoardo

    2016-07-01

    Heart failure is a pandemic condition that is challenging cardiology today. The primary economical and social burden of this syndrome is hospitalization rate whose costs represent the highest ones within the entire healthcare management. Remote monitoring of physiological data, obtained through self-reporting via telephone calls or, automatically, using external devices is a potential novel approach to implement management of patients with heart failure and reduce hospitalization rates. Relatively large but, sometimes, contradicting information exists about the efficacy of remote monitoring via different noninvasive approaches to reduce the economical and social burden of heart failure management. This leaves still partly unaddressed this critical issue and generates the need for new approaches. In this context, the CardioMEMS device that can chronically monitor pulmonary pressures from a small microchip inserted transvenously in the pulmonary artery seems to represent an innovative tool to challenge hospitalization rates. Consecutive analyses from the CHAMPION study had indeed documented the efficacy of the CardioMEMS in the remote monitoring of the pulmonary circulation status of patients with heart failure and in providing adequate information to optimally manage such patients with the final result of a significant hospitalization rate reduction. The striking information here is that this appears to be true in patients with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction also. Overall, the reports from the CHAMPION study encourage the use of CardioMEMS but larger populations are needed to definitively prove its value. PMID:26881785

  13. Arterial wall mechanics as a function of heart rate: role of vascular smooth muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvucci, Fernando Pablo; Schiavone, Jonathan; Craiem, Damian; Barra, Juan Gabriel

    2007-11-01

    Vascular wall viscoelasticity can be evaluated using a first-order lumped model. This model consists of a spring with elastic constant E and a dashpot with viscous constant η. More importantly, this viscoelastic model can be fitted in-vivo measuring arterial pressure and diameter. The aim of this work is to analyze the influence of heart rate over E and η. In two anesthetized sheep, diameter in thoracic aorta and intravascular pressure has been registered. The right atrium was connected to a programmable stimulator through a pair of pace-maker wires to produce changes in stimulation heart rate (HR) from 80 to 160 bpm. Additionally, local activation of vascular smooth muscle was induced with phenylephrine. After converting pressure and diameter signals into stress and strain respectively, E y η were calculated in control state and during muscle activation. The elastic modulus E did not present significant changes with heart rate. The viscous modulus η decreased 49% with a two-fold acceleration in heart rate from 80 to 160 bpm. However, the product η HR remained stable. The viscous modulus η increased 39% with smooth muscle activation. No significant pressure changes were registered during the experiment. The contractile action of vascular smooth muscle could contribute to increasing arterial wall viscosity. The decrease of η when HR increased might be related to smooth muscle relaxation mediated by endothelium activity, which was stimulated by flow increase. We conclude that HR can modulate arterial wall viscoelasticity through endothelium-dependent mechanisms.

  14. ANGPTL2 activity in cardiac pathologies accelerates heart failure by perturbing cardiac function and energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhe; Miyata, Keishi; Kadomatsu, Tsuyoshi; Horiguchi, Haruki; Fukushima, Hiroyuki; Tohyama, Shugo; Ujihara, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Takahiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Zhao, Jiabin; Endo, Motoyoshi; Morinaga, Jun; Sato, Michio; Sugizaki, Taichi; Zhu, Shunshun; Terada, Kazutoyo; Sakaguchi, Hisashi; Komohara, Yoshihiro; Takeya, Motohiro; Takeda, Naoki; Araki, Kimi; Manabe, Ichiro; Fukuda, Keiichi; Otsu, Kinya; Wada, Jun; Murohara, Toyoaki; Mohri, Satoshi; Yamashita, Jun K.; Sano, Motoaki; Oike, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    A cardioprotective response that alters ventricular contractility or promotes cardiomyocyte enlargement occurs with increased workload in conditions such as hypertension. When that response is excessive, pathological cardiac remodelling occurs, which can progress to heart failure, a leading cause of death worldwide. Mechanisms underlying this response are not fully understood. Here, we report that expression of angiopoietin-like protein 2 (ANGPTL2) increases in pathologically-remodeled hearts of mice and humans, while decreased cardiac ANGPTL2 expression occurs in physiological cardiac remodelling induced by endurance training in mice. Mice overexpressing ANGPTL2 in heart show cardiac dysfunction caused by both inactivation of AKT and sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA)2a signalling and decreased myocardial energy metabolism. Conversely, Angptl2 knockout mice exhibit increased left ventricular contractility and upregulated AKT-SERCA2a signalling and energy metabolism. Finally, ANGPTL2-knockdown in mice subjected to pressure overload ameliorates cardiac dysfunction. Overall, these studies suggest that therapeutic ANGPTL2 suppression could antagonize development of heart failure. PMID:27677409

  15. [Structural and functional changes of external and intracranial arteries in elderly patients of different ethnic groups with ischemic heart disease].

    PubMed

    Fedorets, V N; Abramov, E A; Bartosh-Zelenaia, S Iu; Naĭden, T V

    2014-01-01

    The present article discusses the problem of structural and functional changes in extra-and intracranial arteries in elderly patients with ischemic heart disease (CHD) belonging to different ethnic groups before the upcoming coronary arteriography research and planned operative intervention. We examined 120 elderly patients with ischemic heart disease, including 50 patients of Korean nationality and 70 patients of Slavic ethnicity. Average values of IMT of the right and left CCA patients of South Asian group were significantly lower than those of Slavic ethnicity. Elderly patients with CHD the violation of cerebral circulation were due to atherosclerotic lesions of the extracranial vessels and local hemodynamic disturbances in their area of pathological tortuosity. Korean ethnicity elderly patients with CHD were observed more pronounced signs of stenosis and deformation of the main arteries of the neck, as well as lower collateral reserve of cerebral circulation.

  16. Total heart volume as a function of clinical and anthropometric parameters in a population of external beam radiation therapy patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadège Ilembe Badouna, Audrey; Veres, Cristina; Haddy, Nadia; Bidault, François; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Chavaudra, Jean; Bridier, André; de Vathaire, Florent; Diallo, Ibrahima

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to determine anthropometric parameters leading to the least uncertain estimate of heart size when connecting a computational phantom to an external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) patient. From computed tomography images, we segmented the heart and calculated its total volume (THV) in a population of 270 EBRT patients of both sexes, aged 0.7-83 years. Our data were fitted using logistic growth functions. The patient age, height, weight, body mass index and body surface area (BSA) were used as explanatory variables. For both genders, good fits were obtained with both weight (R2 = 0.89 for males and 0.83 for females) and BSA (R2 = 0.90 for males and 0.84 for females). These results demonstrate that, among anthropometric parameters, weight plays an important role in predicting THV. These findings should be taken into account when assigning a computational phantom to a patient.

  17. The bHLH Transcription Factor Hand Regulates the Expression of Genes Critical to Heart and Muscle Function in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Hallier, Benjamin; Hoffmann, Julia; Roeder, Thomas; Tögel, Markus; Meyer, Heiko; Paululat, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Hand proteins belong to the highly conserved family of basic Helix-Loop-Helix transcription factors and are critical to distinct developmental processes, including cardiogenesis and neurogenesis in vertebrates. In Drosophila melanogaster a single orthologous hand gene is expressed with absence of the respective protein causing semilethality during early larval instars. Surviving adult animals suffer from shortened lifespan associated with a disorganized myofibrillar structure being apparent in the dorsal vessel, the wing hearts and in midgut tissue. Based on these data, the major biological significance of Hand seems to be related to muscle development, maintenance or function; however, up to now the physiological basis for Hand functionality remains elusive. Thus, the identification of genes whose expression is, directly or indirectly, regulated by Hand has considerable relevance with respect to understanding its biological functionality in flies and vertebrates. Beneficially, hand mutants are viable and exhibit affected tissues, which renders Drosophila an ideal model to investigate up- or downregulated target genes by a comparative microarray approach focusing on the respective tissues from mutant specimens. Our present work reveals for the first time that Drosophila Hand regulates the expression of numerous genes of diverse physiological relevancy, including distinct factors required for proper muscle development and function such as Zasp52 or Msp-300. These results relate Hand activity to muscle integrity and functionality and may thus be highly beneficial to the evaluation of corresponding hand phenotypes. PMID:26252215

  18. Effect of ethanol on function of the rat heart and skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Pagala, M; Ravindran, K; Amaladevi, B; Namba, T; Grob, D

    1995-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the acute effects of ethanol on responses of the rat heart and skeletal muscles both in vivo and in vitro. In the anesthetized rat, intravenous infusion of ethanol at 0.1-0.5 g/kg body weight (33-167 mM) decreased the breathing rate by 8-83%, heart rate by 4-52%, and QRS amplitude by 5-27%, and increased the P-R interval by 1-49%. In the anterior tibialis muscle subjected to repetitive nerve stimulation at 100 Hz for 0.5 sec, ethanol at 0.1 g/kg increased the amplitude of the muscle action potential (AP) by 7%, whereas at 0.5 g/kg it decreased the muscle AP by 32%. The nerve-evoked tetanic tension was reduced by 7-34% at 0.1-0.5 g/kg ethanol. In the isolated rat heart, perfusion of ethanol at 0.1-3.0% (22-651 mM) decreased the heart rate by 8-48% and QRS amplitude by 10-39%, and increased the P-R interval by 5-61%. Left ventricular pressure was increased by 10% at 0.1% ethanol, and decreased by 80% at 3.0% ethanol. In the isolated rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm muscle preparation subjected to repetitive nerve stimulation at 100 Hz for 0.5 sec, 0.1-3.0% ethanol decreased the amplitude of the nerve AP by 5-89%, nerve-evoked muscle AP by 2-96%, and peak tetanic tension by 1-87%. On repetitive direct muscle stimulation at 100 Hz for 0.5 sec, 0.1-3.0% ethanol decreased the amplitude of the muscle-evoked muscle AP by 8-65%, and muscle-evoked tetanic tension by 2-65%. These studies indicate that ethanol causes smaller reduction in responses of the heart and skeletal muscles at clinical concentrations, but marked reduction in these responses at higher concentrations due to direct action on excitability of these tissues. At higher concentrations, ethanol causes greater reduction in excitability of the skeletal muscle than of the heart. PMID:7573793

  19. Connecting Teratogen-Induced Congenital Heart Defects to Neural Crest Cells and Their Effect on Cardiac Function

    PubMed Central

    Karunamuni, Ganga H.; Ma, Pei; Gu, Shi; Rollins, Andrew M.; Jenkins, Michael W.; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-01-01

    Neural crest cells play many key roles in embryonic development, as demonstrated by the abnormalities that result from their specific absence or dysfunction. Unfortunately, these key cells are particularly sensitive to abnormalities in various intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as genetic deletions or ethanol-exposure that lead to morbidity and mortality for organisms. This review discusses the role identified for a segment of neural crest is in regulating the morphogenesis of the heart and associated great vessels. The paradox is that their derivatives constitute a small proportion of cells to the cardiovascular system. Findings supporting that these cells impact early cardiac function raises the interesting possibility that they indirectly control cardiovascular development at least partially through regulating function. Making connections between insults to the neural crest, cardiac function, and morphogenesis is more approachable with technological advances. Expanding our understanding of early functional consequences could be useful in improving diagnosis and testing therapies. PMID:25220155

  20. Connecting teratogen-induced congenital heart defects to neural crest cells and their effect on cardiac function.

    PubMed

    Karunamuni, Ganga H; Ma, Pei; Gu, Shi; Rollins, Andrew M; Jenkins, Michael W; Watanabe, Michiko

    2014-09-01

    Neural crest cells play many key roles in embryonic development, as demonstrated by the abnormalities that result from their specific absence or dysfunction. Unfortunately, these key cells are particularly sensitive to abnormalities in various intrinsic and extrinsic factors, such as genetic deletions or ethanol-exposure that lead to morbidity and mortality for organisms. This review discusses the role identified for a segment of neural crest in regulating the morphogenesis of the heart and associated great vessels. The paradox is that their derivatives constitute a small proportion of cells to the cardiovascular system. Findings supporting that these cells impact early cardiac function raises the interesting possibility that they indirectly control cardiovascular development at least partially through regulating function. Making connections between insults to the neural crest, cardiac function, and morphogenesis is more approachable with technological advances. Expanding our understanding of early functional consequences could be useful in improving diagnosis and testing therapies.

