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Sample records for affect intestinal motility

  1. Elenoside increases intestinal motility

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, E; Alonso, SJ; Navarro, R; Trujillo, J; Jorge, E

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of elenoside, an arylnaph-thalene lignan from Justicia hyssopifolia, on gastro-intestinal motility in vivo and in vitro in rats. METHODS: Routine in vivo experimental assessments were catharsis index, water percentage of boluses, intestinal transit, and codeine antagonism. The groups included were vehicle control (propylene glycol-ethanol-plant oil-tween 80), elenoside (i.p. 25 and 50 mg/kg), cisapride (i.p. 10 mg/kg), and codeine phosphate (intragastric route, 50 mg/kg). In vitro approaches used isolated rat intestinal tissues (duodenum, jejunum, and ileum). The effects of elenoside at concentrations of 3.2 x 10-4, 6.4 x 10-4 and 1.2 x 10-3 mol/L, and cisapride at 10-6 mol/L were investigated. RESULTS: Elenoside in vivo produced an increase in the catharsis index and water percentage of boluses and in the percentage of distance traveled by a suspension of activated charcoal. Codeine phosphate antagonized the effect of 25 mg/kg of elenoside. In vitro, elenoside in duodenum, jejunum and ileum produced an initial decrease in the contraction force followed by an increase. Elenoside resulted in decreased intestinal frequency in duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. The in vitro and in vivo effects of elenoside were similar to those produced by cisapride. CONCLUSION: Elenoside is a lignan with an action similar to that of purgative and prokinetics drugs. Elenoside, could be an alternative to cisapride in treatment of gastrointestinal diseases as well as a preventive therapy for the undesirable gastrointestinal effects produced by opioids used for mild to moderate pain. PMID:17131476

  2. The effect of gastric inhibitory polypeptide on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Eiichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Harada, Norio; Yamane, Shunsuke; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Toyoda, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Fujita, Yoshihito; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Tsukiyama, Katsushi; Yamada, Yuichiro; Seino, Yutaka; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal motility through a somatostatin-mediated pathway. {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility. {yields} The GIP-receptor-mediated action in intestine does not involve in GLP-1-mediated pathway. -- Abstract: Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is released from the small intestine upon meal ingestion and increases insulin secretion from pancreatic {beta} cells. Although the GIP receptor is known to be expressed in small intestine, the effects of GIP in small intestine are not fully understood. This study was designed to clarify the effect of GIP on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility. Intestinal glucose absorption in vivo was measured by single-pass perfusion method. Incorporation of [{sup 14}C]-glucose into everted jejunal rings in vitro was used to evaluate the effect of GIP on sodium-glucose co-transporter (SGLT). Motility of small intestine was measured by intestinal transit after oral administration of a non-absorbed marker. Intraperitoneal administration of GIP inhibited glucose absorption in wild-type mice in a concentration-dependent manner, showing maximum decrease at the dosage of 50 nmol/kg body weight. In glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor-deficient mice, GIP inhibited glucose absorption as in wild-type mice. In vitro examination of [{sup 14}C]-glucose uptake revealed that 100 nM GIP did not change SGLT-dependent glucose uptake in wild-type mice. After intraperitoneal administration of GIP (50 nmol/kg body weight), small intestinal transit was inhibited to 40% in both wild-type and GLP-1 receptor-deficient mice. Furthermore, a somatostatin receptor antagonist, cyclosomatostatin, reduced the inhibitory effect of GIP on both intestinal transit and glucose absorption in wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility through a somatostatin

  3. SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SIRT1 inhibits the mouse intestinal motility and epithelial proliferation. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a NAD+-dependent histone deacetylase, is involved in a wide array of cellular processes, including glucose homeostasis, energy metabolism, proliferation and apoptosis, and immune response. However, it is un...

  4. The virtual intestine: in silico modeling of small intestinal electrophysiology and motility and the applications.

    PubMed

    Du, Peng; Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Angeli, Timothy R; Cheng, Leo K; O'Grady, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The intestine comprises a long hollow muscular tube organized in anatomically and functionally discrete compartments, which digest and absorb nutrients and water from ingested food. The intestine also plays key roles in the elimination of waste and protection from infection. Critical to all of these functions is the intricate, highly coordinated motion of the intestinal tract, known as motility, which is coregulated by hormonal, neural, electrophysiological and other factors. The Virtual Intestine encapsulates a series of mathematical models of intestinal function in health and disease, with a current focus on motility, and particularly electrophysiology. The Virtual Intestine is being cohesively established across multiple physiological scales, from sub/cellular functions to whole organ levels, facilitating quantitative evaluations that present an integrative in silico framework. The models are also now finding broad physiological applications, including in evaluating hypotheses of slow wave pacemaker mechanisms, smooth muscle electrophysiology, structure-function relationships, and electromechanical coupling. Clinical applications are also beginning to follow, including in the pathophysiology of motility disorders, diagnosing intestinal ischemia, and visualizing colonic dysfunction. These advances illustrate the emerging potential of the Virtual Intestine to effectively address multiscale research challenges in interdisciplinary gastrointestinal sciences.

  5. The Virtual Intestine: in-silico modeling of small intestinal electrophysiology and motility and the applications

    PubMed Central

    Du, Peng; Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Angeli, Timothy R.; Cheng, Leo K; O'Grady, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    The intestine comprises a long hollow muscular tube organized in anatomically and functionally discrete compartments, which digest and absorb nutrients and water from ingested food. The intestine also plays key roles in the elimination of waste and protection from infection. Critical to all of these functions is the intricate, highly-coordinated motion of the intestinal tract, known as motility, which is co-regulated by hormonal, neural, electrophysiological and other factors. The Virtual Intestine encapsulates a series of mathematical models of intestinal function in health and disease, with a current focus on motility, and particularly electrophysiology. The Virtual Intestine is being cohesively established across multiple physiological scales, from sub/cellular functions to whole organ levels, facilitating quantitative evaluations that present an integrative in-silico framework. The models are also now finding broad physiological applications, including in evaluating hypotheses of slow wave pacemaker mechanisms, smooth muscle electrophysiology, structure-function relationships, and electromechanical coupling. Clinical applications are also beginning to follow, including in the pathophysiology of motility disorders, diagnosing intestinal ischemia, and visualizing colonic dysfunction. These advances illustrate the emerging potential of the Virtual Intestine to effectively address multi-scale research challenges in interdisciplinary gastrointestinal sciences. PMID:26562482

  6. LBP based detection of intestinal motility in WCE images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Giovanni; Granata, Eliana

    2011-03-01

    In this research study, a system to support medical analysis of intestinal contractions by processing WCE images is presented. Small intestine contractions are among the motility patterns which reveal many gastrointestinal disorders, such as functional dyspepsia, paralytic ileus, irritable bowel syndrome, bacterial overgrowth. The images have been obtained using the Wireless Capsule Endoscopy (WCE) technique, a patented, video colorimaging disposable capsule. Manual annotation of contractions is an elaborating task, since the recording device of the capsule stores about 50,000 images and contractions might represent only the 1% of the whole video. In this paper we propose the use of Local Binary Pattern (LBP) combined with the powerful textons statistics to find the frames of the video related to contractions. We achieve a sensitivity of about 80% and a specificity of about 99%. The achieved high detection accuracy of the proposed system has provided thus an indication that such intelligent schemes could be used as a supplementary diagnostic tool in endoscopy.

  7. Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection associated with impaired intestinal motility disorder

    PubMed Central

    Figueira, Cláudia Frangioia; Cos, Lynda Dorene; Ussami, Edson Yassushi; Otoch, José Pinhata; Felipe-Silva, Aloisio

    2015-01-01

    Infection by Strongyloides stercoralis is a highly prevalent helminthiasis, which is mostly distributed in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Although a substantial number of cases are asymptomatic or paucisymtomatic, severe and life-threatening forms of this infection still occur and not infrequently is lately diagnosed. Gram-negative bacteria septicemia, which frequently accompanies the severe helminthiasis, contributes to the high mortality rate. Severe infection is invariably triggered by any imbalance in the host's immunity, favoring the auto-infective cycle, which increases the intraluminal parasite burden enormously. Clinical presentation of severe cases is varied, and diagnosis requires a high suspicion index. Acute abdomen has been reported in association with S. stercoralis infection, but intestinal necrosis is rarely found during the surgical approach. The authors report the case of a man who sought the emergency unit with recent onset abdominal pain. Clinical and imaging features were consistent with obstructive acute abdomen. Scattered adhesions and a necrotic ileal segment with a tiny perforation represented the surgical findings. The patient outcome was unfavorable and respiratory distress required an open lung biopsy. Both surgical specimens showed S. stercoralis infection. Unfortunately the patient underwent multiple organ failure and septicemia, and subsequently died. The authors call attention to the finding of intestinal necrosis and impaired intestinal motility disorder as possibilities for the diagnosis and risk factor, respectively, for a severe infection of S. stercoralis. PMID:26484331

  8. A novel portable perfused manometric system for recording of small intestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Samsom, M; Smout, A J; Hebbard, G; Fraser, R; Omari, T; Horowitz, M; Dent, J

    1998-04-01

    The development of solid-state catheters with miniature pressure transducers and portable dataloggers with a large memory capacity has allowed recording of gastrointestinal motility in ambulant subjects. Developments in silicone rubber extrusion technology made it possible to build a perfused manometric system, using a perfused manometric assembly requiring a low volume of perfusate. In the present study the feasibility of recording and automated analysis of small intestinal motility using a perfused multiple lumen manometric system was evaluated in seven healthy volunteers. Pressures were recorded from 12 sideholes arranged in four clusters spaced at 10-cm intervals from the catheter tip. Each channel was perfused at 0.15 mL min-1 with degassed water by a portable, low-compliance, perfusion pump. The 12 sidehole recording channels were connected to external transducers mounted on a belt. Pressure data were stored in two dataloggers. Motility was recorded in the sitting (30 min), and supine (30 min) position, during walking (30 min) and postprandially (90 min). Using purpose-built software baseline variations were corrected for and manometric variables (number of pressure waves, mean amplitude and motility index) calculated. Bench testing of the manometric assembly showed a median baseline pressure offset of 4.2 kPa (range 3.7-10.1) and upon occlusion a rise rate of 27.8 kPa sec-1 (range 19.7-30.8). Changes in body position affected baseline pressures so that compared to the supine position changes in baseline pressure varied between 1.5 +/- 0.7 kPa and 1.9 +/- 0.6 kPa during sitting (P < 0.02), and between 1.7 +/- 0.7 kPa and 1.5 +/- 0.9 kPa during walking (P < 0.03). Manometric recordings obtained during the fasting period showed an increase in small intestinal motor activity during walking. In the postprandial period no differences in motility variables were observed within one cluster and in time. Recording of small intestinal motility with a multiple

  9. Effect of irradiation on morphology and motility of canine small intestine

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, R.W.; Flatt, A.J.; Prihoda, M.J.; Mitros, F.A.

    1987-12-01

    In addition to severe damage to the intestinal mucosa, there is evidence based on altered transit that irradiation affects intestinal motor function. A single dose of 938 cGy to the intestine of dogs consistently produced an acute intestinal radiation syndrome consisting of vomiting and diarrhea but was not lethal. In the fasting state, the migrating myoelectric complex was uniformly interrupted. After a meal, jejunal myoelectric activity analyzed by a computer program showed a progressive decline in the number, duration, and length of migration of spike bursts. There were occasionally bizarre motility patterns consisting of clusters of migrating spike bursts. Slow waves demonstrated irregular rhythm and nonuniform morphology. They occasionally migrated in an orad direction and at times were totally uncoupled. At 24 hr and four days after irradiation, the muscle and the neural plexus were nearly normal by light microscopy, but the mucosa exhibited severe necrosis. Therefore, irradiation produces profound functional abnormalities in intestinal muscle even though the morphology is minimally altered.

  10. Antibiotic-associated colitis: an in vitro investigation of the effects of antibiotics on intestinal motility.

    PubMed Central

    Lees, G. M.; Percy, W. H.

    1981-01-01

    1 Nine antibiotic compounds in common use were studied to determine their ability to affect intestinal motility in vitro, in the guinea-pig ileum and rabbit colon. 2 Ampicillin, doxycycline, mecillinam and metronidazole were without effect over a concentration range which included typical serum levels found when these drugs are used therapeutically. 3 Clindamycin, gentamicin, kanamycin, pivmecillinam and trimethoprim were all found to inhibit evoked and reflex responses of the guinea-pig ileum but only clindamycin and trimethoprim also affected evoked responses of the rabbit colon. 4 Kanamycin and gentamicin appeared to have a predominantly pre-junctional action, pivmecillinam and trimethoprim a predominantly post-junctional action. Clindamycin had a pre-junctional action at low concentrations and long exposure times, and a post-junctional action at high concentrations and short exposure times. 5 The concentration of each antibiotic required to inhibit the peristaltic reflex of the guinea-pig ileum was less than that required to inhibit its responses to electrical stimulation or exogenous acetylcholine or histamine but greater than the serum levels associated with their respective use in therapeutic doses. 6 A sequence of events whereby antibiotic-induced alterations in gastro-intestinal motility could lead to the development of pseudomembranous colitis is proposed. PMID:7237000

  11. Rotavirus Infection Increases Intestinal Motility but Not Permeability at the Onset of Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Istrate, Claudia; Hagbom, Marie; Vikström, Elena; Magnusson, Karl-Eric

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The disease mechanisms associated with onset and secondary effects of rotavirus (RV) diarrhea remain to be determined and may not be identical. In this study, we investigated whether onset of RV diarrhea is associated with increased intestinal permeability and/or motility. To study the transit time, fluorescent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextran was given to RV-infected adult and infant mice. Intestinal motility was also studied with an opioid receptor agonist (loperamide) and a muscarinic receptor antagonist (atropine). To investigate whether RV increases permeability at the onset of diarrhea, fluorescent 4- and 10-kDa dextran doses were given to infected and noninfected mice, and fluorescence intensity was measured subsequently in serum. RV increased transit time in infant mice. Increased motility was detected at 24 h postinfection (h p.i.) and persisted up to 72 h p.i in pups. Both loperamide and atropine decreased intestinal motility and attenuated diarrhea. Analysis of passage of fluorescent dextran from the intestine into serum indicated unaffected intestinal permeability at the onset of diarrhea (24 to 48 h p.i.). We show that RV-induced diarrhea is associated with increased intestinal motility via an activation of the myenteric nerve plexus, which in turn stimulates muscarinic receptors on intestinal smooth muscles. IMPORTANCE We show that RV-infected mice have increased intestinal motility at the onset of diarrhea, and that this is not associated with increased intestinal permeability. These new observations will contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in RV diarrhea. PMID:24371070

  12. Effect of wood creosote and loperamide on propulsive motility of mouse colon and small intestine.

    PubMed

    Ogata, N; Ataka, K; Morino, H; Shibata, T

    1999-10-01

    To elucidate a mechanism of the antidiarrheal activity of wood creosote, its effect on the propulsive motility of mouse colon and small intestine was studied using a charcoal meal test and a colonic bead expulsion test. The effect was compared with that of loperamide. At an ordinary therapeutic dose, wood creosote inhibited the propulsive motility of colon, but not of small intestine. On the other hand, loperamide inhibited the propulsive motility of small intestine, but not of colon. The results indicate that at least a part of the antidiarrheal activity of wood creosote and loperamide is attributable to their antikinetic effect predominantly on colon of the former and predominantly on small intestine of the latter.

  13. Effect of honey consumption on intestinal motility in male albino rats.

    PubMed

    Alagwu, E A; Egwurugwu, J N; Nneli, R O; Oguike, F; Osim, E E

    2013-12-20

    This study investigated the effects of honey on intestinal motility and transit using twenty (20) male albino rats of Wistar strain weighing 210-220g. The rats were randomly grouped into control and honey-fed (test) groups of ten (10) rats each. The control group was fed on normal rat chow ( Pfizer Company, Nigeria ) and water while the test group was fed on rat feed, water and honey ( 1 ml of honey to every 10 ml initial drinking water daily) for twenty two (22) weeks after which the rats were starved over night before the experiment and sacrificed by stunning. Laparatomy was immediately performed, proximal and distal portions of the intestine identified, cut and put in aerated tyrode solution. Cut sections of the ileum (2-3cm) were mounted on organ bath instrument for motility experiment with varying concentrations of acetylcholine and carbachol. Contractions were recorded as well as the intestinal transit in each group and lengths of intestine with total mean values calculated. Results obtained showed that honey significantly decreased (p<0.01 ) intestinal transit in the test group (21.15±0.75 ) compared with the control group ( 35.96±1.15); decreased intestinal motility in the test group compared with the control and caused significant percentage reduction of intestinal motility with varied concentrations of acetylcholine and carbachol in the test group ( Ach-75.00±0.75%; Carbachol-79.00±0.28%) compared with the control group (Ach-62.00±0.39%; Carbachol-51.00±0.39%). In conclusion, unprocessed Nigerian honey decreased intestinal transit, caused intestinal smooth muscle inhibition and motility and reduced sensitivity of gastrointestinal tract to cholinergic agents.

  14. Intestinal motility disorder induced by free radicals: a new model mimicking oxidative stress in gut.

    PubMed

    Peluso, Ilaria; Campolongo, Patrizia; Valeri, Pacifico; Romanelli, Luca; Palmery, Maura

    2002-12-01

    Literature data suggest that the inflamed intestine may be subjected to a considerable oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to simulate the oxidative stress in the gastrointestinal tract and to explore its effect on intestinal motility. This was attained by treating isolated segments from the rabbit jejunum and from the guinea pig ileum with 2,2'-Azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (ABAP), which generates peroxyl radicals by thermal decomposition. Treatment of intestinal segments with ABAP reduced the muscarinic cholinergic response to acetylcholine in both preparations and induced a dose-dependent inhibition of the spontaneous contractions in the jejunum, also in the presence of tetrodotoxin. ABAP was found to inhibit the contractile response induced by BaCl(2) in guinea pig ileum preparations. This effect was not dose-dependent and it was reversed by Bay-K 8644, which activates voltage operated L-type calcium channels. The rapid and reversible effects of ABAP suggest that it might directly affect L-type calcium channels before lipoperoxidation induction. In conclusion, the results of the present study show that ABAP could be a useful tool to simulate early contractility dysfunctions mediated by oxidative stress.

  15. Is sperm motility maturation affected by static magnetic fields?

    PubMed Central

    Tablado, L; Pérez-Sánchez, F; Soler, C

    1996-01-01

    Kinematic parameters were evaluated in mouse epididymal extracts to monitor maturation of sperm movement in animals exposed to static magnetic fields using the Sperm-Class Analyzer computerized image analysis system. For this purpose, animals were exposed to a field of 0.7 T generated by a permanent magnet over 10 or 35 days for either 1 or 24 hr/day. The values of the motion endpoints were similar in animals used as controls and in those exposed to the nonionizing radiation, whatever the period of exposure or daily dosage. Changes in motility were observed in all groups: the percentage of total motile and progressive motile spermatozoa increased during passage through the epididymis, with major changes between the caput and corpus epididymides, and the pattern of swimming changed clearly towards more rapid and straighter trajectories. The processes of initiation of sperm motility and maturation of displacement patterns were not then affected by magnetic treatment. Moreover, it appears that sperm production is unaffected because no changes were observed in testicular or epididymal weights after exposure to static magnetic fields. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8959411

  16. Role of peripheral corticotropin-releasing factor and urocortin II in intestinal inflammation and motility in terminal ileum.

    PubMed

    la Fleur, Susanne E; Wick, Elizabeth C; Idumalla, Prema S; Grady, Eileen F; Bhargava, Aditi

    2005-05-24

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and the closely related family of neuropeptides urocortins (Ucns) are ancient paracrine-signaling peptides secreted in both the central and peripheral neural circuits. CRF and Ucns released from the CNS (central) regulate a plethora of physiological processes that include food intake, inflammation, and bowel motility and permeability. In the gastrointestinal tract, CRF actions are largely proinflammatory, whereas the effects of the Ucn subtypes can be either pro- or antiinflammatory. Central (intracerebroventricular) or peripheral (i.p.) administration of CRF or Ucns inhibits gastric emptying and promotes colonic motility. To ascertain the role of peripherally expressed CRF and UcnII in gastrointestinal inflammation and motility, we generated ileum-specific phenotypic knockouts of these peptides by using RNA interference. Long dsRNA effectively silenced basal expression of CRF and UcnII in ileum. Control dsRNA or saline treatment did not affect CRF or UcnII expression. In an experimental model of toxin-induced intestinal inflammation, inhibition of CRF ablated the inflammatory response (measured by epithelial damage, mucosal edema, and neutrophil infiltration). UcnII dsRNA treatment did not alter the inflammatory response to toxin. Furthermore, ileal motility was increased after site-specific inhibition of both CRF and UcnII. Thus, we demonstrate that ileal-specific CRF promotes inflammation and both CRF and UcnII modulate bowel motility.

  17. Effect of zinc treatment on intestinal motility in experimentally induced diarrhea in rats.

    PubMed

    Adeniyi, O S; Akomolafe, R O; Ojabo, C O; Eru, E U; Olaleye, S B

    2014-06-19

    Zinc supplementation is a critical new intervention for treating diarrheal episodes in children. Recent studies suggest that administration of zinc along with new low osmolarity oral rehydration solutions / salts (ORS) can reduce the duration and severity of diarrheal episodes for up to three months. Several mechanisms of action of zinc has been proposed, however there is dearth of information about the effect of zinc on intestinal motility during diarrhea. Male albino Wistar rats (80-100g) were used. The effect of different doses of zinc sulphate (25, 50, 100, 150 mg/Kg) on the number of wet faeces was investigated. Intestinal motility during castor oil induced diarrhea was assessed using activated charcoal meal and the mechanisms of action of zinc sulphate on motility were investigated. The effective dose of zinc sulphate (100mg/Kg) significantly reduced (p< 0.001) the number of wet faeces (3.0 ± 0.00) compared with control (6.8 ± 0.25) during diarrhea. This antidiarrheal effect of zinc was abolished by propranolol and nifedipine. Zinc sulphate significantly reduced (p< 0.05) intestinal transit time (60.7 ± 7.13%) compared with control (85.7 ± 2.35%). It is concluded that zinc sulphate reduces the frequency of wet faeces output and intestinal motility during diarrhea via activation of β adrenergic receptor and L-type Ca2+ channel.

  18. Learn About GI Motility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility ... Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility ...

  19. About GI Motility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility ... Disorders of the Large Intestine Disorders of the Pelvic Floor Motility Testing Personal Stories Contact About GI Motility ...

  20. Architecture of enteric neural circuits involved in intestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Costa, M; Brookes, S H

    2008-08-01

    This short review describes the conceptual development in the search for the enteric neural circuits with the initial identifications of the classes of enteric neurons on the bases of their morphology, neurochemistry, biophysical properties, projections and connectivity. The discovery of the presence of multiple neurochemicals in the same nerve cells in specific combinations led to the concept of "chemical coding" and of "plurichemical transmission". The proposal that enteric reflexes are largely responsible for the propulsion of contents led to investigations of polarised reflex pathways and how these may be activated to generate the coordinated propulsive behaviour of the intestine. The research over the past decades attempted to integrate information of chemical neuroanatomy with functional studies, with the development of methods combining anatomical, functional and pharmacological techniques. This multidisciplinary strategy led to a full accounting of all functional classes of enteric neurons in the guinea-pig, and advanced wiring diagrams of the enteric neural circuits have been proposed. In parallel, investigations of the actual behaviour of the intestine during physiological motor activity have advanced with the development of spatio-temporal analysis from video recordings. The relation between neural pathways, their activities and the generation of patterns of motor activity remain largely unexplained. The enteric neural circuits appear not set in rigid programs but respond to different physico-chemical contents in an adaptable way (neuromechanical hypothesis). The generation of the complex repertoire of motor patterns results from the interplay of myogenic and neuromechanical mechanisms with spontaneous generation of migratory motor activity by enteric circuits.

  1. The Extracellular Calcium-Sensing Receptor in the Intestine: Evidence for Regulation of Colonic Absorption, Secretion, Motility, and Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lieqi; Cheng, Catherine Y.; Sun, Xiangrong; Pedicone, Alexandra J.; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour; Cheng, Sam X.

    2016-01-01

    Different from other epithelia, the intestinal epithelium has the complex task of providing a barrier impeding the entry of toxins, food antigens, and microbes, while at the same time allowing for the transfer of nutrients, electrolytes, water, and microbial metabolites. These molecules/organisms are transported either transcellularly, crossing the apical and basolateral membranes of enterocytes, or paracellularly, passing through the space between enterocytes. Accordingly, the intestinal epithelium can affect energy metabolism, fluid balance, as well as immune response and tolerance. To help accomplish these complex tasks, the intestinal epithelium has evolved many sensing receptor mechanisms. Yet, their roles and functions are only now beginning to be elucidated. This article explores one such sensing receptor mechanism, carried out by the extracellular calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR). In addition to its established function as a nutrient sensor, coordinating food digestion, nutrient absorption, and regulating energy metabolism, we present evidence for the emerging role of CaSR in the control of intestinal fluid homeostasis and immune balance. An additional role in the modulation of the enteric nerve activity and motility is also discussed. Clearly, CaSR has profound effects on many aspects of intestinal function. Nevertheless, more work is needed to fully understand all functions of CaSR in the intestine, including detailed mechanisms of action and specific pathways involved. Considering the essential roles CaSR plays in gastrointestinal physiology and immunology, research may lead to a translational opportunity for the development of novel therapies that are based on CaSR's unique property of using simple nutrients such as calcium, polyamines, and certain amino acids/oligopeptides as activators. It is possible that, through targeting of intestinal CaSR with a combination of specific nutrients, oral solutions that are both inexpensive and practical may be

  2. Exacerbation of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced small intestinal lesions by antisecretory drugs in rats: the role of intestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Hiroshi; Amagase, Kikuko; Takeuchi, Koji

    2012-11-01

    Antisecretory drugs such as histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2-RAs) and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly used for the treatment of gastric and duodenal ulcers induced by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). However, the effects of these drugs on NSAID-induced small intestinal ulcers are not fully understood. The effects of H2-RAs and PPIs on NSAID-induced gastrointestinal lesions and small intestinal motility were examined in rats. Male Wistar rats (180-220 g) were used. Indomethacin (10 mg/kg) was administered orally in fasted or fed rats, and gastrointestinal lesions were examined 24 h after indomethacin administration. Intestinal motility was measured by using a balloon method under urethane anesthesia. Indomethacin produced multiple lesions in the gastric corpus in fasted rats and in the small intestine in fed rats: 1) H2-RAs (cimetidine, ranitidine, and famotidine) and PPIs (omeprazole, lansoprazole, and rabeprazole) markedly inhibited the formation of gastric lesions. 2) The drugs, except for lansoprazole, increased intestinal lesions. 3) H2-RAs augmented the increase in intestinal motility caused by indomethacin, and the effects of H2-RAs on motility and intestinal lesions were markedly inhibited by atropine. 4) Lansoprazole inhibited the formation of intestinal lesions, and the effect was prevented by both pharmacological ablation of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons and pretreatment with N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester, a selective inhibitor of nitric-oxide synthesis. The results suggest that: 1) inhibition of acid secretion by antisecretory drugs may exacerbate NSAID-induced intestinal lesions, 2) H2-RAs further aggravate lesions by increasing intestinal motility via the activation of cholinergic pathways, and 3) lansoprazole protects the intestinal mucosa against NSAID-related ulcerative stimuli.

  3. Exosome secretion affects social motility in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Shaked, Hadassa; Arvatz, Gil; Tkacz, Itai Dov; Binder, Lior; Waldman Ben-Asher, Hiba; Okalang, Uthman; Chikne, Vaibhav; Cohen-Chalamish, Smadar; Michaeli, Shulamit

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EV) secreted by pathogens function in a variety of biological processes. Here, we demonstrate that in the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei, exosome secretion is induced by stress that affects trans-splicing. Following perturbations in biogenesis of spliced leader RNA, which donates its spliced leader (SL) exon to all mRNAs, or after heat-shock, the SL RNA is exported to the cytoplasm and forms distinct granules, which are then secreted by exosomes. The exosomes are formed in multivesicular bodies (MVB) utilizing the endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT), through a mechanism similar to microRNA secretion in mammalian cells. Silencing of the ESCRT factor, Vps36, compromised exosome secretion but not the secretion of vesicles derived from nanotubes. The exosomes enter recipient trypanosome cells. Time-lapse microscopy demonstrated that cells secreting exosomes or purified intact exosomes affect social motility (SoMo). This study demonstrates that exosomes are delivered to trypanosome cells and can change their migration. Exosomes are used to transmit stress signals for communication between parasites. PMID:28257521

  4. Host Gut Motility Promotes Competitive Exclusion within a Model Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Ryan P; Schlomann, Brandon H; Ganz, Julia; Eisen, Judith S; Guillemin, Karen; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiota is a complex consortium of microorganisms with the ability to influence important aspects of host health and development. Harnessing this “microbial organ” for biomedical applications requires clarifying the degree to which host and bacterial factors act alone or in combination to govern the stability of specific lineages. To address this issue, we combined bacteriological manipulation and light sheet fluorescence microscopy to monitor the dynamics of a defined two-species microbiota within a vertebrate gut. We observed that the interplay between each population and the gut environment produces distinct spatiotemporal patterns. As a consequence, one species dominates while the other experiences sudden drops in abundance that are well fit by a stochastic mathematical model. Modeling revealed that direct bacterial competition could only partially explain the observed phenomena, suggesting that a host factor is also important in shaping the community. We hypothesized the host determinant to be gut motility, and tested this mechanism by measuring colonization in hosts with enteric nervous system dysfunction due to a mutation in the ret locus, which in humans is associated with the intestinal motility disorder known as Hirschsprung disease. In mutant hosts we found reduced gut motility and, confirming our hypothesis, robust coexistence of both bacterial species. This study provides evidence that host-mediated spatial structuring and stochastic perturbation of communities can drive bacterial population dynamics within the gut, and it reveals a new facet of the intestinal host–microbe interface by demonstrating the capacity of the enteric nervous system to influence the microbiota. Ultimately, these findings suggest that therapeutic strategies targeting the intestinal ecosystem should consider the dynamic physical nature of the gut environment. PMID:27458727

  5. [Early postoperative intestinal motility following abdominal surgery in an animal experiment].

    PubMed

    Schippers, E; Braun, J; Erhardt, W; Schumpelick, V

    1990-01-01

    Gastrointestinal myoelectrical activity was registered in 6 dogs after different surgical procedures such as laparotomy, segmental resection of the jejunum and right hemicolectomy. Animals were studied in the fasted- and fed state and after pharmacological stimulation with Ceruletide. The electrical activity was recorded by means of 6 bipolar electrodes implanted along the intestinal wall. Abdominal surgery abolished normal motility in the stomach and small intestine only for a short period of time. The time for the reappearance of regularly recurring activity fronts varied with the type of the surgical procedure from 3 h after segmental resection of the jejunum to 49 h after colon resection. Severe disturbances of the BER (basic electrical rhythm) in the stomach as tachygastria and tachyarrhythmia persist even after restoration of the MMC (migrating motor complex) in the small intestine. Feeding induced a typical fedpattern but never before restoration of the MMC. Stimulation of the intestine during postoperative ileus with Ceruletide increases segmental myoelectrical activity. The period of postoperative ileus was not reduced.

  6. Phytochemical Characteristics of Seeds and Its Effects on the Intestinal Motility and Toxicity of Joannesia princeps.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Adriano Cressoni; Guiguer, Élen Landgraf; Barbalho, Sandra Maria; Bueno, Patrícia C S; Lopes, Juliana Agostinho; da Silva, Bruna Ferreira; Girotto, Letícia Cabrini; de Paula, Marina Guirro; Zeber, Paulo Vitor; de Alvares Goulart, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Joannesia princeps is a plant commonly used in folk medicine as laxative for menstrual discomfort and as antihelminthic and antimicrobial to reduce edema and improve tissue healing. The seeds are used in many regions of Brazil as laxative; however, studies are needed to confirm its effectiveness and safety. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of using seeds of this plant on intestinal motility of Wistar rats, evaluate the effects and acute toxicity of its management, as well as determine its phytochemical profile. The evaluation of the effect on the intestinal motility was performed according to the model described by Michelin and Salgado (2004) with modifications. For the evaluation of acute toxicity, we used the model described by Craveiro et al. (2008) and Goloni et al. (2005), and for the analysis of the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, anthraquinones, steroids, and other components, we used the method described by Carvalho et al. (2006). The results showed that J. princeps exhibits laxative effects similar to those of Senna species such as Cassia angustifolia and the phytochemical analysis of ethanol and aqueous extracts showed the presence of alkaloids, triterpenes, and/or steroids compounds. Acute toxicity showed in the first 12 h: piloerection, contortion, decreased respiratory rate, diarrhea, and weight loss. After this period, these changes were no longer observed. It was concluded that the seeds of this plant have potential laxative activity, confirming the popular use and that the dose of 5 g/kg can be considered safe for consumption.

  7. Sodium affects the sperm motility in the European eel.

    PubMed

    Vílchez, M Carmen; Morini, Marina; Peñaranda, David S; Gallego, Víctor; Asturiano, Juan F; Pérez, Luz

    2016-08-01

    The role of seminal plasma sodium and activation media sodium on sperm motility was examined by selectively removing the element from these two media, in European eel sperm. Sperm size (sperm head area) was also measured using an ASMA (Automated Sperm Morphometry Analyses) system, in the different conditions. Intracellular sodium [Na(+)]i was quantitatively analyzed by first time in the spermatozoa from a marine fish species. Measurement of [Na(+)]i was done before and after motility activation, by Flow Cytometry, using CoroNa Green AM as a dye. Sperm motility activation induced an increase in [Na(+)]i, from 96.72mM in quiescent stage to 152.21mM post-activation in seawater. A significant decrease in sperm head area was observed post-activation in seawater. There was a notable reduction in sperm motility when sodium was removed from the seminal plasma, but not when it was removed from the activation media. Sodium removal was also linked to a significant reduction in sperm head area in comparison to the controls. Our results indicate that the presence of the ion Na(+) in the seminal plasma (or in the extender medium) is necessary for the preservation of sperm motility in European eel, probably because it plays a role in maintaining an appropriate sperm cell volume in the quiescent stage of the spermatozoa.

  8. Resource level affects relative performance of the two motility systems of Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Hillesland, Kristina L; Velicer, Gregory J

    2005-05-01

    The adventurous (A) and social (S) motility systems of the microbial predator Myxococcus xanthus show differential swarming performance on distinct surface types. Under standard laboratory conditions, A-motility performs well on hard agar but poorly on soft agar, whereas the inverse pattern is shown by S-motility. These properties may allow M. xanthus to swarm effectively across a greater diversity of natural surfaces than would be possible with one motility system alone. Nonetheless, the range of ecological conditions under which dual motility enhances effective swarming across distinct surfaces and how ecological parameters affect the complementarity of A-motility and S-motility remain unclear. Here we have examined the role of nutrient concentration in determining swarming patterns driven by dual motility on distinct agar surfaces, as well as the relative contributions of A-motility and S-motility to these patterns. Swarm expansion rates of dually motile (A+S+), solely A-motile (A+S-), and solely S-motile (A-S+) strains were compared on hard and soft agar across a wide range of casitone concentrations. At low casitone concentrations (0-0.1%), swarming on soft agar driven by S-motility is very poor, and is significantly slower than swarming on hard agar driven by A-motility. This reverses at high casitone concentration (1-3.2%) such that swarming on soft agar is much faster than swarming on hard agar. This pattern greatly constrained the ability of M. xanthus to encounter patches of prey bacteria on a soft agar surface when nutrient levels between the patches were low. The swarming patterns of a strain that is unable to produce extracellular fibrils indicate that these appendages are responsible for the elevated swarming of S-motility at high resource levels. Together, these data suggest that large contributions by S-motility to predatory swarming in natural soils may be limited to soft, wet, high-nutrient conditions that may be uncommon. Several likely benefits

  9. Effects of feeding on in vivo motility patterns in the proximal intestine of shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius)

    PubMed Central

    Brijs, Jeroen; Hennig, Grant W.; Axelsson, Michael; Olsson, Catharina

    2014-01-01

    This is the first study to catalogue the diverse array of in vivo motility patterns in a teleost fish and how they are affected by feeding. Video recordings of exteriorised proximal intestine from fasted and fed shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius) were used to generate spatio-temporal maps to portray and quantify motility patterns. Propagating and non-propagating contractions were observed to occur at different frequencies and durations. The most apparent difference between the feeding states was that bands of relatively high amplitude contractions propagating slowly in the anal direction were observed in all fasted fish (N=10) but in only 35% of fed fish (N=11). Additionally, fed fish displayed a reduced frequency (0.21±0.03 versus 0.32±0.06 contractions min−1) and rhythmicity of these contractions compared with fasted fish. Although the underlying mechanisms of these slow anally propagating contractions differ from those of mammalian migrating motor complexes, we believe that they may play a similar role in shorthorn sculpin during the interdigestive period, to potentially remove food remnants and prevent the establishment of pathogens. ‘Ripples’ were the most prevalent contraction type in shorthorn sculpin and may be important during mixing and absorption. The persistence of shallow ripples and pendular movements of longitudinal muscle after tetrodotoxin (1 μmol l−1) treatment suggests these contractions were myogenic in origin. The present study highlights both similarities and differences in motility patterns between shorthorn sculpin and other vertebrates, as well as providing a platform to examine other aspects of gastrointestinal functions in fish, including the impact of environmental changes. PMID:24948631

  10. Effects of Synbiotic2000™ Forte on the Intestinal Motility and Interstitial Cells of Cajal in TBI Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Limei; Zeng, Jing; Ma, Yuanyuan; Tan, Min; Zhou, Min; Fang, Huan; Bengmark, Stig; Zhu, Jingci

    2017-03-16

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the effects of Synbiotic2000™ Forte on the intestinal motility and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in traumatic brain injury (TBI) mouse model. Kunming mice were randomly divided into sham operation group (S group), enteral nutrition group with TBI (E group), and Synbiotic2000™ Forte group with TBI (P group). The contractile activity of the intestinal smooth muscle, densities and ultrastructure of the ICC, kit protein concentration, weight, and defecation of mice were monitored and analyzed. TBI markedly suppressed contractile activity of the intestinal smooth muscle (P < 0.01), which led to a reduction of defecation (P < 0.01) and weight (P < 0.01). However, application of Synbiotic2000™ Forte significantly improved contractile activity of the small intestine (P < 0.01), which may be related to protective effects to the interstitial cells of Cajal, smooth muscle cells, and enteric neurons. TBI impaired ICC networks and densities (P < 0.01), events that were protected by the application of Synbiotic2000™ Forte. Synbiotic2000™ Forte may attenuate TBI-mediated inhibition of the kit protein pathway. Synbiotic2000™ Forte may improve intestinal motility and protect the ICC in the TBI mouse. These findings provide a novel support for the application of Synbiotic2000™ Forte in intestinal motility disturbance after TBI.

  11. Needleless transcutaneous electroacupuncture improves rectal distension-induced impairment in intestinal motility and slow waves via vagal mechanisms in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jun; Yin, Jieyun; Chen, Jiande

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study was designed to compare the effects and mechanisms of transcutaneous electroacupuncture (TEA) on rectal distention (RD)-induced intestinal dysmotility with EA. Methods: six female dogs chronically implanted with a duodenal fistula, a proximal colon fistula and intestinal serosal electrodes were studied. EA and TEA were performed via needles and cutaneous electrodes placed at bilateral ST-36 (Zusanli) acupoints respectively; their effects on postprandial intestinal dysmotility (slow waves, contractions and transit) induced by RD, and autonomic functions were compared. Results: RD at a volume of 140 ml suppressed intestinal contractions; the motility index was reduced with RD (P = 0.001). Both EA and TEA ameliorated the suppressed contractions (P = 0.003 and 0.001) and their effects were comparable. RD reduced the percentage of normal intestinal slow waves (P = 0.002) that was increased with both EA and TEA (P = 0.005 and 0.035). No significant difference was noted between EA and TEA. EA and TEA reduced small bowel transit time (P = 0.001 and 0.007); these prokinetic effects were blocked by atropine. Both EA and TEA increased vagal activity assessed by the spectral analysis of heart rate variability (both P = 0.03). Conclusion: RD inhibits postprandial intestinal motility. Both EA and TEA at ST-36 are able to improve the RD-induced impairment in intestinal contractions, transit and slow waves mediated via the vagal mechanism. Needleless TEA is as effective as EA in ameliorating the intestinal hypomotility. PMID:26064396

  12. Intestinal invasion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the avian host is dose dependent and does not depend on motility and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Hoegh-Andersen, Kirsten Hobolt; Rosenkrantz, Jesper Tjørnholt; Schroll, Casper; Casadesús, Josep; Aabo, Søren; Christensen, Jens Peter

    2013-08-30

    Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) can invade in the intestine of the avian host, and knowledge on the mechanisms that govern this is potentially important for prevention of disease. This study investigated the invasion of S. Typhimurium in the avian host and to which extent it depended on motility and chemotaxis. Wild type and previously well-characterized transposon mutants in flagella genes fliC and fljB and in chemotaxis genes cheA, cheB and cheR were used as challenge strains in intestinal loop experiments. Invasion was shown to be dose dependent, but did not require functional flagella or chemotaxis genes. In support of the results from intestinal loop experiments, flagella and chemotaxis genes were not significantly important to the outcome of an oral infection. The results showed that S. Typhimurium invasion in the avian host was dose dependent and was not affected by the loss of flagella and chemotaxis genes.

  13. The Semen pH Affects Sperm Motility and Capacitation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ji; Chen, Li; Li, Jie; Li, Hongjun; Hong, Zhiwei; Xie, Min; Chen, Shengrong; Yao, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the chemical environment of semen can have a profound effect on sperm quality, we examined the effect of pH on the motility, viability and capacitation of human sperm. The sperm in this study was collected from healthy males to avoid interference from other factors. The spermatozoa cultured in sperm nutrition solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were analyzed for sperm total motility, progressive motility (PR), hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) rate, and sperm penetration. Our results showed that these parameters were similar in pH 7.2 and 8.2 sperm nutrition solutions, but decreased in pH 5.2 and 6.2 solutions. The HOS rate exhibited positive correlation with the sperm total motility and PR. In addition, the sperm Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at different pHs was measured, and the enzyme activity was significantly lower in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media, comparing with that in pH 8.2 and pH 7.2 solutions. Using flow cytometry (FCM) and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM) analysis, the intracellular Ca2(+ )concentrations of sperm cultured in sperm capacitation solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were determined. Compared with that at pH 7.2, the mean fluorescence intensity of sperm in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media decreased significantly, while that of pH 8.2 group showed no difference. Our results suggested that the declined Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity at acidic pHs result in decreased sperm movement and capacitation, which could be one of the mechanisms of male infertility.

  14. Electrophysiological principles of motility disturbances in the small and large intestines--review of the literature and personal experience.

    PubMed

    Holschneider, A M

    1989-01-01

    Motility disturbances of the small and large intestines are based on changes in the smooth-muscle potential, whereby the number of amplitudes and configuration of slow waves and of spike potentials as well as pattern, speed of propagation, and duration of the MMC are of crucial importance. Whereas the electromechanical principles of intestinal motility are sufficiently known, changes in the electromechanical activity in clinically manifest motility disturbances have as yet not been given due regard. Only recently, electromechanical measurements in the upper gastrointestinal tract and colon were performed in several gastrointestinal diseases of internal medicine. In the small intestine, changes in slow waves, spike potentials, and the MMC could be disclosed which are typical for hyperthyrosis, hypothyrosis, irritable bowel syndrome, bacterial diarrhea, primary and secondary intestinal pseudo-obstruction, short-bowel syndrome, postoperative bowel atonia, mechanical bowel obstruction, vagotomy, and diabetic enteropathy with disturbed gastric emptying. Regarding the colon, a disturbance in the electromechanical characteristics was found in irritable bowel syndrome, bacterial overgrowth in the small bowel, chronic constipation, and idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction, which is probably identical with the clinical picture of adynamic ileus. Based on a thorough examination of the literature and on own results from electromechanical measurements in children, electromechanical disturbances have been narrowly defined.

  15. Roles of sphincter of Oddi motility and serum vasoactive intestinal peptide, gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhen-Hai; Qin, Cheng-Kun; Wu, Shuo-Dong; Xu, Jian; Cui, Xian-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Yi; Xian, Guo-Zhe

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate roles of sphincter of Oddi (SO) motility played in pigment gallbladder stone formation in model of guinea pigs. METHODS: Thirty-four adult male Hartley guinea pigs were divided randomly into two groups: the control group and pigment stone group. The pigment stone group was divided into 4 subgroups with 6 guinea pigs each according to time of sacrifice, and were fed a pigment lithogenic diet and sacrificed after 3, 6, 9 and 12 wk. SO manometry and recording of myoelectric activity of the guinea pigs were obtained by multifunctional physiograph at each stage. Serum vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), gastrin and cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) were detected at each stage in the process of pigment gallbladder stone formation by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: The incidence of pigment gallstone formation was 0%, 0%, 16.7% and 66.7% in the 3-, 6-, 9- and 12-wk group, respectively. The frequency of myoelectric activity decreased in the 3-wk group. The amplitude of myoelectric activity had a tendency to decrease but not significantly. The frequency of the SO decreased significantly in the 9-wk group. The SO basal pressure and common bile duct pressure increased in the 12-wk group (25.19 ± 7.77 mmHg vs 40.56 ± 11.81 mmHg, 22.35 ± 7.60 mmHg vs 38.51 ± 11.57 mmHg, P < 0.05). Serum VIP was significantly elevated in the 6- and 12-wk groups and serum CCK-8 was decreased significantly in the 12-wk group. CONCLUSION: Pigment gallstone-causing diet may induce SO dysfunction. The tension of the SO increased. The disturbance in SO motility may play a role in pigment gallstone formation, and changes in serum VIP and CCK-8 may be important causes of SO dysfunction. PMID:24782626

  16. Pressure and frequency dependent linkage between motility and epithelial secretion in human proximal small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Mellander, A; Jarbur, K; Sjovall, H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Motor disturbances are sometimes associated with diarrhoea by unknown mechanisms.
AIM—To determine if there is a quantitative link between intestinal motility and epithelial secretion.
SUBJECTS—Experiments were performed in 21 healthy volunteers and three patients with villus atrophy.
METHODS—Duodenal and jejunal motor activities were registered in the fasted state by open tip manometry. Secretion was measured directly by marker perfusion and indirectly by recording transmural potential difference (PD).
RESULTS—A significant correlation was found between "low pass filtered" pressure and PD, but no correlation was found between amplitudes of isolated contractions and PD changes. During repeated phasic contractions (phase III of migrating motor complex), PD increased at a rate that was higher in the duodenum than in the jejunum, and higher in patients with villus atrophy than in healthy controls. After reaching a peak, PD decreased despite continuing phasic motor activity, provided that there was no concomitant increase in mean pressure. Fluid secretion increased roughly in parallel with PD, except at the very end of the cycle.
CONCLUSIONS—To explain these findings, one has to postulate participation of at least two types of receptor: a slowly adapting pressure sensitive receptor and another mechanoreceptor, possibly a mucosal touch receptor, to account for the run down phenomenon. This model predicts that short lasting trains of contractions, so called discrete clusters, will be a particularly potent stimulus for activation of mucosal secretion.


Keywords: enteric nervous system; intestinal mucosa; migrating motor complex; receptor; chemoreceptor; bile PMID:10673300

  17. Motile invaded neutrophils in the small intestine of Toxoplasma gondii-infected mice reveal a potential mechanism for parasite spread

    PubMed Central

    Coombes, Janine L.; Charsar, Brittany A.; Han, Seong-Ji; Halkias, Joanna; Chan, Shiao Wei; Koshy, Anita A.; Striepen, Boris; Robey, Ellen A.

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection occurs through the oral route, but we lack important information about how the parasite interacts with the host immune system in the intestine. We used two-photon laser-scanning microscopy in conjunction with a mouse model of oral T. gondii infection to address this issue. T. gondii established discrete foci of infection in the small intestine, eliciting the recruitment and transepithelial migration of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes. Neutrophils accounted for a high proportion of actively invaded cells, and we provide evidence for a role for transmigrating neutrophils and other immune cells in the spread of T. gondii infection through the lumen of the intestine. Our data identify neutrophils as motile reservoirs of T. gondii infection and suggest a surprising retrograde pathway for parasite spread in the intestine. PMID:23650399

  18. Functional assessment of intestinal motility and gut wall inflammation in rodents: analyses in a standardized model of intestinal manipulation.

    PubMed

    Vilz, Tim O; Overhaus, Marcus; Stoffels, Burkhard; Websky, Martin von; Kalff, Joerg C; Wehner, Sven

    2012-09-11

    Inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract is a common reason for a variety of human diseases. Animal research models are critical in investigating the complex cellular and molecular of intestinal pathology. Although the tunica mucosa is often the organ of interest in many inflammatory diseases, recent works demonstrated that the muscularis externa (ME) is also a highly immunocompetent organ that harbours a dense network of resident immunocytes.(1,2) These works were performed within the standardized model of intestinal manipulation (IM) that leads to inflammation of the bowel wall, mainly limited to the ME. Clinically this inflammation leads to prolonged intestinal dysmotility, known as postoperative ileus (POI) which is a frequent and unavoidable complication after abdominal surgery.(3) The inflammation is characterized by liberation of proinflammatory mediators such as IL-6(4) or IL-1β or inhibitory neurotransmitters like nitric oxide (NO).(5) Subsequently, tremendous numbers of immunocytes extravasate into the ME, dominated by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) and monocytes and finally maintain POI.(2) Lasting for days, this intestinal paralysis leads to an increased risk of aspiration, bacterial translocation and infectious complications up to sepsis and multi organ failure and causes a high economic burden.(6) In this manuscript we demonstrate the standardized model of IM and in vivo assessment of gastrointestinal transit (GIT) and colonic transit. Furthermore we demonstrate a method for separation of the ME from the tunica mucosa followed by immunological analysis, which is crucial to distinguish between the inflammatory responses in these both highly immunoactive bowel wall compartments. All analyses are easily transferable to any other research models, affecting gastrointestinal function.

  19. The role of selenium in intestinal motility and morphology in a murine model of Typanosoma cruzi infection

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Andréa Pereira; Sieberg, Ryan; Li, Hua; Cahill, Hannah R.; Zhao, Dazhi; Araújo-Jorge, Tania C.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.

    2010-01-01

    Infection with Trypanosoma cruzi causes mega-syndromes of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in humans and animals. In the present study, we employed magnetic resonance imaging to non-invasively monitor the effect of selenium supplementation on alterations in the GI tract of T. cruzi-infected mice. CD1 mice infected with T. cruzi (Brazil strain) exhibited dilatation of the intestines similar to that we recently reported in infected C57Bl/6 mice. The average intestine lumen diameter increased by 65% and the increase was reduced to 29% in mice supplemented with 2 ppm selenium in the drinking water. When supplemented with 3 ppm selenium in chow the lumen diameter was also significantly reduced although the difference between the infected and infected supplemented mice was smaller. Intestinal motility in infected mice fed with selenium-enriched chow was increased compared with infected mice fed with normal unsupplemented chow and was not significantly different from intestinal motility in uninfected mice. We suggest that Se may be used to modulate the inflammatory, immunological, and/or antioxidant responses involved in intestinal disturbances caused by T. cruzi infection. PMID:20195635

  20. A novel tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist prevents motility-stimulating effects of neurokinin A in small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Lördal, Mikael; Navalesi, Giovanni; Theodorsson, Elvar; Maggi, Carlo A; Hellström, Per M

    2001-01-01

    MEN 11420 (nepadutant) is a potent, selective and competitive antagonist of tachykinin NK2 receptors. The objective of the present study was to assess the capability of the drug to antagonize the stimulatory effects of neurokinin A (NKA) on gastrointestinal motility, as well as to change the fasting migrating motor complex (MMC). Thirty-four male volunteers were randomized to treatment with either placebo or MEN 11420 in a double-blinded manner. Effects of MEN 11420 (8 mg intravenously) were evaluated as changes in phases I, II and III of MMC, as well as contraction frequency, amplitude and motility index during baseline conditions and during stimulation of motility using NKA (25 pmol kg−1 min−1 intravenously). NKA preceded by placebo increased the fraction of time occupied by phase II, increased contraction frequency, amplitude and motility index. MEN 11420 effectively antagonized the motility-stimulating effects of NKA. MEN 11420 reduced the phase II-stimulating effect of NKA. In addition, the stimulatory effect of NKA on contraction frequency and amplitude, as well as motility index were inhibited by MEN 11420. MEN 11420 did not affect the characteristics of MMC during saline infusion. Plasma levels of MEN 11420 peaked during the first hour after infusion and decreased to less than half during the first 2 h. In conclusion, intravenous MEN 11420 effectively inhibited NKA-stimulated, but not basal gastrointestinal motility, and was well tolerated by all subjects. PMID:11522614

  1. Role of potassium channels in rabbit intestinal motility disorders induced by 2, 2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH).

    PubMed

    Hernandez, L; Grasa, L; Fagundes, D S; Gonzalo, S; Arruebo, M P; Plaza, M A; Murillo, M D

    2010-06-01

    Oxidative stress appears to play a role in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. Changes in intestinal motility have been reported in different models of intestinal inflammation. The initiating factor of altered motility could be an alteration of gut redox status. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of oxidative stress evoked by 2, 2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH) on the intestinal motility of rabbit duodenum and the possible contribution of different K(+) channels in mediating this response. Whole thickness segments of rabbit duodenum were suspended in the direction of the longitudinal or circular smooth muscle fibres in an organ bath to study the effects of AAPH alone, or in the presence of different K(+) channel blockers on the amplitude, frequency and tone of spontaneous contractions. In circular muscle, AAPH 20 mM induced a reduction of the amplitude, the frequency and tone of the spontaneous contractions. In longitudinal muscle, AAPH 10 mM induced a reduction of the amplitude and tone of the spontaneous contractions. The reduction of the amplitude and tone induced by AAPH was reverted by BaCl2 (1 mM) and TEA (5 mM). Charybdotoxin (100 nM) and iberiotoxin (100 nM) only reverted the reduction of the tone induced by AAPH. In conclusion, our results show that the peroxyl radicals released by AAPH reduced the amplitude and the tone of the spontaneous contractions of the longitudinal smooth muscle from rabbit small intestine. Inward rectifier and intermediate and large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels could be involved in these effects.

  2. Listeria monocytogenes DNA Glycosylase AdlP Affects Flagellar Motility, Biofilm Formation, Virulence, and Stress Responses

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ting; Bae, Dongryeoul

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is structurally similar to the Bacillus cereus alkyl base DNA glycosylase (AlkD), was identified. This determinant was involved in the transcriptional repression of flagellar motility genes and was named adlP (encoding an AlkD-like protein [AdlP]). Deletion of adlP activated the expression of flagellar motility genes at 37°C and disrupted the temperature-dependent inhibition of L. monocytogenes motility. The adlP null strains demonstrated decreased survival in murine macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells and less virulence in mice. Furthermore, the deletion of adlP significantly decreased biofilm formation and impaired the survival of bacteria under several stress conditions, including the presence of a DNA alkylation compound (methyl methanesulfonate), an oxidative agent (H2O2), and aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our findings strongly suggest that adlP may encode a bifunctional protein that transcriptionally represses the expression of flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. IMPORTANCE We discovered a novel protein that we named AlkD-like protein (AdlP). This protein affected flagellar motility, biofilm formation, and virulence. Our data suggest that AdlP may be a bifunctional protein that represses flagellar motility genes and influences stress responses through its DNA glycosylase activity. PMID:27316964

  3. Hexavalent chromium affects sperm motility by influencing protein tyrosine phosphorylation in the midpiece of boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Linqing; Wang, Lirui; Fu, Jieli; Li, Yuhua; Zhao, Na; Li, Xinhong

    2016-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium reportedly induces reproductive toxicity and further inhibits male fertility in mammals. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by which hexavalent chromium affects motility signaling in boar spermatozoa in vitro. The results indicated that Cr(VI) decreased sperm motility, protein phosphorylation, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and metabolic enzyme activity starting at 4μmol/mL following incubation for 1.5h. Notably, all parameters were potently inhibited by 10μmol/mL Cr, while supplementation with the dibutyryl-cAMP (dbcAMP) and the 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) prevented the inhibition of protein phosphorylation. Interestingly, high concentrations of Cr (>10μmol/mL) increased the tyrosine phosphorylation of some high-molecular-weight proteins in the principle piece but decreased that in the middle piece associated with an extreme reduction of sperm motility. These results suggest that chromium affects boar sperm motility by impairing tyrosine phosphorylation in the midpiece of sperm by blocking the cAMP/PKA pathway in boar sperm in vitro.

  4. The first intestinal motility patterns in fetal mice are not mediated by neurons or interstitial cells of Cajal.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Rachael R; Ellis, Melina; Gwynne, Rachel M; Bergner, Annette J; Lewis, Martin D; Beckett, Elizabeth A; Bornstein, Joel C; Young, Heather M

    2010-04-01

    In mature animals, neurons and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) are essential for organized intestinal motility. We investigated motility patterns, and the roles of neurons and myenteric ICC (ICC-MP), in the duodenum and colon of developing mice in vitro. Spatiotemporal mapping revealed regular contractions that propagated in both directions from embryonic day (E)13.5 in the duodenum and E14.5 in the colon. The propagating contractions, which we termed ripples, were unaffected by tetrodotoxin and were present in the intestine of embryonic Ret null mutant mice, which lack enteric neurons. Neurally mediated motility patterns were first observed in the duodenum at E18.5. To examine the possible role of ICC-MP, three approaches were used. First, intracellular recordings from the circular muscle of the duodenum did not detect slow wave activity at E16.5, but regular slow waves were observed in some preparations of E18.5 duodenum. Second, spatiotemporal mapping revealed ripples in the duodenum of E13.5 and E16.5 W/W(v) embryos, which lack KIT+ ICC-MP and slow waves. Third, KIT-immunoreactive cells with the morphology of ICC-MP were first observed at E18.5. Hence, ripples do not appear to be mediated by ICC-MP and must be myogenic. Ripples in the duodenum and colon were abolished by cobalt chloride (1 mm). The L-type Ca(2+) channel antagonist nicardipine (2.5 microm) abolished ripples in the duodenum and reduced their frequency and size in the colon. Our findings demonstrate that prominent propagating contractions (ripples) are present in the duodenum and colon of fetal mice. Ripples are not mediated by neurons or ICC-MP, but entry of extracellular Ca(2+) through L-type Ca(2+) channels is essential. Thus, during development of the intestine, the first motor patterns to develop are myogenic.

  5. Pro-Inflammatory Flagellin Proteins of Prevalent Motile Commensal Bacteria Are Variably Abundant in the Intestinal Microbiome of Elderly Humans

    PubMed Central

    Neville, B. Anne; Sheridan, Paul O.; Harris, Hugh M. B.; Coughlan, Simone; Flint, Harry J.; Duncan, Sylvia H.; Jeffery, Ian B.; Claesson, Marcus J.; Ross, R. Paul; Scott, Karen P.; O'Toole, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Some Eubacterium and Roseburia species are among the most prevalent motile bacteria present in the intestinal microbiota of healthy adults. These flagellate species contribute “cell motility” category genes to the intestinal microbiome and flagellin proteins to the intestinal proteome. We reviewed and revised the annotation of motility genes in the genomes of six Eubacterium and Roseburia species that occur in the human intestinal microbiota and examined their respective locus organization by comparative genomics. Motility gene order was generally conserved across these loci. Five of these species harbored multiple genes for predicted flagellins. Flagellin proteins were isolated from R. inulinivorans strain A2-194 and from E. rectale strains A1-86 and M104/1. The amino-termini sequences of the R. inulinivorans and E. rectale A1-86 proteins were almost identical. These protein preparations stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) from human intestinal epithelial cell lines, suggesting that these flagellins were pro-inflammatory. Flagellins from the other four species were predicted to be pro-inflammatory on the basis of alignment to the consensus sequence of pro-inflammatory flagellins from the β- and γ- proteobacteria. Many fliC genes were deduced to be under the control of σ28. The relative abundance of the target Eubacterium and Roseburia species varied across shotgun metagenomes from 27 elderly individuals. Genes involved in the flagellum biogenesis pathways of these species were variably abundant in these metagenomes, suggesting that the current depth of coverage used for metagenomic sequencing (3.13–4.79 Gb total sequence in our study) insufficiently captures the functional diversity of genomes present at low (≤1%) relative abundance. E. rectale and R. inulinivorans thus appear to synthesize complex flagella composed of flagellin proteins that stimulate IL-8 production. A greater depth of sequencing, improved evenness of sequencing and improved

  6. The quality of sperm preparation medium affects the motility, viability, and DNA integrity of human spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Anbari, Fatemeh; Halvaei, Iman; Nabi, Ali; Ghazali, Shahin; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Johansson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The goal was to compare the effects of three different sperm preparation media on sperm motility, viability, and DNA integrity of semen samples from normozoospermic men. METHODS: A total of 15 normozoospermic males were included in the study. The semen analysis (SA) was performed in accordance with the WHO guidelines (2010). After SA, each sample was divided into three aliquots, and swim-up was performed with three different sperm preparation media (Sperm Preparation Media, Origio, Denmark; Ham's F10, Biochrome, Berlin, Germany; and VitaSperm™, Innovative Biotech, Iran). Sperm motility, viability, and DNA fragmentation were evaluated at 0, 1, 2, and 24 h after swim-up. RESULTS: There were no significant differences, at any time intervals, in the total sperm motility between the different sperm preparation media. However, the rate of progressive motility was significantly higher in spermatozoa prepared using the media from Origio in comparison with VitaSperm™ (P = 0.03), whereas no significant difference was found against Ham's F10 medium. No significant differences in sperm viability were seen between the media products. However, 1 h after swim-up, the extent of sperm DNA fragmentation was lower in the medium from Origio versus VitaSperm™ (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: The data showed that the quality of medium for preparation of semen samples from normozoospermic men significantly affects the performance of spermatozoa in assisted conception programs. PMID:28216914

  7. Nociceptin effect on intestinal motility depends on opioid-receptor like-1 receptors and nitric oxide synthase co-localization

    PubMed Central

    Sibaev, Andrei; Fichna, Jakub; Saur, Dieter; Yuece, Birol; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre; Storr, Martin

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of the opioid-receptor like-1 (ORL1) agonist nociceptin on gastrointestinal (GI) myenteric neurotransmission and motility. METHODS: Reverse transcriptase - polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry were used to localize nociceptin and ORL1 in mouse tissues. Intracellular electrophysiological recordings of excitatory and inhibitory junction potentials (EJP, IJP) were made in a chambered organ bath. Intestinal motility was measured in vivo. RESULTS: Nociceptin accelerated whole and upper GI transit, but slowed colonic expulsion in vivo in an ORL1-dependent manner, as shown using [Nphe1]NOC and AS ODN pretreatment. ORL1 and nociceptin immunoreactivity were found on enteric neurons. Nociceptin reduced the EJP and the nitric oxide-sensitive slow IJP in an ORL1-dependent manner, whereas the fast IJP was unchanged. Nociceptin further reduced the spatial spreading of the EJP up to 2 cm. CONCLUSION: Compounds acting at ORL1 are good candidates for the future treatment of disorders associated with increased colonic transit, such as diarrhea or diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:26261735

  8. Glyphosate affects the spontaneous motoric activity of intestine at very low doses - in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Chłopecka, Magdalena; Mendel, Marta; Dziekan, Natalia; Karlik, Wojciech

    2014-07-01

    Glyphosate is an active substance of the most popular herbicides worldwide. Its common use results from the belief that it affects exclusively plants. However, studies on glyphosate and its trade formulations reveal that it causes numerous morphological, physiological and biochemical disturbances in cells and organisms of animals, including mammals. Due to the fact that shortly after oral exposure glyphosate is detected in the highest amount in small intestine, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of this compound on the spontaneous motoric activity of intestine under in vitro conditions. The experiments were conducted on rat jejunum strips under isotonic conditions. The strips were incubated in buffered (pH 7.35) and non-buffered (pH 5.2) glyphosate solutions ranged from 0.003 to 1.7 g/L. The results indicate that glyphosate applied in buffered solution affects significantly the spontaneous motoric activity of rat isolated jejunum strips. The muscle response is biphasic (miorelaxation accompanied by contraction). The contraction is observed already at a dose of 0.003 g/L and the first significant biphasic reaction at a dose of 0.014 g/L. The incubation of jejunum strips with glyphosate in non-buffered solution (pH 5.2) results in a different reaction. The smooth muscle undergoes only persistent relaxation, which is stronger than the response to glyphosate solution in pH 7.35. Motility disturbances are also observed after glyphosate removal from the incubation solution. The gathered data suggests that glyphosate impairs gastrointestinal strips' motility at concentration that are noticed in human exposed to non-toxic doses of glyphosate.

  9. Curcuma longa L. as a Therapeutic Agent in Intestinal Motility Disorders. 2: Safety Profile in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Micucci, Matteo; Aldini, Rita; Cevenini, Monica; Colliva, Carolina; Spinozzi, Silvia; Roda, Giulia; Montagnani, Marco; Camborata, Cecilia; Camarda, Luca; Chiarini, Alberto; Mazzella, Giuseppe; Budriesi, Roberta

    2013-01-01

    Background Curcuma extract exerts a myorelaxant effect on the mouse intestine. In view of a possible use of curcuma extract in motor functional disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, a safety profile study has been carried out in the mouse. Methods Thirty mice were used to study the in vitro effect of curcuma on gallbladder, bladder, aorta and trachea smooth muscular layers and hearth inotropic and chronotropic activity. The myorelaxant effect on the intestine was also thoroughly investigated. Moreover, curcuma extract (200 mg/Kg/day) was orally administered to twenty mice over 28 days and serum liver and lipids parameters were evaluated. Serum, bile and liver bile acids qualitative and quantitative composition was were also studied. Results In the intestine, curcuma extract appeared as a not competitive inhibitor through cholinergic, histaminergic and serotoninergic receptors and showed spasmolytic effect on K+ induced contraction at the level of L type calcium channels. No side effect was observed on bladder, aorta, trachea and heart when we used a dose that is effective on the intestine. An increase in gallbladder tone and contraction was observed. Serum liver and lipids parameters were normal, while a slight increase in serum and liver bile acids concentration and a decrease in bile were observed. Conclusions Although these data are consistent with the safety of curcuma extract as far as its effect on the smooth muscular layers of different organs and on the heart, the mild cholestatic effect observed in absence of alteration of liver function tests must be further evaluated and the effective dose with minimal side effects considered. PMID:24260512

  10. Effect of antiorthostatic BedRest (BR) on GastroIntestinal Motility (GIM) of normal subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, L.; Hunter, R. P.; Tietze, K. J.; Cintron, N. M.

    1992-01-01

    The combined effects of postural changes, fluid shifts and diuresis associated with the absence of the gravity vector may decrease gastrointestinal motility (GIM) during space flight. GIM can be estimated from the mouth to cecum transit time (MCTT) of orally administered lactulose (LAC); this test is used to assess changes in GIM in normal subjects and in patients with GI pathology and related disease conditions. Since bedrest (BR) mimics some of the physiological changes that occur during space flight, the effect of ten days of BR on GIM was evaluated from the MCTT of LAC. Methods: Subjects were 12 nonsmoking males between the ages of 35 and 50. After an 8-10 hour fast, subjects ingested Cephulac (registered) (20 g solution) with a low-fiber breakfast on four different days (45, 30, 25, and 20) before BR and on three separate days (4, 7, and 10) during BR. Breath-H2 concentrations were measured before and at 10 minute intervals for 4 hours after breakfast using a Quintron breathalyzer and MCTT was determined from these data. Results: MCTT ranged between 10 and 122 minutes during ambulation and 80 to 120 minutes during BR with means of 79 minutes and 122 minutes respectively. Conclusion: Mean MCTT during BR was 54 percent longer than during ambulation, suggesting that absorption and availability of orally administered medications and nutrients may be delayed or impaired as a result of decreased GIM during bedrest.

  11. Nivalenol and deoxynivalenol affect rat intestinal epithelial cells: a concentration related study.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Giuseppe; Fontanella, Bianca; Severino, Lorella; Quaroni, Andrea; Autore, Giuseppina; Marzocco, Stefania

    2012-01-01

    The integrity of the gastrointestinal tract represents a crucial first level defence against ingested toxins. Among them, Nivalenol is a trichotecenes mycotoxin frequently found on cereals and processed grains; when it contaminates human food and animal feed it is often associated with another widespread contaminant, Deoxynivalenol. Following their ingestion, intestinal epithelial cells are exposed to concentrations of these trichothecenes high enough to cause mycotoxicosis. In this study we have investigated the effects of Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol on intestinal cells in an in vitro model system utilizing the non-tumorigenic rat intestinal epithelial cell line IEC-6. Both Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol (5-80 µM) significantly affected IEC-6 viability through a pro-apoptotic process which mainly involved the following steps: (i) Bax induction; (ii) Bcl-2 inhibition, and (iii) caspase-3 activation. Moreover, treatment with Nivalenol produced a significant cell cycle arrest of IEC-6 cells, primarily at the G(0)/G(1) interphase and in the S phase, with a concomitant reduction in the fraction of cells in G(2). Interestingly, when administered at lower concentrations (0.1-2.5 µM), both Nivalenol and Deoxynivalenol affected epithelial cell migration (restitution), representing the initial step in gastrointestinal wound healing in the gut. This reduced motility was associated with significant remodelling of the actin cytoskeleton, and changes in expression of connexin-43 and focal adhesion kinase. The concentration range of Nivalenol or Deoxynivalenol we have tested is comparable with the mean estimated daily intake of consumers eating contaminated food. Thus, our results further highlight the risks associated with intake of even low levels of these toxins.

