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Sample records for affect intestinal motility

  1. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gfroerer, Stefan; Rolle, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric intestinal motility disorders affect many children and thus not only impose a significant impact on pediatric health care in general but also on the quality of life of the affected patient. Furthermore, some of these conditions might also have implications for adulthood. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders frequently present as chronic constipation in toddler age children. Most of these conditions are functional, meaning that constipation does not have an organic etiology, but in 5% of the cases, an underlying, clearly organic disorder can be identified. Patients with organic causes for intestinal motility disorders usually present in early infancy or even right after birth. The most striking clinical feature of children with severe intestinal motility disorders is the delayed passage of meconium in the newborn period. This sign is highly indicative of the presence of Hirschsprung disease (HD), which is the most frequent congenital disorder of intestinal motility. HD is a rare but important congenital disease and the most significant entity of pediatric intestinal motility disorders. The etiology and pathogenesis of HD have been extensively studied over the last several decades. A defect in neural crest derived cell migration has been proven as an underlying cause of HD, leading to an aganglionic distal end of the gut. Numerous basic science and clinical research related studies have been conducted to better diagnose and treat HD. Resection of the aganglionic bowel remains the gold standard for treatment of HD. Most recent studies show, at least experimentally, the possibility of a stem cell based therapy for HD. This editorial also includes rare causes of pediatric intestinal motility disorders such as hypoganglionosis, dysganglionosis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and ganglioneuromatosis in multiple endocrine metaplasia. Underlying organic pathologies are rare in pediatric intestinal motility disorders but must be recognized as early as

  2. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Gfroerer, Stefan; Rolle, Udo

    2015-09-01

    Pediatric intestinal motility disorders affect many children and thus not only impose a significant impact on pediatric health care in general but also on the quality of life of the affected patient. Furthermore, some of these conditions might also have implications for adulthood. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders frequently present as chronic constipation in toddler age children. Most of these conditions are functional, meaning that constipation does not have an organic etiology, but in 5% of the cases, an underlying, clearly organic disorder can be identified. Patients with organic causes for intestinal motility disorders usually present in early infancy or even right after birth. The most striking clinical feature of children with severe intestinal motility disorders is the delayed passage of meconium in the newborn period. This sign is highly indicative of the presence of Hirschsprung disease (HD), which is the most frequent congenital disorder of intestinal motility. HD is a rare but important congenital disease and the most significant entity of pediatric intestinal motility disorders. The etiology and pathogenesis of HD have been extensively studied over the last several decades. A defect in neural crest derived cell migration has been proven as an underlying cause of HD, leading to an aganglionic distal end of the gut. Numerous basic science and clinical research related studies have been conducted to better diagnose and treat HD. Resection of the aganglionic bowel remains the gold standard for treatment of HD. Most recent studies show, at least experimentally, the possibility of a stem cell based therapy for HD. This editorial also includes rare causes of pediatric intestinal motility disorders such as hypoganglionosis, dysganglionosis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and ganglioneuromatosis in multiple endocrine metaplasia. Underlying organic pathologies are rare in pediatric intestinal motility disorders but must be recognized as early as

  3. Elenoside increases intestinal motility

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, E; Alonso, SJ; Navarro, R; Trujillo, J; Jorge, E

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of elenoside, an arylnaph-thalene lignan from Justicia hyssopifolia, on gastro-intestinal motility in vivo and in vitro in rats. METHODS: Routine in vivo experimental assessments were catharsis index, water percentage of boluses, intestinal transit, and codeine antagonism. The groups included were vehicle control (propylene glycol-ethanol-plant oil-tween 80), elenoside (i.p. 25 and 50 mg/kg), cisapride (i.p. 10 mg/kg), and codeine phosphate (intragastric route, 50 mg/kg). In vitro approaches used isolated rat intestinal tissues (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum). The effects of elenoside at concentrations of 3.2 x 10-4, 6.4 x 10-4 and 1.2 x 10-3 mol/L, and cisapride at 10-6 mol/L were investigated. RESULTS: Elenoside in vivo produced an increase in the catharsis index and water percentage of boluses and in the percentage of distance traveled by a suspension of activated charcoal. Codeine phosphate antagonized the effect of 25 mg/kg of elenoside. In vitro, elenoside in duodenum, jejunum and ileum produced an initial decrease in the contraction force followed by an increase. Elenoside resulted in decreased intestinal frequency in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. The in vitro and in vivo effects of elenoside were similar to those produced by cisapride. CONCLUSION: Elenoside is a lignan with an action similar to that of purgative and prokinetics drugs. Elenoside, could be an alternative to cisapride in treatment of gastrointestinal diseases as well as a preventive therapy for the undesirable gastrointestinal effects produced by opioids used for mild to moderate pain. PMID:17131476

  4. Chronic treatment with epigallocatechin gallate reduces motor hyperactivity and affects in vitro tested intestinal motility of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Potenza, Maria Assunta; Montagnani, Monica; Nacci, Carmela; De Salvia, Maria Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    incubation (100 µM, 20 min) of colonic and duodenum strips obtained from untreated SHR and WKY rats showed a reduced contractile colonic response to a fixed dose of carbachol (1.5 µM) only in SHR with respect to its own vehicle, whereas the inhibitory duodenal response to a fixed EFS frequency (5 Hz) was significantly reduced in both WKY rats and SHR groups with respect to their own vehicle. Conclusions These data suggest that EGCG affects body weight gain in rats and this effect seems to be due to the altered intestinal motility and not to increased motor activity. PMID:26899572

  5. Central actions of calcitonin on body temperature and intestinal motility in rats: evidence for different mediations.

    PubMed

    Fargeas, M J; Fioramonti, J; Buéno, L

    1985-06-01

    The effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of calcitonin and PGE2 on intestinal motility and body temperature were examined in conscious rats chronically fitted with intraparietal electrodes in the small intestine, a cannula in a cerebral lateral ventricle and a subcutaneous thermistor probe. Both calcitonin and PGE2 restored the fasted pattern of intestinal motility in fed rats and induced an increase in body temperature. Indomethacin, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase with calcium antagonistic properties, and TMB-8, an intracellular calcium antagonist, blocked the effects of calcitonin on intestinal motility and body temperature. Piroxicam, an inhibitor of the cyclooxygenase which does not affect calcium uptake blocked the thermic but not the intestinal effects of calcitonin. TMB-8 but not indomethacin or piroxicam partially blocked the effects of PGE2 on both intestinal motility and body temperature. It is concluded that the central hyperthermic effect of calcitonin is mediated through the formation and the release of prostaglandins whereas the central action of calcitonin on digestive motility results from intracerebral effects on calcium fluxes. PMID:3875880

  6. The effect of gastric inhibitory polypeptide on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Eiichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Harada, Norio; Yamane, Shunsuke; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Toyoda, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Fujita, Yoshihito; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Tsukiyama, Katsushi; Yamada, Yuichiro; Seino, Yutaka; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal motility through a somatostatin-mediated pathway. {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility. {yields} The GIP-receptor-mediated action in intestine does not involve in GLP-1-mediated pathway. -- Abstract: Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is released from the small intestine upon meal ingestion and increases insulin secretion from pancreatic {beta} cells. Although the GIP receptor is known to be expressed in small intestine, the effects of GIP in small intestine are not fully understood. This study was designed to clarify the effect of GIP on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility. Intestinal glucose absorption in vivo was measured by single-pass perfusion method. Incorporation of [{sup 14}C]-glucose into everted jejunal rings in vitro was used to evaluate the effect of GIP on sodium-glucose co-transporter (SGLT). Motility of small intestine was measured by intestinal transit after oral administration of a non-absorbed marker. Intraperitoneal administration of GIP inhibited glucose absorption in wild-type mice in a concentration-dependent manner, showing maximum decrease at the dosage of 50 nmol/kg body weight. In glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor-deficient mice, GIP inhibited glucose absorption as in wild-type mice. In vitro examination of [{sup 14}C]-glucose uptake revealed that 100 nM GIP did not change SGLT-dependent glucose uptake in wild-type mice. After intraperitoneal administration of GIP (50 nmol/kg body weight), small intestinal transit was inhibited to 40% in both wild-type and GLP-1 receptor-deficient mice. Furthermore, a somatostatin receptor antagonist, cyclosomatostatin, reduced the inhibitory effect of GIP on both intestinal transit and glucose absorption in wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility through a somatostatin

  7. A computational model of gastro-intestinal motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, K. F.; Goossens, D. J.

    2001-12-01

    A simulated neural network model of a section of enteric nervous system is presented. The network is a layered feed-forward network consisting of integrate and fire units. The network shows the basic form of intestinal motility; a descending wave of relaxation followed by a wave of contraction. It also shows interesting (but not biologically realistic) spontaneous behaviours when no stimulus is present.

  8. SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, is involved in a wide array of cellular processes, including glucose homeostasis, energy metabolism, proliferation and apoptosis, and immune response. However, it is un...

  9. Factors affecting gallbladder motility: drugs.

    PubMed

    Marzio, L

    2003-07-01

    Various drugs and medications that inhibit or stimulate gallbladder contraction and basal tone in humans are described. Active gallbladder contraction may be achieved using synthetic hormones such as cholecystokinin, caerulein and motilin, cholinomimetic drugs such as bethanecol, prostigmine, and erythromycin due to its motilin-like effect. Furthermore, cisapride and cholestyramine, may have some excitatory activity on the gallbladder muscle. Intravenous amino acids also induce gallbladder contraction through the release of cholecystokinin. Inhibition of gallbladder contraction induced by a meal, or reduction of the basal fasting tone may be achieved by using atropine and other cholinergics, and by inhibitory hormones such as somatostatin, the nitric acid releaser arginine, the calcium channel antagonist nifedipine, and progesterone. Other drugs such as trimebutine, loperamide and ondansetron may negatively affect gallbladder contraction. PMID:12974504

  10. Diffused and Sustained Inhibitory Effects of Intestinal Electrical Stimulation on Intestinal Motility Mediated via Sympathetic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiaotuan; Yin, Jieyun; Wang, Lijie; Chen, J D Z

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aims was to investigate the energy-dose response effect of IES on small bowel motility, to compare the effect of forward and backward IES; to explore the possibility of using intermittent IES and mechanism of IES on intestinal motility. Material and Methods Five dogs implanted with a duodenal cannula and one pair of intestinal serosal electrodes were studied in 5 sessions: 1) energy-dose response study; 2) forward IES; 3) backward IES; 4) intermittent IES vs. continuous IES; 5) administration of guanethidine. The contractile activity and tonic pressure of the small intestine were recorded. The duration of sustained effect after turning off IES was manually calculated. Results 1) IES with long pulses energy-dose dependently inhibited contractile activity and tonic pressure of the small intestine (p < 0.001). 2) The duration of sustained inhibitory effect of IES on the small intestine depended on the energy of IES delivered (p < 0.001). 3) The potency of the inhibitory effect was the same between forward and backward IES. 4) The efficacy of intermittent IES was the same as continuous IES in inhibiting motility of the small intestine. 5) Guanethidine blocked the inhibitory effect of IES on intestinal motility. Conclusions IES with long pulses inhibits small intestinal motility; the effect is energy-dose dependent, diffused and sustained. Intermittent IES has the same efficacy as the continuous IES in inhibiting small intestinal motility. Forward and backward IES have similar inhibitory effects on small bowel motility. This IES-induced inhibitory effect is mediated via the sympathetic pathway. PMID:23924055

  11. Small intestine motility development in newborn mammals.

    PubMed

    Woliński, Jarosław; Słupecka-Ziemilska, Monika; Boryczka, Maria; Grzesiak, Paulina; Kwiatkowski, Jakub; Kotarba, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, researchers have been working to improve the understanding of gastrointestinal motility. The first major discovery was the observation of a migrating myoelectric complex that turned out to be a universal occurrence among vertebrates. Further inquires resulted in a detailed description of its development during different stages of ontogeny. Some time before that, a cornerstone had been laid for a breakthrough that would come years later. That cornerstone came in the form of interstitial cells of Cajal whose true role could not be discerned until the discovery of a CD117 receptor - their main marker. With the ability to precisely mark interstitial cells of Cajal, a wave of subsequent new experiments and observations connected them to the occurrence of slow waves and allowed an understanding of the mechanism responsible for their generation. Some of these findings suggested that Cajal cells might have a role in the development of several motility disorders thus opening an avenue of research that requires the usage of both traditional and advanced diagnostic methods. PMID:27416626

  12. Effect of Boswellia serrata on intestinal motility in rodents: inhibition of diarrhoea without constipation

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Francesca; Capasso, Francesco; Capasso, Raffaele; Ascione, Valeria; Aviello, Gabriella; Longo, Rocco; Izzo, Angelo A

    2006-01-01

    Clinical studies suggest that the Ayurvedic plant Boswellia serrata may be effective in reducing diarrhoea in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of a Boswellia serrata gum resin extract (BSE) on intestinal motility and diarrhoea in rodents. BSE depressed electrically-, acetylcholine-, and barium chloride-induced contractions in the isolated guinea-pig ileum, being more potent in inhibiting the contractions induced by acetylcholine and barium chloride. The inhibitory effect of BSE on acetylcholine-induced contractions was reduced by the L-type Ca2+ channel blockers verapamil and nifedipine, but not by the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor cyclopiazonic acid, by the phosphodiesterase type IV inhibitor rolipram or by the lipoxygenase inhibitor zileuton. 3-acetyl-11-keto-β-boswellic acid, one of the main active ingredients of B. serrata, inhibited acetylcholine-induced contractions. BSE inhibited upper gastrointestinal transit in croton oil-treated mice as well as castor oil-induced diarrhoea. However, BSE did not affect intestinal motility in control mice, both in the small and in the large intestine. It is concluded that BSE directly inhibits intestinal motility with a mechanism involving L-type Ca2+ channels. BSE prevents diarrhoea and normalizes intestinal motility in pathophysiological states without slowing the rate of transit in control animals. These results could explain, at least in part, the clinical efficacy of this Ayurvedic remedy in reducing diarrhoea in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:16633355

  13. [Effects of trimebutine on intestinal motility in dogs].

    PubMed

    Hondé, C; Le Gallou, B; Pascaud, X; Junien, J L

    1989-02-15

    The effects of intravenous, oral, intracerebroventricular and local intra-arterial administration of trimebutine were investigated in dogs whose digestive tract had been fitted with electrodes and strain gauge transducers. In fasted conscious dogs, trimebutine (5 mg/kg) stimulated small bowel motility with induction of a propagated phase of regular spiking activity. This stimulation was associated with weak inhibition of gastric motility and a biphasic response of the colon characterized by stimulation followed by inhibition. By the oral route, trimebutine (20 mg/kg) stimulated gastrointestinal motility. The duration of the intestinal migrating phase 2 was increased whereas an additional migrating phase 3 developed. These effects were associated with an increase in colonic contractions lasting two hours. The stimulating effect of trimebutine (phase 3) on intestinal motility was not reproduced after intracerebroventricular administration and was abolished by previous intravenous, but not intraventricular, administration of naloxone. The local effects of trimebutine on the circular muscle of canine gastrointestinal tract were studied after close intra-arterial injection in anesthetized dogs. Under these conditions, the drug stimulated the resting gut through its neural and direct smooth muscle components while it inhibited the contractions induced by field stimulation. In conclusion, the excitatory effect of trimebutine seems to be mediated by mu or delta receptors while its inhibitory activity might involve kappa opiate receptors. PMID:2522226

  14. The virtual intestine: in silico modeling of small intestinal electrophysiology and motility and the applications.

    PubMed

    Du, Peng; Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Angeli, Timothy R; Cheng, Leo K; O'Grady, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The intestine comprises a long hollow muscular tube organized in anatomically and functionally discrete compartments, which digest and absorb nutrients and water from ingested food. The intestine also plays key roles in the elimination of waste and protection from infection. Critical to all of these functions is the intricate, highly coordinated motion of the intestinal tract, known as motility, which is coregulated by hormonal, neural, electrophysiological and other factors. The Virtual Intestine encapsulates a series of mathematical models of intestinal function in health and disease, with a current focus on motility, and particularly electrophysiology. The Virtual Intestine is being cohesively established across multiple physiological scales, from sub/cellular functions to whole organ levels, facilitating quantitative evaluations that present an integrative in silico framework. The models are also now finding broad physiological applications, including in evaluating hypotheses of slow wave pacemaker mechanisms, smooth muscle electrophysiology, structure-function relationships, and electromechanical coupling. Clinical applications are also beginning to follow, including in the pathophysiology of motility disorders, diagnosing intestinal ischemia, and visualizing colonic dysfunction. These advances illustrate the emerging potential of the Virtual Intestine to effectively address multiscale research challenges in interdisciplinary gastrointestinal sciences. PMID:26562482

  15. Spatiotemporal Mapping of Motility in Ex Vivo Preparations of the Intestines

    PubMed Central

    Kendig, Derek M.; Hurst, Norm R.; Grider, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple approaches have been used to record and evaluate gastrointestinal motility including: recording changes in muscle tension, intraluminal pressure, and membrane potential. All of these approaches depend on measurement of activity at one or multiple locations along the gut simultaneously which are then interpreted to provide a sense of overall motility patterns. Recently, the development of video recording and spatiotemporal mapping (STmap) techniques have made it possible to observe and analyze complex patterns in ex vivo whole segments of colon and intestine. Once recorded and digitized, video records can be converted to STmaps in which the luminal diameter is converted to grayscale or color [called diameter maps (Dmaps)]. STmaps can provide data on motility direction (i.e., stationary, peristaltic, antiperistaltic), velocity, duration, frequency and strength of contractile motility patterns. Advantages of this approach include: analysis of interaction or simultaneous development of different motility patterns in different regions of the same segment, visualization of motility pattern changes over time, and analysis of how activity in one region influences activity in another region. Video recordings can be replayed with different timescales and analysis parameters so that separate STmaps and motility patterns can be analyzed in more detail. This protocol specifically details the effects of intraluminal fluid distension and intraluminal stimuli that affect motility generation. The use of luminal receptor agonists and antagonists provides mechanistic information on how specific patterns are initiated and how one pattern can be converted into another pattern. The technique is limited by the ability to only measure motility that causes changes in luminal diameter, without providing data on intraluminal pressure changes or muscle tension, and by the generation of artifacts based upon experimental setup; although, analysis methods can account for these issues

  16. LBP based detection of intestinal motility in WCE images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Giovanni; Granata, Eliana

    2011-03-01

    In this research study, a system to support medical analysis of intestinal contractions by processing WCE images is presented. Small intestine contractions are among the motility patterns which reveal many gastrointestinal disorders, such as functional dyspepsia, paralytic ileus, irritable bowel syndrome, bacterial overgrowth. The images have been obtained using the Wireless Capsule Endoscopy (WCE) technique, a patented, video colorimaging disposable capsule. Manual annotation of contractions is an elaborating task, since the recording device of the capsule stores about 50,000 images and contractions might represent only the 1% of the whole video. In this paper we propose the use of Local Binary Pattern (LBP) combined with the powerful textons statistics to find the frames of the video related to contractions. We achieve a sensitivity of about 80% and a specificity of about 99%. The achieved high detection accuracy of the proposed system has provided thus an indication that such intelligent schemes could be used as a supplementary diagnostic tool in endoscopy.

  17. Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection associated with impaired intestinal motility disorder

    PubMed Central

    Figueira, Cláudia Frangioia; Cos, Lynda Dorene; Ussami, Edson Yassushi; Otoch, José Pinhata; Felipe-Silva, Aloisio

    2015-01-01

    Infection by Strongyloides stercoralis is a highly prevalent helminthiasis, which is mostly distributed in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Although a substantial number of cases are asymptomatic or paucisymtomatic, severe and life-threatening forms of this infection still occur and not infrequently is lately diagnosed. Gram-negative bacteria septicemia, which frequently accompanies the severe helminthiasis, contributes to the high mortality rate. Severe infection is invariably triggered by any imbalance in the host's immunity, favoring the auto-infective cycle, which increases the intraluminal parasite burden enormously. Clinical presentation of severe cases is varied, and diagnosis requires a high suspicion index. Acute abdomen has been reported in association with S. stercoralis infection, but intestinal necrosis is rarely found during the surgical approach. The authors report the case of a man who sought the emergency unit with recent onset abdominal pain. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with obstructive acute abdomen. Scattered adhesions and a necrotic ileal segment with a tiny perforation represented the surgical findings. The patient outcome was unfavorable and respiratory distress required an open lung biopsy. Both surgical specimens showed S. stercoralis infection. Unfortunately the patient underwent multiple organ failure and septicemia, and subsequently died. The authors call attention to the finding of intestinal necrosis and impaired intestinal motility disorder as possibilities for the diagnosis and risk factor, respectively, for a severe infection of S. stercoralis. PMID:26484331

  18. [Type of stomach replacement and intestinal motility after total gastrectomy].

    PubMed

    Fass, J; Bares, R; Staude, M; Schumpelick, V

    1993-09-01

    68 disease free patients were investigated prospectively after jejunal gastric replacement [jejunal interposition (JI): n = 40; Roux en Y reconstruction (RY): n = 28]. Used function tests were: scintigraphic emptying studies, hydrogen breath test, hepatobiliary sequential scintigraphy, oral glucose tolerance test, and upper intestinal manometry with 5 measuring ports (times of investigation: 6-12. week and > 1 year postoperatively). Patients with JI showed a better weight gain (p = 0.001), a lower reflux rate (p = 0.01), a slower orocecal transit time (p = 0.05), a prompter bile flow after meal stimulation (p = 0.02), and lower peak glucose levels (p = 0.001). The emptying patterns of the different gastric substitutes were not different. A higher incidence of retrograde contractions in RY and a electromechanical coordination between duodenum and gastric substitute in JI were detected. We conclude that the postoperative function of the jejunal gastric substitute does not depend on it's emptying pattern or volume but on the motility patterns of the entire intestinal tract which seem to be strongly influenced by the choice of the jejunal reconstruction. PMID:8412468

  19. Manometric study on the intestinal motility in a case of megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tomomasa, T; Itoh, Z; Koizumi, T; Kitamura, T; Suzuki, N; Matsuyama, S; Kuroume, T

    1985-04-01

    We report on the intestinal motility in a case of megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) based on a total registered time of 9.5 h by means of a manometric method we recently developed for neonates. The characteristics of this case are as follows: (a) the frequency of the contractions in the stomach and duodenum was significantly lower than that of healthy infants; and (b) bands of rhythmic contractions, resembling phase III activity of the interdigestive migrating contractions in adults, were recorded in the duodenum, but their occurrence was less frequent and the amplitude was significantly lower than that of healthy infants. The present study indicates that "hypoperistalsis" in MMIHS means not only the low frequency, but also the low amplitude, of the contractions in the alimentary tract. PMID:3989629

  20. Antibiotic-associated colitis: an in vitro investigation of the effects of antibiotics on intestinal motility.

    PubMed Central

    Lees, G. M.; Percy, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    1 Nine antibiotic compounds in common use were studied to determine their ability to affect intestinal motility in vitro, in the guinea-pig ileum and rabbit colon. 2 Ampicillin, doxycycline, mecillinam and metronidazole were without effect over a concentration range which included typical serum levels found when these drugs are used therapeutically. 3 Clindamycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, pivmecillinam and trimethoprim were all found to inhibit evoked and reflex responses of the guinea-pig ileum but only clindamycin and trimethoprim also affected evoked responses of the rabbit colon. 4 Kanamycin and gentamicin appeared to have a predominantly pre-junctional action, pivmecillinam and trimethoprim a predominantly post-junctional action. Clindamycin had a pre-junctional action at low concentrations and long exposure times, and a post-junctional action at high concentrations and short exposure times. 5 The concentration of each antibiotic required to inhibit the peristaltic reflex of the guinea-pig ileum was less than that required to inhibit its responses to electrical stimulation or exogenous acetylcholine or histamine but greater than the serum levels associated with their respective use in therapeutic doses. 6 A sequence of events whereby antibiotic-induced alterations in gastro-intestinal motility could lead to the development of pseudomembranous colitis is proposed. PMID:7237000

  1. Effects of intestinal mucosal blood flow and motility on intestinal mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Bin; Liu, Jing; Yang, Zhao-Xu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of intestinal mucosal blood flow (IMBF) and motility in the damage of intestinal mucosal barrier in rats with traumatic brain injury. METHODS: Sixty-four healthy male Wistar rats were divided randomly into two groups: traumatic brain injury (TBI) group (n = 32), rats with traumatic brain injury; and control group (n = 32), rats with sham-operation. Each group was divided into four subgroups (n = 8) as 6, 12, 24 and 48 h after operation. Intestinal motility was measured by the propulsion ratio of a semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink). IMBF was measured with the laser-Doppler technique. Endotoxin and D-xylose levels in plasma were measured to evaluate the change of intestinal mucosal barrier function following TBI. RESULTS: The level of endotoxin was significantly higher in TBI group than in the control group at each time point (0.382 ± 0.014 EU/mL vs 0.102 ± 0.007 EU/mL, 0.466 ± 0.018 EU/mL vs 0.114 ± 0.021 EU/mL, 0.478 ± 0.029 EU/mL vs 0.112 ± 0.018 EU/mL and 0.412 ± 0.036 EU/mL vs 0.108 ± 0.011 EU/mL, P < 0.05). D-xylose concentrations in plasma in TBI group were significantly higher than in the control group (6.68 ± 2.37 mmol/L vs 3.66 ± 1.07 mmol/L, 8.51 ± 2.69 mmol /L vs 3.15 ± 0.95 mmol/L, 11.68 ± 3.24 mmol/L vs 3.78 ± 1.12 mmol/L and 10.23 ± 2.83 mmol/L vs 3.34 ± 1.23 mmol/ L, P < 0.05). The IMBF in TBI group was significantly lower than that in the control group (38.5 ± 2.8 PU vs 45.6 ± 4.6 PU, 25.2 ± 3.1 PU vs 48.2 ± 5.3 PU, 21.5 ± 2.7 PU vs 44.9 ± 2.8 PU, 29. 4 ± 3.8 PU vs 46.7 ± 3.2 PU) (P < 0.05). Significant decelerations of intestinal propulsion ratio in TBI groups were found compared with the control group (0.48% ± 0.06% vs 0.62% ± 0.03%, 0.37% ± 0.05% vs 0.64% ± 0.01%, 0.39% ± 0.07% vs 0.63% ± 0.05% and 0.46% ± 0.03% vs 0.65% ± 0.02%) (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The intestinal mucosal permeability is increased obviously in TBI rats. Decrease of intestinal motility and IMBF occur early in TBI

  2. Effects of mosapride on motility of the small intestine and caecum in normal horses after jejunocaecostomy.

    PubMed

    Okamura, Kouichi; Sasaki, Naoki; Kikuchi, Takuya; Murata, Aya; Lee, Inhyung; Yamada, Haruo; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prokinetic effects of mosapride with non-invasive assessment of myoelectrical activity in the small intestine and caecum of healthy horses after jejunocaecostomy. Six horses underwent celiotomy and jejunocaecostomy, and were treated with mosapride (treated group) at 1.5 mg/kg per osos once daily for 5 days after surgery. The other six horses did not receive treatment and were used as controls (non-treated group). The electrointestinography (EIG) maximum amplitude was used to measure intestinal motility. Motility significantly decreased following surgery. In the treated group, the EIG maximum amplitude of the small intestine was significantly higher than in the controls from day 6 approximately 31 after treatment. These findings clearly indicate that mosapride could overcome the decline of intestinal motility after jejunocaecostomy in normal horses. PMID:19461212

  3. Effects of mosapride on motility of the small intestine and caecum in normal horses after jejunocaecostomy

    PubMed Central

    Okamura, Kouichi; Kikuchi, Takuya; Murata, Aya; Lee, Inhyung; Yamada, Haruo; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prokinetic effects of mosapride with non-invasive assessment of myoelectrical activity in the small intestine and caecum of healthy horses after jejunocaecostomy. Six horses underwent celiotomy and jejunocaecostomy, and were treated with mosapride (treated group) at 1.5 mg/kg per osos once daily for 5 days after surgery. The other six horses did not receive treatment and were used as controls (non-treated group). The electrointestinography (EIG) maximum amplitude was used to measure intestinal motility. Motility significantly decreased following surgery. In the treated group, the EIG maximum amplitude of the small intestine was significantly higher than in the controls from day 6~31 after treatment. These findings clearly indicate that mosapride could overcome the decline of intestinal motility after jejunocaecostomy in normal horses. PMID:19461212

  4. Motility patterns of ex vivo intestine segments depend on perfusion mode

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Dominik; Jost, Viktor; Bischof, Michael; Seebach, Kristina; Lammers, Wim JEP; Douglas, Rees; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate and characterize motility patterns from small intestinal gut segments depending on different perfusion media and pressures. METHODS: Experiments were carried out in a custom designed perfusion chamber system to validate and standardise the perfusion technique used. The perfusion chamber was built with a transparent front wall allowing for optical motility recordings and a custom made fastener to hold the intestinal segments. Experiments with different perfusion and storage media combined with different luminal pressures were carried out to evaluate the effects on rat small intestine motility. Software tools which enable the visualization and characterization of intestinal motility in response to different stimuli were used to evaluate the videotaped experiments. The data collected was presented in so called heatmaps thus providing a concise overview of form and strength of contractility patterns. Furthermore, the effect of different storage media on tissue quality was evaluated. Haematoxylin-Eosin stainings were used to compare tissue quality depending on storage and perfusion mode. RESULTS: Intestinal motility is characterized by different repetitive motility patterns, depending on the actual situation of the gut. Different motility patterns could be recorded and characterized depending on the perfusion pressure and media used. We were able to describe at least three different repetitive patterns of intestinal motility in vitro. Patterns with an oral, anal and oro-anal propagation direction could be recorded. Each type of pattern finalized its movement with or without a subsequent distension of the wavefront. Motility patterns could clearly be distinguished in heatmap diagrams. Furthermore undirected motility could be observed. The quantity of the different patterns varies and is highly dependent on the perfusion medium used. Tissue preservation varies depending on the perfusion medium utilized, therefore media with a simple composition as Tyrode

  5. Scintigraphic method for the assessment of intraluminal volume and motility of isolated intestinal segments. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, A.; Macey, D.J.; Collin, J.

    1983-07-01

    The isolated in vivo intestinal segment is a popular experimental preparation for the investigation of intestinal function, but its value has been limited because no method has been available for measuring changes in intraluminal volume under experimental conditions. We report a scintigraphic technique for measuring intraluminal volume and assessing intestinal motility. Between 30 and 180 ml, the volume of a 75-cm segment of canine jejunum, perfused with Tc-99m-labeled tin colloid, was found to be proportional to the recorded count rate. This method has been used to monitor the effects of the hormone vasopressin on intestinal function.

  6. Villous motility and unstirred water layers in canine intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Mailman, D.; Womack, W.A.; Kvietys, P.R.; Granger, D.N. )

    1990-02-01

    The possibility that villous motility reduces the mucosal unstirred water layer by mechanical stirring was examined. The frequency of contraction of villi was measured by using videomicroscopic techniques while a segment of anesthetized canine jejunum or ileum with its nerve and blood supply intact was maintained in a sealed chamber through which Tyrode solution was perfused. Radioisotopically labeled inulin, H{sub 2}O, and butyric and lauric acid were used to measure net and/or unidirectional fluxes from the chamber. The unidirectional absorptive transport of H{sub 2}O and butyric acid but not lauric acid by jejunal segments was significantly correlated with flow through the chamber. Plasma volume expansion increased villous motility but decreased the absorption of H{sub 2}O and lauric acid. Absorption of butyric acid from the ileum was little different than from the jejunum although the degree of villous motility was less and net water absorption was greater from the ileum. Absorption of butyric acid into dead tissue indicated that passive diffusion into the tissue accounted for between 7 and 25%, depending on flow rate, of the absorption in intact tissue and that nonspecific binding was low. It was concluded that villous motility did not stir the unstirred water layers and was not directly associated with altered transport.

  7. The involvement of opiate receptors in the effects of trimebutine on intestinal motility in the conscious dog.

    PubMed

    Fioramonti, J; Fargeas, M J; Bueno, L

    1984-09-01

    The effects of intravenous (i.v.) vs intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of trimebutine on the motility of the small intestine and colon of fasted dogs were assessed using chronic electromyography. Trimebutine, injected intravenously, stimulated small intestinal motility, by inducing a propagated phase of regular spike activity, and inhibited colonic motility for some 4 h. These effects were not reproduced by i.c.v. administration which disrupted the cyclic motor profile of the small intestine for about 2.5 h and did not modify colonic motility. The stimulation of the small intestine motility induced by i.v. administration of the drug was blocked by previous i.v. but not by i.c.v. administration of naloxone. It was concluded that in the dog, the effects of trimebutine on the small intestine but not on the colon, involve peripheral opiate receptors. PMID:6149288

  8. Effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shao-Xuan; Wu, Wan-Chun

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa in mice, and to explore the relationship between small intestinal dysfunction and small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa under psychological stress. METHODS: Sixty mice were randomly divided into psychological stress group and control group. Each group were subdivided into small intestinal motility group (n = 10), bacteria group (n = 10), and D-xylose administered to stomach group (n = 10). An animal model with psychological stress was established housing the mice with a hungry cat in separate layers of a two-layer cage. A semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink) was used for monitoring small intestinal transit. The proximal small intestine was harvested under sterile condition and processed for quantitation for aerobes (Escherichia coli) and anaerobes (Lactobacilli). The quantitation of bacteria was expressed as log10(colony forming units/g). D-xylose levels in plasma were measured for estimating the damage of small intestinal mucosa. RESULTS: Small intestinal transit was inhibited (39.80±9.50% vs 58.79±11.47%, P<0.01) in mice after psychological stress, compared with the controls. Psychological stress resulted in quantitative alterations in the aerobes (E. coli). There was an increase in the number of E. coli in the proximal small intestinal flora (1.78±0.30 log10(CFU/g) vs 1.37±0.21 log10(CFU/g), P<0.01), and there was decrease in relative proportion of Lactobacilli and E. coli of stressed mice (0.53±0.63 vs 1.14±1.07, P<0.05), while there was no significant difference in the anaerobes (Lactobacilli) between the two groups (2.31±0.70 log10(CFU/g) vs 2.44±0.37 log10(CFU/g), P>0.05). D-xylose concentrations in plasma in psychological stress mice were significantly higher than those in the control group (2.90±0.89 mmol/L vs 0.97±0.33 mmol/L, P<0.01). CONCLUSION: Small intestinal dysfunction under psychological stress may be related to the

  9. Interventions That Affect Gastrointestinal Motility in Hospitalized Adult Patients

    PubMed Central

    Asrani, Varsha M.; Yoon, Harry D.; Megill, Robin D.; Windsor, John A.; Petrov, Maxim S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility is a common complication in acute, critically ill, postoperative, and chronic patients that may lead to impaired nutrient delivery, poor clinical, and patient-reported outcomes. Several pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions to treat GI dysmotility were investigated in dozens of clinical studies. However, they often yielded conflicting results, at least in part, because various (nonstandardized) definitions of GI dysmotility were used and methodological quality of studies was poor. While a universally accepted definition of GI dysmotility is yet to be developed, a systematic analysis of data derived from double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials may provide robust data on absolute and relative effectiveness of various interventions as the study outcome (GI motility) was assessed in the least biased manner. To systematically review data from double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials to determine and compare the effectiveness of interventions that affect GI motility. Three electronic databases (MEDLINE, SCOPUS, and EMBASE) were searched. A random effects model was used for meta-analysis. The summary estimates were reported as mean difference (MD) with the corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI). A total of 38 double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials involving 2371 patients were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review. These studies investigated a total of 20 different interventions, of which 6 interventions were meta-analyzed. Of them, the use of dopamine receptor antagonists (MD, −8.99; 95% CI, −17.72 to −0.27; P = 0.04) and macrolides (MD, −26.04; 95% CI, −51.25 to −0.82; P = 0.04) significantly improved GI motility compared with the placebo group. The use of botulism toxin significantly impaired GI motility compared with the placebo group (MD, 5.31; 95% CI, −0.04 to 10.67; P = 0.05). Other interventions (dietary factors, probiotics, hormones) did

  10. Liquid enteral diets induce bacterial translocation by increasing cecal flora without changing intestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Haskel, Y; Udassin, R; Freund, H R; Zhang, J M; Hanani, M

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of intestinal motility and cecal bacterial overgrowth to liquid diet-induced bacterial translocation (BT). Three different commercially available liquid diets were offered to mice for 1 week. BT to the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), spleen, and liver were examined as well as cecal bacterial counts and populations, small bowel length and weight, and histopathologic changes in the ileal and jejunal mucosa. In addition, the effect of the various diets on intestinal motility was measured by the transit index of a charcoal mixture introduced into the stomach. The incidence of BT to the mesenteric lymph nodes was significantly and similarly increased (p < .05) in mice fed Vivonex (30%), Ensure (30%), and Osmolite (33%) compared with chow-fed controls (0%). Compared with chow-fed controls, all three liquid diets were associated with the development of cecal bacterial overgrowth (p < .01). There were no significant changes in the transit index for the three liquid diet groups compared with the chow-fed controls. BT to the MLN was induced by all three liquid diets tested, casting some doubts as to their role in preventing BT in clinical use. BT was associated with a statistically significant increase in cecal bacterial count but was not associated with gut motility changes in this model. In fact, no significant changes in intestinal motility were noted in all groups tested. PMID:11284471

  11. Effects of trimebutine on intestinal motility after massive small bowel resection.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, M; Iwafuchi, M; Yagi, M; Iinuma, Y; Kanada, S; Ohtaki, M; Homma, S

    2000-08-01

    Effects of trimebutine maleate (TM) on intestinal motility in short bowel syndrome (SBS) were studied in conscious canines in both acute and chronic phases following 80% massive distal small bowel resection (MSBR). TM was administered orally to beagles with MSBR or as controls in the postprandial and fasting states, and given simultaneously with meals. Intestinal motility was measured using bipolar electrodes for approximately 1 month after the electrodes were implanted in each beagle and the data compared between treatment groups. When TM was given with meals, the postprandial period without duodenal migrating myoelectric (or motor) complexes (MMCs) was shorter than in those given meals only. When TM was given in the postprandial state in short bowel beagles, the initial duodenal MMCs occurred earlier, i.e. the postprandial period was shorter. Diarrhea did not occur in these beagles. When TM was given in the fasting state, duodenal MMCs occurred and propagated to the distal intestine. In conclusion, oral TM administration can produce a more appropriate intestinal condition for the next food intake and make enteral nutrition possible even in the acute phase after MSBR. Such feeding can be carried out without overloading gut function as a result of the modulation of gastrointestinal motility by TM. PMID:11286295

  12. Lead chloride affects sperm motility and acrosome reaction in mice: lead affects mice sperm motility and acrosome reaction.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Helena; Spanò, Marcello; Santos, Conceição; Pereira, Maria de Lourdes

    2009-08-01

    Lead is highly toxic and persistent in the environment and, thus, a major concern for public health. In this study, the effects of lead chloride (PbCl2) on mouse epididymal sperm were evaluated. Male mice were subcutaneously injected with 74 and 100 mg PbCl2/kg body weight for four consecutive days. Sperm was collected from the epididymis and several parameters of sperm function, such as sperm density, motility, viability, mitochondrial function, acrosome integrity and morphology, were evaluated. Furthermore, DNA fragmentation was assessed by the terminal deoxylnucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick-end labelling (TUNEL) assay and chromatin integrity was evaluated by sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). In order to assess direct effects on existing sperm population, we sacrificed one group for each condition at day 5. The effects of lead upon one entire spermatogenic cycle were evaluated on day 35. Both lead concentrations used in this work affected sperm motility, although no significant differences were observed in sperm viability, mitochondrial function and DNA/chromatin integrity. However, a decrease in the percentage of intact acrosomes was also observed, mirroring a lead-induced premature acrosome reaction. Thus, the results obtained indicate that, together with impaired motility, the effect of lead toxicity on acrosome integrity, leading to premature reaction, may compromise the ability of sperm to fertilize the oocyte. PMID:18594995

  13. [Effects of trimebutine on motility of the small intestine in humans].

    PubMed

    Couturier, D; Chaussade, S; Grandjouan, S

    1989-02-15

    Trimebutine maleate induces a specific motor response in the human proximal small bowel: except for the few minutes lapse following the occurrence of a spontaneous phase 3, an intravenous injection of 100 mg trimebutine systematically produces, in fed or fasted state, a systemic propagated activity analogous to the spontaneous phase 3 of the migrating motor complex. In lower doses, this effect is not observed. The intraduodenal administration of a high dose (600 mg) induces a similar response to that observed after intravenous injection. Trimebutine possibly acts as a stimulator of peripheral receptors of the enkephalinergic nervous system. Theoretically, these results may result in recommending the therapeutic use of trimebutine in intestinal motility disorders where disappearance or depletion of phase 3 are observed. However, information is still lacking about the relationship between therapeutic activity and the effects on intestinal motility in pathological states. PMID:2537973

  14. The Extracellular Calcium-Sensing Receptor in the Intestine: Evidence for Regulation of Colonic Absorption, Secretion, Motility, and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lieqi; Cheng, Catherine Y.; Sun, Xiangrong; Pedicone, Alexandra J.; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour; Cheng, Sam X.

    2016-01-01

    Different from other epithelia, the intestinal epithelium has the complex task of providing a barrier impeding the entry of toxins, food antigens, and microbes, while at the same time allowing for the transfer of nutrients, electrolytes, water, and microbial metabolites. These molecules/organisms are transported either transcellularly, crossing the apical and basolateral membranes of enterocytes, or paracellularly, passing through the space between enterocytes. Accordingly, the intestinal epithelium can affect energy metabolism, fluid balance, as well as immune response and tolerance. To help accomplish these complex tasks, the intestinal epithelium has evolved many sensing receptor mechanisms. Yet, their roles and functions are only now beginning to be elucidated. This article explores one such sensing receptor mechanism, carried out by the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). In addition to its established function as a nutrient sensor, coordinating food digestion, nutrient absorption, and regulating energy metabolism, we present evidence for the emerging role of CaSR in the control of intestinal fluid homeostasis and immune balance. An additional role in the modulation of the enteric nerve activity and motility is also discussed. Clearly, CaSR has profound effects on many aspects of intestinal function. Nevertheless, more work is needed to fully understand all functions of CaSR in the intestine, including detailed mechanisms of action and specific pathways involved. Considering the essential roles CaSR plays in gastrointestinal physiology and immunology, research may lead to a translational opportunity for the development of novel therapies that are based on CaSR's unique property of using simple nutrients such as calcium, polyamines, and certain amino acids/oligopeptides as activators. It is possible that, through targeting of intestinal CaSR with a combination of specific nutrients, oral solutions that are both inexpensive and practical may be

  15. The Extracellular Calcium-Sensing Receptor in the Intestine: Evidence for Regulation of Colonic Absorption, Secretion, Motility, and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lieqi; Cheng, Catherine Y; Sun, Xiangrong; Pedicone, Alexandra J; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour; Cheng, Sam X

    2016-01-01

    Different from other epithelia, the intestinal epithelium has the complex task of providing a barrier impeding the entry of toxins, food antigens, and microbes, while at the same time allowing for the transfer of nutrients, electrolytes, water, and microbial metabolites. These molecules/organisms are transported either transcellularly, crossing the apical and basolateral membranes of enterocytes, or paracellularly, passing through the space between enterocytes. Accordingly, the intestinal epithelium can affect energy metabolism, fluid balance, as well as immune response and tolerance. To help accomplish these complex tasks, the intestinal epithelium has evolved many sensing receptor mechanisms. Yet, their roles and functions are only now beginning to be elucidated. This article explores one such sensing receptor mechanism, carried out by the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). In addition to its established function as a nutrient sensor, coordinating food digestion, nutrient absorption, and regulating energy metabolism, we present evidence for the emerging role of CaSR in the control of intestinal fluid homeostasis and immune balance. An additional role in the modulation of the enteric nerve activity and motility is also discussed. Clearly, CaSR has profound effects on many aspects of intestinal function. Nevertheless, more work is needed to fully understand all functions of CaSR in the intestine, including detailed mechanisms of action and specific pathways involved. Considering the essential roles CaSR plays in gastrointestinal physiology and immunology, research may lead to a translational opportunity for the development of novel therapies that are based on CaSR's unique property of using simple nutrients such as calcium, polyamines, and certain amino acids/oligopeptides as activators. It is possible that, through targeting of intestinal CaSR with a combination of specific nutrients, oral solutions that are both inexpensive and practical may be

  16. Ulcerogenic and intestinal motility/transit stimulating actions of nevirapine in albino Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Umoren, Elizabeth Bassey; Obembe, Agona Odeh; Osim, Eme Effiom

    2013-09-01

    The antiretroviral is a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of nevirapine (NVP) administration on gastric acid secretion, pepsin secretion, mucosal secretion, intestinal motility, and transit using apparently healthy albino Wistar rats. Eighty albino Wistar rats (50-125 g body weight) from the start of the experiment were used for the study. Rats in the control group were fed normal rodent chow, while the NVP group was fed by gavage NVP (0.4 mg/kg body weight) two times daily (07:00 and 18:00 hours) in addition to normal rodent chow for 12 weeks. All animals were allowed free access to clean drinking water. Mean basal gastric output and peak acid output following histamine administration in the NVP-treated group were significantly higher (p < 0.001, respectively) compared to the control. Following cimetidine administration, there was significant decrease (p < 0.001) in peak acid output in the NVP-treated group compared to the control. The concentration of gastric pepsin, adherent mucus secretion, and mean value for ulcer score were significantly higher (p < 0.001) compared to their control group, respectively. There were significant increases (p < 0.05, respectively) in intestinal motility and basal contraction (p < 0.05) and increase in intestinal transit of the ileum of NVP-treated rats compared to their control, respectively. Results of the study suggest that NVP administration might provoke gastric ulceration in rats which may be caused by high pepsin, high basal acid output, and increased intestinal motility and transit. PMID:23536414

  17. Effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in plasma and small intestine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Shu-Guang; Wu, Wan-Chun; Han, Zhen; Wang, Meng-Ya

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and expression of cholecystokinin (CCK) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in plasma and small intestine, and to explore the relationship between small intestinal motor disorders and gastrointestinal hormones under psychological stress. METHODS: Thirty-six mice were randomly divided into psychological stress group and control group. A mouse model with psychological stress was established by housing the mice with a hungry cat in separate layers of a two-layer cage. A semi-solid colored marker (carbon-ink) was used for monitoring small intestinal transit. CCK and VIP levels in plasma and small intestine in mice were measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). RESULTS: Small intestinal transit was inhibited (52.18±19.15% vs 70.19±17.79%, P<0.01) in mice after psychological stress, compared to the controls. Small intestinal CCK levels in psychological stress mice were significantly lower than those in the control group (0.75±0.53 μg/g vs 1.98±1.17 μg/g, P<0.01), whereas plasma CCK concentrations were not different between the groups. VIP levels in small intestine were significantly higher in psychological stress mice than those in the control group (8.45±1.09 μg/g vs 7.03±2.36 μg/g, P<0.01), while there was no significant difference in plasma VIP levels between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Psychological stress inhibits the small intestinal transit, probably by down-regulating CCK and up-regulating VIP expression in small intestine. PMID:15655834

  18. Clostridium difficile suppresses colonic vasoactive intestinal peptide associated with altered motility.

    PubMed

    Nassif, A; Longo, W E; Sexe, R; Stratton, M; Standeven, J; Vernava, A M; Kaminski, D L

    1995-01-01

    We investigated whether Clostridium difficile toxin alters colonic tissue levels of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) at the expense of changes in colonic motility in the isolated perfused rabbit left colon. Colonic inflammation was induced by the intracolonic administration of 10(-8) M C. difflcile toxin. Strain gauge transducers were sewn onto the serosal surface of the colon to evaluate colonic motility. C. difflcile administration produced histologic changes consistent with epithelial damage. This was associated with an increased production of prostaglandin E(2) and thromboxane B(2). Tissue levels of VIP but not substance P were significantly reduced. This was associated with an increased number of contractions per minute and an average force of each colonic contraction. These results suggest that tissue levels of VIP are suppressed by C. difflcile and may participate in colonic dysmotility during active inflammation. PMID:18475679

  19. Host Gut Motility Promotes Competitive Exclusion within a Model Intestinal Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Wiles, Travis J; Jemielita, Matthew; Baker, Ryan P; Schlomann, Brandon H; Logan, Savannah L; Ganz, Julia; Melancon, Ellie; Eisen, Judith S; Guillemin, Karen; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2016-07-01

    The gut microbiota is a complex consortium of microorganisms with the ability to influence important aspects of host health and development. Harnessing this "microbial organ" for biomedical applications requires clarifying the degree to which host and bacterial factors act alone or in combination to govern the stability of specific lineages. To address this issue, we combined bacteriological manipulation and light sheet fluorescence microscopy to monitor the dynamics of a defined two-species microbiota within a vertebrate gut. We observed that the interplay between each population and the gut environment produces distinct spatiotemporal patterns. As a consequence, one species dominates while the other experiences sudden drops in abundance that are well fit by a stochastic mathematical model. Modeling revealed that direct bacterial competition could only partially explain the observed phenomena, suggesting that a host factor is also important in shaping the community. We hypothesized the host determinant to be gut motility, and tested this mechanism by measuring colonization in hosts with enteric nervous system dysfunction due to a mutation in the ret locus, which in humans is associated with the intestinal motility disorder known as Hirschsprung disease. In mutant hosts we found reduced gut motility and, confirming our hypothesis, robust coexistence of both bacterial species. This study provides evidence that host-mediated spatial structuring and stochastic perturbation of communities can drive bacterial population dynamics within the gut, and it reveals a new facet of the intestinal host-microbe interface by demonstrating the capacity of the enteric nervous system to influence the microbiota. Ultimately, these findings suggest that therapeutic strategies targeting the intestinal ecosystem should consider the dynamic physical nature of the gut environment. PMID:27458727

  20. Host Gut Motility Promotes Competitive Exclusion within a Model Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Ryan P; Schlomann, Brandon H; Ganz, Julia; Eisen, Judith S; Guillemin, Karen; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota is a complex consortium of microorganisms with the ability to influence important aspects of host health and development. Harnessing this “microbial organ” for biomedical applications requires clarifying the degree to which host and bacterial factors act alone or in combination to govern the stability of specific lineages. To address this issue, we combined bacteriological manipulation and light sheet fluorescence microscopy to monitor the dynamics of a defined two-species microbiota within a vertebrate gut. We observed that the interplay between each population and the gut environment produces distinct spatiotemporal patterns. As a consequence, one species dominates while the other experiences sudden drops in abundance that are well fit by a stochastic mathematical model. Modeling revealed that direct bacterial competition could only partially explain the observed phenomena, suggesting that a host factor is also important in shaping the community. We hypothesized the host determinant to be gut motility, and tested this mechanism by measuring colonization in hosts with enteric nervous system dysfunction due to a mutation in the ret locus, which in humans is associated with the intestinal motility disorder known as Hirschsprung disease. In mutant hosts we found reduced gut motility and, confirming our hypothesis, robust coexistence of both bacterial species. This study provides evidence that host-mediated spatial structuring and stochastic perturbation of communities can drive bacterial population dynamics within the gut, and it reveals a new facet of the intestinal host–microbe interface by demonstrating the capacity of the enteric nervous system to influence the microbiota. Ultimately, these findings suggest that therapeutic strategies targeting the intestinal ecosystem should consider the dynamic physical nature of the gut environment. PMID:27458727

  1. Manometric evaluation of gastrointestinal motility in a case of megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS).

    PubMed

    Shono, T; Suita, S; Taguchi, T; Nagasaki, A

    1992-02-01

    We report on a manometric study of the esophagus, stomach, duodenum, jejunum and anorectum in a case of megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS). An esophageal examination showed normal esophageal contractions and a positive rectoanal reflex was obtained in an anorectal manometry. However, the continuous fasting manometric recording of the antrum, duodenum and jejunum lasting a total of 12 hours revealed a severe motility disturbance of the gastrointestinal tract. During the examination a band of low amplitude contractions was observed in the antrum only once and it was followed by small rhythmic contractions of the duodenum, but none of propagated or spontaneous contractions were seen in the jejunum. PMID:1571330

  2. Diabetes-related dysfunction of the small intestine and the colon: focus on motility.

    PubMed

    Horváth, Viktor József; Putz, Zsuzsanna; Izbéki, Ferenc; Körei, Anna Erzsébet; Gerő, László; Lengyel, Csaba; Kempler, Péter; Várkonyi, Tamás

    2015-11-01

    In contrast to gastric dysfunction, diabetes-related functional impairments of the small and large intestine have been studied less intensively. The gastrointestinal tract accomplishes several functions, such as mixing and propulsion of luminal content, absorption and secretion of ions, water, and nutrients, defense against pathogens, and elimination of waste products. Diverse functions of the gut are regulated by complex interactions among its functional elements, including gut microbiota. The network-forming tissues, the enteric nervous system) and the interstitial cells of Cajal, are definitely impaired in diabetic patients, and their loss of function is closely related to the symptoms in diabetes, but changes of other elements could also play a role in the development of diabetes mellitus-related motility disorders. The development of our understanding over the recent years of the diabetes-induced dysfunctions in the small and large intestine are reviewed in this article. PMID:26374571

  3. [Progress of Researches on Relationship between Acu-moxibustion Induced Modulation of Small Intestinal Motility and Autonomic Nervous Activity ].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Yu, Zhi; Xu, Bin

    2014-12-01

    A large body of evidence of clinical and experimental outcomes showed that acupuncture and moxibustion can effectively treat disorders of small intestinal motility. The present articJe collected related literatures and made an analysis on the correlation between the effect of acupuncture-moxibustion intervention and needle-manipulation techniques, stimulating quantities, acupoint recipes, and the body functional states, as well as the corresponding mechanisms. Results indicate that acupuncture stimulation of acupoints of the limbs mainly enhance the motility of the small intestine, while acupuncture stimulation of acupoints in the abdominal region predominately suppress it, which may be closely associated with its effects on activities of the autonomic nervous system. This conclusion tells us that in clinical treatment of small intestinal hypodynamia, acupoints of the limbs should be selected first while in treating intestinal hyperdynamia, those acupoints in the abdominal region should be taken preferably. In ad- dition, at present, non-invaded detection techniques of the small intestinal motility are definitely and urgently needed and will greatly promote the progress of researches of acu-moxibustion on the mechanism underlying modulation of small intestinal motility. PMID:25632580

  4. [Effect of trimebutine on the motility of the normal human small intestines: mechanism of action].

    PubMed

    Chaussade, S; Grandjouan, S; Couturier, D; Thierman-Duffaud, D; Henry, J F

    1987-01-01

    The effects of intravenous trimebutine (TMB) on duodenojejunal motility were investigated in normal subjects in fed and fasted states. The motility was recorded manometrically. In the fasting state TMB 100 mg, 25 min after a spontaneous phase 3 (P3) constantly induced a premature P3. The mean period (means +/- SE) of the migrating motor complex (MMC) cycle decreased from 84 +/- 10.9 to 32.5 +/- 1.0 min. TMB 50 mg, 3 and 25 min after a spontaneous P3 did not significantly modify the periodicity of MMC. TMB 100 mg initiated P3-like activity in post-prandial state. Previous administration of a low dose of naloxone suppressed the stimulating action of TMB. After a TMB injection the motilin plasma level did not vary; a brief increated of PP plasma level was observed. It may be concluded that in the human small intestine TMB included a typical modification of the motility pattern. Opiate receptors might be involved. PMID:3609631

  5. The effect of cannabinoids on intestinal motility and their antinociceptive effect in mice.

    PubMed

    Chesher, G B; Dahl, C J; Everingham, M; Jackson, D M; Marchant-Williams, H; Starmer, G A

    1973-12-01

    1. After oral administration to mice, pethidine, Delta(8)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), Delta(9)-THC, a cannabis extract and cannabinol had a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect when measured by the hot-plate method. Cannabidiol was inactive at 30 mg/kg. Delta(8)-THC, Delta(9)-THC and pethidine did not differ significantly in potency, but Delta(9)-THC was 6.5 times more active than cannabinol.2. After oral administration, three different cannabis extracts, Delta(8)-THC, Delta(9)-THC and morphine produced dose-dependent depressions of the passage of a charcoal meal in mice. Delta(8)-THC and Delta(9)-THC were equipotent and were about five times less potent than morphine. Cannabidiol was inactive up to 30 mg/kg. The effect of the three cannabis extracts on intestinal motility could be accounted for by their Delta(9)-THC content.3. The antinociceptive effect of pethidine and the effect of morphine on intestinal motility were antagonized by nalorphine whilst the effects of the cannabis extracts and the pure cannabinoids were not.4. From these results it is concluded that although cannabis and the narcotics share several common pharmacological properties, the mode of action of each is pharmacologically distinct. PMID:4788032

  6. Crossover clinical trial to determine the effect of manual acupuncture at Siguan points (bilateral LI4 and LR3) on intestinal motility in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Yim, Y K; Kang, W C; Cho, J H; Shin, J W; Lee, N H; Choi, S M; Koo, S T; Park, K S; Son, C G

    2007-01-01

    This study examined whether manual acupuncture at the Siguan points (bilateral points LI4 and LR3) affects intestinal motility in healthy human subjects. Twenty healthy male subjects were randomly assigned either to real acupuncture (RA) at Siguan points or sham acupuncture (SA) groups in a crossover manner. All subjects underwent two experimental sessions; the RA group in the first session was treated with SA in the second session after a 2-week washout period, and vice versa. Each subject took 20 radio-markers and was treated with acupuncture 0, 12, 24, and 36 hours after radio-marker intake. Radiographs were taken at 6, 12.5, 24.5, and 48 hours, and the effect of acupuncture on intestinal motility was evaluated based on the distribution of the radio-markers in the ileum, ascending colon, transverse colon, descending colon, sigmoid/ rectum, and outside the body. Defecating habit was monitored during the trial, and complete blood counts were checked before and after the two acupuncture sessions. The RA and SA results showed extremely similar distributions of the radio-markers in these five regions of the alimentary canal and outside the body in radiographs taken at four different times, verifying that there was no effect of manual acupuncture at the Siguan points on intestinal motility, at least in healthy human subjects. PMID:17436362

  7. Sodium affects the sperm motility in the European eel.

    PubMed

    Vílchez, M Carmen; Morini, Marina; Peñaranda, David S; Gallego, Víctor; Asturiano, Juan F; Pérez, Luz

    2016-08-01

    The role of seminal plasma sodium and activation media sodium on sperm motility was examined by selectively removing the element from these two media, in European eel sperm. Sperm size (sperm head area) was also measured using an ASMA (Automated Sperm Morphometry Analyses) system, in the different conditions. Intracellular sodium [Na(+)]i was quantitatively analyzed by first time in the spermatozoa from a marine fish species. Measurement of [Na(+)]i was done before and after motility activation, by Flow Cytometry, using CoroNa Green AM as a dye. Sperm motility activation induced an increase in [Na(+)]i, from 96.72mM in quiescent stage to 152.21mM post-activation in seawater. A significant decrease in sperm head area was observed post-activation in seawater. There was a notable reduction in sperm motility when sodium was removed from the seminal plasma, but not when it was removed from the activation media. Sodium removal was also linked to a significant reduction in sperm head area in comparison to the controls. Our results indicate that the presence of the ion Na(+) in the seminal plasma (or in the extender medium) is necessary for the preservation of sperm motility in European eel, probably because it plays a role in maintaining an appropriate sperm cell volume in the quiescent stage of the spermatozoa. PMID:27085371

  8. Effects of feeding on in vivo motility patterns in the proximal intestine of shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius)

    PubMed Central

    Brijs, Jeroen; Hennig, Grant W.; Axelsson, Michael; Olsson, Catharina

    2014-01-01

    This is the first study to catalogue the diverse array of in vivo motility patterns in a teleost fish and how they are affected by feeding. Video recordings of exteriorised proximal intestine from fasted and fed shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius) were used to generate spatio-temporal maps to portray and quantify motility patterns. Propagating and non-propagating contractions were observed to occur at different frequencies and durations. The most apparent difference between the feeding states was that bands of relatively high amplitude contractions propagating slowly in the anal direction were observed in all fasted fish (N=10) but in only 35% of fed fish (N=11). Additionally, fed fish displayed a reduced frequency (0.21±0.03 versus 0.32±0.06 contractions min−1) and rhythmicity of these contractions compared with fasted fish. Although the underlying mechanisms of these slow anally propagating contractions differ from those of mammalian migrating motor complexes, we believe that they may play a similar role in shorthorn sculpin during the interdigestive period, to potentially remove food remnants and prevent the establishment of pathogens. ‘Ripples’ were the most prevalent contraction type in shorthorn sculpin and may be important during mixing and absorption. The persistence of shallow ripples and pendular movements of longitudinal muscle after tetrodotoxin (1 μmol l−1) treatment suggests these contractions were myogenic in origin. The present study highlights both similarities and differences in motility patterns between shorthorn sculpin and other vertebrates, as well as providing a platform to examine other aspects of gastrointestinal functions in fish, including the impact of environmental changes. PMID:24948631

  9. Effect of trimebutine on intestinal motility and plasma motilin in the dog.

    PubMed

    Poitras, P; Honde, C; Havrankova, J; Lahaie, R G; Trudel, L; Goyer, R; Junien, J L; Pascaud, X

    1986-09-01

    In a previous report, trimebutine was shown to induce premature periods of phase III activity in fasting dogs, and its action was blocked by naloxone. In this study, we observed that trimebutine (5 mg X kg-1 iv) could induce premature phase IIIs in canine small intestine during interdigestive and digestive periods; trimebutine-induced phase IIIs were migrating along the small intestine faster than spontaneous activity fronts and; trimebutine-induced phase IIIs were accompanied by sharp rises in concentrations of plasma motilin. To further elucidate the trimebutine-stimulatory mechanism, we verified its effects on the release of various circulating peptides that influence intestinal motility: short-interval blood sampling during trimebutine infusion revealed that plasma motilin increases induced by trimebutine preceded the beginning of phase III in proximal duodenum; and gastrin and insulin postprandial releases were abolished by trimebutine. Therefore, trimebutine, by its simultaneous but opposite effects on various peptides that individually carry positive (e.g., motilin) or negative (e.g., gastrin and insulin) influences on the generation of activity fronts, could alter the equilibrium between stimulatory and inhibitory forces in such a way that, in some circumstances (e.g., postprandial period), stimulatory mechanisms become predominant. PMID:3529986

  10. Needleless transcutaneous electroacupuncture improves rectal distension-induced impairment in intestinal motility and slow waves via vagal mechanisms in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun; Yin, Jieyun; Chen, Jiande

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was designed to compare the effects and mechanisms of transcutaneous electroacupuncture (TEA) on rectal distention (RD)-induced intestinal dysmotility with EA. Methods: six female dogs chronically implanted with a duodenal fistula, a proximal colon fistula and intestinal serosal electrodes were studied. EA and TEA were performed via needles and cutaneous electrodes placed at bilateral ST-36 (Zusanli) acupoints respectively; their effects on postprandial intestinal dysmotility (slow waves, contractions and transit) induced by RD, and autonomic functions were compared. Results: RD at a volume of 140 ml suppressed intestinal contractions; the motility index was reduced with RD (P = 0.001). Both EA and TEA ameliorated the suppressed contractions (P = 0.003 and 0.001) and their effects were comparable. RD reduced the percentage of normal intestinal slow waves (P = 0.002) that was increased with both EA and TEA (P = 0.005 and 0.035). No significant difference was noted between EA and TEA. EA and TEA reduced small bowel transit time (P = 0.001 and 0.007); these prokinetic effects were blocked by atropine. Both EA and TEA increased vagal activity assessed by the spectral analysis of heart rate variability (both P = 0.03). Conclusion: RD inhibits postprandial intestinal motility. Both EA and TEA at ST-36 are able to improve the RD-induced impairment in intestinal contractions, transit and slow waves mediated via the vagal mechanism. Needleless TEA is as effective as EA in ameliorating the intestinal hypomotility. PMID:26064396

  11. Antibiotic-Induced Depletion of Murine Microbiota Induces Mild Inflammation and Changes in Toll-Like Receptor Patterns and Intestinal Motility.

    PubMed

    Grasa, Laura; Abecia, Leticia; Forcén, Raquel; Castro, Marta; de Jalón, José Antonio García; Latorre, Eva; Alcalde, Ana Isabel; Murillo, María Divina

    2015-10-01

    We examine the impact of changes in microbiota induced by antibiotics on intestinal motility, gut inflammatory response, and the function and expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs). Alterations in mice intestinal microbiota were induced by antibiotics and evaluated by q-PCR and DGGE analysis. Macroscopic and microscopic assessments of the intestine were performed in control and antibiotic-treated mice. TLR expression was determined in the intestine by q-RT-PCR. Fecal parameter measurements, intestinal transit, and muscle contractility studies were performed to evaluate alterations in intestinal motility. Antibiotics reduced the total bacterial quantity 1000-fold, and diversity was highly affected by treatment. Mice with microbiota depletion had less Peyer's patches, enlarged ceca, and mild gut inflammation. Treatment with antibiotics increased the expression of TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9 in the ileum and TLR3, TLR4, TLR6, TLR7, and TLR8 in the colon, and it reduced the expression of TLR2, TLR3, and TLR6 in the ileum and TLR2 and TLR9 in the colon. Antibiotics decreased fecal output, delayed the whole gut and colonic transit, and reduced the spontaneous contractions and the response to acetylcholine (ACh) in the ileum and colon. Activation of TLR4 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) reverted the reduction of the spontaneous contractions induced by antibiotics in the ileum. Activation of TLR4 by LPS and TLR5 by flagellin reduced the response to ACh in the ileum in control mice. Our results confirm the role of the microbiota in the regulation of TLRs expression and shed light on the microbiota connection to motor intestinal alterations. PMID:25896428

  12. New insights into the pathophysiology of IBS: intestinal microflora, gas production and gut motility.

    PubMed

    Gasbarrini, A; Lauritano, E C; Garcovich, M; Sparano, L; Gasbarrini, G

    2008-08-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a complex disorder clinically characterized by abdominal pain and altered bowel habit. Its pathogenetic mechanisms are still incompletely known; genes, psychosocial factors, changes in gastrointestinal motility and visceral hypersensitivity are traditionally thought to play a crucial role in symptom generation. Recent studies have identified new additional factors that can interact with the established mechanisms. Dysregulation of brain-gut axis, gastrointestinal infection, low-grade infiltration and activation of mast cells in the intestinal mucosa with consequent release of bioactive substances, and altered serotonin metabolism are the emerging factors of IBS pathogenesis. Finally, modification of small bowel and colonic microflora and altered gas balance may be of relevance in at least some subgroups of IBS patients. New therapies can be developed only on the basis of a better understanding of the heterogeneous picture of the pathophysiology of IBS. PMID:18924450

  13. The Semen pH Affects Sperm Motility and Capacitation

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Zhiwei; Xie, Min; Chen, Shengrong; Yao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the chemical environment of semen can have a profound effect on sperm quality, we examined the effect of pH on the motility, viability and capacitation of human sperm. The sperm in this study was collected from healthy males to avoid interference from other factors. The spermatozoa cultured in sperm nutrition solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were analyzed for sperm total motility, progressive motility (PR), hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) rate, and sperm penetration. Our results showed that these parameters were similar in pH 7.2 and 8.2 sperm nutrition solutions, but decreased in pH 5.2 and 6.2 solutions. The HOS rate exhibited positive correlation with the sperm total motility and PR. In addition, the sperm Na+/K+-ATPase activity at different pHs was measured, and the enzyme activity was significantly lower in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media, comparing with that in pH 8.2 and pH 7.2 solutions. Using flow cytometry (FCM) and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM) analysis, the intracellular Ca2+ concentrations of sperm cultured in sperm capacitation solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were determined. Compared with that at pH 7.2, the mean fluorescence intensity of sperm in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media decreased significantly, while that of pH 8.2 group showed no difference. Our results suggested that the declined Na+/K+-ATPase activity at acidic pHs result in decreased sperm movement and capacitation, which could be one of the mechanisms of male infertility. PMID:26173069

  14. Graded effects of unregulated smooth muscle myosin on intestinal architecture, intestinal motility and vascular function in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Joshua; Einhorn, Zev; Seiler, Christoph; Zong, Alan B; Sweeney, H Lee; Pack, Michael

    2016-05-01

    Smooth muscle contraction is controlled by the regulated activity of the myosin heavy chain ATPase (Myh11). Myh11 mutations have diverse effects in the cardiovascular, digestive and genitourinary systems in humans and animal models. We previously reported a recessive missense mutation, meltdown (mlt), which converts a highly conserved tryptophan to arginine (W512R) in the rigid relay loop of zebrafish Myh11. The mlt mutation disrupts myosin regulation and non-autonomously induces invasive expansion of the intestinal epithelium. Here, we report two newly identified missense mutations in the switch-1 (S237Y) and coil-coiled (L1287M) domains of Myh11 that fail to complement mlt Cell invasion was not detected in either homozygous mutant but could be induced by oxidative stress and activation of oncogenic signaling pathways. The smooth muscle defect imparted by the mlt and S237Y mutations also delayed intestinal transit, and altered vascular function, as measured by blood flow in the dorsal aorta. The cell-invasion phenotype induced by the three myh11 mutants correlated with the degree of myosin deregulation. These findings suggest that the vertebrate intestinal epithelium is tuned to the physical state of the surrounding stroma, which, in turn, governs its response to physiologic and pathologic stimuli. Genetic variants that alter the regulation of smooth muscle myosin might be risk factors for diseases affecting the intestine, vasculature, and other tissues that contain smooth muscle or contractile cells that express smooth muscle proteins, particularly in the setting of redox stress. PMID:26893369

  15. Roles of sphincter of Oddi motility and serum vasoactive intestinal peptide, gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Qin, Cheng-Kun; Wu, Shuo-Dong; Xu, Jian; Cui, Xian-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Yi; Xian, Guo-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate roles of sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility played in pigment gallbladder stone formation in model of guinea pigs. METHODS: Thirty-four adult male Hartley guinea pigs were divided randomly into two groups: the control group and pigment stone group. The pigment stone group was divided into 4 subgroups with 6 guinea pigs each according to time of sacrifice, and were fed a pigment lithogenic diet and sacrificed after 3, 6, 9 and 12 wk. SO manometry and recording of myoelectric activity of the guinea pigs were obtained by multifunctional physiograph at each stage. Serum vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) were detected at each stage in the process of pigment gallbladder stone formation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: The incidence of pigment gallstone formation was 0%, 0%, 16.7% and 66.7% in the 3-, 6-, 9- and 12-wk group, respectively. The frequency of myoelectric activity decreased in the 3-wk group. The amplitude of myoelectric activity had a tendency to decrease but not significantly. The frequency of the SO decreased significantly in the 9-wk group. The SO basal pressure and common bile duct pressure increased in the 12-wk group (25.19 ± 7.77 mmHg vs 40.56 ± 11.81 mmHg, 22.35 ± 7.60 mmHg vs 38.51 ± 11.57 mmHg, P < 0.05). Serum VIP was significantly elevated in the 6- and 12-wk groups and serum CCK-8 was decreased significantly in the 12-wk group. CONCLUSION: Pigment gallstone-causing diet may induce SO dysfunction. The tension of the SO increased. The disturbance in SO motility may play a role in pigment gallstone formation, and changes in serum VIP and CCK-8 may be important causes of SO dysfunction. PMID:24782626

  16. Combined effects of fungal alkaloids on intestinal motility in an in vitro rat model.

    PubMed

    Dalziel, J E; Dunstan, K E; Finch, S C

    2013-11-01

    Diarrhea is caused by factors that alter absorption and secretion of water and ions across the intestinal epithelium and disrupt motility. Parasitic infection, stress, poor nutrition, and exposure to plant or fungal toxins predispose livestock to noninfectious diarrhea. This is more prevalent in sheep that graze pastures infected with wild-type endophytic fungus, suggesting the involvement of fungal alkaloids. These increase smooth muscle contraction: ergovaline/ergotamine (ergot alkaloid) activates serotonin (5-HT) receptors, and lolitrem B (indole diterpene) inhibits large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels. Because of their separate mechanisms of action the objective of this study was to investigate whether they act synergistically to increase smooth muscle contraction. Effects of ergotamine (1 µM) and lolitrem B (0.1 µM) on the tension and frequency of spontaneous contractions were investigated in a longitudinal preparation of isolated distal colon. The compounds were dissolved in 0.1% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and applied separately or together for 1 h. Ergotamine increased contractile tension compared to the pretreatment control (P<0.01) and produced a short-lived increase in frequency (P<0.001). Lolitrem B increased contractile tension (P<0.05) but had no effect on frequency. When applied together, the contractile tension was greater than the sum of the compounds applied separately (P<0.05). The frequency of contractions was increased (P<0.05) but was not significantly different from that for ergotamine alone. The increased contractile tension when both compounds were applied together indicates that ergotamine and lolitrem B acted synergistically to increase smooth muscle contraction, suggesting that they would alter motility in vivo. PMID:23989880

  17. Motile invaded neutrophils in the small intestine of Toxoplasma gondii-infected mice reveal a potential mechanism for parasite spread

    PubMed Central

    Coombes, Janine L.; Charsar, Brittany A.; Han, Seong-Ji; Halkias, Joanna; Chan, Shiao Wei; Koshy, Anita A.; Striepen, Boris; Robey, Ellen A.