  1. Modality of fear cues affects acoustic startle potentiation but not heart-rate response in patients with dental phobia.

    PubMed

    Wannemüller, André; Sartory, Gudrun; Elsesser, Karin; Lohrmann, Thomas; Jöhren, Hans P

    2015-01-01

    The acoustic startle response (SR) has consistently been shown to be enhanced by fear-arousing cross-modal background stimuli in phobics. Intra-modal fear-potentiation of acoustic SR was rarely investigated and generated inconsistent results. The present study compared the acoustic SR to phobia-related sounds with that to phobia-related pictures in 104 dental phobic patients and 22 controls. Acoustic background stimuli were dental treatment noises and birdsong and visual stimuli were dental treatment and neutral control pictures. Background stimuli were presented for 4 s, randomly followed by the administration of the startle stimulus. In addition to SR, heart-rate (HR) was recorded throughout the trials. Irrespective of their content, background pictures elicited greater SR than noises in both groups with a trend for phobic participants to show startle potentiation to phobia-related pictures but not noises. Unlike controls, phobics showed HR acceleration to both dental pictures and noises. HR acceleration of the phobia group was significantly positively correlated with SR in the noise condition only. The acoustic SR to phobia-related noises is likely to be inhibited by prolonged sensorimotor gating.

  2. Modality of fear cues affects acoustic startle potentiation but not heart-rate response in patients with dental phobia

    PubMed Central

    Wannemüller, André; Sartory, Gudrun; Elsesser, Karin; Lohrmann, Thomas; Jöhren, Hans P.

    2015-01-01

    The acoustic startle response (SR) has consistently been shown to be enhanced by fear-arousing cross-modal background stimuli in phobics. Intra-modal fear-potentiation of acoustic SR was rarely investigated and generated inconsistent results. The present study compared the acoustic SR to phobia-related sounds with that to phobia-related pictures in 104 dental phobic patients and 22 controls. Acoustic background stimuli were dental treatment noises and birdsong and visual stimuli were dental treatment and neutral control pictures. Background stimuli were presented for 4 s, randomly followed by the administration of the startle stimulus. In addition to SR, heart-rate (HR) was recorded throughout the trials. Irrespective of their content, background pictures elicited greater SR than noises in both groups with a trend for phobic participants to show startle potentiation to phobia-related pictures but not noises. Unlike controls, phobics showed HR acceleration to both dental pictures and noises. HR acceleration of the phobia group was significantly positively correlated with SR in the noise condition only. The acoustic SR to phobia-related noises is likely to be inhibited by prolonged sensorimotor gating. PMID:25774142

  3. Expression of the Mir-133 and Bcl-2 could be affected by swimming training in the heart of ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Parisa; Alihemmati, Alireza; NourAzar, Alireza; Yousefi, Hadi; Mortazavi, Safieh; Ahmadiasl, Nasser

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The beneficial and more potent role of exercise to prevent heart apoptosis in ovariectomized rats has been known. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of swimming training on cardiac expression of Bcl-2, and Mir-133 levels and glycogen changes in the myocyte. Materials and Methods: Forty animals were separated into four groups as control, sham, ovariectomy (OVX) and ovariectomized group with 8 weeks swimming training (OVX.E). Training effects were evaluated by measuring lipid profiles, Bcl-2 and Mir-133 expression levels in the cardiac tissue. Grafts were analyzed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction for Bcl-2 mRNA and Mir-133 and by Western blot for Bcl-2 protein. Results: Ovariectomy down-regulated Bcl-2 and Mir-133 expression levels in the cardiac tissue, and swimming training up-regulated their expression significantly (P<0.05). Conclusion: Our results showed that regular exercise as a physical replacement therapy could prevent and improve the effects of estrogen deficiency in the cardia. PMID:27279981

  4. Antithetical regulation of α-myosin heavy chain between fetal and adult heart failure though shuttling of HDAC5 regulating YY-1 function.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jie; Li, Yifei; Zhou, Kaiyu; Hua, Yimin; Wang, Chuan; Mu, Dezhi

    2015-04-01

    Molecular switches of myosin isoforms are known to occur in various conditions. Here, we demonstrated the result from fetal heart failure and its potential mechanisms. Fetal and adult heart failure rat models were induced by injections of isoproterenol as previously described, and Go6976 was given to heart failing fetuses. Real-time PCR and Western blot were adopted to measure the expressions of α-MHC, β-MHC and YY-1. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed to analysis whether YY-1 interacts with HDAC5. Besides, histological immunofluorescence assessment was carried out to identify the location of HDAC5. α-MHC was recorded elevated in fetal heart failure which was decreased in adult heart failure. Besides, YY-1 was observed elevated both in fetal and adult failing hearts, but YY-1 could co-immunoprecipitation with HDAC5 only in adult hearts. Nuclear localization of HDAC5 was identified in adult cardiomyocytes, while cytoplasmic localization was identified in fetuses. After Go6976 supplied, HDAC5 shuttled into nucleuses interacted with YY-1. The myosin molecular switches were reversed with worsening cardiac functions and higher mortalities. Regulation of MHC in fetal heart failure was different from adult which provided a better compensation with increased α-MHC. This kind of transition was involved with shuttling of HDAC5 regulating YY-1 function.

  5. NKX2-5 mutations causative for congenital heart disease retain functionality and are directed to hundreds of targets

    PubMed Central

    Bouveret, Romaric; Waardenberg, Ashley J; Schonrock, Nicole; Ramialison, Mirana; Doan, Tram; de Jong, Danielle; Bondue, Antoine; Kaur, Gurpreet; Mohamed, Stephanie; Fonoudi, Hananeh; Chen, Chiann-mun; Wouters, Merridee A; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Plachta, Nicolas; Dunwoodie, Sally L; Chapman, Gavin; Blanpain, Cédric; Harvey, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    We take a functional genomics approach to congenital heart disease mechanism. We used DamID to establish a robust set of target genes for NKX2-5 wild type and disease associated NKX2-5 mutations to model loss-of-function in gene regulatory networks. NKX2-5 mutants, including those with a crippled homeodomain, bound hundreds of targets including NKX2-5 wild type targets and a unique set of "off-targets", and retained partial functionality. NKXΔHD, which lacks the homeodomain completely, could heterodimerize with NKX2-5 wild type and its cofactors, including E26 transformation-specific (ETS) family members, through a tyrosine-rich homophilic interaction domain (YRD). Off-targets of NKX2-5 mutants, but not those of an NKX2-5 YRD mutant, showed overrepresentation of ETS binding sites and were occupied by ETS proteins, as determined by DamID. Analysis of kernel transcription factor and ETS targets show that ETS proteins are highly embedded within the cardiac gene regulatory network. Our study reveals binding and activities of NKX2-5 mutations on WT target and off-targets, guided by interactions with their normal cardiac and general cofactors, and suggest a novel type of gain-of-function in congenital heart disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06942.001 PMID:26146939

  6. Syndecans in heart fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Ida G; Herum, Kate M; Carlson, Cathrine C; Christensen, Geir

    2016-09-01

    Heart disease is a deadly syndrome affecting millions worldwide. It reflects an unmet clinical need, and the disease mechanisms are poorly understood. Cardiac fibrosis is central to heart disease. The four-membered family of transmembrane proteoglycans, syndecan-1 to -4, is believed to regulate fibrosis. We review the current literature concerning syndecans in cardiac fibrosis. Syndecan expression is up-regulated in response to pro-inflammatory stimuli in various forms of heart disease with fibrosis. Mice lacking syndecan-1 and -4 show reduced activation of pro-fibrotic signaling and increased cardiac rupture upon infarction indicating an important role for these molecules. Whereas the short cytoplasmic tail of syndecans regulates signaling, their extracellular part, substituted with heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan chains, binds a plethora of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules involved in fibrosis, e.g., collagens, growth factors, cytokines, and immune cell adhesion proteins. Full-length syndecans induce pro-fibrotic signaling, increasing the expression of collagens, myofibroblast differentiation factors, ECM enzymes, growth factors, and immune cell adhesion molecules, thereby also increasing cardiac stiffness and preventing cardiac rupture. Upon pro-inflammatory stimuli, syndecan ectodomains are enzymatically released from heart cells (syndecan shedding). Shed ectodomains affect the expression of ECM molecules, promoting ECM degradation and cardiac rupture upon myocardial infarction. Blood levels of shed syndecan-1 and -4 ectodomains are associated with hospitalization, mortality, and heart remodeling in patients with heart failure. Improved understanding of syndecans and their modifying enzymes in cardiac fibrosis might contribute to the development of compounds with therapeutic potential, and enzymatically shed syndecan ectodomains might constitute a future prognostic tool for heart diseases with fibrosis. Graphical Abstract Graphical abstract summarizing

  7. Endocardial Remodeling in Heart Failure Patients with Impaired and Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function--A Magnetic Resonance Image Study.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lian-Yu; Su, Mao-Yuan M; Pham, Van-Truong; Tran, Thi-Thao; Wang, Yung-Hung; Tseng, Wen-Yih I; Lo, Men-Tzung; Lin, Jiunn-Lee

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) trabeculation has been studied in certain forms of cardiomyopathy. However, the changes of LV endocardial trabeculation during the remodeling process leading to heart failure (HF) are unclear. Seventy-four patients with systolic heart failure (SHF), 65 with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and 61 without HF were prospectively enrolled. All subjects received magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study including cine, T1 and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images. Trabecular-papillary muscle (TPM) mass, fractal dimension (FD) and extracellular volume (ECV) were derived. The results showed that TPM mass index was higher in patients with SHF than that in patients with HFpEF and non-HF. The TPM mass-LV mass ratio (TPMm/LVM) was higher in SHF group than that in HFpEF and non-HF. FD was not different among groups. The presence of LGE was inversely associated with TPM mass index and TPMm/LVM while the ECV were positively associated with TPMm/LVM. The FD was positively associated with LV chamber size. In conclusion, TPM increases in patients with SHF and are probably related to myocardial cell hypertrophy and fibrotic repair during remodeling. The FD increases with the dilatation of LV chamber but remain unchanged with the deterioration of LV function. PMID:26876005

  8. Endocardial Remodeling in Heart Failure Patients with Impaired and Preserved Left Ventricular Systolic Function-A Magnetic Resonance Image Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lian-Yu; Su, Mao-Yuan M.; Pham, Van-Truong; Tran, Thi-Thao; Wang, Yung-Hung; Tseng, Wen-Yih I.; Lo, Men-Tzung; Lin, Jiunn-Lee

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular (LV) trabeculation has been studied in certain forms of cardiomyopathy. However, the changes of LV endocardial trabeculation during the remodeling process leading to heart failure (HF) are unclear. Seventy-four patients with systolic heart failure (SHF), 65 with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) and 61 without HF were prospectively enrolled. All subjects received magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study including cine, T1 and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images. Trabecular-papillary muscle (TPM) mass, fractal dimension (FD) and extracellular volume (ECV) were derived. The results showed that TPM mass index was higher in patients with SHF than that in patients with HFpEF and non-HF. The TPM mass-LV mass ratio (TPMm/LVM) was higher in SHF group than that in HFpEF and non-HF. FD was not different among groups. The presence of LGE was inversely associated with TPM mass index and TPMm/LVM while the ECV were positively associated with TPMm/LVM. The FD was positively associated with LV chamber size. In conclusion, TPM increases in patients with SHF and are probably related to myocardial cell hypertrophy and fibrotic repair during remodeling. The FD increases with the dilatation of LV chamber but remain unchanged with the deterioration of LV function. PMID:26876005

  9. Optimization of a Model Corrected Blood Input Function from Dynamic FDG-PET Images of Small Animal Heart In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Min; Kundu, Bijoy K.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of dynamic Positron Emission Tomography (PET) of mouse heart in vivo is challenging due to the small size of the heart and limited intrinsic spatial resolution of the PET scanner. Here, we optimized a compartment model which can simultaneously correct for spill over and partial volume effects for both blood pool and the myocardium, compute kinetic rate parameters and generate model corrected blood input function (MCBIF) from ordered subset expectation maximization – maximum a posteriori (OSEM-MAP) cardiac and respiratory gated 18F-FDG PET images of mouse heart with attenuation correction in vivo, without any invasive blood sampling. Arterial blood samples were collected from a single mouse to indicate the feasibility of the proposed method. In order to establish statistical significance, venous blood samples from n=6 mice were obtained at 2 late time points, when SP contamination from the tissue to the blood is maximum. We observed that correct bounds and initial guesses for the PV and SP coefficients accurately model the wash-in and wash-out dynamics of the tracer from mouse blood. The residual plot indicated an average difference of about 1.7% between the blood samples and MCBIF. The downstream rate of myocardial FDG influx constant, Ki (0.15±0.03 min−1), compared well with Ki obtained from arterial blood samples (P=0.716). In conclusion, the proposed methodology is not only quantitative but also reproducible. PMID:24741130

  10. Heart failure with preserved ejection fraction: Defining the function of ROS and NO.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Li; Chuang, Chia-Chen; Hemmelgarn, Benjamin T; Best, Thomas M

    2015-10-15

    The understanding of complex molecular mechanisms underlying heart failure (HF) is constantly under revision. Recent research has paid much attention to understanding the growing number of patients that exhibit HF symptoms yet have an ejection fraction similar to a normal phenotype. Termed heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), this novel hypothesis traces its roots to a proinflammatory state initiated in part by the existence of comorbidities that create a favorable environment for the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Triggering a cascade that involves reduced nitric oxide (NO) availability, elevated ROS levels in the coronary endothelium eventually contribute to hypertrophy and increased resting tension in cardiomyocytes. Improved understanding of the molecular pathways associated with HFpEF has led to studies that concentrate on reducing ROS production in the heart, boosting NO availability, and increasing exercise capacity for HFpEF patients. This review will explore the latest research into the role of ROS and NO in the progression of HFpEF, as well as discuss the encouraging results of numerous therapeutic studies.