  12. Rimonabant, Gastrointestinal Motility and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Chen, Jiande

    2012-01-01

    Background: Obesity and overweight affect more than half of the US population and are associated with a number of diseases. Rimonabant, a cannabinoid receptor 1 blocker in the endocannabinoid (EC) system, was indicated in Europe for the treatment of obesity and overweight patients with associated risk factors but withdrawn on Jan, 2009 because of side effects. Many studies have reported the effects of rimonabant on gastrointestinal (GI) motility and food intake. The aims of this review are: to review the relationship of EC system with GI motility and food intake;to review the studies of rimonabant on GI motility, food intake and obesity;and to report the tolerance and side effects of rimonabant. Methods: the literature (Pubmed database) was searched using keywords: rimonabant, obesity and GI motility. Results: GI motility is related with appetite, food intake and nutrients absorption. The EC system inhibits GI motility, reduces emesis and increases food intake; Rimonabant accelerates gastric emptying and intestinal transition but decreases energy metabolism and food intake. There is rapid onset of tolerance to the prokinetic effect of rimonabant. The main side effects of rimonabant are depression and GI symptoms. Conclusions: Rimonabant has significant effects on energy metabolism and food intake, probably mediated via its effects on GI motility. PMID:23449551

  13. Effect of the herbal medicine dai-kenchu-to on gastrointestinal motility in patients with megacystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome (MMIHS) and chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIIP): report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, Hitoshi; Ueno, Shigeru; Matuda, Hiromitu; Hinoki, Tomoya; Kato, Yuko

    2009-04-20

    Dai-kenchu-to (DKT), a traditional Japanese herbal medicine (Kampo medicine), composed of zanthoxylum fruit, ginseng root, dried ginger rhizome and malt sugar, is clinically effective for postoperative ileus and chronic constipation. MMIHS and CIIP are severe motility disorder associated with high morbidity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of DKT on functional intestinal obstruction. DKT was clinically effective for gastrointestinal motility in a case with MMIHS, but not effective in one with CIIP. MMIHS and CIIP are speculated to have different pathogenesis regarding gastrointestinal pseudo-obstruction based upon the effect of this drug.

  14. Prenatal Intestinal Obstruction Affects the Myenteric Plexus and Causes Functional Bowel Impairment in Fetal Rat Experimental Model of Intestinal Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Khen-Dunlop, Naziha; Sarnacki, Sabine; Victor, Anais; Grosos, Celine; Menard, Sandrine; Soret, Rodolphe; Goudin, Nicolas; Pousset, Maud; Sauvat, Frederique; Revillon, Yann; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Neunlist, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Background Intestinal atresia is a rare congenital disorder with an incidence of 3/10 000 birth. About one-third of patients have severe intestinal dysfunction after surgical repair. We examined whether prenatal gastrointestinal obstruction might effect on the myenteric plexus and account for subsequent functional disorders. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied a rat model of surgically induced antenatal atresia, comparing intestinal samples from both sides of the obstruction and with healthy rat pups controls. Whole-mount preparations of the myenteric plexus were stained for choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Quantitative reverse transcription PCR was used to analyze mRNAs for inflammatory markers. Functional motility and permeability analyses were performed in vitro. Phenotypic studies were also performed in 8 newborns with intestinal atresia. In the experimental model, the proportion of nNOS-immunoreactive neurons was similar in proximal and distal segments (6.7±4.6% vs 5.6±4.2%, p = 0.25), but proximal segments contained a higher proportion of ChAT-immunoreactive neurons (13.2±6.2% vs 7.5±4.3%, p = 0.005). Phenotypic changes were associated with a 100-fold lower concentration-dependent contractile response to carbachol and a 1.6-fold higher EFS-induced contractile response in proximal compared to distal segments. Transcellular (p = 0.002) but not paracellular permeability was increased. Comparison with controls showed that modifications involved not only proximal but also distal segments. Phenotypic studies in human atresia confirmed the changes in ChAT expression. Conclusion Experimental atresia in fetal rat induces differential myenteric plexus phenotypical as well as functional changes (motility and permeability) between the two sides of the obstruction. Delineating these changes might help to identify markers predictive of motility dysfunction and to define guidelines for post-surgical care. PMID:23667464

  15. Exposure to Environmentally Relevant Concentrations of Genistein during Activation Does Not Affect Sperm Motility in the Fighting Fish Betta splendens

    PubMed Central

    Clotfelter, Ethan D.; Gendelman, Hannah K.

    2014-01-01

    Sperm collected from male fighting fish Betta splendens were activated in control water, water containing the ion-channel blocker gadolinium (a putative positive control), or water containing the isoflavone phytoestrogen genistein to determine the effects of acute genistein exposure on male reproductive function. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to quantify the proportion of sperm that were motile and the swimming velocity of those sperm. The highest concentration of gadolinium (100 μM) tested was effective at reducing sperm motility and velocity, but neither concentration of genistein tested (3.7 nM or 3.7 μM) significantly affected these sperm parameters. Our findings suggest that acute exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens during activation does not reduce the motility of fish sperm. PMID:24516856

  16. Exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of genistein during activation does not affect sperm motility in the fighting fish Betta splendens.

    PubMed

    Clotfelter, Ethan D; Gendelman, Hannah K

    2014-01-01

    Sperm collected from male fighting fish Betta splendens were activated in control water, water containing the ion-channel blocker gadolinium (a putative positive control), or water containing the isoflavone phytoestrogen genistein to determine the effects of acute genistein exposure on male reproductive function. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to quantify the proportion of sperm that were motile and the swimming velocity of those sperm. The highest concentration of gadolinium (100 μ M) tested was effective at reducing sperm motility and velocity, but neither concentration of genistein tested (3.7 nM or 3.7 μ M) significantly affected these sperm parameters. Our findings suggest that acute exposure to waterborne phytoestrogens during activation does not reduce the motility of fish sperm.

  17. Gadolinium, a mechano-sensitive channel blocker, inhibits osmosis-initiated motility of sea- and freshwater fish sperm, but does not affect human or ascidian sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Krasznai, Zoltán; Morisawa, Masaaki; Krasznai, Zoárd Tibor; Morisawa, Sachiko; Inaba, Kazuo; Bazsáné, Zsuzsa Kassai; Rubovszky, Bálint; Bodnár, Béla; Borsos, Antal; Márián, Teréz

    2003-08-01

    Exposure to hypo-osmotic or hyperosmotic environment triggers the initiation of fish sperm motility. In this article, we report that calcium and potassium channel blockers do not influence motility of puffer fish sperm but calmodulin antagonists reversibly decrease it, suggesting that calmodulin-Ca(2+) interactions are prerequisite for the initiation of sperm motility in this species. Gadolinium (a stretch activated ion channel blocker) decreased the motility of puffer fish sperm from 92 +/- 3% to 6 +/- 3% and that of carp sperm from 91 +/- 7% to 3.5 +/- 4.3% in a dose-dependent manner (10-40 micro M). The effect of gadolinium was reversible, suggesting that stretch activated ion channels participate in the initiation of sperm motility of the two species. Gadolinium inhibits changes in the isoelectric point of certain proteins of puffer fish sperm, which occur when sperm motility is initiated in a hypertonic solution. Anisotropy measurements showed that hypo-osmotic treatment, which initiates carp sperm motility, increased membrane fluidity. When hypo-osmotic treatment was given in the presence of gadolinium, the sperm membrane remained as rigid as in quiescent cells, while motility was blocked. By contrast, gadolinium did not influence the motility parameters of Ciona or human sperm. Based on these lines of evidence, we suggest that conformational changes of mechanosensitive membrane proteins are involved in osmolality-dependent but not osmolality-independent sperm.

  18. Listeria monocytogenes DNA glycosylase AdiP affects flagellar motility, biofilm formation, virulence, and stress responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The temperature-dependent alteration of flagellar motility gene expression is critical for the foodborne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes to respond to a changing environment. In this study, a genetic determinant, L. monocytogenes f2365_0220 (lmof2365_0220), encoding a putative protein that is struct...

  19. Bacterial Shape and ActA Distribution Affect Initiation of Listeria monocytogenes Actin-Based Motility

    PubMed Central

    Rafelski, Susanne M.; Theriot, Julie A.

    2005-01-01

    We have examined the process by which the intracellular bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes initiates actin-based motility and determined the contribution of the variable surface distribution of the ActA protein to initiation and steady-state movement. To directly correlate ActA distributions to actin dynamics and motility of live bacteria, ActA was fused to a monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1). Actin comet tail formation and steady-state bacterial movement rates both depended on ActA distribution, which in turn was tightly coupled to the bacterial cell cycle. Motility initiation was found to be a highly complex, multistep process for bacteria, in contrast to the simple symmetry breaking previously observed for ActA-coated spherical beads. F-actin initially accumulated along the sides of the bacterium and then slowly migrated to the bacterial pole expressing the highest density of ActA as a tail formed. Early movement was highly unstable with extreme changes in speed and frequent stops. Over time, saltatory motility and sensitivity to the immediate environment decreased as bacterial movement became robust at a constant steady-state speed. PMID:15980176

  20. Palmitoylethanolamide normalizes intestinal motility in a model of post-inflammatory accelerated transit: involvement of CB1 receptors and TRPV1 channels

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, Raffaele; Orlando, Pierangelo; Pagano, Ester; Aveta, Teresa; Buono, Lorena; Borrelli, Francesca; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Izzo, Angelo A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), a naturally occurring acylethanolamide chemically related to the endocannabinoid anandamide, interacts with targets that have been identified in peripheral nerves controlling gastrointestinal motility, such as cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors, TRPV1 channels and PPARα. Here, we investigated the effect of PEA in a mouse model of functional accelerated transit which persists after the resolution of colonic inflammation (post-inflammatory irritable bowel syndrome). Experimental Approach Intestinal inflammation was induced by intracolonic administration of oil of mustard (OM). Mice were tested for motility and biochemical and molecular biology changes 4 weeks later. PEA, oleoylethanolamide and endocannabinoid levels were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and receptor and enzyme mRNA expression by qRT-PCR. Key Results OM induced transient colitis and a functional post-inflammatory increase in upper gastrointestinal transit, associated with increased intestinal anandamide (but not 2-arachidonoylglycerol, PEA or oleoylethanolamide) levels and down-regulation of mRNA for TRPV1 channels. Exogenous PEA inhibited the OM-induced increase in transit and tended to increase anandamide levels. Palmitic acid had a weaker effect on transit. Inhibition of transit by PEA was blocked by rimonabant (CB1 receptor antagonist), further increased by 5′-iodoresiniferatoxin (TRPV1 antagonist) and not significantly modified by the PPARα antagonist GW6471. Conclusions and Implications Intestinal endocannabinoids and TRPV1 channel were dysregulated in a functional model of accelerated transit exhibiting aspects of post-inflammatory irritable bowel syndrome. PEA counteracted the accelerated transit, the effect being mediated by CB1 receptors (possibly via increased anandamide levels) and modulated by TRPV1 channels. PMID:24818658

  1. Sperm dilution ratio affects post-thaw motility rate and velocity of Prochilodus lineatus (Characiformes) sperm.

    PubMed

    Viveiros, Ana T M; Leal, Marcelo C

    2016-10-01

    There is a lack of standardization in sperm cryopreservation of aquatic organisms and, thus, a necessity of more accurate investigations in all steps of this process. In this study, the effects of sperm dilution ratio on post-thaw sperm quality of Prochilodus lineatus were evaluated. Sperm was diluted in a standard freezing medium (glucose and methyl glycol) at four different ratios (sperm to final volume = 1:5, 1:10, 1:50 or 1:100), frozen in a nitrogen vapour vessel at -170°C and then stored in liquid nitrogen vessel at -196°C. Post-thaw motility rate and velocities (curvilinear = VCL; average path = VAP; straight line = VSL) were determined using a Computer-Assisted Sperm Analyzer (CASA) at 10 and 40 s post-activation. The highest motility rates were observed when sperm was frozen at a ratio of 1:5 (76%) and 1:10 (75%). The highest VCL (225 μm/s) and VAP (203 μm/s) were observed at a ratio of 1:10, while VSL was similar among samples frozen at 1:5, 1:10 and 1:50 (97-124 μm/s). When those parameters were evaluated again 30 s later, motility decreased significantly in samples frozen at a ratio of 1:5 (57%) and 1:10 (61%), while velocities decreased significantly in all samples regardless of dilution ratio (75-85 μm/s of VCL, 38-53 μm/s of VAP and 25-39 μm/s of VSL). P. lineatus sperm should be frozen at a ratio of 1:10, where both the number of loaded sperm per straw and the post-thaw quality are maximized.

  2. G alpha12 is targeted to the mitochondria and affects mitochondrial morphology and motility.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Alexandra V; Kutuzov, Mikhail A; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana A

    2008-08-01

    G alpha12 constitutes, along with G alpha13, one of the four families of alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins. We found that the N terminus of G alpha12, but not those of other G alpha subunits, contains a predicted mitochondrial targeting sequence. Using confocal microscopy and cell fractionation, we demonstrated that up to 40% of endogenous G alpha12 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells colocalize with mitochondrial markers. N-terminal sequence of G alpha12 fused to GFP efficiently targeted the fusion protein to mitochondria. G alpha12 with mutated mitochondrial targeting sequence was still located in mitochondria, suggesting the existence of additional mechanisms for mitochondrial localization. Lysophosphatidic acid, one of the known stimuli transduced by G alpha12/13, inhibited mitochondrial motility, while depletion of endogenous G alpha12 increased mitochondrial motility. G alpha12Q229L variants uncoupled from RhoGEFs (but not fully functional activated G alpha12Q229L) induced transformation of the mitochondrial network into punctate mitochondria and resulted in a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. All examined G alpha12Q229L variants reduced phosphorylation of Bcl-2 at Ser-70, while only mutants unable to bind RhoGEFs also decreased cellular levels of Bcl-2. These G alpha12 mutants were also more efficient Hsp90 interactors. These findings are the first demonstration of a heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunit specifically targeted to mitochondria and involved in the control of mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.

  3. A new locus affects cell motility, cellulose binding, and degradation by Cytophaga hutchinsonii.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaofei; Xu, Yuanxi; Zhang, Cong; Chen, Ning; Lu, Xuemei

    2012-10-01

    Cytophaga hutchinsonii is a Gram-negative gliding bacterium, which can rapidly degrade crystalline cellulose via a novel strategy without any recognizable processive cellulases. Its mechanism of cellulose binding and degradation is still a mystery. In this study, the mutagenesis of C. hutchinsonii with the mariner-based transposon HimarEm3 and gene complementation with the oriC-based plasmid carrying the antibiotic resistance gene cfxA or tetQ were reported for the first time to provide valuable tools for mutagenesis and genetic manipulation of the bacterium. Mutant A-4 with a transposon mutation in gene CHU_0134, which encodes a putative thiol-disulfide isomerase exhibits defects in cell motility and cellulose degradation. The cellulose binding ability of A-4 was only half of that of the wild-type strain, while the endo-cellulase activity of the cell-free supernatants and on the intact cell surface of A-4 decreased by 40%. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of proteins binding to cellulose in the outer membrane showed that most of them were significantly decreased or disappeared in A-4 including some Gld proteins and hypothetical proteins, indicating that these proteins might play an important role in cell motility and cellulose binding and degradation by the bacterium.

  4. UV-B affects photosynthesis, ROS production and motility of the freshwater flagellate, Euglena agilis Carter.

    PubMed

    Kottuparambil, Sreejith; Shin, Woongghi; Brown, Murray T; Han, Taejun

    2012-10-15

    The effects of ultraviolet B (UV-B; 295-320 nm) radiation on certain vital physiological (photosynthesis), biochemical (production of reactive oxygen species - ROS) and behavioral (motility and orientation) characteristics were investigated in the unicellular photoautotroph, Euglena agilis Carter. The photosynthetic performance of E. agilis was recorded after exposure of between 15 and 60 min followed by a period of recovery lasting 6-24h under dim light (5-10 μmol photons m(-2) s(-1)). The maximum quantum yield of PS II (F(v)/F(m)) was reduced to 65% and 14% of initial values immediately following 15 and 30 min UV-B exposure, but recovered to 100 and 86% of the initials, respectively. Values of rETR(max) in E. agilis exposed to 15 min UV-B were similar to those of the initials, but a 30 min UV exposure resulted in 75% reduction of rETR(max) with only a 43% recovery as compared with the initial after 24h recovery. After a 60 min UV-B exposure, there were no Chl a fluorescence signals, and hence no F(v)/F(m) or rETR(max). A UV dose-dependent increase in DCFH-DA fluorescence was found in E. agilis cells, reflecting an increase in ROS production. After exposures to UV-B for between 15 and 60 min, the percentages of motile cells in the population decreased to 76, 39 and 15%, respectively. Following 24h in dim light, the percentage of motile cells increased to between 66% and 95% of the initial value. The velocity of non-irradiated cells was 60 μm s(-1), which decreased to 16-35 μm s(-1) immediately following exposure for 15-60 min. After periods of time in dim light (6, 12 and 24h) velocities had recovered to between 44 and 81% of the initial value. In untreated controls, the r-value was 0.23, indicating random movement of E. agilis, but it increased to 0.35 and 0.72 after exposure to UV-B for 30 and 60 min, respectively. There was a tendency towards vertical downward movement of cells proportional to the duration of exposure. The compactness of E. agilis decreased

  5. Effects of early enteral nutrition on the gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal barrier of patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu; Gu, Fang; Wang, Fengxian; Zhang, Yuanda

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of early enteral nutrition on the gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal barrier of patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection. Methods: A total of 120 patients with burn-induced invasive fungal infection were randomly divided into an early enteral nutrition (EN) group and a parenteral nutrition (PN) group (n=60). The patients were given nutritional support intervention for 14 days, and the expression levels of serum transferrin, albumin, total protein, endotoxin, D-lactic acid and inflammatory cytokines were detected on the 1st, 7th and 14th days respectively. Results: As the treatment progressed, the levels of serum transferrin, albumin and total protein of the EN group were significantly higher than those of the PN group (P<0.05), while the levels of serum endotoxin and D-lactic acid of the form group were significantly lower (P<0.05). After treatment, the expression levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were decreased in the EN group, which were significantly different from those of the PN group (P<0.05). During treatment, the incidence rates of complications such as abdominal distension, diarrhea, sepsis, nausea, vomiting and gastric retention were similar. The mean healing time of wound surface was 9.34±0.78 days in the EN group and 12.46±2.19 days in the PN group, i.e. such time of the former was significantly shorter than that of the latter (P<0.05). Conclusion: Treating patients having burn-induced invasive fungal infection by early enteral nutrition support with arginine can safely alleviate malnutrition and stress reaction, strengthen cellular immune function and promote wound healing, thereby facilitating the recovery of gastrointestinal motility and the function of intestinal mucosal barrier. PMID:27375697

  6. Deiodinase knockdown during early zebrafish development affects growth, development, energy metabolism, motility and phototransduction.

    PubMed

    Bagci, Enise; Heijlen, Marjolein; Vergauwen, Lucia; Hagenaars, An; Houbrechts, Anne M; Esguerra, Camila V; Blust, Ronny; Darras, Veerle M; Knapen, Dries

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) balance is essential for vertebrate development. Deiodinase type 1 (D1) and type 2 (D2) increase and deiodinase type 3 (D3) decreases local intracellular levels of T3, the most important active TH. The role of deiodinase-mediated TH effects in early vertebrate development is only partially understood. Therefore, we investigated the role of deiodinases during early development of zebrafish until 96 hours post fertilization at the level of the transcriptome (microarray), biochemistry, morphology and physiology using morpholino (MO) knockdown. Knockdown of D1+D2 (D1D2MO) and knockdown of D3 (D3MO) both resulted in transcriptional regulation of energy metabolism and (muscle) development in abdomen and tail, together with reduced growth, impaired swim bladder inflation, reduced protein content and reduced motility. The reduced growth and impaired swim bladder inflation in D1D2MO could be due to lower levels of T3 which is known to drive growth and development. The pronounced upregulation of a large number of transcripts coding for key proteins in ATP-producing pathways in D1D2MO could reflect a compensatory response to a decreased metabolic rate, also typically linked to hypothyroidism. Compared to D1D2MO, the effects were more pronounced or more frequent in D3MO, in which hyperthyroidism is expected. More specifically, increased heart rate, delayed hatching and increased carbohydrate content were observed only in D3MO. An increase of the metabolic rate, a decrease of the metabolic efficiency and a stimulation of gluconeogenesis using amino acids as substrates may have been involved in the observed reduced protein content, growth and motility in D3MO larvae. Furthermore, expression of transcripts involved in purine metabolism coupled to vision was decreased in both knockdown conditions, suggesting that both may impair vision. This study provides new insights, not only into the role of deiodinases, but also into the importance of a correct TH balance

  7. The post-translational modification of the Clostridium difficile flagellin affects motility, cell surface properties and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Faulds-Pain, Alexandra; Twine, Susan M; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Strong, Philippa C R; Dell, Anne; Buckley, Anthony M; Douce, Gillian R; Valiente, Esmeralda; Logan, Susan M; Wren, Brendan W

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a prominent nosocomial pathogen, proliferating and causing enteric disease in individuals with a compromised gut microflora. We characterized the post-translational modification of flagellin in C. difficile 630. The structure of the modification was solved by nuclear magnetic resonance and shown to contain an N-acetylglucosamine substituted with a phosphorylated N-methyl-l-threonine. A reverse genetics approach investigated the function of the putative four-gene modification locus. All mutants were found to have truncated glycan structures by LC-MS/MS, taking into account bioinformatic analysis, we propose that the open reading frame CD0241 encodes a kinase involved in the transfer of the phosphate to the threonine, the CD0242 protein catalyses the addition of the phosphothreonine to the N-acetylglucosamine moiety and CD0243 transfers the methyl group to the threonine. Some mutations affected motility and caused cells to aggregate to each other and abiotic surfaces. Altering the structure of the flagellin modification impacted on colonization and disease recurrence in a murine model of infection, showing that alterations in the surface architecture of C. difficile vegetative cells can play a significant role in disease. We show that motility is not a requirement for colonization, but that colonization was compromised when the glycan structure was incomplete. PMID:25135277

  8. Protein acetylation affects acetate metabolism, motility and acid stress response in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Castaño-Cerezo, Sara; Bernal, Vicente; Post, Harm; Fuhrer, Tobias; Cappadona, Salvatore; Sánchez-Díaz, Nerea C; Sauer, Uwe; Heck, Albert JR; Altelaar, AF Maarten; Cánovas, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Although protein acetylation is widely observed, it has been associated with few specific regulatory functions making it poorly understood. To interrogate its functionality, we analyzed the acetylome in Escherichia coli knockout mutants of cobB, the only known sirtuin-like deacetylase, and patZ, the best-known protein acetyltransferase. For four growth conditions, more than 2,000 unique acetylated peptides, belonging to 809 proteins, were identified and differentially quantified. Nearly 65% of these proteins are related to metabolism. The global activity of CobB contributes to the deacetylation of a large number of substrates and has a major impact on physiology. Apart from the regulation of acetyl-CoA synthetase, we found that CobB-controlled acetylation of isocitrate lyase contributes to the fine-tuning of the glyoxylate shunt. Acetylation of the transcription factor RcsB prevents DNA binding, activating flagella biosynthesis and motility, and increases acid stress susceptibility. Surprisingly, deletion of patZ increased acetylation in acetate cultures, which suggests that it regulates the levels of acetylating agents. The results presented offer new insights into functional roles of protein acetylation in metabolic fitness and global cell regulation. PMID:25518064

  9. Intestine.

    PubMed

    Smith, J M; Skeans, M A; Horslen, S P; Edwards, E B; Harper, A M; Snyder, J J; Israni, A K; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Intestine and intestine-liver transplant plays an important role in the treatment of intestinal failure, despite decreased morbidity associated with parenteral nutrition. In 2014, 210 new patients were added to the intestine transplant waiting list. Among prevalent patients on the list at the end of 2014, 65% were waiting for an intestine transplant and 35% were waiting for an intestine-liver transplant. The pretransplant mortality rate decreased dramatically over time for all age groups. Pretransplant mortality was highest for adult candidates, at 22.1 per 100 waitlist years compared with less than 3 per 100 waitlist years for pediatric candidates, and notably higher for candidates for intestine-liver transplant than for candidates for intestine transplant without a liver. Numbers of intestine transplants without a liver increased from a low of 51 in 2013 to 67 in 2014. Intestine-liver transplants increased from a low of 44 in 2012 to 72 in 2014. Short-gut syndrome (congenital and other) was the main cause of disease leading to both intestine and intestine-liver transplant. Graft survival improved over the past decade. Patient survival was lowest for adult intestine-liver recipients and highest for pediatric intestine recipients.

  10. Factors affecting intestinal absorption of cholesterol and plant sterols and stanols.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Various factors affect intestinal absorption of cholesterol and plant sterols and stanols. Plant sterols and stanols are generally less absorptive than cholesterol. Differential absorption rates among various plant sterols and stanols have been also reported. Although it was suggested that differential absorption among cholesterol and various plant sterols was determined by difference in excretion rates of sterols and stanols through ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC) G5/ABCG8 of intestinal cells, our study suggests that affinity for and solubility in bile salt micelles can be important determinants for differential absorption of plant sterols and stanols. It was also suggested that plant sterols were transiently incorporated into intestinal cells and then excreted to intestinal lumen through ABCG5/ABCG8. However, in a rat study, transient incorporation of sitosterol into intestinal cells was not observed, suggesting that sitosterol is differentiated from cholesterol at the incorporation site of intestinal cells. It is well established that plant sterols inhibit intestinal absorption of cholesterol and exert a hypocholesterolemic activity. Plant sterols are solubilized in bile salt micelles as cholesterol. Our study clearly showed that because the sterol-solubilizing capacity of bile salt micelles was limited, plant sterols solubilized in micelles reduced the solubility of cholesterol. This can be the major cause of inhibition of cholesterol absorption by plant sterols. Pancreatic cholesterol esterase accelerates intestinal absorption of unesterified cholesterol. Although it was suggested that cholesterol esterase accelerated esterification of cholesterol incorporated into intestinal cells and acted as a transporter at the surface of intestinal cells, our research revealed that the accelerated cholesterol absorption was caused by hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine in bile salt micelles. It is thought that hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine reduces the affinity of

  11. Eco-Doppler evaluation of intestinal peristalsis in normal and in some pathological conditions: preliminary data.

    PubMed

    La Bella, A; Gimondo, P; Camboni, M

    1993-01-01

    Duplex-Doppler sonography could be employed in the quantitative investigation of intestinal motility. Preliminary data indicate reproductivity of the method in normal subjects and possible clinical applications in some pathological conditions affecting intestinal transit. Particularly, the possibility to discriminate between segments at different peristaltic activity seems to be very useful in intestinal obstruction. Further studies are necessary to validate this method.

  12. Intestinal development of bovine foetuses during gestation is affected by foetal sex and maternal nutrition.

    PubMed

    Gionbelli, T R S; Rotta, P P; Veloso, C M; Valadares Filho, S C; Carvalho, B C; Marcondes, M I; Ferreira, M F L; Souza, J V F; Santos, J S A A; Lacerda, L C; Duarte, M S; Gionbelli, M P

    2016-08-03

    We aimed to evaluate the effects of maternal nutrition (MN) and foetal sex on the intestinal development of bovine foetuses throughout different days of gestation (DG). Forty-four multiparous, dry Holstein × Gyr cows with average initial body weight of 480 ± 10 kg were fed the same diet of either restricted feeding at 1.15% of body weight (CO, n = 24) or fed ad libitum (overnourished, ON, n = 20). Six cows from CO group and five cows from ON group were slaughtered at 139, 199, 241 and 268 DG, and foetuses were necropsied to evaluate the intestinal development. The mass, length and density of foetal intestines were not affected by MN (p ≥ 0.260). An interaction between MN and DG was observed for the villi length of jejunum (p = 0.006) and ileum (p < 0.001). Villi length of jejunum and ileum was higher (p < 0.10) in foetuses from ON-fed cows than in foetuses from CO-fed cows at 139 DG. However, at 199 DG, the villi length of jejunum and ileum of foetuses from CO-fed cows was higher than in foetuses from ON-fed cows. Despite these differences, MN did not affect the villi length of jejunum and ileum at 268 DG (p > 0.10). Female foetuses had greater small intestine mass (p = 0.093), large intestine mass (p = 0.022), small intestine mass in proportion to body mass (p = 0.017) and large intestine mass in proportion to body mass (p < 0.001) than male foetuses. Female foetuses had also longer small intestine (p = 0.077) and greater small intestine density (p = 0.021) and villi length of jejunum (p = 0.001) and ileum (p = 0.010) than males. We conclude that MN affects the pathway for the development of foetal villi length throughout the gestation in bovine foetuses without changing the final villi length. Female foetuses had higher intestinal mass, density and villi length than males during the foetal phase in bovines.

  13. Daily exposure to summer temperatures affects the motile subpopulation structure of epididymal sperm cells but not male fertility in an in vivo rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Maya-Soriano, M J; Taberner, E; Sabés-Alsina, M; Ramon, J; Rafel, O; Tusell, L; Piles, M; López-Béjar, M

    2015-08-01

    High temperatures have negative effects on sperm quality leading to temporary or permanent sterility. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of long exposure to summer circadian heat stress cycles on sperm parameters and the motile subpopulation structure of epididymal sperm cells from rabbit bucks. Twelve White New Zealand rabbit bucks were exposed to a daily constant temperature of the thermoneutral zone (from 18 °C to 22 °C; control group) or exposed to a summer circadian heat stress cycles (30 °C, 3 h/day; heat stress group). Spermatozoa were flushed from the epididymis and assessed for sperm quality parameters at recovery. Sperm total motility and progressivity were negatively affected by high temperatures (P < 0.05), as were also specific motility parameters (curvilinear velocity, linear velocity, mean velocity, straightness coefficient, linearity coefficient, wobble coefficient, and frequency of head displacement; P < 0.05, but not the mean amplitude of lateral head displacement). Heat stress significantly increased the percentage of less-motile sperm subpopulations, although the percentage of the high-motile subpopulation was maintained, which is consistent with the fact that no effect was detected on fertility rates. However, prolificacy was reduced in females submitted to heat stress when inseminated by control bucks. In conclusion, our results suggest that environmental high temperatures are linked to changes in the proportion of motile sperm subpopulations of the epididymis, although fertility is still preserved despite the detrimental effects of heat stress. On the other hand, prolificacy seems to be affected by the negative effects of high temperatures, especially by altering female reproduction.

  14. Catheterization of Intestinal Loops in Ruminants Does Not Adversely Affect Loop Function

    PubMed Central

    Inglis, G Douglas; Kastelic, John P; Uwiera, Richard R E

    2010-01-01

    Catheterized intestinal loops may be a valuable model to elucidate key components of the host response to various treatments within the small intestine of ruminants. We examined whether catheterizing ileal loops in sheep affected the overall health of animals and intestinal function, whether a bacterial treatment could be introduced into the loops through the catheters, and whether broad-spectrum antibiotics could sterilize the loops. Escherichia coli cells transformed to express the GFP gene were introduced readily into the loops through the catheters, and GFP E. coli cells were localized within the injected loops. Catheterized loops, interspaces, and intact ileum exhibited no abnormalities in tissue appearance or electrical resistance. Expression of the IFNγ, IL1α, IL4, IL6, IL12p40, IL18, TGFβ1, and TNFα cytokine genes did not differ significantly among the intact ileum, catheterized loops, and interspaces, nor did the expression of the gene for inducible nitric oxide synthase. Broad-spectrum antibiotics administered during surgery did not sterilize the loops or interspaces and did not substantively change the composition of the microbiota. However, antibiotics reduced the overall number of bacterial cells within the loop and the relative abundance of community constituents. We concluded that catheterization of intestinal loops did not adversely affect health or loop function in sheep. Furthermore, allowing animals to recover fully from surgery and to clear pharmaceuticals will remove any confounding effects due to these factors, making catheterized intestinal loops a feasible model for studying host responses in ruminants. PMID:21262134

  15. Consumption of Oxidized Soybean Oil Increased Intestinal Oxidative Stress and Affected Intestinal Immune Variables in Yellow-feathered Broilers.

    PubMed

    Liang, Fangfang; Jiang, Shouqun; Mo, Yi; Zhou, Guilian; Yang, Lin

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of oxidized soybean oil in the diet of young chickens on growth performance and intestinal oxidative stress, and indices of intestinal immune function. Corn-soybean-based diets containing 2% mixtures of fresh and oxidized soybean oil provided 6 levels (0.15, 1.01, 3.14, 4.95, 7.05, and 8.97 meqO2/kg) of peroxide value (POV) in the diets. Each dietary treatment, fed for 22 d, had 6 replicates, each containing 30 birds (n = 1,080). Increasing POV levels reduced average daily feed intake (ADFI) of the broilers during d 1 to 10, body weight and average daily gain at d 22 but did not affect overall ADFI. Concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) increased in plasma and jejunum as POV increased but total antioxidative capacity (T-AOC) declined in plasma and jejunum. Catalase (CAT) activity declined in plasma and jejunum as did plasma glutathione S-transferase (GST). Effects were apparent at POV exceeding 3.14 meqO2/kg for early ADFI and MDA in jejunum, and POV exceeding 1.01 meqO2/kg for CAT in plasma and jejunum, GST in plasma and T-AOC in jejunum. Relative jejunal abundance of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) P50 and NF-κB P65 increased as dietary POV increased. Increasing POV levels reduced the jejunal concentrations of secretory immunoglobulin A and cluster of differentiation (CD) 4 and CD8 molecules with differences from controls apparent at dietary POV of 3.14 to 4.95 meqO2/kg. These findings indicated that growth performance, feed intake, and the local immune system of the small intestine were compromised by oxidative stress when young broilers were fed moderately oxidized soybean oil.

  16. Xylitol affects the intestinal microbiota and metabolism of daidzein in adult male mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Motoi; Hoshi, Chigusa; Hori, Sachiko

    2013-12-10

    This study examined the effects of xylitol on mouse intestinal microbiota and urinary isoflavonoids. Xylitol is classified as a sugar alcohol and used as a food additive. The intestinal microbiota seems to play an important role in isoflavone metabolism. Xylitol feeding appears to affect the gut microbiota. We hypothesized that dietary xylitol changes intestinal microbiota and, therefore, the metabolism of isoflavonoids in mice. Male mice were randomly divided into two groups: those fed a 0.05% daidzein with 5% xylitol diet (XD group) and those fed a 0.05% daidzein-containing control diet (CD group) for 28 days. Plasma total cholesterol concentrations were significantly lower in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.05). Urinary amounts of equol were significantly higher in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.05). The fecal lipid contents (% dry weight) were significantly greater in the XD group than in the CD group (p < 0.01). The cecal microbiota differed between the two dietary groups. The occupation ratios of Bacteroides were significantly greater in the CD than in the XD group (p < 0.05). This study suggests that xylitol has the potential to affect the metabolism of daidzein by altering the metabolic activity of the intestinal microbiota and/or gut environment. Given that equol affects bone health, dietary xylitol plus isoflavonoids may exert a favorable effect on bone health.

  17. Deoxynivalenol affects in vitro intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity through inhibition of protein synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Van De Walle, Jacqueline; Sergent, Therese; Piront, Neil; Toussaint, Olivier; Schneider, Yves-Jacques; Larondelle, Yvan

    2010-06-15

    Deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common mycotoxin contaminants of raw and processed cereal food, adversely affects the gastrointestinal tract. Since DON acts as a protein synthesis inhibitor, the constantly renewing intestinal epithelium could be particularly sensitive to DON. We analyzed the toxicological effects of DON on intestinal epithelial protein synthesis and barrier integrity. Differentiated Caco-2 cells, as a widely used model of the human intestinal barrier, were exposed to realistic intestinal concentrations of DON (50, 500 and 5000 ng/ml) during 24 h. DON caused a concentration-dependent decrease in total protein content associated with a reduction in the incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-leucine, demonstrating its inhibitory effect on protein synthesis. DON simultaneously increased the paracellular permeability of the monolayer as reflected through a decreased transepithelial electrical resistance associated with an increased paracellular flux of the tracer [{sup 3}H]-mannitol. A concentration-dependent reduction in the expression level of the tight junction constituent claudin-4 was demonstrated by Western blot, which was not due to diminished transcription, increased degradation, or NF-{kappa}B, ERK or JNK activation, and was also observed for a tight junction independent protein, i.e. intestinal alkaline phosphatase. These results demonstrate a dual toxicological effect of DON on differentiated Caco-2 cells consisting in an inhibition of protein synthesis as well as an increase in monolayer permeability, and moreover suggest a possible link between them through diminished synthesis of the tight junction constituent claudin-4.

  18. Fenugreek seed affects intestinal microbiota and immunological variables in piglets after weaning.

    PubMed

    Zentek, Jürgen; Gärtner, Stefanie; Tedin, Lydia; Männer, Klaus; Mader, Anneluise; Vahjen, Wilfried

    2013-03-14

    Fenugreek seed has been shown to affect the intestinal microbiota and immunological responses in animals. A feeding trial with male castrated piglets was performed over 28 d without or with the addition of 1·5 g fenugreek seeds/kg complete diet in ten and eleven piglets, weaned at 21 d. In the intestinal tract, pH, lactate and SCFA were measured as major bacterial metabolites. Immune cell phenotypes, phagocytic activity and lymphocyte proliferation after stimulation with pokeweed mitogen, concanavalin A and phytohaemagglutinin M were measured by flow cytometry. Health status and performance of the piglets were not affected by fenugreek. The pH in the caecum and colon were reduced compared with the control (P< 0·05). Higher concentrations of l-lactic acid were recorded in the small-intestinal digesta (average concentrations from the duodenum, jejunum and ileum; P< 0·05), while the concentrations of SCFA remained unchanged except an increase in n-butyric acid in colon contents (P< 0·05). The piglets fed the fenugreek diet had higher Lactobacillus and clostridium cluster I concentrations and lower Escherichia, Hafnia and Shigella concentrations in the small intestine. The addition of fenugreek increased the relative concentration of the γδ T-cell population (TCR1+CD8α-) in the blood with a simultaneous reduction of antigen-presenting cells (MHCII+CD5-) (P< 0·05). Proliferation rate and phagocytosis activity of monocytes were not affected by the additive. In conclusion, fenugreek seeds might be interesting as a feed ingredient for young piglets due to their effects on the intestinal microbiota and immunological variables. The impact on performance and animal health has to be further evaluated.

  19. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM affects vitamin E acetate metabolism and intestinal bile acid signature in monocolonized mice.

    PubMed

    Roager, Henrik M; Sulek, Karolina; Skov, Kasper; Frandsen, Henrik L; Smedsgaard, Jørn; Wilcks, Andrea; Skov, Thomas H; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Licht, Tine R

    2014-01-01

    Monocolonization of germ-free (GF) mice enables the study of specific bacterial species in vivo. Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM(TM) (NCFM) is a probiotic strain; however, many of the mechanisms behind its health-promoting effect remain unknown. Here, we studied the effects of NCFM on the metabolome of jejunum, cecum, and colon of NCFM monocolonized (MC) and GF mice using liquid chromatography coupled to mass-spectrometry (LC-MS). The study adds to existing evidence that NCFM in vivo affects the bile acid signature of mice, in particular by deconjugation. Furthermore, we confirmed that carbohydrate metabolism is affected by NCFM in the mouse intestine as especially the digestion of oligosaccharides (penta- and tetrasaccharides) was increased in MC mice. Additionally, levels of α-tocopherol acetate (vitamin E acetate) were higher in the intestine of GF mice than in MC mice, suggesting that NCFM affects the vitamin E acetate metabolism. NCFM did not digest vitamin E acetate in vitro, suggesting that direct bacterial metabolism was not the cause of the altered metabolome in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest that NCFM affects intestinal carbohydrate metabolism, bile acid metabolism and vitamin E metabolism, although it remains to be investigated whether this effect is unique to NCFM.

  20. Modulation of Intracellular Calcium Levels by Calcium Lactate Affects Colon Cancer Cell Motility through Calcium-Dependent Calpain

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramoorthy, Pasupathi; Sim, Jae Jun; Jang, Yeong-Su; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Mander, Poonam; Chul, Oh Byung; Shim, Won-Sik; Oh, Seung Hyun; Nam, Ky-Youb; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+) supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa), its downstream signaling and role in the motility of human colon cancer cells. We found that treating HCT116 and HT-29 cells with CaLa immediately increased the intracellular Ca2+ (iCa2+) levels for a prolonged period of time. Ca2+ influx induced cleavage of FAK into an N-terminal FAK (FERM domain) in a dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK) was also cleaved in to its p-N-terminal FAK. CaLa increased colon cancer cells motility. Calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, reversed the effects of CaLa on FAK and pFAK cleavage in both cancer cell lines. The cleaved FAK translocates into the nucleus and modulates p53 stability through MDM2-associated ubiquitination. CaLa-induced Ca2+ influx increased the motility of colon cancer cells was mediated by calpain activity through FAK and pFAK protein destabilization. In conclusion, these results suggest that careful consideration may be given in deciding dietary Ca2+ supplementation to patient undergoing treatment for metastatic cancer. PMID:25629974

  1. Guar meal germ and hull fractions differently affect growth performance and intestinal viscosity of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Lee, J T; Bailey, C A; Cartwright, A L

    2003-10-01

    High concentrations of guar meal in poultry diets deleteriously affect growth, feed intake, and digesta viscosity. These effects are attributed to residual gum in the meal. A 2 x 5 factorial experiment investigated the impacts of two guar meal fractions (germ and hull) at five inclusion levels (0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5, and 10.0%) on intestinal viscosity, measures of growth, and feed conversion in broiler chickens fed to 20 d of age. Growth and feed conversion ratio were not affected by inclusion of as much as 7.5% of the germ fraction into poultry diets, while inclusion of the hull fraction reduced growth at all concentrations. The hull fraction increased intestinal viscosity at all inclusion levels fed, although feed conversion was not affected until the inclusion rate exceeded 5.0%. The germ fraction significantly increased intestinal viscosity at 7.5 and 10% inclusion rates. When germ fraction was fed, relative organ weights remained constant through all concentrations except for the ventriculus and duodenum at 7.5 and 10% inclusion levels. Relative pancreas weight was significantly increased at the 10% level of the hull fraction. Increases in intestinal viscosity corresponded with growth depression. These results suggest that residual gum was responsible for some deleterious effects seen when guar meal was fed. The germ fraction was a superior ingredient when compared with the hull fraction. The guar meal germ fraction constituting as much as 7.5% of the diet supported growth and feed conversion measures similar to those observed with a typical corn-soybean poultry ration.

  2. Tumor suppressor KAI1 affects integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated ovarian cancer cell adhesion, motility, and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ruseva, Zlatna; Geiger, Pamina Xenia Charlotte; Hutzler, Peter; Kotzsch, Matthias; Luber, Birgit; Schmitt, Manfred; Gross, Eva; Reuning, Ute

    2009-06-10

    The tetraspanin KAI1 had been described as a metastasis suppressor in many different cancer types, a function for which associations of KAI1 with adhesion and signaling receptors of the integrin superfamily likely play a role. In ovarian cancer, integrin {alpha}v{beta}3 correlates with tumor progression and its elevation in vitro provoked enhanced cell adhesion accompanied by significant increases in cell motility and proliferation in the presence of its major ligand vitronectin. In the present study, we characterized integrin {alpha}v{beta}3-mediated tumor biological effects as a function of cellular KAI1 restoration and proved for the first time that KAI1, besides its already known physical crosstalk with {beta}1-integrins, also colocalizes with integrin {alpha}v{beta}3. Functionally, elevated KAI1 levels drastically increased integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-dependent ovarian cancer cell adhesion. Since an intermediate level of cell adhesive strength is required for optimal cell migration, we next studied ovarian cancer cell motility as a function of KAI1 restoration. By time lapse video microscopy, we found impaired integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-mediated cell migration most probably due to strongly enhanced cellular immobilization onto the adhesion-supporting matrix. Moreover, KAI1 reexpression significantly diminished cell proliferation. These data strongly indicate that KAI1 may suppress ovarian cancer progression by inhibiting integrin {alpha}v{beta}3/vitronectin-provoked tumor cell motility and proliferation as important hallmarks of the oncogenic process.

  3. Does chronic supplementation of the diet with dietary fibre extracted from pea or carrot affect colonic motility in man?

    PubMed

    Guédon, C; Ducrotté, P; Antoine, J M; Denis, P; Colin, R; Lerebours, E

    1996-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess, in healthy volunteers and under physiological conditions, the acceptability, clinical tolerance and effects on colonic motility of chronic supplementation of the usual diet with new dietary fibre sources. Three studies were carried out, one after a period of habitual diet, and two after randomized 3-week periods of supplementation with fibre extracted either from pea hulls or carrots, added to the meals as a fine powder. The 24 h motility was recorded on an unprepared colon at five levels to determine the initiation site and the number of high amplitude propagated contractions (HAPC) and to quantify motor activity every 30 min, particularly in the two periods following lunch and breakfast. With the habitual diet the motility pattern was an irregular alternation of quiescence and sporadic non-propagated contractions. HAPC always started from the ascending colon and occurred mainly after breakfast. With either type of fibre the 24 h motor profiles, the 24 h variations and the number of HAPC were not significantly modified but a more distal initiation of HAPC was found. The colonic postprandial motor response was more diffuse after dietary enrichment with carrot fibre than after enrichment with pea-hull fibre. In healthy volunteers the long-term addition of fibre extracted from pea hulls and carrots to the usual diet was easy and well-tolerated without clinical side-effects, but with limited colonic motor effects. However, the more distal initiation of HAPC observed could be deleterious.

  4. Motile properties of the bi-directional kinesin-5 Cin8 are affected by phosphorylation in its motor domain

    PubMed Central

    Shapira, Ofer; Gheber, Larisa

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinesin-5 Cin8 performs essential mitotic functions in spindle assembly and anaphase B spindle elongation. Recent work has shown that Cin8 is a bi-directional motor which moves towards the minus-end of microtubules (MTs) under high ionic strength (IS) conditions and changes directionality in low IS conditions and when bound between anti-parallel microtubules. Previous work from our laboratory has also indicated that Cin8 is differentially phosphorylated during late anaphase at cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1)-specific sites located in its motor domain. In vivo, such phosphorylation causes Cin8 detachment from spindles and reduces the spindle elongation rate, while maintaining proper spindle morphology. To study the effect of phosphorylation on Cin8 motor function, we examined in vitro motile properties of wild type Cin8, as well as its phosphorylation using phospho-deficient and phospho-mimic variants, in a single molecule fluorescence motility assay. Analysis was performed on whole cell extracts and on purified Cin8 samples. We found that addition of negative charges in the phospho-mimic mutant weakened the MT-motor interaction, increased motor velocity and promoted minus-end-directed motility. These results indicate that phosphorylation in the catalytic domain of Cin8 regulates its motor function. PMID:27216310

  5. Intestinal lamina propria dendritic cells maintain T cell homeostasis but do not affect commensalism.

    PubMed

    Welty, Nathan E; Staley, Christopher; Ghilardi, Nico; Sadowsky, Michael J; Igyártó, Botond Z; Kaplan, Daniel H

    2013-09-23

    Dendritic cells (DCs) in the intestinal lamina propria (LP) are composed of two CD103(+) subsets that differ in CD11b expression. We report here that Langerin is expressed by human LP DCs and that transgenic human langerin drives expression in CD103(+)CD11b(+) LP DCs in mice. This subset was ablated in huLangerin-DTA mice, resulting in reduced LP Th17 cells without affecting Th1 or T reg cells. Notably, cognate DC-T cell interactions were not required for Th17 development, as this response was intact in huLangerin-Cre I-Aβ(fl/fl) mice. In contrast, responses to intestinal infection or flagellin administration were unaffected by the absence of CD103(+)CD11b(+) DCs. huLangerin-DTA x BatF3(-/-) mice lacked both CD103(+) LP DC subsets, resulting in defective gut homing and fewer LP T reg cells. Despite these defects in LP DCs and resident T cells, we did not observe alterations of intestinal microbial communities. Thus, CD103(+) LP DC subsets control T cell homeostasis through both nonredundant and overlapping mechanisms.

  6. Down-regulation of UDP-glucose dehydrogenase affects glycosaminoglycans synthesis and motility in HCT-8 colorectal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tsung-Pao; Pan, Yun-Ru; Fu, Chien-Yu; Chang, Hwan-You

    2010-10-15

    UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (UGDH) catalyzes oxidation of UDP-glucose to yield UDP-glucuronic acid, a precursor of hyaluronic acid (HA) and other glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in extracellular matrix. Although association of extracellular matrix with cell proliferation and migration has been well documented, the importance of UGDH in these behaviors is not clear. Using UGDH-specific small interference RNA to treat HCT-8 colorectal carcinoma cells, a decrease in both mRNA and protein levels of UGDH, as well as the cellular UDP-glucuronic acid and GAG production was observed. Treatment of HCT-8 cells with either UGDH-specific siRNA or HA synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone effectively delayed cell aggregation into multicellular spheroids and impaired cell motility in both three-dimensional collagen gel and transwell migration assays. The reduction in cell aggregation and migration rates could be restored by addition of exogenous HA. These results indicate that UGDH can regulate cell motility through the production of GAG. The enzyme may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention of colorectal cancers.

  7. Antibiotic Treatment Affects Intestinal Permeability and Gut Microbial Composition in Wistar Rats Dependent on Antibiotic Class.

    PubMed

    Tulstrup, Monica Vera-Lise; Christensen, Ellen Gerd; Carvalho, Vera; Linninge, Caroline; Ahrné, Siv; Højberg, Ole; Licht, Tine Rask; Bahl, Martin Iain

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotics are frequently administered orally to treat bacterial infections not necessarily related to the gastrointestinal system. This has adverse effects on the commensal gut microbial community, as it disrupts the intricate balance between specific bacterial groups within this ecosystem, potentially leading to dysbiosis. We hypothesized that modulation of community composition and function induced by antibiotics affects intestinal integrity depending on the antibiotic administered. To address this a total of 60 Wistar rats (housed in pairs with 6 cages per group) were dosed by oral gavage with either amoxicillin (AMX), cefotaxime (CTX), vancomycin (VAN), metronidazole (MTZ), or water (CON) daily for 10-11 days. Bacterial composition, alpha diversity and caecum short chain fatty acid levels were significantly affected by AMX, CTX and VAN, and varied among antibiotic treatments. A general decrease in diversity and an increase in the relative abundance of Proteobacteria was observed for all three antibiotics. Additionally, the relative abundance of Bifidobacteriaceae was increased in the CTX group and both Lactobacillaceae and Verrucomicrobiaceae were increased in the VAN group compared to the CON group. No changes in microbiota composition or function were observed following MTZ treatment. Intestinal permeability to 4 kDa FITC-dextran decreased after CTX and VAN treatment and increased following MTZ treatment. Plasma haptoglobin levels were increased by both AMX and CTX but no changes in expression of host tight junction genes were found in any treatment group. A strong correlation between the level of caecal succinate, the relative abundance of Clostridiaceae 1 family in the caecum, and the level of acute phase protein haptoglobin in blood plasma was observed. In conclusion, antibiotic-induced changes in microbiota may be linked to alterations in intestinal permeability, although the specific interactions remain to be elucidated as changes in permeability did

  8. Passive exercise of the lower limbs and trunk alleviates decreased intestinal motility in patients in the intensive care unit after cardiovascular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Morisawa, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Sasanuma, Naoki; Mabuchi, Satoshi; Takeda, Kenta; Hori, Naoto; Ohashi, Naotsugu; Ide, Takeshi; Domen, Kazuhisa; Nishi, Shinichi

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to clarify the effects of passive exercise of the lower limbs and trunk (PELT) in ICU patients after cardiovascular surgery with decreased bowel motility. [Subjects and Methods] Ten ICU patients with clinically-apparent decreased bowel motility during the period of April to July 2016 were enrolled this study. Bowel sounds (BS) for 5 minutes at rest and 5 minutes after PELT were recorded through an electronic stethoscope. A frequency analysis was performed and the BS before and after PELT were compared. In addition, the percent change in BS before and after PELT was determined, and the relationship between the percent change in BS and individual parameters (invasiveness of surgery, inflammation, nutrition, renal function) was examined. [Results] Average BS (integral value) for 5 minutes before and after PELT were 63.1 ± 41.3 mVsec and 115.0 ± 57.8 mVsec, respectively; therefore, BS was significantly increased by PELT. When compared to patients at rest, a significant increase was found 0–4 minutes after PELT. None of the individual parameters was significantly correlated with the percent change. [Conclusion] PELT can increase the bowel motility of ICU patients with decreased bowel motility. PMID:28265164

  9. Breeder age affects small intestine development of broiler chicks with immediate or delayed access to feed.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, K Z; Edens, F W

    2012-01-01

    1. The relationship between breeder age and chick gastrointestinal tract development to 21 days of age, as influenced by immediate or delayed access to feed, was examined in three consecutive trials. 2. Ross 708 chicks, derived from breeder flocks at 31 (young), 40 (middle) and 63 (old) weeks of age were placed randomly into either a control group with immediate access to feed and water, or a 48 h feed delayed (FD) group with free access to water. 3. FD negatively affected body weight (BW) of chicks derived from young and old flocks through the first and second weeks of age, respectively. Chicks from the older flock absorbed more yolk in the first 48 h with no FD effect. When feed was made available, chicks from the FD group showed a large increase in small intestine weight relative to BW, surpassing (P < 0·05) the control groups across all breeder flock ages. 4. Morphological measurements in all intestinal sections had higher values in chicks derived from the middle age breeder flock. FD to newly hatched chicks from the young breeder flock shortened villi (P < 0·01), decreased crypt depth and villus surface area (P < 0·001) in the duodenum through the first week post hatch. 5. Crypt depths were maximised between 7 and 14 d post-hatch in chicks from young and old breeder flocks, but crypt depths in chicks from the middle aged flocks continued to deepen. 6. The increased crypt depth may augment the number of enterocytes available for villus growth, and facilitate longer villi and greater villus surface area, in chicks from the middle age flocks. Intestinal morphological variation was associated with breeder flock age, which accounted for differential growth in chicks derived from young, middle, and old aged breeder flocks.

  10. The establishment of the infant intestinal microbiome is not affected by rotavirus vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ang, Li; Arboleya, Silvia; Lihua, Guo; Chuihui, Yuan; Nan, Qin; Suarez, Marta; Solís, Gonzalo; de los Reyes-Gavilán, Clara G.; Gueimonde, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The microbial colonization of the intestine during the first months of life constitutes the most important process for the microbiota-induced host-homeostasis. Alterations in this process may entail a high-risk for disease in later life. However, the potential factors affecting this process in the infant are not well known. Moreover, the potential impact of orally administered vaccines upon the establishing microbiome remains unknown. Here we assessed the intestinal microbiome establishment process and evaluated the impact of rotavirus vaccination upon this process. Metagenomic, PCR-DGGE and faecal short chain fatty acids analyses were performed on faecal samples obtained from three infants before and after the administration of each dose of vaccine. We found a high inter-individual variability in the early life gut microbiota at microbial composition level, but a large similarity between the infants' microbiomes at functional level. Rotavirus vaccination did not show any major effects upon the infant gut microbiota. Thus, the individual microbiome establishment and development process seems to occur in a defined manner during the first stages of life and rotavirus vaccination appears to be inconsequential for this process. PMID:25491920

  11. Alternative relay domains of Drosophila melanogaster myosin differentially affect ATPase activity, in vitro motility, myofibril structure and muscle function.

    PubMed

    Kronert, William A; Dambacher, Corey M; Knowles, Aileen F; Swank, Douglas M; Bernstein, Sanford I

    2008-06-06

    The relay domain of myosin is hypothesized to function as a communication pathway between the nucleotide-binding site, actin-binding site and the converter domain. In Drosophila melanogaster, a single myosin heavy chain gene encodes three alternative relay domains. Exon 9a encodes the indirect flight muscle isoform (IFI) relay domain, whereas exon 9b encodes one of the embryonic body wall isoform (EMB) relay domains. To gain a better understanding of the function of the relay domain and the differences imparted by the IFI and the EMB versions, we constructed two transgenic Drosophila lines expressing chimeric myosin heavy chains in indirect flight muscles lacking endogenous myosin. One expresses the IFI relay domain in the EMB backbone (EMB-9a), while the second expresses the EMB relay domain in the IFI backbone (IFI-9b). Our studies reveal that the EMB relay domain is functionally equivalent to the IFI relay domain when it is substituted into IFI. Essentially no differences in ATPase activity, actin-sliding velocity, flight ability at room temperature or muscle structure are observed in IFI-9b compared to native IFI. However, when the EMB relay domain is replaced with the IFI relay domain, we find a 50% reduction in actin-activated ATPase activity, a significant increase in actin affinity, abolition of actin sliding, defects in myofibril assembly and rapid degeneration of muscle structure compared to EMB. We hypothesize that altered relay domain conformational changes in EMB-9a impair intramolecular communication with the EMB-specific converter domain. This decreases transition rates involving strongly bound actomyosin states, leading to a reduced ATPase rate and loss of actin motility.

  12. Intestinal Microbiota of Broiler Chickens As Affected by Litter Management Regimens.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingling; Lilburn, Mike; Yu, Zhongtang

    2016-01-01

    Poultry litter is a mixture of bedding materials and enteric bacteria excreted by chickens, and it is typically reused for multiple growth cycles in commercial broiler production. Thus, bacteria can be transmitted from one growth cycle to the next via litter. However, it remains poorly understood how litter reuse affects development and composition of chicken gut microbiota. In this study, the effect of litter reuse on the microbiota in litter and in chicken gut was investigated using 2 litter management regimens: fresh vs. reused litter. Samples of ileal mucosa and cecal digesta were collected from young chicks (10 days of age) and mature birds (35 days of age). Based on analysis using DGGE and pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons, the microbiota of both the ileal mucosa and the cecal contents was affected by both litter management regimen and age of birds. Faecalibacterium, Oscillospira, Butyricicoccus, and one unclassified candidate genus closely related to Ruminococcus were most predominant in the cecal samples, while Lactobacillus was predominant in the ileal samples at both ages and in the cecal samples collected at day 10. At days 10 and 35, 8 and 3 genera, respectively, in the cecal luminal microbiota differed significantly in relative abundance between the 2 litter management regimens. Compared to the fresh litter, reused litter increased predominance of halotolerant/alkaliphilic bacteria and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a butyrate-producing gut bacterium. This study suggests that litter management regimens affect the chicken GI microbiota, which may impact the host nutritional status and intestinal health.

  13. Effect of drugs affecting microtubular assembly on microtubules, phospholipid synthesis and physiological indices (signalling, growth, motility and phagocytosis) in Tetrahymena pyriformis.

    PubMed

    Kovács, P; Csaba, G

    2006-01-01

    Structural changes of microtubules, incorporation of radioactively labelled components into phospholipids, cell motility, growth and phagocytosis were studied under the effect of four drugs affecting microtubular assembly: colchicine, nocodazole, vinblastine and taxol. Although the first three agents influence microtubules in the direction of depolymerization and the fourth stabilizes them, their effects on the structure of microtubules cannot be explained by this. Using confocal microscopy after an acetylated anti-tubulin label, in nocodazole- and colchicine-treated cells, the basal body cages disappear and longitudinal microtubules (LM) became thinner without changing transversal microtubules (TM). After taxol treatment LM also became thinner, however TM disappeared. Under the effect of vinblastine TM became thinner, without influencing LM. These drugs influence the incorporation of components ([(3)H]-serine, [(3)H]-palmitic acid and (32)P) into phospholipids, however their effect is equivocal and cannot be consequently coupled with the effect on the microtubules. Nocodazole, vinblastine and taxol significantly reduced the cell's motility, however colchicine did so to a lesser degree. Vinblastine and nocodazole totally inhibited, and taxol significantly decreased cell growth, while colchicine in a lower concentration increased the multiplication of cells. Phagocytosis was not significantly influenced after 1 min, but after 5 min all the agents studied (except colchicine) significantly inhibited phagocytosis. After 15 and 30 min each molecule caused highly significant inhibition. The experiments demonstrate that drugs affecting microtubular assembly dynamics influence differently the diverse (longitudinal, transversal etc.) microtubular systems of Tetrahymena and also differently influence microtubule-dependent physiological processes. The latter are more dependent on microtubular dynamics than are changes in phospholipid signalling.

  14. Is rumen development in newborn calves affected by different liquid feeds and small intestine development?

    PubMed

    Górka, P; Kowalski, Z M; Pietrzak, P; Kotunia, A; Jagusiak, W; Zabielski, R

    2011-06-01

    fed MR. Significant positive Pearson correlations were found between small intestine and reticulorumen weights as well as between activity of brush border lactase, maltase, aminopeptidase A, and aminopeptidase N and reticulorumen weight. Different liquid feeds affect small intestine development, animal growth, solid feed intake and metabolic status of calves and this effect can indirectly influence the development of forestomachs.

  15. Insights into Embryo Defenses of the Invasive Apple Snail Pomacea canaliculata: Egg Mass Ingestion Affects Rat Intestine Morphology and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, Eduardo J.; Heras, Horacio

    2014-01-01

    Background The spread of the invasive snail Pomacea canaliculata is expanding the rat lungworm disease beyond its native range. Their toxic eggs have virtually no predators and unusual defenses including a neurotoxic lectin and a proteinase inhibitor, presumably advertised by a warning coloration. We explored the effect of egg perivitellin fluid (PVF) ingestion on the rat small intestine morphology and physiology. Methodology/Principal Findings Through a combination of biochemical, histochemical, histopathological, scanning electron microscopy, cell culture and feeding experiments, we analyzed intestinal morphology, growth rate, hemaglutinating activity, cytotoxicity and cell proliferation after oral administration of PVF to rats. PVF adversely affects small intestine metabolism and morphology and consequently the standard growth rate, presumably by lectin-like proteins, as suggested by PVF hemaglutinating activity and its cytotoxic effect on Caco-2 cell culture. Short-term effects of ingested PVF were studied in growing rats. PVF-supplemented diet induced the appearance of shorter and wider villi as well as fused villi. This was associated with changes in glycoconjugate expression, increased cell proliferation at crypt base, and hypertrophic mucosal growth. This resulted in a decreased absorptive surface after 3 days of treatment and a diminished rat growth rate that reverted to normal after the fourth day of treatment. Longer exposure to PVF induced a time-dependent lengthening of the small intestine while switching to a control diet restored intestine length and morphology after 4 days. Conclusions/Significance Ingestion of PVF rapidly limits the ability of potential predators to absorb nutrients by inducing large, reversible changes in intestinal morphology and growth rate. The occurrence of toxins that affect intestinal morphology and absorption is a strategy against predation not recognized among animals before. Remarkably, this defense is rather similar to

  16. The Stringent Response Regulator DksA Is Required for Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Growth in Minimal Medium, Motility, Biofilm Formation, and Intestinal Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Azriel, Shalhevet; Goren, Alina; Rahav, Galia

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a facultative intracellular human and animal bacterial pathogen posing a major threat to public health worldwide. Salmonella pathogenicity requires complex coordination of multiple physiological and virulence pathways. DksA is a conserved Gram-negative regulator that belongs to a distinct group of transcription factors that bind directly to the RNA polymerase secondary channel, potentiating the effect of the signaling molecule ppGpp during a stringent response. Here, we established that in S. Typhimurium, dksA is induced during the logarithmic phase and DksA is essential for growth in minimal defined medium and plays an important role in motility and biofilm formation. Furthermore, we determined that DksA positively regulates the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 and motility-chemotaxis genes and is necessary for S. Typhimurium invasion of human epithelial cells and uptake by macrophages. In contrast, DksA was found to be dispensable for S. Typhimurium host cell adhesion. Finally, using the colitis mouse model, we found that dksA is spatially induced at the midcecum during the early stage of the infection and required for gastrointestinal colonization and systemic infection in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that the ancestral stringent response regulator DksA coordinates various physiological and virulence S. Typhimurium programs and therefore is a key virulence regulator of Salmonella. PMID:26553464

  17. Sperm Motility in Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Juarez, Gabriel; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    A wide variety of plants and animals reproduce sexually by releasing motile sperm that seek out a conspecific egg, for example in the reproductive tract for mammals or in the water column for externally fertilizing organisms. Sperm are aided in their quest by chemical cues, but must also contend with hydrodynamic forces, resulting from laminar flows in reproductive tracts or turbulence in aquatic habitats. To understand how velocity gradients affect motility, we subjected swimming sperm to a range of highly-controlled straining flows using a cross-flow microfluidic device. The motion of the cell body and flagellum were captured through high-speed video microscopy. The effects of flow on swimming are twofold. For moderate velocity gradients, flow simply advects and reorients cells, quenching their ability to cross streamlines. For high velocity gradients, fluid stresses hinder the internal bending of the flagellum, directly inhibiting motility. The transition between the two regimes is governed by the Sperm number, which compares the external viscous stresses with the internal elastic stresses. Ultimately, unraveling the role of flow in sperm motility will lead to a better understanding of population dynamics among aquatic organisms and infertility problems in humans.

  18. Intestinal Microbiota of Broiler Chickens As Affected by Litter Management Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingling; Lilburn, Mike; Yu, Zhongtang

    2016-01-01

    Poultry litter is a mixture of bedding materials and enteric bacteria excreted by chickens, and it is typically reused for multiple growth cycles in commercial broiler production. Thus, bacteria can be transmitted from one growth cycle to the next via litter. However, it remains poorly understood how litter reuse affects development and composition of chicken gut microbiota. In this study, the effect of litter reuse on the microbiota in litter and in chicken gut was investigated using 2 litter management regimens: fresh vs. reused litter. Samples of ileal mucosa and cecal digesta were collected from young chicks (10 days of age) and mature birds (35 days of age). Based on analysis using DGGE and pyrosequencing of bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplicons, the microbiota of both the ileal mucosa and the cecal contents was affected by both litter management regimen and age of birds. Faecalibacterium, Oscillospira, Butyricicoccus, and one unclassified candidate genus closely related to Ruminococcus were most predominant in the cecal samples, while Lactobacillus was predominant in the ileal samples at both ages and in the cecal samples collected at day 10. At days 10 and 35, 8 and 3 genera, respectively, in the cecal luminal microbiota differed significantly in relative abundance between the 2 litter management regimens. Compared to the fresh litter, reused litter increased predominance of halotolerant/alkaliphilic bacteria and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a butyrate-producing gut bacterium. This study suggests that litter management regimens affect the chicken GI microbiota, which may impact the host nutritional status and intestinal health. PMID:27242676

  19. Interferon Tau Affects Mouse Intestinal Microbiota and Expression of IL-17

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Chen, Shuai; Zhang, Liwen; Liu, Gang; Hussain, Tarique; Hao, Xiao; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Wu, Guoyao; Bazer, Fuller W.