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection occurs through the oral route, but we lack important information about how the parasite interacts with the host immune system in the intestine. We used two-photon laser-scanning microscopy in conjunction with a mouse model of oral T. gondii infection to address this issue. T. gondii established discrete foci of infection in the small intestine, eliciting the recruitment and transepithelial migration of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes. Neutrophils accounted for a high proportion of actively invaded cells, and we provide evidence for a role for transmigrating neutrophils and other immune cells in the spread of T. gondii infection through the lumen of the intestine. Our data identify neutrophils as motile reservoirs of T. gondii infection and suggest a surprising retrograde pathway for parasite spread in the intestine. PMID:23650399

  18. Graded effects of unregulated smooth muscle myosin on intestinal architecture, intestinal motility and vascular function in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Joshua; Einhorn, Zev; Seiler, Christoph; Zong, Alan B.; Sweeney, H. Lee; Pack, Michael

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Smooth muscle contraction is controlled by the regulated activity of the myosin heavy chain ATPase (Myh11). Myh11 mutations have diverse effects in the cardiovascular, digestive and genitourinary systems in humans and animal models. We previously reported a recessive missense mutation, meltdown (mlt), which converts a highly conserved tryptophan to arginine (W512R) in the rigid relay loop of zebrafish Myh11. The mlt mutation disrupts myosin regulation and non-autonomously induces invasive expansion of the intestinal epithelium. Here, we report two newly identified missense mutations in the switch-1 (S237Y) and coil-coiled (L1287M) domains of Myh11 that fail to complement mlt. Cell invasion was not detected in either homozygous mutant but could be induced by oxidative stress and activation of oncogenic signaling pathways. The smooth muscle defect imparted by the mlt and S237Y mutations also delayed intestinal transit, and altered vascular function, as measured by blood flow in the dorsal aorta. The cell-invasion phenotype induced by the three myh11 mutants correlated with the degree of myosin deregulation. These findings suggest that the vertebrate intestinal epithelium is tuned to the physical state of the surrounding stroma, which, in turn, governs its response to physiologic and pathologic stimuli. Genetic variants that alter the regulation of smooth muscle myosin might be risk factors for diseases affecting the intestine, vasculature, and other tissues that contain smooth muscle or contractile cells that express smooth muscle proteins, particularly in the setting of redox stress. PMID:26893369

  19. The role of selenium in intestinal motility and morphology in a murine model of Typanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Andréa Pereira; Sieberg, Ryan; Li, Hua; Cahill, Hannah R.; Zhao, Dazhi; Araújo-Jorge, Tania C.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2010-01-01

    Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi causes mega-syndromes of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in humans and animals. In the present study, we employed magnetic resonance imaging to non-invasively monitor the effect of selenium supplementation on alterations in the GI tract of T. cruzi-infected mice. CD1 mice infected with T. cruzi (Brazil strain) exhibited dilatation of the intestines similar to that we recently reported in infected C57Bl/6 mice. The average intestine lumen diameter increased by 65% and the increase was reduced to 29% in mice supplemented with 2 ppm selenium in the drinking water. When supplemented with 3 ppm selenium in chow the lumen diameter was also significantly reduced although the difference between the infected and infected supplemented mice was smaller. Intestinal motility in infected mice fed with selenium-enriched chow was increased compared with infected mice fed with normal unsupplemented chow and was not significantly different from intestinal motility in uninfected mice. We suggest that Se may be used to modulate the inflammatory, immunological, and/or antioxidant responses involved in intestinal disturbances caused by T. cruzi infection. PMID:20195635

  20. Modification of cardiopulmonary and intestinal motility effects of xylazine with glycopyrrolate in horses.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, S; Young, S S; McDonell, W N; O'Grady, M

    1997-01-01

    depression caused by 1 mg/kg XYL, without adversely affecting GI motility. PMID:9114960

  1. Two cholecystokinin receptor subtypes are identified in goldfish, being the CCKAR involved in the regulation of intestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Tinoco, A B; Valenciano, A I; Gómez-Boronat, M; Blanco, A M; Nisembaum, L G; De Pedro, N; Delgado, M J

    2015-09-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) plays a key role in the digestive physiology of vertebrates. However, very little is known about the role of CCK on intestinal functions in fish. The present study identifies two CCK receptor subtypes in a stomachless teleost, the goldfish (Carassius auratus), and investigates by using an in vitro system their involvement mediating the effects of the sulfated octapeptide of CCK (CCK-8S) on the motility of isolated proximal intestine. Partial-length mRNAs encoding two CCK receptor isoforms (CCKAR and CCKBR.I) were sequenced and the structural analysis showed that both receptors belong to the G-protein coupled receptor superfamily. Both goldfish CCK receptor sequences were more closely related to zebrafish sequences, sharing the lowest similarities with cavefish and tilapia. The highest expression of goldfish CCKAR was observed along the whole intestine whereas the CCKBR gen was predominantly expressed in the hypothalamus, vagal lobe and posterior intestine. Application of CCK-8S to the organ bath evoked a concentration-dependent contractile response in intestine strips. The contractions were not blocked by either tetrodotoxin or atropine, suggesting that CCK-8S acts on the gut smooth muscle directly. Preincubations of intestine strips with devazepide and L365,260 (CCKAR and CCKBR receptor selective antagonists) showed that the CCK-8S-induced contraction could be partially mediated by the CCKAR receptor subtype, which is also the most abundant CCK receptor found in gastrointestinal tissues. In conclusion, two CCK receptors with a differential distribution pattern has been identified in goldfish, and the CCKAR subtype is mainly involved in the regulation of intestinal motility by the CCK-8S. PMID:26051613

  2. A novel tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist prevents motility-stimulating effects of neurokinin A in small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Lördal, Mikael; Navalesi, Giovanni; Theodorsson, Elvar; Maggi, Carlo A; Hellström, Per M

    2001-01-01

    MEN 11420 (nepadutant) is a potent, selective and competitive antagonist of tachykinin NK2 receptors. The objective of the present study was to assess the capability of the drug to antagonize the stimulatory effects of neurokinin A (NKA) on gastrointestinal motility, as well as to change the fasting migrating motor complex (MMC). Thirty-four male volunteers were randomized to treatment with either placebo or MEN 11420 in a double-blinded manner. Effects of MEN 11420 (8 mg intravenously) were evaluated as changes in phases I, II and III of MMC, as well as contraction frequency, amplitude and motility index during baseline conditions and during stimulation of motility using NKA (25 pmol kg−1 min−1 intravenously). NKA preceded by placebo increased the fraction of time occupied by phase II, increased contraction frequency, amplitude and motility index. MEN 11420 effectively antagonized the motility-stimulating effects of NKA. MEN 11420 reduced the phase II-stimulating effect of NKA. In addition, the stimulatory effect of NKA on contraction frequency and amplitude, as well as motility index were inhibited by MEN 11420. MEN 11420 did not affect the characteristics of MMC during saline infusion. Plasma levels of MEN 11420 peaked during the first hour after infusion and decreased to less than half during the first 2 h. In conclusion, intravenous MEN 11420 effectively inhibited NKA-stimulated, but not basal gastrointestinal motility, and was well tolerated by all subjects. PMID:11522614

  3. Pro-inflammatory flagellin proteins of prevalent motile commensal bacteria are variably abundant in the intestinal microbiome of elderly humans.

    PubMed

    Neville, B Anne; Sheridan, Paul O; Harris, Hugh M B; Coughlan, Simone; Flint, Harry J; Duncan, Sylvia H; Jeffery, Ian B; Claesson, Marcus J; Ross, R Paul; Scott, Karen P; O'Toole, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    Some Eubacterium and Roseburia species are among the most prevalent motile bacteria present in the intestinal microbiota of healthy adults. These flagellate species contribute "cell motility" category genes to the intestinal microbiome and flagellin proteins to the intestinal proteome. We reviewed and revised the annotation of motility genes in the genomes of six Eubacterium and Roseburia species that occur in the human intestinal microbiota and examined their respective locus organization by comparative genomics. Motility gene order was generally conserved across these loci. Five of these species harbored multiple genes for predicted flagellins. Flagellin proteins were isolated from R. inulinivorans strain A2-194 and from E. rectale strains A1-86 and M104/1. The amino-termini sequences of the R. inulinivorans and E. rectale A1-86 proteins were almost identical. These protein preparations stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) from human intestinal epithelial cell lines, suggesting that these flagellins were pro-inflammatory. Flagellins from the other four species were predicted to be pro-inflammatory on the basis of alignment to the consensus sequence of pro-inflammatory flagellins from the β- and γ- proteobacteria. Many fliC genes were deduced to be under the control of σ(28). The relative abundance of the target Eubacterium and Roseburia species varied across shotgun metagenomes from 27 elderly individuals. Genes involved in the flagellum biogenesis pathways of these species were variably abundant in these metagenomes, suggesting that the current depth of coverage used for metagenomic sequencing (3.13-4.79 Gb total sequence in our study) insufficiently captures the functional diversity of genomes present at low (≤1%) relative abundance. E. rectale and R. inulinivorans thus appear to synthesize complex flagella composed of flagellin proteins that stimulate IL-8 production. A greater depth of sequencing, improved evenness of sequencing and improved

  4. Lactobacilli Antagonize the Growth, Motility, and Adherence of Brachyspira pilosicoli: a Potential Intervention against Avian Intestinal Spirochetosis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Mappley, Luke J.; Tchórzewska, Monika A.; Cooley, William A.; Woodward, Martin J.; La Ragione, Roberto M.

    2011-01-01

    Avian intestinal spirochetosis (AIS) results from the colonization of the ceca and colorectum of poultry by pathogenic Brachyspira species. The number of cases of AIS has increased since the 2006 European Union ban on the use of antibiotic growth promoters, which, together with emerging antimicrobial resistance in Brachyspira, has driven renewed interest in alternative intervention strategies. Probiotics have been reported as protecting livestock against infection with common enteric pathogens, and here we investigate which aspects of the biology of Brachyspira they antagonize in order to identify possible interventions against AIS. The cell-free supernatants (CFS) of two Lactobacillus strains, Lactobacillus reuteri LM1 and Lactobacillus salivarius LM2, suppressed the growth of Brachyspira pilosicoli B2904 in a pH-dependent manner. In in vitro adherence and invasion assays with HT29-16E three-dimensional (3D) cells and in a novel avian cecal in vitro organ culture (IVOC) model, the adherence and invasion of B. pilosicoli in epithelial cells were reduced significantly by the presence of lactobacilli (P < 0.001). In addition, live and heat-inactivated lactobacilli inhibited the motility of B. pilosicoli, and electron microscopic observations indicated that contact between the lactobacilli and Brachyspira was crucial in inhibiting both adherence and motility. These data suggest that motility is essential for B. pilosicoli to adhere to and invade the gut epithelium and that any interference of motility may be a useful tool for the development of control strategies. PMID:21666022

  5. Listeria monocytogenes DNA Glycosylase AdlP Affects Flagellar Motility, Biofilm Formation, Virulence, and Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Bae, Dongryeoul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is structurally similar to the Bacillus cereus alkyl base DNA glycosylase (AlkD), was identified. This determinant was involved in the transcriptional repression of flagellar motility genes and was named adlP (encoding an AlkD-like protein [AdlP]). Deletion of adlP activated the expression of flagellar motility genes at 37°C and disrupted the temperature-dependent inhibition of L. monocytogenes motility. The adlP null strains demonstrated decreased survival in murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells and less virulence in mice. Furthermore, the deletion of adlP significantly decreased biofilm formation and impaired the survival of bacteria under several stress conditions, including the presence of a DNA alkylation compound (methyl methanesulfonate), an oxidative agent (H2O2), and aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our findings strongly suggest that adlP may encode a bifunctional protein that transcriptionally represses the expression of flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. IMPORTANCE We discovered a novel protein that we named AlkD-like protein (AdlP). This protein affected flagellar motility, biofilm formation, and virulence. Our data suggest that AdlP may be a bifunctional protein that represses flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. PMID:27316964

  6. Pro-Inflammatory Flagellin Proteins of Prevalent Motile Commensal Bacteria Are Variably Abundant in the Intestinal Microbiome of Elderly Humans

    PubMed Central

    Neville, B. Anne; Sheridan, Paul O.; Harris, Hugh M. B.; Coughlan, Simone; Flint, Harry J.; Duncan, Sylvia H.; Jeffery, Ian B.; Claesson, Marcus J.; Ross, R. Paul; Scott, Karen P.; O'Toole, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Some Eubacterium and Roseburia species are among the most prevalent motile bacteria present in the intestinal microbiota of healthy adults. These flagellate species contribute “cell motility” category genes to the intestinal microbiome and flagellin proteins to the intestinal proteome. We reviewed and revised the annotation of motility genes in the genomes of six Eubacterium and Roseburia species that occur in the human intestinal microbiota and examined their respective locus organization by comparative genomics. Motility gene order was generally conserved across these loci. Five of these species harbored multiple genes for predicted flagellins. Flagellin proteins were isolated from R. inulinivorans strain A2-194 and from E. rectale strains A1-86 and M104/1. The amino-termini sequences of the R. inulinivorans and E. rectale A1-86 proteins were almost identical. These protein preparations stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) from human intestinal epithelial cell lines, suggesting that these flagellins were pro-inflammatory. Flagellins from the other four species were predicted to be pro-inflammatory on the basis of alignment to the consensus sequence of pro-inflammatory flagellins from the β- and γ- proteobacteria. Many fliC genes were deduced to be under the control of σ28. The relative abundance of the target Eubacterium and Roseburia species varied across shotgun metagenomes from 27 elderly individuals. Genes involved in the flagellum biogenesis pathways of these species were variably abundant in these metagenomes, suggesting that the current depth of coverage used for metagenomic sequencing (3.13–4.79 Gb total sequence in our study) insufficiently captures the functional diversity of genomes present at low (≤1%) relative abundance. E. rectale and R. inulinivorans thus appear to synthesize complex flagella composed of flagellin proteins that stimulate IL-8 production. A greater depth of sequencing, improved evenness of sequencing and improved

  7. Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders in Children

    PubMed Central

    Ambartsumyan, Lusine

    2014-01-01

    The most common and challenging gastrointestinal motility disorders in children include gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), esophageal achalasia, gastroparesis, chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, and constipation. GERD is the most common gastrointestinal motility disorder affecting children and is diagnosed clinically and treated primarily with acid secretion blockade. Esophageal achalasia, a less common disorder in the pediatric patient population, is characterized by dysphagia and treated with pneumatic balloon dilation and/or esophagomyotomy. Gastroparesis and chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction are poorly characterized in children and are associated with significant morbidity. Constipation is among the most common complaints in children and is associated with significant morbidity as well as poor quality of life. Data on epidemiology and outcomes, clinical trials, and evaluation of new diagnostic techniques are needed to better diagnose and treat gastrointestinal motility disorders in children. We present a review of the conditions and challenges related to these common gastrointestinal motility disorders in children. PMID:24799835

  8. Campylobacter jejuni pdxA Affects Flagellum-Mediated Motility to Alter Host Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Hiroshi; Hashii, Noritaka; Uema, Masashi; Kawasaki, Nana; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Igimi, Shizunobu; Yamamoto, Shigeki

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin B6 (pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, PLP) is linked to a variety of biological functions in prokaryotes. Here, we report that the pdxA (putative 4-hydroxy-L-threonine phosphate dehydrogenase) gene plays a pivotal role in the PLP-dependent regulation of flagellar motility, thereby altering host colonization in a leading foodborne pathogen, Campylobacter jejuni. A C. jejuni pdxA mutant failed to produce PLP and exhibited a coincident loss of flagellar motility. Mass spectrometric analyses showed a 3-fold reduction in the main flagellar glycan pseudaminic acid (Pse) associated with the disruption of pdxA. The pdxA mutant also exhibited reduced growth rates compared with the WT strain. Comparative metabolomic analyses revealed differences in respiratory/energy metabolism between WT C. jejuni and the pdxA mutant, providing a possible explanation for the differential growth fitness between the two strains. Consistent with the lack of flagellar motility, the pdxA mutant showed impaired motility-mediated responses (bacterial adhesion, ERK1/2 activation, and IL-8 production) in INT407 cells and reduced colonization of chickens compared with the WT strain. Overall, this study demonstrated that the pdxA gene affects the PLP-mediated flagellar motility function, mainly through alteration of Pse modification, and the disruption of this gene also alters the respiratory/energy metabolisms to potentially affect host colonization. Our data therefore present novel implications regarding the utility of PLP and its dependent enzymes as potent target(s) for the control of this pathogen in the poultry host. PMID:23936426

  9. Motility, haemodynamics and responsibility to vasoactive agents after revascularization of autotransplanted small intestine segments in the dog.

    PubMed

    Kreyer, I; Lehmann, C; Kékesi, V; Dóbi, I; Luther, B

    1989-01-01

    Functional and haemodynamic changes occurring after revascularization of an autotransplanted small intestine segment were studied in acute experiments performed in 10 dogs under pentobarbital anaesthesia. Intestinal motility and mesenteric blood flow of the segment were measured with intraluminal pressurized balloon and electromagnetic flowmeter, respectively. The time-course of observations was divided, according to the findings, into three main periods (phases 1 to 3). In the initial phase (1) the bowel exhibited very slight spontaneous motility which was found to increase moderately but significantly after denervation and isolation of the graft still left in situ before transplantation (phase 2). After declamping of anastomoses of the retransplanted graft (which was protected by cooling to 4 degrees C after being removed from the body) a short period (approximately 2 min) of reactive hyperaemic flow increase was observed in association of vigorous bowel movements lasting for a more prolonged (approximately 15 min) period of time (phase 3a and 3b). Reactivity of the retransplanted vasculature as compared to the denervated control revealed a marked relative shift in adrenergic balance, tested by dopamine, to the vasoconstrictor range, but it showed no change in responses to general haemodynamic or haemorheologic interventions, tested by veratrine and pentoxifylline, respectively. However, the basic levels of blood supply (controlled also by thermography) and systemic blood pressure remained unaltered after transplantation. Regarding the critical role of functional changes immediately after transplantation in determining the survival of bowel grafts, these observations may contribute to a more effective monitoring of surgical interventions. PMID:2640394

  10. How the Motility Pattern of Bacteria Affects Their Dispersal and Chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Taktikos, Johannes; Stark, Holger; Zaburdaev, Vasily

    2013-01-01

    Most bacteria at certain stages of their life cycle are able to move actively; they can swim in a liquid or crawl on various surfaces. A typical path of the moving cell often resembles the trajectory of a random walk. However, bacteria are capable of modifying their apparently random motion in response to changing environmental conditions. As a result, bacteria can migrate towards the source of nutrients or away from harmful chemicals. Surprisingly, many bacterial species that were studied have several distinct motility patterns, which can be theoretically modeled by a unifying random walk approach. We use this approach to quantify the process of cell dispersal in a homogeneous environment and show how the bacterial drift velocity towards the source of attracting chemicals is affected by the motility pattern of the bacteria. Our results open up the possibility of accessing additional information about the intrinsic response of the cells using macroscopic observations of bacteria moving in inhomogeneous environments. PMID:24391710

  11. A diterpenoid from Salvia cinnabarina inhibits mouse intestinal motility in vivo.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Raffaele; Izzo, Angelo A; Capasso, Francesco; Romussi, Giovanni; Bisio, Angela; Mascolo, Nicola

    2004-04-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of 3,4 secoisopimara-4(18),7,15-trien-3-oic acid (compound 1) isolated from the aerial parts of Salvia cinnabarina, on upper gastrointestinal transit in mice in vivo. Compound 1 (10 - 100 mg/kg, i. p.) dose-dependently delayed gastrointestinal motility. Pretreatment ( i. p.) of mice with hexamethonium (10 mg/kg), naloxone (2 mg/kg), N(G)-nitro- L-arginine-methyl ester ( L-NAME) (25 mg/kg) or yohimbine (1 mg/kg) did not modify the inhibitory effect of compound 1 (50 mg/kg). However, the L-type Ca (2+) channel verapamil (5 mg/kg, i. p.) significantly reduced the antimotility effect of compound 1 (50 mg/kg). These results suggest that compound 1 inhibits gastrointestinal motility in mice. The effect could involve, at least in part, L-type Ca (2+) channels. PMID:15095158

  12. Mannose-Binding Lectin Inhibits the Motility of Pathogenic Salmonella by Affecting the Driving Forces of Motility and the Chemotactic Response

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shuichi; Islam, Md. Shafiqul; Guo, Yijie; Ihara, Kohei; Tomioka, Rintaro; Masuda, Mizuki; Yoneyama, Hiroshi; Isogai, Emiko

    2016-01-01

    Mannose-binding lectin (MBL) is a key pattern recognition molecule in the lectin pathway of the complement system, an important component of innate immunity. MBL functions as an opsonin which enhances the sequential immune process such as phagocytosis. We here report an inhibitory effect of MBL on the motility of pathogenic bacteria, which occurs by affecting the energy source required for motility and the signaling pathway of chemotaxis. When Salmonella cells were treated with a physiological concentration of MBL, their motile fraction and free-swimming speed decreased. Rotation assays of a single flagellum showed that the flagellar rotation rate was significantly reduced by the addition of MBL. Measurements of the intracellular pH and membrane potential revealed that MBL affected a driving force for the Salmonella flagellum, the electrochemical potential difference of protons. We also found that MBL treatment increased the reversal frequency of Salmonella flagellar rotation, which interfered with the relative positive chemotaxis toward an attractive substrate. We thus propose that the motility inhibition effect of MBL may be secondarily involved in the attack against pathogens, potentially facilitating the primary role of MBL in the complement system. PMID:27104738

  13. Nociceptin effect on intestinal motility depends on opioid-receptor like-1 receptors and nitric oxide synthase co-localization

    PubMed Central

    Sibaev, Andrei; Fichna, Jakub; Saur, Dieter; Yuece, Birol; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Storr, Martin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of the opioid-receptor like-1 (ORL1) agonist nociceptin on gastrointestinal (GI) myenteric neurotransmission and motility. METHODS: Reverse transcriptase - polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry were used to localize nociceptin and ORL1 in mouse tissues. Intracellular electrophysiological recordings of excitatory and inhibitory junction potentials (EJP, IJP) were made in a chambered organ bath. Intestinal motility was measured in vivo. RESULTS: Nociceptin accelerated whole and upper GI transit, but slowed colonic expulsion in vivo in an ORL1-dependent manner, as shown using [Nphe1]NOC and AS ODN pretreatment. ORL1 and nociceptin immunoreactivity were found on enteric neurons. Nociceptin reduced the EJP and the nitric oxide-sensitive slow IJP in an ORL1-dependent manner, whereas the fast IJP was unchanged. Nociceptin further reduced the spatial spreading of the EJP up to 2 cm. CONCLUSION: Compounds acting at ORL1 are good candidates for the future treatment of disorders associated with increased colonic transit, such as diarrhea or diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:26261735

  14. Inhibition of intestinal motility and secretion by extracts of Epilobium spp. in mice.

    PubMed

    Vitali, Federica; Fonte, Giuseppina; Saija, Antonella; Tita, Beatrice

    2006-10-11

    Ethanol extracts of the fresh aerial parts of various Epilobium species were tested to elucidate the mechanism of their gastrointestinal activity in animals. The methods of charcoal meal, castor oil-induced diarrhoea, and enteropooling assay were used to evaluate their effect on mouse gut at various dose levels. The extracts were found to have a significant activity in all models. Moreover, the extracts resulted to possess very little toxicity. Thus, it can be concluded that Epilobium possesses anti-diarrhoeal, anti-motility, and anti-secretory activities and can prove beneficial in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:16713155

  15. Trimebutine-induced phase III-like activity in infants with intestinal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Boige, N; Cargill, G; Mashako, L; Cezard, J P; Navarro, J

    1987-01-01

    Duodenal manometric recordings were performed in five male children (mean age 11.7 +/- 6.8 months) suffering from severe digestive pathology with clinical findings of dysmotility; they required total parenteral nutrition: one case of enteropathy following intestinal resection for congenital small bowel atresia, and four cases of intestinal pseudoobstruction. The basal 3-h fasting recordings showed complete disorganization of interdigestive activity characterized by an absence of migrating motor complexes and a marked basal hypomotility with motor indices lower than in control subjects. Intravenous trimebutine (3 mg/kg) produced a phase III-like activity 88 +/- 121 s after administration in four cases. The activity lasted 236 +/- 105 s and had a mean frequency of 11.75 +/- 0.86 waves/min. It was propagated aborally in the two patients having two duodenal recording sites. Trimebutine-induced phase III activity was followed by signs of peristalsis in two patients. PMID:3430262

  16. An experimental method to identify neurogenic and myogenic active mechanical states of intestinal motility

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Marcello; Wiklendt, Lukasz; Arkwright, John W.; Spencer, Nicholas J.; Omari, Taher; Brookes, Simon J. H.; Dinning, Phil G.

    2013-01-01

    Excitatory and inhibitory enteric neural input to intestinal muscle acting on ongoing myogenic activity determines the rich repertoire of motor patterns involved in digestive function. The enteric neural activity cannot yet be established during movement of intact intestine in vivo or in vitro. We propose the hypothesis that is possible to deduce indirectly, but reliably, the state of activation of the enteric neural input to the muscle from measurements of the mechanical state of the intestinal muscle. The fundamental biomechanical model on which our hypothesis is based is the “three-element model” proposed by Hill. Our strategy is based on simultaneous video recording of changes in diameters and intraluminal pressure with a fiber-optic manometry in isolated segments of rabbit colon. We created a composite spatiotemporal map (DPMap) from diameter (DMap) and pressure changes (PMaps). In this composite map rhythmic myogenic motor patterns can readily be distinguished from the distension induced neural peristaltic contractions. Plotting the diameter changes against corresponding pressure changes at each location of the segment, generates “orbits” that represent the state of the muscle according to its ability to contract or relax actively or undergoing passive changes. With a software developed in MatLab, we identified twelve possible discrete mechanical states and plotted them showing where the intestine actively contracted and relaxed isometrically, auxotonically or isotonically, as well as where passive changes occurred or was quiescent. Clustering all discrete active contractions and relaxations states generated for the first time a spatio-temporal map of where enteric excitatory and inhibitory neural input to the muscle occurs during physiological movements. Recording internal diameter by an impedance probe proved equivalent to measuring external diameter, making possible to further develop similar strategy in vivo and humans. PMID:23596400

  17. Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth in Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Association with Colon Motility, Bowel Symptoms, and Psychological Distress

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Madhusudan; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Palsson, Olafur S.; Chitkara, Denesh K.; Gangarosa, Lisa M.; Drossman, Douglas A.; Whitehead, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), although with significant controversy. Aims To determine the prevalence of SIBO in IBS and its association with colonic motility, bowel symptoms and psychological distress. Methods Sucrose hydrogen and methane breath tests were performed in 158 IBS and 34 healthy controls (HC). Thresholds for pain and urgency were tested by barostat in the descending colon. The motility index (MI) was calculated as the average area under the curve for all phasic contractions. Questionnaires assessed psychological distress, IBS symptom severity (IBSSS), IBS Quality of Life (IBS-QOL) and self reported bowel symptoms. Results 52/158 (32.9%) IBS patients had abnormal breath tests compared with 6/34 (17.9%) HC (χ2=0.079). SIBO (SIBO+) and Non-SIBO (SIBO−) did not differ in the prevalence of IBS-subtypes, IBS-SS, IBS-QOL and psychological distress variables. IBS had a greater post-distension increase in MI than HC, but there was no difference between SIBO+ and SIBO−. Predominant methane producers had higher urge thresholds (28.4 vs. 18.3, p<0.05) and higher baseline MI (461 vs. 301.45, p<0.05) than SIBO− IBS, and they reported more “hard or lumpy stools” when compared to predominant hydrogen producers (p<0.05) and SIBO− IBS (p< 0.05). Conclusions SIBO is unlikely to contribute significantly in the pathogenesis of IBS. Methane production is associated with constipation. PMID:18482250

  18. Effect of antiorthostatic BedRest (BR) on GastroIntestinal Motility (GIM) of normal subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, L.; Hunter, R. P.; Tietze, K. J.; Cintron, N. M.

    1992-01-01

    The combined effects of postural changes, fluid shifts and diuresis associated with the absence of the gravity vector may decrease gastrointestinal motility (GIM) during space flight. GIM can be estimated from the mouth to cecum transit time (MCTT) of orally administered lactulose (LAC); this test is used to assess changes in GIM in normal subjects and in patients with GI pathology and related disease conditions. Since bedrest (BR) mimics some of the physiological changes that occur during space flight, the effect of ten days of BR on GIM was evaluated from the MCTT of LAC. Methods: Subjects were 12 nonsmoking males between the ages of 35 and 50. After an 8-10 hour fast, subjects ingested Cephulac (registered) (20 g solution) with a low-fiber breakfast on four different days (45, 30, 25, and 20) before BR and on three separate days (4, 7, and 10) during BR. Breath-H2 concentrations were measured before and at 10 minute intervals for 4 hours after breakfast using a Quintron breathalyzer and MCTT was determined from these data. Results: MCTT ranged between 10 and 122 minutes during ambulation and 80 to 120 minutes during BR with means of 79 minutes and 122 minutes respectively. Conclusion: Mean MCTT during BR was 54 percent longer than during ambulation, suggesting that absorption and availability of orally administered medications and nutrients may be delayed or impaired as a result of decreased GIM during bedrest.

  19. Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol Affect Rat Intestinal Epithelial Cells: A Concentration Related Study

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Giuseppe; Fontanella, Bianca; Severino, Lorella; Quaroni, Andrea; Autore, Giuseppina; Marzocco, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    The integrity of the gastrointestinal tract represents a crucial first level defence against ingested toxins. Among them, Nivalenol is a trichotecenes mycotoxin frequently found on cereals and processed grains; when it contaminates human food and animal feed it is often associated with another widespread contaminant, Deoxynivalenol. Following their ingestion, intestinal epithelial cells are exposed to concentrations of these trichothecenes high enough to cause mycotoxicosis. In this study we have investigated the effects of Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol on intestinal cells in an in vitro model system utilizing the non-tumorigenic rat intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Both Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol (5–80 µM) significantly affected IEC-6 viability through a pro-apoptotic process which mainly involved the following steps: (i) Bax induction; (ii) Bcl-2 inhibition, and (iii) caspase-3 activation. Moreover, treatment with Nivalenol produced a significant cell cycle arrest of IEC-6 cells, primarily at the G0/G1 interphase and in the S phase, with a concomitant reduction in the fraction of cells in G2. Interestingly, when administered at lower concentrations (0.1–2.5 µM), both Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol affected epithelial cell migration (restitution), representing the initial step in gastrointestinal wound healing in the gut. This reduced motility was associated with significant remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton, and changes in expression of connexin-43 and focal adhesion kinase. The concentration range of Nivalenol or Deoxynivalenol we have tested is comparable with the mean estimated daily intake of consumers eating contaminated food. Thus, our results further highlight the risks associated with intake of even low levels of these toxins. PMID:23251682

  20. Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol affect rat intestinal epithelial cells: a concentration related study.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Giuseppe; Fontanella, Bianca; Severino, Lorella; Quaroni, Andrea; Autore, Giuseppina; Marzocco, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    The integrity of the gastrointestinal tract represents a crucial first level defence against ingested toxins. Among them, Nivalenol is a trichotecenes mycotoxin frequently found on cereals and processed grains; when it contaminates human food and animal feed it is often associated with another widespread contaminant, Deoxynivalenol. Following their ingestion, intestinal epithelial cells are exposed to concentrations of these trichothecenes high enough to cause mycotoxicosis. In this study we have investigated the effects of Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol on intestinal cells in an in vitro model system utilizing the non-tumorigenic rat intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Both Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol (5-80 µM) significantly affected IEC-6 viability through a pro-apoptotic process which mainly involved the following steps: (i) Bax induction; (ii) Bcl-2 inhibition, and (iii) caspase-3 activation. Moreover, treatment with Nivalenol produced a significant cell cycle arrest of IEC-6 cells, primarily at the G(0)/G(1) interphase and in the S phase, with a concomitant reduction in the fraction of cells in G(2). Interestingly, when administered at lower concentrations (0.1-2.5 µM), both Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol affected epithelial cell migration (restitution), representing the initial step in gastrointestinal wound healing in the gut. This reduced motility was associated with significant remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton, and changes in expression of connexin-43 and focal adhesion kinase. The concentration range of Nivalenol or Deoxynivalenol we have tested is comparable with the mean estimated daily intake of consumers eating contaminated food. Thus, our results further highlight the risks associated with intake of even low levels of these toxins. PMID:23251682

  1. Effect of the herbal medicine dai-kenchu-to on gastrointestinal motility in patients with megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) and chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIIP): report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Hitoshi; Ueno, Shigeru; Matuda, Hiromitu; Hinoki, Tomoya; Kato, Yuko

    2009-04-01

    Dai-kenchu-to (DKT), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine (Kampo medicine), composed of zanthoxylum fruit, ginseng root, dried ginger rhizome and malt sugar, is clinically effective for postoperative ileus and chronic constipation. MMIHS and CIIP are severe motility disorder associated with high morbidity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of DKT on functional intestinal obstruction. DKT was clinically effective for gastrointestinal motility in a case with MMIHS, but not effective in one with CIIP. MMIHS and CIIP are speculated to have different pathogenesis regarding gastrointestinal pseudo-obstruction based upon the effect of this drug. PMID:21318994

  2. Prenatal Intestinal Obstruction Affects the Myenteric Plexus and Causes Functional Bowel Impairment in Fetal Rat Experimental Model of Intestinal Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Khen-Dunlop, Naziha; Sarnacki, Sabine; Victor, Anais; Grosos, Celine; Menard, Sandrine; Soret, Rodolphe; Goudin, Nicolas; Pousset, Maud; Sauvat, Frederique; Revillon, Yann; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Neunlist, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Background Intestinal atresia is a rare congenital disorder with an incidence of 3/10 000 birth. About one-third of patients have severe intestinal dysfunction after surgical repair. We examined whether prenatal gastrointestinal obstruction might effect on the myenteric plexus and account for subsequent functional disorders. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied a rat model of surgically induced antenatal atresia, comparing intestinal samples from both sides of the obstruction and with healthy rat pups controls. Whole-mount preparations of the myenteric plexus were stained for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Quantitative reverse transcription PCR was used to analyze mRNAs for inflammatory markers. Functional motility and permeability analyses were performed in vitro. Phenotypic studies were also performed in 8 newborns with intestinal atresia. In the experimental model, the proportion of nNOS-immunoreactive neurons was similar in proximal and distal segments (6.7±4.6% vs 5.6±4.2%, p = 0.25), but proximal segments contained a higher proportion of ChAT-immunoreactive neurons (13.2±6.2% vs 7.5±4.3%, p = 0.005). Phenotypic changes were associated with a 100-fold lower concentration-dependent contractile response to carbachol and a 1.6-fold higher EFS-induced contractile response in proximal compared to distal segments. Transcellular (p = 0.002) but not paracellular permeability was increased. Comparison with controls showed that modifications involved not only proximal but also distal segments. Phenotypic studies in human atresia confirmed the changes in ChAT expression. Conclusion Experimental atresia in fetal rat induces differential myenteric plexus phenotypical as well as functional changes (motility and permeability) between the two sides of the obstruction. Delineating these changes might help to identify markers predictive of motility dysfunction and to define guidelines for post-surgical care. PMID:23667464

  3. Exposure to Environmentally Relevant Concentrations of Genistein during Activation Does Not Affect Sperm Motility in the Fighting Fish Betta splendens

    PubMed Central

    Clotfelter, Ethan D.; Gendelman, Hannah K.

    2014-01-01

    Sperm collected from male fighting fish Betta splendens were activated in control water, water containing the ion-channel blocker gadolinium (a putative positive control), or water containing the isoflavone phytoestrogen genistein to determine the effects of acute genistein exposure on male reproductive function. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to quantify the proportion of sperm that were motile and the swimming velocity of those sperm. The highest concentration of gadolinium (100 μM) tested was effective at reducing sperm motility and velocity, but neither concentration of genistein tested (3.7 nM or 3.7 μM) significantly affected these sperm parameters. Our findings suggest that acute exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens during activation does not reduce the motility of fish sperm. PMID:24516856

  4. Exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of genistein during activation does not affect sperm motility in the fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; Gendelman, Hannah K

    2014-01-01

    Sperm collected from male fighting fish Betta splendens were activated in control water, water containing the ion-channel blocker gadolinium (a putative positive control), or water containing the isoflavone phytoestrogen genistein to determine the effects of acute genistein exposure on male reproductive function. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to quantify the proportion of sperm that were motile and the swimming velocity of those sperm. The highest concentration of gadolinium (100 μ M) tested was effective at reducing sperm motility and velocity, but neither concentration of genistein tested (3.7 nM or 3.7 μ M) significantly affected these sperm parameters. Our findings suggest that acute exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens during activation does not reduce the motility of fish sperm. PMID:24516856

  5. ALDH isozymes downregulation affects cell growth, cell motility and gene expression in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreb, Jan S; Baker, Henry V; Chang, Lung-Ji; Amaya, Maria; Lopez, M Cecilia; Ostmark, Blanca; Chou, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are highly expressed in non small cell lung cancer. Neither the mechanisms nor the biologic significance for such over expression have been studied. Methods We have employed oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze changes in gene profiles in A549 lung cancer cell line in which ALDH activity was reduced by up to 95% using lentiviral mediated expression of siRNA against both isozymes (Lenti 1+3). Stringent analysis methods were used to identify gene expression patterns that are specific to the knock down of ALDH activity and significantly different in comparison to wild type A549 cells (WT) or cells similarly transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP) siRNA. Results We confirmed significant and specific down regulation of ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 in Lenti 1+3 cells and in comparison to 12 other ALDH genes detected. The results of the microarray analysis were validated by real time RT-PCR on RNA obtained from Lenti 1+3 or WT cells treated with ALDH activity inhibitors. Detailed functional analysis was performed on 101 genes that were significantly different (P < 0.001) and their expression changed by ≥ 2 folds in the Lenti 1+3 group versus the control groups. There were 75 down regulated and 26 up regulated genes. Protein binding, organ development, signal transduction, transcription, lipid metabolism, and cell migration and adhesion were among the most affected pathways. Conclusion These molecular effects of the ALDH knock-down are associated with in vitro functional changes in the proliferation and motility of these cells and demonstrate the significance of ALDH enzymes in cell homeostasis with a potentially significant impact on the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:19025616

  6. Listeria monocytogenes DNA glycosylase AdiP affects flagellar motility, biofilm formation, virulence, and stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is struct...

  7. Intestinal absorption of chromium as affected by wheat bran

    SciTech Connect

    Keim, K.S.; Holloway, C.L.; Hegsted, M.

    1986-03-01

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of dietary fiber, as found in wheat bran, on the absorption of chromium. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into two groups of 10. The control was fed a semi-purified diet containing casein, methionine, cornstarch, sucrose, corn oil, mineral and vitamin mix, and choline bitartrate. The experimental group was fed the same diet but with soft red winter wheat bran added to a level of 35% of the diet at the expense of sucrose. To determine chromium absorption and uptake by selected tissues, rats were fasted for 24 hr, fed 5 g of the respective diet, 2 hr later intubated with 100..mu..Ci of Cr-51of sacrificed 24 hr later. The rats wee housed in metabolic cages after the Cr-51 intubation. The addition of wheat brand to the diet did not significantly affect chromium absorption as measured by percent dose of Cr-51 in the 24 hr urine. The percent dose in the control group was 0.68 +/- 0.20% (mean +/- SEM) and in the experimental group 0.63 +/- 0.24% (mean +/-SEM) (N.S.). The cr-51 uptake of liver, spleen, jejunum, and blood was not statistically different between groups. These results indicate that dietary fiber as found in wheat bran does not impair intestinal absorption of chromium.

  8. Palmitoylethanolamide normalizes intestinal motility in a model of post-inflammatory accelerated transit: involvement of CB1 receptors and TRPV1 channels

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, Raffaele; Orlando, Pierangelo; Pagano, Ester; Aveta, Teresa; Buono, Lorena; Borrelli, Francesca; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Izzo, Angelo A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), a naturally occurring acylethanolamide chemically related to the endocannabinoid anandamide, interacts with targets that have been identified in peripheral nerves controlling gastrointestinal motility, such as cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, TRPV1 channels and PPARα. Here, we investigated the effect of PEA in a mouse model of functional accelerated transit which persists after the resolution of colonic inflammation (post-inflammatory irritable bowel syndrome). Experimental Approach Intestinal inflammation was induced by intracolonic administration of oil of mustard (OM). Mice were tested for motility and biochemical and molecular biology changes 4 weeks later. PEA, oleoylethanolamide and endocannabinoid levels were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and receptor and enzyme mRNA expression by qRT-PCR. Key Results OM induced transient colitis and a functional post-inflammatory increase in upper gastrointestinal transit, associated with increased intestinal anandamide (but not 2-arachidonoylglycerol, PEA or oleoylethanolamide) levels and down-regulation of mRNA for TRPV1 channels. Exogenous PEA inhibited the OM-induced increase in transit and tended to increase anandamide levels. Palmitic acid had a weaker effect on transit. Inhibition of transit by PEA was blocked by rimonabant (CB1 receptor antagonist), further increased by 5′-iodoresiniferatoxin (TRPV1 antagonist) and not significantly modified by the PPARα antagonist GW6471. Conclusions and Implications Intestinal endocannabinoids and TRPV1 channel were dysregulated in a functional model of accelerated transit exhibiting aspects of post-inflammatory irritable bowel syndrome. PEA counteracted the accelerated transit, the effect being mediated by CB1 receptors (possibly via increased anandamide levels) and modulated by TRPV1 channels. PMID:24818658

  9. Sperm forward motility is negatively affected by short-term exposure to altitude hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Verratti, V; Di Giulio, C; D'Angeli, A; Tafuri, A; Francavilla, S; Pelliccione, F

    2016-09-01

    Human exposure to altitude is a model to study the role of oxygen in different areas of physiology and pathophysiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a short exposure to hypoxia (5 days) combined with exercise, at altitude ranging from 900 m above sea level to 5895 m above sea level (Kilimanjaro Expedition) can modify seminal and reproductive hormonal parameter levels in human beings. During the ascent, blood oxygen saturation at 3.848 m above sea level was found to be decreased when compared to sea level (P < 0.02). The sperm forward motility at sea level after the expedition showed a significant reduction ​​(P < 0.02). There were no changes in other seminal parameters among those compared. Determination of the hormonal plasma concentrations showed that baseline values of follicle-stimulating hormone, total testosterone, prolactin and oestradiol were unchanged at sea level after the hypoxic experience, with respect to baseline values at sea level. On the other hand, luteinising hormone levels after altitudes trekking significantly increased compared to levels before the expedition (P < 0.05). Because of the short-term exposure, we can assume that the reduced forward motility described here may result from the effects of the acute altitude hypoxia on spermatozoa during the epididymal transit where they mature acquiring their motility. PMID:26762696

  10. Race Affects Outcome among Infants with Intestinal Failure

    PubMed Central

    Squires, Robert H; Balint, Jane; Horslen, Simon; Wales, Paul W.; Soden, Jason; Duggan, Christopher; Li, Ruosha; Belle, Steven H

    2014-01-01

    Objective Intestinal failure is a rare, devastating condition associated with significant morbidity and mortality. We sought to determine if ethnic and racial differences were associated with patient survival and likelihood of receiving an intestinal transplant in a contemporary cohort of children with intestinal failure. Methods This was an analysis of a multicenter cohort study with data collected from chart review conducted by the Pediatric Intestinal Consortium (PIFCon). Entry criteria included infants < 12 mo receiving parenteral nutrition (PN) for > 60 continuous days and followed for at least 2 years. Outcomes included death and intestinal transplant (ITx). Race and ethnicity were recorded as they were in the medical record. For purposes of statistical comparisons and regression modeling, categories of race were consolidated into “white” and “non-white” children. Results Of 272 subjects enrolled, 204 white and 46 non-white children were available for analysis. The 48 month cumulative incidence probability (CIP) of death without ITx was 0.40 for non-white and 0.16 for white children (p<0.001); the CIP of ITx was 0.07 for non-white vs 0.31 for white children (p=0.003). The associations between race and outcomes remained after accounting for low-birth weight, diagnosis, and being seen at a transplant center. Conclusion Race is associated with death and receiving an ITx in a large cohort of children with intestinal failure. This study highlights the need to investigate reasons for this apparent racial disparity in outcome among children with intestinal failure. PMID:24918984

  11. Polyphenols from olive mill waste affect biofilm formation and motility in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Carraro, Lisa; Fasolato, Luca; Montemurro, Filomena; Martino, Maria Elena; Balzan, Stefania; Servili, Maurizio; Novelli, Enrico; Cardazzo, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Olive mill wastes are sources of phenolic compounds with a wide array of biological activities, including antimicrobial effects. A potential option for bioremediation to overcome ecological problems is the reutilization of these natural compounds in food production. The aim of this work was to gain a better understanding of the antimicrobial mode of action of a phenols extract from olive vegetation water (PEOVW) at molecular level by studying Escherichia coli as a model microorganism. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed on E. coli K-12 exposed to PEOVW. The repression of genes for flagellar synthesis and the involvement of genes linked to biofilm formation and stress response were observed. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of PEOVW significantly decreased biofilm formation, swarming and swimming motility, thus confirming the gene expression data. This study provides interesting insights on the molecular action of PEOVW on E. coli K-12. Given these anti-biofilm properties and considering that biofilm formation is a serious problem for the food industry and human health, PEOVW has proved to be a high-value natural product. Olive mill wastes are sources of phenolic compounds with a wide array of biological activities, including antimicrobial effects. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed on E. coli K-12 exposed to phenols extract from olive vegetation water (PEOVW). Sub-inhibitory concentrations of PEOVW significantly decreased biofilm formation, swarming and swimming motility. Given these anti-biofilm properties PEOVW has proved to be a high-value natural product. PMID:24628798

  12. Effects of early enteral nutrition on the gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal barrier of patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Gu, Fang; Wang, Fengxian; Zhang, Yuanda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of early enteral nutrition on the gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal barrier of patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection. Methods: A total of 120 patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection were randomly divided into an early enteral nutrition (EN) group and a parenteral nutrition (PN) group (n=60). The patients were given nutritional support intervention for 14 days, and the expression levels of serum transferrin, albumin, total protein, endotoxin, D-lactic acid and inflammatory cytokines were detected on the 1st, 7th and 14th days respectively. Results: As the treatment progressed, the levels of serum transferrin, albumin and total protein of the EN group were significantly higher than those of the PN group (P<0.05), while the levels of serum endotoxin and D-lactic acid of the form group were significantly lower (P<0.05). After treatment, the expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were decreased in the EN group, which were significantly different from those of the PN group (P<0.05). During treatment, the incidence rates of complications such as abdominal distension, diarrhea, sepsis, nausea, vomiting and gastric retention were similar. The mean healing time of wound surface was 9.34±0.78 days in the EN group and 12.46±2.19 days in the PN group, i.e. such time of the former was significantly shorter than that of the latter (P<0.05). Conclusion: Treating patients having burn-induced invasive fungal infection by early enteral nutrition support with arginine can safely alleviate malnutrition and stress reaction, strengthen cellular immune function and promote wound healing, thereby facilitating the recovery of gastrointestinal motility and the function of intestinal mucosal barrier. PMID:27375697

  13. Colonic motility in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Elisabetta; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Baldoni, Monia; Dore, Maria Pina

    2014-01-01

    Background Inflammatory conditions affecting the gut may cause motility disturbances, and ulcerative colitis – one of the main disorders among the inflammatory bowel diseases – may display abnormal colonic motility. Aim To review the abnormalities of the large bowel in ulcerative colitis, by considering the motility, laboratory (in vitro) and pathological studies dealing with this topic. Methods A comprehensive online search of Medline and the Science Citation Index was carried out. Results Patients with ulcerative colitis frequently display colonic motor abnormalities, including lack of contractility, an increase of propulsive contractile waves, an excessive production of nitric oxide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide nerves, interleukin 1 beta, neurotensin, tachykinins levels and the weaker action of substance P, likely related to a neuromuscular dysfunction due to the inflammatory process. Conclusions A better understanding of the pathophysiological grounds of altered colonic motility in ulcerative colitis may lead to a more in-depth knowledge of the accompanying symptoms and to better and more targeted therapeutic approaches. PMID:25452840

  14. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients. PMID:26755265

  15. Deiodinase Knockdown during Early Zebrafish Development Affects Growth, Development, Energy Metabolism, Motility and Phototransduction

    PubMed Central

    Bagci, Enise; Heijlen, Marjolein; Vergauwen, Lucia; Hagenaars, An; Houbrechts, Anne M.; Esguerra, Camila V.; Blust, Ronny; Darras, Veerle M.; Knapen, Dries

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) balance is essential for vertebrate development. Deiodinase type 1 (D1) and type 2 (D2) increase and deiodinase type 3 (D3) decreases local intracellular levels of T3, the most important active TH. The role of deiodinase-mediated TH effects in early vertebrate development is only partially understood. Therefore, we investigated the role of deiodinases during early development of zebrafish until 96 hours post fertilization at the level of the transcriptome (microarray), biochemistry, morphology and physiology using morpholino (MO) knockdown. Knockdown of D1+D2 (D1D2MO) and knockdown of D3 (D3MO) both resulted in transcriptional regulation of energy metabolism and (muscle) development in abdomen and tail, together with reduced growth, impaired swim bladder inflation, reduced protein content and reduced motility. The reduced growth and impaired swim bladder inflation in D1D2MO could be due to lower levels of T3 which is known to drive growth and development. The pronounced upregulation of a large number of transcripts coding for key proteins in ATP-producing pathways in D1D2MO could reflect a compensatory response to a decreased metabolic rate, also typically linked to hypothyroidism. Compared to D1D2MO, the effects were more pronounced or more frequent in D3MO, in which hyperthyroidism is expected. More specifically, increased heart rate, delayed hatching and increased carbohydrate content were observed only in D3MO. An increase of the metabolic rate, a decrease of the metabolic efficiency and a stimulation of gluconeogenesis using amino acids as substrates may have been involved in the observed reduced protein content, growth and motility in D3MO larvae. Furthermore, expression of transcripts involved in purine metabolism coupled to vision was decreased in both knockdown conditions, suggesting that both may impair vision. This study provides new insights, not only into the role of deiodinases, but also into the importance of a correct TH balance

  16. The post-translational modification of the Clostridium difficile flagellin affects motility, cell surface properties and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Faulds-Pain, Alexandra; Twine, Susan M; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Strong, Philippa C R; Dell, Anne; Buckley, Anthony M; Douce, Gillian R; Valiente, Esmeralda; Logan, Susan M; Wren, Brendan W

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a prominent nosocomial pathogen, proliferating and causing enteric disease in individuals with a compromised gut microflora. We characterized the post-translational modification of flagellin in C. difficile 630. The structure of the modification was solved by nuclear magnetic resonance and shown to contain an N-acetylglucosamine substituted with a phosphorylated N-methyl-l-threonine. A reverse genetics approach investigated the function of the putative four-gene modification locus. All mutants were found to have truncated glycan structures by LC-MS/MS, taking into account bioinformatic analysis, we propose that the open reading frame CD0241 encodes a kinase involved in the transfer of the phosphate to the threonine, the CD0242 protein catalyses the addition of the phosphothreonine to the N-acetylglucosamine moiety and CD0243 transfers the methyl group to the threonine. Some mutations affected motility and caused cells to aggregate to each other and abiotic surfaces. Altering the structure of the flagellin modification impacted on colonization and disease recurrence in a murine model of infection, showing that alterations in the surface architecture of C. difficile vegetative cells can play a significant role in disease. We show that motility is not a requirement for colonization, but that colonization was compromised when the glycan structure was incomplete. PMID:25135277

  17. Polyphenols from olive mill waste affect biofilm formation and motility in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Lisa; Fasolato, Luca; Montemurro, Filomena; Martino, Maria Elena; Balzan, Stefania; Servili, Maurizio; Novelli, Enrico; Cardazzo, Barbara

    2014-05-01

    Olive mill wastes are sources of phenolic compounds with a wide array of biological activities, including antimicrobial effects. A potential option for bioremediation to overcome ecological problems is the reutilization of these natural compounds in food production. The aim of this work was to gain a better understanding of the antimicrobial mode of action of a phenols extract from olive vegetation water (PEOVW) at molecular level by studying Escherichia coli as a model microorganism. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis was performed on E. coli K-12 exposed to PEOVW. The repression of genes for flagellar synthesis and the involvement of genes linked to biofilm formation and stress response were observed. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of PEOVW significantly decreased biofilm formation, swarming and swimming motility, thus confirming the gene expression data. This study provides interesting insights on the molecular action of PEOVW on E. coli K-12. Given these anti-biofilm properties and considering that biofilm formation is a serious problem for the food industry and human health, PEOVW has proved to be a high-value natural product. PMID:24628798

  18. Enteral leptin administration affects intestinal autophagy in suckling piglets.

    PubMed

    Słupecka, M; Woliński, J; Gajewska, M; Pierzynowski, S G

    2014-01-01

    Leptin has been shown to play an integral role in the endocrine regulation of metabolism. Moreover, a substantial amount of this peptide has been found in colostrum and milk. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of exogenous leptin, administered intragastrically, on the process of autophagy and the changes in cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy in the small intestine mucosa. Three groups (n = 6) of neonatal piglets were used in the study. The pigs were fed either by their sows (sow-reared piglets) or with only milk formula, or with milk formula together with leptin administered via a stomach tube (10 μg/kg BW) every 8 h for 6 d. We have shown that pure milk formula feeding significantly elevates (P < 0.05) autophagy compared with that observed in sow-reared piglets. Compared with the control group, feeding milk formula supplemented with leptin resulted in a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in immunodetection of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3, as well as significantly accelerated epithelial cell renewal (P < 0.05). We demonstrated that autophagy is involved in the remodeling of the small intestine mucosa and that leptin, when administered enterally, may be an important factor for its regulation. PMID:24135555

  19. Total Glucosides of Paeony Promote Intestinal Motility in Slow Transit Constipation Rats through Amelioration of Interstitial Cells of Cajal

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Feiye; Xu, Shan; Zhang, Yongsheng; Chen, Fangming; Ji, Jinjun; Xie, Guanqun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Using an atropine-diphenoxylate-induced slow transit constipation (STC) model, this study explored the effects of the total glucosides of paeony (TGP) in the treatment of STC and the possible mechanisms. Study Design A prospective experimental animal study. Methods The constipation model was set up in rats with an oral gavage of atropine-diphenoxylate and then treated with the TGP. The volume and moisture content of the faeces were observed and the intestinal kinetic power was evaluated. Meanwhile, the colorimetric method and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were employed to determine the changes of nitric oxide (NO), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), vasoative intestinal peptide (VIP) and the P substance (SP) in the serum, respectively. The protein expressions of c-kit and stem cell factor (SCF) were assessed by immunohistochemical analysis and western blot, respectively, and the mRNA level of c-kit was measured by a reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results The TGP attenuated STC responses in terms of an increase in the fecal volume and moisture content, an enhancement of intestinal transit rate and the reduction of NO, NOS and VIP in the serum. In addition, the c-kit, a labeling of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) increased at both protein and mRNA levels. SCF, which serves as a ligand of c-kit also increased at protein level. Conclusion The analysis of our data indicated that the TGP could obviously attenuate STC through improving the function of ICC and blocking the inhibitory neurotransmitters such as NO, NOS and VIP. PMID:27478893

  20. METHOD OF EUTHANASIA DOES NOT AFFECT SPERM MOTILITY IN THE LABORATORY RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine if anesthetic agents used in laboratory animal euthanasia affected sperm motion parameters, rats (n=10) were euthanized by one of 5 different methods: ecapitation alone, or decapitation following either ether, halothane, or nembutal anesthesia, or C02 asphyxiation. p...

  1. The Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor Agonist Exenatide Inhibits Small Intestinal Motility, Flow, Transit, and Absorption of Glucose in Healthy Subjects and Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Thazhath, Sony S; Marathe, Chinmay S; Wu, Tongzhi; Chang, Jessica; Khoo, Joan; Kuo, Paul; Checklin, Helen L; Bound, Michelle J; Rigda, Rachael S; Crouch, Benjamin; Jones, Karen L; Horowitz, Michael; Rayner, Christopher K

    2016-01-01

    The short-acting glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist exenatide reduces postprandial glycemia, partly by slowing gastric emptying, although its impact on small intestinal function is unknown. In this study, 10 healthy subjects and 10 patients with type 2 diabetes received intravenous exenatide (7.5 μg) or saline (-30 to 240 min) in a double-blind randomized crossover design. Glucose (45 g), together with 5 g 3-O-methylglucose (3-OMG) and 20 MBq (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid (total volume 200 mL), was given intraduodenally (t = 0-60 min; 3 kcal/min). Duodenal motility and flow were measured using a combined manometry-impedance catheter and small intestinal transit using scintigraphy. In both groups, duodenal pressure waves and antegrade flow events were fewer, and transit was slower with exenatide, as were the areas under the curves for serum 3-OMG and blood glucose concentrations. Insulin concentrations were initially lower with exenatide than with saline and subsequently higher. Nausea was greater in both groups with exenatide, but suppression of small intestinal motility and flow was observed even in subjects with little or no nausea. The inhibition of small intestinal motor function represents a novel mechanism by which exenatide can attenuate postprandial glycemia. PMID:26470783

  2. Suppression of contractile activity in the small intestine by indomethacin and omeprazole.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberger, Lenard M; Bhattarai, Deepa; Phan, Tri M; Dial, Elizabeth J; Uray, Karen

    2015-05-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used to treat a number of conditions, and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are often used to prevent NSAID-induced gastric mucosal damage; however, the effects of NSAIDs on intestinal motility are poorly understood. The purpose of the present study is to determine the effects of a prototypical NSAID, indomethacin, either alone or in conjunction with the PPI omeprazole, on intestinal motility. Rats were randomly divided into four groups treated with vehicle, omeprazole, indomethacin, or a combination of indomethacin and omeprazole. Intestinal motility and transit were measured along with inflammatory mediators in the intestinal smooth muscle, markers of mucosal damage, and bacterial counts in the intestinal wall. Indomethacin, but not omeprazole, caused mucosal injury indicated by lower gut bleeding; however, both omeprazole and indomethacin suppressed contractile activity and frequency in the distal part of the small intestine. Cotreatment with omeprazole did not reduce indomethacin-induced intestinal bleeding. Furthermore, although indomethacin caused increased inflammation as indicated by increased edema development and inflammatory mediators, cotreatment with omeprazole did not reduce inflammation in the intestinal smooth muscle or prevent the increased bacterial count in the intestinal wall induced by indomethacin. We conclude that both NSAID and PPI treatment suppressed contractile activity in the distal regions of the small intestine. The suppression of intestinal contractility was associated with increased inflammation in both cases; however, indomethacin and omeprazole appear to affect intestinal motility by different mechanisms. PMID:25721304

  3. Consumption of Oxidized Soybean Oil Increased Intestinal Oxidative Stress and Affected Intestinal Immune Variables in Yellow-feathered Broilers.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fangfang; Jiang, Shouqun; Mo, Yi; Zhou, Guilian; Yang, Lin

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of oxidized soybean oil in the diet of young chickens on growth performance and intestinal oxidative stress, and indices of intestinal immune function. Corn-soybean-based diets containing 2% mixtures of fresh and oxidized soybean oil provided 6 levels (0.15, 1.01, 3.14, 4.95, 7.05, and 8.97 meqO2/kg) of peroxide value (POV) in the diets. Each dietary treatment, fed for 22 d, had 6 replicates, each containing 30 birds (n = 1,080). Increasing POV levels reduced average daily feed intake (ADFI) of the broilers during d 1 to 10, body weight and average daily gain at d 22 but did not affect overall ADFI. Concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) increased in plasma and jejunum as POV increased but total antioxidative capacity (T-AOC) declined in plasma and jejunum. Catalase (CAT) activity declined in plasma and jejunum as did plasma glutathione S-transferase (GST). Effects were apparent at POV exceeding 3.14 meqO2/kg for early ADFI and MDA in jejunum, and POV exceeding 1.01 meqO2/kg for CAT in plasma and jejunum, GST in plasma and T-AOC in jejunum. Relative jejunal abundance of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) P50 and NF-κB P65 increased as dietary POV increased. Increasing POV levels reduced the jejunal concentrations of secretory immunoglobulin A and cluster of differentiation (CD) 4 and CD8 molecules with differences from controls apparent at dietary POV of 3.14 to 4.95 meqO2/kg. These findings indicated that growth performance, feed intake, and the local immune system of the small intestine were compromised by oxidative stress when young broilers were fed moderately oxidized soybean oil. PMID:26104529

  4. Xylitol affects the intestinal microbiota and metabolism of daidzein in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Motoi; Hoshi, Chigusa; Hori, Sachiko

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of xylitol on mouse intestinal microbiota and urinary isoflavonoids. Xylitol is classified as a sugar alcohol and used as a food additive. The intestinal microbiota seems to play an important role in isoflavone metabolism. Xylitol feeding appears to affect the gut microbiota. We hypothesized that dietary xylitol changes intestinal microbiota and, therefore, the metabolism of isoflavonoids in mice. Male mice were randomly divided into two groups: those fed a 0.05% daidzein with 5% xylitol diet (XD group) and those fed a 0.05% daidzein-containing control diet (CD group) for 28 days. Plasma total cholesterol concentrations were significantly lower in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.05). Urinary amounts of equol were significantly higher in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.05). The fecal lipid contents (% dry weight) were significantly greater in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.01). The cecal microbiota differed between the two dietary groups. The occupation ratios of Bacteroides were significantly greater in the CD than in the XD group (p < 0.05). This study suggests that xylitol has the potential to affect the metabolism of daidzein by altering the metabolic activity of the intestinal microbiota and/or gut environment. Given that equol affects bone health, dietary xylitol plus isoflavonoids may exert a favorable effect on bone health. PMID:24336061

  5. Xylitol Affects the Intestinal Microbiota and Metabolism of Daidzein in Adult Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Motoi; Hoshi, Chigusa; Hori, Sachiko

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of xylitol on mouse intestinal microbiota and urinary isoflavonoids. Xylitol is classified as a sugar alcohol and used as a food additive. The intestinal microbiota seems to play an important role in isoflavone metabolism. Xylitol feeding appears to affect the gut microbiota. We hypothesized that dietary xylitol changes intestinal microbiota and, therefore, the metabolism of isoflavonoids in mice. Male mice were randomly divided into two groups: those fed a 0.05% daidzein with 5% xylitol diet (XD group) and those fed a 0.05% daidzein-containing control diet (CD group) for 28 days. Plasma total cholesterol concentrations were significantly lower in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.05). Urinary amounts of equol were significantly higher in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.05). The fecal lipid contents (% dry weight) were significantly greater in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.01). The cecal microbiota differed between the two dietary groups. The occupation ratios of Bacteroides were significantly greater in the CD than in the XD group (p < 0.05). This study suggests that xylitol has the potential to affect the metabolism of daidzein by altering the metabolic activity of the intestinal microbiota and/or gut environment. Given that equol affects bone health, dietary xylitol plus isoflavonoids may exert a favorable effect on bone health. PMID:24336061

  6. Deoxynivalenol affects in vitro intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity through inhibition of protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Van De Walle, Jacqueline; Sergent, Therese; Piront, Neil; Toussaint, Olivier; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Larondelle, Yvan

    2010-06-15

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common mycotoxin contaminants of raw and processed cereal food, adversely affects the gastrointestinal tract. Since DON acts as a protein synthesis inhibitor, the constantly renewing intestinal epithelium could be particularly sensitive to DON. We analyzed the toxicological effects of DON on intestinal epithelial protein synthesis and barrier integrity. Differentiated Caco-2 cells, as a widely used model of the human intestinal barrier, were exposed to realistic intestinal concentrations of DON (50, 500 and 5000 ng/ml) during 24 h. DON caused a concentration-dependent decrease in total protein content associated with a reduction in the incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-leucine, demonstrating its inhibitory effect on protein synthesis. DON simultaneously increased the paracellular permeability of the monolayer as reflected through a decreased transepithelial electrical resistance associated with an increased paracellular flux of the tracer [{sup 3}H]-mannitol. A concentration-dependent reduction in the expression level of the tight junction constituent claudin-4 was demonstrated by Western blot, which was not due to diminished transcription, increased degradation, or NF-{kappa}B, ERK or JNK activation, and was also observed for a tight junction independent protein, i.e. intestinal alkaline phosphatase. These results demonstrate a dual toxicological effect of DON on differentiated Caco-2 cells consisting in an inhibition of protein synthesis as well as an increase in monolayer permeability, and moreover suggest a possible link between them through diminished synthesis of the tight junction constituent claudin-4.

  7. Serotonin and colonic motility.

    PubMed

    Kendig, D M; Grider, J R

    2015-07-01

    The role of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT]) in gastrointestinal motility has been studied for over 50 years. Most of the 5-HT in the body resides in the gut wall, where it is located in subsets of mucosal cells (enterochromaffin cells) and neurons (descending interneurons). Many studies suggest that 5-HT is important to normal and dysfunctional gut motility and drugs affecting 5-HT receptors, especially 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors, have been used clinically to treat motility disorders; however, cardiovascular side effects have limited the use of these drugs. Recently studies have questioned the importance and necessity of 5-HT in general and mucosal 5-HT in particular for colonic motility. Recent evidence suggests the importance of 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors for initiation and generation of one of the key colonic motility patterns, the colonic migrating motor complex (CMMC), in rat. The findings suggest that 5-HT3 and 5-HT4 receptors are differentially involved in two different types of rat CMMCs: the long distance contraction (LDC) and the rhythmic propulsive motor complex (RPMC). The understanding of the role of serotonin in colonic motility has been influenced by the specific motility pattern(s) studied, the stimulus used to initiate the motility (spontaneous vs induced), and the route of administration of drugs. All of these considerations contribute to the understanding and the controversy that continues to surround the role of serotonin in the gut. PMID:26095115

  8. Fenugreek seed affects intestinal microbiota and immunological variables in piglets after weaning.

    PubMed

    Zentek, Jürgen; Gärtner, Stefanie; Tedin, Lydia; Männer, Klaus; Mader, Anneluise; Vahjen, Wilfried

    2013-03-14

    Fenugreek seed has been shown to affect the intestinal microbiota and immunological responses in animals. A feeding trial with male castrated piglets was performed over 28 d without or with the addition of 1·5 g fenugreek seeds/kg complete diet in ten and eleven piglets, weaned at 21 d. In the intestinal tract, pH, lactate and SCFA were measured as major bacterial metabolites. Immune cell phenotypes, phagocytic activity and lymphocyte proliferation after stimulation with pokeweed mitogen, concanavalin A and phytohaemagglutinin M were measured by flow cytometry. Health status and performance of the piglets were not affected by fenugreek. The pH in the caecum and colon were reduced compared with the control (P< 0·05). Higher concentrations of l-lactic acid were recorded in the small-intestinal digesta (average concentrations from the duodenum, jejunum and ileum; P< 0·05), while the concentrations of SCFA remained unchanged except an increase in n-butyric acid in colon contents (P< 0·05). The piglets fed the fenugreek diet had higher Lactobacillus and clostridium cluster I concentrations and lower Escherichia, Hafnia and Shigella concentrations in the small intestine. The addition of fenugreek increased the relative concentration of the γδ T-cell population (TCR1+CD8α-) in the blood with a simultaneous reduction of antigen-presenting cells (MHCII+CD5-) (P< 0·05). Proliferation rate and phagocytosis activity of monocytes were not affected by the additive. In conclusion, fenugreek seeds might be interesting as a feed ingredient for young piglets due to their effects on the intestinal microbiota and immunological variables. The impact on performance and animal health has to be further evaluated. PMID:22874597

  9. [Obesity and gastrointestinal motility].

    PubMed

    Lee, Joon Seong

    2006-08-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility has a crucial role in the food consumption, digestion and absorption, and also controls the appetite and satiety. In obese patients, various alterations of GI motility have been investigated. The prevalence of GERD and esophageal motor disorders in obese patients are higher than those of general population. Gastric emptying of solid food is generally accelerated and fasting gastric volume especially in distal stomach is larger in obese patients without change in accommodation. Contractile activity of small intestine in fasting period is more prominent, but orocecal transit is delayed. Autonomic dysfunction is frequently demonstrated in obese patients. These findings correspond with increased appetite and delayed satiety in obese patients, but causes or results have not been confirmed. Therapeutic interventions of these altered GI motility have been developed using botulinum toxin, gastric electrical stimulation in obese patients. Novel agents targeted for GI hormone modulation (such as ghrelin and leptin) need to be developed in the near future. PMID:16929152

  10. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM affects vitamin E acetate metabolism and intestinal bile acid signature in monocolonized mice

    PubMed Central

    Roager, Henrik M; Sulek, Karolina; Skov, Kasper; Frandsen, Henrik L; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Wilcks, Andrea; Skov, Thomas H; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Licht, Tine R

    2014-01-01

    Monocolonization of germ-free (GF) mice enables the study of specific bacterial species in vivo. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFMTM (NCFM) is a probiotic strain; however, many of the mechanisms behind its health-promoting effect remain unknown. Here, we studied the effects of NCFM on the metabolome of jejunum, cecum, and colon of NCFM monocolonized (MC) and GF mice using liquid chromatography coupled to mass-spectrometry (LC-MS). The study adds to existing evidence that NCFM in vivo affects the bile acid signature of mice, in particular by deconjugation. Furthermore, we confirmed that carbohydrate metabolism is affected by NCFM in the mouse intestine as especially the digestion of oligosaccharides (penta- and tetrasaccharides) was increased in MC mice. Additionally, levels of α-tocopherol acetate (vitamin E acetate) were higher in the intestine of GF mice than in MC mice, suggesting that NCFM affects the vitamin E acetate metabolism. NCFM did not digest vitamin E acetate in vitro, suggesting that direct bacterial metabolism was not the cause of the altered metabolome in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that NCFM affects intestinal carbohydrate metabolism, bile acid metabolism and vitamin E metabolism, although it remains to be investigated whether this effect is unique to NCFM. PMID:24717228

  11. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM affects vitamin E acetate metabolism and intestinal bile acid signature in monocolonized mice.

    PubMed

    Roager, Henrik M; Sulek, Karolina; Skov, Kasper; Frandsen, Henrik L; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Wilcks, Andrea; Skov, Thomas H; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Licht, Tine R

    2014-01-01

    Monocolonization of germ-free (GF) mice enables the study of specific bacterial species in vivo. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM(TM) (NCFM) is a probiotic strain; however, many of the mechanisms behind its health-promoting effect remain unknown. Here, we studied the effects of NCFM on the metabolome of jejunum, cecum, and colon of NCFM monocolonized (MC) and GF mice using liquid chromatography coupled to mass-spectrometry (LC-MS). The study adds to existing evidence that NCFM in vivo affects the bile acid signature of mice, in particular by deconjugation. Furthermore, we confirmed that carbohydrate metabolism is affected by NCFM in the mouse intestine as especially the digestion of oligosaccharides (penta- and tetrasaccharides) was increased in MC mice. Additionally, levels of α-tocopherol acetate (vitamin E acetate) were higher in the intestine of GF mice than in MC mice, suggesting that NCFM affects the vitamin E acetate metabolism. NCFM did not digest vitamin E acetate in vitro, suggesting that direct bacterial metabolism was not the cause of the altered metabolome in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that NCFM affects intestinal carbohydrate metabolism, bile acid metabolism and vitamin E metabolism, although it remains to be investigated whether this effect is unique to NCFM. PMID:24717228

  12. Cell motility and biofilm formation in Bacillus subtilis are affected by the ribosomal proteins, S11 and S21.

    PubMed

    Takada, Hiraku; Morita, Masato; Shiwa, Yuh; Sugimoto, Ryoma; Suzuki, Shota; Kawamura, Fujio; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis differentiates into various cellular states in response to environmental changes. It exists in two states during the exponential growth phase: motile cells and connected chains of sessile cells. Here, we identified new regulators of cell motility and chaining, the ribosomal proteins S21 (rpsU) and S11 (rpsK). Their mutants showed impaired cell motility (observed in a laboratory strain) and robust biofilm formation (observed in an undomesticated strain). The two major operons for biofilm formation, tapA-sipW-tasA and epsA-O, were strongly expressed in the rpsU mutant, whereas the flagellin-encoding hag gene and other SigD-dependent motility regulons were not. Genetic analysis revealed that the mutation of remA, the transcriptional activator of the eps operon, is epistatic to that of rpsU, whereas the mutation of antagonistic regulators of SinR is not. Our studies demonstrate that S11 and S21 participate in the regulation of bistability via the RemA/RemB pathway. PMID:25035996

  13. Modulation of Intracellular Calcium Levels by Calcium Lactate Affects Colon Cancer Cell Motility through Calcium-Dependent Calpain

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramoorthy, Pasupathi; Sim, Jae Jun; Jang, Yeong-Su; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Mander, Poonam; Chul, Oh Byung; Shim, Won-Sik; Oh, Seung Hyun; Nam, Ky-Youb; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+) supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa), its downstream signaling and role in the motility of human colon cancer cells. We found that treating HCT116 and HT-29 cells with CaLa immediately increased the intracellular Ca2+ (iCa2+) levels for a prolonged period of time. Ca2+ influx induced cleavage of FAK into an N-terminal FAK (FERM domain) in a dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK) was also cleaved in to its p-N-terminal FAK. CaLa increased colon cancer cells motility. Calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, reversed the effects of CaLa on FAK and pFAK cleavage in both cancer cell lines. The cleaved FAK translocates into the nucleus and modulates p53 stability through MDM2-associated ubiquitination. CaLa-induced Ca2+ influx increased the motility of colon cancer cells was mediated by calpain activity through FAK and pFAK protein destabilization. In conclusion, these results suggest that careful consideration may be given in deciding dietary Ca2+ supplementation to patient undergoing treatment for metastatic cancer. PMID:25629974

  14. Early-Life Environmental Variation Affects Intestinal Microbiota and Immune Development in New-Born Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling-li; Vastenhouw, Stéphanie A.; Heilig, Hans G. H. J.; Smidt, Hauke; Rebel, Johanna M. J.; Smits, Mari A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Early-life environmental variation affects gut microbial colonization and immune competence development; however, the timing and additional specifics of these processes are unknown. The impact of early-life environmental variations, as experienced under real life circumstances, on gut microbial colonization and immune development has not been studied extensively so far. We designed a study to investigate environmental variation, experienced early after birth, to gut microbial colonization and intestinal immune development. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate effects of early-life environmental changes, the piglets of 16 piglet litters were divided into 3 groups per litter and experimentally treated on day 4 after birth. During the course of the experiment, the piglets were kept with their mother sow. Group 1 was not treated, group 2 was treated with an antibiotic, and group 3 was treated with an antibiotic and simultaneously exposed to several routine, but stressful management procedures, including docking, clipping and weighing. Thereafter, treatment effects were measured at day 8 after birth in 16 piglets per treatment group by community-scale analysis of gut microbiota and genome-wide intestinal transcriptome profiling. We observed that the applied antibiotic treatment affected the composition and diversity of gut microbiota and reduced the expression of a large number of immune-related processes. The effect of management procedures on top of the use of an antibiotic was limited. Conclusions/Significance We provide direct evidence that different early-life conditions, specifically focusing on antibiotic treatment and exposure to stress, affect gut microbial colonization and intestinal immune development. This reinforces the notion that the early phase of life is critical for intestinal immune development, also under regular production circumstances. PMID:24941112

  15. Interventions That Affect Gastrointestinal Motility in Hospitalized Adult Patients: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Randomized Trials.

