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Sample records for affect heat flow

  1. Utility of Bromide and Heat Tracers for Aquifer Characterization Affected by Highly Transient Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Zachara, John M.; Tonkin, Matthew J.

    2012-08-29

    A tracer test using both bromide and heat tracers conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge site in Hanford 300 Area (300A), Washington, provided an instrument for evaluating the utility of bromide and heat tracers for aquifer characterization. The bromide tracer data were critical to improving the calibration of the flow model complicated by the highly dynamic nature of the flow field. However, most bromide concentrations were obtained from fully screened observation wells, lacking depth-specific resolution for vertical characterization. On the other hand, depth-specific temperature data were relatively simple and inexpensive to acquire. However, temperature-driven fluid density effects influenced heat plume movement. Moreover, the temperature data contained “noise” caused by heating during fluid injection and sampling events. Using the hydraulic conductivity distribution obtained from the calibration of the bromide transport model, the temperature depth profiles and arrival times of temperature peaks simulated by the heat transport model were in reasonable agreement with observations. This suggested that heat can be used as a cost-effective proxy for solute tracers for calibration of the hydraulic conductivity distribution, especially in the vertical direction. However, a heat tracer test must be carefully designed and executed to minimize fluid density effects and sources of noise in temperature data. A sensitivity analysis also revealed that heat transport was most sensitive to hydraulic conductivity and porosity, less sensitive to thermal distribution factor, and least sensitive to thermal dispersion and heat conduction. This indicated that the hydraulic conductivity remains the primary calibration parameter for heat transport.

  2. Mechanisms by which heat release affects the flow field in a chemically reacting, turbulent mixing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, J. J.; Metcalfe, R. W.; McMurtry, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanisms by which heat release affects the fluid dynamics in a turbulent reacting mixing layer are studied by direct numerical simulation. In agreement with previous laboratory experiments, the heat release is observed to lower the rate at which the mixing layer grows and to reduce the rate at which chemical products are formed. The baroclinic torque and thermal expansion in the mixing layer are shown to produce changes in the flame vortex structure that act to produce more diffuse vortices than in the constant density case, resulting in lower rotation rates of fluid elements. Previously unexplained anomalies observed in the mean velocity profiles of reacting jets and mixing layers are shown to result from vorticity generation by baroclinic torques. The density reductions also lower the generation rates of turbulent kinetic energy and the turbulent shear stresses, resulting in less turbulent mixing of fluid elements. Calculations of the energy in the various wave numbers show that the heat release has a stabilizing effect on the growth rates of individual modes. A linear stability analysis of a simlified model problem confirms this, showing that low density fluid in the mixing region will result in a shift of the frequency of the unstable modes to lower wave numbers (longer wavelengths). The growth rates of the unstable modes decrease, contributing to the slower growth of the mixing layer.

  3. Calibrated heat flow model for the determination of different heat-affected zones in single-pass laser-cut CFRP using a cw CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, P.; Berger, P.; Weber, R.; Speker, N.; Sommer, B.; Graf, T.

    2015-03-01

    Laser machining has great potential for automated manufacturing of parts made of carbon-fiber-reinforced plastic (CFRP) due to the nearly force and tool-wear free processing. The high vaporization temperatures and the large heat conductivity of the carbon fibers, however, lead to unintentional heat conduction into the material causing damage in zones close to the process. In this paper, the matrix damage zone (MDZ) is subdivided into a matrix sublimation zone (MSZ) where the matrix material was sublimated and a zone where the temperature temporarily exceeded a value causing structural damage in the matrix. In order to investigate the extent of these zones, a one-dimensional heat flow model was applied, which was calibrated by cutting experiments using temperature sensors embedded in the CFRP samples. The investigations showed that the extents of the MSZ and MDZ are dominated by a total interaction time, which includes the passage of the laser beam and the continued interaction of the cloud of hot ablation products with the carbon fibers at the kerf wall and that from a practical point of view, the experimentally determined effective heat conductivity is suitable for simple estimations of the heat-affected zones in CFRP.

  4. A heat flow calorimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, W. V.

    1973-01-01

    Reaction mechanism for nickel-cadmium cell is not known well enough to allow calculation of heat effects. Calorimeter can measure heat absorbed or evolved in cell, by determining amount of external heat that must be supplied to calorimeter to maintain constant flow isothermal heat sink.

  5. Planetary heat flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Hagermann, Axel

    2005-12-15

    The year 2005 marks the 35th anniversary of the Apollo 13 mission, probably the most successful failure in the history of manned spaceflight. Naturally, Apollo 13's scientific payload is far less known than the spectacular accident and subsequent rescue of its crew. Among other instruments, it carried the first instrument designed to measure the flux of heat on a planetary body other than Earth. The year 2005 also should have marked the launch of the Japanese LUNAR-A mission, and ESA's Rosetta mission is slowly approaching comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko. Both missions carry penetrators to study the heat flow from their target bodies. What is so interesting about planetary heat flow? What can we learn from it and how do we measure it?Not only the Sun, but all planets in the Solar System are essentially heat engines. Various heat sources or heat reservoirs drive intrinsic and surface processes, causing 'dead balls of rock, ice or gas' to evolve dynamically over time, driving convection that powers tectonic processes and spawns magnetic fields. The heat flow constrains models of the thermal evolution of a planet and also its composition because it provides an upper limit for the bulk abundance of radioactive elements. On Earth, the global variation of heat flow also reflects the tectonic activity: heat flow increases towards the young ocean ridges, whereas it is rather low on the old continental shields. It is not surprising that surface heat flow measurements, or even estimates, where performed, contributed greatly to our understanding of what happens inside the planets. In this article, I will review the results and the methods used in past heat flow measurements and speculate on the targets and design of future experiments. PMID:16286290

  6. Enceladus' Enigmatic Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howett, C.; Spencer, J. R.; Spencer, D.; Verbiscer, A.; Hurford, T.; Segura, M.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate knowledge of Enceladus' heat flow is important because it provides a vital constraint on Enceladus' tidal dissipation mechanisms, orbital evolution, and the physical processes that generate the plumes. In 2011 we published an estimate of the current heat flow from Enceladus' active south polar terrain: 15.8 +/- 3.1 GW (Howett et al., 2011). This value was calculated by first estimating by modeling, and then removing, the passive component from 17 to 1000 micron observations made of the entire south polar terrain by Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS). The heat flow was then directly calculated from the residual, assumed endogenic, component. The derived heat flow of 15.8 GW was surprisingly high, about 10 times greater than that predicted by steady-state tidal heating (Meyer and Wisdom, 2007). CIRS has also returned high spatial resolution observations of Enceladus' active south polar terrain. Two separate observations are used: 9 to 16 micron observations taken over nearly the complete south polar terrain and a single 17 to 1000 micron scan over Damascus, Baghdad and Cairo. The shorter wavelength observations are only sensitive to high temperature emission (>70 K), and so longer wavelength observations are required (despite their limited spatial coverage) to estimate the low temperature emission from the stripes. Analysis of these higher resolution observations tells a different story of Enceladus' endogenic heat flow: the preliminary estimate of the heat flow from the active tiger stripes using these observations is 4.2 GW. An additional 0.5 GW must be added to this number to account for the latent heat release by the plumes (Ingersoll and Pankine 2009), giving a total preliminary estimate of 4.9 GW. The discrepancy in these two numbers is significant and we are currently investigating the cause. One possible reason is that there is significantly higher endogenic emission from the regions between the tiger stripes than we currently estimate

  7. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  8. Convective heat flow probe

    DOEpatents

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  9. Radial flow heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  10. Heat Pipe Blocks Return Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    Metal-foil reed valve in conventional slab-wick heat pipe limits heat flow to one direction only. With sink warmer than source, reed is forced closed and fluid returns to source side through annular transfer wick. When this occurs, wick slab on sink side of valve dries out and heat pipe ceases to conduct heat.

  11. Magnetic heat pump flow director

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Frank S. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A fluid flow director is disclosed. The director comprises a handle body and combed-teeth extending from one side of the body. The body can be formed of a clear plastic such as acrylic. The director can be used with heat exchangers such as a magnetic heat pump and can minimize the undesired mixing of fluid flows. The types of heat exchangers can encompass both heat pumps and refrigerators. The director can adjust the fluid flow of liquid or gas along desired flow directions. A method of applying the flow director within a magnetic heat pump application is also disclosed where the comb-teeth portions of the director are inserted into the fluid flow paths of the heat pump.

  12. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators, or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  13. Heat exchanger with oscillating flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Stephen J. (Inventor); Blosser, Max L. (Inventor); Camarda, Charles J. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    Various heat exchange apparatuses are described in which an oscillating flow of primary coolant is used to dissipate an incident heat flux. The oscillating flow may be imparted by a reciprocating piston, a double action twin reciprocating piston, fluidic oscillators or electromagnetic pumps. The oscillating fluid flows through at least one conduit in either an open loop or a closed loop. A secondary flow of coolant may be used to flow over the outer walls of at least one conduit to remove heat transferred from the primary coolant to the walls of the conduit.

  14. Stress and heat flow

    SciTech Connect

    Lachenbrunch, A.H.; McGarr, A.

    1990-01-01

    As the Pacific plate slides northward past the North American plate along the San Andreas fault, the frictional stress that resists plate motion there is overcome to cause earthquakes. However, the frictional heating predicted for the process has never been detected. Thus, in spite of its importance to an understanding of both plate motion and earthquakes, the size of this frictional stress is still uncertain, even in order of magnitude.

  15. Lunar heat-flow experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. G.

    1977-01-01

    The principal components of the experiment were probes, each with twelve thermometers of exceptional accuracy and stability, that recorded temperature variations at the surface and in the regolith down to 2.5 m. The Apollo 15 experiment and the Apollo 17 probes recorded lunar surface and subsurface temperatures. These data provided a unique and valuable history of the interaction of solar energy with lunar surface and the effects of heat flowing from the deep interior out through the surface of the moon. The interpretation of these data resulted in a clearer definition of the thermal and mechanical properties of the upper two meters of lunar regolith, direct measurements of the gradient in mean temperature due to heat flow from the interior and a determination of the heat flow at the Apollo 15 and Apollo 17 sites.

  16. Heat flow in a pyroelectric converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, R. B.; Butler, W. F.; Drummond, J. E.; Bruno, D. A.; Briscoe, J. M.

    1985-12-01

    A simulated pyroelectric converter has been constructed. The heat flow and temperature profiles within the converter have been measured. Computer simulations of the heat flow compare well with the measurements and predict an efficiency of 12 percent of the Carnot limit for a real pyroelectric converter with the operating configuration of the simulation. These heat flow results are useful in considerations of heat engines using active materials other than pyroelectrics, such as Nitinol, when these engines utilize similar heat flow management.

  17. Polar Heat Flow on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Johnson, T. V.; Davies, A. G.; Blaney, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, Galileo spacecraft data have revealed Io's polar regions to be much warmer than previously expected. This unexpected development came from Photo-Polarimeter Radiometer (PPR) data which show that the minimum night temperatures are in the range of 90-95 K virtually everywhere on Io. The minimum night temperatures show no dependence upon latitude and, when away from the sunset terminator, they show no dependence upon time of night. This is indeed bizarre behavior for surface units which generally had been assumed to be passive with respect to Io's pervasive volcanism. Night temperatures of 90-95 K at high, polar latitudes are particularly hard to explain. Even assuming infinite thermal inertia, at these latitudes there is insufficient sunlight to support these warm night temperatures. Thus, through the process of elimination of other possibilities, we come to the conclusion that these surfaces are volcanically heated. Taking previously passive units and turning them into new sources of heat flow is a radical departure from previous thermophysical model paradigms. However, the geological interpretation is straight forward. We are simply seeing the effect of old, cool lava flows which cover most of the surface of Io but yet have some heat to radiate. Under these new constraints, we have taken on the challenge of formulating a physical model which quantitatively reproduces all of the observations of Io's thermal emission. In the following we introduce a new parametric model which suffices to identify a previously unrecognized polar component of Io's heat flow.

  18. Role of radiogenic heat generation in surface heat flow formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutorskoi, M. D.; Polyak, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    Heat generation due to decay of long-lived radioactive isotopes is considered in the Earth's crust of the Archean-Proterozoic and Paleozoic provinces of Eurasia and North America. The heat flow that forms in the mantle is calculated as the difference between the heat flow observed at the boundary of the solid Earth and radiogenic heat flow produced in the crust. The heat regime in regions with anomalously high radiogenic heat generation is discussed. The relationship between various heat flow components in the Precambrian and Phanerozoic provinces has been comparatively analyzed, and the role of erosion of the surfaceheat- generating layer has been estimated.

  19. Heat transfer in serpentine flow passages with rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, S.; Takamura, J.; Yamawaki, S.; Yang, Wen-Jei

    1992-06-01

    Results are reported of an experimental study tracing heat transfer performance in a rotating serpentine flow passage of a square cross section. The test section is preceded by a hydrodynamic calming region. The test model is a blow-up (by seven times) of actual winding flow passages in rotor blades. It is concluded that the flow in the 180-deg bends exhibits strong 3D structure. The heat transfer coefficient in the bend is substantially higher than in the straight flow passages. The average heat transfer characteristics over the entire flow passage is greatly affected by flow at the 180-deg bends. Due to secondary flow induced by the Coriolis force, the heat transfer coefficient in the radially outward flow passages diminish on the leading surface, but increase on the trailing surface, with an increase in rotational speed. The trend is reversed in the radially inward flow passages.

  20. Entropy flow in quantum heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Mohammad; Nazarov, Yuli

    2015-03-01

    We evaluate Shannon and Renyi entropy flows from generic quantum heat engines (QHE) to a weakly-coupled probe environment kept in thermal equilibrium. We show the flows are determined by two quantities: heat flow and fictitious dissipation that manifest the quantum coherence in the engine. Our theory leads to novel physics in quantum heat engines.

  1. Heat flow in the Keweenawan rift system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, C.; Mareschal, J.; Jaupart, C. P.

    2012-12-01

    The emplacement of large volumes of mafic volcanic rocks during the Keweenawan rifting has modified the average crustal composition and affects the present steady state heat flux in the region. We have combined new heat flux measurements in the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield and previously published data to characterize the heat flux field around the Keweenawan rift system. For the Nipigon embayment, North of lake Superior in Ontario, mafic intrusions associated with the Keweenawan rifting have resulted in an increase in the volume of mafic rocks in the crust and caused a very small <3mW m-2 decrease in the mean heat flux. There is a very marked decrease in the heat flux (Δ Q ≈ 20mW m-2) beneath the western half of Lake Superior and to the west. The very low values of the surface heat flux (≈ 22mW m-2 correlate with the maximum Bouguer gravity anomaly. The heat flux at the base of the crust in the Canadian Shield has been determined from surface heat flux, heat production, and crustal stucture to be ≈ 15 mW m-2. In the Keweenawan rift, the surface heat flux is only a few mW m-2 higher than the mantle heat flux, which implies that the contribution of the entire crustal column to the surface heat flux is small and that the crust is exclusively made up of depleted mafic volcanic rocks. In the eastern part and northeast of Lake Superior, there is a marked increase in heat flux that correlates with a lower Bouguer anomaly. Local high heat flux anomalies due to intrusions by felsic rocks are superposed with a long wavelength trend of higher heat flow suggesting a more felsic crustal composition in the eastern part of the Keweenawan rift. Simple models suggest that such a thick dense volcanic pile as accumulated in the Keweenawan rift is almost invariably unstable and that very particular conditions were required for it to stabilize in the crust.

  2. Axial flow heat exchanger devices and methods for heat transfer using axial flow devices

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    2016-02-16

    Systems and methods described herein are directed to rotary heat exchangers configured to transfer heat to a heat transfer medium flowing in substantially axial direction within the heat exchangers. Exemplary heat exchangers include a heat conducting structure which is configured to be in thermal contact with a thermal load or a thermal sink, and a heat transfer structure rotatably coupled to the heat conducting structure to form a gap region between the heat conducting structure and the heat transfer structure, the heat transfer structure being configured to rotate during operation of the device. In example devices heat may be transferred across the gap region from a heated axial flow of the heat transfer medium to a cool stationary heat conducting structure, or from a heated stationary conducting structure to a cool axial flow of the heat transfer medium.

  3. Study on heat transfer of heat exchangers in the Stirling engine - Heat transfer in a heated tube under the periodically reversing flow condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanzaka, Mitsuo; Iwabuchi, Makio

    1992-11-01

    Heat transfer characteristics in heated tubes under periodically reversing flow conditions have been experimentally investigated, using a test apparatus that simulates heat exchangers for an actual Stirling engine. It is shown that the heat transfer characteristics under these conditions are greatly affected by the piston phase difference that generates the reversing flow of working fluid, and this phenomenon is peculiar to heat transfer under periodically reversing flow. The experimental correlation for the heat transfer coefficient under these conditions is obtained through the use of the working gas velocity evaluated from the Schmidt cycle model, which is one of the ideal Stirling cycles concerning the influence of the piston phase difference.

  4. Map of Io's volcanic heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Veeder, Glenn J.; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    2015-12-01

    We present a map of Io's volcanic heat flow. Io's high heat flow is a result of intense tidal heating, which generates widespread volcanic activity. The surface expression of ongoing volcanic activity constrains the location and magnitude of tidal dissipation within Io. Tidal heating models place heating either at relatively shallow (aesthenosphere) levels, or deep in the mantle. It was thought that actual tidal heating could be approximated using a combination of these end-member models. Io's volcanic heat flow has now been mapped in sufficient detail to compare with the models. Our maps show that the distribution of heat flow is not matched by current models of deep nor shallow tidal heating, nor by any combination of these two models. We find relatively low heat flow at sub-jovian (0°W) and anti-jovian (180°W) longitudes, at odds with the pure aesthenospheric heating model. Furthermore, there are large swaths of Io's surface where there is poor correlation between the number of hot spots in an area and the power emitted. We have previously accounted for ≈54% of Io's observed heat flow. We now show that Io's anomalously warm poles, possibly the result of heat flow from deep-mantle heating, would yield the "missing" energy (48 TW) if the polar surfaces are at temperatures of ∼90 K to ∼95 K and cover latitudes above ∼43° to ∼48° respectively. This possibility implies a ratio of deep to shallow heating of about 1:1. However, explaining regional variations in surface volcanic activity requires more detailed modeling of the location and magnitude of the internal tidal dissipation and the consequences of mantle convection and advection within Io. Future model predictions can be compared to our heat flow map.

  5. Minnesota Heat Flow and Geothermal Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosnold, W. D.; Crowell, J.; Bubach, B.; Wahl, P.; Crowell, A. M.; Mcdonald, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    Radiogenic heat production, bedrock geology, gravity, magnetics, and heat flow were combined to study heat flow and geothermal energy potential in Minnesota. Heat production was determined from one-hundred 800 kg samples collected at outcrops and from drill cores by gamma ray spectrometry. Small splits of the samples were also analyzed by chemical methods for K, U, and Th. Heat production averaged 2.6 W m-1 K-1 ± 2.0 for 42 felsic samples and 0.9 W m-1 K-1 ± 0.6 for 58 mafic samples. Areal variation in heat production measured with a portable gamma ray spectrometer was compared to bedrock geology and gravity and magnetic anomaly patterns. Gravity lows and magnetic highs correlate with higher heat production and vice versa. Prior to this study heat flow was reported for only four borehole sites in Minnesota. Those sites were located in Keweenawan mafic rocks of the mid-continent rift and heat flow values averaged 39 ± 6 mW m-2. These low heat flows are consistent with a heat flow study conducted in Lake Superior that showed a trough of low heat flow (19.2 - 41.0 mW m-2) along the northern edge of the lake. Thirty-one new heat flow determinations in the mafic rocks obtained from borehole temperature measurements in mining holes average (34.1 mW m-2 ± 1.9 mW m-2). However, paleoclimate signals evident in the temperature vs. depth profiles indicate that the temperature gradients are at least 27 percent low and heat flow is likely 46.7 mW m-2. Based on a reduced heat flow of 32 mW m-2 and a depth parameter of 10 km, the heat flow heat production relation yields a heat flow value of 58 mW m-2 in the felsic regions in Minnesota. These heat flow values suggest that EGS with a binary power plant would be achievable in the felsic regions.

  6. Buoyancy driven flow in counter flow heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsson, C. O.

    2012-11-01

    The temperature distribution, the buoyancy head and the flow rate have been studied in a counter flow heat exchanger having buoyancy driven flow on at least one side. The assumptions made for heat flux distribution are varied and the resulting effects on the flow rate and fluid temperatures are studied. A network model is used to simulate the temperature distribution and oil flow rates in an oil-filled power transformer cooled by radiators. It is found that for operating conditions normally found for mineral oil the counter flow assumptions for heat flux distribution gives approximately the same results as assuming uniform heat flux. When a more viscous oil type is used or the radiators are placed lower than normal relative to the heat generating parts, the counter flow assumptions give more reliable results.

  7. Heat flow from the Liberian precambrian shield

    SciTech Connect

    Sass, J.H.; Behrendt, J.C.

    1980-06-10

    Uncorrected heat flow in iron formation rocks from three areas within the Liberian part of the West African Shield ranges from 50 to more than 80 mW m/sup -2/. When corrections are applied for topography and refraction, the range of heat flow is narrowed to between 38 and 42 mW m/sup -2/. In comparison with heat flows from other parts of the West African Craton, these values are consistent with preliminary results from Ghana (42 +- 8 mW m/sup -2/) and Nigeria (38 +- 2 mW /sup -2/) but are somewhat higher than values from Niger (20 mW m/sup -2/) and neighboring Sierra Leone (26 mW m/sup -2/). The Liberian values are significantly lower than the heat flow offshore in the equatorial Atlantic Ocean (58 +- 8 mW m/sup -2/), suggesting large lateral temperature gradients within the lithosphere near the coast. Values of heat production from outcrops of crystalline basement rocks near the holes are between 2 and 2.3 ..mu..W m/sup -3/. A heat-flow/heat-production relation cannot be established because of the small range of values; however, assuming a 'characteristic depth' of 8 km (similar to the North American Craton) the reduced heat flow of from 20 to 25 mW m/sup -2/ is consistent with that from other Precambrian shields.

  8. New Map of Io's Volcanic Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. G.; Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D.; Johnson, T. V.

    2014-12-01

    We have created a global map of Io's volcanic heat flow from 245 thermal sources indicative of ongoing or recent volcanic activity, and 8 additional outbursts [1,2]. We incorporate data from both spacecraft and ground-based instruments that have observed Io primarily at infrared wavelengths. This map provides a snapshot of Io's volcanic activity and distribution during the Galileo epoch. Io's volcanic activity, in terms of thermal emission from individual eruptive centres, spans nearly six orders of magnitude, from Surt in 2001 (78 TW) [3] to a faint hot spot in patera P197 (0.2 GW) [1]. We account for ≈54% of Io's yearly volcanic heat flow, which emanates from ≈2% of Io's surface [1]. Averaged heat flow from the non-active surface is 1 ± 0.2 W m2. This quantification of volcanic heat flow map provides constraints for modelling the magnitude and location of the internal heating of Io by tidal dissipation. The observed heat flow distribution is the result of interior heating and volcanic advection, the delivery of magma to the surface regardless of its depth of origin. As noted previously [1, 2] the distribution of heat flow is not uniform, which is not unexpected. The volcanic heat flow does not match the expected distributions from end-member models for both the deep-seated (mantle) heating model (which predicts enhanced polar heating) and the shallow (aesthenospheric) heating model, which predicts enhanced thermal emission at sub-jovian and anti-jovian longitudes. Intriguingly, heat flow curves using a bin size of 30 degrees show a longitudinal offset from the shallow heating model prediction of some tens of degrees [2], suggesting a more complex mixture of deep and shallow heating. Future work includes refinement of thermal emission by including temporal variability of thermal emission at individual volcanoes, and comparing the heat flow map with the Io Geological Map [4] and global topography [5]. We thank the NASA OPR Program for support. Part of this

  9. Pneumatic Proboscis Heat-Flow Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zacny, Kris; Hedlund, Magnus; Mumm, Eric; Shasho, Jeffrey; Chu, Philip; Kumar, Nishant

    2013-01-01

    Heat flow is a fundamental property of a planet, and provides significant constraints on the abundance of radiogenic isotopes, the thermal evolution and differentiation history, and the mechanical properties of the lithosphere. Heat-flow measurements are also essential in achieving at least four of the goals set out by the National Research Council for future lunar exploration. The heat-flow probe therefore directly addresses the goal of the Lunar Geophysical Network, which is to understand the interior structure and composition of the Moon. A key challenge for heat flow measurement is to install thermal sensors to the depths approximately equal to 3 m that are not influenced by the diurnal, annual, and longer-term fluctuations of the surface thermal environment. In addition, once deployed, the heat flow probe should cause little disturbance to the thermal regime of the surrounding regolith. A heat-flow probe system was developed that has two novel features: (1) it utilizes a pneumatic (gas) approach, excavates a hole by lofting the lunar soil out of the hole, and (2) deploys the heat flow probe, which utilizes a coiled up tape as a thermal probe to reach greater than 3-meter depth. The system is a game-changer for small lunar landers as it exhibits extremely low mass, volume, and simple deployment. The pneumatic system takes advantage of the helium gas used for pressurizing liquid propellant of the lander. Normally, helium is vented once the lander is on the surface, but it can be utilized for powering pneumatic systems. Should sufficient helium not be available, a simple gas delivery system may be taken specifically for the heat flow probe. Either way, the pneumatic heat flow probe system would be much lighter than other systems that entirely rely on the electrical power of the lander.

  10. Thermodynamics of Flow Boiling Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, F. J.

    2003-05-01

    Convective boiling in sub-cooled water flowing through a heated channel is essential in many engineering applications where high heat flux needs to be accommodated. It has been customary to represent the heat transfer by the boiling curve, which shows the heat flux versus the wall-minus-saturation temperature difference. However it is a rather complicated problem, and recent revisions of two-phase flow and heat transfer note that calculated values of boiling heat transfer coefficients present many uncertainties. Quite recently, the author has shown that the average thermal gap in the heated channel (the wall temperature minus the average temperature of the coolant) was tightly connected with the thermodynamic efficiency of a theoretical reversible engine placed in this thermal gap. In this work, whereas this correlation is checked again with data taken by General Electric (task III) for water at high pressure, a possible connection between this wall efficiency and the reversible-work theorem is explored.

  11. Heat Transfer in Regions of Separated and Reattached Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, Davis H; Rumsey, Charles B

    1957-01-01

    Past experimental work has indicated that separated flow can greatly increase the heat transfer to a surface; whereas, some theoretical studies have indicated a possible decrease. Recent investigations have helped to clarify the effects of separation on heat transfer and have indicated a method of reducing separation. This paper considers the results of some of these investigations and shows the heat transfer in regions of separation and reattachment for a few specific shapes. These results show that the heat transfer in a separated region is strongly affected by the extent of separation, the location of the reattachment point, and the location of transition along the separated boundary.

  12. Heat flow from the West African shield

    SciTech Connect

    Brigaud, F.; Lucazeau, F.; Ly, S.; Sauvage, J.F.

    1985-09-01

    The heat flow over Precambrian shields is generally lower than over other continental provinces. Previous observations at 9 sites of the West African shield have shown that heat flow ranges from 20 mW m/sup -2/ in Niger to 38-42 mW m/sup -2/ in Liberia, Ghana and Nigeria. Since some of these values are lower than expected for Precambrian shields, it is important to find out whether or not they are representative of the entire shield before trying to derive its thermal structure. In this paper, we present new heat flow determinations from seven sites of the West African shield. These indicate that the surface heat flow is comparable with that of other Precambrian shields in the world.

  13. Flow and heat transfer enhancement in tube heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayed Ahmed, Sayed Ahmed E.; Mesalhy, Osama M.; Abdelatief, Mohamed A.

    2015-11-01

    The performance of heat exchangers can be improved to perform a certain heat-transfer duty by heat transfer enhancement techniques. Enhancement techniques can be divided into two categories: passive and active. Active methods require external power, such as electric or acoustic field, mechanical devices, or surface vibration, whereas passive methods do not require external power but make use of a special surface geometry or fluid additive which cause heat transfer enhancement. The majority of commercially interesting enhancement techniques are passive ones. This paper presents a review of published works on the characteristics of heat transfer and flow in finned tube heat exchangers of the existing patterns. The review considers plain, louvered, slit, wavy, annular, longitudinal, and serrated fins. This review can be indicated by the status of the research in this area which is important. The comparison of finned tubes heat exchangers shows that those with slit, plain, and wavy finned tubes have the highest values of area goodness factor while the heat exchanger with annular fin shows the lowest. A better heat transfer coefficient ha is found for a heat exchanger with louvered finned and thus should be regarded as the most efficient one, at fixed pumping power per heat transfer area. This study points out that although numerous studies have been conducted on the characteristics of flow and heat transfer in round, elliptical, and flat tubes, studies on some types of streamlined-tubes shapes are limited, especially on wing-shaped tubes (Sayed Ahmed et al. in Heat Mass Transf 50: 1091-1102, 2014; in Heat Mass Transf 51: 1001-1016, 2015). It is recommended that further detailed studies via numerical simulations and/or experimental investigations should be carried out, in the future, to put further insight to these fin designs.

  14. Cryogenic fluid flow instabilities in heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, R. B.; Staub, F. W.

    1969-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigation determines the nature of oscillations and instabilities that occur in the flow of two-phase cryogenic fluids at both subcritical and supercritical pressures in heat exchangers. Test results with varying system parameters suggest certain design approaches with regard to heat exchanger geometry.

  15. Heat Flow of the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, C.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial heat flow determination is of prime interest for oil industry because it impacts directly maturation histories and economic potential of oil fields. Published systematic heat flow determinations from major oil provinces are however seldom. Robust heat flow determinations in drillholes require logging of undisturbed temperatures and intensive sampling of core material for petrophysical measurements. Temperature logging in exploration drillholes is traditionally conducted during drill breaks or shortly after drilling, resulting in temperatures severely disturbed by mud circulation and coring is restricted to selected intervals. Alternatively, test temperatures, information from electric logs and lithological descriptions of drill cuttings can be used to overcome these limitations. The present contribution introduces new heat flow determinations based on 63 exploration drillholes from the Norwegian North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin and the Barents Shelf. Our analyses are based on released DST temperatures, precise lithological descriptions of drill cuttings, previously measured rock matrix thermal conductivities and established porosity laws. For the sake of comparison, we carefully review previous heat flow studies carried out both onshore and offshore Norway. Our results suggest median heat flow values of 64 mW/m2, 65 mW/m2 and 72 mW/m2 for the North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin (mainly the Trøndelag Platform) and the SW Barents Shelf respectively. In detail, heat flow increases by ~ 10 mW/m2 from the southern Norwegian North Sea towards the Mid Norway Margin. This result appears to be in very good agreement with seismic tomographic studies suggesting northward thinning of the underlying mantle lithosphere. Our results together with published marine heat flow data from the Mid Norway Margin suggest a gradual decrease in heat flow levels from both the North Sea and the Trøndelag Platform towards the centres of the deep Møre and Vøring basins. This latter

  16. Coupling of volatile transport and internal heat flow on Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Robert H.; Kirk, Randolph L.

    1994-01-01

    Recently Brown et al. (1991) showed that Triton's internal heat source could amount to 5-20% of the absorbed insolation on Triton, thus significantly affecting volatile transport and atmospheric pressure. Subsequently, Kirk and Brown (1991a) used simple analytical models of the effect of internal heat on the distribution of volatiles on Triton's surface, confirming the speculation of Brown et al. that Triton's internal heat flow could strongly couple to the surface volatile distribution. To further explore this idea, we present numerical models of the permanent distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton that include the effects of sunlight, the two-dimensional distribution of internal heat flow, the coupling of internal heat flow to the surface distribution of nitrogen ice, and the finite viscosity of nitrogen ice. From these models we conclude that: (1) The strong vertical thermal gradient induced in Triton's polar caps by internal heat-flow facilitates viscous spreading to lower latitudes, thus opposing the poleward transport of volatiles by sunlight, and, for plausible viscosities and nitrogen inventories, producing permanent caps of considerable latitudinal extent; (2) It is probable that there is a strong coupling between the surface distribution of nitrogen ice on Triton and internal heat flow; (3) Asymmetries in the spatial distribution of Triton's heat flow, possibly driven by large-scale, volcanic activity or convection in Triton's interior, can result in permanent polar caps of unequal latitudinal extent, including the case of only one permanent polar cap; (4) Melting at the base of a permanent polar cap on Triton caused by internal heat flow can significantly enhance viscous spreading, and, as an alternative to the solid-state greenhouse mechanism proposed by Brown et al. (1990), could provide the necessary energy, fluids, and/or gases to drive Triton's geyser-like plumes; (5) The atmospheric collapse predicted to occur on Triton in the next 20 years

  17. Heat flow and heat generation in greenstone belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drury, M. J.

    1986-01-01

    Heat flow has been measured in Precambrian shields in both greenstone belts and crystalline terrains. Values are generally low, reflecting the great age and tectonic stability of the shields; they range typically between 30 and 50 mW/sq m, although extreme values of 18 and 79 mW/sq m have been reported. For large areas of the Earth's surface that are assumed to have been subjected to a common thermotectonic event, plots of heat flow against heat generation appear to be linear, although there may be considerable scatter in the data. The relationship is expressed as: Q = Q sub o + D A sub o in which Q is the observed heat flow, A sub o is the measured heat generation at the surface, Q sub o is the reduced heat flow from the lower crust and mantle, and D, which has the dimension of length, represents a scale depth for the distribution of radiogenic elements. Most authors have not used data from greenstone belts in attempting to define the relationship within shields, considering them unrepresentative and preferring to use data from relatively homogeneous crystalline rocks. A discussion follows.

  18. Heat flow of the Norwegian continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial heat flow influences a large collection of geological processes. Its determination is a requirement to assess the economic potential of deep sedimentary basins. Published heat flow calculations from e.g. major oil provinces are however seldom. Robust heat flow determinations in drillholes require logging of undisturbed temperatures and intensive sampling of core material for petrophysical measurements. Temperature logging in exploration drillholes is traditionally conducted during drill breaks or shortly after drilling, resulting in temperatures severely disturbed by mud circulation and coring is restricted to selected intervals. Alternatively, test temperatures, information from electric logs and lithological descriptions of drill cuttings can be used to overcome these limitations. The present contribution introduces new heat flow determinations based on 63 exploration drillholes from the Norwegian North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin and the Barents Shelf. Our analyses are based on released DST temperatures, precise lithological descriptions of drill cuttings, previously measured rock matrix thermal conductivities and established porosity laws. Our results suggest median heat flow values of 64 mW/m2, 65 mW/m2 and 72 mW/m2 for the North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin (mainly the Trøndelag Platform) and the SW Barents Shelf respectively. The Barents Shelf shows significantly high heat flow, suggesting lateral transfer of heat from the mantle of the adjacent young ocean. In detail, heat flow increases by ~ 10 mW/m2 from the southern Norwegian North Sea towards the Mid Norway Margin. This result appears to be in very good agreement with seismic tomographic studies suggesting northward thinning of the underlying mantle lithosphere. Our results together with published marine heat flow data from the Mid Norway Margin suggest a gradual decrease in heat flow levels from both the North Sea and the Trøndelag Platform towards the centres of the deep Møre and V

  19. Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, C. Subba

    1993-01-01

    Aerodynamic heating in hypersonic space vehicles is an important factor to be considered in their design. Therefore the designers of such vehicles need reliable heat transfer data in this respect for a successful design. Such data is usually produced by testing the models of hypersonic surfaces in wind tunnels. Most of the hypersonic test facilities at present are conventional blow-down tunnels whose run times are of the order of several seconds. The surface temperatures on such models are obtained using standard techniques such as thin-film resistance gages, thin-skin transient calorimeter gages and coaxial thermocouple or video acquisition systems such as phosphor thermography and infrared thermography. The data are usually reduced assuming that the model behaves like a semi-infinite solid (SIS) with constant properties and that heat transfer is by one-dimensional conduction only. This simplifying assumption may be valid in cases where models are thick, run-times short, and thermal diffusivities small. In many instances, however, when these conditions are not met, the assumption may lead to significant errors in the heat transfer results. The purpose of the present paper is to investigate this aspect. Specifically, the objectives are as follows: (1) to determine the limiting conditions under which a model can be considered a semi-infinite body; (2) to estimate the extent of errors involved in the reduction of the data if the models violate the assumption; and (3) to come up with correlation factors which when multiplied by the results obtained under the SIS assumption will provide the results under the actual conditions.

  20. How does ice sheet loading affect ocean flow around Antarctica?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dijkstra, H. A.; Rugenstein, M. A.; Stocchi, P.; von der Heydt, A. S.

    2012-12-01

    Interactions and dynamical feedbacks between ocean circulation, heat and atmospheric moisture transport, ice sheet evolution, and Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) are overlooked issues in paleoclimatology. Here we will present first results on how ocean flows were possibly affected by the glaciation of Antarctica across the Eocene-Oligocene Transition (~ 34 Ma) through GIA and bathymetry variations. GIA-induced gravitationally self-consistent bathymetry variations are determined by solving the Sea Level Equation (SLE), which describes the time dependent shape of (i) the solid Earth and (ii) the equipotential surface of gravity. Since the ocean circulation equations are defined relative to the equipotential surface of gravity, only bathymetry variations can influence ocean flows, although the sea surface slope will also change through time due to gravitational attraction. We use the Hallberg Isopycnal Model under late Eocene conditions to calculate equilibrium ocean flows in a domain in which the bathymetry evolves under ice loading according to the SLE. The bathymetric effects of the glaciation of Antarctica lead to substantial spatial changes in ocean flows, and close to the coast, the flow even reverses direction. Volume transports through the Drake Passage and Tasman Seaway adjust to the new bathymetry. The results indicate that GIA-induced ocean flow variations alone may have had an impact on sedimentation and erosion patterns, the repositioning of fronts, ocean heat transport and grounding line and ice sheet stability.

  1. Ionospheric Heating Rates Associated with Solar Wind Forcing: Ejecta flow, High Speed Flow and Slow Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knipp, D. J.; Kasprzak, B.; Richardson, I.; Paige, T.; Evans, D.

    2001-12-01

    We present estimates of global ionospheric Joule and particle heating as a function of solar wind flow types over solar cycles 21, 22 and the first half of solar cycle 23. Richardson et al., [JGR, 2000] used a variety of techniques to categorize the solar wind flow as ejecta, high-speed stream or slow flow. Their work provides the basis for our catigorization of heating by flow type. The estimates of Joule heating are based on output of the Assimilative Mapping of Ionospheric Electrodynamics (AMIE) procedure, and fits to the Polar Cap Index [Chun et al., GRL, 1999]. Estimates of particle heating are derived from polar orbiting satellites. Although ejecta only account for 19% of the solar wind flow, they account for 27% of the Joule heating. High-speed stream flow accounts for 47% of the flow occurrence and 44% of the Joule heating. We will show similar comparisons for particle heating. Our solar cycle statistics indicate that Joule heating produces a yearly average hemispheric heating rate of 53 GW while particles produce a hemispheric heating rate of 38 GW. Joule heating exhibits more variability than particle heating. During solar cycle maximum years Joule heating accounts for twice the heating associated with particles heating.

  2. Method for identifying anomalous terrestrial heat flows

    DOEpatents

    Del Grande, Nancy Kerr

    1977-01-25

    A method for locating and mapping the magnitude and extent of terrestrial heat-flow anomalies from 5 to 50 times average with a tenfold improved sensitivity over orthodox applications of aerial temperature-sensing surveys as used for geothermal reconnaissance. The method remotely senses surface temperature anomalies such as occur from geothermal resources or oxidizing ore bodies by: measuring the spectral, spatial, statistical, thermal, and temporal features characterizing infrared radiation emitted by natural terrestrial surfaces; deriving from these measurements the true surface temperature with uncertainties as small as 0.05 to 0.5 K; removing effects related to natural temperature variations of topographic, hydrologic, or meteoric origin, the surface composition, detector noise, and atmospheric conditions; factoring out the ambient normal-surface temperature for non-thermally enhanced areas surveyed under otherwise identical environmental conditions; distinguishing significant residual temperature enhancements characteristic of anomalous heat flows and mapping the extent and magnitude of anomalous heat flows where they occur.

  3. Colorado Heat Flow Data from IHFC

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: The International Heat Flow Commission (IHFC) Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado IHFC Data Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: Abstract: This layer contains the heat flow sites and data of the State of Colorado compiled from the International Heat Flow Commission (IHFC) of the International Association of Seismology and Physics of the Earth's Interior (IASPEI) global heat flow database (www.heatflow.und.edu/index2.html). The data include different items: Item number, descriptive code, name of site, latitude and longitude, elevation, depth interval, number of temperature data, temperature gradient, number of conductivity measurement, average conductivity, number of heat generation measurements, average heat production, heat flow, number of individual sites, references, and date of publication. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4522121.800672 m Left: 165356.134075 m Right: 621836.776246 m Bottom: 4097833.419676 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude Of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich

  4. Stirling Engine With Radial Flow Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitale, N.; Yarr, George

    1993-01-01

    Conflict between thermodynamical and structural requirements resolved. In Stirling engine of new cylindrical configuration, regenerator and acceptor and rejector heat exchangers channel flow of working gas in radial direction. Isotherms in regenerator ideally concentric cylinders, and gradient of temperature across regenerator radial rather than axial. Acceptor and rejector heat exchangers located radially inward and outward of regenerator, respectively. Enables substantial increase in power of engine without corresponding increase in diameter of pressure vessel.

  5. Heat transfer peculiarities in supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borovoi, V. Ia.; Brazhko, V. N.; Maikapar, G. I.; Skuratov, A. S.; Struminskaia, I. V.

    1992-12-01

    A method of heat transfer and gas flow investigation based on the application of thermal sensitive coatings or thermocouple sensors and various visualization techniques is described. The thermal sensitive coatings and visualization reveal heat transfer peculiarities, and the complex nature of the method contributes to understanding the processes and generalization of quantitative results. Data concerning heat transfer on the leeward side of a blunt cone in the regions of the shock-wave boundary layer and bow wave interaction, in gaps and cavities of the orbiter's thermal insulation, and in the vicinity of them, are presented.

  6. Numberical Solution to Transient Heat Flow Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobiske, Ronald A.; Hock, Jeffrey L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the reduction of the one- and three-dimensional diffusion equation to the difference equation and its stability, convergence, and heat-flow applications under different boundary conditions. Indicates the usefulness of this presentation for beginning students of physics and engineering as well as college teachers. (CC)

  7. Notes on heat flow at Ririwai, Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chukwueke, C.

    Heat flow measurements carried out in the Ririwai ring complexes gave an average temperature gradient of 16.0 ± 0.5°C km -1 and thermal conductivity of the granites measured in the laboratory varied from 3.007 to 3.672 W/m°C. The laboratory results conforms with the estimated thermal conductivities from mineralogical compositions: modal analysis 3.13 W/m°C, C.I.P.W. norm 3.06 W/m°C and the content of oxides SiO 2 3.17 W/m°C. The calculated average heat flow is 50.72 ± 2.54 mWm -2 which is higher than those from the West African Craton: 20 mWm -2 in Niger, (Chapman and Pollack, 1974), 26 mWm -2 in Ghana (Beck and Mustonen, 1972) and 38.5 ± 1.7 mWm -2 from the same complex (Verheijen and Ajakaiye, 1979). The heat flow value of 50.72 ± 2.54 mWm -2 is considered normal for post PreCambrian orogenic provinces and also in agreement with the relation between heat flow and age.

  8. Heat flow-heat production relationship not found: what drives heat flow variability of the Western Canadian foreland basin?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majorowicz, Jacek A.

    2016-06-01

    Heat flow high -80 ± 10 mW/m2 in the northern western parts of the Western Canadian foreland basin is in large contrast to low heat flow to the south and east (50 ± 7 mW/m2) of the same basin with the same old 2E09 year's Precambrian basement and some 200-km-thick lithosphere. Over-thrusted and flat-laying sedimentary units are heated from below by heat flow from the old craton' crust and low 15 ± 5 mW/m2 mantle contribution. The heat flow vs. radiogenic heat production statistical relationship is not found for this area. To account for this large heat flow contrast and to have 200-km-thick lithosphere, we would need to assume that high heat production layer of the upper crust varies in thickness as much as factor of 2 and/or that the measured heat production at top of Precambrian basement is not representative for deeper rocks. The other explanation proposed before that heat in the basin is redistributed by the regional fluid flow systems driven from high hydraulic head areas close to the foothills of the Rocky Mountains toward low elevation areas to the east and north cannot be explained by observed low Darcy fluid velocities and the geometry of the basin.

  9. The developing heat transfer and fluid flow in micro-channel heat sink with viscous heating effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelea, Dorin; Cioabla, Adrian Eugen

    2011-07-01

    The numerical modeling of the conjugate heat transfer and fluid flow through the micro-heat sink was presented in the paper, considering the viscous dissipation effect. Three different fluids with temperature dependent fluid viscosity are considered: water, dielectric fluid HFE-7600 and isopropanol. The square shape of the cross-section is considered with D h = 50 μm with a channel length L = 50 mm. As most of the reported researches dealt with fully developed fluid flow and constant fluid properties in this paper the thermal and hydro-dynamic developing laminar fluid flow is analyzed. Two different heat transfer conditions are considered: heating and cooling at various Br. The influence of the viscous heating on local Nu and Po is analyzed. It was shown that for a given geometry the local Po and Nu numbers are strongly affected by the viscous heating. Moreover the Po number attains the fully developed value as the external heating is equal with the internal viscous heating.

  10. Rényi entropy flows from quantum heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Mohammad H.; Nazarov, Yuli V.

    2015-03-01

    We evaluate Rényi entropy flows from generic quantum heat engines (QHE) to a weakly coupled probe environment kept in thermal equilibrium. We show that the flows are determined not only by heat flow but also by a quantum coherent flow that can be separately measured in experiment apart from the heat flow measurement. The same pertains to Shannon entropy flow. This appeals for a revision of the concept of entropy flows in quantum nonequlibrium thermodynamics.

  11. Regional heat flow variations in the northern Michigan and Lake Superior region determined using the silica heat flow estimator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vugrinovich, R.

    1987-01-01

    Conventional heat flow data are sparse for northern Michigan. The groundwater silica heat flow estimator expands the database sufficiently to allow regional variations in heat flow to be examined. Heat flow shows a pattern of alternating highs and lows trending ESE across the Upper Peninsula and Lake Superior. The informal names given to these features, their characteristic heat flow and inferred causes are listed: {A table is presented} The results suggest that, for the study area, regional variations in heat flow cannot be interpreted solely in terms of regional variations of the heat generation rate of basement rocks. ?? 1987.

  12. Turbulent Heat Transfer in Ribbed Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Changwoo; Yang, Kyung-Soo

    2012-11-01

    From the view point of heat transfer control, surface roughness is one of the popular ways adopted for enhancing heat transfer in turbulent pipe flow. Such a surface roughness is often modeled with a rib. In the current investigation, Large Eddy Simulation has been performed for turbulent flow in a pipe with periodically-mounted ribs at Reτ=700, Pr=0.71, and p / k =2, 4, and 8. Here, p and k represent the pitch and rib height, respectively. The rib height is fixed as one tenth of the pipe radius. The profiles of mean velocity components, mean temperature, root-mean-squares (rms) of temperature fluctuation are presented at the selected streamwise locations. In comparison with the smooth-pipe case at the same Re and Pr, the effects of the ribs are clearly identified, leading to overall enhancement of turbulent heat transfer in terms of Nu. The budget of temperature variance is presented in the form of contours. The results of an Octant analysis are also given to elucidate the dominant events. Our LES results shed light on a complete understanding of the heat-transfer mechanisms in turbulent ribbed-pipe flow which has numerous applications in engineering. This work was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) grant funded by the Korea government (MEST) (No. 2012013019).

  13. Heat transfer in thin, compact heat exchangers with circular, rectangular, or pin-fin flow passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    Heat transfer and pressure drop have been measured of three thin, compact heat exchangers in helium gas at 3.5 MPa and higher, with Reynolds numbers of 450 to 36,000. The flow geometries for the three heat exchanger specimens were: circular tube, rectangular channel, and staggered pin fin with tapered pins. The specimens were heated radiatively at heat fluxes up to 77 W/sq cm. Correlations were developed for the isothermal friction factor as a function of Reynolds number, and for the Nusselt number as a function of Reynolds number and the ratio of wall temperature to fluid temperature. The specimen with the pin fin internal geometry had significantly better heat transfer than the other specimens, but it also had higher pressure drop. For certain conditions of helium flow and heating, the temperature more than doubled from the inlet to the outlet of the specimens, producing large changes in gas velocity, density, viscosity, and thermal conductivity. These changes in properties did not affect the correlations for friction factor and Nusselt number in turbulent flow.

  14. Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Hardee, Harry C.; Reynolds, Gerald D.; Steinfort, Terry D.

    1992-01-01

    A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers arranged in a vertical string. The transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings.

  15. Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor

    DOEpatents

    Carrigan, C.R.; Hardee, H.C.; Reynolds, G.D.; Steinfort, T.D.

    1990-01-01

    A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings. 6 figs.

  16. Exploring Online Game Players' Flow Experiences and Positive Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Yu-Tzu; Lin, Sunny S. J.; Cheng, Chao-Yang; Liu, Eric Zhi-Feng

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted two studies to explore online game players' flow experiences and positive affect. Our findings indicated that online game are capable of evoking flow experiences and positive affect, and games of violent or nonviolent type may not arouse players' aggression. The players could be placed into four flow conditions: flow,…

  17. New heat flow measurements in Oman in the Arabian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolandone, F.; Lucazeau, F.; Jaupart, C.; Leroy, S.; Bache, F.; Amerjeed, M.; Lally, J.

    2009-04-01

    Precambrian shields are viewed as low heat flow provinces but detailed studies in Canada, South Africa and India shields demonstrate that large heat flow differences exist between them and within a single province, related to differences of crustal structures. Very few heat flow measurements are available on the Arabian shield and its thermal structure is poorly constrained. Heat flow reported for the Arabian Shield and its immediate platform (36-88 mWm-2) is broad. Thermal regime has a control on rheology and on deformation and the Arabian shield is of particular interest because it was affected by geodynamic processes such as the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden riftings starting around 30 Ma ago and the formation of the Dead Sea Transform fault starting at about 20 Ma. In December 2006, a marine heat-flow survey in the Gulf of Aden provided 169 new heat-flow measurements along multi-channel seismic profiles. One of the main results is that the high heat-flow (~120 mWm-2), characteristic of oceanic domains, extends into the deep continental margin and switches abruptly in the proximal margin to a low value (~40 mWm-2) typical of stable Precambrian domain. These low values have been confirmed by estimates derived from oil exploration data in few locations south of Oman. These data indicate a strong contrast of thermal regimes within the continental margin. Recent tomography studies on Arabia in Oman show that the lithosphere is significantly affected within Arabia in the vicinity of the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden. This pattern is apparently different from the observed heat-flow pattern, which needs to be confirmed and extended into the Arabian platform. The survey we conducted in October 2008 was to evaluate the thermal regime in the onshore domains of Oman. We measured the temperature gradient in 9 water wells in Dhofar south of Oman and in 8 mining wells in northern Oman in the ophiolite belt. The goal is to investigate the thermal structure of the Arabian plate and

  18. Subsurface heat flow in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, Grant; Woodbury, Allan D.

    2004-02-01

    The subsurface temperature field beneath Winnipeg, Canada, is significantly different from that of the surrounding rural areas. Downward heat flow to depths as great as 130 m has been noted in some areas beneath the city and groundwater temperatures in a regional aquifer have risen by as much as 5°C in some areas. Numerical simulation of heat transport supports the conjecture that these temperature changes can be largely attributed to heat loss from buildings and the temperature at any given point is sensitive to the distance from and the age of any buildings. The effect is most noticable when buildings are closely spaced, which is typical of urban areas. Temperature measurements in areas more than a few hundred meters away from any heated structure were only a few tenths of a degree Celsius greater than those observed outside the city, suggesting that other reasons for increases in subsurface temperature, such as changes in surface cover or climate change, may be responsible for some of the some of the observed increase in temperatures. These sources of additional heat to the subsurface make it difficult to resolve information on past climates from temperatures measured in boreholes and monitoring wells. In some areas, the temperature increases may also have an impact on geothermal energy resources. This impact might be in the form of an increase in heat pump efficiency or in the case of the Winnipeg area, a decrease in the efficiency of direct use of groundwater for cooling.

  19. Critical heat flux in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, David Douglas

    The critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon was investigated for water flow in tubes with particular emphasis on the development of methods for predicting CHF in the subcooled flow boiling regime. The Purdue University Boiling and Two-Phase Flow Laboratory (PU-BTPFL) CHF database for water flow in a uniformly heated tube was compiled from the world literature dating back to 1949 and represents the largest CHF database ever assembled with 32,544 data points from over 100 sources. The superiority of this database was proven via a detailed examination of previous databases. The PU-BTPFL CHF database is an invaluable tool for the development of CHF correlations and mechanistic models that are superior to existing ones developed with smaller, less comprehensive CHF databases. In response to the many inaccurate and inordinately complex correlations, two nondimensional, subcooled CHF correlations were formulated, containing only five adjustable constants and whose unique functional forms were determined without using a statistical analysis but rather using the parametric trends observed in less than 10% of the subcooled CHF data. The correlation based on inlet conditions (diameter, heated length, mass velocity, pressure, inlet quality) was by far the most accurate of all known subcooled CHF correlations, having mean absolute and root-mean-square (RMS) errors of 10.3% and 14.3%, respectively. The outlet (local) conditions correlation was the most accurate correlation based on local CHF conditions (diameter, mass velocity, pressure, outlet quality) and may be used with a nonuniform axial heat flux. Both correlations proved more accurate than a recent CHF look-up table commonly employed in nuclear reactor thermal hydraulic computer codes. An interfacial lift-off, subcooled CHF model was developed from a consideration of the instability of the vapor-liquid interface and the fraction of heat required for liquid-vapor conversion as opposed to that for bulk liquid heating. Severe

  20. Numerical and Experimental Approaches Toward Understanding Lava Flow Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, M.; Fagents, S. A.; Hamilton, C.; Crawford, I. A.

    2013-12-01

    , especially at high temperatures. It is important to have this property well constrained as substrate thermal conductivity is the greatest influence on the rate of lava-substrate heat transfer. At Kilauea and Mauna Loa Volcanoes, Hawaii, and other volcanoes that threaten communities, lava may erupt over a variety of substrate materials including cool lava flows, volcanic tephra, soils, sand, and concrete. The composition, moisture, organic content, porosity, and grain size of the substrate dictate the thermophysical properties, thus affecting the transfer of heat from the lava flow into the substrate and flow mobility. Particulate substrate materials act as insulators, subduing the rate of heat transfer from the flow core. Therefore, lava that flows over a particulate substrate will maintain higher core temperatures over a longer period, enhancing flow mobility and increasing the duration and aerial coverage of the resulting flow. Lava flow prediction models should include substrate specification with temperature dependent material property definitions for an accurate understanding of flow hazards.

  1. Heat flow diagnostics for helicon plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Berisford, Daniel F.; Bengtson, Roger D.; Raja, Laxminarayan L.; Cassady, Leonard D.; Chancery, William J.

    2008-10-15

    We present experimental studies of power balance in an argon helicon discharge. An infrared camera measures the heating of the dielectric tube containing a helicon discharge based on measurement of temperature profiles of the tube surface before and after a rf pulse. Using this diagnostic, we have measured surface heating trends at a variety of operating conditions on two helicon systems: the 10 kW VASIMR VX-50 experiment and the University of Texas at Austin 1 kW helicon experiment. Power losses downstream from the antenna are measured using thermocouples and probes. The heating of the dielectric tube increases with decreasing magnetic fields, higher gas flow rates, and higher molecular mass of the gas. These preliminary results suggest that cross-field particle diffusion contributes a significant proportion of the energy flux to the wall.

  2. Comparative study of heat transfer and pressure drop during flow boiling and flow condensation in minichannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikielewicz, Dariusz; Andrzejczyk, Rafał; Jakubowska, Blanka; Mikielewicz, Jarosław

    2014-09-01

    In the paper a method developed earlier by authors is applied to calculations of pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient for flow boiling and also flow condensation for some recent data collected from literature for such fluids as R404a, R600a, R290, R32,R134a, R1234yf and other. The modification of interface shear stresses between flow boiling and flow condensation in annular flow structure are considered through incorporation of the so called blowing parameter. The shear stress between vapor phase and liquid phase is generally a function of nonisothermal effects. The mechanism of modification of shear stresses at the vapor-liquid interface has been presented in detail. In case of annular flow it contributes to thickening and thinning of the liquid film, which corresponds to condensation and boiling respectively. There is also a different influence of heat flux on the modification of shear stress in the bubbly flow structure, where it affects bubble nucleation. In that case the effect of applied heat flux is considered. As a result a modified form of the two-phase flow multiplier is obtained, in which the nonadiabatic effect is clearly pronounced.

  3. Visualization of working fluid flow in gravity assisted heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2015-05-01

    Heat pipe is device working with phase changes of working fluid inside hermetically closed pipe at specific pressure. The phase changes of working fluid from fluid to vapor and vice versa help heat pipe to transport high heat flux. The article deal about construction and processes casing in heat pipe during operation. Experiment visualization of working fluid flow is performed with glass heat pipe filed with ethanol. The visualization of working fluid flow explains the phenomena as working fluid boiling, nucleation of bubbles, vapor flow, vapor condensation on the wall, vapor and condensate flow interaction, flow down condensate film thickness on the wall, occurred during the heat pipe operation.

  4. Flow characteristics and heat transfer in wavy walled channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Zachary; Shah, Tapan; Monts, Vontravis; Warey, Alok; Balestrino, Sandro; Alexeev, Alexander

    2013-11-01

    Using lattice Boltzmann simulations, we investigated the effects of wavy channel geometry on the flow and heat transfer within a parallel plate heat exchanger. We observed three distinct flow regimes that include steady flow with and without recirculation and unsteady time-periodic flow. We determined the critical Reynolds numbers at which the flow transitions between different flow regimes. To validate our computational results, we compared the simulated flow structures with the structures observed in a flowing soap film. Furthermore, we examine the effects of the wavy channel geometry on the heat transfer. We find that the unsteady flow regime drastically enhances the rate of heat transfer and show that heat exchangers with wavy walls outperform currently used heat exchangers with similar volume and power characteristics. Results from our study point to a simple and efficient method for increasing performance in compact heat exchangers.

  5. Program for Heat Flow in Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Graham, M.

    1986-01-01

    Program contains numerical model of temperature distribution in vicinity of weld. Weld model used to produce estimated welding power requirements, welding-power-loss analysis, heat-affected-zone temperature history, and weld-puddle cross-section plots. Applied to gas/tungsten-arc, plasma-arc, electron-beam, and laser-beam welds on wide plates under steady conditions. User predicts power requirements and temperature distributions. Weld model written in BASIC.

  6. Geomechanical Fracturing with Flow and Heat

    2009-01-01

    The GeoFracFH model is a particle-based discrete element model (DEM) that has been coupled with fluid flow and heat conduction/convection. In this model, the rock matrix material is represented by a network of DEM particles connected by mechanical bonds (elastic beams in this case, see Figure 1, gray particles connected by beams). During the simulation process, the mechanical bonds that have been stretched or bent beyond a critical strain (both tensile and shear failures aremore » simulated) are broken and removed from the network in a progressive manner. Bonds can be removed from the network with rates or probabilities that depend on their stress or strain, or the properties of the discrete elements and bonds can be varied continuously to represent phenomena such as creep, strain hardening, and chemical degradation. The coupling of a DEM geomechanical model with models for Darcy flow and heat transport is also illustrated in Figure 1. Darcy flow and heat transport equations are solved on an underlying fixed finite difference grid with evolving porosity and permeability for each grid cell that depends on the local structure of the discrete element network (such as the DEM particle density). The fluid pressure gradient exerts forces on individual elements of the DEM network, which then deforms and fractures the rock matrix. The deformation/fracturing in turn changes the permeability which again changes the evolution of fluid pressure, coupling the two phenomena. The intimate coupling between fracturing, fluid flow, and thermal transport makes the GeoFracFH model, rather than conventional continuum mechanical models, necessary for coupled hydro-thermal-mechanical problems in the subsurface.« less

  7. A coupled heat and water flow apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Mohamed, A.M.O.; Caporouscio, F.; Yong, R.N. ); Cheung, C.H. ); Kjartanson, B.H. )

    1993-03-01

    Safe and permanent disposal of radioactive waste requires isolation of a number of diverse chemical elements form the environment. The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is assessing the concept of disposing of waste in a vault excavated at a depth of 500 to 1000 m below the ground surface in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The temperatures and hydraulic potential in the buffer and back fill material were investigated. To study the performance of a compacted buffer material under thermal and isothermal conditions, a coupled heat and water flow apparatus is designed and presented. In the preliminary design, a one-dimensional flow of heat and water was not achieved. however, control of temperature gradient, existence of one-dimensional flow, and uniformity of temperature and volumetric water content distributions at any cross section within the specimen are achieved in the modified design. Experimental results have shown that the temperature stabilizes very rapidly after a period of approximately 0. 107 days. The moisture moves away from the hot end along the longitudinal direction of the specimen due to imposed thermal gradient. The time required for moisture to stabilize is in order of days. 17 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. 2-Phase Fluid Flow & Heat Transport

    1993-03-13

    GEOTHER is a three-dimensional, geothermal reservoir simulation code. The model describes heat transport and flow of a single component, two-phase fluid in porous media. It is based on the continuity equations for steam and water, which are reduced to two nonlinear partial differential equations in which the dependent variables are fluid pressure and enthalpy. GEOTHER can be used to simulate the fluid-thermal interaction in rock that can be approximated by a porous media representation. Itmore » can simulate heat transport and the flow of compressed water, two-phase mixtures, and superheated steam in porous media over a temperature range of 10 to 300 degrees C. In addition, it can treat the conversion from single to two-phase flow, and vice versa. It can be used for evaluation of a near repository spatial scale and a time scale of a few years to thousands of years. The model can be used to investigate temperature and fluid pressure changes in response to thermal loading by waste materials.« less

  9. Fundamental flow and heat transfer results relevant to oscillating flow regenerators

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, R.A.; Ross, B.A.

    1987-08-01

    Complete understanding of the operation of Stirling and other heat engine regenerators has evaded engineers working on engine development because making measurements in or near such a regenerator is so difficult. Some illumination of the physics that may be involved, however, can be found by studying fundamental experimental results in the literature, results that were examined for other applications in addition to Stirling. Preliminary reviews of literature on the subjects of oscillating flows, periodic flows and porous media have brought to light interesting papers presenting a number of phenomena that may be of importance in heat engine regenerators. Some are also relevant to flows in other Stirling heat exchangers. These topics include heat transfer during compression and expansion, enhanced conduction in oscillating laminar flows, approaches to analysis of nonuniform porous media, and heat transfer enhancement mechanisms in porous media. Each topic is briefly described and discussed in this paper, and a summary of physical phenomena that may affect regenerator performance is presented. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Revised lunar heat-flow values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. G.; Keihm, S. J.; Peters, K.

    1976-01-01

    The 3.5- and 2-year subsurface temperature histories at the Apollo 15 and 17 heat-flow sites have been analyzed, and the results yield significantly lower thermal conductivity determinations than the results of previous short-term experiments. The thermal conductivity determined by probes at a depth of about 150 cm and 250 cm lies in the range 0.9-1.3 times 10 to the -4th W/cm K. On the basis of measurements of variations of surface thorium abundance and inferred crustal thicknesses, the average global heat flux is estimated to be about 1.8 microwatts/sq cm. This requires a uranium concentration of 46 ppb.