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the effects of interferon tau (IFNT) on the intestinal microbiota and expression of interleukin 17 (IL-17) in the intestine of mice. IFNT supplementation increased microbial diversity in the jejunum and ileum but decreased microbial diversity in the feces. IFNT supplementation influenced the composition of the intestinal microbiota as follows: (1) decreasing the percentage of Firmicutes and increasing Bacteroidetes in the jejunum and ileum; (2) enhancing the percentage of Firmicutes but decreasing Bacteroidetes in the colon and feces; (3) decreasing Lactobacillus in the jejunum and ileum; (4) increasing the percentage of Blautia, Bacteroides, Alloprevotella, and Lactobacillus in the colon; and (5) increasing the percentage of Lactobacillus, Bacteroides, and Allobaculum, while decreasing Blautia in the feces. Also, IFNT supplementation decreased the expression of IL-17 in the intestines of normal mice and of an intestinal pathogen infected mice. In conclusion, IFNT supplementation modulates the intestinal microbiota and intestinal IL-17 expression, indicating the applicability of IFNT to treat the intestinal diseases involving IL-17 expression and microbiota. PMID:27610003

  20. Commensal microbiota affects ischemic stroke outcome by regulating intestinal γδT cells

    PubMed Central

    Benakis, Corinne; Brea, David; Caballero, Silvia; Faraco, Giuseppe; Moore, Jamie; Murphy, Michelle; Sita, Giulia; Racchumi, Gianfranco; Ling, Lilan; Pamer, Eric G.; Iadecola, Costantino; Anrather, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Commensal gut bacteria impact the host immune system and can influence disease processes in several organs, including the brain. However, it remains unclear whether the microbiota has an impact on the outcome of acute brain injury. Here we show that antibiotic-induced alterations in the intestinal flora reduces ischemic brain injury in mice, an effect transmissible by fecal transplants. Intestinal dysbiosis alters immune homeostasis in the small intestine leading to an increase in regulatory T cells and a reduction in IL-17+ γδ T cells, through altered dendritic cell activity. Dysbiosis suppresses trafficking of effector T cells from the gut to the leptomeninges after stroke. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-17 are required for the neuroprotection afforded by intestinal dysbiosis. The findings reveal a previously unrecognized gut-brain axis and the impact of the intestinal flora and meningeal IL-17+ γδ T cells on ischemic injury. PMID:27019327

  1. Diet Complexity and Estrogen Receptor β Status Affect the Composition of the Murine Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Rani; Watson, Sara E.; Thomas, Laura N.; Allred, Clinton D.; Dabney, Alan; Azcarate-Peril, M. Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal microbial dysbiosis contributes to the dysmetabolism of luminal factors, including steroid hormones (sterones) that affect the development of chronic gastrointestinal inflammation and the incidence of sterone-responsive cancers of the breast, prostate, and colon. Little is known, however, about the role of specific host sterone nucleoreceptors, including estrogen receptor β (ERβ), in microbiota maintenance. Herein, we test the hypothesis that ERβ status affects microbiota composition and determine if such compositionally distinct microbiota respond differently to changes in diet complexity that favor Proteobacteria enrichment. To this end, conventionally raised female ERβ+/+ and ERβ−/− C57BL/6J mice (mean age of 27 weeks) were initially reared on 8604, a complex diet containing estrogenic isoflavones, and then fed AIN-76, an isoflavone-free semisynthetic diet, for 2 weeks. 16S rRNA gene surveys revealed that the fecal microbiota of 8604-fed mice and AIN-76-fed mice differed, as expected. The relative diversity of Proteobacteria, especially the Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria, increased significantly following the transition to AIN-76. Distinct patterns for beneficial Lactobacillales were exclusive to and highly abundant among 8604-fed mice, whereas several Proteobacteria were exclusive to AIN-76-fed mice. Interestingly, representative orders of the phyla Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes, including the Lactobacillales, also differed as a function of murine ERβ status. Overall, these interactions suggest that sterone nucleoreceptor status and diet complexity may play important roles in microbiota maintenance. Furthermore, we envision that this model for gastrointestinal dysbiosis may be used to identify novel probiotics, prebiotics, nutritional strategies, and pharmaceuticals for the prevention and resolution of Proteobacteria-rich dysbiosis. PMID:23872567

  2. Motility of Mycoplasma pneumoniae.

    PubMed Central

    Radestock, U; Bredt, W

    1977-01-01

    Cell of Mycoplasma pneumoniae FH gliding on a glass surface in liquid medium were examined by microscopic observation and quantitatively by microcinematography (30 frames per min). Comparisons were made only within the individual experiments. The cells moved in an irregular pattern with numerous narrow bends and circles. They never changed their leading end. The average speed (without pauses) was relatively constant between o.2 and 0.5 mum/s. The maximum speed was about 1.5 to 2.0 mum/s. The movements were interrupted by resting periods of different lengths and frequency. Temperature, viscosity, pH, and the presence of yeast extract in the medium influenced the motility significantly; changes in glucose, calcium ions, and serum content were less effective. The movements were affected by iodoacetate, p-mercuribenzoate, and mitomycin C at inhibitory or subinhibitory concentrations. Sodium fluoride, sodium cyanide, dinitrophenol, chloramphenicol, puromycin, cholchicin, and cytochalasin B at minimal inhibitory concentrations did not affect motility. The movements were effectively inhibited by anti-M. pneumoniae antiserum. Studies with absorbed antiserum suggested that the surface components involved in motility are heat labile. The gliding of M. pneumoniae cells required an intact energy metabolism and the proteins involved seemed to have a low turnover. Images PMID:14925

  3. A deregulated intestinal cell cycle program disrupts tissue homeostasis without affecting longevity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Petkau, Kristina; Parsons, Brendon D; Duggal, Aashna; Foley, Edan

    2014-10-10

    Recent studies illuminate a complex relationship between the control of stem cell division and intestinal tissue organization in the model system Drosophila melanogaster. Host and microbial signals drive intestinal proliferation to maintain an effective epithelial barrier. Although it is widely assumed that proliferation induces dysplasia and shortens the life span of the host, the phenotypic consequences of deregulated intestinal proliferation for an otherwise healthy host remain unexplored. To address this question, we genetically isolated and manipulated the cell cycle programs of adult stem cells and enterocytes. Our studies revealed that cell cycle alterations led to extensive cell death and morphological disruptions. Despite the extensive tissue damage, we did not observe an impact on longevity, suggesting a remarkable degree of plasticity in intestinal function.

  4. Fascioliasis and Intestinal Parasitoses Affecting Schoolchildren in Atlixco, Puebla State, Mexico: Epidemiology and Treatment with Nitazoxanide

    PubMed Central

    Zumaquero-Ríos, José Lino; Sarracent-Pérez, Jorge; Rojas-García, Raúl; Rojas-Rivero, Lázara; Martínez-Tovilla, Yaneth; Valero, María Adela; Mas-Coma, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    Background The Atlixco municipality, Puebla State, at a mean altitude of 1840 m, was selected for a study of Fasciola hepatica infection in schoolchildren in Mexico. This area presents permanent water collections continuously receiving thaw water from Popocatepetl volcano (5426 m altitude) through the community supply channels, conforming an epidemiological scenario similar to those known in hyperendemic areas of Andean countries. Methodology and Findings A total of 865 6–14 year-old schoolchildren were analyzed with FasciDIG coproantigen test and Lumbreras rapid sedimentation technique, and quantitatively assessed with Kato-Katz. Fascioliasis prevalences ranged 2.94–13.33% according to localities (mean 5.78%). Intensities were however low (24–384 epg). The association between fascioliasis and the habit of eating raw vegetables was identified, including watercress and radish with pronouncedly higher relative risk than lettuce, corncob, spinach, alfalfa juice, and broccoli. Many F. hepatica-infected children were coinfected by other parasites. Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, Giardia intestinalis, Blastocystis hominis, Hymenolepis nana and Ascaris lumbricoides infection resulted in risk factors for F. hepatica infection. Nitazoxanide efficacy against fascioliasis was 94.0% and 100% after first and second treatment courses, respectively. The few children, for whom a second treatment course was needed, were concomitantly infected by moderate ascariasis burdens. Its efficacy was also very high in the treatment of E. histolytica/E. dispar, G. intestinalis, B. hominis, H. nana, A. lumbricoides, Trichuris trichiura, and Enterobius vermicularis. A second treatment course was needed for all children affected by ancylostomatids. Conclusions Fascioliasis prevalences indicate this area to be mesoendemic, with isolated hyperendemic foci. This is the first time that a human fascioliasis endemic area is described in North America. Nitazoxanide appears as an appropriate

  5. Bacillus megaterium SF185 induces stress pathways and affects the cell cycle distribution of human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Di Luccia, B; D'Apuzzo, E; Varriale, F; Baccigalupi, L; Ricca, E; Pollice, A

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between the enteric microbiota and intestinal cells often involves signal molecules that affect both microbial behaviour and host responses. Examples of such signal molecules are the molecules secreted by bacteria that induce quorum sensing mechanisms in the producing microorganism and signal transduction pathways in the host cells. The pentapeptide competence and sporulation factor (CSF) of Bacillus subtilis is a well characterized quorum sensing factor that controls competence and spore formation in the producing bacterium and induces cytoprotective heat shock proteins in intestinal epithelial cells. We analysed several Bacillus strains isolated from human ileal biopsies of healthy volunteers and observed that some of them were unable to produce CSF but still able to act in a CSF-like fashion on model intestinal epithelial cells. One of those strains belonging to the Bacillus megaterium species secreted at least two factors with effects on intestinal HT29 cells: a peptide smaller than 3 kDa able to induce heat shock protein 27 (hsp27) and p38-MAPK, and a larger molecule able to induce protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) with a pro-proliferative effect.

  6. NCAM regulates cell motility.

    PubMed

    Prag, Søren; Lepekhin, Eugene A; Kolkova, Kateryna; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Kawa, Anna; Walmod, Peter S; Belman, Vadym; Gallagher, Helen C; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth; Pedersen, Nina

    2002-01-15

    Cell migration is required during development of the nervous system. The regulatory mechanisms for this process, however, are poorly elucidated. We show here that expression of or exposure to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) strongly affected the motile behaviour of glioma cells independently of homophilic NCAM interactions. Expression of the transmembrane 140 kDa isoform of NCAM (NCAM-140) caused a significant reduction in cellular motility, probably through interference with factors regulating cellular attachment, as NCAM-140-expressing cells exhibited a decreased attachment to a fibronectin substratum compared with NCAM-negative cells. Ectopic expression of the cytoplasmic part of NCAM-140 also inhibited cell motility, presumably via the non-receptor tyrosine kinase p59(fyn) with which NCAM-140 interacts. Furthermore, we showed that the extracellular part of NCAM acted as a paracrine inhibitor of NCAM-negative cell locomotion through a heterophilic interaction with a cell-surface receptor. As we showed that the two N-terminal immunoglobulin modules of NCAM, which are known to bind to heparin, were responsible for this inhibition, we presume that this receptor is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan. A model for the inhibitory effect of NCAM is proposed, which involves competition between NCAM and extracellular components for the binding to membrane-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan.

  7. Influenza Virus Affects Intestinal Microbiota and Secondary Salmonella Infection in the Gut through Type I Interferons.

    PubMed

    Deriu, Elisa; Boxx, Gayle M; He, Xuesong; Pan, Calvin; Benavidez, Sammy David; Cen, Lujia; Rozengurt, Nora; Shi, Wenyuan; Cheng, Genhong

    2016-05-01

    Human influenza viruses replicate almost exclusively in the respiratory tract, yet infected individuals may also develop gastrointestinal symptoms, such as vomiting and diarrhea. However, the molecular mechanisms remain incompletely defined. Using an influenza mouse model, we found that influenza pulmonary infection can significantly alter the intestinal microbiota profile through a mechanism dependent on type I interferons (IFN-Is). Notably, influenza-induced IFN-Is produced in the lungs promote the depletion of obligate anaerobic bacteria and the enrichment of Proteobacteria in the gut, leading to a "dysbiotic" microenvironment. Additionally, we provide evidence that IFN-Is induced in the lungs during influenza pulmonary infection inhibit the antimicrobial and inflammatory responses in the gut during Salmonella-induced colitis, further enhancing Salmonella intestinal colonization and systemic dissemination. Thus, our studies demonstrate a systemic role for IFN-Is in regulating the host immune response in the gut during Salmonella-induced colitis and in altering the intestinal microbial balance after influenza infection.

  8. Orexin-A affects gastric distention sensitive neurons in the hippocampus and gastric motility and regulation by the perifornical area in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shu; Xu, Luo; Sun, Xiangrong; Guo, Feifei; Gong, Yanling; Gao, Shengli

    2016-09-01

    Orexin-A is mainly produced in the lateral hypothalamus (LHA) and the perifornical area (PeF). Here, we aim to elucidate the effects of orexin-A in the hippocampus (Hi) on gastric distention (GD)-sensitive neurons and gastric motility, and potential regulation mechanisms by the PeF. Retrograde tracing and fluorescent-immunohistochemical staining were used to determine orexin-A neuronal projections. Single unit discharges in the Hi were recorded extracellularly and gastric motility in conscious rats was monitored during administration of orexin-A to the Hi or electrical stimulation of the PeF. Orexin-A administration to the Hi excited most of the GD-excitatory (GD-E) neurons and GD-inhibitory (GD-I) neurons, and increased gastric motility in a dose-dependent manner. All of effects induced by orexin-A could be partly blocked by pretreatment with orexin-A antagonist, SB-334867. Electrical stimulation of the PeF excited the majority of the orexin-A-responsive GD neurons in the Hi and promoted gastric motility. Additionally, pretreatment with SB-334867 in the Hi increased the firing rate of GDI and GDE neurons following electrical stimulation of the PeF. These findings suggest that orexin-A could regulate activities of GD-sensitive neurons and gastric motility. Furthermore, the PeF may be involved in this regulatory pathway.

  9. Intentionally reduced intestinal integrity causes inflammation and negatively affects metabolism and productivity in lactating Holstein cows

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Study objectives were to evaluate the effects of intentionally reduced intestinal barrier function on productivity, metabolism, and inflammatory indices in otherwise healthy dairy cows. Fourteen lactating Holstein cows (parity 2.6 ± 0.3; 117 ± 18 days in milk) were enrolled in two experimental perio...

  10. Yeast culture supplement during nursing and transport affects immunity and intestinal microbial ecology of weanling pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weaning and transport stress can have a negative impact on the piglet's immune system and intestinal microbiota. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of a yeast product on innate immunity and microbial ecology of the gastrointestinal tract following stress of weaning and trans...

  11. Intestinal microbial affects of yeast products on weaned and transport stressed pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Study objectives were to determine effects of a commercially available yeast product (XPC, Diamond-V Mills) and stress of transportation on total Enterobacteriaceae, Escherichia coli, coliforms, and Lactobacilli populations in the intestine of weaning pigs. In a RCB design with a 2 x 2 factorial ar...

  12. Rye Affects Bacterial Translocation, Intestinal Viscosity, Microbiota Composition and Bone Mineralization in Turkey Poults

    PubMed Central

    Tellez, Guillermo; Latorre, Juan D.; Kuttappan, Vivek A.; Hargis, Billy M.; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that rye significantly increased both viscosity and Clostridium perfringens proliferation when compared with corn in an in vitro digestive model. Two independent trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of rye as a source of energy on bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, gut microbiota composition, and bone mineralization, when compared with corn in turkey poults. In each experiment, day-of-hatch, turkey poults were randomly assigned to either a corn or a rye diet (n = 0 /group). At 10 d of age, in both experiments, 12 birds/group were given an oral gavage dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d). After 2.5 h of oral gavage, blood and liver samples were collected to evaluate the passage of FITC-d and bacterial translocation (BT) respectively. Duodenum, ileum and cecum gut sections were collected to evaluate intestinal viscosity and to enumerate gut microbiota. Tibias were collected for observation of bone parameters. Broilers fed with a rye diet showed increased (p<0.05) intestinal viscosity, BT, and serum FITC-d. Bacterial enumeration revealed that turkey poults fed with rye had increased the number of total lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in all three sections of the gastrointestinal tract evaluated when compared to turkey poults fed with corn. Turkey poults fed with rye also had significantly higher coliforms in duodenum and ileum but not in the ceca, whereas the total number of anaerobes increased only in duodenum. A significant reduction in bone strength and bone mineralization was observed in turkey poults fed with rye when compared with corn fed turkey poults. In conclusion, rye evoked mucosal damage in turkey poults that increased intestinal viscosity, increased leakage through the intestinal tract, and altered the microbiota composition and bone mineralization. Studies to evaluate dietary inclusion of selected Direct-Fed Microbial (DFM) candidates that produce exogenous enzymes in rye fed turkey poults are

  13. Dietary fibers affect viscosity of solutions and simulated human gastric and small intestinal digesta.

    PubMed

    Dikeman, Cheryl L; Murphy, Michael R; Fahey, George C

    2006-04-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the viscosities of both soluble and insoluble dietary fibers. In Expt. 1, corn bran, defatted rice bran, guar gum, gum xanthan, oat bran, psyllium, soy hulls, stabilized rice bran, wheat bran, wood cellulose, and 2 methylcellulose controls (Ticacel 42, Ticacel 43) were hydrated in water overnight at 0.5, 1, 1.5, or 2% concentrations. In Expt. 2, guar gum, oat bran, psyllium, rice bran, wheat bran, and wood cellulose were subjected to a 2-stage in vitro gastric and small intestinal digestion simulation model. Viscosity was measured every 2 and 3 h during gastric and small intestinal simulation, respectively. Viscosities in both experiments were measured at multiple shear rates. Viscosities of all fiber solutions were concentration- and shear rate-dependent. Rice brans, soy hulls, and wood cellulose had the lowest viscosities, whereas guar gum, psyllium, and xanthan gum had the highest viscosities, regardless of concentration. During gastric simulation, viscosity was higher (P < 0.05) at 4 h than at 0 h for guar gum, psyllium, rice bran, and wheat bran. During small intestinal simulation, viscosities were higher (P < 0.05) between 3 and 9 h compared with 18 h for guar gum, oat bran, and rice bran. Guar gum, psyllium, and oat bran exhibited viscous characteristics throughout small intestinal simulation, indicating potential for these fibers to elicit blood glucose and lipid attenuation. Wheat and rice brans and wood cellulose did not exhibit viscous characteristics throughout small intestinal digestion; thus, they may be beneficial for laxation.

  14. Preterm infant gut microbiota affects intestinal epithelial development in a humanized microbiome gnotobiotic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yueyue; Lu, Lei; Sun, Jun; Petrof, Elaine O; Claud, Erika C

    2016-09-01

    Development of the infant small intestine is influenced by bacterial colonization. To promote establishment of optimal microbial communities in preterm infants, knowledge of the beneficial functions of the early gut microbiota on intestinal development is needed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of early preterm infant microbiota on host gut development using a gnotobiotic mouse model. Histological assessment of intestinal development was performed. The differentiation of four epithelial cell lineages (enterocytes, goblet cells, Paneth cells, enteroendocrine cells) and tight junction (TJ) formation was examined. Using weight gain as a surrogate marker for health, we found that early microbiota from a preterm infant with normal weight gain (MPI-H) induced increased villus height and crypt depth, increased cell proliferation, increased numbers of goblet cells and Paneth cells, and enhanced TJs compared with the changes induced by early microbiota from a poor weight gain preterm infant (MPI-L). Laser capture microdissection (LCM) plus qRT-PCR further revealed, in MPI-H mice, a higher expression of stem cell marker Lgr5 and Paneth cell markers Lyz1 and Cryptdin5 in crypt populations, along with higher expression of the goblet cell and mature enterocyte marker Muc3 in villus populations. In contrast, MPI-L microbiota failed to induce the aforementioned changes and presented intestinal characteristics comparable to a germ-free host. Our data demonstrate that microbial communities have differential effects on intestinal development. Future studies to identify pioneer settlers in neonatal microbial communities necessary to induce maturation may provide new insights for preterm infant microbial ecosystem therapeutics.

  15. Rye affects bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, microbiota composition and bone mineralization in Turkey poults.

    PubMed

    Tellez, Guillermo; Latorre, Juan D; Kuttappan, Vivek A; Hargis, Billy M; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have reported that rye significantly increased both viscosity and Clostridium perfringens proliferation when compared with corn in an in vitro digestive model. Two independent trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of rye as a source of energy on bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, gut microbiota composition, and bone mineralization, when compared with corn in turkey poults. In each experiment, day-of-hatch, turkey poults were randomly assigned to either a corn or a rye diet (n = 0 /group). At 10 d of age, in both experiments, 12 birds/group were given an oral gavage dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d). After 2.5 h of oral gavage, blood and liver samples were collected to evaluate the passage of FITC-d and bacterial translocation (BT) respectively. Duodenum, ileum and cecum gut sections were collected to evaluate intestinal viscosity and to enumerate gut microbiota. Tibias were collected for observation of bone parameters. Broilers fed with a rye diet showed increased (p<0.05) intestinal viscosity, BT, and serum FITC-d. Bacterial enumeration revealed that turkey poults fed with rye had increased the number of total lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in all three sections of the gastrointestinal tract evaluated when compared to turkey poults fed with corn. Turkey poults fed with rye also had significantly higher coliforms in duodenum and ileum but not in the ceca, whereas the total number of anaerobes increased only in duodenum. A significant reduction in bone strength and bone mineralization was observed in turkey poults fed with rye when compared with corn fed turkey poults. In conclusion, rye evoked mucosal damage in turkey poults that increased intestinal viscosity, increased leakage through the intestinal tract, and altered the microbiota composition and bone mineralization. Studies to evaluate dietary inclusion of selected Direct-Fed Microbial (DFM) candidates that produce exogenous enzymes in rye fed turkey poults are

  16. Yeast culture supplement during nursing and transport affects immunity and intestinal microbial ecology of weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    Weedman, S M; Rostagno, M H; Patterson, J A; Yoon, I; Fitzner, G; Eicher, S D

    2011-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the influence of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product on innate immunity and intestinal microbial ecology after weaning and transport stress. In a randomized complete block design, before weaning and in a split-plot analysis of a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement of yeast culture (YY) and transport (TT) after weaning, 3-d-old pigs (n = 108) were randomly assigned within litter (block) to either a control (NY, milk only) or yeast culture diet (YY; delivered in milk to provide 0.1 g of yeast culture product/kg of BW) from d 4 to 21. At weaning (d 21), randomly, one-half of the NY and YY pigs were assigned to a 6-h transport (NY-TT and YY-TT) before being moved to nursery housing, and the other one-half were moved directly to nursery housing (NY-NT and YY-NT, where NT is no transport). The yeast treatment was a 0.2% S. cerevisiae fermentation product and the control treatment was a 0.2% grain blank in feed for 2 wk. On d 1 before transport and on d 1, 4, 7, and 14 after transport, blood was collected for leukocyte assays, and mesenteric lymph node, jejunal, and ileal tissue, and jejunal, ileal, and cecal contents were collected for Toll-like receptor expression (TLR); enumeration of Escherichia coli, total coliforms, and lactobacilli; detection of Salmonella; and microbial analysis. After weaning, a yeast × transport interaction for ADG was seen (P = 0.05). Transport affected (P = 0.09) ADFI after weaning. Yeast treatment decreased hematocrit (P = 0.04). A yeast × transport interaction was found for counts of white blood cells (P = 0.01) and neutrophils (P = 0.02) and for the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (P = 0.02). Monocyte counts revealed a transport (P = 0.01) effect. Interactions of yeast × transport (P = 0.001) and yeast × transport × day (P = 0.09) for TLR2 and yeast × transport (P = 0.08) for TLR4 expression in the mesenteric lymph node were detected. Day affected lactobacilli, total coliform, and E

  17. The Chromatin Assembly Factor Complex 1 (CAF1) and 5-Azacytidine (5-AzaC) Affect Cell Motility in Src-transformed Human Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Akinori; Ly, Tony; Pippa, Raffaella; Bensaddek, Dalila; Nicolas, Armel; Lamond, Angus I.

    2017-01-01

    Tumor invasion into surrounding stromal tissue is a hallmark of high grade, metastatic cancers. Oncogenic transformation of human epithelial cells in culture can be triggered by activation of v-Src kinase, resulting in increased cell motility, invasiveness, and tumorigenicity and provides a valuable model for studying how changes in gene expression cause cancer phenotypes. Here, we show that epithelial cells transformed by activated Src show increased levels of DNA methylation and that the methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine (5-AzaC) potently blocks the increased cell motility and invasiveness induced by Src activation. A proteomic screen for chromatin regulators acting downstream of activated Src identified the replication-dependent histone chaperone CAF1 as an important factor for Src-mediated increased cell motility and invasion. We show that Src causes a 5-AzaC-sensitive decrease in both mRNA and protein levels of the p150 (CHAF1A) and p60 (CHAF1B), subunits of CAF1. Depletion of CAF1 in untransformed epithelial cells using siRNA was sufficient to recapitulate the increased motility and invasive phenotypes characteristic of transformed cells without activation of Src. Maintaining high levels of CAF1 by exogenous expression suppressed the increased cell motility and invasiveness phenotypes when Src was activated. These data identify a critical role of CAF1 in the dysregulation of cell invasion and motility phenotypes seen in transformed cells and also highlight an important role for epigenetic remodeling through DNA methylation for Src-mediated induction of cancer phenotypes. PMID:27872192

  18. Intestinal glucose absorption in calves as affected by different carbohydrate sources.

    PubMed

    Klinger, S; Noci, B; Müller, K; Breves, G

    2013-04-01

    From numerous recent studies, it has been demonstrated that the development of the forestomach system in ruminants and thus microbial carbohydrate fermentation do not exclude the potential of the small intestines for enzymatic carbohydrate digestion and subsequent monosaccharide absorption. However, the role of regulatory nutritional factors is still under discussion. Therefore, we investigated the kinetic parameters of intestinal Na(+) -dependent glucose absorption and SGLT1 expression using isolated brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) from the jejunum of 10-week-old calves kept on either hay, concentrate or corn silage-based diets in addition to milk replacer. While the maximal transport capacity was significantly higher for concentrate and corn silage-fed animals, SGLT1 protein expression was highest in BBMV isolated from hay-fed animals. This observation differs from the prevalent conception that induction of Na(+) -dependent glucose uptake via SGLT1 is based on an increased number of transporters at the brush border membrane.

  19. Bacillus cereus var. toyoi promotes growth, affects the histological organization and microbiota of the intestinal mucosa in rainbow trout fingerlings.

    PubMed

    Gisbert, E; Castillo, M; Skalli, A; Andree, K B; Badiola, I

    2013-06-01

    In this preliminary study, we evaluated the effects of a gram-positive soil bacteria Bacillus cereus var. toyoi on the growth performance, digestive enzyme activities, intestinal morphology, and microbiota in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss fingerlings. Trout were maintained in a recirculation system and fed 2 diets: 1) a commercial trout feed deprived of the probiotic and 2) the same diet but with the spores of the probiotic bacteria dissolved in fish oil during the manufacturing of the feed (final concentration = 2 × 10(4) cfu/g). Each diet was tested in three 400-L cylindroconical tanks (125 fish per tank; initial density = 1.3 kg/m(3); 13.2°C) for a period of 93 d. The probiotic-supplemented diet promoted growth, and the final mean BW and standard length in fish fed the probiotic were 3.4% and 2.1%, respectively, which was greater than the control group (P < 0.05). Fish fed the probiotic showed a more homogeneous distribution in the final BW, with a greater frequency of individuals around the modal of the normal distribution of the population. This result is of practical importance because homogenous production lots can improve rearing practices, reducing hierarchical dominance situations arising from individuals of larger sizes. In addition, the probiotic-supplemented diet increased the level of leukocyte infiltration in the lamina propria of the intestinal mucosa, the number of goblet cells (P < 0.010), and villi height (P < 0.001) but did not affect villi width. The administration of the probiotic changed the intestinal microbiota as indicated by 16S rDNA PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. In this sense, fish fed the probiotic formed a well-defined cluster composed of 1 super clade, whereas compared control fish had a greater degree of diversity in their gut microbiota. These changes in gut microbiota did not affect the specific activity of selected pancreatic and intestinal digestive enzymes. These results indicate that the inclusion of the

  20. Evaluation of epidemiological studies of intestinal bacteria that affected occurrence of colorectal cancer: studies of prevention of colorectal tumors by dairy products and lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Atsuko; Ishikawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Tomiyo; Kono, Koichi

    2010-05-01

    Enviromental factors have been consistently associated with colon cancer risk. In particular, consumption of Western-style diet including red meat is the most widely accepted etiologic risk factor. It has been reported that dietary factors change the proportion of intestinal flora, and it also affects the composition of fecal bile acids and the intestinal activity of some mutagens. In addition, it was suggested that modulating the composition of intestinal flora may reduce the occurrence of colorectal cancer. In this review, we present the clinical studies on the association between intestinal flora and the risk of colorectal cancer that have been carried out to date. The clinical studies of intestinal bacteria related to colorectal cancer risk have not shown consistent results so far, compared with the accomplishments of some basic studies. On the other hand, it was suggested in some clinical studies that lactic acid bacteria reduce the occurrence of colorectal cancer.

  1. Motility and peristaltic flow in maintaining microbiome populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirbagheri, Seyed Amir; Fu, Henry C.

    2016-11-01

    Bacteria are an important component of the microbiome in the digestive tract, and must be able to maintain their population despite the fact that the contents of the intestines are constantly flowing towards evacuation. Many bacteria accomplish this by colonizing the surfaces of the intestines where flows diminish, but some species live in the lumen. We attempt to address whether swimming motility of these species plays an important role in maintaining bacterial population in the face of peristaltic pumping out of the intestine. Using a two-dimensional model of peristaltic flows induced by small-amplitude traveling waves we examine the Lagrangian trajectories of passive bacteria as well as motile bacteria, which are treated as Brownian particles undergoing enhanced diffusion due to the bacteria's run-and-tumble motility. We examine how the densities of growing populations of bacteria depend on the combination of motility and peristaltic flow.

  2. Colostrum quality affects immune system establishment and intestinal development of neonatal calves.

    PubMed

    Yang, M; Zou, Y; Wu, Z H; Li, S L; Cao, Z J

    2015-10-01

    The first meal of a neonatal calf after birth is crucial for survival and health. The present experiment was performed to assess the effects of colostrum quality on IgG passive transfer, immune and antioxidant status, and intestinal morphology and histology in neonatal calves. Twenty-eight Holstein neonatal male calves were used in the current study, 24 of which were assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups: those that received colostrum (GrC), transitional milk (GrT, which was obtained after the first milking on 2-3 d after calving), and bulk tank milk (GrB) only at birth. The 4 extra neonatal calves who were not fed any milk were assigned to the control group and were killed immediately after birth to be a negative control to small intestinal morphology and histology detection. Calves in GrC gained more body weight than in GrT, whereas GrB calves lost 0.4 kg compared with the birth weight. Serum total protein, IgG, and superoxide dismutase concentrations were highest in GrC, GrT was intermediate, whereas GrB was the lowest on d 2, 3, and 7. Apparent efficiency of absorption at 48 h, serum complement 3 (C3), and complement 4 (C4) on d 2, 3, and 7 in GrB was low compared with GrC and GrT. On the contrary, malondialdehyde on d 7 increased in GrB. Calves in GrC had better villus length and width, crypt depth, villus height/crypt depth (V/C) value, and mucosal thickness in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum, whereas GrT calves had lower villus length and width, crypt depth, and mucosal thickness than those fed colostrum. Villi of calves in GrB were nonuniform, sparse, severely atrophied, and apically abscised, and Peyer's patches and hydroncus were detected. Overall, colostrum is the best source for calves in IgG absorption, antioxidant activities, and serum growth metabolites, and promoting intestinal development. The higher quality of colostrum calves ingested, the faster immune defense mechanism and the more healthy intestinal circumstances they established.

  3. Factors affecting calcium precipitation during neutralisation in a simulated intestinal environment.

    PubMed

    Goss, Sandra; Prushko, Jennifer; Bogner, Robin

    2010-10-01

    Maintaining soluble calcium in the gastrointestinal tract after administration of a calcium supplement is essential for intestinal absorption. Due to the low solubility of calcium carbonate, calcium may precipitate as the carbonate salt during intestinal neutralisation with bicarbonate. The influence of neutralising solution, calcium salt and the presence of amino acids and bile components were determined in an in vitro system. After dissolution of calcium citrate or chloride salt in 0.1 N HCl, the mixture was neutralised to pH 7 with either HCO3(-) or OH(-). For further investigation, amino acids or bile components were added to the initial solution to simulate the effect of digested protein and bile, respectively. The pH and PCO2 were monitored, and samples were analysed for calcium during neutralisation. Precipitation of calcium occurred with the citrate salt, while the chloride salt only precipitated at a high secretion rate of HCO3(-), where no calcium remained in solution at pH 7 and PCO2 was at saturation. There was a buffering effect by amino acids, and bile components maintained calcium in solution. The total soluble calcium under the different physiological conditions in vitro may be used to further understand calcium solubility in vivo, a contributing factor of calcium absorption.

  4. Intentionally induced intestinal barrier dysfunction causes inflammation, affects metabolism, and reduces productivity in lactating Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Kvidera, S K; Dickson, M J; Abuajamieh, M; Snider, D B; Fernandez, M V Sanz; Johnson, J S; Keating, A F; Gorden, P J; Green, H B; Schoenberg, K M; Baumgard, L H

    2017-03-22

    Study objectives were to evaluate the effects of intentionally reduced intestinal barrier function on productivity, metabolism, and inflammatory indices in otherwise healthy dairy cows. Fourteen lactating Holstein cows (parity 2.6 ± 0.3; 117 ± 18 d in milk) were enrolled in 2 experimental periods. Period 1 (5 d) served as the baseline for period 2 (7 d), during which cows received 1 of 2 i.v. treatments twice per day: sterile saline or a gamma-secretase inhibitor (GSI; 1.5 mg/kg of body weight). Gamma-secretase inhibitors reduce intestinal barrier function by inhibiting crypt cell differentiation into absorptive enterocytes. During period 2, control cows receiving sterile saline were pair-fed (PF) to the GSI-treated cows, and all cows were killed at the end of period 2. Administering GSI increased goblet cell area 218, 70, and 28% in jejunum, ileum, and colon, respectively. In the jejunum, GSI-treated cows had increased crypt depth and reduced villus height, villus height-to-crypt depth ratio, cell proliferation, and mucosal surface area. Plasma lipopolysaccharide binding protein increased with time, and tended to be increased 42% in GSI-treated cows relative to PF controls on d 5 to 7. Circulating haptoglobin and serum amyloid A concentrations increased (585- and 4.4-fold, respectively) similarly in both treatments. Administering GSI progressively reduced dry matter intake (66%) and, by design, the pattern and magnitude of decreased nutrient intake was similar in PF controls. A similar progressive decrease (42%) in milk yield occurred in both treatments, but we observed no treatment effects on milk components. Cows treated with GSI tended to have increased plasma insulin (68%) and decreased circulating nonesterified fatty acids (29%) compared with PF cows. For both treatments, plasma glucose decreased with time while β-hydroxybutyrate progressively increased. Liver triglycerides increased 221% from period 1 to sacrifice in both treatments. No differences were

  5. Intestinal Fluid Permeability in Atlantic Salmon (Salmo salar L.) Is Affected by Dietary Protein Source

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Haibin; Kortner, Trond M.; Gajardo, Karina; Chikwati, Elvis; Tinsley, John; Krogdahl, Åshild

    2016-01-01

    In Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.), and also in other fish species, certain plant protein ingredients can increase fecal water content creating a diarrhea-like condition which may impair gut function and reduce fish growth. The present study aimed to strengthen understanding of the underlying mechanisms by observing effects of various alternative plant protein sources when replacing fish meal on expression of genes encoding proteins playing key roles in regulation of water transport across the mucosa of the distal intestine (DI). A 48-day feeding trial was conducted with five diets: A reference diet (FM) in which fish meal (72%) was the only protein source; Diet SBMWG with a mix of soybean meal (30%) and wheat gluten (22%); Diet SPCPM with a mix of soy protein concentrate (30%) and poultry meal (6%); Diet GMWG with guar meal (30%) and wheat gluten (14.5%); Diet PM with 58% poultry meal. Compared to fish fed the FM reference diet, fish fed the soybean meal containing diet (SBMWG) showed signs of enteritis in the DI, increased fecal water content of DI chyme and higher plasma osmolality. Altered DI expression of a battery of genes encoding aquaporins, ion transporters, tight junction and adherens junction proteins suggested reduced transcellular transport of water as well as a tightening of the junction barrier in fish fed the SBMWG diet, which may explain the observed higher fecal water content and plasma osmolality. DI structure was not altered for fish fed the other experimental diets but alterations in target gene expression and fecal water content were observed, indicating that alterations in water transport components may take place without clear effects on intestinal structure. PMID:27907206

  6. Intra Amniotic Administration of Raffinose and Stachyose Affects the Intestinal Brush Border Functionality and Alters Gut Microflora Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pacifici, Sarina; Song, Jaehong; Zhang, Cathy; Wang, Qiaoye; Glahn, Raymond P.; Kolba, Nikolai; Tako, Elad

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of two types of prebiotics—stachyose and raffinose—which are present in staple food crops that are widely consumed in regions where dietary Fe deficiency is a health concern. The hypothesis is that these prebiotics will improve Fe status, intestinal functionality, and increase health-promoting bacterial populations in vivo (Gallus gallus). By using the intra-amniotic administration procedure, prebiotic treatment solutions were injected in ovo (day 17 of embryonic incubation) with varying concentrations of a 1.0 mL pure raffinose or stachyose in 18 MΩ H2O. Four treatment groups (50, 100 mg·mL−1 raffinose or stachyose) and two controls (18 MΩ H2O and non-injected) were utilized. At hatch the cecum, small intestine, liver, and blood were collected for assessment of the relative abundance of the gut microflora, relative expression of Fe-related genes and brush border membrane functional genes, hepatic ferritin levels, and hemoglobin levels, respectively. The prebiotic treatments increased the relative expression of brush border membrane functionality proteins (p < 0.05), decreased the relative expression of Fe-related proteins (p < 0.05), and increased villus surface area. Raffinose and stachyose increased the relative abundance of probiotics (p < 0.05), and decreased that of pathogenic bacteria. Raffinose and stachyose beneficially affected the gut microflora, Fe bioavailability, and brush border membrane functionality. Our investigations have led to a greater understanding of these prebiotics’ effects on intestinal health and mineral metabolism. PMID:28335485

  7. Selective mass treatment with ivermectin to control intestinal helminthiases and parasitic skin diseases in a severely affected population.

    PubMed Central

    Heukelbach, Jörg; Winter, Benedikt; Wilcke, Thomas; Muehlen, Marion; Albrecht, Stephan; de Oliveira, Fabíola Araújo Sales; Kerr-Pontes, Lígia Regina Sansigolo; Liesenfeld, Oliver; Feldmeier, Hermann

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the short-term and long-term impact of selective mass treatment with ivermectin on the prevalence of intestinal helminthiases and parasitic skin diseases in an economically depressed community in north-east Brazil. METHODS: An intervention was carried out in a traditional fishing village in north-east Brazil where the population of 605 is heavily affected by ectoparasites and enteroparasites. The prevalence of intestinal helminths was determined by serial stool examination and the prevalence of parasitic skin diseases by clinical inspection. A total of 525 people out of a target population of 576 were treated at baseline. The majority of these were treated with ivermectin (200 microg/kg with a second dose given after 10 days). If ivermectin was contraindicated, participants were treated with albendazole or mebendazole for intestinal helminths or with topical deltamethrin for ectoparasites. Follow-up examinations were performed at 1 month and 9 months after treatment. FINDINGS: Prevalence rates of intestinal helminthiases before treatment and at 1 month and 9 months after mass treatment were: hookworm disease 28.5%, 16.4% and 7.7%; ascariasis 17.1%, 0.4% and 7.2%; trichuriasis 16.5%, 3.4% and 9.4%; strongyloidiasis 11.0%, 0.6% and 0.7%; and hymenolepiasis 0.6%; 0.4% and 0.5%, respectively. Prevalence rates of parasitic skin diseases before treatment and 1 month and 9 months after mass treatment were: active pediculosis 16.1%, 1.0% and 10.3%; scabies 3.8%, 1.0% and 1.5%; cutaneous larva migrans 0.7%, 0% and 0%; tungiasis 51.3%, 52.1% and 31.2%, respectively. Adverse events occurred in 9.4% of treatments. They were all of mild to moderate severity and were transient. CONCLUSION: Mass treatment with ivermectin was an effective and safe means of reducing the prevalence of most of the parasitic diseases prevalent in a poor community in north-east Brazil. The effects of treatment lasted for a prolonged period of time. PMID:15375445

  8. Proteome analysis of the macroscopically affected colonic mucosa of Crohn’s disease and intestinal tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rukmangadachar, Lokesh A.; Makharia, Govind K.; Mishra, Asha; Das, Prasenjit; Hariprasad, Gururao; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Gupta, Siddhartha Datta; Ahuja, Vineet; Acharya, Subrat K.

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation between intestinal tuberculosis (ITB) and Crohn’s disease (CD) is challenging in geographical regions where both these diseases are prevalent. There is a need of biomarkers for differentiation between these two disorders. Colonic biopsies from inflamed mucosa of treatment-naive patients with ITB, CD and controls were used for analysis. Protein extracted from biopsies was digested with trypsin and resulting peptides were labeled with iTRAQ reagents. The peptides were subsequently analyzed using LC-MS/MS for identification and quantification. Gene ontology annotation for proteins was analyzed in PANTHER. Validation experiments were done for six differentially expressed proteins using immunohistochemistry. 533 proteins were identified and 241 proteins were quantified from 5 sets of iTRAQ experiments. While 63 were differentially expressed in colonic mucosa of patients with CD and ITB in at least one set of iTRAQ experiment, 11 proteins were differentially expressed in more than one set of experiments. Six proteins used for validation using immunohistochemistry in a larger cohort of patients; none of them however was differentially expressed in patients with ITB and CD. There are differentially expressed proteins in tissue proteome of CD and ITB. Further experiments are required using a larger cohort of homogeneous tissue samples. PMID:26988818

  9. Inhibition of β-N-acetylglucosaminidase by acetamide affects sperm motility and fertilization success of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii).

    PubMed

    Sarosiek, B; Glogowski, J; Cejko, B I; Kujawa, R; Szczepkowski, M; Kuźmiński, H; Dobosz, S; Kowalski, R K

    2014-03-15

    β-N-Acetylglucosaminidase (β-NAGase) is an enzyme found in the sperm acrosome of numerous animal species including fish. Fish spermatozoa differ in their morphology including acrosome or acrosomeless aquasperm in chondrostean (e.g., sturgeon) and teleostean (e.g., rainbow trout). It has been shown that β-NAGase exists with high activity in both eggs and sperm of these species. The present study shows the potency of β-NAGase in fertilization. In rainbow trout, increase in sperm motility parameters (VAP and MOT) were observed in the presence of acetamide, an inhibitor for β-NAGase. In contrast, sperm motility parameters (VCL, VSL, VAP, MOT, and PRG) were reduced on the Siberian sturgeon in the presence of acetamide. The inhibition of the activity of β-NAGase in rainbow trout spermatozoa was led to a reduction in the number of fertilized eggs from 79% to 40%, whereas in sturgeon no change was observed in fertilization. Moreover, inhibition of β-NAGase in both spermatozoa and eggs of trout and sturgeon resulted in significant decrease in fertilization rate from 79% to 1% in rainbow trout and from 84% to 12% in Siberian sturgeon. Our research proves that β-NAGase can play a significant role in the fertilization process in teleosteans.

  10. Dietary inclusion of feathers affects intestinal microbiota and microbial metabolites in growing Leghorn-type chickens.

    PubMed

    Meyer, B; Bessei, W; Bessei, A W; Vahjen, W; Zentek, J; Harlander-Matauschek, A

    2012-07-01

    Feather pecking in laying hens is a serious behavioral problem that is often associated with feather eating. The intake of feathers may influence the gut microbiota and its metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of 2 different diets, with or without 5% ground feathers, on the gut microbiota and the resulting microbial fermentation products and to identify keratin-degrading bacteria in chicken digesta. One-day-old Lohmann-Selected Leghorn chicks were divided into 3 feeding groups: group A (control), B (5% ground feathers in the diet), and C, in which the control diet was fed until wk 12 and then switched to the 5% feather diet to study the effect of time of first feather ingestion. The gut microbiota was analyzed by cultivation and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of ileum and cecum digesta. Short-chain fatty acids, ammonia, and lactate concentrations were measured as microbial metabolites. The concentration of keratinolytic bacteria increased after feather ingestion in the ileum (P < 0.001) and cecum (P = 0.033). Bacterial species that hydrolyzed keratin were identified as Enterococcus faecium, Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus reuteri-like species (97% sequence homology), and Lactobacillus salivarius-like species (97% sequence homology). Molecular analysis of cecal DNA extracts showed that the feather diet lowered the bacterial diversity indicated by a reduced richness (P < 0.001) and shannon (P = 0.012) index. The pattern of microbial metabolites indicated some changes, especially in the cecum. This study showed that feather intake induced an adaptation of the intestinal microbiota in chickens. It remains unclear to what extent the changed metabolism of the microbiota reflects the feather intake and could have an effect on the behavior of the hens.

  11. Effect of compounds affecting ABCA1 expression and CETP activity on the HDL pathway involved in intestinal absorption of lutein and zeaxanthin.

    PubMed

    Niesor, Eric J; Chaput, Evelyne; Mary, Jean-Luc; Staempfli, Andreas; Topp, Andreas; Stauffer, Andrea; Wang, Haiyan; Durrwell, Alexandre

    2014-12-01

    The antioxidant xanthophylls lutein and zeaxanthin are absorbed from the diet in a process involving lipoprotein formation. Selective mechanisms exist for their intestinal uptake and tissue-selective distribution, but these are poorly understood. We investigated the role of high-density lipoprotein (HDL), apolipoprotein (apo) A1 and ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABC) A1 in intestinal uptake of lutein in a human polarized intestinal cell culture and a hamster model. Animals received dietary lutein and zeaxanthin and either a liver X receptor (LXR) agonist or statin, which up- or down-regulate intestinal ABCA1 expression, respectively. The role of HDL was studied following treatment with the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) modulator dalcetrapib or the CETP inhibitor anacetrapib. In vitro, intestinal ABCA1 at the basolateral surface of enterocytes transferred lutein and zeaxanthin to apoA1, not to mature HDL. In hamsters, plasma lutein and zeaxanthin levels were markedly increased with the LXR agonist and decreased with simvastatin. Dalcetrapib, but not anacetrapib, increased plasma and liver lutein and zeaxanthin levels. ABCA1 expression and apoA1 acceptor activity are important initial steps in intestinal uptake and maintenance of lutein and zeaxanthin levels by an HDL-dependent pathway. Their absorption may be improved by physiological and pharmacological interventions affecting HDL metabolism.

  12. Nutrient utilisation and intestinal fermentation are differentially affected by the consumption of resistant starch varieties and conventional fibres in pigs.

    PubMed

    Rideout, Todd C; Liu, Qiang; Wood, Peter; Fan, Ming Z

    2008-05-01

    This study examined the influence of different resistant starch (RS) varieties and conventional fibres on the efficiency of nutrient utilisation and intestinal fermentation in pigs. Thirty-six pigs (30 kg) were fed poultry meal-based diets supplemented with 10 % granular resistant corn starch (GCS), granular resistant potato starch (GPS), retrograded resistant corn starch (RCS), guar gum (GG) or cellulose for 36 d according to a completely randomised block design. Distal ileal and total tract recoveries were similar (P>0.05) among the RS varieties. Distal ileal starch recovery was higher (P < 0.05) in pigs consuming the RS diets (27-42 %) as compared with the control group (0.64 %). Consumption of GCS reduced (P < 0.05) apparent total tract digestibility and whole-body retention of crude protein in comparison with the control group. Consumption of GPS reduced (P < 0.05) total tract Ca digestibility and whole-body retention of Ca and P compared with the control group. However, consumption of RCS increased (P < 0.05) total tract Ca digestibility compared with the control group. Caecal butyrate concentration was increased (P < 0.05) following consumption of RCS and GG in comparison with the control group. Consumption of all the RS varieties reduced (P < 0.05) caecal indole concentrations compared with the control. Caecal butyrate concentrations were positively correlated (P < 0.05; r 0.63-0.83) with thermal properties among the RS varieties. We conclude that nutrient utilisation and intestinal fermentation are differentially affected by the consumption of different RS varieties and types of fibres. Thermal properties associated with different RS varieties may be useful markers for developing RS varieties with specific functionality.

  13. A high-fat diet raises fasting plasma CCK but does not affect upper gut motility, PYY, and ghrelin, or energy intake during CCK-8 infusion in lean men.

    PubMed

    Little, Tanya J; Feltrin, Kate L; Horowitz, Michael; Meyer, James H; Wishart, Judith; Chapman, Ian M; Feinle-Bisset, Christine

    2008-01-01

    There is evidence from studies in animals that the effects of both fat and CCK on gastrointestinal function and energy intake are attenuated by consumption of a high-fat diet. In humans, the effects of exogenous CCK-8 on antropyloroduodenal motility, plasma CCK, peptide YY (PYY), and ghrelin concentrations, appetite, and energy intake are attenuated by a high-fat diet. Ten healthy lean males consumed isocaloric diets (~15,400 kJ per day), containing either 44% (high-fat, HF) or 9% (low-fat, LF) fat, for 21 days in single-blind, randomized, cross-over fashion. Immediately following each diet (i.e., on day 22), subjects received a 45-min intravenous infusion of CCK-8 (2 ng.kg(-1).min(-1)), and effects on antropyloroduodenal motility, plasma CCK, PYY, ghrelin concentrations, hunger, and fullness were determined. Thirty minutes after commencement of the infusion, subjects were offered a buffet-style meal, from which energy intake (in kilojoules) was quantified. Body weight was unaffected by the diets. Fasting CCK (P < 0.05), but not PYY and ghrelin, concentrations were greater following the HF, compared with the LF, diet. Infusion of CCK-8 stimulated pyloric pressures (P < 0.01) and suppressed antral and duodenal pressures (P < 0.05), with no difference between the diets. Energy intake also did not differ between the diets. Short-term consumption of a HF diet increases fasting plasma CCK concentrations but does not affect upper gut motility, PYY and ghrelin, or energy intake during CCK-8 infusion, in a dose of 2 ng.kg(-1).min(-1), in healthy males.

  14. Select Acetophenones Modulate Flagellar Motility in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Shakila K.; Pearce, Austin A.; Ibezim, Prudence K.; Primm, Todd P.; Gaillard, Anne R.

    2009-01-01

    Acetophenones were screened for activity against positive phototaxis of Chlamydomonas cells, a process that requires coordinated flagellar motility. The structure-activity relationships of a series of acetophenones are reported, including acetophenones that affect flagellar motility and cell viability. Notably, 4-methoxyacetophenone, 3,4-dimethoxyacetophenone, and 4-hydroxyacetophenone induced negative phototaxis in Chlamydomonas, suggesting interference with activity of flagellar proteins and control of flagellar dominance. PMID:20659114

  15. Gluten affects epithelial differentiation-associated genes in small intestinal mucosa of coeliac patients.

    PubMed

    Juuti-Uusitalo, K; Mäki, M; Kainulainen, H; Isola, J; Kaukinen, K

    2007-11-01

    In coeliac disease gluten induces an immunological reaction in genetically susceptible patients, and influences on epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation in the small-bowel mucosa. Our aim was to find novel genes which operate similarly in epithelial proliferation and differentiation in an epithelial cell differentiation model and in coeliac disease patient small-bowel mucosal biopsy samples. The combination of cDNA microarray data originating from a three-dimensional T84 epithelial cell differentiation model and small-bowel mucosal biopsy samples from untreated and treated coeliac disease patients and healthy controls resulted in 30 genes whose mRNA expression was similarly affected. Nine of 30 were located directly or indirectly in the receptor tyrosine kinase pathway starting from the epithelial growth factor receptor. Removal of gluten from the diet resulted in a reversion in the expression of 29 of the 30 genes in the small-bowel mucosal biopsy samples. Further characterization by blotting and labelling revealed increased epidermal growth factor receptor and beta-catenin protein expression in the small-bowel mucosal epithelium in untreated coeliac disease patients compared to healthy controls and treated coeliac patients. We found 30 genes whose mRNA expression was affected similarly in the epithelial cell differentiation model and in the coeliac disease patient small-bowel mucosal biopsy samples. In particular, those genes involved in the epithelial growth factor-mediated signalling pathways may be involved in epithelial cell differentiation and coeliac disease pathogenesis. The epithelial cell differentiation model is a useful tool for studying gene expression changes in the crypt-villus axis.

  16. Giardia Flagellar Motility Is Not Directly Required to Maintain Attachment to Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    House, Susan A.; Richter, David J.; Pham, Jonathan K.; Dawson, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Giardia trophozoites attach to the intestinal microvilli (or inert surfaces) using an undefined “suction-based” mechanism, and remain attached during cell division to avoid peristalsis. Flagellar motility is a key factor in Giardia's pathogenesis and colonization of the host small intestine. Specifically, the beating of the ventral flagella, one of four pairs of motile flagella, has been proposed to generate a hydrodynamic force that results in suction-based attachment via the adjacent ventral disc. We aimed to test this prevailing “hydrodynamic model” of attachment mediated by flagellar motility. We defined four distinct stages of attachment by assessing surface contacts of the trophozoite with the substrate during attachment using TIRF microscopy (TIRFM). The lateral crest of the ventral disc forms a continuous perimeter seal with the substrate, a cytological indication that trophozoites are fully attached. Using trophozoites with two types of molecularly engineered defects in flagellar beating, we determined that neither ventral flagellar beating, nor any flagellar beating, is necessary for the maintenance of attachment. Following a morpholino-based knockdown of PF16, a central pair protein, both the beating and morphology of flagella were defective, but trophozoites could still initiate proper surface contacts as seen using TIRFM and could maintain attachment in several biophysical assays. Trophozoites with impaired motility were able to attach as well as motile cells. We also generated a strain with defects in the ventral flagellar waveform by overexpressing a dominant negative form of alpha2-annexin::GFP (D122A, D275A). This dominant negative alpha2-annexin strain could initiate attachment and had only a slight decrease in the ability to withstand normal and shear forces. The time needed for attachment did increase in trophozoites with overall defective flagellar beating, however. Thus while not directly required for attachment, flagellar motility is

  17. Microvillus inclusion disease: a genetic defect affecting apical membrane protein traffic in intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Ameen, N A; Salas, P J

    2000-01-01

    The striking similarities between microvillus inclusions (MIs) in enterocytes in microvillus inclusion disease (MID) and vacuolar apical compartment in tissue culture epithelial cells, led us to analyze endoscopic biopsies of duodenal mucosa of a patient after the samples were used for diagnostic procedures. Samples from another patient with an unrelated disease were used as controls. The MID enterocytes showed a decrease in the thickness of the apical F-actin layer, and normal microtubules. The immunofluorescence analysis of the distribution of five apical membrane markers (sucrase isomaltase, alkaline phosphatase, NHE-3 Na+/H+ exchanger, cGMP-dependent protein kinase, and cystic fibrosis trans-membrane conductance regulator), showed low levels of these proteins in their standard localization at the apical membrane as compared with normal duodenal epithelium processed in parallel. Instead, four of these markers were found in a diffuse distribution in the apical cytoplasm, below the terminal web (as indicated by co-localization with F-actin and cytokeratin 19), and in MIs as well. The basolateral protein Na(+)-K+ATPase, in contrast, was normally localized. These results support the hypothesis that MID may represent the first genetic defect affecting apical membrane traffic, possibly in a late step of apical exocytosis.

  18. Defects in D-rhamnosyl residue biosynthetic genes affect lipopolysaccharide structure, motility, and cell-surface hydrophobicity in Pseudomonas syringae pathovar glycinea race 4.

    PubMed

    Chiku, Kazuhiro; Tsunemi, Kazuhiko; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Ohnishi-Kameyama, Mayumi; Yoshida, Mitsuru; Ishii, Tadashi; Taguchi, Fumiko; Iwaki, Masako; Ichinose, Yuki; Ono, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    D-rhamnose (D-Rha) residue is a major component of lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) in strains of the phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar glycinea. To investigate the effects of a deficiency in GDP-D-rhamnose biosynthetic genes on LPS structure and pathogenicity, we generated three mutants defective in D-Rha biosynthetic genes, encoding proteins GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD), GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-D-mannose reductase (RMD), and a putative α-D-rhamnosyltransferase (WbpZ) in P. syringae pv. glycinea race 4. The Δgmd, Δrmd, and ΔwbpZ mutants had a reduced O-antigen polysaccharide consisting of D-Rha residues as compared with the wild type (WT). The swarming motility of the Δgmd, Δrmd, and ΔwbpZ mutant strains decreased and hydrophobicity and adhesion ability increased as compared with WT. Although the mutants had truncated O-antigen polysaccharides, and altered surface properties, they showed virulence to soybean, as WT did.

  19. Chemical form of selenium affects its uptake, transport and glutathione peroxidase activity in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determining the effect of selenium (Se) chemical form on uptake and transport in human intestinal cells is critical to assess Se bioavailability. In the present study, we measured the uptake and transport of various Se compounds in the human intestinal Caco-2 cell model. We found that two sources...

  20. Bacterial fermentation affects net mineral flux in the large intestine of pigs fed diets with viscous and fermentable nonstarch polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Zebeli, B U; Hooda, S; Mosenthin, R; Gänzle, M G; Zijlstra, R T

    2010-10-01

    CEL than for CMC, LG, and HG. In conclusion, these data indicate that the stimulation of fermentation by dietary NSP affects net mineral flux in the large intestine that, in turn, can influence mineral excretion in feces. Additionally, negative effects of CEL on apparent retention may increase the daily requirement for minerals of grower pigs.

  1. Age-related P-glycoprotein expression in the intestine and affecting the pharmacokinetics of orally administered enrofloxacin in broilers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mengjie; Bughio, Shamsuddin; Sun, Yong; Zhang, Yu; Dong, Lingling; Dai, Xiaohua; Wang, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Bioavailability is the most important factor for the efficacy of any drug and it is determined by P- glycoprotein (P-gp) expression. Confirmation of P-gp expression during ontogeny is needed for understanding the differences in therapeutic efficacy of any drug in juvenile and adult animals. In this study, Abcb1 mRNA levels in the liver and intestine of broilers during ontogeny were analysed by RT qPCR. Cellular distribution of P-gp was detected by immunohistochemstry. Age-related differences of enrofloxacin pharmacokinetics were also studied. It was found that broilers aged 4 week-old expressed significantly (P<0.01) higher levels of P-gp mRNA in the liver, jejunum and ileum, than at other ages. However, there was no significant (P>0.05) age-related difference in the duodenum. Furthermore, the highest and lowest levels of Abcb1 mRNA expression were observed in the jejunum, and duodenum, respectively. P-gp immunoreactivity was detected on the apical surface of the enterocytes and in the bile canalicular membranes of the hepatocytes. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that the 8 week-old broilers, when orally administrated enrofloxacin, exhibited significantly higher Cmax (1.97 vs. 0.98 μg • ml(-1), P=0.009), AUC(14.54 vs. 9.35 μg • ml(-1) • h, P=0.005) and Ka (1.38 vs. 0.43 h(-1), P=0.032), as well as lower Tpeak (1.78 vs. 3.28 h, P=0.048) and T1/2 ka (0.6 vs. 1.64 h, P=0.012) than the 4 week-old broilers. The bioavailability of enrofloxacin in 8 week-old broilers was increased by 15.9%, compared with that in 4 week-old birds. Interestingly, combining verapamil, a P-gp modulator, significantly improved pharmacokinetic behaviour of enrofloxacin in all birds. The results indicate juvenile broilers had a higher expression of P-gp in the intestine, affecting the pharmacokinetics and reducing the bioavailability of oral enrofloxacin in broilers. On the basis of our results, it is recommended that alternative dose regimes are necessary for different ages of

  2. Mouse infection and pathogenesis by Trypanosoma brucei motility mutants.

    PubMed

    Kisalu, Neville K; Langousis, Gerasimos; Bentolila, Laurent A; Ralston, Katherine S; Hill, Kent L

    2014-06-01

    The flagellum of Trypanosoma brucei is an essential and multifunctional organelle that drives parasite motility and is receiving increased attention as a potential drug target. In the mammalian host, parasite motility is suspected to contribute to infection and disease pathogenesis. However, it has not been possible to test this hypothesis owing to lack of motility mutants that are viable in the bloodstream life cycle stage that infects the mammalian host. We recently identified a bloodstream-form motility mutant in 427-derived T. brucei in which point mutations in the LC1 dynein subunit disrupt propulsive motility but do not affect viability. These mutants have an actively beating flagellum, but cannot translocate. Here we demonstrate that the LC1 point mutant fails to show enhanced cell motility upon increasing viscosity of the surrounding medium, which is a hallmark of wild type T. brucei, thus indicating that motility of the mutant is fundamentally altered compared with wild type cells. We next used the LC1 point mutant to assess the influence of trypanosome motility on infection in mice. Wesurprisingly found that disrupting parasite motility has no discernible effect on T. brucei bloodstream infection. Infection time-course, maximum parasitaemia, number of waves of parasitaemia, clinical features and disease outcome are indistinguishable between motility mutant and control parasites. Our studies provide an important step toward understanding the contribution of parasite motility to infection and a foundation for future investigations of T. brucei interaction with the mammalian host.

  3. Lack of Intestinal Epithelial Atg7 Affects Paneth Cell Granule Formation but Does Not Compromise Immune Homeostasis in the Gut

    PubMed Central

    Wittkopf, Nadine; Günther, Claudia; Martini, Eva; Waldner, Maximilian; Amann, Kerstin U.; Neurath, Markus F.; Becker, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms of autophagy-related genes have been associated with an increased risk to develop inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Autophagy is an elementary process participating in several cellular events such as cellular clearance and nonapoptotic programmed cell death. Furthermore, autophagy may be involved in intestinal immune homeostasis due to its participation in the digestion of intracellular pathogens and in antigen presentation. In the present study, the role of autophagy in the intestinal epithelial layer was investigated. The intestinal epithelium is essential to maintain gut homeostasis, and defects within this barrier have been associated with the pathogenesis of IBD. Therefore, mice with intestinal epithelial deletion of Atg7 were generated and investigated in different mouse models. Knockout mice showed reduced size of granules and decreased levels of lysozyme in Paneth cells. However, this was dispensable for gut immune homeostasis and had no effect on susceptibility in mouse models of experimentally induced colitis. PMID:22291845

  4. Real-time gastric motility monitoring using transcutaneous intraluminal impedance measurements (TIIM).

    PubMed

    Poscente, M D; Wang, G; Filip, D; Ninova, P; Yadid-Pecht, O; Andrews, C N; Mintchev, M P

    2014-02-01

    The stomach plays a critical role in digestion, processing ingested food mechanically and breaking it up into particles, which can be effectively and efficiently processed by the intestines. When the motility of the stomach is compromised, digestion is adversely affected. This can lead to a variety of disorders. Current diagnostic techniques for gastric motility disorders are seriously lacking, and are based more on eliminating other possibilities rather than on specific tests. Presently, gastric motility can be assessed by monitoring gastric emptying, food transit, intragastric pressures, etc. The associated tests are usually stationary and of relatively short duration. The present study proposes a new method of measuring gastric motility, utilizing the attenuation of an oscillator-induced electrical signal across the gastric tissue, which is modulated by gastric contractions. The induced high-frequency oscillator signal is generated within the stomach, and is picked up transluminally by cutaneous electrodes positioned on the abdominal area connected to a custom-designed data acquisition instrument. The proposed method was implemented in two different designs: first a transoral catheter was modified to emit the signal inside the stomach; and second, a gastric retentive pill was designed to emit the signal. Both implementations were applied in vivo on two mongrel dogs (25.50 kg and 25.75 kg). Gastric contractions were registered and quantitatively compared to recordings from force transducers sutured onto the serosa of the stomach. Gastric motility indices were calculated for each minute, with transluminal impedance measurements and the measurements from the force transducers showing statistically significant (p < 0.05) Pearson correlation coefficients (0.65 ± 0.08 for the catheter-based design and 0.77 ± 0.03 for the gastric retentive pill design). These results show that transcutaneous intraluminal impedance measurement has the potential with further research

  5. Assessment of the Effect of Intestinal Permeability Probes (Lactulose And Mannitol) and Other Liquids on Digesta Residence Times in Various Segments of the Gut Determined by Wireless Motility Capsule: A Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sequeira, Ivana R.; Lentle, Roger G.; Kruger, Marlena C.; Hurst, Roger D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Whilst the use of the mannitol/lactulose test for intestinal permeability has been long established it is not known whether the doses of these sugars modify transit time Similarly it is not known whether substances such as aspirin that are known to increase intestinal permeability to lactulose and mannitol and those such as ascorbic acid which are stated to be beneficial to gastrointestinal health also influence intestinal transit time. Methods Gastric and intestinal transit times were determined with a SmartPill following consumption of either a lactulose mannitol solution, a solution containing 600 mg aspirin, a solution containing 500 mg of ascorbic acid or an extract of blackcurrant, and compared by doubly repeated measures ANOVA with those following consumption of the same volume of a control in a cross-over study in six healthy female volunteers. The dominant frequencies of cyclic variations in gastric pressure recorded by the Smartpill were determined by fast Fourier transforms. Results The gastric transit times of lactulose mannitol solutions, of aspirin solutions and of blackcurrant juice did not differ from those of the control. The gastric transit times of the ascorbic acid solutions were significantly shorter than those of the other solutions. There were no significant differences between the various solutions either in the total small intestinal or colonic transit times. The intraluminal pHs during the initial quartiles of the small intestinal transit times were lower than those in the succeeding quartiles. This pattern did not vary with the solution that was consumed. The power of the frequencies of cyclic variation in intragastric pressure recorded by the Smartpill declined exponentially with increase in frequency and did not peak at the reported physiological frequencies of gastric contractile activity. Conclusions Whilst the segmental residence times were broadly similar to those using other methods, the high degree of variation between

  6. Influence of the Enteric Nervous System on Gut Motility Patterns in Zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ryan; Ganz, Julia; Melancon, Ellie; Eisen, Judith; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    The enteric nervous system (ENS), composed of diverse neuronal subtypes and glia, regulates essential gut functions including motility, secretion, and homeostasis. In humans and animals, decreased numbers of enteric neurons lead to a variety of types of gut dysfunction. However, surprisingly little is known about how the number, position, or subtype of enteric neurons affect the regulation of gut peristalsis, due to the lack of good model systems and the lack of tools for the quantitative characterization of gut motion. We have therefore developed a method of quantitative spatiotemporal mapping using differential interference contrast microscopy and particle image velocimetry, and have applied this to investigate intestinal dynamics in normal and mutant larval zebrafish. From movies of gut motility, we obtain a velocity vector field representative of gut motion, from which we can quantify parameters relating to gut peristalsis such as frequency, wave speed, deformation amplitudes, wave duration, and non-linearity of waves. We show that mutants with reduced neuron number have contractions that are more regular in time and reduced in amplitude compared to wild-type (normal) fish. We also show that feeding fish before their yolk is consumed leads to stronger motility patterns. We acknowledge support from NIH awards P50 GM098911 and P01 HD022486.

  7. Overexpression of Peroxiredoxin 4 Affects Intestinal Function in a Dietary Mouse Model of Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Hirotsugu; Mazaki, Yuichi; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Izumi, Hiroto; Wang, Ke-Yong; Guo, Xin; Uramoto, Hidetaka; Kohno, Kimitoshi; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Fujii, Junichi; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki; Tanimoto, Akihide; Nakayama, Toshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence has shown that methionine- and choline-deficient high fat (MCD+HF) diet induces the development of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), in which elevated reactive oxygen species play a crucial role. We have reported that peroxiredoxin 4 (PRDX4), a unique secretory member of the PRDX antioxidant family, protects against NAFLD progression. However, the detailed mechanism and potential effects on the intestinal function still remain unclear. Methods & Results Two weeks after feeding mice a MCD+HF diet, the livers of human PRDX4 transgenic (Tg) mice exhibited significant suppression in the development of NAFLD compared with wild-type (WT) mice. The serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances levels were significantly lower in Tg mice. In contrast, the Tg small intestine with PRDX4 overexpression showed more suppressed shortening of total length and villi height, and more accumulation of lipid in the jejunum, along with lower levels of dihydroethidium binding. The enterocytes exhibited fewer apoptotic but more proliferating cells, and inflammation was reduced in the mucosa. Furthermore, the small intestine of Tg mice had significantly higher expression of cholesterol absorption-regulatory factors, including liver X receptor-α, but lower expression of microsomal triglyceride-transfer protein. Conclusion Our present data provide the first evidence of the beneficial effects of PRDX4 on intestinal function in the reduction of the severity of NAFLD, by ameliorating oxidative stress-induced local and systemic injury. We can suggest that both liver and intestine are spared, to some degree, by the antioxidant properties of PRDX4. PMID:27035833

  8. Utilization of rye as energy source affects bacterial translocation, intestinal viscosity, microbiota composition, and bone mineralization in broiler chickens

    PubMed Central

    Tellez, Guillermo; Latorre, Juan D.; Kuttappan, Vivek A.; Kogut, Michael H.; Wolfenden, Amanda; Hernandez-Velasco, Xochitl; Hargis, Billy M.; Bottje, Walter G.; Bielke, Lisa R.; Faulkner, Olivia B.

    2014-01-01

    Two independent trials were conducted to evaluate the utilization of rye as energy source on bacterial translocation (BT), intestinal viscosity, gut integrity, gut microbiota composition, and bone mineralization, when compared with a traditional cereal (corn) in broiler chickens. In each experiment, day-of-hatch, broiler chickens were randomly assigned to either a corn or a rye diet (n = 20 chickens/group). At 10 d of age, in both experiments, 12 chickens/group were randomly selected, and given an oral gavage dose of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran (FITC-d). After 2.5 h of oral gavage, blood samples were collected to determine the passage of FITC-d. The liver was collected from each bird to evaluate BT. Duodenum, ileum, and cecum gut sections were collected to evaluate intestinal viscosity and to enumerate gut microbiota. Tibias were collected for observation of bone parameters. Broilers fed with rye showed increased (p < 0.05) intestinal viscosity, BT, and serum FITC-d. Bacterial enumeration revealed that chickens fed with rye had increased the number of total lactic acid bacteria in all three sections of the gastrointestinal tract evaluated when compared to chickens fed with corn. Chickens fed with rye also had significantly higher coliforms in duodenum and ileum, whereas the total number of anaerobes increased only in duodenum. A significant reduction in bone strength and bone mineralization was observed in chickens fed with rye when compared with corn fed chickens. In conclusion, rye evoked mucosal damage in chickens that alter the intestinal viscosity, increased leakage through the intestinal tract, and altered the microbiota composition as well as bone mineralization. Studies to evaluate dietary inclusion of selected DFM candidates that produce exogenous enzymes in rye fed chickens are currently being evaluated. PMID:25309584

  9. Heavy metal pollution across sites affecting the intestinal helminth communities of the Egyptian lizard, Chalcides ocellatus (Forskal, 1775).

    PubMed

    Soliman, M F M

    2012-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the possible effects of heavy metal pollution across sites and some biological factors on helminth communities infecting the lizard, Chalcides ocellatus. The possibility of heavy metal accumulation by such helminths was also investigated. A total of 202 C. ocellatus were collected from three different sites (industrial, rural, and urban systems) in Ismailia governorate, Egypt, during summer 2009. The lizards were classified according to their sex and size and were examined for the intestinal helminths. Heavy metal levels were detected in the intestinal tissue of the lizards and the recovered helminths. Species richness was 6, 5, and 3 in rural, urban, and industrial systems, respectively. Significant site variations regarding infection prevalence, intensity, and abundance were encountered at different levels. Some noticeable effects of the host size were found. The significant differences found between the metal levels of the intestinal tissues and the recovered helminths and the other relations found in this study may be indications for a possible metals accumulation capacity by helminths. The cestode Oochoristica tuberculata could be a promising biomonitor for Cu and Pb, while the intestinal nematodes were less sensitive to the pollution. Differences in the accumulation capacity may be attributed to the intensity of infection, parasite species, and metal. The observed patterns of distribution and occurrence of helminths and the metals accumulation capacity reflect the need for more studies since this study proposes the model intestinal helminth/C. ocellatus as another promising bioindication system in the terrestrial habitat, especially in areas where the lizard C. ocellatus are available.