    PubMed

    Asrani, Varsha M; Yoon, Harry D; Megill, Robin D; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2016-02-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility is a common complication in acute, critically ill, postoperative, and chronic patients that may lead to impaired nutrient delivery, poor clinical, and patient-reported outcomes. Several pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions to treat GI dysmotility were investigated in dozens of clinical studies. However, they often yielded conflicting results, at least in part, because various (nonstandardized) definitions of GI dysmotility were used and methodological quality of studies was poor. While a universally accepted definition of GI dysmotility is yet to be developed, a systematic analysis of data derived from double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials may provide robust data on absolute and relative effectiveness of various interventions as the study outcome (GI motility) was assessed in the least biased manner.To systematically review data from double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials to determine and compare the effectiveness of interventions that affect GI motility.Three electronic databases (MEDLINE, SCOPUS, and EMBASE) were searched. A random effects model was used for meta-analysis. The summary estimates were reported as mean difference (MD) with the corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI).A total of 38 double-blind placebo-controlled randomized trials involving 2371 patients were eligible for inclusion in the systematic review. These studies investigated a total of 20 different interventions, of which 6 interventions were meta-analyzed. Of them, the use of dopamine receptor antagonists (MD, -8.99; 95% CI, -17.72 to -0.27; P = 0.04) and macrolides (MD, -26.04; 95% CI, -51.25 to -0.82; P = 0.04) significantly improved GI motility compared with the placebo group. The use of botulism toxin significantly impaired GI motility compared with the placebo group (MD, 5.31; 95% CI, -0.04 to 10.67; P = 0.05). Other interventions (dietary factors, probiotics, hormones) did not affect GI motility

  16. Methyl donor deficiency affects small-intestinal differentiation and barrier function in rats.

    PubMed

    Bressenot, Aude; Pooya, Shabnam; Bossenmeyer-Pourie, Carine; Gauchotte, Guillaume; Germain, Adeline; Chevaux, Jean-Baptiste; Coste, Florence; Vignaud, Jean-Michel; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Peyrin-Biroulet, Laurent

    2013-02-28

    Dietary methyl donors and their genetic determinants are associated with Crohn's disease risk. We investigated whether a methyl-deficient diet (MDD) may affect development and functions of the small intestine in rat pups from dams subjected to the MDD during gestation and lactation. At 1 month before pregnancy, adult females were fed with either a standard food or a diet without vitamin B12, folate and choline. A global wall hypotrophy was observed in the distal small bowel (MDD animals 0·30 mm v. controls 0·58 mm; P< 0·001) with increased crypt apoptosis (3·37 v. 0·4%; P< 0·001), loss of enterocyte differentiation in the villus and a reduction in intestinal alkaline phosphatase production. Cleaved caspase-3 immunostaining (MDD animals 3·37% v. controls 0·4%, P< 0·001) and the Apostain labelling index showed increased crypt apoptosis (3·5 v. 1·4%; P= 0·018). Decreased proliferation was observed in crypts of the proximal small bowel with a reduced number of minichromosome maintenance 6 (MDD animals 52·83% v. controls 83·17%; P= 0·048) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive cells (46·25 v. 59 %; P= 0·05). This lack of enterocyte differentiation in the distal small bowel was associated with an impaired expression of β-catenin and a decreased β-catenin-E-cadherin interaction. The MDD affected the intestinal barrier in the proximal small bowel by decreasing Paneth cell number after immunostaining for lysosyme (MDD animals 8·66% v. controls 21·66%) and by reducing goblet cell number and mucus production after immunostaining for mucin-2 (crypts 8·66 v. 15·33%; villus 7 v. 17%). The MDD has dual effects on the small intestine by producing dramatic effects on enterocyte differentiation and barrier function in rats. PMID:22794784

  17. Tumor suppressor KAI1 affects integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated ovarian cancer cell adhesion, motility, and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruseva, Zlatna; Geiger, Pamina Xenia Charlotte; Hutzler, Peter; Kotzsch, Matthias; Luber, Birgit; Schmitt, Manfred; Gross, Eva; Reuning, Ute

    2009-06-10

    The tetraspanin KAI1 had been described as a metastasis suppressor in many different cancer types, a function for which associations of KAI1 with adhesion and signaling receptors of the integrin superfamily likely play a role. In ovarian cancer, integrin {alpha}v{beta}3 correlates with tumor progression and its elevation in vitro provoked enhanced cell adhesion accompanied by significant increases in cell motility and proliferation in the presence of its major ligand vitronectin. In the present study, we characterized integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated tumor biological effects as a function of cellular KAI1 restoration and proved for the first time that KAI1, besides its already known physical crosstalk with {beta}1-integrins, also colocalizes with integrin {alpha}v{beta}3. Functionally, elevated KAI1 levels drastically increased integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-dependent ovarian cancer cell adhesion. Since an intermediate level of cell adhesive strength is required for optimal cell migration, we next studied ovarian cancer cell motility as a function of KAI1 restoration. By time lapse video microscopy, we found impaired integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-mediated cell migration most probably due to strongly enhanced cellular immobilization onto the adhesion-supporting matrix. Moreover, KAI1 reexpression significantly diminished cell proliferation. These data strongly indicate that KAI1 may suppress ovarian cancer progression by inhibiting integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-provoked tumor cell motility and proliferation as important hallmarks of the oncogenic process.

  18. Motile properties of the bi-directional kinesin-5 Cin8 are affected by phosphorylation in its motor domain

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, Ofer; Gheber, Larisa

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinesin-5 Cin8 performs essential mitotic functions in spindle assembly and anaphase B spindle elongation. Recent work has shown that Cin8 is a bi-directional motor which moves towards the minus-end of microtubules (MTs) under high ionic strength (IS) conditions and changes directionality in low IS conditions and when bound between anti-parallel microtubules. Previous work from our laboratory has also indicated that Cin8 is differentially phosphorylated during late anaphase at cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)-specific sites located in its motor domain. In vivo, such phosphorylation causes Cin8 detachment from spindles and reduces the spindle elongation rate, while maintaining proper spindle morphology. To study the effect of phosphorylation on Cin8 motor function, we examined in vitro motile properties of wild type Cin8, as well as its phosphorylation using phospho-deficient and phospho-mimic variants, in a single molecule fluorescence motility assay. Analysis was performed on whole cell extracts and on purified Cin8 samples. We found that addition of negative charges in the phospho-mimic mutant weakened the MT-motor interaction, increased motor velocity and promoted minus-end-directed motility. These results indicate that phosphorylation in the catalytic domain of Cin8 regulates its motor function. PMID:27216310

  19. Food contaminant zearalenone and its metabolites affect cytokine synthesis and intestinal epithelial integrity of porcine cells.

    PubMed

    Marin, Daniela E; Motiu, Monica; Taranu, Ionelia

    2015-06-01

    The intestinal epithelium is the first barrier against food contaminants. Zearalenone (ZEN) is an estrogenic mycotoxin that was identified as a common contaminant of cereal grains and food and feedstuffs. In the present study, we have investigated the in vitro effects of ZEN and some of its metabolites (α-ZOL, β-ZOL) in concentrations of 10-100 µM on a swine epithelial cell line: Intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-1). We demonstrated that both ZEN metabolites were more toxic for IPEC cells as resulted from the XTT test, while for doses lower than 10 µM, only β-ZOL showed a more pronounced cytotoxicity versus epithelial cells as resulted from neutral red assay. ZEN has no effect on TER values, while α-ZOL significantly decreased the TER values, starting with day 4 of treatment. β-ZOL had a dual effect, firstly it induced a significant increase of TER, and then, starting on day 6, it induced a dramatic decrease of TER values as compared with on day 0. Concerning the cytokine synthesis, our results showed that ZEN has a tendency to increase the synthesis of IL-8 and IL-10. By contrast, α- and β-ZOL decreased the expression of both IL-8 and IL-10, in a dose dependent manner. In conclusion, our results showed that ZEN and its metabolites differently affected porcine intestinal cell viability, transepithelial resistance and cytokine synthesis with important implication for gut health. PMID:26035492

  20. Food Contaminant Zearalenone and Its Metabolites Affect Cytokine Synthesis and Intestinal Epithelial Integrity of Porcine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Daniela E.; Motiu, Monica; Taranu, Ionelia

    2015-01-01

    The intestinal epithelium is the first barrier against food contaminants. Zearalenone (ZEN) is an estrogenic mycotoxin that was identified as a common contaminant of cereal grains and food and feedstuffs. In the present study, we have investigated the in vitro effects of ZEN and some of its metabolites (α-ZOL, β-ZOL) in concentrations of 10–100 µM on a swine epithelial cell line: Intestinal porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-1). We demonstrated that both ZEN metabolites were more toxic for IPEC cells as resulted from the XTT test, while for doses lower than 10 µM, only β-ZOL showed a more pronounced cytotoxicity versus epithelial cells as resulted from neutral red assay. ZEN has no effect on TER values, while α-ZOL significantly decreased the TER values, starting with day 4 of treatment. β-ZOL had a dual effect, firstly it induced a significant increase of TER, and then, starting on day 6, it induced a dramatic decrease of TER values as compared with on day 0. Concerning the cytokine synthesis, our results showed that ZEN has a tendency to increase the synthesis of IL-8 and IL-10. By contrast, α- and β-ZOL decreased the expression of both IL-8 and IL-10, in a dose dependent manner. In conclusion, our results showed that ZEN and its metabolites differently affected porcine intestinal cell viability, transepithelial resistance and cytokine synthesis with important implication for gut health. PMID:26035492

  1. Antibiotic Treatment Affects Intestinal Permeability and Gut Microbial Composition in Wistar Rats Dependent on Antibiotic Class

    PubMed Central

    Tulstrup, Monica Vera-Lise; Christensen, Ellen Gerd; Carvalho, Vera; Linninge, Caroline; Ahrné, Siv; Højberg, Ole; Licht, Tine Rask; Bahl, Martin Iain

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics are frequently administered orally to treat bacterial infections not necessarily related to the gastrointestinal system. This has adverse effects on the commensal gut microbial community, as it disrupts the intricate balance between specific bacterial groups within this ecosystem, potentially leading to dysbiosis. We hypothesized that modulation of community composition and function induced by antibiotics affects intestinal integrity depending on the antibiotic administered. To address this a total of 60 Wistar rats (housed in pairs with 6 cages per group) were dosed by oral gavage with either amoxicillin (AMX), cefotaxime (CTX), vancomycin (VAN), metronidazole (MTZ), or water (CON) daily for 10–11 days. Bacterial composition, alpha diversity and caecum short chain fatty acid levels were significantly affected by AMX, CTX and VAN, and varied among antibiotic treatments. A general decrease in diversity and an increase in the relative abundance of Proteobacteria was observed for all three antibiotics. Additionally, the relative abundance of Bifidobacteriaceae was increased in the CTX group and both Lactobacillaceae and Verrucomicrobiaceae were increased in the VAN group compared to the CON group. No changes in microbiota composition or function were observed following MTZ treatment. Intestinal permeability to 4 kDa FITC-dextran decreased after CTX and VAN treatment and increased following MTZ treatment. Plasma haptoglobin levels were increased by both AMX and CTX but no changes in expression of host tight junction genes were found in any treatment group. A strong correlation between the level of caecal succinate, the relative abundance of Clostridiaceae 1 family in the caecum, and the level of acute phase protein haptoglobin in blood plasma was observed. In conclusion, antibiotic-induced changes in microbiota may be linked to alterations in intestinal permeability, although the specific interactions remain to be elucidated as changes in permeability did

  2. The group I pilin glycan affects type IVa pilus hydrophobicity and twitching motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1244

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Tara M.; Conrad, Sean

    2015-01-01

    The group I pilin category is the most common type of type IVa pilus produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The lateral surfaces of these pili are characterized by the presence of closely spaced, covalently attached O-antigen repeating units. The current work was conducted to investigate the pilin glycan's effect on pilus solubility and function. Culture supernatant fluids containing fully, partially and non-glycosylated P. aeruginosa group I pili were tested for solubility in the presence of ammonium sulfate. These results showed that while pili expressing three or four sugars were highly soluble under all conditions, those with fewer than three were insoluble under the lowest salt concentrations tested. A representative of the P. aeruginosa group II pili also showed low solubility when assayed under these same conditions. Reduced solubility suggested an increased pilus surface hydrophobicity, which was supported by protein modelling. While having no effect on the WT strain, an ionic strength found at many host infection sites inhibited surface and subsurface twitching motility of strain 1244G7, an isogenic mutant unable to glycosylate pilin. This effect was reversed by mutant complementation. Twitching motility of P. aeruginosa strain PA103, which produces group II pili, was also inhibited by ionic strengths which influenced the mutant 1244 strain. We suggest that the group I pilin glycan may, therefore, be beneficial to this organism specifically for optimal pilus functioning at the many host disease sites with ionic strengths comparable to those tested here. PMID:26297472

  3. Down-regulation of UDP-glucose dehydrogenase affects glycosaminoglycans synthesis and motility in HCT-8 colorectal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tsung-Pao; Pan, Yun-Ru; Fu, Chien-Yu; Chang, Hwan-You

    2010-10-15

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH) catalyzes oxidation of UDP-glucose to yield UDP-glucuronic acid, a precursor of hyaluronic acid (HA) and other glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in extracellular matrix. Although association of extracellular matrix with cell proliferation and migration has been well documented, the importance of UGDH in these behaviors is not clear. Using UGDH-specific small interference RNA to treat HCT-8 colorectal carcinoma cells, a decrease in both mRNA and protein levels of UGDH, as well as the cellular UDP-glucuronic acid and GAG production was observed. Treatment of HCT-8 cells with either UGDH-specific siRNA or HA synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone effectively delayed cell aggregation into multicellular spheroids and impaired cell motility in both three-dimensional collagen gel and transwell migration assays. The reduction in cell aggregation and migration rates could be restored by addition of exogenous HA. These results indicate that UGDH can regulate cell motility through the production of GAG. The enzyme may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention of colorectal cancers.

  4. Glyceroglycolipids Affect Uptake of Carotenoids Solubilized in Mixed Micelles by Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells.

    PubMed

    Kotake-Nara, Eiichi; Yonekura, Lina; Nagao, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    We previously reported that phospholipids markedly affected the uptake of carotenoids solubilized in mixed micelles by human intestinal Caco-2 cells. In the present study, we found that two classes of dietary glyceroglycolipids and the corresponding lysoglyceroglycolipids affected uptake of β-carotene and lutein by differentiated Caco-2 cells. The levels of carotenoid uptake from micelles containing digalactosyldiacylglycerol or sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol were significantly lower than that from control micelles. On the other hand, the uptakes from micelles containing digalactosylmonoacylglycerol or sulfoquinovosylmonoacylglycerol were significantly higher than that from control micelles. In dispersed cells and Caco-2 cells with poor cell-to-cell adhesion, however, the levels of uptake from micelles containing these lyso-lipids were much lower than that from control micelles. The uptake levels from control micelles were markedly decreased depending on the development of cell-to-cell/cell-matrix adhesion in Caco-2 cells, but the uptake levels from the micelles containing these lyso-lipids were not substantially changed, suggesting that the intercellular barrier formed by cell-to-cell/cell-matrix adhesion inhibited the uptake from control micelles, but not from the lyso-lipid-containing micelles. The lyso-lipids appeared to enhance carotenoid uptake by decreasing the intercellular barrier integrity. The results showed that some types of glyceroglycolipids have the potential to modify the intestinal uptake of carotenoids. PMID:26012480

  5. High-fibre sunflower cake affects small intestinal digestion and health in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Kalmendal, R; Elwinger, K; Holm, L; Tauson, R

    2011-02-01

    1. An experiment was conducted to evaluate high-fibre sunflower cake (HF-SFC); a feed ingredient distinguished by large amounts of crude fibre and insoluble non-starch polysaccharides (i-NSP). 2. Broiler chickens (n = 160) were fed on pelleted maize-based diets free from coccidiostats and antibiotic growth promoters between 15 and 31 d of age. Diets included 0, 10, 20 or 30% HF-SFC. Performance and small intestinal health were assessed. 3. In general, HF-SFC inclusion mediated significant linear increases in ileal digestibility of fat and protein and significant linear decreases in ileal digestibility of dry matter, ash and energy. 4. Weight gain increased linearly with HF-SFC inclusion. Feed conversion was negatively affected by 30% HF-SFC but not by 20% HF-SFC. 5. In the jejunal lumen, inclusion of HF-SFC was associated with significant decreases in colony counts of Clostridium spp. 6. HF-SFC inclusion resulted in significant linear reductions of villus height, thickness of muscularis mucosa, and the circular and longitudinal layers of muscularis in the jejunum. Crypt depth and submucosal thickness were not affected. 7. The data indicate that broiler chickens may thrive on feeds with insoluble fibre contents far exceeding those used in practice, and that HF-SFC exerts some positive effects on digestion and small intestinal health. PMID:21337203

  6. Inactivation of Cyclic Di-GMP Binding Protein TDE0214 Affects the Motility, Biofilm Formation, and Virulence of Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Jiang; Liu, Xiangyang; Cheng, Yi-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    As a ubiquitous second messenger, cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) has been studied in numerous bacteria. The oral spirochete Treponema denticola, a periodontal pathogen associated with human periodontitis, has a complex c-di-GMP signaling network. However, its function remains unexplored. In this report, a PilZ-like c-di-GMP binding protein (TDE0214) was studied to investigate the role of c-di-GMP in the spirochete. TDE0214 harbors a PilZ domain with two signature motifs: RXXXR and DXSXXG. Biochemical studies showed that TDE0214 binds c-di-GMP in a specific manner, with a dissociation constant (Kd) value of 1.73 μM, which is in the low range compared to those of other reported c-di-GMP binding proteins. To reveal the role of c-di-GMP in T. denticola, a TDE0214 deletion mutant (TdΔ214) was constructed and analyzed in detail. First, swim plate and single-cell tracking analyses showed that TdΔ214 had abnormal swimming behaviors: the mutant was less motile and reversed more frequently than the wild type. Second, we found that biofilm formation of TdΔ214 was substantially repressed (∼6.0-fold reduction). Finally, in vivo studies using a mouse skin abscess model revealed that the invasiveness and ability to induce skin abscesses and host humoral immune responses were significantly attenuated in TdΔ214, indicative of the impact that TDE0214 has on the virulence of T. denticola. Collectively, the results reported here indicate that TDE0214 plays important roles in motility, biofilm formation, and virulence of the spirochete. This report also paves a way to further unveil the roles of the c-di-GMP signaling network in the biology and pathogenicity of T. denticola. PMID:23794624

  7. MasABK Proteins Interact with Proteins of the Type IV Pilin System to Affect Social Motility of Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Fremgen, Sarah; Williams, Amanda; Furusawa, Gou; Dziewanowska, Katarzyna; Settles, Matthew; Hartzell, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    Gliding motility is critical for normal development of spore-filled fruiting bodies in the soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus. Mutations in mgl block motility and development but one mgl allele can be suppressed by a mutation in masK, the last gene in an operon adjacent to the mgl operon. Deletion of the entire 5.5 kb masABK operon crippled gliding and fruiting body development and decreased sporulation. Expression of pilAGHI, which encodes type IV pili (TFP) components essential for social (S) gliding, several cryptic pil genes, and a LuxR family protein were reduced significantly in the Δmas mutant while expression of the myxalamide operon was increased significantly. Localization and two-hybrid analysis suggest that the three Mas proteins form a membrane complex. MasA-PhoA fusions confirmed that MasA is an integral cytoplasmic membrane protein with a ≈100 amino acid periplasmic domain. Results from yeast two-hybrid assays showed that MasA interacts with the lipoprotein MasB and MasK, a protein kinase and that MasB and MasK interact with one another. Additionally, yeast two-hybrid analysis revealed a physical interaction between two gene products of the mas operon, MasA and MasB, and PilA. Deletion of mas may be accompanied by compensatory mutations since complementation of the Δmas social gliding and developmental defects required addition of both pilA and masABK. PMID:23342171

  8. Prematurity does not markedly affect intestinal sensitivity to endotoxins and feeding in pigs.

    PubMed

    Bering, Stine B; Bai, Shiping; Zhang, Keying; Sangild, Per T

    2012-08-01

    Preterm neonates show enhanced sensitivity to nutrient maldigestion and bacteria-mediated gut inflammatory disorders, such as necrotising enterocolitis (NEC). We hypothesised that preterm birth increases the sensitivity of intestinal nutrient absorption to endotoxins and that feeding after birth reduces this response. Hence, we investigated the postnatal development of nutrient digestive and absorptive capacity in the preterm and term pig intestine, and its responsiveness to endotoxins. Pigs were delivered by caesarean section at preterm (n 20) or term (n 17) gestation, and the small intestine was collected at birth or after 2 d of colostrum feeding, followed by ex vivo stimulation with lipopolysaccharide endotoxins and mixed gut contents collected from pigs with NEC. Brush border enzyme activities were reduced in newborn preterm v. term pigs (39-45 % reduction, P < 0.05), but normalised after 2 d of feeding. Ex vivo leucine and glucose uptake increased with prenatal age. Bacterial stimulation reduced the nutrient uptake similarly at birth and after 2 d in preterm and term pigs (23-41 % reduction, P < 0.05), whereas IL-6 and TNF-α expression was stimulated only at birth. Toll-like receptor-4 expression increased markedly at day 2 for preterm and term pigs (22-33-fold, P < 0.05) but with much lower expression levels in newborn preterm pigs (approximately 95 %, P < 0.01). In conclusion, digestive and absorptive functions mature in the prenatal period, but are similarly affected by postnatal feeding and bacterial exposure in both preterm and term pigs. Nutrient maldigestion may contribute to NEC development, while a prematurity-related hyper-responsiveness to endotoxins could be less important, at least in pigs. PMID:22136806

  9. The establishment of the infant intestinal microbiome is not affected by rotavirus vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Li; Arboleya, Silvia; Lihua, Guo; Chuihui, Yuan; Nan, Qin; Suarez, Marta; Solís, Gonzalo; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The microbial colonization of the intestine during the first months of life constitutes the most important process for the microbiota-induced host-homeostasis. Alterations in this process may entail a high-risk for disease in later life. However, the potential factors affecting this process in the infant are not well known. Moreover, the potential impact of orally administered vaccines upon the establishing microbiome remains unknown. Here we assessed the intestinal microbiome establishment process and evaluated the impact of rotavirus vaccination upon this process. Metagenomic, PCR-DGGE and faecal short chain fatty acids analyses were performed on faecal samples obtained from three infants before and after the administration of each dose of vaccine. We found a high inter-individual variability in the early life gut microbiota at microbial composition level, but a large similarity between the infants' microbiomes at functional level. Rotavirus vaccination did not show any major effects upon the infant gut microbiota. Thus, the individual microbiome establishment and development process seems to occur in a defined manner during the first stages of life and rotavirus vaccination appears to be inconsequential for this process. PMID:25491920

  10. The establishment of the infant intestinal microbiome is not affected by rotavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Ang, Li; Arboleya, Silvia; Lihua, Guo; Chuihui, Yuan; Nan, Qin; Suarez, Marta; Solís, Gonzalo; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The microbial colonization of the intestine during the first months of life constitutes the most important process for the microbiota-induced host-homeostasis. Alterations in this process may entail a high-risk for disease in later life. However, the potential factors affecting this process in the infant are not well known. Moreover, the potential impact of orally administered vaccines upon the establishing microbiome remains unknown. Here we assessed the intestinal microbiome establishment process and evaluated the impact of rotavirus vaccination upon this process. Metagenomic, PCR-DGGE and faecal short chain fatty acids analyses were performed on faecal samples obtained from three infants before and after the administration of each dose of vaccine. We found a high inter-individual variability in the early life gut microbiota at microbial composition level, but a large similarity between the infants' microbiomes at functional level. Rotavirus vaccination did not show any major effects upon the infant gut microbiota. Thus, the individual microbiome establishment and development process seems to occur in a defined manner during the first stages of life and rotavirus vaccination appears to be inconsequential for this process. PMID:25491920

  11. Is rumen development in newborn calves affected by different liquid feeds and small intestine development?

    PubMed

    Górka, P; Kowalski, Z M; Pietrzak, P; Kotunia, A; Jagusiak, W; Zabielski, R

    2011-06-01

    fed MR. Significant positive Pearson correlations were found between small intestine and reticulorumen weights as well as between activity of brush border lactase, maltase, aminopeptidase A, and aminopeptidase N and reticulorumen weight. Different liquid feeds affect small intestine development, animal growth, solid feed intake and metabolic status of calves and this effect can indirectly influence the development of forestomachs. PMID:21605770

  12. Effect of cannabidiol on sepsis-induced motility disturbances in mice: involvement of CB receptors and fatty acid amide hydrolase.

    PubMed

    de Filippis, D; Iuvone, T; d'amico, A; Esposito, G; Steardo, L; Herman, A G; Pelckmans, P A; de Winter, B Y; de Man, J G

    2008-08-01

    Sepsis is an inflammatory condition that is associated with reduced propulsive gastrointestinal motility (ileus). A therapeutic option to treat sepsis is to promote intestinal propulsion preventing bacterial stasis, overgrowth and translocation. Recent evidence suggests that anti-oxidants improve sepsis-induced ileus. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic component of Cannabis sativa, exerts strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory effects without binding to cannabinoid CB(1) or CB(2) receptors. Cannabidiol also regulates the activity of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) which is the main enzyme involved in endocannabinoid breakdown and which modulates gastrointestinal motility. Because of the therapeutic potential of cannabidiol in several pathologies, we investigated its effect on sepsis-induced ileus and on cannabinoid receptor and FAAH expression in the mouse intestine. Sepsis was induced by treating mice with lipopolysaccharides for 18 h. Sepsis led to a decrease in gastric emptying and intestinal transit. Cannabidiol further reduced gastrointestinal motility in septic mice but did not affect gastrointestinal motility in control mice. A low concentration of the CB(1) antagonist AM251 did not affect gastrointestinal motility in control mice but reversed the effect of cannabidiol in septic mice. Sepsis was associated with a selective upregulation of intestinal CB(1) receptors without affecting CB(2) receptor expression and with increased FAAH expression. The increase in FAAH expression was completely reversed by cannabidiol but not affected by AM251. Our results show that sepsis leads to an imbalance of the endocannabinoid system in the mouse intestine. Despite its proven anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, cannabidiol may be of limited use for the treatment of sepsis-induced ileus. PMID:18373655

  13. Insights into Embryo Defenses of the Invasive Apple Snail Pomacea canaliculata: Egg Mass Ingestion Affects Rat Intestine Morphology and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, Eduardo J.; Heras, Horacio

    2014-01-01

    Background The spread of the invasive snail Pomacea canaliculata is expanding the rat lungworm disease beyond its native range. Their toxic eggs have virtually no predators and unusual defenses including a neurotoxic lectin and a proteinase inhibitor, presumably advertised by a warning coloration. We explored the effect of egg perivitellin fluid (PVF) ingestion on the rat small intestine morphology and physiology. Methodology/Principal Findings Through a combination of biochemical, histochemical, histopathological, scanning electron microscopy, cell culture and feeding experiments, we analyzed intestinal morphology, growth rate, hemaglutinating activity, cytotoxicity and cell proliferation after oral administration of PVF to rats. PVF adversely affects small intestine metabolism and morphology and consequently the standard growth rate, presumably by lectin-like proteins, as suggested by PVF hemaglutinating activity and its cytotoxic effect on Caco-2 cell culture. Short-term effects of ingested PVF were studied in growing rats. PVF-supplemented diet induced the appearance of shorter and wider villi as well as fused villi. This was associated with changes in glycoconjugate expression, increased cell proliferation at crypt base, and hypertrophic mucosal growth. This resulted in a decreased absorptive surface after 3 days of treatment and a diminished rat growth rate that reverted to normal after the fourth day of treatment. Longer exposure to PVF induced a time-dependent lengthening of the small intestine while switching to a control diet restored intestine length and morphology after 4 days. Conclusions/Significance Ingestion of PVF rapidly limits the ability of potential predators to absorb nutrients by inducing large, reversible changes in intestinal morphology and growth rate. The occurrence of toxins that affect intestinal morphology and absorption is a strategy against predation not recognized among animals before. Remarkably, this defense is rather similar to

  14. The Stringent Response Regulator DksA Is Required for Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Growth in Minimal Medium, Motility, Biofilm Formation, and Intestinal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Azriel, Shalhevet; Goren, Alina; Rahav, Galia

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a facultative intracellular human and animal bacterial pathogen posing a major threat to public health worldwide. Salmonella pathogenicity requires complex coordination of multiple physiological and virulence pathways. DksA is a conserved Gram-negative regulator that belongs to a distinct group of transcription factors that bind directly to the RNA polymerase secondary channel, potentiating the effect of the signaling molecule ppGpp during a stringent response. Here, we established that in S. Typhimurium, dksA is induced during the logarithmic phase and DksA is essential for growth in minimal defined medium and plays an important role in motility and biofilm formation. Furthermore, we determined that DksA positively regulates the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 and motility-chemotaxis genes and is necessary for S. Typhimurium invasion of human epithelial cells and uptake by macrophages. In contrast, DksA was found to be dispensable for S. Typhimurium host cell adhesion. Finally, using the colitis mouse model, we found that dksA is spatially induced at the midcecum during the early stage of the infection and required for gastrointestinal colonization and systemic infection in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that the ancestral stringent response regulator DksA coordinates various physiological and virulence S. Typhimurium programs and therefore is a key virulence regulator of Salmonella. PMID:26553464

  15. The Stringent Response Regulator DksA Is Required for Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Growth in Minimal Medium, Motility, Biofilm Formation, and Intestinal Colonization.

    PubMed

    Azriel, Shalhevet; Goren, Alina; Rahav, Galia; Gal-Mor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a facultative intracellular human and animal bacterial pathogen posing a major threat to public health worldwide. Salmonella pathogenicity requires complex coordination of multiple physiological and virulence pathways. DksA is a conserved Gram-negative regulator that belongs to a distinct group of transcription factors that bind directly to the RNA polymerase secondary channel, potentiating the effect of the signaling molecule ppGpp during a stringent response. Here, we established that in S. Typhimurium, dksA is induced during the logarithmic phase and DksA is essential for growth in minimal defined medium and plays an important role in motility and biofilm formation. Furthermore, we determined that DksA positively regulates the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 and motility-chemotaxis genes and is necessary for S. Typhimurium invasion of human epithelial cells and uptake by macrophages. In contrast, DksA was found to be dispensable for S. Typhimurium host cell adhesion. Finally, using the colitis mouse model, we found that dksA is spatially induced at the midcecum during the early stage of the infection and required for gastrointestinal colonization and systemic infection in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that the ancestral stringent response regulator DksA coordinates various physiological and virulence S. Typhimurium programs and therefore is a key virulence regulator of Salmonella. PMID:26553464

  16. E. coli Nissle 1917 Affects Salmonella Adhesion to Porcine Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schierack, Peter; Kleta, Sylvia; Tedin, Karsten; Babila, Julius Tachu; Oswald, Sibylle; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A.; Hiemann, Rico; Paetzold, Susanne; Wieler, Lothar H.

    2011-01-01

    Background The probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) has been shown to interfere in a human in vitro model with the invasion of several bacterial pathogens into epithelial cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not known. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of EcN on Salmonella Typhimurium invasion of porcine intestinal epithelial cells, focusing on EcN effects on the various stages of Salmonella infection including intracellular and extracellular Salmonella growth rates, virulence gene regulation, and adhesion. We show that EcN affects the initial Salmonella invasion steps by modulating Salmonella virulence gene regulation and Salmonella SiiE-mediated adhesion, but not extra- and intracellular Salmonella growth. However, the inhibitory activity of EcN against Salmonella invasion always correlated with EcN adhesion capacities. EcN mutants defective in the expression of F1C fimbriae and flagellae were less adherent and less inhibitory toward Salmonella invasion. Another E. coli strain expressing F1C fimbriae was also adherent to IPEC-J2 cells, and was similarly inhibitory against Salmonella invasion like EcN. Conclusions We propose that EcN affects Salmonella adhesion through secretory components. This mechanism appears to be common to many E. coli strains, with strong adherence being a prerequisite for an effective reduction of SiiE-mediated Salmonella adhesion. PMID:21379575

  17. Intestinal Microbiota of Broiler Chickens As Affected by Litter Management Regimens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingling; Lilburn, Mike; Yu, Zhongtang

    2016-01-01

    Poultry litter is a mixture of bedding materials and enteric bacteria excreted by chickens, and it is typically reused for multiple growth cycles in commercial broiler production. Thus, bacteria can be transmitted from one growth cycle to the next via litter. However, it remains poorly understood how litter reuse affects development and composition of chicken gut microbiota. In this study, the effect of litter reuse on the microbiota in litter and in chicken gut was investigated using 2 litter management regimens: fresh vs. reused litter. Samples of ileal mucosa and cecal digesta were collected from young chicks (10 days of age) and mature birds (35 days of age). Based on analysis using DGGE and pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons, the microbiota of both the ileal mucosa and the cecal contents was affected by both litter management regimen and age of birds. Faecalibacterium, Oscillospira, Butyricicoccus, and one unclassified candidate genus closely related to Ruminococcus were most predominant in the cecal samples, while Lactobacillus was predominant in the ileal samples at both ages and in the cecal samples collected at day 10. At days 10 and 35, 8 and 3 genera, respectively, in the cecal luminal microbiota differed significantly in relative abundance between the 2 litter management regimens. Compared to the fresh litter, reused litter increased predominance of halotolerant/alkaliphilic bacteria and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a butyrate-producing gut bacterium. This study suggests that litter management regimens affect the chicken GI microbiota, which may impact the host nutritional status and intestinal health. PMID:27242676

  18. Intestinal Microbiota of Broiler Chickens As Affected by Litter Management Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingling; Lilburn, Mike; Yu, Zhongtang

    2016-01-01

    Poultry litter is a mixture of bedding materials and enteric bacteria excreted by chickens, and it is typically reused for multiple growth cycles in commercial broiler production. Thus, bacteria can be transmitted from one growth cycle to the next via litter. However, it remains poorly understood how litter reuse affects development and composition of chicken gut microbiota. In this study, the effect of litter reuse on the microbiota in litter and in chicken gut was investigated using 2 litter management regimens: fresh vs. reused litter. Samples of ileal mucosa and cecal digesta were collected from young chicks (10 days of age) and mature birds (35 days of age). Based on analysis using DGGE and pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons, the microbiota of both the ileal mucosa and the cecal contents was affected by both litter management regimen and age of birds. Faecalibacterium, Oscillospira, Butyricicoccus, and one unclassified candidate genus closely related to Ruminococcus were most predominant in the cecal samples, while Lactobacillus was predominant in the ileal samples at both ages and in the cecal samples collected at day 10. At days 10 and 35, 8 and 3 genera, respectively, in the cecal luminal microbiota differed significantly in relative abundance between the 2 litter management regimens. Compared to the fresh litter, reused litter increased predominance of halotolerant/alkaliphilic bacteria and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a butyrate-producing gut bacterium. This study suggests that litter management regimens affect the chicken GI microbiota, which may impact the host nutritional status and intestinal health. PMID:27242676

  19. Sperm Motility in Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Juarez, Gabriel; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    A wide variety of plants and animals reproduce sexually by releasing motile sperm that seek out a conspecific egg, for example in the reproductive tract for mammals or in the water column for externally fertilizing organisms. Sperm are aided in their quest by chemical cues, but must also contend with hydrodynamic forces, resulting from laminar flows in reproductive tracts or turbulence in aquatic habitats. To understand how velocity gradients affect motility, we subjected swimming sperm to a range of highly-controlled straining flows using a cross-flow microfluidic device. The motion of the cell body and flagellum were captured through high-speed video microscopy. The effects of flow on swimming are twofold. For moderate velocity gradients, flow simply advects and reorients cells, quenching their ability to cross streamlines. For high velocity gradients, fluid stresses hinder the internal bending of the flagellum, directly inhibiting motility. The transition between the two regimes is governed by the Sperm number, which compares the external viscous stresses with the internal elastic stresses. Ultimately, unraveling the role of flow in sperm motility will lead to a better understanding of population dynamics among aquatic organisms and infertility problems in humans.

  20. Interferon Tau Affects Mouse Intestinal Microbiota and Expression of IL-17

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Chen, Shuai; Zhang, Liwen; Liu, Gang; Hussain, Tarique; Hao, Xiao; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Wu, Guoyao; Bazer, Fuller W.

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the effects of interferon tau (IFNT) on the intestinal microbiota and expression of interleukin 17 (IL-17) in the intestine of mice. IFNT supplementation increased microbial diversity in the jejunum and ileum but decreased microbial diversity in the feces. IFNT supplementation influenced the composition of the intestinal microbiota as follows: (1) decreasing the percentage of Firmicutes and increasing Bacteroidetes in the jejunum and ileum; (2) enhancing the percentage of Firmicutes but decreasing Bacteroidetes in the colon and feces; (3) decreasing Lactobacillus in the jejunum and ileum; (4) increasing the percentage of Blautia, Bacteroides, Alloprevotella, and Lactobacillus in the colon; and (5) increasing the percentage of Lactobacillus, Bacteroides, and Allobaculum, while decreasing Blautia in the feces. Also, IFNT supplementation decreased the expression of IL-17 in the intestines of normal mice and of an intestinal pathogen infected mice. In conclusion, IFNT supplementation modulates the intestinal microbiota and intestinal IL-17 expression, indicating the applicability of IFNT to treat the intestinal diseases involving IL-17 expression and microbiota. PMID:27610003

  1. Interferon Tau Affects Mouse Intestinal Microbiota and Expression of IL-17.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Chen, Shuai; Zhang, Liwen; Liu, Gang; Hussain, Tarique; Hao, Xiao; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Tan, Bie; Wu, Guoyao; Bazer, Fuller W; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the effects of interferon tau (IFNT) on the intestinal microbiota and expression of interleukin 17 (IL-17) in the intestine of mice. IFNT supplementation increased microbial diversity in the jejunum and ileum but decreased microbial diversity in the feces. IFNT supplementation influenced the composition of the intestinal microbiota as follows: (1) decreasing the percentage of Firmicutes and increasing Bacteroidetes in the jejunum and ileum; (2) enhancing the percentage of Firmicutes but decreasing Bacteroidetes in the colon and feces; (3) decreasing Lactobacillus in the jejunum and ileum; (4) increasing the percentage of Blautia, Bacteroides, Alloprevotella, and Lactobacillus in the colon; and (5) increasing the percentage of Lactobacillus, Bacteroides, and Allobaculum, while decreasing Blautia in the feces. Also, IFNT supplementation decreased the expression of IL-17 in the intestines of normal mice and of an intestinal pathogen infected mice. In conclusion, IFNT supplementation modulates the intestinal microbiota and intestinal IL-17 expression, indicating the applicability of IFNT to treat the intestinal diseases involving IL-17 expression and microbiota. PMID:27610003

  2. Soybean-derived beta-conglycinin affects proteome expression in pig intestinal cells in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, F; Hao, Y; Piao, X S; Ma, X; Wu, G Y; Qiao, S Y; Li, D F; Wang, J J

    2011-03-01

    It is well known that β-conglycinin, a soybean allergen, induces allergies and causes intestinal damage in fetuses and neonates. However, the underlying mechanisms responsible for the adverse effects of β-conglycinin remain elusive. In particular, it is unknown whether or not this dietary substance causes direct damage affecting the proliferation and integrity of intestinal cells. This study evaluated the effect of different concentrations of β-conglycinin (0 to 1,500 µg/mL) and the duration of culture (48 or 72 h) on the proliferation and proteome of porcine intestinal epithelial cells. Eight individually housed piglets (10 d old; initial BW, 3.79 ± 0.07 kg) were randomly divided into 2 groups (n = 4) and challenged with or without β-conglycinin via oral administration d 10 through 28. After the last administration of β-conglycinin or PBS, piglets were killed and jejuna mucosal samples were collected for proteomic analysis. Supplementing β-conglycinin to either culture medium or weanling pigs increased (P < 0.05) the expression of proteins related to apoptosis, stress, and inflammation, but decreased (P < 0.05) the expression of proteins related to cytoskeleton and nucleus replication in intestinal cells. Further analysis confirmed an increase in caspase-3 expression in the cells exposed to β-conglycinin in vivo and in vitro. Collectively, these novel results indicate that β-conglycinin directly induces intestinal damage by depressing intestinal-cell growth, damaging the cytoskeleton, and causing apoptosis in the piglet intestine. PMID:21057091

  3. Altered Mucus Glycosylation in Core 1 O-Glycan-Deficient Mice Affects Microbiota Composition and Intestinal Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, Felix; Adam, Nina; Johansson, Malin E. V.; Xia, Lijun; Hansson, Gunnar C.; Bäckhed, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    A functional mucus layer is a key requirement for gastrointestinal health as it serves as a barrier against bacterial invasion and subsequent inflammation. Recent findings suggest that mucus composition may pose an important selection pressure on the gut microbiota and that altered mucus thickness or properties such as glycosylation lead to intestinal inflammation dependent on bacteria. Here we used TM-IEC C1galt-/- mice, which carry an inducible deficiency of core 1-derived O-glycans in intestinal epithelial cells, to investigate the effects of mucus glycosylation on susceptibility to intestinal inflammation, gut microbial ecology and host physiology. We found that TM-IEC C1galt-/- mice did not develop spontaneous colitis, but they were more susceptible to dextran sodium sulphate-induced colitis. Furthermore, loss of core 1-derived O-glycans induced inverse shifts in the abundance of the phyla Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes. We also found that mucus glycosylation impacts intestinal architecture as TM-IEC C1galt-/- mice had an elongated gastrointestinal tract with deeper ileal crypts, a small increase in the number of proliferative epithelial cells and thicker circular muscle layers in both the ileum and colon. Alterations in the length of the gastrointestinal tract were partly dependent on the microbiota. Thus, the mucus layer plays a role in the regulation of gut microbiota composition, balancing intestinal inflammation, and affects gut architecture. PMID:24416370

  4. A Deregulated Intestinal Cell Cycle Program Disrupts Tissue Homeostasis without Affecting Longevity in Drosophila*

    PubMed Central

    Petkau, Kristina; Parsons, Brendon D.; Duggal, Aashna; Foley, Edan

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies illuminate a complex relationship between the control of stem cell division and intestinal tissue organization in the model system Drosophila melanogaster. Host and microbial signals drive intestinal proliferation to maintain an effective epithelial barrier. Although it is widely assumed that proliferation induces dysplasia and shortens the life span of the host, the phenotypic consequences of deregulated intestinal proliferation for an otherwise healthy host remain unexplored. To address this question, we genetically isolated and manipulated the cell cycle programs of adult stem cells and enterocytes. Our studies revealed that cell cycle alterations led to extensive cell death and morphological disruptions. Despite the extensive tissue damage, we did not observe an impact on longevity, suggesting a remarkable degree of plasticity in intestinal function. PMID:25170078

  5. DL-Buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine affects intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Marchionatti, A; Alisio, A; Díaz de Barboza, G; Baudino, V; Tolosa de Talamoni, N

    2001-06-01

    The susceptibility of intestinal alkaline phosphatase to DL-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine was investigated in chicks fed a commercial diet. The results show that DL-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine produced inhibition of intestinal alkaline phosphatase activity. This effect showed dose- and time-dependency and it was caused by either in vivo DL-buthionine-S,R- sulfoximine administration or in vitro DL-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine incubation with villus tip enterocytes. DL-Buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine did not act directly on intestinal alkaline phosphatase but it provoked glutathione depletion which led to changes in the redox state of the enterocyte as shown by the production of free hydroxyl radicals and an incremental increase in the carbonyl content of proteins. The reversibility of the buthionine sulfoximine effect on intestinal alkaline phosphatase was proved by addition of glutathione monoester to the duodenal loop. PMID:11423381

  6. A deregulated intestinal cell cycle program disrupts tissue homeostasis without affecting longevity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Petkau, Kristina; Parsons, Brendon D; Duggal, Aashna; Foley, Edan

    2014-10-10

    Recent studies illuminate a complex relationship between the control of stem cell division and intestinal tissue organization in the model system Drosophila melanogaster. Host and microbial signals drive intestinal proliferation to maintain an effective epithelial barrier. Although it is widely assumed that proliferation induces dysplasia and shortens the life span of the host, the phenotypic consequences of deregulated intestinal proliferation for an otherwise healthy host remain unexplored. To address this question, we genetically isolated and manipulated the cell cycle programs of adult stem cells and enterocytes. Our studies revealed that cell cycle alterations led to extensive cell death and morphological disruptions. Despite the extensive tissue damage, we did not observe an impact on longevity, suggesting a remarkable degree of plasticity in intestinal function. PMID:25170078

  7. Motility of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Radestock, U; Bredt, W

    1977-01-01

    Cell of Mycoplasma pneumoniae FH gliding on a glass surface in liquid medium were examined by microscopic observation and quantitatively by microcinematography (30 frames per min). Comparisons were made only within the individual experiments. The cells moved in an irregular pattern with numerous narrow bends and circles. They never changed their leading end. The average speed (without pauses) was relatively constant between o.2 and 0.5 mum/s. The maximum speed was about 1.5 to 2.0 mum/s. The movements were interrupted by resting periods of different lengths and frequency. Temperature, viscosity, pH, and the presence of yeast extract in the medium influenced the motility significantly; changes in glucose, calcium ions, and serum content were less effective. The movements were affected by iodoacetate, p-mercuribenzoate, and mitomycin C at inhibitory or subinhibitory concentrations. Sodium fluoride, sodium cyanide, dinitrophenol, chloramphenicol, puromycin, cholchicin, and cytochalasin B at minimal inhibitory concentrations did not affect motility. The movements were effectively inhibited by anti-M. pneumoniae antiserum. Studies with absorbed antiserum suggested that the surface components involved in motility are heat labile. The gliding of M. pneumoniae cells required an intact energy metabolism and the proteins involved seemed to have a low turnover. Images PMID:14925

  8. Fascioliasis and Intestinal Parasitoses Affecting Schoolchildren in Atlixco, Puebla State, Mexico: Epidemiology and Treatment with Nitazoxanide

    PubMed Central

    Zumaquero-Ríos, José Lino; Sarracent-Pérez, Jorge; Rojas-García, Raúl; Rojas-Rivero, Lázara; Martínez-Tovilla, Yaneth; Valero, María Adela; Mas-Coma, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Background The Atlixco municipality, Puebla State, at a mean altitude of 1840 m, was selected for a study of Fasciola hepatica infection in schoolchildren in Mexico. This area presents permanent water collections continuously receiving thaw water from Popocatepetl volcano (5426 m altitude) through the community supply channels, conforming an epidemiological scenario similar to those known in hyperendemic areas of Andean countries. Methodology and Findings A total of 865 6–14 year-old schoolchildren were analyzed with FasciDIG coproantigen test and Lumbreras rapid sedimentation technique, and quantitatively assessed with Kato-Katz. Fascioliasis prevalences ranged 2.94–13.33% according to localities (mean 5.78%). Intensities were however low (24–384 epg). The association between fascioliasis and the habit of eating raw vegetables was identified, including watercress and radish with pronouncedly higher relative risk than lettuce, corncob, spinach, alfalfa juice, and broccoli. Many F. hepatica-infected children were coinfected by other parasites. Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Giardia intestinalis, Blastocystis hominis, Hymenolepis nana and Ascaris lumbricoides infection resulted in risk factors for F. hepatica infection. Nitazoxanide efficacy against fascioliasis was 94.0% and 100% after first and second treatment courses, respectively. The few children, for whom a second treatment course was needed, were concomitantly infected by moderate ascariasis burdens. Its efficacy was also very high in the treatment of E. histolytica/E. dispar, G. intestinalis, B. hominis, H. nana, A. lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and Enterobius vermicularis. A second treatment course was needed for all children affected by ancylostomatids. Conclusions Fascioliasis prevalences indicate this area to be mesoendemic, with isolated hyperendemic foci. This is the first time that a human fascioliasis endemic area is described in North America. Nitazoxanide appears as an appropriate

  9. Acquired causes of intestinal malabsorption.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, F

    2016-04-01

    This review focuses on the acquired causes, diagnosis, and treatment of intestinal malabsorption. Intestinal absorption is a complex process that depends on many variables, including the digestion of nutrients within the intestinal lumen, the absorptive surface of the small intestine, the membrane transport systems, and the epithelial absorptive enzymes. Acquired causes of malabsorption are classified by focussing on the three phases of digestion and absorption: 1) luminal/digestive phase, 2) mucosal/absorptive phase, and 3) transport phase. Most acquired diseases affect the luminal/digestive phase. These include short bowel syndrome, extensive small bowel inflammation, motility disorders, and deficiencies of digestive enzymes or bile salts. Diagnosis depends on symptoms, physical examination, and blood and stool tests. There is no gold standard for the diagnosis of malabsorption. Further testing should be based on the specific clinical context and the suspected underlying disease. Therapy is directed at nutritional support by enteral or parenteral feeding and screening for and supplementation of deficiencies in vitamins and minerals. Early enteral feeding is important for intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome. Medicinal treatment options for diarrhoea in malabsorption include loperamide, codeine, cholestyramine, or antibiotics. PMID:27086886

  10. Motility mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We describe six motility mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum in this report. They were identified among a group of temperature-sensitive growth (Tsg) mutants that had been previously isolated using an enrichment for phagocytosis-defective cells. The Tsg mutants were screened for their ability to produce tracks on gold-coated cover slips, and several strains were found that were temperature-sensitive for migration in this assay. Analysis of spontaneous Tsg+ revertants of 10 migration-defective strains identified six strains that co-reverted the Tsg and track formation phenotypes. Characterization of these six strains indicated that they were defective at restrictive temperature in track formation, phagocytosis of bacteria, and pseudopodial and filopodial activity, while retaining normal rates of oxygen consumption and viability. Because they had lost this group of motile capabilities, these strains were designated motility mutants. The Tsg+ revertants of these mutants, which coordinately recovered all of the motile activities, were found at frequencies consistent with single genetic events. Analysis of the motility mutants and their revertants suggests a relationship between the motility mutations in some of these strains and genes affecting axenic growth. PMID:7118999

  11. Intestinal microbial affects of yeast products on weaned and transport stressed pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Study objectives were to determine effects of a commercially available yeast product (XPC, Diamond-V Mills) and stress of transportation on total Enterobacteriaceae, Escherichia coli, coliforms, and Lactobacilli populations in the intestine of weaning pigs. In a RCB design with a 2 x 2 factorial ar...

  12. Yeast culture supplement during nursing and transport affects immunity and intestinal microbial ecology of weanling pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weaning and transport stress can have a negative impact on the piglet's immune system and intestinal microbiota. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of a yeast product on innate immunity and microbial ecology of the gastrointestinal tract following stress of weaning and trans...

  13. Rye Affects Bacterial Translocation, Intestinal Viscosity, Microbiota Composition and Bone Mineralization in Turkey Poults

    PubMed Central

    Tellez, Guillermo; Latorre, Juan D.; Kuttappan, Vivek A.; Hargis, Billy M.; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that rye significantly increased both viscosity and Clostridium perfringens proliferation when compared with corn in an in vitro digestive model. Two independent trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of rye as a source of energy on bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, gut microbiota composition, and bone mineralization, when compared with corn in turkey poults. In each experiment, day-of-hatch, turkey poults were randomly assigned to either a corn or a rye diet (n = 0 /group). At 10 d of age, in both experiments, 12 birds/group were given an oral gavage dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d). After 2.5 h of oral gavage, blood and liver samples were collected to evaluate the passage of FITC-d and bacterial translocation (BT) respectively. Duodenum, ileum and cecum gut sections were collected to evaluate intestinal viscosity and to enumerate gut microbiota. Tibias were collected for observation of bone parameters. Broilers fed with a rye diet showed increased (p<0.05) intestinal viscosity, BT, and serum FITC-d. Bacterial enumeration revealed that turkey poults fed with rye had increased the number of total lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in all three sections of the gastrointestinal tract evaluated when compared to turkey poults fed with corn. Turkey poults fed with rye also had significantly higher coliforms in duodenum and ileum but not in the ceca, whereas the total number of anaerobes increased only in duodenum. A significant reduction in bone strength and bone mineralization was observed in turkey poults fed with rye when compared with corn fed turkey poults. In conclusion, rye evoked mucosal damage in turkey poults that increased intestinal viscosity, increased leakage through the intestinal tract, and altered the microbiota composition and bone mineralization. Studies to evaluate dietary inclusion of selected Direct-Fed Microbial (DFM) candidates that produce exogenous enzymes in rye fed turkey poults are

  14. Dietary fibers affect viscosity of solutions and simulated human gastric and small intestinal digesta.

    PubMed

    Dikeman, Cheryl L; Murphy, Michael R; Fahey, George C

    2006-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the viscosities of both soluble and insoluble dietary fibers. In Expt. 1, corn bran, defatted rice bran, guar gum, gum xanthan, oat bran, psyllium, soy hulls, stabilized rice bran, wheat bran, wood cellulose, and 2 methylcellulose controls (Ticacel 42, Ticacel 43) were hydrated in water overnight at 0.5, 1, 1.5, or 2% concentrations. In Expt. 2, guar gum, oat bran, psyllium, rice bran, wheat bran, and wood cellulose were subjected to a 2-stage in vitro gastric and small intestinal digestion simulation model. Viscosity was measured every 2 and 3 h during gastric and small intestinal simulation, respectively. Viscosities in both experiments were measured at multiple shear rates. Viscosities of all fiber solutions were concentration- and shear rate-dependent. Rice brans, soy hulls, and wood cellulose had the lowest viscosities, whereas guar gum, psyllium, and xanthan gum had the highest viscosities, regardless of concentration. During gastric simulation, viscosity was higher (P < 0.05) at 4 h than at 0 h for guar gum, psyllium, rice bran, and wheat bran. During small intestinal simulation, viscosities were higher (P < 0.05) between 3 and 9 h compared with 18 h for guar gum, oat bran, and rice bran. Guar gum, psyllium, and oat bran exhibited viscous characteristics throughout small intestinal simulation, indicating potential for these fibers to elicit blood glucose and lipid attenuation. Wheat and rice brans and wood cellulose did not exhibit viscous characteristics throughout small intestinal digestion; thus, they may be beneficial for laxation. PMID:16549450

  15. Rye affects bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, microbiota composition and bone mineralization in Turkey poults.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Guillermo; Latorre, Juan D; Kuttappan, Vivek A; Hargis, Billy M; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that rye significantly increased both viscosity and Clostridium perfringens proliferation when compared with corn in an in vitro digestive model. Two independent trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of rye as a source of energy on bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, gut microbiota composition, and bone mineralization, when compared with corn in turkey poults. In each experiment, day-of-hatch, turkey poults were randomly assigned to either a corn or a rye diet (n = 0 /group). At 10 d of age, in both experiments, 12 birds/group were given an oral gavage dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d). After 2.5 h of oral gavage, blood and liver samples were collected to evaluate the passage of FITC-d and bacterial translocation (BT) respectively. Duodenum, ileum and cecum gut sections were collected to evaluate intestinal viscosity and to enumerate gut microbiota. Tibias were collected for observation of bone parameters. Broilers fed with a rye diet showed increased (p<0.05) intestinal viscosity, BT, and serum FITC-d. Bacterial enumeration revealed that turkey poults fed with rye had increased the number of total lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in all three sections of the gastrointestinal tract evaluated when compared to turkey poults fed with corn. Turkey poults fed with rye also had significantly higher coliforms in duodenum and ileum but not in the ceca, whereas the total number of anaerobes increased only in duodenum. A significant reduction in bone strength and bone mineralization was observed in turkey poults fed with rye when compared with corn fed turkey poults. In conclusion, rye evoked mucosal damage in turkey poults that increased intestinal viscosity, increased leakage through the intestinal tract, and altered the microbiota composition and bone mineralization. Studies to evaluate dietary inclusion of selected Direct-Fed Microbial (DFM) candidates that produce exogenous enzymes in rye fed turkey poults are

  16. Influenza Virus Affects Intestinal Microbiota and Secondary Salmonella Infection in the Gut through Type I Interferons.

    PubMed

    Deriu, Elisa; Boxx, Gayle M; He, Xuesong; Pan, Calvin; Benavidez, Sammy David; Cen, Lujia; Rozengurt, Nora; Shi, Wenyuan; Cheng, Genhong

    2016-05-01

    Human influenza viruses replicate almost exclusively in the respiratory tract, yet infected individuals may also develop gastrointestinal symptoms, such as vomiting and diarrhea. However, the molecular mechanisms remain incompletely defined. Using an influenza mouse model, we found that influenza pulmonary infection can significantly alter the intestinal microbiota profile through a mechanism dependent on type I interferons (IFN-Is). Notably, influenza-induced IFN-Is produced in the lungs promote the depletion of obligate anaerobic bacteria and the enrichment of Proteobacteria in the gut, leading to a "dysbiotic" microenvironment. Additionally, we provide evidence that IFN-Is induced in the lungs during influenza pulmonary infection inhibit the antimicrobial and inflammatory responses in the gut during Salmonella-induced colitis, further enhancing Salmonella intestinal colonization and systemic dissemination. Thus, our studies demonstrate a systemic role for IFN-Is in regulating the host immune response in the gut during Salmonella-induced colitis and in altering the intestinal microbial balance after influenza infection. PMID:27149619

  17. Influenza Virus Affects Intestinal Microbiota and Secondary Salmonella Infection in the Gut through Type I Interferons

    PubMed Central

    Deriu, Elisa; Boxx, Gayle M.; He, Xuesong; Pan, Calvin; Benavidez, Sammy David; Cen, Lujia; Rozengurt, Nora; Shi, Wenyuan; Cheng, Genhong

    2016-01-01

    Human influenza viruses replicate almost exclusively in the respiratory tract, yet infected individuals may also develop gastrointestinal symptoms, such as vomiting and diarrhea. However, the molecular mechanisms remain incompletely defined. Using an influenza mouse model, we found that influenza pulmonary infection can significantly alter the intestinal microbiota profile through a mechanism dependent on type I interferons (IFN-Is). Notably, influenza-induced IFN-Is produced in the lungs promote the depletion of obligate anaerobic bacteria and the enrichment of Proteobacteria in the gut, leading to a “dysbiotic” microenvironment. Additionally, we provide evidence that IFN-Is induced in the lungs during influenza pulmonary infection inhibit the antimicrobial and inflammatory responses in the gut during Salmonella-induced colitis, further enhancing Salmonella intestinal colonization and systemic dissemination. Thus, our studies demonstrate a systemic role for IFN-Is in regulating the host immune response in the gut during Salmonella-induced colitis and in altering the intestinal microbial balance after influenza infection. PMID:27149619

  18. Evaluation of epidemiological studies of intestinal bacteria that affected occurrence of colorectal cancer: studies of prevention of colorectal tumors by dairy products and lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Atsuko; Ishikawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Tomiyo; Kono, Koichi

    2010-05-01

    Enviromental factors have been consistently associated with colon cancer risk. In particular, consumption of Western-style diet including red meat is the most widely accepted etiologic risk factor. It has been reported that dietary factors change the proportion of intestinal flora, and it also affects the composition of fecal bile acids and the intestinal activity of some mutagens. In addition, it was suggested that modulating the composition of intestinal flora may reduce the occurrence of colorectal cancer. In this review, we present the clinical studies on the association between intestinal flora and the risk of colorectal cancer that have been carried out to date. The clinical studies of intestinal bacteria related to colorectal cancer risk have not shown consistent results so far, compared with the accomplishments of some basic studies. On the other hand, it was suggested in some clinical studies that lactic acid bacteria reduce the occurrence of colorectal cancer. PMID:20508386

  19. An erythromycin derivative, EM-523, induces motilin-like gastrointestinal motility in dogs.

    PubMed

    Inatomi, N; Satoh, H; Maki, Y; Hashimoto, N; Itoh, Z; Omura, S

    1989-11-01

    The effect of an erythromycin derivative, EM-523, on gastrointestinal motility was investigated in conscious dogs and compared with that of motilin cisapride, trimebutine and metoclopramide. In the fasting state, EM-523 given i.v. or i.d. at 3 micrograms/kg or more induced contractions in the stomach that migrated along the small intestine. The pattern of the contractions was very similar to that induced by motilin. In the digestive state, EM-523 increased the amplitude of gastric contractions. Cisapride and metoclopramide increased gastrointestinal motility both in the fasting and digestive states; however, their contractile pattern was different from that of EM-523. Trimebutine did not induce gastric motility in the fasting state but rather decreased gastric motility in the digestive state. The contractions induced by EM-523 and motilin were inhibited by atropine but were not affected by naloxone, suggesting that the cholinergic pathway is important in the exertion of their action. These results indicate that EM-523 mimics motilin in stimulating gastrointestinal motility and that this agent may be useful treat gastrointestinal disorders such as gastric stasis, gastroesophageal reflux, and postoperative ileus, and so forth. PMID:2810120

  20. Bifidobacteria isolated from infants and cultured on human milk oligosaccharides affect intestinal epithelial function

    PubMed Central

    Chichlowski, Maciej; De Lartigue, Guillaume; German, J. Bruce; Raybould, Helen E.; Mills, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Human milk oligosaccharides (HMO) are the third most abundant component of breast milk. Our laboratory has previously revealed gene clusters specifically linked to HMO metabolism in select bifidobacteria isolated from fecal samples of infants. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that growth of select bifidobacteria on HMO stimulates the intestinal epithelium. Methods Caco-2 and HT-29 cells were incubated with lactose (LAC) or HMO-grown Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis (B. infantis) or B. bifidum. Bacterial adhesion and translocation was measured by real-time quantitative PCR. Expression of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines and tight junction proteins was analyzed by real time reverse transcriptase. Distribution of tight junction proteins was measured using immunofluorescent microscopy. Results We showed that HMO-grown B. infantis had significantly higher rate of adhesion to HT-29 cells compared to B. bifidum. B. infantis also induced expression of a cell membrane glycoprotein, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand -1. Both B. infantis and B. bifidum grown on HMO caused less occludin relocalization and higher expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin (IL)-10 compared to LAC-grown bacteria in Caco-2 cells. B. bifidum grown on HMO showed higher expression of junctional adhesion molecule and occludin in Caco-2 cell and HT-29 cells. There were no significant differences between LAC or HMO treatments in bacterial translocation. Conclusions This study provides evidence for the specific relationship between HMO-grown bifidobacteria and intestinal epithelial cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study describing HMO-induced changes in the bifidobacteria-intestinal cells interaction. PMID:22383026

  1. The feed contaminant deoxynivalenol affects the intestinal barrier permeability through inhibition of protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Awad, Wageha A; Zentek, Jürgen

    2015-06-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) has critical health effects if the contaminated grains consumed by humans or animals. DON can have negative effects on the active transport of glucose and amino acids in the small intestine of chickens. As the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated, the present study was performed to delineate more precisely the effects of cycloheximide (protein synthesis inhibitor, CHX) and DON on the intestinal absorption of nutrients. This was to confirm whether DON effects on nutrient absorption are due to an inhibition of protein synthesis. Changes in ion transport and barrier function were assessed by short-circuit current (Isc) and transepithelial ion conductance (Gt) in Ussing chambers. Addition of D-glucose or L-glutamine to the luminal side of the isolated mucosa of the jejunum increased (P < 0.001) the Isc compared with basal conditions in the control tissues. However, the Isc was not increased by the glucose or glutamine addition after pre-incubation of tissues with DON or CHX. Furthermore, both DON and CHX reduced Gt, indicating that the intestinal barrier is compromised and consequently induced a greater impairment of the barrier function. The remarkable similarity between the activity of CHX and DON on nutrient uptake is consistent with their common ability to inhibit protein synthesis. It can be concluded that the decreases in transport activity by CHX was evident in this study using the chicken as experimental model. Similarly, DON has negative effects on the active transport of some nutrients, and these can be explained by its influence on protein synthesis. PMID:24888376

  2. Colostrum quality affects immune system establishment and intestinal development of neonatal calves.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Zou, Y; Wu, Z H; Li, S L; Cao, Z J

    2015-10-01

    The first meal of a neonatal calf after birth is crucial for survival and health. The present experiment was performed to assess the effects of colostrum quality on IgG passive transfer, immune and antioxidant status, and intestinal morphology and histology in neonatal calves. Twenty-eight Holstein neonatal male calves were used in the current study, 24 of which were assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups: those that received colostrum (GrC), transitional milk (GrT, which was obtained after the first milking on 2-3 d after calving), and bulk tank milk (GrB) only at birth. The 4 extra neonatal calves who were not fed any milk were assigned to the control group and were killed immediately after birth to be a negative control to small intestinal morphology and histology detection. Calves in GrC gained more body weight than in GrT, whereas GrB calves lost 0.4 kg compared with the birth weight. Serum total protein, IgG, and superoxide dismutase concentrations were highest in GrC, GrT was intermediate, whereas GrB was the lowest on d 2, 3, and 7. Apparent efficiency of absorption at 48 h, serum complement 3 (C3), and complement 4 (C4) on d 2, 3, and 7 in GrB was low compared with GrC and GrT. On the contrary, malondialdehyde on d 7 increased in GrB. Calves in GrC had better villus length and width, crypt depth, villus height/crypt depth (V/C) value, and mucosal thickness in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, whereas GrT calves had lower villus length and width, crypt depth, and mucosal thickness than those fed colostrum. Villi of calves in GrB were nonuniform, sparse, severely atrophied, and apically abscised, and Peyer's patches and hydroncus were detected. Overall, colostrum is the best source for calves in IgG absorption, antioxidant activities, and serum growth metabolites, and promoting intestinal development. The higher quality of colostrum calves ingested, the faster immune defense mechanism and the more healthy intestinal circumstances they established. PMID:26233454

  3. Small bowel disaccharidase activity in the rat as affected by intestinal resection and pectin feeding.

    PubMed

    Koruda, M J; Rolandelli, R H; Settle, R G; Rombeau, J L

    1988-03-01

    This study investigated the effects of small bowel resection (SBR) and a pectin-supplemented elemental diet (ED) on intestinal disaccharidase activity. Rats underwent placement of feeding gastrostomy and swivel apparatus. Control animals were returned to their cages while resected animals underwent an 80% SBR. Postoperatively, animals received either a pectin-free ED or the ED supplemented with 2% pectin. After 2 wk jejunal and ileal mucosal sucrase, maltase, and lactase activities and protein content were determined. Feeding the ED after SBR resulted in significant increases in all three ileal segmental disaccharidase activities but only maltase activity was significantly increased in the jejunum. The pectin-supplemented ED, however, significantly enhanced the adaptation of jejunal and ileal segmental sucrase, maltase, and lactase activity to SBR with the increase in all three jejunal disaccharidase activities being significantly greater than that of the resected animals fed the ED alone. PMID:3126640

  4. Fumonisins affect the intestinal microbial homeostasis in broiler chickens, predisposing to necrotic enteritis.

    PubMed

    Antonissen, Gunther; Croubels, Siska; Pasmans, Frank; Ducatelle, Richard; Eeckhaut, Venessa; Devreese, Mathias; Verlinden, Marc; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Eeckhout, Mia; De Saeger, Sarah; Antlinger, Birgit; Novak, Barbara; Martel, An; Van Immerseel, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Fumonisins (FBs) are mycotoxins produced by Fusarium fungi. This study aimed to investigate the effect of these feed contaminants on the intestinal morphology and microbiota composition, and to evaluate whether FBs predispose broilers to necrotic enteritis. One-day-old broiler chicks were divided into a group fed a control diet, and a group fed a FBs contaminated diet (18.6 mg FB1+FB2/kg feed). A significant increase in the plasma sphinganine/sphingosine ratio in the FBs-treated group (0.21 ± 0.016) compared to the control (0.14 ± 0.014) indicated disturbance of the sphingolipid biosynthesis. Furthermore, villus height and crypt depth of the ileum was significantly reduced by FBs. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis showed a shift in the microbiota composition in the ileum in the FBs group compared to the control. A reduced presence of low-GC containing operational taxonomic units in ileal digesta of birds exposed to FBs was demonstrated, and identified as a reduced abundance of Candidatus Savagella and Lactobaccilus spp. Quantification of total Clostridium perfringens in these ileal samples, previous to experimental infection, using cpa gene (alpha toxin) quantification by qPCR showed an increase in C. perfringens in chickens fed a FBs contaminated diet compared to control (7.5 ± 0.30 versus 6.3 ± 0.24 log10 copies/g intestinal content). After C. perfringens challenge, a higher percentage of birds developed subclinical necrotic enteritis in the group fed a FBs contaminated diet as compared to the control (44.9 ± 2.22% versus 29.8 ± 5.46%). PMID:26394675

  5. Parenteral and enteral feeding in preterm piglets differently affects extracellular matrix proteins, enterocyte proliferation and apoptosis in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Oste, Marijke; De Vos, Maartje; Van Haver, Els; Van Brantegem, Leen; Thymann, Thomas; Sangild, Per; Weyns, Andre; Van Ginneken, Chris

    2010-10-01

    The preterm intestine is immature and responds differently to total parenteral nutrition (TPN) and enteral nutrition, compared with the term intestine. We hypothesised that in preterms, diet composition and feeding route affect mucosal morphology, enterocyte mitosis and apoptosis, and the distribution of laminin-1, fibronectin and collagen IV (extracellular matrix proteins (ECMP)). Preterm piglets (93.5 % of gestation) were delivered via caesarean section and birth weight-matched allocated to one of the four experimental groups: the piglets were either euthanised immediately after delivery, after 3 d of TPN or after 2 d enteral feeding with colostrum or milk formula, following 3 d of TPN. We combined immunohistochemistry, image analysis and stereological measurements to describe the intestinal mucosal layer. No significant changes occurred after 3 d of TPN. Feeding colostrum or milk replacer for 2 d after TPN was associated with an increased crypt depth. Only enteral feeding with colostrum resulted in an increased villus height and mitotic index. Neither TPN nor enteral feeding changed the distribution pattern of ECMP or the occurrence of bifid crypts. The immature distribution pattern of ECMP in TPN-fed piglets, coupled with unchanged enterocyte mitosis and apoptosis indices, illustrates that feeding preterm pigs 3 d TPN does not lead to mucosal atrophy. Despite the invariable distribution of ECMP, colostrum was associated with crypt hyperplasia resulting in an increased villus height. These data illustrate that some mechanisms regulating cell turnover are immature in preterms and may in part explain the abnormal gut responses to TPN and enteral feeding in prematurely born pigs. PMID:20887647

  6. GLP-1: broadening the incretin concept to involve gut motility.

    PubMed

    Hellström, Per M

    2009-08-01

    The incretin effect of the gut peptide hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a combined result of inhibition of gastric emptying and stimulation of insulin secretion via an incretin mechanism. The temporal pattern of these events implicate that gastric emptying is primarily delayed, while later in the digestive process insulin is released for nutrient disposal. Since the inhibitory effect of GLP-1 on gastric motility is very outspoken, we considered it of value to study its effects on gut motility. Animal experimentation in the rat clearly showed that not only gastric emptying, but also small bowel motility with the migrating myoelectric complex was profoundly inhibited by GLP-1 at low doses. Similar effects were seen with analogues of the peptide. Extending the studies to man supported our earliest data indicating that the migrating motor complex of the small intestine was affected, and even more noticeable, the summarized motility index inhibited. Further extension of our studies to patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) displayed similar results. This encouraged us to embark on a clinical pain-relief multi-centre study in IBS patients using a GLP-1 analogue, ROSE-010, with longer half-life than the native peptide. The outcome of the IBS study proved ROSE-010 to be superior to placebo with a pain-relief response rate of 24% for ROSE-010 compared to 12% for placebo. Taken together, the GLP-1 analogue ROSE-010 is believed to cause relaxation of the gut and can thereby relieve an acute pain attack of IBS, even though its precise mechanism is yet to be defined. PMID:19362109

  7. Selective mass treatment with ivermectin to control intestinal helminthiases and parasitic skin diseases in a severely affected population.