  11. Plant Species and Functional Group Combinations Affect Green Roof Ecosystem Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lundholm, Jeremy; MacIvor, J. Scott; MacDougall, Zachary; Ranalli, Melissa

    2010-01-01

    Background Green roofs perform ecosystem services such as summer roof temperature reduction and stormwater capture that directly contribute to lower building energy use and potential economic savings. These services are in turn related to ecosystem functions performed by the vegetation layer such as radiation reflection and transpiration, but little work has examined the role of plant species composition and diversity in improving these functions. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a replicated modular extensive (shallow growing- medium) green roof system planted with monocultures or mixtures containing one, three or five life-forms, to quantify two ecosystem services: summer roof cooling and water capture. We also measured the related ecosystem properties/processes of albedo, evapotranspiration, and the mean and temporal variability of aboveground biomass over four months. Mixtures containing three or five life-form groups, simultaneously optimized several green roof ecosystem functions, outperforming monocultures and single life-form groups, but there was much variation in performance depending on which life-forms were present in the three life-form mixtures. Some mixtures outperformed the best monocultures for water capture, evapotranspiration, and an index combining both water capture and temperature reductions. Combinations of tall forbs, grasses and succulents simultaneously optimized a range of ecosystem performance measures, thus the main benefit of including all three groups was not to maximize any single process but to perform a variety of functions well. Conclusions/Significance Ecosystem services from green roofs can be improved by planting certain life-form groups in combination, directly contributing to climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies. The strong performance by certain mixtures of life-forms, especially tall forbs, grasses and succulents, warrants further investigation into niche complementarity or facilitation as mechanisms

  12. Myocardial Galectin-3 Expression Is Associated with Remodeling of the Pressure-Overloaded Heart and May Delay the Hypertrophic Response without Affecting Survival, Dysfunction, and Cardiac Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Frunza, Olga; Russo, Ilaria; Saxena, Amit; Shinde, Arti V; Humeres, Claudio; Hanif, Waqas; Rai, Vikrant; Su, Ya; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2016-05-01

    The β-galactoside-binding animal lectin galectin-3 is predominantly expressed by activated macrophages and is a promising biomarker for patients with heart failure. Galectin-3 regulates inflammatory and fibrotic responses; however, its role in cardiac remodeling remains unclear. We hypothesized that galectin-3 may be up-regulated in the pressure-overloaded myocardium and regulate hypertrophy and fibrosis. In normal mouse myocardium, galectin-3 was constitutively expressed in macrophages and was localized in atrial but not ventricular cardiomyocytes. In a mouse model of transverse aortic constriction, galectin-3 expression was markedly up-regulated in the pressure-overloaded myocardium. Early up-regulation of galectin-3 was localized in subpopulations of macrophages and myofibroblasts; however, after 7 to 28 days of transverse aortic constriction, a subset of cardiomyocytes in fibrotic areas contained large amounts of galectin-3. In vitro, cytokine stimulation suppressed galectin-3 synthesis by macrophages and cardiac fibroblasts. Correlation studies revealed that cardiomyocyte- but not macrophage-specific galectin-3 localization was associated with adverse remodeling and dysfunction. Galectin-3 knockout mice exhibited accelerated cardiac hypertrophy after 7 days of pressure overload, whereas female galectin-3 knockouts had delayed dilation after 28 days of transverse aortic constriction. However, galectin-3 loss did not affect survival, systolic and diastolic dysfunction, cardiac fibrosis, and cardiomyocyte hypertrophy in the pressure-overloaded heart. Despite its potential role as a prognostic biomarker, galectin-3 is not a critical modulator of cardiac fibrosis but may delay the hypertrophic response. PMID:26948424

  13. Affect and the Brain's Functional Organization: A Resting-State Connectivity Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rohr, Christiane S.; Okon-Singer, Hadas; Craddock, R. Cameron; Villringer, Arno; Margulies, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    The question of how affective processing is organized in the brain is still a matter of controversial discussions. Based on previous initial evidence, several suggestions have been put forward regarding the involved brain areas: (a) right-lateralized dominance in emotional processing, (b) hemispheric dominance according to positive or negative valence, (c) one network for all emotional processing and (d) region-specific discrete emotion matching. We examined these hypotheses by investigating intrinsic functional connectivity patterns that covary with results of the Positive and Negative Affective Schedule (PANAS) from 65 participants. This approach has the advantage of being able to test connectivity rather than activation, and not requiring a potentially confounding task. Voxelwise functional connectivity from 200 regions-of-interest covering the whole brain was assessed. Positive and negative affect covaried with functional connectivity involving a shared set of regions, including the medial prefrontal cortex, the anterior cingulate, the visual cortex and the cerebellum. In addition, each affective domain had unique connectivity patterns, and the lateralization index showed a right hemispheric dominance for negative affect. Therefore, our results suggest a predominantly right-hemispheric network with affect-specific elements as the underlying organization of emotional processes. PMID:23935850

  14. Association between Genetic Variations Affecting Mean Telomere Length and the Prevalence of Hypertension and Coronary Heart Disease in Koreans

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with telomere length (TL) were associated with the incidence of hypertension (HTN)/coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular risk factors in the Korean population. Data from 5,705 (ages 39–70) participants in the Korean Genome Epidemiology Study (rural Ansung and urban Ansan cohorts) were studied. Twelve SNPs known to be associated with telomere biology were tested for an association with HTN/CHD. As results, no significant associations were found between the selected TL-related SNPs and prevalence of HTN and CHD. Among non-alcohol users, subjects with minor alleles in rs1269304 and rs10936601 (TERC and LRRC34, respectively) exhibited a higher rate of CHD occurrence (odds ratio [OR], 1.862; 95% confidence intervals [CIs], 1.137, 3.049; OR, 1.855; 95% CIs, 1.111, 2.985; respectively). However, alcohol users with minor alleles in rs398652 (PELI2) were significantly associated with higher HTN prevalence (OR, 1.179; 95% CIs, 1.040, 1.336). Of the 3 SNPs related to disease outcomes, rs1296304 was significantly associated with increased levels of diastolic blood pressure (β estimate, 0.470; 95% CIs, 0.013, 0.926). The minor allele in rs398652 was significantly associated with higher levels of body mass index (OR, 0.128; 95% CIs, 0.010, 0.246) and γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (OR, 0.013; 95% CIs, 0.001, 0.024). In conclusion, there were no significant associations between the selected TL-related SNPs and the occurrence of HTN/CHD in Koreans. However, the results suggest the presence of a possible interaction between related SNPs and alcohol behavior associated with HTN/CHD occurrence. PMID:27812514

  15. [Using functional brain imaging technique to study central mechanism of acupuncture therapy for chronic stable angina pectoris in view of heart-brain correlation].

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng-Jie; Zeng, Fang; Lan, Lei; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Di; Liang, Fan-Rong

    2014-08-01

    Heart-brain correlation is an important component of Chinese medicine about the theory of zang-fu organs, which is still valuable for acupuncture clinical practice. Nowadays, increasing evidence supports the close association between the heart-brain axis, central autonomic nerve network and cardiovascular diseases, as well as the extensive regulative effects of acupuncture intervention on the heart-brain axis, functional connectivity of the brain, automatic nerve activities and cardiac functions. Therefore, the authors of the present paper hold that from the viewpoint of the heart-brain relationship, and by combining non-invasive functional brain imaging techniques with the patients' subjective and objective clinical indexes, our researchers will possibly and systematically reveal the underlying central mechanisms of acupuncture therapy in the treatment of chronic stable angina pectoris. However, the concrete biochemical mechanism should be proved via other advanced biological techniques.

  16. Sexual function and affect in parkinsonian men treated with L-dopa.

    PubMed

    Brown, E; Brown, G M; Kofman, O; Quarrington, B

    1978-12-01

    Using psychiatric interviews, sexual and affect rating scales, hormonal studies, and neurologic assessment, the authors assessed the effect of L-dopa treatment on men with Parkinson's disease. Patients demonstrated variable affect changes. Approximately one-half of the patients reported an increased sexual interest that was not related to improvement in locomotor function. Hormonal factors appeared to be involved. The findings suggest that male parkinsonian patients who possess an intact hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis experience increased sexual function related to L-dopa treatment.

  17. The CopenHeartSF trial—comprehensive sexual rehabilitation programme for male patients with implantable cardioverter defibrillator or ischaemic heart disease and impaired sexual function: protocol of a randomised clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Pernille Palm; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Hastrup-Svendsen, Jesper; Frederiksen, Marianne; Lindschou, Jane; Winkel, Per; Gluud, Christian; Giraldi, Annamaria; Steinke, Elaine; Jaarsma, Tiny; Berg, Selina Kikkenborg

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Sexuality is an important part of people’s physical and mental health. Patients with heart disease often suffer from sexual dysfunction. Sexual dysfunction has a negative impact on quality of life and well-being in persons with heart disease, and sexual dysfunction is associated with anxiety and depression. Treatment and care possibilities seem to be lacking. Studies indicate that non-pharmacological interventions such as exercise training and psychoeducation possess the potential of reducing sexual dysfunction in patients with heart disease. The CopenHeartSF trial will investigate the effect of a comprehensive sexual rehabilitation programme versus usual care. Methods and analysis CopenHeartSF is an investigator-initiated randomised clinical superiority trial with blinded outcome assessment, with 1:1 central randomisation to sexual rehabilitation plus usual care versus usual care alone. Based on sample size calculations, 154 male patients with impaired sexual function due to implantable cardioverter defibrillator or ischaemic heart disease will be included from two university hospitals in Denmark. All patients receive usual care and patients allocated to the experimental intervention group follow a 12-week sexual rehabilitation programme consisting of an individualised exercise programme and psychoeducative consultation with a specially trained nurse. The primary outcome is sexual function measured by the International Index of Erectile Function. The secondary outcome measure is psychosocial adjustment to illness by the Psychosocial Adjustment to Illness Scale, sexual domain. A number of explorative analyses will also be conducted. Ethics and dissemination CopenHeartSF is approved by the regional ethics committee (no H-4-2012-168) and the Danish Data Protection Agency (no 2007-58-0015) and is performed in accordance with good clinical practice and the Declaration of Helsinki in its latest form. Registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01796353

  18. Effect of a Tibetan herbal mixture on microvascular endothelial function, heart rate variability and biomarkers of inflammation, clotting and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Daniela; Lambrecht, Julia; Radtke, Thomas; Wilhelm, Matthias; Saner, Hugo

    2015-08-01

    In this 6-week prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled and double-blind study, we investigated the effects of a natural herbal remedy based on a recipe from Tibet (Padma® 28), on microvascular endothelial function, heart rate variability and biomarkers of inflammation, clotting and coagulation in 80 coronary artery disease (CAD) patients (age 66 ± 8 years) on guideline-based medication for secondary prevention. We found no significant effects of Padma 28 and conclude that the addition of Padma 28 to guideline-based secondary prevention treatment of CAD did not lead to significant effects on important surrogate markers in elderly male CAD patients. PMID:25208904

  19. Proposal for a functional classification system of heart failure in patients with end-stage renal disease: proceedings of the acute dialysis quality initiative (ADQI) XI workgroup.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Herzog, Charles A; Costanzo, Maria Rosa; Tumlin, James; Kellum, John A; McCullough, Peter A; Ronco, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Structural heart disease is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease requiring dialysis. More than 80% of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are reported to have cardiovascular disease. This observation has enormous clinical relevance because the leading causes of death for patients with ESRD are of cardiovascular disease etiology, including heart failure, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death. The 2 systems most commonly used to classify the severity of heart failure are the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification and the American Heart Association (AHA)/American College of Cardiology (ACC) staging system. With rare exceptions, patients with ESRD who do not receive renal replacement therapy (RRT) develop signs and symptoms of heart failure, including dyspnea and edema due to inability of the severely diseased kidneys to excrete sodium and water. Thus, by definition, nearly all patients with ESRD develop a symptomatology consistent with heart failure if fluid removal by RRT is delayed. Neither the AHA/ACC heart failure staging nor the NYHA functional classification system identifies the variable symptomatology that patients with ESRD experience depending upon whether evaluation occurs before or after fluid removal by RRT. Consequently, the incidence, severity, and outcomes of heart failure in patients with ESRD are poorly characterized. The 11th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative has identified this issue as a critical unmet need for the proper evaluation and treatment of heart failure in patients with ESRD. We propose a classification schema based on patient-reported dyspnea assessed both pre- and post-ultrafiltration, in conjunction with echocardiography.