  10. Microgravity, bacteria, and the influence of motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benoit, Michael R.; Klaus, David M.

    Space microbiology studies date back to the 1960s, with most investigations reporting that increased bacterial populations occur in flight compared to ground controls. Several exceptions to these findings, however, have created controversy and complicated explanations of how, or whether, microgravity affects microorganisms. Upon closer examination of the literature, we identified a trend relating cell motility to experimental outcome. Related studies conducted in microgravity analog devices, such as the clinostat or rotating wall vessel bioreactor, further corroborate this trend. We review the literature regarding bacterial growth experiments conducted in space (and using microgravity analogs) and analyze the influence of bacterial motility.

  11. Gastrointestinal motility testing--a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Quigley, E M

    1995-01-01

    The role of motility tests in the evaluation of some common disorders in which motility has been assumed to play a role is reviewed. Three separate areas, non-cardiac chest pain, constipation and the irritable bowel syndrome are discussed. In each area, considerable difficulty in the clinical definition of these disorders persists and presents a major obstacle to the evaluation of diagnostic tests. With regard to non-cardiac chest pain, it is apparent that gastro-oesophageal reflux and sensory/perception abnormalities, rather than dysmotility, are the predominant factors, and investigations should take account of this. While studies of colonic and small intestinal motility have demonstrated various abnormal patterns in patients described as suffering from the irritable bowel syndrome, the specificity of any of these motor 'abnormalities' remains uncertain, and manometry cannot be recommended as a diagnostic tool in this context. Considerable advances have been made in our understanding of gut motor physiology and in our ability to accurately record motor function in man, the basic pathophysiology of many 'functional' gut syndromes remains unclear, and the role of dysmotility, in particular, poorly defined.

  12. Motility of Mollicutes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolgemuth, Charles; Igoshin, Oleg; Oster, George

    2003-03-01

    Recent experiments show that the conformation of filament proteins play a role in the motility and morphology of many different types of bacteria. Conformational changes in the protein subunits may produce forces to drive propulsion and cell division. Here we present a molecular mechanism by which these forces can drive cell motion. Coupling of a biochemical cycle, such as ATP hydrolysis, to the dynamics of elastic filaments enable elastic filaments to propagate deformations that generate propulsive forces. We demonstrate this possibility for two classes of wall-less bacteria called mollicutes: the swimming of helical shaped Spiroplasma, and the gliding motility of Mycoplasma. Similar mechanisms may explain the locomotion of other prokaryotes, including the swimming of Synechococcus and the gliding of some myxobacteria.

  13. Modeling collective cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    Eukaryotic cells often move in groups, a critical aspect of many biological and medical processes including wound healing, morphogenesis and cancer metastasis. Modeling can provide useful insights into the fundamental mechanisms of collective cell motility. Constructing models that incorporate the physical properties of the cells, however, is challenging. Here, I discuss our efforts to build a comprehensive cell motility model that includes cell membrane properties, cell-substrate interactions, cell polarity, and cell-cell interaction. The model will be applied to a variety of systems, including motion on micropatterned substrates and the migration of border cells in Drosophila. This work was supported by NIH Grant No. P01 GM078586 and NSF Grant No. 1068869.

  14. [Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction].

    PubMed

    Muñoz, M T; Solís Herruzo, J A

    2007-02-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a syndrome characterized by the presence of recurrent episodes of clinical intestinal obstruction in the absence of obstructive lesions. Although this syndrome is rare, it causes a high morbidity. It is caused by a disturbance of the intestinal motility, that results in a failure of the progression of the intestinal content. Basically, the failure of the intestinal motility is a consequence of muscular disorder, neurological disorder or both. Usually, CIPO is secondary to other systemic disease; however, in the last years, many cases of primary CIPO have been described. The use of new manometric tecniques and specific histological procedures have allowed to clarify the pathogenesis of some of these entities including mitochondrial diseases and paraneoplasic syndromes. Clinical manifestations of CIPO are diverse, depending on the location and extension of the motility disorder. As the diagnosis of this disease is usually not an easy task, patients frecuently undergo unnecesary surgical interventions, are diagnosed of psyquiatric disorders, or the correct diagnosis is delayed several years after the first symptoms arise. The aims of the treatment are to maintain the nutritional condition and to improve symptoms using nutritional measures, drugs or, eventually, endoscopical or surgical procedures.

  15. Threonine Affects Intestinal Function, Protein Synthesis and Gene Expression of TOR in Jian Carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian)

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Lin; Peng, Yan; Wu, Pei; Hu, Kai; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Jun; Li, Shu-Hong; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of threonine (Thr) on the digestive and absorptive ability, proliferation and differentiation of enterocytes, and gene expression of juvenile Jian carp (Cyprinus carpio var. Jian). First, seven isonitrogenous diets containing graded levels of Thr (7.4–25.2 g/kg diet) were fed to the fishes for 60 days. Second, enterocyte proliferation and differentiation were assayed by culturing enterocytes with graded levels of Thr (0–275 mg/l) in vitro. Finally, enterocytes were cultured with 0 and 205 mg/l Thr to determine protein synthesis. The percent weight gain (PWG), specific growth rate, feed intake, feed efficiency, protein retention value, activities of trypsin, lipase and amylase, weights and protein contents of hepatopancreas and intestine, folds heights, activities of alkaline phosphatase (AKP), γ- glutamyl transpeptidase and Na+/K+-ATPase in all intestinal segments, glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase (GOT) and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase (GPT) activities in hepatopancreas, and 4E-BP2 gene expression in muscle, hepatopancreas and intestinal segments were significantly enhanced by Thr (p<0.05). However, the plasma ammonia concentration and TOR gene expression decreased (p<0.05). In vitro, Thr supplement significantly increased cell numbers, protein content, the activities of GOT, GPT, AKP and Na+/K+-ATPase, and protein synthesis rate of enterocytes, and decreased LDH activity and ammonia content in cell medium (p<0.05). In conclusion, Thr improved growth, digestive and absorptive capacity, enterocyte proliferation and differentiation, and protein synthesis and regulated TOR and 4E-BP2 gene expression in juvenile Jian carp. The dietary Thr requirement of juvenile Jian carp was 16.25 g/kg diet (51.3 g/kg protein) based on quadratic regression analysis of PWG. PMID:23922879

  16. Pasteurization Procedures for Donor Human Milk Affect Body Growth, Intestinal Structure, and Resistance against Bacterial Infections in Preterm Pigs.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanqi; Nguyen, Duc Ninh; de Waard, Marita; Christensen, Lars; Zhou, Ping; Jiang, Pingping; Sun, Jing; Bojesen, Anders Miki; Lauridsen, Charlotte; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Dalsgaard, Trine Kastrup; Bering, Stine Brandt; Sangild, Per Torp

    2017-03-15

    Background: Holder pasteurization (HP) destroys multiple bioactive factors in donor human milk (DM), and UV-C irradiation (UVC) is potentially a gentler method for pasteurizing DM for preterm infants.Objective: We investigated whether UVC-treated DM improves gut maturation and resistance toward bacterial infections relative to HP-treated DM.Methods: Bacteria, selected bioactive components, and markers of antioxidant capacity were measured in unpasteurized donor milk (UP), HP-treated milk, and UVC-treated milk (all from the same DM pool). Fifty-seven cesarean-delivered preterm pigs (91% gestation; ratio of males to females, 30:27) received decreasing volumes of parental nutrition (average 69 mL ⋅ kg(-1) ⋅ d(-1)) and increasing volumes of the 3 DM diets (n = 19 each, average 89 mL ⋅ kg(-1) ⋅ d(-1)) for 8-9 d. Body growth, gut structure and function, and systemic bacterial infection were evaluated.Results: A high bacterial load in the UP (6×10(5) colony forming units/mL) was eliminated similarly by HP and UVC treatments. Relative to HP-treated milk, both UVC-treated milk and UP showed greater activities of lipase and alkaline phosphatase and concentrations of lactoferrin, secretory immunoglobulin A, xanthine dehydrogenase, and some antioxidant markers (all P < 0.05). The pigs fed UVC-treated milk and pigs fed UP showed higher relative weight gain than pigs fed HP-treated milk (5.4% and 3.5%), and fewer pigs fed UVC-treated milk had positive bacterial cultures in the bone marrow (28%) than pigs fed HP-treated milk (68%) (P < 0.05). Intestinal health was also improved in pigs fed UVC-treated milk compared with those fed HP-treated milk as indicated by a higher plasma citrulline concentration (36%) and villus height (38%) (P < 0.05) and a tendency for higher aminopeptidase N (48%) and claudin-4 (26%) concentrations in the distal intestine (P < 0.08). The gut microbiota composition was similar among groups except for greater proportions of Enterococcus in pigs

  17. Cigarette Smoke Extract (CSE) Delays NOD2 Expression and Affects NOD2/RIPK2 Interactions in Intestinal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Aldhous, Marian C.; Soo, Kimberley; Stark, Lesley A.; Ulanicka, Agata A.; Easterbrook, Jennifer E.; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Satsangi, Jack

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic and environmental factors influence susceptibility to Crohn's disease (CD): NOD2 is the strongest individual genetic determinant and smoking the best-characterised environmental factor. Carriage of NOD2 mutations predispose to small-intestinal, stricturing CD, a phenotype also associated with smoking. We hypothesised that cigarette smoke extract (CSE) altered NOD2 expression and function in intestinal epithelial cells. Methods and Findings Intestinal epithelial cell-lines (SW480, HT29, HCT116) were stimulated with CSE and nicotine (to mimic smoking) ±TNFα (to mimic inflammation). NOD2 expression was measured by qRT-PCR and western blotting; NOD2-RIPK2 interactions by co-immunoprecipitation (CoIP); nuclear NFκB-p65 by ELISA; NFκB activity by luciferase reporter assays and chemokines (CCL20, IL8) in culture supernatants by ELISA. In SW480 and HT29 cells the TNFα-induced NOD2 expression at 4 hours was reduced by CSE (p = 0.0226), a response that was dose-dependent (p = 0.003) and time-dependent (p = 0.0004). Similar effects of CSE on NOD2 expression were seen in cultured ileal biopsies from healthy individuals. In SW480 cells CSE reduced TNFα-induced NFκB-p65 translocation at 15 minutes post-stimulation, upstream of NOD2. Levels of the NOD2-RIPK2 complex were no different at 8 hours post-stimulation with combinations of CSE, nicotine and TNFα, but at 18 hours it was increased in cells stimulated with TNFα+CSE but decreased with TNFα alone (p = 0.0330); CSE reduced TNFα-induced NFκB activity (p = 0.0014) at the same time-point. At 24 hours, basal CCL20 and IL8 (p<0.001 for both) and TNFα-induced CCL20 (p = 0.0330) production were decreased by CSE. CSE also reduced NOD2 expression, CCL20 and IL8 production seen with MDP-stimulation of SW480 cells pre-treated with combinations of TNFα and CSE. Conclusions CSE delayed TNFα-induced NOD2 mRNA expression and was associated with abnormal NOD2/RIPK2 interaction, reduced

  18. Dietary sodium selenite affects host intestinal and systemic immune response and disease susceptibility to necrotic enteritis in commercial broilers.

    PubMed

    Xu, S Z; Lee, S H; Lillehoj, H S; Bravo, D

    2015-01-01

    1. This study was to evaluate the effects of supplementary dietary selenium (Se) given as sodium selenite on host immune response against necrotic enteritis (NE) in commercial broiler chickens. 2. Chicks were fed from hatching on a non-supplemented diet or diets supplemented with different levels of Se (0.25, 0.50, and 1.00 Se mg/kg). To induce NE, broiler chickens were orally infected with Eimeria maxima at 14 d of age and then with Clostridium perfringens 4 d later using our previously established NE disease model. 3. NE-associated clinical signs and host protective immunity were determined by body weight changes, intestinal lesion scores, and serum antibodies against α-toxin and necrotic enteritis B (NetB) toxin. The effects of dietary Se on the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines e.g., interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8LITAF (lipopolysaccharide-induced TNFα-factor), tumour necrosis factor (TNF) SF15, and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), glutathione peroxidase 7 (GPx7), and avian β-defensins (AvBD) 6, 8, and 13 (following NE infection) were analysed in the intestine and spleen. 4. The results showed that dietary supplementation of newly hatched broiler chicks with 0.25 Se mg/kg from hatch significantly reduced NE-induced gut lesions compared with infected birds given a non-supplemented diet. The levels of serum antibody against the NetB toxin in the chicks fed with 0.25 and 0.50 mg/kg Se were significantly higher than the non-supplemented control group. The transcripts for IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, iNOS, LITAF, and GPx7, as well as AvBD6, 8, and 13 were increased in the intestine and spleen of Se-supplemented groups, whereas transcript for TNFSF15 was decreased in the intestine. 5. It was concluded that dietary supplementation with optimum levels of Se exerted beneficial effects on host immune response to NE and reduced negative consequence of NE-induced immunopathology.

  19. Technical note: Methodological and feed factors affecting prediction of ruminal degradability and intestinal digestibility of essential amino acids.

    PubMed

    White, Robin R; Kononoff, Paul J; Firkins, Jeffrey L

    2017-03-01

    We hypothesized that ruminal degradability of essential AA (EAA) and the intestinal digestibility of the ruminally undegraded EAA residue in feeds could be evaluated in a meta-analysis. The objective was to characterize methodological factors for ruminal incubation (time of incubation of feed in situ) and method of simulating digestion of the ruminally undegraded AA (incubation of residue in digestive enzymes in vitro or in mobile bags inserted into the duodenum). To increase numbers of observations, feeds were categorized before ANOVA. An approach is described to predict differential ruminal degradability (or undegradability) of individual EAA by normalizing them as a proportion of total AA (TAA) degradability (undegradability) and similarly to normalize the intestinal digestibility of EAA using TAA. Interaction of feed category with individual EAA justifies future studies with a broader range of feeds and more replication within feed to bolster this approach. With broader data, the approach to normalize EAA as a proportion of TAA should allow a better defined EAA library to be integrated with more robust CP databases (that can be updated with specific feed information from more routine laboratory analyses) in dairy supply-requirement models.

  20. Potato powders prepared by successive cooking-process depending on resistant starch content affect the intestinal fermentation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Sakura; Han, Kyu-Ho; Araki, Takahiro; Ohba, Kiyoshi; Wakabayashi, Tatsuya; Shimada, Kenichiro; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2017-02-01

    The effects of resistant starch (RS) in dry potato powders prepared by various processes on intestinal fermentation in rats were assessed. Rats were fed raw potato powder (RP), blanched potato powder (BP), steamed potato powder (SP), or drum-dried potato powder (DP) for 4 weeks. The cecal RS content was significantly higher in the RP group than in the control diet (CN) group and other dry potato powder groups. Cecum pH was significantly lower in the RP group compared to the CN group, and was also significantly lower than that in the SP, BP, and DP groups. Lactic acid bacteria levels in the RP group were significantly higher than those in the CN group, and levels in the SP group also increased relative to the control group. Lactobacillus levels in the RP group were higher than in the CN and other dry potato powder groups. Cecal short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentrations in the RP group followed by the SP group exhibited significantly higher levels relative to the control levels. Dry potato powders containing RS produced during the cooking process may represent a useful food material that increases intestinal concentrations of SCFA and enhances the growth of certain lactic acid bacteria.

  1. Characterization of Pro-Inflammatory Flagellin Proteins Produced by Lactobacillus ruminis and Related Motile Lactobacilli

    PubMed Central

    Neville, B. Anne; Forde, Brian M.; Claesson, Marcus J.; Darby, Trevor; Coghlan, Avril; Nally, Kenneth; Ross, R. Paul; O’Toole, Paul W.

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus ruminis is one of at least twelve motile but poorly characterized species found in the genus Lactobacillus. Of these, only L. ruminis has been isolated from mammals, and this species may be considered as an autochthonous member of the gastrointestinal microbiota of humans, pigs and cows. Nine L. ruminis strains were investigated here to elucidate the biochemistry and genetics of Lactobacillus motility. Six strains isolated from humans were non-motile while three bovine isolates were motile. A complete set of flagellum biogenesis genes was annotated in the sequenced genomes of two strains, ATCC25644 (human isolate) and ATCC27782 (bovine isolate), but only the latter strain produced flagella. Comparison of the L. ruminis and L. mali DSM20444T motility loci showed that their genetic content and gene-order were broadly similar, although the L. mali motility locus was interrupted by an 11.8 Kb region encoding rhamnose utilization genes that is absent from the L. ruminis motility locus. Phylogenetic analysis of 39 motile bacteria indicated that Lactobacillus motility genes were most closely related to those of motile carnobacteria and enterococci. Transcriptome analysis revealed that motility genes were transcribed at a significantly higher level in motile L. ruminis ATCC27782 than in non-motile ATCC25644. Flagellin proteins were isolated from L. ruminis ATCC27782 and from three other Lactobacillus species, while recombinant flagellin of aflagellate L. ruminis ATCC25644 was expressed and purified from E. coli. These native and recombinant Lactobacillus flagellins, and also flagellate L. ruminis cells, triggered interleukin-8 production in cultured human intestinal epithelial cells in a manner suppressed by short interfering RNA directed against Toll-Like Receptor 5. This study provides genetic, transcriptomic, phylogenetic and immunological insights into the trait of flagellum-mediated motility in the lactobacilli. PMID:22808200

  2. Cellular mechanics and motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  3. Symmetry-Breaking Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Allen; Lee, Ha Youn; Kardar, Mehran

    2005-09-01

    Locomotion of bacteria by actin polymerization and in vitro motion of spherical beads coated with a protein catalyzing polymerization are examples of active motility. Starting from a simple model of forces locally normal to the surface of a bead, we construct a phenomenological equation for its motion. The singularities at a continuous transition between moving and stationary beads are shown to be related to the symmetries of its shape. Universal features of the phase behavior are calculated analytically and confirmed by simulations. Fluctuations in velocity are shown to be generically non-Maxwellian and correlated to the shape of the bead.

  4. Quantification of motility of carabid beetles in farmland.

    PubMed

    Allema, A B; van der Werf, W; Groot, J C J; Hemerik, L; Gort, G; Rossing, W A H; van Lenteren, J C

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of the movement of insects at field and landscape levels helps us to understand their ecology and ecological functions. We conducted a meta-analysis on movement of carabid beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae), to identify key factors affecting movement and population redistribution. We characterize the rate of redistribution using motility μ (L2 T-1), which is a measure for diffusion of a population in space and time that is consistent with ecological diffusion theory and which can be used for upscaling short-term data to longer time frames. Formulas are provided to calculate motility from literature data on movement distances. A field experiment was conducted to measure the redistribution of mass-released carabid, Pterostichus melanarius in a crop field, and derive motility by fitting a Fokker-Planck diffusion model using inverse modelling. Bias in estimates of motility from literature data is elucidated using the data from the field experiment as a case study. The meta-analysis showed that motility is 5.6 times as high in farmland as in woody habitat. Species associated with forested habitats had greater motility than species associated with open field habitats, both in arable land and woody habitat. The meta-analysis did not identify consistent differences in motility at the species level, or between clusters of larger and smaller beetles. The results presented here provide a basis for calculating time-varying distribution patterns of carabids in farmland and woody habitat. The formulas for calculating motility can be used for other taxa.

  5. Inclusion of Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) in Pigs' Diets Affects the Intestinal Microenvironment and the Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Haoyu; Ivarsson, Emma; Dicksved, Johan; Lundh, Torbjörn

    2012-01-01

    The content and composition of prebiotic plant fiber in the diet is important in promoting gut-related health. This study investigated the effects of the dietary inclusion of chicory forage and roots on the intestinal microenvironment of pigs. Thirty-seven-week-old pigs were fed 1 of 5 diets for 18 days, including a cereal-based control diet and 4 diets with the inclusion of 80 and 160 g kg−1 of body weight chicory forage (CF80 and CF160), 80 g kg−1 chicory root (CR80), and a mix of 80 g kg−1 forage and 80 g kg−1 chicory root (CFR). The animals maintained good performance and health irrespective of diet. Bacterial community structure and diversity in ileal and colonic samples was assessed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), combined with cloning and sequencing. Samples clustered perfectly according to gut segment with a higher bacterial diversity in colon than ileum. Distal ileum was dominated by lactic acid bacteria (LAB), and the relative amount of this group was increased by the CF160 and CFR diets. The colonic bacterial community was dominated by butyrate-producing bacteria and Prevotella. The increased relative abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria in the colon was positively correlated with the molar proportion of acetic acid and furthermore linked to the chicory forage diets (CF80 and CF160). Diets including chicory roots (CR80 and CFR) were correlated with a higher colonic abundance of Megasphaera elsdenii. The fermentation products and pH in digesta responded to diet type and were correlated with shifts in the microbiota, showing that chicory influences the intestinal microenvironment of pigs. PMID:22492453

  6. Inclusion of chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) in pigs' diets affects the intestinal microenvironment and the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haoyu; Ivarsson, Emma; Dicksved, Johan; Lundh, Torbjörn; Lindberg, Jan Erik

    2012-06-01

    The content and composition of prebiotic plant fiber in the diet is important in promoting gut-related health. This study investigated the effects of the dietary inclusion of chicory forage and roots on the intestinal microenvironment of pigs. Thirty-seven-week-old pigs were fed 1 of 5 diets for 18 days, including a cereal-based control diet and 4 diets with the inclusion of 80 and 160 g kg(-1) of body weight chicory forage (CF80 and CF160), 80 g kg(-1) chicory root (CR80), and a mix of 80 g kg(-1) forage and 80 g kg(-1) chicory root (CFR). The animals maintained good performance and health irrespective of diet. Bacterial community structure and diversity in ileal and colonic samples was assessed using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), combined with cloning and sequencing. Samples clustered perfectly according to gut segment with a higher bacterial diversity in colon than ileum. Distal ileum was dominated by lactic acid bacteria (LAB), and the relative amount of this group was increased by the CF160 and CFR diets. The colonic bacterial community was dominated by butyrate-producing bacteria and Prevotella. The increased relative abundance of butyrate-producing bacteria in the colon was positively correlated with the molar proportion of acetic acid and furthermore linked to the chicory forage diets (CF80 and CF160). Diets including chicory roots (CR80 and CFR) were correlated with a higher colonic abundance of Megasphaera elsdenii. The fermentation products and pH in digesta responded to diet type and were correlated with shifts in the microbiota, showing that chicory influences the intestinal microenvironment of pigs.

  7. Spirochete motility and morpholgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charon, Nyles

    2004-03-01

    Spirochetes have a unique structure, and as a result their motility is different from that of other bacteria. These organisms can swim in a highly viscous, gel-like medium, such as that found in connective tissue, that inhibits the motility of most other bacteria. In spirochetes, the organelles for motility, the periplasmic flagella, reside inside the cell within the periplasmic space. A given periplasmic flagellum is attached only at one end of the cell, and depending on the species, may or may not overlap in the center of the cell. The number of periplasmic flagella varies from species to species. These structures have been shown to be directly involved in motility and function by rotating within the periplasmic space (1). The present talk focuses on the spirochete that causes Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi. In many bacterial species, cell shape is usually dictated by the peptidoyglycan layer of the cell wall. In the first part of the talk, results will be presented that the morphology of B. burgdorferi is the result of a complex interaction between the cell cylinder and the internal periplasmic flagella resulting in a cell with a flat-wave morphology. Backward moving, propagating waves enable these bacteria to swim and translate in a given direction. Using targeted mutagenesis, we inactivated the gene encoding the major periplasmic flagellar filament protein FlaB. The resulting flaB mutants not only were non-motile, but were rod-shaped (2). Western blot analysis indicated that flaB was no longer synthesized, and electron microscopy revealed that the mutants were completely deficient in periplasmic flagella. Our results indicate that the periplasmic flagella of B. burgdorferi have a skeletal function. These organelles dynamically interact with the rod-shaped cell cylinder to enable the cell to swim, and to confer in part its flat-wave morphology The latter part of the talk concerns the basis for asymmetrical rotation of the periplasmic flagella of B

  8. Arabinoxylan‐oligosaccharides (AXOS) affect the protein/carbohydrate fermentation balance and microbial population dynamics of the Simulator of Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, J. I.; Marzorati, M.; Grootaert, C.; Baran, M.; Van Craeyveld, V.; Courtin, C. M.; Broekaert, W. F.; Delcour, J. A.; Verstraete, W.; Van de Wiele, T.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Arabinoxylan‐oligosaccharides (AXOS) are a recently newly discovered class of candidate prebiotics as – depending on their structure – they are fermented in different regions of gastrointestinal tract. This can have an impact on the protein/carbohydrate fermentation balance in the large intestine and, thus, affect the generation of potentially toxic metabolites in the colon originating from proteolytic activity. In this study, we screened different AXOS preparations for their impact on the in vitro intestinal fermentation activity and microbial community structure. Short‐term fermentation experiments with AXOS with an average degree of polymerization (avDP) of 29 allowed part of the oligosaccharides to reach the distal colon, and decreased the concentration of proteolytic markers, whereas AXOS with lower avDP were primarily fermented in the proximal colon. Additionally, prolonged supplementation of AXOS with avDP 29 to the Simulator of Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem (SHIME) reactor decreased levels of the toxic proteolytic markers phenol and p‐cresol in the two distal colon compartments and increased concentrations of beneficial short‐chain fatty acids (SCFA) in all colon vessels (25–48%). Denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis indicated that AXOS supplementation only slightly modified the total microbial community, implying that the observed effects on fermentation markers are mainly caused by changes in fermentation activity. Finally, specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis showed that AXOS supplementation significantly increased the amount of health‐promoting lactobacilli as well as of Bacteroides–Prevotella and Clostridium coccoides–Eubacterium rectale groups. These data allow concluding that AXOS are promising candidates to modulate the microbial metabolism in the distal colon. PMID:21261885

  9. Octreotide in the treatment of refractory diarrhoea and intestinal fistulae.

    PubMed Central

    Farthing, M J

    1994-01-01

    Persistent, refractory diarrhoea continues to be an important clinical problem. The mechanisms involved are associated with reduced intestinal absorption and increased intestinal secretion. Reduced intestinal absorption can result from small intestinal resection or from disorders in which there is damage to the small intestine. Motility disorders may also impair absorptive function. The rationale for using octreotide in refractory diarrhoea, intestinal motility disorders, and fistulae relates to its ability to promote intestinal absorption and inhibit gastric, pancreatic, and intestinal secretion. Several clinical studies in patients with short bowel syndrome have reported a reduction of intestinal output in patients taking octreotide compared with controls. Additionally, a number of studies have shown that octreotide improves secretory diarrhoea resulting from neuroendocrine tumours, intestinal infections in AIDS patients, and intestinal graft v host disease. Octreotide may be of use in patients suffering from intestinal motility disorders such as those associated with systemic sclerosis. Octreotide may also be of value in promoting closure of gastrointestinal and pancreatic fistulae. PMID:8206397

  10. Berberine Improves Intestinal Motility and Visceral Pain in the Mouse Models Mimicking Diarrhea-Predominant Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS-D) Symptoms in an Opioid-Receptor Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Qiuhui; Fichna, Jakub; Zheng, Lijun; Wang, Kesheng; Yu, Zhen; Li, Yongyu; Li, Kun; Song, Aihong; Liu, Zhongchen; Song, Zhenshun; Kreis, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Berberine and its derivatives display potent analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activity. Here we aimed at characterizing the mechanism of action of berberine in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and cortical neurons using animal models and in vitro tests. Methods The effect of berberine was characterized in murine models mimicking diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D) symptoms. Then the opioidantagonists were used to identify the receptors involved. Furthermore, the effect of berberineon opioid receptors expression was established in the mouse intestine and rat fetal cortical neurons. Results In mouse models, berberine prolonged GI transit and time to diarrhea in a dose-dependent manner, and significantly reduced visceral pain. In physiological conditions the effects of berberine were mediated by mu- (MOR) and delta- (DOR) opioidreceptors; hypermotility, excessive secretion and nociception were reversed by berberine through MOR and DOR-dependent action. We also found that berberine increased the expression of MOR and DOR in the mouse bowel and rat fetal cortical neurons. Conclusion Berberine significantly improved IBS-D symptoms in animal models, possibly through mu- and delta- opioid receptors. Berberine may become a new drug candidate for the successful treatment of IBS-D in clinical conditions. PMID:26700862

  11. Effect of da-cheng-qi decoction on pancreatitis-associated intestinal dysmotility in patients and in rat models.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianlei; Zhong, Cejun; He, Zhiyu; Chen, Guangyuan; Tang, Wenfu

    2015-01-01

    The impairment of intestinal motility and related infectious complications are the predominant clinical phenomenon in patients with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). We aimed to investigate the effects of Da-Cheng-Qi decoction (DCQD) on the gastrointestinal injury in SAP patients and the potential mechanism involved in rats. DCQD was enema administered to 70 patients for 7 days in West China Hospital. Mortality and organ failure during admission were observed and blood samples for laboratory analysis were collected. We also experimentally examined plasma inflammatory cytokines in rat serum and carried the morphometric studies of the gut. Intestinal propulsion index and serum and tissue vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) were also detected. Though DCQD did not affect the overall incidence of organ failure, it shortened the average time of paralytic intestinal obstruction and decreased the morbidity of infectious complications in patients with SAP. Compared with untreated rats, the DCQD lowered the levels of proinflammatory cytokine and decreased the mean pathological intestinal lesion scores. The VIP level in intestinal tissue or serum in DCQD group was obviously lowered and intestinal propulsion index was significantly improved. In conclusion, DCQD has good effect on pancreatitis-associated intestinal dysmotility in patients and in rat models.

  12. Mechanics of motility initiation and motility arrest in crawling cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recho, Pierre; Putelat, Thibaut; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2015-11-01

    Motility initiation in crawling cells requires transformation of a symmetric state into a polarized state. In contrast, motility arrest is associated with re-symmetrization of the internal configuration of a cell. Experiments on keratocytes suggest that polarization is triggered by the increased contractility of motor proteins but the conditions of re-symmetrization remain unknown. In this paper we show that if adhesion with the extra-cellular substrate is sufficiently low, the progressive intensification of motor-induced contraction may be responsible for both transitions: from static (symmetric) to motile (polarized) at a lower contractility threshold and from motile (polarized) back to static (symmetric) at a higher contractility threshold. Our model of lamellipodial cell motility is based on a 1D projection of the complex intra-cellular dynamics on the direction of locomotion. In the interest of analytical transparency we also neglect active protrusion and view adhesion as passive. Despite the unavoidable oversimplifications associated with these assumptions, the model reproduces quantitatively the motility initiation pattern in fish keratocytes and reveals a crucial role played in cell motility by the nonlocal feedback between the mechanics and the transport of active agents. A prediction of the model that a crawling cell can stop and re-symmetrize when contractility increases sufficiently far beyond the motility initiation threshold still awaits experimental verification.

  13. Intestinal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... connects your stomach to your large intestine. Intestinal cancer is rare, but eating a high-fat diet ... increase your risk. Possible signs of small intestine cancer include Abdominal pain Weight loss for no reason ...

  14. Intestinal leiomyoma

    MedlinePlus

    Leiomyoma - intestine ... McLaughlin P, Maher MM. The duodenum and small intestine. In: Adam A, Dixon AK, Gillard JH, Schaefer- ... Roline CE, Reardon RF. Disorders of the small intestine. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et ...

  15. Intestinal obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    Paralytic ileus; Intestinal volvulus; Bowel obstruction; Ileus; Pseudo-obstruction - intestinal; Colonic ileus ... objects that are swallowed and block the intestines) Gallstones (rare) Hernias Impacted stool Intussusception (telescoping of 1 ...

  16. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    An intestinal obstruction occurs when food or stool cannot move through the intestines. The obstruction can be complete or partial. ... abdomen Inability to pass gas Constipation A complete intestinal obstruction is a medical emergency. It often requires surgery. ...

  17. Effects of trifluoromethyl ketones on the motility of Proteus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Wolfart, Krisztina; Molnar, Annamaria; Kawase, Masami; Motohashi, Noboru; Molnar, Joseph

    2004-09-01

    In the present study, we showed the inhibition of motility by trifluoromethyl ketone (TF) derivatives (1-8) in Proteus vulgaris (P. vulgaris) cultures. Among them, 1-(2-benzoxazoyl)-3,3,3-trifluoro-2-propanone (1) showed a much stronger inhibitory effect on the motility of P. vulgaris than other TF compounds at 10% MIC. Our results suggest the possibility of an inhibitory action of TF compounds on the proton motive forces by affecting the action of biological motor and proton efflux in the membranes, resulting in a reduction of the ratio of running and the increased number of tumbling and non-motile cells.

  18. Suppression of intestinal smooth muscle contraction by 4-ethylguaiacol, a constituent of wood creosote.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, M; Ogata, N; Shibata, T

    1993-11-01

    Wood creosote, a mixture of phenolic compounds, suppresses in vitro contractions of rat intestine. To identify a compound in wood creosote able to inhibit intestinal motility, we screened its constituent phenolic compounds and found 4-ethylguaiacol (4-EG) as an active compound. It suppressed the spontaneous phasic (IC50 = 513 +/- 48 mumol/l) as well as spasmogenic-agent-induced tonic longitudinal contractions of isolated rat ileum in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner. KCl-depolarization-induced tonic contraction, which was susceptible to a calcium channel blocking agent, was also suppressed by 4-EG with an IC50 of 433 +/- 41 mumol/l. Furthermore, calcium-ionophore-induced contraction, which was affected by an influx of extracellular calcium ion that bypassed calcium channels, was suppressed by 4-EG with an IC50 of 97 +/- 18 mumol/l. These results support the concept that the effect of wood creosote to suppress intestinal motility is attributable, partially or entirely, to its component 4-EG and that this effect of 4-EG on the intestinal muscle is produced at some stage(s) of the muscle contraction process after influx of extracellular calcium into the cytosol of smooth muscle.

  19. The effect of flagellar motor-rotor complexes on twitching motility in P. aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Kun; Utada, Andrew; Gibiansky, Maxsim; Xian, Wujing; Wong, Gerard

    2013-03-01

    P. aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterium responsible for a broad range of biofilm infections. In order for biofilms to form, P. aeruginosa uses different types of surface motility. In the current understanding, flagella are used for swarming motility and type IV pili are used for twitching motility. The flagellum also plays important roles in initial surface attachment and in shaping the architectures of mature biofilms. Here we examine how flagella and pili interact during surface motility, by using cell tracking techniques. We show that the pili driven twitching motility of P. aeruginosa can be affected by the motor-rotor complexes of the flagellar system.

  20. The intestine is a blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Patricia; Lamarca, Morgan; Kravets, Victoria; Hu, David

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, digestive disease affects 60 to 70 million people and costs over 140 billion annually. Despite the significance of the gastrointestinal tract to human health, the physics of digestion remains poorly understood. In this study, we ask a simple question: what sets the frequency of intestinal contractions? We measure the frequency of intestinal contractions in rats, as a function of distance down the intestine. We find that intestines Contract radially ten times faster than longitudinally. This motion promotes mixing and, in turn, absorption of food products by the intestinal wall. We calculate viscous dissipation in the intestinal fluid to rationalize the relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and the viscosity of the intestinal contents. Our findings may help to understand the evolution of the intestine as an ideal mixer.

  1. The intestine is a blender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Patricia; Lamarca, Morgan; Hu, David

    2015-11-01

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, digestive disease affects 60 to 70 million people and costs over 140 billion annually. Despite the significance of the gastrointestinal tract to human health, the physics of digestion remains poorly understood. In this study, we ask a simple question: what sets the frequency of intestinal contractions? We measure the frequency of intestinal contractions in rats, as a function of distance down the intestine. We find that intestines contract radially ten times faster than longitudinally. This motion promotes mixing and, in turn, absorption of food products by the intestinal wall. We calculate viscous dissipation in the intestinal fluid to rationalize the relationship between frequency of intestinal contraction and the viscosity of the intestinal contents. Our findings may help to understand the evolution of the intestine as an ideal mixer.

  2. Potential role of fecal microbiota from patients with slow transit constipation in the regulation of gastrointestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiaolong; Zhao, Wei; Ding, Chao; Tian, Hongliang; Xu, Lizhi; Wang, Hongkan; Ni, Ling; Jiang, Jun; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Weiming; Zhu, Minsheng; Li, Ning

    2017-03-27

    The gut microbiota is involved in various physiological functions, and disturbances in the host-microbiome have been proven to contribute to the dysfunction of gut; however, whether microbiota participates in the pathogenesis of constipation remains unclear. In this study, we extracted and analyzed microbiota in feces from constipated donors who had undergone effective therapy with fecal microbiota transplantation, transplanted microbiota into pseudo-germ-free mice, and measured gut motility. These mice presented with lower pellet frequency and water percentage, smaller pellet size, delayed gastrointestinal transit time, and weaker spontaneous contractions of colonic smooth muscle. To determine the mechanism underlying delayed gut motility, microbial metabolites were measured. Short chain fatty acids and secondary bile acids were decreased in mice receiving microbiota from constipated donors. Moreover, the compositional changes of gut microbiota in constipated patients were identified, including the operational taxonomic unit, and the species richness and α diversity were much greater than those in healthy volunteers. These findings suggest that alterations of the microbiome might affect gut motility via altered microbial-derived metabolites in the development of constipation, and the restoration of disturbed microbiota might improve the clinical phenotype. This study indicates that regulating the intestinal environment may be a novel therapy strategy for constipation.

  3. Rational pharmacotherapy of gastrointestinal motility disorders.

    PubMed

    Demol, P; Ruoff, H J; Weihrauch, T R

    1989-04-01

    Nervous control of gastrointestinal motility is extremely complex, is regulated by the enteric system, the "brain of the gut", and modulated by extrinsic nerves. This system with its multiplicity of transmitters and receptors does not always allow a clear interpretation of experimental data, especially with compounds lacking specificity. In this review the complex situation is described particularly in relation to receptor populations (cholinergic, adrenergic, dopamine, histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, opioid, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), prostanoid and dihydropyridine receptors), therapeutic aspects of drugs and their usefulness in children. Newer principles with known drugs and promising new compounds with a more appropriate kinetic or fewer side-effects, deriving from distinct pharmacological groups, as candidates for the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders are considered e.g. anticholinergics (prifinium or actilonium bromide), adrenergic alpha 2-agonists (clonidine, lidamidine) for diarrhoea in diabetic neuropathy, adrenergic beta-blockers for shortening postoperative ileus (propranolol), dopamine receptor antagonists (metoclopramide, domperidone, alizapride) and another prokinetic substance (cisapride) which may be useful for a number of applications as gastro-oesophageal reflux, gastro-paresis, intestinal pseudo-obstruction, cystic fibrosis and constipation, morphine derivatives (e.g. loperamide) for intractable diarrhoea and calcium antagonists (e.g. nifedipine) for achalasia. Increasing experience in digestive tract pharmacology and reliable clinical studies will furthermore be the basis for a more specific and better tolerated therapy of gastrointestinal motility disorders in adults and children.

  4. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... that only affects the colon). LOCAL COMPLICATIONS OF CROHN’S DISEASE INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION The most common complication of Crohn’s disease, obstruction may arise from swelling and the formation ...

  5. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Antonucci, Alexandra; Fronzoni, Lucia; Cogliandro, Laura; Cogliandro, Rosanna-F; Caputo, Carla; De Giorgio, Roberto; Pallotti, Francesca; Barbara, Giovanni; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2008-05-21

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a severe digestive syndrome characterized by derangement of gut propulsive motility which resembles mechanical obstruction, in the absence of any obstructive process. Although uncommon in clinical practice, this syndrome represents one of the main causes of intestinal failure and is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. It may be idiopathic or secondary to a variety of diseases. Most cases are sporadic, even though familial forms with either dominant or recessive autosomal inheritance have been described. Based on histological features intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be classified into three main categories: neuropathies, mesenchymopathies, and myopathies, according on the predominant involvement of enteric neurones, interstitial cells of Cajal or smooth muscle cells, respectively. Treatment of intestinal pseudo-obstruction involves nutritional, pharmacological and surgical therapies, but it is often unsatisfactory and the long-term outcome is generally poor in the majority of cases.

  6. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Antonucci, Alexandra; Fronzoni, Lucia; Cogliandro, Laura; Cogliandro, Rosanna F; Caputo, Carla; Giorgio, Roberto De; Pallotti, Francesca; Barbara, Giovanni; Corinaldesi, Roberto; Stanghellini, Vincenzo

    2008-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO) is a severe digestive syndrome characterized by derangement of gut propulsive motility which resembles mechanical obstruction, in the absence of any obstructive process. Although uncommon in clinical practice, this syndrome represents one of the main causes of intestinal failure and is characterized by high morbidity and mortality. It may be idiopathic or secondary to a variety of diseases. Most cases are sporadic, even though familial forms with either dominant or recessive autosomal inheritance have been described. Based on histological features intestinal pseudo-obstruction can be classified into three main categories: neuropathies, mesenchymopathies, and myopathies, according on the predominant involvement of enteric neurones, interstitial cells of Cajal or smooth muscle cells, respectively. Treatment of intestinal pseudo-obstruction involves nutritional, pharmacological and surgical therapies, but it is often unsatisfactory and the long-term outcome is generally poor in the majority of cases. PMID:18494042

  7. Electrical Signaling in Motile and Primary Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Kleene, Steven J.; Van Houten, Judith L.

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are highly conserved for their structure and also for their sensory functions. They serve as antennae for extracellular information. Whether the cilia are motile or not, they respond to environmental mechanical and chemical stimuli and send signals to the cell body. The information from extracellular stimuli is commonly converted to electrical signals through the repertoire of ion-conducting channels in the ciliary membrane, which results in changes in concentrations of ions, especially calcium ions, in the cilia. These changes, in turn, affect motility and the ability of the signaling pathways in the cilia and cell body to carry on the signal transduction. We review here the activities of ion channels in cilia in animals from protists to vertebrates. PMID:25892740

  8. A Comprehensive Genetic Characterization of Bacterial Motility

    PubMed Central

    Girgis, Hany S; Liu, Yirchung; Ryu, William S; Tavazoie, Saeed

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a powerful experimental framework that combines competitive selection and microarray-based genetic footprinting to comprehensively reveal the genetic basis of bacterial behaviors. Application of this method to Escherichia coli motility identifies 95% of the known flagellar and chemotaxis genes, and reveals three dozen novel loci that, to varying degrees and through diverse mechanisms, affect motility. To probe the network context in which these genes function, we developed a method that uncovers genome-wide epistatic interactions through comprehensive analyses of double-mutant phenotypes. This allows us to place the novel genes within the context of signaling and regulatory networks, including the Rcs phosphorelay pathway and the cyclic di-GMP second-messenger system. This unifying framework enables sensitive and comprehensive genetic characterization of complex behaviors across the microbial biosphere. PMID:17941710

  9. Cyclic GMP and Cilia Motility

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Motile cilia of the lungs respond to environmental challenges by increasing their ciliary beat frequency in order to enhance mucociliary clearance as a fundamental tenant of innate defense. One important second messenger in transducing the regulable nature of motile cilia is cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP). In this review, the history of cGMP action is presented and a survey of the existing data addressing cGMP action in ciliary motility is presented. Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated regulation of cGMP in ciliated cells is presented in the context of alcohol-induced cilia function and dysfunction. PMID:26264028

  10. Egg storage duration and hatch window affect gene expression of nutrient transporters and intestine morphological parameters of early hatched broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, S; Gursel, I; Bilgen, G; Izzetoglu, G T; Horuluoglu, B H; Gucluer, G

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, researchers have given emphasis on the differences in physiological parameters between early and late hatched chicks within a hatch window. Considering the importance of intestine development in newly hatched chicks, however, changes in gene expression of nutrient transporters in the jejunum of early hatched chicks within a hatch window have not been studied yet. This study was conducted to determine the effects of egg storage duration before incubation and hatch window on intestinal development and expression of PepT1 (H+-dependent peptide transporter) and SGLT1 (sodium-glucose co-transporter) genes in the jejunum of early hatched broiler chicks within a 30 h of hatch window. A total of 1218 eggs obtained from 38-week-old Ross 308 broiler breeder flocks were stored for 3 (ES3) or 14 days (ES14) and incubated at the same conditions. Eggs were checked between 475 and 480 h of incubation and 40 chicks from each egg storage duration were weighed; chick length and rectal temperature were measured. The chicks were sampled to evaluate morphological parameters and PepT1 and SGLT1 expression. The remaining chicks that hatched between 475 and 480 h were placed back in the incubator and the same measurements were conducted with those chicks at the end of hatch window at 510 h of incubation. Chick length, chick dry matter content, rectal temperature and weight of small intestine segments increased, whereas chick weight decreased during the hatch window. The increase in the jejunum length and villus width and area during the hatch window were higher for ES3 than ES14 chicks. PepT1 expression was higher for ES3 chicks compared with ES14. There was a 10.2 and 17.6-fold increase in PepT1 and SGLT1 expression of ES3 chicks at the end of hatch window, whereas it was only 2.3 and 3.3-fold, respectively, for ES14 chicks. These results suggested that egg storage duration affected development of early hatched chicks during 30 h of hatch window. It can be concluded that

  11. Tachykinins and in vivo gut motility.

    PubMed

    Sarna, S K

    1999-08-01

    The gut smooth muscle in the intact conscious state exhibits three distinct types of contractions: rhythmic phasic contractions, tone, and ultrapropulsive contractions. The motility functions of these contractions differ markedly. The phasic contractions mix and propel the ingested food in an orderly fashion so that the nutrients can be absorbed. The ultrapropulsive contractions are of two types, giant migrating contractions (GMCs) and retrograde giant contractions (RGCs). GMCs produce mass movements in the caudal direction and RGCs in the oral direction. GMCs are associated with the symptoms of diarrhea, abdominal cramping, tenesmus, and urgency of defecation. The RGCs regurgitate the contents of the upper small intestine into the stomach in preparation of their expulsion by the somatomotor response. Tachykinins and their receptors are strategically located on the enteric neurons and smooth muscle cells to regulate the above contractions. Recent findings show that NK-1 receptors located on colonic circular smooth muscle cells may mediate colonic GMCs, whereas NK-3 receptors located on presynaptic neurons may mediate the small intestinal GMCs. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of stimulation of RGCs are not known. NK-1 receptor antagonists have shown potential therapeutic effects on vomiting induced by a variety of stimuli in experimental animals.

  12. Effect of pre-freezing conditions on the progressive motility recovery rate of human frozen spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Zhou, Y; Xia, W; Wu, H; Yao, K; Liu, H; Xiong, C

    2012-10-01

    We evaluated the effects of sperm concentration, progressive motility, sperm morphology, duration of abstinence and collection season on the progressive motility recovery rate of human frozen spermatozoa to identify characteristics that predict the progressive motility recovery rate of human frozen spermatozoa and improve the protocol for sperm collecting in sperm banks. A total of 14 190 semen samples donated at Zhejiang human sperm bank of China between September 2006 and June 2011 were collected from 1624 donors. Semen was evaluated according to WHO standard procedures for sperm concentration. Progressive motility, sperm morphology, ejaculate collection season and abstinence time were recorded. After freezing and thawing, the progressive motility was assessed. Results showed that sperm concentration, progressive motility and normal morphology were significantly associated with the progressive motility recovery rate of human frozen spermatozoa. In addition, the abstinence time and collection season also significantly affected progressive motility recovery rate. Our results indicated that sperm concentration, progressive motility and normal morphology could be valuable in predicting the progressive motility recovery rate of human frozen spermatozoa. As such, progressive motility recovery may be improved by donating semen when abstinent for 3-5 days and during seasons other than summer.

  13. Motility of active fluid drops on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoromskaia, Diana; Alexander, Gareth P.

    2015-12-01

    Drops of active liquid crystal have recently shown the ability to self-propel, which was associated with topological defects in the orientation of active filaments [Sanchez et al., Nature 491, 431 (2013), 10.1038/nature11591]. Here, we study the onset and different aspects of motility of a three-dimensional drop of active fluid on a planar surface. We analyze theoretically how motility is affected by orientation profiles with defects of various types and locations, by the shape of the drop, and by surface friction at the substrate. In the scope of a thin drop approximation, we derive exact expressions for the flow in the drop that is generated by a given orientation profile. The flow has a natural decomposition into terms that depend entirely on the geometrical properties of the orientation profile, i.e., its bend and splay, and a term coupling the orientation to the shape of the drop. We find that asymmetric splay or bend generates a directed bulk flow and enables the drop to move, with maximal speeds achieved when the splay or bend is induced by a topological defect in the interior of the drop. In motile drops the direction and speed of self-propulsion is controlled by friction at the substrate.

  14. Intestinal Barrier and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Julio-Pieper, M; Bravo, J A

    2016-01-01

    The intestinal barrier function contributes to gut homeostasis by modulating absorption of water, electrolytes, and nutrients from the lumen into the circulation while restricting the passage of noxious luminal substances and microorganisms. Chronic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and celiac disease are associated to intestinal barrier dysfunction. Here, the hypothesis is that a leaky intestinal wall allowing for indiscriminate passage of intraluminal compounds to the vascular compartment could in turn lead to systemic inflammation. An increasing number of studies are now investigating the association between gut permeability and CNS disorders, under the premise that translocation of intestinal luminal contents could affect CNS function, either directly or indirectly. Still, it is unknown whether disruption of intestinal barrier is a causative agent or a consequence in these situations. Here, we discuss the latest evidence pointing to an association between increased gut permeability and disrupted behavioral responses.

  15. Monoglyceride lipase deficiency causes desensitization of intestinal cannabinoid receptor type 1 and increased colonic μ-opioid receptor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Taschler, U; Eichmann, T O; Radner, F P W; Grabner, G F; Wolinski, H; Storr, M; Lass, A; Schicho, R; Zimmermann, R

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Monoglyceride lipase (MGL) degrades 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG), an endogenous agonist of cannabinoid receptors (CB1/2). Because the CB1 receptor is involved in the control of gut function, we investigated the effects of pharmacological inhibition and genetic deletion of MGL on intestinal motility. Furthermore, we determined whether defective 2-AG degradation affects μ-opioid receptor (μ receptor) signalling, a parallel pathway regulating gut motility. Experimental Approach Gut motility was investigated by monitoring Evans Blue transit and colonic bead propulsion in response to MGL inhibition and CB1 receptor or μ receptor stimulation. Ileal contractility was investigated by electrical field stimulation. CB1 receptor expression in ileum and colon was assessed by immunohistochemical analyses. Key Results Pharmacological inhibition of MGL slowed down whole gut transit in a CB1 receptor-dependent manner. Conversely, genetic deletion of MGL did not affect gut transit despite increased 2-AG levels. Notably, MGL deficiency caused complete insensitivity to CB1 receptor agonist-mediated inhibition of whole gut transit and ileal contractility suggesting local desensitization of CB1 receptors. Accordingly, immunohistochemical analyses of myenteric ganglia of MGL-deficient mice revealed that CB1 receptors were trapped in endocytic vesicles. Finally, MGL-deficient mice displayed accelerated colonic propulsion and were hypersensitive to μ receptor agonist-mediated inhibition of colonic motility. This phenotype was reproduced by chronic pharmacological inhibition of MGL. Conclusion and Implications Constantly elevated 2-AG levels induce severe desensitization of intestinal CB1 receptors and increased sensitivity to μ receptor-mediated inhibition of colonic motility. These changes should be considered when cannabinoid-based drugs are used in the therapy of gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:26075589

  16. Mutations in the Borrelia burgdorferi Flagellar Type III Secretion System Genes fliH and fliI Profoundly Affect Spirochete Flagellar Assembly, Morphology, Motility, Structure, and Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lihui; Zhao, Xiaowei; Liu, Jun; Norris, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi migrates to distant sites in the tick vectors and mammalian hosts through robust motility and chemotaxis activities. FliH and FliI are two cytoplasmic proteins that play important roles in the type III secretion system (T3SS)-mediated export and assembly of flagellar structural proteins. However, detailed analyses of the roles of FliH and FliI in B. burgdorferi have not been reported. In this study, fliH and fliI transposon mutants were utilized to dissect the mechanism of the Borrelia type III secretion system. The fliH and fliI mutants exhibited rod-shaped or string-like morphology, greatly reduced motility, division defects (resulting in elongated organisms with incomplete division points), and noninfectivity in mice by needle inoculation. Mutants in fliH and fliI were incapable of translational motion in 1% methylcellulose or soft agar. Inactivation of either fliH or fliI resulted in the loss of the FliH-FliI complex from otherwise intact flagellar motors, as determined by cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). Flagellar assemblies were still present in the mutant cells, albeit in lower numbers than in wild-type cells and with truncated flagella. Genetic complementation of fliH and fliI mutants in trans restored their wild-type morphology, motility, and flagellar motor structure; however, full-length flagella and infectivity were not recovered in these complemented mutants. Based on these results, disruption of either fliH or fliI in B. burgdorferi results in a severe defect in flagellar structure and function and cell division but does not completely block the export and assembly of flagellar hook and filament proteins. PMID:25968649

  17. Ribose Accelerates Gut Motility and Suppresses Mouse Body Weight Gaining

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Li, Tong-Ruei R; Xu, Cong; Xu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity is closely related to excessive energy consumption. Clinical intervention of energy intake is an attractive strategy to fight obesity. However, the current FDA-approved weight-loss drugs all have significant side effects. Here we show that ribose upregulates gut motility and suppresses mice body weight gain. Ribokinase, which is encoded by Rbks gene, is the first enzyme for ribose metabolism in vivo. Rbks mutation resulted in ribose accumulation in the small intestine, which accelerated gut movement. Ribose oral treatment in wild type mice also enhanced bowel motility and rendered mice resistance to high fat diets. The suppressed weight gain was resulted from enhanced ingested food excretion. In addition, the effective dose of ribose didn't cause any known side effects (i.e. diarrhea and hypoglycemia). Overall, our results show that ribose can regulate gut motility and energy homeostasis in mice, and suggest that administration of ribose and its analogs could regulate gastrointestinal motility, providing a novel therapeutic approach for gastrointestinal dysfunction and weight control. PMID:27194947

  18. Antibiotics conspicuously affect community profiles and richness, but not the density of bacterial cells associated with mucosa in the large and small intestines of mice.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Nathan J; Uwiera, Richard R E; Yanke, L Jay; Selinger, L Brent; Inglis, G Douglas

    2012-02-01

    The influence of three antibiotics (bacitracin, enrofloxacin, and neomycin sulfate) on the mucosa-associated enteric microbiota and the intestines of mice was examined. Antibiotics caused conspicuous enlargement of ceca and an increase in overall length of the intestine. However, there were no pathologic changes associated with increased cecal size or length of the intestine. Conspicuous reductions in the richness of mucosa-associated bacteria and changes to community profiles within the small (duodenum, proximal jejunum, middle jejunum, distal jejunum, and ileum) and large (cecum, ascending colon, and descending colon) intestine occurred in mice administered antibiotics. Communities in antibiotic-treated mice were dominated by a limited number of Clostridium-like (i.e. clostridial cluster XIVa) and Bacteroides species. The richness of mucosa-associated communities within the small and large intestine increased during the 14-day recovery period. However, community profiles within the large intestine did not return to baseline (i.e. relative to the control). Although antibiotic administration greatly reduced bacterial richness, densities of mucosa-associated bacteria were not reduced correspondingly. These data showed that the antibiotics, bacitracin, enrofloxacin, and neomycin sulfate, administered for 21 days to mice did not sterilize the intestine, but did impart a tremendous and prolonged impact on mucosa-associated bacterial communities throughout the small and large intestine.

  19. Intestinal Obstruction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wall Hernias Inguinal Hernia Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of the Digestive ... Wall Hernias Inguinal Hernia Acute Mesenteric Ischemia Appendicitis Ileus Intestinal Obstruction Ischemic Colitis Perforation of the Digestive ...

  20. In vivo imaging and genetic analysis link bacterial motility and symbiosis in the zebrafish gut

    PubMed Central

    Rawls, John F.; Mahowald, Michael A.; Goodman, Andrew L.; Trent, Chad M.; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2007-01-01

    Complex microbial communities reside within the intestines of humans and other vertebrates. Remarkably little is known about how these microbial consortia are established in various locations within the gut, how members of these consortia behave within their dynamic ecosystems, or what microbial factors mediate mutually beneficial host–microbial interactions. Using a gnotobiotic zebrafish–Pseudomonas aeruginosa model, we show that the transparency of this vertebrate species, coupled with methods for raising these animals under germ-free conditions can be used to monitor microbial movement and localization within the intestine in vivo and in real time. Germ-free zebrafish colonized with isogenic P. aeruginosa strains containing deletions of genes related to motility and pathogenesis revealed that loss of flagellar function results in attenuation of evolutionarily conserved host innate immune responses but not conserved nutrient responses. These results demonstrate the utility of gnotobiotic zebrafish in defining the behavior and localization of bacteria within the living vertebrate gut, identifying bacterial genes that affect these processes, and assessing the impact of these genes on host–microbial interactions. PMID:17456593

  1. Gastrointestinal motility in space motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, William E.; Linder, Barry J.; Moore, Thomas P.; Pool, Sam L.

    1987-01-01

    Gastrointestinal symptoms in space motion sickness (SMS) are significantly different from those in ordinary motion sickness (MS). Recording and tabulation of sounds was the only technique that could be used as a measure of motility during spaceflight operations. There were 17 subjects, six unaffected by SMS, who made ambulatory recordings preflight and inflight. With one exception, all those affected had sharply reduced sounds, while those unaffected had increases or moderate reductions. The mechanism of vomiting in SMS appears to be secondary to this ileus, in contrast to vomiting in ordinary MS, where the emesis center is thought to be directly triggered by the vestibular system.

  2. Typha capensis (Rohrb.)N.E.Br. (bulrush) extract scavenges free radicals, inhibits collagenase activity and affects human sperm motility and mitochondrial membrane potential in vitro: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Henkel, R; Fransman, W; Hipler, U-C; Wiegand, C; Schreiber, G; Menkveld, R; Weitz, F; Fisher, D

    2012-05-01

    The biodiversity in South Africa provides more than 30,000 higher plants, of which more than 3000 are used by traditional healers to treat diseases. Typha capensis (bulrush) is one of the medicinal plants used in South Africa to treat male fertility problems. Considering that South African traditional healers have been recognised by Law and the health benefits of T. capensis have not been scientifically investigated yet, this study aimed at investigating the in vitro effects of aqueous extracts from this plant on male reproductive functions. Both leaves and rhizomes of T. capensis were dried, infused with distilled water and freeze-dried. Motile sperm from 50 men were isolated by swim-up and incubated with 1 μg ml(-1) aqueous extract of Typha rhizome for 1 h at 37 °C. Vitality, motility, sperm production of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial membrane potential were analysed in the test sample, a control and in the pellet from the swim-up. Results showed that the rhizome extract had significant (P < 0.0001) negative effects on all parameters. The extracts from the leaves and rhizomes revealed dose-dependent inhibitory activity for collagenase and free radical formation. No inhibitory activity for elastase was found. The inhibitory activity for collagenase might indicate possible anti-cancer effects.

  3. pH gradients and a micro-pore filter at the luminal surface affect fluxes of propionic acid across guinea pig large intestine.

    PubMed

    Busche, Roger; von Engelhardt, Wolfgang

    2007-10-01

    A neutral pH microclimate had been shown at the luminal surface of the large intestine. The aim was to estimate to what extent fluxes of propionic acid/propionate are affected by changes of the luminal pH when this microclimate is present, largely reduced or absent. Fluxes of propionic acid/propionate (J(Pr)) across epithelia from the caecum, the proximal and the distal colon of guinea pigs were measured in Ussing chambers with and without a filter at the luminal surface. With bicarbonate and with a neutral or an acid pH of mucosal solutions (pH 7.4 or 6.4), mucosal-to-serosal fluxes (J(ms)(Pr) ) were 1.5 to 1.9-fold higher at the lower pH, in bicarbonate-free solutions and carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibition 2.1 to 2.6-fold. With a filter at the mucosal surface and with bicarbonate containing solutions, J (ms) (Pr) was not or only little elevated at the lower pH. Without bicarbonate J(ms)(Pr) was clearly higher. We conclude that the higher J(ms)(Pr) after luminal acidification is due to vigorous mixing in Ussing chambers resulting in a markedly reduced unstirred layer. Therefore, an effective pH microclimate at the epithelial surface is missing. J(ms)(Pr) is not or is little affected by lowering of pH because in the presence of bicarbonate the filter maintains the pH microclimate. However, in bicarbonate-free solutions J(ms)(Pr) was higher at pH 6.4 because a pH microclimate does not develop. Findings confirm that 30-60% of J(ms)(Pr) results from non-ionic diffusion.

  4. Purified Shigella enterotoxin does not alter intestinal motility.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, A; Sninsky, C A; O'Brien, A D; Clench, M H; Mathias, J R

    1984-01-01

    A purified Shigella enterotoxin (pST) and a cell-free lysate with pST removed (CFL-pST) from the whole-cell lysate of Shigella dysenteriae 60 R were used to study their effect on the myoelectric activity and mucosal integrity of rabbit ileal segments. We have previously defined two myoelectric patterns: the migrating action potential complex and repetitive bursts of action potentials that occur in response to certain bacteria and their enterotoxins. The in vivo model consisted of isolated ileal segments in male New Zealand White rabbits. The segments were infused with sterile saline (1 ml/h), pST (2.4-micrograms injection), or CFL-pST (1 ml/h). Myoelectric activity in the segments exposed to pST was similar to that with the saline infusion, but CFL-pST induced significant alterations in myoelectric activity in the form of repetitive bursts of action potentials. The mucosa of the segments exposed to pST showed only mild inflammatory changes. In contrast, CFL-pST caused moderate to severe inflammatory changes with enterocyte necrosis. These studies show that pST, a known enterotoxin, did not alter myoelectric activity and had no significant effect on the integrity of ileal mucosa, as determined by light microscopy. CFL-pST caused both inflammation and tissue necrosis with significant alterations in motor activity. These studies suggest that S. dysenteriae 60 R produces a substance or substances other than pST that cause florid in vivo cytotoxicity and alter myoelectric activity. Images PMID:6363286

  5. Proteomic changes of the porcine small intestine in response to chronic heat stress.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanjun; Gu, Xianhong

    2015-12-01

    Acute heat stress (HS) negatively affects intestinal integrity and barrier function. In contrast, chronic mild HS poses a distinct challenge to animals. Therefore, this study integrates biochemical, histological and proteomic approaches to investigate the effects of chronic HS on the intestine in finishing pigs. Castrated male crossbreeds (79.00 ± 1.50 kg BW) were subjected to either thermal neutral (TN, 21 °C; 55% ± 5% humidity; n=8) or HS conditions (30 °C; 55% ± 5% humidity; n=8) for 3 weeks. The pigs were sacrificed after 3 weeks of high environmental exposure and the plasma hormones, the intestinal morphology, integrity, and protein profiles of the jejunum mucosa were determined. Chronic HS reduced the free triiodothyronine (FT3) and GH levels. HS damaged intestinal morphology, increased plasma d-lactate concentrations and decreased alkaline phosphatase activity of intestinal mucosa. Proteome analysis of the jejunum mucosa was conducted by 2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Fifty-three intestinal proteins were found to be differentially abundant, 18 of which were related to cell structure and motility, and their changes in abundance could comprise intestinal integrity and function. The down-regulation of proteins involved in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA cycle), electron transport chain (ETC), and oxidative phosphorylation suggested that chronic HS impaired energy metabolism and thus induced oxidative stress. Moreover, the changes of ten proteins in abundance related to stress response and defense indicated pigs mediated long-term heat exposure and counteracted its negative effects of heat exposure. These findings have important implications for understanding the effect of chronic HS on intestines.

  6. Sensing via Intestinal Sweet Taste Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Young, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    The detection of nutrients in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is of fundamental significance to the control of motility, glycemia and energy intake, and yet we barely know the most fundamental aspects of this process. This is in stark contrast to the mechanisms underlying the detection of lingual taste, which have been increasingly well characterized in recent years, and which provide an excellent starting point for characterizing nutrient detection in the intestine. This review focuses on the form and function of sweet taste transduction mechanisms identified in the intestinal tract; it does not focus on sensors for fatty acids or proteins. It examines the intestinal cell types equipped with sweet taste transduction molecules in animals and humans, their location, and potential signals that transduce the presence of nutrients to neural pathways involved in reflex control of GI motility. PMID:21519398

  7. Shikonin Inhibits Intestinal Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels and Prevents Rotaviral Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui

    2016-01-01

    Secretory diarrhea remains a global health burden and causes major mortality in children. There have been some focuses on antidiarrheal therapies that may reduce fluid losses and intestinal motility in diarrheal diseases. In the present study, we identified shikonin as an inhibitor of TMEM16A chloride channel activity using cell-based fluorescent-quenching assay. The IC50 value of shikonin was 6.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurements demonstrated that shikonin inhibited Eact-induced Cl- current in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 value of 1.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurement showed that shikonin exhibited inhibitory effect against CCh-induced Cl- currents in mouse colonic epithelia but did not affect cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration as well as the other major enterocyte chloride channel conductance regulator. Characterization study found that shikonin inhibited basolateral K+ channel activity without affecting Na+/K+-ATPase activities. In vivo studies revealed that shikonin significantly delayed intestinal motility in mice and reduced stool water content in a neonatal mice model of rotaviral diarrhea without affecting the viral infection process in vivo. Taken together, the results suggested that shikonin inhibited enterocyte calcium-activated chloride channels, the inhibitory effect was partially through inhbition of basolateral K+ channel activity, and shikonin could be a lead compound in the treatment of rotaviral secretory diarrhea. PMID:27601995

  8. Shikonin Inhibits Intestinal Calcium-Activated Chloride Channels and Prevents Rotaviral Diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Yu, Bo; Yang, Hong; Ma, Tonghui

    2016-01-01

    Secretory diarrhea remains a global health burden and causes major mortality in children. There have been some focuses on antidiarrheal therapies that may reduce fluid losses and intestinal motility in diarrheal diseases. In the present study, we identified shikonin as an inhibitor of TMEM16A chloride channel activity using cell-based fluorescent-quenching assay. The IC50 value of shikonin was 6.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurements demonstrated that shikonin inhibited Eact-induced Cl(-) current in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 value of 1.5 μM. Short-circuit current measurement showed that shikonin exhibited inhibitory effect against CCh-induced Cl(-) currents in mouse colonic epithelia but did not affect cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration as well as the other major enterocyte chloride channel conductance regulator. Characterization study found that shikonin inhibited basolateral K(+) channel activity without affecting Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activities. In vivo studies revealed that shikonin significantly delayed intestinal motility in mice and reduced stool water content in a neonatal mice model of rotaviral diarrhea without affecting the viral infection process in vivo. Taken together, the results suggested that shikonin inhibited enterocyte calcium-activated chloride channels, the inhibitory effect was partially through inhbition of basolateral K(+) channel activity, and shikonin could be a lead compound in the treatment of rotaviral secretory diarrhea.

  9. Esophageal motility disorders: medical therapy.

    PubMed

    Lacy, Brian E; Weiser, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    Symptoms of chest pain and dysphagia are common in the adult population. Most patients initially undergo an evaluation to exclude anatomic causes (ie, esophagitis, stricture) and cardiovascular disease as the etiology of these symptoms. Patients with persistent symptoms may then be referred for specialized testing of the esophagus, including esophageal manometry. Disorders of esophageal motility, which include achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter, and ineffective motility are often identified in these patients. Unfortunately, the etiology of these disorders has not been well characterized and the treatment has not been standardized. This review will briefly discuss the impact, etiology, and diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders, and then focus on the medical management of these disorders using evidence from well-designed, prospective studies, where available.

  10. Effects of environment factors on initiation of sperm motility in sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Li; Shao, Mingyu; Bao, Zhenmin; Hu, Jingjie; Zhang, Zhifeng

    2011-06-01

    Sperm of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka) were quiescent in electrolyte NaCl solution and artificial seawater (ASW) and nonelectrolyte glucose and mannitol solutions when the osmolality was less than 200 mOsm kg-1. The sperm started to be motile as a result of increased osmolality, indicating an osmolality-dependent initiation of sperm motility in sea cucumber. After a brief incubation in hypotonic NaCl and glucose solutions with osmolalities of 200 and 400 mOsm kg-1, sperm lost partial motile ability. Sperm became immobilized when pH was 6.0 in NaCl, glucose and mannitol solutions, suggesting that an H+ release is involved in sperm activation. The decreased pH had no effect on the percentage of motile sperm in ASW, whereas it delayed the time period to reach the maximum motility (motilitymax). Extracellular Ca2+ in electrolyte solutions was not essential for motility stimulation but shortened the time of reaching motilitymax. When Ca2+ was mixed in nonelectrolyte solutions the sperm motility was completely suppressed. The K+ channel blocker, quinine, suppressed the sperm motility in electrolyte solution, showing a possible involvement of K+ transport in the process. High K+ concentration did not affect the sperm motility in NaCl solution, but decreased it in ASW and almost entirely suppressed it in nonelectrolyte solutions. The different effects of pH and K+ in ASW and NaCl solution indicate that external ions may also regulate sperm motility.