  11. Underworld and multi-basin heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quenette, S. M.; O'Neill, C.; Moresi, L. N.; Danis, C. R.; Mansour, J.

    2011-12-01

    We present an over arching method for non-linear heat flow assessments of large, multi-basin systems. Our example is the Sydney-, Gunnedah-, Bowen basins (Danis et al 2011), which covers an area of 800kms by 1900kms and depth of 5kms, on the east coast of Australia. It is used as a baseline towards further fluid and structural geodynamics oriented analysis. In contrast to reservoir scale geothermal models - basin, multi-basin and towards lithosphere scale models exhibit their own challenges in terms of physical/rheological behaviour and computational tractability. For instance we model a non-linear heat flow by means of temperature dependent conductivity, as indicated by Clauser and Huenges (1995), which allows crystalline basement rocks, such as granites, to show for example a significant decrease in conductivity from ambient temperature up to around 400C, dropping from around 3 mK**(units) to around 2. For this modelling, a specialisation of the geodynamics code 'Underworld' (Moresi et al 2007) called Underworld-GT is used. A toolbox is added to the otherwise un-touched Underworld code adding geothermal workflow and context to Underworld. A particular novel feature is the ability to load stratigraphic layers, and/or GoCAD or GeoModeller voxel sets as the constraining geological geometry, whilst allowing the heat assessment models to scale from 1 process to 1000s. Another is the ability to prescribe synthetic drill holes, and its use in stochastic-oriented assessments of model parameters. Following the Underworld platform's approach and its simple PDE abstraction layer, these model configurations from a baseline for further additions to the governing equations such as fluid flow and structure, enabling a bridge between reservoir and continental scale dynamics, albeit with their own computational challenges.

  12. The effect of asymmetric heating on flow stability and heat transfer for flow in a vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Tappan, C.H.

    1987-11-01

    This study presents experimental results of combined free and forced convection heat transfer in a vertical tube with a circumferentially nonuniform constant wall heat flux. The effect of an asymmetric wall heat flux on flow stability and on the rate of heat transfer for water flowing downward in a vertical tube was investigated. Experimental results were used to develop two stability maps which identify various flow regimes, corresponding to different thermal and hydraulic conditions. Heat transfer coefficients were also determined. Experimental results in the present investigation were compared to those with uniform heating in horizontal and vertical tube flow situations discussed in the literature. 23 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Thaw flow control for liquid heat transport systems

    DOEpatents

    Kirpich, Aaron S.

    1989-01-01

    In a liquid metal heat transport system including a source of thaw heat for use in a space reactor power system, the thaw flow throttle or control comprises a fluid passage having forward and reverse flow sections and a partition having a plurality of bleed holes therein to enable fluid flow between the forward and reverse sections. The flow throttle is positioned in the system relatively far from the source of thaw heat.

  14. Coupled flow, thermal and structural analysis of aerodynamically heated panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Earl A.; Dechaumphai, Pramote

    1986-01-01

    A finite element approach to coupling flow, thermal and structural analyses of aerodynamically heated panels is presented. The Navier-Stokes equations for laminar compressible flow are solved together with the energy equation and quasi-static structural equations of the panel. Interactions between the flow, panel heat transfer and deformations are studied for thin stainless steel panels aerodynamically heated by Mach 6.6 flow.

  15. Calibrated Heat Flow Model for Determining the Heat Conduction Losses in Laser Cutting of CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucha, P.; Weber, R.; Speker, N.; Berger, P.; Sommer, B.; Graf, T.

    Laser machining has great potential regarding automation in fabrication of CFRP (carbon-fiber-reinforced plastics) parts, due to the nearly force and tool-wear free processing at high process speeds. The high vaporization temperatures and the large heat conductivity of the carbon fibers lead to a large heat transport into the sample. This causes the formation of a heat-affected zone and a decrease of the process speed. In the present paper,an analytical heat flow model was adapted in order to understand and investigate the heat conduction losses. Thermal sensors were embedded in samples at different distances from the kerf to fit the calculated to the measured temperatures. Heat conduction losses of up to 30% of the laser power were determined. Furthermore, the energy not absorbed by the sample, the energy for sublimating the composite material in the kerf, the energy for the formation of the HAZ, and the residual heat in the sample are compared in an energy balance.

  16. Flow and heat transfer characteristics of orthogonally rotating channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Hiroshi

    1991-12-01

    Numerical analysis was conducted to predict the centripetal buoyant effect on flow and heat transfer characteristics in a channel rotating about a perpendicular axis. The conditions were assumed to be laminar, fully developed, and uniform heat flux. Calculation were conducted both for radially outward flow from the rotating axis and radially inward flow. The calculated results indicated that for radially outward flow buoyancy decreases the suction side friction and heat transfer while increasing pressure side friction and heat transfer. This trends were reversed for radially inward flow.

  17. High Heating Rates Affect Greatly the Inactivation Rate of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Aznar, Arantxa; Esnoz, Arturo; Fernández, Pablo S.; Iguaz, Asunción; Periago, Paula M.; Palop, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Heat resistance of microorganisms can be affected by different influencing factors. Although, the effect of heating rates has been scarcely explored by the scientific community, recent researches have unraveled its important effect on the thermal resistance of different species of vegetative bacteria. Typically heating rates described in the literature ranged from 1 to 20°C/min but the impact of much higher heating rates is unclear. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of different heating rates, such as those currently achieved in the heat exchangers used in the food industry, on the heat resistance of Escherichia coli. A pilot plant tubular heat exchanger and a thermoresistometer Mastia were used for this purpose. Results showed that fast heating rates had a deep impact on the thermal resistance of E. coli. Heating rates between 20 and 50°C/min were achieved in the heat exchanger, which were much slower than those around 20°C/s achieved in the thermoresistometer. In all cases, these high heating rates led to higher inactivation than expected: in the heat exchanger, for all the experiments performed, when the observed inactivation had reached about seven log cycles, the predictions estimated about 1 log cycle of inactivation; in the thermoresistometer these differences between observed and predicted values were even more than 10 times higher, from 4.07 log cycles observed to 0.34 predicted at a flow rate of 70 mL/min and a maximum heating rate of 14.7°C/s. A quantification of the impact of the heating rates on the level of inactivation achieved was established. These results point out the important effect that the heating rate has on the thermal resistance of E. coli, with high heating rates resulting in an additional sensitization to heat and therefore an effective food safety strategy in terms of food processing. PMID:27563300

  18. High Heating Rates Affect Greatly the Inactivation Rate of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Huertas, Juan-Pablo; Aznar, Arantxa; Esnoz, Arturo; Fernández, Pablo S; Iguaz, Asunción; Periago, Paula M; Palop, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Heat resistance of microorganisms can be affected by different influencing factors. Although, the effect of heating rates has been scarcely explored by the scientific community, recent researches have unraveled its important effect on the thermal resistance of different species of vegetative bacteria. Typically heating rates described in the literature ranged from 1 to 20°C/min but the impact of much higher heating rates is unclear. The aim of this research was to explore the effect of different heating rates, such as those currently achieved in the heat exchangers used in the food industry, on the heat resistance of Escherichia coli. A pilot plant tubular heat exchanger and a thermoresistometer Mastia were used for this purpose. Results showed that fast heating rates had a deep impact on the thermal resistance of E. coli. Heating rates between 20 and 50°C/min were achieved in the heat exchanger, which were much slower than those around 20°C/s achieved in the thermoresistometer. In all cases, these high heating rates led to higher inactivation than expected: in the heat exchanger, for all the experiments performed, when the observed inactivation had reached about seven log cycles, the predictions estimated about 1 log cycle of inactivation; in the thermoresistometer these differences between observed and predicted values were even more than 10 times higher, from 4.07 log cycles observed to 0.34 predicted at a flow rate of 70 mL/min and a maximum heating rate of 14.7°C/s. A quantification of the impact of the heating rates on the level of inactivation achieved was established. These results point out the important effect that the heating rate has on the thermal resistance of E. coli, with high heating rates resulting in an additional sensitization to heat and therefore an effective food safety strategy in terms of food processing. PMID:27563300

  19. One dimensional lunar ash flow with and without heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pai, S. I.; Hsieh, T.

    1971-01-01

    The characteristics of lunar ash flow are discussed in terms of the two phase flow theory of a mixture of a gas and small solid particles. A model is developed to present the fundamental equations and boundary conditions. Numerical solutions for special ash flow with and without heat transfer are presented. In the case of lunar ash flow with small initial velocity, the effect of the heat transfer makes the whole layer of ash flow more compacted together than the corresponding isothermal case.

  20. Vestibular stimulation affects optic-flow sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Mark; O'Mahony, Simon; Ibbotson, Michael R; Kohlhagen, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Typically, multiple cues can be used to generate a particular percept. Our area of interest is the extent to which humans are able to synergistically combine cues that are generated when moving through an environment. For example, movement through the environment leads to both visual (optic-flow) and vestibular stimulation, and studies have shown that non-human primates are able to combine these cues to generate a more accurate perception of heading than can be obtained with either cue in isolation. Here we investigate whether humans show a similar ability to synergistically combine optic-flow and vestibular cues. This was achieved by determining the sensitivity to optic-flow stimuli while physically moving the observer, and hence producing a vestibular signal, that was either consistent with the optic-flow signal, eg a radially expanding pattern coupled with forward motion, or inconsistent with it, eg a radially expanding pattern with backward motion. Results indicate that humans are more sensitive to motion-in-depth optic-flow stimuli when they are combined with complementary vestibular signals than when they are combined with conflicting vestibular signals. These results indicate that in humans, like in nonhuman primates, there is perceptual integration of visual and vestibular signals. PMID:21180352

  1. Measuring fluid flow and heat output in seafloor hydrothermal environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germanovich, Leonid N.; Hurt, Robert S.; Smith, Joshua E.; Genc, Gence; Lowell, Robert P.

    2015-12-01

    We review techniques for measuring fluid flow and advective heat output from seafloor hydrothermal systems and describe new anemometer and turbine flowmeter devices we have designed, built, calibrated, and tested. These devices allow measuring fluid velocity at high- and low-temperature focused and diffuse discharge sites at oceanic spreading centers. The devices perform at ocean floor depths and black smoker temperatures and can be used to measure flow rates ranging over 2 orders of magnitude. Flow velocity is determined from the rotation rate of the rotor blades or paddle assembly. These devices have an open bearing design that eliminates clogging by particles or chemical precipitates as the fluid passes by the rotors. The devices are compact and lightweight enough for deployment from either an occupied or remotely operated submersible. The measured flow rates can be used in conjunction with vent temperature or geochemical measurements to obtain heat outputs or geochemical fluxes from both vent chimneys and diffuse flow regions. The devices have been tested on 30 Alvin dives on the Juan de Fuca Ridge and 3 Jason dives on the East Pacific Rise (EPR). We measured an anomalously low entrainment coefficient (0.064) and report 104 new measurements over a wide range of discharge temperatures (5°-363°C), velocities (2-199 cm/s), and depths (1517-2511 m). These include the first advective heat output measurements at the High Rise vent field and the first direct fluid flow measurement at Middle Valley. Our data suggest that black smoker heat output at the Main Endeavour vent field may have declined since 1994 and that after the 2005-2006 eruption, the high-temperature advective flow at the EPR 9°50'N field may have become more channelized, predominately discharging through the Bio 9 structure. We also report 16 measurements on 10 Alvin dives and 2 Jason dives with flow meters that predate devices described in this work and were used in the process of their development

  2. Heat flow in the postquasistatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez-Mueller, B.; Peralta, C.; Barreto, W.; Rosales, L.

    2010-08-15

    We apply the postquasistatic approximation to study the evolution of spherically symmetric fluid distributions undergoing dissipation in the form of radial heat flow. For a model that corresponds to an incompressible fluid departing from the static equilibrium, it is not possible to go far from the initial state after the emission of a small amount of energy. Initially collapsing distributions of matter are not permitted. Emission of energy can be considered as a mechanism to avoid the collapse. If the distribution collapses initially and emits one hundredth of the initial mass only the outermost layers evolve. For a model that corresponds to a highly compressed Fermi gas, only the outermost shell can evolve with a shorter hydrodynamic time scale.

  3. Meteorological insights from planetary heat flow measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2015-04-01

    Planetary heat flow measurements are made with a series of high-precision temperature sensors deployed in a column of regolith to determine the geothermal gradient. Such sensors may, however, be susceptible to other influences, especially on worlds with atmospheres. First, pressure fluctuations at the surface may pump air in and out of pore space leading to observable, and otherwise unexpected, temperature fluctuations at depth. Such pumping is important in subsurface radon and methane transport on Earth: evidence of such pumping may inform understanding of methane or water vapor transport on Mars. Second, the subsurface profile contains a muted record of surface temperature history, and such measurements on other worlds may help constrain the extent to which Earth's Little Ice Age was directly solar-forced, versus volcanic-driven and/or amplified by climate feedbacks.

  4. A CFD technique to investigate the chocked flow and heat transfer characteristic in a micro-channel heat sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azari, Ahmad; Bahraini, Abdorrasoul; Marhamati, Saeideh

    2015-04-01

    In this research, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique was used to investigate the effect of choking on the flow and heat transfer characteristics of a typical micro-channel heat sink. Numerical simulations have been carried out using Spalart-Allmaras model. Comparison of the numerical results for the heat transfer rate, mass flow rate and Stanton number with the experimental data were conducted. Relatively good agreement was achieved with maximum relative error 16%, and 8% for heat transfer and mass flow rate, respectively. Also, average relative error 9.2% was obtained for the Stanton number in comparison with the experimental values. Although, the results show that the majority of heat was transferred in the entrance region of the channel, but the heat transfer in micro-channels can also be affected by choking at channel exit. Moreover, the results clearly show that, the location where the flow is choked (at the vicinity of the channel exit) is especially important in determining the heat transfer phenomena. It was found that Spalart-Allmaras model is capable to capture the main features of the choked flow. Also, the effects of choking on the main characteristics of the flow was presented and discussed.

  5. Analysis of the transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Jong Hoon; Faghri, Amir; Chang, Won Soon

    1989-01-01

    The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds and high mass flow rates are successfully predicted. The one-dimensional model also describes the vapor flow dynamics in cylindrical heat pipes at high temperatures.

  6. Heat-flow reconnaissance of the Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1982-04-01

    Most of the 46 new values of heat flow determined for the Gulf Coastal Plain are in the low to normal range, but heat-flow values averaging 1.8 heat-flow unit (HFU) were obtained in Claiborne, Ouachita, and Union parishes, Louisiana. Moreover, a zone of relatively high heat-flow values and steep thermal gradients (35 to 46/sup 0/C/km) extends from northern Louisiana into southwestern Mississippi. Also near Pensacola, Florida, temperatures of 50/sup 0/C at 1-km depth have been extrapolated from thermal gradients. Future development of low-grade geothermal resources may be warranted in these areas.

  7. Heat transfer coefficients for drying in pulsating flows

    SciTech Connect

    Fraenkel, S.L.

    1998-05-01

    Pulsating flows generated by a Rijke type combustor are studied for drying of grains and food particles. It is assumed that the velocity fluctuations are the main factor in the enhancement of the drying process. The heat transfer coefficients for drying in vibrating beds are utilized to estimate the heat transfer coefficients of fixed beds in pulsating and permeating flows and are compared to the steady flow heat transfer coefficients obtained for solid porous bodies, after perturbing the main flow. The cases considered are compared to the convective heat transfer coefficients employed in non-pulsating drying.

  8. Terrestrial heat flow in east and southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyblade, Andrew A.; Pollack, Henry N.; Jones, D. L.; Podmore, Francis; Mushayandebvu, Martin

    1990-10-01

    We report 26 new heat flow and 13 radiogenic heat production measurements from Zimbabwe, Zambia and Tanzania, together with details and some revisions of 18 previous heat flow measurements by other investigators from Kenya and Tanzania. These measurements come from Archean cratons, Proterozoic mobile belts, and Mesozoic and Cenozoic rifts. Heat flow data from eight new sites in the Archean Zimbabwe Craton are consistent with previous measurements in the Archean Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe Craton and Limpopo Belt (Kalahari Craton) and do not change the mean heat flow of 47±2 mW m-2 (standard error of the mean) in the Kalahari Craton based on 53 previous measurements. Eight new sites in the Archean Tanzania Craton give a mean heat flow of 34±4 mW m-2. The mean heat flow from nine sites in the Proterozoic Mozambique Belt to the east of the Tanzania Craton in Kenya and Tanzania is 47±4 mW m-2. Twelve measurements in the Mesozoic rifted continental margin in east Africa give a mean heat flow of 68±4 mW m-2; four measurements in the Mesozoic Luangwa and Zambezi Rifts range from 44 to 110 mW m-2 with a mean of 76±14 mW m-2. In comparing heat flow in east and southern Africa, we observe a common heat flow pattern of increasing heat flow away from the centers of the Archean cratons. This pattern suggests a fundamental difference in lithospheric thermal structure between the Archean cratons and the Proterozoic and early Paleozoic mobile belts which surround them. Superimposed on this common pattern are two regional variations in heat flow. Heat flow in the Tanzania Craton is lower by about 13 mW m-2 than in the Kalahari Craton, and in the Mozambique Belt in east Africa heat flow is somewhat lower than in the southern African mobile belts at similar distances from the Archean cratonic margin. The two regional variations can be explained in several ways, none of which can as yet be elevated to a preferred status: (1) by variations in crustal heat production, (2) by thin

  9. Heat transfer research on supercritical water flow upward in tube

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H. B.; Yang, J.; Gu, H. Y.; Zhao, M.; Lu, D. H.; Zhang, J. M.; Wang, F.; Zhang, Y.

    2012-07-01

    The experimental research of heat transfer on supercritical water has been carried out on the supercritical water multipurpose test loop with a 7.6 mm upright tube. The experimental data of heat transfer is obtained. The experimental results of thermal-hydraulic parameters on flow and heat transfer of supercritical water show that: Heat transfer enhancement occurs when the fluid temperature reaches pseudo-critical point with low mass flow velocity, and peters out when the mass flow velocity increases. The heat transfer coefficient and Nusselt number decrease with the heat flux or system pressure increases, and increase with the increasing of mass flow velocity. The wall temperature increases when the mass flow velocity decreases or the system pressure increases. (authors)

  10. Effects of secondary flow on heat transfer in rotating passages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Joan G.; Moore, John

    1990-02-01

    Secondary flow in rotating cooling passages of jet engine turbine rotors is considered. A Navier-Stokes calculation procedure for turbulent flow is used to compute flow development in a radially outward flow channel, round a sharp 180 degree bend, and in the radially inward flow channel downstream. Areas of high and low heat transfer are explained by secondary flow development and quantitative results show regions of design interest.

  11. Working fluid flow visualization in gravity heat pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemec, Patrik; Malcho, Milan

    2016-03-01

    Heat pipe is device working with phase changes of working fluid inside hermetically closed pipe at specific pressure. The phase changes of working fluid from fluid to vapour and vice versa help heat pipe to transport high heat flux. The article deal about gravity heat pipe construction and processes casing inside during heat pipe operation. Experiment working fluid flow visualization is performed with two glass heat pipes with different inner diameter (13 mm and 22 mm) and filled with water. The working fluid flow visualization explains the phenomena as a working fluid boiling, nucleation of bubbles, and vapour condensation on the wall, vapour and condensate flow interaction, flow down condensate film thickness on the wall occurred during the heat pipe operation.

  12. A New Determination of Io's Heat Flow Using Diurnal Heat Balance Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. R.; Rathbun, J. A.; McEwen, A. S.; Pearl, J. C.; Bastos, A.; Andrade, J.; Correia, M.; Barros, S.

    2002-01-01

    We use heat balance arguments to obtain a new estimate of Io's heat flow that does not depend on assumptions about the temperatures of its thermal anomalies. Our estimated heat flow is somewhat less than 2.2 +/- 0.9 W/sq m. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Heat flow calorimeter. [measures output of Ni-Cd batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, J. C.; Johnston, W. V. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Heat flow calorimeter devices are used to measure heat liberated from or absorbed by an object. This device is capable of measuring the thermal output of sealed nickel-cadmium batteries or cells during charge-discharge cycles. An elongated metal heat conducting rod is coupled between the calorimeter vessel and a heat sink, thus providing the only heat exchange path from the calorimeter vessel itself.

  14. Unsteady Flow in a Supersonic Turbine with Variable Specific Heats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorney, Daniel J.; Griffin, Lisa W.; Huber, Frank; Sondak, Douglas L.; Turner, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Modern high-work turbines can be compact, transonic, supersonic, counter-rotating, or use a dense drive gas. The vast majority of modern rocket turbine designs fall into these Categories. These turbines usually have large temperature variations across a given stage, and are characterized by large amounts of flow unsteadiness. The flow unsteadiness can have a major impact on the turbine performance and durability. For example, the Space Transportation Main Engine (STME) fuel turbine, a high work, transonic design, was found to have an unsteady inter-row shock which reduced efficiency by 2 points and increased dynamic loading by 24 percent. The Revolutionary Reusable Technology Turbopump (RRTT), which uses full flow oxygen for its drive gas, was found to shed vortices with such energy as to raise serious blade durability concerns. In both cases, the sources of the problems were uncovered (before turbopump testing) with the application of validated, unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to the designs. In the case of the RRTT and the Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) turbines, the unsteady CFD codes have been used not just to identify problems, but to guide designs which mitigate problems due to unsteadiness. Using unsteady flow analyses as a part of the design process has led to turbine designs with higher performance (which affects temperature and mass flow rate) and fewer dynamics problems. One of the many assumptions made during the design and analysis of supersonic turbine stages is that the values of the specific heats are constant. In some analyses the value is based on an average of the expected upstream and downstream temperatures. In stages where the temperature can vary by 300 to 500 K, however, the assumption of constant fluid properties may lead to erroneous performance and durability predictions. In this study the suitability of assuming constant specific heats has been investigated by performing three-dimensional unsteady Navier

  15. Boiling heat transfer of refrigerant R-21 in upward flow in plate-fin heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, V. V.; Shamirzaev, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    The article presents the results of experimental investigation of boiling heat transfer of refrigerant R-21 in upward flow in a vertical plate-fin heat exchanger with transverse size of the channels that is smaller than the capillary constant. The heat transfer coefficients obtained in ranges of small mass velocities and low heat fluxes, which are typical of the industry, have been poorly studied yet. The characteristic patterns of the upward liquid-vapor flow in the heat exchanger channels and the regions of their existence are detected. The obtained data show a weak dependence of heat transfer coefficient on equilibrium vapor quality, mass flow rate, and heat flux density and do not correspond to calculations by the known heat transfer models. A possible reason for this behavior is a decisive influence of evaporation of thin liquid films on the heat transfer at low heat flux.

  16. Flow instability and flow reversal in heated annular multichannels with initial downward flow

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H.N.; Hart, C.M.

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented regarding the stability of initial downward flow of single phase water in parallel annular channels of the Savannah River Site (SRS) fuel assembly. The test was performed on an electrically heated prototypic mockup of a Mark-22 fuel assembly. The test conditions consisted of mass fluxes, from 98--294 kg/m[sup 2]-sec, and inlet water temperatures of 25[degrees]C and 40[degrees]C. With increased power to the heaters, flow instability was detected, characterized by flow fluctuations and flow redistribution among subchannels of the outer flow channel. With increased power, a condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increased, a critical heat flux condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increases, a critical heat flux condition was reached in the outer channel.

  17. Flow instability and flow reversal in heated annular multichannels with initial downward flow

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, H.N.; Hart, C.M.

    1992-12-31

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented regarding the stability of initial downward flow of single phase water in parallel annular channels of the Savannah River Site (SRS) fuel assembly. The test was performed on an electrically heated prototypic mockup of a Mark-22 fuel assembly. The test conditions consisted of mass fluxes, from 98--294 kg/m{sup 2}-sec, and inlet water temperatures of 25{degrees}C and 40{degrees}C. With increased power to the heaters, flow instability was detected, characterized by flow fluctuations and flow redistribution among subchannels of the outer flow channel. With increased power, a condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increased, a critical heat flux condition was observed indicating local subchannel flow reversals where certain subchannel fluid temperatures were high at the inlet and low at the exit. With additional power increases, a critical heat flux condition was reached in the outer channel.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Heat Affected Zone of High Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sefcikova, K.; Brtnik, T.; Dolejs, J.; Keltamaki, K.; Topilla, R.

    2015-11-01

    High Strength Steels became more popular as a construction material during last decade because of their increased availability and affordability. On the other hand, even though general use of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) is expanding, the wide utilization is limited because of insufficient information about their behaviour in structures. The most widely used technique for joining steels is fusion welding. The welding process has an influence not only on the welded connection but on the area near this connection, the so-called heat affected zone, as well. For that reason it is very important to be able to determine the properties in the heat affected zone (HAZ). This area of investigation is being continuously developed in dependence on significant progress in material production, especially regarding new types of steels available. There are currently several types of AHSS on the world market. Two most widely used processes for AHSS production are Thermo-Mechanically Controlled Processing (TMCP) and Quenching in connection with Tempering. In the presented study, TMCP and QC steels grade S960 were investigated. The study is focused on the changes of strength, ductility, hardness and impact strength in heat affected zone based on the used amount of heat input.

  19. New heat flow determination in northern Tarim Craton, northwest China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shaowen; Lei, Xiao; Wang, Liangshu

    2015-02-01

    Tarim Craton is a Precambrian block situated in northwest China, just north of the Tibetan Plateau, where a large sedimentary basin with abundant hydrocarbon potential has developed. Accurate heat flow data for Tarim is vital for understanding the lithospheric evolution and hydrocarbon generation in this area; however, there were unavailable until now, due to a lack of high quality steady-state temperature logging data. Here, we report 10 new heat flow values derived from steady-state temperature logging and measured thermal conductivity data. New heat flow values range from 40.1 to 49.4 mW m-2, with a mean of 43.1 ± 3.0 mW m-2. In addition, radiogenic heat production from the sediments accounts for 20 per cent of the observed surface heat flow, whilst the mantle heat flow is estimated to be as low as 6-15 mW m-2; this indicates a dominant contribution from crustal heat, to the observed heat flow. The average heat flow and crustal temperature in the Tarim Craton are markedly lower than those in the Tibetan Plateau, whilst the calculated rheological strength of the lithosphere, beneath Tarim, is sufficiently large to resist the elevation-induced gravitational potential energy difference between Tarim and Tibet. This inherited thermal and rheological contrast, between the craton and Plateau, can be traced back to before the India-Asia collision; this accounts for the differential active deformation pattern in the Tarim Craton and adjacent areas.

  20. A Prototype Flux-Plate Heat-Flow Sensor for Venus Surface Heat-Flow Determinations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Paul; Reyes, Celso; Smrekar, Suzanne E.

    2005-01-01

    Venus is the most Earth-like planet in the Solar System in terms of size, and the densities of the two planets are almost identical when selfcompression of the two planets is taken into account. Venus is the closest planet to Earth, and the simplest interpretation of their similar densities is that their bulk compositions are almost identical. Models of the thermal evolution of Venus predict interior temperatures very similar to those indicated for the regions of Earth subject to solid-state convection, but even global analyses of the coarse Pioneer Venus elevation data suggest Venus does not lose heat by the same primary heat loss mechanism as Earth, i.e., seafloor spreading. The comparative paucity of impact craters on Venus has been interpreted as evidence for relatively recent resurfacing of the planet associated with widespread volcanic and tectonic activity. The difference in the gross tectonic styles of Venus and Earth, and the origins of some of the enigmatic volcano-tectonic features on Venus, such as the coronae, appear to be intrinsically related to Venus heat loss mechanism(s). An important parameter in understanding Venus geological evolution, therefore, is its present surface heat flow. Before the complications of survival in the hostile Venus surface environment were tackled, a prototype fluxplate heat-flow sensor was built and tested for use under synthetic stable terrestrial surface conditions. The design parameters for this prototype were that it should operate on a conforming (sand) surface, with a small, self-contained power and recording system, capable of operating without servicing for at least several days. The precision and accuracy of the system should be < 5 mW/sq m. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  1. Heat/mass transfer and flow characteristics of pin fin cooling channels in turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, S. C.; Saxena, A.

    Experiments studied the local heat/mass transfer distributions and pressure drops in pin fin channels that modeled internal cooling passages in gas turbine blades. Heat/mass transfer distributions were determined for a straight flow through a pin fin channel (H/D = 1.0, X/D = S/D = 2.5) and a flow through the pin fin channel with trailing edge flow ejection. The overall friction factor and local pressure drop results were obtained for various configurations and lengths of the trailing edge ejection holes. The results show that, when there is trailing edge flow ejection, the main flow stream turns toward the trailing edge ejection holes. The wake regions downstream of the pins and the regions affected by secondary flow shift toward the ejection holes. The local channel wall heat/mass transfer is generally high immediately upstream of a pin, in the wake region downstream of a pin, and in the regions affected by secondary flow. In the case with trailing edge flow ejection, the heat/mass transfer generally decreases in the radial direction as a result of the reducing radial mass flow rate. The overall friction is higher when the trailing edge ejection holes are longer and when they are configured such that more flow is forced further downstream in the pin fin channel before exiting through the ejection holes.

  2. Heat flow, crustal differentiation and lithospheric strength in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, C.; Mareschal, J.; Jaupart, C.

    2008-12-01

    In stable North America, thermal models based on heat flow and heat production measurements suggest that the mechanical resistance of the lithosphere on a regional scale is greater in provinces of elevated heat flow. This is contrary to the general belief that higher surface heat flow means less stable lithosphere. We show that crustal differentiation is equally important to determine lithospheric strength. The degree of crustal radiogenic differentiation may be described using the average surface and crustal heat flows, and is quantified through the differentiation index. This index is obtained as the ratio between regional average values of heat production at the surface and in the bulk crust. The differentiation index is calculated with the bulk average heat production, suggesting that crustal differentiation processes are largely driven by internal radiogenic heat. We show that the most stable of lithospheres may be characterized by relatively high surface heat flow, simply a result of the distribution of heat sources through the crust. This may have important implications for the thermo-mechanical evolution of stable continental interiors, and for the vertical distribution of crustal heat sources through time.

  3. Inductive heating with magnetic materials inside flow reactors.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Sascha; Coutable, Ludovic; Wegner, Jens; Kirschning, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles coated with silica gel or alternatively steel beads are new fixed-bed materials for flow reactors that efficiently heat reaction mixtures in an inductive field under flow conditions. The scope and limitations of these novel heating materials are investigated in comparison with conventional and microwave heating. The results suggest that inductive heating can be compared to microwave heating with respect to rate acceleration. It is also demonstrated that a very large diversity of different reactions can be performed under flow conditions by using inductively heated flow reactors. These include transfer hydrogenations, heterocyclic condensations, pericyclic reactions, organometallic reactions, multicomponent reactions, reductive cyclizations, homogeneous and heterogeneous transition-metal catalysis. Silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles are stable under many chemical conditions and the silica shell could be utilized for further functionalization with Pd nanoparticles, rendering catalytically active heatable iron oxide particles. PMID:21274939

  4. Air-side flow and heat transfer in compact heat exchangers: A discussion of enhancement mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobi, A.M.; Shah, R.K.

    1998-10-01

    The behavior of air flows in complex heat exchanger passages is reviewed with a focus on the heat transfer effects of boundary-layer development, turbulence, spanwise and streamwise vortices, and wake management. Each of these flow features is discussed for the plain, wavy, and interrupted passages found in contemporary compact heat exchanger designs. Results from the literature are used to help explain the role of these mechanisms in heat transfer enhancement strategies.

  5. Computation of flow and heat transfer in rotating cavities with peripheral flow of cooling air.

    PubMed

    Kiliç, M

    2001-05-01

    Numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations have been used to model the flow and the heat transfer that occurs in the internal cooling-air systems of gas turbines. Computations are performed to study the effect of gap ratio, Reynolds number and the mass flow rate on the flow and the heat transfer structure inside isothermal and heated rotating cavities with peripheral flow of cooling air. Computations are compared with some of the recent experimental work on flow and heat transfer in rotating-cavities. The agreement between the computed and the available experimental data is reasonably good. PMID:11460668

  6. A New U.S. Marine Heat Flow Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, R. N.; Fisher, A. T.

    2009-12-01

    Marine heat flow observations provide critical information on physical, chemical and biological processes occurring near and below the seafloor. Renewed interest in the collection and application of marine heat flow data to a broad range of scientific purposes is indicated by a renaissance in heat flow studies and publications over the last 10-15 years, as documented by a recent NSF-sponsored workshop and report on the Future of Marine Heat Flow [Harris et al., 2007]. Fundamental questions of geodynamics, global mass and energy fluxes across the seafloor, marine hydrogeology, gas hydrates, marine microbiology, sedimentary processes and other topics are addressed in recent heat flow studies. To facilitate these measurements we are establishing a marine heat flow capability for use by U.S. academic researchers on standard UNOLS vessels in collaboration with the Oregon State University coring capability. This capability includes two main sets of instruments: 1) A multipenetration probe that allows multiple measurements of heat flow, the product of the thermal gradient and thermal conductivity, with a single instrument transit to the seafloor; and 2) an outrigger probe system that allows measurements at a single location when a gravity or piston core is collected. A thermal conductivity needle probe system for use on recovered core samples will complete the determination of heat flow using outrigger probes, and supplement in-situ measurements from the multipenetration probe. This capability is available to U.S. scientists for an initial five-year period through funding from the National Science Foundation. Researchers wishing to include measurements of marine heat flow as part of a field program can request access to equipment, software, and technical support through the UNOLS ship time request system, and should consult early in the cruise planning process with US heat flow capability personnel to determine specific needs and capabilities. More information is

  7. Exhaust bypass flow control for exhaust heat recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Michael G.

    2015-09-22

    An exhaust system for an engine comprises an exhaust heat recovery apparatus configured to receive exhaust gas from the engine and comprises a first flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas and a second flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas. A heat exchanger/energy recovery unit is disposed in the second flow passage and has a working fluid circulating therethrough for exchange of heat from the exhaust gas to the working fluid. A control valve is disposed downstream of the first and the second flow passages in a low temperature region of the exhaust heat recovery apparatus to direct exhaust gas through the first flow passage or the second flow passage.

  8. Direct numerical simulation of solidification microstructures affected by fluid flow

    SciTech Connect

    Juric, D.

    1997-12-01

    The effects of fluid flow on the solidification morphology of pure materials and solute microsegregation patterns of binary alloys are studied using a computational methodology based on a front tracking/finite difference method. A general single field formulation is presented for the full coupling of phase change, fluid flow, heat and solute transport. This formulation accounts for interfacial rejection/absorption of latent heat and solute, interfacial anisotropies, discontinuities in material properties between the liquid and solid phases, shrinkage/expansion upon solidification and motion and deformation of the solid. Numerical results are presented for the two dimensional dendritic solidification of pure succinonitrile and the solidification of globulitic grains of a plutonium-gallium alloy. For both problems, comparisons are made between solidification without fluid flow and solidification within a shear flow.

  9. Earth tides, global heat flow, and tectonics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaw, H.R.

    1970-01-01

    The power of a heat engine ignited by tidal energy can account for geologically reasonable rates of average magma production and sea floor spreading. These rates control similarity of heat flux over continents and oceans because of an inverse relationship between respective depth intervals for mass transfer and consequent distributions of radiogenic heat production.

  10. Cryogenic Heat Exchanger with Turbulent Flows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrit, Jay; Douay, Christelle; Dubois, Francis; Defresne, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    An evaporator-type cryogenic heat exchanger is designed and built for introducing fluid-solid heat exchange phenomena to undergraduates in a practical and efficient way. The heat exchanger functions at liquid nitrogen temperature and enables cooling of N[subscript 2] and He gases from room temperatures. We present first the experimental results of…

  11. 3D topographic correction of the BSR heat flow and detection of focused fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Tao; Li, Hong-Lin; Zou, Chang-Chun

    2014-06-01

    The bottom-simulating reflector (BSR) is a seismic indicator of the bottom of a gas hydrate stability zone. Its depth can be used to calculate the seafloor surface heat flow. The calculated BSR heat flow variations include disturbances from two important factors: (1) seafloor topography, which focuses the heat flow over regions of concave topography and defocuses it over regions of convex topography, and (2) the focused warm fluid flow within the accretionary prism coming from depths deeper than BSR. The focused fluid flow can be detected if the contribution of the topography to the BSR heat flow is removed. However, the analytical equation cannot solve the topographic effect at complex seafloor regions. We prove that 3D finite element method can model the topographic effect on the regional background heat flow with high accuracy, which can then be used to correct the topographic effect and obtain the BSR heat flow under the condition of perfectly flat topography. By comparing the corrected BSR heat flow with the regional background heat flow, focused fluid flow regions can be detected that are originally too small and cannot be detected using present-day equipment. This method was successfully applied to the midslope region of northern Cascadia subducting margin. The results suggest that the Cucumber Ridge and its neighboring area are positive heat flow anomalies, about 10%-20% higher than the background heat flow after 3D topographic correction. Moreover, the seismic imaging associated the positive heat flow anomaly areas with seabed fracture-cavity systems. This suggests flow of warm gas-carrying fluids along these high-permeability pathways, which could result in higher gas hydrate concentrations.

  12. Study on the heat-flow controllable heat exchanger (2nd report): Dehumidification in the greenhouse by the ventilation type dehumidifier with heat-flow controllable heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Yanadori, Michio; Hamano, Masayoshi )

    1994-07-01

    A novel ventilation type dehumidifier with heat-flow controllable heat exchanger was installed on the wall of a greenhouse. Dehumidification and heat recovery experiments were conducted. The construction of the novel dehumidifier is simpler than that of the conventional dehumidifier with a compressor. It was found that the required input for the ventilation type dehumidifier was less than that of a conventional dehumidifier with compressor.

  13. Steady and transient forced convection heat transfer for water flowing in small tubes with exponentially increasing heat inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibahara, M.; Fukuda, K.; Liu, Q. S.; Hata, K.

    2016-06-01

    Steady and transient heat transfer coefficients for water flowing in small tubes with exponentially increasing heat inputs were measured. Platinum tubes with inner diameters of 1.0 and 2.0 mm were used as test tubes, which were mounted vertically in the experimental water loop. In the experiment, the upward flow velocity ranged from 2 to 16 m/s, and the corresponding Reynolds numbers ranged from 4.77 × 103 to 9.16 × 104 at the inlet liquid temperatures ranged from 298 to 343 K. The heat generation rate exponentially increased with the function. The period of the heat generation rate ranged from 24 ms to 17.5 s. Experimental results indicate that steady heat transfer coefficients decreased with the increase in the inner diameter of the small tube. Moreover, the ratio of bulk viscosity to near-wall viscosity of water increased with the rise in surface temperature of the vertical tube. From the experimental data, correlations of steady-state heat transfer for inner diameters of 1.0 and 2.0 mm were obtained. The heat transfer coefficient increased with decreasing the period of the heat generation rate as the flow velocity decreased. Moreover, the Nusselt number under the transient condition was affected by the Fourier number and the Reynolds number.

  14. Echo-acoustic flow affects flight in bats.

    PubMed

    Kugler, Kathrin; Greiter, Wolfgang; Luksch, Harald; Firzlaff, Uwe; Wiegrebe, Lutz

    2016-06-15

    Flying animals need to react fast to rapid changes in their environment. Visually guided animals use optic flow, generated by their movement through structured environments. Nocturnal bats cannot make use of optic flow, but rely mostly on echolocation. Here, we show that bats exploit echo-acoustic flow to negotiate flight through narrow passages. Specifically, bats' flight between lateral structures is significantly affected by the echo-acoustic salience of those structures, independent of their physical distance. This is true even though echolocation, unlike vision, provides explicit distance cues. Moreover, the bats reduced the echolocation sound levels in stronger flow, probably to compensate for the increased summary target strength of the lateral reflectors. However, bats did not reduce flight velocity under stronger echo-acoustic flow. Our results demonstrate that sensory flow is a ubiquitous principle for flight guidance, independent of the fundamentally different peripheral representation of flow across the senses of vision and echolocation. PMID:27045094

  15. Heat Transfer and Flow Structure Evaluation of a Synthetic Jet Emanating from a Planar Heat Sink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Paul; Persoons, Tim; Murray, Darina

    2014-07-01

    Direct impinging synthetic jets are a proven method for heat transfer enhancement, and have been subject to extensive research. However, despite the vast amount of research into direct synthetic jet impingement, there has been little research investigating the effects of a synthetic jet emanating from a heated surface, this forms the basis of the current research investigation. Both single and multiple orifices are integrated into a planar heat sink forming a synthetic jet, thus allowing the heat transfer enhancement and flow structures to be assessed. The heat transfer analysis highlighted that the multiple orifice synthetic jet resulted in the greatest heat transfer enhancements. The flow structures responsible for these enhancements were identified using a combination of flow visualisation, thermal imaging and thermal boundary layer analysis. The flow structure analysis identified that the synthetic jets decreased the thermal boundary layer thickness resulting in a more effective convective heat transfer process. Flow visualisation revealed entrainment of local air adjacent to the heated surface; this occurred from vortex roll-up at the surface of the heat sink and from the highly sheared jet flow. Furthermore, a secondary entrainment was identified which created a surface impingement effect. It is proposed that all three flow features enhance the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

  16. Nonsteady flow of a vapor-drop flow in a heated channel

    SciTech Connect

    Kroshilin, V.E.; Khodzhaev, Y.D.

    1992-06-01

    Flow of a vapor-drop mixture in a heated channel is studied under steady and non-steady conditions using a model which considers direct thermal interaction of drops with the heating surface. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Flow and heat transfer in a curved channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinich, P. F.; Graham, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    Flow and heat transfer in a curved channel of aspect ratio 6 and inner- to outer-wall radius ratio 0.96 were studied. Secondary currents and large longitudinal vortices were found. The heat-transfer rates of the outer and inner walls were independently controlled to maintain a constant wall temperature. Heating the inner wall increased the pressure drop along the channel length, whereas heating the outer wall had little effect. Outer-wall heat transfer was as much as 40 percent greater than the straight-channel correlation, and inner-wall heat transfer was 22 percent greater than the straight-channel correlation.

  18. On the global variations of terrestrial heat-flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, W.H.K.

    1969-01-01

    Over 3 500 measurements of surface heat-flux have been catalogued and analyzed to study the large-scale variations of terrestrial heat-flow. It was found that heat-flow values are correlated with major geologic provinces: higher averages and scattered values in active tectonic regions, and lower averages and more uniform values in stable areas. Analyzing the data in the light of new global tectonics shows that the variations of heat-flow are consistent with the hypotheses of sea-floor spreading and plate tectonics. The observed heat-flow across the mid-oceanic ridges can be accounted for by a simple model of a spreading sea floor. ?? 1970.

  19. Double Stage Heat Transformer Controlled by Flow Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Sotelo, S.; Romero, R. J.; Rodríguez – Martínez, A.

    this paper shows the values of Flow ratio (FR) for control of an absorption double stage heat transformer. The main parameters for the heat pump system are defined as COP, FR and GTL. The control of the entire system is based in a new definition of FR. The heat balance of the Double Stage Heat Transformer (DSHT) is used for the control. The mass flow is calculated for a HPVEE program and a second program control the mass flow. The mass flow is controlled by gear pumps connected to LabView program. The results show an increment in the fraction of the recovery energy. An example of oil distillation is used for the calculation. The waste heat energy is added at the system at 70 °C. Water ™ - Carrol mixture is used in the DSHT. The recover energy is obtained in a second absorber at 128 °C with two scenarios.

  20. Heat transfer and flow characteristics on a gas turbine shroud.

    PubMed

    Obata, M; Kumada, M; Ijichi, N

    2001-05-01

    The work described in this paper is an experimental investigation of the heat transfer from the main flow to a turbine shroud surface, which may be applicable to ceramic gas turbines. Three kinds of turbine shrouds are considered with a flat surface, a taper surface and a spiral groove surface opposite to the blades in an axial flow turbine of actual turbo-charger. Heat transfer measurements were performed for the experimental conditions of a uniform heat flux or a uniform wall temperature. The effects of the inlet flow angle, rotational speed, and tip clearance on the heat transfer coefficient were clarified under on- and off-design flow conditions. The mean heat transfer coefficient was correlated to the blade Reynolds number and tip clearance, and compared with an experimental correlation and measurements of a flat surface. A comparison was also made for the measurement of static pressure distributions. PMID:11460639

  1. Numerical prediction of turbulent oscillating flow and associated heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, W. J.; Patankar, S. V.; Ibele, W. E.

    1991-08-01

    A crucial point for further development of engines is the optimization of its heat exchangers which operate under oscillatory flow conditions. It has been found that the most important thermodynamic uncertainties in the Stirling engine designs for space power are in the heat transfer between gas and metal in all engine components and in the pressure drop across the heat exchanger components. So far, performance codes cannot predict the power output of a Stirling engine reasonably enough if used for a wide variety of engines. Thus, there is a strong need for better performance codes. However, a performance code is not concerned with the details of the flow. This information must be provided externally. While analytical relationships exist for laminar oscillating flow, there has been hardly any information about transitional and turbulent oscillating flow, which could be introduced into the performance codes. In 1986, a survey by Seume and Simon revealed that most Stirling engine heat exchangers operate in the transitional and turbulent regime. Consequently, research has since focused on the unresolved issue of transitional and turbulent oscillating flow and heat transfer. Since 1988, the University of Minnesota oscillating flow facility has obtained experimental data about transitional and turbulent oscillating flow. However, since the experiments in this field are extremely difficult, lengthy, and expensive, it is advantageous to numerically simulate the flow and heat transfer accurately from first principles. Work done at the University of Minnesota on the development of such a numerical simulation is summarized.

  2. Numerical prediction of turbulent oscillating flow and associated heat transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, W. J.; Patankar, S. V.; Ibele, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    A crucial point for further development of engines is the optimization of its heat exchangers which operate under oscillatory flow conditions. It has been found that the most important thermodynamic uncertainties in the Stirling engine designs for space power are in the heat transfer between gas and metal in all engine components and in the pressure drop across the heat exchanger components. So far, performance codes cannot predict the power output of a Stirling engine reasonably enough if used for a wide variety of engines. Thus, there is a strong need for better performance codes. However, a performance code is not concerned with the details of the flow. This information must be provided externally. While analytical relationships exist for laminar oscillating flow, there has been hardly any information about transitional and turbulent oscillating flow, which could be introduced into the performance codes. In 1986, a survey by Seume and Simon revealed that most Stirling engine heat exchangers operate in the transitional and turbulent regime. Consequently, research has since focused on the unresolved issue of transitional and turbulent oscillating flow and heat transfer. Since 1988, the University of Minnesota oscillating flow facility has obtained experimental data about transitional and turbulent oscillating flow. However, since the experiments in this field are extremely difficult, lengthy, and expensive, it is advantageous to numerically simulate the flow and heat transfer accurately from first principles. Work done at the University of Minnesota on the development of such a numerical simulation is summarized.

  3. Three-phase flow? Consider helical-coil heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Haraburda, S.S.

    1995-07-01

    In recent years, chemical process plants are increasingly encountering processes that require heat exchange in three-phase fluids. A typical application, for example, is heating liquids containing solid catalyst particles and non-condensable gases. Heat exchangers designed for three-phase flow generally have tubes with large diameters (typically greater than two inches), because solids can build-up inside the tube and lead to plugging. At the same time, in order to keep heat-transfer coefficients high, the velocity of the process fluid within the tube should also be high. As a result, heat exchangers for three-phase flow may require less than five tubes -- each having a required linear length that could exceed several hundred feet. Given these limitations, it is obvious that a basic shell-and-tube heat exchanger is not the most practical solution for this purpose. An alternative for three-phase flow is a helical-coil heat exchanger. The helical-coil units offer a number of advantages, including perpendicular, counter-current flow and flexible overall dimensions for the exchanger itself. The paper presents equations for: calculating the tube-side heat-transfer coefficient; calculating the shell-side heat-transfer coefficient; calculating the heat-exchanger size; calculating the tube-side pressure drop; and calculating shell-side pressure-drop.

  4. Unsteady flow patterns in the vicinity of heated wall-mounted transverse ribs.

    PubMed

    Polidori, Guillaume; Padet, Jacques

    2002-10-01

    This paper deals with experimental modeling of the unsteady junction flow features in the vicinity of an isoflux heated wall with mounted insulated rectangular ribs representing three distinctive ribbed test geometries. Both flow visualizations and surface temperature distributions show that the blockage effect upstream of the ribs, as well as the presence of complex eddy structures inside the open cavities, significantly affect the heat transfer process. All the configurations indicate degraded heat transfer performance in the area close to the ribs and an enhancement just downstream from the last rib. PMID:12496017

  5. Spherical harmonic analysis of earth's conductive heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza, V. M.; Cardoso, R. R.; Ponte Neto, C. F.

    2008-04-01

    A reappraisal of the international heat flow database has been carried out and the corrected data set was employed in spherical harmonic analysis of the conductive component of global heat flow. Procedures used prior to harmonic analysis include analysis of the heat flow data and determination of representative mean values for a set of discretized area elements of the surface of the earth. Estimated heat flow values were assigned to area elements for which experimental data are not available. However, no corrections were made to account for the hypothetical effects of regional-scale convection heat transfer in areas of oceanic crust. New sets of coefficients for 12° spherical harmonic expansion were calculated on the basis of the revised and homogenized data set. Maps derived on the basis of these coefficients reveal several new features in the global heat flow distribution. The magnitudes of heat flow anomalies of the ocean ridge segments are found to have mean values of less than 150 mW/m2. Also, the mean global heat flow values for the raw and binned data are found to fall in the range of 56-67 mW/m2, down by nearly 25% compared to the previous estimate of 1993, but similar to earlier assessments based on raw data alone. To improve the spatial resolution of the heat flow anomalies, the spherical harmonic expansions have been extended to higher degrees. Maps derived using coefficients for 36° harmonic expansion have allowed identification of new features in regional heat flow fields of several oceanic and continental segments. For example, lateral extensions of heat flow anomalies of active spreading centers have been outlined with better resolution than was possible in earlier studies. Also, the characteristics of heat flow variations in oceanic crust away from ridge systems are found to be typical of conductive cooling of the lithosphere, there being little need to invoke the hypothesis of unconfined hydrothermal circulation on regional scales. Calculations

  6. Heat flow in the north-central Colorado Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodell, John Michael; Chapman, David S.

    1982-04-01

    We report new heat flow measurements at 25 evenly distributed sites in the north-central Colorado Plateau. Heat flow values computed for these new sites and one previously published site range from 43 to 116 mW m-2 but fall into the following distinct subsets related to physiographic and tectonic elements within the Plateau: (1) heat flow of 51 mW m-2 (12 sites; s.d. 6) in the San Rafael Swell and Green River Desert which constitute the core of the Colorado Plateau at this latitude, (2) heat flows of 69 mW m-2 (5 sites; s.d. 10) and 88 mW m-2 (4 sites; s.d. 19) in successive parallel north-south bands approaching the Wasatch Plateau to the west but still 80 km east of the Basin and Range physiographic boundary, (3) heat flow of 64 mW m-2 (5 sites; s.d. 2) along the Salt Anticline trend which strikes northwest in the region of Moab, Utah. Heat flow results for the entire Colorado Plateau have been reexamined in view of our new results, and the overall pattern supports the concept of a low heat flow `thermal interior' for the plateau surrounded by a periphery some 100 km wide having substantially higher heat flow. Average heat flow in the thermal interior is about 60 mW m-2 compared to 80-90 mW m-2 in the periphery. This regional heat flow pattern supports a model of Tertiary lithospheric thinning under the Colorado Plateau whereby the plateau is still in transient thermal response and a 15-20 m.y. lag between uplift and corresponding surface heat flow anomaly is to be expected. The position of the heat flow transition between our interior and peripheral regions in the northwest plateau is roughly consistent with lateral warming and weakening of the Colorado Plateau lithosphere initiated at the Basin and Range boundary some 20 m.y. ago.

  7. Investigation on critical heat flux of flow in pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Senyuan

    1990-08-01

    This paper experimentally and theoretically investigates the critical heat flux of flow in pipes. From the analysis of the boiling mechanism and processing by means of the analogy principle of two-phase flow, a criterion equation to express critical heat flux has been derived. Correlated with six different coolants, 355 experimental data, the constant A and exponents K, m, and n are obtained. With a dimensionless correction term to calculate the effect on the varying slotted height of the cooling jacket, the previous equation will be a general equation to calculate the critical heat flux of flow in pipes.

  8. In-situ measurements of lunar heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. G.; Keihm, S. J.

    1974-01-01

    During the Apollo program two successful heat flow measurements were made in situ on the lunar surface. At the Apollo 15 site a value of 0.0000031 watts/sqcm was measured and at the Apollo 17 site a value of 0.0000022 watts/sqcm was determined. Both measurements have uncertainty limits of + or - 20% and have been corrected for perturbing topographic effects. The apparent difference between the observations may correlate with observed variations in the surface abundance of thorium. Comparison with earlier determinations of heat flow, using the microwave emission spectrum from the moon, gives support to the high gradients and heat flows observed in situ.

  9. Turbulent flow and heat transfer in rotating channels and tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitiakov, V. Y.; Petropavlovskii, R. R.; Ris, V. V.; Smirnov, E. M.; Smirnov, S. A.

    This document is a reduction of the author's experimental results on turbulent flow characteristics and heat transfer in rotating channels whose axes are parallel to the plane of rotation. Substantial dissimilarities of longitudinal velocity field profile and pulsational characteristics are caused by effects of stabilization and destabilization and secondary flow production. Local heat transfer coefficients vary over the perimeter of the tube section connecting detected flow peculiarities. It is shown that the increase in rotational intensity caused an increase in the relative dissimilarity of the local heat transfer coefficients and increased their mean value.

  10. In-situ measurements of lunar heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langseth, M. B.; Keihm, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    During the Apollo program two successful heat flow measurements were made in situ on the lunar surface. At the Apollo 15 site a value of .0000031 W/sq cm was measured, and at the Apollo 17 site a value of .0000022 W/sq cm was determined. Both measurements have uncertainty limits of + or - 20 percent and have been corrected for perturbing topographic effects. The apparent difference between the observations may correlate with observed variations in the surface abundance of thorium. Comparison with earlier determinations of heat flow, using the microwave emission spectrum from the moon, gives support to the high gradients and heat flows observed in situ.

  11. Coupled Groundwater and Heat Flow in the Tahoe Basin Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trask, J. C.

    2002-12-01

    We propose that recent developments in available temperature probe technology and improvements in appropriate modeling software, together with the advent of desktop high-speed computing, have enabled the thermal analysis approach to be an inexpensive, robust, and practical way to constrain groundwater flow fields in a wide variety of environments. We present field measurements and numerical models of coupled heat and groundwater flow in the Tahoe Basin region. In montane regions such as the Tahoe Basin, steep topography provides a driving force for deep groundwater flow. Deep groundwater flow re-routes subsurface heat flow, impacting temperature gradients to depth, including the shallow subsurface (<100m depth). In the Tahoe Basin region, the magnitude of deep groundwater flow on the areal or regional scale has been largely unknown. We present examples of borehole temperature profiles that constrain possible areal groundwater flow patterns, including the magnitude of flow beneath the bottom of boreholes probed.

  12. Flow and heat transfer model for a rotating cryogenic motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykhuizen, R. C.; Baca, R. G.; Bickel, T. C.

    1993-08-01

    Development of a high-temperature, superconducting, synchronous motor for large applications (greater than 1000 HP) could offer significant electrical power savings for industrial users. Presently 60% of all electric power generated in the United States is converted by electric motors. A large part of this power is utilized by motors 1000 HP or larger. The use of high-temperature superconducting materials with critical temperatures above that of liquid nitrogen (77 K) in the field winding would reduce the losses in these motors significantly, and therefore, would have a definite impact on the electrical power usage in the U.S. These motors will be 1/3 to 1/2 the size of conventional motors of similar power and, thus, offer potential savings in materials and floor space. The cooling of the superconducting materials in the field windings of the rotor presents a unique application of cryogenic engineering. The rotational velocity results in significant radial pressure gradients that affect the flow distribution of the cryogen. The internal pressure fields can result in significant nonuniformities in the two-phase flow of the coolant. Due to the variable speed design, the flow distribution has the potential to change during operation. A multiphase-flow computer model of the cryogenic cooling is developed to calculate the boiling heat transfer and phase distribution of the nitrogen coolant in the motor. The model accounts for unequal phase velocities and nonuniform cooling requirements of the rotor. The unequal radial pressure gradients in the inlet and outlet headers result in a larger driving force for flow in the outer cooling channels. The effect of this must be accounted for in the design of the motor. Continuing improvements of the model will allow the investigation of the transient thermal issues associated with localized quenching of the superconducting components of the motor.

  13. Flow and heat transfer model for a rotating cryogenic motor

    SciTech Connect

    Dykhuizen, R.C.; Baca, R.G.; Bickel, T.C.

    1993-08-01

    Development of a high-temperature, superconducting, synchronous motor for large applications (>1000 HP) could offer significant electrical power savings for industrial users. Presently 60% of all electric power generated in the United States is converted by electric motors. A large part of two power is utilized by motors 1000 HP or larger. The use of high-temperature superconducting materials with critical temperatures above that of liquid nitrogen (77 K) in the field winding would reduce the losses in these motors significantly, and therefore, would have a definite impact on the electrical power usage in the US. These motors will be 1/3 to 1/2 the size of conventional motors of similar power and, thus, offer potential savings in materials and floor space. The cooling of the superconducting materials in the field windings of the rotor presents a unique application of cryogenic engineering. The rotational velocity results in significant radial pressure gradients that affect the flow distribution of the cryogen. The internal pressure fields can result in significant nonuniformities in the two-phase flow of the coolant. Due to the variable speed design, the flow distribution has the potential to change during operation. A multiphase-flow computer model of the cryogenic cooling is developed to calculate the boiling heat transfer and phase distribution of the nitrogen coolant in the motor. The model accounts for unequal phase velocities and nonuniform cooling requirements of the rotor. The unequal radial pressure gradients in the inlet and outlet headers result in a larger driving force for flow in the outer cooling channels. The effect of this must be accounted for in the design of the motor. Continuing improvements of the model will allow the investigation of the transient thermal issues associated with localized quenching of the superconducting components of the motor.

  14. Application of heat flow models to SOI current mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Feixia; Cheng, Ming-C.

    2004-11-01

    An analytical heat flow model for SOI circuits is presented. The model is able to account for heat exchanges among devices and heat loss from the silicon film and interconnects to the substrate through the buried oxide. The developed model can accurately and efficiently predict the temperature distribution in the interconnect/poly-lines and SOI devices. The model is applied to SOI current mirrors to study heat flow in different layout designs. The results from the developed model are verified with those from Raphael, a 3D numerical simulator that can provide the detailed 3D temperature distribution in interconnect/poly-lines.

  15. Laminar flow heat transfer downstream from U-bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie Nassif

    1987-05-01

    The laminar flow heat transfer downstream from the unheated, vertical bends in horizontal U-tubes with electrically heated straight tube sections was investigated. For each test section, local axial and peripheral wall temperatures were measured and the local peripheral heat transfer coefficients at the various locations were calculated. The investigation permitted a better understanding of the interaction of the primary, secondary and tertiary flow patterns, i.e., the combination of forced and natural convection with the centrifugal effects. Also, a correlation was developed, which predicts the heat transfer coefficient downstream from an unheated U-bend, and which can be extended to straight tubes.

  16. Gas flow environment and heat transfer nonrotating 3D program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A complete set of benchmark quality data for the flow and heat transfer within a large rectangular turning duct is provided. These data are to be used to evaluate, and verify, three-dimensional internal viscous flow models and computational codes. The analytical contract objective is to select a computational code and define the capabilities of this code to predict the experimental results obtained. Details of the proper code operation will be defined and improvements to the code modeling capabilities will be formulated. Internal flow in a large rectangular cross-sectioned 90 deg. bend turning duct was studied. The duct construction was designed to allow detailed measurements to be made for the following three duct wall conditions: (1) an isothermal wall with isothermal flow; (2) an adiabatic wall with convective heat transfer by mixing between an unheated surrounding flow; and (3) an isothermal wall with heat transfer from a uniformly hot inlet flow.

  17. Correlations for heat transfer and flow friction characteristics of compact plate-type heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinaut, F. V.; Melgar, A.; Rahman Ali, A. A.

    1992-07-01

    Correlations for heat transfer and flow friction coefficients are provided for plane parallel plates and offset strip-fin plates over the ranges used in compact heat exchangers. Closed form expressions have been used to present these correlations. The proposed correlations allow one to adequately predict experimental data available for the heat exchanged and pressure losses in compact plate-type heat exchangers. The correlation cover continuously the full range from laminar to turbulent flow, for both short and long pipes. Suggestions to extend the correlations to other flow conditions are provided.

  18. Analysis of Heat Transfers inside Counterflow Plate Heat Exchanger Augmented by an Auxiliary Fluid Flow

    PubMed Central

    Khaled, A.-R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Enhancement of heat transfers in counterflow plate heat exchanger due to presence of an intermediate auxiliary fluid flow is investigated. The intermediate auxiliary channel is supported by transverse conducting pins. The momentum and energy equations for the primary fluids are solved numerically and validated against a derived approximate analytical solution. A parametric study including the effect of the various plate heat exchanger, and auxiliary channel dimensionless parameters is conducted. Different enhancement performance indicators are computed. The various trends of parameters that can better enhance heat transfer rates above those for the conventional plate heat exchanger are identified. Large enhancement factors are obtained under fully developed flow conditions. The maximum enhancement factors can be increased by above 8.0- and 5.0-fold for the step and exponential distributions of the pins, respectively. Finally, counterflow plate heat exchangers with auxiliary fluid flows are recommended over the typical ones if these flows can be provided with the least cost. PMID:24719572

  19. Conjugate Compressible Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Ducts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, M. F.

    2011-01-01

    A computational approach to modeling transient, compressible fluid flow with heat transfer in long, narrow ducts is presented. The primary application of the model is for analyzing fluid flow and heat transfer in solid propellant rocket motor nozzle joints during motor start-up, but the approach is relevant to a wide range of analyses involving rapid pressurization and filling of ducts. Fluid flow is modeled through solution of the spatially one-dimensional, transient Euler equations. Source terms are included in the governing equations to account for the effects of wall friction and heat transfer. The equation solver is fully-implicit, thus providing greater flexibility than an explicit solver. This approach allows for resolution of pressure wave effects on the flow as well as for fast calculation of the steady-state solution when a quasi-steady approach is sufficient. Solution of the one-dimensional Euler equations with source terms significantly reduces computational run times compared to general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages solving the Navier-Stokes equations with resolved boundary layers. In addition, conjugate heat transfer is more readily implemented using the approach described in this paper than with most general purpose computational fluid dynamics packages. The compressible flow code has been integrated with a transient heat transfer solver to analyze heat transfer between the fluid and surrounding structure. Conjugate fluid flow and heat transfer solutions are presented. The author is unaware of any previous work available in the open literature which uses the same approach described in this paper.

  20. Critical heat flux of subcooled flow boiling with water for high heat flux application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inasaka, Fujio; Nariai, Hideki

    1993-11-01

    Subcooled flow boiling in water is thought to be advantageous in removing high heat load of more than 10 MW/m2. Characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF), which determines the upper limit of heat removal, are very important for the design of cooling systems. In this paper, studies on subcooled flow boiling CHF, which have been conducted by the authors, are reported. Experiments were conducted using direct current heating of stainless steel tube. For uniform heating conditions, CHF increment in small diameter tubes (1 - 3 mm inside diameter) and the CHF characteristics in tubes with internal twisted tapes were investigated, and also the existing CHF correlations for ordinary tubes (more than 3 mm inside diameter) were evaluated. For peripherally non-uniform heating conditions using the tube, whose wall thickness was partly reduced, the CHF for swirl flow was higher than the CHF under uniform heating conditions with an increase of the non-uniformity factor.