  20. Proposal for a functional classification system of heart failure in patients with end-stage renal disease: proceedings of the acute dialysis quality initiative (ADQI) XI workgroup.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Herzog, Charles A; Costanzo, Maria Rosa; Tumlin, James; Kellum, John A; McCullough, Peter A; Ronco, Claudio

    2014-04-01

    Structural heart disease is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease requiring dialysis. More than 80% of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are reported to have cardiovascular disease. This observation has enormous clinical relevance because the leading causes of death for patients with ESRD are of cardiovascular disease etiology, including heart failure, myocardial infarction, and sudden cardiac death. The 2 systems most commonly used to classify the severity of heart failure are the New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional classification and the American Heart Association (AHA)/American College of Cardiology (ACC) staging system. With rare exceptions, patients with ESRD who do not receive renal replacement therapy (RRT) develop signs and symptoms of heart failure, including dyspnea and edema due to inability of the severely diseased kidneys to excrete sodium and water. Thus, by definition, nearly all patients with ESRD develop a symptomatology consistent with heart failure if fluid removal by RRT is delayed. Neither the AHA/ACC heart failure staging nor the NYHA functional classification system identifies the variable symptomatology that patients with ESRD experience depending upon whether evaluation occurs before or after fluid removal by RRT. Consequently, the incidence, severity, and outcomes of heart failure in patients with ESRD are poorly characterized. The 11th Acute Dialysis Quality Initiative has identified this issue as a critical unmet need for the proper evaluation and treatment of heart failure in patients with ESRD. We propose a classification schema based on patient-reported dyspnea assessed both pre- and post-ultrafiltration, in conjunction with echocardiography. PMID:24530671

  1. Kabuki syndrome genes KMT2D and KDM6A: functional analyses demonstrate critical roles in craniofacial, heart and brain development.

    PubMed

    Van Laarhoven, Peter M; Neitzel, Leif R; Quintana, Anita M; Geiger, Elizabeth A; Zackai, Elaine H; Clouthier, David E; Artinger, Kristin B; Ming, Jeffrey E; Shaikh, Tamim H

    2015-08-01

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) is a rare multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by distinctive facial features, global developmental delay, intellectual disability and cardiovascular and musculoskeletal abnormalities. While mutations in KMT2D have been identified in a majority of KS patients, a few patients have mutations in KDM6A. We analyzed 40 individuals clinically diagnosed with KS for mutations in KMT2D and KDM6A. Mutations were detected in KMT2D in 12 and KDM6A in 4 cases, respectively. Observed mutations included single-nucleotide variations and indels leading to frame shifts, nonsense, missense or splice-site alterations. In two cases, we discovered overlapping chromosome X microdeletions containing KDM6A. To further elucidate the functional roles of KMT2D and KDM6A, we knocked down the expression of their orthologs in zebrafish. Following knockdown of kmt2d and the two zebrafish paralogs kdm6a and kdm6al, we analyzed morphants for developmental abnormalities in tissues that are affected in individuals with KS, including craniofacial structures, heart and brain. The kmt2d morphants exhibited severe abnormalities in all tissues examined. Although the kdm6a and kdm6al morphants had similar brain abnormalities, kdm6a morphants exhibited craniofacial phenotypes, whereas kdm6al morphants had prominent defects in heart development. Our results provide further support for the similar roles of KMT2D and KDM6A in the etiology of KS by using a vertebrate model organism to provide direct evidence of their roles in the development of organs and tissues affected in KS patients. PMID:25972376

  2. Contributions of Comorbid Diabetes to Sleep Characteristics, Daytime Symptoms, and Physical Function among Patients with Stable Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Fritschi, Cynthia; Redeker, Nancy S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes (DM) and heart failure (HF) are often comorbid. Sleep disturbances, poor physical functioning, and high levels of daytime symptoms are prevalent and contribute to poor quality of life in both populations. However, little is known about the independent and additive effects of comorbid DM on sleep, physical function, and daytime symptoms among patients with HF. Objective To investigate the extent to which comorbid DM confers independent and additive effects on sleep disturbance, physical functioning, and symptoms among patients with stable HF. Methods This secondary analysis was conducted on a sample of 173 stable Class II-IV HF patients. Self-report and polysomnography were used to measure sleep quality, objective sleep characteristics, and sleep disordered breathing. Physical function measures included wrist actigraphy, the six minute walk test, and the SF-36 Physical Component Summary Score. Fatigue, sleepiness, and depression were also measured. Univariate analyses and hierarchical regression models were computed. Results The sample included 173 (n = 119/68% HF and n = 54/32% HF plus DM) patients (age 60.4 ± 16.1 years). In analyses adjusted for age, gender, BMI, and NY Heart Association classification, HF patients with DM had longer sleep latency and spent a greater percentage of time awake after sleep onset (WASO %] than the HF patients who did not have DM (all p < .05). There were no statistically significant differences in respiratory disturbance index (RDI) or self-reported sleep quality. Sleep duration was low in both groups. Patients with DM had shorter 6MWT distance, lower ratio of daytime to nighttime activity, and lower general health and self-reported physical function. Hierarchical regression models revealed that age and DM were the only significant correlates of the sleep variables, while age, gender, NYHA class, and DM were all associated with 6MWT distance. Conclusions Comorbid DM contributes independent and additive effects on

  3. Advantageous effects of immunosuppression with tacrolimus in comparison with cyclosporine A regarding renal function in patients after heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Helmschrott, Matthias; Rivinius, Rasmus; Ruhparwar, Arjang; Schmack, Bastian; Erbel, Christian; Gleissner, Christian A; Akhavanpoor, Mohammadreza; Frankenstein, Lutz; Ehlermann, Philipp; Bruckner, Tom; Katus, Hugo A; Doesch, Andreas O

    2015-01-01

    Background Nephrotoxicity is a serious adverse effect of calcineurin inhibitor therapy in patients after heart transplantation (HTX). Aim In this retrospective registry study, renal function within the first 2 years after HTX in patients receiving de novo calcineurin inhibitor treatment, that is, cyclosporine A (CSA) or tacrolimus (TAC), was analyzed. In a consecutive subgroup analysis, renal function in patients receiving conventional tacrolimus (CTAC) was compared with that of patients receiving extended-release tacrolimus (ETAC). Methods Data from 150 HTX patients at Heidelberg Heart Transplantation Center were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were continuously receiving the primarily applied calcineurin inhibitor during the first 2 years after HTX and received follow-up care according to center practice. Results Within the first 2 years after HTX, serum creatinine increased significantly in patients receiving CSA (P<0.0001), whereas in patients receiving TAC, change of serum creatinine was not statistically significant (P=not statistically significant [ns]). McNemar’s test detected a significant accumulation of patients with deterioration of renal function in the first half year after HTX among patients receiving CSA (P=0.0004). In patients receiving TAC, no significant accumulation of patients with deterioration of renal function during the first 2 years after HTX was detectable (all P=ns). Direct comparison of patients receiving CTAC versus those receiving ETAC detected no significant differences regarding renal function between patients primarily receiving CTAC or ETAC treatment during study period (all P=ns). Conclusion CSA is associated with a more pronounced deterioration of renal function, especially in the first 6 months after HTX, in comparison with patients receiving TAC as baseline immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:25759566

  4. Ramp Study Hemodynamics, Functional Capacity, and Outcome in Heart Failure Patients with Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mette H; Gustafsson, Finn; Houston, Brian; Russell, Stuart D

    2016-01-01

    Ramp studies-measuring changes in cardiac parameters as a function of serial pump speed changes (revolutions per minute [rpm])-are increasingly used to evaluate function and malfunction of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs). We hypothesized that ramp studies can predict functional capacity, quality of life (QOL), and survival in CF-LVAD patients. Hemodynamic changes per Δrpm were measured at a minimum of CF-LVAD support, at baseline pump speed, and at maximal tolerable pump speed. Subsequently functional capacity and QOL were assessed. Eighty ramp tests were performed in 44 patients (HeartMate II, Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA). Functional status was evaluated in 70% (31/44); average 6 minute walk test (6MWT) was 312 ± 220 min, New York Heart Association (NYHA) I-II/III-IV (70/30%) and activity scores very low-low/moderate-very high (55/45%). Decrease in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure per Δrpm was related to better NYHA classification; NYHA I-II vs. III-IV, -0.29 ± 0.15 vs. -0.09 ± 0.16 mm Hg/rpm * 10 (p = 0.007) as well as to activity score; very low-low vs. moderate-very high, -0.16 ± 0.16 vs. -0.31 ± 0.16 mm Hg/rpm * 10 (p = 0.02). Cardiac output change per Δrpm was correlated to measures of QOL. Ramp tests did not predict survival. In conclusion, hemodynamic changes during ramp studies are associated with measures of functional capacity and QOL. Hence, such tests could potentially identify patients in risk of failure to thrive during CF-LVAD support.

  5. Ramp Study Hemodynamics, Functional Capacity, and Outcome in Heart Failure Patients with Continuous-Flow Left Ventricular Assist Devices.