  11. Altered motility causes the early gastrointestinal toxicity of irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, B.A.; Moulder, J.E.; Otterson, M.F.; Sarna, S.K. )

    1994-03-01

    This article reviews studies of large and small intestinal contractile activity following radiation exposure. Studies of motility utilize strain gauge transducers surgically implanted on the seromuscular layer of the small intestine. All studies were performed in mixed breed dogs to record the occurrence of normal contractions, giant migrating contractions (GMCs) and retrograde giant contractions (RGCs) before, during and after irradiation (22.5 Gy in 9 fractions at 3 fractions/week). Giant migrating contractions and retrograde giant contractions are infrequent in the healthy state. However, in diseased states, GMCs are associated with abdominal cramps and diarrhea, and RGCs precede vomiting. In fasted animals, fractionated abdominal irradiation dramatically increased the frequency of GMCs, with the incidence peaking after the second dose. The increased frequency of GMCS occurred as early as a few hours after the first radiation fraction, and returned to normal within days of cessation of radiation. RGCs were also significantly increased after abdominal irradiation. The frequency of RGCs was greatest on the first and sixth dose of radiation. Clinically, the dogs developed nausea, vomiting and diarrhea as early as the first day of irradiation. In dogs studied in the fed state, decreased amplitude, duration, and frequency of postprandial contractions occurred. These changes may slow intestinal transit during irradiation. Radiation also produced a striking increase in the frequency of colonic GMCs; these changes in colonic motor activity were associated with diarrhea as early as the second irradiation. Changes in GI motility during fractionated irradiation precede the appearance of histopathological lesions in the GI tract. Thus, the symptoms of nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea experienced during radiotherapy (particularly those within the first week) are directly related to changes in bowel motility. 41 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Cryopreservation of human spermatozoa. III. The effect of cryoprotectants on motility.

    PubMed

    Critser, J K; Huse-Benda, A R; Aaker, D V; Arneson, B W; Ball, G D

    1988-08-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to examine potential toxic effects of cryoprotectants on motility of human spermatozoa. The data indicated that exposure of spermatozoa to cryoprotectant medium for as little as 15 minutes at room temperature caused a reduction in motility. This reduction in motility was caused by glycerol. Lowering glycerol concentrations from 7.5% to 5.0% improved sperm motility at 24 hours post-thaw. Sperm motility was not affected by either slow or abrupt cooling rates above -5 degrees C. Motility was greater in cryopreserved sperm at 24 hours post-thaw when glycerol was added at -5 degrees C rather than at room temperature. These data suggest that avoiding glycerol toxicity either by reducing the concentration used or by adding glycerol at a lower temperature, or both, may improve human sperm cryosurvival rates.

  13. A genome scan for quantitative trait loci affecting the length of small intestine in a White Duroc x Chinese Erhualian intercross resource population.

    PubMed

    Gao, J; Ren, J; Zhou, L H; Ren, D R; Li, L; Xiao, S J; Yang, B; Huang, L S

    2010-04-01

    The small intestine is a vital organ in animal gastrointestinal system, in which a large variety of nutrients are absorbed. To identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for the length of porcine small intestine, phenotypic values were measured in 1034 individuals at 240 d from a White Duroc x Chinese Erhualian intercross F(2) population. The length of small intestine showed strong correlation with growth traits and carcass length in the F2 population. A whole-genome scan was performed based on 183 microsatellites covering the pig genome in the F(2) population. A total of 10 QTL for this trait were identified on 8 pig chromosomes (SSC), including four 1% genome-wide significant QTL on SSC2, 4, 7 and 8, one 5% genome-wide significant QTL on SSC12, and five 5% chromosome-wide significant QTL on SSC5, 7, 13 and 14. The Erhualian alleles were generally associated with shorter length of the small intestine except the alleles on SSC7 and 13. The QTL on SSC4 overlapped with the previously reported QTL for the length of small intestine. Several significant QTL on SSC2, 8, and 12 were consistent with previous reports. The significant QTL detected on SSC7 was reported for the first time. All QTL identified in this study corresponded to the known region significantly associated with growth traits, supporting the important role of the length of small intestine in pig growth.

  14. Apramycin treatment affects selection and spread of a multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli strain able to colonize the human gut in the intestinal microbiota of pigs.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Fresno, Ana; Zachariasen, Camilla; Hansen, Monica Hegstad; Nielsen, Alexander; Hendriksen, Rene S; Nielsen, Søren Saxmose; Olsen, John Elmerdahl

    2016-01-07

    The effect of apramycin treatment on transfer and selection of an Escherichia coli strain (E. coli 912) in the intestine of pigs was analyzed through an in vivo experiment. The strain was sequenced and assigned to the sequence type ST101 and serotype O11. It carried resistance genes to apramycin/gentamicin, sulphonamide, tetracycline, hygromycin B, β-lactams and streptomycin [aac(3)-IV, sul2, tet(X), aph(4), bla TEM-1 and strA/B], with all but tet(X) located on the same conjugative plasmid. Nineteen pigs were randomly allocated into two inoculation groups, one treated with apramycin (pen 2) and one non-treated (pen 3), along with a non-inoculated control group (pen 1). Two pigs of pen 2 and 3 were inoculated intragastrically with a rifampicin resistant variant of the strain. Apramycin treatment in pen 2 was initiated immediately after inoculation. Strain colonization was assessed in the feces from all pigs. E. coli 912 was shown to spread to non-inoculated pigs in both groups. The selective effect did not persist beyond 3 days post-treatment, and the strain was not detected from this time point in pen 2. We demonstrated that E. coli 912 was able to spread between pigs in the same pen irrespective of treatment, and apramycin treatment resulted in significantly higher counts compared to the non-treated group. This represents the first demonstration of how antimicrobial treatment affects spread of resistant bacteria in pig production. The use of apramycin may lead to enhanced spread of gentamicin-resistant E. coli. Since gentamicin is a first-choice drug for human bacteremia, this is of concern.

  15. Crosstalk between Muscularis Macrophages and Enteric Neurons Regulates Gastrointestinal Motility

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Paul Andrew; Koscsó, Balázs; Rajani, Gaurav Manohar; Stevanovic, Korey; Berres, Marie-Luise; Hashimoto, Daigo; Mortha, Arthur; Leboeuf, Marylene; Li, Xiu-Min; Mucida, Daniel; Stanley, E. Richard; Dahan, Stephanie; Margolis, Kara Gross; Gershon, Michael David; Merad, Miriam; Bogunovic, Milena

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Intestinal peristalsis is a dynamic physiologic process influenced by dietary and microbial changes. It is tightly regulated by complex cellular interactions; however, our understanding of these controls is incomplete. A distinct population of macrophages is distributed in the intestinal muscularis externa. We demonstrate that in the steady state muscularis macrophages regulate peristaltic activity of the colon. They change the pattern of smooth muscle contractions by secreting bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2), which activates BMP receptor (BMPR) expressed by enteric neurons. Enteric neurons, in turn, secrete colony stimulatory factor 1 (CSF1), a growth factor required for macrophage development. Finally, stimuli from microbial commensals regulate BMP2 expression by macrophages and CSF1 expression by enteric neurons. Our findings identify a plastic, microbiota-driven, crosstalk between muscularis macrophages and enteric neurons, which controls gastrointestinal motility. PMID:25036630

  16. Motility of Electric Cable Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Damgaard, Lars Riis; Holm, Simon Agner; Schramm, Andreas; Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cable bacteria are filamentous bacteria that electrically couple sulfide oxidation and oxygen reduction at centimeter distances, and observations in sediment environments have suggested that they are motile. By time-lapse microscopy, we found that cable bacteria used gliding motility on surfaces with a highly variable speed of 0.5 ± 0.3 μm s−1 (mean ± standard deviation) and time between reversals of 155 ± 108 s. They frequently moved forward in loops, and formation of twisted loops revealed helical rotation of the filaments. Cable bacteria responded to chemical gradients in their environment, and around the oxic-anoxic interface, they curled and piled up, with straight parts connecting back to the source of sulfide. Thus, it appears that motility serves the cable bacteria in establishing and keeping optimal connections between their distant electron donor and acceptors in a dynamic sediment environment. IMPORTANCE This study reports on the motility of cable bacteria, capable of transmitting electrons over centimeter distances. It gives us a new insight into their behavior in sediments and explains previously puzzling findings. Cable bacteria greatly influence their environment, and this article adds significantly to the body of knowledge about this organism. PMID:27084019

  17. Small intestinal physiology and pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Sarna, S K; Otterson, M F

    1989-06-01

    The small intestine, like the rest of the gastrointestinal tract, is an intelligent organ. It generates a wide variety of motor patterns to meet motility requirements in different situations. Its basic motor function after a meal is to mix the chyme with exocrine and intestinal secretions, agitate its contents to uniformly and evenly expose them to the mucosal surface, and to propel them distally at a rate that allows optimal absorption of food components, and reabsorption of bile. Most of these functions are performed by individual phasic contractions. In humans, the phasic contractions are largely disorganized in time and space. These contractions may cause mixing and agitation of luminal contents with slow distal propulsion. Occasionally, an individual contraction of large amplitude and long duration migrates over several centimeters and may rapidly propel the contents over this distance. In general, the spatial and temporal relationships of individual phasic contractions become less organized distally, resulting in a slower propulsion rate in the distal small intestine than in the proximal small intestine. The migrating clustered contractions generated after a meal may also be propulsive, but because of their unpredictable and irregular occurrence, their precise role in postprandial propulsion is incompletely understood. Rapidly migrating contractions may occur when the electrical control activity is obliterated by pharmacologic agents or during parasitic infections. Their effects on motility are not known yet. Between meals, when digestion is complete, the small intestine generates migrating motor complexes that help keep the small intestine clean by dislodging debris from the villi and dumping them into the colon. This may prevent decay of these materials in the small intestine and limit their contribution to bacterial overgrowth. Giant migrating contractions may perform a similar function in the distal small intestine as well as return any refluxed fecal

  18. Sperm motility-initiating substance in newt egg-jelly induces differential initiation of sperm motility based on sperm intracellular calcium levels.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Akihiko; Takayama-Watanabe, Eriko; Vines, Carol A; Cherr, Gary N

    2011-01-01

    Sperm motility-initiating substance (SMIS), a novel motility inducer from newt egg-jelly, is activated by the release from associated jelly substances at the beginning of internal fertilization and affects female-stored sperm. We examined motility initiation kinetics of newt sperm in response to SMIS by monitoring the changes of sperm intracellular calcium ([Ca²(+)](i)). In quiescent non-motile sperm loaded with the Ca²(+) indicator Fluo-4, intracellular free Ca²(+) was observed around mitochondria using confocal scanning laser microscopy. A slight increase in [Ca²(+)](i) occurred simultaneously and transiently at motility initiation in sperm treated with either heated jelly extract (hJE) containing activated SMIS, or a low osmotic solution, which naturally initiates motility in externally-fertilizing amphibians and can initiate motility in urodele sperm. When the increase of [Ca²(+)](i) at motility-initiation was monitored using spectrofluorometry, large increases in [Ca²(+)](i) occurred immediately in the low osmotic solution and within 1.5 min in the hJE. In the intact jelly extract (no heating), small increases of [Ca²(+)](i) irregularly occurred from around 1 min and for about 4 min, during which motility was differentially initiated among sperm. These results indicate that the SMIS induces differential initiation of sperm motility depending on the activational states of the SMIS and its overall activity. The motility initiation in the jelly extract was delayed in sperm whose intracellular Ca²(+) had been chelated with BAPTA-AM. The relative levels of [Ca²(+)](i) were variable with a mean of 414 ± 256 nmol/L among resting sperm, suggesting that the level of [Ca²(+)](i) in the resting sperm modulates the responsiveness to the SMIS.

  19. Cell motility and antibiotic tolerance of bacterial swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Wenlong

    Many bacteria species can move across moist surfaces in a coordinated manner known as swarming. It is reported that swarm cells show higher tolerance to a wide variety of antibiotics than planktonic cells. We used the model bacterium E. coli to study how motility affects the antibiotic tolerance of swarm cells. Our results provide new insights for the control of pathogenic invasion via regulating cell motility. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: zwlong@live.com.

  20. Bacterial motility and chemotaxis in shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusconi, Roberto; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Son, Kwangmin; Stocker, Roman

    2011-11-01

    Bacteria often exhibit directed motility (``taxis'') in response to gradients of dissolved resources, like nutrients or oxygen. While we have a detailed understanding of chemotaxis in quiescent environments, it has been largely overlooked how this behavior is affected by fluid flow, despite the ubiquity of flow in bacterial habitats. Here we present experiments on aerotaxis (attraction to dissolved oxygen) of Bacillus subtilis in controlled shear flows. Using novel microfluidic devices we expose bacterial suspensions to steady oxygen gradients, with independent control over shear rates. From single-cell trajectories and the spatial distribution of bacteria, we show that the cell rotation induced by shear reduces the aerotactic performance, demonstrating that hydrodynamic conditions affect bacterial fitness.

  1. Motile and non-motile cilia in human pathology: from function to phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Mitchison, Hannah M; Valente, Enza Maria

    2017-01-01

    Ciliopathies are inherited human disorders caused by both motile and non-motile cilia dysfunction that form an important and rapidly expanding disease category. Ciliopathies are complex conditions to diagnose, being multisystem disorders characterized by extensive genetic heterogeneity and clinical variability with high levels of lethality. There is marked phenotypic overlap among distinct ciliopathy syndromes that presents a major challenge for their recognition, diagnosis, and clinical management, in addition to posing an on-going task to develop the most appropriate family counselling. The impact of next-generation sequencing and high-throughput technologies in the last decade has significantly improved our understanding of the biological basis of ciliopathy disorders, enhancing our ability to determine the possible reasons for the extensive overlap in their symptoms and genetic aetiologies. Here, we review the diverse functions of cilia in human health and disease and discuss a growing shift away from the classical clinical definitions of ciliopathy syndromes to a more functional categorization. This approach arises from our improved understanding of this unique organelle, revealed through new genetic and cell biological insights into the discrete functioning of subcompartments of the cilium (basal body, transition zone, intraflagellar transport, motility). Mutations affecting these distinct ciliary protein modules can confer different genetic diseases and new clinical classifications are possible to define, according to the nature and extent of organ involvement. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Autocrine motility factor modulates EGF-mediated invasion signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kho, Dhong Hyo; Zhang, Tianpeng; Balan, Vitaly; Yi, Wang; Ha, Seung-Wook; Xie, Youming; Raz, Avraham

    2014-01-01

    Autocrine motility factor (AMF) enhances invasion by breast cancer cells, but how its secretion and effector signaling are controlled in the tumor microenvironment is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated these issues with a chimeric AMF that is secreted at high levels through a canonical ER/Golgi pathway. Using this tool, we found that AMF enhances tumor cell motility by activating AKT/ERK, altering actin organization and stimulating β-catenin/TCF and AP-1 transcription. EGF enhanced secretion of AMF through its casein kinase 2-mediated phosphorylation. RNAi-mediated attenuation of AMF expression inhibited EGF-induced invasion by suppressing ERK signaling. Conversely, exogenous AMF overcame the inhibitory effect of EGFR inhibitor gefitinib on invasive motility by activating HER2 signaling. Taken together, our findings show how AMF modulates EGF-induced invasion while affecting acquired resistance to cytotoxic drugs in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:24576828

  3. The c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase VmpA absent in Escherichia coli K12 strains affects motility and biofilm formation in the enterohemorrhagic O157:H7 serotype.

    PubMed

    Branchu, Priscilla; Hindré, Thomas; Fang, Xin; Thomas, Robynn; Gomelsky, Mark; Claret, Laurent; Harel, Josée; Gobert, Alain P; Martin, Christine

    2013-03-15

    Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is a foodborne pathogen that resists the acidic gastric environment, colonizes the gut epithelium, and causes hemorrhagic colitis and hemolytic-uremic syndrome, especially in children. The genomic island OI-47 of E. coli O157:H7 contains a gene, z1528, encoding an EAL-domain protein potentially involved in c-di-GMP hydrolysis that is absent in non-pathogenic E. coli. This gene, designated vmpA, is co-transcribed with ycdT, which is present in non pathogenic E. coli and encodes a diguanylate cyclase involved in c-di-GMP synthesis. To test for vmpA function, we constructed a vmpA knockout mutant. We also overexpressed vmpA, purified the VmpA protein and assayed for its activity in vitro. We found that VmpA possesses c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase activity and that the vmpA mutation results in increased biofilm formation, and reduced swimming motility, which is consistent with the function determined in vitro. Unexpectedly, suppressor mutations arise frequently in the vmpA background suggesting that VmpA plays an important regulatory role in E. coli O157:H7. These findings represent an example of remarkable flexibility in the organization of c-di-GMP signaling pathways in closely related species.

  4. Intrinsic Photosensitivity Enhances Motility of T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Thieu X.; Jaruga, Barbara; Pingle, Sandeep C.; Bandyopadhyay, Bidhan C.; Ahern, Gerard P.

    2016-01-01

    Sunlight has important biological effects in human skin. Ultraviolet (UV) light striking the epidermis catalyzes the synthesis of Vitamin D and triggers melanin production. Although a causative element in skin cancers, sunlight is also associated with positive health outcomes including reduced incidences of autoimmune diseases and cancers. The mechanisms, however, by which light affects immune function remain unclear. Here we describe direct photon sensing in human and mouse T lymphocytes, a cell-type highly abundant in skin. Blue light irradiation at low doses (<300 mJ cm−2) triggers synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in T cells revealed by the genetically encoded reporter HyPerRed. In turn, H2O2 activates a Src kinase/phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) signaling pathway and Ca2+ mobilization. Pharmacologic inhibition or genetic disruption of Lck kinase, PLC-γ1 or the T cell receptor complex inhibits light-evoked Ca2+ transients. Notably, both light and H2O2 enhance T-cell motility in a Lck-dependent manner. Thus, T lymphocytes possess intrinsic photosensitivity and this property may enhance their motility in skin. PMID:27995987

  5. Nutrigenomic profiling of transcriptional processes affected in liver and distal intestine in response to a soybean meal-induced nutritional stress in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar).

    PubMed

    De Santis, Christian; Bartie, Kerry L; Olsen, Rolf E; Taggart, John B; Tocher, Douglas R

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to generate an experimental model to characterize the nutrigenomic profile of a plant-derived nutritional stress. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) was used as the model species. The nutritional stress was induced by inclusion of dietary defatted soybean meal (SBM), as this ingredient had been previously demonstrated to induce enteropathy in the distal intestine and reduce growth in salmon. Triplicate groups of Atlantic salmon were fed concentrations of 0, 100, 200 and 300 g kg(-1) SBM for 12 weeks and reduced growth performance was used as the indicator of nutritional stress. The transcriptome was analyzed in two tissues, liver and distal intestine, with the hypothesis being that the liver transcriptome would be characterized by gene expression responses related to overall growth and health performance, whereas intestinal gene expression would be dominated by specific responses to SBM. A set of 133 genes was differentially expressed in liver including 44 genes in common with the intestinal response. The liver-specific response included up-regulation of genes involved in protein digestion, energy metabolism and immune functions, whereas genes in other metabolic pathways were generally anabolic and down-regulated. These responses may be more related to general nutritional stress than to SBM per se. The transcriptomic profile in the distal intestine was consistent with the enteritis response as described previously. This study provides a comprehensive report on the profiles of liver and distal intestine transcriptomes, specifically highlighting the role of the liver in fish undergoing SBM-induced nutritional stress.

  6. A Comparative Study on Antioxidant System in Fish Hepatopancreas and Intestine Affected by Choline Deficiency: Different Change Patterns of Varied Antioxidant Enzyme Genes and Nrf2 Signaling Factors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Pei; Liu, Yang; Jiang, Wei-Dan; Jiang, Jun; Zhao, Juan; Zhang, Yong-An; Zhou, Xiao-Qiu; Feng, Lin

    2017-01-01

    The liver and intestine are susceptible to the oxidative damage which could result in several diseases. Choline deficiency induced oxidative damage in rat liver cells. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the potential molecular mechanisms responsible for choline deficiency-induced oxidative damage. Juvenile Jian carp were fed diets differing in choline content [165 (deficient group), 310, 607, 896, 1167 and 1820 mg/kg diet] respectively for 65 days. Oxidative damage, antioxidant enzyme activities and related gene expressions in the hepatopancreas and intestine were measured. Choline deficiency decreased choline and phosphatidylcholine contents, and induced oxidative damage in both organs, as evidenced by increased levels of oxidative-stress markers (malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine), coupled with decreased activities of antioxidant enzymes [Copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)]. However, choline deficiency increased glutathione contents in the hepatopancreas and intestine. Furthermore, dietary choline deficiency downregulated mRNA levels of MnSOD, GPx1b, GST-rho, mGST3 and Kelch-like ECH associating protein 1 (Keap1b) in the hepatopancreas, MnSOD, GPx1b, GPx4a, GPx4b, GST-rho, GST-theta, GST-mu, GST-alpha, GST-pi and GST-kappa in the intestine, as well as intestinal Nrf2 protein levels. In contrast, choline deficiency upregulated the mRNA levels of GPx4a, GPx4b, mGST1, mGST2, GST-theta, GST-mu, Keap1a and PKC in the hepatopancreas, mGST3, nuclear factor erythoid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and Keap1a in the intestine, as well as hepatopancreatic Nrf2 protein levels. This study provides new evidence that choline deficiency-induced oxidative damage is associated with changes in the transcription of antioxidant enzyme and Nrf2/Keap1 signaling molecules in the hepatopancreas and intestine. Additionally, this study firstly

  7. Intestinal Parasitoses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagardere, Bernard; Dumburgier, Elisabeth

    1994-01-01

    Intestinal parasites have become a serious public health problem in tropical countries because of the climate and the difficulty of achieving efficient hygiene. The objectives of this journal issue are to increase awareness of the individual and collective repercussions of intestinal parasites, describe the current conditions of contamination and…

  8. Cinnamon polyphenols regulate multiple metabolic pathways involved in intestinal lipid metabolism of primary small intestinal enterocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing evidence suggests that dietary factors may affect the expression of multiple genes and signaling pathways including those that regulate intestinal lipoprotein metabolism. The small intestine is actively involved in the regulation of dietary lipid absorption, intracellular transport and me...

  9. Axoneme Structure from Motile Cilia.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takashi

    2017-01-03

    The axoneme is the main extracellular part of cilia and flagella in eukaryotes. It consists of a microtubule cytoskeleton, which normally comprises nine doublets. In motile cilia, dynein ATPase motor proteins generate sliding motions between adjacent microtubules, which are integrated into a well-orchestrated beating or rotational motion. In primary cilia, there are a number of sensory proteins functioning on membranes surrounding the axoneme. In both cases, as the study of proteomics has elucidated, hundreds of proteins exist in this compartmentalized biomolecular system. In this article, we review the recent progress of structural studies of the axoneme and its components using electron microscopy and X-ray crystallography, mainly focusing on motile cilia. Structural biology presents snapshots (but not live imaging) of dynamic structural change and gives insights into the force generation mechanism of dynein, ciliary bending mechanism, ciliogenesis, and evolution of the axoneme.

  10. The in vivo infusion of hydrogen peroxide induces oxidative stress and differentially affects the activities of small intestinal carbohydrate digestive enzymes in the neonatal pig.

    PubMed

    Lackeyram, D; Mine, Y; Widowski, T; Archbold, T; Fan, M Z

    2012-12-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterized by persistent and relapsing fatigue that involves oxidative stress in its pathogenesis. We tested the hypothesis that a decrease in key carbohydrate-digesting enzyme activity in the gut is one of the major biological mechanisms of developing CFS in liquid formula-fed neonatal pigs with in vivo infusion of H(2)O(2). Piglets at 7 to 10 d of age were fitted with an intraperitoneal catheter, allowed a 3-d post surgical recovery, and infused with either H(2)O(2) at 5 mmol/kg BW (PER; n = 8) or the same volume of saline (CON; n = 8) in six 20-ml doses daily for a period of 10 d. During this period, animal behavior was monitored, blood samples collected, and jejunal enzyme activity kinetic experiments for lactase, sucrase, maltase, and maltase-glucoamylase were conducted. Plasma concentration of reduced glutathione remained similar (P > 0.05) to the pre-infusion level over the study duration in the CON group whereas this was 65% lower (P < 0.05) than the pre-infusion level in the PER group. Piglets experiencing oxidative stress had an overall lower (P < 0.05) physical mobility and the maximal jejunal specific activities [μmol/(mg protein · min)] for lactase (PER, 6.54 ± 0.68 vs. CON, 12.65 ± 0.69) and maltase (PER, 57.39 ± 1.02 vs. CON, 75.60 ± 1.04), respectively. However, differences were not observed (P > 0.05) in the maximal specific activities [μmol/(mg protein · min)] of sucrase (PER, 10.50 ± 1.37 vs. CON, 12.40 ± 1.55) and maltase-glucoamylase (PER, 0.71 ± 0.08 vs. CON, 0.70 ± 0.07) between the 2 groups. In conclusion, infusion of a suitable dose of H(2)O(2) induced CFS in the neonatal pigs. Oxidative stress in vivo differentially affected the maximal activities of important small intestinal carbohydrate-digesting enzymes in neonatal pigs fed a dairy milk-based liquid formula.

  11. Self-organized cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xinxin; Doubrovinski, Konstantin

    2011-03-01

    Cell migration plays a key role in a wide range of biological phenomena, such as morphogenesis, chemotaxis, and wound healing. Cell locomotion relies on the cytoskeleton, a meshwork of filamentous proteins, intrinsically out of thermodynamic equilibrium and cross-linked by molecular motors, proteins that turn chemical energy into mechanical work. In the course of locomotion, cells remain polarized, i.e. they retain a single direction of motion in the absence of external cues. Traditionally, polarization has been attributed to intracellular signaling. However, recent experiments show that polarization may be a consequence of self-organized cytoskeletal dynamics. Our aim is to elucidate the mechanisms by which persistent unidirectional locomotion may arise through simple mechanical interactions of the cytoskeletal proteins. To this end, we develop a simple physical description of cytoskeletal dynamics. We find that the proposed description accounts for a range of phenomena associated with cell motility, including spontaneous polarization, persistent unidirectional motion, and the co-existence of motile and non-motile states.

  12. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction related to viral infections.

    PubMed

    De Giorgio, R; Ricciardiello, L; Naponelli, V; Selgrad, M; Piazzi, G; Felicani, C; Serra, M; Fronzoni, L; Antonucci, A; Cogliandro, R F; Barbara, G; Corinaldesi, R; Tonini, M; Knowles, C H; Stanghellini, V

    2010-01-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIPO), one of the most severe gastrointestinal motility disorders, is a condition characterized by a clinical picture mimicking small bowel occlusion with related symptoms and signs in the absence of demonstrable mechanical obstruction. Analysis of full-thickness biopsy samples may unravel structural changes of the neuromuscular layer involving the whole gut, although the midgut is usually worst affected. Intestinal pseudo-obstruction can occur in association with systemic neurological, endocrine, and connective tissue diseases or malignancy but, when no recognizable etiology is found, CIPO is referred to as idiopathic (CIIPO). The latter form can be diagnosed early in life due to a genetic etiology or in adulthood when a viral origin may be considered. This review addresses the hypothesis that some systemic neurotrophic viral infections can affect the enteric nervous system thereby altering normal peristaltic activity. Available data are reviewed, focusing specifically on herpesviruses or polyomaviruses (JC virus). These suggest that in comparison to a proportion of CIIPO patients, healthy controls rarely harbor viral DNA in the myenteric plexus, leaving open the possibility that a viral infection might have an etiologic role in the development of CIIPO. The review thus provides some new perspectives in the pathophysiology and perhaps targeted treatment of CIIPO.

  13. Fundoplication improves disordered esophageal motility.

    PubMed

    Heider, T Ryan; Behrns, Kevin E; Koruda, Mark J; Shaheen, Nicholas J; Lucktong, Tananchai A; Bradshaw, Barbara; Farrell, Timothy M

    2003-02-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and disordered esophageal motility are at risk for postoperative dysphagia, and are often treated with partial (270-degree) fundoplication as a strategy to minimize postoperative swallowing difficulties. Complete (360-degree) fundoplication, however, may provide more effective and durable reflux protection over time. Recently we reported that postfundoplication dysphagia is uncommon, regardless of preoperative manometric status and type of fundoplication. To determine whether esophageal function improves after fundoplication, we measured postoperative motility in patients in whom disordered esophageal motility had been documented before fundoplication. Forty-eight of 262 patients who underwent laparoscopic fundoplication between 1995 and 2000 satisfied preoperative manometric criteria for disordered esophageal motility (distal esophageal peristaltic amplitude < or =30 mm Hg and/or peristaltic frequency < or =80%). Of these, 19 had preoperative manometric assessment at our facility and consented to repeat study. Fifteen (79%) of these patients had a complete fundoplication and four (21%) had a partial fundoplication. Each patient underwent repeat four-channel esophageal manometry 29.5 +/- 18.4 months (mean +/- SD) after fundoplication. Distal esophageal peristaltic amplitude and peristaltic frequency were compared to preoperative data by paired t test. After fundoplication, mean peristaltic amplitude in the distal esophagus increased by 47% (56.8 +/- 30.9 mm Hg to 83.5 +/- 36.5 mm Hg; P < 0.001) and peristaltic frequency improved by 33% (66.4 +/- 28.7% to 87.6 +/- 16.3%; P < 0.01). Normal esophageal motor function was present in 14 patients (74%) after fundoplication, whereas in five patients the esophageal motor function remained abnormal (2 improved, 1 worsened, and 2 remained unchanged). Three patients with preoperative peristaltic frequencies of 0%, 10%, and 20% improved to 84%, 88%, and 50%, respectively

  14. Saturated fat stimulates obesity and hepatic steatosis and affects gut microbiota composition by an enhanced overflow of dietary fat to the distal intestine.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Nicole; Derrien, Muriel; Bosch-Vermeulen, Hanneke; Oosterink, Els; Keshtkar, Shohreh; Duval, Caroline; de Vogel-van den Bosch, Johan; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Müller, Michael; van der Meer, Roelof

    2012-09-01

    We studied the effect of dietary fat type, varying in polyunsaturated-to-saturated fatty acid ratios (P/S), on development of metabolic syndrome. C57Bl/6J mice were fed purified high-fat diets (45E% fat) containing palm oil (HF-PO; P/S 0.4), olive oil (HF-OO; P/S 1.1), or safflower oil (HF-SO; P/S 7.8) for 8 wk. A low-fat palm oil diet (LF-PO; 10E% fat) was used as a reference. Additionally, we analyzed diet-induced changes in gut microbiota composition and mucosal gene expression. The HF-PO diet induced a higher body weight gain and liver triglyceride content compared with the HF-OO, HF-SO, or LF-PO diet. In the intestine, the HF-PO diet reduced microbial diversity and increased the Firmicutes-to-Bacteroidetes ratio. Although this fits a typical obesity profile, our data clearly indicate that an overflow of the HF-PO diet to the distal intestine, rather than obesity itself, is the main trigger for these gut microbiota changes. A HF-PO diet-induced elevation of lipid metabolism-related genes in the distal small intestine confirmed the overflow of palm oil to the distal intestine. Some of these lipid metabolism-related genes were previously already associated with the metabolic syndrome. In conclusion, our data indicate that saturated fat (HF-PO) has a more stimulatory effect on weight gain and hepatic lipid accumulation than unsaturated fat (HF-OO and HF-SO). The overflow of fat to the distal intestine on the HF-PO diet induced changes in gut microbiota composition and mucosal gene expression. We speculate that both are directly or indirectly contributive to the saturated fat-induced development of obesity and hepatic steatosis.

  15. In vivo characterization of intestinal effects of endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 in type 1 diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-Lin; Zhou, Ying; Guo, Chao; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Rui

    2013-01-05

    Previously, we have demonstrated that type 1 diabetes significantly attenuated the effects of endomorphins on mouse colonic contractions in vitro. In the present study, to further assess whether diabetes affects the in vivo effects of endomorphins on the mouse intestinal motility, we investigated the effects of endomorphins on colonic propulsion and large intestinal transit in diabetic mice. Both colonic bead expulsion and large intestinal transit were significantly delayed in 4 and 8 weeks diabetic mice compared to non-diabetic mice. Moreover, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of EM-1 and EM-2 (0.5, 1.5 and 5 nmol/mouse) significantly increased bead expulsion latency in a dose-dependent manner both in non-diabetic and diabetic mice. Similar results were found in large intestinal transit. However, the inhibitory effects of colonic propulsion induced by endomorphins were significantly attenuated in diabetes compared to non-diabetes. It is noteworthy that the inhibition of distal colonic propulsion induced by EM-1 in 8-week diabetes was lower than that of in 4 weeks diabetes. Nevertheless, there was no significant influence on endomorphins-induced inhibition of large intestinal transit caused by diabetes. Co-administration of naloxone (10 nmol/mouse, i.c.v.) significantly attenuated the inhibitory effects of endomorphins (5 nmol/mouse, i.c.v.) on colonic bead expulsion and large intestinal transit in 4 weeks diabetes, indicating that opioid receptor involved in these effects. Our results indicated that type 1 diabetes attenuated the inhibition of distal colonic propulsion induced by endomorphins in mice, but not the large intestine. The central opioid mechanism was involved in the endomorphins-induced intestinal effects in diabetes.

  16. Intestinal Capillariasis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    bhIll inenais, the tiny nematode causing Intestinal capillariasis In humans, Is a Iunique parasite. It is one of the newest parasites that has been...Capillariaphilippinensis, the tiny nematode causing intestinal capillariasis in humans, is a unique parasite. It is one of the newest parasites that has been shown to...stichocytes surrounding the oesophagus. The posterior half of the nematode is wider than the anterior half and contains the digestive tract and the

  17. Probiotic supplementation affects markers of intestinal barrier, oxidation, and inflammation in trained men; a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Probiotics are an upcoming group of nutraceuticals claiming positive effects on athlete’s gut health, redox biology and immunity but there is lack of evidence to support these statements. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo controlled trial to observe effects of probiotic supplementation on markers of intestinal barrier, oxidation and inflammation, at rest and after intense exercise. 23 trained men received multi-species probiotics (1010 CFU/day, Ecologic®Performance or OMNi-BiOTiC®POWER, n = 11) or placebo (n = 12) for 14 weeks and performed an intense cycle ergometry over 90 minutes at baseline and after 14 weeks. Zonulin and α1-antitrypsin were measured from feces to estimate gut leakage at baseline and at the end of treatment. Venous blood was collected at baseline and after 14 weeks, before and immediately post exercise, to determine carbonyl proteins (CP), malondialdehyde (MDA), total oxidation status of lipids (TOS), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Statistical analysis used multifactorial analysis of variance (ANOVA). Level of significance was set at p < 0.05, a trend at p < 0.1. Results Zonulin decreased with supplementation from values slightly above normal into normal ranges (<30 ng/ml) and was significantly lower after 14 weeks with probiotics compared to placebo (p = 0.019). We observed no influence on α1-antitrypsin (p > 0.1). CP increased significantly from pre to post exercise in both groups at baseline and in the placebo group after 14 weeks of treatment (p = 0.006). After 14 weeks, CP concentrations were tendentially lower with probiotics (p = 0.061). TOS was slightly increased above normal in both groups, at baseline and after 14 weeks of treatment. There was no effect of supplementation or exercise on TOS. At baseline, both groups showed considerably higher TNF-α concentrations than normal. After 14 weeks TNF-α was

  18. Gliding motility in bacteria: insights from studies of Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Spormann, A M

    1999-09-01

    motor in M. xanthus controls cell movement in groups (S-motility system). It is dependent on functional type IV pili and is operative only when cells are in close proximity to each other. Type IV pili are known to be involved in another mode of bacterial surface translocation, called twitching motility. S-motility may well represent a variation of twitching motility in M. xanthus. However, twitching differs from gliding since it involves cell movements that are jerky and abrupt and that lack the organization and smoothness observed in gliding. Components of this motor are encoded by genes of the S-system, which appear to be homologs of genes involved in the biosynthesis, assembly, and function of type IV pili in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. How type IV pili generate force in S-motility is currently unknown, but it is to be expected that ongoing physiological, genetic, and biochemical studies in M. xanthus, in conjunction with studies on twitching in P. aeruginosa and N. gonorrhoeae, will provide important insights into this microbial motor. The two motility systems of M. xanthus are affected to different degrees by the MglA protein, which shows similarity to a small GTPase. Bacterial chemotaxis-like sensory transduction systems control gliding motility in M. xanthus. The frz genes appear to regulate gliding movement of individual cells and movement by the S-motility system, suggesting that the two motors found in this bacterium can be regulated to result in coordinated multicellular movements. In contrast, the dif genes affect only S-system-dependent swarming.

  19. Gliding Motility in Bacteria: Insights from Studies of Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Spormann, Alfred M.

    1999-01-01

    motor in M. xanthus controls cell movement in groups (S-motility system). It is dependent on functional type IV pili and is operative only when cells are in close proximity to each other. Type IV pili are known to be involved in another mode of bacterial surface translocation, called twitching motility. S-motility may well represent a variation of twitching motility in M. xanthus. However, twitching differs from gliding since it involves cell movements that are jerky and abrupt and that lack the organization and smoothness observed in gliding. Components of this motor are encoded by genes of the S-system, which appear to be homologs of genes involved in the biosynthesis, assembly, and function of type IV pili in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. How type IV pili generate force in S-motility is currently unknown, but it is to be expected that ongoing physiological, genetic, and biochemical studies in M. xanthus, in conjunction with studies on twitching in P. aeruginosa and N. gonorrhoeae, will provide important insights into this microbial motor. The two motility systems of M. xanthus are affected to different degrees by the MglA protein, which shows similarity to a small GTPase. Bacterial chemotaxis-like sensory transduction systems control gliding motility in M. xanthus. The frz genes appear to regulate gliding movement of individual cells and movement by the S-motility system, suggesting that the two motors found in this bacterium can be regulated to result in coordinated multicellular movements. In contrast, the dif genes affect only S-system-dependent swarming. PMID:10477310

  20. Hydrogen Sulfide and/or Ammonia Reduces Spermatozoa Motility through AMPK/AKT Related Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yong; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Liu, Xin-Qi; Zhang, Peng-Fei; Hao, Ya-Nan; Li, Lan; Chen, Liang; Shen, Wei; Tang, Xiang-Fang; Min, Ling-Jiang; Meng, Qing-Shi; Wang, Shu-Kun; Yi, Bao; Zhang, Hong-Fu

    2016-11-01

    A number of emerging studies suggest that air pollutants such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and ammonia (NH3) may cause a decline in spermatozoa motility. The impact and underlying mechanisms are currently unknown. Boar spermatozoa (in vitro) and peripubertal male mice (in vivo) were exposed to H2S and/or NH3 to evaluate the impact on spermatozoa motility. Na2S and/or NH4Cl reduced the motility of boar spermatozoa in vitro. Na2S and/or NH4Cl disrupted multiple signaling pathways including decreasing Na+/K+ ATPase activity and protein kinase B (AKT) levels, activating Adenosine 5‧-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), and increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) to diminish boar spermatozoa motility. The increase in ROS might have activated PTEN, which in turn diminished AKT activation. The ATP deficiency (indicated by reduction in Na+/K+ ATPase activity), transforming growth factor (TGFβ) activated kinase-1 (TAK1) activation, and AKT deactivation stimulated AMPK, which caused a decline in boar spermatozoa motility. Simultaneously, the deactivation of AKT might play some role in the reduction of boar spermatozoa motility. Furthermore, Na2S and/or NH4Cl declined the motility of mouse spermatozoa without affecting mouse body weight gain in vivo. Findings of the present study suggest that H2S and/or NH3 are adversely associated with spermatozoa motility.

  1. Hydrogen Sulfide and/or Ammonia Reduces Spermatozoa Motility through AMPK/AKT Related Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yong; Zhang, Wei-Dong; Liu, Xin-Qi; Zhang, Peng-Fei; Hao, Ya-Nan; Li, Lan; Chen, Liang; Shen, Wei; Tang, Xiang-Fang; Min, Ling-Jiang; Meng, Qing-Shi; Wang, Shu-Kun; Yi, Bao; Zhang, Hong-Fu

    2016-01-01

    A number of emerging studies suggest that air pollutants such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and ammonia (NH3) may cause a decline in spermatozoa motility. The impact and underlying mechanisms are currently unknown. Boar spermatozoa (in vitro) and peripubertal male mice (in vivo) were exposed to H2S and/or NH3 to evaluate the impact on spermatozoa motility. Na2S and/or NH4Cl reduced the motility of boar spermatozoa in vitro. Na2S and/or NH4Cl disrupted multiple signaling pathways including decreasing Na+/K+ ATPase activity and protein kinase B (AKT) levels, activating Adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), and increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) to diminish boar spermatozoa motility. The increase in ROS might have activated PTEN, which in turn diminished AKT activation. The ATP deficiency (indicated by reduction in Na+/K+ ATPase activity), transforming growth factor (TGFβ) activated kinase-1 (TAK1) activation, and AKT deactivation stimulated AMPK, which caused a decline in boar spermatozoa motility. Simultaneously, the deactivation of AKT might play some role in the reduction of boar spermatozoa motility. Furthermore, Na2S and/or NH4Cl declined the motility of mouse spermatozoa without affecting mouse body weight gain in vivo. Findings of the present study suggest that H2S and/or NH3 are adversely associated with spermatozoa motility. PMID:27883089

  2. A Simple, Inexpensive Method for the Measurement of in vivo Intestinal Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sallee, V. L.; Gaugl, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a system that monitors intestinal motility in vivo which is very sensitive, minimally injurious to the tissue, and inexpensive. Used are two balloons, one of which is inserted into the intestinal lumen and the other suspended from a force transducer. (CS)

  3. Mechanism of Actin-Based Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantaloni, Dominique; Le Clainche, Christophe; Carlier, Marie-France

    2001-05-01

    Spatially controlled polymerization of actin is at the origin of cell motility and is responsible for the formation of cellular protrusions like lamellipodia. The pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri, which undergo actin-based propulsion, are acknowledged models of the leading edge of lamellipodia. Actin-based motility of the bacteria or of functionalized microspheres can be reconstituted in vitro from only five pure proteins. Movement results from the regulated site-directed treadmilling of actin filaments, consistent with observations of actin dynamics in living motile cells and with the biochemical properties of the components of the synthetic motility medium.

  4. The outer mucus layer hosts a distinct intestinal microbial niche

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hai; Limenitakis, Julien P.; Fuhrer, Tobias; Geuking, Markus B.; Lawson, Melissa A.; Wyss, Madeleine; Brugiroux, Sandrine; Keller, Irene; Macpherson, Jamie A.; Rupp, Sandra; Stolp, Bettina; Stein, Jens V.; Stecher, Bärbel; Sauer, Uwe; McCoy, Kathy D.; Macpherson, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    The overall composition of the mammalian intestinal microbiota varies between individuals: within each individual there are differences along the length of the intestinal tract related to host nutrition, intestinal motility and secretions. Mucus is a highly regenerative protective lubricant glycoprotein sheet secreted by host intestinal goblet cells; the inner mucus layer is nearly sterile. Here we show that the outer mucus of the large intestine forms a unique microbial niche with distinct communities, including bacteria without specialized mucolytic capability. Bacterial species present in the mucus show differential proliferation and resource utilization compared with the same species in the intestinal lumen, with high recovery of bioavailable iron and consumption of epithelial-derived carbon sources according to their genome-encoded metabolic repertoire. Functional competition for existence in this intimate layer is likely to be a major determinant of microbiota composition and microbial molecular exchange with the host. PMID:26392213

  5. 21 CFR 876.1725 - Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. 876... Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal motility monitoring system is a... esophageal motility monitor and tube, the gastrointestinal motility (electrical) system, and...

  6. 21 CFR 876.1725 - Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. 876... Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal motility monitoring system is a... esophageal motility monitor and tube, the gastrointestinal motility (electrical) system, and...

  7. 21 CFR 876.1725 - Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. 876... Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal motility monitoring system is a... esophageal motility monitor and tube, the gastrointestinal motility (electrical) system, and...

  8. 21 CFR 876.1725 - Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. 876... Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal motility monitoring system is a... esophageal motility monitor and tube, the gastrointestinal motility (electrical) system, and...

  9. 21 CFR 876.1725 - Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. 876... Gastrointestinal motility monitoring system. (a) Identification. A gastrointestinal motility monitoring system is a... esophageal motility monitor and tube, the gastrointestinal motility (electrical) system, and...

  10. Effects of controlled ingestion of kaolinite (5%) on food intake, gut morphology and in vitro motility in rats.

    PubMed

    Voinot, Florian; Fischer, Caroline; Bœuf, Amandine; Schmidt, Camille; Delval-Dubois, Véronique; Reichardt, François; Liewig, Nicole; Chaumande, Bertrand; Ehret-Sabatier, Laurence; Lignot, Jean-Hervé; Angel, Fabielle

    2012-10-01

    Geophagia is found in various animal species and in humans. We have previously shown that spontaneously ingested kaolinite interacts with the intestinal mucosa modifies nutrient absorption and slows down gastric emptying and intestinal transit in rats in vivo. However, the precise mechanisms involved are not elucidated. The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of controlled kaolinite ingestion on food intake, gut morphology and in vitro motility in rats. Male Wistar rats were fed with 5% kaolinite in standard food pellets during 7, 14 and 28 days. Body mass and food consumption were measured daily. Intestinal morphological and proteomic analyses were conducted. The length of mucosal lacteals was evaluated. Plasmatic levels of leptin and adiponectin were determined. Finally, organ bath studies were conducted to evaluate smooth muscle contractility. Food consumption was significantly increased during the first two weeks of kaolinite ingestion without any mass gain compared to controls. Kaolinite induced weak variations in proteins that are involved in various biological processes. Compared to control animals, the length of intestinal lacteals was significantly reduced in kaolinite group whatever the duration of the experiment. Leptin and adiponectin plasmatic levels were significantly increased after 14 days of kaolinite consumption. Changes in spontaneous motility and responses to electrical nerve stimulation of the jejunum and proximal colon were observed at day 14. Altogether, the present data give evidence for a modulation by kaolinite-controlled ingestion on satiety and anorexigenic signals as well as on intestinal and colonic motility.

  11. Roles of ion transport in control of cell motility.

    PubMed

    Stock, Christian; Ludwig, Florian T; Hanley, Peter J; Schwab, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    Cell motility is an essential feature of life. It is essential for reproduction, propagation, embryonic development, and healing processes such as wound closure and a successful immune defense. If out of control, cell motility can become life-threatening as, for example, in metastasis or autoimmune diseases. Regardless of whether ciliary/flagellar or amoeboid movement, controlled motility always requires a concerted action of ion channels and transporters, cytoskeletal elements, and signaling cascades. Ion transport across the plasma membrane contributes to cell motility by affecting the membrane potential and voltage-sensitive ion channels, by inducing local volume changes with the help of aquaporins and by modulating cytosolic Ca(2+) and H(+) concentrations. Voltage-sensitive ion channels serve as voltage detectors in electric fields thus enabling galvanotaxis; local swelling facilitates the outgrowth of protrusions at the leading edge while local shrinkage accompanies the retraction of the cell rear; the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration exerts its main effect on cytoskeletal dynamics via motor proteins such as myosin or dynein; and both, the intracellular and the extracellular H(+) concentration modulate cell migration and adhesion by tuning the activity of enzymes and signaling molecules in the cytosol as well as the activation state of adhesion molecules at the cell surface. In addition to the actual process of ion transport, both, channels and transporters contribute to cell migration by being part of focal adhesion complexes and/or physically interacting with components of the cytoskeleton. The present article provides an overview of how the numerous ion-transport mechanisms contribute to the various modes of cell motility.

  12. Active gel model of amoeboid cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callan-Jones, A. C.; Voituriez, R.

    2013-02-01

    We develop a model of amoeboid cell motility based on active gel theory. Modeling the motile apparatus of a eukaryotic cell as a confined layer of finite length of poroelastic active gel permeated by a solvent, we first show that, due to active stress and gel turnover, an initially static and homogeneous layer can undergo a contractile-type instability to a polarized moving state in which the rear is enriched in gel polymer. This agrees qualitatively with motile cells containing an actomyosin-rich uropod at their rear. We find that the gel layer settles into a steadily moving, inhomogeneous state at long times, sustained by a balance between contractility and filament turnover. In addition, our model predicts an optimal value of the gel-substrate adhesion leading to maximum layer speed, in agreement with cell motility assays. The model may be relevant to motility of cells translocating in complex, confining environments that can be mimicked experimentally by cell migration through microchannels.

  13. Sperm motility under conditions of weightlessness.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, U; Krassnigg, F; Schill, W B

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the differences in motility of frozen and thawed bull spermatozoa under conditions of weightlessness compared with ground conditions. The tests were performed within a series of scientific and technologic experiments under microgravity using sounding rockets in the Technologische Experimente unter Schwerelosigkeit (TEXUS) program launched in Kiruna, North Sweden. Using a computerized sperm motility analyzer, significant differences were found in sperm motility under microgravity compared with sperm under gravitational conditions on earth. Computer analysis showed alterations in straight line and curvilinear velocity, as well as in linearity values. The amount of progressively motile spermatozoa, including all spermatozoa with a velocity > 20 microns/second, increased significantly from 24% +/- 9.5% in the reference test to 49% +/- 7.6% in the microgravity test. In conclusion, there is strong evidence that gravity influences sperm motility.

  14. Inhibitory Effects and Sympathetic Mechanisms of Distension in the Distal Organs on Small Bowel Motility and Slow Waves in Canine.

    PubMed

    Song, Jun; Yin, Jieyun; Chen, Jiande D Z

    2015-12-01

    Rectal distension (RD) is known to induce intestinal dysmotility. Few studies were performed to compare effects of RD, colon distension (CD) and duodenal distension (DD) on small bowel motility. This study aimed to investigate effects and underlying mechanisms of distensions in these regions on intestinal motility and slow waves. Eight dogs chronically implanted with a duodenal fistula, a proximal colon fistula, and intestinal serosal electrodes were studied in six sessions: control, RD, CD, DD, RD + guanethidine, and CD + guanethidine. Postprandial intestinal contractions and slow waves were recorded for the assessment of intestinal motility. The electrocardiogram was recorded for the assessment of autonomic functions. (1) Isobaric RD and CD suppressed intestinal contractions (contractile index: 6.0 ± 0.4 with RD vs. 9.9 ± 0.9 at baseline, P = 0.001, 5.3 ± 0.2 with CD vs. 7.7 ± 0.8 at baseline, P = 0.008). Guanethidine at 3 mg/kg iv was able to partially block the effects. (2) RD and CD reduced the percentage of normal intestinal slow waves from 92.1 ± 2.8 to 64.2 ± 3.4 % (P < 0.001) and from 90 ± 2.7 to 69.2 ± 3.7 % (P = 0.01), respectively. Guanethidine could eliminate these inhibitory effects. (3) DD did not induce any changes in small intestinal contractions and slow waves (P > 0.05). (4) The spectral analysis of the heart rate variability showed that both RD and CD increased sympathetic activity (LF) and reduced vagal activity (HF) (P < 0.05). Isobaric RD and CD could inhibit postprandial intestinal motility and impair intestinal slow waves, which were mediated via the sympathetic pathway. However, DD at a site proximal to the measurement site did not seem to impair small intestinal contractions or slow waves.

  15. Effects of Lizhong Tang on gastrointestinal motility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Cheol; Ha, Wooram; Park, Jinhyeong; Kim, Junghoon; Jung, Yunjin; Kim, Byung Joo

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the effects of Lizhong Tang, a traditional Chinese medicine formula, on gastrointestinal motility in mice. METHODS The in vivo effects of Lizhong Tang on GI motility were investigated by measuring the intestinal transit rates (ITRs) and gastric emptying (GE) values in normal mice and in mice with experimentally induced GI motility dysfunction (GMD). RESULTS In normal ICR mice, the ITR and GE values were significantly and dose-dependently increased by Lizhong Tang (ITR values: 54.4% ± 1.9% vs 65.2% ± 1.8%, P < 0.01 with 0.1 g/kg Lizhong Tang and 54.4% ± 1.9% vs 83.8% ± 1.9%, P < 0.01 with 1 g/kg Lizhong Tang; GE values: 60.7% ± 1.9% vs 66.8% ± 2.1%, P < 0.05 with 0.1 g/kg Lizhong Tang and 60.7% ± 1.9% vs 72.5% ± 1.7%, P < 0.01 with 1 g/kg Lizhong Tang). The ITRs of the GMD mice were significantly reduced compared with those of the normal mice, which were significantly and dose-dependently reversed by Lizhong Tang. Additionally, in loperamide- and cisplatin-induced models of GE delay, Lizhong Tang administration reversed the GE deficits. CONCLUSION These results suggest that Lizhong Tang may be a novel candidate for development as a prokinetic treatment for the GI tract. PMID:27678361

  16. Intestinal disaccharidase activities in the chick

    PubMed Central

    Siddons, R. C.

    1969-01-01

    1. Disaccharidase activities of the small and large intestines of the chick were studied. 2. Homogenates of the small intestine readily hydrolysed maltose, sucrose and palatinose (6-O-α-d-glucopyranosyl-d-fructose), hydrolysed lactose slowly and did not hydrolyse trehalose and cellobiose. 3. Within the small intestine the disaccharidases were located mainly in the intestinal wall; the activity in the contents accounted for less than 5% of the total activity. 4. The disaccharidases were non-uniformly distributed along the small intestine, the activities being greatest in the middle section. 5. The disaccharidase activities increased with age between 1 and 43 days. 6. Homogenates of the large intestine and contents readily hydrolysed maltose, sucrose, palatinose and lactose and hydrolysed cellobiose and trehalose slowly. 7. The large-intestinal disaccharidases were located mainly in the contents. 8. Similar Km and pH optimum values were found for the maltase, sucrase and palatinase activities of the large and small intestines. 9. The lactase activity of the large intestine was markedly affected by diet and had different Km and pH values from the small intestinal lactase. 10. Low activities of intestinal disaccharidase were found in 12-day-old embryos and marked increases in the intestinal disaccharidases of the developing embryo occurred 2–3 days before hatching. PMID:5774506

  17. Bacterial signaling and motility: Sure bets

    SciTech Connect

    Zhulin, Igor B

    2008-01-01

    cytoplasmic membrane. The interaction causes the supramembrane and cytoplasmic rings to rotate along with the flagellar filaments. The energy for flagellar rotation comes from proton motive force or other ions, especially sodium in marine bacteria, which generate an electrochemical gradient across the cell membrane. Three proteins, FliM, FliN, and FliG, located at the base of the motor act as switches that control the direction of flagellar rotation. As exemplified by the enteric bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, changes in the direction of flagellar rotation affect the swimming behavior of the bacterial cell. Counterclockwise (CCW) rotation of the flagella causes the flagellar filaments to form a bundle that pushes the cell forward in a 'run.' In contrast, clockwise (CW) rotation causes the flagellar bundle to fly apart, and the cell tumbles to reorient to a new direction for the ensuing run upon the return of CCW rotation. The interchanging pattern of CCW and CW rotations produces a random walk, composed of relatively long runs with occasional direction changes or turns. By modulating the lengths of the runs or the frequency of tumbling, bacteria can regulate their motile behavior to move in a desirable direction. Many bacteria can also move on surfaces. Except for flagellum-driven swarming motility, all the other forms of known bacterial surface movement involve no flagella. The flagellum-independent surface motility, known as gliding, is observed in cyanobacteria, Mycoplasma species, Cytophaga-Flexibacterium species, and Myxococcus species. Without a doubt, the most thoroughly studied model gliding bacterium is Myxococcus xanthus, which also serves as a prokaryotic model for developmental biology due to its ability to develop multicellular fruiting bodies. M. xanthus cells use gliding motility both to hunt for food during vegetative growth and to aggregate during fruiting body formation. When nutrients are present, groups of cells or

  18. Screening of a Haloferax volcanii Transposon Library Reveals Novel Motility and Adhesion Mutants.

    PubMed

    Legerme, Georgio; Yang, Evan; Esquivel, Rianne N; Kiljunen, Saija; Savilahti, Harri; Pohlschroder, Mechthild

    2016-11-26

    Archaea, like bacteria, use type IV pili to facilitate surface adhesion. Moreover, archaeal flagella-structures required for motility-share a common ancestry with type IV pili. While the characterization of archaeal homologs of bacterial type IV pilus biosynthesis components has revealed important aspects of flagellum and pilus biosynthesis and the mechanisms regulating motility and adhesion in archaea, many questions remain. Therefore, we screened a Haloferax volcanii transposon insertion library for motility mutants using motility plates and adhesion mutants, using an adapted air-liquid interface assay. Here, we identify 20 genes, previously unknown to affect motility or adhesion. These genes include potential novel regulatory genes that will help to unravel the mechanisms underpinning these processes. Both screens also identified distinct insertions within the genomic region lying between two chemotaxis genes, suggesting that chemotaxis not only plays a role in archaeal motility, but also in adhesion. Studying these genes, as well as hypothetical genes hvo_2512 and hvo_2876-also critical for both motility and adhesion-will likely elucidate how these two systems interact. Furthermore, this study underscores the usefulness of the transposon library to screen other archaeal cellular processes for specific phenotypic defects.

  19. Disruption of TgPHIL1 alters specific parameters of Toxoplasma gondii motility measured in a quantitative, three-dimensional live motility assay.

    PubMed

    Leung, Jacqueline M; Rould, Mark A; Konradt, Christoph; Hunter, Christopher A; Ward, Gary E

    2014-01-01

    T. gondii uses substrate-dependent gliding motility to invade cells of its hosts, egress from these cells at the end of its lytic cycle and disseminate through the host organism during infection. The ability of the parasite to move is therefore critical for its virulence. T. gondii engages in three distinct types of gliding motility on coated two-dimensional surfaces: twirling, circular gliding and helical gliding. We show here that motility in a three-dimensional Matrigel-based environment is strikingly different, in that all parasites move in irregular corkscrew-like trajectories. Methods developed for quantitative analysis of motility parameters along the smoothed trajectories demonstrate a complex but periodic pattern of motility with mean and maximum velocities of 0.58 ± 0.07 µm/s and 2.01 ± 0.17 µm/s, respectively. To test how a change in the parasite's crescent shape might affect trajectory parameters, we compared the motility of Δphil1 parasites, which are shorter and wider than wild type, to the corresponding parental and complemented lines. Although comparable percentages of parasites were moving for all three lines, the Δphil1 mutant exhibited significantly decreased trajectory lengths and mean and maximum velocities compared to the parental parasite line. These effects were either partially or fully restored upon complementation of the Δphil1 mutant. These results show that alterations in morphology may have a significant impact on T. gondii motility in an extracellular matrix-like environment, provide a possible explanation for the decreased fitness of Δphil1 parasites in vivo, and demonstrate the utility of the quantitative three-dimensional assay for studying parasite motility.

  20. Immunity Provided by an Outer Membrane Vesicle Cholera Vaccine Is Due to O-Antigen-Specific Antibodies Inhibiting Bacterial Motility.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhu; Lazinski, David W; Camilli, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    An outer membrane vesicle (OMV)-based cholera vaccine is highly efficacious in preventing intestinal colonization in the suckling mouse model. Immunity from OMVs comes from immunoglobulin (Ig), particularly IgG, in the milk of mucosally immunized dams. Anti-OMV IgG renders Vibrio cholerae organisms immotile, thus they pass through the small intestine without colonizing. However, the importance of motility inhibition for protection and the mechanism by which motility is inhibited remain unclear. By using both in vitro and in vivo experiments, we found that IgG inhibits motility by specifically binding to the O-antigen of V. cholerae We demonstrate that the bivalent structure of IgG, although not required for binding to the O-antigen, is required for motility inhibition. Finally, we show using competition assays in suckling mice that inhibition of motility appears to be responsible for most, if not all, of the protection engendered by OMV vaccination, thus providing insight into the mechanism of immune protection.

  1. Regulation of flagellar motility during biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Guttenplan, Sarah B.; Kearns, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Many bacteria swim in liquid or swarm over solid surfaces by synthesizing rotary flagella. The same bacteria that are motile also commonly form non-motile multicellular aggregates held together by an extracellular matrix called biofilms. Biofilms are an important part of the lifestyle of pathogenic bacteria and it is assumed that there is a motility-to-biofilm transition wherein the inhibition of motility promotes biofilm formation. The transition is largely inferred from regulatory mutants that reveal the opposite regulation of the two phenotypes. Here we review the regulation of motility during biofilm formation in Bacillus, Pseudomonas, Vibrio, and Escherichia, and we conclude that the motility-to-biofilm transition, if necessary, likely involves two steps. In the short term, flagella are functionally regulated to either inhibit rotation or modulate the basal flagellar reversal frequency. Over the long term, flagellar gene transcription is inhibited and in the absence of de novo synthesis, flagella are likely diluted to extinction through growth. Both short term and long term control is likely important to the motility-to-biofilm transition to stabilize aggregates and optimize resource investment. We emphasize the newly discovered classes of flagellar functional regulators and speculate that others await discovery in the context of biofilm formation. PMID:23480406

  2. Modulation of mammalian sperm motility by quercetin.

    PubMed

    Nass-Arden, L; Breitbart, H

    1990-04-01

    The flavonoid quercetin inhibits collective motility of ejaculated ram spermatozoa in the first 2 hr of incubation; during the next 3-4 hr motility is stimulated. To explain this interesting effect, we followed the influence of quercetin on sperm glycolysis, extracellular pH, ATP content, mitochondrial respiration, and lipid peroxidation. The collective motility of untreated cells is decreased to about 40% of the original motility during two hours of incubation. During this time, the rate of glycolysis is constant, respiration rate is increasing, there is no change in ATP content, the rate of lipid peroxidation is very slow, and the extracellular pH became very acidic (pH 5.5). It is concluded that motility is decreased due to this acidification. This acidification is prevented to some extent by quercetin, which indirectly inhibits glycolysis. Quercetin inhibits motility due to the inhibition of the plasma membrane calcium pump, as we showed previously (Breitbart et al., J Biol Chem 260:11548-11553, 1985). The motility of untreated cells is arrested after 3.5 hr of incubation, whereas quercetin-treated cells show high motility, which continues for additional 2-3 hr. After 3.5 hr, the control cells show no glycolytic activity, ATP content and respiration rates are decreased, and rate of lipid peroxidation is highly increased. At this time, quercetin-treated cells show no glycolytic activity, only a small decrease in ATP content and respiratory rate, and a very low rate of lipid peroxidation. Based on these data it is concluded that sperm motility after 3.5 hr of incubation is dependent mainly on mitochondrial respiration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. An Orally Active Cannabis Extract with High Content in Cannabidiol attenuates Chemically-induced Intestinal Inflammation and Hypermotility in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Ester; Capasso, Raffaele; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Romano, Barbara; Parisi, Olga A.; Finizio, Stefania; Lauritano, Anna; Marzo, Vincenzo Di; Izzo, Angelo A.; Borrelli, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Anecdotal and scientific evidence suggests that Cannabis use may be beneficial in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Here, we have investigated the effect of a standardized Cannabis sativa extract with high content of cannabidiol (CBD), here named CBD BDS for “CBD botanical drug substance,” on mucosal inflammation and hypermotility in mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Colitis was induced in mice by intracolonic administration of dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS). Motility was evaluated in the experimental model of intestinal hypermotility induced by irritant croton oil. CBD BDS or pure CBD were given - either intraperitoneally or by oral gavage – after the inflammatory insult (curative protocol). The amounts of CBD in the colon, brain, and liver after the oral treatments were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to ion trap-time of flight mass spectrometry. CBD BDS, both when given intraperitoneally and by oral gavage, decreased the extent of the damage (as revealed by the decrease in the colon weight/length ratio and myeloperoxidase activity) in the DNBS model of colitis. It also reduced intestinal hypermotility (at doses lower than those required to affect transit in healthy mice) in the croton oil model of intestinal hypermotility. Under the same experimental conditions, pure CBD did not ameliorate colitis while it normalized croton oil-induced hypermotility when given intraperitoneally (in a dose-related fashion) or orally (only at one dose). In conclusion, CBD BDS, given after the inflammatory insult, attenuates injury and motility in intestinal models of inflammation. These findings sustain the rationale of combining CBD with other minor Cannabis constituents and support the clinical development of CBD BDS for IBD treatment. PMID:27757083

  4. An Orally Active Cannabis Extract with High Content in Cannabidiol attenuates Chemically-induced Intestinal Inflammation and Hypermotility in the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Pagano, Ester; Capasso, Raffaele; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Romano, Barbara; Parisi, Olga A; Finizio, Stefania; Lauritano, Anna; Marzo, Vincenzo Di; Izzo, Angelo A; Borrelli, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Anecdotal and scientific evidence suggests that Cannabis use may be beneficial in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Here, we have investigated the effect of a standardized Cannabis sativa extract with high content of cannabidiol (CBD), here named CBD BDS for "CBD botanical drug substance," on mucosal inflammation and hypermotility in mouse models of intestinal inflammation. Colitis was induced in mice by intracolonic administration of dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (DNBS). Motility was evaluated in the experimental model of intestinal hypermotility induced by irritant croton oil. CBD BDS or pure CBD were given - either intraperitoneally or by oral gavage - after the inflammatory insult (curative protocol). The amounts of CBD in the colon, brain, and liver after the oral treatments were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to ion trap-time of flight mass spectrometry. CBD BDS, both when given intraperitoneally and by oral gavage, decreased the extent of the damage (as revealed by the decrease in the colon weight/length ratio and myeloperoxidase activity) in the DNBS model of colitis. It also reduced intestinal hypermotility (at doses lower than those required to affect transit in healthy mice) in the croton oil model of intestinal hypermotility. Under the same experimental conditions, pure CBD did not ameliorate colitis while it normalized croton oil-induced hypermotility when given intraperitoneally (in a dose-related fashion) or orally (only at one dose). In conclusion, CBD BDS, given after the inflammatory insult, attenuates injury and motility in intestinal models of inflammation. These findings sustain the rationale of combining CBD with other minor Cannabis constituents and support the clinical development of CBD BDS for IBD treatment.

  5. Non-invasive panel tests for gastrointestinal motility monitoring within the MARS-500 Project

    PubMed Central

    Roda, Aldo; Mirasoli, Mara; Guardigli, Massimo; Simoni, Patrizia; Festi, Davide; Afonin, Boris; Vasilyeva, Galina

    2013-01-01

    the H2-breath test was strongly affected by external factors, which may have been related to the diet of the crewmembers or to environmental conditions (e.g., the accumulation of hydrogen in the simulator microenvironment). At least in closed microenvironments such as the MARS-500 simulator, 13C-breath tests should therefore be preferred to H2-breath tests. Finally, the fecal calprotectin test showed significant alterations during the mission simulation: all of the crewmembers were negative for the test at the beginning of the simulation but showed various degrees of positivity in at least one of the subsequent tests, thus indicating the onset of an intestinal inflammation. CONCLUSION: Breath tests, especially those 13C-based, proved suitable for monitoring gastrointestinal motility in the 520-d isolation experiment within MARS-500 project and can be applied in long-term spaceflights. PMID:23599647

  6. Gut microbiota-produced succinate promotes C. difficile infection after antibiotic treatment or motility disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Ferreyra, Jessica A.; Wu, Katherine J.; Hryckowian, Andrew J.; Bouley, Donna M.; Weimer, Bart C.; Sonnenburg, Justin L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea. The mechanisms underlying C. difficile expansion after microbiota disturbance are just emerging. We assessed the gene expression profile of C. difficile within the intestine of gnotobiotic mice to identify genes regulated in response to either dietary or microbiota compositional changes. In the presence of the gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, C. difficile induces a pathway that metabolizes the microbiota fermentation end-product succinate to butyrate. The low concentration of succinate in the microbiota of conventional mice is transiently elevated upon antibiotic treatment or chemically-induced intestinal motility disturbance, and C. difficile exploits this succinate spike to expand in the perturbed intestine. A C. difficile mutant compromised in succinate utilization is at a competitive disadvantage during these perturbations. Understanding the metabolic mechanisms involved in microbiota-C. difficile interactions may help to identify approaches for the treatment and prevention of C. difficile-associated diseases. PMID:25498344

  7. The locus for a novel syndromic form of neuronal intestinal pseudoobstruction maps to Xq28.

    PubMed Central

    Auricchio, A.; Brancolini, V.; Casari, G.; Milla, P. J.; Smith, V. V.; Devoto, M.; Ballabio, A.