  1. Approximate convective heating equations for hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoby, E. V.; Moss, J. N.; Sutton, K.

    1979-01-01

    Laminar and turbulent heating-rate equations appropriate for engineering predictions of the convective heating rates about blunt reentry spacecraft at hypersonic conditions are developed. The approximate methods are applicable to both nonreacting and reacting gas mixtures for either constant or variable-entropy edge conditions. A procedure which accounts for variable-entropy effects and is not based on mass balancing is presented. Results of the approximate heating methods are in good agreement with existing experimental results as well as boundary-layer and viscous-shock-layer solutions.

  2. Constraints on hydrothermal heat flux through the oceanic lithosphere from global heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, Carol A.; Stein, Seth

    1994-01-01

    A significant discrepancy exists between the heat flow measured at the seafloor and the higher values predicted by thermal models of the cooling lithosphere. This discrepancy is generally interpreted as indicating that the upper oceanic crust is cooled significantly by hydrothermal circulation. The magnitude of this heat flow discrepancy is the primary datum used to estimate the volume of hydrothermal flow, and the variation in the discrepancy with lithospheric age is the primary constraint on how the hydrothermal flux is divided between near-ridge and off-ridge environments. The resulting estimates are important for investigation of both the thermal structure of the lithosphere and the chemistry of the oceans. We reevaluate the magnitude and age variation of the discrepancy using a global heat flow data set substantially larger than in earlier studies, and the GDHI (Global Depth and Heat Flow) model that better predicts the heat flow. We estimate that of the predicted global oceanic heat flux of 32 x 10(exp 12) W, 34% (11 x 10(exp 12) W) occurs by hydrothermal flow. Approximately 30% of the hydrothermal heat flux occurs in crust younger than 1 Ma, so the majority of this flux is off-ridge. These hydrothermal heat flux estimates are upper bounds, because heat flow measurements require sediment at the site and so are made preferentially at topographic lows, where heat flow may be depressed. Because the water temperature for the near-ridge flow exceeds that for the off-ridge flow, the near-ridge water flow will be even a smaller fraction of the total water flow. As a result, in estimating fluxes from geochemical data, use of the high water temperatures appropriate for the ridge axis may significantly overestimate the heat flux for an assumed water flux or underestimate the water flux for an assumed heat flux. Our data also permit improved estimates of the 'sealing' age, defined as the age where the observed heat flow approximately equals that predicted, suggesting

  3. Frictional strength and heat flow of southern San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, P. P.

    2016-01-01

    Frictional strength and heat flow of faults are two related subjects in geophysics and seismology. To date, the investigation on regional frictional strength and heat flow still stays at the stage of qualitative estimation. This paper is concentrated on the regional frictional strength and heat flow of the southern San Andreas Fault (SAF). Based on the in situ borehole measured stress data, using the method of 3D dynamic faulting analysis, we quantitatively determine the regional normal stress, shear stress, and friction coefficient at various seismogenic depths. These new data indicate that the southern SAF is a weak fault within the depth of 15 km. As depth increases, all the regional normal and shear stresses and friction coefficient increase. The former two increase faster than the latter. Regional shear stress increment per kilometer equals 5.75 ± 0.05 MPa/km for depth ≤15 km; regional normal stress increment per kilometer is equal to 25.3 ± 0.1 MPa/km for depth ≤15 km. As depth increases, regional friction coefficient increment per kilometer decreases rapidly from 0.08 to 0.01/km at depths less than ~3 km. As depth increases from ~3 to ~5 km, it is 0.01/km and then from ~5 to 15 km, and it is 0.002/km. Previously, frictional strength could be qualitatively determined by heat flow measurements. It is difficult to obtain the quantitative heat flow data for the SAF because the measured heat flow data exhibit large scatter. However, our quantitative results of frictional strength can be employed to investigate the heat flow in the southern SAF. We use a physical quantity P f to describe heat flow. It represents the dissipative friction heat power per unit area generated by the relative motion of two tectonic plates accommodated by off-fault deformation. P f is called "fault friction heat." On the basis of our determined frictional strength data, utilizing the method of 3D dynamic faulting analysis, we quantitatively determine the regional long-term fault

  4. Flows through sequential orifices with heated spacer reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Stetz, T. T.

    1982-01-01

    Flow rates and pressure thermal profiles for two phase choked flows of fluid nitrogen were studied theoretically and experimentally in a four sequential orifice configuration. Both theory and experimental evidence demonstrate that heat addition in the first spacer-reservoir adjacent to the inlet orifice is most effective in reducing the flow rate and that heat addition in the last spacer-reservoir is least effective. The flows are choked at the exit orifice for large spacings and at the inlet orifice for small spacings. The moderate addition of heat available for this experiment did not materially alter this result for large spacings; however, significant heat addition for the small spacings tended to shift the choke point to the exit orifice. Nitrogen is used as the working fluid over a range of states from liquid to gas with a reduced inlet stagnation pressure range to P sub r, o = 2.

  5. Heat flow from eastern Panama and northwestern Colombia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Munroe, R.J.; Moses, T.H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Heat flows were determined at 12 sites in four distinct areas between longitude 77?? and 80??W in eastern Panama and northwestern Colombia. Evidently, most of the region is underlain by mafic oceanic crust so that the crustal radiogenic component of heat flow is very small (??? 0.1 ??cal cm-2 sec-1). Low heat-flow values (??? 0.7 ??cal cm-2 sec-1) in northwestern Colombia may reflect thermal transients associated with shallow subduction. The normal values (??? 1) at about 78??W are consistent with the mean heat flow from the western Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico. At 80??W, a fairly high value of 1.8 may define the easterly limit of thermal transients due to Cenozoic volcanic activity in Central America. ?? 1974.

  6. Heat flow measurements on the southeast coast of Australia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hyndman, R.D.; Jaeger, J.C.; Sass, J.H.

    1969-01-01

    Three boreholes have been drilled for the Australian National University near the southeast coast of New South Wales, Australia. The heat flows found are 1.1, 1.0, and 1.3 ??cal/cm2sec. The errors resulting from the proximity of the sea and a lake, surface temperature change, conductivity structure and water flow have been examined. The radioactive heat production in some of the intrusive rocks of the area have also been measured. The heat flows are much lower than the values of about 2.0 found elsewhere in south eastern Australia. The lower values appear to be part of a distinct heat flow province in eastern Australia. ?? 1969.

  7. Flow-Dependent Vascular Heat Transfer during Microwave Thermal Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Jason; Hynes, Kieran; Brace, Christopher L.

    2012-01-01

    Microwave tumor ablation is an attractive option for thermal ablation because of its inherent benefits over radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the treatment of solid tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Microwave energy heats tissue to higher temperatures and at a faster rate than RFA, creating larger, more homogenous ablation zones. In this study, we investigate microwave heating near large vasculature using coupled fluid-flow and thermal analysis. Low-flow conditions are predicted to be more likely to cause cytotoxic heating and, therefore, vessel thrombosis and endothelial damage of downstream tissues. Such conditions may be more prevalent in patient with severe cirrhosis or compromised blood flow. High-flow conditions create the more familiar heat-sink effect that can protect perivascular tissues from the intended thermal damage. These results may help guide placement and use of microwave ablation technologies in future studies. PMID:23367194

  8. Forced flow heat transfer of supercritical hydrogen for superconductor cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiotsu, M.; Shirai, Y.; Tatsumoto, H.; Hata, K.; Kobayashi, H.; Naruo, Y.; Inatani, H.

    2014-01-01

    Heat transfer from inner side of a vertical tube to forced flow of hydrogen was measured at the pressure of 1.5 MPa. The test tubes were made of stainless steel 316L with the inner diameters from 3 mm to 9 mm and lengths from 100 mm to 250 mm. Heat transfer curves were obtained by gradually increasing the heating current to the test tube and raising the surface temperature up to around 200 K. Inlet fluid temperature and flow velocity were varied from 21 to 30 K and 0.5 to 12 m/s, respectively. Effects of inlet temperature, flow velocity and tube dimension were clearly observed. The heat transfer curve for each flow velocity consists of a lower temperature region with a higher gradient and higher temperature region with a lower gradient. The experimental results were compared with the authors' correlation presented formerly. It was confirmed that this correlation can describe the experimental results obtained here.

  9. Oregon Cascades Play Fairway Analysis: Faults and Heat Flow maps

    SciTech Connect

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    This submission includes a fault map of the Oregon Cascades and backarc, a probability map of heat flow, and a fault density probability layer. More extensive metadata can be found within each zip file.

  10. Constraints on rift thermal processes from heat flow and uplift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.

    1983-01-01

    The implications of heat flow data available from five major Cenozoic continental rift systems for the processes of continental rifting are discussed, and simple thermal models of lithospheric thinning which predict uplift are used to further constrain the thermal processes in the lithosphere during rifting. Compilations of the heat flow data are summarized and the salient results of these compilations are briefly discussed. The uplift predictions of the slow and rapid thinning models, in which thinning is assumed to occur at a respectively slower and faster rate than heat can be conducted into the lithosphere, are presented. Comparison of uplift rates with model results indicates that the lithosphere is in a state between the two models. While uplift is predicted to continue after thinning has ceased due to thermal relaxation of the lithosphere, the rapid thinning model is always predicted to apply to surface heat flow, and an anomaly in this flow is not predicted to develop until after thinning has stopped.

  11. Effect of flow twisting on hydraulic resistance and heat exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suslov, V. Ya.; Makarov, N. A.

    1989-02-01

    On the basis of dimensional analysis through a differentiated approach to the dimensions of length we have obtained formulas for the effect of flow twisting in a circular tube on the hydraulic resistance and exchange of heat.

  12. Modeling Io's Heat Flow: Constraints from Galileo PPR Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathbun, J. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Tamppari, L. K.

    2000-01-01

    We attempt to improve on previous Io heat flow estimates by using higher resolution data from Galileo Photopolarimeter Radiometer (PPR) and improved thermophysical models of the surface, including finite thermal inertia, the pedestal effect, and disk-resolved radiance.

  13. Enhanced two phase flow in heat transfer systems

    DOEpatents

    Tegrotenhuis, Ward E; Humble, Paul H; Lavender, Curt A; Caldwell, Dustin D

    2013-12-03

    A family of structures and designs for use in devices such as heat exchangers so as to allow for enhanced performance in heat exchangers smaller and lighter weight than other existing devices. These structures provide flow paths for liquid and vapor and are generally open. In some embodiments of the invention, these structures can also provide secondary heat transfer as well. In an evaporate heat exchanger, the inclusion of these structures and devices enhance the heat transfer coefficient of the evaporation phase change process with comparable or lower pressure drop.

  14. Mercurian megaregolith layer and surface heat flows constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egea-Gonzalez, Isabel; Ruiz, Javier

    2013-04-01

    Mercury is covered by a thermally insulating megaregolith layer. Despite the fact that it is known that this poor conducting layer has important influences on surface heat flows, most thermal modeling studies have overlooked it. Mercurian megaregolith is not very well known, but data provided by MESSENGER suggest that mercurian megaregolith is less insulating than its lunar counterpart. This information together with brittle-ductile transition (BDT) depths, estimated from the analysis of fault geometries associated with lobate scarps, allow us to constrain the surface heat flow on Mercury at the time of scarps formation. In this work, we have solved the heat conduction equation in order to constrain surface heat flows. Firstly, we obtain an upper limit in surface heat flows by using published values of the BDT depth and by neglecting the megaregolith layer. Then, we calculate a lower limit by including in the heat equation a top layer with thermal properties representative of the lunar megaregolith. In our calculations we have taken into account volumetric heat production rates obtained from the surface abundances of radioactive elements provided by MESSENGER. Heat equation solutions constrain surface heat flows to a range of 6 - 29 mWm-2. These results suggest the possibility that surface heat flows could be lower than those calculated in previous works, which is in agreement with the small amount of radial contraction detected on Mercury. Furthermore, the procedure followed in this article can be easily applied to other planets and satellites, which will improve our knowledge about the thermal evolution of these bodies.

  15. Heat flow vs. atmospheric greenhouse on early Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanale, F. P.; Postawko, S. E.

    1991-01-01

    Researchers derived a quantitative relationship between the effectiveness of an atmospheric greenhouse and internal heat flow in producing the morphological differences between earlier and later Martian terrains. The derivation is based on relationships previously derived by other researchers. The reasoning may be stated as follows: the CO2 mean residence time in the Martian atmosphere is almost certainly much shorter than the total time span over which early climate differences are thought to have been sustained. Therefore, recycling of previously degassed CO2 quickly becomes more important than the ongoing supply of juvenile CO2. If so, then the atmospheric CO2 pressure, and thereby the surface temperature, may be approximated mathematically as a function of the total degassed CO2 in the atmosphere plus buried material and the ratio of the atmospheric and regolith mean residence times. The latter ratio can also be expressed as a function of heat flow. Hence, it follows that the surface temperature may be expressed as a function of heat flow and the total amount of available CO2. However, the depth to the water table can simultaneously be expressed as a function of heat flow and the surface temperature (the boundary condition). Therefore, for any given values of total available CO2 and regolith conductivity, there exist coupled independent equations which relate heat flow, surface temperature, and the depth to the water table. This means we can now derive simultaneous values of surface temperature and the depth of the water table for any value of the heat flow. The derived relationship is used to evaluate the relative importance of the atmospheric greenhouse effect and the internal regolith thermal gradient in producing morphological changes for any value of the heat flow, and to assess the absolute importance of each of the values of the heat flow which are thought to be reasonable on independent geophysical grounds.

  16. Effects of pulsation on separated flow and heat transfer in enlarged channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Kai, Tomonori; Munekata, Mizue; Ohba, Hideki

    2011-03-01

    Numerical results of three-dimensional separated flow and heat transfer in an enlarged rectangular channel are presented in this paper. The expansion ratio and aspect ratio of the channel are 2.0 and 16.0, respectively. Reynolds number of the flow is 200 and it is over the critical Reynolds number. Over the critical Reynolds number, the flow in the symmetric channel becomes asymmetric and deflects to one side of the walls. Effects of the pulsating fluctuation at the inlet upon the flow in the channel are investigated. It is clarified that the inlet flow with a pulsating fluctuation of Strouhal number 0.05 and 0.10 strongly affects on the flow in the channel, and heat transfer on the walls is enhanced, especially on the wall surface covered with long separation bubble. On the other hand, the pulsation of St = 0.0125 oscillates the shear layer more weakly than that of St = 0.05, 0.10 and the enhancement of heat transfer is smaller, though some vortices are shed from the vicinity of the side wall near the reattachment region. The oscillation of the main flow calms down gradually as the Strouhal number of the pulsation increases over 0.10. The influence of pulsation of St = 0.20 on the flow is restricted in the near downstream of the step, and heat transfer on the walls is almost similar to that of the steady flow in the channel.

  17. New computer program solves wide variety of heat flow problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Almond, J. C.

    1966-01-01

    Boeing Engineering Thermal Analyzer /BETA/ computer program uses numerical methods to provide accurate heat transfer solutions to a wide variety of heat flow problems. The program solves steady-state and transient problems in almost any situation that can be represented by a resistance-capacitance network.

  18. Study on the Heat-Flow Controllable Heat Exchanger-3rd report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Osamu; Hamano, Masayoshi; Yanadori, Michio

    The heat-flow controllable heat exchanger for the purpose of heat recovery through the waste hot water at the bathroom and the washing room has been developed. The system is especially available at the house of cold area and the recovery heat is used to warm the suction air conducted from ventilation device. As the result of field test, it is clarified that the heat recovery rate by the system is very large. Also, the exchanger is possible to control the amount of recorery heat. Therefore, it is considered that the exchanger is applicable in the ventilation systems used the waste hot water.

  19. Flow and convective heat transfer in cylindrical reversed flow combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Kilic, M.

    1996-12-01

    This paper presents a computational study of the flow and convective heat transfer in cylindrical reversed flow combustion chambers. The computations are performed using an elliptic solver incorporates the {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model. Heat production by combustion is simulated by adding heat generation source terms in the energy equation. And it is assumed that heat generation occurs only a section of the furnace. A number of different inlet conditions with different geometries are considered, and the changes of flow structure, temperature distribution, convective heat flux rate are presented and compared. The results show that, in general, heat transfer in the reversed flow combustion chamber can be improved by properly chosen geometry for the required output.

  20. Heat flow and gravity responses over salt bodies: A comparative model analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Corrigan, J.; Sweat, M.

    1995-07-01

    Two-dimensional numerical modeling of sea-floor heat flow and water-bottom gravity responses to systematic variations in simple subsurface salt body geometries provides insight on the relative usefulness of these two data types for extracting salt geometry information. For a given salt body geometry, diffusion of heat through overlying sediments results in a dramatic decrease in the amplitude of heat flow anomalies as the depth to the top of the salt body increases. For top-of-salt depths greater than about 1 km, the heat flow response is insensitive to the length of salt feeder stocks and to the thickness of salt tongues/sheets. This shallow depth-to-top-of-salt sensitivity range, in addition to a number of environmental factors that can adversely affect interpretation of heat flow anomalies in terms of heat refraction towards and through salt bodies, severely limits the usefulness of sea-floor heat flow data for constraining aspects of salt body geometry. For gravity data, the critical factor for addressing salt body geometry is the distribution of salt relative to the sediment-salt density crossover depth (above and below which salt is more and less dense, respectively, than the surrounding sediment). Except when ht relevant geometry information being sought (presence and/or length of feeder stock, thickness of salt tongue or sheet) is near the density crossover depth, the geometry-related information content of the gravity field is greater than that of the heat flow field. Based on these model results, measurement uncertainty considerations, and data limitations, the authors conclude that gravity data generally offer an order of magnitude greater resolution capability than sea-floor heat flow data for addressing salt body geometry issues of exploration interest.

  1. Crater Relaxation and Heat Flow on Dione and Tethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, O. L.; Schenk, P.

    2012-12-01

    Crater relaxation magnitudes on Saturn's mid-sized icy satellites can provide a record of the history of heat flow across their surfaces [Schenk, 1989]. Precise characterization of the morphologies of these craters is therefore a priority, and Cassini's orbital tour of the Saturnian system [Matson et al., 2004] has provided near-global stereo coverage for each of the satellites at resolutions better than 1.5 km/px. We have used customized ISIS software developed at LPI to create and process digital elevation models (DEMs) of all of Saturn's mid-sized icy satellites using Cassini stereo images and photoclinometry. We have so far used these DEMs to obtain depth/diameter plots for a wide range of crater diameters on Rhea and Iapetus, from which we have been able to assess the state of crater relaxation on these satellites [White et al., in preparation]. We are currently in the process of obtaining crater measurements for Dione and Tethys, two satellites that show a more complex crater relaxation history than either Rhea or Iapetus [Jaumann et al., 2009]. Depth/diameter plots for all four satellites are shown in Fig. 1. Relaxation for all crater sizes appears to be negligible on Iapetus, and on Rhea only affects craters above ~100 km diameter, regardless of location on the satellite [White and Schenk, 2011]. On Dione and Tethys, relaxation is less size-dependent and appears to be controlled by location on the satellites, indicating a history of differential heat flow across their surfaces. On Tethys, relaxation and heat flow decreased prior to ~1 Gyr, but continued on Dione for a longer time and with greater intensity [Moore and Schenk, 2007]. We intend to update our measurements for Dione and Tethys with higher quality DEMs obtained from data from recent Cassini flybys. We intend to present depth/diameter plots for Dione and Tethys that are of completeness comparable to our Rhea and Iapetus plots. We will also map relaxation magnitudes of large basins across Dione and

  2. Numerical Simulation of Flow Instability and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Hua-Shu; Jiang, Gang

    2014-11-01

    This paper numerically investigates the physical mechanism of flow instability and heat transfer of natural convection in a cavity with thin fin(s). The left and the right walls of the cavity are differentially heated. The cavity is given an initial temperature, and the thin fin(s) is fixed on the hot wall in order to control the heat transfer. The finite volume method with the SIMPLE scheme is used to simulate the flow. Distributions of the temperature, the pressure, the velocity and the total pressure are achieved. Then, the energy gradient method is employed to study the physical mechanism of flow instability and the effect of the thin fin(s) on heat transfer. Based on the energy gradient method, the energy gradient function K represents the characteristic of flow instability. It is observed from the simulation results that the positions where instabilities take place in the temperature contours accord well with those of higher K value, which demonstrates that the energy gradient method reveals the physical mechanism of flow instability. Furthermore, the effect of the fin length, the fin position, the fin number, and Ra on heat transfer is also investigated. It is found that the effect of the fin length on heat transfer is negligible when Ra is relatively high. When there is only one fin, the most efficient heat transfer rate is achieved as the fin is fixed at the middle height of the cavity. The fin blocks heat transfer with a relatively small Ra, but the fin enhances heat transfer with a relatively large Ra. The fin(s) enhances heat transfer gradually with the increase of Ra under the influence of the thin fin(s). Finally, it is observed that both Kmax and Ra can reveal the physical mechanism of natural convection from different approaches.

  3. A heat-flow reconnaissance of southeastern Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Lawver, L.A.; Munroe, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Heat flow was measured at nine sites in crystalline and sedimentary rocks of SE Alaska. Seven of the sites, located between 115 and 155 km landward of the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather transform fault, have heat flows significantly higher than the mean in the coastal provinces between Cape Mendocino and the Queen Charlotte Islands, and lower than the mean for 81 values within 100 km of the San Andreas transform fault, even further S. There is no evidence for heat sources that might be associated with late Cainozoic thermal events.-P.Br.

  4. Topographically driven groundwater flow and the San Andreas heat flow paradox revisited

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saffer, D.M.; Bekins, B.A.; Hickman, S.

    2003-01-01

    Evidence for a weak San Andreas Fault includes (1) borehole heat flow measurements that show no evidence for a frictionally generated heat flow anomaly and (2) the inferred orientation of ??1 nearly perpendicular to the fault trace. Interpretations of the stress orientation data remain controversial, at least in close proximity to the fault, leading some researchers to hypothesize that the San Andreas Fault is, in fact, strong and that its thermal signature may be removed or redistributed by topographically driven groundwater flow in areas of rugged topography, such as typify the San Andreas Fault system. To evaluate this scenario, we use a steady state, two-dimensional model of coupled heat and fluid flow within cross sections oriented perpendicular to the fault and to the primary regional topography. Our results show that existing heat flow data near Parkfield, California, do not readily discriminate between the expected thermal signature of a strong fault and that of a weak fault. In contrast, for a wide range of groundwater flow scenarios in the Mojave Desert, models that include frictional heat generation along a strong fault are inconsistent with existing heat flow data, suggesting that the San Andreas Fault at this location is indeed weak. In both areas, comparison of modeling results and heat flow data suggest that advective redistribution of heat is minimal. The robust results for the Mojave region demonstrate that topographically driven groundwater flow, at least in two dimensions, is inadequate to obscure the frictionally generated heat flow anomaly from a strong fault. However, our results do not preclude the possibility of transient advective heat transport associated with earthquakes.

  5. Oscillating flow loss test results in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, G.; Howell, S.; Wood, G.; Miller, E.; Gedeon, D.

    1990-01-01

    The results are presented for a test program designed to generate a database of oscillating flow loss information that is applicable to Stirling engine heat exchangers. The tests were performed on heater/cooler tubes of various lengths and entrance/exit configurations, on stacked and sintered screen regenerators of various wire diameters and on Brunswick and Metex random fiber regenerators. The test results were performed over a range of oscillating flow parameters consistent with Stirling engine heat exchanger experience. The tests were performed on the Sunpower oscillating flow loss rig which is based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. In general, the results are presented by comparing the measured oscillating flow losses to the calculated flow losses. The calculated losses are based on the cycle integration of steady flow friction factors and entrance/exit loss coefficients.

  6. Effect on the flow and heat transfer characteristics for sinusoidal pulsating laminar flow in a heated square cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiu-Yang; Lin, Wei; Zheng, Xiao-Tao

    2014-06-01

    Two-dimensional numerical simulation is performed to understand the effect of flow pulsation on the flow and heat transfer from a heated square cylinder at Re = 100. Numerical calculations are carried out by using a finite volume method based on the pressure-implicit with splitting of operators algorithm in a collocated grid. The effects of flow pulsation amplitude (0.2 ≤ A ≤ 0.8) and frequency (0 ≤ f p ≤ 20 Hz) on the detailed kinematics of flow (streamlines, vorticity patterns), the macroscopic parameters (drag coefficient, vortex shedding frequency) and heat transfer enhancement are presented in detail. The Strouhal number of vortices shedding, drag coefficient for non-pulsating flow are compared with the previously published data, and good agreement is found. The lock-on phenomenon is observed for a square cylinder in the present flow pulsation. When the pulsating frequency is within the lock-on regime, time averaged drag coefficient and heat transfer from the square cylinder is substantially augmented, and when the pulsating frequency in about the natural vortex shedding frequency, the heat transfer is also substantially enhanced. In addition, the influence of the pulsating amplitude on the time averaged drag coefficient, heat transfer enhancement and lock-on occurrence is discussed in detail.

  7. Heat Transfer Enhancement in Separated and Vortex Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Richard J. Goldstein

    2004-05-27

    This document summarizes the research performance done at the Heat Transfer Laboratory of the University of Minnesota on heat transfer and energy separation in separated and vortex flow supported by DOE in the period September 1, 1998--August 31, 2003. Unsteady and complicated flow structures in separated or vortex flows are the main reason for a poor understanding of heat transfer under such conditions. The research from the University of Minnesota focused on the following important aspects of understanding such flows: (1) Heat/mass transfer from a circular cylinder; (2) study of energy separation and heat transfer in free jet flows and shear layers; and (3) study of energy separation on the surface and in the wake of a cylinder in crossflow. The current study used three different experimental setups to accomplish these goals. A wind tunnel and a liquid tunnel using water and mixtures of ethylene glycol and water, is used for the study of prandtl number effect with uniform heat flux from the circular cylinder. A high velocity air jet is used to study energy separation in free jets. A high speed wind tunnel, same as used for the first part, is utilized for energy separation effects on the surface and in the wake of the circular cylinder. The final outcome of this study is a substantial advancement in this research area.

  8. Heat flow map of the western Mediterranean basins

    SciTech Connect

    Foucher, J.P.; Burrus, J.; Vedova, B.D.

    1988-08-01

    More than 400 terrestrial heat flow determinations have been carried our in the western Mediterranean basins. These include results of detailed surveys in the Ligurian Sea and in the Gulf of Lions and Tyrrhenian basins, as well as sparse measurements in the Gulf of Valencia and the Algerian basin. Most of the measurements are surficial, obtained from the temperatures sensed by outrigged thermistors mounted on weight-driven probes penetrating the sediment to 3 to 10 m. Thermal conductivity was measured either on cores or in situ. The authors present a heat flow map of the western Mediterranean basins based on the available geothermal results. Mean regional heat flow values range from 55 to 105 mW m/sup /minus/2/ in the Lugiran and Gulf of Lions basin and from 50 to 200 m mW m/sup /minus/2/ in the Tyrrhenian Sea. In the latter basin, high heat flow characterizes areas of recent intensive thinning of the continental crust and associated incipient oceanic crust formation. In the former basins, heat flow tends to increase from the Provencal coast of France to the Corsican and Sardinian margins, which may reflect on increasing heat contribution from the mantle.

  9. Flow dynamics and heat transfer of wavy condensate film

    SciTech Connect

    Miyara, Akio

    1999-07-01

    Wave evolution and heat transfer behavior of a wavy condensate film down a vertical wall have been investigated by a finite different method, in which the algorithm is based on the HSMAC method, and a staggered grid fixed on a physical space is employed. For the moving interface, newly proposed methods are used. A random perturbation of the film thickness is generated near the leading edge. The perturbation quickly diminishes once and small-amplitude long waves are propagated downstream. Then the amplitude of the wave increases rapidly at a certain position, and the wave shape changes from a sinusoidal wave to a pulse-like solitary wave which is composed of a large-amplitude wave and capillary waves. Figure A-1 shows an instantaneous stream line of the pulse-like solitary waves. The stream line is obtained for moving coordinates with the wave velocity. A circulation flow occurs in the large waves, and it disappears in the interacting wave at downstream. In the capillary waves, no circulation flow generates. The circulation flow affects the temperature field. Temperature contour lines are deformed by the convection effect of the circulation flow. On the other hand, the temperature contour is dense in the wave toughs and substrates because of the film thinning effect. These facets imply that the heat transfer is enhanced by two kinds of effects: the convection and the local film thinning. Figure A-3 shows the comparison of the present simulation results with the Chun-Seban equation for wavy film and the Nusselt equation for laminar film with smooth surface. Nu of the present results departs from Nusselt equation because of the wave generation. The pint of the departure depends on Prandtl number. Lower Prandtl number departs at higher Reynolds number. In the fully developed wave region, the simulation result of Pr = 5 reasonably agrees to the Chun-Seban equation. For Pr = 10, however, the simulation result is fairly higher. Because of limitation of calculation scheme

  10. Heat-flow mapping at the Geysers Geothermal Field

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.P.

    1986-10-31

    Pertinent data were compiled for 187 temperature-gradient holes in the vicinity of The Geysers Geothermal field. Terrain-correction techniques were applied to most of the temperature-gradient data, and a temperature-gradient map was constructed. Cutting samples from 16, deep, production wells were analyzed for thermal conductivity. From these samples, the mean thermal conductivities were determined for serpentinized ultramafic rock, greenstone, and graywacke. Then, a heat flow map was made. The temperature-gradient and heat-flow maps show that The Geysers Geothermal field is part of a very large, northwesterly-trending, thermal anomaly; the commercially productive portion of the field may be 100 km/sup 2/ in area. The rate that heat energy flows through the surface by thermal conduction is estimated at 1.79 x 10/sup 9/MJ per year. The net heat energy loss from commercial production for 1983 is estimated at 180.14 x 10/sup 9/MJ.

  11. Numerical simulation of transitional flows with heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kožíšek, Martin; Příhoda, Jaromír; Fürst, Jiří; Straka, Petr

    2016-06-01

    The contribution deals with simulation of internal flows with the laminar/turbulent transition and heat transfer. The numerical modeling of incompressible flow on a heated flat plate was carried out partly by the k-kL-ω model of Walters and Cokljat [1] and partly by the algebraic transition model of Straka and Příhoda [2] connected with the EARSM turbulence model of Hellsten [3]. Transition models were tested by means of the skin friction and the Stanton number distribution. Used models of turbulent heat transfer were compared with the simplest model based on the constant turbulent Prandtl number. The k-kL-ω model is applied for the simulation of compressible flow through the VKI turbine blade cascade with heat transfer.

  12. Convective heat transfer characteristics of laminar pulsating pipe air flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, M. A.; Attya, A. M.; Eid, A. I.; Aly, A. Z.

    Heat transfer characteristics to laminar pulsating pipe flow under different conditions of Reynolds number and pulsation frequency were experimentally investigated. The tube wall of uniform heat flux condition was considered. Reynolds number was varied from 780 to 1987 while the frequency of pulsation ranged from 1 to 29.5Hz. The results showed that the relative mean Nusselt number is strongly affected by pulsation frequency while it is slightly affected by Reynolds number. The results showed enhancements in the relative mean Nusselt number. In the frequency range of 1-4Hz, an enhancement up to 30% (at Reynolds number of 1366 and pulsation frequency of 1.4Hz) was obtained. In the frequency range of 17-25Hz, an enhancement up to 9% (at Reynolds number of 1366 and pulsation frequency of 17.5Hz) was indicated. The rate of enhancement of the relative mean Nusselt number decreased as pulsation frequency increased or as Reynolds number increased. A reduction in relative mean Nusselt number occurred outside these ranges of pulsation frequencies. A reduction in relative mean Nusselt number up to 40% for pulsation frequency range of 4.1-17Hz and a reduction up to 20% for pulsation frequency range of 25-29.5Hz for Reynolds numbers range of 780-1987 were considered. This reduction is directly proportional to the pulsation frequency. Empirical dimensionless equations have been developed for the relative mean Nusselt number that related to Reynolds number (750

  13. Core Heat Flow and Suppression of Mantle Plumes by Plate-Scale Mantle Flow: Results From Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, H. M.; Jellinek, A. M.; Richards, M. A.; Manga, M.

    2002-12-01

    Heat flow from the Earth's core to the mantle remains an unresolved quantity. Its value has implications for the core's thermal evolution and growth of the inner core, the geodynamo, and the relative abundance of radioactive elements in the core and mantle. Core heat flow is affected by dynamics of the lowermost mantle in three ways: (1) advection of heat by plume instabilities; (2) conductive heating of subducted material; and (3) suppression of plume instabilities, as well as advection of heat by plate-scale mantle flow. We present results from a boundary-layer analysis and laboratory experiments aimed at understanding the effects of an imposed large-scale circulation on thermal convection at high-Rayleigh number (106<=Ra<=109) in a fluid with a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity. The ultimate goal of this work is to better understand the effect of plate-scale mantle flow on heat flux across the CMB and on the dynamics of plume formation at the CMB. Our theoretical analysis is complemented by lab experiments, in which a layer of corn syrup is heated from below and a large-scale flow is induced in the fluid above the hot boundary. We identify 4 convective regions associated with high-Rayleigh number convection in the presence of a large-scale flow: (1) a subcritical TBL region (Domain I), where plume instabilities are suppressed by the advective thinning of the TBL and heat flux is increased relative to convection without large-scale flow; (2) a supercritical TBL region (Domain II), where plume instabilities are no longer suppressed and heat flux is equal to convection without large-scale flow; (3) a flow-dominated region (Domain III), which is free of plumes; and (4) a plume-dominated domain (Domain IV), where the interaction of hot buoyant plumes and imposed large-scale flow results in lateral advection and distortion of rising plumes. In addition, we present a boundary-layer analysis that predicts heat flux, Q, from a hot surface as a function of imposed

  14. Does the Heat Island Effect Affect Lake Chabot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, K. A.; Mock, Y.; Pun, C.

    2014-12-01

    Lake Chabot is a backup water supply source and it is important to know if the water is healthy because California is experiencing a drought. To check the quality of the water we used a submersible, waterproof thermometer to measure the temperature of the water at different depths. We hypothesized that the heat-island effect would cause the runoff from the surrounding developed areas to be warmer. This is because paving roads causes areas to become impermeable and absorb heat. Water runs off these impermeable surfaces, absorbing heat from the ground and enters larger bodies of water via stream. To locate streams we used a topography map. We located close lines followed by lines that were farther apart and then once again followed by close lines. This indicates that there is a concave area between two high points, allowing water to possibly flow through. We found that areas where the water came from highly populated areas were warmer. The increase in temperature was shown throughout all depths of the water at each site that was measured. The temperature throughout the lake was in between 19°C and 25°C. This warm temperature makes it hard for gases to mix. The lower the dissolved oxygen level, the less desirable it is for a variety of organisms to survive. Higher temperatures also increase bacterial growth and can causes water to be unhealthy. This indicates that the water at Lake Chabot is not suitable for human consumption and should not be considered a suitable backup water source for our area.

  15. Lunar heat flow: Regional prospective of the Apollo landing sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegler, M. A.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2014-01-01

    reexamine the Apollo Heat Flow Experiment in light of new orbital data. Using three-dimensional thermal conduction models, we examine effects of crustal thickness, density, and radiogenic abundance on measured heat flow values at the Apollo 15 and 17 sites. These models show the importance of regional context on heat flux measurements. We find that measured heat flux can be greatly altered by deep subsurface radiogenic content and crustal density. However, total crustal thickness and the presence of a near-surface radiogenic-rich ejecta provide less leverage, representing only minor (<1.5 mW m-2) perturbations on surface heat flux. Using models of the crust implied by Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory results, we found that a roughly 9-13 mW m-2 mantle heat flux best approximate the observed heat flux. This equates to a total mantle heat production of 2.8-4.1 × 1011 W. These heat flow values could imply that the lunar interior is slightly less radiogenic than the Earth's mantle, perhaps implying that a considerable fraction of terrestrial mantle material was incorporated at the time of formation. These results may also imply that heat flux at the crust-mantle boundary beneath the Procellarum potassium, rare earth element, and phosphorus (KREEP) Terrane (PKT) is anomalously elevated compared to the rest of the Moon. These results also suggest that a limited KREEP-rich layer exists beneath the PKT crust. If a subcrustal KREEP-rich layer extends below the Apollo 17 landing site, required mantle heat flux can drop to roughly 7 mW m-2, underlining the need for future heat flux measurements outside of the radiogenic-rich PKT region.

  16. A survey of oscillating flow in Stirling engine heat exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Terrence W.; Seume, Jorge R.

    1988-01-01

    Similarity parameters for characterizing the effect of flow oscillation on wall shear stress, viscous dissipation, pressure drop and heat transfer rates are proposed. They are based on physical agruments and are derived by normalizing the governing equations. The literature on oscillating duct flows, regenerator and porous media flows is surveyed. The operating characteristics of the heat exchanger of eleven Stirling engines are discribed in terms of the similarity parameters. Previous experimental and analytical results are discussed in terms of these parameters and used to estimate the nature of the oscillating flow under engine operating conditions. The operating points for many of the modern Stirling engines are in or near the laminar to turbulent transition region. In several engines, working fluid does not pass entirely through heat exchangers during a cycle. Questions that need to be addressed by further research are identified.

  17. Flow and heat transfer of petal shaped double tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakouchi, Toshihiko; Kawashima, Yuki; Tsujimoto, Koichi; Ando, Toshitake

    2014-06-01

    In this study, the flow and heat transfer characteristics of petal-shaped double tube with 6 petals are examined experimentally for a compact heat exchanger. As results, the heat transfer rate, Q, of the 6 petal shaped double tube (6-p tube) is much larger than that, Qp, of conventional circular double tube in all Reynolds number Rein,h (where, the reference length is hydraulic diameter) ranges. For example, at Rein,h =(0.5~1.0)× 104 it is about 4 times of Qp. The heat transfer enhancement of 6-p tube is by the increase of heat transfer area, wetting perimeter, and a highly fluctuating flow, and Q of the 6-p tube can be expressed by Q [kW/m] = 0.54Rein,h + 2245.

  18. Instability of flow of liquid film over a heated surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sha, W.T.; Soo, S.L.

    1994-08-01

    Fundamental concepts and basic equations of a flowing thin liquid film cooling a heated surfaced by its vaporization and the effect of dry patches were treated. Stable film flow prior to the appearance of dry patches on the heated surface is maintained by a balance of various forces due to surface tension, shear stress, heat and mass transfer, and gravity. Film splitting at a critical film thickness produces dry patches due to perturbation by waves on a perfect surface, and often by surface imperfection and uneven heating. This work is primarily motivated by the design of next-generation nuclear reactors, which employ many novel passive heat-removal systems via natural circulation. These systems are design to prevent damage to the reactor core and containment without action by the reactor operators during or after a design basis accident such as a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) or a main steam-line break (MSLB) accident.

  19. Relations between heat flow, topography and Moho depth for Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin; Majorowicz, Jacek; Grad, Marek

    2013-04-01

    The relation between heat flow, topography and Moho depth for recent maps of Europe is presented. New heat flow map of Europe (Majorowicz and Wybraniec, 2010) is based on updated database of uncorrected heat flow values to which paleoclimatic correction is applied across the continental Europe. Correction is depth dependent due to a diffusive thermal transfer of the surface temperature forcing of which glacial-interglacial history has the largest impact. This explains some very low uncorrected heat flow values 20-30 mW/m2 in the shields, shallow basin areas of the cratons, and in other areas including orogenic belts were heat flow was likely underestimated. New integrated map of the European Moho depth (Grad et al., 2009) is the first high resolution digital map for European plate understand as an area from Ural Mountains in the east to mid-Atlantic ridge in the west, and Mediterranean Sea in the south to Spitsbergen and Barents Sea in Arctic in the north. For correlation we used: onshore heat flow density data with palaeoclimatic correction (5318 locations), topography map (30 x 30 arc seconds; Danielson and Gesch, 2011) and Moho map (longitude, latitude and Moho depth, each 0.1 degree). Analysis was done in areas where data from all three datasets were available. Continental Europe area could be divided into two large domains related with Precambrian East European craton and Palaeozoic Platform. Next two smaller areas correspond to Scandinavian Caledonides and Anatolia. Presented results show different correlations between Moho depth, elevation and heat flow for all discussed regions. For each region more detailed analysis of these relation in different elevation ranges is presented. In general it is observed that Moho depth is more significant to HF then elevation. Depending on region and elevation range HF value in mW/m2 is up to two times larger than Moho depth in km, while HF relation to elevation varies much more.

  20. Heat flow anomalies in oil- and gas-bearing structures

    SciTech Connect

    Sergiyenko, S.I.

    1988-02-01

    The main features of the distribution of heat flow values in oil, gas and gas-condensate fields on the continents have been discussed by Makarenko and Sergiyenko. The method of analysis used made it possible to establish that the presence of hydrocarbons in formations leads to high heat-flow, regardless of the age of folding of the potentially oil- and gas-bearing zones. Only in regions adjacent to marginal Cenozoic folded mountain structures and in zones of Cenozoic volcanism is the world average higher, by 2.5 to 10%, than in the oil- and gas-bearing structures in those regions. The earlier analysis of the distribution of heat flow values in oil and gas structures was based on 403 measurements. The author now has nearly doubled the sample population, enabling him substantially to revise the ideas on the distribution of heat flow values and the development of the thermal regime of local oil and gas structures. He notes that the method previously used, comparing heat flow values on young continental platforms with values in local oil and gas structures, makes it possible to estimate the thermal effect of the presence of oil and gas. This conclusion stems from the fact that the overwhelming majority of heat flow measurements were made on various kinds of positive structural forms, and distortions of the thermal field caused by thermal anisotropy phenomena are equally characteristic of both productive and nonproductive structures. As a result, for the first time a continuous time series of heat flow measurements over oil and gas structures in various tectonic regions, with ages of consolidation ranging from the Precambrian to the Cenozoic, was established. 26 references.

  1. A novel compact heat exchanger using gap flow mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, J. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, D. Z.; Luo, T. P.; Ren, T. Q.

    2015-02-01

    A novel, compact gap-flow heat exchanger (GFHE) using heat-transfer fluid (HTF) was developed in this paper. The detail design of the GFHE coaxial structure which forms the annular gap passage for HTF is presented. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were introduced into the design to determine the impacts of the gap width and the HTF flow rate on the GFHE performance. A comparative study on the GFHE heating rate, with the gap widths ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 mm and the HTF flow rates ranged from 100 to 500 ml/min, was carried out. Results show that a narrower gap passage and a higher HTF flow rate can yield a higher average heating rate in GFHE. However, considering the compromise between the GFHE heating rate and the HTF pressure drop along the gap, a 0.4 mm gap width is preferred. A testing loop was also set up to experimentally evaluate the GFHE capability. The testing results show that, by using 0.4 mm gap width and 500 ml/min HTF flow rate, the maximum heating rate in the working chamber of the as-made GFHE can reach 18 °C/min, and the average temperature change rates in the heating and cooling processes of the thermal cycle test were recorded as 6.5 and 5.4 °C/min, respectively. These temperature change rates can well satisfy the standard of IEC 60068-2-14:2009 and show that the GFHE developed in this work has sufficient heat exchange capacity and can be used as an ideal compact heat exchanger in small volume desktop thermal fatigue test apparatus.

  2. A novel compact heat exchanger using gap flow mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liang, J S; Zhang, Y; Wang, D Z; Luo, T P; Ren, T Q

    2015-02-01

    A novel, compact gap-flow heat exchanger (GFHE) using heat-transfer fluid (HTF) was developed in this paper. The detail design of the GFHE coaxial structure which forms the annular gap passage for HTF is presented. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were introduced into the design to determine the impacts of the gap width and the HTF flow rate on the GFHE performance. A comparative study on the GFHE heating rate, with the gap widths ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 mm and the HTF flow rates ranged from 100 to 500 ml/min, was carried out. Results show that a narrower gap passage and a higher HTF flow rate can yield a higher average heating rate in GFHE. However, considering the compromise between the GFHE heating rate and the HTF pressure drop along the gap, a 0.4 mm gap width is preferred. A testing loop was also set up to experimentally evaluate the GFHE capability. The testing results show that, by using 0.4 mm gap width and 500 ml/min HTF flow rate, the maximum heating rate in the working chamber of the as-made GFHE can reach 18 °C/min, and the average temperature change rates in the heating and cooling processes of the thermal cycle test were recorded as 6.5 and 5.4 °C/min, respectively. These temperature change rates can well satisfy the standard of IEC 60068-2-14:2009 and show that the GFHE developed in this work has sufficient heat exchange capacity and can be used as an ideal compact heat exchanger in small volume desktop thermal fatigue test apparatus. PMID:25725874

  3. Heat flow and efficiency in a microscopic engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, B.-Q.; Xie, H.-Z.; Wen, D.-H.; Liu, X.-M.; Liu, L.-G.

    2005-11-01

    We study the energetics of a thermal motor driven by temperature differences, which consists of a Brownian particle moving in a sawtooth potential with an external load where the viscous medium is periodically in contact with hot and cold heat reservoir along space coordinate. The motor can work as a heat engine or a refrigerator under different conditions. The heat flow via both potential and kinetic energy is considered. The former is reversible when the engine works quasistatically and the latter is always irreversible. The efficiency of the heat engine can never approach Carnot efficiency.

  4. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics of the Staggered Slotted Semi Cylinders in a Cross Flow Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yayla, Sedat; Beyin, Seyfettin; Oztekin, Alparslan

    2012-11-01

    Transient 3-D dimensional turbulent flow simulations are conducted to examine flow and heat transfer characteristics in inline and staggered slotted semi-cylinders placed in a rectangular cross sectioned fin tube heat exchanger. Both Reynolds averaged Navier's equation and Large Eddy simulations model are employed to conduct simulations using Fluent-ANSYS. Predictions of transient simulations are compared against the results of the PIV flow visualization observations at Reynolds number 1500 and 4000. Measured and predicted velocity and the vorticity field in the wake of cylinders agree well with each other at both Reynolds number. The effect of the angle between the slotted semi cylinders and the flow direction is investigated for various values of Reynolds number in both laminar and turbulent flow regimes. Transient nature of the three dimensional flow structures with flow separation, reattachment and vortices are characterized. The effects of the flow structure on the heat transfer characteristics are determined by calculating the heat transfer coefficient along the surface of the semi cylinders.

  5. Surface heat flow measurements from the East Siberian continental slope and southern Lomonosov Ridge, Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Regan, Matt; Preto, Pedro; Stranne, Christian; Jakobsson, Martin; Koshurnikov, Andrey

    2016-05-01

    Surface heat flow data in the Arctic Ocean are needed to assess hydrocarbon and methane hydrate distributions, and provide constraints into the tectonic origins and nature of underlying crust. However, across broad areas of the Arctic, few published measurements exist. This is true for the outer continental shelf and slope of the East Siberian Sea, and the adjoining deep water ridges and basins. Here we present 21 new surface heat flow measurements from this region of the Arctic Ocean. On the Southern Lomonosov Ridge, the average measured heat flow, uncorrected for effects of sedimentation and topography, is 57 ± 4 mW/m2 (n = 4). On the outer continental shelf and slope of the East Siberian Sea (ESS), the average is 57 ± 10 mW/m2 (n = 16). An anomalously high heat flow of 203 ± 28 mW/m2 was measured at a single station in the Herald Canyon. With the exception of this high heat flow, the new data from the ESS are consistent with predictions for thermally equilibrated lithosphere of continental origin that was last affected by thermotectonic processes in the Cretaceous to early Cenozoic. Variability within the data likely arises from differences in radiogenic heat production within the continental crust and overlying sediments. This can be further explored by comparing the data with geophysical constraints on sediment and crustal thicknesses.

  6. Heat flow structure in the Paleozoides of the Central Asian Fold Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khutorskoy, M. D.; Lyapunov, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Heat generation produced by radioactive decay of long-lived isotopes in the Earth's crust (radiogenic heat flow) within the Paleozoic provinces of the Central Asian Fold Belt is considered. Heat flow from the mantle is calculated as the difference between the observed heat flow and the radiogenic flow. The major cause of this heat flow is the transition of potential energy of gravity differentiation into heat; in this respect, mantle heat flow is called gravigenic. Calculation shows that the fractions of radiogenic and gravigenic heat flows in the Paleozoides studied are nearly equal.

  7. Marine Heat Flow Measurements of the Northern and Southern Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antriasian, A. M.; Harris, R. N.; Trehu, A. M.; Henrys, S. A.; Gorman, A. R.; Lauer, R. M.; Phrampus, B. J.; Colella, H.; Baker, D.; Rocco, N.

    2015-12-01

    The 120 Ma Hikurangi Plateau, a large igneous province on the Pacific plate, is subducting below the Australian plate at the Hikurangi margin. Large along-strike variations in apparent interseismic coupling and in the depth range over which slow slip occurs provide the opportunity to better understand which factors affect the slip behavior along the megathrust. Prior to our heat flow survey the thermal regime of the incoming Hikurangi Plateau was largely unknown. In May and June, 2015, we collected 196 seafloor heat flow values in a series of transects consisting of closely-spaced measurements with a 3.5 m "violin-bow" type probe. Heat flow measurements are located around the northern and southern Hikurangi margin and are collocated with seismic reflection lines. The background heat flow on the incoming plate is 49 ± 7, and 52 ± 9, mW/m2 for the northern and southern areas, respectively. These values are consistent with cooling plate models for this age of oceanic crust and suggest no difference in the basal heat flux between these two areas. However, heat flow transects in the northern Hikurangi trough show clear evidence for crustal fluid flow associated with the basement relief, while heat flow transects along the southern Hikurangi trough do not show evidence for crustal fluid flow, which may be due to a lack of basement relief. We are developing a 2D thermal model for each region to understand the thermal and hydrologic regimes and their influence on clay diagenesis and modes of deformation.

  8. Bead temperature effects on FCAW heat-affected zone hardness

    SciTech Connect

    Kiefer, J.H.

    1995-11-01

    Hardness limits for welding procedure qualification are often imposed to lessen the chances of delayed hydrogen cracking during production fabrication. Temper bead techniques have been used by fabricators during these qualifications to improve their chances of success. This practice involves using the heat of additional weld beads to soften the heat-affected zone (HAZ) hardness in the base metal next to the weld where the hardness is the greatest. The technique works under controlled conditions, but the consistency for field use was questionable. This report describes an investigate of the effect of welding parameters, base metal chemical composition, and weld bead placement on HAZ softening. An empirical formula developed from base plate chemical composition, weld cooling time, and temper bead placement can be used to estimate the amount of HAZ tempering. Combined with an appropriate hardness prediction formula, it can help find the welding procedure needed to achieve a desired maximum HAZ hardness, or predict the HAZ hardness of existing welds. Based on the results of the study, bead temperature is not recommended for HAZ hardness control on large scale fabrications.

  9. Brine flow in heated geologic salt.

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Malama, Bwalya

    2013-03-01

    This report is a summary of the physical processes, primary governing equations, solution approaches, and historic testing related to brine migration in geologic salt. Although most information presented in this report is not new, we synthesize a large amount of material scattered across dozens of laboratory reports, journal papers, conference proceedings, and textbooks. We present a mathematical description of the governing brine flow mechanisms in geologic salt. We outline the general coupled thermal, multi-phase hydrologic, and mechanical processes. We derive these processes' governing equations, which can be used to predict brine flow. These equations are valid under a wide variety of conditions applicable to radioactive waste disposal in rooms and boreholes excavated into geologic salt.

  10. Joule Heating Effects on Electrokinetic Flow Instabilities in Ferrofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumme, Christian; Shaw, Ryan; Zhou, Yilong; Prabhakaran, Rama; Xuan, Xiangchun

    We have demonstrated in our earlier work that the application of a tangential electric field can draw fluid instabilities at the interface of a ferrofluid/water co-flow. These electrokinetic flow instabilities are produced primarily by the mismatch of electric conductivities of the two fluids. We demonstrate in this talk that the Joule heating induced fluid temperature rises and gradients can significantly suppress the electrokinetic flow instabilities. We also develop a two-dimensional depth-averaged numerical model to predict the fluid temperature, flow and concentration fields in the two-fluid system with the goal to understand the Joule heating effects on electric field-driven ferrofluid flow instabilities. This work was supported by the Honors and Creative Inquiry programs at Clemson University.

  11. Microstructural response to heat affected zone cracking of prewelding heat-treated Inconel 939 superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M.A.; Garza, A.

    2011-12-15

    The microstructural response to cracking in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a nickel-based IN 939 superalloy after prewelding heat treatments (PWHT) was investigated. The PWHT specimens showed two different microstructures: 1) spherical ordered {gamma} Prime precipitates (357-442 nm), with blocky MC and discreet M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides dispersed within the coarse dendrites and in the interdendritic regions; and 2) ordered {gamma} Prime precipitates in 'ogdoadically' diced cube shapes and coarse MC carbides within the dendrites and in the interdendritic regions. After being tungsten inert gas welded (TIG) applying low heat input, welding speed and using a more ductile filler alloy, specimens with microstructures consisting of spherical {gamma} Prime precipitate particles and dispersed discreet MC carbides along the grain boundaries, displayed a considerably improved weldability due to a strong reduction of the intergranular HAZ cracking associated with the liquation microfissuring phenomena. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homogeneous microstructures of {gamma} Prime spheroids and discreet MC carbides of Ni base superalloys through preweld heat treatments. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {gamma} Prime spheroids and discreet MC carbides reduce the intergranular HAZ liquation and microfissuring of Nickel base superalloys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure {gamma} Prime spheroids and discreet blocky type MC carbides, capable to relax the stress generated during weld cooling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low welding heat input welding speeds and ductile filler alloys reduce the HAZ cracking susceptibility.

  12. Nanofluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Channel Entrance Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Joseph T. C.; Puliti, Gianluca

    2014-11-01

    The present work uses the continuum description of nanofluid flow to study the flow, heat and mass transfer in the entrance and developing region of channels or tubes, where the viscous and heat conduction layers are thin and the heat transfer is much more intense than fully developed flow. Instead of supplementing the formulation with thermodynamic properties based on mixture calculations, use is made of recent molecular dynamical computations of such properties, specifically, the density and heat capacity of gold-water nanofluids. The more general formulation results, within the Rayleigh-Stokes (plug flow) approximation and perturbation for small volume fraction, show that the nanofluid density-heat capacity has an enormous effect in the inertia mechanism in causing the nanofluid temperature profile to steepen. The nanofluid thermal conductivity though has an explicit enhancement of the surface heat transfer rate has the almost hidden effect of stretching the nanofluid temperature profile thus giving the opposite effect of enhancement. Quantitative results for Gold-Water nanofluid is presented.

  13. Basic data for some recent Australian heat-flow measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munroe, Robert J.; Sass, J.H.; Milburn, G.T.; Jaeger, J.C.; Tammemagi, H.Y.

    1975-01-01

    This report has been compiled to provide background information and detailed temperature and thermal conductivity data for the heat-flow values reported in Sass, Jaeger, and Munroe (in press). The data were collected as part of a joint heat-flow study by the Australian National University (ANU) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) under the direction of J. C. Jaeger (ANU) and J. H. Sass (USGS). The format is similar to that used for basic data from United States heat-flow determinations (Sass and Munroe, 1974). Each section contains a state map showing the geographic distribution of heat-flow data followed by tables which list individual temperatures, thermal conductivities, and radiogenic heat production values. A companion volume (Bunker and others, 1975) gives details of the heat-production measurements together with individual radioelement concentrations. Localities are arranged in alphabetical order within each state. The methods and techniques of measurements have been described by Sass and others (1971a, b). Unusual methods or procedures which differ markedly from these techniques are noted and described in the comments sections of the tables.

  14. Percussive and Proboscis Based Lunar Heat Flow Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumm, E.; Zacny, K.; Kumar, N.

    2009-12-01

    The subsurface temperature of the Moon is strongly influenced by the diurnal, annual, and precession fluctuations of the insolation. Therefore, to measure the heat flow, the probe has to be inserted to a depth of at least 3m. There are a number of ways the heat flow probe can be deployed. These methods differ in many ways such as simplicity and mass of the deployment system, power required to deploy it, extent of thermal isolation between temperature sensors and between sensors themselves and surface system (deployment system, lander, electronics box etc), thermal sensor placement within the hole (radiative as opposed to conducive coupling), and methods of deployment. The percussive based heat flow probe utilizes a percussive approach to drive a small diameter (20mm) cone penetrometer to >3 meter depths, deploying ring-like thermal sensors every 30 cm. It leaves only small sensors in the borehole, maximizing measurement sensitivity by minimizing thermal coupling from the lander to the electrical tether. The proboscis based heat flow probe utilizes a pneumatic (gas) approach to lower the heat flow probe, a lenticular tape, to 3 meters. The system offers extremely low mass, volume, and simple deployment.

  15. Heat flow through the sea bottom around the Yucatan Peninsula

    SciTech Connect

    Khutorskoy, M.D.; Kononov, V.I.; Polyak, B.G. ); Fernandez, R. ); Matveev, V.G.; Rot, A.A. )

    1990-02-10

    Heat flow studies were conducted in January-February 1987, off the Atlantic Coast of Mexico on board the R/V Akademik Nikolai Strakhov. Two areas were surveyed, one transecting the Salt Dome Province and the Campeche Canyon, in the Gulf of Mexico, and the other, on the eastern flank of the Yucatan Peninsula. Conductive heat flow through the bottom sediments was determined as the product of vertical temperature gradient and in situ thermal conductivity, measured with a thermal probe using a multithermistor array and real-time processing capabilities. Forward two-dimensional modeling allows one to estimate heat flow variations at both sites from local disturbances and to obtain average heat flow values of 51 mW/m{sup 2} for the transect within the Gulf of Mexico and 38 and 69 mW/m{sup 2} for two basins within the Yucatan area. Sea bottom relief has a predominant effect over other environmental factors in the scatter of heat flow determination in the Gulf of Mexico.

  16. Modeling heat flow in a thermos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karls, Michael A.; Scherschel, James E.

    2003-07-01

    One of the first mathematical models that students encounter is that of the cooling of a cup of coffee. A related, but more complicated, problem is how the temperature in a thermos full of ice-cold water changes as a function of both time and position in the thermos. We use the approach developed by Fourier for the heating of an insulated rod to establish a model for a thermos. We verify the model by comparing it to data recorded with a calculator-based laboratory.

  17. Heat transfer intensification by increasing vapor flow rate in flat heat pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprinceana, Silviu; Mihai, Ioan; Beniuga, Marius; Suciu, Cornel

    2015-02-01

    Flat heat pipes have various technical applications, one of the most important being the cooling of electronic components[9]. Their continuous development is due to the fact that these devices permit heat transfer without external energetic contribution. The practical exploitation of flat heat pipes however is limited by the fact that dissipated power can only reach a few hundred watts. The present paper aims to advance a new method for the intensification of convective heat transfer. A centrifugal mini impeller, driven by a turntable which incorporates four permanent magnets was designed. These magnets are put in motion by another rotor, which in its turn includes two permanent magnets and is driven by a mini electrical motor. Rotation of the centrifugal blades generates speed and pressure increase of the cooling agent brought to vapor state within the flat micro heat pipe. It's well known that the liquid suffers biphasic transformations during heat transfer inside the heat pipe. Over the hotspot (the heat source being the electronic component) generated at one end of the heat pipe, convective heat transfer occurs, leading to sudden vaporization of the liquid. Pressures generated by newly formed vapors push them towards the opposite end of the flat heat pipe, where a finned mini heat sink is usually placed. The mini-heat exchanger is air-cooled, thus creating a cold spot, where vapors condensate. The proposed method contributes to vapor flow intensification by increasing their transport speed and thus leading to more intense cooling of the heat pipe.

  18. Can differences in heat flow between east and southern Africa be easily interpreted?: Implications for understanding regional variability in continental heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyblade, Andrew A.; Pollack, Henry N.

    1993-03-01

    We address the extent to which regional variations in continental heat flow can be interpreted, making use of a heat flow data set from east and southern Africa. The first-order observation deriving from these heat flow measurements is a common pattern characterized in both regions by low heat flow in Archean cratons and higher heat flow in younger mobile belts. Two regional differences between east and southern Africa are superimposed on this common heat flow pattern: (1) heat flow in the Tanzania Craton is about 13 mW m -2 lower than in the Kalahari Craton, and (2) heat flow in the Mozambique Belt in east Africa is about 9 mW m -2 lower than in the southern African mobile belts, within about 250 km of the respective Archean cratons. The differences in heat flow between east and southern Africa suggest that the thermal structure of the lithosphere beneath these regions differs somewhat, and we attempt to resolve these differences in lithospheric thermal structure by examining four explanations that could account for the heat flow observations: (1) diminished heat flow in shallow boreholes in east Africa; (2) less crustal heat production in the regions of lower heat flow; (3) thicker lithosphere beneath the regions of lower heat flow; (4) cooler mantle beneath the areas of lower heat flow. We find it difficult to interpret uniquely the heat flow differences between east and southern Africa because available constraints on crustal heat production, crustal structure, lithospheric thickness and mantle temperatures are insufficient to discriminate among the possible explanations. Hence, extracting significant information about lithospheric thermal structure from regional heat flow variations requires more ancillary geochemical and geophysical information than Africa presently offers.

  19. Heat Flow and Segregation in Directional Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, A. F.

    1985-01-01

    This research is composed of three major components: (1) development of interface morphology control for automated Bridgman growth of semiconductor systems; (2) comparative analysis of segregation during crystal growth in a reduced gravity environment and in the presence of magnetic fields; and (3) consequences of seeding by meltback in Bridgman growth under reduced gravity conditions. In attempts to optimize furnace design for crystal growth in a reduced gravity environment, an analytical approach to heat transfer was developed. It was thus found that charge confining crucibles diminish the ability to control the growth interface morphology through its position within the gradient zone. A heat pipe hot zone system for Bridgman growth, in reduced gravity environment, of crystal with diameters up to 16 mm was developed. For growth of Ga-doped germanium in the multipurpose (ASTP) furnace, it was found that the application of transverse magnetic fields (up to 36 kg) does not substantially increase the effective distribution coefficient; i.e., diffusion-controlled segregation observed in reduced gravity environment cannot be reached nor approached by magnetic field induced melt stabilization.

  20. Heat transfer analysis for peripheral blood flow measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Koji; Hattori, Hideharu; Sato, Nobuhiko; Ichige, Yukiko; Kiguchi, Masashi

    2009-06-01

    Some disorders such as circulatory disease and metabolic abnormality cause many problems to peripheral blood flow condition. Therefore, frequent measurement of the blood flow condition is bound to contribute to precaution against those disorders and to control of conditions of the diseases. We propose a convenient means of blood flow volume measurement at peripheral part, such as fingertips. Principle of this measurement is based on heat transfer characteristics of peripheral part containing the blood flow. Transition response analysis of skin surface temperature has provided measurement model of the peripheral blood flow volume. We developed the blood flow measurement system based on that model and evaluated it by using artificial finger under various temperature conditions of ambience and internal fluid. The evaluation results indicated that proposed method could estimate the volume of the fluid regardless of temperature condition of them. Finally we applied our system to real finger testing and have obtained results correlated well with laser Doppler blood flow meter values.

  1. Heat production in an Archean crustal profile and implications for heat flow and mobilization of heat-producing elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, L. D.; Morgan, P.; Kelley, S. A.; Percival, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    Concentrations of heat producing elements (Th, U, and K) in 58 samples representative of the main lithologies in a 100-km transect of the Superior Province of the Canadian Shield have been obtained. The relatively large variation in heat production found among the silicic plutonic rocks is shown to correlate with modal abundances of accessory minerals, and these variations are interpreted as premetamorphic. The present data suggest fundamental differences in crustal radioactivity distributions between granitic and more mafic terrains, and indicate that a previously determined apparently linear heat flow-heat production relationship for the Kapuskasing area does not relate to the distribution of heat production with depth.