    PubMed Central

    Heukelbach, Jörg; Winter, Benedikt; Wilcke, Thomas; Muehlen, Marion; Albrecht, Stephan; de Oliveira, Fabíola Araújo Sales; Kerr-Pontes, Lígia Regina Sansigolo; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Feldmeier, Hermann

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the short-term and long-term impact of selective mass treatment with ivermectin on the prevalence of intestinal helminthiases and parasitic skin diseases in an economically depressed community in north-east Brazil. METHODS: An intervention was carried out in a traditional fishing village in north-east Brazil where the population of 605 is heavily affected by ectoparasites and enteroparasites. The prevalence of intestinal helminths was determined by serial stool examination and the prevalence of parasitic skin diseases by clinical inspection. A total of 525 people out of a target population of 576 were treated at baseline. The majority of these were treated with ivermectin (200 microg/kg with a second dose given after 10 days). If ivermectin was contraindicated, participants were treated with albendazole or mebendazole for intestinal helminths or with topical deltamethrin for ectoparasites. Follow-up examinations were performed at 1 month and 9 months after treatment. FINDINGS: Prevalence rates of intestinal helminthiases before treatment and at 1 month and 9 months after mass treatment were: hookworm disease 28.5%, 16.4% and 7.7%; ascariasis 17.1%, 0.4% and 7.2%; trichuriasis 16.5%, 3.4% and 9.4%; strongyloidiasis 11.0%, 0.6% and 0.7%; and hymenolepiasis 0.6%; 0.4% and 0.5%, respectively. Prevalence rates of parasitic skin diseases before treatment and 1 month and 9 months after mass treatment were: active pediculosis 16.1%, 1.0% and 10.3%; scabies 3.8%, 1.0% and 1.5%; cutaneous larva migrans 0.7%, 0% and 0%; tungiasis 51.3%, 52.1% and 31.2%, respectively. Adverse events occurred in 9.4% of treatments. They were all of mild to moderate severity and were transient. CONCLUSION: Mass treatment with ivermectin was an effective and safe means of reducing the prevalence of most of the parasitic diseases prevalent in a poor community in north-east Brazil. The effects of treatment lasted for a prolonged period of time. PMID:15375445

  8. Proteome analysis of the macroscopically affected colonic mucosa of Crohn’s disease and intestinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rukmangadachar, Lokesh A.; Makharia, Govind K.; Mishra, Asha; Das, Prasenjit; Hariprasad, Gururao; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Ahuja, Vineet; Acharya, Subrat K.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation between intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and Crohn’s disease (CD) is challenging in geographical regions where both these diseases are prevalent. There is a need of biomarkers for differentiation between these two disorders. Colonic biopsies from inflamed mucosa of treatment-naive patients with ITB, CD and controls were used for analysis. Protein extracted from biopsies was digested with trypsin and resulting peptides were labeled with iTRAQ reagents. The peptides were subsequently analyzed using LC-MS/MS for identification and quantification. Gene ontology annotation for proteins was analyzed in PANTHER. Validation experiments were done for six differentially expressed proteins using immunohistochemistry. 533 proteins were identified and 241 proteins were quantified from 5 sets of iTRAQ experiments. While 63 were differentially expressed in colonic mucosa of patients with CD and ITB in at least one set of iTRAQ experiment, 11 proteins were differentially expressed in more than one set of experiments. Six proteins used for validation using immunohistochemistry in a larger cohort of patients; none of them however was differentially expressed in patients with ITB and CD. There are differentially expressed proteins in tissue proteome of CD and ITB. Further experiments are required using a larger cohort of homogeneous tissue samples. PMID:26988818

  9. Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 supplementation affects intestinal immune-associated gene expression in post-weaning piglets.

    PubMed

    Siepert, Bianca; Reinhardt, Nicole; Kreuzer, Susanne; Bondzio, Angelika; Twardziok, Sven; Brockmann, Gudrun; Nöckler, Karsten; Szabó, Istvan; Janczyk, Pawel; Pieper, Robert; Tedin, Karsten

    2014-01-15

    In a Salmonella challenge study of weaned piglets supplemented with the probiotic Enterococcus faecium NCIMB 10415 (SF68), we observed a delayed, post-infection proliferative response of purified blood mononuclear cell fractions towards Salmonella antigens. In order to clarify this observation, we examined the patterns of immune-associated gene expression in long-term feeding trials of both pre- and post-weaning piglets. Piglets supplemented with E. faecium NCIMB 10415 showed a post-weaning dysregulation in the expression patterns of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine expression in intestinal tissues and spleen. Piglets of the supplemented group showed significantly reduced levels of IL-8, IL-10 and the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 mRNA expression in ileal Peyer's patches. The expression of CTLA4, an inhibitor of T-cell activation/proliferation, showed similar levels of expression in all tissues examined, particularly in ileal Peyer's patches post-weaning where IL-8, IL-10 and CD86 transcript levels were significantly reduced relative to control animals. Blood serum cytokine protein levels showed elevated TGFβ in pre-weaning piglets which, together with IL-6, may have suppressed IFNγ production in the probiotic-fed animals. In a second Salmonella challenge study, post-weaning, E. faecium-fed animals showed significantly elevated levels of IL-8 gene expression in mesenteric lymph nodes, but reduced levels in the spleen. At early times post-infection, the probiotic-fed group showed similar levels of IL-10, CD86 and CTLA4 mRNA expression as the control animals in intestinal Peyer's Patches, despite high relative levels of IL-8 expression in mesenteric lymph nodes. The sum of the observations suggests that supplementation of pre-weaning piglets with E. faecium affects intestinal immune-associated gene expression, which is aggravated post-weaning when the animals receive increased levels of the probiotic in feed. We suggest the post-weaning reductions in gene

  10. Lactose-egg yolk diluent supplemented with N-acetyl-D-glucosamine affect acrosome morphology and motility of frozen-thawed boar sperm.

    PubMed

    Yi, Y J; Im, G S; Park, C S

    2002-12-16

    These experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, and to obtain additional information about the effect of orvus es paste (OEP) and egg yolk concentration in the freezing of boar sperm in the maxi-straw. The highest post-thaw acrosomes of normal apical ridge (NAR) and motility were obtained with 0.025 or 0.05% N-acetyl-D-glucosamine concentration in the first diluent. However, there were no effects of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine among the diluents with or without N-acetyl-D-glucosamine at the second dilution. The N-acetyl-D-glucosamine in the first and second diluents was added at room temperatures (20-23 degrees C) and 5 degrees C, respectively. It is suggested that the temperature of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine addition is important for the effect of boar sperm protection during freezing and thawing. When the 0.05% N-acetyl-D-glucosamine was supplemented in the first diluent, the optimum final OEP content was 0.5%. The optimum content of egg yolk in the diluent with 0.05% N-acetyl-D-glucosamine concentration was 20% and egg yolk was one of the main cryoprotective agents. In conclusion, we found out that the diluent with 0.025 or 0.05% soluble N-acetyl-D-glucosamine in the first diluent, 0.5% final orvus es paste concentration and 20% egg yolk concentration significantly enhanced NAR acrosomes and motility of boar sperm after freezing and thawing. PMID:12417120

  11. Giardia Flagellar Motility Is Not Directly Required to Maintain Attachment to Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    House, Susan A.; Richter, David J.; Pham, Jonathan K.; Dawson, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia trophozoites attach to the intestinal microvilli (or inert surfaces) using an undefined “suction-based” mechanism, and remain attached during cell division to avoid peristalsis. Flagellar motility is a key factor in Giardia's pathogenesis and colonization of the host small intestine. Specifically, the beating of the ventral flagella, one of four pairs of motile flagella, has been proposed to generate a hydrodynamic force that results in suction-based attachment via the adjacent ventral disc. We aimed to test this prevailing “hydrodynamic model” of attachment mediated by flagellar motility. We defined four distinct stages of attachment by assessing surface contacts of the trophozoite with the substrate during attachment using TIRF microscopy (TIRFM). The lateral crest of the ventral disc forms a continuous perimeter seal with the substrate, a cytological indication that trophozoites are fully attached. Using trophozoites with two types of molecularly engineered defects in flagellar beating, we determined that neither ventral flagellar beating, nor any flagellar beating, is necessary for the maintenance of attachment. Following a morpholino-based knockdown of PF16, a central pair protein, both the beating and morphology of flagella were defective, but trophozoites could still initiate proper surface contacts as seen using TIRFM and could maintain attachment in several biophysical assays. Trophozoites with impaired motility were able to attach as well as motile cells. We also generated a strain with defects in the ventral flagellar waveform by overexpressing a dominant negative form of alpha2-annexin::GFP (D122A, D275A). This dominant negative alpha2-annexin strain could initiate attachment and had only a slight decrease in the ability to withstand normal and shear forces. The time needed for attachment did increase in trophozoites with overall defective flagellar beating, however. Thus while not directly required for attachment, flagellar motility is

  12. Chemical form of selenium affects its uptake, transport and glutathione peroxidase activity in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining the effect of selenium (Se) chemical form on uptake and transport in human intestinal cells is critical to assess Se bioavailability. In the present study, we measured the uptake and transport of various Se compounds in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. We found that two sources...

  13. Curcumin affects cell survival and cell volume regulation in human renal and intestinal cells

    PubMed Central

    Kössler, Sonja; Nofziger, Charity; Jakab, Martin; Dossena, Silvia; Paulmichl, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin (1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1E,6E-heptadiene-3,5-dione or diferuloyl methane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, commonly known as turmeric. This substance has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries for its anti-oxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activity. More recently curcumin has been found to possess anti-cancer properties linked to its pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative actions. The underlying mechanisms of these diverse effects are complex, not fully elucidated and subject of intense scientific debate. Despite increasing evidence indicating that different cation channels can be a molecular target for curcumin, very little is known about the effect of curcumin on chloride channels. Since, (i) the molecular structure of curcumin indicates that the substance could potentially interact with chloride channels, (ii) chloride channels play a role during the apoptotic process and regulation of the cell volume, and (iii) apoptosis is a well known effect of curcumin, we set out to investigate whether or not curcumin could (i) exert a modulatory effect (direct or indirect) on the swelling activated chloride current IClswell in a human cell system, therefore (ii) affect cell volume regulation and (iii) ultimately modulate cell survival. The IClswell channels, which are essential for regulating the cell volume after swelling, are also known to be activated under isotonic conditions as an early event in the apoptotic process. Here we show that long-term exposure of a human kidney cell line to extracellular 0.1–10 μM curcumin modulates IClswell in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 μM curcumin is ineffective, 0.5–5.0 μM curcumin increase, while 10 μM curcumin decrease the current), and short-term exposure to micromolar concentrations of curcumin does not affect IClswell neither if applied from the extracellular nor from the intracellular side – therefore, a direct effect of curcumin on

  14. Toll-like receptor 4 contributes to the inhibitory effect of morphine on colonic motility in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Farzi, Aitak; Halicka, Juraj; Mayerhofer, Raphaela; Fröhlich, Esther E; Tatzl, Eva; Holzer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Opioids rank among the most potent analgesic drugs but gastrointestinal side effects, especially constipation, limit their therapeutic utility. The adverse effects of opioids have been attributed to stimulation of opioid receptors, but emerging evidence suggests that opioids interact with the innate immune receptor Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and its signalling pathway. As TLR4 signalling affects gastrointestinal motility, we examined the involvement of TLR4 in morphine-induced depression of peristaltic motility in the guinea-pig intestine in vitro and male C57BL/6N mice in vivo. While the TLR4 antagonist TAK-242 (0.1 μM and 1 μM) did not alter the morphine-induced inhibition of peristalsis in the isolated guinea-pig small intestine, the morphine-induced decrease in pellet propulsion velocity in colonic segments was attenuated by TAK-242 (0.1 μM). The ability of TAK-242 (4 mg/kg) to mitigate the morphine-induced suppression of colonic motility was replicated in mice in vivo by measuring the expulsion time of beads inserted in the distal colon. The inhibition of upper gastrointestinal transit of mice by morphine was not affected by pre-treatment with TAK-242 (4 mg/kg) in vivo. This is the first report that morphine-induced inhibition of colonic peristalsis is alleviated by TLR4 antagonism. We therefore conclude that TLR4 may contribute to opioid-induced constipation. PMID:25962524

  15. Feeding rates affect growth, intestinal digestive and absorptive capabilities and endocrine functions of juvenile blunt snout bream Megalobrama amblycephala.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Li, Xiang-Fei; Tian, Hong-Yan; Jiang, Guang-Zhen; Liu, Wen-Bin

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the optimal feeding rate for juvenile blunt snout bream (average initial weight 23.74 ± 0.09 g) based on the results on growth performance, intestinal digestive and absorptive capabilities and endocrine functions. A total of 840 fish were randomly distributed into 24 cages and fed a commercial feed at six feeding rates ranging from 2.0 to 7.0 % body weight (BW)/day. The results indicated that weight gain rate increased significantly (P < 0.05) as feeding rates increased from 2.0 to 5.0 % BW/day, but decreased with the further increasing feeding rates (P > 0.05). Protein efficiency ratio and nitrogen and energy retention all showed a similar trend. However, feed conversion ratio increased significantly (P < 0.05) with increasing feeding rates. Feeding rates have little effects (P > 0.05) on whole-body moisture, ash and protein contents, but significantly (P < 0.05) affect both lipid and energy contents with the highest values both observed in fish fed 4.0 % BW/day. In addition, moderate ration sizes (2.0-4.0 % BW/day) resulted in the enhanced activities of intestinal enzymes, including lipase, protease, Na(+), K(+)-ATPase, alkaline phosphatase and creatine kinase. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of growth hormone, insulin-like growth factors-I, growth hormone receptor and neuropeptide all increased significantly (P < 0.05) as feeding rates increased from 2.0 to 5.0 % and 6.0 % BW/day, but decreased significantly (P < 0.05) with the further increase in feeding rates, whereas both leptin and cholecystokinin expressions showed an opposite trend. Based on the broken-line regression analysis of SGR against feeding rates, the optimal feeding rate for juvenile blunt snout bream was estimated to be 4.57 % BW/day. PMID:26597852

  16. Age-Related P-Glycoprotein Expression in the Intestine and Affecting the Pharmacokinetics of Orally Administered Enrofloxacin in Broilers

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yong; Zhang, Yu; Dong, Lingling; Dai, Xiaohua; Wang, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Bioavailability is the most important factor for the efficacy of any drug and it is determined by P- glycoprotein (P-gp) expression. Confirmation of P-gp expression during ontogeny is needed for understanding the differences in therapeutic efficacy of any drug in juvenile and adult animals. In this study, Abcb1 mRNA levels in the liver and intestine of broilers during ontogeny were analysed by RT qPCR. Cellular distribution of P-gp was detected by immunohistochemstry. Age-related differences of enrofloxacin pharmacokinetics were also studied. It was found that broilers aged 4 week-old expressed significantly (P<0.01) higher levels of P-gp mRNA in the liver, jejunum and ileum, than at other ages. However, there was no significant (P>0.05) age-related difference in the duodenum. Furthermore, the highest and lowest levels of Abcb1 mRNA expression were observed in the jejunum, and duodenum, respectively. P-gp immunoreactivity was detected on the apical surface of the enterocytes and in the bile canalicular membranes of the hepatocytes. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that the 8 week-old broilers, when orally administrated enrofloxacin, exhibited significantly higher Cmax (1.97 vs. 0.98 μg•ml-1, P=0.009), AUC(14.54 vs. 9.35 μg•ml-1•h, P=0.005) and Ka (1.38 vs. 0.43 h-1, P=0.032), as well as lower Tpeak (1.78 vs. 3.28 h, P=0.048) and T1/2ka (0.6 vs. 1.64 h, P=0.012) than the 4 week-old broilers. The bioavailability of enrofloxacin in 8 week-old broilers was increased by 15.9%, compared with that in 4 week-old birds. Interestingly, combining verapamil, a P-gp modulator, significantly improved pharmacokinetic behaviour of enrofloxacin in all birds. The results indicate juvenile broilers had a higher expression of P-gp in the intestine, affecting the pharmacokinetics and reducing the bioavailability of oral enrofloxacin in broilers. On the basis of our results, it is recommended that alternative dose regimes are necessary for different ages of broilers for

  17. The physiology of the biliary tree. Motility of the gallbladder--part 1.

    PubMed

    Ballal, M A; Sanford, P A

    1999-09-01

    An incomplete picture has emerged of the complex means by which gallbladder motility is controlled under normal and pathophysiological conditions. In the first part of this review an overall account is presented. The mechanisms of cholecystokinin release, its stimulation by dietary factors and peptides elaborated by both pancreas and small intestine are discussed. The inhibition of cholecystokinin release by bile acids and proteases is also described. In the second part attention is focussed on other peptides affecting motility. These include (a) octreotide, effective for treatment of acromegaly, (b) peptide YY, contributing to a "colonic brake', (c) motilin. associated with interdigestive contractions, analogues of which possibly correct gallbladder hypomotility, and (d) substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, which facilitate ganglionic transmission after release from extrinsic sensory neurones and alter gallbladder responses to vagal stimulation. The sympathetic nervous system and diabetes mellitus also influence vagal responses. The former, acting presynaptically, may provide a "brake" to prevent vagal overactivity. The latter could cause hypomotility via autonomic neuropathy, although hyperglycaemia, itself, may play a role. The role of nitric oxide, released from neurones also producing vasoactive intestinal peptide is recognized. Both lengthen muscle, the former producing responses without requiring plasma membrane receptors. Gallbladder motility also changes during pregnancy and stone formation. Progesterone and cholesterol can limit G protein actions, thus impairing contractions. Inflammation is associated with abnormal motility. The production of reactive oxygen metabolites, acting directly or releasing prokinetic prostaglandins, may be responsible. It has been proposed that the gastrointestinal tract may be normally in a state of controlled inflammation, primed to react to harmful challenges. PMID:19864732

  18. Intrauterine growth restriction in neonatal piglets affects small intestinal mucosal permeability and mRNA expression of redox-sensitive genes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Degroote, Jeroen; Van Ginneken, Chris; Van Poucke, Mario; Vergauwen, Hans; Dam, Thi Minh Tho; Vanrompay, Daisy; Peelman, Luc J; De Smet, Stefaan; Michiels, Joris

    2016-02-01

    Neonates with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) show lower efficiency of nutrient utilization compared to normal birth weight (NBW) newborns. This study was conducted using neonatal piglets as a model to test the hypothesis that IUGR affects the intestinal barrier function, intestinal structure, and antioxidant system development during the suckling period. The small intestinal mucosae were obtained from IUGR and NBW littermates in the suckling period (d 0, 3, 8, and 19 postnatal). The epithelial barrier function was assessed by FITC-dextran 4 (FD4) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP) fluxes across the epithelium, histomorphologic measurements, and expression of tight-junction proteins. Redox status represented by the glutathione disulfide/glutathione ratio and malondialdehyde concentrations was determined, whereas mRNA expressions of some redox-sensitive proteins were quantified. Results showed that IUGR piglets exhibited a 2-fold higher intestinal permeability in the proximal small intestine on d 0 (P < 0.05), and this difference between IUGR and NBW piglets was widened to 3 and 4 times for FD4 and HRP, respectively (P < 0.05), on d 3. In accordance, expression of occludin was down-regulated at the transcriptional level in IUGR piglets at d 0 and 19 (P < 0.01). Furthermore, the transcription of heme oxygenase 1, catalase, and thioredoxin reductase genes was down-regulated in IUGR piglets, mainly on postnatal d 0 and 19 (P < 0.01). It appears that IUGR subjects have a lower capacity to mount an antioxidant response in the early postnatal period. Collectively, these results add to our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for intestinal dysfunction in IUGR neonates. PMID:26514167

  19. Real-time gastric motility monitoring using transcutaneous intraluminal impedance measurements (TIIM).

    PubMed

    Poscente, M D; Wang, G; Filip, D; Ninova, P; Yadid-Pecht, O; Andrews, C N; Mintchev, M P

    2014-02-01

    The stomach plays a critical role in digestion, processing ingested food mechanically and breaking it up into particles, which can be effectively and efficiently processed by the intestines. When the motility of the stomach is compromised, digestion is adversely affected. This can lead to a variety of disorders. Current diagnostic techniques for gastric motility disorders are seriously lacking, and are based more on eliminating other possibilities rather than on specific tests. Presently, gastric motility can be assessed by monitoring gastric emptying, food transit, intragastric pressures, etc. The associated tests are usually stationary and of relatively short duration. The present study proposes a new method of measuring gastric motility, utilizing the attenuation of an oscillator-induced electrical signal across the gastric tissue, which is modulated by gastric contractions. The induced high-frequency oscillator signal is generated within the stomach, and is picked up transluminally by cutaneous electrodes positioned on the abdominal area connected to a custom-designed data acquisition instrument. The proposed method was implemented in two different designs: first a transoral catheter was modified to emit the signal inside the stomach; and second, a gastric retentive pill was designed to emit the signal. Both implementations were applied in vivo on two mongrel dogs (25.50 kg and 25.75 kg). Gastric contractions were registered and quantitatively compared to recordings from force transducers sutured onto the serosa of the stomach. Gastric motility indices were calculated for each minute, with transluminal impedance measurements and the measurements from the force transducers showing statistically significant (p < 0.05) Pearson correlation coefficients (0.65 ± 0.08 for the catheter-based design and 0.77 ± 0.03 for the gastric retentive pill design). These results show that transcutaneous intraluminal impedance measurement has the potential with further research

  20. Intestinal Epithelial Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Affects Epithelial Function and Colonic Microbiota and Promotes a Risk for Transmissible Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Dheer, Rishu; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Davies, Julie M.; Lang, Jessica K.; Phillips, Matthew C.; Pastorini, Cristhine; Vazquez-Pertejo, Maria T.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence obtained from gene knockout studies supports the role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in intestinal inflammation and microbiota recognition. Increased epithelial TLR4 expression is observed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. However, little is known of the effect of increased TLR4 signaling on intestinal homeostasis. Here, we examined the effect of increased TLR4 signaling on epithelial function and microbiota by using transgenic villin-TLR4 mice that overexpress TLR4 in the intestinal epithelium. Our results revealed that villin-TLR4 mice are characterized by increases in the density of mucosa-associated bacteria and bacterial translocation. Furthermore, increased epithelial TLR4 signaling was associated with an impaired epithelial barrier, altered expression of antimicrobial peptide genes, and altered epithelial cell differentiation. The composition of the colonic luminal and mucosa-associated microbiota differed between villin-TLR4 and wild-type (WT) littermates. Interestingly, WT mice cohoused with villin-TLR4 mice displayed greater susceptibility to acute colitis than singly housed WT mice did. The results of this study suggest that epithelial TLR4 expression shapes the microbiota and affects the functional properties of the epithelium. The changes in the microbiota induced by increased epithelial TLR4 signaling are transmissible and exacerbate dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis. Together, our findings imply that host innate immune signaling can modulate intestinal bacteria and ultimately the host's susceptibility to colitis. PMID:26755160

  1. Intestinal Epithelial Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling Affects Epithelial Function and Colonic Microbiota and Promotes a Risk for Transmissible Colitis.

    PubMed

    Dheer, Rishu; Santaolalla, Rebeca; Davies, Julie M; Lang, Jessica K; Phillips, Matthew C; Pastorini, Cristhine; Vazquez-Pertejo, Maria T; Abreu, Maria T

    2016-03-01

    Evidence obtained from gene knockout studies supports the role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in intestinal inflammation and microbiota recognition. Increased epithelial TLR4 expression is observed in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. However, little is known of the effect of increased TLR4 signaling on intestinal homeostasis. Here, we examined the effect of increased TLR4 signaling on epithelial function and microbiota by using transgenic villin-TLR4 mice that overexpress TLR4 in the intestinal epithelium. Our results revealed that villin-TLR4 mice are characterized by increases in the density of mucosa-associated bacteria and bacterial translocation. Furthermore, increased epithelial TLR4 signaling was associated with an impaired epithelial barrier, altered expression of antimicrobial peptide genes, and altered epithelial cell differentiation. The composition of the colonic luminal and mucosa-associated microbiota differed between villin-TLR4 and wild-type (WT) littermates. Interestingly, WT mice cohoused with villin-TLR4 mice displayed greater susceptibility to acute colitis than singly housed WT mice did. The results of this study suggest that epithelial TLR4 expression shapes the microbiota and affects the functional properties of the epithelium. The changes in the microbiota induced by increased epithelial TLR4 signaling are transmissible and exacerbate dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis. Together, our findings imply that host innate immune signaling can modulate intestinal bacteria and ultimately the host's susceptibility to colitis. PMID:26755160

  2. Vegetable lipid sources affect in vitro biosynthesis of triacylglycerols and phospholipids in the intestine of sea bream (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Caballero, Maria José; Gallardo, Germán; Robaina, Lidia; Montero, Daniel; Fernández, Antonio; Izquierdo, Marisol

    2006-03-01

    Despite the good growth performance of several fish species when dietary fish oil is partly replaced by vegetable oils, recent studies have reported several types of intestinal morphological alterations in cultured fish fed high contents of vegetable lipid sources. However, the physiological process implied in these morphological changes have not been clarified yet, since alterations in the physiological mechanisms involved in the different processes of lipid absorption could be responsible for such gut morphological features. The objective of the present study was to investigate the activities of reacylation pathways in fish, the glycerol-3-phosphate and the monoacylglycerol pathways, in order to clarify the intestinal triacylglycerol (TAG) and phospholipid biosynthesis to better understand the morphological alterations observed in the intestine of fish fed vegetable oils. Intestinal microsomes of sea bream fed different lipid sources (fish, soyabean and rapeseed oils) at three different inclusion levels were isolated and incubated with L-[(14)C(U)]glycerol-3-phosphate and [1-(14)C]palmitoyl CoA. The results showed that in this fish species the glycerol-3-phosphate pathway is mainly involved in phospholipid synthesis, whereas TAG synthesis is mainly mediated by the monoacylglycerol pathway. Feeding with rapeseed oil reduced the reacylation activity in both pathways, explaining the high accumulation of lipid droplets in the supranuclear portion of the intestinal epithelium, whereas soyabean oil enhanced phosphatidylcholine synthesis, being associated with the increase in VLDL found in previous studies. PMID:16512929

  3. Assessment of the Effect of Intestinal Permeability Probes (Lactulose And Mannitol) and Other Liquids on Digesta Residence Times in Various Segments of the Gut Determined by Wireless Motility Capsule: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sequeira, Ivana R.; Lentle, Roger G.; Kruger, Marlena C.; Hurst, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whilst the use of the mannitol/lactulose test for intestinal permeability has been long established it is not known whether the doses of these sugars modify transit time Similarly it is not known whether substances such as aspirin that are known to increase intestinal permeability to lactulose and mannitol and those such as ascorbic acid which are stated to be beneficial to gastrointestinal health also influence intestinal transit time. Methods Gastric and intestinal transit times were determined with a SmartPill following consumption of either a lactulose mannitol solution, a solution containing 600 mg aspirin, a solution containing 500 mg of ascorbic acid or an extract of blackcurrant, and compared by doubly repeated measures ANOVA with those following consumption of the same volume of a control in a cross-over study in six healthy female volunteers. The dominant frequencies of cyclic variations in gastric pressure recorded by the Smartpill were determined by fast Fourier transforms. Results The gastric transit times of lactulose mannitol solutions, of aspirin solutions and of blackcurrant juice did not differ from those of the control. The gastric transit times of the ascorbic acid solutions were significantly shorter than those of the other solutions. There were no significant differences between the various solutions either in the total small intestinal or colonic transit times. The intraluminal pHs during the initial quartiles of the small intestinal transit times were lower than those in the succeeding quartiles. This pattern did not vary with the solution that was consumed. The power of the frequencies of cyclic variation in intragastric pressure recorded by the Smartpill declined exponentially with increase in frequency and did not peak at the reported physiological frequencies of gastric contractile activity. Conclusions Whilst the segmental residence times were broadly similar to those using other methods, the high degree of variation between

  4. Effects of motility on epithelial transport in the human descending duodenum.

    PubMed

    Mellander, A; Järbur, K; Hemlin, M; Sjövall, H

    2001-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine how motility affects the balance between absorptive and secretory ion transport in the proximal human small intestine. Thirty-two healthy subjects and 16 patients (eight with villus atrophy, eight with normal duodenal biopsies) were studied. The absorptive sodium flux was estimated by measurement of bicarbonate absorption with a double-lumen perfusion technique. The secretory chloride flux was calculated from the ratio between the continuously recorded transmural potential difference (PD) and the epithelial parallel resistance, which was measured in forceps biopsies by square-wave current analysis. Graded variations in contraction frequency were obtained by recording during defined time periods before, during and after phase III of the migrating motor complex (MMC). Bicarbonate was absorbed by a process that led to CO2 formation, and both bicarbonate absorption and luminal PCO2 increased with contraction frequency. The motility-related PCO2 rise was reduced in patients with villus atrophy and by removal of bicarbonate from the perfusate. A higher motor activity was also associated with a larger PD (more lumen negative). Both the absorptive and the secretory fluxes were thus enhanced by motility. The estimated absorptive flux was approximately twice as large as the secretory flux during periods of low motor activity, and four times as large during submaximal motor activity. We conclude that motor activity affects both absorptive and secretory mucosal function in a quantifiable manner. Information about the behaviour of the respective linkage functions may make it possible to model the intestinal absorption process in vivo. PMID:11437741

  5. Cell motility on nanotopography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Masahiro; Tsai, Irene; Green, Angelo; Jacobson, Bruce; Russell, Thomas

    2003-03-01

    Cell motility is strongly influenced by the structure of the substratum. Understanding cells motility on a surface has significant applications both in vivo and in vitro applications, such as biological sensors and hip replacement. A gradient surface is used to study the effect of the lateral nanotopography on cell motility. A gradient surface is generated by block copolymer and homopolymer blends, where the concentration of the components varies uniformly across the surface. The two homopolymers phase separate on the micron scale and this length scale gradually decrease to the nanoscopic, i.e. microphase separation of the diblock, as the copolymer concentration increases. Quantitative analysis of the speed of cell migration is correlated to the lateral length scale of the surface.

  6. Influence of the Enteric Nervous System on Gut Motility Patterns in Zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ryan; Ganz, Julia; Melancon, Ellie; Eisen, Judith; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    The enteric nervous system (ENS), composed of diverse neuronal subtypes and glia, regulates essential gut functions including motility, secretion, and homeostasis. In humans and animals, decreased numbers of enteric neurons lead to a variety of types of gut dysfunction. However, surprisingly little is known about how the number, position, or subtype of enteric neurons affect the regulation of gut peristalsis, due to the lack of good model systems and the lack of tools for the quantitative characterization of gut motion. We have therefore developed a method of quantitative spatiotemporal mapping using differential interference contrast microscopy and particle image velocimetry, and have applied this to investigate intestinal dynamics in normal and mutant larval zebrafish. From movies of gut motility, we obtain a velocity vector field representative of gut motion, from which we can quantify parameters relating to gut peristalsis such as frequency, wave speed, deformation amplitudes, wave duration, and non-linearity of waves. We show that mutants with reduced neuron number have contractions that are more regular in time and reduced in amplitude compared to wild-type (normal) fish. We also show that feeding fish before their yolk is consumed leads to stronger motility patterns. We acknowledge support from NIH awards P50 GM098911 and P01 HD022486.

  7. Motility of the diplomonad fish parasite Spironucleus vortens through thixotropic solid media.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, David; Lewis, Iwan B; Williams, Catrin F; Hayes, Anthony J; Symons, Hannah; Hill, Edward C

    2015-01-01

    Investigation of a series of nutrient-supplemented thixotropic gels at successive dilutions that impede the trajectories of a highly vigorous motile flagellated protist, Spironucleus vortens, provides insights into both its swimming characteristics and a means for its immobilization. The progress of movement of this organism through the solidified growth medium was monitored by the in situ reductive production of a formazan chromophore from a dissolved tetrazolium salt. The physical properties of the gels were measured using an Anton Paar rheometer. The test parameters and measurements included: angular frequency, complex viscosity, complex shear modulus, shear rate and rotational recovery. These rheological characteristics affected the forward velocity of the organism through the gels, during and after multiple resetting, information potentially useful for determination of the dynamic characteristics of flagellar movement and propulsion rates of the organism. Application to separation of single cells, individuals of distinct sizes or the differing species from mixed cultures of motile and non-motile organisms or less actively swimming species was evident. These applications can be used when isolating the parasite from the intestinal contents of its host or from faecal pellets. PMID:25406450

  8. Feed supplemented with organic acids does not affect starch digestibility, nor intestinal absorptive or secretory function in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Ruhnke, I; Röhe, I; Goodarzi Boroojeni, F; Knorr, F; Mader, A; Hafeez, A; Zentek, J

    2015-04-01

    The current study aimed to determine the impact of acidified feed on apparent ileal starch digestibility, intestinal transport and barrier function and intestinal glucose transporter expression. The experiment included a control group and a treatment group with broilers fed a standard diet without or with 1.5% of a commercial organic acid product (64% formic acid, 25% propionic acid, 11% water). Broilers were fed with the experimental diets from hatching until days 32-35. Starch digestibility was determined using 0.2% titanium dioxide as ingestible marker. Gene expressions of the intestinal sodium glucose transporter 1 (SGLT-1) and glucose transporter 2 (GLUT-2) were analysed using qPCR analysis. Additionally, SGLT-1 function and chloride secretion were analysed in Ussing chamber experiments. Jejunal samples were sequentially exposed to 10 mm glucose, 100 μm phloridzin, 100 μm histamine and 100 μm carbachol. Apparent ileal starch digestibility (±SEM) of the control group (97.5 ± 0.35%) and the acid-treated group (97.0 ± 0.59%) did not differ (p = 0.674). The mean tissue conductance of intestinal samples obtained from the control group and the treatment group was similar [10.6 mS/cm(2) (±0.68) and 9.4 mS/cm(2) (±0.80) respectively (p = 0.147)]. The mean short-circuit currents (ΔIsc ) of the samples exposed to glucose, phloridzin, histamine and carbachol did not differ (p > 0.05). Additionally, no differences in the expression of SGLT-1 and GLUT-2 could be observed (p = 0.942, p = 0.413). Based on this study, the consumption of feed supplemented with organic acids was not associated with effects on ileal starch digestibility and functional traits of jejunal tissues, indicating that these additives have no major impact on the small intestinal function in broilers. PMID:25865420

  9. Utilization of rye as energy source affects bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, microbiota composition, and bone mineralization in broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    Tellez, Guillermo; Latorre, Juan D.; Kuttappan, Vivek A.; Kogut, Michael H.; Wolfenden, Amanda; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Hargis, Billy M.; Bottje, Walter G.; Bielke, Lisa R.; Faulkner, Olivia B.

    2014-01-01

    Two independent trials were conducted to evaluate the utilization of rye as energy source on bacterial translocation (BT), intestinal viscosity, gut integrity, gut microbiota composition, and bone mineralization, when compared with a traditional cereal (corn) in broiler chickens. In each experiment, day-of-hatch, broiler chickens were randomly assigned to either a corn or a rye diet (n = 20 chickens/group). At 10 d of age, in both experiments, 12 chickens/group were randomly selected, and given an oral gavage dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d). After 2.5 h of oral gavage, blood samples were collected to determine the passage of FITC-d. The liver was collected from each bird to evaluate BT. Duodenum, ileum, and cecum gut sections were collected to evaluate intestinal viscosity and to enumerate gut microbiota. Tibias were collected for observation of bone parameters. Broilers fed with rye showed increased (p < 0.05) intestinal viscosity, BT, and serum FITC-d. Bacterial enumeration revealed that chickens fed with rye had increased the number of total lactic acid bacteria in all three sections of the gastrointestinal tract evaluated when compared to chickens fed with corn. Chickens fed with rye also had significantly higher coliforms in duodenum and ileum, whereas the total number of anaerobes increased only in duodenum. A significant reduction in bone strength and bone mineralization was observed in chickens fed with rye when compared with corn fed chickens. In conclusion, rye evoked mucosal damage in chickens that alter the intestinal viscosity, increased leakage through the intestinal tract, and altered the microbiota composition as well as bone mineralization. Studies to evaluate dietary inclusion of selected DFM candidates that produce exogenous enzymes in rye fed chickens are currently being evaluated. PMID:25309584

  10. Utilization of rye as energy source affects bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, microbiota composition, and bone mineralization in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Guillermo; Latorre, Juan D; Kuttappan, Vivek A; Kogut, Michael H; Wolfenden, Amanda; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Hargis, Billy M; Bottje, Walter G; Bielke, Lisa R; Faulkner, Olivia B

    2014-01-01

    Two independent trials were conducted to evaluate the utilization of rye as energy source on bacterial translocation (BT), intestinal viscosity, gut integrity, gut microbiota composition, and bone mineralization, when compared with a traditional cereal (corn) in broiler chickens. In each experiment, day-of-hatch, broiler chickens were randomly assigned to either a corn or a rye diet (n = 20 chickens/group). At 10 d of age, in both experiments, 12 chickens/group were randomly selected, and given an oral gavage dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d). After 2.5 h of oral gavage, blood samples were collected to determine the passage of FITC-d. The liver was collected from each bird to evaluate BT. Duodenum, ileum, and cecum gut sections were collected to evaluate intestinal viscosity and to enumerate gut microbiota. Tibias were collected for observation of bone parameters. Broilers fed with rye showed increased (p < 0.05) intestinal viscosity, BT, and serum FITC-d. Bacterial enumeration revealed that chickens fed with rye had increased the number of total lactic acid bacteria in all three sections of the gastrointestinal tract evaluated when compared to chickens fed with corn. Chickens fed with rye also had significantly higher coliforms in duodenum and ileum, whereas the total number of anaerobes increased only in duodenum. A significant reduction in bone strength and bone mineralization was observed in chickens fed with rye when compared with corn fed chickens. In conclusion, rye evoked mucosal damage in chickens that alter the intestinal viscosity, increased leakage through the intestinal tract, and altered the microbiota composition as well as bone mineralization. Studies to evaluate dietary inclusion of selected DFM candidates that produce exogenous enzymes in rye fed chickens are currently being evaluated. PMID:25309584

  11. Overexpression of Peroxiredoxin 4 Affects Intestinal Function in a Dietary Mouse Model of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Hirotsugu; Mazaki, Yuichi; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Izumi, Hiroto; Wang, Ke-Yong; Guo, Xin; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Kohno, Kimitoshi; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Fujii, Junichi; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki; Tanimoto, Akihide; Nakayama, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence has shown that methionine- and choline-deficient high fat (MCD+HF) diet induces the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), in which elevated reactive oxygen species play a crucial role. We have reported that peroxiredoxin 4 (PRDX4), a unique secretory member of the PRDX antioxidant family, protects against NAFLD progression. However, the detailed mechanism and potential effects on the intestinal function still remain unclear. Methods & Results Two weeks after feeding mice a MCD+HF diet, the livers of human PRDX4 transgenic (Tg) mice exhibited significant suppression in the development of NAFLD compared with wild-type (WT) mice. The serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels were significantly lower in Tg mice. In contrast, the Tg small intestine with PRDX4 overexpression showed more suppressed shortening of total length and villi height, and more accumulation of lipid in the jejunum, along with lower levels of dihydroethidium binding. The enterocytes exhibited fewer apoptotic but more proliferating cells, and inflammation was reduced in the mucosa. Furthermore, the small intestine of Tg mice had significantly higher expression of cholesterol absorption-regulatory factors, including liver X receptor-α, but lower expression of microsomal triglyceride-transfer protein. Conclusion Our present data provide the first evidence of the beneficial effects of PRDX4 on intestinal function in the reduction of the severity of NAFLD, by ameliorating oxidative stress-induced local and systemic injury. We can suggest that both liver and intestine are spared, to some degree, by the antioxidant properties of PRDX4. PMID:27035833

  12. [Intestinal endometriosis].

    PubMed

    González Rodríguez, C I; Cires, M; Jiménez, F J; Rubio, T

    2008-01-01

    Endometriosis is a chronic, benign gynaecological disorder that is frequent in women of a child-bearing age. It is estimated that there is some degree of endometriosis in as many as 15% of pre-menopausal women, associated with a history of infertility, caesarean antecedents, dysmenorrhoea and abnormality in uterine bleeding. It is believed to be due to the rise of menstrual contents through the Fallopian tubes (retrograde menstruation). In the intestinal affectation, the colon is the segment most frequently affected, above all at the rectosigmoidal level. The clinical features are unspecific, with abdominal pain the most frequent and/or pelvic pain of a cholic type that coincides with, or is exacerbated by, menstruation. Differential diagnosis includes intestinal inflammatory disease, diverticulitis, ischemic colitis and neoplastic processes, with the definitive diagnosis being anatomopathological. With respect to treatment, this will depend on the clinical features and the age of the patient, as well as her wishes with regard to pregnancy. PMID:18953367

  13. Regulation of axonemal motility in demembranated equine sperm.

    PubMed

    Loux, Shavahn C; Macías-Garcia, Beatríz; González-Fernández, Lauro; Canesin, Heloisa DeSiqueira; Varner, Dickson D; Hinrichs, Katrin

    2014-12-01

    Equine in vitro fertilization is not yet successful because equine sperm do not effectively capacitate in vitro. Results of previous studies suggest that this may be due to failure of induction of hyperactivated motility in equine sperm under standard capacitating conditions. To evaluate factors directly affecting axonemal motility in equine sperm, we developed a demembranated sperm model and analyzed motility parameters in this model under different conditions using computer-assisted sperm analysis. Treatment of ejaculated equine sperm with 0.02% Triton X-100 for 30 sec maximized both permeabilization and total motility after reactivation. The presence of ATP was required for motility of demembranated sperm after reactivation, but cAMP was not. The calculated intracellular pH of intact equine sperm was 7.14 ± 0.07. Demembranated sperm showed maximal total motility at pH 7. Neither increasing pH nor increasing calcium levels, nor any interaction of the two, induced hyperactivated motility in demembranated equine sperm. Motility of demembranated sperm was maintained at free calcium concentrations as low as 27 pM, and calcium arrested sperm motility at much lower concentrations than those reported in other species. Calcium arrest of sperm motility was not accompanied by flagellar curvature, suggesting a failure of calcium to induce the tonic bend seen in other species and thought to support hyperactivated motility. This indicated an absence, or difference in calcium sensitivity, of the related asymmetric doublet-sliding proteins. These studies show a difference in response to calcium of the equine sperm axoneme to that reported in other species that may be related to the failure of equine sperm to penetrate oocytes in vitro under standard capacitating conditions. Further work is needed to determine the factors that stimulate hyperactivated motility at the axonemal level in equine sperm. PMID:25339104

  14. Gastrointestinal motility and functional gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Kusano, Motoyasu; Hosaka, Hiroko; Kawada, Akiyo; Kuribayashi, Shiko; Shimoyama, Yasuyuki; Zai, Hiroaki; Kawamura, Osamu; Yamada, Masanobu

    2014-01-01

    Digestive tract motility patterns are closely related to the pathophysiology of functional gastrointestinal diseases (FGID), and these patterns differ markedly between the interdigestive period and the postprandial period. The characteristic motility pattern in the interdigestive period is so-called interdigestive migrating contraction (IMC). IMCs have a housekeeping role in the intestinal tract, and could also be related to FGID. IMCs arising from the stomach are called gastrointestinal IMCs (GI-IMC), while IMCs arising from the duodenum without associated gastric contractions are called intestinal IMCs (I-IMC). It is thought that I-IMCs are abnormal in FGID. Transport of food residue to the duodenum via gastric emptying is one of the most important postprandial functions of the stomach. In patients with functional dyspepsia (FD), abnormal gastric emptying is a possible mechanism of gastric dysfunction. Accordingly, delayed gastric emptying has attracted attention, with prokinetic agents and herbal medicines often being administered in Japan to accelerate gastric emptying in patients who have anorexia associated with dyspepsia. Recently, we found that addition of monosodium L-glutamate (MSG) to a high-calorie liquid diet rich in casein promoted gastric emptying in healthy men. Therefore, another potential method of improving delayed gastric emptying could be activation of chemosensors that stimulate the autonomic nervous system of the gastrointestinal tract, suggesting a role for MSG in the management of delayed gastric emptying in patients with FD. PMID:23886379

  15. [Effect of some pharmacological substances on the motility of the Cryptocotyle lingua cercaria (Heterophyidae)].

    PubMed

    Tolstenkov, O O; Prokof'ev, V V; Terenina, N B; Galaktionov, K V

    2010-01-01

    The effect of some biologically active substances (acetylcholine, serotonin, octopamine, sodium nitroprussid and FMRF-amide) on the motility of the Cryptocotyle lingua cercariae was studied. Solutions of FMRF-amide, octopamine, and sodium nitroprussid have no statistically significant influence on the motility of C. lingua. Acetylcholine and serotonin in solutions affected the motility through the prolongation of the active phase of swimming. Further research is required to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the cercarial motility. PMID:21061596

  16. Modeling collective cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    Eukaryotic cells often move in groups, a critical aspect of many biological and medical processes including wound healing, morphogenesis and cancer metastasis. Modeling can provide useful insights into the fundamental mechanisms of collective cell motility. Constructing models that incorporate the physical properties of the cells, however, is challenging. Here, I discuss our efforts to build a comprehensive cell motility model that includes cell membrane properties, cell-substrate interactions, cell polarity, and cell-cell interaction. The model will be applied to a variety of systems, including motion on micropatterned substrates and the migration of border cells in Drosophila. This work was supported by NIH Grant No. P01 GM078586 and NSF Grant No. 1068869.

  17. Motility of Mollicutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolgemuth, Charles; Igoshin, Oleg; Oster, George

    2003-03-01

    Recent experiments show that the conformation of filament proteins play a role in the motility and morphology of many different types of bacteria. Conformational changes in the protein subunits may produce forces to drive propulsion and cell division. Here we present a molecular mechanism by which these forces can drive cell motion. Coupling of a biochemical cycle, such as ATP hydrolysis, to the dynamics of elastic filaments enable elastic filaments to propagate deformations that generate propulsive forces. We demonstrate this possibility for two classes of wall-less bacteria called mollicutes: the swimming of helical shaped Spiroplasma, and the gliding motility of Mycoplasma. Similar mechanisms may explain the locomotion of other prokaryotes, including the swimming of Synechococcus and the gliding of some myxobacteria.

  18. An ocular motility conundrum.

    PubMed

    McElnea, Elizabeth Margaret; Stephenson, Kirk; Lanigan, Bernie; Flitcroft, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Two siblings, an 11-year-old boy and a 7-year-old girl presented with bilateral symmetrical ptosis and limited eye movements. Having already been reviewed on a number of occasions by a variety of specialists in multiple hospital settings a diagnosis of their ocular motility disorder had remained elusive. We describe their cases, outline the differential diagnosis and review the investigations performed which were influential in finally making a diagnosis. PMID:25349186

  19. Threonine Affects Intestinal Function, Protein Synthesis and Gene Expression of TOR in Jian Carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lin; Peng, Yan; Wu, Pei; Hu, Kai; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Li, Shu-Hong; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of threonine (Thr) on the digestive and absorptive ability, proliferation and differentiation of enterocytes, and gene expression of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian). First, seven isonitrogenous diets containing graded levels of Thr (7.4–25.2 g/kg diet) were fed to the fishes for 60 days. Second, enterocyte proliferation and differentiation were assayed by culturing enterocytes with graded levels of Thr (0–275 mg/l) in vitro. Finally, enterocytes were cultured with 0 and 205 mg/l Thr to determine protein synthesis. The percent weight gain (PWG), specific growth rate, feed intake, feed efficiency, protein retention value, activities of trypsin, lipase and amylase, weights and protein contents of hepatopancreas and intestine, folds heights, activities of alkaline phosphatase (AKP), γ- glutamyl transpeptidase and Na+/K+-ATPase in all intestinal segments, glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) activities in hepatopancreas, and 4E-BP2 gene expression in muscle, hepatopancreas and intestinal segments were significantly enhanced by Thr (p<0.05). However, the plasma ammonia concentration and TOR gene expression decreased (p<0.05). In vitro, Thr supplement significantly increased cell numbers, protein content, the activities of GOT, GPT, AKP and Na+/K+-ATPase, and protein synthesis rate of enterocytes, and decreased LDH activity and ammonia content in cell medium (p<0.05). In conclusion, Thr improved growth, digestive and absorptive capacity, enterocyte proliferation and differentiation, and protein synthesis and regulated TOR and 4E-BP2 gene expression in juvenile Jian carp. The dietary Thr requirement of juvenile Jian carp was 16.25 g/kg diet (51.3 g/kg protein) based on quadratic regression analysis of PWG. PMID:23922879

  20. Dietary amino acid levels and feed restriction affect small intestinal development, mortality, and weight gain of male broilers.

    PubMed

    Wijtten, P J A; Hangoor, E; Sparla, J K W M; Verstegen, M W A

    2010-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of 2 different dietary amino acid treatments and feed restriction in early life versus a control treatment on development of the small intestine segments (weights), mortality, and broiler performance. Each treatment was applied to 6 cages with Ross 308 male broilers and to 6 cages with Cobb 500 male broilers with 24 birds per cage. A control treatment (100% ideal protein) was compared with a treatment with 30% extra ideal protein, a treatment with daily adjustment of the dietary amino acid level and profile, and a feed restriction treatment. The protein treatments were applied from 0 to 14 d of age. The feed restriction was applied from 4 to 21 d of age. Restriction was 15% from d 4 to 14 of age and diminished with equal daily steps thereafter to 5% at 21 d of age. Birds were weighed and dissected for evaluation of small intestine weights at 6, 9, 14, and 36 d of age. Feed intake restriction reduced leg problems in Ross and Cobb broilers. Extra dietary protein reduced leg problems in Ross broilers only. The present experiment does not show that small intestinal weight development is related to mortality. Thirty percent extra dietary ideal protein increased duodenum weight between 6 and 9 d of age. This was not further increased by the daily optimization of the dietary amino acid level and profile. The increased duodenum weights coincided with an improved BW gain. This indicates that duodenum weight may be important in facilitating BW gain in young broilers. Thus, it may be worthwhile to pay more attention to the relation between nutrition and duodenum weight and duodenum function in further studies. PMID:20548070

  1. Dietary sodium selenite affects host intestinal and systemic immune response and disease susceptibility to necrotic enteritis in commercial broilers.

    PubMed

    Xu, S Z; Lee, S H; Lillehoj, H S; Bravo, D

    2015-01-01

    1. This study was to evaluate the effects of supplementary dietary selenium (Se) given as sodium selenite on host immune response against necrotic enteritis (NE) in commercial broiler chickens. 2. Chicks were fed from hatching on a non-supplemented diet or diets supplemented with different levels of Se (0.25, 0.50, and 1.00 Se mg/kg). To induce NE, broiler chickens were orally infected with Eimeria maxima at 14 d of age and then with Clostridium perfringens 4 d later using our previously established NE disease model. 3. NE-associated clinical signs and host protective immunity were determined by body weight changes, intestinal lesion scores, and serum antibodies against α-toxin and necrotic enteritis B (NetB) toxin. The effects of dietary Se on the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines e.g., interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8LITAF (lipopolysaccharide-induced TNFα-factor), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) SF15, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), glutathione peroxidase 7 (GPx7), and avian β-defensins (AvBD) 6, 8, and 13 (following NE infection) were analysed in the intestine and spleen. 4. The results showed that dietary supplementation of newly hatched broiler chicks with 0.25 Se mg/kg from hatch significantly reduced NE-induced gut lesions compared with infected birds given a non-supplemented diet. The levels of serum antibody against the NetB toxin in the chicks fed with 0.25 and 0.50 mg/kg Se were significantly higher than the non-supplemented control group. The transcripts for IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, iNOS, LITAF, and GPx7, as well as AvBD6, 8, and 13 were increased in the intestine and spleen of Se-supplemented groups, whereas transcript for TNFSF15 was decreased in the intestine. 5. It was concluded that dietary supplementation with optimum levels of Se exerted beneficial effects on host immune response to NE and reduced negative consequence of NE-induced immunopathology. PMID:25387235

  2. Characterization of Pro-Inflammatory Flagellin Proteins Produced by Lactobacillus ruminis and Related Motile Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Neville, B. Anne; Forde, Brian M.; Claesson, Marcus J.; Darby, Trevor; Coghlan, Avril; Nally, Kenneth; Ross, R. Paul; O’Toole, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus ruminis is one of at least twelve motile but poorly characterized species found in the genus Lactobacillus. Of these, only L. ruminis has been isolated from mammals, and this species may be considered as an autochthonous member of the gastrointestinal microbiota of humans, pigs and cows. Nine L. ruminis strains were investigated here to elucidate the biochemistry and genetics of Lactobacillus motility. Six strains isolated from humans were non-motile while three bovine isolates were motile. A complete set of flagellum biogenesis genes was annotated in the sequenced genomes of two strains, ATCC25644 (human isolate) and ATCC27782 (bovine isolate), but only the latter strain produced flagella. Comparison of the L. ruminis and L. mali DSM20444T motility loci showed that their genetic content and gene-order were broadly similar, although the L. mali motility locus was interrupted by an 11.8 Kb region encoding rhamnose utilization genes that is absent from the L. ruminis motility locus. Phylogenetic analysis of 39 motile bacteria indicated that Lactobacillus motility genes were most closely related to those of motile carnobacteria and enterococci. Transcriptome analysis revealed that motility genes were transcribed at a significantly higher level in motile L. ruminis ATCC27782 than in non-motile ATCC25644. Flagellin proteins were isolated from L. ruminis ATCC27782 and from three other Lactobacillus species, while recombinant flagellin of aflagellate L. ruminis ATCC25644 was expressed and purified from E. coli. These native and recombinant Lactobacillus flagellins, and also flagellate L. ruminis cells, triggered interleukin-8 production in cultured human intestinal epithelial cells in a manner suppressed by short interfering RNA directed against Toll-Like Receptor 5. This study provides genetic, transcriptomic, phylogenetic and immunological insights into the trait of flagellum-mediated motility in the lactobacilli. PMID:22808200

  3. Local actions of trimebutine maleate in canine small intestine.

    PubMed

    Daniel, E E; Kostolanska, F; Allescher, H D; Ahmad, S; Fox, J E

    1988-06-01

    A study of the local actions of trimebutine (TMB) maleate and its N-diesmethyl metabolite (TMB-M) was carried out in the gastrointestinal tract of anesthetized dogs. In the unstimulated small intestine, but not in the stomach or colon, i.a. TMB and TMB-M caused activation of circular muscle. Like the activation by i.a. [Met5]-enkephalin, this was antagonized by naloxone. In field-stimulated segments of stomach and small intestine circular muscle, TMB or TMB-M, like dynorphin-1-13 or [Met5]-enkephalin, inhibited the phasic and tonic contractions which were mediated mostly by cholinergic, postganglionic nerves. However, the inhibitory effects of dynorphin-1-13 or [Met5]-enkephalin on small intestine were antagonized by naloxone whereas those of TMB sometimes or those of TMB-M usually were not. TMB or TMB-M did not affect responses to i.a. acetylcholine, but high doses reduced the contractile responses to subsequent field stimulation and excitatory responses to [Met5]-enkephalin. We concluded that the excitatory local actions of TMB or TMB-M on small intestine involved opioid receptors probably of the mu or delta types. Inhibitory local actions on nerve-mediated responses, however, may not have involved opioid receptors. Comparison of these data to results when TMB or TMB-M were given i.v. suggests that these agents also have peripheral actions to affect gastrointestinal motility at sites outside the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:2898521

  4. The Host Genotype and Environment Affect Strain Types of Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum Inhabiting the Intestinal Tracts of Twins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Hang, Xiaomin; Tan, Jing

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the influences of host genotype and environment on Bifidobacterium longum subsp. longum inhabiting human intestines at the strain level, six pairs of twins, divided into two groups (children and adults), were recruited. Each group consisted of two monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs and one dizygotic (DZ) twin pair. Child twins had been living together from birth, while adult twins had been living separately for 5 to 10 years. A total of 345 B. longum subsp. longum isolates obtained from 60 fecal samples from these twins were analyzed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), and 35 sequence types (STs) were finally acquired. Comparison of strains within and between the twin pairs showed that no strains with identical STs were observed between unrelated individuals or within adult DZ twin pairs. Eight STs were found to be monophyletic, existing within MZ twins and child DZ twins. The similarity of strain types within child cotwins was significantly higher than that within adult cotwins, which indicated that environment was one of the important determinants in B. longum subsp. longum strain types inhabiting human intestines. However, although these differences between MZ and DZ twins were observed, it is still difficult to reach an exact conclusion about the impact of host genotype. This is mainly because of the limited number of subjects tested in the present study and the lack of strain types tracing in the same twin pairs from birth until adulthood. PMID:25956768

  5. Ruminal protein metabolism and intestinal amino acid utilization as affected by dietary protein and carbohydrate sources in sheep.

    PubMed

    Hussein, H S; Jordan, R M; Stern, M D

    1991-05-01

    Eight wether lambs fitted with ruminal, duodenal, and ileal cannulas were used in a replicated 4 x 4 Latin square design to study the effects of carbohydrate and protein sources on ruminal protein metabolism and carbohydrate fermentation and intestinal amino acid (AA) absorption. Treatments were arranged as a 2 x 2 factorial. Carbohydrate sources were corn and barley; protein sources were soybean meal (SBM) and fish meal (FM). Diets contained 15.5% CP, of which 40% was supplied by SBM or FM. Corn or barley provided 39% of dietary DM that contained equal amounts of grass hay and wheat straw. Fish meal diets produced a lower (P less than .05) ruminal NH3 concentration and resulted in less CP degradation and bacterial protein flow to the duodenum than did SBM diets. Replacing SBM with FM increased (P less than .05) ruminal digestion of all fiber fractions. In addition, cellulose and hemicellulose digestibilities in the rumen tended to increase (P greater than .05) when barley replaced corn in the FM diets. Carbohydrate x protein interactions (P less than .05) were observed for OM digestion in the rumen and AA absorption in the small intestine (percentage of AA entering); these interactions were highest for the barley-FM diet. These results suggest that feeding FM with barley, which is high in both degradable carbohydrate and protein, might benefit ruminants more than feeding FM with corn, which is high in degradable carbohydrate but relatively low in degradable protein. PMID:1648551

  6. Quantification of motility of carabid beetles in farmland.

    PubMed

    Allema, A B; van der Werf, W; Groot, J C J; Hemerik, L; Gort, G; Rossing, W A H; van Lenteren, J C

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of the movement of insects at field and landscape levels helps us to understand their ecology and ecological functions. We conducted a meta-analysis on movement of carabid beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae), to identify key factors affecting movement and population redistribution. We characterize the rate of redistribution using motility μ (L2 T-1), which is a measure for diffusion of a population in space and time that is consistent with ecological diffusion theory and which can be used for upscaling short-term data to longer time frames. Formulas are provided to calculate motility from literature data on movement distances. A field experiment was conducted to measure the redistribution of mass-released carabid, Pterostichus melanarius in a crop field, and derive motility by fitting a Fokker-Planck diffusion model using inverse modelling. Bias in estimates of motility from literature data is elucidated using the data from the field experiment as a case study. The meta-analysis showed that motility is 5.6 times as high in farmland as in woody habitat. Species associated with forested habitats had greater motility than species associated with open field habitats, both in arable land and woody habitat. The meta-analysis did not identify consistent differences in motility at the species level, or between clusters of larger and smaller beetles. The results presented here provide a basis for calculating time-varying distribution patterns of carabids in farmland and woody habitat. The formulas for calculating motility can be used for other taxa. PMID:25673121

  7. Intestinal leiomyoma

    MedlinePlus

    Leiomyoma - intestine ... McLaughlin P, Maher MM. The duodenum and small intestine. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ... Roline CE, Reardon RF. Disorders of the small intestine. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  8. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  9. Maintenance of motility bias during cyanobacterial phototaxis.

    PubMed

    Chau, Rosanna Man Wah; Ursell, Tristan; Wang, Shuo; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Bhaya, Devaki

    2015-04-01

    Signal transduction in bacteria is complex, ranging across scales from molecular signal detectors and effectors to cellular and community responses to stimuli. The unicellular, photosynthetic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 transduces a light stimulus into directional movement known as phototaxis. This response occurs via a biased random walk toward or away from a directional light source, which is sensed by intracellular photoreceptors and mediated by Type IV pili. It is unknown how quickly cells can respond to changes in the presence or directionality of light, or how photoreceptors affect single-cell motility behavior. In this study, we use time-lapse microscopy coupled with quantitative single-cell tracking to investigate the timescale of the cellular response to various light conditions and to characterize the contribution of the photoreceptor TaxD1 (PixJ1) to phototaxis. We first demonstrate that a community of cells exhibits both spatial and population heterogeneity in its phototactic response. We then show that individual cells respond within minutes to changes in light conditions, and that movement directionality is conferred only by the current light directionality, rather than by a long-term memory of previous conditions. Our measurements indicate that motility bias likely results from the polarization of pilus activity, yielding variable levels of movement in different directions. Experiments with a photoreceptor (taxD1) mutant suggest a supplementary role of TaxD1 in enhancing movement directionality, in addition to its previously identified role in promoting positive phototaxis. Motivated by the behavior of the taxD1 mutant, we demonstrate using a reaction-diffusion model that diffusion anisotropy is sufficient to produce the observed changes in the pattern of collective motility. Taken together, our results establish that single-cell tracking can be used to determine the factors that affect motility bias, which can then be coupled with

  10. Cellular mechanics and motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  11. Arabinoxylan‐oligosaccharides (AXOS) affect the protein/carbohydrate fermentation balance and microbial population dynamics of the Simulator of Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, J. I.; Marzorati, M.; Grootaert, C.; Baran, M.; Van Craeyveld, V.; Courtin, C. M.; Broekaert, W. F.; Delcour, J. A.; Verstraete, W.; Van de Wiele, T.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Arabinoxylan‐oligosaccharides (AXOS) are a recently newly discovered class of candidate prebiotics as – depending on their structure – they are fermented in different regions of gastrointestinal tract. This can have an impact on the protein/carbohydrate fermentation balance in the large intestine and, thus, affect the generation of potentially toxic metabolites in the colon originating from proteolytic activity. In this study, we screened different AXOS preparations for their impact on the in vitro intestinal fermentation activity and microbial community structure. Short‐term fermentation experiments with AXOS with an average degree of polymerization (avDP) of 29 allowed part of the oligosaccharides to reach the distal colon, and decreased the concentration of proteolytic markers, whereas AXOS with lower avDP were primarily fermented in the proximal colon. Additionally, prolonged supplementation of AXOS with avDP 29 to the Simulator of Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem (SHIME) reactor decreased levels of the toxic proteolytic markers phenol and p‐cresol in the two distal colon compartments and increased concentrations of beneficial short‐chain fatty acids (SCFA) in all colon vessels (25–48%). Denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis indicated that AXOS supplementation only slightly modified the total microbial community, implying that the observed effects on fermentation markers are mainly caused by changes in fermentation activity. Finally, specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis showed that AXOS supplementation significantly increased the amount of health‐promoting lactobacilli as well as of Bacteroides–Prevotella and Clostridium coccoides–Eubacterium rectale groups. These data allow concluding that AXOS are promising candidates to modulate the microbial metabolism in the distal colon. PMID:21261885

  12. The importance of gut motility in the metabolic control of propionic acidemia.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Chitra; Nurko, Samuel; Borovoy, Jacob; Korson, Mark S

    2004-04-01

    We hypothesized that gut motility likely plays a critical role in the metabolic stability in propionic acidemia (PA). Therefore, 4 known patients with PA (aged 47 months to 185 months) were prospectively studied over 7 days in the Clinical Research Center at Children's Hospital, Boston. Determinations of ammonia, bicarbonate, and amino acids in blood; organic acids and propionylglycine in urine; and a lactulose breath test were conducted under two study conditions: on regular therapy (for 4 days) and on regular therapy plus Senekot (Purdue Frederick Company, Norwalk, Conn), an intestinal motility agent (for 3 days). The total gastrointestinal transit time was calculated using 20 nonabsorbable, inert, radio-opaque markers. The addition of an intestinal motility agent resulted in a significant decrease in blood ammonia, urinary excretion of propionylglycine, and a rise in the ratio of free to total carnitine over baseline. We concluded that enhancement of gut motility can improve metabolic stability in patients with PA. PMID:15069406

  13. Berberine Improves Intestinal Motility and Visceral Pain in the Mouse Models Mimicking Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS-D) Symptoms in an Opioid-Receptor Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Qiuhui; Fichna, Jakub; Zheng, Lijun; Wang, Kesheng; Yu, Zhen; Li, Yongyu; Li, Kun; Song, Aihong; Liu, Zhongchen; Song, Zhenshun; Kreis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Berberine and its derivatives display potent analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activity. Here we aimed at characterizing the mechanism of action of berberine in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and cortical neurons using animal models and in vitro tests. Methods The effect of berberine was characterized in murine models mimicking diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) symptoms. Then the opioidantagonists were used to identify the receptors involved. Furthermore, the effect of berberineon opioid receptors expression was established in the mouse intestine and rat fetal cortical neurons. Results In mouse models, berberine prolonged GI transit and time to diarrhea in a dose-dependent manner, and significantly reduced visceral pain. In physiological conditions the effects of berberine were mediated by mu- (MOR) and delta- (DOR) opioidreceptors; hypermotility, excessive secretion and nociception were reversed by berberine through MOR and DOR-dependent action. We also found that berberine increased the expression of MOR and DOR in the mouse bowel and rat fetal cortical neurons. Conclusion Berberine significantly improved IBS-D symptoms in animal models, possibly through mu- and delta- opioid receptors. Berberine may become a new drug candidate for the successful treatment of IBS-D in clinical conditions. PMID:26700862

  14. Spirochete motility and morpholgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charon, Nyles

    2004-03-01

    Spirochetes have a unique structure, and as a result their motility is different from that of other bacteria. These organisms can swim in a highly viscous, gel-like medium, such as that found in connective tissue, that inhibits the motility of most other bacteria. In spirochetes, the organelles for motility, the periplasmic flagella, reside inside the cell within the periplasmic space. A given periplasmic flagellum is attached only at one end of the cell, and depending on the species, may or may not overlap in the center of the cell. The number of periplasmic flagella varies from species to species. These structures have been shown to be directly involved in motility and function by rotating within the periplasmic space (1). The present talk focuses on the spirochete that causes Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi. In many bacterial species, cell shape is usually dictated by the peptidoyglycan layer of the cell wall. In the first part of the talk, results will be presented that the morphology of B. burgdorferi is the result of a complex interaction between the cell cylinder and the internal periplasmic flagella resulting in a cell with a flat-wave morphology. Backward moving, propagating waves enable these bacteria to swim and translate in a given direction. Using targeted mutagenesis, we inactivated the gene encoding the major periplasmic flagellar filament protein FlaB. The resulting flaB mutants not only were non-motile, but were rod-shaped (2). Western blot analysis indicated that flaB was no longer synthesized, and electron microscopy revealed that the mutants were completely deficient in periplasmic flagella. Our results indicate that the periplasmic flagella of B. burgdorferi have a skeletal function. These organelles dynamically interact with the rod-shaped cell cylinder to enable the cell to swim, and to confer in part its flat-wave morphology The latter part of the talk concerns the basis for asymmetrical rotation of the periplasmic flagella of B

  15. Motility of the jejunum after proctocolectomy and ileal pouch anastomosis.

    PubMed Central

    Chaussade, S; Merite, F; Hautefeuille, M; Valleur, P; Hautefeuille, P; Couturier, D

    1989-01-01

    Proctocolectomy with ileal pouch anastomosis could modify motility of the small intestine through two mechanisms: obstruction or bacterial overgrowth. Motility of the jejunum was measured in 11 patients with ileoanal anastomosis six (n = 6), or 12 (n = 5) months after closure of the loop ileostomy. Manometric recording from the jejunum were made during fasting (four hours) and after a liquid meal (one hour). These findings were compared with those of six healthy volunteers. Motor events were classified as follows: migrating motor complex (MMC), propagated contractions, or discrete clustered contractions. All patients were investigated for bacterial overgrowth (D-glucose breath test). Only two patients had bacterial overgrowth. The frequency of MMC remained unchanged after ileo-anal anastomosis (2.83 (0.37)/four hours) compared with normal volunteers (2.81 (0.29)/four hours). During fasting, four patients had numerous propagated contractions in the jejunum. This condition was associated in two with bacterial overgrowth and in two with intubation of the reservoir. Discrete clustered contractions were found in the seven patients studied postprandially (7.6 (2.5)/h), but not in volunteers. These seven patients emptied their pouch spontaneously and bacterial overgrowth was found in only one. As this motility pattern was previously described in partial small intestinal obstruction, it is postulated that discrete clustered contractions could be the consequence of a functional obstruction as a result of anastomosis of the small intestine to the high pressure zone of the anal sphincters. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2707637

  16. The intestine is a blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Patricia; Lamarca, Morgan; Kravets, Victoria; Hu, David

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, digestive disease affects 60 to 70 million people and costs over 140 billion annually. Despite the significance of the gastrointestinal tract to human health, the physics of digestion remains poorly understood. In this study, we ask a simple question: what sets the frequency of intestinal contractions? We measure the frequency of intestinal contractions in rats, as a function of distance down the intestine. We find that intestines Contract radially ten times faster than longitudinally. This motion promotes mixing and, in turn, absorption of food products by the intestinal wall. We calculate viscous dissipation in the intestinal fluid to rationalize the relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and the viscosity of the intestinal contents. Our findings may help to understand the evolution of the intestine as an ideal mixer.

  17. The intestine is a blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Patricia; Lamarca, Morgan; Hu, David

    2015-11-01

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, digestive disease affects 60 to 70 million people and costs over 140 billion annually. Despite the significance of the gastrointestinal tract to human health, the physics of digestion remains poorly understood. In this study, we ask a simple question: what sets the frequency of intestinal contractions? We measure the frequency of intestinal contractions in rats, as a function of distance down the intestine. We find that intestines contract radially ten times faster than longitudinally. This motion promotes mixing and, in turn, absorption of food products by the intestinal wall. We calculate viscous dissipation in the intestinal fluid to rationalize the relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and the viscosity of the intestinal contents. Our findings may help to understand the evolution of the intestine as an ideal mixer.

  18. Processing of soybean meal and 00-rapeseed meal reduces protein digestibility and pig growth performance but does not affect nitrogen solubilization along the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Hulshof, T G; van der Poel, A F B; Hendriks, W H; Bikker, P

    2016-06-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of processing of soybean meal (SBM) and 00-rapeseed meal (RSM) on N solubilization in chyme, CP digestibility along the small intestine, metabolic load as determined by organ weight, body composition, and growth performance in growing pigs. The SBM and RSM were processed by secondary toasting (at 95°C for 30 min) in the presence of lignosulfonate, resulting in processed SBM (pSBM) and processed RSM (pRSM) as a model for overprocessed protein sources. Fifty-four growing pigs were each fed 1 of the 6 experimental diets. Four of the diets contained SBM, pSBM, RSM, or pRSM as the sole protein source. The remaining 2 experimental diets contained pSBM or pRSM and were supplemented with crystalline AA to the same standardized ileal digestible AA levels as the SBM or RSM diet. Pigs were slaughtered at 40 kg, and organ weights were recorded. The organs plus blood and empty carcass were analyzed for CP content. The small intestine was divided into 3 segments, and chyme samples were taken from the last meter of each segment. Chyme of the SBM, pSBM, RSM, and pRSM diets was centrifuged to separate the soluble and insoluble fractions, and N content was determined in the latter. The amount of insoluble N as a fraction of N in chyme at each small intestinal segment was not affected by processing. Diet type, comprising effects of processing and supplementing crystalline AA, affected ( < 0.05) the G:F and standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of CP. Processing reduced G:F from 0.56 to 0.38 for SBM and 0.49 to 0.40 for RSM, whereas supplementing crystalline AA increased G:F to the level of the SBM and RSM diets. Processing reduced the SID of CP from 87.2% to 69.2% for SBM and 71.0% to 52.2% for RSM. Diet type affected ( < 0.05) the CP content in the empty body, with processing reducing this content from 170 to 144 g/kg empty BW for SBM and 157 to 149 g/kg empty BW for RSM and supplementing crystalline AA restoring this content

  19. Effects of trifluoromethyl ketones on the motility of Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Wolfart, Krisztina; Molnar, Annamaria; Kawase, Masami; Motohashi, Noboru; Molnar, Joseph

    2004-09-01

    In the present study, we showed the inhibition of motility by trifluoromethyl ketone (TF) derivatives (1-8) in Proteus vulgaris (P. vulgaris) cultures. Among them, 1-(2-benzoxazoyl)-3,3,3-trifluoro-2-propanone (1) showed a much stronger inhibitory effect on the motility of P. vulgaris than other TF compounds at 10% MIC. Our results suggest the possibility of an inhibitory action of TF compounds on the proton motive forces by affecting the action of biological motor and proton efflux in the membranes, resulting in a reduction of the ratio of running and the increased number of tumbling and non-motile cells. PMID:15340240

  20. Mechanics of motility initiation and motility arrest in crawling cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recho, Pierre; Putelat, Thibaut; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2015-11-01

    Motility initiation in crawling cells requires transformation of a symmetric state into a polarized state. In contrast, motility arrest is associated with re-symmetrization of the internal configuration of a cell. Experiments on keratocytes suggest that polarization is triggered by the increased contractility of motor proteins but the conditions of re-symmetrization remain unknown. In this paper we show that if adhesion with the extra-cellular substrate is sufficiently low, the progressive intensification of motor-induced contraction may be responsible for both transitions: from static (symmetric) to motile (polarized) at a lower contractility threshold and from motile (polarized) back to static (symmetric) at a higher contractility threshold. Our model of lamellipodial cell motility is based on a 1D projection of the complex intra-cellular dynamics on the direction of locomotion. In the interest of analytical transparency we also neglect active protrusion and view adhesion as passive. Despite the unavoidable oversimplifications associated with these assumptions, the model reproduces quantitatively the motility initiation pattern in fish keratocytes and reveals a crucial role played in cell motility by the nonlocal feedback between the mechanics and the transport of active agents. A prediction of the model that a crawling cell can stop and re-symmetrize when contractility increases sufficiently far beyond the motility initiation threshold still awaits experimental verification.