    PubMed

    Jung, Mette H; Gustafsson, Finn; Houston, Brian; Russell, Stuart D

    2016-01-01

    Ramp studies-measuring changes in cardiac parameters as a function of serial pump speed changes (revolutions per minute [rpm])-are increasingly used to evaluate function and malfunction of continuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (CF-LVADs). We hypothesized that ramp studies can predict functional capacity, quality of life (QOL), and survival in CF-LVAD patients. Hemodynamic changes per Δrpm were measured at a minimum of CF-LVAD support, at baseline pump speed, and at maximal tolerable pump speed. Subsequently functional capacity and QOL were assessed. Eighty ramp tests were performed in 44 patients (HeartMate II, Thoratec Corporation, Pleasanton, CA). Functional status was evaluated in 70% (31/44); average 6 minute walk test (6MWT) was 312 ± 220 min, New York Heart Association (NYHA) I-II/III-IV (70/30%) and activity scores very low-low/moderate-very high (55/45%). Decrease in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure per Δrpm was related to better NYHA classification; NYHA I-II vs. III-IV, -0.29 ± 0.15 vs. -0.09 ± 0.16 mm Hg/rpm * 10 (p = 0.007) as well as to activity score; very low-low vs. moderate-very high, -0.16 ± 0.16 vs. -0.31 ± 0.16 mm Hg/rpm * 10 (p = 0.02). Cardiac output change per Δrpm was correlated to measures of QOL. Ramp tests did not predict survival. In conclusion, hemodynamic changes during ramp studies are associated with measures of functional capacity and QOL. Hence, such tests could potentially identify patients in risk of failure to thrive during CF-LVAD support. PMID:27195741

  6. Plant sterols: factors affecting their efficacy and safety as functional food ingredients

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Alvin; Jones, Peter JH; Abumweis, Suhad S

    2004-01-01

    Plant sterols are naturally occurring molecules that humanity has evolved with. Herein, we have critically evaluated recent literature pertaining to the myriad of factors affecting efficacy and safety of plant sterols in free and esterified forms. We conclude that properly solubilized 4-desmetyl plant sterols, in ester or free form, in reasonable doses (0.8–1.0 g of equivalents per day) and in various vehicles including natural sources, and as part of a healthy diet and lifestyle, are important dietary components for lowering low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and maintaining good heart health. In addition to their cholesterol lowering properties, plant sterols possess anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, anti-atherogenicity, and anti-oxidation activities, and should thus be of clinical importance, even for those individuals without elevated LDL cholesterol. The carotenoid lowering effect of plant sterols should be corrected by increasing intake of food that is rich in carotenoids. In pregnant and lactating women and children, further study is needed to verify the dose required to decrease blood cholesterol without affecting fat-soluble vitamins and carotenoid status. PMID:15070410

  7. Matrine improved the function of heart failure in rats via inhibiting apoptosis and blocking β3‑adrenoreceptor/endothelial nitric oxide synthase pathway.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiangbo; Yang, Shusen; Wang, Xu; Gan, Runtao

    2014-12-01

    Matrine, an alkaloid isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine Sophora flavescens AIT has exhibited a number of therapeutic effects on cardiovascular and liver diseases. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether matrine has a protective effect on heart failure in rats. Coronary artery ligation was used to induce a heart failure (CHF) model in rats. Four weeks following the procedure, the rats were treated with different doses of matrine for one month. Histopathological examination demonstrated that matrine treatment alleviated myocardial hypertrophy and cardiac fibrosis in failing hearts. Furthermore, matrine administration also inhibited the increase of plasma aspartate amino transferase, creatine phosphokinase and lactate dehydrogenase levels in CHF rats. The rats with heart failure exhibited a significant reduction in ejection fraction and fractional shortening, as well as an increase in the left ventricular end systolic dimension, and matrine attenuated this decline in heart function. Further investigation demonstrated that matrine treatment also inhibited the upregulation of Bax and increase in the Bcl‑2 expression in the failing hearts. Furthermore, the upregulation of β3-adrenoreceptor (AR) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase proteins following heart failure were also attenuated by matrine. In conclusion, matrine had a preventive role in heart failure in rats at least in part by inhibiting myocardial apoptosis and the β3-AR pathway.

  8. Peripheral chemoreceptor control of cardiovascular function at rest and during exercise in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Edgell, Heather; McMurtry, M Sean; Haykowsky, Mark J; Paterson, Ian; Ezekowitz, Justin A; Dyck, Jason R B; Stickland, Michael K

    2015-04-01

    Peripheral chemoreceptor activity/sensitivity is enhanced in chronic heart failure (HF), and sensitivity is linked to greater mortality. This study aimed to determine the role of the peripheral chemoreceptor in cardiovascular control at rest and during exercise in HF patients and controls. Clinically stable HF patients (n = 11; ejection fraction: 39 ± 5%) and risk-matched controls (n = 10; ejection fraction: 65 ± 2%) performed randomized trials with or without dopamine infusion (2 μg·min(-1)·kg(-1)) at rest and during 40% maximal voluntary contraction handgrip (HG) exercise, and a resting trial of 2 min of inspired 100% oxygen. Both dopamine and hyperoxia were used to inhibit the peripheral chemoreceptor. At rest in HF patients, dopamine decreased ventilation (P = 0.02), decreased total peripheral resistance index (P = 0.003), and increased cardiac and stroke indexes (P ≤ 0.01), yet there was no effect of dopamine on these variables in controls (P ≥ 0.7). Hyperoxia lowered ventilation in HF (P = 0.01), but not in controls (P = 0.9), indicating suppression of the peripheral chemoreceptors in HF. However, no decrease of total peripheral resistance index was observed in HF. As expected, HG increased heart rate, ventilation, and brachial conductance of the nonexercising arm in controls and HF patients. During dopamine infusion, there were no changes in mean arterial pressure, heart rate, or ventilation responses to HG in either group (P ≥ 0.26); however, brachial conductance increased with dopamine in the control group (P = 0.004), but decreased in HF (P = 0.02). Our findings indicate that the peripheral chemoreceptor contributes to cardiovascular control at rest in HF patients and during exercise in risk-matched controls.

  9. Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy in Japanese Patients: Clinical Features, Visual Function, and Factors Affecting Visual Function

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Saho; Saito, Wataru; Saito, Michiyuki; Hashimoto, Yuki; Mori, Shohei; Noda, Kousuke; Namba, Kenichi; Ishida, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the clinical features and investigate their relationship with visual function in Japanese patients with acute zonal occult outer retinopathy (AZOOR). Methods Fifty-two eyes of 38 Japanese AZOOR patients (31 female and 7 male patients; mean age at first visit, 35.0 years; median follow-up duration, 31 months) were retrospectively collected: 31 untreated eyes with good visual acuity and 21 systemic corticosteroid-treated eyes with progressive visual acuity loss. Variables affecting the logMAR values of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and the mean deviation (MD) on Humphrey perimetry at initial and final visits were examined using multiple stepwise linear regression analysis. Results In untreated eyes, the mean MD at the final visit was significantly higher than that at the initial visit (P = 0.00002). In corticosteroid-treated eyes, the logMAR BCVA and MD at the final visit were significantly better than the initial values (P = 0.007 and P = 0.02, respectively). The final logMAR BCVA was 0.0 or less in 85% of patients. Variables affecting initial visual function were moderate anterior vitreous cells, myopia severity, and a-wave amplitudes on electroretinography; factors affecting final visual function were the initial MD values, female sex, moderate anterior vitreous cells, and retinal atrophy. Conclusions Our data indicated that visual functions in enrolled patients significantly improved spontaneously or after systemic corticosteroids therapy, suggesting that Japanese patients with AZOOR have good visual outcomes during the follow-up period of this study. Furthermore, initial visual field defects, gender, anterior vitreous cells, and retinal atrophy affected final visual functions in these patients. PMID:25919689

  10. Chronic electroacupuncture of the ST36 point improves baroreflex function and haemodynamic parameters in heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Lima, J W; Hentschke, V S; Rossato, D D; Quagliotto, E; Pinheiro, L; Almeida, E; Dal Lago, P; Lukrafka, J L

    2015-12-01

    Electroacupuncture (EA) has been used to treat many diseases, including heart failure (HF). This study aimed to evaluate the effects of chronic stimulation in the ST36 acupuncture point on haemodynamic parameters and baroreflex function in rats with HF. Cardiovascular parameters assessed were heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and the reflex cardiovascular response of HR triggered by stimulation of baroreceptors in animals with HF subsequent to acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: Sham Control - animals without HF and without EA; HF Control group - animals with HF and without EA; and HF EA group - animals with HF that received the EA protocol. Six weeks after surgical induction of AMI, the EA protocol (8 weeks, 5 times a week) was performed. The protocol was applied with EA at the ST36 point, frequency of 2 Hz, pulse of 0.3 ms and intensity of 1-3 mA for 30 min. Haemodynamic parameters and baroreceptor function were assessed. There was no difference between groups in the variables HR, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), which were evaluated with awake animals (p>0.05). There was an increase in the mean arterial pressure (MAP) in the HF EA group compared to the HF Control group (p<0.05). The maximum gain of the baroreflex heart rate response (Gain) was higher in the HF EA group than the HF Control and Sham Control groups. Chronic EA in the ST36 point increased the MAP and baroreflex sensitivity in rats with HF.

  11. Interventricular heterogeneity in rat heart responses to hypoxia: the tuning of glucose metabolism, ion gradients, and function.

    PubMed

    Komniski, Milena Segato; Yakushev, Sergej; Bogdanov, Nikolai; Gassmann, Max; Bogdanova, Anna

    2011-05-01

    The matching of energy supply and demand under hypoxic conditions is critical for sustaining myocardial function. Numerous reports indicate that basal energy requirements and ion handling may differ between the ventricles. We hypothesized that ventricular response to hypoxia shows interventricular differences caused by the heterogeneity in glucose metabolism and expression and activity of ion transporters. Thus we assessed glucose utilization rate, ATP, sodium and potassium concentrations, Na, K-ATPase activity, and tissue reduced:oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) content in the right and left ventricles before and after the exposure of either the whole animals or isolated blood-perfused hearts to hypoxia. The hypoxia-induced boost in glucose utilization was more pronounced in the left ventricle compared with the right one. ATP levels in the right ventricle of hypoxic heart were lower than those in the left ventricle. Left ventricular sodium content was higher, and hydrolytic Na, K-ATPase activity was reduced compared with the right ventricle. Administration of the Na, K-ATPase blocker ouabain caused rapid increase in the right ventricular Na(+) and elimination of the interventricular Na(+) gradients. Exposure of the hearts to hypoxia made the interventricular heterogeneity in the Na(+) distribution even more pronounced. Furthermore, systemic hypoxia caused oxidative stress that was more pronounced in the right ventricle as revealed by GSH/GSSG ratios. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that the right ventricle is more prone to hypoxic damage, as it is less efficient in recruiting glucose as an alternative fuel and is particularly dependent on the efficient Na, K-ATPase function. PMID:21398597

  12. Handgrip Strength, Positive Affect, and Perceived Health Are Prospectively Associated with Fewer Functional Limitations among Centenarians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franke, Warren D.; Margrett, Jennifer A.; Heinz, Melinda; Martin, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the association between perceived health, fatigue, positive and negative affect, handgrip strength, objectively measured physical activity, body mass index, and self-reported functional limitations, assessed 6 months later, among 11 centenarians (age = 102 plus or minus 1). Activities of daily living, assessed 6 months prior to…

  13. Weight Reduction in Athletes May Adversely Affect the Phagocytic Function of Monocytes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kono, Ichiro; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Study of the monocyte phagocytic function in nine competitive athletes before and after a two-week weight reduction (through calorie restriction) program revealed that their pre-program phagocytic activity was higher than in sedentary controls but decreased significantly after the program. This suggests calorie restriction may affect the human…

  14. Automatic facial responses to affective stimuli in high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorder.

    PubMed

    Mathersul, Danielle; McDonald, Skye; Rushby, Jacqueline A

    2013-01-17

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) demonstrate atypical behavioural responses to affective stimuli, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Investigating automatic responses to these stimuli may help elucidate these mechanisms. 18 high-functioning adults with ASDs and 18 typically developing controls viewed 54 extreme pleasant (erotica), extreme unpleasant (mutilations), and non-social neutral images from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS). Two-thirds of images received an acoustic startle probe 3s post-picture onset. Facial electromyography (EMG) activity (orbicularis, zygomaticus, corrugator), skin conductance (SCR) and cardiac responses were recorded. The adults with ASDs demonstrated typical affective startle modulation and automatic facial EMG responses but atypical autonomic (SCRs and cardiac) responses, suggesting a failure to orient to, or a deliberate effort to disconnect from, socially relevant stimuli (erotica, mutilations). These results have implications for neural systems known to underlie affective processes, including the orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala. PMID:23142408

  15. Functional importance of cardiac enhancer-associated noncoding RNAs in heart development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Ounzain, Samir; Pezzuto, Iole; Micheletti, Rudi; Burdet, Frédéric; Sheta, Razan; Nemir, Mohamed; Gonzales, Christine; Sarre, Alexandre; Alexanian, Michael; Blow, Matthew J.; May, Dalit; Johnson, Rory; Dauvillier, Jérôme; Pennacchio, Len A.; Pedrazzini, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The key information processing units within gene regulatory networks are enhancers. Enhancer activity is associated with the production of tissue-specific noncoding RNAs, yet the existence of such transcripts during cardiac development has not been established. Using an integrated genomic approach, we demonstrate that fetal cardiac enhancers generate long noncoding RNAs (IncRNAs) during cardiac differentiation and morphogenesis. Enhancer expression correlates with the emergence of active enhancer chromatin states, the initiation of RNA polymerase II at enhancer loci and expression of target genes. Orthologous human sequences are also transcribed in fetal human hearts and cardiac progenitor cells. Through a systematic bioinformatic analysis, we identified and characterized, for the first time, a catalog of IncRNAs that are expressed during embryonic stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and associated with active cardiac enhancer sequences. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that many of these transcripts are polyadenylated, multi-exonic long noncoding RNAs. Moreover, knockdown of two enhancer-associated IncRNAs resulted in the specific downregulation of their predicted target genes. Interestingly, the reactivation of the fetal gene program, a hallmark of the stress response in the adult heart, is accompanied by increased expression of fetal cardiac enhancer transcripts. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that the activity of cardiac enhancers and expression of their target genes are associated with the production of enhancer-derived IncRNAs. PMID:25149110