    1996-01-01

    The neuronal type of primary chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIIP) results from the developmental failure of enteric neurons to migrate or differentiate correctly. This leads to intestinal motility disorders, which are characterized by symptoms and signs of bowel obstruction in the absence of a mechanical obstacle. Most of these conditions are congenital, and among them some are inherited. One syndromic condition characterized by intestinal pseudoobstruction with morphological abnormalities of the argyrophil neurons in the myenteric plexus, associated with short small bowel, malrotation, and pyloric hypertrophy, has been previously described. We have studied a family affected by this disorder, in which the disease appeared to segregate as an X-linked recessive trait. In order to map the CIIP locus in this family, we performed linkage analysis in 26 family members by use of highly polymorphic microsatellite markers from the X chromosome. One of these markers, DXYS154, located in the distal part of Xq28, shows no recombination with a maximum lod score of 2.32. Multipoint analysis excluded linkage with markers spanning other regions of the X chromosome. Our results, integrated with the current genetic and physical map of Xq28, determine the order of loci as cen-DXS15-(CIIPX)-DXS1108/DXYS154-tel. This study establishes, for the first time, the mapping assignment of a neuropathic form of CIIP other than Hirschsprung disease. Images Figure 1 PMID:8644737

  8. The Intestinal Microbiome and Health

    PubMed Central

    Tuddenham, Susan; Sears, Cynthia L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review A diverse array of microbes colonizes the human intestine. In this review we seek to outline the current state of knowledge on what characterizes a “healthy” or “normal” intestinal microbiome, what factors modify the intestinal microbiome in the healthy state and how the intestinal microbiome affects normal host physiology Recent Findings What constitutes a “normal” or “healthy” intestinal microbiome is an area of active research, but key characteristics may include diversity, richness and a microbial community’s resilience and ability to resist change. A number of factors, including age, the host immune system, host genetics, diet and antibiotic use appear to modify the intestinal microbiome in the normal state. New research shows that the microbiome likely plays a critical role in the healthy human immune system and metabolism. Summary It is clear that there is a complicated bi-directional relationship between the intestinal microbiota and host which is vital to health. An enhanced understanding of this relationship will be critical not only to maximize and maintain human health but also to shape our understanding of disease and to foster new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26237547

  9. Regulation of Eukaryotic Flagellar Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, David R.

    2005-03-01

    The central apparatus is essential for normal eukaryotic flagellar bend propagation as evidenced by the paralysis associated with mutations that prevent central pair (CP) assembly. Interactions between doublet-associated radial spokes and CP projections are thought to modulate spoke-regulated protein kinases and phosphatases on outer doublets, and these enzymes in turn modulate dynein activity. To better understand CP control mechanisms, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CP complex and analyzed CP orientation during formation and propagation of flagellar bending waves. We show that a single CP microtubule, C1, is near the outermost doublet in curved regions of the flagellum, and this orientation is maintained by twists between successive principal and reverse bends. The Chlamydomonas CP is inherently twisted; twists are not induced by bend formation, and do not depend on forces or signals transmitted through spoke-central pair interactions. We hypothesize that CP orientation passively responds to bend formation, and that bend propagation drives rotation of the CP and maintains a constant CP orientation in bends, which in turn permits signal transduction between specific CP projections and specific doublet-associated dyneins through radial spokes. The central pair kinesin, Klp1, although essential for normal motility, is therefore not the motor that drives CP rotation. The CP also acts as a scaffold for enzymes that maintain normal intraflagellar ATP concentration.

  10. Deterministic patterns in cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavi, Ido; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Voituriez, Raphaël; Gov, Nir S.

    2016-12-01

    Cell migration paths are generally described as random walks, associated with both intrinsic and extrinsic noise. However, complex cell locomotion is not merely related to such fluctuations, but is often determined by the underlying machinery. Cell motility is driven mechanically by actin and myosin, two molecular components that generate contractile forces. Other cell functions make use of the same components and, therefore, will compete with the migratory apparatus. Here, we propose a physical model of such a competitive system, namely dendritic cells whose antigen capture function and migratory ability are coupled by myosin II. The model predicts that this coupling gives rise to a dynamic instability, whereby cells switch from persistent migration to unidirectional self-oscillation, through a Hopf bifurcation. Cells can then switch to periodic polarity reversals through a homoclinic bifurcation. These predicted dynamic regimes are characterized by robust features that we identify through in vitro trajectories of dendritic cells over long timescales and distances. We expect that competition for limited resources in other migrating cell types can lead to similar deterministic migration modes.

  11. The contribution of cell-cell signaling and motility to bacterial biofilm formation

    PubMed Central

    Shrout, Joshua D.; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael; Parsek, Matthew R.

    2011-01-01

    Many bacteria grow attached to a surface as biofilms. Several factors dictate biofilm formation, including responses by the colonizing bacteria to their environment. Here we review how bacteria use cell-cell signaling (also called quorum sensing) and motility during biofilm formation. Specifically, we describe quorum sensing and surface motility exhibited by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous environmental organism that acts as an opportunistic human pathogen in immunocompromised individuals. P. aeruginosa uses acyl-homoserine lactone signals during quorum sensing to synchronize gene expression important to the production of polysaccharides, rhamnolipid, and other virulence factors. Surface motility affects the assembly and architecture of biofilms, and some aspects of motility are also influenced by quorum sensing. While some genes and their function are specific to P. aeruginosa, many aspects of biofilm development can be used as a model system to understand how bacteria differentially colonize surfaces. PMID:22053126

  12. An O Island 172 Encoded RNA Helicase Regulates the Motility of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Changyun; Ren, Zhihong; Liu, Li; Zhao, Ailan; Wu, Long-Fei; Xu, Jianguo

    2013-01-01

    Enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 is a major cause of zoonotic food- and water-borne intestinal infections worldwide with clinical consequences ranging from mild diarrhoea to hemolytic uraemic syndrome. The genome of EHEC O157:H7 contains many regions of unique DNA that are referred to as O islands including the Shiga toxin prophages and pathogenicity islands encoding key virulence factors. However many of these O islands are of unknown function. In this study, genetic analysis was conducted on OI-172 which is a 44,434 bp genomic island with 27 open reading frames. Comparative genome analysis showed that O1-72 is a composite island with progressive gain of genes since O157:H7 evolved from its ancestral O55:H7. A partial OI-172 island was also found in 2 unrelated E. coli strains and 2 Salmonella strains. OI-172 encodes several putative helicases, one of which (Z5898) is a putative DEAH box RNA helicase. To investigate the function of Z5898, a deletion mutant (EDL933ΔZ5898) was constructed in the O157:H7 strain EDL933. Comparative proteomic analysis of the mutant with the wild-type EDL933 found that flagellin was down-regulated in the Z5898 mutant. Motility assay showed that EDL933ΔZ5898 migrated slower than the wild-type EDL933 and electron microscopy found no surface flagella. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR revealed that the fliC expression of EDL933ΔZ5898 was significantly lower while the expression of its upstream regulator gene, fliA, was not affected. Using a fliA and a fliC promoter – green fluorescent protein fusion contruct, Z5898 was found to affect only the fliC promoter activity. Therefore, Z5898 regulates the flagella based motility by exerting its effect on fliC. We conclude that OI-172 is a motility associated O island and hereby name it the MAO island. PMID:23785398

  13. [Intestinal microbiota].

    PubMed

    Debré, Patrice; Le Gall, Jean-Yves

    2014-12-01

    The human body normally lives in symbiosis with a considerable microscopic environment present on all interfaces with the external environment; it hosts ten times more microbes (microbiota) that it has somatic or germ cells, representing a gene diversity (microbiome) 100-150 times higher than the human genome. These germs are located mainly in the gut, where they represent a mass of about one kilogram. The primary colonization of the gastrointestinal tract depends on the delivery route, the bacterial flora rewarding then depending on the environment, food hygiene, medical treatments. The intestinal microbiota plays an important role in the maturation of the immune system and in different physiological functions: digestion of polysaccharides, glycosaminoglycans and glycoproteins, vitamins biosynthesis, bile salt metabolism of some amino acids and xenobiotics. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the microbiota are observed in a wide range of diseases: obesity, colorectal cancer, liver cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune diseases, allergies... pharmacobiotics aim to modify the intestinal microbiota in a therapeutic goal and this by various means: prebiotics, probiotics, antibiotics or fecal transplants. Intestinal flora also plays a direct role in the metabolism of certain drugs and the microbiota should be considered as a predictive parameter of response to some chemotherapies.

  14. Gastrointestinal symptoms and motility disorders in patients with systemic scleroderma

    PubMed Central

    Di Ciaula, Agostino; Covelli, Michele; Berardino, Massimo; Wang, David QH; Lapadula, Giovanni; Palasciano, Giuseppe; Portincasa, Piero

    2008-01-01

    Background Studies on gastrointestinal symptoms, dysfunctions, and neurological disorders in systemic scleroderma are lacking so far. Methods Thirty-eight scleroderma patients (34 limited, 4 diffuse), 60 healthy controls and 68 dyspeptic controls were scored for upper and lower gastrointestinal symptoms (dyspepsia, bowel habits), gastric and gallbladder emptying to liquid meal (functional ultrasonography) and small bowel transit (H2-breath test). Autonomic nerve function was assessed by cardiovascular tests. Results The score for dyspepsia (mainly gastric fullness) was greater in scleroderma patients than healthy controls, but lower than dyspeptic controls who had multiple symptoms, instead. Scleroderma patients with dyspepsia had a longer disease duration. Fasting antral area and postprandial antral dilatation were smaller in scleroderma patients than dyspeptic and healthy controls. Gastric emptying was delayed in both scleroderma patients (particularly in those with abnormal dyspeptic score) and dyspeptic controls, who also showed a larger residual area. Despite gallbladder fasting and postprandial volumes were comparable across the three groups, gallbladder refilling appeared delayed in dyspeptic controls and mainly dependent on delayed gastric emptying in scleroderma. Small intestinal transit was also delayed in 74% of scleroderma and 66% of dyspeptic controls. Bowel habits were similar among the three groups. Autonomic neuropathy was not associated with dyspepsia, gastric and gallbladder motility and small intestinal transit. Conclusion In scleroderma patients dyspepsia (mainly gastric fullness), restricted distension of the gastric antrum and diffuse gastrointestinal dysmotility are frequent features. These defects are independent from the occurrence of autonomic neuropathy. PMID:18304354

  15. Dietary protein concentration affects intestinal microbiota of adult cats: a study using DGGE and qPCR to evaluate differences in microbial populations in the feline gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Lubbs, D C; Vester, B M; Fastinger, N D; Swanson, K S

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this study was to identify qualitative and quantitative differences in microbial populations of adult cats fed diets containing different protein concentrations. Following a 4 week baseline period, eight healthy adult domestic short-hair queens (>1-year-old) were randomly allotted to a moderate-protein (MP; n = 4) or high-protein (HP; n = 4) diet for 8 weeks. Fresh faecal samples were collected after baseline and 8 weeks on treatment and stored at -80 degrees C. Following DNA extraction, samples were analyzed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to distinguish qualitative changes between diets. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure E. coli, Bifidobacterium, Clostridium perfringens, and Lactobacillus populations. Compared to baseline, cats fed MP had a bacterial similarity index of 66.7% as opposed to 40.6% similarity for those fed HP, exhibiting marked changes in intestinal bacteria of cats fed HP. Bifidobacterium populations were greater (p < 0.05) in cats fed MP versus HP (9.44 vs. 5.63 CFU/g). Clostridium perfringens populations were greater (p < 0.05) in cats fed HP than MP (12.39 vs. 10.83 CFU/g). In this experiment, a high-protein diet resulted in a dramatic shift in microbial populations. Decreased Bifidobacterium population in cats fed HP may justify prebiotic supplementation for such diets.

  16. Silencing of ecdysone receptor, insect intestinal mucin and sericotropin genes by bacterially produced double-stranded RNA affects larval growth and development in Plutella xylostella and Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Israni, B; Rajam, M V

    2017-04-01

    RNA interference mediated gene silencing, which is triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), has become a important tool for functional genomics studies in various systems, including insects. Bacterially produced dsRNA employs the use of a bacterial strain lacking in RNaseIII activity and harbouring a vector with dual T7 promoter sites, which allow the production of intact dsRNA molecules. Here, we report an assessment of the functional relevance of the ecdysone receptor, insect intestinal mucin and sericotropin genes through silencing by dsRNA in two lepidopteran insect pests, Helicoverpa armigera and Plutella xylostella, both of which cause serious crop losses. Oral feeding of dsRNA led to significant reduction in transcripts of the target insect genes, which caused significant larval mortality with various moulting anomalies and an overall developmental delay. We also found a significant decrease in reproductive potential in female moths, with a drop in egg laying and compromised egg hatching from treated larvae as compared to controls. dsRNA was stable in the insect gut and was efficiently processed into small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), thus accounting for the phenotypes observed in the present work. The study revealed the importance of these genes in core insect processes, which are essential for insect development and survival.

  17. Motility of liquid stored ram spermatozoa is altered by dilution rate independent of seminal plasma concentration.

    PubMed

    Mata-Campuzano, M; Soleilhavoup, C; Tsikis, G; Martinez-Pastor, F; de Graaf, S P; Druart, X

    2015-11-01

    The fertility after use of liquid stored ram semen following cervical AI rapidly decreases if semen is stored beyond 12h. The dilution of seminal plasma is often cited as a key contributor to the diminished motility and fertility of ram spermatozoa subjected to liquid preservation. Two experiments were conducted to assess the effect of spermatozoa concentration (i.e. dilution rate) and percentage of seminal plasma on the motility and viability of liquid stored ram spermatozoa. In Experiment 1, semen was diluted to one of seven concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 1.4×10(9)spermatozoa/ml with milk and assessed for motility after 3 or 24h of storage at 15°C. In Experiment 2, semen was collected and washed to remove seminal plasma before re-dilution to 0.2-1.4×10(9)spermatozoa/ml with milk containing 0%, 20% or 40% (final v/v ratio) seminal plasma and assessed for viability and motility after 3 or 24h of storage at 15°C. Whereas motility was not affected by spermatozoa concentration after 3h of storage, the proportion of progressive spermatozoa decreased after 24h of storage when spermatozoa concentration was greater than 1.0×10(9)spermatozoa/ml. The duration of preservation and the spermatozoa concentration affected spermatozoa motility but had no impact on spermatozoa viability. This negative effect of greater spermatozoa concentrations on motility was independent of the presence and the concentration of seminal plasma. The seminal plasma at both concentrations (20% and 40%) had a protective effect on spermatozoa motility after 24h of storage. These findings have the potential to improve the efficiency of cervical AI with liquid stored ram semen.

  18. A Novel Inducer of Roseobacter Motility Is Also a Disruptor of Algal Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Sule, Preeti

    2013-01-01

    Silicibacter sp. strain TM1040, a member of the Roseobacter clade, forms a symbiosis with unicellular phytoplankton, which is inextricably linked to the biphasic “swim or stick” lifestyle of the bacteria. Mutations in flaC bias the population toward the motile phase. Renewed examination of the FlaC− strain (HG1016) uncovered that it is composed of two different cells: a pigmented type, PS01, and a nonpigmented cell, PS02, each of which has an identical mutation in flaC. While monocultures of PS01 and PS02 had few motile cells (0.6 and 6%, respectively), coculturing the two strains resulted in a 10-fold increase in the number of motile cells. Cell-free supernatants from coculture or wild-type cells were fully capable of restoring motility to PS01 and PS02, which was due to increased fliC3 (flagellin) transcription, FliC3 protein levels per cell, and flagella synthesis. The motility-inducing compound has an estimated mass of 226 Da, as determined by mass spectrometry, and is referred to as Roseobacter Motility Inducer (RMI). Mutations affecting genes involved in phenyl acetic acid synthesis significantly reduced RMI, while defects in tropodithietic acid (TDA) synthesis had marginal or no effect on RMI. RMI biosynthesis is induced by p-coumaric acid, a product of algal lignin degradation. When added to algal cultures, RMI caused loss of motility, cell enlargement, and vacuolization in the algal cells. RMI is a new member of the roseobacticide family of troponoid compounds whose activities affect roseobacters, by shifting their population toward motility, as well as their phytoplankton hosts, through an algicidal effect. PMID:23161030

  19. Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, E. A.; Gadêlha, H.; Smith, D. J.; Blake, J. R.; Kirkman-Brown, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics.

  20. EFFECTS OF METHYLNALTREXONE ON GUINEA PIG GASTROINTESTINAL MOTILITY

    PubMed Central

    Anselmi, Laura; Huynh, Jennifer; Vegezzi, Gaia; Sternini, Catia

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the effects of methylnaltrexone (MNTX), a peripherally acting μ opioid receptor (μOR) antagonist, on gastrointestinal (GI) motility in naïve vs. opiate-chronically treated guinea pigs in vitro and in vivo. We have used the electrically stimulated muscle twitch contractions of longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus (LMMP) preparations and total GI transit as measure of GI motility. In LMMP preparations of naïve guinea pigs, MNTX (1–30 μM) induced a significant, dose-response reduction of morphine-induced inhibition of electrically stimulated muscle twitch contractions, with an IC50 of 9.4 10−8M. By contrast, MNTX abolished the inhibitory effect of acute morphine at any concentration tested (1–30 μM) in the guinea pigs chronically treated with opiates. In vivo, MNTX (10–50 mg s.c.) did not affect GI transit in naïve guinea pigs when administered acutely or for 5 consecutive days, but reversed the GI transit delay induced by chronic morphine treatment. These findings show that MNTX is effective in reversing opiate-induced inhibition of GI motility acting at peripheral μORs, but does not exert a pharmacologic effect on GI transit in the absence of opiate stimulation. PMID:23361094

  1. Drosophila Sperm Motility in the Reproductive Tract1

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Lu, Xiangyi

    2011-01-01

    Motile cilia and flagella exhibit many waveforms as outputs of dynein activation sequences on the highly conserved axoneme. Motility change of sperm in the reproductive tract is difficult to study and remains an important area of investigation. Sperm typically execute a sinusoidal waveform. Increased viscosity in the medium induces somewhat unusual arc-line and helical waveforms in some sperm. However, whether the latter two waveforms occur in vivo is not known. Using green fluorescence protein imaging, we show that Drosophila sperm in the uterus move in circular foci via arc-line waves, predominantly in a tail-leading orientation. From the uterus, a small fraction of the sperm enters the seminal receptacle (SR) in parallel formations. After sperm storage and coincident with fertilization of the egg, the sperm exit the SR via head-leading helical waves. Consistent with the observed bidirectional movements, the sperm show the ability to propagate both base-to-tip and tip-to-base flagellar waves. Numerous studies have shown that sperm motility is regulated by intraflagellar calcium concentrations; in particular, the Pkd2 calcium channel has been shown to affect sperm storage. Our analyses here suggest that Pkd2 is required for the sperm to adopt the correct waveform and movement orientation during SR entry. A working model for the sperm's SR entry movement is proposed. PMID:21293028

  2. Influence of Bovine Whey Protein Concentrate and Hydrolysate Preparation Methods on Motility in the Isolated Rat Distal Colon.

    PubMed

    Dalziel, Julie E; Anderson, Rachel C; Bassett, Shalome A; Lloyd-West, Catherine M; Haggarty, Neill W; Roy, Nicole C

    2016-12-14

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) and hydrolysate (WPH) are protein ingredients used in sports, medical and pediatric formulations. Concentration and hydrolysis methods vary for whey sourced from cheese and casein co-products. The purpose of this research was to investigate the influence of whey processing methods on in vitro gastrointestinal (GI) health indicators for colonic motility, epithelial barrier integrity and immune modulation. WPCs from casein or cheese processing and WPH (11% or 19% degree of hydrolysis, DH) were compared for their effects on motility in a 1 cm section of isolated rat distal colon in an oxygenated tissue bath. Results showed that WPC decreased motility irrespective of whether it was a by-product of lactic acid or mineral acid casein production, or from cheese production. This indicated that regardless of the preparation methodology, the whey protein contained components that modulate aspects of motility within the distal colon. WPH (11% DH) increased contractile frequency by 27% in a delayed manner and WPH (19% DH) had an immediate effect on contractile properties, increasing tension by 65% and frequency by 131%. Increased motility was associated with increased hydrolysis that may be attributed to the abundance of bioactive peptides. Increased frequency of contractions by WPH (19% DH) was inhibited (by 44%) by naloxone, implicating a potential involvement of opioid receptors in modulation of motility. Trans-epithelial electrical resistance and cytokine expression assays revealed that the WPC proteins studied did not alter intestinal barrier integrity or elicit any discernible immune response.

  3. Influence of Bovine Whey Protein Concentrate and Hydrolysate Preparation Methods on Motility in the Isolated Rat Distal Colon

    PubMed Central

    Dalziel, Julie E.; Anderson, Rachel C.; Bassett, Shalome A.; Lloyd-West, Catherine M.; Haggarty, Neill W.; Roy, Nicole C.

    2016-01-01

    Whey protein concentrate (WPC) and hydrolysate (WPH) are protein ingredients used in sports, medical and pediatric formulations. Concentration and hydrolysis methods vary for whey sourced from cheese and casein co-products. The purpose of this research was to investigate the influence of whey processing methods on in vitro gastrointestinal (GI) health indicators for colonic motility, epithelial barrier integrity and immune modulation. WPCs from casein or cheese processing and WPH (11% or 19% degree of hydrolysis, DH) were compared for their effects on motility in a 1 cm section of isolated rat distal colon in an oxygenated tissue bath. Results showed that WPC decreased motility irrespective of whether it was a by-product of lactic acid or mineral acid casein production, or from cheese production. This indicated that regardless of the preparation methodology, the whey protein contained components that modulate aspects of motility within the distal colon. WPH (11% DH) increased contractile frequency by 27% in a delayed manner and WPH (19% DH) had an immediate effect on contractile properties, increasing tension by 65% and frequency by 131%. Increased motility was associated with increased hydrolysis that may be attributed to the abundance of bioactive peptides. Increased frequency of contractions by WPH (19% DH) was inhibited (by 44%) by naloxone, implicating a potential involvement of opioid receptors in modulation of motility. Trans-epithelial electrical resistance and cytokine expression assays revealed that the WPC proteins studied did not alter intestinal barrier integrity or elicit any discernible immune response. PMID:27983629

  4. Toward the reconstitution of synthetic cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Siton-Mendelson, Orit; Bernheim-Groswasser, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cellular motility is a fundamental process essential for embryonic development, wound healing, immune responses, and tissues development. Cells are mostly moving by crawling on external, or inside, substrates which can differ in their surface composition, geometry, and dimensionality. Cells can adopt different migration phenotypes, e.g., bleb-based and protrusion-based, depending on myosin contractility, surface adhesion, and cell confinement. In the few past decades, research on cell motility has focused on uncovering the major molecular players and their order of events. Despite major progresses, our ability to infer on the collective behavior from the molecular properties remains a major challenge, especially because cell migration integrates numerous chemical and mechanical processes that are coupled via feedbacks that span over large range of time and length scales. For this reason, reconstituted model systems were developed. These systems allow for full control of the molecular constituents and various system parameters, thereby providing insight into their individual roles and functions. In this review we describe the various reconstituted model systems that were developed in the past decades. Because of the multiple steps involved in cell motility and the complexity of the overall process, most of the model systems focus on very specific aspects of the individual steps of cell motility. Here we describe the main advancement in cell motility reconstitution and discuss the main challenges toward the realization of a synthetic motile cell. PMID:27019160

  5. Tumor invasion as dysregulated cell motility.

    PubMed

    Kassis, J; Lauffenburger, D A; Turner, T; Wells, A

    2001-04-01

    Investigations across a range of disciplines over the past decade have brought the study of cell motility and its role in invasion to an exciting threshold. The biophysical forces proximally involved in generating cell locomotion, as well as the underlying signaling and genomic regulatory processes, are gradually becoming elucidated. We now appreciate the intricacies of the many cellular and extracellular events that modulate cell migration. This has enabled the demonstration of a causal role of cell motility in tumor progression, with various points of 'dysregulation' of motility being responsible for promoting invasion. In this paper, we describe key fundamental principles governing cell motility and branch out to describe the essence of the data that describe these principles. It has become evident that many proposed models may indeed be converging into a tightly-woven tapestry of coordinated events which employ various growth factors and their receptors, adhesion receptors (integrins), downstream molecules, cytoskeletal components, and altered genomic regulation to accomplish cell motility. Tumor invasion occurs in response to dysregulation of many of these modulatory points; specific examples include increased signaling from the EGF receptor and through PLC gamma, altered localization and expression of integrins, changes in actin modifying proteins and increased transcription from specific promoter sites. This diversity of alterations all leading to tumor invasion point to the difficulty of correcting causal events leading to tumor invasion and rather suggest that the underlying common processes required for motility be targeted for therapeutic intervention.

  6. Flagellar motility in eukaryotic human parasites.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Timothy; Engstler, Markus

    2015-10-01

    A huge variety of protists rely on one or more motile flagella to either move themselves or move fluids and substances around them. Many of these flagellates have evolved a symbiotic or parasitic lifestyle. Several of the parasites have adapted to human hosts, and include agents of prevalent and serious diseases. These unicellular parasites have become specialised in colonising a wide range of biological niches within humans. They usually have diverse transmission cycles, and frequently manifest a variety of distinct morphological stages. The motility of the single or multiple flagella plays important but understudied roles in parasite transmission, host invasion, dispersal, survival, proliferation and pathology. In this review we provide an overview of the important human pathogens that possess a motile flagellum for at least part of their life cycle. We highlight recently published studies that aim to elucidate motility mechanisms, and their relevance for human disease. We then bring the physics of swimming at the microscale into context, emphasising the importance of interdisciplinary approaches for a full understanding of flagellate motility - especially in light of the parasites' microenvironments and population dynamics. Finally, we summarise some important technological aspects, describing challenges for the field and possibilities for motility analyses in the future.

  7. The mesenterially perfused rat small intestine: A versatile approach for pharmacological testings.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Dominik; Klotz, Markus; Laures, Kerstin; Clasohm, Jasmin; Bischof, Michael; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert

    2014-05-01

    Pharmaceutical compounds enter the body via several major natural gateways; i.e. the lung, the skin and the gastrointestinal tract. Drug application during surgical operations can lead to severe impairment of gastrointestinal motility, which can contribute to a paralytic ileus. Here we investigated an ex vivo perfused small intestine model that allows us to ascertain the influence of pharmaceuticals upon the gut. Corresponding segments from the proximal jejunum of adult rats were used. Their mesenteric arteries and veins were cannulated and the jejunal segment excised. The individual segments were placed in a custom designed perfusion chamber and perfusion performed through the intestinal lumen as well as the mesenteric superior artery. Three test drugs, which are commonly used in anesthesiology; i.e. pentobarbital, propofol and ketamine were administered via the blood vessels. Their effects upon gastrointestinal motility patterns were evaluated by optical measurements. Longitudinal and pendular movements were distinguishable and separately analyzed. Pharmacological effects of the individual substances could be investigated. Propofol (50-200 μg/ml) was found to decrease intestinal motility, especially longitudinal movements in a dose dependent manner. Pentobarbital decreased intestinal motility only at high concentrations, above 2.5 mg/ml. A dose of 2.5 mg/ml lead to an increase in longitudinal- and pendular movements in comparison to control, while ketamine (2.5-10 mg/ml) did not alter intestinal motility at all. Histological examination of the perfused segments revealed only minor changes in tissue morphology after perfusion. The perfusion approach shown here allows for the identification of compounds which interfere with gut motility in a highly sophisticated way. It is suitable for characterization of drug and dose specific changes in motility patterns and can be used in drug development and preclinical studies.

  8. Identification of quantitative trait loci affecting resistance to gastro-intestinal parasites in a double backcross population of Red Maasai and Dorper sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A genome-wide scan for quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting gastrointestinal (GI) nematode resistance was completed using a double backcross sheep population derived from Red Maasai and Dorper ewes bred to F1 rams. These breeds were chosen, because Red Maasai sheep are known to be more tolerant ...

  9. Fluoroscopic study of the normal gastrointestinal motility and measurements in the Hispaniolan Amazon parrot (Amazona ventralis).

    PubMed

    Beaufrère, Hugues; Nevarez, Javier; Taylor, W Michael; Jankowski, Gwendolyn; Rademacher, Nathalie; Gaschen, Lorrie; Pariaut, Romain; Tully, Thomas N

    2010-01-01

    Contrast fluoroscopy is a valuable tool to examine avian gastrointestinal motility. However, the lack of a standardized examination protocol and reference ranges prevents the objective interpretation of motility disorders and other gastrointestinal abnormalities. Our goals were to evaluate gastrointestinal motility in 20 Hispaniolan Amazon parrots (Amazona ventralis) by contrast fluoroscopy. Each parrot was crop-fed an equal part mixture of barium sulfate and hand-feeding formula and placed in a cardboard box for fluoroscopy. Over a 3-h period, 1.5 minute segments of lateral and ventrodorsal fluoroscopy were recorded every 30 min. The gastric cycle and patterns of intestinal motility were described. The frequency of crop contractions, esophageal boluses, and gastric cycles were determined in lateral and ventrodorsal views. A range of 3.4-6.6 gastric cycles/min was noted on the lateral view and 3.0-6.6 gastric cycles/min on the ventrodorsal view. Circular measurements of the proventriculus diameter, ventriculus width, and length were obtained using the midshaft femoral diameter as a standard reference unit. The upper limits of the reference ranges were 3.6 and 4.7 femoral units for the proventriculus diameter in the lateral and ventrodorsal view, respectively. Two consecutive measurements were obtained and the measurement technique was found to have high reproducibility. In this study, we established a standardized protocol for contrast fluoroscopic examination of the gastrointestinal tract and a reliable measurement method of the proventriculus and ventriculus using femoral units in the Hispaniolan Amazon parrot.

  10. Targeting motility properties of bacteria in the development of probiotic cultures against Campylobacter jejuni in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Vivian F; Donoghue, Ann M; Arsi, Komala; Reyes-Herrera, Ixchel; Metcalf, Joel H; de los Santos, Fausto S; Blore, Pamela J; Donoghue, Dan J

    2013-05-01

    Campylobacter is the leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. Campylobacter is commonly present in the intestinal tract of poultry, and one strategy to reduce enteric colonization is the use of probiotic cultures. This strategy has successfully reduced enteric colonization of Salmonella, but has had limited success against Campylobacter. In an effort to improve the efficacy of probiotic cultures, we developed a novel in vitro screening technique for selecting bacterial isolates with enhanced motility. It is proposed that motility-selected bacteria have the marked ability to reach the same gastrointestinal niche in poultry and competitively reduce C. jejuni. Bacterial isolates were collected from ceca of healthy chickens, and motile isolates were identified and tested for anti-Campylobacter activity. Isolates with these properties were selected for increased motility by passing each isolate 10 times and at each passage selecting bacteria that migrated the farthest during each passage. Three bacterial isolates with the greatest motility (all Bacillus subtilis) were used alone or in combination in two chicken trials. At day of hatch, chicks were administered these isolates alone or in combination (n=10/treatment, two trials), and chicks were orally challenged with a mixture of four different wild-type strains of C. jejuni (∼10(5) CFU/mL) on day 7. Isolate 1 reduced C. jejuni colonization in both of the trials (p<0.05). A follow-up study was conducted to compare isolate 1 subjected to enhanced motility selection with its nonselected form. A reduction (p<0.05) in Campylobacter colonization was observed in all three trials in the chickens dosed using isolate with enhanced motility compared to the control and unselected isolate. These findings support the theory that the motility enhancement of potential probiotic bacteria may provide a strategy for reduction of C. jejuni in preharvest chickens.

  11. Screening of a Haloferax volcanii Transposon Library Reveals Novel Motility and Adhesion Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Legerme, Georgio; Yang, Evan; Esquivel, Rianne N.; Kiljunen, Saija; Savilahti, Harri; Pohlschroder, Mechthild

    2016-01-01

    Archaea, like bacteria, use type IV pili to facilitate surface adhesion. Moreover, archaeal flagella—structures required for motility—share a common ancestry with type IV pili. While the characterization of archaeal homologs of bacterial type IV pilus biosynthesis components has revealed important aspects of flagellum and pilus biosynthesis and the mechanisms regulating motility and adhesion in archaea, many questions remain. Therefore, we screened a Haloferax volcanii transposon insertion library for motility mutants using motility plates and adhesion mutants, using an adapted air–liquid interface assay. Here, we identify 20 genes, previously unknown to affect motility or adhesion. These genes include potential novel regulatory genes that will help to unravel the mechanisms underpinning these processes. Both screens also identified distinct insertions within the genomic region lying between two chemotaxis genes, suggesting that chemotaxis not only plays a role in archaeal motility, but also in adhesion. Studying these genes, as well as hypothetical genes hvo_2512 and hvo_2876—also critical for both motility and adhesion—will likely elucidate how these two systems interact. Furthermore, this study underscores the usefulness of the transposon library to screen other archaeal cellular processes for specific phenotypic defects. PMID:27898036

  12. Methods for Observing and Quantifying Muscle Satellite Cell Motility and Invasion In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Lund, Dane K; McAnulty, Patrick; Siegel, Ashley L; Cornelison, Ddw

    2017-01-01

    Motility and/or chemotaxis of satellite cells has been suggested or observed in multiple in vitro and in vivo contexts. Satellite cell motility also affects the efficiency of muscle regeneration, particularly in the context of engrafted exogenous cells. Consequently, there is keen interest in determining what cell-autonomous and environmental factors influence satellite cell motility and chemotaxis in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the ability of activated satellite cells to relocate in vivo would suggest that they must be able to invade and transit through the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is supported by studies in which alteration or addition of matrix metalloprotease (MMP) activity enhanced the spread of engrafted satellite cells. However, despite its potential importance, analysis of satellite cell motility or invasion quantitatively even in an in vitro setting can be difficult; one of the most powerful techniques for overcoming these difficulties is timelapse microscopy. Identification and longitudinal evaluation of individual cells over time permits not only quantification of variations in motility due to intrinsic or extrinsic factors, it permits observation and analysis of other (frequently unsuspected) cellular activities as well. We describe here three protocols developed in our group for quantitatively analyzing satellite cell motility over time in two dimensions on purified ECM substrates, in three dimensions on a living myofiber, and in three dimensions through an artificial matrix.

  13. Statistical physical models of cellular motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banigan, Edward J.

    Cellular motility is required for a wide range of biological behaviors and functions, and the topic poses a number of interesting physical questions. In this work, we construct and analyze models of various aspects of cellular motility using tools and ideas from statistical physics. We begin with a Brownian dynamics model for actin-polymerization-driven motility, which is responsible for cell crawling and "rocketing" motility of pathogens. Within this model, we explore the robustness of self-diffusiophoresis, which is a general mechanism of motility. Using this mechanism, an object such as a cell catalyzes a reaction that generates a steady-state concentration gradient that propels the object in a particular direction. We then apply these ideas to a model for depolymerization-driven motility during bacterial chromosome segregation. We find that depolymerization and protein-protein binding interactions alone are sufficient to robustly pull a chromosome, even against large loads. Next, we investigate how forces and kinetics interact during eukaryotic mitosis with a many-microtubule model. Microtubules exert forces on chromosomes, but since individual microtubules grow and shrink in a force-dependent way, these forces lead to bistable collective microtubule dynamics, which provides a mechanism for chromosome oscillations and microtubule-based tension sensing. Finally, we explore kinematic aspects of cell motility in the context of the immune system. We develop quantitative methods for analyzing cell migration statistics collected during imaging experiments. We find that during chronic infection in the brain, T cells run and pause stochastically, following the statistics of a generalized Levy walk. These statistics may contribute to immune function by mimicking an evolutionarily conserved efficient search strategy. Additionally, we find that naive T cells migrating in lymph nodes also obey non-Gaussian statistics. Altogether, our work demonstrates how physical

  14. Intestinal capillariasis.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, J H

    1992-01-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt, and Taiwan, but most infections occur in the Philippines and Thailand. As established experimentally, the life cycle involves freshwater fish as intermediate hosts and fish-eating birds as definitive hosts. Embryonated eggs from feces fed to fish hatch and grow as larvae in the fish intestines. Infective larvae fed to monkeys, Mongolian gerbils, and fish-eating birds develop into adults. Larvae become adults in 10 to 11 days, and the first-generation females produce larvae. These larvae develop into males and egg-producing female worms. Eggs pass with the feces, reach water, embryonate, and infect fish. Autoinfection is part of the life cycle and leads to hyperinfection. Humans acquire the infection by eating small freshwater fish raw. The parasite multiplies, and symptoms of diarrhea, borborygmus, abdominal pain, and edema develop. Chronic infections lead to malabsorption and hence to protein and electrolyte loss, and death results from irreversible effects of the infection. Treatment consists of electrolyte replacement and administration of an antidiarrheal agent and mebendazole or albendazole. Capillariasis philippinensis is considered a zoonotic disease of migratory fish-eating birds. The eggs are disseminated along flyways and infect the fish, and when fish are eaten raw, the disease develops. Images PMID:1576584

  15. Intestinal capillariasis.

    PubMed

    Cross, J H

    1992-04-01

    Intestinal capillariasis caused by Capillaria philippinensis appeared first in the Philippines and subsequently in Thailand, Japan, Iran, Egypt, and Taiwan, but most infections occur in the Philippines and Thailand. As established experimentally, the life cycle involves freshwater fish as intermediate hosts and fish-eating birds as definitive hosts. Embryonated eggs from feces fed to fish hatch and grow as larvae in the fish intestines. Infective larvae fed to monkeys, Mongolian gerbils, and fish-eating birds develop into adults. Larvae become adults in 10 to 11 days, and the first-generation females produce larvae. These larvae develop into males and egg-producing female worms. Eggs pass with the feces, reach water, embryonate, and infect fish. Autoinfection is part of the life cycle and leads to hyperinfection. Humans acquire the infection by eating small freshwater fish raw. The parasite multiplies, and symptoms of diarrhea, borborygmus, abdominal pain, and edema develop. Chronic infections lead to malabsorption and hence to protein and electrolyte loss, and death results from irreversible effects of the infection. Treatment consists of electrolyte replacement and administration of an antidiarrheal agent and mebendazole or albendazole. Capillariasis philippinensis is considered a zoonotic disease of migratory fish-eating birds. The eggs are disseminated along flyways and infect the fish, and when fish are eaten raw, the disease develops.

  16. Cross-Phosphorylation and Interaction between Src/FAK and MAPKAP5/PRAK in Early Focal Adhesions Controls Cell Motility

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Sheila Figel; Gelman, Irwin H

    2015-01-01

    P38-regulated and activated kinase (PRAK/MAPKAPK5) is a serine/threonine kinase which lies downstream of the p38 and ERK3/4 MAP kinase pathways. PRAK plays diverse roles in the processes of cell growth, nutrient starvation response, programmed cell death, senescence and motility. PRAK has been shown to both promote and inhibit cell motility in different contexts. The pro-motility functions of PRAK are attributed mainly to cytoskeletal rearrangement occurring downstream of its phosphorylated substrate HSP27; however, it was recently shown that PRAK is required for motility in endothelial cells upstream of Focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Along with Src, FAK functions as a mediator of motility signaling through the phosphorylation of substrates in focal adhesions. Here, we show that PRAK, initially identified as a FAK substrate in an in situ/ kinase overlay assay, is a Src substrate, the phosphorylation of which directs PRAK to focal adhesions. Focal adhesion localization of PRAK was not found to affect cell motility, however transient over expression of PRAK inhibited motility in HeLa cells. This effect requires PRAK kinase activity and proceeds through an impairment of FAK activation via phosphorylation on Y861. Our studies demonstrate for the first time that PRAK is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation, localizes to focal adhesions, and interacts physically with and can phosphorylate FAK/Src. Further we provide a novel mechanism for the inhibition of motility downstream of PRAK. PMID:26042227

  17. Gastrointestinal Motility, Part 2: Small-Bowel and Colon Transit.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Alan H

    2016-03-01

    Because of the difficulty often encountered in deciding whether a patient's symptoms originate in the upper or lower gastrointestinal tract, gastrointestinal transit scintigraphy is a uniquely suited noninvasive, quantitative, and physiologic method of determining whether there is a motility disorder affecting the stomach, small bowel, or colon. Small-bowel and colon transit studies can be performed alone or together with gastric emptying studies after oral administration of an appropriately radiolabeled meal. It is hoped that newly published standards for performing these studies and the anticipated arrival of new Current Procedural Terminology codes in the United States for small-bowel and colon transit studies will increase their availability and use.

  18. Gastrointestinal Motility, Part 2: Small-Bowel and Colon Transit.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Alan H

    2015-09-01

    Because of the difficulty often encountered in deciding whether a patient's symptoms originate in the upper or lower gastrointestinal tract, gastrointestinal transit scintigraphy is a uniquely suited noninvasive, quantitative, and physiologic method of determining whether there is a motility disorder affecting the stomach, small bowel, or colon. Small-bowel and colon transit studies can be performed alone or together with gastric emptying studies after oral administration of an appropriately radiolabeled meal. It is hoped that newly published standards for performing these studies and the anticipated arrival of new Current Procedural Terminology codes in the United States for small-bowel and colon transit studies will increase their availability and use.

  19. Intestinal Organoids: New Frontiers in the Study of Intestinal Disease and Physiology.

    PubMed

    Wallach, Thomas E; Bayrer, James R

    2017-02-01

    The development of sustainable intestinal organoid cell culture has emerged as a new modality for the study of intestinal function and cellular processes. Organoid culture is providing a new testbed for therapeutic research and development. Intestinal organoids, self-renewing 3-dimensional structures comprised intestinal stem cells and their differentiated epithelial progeny allow for more facile and robust exploration of cellular activity, cell organization and structure, genetic manipulation, and vastly more physiologic modeling of intestinal response to stimuli as compared to traditional 2-dimensional cell line cultures. Intestinal organoids are affecting a wide variety of research into gastrointestinal pathology. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current state-of-the-art and future effect of research using enteroids and colonoids (organoids grown from the small and large intestines, respectively).

  20. N-Glycosylation of the archaellum filament is not important for archaella assembly and motility, although N-Glycosylation is essential for motility in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Benjamin H; Birich, Anton; Albers, Sonja-Verena

    2015-11-01

    N-Glycosylation is one of the predominant posttranslational modifications, which is found in all three domains of life. N-Glycosylation has been shown to influence many biological aspects of proteins, like protein folding, stability or activity. In this study we demonstrate that the archaellum filament subunit FlaB of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius is N-glycosylated. Each of the six predicted N-Glycosylation sites within FlaB are modified with the attachment of an N-glycan. Although, it has been previously shown that N-Glycosylation is essential for motility in S. acidocaldarius, as defects in the N-Glycosylation process resulted in none or reduced motile cells, strains lacking one to all six N-Glycosylation sites within FlaB still remained motile. Deletion of the first five N-Glycosylation sites in FlaB did not significantly affect the motility, whereas removal of all six N-Glycosylation sites reduced motility by about 40%. Transmission electron microscopy analyses of non glycosylated and glycosylated archaellum filament revealed no structural change in length. Therefore N-Glycosylation does not appear to be important for the stability and assembly of the archaellum filament itself, but plays a role in other parts of the archaellum assembly.

  1. Tubulin protofilaments and kinesin-dependent motility

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    . This indicates that even if these microtubules differ in surface lattice, this does not affect the motility. PMID:1500429

  2. Fourier analysis of cell motility: correlation of motility with metastatic potential.

    PubMed Central

    Partin, A W; Schoeniger, J S; Mohler, J L; Coffey, D S

    1989-01-01

    We report the development of a computerized, mathematical system for quantitating the various types of cell motility. This Fourier analysis method simultaneously quantifies for individual cells (i) temporal changes in cell shape represented by cell ruffling, undulation, and pseudopodal extension, (ii) cell translation, and (iii) average cell size and shape. This spatial-temporal Fourier analysis was tested on a series of well-characterized animal tumor cell lines of rat prostatic cancer to study in a quantitative manner the correlation of cell motility with increasing in vivo metastatic potential. Fourier motility coefficients measuring pseudopodal extension correlated best with metastatic potential in the cell lines studied. This study demonstrated that Fourier analysis provides quantitative measurement of cell motility that may be applied to the study of biological processes. This analysis should aid in the study of the motility of individual cells in various areas of cellular and tumor biology. Images PMID:2919174

  3. Motility modes of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temel, Fatma Zeynep; Qu, Zijie; McAllaster, Michael; de Graffenried, Christopher; Breuer, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    The parasitic single-celled protozoan Trypanosoma brucei causes African Sleeping Sickness, which is a fatal disease in humans and animals that threatens more than 60 million people in 36 African countries. Cell motility plays a critical role in the developmental phases and dissemination of the parasite. Unlike many other motile cells such as bacteria Escherichia coli or Caulobacter crescentus, the flagellum of T. brucei is attached along the length of its awl-like body, producing a unique mode of motility that is not fully understood or characterized. Here, we report on the motility of T. brucei, which swims using its single flagellum employing both rotating and undulating propulsion modes. We tracked cells in real-time in three dimensions using fluorescent microscopy. Data obtained from experiments using both short-term tracking within the field of view and long-term tracking using a tracking microscope were analyzed. Motility modes and swimming speed were analyzed as functions of cell size, rotation rate and undulation pattern. Research supported by NSF.

  4. Study of human sperm motility post cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Bhavni; Kumar, Sushil; Talwar, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Background Cryopreservation of spermatozoa is a widely used technique to preserve the fertility of males. It can also benefit the armed forces personnel who are to be sent for long recruitments, while leaving their families behind. This study, apart from studying the effects of freezing and thawing, reveals the effect of the post thaw interval on the motility of the human spermatozoa and thus widens the insemination window period. Methods A detailed semen analysis was carried out as per the WHO guidelines for 25 samples. The samples were then washed, analysed and frozen in liquid nitrogen. The semen samples were subsequently thawed and similarly analysed after 20 min and 40 min of thawing. This was then followed by statistical analysis of the comparative motilities. Results Motility of sperms is found to decrease after cryopreservation. However, the study revealed that after thawing a significant increase in the motility of the sperms was noted with the progression of time (p < 0.05). Conclusion By simulating conditions similar to the in vivo conditions for the post thaw semen samples, we can safely wait, confirm the parameters like motility and count, and then inseminate the samples instead of blindly inseminating them immediately after thawing. PMID:25382909

  5. Intestinal protozoa.

    PubMed

    Juckett, G

    1996-06-01

    Giardia is the best known cause of protozoal gastrointestinal disease in North America, producing significant but not life-threatening gastrointestinal distress and diarrhea. Although diagnosis of giardiasis may be challenging, treatment is usually successful. Entamoeba histolytica poses a rarer but far more difficult clinical challenge. Dysentery caused by E. histolytica may be the most feared intestinal protozoal infection, although Cryptosporidium parvum, Balantidium coli, Isospora belli, Sarcocystis species and other newly described protozoa also may cause diarrhea in healthy individuals and may result in intractable, life-threatening illness in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or other immunosuppressive diseases. Certain protozoa once considered relatively unimportant, such as Cryptosporidium, are now recognized as significant causes of morbidity even in the United States, since transmission readily occurs through contaminated water.

  6. The effect of consuming small volumes of beer on gastric motility and the involvement of gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Tomoyuki; Yamashita, Hiromi; Kawamura, Tomohiko; Jodai, Yasutaka; Omori, Takafumi; Sumi, Kazuya; Ichikawa, Yuichiro; Okubo, Masaaki; Ishizuka, Takamitsu; Tahara, Tomomitsu; Nagasaka, Mitsuo; Nakagawa, Yoshihito; Hirata, Ichiro; Ohmiya, Naoki; Nakao, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of consuming small amounts of beer or a nonalcoholic beer taste beverage (non-beer) on gastric emptying and the polymorphisms in alcohol metabolism-related enzyme-encoding genes. Twenty male healthy volunteers were questioned regarding their alcohol consumption status, and body measurement was performed. The genetic polymorphisms in ADH1B (rs1229984, Arg47His) and ALDH2 (rs671 Glu487Lys) were analyzed. The subjects consumed 150 mL of beer or non-beer once per week, followed by the ingestion of 200 kcal of the test nutrient containing (13)C-acetate 15 min later, after which the subjects' exhalations were collected up to 120 min. The concentration peak of (13)C was measured as Tmax. Diamine oxidase (DAO) activity for the marker of small intestinal function activity was also measured the day after the test. Gastric emptying was significantly slower in the group that consumed a small amount of beer, and in daily beer consumption group, and also in the ADH1B *2/*2, ALDH2 *1/*2 genotypes compared to non-beer drinking group. DAO values were not significantly changed between beer and non-beer group. The consumption of even a small amount of beer and the polymorphisms in ADH1B / ALDH2 affects gastric motility.

  7. Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gabbard, Scott L; Lacy, Brian E

    2013-06-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIP) is a rare and serious disorder of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract characterized as a motility disorder with the primary defect of impaired peristalsis; symptoms are consistent with a bowel obstruction, although mechanical obstruction cannot be identified. CIP is classified as a neuropathy, myopathy, or mesenchymopathy; it is a neuropathic process in the majority of patients. The natural history of CIP is generally that of a progressive disorder, although occasional patients with secondary CIP note significant symptomatic improvement when the underlying disorder is identified and treated. Symptoms vary from patient to patient depending on the location of the luminal GI tract involved and the degree of involvement; however, the small intestine is nearly always involved. Common symptoms include dysphagia, gastroesophageal reflux, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, bloating, abdominal distension, constipation or diarrhea, and involuntary weight loss. Unfortunately, these symptoms are nonspecific, which can contribute to misdiagnosis or a delay in diagnosis and treatment. Since many of the symptoms and signs suggest a mechanical bowel obstruction, diagnostic tests typically focus on uncovering a mechanical obstruction, although routine tests do not identify an obstructive process. Nutrition supplementation is required for many patients with CIP due to symptoms of dysphagia, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. This review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with CIP, with an emphasis on nutrition assessment and treatment options for patients with nutrition compromise.

  8. Plasma catecholamines and postoperative gastric emptying and small intestinal propulsion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dubois, A; Henry, D P; Kopin, I J

    1975-03-01

    The role of adrenal medullary discharge of catecholamines on inhibition of gastric emptying and small intestinal propulsion after laparotomy was examined in rats. The rate of movement of a 51Cr-labeled liquid test meal, which had been introduced by gastric intubation, out of the stomach and through the small intestine, was retarded 12 hr after laparotomy. Adrenal demedullation produced a striking decrease in plasma catecholamines and abolished surgically induced elevation of the catecholamines, but had no significant effect on gastric emptying or intestinal propulsion in rats subjected to laparotomy or in the unoperated control animals. Thus circulating catecholamines play little if any role in controlling normal gastroinestinal motility or in the postoperative decrease in rate of gastric emptying and small intestinal motility.

  9. Response of a Motile/Non-Motile Escherichia coli Front to Hydrodynamic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baabour, Magali; Douarche, Carine; Salin, Dominique

    2014-11-01

    In a recent study (Douarche et al. PRL 102, 198101 (2009)), it has been shown that the motility of Escherichia coli (E. coli) is highly correlated to the oxygen level in a minimal medium: bacteria swim as long as they are provided with oxygen but reversibly transit to a non-motile state when they lack of it. Hence, when oxygen diffuses into an anaerobic sample of non-motile bacteria, a propagating front delineates a region of motile bacteria where oxygen is present from a region of non-motile ones where the oxygen is still not present. To study the response of this front to hydrodynamics excitation, we use the same fluorescent E. coli bacterial solution in rectangular cross section glass cells open to air (oxygen) at one inlet. After bacteria have consumed the oxygen of the solution, the presence of the oxygen only at the open edge of the sample leads to the formation of an analogous stationary front between motile and non-motile bacteria. We follow the response of this front to hydrodynamics flows such as an oscillating Poiseuille flow or natural convection. We analyze both the macroscopic behavior (shape and width) of the front as well as the microscopic displacements of individual bacteria. The dispersive behavior of this bacterial front is compared to the one of equivalent. Collaboration between Laboratories FAST and LPS, Univ Paris Sud and CNRS.

  10. PilZ Domain Protein FlgZ Mediates Cyclic Di-GMP-Dependent Swarming Motility Control in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Amy E.; Diepold, Andreas; Kuchma, Sherry L.; Scott, Jessie E.; Ha, Dae Gon; Orazi, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) is an important regulator of motility in many bacterial species. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, elevated levels of c-di-GMP promote biofilm formation and repress flagellum-driven swarming motility. The rotation of P. aeruginosa's polar flagellum is controlled by two distinct stator complexes, MotAB, which cannot support swarming motility, and MotCD, which promotes swarming motility. Here we show that when c-di-GMP levels are elevated, swarming motility is repressed by the PilZ domain-containing protein FlgZ and by Pel polysaccharide production. We demonstrate that FlgZ interacts specifically with the motility-promoting stator protein MotC in a c-di-GMP-dependent manner and that a functional green fluorescent protein (GFP)-FlgZ fusion protein shows significantly reduced polar localization in a strain lacking the MotCD stator. Our results establish FlgZ as a c-di-GMP receptor affecting swarming motility by P. aeruginosa and support a model wherein c-di-GMP-bound FlgZ impedes motility via its interaction with the MotCD stator. IMPORTANCE The regulation of surface-associated motility plays an important role in bacterial surface colonization and biofilm formation. c-di-GMP signaling is a widespread means of controlling bacterial motility, and yet the mechanism whereby this signal controls surface-associated motility in P. aeruginosa remains poorly understood. Here we identify a PilZ domain-containing c-di-GMP effector protein that contributes to c-di-GMP-mediated repression of swarming motility by P. aeruginosa. We provide evidence that this effector, FlgZ, impacts swarming motility via its interactions with flagellar stator protein MotC. Thus, we propose a new mechanism for c-di-GMP-mediated regulation of motility for a bacterium with two flagellar stator sets, increasing our understanding of surface-associated behaviors, a key prerequisite to identifying ways to control the formation of biofilm communities. PMID

  11. Internal radiation dosimetry of orally administered radiotracers for the assessment of gastrointestinal motility.

    PubMed

    Yeong, Chai-Hong; Ng, Kwan-Hoong; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet; Chung, Lip-Yong; Goh, Khean-Lee; Perkins, Alan Christopher

    2014-12-01

    Radionuclide imaging using (111)In, (99m)Tc and (153)Sm is commonly undertaken for the clinical investigation of gastric emptying, intestinal motility and whole gut transit. However the documented evidence concerning internal radiation dosimetry for such studies is not readily available. This communication documents the internal radiation dosimetry for whole gastrointestinal transit studies using (111)In, (99m)Tc and (153)Sm labeled formulations. The findings were compared to the diagnostic reference levels recommended by the United Kingdom Administration of Radioactive Substances Advisory Committee, for gastrointestinal transit studies.

  12. The swarming motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is blocked by cranberry proanthocyanidins and other tannin-containing materials.

    PubMed

    O'May, Che; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2011-05-01

    Bacterial motility plays a key role in the colonization of surfaces by bacteria and the subsequent formation of resistant communities of bacteria called biofilms. Derivatives of cranberry fruit, predominantly condensed tannins called proanthocyanidins (PACs) have been reported to interfere with bacterial adhesion, but the effects of PACs and other tannins on bacterial motilities remain largely unknown. In this study, we investigated whether cranberry PAC (CPAC) and the hydrolyzable tannin in pomegranate (PG; punicalagin) affected the levels of motilities exhibited by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This bacterium utilizes flagellum-mediated swimming motility to approach a surface, attaches, and then further spreads via the surface-associated motilities designated swarming and twitching, mediated by multiple flagella and type IV pili, respectively. Under the conditions tested, both CPAC and PG completely blocked swarming motility but did not block swimming or twitching motilities. Other cranberry-containing materials and extracts of green tea (also rich in tannins) were also able to block or impair swarming motility. Moreover, swarming bacteria were repelled by filter paper discs impregnated with many tannin-containing materials. Growth experiments demonstrated that the majority of these compounds did not impair bacterial growth. When CPAC- or PG-containing medium was supplemented with surfactant (rhamnolipid), swarming motility was partially restored, suggesting that the effective tannins are in part acting by a rhamnolipid-related mechanism. Further support for this theory was provided by demonstrating that the agar surrounding tannin-induced nonswarming bacteria was considerably less hydrophilic than the agar area surrounding swarming bacteria. This is the first study to show that natural compounds containing tannins are able to block P. aeruginosa swarming motility and that swarming bacteria are repelled by such compounds.

  13. Peristalsis in the Guinea pig small intestine in vitro is impaired by acetaminophen but not aspirin and dipyrone.

    PubMed

    Herbert, Michael K; Weis, Rebecca; Holzer, Peter; Roewer, Norbert

    2005-01-01

    Inhibition of intestinal peristalsis is a major side effect of opioid analgesics. It is unknown whether non-opioid analgesics, such as acetaminophen, acetylsalicylic acid, and dipyrone, exert any effect on intestinal motility. In the current in vitro study we examined the effect of these analgesics on intestinal peristalsis and analyzed some of their mechanisms of action. In isolated segments of the guinea pig small intestine peristalsis was triggered by a perfusion-induced increase of the intraluminal pressure. The peristaltic pressure threshold (PPT) at which peristaltic waves were elicited was used to quantify drug effects on peristalsis. Vehicle (Tyrode's solution), acetaminophen (0.01-100 microM), acetylsalicylic acid (100-300 microM), and dipyrone (10-100 microM) were added extraserosally to the organ bath. Acetaminophen concentration-dependently increased PPT and abolished peristalsis in four of six segments at the concentration of 10 microM and in all segments tested at 100 microM (EC50=6.0 microM). The increase in PPT resulting from 3 microM acetaminophen was reduced by naloxone and apamin but not changed by L-nitro-arginine methylester (L-NAME), its inactive enantiomer D-NAME, acetylsalicylic acid, methysergide, or tropisetron. Acetylsalicylic acid and dipyrone did not affect peristalsis. The results reveal, for the first time, that acetaminophen concentration-dependently impairs intestinal peristalsis, whereas acetylsalicylic acid and dipyrone lacked such an effect. The inhibition caused by acetaminophen involves transmitters acting via small conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels, endogenous opioidergic pathways, and presumably inhibition of cyclooxygenase-3.

  14. Quinoa extract enriched in 20-hydroxyecdysone affects energy homeostasis and intestinal fat absorption in mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Foucault, Anne-Sophie; Even, Patrick; Lafont, René; Dioh, Waly; Veillet, Stanislas; Tomé, Daniel; Huneau, Jean-François; Hermier, Dominique; Quignard-Boulangé, Annie

    2014-04-10

    In a previous study, we have demonstrated that a supplementation of a high-fat diet with a quinoa extract enriched in 20-hydroxyecdysone (QE) or pure 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) could prevent the development of obesity. In line with the anti-obesity effect of QE, we used indirect calorimetry to examine the effect of dietary QE and 20E in high-fat fed mice on different components of energy metabolism. Mice were fed a high-fat (HF) diet with or without supplementation by QE or pure 20E for 3 weeks. As compared to mice maintained on a low-fat diet, HF feeding resulted in a marked physiological shift in energy homeostasis, associating a decrease in global energy expenditure (EE) and an increase in lipid utilization as assessed by the lower respiratory quotient (RQ). Supplementation with 20E increased energy expenditure while food intake and activity were not affected. Furthermore QE and 20E promoted a higher rate of glucose oxidation leading to an increased RQ value. In QE and 20E-treated HFD fed mice, there was an increase in fecal lipid excretion without any change in stool amount. Our study indicates that anti-obesity effect of QE can be explained by a global increase in energy expenditure, a shift in glucose metabolism towards oxidation to the detriment of lipogenesis and a decrease in dietary lipid absorption leading to reduced dietary lipid storage in adipose tissue.

  15. Role of Glycosyltransferases Modifying Type B Flagellin of Emerging Hypervirulent Clostridium difficile Lineages and Their Impact on Motility and Biofilm Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Valiente, Esmeralda; Bouché, Laura; Hitchen, Paul; Faulds-Pain, Alexandra; Songane, Mario; Dawson, Lisa F.; Donahue, Elizabeth; Stabler, Richard A.; Panico, Maria; Morris, Howard R.; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona; Logan, Susan M.; Dell, Anne; Wren, Brendan W.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the principal cause of nosocomial infectious diarrhea worldwide. The pathogen modifies its flagellin with either a type A or type B O-linked glycosylation system, which has a contributory role in pathogenesis. We study the functional role of glycosyltransferases modifying type B flagellin in the 023 and 027 hypervirulent C. difficile lineages by mutagenesis of five putative glycosyltransferases and biosynthetic genes. We reveal their roles in the biosynthesis of the flagellin glycan chain and demonstrate that flagellar post-translational modification affects motility and adhesion-related bacterial properties of these strains. We show that the glycosyltransferases 1 and 2 (GT1 and GT2) are responsible for the sequential addition of a GlcNAc and two rhamnoses, respectively, and that GT3 is associated with the incorporation of a novel sulfonated peptidyl-amido sugar moiety whose structure is reported in our accompanying paper (Bouché, L., Panico, M., Hitchen, P., Binet, D., Sastre, F., Faulds-Pain, A., Valiente, E., Vinogradov, E., Aubry, A., Fulton, K., Twine, S., Logan, S. M., Wren, B. W., Dell, A., and Morris, H. R. (2016) J. Biol. Chem. 291, 25439–25449). GT2 is also responsible for methylation of the rhamnoses. Whereas type B modification is not required for flagellar assembly, some mutations that result in truncation or abolition of the glycan reduce bacterial motility and promote autoaggregation and biofilm formation. The complete lack of flagellin modification also significantly reduces adhesion of C. difficile to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells but does not affect activation of human TLR5. Our study advances our understanding of the genes involved in flagellar glycosylation and their biological roles in emerging hypervirulent C. difficile strains. PMID:27703012

  16. Role of Glycosyltransferases Modifying Type B Flagellin of Emerging Hypervirulent Clostridium difficile Lineages and Their Impact on Motility and Biofilm Formation.

    PubMed

    Valiente, Esmeralda; Bouché, Laura; Hitchen, Paul; Faulds-Pain, Alexandra; Songane, Mario; Dawson, Lisa F; Donahue, Elizabeth; Stabler, Richard A; Panico, Maria; Morris, Howard R; Bajaj-Elliott, Mona; Logan, Susan M; Dell, Anne; Wren, Brendan W

    2016-12-02

    Clostridium difficile is the principal cause of nosocomial infectious diarrhea worldwide. The pathogen modifies its flagellin with either a type A or type B O-linked glycosylation system, which has a contributory role in pathogenesis. We study the functional role of glycosyltransferases modifying type B flagellin in the 023 and 027 hypervirulent C. difficile lineages by mutagenesis of five putative glycosyltransferases and biosynthetic genes. We reveal their roles in the biosynthesis of the flagellin glycan chain and demonstrate that flagellar post-translational modification affects motility and adhesion-related bacterial properties of these strains. We show that the glycosyltransferases 1 and 2 (GT1 and GT2) are responsible for the sequential addition of a GlcNAc and two rhamnoses, respectively, and that GT3 is associated with the incorporation of a novel sulfonated peptidyl-amido sugar moiety whose structure is reported in our accompanying paper (Bouché, L., Panico, M., Hitchen, P., Binet, D., Sastre, F., Faulds-Pain, A., Valiente, E., Vinogradov, E., Aubry, A., Fulton, K., Twine, S., Logan, S. M., Wren, B. W., Dell, A., and Morris, H. R. (2016) J. Biol. Chem. 291, 25439-25449). GT2 is also responsible for methylation of the rhamnoses. Whereas type B modification is not required for flagellar assembly, some mutations that result in truncation or abolition of the glycan reduce bacterial motility and promote autoaggregation and biofilm formation. The complete lack of flagellin modification also significantly reduces adhesion of C. difficile to Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells but does not affect activation of human TLR5. Our study advances our understanding of the genes involved in flagellar glycosylation and their biological roles in emerging hypervirulent C. difficile strains.

  17. The role of adrenergic receptors in the motility of duodenum and choledochoduodenal junction in the pig.

    PubMed

    Blichowski, A; Andrzejewski, W; Gaszyński, W; Kozulski, W

    1977-01-01

    The role of adenergic receptors in the motility of duodenum and choledochoduodenal junction in the pig. Acta Physiol. Pol., 1977, 28 (6): 521-528. The choldeochoduodenal junction in the Vietnamese pig is functionally and anatomically a part of duodenal wall. In view of this, investigations were carried out for establishing the role of adrenergic receptors in the development of motor function of this part of the intestinal tract. The experiments were performed on domestic Vietnamese pigs (Sus scrofa domestica) and they showed that after stimulation of alpha and beta adrenergic receptors the motor activity of the duodenal muscular coat and the choledochoduodenal junction is inhibited. The obtained results suggest similar reactions of the adrenergic receptors in both examined parts of the intestinal tract in the pig.

  18. Semiautomated Motility Assay For Determining Toxicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.; Cronise, Raymond

    1996-01-01

    Improved method of assessing toxicities of various substances based on observation of effects of those substances on motilities of manageably small number of cells of protozoan species Tetrahema pyriformis. Provides repeatable, standardized tests with minimal handling by technicians and with minimal exposure of technicians to chemicals. Rapid and economical alternative to Draize test.

  19. Methods for fabricating microarrays of motile bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rozhok, Sergey; Shen, Clifton K-F; Littler, Pey-Lih H; Fan, Zhifang; Liu, Chang; Mirkin, Chad A; Holz, Richard C

    2005-04-01

    Motile bacterial cell microarrays were fabricated by attaching Escherichia coli K-12 cells onto predesigned 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid patterned microarrays, which were covalently functionalized with E. coli antibodies or poly-L-lysine. By utilizing 11-mercaptoundecyl-penta(ethylene glycol) or 11-mercapto-1-undecanol as passivating molecules, nonspecific binding of E. coli was significantly reduced. Microcontact printing and dip-pen nanolithography were used to prepare microarrays for bacterial adhesion, which was studied by optical fluorescence and atomic force microscopy. These data indicate that single motile E. coli can be attached to predesigned line or dot features and binding can occur via the cell body or the flagella of bacteria. Adherent bacteria are viable (remain alive and motile after adhesion to patterned surface features) for more than four hours. Individual motile bacterial cells can be placed onto predesigned surface features that are at least 1.3 microm in diameter or larger. The importance of controlling the adhesion of single bacterial cell to a surface is discussed with regard to biomotor design.

  20. Esophageal motility disorders after gastric banding.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, R W; Deveney, C W; McConnell, D B; Wolfe, B M; Jobe, B A

    2007-01-01

    The long-term effects of gastric banding on esophageal function are not well described. This report describes a 28-year-old woman who developed signs and symptoms of abnormal esophageal motility and lower esophageal sphincter hypotension after gastric banding for morbid obesity. The current literature addressing the effects of gastric banding on esophageal function in light of this case report is discussed.

  1. Esophageal motility abnormalities in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Martinucci, Irene; de Bortoli, Nicola; Giacchino, Maria; Bodini, Giorgia; Marabotto, Elisa; Marchi, Santino; Savarino, Vincenzo; Savarino, Edoardo

    2014-05-06

    Esophageal motility abnormalities are among the main factors implicated in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease. The recent introduction in clinical and research practice of novel esophageal testing has markedly improved our understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease, allowing a better management of patients with this disorder. In this context, the present article intends to provide an overview of the current literature about esophageal motility dysfunctions in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. Esophageal manometry, by recording intraluminal pressure, represents the gold standard to diagnose esophageal motility abnormalities. In particular, using novel techniques, such as high resolution manometry with or without concurrent intraluminal impedance monitoring, transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations, hypotensive LES, ineffective esophageal peristalsis and bolus transit abnormalities have been better defined and strongly implicated in gastroesophageal reflux disease development. Overall, recent findings suggest that esophageal motility abnormalities are increasingly prevalent with increasing severity of reflux disease, from non-erosive reflux disease to erosive reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus. Characterizing esophageal dysmotility among different subgroups of patients with reflux disease may represent a fundamental approach to properly diagnose these patients and, thus, to set up the best therapeutic management. Currently, surgery represents the only reliable way to restore the esophagogastric junction integrity and to reduce transient LES relaxations that are considered to be the predominant mechanism by which gastric contents can enter the esophagus. On that ground, more in depth future studies assessing the pathogenetic role of dysmotility in patients with reflux disease are warranted.

  2. [Increased spontaneous uterine motility with serotonin].

    PubMed

    Lechner, W; Sölder, E; Sölder, B; Kölle, D; Huter, O

    1992-01-01

    The influence of serotonine, a vasoactive neurotransmitter, on the spontaneous motility of uterine strips was investigated. A highly significant (p less than 0.001) increase of uterine activity was observed when serotonine 10(-6) M was added to the perfusing medium.

  3. [Intestinal microbiota].

    PubMed

    Perez, Horacio Joaquín; Menezes, Maria Elisabeth; d'Acâmpora, Armando José

    2014-01-01

    There is accumulative evidence on the multiple functions of the intestinal microflora in relation to the homeostasis of the host. At first considered as a simple mutualism, today this relationship proves to be essential to the health and to pathologic processes, particularly metabolic (eg, obesity) and gastrointestinal (eg, inflammatory bowel disease and functional disorders). The first studies were conducted on the microbiota from fecal material cultured anaerobically. With the advent of molecular biology, it has become possible to determine qualitative and quantitatively the dominant, subdominant and transients species. In recent years, there were advances in the understanding of the relationship betwen the microbiota and the host, as well as among the microorganisms in their respective niches. These advances result from translational integration of microbiology with specialities such as molecular biology, cell phisiology, immunology and ecology. There are few studies on the spatial distribution of the microflora in the gut. Unravelling the topography of the microflora in mammals is a way to validate new animal models for the study of microflora.

  4. An animated model of reticulorumen motility.

    PubMed

    Gookin, Jody L; Foster, Derek M; Harvey, Alice M; McWhorter, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Understanding reticulorumen motility is important to the assessment of ruminant health and optimal production, and in the recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Accordingly, the teaching of reticulorumen motility is a staple of all veterinary curricula. This teaching has historically been based on written descriptions, line drawings, or pressure tracings obtained during contraction sequences. We developed an animated model of reticulorumen motility and hypothesized that veterinary students would prefer use of the model over traditional instructional methods. First-year veterinary students were randomly allocated to one of two online learning exercises: with the animated model (Group A) or with text and line drawings (Group B) depicting reticulorumen motility. Learning was assessed with a multiple-choice quiz and feedback on the learning alternatives was obtained by survey. Seventy-four students participated in the study, including 38/42 in Group A and 36/36 in Group B. Sixty-four out of 72 students (89%) responded that they would prefer use of the animated model if only one of the two learning methods was available. A majority of students agreed or strongly agreed that the animated model was easy to understand and improved their knowledge and appreciation of the importance of reticulorumen motility, and would recommend the model to other veterinary students. Interestingly, students in Group B achieved higher scores on examination than students in Group A. This could be speculatively attributed to the inclusion of an itemized list of contraction sequences in the text provided to Group B and failure of Group A students to read the text associated with the animations.