  1. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Alexandra; Fronzoni, Lucia; Cogliandro, Laura; Cogliandro, Rosanna F; Caputo, Carla; Giorgio, Roberto De; Pallotti, Francesca; Barbara, Giovanni; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a severe digestive syndrome characterized by derangement of gut propulsive motility which resembles mechanical obstruction, in the absence of any obstructive process. Although uncommon in clinical practice, this syndrome represents one of the main causes of intestinal failure and is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. It may be idiopathic or secondary to a variety of diseases. Most cases are sporadic, even though familial forms with either dominant or recessive autosomal inheritance have been described. Based on histological features intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be classified into three main categories: neuropathies, mesenchymopathies, and myopathies, according on the predominant involvement of enteric neurones, interstitial cells of Cajal or smooth muscle cells, respectively. Treatment of intestinal pseudo-obstruction involves nutritional, pharmacological and surgical therapies, but it is often unsatisfactory and the long-term outcome is generally poor in the majority of cases. PMID:18494042

  2. Endogenous leptin receptor signaling in the medial nucleus tractus solitarius affects meal size and potentiates intestinal satiation signals

    PubMed Central

    Kanoski, Scott E.; Zhao, Shiru; Guarnieri, Douglas J.; DiLeone, Ralph J.; Yan, Jianqun; De Jonghe, Bart C.; Bence, Kendra K.; Hayes, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Leptin receptor (LepRb) signaling in the hindbrain is required for energy balance control. Yet the specific hindbrain neurons and the behavioral processes mediating energy balance control by hindbrain leptin signaling are unknown. Studies here employ genetic [adeno-associated virally mediated RNA interference (AAV-RNAi)] and pharmacological methodologies to specify the neurons and the mechanisms through which hindbrain LepRb signaling contributes to the control of food intake. Results show that AAV-RNAi-mediated LepRb knockdown targeting a region encompassing the mNTS and area postrema (AP) (mNTS/AP LepRbKD) increases overall cumulative food intake by increasing the size of spontaneous meals. Other results show that pharmacological hindbrain leptin delivery and RNAi-mediated mNTS/AP LepRb knockdown increased and decreased the intake-suppressive effects of intraduodenal nutrient infusion, respectively. These meal size and intestinally derived signal amplification effects are likely mediated by LepRb signaling in the mNTS and not the AP, since 4th icv and mNTS parenchymal leptin (0.5 μg) administration reduced food intake, whereas this dose did not influence food intake when injected into the AP. Overall, these findings deepen the understanding of the distributed neuronal systems and behavioral mechanisms that mediate the effects of leptin receptor signaling on the control of food intake. PMID:22693203

  3. Is early post-operative treatment with 5-fluorouracil possible without affecting anastomotic strength in the intestine?

    PubMed Central

    van der Kolk, B M; de Man, B M; Wobbes, T; Hendriks, T

    1999-01-01

    Early post-operative local or systemic administration of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) is under investigation as a means to improve outcome after resection of intestinal malignancies. It is therefore quite important to delineate accurately its potentially negative effects on anastomotic repair. Five groups (n = 24) of rats underwent resection and anastomosis of both ileum and colon: a control group and four experimental groups receiving daily 5-FU, starting immediately after operation or after 1, 2 or 3 days. Within each group, the drug (or saline) was delivered either intraperitoneally (n = 12) or intravenously (n = 12). Animals were killed 7 days after operation and healing was assessed by measurement of anastomotic bursting pressure, breaking strength and hydroxyproline content. In all cases, 5-FU treatment from the day of operation or from day 1 significantly (P < 0.025) and severely suppressed wound strength; concomitantly, the anastomotic hydroxyproline content was reduced. Depending on the location of the anastomosis and the route of 5-FU administration, even a period of 3 days between operation and first dosage seemed insufficient to prevent weakening of the anastomosis. The effects of intravenous administration, though qualitatively similar, were quantitatively less dramatic than those observed after intraperitoneal delivery. Post-operative treatment with 5-FU, if started within the first 3 days after operation, is detrimental to anastomotic strength and may compromise anastomotic integrity. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10027328

  4. Ratio of "A-type" to "B-type" proanthocyanidin interflavan bonds affects extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli invasion of gut epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Feliciano, Rodrigo P; Meudt, Jennifer J; Shanmuganayagam, Dhanansayan; Krueger, Christian G; Reed, Jess D

    2014-05-01

    Gut colonization by extra-intestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) increases the risk of subsequent infections, including urinary tract infection and septicemia. Previous work suggests that cranberry proanthocyanidins (PAC) interact with bacterial surface factors, altering bacterial interaction with host cells. Methods were developed to determine if ratios of "A-type" to "B-type" interflavan bonds in PAC affect ExPEC agglutination and invasion of enterocytes. In cranberries, 94.5% of PAC contain one or more "A-type" bonds, whereas in apples, 88.3% of PAC contain exclusively "B-type" bonds. Results show that cranberry "A-type" PAC have greater bioactivity than apple "B-type" PAC for increasing ExPEC agglutination and decreasing ExPEC epithelial cell invasion. PMID:24215458

  5. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bures, Jan; Cyrany, Jiri; Kohoutova, Darina; Förstl, Miroslav; Rejchrt, Stanislav; Kvetina, Jaroslav; Vorisek, Viktor; Kopacova, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    Human intestinal microbiota create a complex polymicrobial ecology. This is characterised by its high population density, wide diversity and complexity of interaction. Any dysbalance of this complex intestinal microbiome, both qualitative and quantitative, might have serious health consequence for a macro-organism, including small intestinal bacterial overgrowth syndrome (SIBO). SIBO is defined as an increase in the number and/or alteration in the type of bacteria in the upper gastrointestinal tract. There are several endogenous defence mechanisms for preventing bacterial overgrowth: gastric acid secretion, intestinal motility, intact ileo-caecal valve, immunoglobulins within intestinal secretion and bacteriostatic properties of pancreatic and biliary secretion. Aetiology of SIBO is usually complex, associated with disorders of protective antibacterial mechanisms (e.g. achlorhydria, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, immunodeficiency syndromes), anatomical abnormalities (e.g. small intestinal obstruction, diverticula, fistulae, surgical blind loop, previous ileo-caecal resections) and/or motility disorders (e.g. scleroderma, autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus, post-radiation enteropathy, small intestinal pseudo-obstruction). In some patients more than one factor may be involved. Symptoms related to SIBO are bloating, diarrhoea, malabsorption, weight loss and malnutrition. The gold standard for diagnosing SIBO is still microbial investigation of jejunal aspirates. Non-invasive hydrogen and methane breath tests are most commonly used for the diagnosis of SIBO using glucose or lactulose. Therapy for SIBO must be complex, addressing all causes, symptoms and complications, and fully individualised. It should include treatment of the underlying disease, nutritional support and cyclical gastro-intestinal selective antibiotics. Prognosis is usually serious, determined mostly by the underlying disease that led to SIBO. PMID:20572300

  6. Electrical Signaling in Motile and Primary Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Kleene, Steven J.; Van Houten, Judith L.

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are highly conserved for their structure and also for their sensory functions. They serve as antennae for extracellular information. Whether the cilia are motile or not, they respond to environmental mechanical and chemical stimuli and send signals to the cell body. The information from extracellular stimuli is commonly converted to electrical signals through the repertoire of ion-conducting channels in the ciliary membrane, which results in changes in concentrations of ions, especially calcium ions, in the cilia. These changes, in turn, affect motility and the ability of the signaling pathways in the cilia and cell body to carry on the signal transduction. We review here the activities of ion channels in cilia in animals from protists to vertebrates. PMID:25892740

  7. Egg storage duration and hatch window affect gene expression of nutrient transporters and intestine morphological parameters of early hatched broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, S; Gursel, I; Bilgen, G; Izzetoglu, G T; Horuluoglu, B H; Gucluer, G

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, researchers have given emphasis on the differences in physiological parameters between early and late hatched chicks within a hatch window. Considering the importance of intestine development in newly hatched chicks, however, changes in gene expression of nutrient transporters in the jejunum of early hatched chicks within a hatch window have not been studied yet. This study was conducted to determine the effects of egg storage duration before incubation and hatch window on intestinal development and expression of PepT1 (H+-dependent peptide transporter) and SGLT1 (sodium-glucose co-transporter) genes in the jejunum of early hatched broiler chicks within a 30 h of hatch window. A total of 1218 eggs obtained from 38-week-old Ross 308 broiler breeder flocks were stored for 3 (ES3) or 14 days (ES14) and incubated at the same conditions. Eggs were checked between 475 and 480 h of incubation and 40 chicks from each egg storage duration were weighed; chick length and rectal temperature were measured. The chicks were sampled to evaluate morphological parameters and PepT1 and SGLT1 expression. The remaining chicks that hatched between 475 and 480 h were placed back in the incubator and the same measurements were conducted with those chicks at the end of hatch window at 510 h of incubation. Chick length, chick dry matter content, rectal temperature and weight of small intestine segments increased, whereas chick weight decreased during the hatch window. The increase in the jejunum length and villus width and area during the hatch window were higher for ES3 than ES14 chicks. PepT1 expression was higher for ES3 chicks compared with ES14. There was a 10.2 and 17.6-fold increase in PepT1 and SGLT1 expression of ES3 chicks at the end of hatch window, whereas it was only 2.3 and 3.3-fold, respectively, for ES14 chicks. These results suggested that egg storage duration affected development of early hatched chicks during 30 h of hatch window. It can be concluded that

  8. Cyclic GMP and Cilia Motility

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Motile cilia of the lungs respond to environmental challenges by increasing their ciliary beat frequency in order to enhance mucociliary clearance as a fundamental tenant of innate defense. One important second messenger in transducing the regulable nature of motile cilia is cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP). In this review, the history of cGMP action is presented and a survey of the existing data addressing cGMP action in ciliary motility is presented. Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated regulation of cGMP in ciliated cells is presented in the context of alcohol-induced cilia function and dysfunction. PMID:26264028

  9. Monoglyceride lipase deficiency causes desensitization of intestinal cannabinoid receptor type 1 and increased colonic μ-opioid receptor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Taschler, U; Eichmann, T O; Radner, F P W; Grabner, G F; Wolinski, H; Storr, M; Lass, A; Schicho, R; Zimmermann, R

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Monoglyceride lipase (MGL) degrades 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), an endogenous agonist of cannabinoid receptors (CB1/2). Because the CB1 receptor is involved in the control of gut function, we investigated the effects of pharmacological inhibition and genetic deletion of MGL on intestinal motility. Furthermore, we determined whether defective 2-AG degradation affects μ-opioid receptor (μ receptor) signalling, a parallel pathway regulating gut motility. Experimental Approach Gut motility was investigated by monitoring Evans Blue transit and colonic bead propulsion in response to MGL inhibition and CB1 receptor or μ receptor stimulation. Ileal contractility was investigated by electrical field stimulation. CB1 receptor expression in ileum and colon was assessed by immunohistochemical analyses. Key Results Pharmacological inhibition of MGL slowed down whole gut transit in a CB1 receptor-dependent manner. Conversely, genetic deletion of MGL did not affect gut transit despite increased 2-AG levels. Notably, MGL deficiency caused complete insensitivity to CB1 receptor agonist-mediated inhibition of whole gut transit and ileal contractility suggesting local desensitization of CB1 receptors. Accordingly, immunohistochemical analyses of myenteric ganglia of MGL-deficient mice revealed that CB1 receptors were trapped in endocytic vesicles. Finally, MGL-deficient mice displayed accelerated colonic propulsion and were hypersensitive to μ receptor agonist-mediated inhibition of colonic motility. This phenotype was reproduced by chronic pharmacological inhibition of MGL. Conclusion and Implications Constantly elevated 2-AG levels induce severe desensitization of intestinal CB1 receptors and increased sensitivity to μ receptor-mediated inhibition of colonic motility. These changes should be considered when cannabinoid-based drugs are used in the therapy of gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:26075589

  10. Effects of erythromycin in chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Minami, T; Nishibayashi, H; Shinomura, Y; Matsuzawa, Y

    1996-12-01

    The prokinetic effects of erythromycin, a macrolide antibiotic, on the gastrointestinal tract as a motilin receptor agonist and its potential value for the treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders have recently attracted interest. The effects of erythromycin on the clinical symptoms and gastrointestinal motility of patients with chronic idiopathic pseudo-obstruction have not been investigated extensively. We presented a case of chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, in a 67-year-old man in whom oral erythromycin (900 mg/day) dramatically improved postprandial abdominal distention, nausea, and vomiting. Other agents with prokinetic effects on intestinal motility, i.e., cisapride, domperidone, metoclopramide, and trimebutine maleate did not have a favorable effect. Gastric emptying, measured by the sulfamethizole method; and intestinal transit, evaluated using radio-opaque markers, were markedly improved by treatment with erythromycin. Our experience suggests that the prokinetic effects of erythromycin may be of therapeutic value in chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. PMID:9027652

  11. Drosophila sperm motility in the reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Lu, Xiangyi

    2011-05-01

    Motile cilia and flagella exhibit many waveforms as outputs of dynein activation sequences on the highly conserved axoneme. Motility change of sperm in the reproductive tract is difficult to study and remains an important area of investigation. Sperm typically execute a sinusoidal waveform. Increased viscosity in the medium induces somewhat unusual arc-line and helical waveforms in some sperm. However, whether the latter two waveforms occur in vivo is not known. Using green fluorescence protein imaging, we show that Drosophila sperm in the uterus move in circular foci via arc-line waves, predominantly in a tail-leading orientation. From the uterus, a small fraction of the sperm enters the seminal receptacle (SR) in parallel formations. After sperm storage and coincident with fertilization of the egg, the sperm exit the SR via head-leading helical waves. Consistent with the observed bidirectional movements, the sperm show the ability to propagate both base-to-tip and tip-to-base flagellar waves. Numerous studies have shown that sperm motility is regulated by intraflagellar calcium concentrations; in particular, the Pkd2 calcium channel has been shown to affect sperm storage. Our analyses here suggest that Pkd2 is required for the sperm to adopt the correct waveform and movement orientation during SR entry. A working model for the sperm's SR entry movement is proposed. PMID:21293028

  12. Motility of active fluid drops on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoromskaia, Diana; Alexander, Gareth P.

    2015-12-01

    Drops of active liquid crystal have recently shown the ability to self-propel, which was associated with topological defects in the orientation of active filaments [Sanchez et al., Nature 491, 431 (2013), 10.1038/nature11591]. Here, we study the onset and different aspects of motility of a three-dimensional drop of active fluid on a planar surface. We analyze theoretically how motility is affected by orientation profiles with defects of various types and locations, by the shape of the drop, and by surface friction at the substrate. In the scope of a thin drop approximation, we derive exact expressions for the flow in the drop that is generated by a given orientation profile. The flow has a natural decomposition into terms that depend entirely on the geometrical properties of the orientation profile, i.e., its bend and splay, and a term coupling the orientation to the shape of the drop. We find that asymmetric splay or bend generates a directed bulk flow and enables the drop to move, with maximal speeds achieved when the splay or bend is induced by a topological defect in the interior of the drop. In motile drops the direction and speed of self-propulsion is controlled by friction at the substrate.

  13. Intestinal Malrotation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the intestines don't position themselves normally during fetal development and aren't attached inside properly as a result. The exact reason this occurs is unknown. When a fetus develops in the womb, the intestines start out ...

  14. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the major causes of intestinal obstruction in infants and children. Causes of paralytic ileus may include: Bacteria or viruses that cause intestinal infections ( gastroenteritis ) Chemical, electrolyte, or mineral imbalances (such as decreased ...

  15. Link between hypothyroidism and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Patil, Anant D

    2014-05-01

    Altered gastrointestinal (GI) motility is seen in many pathological conditions. Reduced motility is one of the risk factors for development of a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Hypothyroidism is associated with altered GI motility. The aim of this article was to study the link between hypothyroidism, altered GI motility and development of SIBO. Published literature was reviewed to study the association of altered GI motility, SIBO and hypothyroidism. Altered GI motility leads to SIBO. SIBO is common in patients with hypothyroidism. Patients with chronic GI symptoms in hypothyroidism should be evaluated for the possibility of SIBO. Both antibiotics and probiotics have been studied and found to be effective in management of SIBO. PMID:24944923

  16. Link between hypothyroidism and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Anant D.

    2014-01-01

    Altered gastrointestinal (GI) motility is seen in many pathological conditions. Reduced motility is one of the risk factors for development of a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). Hypothyroidism is associated with altered GI motility. The aim of this article was to study the link between hypothyroidism, altered GI motility and development of SIBO. Published literature was reviewed to study the association of altered GI motility, SIBO and hypothyroidism. Altered GI motility leads to SIBO. SIBO is common in patients with hypothyroidism. Patients with chronic GI symptoms in hypothyroidism should be evaluated for the possibility of SIBO. Both antibiotics and probiotics have been studied and found to be effective in management of SIBO. PMID:24944923

  17. Actin-based phagosome motility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fangliang; Southwick, Frederick S; Purich, Daniel L

    2002-10-01

    Despite abundant evidence of actin's involvement at the particle internalization stage of phagocytosis, little is known about whether phagosomes undergo the same type of actin-based motility as observed with endocytic vesicles or such intracellular pathogens as Listeria and Shigella. By employing video microscopy to follow the fate of latex bead-containing phagosomes within the cytoplasm of bone marrow macrophages, we have made the novel observation of actin-based phagosome motility. Immunofluorescence microscopy confirmed that phagosomes containing IgG-opsonized, bovine serum albumin (or BSA) -coated or uncoated latex beads all formed actin-rich rocket tails that persisted only during a brief, 1-2 min period of actin-based motility. Average speeds of actin-based phagosome motility were 0.13 +/- 0.06 microm/s for IgG-coated beads, 0.14 +/- 0.04 microm/s for BSA-coated beads, and 0.11+/- 0.03 microm/s for uncoated beads. Moreover, the speeds and motile-phase duration of each type of phagosome were comparable to the behavior of pinosomes [Merrifield et al., 1999: Nat. Cell Biol. 1:72-74.]. Determination of optimal conditions for observing and analyzing actin-based phagosome motility should facilitate future investigations of phagocytosis and phagosome maturation. PMID:12211106

  18. Intestine Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... intestine segment, most intestine transplants involve a whole organ from a deceased donor. In addition, most intestine transplants are performed in ... blood before surgery. I am looking for ... allocation About UNOS Being a living donor Calculator - CPRA Calculator - KDPI Calculator - LAS Calculator - MELD ...

  19. Ribose Accelerates Gut Motility and Suppresses Mouse Body Weight Gaining

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Li, Tong-Ruei R; Xu, Cong; Xu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity is closely related to excessive energy consumption. Clinical intervention of energy intake is an attractive strategy to fight obesity. However, the current FDA-approved weight-loss drugs all have significant side effects. Here we show that ribose upregulates gut motility and suppresses mice body weight gain. Ribokinase, which is encoded by Rbks gene, is the first enzyme for ribose metabolism in vivo. Rbks mutation resulted in ribose accumulation in the small intestine, which accelerated gut movement. Ribose oral treatment in wild type mice also enhanced bowel motility and rendered mice resistance to high fat diets. The suppressed weight gain was resulted from enhanced ingested food excretion. In addition, the effective dose of ribose didn't cause any known side effects (i.e. diarrhea and hypoglycemia). Overall, our results show that ribose can regulate gut motility and energy homeostasis in mice, and suggest that administration of ribose and its analogs could regulate gastrointestinal motility, providing a novel therapeutic approach for gastrointestinal dysfunction and weight control. PMID:27194947

  20. Antibiotics conspicuously affect community profiles and richness, but not the density of bacterial cells associated with mucosa in the large and small intestines of mice.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Nathan J; Uwiera, Richard R E; Yanke, L Jay; Selinger, L Brent; Inglis, G Douglas

    2012-02-01

    The influence of three antibiotics (bacitracin, enrofloxacin, and neomycin sulfate) on the mucosa-associated enteric microbiota and the intestines of mice was examined. Antibiotics caused conspicuous enlargement of ceca and an increase in overall length of the intestine. However, there were no pathologic changes associated with increased cecal size or length of the intestine. Conspicuous reductions in the richness of mucosa-associated bacteria and changes to community profiles within the small (duodenum, proximal jejunum, middle jejunum, distal jejunum, and ileum) and large (cecum, ascending colon, and descending colon) intestine occurred in mice administered antibiotics. Communities in antibiotic-treated mice were dominated by a limited number of Clostridium-like (i.e. clostridial cluster XIVa) and Bacteroides species. The richness of mucosa-associated communities within the small and large intestine increased during the 14-day recovery period. However, community profiles within the large intestine did not return to baseline (i.e. relative to the control). Although antibiotic administration greatly reduced bacterial richness, densities of mucosa-associated bacteria were not reduced correspondingly. These data showed that the antibiotics, bacitracin, enrofloxacin, and neomycin sulfate, administered for 21 days to mice did not sterilize the intestine, but did impart a tremendous and prolonged impact on mucosa-associated bacterial communities throughout the small and large intestine. PMID:22185696

  1. Mass sperm motility is associated with fertility in sheep.

    PubMed

    David, Ingrid; Kohnke, Philippa; Lagriffoul, Gilles; Praud, Olivier; Plouarboué, Franck; Degond, Pierre; Druart, Xavier

    2015-10-01

    The study was to focus on the relationship between wave motion (mass sperm motility, measured by a mass sperm motility score, manually assessed by artificial insemination (AI) center operators) and fertility in male sheep. A dataset of 711,562 artificial inseminations performed in seven breeds by five French AI centers during the 2001-2005 time period was used for the analysis. Factors influencing the outcome of the insemination, which is a binary response observed at lambing of either success (1) or failure (0), were studied using a joint model within each breed and AI center (eight separate analyses). The joint model is a multivariate model where all information related to the female, the male and the insemination process were included to improve the estimation of the factor effects. Results were consistent for all analyses. The male factors affecting AI results were the age of the ram and the mass motility. After correction for the other factors of variation, the lambing rate increased quasi linearly from three to more than ten points with the mass sperm motility score depending on the breed and the AI center. The consistency of the relationship for all breeds indicated that mass sperm motility is predictive of the fertility resulting when sperm are used from a specific ejaculate. Nonetheless, predictability could be improved if an objective measurement of mass sperm motility were available as a substitute for the subjective scoring currently in use in AI centers. PMID:26364125

  2. Proteomic changes of the porcine small intestine in response to chronic heat stress.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanjun; Gu, Xianhong

    2015-12-01

    Acute heat stress (HS) negatively affects intestinal integrity and barrier function. In contrast, chronic mild HS poses a distinct challenge to animals. Therefore, this study integrates biochemical, histological and proteomic approaches to investigate the effects of chronic HS on the intestine in finishing pigs. Castrated male crossbreeds (79.00 ± 1.50 kg BW) were subjected to either thermal neutral (TN, 21 °C; 55% ± 5% humidity; n=8) or HS conditions (30 °C; 55% ± 5% humidity; n=8) for 3 weeks. The pigs were sacrificed after 3 weeks of high environmental exposure and the plasma hormones, the intestinal morphology, integrity, and protein profiles of the jejunum mucosa were determined. Chronic HS reduced the free triiodothyronine (FT3) and GH levels. HS damaged intestinal morphology, increased plasma d-lactate concentrations and decreased alkaline phosphatase activity of intestinal mucosa. Proteome analysis of the jejunum mucosa was conducted by 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Fifty-three intestinal proteins were found to be differentially abundant, 18 of which were related to cell structure and motility, and their changes in abundance could comprise intestinal integrity and function. The down-regulation of proteins involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle), electron transport chain (ETC), and oxidative phosphorylation suggested that chronic HS impaired energy metabolism and thus induced oxidative stress. Moreover, the changes of ten proteins in abundance related to stress response and defense indicated pigs mediated long-term heat exposure and counteracted its negative effects of heat exposure. These findings have important implications for understanding the effect of chronic HS on intestines. PMID:26416815

  3. Proteomic changes of the porcine small intestine in response to chronic heat stress

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yanjun; Gu, Xianhong

    2015-01-01

    Acute heat stress (HS) negatively affects intestinal integrity and barrier function. In contrast, chronic mild HS poses a distinct challenge to animals. Therefore, this study integrates biochemical, histological and proteomic approaches to investigate the effects of chronic HS on the intestine in finishing pigs. Castrated male crossbreeds (79.00±1.50 kg BW) were subjected to either thermal neutral (TN, 21 °C; 55%±5% humidity; n=8) or HS conditions (30 °C; 55%±5% humidity; n=8) for 3 weeks. The pigs were sacrificed after 3 weeks of high environmental exposure and the plasma hormones, the intestinal morphology, integrity, and protein profiles of the jejunum mucosa were determined. Chronic HS reduced the free triiodothyronine (FT3) and GH levels. HS damaged intestinal morphology, increased plasma d-lactate concentrations and decreased alkaline phosphatase activity of intestinal mucosa. Proteome analysis of the jejunum mucosa was conducted by 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Fifty-three intestinal proteins were found to be differentially abundant, 18 of which were related to cell structure and motility, and their changes in abundance could comprise intestinal integrity and function. The down-regulation of proteins involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle), electron transport chain (ETC), and oxidative phosphorylation suggested that chronic HS impaired energy metabolism and thus induced oxidative stress. Moreover, the changes of ten proteins in abundance related to stress response and defense indicated pigs mediated long-term heat exposure and counteracted its negative effects of heat exposure. These findings have important implications for understanding the effect of chronic HS on intestines. PMID:26416815

  4. Mutations in the Borrelia burgdorferi Flagellar Type III Secretion System Genes fliH and fliI Profoundly Affect Spirochete Flagellar Assembly, Morphology, Motility, Structure, and Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lihui; Zhao, Xiaowei; Liu, Jun; Norris, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi migrates to distant sites in the tick vectors and mammalian hosts through robust motility and chemotaxis activities. FliH and FliI are two cytoplasmic proteins that play important roles in the type III secretion system (T3SS)-mediated export and assembly of flagellar structural proteins. However, detailed analyses of the roles of FliH and FliI in B. burgdorferi have not been reported. In this study, fliH and fliI transposon mutants were utilized to dissect the mechanism of the Borrelia type III secretion system. The fliH and fliI mutants exhibited rod-shaped or string-like morphology, greatly reduced motility, division defects (resulting in elongated organisms with incomplete division points), and noninfectivity in mice by needle inoculation. Mutants in fliH and fliI were incapable of translational motion in 1% methylcellulose or soft agar. Inactivation of either fliH or fliI resulted in the loss of the FliH-FliI complex from otherwise intact flagellar motors, as determined by cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). Flagellar assemblies were still present in the mutant cells, albeit in lower numbers than in wild-type cells and with truncated flagella. Genetic complementation of fliH and fliI mutants in trans restored their wild-type morphology, motility, and flagellar motor structure; however, full-length flagella and infectivity were not recovered in these complemented mutants. Based on these results, disruption of either fliH or fliI in B. burgdorferi results in a severe defect in flagellar structure and function and cell division but does not completely block the export and assembly of flagellar hook and filament proteins. PMID:25968649

  5. Psychoactive cannabinoids reduce gastrointestinal propulsion and motility in rodents.

    PubMed

    Shook, J E; Burks, T F

    1989-05-01

    Marijuana has been reported to be an effective antinauseant and antiemetic in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. Whether this is due to psychological changes, central antiemetic properties and/or direct effects on gastrointestinal (GI) function is not known. The purpose of these investigations was to determine whether the major constituents of marijuana and the synthetic cannabinoid nabilone have any effects on GI function which can be detected in rodent models of GI transit and motility. Intravenous delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) slowed the rate of gastric emptying and small intestinal transit in mice and in rats. Delta 9,11-THC, cannabinol and nabilone given i.v. also inhibited small intestinal transit in mice, but were less effective in reducing gastric emptying. Cannabidiol given i.v. had no effect on gastric emptying or intestinal transit. Those cannabinoids which inhibited GI transit did so at doses equal to, or lower, than those reported to produce central nervous system activity. In rats, delta 9-THC produced greater inhibition of gastric emptying and small intestinal transit than large bowel transit, indicating a selectivity for the more proximal sections of the gut. In addition, i.v. delta 9-THC decreased the frequency of both gastric and intestinal contractions without altering intraluminal pressure. Such changes probably reflect a decrease in propulsive activity, without change in basal tone. These data indicate that delta 9-THC, delta 9,11-THC, cannabinol and nabilone (but not cannabidiol) exert an inhibitory effect on GI transit and motility in rats. PMID:2542532

  6. Shikonin Inhibits Intestinal Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels and Prevents Rotaviral Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui

    2016-01-01

    Secretory diarrhea remains a global health burden and causes major mortality in children. There have been some focuses on antidiarrheal therapies that may reduce fluid losses and intestinal motility in diarrheal diseases. In the present study, we identified shikonin as an inhibitor of TMEM16A chloride channel activity using cell-based fluorescent-quenching assay. The IC50 value of shikonin was 6.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurements demonstrated that shikonin inhibited Eact-induced Cl(-) current in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 value of 1.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurement showed that shikonin exhibited inhibitory effect against CCh-induced Cl(-) currents in mouse colonic epithelia but did not affect cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration as well as the other major enterocyte chloride channel conductance regulator. Characterization study found that shikonin inhibited basolateral K(+) channel activity without affecting Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities. In vivo studies revealed that shikonin significantly delayed intestinal motility in mice and reduced stool water content in a neonatal mice model of rotaviral diarrhea without affecting the viral infection process in vivo. Taken together, the results suggested that shikonin inhibited enterocyte calcium-activated chloride channels, the inhibitory effect was partially through inhbition of basolateral K(+) channel activity, and shikonin could be a lead compound in the treatment of rotaviral secretory diarrhea. PMID:27601995

  7. Shikonin Inhibits Intestinal Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels and Prevents Rotaviral Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui

    2016-01-01

    Secretory diarrhea remains a global health burden and causes major mortality in children. There have been some focuses on antidiarrheal therapies that may reduce fluid losses and intestinal motility in diarrheal diseases. In the present study, we identified shikonin as an inhibitor of TMEM16A chloride channel activity using cell-based fluorescent-quenching assay. The IC50 value of shikonin was 6.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurements demonstrated that shikonin inhibited Eact-induced Cl- current in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 value of 1.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurement showed that shikonin exhibited inhibitory effect against CCh-induced Cl- currents in mouse colonic epithelia but did not affect cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration as well as the other major enterocyte chloride channel conductance regulator. Characterization study found that shikonin inhibited basolateral K+ channel activity without affecting Na+/K+-ATPase activities. In vivo studies revealed that shikonin significantly delayed intestinal motility in mice and reduced stool water content in a neonatal mice model of rotaviral diarrhea without affecting the viral infection process in vivo. Taken together, the results suggested that shikonin inhibited enterocyte calcium-activated chloride channels, the inhibitory effect was partially through inhbition of basolateral K+ channel activity, and shikonin could be a lead compound in the treatment of rotaviral secretory diarrhea. PMID:27601995

  8. Gastrointestinal motility in space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, William E.; Linder, Barry J.; Moore, Thomas P.; Pool, Sam L.

    1987-01-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms in space motion sickness (SMS) are significantly different from those in ordinary motion sickness (MS). Recording and tabulation of sounds was the only technique that could be used as a measure of motility during spaceflight operations. There were 17 subjects, six unaffected by SMS, who made ambulatory recordings preflight and inflight. With one exception, all those affected had sharply reduced sounds, while those unaffected had increases or moderate reductions. The mechanism of vomiting in SMS appears to be secondary to this ileus, in contrast to vomiting in ordinary MS, where the emesis center is thought to be directly triggered by the vestibular system.

  9. Effect of antidiuretic hormone on human small intestinal water and solute transport

    PubMed Central

    Soergel, Konrad H.; Whalen, George E.; Harris, John A.; Geenen, Joseph E.

    1968-01-01

    The effect of i.v. Pitressin (ADH) in a dose of 1 U/hr on permeability characteristics and on absorptive capacity of the normal human small intestine was investigated. The method of continuous intestinal perfusion was employed with polyethylene glycol 4000 as a nonabsorbable marker. Unidirectional flux rates of Na and H2O were calculated from the disappearance of 22Na and of 3HOH from isotonic saline solution within the intestinal lumen. Each study consisted of two successive perfusion periods: one while the subject was hydrated, the other during ADH infusion or while the subject was dehydrated. Water and sodium absorption from isotonic NaCl occurred in the hydrated state and was abolished by ADH as well as by dehydration in the jejunum. In some instances, net gain of water and sodium in the lumen occurred. In the ileum, ADH and dehydration caused a decrease in water and sodium absorption rate. By contrast, unidirectional flux into the intestinal lumen of water and sodium, as well as dextrose and D-xylose diffusion, remained unchanged by ADH. During perfusions with hypertonic urea solutions the rates of sodium and water entry into the intestine were greatly increased during i.v. ADH infusion, whereas urea loss from the study segment remained constant. ADH in the dosage used did not affect human intestinal motility. The results suggest that circulating ADH in physiologic concentrations affects the small intestine in one of two ways: increased secretion of water and salt into the lumen or direct interference with the active sodium transport mechanism. PMID:5645853

  10. pH gradients and a micro-pore filter at the luminal surface affect fluxes of propionic acid across guinea pig large intestine.

    PubMed

    Busche, Roger; von Engelhardt, Wolfgang

    2007-10-01

    A neutral pH microclimate had been shown at the luminal surface of the large intestine. The aim was to estimate to what extent fluxes of propionic acid/propionate are affected by changes of the luminal pH when this microclimate is present, largely reduced or absent. Fluxes of propionic acid/propionate (J(Pr)) across epithelia from the caecum, the proximal and the distal colon of guinea pigs were measured in Ussing chambers with and without a filter at the luminal surface. With bicarbonate and with a neutral or an acid pH of mucosal solutions (pH 7.4 or 6.4), mucosal-to-serosal fluxes (J(ms)(Pr) ) were 1.5 to 1.9-fold higher at the lower pH, in bicarbonate-free solutions and carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibition 2.1 to 2.6-fold. With a filter at the mucosal surface and with bicarbonate containing solutions, J (ms) (Pr) was not or only little elevated at the lower pH. Without bicarbonate J(ms)(Pr) was clearly higher. We conclude that the higher J(ms)(Pr) after luminal acidification is due to vigorous mixing in Ussing chambers resulting in a markedly reduced unstirred layer. Therefore, an effective pH microclimate at the epithelial surface is missing. J(ms)(Pr) is not or is little affected by lowering of pH because in the presence of bicarbonate the filter maintains the pH microclimate. However, in bicarbonate-free solutions J(ms)(Pr) was higher at pH 6.4 because a pH microclimate does not develop. Findings confirm that 30-60% of J(ms)(Pr) results from non-ionic diffusion. PMID:17639416

  11. Dietary strawberry seed oil affects metabolite formation in the distal intestine and ameliorates lipid metabolism in rats fed an obesogenic diet

    PubMed Central

    Jurgoński, Adam; Fotschki, Bartosz; Juśkiewicz, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Objective To answer the question whether dietary strawberry seed oil rich in α-linolenic acid and linoleic acid (29.3 and 47.2% of total fatty acids, respectively) can beneficially affect disorders induced by the consumption of an obesogenic diet. Design Thirty-two male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to four groups of eight animals each and fed with a basal or obesogenic (high in fat and low in fiber) diet that contained either strawberry seed oil or an edible rapeseed oil. A two-way analysis of variance was then applied to assess the effects of diet and oil and the interaction between them. Results After 8 weeks of feeding, the obesogenic diet increased the body weight and the liver mass and fat content, whereas decreased the cecal acetate and butyrate concentration. This diet also altered the plasma lipid profile and decreased the liver sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c) content. However, the lowest liver SREBP-1c content was observed in rats fed an obesogenic diet containing strawberry seed oil. Moreover, dietary strawberry seed oil decreased the cecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations (acetate, propionate, and butyrate) regardless of the diet type, whereas the cecal β-glucuronidase activity was considerably increased only in rats fed an obesogenic diet containing strawberry seed oil. Dietary strawberry seed oil also lowered the liver fat content, the plasma triglyceride level and the atherogenic index of plasma. Conclusions Strawberry seed oil has a potent lipid-lowering activity but can unfavorably affect microbial metabolism in the distal intestine. The observed effects are partly due to the synergistic action of the oil and the obesogenic diet. PMID:25636326

  12. Effects of environment factors on initiation of sperm motility in sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li; Shao, Mingyu; Bao, Zhenmin; Hu, Jingjie; Zhang, Zhifeng

    2011-06-01

    Sperm of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka) were quiescent in electrolyte NaCl solution and artificial seawater (ASW) and nonelectrolyte glucose and mannitol solutions when the osmolality was less than 200 mOsm kg-1. The sperm started to be motile as a result of increased osmolality, indicating an osmolality-dependent initiation of sperm motility in sea cucumber. After a brief incubation in hypotonic NaCl and glucose solutions with osmolalities of 200 and 400 mOsm kg-1, sperm lost partial motile ability. Sperm became immobilized when pH was 6.0 in NaCl, glucose and mannitol solutions, suggesting that an H+ release is involved in sperm activation. The decreased pH had no effect on the percentage of motile sperm in ASW, whereas it delayed the time period to reach the maximum motility (motilitymax). Extracellular Ca2+ in electrolyte solutions was not essential for motility stimulation but shortened the time of reaching motilitymax. When Ca2+ was mixed in nonelectrolyte solutions the sperm motility was completely suppressed. The K+ channel blocker, quinine, suppressed the sperm motility in electrolyte solution, showing a possible involvement of K+ transport in the process. High K+ concentration did not affect the sperm motility in NaCl solution, but decreased it in ASW and almost entirely suppressed it in nonelectrolyte solutions. The different effects of pH and K+ in ASW and NaCl solution indicate that external ions may also regulate sperm motility.

  13. Altered motility causes the early gastrointestinal toxicity of irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, B.A.; Moulder, J.E.; Otterson, M.F.; Sarna, S.K. )

    1994-03-01

    This article reviews studies of large and small intestinal contractile activity following radiation exposure. Studies of motility utilize strain gauge transducers surgically implanted on the seromuscular layer of the small intestine. All studies were performed in mixed breed dogs to record the occurrence of normal contractions, giant migrating contractions (GMCs) and retrograde giant contractions (RGCs) before, during and after irradiation (22.5 Gy in 9 fractions at 3 fractions/week). Giant migrating contractions and retrograde giant contractions are infrequent in the healthy state. However, in diseased states, GMCs are associated with abdominal cramps and diarrhea, and RGCs precede vomiting. In fasted animals, fractionated abdominal irradiation dramatically increased the frequency of GMCs, with the incidence peaking after the second dose. The increased frequency of GMCS occurred as early as a few hours after the first radiation fraction, and returned to normal within days of cessation of radiation. RGCs were also significantly increased after abdominal irradiation. The frequency of RGCs was greatest on the first and sixth dose of radiation. Clinically, the dogs developed nausea, vomiting and diarrhea as early as the first day of irradiation. In dogs studied in the fed state, decreased amplitude, duration, and frequency of postprandial contractions occurred. These changes may slow intestinal transit during irradiation. Radiation also produced a striking increase in the frequency of colonic GMCs; these changes in colonic motor activity were associated with diarrhea as early as the second irradiation. Changes in GI motility during fractionated irradiation precede the appearance of histopathological lesions in the GI tract. Thus, the symptoms of nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea experienced during radiotherapy (particularly those within the first week) are directly related to changes in bowel motility. 41 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  14. [Mechanism of bacterial gliding motility].

    PubMed

    Nakane, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria have various way to move over solid surfaces, such as glass, agar, and host cell. These movements involve surface appendages including flagella, type IV pili and other "mysterious" nano-machineries. Gliding motility was a term used various surface movements by several mechanisms that have not been well understood in past few decades. However, development of visualization techniques allowed us to make much progress on their dynamics of machineries. It also provided us better understanding how bacteria move over surfaces and why bacteria move in natural environments. In this review, I will introduce recent studies on the gliding motility of Flavobacteium and Mycoplasma based on the detail observation of single cell and its motility machinery with micro-nano scales. PMID:26632217

  15. Relationship of small bowel motility to ileoanal reservoir function.

    PubMed Central

    Groom, J S; Kamm, M A; Nicholls, R J

    1994-01-01

    Some patients with an ileoanal reservoir have a high defecation frequency, despite a good anatomical result and the absence of pouchitis. This study aimed to determine whether variation in function is related to a difference in small bowel motility proximal to the reservoir and if small bowel motility is propagated into the reservoir. Ambulatory small bowel and reservoir motility was studied for 24 hours in five patients with good function (median bowel frequency 4 per day, range 3-6) and seven subjects with poor function (median bowel frequency 12 per day, range 10-20). Five solid state pressure sensors were positioned in the small bowel and one in the reservoir. During the fasting nocturnal period (2300-0800 h), patients with poor function had a median of 10 (range 5-13) migrating motor complexes (MMC), significantly greater (p = 0.03) than the corresponding median number of 3 (range 2-7) in patients with good function. A total of 120 MMCs were observed in the whole series of 12 patients. Of these only two were propagated from the small bowel into the reservoir. Discrete clustered contractions were not propagated into the reservoir, although prolonged propagated contractions did pass into the reservoir in one patient. Patients with poor function had similar 24 hour stool output and radiological reservoir size to those with good function, but the median maximum tolerated volume on reservoir distension was 290 ml (range 160-450) for patients with poor function compared with 475 ml (range 460-550) for patients with good function (p = 0.005). Small bowel motility proximal to the reservoir bears an important relationship to pouch function and defecation frequency. Propagation of coordinated proximal small intestinal motility into the reservoir is rare. PMID:8174992

  16. Essential Roles of Enteric Neuronal Serotonin in Gastrointestinal Motility and the Development/Survival of Enteric Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhishan; Chalazonitis, Alcmène; Huang, Yung-yu; Mann, J. John; Margolis, Kara Gross; Yang, Qi Melissa; Kim, Dolly O.; Côté, Francine; Mallet, Jacques; Gershon, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    The gut contains a large 5-HT pool in enterochromaffin (EC) cells and a smaller 5-HT pool in the enteric nervous system (ENS). During development, enteric neurons are generated asynchronously. We tested hypotheses that serotonergic neurons, which arise early, affect development/survival of later-born dopaminergic, GABAergic, nitrergic, and calcitonin gene-related peptide-expressing neurons and are essential for gastrointestinal motility. 5-HT biosynthesis depends on tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1) in EC cells and on TPH2 in neurons; therefore, mice lacking TPH1 and/or TPH2 distinguish EC-derived from neuronal 5-HT. Deletion of TPH2, but not TPH1, decreased myenteric neuronal density and proportions of dopaminergic and GABAergic neurons but did not affect the extrinsic sympathetic innervation of the gut; intestinal transit slowed in mice lacking TPH2 mice, but gastric emptying accelerated. Isolated enteric crest-derived cells (ENCDCs) expressed the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) and 15 subtypes of 5-HT receptor. Addition of 5- HT to cultures of isolated ENCDCs promoted total and dopaminergic neuronal development. Rings of SERT-immunoreactive terminal axons surrounded myenteric dopaminergic neurons and SERT knock-out increased intestinal levels of dopamine metabolites, implying that enteric dopaminergic neurons receive a serotonergic innervation. Observations suggest that constitutive gastrointestinal motility depends more on neuronal than EC cell serotonin; moreover, serotonergic neurons promote development/survival of some classes of late-born enteric neurons, including dopaminergic neurons, which appear to innervate and activate in the adult ENS. PMID:21677183

  17. Intestinal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rege, Aparna; Sudan, Debra

    2016-04-01

    Intestinal transplantation has now emerged as a lifesaving therapeutic option and standard of care for patients with irreversible intestinal failure. Improvement in survival over the years has justified expansion of the indications for intestinal transplantation beyond the original indications approved by Center for Medicare and Medicaid services. Management of patients with intestinal failure is complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach to accurately select candidates who would benefit from rehabilitation versus transplantation. Significant strides have been made in patient and graft survival with several advancements in the perioperative management through timely referral, improved patient selection, refinement in the surgical techniques and better understanding of the immunopathology of intestinal transplantation. The therapeutic efficacy of the procedure is well evident from continuous improvements in functional status, quality of life and cost-effectiveness of the procedure. This current review summarizes various aspects including current practices and evidence based recommendations of intestinal transplantation. PMID:27086894

  18. INTESTINAL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Tzakis, Andreas G.; Todo, Satoru; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Intestinal transplantation is often the only alternative form of treatment for patients dependent on total parenteral nutrition for survival. Although a limited number of intestinal transplantations have been performed, results with FK 506 immunosuppression are comparable to those for other organ transplants. The impact of successful intestinal transplantation on gastroenterology will likely be similar to the impact of kidney and liver transplantation on nephrology and hepatology. PMID:7515221

  19. Crosstalk between Muscularis Macrophages and Enteric Neurons Regulates Gastrointestinal Motility

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Paul Andrew; Koscsó, Balázs; Rajani, Gaurav Manohar; Stevanovic, Korey; Berres, Marie-Luise; Hashimoto, Daigo; Mortha, Arthur; Leboeuf, Marylene; Li, Xiu-Min; Mucida, Daniel; Stanley, E. Richard; Dahan, Stephanie; Margolis, Kara Gross; Gershon, Michael David; Merad, Miriam; Bogunovic, Milena

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Intestinal peristalsis is a dynamic physiologic process influenced by dietary and microbial changes. It is tightly regulated by complex cellular interactions; however, our understanding of these controls is incomplete. A distinct population of macrophages is distributed in the intestinal muscularis externa. We demonstrate that in the steady state muscularis macrophages regulate peristaltic activity of the colon. They change the pattern of smooth muscle contractions by secreting bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), which activates BMP receptor (BMPR) expressed by enteric neurons. Enteric neurons, in turn, secrete colony stimulatory factor 1 (CSF1), a growth factor required for macrophage development. Finally, stimuli from microbial commensals regulate BMP2 expression by macrophages and CSF1 expression by enteric neurons. Our findings identify a plastic, microbiota-driven, crosstalk between muscularis macrophages and enteric neurons, which controls gastrointestinal motility. PMID:25036630

  20. Sperm motility-initiating substance in newt egg-jelly induces differential initiation of sperm motility based on sperm intracellular calcium levels.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akihiko; Takayama-Watanabe, Eriko; Vines, Carol A; Cherr, Gary N

    2011-01-01

    Sperm motility-initiating substance (SMIS), a novel motility inducer from newt egg-jelly, is activated by the release from associated jelly substances at the beginning of internal fertilization and affects female-stored sperm. We examined motility initiation kinetics of newt sperm in response to SMIS by monitoring the changes of sperm intracellular calcium ([Ca²(+)](i)). In quiescent non-motile sperm loaded with the Ca²(+) indicator Fluo-4, intracellular free Ca²(+) was observed around mitochondria using confocal scanning laser microscopy. A slight increase in [Ca²(+)](i) occurred simultaneously and transiently at motility initiation in sperm treated with either heated jelly extract (hJE) containing activated SMIS, or a low osmotic solution, which naturally initiates motility in externally-fertilizing amphibians and can initiate motility in urodele sperm. When the increase of [Ca²(+)](i) at motility-initiation was monitored using spectrofluorometry, large increases in [Ca²(+)](i) occurred immediately in the low osmotic solution and within 1.5 min in the hJE. In the intact jelly extract (no heating), small increases of [Ca²(+)](i) irregularly occurred from around 1 min and for about 4 min, during which motility was differentially initiated among sperm. These results indicate that the SMIS induces differential initiation of sperm motility depending on the activational states of the SMIS and its overall activity. The motility initiation in the jelly extract was delayed in sperm whose intracellular Ca²(+) had been chelated with BAPTA-AM. The relative levels of [Ca²(+)](i) were variable with a mean of 414 ± 256 nmol/L among resting sperm, suggesting that the level of [Ca²(+)](i) in the resting sperm modulates the responsiveness to the SMIS. PMID:21261606

  1. Management of irritable bowel syndrome: novel approaches to the pharmacology of gut motility.

    PubMed

    Scarpignato, C; Pelosini, I

    1999-03-01

    Although it is unclear to what extent irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms represent a normal perception of abnormal function or an abnormal perception of normal function, many believe that IBS constitutes the clinical expression of an underlying motility disorder, affecting primarily the mid- and lower gut. Indeed, transit and contractile abnormalities have been demonstrated with sophisticated techniques in a subset of patients with IBS. As a consequence, drugs affecting gastrointestinal (GI) motility have been widely employed with the aim of correcting the major IBS manifestations, ie, pain and altered bowel function. Unfortunately, no single drug has proven to be effective in treating IBS symptom complex. In addition, the use of some medications has often been associated with unpleasant side effects. Therefore, the search for a truly effective and safe drug to control motility disturbances in IBS continues. Several classes of drugs look promising and are under evaluation. Among the motor-inhibiting drugs, gut selective muscarinic antagonists (such as zamifenacin and darifenacin), neurokinin2 antagonists (such as MEN-10627 and MEN-11420), beta3-adrenoreceptor agonists (eg, SR-58611A) and GI-selective calcium channel blockers (eg, pinaverium bromide and octylonium) are able to decrease painful contractile activity in the gut (antispasmodic effect), without significantly affecting other body functions. Novel mechanisms to stimulate GI motility and transit include blockade of cholecystokinin (CCK)A receptors and stimulation of motilin receptors. Loxiglumide (and its dextroisomer, dexloxiglumide) is the only CCKA receptor antagonist that is being evaluated clinically. This drug accelerates gastric emptying and colonic transit, thereby increasing the number of bowel movements in patients with chronic constipation. It is also able to reduce visceral perception. Erythromycin and related 14-member macrolide compounds inhibit the binding of motilin to its receptors on

  2. Cell motility and antibiotic tolerance of bacterial swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Wenlong

    Many bacteria species can move across moist surfaces in a coordinated manner known as swarming. It is reported that swarm cells show higher tolerance to a wide variety of antibiotics than planktonic cells. We used the model bacterium E. coli to study how motility affects the antibiotic tolerance of swarm cells. Our results provide new insights for the control of pathogenic invasion via regulating cell motility. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: zwlong@live.com.

  3. Autologous intestinal reconstruction surgery as part of comprehensive management of intestinal failure.

    PubMed

    Pakarinen, Mikko P

    2015-05-01

    Pediatric intestinal failure (IF) remains to be associated with significant morbidity and mortality, the most frequent underlying etiologies being short bowel syndrome (SBS), and primary motility disorders. Management aims to assure growth and development, while preventing complications and facilitating weaning off parenteral support (PS) by fully utilizing adaptation potential of the remaining gut. Probability of survival and weaning off PS is improved by coordinated multidisciplinary intestinal rehabilitation combining individualized physiological enteral and parenteral nutrition (PN), meticulous central line care and medical management with carefully planned surgical care. Increasing evidence suggests that autologous intestinal reconstruction (AIR) surgery is effective treatment for selected short bowel patients. Bowel lengthening procedures normalize pathological adaptation-associated short bowel dilatation with potential to support intestinal absorption and liver function by various mechanisms. Although reversed small intestinal segment, designed to prolong accelerated intestinal transit, improves absorption in adult SBS, its feasibility in children remains unclear. Controlled bowel obstruction to induce dilatation followed by bowel lengthening aims to gain extra length in patients with the shortest duodenojejunal remnant. Reduced PS requirement limits the extent of complications, improving prognosis and quality of life. The great majority of children with SBS can be weaned from PS while prognosis of intractable primary motility disorders remains poor without intestinal transplantation, which serves as a salvage therapy for life-threatening complications such as liver failure, central vein thrombosis or recurrent bloodstream infections. PMID:25820764

  4. Intestinal Parasitoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagardere, Bernard; Dumburgier, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    Intestinal parasites have become a serious public health problem in tropical countries because of the climate and the difficulty of achieving efficient hygiene. The objectives of this journal issue are to increase awareness of the individual and collective repercussions of intestinal parasites, describe the current conditions of contamination and…

  5. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason Blood in the stool A lump in the abdomen Imaging tests that create pictures of the small ... help diagnose intestinal cancer and show whether it has spread. Surgery is ...

  6. Cinnamon polyphenols regulate multiple metabolic pathways involved in intestinal lipid metabolism of primary small intestinal enterocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing evidence suggests that dietary factors may affect the expression of multiple genes and signaling pathways including those that regulate intestinal lipoprotein metabolism. The small intestine is actively involved in the regulation of dietary lipid absorption, intracellular transport and me...

  7. Effect of preoperative suggestion on postoperative gastrointestinal motility.

    PubMed Central

    Disbrow, E A; Bennett, H L; Owings, J T

    1993-01-01

    Autonomic behavior is subject to direct suggestion. We found that patients undergoing major operations benefit more from instruction than from information and reassurance. We compared the return of intestinal function after intra-abdominal operations in 2 groups of patients: the suggestion group received specific instructions for the early return of gastrointestinal motility, and the control group received an equal-length interview offering reassurance and nonspecific instructions. The suggestion group had a significantly shorter average time to the return of intestinal motility, 2.6 versus 4.1 days. Time to discharge was 6.5 versus 8.1 days. Covariates including duration of operation, amount of intraoperative bowel manipulation, and amount of postoperative narcotics were also examined using the statistical model analysis of covariance. An average savings of $1,200 per patient resulted from this simple 5-minute intervention. In summary, the use of specific physiologically active suggestions given preoperatively in a beleivable manner can reduce the morbidity associated with an intra-abdominal operation by reducing the duration of ileus. PMID:8342264

  8. The in vivo infusion of hydrogen peroxide induces oxidative stress and differentially affects the activities of small intestinal carbohydrate digestive enzymes in the neonatal pig.

    PubMed

    Lackeyram, D; Mine, Y; Widowski, T; Archbold, T; Fan, M Z

    2012-12-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterized by persistent and relapsing fatigue that involves oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. We tested the hypothesis that a decrease in key carbohydrate-digesting enzyme activity in the gut is one of the major biological mechanisms of developing CFS in liquid formula-fed neonatal pigs with in vivo infusion of H(2)O(2). Piglets at 7 to 10 d of age were fitted with an intraperitoneal catheter, allowed a 3-d post surgical recovery, and infused with either H(2)O(2) at 5 mmol/kg BW (PER; n = 8) or the same volume of saline (CON; n = 8) in six 20-ml doses daily for a period of 10 d. During this period, animal behavior was monitored, blood samples collected, and jejunal enzyme activity kinetic experiments for lactase, sucrase, maltase, and maltase-glucoamylase were conducted. Plasma concentration of reduced glutathione remained similar (P > 0.05) to the pre-infusion level over the study duration in the CON group whereas this was 65% lower (P < 0.05) than the pre-infusion level in the PER group. Piglets experiencing oxidative stress had an overall lower (P < 0.05) physical mobility and the maximal jejunal specific activities [μmol/(mg protein · min)] for lactase (PER, 6.54 ± 0.68 vs. CON, 12.65 ± 0.69) and maltase (PER, 57.39 ± 1.02 vs. CON, 75.60 ± 1.04), respectively. However, differences were not observed (P > 0.05) in the maximal specific activities [μmol/(mg protein · min)] of sucrase (PER, 10.50 ± 1.37 vs. CON, 12.40 ± 1.55) and maltase-glucoamylase (PER, 0.71 ± 0.08 vs. CON, 0.70 ± 0.07) between the 2 groups. In conclusion, infusion of a suitable dose of H(2)O(2) induced CFS in the neonatal pigs. Oxidative stress in vivo differentially affected the maximal activities of important small intestinal carbohydrate-digesting enzymes in neonatal pigs fed a dairy milk-based liquid formula. PMID:23365398

  9. Intestinal steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bouguen, Guillaume; Dubuquoy, Laurent; Desreumaux, Pierre; Brunner, Thomas; Bertin, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    Steroids are fundamental hormones that control a wide variety of physiological processes such as metabolism, immune functions, and sexual characteristics. Historically, steroid synthesis was considered a function restricted to the adrenals and the gonads. In the past 20 years, a significant number of studies have demonstrated that steroids could also be synthesized or metabolized by other organs. According to these studies, the intestine appears to be a major source of de novo produced glucocorticoids as well as a tissue capable of producing and metabolizing sex steroids. This finding is based on the detection of steroidogenic enzyme expression as well as the presence of bioactive steroids in both the rodent and human gut. Within the intestinal mucosa, the intestinal epithelial cell layer is one of the main cellular sources of steroids. Glucocorticoid synthesis regulation in the intestinal epithelial cells is unique in that it does not involve the classical positive regulator steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1) but a closely related homolog, namely the liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1). This local production of immunoregulatory glucocorticoids contributes to intestinal homeostasis and has been linked to pathophysiology of inflammatory bowel diseases. Intestinal epithelial cells also possess the ability to metabolize sex steroids, notably estrogen; this mechanism may impact colorectal cancer development. In this review, we contextualize and discuss what is known about intestinal steroidogenesis and regulation as well as the key role these functions play both in physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25560486

  10. Role of calcitonin receptor-like receptor in colonic motility and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Clifton, Matthew S; Hoy, Julia J; Chang, Jen; Idumalla, Prema S; Fakhruddin, Humera; Grady, Eileen F; Dada, Stephen; Corvera, Carlos U; Bhargava, Aditi

    2007-07-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) mediates neurogenic inflammation and modulates intestinal motility. The CGRP receptor is a heterodimer of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor-associated modifying protein 1. We used RNA interference to elucidate the specific role of CLR in colonic motility and inflammation. Intramural injection of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) against CLR (dsCLR) into the colonic wall at two sites caused the spatial and temporal downregulation of CLR in the colon within 1 day of dsRNA injection. Knockdown of CLR persisted for 7-9 days, and the effect of knockdown spread to approximately 2 cm proximal and distal to the injection sites, whereas control dsRNA injection did not affect CLR expression. Measurement of isometric contractions of isolated colonic muscle segments revealed that in control dsRNA-injected rats, CGRP abrogated contractions entirely and decreased resting muscular tone, whereas in dsCLR-injected rats, CGRP decreased muscle tone but slow-wave contractions of varying amplitude persisted. In trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced colitis, rats with knockdown of CLR displayed a significantly greater degree of edema and necrosis than saline- or control dsRNA-injected rats. Levels of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-6 were markedly upregulated by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid treatment. TNF-alpha mRNA levels were further increased in CLR knockdown rats, whereas levels of IL-6 were unaltered. Thus this study demonstrates that CLR is a functional receptor for CGRP. PMID:17363466

  11. The Shape of Motile Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mogilner, Alex; Keren, Kinneret

    2010-01-01

    Motile cells — fan-like keratocytes, hand-shaped nerve growth cones, polygonal fibroblasts, to name but a few — come in different shapes and sizes. We discuss the origins of this diversity as well as what shape tells us about the physics and biochemistry underlying cell movement. We start with geometric rules describing cell-edge kinetics that govern cell shape, followed by a discussion of the underlying biophysics; we consider actin treadmilling, actin–myosin contraction, cell-membrane deformations, adhesion, and the complex interactions between these modules, as well as their regulation by microtubules and Rho GTPases. Focusing on several different cell types, including keratocytes and fibroblasts, we discuss how dynamic cell morphology emerges from the interplay between the different motility modules and the environment. PMID:19906578

  12. Intestinal manometry: who needs it?

    PubMed Central

    Bassotti, Gabrio; Bologna, Sara; Ottaviani, Laura; Russo, Michele; Dore, Maria Pina

    2015-01-01

    The use of manometry, i.e. the recording of pressures within hollow viscera, after being successfully applied to the study of esophageal and anorectal motor dysfunctions, has also been used to investigate physiological and pathological conditions of the small bowel. By means of this technique, it has been possible to understand better the normal motor functions of the small intestine, and their relationship and variations following physiologic events, such as food ingestion. Moreover, intestinal manometry has proved useful to document motor abnormalities of the small bowel, although recognition of altered patterns specific for a determinate pathologic condition is still unavailable. However, this technique often permits the detection of abnormal gut motility in patients with abdominal symptoms such as unexplained vomiting and diarrhea, and it is sometimes also useful to address therapeutic targeting. PMID:26468344

  13. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    Obstruction of the bowel may due to: A mechanical cause, which means something is in the way ... lung disease Use of certain medicines, especially narcotics Mechanical causes of intestinal obstruction may include: Adhesions or ...

  14. A Simple, Inexpensive Method for the Measurement of in vivo Intestinal Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallee, V. L.; Gaugl, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a system that monitors intestinal motility in vivo which is very sensitive, minimally injurious to the tissue, and inexpensive. Used are two balloons, one of which is inserted into the intestinal lumen and the other suspended from a force transducer. (CS)

  15. Small Intestine Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease Crohn's disease Infections Intestinal cancer Intestinal obstruction Irritable bowel syndrome Ulcers, such as peptic ulcer Treatment of disorders of the small intestine depends on the cause.

  16. The outer mucus layer hosts a distinct intestinal microbial niche

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai; Limenitakis, Julien P.; Fuhrer, Tobias; Geuking, Markus B.; Lawson, Melissa A.; Wyss, Madeleine; Brugiroux, Sandrine; Keller, Irene; Macpherson, Jamie A.; Rupp, Sandra; Stolp, Bettina; Stein, Jens V.; Stecher, Bärbel; Sauer, Uwe; McCoy, Kathy D.; Macpherson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    The overall composition of the mammalian intestinal microbiota varies between individuals: within each individual there are differences along the length of the intestinal tract related to host nutrition, intestinal motility and secretions. Mucus is a highly regenerative protective lubricant glycoprotein sheet secreted by host intestinal goblet cells; the inner mucus layer is nearly sterile. Here we show that the outer mucus of the large intestine forms a unique microbial niche with distinct communities, including bacteria without specialized mucolytic capability. Bacterial species present in the mucus show differential proliferation and resource utilization compared with the same species in the intestinal lumen, with high recovery of bioavailable iron and consumption of epithelial-derived carbon sources according to their genome-encoded metabolic repertoire. Functional competition for existence in this intimate layer is likely to be a major determinant of microbiota composition and microbial molecular exchange with the host. PMID:26392213

  17. Physiological and pathophysiological factors affecting the expression and activity of the drug transporter MRP2 in intestine. Impact on its function as membrane barrier.

    PubMed

    Arana, Maite R; Tocchetti, Guillermo N; Rigalli, Juan P; Mottino, Aldo D; Villanueva, Silvina S M

    2016-07-01

    The gastrointestinal epithelium functions as a selective barrier to absorb nutrients, electrolytes and water, but at the same time restricts the passage into the systemic circulation of intraluminal potentially toxic compounds. This epithelium maintains its selective barrier function through the presence of very selective and complex intercellular junctions and the ability of the absorptive cells to reject those compounds. Accordingly, the enterocytes metabolize orally incorporated xenobiotics and secrete the hydrophilic metabolites back into the intestinal lumen through specific transporters localized apically. In the recent decades, there has been increasing recognition of the existence of the intestinal cellular barrier. In the present review we focus on the role of the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (MRP2, ABCC2) in the apical membrane of the enterocytes, as an important component of this intestinal barrier, as well as on its regulation. We provide a detailed compilation of significant contributions demonstrating that MRP2 expression and function vary under relevant physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Because MRP2 activity modulates the availability and pharmacokinetics of many therapeutic drugs administered orally, their therapeutic efficacy and safety may vary as well. PMID:27109321

  18. Gliding Motility in Bacteria: Insights from Studies of Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Spormann, Alfred M.

    1999-01-01

    motor in M. xanthus controls cell movement in groups (S-motility system). It is dependent on functional type IV pili and is operative only when cells are in close proximity to each other. Type IV pili are known to be involved in another mode of bacterial surface translocation, called twitching motility. S-motility may well represent a variation of twitching motility in M. xanthus. However, twitching differs from gliding since it involves cell movements that are jerky and abrupt and that lack the organization and smoothness observed in gliding. Components of this motor are encoded by genes of the S-system, which appear to be homologs of genes involved in the biosynthesis, assembly, and function of type IV pili in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. How type IV pili generate force in S-motility is currently unknown, but it is to be expected that ongoing physiological, genetic, and biochemical studies in M. xanthus, in conjunction with studies on twitching in P. aeruginosa and N. gonorrhoeae, will provide important insights into this microbial motor. The two motility systems of M. xanthus are affected to different degrees by the MglA protein, which shows similarity to a small GTPase. Bacterial chemotaxis-like sensory transduction systems control gliding motility in M. xanthus. The frz genes appear to regulate gliding movement of individual cells and movement by the S-motility system, suggesting that the two motors found in this bacterium can be regulated to result in coordinated multicellular movements. In contrast, the dif genes affect only S-system-dependent swarming. PMID:10477310

  19. Neuropeptide S inhibits gastrointestinal motility and increases mucosal permeability through nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Wan Saudi, Wan Salman; Halim, Md Abdul; Rudholm-Feldreich, Tobias; Gillberg, Linda; Rosenqvist, Evelina; Tengholm, Anders; Sundbom, Magnus; Karlbom, Urban; Näslund, Erik; Webb, Dominic-Luc; Sjöblom, Markus; Hellström, Per M

    2015-10-15

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) receptor (NPSR1) polymorphisms are associated with enteral dysmotility and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This study investigated the role of NPS in conjunction with nitrergic mechanisms in the regulation of intestinal motility and mucosal permeability. In rats, small intestinal myoelectric activity and luminal pressure changes in small intestine and colon, along with duodenal permeability, were studied. In human intestine, NPS and NPSR1 were localized by immunostaining. Pre- and postprandial plasma NPS was measured by ELISA in healthy and active IBD humans. Effects and mechanisms of NPS were studied in human intestinal muscle strips. In rats, NPS 100-4,000 pmol·kg(-1)·min(-1) had effects on the small intestine and colon. Low doses of NPS increased myoelectric spiking (P < 0.05). Higher doses reduced spiking and prolonged the cycle length of the migrating myoelectric complex, reduced intraluminal pressures (P < 0.05-0.01), and increased permeability (P < 0.01) through NO-dependent mechanisms. In human intestine, NPS localized at myenteric nerve cell bodies and fibers. NPSR1 was confined to nerve cell bodies. Circulating NPS in humans was tenfold below the ∼0.3 nmol/l dissociation constant (Kd) of NPSR1, with no difference between healthy and IBD subjects. In human intestinal muscle strips precontracted by bethanechol, NPS 1-1,000 nmol/l induced NO-dependent muscle relaxation (P < 0.05) that was sensitive also to tetrodotoxin (P < 0.01). In conclusion, NPS inhibits motility and increases permeability in neurocrine fashion acting through NO in the myenteric plexus in rats and humans. Aberrant signaling and upregulation of NPSR1 could potentially exacerbate dysmotility and hyperpermeability by local mechanisms in gastrointestinal functional and inflammatory reactions. PMID:26206857

  20. Technique of Functional and Motility Test: How to Perform Antroduodenal Manometry

    PubMed Central

    Patcharatrakul, Tanisa

    2013-01-01

    Antroduodenal manometry is one of the methods to evaluate stomach and duodenal motility. This test is a valuable diagnostic tool for gastrointestinal motility disorders especially small intestinal pseudo-obstruction which is difficult to make definite diagnosis by clinical manifestations or radiologic findings. Manometric findings that have no evidence of mechanical obstruction and suggestive of pseudo-obstruction with neuropathy or myopathy can avoid unnecessary surgery and the treatment can be directly targeted. Moreover, among patients who have clinically suspected small intestinal pseudo-obstruction but with normal manometric findings, the alternative diagnosis including psychiatric disorder or other organic disease should be considered. The application of this test to the patients with functional gastrointestinal symptoms especially to find the association of motor abnormalities to the symptom has less impressive yield. Antroduodenal manometry is now readily available only in some tertiary care centers. The aim of this review is to describe the antroduodenal manometry technique, interpretation and clinical utility. PMID:23875108

  1. Elastic mismatch enhances cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresler, Yony; Palmieri, Benoit; Grant, Martin

    In recent years, the study of physics phenomena in cancer has drawn considerable attention. In cancer metastasis, a soft cancer cell leaves the tumor, and must pass through the endothelium before reaching the bloodstream. Using a phase-field model we have shown that the elasticity mismatch between cells alone is sufficient to enhance the motility of thesofter cancer cell by means of bursty migration, in agreement with experiment. We will present further characterization of these behaviour, as well as new possible applications for this model.

  2. Ursodeoxycholic acid improves gastrointestinal motility defects in gallstone patients

    PubMed Central

    Colecchia, A; Mazzella, G; Sandri, L; Azzaroli, F; Magliuolo, M; Simoni, P; Bacchi-Reggiani, ML; Roda, E; Festi, D

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To simultaneously evaluate the presence of defects in gallbladder and gastric emptying, as well as in intestinal transit in gallstone patients (GS) and the effect of chronic ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) administration on these parameters and on serum bile acids and clinical outcome in GS and controls (CTR). METHODS: After a standard liquid test meal, gallbla-dder and gastric emptying (by ultrasound), oroileal transit time (OITT) (by an immunoenzymatic technique) and serum bile acids (by HPLC) were evaluated before and after 3 mo of UDCA (12 mg/kg bw/d) or placebo administration in 10 symptomatic GS and 10 matched healthy CTR. RESULTS: OITT was longer in GS than in CTR (P < 0.0001); UDCA significantly reduced OITT in GS (P < 0.0001), but not in CTR. GS had longer gastric half-emptying time (t1/2) than CTR (P < 0.0044) at baseline; after UDCA, t1/2 significantly decreased (P < 0.006) in GS but not in CTR. Placebo administration had no effect on gastric emptying and intestinal transit in both GS and CTR. CONCLUSION: The gallstone patient has simultaneous multiple impairments of gallbladder and gastric emptying, as well as of intestinal transit. UDCA administration restores these defects in GS, without any effect in CTR. These results confirm the pathogenetic role of gastrointestinal motility in gallstone disease and suggest an additional mechanism of action for UDCA in reducing bile cholesterol supersaturation. PMID:16981264

  3. Correlation of cell membrane dynamics and cell motility

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Essential events of cell development and homeostasis are revealed by the associated changes of cell morphology and therefore have been widely used as a key indicator of physiological states and molecular pathways affecting various cellular functions via cytoskeleton. Cell motility is a complex phenomenon primarily driven by the actin network, which plays an important role in shaping the morphology of the cells. Most of the morphology based features are approximated from cell periphery but its dynamics have received none to scant attention. We aim to bridge the gap between membrane dynamics and cell states from the perspective of whole cell movement by identifying cell edge patterns and its correlation with cell dynamics. Results We present a systematic study to extract, classify, and compare cell dynamics in terms of cell motility and edge activity. Cell motility features extracted by fitting a persistent random walk were used to identify the initial set of cell subpopulations. We propose algorithms to extract edge features along the entire cell periphery such as protrusion and retraction velocity. These constitute a unique set of multivariate time-lapse edge features that are then used to profile subclasses of cell dynamics by unsupervised clustering. Conclusions By comparing membrane dynamic patterns exhibited by each subclass of cells, correlated trends of edge and cell movements were identified. Our findings are consistent with published literature and we also identified that motility patterns are influenced by edge features from initial time points compared to later sampling intervals. PMID:22372978

  4. Divalent Cation Control of Flagellar Motility in African Trypanosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westergard, Anna M.; Hutchings, Nathan R.

    2005-03-01

    Changes in calcium concentration have been shown to dynamically affect flagellar motility in several eukaryotic systems. The African trypanosome is a monoflagellated protozoan parasite and the etiological agent of sleeping sickness. Although cell motility has been implicated in disease progression, very little is currently known about biochemical control of the trypanosome flagellum. In this study, we assess the effects of extracellular changes in calcium and nickel concentration on trypanosome flagellar movement. Using a flow through chamber, we determine the relative changes in motility in individual trypanosomes in response to various concentrations of calcium and nickel, respectively. Extracellular concentrations of calcium and nickel (as low as 100 micromolar) significantly inhibit trypanosome cell motility. The effects are reversible, as indicated by the recovery of motion after removal of the calcium or nickel from the chamber. We are currently investigating the specific changes in flagellar oscillation and coordination that result from calcium and nickel, respectively. These results verify the presence of a calcium-responsive signaling mechanism(s) that regulates flagellar beat in trypanosomes.

  5. Mechanism of Actin-Based Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaloni, Dominique; Le Clainche, Christophe; Carlier, Marie-France

    2001-05-01

    Spatially controlled polymerization of actin is at the origin of cell motility and is responsible for the formation of cellular protrusions like lamellipodia. The pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri, which undergo actin-based propulsion, are acknowledged models of the leading edge of lamellipodia. Actin-based motility of the bacteria or of functionalized microspheres can be reconstituted in vitro from only five pure proteins. Movement results from the regulated site-directed treadmilling of actin filaments, consistent with observations of actin dynamics in living motile cells and with the biochemical properties of the components of the synthetic motility medium.

  6. High or low dietary carbohydrate:protein ratios during first-feeding affect glucose metabolism and intestinal microbiota in juvenile rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Geurden, I; Mennigen, J; Plagnes-Juan, E; Veron, V; Cerezo, T; Mazurais, D; Zambonino-Infante, J; Gatesoupe, J; Skiba-Cassy, S; Panserat, S

    2014-10-01

    Based on the concept of nutritional programming in mammals, we tested whether an acute hyperglucidic-hypoproteic stimulus during first feeding could induce long-term changes in nutrient metabolism in rainbow trout. Trout alevins received during the five first days of exogenous feeding either a hyperglucidic (40% gelatinized starch + 20% glucose) and hypoproteic (20%) diet (VLP diet) or a high-protein (60%) glucose-free diet (HP diet, control). Following a common 105-day period on a commercial diet, both groups were then challenged (65 days) with a carbohydrate-rich diet (28%). Short- and long-term effects of the early stimuli were evaluated in terms of metabolic marker gene expressions and intestinal microbiota as initial gut colonisation is essential for regulating the development of the digestive system. In whole alevins (short term), diet VLP relative to HP rapidly increased gene expressions of glycolytic enzymes, while those involved in gluconeogenesis and amino acid catabolism decreased. However, none of these genes showed persistent molecular adaptation in the liver of challenged juveniles (long term). By contrast, muscle of challenged juveniles subjected previously to the VLP stimulus displayed downregulated expression of markers of glycolysis and glucose transport (not seen in the short term). These fish also had higher plasma glucose (9 h postprandial), suggesting impaired glucose homeostasis induced by the early stimulus. The early stimulus did not modify the expression of the analysed metabolism-related microRNAs, but had short- and long-term effects on intestinal fungi (not bacteria) profiles. In summary, our data show that a short hyperglucidic-hypoproteic stimulus during early life may have a long-term influence on muscle glucose metabolism and intestinal microbiota in trout. PMID:25274323

  7. Chemotactic Motility of Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 under Aerobic and Denitrification Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Redondo-Nieto, Miguel; Rivilla, Rafael; Martín, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The sequence of the genome of Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 has shown the presence of multiple traits relevant for rhizosphere colonization and plant growth promotion. Among these traits are denitrification and chemotactic motility. Besides aerobic growth, F113 is able to grow anaerobically using nitrate and nitrite as final electron acceptors. F113 is able to perform swimming motility under aerobic conditions and under anaerobic conditions when nitrate is used as the electron acceptor. However, nitrite can not support swimming motility. Regulation of swimming motility is similar under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, since mutants that are hypermotile under aerobic conditions, such as gacS, sadB, kinB, algU and wspR, are also hypermotile under anaerobic conditions. However, chemotactic behavior is different under aerobic and denitrification conditions. Unlike most pseudomonads, the F113 genome encode three complete chemotaxis systems, Che1, Che2 and Che3. Mutations in each of the cheA genes of the three Che systems has shown that the three systems are functional and independent. Mutation of the cheA1 gene completely abolished swimming motility both under aerobic and denitrification conditions. Mutation of the cheA2 gene, showed only a decrease in swimming motility under both conditions, indicating that this system is not essential for chemotactic motility but is necessary for optimal motility. Mutation of the cheA3 gene abolished motility under denitrification conditions but only produced a decrease in motility under aerobic conditions. The three Che systems proved to be implicated in competitive rhizosphere colonization, being the cheA1 mutant the most affected. PMID:26161531

  8. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... the small intestine (duodenum) may be caused by cancer of the pancreas, scarring from an ulcer, or Crohn disease . Rarely, a gallstone, a mass of undigested food, or a collection of parasitic worms may block ... commonly caused by cancer, diverticulitis , or a hard lump of stool (fecal ...