  2. Heat treatment of organic polymers in a flow of a gaseous heat carrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuravskii, G. I.; Vinogradov, L. M.; Greben'kov, A. Zh.; Drozdov, V. N.; Egorov, N. N.

    1996-11-01

    Processes of heat and mass transfer are studied during heat treatment of organic polymers in a superheated-steam flow. Promising environmentally safe engineering processes of treatment of plant biomass, plastics, and rubber wastes that contain petroleum products of sludges and soils are described.

  3. Influence of two-phase flow characteristic on critical heat flux in low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Akira; Lee, Sangryoul

    1996-08-01

    Estimation of the critical heat flux (CHF) in a boiling two-phase flow is one of the important subjects for the safety of water-cooled reactors and other energy systems. In the case of a boiling two-phase flow at low pressure, flow pattern and void fraction are easy to change by the power input and the flow becomes more complex due to low density of gas phase. The CHF is affected by the flow pattern. In this study, the CHFs were measured over wide quality range from the subcooled boiling to the annular-mist flow. By using Pyrex glass tube as a test channel, the two-phase flow situation was observed. Graphite rod or stainless steel tube was used as a heater rod and installed at the center of the glass tube. Two-phase flow was formed by steam injection to circulating water at an upstream region of the test section. The flow pattern was kept nearly constant over the length of test section due to the low input power density into the fluid. Then, the characteristics of CHF could be investigated at each flow patterns of bubbly, slug, annular and annular-mist flow. In the subcooled boiling region of bubbly flow, the CHF decreased with increase of quality and was less sensitive to flow rate. In the slug flow region, the CHF showed a minimum value. With more increase of quality in the annular flow, the CHF increased and reached a peak value at a certain quality depending on a flow rate. The peak of CHF occurred almost at a constant vapor mass velocity. In the annular-mist flow region, the CHF decreased with increase of quality. In the region, the effect of heated length on the CHF was systematically measured and validity of an analytical model considering dryout of liquid film based on formation of a dry patch was investigated.

  4. Transient pipe flow derived by periodic heat release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Zun; Celik, Ismail

    The heat release resulting from chemical reactions in a combustor/tail pipe system usually induces an instability in the gas flow. This instability may lead to a stable periodic motion under certain combinations of combustion heat release and combustor geometry. This paper reports a numerical study of the unsteady (periodic) gas flow which is driven by a periodic heat release prescribed empirically. The one-dimensional transient equations of motion and energy are derived by integration from the more general two-dimensional equations. The combustion heat release is added to the energy equation as a source term. These equations are solved using the explicit, predictor-corrector method of MacCormack. Some predictions are compared with measurements. The effects of the wall friction, heat transfer, and the amplitude and frequency of combustion heat release on the velocity and pressure waves are investigated. The results indicate that pulsation amplitude is a strong function of the heat release rate and it shows a maximum near an equivalence ratio value of one, where the heat release is near its maximum; this is in conformity with the experimental data. A method for calculating the natural operation frequency of pulse combustor is suggested.

  5. Terrestrial heat flow in the North Island of New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Om Prakash

    1981-07-01

    Large variations in terrestrial heat flow from 21 to 209 mW/m 2 have been observed over the North Island, New Zealand. This is generally in good agreement with the pattern of existing geological and geophysical observations. A high heat flow zone with a value of 92 ±3 mW/m 2, which corresponds to melting temperatures near the base of the crust, is delineated in the northern part of the Taranaki Basin. In the rest of the island, heat flow appears to be low to normal, but some isolated high values are also found. Observed results are interpreted in terms of crust and mantle structure in a region of plate subduction.

  6. Relativistic Pulsar Winds with Pressure Anisotropy and Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenbarge, Jason; Hazeltine, Richard; Mahajan, Swadesh

    2008-11-01

    A newly developed covariant fluid model for magnetized plasmas, incorporating anisotropy in both temperature and heat flow, is used to study equatorial radial profiles of density, velocity, magnetic field, pressure, and heat flow in the hot, strongly magnetized wind region beyond the light cylinder of pulsar magnetospheres. Radiative losses are assumed to have isotropized the wind region plasma so that PP. Fluid velocities are taken as mildly relativistic, while temperatures are ultra-relativistic. This study of pulsar magnetospheres extends the work by Tsikarishvili et al. to a more general fluid closure including heat flow. The general covariant fluid model in spherical geometry and equations of state for arbitrary temperature will also be presented for more general applicability. J. M. TenBarge, R. D. Hazeltine, and S. M. Mahajan, Phys. Plasmas 15, 062112 (2008)., E. G. Tsikarishvili, A. D. Rogava, and D. G. Tsiklauri, Ap. J. 439, 822 (1995).

  7. Heat transfer from cylinders in subsonic slip flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagabushana, K. A.; Stainback, P. C.

    1992-01-01

    The heat transfer in heated wires was measured using a constant temperature anemometer over a Mach number range from 0.05 to 0.4 and pressures from 0.5 to 8.0 atmospheres. The total temperature ranged from 80 to 120 F and the wire diameters were 0.00015, 0.00032, and 0.00050 inch. The heat transfer data is presented in the form of a corrected Nusselt number. Based on suggested criteria, much of the data was obtained in the slip flow regime. Therefore, the data is compared with data having comparable flow conditions. The possible application of the heat transfer data to hot wire anemometry is discussed. To this end, the sensitivity of the wires to velocity, density, and total temperature is computed and compared using two different types of correlations.

  8. Modelling of fluid flow and heat transfer in a reciprocating compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuhovcak, J.; Hejcik, J.; Jicha, M.

    2015-08-01

    Efficiency of reciprocating compressor is strongly dependent on several parameters. The most important are valve behaviour and heat transfer. Valves affect the flow through the suction and discharge line. Heat flow from the walls to working fluid increases the work of the cycle. Understanding of these phenomena inside the compressor is a necessary step in the development process. Commercial CFD tools offer wide range of opportunities how to simulate the flow inside the reciprocating compressor nowadays, however they are too demanding in terms of computational time and mesh creation. Several approaches using various correlation equation exist to describe the heat transfer inside the cylinder, however none of them was validated by measurements due to the complicated settings. The goal of this paper is to show a comparison between these correlations using in-house code based on energy balance through the cycle.

  9. Flow pattern and heat transfer behavior of boiling two-phase flow in inclined pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dezhang; Ning, Ouyang

    1992-09-01

    Movable Electrical Conducting Probe (MECP), a kind of simple and reliable measuring transducer, used for predicting full-flow-path flow pattern in a boiling vapor/liquid two-phase flow is introduced in this paper. When the test pipe is set at different inclination angles, several kinds of flow patterns, such as bubble, slug, churn, intermittent, and annular flows, may be observed in accordance with the locations of MECP. By means of flow pattern analysis, flow field numerical calculations have been carried out, and heat transfer coefficient correlations along full-flow-path derived. The results show that heat transfer performance of boiling two-phase flow could be significantly augmented as expected in some flow pattern zones. The results of the investigation, measuring techniques and conclusions contained in this paper would be a useful reference in foundational research for prediction of flow pattern and heat transfer behavior in boiling two-phase flow, as well as for turbine vane liquid-cooling design.

  10. Performance evaluation on an air-cooled heat exchanger for alumina nanofluid under laminar flow

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the characteristics of alumina (Al2O3)/water nanofluid to determine the feasibility of its application in an air-cooled heat exchanger for heat dissipation for PEMFC or electronic chip cooling. The experimental sample was Al2O3/water nanofluid produced by the direct synthesis method at three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt.%). The experiments in this study measured the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluid with weight fractions and sample temperatures (20-60°C), and then used the nanofluid in an actual air-cooled heat exchanger to assess its heat exchange capacity and pressure drop under laminar flow. Experimental results show that the nanofluid has a higher heat exchange capacity than water, and a higher concentration of nanoparticles provides an even better ratio of the heat exchange. The maximum enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop for all the experimental parameters in this study was about 39% and 5.6%, respectively. In addition to nanoparticle concentration, the temperature and mass flow rates of the working fluid can affect the enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop of nanofluid. The cross-section aspect ratio of tube in the heat exchanger is another important factor to be taken into consideration. PMID:21827644

  11. Performance evaluation on an air-cooled heat exchanger for alumina nanofluid under laminar flow.

    PubMed

    Teng, Tun-Ping; Hung, Yi-Hsuan; Teng, Tun-Chien; Chen, Jyun-Hong

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the characteristics of alumina (Al2O3)/water nanofluid to determine the feasibility of its application in an air-cooled heat exchanger for heat dissipation for PEMFC or electronic chip cooling. The experimental sample was Al2O3/water nanofluid produced by the direct synthesis method at three different concentrations (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 wt.%). The experiments in this study measured the thermal conductivity and viscosity of nanofluid with weight fractions and sample temperatures (20-60°C), and then used the nanofluid in an actual air-cooled heat exchanger to assess its heat exchange capacity and pressure drop under laminar flow. Experimental results show that the nanofluid has a higher heat exchange capacity than water, and a higher concentration of nanoparticles provides an even better ratio of the heat exchange. The maximum enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop for all the experimental parameters in this study was about 39% and 5.6%, respectively. In addition to nanoparticle concentration, the temperature and mass flow rates of the working fluid can affect the enhanced ratio of heat exchange and pressure drop of nanofluid. The cross-section aspect ratio of tube in the heat exchanger is another important factor to be taken into consideration. PMID:21827644

  12. A Model of Solar Radiation and Joule Heating in Flow of Third Grade Nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Tariq; Hayat, Tasawar; Shehzad, Sabir Ali; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Chen, Bin

    2015-03-01

    The flow problem resulting from the stretching of a surface with convective conditions in a magnetohydrodynamic nanofluid with solar radiation is examined. Both heat and nanoparticle mass transfer convective conditions are employed. An incompressible third grade fluid which exhibits shear thinning and shear thickening characteristics is used as a base fluid. Concept of convective nanoparticle mass condition is introduced. Effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis on magnetohydrodynamic flow of nanofluid are accounted in the presence of thermal radiation. Energy equation incorporates the features of Joule heating. The impact of physical parameters on the temperature and nanoparticle concentration has been pointed out. Numerical values of skin-friction coefficient are presented and analysed. It is hoped that this present investigation serves as a stimulus for the next generation of solar film collectors, heat exchangers technology, material processing, geothermal energy storage, and all those processes which are highly affected by the heat enhancement concept.

  13. Channel orientation and geometry influence on heat transfer with two-phase forced flow of nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimenko, V. V.; Fyodorov, M. V.; Fomichyov, Yu. A.

    The results of an investigation of tube diameter and orientation influence on two-phase forced flow heat transfer of nitrogen are presented. In vertical channels a diameter effect is revealed in a transition from convective to less intensive nucleate boiling when the Froude number of a mixture, Fr m = w m(gd) - 1/2 decreases from 40 to 10. On the contrary, in horizontal non-stratified flow, the reduction of the Frm number is accompanied by heat transfer enhancement in the upper part of the channel because of the formation of a thin liquid film there. This leads to a notable increase (20-30%), averaged over the cross-section, of heat transfer coefficient in the nucleate boiling region. If Frm ≳ 40 then geometry and orientation do not affect the heat transfer coefficient which can be calculated using the Klimenko correlation.

  14. The Detectability of Heat Flow Signatures on Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paige, D. A.; Hayne, P. O.; Spencer, J. R.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Bennett, K. A.; Mellon, M. T.; Bandfield, J. L.; Aharonson, O.

    2014-12-01

    Europa is planetary body with a young, tectonically active ice shell and a subsurface liquid water ocean. These characteristics make it one of the most promising places in the solar system to search for extant life beyond Earth. Conventional wisdom dictates that temperatures at the surface of Europa's ice shell are not expected to exceed 130K, which is well below the stability temperature of liquid water or brines. However, the regional or local-scale surface temperatures on Europa could be elevated due to regional or local scale heat flow anomalies as manifested by regional variations in tidal heating, recent cracks in the ice shell, or episodic eruptive plumes. Using a sophisticated ray-tracing thermal model developed for the moon and Mercury, we have explored the potential detectability of a range of heat flow anomalies on Europa from remote sensing measurements of the thermal emission and solar reflection from the Europa's surface. We find that the thermal emission signatures of potential heat flow anomalies can be differentiated from those caused by topography, roughness, exposed ice blocks and Jupiter shine. We further quantify the requirements for accuracy and signal-to-noise, as well as the requirements, for spatial, spectral and diurnal coverage, and conclude that heat flow signatures from sites of recent plume activity should be readily detectable, even if they are not currently active.

  15. Pressure Gradient Effects on Hypersonic Cavity Flow Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Merski, N. Ronald; Wood, William A.; Prabhu, Ramdas K.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of a pressure gradient on the local heating disturbance of rectangular cavities tested at hypersonic freestream conditions has been globally assessed using the two-color phosphor thermography method. These experiments were conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and were initiated in support of the Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Program. Two blunted-nose test surface geometries were developed, including an expansion plate test surface with nearly constant negative pressure gradient and a flat plate surface with nearly zero pressure gradient. The test surface designs and flow characterizations were performed using two-dimensional laminar computational methods, while the experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred using the measured heating distributions. Three-dimensional computational predictions of the entire model geometry were used as a check on the design process. Both open-flow and closed-flow cavities were tested on each test surface. The cavity design parameters and the test condition matrix were established using the computational predictions. Preliminary conclusions based on an analysis of only the cavity centerline data indicate that the presence of the pressure gradient did not alter the open cavity heating for laminar-entry/laminar-exit flows, but did raise the average floor heating for closed cavities. The results of these risk-reduction studies will be used to formulate a heating assessment of potential damage scenarios occurring during future Space Shuttle flights.

  16. Pressure Gradient Effects on Hypersonic Cavity Flow Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Alter, Stephen J.; Merski, N. Ronald; Wood, William A.; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of a pressure gradient on the local heating disturbance of rectangular cavities tested at hypersonic freestream conditions has been globally assessed using the two-color phosphor thermography method. These experiments were conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and were initiated in support of the Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Program. Two blunted-nose test surface geometries were developed, including an expansion plate test surface with nearly constant negative pressure gradient and a flat plate surface with nearly zero pressure gradient. The test surface designs and flow characterizations were performed using two-dimensional laminar computational methods, while the experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred using the measured heating distributions. Three-dimensional computational predictions of the entire model geometry were used as a check on the design process. Both open-flow and closed-flow cavities were tested on each test surface. The cavity design parameters and the test condition matrix were established using the computational predictions. Preliminary conclusions based on an analysis of only the cavity centerline data indicate that the presence of the pressure gradient did not alter the open cavity heating for laminar-entry/laminar-exit flows, but did raise the average floor heating for closed cavities. The results of these risk-reduction studies will be used to formulate a heating assessment of potential damage scenarios occurring during future Space Shuttle flights.

  17. Prediction of strongly-heated internal gas flows

    SciTech Connect

    McEligot, D.M. ||; Shehata, A.M.; Kunugi, Tomoaki |

    1997-12-31

    The purposes of the present article are to remind practitioners why the usual textbook approaches may not be appropriate for treating gas flows heated from the surface with large heat fluxes and to review the successes of some recent applications of turbulence models to this case. Simulations from various turbulence models have been assessed by comparison to the measurements of internal mean velocity and temperature distributions by Shehata for turbulent, laminarizing and intermediate flows with significant gas property variation. Of about fifteen models considered, five were judged to provide adequate predictions.

  18. Heat flow and geothermal studies in the state of Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, D.D.; Steele, J.L.; Kelley, S.A.

    1985-08-01

    Existing geothermal gradient and heat flow data for the state of Washington are summarized. In addition, information on mean-annual ground surface temperatures is included. The data consist of accurate, detailed temperature-depth measurements in selected available holes throughout the state of Washington made between 1979 and 1982. Measurements of thermal conductivity on selected rock samples from these drill holes and ancillary information required to assess the significance of the data and calculate heat flow values were obtained as well. Information is presented on the mean-annual ground-surface temperatures throughout the state of Washington. 32 refs., 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Temperature-gated thermal rectifier for active heat flow control.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jia; Hippalgaonkar, Kedar; Shen, Sheng; Wang, Kevin; Abate, Yohannes; Lee, Sangwook; Wu, Junqiao; Yin, Xiaobo; Majumdar, Arun; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-08-13

    Active heat flow control is essential for broad applications of heating, cooling, and energy conversion. Like electronic devices developed for the control of electric power, it is very desirable to develop advanced all-thermal solid-state devices that actively control heat flow without consuming other forms of energy. Here we demonstrate temperature-gated thermal rectification using vanadium dioxide beams in which the environmental temperature actively modulates asymmetric heat flow. In this three terminal device, there are two switchable states, which can be regulated by global heating. In the "Rectifier" state, we observe up to 28% thermal rectification. In the "Resistor" state, the thermal rectification is significantly suppressed (<1%). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of solid-state active-thermal devices with a large rectification in the Rectifier state. This temperature-gated rectifier can have substantial implications ranging from autonomous thermal management of heating and cooling systems to efficient thermal energy conversion and storage. PMID:25010206

  20. Heat flow and energetics of the San Andreas fault zone.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lachenbruch, A.H.; Sass, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    Approximately 100 heat flow measurements in the San Andreas fault zone indicate 1) there is no evidence for local frictional heating of the main fault trace at any latitude over a 1000-km length from Cape Mendocino to San Bernardino, 2) average heat flow is high (ca.2 HFU, ca.80 mW m-2) throughout the 550-km segment of the Coast Ranges that encloses the San Andreas fault zone in central California; this broad anomaly falls off rapidly toward the Great Valley to the east, and over a 200-km distance toward the Mendocino Triple Junction to the northwest. As others have pointed out, a local conductive heat flow anomaly would be detectable unless the frictional resistance allocated to heat production on the main trace were less than 100 bars. Frictional work allocated to surface energy of new fractures is probably unimportant, and hydrologic convection is not likely to invalidate the conduction assumption, since the heat discharge by thermal springs near the fault is negligible. -Authors

  1. Heat transfer enhancement and vortex flow structure over a heated cylinder oscillating in the crossflow direction

    SciTech Connect

    Gau, C.; Wu, J.M.; Liang, C.Y.

    1999-11-01

    Experiments are performed to study the flow structure and heat transfer over a heated oscillating cylinder. Both flow visualization using a smoke wire and local heat transfer measurements around the cylinder were made. The excitation frequencies of the cylinder are selected at F{sub e}/F{sub n} = 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, and 3. These include excitations at harmonic, subharmonic, superharmonic, and non harmonic frequencies. Synchronization of vortex shedding with the cylinder excitation occurs not only at F{sub e}/F{sub n} = 1 but also at F{sub e}/F{sub n} = 3, which can greatly enhance the heat transfer. The simultaneous enhancement of heat transfer at the stagnation point, its downstream region, and the wake region of the flow suggests that different modes of instabilities occurring in the shear layer of the near wake are actually initiated and amplified far upstream in the stagnation point, which were suppressed in the accelerated flow region and re-amplified in the decelerated flow region. As long as the dominant mode of the instability is amplified by the excitation of cylinder, enhancement of heat transfer can be obtained. During the experiments, the Reynolds numbers vary from 1,600 to 4,800, the ratios of oscillation amplitude to diameter of the cylinder from 0.064 to 0.016.

  2. Fluid flow and heat convection studies for actively cooled airframes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, A. F.

    1992-01-01

    The work done during the progress report period from May-October 1992 is summarized. The effect of wall thermal boundary conditions on flows over a step or rib when repeated rib roughness is used for heating augmentation is examined. In numerical investigations of various such laminar and turbulent flows, the local heat transfer coefficients on a forward-facing step or on a rib were found to be very sensitive to the wall thermal boundary condition. For the computation of constant property laminar flow, the wall thermal boundary conditions were either a uniform heat flux or a uniform temperature. Results (Nusselt number and isotherms) of the studies are included. The second part of the work consisted of using PHOENICS to solve the conjugate heat transfer problem of flow over a rib in channel. Finally, the algebraic stress model in the TEAM (Turbulent Elliptic Algorithm-Manchester) code was tested for jet impingement flow, but there needs to be an addition of the energy equation to the code.

  3. Incorporation of Condensation Heat Transfer in a Flow Network Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, Miranda; Majumdar, Alok; McConnaughey, Paul K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we have investigated the condensation of water vapor in a short tube. A numerical model of condensation heat transfer was incorporated in a flow network code. The flow network code that we have used in this paper is Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). GFSSP is a finite volume based flow network code. Four different condensation models were presented in the paper. Soliman's correlation has been found to be the most stable in low flow rates which is of particular interest in this application. Another highlight of this investigation is conjugate or coupled heat transfer between solid or fluid. This work was done in support of NASA's International Space Station program.

  4. Marangoni mixed convection flow with Joule heating and nonlinear radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hayat, Tasawar; Shaheen, Uzma; Shafiq, Anum; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Asghar, Saleem

    2015-07-15

    Marangoni mixed convective flow of Casson fluid in a thermally stratified medium is addressed. Flow analysis has been carried out in presence of inclined magnetic field. Heat transfer analysis is discussed in the presence of viscous dissipation, Joule heating and nonlinear thermal radiation. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are first converted into ordinary differential systems and then developed the convergent series solutions. Flow pattern with the influence of pertinent parameters namely the magnetic parameter, Casson fluid parameter, temperature ratio parameter, stratification parameter, Prandtl number, Eckert number and radiation parameter is investigated. Expression of local Nusselt number is computed and analyzed. It is found that the Nusselt number decreases by increasing magnetic parameter, temperature ratio parameter, angle of inclination and stratification parameter. Moreover the effect of buoyancy parameter on the velocity distribution is opposite in both the opposing and assisting flow phenomena. Thermal field and associated layer thickness are enhanced for larger radiation parameter.

  5. Experimental investigation of flow and heating in a resonance tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarohia, V.; Back, L. H.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments have been performed to determine the basic mechanism of heating in resonance tubes of square section with constant area excited by underexpanded jet flows. The jet flow between the nozzle exit and the tube inlet plays a key role in the performance of a resonance tube. A detailed and systematic investigation of the unsteady complex shock structure in this part of the flow region has led to a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms associated with the gas heating in such tubes. A study of the effects of tube location in relation to free-jet shock location (without the presence of the resonance tube) has shed further light on the underlying mechanism of sustained oscillations of the flow in a resonance tube.

  6. Can fault slip affect vitrinite reflectance without heat?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, P. M.; Kitamura, M.; Mukoyoshi, H.; Hirose, T.

    2012-12-01

    increased displacement. However, this very small increase is within the standard deviation amongst measurements and is not likely significant. In addition, the spatial distribution of Rmax, Rmin, and anisotropy values all appear randomly distributed within the thin sections and do not appear concentrated in zones of strain localization. Our results suggest that, at least for clay dominated gouge zones, there is essentially no non-thermal effect on vitrinite reflectance under a reasonable range of slip rates and displacements typical of earthquakes and for conditions likely applicable for the shallow toe of subduction zones where IODP fault zone cores have recently been obtained (e.g., Nankai and Japan Trench). Observations of increases in R in such locations would thus likely reflect the effects of frictional heating, although how the mechanical effects of shearing combined with fast heating may affect the kinetics requires further evaluation in order to accurately assess peak temperature values.

  7. Understanding heat and fluid flow in linear GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1992-12-31

    A transient heat flow and fluid flow model was used to predict the development of gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld pools in 1.5 mm thick AISI 304 SS. The welding parameters were chosen so as to correspond to an earlier experimental study which produced high-resolution surface temperature maps. The motivation of the present study was to verify the predictive capability of the computational model. Comparison of the numerical predictions and experimental observations indicate good agreement.

  8. Understanding heat and fluid flow in linear GTA welds

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharia, T.; David, S.A.; Vitek, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    A transient heat flow and fluid flow model was used to predict the development of gas tungsten arc (GTA) weld pools in 1.5 mm thick AISI 304 SS. The welding parameters were chosen so as to correspond to an earlier experimental study which produced high-resolution surface temperature maps. The motivation of the present study was to verify the predictive capability of the computational model. Comparison of the numerical predictions and experimental observations indicate good agreement.

  9. Gas flow environmental and heat transfer nonrotating 3D program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geil, T.; Steinhoff, J.

    1983-01-01

    A complete set of benchmark quality data for the flow and heat transfer within a large rectangular turning duct is being compiled. These data will be used to evaluate and verify three dimensional internal viscous flow models and computational codes. The analytical objective is to select such a computational code and define the capabilities of this code to predict the experimental results. Details of the proper code operation will be defined and improvements to the code modeling capabilities will be formulated.

  10. Proceedings of heat transfer and flow in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Somerton, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    The topic of heat transfer and flow in porous media continues to be the focus of considerable research efforts. Certainly, this is partly due to the wide application of porous materials in engineering systems as well as the novel application of a porous media model to a variety of engineering problems. The work presented in this volume deals with such applications as papermaking, insulation materials, heat pipes, buried heating systems, tumor treatment, and cooling of microelectronics. This volume contains a nice mixture of experimental and computational approaches to problems and should provide the reader with a sense of the current state-of-the-art in porous media research.

  11. Oscillatory/Chaotic Thermocapillary Flow Induced by Radiant Heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, Kenneth J.

    1998-01-01

    There is a continuing need to understand the fluid physics occurring under low gravity conditions in processes such as crystal growth, materials processing, and the movement of bubbles or droplets. The fluid flow in such situations is often caused by a gradient in interfacial tension. If a temperature gradient is created due to a heat source, the resulting flow is called thermocapillary flow, a special case of Marangoni Convection. In this study, an experimental investigation was conducted using silicone oil in cylindrical containers with a laser heat source at the free surface. It was desired to determine the conditions under which steady, axisymmetrical thermocapillary flow becomes unstable and oscillatory three-dimensional flow states develop. The critical Marangoni number for each observed oscillatory state was measured as a function of the container aspect ratio and the dynamic Bond number, a measure of buoyant force versus ii thermocapillary force. Various oscillatory modes were observed during three- dimensional convection, and chaotic flow was reached in one test condition. The critical Marangoni numbers are compared with those measured in previous studies, and the power spectra and phase trajectories of the instantaneous surface temperature distributions are used to characterize the routes of transitions to the chaotic flow state. Results show that only superharmonic modes appear in the routes to chaos while infinite number of subharmonic modes occur in flow transitions for pure Rayleigh convection.

  12. Heat Transfer to Longitudinal Laminar Flow Between Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparrow, Ephraim M.; Loeffler, Albert L. Jr.; Hubbard, H. A.

    1960-01-01

    Consideration is given to the fully developed heat transfer characteristics for longitudinal laminar flow between cylinders arranged in an equilateral triangular array. The analysis is carried out for the condition of uniform heat transfer per unit length. Solutions are obtained for the temperature distribution, and from these, Nusselt numbers are derived for a wide range of spacing-to-diameter ratios. It is found that as the spacing ratio increases, so also does the wall-to-bulk temperature difference for a fixed heat transfer per unit length. Corresponding to a uniform surface temperature around the circumference of a cylinder, the circumferential variation of the local heat flux is computed. For spacing ratios of 1.5 - 2.0 and greater, uniform peripheral wall temperature and uniform peripheral heat flux are simultaneously achieved. A simplified analysis which neglects circumferential variations is also carried out, and the results are compared with those from the more exact formulation.

  13. EFFECT OF HORIZONTALLY INHOMOGENEOUS HEATING ON FLOW AND MAGNETIC FIELD IN THE CHROMOSPHERE OF THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Song, P.; Vasyliūnas, V. M.

    2014-12-01

    The solar chromosphere is heated by damped Alfvén waves propagating upward from the photosphere at a rate that depends on magnetic field strength, producing enhanced heating at low altitudes in the extended weak-field regions (where the additional heating accounts for the radiative losses) between the boundaries of the chromospheric network as well as enhanced heating per particle at higher altitudes in strong magnetic field regions of the network. The resulting inhomogeneous radiation and temperature distribution produces bulk flows, which in turn affect the configuration of the magnetic field. The basic flow pattern is circulation on the spatial scale of a supergranule, with upward flow in the strong-field region; this is a mirror image in the upper chromosphere of photospheric/subphotospheric convection widely associated with the formation of the strong network field. There are significant differences between the neutral and the ionized components of the weakly ionized medium: neutral flow streamlines can form closed cells, whereas plasma is largely constrained to flow along the magnetic field. Stresses associated with this differential flow may explain why the canopy/funnel structures of the network magnetic field have a greater horizontal extent and are relatively more homogeneous at high altitudes than is expected from simple current-free models.

  14. Effect of Horizontally Inhomogeneous Heating on Flow and Magnetic Field in the Chromosphere of the Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, P.; Vasyliūnas, V. M.

    2014-12-01

    The solar chromosphere is heated by damped Alfvén waves propagating upward from the photosphere at a rate that depends on magnetic field strength, producing enhanced heating at low altitudes in the extended weak-field regions (where the additional heating accounts for the radiative losses) between the boundaries of the chromospheric network as well as enhanced heating per particle at higher altitudes in strong magnetic field regions of the network. The resulting inhomogeneous radiation and temperature distribution produces bulk flows, which in turn affect the configuration of the magnetic field. The basic flow pattern is circulation on the spatial scale of a supergranule, with upward flow in the strong-field region; this is a mirror image in the upper chromosphere of photospheric/subphotospheric convection widely associated with the formation of the strong network field. There are significant differences between the neutral and the ionized components of the weakly ionized medium: neutral flow streamlines can form closed cells, whereas plasma is largely constrained to flow along the magnetic field. Stresses associated with this differential flow may explain why the canopy/funnel structures of the network magnetic field have a greater horizontal extent and are relatively more homogeneous at high altitudes than is expected from simple current-free models.

  15. Microgravity Two-phase Flow and Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Kamiel

    2006-12-01

    Multiphase thermal systems (involving more than one phase or one component) have numerous applications in aerospace, heat-exchanger, transport of contaminants in environmental systems, and energy transport and energy conversion systems. Advances in understanding the behaviour of multiphase thermal systems could lead to higher efficiency energy production systems, improved heat-exchanger design, and safer and enhanced treatment of hazardous waste. But such advances have been greatly hindered by the strong effect of gravitational acceleration on the flow. Depending on the flow orientation and the phase velocities, gravitational forces could significantly alter the flow regime, and hence the pressure-drop and heat-transfer coefficients associated with the flow. A reduced gravity environment (or "microgravity"), provides an excellent tool to study the flow without the masking effects of gravity. This book presents for the first time a comprehensive coverage of all aspects of two-phase flow behaviour in the virtual absence of gravity. Link: http://www.springer.com/east/home?SGWID=5-102-22-173662745-0&changeHeader=true

  16. Io's heat flow from infrared radiometry: 1983-1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, Glenn J.; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Blaney, Diana L.; Goguen, Jay D.

    1994-01-01

    We report the following results from a decade of infrared radiometry of Io: (1) The average global heat flow is more than approx. 2.5 W/sq.m, (2) large warm (less than or equal to 200 K) volcanic regions dominate the global heat flow, (3) smal high-temperature (greater than or = 300 K) 'hotspots' contribute little to the average heat flow, (4) thermal anomalies on the leading hemisphere contribute about half of the heat flow, (5) a substantial amount of heat is radiated during Io's night, (6) high-temperature (greater than or = 600 K) 'outbursts' occurred during approx. 4% of the nights we observed, (7) 'Loki' is the brightest, persistent, infrared emission feature, and (8) some excess emission is always present at the longitude of Loki, but its intensity and other characteristics change between apparitions. Observations of Io at M(4.8 micrometer), 8.7 micrometer, N(10 micrometer), and Q(20 micrometer) with the Infrared Telescope Facility presented here were collected during nine apparitions between 1983 and 1993. These measurements provide full longitudinal coveraged as well as an eclipse observation and the detection of two outbursts. Reflected sunlight, passive thermal emission, and radiation from thermal anomalies all contribute to the observed flux densities. We find that a new thermophysical model is required to match all the data. Two key elements of this model are (1) a 'thermal reservoir' unit which lowers daytime temperatures, and (2) the 'thermal pedestal effect' which shifts to shorter wavelengths the spectral emission due to the reradiation of solar energy absorbed by the thermal anomalies. The thermal anomalies are modeled with a total of 10 source components at five locations. Io's heat flow is the sum of the power from these components.

  17. Enhanced Phase Synchronization of Blood Flow Oscillations between Heated and Adjacent Non-heated Sacral Skin

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fuyuan; Jan, Yih-Kuen

    2012-01-01

    The study of skin microcirculation may be used to assess risk for pressure ulcers. It is observed that local heating not only causes an increase in blood flow of the heated skin but also in the adjacent non-heated skin. The underlying physiological mechanism of this indirect vasodilation of the non-heated skin remains unclear. We hypothesized that blood flow oscillations (BFO) in the adjacent non-heated skin area synchronize with BFO in the heated skin, thus inducing a vasodilatory response. We investigated BFO in the heated and adjacent non-heated skin (12.1±1.2 cm distance) on the sacrum in 12 healthy participants. The ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) was used to decompose blood flow signals into a set of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs), and the IMFs with power spectra over the frequency range of 0.0095–0.02 Hz, 0.02–0.05 Hz, and 0.05–0.15 Hz were chosen as the characteristic components corresponding to metabolic, neurogenic, and myogenic regulations, respectively. Then, the instantaneous phase of the characteristic components was calculated using the Hilbert transform. From the time series of phase difference between a pair of characteristic components, the epochs of phase synchronization were detected. The results showed that myogenic and neurogenic BFO exhibit self-phase synchronization during the slower vasodilation of the heated skin. In the non-heated skin, the degree of synchronization of BFO is associated with the changes in blood flow. PMID:22936012

  18. Heat pump system and heat pump device using a constant flow reverse stirling cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Fineblum, S.S.

    1993-08-31

    A constant flow reverse Stirling cycle heat pump system is described comprising: a constant flow isothermal compression means for compressing a working gas, the compression means including a drive means, an inlet, and an outlet, and further including a cooling means to remove heat of compression from the working gas; a constant flow isothermal expansion means for expanding the working gas, the expansion means including an inlet, an outlet, and a heat source means to provide isothermal expansion of the working gas while removing heat from said heat source means; and a constant volume regenerative heat exchange means for transferring heat from compressed working gas to expanded working gas, the constant volume regenerative heat exchange means comprising: an enclosure, the enclosure containing a high pressure portion with an inlet receiving compressed working gas from the compression means outlet and with an outlet discharging cooled working gas to the expansion means inlet, a low pressure portion with an inlet receiving expanded working gas from the expansion means outlet and with an outlet discharging heated working gas to the compression means inlet, a slotted rotor in a central portion of the enclosure, the rotor containing a plurality of radially extending slots, and a plurality of radially sliding vanes mounted in the slots and extending to seal against a wall of the enclosure, wherein a first portion of the wall having a constant first radial distance from the rotor cooperates with the vanes to form a first constant volume channel defining the high pressure portion and a second portion of the wall having a constant second radial distance from the rotor cooperates with the vanes to form a second constant volume channel defining the low pressure portion; and heat transfer means in thermal contact with the high pressure portion and the low pressure portion for transferring heat from the compressed working gas to the expanded working gas.

  19. Oscillatory/chaotic thermocapillary flow induced by radiant heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, Kwang-Chung; Thompson, Robert L.; Vanzandt, David; Dewitt, Kenneth; Nash, Jon

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to conduct ground-based experiments to measure the onset conditions of oscillatory Marangoni flow in laser-heated silicone oil in a cylindrical container. For a single fluid, experimental data are presented using the aspect ratio and the dynamic Bond number. It is found that for a fixed aspect ratio, there seems to be an asymptotic limit of the dynamic Bond number beyond which no onset of flow oscillation could occur. Experimental results also suggested that there could be a lower limit of the aspect ratio below which there is no onset of oscillatory flow.

  20. Periodically developed flow and heat transfer in a ribbed duct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acharya, S.; Dutta, S.; Myrum, T. A.; Baker, R. S.

    1993-05-01

    Periodic fully developed flow and heat transfer results for a ribbed duct were obtained experimentally and numerically, using the nonlinear and standard k-epsilon turbulence models. Predicted recirculation lengths and maximum Nusselt number locations agreed well with the measured values. Both models performed poorly in the separated region just behind the ribs, where the Reynolds stresses were grossly underpredicted, the flow temperatures were overpredicted, and the mean velocity magnitudes were generally underpredicted. The local Nusselt numbers were underpredicted by both models. The nonlinear model predicted more realistic Reynolds stresses in the core flow region immediately above the ribs than the standard k-epsilon model.

  1. Azimuthal Stress and Heat Flux In Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlen, Ebru

    2016-07-01

    Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flows (RIAFs) have low radiative efficiencies and/or low accretion rates. The accreting gas may retain most of its binding energy in the form of heat. This lost energy for hot RIAFs is one of the problems heavily worked on in the literature. RIAF observations on the accretion to super massive black holes (e.g., Sagittarius A* in the center of our Galaxy) have shown that the observational data are not consistent with either advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) or Bondi models. For this reason, it is very important to theoretically comprehend the physical properties of RIAFs derived from observations with a new disk/flow model. One of the most probable candidates for definition of mass accretion and the source of excess heat energy in RIAFs is the gyroviscous modified magnetorotational instability (GvMRI). Dispersion relation is derived by using MHD equations containing heat flux term based on viscosity in the energy equation. Numerical solutions of the disk equations are done and the growth rates of the instability are calculated. This additional heat flux plays an important role in dissipation of energy. The rates of the angular momentum and heat flux which are obtained from numerical calculations of the turbulence brought about by the GVMRI are also discussed.

  2. Metals in Particulate Pollutants Affect Peak Expiratory Flow of Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yun-Chul; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Kim, Jin Hee; Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Lee, Hyun-Jung; Lee, Kwan-Hee; Yu, Seung-Do; Kim, Dae-Seon

    2007-01-01

    Background The contribution of the metal components of particulate pollutants to acute respiratory effects has not been adequately evaluated. Moreover, little is known about the effects of genetic polymorphisms of xenobiotic metabolism on pulmonary function. Objectives This study was conducted to assess lung function decrement associated with metal components in particulate pollutants and genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1. Methods We studied 43 schoolchildren who were in the 3rd to 6th grades. Each student measured peak expiratory flow rate three times a day for 42 days. Particulate air concentrations were monitored every day, and the concentrations of iron, manganese, lead, zinc, and aluminum in the particles were measured. Glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 genetic polymorphisms were determined using DNA extracted from participant buccal washings. We used a mixed linear regression model to estimate the association between peak expiratory flow rate and particulate air pollutants. Results We found significant reduction in the peak expiratory flow rate after the children’s exposure to particulate pollutants. The effect was shown most significantly 1 day after exposure to the ambient particles. Manganese and lead in the particles also reduced the peak expiratory flow rate. Genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase M1 and T1 did not significantly affect peak expiratory flow rate. Conclusions This study demonstrated that particulate pollutants and metals such as manganese and lead in the particles are associated with a decrement of peak expiratory flow rate. These effects were robust even with consideration of genetic polymorphisms of glutathione S-transferase. PMID:17431494

  3. Terrestrial heat flow and its role in petroleum geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipova, E. N.; Ivanov, I. V.; Smirnov, V. A.; Abramova, R. N.

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes an overview of mineral resources exploration survey by geothermal method based on the studies of terrestrial heat flow, anomalies varying in strike, in depth, physical behavior and in time. Applying geothermometry in oil-gas deposit exploration, based on paleotemperature modeling of sedimentation sequences was illustrated.

  4. Computational heat transfer analysis for oscillatory channel flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, Mounir; Kannapareddy, Mohan

    1993-01-01

    An accurate finite-difference scheme has been utilized to investigate oscillatory, laminar and incompressible flow between two-parallel-plates and in circular tubes. The two-parallel-plates simulate the regenerator of a free-piston Stirling engine (foil type regenerator) and the channel wall was included in the analysis (conjugate heat transfer problem). The circular tubes simulate the cooler and heater of the engine with an isothermal wall. The study conducted covered a wide range for the maximum Reynolds number (from 75 to 60,000), Valensi number (from 2.5 to 700), and relative amplitude of fluid displacement (0.714 and 1.34). The computational results indicate a complex nature of the heat flux distribution with time and axial location in the channel. At the channel mid-plane we observed two thermal cycles (out of phase with the flow) per each flow cycle. At this axial location the wall heat flux mean value, amplitude and phase shift with the flow are dependent upon the maximum Reynolds number, Valensi number and relative amplitude of fluid displacement. At other axial locations, the wall heat flux distribution is more complex.

  5. A review of the heat flow data of NE Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiozzi, Paolo; Barkaoui, Alae-Eddine; Rimi, Abdelkrim; Verdoya, Massimo; Zarhloule, Yassine

    2016-04-01

    The Atlas chain is characterised by a SW-NE trending volcanic belt roughly extending from the Atlantic to the Mediterranean Sea and showing activity that spans in age mainly from Middle Miocene to Quaternary (14.6-0.3 Ma). The geochemical features of volcanism are mostly intraplate and alkaline with the exception of the northeastern termination of the belt where calc-alkaline series crop out. Lithospheric thermal and density models so far proposed, constrained by heat flow, gravity anomalies, geoid, and topography data, show that the Atlas chain is not supported isostatically by a thickened crust and a thin, hot and low-density lithosphere explains the high topography. One of the possible explanations for lithospheric mantle thinning, possibly in relation with the observed alkaline volcanism, is thermal erosion produced by either small-scale convection or activation of a small mantle plume, forming part of a hot and deep mantle reservoir system extending from the Canary Islands. This paper focuses on the several geothermal data available in the northeastern sector of the volcanic belt. The occurrence of an extensive, often artesian, carbonatic reservoir hosting moderately hot groundwater might boost the temperature gradient in the overlying impermeable cover, and consequently mask the deep thermal regime. We therefore revised the available dataset and investigated the contribution of advection. Temperature data available from water and oil wells were reprocessed and analysed in combination with thermal conductivity measurements on a wide set of lithotypes. Data were filtered according to rigid selection criteria, and, in the deeper boreholes, the heat flow was inferred by taking into account the porosity variation with depth and the temperature effect on the matrix and pore-filling fluid conductivity. Moreover, the possible effect of advection was evaluated with simple analytical models which envisage the carbonatic layers as confined aquifers heated by the

  6. Heat transfer and flow visualization of swirling impinging jets

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    The heat transfer performance of swirling impinging jets was experimentally investigated, and the flow fields were visualized for a jet diameter, d{sub j} = 12.7 mm and swirl angles, {theta} = 15{degree}, 30{degree}, and 45{degree}. Other experimental parameters included Reynolds number, Re = 3,620--17,600, vertical jet spacing, h = 12.7--76.2 mm, and radial distance from the stagnation point, r = 0--65 mm. The results showed significant enhancement in the heat transfer coefficient, both with respect to radial uniformity and local values, compared to a circular straight impinging jet of the same dimensions at the same test conditions. The flow field visualizations confirmed the measured enhancement in the heat transfer coefficient for the swirling jets as well as the radial distribution of local Nusselt number.

  7. Flow-induced vibration of component cooling water heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, Y.S.; Chen, S.S. . Nuclear Engineering Dept.; Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of flow-induced vibration problems of component cooling water heat exchangers in one of Taipower's nuclear power stations. Specifically, it describes flow-induced vibration phenomena, tests to identify the excitation mechanisms, measurement of response characteristics, analyses to predict tube response and wear, various design alterations, and modifications of the original design. Several unique features associated with the heat exchangers are demonstrated, including energy-trapping modes, existence of tube-support-plate (TSP)-inactive modes, and fluidelastic instability of TSP-active and -inactive modes. On the basis of this evaluation, the difficulties and future research needs for the evaluation of heat exchangers are identified. 11 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Flow of superfluid helium in tubes with heated walls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, H. A.; Mord, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    The equations for superfluid helium flowing through a straight tube with heated walls are integrated. The model equations are based on those of Landau as modified for superfluid turbulence by Gorter and Mellink (1949). The model is implemented by the program SUPERFLOW which runs on a personal computer. The effect of the heating level on the mass flux, the energy flux, and the pressure and temperature profiles is investigated. The four types of profiles which occur without sidewall heating are also found with heated walls. The progression through these four types is shown to depend primarily on the dimensionless parameter, defined previously to characterize the unheated profiles, and a dimensionless ratio of heat fluxes. The pressure and temperature maxima which rise well above the boundary values increase significantly with sidewall heating. Approximate design equations for estimating the mass flux and the profiles are presented. The physical basis of the results is discussed. These results are useful in the design of optimal cooling loops and other superfluid flow systems.

  9. Groundwater flow and hydrochemistry in mountain areas affected by DSGSDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Giovanni B.; Frattini, Paolo; Pena Reyes, Fredy; Riva, Federico

    2014-05-01

    Large slope instabilities such as DSGSD and rockslides locally affect the groundwater flow at the slope scale. These phenomena present morphostructures (scarps, counterscarps and trenches) parallel to the slope direction that control the surface water runoff, directing it transversal to the slope dip and favouring its percolation within the slope through the more conductive materials aligned with the trench . This also affects the slope hydrochemistry, locally controlling the solute transport and circulation. The upper Valtellina (Central European Alps, Northern Italy) is characterize by a high density of DSGSD phenomena, with 29 DSGSDs within an area of about 900 km2 (Crosta et al, 2013). The study area ranges from 1150 to 3500 m in altitude, and shows a clear glacial imprint, which significantly influenced the geomorphology and water distribution in the study area. In order to characterize the groundwater flow and the hydrochemistry of the area, we collected historical data analysis (4070 samples from springs, wells, lakes, rivers and public fountains), and we performed four seasonal campaigns, from summer 2012 to spring 2013, to complete a hydrologic year. During these campaigns, we measured the spring discharge, and we collected samples for chemical (anions and cations) and isotopic (tritium, deuterium and O18) analyses in more almost 40 selected spring located throughout the study area. These springs were selected because representative of main spring clusters, with a particular attention to problems related to the presence of Arsenic in high concentration. In this study, we analyze the effect of DSGSD phenomena on the aquifers of upper Valtellina through the quantitative analysis of hydro-chemical and isotopic data. We show how these phenomena affect the ground water flow also in relation to the presence of geological structures that are associated and locally reactivated by DSGSDs.

  10. Global Crustal Heat Flow Using Random Decision Forest Prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, J. J.; Wood, W. T.; Martin, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    We have applied supervised learning with random decision forests (RDF) to estimate, or predict, a global, densely spaced grid of crustal heat flow. The results are similar to global heat flow predictions that have been previously published but are more accurate and offer higher resolution. The training inputs are measurement values and uncertainties of existing sparsely sampled, (~8,000 locations), geographically biased, yet globally extensive, datasets of crustal heat flow. The RDF estimate is a highly non-linear empirical relationship between crustal heat flow and dozens of other parameters (attributes) that we have densely sampled, global, estimates of (e.g., crustal age, water depth, crustal thickness, seismic sound speed, seafloor temperature, sediment thickness, and sediment grain type). Synthetic attributes were key to obtaining good results using the RDF method. We created synthetic attributes by applying physical intuition and statistical analyses to the fundamental attributes. Statistics include median, kurtosis, and dozens of other functions, all calculated at every node and averaged over a variety of ranges from 5 to 500km. Other synthetic attributes are simply plausible, (e.g., distance from volcanoes, seafloor porosity, mean grain size). More than 600 densely sampled attributes are used in our prediction, and for each we estimated their relative importance. The important attributes included all those expected from geophysics, (e.g., inverse square root of age, gradient of depth, crustal thickness, crustal density, sediment thickness, distance from trenches), and some unexpected but plausible attributes, (e.g., seafloor temperature), but none that were unphysical. The simplicity of the RDF technique may also be of great interest beyond the discipline of crustal heat flow as it allows for more geologically intelligent predictions, decreasing the effect of sampling bias, and improving predictions in regions with little or no data, while rigorously

  11. Convection flows driven by laser heating of a liquid layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivière, David; Selva, Bertrand; Chraibi, Hamza; Delabre, Ulysse; Delville, Jean-Pierre

    2016-02-01

    When a fluid is heated by the absorption of a continuous laser wave, the fluid density decreases in the heated area. This induces a pressure gradient that generates internal motion of the fluid. Due to mass conservation, convection eddies emerge in the sample. To investigate these laser-driven bulk flows at the microscopic scale, we built a setup to perform temperature measurements with a fluorescent-sensitive dye on the one hand, and measured the flow pattern at different beam powers, using a particle image velocimetry technique on the other hand. Temperature measurements were also used in numerical simulations in order to compare predictions to the experimental velocity profiles. The combination of our numerical and experimental approaches allows a detailed description of the convection flows induced by the absorption of light, which reveals a transition between a thin and a thick liquid layer regime. This supports the basis of optothermal approaches for microfluidic applications.

  12. Spacecraft heat transfer by two-phase flow method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hye, A.

    1985-01-01

    A refrigerator/freezer has been designed with an oil-free compressor to provide an economical two-phase flow system for heat transfer. A computer simulation has been done for the condenser and evaporator to determine the design parameters, such as length, diameter, and flow regimes, for different refrigerants and load requirements. A large Reynolds number was considered to ensure annular flow (in order to maximize heat transfer coefficients) and large Froude number. The simulation was correlated with the test data of a vapor compression refrigerator/freezer flown on STS-4 (which provided information on vapor compression in a zero-gravity environment). The two-phase system will be used for the Spacelab mission SLS-1 and can be used in future spacecraft and high-speed aircraft, where weight, volume, and power requirements are critical.

  13. Modeling of fluid and heat flow in fractured geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Pruess, K.

    1988-08-01

    In most geothermal reservoirs large-scale permeability is dominated by fractures, while most of the heat and fluid reserves are stored in the rock matrix. Early-time fluid production comes mostly from the readily accessible fracture volume, while reservoir behavior at later time depends upon the ease with which fluid and heat can be transferred from the rock matrix to the fractures. Methods for modeling flow in fractured porous media must be able to deal with this matrix-fracture exchange, the so-called interporosity flow. This paper reviews recent work at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on numerical modeling of nonisothermal multiphase flow in fractured porous media. We also give a brief summary of simulation applications to problems in geothermal production and reinjection. 29 refs., 1 fig.

  14. A laser-induced heat flux technique for convective heat transfer measurements in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. R.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; Hingst, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the local convective heat transfer coefficient on a model surface in a supersonic flow field. The technique uses a laser to apply a discrete local heat flux at the model test surface, and an infrared camera system determines the local temperature distribution due to the heating. From this temperature distribution and an analysis of the heating process, a local convective heat transfer coefficient is determined. The technique was used to measure the local surface convective heat transfer coefficient distribution on a flat plate at nominal Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0. The flat plate boundary layer initially was laminar and became transitional in the measurement region. The experimentally determined convective heat transfer coefficients were generally higher than the theoretical predictions for flat plate laminar boundary layers. However, the results indicate that this nonintrusive optical measurement technique has the potential to measure surface convective heat transfer coefficients in high speed flow fields.

  15. An experimental study of the flow and heat transfer between enhanced heat transfer plates for PHEs

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiao-wei; Meng, Ji-an; Li, Zhi-xin

    2010-11-15

    The flow and heat transfer between inclined discrete rib plates for plate heat exchangers have been experimentally studied. Dye injection method is used to visualize the flow structures. The visualization results show that front vortex, rear vortex and main vortex are formed between the plates. The rib parameter influence is also studied using visualization method. The pressure drop and heat transfer between the inclined discrete rib plates as well as that between inclined continuous rib plates and smooth plates are also measured. The measured results show that the inclined discrete rib plate can enhanced heat transfer 20-25% at the same pumping power compared with the commonly used inclined continuous rib plates. (author)

  16. Heat conduction boundary layers of condensed clumps in cooling flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehringer, H.; Fabian, A. C.

    1989-04-01

    The structure of heat conduction boundary layers of gaseous condensations embedded in the hot intergalactic gas in clusters of galaxies is investigated by means of steady, one-dimensional, hydrodynamic models. It is assumed that heat conduction is effective only on scales much smaller than the total region of the cooling flow. Models are calculated for an arbitrary scaling factor, accounting for the reduction in heat conduction efficiency compared to the classical Spitzer case. The results imply a lower limit to the size spectrum of the condensations. The enhancement of cooling in the ambient medium due to heat conduction losses is calculated for a range of clump parameters. The luminosity of several observable emission lines, the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray emission spectrum, and the column density of some important ions are determined for the model boundary layers and compared with observations.

  17. An Engineering Aerodynamic Heating Method for Hypersonic Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Christopher J.; DeJarnette, Fred R.

    1992-01-01

    A capability to calculate surface heating rates has been incorporated in an approximate three-dimensional inviscid technique. Surface streamlines are calculated from the inviscid solution, and the axisymmetric analog is then used along with a set of approximate convective-heating equations to compute the surface heat transfer. The method is applied to blunted axisymmetric and three-dimensional ellipsoidal cones at angle of attack for the laminar flow of a perfect gas. The method is also applicable to turbulent and equilibrium-air conditions. The present technique predicts surface heating rates that compare favorably with experimental (ground-test and flight) data and numerical solutions of the Navier-Stokes (NS) and viscous shock-layer (VSL) equations. The new technique represents a significant improvement over current engineering aerothermal methods with only a modest increase in computational effort.

  18. Heat flow in Jane Basin, northwest Weddell Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawver, Lawrence A.; Della Vedova, Bruno; von Herzen, Richard P.

    1991-02-01

    The Jane Basin is a marginal basin situated immediately to the east of the South Orkney microcontinent in the Northwest section of the Weddell Sea. Thirty-five heat flow measurements made in the Jane Basin ranged in value from 67.5±4.3 to 92.1±3.0 mW/m2. Excluding values that were corrected for tilting or were on the very edge of the basin, the remaining 28 values range between 75.0±8.0 and 84.6±9.1 mW/m2. Magnetostratigraphy on the recovered core from Ocean Drilling Program hole 697, which was drilled in Jane Basin to a depth of 322 m, allowed sedimentation rates to be calculated back to 4.5 Ma. Single-channel seismic reflection data from RSS Shackleton allowed estimations of total sediment thickness for the Jane Basin to be made. We calculate that the measured heat flow is only 86-89% of the actual heat flow as a result of sedimentation. Heat generation in the sediments contributes 1.5-1.9 mW/m2to the total heat flow. The corrected heat flow gives an age for the Jane Basin of between 25 and 32 Ma from age-versus-heat flow comparisons, similar to the age determined from basement depth. The Scotia Sea, located to the north of Jane Basin and the South Orkney microcontinent, has been dated as anomaly 10 (30 Ma) and younger. Our calculated age for the Jane Basin would indicate that it may have been created prior to the initiation of seafloor spreading in the Scotia Sea. Evidence from major plate motions indicate that Antarctica began to rotate clockwise away from South America at about 65 Ma. Such motion may have triggered subduction along the southeast side of Jane Bank and the opening of Jane Basin as a back arc basin. Subduction at Jane Bank ended at anomaly 6A time (22 Ma) as evidenced by the age of the identified magnetic anomalies on the Antarctic plate found immediately to the east of Jane Bank. We conclude that Jane Basin opened prior to the opening of the Scotia Sea and that the spreading center that opened Jane Basin may have jumped to the Scotia Sea and

  19. Three dimensional simulation of flow and heat transfer in an F shell heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Prithiviraj, M.; Andrews, M.J.

    1998-12-31

    Shell-and-tube heat exchangers are the most commonly used design in process and petrochemical industries. Over the last four years, a three-dimensional numerical model has been developed at Texas A and M University to model flow and heat transfer within shell-and-tube heat exchangers. This model is based on the distributed resistance concept of Patankar and Spalding (1974). Sub-models used for pressure drop, heat transfer and turbulence generation are briefly described. Leakage flow through the baffle-tube and baffle-shell clearances are modeled using a Bernoulli type approach. The discretized governing equations are solved using a SIMPLE type finite volume method on a colocated grid. The numerical model was previously used to perform E shell simulations. Here the 3D model is used to analyze flow through an F shell heat exchanger. Velocity vector plots for the shellside fluid and temperature contours for the shellside and tubeside fluids are used to study the flow structure. The performance of the 3D model is compared with the Bell Method (1981) for the prediction of overall pressure drop. Good agreement is obtained between the computed overall pressure drop and the pressure drop predicted by the Bell method.

  20. Investigation into flow boiling heat transfer in a minichannel with enhanced heating surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecka, Magdalena

    2012-04-01

    The paper presents results of flow boiling in a minichannel of 1.0 mm depth. The heating element for the working fluid (FC-72) that flows along the minichannel is a single-sided enhanced alloy foil made from Haynes-230. Microrecesses were formed on the selected area of the heating foil by laser technology. The observations of the flow structure were carried out through a piece of glass. Simultaneously, owing to the liquid crystal layer placed on the opposite side of the enhanced foil surface, it was possible to measure temperature distribution on the heating wall through another piece of glass. The experimental research has been focused on the transition from single phase forced convection to nucleate boiling, i.e. the zone of boiling incipience and further development of boiling. The objective of the paper is determining of the void fraction for some cross-sections of selected images for increasing heat fluxes supplied to the heating surface. The flow structure photos were processed in Corel graphics software and binarized. The analysis of phase volumes was developed in Techystem Globe software.

  1. The thermal state of the Arabian plate derived from heat flow measurements in Oman and Yemen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolandone, Frederique; Lucazeau, Francis; Leroy, Sylvie; Mareschal, Jean-Claude; Jorand, Rachel; Goutorbe, Bruno; Bouquerel, Hélène

    2013-04-01

    The dynamics of the Afar plume and the rifting of the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden affect the present-day thermal regime of the Arabian plate. However, the Arabian plate is a Precambrian shield covered on its eastern part by a Phanerozoic platform and its thermal regime, before the plume and rifting activities, should be similar to that of other Precambrian shields with a thick and stable lithosphere. The first heat flow measurements in the shield, in Saudi Arabia, yielded low values (35-44 mW/m2), similar to the typical shields values. Recent heat flow measurements in Jordan indicate higher values (56-66 mW/m2). As part of the YOCMAL project (YOung Conjugate MArgins Laboratory), we have conducted heat flow measurements in southern and northern Oman to obtain 10 new heat flux values in the eastern Arabian plate. We also derived 20 heat flux values in Yemen and Oman by processing thermal data from oil exploration wells. The surface heat flux in these different locations is uniformly low (45 mW/m2). The heat production in samples from the Dhofar and Socotra Precambrian basement is also low (0.7 µW/m3). Differences in heat flow between the eastern (60 mW/m2) and the western (45 mW/m2) parts of Arabia reflect differences in crustal heat production as well as a higher mantle heat flux in the west. We have calculated a steady state geotherm for the Arabian platform that intersects the isentropic temperature profile at a depth of about 150 km, consistent with the seismic observations. Seismic tomography studies of the mantle beneath Arabia also show this east-west contrast. Seismic studies have shown that the lithosphere is rather thin, 100 km or less below the shield and 150 km below the platform. The lithospheric thickness for the Arabian plate is 150 km, and the progressive thinning near the Red Sea, caused by the thermal erosion of the plume material, is too recent to be detected at the surface. The Afar plume mostly affects the base of the Arabian lithosphere along

  2. Heat flow and continental breakup: The Gulf of Elat (Aqaba)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ben-Avraham, Z.; Vonherzen, R. P.

    1985-01-01

    Heat flow measurements were made in the major basins of the Gulf of Elat (Aqaba), northern Red Sea. The gulf is located at the southern portion of the Dead Sea rift which is a transform plate boundary. Gradient measurements at each site were made with a probe which allows multiple penetration of the bottom during a single deployment of the instrument. Thermal conductivity was determined by needle probe measurements on sedimentary cores. The mean heat flux, about 80 mWm(-2), is significantly above the continental mean, and probably also above that from the adjacent Sinai and Arabian continental blocks. The heat flow appears to increase from north to south. Such an increase may be related to the more advanced rifting stage of the Red Sea immediately to the south, which presently includes creation of an oceanic crust. This trend also corresponds to the general trend of the deep crustal structure in the gulf. Evidence from various geophysical fields suggest a gradual thinning of the crust towards the direction of the Red Sea where a normal oceanic crust exists. The heat flow data, together with other geophysical data, indicate a propagation of mature rifting activity from the Red Sea into the Gulf of Elat. This process is acting simultaneously with the transform motion along the Dead Sea rift.

  3. Does topical phenylephrine, tropicamide, or proparacaine affect macular blood flow?

    PubMed

    Robinson, F; Petrig, B L; Sinclair, S H; Riva, C E; Grunwald, J E

    1985-08-01

    The acute effect of topical phenylephrine HCl 10%, tropicamide 1% and proparacaine HCl 0.5% on macular capillary blood flow was studied in six healthy human volunteers using the blue field simulation technique. This technique provides a method for quantifying the velocity of leukocytes flowing in one's own retinal macular capillaries. Patients adjusted the velocity of computer simulated leukocytes moving on a CRT screen to match that of their own entoptically perceived leukocytes before instillation of each of the tested preparations and for 35 minutes immediately thereafter A 5% NaCl solution was used as a control. We found no significant difference in leukocyte velocity between the control drop and any of the tested drugs. With the six subjects tested, the calculated average minimum percentage change in leukocyte velocity detectable with this technique (P less than 0.05, paired t-test) was 9%. None of the tested drugs affected macular leukocyte velocity, and presumably blood flow, by more than this amount. PMID:4047607

  4. Basic study of heat flow in fusion welding. Progress report, March 1, 1980-February 28, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Szekely, J.; Eagar, T.W.

    1981-01-01

    During the past year the study of electroslag welding was essentially completed with good agreement between the experimental and the theoretical results. It is concluded that the ESW process has certain inherent limitations which were not appreciated previously. The study has expanded into a more complete analysis of heat and fluid flow in arc welding. It has been shown that the heat affected zone and fusion zone sizes are not simple functions of the net heat input as predicted by all current theories. This will affect the choice of welding parameters. For example, in single pass arc welds, the smallest HAZ is usually desirable, while in multipass welding large HAZ's may be desirable to provide tempering of the previous weld beads. It may be possible to achieve both these goals at equivalent heat input by proper adjustment of the welding parameters (such as voltage, current and travel speed). Goal of the current study is to predict which combinations of parameters maximize or minimize the size of the heat affected zone and fusion zone at equal heat input.

  5. Laminar-flow heat transfer downstream from U-bends

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelmessih, A.N

    1987-01-01

    The laminar-flow heat transfer downstream from the unheated, vertical bends in horizontal U-tubes with electrically heated straight tube sections was investigated. Four U-tubes with curvature ratios of 4.84, 7.66, 12.35, and 25.36 were studied. Distilled water and almost-pure ethylene glycol solutions (water content 1 to 5%) were the test fluids. For each test section, local axial and peripheral wall temperatures were measured, and the local peripheral heat-transfer coefficients at the various locations were calculated. The experiments covered the local bulk Reynolds number range of 120 to 2500. The local bulk Prandtl number varied between 4 and 110, while the Grashof number ranged from 2500 to 1,130,000. The uniform wall heat flux ranged from 900 to 4230 Btu/hr.sq.ft (3.12 to 13.33 KW/sq.m.). This investigation permitted a better understanding of the interaction of the primary, secondary, and tertiary flow patterns. Also, a correlation was developed that predicts the heat-transfer coefficient downstream from an unheated U-bend and that can be extended to straight tubes.