  5. Intestinal Microbiota-Derived GABA Mediates Interleukin-17 Expression during Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Xiao, Hao; Chen, Shuai; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Li, Nengzhang; Peng, Yuanyi; Li, Tiejun; Zeng, Benhua; Li, Wenxia; Wei, Hong; Yin, Zhinan; Wu, Guoyao; Hardwidge, Philip R.; Yin, Yulong

    2017-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota has critical importance in pathogenesis of intestinal infection; however, the role of intestinal microbiota in intestinal immunity during enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is poorly understood. The present study tested the hypothesis that the intestinal microbiota is associated with intestinal interleukin-17 (IL-17) expression in response to ETEC infection. Here, we found ETEC infection induced expression of intestinal IL-17 and dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota, increasing abundance of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. Antibiotics treatment in mice lowered the expression of intestinal IL-17 during ETEC infection, while GABA or L. lactis subsp. lactis administration restored the expression of intestinal IL-17. L. lactis subsp. lactis administration also promoted expression of intestinal IL-17 in germ-free mice during ETEC infection. GABA enhanced intestinal IL-17 expression in the context of ETEC infection through activating mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) signaling. GABA–mTORC1 signaling also affected intestinal IL-17 expression in response to Citrobacter rodentium infection and in drug-induced model of intestinal inflammation. These findings highlight the importance of intestinal GABA signaling in intestinal IL-17 expression during intestinal infection and indicate the potential of intestinal microbiota-GABA signaling in IL-17-associated intestinal diseases. PMID:28138329

  6. Intestinal Microbiota-Derived GABA Mediates Interleukin-17 Expression during Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli Infection.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Xiao, Hao; Chen, Shuai; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Li, Nengzhang; Peng, Yuanyi; Li, Tiejun; Zeng, Benhua; Li, Wenxia; Wei, Hong; Yin, Zhinan; Wu, Guoyao; Hardwidge, Philip R; Yin, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal microbiota has critical importance in pathogenesis of intestinal infection; however, the role of intestinal microbiota in intestinal immunity during enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection is poorly understood. The present study tested the hypothesis that the intestinal microbiota is associated with intestinal interleukin-17 (IL-17) expression in response to ETEC infection. Here, we found ETEC infection induced expression of intestinal IL-17 and dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota, increasing abundance of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-producing Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis. Antibiotics treatment in mice lowered the expression of intestinal IL-17 during ETEC infection, while GABA or L. lactis subsp. lactis administration restored the expression of intestinal IL-17. L. lactis subsp. lactis administration also promoted expression of intestinal IL-17 in germ-free mice during ETEC infection. GABA enhanced intestinal IL-17 expression in the context of ETEC infection through activating mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1)-ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) signaling. GABA-mTORC1 signaling also affected intestinal IL-17 expression in response to Citrobacter rodentium infection and in drug-induced model of intestinal inflammation. These findings highlight the importance of intestinal GABA signaling in intestinal IL-17 expression during intestinal infection and indicate the potential of intestinal microbiota-GABA signaling in IL-17-associated intestinal diseases.

  7. Tibetan herbal formula Padma Digestin modulates gastrointestinal motility in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Balsiger, Bruno M; Krayer, Magali; Rickenbacher, Andreas; Flogerzi, Beatrice; Vennos, Cecile; Gschossmann, Juergen M

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of Padma Digestin on the smooth muscle motility of different gastrointestinal segments in vitro. METHODS: The effects of the ethanolic extract of Padma Digestin (at 8.16 mg/mL or 81.6 mg/mL) on the contractility and susceptibility to acetylcholine (ACh) of muscle strips from the cardia, antrum, pylorus, duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon of male Wistar rats were analyzed. RESULTS: Compared with the control treatment, the Padma Digestin extract had a procontractile effect on the antral smooth muscle strips. Padma Digestin decreased ACh sensitivity in cardia muscle strips and increased it in those from the antrum and pylorus. In the intestinal segments, spontaneous contractility was inhibited in both the duodenal and jejunal strips, whereas reactivity to ACh was inhibited in the jejunal strips only. In the colonic samples, Padma Digestin inhibited spontaneous and ACh-stimulated contractility at a low dose but seems to have increasing effects at a high dose. CONCLUSION: Padma Digestin extract has region-specific effects on the contractility and excitability of gastrointestinal smooth muscle. Our results support the traditional use of Padma Digestin for maldigestion and functional gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:23515138

  8. Plasmodium berghei ANKA causes intestinal malaria associated with dysbiosis.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Tomoyo; Miyauchi, Eiji; Nakamura, Shota; Hirai, Makoto; Suzue, Kazutomo; Imai, Takashi; Nomura, Takahiro; Handa, Tadashi; Okada, Hiroko; Shimokawa, Chikako; Onishi, Risa; Olia, Alex; Hirata, Jun; Tomita, Haruyoshi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Horii, Toshihiro; Hisaeda, Hajime

    2015-10-27

    Gastrointestinal symptoms, such as abdominal pain and diarrhea, are frequently observed in patients with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. However, the correlation between malaria intestinal pathology and intestinal microbiota has not been investigated. In the present study, infection of C57BL/6 mice with P. berghei ANKA (PbA) caused intestinal pathological changes, such as detachment of epithelia in the small intestines and increased intestinal permeability, which correlated with development with experimental cerebral malaria (ECM). Notably, an apparent dysbiosis occurred, characterized by a reduction of Firmicutes and an increase in Proteobacteria. Furthermore, some genera of microbiota correlated with parasite growth and/or ECM development. By contrast, BALB/c mice are resistant to ECM and exhibit milder intestinal pathology and dysbiosis. These results indicate that the severity of cerebral and intestinal pathology coincides with the degree of alteration in microbiota. This is the first report demonstrating that malaria affects intestinal microbiota and causes dysbiosis.

  9. Adipose triglyceride lipase is a TG hydrolase of the small intestine and regulates intestinal PPARα signaling.

    PubMed

    Obrowsky, Sascha; Chandak, Prakash G; Patankar, Jay V; Povoden, Silvia; Schlager, Stefanie; Kershaw, Erin E; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G; Hoefler, Gerald; Levak-Frank, Sanja; Kratky, Dagmar

    2013-02-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is the rate-limiting enzyme mediating triglyceride (TG) hydrolysis. The lack of ATGL results in TG accumulation in multiple tissues, underscoring the critical role of ATGL in maintaining lipid homeostasis. Recent evidence suggests that ATGL affects TG metabolism via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). To investigate specific effects of intestinal ATGL on lipid metabolism we generated mice lacking ATGL exclusively in the intestine (ATGLiKO). We found decreased TG hydrolase activity and increased intracellular TG content in ATGLiKO small intestines. Intragastric administration of [(3)H]trioleate resulted in the accumulation of radioactive TG in the intestine, whereas absorption into the systemic circulation was unchanged. Intraperitoneally injected [(3)H]oleate also accumulated within TG in ATGLiKO intestines, indicating that ATGL mobilizes fatty acids from the systemic circulation absorbed by the basolateral side from the blood. Down-regulation of PPARα target genes suggested modulation of cholesterol absorption by intestinal ATGL. Accordingly, ATGL deficiency in the intestine resulted in delayed cholesterol absorption. Importantly, this study provides evidence that ATGL has no impact on intestinal TG absorption but hydrolyzes TGs taken up from the intestinal lumen and systemic circulation. Our data support the role of ATGL in modulating PPARα-dependent processes also in the small intestine.

  10. Experimental and Mathematical-Modeling Characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigote Motility

    PubMed Central

    Arias-del-Angel, Jorge A.; Dévora-Canales, Diego; Manning-Cela, Rebeca G.; Santana-Solano, Jesús; Santillán, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    The present work is aimed at characterizing the motility of parasite T. cruzi in its epimastigote form. To that end, we recorded the trajectories of two strains of this parasite (a wild-type strain and a stable transfected strain, which contains an ectopic copy of LYT1 gene and whose motility is known to be affected). We further extracted parasite trajectories from the recorded videos, and statistically analysed the following trajectory-step features: step length, angular change of direction, longitudinal and transverse displacements with respect to the previous step, and mean square displacement. Based on the resulting observations, we developed a mathematical model to simulate parasite trajectories. The fact that the model predictions closely match most of the experimentally observed parasite-trajectory characteristics, allows us to conclude that the model is an accurate description of T. cruzi motility. PMID:26544863

  11. Automated single-cell motility analysis on a chip using lensfree microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarsky, Ivan; Lyb, Yunbo; Weaver, Westbrook; Su, Ting-Wei; Mudanyali, Onur; Ozcan, Aydogan; di Carlo, Dino

    2014-04-01

    Quantitative cell motility studies are necessary for understanding biophysical processes, developing models for cell locomotion and for drug discovery. Such studies are typically performed by controlling environmental conditions around a lens-based microscope, requiring costly instruments while still remaining limited in field-of-view. Here we present a compact cell monitoring platform utilizing a wide-field (24 mm2) lensless holographic microscope that enables automated single-cell tracking of large populations that is compatible with a standard laboratory incubator. We used this platform to track NIH 3T3 cells on polyacrylamide gels over 20 hrs. We report that, over an order of magnitude of stiffness values, collagen IV surfaces lead to enhanced motility compared to fibronectin, in agreement with biological uses of these structural proteins. The increased throughput associated with lensfree on-chip imaging enables higher statistical significance in observed cell behavior and may facilitate rapid screening of drugs and genes that affect cell motility.

  12. A cell number-counting factor regulates the cytoskeleton and cell motility in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Lei; Gao, Tong; McCollum, Catherine; Jang, Wonhee; Vicker, Michael G.; Ammann, Robin R.; Gomer, Richard H.

    2002-01-01

    Little is known about how a morphogenetic rearrangement of a tissue is affected by individual cells. Starving Dictyostelium discoideum cells aggregate to form dendritic streams, which then break up into groups of ≈2 × 104 cells. Cell number is sensed at this developmental stage by using counting factor (CF), a secreted complex of polypeptides. A high extracellular concentration of CF indicates that there is a large number of cells, which then causes the aggregation stream to break up. Computer simulations indicated that stream breakup could be caused by CF decreasing cell–cell adhesion and/or increasing cell motility, and we observed that CF does indeed decrease cell–cell adhesion. We find here that CF increases cell motility. In Dictyostelium, motility is mediated by actin and myosin. CF increases the amounts of polymerized actin and the ABP-120 actin-crosslinking protein. Partially inhibiting motility by using drugs that interfere with actin polymerization reduces stream dissipation, resulting in fewer stream breaks and thus larger groups. CF also potentiates the phosphorylation and redistribution of myosin while repressing its basal level of assembly. The computer simulations indicated that a narrower distribution of group sizes results when a secreted factor modulates both adhesion and motility. CF thus seems to induce the morphogenesis of streams into evenly sized groups by increasing actin polymerization, ABP-120 levels, and myosin phosphorylation and decreasing adhesion and myosin polymerization. PMID:11818526

  13. A cell number-counting factor regulates the cytoskeleton and cell motility in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Tang, Lei; Gao, Tong; McCollum, Catherine; Jang, Wonhee; Vicker, Michael G; Ammann, Robin R; Gomer, Richard H

    2002-02-05

    Little is known about how a morphogenetic rearrangement of a tissue is affected by individual cells. Starving Dictyostelium discoideum cells aggregate to form dendritic streams, which then break up into groups of approximately 2 x 10(4) cells. Cell number is sensed at this developmental stage by using counting factor (CF), a secreted complex of polypeptides. A high extracellular concentration of CF indicates that there is a large number of cells, which then causes the aggregation stream to break up. Computer simulations indicated that stream breakup could be caused by CF decreasing cell-cell adhesion and/or increasing cell motility, and we observed that CF does indeed decrease cell-cell adhesion. We find here that CF increases cell motility. In Dictyostelium, motility is mediated by actin and myosin. CF increases the amounts of polymerized actin and the ABP-120 actin-crosslinking protein. Partially inhibiting motility by using drugs that interfere with actin polymerization reduces stream dissipation, resulting in fewer stream breaks and thus larger groups. CF also potentiates the phosphorylation and redistribution of myosin while repressing its basal level of assembly. The computer simulations indicated that a narrower distribution of group sizes results when a secreted factor modulates both adhesion and motility. CF thus seems to induce the morphogenesis of streams into evenly sized groups by increasing actin polymerization, ABP-120 levels, and myosin phosphorylation and decreasing adhesion and myosin polymerization.

  14. Facilitation of gastric motility induced by portal infusion of hyper- and hypotonic solution in rats.

    PubMed

    Kobashi, M; Mizutani, M; Adachi, A

    1998-11-10

    The effects of the portal infusion of hyper- and hypotonic solution on gastric motility in rats were investigated. The infusion of hypertonic saline into the portal vein (portal infusion) elicited a significant enhancement of gastric contractile activity. The portal infusion of water also produced this enhancement. However, the portal infusion of isotonic saline showed no significant enhancement; nor did the infusion of water and hypertonic saline into the jugular vein. Sectioning of the hepatic branch of the vagus nerve (hepatic vagus) eliminated the enhanced responses of the gastric motility. It is therefore concluded that hepatoportal osmoreceptive afferent signals affect the gastric motility by way of the hepatic vagus. These effects on osmolarity revealed that hypotonic stimulation is more effective than hypertonic stimulation for the enhancement of motility. Sectioning of the dorsal subdiaphragmatic vagus, which includes the dorsal gastric and celiac branch, did not eliminate these responses. Sectioning of the ventral gastric vagus, in contrast, did eliminate the responses. These results suggest that vagal preganglionic neurons in the left dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus play a role in enhancement of gastric motility observed in the present research.

  15. Integrin-linked kinase regulates cellular mechanics facilitating the motility in 3D extracellular matrices.

    PubMed

    Kunschmann, Tom; Puder, Stefanie; Fischer, Tony; Perez, Jeremy; Wilharm, Nils; Mierke, Claudia Tanja

    2017-03-01

    The motility of cells plays an important role for many processes such as wound healing and malignant progression of cancer. The efficiency of cell motility is affected by the microenvironment. The connection between the cell and its microenvironment is facilitated by cell-matrix adhesion receptors and upon their activation focal adhesion proteins such as integrin-linked kinase (ILK) are recruited to sites of focal adhesion formation. In particular, ILK connects cell-matrix receptors to the actomyosin cytoskeleton. However, ILK's role in cell mechanics regulating cellular motility in 3D collagen matrices is still not well understood. We suggest that ILK facilitates 3D motility by regulating cellular mechanical properties such as stiffness and force transmission. Thus, ILK wild-type and knock-out cells are analyzed for their ability to migrate on 2D substrates serving as control and in dense 3D extracellular matrices. Indeed, ILK wild-type cells migrated faster on 2D substrates and migrated more numerous and deeper in 3D matrices. Hence, we analyzed cellular deformability, Young's modulus (stiffness) and adhesion forces. We found that ILK wild-type cells are less deformable (stiffer) and produce higher cell-matrix adhesion forces compared to ILK knock-out cells. Finally, ILK is essential for providing cellular mechanical stiffness regulating 3D motility.

  16. Numerical Evaluation of Efficacy of Glutamate on Gastrointestinal Motility: Rapid MRI Study.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shinsuke; Teramoto, Hidemi

    2016-01-01

     The umami taste amino acid, glutamate acts as a signaling molecule in multiple cellular systems in the body, including the brain and gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, glutamate may affect appetite by modulating gastrointestinal motility as well as through taste perception. In this study, we examined the effect of glutamate on gastric emptying and duodenal motility, by using rapid magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ten healthy male volunteers participated in the measurements. Abdominal coronal MR images were successively acquired after ingestion of a liquid meal with and without monosodium L-glutamate (MSG). Image analysis was performed with a homemade segment software, in which respiratory motions were cancelled automatically by minimizing an energy function, thereby allowing participants breathe freely during MRI measurements. In two out of 10 participants, gastric emptying slowed down, while in the remaining eight participants, gastric residual volume decreased to 84% without MSG, and to 73% with MSG after 60 min. The inclusion of MSG enhanced duodenal motility, judging from changes in, 1) the magnitude of the duodenal area, 2) the center of gravity, and 3) the mean velocity of the wall motions. The third parameter most significantly indicated the excitatory effect of MSG on duodenum motility (3-7 fold increase). In conclusion, the present observations of rapid MRI indicate that MSG accelerates gastric emptying by facilitating duodenal motility, at least in healthy subjects with positive responses to MSG. This suggests the possible use of MSG as a prokinetic nutrient for improving the quality of life in hospitalized patients after a clinical assessment.

  17. Pathophysiology and treatment of patients with globus sensation--from the viewpoint of esophageal motility dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Noriaki; Tsutsui, Hideaki; Kusunoki, Hiroaki; Hata, Jiro; Haruma, Ken

    2014-01-01

    "Globus sensation" is often described as the sensation of a lump in the throat associated with dry swallowing or the need for dry swallowing, which disappears completely during eating or drinking and for which no organic cause can be established. Due to the uncertain etiology of "globus sensation", it remains difficult to establish standard treatment strategies for affected patients. Lately most attention has been focused on gastroesophageal reflux disease and several reports have indicated that there is a close relationship between esophageal acid reflux and globus sensation. Nowadays, empirical therapy with a high dose of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is considered to be indicated for patients with globus sensation, after excluding organic diseases such as pharyngeal cancer, Zenker's diverticulum, or thyroid enlargement. If patients are nonresponsive to PPI therapy, evaluation of esophageal motility should be done. In our recent study, 47.9% had abnormal esophageal motility, with the most common esophageal motility abnormality being an ineffective esophageal motility in PPI-resistant patients with globus sensation. This suggests that prokinetics alone or adding prokinetics to PPI should be the treatment to be considered, although few studies have investigated the efficacy of prokinetics in the treatment of patients with globus sensation. If patients without any esophageal motility dysfunctions are nonresponsive to PPI therapy, either cognitive-behavioral therapy, anti-depressants, or gabapentin could be helpful, although further well-designed, randomized controlled large-scale studies will be necessary to determine the effectiveness of each treatment strategy on patients with globus sensation.

  18. Effects of Lizhong Tang on cultured mouse small intestine interstitial cells of Cajal

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Min Woo; Kim, Jung Nam; Song, Ho Jun; Lim, Bora; Kwon, Young Kyu; Kim, Byung Joo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of Lizhong Tang, an herbal product used in traditional Chinese medicine, on mouse small intestine interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs). METHODS: Enzymatic digestions were used to dissociate ICCs from mouse small intestine tissues. The ICCs were morphologically distinct from other cell types in culture and were identified using phase contrast microscopy after verification with anti c-kit antibody. A whole-cell patch-clamp configuration was used to record potentials (current clamp) from cultured ICCs. All of the experiments were performed at 30-32  °C. RESULTS: ICCs generated pacemaker potentials, and Lizhong Tang produced membrane depolarization in current-clamp mode. The application of flufenamic acid (a nonselective cation channel blocker) abolished the generation of pacemaker potentials by Lizhong Tang. Pretreatment with thapsigargin (a Ca2+-ATPase inhibitor in the endoplasmic reticulum) also abolished the generation of pacemaker potentials by Lizhong Tang. However, pacemaker potentials were completely abolished in the presence of an external Ca2+-free solution, and under this condition, Lizhong Tang induced membrane depolarizations. Furthermore, When GDP-β-S (1 mmol/L) was in the pipette solution, Lizhong Tang still induced membrane depolarizations. In addition, membrane depolarizations were not inhibited by chelerythrine or calphostin C, which are protein kinase C inhibitors, but were inhibited by U-73122, an active phospholipase C inhibitors. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that Lizhong Tang might affect gastrointestinal motility by modulating pacemaker activity in interstitial cells of Cajal. PMID:23599652

  19. Somatostatin and the intestinal transport of glucose and other nutrients in the anaesthetised rat.

    PubMed Central

    Daumerie, C; Henquin, J C

    1982-01-01

    The effects of somatostatin on oral glucose tolerance and on intestinal absorption of glucose and other nutrients have been studied in anaesthetised rats. Intravenous somatostatin (0.1-0.6 nmol/min) increased the rate of gastric emptying. After intraduodenal administration of glucose, the rise in peripheral plasma levels of the sugar was delayed, but finally exaggerated by somatostatin, which inhibited the insulin response. Absorption was evaluated by measuring the disappearance of radioactive nutrients from the lumen of a 'tied duodenojejunal loop'. At a luminal concentration of 4 mmol/l of 3-0-methylglucose, neither disappearance of the sugar from the lumen nor its appearance in plasma was affected by somatostatin. Passive transport of 3-0-methylglucose (100 mmol/l) was not significantly modified by somatostatin, although the appearance of the labelled tracer in plasma was delayed. Somatostatin had no significant effect on absorption of galactose (4 mmol/l), sucrose (40 mmol/l), leucine (4 mmol/l) or palmitate (0.1 and 0.4 mmol/l). These results show that somatostatin delays appearance of ingested sugars in peripheral plasma without direct effect on the absorption sites; this delay may result from changes in intestinal motility, enzyme secretion and splanchnic blood flow. PMID:6121743

  20. Unraveling the ties between irritable bowel syndrome and intestinal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung Noh; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2014-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorder. It is a multifactorial disorder. Intestinal microbiota may cause the pathogenesis of IBS by contributing to abnormal gastrointestinal motility, low-grade inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, communication in the gut-brain axis, and so on. Previous attempts to identify the intestinal microbiota composition in IBS patients have yielded inconsistent and occasionally contradictory results. This inconsistency may be due to the differences in the molecular techniques employed, the sample collection and handling methods, use of single samples that are not linked to fluctuating symptoms, or other factors such as patients’ diets and phenotypic characterizations. Despite these difficulties, previous studies found that the intestinal microbiota in some IBS patients was completely different from that in healthy controls, and there does appear to be a consistent theme of Firmicutes enrichment and reduced abundance of Bacteroides. Based on the differences in intestinal microbiota composition, many studies have addressed the roles of microbiota-targeted treatments, such as antibiotics and probiotics, in alleviating certain symptoms of IBS. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the associations between intestinal microbiota and IBS as well as the possible modes of action of intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis of IBS. Improving the current level of understanding of host-microbiota interactions in IBS is important not only for determining the role of intestinal microbiota in IBS pathogenesis but also for therapeutic modulation of the microbiota. PMID:24627584

  1. Are Primo Vessels (PVs) on the Surface of Gastrointestine Involved in Regulation of Gastric Motility Induced by Stimulating Acupoints ST36 or CV12?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoyu; Shi, Hong; Shang, Hongyan; Su, Yangshuai; Xin, Juanjuan; He, Wei; Jing, Xianghong; Zhu, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies showed primo vessels (PVs), which were referred to as Bonhan ducts (BHDs) and a part of circulatory system by Kim, located in different places of the body. The BHDs system was once considered as the anatomical basis of classical acupuncture meridian but not clearly identified by other investigators. In the present study, we tried to address the relationship between PVs and meridians through detecting the modulation of gastric motility by stimulating the PVs on the surface of stomach or intestine, as well as acupoints Zusanli (ST36) and Zhongwan (CV12). The results showed electric stimulation of the PVs had no effect on the gastric motility. While stimulating CV12 inhibited gastric motility significantly in PVs-intact and PVs-cut rats, there is no significant difference between the inhibition rate of the PVS-intact and the PVS-cut rats. Stimulating at ST36 increased gastric motility significantly in both the PVs-intact and the PVs-cut rats, yet there was no significant difference between the facilitation rate of the both groups. Taken together, the PVs on the surface of stomach or intestine did not mediate the regulation of gastric motility induced by stimulating at the acupoints ST36 or CV12. PMID:23091558

  2. Esophageal motility disorders in HIV patients.

    PubMed

    Zalar, Alberto E; Olmos, Martín A; Piskorz, Eduardo L; Magnanini, Fernando L

    2003-05-01

    Opportunistic esophageal infections (Candida, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus) and idiophatic esophageal ulcerations are commonly found in HIV patients. However, motility disorders of the esophagus have seldom been investigated in this population. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the presence of motility disorders in HIV patients with esophageal symptoms (with or without associated lesions detected by endoscopy) and in HIV patients without esophageal symptoms and normal esophagoscopy. Eigthteen consecutive HIV patients (10 male, 8 female, ages 20-44 years, mean age 33.5; 8 HIV positive and 10 AIDS) were studied prospectively. Nine patients complained of esophageal symptoms, e.g, dysphagia/odynophagia (group 1) and 9 had symptoms not related to esophageal disease, such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, or gastrointestinal bleeding (group 2). All patients underwent upper endoscopy; mucosal biopsies were taken when macroscopic esophageal lesions were identified or when the patients were symptomatic even if the esophageal mucosa was normal. Esophageal manometry was performed in the 18 patients, using a 4-channel water-perfused system according to a standardized technique. Sixteen of the 18 patients (88.8%) had baseline manometric abnormalities. In group 1, 8/9 patients had esophageal motility disorders: nutcrackeresophagus in 1, hypertensive lower esophageal sphincter (LES) with incomplete relaxation in 2, nonspecific esophageal motility disorders (NEMD) in 3, diffuse esophageal spasm in 1, esophageal hypocontraction with low LES pressure in 1. Six of these 9 patients had lesions detected by endoscopy: CMV ulcers in 2, idiopathic ulcers in 1, candidiasis in 1, idiopathic ulcer + candidiasis in 1, nonspecific esophagitis in 1; and 3/9 had normal endoscopy and normal esophageal biopsies. In group 2, 8/9 patients had abnormal motility: hypertensive LES with incomplete relaxation in 1, nutcracker esophagus in 2, esophageal hypocontraction in 3, and NEMD

  3. Modulation of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii flagellar motility by redox poise

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Ken-ichi; King, Stephen M.

    2006-01-01

    Redox-based regulatory systems are essential for many cellular activities. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exhibits alterations in motile behavior in response to different light conditions (photokinesis). We hypothesized that photokinesis is signaled by variations in cytoplasmic redox poise resulting from changes in chloroplast activity. We found that this effect requires photosystem I, which generates reduced NADPH. We also observed that photokinetic changes in beat frequency and duration of the photophobic response could be obtained by altering oxidative/reductive stress. Analysis of reactivated cell models revealed that this redox poise effect is mediated through the outer dynein arms (ODAs). Although the global redox state of the thioredoxin-related ODA light chains LC3 and LC5 and the redox-sensitive Ca2+-binding subunit of the docking complex DC3 did not change upon light/dark transitions, we did observe significant alterations in their interactions with other flagellar components via mixed disulfides. These data indicate that redox poise directly affects ODAs and suggest that it may act in the control of flagellar motility. PMID:16754958

  4. Early Investigational Therapeutics for Gastrointestinal Motility Disorders: From Animal Studies to Phase II Trials

    PubMed Central

    Valentin, Nelson; Acosta, Andres; Camilleri, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The most common gastrointestinal disorders which include evidence of dysmotility include: gastroparesis, the lower functional gastrointestinal disorders associated with altered bowel function [such as chronic (functional) diarrhea, chronic idiopathic constipation (CIC)], and opioid induced constipation (OIC). These conditions, which are grouped as gastrointestinal motility and functional disorders, are characterized by abnormal motor, sensory, or secretory functions that alter bowel function and result in a significant disease burden, since currently available treatments do not completely alleviate symptoms. New drugs are being developed for these disorders, targeting mechanisms involved in the pathophysiology of these diseases, specifically, motor function, intestinal secretion and bile acid modulation. Areas Covered The article provides a brief overview of motility disorders and the drugs approved and currently available for these indications. It also provides an evaluation of the efficacy, safety and possible mechanisms of the drugs currently under investigation for the treatment of gastroparesis, chronic diarrhea, CIC and OIC, based on animal to phase II studies. Medications with complete phase III trials are excluded from this discussion. Expert opinion Treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders requires the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms, biomarkers to identify subgroups of these disorders, and robust pharmacological studies from animal to phase II studies. These are prerequisites for the development of efficacious medications and individualizing therapy in order to enhance the treatment of these patients. PMID:25971881

  5. Targeting extra-oral bitter taste receptors modulates gastrointestinal motility with effects on satiation

    PubMed Central

    Avau, Bert; Rotondo, Alessandra; Thijs, Theo; Andrews, Christopher N.; Janssen, Pieter; Tack, Jan; Depoortere, Inge

    2015-01-01

    Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) are present in extra-oral tissues, including gut endocrine cells. This study explored the presence and mechanism of action of TAS2R agonists on gut smooth muscle in vitro and investigated functional effects of intra-gastric administration of TAS2R agonists on gastric motility and satiation. TAS2Rs and taste signalling elements were expressed in smooth muscle tissue along the mouse gut and in human gastric smooth muscle cells (hGSMC). Bitter tastants induced concentration and region-dependent contractility changes in mouse intestinal muscle strips. Contractions induced by denatonium benzoate (DB) in gastric fundus were mediated via increases in intracellular Ca2+ release and extracellular Ca2+-influx, partially masked by a hyperpolarizing K+-efflux. Intra-gastric administration of DB in mice induced a TAS2R-dependent delay in gastric emptying. In hGSMC, bitter compounds evoked Ca2+-rises and increased ERK-phosphorylation. Healthy volunteers showed an impaired fundic relaxation in response to nutrient infusion and a decreased nutrient volume tolerance and increased satiation during an oral nutrient challenge test after intra-gastric DB administration. These findings suggest a potential role for intestinal TAS2Rs as therapeutic targets to alter gastrointestinal motility and hence to interfere with hunger signalling. PMID:26541810

  6. Hydrodynamic Contributions to Amoeboid Cell Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Owen; Guy, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the methods by which cells move is a fundamental problem in modern biology. Recent evidence has shown that the fluid dynamics of cytoplasm can play a vital role in cellular motility. The slime mold Physarum polycephalum provides an excellent model organism for the study of amoeboid motion. In this research, we use a simply analytic model in conjuction with computational experiments to investigate intracellular fluid flow in a simple model of Physarum. Of particlar interest are stresses generated by cytoplasmic flow which may be used to aid in cellular motility. In our numerical model, the Immersed Boundary Method is used to account for such stresses. We investigate the relationship between contraction waves, flow waves, adhesion, and locomotive forces in an attempt to characterize conditions necessary to generate directed motion.

  7. Hydrodynamic Contributions to Amoeboid Cell Motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Owen; Guy, Robert

    2011-11-01

    Understanding the methods by which cells move is a fundamental problem in modern biology. Recent evidence has shown that the fluid dynamics of cytoplasm can play a vital role in cellular motility. The slime mold Physarum polycephalum provides an excellent model organism for the study of amoeboid motion. In this research, we use both analytic and computational models to investigate intracellular fluid flow in a simple model of Physarum. In both models, of we are specifically interested in stresses generated by cytoplasmic flow which act in the direction of cellular motility. In our numerical model, the Immersed Boundary Method is used to account for such stresses. We investigate the relationship between contraction waves, low waves and locomotive forces, and attempt characterize conditions necessary to generate directed motion.

  8. Uterine motility in patients with bicornuate uterus.

    PubMed

    Oliva, G C; Fratoni, A; Genova, M; Romanini, C

    1992-01-01

    This study analyzes uterine motility in 12 women with a bicornuate uterus using the results of the recordings of endo-uterine pressure, obtained with two balloon-closed catheters. Seven patients had symmetric uterine cavities, while the rest (5 patient) had very dissimilar ones. The registration of the uterine motility was carried out during various phases of the cycle and after the administration of two drugs (oxitocin and methylergobasine), with the following results: the bicornuate uterus has a spontaneous activity similar to that of a normal uterus. A similar contractile response was observed in the uteri with two anatomically symmetric horns, whereas a dissimilar response was typical of the uteri with marked anatomic differences between the two horns.

  9. Symbiosis and the origin of eukaryotic motility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.; Hinkle, G.

    1991-01-01

    Ongoing work to test the hypothesis of the origin of eukaryotic cell organelles by microbial symbioses is discussed. Because of the widespread acceptance of the serial endosymbiotic theory (SET) of the origin of plastids and mitochondria, the idea of the symbiotic origin of the centrioles and axonemes for spirochete bacteria motility symbiosis was tested. Intracellular microtubular systems are purported to derive from symbiotic associations between ancestral eukaryotic cells and motile bacteria. Four lines of approach to this problem are being pursued: (1) cloning the gene of a tubulin-like protein discovered in Spirocheata bajacaliforniesis; (2) seeking axoneme proteins in spirochets by antibody cross-reaction; (3) attempting to cultivate larger, free-living spirochetes; and (4) studying in detail spirochetes (e.g., Cristispira) symbiotic with marine animals. Other aspects of the investigation are presented.

  10. Soft micromachines with programmable motility and morphology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hen-Wei; Sakar, Mahmut Selman; Petruska, Andrew J; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J

    2016-07-22

    Nature provides a wide range of inspiration for building mobile micromachines that can navigate through confined heterogenous environments and perform minimally invasive environmental and biomedical operations. For example, microstructures fabricated in the form of bacterial or eukaryotic flagella can act as artificial microswimmers. Due to limitations in their design and material properties, these simple micromachines lack multifunctionality, effective addressability and manoeuvrability in complex environments. Here we develop an origami-inspired rapid prototyping process for building self-folding, magnetically powered micromachines with complex body plans, reconfigurable shape and controllable motility. Selective reprogramming of the mechanical design and magnetic anisotropy of body parts dynamically modulates the swimming characteristics of the micromachines. We find that tail and body morphologies together determine swimming efficiency and, unlike for rigid swimmers, the choice of magnetic field can subtly change the motility of soft microswimmers.

  11. Soft micromachines with programmable motility and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hen-Wei; Sakar, Mahmut Selman; Petruska, Andrew J.; Pané, Salvador; Nelson, Bradley J.

    2016-07-01

    Nature provides a wide range of inspiration for building mobile micromachines that can navigate through confined heterogenous environments and perform minimally invasive environmental and biomedical operations. For example, microstructures fabricated in the form of bacterial or eukaryotic flagella can act as artificial microswimmers. Due to limitations in their design and material properties, these simple micromachines lack multifunctionality, effective addressability and manoeuvrability in complex environments. Here we develop an origami-inspired rapid prototyping process for building self-folding, magnetically powered micromachines with complex body plans, reconfigurable shape and controllable motility. Selective reprogramming of the mechanical design and magnetic anisotropy of body parts dynamically modulates the swimming characteristics of the micromachines. We find that tail and body morphologies together determine swimming efficiency and, unlike for rigid swimmers, the choice of magnetic field can subtly change the motility of soft microswimmers.

  12. Endocytic reawakening of motility in jammed epithelia.

    PubMed

    Malinverno, Chiara; Corallino, Salvatore; Giavazzi, Fabio; Bergert, Martin; Li, Qingsen; Leoni, Marco; Disanza, Andrea; Frittoli, Emanuela; Oldani, Amanda; Martini, Emanuele; Lendenmann, Tobias; Deflorian, Gianluca; Beznoussenko, Galina V; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ong, Kok Haur; Uroz, Marina; Trepat, Xavier; Parazzoli, Dario; Maiuri, Paolo; Yu, Weimiao; Ferrari, Aldo; Cerbino, Roberto; Scita, Giorgio

    2017-01-30

    Dynamics of epithelial monolayers has recently been interpreted in terms of a jamming or rigidity transition. How cells control such phase transitions is, however, unknown. Here we show that RAB5A, a key endocytic protein, is sufficient to induce large-scale, coordinated motility over tens of cells, and ballistic motion in otherwise kinetically arrested monolayers. This is linked to increased traction forces and to the extension of cell protrusions, which align with local velocity. Molecularly, impairing endocytosis, macropinocytosis or increasing fluid efflux abrogates RAB5A-induced collective motility. A simple model based on mechanical junctional tension and an active cell reorientation mechanism for the velocity of self-propelled cells identifies regimes of monolayer dynamics that explain endocytic reawakening of locomotion in terms of a combination of large-scale directed migration and local unjamming. These changes in multicellular dynamics enable collectives to migrate under physical constraints and may be exploited by tumours for interstitial dissemination.

  13. Small Intestine Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your small intestine is the longest part of your digestive system - about twenty feet long! It connects your stomach to ... many times to fit inside your abdomen. Your small intestine does most of the digesting of the foods ...

  14. Small intestine (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The small intestine is the portion of the digestive system most responsible for absorption of nutrients from food into the ... the duodenum. This short first portion of the small intestine is followed by the jejunum and the ileum. ...

  15. Interaction of the Histone-Like Nucleoid Structuring Protein and the General Stress Response Regulator RpoS at Vibrio cholerae Promoters That Regulate Motility and Hemagglutinin/Protease Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongxia; Ayala, Julio C.; Benitez, Jorge A.

    2012-01-01

    The bacterium Vibrio cholerae colonizes the human small intestine and secretes cholera toxin (CT) to cause the rice-watery diarrhea characteristic of this illness. The ability of this pathogen to colonize the small bowel, express CT, and return to the aquatic environment is controlled by a complex network of regulatory proteins. Two global regulators that participate in this process are the histone-like nucleoid structuring protein (H-NS) and the general stress response regulator RpoS. In this study, we address the role of RpoS and H-NS in the coordinate regulation of motility and hemagglutinin (HA)/protease expression. In addition to initiating transcription of hapA encoding HA/protease, RpoS enhanced flrA and rpoN transcription to increase motility. In contrast, H-NS was found to bind to the flrA, rpoN, and hapA promoters and represses their expression. The strength of H-NS repression at the above-mentioned promoters was weaker for hapA, which exhibited the strongest RpoS dependency, suggesting that transcription initiation by RNA polymerase containing σS could be more resistant to H-NS repression. Occupancy of the flrA and hapA promoters by H-NS was demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). We show that the expression of RpoS in the stationary phase significantly diminished H-NS promoter occupancy. Furthermore, RpoS enhanced the transcription of integration host factor (IHF), which positively affected the expression of flrA and rpoN by diminishing the occupancy of H-NS at these promoters. Altogether, we propose a model for RpoS regulation of motility gene expression that involves (i) attenuation of H-NS repression by IHF and (ii) RpoS-dependent transcription initiation resistant to H-NS. PMID:22194453

  16. Cell motility: Combining experiments with modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2013-03-01

    Cell migration and motility is a pervasive process in many biology systems. It involves intra-cellular signal transduction pathways that eventually lead to membrane extension and contraction. Here we describe our efforts to combine quantitative experiments with theoretical and computational modeling to gain fundamental insights into eukaryotic cell motion. In particular, we will focus on the amoeboid motion of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. This work is supported by the National Institutes of Health (P01 GM078586)

  17. Motility-indole-lysine-sulfide medium.

    PubMed

    Ederer, G M; Lund, M E; Blazevic, D J; Reller, L B; Mirrett, S

    1975-09-01

    A medium designed for the detection of motility, indole, lysine decarboxylase and deaminase reactions, and H2S production was devised and evaluated. Results, using 157 strains of enteric pathogens, were in agreement with reference methods. When 300 isolates from fecal cultures were screened using this medium, Shigella was easily differentiated from Escherichia and more of the Proteus species, especially P. morganii, could be eliminated from further study.

  18. Hyaluronan stimulates pancreatic cancer cell motility

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao-Bo; Kohi, Shiro; Koga, Atsuhiro; Hirata, Keiji; Sato, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) accumulates in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but functional significance of HA in the aggressive phenotype remains unknown. We used different models to investigate the effect of HA on PDAC cell motility by wound healing and transwell migration assay. Changes in cell motility were examined in 8 PDAC cell lines in response to inhibition of HA production by treatment with 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) and to promotion by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or by co-culture with tumor-derived stromal fibroblasts. We also investigated changes in cell motility by adding exogenous HA. Additionally, mRNA expressions of hyaluronan synthases and hyaluronidases were examined using real time RT-PCR. Inhibition of HA by 4-MU significantly decreased the migration, whereas promotion of HA by TPA or co-culture with tumor-derived fibroblasts significantly increased the migration of PDAC cells. The changes in HA production by these treatments tended to be associated with changes in HAS3 mRNA expression. Furthermore, addition of exogenous HA, especially low-molecular-weight HA, significantly increased the migration of PDAC cells. These findings suggest that HA stimulates PDAC cell migration and thus represents an ideal therapeutic target to prevent invasion and metastasis. PMID:26684359

  19. Effect of total laryngectomy on esophageal motility

    SciTech Connect

    Hanks, J.B.; Fisher, S.R.; Meyers, W.C.; Christian, K.C.; Postlethwait, R.W.; Jones, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    Total laryngectomy for cancer can result in dysphagia and altered esophageal motility. Manometric changes in the upper esophageal sphincter (UES), and in proximal and distal esophageal function have been reported. However, most studies have failed to take into account radiation therapy and appropriate controls. We selected ten male patients (54.3 +/- 1.9 yr) for longitudinal manometric evaluation prior to laryngectomy then at two weeks and again six months later. No patient received preoperative radiation therapy, had a previous history of esophageal surgery, or developed a postoperative wound infection or fistula. Seven of ten patients had positive nodes and received 6,000-6,600 rads postoperative radiation therapy. Preoperatively 4 of 10 patients complained of dysphagia which did not significantly change following surgery and radiation. Two of three patients who did not complain of dysphagia preoperatively and received radiation postoperatively developed dysphagia. No patient without dysphagia preoperatively who received no radiation therapy developed symptoms. Our studies show that laryngectomy causes alterations in the UES resting and peak pressures but not in the proximal or distal esophagus, or the lower esophageal sphincter. These data also imply radiation therapy may be associated with progressive alterations in motility and symptomatology. Further study regarding the effects of radiation on esophageal motility and function are urged.

  20. Characterization of swarming motility in Citrobacter freundii.

    PubMed

    Cong, Yanguang; Wang, Jing; Chen, Zhijin; Xiong, Kun; Xu, Qiwang; Hu, Fuquan

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial swarming motility is a flagella-dependent translocation on the surface environment. It has received extensive attention as a population behavior involving numerous genes. Here, we report that Citrobacter freundii, an opportunistic pathogen, exhibits swarming movement on a solid medium surface with appropriate agar concentration. The swarming behavior of C. freundii was described in detail. Insertional mutagenesis with transposon Mini-Tn5 was carried out to discover genetic determinants related to the swarming of C. freundii. A number of swarming genes were identified, among which flhD, motA, motB, wzx, rfaL, rfaJ, rfbX, rfaG, rcsD, rcsC, gshB, fabF, dam, pgi, and rssB have been characterized previously in other species. In mutants related to lipopolysaccharide synthesis and RcsCDB signal system, a propensity to form poorly motile bacterial aggregates on the agar surface was observed. The aggregates hampered bacterial surface migration. In several mutants, the insertion sites were identified to be in the ORF of yqhC, yeeZ, CKO_03941, glgC, and ttrA, which have never been shown to be involved in swarming. Our results revealed several novel characteristics of swarming motility in C. freundii which are worthy of further study.

  1. Swimming Motility Reduces Deposition to Silica Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Nanxi; Massoudieh, Arash; Liang, Xiaomeng; Hu, Dehong; Kamai, Tamir; Ginn, Timothy R.; Zilles, Julie L.; Nguyen, Thanh H.

    2015-01-01

    The role of swimming motility on bacterial transport and fate in porous media was evaluated. We present microscopic evidence showing that strong swimming motility reduces attachment of Azotobacter vinelandii cells to silica surfaces. Applying global and cluster statistical analyses to microscopic videos taken under non-flow conditions, wild type, flagellated A. vinelandii strain DJ showed strong swimming ability with an average speed of 13.1 μm/s, DJ77 showed impaired swimming averaged at 8.7 μm/s, and both the non-flagellated JZ52 and chemically treated DJ cells were non-motile. Quantitative analyses of trajectories observed at different distances above the collector of a radial stagnation point flow cell (RSPF) revealed that both swimming and non-swimming cells moved with the flow when at a distance of at least 20 μm from the collector surface. Near the surface, DJ cells showed both horizontal and vertical movement diverging them from reaching surfaces, while chemically treated DJ cells moved with the flow to reach surfaces, suggesting that strong swimming reduced attachment. In agreement with the RSPF results, the deposition rates obtained for two-dimensional multiple-collector micromodels were also lowest for DJ, while DJ77 and JZ52 showed similar values. Strong swimming specifically reduced deposition on the upstream surfaces of the micromodel collectors.

  2. [Urodynamics of upper urinary tracts after intestinal plastic surgery on urinary bladder (experimental study)].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Mudraia, I S; David'iants, A A; Zaĭtsev, A V

    1999-01-01

    In dog experiments, the urinary bladder was replaced for an isolated intestinal segment to test upper urinary tract function as regards configuration of the established urine reservoir early and late after the surgery. Intestinal plastic surgery of the bladder changes parameters of ureteral function in unchanged potential reserve of ureteral contraction. Postileocystoplasty urodynamics of the upper urinary tracts is characterized by lowering of intraureteral pressure, decreased amplitude of ureteral contractions, enhanced tonicity and motility. Plastic replacement of the bladder with isolated intestinal segment is not contraindicated in the solitary kidney.

  3. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2013-09-01

    Motor proteins are enzymatic molecules that transform chemical energy into mechanical motion and work. They are critically important for supporting various cellular activities and functions. In the last 15 years significant progress in understanding the functioning of motor proteins has been achieved due to revolutionary breakthroughs in single-molecule experimental techniques and strong advances in theoretical modelling. However, microscopic mechanisms of protein motility are still not well explained, and the collective efforts of many scientists are needed in order to solve these complex problems. In this special section the reader will find the latest advances on the difficult road to mapping motor proteins dynamics in various systems. Recent experimental developments have allowed researchers to monitor and to influence the activity of single motor proteins with a high spatial and temporal resolution. It has stimulated significant theoretical efforts to understand the non-equilibrium nature of protein motility phenomena. The latest results from all these advances are presented and discussed in this special section. We would like to thank the scientists from all over the world who have reported their latest research results for this special section. We are also grateful to the staff and editors of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for their invaluable help in handling all the administrative and refereeing activities. The field of motor proteins and protein motility is fast moving, and we hope that this collection of articles will be a useful source of information in this highly interdisciplinary area. Physics of protein motility and motor proteins contents Physics of protein motility and motor proteinsAnatoly B Kolomeisky Identification of unique interactions between the flexible linker and the RecA-like domains of DEAD-box helicase Mss116 Yuan Zhang, Mirkó Palla, Andrew Sun and Jung-Chi Liao The load dependence of the physical properties of a molecular motor

  4. Intestinal motor activity, endoluminal motion and transit.

    PubMed

    de Iorio, F; Malagelada, C; Azpiroz, F; Maluenda, M; Violanti, C; Igual, L; Vitrià, J; Malagelada, J-R

    2009-12-01

    A programme for evaluation of intestinal motility has been recently developed based on endoluminal image analysis using computer vision methodology and machine learning techniques. Our aim was to determine the effect of intestinal muscle inhibition on wall motion, dynamics of luminal content and transit in the small bowel. Fourteen healthy subjects ingested the endoscopic capsule (Pillcam, Given Imaging) in fasting conditions. Seven of them received glucagon (4.8 microg kg(-1) bolus followed by a 9.6 microg kg(-1) h(-1) infusion during 1 h) and in the other seven, fasting activity was recorded, as controls. This dose of glucagon has previously shown to inhibit both tonic and phasic intestinal motor activity. Endoluminal image and displacement was analyzed by means of a computer vision programme specifically developed for the evaluation of muscular activity (contractile and non-contractile patterns), intestinal contents, endoluminal motion and transit. Thirty-minute periods before, during and after glucagon infusion were analyzed and compared with equivalent periods in controls. No differences were found in the parameters measured during the baseline (pretest) periods when comparing glucagon and control experiments. During glucagon infusion, there was a significant reduction in contractile activity (0.2 +/- 0.1 vs 4.2 +/- 0.9 luminal closures per min, P < 0.05; 0.4 +/- 0.1 vs 3.4 +/- 1.2% of images with radial wrinkles, P < 0.05) and a significant reduction of endoluminal motion (82 +/- 9 vs 21 +/- 10% of static images, P < 0.05). Endoluminal image analysis, by means of computer vision and machine learning techniques, can reliably detect reduced intestinal muscle activity and motion.

  5. Diagnosis and management of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth.

    PubMed

    Bohm, Matthew; Siwiec, Robert M; Wo, John M

    2013-06-01

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) can result from failure of the gastric acid barrier, failure of small intestinal motility, anatomic alterations, or impairment of systemic and local immunity. The current accepted criteria for the diagnosis of SIBO is the presence of coliform bacteria isolated from the proximal jejunum with >10(5) colony-forming units/mL. A major concern with luminal aspiration is that it is only one random sampling of the small intestine and may not always be representative of the underlying microbiota. A new approach to examine the underlying microbiota uses rapid molecular sequencing, but its clinical utilization is still under active investigation. Clinical manifestations of SIBO are variable and include bloating, flatulence, abdominal distention, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Severe cases may present with nutrition deficiencies due to malabsorption of micro- and macronutrients. The current management strategies for SIBO center on identifying and correcting underlying causes, addressing nutrition deficiencies, and judicious utilization of antibiotics to treat symptomatic SIBO.

  6. Membrane tension feedback on shape and motility of eukaryotic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Benjamin; Aranson, Igor S.; Ziebert, Falko

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of a phase field model of a single cell crawling on a substrate, we investigate how the properties of the cell membrane affect the shape and motility of the cell. Since the membrane influences the cell dynamics on multiple levels and provides a nontrivial feedback, we consider the following fundamental interactions: (i) the reduction of the actin polymerization rate by membrane tension; (ii) area conservation of the cell's two-dimensional cross-section vs. conservation of the circumference (i.e. membrane inextensibility); and (iii) the contribution from the membrane's bending energy to the shape and integrity of the cell. As in experiments, we investigate two pertinent observables - the cell's velocity and its aspect ratio. We find that the most important effect is the feedback of membrane tension on the actin polymerization. Bending rigidity has only minor effects, visible mostly in dynamic reshaping events, as exemplified by collisions of the cell with an obstacle.

  7. Circadian regulators of intestinal lipid absorption

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, M. Mahmood; Pan, Xiaoyue

    2015-01-01

    Among all the metabolites present in the plasma, lipids, mainly triacylglycerol and diacylglycerol, show extensive circadian rhythms. These lipids are transported in the plasma as part of lipoproteins. Lipoproteins are synthesized primarily in the liver and intestine and their production exhibits circadian rhythmicity. Studies have shown that various proteins involved in lipid absorption and lipoprotein biosynthesis show circadian expression. Further, intestinal epithelial cells express circadian clock genes and these genes might control circadian expression of different proteins involved in intestinal lipid absorption. Intestinal circadian clock genes are synchronized by signals emanating from the suprachiasmatic nuclei that constitute a master clock and from signals coming from other environmental factors, such as food availability. Disruptions in central clock, as happens due to disruptions in the sleep/wake cycle, affect intestinal function. Similarly, irregularities in temporal food intake affect intestinal function. These changes predispose individuals to various metabolic disorders, such as metabolic syndrome, obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. Here, we summarize how circadian rhythms regulate microsomal triglyceride transfer protein, apoAIV, and nocturnin to affect diurnal regulation of lipid absorption. PMID:25057097

  8. Polarized cell motility induces hydrogen peroxide to inhibit cofilin via cysteine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Jenifer M; Gabrielsen, Mads; Chim, Ya Hua; Munro, June; McGhee, Ewan J; Sumpton, David; Eaton, Philip; Anderson, Kurt I; Yin, Huabing; Olson, Michael F

    2015-06-01

    Mesenchymal cell motility is driven by polarized actin polymerization [1]. Signals at the leading edge recruit actin polymerization machinery to promote membrane protrusion, while matrix adhesion generates tractive force to propel forward movement. To work effectively, cell motility is regulated by a complex network of signaling events that affect protein activity and localization. H2O2 has an important role as a diffusible second messenger [2], and mediates its effects through oxidation of cysteine thiols. One cell activity influenced by H2O2 is motility [3]. However, a lack of sensitive and H2O2-specific probes for measurements in live cells has not allowed for direct observation of H2O2 accumulation in migrating cells or protrusions. In addition, the identities of proteins oxidized by H2O2 that contribute to actin dynamics and cell motility have not been characterized. We now show, as determined by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, that motile cells generate H2O2 at membranes and cell protrusions and that H2O2 inhibits cofilin activity through oxidation of cysteines 139 (C139) and 147 (C147). Molecular modeling suggests that C139 oxidation would sterically hinder actin association, while the increased negative charge of oxidized C147 would lead to electrostatic repulsion of the opposite negatively charged surface. Expression of oxidation-resistant cofilin impairs cell spreading, adhesion, and directional migration. These findings indicate that H2O2 production contributes to polarized cell motility through localized cofilin inhibition and that there are additional proteins oxidized during cell migration that might have similar roles.

  9. Effect of Daily Supine LBNP Exercise on Gastrointestinal Motility During Antiorthostatic Bedrest in Normal Subjects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putcha, Lakshmi; DeKerlegand, D.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Space flight alters gastrointestinal (GI) function in general, and GI motility, in particular. This can decrease appetite, affect the body's ability to absorb nutrients, fluids and electrolytes, and contribute to a negative energy balance. Antiorthostatic bed rest (ABR) has been used to simulate microgravity-induced physiological changes in human subjects. The objective of this investigation is to determine if daily supine lower body negative pressure (LBNP) exercise will maintain GI motility at near normal levels during ABR. Eight subjects participated in the study protocol consisting of an ambulatory phase scheduled before bedrest periods and two 14 day bed rest (6 deg head-down tilt) periods, once with and another time without exercise. Supine treadmill running in an LBNP chamber was used for exercise. Mouth-to-cecum transit time (MCTT) of lactulose was measured indirectly using the rise in breath hydrogen level after oral administration of lactulose (20 g) following a standard low-fiber breakfast. GI motility during ambulatory and ABR periods was assessed using MCTT data. Results of this Study indicate that GI motility during ABR without exercise decreased by 45% [MCTT +/- S.E.M. 56.2 +/- 6.0 (Ambulatory); 87.3 +/- 8.3 (ABR)]. Supine LBNP exercise did not significantly alter this reduction in GI motility during ABR [MCTT +/- S.E.M. 81.3 +/- 4.2 (Exercise); 87.3 +/- 8.3 (No Exercise)]. These results suggest that supine LBNP exercise may not be an effective countermeasure for microgravity-induced decrements in GI motility and function.

  10. The Che4 pathway of Myxococcus xanthus regulates type IV pilus-mediated motility.

    PubMed

    Vlamakis, Hera C; Kirby, John R; Zusman, David R

    2004-06-01

    Myxococcus xanthus co-ordinates cell movement during its complex life cycle using multiple chemotaxis-like signal transduction pathways. These pathways regulate both type IV pilus-mediated social (S) motility and adventurous (A) motility. During a search for new chemoreceptors, we identified the che4 operon, which encodes homologues to a MCP (methyl-accepting chemotaxis protein), two CheWs, a hybrid CheA-CheY, a response regulator and a CheR. Deletion of the che4 operon did not cause swarming or developmental defects in either the wild-type (A(+)S(+)) strain or in a strain sustaining only A motility (A(+)S(-)). However, in a strain displaying only S motility (A(-)S(+)), deletion of the che4 operon or the gene encoding the response regulator, cheY4, caused enhanced vegetative swarming and prevented aggregation and sporulation. In contrast, deletion of mcp4 caused reduced vegetative swarming and enhanced development compared with the parent strain. Single-cell analysis of the motility of the A(-)S(+) parent strain revealed a previously unknown inverse correlation between velocity and reversal frequency. Thus, cells that moved at higher velocities showed a reduced reversal frequency. This co-ordination of reversal frequency and velocity was lost in the mcp4 and cheY4 mutants. The structural components of the S motility apparatus were unaffected in the che4 mutants, suggesting that the Che4 system affects reversal frequency of cells by modulating the function of the type IV pilus.

  11. The Wireless Motility Capsule: a One-Stop Shop for the Evaluation of GI Motility Disorders.

    PubMed

    Saad, Richard J

    2016-03-01

    The wireless motility and pH capsule (WMC) provides an office-based test to simultaneously assess both regional and whole gut transit. Ingestion of this non-digestible capsule capable of measuring temperature, pH, and the pressure of its immediate surroundings allows for the measurement of gastric, small bowel, and colonic transit times in an ambulatory setting. Approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the evaluation of suspected conditions of delayed gastric emptying and the evaluation of colonic transit in chronic idiopathic constipation, WMC should be considered in suspected gastrointestinal motility disorders as it provides a single study capable of simultaneously assessing for regional, multiregional, or generalized motility disorders. Specific indications for testing with the WMC should include the evaluation of suspect cases of gastroparesis, small bowel dysmotility, and slow transit constipation, as well as symptom syndromes suggestive of a multiregional or generalized gastrointestinal transit delay.

  12. Establishment of Intestinal Bacteriology

    PubMed Central

    MITSUOKA, Tomotari

    2014-01-01

    Research on intestinal bacteria began around the end of the 19th century. During the last 5 decades of the 20th century, research on the intestinal microbiota made rapid progress. At first, in my work, I first developed a method of comprehensive analysis of the intestinal microbiota, and then I established classification and identification methods for intestinal anaerobes. Using these methods I discovered a number of ecological rules governing the intestinal microbiota and the role of the intestinl microbiota in health and disease. Moreover, using germfree animals, it was proven that the intestinal microbiota has a role in carcinogenesis and aging in the host. Thus, a new interdisciplinary field, “intestinal bacteriology” was established. PMID:25032084

  13. First identification of proteins involved in motility of Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

    PubMed

    Indikova, Ivana; Vronka, Martin; Szostak, Michael P

    2014-10-17

    Mycoplasma gallisepticum, the most pathogenic mycoplasma in poultry, is able to glide over solid surfaces. Although this gliding motility was first observed in 1968, no specific protein has yet been shown to be involved in gliding. We examined M. gallisepticum strains and clonal variants for motility and found that the cytadherence proteins GapA and CrmA were required for gliding. Loss of GapA or CrmA resulted in the loss of motility and hemadsorption and led to drastic changes in the characteristic flask-shape of the cells. To identify further genes involved in motility, a transposon mutant library of M. gallisepticum was generated and screened for motility-deficient mutants, using a screening assay based on colony morphology. Motility-deficient mutants had transposon insertions in gapA and the neighbouring downstream gene crmA. In addition, insertions were seen in gene mgc2, immediately upstream of gapA, in two motility-deficient mutants. In contrast to the GapA/CrmA mutants, the mgc2 motility mutants still possessed the ability to hemadsorb. Complementation of these mutants with a mgc2-hexahistidine fusion gene restored the motile phenotype. This is the first report assigning specific M. gallisepticum proteins to involvement in gliding motility.

  14. Radiation-induced recurrent intestinal pseudo-obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, J.L.; Anuras, S.

    1981-06-01

    The syndrome of intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a complex of signs and symptoms of intestinal obstruction without evidence of mechanical obstruction of the intestinal lumen. A patient with radiation-induced intestinal pseudoobstruction is described. The patient is a 74-year old woman with a history of chronic diarrhea, recurrent episodes of crampy abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting since receiving a 13,000 rad radiation dose to the pelvis in 1954. She has been hospitalized on many occasions for symptoms and signs of bowel obstruction. Upper gastrointestinal contrast roentgenograms with small bowel follow-through done during these episodes revealed multiple dilated loops of small bowel with no obstructing lesion. Barium enemas revealed no obstructing lesion. Each episode resolved with conservative therapy. Other secondary causes for intestinal pseudo-obstruction were ruled out in our patient. She gave no history of familial gastrointestinal disorders. Although postirradiation motility abnormalities have been demonstrated experimentally this is the first report of radiation induced intestinal pseudo-obstruction.

  15. Normal and abnormal electrical propagation in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Lammers, W J E P

    2015-02-01

    As in other muscular organs, small intestinal motility is determined to a large degree by the electrical activities that occur in the smooth muscle layers of the small intestine. In recent decades, the interstitial cells of Cajal, located in the myenteric plexus, have been shown to be responsible for the generation and propagation of the electrical impulse: the slow wave. It was also known that the slow waves as such do not cause contraction, but that the action potentials ('spikes') that are generated by the slow waves are responsible for the contractions. Recording from large number of extracellular electrodes simultaneously is one method to determine origin and pattern of propagation of these electrical signals. This review reports the characteristics of slow wave propagation through the intestinal tube, the occurrence of propagation blocks along its length, which explains the well-known decrease in frequency, and the specific propagation pattern of the spikes that follow the slow waves. But the value of high-resolution mapping is highest in discovering and analysing mechanisms of arrhythmias in the gut. Most recently, circus movements (also called 're-entries') have been described in the small intestine in several species. Moreover, several types of re-entries have now been described, some similar to what may occur in the heart, such as functional re-entries, but others more unique to the small intestine, such as circumferential re-entry. These findings seem to suggest the possibilities of hitherto unknown pathologies that may be present in the small intestine.

  16. GLP-1 and GLP-2 act in concert to inhibit fasted, but not fed, small bowel motility in the rat.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Ayhan; Näslund, Erik; Holst, Jens Juul; Hellström, Per M

    2002-07-15

    Small bowel motility was studied in rats at increasing (1-20 pmol/kg/min) intravenous doses of either glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) or glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2) alone, or in combination in the fasted and fed state. There was a dose-dependent inhibitory action of GLP-1 on the migrating myoelectric complex (MMC), where the dose of 5 pmol/kg/min induced an increased MMC cycle length. No effect was seen with GLP-2 alone, but the combination of GLP-1 and GLP-2 induced a more pronounced inhibitory effect, with significant increase of the MMC cycle length from a dose of 2 pmol/kg/min. During fed motility, infusion of GLP-1 resulted in an inhibition of spiking activity compared to control. In contrast, infusion of GLP-2 only numerically increased spiking activity compared to control, while the combination of GLP-1 and GLP-2 resulted in no change compared to control. In summary, this study demonstrates an additive effect of peripheral administration of GLP-1 and GLP-2 on fasted small bowel motility. In the fed state, GLP-1 and GLP-2 seem to display counter-balancing effects on motility of the small intestine.

  17. Constitutively Active 5-HT Receptors: An Explanation of How 5-HT Antagonists Inhibit Gut Motility in Species Where 5-HT is Not an Enteric Neurotransmitter?

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Nick J.

    2015-01-01

    Antagonists of 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors are well known to inhibit gastrointestinal (GI)-motility and transit in a variety of mammals, including humans. Originally, these observations had been interpreted by many investigators (including us) as evidence that endogenous 5-HT plays a major role in GI motility. This seemed a logical assumption. However, the story changed dramatically after recent studies revealed that 5-HT antagonists still blocked major GI motility patterns (peristalsis and colonic migrating motor complexes) in segments of intestine depleted of all 5-HT. Then, these results were further supported by Dr. Gershons' laboratory, which showed that genetic deletion of all genes that synthesizes 5-HT had minor, or no inhibitory effects on GI transit in vivo. If 5-HT was essential for GI motility patterns and transit, then one would expect major disruptions in motility and transit when 5-HT synthesis was genetically ablated. This does not occur. The inhibitory effects of 5-HT antagonists on GI motility clearly occur independently of any 5-HT in the gut. Evidence now suggests that 5-HT antagonists act on 5-HT receptors in the gut which are constitutively active, and don't require 5-HT for their activation. This would explain a long-standing mystery of how 5-HT antagonists inhibit gut motility in species like mice, rats, and humans where 5-HT is not an enteric neurotransmitter. Studies are now increasingly demonstrating that the presence of a neurochemical in enteric neurons does not mean they function as neurotransmitters. Caution should be exercised when interpreting any inhibitory effects of 5-HT antagonists on GI motility. PMID:26732863

  18. The sonic hedgehog signaling pathway stimulates anaplastic thyroid cancer cell motility and invasiveness by activating Akt and c-Met.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Ashley J; Doscas, Michelle E; Ye, Jin; Heiden, Katherine B; Xing, Mingzhao; Li, Yi; Prinz, Richard A; Xu, Xiulong

    2016-03-01

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) pathway is highly activated in thyroid neoplasms and promotes thyroid cancer stem-like cell phenotype, but whether the Shh pathway regulates thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness remains unknown. Here, we report that the motility and invasiveness of two anaplastic thyroid tumor cell lines, KAT-18 and SW1736, were inhibited by two inhibitors of the Shh pathway (cyclopamine and GANT61). Consistently, the cell motility and invasiveness was decreased by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, and was increased by Gli1 overexpression in KAT-18 cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that Akt and c-Met phosphorylation was decreased by a Gli1 inhibitor and by Shh and Gli1 knockdown, but was increased by Gli1 overexpression. LY294002, a PI-3 kinase inhibitor, and a c-Met inhibitor inhibited the motility and invasiveness of Gli1-transfected KAT-18 cells more effectively than the vector-transfected cells. Knockdown of Snail, a transcription factor regulated by the Shh pathway, led to decreased cell motility and invasiveness in KAT-18 and SW1736 cells. However, key epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers including E-cadherin and vimentin as well as Slug were not affected by cyclopamine and GANT61 in either SW1736 or WRO82, a well differentiated follicular thyroid carcinoma cell line. Our data suggest that the Shh pathway-stimulated thyroid tumor cell motility and invasiveness is largely mediated by AKT and c-Met activation with little involvement of EMT.

  19. Potential benefits of pro- and prebiotics on intestinal mucosal immunity and intestinal barrier in short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stoidis, Christos N; Misiakos, Evangelos P; Patapis, Paul; Fotiadis, Constantine I; Spyropoulos, Basileios G

    2011-06-01

    The mechanism of impaired gut barrier function in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS) is poorly understood and includes decreased intestinal motility leading to bacterial overgrowth, a reduction in gut-associated lymphoid tissue following the loss of intestinal length, inhibition of mucosal immunity of the small intestine by intravenous total parental nutrition, and changes in intestinal permeability to macromolecules. Novel therapeutic strategies (i.e. nutritive and surgical) have been introduced in order to prevent the establishment or improve the outcome of this prevalent disease. Pre- and probiotics as a nutritive supplement are already known to be very active in the intestinal tract (mainly in the colon) by maintaining a healthy gut microflora and influencing metabolic, trophic and protective mechanisms, such as the production of SCFA which influence epithelial cell metabolism, turnover and apoptosis. Probiotics have been recommended for patients suffering from SBS in order to decrease bacterial overgrowth and prevent bacterial translocation, two major mechanisms in the pathogenesis of SBS. The present review discusses the research available in the international literature, clinical and experimental, regarding probiotic supplementation for this complicated group of patients based on the clinical spectrum and pathophysiological aspects of the syndrome. The clinical data that were collected for the purposes of the present review suggest that it is difficult to correctly characterise probiotics as a preventive or therapeutic measure. It is very challenging after all to examine the relationship of the bacterial flora, the intestinal barrier and the probiotics as, according to the latest knowledge, demonstrate an interesting interaction.

  20. Cell motility and local viscoelasticity of fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Park, S; Koch, D; Cardenas, R; Käs, J; Shih, C K

    2005-12-01

    Viscoelastic changes of the lamellipodial actin cytoskeleton are a fundamental element of cell motility. Thus, the correlation between the local viscoelastic properties of the lamellipodium (including the transitional region to the cell body) and the speed of lamellipodial extension is studied for normal and malignantly transformed fibroblasts. Using our atomic force microscopy-based microrheology technique, we found different mechanical properties between the lamellipodia of malignantly transformed fibroblasts (H-ras transformed and SV-T2 fibroblasts) and normal fibroblasts (BALB 3T3 fibroblasts). The average elastic constants, K, in the leading edge of SV-T2 fibroblasts (0.48 +/- 0.51 kPa) and of H-ras transformed fibroblasts (0.42 +/- 0.35 kPa) are significantly lower than that of BALB 3T3 fibroblasts (1.01 +/- 0.40 kPa). The analysis of time-lapse phase contrast images shows that the decrease in the elastic constant, K, for malignantly transformed fibroblasts is correlated with the enhanced motility of the lamellipodium. The measured mean speeds are 6.1 +/- 4.5 microm/h for BALB 3T3 fibroblasts, 13.1 +/- 5.2 microm/h for SV-T2 fibroblasts, and 26.2 +/- 11.5 microm/h for H-ras fibroblasts. Furthermore, the elastic constant, K, increases toward the cell body in many instances which coincide with an increase in actin filament density toward the cell body. The correlation between the enhanced motility and the decrease in viscoelastic moduli supports the Elastic Brownian Ratchet model for driving lamellipodia extension.

  1. Structure-function analysis of dynein light chain 1 identifies viable motility mutants in bloodstream-form Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Ralston, Katherine S; Kisalu, Neville K; Hill, Kent L

    2011-07-01

    The flagellum of Trypanosoma brucei is an essential and multifunctional organelle that is receiving increasing attention as a potential drug target and as a system for studying flagellum biology. RNA interference (RNAi) knockdown is widely used to test the requirement for a protein in flagellar motility and has suggested that normal flagellar motility is essential for viability in bloodstream-form trypanosomes. However, RNAi knockdown alone provides limited functional information because the consequence is often loss of a multiprotein complex. We therefore developed an inducible system that allows functional analysis of point mutations in flagellar proteins in T. brucei. Using this system, we identified point mutations in the outer dynein light chain 1 (LC1) that allow stable assembly of outer dynein motors but do not support propulsive motility. In procyclic-form trypanosomes, the phenotype of LC1 mutants with point mutations differs from the motility and structural defects of LC1 knockdowns, which lack the outer-arm dynein motor. Thus, our results distinguish LC1-specific functions from broader functions of outer-arm dynein. In bloodstream-form trypanosomes, LC1 knockdown blocks cell division and is lethal. In contrast, LC1 point mutations cause severe motility defects without affecting viability, indicating that the lethal phenotype of LC1 RNAi knockdown is not due to defective motility. Our results demonstrate for the first time that normal motility is not essential in bloodstream-form T. brucei and that the presumed connection between motility and viability is more complex than might be interpreted from knockdown studies alone. These findings open new avenues for dissecting mechanisms of flagellar protein function and provide an important step in efforts to exploit the potential of the flagellum as a therapeutic target in African sleeping sickness.