  9. Aqueous extracts of husks of Plantago ovata reduce hyperglycaemia in type 1 and type 2 diabetes by inhibition of intestinal glucose absorption.

    PubMed

    Hannan, J M A; Ali, L; Khaleque, J; Akhter, M; Flatt, P R; Abdel-Wahab, Y H A

    2006-07-01

    Plantago ovata has been reported to reduce postprandial glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. In the present study, the efficacy and possible modes of action of hot-water extracts of husk of P. ovata were evaluated. The administration of P. ovata (0.5 g/kg body weight) significantly improved glucose tolerance in normal, type 1 and type 2 diabetic rat models. When the extract was administered orally with sucrose solution, it suppressed postprandial blood glucose and retarded small intestinal absorption without inducing the influx of sucrose into the large intestine. The extract significantly reduced glucose absorption in the gut during in situ perfusion of small intestine in non-diabetic rats. In 28 d chronic feeding studies in type 2 diabetic rat models, the extract reduced serum atherogenic lipids and NEFA but had no effect on plasma insulin and total antioxidant status. No effect of the extract was evident on intestinal disaccharidase activity. Furthermore, the extract did not stimulate insulin secretion in perfused rat pancreas, isolated rat islets or clonal beta cells. Neither did the extract affect glucose transport in 3T3 adipocytes. In conclusion, aqueous extracts of P. ovata reduce hyperglycaemia in diabetes via inhibition of intestinal glucose absorption and enhancement of motility. These attributes indicate that P. ovata may be a useful source of active components to provide new opportunities for diabetes therapy. PMID:16870001

  10. Bacterial signaling and motility: Sure bets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhulin, Igor B

    2008-01-01

    cytoplasmic membrane. The interaction causes the supramembrane and cytoplasmic rings to rotate along with the flagellar filaments. The energy for flagellar rotation comes from proton motive force or other ions, especially sodium in marine bacteria, which generate an electrochemical gradient across the cell membrane. Three proteins, FliM, FliN, and FliG, located at the base of the motor act as switches that control the direction of flagellar rotation. As exemplified by the enteric bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, changes in the direction of flagellar rotation affect the swimming behavior of the bacterial cell. Counterclockwise (CCW) rotation of the flagella causes the flagellar filaments to form a bundle that pushes the cell forward in a 'run.' In contrast, clockwise (CW) rotation causes the flagellar bundle to fly apart, and the cell tumbles to reorient to a new direction for the ensuing run upon the return of CCW rotation. The interchanging pattern of CCW and CW rotations produces a random walk, composed of relatively long runs with occasional direction changes or turns. By modulating the lengths of the runs or the frequency of tumbling, bacteria can regulate their motile behavior to move in a desirable direction. Many bacteria can also move on surfaces. Except for flagellum-driven swarming motility, all the other forms of known bacterial surface movement involve no flagella. The flagellum-independent surface motility, known as gliding, is observed in cyanobacteria, Mycoplasma species, Cytophaga-Flexibacterium species, and Myxococcus species. Without a doubt, the most thoroughly studied model gliding bacterium is Myxococcus xanthus, which also serves as a prokaryotic model for developmental biology due to its ability to develop multicellular fruiting bodies. M. xanthus cells use gliding motility both to hunt for food during vegetative growth and to aggregate during fruiting body formation. When nutrients are present, groups of cells or

  11. Disruption of TgPHIL1 Alters Specific Parameters of Toxoplasma gondii Motility Measured in a Quantitative, Three-Dimensional Live Motility Assay

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Jacqueline M.; Rould, Mark A.; Konradt, Christoph; Hunter, Christopher A.; Ward, Gary E.

    2014-01-01

    T. gondii uses substrate-dependent gliding motility to invade cells of its hosts, egress from these cells at the end of its lytic cycle and disseminate through the host organism during infection. The ability of the parasite to move is therefore critical for its virulence. T. gondii engages in three distinct types of gliding motility on coated two-dimensional surfaces: twirling, circular gliding and helical gliding. We show here that motility in a three-dimensional Matrigel-based environment is strikingly different, in that all parasites move in irregular corkscrew-like trajectories. Methods developed for quantitative analysis of motility parameters along the smoothed trajectories demonstrate a complex but periodic pattern of motility with mean and maximum velocities of 0.58±0.07 µm/s and 2.01±0.17 µm/s, respectively. To test how a change in the parasite's crescent shape might affect trajectory parameters, we compared the motility of Δphil1 parasites, which are shorter and wider than wild type, to the corresponding parental and complemented lines. Although comparable percentages of parasites were moving for all three lines, the Δphil1 mutant exhibited significantly decreased trajectory lengths and mean and maximum velocities compared to the parental parasite line. These effects were either partially or fully restored upon complementation of the Δphil1 mutant. These results show that alterations in morphology may have a significant impact on T. gondii motility in an extracellular matrix-like environment, provide a possible explanation for the decreased fitness of Δphil1 parasites in vivo, and demonstrate the utility of the quantitative three-dimensional assay for studying parasite motility. PMID:24489670

  12. Disruption of TgPHIL1 alters specific parameters of Toxoplasma gondii motility measured in a quantitative, three-dimensional live motility assay.

    PubMed

    Leung, Jacqueline M; Rould, Mark A; Konradt, Christoph; Hunter, Christopher A; Ward, Gary E

    2014-01-01

    T. gondii uses substrate-dependent gliding motility to invade cells of its hosts, egress from these cells at the end of its lytic cycle and disseminate through the host organism during infection. The ability of the parasite to move is therefore critical for its virulence. T. gondii engages in three distinct types of gliding motility on coated two-dimensional surfaces: twirling, circular gliding and helical gliding. We show here that motility in a three-dimensional Matrigel-based environment is strikingly different, in that all parasites move in irregular corkscrew-like trajectories. Methods developed for quantitative analysis of motility parameters along the smoothed trajectories demonstrate a complex but periodic pattern of motility with mean and maximum velocities of 0.58 ± 0.07 µm/s and 2.01 ± 0.17 µm/s, respectively. To test how a change in the parasite's crescent shape might affect trajectory parameters, we compared the motility of Δphil1 parasites, which are shorter and wider than wild type, to the corresponding parental and complemented lines. Although comparable percentages of parasites were moving for all three lines, the Δphil1 mutant exhibited significantly decreased trajectory lengths and mean and maximum velocities compared to the parental parasite line. These effects were either partially or fully restored upon complementation of the Δphil1 mutant. These results show that alterations in morphology may have a significant impact on T. gondii motility in an extracellular matrix-like environment, provide a possible explanation for the decreased fitness of Δphil1 parasites in vivo, and demonstrate the utility of the quantitative three-dimensional assay for studying parasite motility. PMID:24489670

  13. The locus for a novel syndromic form of neuronal intestinal pseudoobstruction maps of Xq28

    SciTech Connect

    Auricchio, A.; Casari, G.; Ballabio, A.; Brancolini, V.; Devoto, M.

    1996-04-01

    The neuronal type of primary chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIIP) results from the developmental failure of enteric neurons to migrate or differentiate correctly. This leads to intestinal motility disorders, which are characterized by symptoms and signs of bowel obstruction in the absence of a mechanical obstacle. Most of these conditions are congenital, and among them some are inherited. One syndromic condition characterized by intestinal pseudoobstruction with morphological abnormalities of the argyrophil neurons in the myenteric plexus, associated with short small bowel, malrotation, and pyloric hypertrophy, has been previously described. We have studied a family affected by this disorder, in which the disease appeared to segregate as an X-linked recessive trait. In order to map the CIIP locus in this family, we performed linkage analysis in 26 family members by use of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers from the X chromosome. One of these markers, DXYS154, located in the distal part of Xq28, shows no recombination with a maximum lod score of 2.32. Multipoint analysis excluded linkage with markers spanning other regions of the X chromosome. Our results, integrated with the current genetic and physical map of Xq28, determine the order of loci as cen-DXS15-(CIIPX)-DXS1108/DXYS154-tel. This study establishes, for the first time, the mapping assignment of a neuropathic form of CIIP other than Hirschsprung disease. 31 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Warren H.

    1950-01-01

    Despite improvements in knowledge of the pathologic physiology of intestinal obstruction, the introduction of gastrointestinal decompression, and more effective antibiotics, obstruction remains a serious disease with a high mortality rate. Although the diagnosis is often obscure, it can usually be made with a fair degree of accuracy by the history alone; pain is fairly constant and characteristically is of a cramping type simulated by very few other lesions. Distention is present in low lesions but absent in high lesions; on the contrary, vomiting is minimal in low lesions but prominent in high lesions. Visible peristaltic waves are almost pathognomonic of intestinal obstruction. Increased peristaltic sounds, as noted by auscultation, are extremely helpful in diagnosis; they are absent in paralytic ileus. Although intestinal obstruction is a surgical lesion, it must be remembered that in the type produced by adhesions the obstruction can be relieved by gastrointestinal decompression in 80 to 90 per cent of cases. Operation is usually indicated a short time after relief because of the probability of recurrence. In practically all other types of obstruction decompression is indicated only while the patient is being prepared for operation. Obviously any type of strangulation demands early operation. Strangulation can usually be diagnosed, particularly if it develops while the patient is under observation. Increase in pain, muscle spasm and pulse rate are important indications of development of strangulation. Dehydration and electrolytic imbalance are produced almost universally in high obstruction. Usually, it is unwise to wait until these two deficiencies are corrected before operation is undertaken, but correction must be well under way at the time of operation. Resections should be avoided in the presence of intestinal obstruction, but obviously will be necessary in strangulation. Operative technique must be expert and carried out with minimal trauma. Postoperative

  15. Intestinal spirochaetosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, F. D.; Kraszewski, A.; Gordon, J.; Howie, J. G. R.; McSeveney, D.; Harland, W. A.

    1971-01-01

    An abnormal condition of the large intestine is described in which the surface epithelium is infested by short spirochaetes. Diagnosis can be made by light microscopy. A review of 14 cases diagnosed by rectal biopsy and 62 cases involving the appendix shows no consistent symptom complex. The possible significance is discussed. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 1 PMID:5548558

  16. Small intestinal ischemia and infarction

    MedlinePlus

    ... small intestine; Atherosclerosis - small intestine; Hardening of the arteries - small intestine ... Embolus: Blood clots can block one of the arteries supplying the intestine. People who have had a ...

  17. Non-invasive panel tests for gastrointestinal motility monitoring within the MARS-500 Project

    PubMed Central

    Roda, Aldo; Mirasoli, Mara; Guardigli, Massimo; Simoni, Patrizia; Festi, Davide; Afonin, Boris; Vasilyeva, Galina

    2013-01-01

    the H2-breath test was strongly affected by external factors, which may have been related to the diet of the crewmembers or to environmental conditions (e.g., the accumulation of hydrogen in the simulator microenvironment). At least in closed microenvironments such as the MARS-500 simulator, 13C-breath tests should therefore be preferred to H2-breath tests. Finally, the fecal calprotectin test showed significant alterations during the mission simulation: all of the crewmembers were negative for the test at the beginning of the simulation but showed various degrees of positivity in at least one of the subsequent tests, thus indicating the onset of an intestinal inflammation. CONCLUSION: Breath tests, especially those 13C-based, proved suitable for monitoring gastrointestinal motility in the 520-d isolation experiment within MARS-500 project and can be applied in long-term spaceflights. PMID:23599647

  18. Effects of orally vs. parenterally administrated trimebutine on gastrointestinal and colonic motility in dogs.

    PubMed

    Buéno, L; Hondé, C; Pascaud, X; Junien, J L

    1987-01-01

    The influence of oral administration and intravenous infusion of trimebutine maleate (TMB) and N-desmethyl TMB (NDTMB), its main metabolite, was investigated in conscious dogs equipped with chronically implanted strain-gauges. In fasted dogs, TMB (10 to 20 mg/kg per os) delayed the occurrence of the next activity front on both stomach and duodenum by reinforcing the duration of the intestinal phase II. It also induced the occurrence of an additional migrating phase III. These effects were associated with a colonic stimulation generally followed by an inhibition. Comparatively NDTMB at similar dosages disrupted the antral cyclic phases which were replaced by continuous low amplitude contractions during 5-7 h. The MMC pattern persisted with a significant increase in the duration of phase II, and the colonic motility was inhibited during 4.3 to 6.7 h. Infused intravenously at a dose of 3 mg X kg-1 X h-1, TMB immediately inhibited the gastric cyclic contractions in fasted dogs. As for the oral route, the small bowel exhibited an increase in the duration of phase II frequently associated with the occurrence of an additional phase III. Furthermore an inhibition of the colonic motility was observed only at the end of the infusion and lasted at least 4 h. At similar dosage NDTMB had less pronounced inhibitory effects on gastric activity fronts and in contrast with TMB, the inhibitory effect on the colonic motility was observed as soon as the infusion of NDTMB started. These data demonstrate that orally administered TMB stimulates intestinal motility as previously described for i.v. route but in contrast to parenteral administration also stimulates antral and colonic motility.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3609630

  19. Gut microbiota-produced succinate promotes C. difficile infection after antibiotic treatment or motility disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Ferreyra, Jessica A.; Wu, Katherine J.; Hryckowian, Andrew J.; Bouley, Donna M.; Weimer, Bart C.; Sonnenburg, Justin L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. The mechanisms underlying C. difficile expansion after microbiota disturbance are just emerging. We assessed the gene expression profile of C. difficile within the intestine of gnotobiotic mice to identify genes regulated in response to either dietary or microbiota compositional changes. In the presence of the gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, C. difficile induces a pathway that metabolizes the microbiota fermentation end-product succinate to butyrate. The low concentration of succinate in the microbiota of conventional mice is transiently elevated upon antibiotic treatment or chemically-induced intestinal motility disturbance, and C. difficile exploits this succinate spike to expand in the perturbed intestine. A C. difficile mutant compromised in succinate utilization is at a competitive disadvantage during these perturbations. Understanding the metabolic mechanisms involved in microbiota-C. difficile interactions may help to identify approaches for the treatment and prevention of C. difficile-associated diseases. PMID:25498344

  20. Protonmotive force and motility of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed Central

    Shioi, J I; Imae, Y; Oosawa, F

    1978-01-01

    Motility of Bacillus subtilis was inhibited within a few minutes by a combination of valinomycin and a high concentration of potassium ions in the medium at neutral pH. Motility was restored by lowering the concentration of valinomycin or potassium ions. The valinomycin concentration necessary for motility inhibition was determined at various concentrations of potassium ions and various pH's. At pH 7.5, valinomycin of any concentration did not inhibit the motility, when the potassium ion concentration was lower than 9 mM. In the presence of 230 mM potassium ion, the motility inhibition by valinomycin was not detected at pH lower than 6.1. These results are easily explained by the idea that the motility of B. subtilis is supported by the electrochemical potential difference of the proton across the membrane, or the protonmotive force. The electrochemical potential difference necessary for motility was estimated to be about -90 mV. PMID:25261

  1. Regulation of flagellar motility during biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Sarah B.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Many bacteria swim in liquid or swarm over solid surfaces by synthesizing rotary flagella. The same bacteria that are motile also commonly form non-motile multicellular aggregates held together by an extracellular matrix called biofilms. Biofilms are an important part of the lifestyle of pathogenic bacteria and it is assumed that there is a motility-to-biofilm transition wherein the inhibition of motility promotes biofilm formation. The transition is largely inferred from regulatory mutants that reveal the opposite regulation of the two phenotypes. Here we review the regulation of motility during biofilm formation in Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Vibrio, and Escherichia, and we conclude that the motility-to-biofilm transition, if necessary, likely involves two steps. In the short term, flagella are functionally regulated to either inhibit rotation or modulate the basal flagellar reversal frequency. Over the long term, flagellar gene transcription is inhibited and in the absence of de novo synthesis, flagella are likely diluted to extinction through growth. Both short term and long term control is likely important to the motility-to-biofilm transition to stabilize aggregates and optimize resource investment. We emphasize the newly discovered classes of flagellar functional regulators and speculate that others await discovery in the context of biofilm formation. PMID:23480406

  2. Complementary effects of propranolol and nonoxynol-9 upon human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    White, D R; Clarkson, J S; Ratnasooriya, W D; Aitken, R J

    1995-10-01

    The inhibitory effects of nonoxynol-9, DL- and D-propranolol upon human sperm motility were determined in vitro. All three compounds were capable of causing complete cessation of sperm movement. However, greater efficacy was achieved using combinations of nonoxynol-9 and propranolol, suggesting a complementary interaction between these compounds. Investigations of the mechanism of action of propranolol revealed that an influx of calcium accompanied the loss of motility. However, since incubation in the absence of calcium enhanced the spermicidal effects of this compound, it was concluded that this calcium influx did not constitute the primary means by which motility was disrupted. Low doses of propranolol, which did not affect motility, were found to inhibit the capacity of human spermatozoa for sperm-oocyte fusion. PMID:8605783

  3. Cadmium inhibits mouse sperm motility through inducing tyrosine phosphorylation in a specific subset of proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lirui; Li, Yuhua; Fu, Jieli; Zhen, Linqing; Zhao, Na; Yang, Qiangzhen; Li, Sisi; Li, Xinhong

    2016-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) has been reported to impair male fertility, primarily by disrupting sperm motility, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here we investigated the effects of Cd on sperm motility, tyrosine phosphorylation, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) activity, and ATP levels in vitro. Our results demonstrated that Cd inhibited sperm motility, GAPDH activity, AMPK activity and ATP production, and induced tyrosine phosphorylation of 55-57KDa proteins. Importantly, all the parameters affected by Cd were restored to normal levels when incubated with 10μM Cd in the presence of 30μM ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Interestingly, changes of tyrosine phosphorylation levels of 55-57KDa proteins are completely contrary to that of other parameters. These results suggest that Cd-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of 55-57KDa proteins might act as an engine to block intracellular energy metabolism and thus decrease sperm motility. PMID:27233480

  4. A Novel Inducer of Roseobacter Motility Is Also a Disruptor of Algal Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Sule, Preeti

    2013-01-01

    Silicibacter sp. strain TM1040, a member of the Roseobacter clade, forms a symbiosis with unicellular phytoplankton, which is inextricably linked to the biphasic “swim or stick” lifestyle of the bacteria. Mutations in flaC bias the population toward the motile phase. Renewed examination of the FlaC− strain (HG1016) uncovered that it is composed of two different cells: a pigmented type, PS01, and a nonpigmented cell, PS02, each of which has an identical mutation in flaC. While monocultures of PS01 and PS02 had few motile cells (0.6 and 6%, respectively), coculturing the two strains resulted in a 10-fold increase in the number of motile cells. Cell-free supernatants from coculture or wild-type cells were fully capable of restoring motility to PS01 and PS02, which was due to increased fliC3 (flagellin) transcription, FliC3 protein levels per cell, and flagella synthesis. The motility-inducing compound has an estimated mass of 226 Da, as determined by mass spectrometry, and is referred to as Roseobacter Motility Inducer (RMI). Mutations affecting genes involved in phenyl acetic acid synthesis significantly reduced RMI, while defects in tropodithietic acid (TDA) synthesis had marginal or no effect on RMI. RMI biosynthesis is induced by p-coumaric acid, a product of algal lignin degradation. When added to algal cultures, RMI caused loss of motility, cell enlargement, and vacuolization in the algal cells. RMI is a new member of the roseobacticide family of troponoid compounds whose activities affect roseobacters, by shifting their population toward motility, as well as their phytoplankton hosts, through an algicidal effect. PMID:23161030

  5. Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, E. A.; Gadêlha, H.; Smith, D. J.; Blake, J. R.; Kirkman-Brown, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics.

  6. [Effect of drugs on granulocyte motility].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, D; Morenz, J

    1985-01-01

    The in-vitro influence of drugs on the chemokinesis and chemotaxis of neutrophils was investigated in order to prevent additional drug-induced motility impairment of cells in cases of already existing host defense disorders and for an eventual specific treatment of motility defects. Granulocyte motility is unimpaired by penicillin, ampicillin, carbenicillin, streptomycin, nystatin, and cyclophosphamide. The chemokinesis and chemotaxis of neutrophils are inhibited by erythromycin, oxytetracycline, doxycycline, chloramphenicol, hydrocortisone, g-strophanthin, digoxin, and digitoxin and in higher concentrations also by sulfonamides, gentamycin, prednisolone, methylprednisolone, dexamethasone, and phenylbutazone. Chemotaxis is selectively or rather more inhibited than chemokinesis by amphotericin B, griseofulvin, vinblastine++, trifluoperazine, and promethazine. Granulocyte motility is, however, stimulated by ascorbic acid, potassium thiocyanate, levamisole, lithium, and metofenazate. PMID:3161313

  7. Motility in the epsilon-proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Beeby, Morgan

    2015-12-01

    The epsilon-proteobacteria are a widespread group of flagellated bacteria frequently associated with either animal digestive tracts or hydrothermal vents, with well-studied examples in the human pathogens of Helicobacter and Campylobacter genera. Flagellated motility is important to both pathogens and hydrothermal vent members, and a number of curious differences between the epsilon-proteobacterial and enteric bacterial motility paradigms make them worthy of further study. The epsilon-proteobacteria have evolved to swim at high speed and through viscous media that immobilize enterics, a phenotype that may be accounted for by the molecular architecture of the unusually large epsilon-proteobacterial flagellar motor. This review summarizes what is known about epsilon-proteobacterial motility and focuses on a number of recent discoveries that rationalize the differences with enteric flagellar motility. PMID:26590774

  8. Human follicular fluid adverses hamster spermatozoa motility.

    PubMed

    Wetzels, A; Goverde, H J; Bastiaans, L A; Rolland, R

    1989-01-01

    To determine the optimal conditions for in vitro spermatozoa vitality, human and hamster spermatozoa were incubated at 37 degrees C in T6 medium supplemented with different biologic fluids (10% v/v). The fluids tested were human serum (HUS), hamster serum (HAS), and human follicular fluid (HUF). After incubation the spermatozoa were investigated for their qualitative and quantitative motility. Human spermatozoa maintained a good vitality in all fluids tested (approximately 25% motility after 18-h incubation). The hamster spermatozoa had after an incubation of 4 h a motility of 28.4% in HUS, 14.2% in HAS, and 2.2% in HUF. The quality of the motility was also extremely low in HUF, whereas it was adequate in HUS and in HAS. The presence of species-specific substances in mammalian follicular fluid is discussed. PMID:2589906

  9. Implications of altered gastrointestinal motility in obesity.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, T K; Geoghegan, J G; Baird, A W; Winter, D C

    2007-10-01

    The onset of obesity occurs as a result of an imbalance between nutrient consumption/absorption and energy expenditure. Gastrointestinal (GI) motility plays a critical role in the rate of consumption of foods, digestion, and absorption of nutrients. Various segments of the GI tract coordinate in a complex yet precise way, to control the process of food consumption, digestion, and absorption of nutrients. GI motility not only regulates the rates at which nutrients are processed and absorbed in the gut, but also, via mechanical and neurohormonal methods, participates in the control of appetite and satiety. Altered GI motility has frequently been observed in obese patients, the significance of which is incompletely understood. However, these alterations can be considered as potential contributing factors in the development and maintenance of obesity and changed eating behavior. Therapies aimed at regulating or counteracting the observed changes in GI motility are being actively explored and applied clinically in the management of obese patients. PMID:18098402

  10. Large intestine (colon) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The large intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of water from the indigestible ... the ileum (small intestine) passes material into the large intestine at the cecum. Material passes through the ...

  11. Drosophila Sperm Motility in the Reproductive Tract1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Lu, Xiangyi

    2011-01-01

    Motile cilia and flagella exhibit many waveforms as outputs of dynein activation sequences on the highly conserved axoneme. Motility change of sperm in the reproductive tract is difficult to study and remains an important area of investigation. Sperm typically execute a sinusoidal waveform. Increased viscosity in the medium induces somewhat unusual arc-line and helical waveforms in some sperm. However, whether the latter two waveforms occur in vivo is not known. Using green fluorescence protein imaging, we show that Drosophila sperm in the uterus move in circular foci via arc-line waves, predominantly in a tail-leading orientation. From the uterus, a small fraction of the sperm enters the seminal receptacle (SR) in parallel formations. After sperm storage and coincident with fertilization of the egg, the sperm exit the SR via head-leading helical waves. Consistent with the observed bidirectional movements, the sperm show the ability to propagate both base-to-tip and tip-to-base flagellar waves. Numerous studies have shown that sperm motility is regulated by intraflagellar calcium concentrations; in particular, the Pkd2 calcium channel has been shown to affect sperm storage. Our analyses here suggest that Pkd2 is required for the sperm to adopt the correct waveform and movement orientation during SR entry. A working model for the sperm's SR entry movement is proposed. PMID:21293028

  12. Distraction-induced intestinal enterogenesis: Preservation of intestinal function and lengthening after re-implantation into normal jejunum

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Hiroyuki; Sun, Xiaoyi; Yang, Hua; Nose, Keisuke; Somara, Sita; Bitar, Khalil N; Owyang, Chung; Okawada, Manabu; Teitelbaum, Daniel H

    2011-01-01

    Background Significant bowel lengthening can occur in an isolated intestinal segment with the use for linearly directed distractive forces; resulting in increased surface area and epithelial cell proliferation. We hypothesized that re-implantation of this lengthened intestine into normal jejunum would preserve this gain in intestinal length and function similar to normal jejunum. Methods An intestinal lengthening device was inserted into isolated jejunal segments in pigs, and fully expanded over 8 days. Lengthened segment were then re-implanted into normal intestinal continuity. Pigs were studied after another 28days. Function was assessed by motility, mucosal enzyme activity, barrier function and intestinal ion transport. Results Lengthened segments were significantly longer than control segments, and had nearly 2-fold greater surface area. Bowel lengthening was maintained 4 weeks after re-implantation. Motility after re-implantation was similar to non-operated pigs. Barrier function, mucosal disaccharidase levels and electrophysiologic measures declined immediately after lengthening, but returned to nearly normal levels 28 days after re-implantation. Conclusion Bowel lengthening results in a transient decline in mucosal absorptive function and smooth muscle contractility. However, function approaches that of normal bowel after re-implantation into enteric flow. These data may support the use of this technique as a potential new option for the treatment of patients with short bowel syndrome. PMID:21997804

  13. ATPases, ion exchangers and human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Peralta-Arias, Rubén D; Vívenes, Carmen Y; Camejo, María I; Piñero, Sandy; Proverbio, Teresa; Martínez, Elizabeth; Marín, Reinaldo; Proverbio, Fulgencio

    2015-05-01

    Human sperm has several mechanisms to control its ionic milieu, such as the Na,K-ATPase (NKA), the Ca-ATPase of the plasma membrane (PMCA), the Na(+)/Ca(2) (+)-exchanger (NCX) and the Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger (NHE). On the other hand, the dynein-ATPase is the intracellular motor for sperm motility. In this work, we evaluated NKA, PMCA, NHE, NCX and dynein-ATPase activities in human sperm and investigated their correlation with sperm motility. Sperm motility was measured by Computer Assisted Semen Analysis. It was found that the NKA activity is inhibited by ouabain with two Ki (7.9 × 10(-9) and 9.8 × 10(-5) M), which is consistent with the presence of two isoforms of α subunit of the NKA in the sperm plasma membranes (α1 and α4), being α4 more sensitive to ouabain. The decrease in NKA activity is associated with a reduction in sperm motility. In addition, sperm motility was evaluated in the presence of known inhibitors of NHE, PMCA and NCX, such as amiloride, eosin, and KB-R7943, respectively, as well as in the presence of nigericin after incubation with ouabain. Amiloride, eosin and KB-R7943 significantly reduced sperm motility. Nigericin reversed the effect of ouabain and amiloride on sperm motility. Dynein-ATPase activity was inhibited by acidic pH and micromolar concentrations of Ca(2) (+). We explain our results in terms of inhibition of the dynein-ATPase in the presence of higher cytosolic H(+) and Ca(2) (+), and therefore inhibition of sperm motility. PMID:25820902

  14. Novel mechanisms power bacterial gliding motility.

    PubMed

    Nan, Beiyan; Zusman, David R

    2016-07-01

    For many bacteria, motility is essential for survival, growth, virulence, biofilm formation and intra/interspecies interactions. Since natural environments differ, bacteria have evolved remarkable motility systems to adapt, including swimming in aqueous media, and swarming, twitching and gliding on solid and semi-solid surfaces. Although tremendous advances have been achieved in understanding swimming and swarming motilities powered by flagella, and twitching motility powered by Type IV pili, little is known about gliding motility. Bacterial gliders are a heterogeneous group containing diverse bacteria that utilize surface motilities that do not depend on traditional flagella or pili, but are powered by mechanisms that are less well understood. Recently, advances in our understanding of the molecular machineries for several gliding bacteria revealed the roles of modified ion channels, secretion systems and unique machinery for surface movements. These novel mechanisms provide rich source materials for studying the function and evolution of complex microbial nanomachines. In this review, we summarize recent findings made on the gliding mechanisms of the myxobacteria, flavobacteria and mycoplasmas. PMID:27028358

  15. Ghrelin family of peptides and gut motility.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Akihiro; Ataka, Koji; Fujino, Kazunori; Chen, Chih-Yen; Kato, Ikuo; Fujimiya, Mineko; Inui, Akio

    2011-04-01

    Acyl ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin, and obestatin are three peptides isolated from the gastrointestinal tract and encoded by the same preproghrelin gene. Three ghrelin gene products participate in modulating appetite, adipogenesis, glucose metabolism, cell proliferation, immune, sleep, memory, anxiety, cognition, and stress. We have investigated the effects of ghrelin family of peptides on fed and fasted motor activities in the stomach and duodenum of freely moving conscious rats by manometric method. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) and intravenous (IV) administration of acyl ghrelin induced fasted motor activity in the duodenum in fed rats. ICV and IV administration of des-acyl ghrelin disrupted fasted motor activity in the antrum. Changes in gastric motility induced by IV administration of des-acyl ghrelin were antagonized by ICV administration of a corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) 2 receptor antagonist. IV administration of obestatin decreased the percentage motor index in the antrum and prolonged the time taken to return to fasted motility in the duodenum in fed rats. ICV administration of CRF 1 and 2 receptor antagonists prevented the effects of obestatin on gastroduodenal motility. Ghrelin gene products regulate feeding-associated gastroduodenal motility. Stomach may regulate various functions including gastrointestinal motility via acyl ghrelin, des-acyl ghrelin and obestatin as an endocrine organ. Increasing knowledge of the effects of ghrelin family of peptides on gastrointestinal motility could lead to innovative new therapies for functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:21443714

  16. Intestinal capillariasis.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, J H

    1992-01-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt, and Taiwan, but most infections occur in the Philippines and Thailand. As established experimentally, the life cycle involves freshwater fish as intermediate hosts and fish-eating birds as definitive hosts. Embryonated eggs from feces fed to fish hatch and grow as larvae in the fish intestines. Infective larvae fed to monkeys, Mongolian gerbils, and fish-eating birds develop into adults. Larvae become adults in 10 to 11 days, and the first-generation females produce larvae. These larvae develop into males and egg-producing female worms. Eggs pass with the feces, reach water, embryonate, and infect fish. Autoinfection is part of the life cycle and leads to hyperinfection. Humans acquire the infection by eating small freshwater fish raw. The parasite multiplies, and symptoms of diarrhea, borborygmus, abdominal pain, and edema develop. Chronic infections lead to malabsorption and hence to protein and electrolyte loss, and death results from irreversible effects of the infection. Treatment consists of electrolyte replacement and administration of an antidiarrheal agent and mebendazole or albendazole. Capillariasis philippinensis is considered a zoonotic disease of migratory fish-eating birds. The eggs are disseminated along flyways and infect the fish, and when fish are eaten raw, the disease develops. Images PMID:1576584

  17. C-di-GMP Regulates Motile to Sessile Transition by Modulating MshA Pili Biogenesis and Near-Surface Motility Behavior in Vibrio cholerae

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher J.; Utada, Andrew; Davis, Kimberly R.; Thongsomboon, Wiriya; Zamorano Sanchez, David; Banakar, Vinita; Cegelski, Lynette; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    In many bacteria, including Vibrio cholerae, cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) controls the motile to biofilm life style switch. Yet, little is known about how this occurs. In this study, we report that changes in c-di-GMP concentration impact the biosynthesis of the MshA pili, resulting in altered motility and biofilm phenotypes in V. cholerae. Previously, we reported that cdgJ encodes a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase and a ΔcdgJ mutant has reduced motility and enhanced biofilm formation. Here we show that loss of the genes required for the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MshA) pilus biogenesis restores motility in the ΔcdgJ mutant. Mutations of the predicted ATPase proteins mshE or pilT, responsible for polymerizing and depolymerizing MshA pili, impair near surface motility behavior and initial surface attachment dynamics. A ΔcdgJ mutant has enhanced surface attachment, while the ΔcdgJmshA mutant phenocopies the high motility and low attachment phenotypes observed in a ΔmshA strain. Elevated concentrations of c-di-GMP enhance surface MshA pilus production. MshE, but not PilT binds c-di-GMP directly, establishing a mechanism for c-di-GMP signaling input in MshA pilus production. Collectively, our results suggest that the dynamic nature of the MshA pilus established by the assembly and disassembly of pilin subunits is essential for transition from the motile to sessile lifestyle and that c-di-GMP affects MshA pilus assembly and function through direct interactions with the MshE ATPase. PMID:26505896

  18. C-di-GMP Regulates Motile to Sessile Transition by Modulating MshA Pili Biogenesis and Near-Surface Motility Behavior in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher J; Utada, Andrew; Davis, Kimberly R; Thongsomboon, Wiriya; Zamorano Sanchez, David; Banakar, Vinita; Cegelski, Lynette; Wong, Gerard C L; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2015-10-01

    In many bacteria, including Vibrio cholerae, cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) controls the motile to biofilm life style switch. Yet, little is known about how this occurs. In this study, we report that changes in c-di-GMP concentration impact the biosynthesis of the MshA pili, resulting in altered motility and biofilm phenotypes in V. cholerae. Previously, we reported that cdgJ encodes a c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase and a ΔcdgJ mutant has reduced motility and enhanced biofilm formation. Here we show that loss of the genes required for the mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MshA) pilus biogenesis restores motility in the ΔcdgJ mutant. Mutations of the predicted ATPase proteins mshE or pilT, responsible for polymerizing and depolymerizing MshA pili, impair near surface motility behavior and initial surface attachment dynamics. A ΔcdgJ mutant has enhanced surface attachment, while the ΔcdgJmshA mutant phenocopies the high motility and low attachment phenotypes observed in a ΔmshA strain. Elevated concentrations of c-di-GMP enhance surface MshA pilus production. MshE, but not PilT binds c-di-GMP directly, establishing a mechanism for c-di-GMP signaling input in MshA pilus production. Collectively, our results suggest that the dynamic nature of the MshA pilus established by the assembly and disassembly of pilin subunits is essential for transition from the motile to sessile lifestyle and that c-di-GMP affects MshA pilus assembly and function through direct interactions with the MshE ATPase. PMID:26505896

  19. Dietary protein level and source differentially affect bone metabolism, strength, and intestinal calcium transporter expression during ad libitum and food-restricted conditions in male rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High protein diets may attenuate bone loss during energy restriction (ER). The objective of the current study was to determine whether high protein diets suppress bone turnover and improve bone quality in rats during ER and whether dietary protein source affects this relationship. Eighty 12-week o...

  20. Identification of quantitative trait loci affecting resistance to gastro-intestinal parasites in a double backcross population of Red Maasai and Dorper sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genome-wide scan for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting gastrointestinal (GI) nematode resistance was completed using a double backcross sheep population derived from Red Maasai and Dorper ewes bred to F1 rams. These breeds were chosen, because Red Maasai sheep are known to be more tolerant ...

  1. Exposure of rainbow trout milt to mercury and cadmium alters sperm motility parameters and reproductive success.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Grzegorz J; Dietrich, Mariola; Kowalski, R K; Dobosz, Stefan; Karol, Halina; Demianowicz, Wiesław; Glogowski, Jan

    2010-05-10

    In the current work, seminal plasma was used for the first time as an incubation medium for monitoring short-time exposure effects of sublethal concentrations of mercury and cadmium ions on rainbow trout sperm. Sperm motility parameters (CASA) and hatching rates were used as gamete quality markers. Additionally live/dead sperm viability test and comet assay of DNA fragmentation were performed. We demonstrated that computer-assisted sperm motility analysis (CASA) may serve as a predictor of reproductive success, when milt contaminated with heavy metals is used. Results presented in this study demonstrate that mercury ions altered sperm motility characteristics at 1-10 mg Hg2+/l and 10 mg Cd2+/l and hatching rates at 10 mg Hg2+/l and 10 mg Cd2+/l after 4h of exposure. Although mercury ions affected sperm motility parameters immediately after dilution with milt as well as at 4h of exposure, no differences in sperm motility parameters were found between intact and mercury-treated milt after 24h of exposure. Our results suggest that rainbow trout seminal plasma has a protective role against the toxic effects of mercury ions of rainbow trout sperm motility. PMID:20044150

  2. HEATR2 Plays a Conserved Role in Assembly of the Ciliary Motile Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    zur Lage, Petra; Ait-Lounis, Aouatef; Schmidts, Miriam; Shoemark, Amelia; Garcia Munoz, Amaya; Halachev, Mihail R.; Gautier, Philippe; Yeyati, Patricia L.; Bonthron, David T.; Carr, Ian M.; Hayward, Bruce; Markham, Alexander F.; Hope, Jilly E.; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Jackson, Ian J.; Durand, Bénédicte; Reith, Walter; Sheridan, Eamonn; Jarman, Andrew P.; Mill, Pleasantine

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are highly conserved microtubule-based structures that perform a variety of sensory and motility functions during development and adult homeostasis. In humans, defects specifically affecting motile cilia lead to chronic airway infections, infertility and laterality defects in the genetically heterogeneous disorder Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD). Using the comparatively simple Drosophila system, in which mechanosensory neurons possess modified motile cilia, we employed a recently elucidated cilia transcriptional RFX-FOX code to identify novel PCD candidate genes. Here, we report characterization of CG31320/HEATR2, which plays a conserved critical role in forming the axonemal dynein arms required for ciliary motility in both flies and humans. Inner and outer arm dyneins are absent from axonemes of CG31320 mutant flies and from PCD individuals with a novel splice-acceptor HEATR2 mutation. Functional conservation of closely arranged RFX-FOX binding sites upstream of HEATR2 orthologues may drive higher cytoplasmic expression of HEATR2 during early motile ciliogenesis. Immunoprecipitation reveals HEATR2 interacts with DNAI2, but not HSP70 or HSP90, distinguishing it from the client/chaperone functions described for other cytoplasmic proteins required for dynein arm assembly such as DNAAF1-4. These data implicate CG31320/HEATR2 in a growing intracellular pre-assembly and transport network that is necessary to deliver functional dynein machinery to the ciliary compartment for integration into the motile axoneme. PMID:25232951

  3. Effects of traditional Chinese herbal medicine San-Huang-Xie-Xin-Tang on gastrointestinal motility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Min Woo; Ahn, Tae Seok; Hong, Noo Ri; Jeong, Han-Sol; Jung, Myeong Ho; Ha, Ki-Tae; Kim, Byung Joo

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of San-Huang-Xie-Xin-Tang (SHXXT), a herbal product used in traditional Chinese medicine, on gastrointestinal (GI) motility in mice. METHODS: The in vivo effects of SHXXT on GI motility were investigated by measuring the intestinal transit rates (ITRs) using Evans blue in normal mice and in mice with experimentally induced GI motility dysfunction (GMD). RESULTS: In normal ICR mice, ITRs were significantly and dose-dependently increased by SHXXT (0.1-1 g/kg). GMD was induced by injecting acetic acid or streptozotocin intraperitoneally. The ITRs of GMD mice were significantly reduced compared to normal mice, and these reductions were significantly and dose-dependently inhibited by SHXXT (0.1-1 g/kg). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that SHXXT is a novel candidate for the development of a prokinetic agent that may prevent or alleviate GMD. PMID:25632184

  4. Statistical physical models of cellular motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banigan, Edward J.

    Cellular motility is required for a wide range of biological behaviors and functions, and the topic poses a number of interesting physical questions. In this work, we construct and analyze models of various aspects of cellular motility using tools and ideas from statistical physics. We begin with a Brownian dynamics model for actin-polymerization-driven motility, which is responsible for cell crawling and "rocketing" motility of pathogens. Within this model, we explore the robustness of self-diffusiophoresis, which is a general mechanism of motility. Using this mechanism, an object such as a cell catalyzes a reaction that generates a steady-state concentration gradient that propels the object in a particular direction. We then apply these ideas to a model for depolymerization-driven motility during bacterial chromosome segregation. We find that depolymerization and protein-protein binding interactions alone are sufficient to robustly pull a chromosome, even against large loads. Next, we investigate how forces and kinetics interact during eukaryotic mitosis with a many-microtubule model. Microtubules exert forces on chromosomes, but since individual microtubules grow and shrink in a force-dependent way, these forces lead to bistable collective microtubule dynamics, which provides a mechanism for chromosome oscillations and microtubule-based tension sensing. Finally, we explore kinematic aspects of cell motility in the context of the immune system. We develop quantitative methods for analyzing cell migration statistics collected during imaging experiments. We find that during chronic infection in the brain, T cells run and pause stochastically, following the statistics of a generalized Levy walk. These statistics may contribute to immune function by mimicking an evolutionarily conserved efficient search strategy. Additionally, we find that naive T cells migrating in lymph nodes also obey non-Gaussian statistics. Altogether, our work demonstrates how physical

  5. Neuropilin 1 Is Essential for Gastrointestinal Smooth Muscle Contractility and Motility in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yamaji, Maiko; Mahmoud, Marwa; Evans, Ian M.; Zachary, Ian C.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Neuropilin 1 (NRP1) is a non-tyrosine kinase receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and class 3 semaphorins, playing a role in angiogenesis and neuronal axon guidance, respectively. NRP1 is expressed in smooth muscle cells (SMC) but the functional role of NRP1 in SMC has not been elucidated. We therefore investigated the biological relevance of NRP1 in SMC in vivo by generating mice with SMC-specific Nrp1 deficiency. Methods Conditional gene targeting generated SMC-specific Nrp1 knockout mice (Nrp1SMKO) in which Cre recombinase is driven by the smooth muscle-specific myosin heavy chain (smMHC) promoter. Results SMC-specific Nrp1 deficiency resulted in a significant reduction in intestinal length by 6 months, and, by 18 months, in severe constipation, and enlargement of the intestine consistent with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction. These effects were associated with significant thinning of the intestinal smooth muscle, and decreased intestinal contractility. Expression of contractile proteins was reduced in Nrp1SMKO mice, including the smMHC isoform, SMB, whereas we observed a significant increase in the expression of the small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel 3 (SK3/KCa2.3), implicated in negative regulation of smooth muscle contraction. Conclusions Nrp1 deficiency in visceral SMC results in adult-onset defects in gastrointestinal contractility and motility and causes a shift to a less contractile SMC phenotype. These findings indicate a new role for Nrp1 in the maintenance of the visceral SMC contractile phenotype required for normal GI motility in aged mice. PMID:25659123

  6. Cellular Motility--Experiments on Contractile and Motile Mechanisms in the Slime Mould, Physarum Polycephalum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, R. P.; Stewart, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    Actin and myosin have now been demonstrated to be important constituents of many eukaryotic cells. Their role is primarily that of a contractile system underlying all aspects of cellular motility. Described here is a simple experimental system to demonstrate quantitatively aspects of motility and its regulation in a slime mold. (Author/MA)

  7. Study of human sperm motility post cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Bhavni; Kumar, Sushil; Talwar, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Background Cryopreservation of spermatozoa is a widely used technique to preserve the fertility of males. It can also benefit the armed forces personnel who are to be sent for long recruitments, while leaving their families behind. This study, apart from studying the effects of freezing and thawing, reveals the effect of the post thaw interval on the motility of the human spermatozoa and thus widens the insemination window period. Methods A detailed semen analysis was carried out as per the WHO guidelines for 25 samples. The samples were then washed, analysed and frozen in liquid nitrogen. The semen samples were subsequently thawed and similarly analysed after 20 min and 40 min of thawing. This was then followed by statistical analysis of the comparative motilities. Results Motility of sperms is found to decrease after cryopreservation. However, the study revealed that after thawing a significant increase in the motility of the sperms was noted with the progression of time (p < 0.05). Conclusion By simulating conditions similar to the in vivo conditions for the post thaw semen samples, we can safely wait, confirm the parameters like motility and count, and then inseminate the samples instead of blindly inseminating them immediately after thawing. PMID:25382909

  8. Motility modes of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temel, Fatma Zeynep; Qu, Zijie; McAllaster, Michael; de Graffenried, Christopher; Breuer, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    The parasitic single-celled protozoan Trypanosoma brucei causes African Sleeping Sickness, which is a fatal disease in humans and animals that threatens more than 60 million people in 36 African countries. Cell motility plays a critical role in the developmental phases and dissemination of the parasite. Unlike many other motile cells such as bacteria Escherichia coli or Caulobacter crescentus, the flagellum of T. brucei is attached along the length of its awl-like body, producing a unique mode of motility that is not fully understood or characterized. Here, we report on the motility of T. brucei, which swims using its single flagellum employing both rotating and undulating propulsion modes. We tracked cells in real-time in three dimensions using fluorescent microscopy. Data obtained from experiments using both short-term tracking within the field of view and long-term tracking using a tracking microscope were analyzed. Motility modes and swimming speed were analyzed as functions of cell size, rotation rate and undulation pattern. Research supported by NSF.

  9. Intestinal Neuromuscular Function after Preservation and Transplantation1

    PubMed Central

    Hamada, Nobuo; Hutson, William R.; Nakada, Koji; Ikoma, Akira; Suzuki, Tomomi; Zhu, Yue; Starzl, Thomas E.; Todo, Satoru

    2010-01-01

    While it is well known that prolonged preservation of the intestinal graft causes severe mucosal damage after transplantation, little is known about the effect on neuromuscular function. The entire small intestine of adult hound dogs was flushed and preserved with cold lactated Ringer’s solution and autotransplanted either immediately (n = 6) or after 24 hr (n = 6). Animals undergoing sham operation (n = 4) were used as a control. Fasting motility and the response of the intestinal smooth muscle and enteric nerves to bethanechol (100 μg/kg/0.5 hr, iv) and cisapride (0.5 mg/kg, iv) were determined by a multiple strain gauge method on Postoperative Days 2, 4, 7, 14, 21, and 28. Compared to the control, immediately transplanted grafts and those preserved for 24 hr developed delayed reappearance of migrating myoelectric complexes (MMC), hypercontractile activity, and reduced response to bethanechol and cisapride administration. Animals in the preservation group developed more abnormal fasting motility after transplantation, but responses to bethanechol and cisapride stimulation were not markedly different from those of the immediate group. The reappearance of MMC occurred 3 weeks postoperatively in the preservation group compared to 2 days in the immediate group. The results of our study indicate that intestinal dysmotility is augmented in prolonged-preservation grafts compared to those with brief preservation. The dysmotility was transient and normalized 3 to 4 weeks after surgery. Preservation and reperfusion injury to the neuromuscular system of intestinal grafts are reversible and are attenuated by simple hypothermia. PMID:8661243

  10. [A case of total intestinal aganglionosis. 2 years of survival].

    PubMed

    López Gútiérrez, J C; de Agustín, J C; Murcia, J; Carrero, C; Muguerza, R; Soto, C; Utrilla, J G; Lassaletta, L

    1991-10-01

    A two-year-old male is presented. Small bowel aganglionosis was proved to extend to 3 cm below ligament of Treitz. Gastrostomy and ileostomy was done. He received his caloric intake by cyclic home parenteral nutrition trough implantable venous system. At eighteen months of age, intestinal transplantation was refused and reoperation was done. The child underwent Ziegler's miotomymiectomy on 60 cm of aganglionic jejunum. Now at twenty seven months of age he receives cyclic parenteral nutrition, and enteral feedings are being increased slowly. The weight/height was at 91 per 100 standard, intestinal motility appears much better on contrast study and he is developmentally a normal child. PMID:1760266

  11. Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Makhija, P S; Magdalene, K F; Babu, M K

    1999-01-01

    Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a rare cause of intestinal obstruction mainly affecting female neonates. We present a case of a newborn female infant with a history of abdominal distension, bilious vomiting and decreased urine output. Barium enema showed a microcolon. Patient died soon after admission and the autopsy revealed a shortened bowel, a microcolon with abundant ganglion cells in the myenteric plexus, and an enlarged urinary bladder. An interesting finding in this case was the presence of enlarged nerve bundles containing several large ganglion cells on the lateral wall of the cervix. The salient clinical and autopsy findings in this case are presented. PMID:10798164

  12. Trimebutine as a modulator of gastrointestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Tai; Kim, Byung Joo

    2011-06-01

    Trimebutine has been used for treatment of both hypermotility and hypomotility disorders of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, such as irritable bowel syndrome. In this issue, Tan et al. (2011) examined the concentration-dependent dual effects of trimebutine on colonic motility in guinea pig. The authors suggested that trimebutine attenuated colonic motility mainly through the inhibition of L-type Ca(2+) channels at higher concentrations, whereas, at lower concentrations, it depolarized membrane potentials by reducing BK(ca) currents, resulting in the enhancement of the muscle contractions. Trimebutine might be a plausible modulator of GI motility, which gives an insight in developing new prokinetic agents. Further studies to elucidate the effects of trimebutine on the interstitial cells of Cajal, the pacemaker in GI muscles would promote the therapeutic benefits as a GI modulator. PMID:21725804

  13. Direct Upstream Motility in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kaya, Tolga; Koser, Hur

    2012-01-01

    We provide an experimental demonstration of positive rheotaxis (rapid and continuous upstream motility) in wild-type Escherichia coli freely swimming over a surface. This hydrodynamic phenomenon is dominant below a critical shear rate and robust against Brownian motion and cell tumbling. We deduce that individual bacteria entering a flow system can rapidly migrate upstream (>20 μm/s) much faster than a gradually advancing biofilm. Given a bacterial population with a distribution of sizes and swim speeds, local shear rate near the surface determines the dominant hydrodynamic mode for motility, i.e., circular or random trajectories for low shear rates, positive rheotaxis for moderate flow, and sideways swimming at higher shear rates. Faster swimmers can move upstream more rapidly and at higher shear rates, as expected. Interestingly, we also find on average that both swim speed and upstream motility are independent of cell aspect ratio. PMID:22500751

  14. Mechanism of shape determination in motile cells

    PubMed Central

    Keren, Kinneret; Pincus, Zachary; Allen, Greg M.; Barnhart, Erin L.; Marriott, Gerard; Mogilner, Alex; Theriot, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    The shape of motile cells is determined by many dynamic processes spanning several orders of magnitude in space and time, from local polymerization of actin monomers at subsecond timescales to global, cell-scale geometry that may persist for hours. Understanding the mechanism of shape determination in cells has proved to be extremely challenging due to the numerous components involved and the complexity of their interactions. Here we harness the natural phenotypic variability in a large population of motile epithelial keratocytes from fish (Hypsophrys nicaraguensis) to reveal mechanisms of shape determination. We find that the cells inhabit a low-dimensional, highly correlated spectrum of possible functional states. We further show that a model of actin network treadmilling in an inextensible membrane bag can quantitatively recapitulate this spectrum and predict both cell shape and speed. Our model provides a simple biochemical and biophysical basis for the observed morphology and behaviour of motile cells. PMID:18497816

  15. Screening and identification of proteins mediating senna induced gastrointestinal motility enhancement in mouse colon

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Zhong, Yue-Xia; Lan, Mei; Zhang, Zong-You; Shi, Yong-Quan; Lu, Ju; Ding, Jie; Wu, Kai-Cun; Jin, Jian-Ping; Pan, Bo-Rong; Fan, Dai Min

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To isolate the proteins involved in pharmacologic action of senna extract (SE) from mouse gastrointestinal tract and to explore the molecular mechanism of gastrointestinal motility change induced by SE. METHODS: SE was administrated to mice by different routes. Gastrointestinal motility of mice was observed using cathartic, gastrointestinal propellant movement experiments and X-ray analysis. Mouse model for gastrointestinal motility enhancement was established through continuous gastric administration of SE at progressively increased dose. At 3 h and week 3, 4, 6 and 10, morphological changes of gastrointestinal tissues were found under light microscope. Ultrastructural changes of intestinal and colonic tissues at week 6 were observed under transmission electron microscope. The colonic proteomic changes in model mice were examined by two-dimension polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with immobilized pH gradient isoelectric focusing to screen the differentially expressed proteins, and their molecular masses and isoelectric points were determined. Two N-terminal sequences of the samples were also determined by mass spectrometry. RESULTS: SE (0.3 g) caused diarrhea after gastric administration in 1-6 h and enhanced gastrointestinal propellant (65.1% ± 7.5%; 45.8% ± 14.6%,P < 0.01) in mice, but intramuscular and hypodermic injection had no cathartic effect. X-ray analysis of gastrointestinal motility demonstrated that gastric administration of SE enhanced gastric evacuation and gastrointestinal transferring function. At 3 h and week 3 and 4 after gastric administration of SE, light microscopic examination revealed no apparent change in gastrointestinal mucosal tissues, but transmission electron microscopic examination revealed inflammatory changes in whole layer of intestinal and colonic wall. Twenty differential proteins were detected in the colonic tissues of the model mice by two-dimensional electrophoresis, and the N-terminal amino acid sequences of two

  16. A rare cause of mechanical intestinal obstruction: Pharmacobezoar

    PubMed Central

    Erdemir, Ayhan; Ağalar, Fatih; Çakmakçı, Metin; Ramadan, Saime; Baloğlu, Hüseyin

    2015-01-01

    A bezoar is a hard, and solid, foreign body located in the gastrointestinal tract that may recur. Bezoar is classified according to its origin. Pharmacobezoars develop in the gastrointestinal tract due to alterations in anatomical structure and/or intestinal motility. In this paper, a case, not yet defined in the literature, of a pharmacobezoar causing a mechanical obstruction that is accompanied by a malignancy in the colon is reported, with the aim of contributing to the literature. PMID:26170758

  17. Incidence of motile Aeromonas spp. in foods.

    PubMed

    Pin, C; Marín, M L; García, M L; Tormo, J; Selgas, M D; Casas, C

    1994-09-01

    A total of 80 food samples were purchased from local retail consumer shops and examined for the presence of motile Aeromonas spp. Of the food categories tested, poultry had the highest incidence, with 100% positive. This was followed by lamb samples, with 60% positive. Raw milk and cheese samples had very low incidence (20%). No motile Aeromonas spp. were found in pre-prepared salads. Shellfish, fish, pork and beef samples had incidences of 40%. Most of the strains isolated were Aeromonas hydrophila, and for most of the food categories, no Aeromonas caviae isolates were obtained. PMID:7873101

  18. Response of a Motile/Non-Motile Escherichia coli Front to Hydrodynamic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baabour, Magali; Douarche, Carine; Salin, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    In a recent study (Douarche et al. PRL 102, 198101 (2009)), it has been shown that the motility of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is highly correlated to the oxygen level in a minimal medium: bacteria swim as long as they are provided with oxygen but reversibly transit to a non-motile state when they lack of it. Hence, when oxygen diffuses into an anaerobic sample of non-motile bacteria, a propagating front delineates a region of motile bacteria where oxygen is present from a region of non-motile ones where the oxygen is still not present. To study the response of this front to hydrodynamics excitation, we use the same fluorescent E. coli bacterial solution in rectangular cross section glass cells open to air (oxygen) at one inlet. After bacteria have consumed the oxygen of the solution, the presence of the oxygen only at the open edge of the sample leads to the formation of an analogous stationary front between motile and non-motile bacteria. We follow the response of this front to hydrodynamics flows such as an oscillating Poiseuille flow or natural convection. We analyze both the macroscopic behavior (shape and width) of the front as well as the microscopic displacements of individual bacteria. The dispersive behavior of this bacterial front is compared to the one of equivalent. Collaboration between Laboratories FAST and LPS, Univ Paris Sud and CNRS.

  19. Quinoa extract enriched in 20-hydroxyecdysone affects energy homeostasis and intestinal fat absorption in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Anne-Sophie; Even, Patrick; Lafont, René; Dioh, Waly; Veillet, Stanislas; Tomé, Daniel; Huneau, Jean-François; Hermier, Dominique; Quignard-Boulangé, Annie

    2014-04-10

    In a previous study, we have demonstrated that a supplementation of a high-fat diet with a quinoa extract enriched in 20-hydroxyecdysone (QE) or pure 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) could prevent the development of obesity. In line with the anti-obesity effect of QE, we used indirect calorimetry to examine the effect of dietary QE and 20E in high-fat fed mice on different components of energy metabolism. Mice were fed a high-fat (HF) diet with or without supplementation by QE or pure 20E for 3 weeks. As compared to mice maintained on a low-fat diet, HF feeding resulted in a marked physiological shift in energy homeostasis, associating a decrease in global energy expenditure (EE) and an increase in lipid utilization as assessed by the lower respiratory quotient (RQ). Supplementation with 20E increased energy expenditure while food intake and activity were not affected. Furthermore QE and 20E promoted a higher rate of glucose oxidation leading to an increased RQ value. In QE and 20E-treated HFD fed mice, there was an increase in fecal lipid excretion without any change in stool amount. Our study indicates that anti-obesity effect of QE can be explained by a global increase in energy expenditure, a shift in glucose metabolism towards oxidation to the detriment of lipogenesis and a decrease in dietary lipid absorption leading to reduced dietary lipid storage in adipose tissue. PMID:24534167

  20. Plasmodium berghei ANKA causes intestinal malaria associated with dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Tomoyo; Miyauchi, Eiji; Nakamura, Shota; Hirai, Makoto; Suzue, Kazutomo; Imai, Takashi; Nomura, Takahiro; Handa, Tadashi; Okada, Hiroko; Shimokawa, Chikako; Onishi, Risa; Olia, Alex; Hirata, Jun; Tomita, Haruyoshi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Horii, Toshihiro; Hisaeda, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, are frequently observed in patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. However, the correlation between malaria intestinal pathology and intestinal microbiota has not been investigated. In the present study, infection of C57BL/6 mice with P. berghei ANKA (PbA) caused intestinal pathological changes, such as detachment of epithelia in the small intestines and increased intestinal permeability, which correlated with development with experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). Notably, an apparent dysbiosis occurred, characterized by a reduction of Firmicutes and an increase in Proteobacteria. Furthermore, some genera of microbiota correlated with parasite growth and/or ECM development. By contrast, BALB/c mice are resistant to ECM and exhibit milder intestinal pathology and dysbiosis. These results indicate that the severity of cerebral and intestinal pathology coincides with the degree of alteration in microbiota. This is the first report demonstrating that malaria affects intestinal microbiota and causes dysbiosis. PMID:26503461

  1. Plasmodium berghei ANKA causes intestinal malaria associated with dysbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Taniguchi, Tomoyo; Miyauchi, Eiji; Nakamura, Shota; Hirai, Makoto; Suzue, Kazutomo; Imai, Takashi; Nomura, Takahiro; Handa, Tadashi; Okada, Hiroko; Shimokawa, Chikako; Onishi, Risa; Olia, Alex; Hirata, Jun; Tomita, Haruyoshi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Horii, Toshihiro; Hisaeda, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, are frequently observed in patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. However, the correlation between malaria intestinal pathology and intestinal microbiota has not been investigated. In the present study, infection of C57BL/6 mice with P. berghei ANKA (PbA) caused intestinal pathological changes, such as detachment of epithelia in the small intestines and increased intestinal permeability, which correlated with development with experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). Notably, an apparent dysbiosis occurred, characterized by a reduction of Firmicutes and an increase in Proteobacteria. Furthermore, some genera of microbiota correlated with parasite growth and/or ECM development. By contrast, BALB/c mice are resistant to ECM and exhibit milder intestinal pathology and dysbiosis. These results indicate that the severity of cerebral and intestinal pathology coincides with the degree of alteration in microbiota. This is the first report demonstrating that malaria affects intestinal microbiota and causes dysbiosis. PMID:26503461

  2. SHP-2 phosphatase activity is required for PECAM-1-dependent cell motility.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing-Xu; Cao, Gaoyuan; Williams, James T; Delisser, Horace M

    2010-10-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) has been implicated in endothelial cell motility during angiogenesis. Although there is evidence that SHP-2 plays a role in PECAM-1-dependent cell motility, the molecular basis of the activity of SHP-2 in this process has not been defined. To investigate the requirement of SHP-2 in PECAM-1-dependent cell motility, studies were done in which various constructs of SHP-2 were expressed in cell transfectants expressing PECAM-1. We observed that the levels of PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation and SHP-2 association with PECAM-1 were significantly increased in cells expressing a phosphatase-inactive SHP-2 mutant, suggesting that the level of PECAM-1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and thus SHP-2 binding are regulated in part by bound, catalytically active SHP-2. We subsequently found that expression of PECAM-1 stimulated wound-induced migration and the formation of filopodia (a morphological feature of motile cells). These activities were associated with increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and the dephosphorylation of paxillin (an event implicated in the activation of MAPK). The phosphatase-inactive SHP-2 mutant, however, suppressed these PECAM-1-dependent phenomena, whereas the activity of PECAM-1 expressing cells was not altered by expression of wild-type SHP-2 or SHP-2 in which the scaffold/adaptor function had been disabled. Pharmacological inhibition of SHP-2 phosphatase activity also suppressed PECAM-1-dependent motility. Furthermore, PECAM-1 expression also stimulates tube formation, but none of the SHP-2 constructs affected this process. These findings therefore suggest a model for the involvement of SHP-2 in PECAM-1-dependent motility in which SHP-2, recruited by its interaction with PECAM-1, targets paxillin to ultimately activate the MAPK pathway and downstream events required for cell motility. PMID:20631249

  3. Roles of Pseudomonas aeruginosa las and rhl Quorum-Sensing Systems in Control of Twitching Motility

    PubMed Central

    Glessner, Alex; Smith, Roger S.; Iglewski, Barbara H.; Robinson, Jayne B.

    1999-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a ubiquitous environmental bacterium and an important human pathogen. The production of several virulence factors by P. aeruginosa is controlled through two quorum-sensing systems, las and rhl. We have obtained evidence that both the las and rhl quorum-sensing systems are also required for type 4 pilus-dependent twitching motility and infection by the pilus-specific phage D3112cts. Mutants which lack the ability to synthesize PAI-1, PAI-2, or both autoinducers were significantly or greatly impaired in twitching motility and in susceptibility to D3112cts. Twitching motility and phage susceptibility in the autoinducer-deficient mutants were partially restored by exposure to exogenous PAI-1 and PAI-2. Both twitching motility and infection by pilus-specific phage are believed to be dependent on the extension and retraction of polar type 4 pili. Western blot analysis of whole-cell lysates and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays of intact cells were used to measure the amounts of pilin on the cell surfaces of las and rhl mutants relative to that of the wild type. It appears that PAI-2 plays a crucial role in twitching motility and phage infection by affecting the export and assembly of surface type 4 pili. The ability of P. aeruginosa cells to adhere to human bronchial epithelial cells was also found to be dependent on the rhl quorum-sensing system. Microscopic analysis of twitching motility indicated that mutants which were unable to synthesize PAI-1 were defective in the maintenance of cellular monolayers and migrating packs of cells. Thus, PAI-1 appears to have an essential role in maintaining cell-cell spacing and associations required for effective twitching motility. PMID:10049396

  4. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-05-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted. PMID:24868489

  5. Actin motility: formin a SCAry tail.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Art; Way, Michael

    2011-01-11

    A new biochemical analysis has revealed that the Rickettsia bacterial protein Sca2--recently shown to be essential for virulence and actin-dependent motility--assembles actin filaments using a mechanism that functionally resembles the processive elongation tactics used by formins. PMID:21215933

  6. Semiautomated Motility Assay For Determining Toxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond

    1996-01-01

    Improved method of assessing toxicities of various substances based on observation of effects of those substances on motilities of manageably small number of cells of protozoan species Tetrahema pyriformis. Provides repeatable, standardized tests with minimal handling by technicians and with minimal exposure of technicians to chemicals. Rapid and economical alternative to Draize test.

  7. Targeting tumor cell motility to prevent metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Trenis D.; Ashby, William J.; Lewis, John D.; Zijlstra, Andries

    2011-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity in patients with solid tumors invariably results from the disruption of normal biological function caused by disseminating tumor cells. Tumor cell migration is under intense investigation as the underlying cause of cancer metastasis. The need for tumor cell motility in the progression of metastasis has been established experimentally and is supported empirically by basic and clinical research implicating a large collection of migration-related genes. However, there are few clinical interventions designed to specifically target the motility of tumor cells and adjuvant therapy to specifically prevent cancer cell dissemination is severely limited. In an attempt to define motility targets suitable for treating metastasis, we have parsed the molecular determinants of tumor cell motility into five underlying principles including cell autonomous ability, soluble communication, cell-cell adhesion, cell-matrix adhesion, and integrating these determinants of migration on molecular scaffolds. The current challenge is to implement meaningful and sustainable inhibition of metastasis by developing clinically viable disruption of molecular targets that control these fundamental capabilities. PMID:21664937

  8. Unraveling the ties between irritable bowel syndrome and intestinal microbiota.

    PubMed

    Hong, Sung Noh; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2014-03-14

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder. It is a multifactorial disorder. Intestinal microbiota may cause the pathogenesis of IBS by contributing to abnormal gastrointestinal motility, low-grade inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, communication in the gut-brain axis, and so on. Previous attempts to identify the intestinal microbiota composition in IBS patients have yielded inconsistent and occasionally contradictory results. This inconsistency may be due to the differences in the molecular techniques employed, the sample collection and handling methods, use of single samples that are not linked to fluctuating symptoms, or other factors such as patients' diets and phenotypic characterizations. Despite these difficulties, previous studies found that the intestinal microbiota in some IBS patients was completely different from that in healthy controls, and there does appear to be a consistent theme of Firmicutes enrichment and reduced abundance of Bacteroides. Based on the differences in intestinal microbiota composition, many studies have addressed the roles of microbiota-targeted treatments, such as antibiotics and probiotics, in alleviating certain symptoms of IBS. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the associations between intestinal microbiota and IBS as well as the possible modes of action of intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis of IBS. Improving the current level of understanding of host-microbiota interactions in IBS is important not only for determining the role of intestinal microbiota in IBS pathogenesis but also for therapeutic modulation of the microbiota. PMID:24627584

  9. Unraveling the ties between irritable bowel syndrome and intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung Noh; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder. It is a multifactorial disorder. Intestinal microbiota may cause the pathogenesis of IBS by contributing to abnormal gastrointestinal motility, low-grade inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, communication in the gut-brain axis, and so on. Previous attempts to identify the intestinal microbiota composition in IBS patients have yielded inconsistent and occasionally contradictory results. This inconsistency may be due to the differences in the molecular techniques employed, the sample collection and handling methods, use of single samples that are not linked to fluctuating symptoms, or other factors such as patients’ diets and phenotypic characterizations. Despite these difficulties, previous studies found that the intestinal microbiota in some IBS patients was completely different from that in healthy controls, and there does appear to be a consistent theme of Firmicutes enrichment and reduced abundance of Bacteroides. Based on the differences in intestinal microbiota composition, many studies have addressed the roles of microbiota-targeted treatments, such as antibiotics and probiotics, in alleviating certain symptoms of IBS. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the associations between intestinal microbiota and IBS as well as the possible modes of action of intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis of IBS. Improving the current level of understanding of host-microbiota interactions in IBS is important not only for determining the role of intestinal microbiota in IBS pathogenesis but also for therapeutic modulation of the microbiota. PMID:24627584

  10. Targeting ion channels for the treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders

    PubMed Central

    Beyder, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) functional and motility disorders are highly prevalent and responsible for long-term morbidity and sometimes mortality in the affected patients. It is estimated that one in three persons has a GI functional or motility disorder. However, diagnosis and treatment of these widespread conditions remains challenging. This partly stems from the multisystem pathophysiology, including processing abnormalities in the central and peripheral (enteric) nervous systems and motor dysfunction in the GI wall. Interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) are central to the generation and propagation of the cyclical electrical activity and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are responsible for electromechanical coupling. In these and other excitable cells voltage-sensitive ion channels (VSICs) are the main molecular units that generate and regulate electrical activity. Thus, VSICs are potential targets for intervention in GI motility disorders. Research in this area has flourished with advances in the experimental methods in molecular and structural biology and electrophysiology. However, our understanding of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the complex and variable electrical behavior of ICCs and SMCs remains incomplete. In this review, we focus on the slow waves and action potentials in ICCs and SMCs. We describe the constituent VSICs, which include voltage-gated sodium (NaV), calcium (CaV), potassium (KV, KCa), chloride (Cl–) and nonselective ion channels (transient receptor potentials [TRPs]). VSICs have significant structural homology and common functional mechanisms. We outline the approaches and limitations and provide examples of targeting VSICs at the pores, voltage sensors and alternatively spliced sites. Rational drug design can come from an integrated view of the structure and mechanisms of gating and activation by voltage or mechanical stress. PMID:22282704

  11. Fasciola hepatica: motility response to fasciolicides in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fairweather, I; Holmes, S D; Threadgold, L T

    1984-06-01

    The effects of a wide range of fasciolicides on the in vitro motility of Fasciola hepatica have been determined by means of an isometric transducer system. Carbon tetrachloride and diamphenethide do not affect movement at concentrations up to 500 and 100 micrograms/ml, respectively; at 1000 micrograms/ml, however, carbon tetrachloride induces a rapid tonic paralysis. Brotianide and the deacetylated metabolite of diamphenethide cause a rapid flaccid paralysis of the fluke at concentrations of 1.0 micrograms/ml and above. In contrast, the effect of MK-401 is a long-term one, a flaccid paralysis occurring after 20 hr only at 200 micrograms/ml. Praziquantel also produces a flaccid paralysis of the fluke, but this follows an initial increase, then decrease in muscle tone. The effect is rapid at 500 micrograms/ml, but long-term at 100 and 200 micrograms/ml; at these lower concentrations there is also a stimulation of activity. Oxyclozanide , rafoxanide, niclofolan , bithionol, and hexacholorophene induce a rapid spastic paralysis of the fluke at concentrations of 1.0 micrograms/ml and above. Both phasic and tonic components are evident in the response at concentrations of 1.0 micrograms/ml and below; the phasic component disappears at higher concentrations. Nitroxynil produces a similar effect, evident at higher concentrations. Among the benzimidazoles, mebendazole, oxfendazole, and albendazole sulphoxide cause a suppression of motility, whilst thiabendazole and albendazole produce a stimulation of movement. The effects are not rapid, however, for only mebendazole at 500 micrograms/ml causes total inactivity of the fluke within a 12-hr period. Possible explanations for these effects on fluke motility are discussed. PMID:6723893

  12. An animated model of reticulorumen motility.

    PubMed

    Gookin, Jody L; Foster, Derek M; Harvey, Alice M; McWhorter, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Understanding reticulorumen motility is important to the assessment of ruminant health and optimal production, and in the recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Accordingly, the teaching of reticulorumen motility is a staple of all veterinary curricula. This teaching has historically been based on written descriptions, line drawings, or pressure tracings obtained during contraction sequences. We developed an animated model of reticulorumen motility and hypothesized that veterinary students would prefer use of the model over traditional instructional methods. First-year veterinary students were randomly allocated to one of two online learning exercises: with the animated model (Group A) or with text and line drawings (Group B) depicting reticulorumen motility. Learning was assessed with a multiple-choice quiz and feedback on the learning alternatives was obtained by survey. Seventy-four students participated in the study, including 38/42 in Group A and 36/36 in Group B. Sixty-four out of 72 students (89%) responded that they would prefer use of the animated model if only one of the two learning methods was available. A majority of students agreed or strongly agreed that the animated model was easy to understand and improved their knowledge and appreciation of the importance of reticulorumen motility, and would recommend the model to other veterinary students. Interestingly, students in Group B achieved higher scores on examination than students in Group A. This could be speculatively attributed to the inclusion of an itemized list of contraction sequences in the text provided to Group B and failure of Group A students to read the text associated with the animations. PMID:20054084

  13. Colony Expansion of Socially Motile Myxococcus xanthus Cells Is Driven by Growth, Motility, and Exopolysaccharide Production

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Pintu; Kissoon, Kimberley; Cornejo, Isabel; Kaplan, Heidi B.; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2016-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus, a model organism for studies of multicellular behavior in bacteria, moves exclusively on solid surfaces using two distinct but coordinated motility mechanisms. One of these, social (S) motility is powered by the extension and retraction of type IV pili and requires the presence of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by neighboring cells. As a result, S motility requires close cell-to-cell proximity and isolated cells do not translocate. Previous studies measuring S motility by observing the colony expansion of cells deposited on agar have shown that the expansion rate increases with initial cell density, but the biophysical mechanisms involved remain largely unknown. To understand the dynamics of S motility-driven colony expansion, we developed a reaction-diffusion model describing the effects of cell density, EPS deposition and nutrient exposure on the expansion rate. Our results show that at steady state the population expands as a traveling wave with a speed determined by the interplay of cell motility and growth, a well-known characteristic of Fisher’s equation. The model explains the density-dependence of the colony expansion by demonstrating the presence of a lag phase–a transient period of very slow expansion with a duration dependent on the initial cell density. We propose that at a low initial density, more time is required for the cells to accumulate enough EPS to activate S-motility resulting in a longer lag period. Furthermore, our model makes the novel prediction that following the lag phase the population expands at a constant rate independent of the cell density. These predictions were confirmed by S motility experiments capturing long-term expansion dynamics. PMID:27362260

  14. Are Primo Vessels (PVs) on the Surface of Gastrointestine Involved in Regulation of Gastric Motility Induced by Stimulating Acupoints ST36 or CV12?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Shi, Hong; Shang, Hongyan; Su, Yangshuai; Xin, Juanjuan; He, Wei; Jing, Xianghong; Zhu, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies showed primo vessels (PVs), which were referred to as Bonhan ducts (BHDs) and a part of circulatory system by Kim, located in different places of the body. The BHDs system was once considered as the anatomical basis of classical acupuncture meridian but not clearly identified by other investigators. In the present study, we tried to address the relationship between PVs and meridians through detecting the modulation of gastric motility by stimulating the PVs on the surface of stomach or intestine, as well as acupoints Zusanli (ST36) and Zhongwan (CV12). The results showed electric stimulation of the PVs had no effect on the gastric motility. While stimulating CV12 inhibited gastric motility significantly in PVs-intact and PVs-cut rats, there is no significant difference between the inhibition rate of the PVS-intact and the PVS-cut rats. Stimulating at ST36 increased gastric motility significantly in both the PVs-intact and the PVs-cut rats, yet there was no significant difference between the facilitation rate of the both groups. Taken together, the PVs on the surface of stomach or intestine did not mediate the regulation of gastric motility induced by stimulating at the acupoints ST36 or CV12. PMID:23091558

  15. Automated single-cell motility analysis on a chip using lensfree microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarsky, Ivan; Lyb, Yunbo; Weaver, Westbrook; Su, Ting-Wei; Mudanyali, Onur; Ozcan, Aydogan; di Carlo, Dino

    2014-04-01

    Quantitative cell motility studies are necessary for understanding biophysical processes, developing models for cell locomotion and for drug discovery. Such studies are typically performed by controlling environmental conditions around a lens-based microscope, requiring costly instruments while still remaining limited in field-of-view. Here we present a compact cell monitoring platform utilizing a wide-field (24 mm2) lensless holographic microscope that enables automated single-cell tracking of large populations that is compatible with a standard laboratory incubator. We used this platform to track NIH 3T3 cells on polyacrylamide gels over 20 hrs. We report that, over an order of magnitude of stiffness values, collagen IV surfaces lead to enhanced motility compared to fibronectin, in agreement with biological uses of these structural proteins. The increased throughput associated with lensfree on-chip imaging enables higher statistical significance in observed cell behavior and may facilitate rapid screening of drugs and genes that affect cell motility.