  6. Understanding heat and groundwater flow through continental flood basalt provinces: insights gained from alternative models of permeability/depth relationships for the Columbia Plateau, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burns, Erick R.; Williams, Colin F.; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Voss, Clifford I.; Spane, Frank A.; DeAngelo, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Heat-flow mapping of the western USA has identified an apparent low-heat-flow anomaly coincident with the Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System, a thick sequence of basalt aquifers within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). A heat and mass transport model (SUTRA) was used to evaluate the potential impact of groundwater flow on heat flow along two different regional groundwater flow paths. Limited in situ permeability (k) data from the CRBG are compatible with a steep permeability decrease (approximately 3.5 orders of magnitude) at 600–900 m depth and approximately 40°C. Numerical simulations incorporating this permeability decrease demonstrate that regional groundwater flow can explain lower-than-expected heat flow in these highly anisotropic (kx/kz ~ 104) continental flood basalts. Simulation results indicate that the abrupt reduction in permeability at approximately 600 m depth results in an equivalently abrupt transition from a shallow region where heat flow is affected by groundwater flow to a deeper region of conduction-dominated heat flow. Most existing heat-flow measurements within the CRBG are from shallower than 600 m depth or near regional groundwater discharge zones, so that heat-flow maps generated using these data are likely influenced by groundwater flow. Substantial k decreases at similar temperatures have also been observed in the volcanic rocks of the adjacent Cascade Range volcanic arc and at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, where they result from low-temperature hydrothermal alteration.

  7. Understanding heat and groundwater flow through continental flood basalt provinces: insights gained from alternative models of permeability/depth relationships for the Columbia Plateau, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Erick R.; Williams, Colin F.; Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Voss, Clifford I.; Spane, Frank A.; DeAngelo, Jacob

    2015-02-01

    Heat-flow mapping of the western USA has identified an apparent low-heat-flow anomaly coincident with the Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System, a thick sequence of basalt aquifers within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). A heat and mass transport model (SUTRA) was used to evaluate the potential impact of groundwater flow on heat flow along two different regional groundwater flow paths. Limited in situ permeability (k) data from the CRBG are compatible with a steep permeability decrease (approximately 3.5 orders of magnitude) at 600–900 m depth and approximately 40°C. Numerical simulations incorporating this permeability decrease demonstrate that regional groundwater flow can explain lower-than-expected heat flow in these highly anisotropic (kx/kz ~ 104) continental flood basalts. Simulation results indicate that the abrupt reduction in permeability at approximately 600 m depth results in an equivalently abrupt transition from a shallow region where heat flow is affected by groundwater flow to a deeper region of conduction-dominated heat flow. Most existing heat-flow measurements within the CRBG are from shallower than 600 m depth or near regional groundwater discharge zones, so that heat-flow maps generated using these data are likely influenced by groundwater flow. Substantial k decreases at similar temperatures have also been observed in the volcanic rocks of the adjacent Cascade Range volcanic arc and at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, where they result from low-temperature hydrothermal alteration.

  8. Terrestrial heat flow in the tertiary basin of central Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Da Silva Carvalho, Humberto; Purwoko; Siswoyo; Thamrin, M.; Vacquier, Victor

    1980-10-01

    Heat flow at 170 locations in the Central Tertiary basin of Sumatra was determined from thermal gradients obtained from the extrapolated oil well bottom hole formation temperature and the assumed temperature of 80°F at the surface. The effective thermal conductivity of the whole rock column, by which the gradient is multiplied to get the heat flow was calculated from measurements on 273 specimens of the geologic section and inspection of 92 well logs. For the whole basin the gradient averaged 3.71 ± 1.04°F/ 100 ft (67.6°C/km) the conductivity 4.83 ± 0.31 mcal °C -1 cm -1 sec -1, giving an average heat flow of 3.27 ± 0.93 10-6 cal cm -2 sec -1 which is about twice the world average. The gradient and the heat flow vary inversely with the depth of the wells most of which bottom in the pre-Tertiary basement. This may result from the basement rocks being several times more conductive than the sediments. Mocel calculations on a narrow heat-flow anomaly which rises from a base level of 3.2 HFU to 8.8 HFU suggest that it can be caused by the intrusion less than 55,000 years ago of an igneous plug or laccolith no deeper than 3 km and 2.2 to 4.6 km wide. Using the gradients from the SEAPEX Geothermal Gradient Map and assuming a conductivity of 5 mcal cm -1 °C -1 sec -1, the heat flow in the North Sumatra basin, the South Sumatra Basin, Sunda Strait and West Java is 2.5 HFU, while in Java east of 110°E longitude it drops to 1.9 HFU. Since subduction off Sumatra dates back at least to the Cretaceous, compression of the Asian plate against the Benioff zone is preventing the opening of a back-arc basin. This does not preclude the possibility of occasional periods of crustal tension corresponding perhaps to episodes of transgression which allow magma to rise into the rocks underlying the basin.

  9. Thermoelectric and heat flow phenomena in mesoscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Jason E.

    Low-dimensional electronic systems, systems that are restricted to single energy levels in at least one of the three spatial dimensions, have attracted considerable interest in the field of thermoelectric materials. At these scales, the ability to manipulate electronic energy levels offers a great deal of control over a device's thermopower, that is, its ability to generate a voltage due to a thermal gradient. In addition, low-dimensional devices offer increased control over phononic heat flow. Mesoscale geometry can also have a large impact on both electron and phonon dynamics. Effects such as ballistic transport in a two-dimensional electron gas structure can lead to the enhancement or attenuation of electron transmission probabilities in multi-terminal junctions. The first half of this dissertation investigates the transverse thermoelectric properties of a four-terminal ballistic junction containing a central symmetry-breaking scatterer. It is believed that the combined symmetry of the scatterer and junction is the key component to understanding non-linear and thermoelectric transport in these junctions. To this end, experimental investigations on this type of junction were carried out to demonstrate its ability to generate a transverse thermovoltage. To aid in interpreting the results, a multi-terminal scattering-matrix theory was developed that relates the junction's non-linear electronic properties to its thermoelectric properties. The possibility of a transverse thermoelectric device also motivated the first derivation of the transverse thermoelectric efficiency. This second half of this dissertation focuses on heat flow phenomena in InAs/InP heterostructure nanowires. In thermoelectric research, a phononic heat flow between thermal reservoirs is considered parasitic due to its minimal contribution to the electrical output. Recent experiments involving heterostructure nanowires have shown an unexpectedly large heat flow, which is attributed in this

  10. Measuring Heat Flow on the Moon and Mars- The Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package HP-cubed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spohn, T.; Grott, M.; Ho, T.; van Zoest, T.; Kargl, G.; Smrekar, S. E.; Hudson, T. L.

    2010-12-01

    With only two successful heat flow measurements performed on the surface of the Moon to date, the thermal state of the Moon remains poorly constrained. Furthermore, measurements were taken close to the boundary of the Procellarum KREEP terraine, and the obtained values may not be representative for the bulk of the planet. For Mars, no heat flow measurement is yet available. Here we will present the Heat Flow and Physical Properties Package HP-cubed a self-penetrating, robotic heat flow probe. The instrument consists of electrical and temperature sensors that will be emplaced into the lunar subsurface by means of an electro-mechanical hammering mechanism. The instruement is foreseen to penetrate 3-5 m into the planet’s soil and will perform depth resolved measurements, from which the surface planetary heat flow can be directly deduced. The instrument has been pre-developed in two ESA funded precursor studies and has been further developed in the framework of ESA’s ExoMars mission. The current readiness level of the instrument is TRL 5.62 (ESA PDR Apr. 2009) which has been achieved with several Breadboards developed and tested between 2004 and 2009. As no drilling is required to achieve soil penetration, HP-cubed is a relatively lightweight heat flow probe, weighting less than 1800 g. It has been further studied as parts of the discovery proposals Lunette and GEMS and for the proposed Japanese lunar mission SELENE 2 The instrument consists of an electro-mechanic mole, a pay-load compartment, and a tether equipped with temperature sensors. The latter can be actively heated for thermal conductivity measurements. A tiltmeter and acceleraometer will help to track the path of the mole. The payload compartment has room for sensors such as a permittivity probe, a bore-hole camera, and/or a masspectrometer. Following deployment of the instrument, instrument operations will be split into two phases: During the penetration phase soil intrusion is achieved by means of the

  11. Growth and decay of acceleration waves in non-ideal gas flow with radiative heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Lal; Singh, Raghwendra; Ram, Subedar

    2012-09-01

    The present paper is concerned with the study of the propagation of acceleration waves along the characteristic path in a non-ideal gas flow with effect of radiative heat transfer. It is shown that a linear solution in the characteristic plane can exhibit non-linear behavior in the physical plane. It is also investigated as to how the radiative heat transfer under the optically thin limit will affect the formation of shock in planer, cylindrical and spherically symmetric flows. We conclude that there exists critical amplitude such that any compressive waves with initial amplitude greater than the critical one terminate into shock waves while an initial amplitude less than the critical one results in the decay of the disturbance. The critical time for shock formation has been computed. In this paper we also compare/contrast the nature of solution in ideal and non ideal gas flows.

  12. A high performance cocurrent-flow heat pipe for heat recovery applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saaski, E. W.; Hartl, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    By the introduction of a plate-and-tube separator assembly into a heat pipe vapor core, it has been demonstrated that axial transport capacity in reflux mode can be improved by up to a factor of 10. This improvement is largely the result of eliminating the countercurrent shear that commonly limits reflux heat pipe axial capacity. With benzene, axial heat fluxes up to 1800 W/sq cm were obtained in the temperature range 40 to 80 C, while heat flux densities up to 3000 W/sq cm were obtained with R-11 over the temperature range 40 to 80 C. These very high axial capacities compare favorably with liquid metal limits; the sonic limit for liquid sodium, for example, is 3000 W/sq cm at 657 C. Computational models developed for these cocurrent flow heat pipes agreed with experimental data within + or - 25%.

  13. Natural convection flow in porous enclosure with localized heating from below with heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiki, Md. Noor-A.-Alam; Molla, Md. Mamun; Saha, Suvash C.

    2016-07-01

    Unsteady natural convection flow in a two dimensional fluid saturated porous enclosure with localized heating from below with heat flux, symmetrical cooling from the sides and the insulated top wall has been investigated numerically. The governing equations are the Darcy's law for the porous media and the energy equation for the temperature field has been considered. The non-dimensional Darcy's law in terms of the stream function is solved by finite difference method using the successive over-relaxation (SOR) scheme and the energy equation is solved by Alternative Direction Alternative (ADI) scheme. The uniform heat flux source is located centrally at the bottom wall. The numerical results are presented in terms of the streamlines and isotherms, as well as the local and average rate of heat transfer for the wide range of the Darcy's Rayleigh number and the length of the heat flux source at the bottom wall.

  14. Two-phase flow and heat transfer under low gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, W.

    1981-11-01

    Spacelab experiment to investigate two-phase flow patterns under gravity uses a water-air mixture experiment. Air and water are circulated through the system. The quality or the mixture or air-water is controlled. Photographs of the test section are made and at the same time pressure drop across the test section is measured. The data establishes a flow regime map under reduced gravity conditions with corresponding pressure drop correlations. The test section is also equipped with an electrical resistance heater in order to allow a flow boiling experiment to be carried out using Freon II. High-speed photographs of the test section are used to determine flow patterns. The temperature gradient and pressure drop along the duct can be measured. Thus, quality change can be measured, and heat transfer calculated.

  15. Two-phase flow and heat transfer under low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.

    1981-01-01

    Spacelab experiment to investigate two-phase flow patterns under gravity uses a water-air mixture experiment. Air and water are circulated through the system. The quality or the mixture or air-water is controlled. Photographs of the test section are made and at the same time pressure drop across the test section is measured. The data establishes a flow regime map under reduced gravity conditions with corresponding pressure drop correlations. The test section is also equipped with an electrical resistance heater in order to allow a flow boiling experiment to be carried out using Freon II. High-speed photographs of the test section are used to determine flow patterns. The temperature gradient and pressure drop along the duct can be measured. Thus, quality change can be measured, and heat transfer calculated.

  16. Heat flow in variable polarity plasma arc welds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1992-01-01

    The space shuttle external tank and the space station Freedom are fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding. Heat sink effects (taper) are observed when there are irregularities in the work-piece configuration especially if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, and in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of the previous, present, and consecutive research studies is to investigate the effect of irregularities in the work-piece configuration and fixture differences on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate automatically for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld.

  17. Heat flow in variable polarity plasma arc welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.

    1992-12-01

    The space shuttle external tank and the space station Freedom are fabricated by the variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) welding. Heat sink effects (taper) are observed when there are irregularities in the work-piece configuration especially if these irregularities are close to the weld bead. These heat sinks affect the geometry of the weld bead, and in extreme cases they could cause defects such as incomplete fusion. Also, different fixtures seem to have varying heat sink effects. The objective of the previous, present, and consecutive research studies is to investigate the effect of irregularities in the work-piece configuration and fixture differences on the weld bead geometry with the ultimate objective to compensate automatically for the heat sink effects and achieve a perfect weld.

  18. Heat Transfer Over the Circumference of a Heated Cylinder in Transverse Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Ernst; Wenner, Karl

    1943-01-01

    A method for recording the local heat-transfer coefficients on bodies in flow was developed. The cylinder surface was kept at constant temperature by the condensation of vapor except for a narrow strip which is heated separately to the same temperature by electricity. The heat-transfer coefficient at each point was determined from the electric heat output and the temperature increase. The distribution of the heat transfer along the circumference of cylinders was recorded over a range of Reynolds numbers of from 5000 to 426,000. The pressure distribution was measured at the same time. At Reynolds numbers up to around 100,000 high maximums of the heat transfer occurred in the forward stagnation point at and on the rear side at 180C, while at around 80 the heat-transfer coefficient on both sides of the cylinder behind the forward stagnation point manifested distinct minimums. Two other maximums occurred at around 115 C behind the forward stagnation point between 170,000 and 426,000. At 426,000 the heat transfer at the location of those maximums was almost twice as great as in the forward stagnation point, and the rear half of the cylinder diffused about 60 percent of the entire heat, The tests are compared with the results of other experimental and theoretical investigations.

  19. New and classical applications of heat flow studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauser, C.

    2005-12-01

    This special issue of Journal of Geophysics and Engineering is dedicated to a collection of papers which resulted from an international workshop held in Aachen, Germany, on 4-7 October 2004, called 'New and Classical Applications of Heat Flow Studies'. This was the third in a series of topical geothermal workshops arranged by the Geothermal Working Group of the German Geophysical Society (DGG) and was organized by the Institute of Applied Geophysics at RWTH Aachen University under the auspices of the International Heat Flow Commission of the International Association of Seismology and Physics (IASPEI). The meeting was attended by some 60 scientists from 14 countries and three continents. Financial assistance, granted by DGG and IASPEI, allowed us to provide partial support for a total of eight students, young scientists and eminent researchers from eastern Europe and overseas. The convenors of the meeting were Christoph Clauser (Aachen), Thomas Kohl (Zürich) and Makoto Taniguchi (Kyoto). The main local organizers were Volker Rath (scientific programme) and Ute Kreutz (accommodation and financial affairs). The topics addressed in more than 50 oral and poster presentations indicated that today intriguing new applications of heat flow studies have emerged, complementing the classical topics of heat flow mapping and the tectonic implications of heat flow. In classical applications, for instance, thermal signatures of water flow or downward diffusion of variations in the Earth's mean temperature are considered as noise which needs to be corrected prior to further use of the data. In contrast, in several new applications it is exactly the information contained in these signatures which has been extracted and interpreted. For instance, over the past two decades, work on the most prominent of these new applications has been devoted to inverting the variation of the Earth's past mean ground surface temperature (GST). As of today, GST provided by the geothermal method has

  20. A New Model for Heat Flow in Extensional Basins: Estimating Radiogenic Heat Production

    SciTech Connect

    Waples, Douglas W.

    2002-06-15

    Radiogenic heat production (RHP) represents a significant fraction of surface heat flow, both on cratons and in sedimentary basins. RHP within continental crust-especially the upper crust-is high. RHP at any depth within the crust can be estimated as a function of crustal age. Mantle RHP, in contrast, is always low, contributing at most 1 to 2 mW/m{sup 2} to total heat flow. Radiogenic heat from any noncrystalline basement that may be present also contributes to total heat flow. RHP from metamorphic rocks is similar to or slightly lower than that from their precursor sedimentary rocks. When extension of the lithosphere occurs-as for example during rifting-the radiogenic contribution of each layer of the lithosphere and noncrystalline basement diminishes in direct proportion to the degree of extension of that layer. Lithospheric RHP today is somewhat less than in the distant past, as a result of radioactive decay. In modeling, RHP can be varied through time by considering the half lives of uranium, thorium, and potassium, and the proportional contribution of each of those elements to total RHP from basement. RHP from sedimentary rocks ranges from low for most evaporites to high for some shales, especially those rich in organic matter. The contribution to total heat flow of radiogenic heat from sediments depends strongly on total sediment thickness, and thus differs through time as subsidence and basin filling occur. RHP can be high for thick clastic sections. RHP in sediments can be calculated using ordinary or spectral gamma-ray logs, or it can be estimated from the lithology.

  1. The role of fault zone in affecting multiphase flow at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Y.W.; Pruess, K.; Wang, J.S.Y.

    1993-12-31

    Within Yucca Mountain, the potential High Level Nuclear-Waste Repository site, there are large scale fault zones, most notably the Ghost Dance Fault. The effect of such high-permeability, large-scale discontinuities on the flow and transport is a question of concern in assessing the ability of the site to isolate radio-nuclides from the biosphere. In this paper, we present a numerical study to investigate the role of the fault in affecting both the liquid and gas phase flows in the natural state at Yucca Mountain prior to waste emplacement, as well as after the waste emplacement when the fluid flow is strongly heat-driven. Our study shows that if the characteristic curves of the Ghost Dance Fault obey the same relationship between saturated permeability and capillary scaling parameter, is as observed from the measured data of Yucca Mountain welded and nonwelded tuffs, Apache Leap tuffs, and Las Cruces soil, then a large saturated permeability of the Ghost Dance Fault will play little role in channeling water into the fault, or in enhancing the flow of water down the fault. However, the Fault may greatly enhance the upward gas flow after emplacement of waste. This may have implications on the transport of gaseous radio-nuclides such as C{sup 14}. The results of this study also focus attention on the need for field measurements of fluid flow in the fault zones.

  2. The role of fault zones in affecting multiphase flow at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Y.W.; Pruess, K.; Wang, J.S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Within Yucca Mountain, the potential High Level Nuclear-Waste Repository site, there are large scale fault zones, most notably the Ghost Dance Fault. The effect of such high-permeability, large scale discontinuities on the flow and transport is a question of concern in assessing the ability of the site to isolate radio-nuclides from the biosphere. In this paper, we present a numerical study to investigate the role of the fault in affecting both the liquid and gas phase flows in the natural state at Yucca Mountain prior to waste emplacement, as well as after the waste emplacement when the fluid flow is strongly heat-driven. Our study shows that if the characteristic curves of the Ghost Dance Fault obey the same relationship between saturated permeability and capillary scaling parameter, as is observed from the measured data of Yucca Mountain welded and nonwelded tuffs. Apache Leap tuffs, and Las Cruces soil, then a large saturated permeability of the Ghost Dance Fault will play little role in channeling water into the fault, or inenhancing the flow of water down the fault. However, the Fault may greatly enhance the upward gas flow after emplacement of waste. This may have implications on the transport of gaseous radio-nuclides such as C{sup 14}. The results of this study also focus attention on the need for field measurements of fluid flow in the fault zones.

  3. Acoustically excited heated jets. 3: Mean flow data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Salikuddin, M.; Morris, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    This is Part 3 of a report on the excitability of heated jets under the influence of acoustic excitation. The effects of upstream internal acoustic excitation on jet mixing were described in Part 1. Part 2 described the effects of external excitation on flow mixing. Part 3 contains quantitative results from the measurements of mean Mach number and temperature and consists of radial profiles and centerline distributions measured at selected jet operating conditions for internally excited and unexcited jets. The mean flow data are presented in both graphical and tabulated forms. For the sake of completeness, this part contains temperature probe calibration curves also.

  4. Oxidative Activity of Heated Coal Affected by Antypirogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torosyan, V. F.; Torosyan, E. S.; Borovikov, I. F.; Yakutova, V. A.

    2016-04-01

    The effect of antypirogens on chemical activity of heated coal is studied. It is proved that ammonium sulfate, calcium phosphate, calcium chloride, calcium nitrate and acid fluoride are the most effective antypirogens.

  5. Thermographic imaging in the beating heart: a method for coronary flow estimation based on a heat transfer model.

    PubMed

    Gordon, N; Rispler, S; Sideman, S; Shofty, R; Beyar, R

    1998-09-01

    Intraoperative thermographic imaging in open-chest conditions can provide the surgeon with important qualitative information regarding coronary flow by utilizing heat transfer analysis following injection of cold saline into the aortic root. The heat transfer model is based on the assumption that the epicardial temperature changes are mainly due to convection of heat by the blood flow, which may, therefore, be estimated by measuring the temperature variations. Hearts of eight dogs were exposed and imaged by a thermographic camera. Flow in the left arterial descending (LAD) coronary branch was measured by a transit-time flowmeter. 20 ml of cold saline were injected into the aortic root (just after the aortic valve) and the epicardial temperature images were recorded at end-diastole, for 20-30 s. Different flow rates were achieved by 1 min occlusion of the LAD, which affected a reactive hyperemic response. The dynamics of the temperature in the arterial coronary tree was obtained by averaging the temperature over an edge-detected arterial segment for each frame. The heat transfer equation was curve-fitted, and the flow-dependent heat transfer index was correlated with the experimentally determined coronary flow (r = 0.69, p < 0.001). In summary: a method for quantitative estimation of coronary blood flow by thermography and heat transfer analysis was developed and tested in animal experiments. This method can provide important information regarding coronary blood flow during open-chest surgical procedures. PMID:9796950

  6. Effects of welding heat input on microstructure and hardness in heat-affected zone of HQ130 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J. S.; Wu, C. S.; Sun, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    There are two parts of the heat input in gas-metal arc welding (GMAW): one is the arc heat flux and the other is the heat content of filler metal droplets. This paper introduces a new mode of arc heat flux density distribution on the deformed GMAW weldpool surface. A numerical model of fluid flow and temperature field in GMAW is established according to the new mode of arc heat flux distribution. By using a numerical simulation technique, the effects of welding heat input on microstructure and hardness in HAZ of HQ130 steel are studied. The dimensions of Austenitic grains and hardness in different locations in HAZ of HQ130 steel are calculated under different welding heat inputs. Experiments show that the calculated results of welding thermal cycle and microstructure and hardness in HAZ of HQ130 steel are in agreement with measured ones.

  7. Heat stress redistributes blood flow in arteries of the brain during dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kohei; Oue, Anna; Yoneya, Marina; Sadamoto, Tomoko; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2016-04-01

    We hypothesized that heat stress would decrease anterior and posterior cerebral blood flow (CBF) during exercise, and the reduction in anterior CBF would be partly associated with large increase in extracranial blood flow (BF). Nine subjects performed 40 min of semirecumbent cycling at 60% of the peak oxygen uptake in hot (35°C; Heat) and thermoneutral environments (25°C; Control). We evaluated BF and conductance (COND) in the external carotid artery (ECA), internal carotid artery (ICA), and vertebral artery (VA) using ultrasonography. During the Heat condition, ICA and VA BF were significantly increased 10 min after the start of exercise (P< 0.05) and thereafter gradually decreased. ICA COND was significantly decreased (P< 0.05), whereas VA COND remained unchanged throughout Heat. Compared with the Control, either BF or COND of ICA and VA at the end of Heat tended to be lower, but not significantly. In contrast, ECA BF and COND at the end of Heat were both higher than levels in the Control condition (P< 0.01). During Heat, a reduction in ICA BF appears to be associated with a decline in end-tidal CO2tension (r= 0.84), whereas VA BF appears to be affected by a change in cardiac output (r= 0.87). In addition, a change in ECA BF during Heat was negatively correlated with a change in ICA BF (r= -0.75). Heat stress resulted in modification of the vascular response of head and brain arteries to exercise, which resulted in an alteration in the distribution of cardiac output. Moreover, a hyperthermia-induced increase in extracranial BF might compromise anterior CBF during exercise with heat stress. PMID:26846548

  8. Heat loss and blood flow during hyperthermia in normal canine brain. I: Empirical study and analysis.

    PubMed

    Lyons, B E; Samulski, T V; Cox, R S; Fessenden, P

    1989-01-01

    The effects of blood flow and thermal conduction during microwave hyperthermia were investigated in normal canine brain. Heating was accomplished with an external microstrip spiral antenna and temperature measurements were made using a multichannel fluoroptic thermometry system. In order to determine cooling rates, temperature measurements made during cooling were fitted with a model consisting of a constant value and an exponential term. Data from experiments in both perfused and non-perfused brains could be fitted with this simple model. The resulting cooling rates indicated that heat loss by conduction is comparable to that by blood flow. In another series of experiments, temperature measurements were made during several 1 min cooling intervals in which the power was shut off intermittently during a 35 min heating episode. Results were consistent with a 2-3-fold increase in blood flow rate which occurred gradually throughout the course of heating. Parameters that affect the determination of cooling rates are discussed in terms of the bioheat transfer equation. These investigations demonstrate that a simple heat sink model provides a good representation of the cooling data for the thermal distributions obtained. PMID:2926187

  9. The impact of separated flow on heat and mass transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.J.; Jabbari, M.Y.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of flow separation on heat (or mass) transfer is underway. This research, sponsored by the Department of Energy (Contract No. FG02-87ER13800), is planned to enhance our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms governing the process. This report summarizes previous accomplishments and briefly describes works done during period May 1, 1989 through April 30, 1990. Future plans and studies under preparation are also mentioned. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Numerical simulations on flow and heat transfer in turbine cascade and tip clearance over shrouded blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yumin

    A three-dimensional solver based on AF (Approximate Factorization) method and Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model is developed to deal with the three-dimensional transonic turbulent flow in a turbine cascade. The calculation results show that: (1) there are complex three-dimensional vortices existing in the wake flow downstream of the blade trailing edge, which interact with the main flow to dissipate the secondary flow and with the boundary layer on the end-wall to result in high heat transfer region on the end-wall; (2) the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model lacks the ability to predict the heat transfer in the transition and laminar region, but valid in the turbulent region; (3) the upward pressure gradient near the end-wall on the suction side and the pressure difference between the pressure side and the suction side are the "driving forces" for the secondary flow to emerge and develop in the passage; the secondary flows interact with the boundary layer on the end-wall and enhance the heat transfer in the local regions; the secondary flow dissipation mechanism in transonic flow is different from that in subsonic flow; (4) it is possible to control the secondary flow by an appropriate blade geometric design and end-wall contouring. In order to minimize the blade tip clearance loss, a new kind of labyrinth seal, the staggered labyrinth seal with case recessing, is developed. The presented staggered labyrinth seal is found through the study to be more efficient than the typical one. The staggered labyrinth seal arrangement can reduce the highest load imposed on seal tooth. The numerical simulation results show that: the leakage flow-rate is dominated the pressure drop and the minimum clearance space in the passage; the space between two seal teeth has a little influence on the total mass flow rate but influences the flow pattern and the dissipation mechanism in the seal space; the leakage flow rate increases as the wall temperature decreases; swirl flow has

  11. Analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in a channel with intermittent heated porous blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikh, S.; Boumedien, A.; Bouhadef, K.; Lauriat, G.

    A numerical study of forced convection enhancement in a channel intermittently heated is presented in this work. The use of porous blocks mounted on the heated parts of the channel to improve thermal performance is investigated. In order to account for the inertia, drag and boundary effects, the Brinkman-Forchheimer-extended Darcy model is adopted for the flow inside the porous regions. The effects of several parameters such as Darcy number, the block dimensions, the number of blocks and the thermal conductivity ratio are documented. The results show that the blocks may alter substantially the flow pattern depending on the permeability of the porous medium, and may improve the heat transfer and reduce the wall temperature under certain circumstances.

  12. Electroosmotic flow and Joule heating in preparative continuous annular electrochromatography.

    PubMed

    Laskowski, René; Bart, Hans-Jörg

    2015-09-01

    An openFOAM "computational fluid dynamic" simulation model was developed for the description of local interaction of hydrodynamics and Joule heating in annular electrochromatography. A local decline of electrical conductivity of the background eluent is caused by an electrokinetic migration of ions resulting in higher Joule heat generation. The model equations consider the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible fluids, the energy equation for stationary temperature fields, and the mass transfer equation for the electrokinetic flow. The simulations were embedded in commercial ANSYS Fluent software and in open-source environment openFOAM. The annular gap (1 mm width) contained an inorganic C8 reverse-phase monolith as stationary phase prepared by an in situ sol-gel process. The process temperature generated by Joule heating was determined by thermal camera system. The local hydrodynamics in the prototype was detected by a gravimetric contact-free measurement method and experimental and simulated values matched quite well. PMID:25997390

  13. Heat flow control and segregation in directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, A. F.; Rohsenow, W. M.; Houpt, P. K.

    1982-01-01

    Optimization of the vertical Bridgman technique for growth of electronic materials in single crystal form was investigated. The limitations of the crystal growth configuration were experimentally determined and heat transfer related deficiencies identified. Design of an alternate system was based on the use of heat pipes separated by a gradient region. Heat transfer analyses based on one and two dimensional models indicated the necessity of a flexible gradient zone configuration. Directional melting of binary systems as encountered during seeding in melt growth was analysed for concurrent compositional changes at the crystal-metal interface, and the theoretical treatment numerically applied to HgCdTe and Ga doped germanium. A theoretical and experimental study of the thermal effects associated with current flow was conducted. It was found that experimental measurements of dc induced growth during crystal pulling can be used for the precise determination of the Peltier coefficient.

  14. Heat transfer characteristics of pulsated turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habib, M. A.; Said, S. A. M.; Al-Farayedhi, A. A.; Al-Dini, S. A.; Asghar, A.; Gbadebo, S. A.

    Heat Transfer characteristics of pulsated turbulent pipe flow under different conditions of pulsation frequency, amplitude and Reynolds number were experimentally investigated. The pipe wall was kept at uniform heat flux. Reynolds number was varied from 5000 to 29 000 while frequency of pulsation ranged from 1 to 8 Hz. The results show an enhancement in the local Nusselt number at the entrance region. The rate of enhancement decreased as Re increased. Reduction of heat transfer coefficient was observed at higher frequencies and the effect of pulsation is found to be significant at high Reynolds number. It can be concluded that the effect of pulsation on the mean Nusselt numbers is insignificant at low values of Reynolds number.

  15. A laser-induced heat flux technique for convective heat transfer measurements in high speed flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porro, A. R.; Keith, T. G., Jr.; Hingst, W. R.

    1991-01-01

    A technique is developed to measure the local convective heat transfer coefficient on a model surface in a supersonic flow field. The technique uses a laser to apply a discrete local heat flux at the model test surface, and an infrared camera system determines the local temperature distribution due to the heating. From this temperature distribution and an analysis of the heating process, a local convective heat transfer coefficient is determined. The technique was used to measure the local surface convective heat transfer coefficient distribution on a flat plate at nominal Mach numbers of 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, and 4.0. The flat plate boundary layer initially was laminar and became transitional in the measurement region. The experimentally determined convective heat transfer coefficients were generally higher than the theoretical predictions for flat plate laminar boundary layers. However, the results indicate that this nonintrusive optical measurement technique has the potential to measure surface convective heat transfer coefficients in high-speed flowfields.

  16. Flow and heat simultaneously induced by two stretchable rotating disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkyilmazoglu, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    An exact solution for the steady state Navier-Stokes equations in cylindrical coordinates is presented in this work. It serves to investigate the fluid flow and heat transfer occurring between two stretchable disks rotating co-axially at constant distance apart. The governing equations of motion and energy are first transformed into a set of nonlinear differential equation system by the use of von Karman similarity transformations, which are later solved numerically. The small Reynolds number case allows us to extract closed-form solutions for the physical phenomenon. The effects of the same or opposite direction rotation, as well as the stretching parameter and the Reynolds number, are discussed on the flow and heat characteristics. The main physical implication of the results is that stretching action of a disk surface alters considerably the classical flow behavior occurring between two disks and the physically interesting quantities like the torque and heat transfer are elucidated in the presence of a new physical mechanism; that is the surface stretching in the current research.

  17. Restoration of the Apollo Heat Flow Experiments Metadata

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagihara, S.; Stephens, M. K.; Taylor, P. T.; Williams, D. R.; Hills, H. K.; Nakamura, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Geothermal heat flow probes were deployed on the Apollo 15 and 17 missions as part of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP). At each landing site, the astronauts drilled 2 holes, 10-m apart, and installed a probe in each. The holes were 1- and 1.5-m deep at the Apollo 15 site and 2.5-m deep at the Apollo 17 sites. The probes monitored surface temperature and subsurface temperatures at different depths. At the Apollo 15 site, the monitoring continued from July 1971 to January 1977. At the Apollo 17 site, it did from December 1972 to September 1977. Based on the observations made through December 1974, Marcus Langseth, the principal investigator of the heat flow experiments (HFE), determined the thermal conductivity of the lunar regolith by mathematically modeling how the seasonal temperature fluctuation propagated down through the regolith. He also determined the temperature unaffected by diurnal and seasonal thermal waves of the regolith at different depths, which yielded the geothermal gradient. By multiplying the thermal gradient and the thermal conductivity, Langseth obtained the endogenic heat flow of the Moon as 21 mW/m(exp 2) at Site 15 and 16 mW/m(exp 2) at Site 17.

  18. Nonclassical Symmetry Analysis of Heated Two-Dimensional Flow Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Imran; Naz, Rehana; Khan, Muhammad Danish

    2015-12-01

    This article analyses the nonclassical symmetries and group invariant solution of boundary layer equations for two-dimensional heated flows. First, we derive the nonclassical symmetry determining equations with the aid of the computer package SADE. We solve these equations directly to obtain nonclassical symmetries. We follow standard procedure of computing nonclassical symmetries and consider two different scenarios, ξ1≠0 and ξ1=0, ξ2≠0. Several nonclassical symmetries are reported for both scenarios. Furthermore, numerous group invariant solutions for nonclassical symmetries are derived. The similarity variables associated with each nonclassical symmetry are computed. The similarity variables reduce the system of partial differential equations (PDEs) to a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in terms of similarity variables. The reduced system of ODEs are solved to obtain group invariant solution for governing boundary layer equations for two-dimensional heated flow problems. We successfully formulate a physical problem of heat transfer analysis for fluid flow over a linearly stretching porous plat and, with suitable boundary conditions, we solve this problem.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Wall Heat Load in Combustor Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panara, D.; Hase, M.; Krebs, W.; Noll, B.

    2007-09-01

    Due to the major mechanism of NOx generation, there is generally a temperature trade off between improved cycle efficiency, material constraints and low NOx emission. The cycle efficiency is proportional to the highest cycle temperature, but unfortunately also the NOx production increases with increasing combustion temperature. For this reason, the modern combustion chamber design has been oriented towards lean premixed combustion system and more and more attention must be focused on the cooling air management. The challenge is to ensure sufficiently low temperature of the combustion liner with very low amount of film or effusion cooling air. Correct numerical prediction of temperature fields and wall heat load are therefore of critical interest in the modern combustion chamber design. Moreover, lean combustion technology has shown the appearance of thermo-acoustic instabilities which have to be taken into account in the simulation and, more in general, in the design of reliable combustion systems. In this framework, the present investigation addresses the capability of a commercial multiphysics code (ANSYS CFX) to correctly predict the wall heat load and the core flow temperature field in a scaled power generation combustion chamber with a simplified ceramic liner. Comparison are made with the experimental results from the ITS test rig at the University of Karlsruhe [1] and with a previous numerical campaign from [2]. In addition the effect of flow unsteadyness on the wall heat load is discussed showing some limitations of the traditional steady state flow thermal design.

  20. Heat flow and heat generation estimates for the Churchill basement of the Western Canadian Basin in Alberta, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Beach, R.D.W.; Jones, F.W.; Majorowicz, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Heat flow through the sediments and temperatures of the Churchill province basement under the sedimentary cover are determined for 24 locations in the central part of the Prairies basin in Alberta where the vertical heat flux is approximately constant from the base of the sediments to the surface. The contribution to heat flow from heat generation in the sediments is also considered. The average heat flow through the sediments is found to be 71 mWm/sup -2/ +- 12mWm/sup -2/ which is about 30 mWm/sup -2/ higher than in the neighbouring shield area of the Churchill province, and the contribution from heat generation in the sediments to the surface heat flow is only approximately 2.5 mWm/sup -2/. The relationship between basement heat generation and heat flow is investigated, and it is found that the platform heat flow/heat generation values are in general higher than those from the Churchill province of the shield found by Drury (1985). Although for the platform and shield data, the reduced heat flow is about 40 mWm/sup -2/ and the slope is about 8km, it is apparent that the platform data alone are not good enough to establish a precise relationship.

  1. Flow and heat transfer for gas flowing in microchannels: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostami, A. A.; Mujumdar, A. S.; Saniei, N.

    Microchannels are currently being used in many areas and have high potential for applications in many other areas, which are considered realistic by experts. The application areas include medicine, biotechnology, avionics, consumer electronics, telecommunications, metrology, computer technology, office equipment and home appliances, safety technology, process engineering, robotics, automotive engineering and environmental protection. A number of these applications are introduced in this paper, followed by a critical review of the works on the flow and heat transfer for gas flowing in microchannels. The results show that the flow and heat transfer characteristics of a gas flowing in microchannels can not be adequately predicted by the theories and correlations developed for conventional sized channels. The results of theoretical and experimental works are discussed and summarized along with suggestions for future research directions.

  2. The stability of Taylor-Couette flow with radial heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Mohamed El-Sayed

    The stability of circular Couette flow with radial heating across vertically oriented coaxial cylinders is investigated using linearized stability theory. The physical problem is governed by five parameters: the Taylor number Ta, the Groshof number G, the Prandtl number Pr, the cylinder aspect ration A, and the radius ratio eta. In the model infinite aspect ratio is assumed and critical stability boundaries are calculated for a conduction regime base flow. A rational analysis is made to derive the full governing perturbation equations and test flow stability subject to both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric disturbances. The flow may be driven to instability by competition between centrifugal, buoyancy, and shear force mechanisms. In spite of this complexity, the existence of solution symmetries of the perturbation equations with respect to the sense of radial heating and the sense of cylinder rotation are proven. The linear boundary-value problem defined by 16 first-order differential equations is solved using the software package SUPORT in combination with the nonlinear equation solver SNSQE. Critical stability boundaries at fixed Pr and eta were determined by searching for the minimum value of either Ta or G over all wavelengths K and mode numbers n.

  3. Preliminary investigation of heat transfer to water flowing in an electrically heated Inconel tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Samuel J; Isely, Francis D

    1950-01-01

    A heat-transfer investigation was conducted with water flowing in an electrically heated Inconel tube with an inside diameter of 0.204 inch and a length-diameter ratio of 50 for ranges of Reynolds number up to 100,000 and of entrance pressure up to 200 inches of mercury gage. Correlation of average heat-transfer coefficients was obtained by use of the familiar Nusselt relation, wherein the physical properties of water were evaluated at an average bulk temperature. For conditions in which no boiling occurred, the data gave a good correlation. Runs made in the nucleate-boiling region, however, gave higher values of heat-transfer coefficient than would be predicted by the Nusselt relation.

  4. Modulation of mantle plumes and heat flow at the core mantle boundary by plate-scale flow: results from laboratory experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, Helge M.; Jellinek, A. Mark; Richards, Mark A.; Manga, Michael

    2004-09-01

    We report results from analog laboratory experiments, in which a large-scale flow is imposed upon natural convection from a hot boundary layer at the base of a large tank of corn syrup. The experiments show that the subdivision of the convective flow into four regions provides a reasonable conceptual framework for interpreting the effects of large-scale flow on plumes. Region I includes the area of the hot thermal boundary layer (TBL) that is thinned by the large-scale flow, thereby suppressing plumes. Region II encompasses the critically unstable boundary layer where plumes form. Region III is the area above the boundary layer that is devoid of plumes. Region IV comprises the area of hot upwelling and plume conduits. Quantitative analysis of our experiments results in a scaling law for heat flux from the hot boundary and for the spatial extent of plume suppression. When applied to the Earth's core-mantle boundary (CMB), our results suggest that large-scale mantle flow, due to sinking lithospheric plates, can locally thin the TBL and suppress plume formation over large fractions of the CMB. Approximately 30% of heat flow from the core may be due to increased heat flux from plate-scale flow. Furthermore, CMB heat flux is non-uniformly distributed along the CMB, with large areas where heat flux is increased on average by a factor of 2. As a consequence, the convective flow pattern in the outer core may be affected by CMB heat-flux heterogeneity and sensitive to changes in plate-scale mantle flow. Because of plume suppression and 'focusing' of hot mantle from the CMB into zones of upwelling flow, plume conduits (hotspots) are expected to be spatially associated with lower-mantle regions of low seismic velocities, inferred as hot upwelling mantle flow.

  5. The impact of separated flow on heat and mass transfer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, R.J.

    1998-08-01

    An investigation of the effect of flow separation on heat and mass transfer has been completed. This research provided enhanced understanding of fundamental mechanisms governing important heat and mass transfer flow processes. This report summarizes the work conducted under the project. This research has provided considerable new knowledge on flow and heat transfer situations of great interest in a number of energy conversion devices, including heat exchangers, gas turbines, solar energy systems and general heat transfer systems.

  6. The effects of orbital and climatic variations on Martian surface heat flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellon, Michael T.; Jakosky, Bruce M.

    1992-01-01

    We have examined the effects of climate changes, induced by orbital oscillations, on Martian surface heat flow. It was found that the climatological component of the surface heat flow can be larger than the expected internal geothermal heat flow. We suggest that measurements of surface heat flow be targeted for equatorial and south polar regions to avoid climatic effects and that care be taken in interpreting measurements in mid-latitude and north polar regions.

  7. Heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ben

    The demand for clean and environmentally benign energy resources has been a great concern in the last two decades. To alleviate the associated environmental problems, reduction of the use of fossil fuels by developing more cost-effective renewable energy technologies becomes more and more significant. Among various types of renewable energy sources, solar energy and bioenergy take a great proportion. This dissertation focuses on the heat transfer and flow in solar energy and bioenergy systems, specifically for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) systems in Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants and open-channel algal culture raceways for biofuel production. The first part of this dissertation is the discussion about mathematical modeling, numerical simulation and experimental investigation of solar TES system. First of all, in order to accurately and efficiently simulate the conjugate heat transfer between Heat Transfer Fluid (HTF) and filler material in four different solid-fluid TES configurations, formulas of an e?ective heat transfer coe?cient were theoretically developed and presented by extending the validity of Lumped Capacitance Method (LCM) to large Biot number, as well as verifications/validations to this simplified model. Secondly, to provide design guidelines for TES system in CSP plant using Phase Change Materials (PCM), a general storage tank volume sizing strategy and an energy storage startup strategy were proposed using the enthalpy-based 1D transient model. Then experimental investigations were conducted to explore a novel thermal storage material. The thermal storage performances were also compared between this novel storage material and concrete at a temperature range from 400 °C to 500 °C. It is recommended to apply this novel thermal storage material to replace concrete at high operating temperatures in sensible heat TES systems. The second part of this dissertation mainly focuses on the numerical and experimental study of an open-channel algae

  8. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Air Flow, Heat Transfer and Thermal Comfort in Buildings with Different Heating Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabanskis, A.; Virbulis, J.

    2016-04-01

    Monitoring of temperature, humidity and air flow velocity is performed in 5 experimental buildings with the inner size of 3×3×3 m3 located in Riga, Latvia. The buildings are equipped with different heating systems, such as an air-air heat pump, air-water heat pump, capillary heating mat on the ceiling and electric heater. Numerical simulation of air flow and heat transfer by convection, conduction and radiation is carried out using OpenFOAM software and compared with experimental data. Results are analysed regarding the temperature and air flow distribution as well as thermal comfort.

  9. Visualization of heat transfer for impinging swirl flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bakirci, K.; Bilen, K.

    2007-10-15

    The objective of the experimental study was to visualize the temperature distribution and evaluate heat transfer rate on the impingement surface kept at a constant wall temperature boundary condition for the swirling (SIJ), multi-channel (MCIJ) and conventional impinging jet (CIJ) using liquid crystal technique. The swirling jet assembly consisted of a housing tube and a solid swirl generator insert which had four narrow slots machined on its surface. The swirl angle, {theta}, was set as 0 , 22.5 , 41 , 50 to change the direction and strength of the swirl in the air flow exiting the housing tube. The local Nusselt numbers of the MCIJ ({theta} = 0 ) were generally much higher than those of CIJ and SIJs. As the swirl angle increased, the radial uniformity of the heat transfer was seen compared to MCIJ and SIJ; the best results were for {theta} = 50 and the jet-to-surface distance of H/D = 14. The location of the distance of the maximum heat transfer for the swirl angles of {theta} = 41 and 50 was shifted away from the stagnation point in a radial distance of nearly r/D = 2.5. Increasing Reynolds number for same swirler angle increased the heat transfer rate on the entire surface, and increased saddle shape heat transfer distribution on the surface, but had no significant effect on the position of the individual impingement regions, but increased saddle shape heat transfer distribution on the surface. The lower Reynolds number (Re = 10 000) and the highest H/D = 14 gave much more uniform local and average heat transfer distribution on the surface, but decreased their values on the entire surface. (author)

  10. In situ determination of heat flow in unconsolidated sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Kennelly, J.P.; Wendt, W.E.; Moses, T.H.; Ziagos, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    Subsurface thermal measurements are the most effective, least ambiguous tools for identifying and delineating possible geothernml resources. Measurements of thermal gradient in the upper few tens of meters generally are sufficient to outline the major anomalies, but it is always desirable to combine these gradients with reliable estimates of thermal conductivity to provide data on the energy flux and to constrain models for the heat sources responsible for the observed, near-surface thermal anomalies. The major problems associated with heat-flow measurements in the geothermal exploration mode are concerned with the economics of casing and/or grouting holes, the repeated site visits necessary to obtain equilibrium temperature values, the possible legal liability associated with the disturbance of underground aquifers, the surface hazards presented by pipes protruding from the ground, and the security problems associated with leaving cased holes open for periods of weeks to months. We have developed a technique which provides reliable 'real-time' determinations of temperature, thermal conductivity, and hence, of heat flow during the drilling operation in unconsolidated sediments. A combined temperature, gradient, and thermal conductivity experiment can be carried out, by driving a thin probe through the bit about 1.5 meters into the formation in the time that would otherwise be required for a coring trip. Two or three such experiments over the depth range of, say, 50 to 150 meters provide a high-quality heat-flow determination at costs comparable to those associated with a standard cased 'gradient hole' to comparable depths. The hole can be backfilled and abandoned upon cessation of drilling, thereby eliminating the need for casing, grouting, or repeated site visits.

  11. Modeling Heat Flow for a Distributed Moving Heat Source in Micro-Laser Welding of Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewell, David; Benatar, Avraham

    2004-06-01

    Polymer use in micro-devices, especially in the medical industry has been rapidly increasing. During assembly of micro-devices it is desirable to produce weld joints that are about 100 μm in width. This paper reviews the modeling of heat flow during through transmission infrared micro-welding of plastic using fiber coupled laser diodes. Two models were used to predict the temperature distributions within welded samples. Both models were based on a moving heat source and moving coordinate system. For the simpler model a moving point heat source was used and for the more complex model a Gaussian distributed heat source was used. It was found that the distributed model can accurately predict temperature fields in plastic laser welds for all ranges of the parameters evaluated. However, the point heat source model was only able to accurately predict temperature fields with a relatively small laser focal spot (25 μm). In addition it was found that for micro-welding of plastics, when the dimensionless distribution parameter is less than two, a point heat source model predicts similar widths to those predicted by a distributed heat source model.

  12. Flow and heat transfer of ferrofluids over a flat plate with uniform heat flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, W. A.; Khan, Z. H.; Haq, R. U.

    2015-04-01

    The present work is dedicated to analyze the flow and heat transport of ferrofluids along a flat plate subjected to uniform heat flux and slip velocity. A magnetic field is applied in the transverse direction to the plate. Moreover, three different kinds of magnetic nanoparticles (Fe3O4, CoFe2O4, Mn-ZnFe2O4 are incorporated within the base fluid. We have considered two different kinds of base fluids (kerosene and water) having poor thermal conductivity as compared to solid magnetic nanoparticles. Self-similar solutions are obtained and are compared with the available data for special cases. A simulation is performed for each ferrofluid mixture by considering the dominant effects of slip and uniform heat flux. It is found that the present results are in an excellent agreement with the existing literature. The variation of skin friction and heat transfer is also performed at the surface of the plate and then the better heat transfer and of each mixture is analyzed. Kerosene-based magnetite Fe3O4 provides the higher heat transfer rate at the wall as compared to the kerosene-based cobalt ferrite and Mn-Zn ferrite. It is also concluded that the primary effect of the magnetic field is to accelerate the dimensionless velocity and to reduce the dimensionless surface temperature as compared to the hydrodynamic case, thereby increasing the skin friction and the heat transfer rate of ferrofluids.

  13. Borehole Heat Exchangers: heat transfer simulation in the presence of a groundwater flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelotti, A.; Alberti, L.; La Licata, I.; Antelmi, M.

    2014-04-01

    The correct design of the Borehole Heat Exchanger is crucial for the operation and the energy performance of a Ground Source Heat Pump. Most design methods and tools are based on the assumption that the ground is a solid medium where conduction is the only heat transfer mechanism. In turn in regions rich in groundwater the groundwater flow influence has to be assessed, by including the convection effects. In this paper a numerical model of a 100 m U-pipe in a saturated porous medium is presented. The model is created adopting MT3DMS coupled to MODFLOW. A Darcy flow is imposed across the medium. The typical operation of a Borehole Heat Exchanger operating both in winter and in summer is simulated for two years, under different groundwater velocities. The energy injected to and extracted from the ground is derived as a function of the Darcy velocity and compared with the purely conductive case. Temperature fields in the ground at key moments are shown and discussed. From both the energy and the aquifer temperature field points of view, the velocity ranges for respectively negligible and relevant influence of the groundwater flow are identified.

  14. Nanofluid flow and forced convection heat transfer over a stretching surface considering heat source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadpour, M.; Valipour, P.; Shambooli, M.; Ayani, M.; Mirparizi, M.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, magnetic field effects on the forced convection flow of a nanofluid over a stretching surface in the presence of heat generation/absorption are studied. The equations of continuity, momentum and energy are transformed into ordinary differential equations and solved numerically using the fourth-order Runge-Kutta integration scheme featuring the shooting technique. Different types of nanoparticles as copper (Cu), silver (Ag), alumina (Al2O3) and titania (TiO2) with water as their base fluid has been considered. The influence of significant parameters, such as magnetic parameter, volume fraction of the nanoparticles, heat generation/absorption parameter, velocity ratio parameter and temperature index parameter on the flow and heat transfer characteristics are discussed. The results show that the values of temperature profiles increase with increasing heat generation/absorption and volume fraction of the nanoparticles but they decrease with increasing velocity ratio parameter and temperature index parameter. Also, it can be found that selecting silver as nanoparticle leads to the highest heat transfer enhancement.

  15. Paleo-heat flows, radioactive heat generation, and the cooling and deformation history of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Javier; López, Valle; Egea-González, Isabel

    2013-07-01

    Estimates of lithospheric strength for Mercury, based on the depth of thrust faults associated with large lobate scarps (which were most probably formed previously to ˜3 Ga) or on the effective elastic thickness of the lithosphere supporting a broad rise in the northern smooth plains (whose formation is poorly constrained, but posterior to 3.8 Ga), serve as a basis for the calculation of paleo-heat flows, referred to the time when these structures were formed. The so-obtained paleo-heat flows can give information on the Urey ratio (Ur), the ratio between the total radioactive heat production and the total surface heat loss. By imposing the condition Ur < 1 (corresponding to a cooling Mercury, consistent with the observed widespread contraction), we obtain an upper limit of 0.4 times the average surface value for the abundance of heat-producing elements in the outer solid shell of Mercury. We also find that if the formation of the northern rise occurred in a time posterior to ˜3 Ga, then in that time the Urey ratio was lower, and the cooling more intense, than when most of large lobate scarps were formed. Thus, because largest lobate scarps deform older terrains (suggesting more intense contraction early in the mercurian history), we conclude that the northern rise was formed previously to 3 Ga. If the age of other smooth plains large wavelength deformations is similar, then tectonic activity in Mercury would have been limited in the last 3 billion of years.

  16. Instantaneous/Simultaneous Flow Field and Endwall Heat Transfer in Turbulent Juncture Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praisner, Thomas; Smith, Charles

    1998-11-01

    A study of the instantaneous and time-mean flow topology along with the associated endwall heat transfer is presented for a turbulent juncture flow formed with an airfoil body. An experimental technique has been employed which allows the recording of simultaneous and instantaneous high-density PIV and thermochromic liquid-crystal based endwall heat transfer data. Data collected on the symmetry, 60o, 90o, and 90o+0.5D planes reveal the existence of a dominant horseshoe vortex, along with a counter-rotating secondary vortex, a co-rotating tertiary vortex, and a small corner vortex on the symmetry plane. Both instantaneous and time mean endwall heat transfer distributions are characterized by two bands of high heat transfer which circumscribe the base of the bluff body. The region upstream of the horseshoe vortex is characterized by a bimodal switching of the near-wall reverse flow which results in quasi-periodic eruptions of the secondary vortex. A physical model for the unsteady interaction process which gives rise to the high levels of endwall heat transfer is presented and discussed.

  17. Flow Characteristics of the Raw Sewage for the Design of Sewage-Source Heat Pump Systems

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; Wu, Yuebin; Sun, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    The flow characteristics of raw sewage directly affect the technical and economic performance of sewage-source heat pump systems. The purpose of this research is to characterize the flow characteristics of sewage by experimental means. A sophisticated and flexible experimental apparatus was designed and constructed. Then the flow characteristics of the raw sewage were studied through laboratorial testing and theoretical analyses. Results indicated that raw sewage could be characterized as a power-law fluid with the rheological exponent n being 0.891 and the rheological coefficient k being 0.00175. In addition, the frictional loss factor formula in laminar flow for raw sewage was deduced by theoretical analysis of the power-law fluid. Furthermore, an explicit empirical formula for the frictional loss factor in turbulent flow was obtained through curve fitting of the experimental data. Finally, the equivalent viscosity of the raw sewage is defined in order to calculate the Reynolds number in turbulent flow regions; it was found that sewage had two to three times the viscosity of water at the same temperature. These results contributed to appropriate parameters of fluid properties when designing and operating sewage-source heat pump systems. PMID:24987735

  18. Initial solidification phenomena: Factors affecting heat transfer in strip casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolli, Paolo

    In the last few years a few companies have announced the final stage of the commercial development of strip casting of steels. In strip casting heat extraction and productivity are limited by the thermal resistance at the interface between processed material and moving mold (rolls for twin-roll strip casters). Among many factors influencing interfacial heat transfer, films of various composition, either formed during casting or deposited before casting on the surface of the rolls, melt superheat and gas atmosphere composition can have a significantly positive or negative effect on the achieved heat transfer rate. From an industrial point view, methods to improve interfacial heat transfer rates must be found, in order to increase productivity. The objective of this research project is to assess if it is feasible to improve heat transfer rates during solidification of steel in direct contact with a copper mold: (1) by the application of thin coatings on the mold surface; (2) by adding a reactive gas species containing sulfur in the gas shrouding where casting is performed. To address the former, solidification experiments were performed with the mold surface either kept uncoated or coated with coatings of different compositions. To address the latter, the experiments were performed in gas shrouding atmospheres with or without sulphydric acid. It was observed that the resulting heat extraction rates were improved by the application of certain coatings and by the addition of H2S to the gas atmosphere. These findings prove that the application of coatings and the use of small amounts of reactive gaseous species containing sulfur may be methods to increase productivity in strip casting. The effect of superheat and the effect of naturally deposited oxides (Mn-oxide) were also evaluated experimentally. A numerical study of the effect of the critical undercooling on the productivity of a twin-roll strip caster showed that the maximum allowable casting speed can be increased

  19. Pluto's Polygonal Terrain Places Lower Limit on Planetary Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trowbridge, A.; Steckloff, J. K.; Melosh, H., IV; Freed, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    During its recent flyby of Pluto, New Horizons imaged an icy plains region (Sputnik Planum) whose surface is divided into polygonal blocks, ca. 20-30 km across, bordered by what appear to be shallow troughs. The lack of craters within these plains suggests they are relatively young, implying that the underlying material is recently active. The scale of these features argues against an origin by cooling and contraction. Here we investigate the alternative scenario that they are the surface manifestation of shallow convection in a thick layer of nitrogen ice. Typical Rayleigh-Bernard convective cells are approximately three times wider than the depth of the convecting layer, implying a layer depth of ca. 7-10 km. Our convection hypothesis requires that the Rayleigh number exceed a minimum of about 1000 in the nitrogen ice layer. We coupled a parameterized convection model with a temperature dependent rheology of nitrogen ice (Yamashita, 2008), finding a Rayleigh number 1500 to 7500 times critical for a plausible range of heat flows for Pluto's interior. The computed range of heat flow (3.5-5.2 mW/m2) is consistent with the radiogenic heat generated by a carbonaceous chondrite (CC) core implied by Pluto's bulk density. The minimum heat flow at the critical Rayleigh number is 0.13 mW/m2. Our model implies a core temperature of 44 K in the interior of the convecting layer. This is very close to the exothermic β-α phase transition in nitrogen ice at 35.6 K (for pure N2 ice; dissolved CO can increase this, depending on its concentration), suggesting that the warm cores of the rising convective cells may be β phase, whereas the cooler sinking limbs may be α phase. This transition may thus be observable due to the large difference in their spectral signature. Further applying our model to Pluto's putative water ice mantle, the heat flow from CC is consistent with convection in Pluto's mantle and the activity observed on its surface.

  20. Vortex generator induced heat transfer augmentation past a rib in a heated duct air flow

    SciTech Connect

    Myrum, T.A.; Acharya, S.; Inamdar, S.; Mehrotra, A. )

    1992-02-01

    The present investigation represents the initial phase of a comprehensive experimental program designed to study the potential for increasing the heat transfer per unit pressure drop in a ribbed duct by positioning vortex generators at key locations in the flow. In particular, the present investigation consists of a rib positioned at the inlet to a rectangular test section with uniform heating at its bottom wall. Local and average Nusselt number results are obtained for a circular rod positioned either immediately above or just downstream of the rib.

  1. Heat Flow, Climate Change and Advective Heat Transfer Beneath Winnipeg, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferguson, G. A.; Woodbury, A. D.

    2002-12-01

    Winnipeg, Canada is situated in an area of relatively low heat flow, occurring near the eastern edge of the Williston Basin. Temperatures in the carbonate sequence beneath the city are typically between 5.0 and 6.0°C, with geothermal gradients of approximately 0.008 to 0.015°C/m. However, temperatures as high as 11.0°C have been found in the upper reaches of the bedrock beneath certain areas of Winnipeg. Associated with these elevated temperatures are negative geothermal gradients low as -0.060°C/m, indicating downward heat flow. This downward flow of heat has been found to penetrate as deep as 130 metres below ground surface. Elevated temperatures in the bedrock beneath Winnipeg cannot be attributed to climate change alone due to the magnitude of the anomaly. Basement heating and injection of warm water into the aquifers underlying Winnipeg are likely responsible for the temperature anomaly along with mesoclimate change. Basement construction occurring over approximately the last 100 years has altered the heat loading at the surface and in many cases several metres below the surface. Temperatures beneath basements are held constant at approximately 15 to 20°C, rather than fluctuating about the mean annual temperature of 2.14°C. This has played a large role in altering the subsurface temperatures of the region. Temperature profiles beneath central Winnipeg show the greatest impacts of this loading of heat from the surface, with smooth temperature profile and geothermal gradients that increase linearly from the surface. Groundwater use practices have also played a large role in altering the heat flow beneath Winnipeg, Canada. Most groundwater use within the City of Winnipeg is for air conditioning and industrial cooling and much of this use is non-consumptive, with warm water being pumped back into the shallow carbonate rock aquifer, known locally as the Upper Carbonate Aquifer, to maintain aquifer pressures. These injection wells exist throughout the city but

  2. Groundwater flow and heat flow in an area of mineral springs

    SciTech Connect

    Vasseur, G. )

    1991-01-01

    As part of the project Geologie Profonde de la France, two boreholes have been drilled in the active hydrothermal area of Chassole, an area of metamorphic Variscan basement characterized by the occurrence of sodium-bicarbonate waters that have undergone high temperatures during their underground cycle. The underground water flow system, as revealed from various hydraulic and chemical observations, appears very complex: it is characterized by the simultaneous presence of meteoric water flowing downwards and mineralized water of deep origin flowing upwards. Geothermal measurements performed in the borehole are presented in detail and a semi-quantitative interpretation is given. A vertical profile of heat flow down to 1400 m depth indicates important variations, which are interpreted as the result of upward vertical movement of water. The quantitative interpretation of the data is based on simple models of steady state and transient temperature disturbances associated with water flow.

  3. Channelized fluid flow in oceanic crust reconciles heat-flow and permeability data

    PubMed

    Fisher; Becker

    2000-01-01

    Hydrothermal fluid circulation within the sea floor profoundly influences the physical, chemical and biological state of the crust and the oceans. Circulation within ridge flanks (in crust more than 1 Myr old) results in greater heat loss and fluid flux than that at ridge crests and persists for millions of years, thereby altering the composition of the crust and overlying ocean. Fluid flow in oceanic crust is, however, limited by the extent and nature of the rock's permeability. Here we demonstrate that the global data set of borehole permeability measurements in uppermost oceanic crust defines a trend with age that is consistent with changes in seismic velocity. This trend-which indicates that fluid flow should be greatly reduced in crust older than a few million years-would appear to be inconsistent with heat-flow observations, which on average indicate significant advective heat loss in crust up to 65 Myr old. But our calculations, based on a lateral flow model, suggest that regional-scale permeabilities are much higher than have been measured in boreholes. These results can be reconciled if most of the fluid flow in the upper crust is channelized through a small volume of rock, influencing the geometry of convection and the nature of fluid-rock interaction. PMID:10638753

  4. Determination of forced convective heat transfer coefficients for subsonic flows over heated asymmetric NANA 4412 airfoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dag, Yusuf

    Forced convection over traditional surfaces such as flat plate, cylinder and sphere have been well researched and documented. Data on forced convection over airfoil surfaces, however, remain very scanty in literature. High altitude vehicles that employ airfoils as lifting surfaces often suffer leading edge ice accretions which have tremendous negative consequences on the lifting capabilities and stability of the vehicle. One of the ways of mitigating the effect of ice accretion involves judicious leading edge convective cooling technique which in turn depends on the accuracy of convective heat transfer coefficient used in the analysis. In this study empirical investigation of convective heat transfer measurements on asymmetric airfoil is presented at different angle of attacks ranging from 0° to 20° under subsonic flow regime. The top and bottom surface temperatures are measured at given points using Senflex hot film sensors (Tao System Inc.) and used to determine heat transfer characteristics of the airfoils. The model surfaces are subjected to constant heat fluxes using KP Kapton flexible heating pads. The monitored temperature data are then utilized to determine the heat convection coefficients modelled empirically as the Nusselt Number on the surface of the airfoil. The experimental work is conducted in an open circuit-Eiffel type wind tunnel, powered by a 37 kW electrical motor that is able to generate subsonic air velocities up to around 41 m/s in the 24 square-inch test section. The heat transfer experiments have been carried out under constant heat flux supply to the asymmetric airfoil. The convective heat transfer coefficients are determined from measured surface temperature and free stream temperature and investigated in the form of Nusselt number. The variation of Nusselt number is shown with Reynolds number at various angles of attacks. It is concluded that Nusselt number increases with increasing Reynolds number and increase in angle of attack from 0

  5. Cryogenic two-phase flow during chilldown: Flow transition and nucleate boiling heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Jelliffe Kevin

    The recent interest in space exploration has placed a renewed focus on rocket propulsion technology. Cryogenic propellants are the preferred fuel for rocket propulsion since they are more energetic and environmentally friendly compared with other storable fuels. Voracious evaporation occurs while transferring these fluids through a pipeline that is initially in thermal equilibrium with the environment. This phenomenon is referred to as line chilldown. Large temperature differences, rapid transients, pressure fluctuations and the transition from the film boiling to the nucleate boiling regime characterize the chilldown process. Although the existence of the chilldown phenomenon has been known for decades, the process is not well understood. Attempts have been made to model the chilldown process; however the results have been fair at best. A major shortcoming of these models is the use of correlations that were developed for steady, non-cryogenic flows. The development of reliable correlations for cryogenic chilldown has been hindered by the lack of experimental data. An experimental facility was constructed that allows the flow structure, the temperature history and the pressure history to be recorded during the line chilldown process. The temperature history is then utilized in conjunction with an inverse heat conduction procedure that was developed, which allows the unsteady heat transfer coefficient on the interior of the pipe wall to be extracted. This database is used to evaluate present predictive models and correlations for flow regime transition and nucleate boiling heat transfer. It is found that by calibrating the transition between the stratified-wavy and the intermittent/annular regimes of the Taitel and Dukler flow regime map, satisfactory predictions are obtained. It is also found that by utilizing a simple model that includes the effect of flow structure and incorporating the enhancement provided by the local heat flux, significant improvement in the

  6. Flow Visualization within the Evaporator of Planar Loop Heat Pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Junwoo; Cytrynowicz, Debra; Medis, Praveen; Gerner, Frank M.; Henderson, H. Thurman

    2005-02-01

    A planar micro loop heat pipe (LHP) with coherent porous silicon (CPS) wick in the evaporator is a two-phase heat transfer device that utilizes evaporation and condensation to transfer heat. This CPS wick has thousands of pores, which are 2 micrometer in diameter, contained over an area of one square centimeter. As heat is applied to the evaporator, liquid is vaporized and evaporator chamber's pressure is increased. A meniscus formed at the liquid/vapor interface inside the pore of the CPS wick is supported by capillary forces even though pressure force pushes it down. Vapor flows through the vapor line to the condenser and condenses. Liquid is transported back to the evaporator due to pressure difference. The internal thermodynamics and fluid dynamics are poorly understood due to the difficulty of taking internal measurements and the complexity of two-phase phenomena. To understand this thermal device, the clear evaporator machined from Pyrex glass was utilized to monitor the complex phenomena which occur in the evaporator. These phenomena include vapor formation, nucleate boiling, evaporation, depriming, and pressure oscillation. DI-water was utilized as the working fluid.