  16. Investigating the functionality of diamond-like carbon films on an artificial heart diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Ohgoe, Yasuharu; Takada, Satoshi; Hirakuri, Kenji K; Tsuchimoto, Katsuya; Homma, Akihiko; Miyamatsu, Toshinobu; Saitou, Tomoyuki; Friedbacher, Gernot; Tatsumi, Eisuke; Taenaka, Yoshiyuki; Fukui, Yasuhiro

    2003-01-01

    In this study, the authors used diamond-like carbon film to coat the ellipsoidal diaphragm (polyurethane elastomer) of artificial hearts. The purpose of such coatings is to prevent the penetration of hydraulic silicone oil and blood through the diaphragm. To attach diamond-like carbon film uniformly on the diaphragm, the authors developed a special electrode. In estimating the uniformity of the diamond-like carbon film, the thickness was measured using a scanning electron microscope, and the characteristics of the diamond-like carbon film was investigated using infrared spectroscopy, Ar-laser Raman spectrophotometer, and x-ray photoelectron spectrometer. Also, to estimate the penetration of silicone oil through the diaphragm, in vitro testing was operated by alternating the pressure of silicone oil for 20 days. The authors were able to successfully attach uniform deposition of diamond-like carbon film on the ellipsoidal diaphragm. In this in vitro test, diamond-like carbon film was proven to have good stability. The amount of silicone oil penetration was improved by one-third using the diamond-like carbon film coating compared with an uncoated diaphragm. It is expected that through the use of the diamond-like carbon film, the dynamic compatibility of an artificial heart diaphragm will increase.

  17. Form Follows Function: Advances in Trilayered Structure Replication for Aortic Heart Valve Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Simionescu, Dan T.; Chen, Joseph; Jaeggli, Michael; Wang, Bo; Liao, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Tissue engineering the aortic heart valve is a challenging endeavor because of the particular hemodynamic and biologic conditions present in the native aortic heart valve. The backbone of an ideal valve substitute should be a scaffold that is strong enough to withstand billions of repetitive bending, flexing and stretching cycles, while also being slowly degradable to allow for remodeling. In this review we highlight three overlooked aspects that might influence the long term durability of tissue engineered valves: replication of the native valve trilayered histoarchitecture, duplication of the three-dimensional shape of the valve and cell integration efforts focused on getting the right number and type of cells to the right place within the valve structure and driving them towards homeostatic maintenance of the valve matrix. We propose that the trilayered structure in the native aortic valve that includes a middle spongiosa layer cushioning the motions of the two external fibrous layers should be our template for creation of novel scaffolds with improved mechanical durability. Furthermore, since cells adapt to micro-loads within the valve structure, we believe that interstitial cell remodeling of the valvular matrix will depend on the accurate replication of the structures and loads, resulting in successful regeneration of the valve tissue and extended durability. PMID:23355946

  18. Functional importance of cardiac enhancer-associated noncoding RNAs in heart development and disease

    DOE PAGES

    Ounzain, Samir; Pezzuto, Iole; Micheletti, Rudi; Burdet, Frédéric; Sheta, Razan; Nemir, Mohamed; Gonzales, Christine; Sarre, Alexandre; Alexanian, Michael; Blow, Matthew J.; et al

    2014-08-19

    We report here that the key information processing units within gene regulatory networks are enhancers. Enhancer activity is associated with the production of tissue-specific noncoding RNAs, yet the existence of such transcripts during cardiac development has not been established. Using an integrated genomic approach, we demonstrate that fetal cardiac enhancers generate long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) during cardiac differentiation and morphogenesis. Enhancer expression correlates with the emergence of active enhancer chromatin states, the initiation of RNA polymerase II at enhancer loci and expression of target genes. Orthologous human sequences are also transcribed in fetal human hearts and cardiac progenitor cells. Throughmore » a systematic bioinformatic analysis, we identified and characterized, for the first time, a catalog of lncRNAs that are expressed during embryonic stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and associated with active cardiac enhancer sequences. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that many of these transcripts are polyadenylated, multi-exonic long noncoding RNAs. Moreover, knockdown of two enhancer-associated lncRNAs resulted in the specific downregulation of their predicted target genes. Interestingly, the reactivation of the fetal gene program, a hallmark of the stress response in the adult heart, is accompanied by increased expression of fetal cardiac enhancer transcripts. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that the activity of cardiac enhancers and expression of their target genes are associated with the production of enhancer-derived lncRNAs.« less

  19. Functional importance of cardiac enhancer-associated noncoding RNAs in heart development and disease

    SciTech Connect

    Ounzain, Samir; Pezzuto, Iole; Micheletti, Rudi; Burdet, Frédéric; Sheta, Razan; Nemir, Mohamed; Gonzales, Christine; Sarre, Alexandre; Alexanian, Michael; Blow, Matthew J.; May, Dalit; Johnson, Rory; Dauvillier, Jérôme; Pennacchio, Len A.; Pedrazzini, Thierry

    2014-08-19

    We report here that the key information processing units within gene regulatory networks are enhancers. Enhancer activity is associated with the production of tissue-specific noncoding RNAs, yet the existence of such transcripts during cardiac development has not been established. Using an integrated genomic approach, we demonstrate that fetal cardiac enhancers generate long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) during cardiac differentiation and morphogenesis. Enhancer expression correlates with the emergence of active enhancer chromatin states, the initiation of RNA polymerase II at enhancer loci and expression of target genes. Orthologous human sequences are also transcribed in fetal human hearts and cardiac progenitor cells. Through a systematic bioinformatic analysis, we identified and characterized, for the first time, a catalog of lncRNAs that are expressed during embryonic stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and associated with active cardiac enhancer sequences. RNA-sequencing demonstrates that many of these transcripts are polyadenylated, multi-exonic long noncoding RNAs. Moreover, knockdown of two enhancer-associated lncRNAs resulted in the specific downregulation of their predicted target genes. Interestingly, the reactivation of the fetal gene program, a hallmark of the stress response in the adult heart, is accompanied by increased expression of fetal cardiac enhancer transcripts. Altogether, these findings demonstrate that the activity of cardiac enhancers and expression of their target genes are associated with the production of enhancer-derived lncRNAs.

  20. Genetic Polymorphisms Affect Mouse and Human Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Function.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao; Walter, Nicole A R; Harkness, John H; Neve, Kim A; Williams, Robert W; Lu, Lu; Belknap, John K; Eshleman, Amy J; Phillips, Tamara J; Janowsky, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) and neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites such as tyramine, octopamine, and β-phenethylamine stimulate the G protein-coupled trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). TAAR1 has been implicated in human conditions including obesity, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine, and addiction. Additionally TAAR1 is expressed on lymphocytes and astrocytes involved in inflammation and response to infection. In brain, TAAR1 stimulation reduces synaptic dopamine availability and alters glutamatergic function. TAAR1 is also expressed at low levels in heart, and may regulate cardiovascular tone. Taar1 knockout mice orally self-administer more MA than wild type and are insensitive to its aversive effects. DBA/2J (D2) mice express a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in Taar1 that does not respond to MA, and D2 mice are predisposed to high MA intake, compared to C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Here we demonstrate that endogenous agonists stimulate the recombinant B6 mouse TAAR1, but do not activate the D2 mouse receptor. Progeny of the B6XD2 (BxD) family of recombinant inbred (RI) strains have been used to characterize the genetic etiology of diseases, but contrary to expectations, BXDs derived 30-40 years ago express only the functional B6 Taar1 allele whereas some more recently derived BXD RI strains express the D2 allele. Data indicate that the D2 mutation arose subsequent to derivation of the original RIs. Finally, we demonstrate that SNPs in human TAAR1 alter its function, resulting in expressed, but functional, sub-functional and non-functional receptors. Our findings are important for identifying a predisposition to human diseases, as well as for developing personalized treatment options. PMID:27031617

  1. Genetic Polymorphisms Affect Mouse and Human Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Function

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xiao; Walter, Nicole A. R.; Harkness, John H.; Neve, Kim A.; Williams, Robert W.; Lu, Lu; Belknap, John K.; Eshleman, Amy J.; Phillips, Tamara J.; Janowsky, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) and neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites such as tyramine, octopamine, and β-phenethylamine stimulate the G protein-coupled trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). TAAR1 has been implicated in human conditions including obesity, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine, and addiction. Additionally TAAR1 is expressed on lymphocytes and astrocytes involved in inflammation and response to infection. In brain, TAAR1 stimulation reduces synaptic dopamine availability and alters glutamatergic function. TAAR1 is also expressed at low levels in heart, and may regulate cardiovascular tone. Taar1 knockout mice orally self-administer more MA than wild type and are insensitive to its aversive effects. DBA/2J (D2) mice express a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in Taar1 that does not respond to MA, and D2 mice are predisposed to high MA intake, compared to C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Here we demonstrate that endogenous agonists stimulate the recombinant B6 mouse TAAR1, but do not activate the D2 mouse receptor. Progeny of the B6XD2 (BxD) family of recombinant inbred (RI) strains have been used to characterize the genetic etiology of diseases, but contrary to expectations, BXDs derived 30–40 years ago express only the functional B6 Taar1 allele whereas some more recently derived BXD RI strains express the D2 allele. Data indicate that the D2 mutation arose subsequent to derivation of the original RIs. Finally, we demonstrate that SNPs in human TAAR1 alter its function, resulting in expressed, but functional, sub-functional and non-functional receptors. Our findings are important for identifying a predisposition to human diseases, as well as for developing personalized treatment options. PMID:27031617

  2. Genetic Polymorphisms Affect Mouse and Human Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 Function.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao; Walter, Nicole A R; Harkness, John H; Neve, Kim A; Williams, Robert W; Lu, Lu; Belknap, John K; Eshleman, Amy J; Phillips, Tamara J; Janowsky, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) and neurotransmitter precursors and metabolites such as tyramine, octopamine, and β-phenethylamine stimulate the G protein-coupled trace amine-associated receptor 1 (TAAR1). TAAR1 has been implicated in human conditions including obesity, schizophrenia, depression, fibromyalgia, migraine, and addiction. Additionally TAAR1 is expressed on lymphocytes and astrocytes involved in inflammation and response to infection. In brain, TAAR1 stimulation reduces synaptic dopamine availability and alters glutamatergic function. TAAR1 is also expressed at low levels in heart, and may regulate cardiovascular tone. Taar1 knockout mice orally self-administer more MA than wild type and are insensitive to its aversive effects. DBA/2J (D2) mice express a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in Taar1 that does not respond to MA, and D2 mice are predisposed to high MA intake, compared to C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Here we demonstrate that endogenous agonists stimulate the recombinant B6 mouse TAAR1, but do not activate the D2 mouse receptor. Progeny of the B6XD2 (BxD) family of recombinant inbred (RI) strains have been used to characterize the genetic etiology of diseases, but contrary to expectations, BXDs derived 30-40 years ago express only the functional B6 Taar1 allele whereas some more recently derived BXD RI strains express the D2 allele. Data indicate that the D2 mutation arose subsequent to derivation of the original RIs. Finally, we demonstrate that SNPs in human TAAR1 alter its function, resulting in expressed, but functional, sub-functional and non-functional receptors. Our findings are important for identifying a predisposition to human diseases, as well as for developing personalized treatment options.