  16. Experimental and Mathematical-Modeling Characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigote Motility

    PubMed Central

    Arias-del-Angel, Jorge A.; Dévora-Canales, Diego; Manning-Cela, Rebeca G.; Santana-Solano, Jesús; Santillán, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    The present work is aimed at characterizing the motility of parasite T. cruzi in its epimastigote form. To that end, we recorded the trajectories of two strains of this parasite (a wild-type strain and a stable transfected strain, which contains an ectopic copy of LYT1 gene and whose motility is known to be affected). We further extracted parasite trajectories from the recorded videos, and statistically analysed the following trajectory-step features: step length, angular change of direction, longitudinal and transverse displacements with respect to the previous step, and mean square displacement. Based on the resulting observations, we developed a mathematical model to simulate parasite trajectories. The fact that the model predictions closely match most of the experimentally observed parasite-trajectory characteristics, allows us to conclude that the model is an accurate description of T. cruzi motility. PMID:26544863

  17. Pathophysiology and treatment of patients with globus sensation--from the viewpoint of esophageal motility dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Noriaki; Tsutsui, Hideaki; Kusunoki, Hiroaki; Hata, Jiro; Haruma, Ken

    2014-01-01

    "Globus sensation" is often described as the sensation of a lump in the throat associated with dry swallowing or the need for dry swallowing, which disappears completely during eating or drinking and for which no organic cause can be established. Due to the uncertain etiology of "globus sensation", it remains difficult to establish standard treatment strategies for affected patients. Lately most attention has been focused on gastroesophageal reflux disease and several reports have indicated that there is a close relationship between esophageal acid reflux and globus sensation. Nowadays, empirical therapy with a high dose of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is considered to be indicated for patients with globus sensation, after excluding organic diseases such as pharyngeal cancer, Zenker's diverticulum, or thyroid enlargement. If patients are nonresponsive to PPI therapy, evaluation of esophageal motility should be done. In our recent study, 47.9% had abnormal esophageal motility, with the most common esophageal motility abnormality being an ineffective esophageal motility in PPI-resistant patients with globus sensation. This suggests that prokinetics alone or adding prokinetics to PPI should be the treatment to be considered, although few studies have investigated the efficacy of prokinetics in the treatment of patients with globus sensation. If patients without any esophageal motility dysfunctions are nonresponsive to PPI therapy, either cognitive-behavioral therapy, anti-depressants, or gabapentin could be helpful, although further well-designed, randomized controlled large-scale studies will be necessary to determine the effectiveness of each treatment strategy on patients with globus sensation. PMID:26081369

  18. Swimming motility plays a key role in the stochastic dynamics of cell clumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xianghong; Nellas, Ricky B.; Byrn, Matthew W.; Russell, Matthew H.; Bible, Amber N.; Alexandre, Gladys; Shen, Tongye

    2013-04-01

    Dynamic cell-to-cell interactions are a prerequisite to many biological processes, including development and biofilm formation. Flagellum induced motility has been shown to modulate the initial cell-cell or cell-surface interaction and to contribute to the emergence of macroscopic patterns. While the role of swimming motility in surface colonization has been analyzed in some detail, a quantitative physical analysis of transient interactions between motile cells is lacking. We examined the Brownian dynamics of swimming cells in a crowded environment using a model of motorized adhesive tandem particles. Focusing on the motility and geometry of an exemplary motile bacterium Azospirillum brasilense, which is capable of transient cell-cell association (clumping), we constructed a physical model with proper parameters for the computer simulation of the clumping dynamics. By modulating mechanical interaction (‘stickiness’) between cells and swimming speed, we investigated how equilibrium and active features affect the clumping dynamics. We found that the modulation of active motion is required for the initial aggregation of cells to occur at a realistic time scale. Slowing down the rotation of flagellar motors (and thus swimming speeds) is correlated to the degree of clumping, which is consistent with the experimental results obtained for A. brasilense.

  19. Effects of Motility and Adsorption Rate Coefficient on Transport of Bacteria through Saturated Porous Media

    PubMed Central

    Camper, Anne K.; Hayes, Jason T.; Sturman, Paul J.; Jones, Warren L.; Cunningham, Alfred B.

    1993-01-01

    Three strains of Pseudomonas fluorescens with different motility rates and adsorption rate coefficients were injected into porous-medium reactors packed with l-mm-diameter glass spheres. Cell breakthrough, time to peak concentration, tailing, and cell recovery were measured at three interstitial pore velocities (higher than, lower than, and much lower than the maximal bacterial motility rate). All experiments were done with distilled water to reduce the effects of growth and chemotaxis. Contrary to expectations, motility did not result in either early breakthrough or early time to peak concentration at flow velocities below the motility rate. Bacterial size exclusion effects were shown to affect breakthrough curve shape at the very low flow velocity, but no such effect was seen at the higher flow velocity. The tendency of bacteria to adsorb to porous-medium surfaces, as measured by adsorption rate coefficients, profoundly influenced transport characteristics. Cell recoveries were shown to be correlated with the ratio of advective to adsorptive transport in the reactors. Adsorption rate coefficients were found to be better predictors of microbial transport phenomena than individual characteristics, such as size, motility, or porous-medium hydrodynamics. PMID:16349075

  20. Thermo-Regulation of Genes Mediating Motility and Plant Interactions in Pseudomonas syringae

    PubMed Central

    Hockett, Kevin L.; Burch, Adrien Y.; Lindow, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is an important phyllosphere colonist that utilizes flagellum-mediated motility both as a means to explore leaf surfaces, as well as to invade into leaf interiors, where it survives as a pathogen. We found that multiple forms of flagellum-mediated motility are thermo-suppressed, including swarming and swimming motility. Suppression of swarming motility occurs between 28° and 30°C, which coincides with the optimal growth temperature of P. syringae. Both fliC (encoding flagellin) and syfA (encoding a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase involved in syringafactin biosynthesis) were suppressed with increasing temperature. RNA-seq revealed 1440 genes of the P. syringae genome are temperature sensitive in expression. Genes involved in polysaccharide synthesis and regulation, phage and IS elements, type VI secretion, chemosensing and chemotaxis, translation, flagellar synthesis and motility, and phytotoxin synthesis and transport were generally repressed at 30°C, while genes involved in transcriptional regulation, quaternary ammonium compound metabolism and transport, chaperone/heat shock proteins, and hypothetical genes were generally induced at 30°C. Deletion of flgM, a key regulator in the transition from class III to class IV gene expression, led to elevated and constitutive expression of fliC regardless of temperature, but did not affect thermo-regulation of syfA. This work highlights the importance of temperature in the biology of P. syringae, as many genes encoding traits important for plant-microbe interactions were thermo-regulated. PMID:23527276

  1. The Effect of Curcumin on Intracellular pH (pHi), Membrane Hyperpolarization and Sperm Motility

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Rajesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Curcumin has shown to affect sperm motility and function in vitro and fertility in vivo. The molecular mechanism(s) by which curcumin affects sperm motility has not been delineated. Since modulation of intracellular pH (pHi) and plasma membrane polarization is involved in sperm motility, the present study was conducted to investigate the effect of curcumin on these sperm (human and murine) parameters. Methods The effect of curcumin on sperm forward motility was examined by counting percentages of forward moving sperm. The effect of curcumin on intracellular pH (pHi) was measured by the fluorescent pH indicator 2,7-bicarboxyethyl-5,6-carboxyfluorescein-acetoxymethyl ester (BCECF-AM). The effect of curcumin on plasma membrane polarization was examined using the fluorescence sensitive dye bis (1,3-dibarbituric acid)-trimethine oxanol [DiBAC4(3)]. Results Curcumin caused a concentration-dependent (p<0.05) decrease in forward motility of both human and mouse sperm. It also caused a concentration-dependent decrease in intracellular pH (pHi) in both human and mouse sperm. Curcumin induced significant (p<0.05) hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane in both human and mouse sperm. Conclusion These findings indicate that curcumin inhibits sperm forward motility by intracellular acidification and hyperpolarization of sperm plasma membrane. This is the first study to our knowledge which examined the effect of curcumin on sperm pHi and membrane polarization that affect sperm forward motility. These exciting findings will have application in deciphering the signal transduction pathway involved in sperm motility and function and in development of a novel non-steroidal contraceptive for infertility. PMID:24918078

  2. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  3. Early Investigational Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders: From Animal Studies to Phase II Trials

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Nelson; Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The most common gastrointestinal disorders which include evidence of dysmotility include: gastroparesis, the lower functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with altered bowel function [such as chronic (functional) diarrhea, chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC)], and opioid induced constipation (OIC). These conditions, which are grouped as gastrointestinal motility and functional disorders, are characterized by abnormal motor, sensory, or secretory functions that alter bowel function and result in a significant disease burden, since currently available treatments do not completely alleviate symptoms. New drugs are being developed for these disorders, targeting mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of these diseases, specifically, motor function, intestinal secretion and bile acid modulation. Areas Covered The article provides a brief overview of motility disorders and the drugs approved and currently available for these indications. It also provides an evaluation of the efficacy, safety and possible mechanisms of the drugs currently under investigation for the treatment of gastroparesis, chronic diarrhea, CIC and OIC, based on animal to phase II studies. Medications with complete phase III trials are excluded from this discussion. Expert opinion Treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders requires the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms, biomarkers to identify subgroups of these disorders, and robust pharmacological studies from animal to phase II studies. These are prerequisites for the development of efficacious medications and individualizing therapy in order to enhance the treatment of these patients. PMID:25971881

  4. The detection of intestinal spike activity on surface electroenterograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye-Lin, Y.; Garcia-Casado, J.; Martinez-de-Juan, J. L.; Prats-Boluda, G.; Ponce, J. L.

    2010-02-01

    Myoelectrical recording could provide an alternative technique for assessing intestinal motility, which is a topic of great interest in gastroenterology since many gastrointestinal disorders are associated with intestinal dysmotility. The pacemaker activity (slow wave, SW) of the electroenterogram (EEnG) has been detected in abdominal surface recordings, although the activity related to bowel contractions (spike bursts, SB) has to date only been detected in experimental models with artificially favored electrical conductivity. The aim of the present work was to assess the possibility of detecting SB activity in abdominal surface recordings under physiological conditions. For this purpose, 11 recording sessions of simultaneous internal and external myolectrical signals were conducted on conscious dogs. Signal analysis was carried out in the spectral domain. The results show that in periods of intestinal contractile activity, high-frequency components of EEnG signals can be detected on the abdominal surface in addition to SW activity. The energy between 2 and 20 Hz of the surface myoelectrical recording presented good correlation with the internal intestinal motility index (0.64 ± 0.10 for channel 1 and 0.57 ± 0.11 for channel 2). This suggests that SB activity can also be detected in canine surface EEnG recording.

  5. Gastrointestinal motility during sleep assessed by tracking of telemetric capsules combined with polysomnography - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Haase, Anne-Mette; Fallet, Sibylle; Otto, Marit; Scott, S Mark; Schlageter, Vincent; Krogh, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Studies of gastrointestinal function during sleep are hampered by lack of applicable techniques. Recent development of a novel ambulatory telemetric capsule system, which can be used in conjunction with polysomnography, offers a solution to this problem. The 3D-Transit system consists of ingestible electromagnetic capsules traceable through a portable extracorporeal receiver while traversing the gut. During sleep monitored by polysomnography, gastrointestinal motility was concurrently investigated using 3D-Transit in nine healthy subjects. Overall, the amplitude of gastric contractions decreased with depth of sleep (light sleep, N2 versus deep sleep, N3; P<0.05). Progression through the small intestine did not change with depth of sleep (Kruskal-Wallis probability =0.1), and there was no association between nocturnal awakenings or arousals and the occurrence of colonic or small intestinal propagating movements. Basal colonic activity was suppressed during both deep sleep (P<0.05) and light sleep (P<0.05) when compared with nocturnal wake periods. In conclusion, the novel ambulatory 3D-Transit system combined with polysomnography allows minimally invasive and completely ambulatory investigation of associations between sleep patterns and gastrointestinal motility. PMID:26677340

  6. Targeting extra-oral bitter taste receptors modulates gastrointestinal motility with effects on satiation

    PubMed Central

    Avau, Bert; Rotondo, Alessandra; Thijs, Theo; Andrews, Christopher N.; Janssen, Pieter; Tack, Jan; Depoortere, Inge

    2015-01-01

    Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) are present in extra-oral tissues, including gut endocrine cells. This study explored the presence and mechanism of action of TAS2R agonists on gut smooth muscle in vitro and investigated functional effects of intra-gastric administration of TAS2R agonists on gastric motility and satiation. TAS2Rs and taste signalling elements were expressed in smooth muscle tissue along the mouse gut and in human gastric smooth muscle cells (hGSMC). Bitter tastants induced concentration and region-dependent contractility changes in mouse intestinal muscle strips. Contractions induced by denatonium benzoate (DB) in gastric fundus were mediated via increases in intracellular Ca2+ release and extracellular Ca2+-influx, partially masked by a hyperpolarizing K+-efflux. Intra-gastric administration of DB in mice induced a TAS2R-dependent delay in gastric emptying. In hGSMC, bitter compounds evoked Ca2+-rises and increased ERK-phosphorylation. Healthy volunteers showed an impaired fundic relaxation in response to nutrient infusion and a decreased nutrient volume tolerance and increased satiation during an oral nutrient challenge test after intra-gastric DB administration. These findings suggest a potential role for intestinal TAS2Rs as therapeutic targets to alter gastrointestinal motility and hence to interfere with hunger signalling. PMID:26541810

  7. Loss of SNAP29 Impairs Endocytic Recycling and Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Rapaport, Debora; Lugassy, Yevgenia; Sprecher, Eli; Horowitz, Mia

    2010-01-01

    Intracellular membrane trafficking depends on the ordered formation and consumption of transport intermediates and requires that membranes fuse with each other in a tightly regulated and highly specific manner. Membrane anchored SNAREs assemble into SNARE complexes that bring membranes together to promote fusion. SNAP29 is a ubiquitous synaptosomal-associated SNARE protein. It interacts with several syntaxins and with the EH domain containing protein EHD1. Loss of functional SNAP29 results in CEDNIK syndrome (Cerebral Dysgenesis, Neuropathy, Ichthyosis and Keratoderma). Using fibroblast cell lines derived from CEDNIK patients, we show that SNAP29 mediates endocytic recycling of transferrin and β1-integrin. Impaired β1-integrin recycling affected cell motility, as reflected by changes in cell spreading and wound healing. No major changes were detected in exocytosis of VSVG protein from the Golgi apparatus, although the Golgi system acquired a dispersed morphology in SNAP29 deficient cells. Our results emphasize the importance of SNAP29 mediated membrane fusion in endocytic recycling and consequently, in cell motility. PMID:20305790

  8. Anti-inflammatory effect of ginsenoside Rb1 contributes to the recovery of gastrointestinal motility in the rat model of postoperative ileus.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shanjun; Yu, Wenkui; Lin, Zhiliang; Chen, Qiyi; Shi, Jialiang; Dong, Yi; Duan, Kaipeng; Bai, Xiaowu; Xu, Lin; Li, Jieshou; Li, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Ginsenoside Rb1 (GRb1), one of the principle active components of Panax ginseng, has been reported to reduce inflammation in various diseases. In the present study, we investigated whether GRb1 has an anti-inflammatory effect on postoperative ileus (POI) and further contributes to the recovery of gastrointestinal motility. POI was induced in rats by intestinal manipulation. The POI rats received 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg GRb1 orally via gavage four times before and after surgery. Gastrointestinal motility was assessed by charcoal transport. Systemic inflammation was assessed by serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 concentrations, whereas intestinal inflammation was assessed by the activity of myeloperoxidase, and concentrations and gene expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 in the ileum tissue. The results revealed that GRb1 increased rat gastrointestinal transit with POI. The increased levels of systemic and intestinal inflammatory parameters in POI rats were also reduced by GRb1. In addition, GRb1 reduced systemic and intestinal inflammation and increased the gastrointestinal transit of POI rats in a dose-dependent manner, and with significance at doses of 10 and 20 mg/kg. These results suggest that GRb1 has a potent anti-inflammatory effect on POI and further contributes to the recovery of gastrointestinal motility. GRb1 may be a promising treatment for POI prophylaxis. PMID:25177041

  9. Intestinal plasmacytoma in an African hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Vara, J A; Miller, M A; Craft, D

    1998-04-01

    A 3-yr-old male African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) had anorexia and weight loss for 1 wk before its death. The colon and mesocolon were diffusely infiltrated by a neoplastic proliferation of round cells with plasmacytoid features. A diagnosis of intestinal plasmacytoma was made and confirmed by electron microscopy. No other organs appeared to be affected. This is the first description of intestinal plasmacytoma in a hedgehog. PMID:9577789

  10. MOTILITY, AGGRESSION, AND THE BODILY I: AN INTERPRETATION OF WINNICOTT.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Jeremy

    2015-10-01

    Among the central ideas associated with the name of Winnicott, scant mention is made of motility. This is largely attributable to Winnicott himself, who never thematized motility and never wrote a paper specifically devoted to the topic. This paper suggests both that the idea of motility is nonetheless of central significance in Winnicott's thought, and that motility is of central importance in the development and constitution of the bodily I. In elaborating both these suggestions, the paper gives particular attention to the connections between motility, continuity, aggression, and creativity in Winnicott's work. PMID:26443951

  11. Travel stress alters the intestinal migrating myoelectric complex in rats: antagonist effect of trimebutine.

    PubMed

    Diop, L; Pascaud, X; Le Gallou, B; Junien, J L

    1992-01-01

    A novel stress model was developed that may closely resemble a real-life situation. Intestinal motility was monitored in rats before and after a 12 hour train voyage (travel stress). Travel stress reduced the duration of phase III of the intestinal MMC by 30% (3.2 +/- 0.3 vs 4.7 +/- 0.6 min; p less than 0.001) while the durations of phase I and II were unaffected. This effect persisted for two days. Phase III duration returned to basal values after 3 days indicating a reversible alteration on intestinal migrating myoelectric complex (MMC). The infusion of trimebutine at a flow rate of 166 micrograms/kg/h during the stress exposure abolished the changes observed in the duration of phase III of the MMC; the infusion of diazepam (16.6 micrograms/kg/h) had no effect. These results indicate that the travel stress model may be similar to common life events that induce alterations of intestinal motility. Furthermore, trimebutine prevented the reduction of phase III duration induced by travel stress suggesting its possible action on mechanisms involved in the mediation of the stress-induced intestinal motility changes. PMID:1732698

  12. Soft micromachines with programmable motility and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hen-Wei; Sakar, Mahmut Selman; Petruska, Andrew J.; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J.

    2016-07-01

    Nature provides a wide range of inspiration for building mobile micromachines that can navigate through confined heterogenous environments and perform minimally invasive environmental and biomedical operations. For example, microstructures fabricated in the form of bacterial or eukaryotic flagella can act as artificial microswimmers. Due to limitations in their design and material properties, these simple micromachines lack multifunctionality, effective addressability and manoeuvrability in complex environments. Here we develop an origami-inspired rapid prototyping process for building self-folding, magnetically powered micromachines with complex body plans, reconfigurable shape and controllable motility. Selective reprogramming of the mechanical design and magnetic anisotropy of body parts dynamically modulates the swimming characteristics of the micromachines. We find that tail and body morphologies together determine swimming efficiency and, unlike for rigid swimmers, the choice of magnetic field can subtly change the motility of soft microswimmers.

  13. Symbiosis and the origin of eukaryotic motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Hinkle, G.

    1991-01-01

    Ongoing work to test the hypothesis of the origin of eukaryotic cell organelles by microbial symbioses is discussed. Because of the widespread acceptance of the serial endosymbiotic theory (SET) of the origin of plastids and mitochondria, the idea of the symbiotic origin of the centrioles and axonemes for spirochete bacteria motility symbiosis was tested. Intracellular microtubular systems are purported to derive from symbiotic associations between ancestral eukaryotic cells and motile bacteria. Four lines of approach to this problem are being pursued: (1) cloning the gene of a tubulin-like protein discovered in Spirocheata bajacaliforniesis; (2) seeking axoneme proteins in spirochets by antibody cross-reaction; (3) attempting to cultivate larger, free-living spirochetes; and (4) studying in detail spirochetes (e.g., Cristispira) symbiotic with marine animals. Other aspects of the investigation are presented.

  14. Hydrodynamic Contributions to Amoeboid Cell Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Owen; Guy, Robert

    2011-11-01

    Understanding the methods by which cells move is a fundamental problem in modern biology. Recent evidence has shown that the fluid dynamics of cytoplasm can play a vital role in cellular motility. The slime mold Physarum polycephalum provides an excellent model organism for the study of amoeboid motion. In this research, we use both analytic and computational models to investigate intracellular fluid flow in a simple model of Physarum. In both models, of we are specifically interested in stresses generated by cytoplasmic flow which act in the direction of cellular motility. In our numerical model, the Immersed Boundary Method is used to account for such stresses. We investigate the relationship between contraction waves, low waves and locomotive forces, and attempt characterize conditions necessary to generate directed motion.

  15. Hydrodynamic Contributions to Amoeboid Cell Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Owen; Guy, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the methods by which cells move is a fundamental problem in modern biology. Recent evidence has shown that the fluid dynamics of cytoplasm can play a vital role in cellular motility. The slime mold Physarum polycephalum provides an excellent model organism for the study of amoeboid motion. In this research, we use a simply analytic model in conjuction with computational experiments to investigate intracellular fluid flow in a simple model of Physarum. Of particlar interest are stresses generated by cytoplasmic flow which may be used to aid in cellular motility. In our numerical model, the Immersed Boundary Method is used to account for such stresses. We investigate the relationship between contraction waves, flow waves, adhesion, and locomotive forces in an attempt to characterize conditions necessary to generate directed motion.

  16. Soft micromachines with programmable motility and morphology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hen-Wei; Sakar, Mahmut Selman; Petruska, Andrew J; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J

    2016-01-01

    Nature provides a wide range of inspiration for building mobile micromachines that can navigate through confined heterogenous environments and perform minimally invasive environmental and biomedical operations. For example, microstructures fabricated in the form of bacterial or eukaryotic flagella can act as artificial microswimmers. Due to limitations in their design and material properties, these simple micromachines lack multifunctionality, effective addressability and manoeuvrability in complex environments. Here we develop an origami-inspired rapid prototyping process for building self-folding, magnetically powered micromachines with complex body plans, reconfigurable shape and controllable motility. Selective reprogramming of the mechanical design and magnetic anisotropy of body parts dynamically modulates the swimming characteristics of the micromachines. We find that tail and body morphologies together determine swimming efficiency and, unlike for rigid swimmers, the choice of magnetic field can subtly change the motility of soft microswimmers. PMID:27447088

  17. Congo red uptake by motile Aeromonas species.

    PubMed

    Statner, B; George, W L

    1987-05-01

    Virulence of several species of enteropathogenic bacteria has been correlated with the ability of isolates to take up the dye Congo red. To determine whether Congo red uptake might be a useful marker for virulence of motile Aeromonas species, we examined 50 strains of diverse clinical origin on a medium containing 50 micrograms of Congo red per ml. All of the strains took up the dye to various degrees. For most strains, uptake was greatest at 37 degrees C and least at 22 degrees C. Production of acetyl methyl carbinol (Voges-Proskauer test) or lysine decarboxylase has been reported by some investigators to be a virulence marker for Aeromonas species. Congo red uptake did not correlate with either acetyl methyl carbinol or lysine decarboxylase production in our study. These data suggest that Congo red uptake may not be a useful marker for virulence of motile Aeromonas species. PMID:3584422

  18. Vertebrate Intestinal Endoderm Development

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Jason R.; Lauf, Ryan; Shroyer, Noah F.

    2010-01-01

    The endoderm gives rise to the lining of the esophagus, stomach and intestines, as well as associated organs. To generate a functional intestine, a series of highly orchestrated developmental processes must occur. In this review, we attempt to cover major events during intestinal development from gastrulation to birth, including endoderm formation, gut tube growth and patterning, intestinal morphogenesis, epithelial reorganization, villus emergence as well as proliferation and cytodifferentiation. Our discussion includes morphological and anatomical changes during intestinal development as well as molecular mechanisms regulating these processes. PMID:21246663

  19. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-01-01

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett’s esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted. PMID:24868489

  20. [Gastrointestinal motility and possibilities of influencing it].

    PubMed

    Duris, I; Payer, J; Huorka, M; Randus, V; Ondrejka, P

    1994-06-01

    The authors discuss factors which influence the motility of the smooth muscles in the pancreatobiliary region. They investigated some clinical and laboratory parameters after administration of the selective antagonist of calcium influx-Pineverium bromide-Dicetel. The drug influenced significantly in a positive way nausea, flatulence, pain and chronically elevated amylases. The authors mention a cycle of possible neurohumoral changes with which specific calcium channel antagonists could interfere. PMID:8073641

  1. Regulation of intestinal ontogeny by intraluminal nutrients.

    PubMed

    Castillo, R O; Feng, J J; Stevenson, D K; Kerner, J A; Kwong, L K

    1990-02-01

    Major events in gastrointestinal ontogeny occur in the infant rat in association with weaning, resulting in striking alterations in small intestinal structure and function. Although the dietary changes attendant to weaning are not essential for the initiation of these events, dietary nutrients have been shown to participate in the maturation of some intestinal parameters. In order to define more precisely the role of intraluminal nutrients in the regulation of small intestinal ontogeny, a longitudinal study was conducted using a unique animal model in which intraluminal nutrients were excluded from the intact maturing intestine in vivo throughout the entire weaning period without major compromise in nutritional status. The absence of intraluminal nutrients over the weaning period resulted in diminished lengthening and accretion of mucosal mass, suggesting a slower rate of intestinal growth. Lower mucosal DNA, protein, and mitotic indices in intestines of animals receiving no intraluminal nutrients suggested that the lack of intraluminal nutrients resulted in the blunting of the striking increases in cellular proliferation normally exhibited by the developing intestinal mucosa at this time. Maturation of intestinal lactase-phlorizin hydrolase and maltase-glucoamylase was not affected by the absence of intraluminal nutrients. Although the appearance of sucrase-isomaltase was not altered by the absence of intraluminal nutrients, activity levels rose to only 50% of control levels. These data suggest that during this period of rapid intestinal maturation, intestinal growth is more dependent upon intraluminal nutrients than are the characteristic enzymic alterations normally expressed during this period.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2303970

  2. Swimming Motility Reduces Deposition to Silica Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Nanxi; Massoudieh, Arash; Liang, Xiaomeng; Hu, Dehong; Kamai, Tamir; Ginn, Timothy R.; Zilles, Julie L.; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2015-01-01

    The role of swimming motility on bacterial transport and fate in porous media was evaluated. We present microscopic evidence showing that strong swimming motility reduces attachment of Azotobacter vinelandii cells to silica surfaces. Applying global and cluster statistical analyses to microscopic videos taken under non-flow conditions, wild type, flagellated A. vinelandii strain DJ showed strong swimming ability with an average speed of 13.1 μm/s, DJ77 showed impaired swimming averaged at 8.7 μm/s, and both the non-flagellated JZ52 and chemically treated DJ cells were non-motile. Quantitative analyses of trajectories observed at different distances above the collector of a radial stagnation point flow cell (RSPF) revealed that both swimming and non-swimming cells moved with the flow when at a distance of at least 20 μm from the collector surface. Near the surface, DJ cells showed both horizontal and vertical movement diverging them from reaching surfaces, while chemically treated DJ cells moved with the flow to reach surfaces, suggesting that strong swimming reduced attachment. In agreement with the RSPF results, the deposition rates obtained for two-dimensional multiple-collector micromodels were also lowest for DJ, while DJ77 and JZ52 showed similar values. Strong swimming specifically reduced deposition on the upstream surfaces of the micromodel collectors.

  3. Bacteria motility at oil-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Gabriel; Smirga, Steven; Fernandez, Vicente; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    The swimming dynamics of bacteria are strongly influenced by interfaces: Motile bacteria often accumulate at rigid boundaries, such as liquid-solid interfaces, and at soft boundaries, such as liquid-air or liquid-liquid interfaces. Attachment of bacteria to these interfaces is crucial for the formation of biofilms (liquid-solid), pellicles (liquid-air), and oil-degrading communities (liquid-liquid). We investigated the motility of the oil-degrading bacteria Marinobacter aquaeolei in the presence of oil droplets. We created individual oil droplets using dedicated microfluidic devices and captured the swimming behavior of individual bacteria near the interface and their attachment dynamics to the droplets with high-speed and epifluorescent microscopy. We find that Marinobacter aquaeolei has a high affinity towards interfaces and their swimming dynamics at soft interfaces differ from both those in the bulk and at rigid boundaries. Characterizing the interaction and attachment of motile bacteria to liquid-liquid interfaces will promote a fundamental understanding to oil-microbe interactions in aquatic environments and potentially lead to improved oil bioremediation strategies.

  4. Effect of total laryngectomy on esophageal motility

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, J.B.; Fisher, S.R.; Meyers, W.C.; Christian, K.C.; Postlethwait, R.W.; Jones, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Total laryngectomy for cancer can result in dysphagia and altered esophageal motility. Manometric changes in the upper esophageal sphincter (UES), and in proximal and distal esophageal function have been reported. However, most studies have failed to take into account radiation therapy and appropriate controls. We selected ten male patients (54.3 +/- 1.9 yr) for longitudinal manometric evaluation prior to laryngectomy then at two weeks and again six months later. No patient received preoperative radiation therapy, had a previous history of esophageal surgery, or developed a postoperative wound infection or fistula. Seven of ten patients had positive nodes and received 6,000-6,600 rads postoperative radiation therapy. Preoperatively 4 of 10 patients complained of dysphagia which did not significantly change following surgery and radiation. Two of three patients who did not complain of dysphagia preoperatively and received radiation postoperatively developed dysphagia. No patient without dysphagia preoperatively who received no radiation therapy developed symptoms. Our studies show that laryngectomy causes alterations in the UES resting and peak pressures but not in the proximal or distal esophagus, or the lower esophageal sphincter. These data also imply radiation therapy may be associated with progressive alterations in motility and symptomatology. Further study regarding the effects of radiation on esophageal motility and function are urged.

  5. Hyaluronan stimulates pancreatic cancer cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao-Bo; Kohi, Shiro; Koga, Atsuhiro; Hirata, Keiji; Sato, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) accumulates in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but functional significance of HA in the aggressive phenotype remains unknown. We used different models to investigate the effect of HA on PDAC cell motility by wound healing and transwell migration assay. Changes in cell motility were examined in 8 PDAC cell lines in response to inhibition of HA production by treatment with 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) and to promotion by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or by co-culture with tumor-derived stromal fibroblasts. We also investigated changes in cell motility by adding exogenous HA. Additionally, mRNA expressions of hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronidases were examined using real time RT-PCR. Inhibition of HA by 4-MU significantly decreased the migration, whereas promotion of HA by TPA or co-culture with tumor-derived fibroblasts significantly increased the migration of PDAC cells. The changes in HA production by these treatments tended to be associated with changes in HAS3 mRNA expression. Furthermore, addition of exogenous HA, especially low-molecular-weight HA, significantly increased the migration of PDAC cells. These findings suggest that HA stimulates PDAC cell migration and thus represents an ideal therapeutic target to prevent invasion and metastasis. PMID:26684359

  6. Establishment of Intestinal Bacteriology

    PubMed Central

    MITSUOKA, Tomotari

    2014-01-01

    Research on intestinal bacteria began around the end of the 19th century. During the last 5 decades of the 20th century, research on the intestinal microbiota made rapid progress. At first, in my work, I first developed a method of comprehensive analysis of the intestinal microbiota, and then I established classification and identification methods for intestinal anaerobes. Using these methods I discovered a number of ecological rules governing the intestinal microbiota and the role of the intestinl microbiota in health and disease. Moreover, using germfree animals, it was proven that the intestinal microbiota has a role in carcinogenesis and aging in the host. Thus, a new interdisciplinary field, “intestinal bacteriology” was established. PMID:25032084

  7. The validation of an invitro colonic motility assay as a biomarker for gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Keating, Christopher; Martinez, Vicente; Ewart, Lorna; Gibbons, Stephen; Grundy, Luke; Valentin, Jean-Pierre; Grundy, David

    2010-06-15

    Motility-related gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions (GADRs), such as constipation and diarrhea, are some of the most frequently reported adverse events associated with the clinical development of new chemical entities, and for marketed drugs. However, biomarkers capable of detecting such GADRs are lacking. Here, we describe an in vitro assay developed to detect and quantify changes in intestinal motility as a surrogate biomarker for constipation/diarrhea-type GADRs. In vitro recordings of intraluminal pressure were used to monitor the presence of colonic peristaltic motor complexes (CPMCs) in mouse colonic segments. CPMC frequency, contractile and total mechanical activity were assessed. To validate the assay, two experimental protocols were conducted. Initially, five drugs with known gastrointestinal effects were tested to determine optimal parameters describing excitation and inhibition as markers for disturbances in colonic motility. This was followed by a 'blinded' evaluation of nine drugs associated with or without clinically identified constipation/diarrhea-type GADRs. Concentration-response relationships were determined for these drugs and the effects were compared with their maximal free therapeutic plasma concentration in humans. The assay detected stimulatory and inhibitory responses, likely correlating to the occurrence of diarrhea or constipation. Concentration-related effects were identified and potential mechanisms of action were inferred for several drugs. Based on the results from the fourteen drugs assessed, the sensitivity of the assay was calculated at 90%, with a specificity of 75% and predictive capacity of 86%. These results support the potential use of this assay in screening for motility-related GADRs during early discovery phase, safety pharmacology assessment.

  8. AM841, a covalent cannabinoid ligand, powerfully slows gastrointestinal motility in normal and stressed mice in a peripherally restricted manner

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, C M; Storr, M A; Thakur, G A; Wood, J T; Wager-Miller, J; Straiker, A; Eno, M R; Nikas, S P; Bashashati, M; Hu, H; Mackie, K; Makriyannis, A; Sharkey, K A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cannabinoid (CB) ligands have been demonstrated to have utility as novel therapeutic agents for the treatment of pain, metabolic conditions and gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. However, many of these ligands are centrally active, which limits their usefulness. Here, we examine a unique novel covalent CB receptor ligand, AM841, to assess its potential for use in physiological and pathophysiological in vivo studies. Experimental Approach The covalent nature of AM841 was determined in vitro using electrophysiological and receptor internalization studies on isolated cultured hippocampal neurons. Mouse models were used for behavioural analysis of analgesia, hypothermia and hypolocomotion. The motility of the small and large intestine was assessed in vivo under normal conditions and after acute stress. The brain penetration of AM841 was also determined. Key Results AM841 behaved as an irreversible CB1 receptor agonist in vitro. AM841 potently reduced GI motility through an action on CB1 receptors in the small and large intestine under physiological conditions. AM841 was even more potent under conditions of acute stress and was shown to normalize accelerated GI motility under these conditions. This compound behaved as a peripherally restricted ligand, showing very little brain penetration and no characteristic centrally mediated CB1 receptor-mediated effects (analgesia, hypothermia or hypolocomotion). Conclusions and Implications AM841, a novel peripherally restricted covalent CB1 receptor ligand that was shown to be remarkably potent, represents a new class of potential therapeutic agents for the treatment of functional GI disorders. PMID:25572435

  9. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Perlemuter, G; Chaussade, S; Wechsler, B; Cacoub, P; Dapoigny, M; Kahan, A; Godeau, P; Couturier, D

    1998-01-01

    Background/Aims—Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) reflects a dysfunction of the visceral smooth muscle or the enteric nervous system. Gastrointestinal manifestations are common in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) but CIPO has not been reported. Features of CIPO are reported in five patients with SLE. 
Methods—From 1988 to 1993, five patients with SLE or SLE-like syndrome were hospitalised for gastrointestinal manometric studies. CIPO was the onset feature in two cases. Antroduodenal manometry (three hours fasting, two hours fed) was performed in all patients, and oesophageal manometry in four. 
Results—Intestinal hypomotility associated with reduced bladder capacity and bilateral ureteral distension was found in four patients and aperistalsis of the oesophagus in three. Treatment, which consisted of high dose corticosteroids, parenteral nutrition, promotility agents, and antibiotics, led to remission of both CIPO and urinary abnormalities in all cases. Antroduodenal manometry performed in two patients after remission showed increased intestinal motility. One patient died, and postmortem examination showed intestinal vasculitis. 
Conclusions—CIPO in SLE is a life threatening situation that can be reversed by treatment. It may be: (a) a complication or onset feature of the disease; (b) secondary to smooth muscle involvement; (c) associated with ureteral and vesical involvement; (d) the result of intestinal vasculitis. 

 Keywords: chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction; systemic lupus erythematosus PMID:9771415

  10. Insights into Vibrio cholerae Intestinal Colonization from Monitoring Fluorescently Labeled Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Millet, Yves A.; Alvarez, David; Ringgaard, Simon; von Andrian, Ulrich H.; Davis, Brigid M.; Waldor, Matthew K.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the agent of cholera, is a motile non-invasive pathogen that colonizes the small intestine (SI). Most of our knowledge of the processes required for V. cholerae intestinal colonization is derived from enumeration of wt and mutant V. cholerae recovered from orogastrically infected infant mice. There is limited knowledge of the distribution of V. cholerae within the SI, particularly its localization along the villous axis, or of the bacterial and host factors that account for this distribution. Here, using confocal and intravital two-photon microscopy to monitor the localization of fluorescently tagged V. cholerae strains, we uncovered unexpected and previously unrecognized features of V. cholerae intestinal colonization. Direct visualization of the pathogen within the intestine revealed that the majority of V. cholerae microcolonies attached to the intestinal epithelium arise from single cells, and that there are notable regiospecific aspects to V. cholerae localization and factors required for colonization. In the proximal SI, V. cholerae reside exclusively within the developing intestinal crypts, but they are not restricted to the crypts in the more distal SI. Unexpectedly, V. cholerae motility proved to be a regiospecific colonization factor that is critical for colonization of the proximal, but not the distal, SI. Furthermore, neither motility nor chemotaxis were required for proper V. cholerae distribution along the villous axis or in crypts, suggesting that yet undefined processes enable the pathogen to find its niches outside the intestinal lumen. Finally, our observations suggest that host mucins are a key factor limiting V. cholerae intestinal colonization, particularly in the proximal SI where there appears to be a more abundant mucus layer. Collectively, our findings demonstrate the potent capacity of direct pathogen visualization during infection to deepen our understanding of host pathogen interactions. PMID:25275396

  11. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2013-09-01

    Motor proteins are enzymatic molecules that transform chemical energy into mechanical motion and work. They are critically important for supporting various cellular activities and functions. In the last 15 years significant progress in understanding the functioning of motor proteins has been achieved due to revolutionary breakthroughs in single-molecule experimental techniques and strong advances in theoretical modelling. However, microscopic mechanisms of protein motility are still not well explained, and the collective efforts of many scientists are needed in order to solve these complex problems. In this special section the reader will find the latest advances on the difficult road to mapping motor proteins dynamics in various systems. Recent experimental developments have allowed researchers to monitor and to influence the activity of single motor proteins with a high spatial and temporal resolution. It has stimulated significant theoretical efforts to understand the non-equilibrium nature of protein motility phenomena. The latest results from all these advances are presented and discussed in this special section. We would like to thank the scientists from all over the world who have reported their latest research results for this special section. We are also grateful to the staff and editors of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for their invaluable help in handling all the administrative and refereeing activities. The field of motor proteins and protein motility is fast moving, and we hope that this collection of articles will be a useful source of information in this highly interdisciplinary area. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins contents Physics of protein motility and motor proteinsAnatoly B Kolomeisky Identification of unique interactions between the flexible linker and the RecA-like domains of DEAD-box helicase Mss116 Yuan Zhang, Mirkó Palla, Andrew Sun and Jung-Chi Liao The load dependence of the physical properties of a molecular motor

  12. Intragastric monosodium L-glutamate stimulates motility of upper gut via vagus nerve in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Toyomasu, Yoshitaka; Mochiki, Erito; Yanai, Mitsuhiro; Ogata, Kyoichi; Tabe, Yuichi; Ando, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Tetsuro; Aihara, Ryuusuke; Zai, Hiroaki; Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2010-04-01

    Monosodium l-glutamate (MSG) is a substance known to produce the umami taste. Recent studies indicate that MSG also stimulates a variety of activities in the gastrointestinal tract through its receptor in the gut, but no study has reported the activity in conscious large experimental animals. The aim of our study was to investigate whether direct intragastric MSG stimulates gut motility and to identify the mechanism in conscious dogs. Contractile response to intraluminal injection of MSG was studied in the fed and fasted states by means of chronically implanted force transducers. MSG (5, 15, 45, and 90 mM/kg) dissolved in water was injected into the stomach and duodenum in normal and vagotomized dogs. MSG solution was administered into the stomach before feeding, and gastric emptying was evaluated. Several inhibitors of gastrointestinal motility (atropine, hexamethonium, and granisetron) were injected intravenously before MSG administration to the stomach. The effect of MSG was investigated in Pavlov (vagally innervated corpus pouch), Heidenhain (vagally denervated corpus pouch), and antral pouch (vagally innervated) dogs. Upper gut motility was significantly increased by intragastric MSG but not significantly stimulated by intraduodenal MSG. Intragastric MSG (45 mM/kg) stimulated postprandial motility and accelerated gastric emptying. MSG-induced contractions were inhibited by truncal vagotomy, atropine, hexamethonium, and granisetron. Gut motility was increased by intrapouch injection of MSG in the Pavlov pouch, but it was not affected in the Heidenhain or antral pouch dogs. We conclude that intragastric MSG stimulates upper gut motility and accelerates gastric emptying. The sensory structure of MSG is present in the gastric corpus, and the signal is mediated by the vagus nerve. PMID:20071606

  13. Knockdown of Inner Arm Protein IC138 in Trypanosoma brucei Causes Defective Motility and Flagellar Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Corinne S.; Chang, Alex J.; Greene, Rebecca; Machado, Sulynn; Parsons, Matthew W.; Takats, Taylor A.; Zambetti, Luke J.; Springer, Amy L.

    2015-01-01

    Motility in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei is conferred by a single flagellum, attached alongside the cell, which moves the cell forward using a beat that is generated from tip-to-base. We are interested in characterizing components that regulate flagellar beating, in this study we extend the characterization of TbIC138, the ortholog of a dynein intermediate chain that regulates axonemal inner arm dynein f/I1. TbIC138 was tagged In situ-and shown to fractionate with the inner arm components of the flagellum. RNAi knockdown of TbIC138 resulted in significantly reduced protein levels, mild growth defect and significant motility defects. These cells tended to cluster, exhibited slow and abnormal motility and some cells had partially or fully detached flagella. Slight but significant increases were observed in the incidence of mis-localized or missing kinetoplasts. To document development of the TbIC138 knockdown phenotype over time, we performed a detailed analysis of flagellar detachment and motility changes over 108 hours following induction of RNAi. Abnormal motility, such as slow twitching or irregular beating, was observed early, and became progressively more severe such that by 72 hours-post-induction, approximately 80% of the cells were immotile. Progressively more cells exhibited flagellar detachment over time, but this phenotype was not as prevalent as immotility, affecting less than 60% of the population. Detached flagella had abnormal beating, but abnormal beating was also observed in cells with no flagellar detachment, suggesting that TbIC138 has a direct, or primary, effect on the flagellar beat, whereas detachment is a secondary phenotype of TbIC138 knockdown. Our results are consistent with the role of TbIC138 as a regulator of motility, and has a phenotype amenable to more extensive structure-function analyses to further elucidate its role in the control of flagellar beat in T. brucei. PMID:26555902

  14. Energetic Metabolism and Human Sperm Motility: Impact of CB1 Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Barbonetti, A.; Vassallo, M. R. C.; Fortunato, D.; Francavilla, S.; Maccarrone, M.; Francavilla, F.

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA) exerts an adverse effect on human sperm motility, which has been ascribed to inhibition of mitochondrial activity. This seems to be at variance with evidence suggesting a major role of glycolysis in supplying ATP for sperm motility; furthermore, the role of AEA-binding receptors in mediating mitochondrial inhibition has not yet been explored. In this study, human sperm exposure to Met-AEA (methanandamide, nonhydrolyzable analog of AEA) in the micromolar range significantly decreased mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), similarly to rotenone, mitochondrial complex I inhibitor. The effect of Met-AEA (1 μm) was prevented by SR141716, CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist, but not by SR144528, CB2 antagonist, nor by iodoresiniferatoxin, vanilloid receptor antagonist. The effect of Met-AEA did not involve activation of caspase-9 or caspase-3 and was reverted by washing. In the presence of glucose, sperm exposure either to Met-AEA up to 1 μm or to rotenone for up to 18 h did not affect sperm motility. At higher doses Met-AEA produced a CB1-independent poisoning of spermatozoa, reducing their viability. Under glycolysis blockage, 1 μm Met-AEA, similarly to rotenone, dramatically abolished sperm motility, an effect that was prevented by SR1 and reverted by washing. In conclusion, CB1 activation induced a nonapoptotic decrease of ΔΨm, the detrimental reflection on sperm motility of which could be revealed only under glycolysis blockage, unless very high doses of Met-AEA, producing CB1-independent sperm toxicity, were used. The effects of CB1 activation reported here contribute to elucidate the relationship between energetic metabolism and human sperm motility. PMID:20962050

  15. Effect of Daily Supine LBNP Exercise on Gastrointestinal Motility During Antiorthostatic Bedrest in Normal Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; DeKerlegand, D.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Space flight alters gastrointestinal (GI) function in general, and GI motility, in particular. This can decrease appetite, affect the body's ability to absorb nutrients, fluids and electrolytes, and contribute to a negative energy balance. Antiorthostatic bed rest (ABR) has been used to simulate microgravity-induced physiological changes in human subjects. The objective of this investigation is to determine if daily supine lower body negative pressure (LBNP) exercise will maintain GI motility at near normal levels during ABR. Eight subjects participated in the study protocol consisting of an ambulatory phase scheduled before bedrest periods and two 14 day bed rest (6 deg head-down tilt) periods, once with and another time without exercise. Supine treadmill running in an LBNP chamber was used for exercise. Mouth-to-cecum transit time (MCTT) of lactulose was measured indirectly using the rise in breath hydrogen level after oral administration of lactulose (20 g) following a standard low-fiber breakfast. GI motility during ambulatory and ABR periods was assessed using MCTT data. Results of this Study indicate that GI motility during ABR without exercise decreased by 45% [MCTT +/- S.E.M. 56.2 +/- 6.0 (Ambulatory); 87.3 +/- 8.3 (ABR)]. Supine LBNP exercise did not significantly alter this reduction in GI motility during ABR [MCTT +/- S.E.M. 81.3 +/- 4.2 (Exercise); 87.3 +/- 8.3 (No Exercise)]. These results suggest that supine LBNP exercise may not be an effective countermeasure for microgravity-induced decrements in GI motility and function.

  16. Membrane tension feedback on shape and motility of eukaryotic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Benjamin; Aranson, Igor S.; Ziebert, Falko

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of a phase field model of a single cell crawling on a substrate, we investigate how the properties of the cell membrane affect the shape and motility of the cell. Since the membrane influences the cell dynamics on multiple levels and provides a nontrivial feedback, we consider the following fundamental interactions: (i) the reduction of the actin polymerization rate by membrane tension; (ii) area conservation of the cell's two-dimensional cross-section vs. conservation of the circumference (i.e. membrane inextensibility); and (iii) the contribution from the membrane's bending energy to the shape and integrity of the cell. As in experiments, we investigate two pertinent observables - the cell's velocity and its aspect ratio. We find that the most important effect is the feedback of membrane tension on the actin polymerization. Bending rigidity has only minor effects, visible mostly in dynamic reshaping events, as exemplified by collisions of the cell with an obstacle.

  17. Motility of small nematodes in disordered wet granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Gabriel; Lu, Kevin; Sznitman, Josue; Arratia, Paulo E.

    2010-11-01

    Organisms that evolve within complex fluidic environments often develop unique methods of locomotion that allow them to exploit the properties of the media. In this talk, we present an investigation on the motility of the worm nematode Caenorhabditis elegans in shallow, wet granular media as a function of particle size dispersity and area density (φ) using both particle- and nematode-tracking methods. Surprisingly, the nematode's propulsion speed is enhanced by the presence of particles in a fluid and is nearly independent of local area density. The undulation speed, often used to differentiate locomotion gaits, is significantly affected by particle size dispersity for area densities above φ> 0.55, and is characterized by a change in the nematode's waveform from swimming to crawling. This change occurs for dense polydisperse media only and highlights the organism's adaptability to subtle differences in local structure between monodisperse and polydisperse media.

  18. Motility of small nematodes in wet granular media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, G.; Lu, K.; Sznitman, J.; Arratia, P. E.

    2010-11-01

    The motility of the worm nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is investigated in shallow, wet granular media as a function of particle size dispersity and area density (phi). Surprisingly, we find that the nematode's propulsion speed is enhanced by the presence of particles in a fluid and is nearly independent of area density. The undulation speed, often used to differentiate locomotion gaits, is significantly affected by the bulk material properties of wet mono- and polydisperse granular media for phi>=0.55. This difference is characterized by a change in the nematode's waveform from swimming to crawling in dense polydisperse media only. This change highlights the organism's adaptability to subtle differences in local structure and response between monodisperse and polydisperse media.

  19. The Wireless Motility Capsule: a One-Stop Shop for the Evaluation of GI Motility Disorders.

    PubMed

    Saad, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    The wireless motility and pH capsule (WMC) provides an office-based test to simultaneously assess both regional and whole gut transit. Ingestion of this non-digestible capsule capable of measuring temperature, pH, and the pressure of its immediate surroundings allows for the measurement of gastric, small bowel, and colonic transit times in an ambulatory setting. Approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the evaluation of suspected conditions of delayed gastric emptying and the evaluation of colonic transit in chronic idiopathic constipation, WMC should be considered in suspected gastrointestinal motility disorders as it provides a single study capable of simultaneously assessing for regional, multiregional, or generalized motility disorders. Specific indications for testing with the WMC should include the evaluation of suspect cases of gastroparesis, small bowel dysmotility, and slow transit constipation, as well as symptom syndromes suggestive of a multiregional or generalized gastrointestinal transit delay. PMID:26908282

  20. Src family kinases differentially influence glioma growth and motility.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Tuffin, Laura J; Feathers, Ryan; Hari, Priya; Durand, Nisha; Li, Zhimin; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Bakken, Katie; Carlson, Brett; Schroeder, Mark; Sarkaria, Jann N; Anastasiadis, Panos Z

    2015-11-01

    Src-family kinase (SFK) signaling impacts multiple tumor-related properties, particularly in the context of the brain tumor glioblastoma. Consequently, the pan-SFK inhibitor dasatinib has emerged as a therapeutic strategy, despite physiologic limitations to its effectiveness in the brain. We investigated the importance of individual SFKs (Src, Fyn, Yes, and Lyn) to glioma tumor biology by knocking down individual SFK expression both in culture (LN229, SF767, GBM8) and orthotopic xenograft (GBM8) contexts. We evaluated the effects of these knockdowns on tumor cell proliferation, migration, and motility-related signaling in culture, as well as overall survival in the orthotopic xenograft model. The four SFKs differed significantly in their importance to these properties. In culture, Src, Fyn, and Yes knockdown generally reduced growth and migration and altered motility-related phosphorylation patterns while Lyn knockdown did so to a lesser extent. However the details of these effects varied significantly depending on the cell line: in no case were conclusions about the role of a particular SFK applicable to all of the measures or all of the cell types examined. In the orthotopic xenograft model, mice implanted with non-target or Src or Fyn knockdown cells showed no differences in survival. In contrast, mice implanted with Yes knockdown cells had longer survival, associated with reduced tumor cell proliferation. Those implanted with Lyn knockdown cells had shorter survival, associated with higher overall tumor burden. Together, our results suggest that Yes signaling directly affects tumor cell biology in a pro-tumorigenic manner, while Lyn signaling affects interactions between tumor cells and the microenvironment in an anti-tumor manner. In the context of therapeutic targeting of SFKs, these results suggest that pan-SFK inhibitors may not produce the intended therapeutic benefit when Lyn is present. PMID:26105207

  1. First identification of proteins involved in motility of Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Indikova, Ivana; Vronka, Martin; Szostak, Michael P

    2014-01-01

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum, the most pathogenic mycoplasma in poultry, is able to glide over solid surfaces. Although this gliding motility was first observed in 1968, no specific protein has yet been shown to be involved in gliding. We examined M. gallisepticum strains and clonal variants for motility and found that the cytadherence proteins GapA and CrmA were required for gliding. Loss of GapA or CrmA resulted in the loss of motility and hemadsorption and led to drastic changes in the characteristic flask-shape of the cells. To identify further genes involved in motility, a transposon mutant library of M. gallisepticum was generated and screened for motility-deficient mutants, using a screening assay based on colony morphology. Motility-deficient mutants had transposon insertions in gapA and the neighbouring downstream gene crmA. In addition, insertions were seen in gene mgc2, immediately upstream of gapA, in two motility-deficient mutants. In contrast to the GapA/CrmA mutants, the mgc2 motility mutants still possessed the ability to hemadsorb. Complementation of these mutants with a mgc2-hexahistidine fusion gene restored the motile phenotype. This is the first report assigning specific M. gallisepticum proteins to involvement in gliding motility. PMID:25323771

  2. Constitutively Active 5-HT Receptors: An Explanation of How 5-HT Antagonists Inhibit Gut Motility in Species Where 5-HT is Not an Enteric Neurotransmitter?

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Nick J.

    2015-01-01

    Antagonists of 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors are well known to inhibit gastrointestinal (GI)-motility and transit in a variety of mammals, including humans. Originally, these observations had been interpreted by many investigators (including us) as evidence that endogenous 5-HT plays a major role in GI motility. This seemed a logical assumption. However, the story changed dramatically after recent studies revealed that 5-HT antagonists still blocked major GI motility patterns (peristalsis and colonic migrating motor complexes) in segments of intestine depleted of all 5-HT. Then, these results were further supported by Dr. Gershons' laboratory, which showed that genetic deletion of all genes that synthesizes 5-HT had minor, or no inhibitory effects on GI transit in vivo. If 5-HT was essential for GI motility patterns and transit, then one would expect major disruptions in motility and transit when 5-HT synthesis was genetically ablated. This does not occur. The inhibitory effects of 5-HT antagonists on GI motility clearly occur independently of any 5-HT in the gut. Evidence now suggests that 5-HT antagonists act on 5-HT receptors in the gut which are constitutively active, and don't require 5-HT for their activation. This would explain a long-standing mystery of how 5-HT antagonists inhibit gut motility in species like mice, rats, and humans where 5-HT is not an enteric neurotransmitter. Studies are now increasingly demonstrating that the presence of a neurochemical in enteric neurons does not mean they function as neurotransmitters. Caution should be exercised when interpreting any inhibitory effects of 5-HT antagonists on GI motility. PMID:26732863

  3. The sonic hedgehog signaling pathway stimulates anaplastic thyroid cancer cell motility and invasiveness by activating Akt and c-Met.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Ashley J; Doscas, Michelle E; Ye, Jin; Heiden, Katherine B; Xing, Mingzhao; Li, Yi; Prinz, Richard A; Xu, Xiulong

    2016-03-01

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway is highly activated in thyroid neoplasms and promotes thyroid cancer stem-like cell phenotype, but whether the Shh pathway regulates thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness remains unknown. Here, we report that the motility and invasiveness of two anaplastic thyroid tumor cell lines, KAT-18 and SW1736, were inhibited by two inhibitors of the Shh pathway (cyclopamine and GANT61). Consistently, the cell motility and invasiveness was decreased by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, and was increased by Gli1 overexpression in KAT-18 cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that Akt and c-Met phosphorylation was decreased by a Gli1 inhibitor and by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, but was increased by Gli1 overexpression. LY294002, a PI-3 kinase inhibitor, and a c-Met inhibitor inhibited the motility and invasiveness of Gli1-transfected KAT-18 cells more effectively than the vector-transfected cells. Knockdown of Snail, a transcription factor regulated by the Shh pathway, led to decreased cell motility and invasiveness in KAT-18 and SW1736 cells. However, key epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers including E-cadherin and vimentin as well as Slug were not affected by cyclopamine and GANT61 in either SW1736 or WRO82, a well differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma cell line. Our data suggest that the Shh pathway-stimulated thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness is largely mediated by AKT and c-Met activation with little involvement of EMT. PMID:26859575

  4. The sonic hedgehog signaling pathway stimulates anaplastic thyroid cancer cell motility and invasiveness by activating Akt and c-Met

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Ashley J.; Doscas, Michelle E.; Ye, Jin; Heiden, Katherine B.; Xing, Mingzhao; Li, Yi; Prinz, Richard A.; Xu, Xiulong

    2016-01-01

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway is highly activated in thyroid neoplasms and promotes thyroid cancer stem-like cell phenotype, but whether the Shh pathway regulates thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness remains unknown. Here, we report that the motility and invasiveness of two anaplastic thyroid tumor cell lines, KAT-18 and SW1736, were inhibited by two inhibitors of the Shh pathway (cyclopamine and GANT61). Consistently, the cell motility and invasiveness was decreased by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, and was increased by Gli1 overexpression in KAT-18 cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that Akt and c-Met phosphorylation was decreased by a Gli1 inhibitor and by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, but was increased by Gli1 overexpression. LY294002, a PI-3 kinase inhibitor, and a c-Met inhibitor inhibited the motility and invasiveness of Gli1-transfected KAT-18 cells more effectively than the vector-transfected cells. Knockdown of Snail, a transcription factor regulated by the Shh pathway, led to decreased cell motility and invasiveness in KAT-18 and SW1736 cells. However, key epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers including E-cadherin and vimentin as well as Slug were not affected by cyclopamine and GANT61 in either SW1736 or WRO82, a well differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma cell line. Our data suggest that the Shh pathway-stimulated thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness is largely mediated by AKT and c-Met activation with little involvement of EMT. PMID:26859575

  5. Regulation of salmonid fish sperm motility by osmotic shock-induced water influx across the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Takei, Gen Leon; Mukai, Chinatsu; Okuno, Makoto

    2015-04-01

    The motility of salmonid fish sperm is initiated by a decrease in the extracellular K(+) concentration. However, our previous studies revealed that salmonid fish sperm motility could be initiated in the presence of an inhibitory concentration of K(+) by drastic osmotic shock induced by suspension in a hypertonic glycerol solution and subsequent dilution in a hypotonic solution (glycerol-treatment). In the present study, we examined if an osmotic shock-induced water influx is involved in the regulation of salmonid fish sperm motility. HgCl2, a common inhibitor of aquaporins (AQPs), decreased the duration of salmonid fish sperm motility. Dilution of sperm cells in a hypotonic solution increased the cellular volume, whereas HgCl2 inhibited such an increase in cellular volume. Furthermore, the expression of AQP 1a and 10 in rainbow trout testes was confirmed. In contrast, HgCl2 did not affect glycerol-treated sperm motility, indicating that AQPs are not involved in glycerol-treated sperm motility. We also explored the possibility of aquaporin-independent water influx in glycerol-treated sperm by assessing the sperm membrane permeability using propidium iodide. The plasma membrane of glycerol-treated sperm was considerably permeabilized. The cellular volume was decreased in a hypertonic glycerol solution and increased upon subsequent hypoosmotic shock, indicating an AQP-independent water flux across the plasma membrane upon glycerol-treatment. Taken together, these results showed that water influx across the plasma membrane via AQP is crucial for the maintenance of salmonid fish sperm motility under normal conditions, whereas water influx by osmotic shock-induced membrane permeation is critical for the initiation of glycerol-treated sperm motility. PMID:25522712

  6. Swimming Motility Reduces Deposition to Silica Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Lu, Nanxi; Massoudieh, Arash; Liang, Xiaomeng; Hu, Dehong; Kamai, Tamir; Ginn, Timothy R; Zilles, Julie L; Nguyen, Thanh H

    2015-09-01

    The transport and fate of bacteria in porous media is influenced by physicochemical and biological properties. This study investigated the effect of swimming motility on the attachment of cells to silica surfaces through comprehensive analysis of cell deposition in model porous media. Distinct motilities were quantified for different strains using global and cluster-based statistical analyses of microscopic images taken under no-flow condition. The wild-type, flagellated strain DJ showed strong swimming as a result of the actively swimming subpopulation whose average speed was 25.6 μm/s; the impaired swimming of strain DJ77 was attributed to the lower average speed of 17.4 μm/s in its actively swimming subpopulation; and both the nonflagellated JZ52 and chemically treated DJ cells were nonmotile. The approach and deposition of these bacterial cells were analyzed in porous media setups, including single-collector radial stagnation point flow cells (RSPF) and two-dimensional multiple-collector micromodels under well-defined hydrodynamic conditions. In RSPF experiments, both swimming and nonmotile cells moved with the flow when at a distance ≥20 μm above the collector surface. Closer to the surface, DJ cells showed both horizontal and vertical movement, limiting their contact with the surface, while chemically treated DJ cells moved with the flow to reach the surface. These results explain how wild-type swimming reduces attachment. In agreement, the deposition in micromodels was also lowest for DJ compared with those for DJ77 and JZ52. Wild-type swimming specifically reduced deposition on the upstream surfaces of the micromodel collectors. Conducted under environmentally relevant hydrodynamic conditions, the results suggest that swimming motility is an important characteristic for bacterial deposition and transport in the environment. PMID:26436254

  7. Motile responses in outer hair cells.

    PubMed

    Zenner, H P

    1986-01-01

    Motile responses of cochlear hair cells open new perspectives for the understanding of cochlear hearing mechanisms and hearing disorders located in hair cells. Direct visualization of hair cell motility was achieved by a method for the study of living isolated mammalian outer hair cells (OHCs) which has overcome some of the complexities in dealing with the heterogeneous organ of Corti. Electrophysiological giga-seal whole-cell recordings of single OHC prepared by this approach had revealed negative cell potentials ranging from -32 mV to -70 mV (Gitter et al. (1986) Oto-Rhino-Laryngol. in press). Elucidation of HC motility has come from two lines of experiments. One follows from the observation that exposure of the lateral and basal membrane parts of living OHCs to increasing bath K+ concentrations resulted in a sustained reversible depolarization of the cell. Here, we report that by depolarization of the cell membrane in the presence of 25-125 mM K+/Cl- a sustained contraction of OHC was induced. This was followed by relaxation in the presence of artificial perilymph containing 5.4 mM K+/Cl-. By alternating these procedures OHCs were made to undergo as many as five cycles of contraction and relaxation. External Ca2+ was not required for the initial contraction but was essential for relaxation. Following repeated contraction/relaxation cycles the cytoplasm of individual OHCs exhibited a filamentous network, correlating with a new infracuticular anti-actin binding capacity. The second series of experiments originates in the observation that permeabilized OHCs contracted in the presence of ATP. No response was seen in the presence of control nucleotides.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3733547

  8. The unique paradigm of spirochete motility and chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Charon, Nyles W.; Cockburn, Andrew; Li, Chunhao; Liu, Jun; Miller, Kelly A.; Miller, Michael R.; Motaleb, Md.; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    Spirochete motility is enigmatic: It differs from the motility of most other bacteria in that the entire bacterium is involved in translocation in the absence of external appendages. Using the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) as a model system, we explore the current research on spirochete motility and chemotaxis. Bb has periplasmic flagella (PFs) subterminally attached to each end of the protoplasmic cell cylinder, and surrounding the cell is an outer membrane. These internal helically shaped PFs allow the spirochete to swim by generating backward-moving waves by rotation. Exciting advances using cryoelectron microscopy tomography are presented with respect to in situ analysis of cell, PF, and motor structure. In addition, advances in the dynamics of motility, chemotaxis, gene regulation, and the role of motility and chemotaxis in the life cycle of Bb are summarized. The results indicate that the motility paradigms of flagellated bacteria do not apply to these unique bacteria. PMID:22994496

  9. Uncovering the Mystery of Gliding Motility in the Myxobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Nan, Beiyan; Zusman, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial gliding motility is the smooth movement of cells on solid surfaces unaided by flagella or pili. Many diverse groups of bacteria exhibit gliding, but the mechanism of gliding motility has remained a mystery since it was first observed more than a century ago. Recent studies on the motility of Myxococcus xanthus, a soil myxobacterium, suggest a likely mechanism for gliding in this organism. About forty M. xanthus genes were shown to be involved in gliding motility, and some of their protein products were labeled and localized within cells. These studies suggest that gliding motility in M. xanthus involves large multiprotein structural complexes, regulatory proteins, and cytoskeletal filaments. In this review, we summarize recent experiments that provide the basis for this emerging view of M. xanthus motility. We also discuss alternative models for gliding. PMID:21910630

  10. Filling an Emulsion Drop with Motile Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladescu, I. D.; Marsden, E. J.; Schwarz-Linek, J.; Martinez, V. A.; Arlt, J.; Morozov, A. N.; Marenduzzo, D.; Cates, M. E.; Poon, W. C. K.

    2014-12-01

    We have measured the spatial distribution of motile Escherichia coli inside spherical water droplets emulsified in oil. At low cell concentrations, the cell density peaks at the water-oil interface; at increasing concentration, the bulk of each droplet fills up uniformly while the surface peak remains. Simulations and theory show that the bulk density results from a "traffic" of cells leaving the surface layer, increasingly due to cell-cell scattering as the surface coverage rises above ˜10 %. Our findings show similarities with the physics of a rarefied gas in a spherical cavity with attractive walls.