  7. Heat transfer deterioration in tubes caused by bulk flow acceleration due to thermal and frictional influences

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J. D.

    2012-07-01

    Severe deterioration of forced convection heat transfer can be encountered with compressible fluids flowing through strongly heated tubes of relatively small bore as the flow accelerates and turbulence is reduced because of the fluid density falling (as the temperature rises and the pressure falls due to thermal and frictional influence). The model presented here throws new light on how the dependence of density on both temperature and pressure can affect turbulence and heat transfer and it explains why the empirical equations currently available for calculating effectiveness of forced convection heat transfer under conditions of strong non-uniformity of fluid properties sometimes fail to reproduce observed behaviour. It provides a criterion for establishing the conditions under which such deterioration of heat transfer might be encountered and enables heat transfer coefficients to be determined when such deterioration occurs. The analysis presented here is for a gaseous fluid at normal pressure subjected strong non-uniformity of fluid properties by the application of large temperature differences. Thus the model leads to equations which describe deterioration of heat transfer in terms of familiar parameters such as Mach number, Reynolds number and Prandtl number. It is applicable to thermal power plant systems such as rocket engines, gas turbines and high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors. However, the ideas involved apply equally well to fluids at supercritical pressure. Impairment of heat transfer under such conditions has become a matter of growing interest with the active consideration now being given to advanced water-cooled nuclear reactors designed to operate at pressures above the critical value. (authors)

  8. Snow distribution and heat flow in the taiga

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, M. )

    1992-05-01

    The trees of the taiga intercept falling snow and cause it to become distributed in an uneven fashion. Around aspen and birch, cone-shaped accumulations form. Beneath large spruce trees, the snow cover is depleted, forming a bowl-shaped depression called a tree well. Small spruce trees become covered with snow, creating cavities that funnel cold air to the snow/ground interface. The depletion of snow under large spruce trees results in greater heat loss from the ground. A finite difference model suggests that heat flow from tree wells can be more than twice that of undisturbed snow. In forested watersheds, this increase can be a significant percentage of the total winter energy exchange.

  9. Investigation of turbulent juncture flow endwall heat transfer and flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praisner, Thomas James

    A study of the instantaneous and time-mean flow topology in a turbulent juncture flow, and the associated endwall heat transfer is presented. A new experimental technique was developed for this work which allows the recording of simultaneous and instantaneous high-density Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and thermochromic Liquid-Crystal (LC) based endwall heat transfer data. Endwall heat transfer and simultaneous PIV data in the symmetry, 60sp°, 90sp°, and 90sp° + 0.5D planes were recorded for juncture flows with ResbD\\ ≅ 2.4 × 10sp5. The results illustrate the existence (in an instantaneous and time-mean sense) of a dominant horseshoe vortex, a counter-rotating secondary vortex, a co-rotating tertiary vortex, and a small corner vortex. The corner vortex is a steady feature of the corner region, while the secondary vortex develops sporadically immediately upstream of the horseshoe vortex. The tertiary vortex appears intermittently upstream of the secondary vortex. The region upstream of the horseshoe vortex is characterized by a bimodal switching of the near-wall reverse flow which results in quasi-periodic eruptions of the secondary vortex. The bimodal switching of the reverse flow is shown to be a result of sporadic bursting of the down-wash fluid on the face of the bluff body. Both instantaneous and time mean endwall heat transfer distributions are characterized by two bands of high heat transfer which circumscribe the base of the bluff body. The primary band of high heat transfer (near x/D = 0.05) is a result of the outer-region fluid which impinges on the endwall in the corner region after advecting down the face of the bluff body. The inrush of cool outer-region fluid following the eruptive events upstream of the horseshoe vortex gives rise to the secondary band of high heat transfer near x/D = 0.27. A physical model for the complete interaction process on the symmetry plane is presented along with the associated trends in endwall surface heat transfer

  10. How does tidal flow affect pattern formation in mussel beds?

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Jonathan A; Mackenzie, Julia J

    2016-10-01

    In the Wadden Sea, mussel beds self-organise into spatial patterns consisting of bands parallel to the shore. A leading explanation for this phenomenon is that mussel aggregation reduces losses from dislodgement and predation, because of the adherence of mussels to one another. Previous mathematical modelling has shown that this can lead to spatial patterning when it is coupled to the advection from the open sea of algae-the main food source for mussels in the Wadden Sea. A complicating factor in this process is that the advection of algae will actually oscillate with the tidal flow. This has been excluded from previous modelling studies, and the present paper concerns the implications of this oscillation for pattern formation. The authors initially consider piecewise constant ("square-tooth") oscillations in advection, which enables analytical investigation of the conditions for pattern formation. They then build on this to study the more realistic case of sinusoidal oscillations. Their analysis shows that future research on the details of pattern formation in mussel beds will require an in-depth understanding of how the tides affect long-range inhibition among mussels. PMID:27343625

  11. Couette flow regimes with heat transfer in rarefied gas

    SciTech Connect

    Abramov, A. A. Butkovskii, A. V.

    2013-06-15

    Based on numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation by direct statistic simulation, the Couette flow with heat transfer is studied in a broad range of ratios of plate temperatures and Mach numbers of a moving plate. Flow regime classification by the form of the dependences of the energy flux and friction stress on the Knudsen number Kn is proposed. These dependences can be simultaneously monotonic and nonmonotonic and have maxima. Situations are possible in which the dependence of the energy flux transferred to a plate on Kn has a minimum, while the dependence of the friction stress is monotonic or even has a maximum. Also, regimes exist in which the dependence of the energy flux on Kn has a maximum, while the dependence of the friction stress is monotonic, and vice versa.

  12. Flow regimes and heat transfer in vertical narrow annuli

    SciTech Connect

    Ulke, A.; Goldberg, I.

    1993-11-01

    In shell side boiling heat exchangers narrow crevices that are formed between the tubes and the tube support structure provide areas for local thermal-hydraulic conditions which differ significantly from bulk fluid conditions. Understanding of the processes of boiling and dryout in flow restricted crevices can help in designing of tube support geometries to minimize the likelihood of tube support plate and tube corrosion observed in commercial power plant steam generators. This paper describes a one dimensional thermal-hydraulic model of a vertical crevice between a tube and a support plate with cylindrical holes. The annulus formed by the support plate hole and an eccentrically located tube has been represented by vertical strips. The formation, growth and collapse of a steam bubble in each strip has been determined. Based on the bubble history, and flow regimes characterized by ``isolated`` bubbles, ``coalesced`` bubbles and liquid deficient regions have been defined.

  13. Heat transport in laminar flow of erythrocyte suspensions.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, A S

    1975-07-01

    Measurements of thermal conductivity were made in laminar flow of dog and turkey erythrocyte suspensions in a stainless stell tube of about 1 mm ID. These measurements were independent of the shear rate, showing that the red cell motion relative to plasma in flowing blood had no effect on the heat transfer. Measurements of thermal conductivity were further made in suspensions of polystyrene spheres of 100 mum and were found to be dependent upon the shear rate. The Graetz solution corresponding to uniform wall temperature was used for determining the value of thermal conductivity in an apparatus calibrated with tap water. The overall accuracy of the results is within 10%. A model based on the particle rotation with the entrained fluid is proposed. It is pointed out that the diffusion of platelets, red cells, and possibly plasma proteins (such as fibrinogen) will be augmented if they happen to be in the hydrodynamic field of rotating erythrocytes. PMID:1150598

  14. Heating surface material’s effect on subcooled flow boiling heat transfer of R134a

    SciTech Connect

    Ling Zou; Barclay G. Jones

    2012-11-01

    In this study, subcooled flow boiling of R134a on copper (Cu) and stainless steel (SS) heating surfaces was experimentally investigated from both macroscopic and microscopic points of view. By utilizing a high-speed digital camera, bubble growth rate, bubble departure size, and nucleation site density, were able to be observed and analyzed from the microscopic point of view. Macroscopic characteristics of the subcooled flow boiling, such as heat transfer coefficient, were able to be measured as well. Experimental results showed that there are no obvious difference between the copper and the stainless surface with respect to bubble dynamics, such as contact angle, growth rate and departure size. On the contrary, the results clearly showed a trend that the copper surface had a better performance than the stainless steel surface in terms of heat transfer coefficient. It was also observed that wall heat fluxes on both surfaces were found highly correlated with nucleation site density, as bubble hydrodynamics are similar on these two surfaces. The difference between these two surfaces was concluded as results of different surface thermal conductivities.

  15. Pressure Drop and Heat Transfer of Water Flowing Shell-Side of Multitube Heat Exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Yukio; Hashizume, Kenichi

    Experimental studies on heat transfer augmentation in water-flowing shell sides of counter flow multitube exchangers are presented. Various kinds of augmented tube bundles have been examined to obtain the characteristics of pressure drop and heat transfer. Data for a smooth tube bundle were a little different from those for the tube side. The pressure drop in the shell side depended on Re-0.4 and deviated from the tube side pressure drop to within +30%, while the shell side heat transfer coefficient depended on Re0.8 but about 35%. larger than that of the tube side. Furthermore the augmented tube bundles have been evaluated and compared using 21 evaluation criteria. Enhanced tube bundles, low-finned tube bundles and those with twisted tapes inserted had especially good performances. The ratios of increase in heat transfer were larger than those in pressure drop. In case of low-finned tube bundles, there seem to exist an optimum fin-pitch and an optimum relation between the fin-pitch and the pitch of twisted tapes inserted.

  16. Surface heat flow and the mantle contribution on the margins of Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goutorbe, Bruno; Lucazeau, Francis; Bonneville, Alain

    2008-05-01

    We present thermal data from 473 oil exploration wells in Australia and New Zealand. Approximately 2300 bottom-hole temperatures are corrected to form a homogeneous set along with 86 temperatures from reservoir tests. Thermal conductivity profiles are estimated from a set of geophysical well logs using a recently developed neural network approach. Retaining wells in which temperature and thermal conductivity data overlap over an interval greater than 1000 m, we estimate 10 heat flow values in the Taranaki basin of New Zealand and 270 values in the northwestern, western, and southern margins and in the intracontinental Canning basin of Australia. The values are in the range 30-80 mW m-2. As a result of several differences in the data and methods, our heat flow values are 10-20 mW m-2 lower compared to previously published estimates for the same wells in New Zealand. For Australia, our values are consistent with previously measured values and trends in the continental and marine regions. On the northwestern and southeastern margins, we interpret the variations as reflecting changes in the nature of the underlying basement. Consistent with onshore data, it is inferred that the Archean crust is depleted in radiogenic elements compared to Proterozoic regions and that recent volcanism affects the eastern Paleozoic area. After removing from surface heat flow the sediment contributions, including a permanent radiogenic heat component and a transient sedimentation effect, a simple crustal model suggests that mantle heat flow on the continental margin bordering the Pilbara craton is higher than below the craton itself. Moreover, heat flow corrected for the sediment contributions is markedly lower in the Petrel intracontinental basin than in the adjacent margin, although the crust is thinner below this latter region. As both are underlaid by the same basement, this observation may indicate that the mantle contribution is also higher below that margin. Such a higher mantle

  17. Heat Flow of The NE German Basin: A Matter of Revision?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, B.; Förster, A.

    The Northeast German Basin (NEGB) is part of the Middle European Depression and comprises a sedimentary succession up to 9 km thick. Recent geophysical investiga- tions have shown that Baltic crust reaches to the south of the Caledonian Deforma- tion Front (CDF) and that strong crustal heterogeneity exists between the CDF and the Elbe line. This area of crustal heterogeneity is interpreted as the transition zone between Proterozoic and Phanerozoic European crusts where magmatic underplating occurred in Permian time. The crust here supposedly contains blocks of lower crust of Baltica that were detached and displaced during the Caledonian orogeny. To further clarify whether the crust beneath the NEGB is different in composition and to what extent crustal composition and crustal thickness affect the thermal conditions of the basin it is of interest to revisit surface heat flow. A set of widely distributed deep wells from which temperature profiles and drill cores are available is under examination yet. The Lower Permian (Rotliegend) sediments and volcanic rocks are the main target for new heat flow determinations. Obstacles for determining high-quality heat flow val- ues are the temperature data provided by the oil industry with large (50-m) recording intervals and therefore lack of detail in the temperature-depth distribution. Some tem- perature logs need to be corrected for thermal equilibrium. Other corrections concern the temperature dependence of thermal conductivity and the heat transfer around thick salt structures. For example, the temperature decrease below a salt structure of 2000- m thickness and, vice versa, the temperature increase above the salt can be observed for several hundred meters and may reach -5 to +15 C, respectively. New thermal conductivity values differ slightly to strongly from measurements made in previous studies under unknown conditions. Andesites show values of 2.2 W/m/K in corre- spondence with the older data. In contrast, previous

  18. Reattachment heating upstream of short compression ramps in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estruch-Samper, David

    2016-05-01

    Hypersonic shock-wave/boundary-layer interactions with separation induce unsteady thermal loads of particularly high intensity in flow reattachment regions. Building on earlier semi-empirical correlations, the maximum heat transfer rates upstream of short compression ramp obstacles of angles 15° ⩽ θ ⩽ 135° are here discretised based on time-dependent experimental measurements to develop insight into their transient nature (Me = 8.2-12.3, Re_h= 0.17× 105-0.47× 105). Interactions with an incoming laminar boundary layer experience transition at separation, with heat transfer oscillating between laminar and turbulent levels exceeding slightly those in fully turbulent interactions. Peak heat transfer rates are strongly influenced by the stagnation of the flow upon reattachment close ahead of obstacles and increase with ramp angle all the way up to θ =135°, whereby rates well over two orders of magnitude above the undisturbed laminar levels are intermittently measured (q'_max>10^2q_{u,L}). Bearing in mind the varying degrees of strength in the competing effect between the inviscid and viscous terms—namely the square of the hypersonic similarity parameter (Mθ )^2 for strong interactions and the viscous interaction parameter bar{χ } (primarily a function of Re and M)—the two physical factors that appear to most globally encompass the effects of peak heating for blunt ramps (θ ⩾ 45°) are deflection angle and stagnation heat transfer, so that this may be fundamentally expressed as q'_max∝ {q_{o,2D}} θ ^2 with further parameters in turn influencing the interaction to a lesser extent. The dominant effect of deflection angle is restricted to short obstacle heights, where the rapid expansion at the top edge of the obstacle influences the relaxation region just downstream of reattachment and leads to an upstream displacement of the separation front. The extreme heating rates result from the strengthening of the reattaching shear layer with the increase in

  19. Heat flow and thermal history of the Anadarko basin, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, L.S.; Kelley, S.A.; Blackwell, D.D.; Naeser, N.D.

    1998-01-01

    New heat-flow values for seven sites in the Anadarko basin, Oklahoma, were determined using high-precision temperature logs and thermal conductivity measurements from nearly 300 core plugs. Three of the sites are on the northern shelf, three sites are in the deep basin, and one site is in the frontal fault zone of the northern Wichita Mountains. The heat flow decreased from 55 to 64 mW/m2 in the north, and from 39 to 54 mW/m2 in the south, due to a decrease in heat generation in the underlying basement rock toward the south. Lateral lithologic changes in the basin, combined with the change in heat flow across the basin, resulted in an unusual pattern of thermal maturity. The vitrinite reflectance values of the Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Woodford formation are highest 30-40 km north-northwest of the deepest part of the basin. The offset in highest reflectance values is due to the contrast in thermal conductivity between the Pennsylvanian "granite wash" section adjacent to the Wichita uplift and the Pennsylvanian shale section to the north. The geothermal gradient in the low-conductivity shale section is elevated relative to the geothermal gradient in the high-conductivity "granite wash" section, thus displacing the highest temperatures to the north of the deepest part of the basin. Apatite fission-track, vitrinite reflectance, and heat-flow data were used to constrain regional aspects of the burial history of the Anadarko basin. By combining these data sets, we infer that at least 1.5 km of denudation has occurred at two sites in the deep Anadarko basin since the early to middle Cenozoic (40 ?? 10 m.y.). The timing of the onset of denudation in the southern Anadarko basin coincides with the period of late Eocene erosion observed in the southern Rocky Mountains and in the northern Great Plains. Burial history models for two wells from the deep Anadarko basin predict that shales of the Woodford formation passed through the hydrocarbon maturity window by the

  20. Volcanic eruptions on Io: Heat flow, resurfacing, and lava composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaney, Diana L.; Johnson, Torrence V.; Matson, Dennis L.; Veeder, Glenn J.

    1995-01-01

    We model an infrared outburst on Io as being due to a large, erupting lava flow which increased its area at a rate of 1.5 x 10(exp 5)/sq m and cooled from 1225 to 555 K over the 2.583-hr period of observation. The inferred effusion rate of 3 x 10(exp 5) cu m/sec for this eruption is very high, but is not unprece- dented on the Earth and is similar to the high eruption rates suggested for early lunar volcanism. Eruptions occur approxi- mately 6% of the time on Io. These eruptions provide ample resurfacing to explain Io's lack of impact craters. We suggest that the large total radiometric heat flow, 10(exp 14) W, and the size and temperature distribution of the thermal anomalies (McEwen et al. 1992; Veeder et al. 1994) can be accounted for by a series of silicate lava flows in various stages of cooling. We propose that the whole suite of Io's currently observed thermal anomalies was produced by multiple, high-eruptive-rate silicate flows within the past century.

  1. Nutrient transport as affected by rate of overland flow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Little information is currently available concerning the effects of varying flow rate on nutrient transport by overland flow. The objective of this study was to measure the effects of overland flow rate on nutrient transport following the application of beef cattle or swine manure to plots containin...

  2. Development of a Deep-Penetrating, Compact Geothermal Heat Flow System for Robotic Lunar Geophysical Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagihara, Seiichi; Zacny, Kris; Hedlund, Magnus; Taylor, Patrick T.

    2012-01-01

    increase during the heating. By stopping during the excavation, it is possible to measure thermal conductivities at different depths. The gas jets are turned off when the penetrating cone reaches the target depth. Then, the stem pushes the needle sensor into the undisturbed soil at the bottom of the hole and carries out a thermal conductivity measurement. When the measurement is complete, the system resumes excavation. RTDs, placed along the stem at short (approx 30 cm) intervals, will monitor long-term temperature stability of the subsurface. Temperature in the shallow subsurface would fluctuate with the diurnal, annual, and precession cycles of the Moon. These thermal waves penetrate to different depths into the regolith. Longterm monitoring of the subsurface temperature would allow us to accurately delineate these cyclic signals and separate them from the signal associated with the outward flow of the Moon s endogenic heat. Further, temperature toward bottom of the 3-m hole should be fairly stable after the heat generated during the excavation dissipates into the surrounding soil. The geothermal gradient may be determined reliably from temperature measurements at the RTDs near the bottom. In order to minimize the heat conduction along the stem from affecting the geothermal gradient measurements, we plan to use low-conductive materials for the stem and develop a mechanism to achieve close coupling between the RTDs and the wall of the excavated hole.

  3. Heat Transfer of Viscoelastic Fluid Flow due to Nonlinear Stretching Sheet with Internal Heat Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandeppanavar, M. M.; Siddalingappa, M. N.; Jyoti, H.

    2013-08-01

    In the present paper, a viscoelastic boundary layer flow and heat transfer over an exponentially stretching continuous sheet in the presence of a heat source/sink has been examined. Loss of energy due to viscous dissipation of the non-Newtonian fluid has been taken into account in this study. Approximate analytical local similar solutions of the highly non-linear momentum equation are obtained for velocity distribution by transforming the equation into Riccati-type and then solving this sequentially. Accuracy of the zero-order analytical solutions for the stream function and velocity are verified by numerical solutions obtained by employing the Runge-Kutta fourth order method involving shooting. Similarity solutions of the temperature equation for non-isothermal boundary conditions are obtained in the form of confluent hypergeometric functions. The effect of various physical parameters on the local skin-friction coefficient and heat transfer characteristics are discussed in detail. It is seen that the rate of heat transfer from the stretching sheet to the fluid can be controlled by suitably choosing the values of the Prandtl number Pr and local Eckert number E, local viscioelastic parameter k*1 and local heat source/ sink parameter β*

  4. High heat flux burnout in subcooled flow boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celata, G. P.; Cumo, M.; Mariani, A.

    1995-09-01

    The paper reports the results of an experimental research carried out at the Heat Transfer Division of the Energy Department, C.R. Casaccia, on the thermal hydraulic characterization of subcooled flow boiling CHF under typical conditions of thermonuclear fusion reactors, i.e. high liquid velocity and subcooling. The experiment was carried out exploring the following parameters: channel diameter (from 2.5 to 8.0 mm), heated length (10 and 15 cm), liquid velocity (from 2 to 40 m/s), exit pressure (from atmospheric to 5.0 MPa), inlet temperature (from 30 to 80 °C), channel orientation (vertical and horizontal). A maximum CHF value of 60.6 MW/m2 has been obtained under the following conditions: T in=30°, p=2.5 MPa, u=40 m/s, D=2.5 mm (smooth channel) Turbulence promoters (helically coiled wires) have been employed to further enhance the CHF attainable with subcooled flow boiling. Helically coiled wires allow an increase of 50% of the maximum CHF obtained with smooth channels.

  5. Flow and heat transfer predictions for film cooling.

    PubMed

    Acharya, S; Tyagi, M; Hoda, A

    2001-05-01

    Film cooling flows are characterized by a row of jets injected at an angle from the blade surface or endwalls into the heated crossflow. The resulting flowfield is quite complex, and accurate predictions of the flow and heat transfer have been difficult to obtain, particularly in the near field of the injected jet. The flowfield is characterized by a spectrum of vortical structures including the dominant kidney vortex, the horse-shoe vortex, the wake vortices and the shear layer vortices. These anisotropic and unsteady structures are not well represented by empirical or ad-hoc turbulence models, and lead to inaccurate predictions in the near field of the jet. In this paper, a variety of modeling approaches have been reviewed, and the limitations of these approaches are identified. Recent emergence of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) tools allow the resolution of the coherent structure dynamics, and it is shown in this paper, that such approaches provide improved predictions over that obtained with turbulence models. PMID:11460622

  6. Transition to turbulence and noise radiation in heated coaxial jet flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloor, Michael; Bühler, Stefan; Kleiser, Leonhard

    2016-04-01

    Laminar-turbulent transition and noise radiation of a parametrized set of subsonic coaxial jet flows with a hot primary (core) stream are investigated numerically by Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) and direct noise computation. This study extends our previous research on local linear stability of heated coaxial jet flows by analyzing the nonlinear evolution of initially laminar flows disturbed by a superposition of small-amplitude unstable eigenmodes. First, a baseline configuration is studied to shed light on the flow dynamics of coaxial jet flows. Subsequently, LESs are performed for a range of Mach and Reynolds numbers to systematically analyze the influences of the temperature and the velocity ratios between the primary and the secondary (bypass) stream. The results provide a basis for a detailed analysis of fundamental flow-acoustic phenomena in the considered heated coaxial jet flows. Increasing the primary-jet temperature leads to an increase of fluctuation levels and to an amplification of far-field noise, especially at low frequencies. Strong mixing between the cold bypass stream and the hot primary stream as well as the intermittent character of the flow field at the end of the potential core lead to a pronounced noise radiation at an aft angle of approximately 35∘. The velocity ratio strongly affects the shear-layer development and therefore also the noise generation mechanisms. Increasing the secondary-stream velocity amplifies the dominance of outer shear-layer perturbations while the disturbance growth rates in the inner shear layer decrease. Already for rmic > 40R1, where rmic is the distance from the end of the potential core and R1 is the core-jet radius, a perfect 1/rmic decay of the sound pressure amplitudes is observed. The potential-core length increases for higher secondary-stream velocities which leads to a shift of the center of the dominant acoustic radiation in the downstream direction.

  7. Estimation of respiratory heat flows in prediction of heat strain among Taiwanese steel workers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wang-Yi; Juang, Yow-Jer; Hsieh, Jung-Yu; Tsai, Perng-Jy; Chen, Chen-Peng

    2016-06-01

    International Organization for Standardization 7933 standard provides evaluation of required sweat rate (RSR) and predicted heat strain (PHS). This study examined and validated the approximations in these models estimating respiratory heat flows (RHFs) via convection (C res) and evaporation (E res) for application to Taiwanese foundry workers. The influence of change in RHF approximation to the validity of heat strain prediction in these models was also evaluated. The metabolic energy consumption and physiological quantities of these workers performing at different workloads under elevated wet-bulb globe temperature (30.3 ± 2.5 °C) were measured on-site and used in the calculation of RHFs and indices of heat strain. As the results show, the RSR model overestimated the C res for Taiwanese workers by approximately 3 % and underestimated the E res by 8 %. The C res approximation in the PHS model closely predicted the convective RHF, while the E res approximation over-predicted by 11 %. Linear regressions provided better fit in C res approximation (R 2 = 0.96) than in E res approximation (R 2 ≤ 0.85) in both models. The predicted C res deviated increasingly from the observed value when the WBGT reached 35 °C. The deviations of RHFs observed for the workers from those predicted using the RSR or PHS models did not significantly alter the heat loss via the skin, as the RHFs were in general of a level less than 5 % of the metabolic heat consumption. Validation of these approximations considering thermo-physiological responses of local workers is necessary for application in scenarios of significant heat exposure.

  8. Recovery of Heat Treated Bacillus cereus Spores Is Affected by Matrix Composition and Factors with Putative Functions in Damage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Warda, Alicja K.; Tempelaars, Marcel H.; Abee, Tjakko; Nierop Groot, Masja N.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of spores to recover and grow out after food processing is affected by cellular factors and by the outgrowth conditions. In the current communication we studied the recovery and outgrowth of individually sorted spores in BHI and rice broth media and on agar plates using flow cytometry. We show that recovery of wet heat treated Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores is affected by matrix composition with highest recovery in BHI broth or on rice agar plates, compared to BHI agar plates and rice broth. Data show that not only media composition but also its liquid or solid state affect the recovery of heat treated spores. To determine the impact of factors with putative roles in recovery of heat treated spores, specific genes previously shown to be highly expressed in outgrowing heat-treated spores were selected for mutant construction. Spores of nine B. cereus ATCC 14579 deletion mutants were obtained and their recovery from wet heat treatment was evaluated using BHI and rice broth and agar plates. Deletion mutant spores showed different capacity to recover from heat treatment compared to wild type with the most pronounced effect for a mutant lacking BC5242, a gene encoding a membrane protein with C2C2 zinc finger which resulted in over 95% reduction in recovery compared to the wild type in BHI broth. Notably, similar relative performance of wild type and mutants was observed using the other recovery conditions. We obtained insights on the impact of matrix composition and state on recovery of individually sorted heat treated spores and identified cellular factors with putative roles in this process. These results may provide leads for future developments in design of more efficient combined preservation treatments. PMID:27486443

  9. Recovery of Heat Treated Bacillus cereus Spores Is Affected by Matrix Composition and Factors with Putative Functions in Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Warda, Alicja K; Tempelaars, Marcel H; Abee, Tjakko; Nierop Groot, Masja N

    2016-01-01

    The ability of spores to recover and grow out after food processing is affected by cellular factors and by the outgrowth conditions. In the current communication we studied the recovery and outgrowth of individually sorted spores in BHI and rice broth media and on agar plates using flow cytometry. We show that recovery of wet heat treated Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 spores is affected by matrix composition with highest recovery in BHI broth or on rice agar plates, compared to BHI agar plates and rice broth. Data show that not only media composition but also its liquid or solid state affect the recovery of heat treated spores. To determine the impact of factors with putative roles in recovery of heat treated spores, specific genes previously shown to be highly expressed in outgrowing heat-treated spores were selected for mutant construction. Spores of nine B. cereus ATCC 14579 deletion mutants were obtained and their recovery from wet heat treatment was evaluated using BHI and rice broth and agar plates. Deletion mutant spores showed different capacity to recover from heat treatment compared to wild type with the most pronounced effect for a mutant lacking BC5242, a gene encoding a membrane protein with C2C2 zinc finger which resulted in over 95% reduction in recovery compared to the wild type in BHI broth. Notably, similar relative performance of wild type and mutants was observed using the other recovery conditions. We obtained insights on the impact of matrix composition and state on recovery of individually sorted heat treated spores and identified cellular factors with putative roles in this process. These results may provide leads for future developments in design of more efficient combined preservation treatments. PMID:27486443

  10. Scaling heat and mass flow through porous media during pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maes, Julien; Muggeridge, Ann H.; Jackson, Matthew D.; Quintard, Michel; Lapene, Alexandre

    2015-03-01

    The modelling of heat and mass flow through porous media in the presence of pyrolysis is complex because various physical and chemical phenomena need to be represented. In addition to the transport of heat by conduction and convection, and the change of properties with varying pressure and temperature, these processes involve transport of mass by convection, evaporation, condensation and pyrolysis chemical reactions. Examples of such processes include pyrolysis of wood, thermal decomposition of polymer composite and in situ upgrading of heavy oil and oil shale. The behaviours of these systems are difficult to predict as relatively small changes in the material composition can significantly change the thermophysical properties. Scaling reduces the number of parameters in the problem statement and quantifies the relative importance of the various dimensional parameters such as permeability, thermal conduction and reaction constants. This paper uses inspectional analysis to determine the minimum number of dimensionless scaling groups that describe the decomposition of a solid porous material into a gas in one dimension. Experimental design is then used to rank these scaling groups in terms of their importance in describing the outcome of two example processes: the thermal decomposition of heat shields formed from polymer composites and the in situ upgrading of heavy oils and oil shales. A sensitivity analysis is used to divide these groups into three sets (primary, secondary and insignificant), thus identifying the combinations of solid and fluid properties that have the most impact on the performance of the different processes.

  11. Flow of Supercritical Hydrogen in a Uniformly Heated Circular Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youn, B.; Mills, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    Turbulent flow of supercritical hydrogen through a uniformly heated circular tube has been investigated using numerical methods, for the range of 4 x 10(exp 5) less than Re less than 3 x 10(exp 6), 5 less than or equal to q(sub W) less than or equal to 10 MW/sq m, 30 less than or equal to T(sub in) less than or equal to 90 K, and 5 less than or equal to P(sub in) less than or equal to 15 MPa. The purpose is to validate a turbulence model and calculation method for the design of active cooling systems of hydrogen-fueled hypersonic aircraft, where the hydrogen fuel a used as coolant. The PHOENICS software package was used for the computations, which required special provision for evaluation of the thermophysical properties of the supercritical hydrogen, and a low Reynolds number form of the k-epsilon turbulence model. Pressure drop and heat transfer data were compared with experiment and existing correlations and good agreement was demonstrated. For the pressure range considered here a "thermal spike" was observed and shown to be due to the secondary peak in specific heat, rather than the primary peak.

  12. Development of Compact, Modular Lunar Heat Flow Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagihara, S.; Zacny, K.; Hedlund, M.; Taylor, P. T.

    2014-01-01

    Geothermal heat flow measurements are a high priority for the future lunar geophysical network missions recommended by the latest Decadal Survey and previously the International Lunar Network. Because the lander for such a mission will be relatively small, the heat flow instrumentation must be a low-mass and low-power system. The instrument needs to measure both thermal gradient and thermal conductivity of the regolith penetrated. It also needs to be capable of excavating a deep enough hole (approx. 3 m) to avoid the effect of potential long-term changes of the surface thermal environment. The recently developed pneumatic excavation system can largely meet the low-power, low-mass, and the depth requirements. The system utilizes a stem which winds out of a pneumatically driven reel and pushes its conical tip into the regolith. Simultaneously, gas jets, emitted from the cone tip, loosen and blow away the soil. The thermal sensors consist of resistance temperature detectors (RTDs) embedded on the stem and an insitu thermal conductivity probe attached to the cone tip. The thermal conductivity probe consists of a short 'needle' (2.4-mm diam. and 15- to 20-mm length) that contains a platinum RTD wrapped in a coil of heater wire. During a deployment, when the penetrating cone reaches a desired depth, it stops blowing gas, and the stem pushes the needle into the yet-to-be excavated, undisturbed bottom soil. Then, it begins heating and monitors the temperature. Thermal conductivity of the soil can determined from the rate of temperature increase with time. When the measurement is complete, the system resumes excavation until it reaches the next targeted depth.

  13. Visualization techniques to experimentally model flow and heat transfer in turbine and aircraft flow passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Louis M.; Hippensteele, Steven A.

    1991-01-01

    Increased attention to fuel economy and increased thrust requirements have increased the demand for higher aircraft gas turbine engine efficiency through the use of higher turbine inlet temperatures. These higher temperatures increase the importance of understanding the heat transfer patterns which occur throughout the turbine passages. It is often necessary to use a special coating or some form of cooling to maintain metal temperatures at a level which the metal can withstand for long periods of time. Effective cooling schemes can result in significant fuel savings through higher allowable turbine inlet temperatures and can increase engine life. Before proceeding with the development of any new turbine it is economically desirable to create both mathematical and experimental models to study and predict flow characteristics and temperature distributions. Some of the methods are described used to physically model heat transfer patterns, cooling schemes, and other complex flow patterns associated with turbine and aircraft passages.

  14. Interpretation of lunar heat flow data. [for estimating bulk uranium abundance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conel, J. E.; Morton, J. B.

    1975-01-01

    Lunar heat flow observations at the Apollo 15 and 17 sites can be interpreted to imply bulk U concentrations for the moon of 5 to 8 times those of normal chondrites and 2 to 4 times terrestrial values inferred from the earth's heat flow and the assumption of thermal steady state between surface heat flow and heat production. A simple model of nearsurface structure that takes into account the large difference in (highly insulating) regolith thickness between mare and highland provinces is considered. This model predicts atypically high local values of heat flow near the margins of mare regions - possibly a factor of 10 or so higher than the global average. A test of the proposed model using multifrequency microwave techniques appears possible wherein heat flow traverse measurements are made across mare-highland contacts. The theoretical considerations discussed here urge caution in attributing global significance to point heat-flow measurements on the moon.

  15. Cooling performance of a nanofluid flow in a heat sink microchannel with axial conduction effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadi, M.; Shahmardan, M. M.; Norouzi, M.; Rashidi, A. M.; Behzadmehr, A.

    2014-12-01

    In this work, the forced convection of a nanofluid flow in a microscale duct has been investigated numerically. The governing equations have been solved utilizing the finite volume method. Two different conjugated domains for both flow field and substrate have been considered in order to solve the hydrodynamic and thermal fields. The results of the present study are compared to those of analytical and experimental ones, and a good agreement has been observed. The effects of Reynolds number, thermal conductivity and thickness of substrate on the thermal and hydrodynamic indexes have been studied. In general, considering the wall affected the thermal parameter while it had no impact on the hydrodynamics behavior. The results show that the effect of nanoparticle volume fraction on the increasing of normalized local heat transfer coefficient is more efficient in thick walls. For higher Reynolds number, the effect of nanoparticle inclusion on axial distribution of heat flux at solid-fluid interface declines. Also, less end losses and further uniformity of axial heat flux lead to an increase in the local normalized heat transfer coefficient.

  16. Cooling performance of a nanofluid flow in a heat sink microchannel with axial conduction effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izadi, M.; Shahmardan, M. M.; Norouzi, M.; Rashidi, A. M.; Behzadmehr, A.

    2014-09-01

    In this work, the forced convection of a nanofluid flow in a microscale duct has been investigated numerically. The governing equations have been solved utilizing the finite volume method. Two different conjugated domains for both flow field and substrate have been considered in order to solve the hydrodynamic and thermal fields. The results of the present study are compared to those of analytical and experimental ones, and a good agreement has been observed. The effects of Reynolds number, thermal conductivity and thickness of substrate on the thermal and hydrodynamic indexes have been studied. In general, considering the wall affected the thermal parameter while it had no impact on the hydrodynamics behavior. The results show that the effect of nanoparticle volume fraction on the increasing of normalized local heat transfer coefficient is more efficient in thick walls. For higher Reynolds number, the effect of nanoparticle inclusion on axial distribution of heat flux at solid-fluid interface declines. Also, less end losses and further uniformity of axial heat flux lead to an increase in the local normalized heat transfer coefficient.

  17. Forced flow supercritical helium in a closed heat transfer loop subjected to pulsed heat loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoa, Christine; Bonnay, Patrick; Bon-Mardion, Michel; Charvin, Philippe; Cheynel, Jean-Noel; Girard, Alain; Lagier, Benjamin; Michel, Frederic; Monteiro, Lionel; Poncet, Jean-Marc; Roussel, Pascal; Rousset, Bernard; Vallcorba-Carbonell, Roser

    2012-06-01

    The superconducting magnets of the tokamak JT-60SA are cooled by means of forced flows of supercritical helium at 4.4 K and 0.5 MPa. The closed loops transfer heat from the magnets to the refrigerator through heat exchangers immersed into a saturated liquid helium bath. An experimental loop was designed to represent a 1/20 scaled down mock-up of JT-60SA central solenoid cooling circuits. This design for keeping the same transit times in the helium circuits, aims at observing the thermally induced transients in the closed loop. Indeed, heated section simulates the variable loads coming from the magnet circuits. A series of experiments was performed with pulsed loads in an isochoric configuration of the loop. The cold circulator has been characterized under pulsed operation and its performances are addressed. Mass flow regulations at the interface of the refrigerator were tested to smooth the pulsed loads with the saturated liquid bath acting as a thermal buffer. Knowledge of the pulsed loads effects on the cryogenic components is important in view of a safe operation of the cryogenic system.

  18. Nitrogen Flow in a Nanonozzle with Heat Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averkin, Sergey; Zhang, Zetian; Gatsonis, Nikolaos

    2012-11-01

    The nitrogen flow in conical nanonozzles at atmospheric pressures are investigated using a three-dimensional unstructured direct simulation Monte Carlo (U3DSMC) method. The DSMC simulations are performed in computational domains that feature the plenum, the nanonozzle region and the external plume expansion region. The inlet and outlet boundaries are modeled by the Kinetic-Moment (KM) boundary conditions method. This methodology is based on the local one dimensional inviscid (LODI) formulation used in compressible (continuous) flow computations. The cross section for elastic collisions is based on the variable hard sphere (VHS) model. The Larsen-Borgnakke (L-B) model is used to simulate the exchange of the internal energy in the collision pair. Solid surfaces are modeled as being either diffuse or specularly reflecting. The effects of Knudsen number, aspect ratio, and nanonozzle scale on the heat transfer are investigating by ranging the throat diameters from 100-500 nm, exit diameter from 100-1000 nm, stagnation pressure from 1-10atm, and wall temperature from 300K-500K. Finite backpressure and vacuum conditions are considered. Macroscopic flow variables are obtained and compared with continuum predictions in order to elucidate the impacts of nanoscale.

  19. Heat Transfer Effects on Laminar Velocity Profiles in Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Robert; Jenkins, Thomas

    1998-11-01

    Heat Transfer Effects on Laminar Velocity Profiles in Pipe Flow. Robert L. Powell, Thomas P. Jenkins Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science University of California, Davis, CA 95616 Using laser Doppler velocimetry, we have measured the axial velocity profiles for steady, pressure driven, laminar flow of water in a circular tube. The flow was established in a one inch diameter seamless glass tube. The entry length prior to the measuring section was over one hundred diameters. Reynolds numbers in the range 500-2000 were used. Under conditions where the temperature difference between the fluid and the surroundings differed by as little as 0.2C, we found significant asymmetries in the velocity profiles. This asymmetry was most pronounced in the vertical plane. Varying the temperature difference moved the velocity maximum either above or below the centerline depending upon whether the fluid was warmer or cooler than the room. These results compare well to existing calculations. Using the available theory and our experiments it is possible to identify parameter ranges where non-ideal conditions(not parabolic velocity profiles) will be found. Supported by the EMSP Program of DOE.

  20. On variations of heat flow and Pn velocity— A case study from the continental area of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaopeng, Huang; Jiyang, Wang

    Temperature is an important factor affecting seismic velocity, and terrestrial heat flow is the direct indication of the thermal state of the lithosphere. Some authors suggested that Pn velocity was closely related with heat flow. Average heat flow values ( q) and Pn velocities ( VPn) from 22 regions have been calculated and collected from published literature to investigate the possible correlationship between these two parameters for the continental area of China. The regional average heat flow values vary from 43 to 99 mW m -2, corresponding to a Pn velocity range of 7.6-8.4 km s -1. Results show that the variations of q and Vpn are far away from any significant inverse relation. Dependencies of seismic velocity on pressure and heat flow on crustal radiogenic heat have been taken into consideration in regressions. However, all the corrections are of little help for the improvement of the expected inverse relation. Various interpretations have been discussed. Seismic velocity is a function of multi varieties. At the depth of Moho boundary, it can at most be simplified as a function of pressure and temperature. With respect to depth, effects of geopressure and geotemperature on Vpn are of exactly the same order with opposite sign. Therefore, any meaningful q- Vpn relationship should be sensitive to the correction of pressure effect on Vpn. But even the relation for the North America (Black and Braile, 1982) is dull of pressure correction. The conclusion deduced from the present study is that temperature at the Moho boundary is not the most important factor affecting Pn velocity. The conceptual inverse correlationship between heat flow and Pn velocity might be masked by various "noises". The non-inverse correlationship has been interpreted as a result of the complex deep structure, unnegligible heterogeneity of the upper mantle and the thermal processes at depth of the lithosphere in the continental area of China.

  1. Laminar natural convection heat transfer and air flow in three-dimensional cubic enclosures with a partially heated wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellah, S.; Ben-Cheikh, N.; Ben-Beya, B.; Lili, T.

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, a finite volume computational procedure and a full multigrid technique are used to investigate laminar natural convection in partially heated cubic enclosures. Effects of heated strip disposition in the enclosure on the heat transfer rate are studied. Results are presented in the form of flow lines, isotherms plots, average Nusselt numbers, and average temperature on the heat source surface. Statistical distributions of temperature and average velocity fields and their root-mean-square values are presented and discussed.

  2. A note on drillhole depths required for reliable heat flow determinations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, D.S.; Howell, J.; Sass, J.H.

    1984-01-01

    In general, there is a limiting depth in a drillhole above which the reliability of a single determination of heat flow decreases rapidly with decreasing depth and below which the statistical uncertainty of a heat flow determination does not change perceptibly with increasing depth. This feature has been established empirically for a test case comprising a group of twelve heat flow sites in the Republic of Zambia. The technique consists of constructing heat flow versus depth curves for individual sites by progressively discarding data from the lower part of the hole and recomputing heat flow from the remaining data. For the Zambian test case, the curves converge towards a uniform value of 67 ?? 3 mW m-2 when all available data are used, but values of heat flow calculated for shallow(< 100 m) parts of the same holes range from 45 to 95 mW m-2. The heat flow versus depth curves are enclosed by a perturbation envelope which has an amplitude of 40 mW m-2 at the surface and decreases linearly to the noise level at 190 m. For the test region of Zambia a depth of 170 m is needed to guarantee a heat flow measurement within ?? 10% of the background regional value. It is reasonable to expect that this depth will be shallower in some regions and deeper in others. Features of heat flow perturbation envelopes can be used as quantitative reliability indices for heat flow studies. ?? 1984.

  3. Experimental and numerical simulations of flow and heat transfer in heat exchanger elements using liquid crystal thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasiek, Jan; Ciofalo, Michele; Wierzbowski, Maciej

    2004-05-01

    Experimental and numerical investigation of heat transfer and fluid flow were conducted for classic heat exchanger elements (flat plate with fin-tubes in-line, staggered and with vortex generators) and corrugated-undulated ducts under transitional and weakly turbulent conditions. The dependence of average heat transfer and pressure drop on Reynolds number and geometrical parameters was investigated. Distributions of local heat transfer coefficient were obtained by using liquid crystal thermography and surface-averaged values were computed. Three-dimensional numerical simulations were conducted by a finite-volume method using a low-Reynolds number k-ɛ model under the assumption of fully developed flow. Computed flow fields provided otherwise inaccessible information on the flow patterns and the mechanisms of heat transfer enhancement.

  4. An Integrated Approach on Groundwater Flow and Heat/Solute Transport for Sustainable Groundwater Source Heat Pump (GWHP) System Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, D. K.; Bae, G. O.; Joun, W.; Park, B. H.; Park, J.; Park, I.; Lee, K. K.

    2015-12-01

    The GWHP system uses a stable temperature of groundwater for cooling and heating in buildings and thus has been known as one of the most energy-saving and cost-efficient renewable energy techniques. A GWHP facility was installed at an island located at the confluence of North Han and South Han rivers, Korea. Because of well-developed alluvium, the aquifer is suitable for application of this system, extracting and injecting a large amount of groundwater. However, the numerical experiments under various operational conditions showed that it could be vulnerable to thermal interference due to the highly permeable gravel layer, as a preferential path of thermal plume migration, and limited space for well installation. Thus, regional groundwater flow must be an important factor of consideration for the efficient operation under these conditions but was found to be not simple in this site. While the groundwater level in this site totally depends on the river stage control of Paldang dam, the direction and velocity of the regional groundwater flow, observed using the colloidal borescope, have been changed hour by hour with the combined flows of both the rivers. During the pumping and injection tests, the water discharges in Cheongpyeong dam affected their respective results. Moreover, the measured NO3-N concentrations might imply the effect of agricultural activities around the facility on the groundwater quality along the regional flow. It is obvious that the extraction and injection of groundwater during the facility operation will affect the fate of the agricultural contaminants. Particularly, the gravel layer must also be a main path for contaminant migration. The simulations for contaminant transport during the facility operation showed that the operation strategy for only thermal efficiency could be unsafe and unstable in respect of groundwater quality. All these results concluded that the integrated approach on groundwater flow and heat/solute transport is necessary

  5. Flow and heat transfer in rotating-disc systems. Volume I - Rotor-stator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, J. M.; Roger, R. H.

    The rotating flows occurring inside turbomachinery are discussed. Laminar and turbulent flow over a single disk and heat transfer from a single disk are addressed. Rotor-stator systems with and without superposed flow, heat transfer in rotor-stator systems, and the ingress problem of sealing rotor-stator systems are examined.

  6. Similarity flow in interaction of a shock wave with an inclined heated channel

    SciTech Connect

    Artemiev, V.I.; Medvedyuk, S.A.; Rybakov, V.A.

    1993-11-01

    A study is made of gasdynamic flow that initiates when a shock wave propagates along a thin heated channel. Analytical conditions of the onset of an unsteady flow precursor are obtained. The flow similarity is proved experimentally; precursor characteristics vs shock wave and heated channel parameters are analyzed.

  7. Distribution Pattern of Terrestrial Heat Flow in Bohai Bay Basin, North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Gong, Y.; Liu, S.; Li, C.; Li, H.

    2004-12-01

    New temperature data from wells in Bohai bay basin increasing associated with the enhancement of oil and gas exploration there provides more reliable information about studying on Terrestrial heat flow pattern. Based on the data from 88 systematic continuous temperature logging curves and more than 1000 well test temperature data, along with the corresponding thermo-physical parameters of rock samples, here we determined 53 heat flow data and estimated other 172 according to thermal resistance method, then the distribution Pattern of heat flow in Bohai Bay basin is presented. Heat flow in Bohai bay basin is relatively large than those in the surrounding mountain areas. For instance, heat flow of Yanshan, north of the basin, is only low as 25 ~ 54 mW/m2, and less than 50 mW/m2 for Taihang mountain to the west, the average heat flow of Luxi Uplift is about 54 mW/m2. Crustal thickness of regions outside the basin to the west and north approximating to 36~44km, apparently is larger than that of basin, which maybe accounts for the high heat flow in Bohai bay basin. Those regions of relatively thin crust within the basin are of middle-high heat flow. Heat flow in such depressions as the Lower Liaohe, Bozhong, Jiyang and Yongqing area northeast of Jizhong Depression, together with Bohai offshore, for example, are all larger than 64 mW/m2, and even high as 70 mW/m2 for some regions with mantle upwelling. Low heat flow appears in those areas with relatively thick crust. For instance, heat flow in Linqing Depression, southwest margin of Jizhong Depression and southern Huanghua Depression, are all less than 64 mW/m2, even less than 60 mW/m2 for those areas with mantle downwelling. Heat flow pattern in Bohai Bay basin is negative correlation with crustal thickness, for those regions with relatively crustal thinning, heat derived from the deep earth is more due to the large lithospheric extension, resulting in the high heat flow; while for those with crustal thickening, heat

  8. Mechanical Properties and Microstructural Evolution of Simulated Heat-Affected Zones in Wrought Eglin Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leister, Brett M.; DuPont, John N.; Watanabe, Masashi; Abrahams, Rachel A.

    2015-12-01

    A comprehensive study was performed to correlate the mechanical properties and microstructural evolution in the heat-affected zone of Eglin steel. A Gleeble 3500 thermo-mechanical simulator was used to simulate weld thermal cycles with different peak temperatures at a heat input of 1500 J/mm. These samples underwent mechanical testing to determine strength and toughness in the as-welded and post-weld heat-treated conditions. The inter-critical heat-affected zone (HAZ) had the lowest strength following thermal simulation, while the fine-grain and coarse-grain heat-affected zone exhibited increased strength when compared to the inter-critical HAZ. The toughness of the heat-affected zone in the as-simulated condition is lower than that of the base metal in all regions of the HAZ. Post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) increased the toughness of the HAZ, but at the expense of strength. In addition, certain combinations of PWHTs within specific HAZ regions exhibited low toughness caused by tempered martensite embrittlement or intergranular failure. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data have shown that Eglin steel has retained austenite in the fine-grain HAZ in the as-simulated condition. In addition, alloy carbides (M23C6, M2C, M7C3) have been observed in the diffraction spectra for the fine-grain and coarse-grain HAZ following a PWHT of 973 K (700 °C)/4 hours.

  9. Heat and Groundwater Flow through Continental Flood Basalt Provinces: Insights Gained from Alternative Models of Permeability/Depth Relationships for the Columbia Plateau, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, E. R.; Williams, C. F.; Ingebritsen, S.; Voss, C. I.; Spane, F.; DeAngelo, J.

    2014-12-01

    Heat-flow mapping of the western USA has identified an apparent low-heat-flow anomaly coincident with the Columbia Plateau Regional Aquifer System, a thick sequence of basalt aquifers within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG). A heat and mass transport model (SUTRA) was used to evaluate the potential impact of groundwater flow on heat flow along two different regional groundwater flow paths. Limited in situ permeability (k) data from the CRBG are compatible with a steep permeability decrease (~3.5 orders of magnitude) at 600-900 m depth and ~40oC. Numerical simulations incorporating this permeability decrease demonstrate that regional groundwater flow can explain lower-than-expected heat flow in these highly anisotropic (kx/kz ~104) continental flood basalts. Simulation results indicate that the abrupt reduction in permeability at ~600 m depth results in an equivalently abrupt transition from a shallow region where heat flow is affected by groundwater flow to a deeper region of conduction-dominated heat flow. Abrupt k decreases at similar temperatures have also been observed in the volcanic rocks of the adjacent Cascade Range volcanic arc and at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, where they result from low-temperature hydrothermal alteration. Because pore filling hydrothermal minerals are largely controlled by the major mineral assemblages of the volcanic rocks, other continental flood basalt provinces may also have large permeability changes at depths corresponding to ~40oC.

  10. Experimental investigation on the heat transfer characteristics and flow pattern in vertical narrow channels heated from one side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lihao; Li, Gang; Tao, Leren

    2016-07-01

    Experimental investigation for the flow boiling of water in a vertical rectangular channel was conducted to reveal the boiling heat transfer mechanism and flow patterns map aspects. The onset of nucleate boiling went upward with the increasing of the working fluid mass flow rate or the decreasing of the inlet working fluid temperature. As the vapour quality was increased, the local heat transfer coefficient increased first, then decreased, followed by various flow patterns. The test data from other researchers had a similar pattern transition for the bubble-slug flow and the slug-annular flow. Flow pattern transition model analysis was performed to make the comparison with current test data. The slug-annular and churn-annular transition models showed a close trend with current data except that the vapor phase superficial velocity of flow pattern transition was much higher than that of experimental data.

  11. 3D numerical simulation on fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics in multistage heat exchanger with slit fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, W. Q.; Cheng, Y. P.; Lee, T. S.

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, a numerical investigation is performed for three-stage heat exchangers with plain plate fins and slit fins respectively, with a three-dimensional laminar conjugated model. The tubes are arranged in a staggered way, and heat conduction in fins is considered. In order to save the computer resource and speed up the numerical simulation, the numerical modeling is carried out stage by stage. In order to avoid the large pressure drop penalty in enhancing heat transfer, a slit fin is presented with the strip arrangement of “front coarse and rear dense” along the flow direction. The numerical simulation shows that, compared to the plain plate fin heat exchanger, the increase in the heat transfer in the slit fin heat exchanger is higher than that of the pressure drop, which proves the excellent performance of this slit fin. The fluid flow and heat transfer performance along the stages is also provided.

  12. Acupuncture affects regional blood flow in various organs.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Sae; Hotta, Harumi

    2008-06-01

    In this review, our recent studies using anesthetized animals concerning the neural mechanisms of vasodilative effect of acupuncture-like stimulation in various organs are briefly summarized. Responses of cortical cerebral blood flow and uterine blood flow are characterized as non-segmental and segmental reflexes. Among acupuncture-like stimuli delivered to five different segmental areas of the body; afferent inputs to the brain stem (face) and to the spinal cord at the cervical (forepaw), thoracic (chest or abdomen), lumbar (hindpaw) and sacral (perineum) levels, cortical cerebral blood flow was increased by stimuli to face, forepaw and hindpaw. The afferent pathway of the responses is composed of somatic groups III and IV afferent nerves and whose efferent nerve pathway includes intrinsic cholinergic vasodilators originating in the basal forebrain. Uterine blood flow was increased by cutaneous stimulation of the hindpaw and perineal area, with perineal predominance. The afferent pathway of the response is composed of somatic group II, III and IV afferent nerves and the efferent nerve pathway includes the pelvic parasympathetic cholinergic vasodilator nerves. Furthermore, we briefly summarize vasodilative regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow via a calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) induced by antidromic activation of group IV somatic afferent nerves. These findings in healthy but anesthetized animals may be applicable to understanding the neural mechanisms improving blood flow in various organs following clinical acupuncture. PMID:18604254

  13. Developmental acclimation to low or high humidity conditions affect starvation and heat resistance of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Parkash, Ravi; Ranga, Poonam; Aggarwal, Dau Dayal

    2014-09-01

    Several Drosophila species originating from tropical humid localities are more resistant to starvation and heat stress than populations from high latitudes but mechanistic bases of such physiological changes are largely unknown. In order to test whether humidity levels affect starvation and heat resistance, we investigated developmental acclimation effects of low to high humidity conditions on the storage and utilization of energy resources, body mass, starvation survival, heat knockdown and heat survival of D. melanogaster. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity (85% RH) stored significantly higher level of lipids and showed greater starvation survival hours but smaller in body size. In contrast, lines reared at low humidity evidenced reduced levels of body lipids and starvation resistance. Starvation resistance and lipid storage level were higher in females than males. However, the rate of utilization of lipids under starvation stress was lower for lines reared under higher humidity. Adult flies of lines reared at 65% RH and acclimated under high or low humidity condition for 200 hours also showed changes in resistance to starvation and heat but such effects were significantly lower as compared with developmental acclimation. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity showed greater heat knockdown time and heat-shock survival. These laboratory observations on developmental and adult acclimation effects of low versus high humidity conditions have helped in explaining seasonal changes in resistance to starvation and heat of the wild-caught flies of D. melanogaster. Thus, we may suggest that wet versus drier conditions significantly affect starvation and heat resistance of D. melanogaster. PMID:24845200

  14. Heat transfer measurements on biconics at incidence in hypersonic high enthalpy air and nitrogen flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gai, S. L.; Cain, T.; Joe, W. S.; Sandeman, R. J.; Miller, C. G.

    1988-01-01

    Heat transfer rate measurements have been obtained at 0, 5, 15, and 21 deg angles-of-attack for a straight biconic scale model of an aeroassisted orbital vehicle proposed for planetary probe missions. Heat-transfer distributions were measured using palladium thin-film resistance gauges deposited on a glass-ceramic substrate. The windward heat transfer correlations were based on equilibrium flow in the shock layer of the model, although the flow may depart from equilibrium in the flow-field.

  15. A Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pump Computer Model in EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect

    Raustad, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the variable refrigerant flow heat pump computer model included with the Department of Energy's EnergyPlusTM whole-building energy simulation software. The mathematical model for a variable refrigerant flow heat pump operating in cooling or heating mode, and a detailed model for the variable refrigerant flow direct-expansion (DX) cooling coil are described in detail.

  16. Modeling fluid flow and heat transfer at Basin and Range faults: preliminary results for Leach hot springs, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    López, Dina L.; Smith, Leslie; Storey, Michael L.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrothermal systems of the Basin and Range Province are often located at or near major range bounding normal faults. The flow of fluid and energy at these faults is affected by the advective transfer of heat and fluid from an to the adjacent mountain ranges and valleys, This paper addresses the effect of the exchange of fluid and energy between the country rock, the valley fill sediments, and the fault zone, on the fluid and heat flow regimes at the fault plane. For comparative purposes, the conditions simulated are patterned on Leach Hot Springs in southern Grass Valley, Nevada. Our simulations indicated that convection can exist at the fault plane even when the fault is exchanging significant heat and fluid with the surrounding country rock and valley fill sediments. The temperature at the base of the fault decreased with increasing permeability of the country rock. Higher groundwater discharge from the fault and lower temperatures at the base of the fault are favored by high country rock permabilities and fault transmissivities. Preliminary results suggest that basal temperatures and flow rates for Leach Hot Springs can not be simulated with a fault 3 km deep and an average regional heat flow of 150 mW/m2 because the basal temperature and mass discharge rates are too low. A fault permeable to greater depths or a higher regional heat flow may be indicated for these springs.

  17. Development of a Compact, Deep-Penetrating Heat Flow Instrument for Lunar Landers: In-Situ Thermal Conductivity System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagihara, S.; Zacny, K.; Hedlund, M.; Taylor, P. T.

    2012-01-01

    Geothermal heat flow is obtained as a product of the geothermal gradient and the thermal conductivity of the vertical soil/rock/regolith interval penetrated by the instrument. Heat flow measurements are a high priority for the geophysical network missions to the Moon recommended by the latest Decadal Survey and previously the International Lunar Network. One of the difficulties associated with lunar heat flow measurement on a robotic mission is that it requires excavation of a relatively deep (approx 3 m) hole in order to avoid the long-term temporal changes in lunar surface thermal environment affecting the subsurface temperature measurements. Such changes may be due to the 18.6-year-cylcle lunar precession, or may be initiated by presence of the lander itself. Therefore, a key science requirement for heat flow instruments for future lunar missions is to penetrate 3 m into the regolith and to measure both thermal gradient and thermal conductivity. Engineering requirements are that the instrument itself has minimal impact on the subsurface thermal regime and that it must be a low-mass and low-power system like any other science instrumentation on planetary landers. It would be very difficult to meet the engineering requirements, if the instrument utilizes a long (> 3 m) probe driven into the ground by a rotary or percussive drill. Here we report progress in our efforts to develop a new, compact lunar heat flow instrumentation that meets all of these science and engineering requirements.

  18. Experimental and numerical simulations of heat transfers between flowing water and a horizontal frozen porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, N.; Costard, F.; Grenier, C. F.

    2013-12-01

    In permafrost-affected regions, hydrological changes due to global warming are still under investigation. But yet, we can already foresee from recent studies that for example, the variability and intensity of surface/subsurface flow are likely to be affected by permafrost degradation. And the feedback induced by such changes on permafrost degradation is still not clearly assessed. Of particular interest are lake and river-taliks. A talik is a permanently unfrozen zone that lies below rivers or lake. They should play a key role in these interactions given that they are the only paths for groundwater flow in permafrost regions. Thus heat transfers on a regional scale are potentially influenced by groundwater circulation. The aim of our study is therefore to investigate the evolution of river taliks. We developed a multidisciplinary approach coupling field investigation, experimental studies in a cold room and numerical modeling. In Central Yakutia, Siberia, where permafrost is continuous, we recently installed instruments to monitor ground temperature and water pressure in a river talik between two thermokarst lakes. We present here the coupling of numerical modeling and laboratory experiments in order to look after the main parameters controlling river-talik installation. In a cold room at IDES, where a metric scale channel is filled with sand as a porous medium, we are able to control air, water and permafrost temperature, but also water flow, so that we can test various parameter sets for a miniaturized river. These results are confronted with a numerical model developed at the LSCE with Cast3m (www-cast3m.cea.fr), that couples heat and water transfer. In particular, expressions for river-talik heat exchange terms are investigated. A further step will come in the near future with results from field investigation providing the full complexity of a natural system. Keywords: Talik, River, Numerical Modeling, Cold Room, Permafrost.