  3. Randomly and Non-Randomly Missing Renal Function Data in the Strong Heart Study: A Comparison of Imputation Methods.

    PubMed

    Shara, Nawar; Yassin, Sayf A; Valaitis, Eduardas; Wang, Hong; Howard, Barbara V; Wang, Wenyu; Lee, Elisa T; Umans, Jason G

    2015-01-01

    Kidney and cardiovascular disease are widespread among populations with high prevalence of diabetes, such as American Indians participating in the Strong Heart Study (SHS). Studying these conditions simultaneously in longitudinal studies is challenging, because the morbidity and mortality associated with these diseases result in missing data, and these data are likely not missing at random. When such data are merely excluded, study findings may be compromised. In this article, a subset of 2264 participants with complete renal function data from Strong Heart Exams 1 (1989-1991), 2 (1993-1995), and 3 (1998-1999) was used to examine the performance of five methods used to impute missing data: listwise deletion, mean of serial measures, adjacent value, multiple imputation, and pattern-mixture. Three missing at random models and one non-missing at random model were used to compare the performance of the imputation techniques on randomly and non-randomly missing data. The pattern-mixture method was found to perform best for imputing renal function data that were not missing at random. Determining whether data are missing at random or not can help in choosing the imputation method that will provide the most accurate results.

  4. Brain-heart interactions: challenges and opportunities with functional magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field.

    PubMed

    Chang, Catie; Raven, Erika P; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-05-13

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at ultra-high field (UHF) strengths (7 T and above) offers unique opportunities for studying the human brain with increased spatial resolution, contrast and sensitivity. However, its reliability can be compromised by factors such as head motion, image distortion and non-neural fluctuations of the functional MRI signal. The objective of this review is to provide a critical discussion of the advantages and trade-offs associated with UHF imaging, focusing on the application to studying brain-heart interactions. We describe how UHF MRI may provide contrast and resolution benefits for measuring neural activity of regions involved in the control and mediation of autonomic processes, and in delineating such regions based on anatomical MRI contrast. Limitations arising from confounding signals are discussed, including challenges with distinguishing non-neural physiological effects from the neural signals of interest that reflect cardiorespiratory function. We also consider how recently developed data analysis techniques may be applied to high-field imaging data to uncover novel information about brain-heart interactions.

  5. Brain-heart interactions: challenges and opportunities with functional magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field.

    PubMed

    Chang, Catie; Raven, Erika P; Duyn, Jeff H

    2016-05-13

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at ultra-high field (UHF) strengths (7 T and above) offers unique opportunities for studying the human brain with increased spatial resolution, contrast and sensitivity. However, its reliability can be compromised by factors such as head motion, image distortion and non-neural fluctuations of the functional MRI signal. The objective of this review is to provide a critical discussion of the advantages and trade-offs associated with UHF imaging, focusing on the application to studying brain-heart interactions. We describe how UHF MRI may provide contrast and resolution benefits for measuring neural activity of regions involved in the control and mediation of autonomic processes, and in delineating such regions based on anatomical MRI contrast. Limitations arising from confounding signals are discussed, including challenges with distinguishing non-neural physiological effects from the neural signals of interest that reflect cardiorespiratory function. We also consider how recently developed data analysis techniques may be applied to high-field imaging data to uncover novel information about brain-heart interactions. PMID:27044994

  6. Factors affecting longitudinal functional decline and survival in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hazuki; Atsuta, Naoki; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Hirohisa; Ito, Mizuki; Senda, Jo; Katsuno, Masahisa; Izumi, Yuishin; Morita, Mitsuya; Tomiyama, Hiroyuki; Taniguchi, Akira; Aiba, Ikuko; Abe, Koji; Mizoguchi, Kouichi; Oda, Masaya; Kano, Osamu; Okamoto, Koichi; Kuwabara, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Kazuko; Imai, Takashi; Aoki, Masashi; Tsuji, Shoji; Nakano, Imaharu; Kaji, Ryuji; Sobue, Gen

    2015-06-01

    Our objective was to elucidate the clinical factors affecting functional decline and survival in Japanese amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients. We constructed a multicenter prospective ALS cohort that included 451 sporadic ALS patients in the analysis. We longitudinally utilized the revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) as the functional scale, and determined the timing of introduction of a tracheostomy for positive-pressure ventilation and death. A joint modelling approach was employed to identify prognostic factors for functional decline and survival. Age at onset was a common prognostic factor for both functional decline and survival (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, respectively). Female gender (p = 0.019) and initial symptoms, including upper limb weakness (p = 0.010), lower limb weakness (p = 0.008) or bulbar symptoms (p = 0.005), were related to early functional decline, whereas neck weakness as an initial symptom (p = 0.018), non-use of riluzole (p = 0.030) and proximal dominant muscle weakness in the upper extremities (p = 0.01) were related to a shorter survival time. A decline in the ALSFRS-R score was correlated with a shortened survival time (p < 0.001). In conclusion, the factors affecting functional decline and survival in ALS were common in part but different to some extent. This difference has not been previously well recognized but is informative in clinical practice and for conducting trials.

  7. Small but powerful: top predator local extinction affects ecosystem structure and function in an intermittent stream.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Verkaik, Iraima; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2015-01-01

    Top predator loss is a major global problem, with a current trend in biodiversity loss towards high trophic levels that modifies most ecosystems worldwide. Most research in this area is focused on large-bodied predators, despite the high extinction risk of small-bodied freshwater fish that often act as apex consumers. Consequently, it remains unknown if intermittent streams are affected by the consequences of top-predators' extirpations. The aim of our research was to determine how this global problem affects intermittent streams and, in particular, if the loss of a small-bodied top predator (1) leads to a 'mesopredator release', affects primary consumers and changes whole community structures, and (2) triggers a cascade effect modifying the ecosystem function. To address these questions, we studied the top-down effects of a small endangered fish species, Barbus meridionalis (the Mediterranean barbel), conducting an enclosure/exclosure mesocosm experiment in an intermittent stream where B. meridionalis became locally extinct following a wildfire. We found that top predator absence led to 'mesopredator release', and also to 'prey release' despite intraguild predation, which contrasts with traditional food web theory. In addition, B. meridionalis extirpation changed whole macroinvertebrate community composition and increased total macroinvertebrate density. Regarding ecosystem function, periphyton primary production decreased in apex consumer absence. In this study, the apex consumer was functionally irreplaceable; its local extinction led to the loss of an important functional role that resulted in major changes to the ecosystem's structure and function. This study evidences that intermittent streams can be affected by the consequences of apex consumers' extinctions, and that the loss of small-bodied top predators can lead to large ecosystem changes. We recommend the reintroduction of small-bodied apex consumers to systems where they have been extirpated, to restore

  8. Small but powerful: top predator local extinction affects ecosystem structure and function in an intermittent stream.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Verkaik, Iraima; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2015-01-01

    Top predator loss is a major global problem, with a current trend in biodiversity loss towards high trophic levels that modifies most ecosystems worldwide. Most research in this area is focused on large-bodied predators, despite the high extinction risk of small-bodied freshwater fish that often act as apex consumers. Consequently, it remains unknown if intermittent streams are affected by the consequences of top-predators' extirpations. The aim of our research was to determine how this global problem affects intermittent streams and, in particular, if the loss of a small-bodied top predator (1) leads to a 'mesopredator release', affects primary consumers and changes whole community structures, and (2) triggers a cascade effect modifying the ecosystem function. To address these questions, we studied the top-down effects of a small endangered fish species, Barbus meridionalis (the Mediterranean barbel), conducting an enclosure/exclosure mesocosm experiment in an intermittent stream where B. meridionalis became locally extinct following a wildfire. We found that top predator absence led to 'mesopredator release', and also to 'prey release' despite intraguild predation, which contrasts with traditional food web theory. In addition, B. meridionalis extirpation changed whole macroinvertebrate community composition and increased total macroinvertebrate density. Regarding ecosystem function, periphyton primary production decreased in apex consumer absence. In this study, the apex consumer was functionally irreplaceable; its local extinction led to the loss of an important functional role that resulted in major changes to the ecosystem's structure and function. This study evidences that intermittent streams can be affected by the consequences of apex consumers' extinctions, and that the loss of small-bodied top predators can lead to large ecosystem changes. We recommend the reintroduction of small-bodied apex consumers to systems where they have been extirpated, to restore

  9. Small but Powerful: Top Predator Local Extinction Affects Ecosystem Structure and Function in an Intermittent Stream

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Pablo; Verkaik, Iraima; Rieradevall, Maria; Prat, Narcís

    2015-01-01

    Top predator loss is a major global problem, with a current trend in biodiversity loss towards high trophic levels that modifies most ecosystems worldwide. Most research in this area is focused on large-bodied predators, despite the high extinction risk of small-bodied freshwater fish that often act as apex consumers. Consequently, it remains unknown if intermittent streams are affected by the consequences of top-predators’ extirpations. The aim of our research was to determine how this global problem affects intermittent streams and, in particular, if the loss of a small-bodied top predator (1) leads to a ‘mesopredator release’, affects primary consumers and changes whole community structures, and (2) triggers a cascade effect modifying the ecosystem function. To address these questions, we studied the top-down effects of a small endangered fish species, Barbus meridionalis (the Mediterranean barbel), conducting an enclosure/exclosure mesocosm experiment in an intermittent stream where B. meridionalis became locally extinct following a wildfire. We found that top predator absence led to ‘mesopredator release’, and also to ‘prey release’ despite intraguild predation, which contrasts with traditional food web theory. In addition, B. meridionalis extirpation changed whole macroinvertebrate community composition and increased total macroinvertebrate density. Regarding ecosystem function, periphyton primary production decreased in apex consumer absence. In this study, the apex consumer was functionally irreplaceable; its local extinction led to the loss of an important functional role that resulted in major changes to the ecosystem’s structure and function. This study evidences that intermittent streams can be affected by the consequences of apex consumers’ extinctions, and that the loss of small-bodied top predators can lead to large ecosystem changes. We recommend the reintroduction of small-bodied apex consumers to systems where they have been

  10. Submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Scott L; Herald, John; Alpert, Craig; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A; Champoux, Wendy S; Dengel, Donald R; Vaitkevicius, Peter V; Alexander, Neil B

    2016-01-01

    Background Submaximal oxygen uptake measures are more feasible and may better predict clinical cardiac outcomes than maximal tests in older adults with heart failure (HF). We examined relationships between maximal oxygen uptake, submaximal oxygen kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction. Methods Older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction (n = 25, age 75 ± 7 years) were compared to 25 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Assessments included a maximal treadmill test for peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), oxygen uptake kinetics at onset of and on recovery from a submaximal treadmill test, functional mobility testing [Get Up and Go (GUG), Comfortable Gait Speed (CGS), Unipedal Stance (US)], and self-reported physical activity (PA). Results Compared to controls, HF had worse performance on GUG, CGS, and US, greater delays in submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, and lower PA. In controls, VO2peak was more strongly associated with functional mobility and PA than submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics. In HF patients, submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics were similarly associated with GUG and CGS as VO2peak, but weakly associated with PA. Conclusions Based on their mobility performance, older HF patients with reduced ejection fraction are at risk for adverse functional outcomes. In this population, submaximal oxygen uptake measures may be equivalent to VO2 peak in predicting functional mobility, and in addition to being more feasible, may provide better insight into how aerobic function relates to mobility in older adults with HF. PMID:27594875

  11. Submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Scott L; Herald, John; Alpert, Craig; Gretebeck, Kimberlee A; Champoux, Wendy S; Dengel, Donald R; Vaitkevicius, Peter V; Alexander, Neil B

    2016-01-01

    Background Submaximal oxygen uptake measures are more feasible and may better predict clinical cardiac outcomes than maximal tests in older adults with heart failure (HF). We examined relationships between maximal oxygen uptake, submaximal oxygen kinetics, functional mobility, and physical activity in older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction. Methods Older adults with HF and reduced ejection fraction (n = 25, age 75 ± 7 years) were compared to 25 healthy age- and gender-matched controls. Assessments included a maximal treadmill test for peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), oxygen uptake kinetics at onset of and on recovery from a submaximal treadmill test, functional mobility testing [Get Up and Go (GUG), Comfortable Gait Speed (CGS), Unipedal Stance (US)], and self-reported physical activity (PA). Results Compared to controls, HF had worse performance on GUG, CGS, and US, greater delays in submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics, and lower PA. In controls, VO2peak was more strongly associated with functional mobility and PA than submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics. In HF patients, submaximal oxygen uptake kinetics were similarly associated with GUG and CGS as VO2peak, but weakly associated with PA. Conclusions Based on their mobility performance, older HF patients with reduced ejection fraction are at risk for adverse functional outcomes. In this population, submaximal oxygen uptake measures may be equivalent to VO2 peak in predicting functional mobility, and in addition to being more feasible, may provide better insight into how aerobic function relates to mobility in older adults with HF.