  11. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in children

    PubMed Central

    Isa, Hasan M.; Al-Arayedh, Ghadeer G.; Mohamed, Afaf M.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL) is a rare disease characterized by dilatation of intestinal lymphatics. It can be classified as primary or secondary according to the underlying etiology. The clinical presentations of IL are pitting edema, chylous ascites, pleural effusion, acute appendicitis, diarrhea, lymphocytopenia, malabsorption, and intestinal obstruction. The diagnosis is made by intestinal endoscopy and biopsies. Dietary modification is the mainstay in the management of IL with a variable response. Here we report 2 patients with IL in Bahrain who showed positive response to dietary modification. PMID:26837404

  12. Quantitative in vivo analysis of small bowel motility using MRI examinations in mice--proof of concept study.

    PubMed

    Bickelhaupt, S; Wurnig, M C; Lesurtel, M; Patak, M A; Boss, A

    2015-01-01

    Small bowel motility analyses using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could reduce current invasive techniques in animal studies and comply with the 'three Rs' rule for human animal experimentation. Thus we investigated the feasibility of in vivo small bowel motility analyses in mice using dynamic MRI acquisitions. All experimental procedures were approved by the institutional animal care committee. Six C57BL/6 mice underwent MRI without additional preparation after isoflurane anaesthetization in the prone position on a 4.7 T small animal imager equipped with a linear polarized hydrogen birdcage whole-body mouse coil. Motility was assessed using a true fast imaging in a steady precession sequence in the coronal orientation (acquisition time per slice 512 ms, in-plane resolution 234 × 234 µm, matrix size 128 × 128, slice thickness 1 mm) over 30 s corresponding to 60 acquisitions. Motility was manually assessed measuring the small bowel diameter change over time. The resulting motility curves were analysed for the following parameters: contraction frequency per minute (cpm), maximal contraction amplitude (maximum to minimum [mm]), luminal diameter (mm) and luminal occlusion rate. Small bowel motility quantification was found to be possible in all animals with a mean small bowel contraction frequency of 10.67 cpm (SD ± 3.84), a mean amplitude of the contractions of 1.33 mm (SD ± 0.43) and a mean luminal diameter of 1.37 mm (SD ± 0.42). The mean luminal occlusion rate was 1.044 (SD ± 0.45%/100). The mean duration needed for a single motility assessment was 185 s (SD ± 54.02). Thus our study demonstrated the feasibility of an easy and time-sparing functional assessment for in vivo small bowel motility analyses in mice. This could improve the development of small animal models of intestinal diseases and provide a method similar to clinical MR examinations that is in concordance with the 'three Rs' for humane animal

  13. Intestinal Autophagy Improves Healthspan and Longevity in C. elegans during Dietary Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Gelino, Sara; Chang, Jessica T.; Kumsta, Caroline; She, Xingyu; Davis, Andrew; Nguyen, Christian; Panowski, Siler; Hansen, Malene

    2016-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) is a dietary regimen that extends lifespan in many organisms. One mechanism contributing to the conserved effect of DR on longevity is the cellular recycling process autophagy, which is induced in response to nutrient scarcity and increases sequestration of cytosolic material into double-membrane autophagosomes for degradation in the lysosome. Although autophagy plays a direct role in DR-mediated lifespan extension in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the contribution of autophagy in individual tissues remains unclear. In this study, we show a critical role for autophagy in the intestine, a major metabolic tissue, to ensure lifespan extension of dietary-restricted eat-2 mutants. The intestine of eat-2 mutants has an enlarged lysosomal compartment and flux assays indicate increased turnover of autophagosomes, consistent with an induction of autophagy in this tissue. This increase in intestinal autophagy may underlie the improved intestinal integrity we observe in eat-2 mutants, since whole-body and intestinal-specific inhibition of autophagy in eat-2 mutants greatly impairs the intestinal barrier function. Interestingly, intestinal-specific inhibition of autophagy in eat-2 mutants leads to a decrease in motility with age, alluding to a potential cell non-autonomous role for autophagy in the intestine. Collectively, these results highlight important functions for autophagy in the intestine of dietary-restricted C. elegans. PMID:27414651

  14. Treating Woman with Myo-Inositol Vaginal Suppositories Improves Partner's Sperm Motility and Fertility.

    PubMed

    Montanino Oliva, Mario; Poverini, Roberta; Lisi, Rosella; Carra, Maria Cristina; Lisi, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Motility is the feature that allows spermatozoa to actively reach and penetrate the female gamete during fertilization. When this function is altered, and especially decreased, troubles in conceiving may occur. In this study, we demonstrated that treating fertile women with myo-inositol (MI) vaginal suppositories ameliorated their partners' sperm motility and also positively affected their conceiving capacity, without changes in cervical mucus structural and biochemical characteristics. Indeed, by means of the postcoital test on female cervical mucus, a significant improvement especially in progressive sperm motility was recorded after MI suppository use. Concomitantly, after MI treatment, a reduction of immotile spermatozoa percentage was observed. Importantly, MI vaginal supplementation positively correlated with a pregnancy for 5 of the 50 couples enrolled in the study, leading us to speculate that this substance may substantially contribute to create in the cervical mucus an ideal milieu that makes spermatozoa more motile and functionally able to fertilize. Even though the detailed mechanism is still unclear, these results should encourage MI vaginal use for the clinical improvement of male infertility, through their partners. PMID:27403162

  15. JAM-A is present in Mammalian Spermatozoa where it is Essential for Normal Motility

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Minghai; Ghosh, Ananya; Cooke, Vesselina G.; Naik, Ulhas P.; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    Junctional Adhesion Molecules (JAMs) that are expressed in endothelial and epithelial cells and function in tight junction assembly, also perform important roles in testis where the closely-related JAM-A, JAM-B, and JAM-C are found. Disruption of murine Jam-B and Jam-C has varying effects on sperm development and function, however deletion of Jam-A has not yet been studied. Here we show for the first time that in addition to expression in the Sertoli-Sertoli tight junctions in the seminiferous tubules, the ∼32 kDa murine JAM-A is present in elongated spermatids and in the plasma membrane of the head and flagellum of sperm. Deletion of Jam-A, using the gene trap technology, results in flagellar defects at the ultrastructural level. In Jam-A-deficient mice, which have reduced litter size, both progressive and hyperactived motility are significantly affected (P<0.0001) before and, more severely, after capacitation. The findings show that JAM-A is involved in sperm tail formation and is essential for normal motility, which may occur via its signal transduction and protein phosphorylation properties. Detection of JAM-A in human sperm protein indicates that its role may be conserved in sperm motility and that JAM-A may be a candidate gene for the analysis of idiopathic sperm motility defects resulting in male subfertility in the human population. PMID:18022613

  16. Impact of dissolved organic matter on bacterial tactic motility, attachment, and transport.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Sanchez, Celia; Wick, Lukas Y; Cantos, Manuel; Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial dispersal is a key driver of the ecology of microbial contaminant degradation in soils. This work investigated the role of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the motility, attachment, and transport of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida G7 in saturated porous media. The study is based on the hypothesis that DOM quality is critical to triggering tactic motility and, consequently, affects bacterial transport and dispersal. Sunflower root exudates, humic acids (HA), and the synthetic oleophilic fertilizer S-200 were used as representatives of fresh, weathered, and artificially processed DOM with high nitrogen and phosphorus contents, respectively. We studied DOM levels of 16-130 mg L(-1), which are representative of DOM concentrations typically found in agricultural soil pore water. In contrast to its responses to HA and S-200, strain G7 exhibited a tactic behavior toward root exudates, as quantified by chemotaxis assays and single-cell motility observations. All DOM types promoted bacterial transport through sand at high concentrations (∼ 130 mg L(-1)). At low DOM concentrations (∼ 16 mg L(-1)), the enhancement occurred only in the presence of sunflower root exudates, and this enhancement did not occur with G7 bacteria devoid of flagella. Our results suggest that tactic DOM effectors strongly influence bacterial transport and the interception probability of motile bacteria by collector surfaces. PMID:25734420

  17. Treating Woman with Myo-Inositol Vaginal Suppositories Improves Partner's Sperm Motility and Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Poverini, Roberta; Lisi, Rosella; Carra, Maria Cristina; Lisi, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Motility is the feature that allows spermatozoa to actively reach and penetrate the female gamete during fertilization. When this function is altered, and especially decreased, troubles in conceiving may occur. In this study, we demonstrated that treating fertile women with myo-inositol (MI) vaginal suppositories ameliorated their partners' sperm motility and also positively affected their conceiving capacity, without changes in cervical mucus structural and biochemical characteristics. Indeed, by means of the postcoital test on female cervical mucus, a significant improvement especially in progressive sperm motility was recorded after MI suppository use. Concomitantly, after MI treatment, a reduction of immotile spermatozoa percentage was observed. Importantly, MI vaginal supplementation positively correlated with a pregnancy for 5 of the 50 couples enrolled in the study, leading us to speculate that this substance may substantially contribute to create in the cervical mucus an ideal milieu that makes spermatozoa more motile and functionally able to fertilize. Even though the detailed mechanism is still unclear, these results should encourage MI vaginal use for the clinical improvement of male infertility, through their partners. PMID:27403162

  18. Chemokinetic motility responses of the cyanobacterium oscillatoria terebriformis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Castenholz, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    Oscillatoria terebriformis, a gliding, filamentous, thermophilic cyanobacterium, exhibited an inhibition of gliding motility upon exposure to fructose. The observed response was transient, and the duration of nonmotility was directly proportional to the concentration of fructose. Upon resumption of motility, the rate of motility was also inversely proportional to the concentration of fructose. Sulfide caused a similar response. The effect of sulfide was specific and not due to either anoxia or negative redox potential. Exposure to glucose, acetate, lactate, or mat interstitial water did not elicit any motility response.

  19. Loss of PDZ-adaptor protein NHERF2 affects membrane localization and cGMP- and [Ca2+]- but not cAMP-dependent regulation of Na+/H+ exchanger 3 in murine intestine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingmin; Sultan, Ayesha; Cinar, Ayhan; Yeruva, Sunil; Riederer, Brigitte; Singh, Anurag Kumar; Li, Junhua; Bonhagen, Janina; Chen, Gang; Yun, Chris; Donowitz, Mark; Hogema, Boris; deJonge, Hugo; Seidler, Ursula

    2010-01-01

    Trafficking and regulation of the epithelial brush border membrane (BBM) Na+/H+ exchanger 3 (NHE3) in the intestine involves interaction with four different members of the NHERF family in a signal-dependent and possibly segment-specific fashion. The aim of this research was to study the role of NHERF2 (E3KARP) in intestinal NHE3 BBM localization and second messenger-mediated and receptor-mediated inhibition of NHE3. Immunolocalization of NHE3 in WT mice revealed predominant microvillar localization in jejunum and colon, a mixed distribution in the proximal ileum but localization near the terminal web in the distal ileum. The terminal web localization of NHE3 in the distal ileum correlated with reduced acid-activated NHE3 activity (fluorometrically assessed). NHERF2 ablation resulted in a shift of NHE3 to the microvilli and higher basal fluid absorption rates in the ileum, but no change in overall NHE3 protein or mRNA expression. Forskolin-induced NHE3 inhibition was preserved in the absence of NHERF2, whereas Ca2+ ionophore- or carbachol-mediated inhibition was abolished. Likewise, Escherichia coli heat stable enterotoxin peptide (STp) lost its inhibitory effect on intestinal NHE3. It is concluded that in native murine intestine, the NHE3 adaptor protein NHERF2 plays important roles in tethering NHE3 to a position near the terminal web and in second messenger inhibition of NHE3 in a signal- and segment-specific fashion, and is therefore an important regulator of intestinal fluid transport. PMID:20962002

  20. Mechanics and polarity in cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosi, D.; Zanzottera, A.

    2016-09-01

    The motility of a fish keratocyte on a flat substrate exhibits two distinct regimes: the non-migrating and the migrating one. In both configurations the shape is fixed in time and, when the cell is moving, the velocity is constant in magnitude and direction. Transition from a stable configuration to the other one can be produced by a mechanical or chemotactic perturbation. In order to point out the mechanical nature of such a bistable behaviour, we focus on the actin dynamics inside the cell using a minimal mathematical model. While the protein diffusion, recruitment and segregation govern the polarization process, we show that the free actin mass balance, driven by diffusion, and the polymerized actin retrograde flow, regulated by the active stress, are sufficient ingredients to account for the motile bistability. The length and velocity of the cell are predicted on the basis of the parameters of the substrate and of the cell itself. The key physical ingredient of the theory is the exchange among actin phases at the edges of the cell, that plays a central role both in kinematics and in dynamics.

  1. Regulation of macrophage motility by Irgm1

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Stanley C.; Traver, Maria; Daniell, Xiaojou; Indaram, Maanasa; Oliver, Tim; Taylor, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    IRG are a family of IFN-regulated proteins that are critical for resistance to infection. Mouse IRG proteins are divided into GMS and GKS subfamilies, based on a sequence within the G1 GTP-binding motif. The GMS proteins have a particularly profound impact on immunity, as typified by Irgm1, of which absence leads to a complete loss of resistance to a variety of intracellular bacteria and protozoa. The underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms are not clear. Here, we use time-lapse microscopy and cell-tracking analysis to demonstrate that Irgm1 is required for motility of IFN-γ-activated macrophages. The absence of Irgm1 led to decreased actin remodeling at the leading edge of migrating macrophages, as well as decreased Rac activation. Although Irgm1 did not localize to the leading edge of migrating macrophages, it was found to regulate the localization of a GKS IRG protein, Irgb6, which in turn, concentrated on the plasma membrane in the advancing lamellipodia, in close apposition to molecular components that regulate membrane remodeling, including Rac, paxillin, and actin. Thus, Irgm1 likely controls macrophage motility by regulating the positioning of specific GKS IRG proteins to the plasma membrane, which in turn, modulate cytoskeletal remodeling and membrane dynamics. PMID:19920210

  2. The mechanics of motility in dissociated cytoplasm.

    PubMed Central

    Dembo, M

    1986-01-01

    We stimulate the dynamical behavior of dissociated cytoplasm using the Reactive Flow Model (Dembo, M., and F. Harlow, 1986, Biophys. J., 50:109-121). We find that for the most part the predicted dynamical behavior of the cytoplasm is governed by three nondimensional numbers. Several other nondimensional parameters, the initial conditions, and boundary conditions are found to have lesser effects. Of the three major nondimensional parameters, one (D#) controls the percentage of ectoplasm, the second (C#) controls the sharpness of the endoplasm-ectoplasm boundary, and the third (R#) controls the topological complexity of the endoplasm-ectoplasm distribution. If R# is very small, then the cytoplasm contracts into a single uniform mass, and there is no bulk streaming. If R# is very large, then the cytoplasmic mass breaks up into a number of clumps scattered throughout the available volume. Between these clumps the solution undergoes turbulent or chaotic patterns of streaming. Intermediate values of R# can be found such that the mass of cytoplasm remains connected and yet undergoes coherent modes of motility similar to flares (Taylor, D.L., J.S. Condeelis, P.L. Moore, and R.D. Allen, 1973, J. Cell Biol., 59:378-394) and rosettes (Kuroda, K., 1979, Cell Motility: Molecules and Organization, 347-362). Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 1B FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:3801576

  3. Bacterial Motility Reveals Unknown Molecular Organization.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Ismaël; Rainville, Simon; Galstian, Tigran

    2015-11-17

    The water solubility of lyotropic liquid crystals (LCs) makes them very attractive to study the behavior of biological microorganisms in an environment where local symmetry is broken (as often encountered in nature). Several recent studies have shown a dramatic change in the behavior of flagellated bacteria when swimming in solutions of the lyotropic LC disodium cromoglycate (DSCG). In this study, the movements of Escherichia coli bacteria in DSCG-water solutions of different concentrations are observed to improve our understanding of this phenomenon. In addition, the viscosity of DSCG aqueous solutions is measured as a function of concentration at room temperature. We also experimentally identify a previously undescribed isotropic pretransition zone where bacteria start sticking to each other and to surfaces. Simple estimations show that the unbalanced osmotic pressure induced depletion force might be responsible for this sticking phenomenon. An estimate of the bacteria propulsive force and the DSCG aggregates length (versus concentration) are calculated from the measured viscosity of the medium. All these quantities are found to undergo a strong increase in the pretransition zone, starting at a threshold concentration of 6±1 wt % DSCG that is well below the known isotropic-LC transition (∼10 wt %). This study also shines light on the motility of flagellated bacteria in realistic environments, and it opens new avenues for interesting applications such as the use of motile microorganisms to probe the physical properties of their host or smart bandages that could guide bacteria out of wounds. PMID:26588572

  4. Effects of trimebutine on cytosolic Ca2+ and force transitions in intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, M; Kobayashi, T; Tamaki, H

    1991-04-01

    The effects of trimebutine maleate on cytosolic free Ca2+ and force transitions in the guinea-pig taenia cecum were studied by fura-2 fluorometry and tension recording. The addition of 80 mM K+ induced a transient increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and tension, followed by a sustained increase. Trimebutine (10 microM) suppressed both [Ca2+]i elevation and tension development. The tonic responses were more potently inhibited than the phasic responses. Phasic components gradually increased as the added K+ increased (10-40 mM). The relationship between the peak increases in [Ca2+]i and tension was not affected by trimebutine (10 microM). This means that trimebutine does not affect the Ca2+ sensitivity of contractile elements. In a high K+ and Ca(2+)-free medium, carbachol (10 microM) or caffeine (30 mM) caused transient [Ca2+]i elevation and tension development in the smooth muscle. Trimebutine (10 microM) decreased the amplitude of both responses. Trimebutine (10 microM) inhibited the spontaneous fluctuations in [Ca2+]i and motility of taenia cecum in the presence of tetrodotoxin (TTX; 0.3 microM). These results suggest that trimebutine has two types of inhibitory actions on intestinal smooth muscle; one, the inhibition of Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent calcium channels, and the other, the inhibition of Ca2+ release from intracellular storage sites. PMID:1868878

  5. Temporal profile of intestinal tissue expression of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in a rat model of necrotizing enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Ana Leda Bertoncini; Figueira, Rebeca Lopes; Gonçalves, Frances Lilian Lanhellas; Mitidiero, Luís Felipe Tsuyoshi; Silva, Orlando Castro e; Peiró, José Luis; Sbragia, Lourenço

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Necrotizing enterocolitis is a severe multifactorial intestinal disorder that primarily affects preterm newborns, causing 20-40% mortality and morbidity. Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein has been reported to be a biomarker for the detection of intestinal injuries. Our aim was to assess intestinal tissue injury and the molecular expression of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein over time in a necrotizing enterocolitis model. METHODS: A total of 144 Newborn rats were divided into two groups: 1) Control, which received breastfeeding (n=72) and 2) Necrotizing Enterocolitis, which received formula feeding and underwent hypoxia and hypothermia (n=72). A total of six time points of ischemia (2 times a day for 3 days; 12 pups for each time point) were examined. Samples were collected for analysis of body weight, morphological and histological characteristics, intestinal weight, intestinal weight/body weight ratio, injury grade, and intestinal fatty acid-binding protein levels. RESULTS: Body and intestinal weights were lower in the Necrotizing Enterocolitis group than in the Control group (p<0.005 and p<0.0005, respectively). The intestinal weight/body weight ratio was higher in the Necrotizing Enterocolitis group than in the Control group (p<0.005) only at the sixth ischemia time point. The Necrotizing Enterocolitis group displayed higher expression of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (p<0.0005) and showed greater tissue damage than the Control group. CONCLUSION: Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein was an efficient marker of ischemic injury to the intestine and a good correlation was demonstrated between the time of ischemic injury and the grade of intestinal injury. PMID:27464299

  6. [The biliary intestinal obstruction].

    PubMed

    Demetrashvili, Z M; Asatiani, G A; Nemsadze, G Sh; Kenchadze, G Z

    2012-01-01

    The successful experience of treatment of 3 patients with biliary intestinal obstruction is depicted. The most informative means of diagnostics was the multispiral computed tomography. Authors state, that the volume of the operation should include only the liquidation of the intestinal obstruction. The simultaneous biliodigestive fistulae closure should be performed only in rare situations. PMID:22678540

  7. The intestinal microbiome of fish under starvation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Starvation not only affects the nutritional and health status of the animals, but also the microbial composition in the host’s intestine. Next-generation sequencing provides a unique opportunity to explore gut microbial communities and their interactions with hosts. However, studies on gut microbiomes have been conducted predominantly in humans and land animals. Not much is known on gut microbiomes of aquatic animals and their changes under changing environmental conditions. To address this shortcoming, we determined the microbial gene catalogue, and investigated changes in the microbial composition and host-microbe interactions in the intestine of Asian seabass in response to starvation. Results We found 33 phyla, 66 classes, 130 orders and 278 families in the intestinal microbiome. Proteobacteria (48.8%), Firmicutes (15.3%) and Bacteroidetes (8.2%) were the three most abundant bacteria taxa. Comparative analyses of the microbiome revealed shifts in bacteria communities, with dramatic enrichment of Bacteroidetes, but significant depletion of Betaproteobacteria in starved intestines. In addition, significant differences in clusters of orthologous groups (COG) functional categories and orthologous groups were observed. Genes related to antibiotic activity in the microbiome were significantly enriched in response to starvation, and host genes related to the immune response were generally up-regulated. Conclusions This study provides the first insights into the fish intestinal microbiome and its changes under starvation. Further detailed study on interactions between intestinal microbiomes and hosts under dynamic conditions will shed new light on how the hosts and microbes respond to the changing environment. PMID:24708260

  8. Direct Correlation between Motile Behavior and Protein Abundance in Single Cells.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Yann S; Gillet, Sébastien; Frankel, Nicholas W; Weibel, Douglas B; Emonet, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Understanding how stochastic molecular fluctuations affect cell behavior requires the quantification of both behavior and protein numbers in the same cells. Here, we combine automated microscopy with in situ hydrogel polymerization to measure single-cell protein expression after tracking swimming behavior. We characterized the distribution of non-genetic phenotypic diversity in Escherichia coli motility, which affects single-cell exploration. By expressing fluorescently tagged chemotaxis proteins (CheR and CheB) at different levels, we quantitatively mapped motile phenotype (tumble bias) to protein numbers using thousands of single-cell measurements. Our results disagreed with established models until we incorporated the role of CheB in receptor deamidation and the slow fluctuations in receptor methylation. Beyond refining models, our central finding is that changes in numbers of CheR and CheB affect the population mean tumble bias and its variance independently. Therefore, it is possible to adjust the degree of phenotypic diversity of a population by adjusting the global level of expression of CheR and CheB while keeping their ratio constant, which, as shown in previous studies, confers functional robustness to the system. Since genetic control of protein expression is heritable, our results suggest that non-genetic diversity in motile behavior is selectable, supporting earlier hypotheses that such diversity confers a selective advantage. PMID:27599206

  9. Vasoactive Intestinal Polypeptide Promotes Intestinal Barrier Homeostasis and Protection Against Colitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiujuan; Conlin, Victoria S.; Morampudi, Vijay; Ryz, Natasha R.; Nasser, Yasmin; Bhinder, Ganive; Bergstrom, Kirk S.; Yu, Hong B.; Waterhouse, Chris C. M.; Buchan, Allison M. J.; Popescu, Oana E.; Gibson, William T.; Waschek, James A.; Vallance, Bruce A.; Jacobson, Kevan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic gastrointestinal inflammatory disorder associated with changes in neuropeptide expression and function, including vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). VIP regulates intestinal vasomotor and secretomotor function and motility; however, VIP’s role in development and maintenance of colonic epithelial barrier homeostasis is unclear. Using VIP deficient (VIPKO) mice, we investigated VIP’s role in epithelial barrier homeostasis, and susceptibility to colitis. Colonic crypt morphology and epithelial barrier homeostasis were assessed in wildtype (WT) and VIPKO mice, at baseline. Colitic responses were evaluated following dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS) or dextran-sodium sulfate (DSS) exposure. Mice were also treated with exogenous VIP. At baseline, VIPKO mice exhibited distorted colonic crypts, defects in epithelial cell proliferation and migration, increased apoptosis, and altered permeability. VIPKO mice also displayed reduced goblet cell numbers, and reduced expression of secreted goblet cell factors mucin 2 and trefoil factor 3. These changes were associated with reduced expression of caudal type homeobox 2 (Cdx2), a master regulator of intestinal function and homeostasis. DNBS and DSS-induced colitis were more severe in VIPKO than WT mice. VIP treatment rescued the phenotype, protecting VIPKO mice against DSS colitis, with results comparable to WT mice. In conclusion, VIP plays a crucial role in the development and maintenance of colonic epithelial barrier integrity under physiological conditions and promotes epithelial repair and homeostasis during colitis. PMID:25932952

  10. Molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones modulation on corneal fibroblast motility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsan-Chi; Tsai, Tzu-Yun; Chang, Shu-Wen

    2016-04-01

    Topical fluoroquinolones are widely used to prevent ocular infections after ophthalmic surgery. However, they have been shown to affect the corneal cell motility, whose mechanism remains indefinite. The purpose of this study was to investigate how fluoroquinolones affect corneal stromal cell motility. Human corneal fibroblasts (HCFs) were incubated in ciprofloxacin (CIP), levofloxacin (LEV), or moxifloxacin (MOX) at 0, 10, 50, and 100 μg/ml for up to 3 days. Effect of CIP, LEV, or MOX on HCF migration was monitored using migration assay. HCF viability was determined by WST-1 assay. Expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin (PXN), and their phosphorylated forms were analyzed by immunoblotting. Binding affinity between FAK and PXN was determined by co-immunoprecipitation. Our results revealed that CIP and MOX, but not LEV, noticeably retarded HCF migration. HCF proliferation was significantly reduced by CIP (38.2%), LEV (29.5%), and MOX (21.3%), respectively (p = 0.002). CIP and MOX suppressed the phosphorylation of PXN at tyrosines (10.2 ± 4.3%, p < 0.001; 11.7 ± 2.4%, p < 0.001, respectively), including tyrosine 118 (33.3 ± 5.2%, p < 0.001; 34.0 ± 4.4%, p < 0.001, respectively). CIP and MOX diminished the binding affinity between FAK and PXN (8.2 ± 1.8%, p < 0.001; 9.0 ± 4.5%, p < 0.001, respectively). Nevertheless, tyrosine dephosphorylation and FAK dissociation of PXN were not found in LEV-treated HCFs. None of these fluoroquinolones affect phosphorylation of FAK-Y397. We conclude that CIP and MOX, but not LEV, might delay corneal fibroblast migration via interfering with recruitment of PXN to focal adhesions and dephosphorylation of PXN at the tyrosines. PMID:26546726

  11. Electroacupuncture at ST25 inhibits jejunal motility: Role of sympathetic pathways and TRPV1

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhi; Zhang, Na; Lu, Chun-Xia; Pang, Ting-Ting; Wang, Kai-Yue; Jiang, Jing-Feng; Zhu, Bing; Xu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether electroacupuncture (EA) at ST25 affects jejunal motility in vivo and if so, whether a sympathetic pathway is involved. METHODS: Jejunal motility was assessed using a manometric balloon placed in the jejunum approximately about 3-5 cm away from the suspensory ligament of the duodenum in anesthetized animals. The effects of EA at ST25 were measured in male Sprague-Dawley rats, some of which were treated with propranolol or clenbuterol (EA intensities: 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 mA), and in male transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) (capsaicin receptor) knockout mice (EA intensities: 1, 2, and 4 mA). RESULTS: Anesthetized rats exhibited three types of fasting jejunal motor patterns (types A, B, and C), and only type C rats responded to EA stimulation. In type C rats, EA at ST25 significantly suppressed the motor activity of the jejunum in an intensity-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of EA was weakened by propranolol (β adrenoceptor antagonist) and disappeared with clenbuterol (β adrenoceptor agonist) induced inhibition of motility, suggesting that the effect of EA on motility is mediated via a sympathetic pathway. Compared with wild-type mice, EA at ST25 was less effective in TRPV1 knockout mice, suggesting that this multi-modal sensor channel participates in the mechanism. CONCLUSION: EA at ST25 was found to inhibit jejunal motility in an intensity-dependent manner, via a mechanism in which sympathetic nerves and TRPV1 receptors play an important role. PMID:26855542

  12. Coordinated Cyclic-Di-GMP Repression of Salmonella Motility through YcgR and Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Zorraquino, Violeta; García, Begoña; Latasa, Cristina; Echeverz, Maite; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Valle, Jaione

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a secondary messenger that controls a variety of cellular processes, including the switch between a biofilm and a planktonic bacterial lifestyle. This nucleotide binds to cellular effectors in order to exert its regulatory functions. In Salmonella, two proteins, BcsA and YcgR, both of them containing a c-di-GMP binding PilZ domain, are the only known c-di-GMP receptors. BcsA, upon c-di-GMP binding, synthesizes cellulose, the main exopolysaccharide of the biofilm matrix. YcgR is dedicated to c-di-GMP-dependent inhibition of motility through its interaction with flagellar motor proteins. However, previous evidences indicate that in the absence of YcgR, there is still an additional element that mediates motility impairment under high c-di-GMP levels. Here we have uncovered that cellulose per se is the factor that further promotes inhibition of bacterial motility once high c-di-GMP contents drive the activation of a sessile lifestyle. Inactivation of different genes of the bcsABZC operon, mutation of the conserved residues in the RxxxR motif of the BcsA PilZ domain, or degradation of the cellulose produced by BcsA rescued the motility defect of ΔycgR strains in which high c-di-GMP levels were reached through the overexpression of diguanylate cyclases. High c-di-GMP levels provoked cellulose accumulation around cells that impeded flagellar rotation, probably by means of steric hindrance, without affecting flagellum gene expression, exportation, or assembly. Our results highlight the relevance of cellulose in Salmonella lifestyle switching as an architectural element that is both essential for biofilm development and required, in collaboration with YcgR, for complete motility inhibition. PMID:23161026

  13. Insect Stage-Specific Adenylate Cyclases Regulate Social Motility in African Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Miguel A.; Saada, Edwin A.

    2014-01-01

    Sophisticated systems for cell-cell communication enable unicellular microbes to act as multicellular entities capable of group-level behaviors that are not evident in individuals. These group behaviors influence microbe physiology, and the underlying signaling pathways are considered potential drug targets in microbial pathogens. Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite that causes substantial human suffering and economic hardship in some of the most impoverished regions of the world. T. brucei lives on host tissue surfaces during transmission through its tsetse fly vector, and cultivation on surfaces causes the parasites to assemble into multicellular communities in which individual cells coordinate their movements in response to external signals. This behavior is termed “social motility,” based on its similarities with surface-induced social motility in bacteria, and it demonstrates that trypanosomes are capable of group-level behavior. Mechanisms governing T. brucei social motility are unknown. Here we report that a subset of receptor-type adenylate cyclases (ACs) in the trypanosome flagellum regulate social motility. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of adenylate cyclase 6 (AC6), or dual knockdown of AC1 and AC2, causes a hypersocial phenotype but has no discernible effect on individual cells in suspension culture. Mutation of the AC6 catalytic domain phenocopies AC6 knockdown, demonstrating that loss of adenylate cyclase activity is responsible for the phenotype. Notably, knockdown of other ACs did not affect social motility, indicating segregation of AC functions. These studies reveal interesting parallels in systems that control social behavior in trypanosomes and bacteria and provide insight into a feature of parasite biology that may be exploited for novel intervention strategies. PMID:25416239

  14. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14). Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center). Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to swarm center cells, tendril

  15. Determining the Relative Contribution and Hierarchy of hha and qseBC in the Regulation of Flagellar Motility of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vijay K.; Casey, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    In recent studies, we demonstrated that a deletion of hha caused increased secretion of locus of enterocyte encoded adherence proteins and reduced motility of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7. In addition to the importance of hha in positive regulation of motility, a two-component quorum sensing pathway encoded by the qseBC genes has been shown to activate bacterial motility in response to mammalian stress hormones epinephrine and norepinephrine as well as bacterially produced autoinducer-3. In this study, we compared regulatory contribution and hierarchy of hha, a member of the Hha/YmoA family of nucleoid-associated proteins, to that of qseBC in the expression of EHEC O157:H7 motility. Since norepinephrine affects motility of EHEC O157:H7 through a qseBC-encoded two-component quorum sensing signaling, we also determined whether the hha-mediated regulation of motility is affected by norepinephrine and whether this effect is qseBC dependent. We used single (Δhha or ΔqseC) and double (Δhha ΔqseC) deletion mutants to show that hha exerts a greater positive regulatory effect in comparison to qseBC on the expression of motility by EHEC O157:H7. We also show that Hha is hierarchically superior in transcriptional regulation of motility than QseBC because transcription of qseC was significantly reduced in the hha deletion mutant compared to that in the parental and the hha-complemented mutant strains. These results suggest that hha regulates motility of EHEC O157:H7 directly as well as indirectly by controlling the transcription of qseBC. PMID:24465756

  16. Intestinal epithelial dysplasia (tufting enteropathy).

    PubMed

    Goulet, Olivier; Salomon, Julie; Ruemmele, Frank; de Serres, Natacha Patey-Mariaud; Brousse, Nicole

    2007-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial dysplasia (IED), also known as tufting enteropathy, is a congenital enteropathy presenting with early-onset severe intractable diarrhea causing sometimes irreversible intestinal failure. To date, no epidemiological data are available, however, the prevalence can be estimated at around 1/50,000-100,000 live births in Western Europe. The prevalence seems higher in areas with high degree of consanguinity and in patients of Arabic origin. Infants develop within the first days after birth a watery diarrhea persistent in spite of bowel rest and parenteral nutrition. Some infants are reported to have associated choanal rectal or esophageal atresia. IED is thought to be related to abnormal enterocytes development and/or differentiation. Nonspecific punctuated keratitis was reported in more than 60% of patients. Histology shows various degree of villous atrophy, with low or without mononuclear cell infiltration of the lamina propria but specific histological abnormalities involving the epithelium with disorganization of surface enterocytes with focal crowding, resembling tufts. Several associated specific features were reported, including abnormal deposition of laminin and heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) in the basement membrane, increased expression of desmoglein and ultrastructural changes in the desmosomes, and abnormal distribution of alpha2beta1 integrin adhesion molecules. One model of transgenic mice in which the gene encoding the transcription factor Elf3 is disrupted have morphologic features resembling IED. Parental consanguinity and/or affected siblings suggest an autosomal recessive transmission but the causative gene(s) have not been yet identified making prenatal diagnosis unavailable. Some infants have a milder phenotype than others but in most patients, the severity of the intestinal malabsorption even with enteral feeding make them totally dependent on daily long-term parenteral nutrition with a subsequent risk of complications

  17. Laser radiation and motility patterns of human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Lenzi, A.; Claroni, F.; Gandini, L.; Lombardo, F.; Barbieri, C.; Lino, A.; Dondero, F. )

    1989-01-01

    Human sperm were exposed in vitro to laser radiation. An increase in progressive sperm motility was associated with a faster rate of sperm ATP consumption. Computer-assisted analysis of sperm motility confirmed the positive effect of laser irradiation on velocity and linearity of sperm.

  18. Action of pinaverium bromide, a calcium-antagonist, on gastrointestinal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Christen, M O

    1990-01-01

    1. The evidence reviewed here indicates that pinaverium bromide (Dicetel) relaxes gastrointestinal (GI) structures primarily by inhibiting Ca2+ influx through potential-dependent channels of surface membranes of smooth muscle cells. 2. The in vivo selectivity of pinaverium bromide for the GI tract appears to be due mainly to its pharmacokinetic properties. Because of its low absorption (typical for quaternary ammonium compounds) and marked hepatobiliary excretion, most of the orally-administered dose of pinaverium bromide remains in the GI tract. 3. Orally-administered pinaverium bromide does not elicit adverse cardiovascular side-effects at doses that effectively relieve GI spasm, pain, transit disturbances and other symptoms related to motility disorders. 4. Pinaverium bromide is the only Ca2(+)-antagonist with known therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome and certain other functional intestinal disorders. PMID:2177709

  19. Management of acute intestinal ischaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Windsor, C. W.

    1977-01-01

    The acute abdomen due to a vascular catastrophe affecting the major splanchnic vessels is often a life-threatening condition that can be very difficult to diagnose. In this article the pathological and physiological changes found in large- and small-intestinal ischaemia are related to the clinical features of the illness. Radiological, biochemical, and haematological aids to diagnosis are discussed. The treatment of large- and small-bowel ischaemia and of their specific complications, such as malabsorption and gastric hypersecretion, is outlined. PMID:835982

  20. Intestinal adaptation after massive intestinal resection

    PubMed Central

    Weale, A; Edwards, A; Bailey, M; Lear, P

    2005-01-01

    Patients with short bowel syndrome require long term parenteral nutrition support. However, after massive intestinal resection the intestine undergoes adaptation and nutritional autonomy may be obtained. Given that the complications of parenteral nutrition may be life threatening or result in treatment failure and the need for intestinal transplantation, a more attractive option is to wean patients off nutrition support by optimising the adaptive process. The article examines the evidence that after extensive small bowel resection adaptation occurs in humans and focuses on the factors that influence adaptation and the strategies that have been used to optimise this process. The review is based on an English language Medline search with secondary references obtained from key articles. There is evidence that adaptation occurs in humans. Adaptation is a complex process that results in response to nutrient and non-nutrient stimuli. Successful and reproducible strategies to improve adaptation remain elusive despite an abundance of experimental data. Nevertheless given the low patient survival and quality of life associated with other treatments for irreversible intestinal failure it is imperative that clinical research continues into the optimisation of the adaptation. PMID:15749794

  1. Mechanics model for actin-based motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    We present here a mechanics model for the force generation by actin polymerization. The possible adhesions between the actin filaments and the load surface, as well as the nucleation and capping of filament tips, are included in this model on top of the well-known elastic Brownian ratchet formulation. A closed form solution is provided from which the force-velocity relationship, summarizing the mechanics of polymerization, can be drawn. Model predictions on the velocity of moving beads driven by actin polymerization are consistent with experiment observations. This model also seems capable of explaining the enhanced actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes and beads by the presence of Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, as observed in recent experiments.

  2. Metabolism and motility in prebiotic structures

    PubMed Central

    Hanczyc, Martin M.

    2011-01-01

    Easily accessible, primitive chemical structures produced by self-assembly of hydrophobic substances into oil droplets may result in self-moving agents able to sense their environment and move to avoid equilibrium. These structures would constitute very primitive examples of life on the Earth, even more primitive than simple bilayer vesicle structures. A few examples of simple chemical systems are presented that self-organize to produce oil droplets capable of movement, environment remodelling and primitive chemotaxis. These chemical agents are powered by an internal chemical reaction based on the hydrolysis of an oleic anhydride precursor or on the hydrolysis of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) polymer, a plausible prebiotic chemistry. Results are presented on both the behaviour of such droplets and the surface-active properties of HCN polymer products. Such motile agents would be capable of finding resources while escaping equilibrium and sustaining themselves through an internal metabolism, thus providing a working chemical model for a possible origin of life. PMID:21930579

  3. Method and system for enhancing microbial motility

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.; Lopez-De-Victoria, G.

    1992-12-31

    A method and system for enhancing the motility of microorganisms by placing an effective amount of chlorinated hydrocarbons, preferably chlorinated alkenes, and most preferably trichloroethylene in spaced relation to the microbes so that the surprisingly strong, monomodal, chemotactic response of the chlorinated hydrocarbon on subsurface microbes can draw the microbes away from or towards and into a substance, as desired. In remediation of groundwater pollution, for example, TCE can be injected into the plume to increase the population of microbes at the plume whereby the plume can be more quickly degraded. A TCE-degrading microbe, such as Welchia alkenophilia, can be used to degrade the TCE following the degradation of the original pollutant.

  4. Evolutionary aspects of collective motility in pathogenic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforet, Maxime; Xavier, Joao

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogenic bacteria that can use its single polar flagellum to swim through liquids. It can move collectively over semisolid surfaces, a behavior called swarming. It can also settle and form surface-attached communities called biofilms that protect them from antibiotics. The transition from single motility (swimming) to collective motility (swarming) is biologically relevant as it enables exploring environments that a single bacterium cannot explore on its own. It is also clinically relevant since swarming and biofilm formation are thought to be antagonistic. We investigate the mechanisms of bacterial collective motility using a multidisciplinary approach that combines mathematical modeling, quantitative experiments, and microbial genetics. We aim to identify how these mechanisms may evolve under the selective pressure of population expansion, and consequently reinforce or hinder collective motility. In particular, we clarify the role of growth rate and motility in invasive populations.

  5. Motile Cilia of Human Airway Epithelia Are Chemosensory

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Alok S; Ben-Shahar, Yehuda; Moninger, Thomas O; Kline, Joel N; Welsh, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Cilia are microscopic projections that extend from eukaryotic cells. There are two general types of cilia; primary cilia serve as sensory organelles, whereas motile cilia exert mechanical force. The motile cilia emerging from human airway epithelial cells propel harmful inhaled material out of the lung. We found that these cells express sensory bitter taste receptors, which localized on motile cilia. Bitter compounds increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and stimulated ciliary beat frequency. Thus, airway epithelia contain a cell-autonomous system in which motile cilia both sense noxious substances entering airways and initiate a defensive mechanical mechanism to eliminate the offending compound. Hence, like primary cilia, classical motile cilia also contain sensors to detect the external environment. PMID:19628819

  6. A mechanism for cell motility by active polar gels

    PubMed Central

    Marth, W.; Praetorius, S.; Voigt, A.

    2015-01-01

    We analyse a generic motility model, with the motility mechanism arising by contractile stress due to the interaction of myosin and actin. A hydrodynamic active polar gel theory is used to model the cytoplasm of a cell and is combined with a Helfrich-type model to account for membrane properties. The overall model allows consideration of the motility without the necessity for local adhesion. Besides a detailed numerical approach together with convergence studies for the highly nonlinear free boundary problem, we also compare the induced flow field of the motile cell with that of classical squirmer models and identify the motile cell as a puller or pusher, depending on the strength of the myosin–actin interactions. PMID:25926698

  7. Thyroxin Is Useful to Improve Sperm Motility

    PubMed Central

    Mendeluk, Gabriela Ruth; Rosales, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the non-genomic action of thyroxin on sperm kinetic and its probable use to improve sperm recovery after applying an en- richment method like “swim-up” in comparison with the available one, pentoxifylline. Materials and Methods This is an experimental study. A total of 50 patients were re- cruited, followed by infertility consultation. Conventional sperm assays were performed according to World Health Organization criteria-2010 (WHO-2010). A Computer Aided Semen Analysis System was employed to assess kinetic parameters and concentrations. Number of the motile sperm recovered after preparation technique was calculated. Results Addition of T4 (0.002 µg/ml) to semen samples increased hypermotility at 20 minutes (control: 14.18 ± 5.1% vs. 17.66 ± 8.88%, P<0.03, data expressed as mean ± SD) and remained unchanged after 40 minutes. Significant differences were found in the motile sperm recovered after swim-up (control: 8.93×106 ± 9.52× 06vs. 17.20×106 ± 21.16×106, P<0.03), achieving all of the tested samples a desirable threshold value for artificial insemination outcome, while adding pentoxifylline increased the number of recovered sperm after swim-up in 60% of the studied cases. No synergism between two treatments could be determined. Conclusion We propose a new physiological tool to artificially improve insemination. The discussion opens windows to investigate unknown pathways involved in sperm ca- pacitation and gives innovative arguments to better understand infertility mechanisms. PMID:27441054

  8. Hydrodynamics of helical-shaped bacterial motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Hirofumi; Netz, Roland R.

    2009-08-01

    To reveal the underlying hydrodynamic mechanism for the directed propulsion of the bacterium Spiroplasma, we formulate a coarse-grained elastic polymer model with domains of alternating helicities along the contour. Using hydrodynamic simulations and analytic arguments, we show that the propagation of helical domain walls leads to the directed propulsion of the cell body opposite to the domain-wall traveling direction. Several key features of Spiroplasma motility are reproduced by our model. We in particular show that the helical pitch angle observed for Spiroplasma meliferum, ψ=35° , is optimized for maximal swimming speed and energy-conversion efficiency. Our analytic theory based on the slender-body hydrodynamic approximation agrees very well with our numerical data demonstrating how the chirality switch propagating along the helical cell body is converted to a translational thrust for the cell body itself. We in detail consider thermal effects on the propulsion efficiency in the form of orientational fluctuations and conformational fluctuations of the helix shape. The body length dependence of the cell motility is studied numerically and compared to our approximate analytic theory. For fixed pitch angle ψ=35° , the swimming speed is maximized at a ratio of cell-body length to domain length of about 2-3, which are typical values for real cells. We also propose simple analytic arguments for an enhancement of the swimming velocity with increasing solution viscosity by taking into account the effects of transient confinement of a helical cell body in a polymeric meshwork. Comparison with a generalized theory for the swimming speed of flagellated bacteria in polymeric meshworks shows that the presence of a finite-sized bacterial head gives rise to a maximal swimming speed at a finite solution viscosity, whereas in the absence of a head the swimming speed monotonically increases with increasing viscosity.

  9. Motility alterations in celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Sanchez, Maria Ines; Bercik, Premysl; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of gut motility is complex and involves neuromuscular, immune and environmental mechanisms. It is well established that patients with celiac disease (CD) often display gut dysmotility. Studies have shown the presence of disturbed esophageal motility, altered gastric emptying, and dysmotility of the small intestine, gallbladder and colon in untreated CD. Most of these motor abnormalities resolve after a strict gluten-free diet, suggesting that mechanisms related to the inflammatory condition and disease process are responsible for the motor dysfunction. Motility abnormalities are also a hallmark of functional bowel disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where it has been proposed as underlying mechanism for symptom generation (diarrhea, constipation, bloating). Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a poorly defined entity, mostly self-diagnosed, that presents clinically with IBS symptoms in the absence of specific celiac markers. Patients with NCGS are believed to react symptomatically to wheat components, and some studies have proposed the presence of low-grade inflammation in these patients. There is little information regarding the functional characterization of these patients before and after a gluten-free diet. A study suggested the presence of altered gastrointestinal transit in NCGS patients who also have a high prevalence of nonspecific anti-gliadin antibodies. Results of an ongoing clinical study in NCGS patients with positive anti-gliadin antibodies before and after a gluten-free diet will be discussed. Elucidating the mechanisms for symptom generation in NCGS patients is important to find new therapeutic alternatives to the burden of imposing a strict gluten-free diet in patients who do not have CD. PMID:25925923

  10. Chronic Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Panganamamula, Kashyap V; Parkman, Henry P

    2005-02-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIP) is a gastrointestinal motility disorder characterized by chronic symptoms and signs of bowel obstruction in the absence of a fixed, lumen-occluding lesion. Radiographic findings consist of dilated bowel with air-fluid levels. Pseudo-obstruction is an uncommon condition and can result from primary or secondary causes. The management is primarily focused on symptom control and nutritional support to prevent weight loss and malnutrition. The principles of management of patients with CIP involve 1) establishing a correct clinical diagnosis and excluding mechanical obstruction; 2) differentiating between idiopathic and secondary forms; 3) performing a symptomatic and physiologic assessment of the parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract involved by manometric and whole gut transit scintigraphic studies; 4) careful assessment of nutritional status of the patient; and 5) developing a therapeutic plan addressing the patient's symptoms and nutritional status. Treatment of CIP includes frequent small meals with a low-fat, low-fiber diet, liquid nutritional supplements may be needed; prokinetic agents such as metoclopramide may help to reduce upper GI symptoms. Trials of drugs such as erythromycin, domperidone, cisapride, and tegaserod may be considered if there is no response. Subcutaneous octreotide may be helpful to improve small bowel dysmotility especially in patients with scleroderma. In patients with symptoms suggestive of bacterial overgrowth, courses of antibiotics such as metronidazole, ciprofloxacin, and doxycycline may be needed. Nutritional assessment and support is an important aspect of management. Enteral nutrition is usually preferred. In carefully selected patients, feeding jejunostomy with or without decompression gastrostomy may be tried. Long term parenteral nutrition should be reserved for patients who can not tolerate enteral nutrition. Complications associated with total parenteral nutrition include

  11. Intestinal colonization resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lawley, Trevor D; Walker, Alan W

    2013-01-01

    Dense, complex microbial communities, collectively termed the microbiota, occupy a diverse array of niches along the length of the mammalian intestinal tract. During health and in the absence of antibiotic exposure the microbiota can effectively inhibit colonization and overgrowth by invading microbes such as pathogens. This phenomenon is called ‘colonization resistance’ and is associated with a stable and diverse microbiota in tandem with a controlled lack of inflammation, and involves specific interactions between the mucosal immune system and the microbiota. Here we overview the microbial ecology of the healthy mammalian intestinal tract and highlight the microbe–microbe and microbe–host interactions that promote colonization resistance. Emerging themes highlight immunological (T helper type 17/regulatory T-cell balance), microbiota (diverse and abundant) and metabolic (short-chain fatty acid) signatures of intestinal health and colonization resistance. Intestinal pathogens use specific virulence factors or exploit antibiotic use to subvert colonization resistance for their own benefit by triggering inflammation to disrupt the harmony of the intestinal ecosystem. A holistic view that incorporates immunological and microbiological facets of the intestinal ecosystem should facilitate the development of immunomodulatory and microbe-modulatory therapies that promote intestinal homeostasis and colonization resistance. PMID:23240815

  12. How does long-term parenteral nutrition impact the bone mineral status of children with intestinal failure?

    PubMed

    Diamanti, Antonella; Bizzarri, Carla; Bizzarri, Claudia; Basso, Maria Sole; Gambarara, Manuela; Cappa, Marco; Daniele, Antonella; Noto, Cristian; Castro, Massimo

    2010-05-01

    Patients on long-term parenteral nutrition (PN) are at significantly increased risk for the development of metabolic bone disease (MBD); this condition is characterized by incomplete mineralization of osteoid with consequent disturbances ranging from osteopenia to severe bone disease with fractures. The aim of the study was: (1) to evaluate the prevalence of MBD, (2) to identify the PN- or intestinal failure (IF)-related factors and (3) to assess annual changes of bone mineral status. Since September 2005 all patients affected by IF and treated with PN started a BMD evaluation program using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Twenty-four IF patients were included [15 with short bowel syndrome (SBS), 5 with severe protracted diarrhea and 4 with chronic intestinal pseudostruction]. The bone mineral density (BMD) Z-score was significantly lower in patients than in the control group. In our series SBS patients showed a BMD Z-score significantly higher in comparison with the medical causes of IF. No significant correlations were found between bone mineral status and PN duration and nutrient intake. Nine IF patients were submitted to a second DXA evaluation after 1 year from the baseline. All bone mineral variables were significantly increased at the second DXA evaluation. The high prevalence of MBD in IF patients undergoing long-term treatment with PN requires that these patients undergo careful and periodic monitoring of their bone mineral status; patients with congenital gut dysfunctions, such as epithelium defects and motility anomalies, are at major risk of developing this complication, probably due to the association with extra-intestinal causes of bone loss. PMID:20033239

  13. Loss of Sigma Factor RpoN Increases Intestinal Colonization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in an Adult Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, W. Brian; Richards, Gary P.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of bacterial seafood-borne gastroenteritis worldwide, yet little is known about how this pathogen colonizes the human intestine. The alternative sigma factor RpoN/sigma-54 is a global regulator that controls flagellar synthesis, as well as a wide range of nonflagellar genes. We constructed an in-frame deletion mutation in rpoN (VP2670) in V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633, a clinical serogroup O3:K6 isolate, and examined the effects in vivo using a streptomycin-treated mouse model of colonization. We confirmed that deletion of rpoN rendered V. parahaemolyticus nonmotile, and it caused reduced biofilm formation and an apparent defect in glutamine synthetase production. In in vivo competition assays between the rpoN mutant and a wild-type RIMD2210633 strain marked with the β-galactosidase gene lacZ (WBWlacZ), the mutant colonized significantly more proficiently. Intestinal persistence competition assays also demonstrated that the rpoN mutant had enhanced fitness and outcompeted WBWlacZ. Mutants defective in the polar flagellum biosynthesis FliAP sigma factor also outcompeted WBWlacZ but not to the same level as the rpoN mutant, which suggested that lack of motility is not the sole cause of the fitness effect. In an in vitro growth competition assay in mouse intestinal mucus, the rpoN mutant also outcompeted the wild type and exhibited faster doubling times when grown in mucus and on individual components of mucus. Genes in the pathways for the catabolism of mucus sugars also had significantly higher expression levels in a ΔrpoN mutant than in the wild type. These data suggest that in V. parahaemolyticus, RpoN plays an important role in carbon utilization regulation, which may significantly affect host colonization. PMID:24478070

  14. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors in the canine gastrointestinal tract

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.P.; Gates, T.S.; Mantyh, C.R.; Vigna, S.R.; Boehmer, C.G.; Mantyh, P.W.

    1988-11-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a putative neurotransmitter in both the brain and peripheral tissues. To define possible target tissues of VIP we have used quantitative receptor autoradiography to localize and quantify the distribution of /sup 125/I-VIP receptor binding sites in the canine gastrointestinal tract. While the distribution of VIP binding sites was different for each segment examined, specific VIP binding sites were localized to the mucosa, the muscularis mucosa, the smooth muscle of submucosal arterioles, lymph nodules, and the circular and longitudinal smooth muscle of the muscularis externa. These results identify putative target tissues of VIP action in the canine gastrointestinal tract. In correlation with physiological data, VIP sites appear to be involved in the regulation of a variety of gastrointestinal functions including epithelial ion transport, gastric secretion, hemodynamic regulation, immune response, esophageal, gastric and intestinal motility.

  15. Inhibition of intestinal motility by the putative BK(Ca) channel opener LDD175.

    PubMed

    Dela Peña, Ike Campomayor; Yoon, Seo Young; Kim, Sung Mok; Lee, Geum Seon; Park, Chul-Seung; Kim, Yong Chul; Cheong, Jae Hoon

    2009-03-01

    LDD175 (4-chloro-7-trifluoromethyl-10H-benzo[4,5]furo[3,2-b]indole-1-carboxylic acid) is a benzofuroindole compound characterized previously as a potent opener of the large conductance calcium activated (BK(Ca)) channels. Activators of the BK(Ca) channels are potential therapies for smooth muscle hyperactivity disorders. The present study investigates the influence of LDD175 on the mechanical activity of the ileum smooth muscle. LDD175 inhibited spontaneous contractions of the ileum in a concentration-dependent manner (pEC(50)=5.9 +/- 0.1) (E (max)=96 +/- 1.0% at 100 muM, n=3). It also remarkably inhibited contractions due to acetylcholine (ACh) (pEC(50)=5.3 +/- 0.1)(E (max)=97.7 +/- 2.3%, n=6) and electrical field stimulation (EFS) (pEC(50)=5.5 +/- 0.1) (E (max)=83.3 +/- 6.0%, n=6). In strips precontracted by 20 mM KCl, LDD175 significantly reduced the contractions yielding a pEC(50) of 6.1 +/- 0.1 and E (max) of 96.6 +/- 0.9%, (n=6). In 60 mM KCl, a concentration-dependent inhibition was observed with respective pEC(50) and E (max) values of 4.1 +/- 0.1 and 50.8 +/- 5.0% (n=3). BK(Ca) channel blockers iberiotoxin (IbTX) and tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA, 1 mM) attenuated the relaxative effect of LDD175 but not barium chloride (BaCl(2)), and glibenclamide (K(IR) and K(ATP) channel blockers, respectively). These data demonstrate the antispasmodic activity of LDD175 attributable to the potentiation of the BK(Ca) channels. PMID:19387586

  16. [Effects of trimebutine maleate on interdigestive motility of the stomach and small intestine in conscious dogs].

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Iizuka, M; Takaiti, O

    1982-03-01

    Effects of trimebutine maleate (TM-906) on gastrointestinal motor activity of interdigestive state were studied in seven unanaesthetized dogs by means of chronically implanted force transducers. In animals which showed typical interdigestive motor pattern consisted of long lasting motor quiescence and recurring high-amplitude contractions (interdigestive contractions), intravenous infusion of TM-906 (0.6-6.0 mg/kg-hr) shortened the quiescent period. During TM-906 infusion, the number and the duration of the interdigestive contractions decreased in the gastric antrum. These effects were in a dose dependent manner. Infusion of TM-906 of 6.0 mg/kg-hr over 60 min introduced additional responses: persistent contractions different from the usual interdigestive contractions and delayed onset of the interdigestive contractions. Metoclopramide (1.8-6.0 mg/kg-hr) developed high-frequency contractions with gradually increasing amplitude and caused enhancement of the interdigestive contractions. In three animals which showed anomalous fasted motor pattern consisted of continuous low-amplitude contractions, bolus i.v. injection of TM-906 (2.0-2.5 mg/kg) introduced a transient suppression of the contractions in the antrum. Metoclopramide (1.0 mg/kg i.v.) potentiated and hyoscine-N-butylbromide (0.1 mg/kg i.v.) inhibited the contractions in all the regions. PMID:7143841

  17. Subinhibitory Concentrations of Allicin Decrease Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) Biofilm Formation, Adhesion Ability, and Swimming Motility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaolong; Sha, Kaihui; Xu, Guangya; Tian, Hanwen; Wang, Xiaoying; Chen, Shanze; Wang, Yi; Li, Jingyu; Chen, Junli; Huang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) biofilm formation enables the organism to avoid the host immune system, resist antibiotics, and provide a reservoir for persistent infection. Once the biofilm is established, eradication of the infection becomes difficult. Therefore, strategies against UPEC biofilm are urgently required. In this study, we investigated the effect of allicin, isolated from garlic essential oil, on UPEC CFT073 and J96 biofilm formation and dispersal, along with its effect on UPEC adhesion ability and swimming motility. Sub-inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of allicin decreased UPEC biofilm formation and affected its architecture. Allicin was also capable of dispersing biofilm. Furthermore, allicin decreased the bacterial adhesion ability and swimming motility, which are important for biofilm formation. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) revealed that allicin decreased the expression of UPEC type 1 fimbriae adhesin gene fimH. Docking studies suggested that allicin was located within the binding pocket of heptyl α-d-mannopyrannoside in FimH and formed hydrogen bonds with Phe1 and Asn135. In addition, allicin decreased the expression of the two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) cognate response regulator gene uvrY and increased the expression of the RNA binding global regulatory protein gene csrA of UPEC CFT073, which is associated with UPEC biofilm. The findings suggest that sub-MICs of allicin are capable of affecting UPEC biofilm formation and dispersal, and decreasing UPEC adhesion ability and swimming motility. PMID:27367677

  18. Subinhibitory Concentrations of Allicin Decrease Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) Biofilm Formation, Adhesion Ability, and Swimming Motility

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaolong; Sha, Kaihui; Xu, Guangya; Tian, Hanwen; Wang, Xiaoying; Chen, Shanze; Wang, Yi; Li, Jingyu; Chen, Junli; Huang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) biofilm formation enables the organism to avoid the host immune system, resist antibiotics, and provide a reservoir for persistent infection. Once the biofilm is established, eradication of the infection becomes difficult. Therefore, strategies against UPEC biofilm are urgently required. In this study, we investigated the effect of allicin, isolated from garlic essential oil, on UPEC CFT073 and J96 biofilm formation and dispersal, along with its effect on UPEC adhesion ability and swimming motility. Sub-inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of allicin decreased UPEC biofilm formation and affected its architecture. Allicin was also capable of dispersing biofilm. Furthermore, allicin decreased the bacterial adhesion ability and swimming motility, which are important for biofilm formation. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) revealed that allicin decreased the expression of UPEC type 1 fimbriae adhesin gene fimH. Docking studies suggested that allicin was located within the binding pocket of heptyl α-d-mannopyrannoside in FimH and formed hydrogen bonds with Phe1 and Asn135. In addition, allicin decreased the expression of the two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) cognate response regulator gene uvrY and increased the expression of the RNA binding global regulatory protein gene csrA of UPEC CFT073, which is associated with UPEC biofilm. The findings suggest that sub-MICs of allicin are capable of affecting UPEC biofilm formation and dispersal, and decreasing UPEC adhesion ability and swimming motility. PMID:27367677

  19. Inhibitory effect of Ipomoea aquatica extracts on glucose absorption using a perfused rat intestinal preparation.

    PubMed

    Sokeng, S D; Rokeya, B; Hannan, J M A; Junaida, K; Zitech, P; Ali, L; Ngounou, G; Lontsi, D; Kamtchouing, P

    2007-12-01

    Investigations were carried out to evaluate the effect of Ipomoea aquatica aqueous and dichloromethane/methanol extracts on the glucose absorption using a rat intestinal preparation in situ. Extracts orally tested at the dose of 160 mg/kg exerted a significant inhibitory effect on glucose absorption when compared with control animals. The most pronounced effect was observed with the aqueous extract. Ouabain used as reference inhibitor strongly inhibited glucose absorption. On the other hand both plant extracts inhibited the gastrointestinal motility suggesting that the inhibition of glucose absorption is not due to the acceleration of intestinal transit. PMID:17651914

  20. Megacystis Microcolon Intestinal Hypoperistalsis Syndrome: Case Reports and Discussion of the Literature.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, Joana; Upadhyay, Vipul; Stone, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a rare intestinal dysmotility condition that also involves a dilated urinary bladder. It was believed to be an autosomal recessive condition, but genetic studies have suggested possibly an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. Prenatal diagnosis can be challenging, but MRI and amniotic fluid/digestive fluid studies may be complementary investigations to improve diagnostic accuracy. Prognosis of MMIHS is generally poor and treatment is mostly supportive. To date, bowel transplantation remains the only viable treatment to restore bowel motility. Here we present two additional cases to contribute towards the scant literature on this condition. PMID:26645214

  1. Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS): a case report in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Manop, Jirapa; Chamnanvanakij, Sangkae; Wattanasarn, Charnvit

    2004-11-01

    Megacystis microcolon intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) is a rare congenital disease with high mortality rate. The authors report a case of a female term infant with massive abdominal distension at birth. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a huge cystic mass resolved after urinary catheterization. Exploratory laparotomy was performed and intraoperative findings were an enlarged urinary bladder, microcolon, short bowel and malrotation of the small intestine. Ladd's procedure, ileostomy and vesicostomy were performed. Pathological findings of rectal biopsy revealed normal ganglion cells. Although prokinetic drugs were given for promoting bowel motility, enteral feedings were not tolerated. She died from septicemia at the age of 50 days. PMID:15825718

  2. Effects of pH on the growth rate, motility and photosynthesis in Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Danilov, R A; Ekelund, N G

    2001-01-01

    The influence of pH 3-10 on the growth, motility and photosynthesis in Euglena gracilis was demonstrated during a 7-d cultivation. The cells did not survive at pH < 4 and > 8, highest growth rate being detected at pH 7. Motility followed a similar pattern as growth rate. Photosynthetic response curves were shown to be of the same type over the whole pH range. High respiration was characteristic for cells grown at pH 5 and 6, the lowest one at 7. At high and also at low pH more active respiration was found which can be considered as a protective response on proton stress. Respiration was not completely inhibited with potassium cyanide. Photosynthesis was the most effective at pH 6; lower and higher pH decreased photosynthetic efficiency. pH affected more the growth rate than the photosynthesis. PMID:11898347

  3. Radixin Is Involved in Lamellipodial Stability during Nerve Growth Cone Motility

    PubMed Central

    Castelo, Leslie; Jay, Daniel G.

    1999-01-01

    Immunocytochemistry and in vitro studies have suggested that the ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) protein, radixin, may have a role in nerve growth cone motility. We tested the in situ role of radixin in chick dorsal root ganglion growth cones by observing the effects of its localized and acute inactivation. Microscale chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (micro-CALI) of radixin in growth cones causes a 30% reduction of lamellipodial area within the irradiated region whereas all control treatments did not affect lamellipodia. Micro-CALI of radixin targeted to the middle of the leading edge often split growth cones to form two smaller growth cones during continued forward movement (>80%). These findings suggest a critical role for radixin in growth cone lamellipodia that is similar to ezrin function in pseudopodia of transformed fibroblasts. They are consistent with radixin linking actin filaments to each other or to the membrane during motility. PMID:10233159

  4. A low conductivity culture medium suitable for the evaluation of sperm motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rui; Han, Chao; Sun, Zilong; Huang, Guoliang; Yu, Zhongyao; Zhou, Yuxiang; Wang, Jundong; Qiao, Jie; Cheng, Jing

    2008-12-01

    A novel culture medium of low conductivity suitable for dielectrophoretic selection of sperm was developed. Conventional IVF methods lack the capability of selecting the expected sperms and the embryonic development may be adversely affected to certain extent. Dielectrophoresis (DEP), a technique commonly applied in cell manipulation [1], may provide an alternative. However, the conventional IVF medium has a high conductivity, which may result in the unexpected heating effect during DEP causing damage to the gametes. The newly developed medium consists of sucrose, HEPES, BSA and low concentrations of ions. The conductivity of this medium is significantly lower than the conventional IVF medium. Motility and membrane integrality of the mouse sperm were tested in the low-conductivity medium, demonstrating an acceptable percent rate of motile sperm compared to the control groups.

  5. Rapid Effects of a Protective O-Polysaccharide-Specific Monoclonal IgA on Vibrio cholerae Agglutination, Motility, and Surface Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, Kara J.; De Jesus, Magdia

    2015-01-01

    2D6 is a dimeric monoclonal immunoglobulin A (IgA) specific for the nonreducing terminal residue of Ogawa O-polysaccharide (OPS) of Vibrio cholerae. It was previously demonstrated that 2D6 IgA is sufficient to passively protect suckling mice from oral challenge with virulent V. cholerae O395. In this study, we sought to define the mechanism by which 2D6 IgA antibody protects the intestinal epithelium from V. cholerae infection. In a mouse ligated-ileal-loop assay, 2D6 IgA promoted V. cholerae agglutination in the intestinal lumen and limited the ability of the bacteria to associate with the epithelium, particularly within the crypt regions. In vitro fluorescence digital video microscopy analysis of antibody-treated V. cholerae in liquid medium revealed that 2D6 IgA not only induced the rapid (5- to 10-min) onset of agglutination but was an equally potent inhibitor of bacterial motility. Scanning electron microscopy showed that 2D6 IgA promoted flagellum-flagellum cross-linking, as well as flagellar entanglement with bacterial bodies, suggesting that motility arrest may be a consequence of flagellar tethering. However, monovalent 2D6 Fab fragments also inhibited V. cholerae motility, demonstrating that antibody-mediated agglutination and motility arrest are separate phenomena. While 2D6 IgA is neither bactericidal nor bacteriostatic, exposure of V. cholerae to 2D6 IgA (or Fab fragments) resulted in a 5-fold increase in surface-associated blebs, as well an onset of a wrinkled surface morphotype. We propose that the protective immunity conferred by 2D6 IgA is the result of multifactorial effects on V. cholerae, including agglutination, motility arrest, and possibly outer membrane stress. PMID:25667263

  6. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome). Special diets often do not work. However, vitamin B12 and other vitamin supplements should be used for ... JM, Blackshaw LA. Small intestinal motor and sensory function and dysfunction. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt ...

  7. Intestinal obstruction repair

    MedlinePlus

    ... organs in the body Formation of scar tissue ( adhesions ) Heart attack or stroke Infection, including the lungs, ... Saunders; 2010:chap 119. Read More Abdomen - swollen Adhesion Colostomy Cyst Intestinal obstruction Intussusception - children Large bowel ...

  8. Intestinal mucosal adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Drozdowski, Laurie; Thomson, Alan BR

    2006-01-01

    Intestinal failure is a condition characterized by malnutrition and/or dehydration as a result of the inadequate digestion and absorption of nutrients. The most common cause of intestinal failure is short bowel syndrome, which occurs when the functional gut mass is reduced below the level necessary for adequate nutrient and water absorption. This condition may be congenital, or may be acquired as a result of a massive resection of the small bowel. Following resection, the intestine is capable of adaptation in response to enteral nutrients as well as other trophic stimuli. Identifying factors that may enhance the process of intestinal adaptation is an exciting area of research with important potential clinical applications. PMID:16937429

  9. Cyclic Di-GMP-Mediated Repression of Swarming Motility by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 Requires the MotAB Stator

    PubMed Central

    Kuchma, S. L.; Delalez, N. J.; Filkins, L. M.; Snavely, E. A.; Armitage, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) plays a critical role in the regulation of motility. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, c-di-GMP inversely controls biofilm formation and surface swarming motility, with high levels of this dinucleotide signal stimulating biofilm formation and repressing swarming. P. aeruginosa encodes two stator complexes, MotAB and MotCD, that participate in the function of its single polar flagellum. Here we show that the repression of swarming motility requires a functional MotAB stator complex. Mutating the motAB genes restores swarming motility to a strain with artificially elevated levels of c-di-GMP as well as stimulates swarming in the wild-type strain, while overexpression of MotA from a plasmid represses swarming motility. Using point mutations in MotA and the FliG rotor protein of the motor supports the conclusion that MotA-FliG interactions are critical for c-di-GMP-mediated swarming inhibition. Finally, we show that high c-di-GMP levels affect the localization of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-MotD fusion, indicating a mechanism whereby this second messenger has an impact on MotCD function. We propose that when c-di-GMP level is high, the MotAB stator can displace MotCD from the motor, thereby affecting motor function. Our data suggest a newly identified means of c-di-GMP-mediated control of surface motility, perhaps conserved among Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas, and other organisms that encode two stator systems. PMID:25349157

  10. The effect of intestinal anastomosis on gut growth and maturation.

    PubMed

    Stringel, G; Uauy, R; Guertin, L

    1989-10-01

    We evaluated the effect of intestinal anastomosis without resection on gut morphometry (muscle thickness, villus height, and crypt depth), growth indices (DNA, protein, and protein:DNA ratio), and disaccharidase activity (maltase, sucrase, and lactase) in the growing animal. A group of 10 weanling Sprague-Dawley rats at 21 days of age was subjected to intestinal transection and anastomosis in the upper jejunum, 10 cm distal to the ligament of Treitz. A second group of 10 similar rats was used as a control group. All rats were fed a regular diet and kept under the same conditions. They were sacrificed 2 weeks later. Body weight, intestinal weight, and intestinal length measurements were obtained. The intestine was divided into two sections: preanastomotic (section A) and postanastomotic (section B) in the surgery group and equivalent sections A and B in the control group. Specimens were subjected to morphometric evaluation and mucosal scrapings for biochemical analysis. Despite significant weight gain in the control group, there were no differences in intestinal length, intestinal weight, and mucosal weight between the two groups. Muscle thickness, villus height, and crypt depth were significantly increased in the preanastomotic segment. Protein and DNA were also higher in the preanastomotic segment, but the protein:DNA ratio was less affected. There was significantly decreased enzymatic activity in the preanastomotic segment. Intestinal anastomosis has a significant effect on gut growth and maturation in the growing animal and may have important implications in the postoperative management of newborns and infants following intestinal surgery. PMID:2809956

  11. Synergy between bacterial infection and genetic predisposition in intestinal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Apidianakis, Yiorgos; Pitsouli, Chrysoula; Perrimon, Norbert; Rahme, Laurence

    2009-12-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that hyperproliferating intestinal stem cells (SCs) and progenitors drive cancer initiation, maintenance, and metastasis. In addition, chronic inflammation and infection have been increasingly recognized for their roles in cancer. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which bacterial infections can initiate SC-mediated tumorigenesis remain elusive. Using a Drosophila model of gut pathogenesis, we show that intestinal infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a human opportunistic bacterial pathogen, activates the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway, a hallmark of the host stress response. This, in turn, causes apoptosis of enterocytes, the largest class of differentiated intestinal cells, and promotes a dramatic proliferation of SCs and progenitors that serves as a homeostatic compensatory mechanism to replenish the apoptotic enterocytes. However, we find that this homeostatic mechanism can lead to massive over-proliferation of intestinal cells when infection occurs in animals with a latent oncogenic form of the Ras1 oncogene. The affected intestines develop excess layers of cells with altered apicobasal polarity reminiscent of dysplasia, suggesting that infection can directly synergize with the genetic background in predisposed individuals to initiate SC-mediated tumorigenesis. Our results provide a framework for the study of intestinal bacterial infections and their effects on undifferentiated and mature enteric epithelial cells in the initial stages of intestinal cancer. Assessment of progenitor cell responses to pathogenic intestinal bacteria could provide a measure of predisposition for apoptotic enterocyte-assisted intestinal dysplasias in humans. PMID:19934041

  12. Effect of sorafenib on sperm count and sperm motility in male Swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Surekha Devadasa; Bairy, Laxminarayana Kurady

    2015-01-01

    The issue of male germ line mutagenesis and the effects on developmental defects in the next generation has become increasingly high profile over recent years. Mutagenic substance affects germinal cells in the testis. Since the cells are undergoing different phases of cell division and maturation, it is an ideal system to study the effect of chemotherapeutic agents. There are lacunae in the literature on the effect of sorafenib on gonadal function. With background, a study was planned to evaluate the effects of sorafenib on sperm count and sperm motility in male Swiss albino mice. Male Swiss albino mice were used for the study. The animals were segregated into control, positive control (PC) and three treatment groups. PC received oral imatinib (100 mg/kg body weight) and treatment groups received 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg body weight of sorafenib orally for 7 consecutive days at intervals of 24 h between two administrations. The control group remained in the home cage for an equal duration of time to match their corresponding treatment groups. The animals were sacrificed at the end of 1(st), 2(nd), 4(th), 5(th), 7(th), and 10(th) weeks after the last exposure to drug, respectively. Sperm suspensions were prepared and introduced into a counting chamber. Total sperm count and motility were recorded. There was a significant decrease in sperm count and sperm motility by sorafenib which was comparable with the effect of PC imatinib. Sorafenib adversely affects sperm count and sperm motility which are reversible after discontinuation of treatment. PMID:26605157

  13. Effect of sorafenib on sperm count and sperm motility in male Swiss albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Surekha Devadasa; Bairy, Laxminarayana Kurady

    2015-01-01

    The issue of male germ line mutagenesis and the effects on developmental defects in the next generation has become increasingly high profile over recent years. Mutagenic substance affects germinal cells in the testis. Since the cells are undergoing different phases of cell division and maturation, it is an ideal system to study the effect of chemotherapeutic agents. There are lacunae in the literature on the effect of sorafenib on gonadal function. With background, a study was planned to evaluate the effects of sorafenib on sperm count and sperm motility in male Swiss albino mice. Male Swiss albino mice were used for the study. The animals were segregated into control, positive control (PC) and three treatment groups. PC received oral imatinib (100 mg/kg body weight) and treatment groups received 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg body weight of sorafenib orally for 7 consecutive days at intervals of 24 h between two administrations. The control group remained in the home cage for an equal duration of time to match their corresponding treatment groups. The animals were sacrificed at the end of 1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, 7th, and 10th weeks after the last exposure to drug, respectively. Sperm suspensions were prepared and introduced into a counting chamber. Total sperm count and motility were recorded. There was a significant decrease in sperm count and sperm motility by sorafenib which was comparable with the effect of PC imatinib. Sorafenib adversely affects sperm count and sperm motility which are reversible after discontinuation of treatment. PMID:26605157

  14. Dynamic self-assembly of motile bacteria in liquid crystals

    PubMed Central

    Mushenheim, Peter C.; Trivedi, Rishi R.; Tuson, Hannah H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports an investigation of dynamical behaviors of motile rod-shaped bacteria within anisotropic viscoelastic environments defined by lyotropic liquid crystals (LCs). In contrast to passive microparticles (including non-motile bacteria) that associate irreversibly in LCs via elasticity-mediated forces, we report that motile Proteus mirabilis bacteria form dynamic and reversible multi-cellular assemblies when dispersed in a lyotropic LC. By measuring the velocity of the bacteria through the LC (8.8 +/− 0.2 μm/s) and by characterizing the ordering of the LC about the rod-shaped bacteria (tangential anchoring), we conclude that the reversibility of the inter-bacterial interaction emerges from the interplay of forces generated by the flagella of the bacteria and the elasticity of the LC, both of which are comparable in magnitude (tens of pN) for motile Proteus mirabilis cells. We also measured the dissociation process, which occurs in a direction determined by the LC, to bias the size distribution of multi-cellular bacterial complexes in a population of motile Proteus mirabilis relative to a population of non-motile cells. Overall, these observations and others reported in this paper provide insight into the fundamental dynamical behaviors of bacteria in complex anisotropic environments and suggest that motile bacteria in LCs are an exciting model system for exploration of principles for the design of active materials. PMID:24652584

  15. Quorum sensing positively regulates flagellar motility in pathogenic Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Vibrios belonging to the Harveyi clade are among the major pathogens of aquatic organisms. Quorum sensing (QS) is essential for virulence of V. harveyi towards different hosts. However, most virulence factors reported to be controlled by QS to date are negatively regulated by QS, therefore suggesting that their impact on virulence is limited. In this study, we report that QS positively regulates flagellar motility. We found that autoinducer synthase mutants showed significantly lower swimming motility than the wild type, and the swimming motility could be restored by adding synthetic signal molecules. Further, motility of a luxO mutant with inactive QS (LuxO D47E) was significantly lower than that of the wild type and of a luxO mutant with constitutively maximal QS activity (LuxO D47A). Furthermore, we found that the expression of flagellar genes (both early, middle and late genes) was significantly lower in the luxO mutant with inactive QS when compared with wild type and the luxO mutant with maximal QS activity. Motility assays and gene expression also revealed the involvement of the quorum-sensing master regulator LuxR in the QS regulation of motility. Finally, the motility inhibitor phenamil significantly decreased the virulence of V. harveyi towards gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae. PMID:24528485

  16. Ion channels and calcium signaling in motile cilia

    PubMed Central

    Doerner, Julia F; Delling, Markus; Clapham, David E

    2015-01-01

    The beating of motile cilia generates fluid flow over epithelia in brain ventricles, airways, and Fallopian tubes. Here, we patch clamp single motile cilia of mammalian ependymal cells and examine their potential function as a calcium signaling compartment. Resting motile cilia calcium concentration ([Ca2+] ~170 nM) is only slightly elevated over cytoplasmic [Ca2+] (~100 nM) at steady state. Ca2+ changes that arise in the cytoplasm rapidly equilibrate in motile cilia. We measured CaV1 voltage-gated calcium channels in ependymal cells, but these channels are not specifically enriched in motile cilia. Membrane depolarization increases ciliary [Ca2+], but only marginally alters cilia beating and cilia-driven fluid velocity within short (~1 min) time frames. We conclude that beating of ependymal motile cilia is not tightly regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels, unlike that of well-studied motile cilia and flagella in protists, such as Paramecia and Chlamydomonas. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11066.001 PMID:26650848