  19. Revised conceptualization of the North China Basin groundwater flow system: Groundwater age, heat and flow simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Guoliang; Han, Dongmei; Currell, Matthew J.; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2016-09-01

    Groundwater flow in deep sedimentary basins results from complex evolution processes on geological timescales. Groundwater flow systems conceptualized according to topography and/or groundwater table configuration generally assume a near-equilibrium state with the modern landscape. However, the time to reach such a steady state, and more generally the timescales of groundwater flow system evolution are key considerations for large sedimentary basins. This is true in the North China Basin (NCB), which has been studied for many years due to its importance as a groundwater supply. Despite many years of study, there remain contradictions between the generally accepted conceptual model of regional flow, and environmental tracer data. We seek to reconcile these contractions by conducting simulations of groundwater flow, age and heat transport in a three dimensional model, using an alternative conceptual model, based on geological, thermal, isotope and historical data. We infer flow patterns under modern hydraulic conditions using this new model and present the theoretical maximum groundwater ages under such a flow regime. The model results show that in contrast to previously accepted conceptualizations, most groundwater is discharged in the vicinity of the break-in-slope of topography at the boundary between the piedmont and central plain. Groundwater discharge to the ocean is in contrast small, and in general there are low rates of active flow in the eastern parts of the basin below the central and coastal plain. This conceptualization is more compatible with geochemical and geothermal data than the previous model. Simulated maximum groundwater ages of ∼1 Myrs below the central and coastal plain indicate that residual groundwater may be retained in the deep parts of the basin since being recharged during the last glacial period or earlier. The groundwater flow system has therefore probably not reached a new equilibrium state with modern-day hydraulic conditions. The

  20. Convective heat and mass transfer during the evaporation of a liquid into a gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiarshinov, B. F.; Volchkov, E. P.; Terekhov, V. I.

    1985-10-01

    Heat and mass transfer processes associated with liquid evaporation are analyzed for adiabatic and nonadiabatic conditions. Experimental data are then presented on heat and mass transfer during the evaporation of water and ethyl alcohol from a porous surface. It is shown that heat and mass transfer under conditions of evaporation can be described by using expressions for flow past a 'dry' wall. A diagram is presented for determining the magnitudes of additional heat sources in the case of nonadiabatic evaporation. Finally, the effect of various factors, such as temperature, flow humidity, and liquid type, on heat and mass transfer during evaporation is analyzed for laminar and turbulent flows.

  1. Constraints on lithospheric thermal structure for the Indian Ocean from depth and heat flow data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoberg, Tom; Stein, Carol A.; Stein, Seth

    1993-01-01

    Models for the thermal evolution of oceanic lithosphere are primarily constrained by variations in seafloor depth and heat flow with age. These models have been largely based on data from the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean basins. We construct seafloor age relations for the Indian Ocean which we combine with bathymetric, sediment isopach and heat flow data to derive curves for depth and heat flow versus age. Comparison of these curves with predictions from three thermal models shows that they are better fit by the shallower depths and higher heat flow for the GDH1 model, which is characterized by a thinner and hotter lithosphere than previous models.

  2. Joint influences of aerodynamic flow field and aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of airborne optical systems.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Haosu; Zuo, Baojun; Tian, Yi; Zhang, Wang; Hao, Chenglong; Liu, Chaofeng; Li, Qi; Li, Fan; Zhang, Li; Fan, Zhigang

    2012-12-20

    We investigated the joint influences exerted by the nonuniform aerodynamic flow field surrounding the optical dome and the aerodynamic heating of the dome on imaging quality degradation of an airborne optical system. The Spalart-Allmaras model provided by FLUENT was used for flow computations. The fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm based ray tracing program was used to simulate optical transmission through the aerodynamic flow field and the dome. Four kinds of imaging quality evaluation parameters were presented: wave aberration of the exit pupil, point spread function, encircled energy, and modulation transfer function. The results show that the aero-optical disturbance of the aerodynamic flow field and the aerodynamic heating of the dome significantly affect the imaging quality of an airborne optical system. PMID:23262604

  3. Aero-Heating of Shallow Cavities in Hypersonic Freestream Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Berger, Karen T.; Merski, N. R., Jr.; Woods, William A.; Hollingsworth, Kevin E.; Hyatt, Andrew; Prabhu, Ramadas K.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of these experiments and analysis was to augment the heating database and tools used for assessment of impact-induced shallow-cavity damage to the thermal protection system of the Space Shuttle Orbiter. The effect of length and depth on the local heating disturbance of rectangular cavities tested at hypersonic freestream conditions has been globally assessed using the two-color phosphor thermography method. These rapid-response experiments were conducted in the Langley 31-Inch Mach 10 Tunnel and were initiated immediately prior to the launch of STS-114, the initial flight in the Space Shuttle Return-To-Flight Program, and continued during the first week of the mission. Previously-designed and numerically-characterized blunted-nose baseline flat plates were used as the test surfaces. Three-dimensional computational predictions of the entire model geometry were used as a check on the design process and the two-dimensional flow assumptions used for the data analysis. The experimental boundary layer state conditions were inferred using the measured heating distributions on a no-cavity test article. Two test plates were developed, each containing 4 equally-spaced spanwise-distributed cavities. The first test plate contained cavities with a constant length-to-depth ratio of 8 with design point depth-to-boundary-layer-thickness ratios of 0.1, 0.2, 0.35, and 0.5. The second test plate contained cavities with a constant design point depth-to-boundary-layer-thickness ratio of 0.35 with length-to-depth ratios of 8, 12, 16, and 20. Cavity design parameters and the test condition matrix were established using the computational predictions. Preliminary results indicate that the floor-averaged Bump Factor (local heating rate nondimensionalized by upstream reference) at the tested conditions is approximately 0.3 with a standard deviation of 0.04 for laminar-in/laminar-out conditions when the cavity length-to-boundary-layer thickness is between 2.5 and 10 and for

  4. Measurement and prediction of the heat flow and temperature level in a precombustion chamber diesel

    SciTech Connect

    Fahmy, A.S.; Radwan, M.S.; Shams, A.M.; Raafat, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Heat flux and temperature mapping were carried out in necessary detail in the combustion chamber of a pepper-pot type pre-combustion chamber diesel engine. A test set up was specifically prepared for this purpose in which heat fluxes were measured by specially designed traversing thermo couples, four of which were installed across the cylinder head and five were fitted along the cylinder liner. In combustion chamber locations not subjected to very high heat flows viz pre-combustion chamber tip, fuel-injection nozzle tip, exhaust valve etc. but their temperature level is the all-important factor in service, fixed microthermo couples were embedded in the metal as close as possible to the gas face of the component. The widest possible variation in load and speed was applied and it was found that the predominant factor affecting the heat flux and temperature level was the fueling rate unit piston area, effected by engine load and/or speed. Qualitative evidence suggests that piston heat fluxes follow the same pattern of that in the cylinder head. Heat flux and temperature level correlations were developed for the various combustion chamber components. Heat fluxes and metal temperatures seemed to follow the direction and intensity of air swirl. Thus they proved to be considerably higher in this engine in comparison with compression-swirl or induction swirl engines. As a result, pre-combustion chamber engines will be more difficult to uprate than comet or direct-injection engines. Contrary to most other types of engines, the centre region of the cylinder head which encompasses the valve bridge did not exhibit the highest thermal load. In fact the outer locations of bore are the critical zones in design.

  5. Temperature-dependent transformation thermotics for unsteady states: Switchable concentrator for transient heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Shen, Xiangying; Huang, Jiping; Ni, Yushan

    2016-04-01

    For manipulating heat flow efficiently, recently we established a theory of temperature-dependent transformation thermotics which holds for steady-state cases. Here, we develop the theory to unsteady-state cases by considering the generalized Fourier's law for transient thermal conduction. As a result, we are allowed to propose a new class of intelligent thermal metamaterial - switchable concentrator, which is made of inhomogeneous anisotropic materials. When environmental temperature is below or above a critical value, the concentrator is automatically switched on, namely, it helps to focus heat flux in a specific region. However, the focusing does not affect the distribution pattern of temperature outside the concentrator. We also perform finite-element simulations to confirm the switching effect according to the effective medium theory by assembling homogeneous isotropic materials, which bring more convenience for experimental fabrication than inhomogeneous anisotropic materials. This work may help to figure out new intelligent thermal devices, which provide more flexibility in controlling heat flow, and it may also be useful in other fields that are sensitive to temperature gradient, such as the Seebeck effect.

  6. Some aspects of fluid flow and heat transfer in porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Masuoka, Takashi

    1999-07-01

    Flows in porous media can exhibit time-dependent, chaotic, and turbulent behaviors, despite the highly dissipative effects of viscosity and thermal conductivity. Since the complicated flow paths in porous media cannot be directly followed in general, the description of the phenomena depends on certain simplifications based on proper averaging techniques, taking the characteristic spatial and time scales specifying the phenomena into consideration. This paper discusses some basic effects of the porous structures on fluid flow and heat transfer, including the examination of the chaotic behaviors in porous media. The presence of the porous matrix brings about both the macroscopic and microscopic (particle-diameter level) effects on fluid flow and heat transfer characteristics basically through the short-distance interaction of fluid with the adjacent inner walls, which exist everywhere in porous media. It is shown that even the concentrated inhomogeneities of permeability and of thermal conductivity modify the action of the buoyant force and the flow resistance, which yields the various modes of convection and the nonlinear stabilities of three-dimensional flow modes, much less for convection with distributed inhomogeneities. Next, the basic aspects of chaotic behaviors of thermal convection in porous media are discussed, concentrating on the finite Prandtl-number effect. The inertia force causes the flow against the action of buoyant force, which will introduce the flow-reversal mechanism and brings about the instability of the flow direction in large-scale convective motions, while the instability of the thermal boundary layers dominates in the limit of Pr {r_arrow} {infinity}. That is, for thermal convection in porous media or in Hele-Shaw cells, if the condition of 1/pr = 0 is relaxed, the chaotic behaviors of different nature are produced. It is also seen that the chaotic behaviors can affect the entropy generation rate through the mechanism of the instabilities

  7. Vapor Flow Patterns During a Start-Up Transient in Heat Pipes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Issacci, F.; Ghoniem, N, M.; Catton, I.

    1996-01-01

    The vapor flow patterns in heat pipes are examined during the start-up transient phase. The vapor core is modelled as a channel flow using a two dimensional compressible flow model. A nonlinear filtering technique is used as a post process to eliminate the non-physical oscillations of the flow variables. For high-input heat flux, multiple shock reflections are observed in the evaporation region. The reflections cause a reverse flow in the evaporation and circulations in the adiabatic region. Furthermore, each shock reflection causes a significant increase in the local pressure and a large pressure drop along the heat pipe.

  8. Rheological and heat transfer characteristics of flowing coal-water mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, C.Y.; Novack, M.; Roffe, G.

    1988-12-01

    This research program was designed to develop a consistent data base and to derive engineering correlations for the prediction of pressure drop and heat transfer rate of CWM flows under various heating conditions. The test program was carried out using a heated extrusion rheometer. Pressure drops and heat transfer rate were measured simultaneously under convective heating and then boiling conditions. Parametric tests were carried out to examine the effect of various operating parameters such as mass flow, bulk temperature, heat flux, CWM type, tube size, and steam quality. 15 refs., 40 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Evaluation of correlations of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in horizontal channels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhanru; Fang, Xiande; Li, Dingkun

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels is required in a variety of applications, such as chemical process cooling systems, refrigeration, and air conditioning. A number of correlations for flow boiling heat transfer in channels have been proposed. This work evaluates the existing correlations for flow boiling heat transfer coefficient with 1669 experimental data points of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 collected from 18 published papers. The top two correlations for R22 are those of Liu and Winterton (1991) and Fang (2013), with the mean absolute deviation of 32.7% and 32.8%, respectively. More studies should be carried out to develop better ones. Effects of channel dimension and vapor quality on heat transfer are analyzed, and the results provide valuable information for further research in the correlation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels. PMID:23956695

  10. Evaluation of Correlations of Flow Boiling Heat Transfer of R22 in Horizontal Channels

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Xiande; Li, Dingkun

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels is required in a variety of applications, such as chemical process cooling systems, refrigeration, and air conditioning. A number of correlations for flow boiling heat transfer in channels have been proposed. This work evaluates the existing correlations for flow boiling heat transfer coefficient with 1669 experimental data points of flow boiling heat transfer of R22 collected from 18 published papers. The top two correlations for R22 are those of Liu and Winterton (1991) and Fang (2013), with the mean absolute deviation of 32.7% and 32.8%, respectively. More studies should be carried out to develop better ones. Effects of channel dimension and vapor quality on heat transfer are analyzed, and the results provide valuable information for further research in the correlation of two-phase flow boiling heat transfer of R22 in channels. PMID:23956695

  11. Evaluation of heat flow and its geological implications on Mt. St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Grady, T.; Adams, E.; Brown, R.L.; Sato, A.

    1982-04-01

    A study to determine the heat flux pattern in the vicinity of Mt. St. Helens was undertaken as part of a program to evaluate the effects of the eruption on future snowpack conditions in the area. Subsurface temperature and low energy refraction seismic studies were made during the early spring in 1981 to determine both the heat flux in the area of pyroclastic deposition and its potential source. In addition, samples were collected for later laboratory determination of thermal conductivity and diffusivity. Results indicate that the heat flow values in the area of pyroclastic deposition are as large as forty times greater than the heat flow values measured on Mt. Adams and Mt. Hood during the same period. The highest heat flow values appear to coincide with a pumice flow unit on the north side of the mountain.. Comparison with work done on the eruption of Mt. Komagatake indicates that the large heat flow values continue for several years.

  12. Dry heat treatment affects wheat bran surface properties and hydration kinetics.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Pieter J; Hemdane, Sami; Delcour, Jan A; Courtin, Christophe M

    2016-07-15

    Heat stabilization of wheat bran aims at inactivation of enzymes which may cause rancidity and processability issues. Such treatments may however cause additional unanticipated phenomena which may affect wheat bran technological properties. In this work, the impact of toasting on wheat bran hydration capacity and hydration kinetics was studied. Hydration properties were assessed using the Enslin-Neff and drainage centrifugation water retention capacity methods, thermogravimetric analysis and contact angle goniometry, next to more traditional methods. While equilibrium hydration properties of bran were not affected by the heat treatment, the rate at which the heat treated bran hydrated was, however, very significantly reduced compared to the untreated bran. This phenomenon was found to originate from the formation of a lipid coating during the treatment rendering the bran surface hydrophobic. These insights help to understand and partially account for the modified processability of heat treated bran in food applications. PMID:26948645

  13. Heat exchange in a laminar channel flow with temperature gradients at the walls: possibility for heat transfer reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Manuel; Rebollo, Daniel; Campo, Antonio

    This paper presents a detailed numerical study of the heat exchange between two parallel plates with prescribed temperature gradients along the plates and a fluid circulating between them. The interplay between the bulk temperature, the heat flow and the Nusselt number has been clarified.

  14. Gas flow characteristics of a time modulated APPJ: the effect of gas heating on flow dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Sobota, A.; van Veldhuizen, E. M.; Bruggeman, P. J.

    2015-01-01

    This work investigates the flow dynamics of a radio-frequency (RF) non-equilibrium argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet. The RF power is at a frequency of 50 Hz or 20 kHz. Combined flow pattern visualizations (obtained by shadowgraphy) and gas temperature distributions (obtained by Rayleigh scattering) are used to study the formation of transient vortex structures in initial flow field shortly after the plasma is switched on and off in the case of 50 Hz modulation. The transient vortex structures correlate well with observed temperature differences. Experimental results of the fast modulated (20 kHz) plasma jet that does not induce changes of the gas temperature are also presented. The latter result suggests that momentum transfer by ions does not have dominant effect on the flow pattern close to the tube. It is argued that the increased gas temperature and corresponding gas velocity increase at the tube exit due to the plasma heating increases the admixing of surrounding air and reduces the effective potential core length. With increasing plasma power a reduction of the effective potential core length is observed with a minimum length for 5.6 W after which the length extends again. Possible mechanisms related to viscosity effects and ionic momentum transfer are discussed.

  15. Effects of precursor heating on chemical and radiation nonequilibrium viscous flow around a Jovian entry body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Szema, K. Y.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of precursor heating on viscous chemical nonequilibrium radiating flow around a Jovian entry body is investigated. Results obtained for a 45-degree hyperboloid blunt body entering Jupiter's nominal atmosphere at zero angle of attack indicate that the nonequilibrium radiative heating rate is significantly higher than the corresponding equilibrium heating. The precursor heating, in general, increases the radiative and convective heating to the body, and this increase is slightly higher for the nonequilibrium conditions.

  16. Lunar surface heat flow mapping from radioactive elements measured by Lunar Prospector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dan; Li, Xiongyao; Li, Qingxia; Lang, Liang; Zheng, Yongchun

    2014-06-01

    An accurate estimate of global surface heat flow is important because it provides strong constraints on interior thermal model and understanding of the thermal state and geologic evolution of the Moon. In this paper, a distribution map of lunar surface heat flow is derived from calibrated Lunar Prospector gamma-ray spectrometer data (K, U and Th abundances). It shows that surface heat flow varies regionally from about 10.6 mW/m2 to 66.1 mW/m2, which is in the same order of magnitude as previous results. In the calculation, lunar surface heat flow includes the heat flow from the non-uniform distribution of radioactive elements K, U and Th and that from secular cooling of the Moon. The calculation of heat flow from radioactive elements is based on the assumption that the radioactive decay of K, U and Th on the Moon is the same as that on the Earth. The heat flow from secular cooling of the Moon is assumed to be equal to the global average radioactive heat flow. Firstly we construct a relationship between radioactive elements K, U and Th and lunar surface heat flow. The key parameter of the characteristic length scale in the relationship is determined by measured surface heat flow and Th abundances at Apollo 15 and 17 landing sites. Then the distribution of lunar surface heat flow is derived by combining other parameters such as lunar crustal thickness measured by Clementine and lunar crustal density. In addition, correlation analysis of the three radioactive elements is carried out due to the higher resolution of Th abundance and for ease of calculation.

  17. Heat flow and temperature-depth curves throughout Alaska: finding regions for future geothermal exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batir, Joseph F.; Blackwell, David D.; Richards, Maria C.

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this research is to contribute to the understanding of the thermal regime of Alaska and its relationship to geology, regional tectonics, and to suggest potential sites for future geothermal energy production. New heat flow data were collected and are combined with existing published and unpublished data, although large sections of Alaska still lack data. Fault traces were implemented into the heat flow contouring as an additional gridding constraint, to incorporate both heat flow measurements and geology. New heat flow data supported the use of geologic trends in the heat flow mapping procedure, and a heat flow map of Alaska was produced with this added constraint. The multi-input contouring strategy allows production of a map with a regional interpretation of heat flow, in addition to site-specific heat flow and thermal model interpretations in areas with sufficient data density. Utilizing the new heat flow map, temperature-at-depth curves were created for example areas. Temperature-at-depth curves are calculated to 10 km depth for the areas of Anchorage, Fairbanks, Juneau, the Alaska Peninsula, Bristol Bay, and the Copper River Basin. The temperatures-at-depth predicted near the population centers of Anchorage and Juneau are relatively low, limiting the geothermal resource potential. The Fairbanks area temperature estimates are near conventional power production temperatures (150 °C) between 3.5 and 4 km. All data areas, except at Juneau, have temperatures sufficient for low temperature geothermal applications (40 °C) by 2 km. A high heat flow region exists within the Aleutian Volcanic Arc, although new data show heat flow variations from 59 to 120 mW m‑2, so individual geothermal resources within the arc will be irregularly located.

  18. Effect of homogenization heat treatment on the microstructure and heat-affected zone microfissuring in welded cast alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Huang; Richards, N.L.; Chaturvedi, M.C.

    1996-03-01

    The effect of homogenization temperature on microfissuring in the heat-affected zones of electron-beam welded cast INCONEL 718 has been studied. The material was homogenized at various temperatures in the range of 1,037 C and 1,163 C and air-cooled. The homogenized material was then electron-beam welded by the bead-on-plate welding technique. The microstructures and microfissuring in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) were evaluated by analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The grain boundary segregation of various elements was evaluated by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). It was observed that the total crack length (TCL) of microfissures first decreases with homogenization temperature and then increases, with a minimum occurring in the specimen heat treated at 1,163 C. This trend coincides with the variation in segregation of B at grain boundaries with homogenization temperature and has been explained by equilibrium and nonequilibrium segregation of B to grain boundaries during the homogenization heat treatment. No other element was observed to segregate at the grain boundaries. The variation in volume fraction of phases like {delta}-Ni{sub 3}Nb, MC carbide, and Laves phases does not follow the same trend as that observed for TCL and B segregation at the grain boundaries. Therefore, microfissuring in HAZ of welded cast INCONEL 718 is attributed to the segregation of B at the grain boundaries.

  19. Effect of homogenization heat treatment on the microstructure and heat- affected zone microfissuring in welded cast alloy 718

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiao; Chaturvedi, M. C.; Richards, N. L.

    1996-03-01

    The effect of homogenization temperature on microfissuring in the heat-affected zones of electronwelded cast INCONEL 718 has been studied. The material was homogenized at various temperatures in the range of 1037 ° to 1163 ° and air-cooled. The homogenized material was then electron-beam welded by the bead-on-plate welding technique. The microstructures and microfissuring in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) were evaluated by analytical scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The grain boundary segregation of various elements was evaluated by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). It was observed that the total crack length (TCL) of microfissures first decreases with homogenization temperature and then increases, with a minimum occurring in the specimen heat treated at 1163 °. This trend coincides with the variation in segregation of B at grain boundaries with homogenization temperature and has been explained by equilibrium and nonequilibrium segregation of B to grain boundaries during the homogenization heat treatment. No other element was observed to segregate at the grain boundaries. The variation in volume fraction of phases like δ-Ni3Nb, MC carbide, and Laves phases does not follow the same trend as that observed for TCL and B segregation at the grain boundaries. Therefore, microfissuring in HAZ of welded cast INCONEL 718 is attributed to the segregation of B at the grain boundaries.

  20. TOPAZ: a computer code for modeling heat transfer and fluid flow in arbitrary networks of pipes, flow branches, and vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.S.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the computer code TOPAZ (Transient-One-Dimensional Pipe Flow Analyzer) is presented. TOPAZ models the flow of compressible and incompressible fluids through complex and arbitrary arrangements of pipes, valves, flow branches and vessels. Heat transfer to and from the fluid containment structures (i.e. vessel and pipe walls) can also be modeled. This document includes discussions of the fluid flow equations and containment heat conduction equations. The modeling philosophy, numerical integration technique, code architecture, and methods for generating the computational mesh are also discussed.

  1. Carbon dioxide and R410A flow boiling heat transfer, pressure drop, and flow pattern in horizontal tubes at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Chang Yong

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has been seriously considered as an alternate refrigerant for HCFC and HFC fluids, due to the increasing interest of environmentally safe refrigerants in air-conditioning and refrigeration systems. In this study, CO2 flow boiling heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop are measured in macro-scale (6.1 and 3.5 mm) tubes at evaporation temperatures of -15 and -30°C. The measured results show that the nucleate boiling is a main heat transfer mechanism in the 6.1 mm tube and the contribution of convective boiling becomes greater with the decrease of tube diameters and the increase of mass fluxes. The surface roughness of the 6.1 and 3.5 mm tube are presented by SEM and AFM images and surface profiles, and it is shown that the rougher surface of the 6.1 mm tube can affect the flow boiling heat transfer. The CO2 heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop are measured in a mini-scale (0.89 mm) multi-ported tube at the evaporation temperature of -30°C. Also, R410A and R22 flow boiling heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop in a macro-scale (6.1 mm) tube were measured, and they are compared with CO2. This comparison presents that the CO2 flow boiling heat transfer coefficients are higher than R410A and R22 at low vapor qualities, and CO2 pressure drop is significantly lower than R410A and R22. This advantageous characteristic for CO2 could be explained by properties such as surface tension, reduced pressure, and the density ratio of liquid to vapor. The prediction of heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop was performed by general correlations and the calculation results are compared with measured values. Two-phase flow patterns were visualized for CO2 and R410A in the 6 and 3 mm glass tubes, and they are compared with the Weisman et al. and the Wojtan et al. flow pattern maps. The flow pattern maps can determine the flow patterns relatively well, except the transition from intermittent to annular flow.

  2. Influence of heat generation and heat flux on peristaltic flow with interacting nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbar, Noreen Sher; Raza, M.; Ellahi, R.

    2014-08-01

    In the current study, we have examined the peristaltic flow of three different nanoparticles with water as base fluid under the influence of slip boundary conditions through a vertical asymmetric porous channel in the presence of MHD. The selected nanoparticles are titanium dioxide ( TiO2 , copper oxide (CuO) and silicon dioxide ( SiO2 . The Brownian motion shows that the effective conductivity increases to result in a lower temperature gradient for a given heat flux. To examine these transport phenomena thoroughly, we also consider the thermal conductivity model of Brownian motion for nanofluids, this increases the effect of the particle size, particle volume fraction and temperature dependence. The mathematical formulation is presented. Exact solutions are obtained from the resulting equations. The obtained expressions for pressure gradient, temperature and velocity profile are described through graphs for the various relevant parameters. The streamlines are drawn for some physical quantities to discuss the trapping phenomenon.

  3. Fiber laser heating and penetration of aluminum in shear flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Sean M.; Hurst, Benjamin E.; Marciniak, Michael A.; Perram, Glen P.

    2014-12-01

    Laser damage experiments were performed on painted and unpainted aluminum coupons using a 1.07-μm fiber laser at irradiances ranging from 0.2 to 1.4 kW/cm2 in a wind tunnel operating at Mach 0.1 to 0.9. Coupon penetration times of ˜0.5 to 10 s were measured using a silicon photodiode viewing a Lambertian scatter plate placed behind the target. Despite the thin, 0.81 to 0.95 mm, samples and large laser spot diameters, 2 to 3 cm, the effects of radial heat conduction dominate for irradiances of <1 kW/cm2. The fluence required to melt the back surface scales linearly with paint absorbance and the effects of paint aging have been observed. Penetration times for gray-painted aluminum at 287 W/cm2 decrease by 45% as the airflow speed increases from M=0.1 to M=0.2, but remains constant for flow speeds up to M=0.7.

  4. Modelling of Radiation Heat Transfer in Reacting Hot Gas Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thellmann, A.; Mundt, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the interaction between a turbulent flow including chemical reactions and radiation transport is investigated. As a first step, the state-of-the art radiation models P1 based on the moment method and Discrete Transfer Model (DTM) based on the discrete ordinate method are used in conjunction with the CFD code ANSYS CFX. The absorbing and emitting medium (water vapor) is modeled by Weighted Sum of Gray Gases. For the chemical reactions the standard Eddy dissipation model combined with the two equation turbulence model k-epsilon is employed. A demonstration experiment is identified which delivers temperature distribution, species concentration and radiative intensity distribution in the investigated combustion enclosure. The simulation results are compared with the experiment and reveals that the P1 model predicts the location of the maximal radiation intensity unphysically. On the other hand the DTM model does better but over predicts the maximum value of the radiation intensity. This radiation sensitivity study is a first step on the way to identify a suitable radiation transport and spectral model in order to implement both in an existing 3D Navier-Stokes Code. Including radiation heat transfer we intend to investigate the influence on the overall energy balance in a hydrogen/oxygen rocket combustion chamber.

  5. Fractal density and singularity analysis of heat flow over ocean ridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiuming, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Peak heat flow occurs at mid-ocean ridges and decreases with the age of the oceanic lithosphere. Several plate models, including the Parsons and Sclater (PSM) model, Global Depth and Heat (GDH1) model and Constant Heat flow Applied on the Bottom Lithospheric Isotherm (CHABLIS) model, have been used to predict heat flow in the ocean lithosphere. The discrepancy between the predicted and measured heat flow in the younger lithosphere (i.e. younger than 55 Myr) influenced by local hydrothermal circulation has been used to estimate hydrothermal heat flux and investigate hydrothermal processes. We can modify the cooling models by substituting the ordinary mass density of lithosphere by fractal density with singularity. This new model provides a modified solution to fit the observed heat flow data used in other models in the literature throughout the age range. This model significantly improves the results for prediction of heat flow that were obtained using the PSM, GDH1 and CHABLIS models. Furthermore, the heat flow model does not exhibit special characteristics around any particular age of lithosphere. This raises a fundamental question about the existence of a “sealing” age and accordingly the hydrothermal flux estimation based on the cooling models.

  6. Advective and Conductive Heat Flow Budget Across the Wagner Basin, Northern Gulf of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, F.; Negrete-Aranda, R.; Contreras, J.; Müller, C.; Hutnak, M.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, A.; Harris, R. N.; Sclater, J. G.

    2015-12-01

    In May 2015, we conducted a cruise across the northern Gulf of California, an area of continental rift basin formation and rapid deposition of sediments. The cruise was undertaken aboard the R/V Alpha Helix; our goal was to study variation in superficial conductive heat flow, lateral changes in the shallow thermal conductivity structure, and advective transport of heat across the Wagner basin. We used a Fielax heat flow probe with 22 thermistors that can penetrate up to 6 m into the sediment cover. The resulting data set includes 53 new heat flow measurements collected along three profiles. The longest profile (42 km) contains 30 measurements spaced 1-2 km apart. The western part of the Wagner basin (hanging wall block) exhibit low to normal conductive heat flow whereas the eastern part of the basin (foot wall block) heat flow is high to very high (up to 2500 mWm-2). Two other short profiles (12 km long each) focused on resolving an extremely high heat flow anomaly up to 15 Wm-2 located near the intersection between the Wagner bounding fault system and the Cerro Prieto fault. We hypothesize that the contrasting heat flow values observed across the Wagner basin are due to horizontal water circulation through sand layers and fault pathways of high permeability. Circulation appears to be from west (recharge zone) to east (discharge zone). Additionally, our results reveal strong vertical advection of heat due to dehydration reactions and compaction of fine grained sediments.

  7. Fractal density and singularity analysis of heat flow over ocean ridges.

    PubMed

    Qiuming, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Peak heat flow occurs at mid-ocean ridges and decreases with the age of the oceanic lithosphere. Several plate models, including the Parsons and Sclater (PSM) model, Global Depth and Heat (GDH1) model and Constant Heat flow Applied on the Bottom Lithospheric Isotherm (CHABLIS) model, have been used to predict heat flow in the ocean lithosphere. The discrepancy between the predicted and measured heat flow in the younger lithosphere (i.e. younger than 55 Myr) influenced by local hydrothermal circulation has been used to estimate hydrothermal heat flux and investigate hydrothermal processes. We can modify the cooling models by substituting the ordinary mass density of lithosphere by fractal density with singularity. This new model provides a modified solution to fit the observed heat flow data used in other models in the literature throughout the age range. This model significantly improves the results for prediction of heat flow that were obtained using the PSM, GDH1 and CHABLIS models. Furthermore, the heat flow model does not exhibit special characteristics around any particular age of lithosphere. This raises a fundamental question about the existence of a "sealing" age and accordingly the hydrothermal flux estimation based on the cooling models. PMID:26757680

  8. Fractal density and singularity analysis of heat flow over ocean ridges

    PubMed Central

    Qiuming, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Peak heat flow occurs at mid-ocean ridges and decreases with the age of the oceanic lithosphere. Several plate models, including the Parsons and Sclater (PSM) model, Global Depth and Heat (GDH1) model and Constant Heat flow Applied on the Bottom Lithospheric Isotherm (CHABLIS) model, have been used to predict heat flow in the ocean lithosphere. The discrepancy between the predicted and measured heat flow in the younger lithosphere (i.e. younger than 55 Myr) influenced by local hydrothermal circulation has been used to estimate hydrothermal heat flux and investigate hydrothermal processes. We can modify the cooling models by substituting the ordinary mass density of lithosphere by fractal density with singularity. This new model provides a modified solution to fit the observed heat flow data used in other models in the literature throughout the age range. This model significantly improves the results for prediction of heat flow that were obtained using the PSM, GDH1 and CHABLIS models. Furthermore, the heat flow model does not exhibit special characteristics around any particular age of lithosphere. This raises a fundamental question about the existence of a “sealing” age and accordingly the hydrothermal flux estimation based on the cooling models. PMID:26757680

  9. Heat flows to the combustion chamber walls in detonation and turbulent combustion regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykovskii, F. A.

    1991-02-01

    Measuremens of heat flows to the walls of an annular combustion chamber under conditions of combustion and continuous detonation are reported for a propane-oxygen mixture. It is shown that specific heat flows to the chamber walls under conditions of detonation are significantly lower than those observed during ordinary combustion. The experimental equipment and details of the experimental procedure are described.

  10. Syn- and post-collisional heat flow in the Cenozoic Eastern Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachsenhofer, Reinhard F.

    2001-08-01

    The heat flow evolution of a continental collisional zone is exemplified by the Eastern Alps. Heat flow maps for the syn-collision (Oligocene), syn-extrusion (Early/Middle Miocene), and post-extrusion (Late Miocene, Recent) stages are presented, and are discussed in relation to the orogenic evolution. Continental collision during Paleogene time was characterized by extremely low heat flow (<40 mW/m2) along the orogenetic front, and very high heat flow (>150 mW/m2) a few hundred kilometers south of it. The former was a result of crustal thickening and of thermal blanketing due to rapid sedimentation and nappe stacking. The latter was caused by slab break-off and magmatic activity. The Early/Middle Miocene syn-extrusion stage was characterized by rapid exhumation of metamorphic core complexes (Tauern and Rechnitz Windows), and by magmatic activity (Styrian Basin). Both mechanisms caused extremely high heat flow (>200 mW/m2). In contrast, the orogenetic front remained cold. Thereafter, magmatic activity ended and uplift rates decreased. Thus, Late Miocene heat flow is characterized by low to moderately high values. Heat flow values >75 mW/m2 were restricted to the transition zone of the Pannonian Basin characterized by thinned crust, and to the Tauern Window area. Recent temperature data indicate a subtle post-Miocene increase in heat flow.

  11. Large deviations in stochastic heat-conduction processes provide a gradient-flow structure for heat conduction

    SciTech Connect

    Peletier, Mark A.; Redig, Frank; Vafayi, Kiamars

    2014-09-01

    We consider three one-dimensional continuous-time Markov processes on a lattice, each of which models the conduction of heat: the family of Brownian Energy Processes with parameter m (BEP(m)), a Generalized Brownian Energy Process, and the Kipnis-Marchioro-Presutti (KMP) process. The hydrodynamic limit of each of these three processes is a parabolic equation, the linear heat equation in the case of the BEP(m) and the KMP, and a nonlinear heat equation for the Generalized Brownian Energy Process with parameter a (GBEP(a)). We prove the hydrodynamic limit rigorously for the BEP(m), and give a formal derivation for the GBEP(a). We then formally derive the pathwise large-deviation rate functional for the empirical measure of the three processes. These rate functionals imply gradient-flow structures for the limiting linear and nonlinear heat equations. We contrast these gradient-flow structures with those for processes describing the diffusion of mass, most importantly the class of Wasserstein gradient-flow systems. The linear and nonlinear heat-equation gradient-flow structures are each driven by entropy terms of the form -log ρ; they involve dissipation or mobility terms of order ρ² for the linear heat equation, and a nonlinear function of ρ for the nonlinear heat equation.

  12. Effect of turbulent or stationary structures on the flow thermal behaviour in heated square ducts with a non-symmetric heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez, M. S.; Rodriguez, W. V.

    2005-04-01

    From large eddy simulations of heated square ducts, we study the effect of non-stationary structures over the flow thermal behavior. Indeed the net decrease of the turbulent intensity over the heated wall, the velocity temperature correlation intensity is enhanced. This correlation which represents the turbulent heat transfer is fed by turbulent structures of high intensity, but with a low frequency. These turbulent structures create high amplitude temperature fluctuations. A conditional statistical study is performed for isolating these turbulent structures and knowing its local and global effects over the flow.

  13. Heat transfer in turbulent decaying swirl flow in a circular pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algifri, A. H.; Bhardwaj, R. K.; Rao, Y. V. N.

    1988-08-01

    Heat transfer coefficients for air are measured along a heated pipe for decaying swirl flow, generated by radial blade cascade. The results are compared with an expression proposed for predicting the heat transfer coefficients in swirling flow. The theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the experimental data, with average and maximum deviations of 7 and 11 percent, respectively. The application of the theoretical approach to the experimental results obtained by other investigators for heat transfer in a decaying swirl flow generated by short-twisted tapes and tangential slots at inlet also give rise to encouraging agreement.

  14. Effect of flow maldistribution and axial conduction on compact microchannel heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Seungwhan; Lee, Cheonkyu; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2014-03-01

    When a compact microchannel heat exchanger is operated at cryogenic environments, it has potential problems of axial conduction and flow maldistribution. To analyze these detrimental effects, the heat exchanger model that includes both axial conduction and flow maldistribution effect is developed in consideration of the microchannel heat exchanger geometry. A dimensionless axial conduction parameter (λ) is used to describe the axial conduction effect, and the coefficient of variation (CoV) is introduced to quantify the flow maldistribution condition. The effectiveness of heat exchanger is calculated according to the various values of the axial conduction parameter and the CoV. The analysis results show that the heat exchanger effectiveness is insensitive when λ is less than 0.005, and effectiveness is degraded with the large value of CoV. Three microchannel heat exchangers are fabricated with printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) technology for validation purpose of the heat exchanger model. The first heat exchanger is a conventional heat exchanger, the second heat exchanger has the modified cross section to eliminate axial conduction effect, and the third heat exchanger has the modified cross section and the cross link in parallel channel to mitigate flow maldistribution effect. These heat exchangers are tested in cryogenic single-phase, and two-phase environments. The third heat exchanger shows the ideal thermal characteristic, while the other two heat exchangers experience some performance degradation due to axial conduction or flow maldistribution. The impact of axial conduction and flow maldistribution effects are verified by the simulation results and compared with the experimental results.

  15. The combined effects of longitudinal heat conduction, flow nonuniformity and temperature nonuniformity in crossflow plate-fin heat exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Ranganayakulu, C. ); Seetharamu, K.N. . School of Mechanical Engineering)

    1999-07-01

    An analysis of a crossflow plate-fin compact heat exchanger, accounting for the combined effects of two-dimensional longitudinal heat conduction through the exchanger wall and nonuniform inlet fluid flow and temperature distribution is carried out using a finite element method. A mathematical equation is developed to generate different types of fluid flow/temperature maldistribution models considering the possible deviations in fluid flow. Using these models, the exchanger effectiveness and its deterioration due to the combined effects of longitudinal heat conduction, flow nonuniformity and temperature nonuniformity are calculated for various design and operating conditions of the exchanger. It was found that the performance variations are quite significant in some typical applications.

  16. Heat flow in eastern Egypt - The thermal signature of a continental breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.; Boulos, F. K.; Hennin, S. F.; El-Sherif, A. A.; El-Sayed, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    Data on the heat flow in eastern Egypt were collected to provide information related to the mode and the mechanism of the Red Sea opening. The data indicate a general increase in heat flow towards the Red Sea (75-100 mW/sq m in a zone within 40 km of the coast compared with 35-55 mW/sq m inland). Moderately high heat flow (about 70 mW/sq m) was found for the Gulf of Suez. Heat production data indicate that the coastal thermal anomaly is not primarily related to crustal radiogenic heat production. Possible causes of the anomaly (one of which could be a high mantle heat flow causing a lithospheric thinning centered beneath the Red Sea) are discussed.

  17. Investigation of flow structure and heat transfer characteristics in an array of impinging slot jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozmen, Yucel; Ipek, Gokhan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, an experimental and numerical study is carried out to investigate flow field and heat transfer characteristics of unconfined and confined arrays of four turbulent slot air jets issuing from the lower surface and impinging normally on the upper surface. Pressure and temperature distributions on the surfaces were obtained for the nozzle-to-plate spacing (H/W) of 1-10 and for the Reynolds numbers in the range of 5000-15,000 at the jet-to-jet centerline spacing (S/W) of 9. The effects of jet confinement, Reynolds number and nozzle-to-plate spacing on the flow structure and heat transfer were investigated. Pressure distributions are obtained experimentally and numerically, while heat transfer distributions are computed numerically. It is observed that the surface pressure distributions on both impingement and confinement plates are independent from the Reynolds number, while they have been largely affected from the nozzle-to-plate spacing. Jet confinement causes a considerable difference at the flow field especially for small nozzle-to-plate spacings. Subatmospheric regions are not observed for unconfined jet. However three different types of subatmospheric pressure regions occur on both impingement and confinement plates for confined jet. Nusselt distributions on the impingement plate for both unconfined and confined jet configurations depend on the Reynolds number and nozzle-to-plate spacing. It is concluded that there is a strong correlation between subatmospheric regions and secondary peaks in Nusselt distributions. The numerical results obtained using the Realizable k-ɛ turbulence model is in good accordance with the experimental results for moderate values of nozzle-to-plate spacings.

  18. Computer code for predicting coolant flow and heat transfer in turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, Peter L.

    1990-01-01

    A computer code was developed to analyze any turbomachinery coolant flow path geometry that consist of a single flow passage with a unique inlet and exit. Flow can be bled off for tip-cap impingement cooling, and a flow bypass can be specified in which coolant flow is taken off at one point in the flow channel and reintroduced at a point farther downstream in the same channel. The user may either choose the coolant flow rate or let the program determine the flow rate from specified inlet and exit conditions. The computer code integrates the 1-D momentum and energy equations along a defined flow path and calculates the coolant's flow rate, temperature, pressure, and velocity and the heat transfer coefficients along the passage. The equations account for area change, mass addition or subtraction, pumping, friction, and heat transfer.

  19. An experimental investigation of heat transfer in a spiral-coil tube with pulsating turbulent water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharvani, H. Ramezani; Doshmanziari, F. Ilami; Zohir, A. E.; Jalali-Vahid, D.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, in order to increase the heat transfer rate in a spiral-coil tube by an active method, a rotating ball valve was mounted downstream/upstream of the spiral-coil tube and used as a pulse generator. Influence of pulsation on heat transfer in the spiral-coil tube was experimentally investigated. Cold water was used as a working fluid inside the spiral-coil that was immersed horizontally in a hot water reservoir tank. The Average temperature of the hot water bath was kept constant at 60 °C to establish a uniform temperature. All experiments for both pulsator locations (upstream and downstream pulsation) were performed at fixed pulsation amplitude. Reynolds number was ranged from 6220 to 16,300 while pulsation frequency was varied from 0 to 20 Hz. It can be clearly observed from heat transfer results that the overall average heat transfer coefficient was enhanced up to 26 % for pulsating flow compared to steady flow without pulsation at all pulsation frequencies. It is also clear that the relative overall average heat transfer coefficient is strongly affected by Reynolds number. Finally, it was obtained that the upstream pulsation heat transfer coefficient has better heat transfer results than the corresponding ones of downstream pulsation in the studied range of Reynolds number.

  20. Numerical simulations of heat and mass transfer at ablating surface in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, A. N.; Golovin, N. N.; Petrovskiy, V. P.; Teplyakov, I. O.

    2015-11-01

    The numerical technique was developed to solve heat and mass transfer problem in 3D hypersonic flow taking into account destruction of thermal protection system. Described technique was applied for calculation of heat and mass transfer in sphere-cone shaped body. The data on temperature, heat flux and mass flux were obtained.

  1. Thermal induced flow oscillations in heat exchangers for supercritical fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedly, J. C.; Manganaro, J. L.; Krueger, P. G.

    1972-01-01

    Analytical model has been developed to predict possible unstable behavior in supercritical heat exchangers. From complete model, greatly simplified stability criterion is derived. As result of this criterion, stability of heat exchanger system can be predicted in advance.

  2. Thermal design of multi-fluid mixed-mixed cross-flow heat exchangers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roetzel, W.; Luo, X.

    2010-11-01

    A fast analytical calculation method is developed for the thermal design and rating of multi-fluid mixed-mixed cross-flow heat exchangers. Temperature dependent heat capacities and heat transfer coefficients can iteratively be taken into account. They are determined at one or two special reference temperatures. Examples are given for the application of the method to the rating of special multi-fluid multi-pass shell-and-tube heat exchangers and multi-fluid cross-flow plate-fin heat exchangers. The accuracy of the method is tested against numerical calculations with good results.

  3. Enhancement of critical heat flux in tubes using staged tangential flow injection: (Progress report)

    SciTech Connect

    Dhir, V.K.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental studies of the enhancement in single and two phase heat transfer from tubes subjected to tangential flow injection have been continuing. Investigations using water as the test liquid have been focused on: single phase heat transfer coefficients; two phase heat transfer coefficients under subcooled boiling conditions; subcooled critical heat fluxes; and modeling of the enhancement under swirl flow conditions. With tangential injection up to four fold increase in the average heat transfer coefficient has been observed. During subcooled boiling the enhancement is relatively small. However swirl induced centripetal force increases vapor escape velocity and as a result higher critical heat fluxes can be accommodated. In the range of flow parameters studied up to 40% enhancement in critical heat flux has been observed with single stage injection. This enhancement is slightly less than that obtained with Freon-113. The mechanistic reasons for this observation are currently being investigated.

  4. Enhancement of critical heat flux in tubes using staged tangential flow injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhir, V. K.

    Experimental studies of the enhancement in single and two phase heat transfer from tubes subjected to tangential flow injection have been continuing. Investigations using water as the test liquid have been focused on: single phase heat transfer coefficients; two phase heat transfer coefficients under subcooled boiling conditions; subcooled critical heat fluxes; and modeling of the enhancement under swirl flow conditions. With tangential injection up to four fold increase in the average heat transfer coefficient has been observed. During subcooled boiling the enhancement is relatively small. However swirl induced centripetal force increases vapor escape velocity and as a result higher critical heat fluxes can be accommodated. In the range of flow parameters studied up to 40% enhancement in critical heat flux has been observed with single stage injection. This enhancement is slightly less than that obtained with Freon-113. The mechanistic reasons for this observation are currently being investigated.

  5. Rapid heat-flowing surveying of geothermal areas, utilizing individual snowfalls as calorimeters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Donald E.

    1969-01-01

    Local differences in rate of heat transfer in vapor and by conduction through the ground in hot spring areas are difficult and time-consuming to measure quantitatively. Individual heavy snowfalls provide a rapid low-cost means of measuring total heat flow from such ground. After a favorable snowfall (heavy, brief duration, little wind, air temperature near 0°C), contacts between snow-covered and snow-free ground are mapped on a suitable base. Each mapped contact, as time elapses after a specific snowfall, is a heat-flow contour representing a decreasing rate of flow. Calibration of each mapped contact or snow line is made possible by the fact that snow remains on insulated surfaces (such as the boardwalks of Yellowstone's thermal areas) long after it has melted on adjacent warm ground. Heat-flow contours mapped to date range from 450 to 5500 μcal/cm2 sec, or 300 to 3700 times the world average of conductive heat flow. The very high rates of heat flow (2000 to > 10,000 μcal/cm2 sec) are probably too high, and the lower heat flows determinable by the method (2 sec) may be too low. Values indicated by the method are, however, probably within a factor of 2 of the total conductive and convective heat flow. Thermal anomalies from infrared imagery are similar in shape to heat-flow contours of a test area near Old Faithful geyser. Snowfall calorimetry provides a rapid means for evaluating the imagery and computer-derived products of the infrared data in terms of heat flow.

  6. Beyond surface heat flow: An example from a tectonically active sedimentary basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Phillip A.; Chapman, David S.

    1998-02-01

    Thermal anomalies that have important geodynamic implications may not always be recognizable in present-day surface heat-flow patterns. The masking occurs because surface heat flow responds to mantle heat, crustal radioactivity, magmatism, crustal deformation, burial and/or exhumation, and fluid movement, any of which may offset the thermal effects of the others. Sedimentary basins are particularly suited to partitioning heat flow into its various components. We use Taranaki basin, New Zealand, as an example. It has a relatively undeformed (since the Miocene) western region that is used as a control against which the tectonically active eastern region can be compared. Although surface heat flow is roughly constant across Taranaki basin, basal heat flow modeled at lower crustal upper mantle depths varies by a factor of two or more. A combination of low heat-producing crust and the heat sink effects of crustal thickening in the eastern region can account for the basal heat-flow anomalies. The tectonic thermal anomaly would have gone unnoticed without the aid of detailed basin analysis and thermal modeling.

  7. Flow and heat transfer in gas turbine disk cavities subject to nonuniform external pressure field

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, R.P.; Kim, Y.W.; Tong, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    Injestion of hot gas from the main-stream gas path into turbine disk cavities, particularly the first-stage disk cavity, has become a serious concern for the next-generation industrial gas turbines featuring high rotor inlet temperature. Fluid temperature in the cavities increases further due to windage generated by fluid drag at the rotating and stationary surfaces. The resulting problem of rotor disk heat-up is exacerbated by the high disk rim temperature due to adverse (relatively flat) temperature profile of the mainstream gas in the annular flow passage of the turbine. A designer is concerned about the level of stresses in the turbine rotor disk and its durability, both of which are affected significantly by the disk temperature distribution. This distribution also plays a major role in the radial position of the blade tip and thus, in establishing the clearance between the tip and the shroud. To counteract mainstream gas ingestion as well as to cool the rotor and the stator disks, it is necessary to inject cooling air (bled from the compressor discharge) into the wheel space. Since this bleeding of compressor air imposes a penalty on the engine cycle performance, the designers of disk cavity cooling and sealing systems need to accomplish these tasks with the minimum possible amount of bleed air without risking disk failure. This requires detailed knowledge of the flow characteristics and convective heat transfer in the cavity. The flow in the wheel space between the rotor and stator disks is quite complex. It is usually turbulent and contains recirculation regions. Instabilities such as vortices oscillating in space have been observed in the flow. It becomes necessary to obtain both a qualitative understanding of the general pattern of the fluid motion as well as a quantitative map of the velocity and pressure fields.

  8. The Mystery of Io's Warm Polar Regions: Implications for Heat Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matson, D. L.; Veeder, G. J.; Johnson, T. V.; Blaney, D. L.; Davies, A. G.

    2002-01-01

    Unexpectedly warm polar temperatures further support the idea that Io is covered virtually everywhere by cooling lava flows. This implies a new heat flow component. Io's heat flow remains constrained between a lower bound of (approximately) 2.5 W m(exp -2) and an upper bound of (approximately) 13 W m(exp -2). Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Analysis of the Hydrodynamics and Heat Transfer Aspects of Microgravity Two-Phase Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rezkallah, Kamiel S.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental results for void fractions, flow regimes, and heat transfer rates in two-phase, liquid-gas flows are summarized in this paper. The data was collected on-board NASA's KC-135 reduced gravity aircraft in a 9.525 mm circular tube (i.d.), uniformly heated at the outer surface. Water and air flows were examined as well as three glycerol/water solutions and air. Results are reported for the water-air data.

  10. Numerical study of unsteady convective heat transfer in pulsating duct flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stosic, N.; Hanjalic, K.

    Numerical study results are presented for hydrodynamic parameters and heat transfer in a periodic gas flow, within a circular pipe in which flow oscillations were generated by pressure variation at one of the pipe ends. A comparison of experimental and numerical results has demonstrated satisfactory agreement, as well as the significant augmentation of the heat transfer coefficient under those resonant conditions in which the flow pulsation incitement frequencies correspond to the natural frequencies of the duct.

  11. Experimental study on subcooled flow boiling on heating surfaces with different thermal conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ling

    Subcooled flow boiling is generally characterized by high heat transfer capacity and low wall superheat, which is essential for cooling applications requiring high heat transfer rate, such as nuclear reactors and fossil boilers. In this study, subcooled flow boiling on copper and stainless steel heating surfaces was experimentally investigated from both macroscopic and microscopic points of view. Flow boiling heat flux and heat transfer coefficient were experimentally measured on both surfaces under different conditions, such as pressure, flow rate and inlet subcooling. Significant boiling heat transfer coefficient differences were found between the copper and the stainless steel heating surfaces. To explain the different flow boiling behaviors on these two heating surfaces, nucleation site density and bubble dynamics were visually observed and measured at different experimental conditions utilizing a high-speed digital video camera. These two parameters are believed to be keys in determining flow boiling heat flux. Wall superheat, critical cavity size and wall heat flux were used to correlate with nucleation site density data. Among them, wall heat flux shows the best correlation for eliminating both pressure and surface property effects. The observed nucleation site distribution shows a random distribution. When compared to the spatial Poisson distribution, similarity between them was found, while the measured nucleation site distribution is more uniform. From experimental observations, for the two surface materials investigated, which have similar surface wettability but sharply different thermal properties, bubble dynamics displayed fairly similar behavior. The obtained experimental results indicate that thermal conductivity of heating surface material plays an important role in boiling heat transfer. This is due to thermal conductivity having a significant impact on the lateral heat conduction at the heating surface and consequently temperature uniformity of

  12. Studies of Two-Phase Flow Dynamics and Heat Transfer at Reduced Gravity Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, Larry C.; Bousman, W. Scott; Fore, Larry B.

    1996-01-01

    The ability to predict gas-liquid flow patterns is crucial to the design and operation of two-phase flow systems in the microgravity environment. Flow pattern maps have been developed in this study which show the occurrence of flow patterns as a function of gas and liquid superficial velocities as well as tube diameter, liquid viscosity and surface tension. The results have demonstrated that the location of the bubble-slug transition is affected by the tube diameter for air-water systems and by surface tension, suggesting that turbulence-induced bubble fluctuations and coalescence mechanisms play a role in this transition. The location of the slug-annular transition on the flow pattern maps is largely unaffected by tube diameter, liquid viscosity or surface tension in the ranges tested. Void fraction-based transition criteria were developed which separate the flow patterns on the flow pattern maps with reasonable accuracy. Weber number transition criteria also show promise but further work is needed to improve these models. For annular gas-liquid flows of air-water and air- 50 percent glycerine under reduced gravity conditions, the pressure gradient agrees fairly well with a version of the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation but the measured film thickness deviates from published correlations at lower Reynolds numbers. Nusselt numbers, based on a film thickness obtained from standard normal-gravity correlations, follow the relation, Nu = A Re(sup n) Pr(exp l/3), but more experimental data in a reduced gravity environment are needed to increase the confidence in the estimated constants, A and n. In the slug flow regime, experimental pressure gradient does not correlate well with either the Lockhart-Martinelli or a homogeneous formulation, but does correlate nicely with a formulation based on a two-phase Reynolds number. Comparison with ground-based correlations implies that the heat transfer coefficients are lower at reduced gravity than at normal gravity under the same

  13. Experimental study of flow boiling heat transfer in a rectangular minichannel by using various enhanced heating surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piasecka, Magdalena

    2012-11-01

    The paper presents the results of flow boiling heat transfer in a horizontal minichannel, 1 mm deep, 40 mm wide and 360 mm long. The heating element for FC-72 which flows along the minichannel is a thin enhanced alloy. It is possible to observe both surfaces of the minichannel through an opening covered with two glass panes. The first one allows observing changes in the temperature of the foil surface due to liquid crystal thermography. The second allows the identification of the two-phase flow patterns. The experiments employed the enhanced heating foil with various depressions, distributed diversely on the surface. Two types of enhanced heating surfaces: with micro re-entrant cavities evenly distributed, and with mini re-entrant cavities unevenly distributed, were used for the purpose of the investigation. The main objective of the paper is to determine the void fraction for cross-sections of selected images for increasing heat fluxes supplied to the heating surface. The results are presented as the void fraction dependence along the minichannel length for the selected cross-sections. Exemplary boiling curves derived from data obtained from initial increasing and subsequent decreasing the heat flux supplied to the foil are also presented. The investigation has been intended to determine the correlation for the calculations of the Nusselt number as a function of variable parameters.

  14. Analytical skin friction and heat transfer formula for compressible internal flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dechant, Lawrence J.; Tattar, Marc J.

    1994-01-01

    An analytic, closed-form friction formula for turbulent, internal, compressible, fully developed flow was derived by extending the incompressible law-of-the-wall relation to compressible cases. The model is capable of analyzing heat transfer as a function of constant surface temperatures and surface roughness as well as analyzing adiabatic conditions. The formula reduces to Prandtl's law of friction for adiabatic, smooth, axisymmetric flow. In addition, the formula reduces to the Colebrook equation for incompressible, adiabatic, axisymmetric flow with various roughnesses. Comparisons with available experiments show that the model averages roughly 12.5 percent error for adiabatic flow and 18.5 percent error for flow involving heat transfer.

  15. Gas hydrate stability and the assessment of heat flow through continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grevemeyer, Ingo; Villinger, Heinrich

    2001-06-01

    A prominent feature across some continental margins is a bottom-simulating reflector (BSR). This seismic reflection generally coincides with the depth predicted for the base of the gas hydrate stability field. Because the occurrence of gas hydrates is controlled by temperature and pressure conditions, it has been suggested that BSRs mark an isotherm and they have therefore been used to estimate the heat flow through continental margins; crucial parameters are the temperature at BSR depth and at the seafloor and the thermal conductivity structure between the BSR and the seabed. However, very often the required parameters are not available and therefore they have been derived from models for gas hydrate stability and empirical relationships to obtain thermal conductivities from seismic velocities. Here, we use downhole temperature, thermal conductivity, porosity and logging data from 10 Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) sites drilled into and through the gas hydrate field to investigate the quality of estimates. Our analyses and application of constraints to the Makran margin off Pakistan indicate the following. (i) The temperature at BSR depth could be approximated by a seawater-methane system, although capillary forces, chemical impurities or non-equilibrium conditions can lower (or increase) the temperature. If calibration by heat probe measurements is possible, errors of geothermal gradients are less than 10 per cent, otherwise uncertainties of 20 per cent (or even higher) may arise. In addition, seasonal variations of bottom water temperature have to be considered, because they may affect thermal gradients by up to ~10 per cent. (ii) The impact of typical quantities of low-thermal-conductivity gas hydrate on the bulk thermal conductivity is insignificant. (iii) The thermal conductivity profile between the BSR and the seabed can generally be approximated by a mean value. Thus, (iv) seabed measurements should be used instead of empirical relationships, which may

  16. An investigation of flow regimes affecting the Mexico City region

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    The Mexico City region is well-known to the meteorological community for its overwhelming air pollution problem. Several factors contribute to this predicament, namely, the 20 million people and vast amount of industry within the city. The unique geographical setting of the basin encompassing Mexico City also plays an important role. This basin covers approximately 5000 km{sup 2} of the Mexican Plateau at an average elevation of 2250 m above sea level (asl) and is surrounded on three sides by mountains averaging over 3500 m asl, with peaks over 5000 m asl. Only to the north is their a significant opening in the mountainous terrain. Mexico City sprawls over 1000 km{sup 2} in the southwestern portion of the basin. In recent years, several major research programs have been undertaken to investigate the air quality problem within Mexico City. One of these, the Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative (MARI), conducted in 1990--1993, was a cooperative study between researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Mexican Petroleum Institute. As part of this study, a field campaign was initiated in February 1991 during which numerous surface, upper air, aircraft, and LIDAR measurements were taken. Much of the work to date has focused upon defining and simulating the local meteorological conditions that are important for understanding the complex photochemistry occurring within the confines of the city. It seems reasonable to postulate, however, that flow systems originating outside of the Mexico City basin will influence conditions within the city much of the time.

  17. Crustal heat flow measurements in western Anatolia from borehole equilibrium temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkan, K.

    2014-01-01

    Results of a crustal heat flow analysis in western Anatolia based on borehole equilibrium temperatures and rock thermal conductivity data are reported. The dataset comprises 113 borehole sites that were collected in Southern Marmara and Aegean regions of Turkey in 1995-1999. The measurements are from abandoned water wells with depths of 100-150 m. Data were first classed in terms of quality, and the low quality data, including data showing effects of hydrologic disturbances on temperatures, were eliminated. For the remaining 34 sites, one meter resolution temperature-depth curves were carefully analyzed for determination of the background geothermal gradients, and any effects of terrain topography and intra-borehole fluid flow were corrected when necessary. Thermal conductivities were determined either by direct measurements on representative surface outcrop or estimated from the borehole lithologic records. The calculated heat flow values are 85-90 mW m-2 in the northern and central parts of the Menderes horst-graben system. Within the system, the highest heat flow values (> 100 mW m-2) are observed in the northeastern part of Gediz Graben, near Kula active volcanic center. The calculated heat flow values are also in agreement with the results of studies on the maximum depth of seismicity in the region. In the Menderes horst-graben system, surface heat flow is expected to show significant variations as a result of active sedimentation and thermal refraction in grabens, and active erosion on horst detachment zones. High heat flow values (90-100 mW m-2) are also observed in the peninsular (western) part of Çanakkale province. The heat flow anomaly here may be an extension of the high heat flow zone previously observed in the northern Aegean Sea. Moderate heat flow values (60-70 mW m-2) are observed in eastern part of Çanakkale and central part of Balıkesir provinces.

  18. Historical Dates of Ice-Affected Flows for 18 Rivers in New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodgkins, Glenn A.; Caldwell, James M.; Dudley, Robert W.

    2003-01-01

    Historical dates of ice-affected flows for 18 rivers in New England were compiled and are presented in this report. The length of this record for the rivers ranges from 48 to 71 years, with an average of 62 years. The minimum number of days of ice-affected flow in a water year (October 1 to September 30) ranged from zero on three rivers in south-coastal Maine and coastal New Hampshire to 110 on the Allagash River in northern Maine. The maximum number of days of ice-affected flow in a water year ranged from 106 on the Royal River in south-coastal Maine to 171 on the Allagash River in northern Maine. Six streamflow-< gaging stations in Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont had their latest days of ice-affected flow in the spring of 1939.

  19. Magnetic Field and Slip Effects on the Flow and Heat Transfer of Stagnation Point Jeffrey Fluid over Deformable Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turkyilmazoglu, Mustafa

    2016-06-01

    The Mhd slip flow and heat transfer of stagnation point Jeffrey fluid over deformable surfaces are the state of the art of this article. Following an analytical approach, the existence, uniqueness, and possible multiplicity of the physical solutions affected by several physical parameters are investigated. Particularly, magnetic interaction and slip factor are shown to much influence the structure of the solutions regarding both momentum and thermal boundary layers. The presented exact solutions not only provide a clear understanding of fruitful physical mechanisms present in this nonlinear flow problem but they have also merits in calculations by means of numerous numerical schemes aiming to explore further complex phenomena.

  20. Basic study of heat flow in fusion welding. Progress report to the US Department of Energy, October 1, 1980-October 1, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Szekely, J.; Eagar, T.W.

    1981-10-15

    Progress is reported in an investigation whose purpose is the development of a fundamental understanding of heat and fluid flow in fusion welding operations and of the role played by heat and fluid flow in determining the mechanical and structural properties of the welds produced. To date, a good quantitative description has been developed of the temperature profiles for electroslag welding systems and an understanding has been derived of factors that determine the size of the heat-affected zone (HAZ). Mathematical models of heat and fluid flow in the weld pool and of the temperature distribution in weldments using a moving heat source were developed. Experiments were performed to determine the effects of welding process parameters on the size and shape of the weld pool and of the HAZ. An unexpected finding was that the size of the HAZ was not markedly dependent on any of the welding process parameters. (LCL)

  1. Heat flow and near-surface radioactivity in the Australian continental crust

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sass, J.H.; Jaeger, J.C.; Munroe, Robert J.