  12. Progenitor Hematopoietic Cells Implantation Improves Functional Capacity of End Stage Coronary Artery Disease Patients with Advanced Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Yuniadi, Yoga; Kusnadi, Yuyus; Sandhow, Lakshmi; Erika, Rendra; Hanafy, Dicky A.; Sardjono, Caroline; Kaligis, R. W. M.; Kasim, Manoefris; Harimurti, Ganesja M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Proangiogenic Hematopoietic Cells (PHC) which comprise diverse mixture of cell types are able to secrete proangiogenic factors and interesting candidate for cell therapy. The aim of this study was to seek for benefit in implantation of PHC on functional improvement in end stage coronary artery disease patients with advanced heart failure. Methods. Patients with symptomatic heart failure despite guideline directed medical therapy and LVEF less than 35% were included. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated, cultivated for 5 days, and then harvested. Flow cytometry and cell surface markers were used to characterize PHC. The PHC were delivered retrogradely via sinus coronarius. Echocardiography, myocardial perfusion, and clinical and functional data were analyzed up to 1-year observation. Results. Of 30 patients (56.4 ± 7.40 yo) preimplant NT proBNP level is 5124.5 ± 4682.50 pmol/L. Harvested cells characterized with CD133, CD34, CD45, and KDR showed 0.87 ± 0.41, 0.63 ± 0.66, 99.00 ± 2.60, and 3.22 ± 3.79%, respectively. LVEF was improved (22 ± 5.68 versus 26.8 ± 7.93, p < 0.001) during short and long term observation. Myocardial perfusion significantly improved 6 months after treatment. NYHA Class and six-minute walk test are improved during short term and long term follow-up. Conclusion. Expanded peripheral blood PHC implantation using retrograde delivery approach improved LV systolic function, myocardial perfusion, and functional capacity. PMID:27148465

  13. Progenitor Hematopoietic Cells Implantation Improves Functional Capacity of End Stage Coronary Artery Disease Patients with Advanced Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Yuniadi, Yoga; Kusnadi, Yuyus; Sandhow, Lakshmi; Erika, Rendra; Hanafy, Dicky A; Sardjono, Caroline; Kaligis, R W M; Kasim, Manoefris; Harimurti, Ganesja M

    2016-01-01

    Background. Proangiogenic Hematopoietic Cells (PHC) which comprise diverse mixture of cell types are able to secrete proangiogenic factors and interesting candidate for cell therapy. The aim of this study was to seek for benefit in implantation of PHC on functional improvement in end stage coronary artery disease patients with advanced heart failure. Methods. Patients with symptomatic heart failure despite guideline directed medical therapy and LVEF less than 35% were included. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated, cultivated for 5 days, and then harvested. Flow cytometry and cell surface markers were used to characterize PHC. The PHC were delivered retrogradely via sinus coronarius. Echocardiography, myocardial perfusion, and clinical and functional data were analyzed up to 1-year observation. Results. Of 30 patients (56.4 ± 7.40 yo) preimplant NT proBNP level is 5124.5 ± 4682.50 pmol/L. Harvested cells characterized with CD133, CD34, CD45, and KDR showed 0.87 ± 0.41, 0.63 ± 0.66, 99.00 ± 2.60, and 3.22 ± 3.79%, respectively. LVEF was improved (22 ± 5.68 versus 26.8 ± 7.93, p < 0.001) during short and long term observation. Myocardial perfusion significantly improved 6 months after treatment. NYHA Class and six-minute walk test are improved during short term and long term follow-up. Conclusion. Expanded peripheral blood PHC implantation using retrograde delivery approach improved LV systolic function, myocardial perfusion, and functional capacity.

  14. At the heart of the matter: the endocannabinoid system in cardiovascular function and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Montecucco, Fabrizio; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    2012-06-01

    Starting from the well-documented effects of marijuana smoking on heart rate and blood pressure, the cardiovascular effects of Δ⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, the main psychotropic ingredient of Cannabis) and endocannabinoids [THC endogenous counterparts that activate cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB₁) and 2 (CB₂)] have been thoroughly investigated. These studies were mostly aimed at establishing the molecular bases of the hypotensive actions of THC, endocannabinoids and related molecules, but also evaluated their therapeutic potential in cardiac injury protection, metabolic cardiovascular risk factors and atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. The results of these investigations, reviewed here, also served to highlight some of the most peculiar aspects of endocannabinoid signaling, such as redundancy in endocannabinoid targets and the often dualistic role of CB₁ and CB₂ receptors during pathological conditions. PMID:22503477

  15. Assessment of cardiac function and rheumatic heart disease in children with adenotonsillar hypertrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Odemis, Ender; Catal, Ferhat; Karadag, Ahmet; Kurtaran, Hanifi; Ark, Nebil; Mete, Emin

    2006-01-01

    Our aim was to evaluate whether adenotonsillar hypertrophy (ATH) is associated with rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in children. Fifty-three patients with ATH and 50 healthy children as a control group were enrolled in the study. Medical history and clinical findings were investigated, and echocardiographies were done by researchers who were unaware of the diagnosis. The two groups were compared. Valvular findings suggesting RHD were encountered in four patients (7.5%) in the ATH group and in two children (4%) in the control group. This difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.098); however, we found physiological mitral regurgitation to be significantly more frequent in the ATH group than in the control group (p = 0.023). ATH did not increase the risk of valvulitis related to RHD regardless of adenoid size and frequency of the infection. To preclude the misdiagnosis of mitral regurgitation that results from RHD, diagnostic criteria for pathological mitral regurgitation should be carefully applied. PMID:17225844

  16. Functional response of the isolated, perfused normoxic heart to pyruvate dehydrogenase activation by dichloroacetate and pyruvate

    PubMed Central

    Jaimes, Rafael; Kuzmiak-Glancy, Sarah; Brooks, Daina M.; Swift, Luther M.; Posnack, Nikki G.; Kay, Matthew W.

    2015-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA) and pyruvate activate pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), a key enzyme that modulates glucose oxidation and mitochondrial NADH production. Both compounds improve recovery after ischemia in isolated hearts. However, the action of DCA and pyruvate in normoxic myocardium is incompletely understood. We measured the effect of DCA and pyruvate on contraction, mitochondrial redox state, and intracellular calcium cycling in isolated rat hearts during normoxic perfusion. Normalized epicardial NADH fluorescence (nNADH) and left ventricular developed pressure (LVDP) were measured before and after administering DCA (5 mM) or pyruvate (5 mM). Optical mapping of Rhod-2AM was used to measure cytosolic calcium kinetics. DCA maximally activated PDH, increasing the ratio of active to total PDH from 0.48±0.03 to 1.03 ±0.03. Pyruvate sub-maximally activated PDH to a ratio of 0.75±0.02. DCA and pyruvate increased LVDP. When glucose was the only exogenous fuel, pyruvate increased nNADH by 21.4±2.9 % while DCA reduced nNADH by 21.4±6.1 % and elevated the incidence of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs). When lactate, pyruvate, and glucose were provided together as exogenous fuels, nNADH increased with DCA, indicating that PDH activation with glucose as the only exogenous fuel depletes PDH substrate. Calcium transient time-to-peak was shortened by DCA and pyruvate and SR calcium re-uptake was 30 % longer. DCA and pyruvate increased SR calcium load in myocyte monolayers. Overall, during normoxia when glucose is the only exogenous fuel, DCA elevates SR calcium, increases LVDP and contractility, and diminishes mitochondrial NADH. Administering DCA with plasma levels of lactate and pyruvate mitigates the drop in mitochondrial NADH and prevents PVCs. PMID:26142699

  17. Prevention and Treatment of Functional and Structural Radiation Injury in the Rat Heart by Pentoxifylline and Alpha-Tocopherol

    SciTech Connect

    Boerma, Marjan Roberto, Kerrey A.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD) is a severe side effect of thoracic radiotherapy. This study examined the effects of pentoxifylline (PTX) and {alpha}-tocopherol on cardiac injury in a rat model of RIHD. Methods and Materials: Male Sprague-Dawley rats received fractionated local heart irradiation with a daily dose of 9 Gy for 5 days and were observed for 6 months after irradiation. Rats were treated with a combination of PTX, 100 mg/kg/day, and {alpha}-tocopherol (20 IU/kg/day) and received these compounds either from 1 week before until 6 months after irradiation or starting 3 months after irradiation, a time point at which histopathologic changes become apparent in our model of RIHD. Results: Radiation-induced increases in left ventricular diastolic pressure (in mm Hg: 35 {+-} 6 after sham-irradiation, 82 {+-} 11 after irradiation) were significantly reduced by PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol (early treatment: 48 {+-} 7; late treatment: 53 {+-} 6). PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol significantly reduced deposition of collagen types I (radiation only: 3.5 {+-} 0.2 {mu}m{sup 2} per 100 {mu}m{sup 2}; early treatment: 2.7 {+-} 0.8; late treatment: 2.2 {+-} 0.2) and III (radiation only: 13.9 {+-} 0.8; early treatment: 11.0 {+-} 1.2; late treatment: 10.6 {+-} 0.8). On the other hand, radiation-induced alterations in heart/body weight ratios, myocardial degeneration, left ventricular mast cell densities, and most echocardiographic parameters were not significantly altered by PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol. Conclusions: Treatment with PTX and {alpha}-tocopherol may have beneficial effects on radiation-induced myocardial fibrosis and left ventricular function, both when started before irradiation and when started later during the process of RIHD.

  18. Exogenous connexin43-expressing autologous skeletal myoblasts ameliorate mechanical function and electrical activity of the rabbit heart after experimental infarction.

    PubMed

    Antanavičiūtė, Ieva; Ereminienė, Eglė; Vysockas, Vaidas; Račkauskas, Mindaugas; Skipskis, Vilius; Rysevaitė, Kristina; Treinys, Rimantas; Benetis, Rimantas; Jurevičius, Jonas; Skeberdis, Vytenis A

    2015-02-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is one of the major causes of mortality worldwide. For regeneration of the rabbit heart after experimentally induced infarction we used autologous skeletal myoblasts (SMs) due to their high proliferative potential, resistance to ischaemia and absence of immunological and ethical concerns. The cells were characterized with muscle-specific and myogenic markers. Cell transplantation was performed by injection of cell suspension (0.5 ml) containing approximately 6 million myoblasts into the infarction zone. The animals were divided into four groups: (i) no injection; (ii) sham injected; (iii) injected with wild-type SMs; and (iv) injected with SMs expressing connexin43 fused with green fluorescent protein (Cx43EGFP). Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was evaluated by 2D echocardiography in vivo before infarction, when myocardium has stabilized after infarction, and 3 months after infarction. Electrical activity in the healthy and infarction zones of the heart was examined ex vivo in Langendorff-perfused hearts by optical mapping using di-4-ANEPPS, a potential sensitive fluorescent dye. We demonstrate that SMs in the coculture can couple electrically not only to abutted but also to remote acutely isolated allogenic cardiac myocytes through membranous tunnelling tubes. The beneficial effect of cellular therapy on LVEF and electrical activity was observed in the group of animals injected with Cx43EGFP-expressing SMs. L-type Ca(2+) current amplitude was approximately fivefold smaller in the isolated SMs compared to healthy myocytes suggesting that limited recovery of LVEF may be related to inadequate expression or function of L-type Ca(2+) channels in transplanted differentiating SMs. PMID:25529770

  19. Cholinergic and serotonergic modulations differentially affect large-scale functional networks in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Shah, Disha; Blockx, Ines; Keliris, Georgios A; Kara, Firat; Jonckers, Elisabeth; Verhoye, Marleen; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2016-07-01

    Resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI) is a widely implemented technique used to investigate large-scale topology in the human brain during health and disease. Studies in mice provide additional advantages, including the possibility to flexibly modulate the brain by pharmacological or genetic manipulations in combination with high-throughput functional connectivity (FC) investigations. Pharmacological modulations that target specific neurotransmitter systems, partly mimicking the effect of pathological events, could allow discriminating the effect of specific systems on fun