    1976-01-01

    Heat-flow data have been obtained at 44 sites in various parts of Australia. These include seven sites from the old (~ 2500 m.y.) Precambrian shield of Western Australia, seventeen from the younger (~ 600- 2000 m.y.) Precambrian rocks of South Australia, the Northern Territory, and Queensland, and twenty within the eastern Paleozoic and younger rocks. Thirty of the sites are located where no previous heat-flow data existed, and the remainder provide significant extensions or refinements of areas previously studied. Where the holes studied penetrated the crystalline basement rocks, or where the latter rocks were exposed within a few kilometers of the holes, the upper crustal radiogenic heat production has been estimated based on gamma-ray spectrometric determinations of U, Th, and K abundances. Three heat-flow provinces are recognized in Australia based on the linear relation (q = q* + DA0 ) between heat flow q and surface radioactivity A0. New data from the Western Australian shield support earlier studies showing that heat flow is low to normal with values ranging from 0.7 to 1.2 hfu and with the majority of values less than 1.0 hfu, and the parameters q* = 0.63 hfu and 0 = 4.5 km determined previously were confirmed. Heat flow in the Proterozoic shield of central Australia is quite variable, with values ranging between about l and 3 hfu. This variability is attributed mainly to variations in near-surface crustal radioactivity. The parameters of the heat-flow line are q* = 0.64 hfu and 0 = 11.1 km and moderately high temperatures are predicted for the lower crust and upper mantle. Previous suggestions of a band of l ow- to - normal heat flow near the coast in eastern Australia were confirmed in some areas, but the zone is interrupted in at least one region (the Sydney Basin), where heat flow is about 2.0 hfu over a large area. The reduced heat flow, q*, in the Paleozoic intrusive rocks of eastern Australia varies from about 0.8 to 2.0 hfu . This variability might

  2. Experimental and numerical simulations of heat transfers between flowing water and a frozen porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Nicolas; Grenier, Christophe; Costard, François

    2015-04-01

    In permafrost-affected regions, hydrological changes due to global warming are still under investigation. But yet, we can already foresee from recent studies that for example, the variability and intensity of surface/subsurface flow are likely to be affected by permafrost degradation. The feedback induced by such changes on permafrost degradation is still not clearly assessed. Of particular interest are lake and river's taliks. A talik is a permanently unfrozen zone that lies below rivers or lakes. They are likely to play a key role in the formerly presented interactions, given that they are the only paths for groundwater flow in permafrost regions. Thus heat transfers on a regional scale are influenced by groundwater circulation. The aim of our study is therefore to investigate the evolution of river's taliks. In addition, they are the only perennial liquid water resources in continuous permafrost environments. The issue associated is to what extent can taliks develop into the future because of climate change and how likely are they to become open taliks, connecting sub-permafrost water with surface water with potentially strong geochemical changes? We developed a multidisciplinary approach coupling field investigation, experimental studies in a cold room and numerical modeling. The field investigation concerns Central Yakutia, Siberia, where we have installed instruments to monitor ground temperatures and water pressure in a small river's talik between two thermokarst lakes. We present here the results corresponding to the cold room experimental work, associating numerical modeling and laboratory experiments in order to look after the main parameters controlling river's talik installation and validate our numerical simulation approach. In a cold room at GEOPS, where a metric scale channel is filled with a porous medium (sand or silty-clay), we are able to control air, water and permafrost initial temperature, but also water flow. At initial time, the "river

  3. Depression of the Superfluid Transition Temperature in 4He by a Heat Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Liang; Lin, Peng; Qi, Xin

    2014-11-01

    The depression of the superfluid transition temperature Tλ in 4He by a heat flow Q is studied. A small sealed cell with a capillary is introduced and a stable and flat superfluid transition temperature plateau is easily obtained by controlling the temperature of the variable-temperature platform and the bottom chamber of the sealed cell. Owing to the depression effect of the superfluid transition temperature by the heat flow, the heat flow through the capillary is changed by the temperature control to obtain multiple temperature plateaus of different heat flows. The thermometer self-heating effect, the residual heat leak of the 4.2 K environment, the temperature difference on the He II liquid column, the Kapiza thermal resistance between the liquid helium and the copper surface of the sealed cell, the temperature gradient of the sealed cell, the static pressure of the He II liquid column and other factors have influence on the depression effect and the influence is analyzed in detail. Twenty experiments of the depression of the superfluid transition temperature in 4He by heat flow are made with four sealed cells in one year. The formula of the superfluid transition temperature pressured by the heat flow is Tλ (Q) = -0.00000103Q + 2.1769108, and covers the range 229 <= Q <= 6462 μW/cm2.

  4. An estimate of the heat flow on the Meteor Rise, subantarctic South Atlantic

    SciTech Connect

    Nobes, D.C. ); Mienert, J. ); Mwenifumbo, C.J. )

    1991-04-10

    Heat flow determinations require more than one reliable temperature measurment to obtain an estimate of the temperature gradient, and subsequently the heat flow. Two temperature readings were taken on leg 114 of the Ocean Drilling Program, both in hole 704B on the Meteor Rise in the subantarctic South Atlantic. One of these readings appears to be reliable, but the other appears to be invalid. Because any temperature gradient and estimate of heat flow derived using these two readings will be questionable, the authors suggest a different approach to determine heat flow. They use the one reliable temperature measurement to calibrate the temperature derived from the induction resistivity log and the laboratory porosity measurements. The temperature and heat flow depend on the shape factor used in the modified Archie's law. The temperature gradient empirically obtained from the resistivity and porosity is 38 {plus minus} mK/m and the average heat flow is 64 {plus minus} 8 mW/m{sup 2}, which is consistent with the age of the Meteor Rise (approximately 60 to 65 Ma). These values are in agreement with the computed heat flow when they assume a simple linear temperature gradient through the sediment section.

  5. Plasma Heating and Flow in an Auroral Arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Chandler, M. O.; Pollock, C. J.; Reasoner, D. L.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Austin, B.; Kintner, P. M.; Bonnell, J.

    1996-01-01

    We report direct observations of the three-dimensional velocity distribution of selected topside ionospheric ion species in an auroral context between 500 and 550 km altitude. We find heating transverse to the local magnetic field in the core plasma, with significant heating of 0(+), He(+), and H(+), as well as tail heating events that occur independently of the core heating. The 0(+) velocity distribution departs from bi-Maxwellian, at one point exhibiting an apparent ring-like shape. However, these observations are shown to be aliased within the auroral arc by temporal variations that arc not well-resolved by the core plasma instrument. The dc electric field measurements reveal superthermal plasma drifts that are consistent with passage of the payload through a series of vortex structures or a larger scale circularly polarized hydromagnetic wave structure within the auroral arc. The dc electric field also shows that impulsive solitary structures, with a frequency spectrum in the ion cyclotron frequency range, occur in close correlation with the tail heating events. The drift and core heating observations lend support to the idea that core ion heating is driven at low altitudes by rapid convective motions imposed by the magnetosphere. Plasma wave emissions at ion frequencies and parallel heating of the low-energy electron plasma are observed in conjunction with this auroral form; however, the conditions are much more complex than those typically invoked in previous theoretical treatments of superthermal frictional heating. The observed ion heating within the arc clearly exceeds that expected from frictional heating for the light ion species H(+) and He(+), and the core distributions also contain hot transverse tails, indicating an anomalous transverse heat source.

  6. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities) in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1) using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR) as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2) revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3) prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4) obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  7. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Closed-Type Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Saito, Yuji; Fujimoto, Hiromitsu

    A closed-loop two-phase thermosyphon can transport a large amount of thermal energy with small temperature differences without any external power supply. A fundamental investigation of flow and heat transfer characteristics was performed experimentally and theoretically using water, ethanol and R113 as the working liquids. Heat transfer coefficients in an evaporator and a condenser, and circulation flow rates were measured experimentally. The effects of liquid fill charge, rotation angle, pressure in the loop and heat flux on the heat transfer coefficients were examined. The heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator and the condenser were correlated by the expressions for pool boiling and film condensation respectively. As a result, the heat transfer coefficients in the evaporator were correlated by the Stephan-Abdelsalam equations within a±40% error. Theoretically, the circulation flow rate was predicted by calculating pressure, temperature, quality and void fraction along the loop. And, the comparison between the calculated and experimental results was made.

  8. Factors affecting gas migration and contaminant redistribution in heterogeneous porous media subject to electrical resistance heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munholland, Jonah L.; Mumford, Kevin G.; Kueper, Bernard H.

    2016-01-01

    A series of intermediate-scale laboratory experiments were completed in a two-dimensional flow cell to investigate gas production and migration during the application of electrical resistance heating (ERH) for the removal of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Experiments consisted of heating water in homogeneous silica sand and heating 270 mL of trichloroethene (TCE) and chloroform (CF) DNAPL pools in heterogeneous silica sands, both under flowing groundwater conditions. Spatial and temporal distributions of temperature were measured using thermocouples and observations of gas production and migration were collected using front-face image capture throughout the experiments. Post-treatment soil samples were collected and analyzed to assess DNAPL removal. Results of experiments performed in homogeneous sand subject to different groundwater flow rates showed that high groundwater velocities can limit subsurface heating rates. In the DNAPL pool experiments, temperatures increased to achieve DNAPL-water co-boiling, creating estimated gas volumes of 131 and 114 L that originated from the TCE and CF pools, respectively. Produced gas migrated vertically, entered a coarse sand lens and subsequently migrated laterally beneath an overlying capillary barrier to outside the heated treatment zone where 31-56% of the original DNAPL condensed back into a DNAPL phase. These findings demonstrate that layered heterogeneity can potentially facilitate the transport of contaminants outside the treatment zone by mobilization and condensation of gas phases during ERH applications. This underscores the need for vapor phase recovery and/or control mechanisms below the water table during application of ERH in heterogeneous porous media during the co-boiling stage, which occurs prior to reaching the boiling point of water.

  9. Factors affecting gas migration and contaminant redistribution in heterogeneous porous media subject to electrical resistance heating.

    PubMed

    Munholland, Jonah L; Mumford, Kevin G; Kueper, Bernard H

    2016-01-01

    A series of intermediate-scale laboratory experiments were completed in a two-dimensional flow cell to investigate gas production and migration during the application of electrical resistance heating (ERH) for the removal of dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). Experiments consisted of heating water in homogeneous silica sand and heating 270 mL of trichloroethene (TCE) and chloroform (CF) DNAPL pools in heterogeneous silica sands, both under flowing groundwater conditions. Spatial and temporal distributions of temperature were measured using thermocouples and observations of gas production and migration were collected using front-face image capture throughout the experiments. Post-treatment soil samples were collected and analyzed to assess DNAPL removal. Results of experiments performed in homogeneous sand subject to different groundwater flow rates showed that high groundwater velocities can limit subsurface heating rates. In the DNAPL pool experiments, temperatures increased to achieve DNAPL-water co-boiling, creating estimated gas volumes of 131 and 114 L that originated from the TCE and CF pools, respectively. Produced gas migrated vertically, entered a coarse sand lens and subsequently migrated laterally beneath an overlying capillary barrier to outside the heated treatment zone where 31-56% of the original DNAPL condensed back into a DNAPL phase. These findings demonstrate that layered heterogeneity can potentially facilitate the transport of contaminants outside the treatment zone by mobilization and condensation of gas phases during ERH applications. This underscores the need for vapor phase recovery and/or control mechanisms below the water table during application of ERH in heterogeneous porous media during the co-boiling stage, which occurs prior to reaching the boiling point of water. PMID:26638038

  10. Cross-flow heat exchangers for anti-freezing of liquid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ho-Myung; Gwak, Kyung Hyun; Yang, Hyung Suk; Hwang, Si-Dole

    2013-10-01

    Cross-flow heat exchangers are proposed and experimentally investigated as an anti-freezing scheme of liquid nitrogen. The possibility of freeze-out of liquid nitrogen is an important design issue in developing long superconducting cables, as the supply temperature of liquid nitrogen is close to its freezing temperature (63.3 K). Plate-fin heat exchangers are fabricated as typical counter-flow and newly proposed two-pass cross-flow in laboratory scale, and tested with cold helium gas at temperatures below 60 K. The experimental results show that the cross-flow heat exchanger is less vulnerable to the freeze-out condition, since the temperature distribution is basically two-dimensional. The cross-flow heat exchangers are effective in avoiding a complete clog-up of all passages and reducing the risk of freeze-out of liquid nitrogen.

  11. Analysing Thermal Response Test Data Affected by Groundwater Flow and Surface Temperature Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdoya, Massimo; Imitazione, Gianmario; Chiozzi, Paolo; Orsi, Marco; Armadillo, Egidio

    2014-05-01

    Tests that record the underground temperature variation due to a constant heat injected into a borehole (or extracted from it) by means of a carrier fluid are routinely performed to infer subsurface thermal conductivity and borehole thermal resistance, which are needed to size geothermal heat pump systems. The most popular model to analyse temperature-time curves obtained from these tests is the infinite line source (ILS). This model gives appropriate estimations of thermal parameters only if particular hydro-geological conditions are fulfilled. Several flaws can however affect data interpretation with ILS, which is based on strong assumptions like those of a purely conductive heat transfer regime in a homogeneous medium, no vertical heat flow and infinite length of the borehole. Other drawbacks can arise from the difficulty in the proper thermal insulation of the test equipment, and consequently with oscillations of the carrier fluid temperature due to surface temperature changes. In this paper, we focused on the treatment of thermal response test data when both advection and periodic changes of surface temperature occur. We used a moving line source model to simulate temperature-time signals under different hypothesis of Darcy velocity and thermal properties. A random noise was added to the signal in order to mimic high frequency disturbances, possibly caused by equipment operating conditions and/or geological variability. The subsurface thermal conductivity, the Darcy velocity and the borehole thermal resistance were inferred by minimising the root mean square error between the synthetic dataset and the theoretical model. The optimisation was carried out with the Nelder-Mead algorithm, and thermal and hydraulic properties were determined by iterative reprocessing according to a trial-and-error procedure. The inferred thermal and hydraulic parameters are well consistent with the 'a priory' values, and the presence of noise in the synthetic data does not produce

  12. Buoyant instabilities in downward flow in a symmetrically heated vertical channel

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, G.; Greif, R.

    1996-07-01

    This study of the downward flow of nitrogen in a tall, partially heated vertical channel (upstream isothermal at T{sub in}*, heated region isothermal at T{sub s}* downstream adiabatic) shows the strong effects of buoyancy even for small temperature differences. Time-dependent oscillations including periodic flow reversals occur along the channel walls. Although the flow and heat transfer are asymmetric, the temperature and axial component of velocity show symmetric reflections at two times that are half a period apart and the lateral component of velocity shows antisymmetric reflections at the two times. There is strong interaction between the downward flow in the central region of the channel and the upward flow along the heated channel walls. At the top of the heated region, the upward buoyant flow turns toward the center of the channel and is incorporated into the downward flow. Along the channel centerline there are nonmonotonic variations of the axial component of velocity and temperature and a large lateral component of velocity that reverses direction periodically. Results are presented for Re = 219.7 and Gr/Re{sup 2} = 1.83, 8.0, and 13.7. The heat transfer and the frequency of the oscillations increases and the flow and temperature fields become more complex as Gr/Re{sup 2} increases. The results have applications to fiber drying, food processing, crystal growth, solar energy collection, cooling of electronic circuits, ventilation, etc.

  13. The first deep heat flow determination in crystalline basement rocks beneath the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majorowicz, Jacek; Chan, Judith; Crowell, James; Gosnold, Will; Heaman, Larry M.; Kück, Jochem; Nieuwenhuis, Greg; Schmitt, Douglas R.; Unsworth, Martyn; Walsh, Nathaniel; Weides, Simon

    2014-05-01

    Heat flow (Q) determined from bottom-hole temperatures measured in oil and gas wells in Alberta show a large scatter with values ranging from 40 to 90 mW m-2. Only two precise measurements of heat flow were previously reported in Alberta, and were made more than half a century ago. These were made in wells located near Edmonton, Alberta, and penetrated the upper kilometre of clastic sedimentary rocks yielding heat flows values of 61 and 67 mW m-2 (Garland & Lennox). Here, we report a new precise heat flow determination from a 2363-m deep well drilled into basement granite rocks just west of Fort McMurray, Alberta (the Hunt Well). Temperature logs acquired in 2010-2011 show a significant increase in the thermal gradient in the granite due to palaeoclimatic effects. In the case of the Hunt Well, heat flow at depths >2200 m is beyond the influence of the glacial-interglacial surface temperatures. Thermal conductivity and temperature measurements in the Hunt Well have shown that the heat flow below 2.2 km is 51 mW m-2 (±3 mW m-2), thermal conductivity measured by the divided bar method under bottom of the well in situ like condition is 2.5 W m-1 K-1, and 2.7 W m-1 K-1 in ambient conditions), and the geothermal gradient was measured as 20.4 mK m-1. The palaeoclimatic effect causes an underestimate of heat flow derived from measurements collected at depths shallower than 2200 m, meaning other heat flow estimates calculated from basin measurements have likely been underestimated. Heat production (A) was calculated from spectral gamma recorded in the Hunt Well granites to a depth of 1880 m and give an average A of 3.4 and 2.9 μW m-3 for the whole depth range of granites down to 2263 m, based on both gamma and spectral logs. This high A explains the relatively high heat flow measured within the Precambrian basement intersected by the Hunt Well; the Taltson Magmatic Zone. Heat flow and related heat generation from the Hunt Well fits the heat flow-heat generation

  14. Heat Transfer Characteristics of Liquid-Gas Taylor Flows incorporating Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J. A.; Walsh, P. A.

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the heat transfer characteristics associated with liquid-gas Taylor flows in mini channels incorporating microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCM). Taylor flows have been shown to result in heat transfer enhancements due to the fluid recirculation experienced within liquid slugs which is attributable to the alternating liquid slug and gas bubble flow structure. Microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCM) also offer significant potential with increased thermal capacity due to the latent heat required to cause phase change. The primary aim of this work was to examine the overall heat transfer potential associated with combining these two novel liquid cooling technologies. By investigating the local heat transfer characteristics, the augmentation/degradation over single phase liquid cooling was quantified while examining the effects of dimensionless variables, including Reynolds number, liquid slug length and gas void fraction. An experimental test facility was developed which had a heated test section and allowed MPCM-air Taylor flows to be subjected to a constant heat flux boundary condition. Infrared thermography was used to record high resolution experimental wall temperature measurements and determine local heat transfer coefficients from the thermal entrance point. 30.2% mass particle concentration of the MPCM suspension fluid was examined as it provided the maximum latent heat for absorption. Results demonstrate a significant reduction in experimental wall temperatures associated with MPCM-air Taylor flows when compared with the Graetz solution for conventional single phase coolants. Total enhancement in the thermally developed region is observed to be a combination of the individual contributions due to recirculation within the liquid slugs and also absorption of latent heat. Overall, the study highlights the potential heat transfer enhancements that are attainable within heat exchange devices employing MPCM

  15. Contrasting discharge computation methods in riverine and tidal-affected flows in Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turnipseed, D.P.

    2004-01-01

    Recent advancements in acoustic science have improved the measurement of real-time flow conditions in complex open-channel flow systems with dynamic channel geometry, velocity distribution and direction, and other gradually varying hydraulic characteristics. In the lower Pascagoula River Basin, a drainage area of about 9,500 square miles in Mississippi, riverine and tidal-affected river reaches exist that exhibit fairly steady flows during and after rainfall runoff events, and unsteady flows during low flow, tidal-affected events. Fairly steady flows can be computed usually within 5 percent by using methods developed by the USGS. Accurate measurement and computation of varied, non-uniform open-channel hydraulic streamflow conditions have historically been difficult or impossible. Acoustic and conventional methodologies to measure velocity in an open-channel riverine and tidal-affected reach have been combined to compute continuous discharge during varied, nonuniform flows by using the relations of stage and area in concert with average velocity and index velocity. Due to the unique flow characteristics on the lower Pascagoula River in Mississippi, an independent means of computing high flows based on conventional methods of a log regression of stage and discharge for a range of stages was also used. The two methods were contrasted and had good correlation. Copyright ASCE 2004.

  16. SCC Initiation in Alloy 600 Heat Affected Zones Exposed to High Temperature Water

    SciTech Connect

    E Richey; DS Morton; RA Etien; GA Young; RB Bucinell

    2006-11-03

    Studies have shown that grain boundary chromium carbides improve the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of nickel based alloys exposed to high temperature, high purity water. However, thermal cycles from welding can significantly alter the microstructure of the base material near the fusion line. In particular, the heat of welding can solutionize grain boundary carbides and produce locally high residual stresses and strains, reducing the SCC resistance of the Alloy 600 type material in the heat affected zone (HAZ). Testing has shown that the SCC growth rate in Alloy 600 heat affected zone samples can be {approx}30x faster than observed in the Alloy 600 base material under identical testing conditions due to fewer intergranular chromium rich carbides and increased plastic strain in the HAZ [1, 2]. Stress corrosion crack initiation tests were conducted on Alloy 600 HAZ samples at 360 C in hydrogenated, deaerated water to determine if these microstructural differences significantly affect the SCC initiation resistance of Alloy 600 heat affected zones compared to the Alloy 600 base material. Alloy 600 to EN82H to Alloy 600 heat-affected-zone (HAZ) specimens where fabricated from an Alloy 600 to Alloy 600 narrow groove weld with EN82H filler metal. The approximate middle third of the specimen gauge region was EN82H such that each specimen had two HAZ regions. Tests were conducted with in-situ monitored smooth tensile specimens under a constant load, and a direct current electric potential drop was used for in-situ detection of SCC. Test results suggest that the SCC initiation resistance of Alloy 600 and its weld metal follows the following order: EN82H > Alloy 600 HAZ > Alloy 600. The high SCC initiation resistance observed to date in Alloy 600 heat affected zones compared to wrought Alloy 600 is unexpected based on the microstructure of HAZ versus wrought material and based on prior SCC growth rate studies. The observed behavior for the HAZ specimens is likely

  17. Heat-flow studies in the northwest geysers geothermal field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Colin F.; Galanis, S. Peter; Moses, Thomas H.; Grubb, Frederick V.

    1993-01-01

    Temperature and thermal conductivity data were acquired from 3 idle production wells in the Northwest Geysers. Heat-flow profiles derived from data recorded in the caprock which overlies the steam reservoir reveal a decrease of heat flow with depth in 2 of the 3 wells. These observations contradict the generally accepted theory that conductive heat flow is constant with depth within The Geysers caprock. There are several possible explanations for this, but the available data suggest that these profiles reflect a local recession or cooling of the reservoir top within the past 5000 to 10000 years.

  18. Effect of horizontal heat and fluid flow on the vertical temperature distribution in a semiconfining layer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, N.; Ge, S.

    1996-01-01

    By including the constant flow of heat and fluid in the horizontal direction, we develop an analytical solution for the vertical temperature distribution within the semiconfining layer of a typical aquifer system. The solution is an extension of the previous one-dimensional theory by Bredehoeft and Papadopulos [1965]. It provides a quantitative tool for analyzing the uncertainty of the horizontal heat and fluid flow. The analytical results demonstrate that horizontal flow of heat and fluid, if at values much smaller than those of the vertical, has a negligible effect on the vertical temperature distribution but becomes significant when it is comparable to the vertical.

  19. Numerical study of heat transfer enhancement in a channel flow using an oscillating vortex generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.-J.

    2002-04-01

    A numerical simulation is performed to study the unsteady flow and heat transfer in a channel with an oscillating bar, which is called an oscillating vortex generator. The behavior of the oscillating bar and flow is coupled, and the variation of the flow and thermal fields is classified as a moving boundary problem. An arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian kinematic description method is adopted to describe the flow and thermal fields, and a Galerkin finite element formulation with moving meshes is applied to solve the governing equations. The effects of Reynolds number, maximum oscillating speed, oscillating amplitude, and oscillating frequency of the bar on the flow and heat transfer are examined in details. The results show that the unsteady flow of transverse vortices is actively and largely formed behind the bar as the bar oscillates in the channel. The transverse vortices transport the low-temperature and high-speed core flow toward the heated regions of the channel. Also, the high-temperature wall flow is carried away from the heated regions of the channel to mix with the low-temperature core flow by transverse vortices. Based upon the fixed heat transfer area, the efficiency index is greater than 1.0 for almost all cases.

  20. Pressure Drop and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Boiling Nitrogen in Square Pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Katsuhide; Nakayama, Tadashi; Takahashi, Koichi; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Taguchi, Hideyuki; Aoki, Itsuo

    Pressure drop and forced convection heat transfer were studied in the boiling nitrogen flow in a horizontal square pipe with a side of 12 mm at inlet pressure between 0.1 and0.15 MPa with a mass flux between 70 and 2000 kg/m2-s and with a heat flux of 5, 10 and 20 kW/m2. Accordingly, the flow and heat transfer mechanisms specific to square pipe were elucidated, and the applicability to cryogenic fluids of pressure drop and heat transfer models originally proposed for room temperature fluids was clarified.

  1. Dryout of an inductively heated bed of steel particles with subcooled flow from beneath the bed

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, F.P.; Catton, I.; Dhir, V.K.; Jakobsson, J.

    1984-04-01

    An experimental investigation has been conducted of dryout heat flux in an inductively heated bed of metal particles with forced flow from beneath the bed. The mass flux varied from 0 to 3.11 kg/m/sup 2/.s. Freon113 was used as coolant. Particle sizes were 1588, 3175, and 4763 /rho/m in diameter. The dryout heat flux was found to increase as mass flux increases. When the mass flux is large enough, the dryout heat flux asymptotically approaches the total evaporation energy of the inlet flow.

  2. Bypass valve and coolant flow controls for optimum temperatures in waste heat recovery systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meisner, Gregory P

    2013-10-08

    Implementing an optimized waste heat recovery system includes calculating a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a heat exchanger of a waste heat recovery system, and predicting a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a material flowing through a channel of the waste heat recovery system. Upon determining the rate of change in the temperature of the material is predicted to be higher than the rate of change in the temperature of the heat exchanger, the optimized waste heat recovery system calculates a valve position and timing for the channel that is configurable for achieving a rate of material flow that is determined to produce and maintain a defined threshold temperature of the heat exchanger, and actuates the valve according to the calculated valve position and calculated timing.

  3. Using Groundwater Temperatures and Heat Flow Patterns to Assess Groundwater Flow in Snake Valley, Nevada and Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masbruch, M. D.; Chapman, D. S.

    2009-12-01

    The Southern Nevada Water Authority’s (SNWA) proposal to develop groundwater resources in Snake Valley and adjacent basins in eastern Nevada has focused attention on understanding the links between basin-fill and carbonate aquifer systems, groundwater flow paths, and the movement of groundwater between basins. The SNWA development plans are contentious in part because (1) there are few perennial streams that flow into the basins and these surface-water resources are fully appropriated; (2) groundwater resources that sustain streams, springs, wetlands, and the local agricultural economy are also limited; and (3) because Snake Valley straddles the Utah-Nevada state line. We report groundwater temperatures and estimates of heat flow used to constrain estimates of groundwater flow into and through Snake Valley. Thermal logs have been collected from 24 monitoring wells in the Utah part of the valley. Natural, undisturbed geothermal gradients within the Basin and Range are generally 30 °C/km, which correspond to heat flow values of approximately 90 mW/m2. Geothermal gradients in the southern portion of Snake Valley are lower than typical Basin and Range geothermal gradients, with the majority ranging between 10 and 20 °C/km, corresponding to heat flow values of 30 to 60 mW/m2. In the northern portion of the basin, however, geothermal gradients are generally higher than typical Basin and Range geothermal gradients, with thermal logs of two wells indicating gradients of 39 °C/km and 51 °C/km, which correspond to heat flow values of approximately 117 and 153 mW/m2, respectively. These observations suggest heat is being redistributed by groundwater flow to discharge points in northern Snake Valley. This interpretation is also supported by spring temperatures in northern Snake Valley and at Fish Springs National Wildlife Refuge to the northeast that are higher than ambient (12 °C) surface temperature. These thermal data are being used together with water levels and

  4. Distributed measurement of flow rate in conduits using heated fiber optic distributed temperature sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Raúl; Zubelzu, Sergio; Rodríguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Juana, Luis

    2016-04-01

    In some cases flow varies along conduits, such as in irrigated land drainage pipes and channels, irrigation laterals and others. Detailed knowledge of flow rate along the conduit makes possible analytical evaluation of water distribution and collection systems performance. Flow rate can change continuously in some systems, like in drainage pipes and channels, or abruptly, like in conduits bifurcations or emitter insertions. A heat pulse along the conduit makes possible to get flow rate from continuity and heat balance equations. Due to the great value of specific heat of water, temperature changes along conduit are smaller than the noise that involves the measurement process. This work presents a methodology that, dealing with the noise of distributed temperature measurements, leads to flow rate determination along pressurized pipes or open channel flows.

  5. Effect of heat transfer on rotating electroosmotic flow through a micro-vessel: haemodynamical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, A.; Mondal, A.; Shit, G. C.; Kundu, P. K.

    2016-08-01

    This paper theoretically analyzes the heat transfer characteristics associated with electroosmotic flow of blood through a micro-vessel having permeable walls. The analysis is based on the Debye-Hückel approximation for charge distributions and the Navier-Stokes equations are assumed to represent the flow field in a rotating system. The velocity slip condition at the vessel walls is taken into account. The essential features of the rotating electroosmotic flow of blood and associated heat transfer characteristics through a micro-vessel are clearly highlighted by the variation in the non-dimensional flow velocity, volumetric flow rate and non-dimensional temperature profiles. Moreover, the effect of Joule heating parameter and Prandtl number on the thermal transport characteristics are discussed thoroughly. The study reveals that the flow of blood is appreciably influenced by the elctroosmotic parameter as well as rotating Reynolds number.

  6. Heat Flow Surveys on the Washington Margin of the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmi, M.; Johnson, H. P.; Solomon, E. A.; Harris, R. N.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the temperature distribution along an active subducting plate interface can improve our understanding of subduction zone dynamics and our ability to estimate seismic hazards. The 'locking' mechanism on the fault appears temperature dependent, where the up-dip (shallow) limit of the seismic zone ranges from 100-150°and the down-dip (deep) limit is a transition zone between 350°C and 450°C. Heat flow measurements provide the most direct method for resolving the subduction zone thermal environment. The Cascadia Subduction Zone currently poses the single largest seismic hazard to population centers within the Northwest United States. In August 2013, heat flow data were collected offshore Grays Harbor, WA, along a profile perpendicular to the accretionary wedge. Measurements extend seaward of the Cascadia deformation front and landward over the accretionary wedge and are collocated along line 4 of the 2012 R/V Langseth multi-channel seismology (MCS) profiles. These data consist of 43 long probe (3 m) measurements, 204 ROV Jason II probe (0.6 m) and 27 thermal blanket heat flow measurements Preliminary results indicate a mean heat flow of 110 mW/m2 over the incoming plate, a decrease to 30 mW/m2 at the first deformation ridge, then heat flow varying between 90 to 120 mW/m2 over the lower accretionary wedge. BSR derived heat flow decreases from 90 mW/m2 at the deformation front to 60 mW/m2 60 km landward and up the accretionary wedge. Regionally the heat flow values are consistent with the subduction of a thickly sedimented and young oceanic plate and local heat flow variations likely reflect advective and conductive heat transfer within the shallow portion of the accretionary wedge.

  7. Flow and heat transfer measurements in a swirl chamber with different outlet geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biegger, Christoph; Weigand, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    In technical applications, an efficient cooling is necessary for high thermal load components such as turbine blades. One potential and promising technique is a swirling tube flow in comparison with an axial flow. The additional circumferential velocity and enhanced turbulent mixing increase the heat transfer. But the complex flow field and heat transfer mechanisms are still under research. Furthermore, the reliability of a swirl chamber regarding different outlet conditions is of great interest for a robust cooling design. Therefore, we investigated the influence of a straight, a tangential and a bend outlet. To gain understanding of the flow phenomena, we measured the velocity field by means of stereo-PIV (particle image velocimetry). We experimentally studied the cooling capability measuring the heat transfer coefficients using thermochromic liquid crystals. For an accurate cooling design, we used the local adiabatic wall temperature as the correct reference temperature for calculating the heat transfer coefficients. We will show the velocity field, the pressure loss and the heat transfer results for realistic Reynolds numbers from 10,000 to 40,000 and for swirl numbers between and . The obtained heat transfer is more than four times higher compared to an axial tube flow. Our measurements indicate that the here investigated outlet redirection has no significant influence on the flow field and the heat transfer coefficients.

  8. Heat line analysis for MHD mixed convection flow of nanofluid within a driven cavity containing heat generating block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvin, Salma; Siddiqua, Ayesha

    2016-07-01

    Mixed convective flow and heat transfer characteristics of nanofluid inside a double lid driven cavity with a square heat generating block is analyzed numerically based on heat line approach. The water- alumina nanofluid is chosen as the operational fluid through the enclosure. The governing partial differential equations with proper boundary conditions are solved by Finite Element Method using Galerkin's weighted residual scheme. Calculations are performed for different solid volume fraction (χ) of nanoparticles 0 ≤ χ ≤ 0.15. Results are shown in terms of stream lines, isothermal lines, heat lines, average Nusselt number, average velocity and average temperature. An enhancement in heat transfer rate is observed with the increase of nanoparticles volume fraction.

  9. Internal (Annular) and Compressible External (Flat Plate) Turbulent Flow Heat Transfer Correlations.

    SciTech Connect

    Dechant, Lawrence; Smith, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Here we provide a discussion regarding the applicability of a family of traditional heat transfer correlation based models for several (unit level) heat transfer problems associated with flight heat transfer estimates and internal flow heat transfer associated with an experimental simulation design (Dobranich 2014). Variability between semi-empirical free-flight models suggests relative differences for heat transfer coefficients on the order of 10%, while the internal annular flow behavior is larger with differences on the order of 20%. We emphasize that these expressions are strictly valid only for the geometries they have been derived for e.g. the fully developed annular flow or simple external flow problems. Though, the application of flat plate skin friction estimate to cylindrical bodies is a traditional procedure to estimate skin friction and heat transfer, an over-prediction bias is often observed using these approximations for missile type bodies. As a correction for this over-estimate trend, we discuss a simple scaling reduction factor for flat plate turbulent skin friction and heat transfer solutions (correlations) applied to blunt bodies of revolution at zero angle of attack. The method estimates the ratio between axisymmetric and 2-d stagnation point heat transfer skin friction and Stanton number solution expressions for sub-turbulent Reynolds numbers %3C1x10 4 . This factor is assumed to also directly influence the flat plate results applied to the cylindrical portion of the flow and the flat plate correlations are modified by

  10. The effects of soft-sphere contact models on heat transfer to particles flowing over a heated surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Aaron; Hrenya, Christine; Ma, Zhiwen; Pannala, Sreekanth; O'Brien, Tom

    2013-11-01

    DEM simulations are performed for solid particles flowing around a heated surface. For moderately dense granular flows with enduring particle-wall contacts, particles in contact with the surface are warmed by conduction across the mutual contact area. Heat transfer may also occur via conduction through the interstitial fluid within the small gaps between particles and the wall. The conductive heat transfer depends on the specific contact model, i.e. Hertzian or linear spring dashpot (LSD), because such models determine the contact area and duration. In this work, we use MFIX DEM (an open source simulation tool developed at NETL) to simulate particles falling in crossflow around a heated cylinder. Heat transfer models for both contact conduction as well as conduction across the interstitial fluid are included in these simulations. We discuss how different collision models impact the heat transfer to the particles as well as the sensitivity to various model parameters. We also compare the heat transfer predicted by different contact conduction thermal models.

  11. Effects of Imposed Large-scale Flow During Convection at Large Rayleigh Numbers: Plume Dynamics and Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, H. M.; Jellinek, M. A.; Richards, M. A.; Manga, M.

    2001-12-01

    layer thickness and heat flux have a square root and inverse-square root dependence, respectively, on the Peclet number. The thermal boundary layer thickens and heat flux from the hot boundary decreases in the downstream direction. In the case of a laterally uniform imposed flow, the thermal boundary layer will eventually grow to a critical thickness at sufficiently large downstream distances. Thus, it is possible for most of the boundary layer to be stable, with only part of the boundary layer capable to generate plume instabilities. In the case of non-uniform imposed flow (i.e. horizontal flow with a cold downwelling and downstream upwelling) the thermal boundary-layer thickness increases rapidly in the vicinity of the upwelling, thereby causing preferential formation and growth of plumes in the vicinity of the upwelling region. When applied to the Earth, our results provide a basis for quantitative assessment of how plume formation and heat flux across the CMB can be affected by plate-scale mantle flow.

  12. Microstructural transformations of heat affected zones in duplex steel welded joints

    SciTech Connect

    Nowacki, Jerzy . E-mail: jnowacki@ps.pl; Lukojc, Aleksander

    2006-06-15

    The influence of the welding thermal conditions exemplified by heat input and heat treatment after welding on the structure of the heat affected zone (HAZ) UNS S31803 has been analysed. The post weld treatment was used to create the precisely defined thermal conditions for the decomposition of primary phases in the HAZ, by a multi-layer welding thermal cycle stimulation. Detailed analyses of the microstructure and chemical composition of the phases in the different post welded conditions were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Three types of secondary precipitates have been observed: secondary austenite ({gamma}{sub 2}), carbides: M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and M{sub 7}C{sub 3}. The dependence of the secondary austenite volume fraction and morphology in the HAZ on thermal cycle have been interpreted. The eutectoid decomposition of the primary phases in the analysed thermal conditions was confirmed.

  13. Two-phase gas-liquid flow characteristics inside a plate heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Nilpueng, Kitti; Wongwises, Somchai

    2010-11-15

    In the present study, the air-water two-phase flow characteristics including flow pattern and pressure drop inside a plate heat exchanger are experimentally investigated. A plate heat exchanger with single pass under the condition of counter flow is operated for the experiment. Three stainless steel commercial plates with a corrugated sinusoidal shape of unsymmetrical chevron angles of 55 and 10 are utilized for the pressure drop measurement. A transparent plate having the same configuration as the stainless steel plates is cast and used as a cover plate in order to observe the flow pattern inside the plate heat exchanger. The air-water mixture flow which is used as a cold stream is tested in vertical downward and upward flow. The results from the present experiment show that the annular-liquid bridge flow pattern appeared in both upward and downward flows. However, the bubbly flow pattern and the slug flow pattern are only found in upward flow and downward flow, respectively. The variation of the water and air velocity has a significant effect on the two-phase pressure drop. Based on the present data, a two-phase multiplier correlation is proposed for practical application. (author)

  14. Anomalous subglacial heat flow in central Greenland induced by the Iceland plume.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrunin, Alexey G.; Rogozhina, Irina; Kaban, Mikhail K.; Vaughan, Alan P. M.; Steinberger, Bernhard; Johnson, Jesse; Koulakov, Ivan; Thomas, Maik

    2013-04-01

    3000 m of ice sheet thickness has ensured that central Greenland has kept it geothermal heat flow (GHF) distribution enigmatic. Some few direct ice temperature measurements from deep ice cores reveal a GHF of 50 to 60 mW/m² in the Summit region and this is noticeably above what would be expected for the underlying Early Proterozoic lithosphere. In addition, indirect estimates from zones of rapid basal melting suggest extreme anomalies 15 to 30 times continental background. Subglacial topography indicates caldera like topographic features in the zones hinting at possible volcanic activity in the past [1], and all of these observations combined hint at an anomalous lithospheric structure. Further supporting this comes from new high-resolution P-wave tomography, which shows a strong thermal anomaly in the lithosphere crossing Greenland from east to west [2]. Rock outcrops at the eastern and western end of this zone indicate significant former magmatic activity, older in the east and younger in the west. Additionally, plate modelling studies suggest that the Greenland plate passed over the mantle plume that is currently under Iceland from late Cretaceous to Neogene times, consistent with the evidence from age of magmatism. Evidence of rapid basal melt revealed by ice penetrating radar along the hypocentre of the putative plume track indicates that it continues to affect the Greenland continental geotherm today. We analyse plume-induced thermal disturbance of the present-day lithosphere and their effects on the central Greenland ice sheet by using a novel evolutionary model of the climate-ice-lithosphere-upper mantle system. Our results indicate that mantle plume-induced erosion of the lithosphere has occurred, explaining caldera-type volcanic structures, the GHF anomaly, and requiring dyke intrusion into the crust during the early Cenozoic. The residual thermo-mechanical effect of the mantle plume has raised deep-sourced heat flow by over 25 mW/m² since 60 Ma and

  15. Analysis of laser ablation dynamics of CFRP in order to reduce heat affected zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yuji; Tsukamoto, Masahiro; Nariyama, Tatsuya; Nakai, Kazuki; Matsuoka, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Kenjiro; Masuno, Shinichiro; Ohkubo, Tomomasa; Nakano, Hitoshi

    2014-03-01

    A carbon fiber reinforced plastic [CFRP], which has high strength, light weight and weather resistance, is attractive material applied for automobile, aircraft and so on. The laser processing of CFRP is one of suitable way to machining tool. However, thermal affected zone was formed at the exposure part, since the heat conduction property of the matrix is different from that of carbon fiber. In this paper, we demonstrated that the CFRP plates were cut with UV nanosecond laser to reduce the heat affected zone. The ablation plume and ablation mass were investigated by laser microscope and ultra-high speed camera. Furthermore, the ablation model was constructed by energy balance, and it was confirmed that the ablation rate was 0.028 μg/ pulse in good agreement with the calculation value of 0.03 μg/ pulse.

  16. Mathematical modeling of microstructure evolution in the heat affected zone of electroslag cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.V.; Atteridge, D.G.; Meekisho, L.

    1996-12-31

    An algorithm is presented for computing microstructure evolution in weld heat affected zone of low alloy steels. It contains computational models for multicomponent Fe-C-M system equilibria, austenite grain growth kinetics, and austenite decomposition kinetics. A new kinetics model for austenite decomposition has been developed based on first principles of phase transformations expressed with Zener-Hillert type formulas. Coefficients in this model were calibrated with CCT diagrams of low alloy steels. This algorithm has the capability of computing TTT diagrams, CCT diagrams Jominy hardness curves, and phase transformations in the weld heat affected zone of low alloy steels. Excellent agreement was observed between the experimentally observed and the predicted microstructure and hardness.

  17. Utilizing thermal isostasy to estimate sub-lithospheric heat flow and anomalous crustal radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasterok, D.; Gard, M.

    2016-09-01

    While surface heat flow relates to the heat loss through the lithosphere, it can be difficult to quantify and separate the heat produced internally through radiogenic decay from the heat transferred across the base of the lithosphere by mantle convection. In this study, we apply a thermo-isostatic analysis to Australia and estimate the sub-lithospheric and radiogenic heat flow components by employing a simple 1-D conservation of energy model. We estimate an anomalous radiogenic heat production across much of eastern Australia generally accounting for >50 mW m-2, while western Australia appears to have high crustal compositionally corrected elevation, possibly related to chemical buoyancy of the mantle lithosphere. A moderately high sub-lithospheric heat flow (∼40 mW m-2) along the eastern and southeastern coast, including Tasmania, is coincident with locations of Cenozoic volcanism and supports an edge-driven convection hypothesis. However, the pattern of sub-lithospheric heat flow along the margin does not support the existence of hotspot tracks. Thermo-isostatic models such as these improve our ability to identify and quantify crustal from mantle sources of heat loss and add valuable constraints on tectonic and geodynamic models of the continental lithosphere's physical state and evolution.

  18. Experimental Demonstration of a Novel Heat Exchange Loop Used for Oscillating Flow Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, B.; Wu, Z. H.; Luo, E. C.; Dai, W.

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes a non-resonant self-circulating heat exchanger which uses a pair of check valves to transform oscillating flow into steady flow that allows the oscillating flow system's own working gas to go through a physically remote high-temperature or cold-temperature heat source. Unlike traditional heat exchangers used in thermoacoustic systems, the length of the non-resonant self-circulating heat exchanger is not limited by the peak-to-peak displacement. In addition, it is also different from the resonant self-circulating heat exchanger that needs a specific resonant length. This invention may lead to easy design and fabrication of heat exchangers for oscillating-flow refrigeration system with large capacity. To verify this idea, we have built an experimental system by incorporating such a heat exchanger loop with a mechanical pressure wave generator. Measurements of heat transfer of the heat exchanger loop under different operating conditions including mean pressure, and operating frequency, etc. have been made. Our experiments have demonstrated its feasibility and flexibility for practical applications.

  19. A review of heat transfer enhancement through flow disruption in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewan, Anupam; Srivastava, Pankaj

    2015-06-01

    In this paper a comprehensive review of heat transfer enhancement through microchannels has been presented. Over the past few years due to multifunction, shrinking package size and high power dissipation, the heat flux per unit area has increased significantly. Microchannels, with their large heat transfer surface to volume ratio and their small volumes, have shown a good thermal performance. Microchannels have been proven to be a high performance cooling technique which is able to dissipate heat flux effectively from localized hot spots over small surface area. A good amount of heat transfer augmentation techniques have been reported on flow disruption through microchannel. These techniques promote free stream separation at the leading edge which results in boundary layer development and enhanced mixing leading to increased heat transfer. Flow disruption can be achieved through passive surface modifications, such as, shape of channel, dimple surfaces, ribs, cavities, groove structures, porous medium, etc. Combined effects of these geometrical configurations in heat transfer augmentation are also reported in the literature. In this paper recent developments in experimental and numerical simulations of single-phase liquid cooled microchannel have been discussed to analyze the pressure drop, friction and heat transfer characteristics due to different flow conditions, roughness structure and passive surface modifications. It has been observed that the flow disruption techniques are effective for heat transfer enhancement with lower penalties of increased pressure drop. The review concludes with suggestions for future research in this area.

  20. The effect of facial blood flow on ratings of blushing and negative affect during an embarrassing task: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Peter D; Lazaroo, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    Expecting to blush is a common source of social anxiety, and is associated with heightened perceptions of blushing and embarrassment. To assess whether sensory cues associated with heightened facial blood flow are an additional source of anxiety, the vasodilator niacin (100mg) or placebo was administered double-blind to 33 participants, and facial blood flow was investigated when they sang a children's song. Vasodilatation during singing was greater in the niacin than placebo condition, and niacin-evoked flushing and increases in pulse rate were greater in participants with high than low fear of negative evaluation. Nevertheless, ratings of embarrassment, anxiety, blushing and facial heat were similar in both drug conditions. This dissociation implies that cognitive appraisals or negative affect overrode more subtle physiological cues of blushing during embarrassment. Clarifying how judgments about blushing are made could be crucial for correcting faulty assumptions about blushing in people who are frightened of this response. PMID:22257642

  1. Morphology of weld heat-affected zone liquation cracking in Ta-modified cast alloy 718

    SciTech Connect

    West, S.L.; Baeslack, W.A. . Dept. of Welding Engineering); Kelly, T.J. . Aircraft Engine Business Group)

    1989-11-01

    The authors' discuss some problems involved in the use of alloy 718 which is a precipitation-hardenable, nickel-base superalloy developed in the early 1960s for medium temperature (540-705{sup 0}C) aerospace applications. The use of Nb as a substitute for Al and Ti leads to a susceptibility to liquation cracking in the weld heat-affected zone (HAZ). This problem is discussed in detail in the article.

  2. Crack arrest toughness of a heat-affected zone containing local brittle zones

    SciTech Connect

    Malik, L.; Pussegoda, L.N.; Graville, B.A.; Tyson, W.R.

    1996-11-01

    The awareness of the presence of local brittle zones (LBZs) in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of welds has led to the requirements for minimum initiation toughness for the HAZ for critical applications. A fracture control philosophy that is proposed to be an attractive alternative for heat-affected zones containing LBZs is the prevention of crack propagation rather than of crack initiation. Such an approach would be viable if it could be demonstrated that cracks initiated in the LBZs will be arrested without causing catastrophic failure, notwithstanding the low initiation (CTOD) toughness resulting from the presence of LBZs. Unstable propagation of a crack initiating from an LBZ requires the rupture of tougher microstructural regions surrounding the LBZ in HAZ, and therefore the CTOD value reflecting the presence of LBZ is unlikely to provide a true indication of the potential for fast fracture along the heat-affected zone. Base metal specifications usually ensure that small unstable cracks propagating from the weld zone into the base metal would be arrested. To investigate the likelihood of fast fracture within the HAZ, a test program has been carried out that involved performing compact plane strain and plane stress crack arrest tests on a heat-affected zone that contained LBZs, and thus exhibited unacceptable low CTOD toughness for resistance to brittle fracture initiation. The results indicated that the crack arrest toughness was little influenced by the presence of local brittle zones. Instead, the superior toughness of the larger proportion of finer-grain HAZ surrounding the LBZ present along the crack path has a greater influence on the crack arrest toughness.

  3. Transport of heat and momentum in oscillatory wall-bounded flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebadi, Alireza; Biles, Drummond; White, Christopher; Pond, Ian; Dubief, Yves; UNH Team; UVM Team

    2015-11-01

    The balance of the leading order terms in the mean momentum and energy equations and their thrice integrated forms are investigated in oscillatory wall-bounded flow using both DNS and experimental data. The integrated forms of the equations are used to investigate the dynamical contributions to the phase-averaged wall shear stress and wall heat flux. Preliminary results indicate that phases corresponding to flow acceleration are dynamically similar to oscillatory laminar flow and phases corresponding to flow deceleration are dynamically similar to fully developed turbulent flow. Moreover, the flow becomes more turbulent-like with increasing period of oscillation.

  4. The simplicity of fractal-like flow networks for effective heat and mass transport

    SciTech Connect

    Pence, Deborah

    2010-05-15

    A variety of applications using disk-shaped fractal-like flow networks and the status of one and two-dimensional predictive models for these applications are summarized. Applications discussed include single-phase and two-phase heat sinks and heat exchangers, two-phase flow separators, desorbers, and passive micromixers. Advantages of using these fractal-like flow networks versus parallel-flow networks include lower pressure drop, lower maximum wall temperature, inlet plenum symmetry, alternate flow paths, and pressure recovery at the bifurcation. The compact nature of microscale fractal-like branching heat exchangers makes them ideal for modularity. Differences between fractal-like and constructal approaches applied to disk-shaped heat sink designs are highlighted, and the importance of including geometric constraints, including fabrication constraints, in flow network design optimization is discussed. Finally, a simple pencil and paper procedure for designing single-phase heat sinks with fractal-like flow networks based solely on geometric constraints is outlined. Benefit-to-cost ratios resulting from geometric-based designs are compared with those from flow networks determined using multivariable optimization. Results from the two network designs are within 11%. (author)

  5. Influence of a pulsating flow on the transfer of heat from cylinders and finned tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perwaiz, J.; Base, T. E.

    The effect of pulsations in the flow on forced convective heat transfer coefficients around a circular cylinder and a finned tube is studied. Convection measurement experiments were performed to determine the rate of heat transfer (average Nusselt numbers) from a circular cylinder and a finned tube in a pulsating crossflow. The experiments were performed using the unsteady flow inducer wind tunnel, which had facility for generating time-dependent flow. The forced convective heat transfer in steady crossflows was checked for both the circular cylinder and the finned tube to validate the experimental techniques and apparatus. The findings indicate the dependence of heat transfer on the dimensionless frequency of the crossflow. Specifically, at higher mean flows there is considerable discrepancy between the Nusselt number for steady flows and the Nusselt number for unsteady flows with the same mean flow value. The effects on the variation in the heat transfer must be carefully taken into account in the design and analysis of thermal systems exposed to pulsating flows.

  6. Flow and Heat Transfer Characteristics in a Two-Phase Loop Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imura, Hideaki; Takeshita, Kazuhiro; Horie, Yoshiatsu; Noda, Ken-Ichi

    A two-phase loop thermosyphon transports thermal energy from a heat source to a heat sink by natural convective circulation under a body force field without any external power supply such as a pump. It is, therefore, thought that this could be applied to an energy-saving heat transportation system, and so forth. In practical use, an evaporator has several heated tubes and also the heat supplied to each of the heated tubes is not always equal. Therefore, the present study was performed both experimentally and theoretically on the flow and heat transfer characteristics in the two-phase loop thermosyphon installed with the evaporator with three heated tubes as a comparatively simple multi-tube evaporator in the lower part of the loop. The circulation mass flow rate, pressure and temperature distributions along the loop, as well as the heat transfer coefficients in the heated tubes were measured using water, ethanol and benzene, on which the effects of subcooling at the evaporator inlet and a heat input ratio of the three heated tubes were examined, and the experimental data were compared with the theoretically calculated results.

  7. Additions to compact heat exchanger technology: Jet impingement cooling & flow & heat transfer in metal foam-fins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onstad, Andrew J.

    Compact heat exchangers have been designed following the same basic methodology for over fifty years. However, with the present emphasis on energy efficiency and light weight of prime movers there is increasing demand for completely new heat exchangers. Moreover, new materials and mesoscale fabrication technologies offer the possibility of significantly improving heat exchanger performance over conventional designs. This work involves fundamental flow and heat transfer experimentation to explore two new heat exchange systems: in Part I, large arrays of impinging jets with local extraction and in Part II, metal foams used as fins. Jet impingement cooling is widely used in applications ranging from paper manufacturing to the cooling of gas turbine blades because of the very high local heat transfer coefficients that are possible. While the use of single jet impingement results in non-uniform cooling, increased and more uniform mean heat transfer coefficients may be attained by dividing the total cooling flow among an array of smaller jets. Unfortunately, when the spent fluid from the array's central jets interact with the outer jets, the overall mean heat transfer coefficient is reduced. This problem can be alleviated by locally extracting the spent fluid before it is able to interact with the surrounding jets. An experimental investigation was carried out on a compact impingement array (Xn/Djet = 2.34) utilizing local extraction of the spent fluid (Aspent/Ajet = 2.23) from the jet exit plane. Spatially resolved measurements of the mean velocity field within the array were carried out at jet Reynolds numbers of 2300 and 5300 by magnetic resonance velocimetry, MRV. The geometry provided for a smooth transition from the jet to the target surface and out through the extraction holes without obvious flow recirculation. Mean Nusselt number measurements were also carried out for a Reynolds number range of 2000 to 10,000. The Nusselt number was found to increase with the

  8. Modeling the Ferrite-Austenite Transformation in the Heat-Affected Zone of Stainless Steel Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Vitek, J.M.; David, S.A.

    1997-12-01

    The diffusion-controlled ferrite-austenite transformation in stainless steel welds was modeled. An implicit finite-difference analysis that considers multi-component diffusion was used. The model was applied to the Fe-Cr-Ni system to investigate the ferrite- austenite transformation in the heat-affected zone of stainless steel weld metal. The transformation was followed as a function of time as the heat-affected zone was subjected to thermal cycles comparable to those experienced during gas-tungsten arc welding. The results showed that the transformation behavior and the final microstructural state are very sensitive to the maximum temperature that is experienced by the heat-affected zone. For high maximum exposure temperatures ({approximately} 1300{degree} C), the ferrite formation that occurs at the highest temperatures is not completely offset by the reverse ferrite dissolution at lower temperatures. As a result, for high temperature exposures there is a net increase in the amount of ferrite in the microstructure. It was also found that if compositional gradients are present in the initial ferrite and austenite phases, the extent of the transformation is impacted.

  9. A study of leeside flow field heat transfer on Shuttle Orbiter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranowski, L. C.; Kipp, H. W.

    1984-01-01

    A coupled inviscid and viscous theoretical solution of the flow about the entire configuration is the desirable and comprehensive approach to defining thermal environments about the space shuttle orbiter. Simplified methods for predicting entry heating on leeside surfaces of the orbiter are considered. Wind tunnel heat transfer and oil flow data at Mach 6 and 10 and Reynolds numbers ranging from 500,000 to 73 million were used to develop correlations for the wing upper surface and the top surface of the fuselage. These correlations were extrapolated to flight Reynolds number and compared with heating data obtained during the shuttle STS-2 reentry. Efforts directed toward the wing leeside surface resulted in an approach which generally agreed with the flight data. Heating predictions for the upper fuselage were less successful due to the extreme complexity of local flow interactions and the associated heating environment.

  10. Heat transfer between a stationary granular packing and a descending flow of dusty gas

    SciTech Connect

    Dryabin, V.A.; Galershtein, D.M.

    1988-10-01

    The transfer of heat from a stationary granular bed (packing) to a gas-particle flow has been investigated experimentally. Heat transfer experiments were carried out on an apparatus with an open gas-particle flow system. Monodisperse packing comprised of smooth steel balls or round porcelain granules was used. Particles used in the gas flow consisted of grades of sand and electrical corundum. The external heat transfer coefficient was determined by local modeling of heat transfer in the steady temperature field regime. Calorimetry was used for determining this regime as well as the temperature of the air and dusty gas. A correlation was obtained for calculating the heat-transfer coefficient in the system.

  11. Heat flow in eastern Egypt - The thermal signature of a continental breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, P.; Boulos, F. K.; Hennin, S. F.; El-Sherif, A. A.; El-Sayed, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    It is noted that the Red Sea is a modern example of continental fragmentation and incipient ocean formation. A consistent pattern of high heat flow in the Red Sea margins and coastal zone, including Precambrian terrane up to at least 30 km from the Red Sea, has emerged from the existing data. It is noted that this pattern has important implications for the mode and mechanism of Red Sea opening. High heat flow in the Red Sea shelf requires either a high extension of the crust in this zone (probably with major basic magmatic activity) or young oceanic crust beneath this zone. High heat flow in the coastal thermal anomaly zone may be caused by lateral conduction from the offshore lithosphere and/or from high mantle heat flow. It is suggested that new oceanic crust and highly extended continental crust would be essentially indistinguishable with the available data in the Red Sea margins, and are for many purposes essentially identical.

  12. Heat-flow properties of systems with alternate masses or alternate on-site potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Emmanuel; Santana, Leonardo M.; Ávila, Ricardo

    2011-07-01

    We address a central issue of phononics: the search of properties or mechanisms to manage the heat flow in reliable materials. We analytically study standard and simple systems modeling the heat flow in solids, namely, the harmonic, self-consistent harmonic and also anharmonic chains of oscillators, and we show an interesting insulating effect: While in the homogeneous models the heat flow decays as the inverse of the particle mass, in the chain with alternate masses it decays as the inverse of the square of the mass difference, that is, it decays essentially as the mass ratio (between the smaller and the larger one) for a large mass difference. A similar effect holds if we alternate on-site potentials instead of particle masses. The existence of such behavior in these different systems, including anharmonic models, indicates that it is a ubiquitous phenomenon with applications in the heat flow control.

  13. Future directions in two-phase flow and heat transfer in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankoff, S. George

    1994-01-01

    Some areas of opportunity for future research in microgravity two-phase flow and heat transfer are pointed out. These satisfy the dual requirements of relevance to current and future needs, and scientific/engineering interest.

  14. Prediction of heat transfer to a thin liquid film in plane and radially spreading flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Faghri, A.; Hankey, W. L.; Swanson, T. D.

    1990-01-01

    The energy equation is incorporated in the solution algorithm of Rahman et al. (1990) to compute the heat transfer to a thin film in the presence or absence of gravity. For a plane flow under zero gravity, it is found that, for both isothermal and uniformly heated walls, the heat transfer coefficient gradually decreases downstream, with Nu-asterisk (the Nusselt number in terms of film height) remaining approximately constant except for regions very close to the entrance. In the case of radial flow under zero gravity, Nu-asterisk is found to decrease monotonically when the plane is uniformly heated. Two different flow regimes are identified in the presence of gravity for both plane and radial flows. The results of the study may be applicable to the design of space-based cooling systems.

  15. Effects of dynamic load on flow and heat transfer of two-phase boiling water in a horizontal pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Qiu-Ping; Song, Bao-Yin; Zhao, Mei; Cao, Xi

    2009-07-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to obtain the flow and heat transfer characteristics of single-phase water flow and two-phase pipe boiling water flow under high gravity (Hi-G) in present work. The experiments were conducted on a rotating platform, and boiling two-phase flow state was obtained by means of electric heating. The data were collected specifically in the test section, which was a lucite pipe with inner diameter of 20 mm and length of 400 mm. By changing the parameters, such as rotation speed, inlet temperature, flow rate, and etc., and analyzing the fluid resistance, effective heat and heat transfer coefficient of the experimental data, the effects of dynamic load on the flow and heat transfer characteristics of single phase water and two-phase boiling water flow were investigated and obtained. The two-phase flow patterns under Hi-G condition were obtained with a video camera. The results show that the dynamic load significantly influences the flow characteristic and boiling heat transfer of the two-phase pipe flow. As the direction of the dynamic load and the flow direction are opposite, the greater the dynamic load, the higher the outlet pressure and the flow resistance, and the lower the flow rate, the void fraction, the wall inner surface temperature and the heat transfer capability. Therefore, the dynamic load will block the fluid flow, enhance heat dissipation toward the ambient environment and reduce the heat transfer to the two-phase boiling flow.

  16. Partial flow compensation by transverse bypass configuration in multi-channel cryogenic compact heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jeheon; Hwang, Gyuwan; Baek, Seungwhan; Jeong, Sangkwon; Rowe, Andrew M.

    2012-01-01

    High-performance multi-channel heat exchangers are vulnerable to small defects such as ill-manufacture or contamination in flow channels. Even slight flow mal-distribution may result in drastic reduction of their thermal performance. In order to accommodate such performance reduction in multi-channel heat exchangers, transverse bypass structure among the channels of hot stream or cold stream is proposed. Since transverse bypass structure enables voluntary flow re-distribution among the channels, detrimental effect of flow defects can be partially reduced and flow mal-distribution can be locally relieved. The lower the flow resistance of transverse bypass is, the more substantial the flow re-distribution is and the larger its effect can be. Quantitative analysis and experimental verification on the effect of transverse bypass is carried out, and the results are presented in this paper.

  17. Saturated critical heat flux in a multi-microchannel heat sink fed by a split flow system

    SciTech Connect

    Mauro, A.W.; Toto, D.; Thome, J.R.; Vanoli, G.P.

    2010-01-15

    An extensive experimental campaign has been carried out for the measurement of saturated critical heat flux in a multi-microchannel copper heat sink. The heat sink was formed by 29 parallel channels that were 199 {mu}m wide and 756 {mu}m deep. In order to increase the critical heat flux and reduce the two-phase pressure drop, a split flow system was implemented with one central inlet at the middle of the channels and two outlets at either end. The base critical heat flux was measured using three HFC Refrigerants (R134a, R236fa and R245fa) for mass fluxes ranging from 250 to 1500 kg/m{sup 2} s, inlet subcoolings from -25 to -5 K and saturation temperatures from 20 to 50 C. The parametric effects of mass velocity, saturation temperature and inlet subcooling were investigated. The analysis showed that significantly higher CHF was obtainable with the split flow system (one inlet-two outlets) compared to the single inlet-single outlet system, providing also a much lower pressure drop. Notably several existing predictive methods matched the experimental data quite well and quantitatively predicted the benefit of higher CHF of the split flow. (author)

  18. Quantification of palaeoclimatic effects on heat flow in the Paris basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentzer, Jacques; Lopez, Simon; Violette, Sophie; Bruel, Dominique

    2015-04-01

    Deep geothermal resources of the Paris basin have been harnessed for more than 40 years with nearly 40 operating plants supplying heat to district networks in the Parisian suburbs. The target of all these operations is the deep "Dogger" aquifer. Though these areas are densely exploited, no thermal breakthrough has been observed yet, except for a few isolated cases. As new geothermal projects are currently scheduled, heat transfers and thermal anomalies are now quantified considering the whole sedimentary pile. At this scale, thermal profiles are particularly relevant to discriminate different possible causes for the observed temperature and heat flow anomalies. Based on 10 thermal profiles in the centre of the Paris basin, a mean heat flow profile is reassessed. For each geological formation, a mean thermal gradient is estimated and heat flow is calculated with an averaged formation thermal conductivity. A simple 1D conductive numerical model is then set up with 19 sedimentary layers and a bedrock layer. Palaeoclimatic effects are quantified by testing different published temperature scenarios. These scenarios cover time scales ranging from 65 ky to 5 My. Although the uncertainty on heat flow derived from thermal profiles is around +/- 15 mW/m2, the model reproduces satisfactorily the main heat flow anomaly present in the upper part of the basin, with heat flow decreasing from 85 mW/m2 at 1200 m depth to less than 60 mW/m2 at the surface. Consequently, climatic variations over a long period of time (5 My scenario) seem enough to reproduce this anomaly correctly, which was previously attributed to convective effects. Yet, smaller scale heat flow fluctuations match aquifer levels exactly and are probably related to (relatively) short time convective water transfers at the basin scale.

  19. SCDAP/RELAP5 Modeling of Heat Tra