  2. Dynamic Clustering in Suspension of Motile Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hepeng; Chen, Xiao; Yang, Xiang; Yang, Mingcheng

    2015-03-01

    Bacteria suspension exhibits a wide range of collective phenomena arising from interactions between individual cells. Here we investigate dynamic clusters of motile bacteria near an air-liquid interface. Cell in a cluster orient its flagella perpendicular to the interface and generate attractive radial fluid flow that leads to cluster formation. Rotating cell also creates tangential forces on neighbors that sets clusters into counter-clockwise rotation. We construct a numerical model of self-propelled particles that interact via pair-wise forces extracted from hydrodynamic calculations; such a model reproduces many properties of observed cluster dynamics.

  3. The unique paradigm of spirochete motility and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Charon, Nyles W; Cockburn, Andrew; Li, Chunhao; Liu, Jun; Miller, Kelly A; Miller, Michael R; Motaleb, Md A; Wolgemuth, Charles W

    2012-01-01

    Spirochete motility is enigmatic: It differs from the motility of most other bacteria in that the entire bacterium is involved in translocation in the absence of external appendages. Using the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) as a model system, we explore the current research on spirochete motility and chemotaxis. Bb has periplasmic flagella (PFs) subterminally attached to each end of the protoplasmic cell cylinder, and surrounding the cell is an outer membrane. These internal helix-shaped PFs allow the spirochete to swim by generating backward-moving waves by rotation. Exciting advances using cryoelectron tomography are presented with respect to in situ analysis of cell, PF, and motor structure. In addition, advances in the dynamics of motility, chemotaxis, gene regulation, and the role of motility and chemotaxis in the life cycle of Bb are summarized. The results indicate that the motility paradigms of flagellated bacteria do not apply to these unique bacteria.

  4. Swimming and swarming motility properties of peanut-nodulating rhizobia.

    PubMed

    Vicario, Julio C; Dardanelli, Marta S; Giordano, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Motility allows populations of bacteria to rapidly reach and colonize new microniches or microhabitats. The motility of rhizobia (symbiotic nitrogen-fixing bacteria that nodulate legume roots) is an important factor determining their competitive success. We evaluated the effects of temperature, incubation time, and seed exudates on swimming and swarming motility of five strains of Bradyrhizobium sp. (peanut-nodulating rhizobia). Swimming motility was increased by exudate exposure for all strains except native Pc34. In contrast, swarming motility was increased by exudate exposure for native 15A but unchanged for the other four strains. All five strains displayed the ability to differentiate into swarm cells. Morphological examination by scanning electron microscopy showed that the length of the swarm cells was variable, but generally greater than that of vegetative cells. Our findings suggest the importance of differential motility properties of peanut-nodulating rhizobial strains during agricultural inoculation and early steps of symbiotic interaction with the host.

  5. Ineffective esophageal motility is a primary motility disorder in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shih-Chi; Chang, Chi-Sen; Wu, Chun-Ying; Chen, Gran-Hum

    2002-03-01

    The relationship between esophageal motor abnormalities and GERD has been widely studied. The purpose of this study was to identify the prevalence of ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) in patients with GERD. In addition, we also evaluated esophageal acid exposure, acid clearance, and endoscopic esophagitis in GERD patients with IEM. Of 89 patients enrolled in this study, 47 (52.8%) were found to have nonspecific esophageal motility disorder (NEMD). Forty-four of the 47 (93.6%) patients with NEMD met the diagnostic criteria for IEM. The overall incidence of IEM in GERD patients was 49.4%. Patients with IEM had significant increases in upright and recumbent mean fraction of time pH < 4 (6.70% and 4.38%) and mean recumbent esophageal acid clearance (12.45 min/reflux) when compared to those with other motility findings. Seventeen of the 44 (39%) IEM patients did not have endoscopic esophagitis. On the other hand, 26 of the 39 (67%) patients with normal manometry had endoscopic esophagitis. We concluded that not only is the prevalence of IEM high in GERD, but also that IEM patients have more recumbent gastroesophageal reflux and delayed acid clearance. Combined with endoscopic findings, we propose that IEM can be viewed as a specific entity of primary esophageal motility disorder in patients with GERD.

  6. Chemokinetic motility responses of the cyanobacterium oscillatoria terebriformis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Laurie L.; Castenholz, Richard W.

    1989-01-01

    Oscillatoria terebriformis, a gliding, filamentous, thermophilic cyanobacterium, exhibited an inhibition of gliding motility upon exposure to fructose. The observed response was transient, and the duration of nonmotility was directly proportional to the concentration of fructose. Upon resumption of motility, the rate of motility was also inversely proportional to the concentration of fructose. Sulfide caused a similar response. The effect of sulfide was specific and not due to either anoxia or negative redox potential. Exposure to glucose, acetate, lactate, or mat interstitial water did not elicit any motility response.

  7. Exploring food effects on indinavir absorption with human intestinal fluids in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Holmstock, Nico; De Bruyn, Tom; Bevernage, Jan; Annaert, Pieter; Mols, Raf; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2013-04-11

    Food can have a significant impact on the pharmacokinetics of orally administered drugs, as it may affect drug solubility as well as permeability. Since fed state conditions cannot easily be implemented in the presently available permeability tools, including the frequently used Caco-2 system, exploring food effects during drug development can be quite challenging. In this study, we investigated the effect of fasted and fed state conditions on the intestinal absorption of the HIV protease inhibitor indinavir using simulated and human intestinal fluids in the in situ intestinal perfusion technique in mice. Although the solubility of indinavir was 6-fold higher in fed state human intestinal fluids (FeHIF) as compared to fasted state HIF (FaHIF), the intestinal permeation of indinavir was 22-fold lower in FeHIF as compared to FaHIF. Dialysis experiments showed that only a small fraction of indinavir is accessible for absorption in FeHIF due to micellar entrapment, possibly explaining its low intestinal permeation. The presence of ritonavir, a known P-gp inhibitor, increased the intestinal permeation of indinavir by 2-fold in FaHIF, while there was no increase when using FeHIF. These data confirm that drug-food interactions form a complex interplay between solubility and permeability effects. The use of HIF in in situ intestinal perfusions holds great promise for biorelevant absorption evaluation as it allows to directly explore this complex solubility/permeability interplay on drug absorption.

  8. JAM-A is present in mammalian spermatozoa where it is essential for normal motility.

    PubMed

    Shao, Minghai; Ghosh, Ananya; Cooke, Vesselina G; Naik, Ulhas P; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A

    2008-01-01

    Junctional adhesion molecules (JAMs) that are expressed in endothelial and epithelial cells and function in tight junction assembly, also perform important roles in testis where the closely-related JAM-A, JAM-B, and JAM-C are found. Disruption of murine Jam-B and Jam-C has varying effects on sperm development and function; however, deletion of Jam-A has not yet been studied. Here we show for the first time that in addition to expression in the Sertoli-Sertoli tight junctions in the seminiferous tubules, the approximately 32 kDa murine JAM-A is present in elongated spermatids and in the plasma membrane of the head and flagellum of sperm. Deletion of Jam-A, using the gene trap technology, results in flagellar defects at the ultrastructural level. In Jam-A-deficient mice, which have reduced litter size, both progressive and hyperactive motility are significantly affected (P<0.0001) before and, more severely, after capacitation. The findings show that JAM-A is involved in sperm tail formation and is essential for normal motility, which may occur via its signal transduction and protein phosphorylation properties. Detection of JAM-A in human sperm proteins indicates that its role may be conserved in sperm motility and that JAM-A may be a candidate gene for the analysis of idiopathic sperm motility defects resulting in male subfertility in the human population.

  9. Treating Woman with Myo-Inositol Vaginal Suppositories Improves Partner's Sperm Motility and Fertility

    PubMed Central

    Poverini, Roberta; Lisi, Rosella; Carra, Maria Cristina; Lisi, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Motility is the feature that allows spermatozoa to actively reach and penetrate the female gamete during fertilization. When this function is altered, and especially decreased, troubles in conceiving may occur. In this study, we demonstrated that treating fertile women with myo-inositol (MI) vaginal suppositories ameliorated their partners' sperm motility and also positively affected their conceiving capacity, without changes in cervical mucus structural and biochemical characteristics. Indeed, by means of the postcoital test on female cervical mucus, a significant improvement especially in progressive sperm motility was recorded after MI suppository use. Concomitantly, after MI treatment, a reduction of immotile spermatozoa percentage was observed. Importantly, MI vaginal supplementation positively correlated with a pregnancy for 5 of the 50 couples enrolled in the study, leading us to speculate that this substance may substantially contribute to create in the cervical mucus an ideal milieu that makes spermatozoa more motile and functionally able to fertilize. Even though the detailed mechanism is still unclear, these results should encourage MI vaginal use for the clinical improvement of male infertility, through their partners. PMID:27403162

  10. Treating Woman with Myo-Inositol Vaginal Suppositories Improves Partner's Sperm Motility and Fertility.

    PubMed

    Montanino Oliva, Mario; Poverini, Roberta; Lisi, Rosella; Carra, Maria Cristina; Lisi, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Motility is the feature that allows spermatozoa to actively reach and penetrate the female gamete during fertilization. When this function is altered, and especially decreased, troubles in conceiving may occur. In this study, we demonstrated that treating fertile women with myo-inositol (MI) vaginal suppositories ameliorated their partners' sperm motility and also positively affected their conceiving capacity, without changes in cervical mucus structural and biochemical characteristics. Indeed, by means of the postcoital test on female cervical mucus, a significant improvement especially in progressive sperm motility was recorded after MI suppository use. Concomitantly, after MI treatment, a reduction of immotile spermatozoa percentage was observed. Importantly, MI vaginal supplementation positively correlated with a pregnancy for 5 of the 50 couples enrolled in the study, leading us to speculate that this substance may substantially contribute to create in the cervical mucus an ideal milieu that makes spermatozoa more motile and functionally able to fertilize. Even though the detailed mechanism is still unclear, these results should encourage MI vaginal use for the clinical improvement of male infertility, through their partners.

  11. Chemical effectors cause different motile behavior and deposition of bacteria in porous media.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Sanchez, Celia; Wick, Lukas Y; Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio

    2012-06-19

    We tested the hypothesis whether chemically induced motility patterns of bacteria may affect their transport in porous media. Naphthalene-degrading Pseudomonas putida G7 cells were exposed to glucose, salicylate, and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and their motility was assessed by computer-assisted, quantitative swimming and capillary-based taxis determinations. Exposure to salicylate induced smooth movement with few acceleration events and positive taxis, whereas cells exposed to AgNPs exhibited tortuous movement and a repellent response. Although metabolized by strain G7, glucose did not cause attraction and induced a hyper-motile mode of swimming, characterized by a high frequency of acceleration events, high swimming speed (>60 μm s(-1)), and a high tortuosity in the trajectories. Chemically induced motility behavior correlated with distinct modes of attachment to sand in batch assays and breakthrough curves in percolation column experiments. Salicylate significantly reduced deposition of G7 cells in column experiments whereas glucose and AgNPs enhanced attachment and caused filter blocking that resulted in a progressive decrease in deposition. These findings are relevant for bioremediation scenarios that require an optimized outreach of introduced inoculants and in other environmental technologies, such as water disinfection and microbially enhanced oil recovery.

  12. Impact of dissolved organic matter on bacterial tactic motility, attachment, and transport.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Sanchez, Celia; Wick, Lukas Y; Cantos, Manuel; Ortega-Calvo, José-Julio

    2015-04-07

    Bacterial dispersal is a key driver of the ecology of microbial contaminant degradation in soils. This work investigated the role of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the motility, attachment, and transport of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida G7 in saturated porous media. The study is based on the hypothesis that DOM quality is critical to triggering tactic motility and, consequently, affects bacterial transport and dispersal. Sunflower root exudates, humic acids (HA), and the synthetic oleophilic fertilizer S-200 were used as representatives of fresh, weathered, and artificially processed DOM with high nitrogen and phosphorus contents, respectively. We studied DOM levels of 16-130 mg L(-1), which are representative of DOM concentrations typically found in agricultural soil pore water. In contrast to its responses to HA and S-200, strain G7 exhibited a tactic behavior toward root exudates, as quantified by chemotaxis assays and single-cell motility observations. All DOM types promoted bacterial transport through sand at high concentrations (∼ 130 mg L(-1)). At low DOM concentrations (∼ 16 mg L(-1)), the enhancement occurred only in the presence of sunflower root exudates, and this enhancement did not occur with G7 bacteria devoid of flagella. Our results suggest that tactic DOM effectors strongly influence bacterial transport and the interception probability of motile bacteria by collector surfaces.

  13. The Effects of Eupatilin (Stillen®) on Motility of Human Lower Gastrointestinal Tracts

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, Seung-Bum; Oh, Heung-Kwon; Yu, Sung A; Moon, Sang Hui; Choe, Eun Kyung; Oh, Tae Young

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal motility consists of phasic slow-wave contractions and the migrating motor complex (MMC). Eupatilin (Stillen®) has been widely used to treat gastritis and peptic ulcers, and various cytokines and neuropeptides are thought to be involved, which can affect gastrointestinal motility. We performed a study to identify the effects of eupatilin on lower gastrointestinal motility with electromechanical recordings of smooth muscles in the human ileum and colon. Ileum and colon samples were obtained from patients undergoing bowel resection. The tissues were immediately stored in oxygenated Krebs-Ringer's bicarbonate solution, and conventional microelectrode recordings from muscle cells and tension recordings from muscle strips and ileal or colonic segments were performed. Eupatilin was perfused into the tissue chamber, and changes in membrane potentials and contractions were measured. Hyperpolarization of resting membrane potential (RMP) was observed after administration of eupatilin. The amplitude, AUC, and frequency of tension recordings from circular and longitudinal smooth muscle strips and bowel segments of the ileum and colon were significantly decreased after admission of eupatilin. Eupatilin elicited dose-dependent decreases during segmental tension recordings. In conclusion, eupatilin (Stillen®) showed inhibitory effects on the human ileum and colon. We propose that this drug may be useful for treating diseases that increase bowel motility, but further studies are necessary. PMID:25352757

  14. Bacterial Motility Reveals Unknown Molecular Organization.

    PubMed

    Duchesne, Ismaël; Rainville, Simon; Galstian, Tigran

    2015-11-17

    The water solubility of lyotropic liquid crystals (LCs) makes them very attractive to study the behavior of biological microorganisms in an environment where local symmetry is broken (as often encountered in nature). Several recent studies have shown a dramatic change in the behavior of flagellated bacteria when swimming in solutions of the lyotropic LC disodium cromoglycate (DSCG). In this study, the movements of Escherichia coli bacteria in DSCG-water solutions of different concentrations are observed to improve our understanding of this phenomenon. In addition, the viscosity of DSCG aqueous solutions is measured as a function of concentration at room temperature. We also experimentally identify a previously undescribed isotropic pretransition zone where bacteria start sticking to each other and to surfaces. Simple estimations show that the unbalanced osmotic pressure induced depletion force might be responsible for this sticking phenomenon. An estimate of the bacteria propulsive force and the DSCG aggregates length (versus concentration) are calculated from the measured viscosity of the medium. All these quantities are found to undergo a strong increase in the pretransition zone, starting at a threshold concentration of 6±1 wt % DSCG that is well below the known isotropic-LC transition (∼10 wt %). This study also shines light on the motility of flagellated bacteria in realistic environments, and it opens new avenues for interesting applications such as the use of motile microorganisms to probe the physical properties of their host or smart bandages that could guide bacteria out of wounds.

  15. Major regulatory mechanisms involved in sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rute; Sá, Rosália; Barros, Alberto; Sousa, Mário

    2017-01-01

    The genetic bases and molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly and function of the flagellum components as well as in the regulation of the flagellar movement are not fully understood, especially in humans. There are several causes for sperm immotility, of which some can be avoided and corrected, whereas other are related to genetic defects and deserve full investigation to give a diagnosis to patients. This review was performed after an extensive literature search on the online databases PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science. Here, we review the involvement of regulatory pathways responsible for sperm motility, indicating possible causes for sperm immotility. These included the calcium pathway, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway, the importance of kinases and phosphatases, the function of reactive oxygen species, and how the regulation of cell volume and osmolarity are also fundamental components. We then discuss main gene defects associated with specific morphological abnormalities. Finally, we slightly discuss some preventive and treatments approaches to avoid development of conditions that are associated with unspecified sperm immotility. We believe that in the near future, with the development of more powerful techniques, the genetic causes of sperm immotility and the regulatory mechanisms of sperm motility will be better understand, thus enabling to perform a full diagnosis and uncover new therapies.

  16. Bacterial Motility Reveals Unknown Molecular Organization

    PubMed Central

    Duchesne, Ismaël; Rainville, Simon; Galstian, Tigran

    2015-01-01

    The water solubility of lyotropic liquid crystals (LCs) makes them very attractive to study the behavior of biological microorganisms in an environment where local symmetry is broken (as often encountered in nature). Several recent studies have shown a dramatic change in the behavior of flagellated bacteria when swimming in solutions of the lyotropic LC disodium cromoglycate (DSCG). In this study, the movements of Escherichia coli bacteria in DSCG-water solutions of different concentrations are observed to improve our understanding of this phenomenon. In addition, the viscosity of DSCG aqueous solutions is measured as a function of concentration at room temperature. We also experimentally identify a previously undescribed isotropic pretransition zone where bacteria start sticking to each other and to surfaces. Simple estimations show that the unbalanced osmotic pressure induced depletion force might be responsible for this sticking phenomenon. An estimate of the bacteria propulsive force and the DSCG aggregates length (versus concentration) are calculated from the measured viscosity of the medium. All these quantities are found to undergo a strong increase in the pretransition zone, starting at a threshold concentration of 6 ± 1 wt % DSCG that is well below the known isotropic-LC transition (∼10 wt %). This study also shines light on the motility of flagellated bacteria in realistic environments, and it opens new avenues for interesting applications such as the use of motile microorganisms to probe the physical properties of their host or smart bandages that could guide bacteria out of wounds. PMID:26588572

  17. Major regulatory mechanisms involved in sperm motility

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rute; Sá, Rosália; Barros, Alberto; Sousa, Mário

    2017-01-01

    The genetic bases and molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly and function of the flagellum components as well as in the regulation of the flagellar movement are not fully understood, especially in humans. There are several causes for sperm immotility, of which some can be avoided and corrected, whereas other are related to genetic defects and deserve full investigation to give a diagnosis to patients. This review was performed after an extensive literature search on the online databases PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science. Here, we review the involvement of regulatory pathways responsible for sperm motility, indicating possible causes for sperm immotility. These included the calcium pathway, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway, the importance of kinases and phosphatases, the function of reactive oxygen species, and how the regulation of cell volume and osmolarity are also fundamental components. We then discuss main gene defects associated with specific morphological abnormalities. Finally, we slightly discuss some preventive and treatments approaches to avoid development of conditions that are associated with unspecified sperm immotility. We believe that in the near future, with the development of more powerful techniques, the genetic causes of sperm immotility and the regulatory mechanisms of sperm motility will be better understand, thus enabling to perform a full diagnosis and uncover new therapies. PMID:26680031

  18. Flagellated bacterial motility in polymer solutions

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Vincent A.; Schwarz-Linek, Jana; Reufer, Mathias; Wilson, Laurence G.; Morozov, Alexander N.; Poon, Wilson C. K.

    2014-01-01

    It is widely believed that the swimming speed, v, of many flagellated bacteria is a nonmonotonic function of the concentration, c, of high-molecular-weight linear polymers in aqueous solution, showing peaked v(c) curves. Pores in the polymer solution were suggested as the explanation. Quantifying this picture led to a theory that predicted peaked v(c) curves. Using high-throughput methods for characterizing motility, we measured v and the angular frequency of cell body rotation, Ω, of motile Escherichia coli as a function of polymer concentration in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and Ficoll solutions of different molecular weights. We find that nonmonotonic v(c) curves are typically due to low-molecular-weight impurities. After purification by dialysis, the measured v(c) and Ω(c) relations for all but the highest-molecular-weight PVP can be described in detail by Newtonian hydrodynamics. There is clear evidence for non-Newtonian effects in the highest-molecular-weight PVP solution. Calculations suggest that this is due to the fast-rotating flagella seeing a lower viscosity than the cell body, so that flagella can be seen as nano-rheometers for probing the non-Newtonian behavior of high polymer solutions on a molecular scale. PMID:25468981

  19. Flagellated bacterial motility in polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Vincent A; Schwarz-Linek, Jana; Reufer, Mathias; Wilson, Laurence G; Morozov, Alexander N; Poon, Wilson C K

    2014-12-16

    It is widely believed that the swimming speed, v, of many flagellated bacteria is a nonmonotonic function of the concentration, c, of high-molecular-weight linear polymers in aqueous solution, showing peaked v(c) curves. Pores in the polymer solution were suggested as the explanation. Quantifying this picture led to a theory that predicted peaked v(c) curves. Using high-throughput methods for characterizing motility, we measured v and the angular frequency of cell body rotation, Ω, of motile Escherichia coli as a function of polymer concentration in polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and Ficoll solutions of different molecular weights. We find that nonmonotonic v(c) curves are typically due to low-molecular-weight impurities. After purification by dialysis, the measured v(c) and Ω(c) relations for all but the highest-molecular-weight PVP can be described in detail by Newtonian hydrodynamics. There is clear evidence for non-Newtonian effects in the highest-molecular-weight PVP solution. Calculations suggest that this is due to the fast-rotating flagella seeing a lower viscosity than the cell body, so that flagella can be seen as nano-rheometers for probing the non-Newtonian behavior of high polymer solutions on a molecular scale.

  20. Intestinal M cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    We have an enormous number of commensal bacteria in our intestine, moreover, the foods that we ingest and the water we drink is sometimes contaminated with pathogenic microorganisms. The intestinal epithelium is always exposed to such microbes, friend or foe, so to contain them our gut is equipped with specialized gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), literally the largest peripheral lymphoid tissue in the body. GALT is the intestinal immune inductive site composed of lymphoid follicles such as Peyer’s patches. M cells are a subset of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) residing in the region of the epithelium covering GALT lymphoid follicles. Although the vast majority of IEC function to absorb nutrients from the intestine, M cells are highly specialized to take up intestinal microbial antigens and deliver them to GALT for efficient mucosal as well as systemic immune responses. I will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of M-cell differentiation and functions. PMID:26634447

  1. Preventive effect of Desferal on sperm motility and morphology.

    PubMed

    Nenkova, Galina; Stefanov, Rossen; Chervenkov, Mihail; Alexandrova, Albena

    2016-08-01

    Transition metal ions, mainly iron, are involved in the generation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, which are the most powerful inducers of oxidative damage to all biomolecules. The lipids in sperm membranes are highly susceptible to oxidation. Sperm lipid peroxidation (LPO) leads to decrease of motility and reduction of likelihood for sperm-oocyte fusion. The excess radical production may affect also the spermatozoa morphology. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of Desferal on the LPO, motility, and morphology of boar sperm subjected to oxidative stress. After collection, the ejaculates were equally separated and diluted in a commercial semen extender (experiment 1) or in physiological saline (experiment 2). The ejaculates of the 2 experiments were divided into aliquots, which were incubated with one of the following agents: FeSO4 (0.1mM), H2 O2 (0.5mM), or FeSO4  + H2 O2 (Fenton system), in the presence or absence of Desferal. The application of Desferal in the incubation medium had a protective effect against FeSO4  + H2 O2 -induced sperm damage, namely, decrease of LPO; decrease the quantity of immotile spermatozoa and decrease the number of morphological abnormalities, regardless of the used medium. In experiment 2, the presence of FeSO4 in the incubation medium induced LPO in the same range as the combination FeSO4  + H2 O2 , in which the effect was reduced by Desferal. Thus, the supplement of Desferal to media used for sperm storage and processing could be a useful tool for diminishing oxidative injury and improving the quality of the semen.

  2. Intestinal lymphangiectasia in children

    PubMed Central

    Isa, Hasan M.; Al-Arayedh, Ghadeer G.; Mohamed, Afaf M.

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL) is a rare disease characterized by dilatation of intestinal lymphatics. It can be classified as primary or secondary according to the underlying etiology. The clinical presentations of IL are pitting edema, chylous ascites, pleural effusion, acute appendicitis, diarrhea, lymphocytopenia, malabsorption, and intestinal obstruction. The diagnosis is made by intestinal endoscopy and biopsies. Dietary modification is the mainstay in the management of IL with a variable response. Here we report 2 patients with IL in Bahrain who showed positive response to dietary modification. PMID:26837404

  3. Intestinal transplantation: a review.

    PubMed

    Desai, Chirag Sureshchandra; Khan, Khalid Mahmood; Girlanda, Raffaele; Fishbein, Thomas M

    2012-09-01

    Parenteral nutrition is a life-saving therapy for patients with intestinal failure. Intestinal transplantation is now recognized as a treatment for patients who develop complications of parenteral nutrition and in whom attempts at intestinal rehabilitation have failed. Patients with parenteral nutrition related liver disease will require a liver graft typically part of a multivisceral transplant. Isolated intestinal transplants are more commonly performed in adults while multivisceral transplants are most commonly performed in infants. Isolated intestinal transplants have the best short-term outcome, with over 80 % survival at 1 year. Patients requiring multivisceral transplants have a high rate of attrition with a 1 year survival less than 70 %. Prognostic factors for a poor outcome include patient hospitalization at the time of transplant and donor age greater than 40 years while systemic sepsis and acute rejection are the major determinant of early postoperative outcome. For patients surviving the first year the outcome of transplantation of the liver in addition to intestine affords some survival advantage though long-term outcome does not yet match other abdominal organs. Outcomes for intestinal retransplantation are poor as a result of immunology and patient debility. Overall intestinal transplantation continues to develop and is a clear indication with cost and quality of life advantages in patients with intestinal failure that do not remain stable on parenteral nutrition.

  4. Balancing Thymocyte Adhesion and Motility: A Functional Linkage Between β1 Lntegrins and The Motility Receptor RHAMM

    PubMed Central

    Gares, Sheryl L.

    2000-01-01

    Thymocyte differentiation involves several processes that occur in different anatomic sites within the thymus. Therefore, thymocytes must have the ability to respond to signals received from stromal cells and adopt either adhesive or motile behavior. We will discuss our data indicating human thymocytes use α4β1 integrin, α5β1 integrin and RHAMM to mediate these activities. Immature multinegative (MN; CD3–4–8–19-) thymocytes use α4β1 and α5β1 integrins to mediate weak and strong adhesion. This subset also uses α4β1 integrin to mediate motility. As thymocytes differentiate, they begin to express and use RHAMM to mediate motility in conjunction with α4β1 and α5β1 integrins. Motile thymocytes use β1 integrins to maintain weakly adhesive contacts with substrate to provide traction for locomoting cells, thus weak adhesion is a requirement of motile behavior. Hyaluronan (HA) is also required by thymocytes to mediate motility. HA binding to cell surface RHAMM redistributes intracellular RHAMM to the cell surface where it functions to mediate motility. We propose that the decision to maintain adhesive or motile behavior is based on the balance between low and high avidity binding conformations of β1 integrins on thymocytes and that RHAMM:HA interactions decrease high avidity binding conformations of integrins pushing the balance toward motile behavior. PMID:11097213

  5. Live Imaging of Influenza Infection of the Trachea Reveals Dynamic Regulation of CD8+ T Cell Motility by Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Lambert Emo, Kris; Hyun, Young-min; Barilla, Christopher; Gerber, Scott; Fowell, Deborah; Kim, Minsoo

    2016-01-01

    During a primary influenza infection, cytotoxic CD8+ T cells need to infiltrate the infected airways and engage virus-infected epithelial cells. The factors that regulate T cell motility in the infected airway tissue are not well known. To more precisely study T cell infiltration of the airways, we developed an experimental model system using the trachea as a site where live imaging can be performed. CD8+ T cell motility was dynamic with marked changes in motility on different days of the infection. In particular, significant changes in average cell velocity and confinement were evident on days 8–10 during which the T cells abruptly but transiently increase velocity on day 9. Experiments to distinguish whether infection itself or antigen affect motility revealed that it is antigen, not active infection per se that likely affects these changes as blockade of peptide/MHC resulted in increased velocity. These observations demonstrate that influenza tracheitis provides a robust experimental foundation to study molecular regulation of T cell motility during acute virus infection. PMID:27644089

  6. Intestinal Autophagy Improves Healthspan and Longevity in C. elegans during Dietary Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Gelino, Sara; Chang, Jessica T.; Kumsta, Caroline; She, Xingyu; Davis, Andrew; Nguyen, Christian; Panowski, Siler; Hansen, Malene

    2016-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) is a dietary regimen that extends lifespan in many organisms. One mechanism contributing to the conserved effect of DR on longevity is the cellular recycling process autophagy, which is induced in response to nutrient scarcity and increases sequestration of cytosolic material into double-membrane autophagosomes for degradation in the lysosome. Although autophagy plays a direct role in DR-mediated lifespan extension in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the contribution of autophagy in individual tissues remains unclear. In this study, we show a critical role for autophagy in the intestine, a major metabolic tissue, to ensure lifespan extension of dietary-restricted eat-2 mutants. The intestine of eat-2 mutants has an enlarged lysosomal compartment and flux assays indicate increased turnover of autophagosomes, consistent with an induction of autophagy in this tissue. This increase in intestinal autophagy may underlie the improved intestinal integrity we observe in eat-2 mutants, since whole-body and intestinal-specific inhibition of autophagy in eat-2 mutants greatly impairs the intestinal barrier function. Interestingly, intestinal-specific inhibition of autophagy in eat-2 mutants leads to a decrease in motility with age, alluding to a potential cell non-autonomous role for autophagy in the intestine. Collectively, these results highlight important functions for autophagy in the intestine of dietary-restricted C. elegans. PMID:27414651

  7. Direct Correlation between Motile Behavior and Protein Abundance in Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gillet, Sébastien; Frankel, Nicholas W.; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how stochastic molecular fluctuations affect cell behavior requires the quantification of both behavior and protein numbers in the same cells. Here, we combine automated microscopy with in situ hydrogel polymerization to measure single-cell protein expression after tracking swimming behavior. We characterized the distribution of non-genetic phenotypic diversity in Escherichia coli motility, which affects single-cell exploration. By expressing fluorescently tagged chemotaxis proteins (CheR and CheB) at different levels, we quantitatively mapped motile phenotype (tumble bias) to protein numbers using thousands of single-cell measurements. Our results disagreed with established models until we incorporated the role of CheB in receptor deamidation and the slow fluctuations in receptor methylation. Beyond refining models, our central finding is that changes in numbers of CheR and CheB affect the population mean tumble bias and its variance independently. Therefore, it is possible to adjust the degree of phenotypic diversity of a population by adjusting the global level of expression of CheR and CheB while keeping their ratio constant, which, as shown in previous studies, confers functional robustness to the system. Since genetic control of protein expression is heritable, our results suggest that non-genetic diversity in motile behavior is selectable, supporting earlier hypotheses that such diversity confers a selective advantage. PMID:27599206

  8. Molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolones modulation on corneal fibroblast motility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsan-Chi; Tsai, Tzu-Yun; Chang, Shu-Wen

    2016-04-01

    Topical fluoroquinolones are widely used to prevent ocular infections after ophthalmic surgery. However, they have been shown to affect the corneal cell motility, whose mechanism remains indefinite. The purpose of this study was to investigate how fluoroquinolones affect corneal stromal cell motility. Human corneal fibroblasts (HCFs) were incubated in ciprofloxacin (CIP), levofloxacin (LEV), or moxifloxacin (MOX) at 0, 10, 50, and 100 μg/ml for up to 3 days. Effect of CIP, LEV, or MOX on HCF migration was monitored using migration assay. HCF viability was determined by WST-1 assay. Expression of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin (PXN), and their phosphorylated forms were analyzed by immunoblotting. Binding affinity between FAK and PXN was determined by co-immunoprecipitation. Our results revealed that CIP and MOX, but not LEV, noticeably retarded HCF migration. HCF proliferation was significantly reduced by CIP (38.2%), LEV (29.5%), and MOX (21.3%), respectively (p = 0.002). CIP and MOX suppressed the phosphorylation of PXN at tyrosines (10.2 ± 4.3%, p < 0.001; 11.7 ± 2.4%, p < 0.001, respectively), including tyrosine 118 (33.3 ± 5.2%, p < 0.001; 34.0 ± 4.4%, p < 0.001, respectively). CIP and MOX diminished the binding affinity between FAK and PXN (8.2 ± 1.8%, p < 0.001; 9.0 ± 4.5%, p < 0.001, respectively). Nevertheless, tyrosine dephosphorylation and FAK dissociation of PXN were not found in LEV-treated HCFs. None of these fluoroquinolones affect phosphorylation of FAK-Y397. We conclude that CIP and MOX, but not LEV, might delay corneal fibroblast migration via interfering with recruitment of PXN to focal adhesions and dephosphorylation of PXN at the tyrosines.

  9. Intestinal or bowel obstruction - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000150.htm Intestinal or bowel obstruction - discharge To use the sharing features on this ... your bowel (intestine). This condition is called an intestinal obstruction . The blockage may be partial or total (complete). ...

  10. Ultrasonographic examination of the small intestine, large intestine and greater omentum in 30 Saanen goats.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Steininger, K; Tschuor, A; Hässig, M

    2011-09-01

    The small and large intestine of 30 healthy Saanen goats were examined ultrasonographically using a 5.0 MHz-linear transducer. The goats were examined on the right side, from the eighth rib to the caudal aspect of the flank. The small and large intestine could be easily differentiated. The descending duodenum could be imaged in 19 goats, and the jejunum and ileum seen in all goats. The jejunum and ileum were most often seen in cross-section and rarely in longitudinal section in the ventral region of the right flank. The intestinal contents were usually homogenously echoic, and active motility was observed in all the goats. The diameter of the small intestine was 0.8-2.7 cm (1.6 [0.33] cm). The spiral ansa of the colon was imaged in all the goats, and in 21 the caecum was also seen. Both these sections of large intestine were most commonly seen in the dorsal region of the right flank. The spiral ansa of the colon was easily identified by its spiral arrangement of centripetal and centrifugal gyri, which had a garland-like appearance. Because of intraluminal gas, only the wall of the colon closest to the transducer could be imaged. The diameter of the spiral colon ranged from 0.8 to 2.0 cm (1.1 [0.24] cm). Usually only the wall of the caecum closest to the transducer could be imaged and it appeared as a thick, echoic, slightly undulating line. The greater omentum could be seen in all the goats.

  11. Temporal profile of intestinal tissue expression of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein in a rat model of necrotizing enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Ana Leda Bertoncini; Figueira, Rebeca Lopes; Gonçalves, Frances Lilian Lanhellas; Mitidiero, Luís Felipe Tsuyoshi; Silva, Orlando Castro e; Peiró, José Luis; Sbragia, Lourenço

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Necrotizing enterocolitis is a severe multifactorial intestinal disorder that primarily affects preterm newborns, causing 20-40% mortality and morbidity. Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein has been reported to be a biomarker for the detection of intestinal injuries. Our aim was to assess intestinal tissue injury and the molecular expression of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein over time in a necrotizing enterocolitis model. METHODS: A total of 144 Newborn rats were divided into two groups: 1) Control, which received breastfeeding (n=72) and 2) Necrotizing Enterocolitis, which received formula feeding and underwent hypoxia and hypothermia (n=72). A total of six time points of ischemia (2 times a day for 3 days; 12 pups for each time point) were examined. Samples were collected for analysis of body weight, morphological and histological characteristics, intestinal weight, intestinal weight/body weight ratio, injury grade, and intestinal fatty acid-binding protein levels. RESULTS: Body and intestinal weights were lower in the Necrotizing Enterocolitis group than in the Control group (p<0.005 and p<0.0005, respectively). The intestinal weight/body weight ratio was higher in the Necrotizing Enterocolitis group than in the Control group (p<0.005) only at the sixth ischemia time point. The Necrotizing Enterocolitis group displayed higher expression of intestinal fatty acid-binding protein (p<0.0005) and showed greater tissue damage than the Control group. CONCLUSION: Intestinal fatty acid-binding protein was an efficient marker of ischemic injury to the intestine and a good correlation was demonstrated between the time of ischemic injury and the grade of intestinal injury. PMID:27464299

  12. Clinically relevant enhancement of human sperm motility using compounds with reported phosphodiesterase inhibitor activity

    PubMed Central

    Tardif, Steve; Madamidola, Oladipo A.; Brown, Sean G.; Frame, Lorna; Lefièvre, Linda; Wyatt, Paul G.; Barratt, Christopher L.R.; Martins Da Silva, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Can we identify compound(s) with reported phosphodiesterase inhibitor (PDEI) activity that could be added to human spermatozoa in vitro to enhance their motility without compromising other sperm functions? SUMMARY ANSWER We have identified several compounds that produce robust and effective stimulation of sperm motility and, importantly, have a positive response on patient samples. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY For >20 years, the use of non-selective PDEIs, such as pentoxifylline, has been known to influence the motility of human spermatozoa; however, conflicting results have been obtained. It is now clear that human sperm express several different phosphodiesterases and these are compartmentalized at different regions of the cells. By using type-specific PDEIs, differential modulation of sperm motility may be achieved without adversely affecting other functions such as the acrosome reaction (AR). STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This was a basic medical research study examining sperm samples from normozoospermic donors and subfertile patients attending the Assisted Conception Unit (ACU), Ninewells Hospital Dundee for diagnostic semen analysis, IVF and ICSI. Phase 1 screened 43 commercially available compounds with reported PDEI activity to identify lead compounds that stimulate sperm motility. Samples were exposed (20 min) to three concentrations (1, 10 and 100 µM) of compound, and selected candidates (n = 6) progressed to Phase 2, which provided a more comprehensive assessment using a battery of in vitro sperm function tests. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS All healthy donors and subfertile patients were recruited at the Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee and ACU, Ninewells Hospital Dundee (ethical approval 08/S1402/6). In Phase 1, poor motility cells recovered from the 40% interface of the discontinuous density gradient were used as surrogates for patient samples. Pooled samples from three to four different donors were utilized in

  13. Quantum-dot-based cell motility assay.

    PubMed

    Gu, Weiwei; Pellegrino, Teresa; Parak, Wolfgang J; Boudreau, Rosanne; Le Gros, Mark A; Gerion, Daniele; Alivisatos, A Paul; Larabell, Carolyn A

    2005-06-28

    Because of their favorable physical and photochemical properties, colloidal CdSe/ZnS-semiconductor nanocrystals (commonly known as quantum dots) have enormous potential for use in biological imaging. In this report, we present an assay that uses quantum dots as markers to quantify cell motility. Cells that are seeded onto a homogeneous layer of quantum dots engulf and absorb the nanocrystals and, as a consequence, leave behind a fluorescence-free trail. By subsequently determining the ratio of cell area to fluorescence-free track area, we show that it is possible to differentiate between invasive and noninvasive cancer cells. Because this assay uses simple fluorescence detection, requires no significant data processing, and can be used in live-cell studies, it has the potential to be a powerful new tool for discriminating between invasive and noninvasive cancer cell lines or for studying cell signaling events involved in migration.

  14. Spontaneous Motility of Actin Lamellar Fragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanch-Mercader, C.; Casademunt, J.

    2013-02-01

    We show that actin lamellar fragments driven solely by polymerization forces at the bounding membrane are generically motile when the circular symmetry is spontaneously broken, with no need of molecular motors or global polarization. We base our study on a nonlinear analysis of a recently introduced minimal model [Callan-Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 258106 (2008)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.100.258106]. We prove the nonlinear instability of the center of mass and find an exact and simple relation between shape and center-of-mass velocity. A complex subcritical bifurcation scenario into traveling solutions is unfolded, where finite velocities appear through a nonadiabatic mechanism. Examples of traveling solutions and their stability are studied numerically.

  15. Polymer confinement and bacterial gliding motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, J.; Dobrynin, A. V.

    2005-07-01

    Cyanobacteria and myxobacteria use slime secretion for gliding motility over surfaces. The slime is produced by the nozzle-like pores located on the bacteria surface. To understand the mechanism of gliding motion and its relation to slime polymerization, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations of a molecular nozzle with growing inside polymer chains. These simulations show that the compression of polymer chains inside the nozzle is a driving force for propulsion. There is a linear relationship between the average nozzle velocity and the chain polymerization rate with a proportionality coefficient dependent on the geometric characteristics of the nozzle such as its length and friction coefficient. This minimal model of the molecular engine was used to explain the gliding motion of bacteria over surfaces.

  16. Mechanics model for actin-based motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    We present here a mechanics model for the force generation by actin polymerization. The possible adhesions between the actin filaments and the load surface, as well as the nucleation and capping of filament tips, are included in this model on top of the well-known elastic Brownian ratchet formulation. A closed form solution is provided from which the force-velocity relationship, summarizing the mechanics of polymerization, can be drawn. Model predictions on the velocity of moving beads driven by actin polymerization are consistent with experiment observations. This model also seems capable of explaining the enhanced actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes and beads by the presence of Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, as observed in recent experiments.

  17. Mechanics model for actin-based motility.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan

    2009-02-01

    We present here a mechanics model for the force generation by actin polymerization. The possible adhesions between the actin filaments and the load surface, as well as the nucleation and capping of filament tips, are included in this model on top of the well-known elastic Brownian ratchet formulation. A closed form solution is provided from which the force-velocity relationship, summarizing the mechanics of polymerization, can be drawn. Model predictions on the velocity of moving beads driven by actin polymerization are consistent with experiment observations. This model also seems capable of explaining the enhanced actin-based motility of Listeria monocytogenes and beads by the presence of Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein, as observed in recent experiments.

  18. Method and system for enhancing microbial motility

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.; Lopez-De-Victoria, G.

    1992-12-31

    A method and system for enhancing the motility of microorganisms by placing an effective amount of chlorinated hydrocarbons, preferably chlorinated alkenes, and most preferably trichloroethylene in spaced relation to the microbes so that the surprisingly strong, monomodal, chemotactic response of the chlorinated hydrocarbon on subsurface microbes can draw the microbes away from or towards and into a substance, as desired. In remediation of groundwater pollution, for example, TCE can be injected into the plume to increase the population of microbes at the plume whereby the plume can be more quickly degraded. A TCE-degrading microbe, such as Welchia alkenophilia, can be used to degrade the TCE following the degradation of the original pollutant.

  19. Method and system for enhancing microbial motility

    SciTech Connect

    Hazen, T.C.; Lopez-De-Victoria, G.

    1990-01-05

    A method and system for enhancing the motility of microorganisms by placing an effective amount of chlorinated hydrocarbons, preferably chlorinated alkenes, and most preferably trichloroethylene in spaced relation to the microbes so that the surprisingly strong, monomodal, chemotactic response of the chlorinated hydrocarbon on subsurface microbes can draw the microbes away from or towards and into a substance, as desired. In remediation of groundwater pollution, for example, TCE can be injected into the plume to increase the population of microbes at the plume whereby the plume can be more quickly degraded. A TCE-degrading microbe, such as Welchia alkenophilia, can be used to degrade the TCE following the degradation of the original pollutant. 5 figs.

  20. Motility recovery during the process of regeneration in freshwater planarians.

    PubMed

    Kato, Chihiro; Mihashi, Koshin; Ishida, Sachiko

    2004-04-02

    Planarians are phylogenetically considered to be the most primitive animals to have acquired a central nervous system and a bilateral symmetry. However, very little is known about the relationship between planarian brain integration and motility. A behavioural and histological study was therefore undertaken in an aspect of planarian motility recovery during its process of regeneration. Quantitative analysis showed that the tail-regenerates recovered their motility gradually as the new heads reformed, while the non-head reforming tail fragments showed no signs of recovery. The head fragments recovered their motility soon after cutting. The cephalic margin was not a function of the motility. The brain regenerated back to its original form in approximately two weeks, the same amount of time it took for the decapitated tails to recover their motility to initial levels. This study provides quantitative evidence that the planarian motility recovered in relation to the head formation during its process of regeneration. Our results reinforce the view that the brain plays a functional part in activating planarian motility.

  1. Laser radiation and motility patterns of human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Lenzi, A.; Claroni, F.; Gandini, L.; Lombardo, F.; Barbieri, C.; Lino, A.; Dondero, F. )

    1989-01-01

    Human sperm were exposed in vitro to laser radiation. An increase in progressive sperm motility was associated with a faster rate of sperm ATP consumption. Computer-assisted analysis of sperm motility confirmed the positive effect of laser irradiation on velocity and linearity of sperm.

  2. A model for Vibrio cholerae colonization of the human intestine.

    PubMed

    Spagnuolo, Anna Maria; Dirita, Victor; Kirschner, Denise

    2011-11-21

    Vibrio cholerae is a strict human pathogen that causes the disease cholera. It is an old-world pathogen that has re-emerged as a new threat since the early 1990s. V. cholerae colonizes the upper, small intestine where it produces a toxin that leads to watery diarrhea, characterizing the disease (Kahn et al., 1988). The dynamics of colonization by the bacteria of the intestines are largely unknown. Although a large initial infectious dose is required for infection, data suggests that only a smaller sub-population colonizes a portion of the small bowel leading to disease. There are many barriers to colonization in the intestines including peristalsis, fluid wash-out, viscosity of the mucus layer, and pH. We are interested in identifying the mechanisms that allow this sub-population of bacteria to survive and colonize the intestines when faced with these barriers. To elaborate the dynamics of V. cholerae infection, we have developed a mathematical model based on a convection-diffusion-reaction-swimming equation capturing bacterial dynamics coupled with Stokes equations governing fluid velocity where we developed a novel non-local boundary condition. Our results indicate that both host and bacterial factors contribute to bacterial density in the gut. Host factors include intestinal diffusion and convection rates while bacterial factors include adherence, motility and growth rates. This model can ultimately be used to test therapeutic strategies against V. cholerae.

  3. The Intestinal Microbiota in the Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Collins, S M

    2016-01-01

    The irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic abdominal symptom complex occurring in a bowel devoid of discernible relevant pathology. There is growing interest in the role of the intestinal microbiota as a basis for the intestinal and possibly behavioral manifestations of this condition. Molecular-based microbial profiling has revealed compositional changes in the microbiota of at least a subset of IBS patients but the data are often conflicting and no microbial signature for this condition has yet been defined. Animal studies in which a previously stable intestinal microbiota is perturbed, by antibiotics or dietary change, results in alterations in intestinal function reminiscent of that seen in IBS patients. These include visceral sensitivity to painful stimuli, altered motility and intestinal barrier function as well as immune activation, and low-grade inflammation. More recent studies have shown that perturbation of the microbial composition of the gut alters brain chemistry and behavior. In a step toward establishing a causal link between an altar microbiota and gut-brain manifestations of IBS, colonization of germ-free mice with microbiota from IBS patients results in an IBS-like phenotype, including alterations and behavior if the donor exhibited psychiatric comorbidity, such as high levels of anxiety. This model provides an opportunity for exploring the mechanisms underlying host-microbe interactions relevant to the pathogenesis of IBS and for developing novel therapeutic targets.

  4. Detection and Genomic Characterization of Motility in Lactobacillus curvatus: Confirmation of Motility in a Species outside the Lactobacillus salivarius Clade

    PubMed Central

    Cousin, Fabien J.; Lynch, Shónagh M.; Harris, Hugh M. B.; McCann, Angela; Lynch, Denise B.; Neville, B. Anne; Irisawa, Tomohiro; Okada, Sanae; Endo, Akihito

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus is the largest genus within the lactic acid bacteria (LAB), with almost 180 species currently identified. Motility has been reported for at least 13 Lactobacillus species, all belonging to the Lactobacillus salivarius clade. Motility in lactobacilli is poorly characterized. It probably confers competitive advantages, such as superior nutrient acquisition and niche colonization, but it could also play an important role in innate immune system activation through flagellin–Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) interaction. We now report strong evidence of motility in a species outside the L. salivarius clade, Lactobacillus curvatus (strain NRIC 0822). The motility of L. curvatus NRIC 0822 was revealed by phase-contrast microscopy and soft-agar motility assays. Strain NRIC 0822 was motile at temperatures between 15°C and 37°C, with a range of different carbohydrates, and under varying atmospheric conditions. We sequenced the L. curvatus NRIC 0822 genome, which revealed that the motility genes are organized in a single operon and that the products are very similar (>98.5% amino acid similarity over >11,000 amino acids) to those encoded by the motility operon of Lactobacillus acidipiscis KCTC 13900 (shown for the first time to be motile also). Moreover, the presence of a large number of mobile genetic elements within and flanking the motility operon of L. curvatus suggests recent horizontal transfer between members of two distinct Lactobacillus clades: L. acidipiscis in the L. salivarius clade and L. curvatus in the L. sakei clade. This study provides novel phenotypic, genetic, and phylogenetic insights into flagellum-mediated motility in lactobacilli. PMID:25501479

  5. Detection and genomic characterization of motility in Lactobacillus curvatus: confirmation of motility in a species outside the Lactobacillus salivarius clade.

    PubMed

    Cousin, Fabien J; Lynch, Shónagh M; Harris, Hugh M B; McCann, Angela; Lynch, Denise B; Neville, B Anne; Irisawa, Tomohiro; Okada, Sanae; Endo, Akihito; O'Toole, Paul W

    2015-02-01

    Lactobacillus is the largest genus within the lactic acid bacteria (LAB), with almost 180 species currently identified. Motility has been reported for at least 13 Lactobacillus species, all belonging to the Lactobacillus salivarius clade. Motility in lactobacilli is poorly characterized. It probably confers competitive advantages, such as superior nutrient acquisition and niche colonization, but it could also play an important role in innate immune system activation through flagellin–Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) interaction. We now report strong evidence of motility in a species outside the L. salivarius clade, Lactobacillus curvatus (strain NRIC0822). The motility of L. curvatus NRIC 0822 was revealed by phase-contrast microscopy and soft-agar motility assays. Strain NRIC 0822 was motile at temperatures between 15 °C and 37 °C, with a range of different carbohydrates, and under varying atmospheric conditions. We sequenced the L. curvatus NRIC 0822 genome, which revealed that the motility genes are organized in a single operon and that the products are very similar (>98.5% amino acid similarity over >11,000 amino acids) to those encoded by the motility operon of Lactobacillus acidipiscis KCTC 13900 (shown for the first time to be motile also). Moreover, the presence of a large number of mobile genetic elements within and flanking the motility operon of L. curvatus suggests recent horizontal transfer between members of two distinct Lactobacillus clades: L. acidipiscis in the L. salivarius clade and L. curvatus inthe L. sakei clade. This study provides novel phenotypic, genetic, and phylogenetic insights into flagellum-mediated motility in lactobacilli.

  6. Kinematic analysis of Toxoplasma gondii motility.

    PubMed

    Frixione, E; Mondragón, R; Meza, I

    1996-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii tachyzoites execute a complex and little understood combination of rapid movements to reach and penetrate human or other animals cells. In the present study, computer-assisted simulation was used to quantitatively analyze the motility of these parasites in three-dimensional space with spatial and temporal resolutions in the micrometer and subsecond ranges. A digital model based on electron-micrographs of a serially sectioned tachyzoite was animated according to a videomicrographed sequence of a characteristic repetitive movement. Keyframe animation defined over 150 frames by a total of 36 kinematic parameters for specific motions, of both the whole model and particular domains, resulted in a real-time life-like simulation of the videorecorded tachyzoite movement. The kinematic values indicate that a full revolution of the model is composed of three half-turns accomplished in nearly 5 s with two phases: a relatively slow 180 degrees tilting with regard to the substratum plane, followed by fast (over 200 degrees/s) spinning almost simultaneous with pivoting around the posterior end, each clockwise and for about 180 degrees. Maximal flexing of the body, as well as bowing and retraction of its anterior end, occur at midway during the tilting phase. An estimated 70 degrees. clockwise torsion of the body seems to precede the spinning-pivoting phase. The results suggest the operation of two basic forces in the motility of T. gondii tachyzoites: (1) a clockwise torque that causes torsion, spinning, and pivoting; and (2) a longitudinal pull that contracts, bends and tilts the parasite. We discuss the possibility that both of these forces might result from the action of an actin-myosin system enveloping the twisted framework of microtubules characteristic of these organisms.

  7. Thyroxin Is Useful to Improve Sperm Motility

    PubMed Central

    Mendeluk, Gabriela Ruth; Rosales, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the non-genomic action of thyroxin on sperm kinetic and its probable use to improve sperm recovery after applying an en- richment method like “swim-up” in comparison with the available one, pentoxifylline. Materials and Methods This is an experimental study. A total of 50 patients were re- cruited, followed by infertility consultation. Conventional sperm assays were performed according to World Health Organization criteria-2010 (WHO-2010). A Computer Aided Semen Analysis System was employed to assess kinetic parameters and concentrations. Number of the motile sperm recovered after preparation technique was calculated. Results Addition of T4 (0.002 µg/ml) to semen samples increased hypermotility at 20 minutes (control: 14.18 ± 5.1% vs. 17.66 ± 8.88%, P<0.03, data expressed as mean ± SD) and remained unchanged after 40 minutes. Significant differences were found in the motile sperm recovered after swim-up (control: 8.93×106 ± 9.52× 06vs. 17.20×106 ± 21.16×106, P<0.03), achieving all of the tested samples a desirable threshold value for artificial insemination outcome, while adding pentoxifylline increased the number of recovered sperm after swim-up in 60% of the studied cases. No synergism between two treatments could be determined. Conclusion We propose a new physiological tool to artificially improve insemination. The discussion opens windows to investigate unknown pathways involved in sperm ca- pacitation and gives innovative arguments to better understand infertility mechanisms. PMID:27441054

  8. Small intestinal ganglioneuromatosis in a dog.

    PubMed

    Paris, J K; McCandlish, I A P; Schwarz, T; Simpson, J W; Smith, S H

    2013-05-01

    A 9-year-old female neutered collie-cross dog was presented with a 2-month history of persistent diarrhoea, weight loss and intermittent vomiting. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed one loop of jejunum with a markedly thickened and multifocally hyperechoic wall, without loss of wall layering. Laparotomies were performed for biopsy and resection of affected intestine. Histopathological examination revealed small intestinal ganglioneuromatosis (GN). The dog recovered well from surgery and the diarrhoea resolved. Eleven months later the dog has gained weight and remains asymptomatic. This is the first report of small intestinal GN affecting a mature dog, in which pathology was localized to the mucosal lamina propria and surgical treatment resulted in a successful outcome.

  9. Intestinal obstruction repair - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100116.htm Intestinal obstruction repair - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Adhesions Intestinal Obstruction A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  10. Intestinal obstruction (pediatric) - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100165.htm Intestinal obstruction (pediatric) - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Intestinal Obstruction A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  11. Effects of osmolality on sperm morphology, motility and flagellar wave parameters in Northern pike (Esox lucius L.).

    PubMed

    Alavi, S M Hadi; Rodina, Marek; Viveiros, Ana T M; Cosson, Jacky; Gela, David; Boryshpolets, Sergei; Linhart, Otomar

    2009-07-01

    Northern pike (Esox lucius L.) spermatozoa are uniflagellated cells differentiated into a head without acrosome, a midpiece and a flagellar tail region flanked by a fin structure. Total, flagellar, head and midpiece lengths of spermatozoa were measured and show mean values of 34.5, 32.0, 1.32, 1.17 microm, respectively, with anterior and posterior widths of the midpiece measuring 0.8 and 0.6 microm, respectively. The osmolality of seminal plasma ranged from 228 to 350 mOsmol kg(-1) (average: 283.88+/-33.05). After triggering of sperm motility in very low osmolality medium (distilled water), blebs appeared along the flagellum. At later periods in the motility phase, the tip of the flagellum became curled into a loop shape which resulted in a shortening of the flagellum and a restriction of wave development to the proximal part (close to head). Spermatozoa velocity and percentage of motile spermatozoa decreased rapidly as a function of time postactivation and depended on the osmolality of activation media (P<0.05). In general, the greatest percentage of motile spermatozoa and highest spermatozoa velocity were observed between 125 and 235 mOsmol kg(-1). Osmolality above 375 mOsmol kg(-1) inhibited the motility of spermatozoa. After triggering of sperm motility in activation media, beating waves propagated along the full length of flagella, while waves appeared dampened during later periods in the motility phase, and were absent at the end of the motility phase. By increasing osmolality, the velocity of spermatozoa reached the highest value while wave length, amplitude, number of waves and curvatures also were at their highest values. This study showed that sperm morphology can be used for fish classification. Sperm morphology, in particular, the flagellar part showed several changes during activation in distilled water. Sperm motility of pike is inhibited due to high osmolality in the seminal plasma. Osmolality of activation medium affects the percentage of motile

  12. Hepatic and intestinal cytochrome P-450, glutathione-S-transferase and UDP-glucuronosyl transferase are affected by six types of dietary fiber in rats inoculated with human whole fecal flora.

    PubMed

    Roland, N; Nugon-Baudon, L; Flinois, J P; Beaune, P

    1994-09-01

    The effects of six different sources of dietary fiber (inulin, wheat brain, carrot, cocoa, pea and oat fiber) on hepatic and intestinal cytochrome P-450 (EC 1.14.14.1), glutathione-S-transferase (GSH-T, EC 2.5.1.18) and UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UDPG-T, EC 2.4.1.17) were studied using germ-free F344 rats subsequently inoculated with a human whole fecal flora. In the liver, the total concentration of P-450 was significantly lower in the wheat bran-fed group than in the carrot-fed group. The 2E1 form of P-450, involved in nitrosamine metabolism, was enhanced in the carrot-fed group compared with those fed most other types of fiber. Compared with the pea-fed group, rats fed cocoa had a lower constitutive 2C11 form and a higher 1A2 form. A very high concentration of small intestinal 1A1 form--involved in "toxication" reactions--was observed in rats fed cocoa. The specific activity of hepatic GSH-T was significantly higher in rats fed inulin than in all other groups, except the carrot-fed group. In the colon, GSH-T specific activity was twice as high in the oat-fed group as in the wheat bran-fed counterpart. Small intestinal GSH-T activity and hepatic and intestinal UDPG-T activities were unaffected by diet. Results are discussed in relation to potential health benefits.

  13. The sacral parasympathetic reflex pathway regulating colonic motility and defaecation in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    De Groat, W C; Krier, J

    1978-01-01

    1. The sacral parasympathetic outflow to the large intestine of the cat was studied by monitoring simultaneously intestinal motility and the efferent firing in postganglionic fibres on the serosal surface of the mid-distal colon. 2. Increases in efferent firing were noted during the occurrence of spontaneous propulsive activity (tonic pressure waves) or segmental contractions (slow rhythmic pressure waves). The neural discharge was not altered by transection of the lumbar sympathetic innervation to the colon but was blocked by interruption of the sacral parasympathetic outflow. 3. Electrical stimulation of pelvic nerve afferents arising in the colon or distension of the colon or rectum evoked reflex increases in efferent firing and sustained propulsive contractions that were associated with defaecation. Both responses were abolished by transection of the pelvic nerves or sacral dorsal roots. 4. Electrical stimulation of colonic afferent fibres also evoked synchronous reflex discharges in colonic efferents at latencies ranging from 180 to 300 msec. The discharges were enhanced during propulsive contractions, abolished by transection of the pelvic nerves but not altered by transection of the lumbar sympathetic nerves. 5. Sacral reflexes were present in cats with intact spinal cord and in chronic spinal animals (transection at T10-T12). The reflexes recovered within minutes to several hours after acute transection of the spinal cord. 6. Electrophysiological measurements indicated that the sacral reflexes to the large intestine were mediated by non-myelinated afferent and preganglionic efferent fibres. The central delay for the reflex was estimated to be 45-60 msec. 7. It is concluded that the sacral parasympathetic reflexes to the large intestine are mediated via a spinal pathway and have an essential role in the initiation of propulsive activity during defaecation. PMID:650474

  14. Evolutionary aspects of collective motility in pathogenic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deforet, Maxime; Xavier, Joao

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogenic bacteria that can use its single polar flagellum to swim through liquids. It can move collectively over semisolid surfaces, a behavior called swarming. It can also settle and form surface-attached communities called biofilms that protect them from antibiotics. The transition from single motility (swimming) to collective motility (swarming) is biologically relevant as it enables exploring environments that a single bacterium cannot explore on its own. It is also clinically relevant since swarming and biofilm formation are thought to be antagonistic. We investigate the mechanisms of bacterial collective motility using a multidisciplinary approach that combines mathematical modeling, quantitative experiments, and microbial genetics. We aim to identify how these mechanisms may evolve under the selective pressure of population expansion, and consequently reinforce or hinder collective motility. In particular, we clarify the role of growth rate and motility in invasive populations.

  15. Gliding Motility Revisited: How Do the Myxobacteria Move without Flagella?

    PubMed Central

    Mauriello, Emilia M. F.; Mignot, Tâm; Yang, Zhaomin; Zusman, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: In bacteria, motility is important for a wide variety of biological functions such as virulence, fruiting body formation, and biofilm formation. While most bacteria move by using specialized appendages, usually external or periplasmic flagella, some bacteria use other mechanisms for their movements that are less well characterized. These mechanisms do not always exhibit obvious motility structures. Myxococcus xanthus is a motile bacterium that does not produce flagella but glides slowly over solid surfaces. How M. xanthus moves has remained a puzzle that has challenged microbiologists for over 50 years. Fortunately, recent advances in the analysis of motility mutants, bioinformatics, and protein localization have revealed likely mechanisms for the two M. xanthus motility systems. These results are summarized in this review. PMID:20508248

  16. Analysis of energy sources for Mycoplasma penetrans gliding motility.

    PubMed

    Jurkovic, Dominika A; Hughes, Michael R; Balish, Mitchell F

    2013-01-01

    Mycoplasma penetrans, a potential human pathogen found mainly in HIV-infected individuals, uses a tip structure for both adherence and gliding motility. To improve our understanding of the molecular mechanism of M. penetrans gliding motility, we used chemical inhibitors of energy sources associated with motility of other organisms to determine which of these is used by M. penetrans and also tested whether gliding speed responded to temperature and pH. Mycoplasma penetrans gliding motility was not eliminated in the presence of a proton motive force inhibitor, a sodium motive force inhibitor, or an agent that depletes cellular ATP. At near-neutral pH, gliding speed increased as temperature increased. The absence of a clear chemical energy source for gliding motility and a positive correlation between speed and temperature suggest that energy derived from heat provides the major source of power for the gliding motor of M. penetrans.

  17. Motile axonal mitochondria contribute to the variability of presynaptic strength.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Qiao, Haifa; Pan, Ping-Yue; Chen, Yanmin; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2013-08-15

    One of the most notable characteristics of synaptic transmission is the wide variation in synaptic strength in response to identical stimulation. In hippocampal neurons, approximately one-third of axonal mitochondria are highly motile, and some dynamically pass through presynaptic boutons. This raises a fundamental question: can motile mitochondria contribute to the pulse-to-pulse variability of presynaptic strength? Recently, we identified syntaphilin as an axonal mitochondrial-docking protein. Using hippocampal neurons and slices of syntaphilin knockout mice, we demonstrate that the motility of axonal mitochondria correlates with presynaptic variability. Enhancing mitochondrial motility increases the pulse-to-pulse variability, whereas immobilizing mitochondria reduces the variability. By dual-color live imaging at single-bouton levels, we further show that motile mitochondria passing through boutons dynamically influence synaptic vesicle release, mainly by altering ATP homeostasis in axons. Thus, our study provides insight into the fundamental properties of the CNS to ensure the plasticity and reliability of synaptic transmission.

  18. Computational approaches to substrate-based cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S.

    2016-07-01

    Substrate-based crawling motility of eukaryotic cells is essential for many biological functions, both in developing and mature organisms. Motility dysfunctions are involved in several life-threatening pathologies such as cancer and metastasis. Motile cells are also a natural realisation of active, self-propelled 'particles', a popular research topic in nonequilibrium physics. Finally, from the materials perspective, assemblies of motile cells and evolving tissues constitute a class of adaptive self-healing materials that respond to the topography, elasticity and surface chemistry of the environment and react to external stimuli. Although a comprehensive understanding of substrate-based cell motility remains elusive, progress has been achieved recently in its modelling on the whole-cell level. Here we survey the most recent advances in computational approaches to cell movement and demonstrate how these models improve our understanding of complex self-organised systems such as living cells.

  19. A mechanism for cell motility by active polar gels

    PubMed Central

    Marth, W.; Praetorius, S.; Voigt, A.

    2015-01-01

    We analyse a generic motility model, with the motility mechanism arising by contractile stress due to the interaction of myosin and actin. A hydrodynamic active polar gel theory is used to model the cytoplasm of a cell and is combined with a Helfrich-type model to account for membrane properties. The overall model allows consideration of the motility without the necessity for local adhesion. Besides a detailed numerical approach together with convergence studies for the highly nonlinear free boundary problem, we also compare the induced flow field of the motile cell with that of classical squirmer models and identify the motile cell as a puller or pusher, depending on the strength of the myosin–actin interactions. PMID:25926698

  20. Esophageal motility in nonacid reflux compared with acid reflux.

    PubMed

    Wang, Victor S; Feldman, Natan; Maurer, Rie; Burakoff, Robert

    2009-09-01

    Esophageal motility has been well studied in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and acid reflux, but not in nonacid reflux. Consecutive patients who had both 24-h multichannel intraluminal impedance-pH (MII-pH) and esophageal motility tests for suspected GERD were studied. Patients were grouped into nonacid refluxers, acid refluxers, and nonrefluxers based on positive symptom correlation and objective findings of acid reflux. Of 96 patients enrolled, 21 patients (22%) were nonacid refluxers, 44 patients (46%) were acid refluxers, and 31 patients (32%) had no objective evidence of reflux. Normal motility was recorded in 86% of nonacid refluxers, 71% of acid refluxers, and 60% of nonrefluxers. Ineffective esophageal motility was seen in 24% of acid refluxers, and 5% of nonacid refluxers (P = 0.11). Symptomatic nonacid reflux events comprised 22% of patients studied for GERD symptoms by MII-pH. Esophageal motility in nonacid reflux is normal 86% of the time.

  1. Amount and source of dietary copper affects small intestine morphology, duodenal lipid peroxidation, hepatic oxidative stress,and mRNA expression of hepatic copper regulatory proteins in weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    Fry, R S; Ashwell, M S; Lloyd, K E; O'Nan, A T; Flowers, W L; Stewart, K R; Spears, J W

    2012-09-01

    Thirty weanling, crossbred barrows (SUS SCROFA) were used to determine the effects of amount and source of dietary Cu on small intestinal morphology and lipid peroxidation, Cu metabolism, and mRNA expression of proteins involved in hepatic Cu homeostasis. At 21 d of age, pigs were stratified by BW (6.33 ± 0.23 kg) and allocated to 1 of the following dietary treatments: i) control (no supplemental Cu; 6.7 mg Cu/kg), ii) 225 mg supplemental Cu/kg diet from Cu sulfate (CuSO(4)), or iii) 225 mg supplemental Cu/kg diet from tribasic Cu chloride (TBCC). Pigs were housed 2 pigs per pen and were fed a 3-phase diet regimen until d 35 or 36 of the study. During harvest, bile and liver were obtained for mineral analysis, and liver samples were also obtained for analysis of liver glutathione (GSH) and mRNA expression of Cu regulatory proteins. Segments of duodenum, proximal jejunum, and ileum were obtained for mucosal morphology, and duodenal mucosal scrapings were collected from all pigs for analysis of malondialdehyde (MDA). Duodenal villus height was reduced in CuSO(4) pigs compared with control (P = 0.001) and TBCC (P = 0.03) pigs. Villus height in the proximal jejunum of CuSO(4) pigs was reduced (P = 0.03) compared with control pigs, but ileal villus height was not affected (P = 0.82) by treatment. Duodenal MDA concentrations were greater (P = 0.03) in CuSO(4) pigs and tended to be greater (P = 0.10) in pigs supplemented with TBCC compared with control pigs. Liver Cu was greater (P = 0.01) in CuSO(4) vs. control pigs, and tended (P = 0.07) to be greater in TBCC pigs than control pigs. Bile Cu concentrations were greater (P < 0.001) in CuSO(4) and TBCC pigs vs. controls and were also greater (P = 0.04) in TBCC vs. CuSO(4) pigs. Total liver GSH concentrations were less (P = 0.02) in pigs fed diets supplemented with CuSO(4) vs. pigs fed control diets but total liver GSH did not differ (P = 0.11) between control and TBCC pigs. Hepatic mRNA of cytochrome c oxidase assembly

  2. Motility alterations in celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Pinto-Sanchez, Maria Ines; Bercik, Premysl; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of gut motility is complex and involves neuromuscular, immune and environmental mechanisms. It is well established that patients with celiac disease (CD) often display gut dysmotility. Studies have shown the presence of disturbed esophageal motility, altered gastric emptying, and dysmotility of the small intestine, gallbladder and colon in untreated CD. Most of these motor abnormalities resolve after a strict gluten-free diet, suggesting that mechanisms related to the inflammatory condition and disease process are responsible for the motor dysfunction. Motility abnormalities are also a hallmark of functional bowel disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where it has been proposed as underlying mechanism for symptom generation (diarrhea, constipation, bloating). Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a poorly defined entity, mostly self-diagnosed, that presents clinically with IBS symptoms in the absence of specific celiac markers. Patients with NCGS are believed to react symptomatically to wheat components, and some studies have proposed the presence of low-grade inflammation in these patients. There is little information regarding the functional characterization of these patients before and after a gluten-free diet. A study suggested the presence of altered gastrointestinal transit in NCGS patients who also have a high prevalence of nonspecific anti-gliadin antibodies. Results of an ongoing clinical study in NCGS patients with positive anti-gliadin antibodies before and after a gluten-free diet will be discussed. Elucidating the mechanisms for symptom generation in NCGS patients is important to find new therapeutic alternatives to the burden of imposing a strict gluten-free diet in patients who do not have CD.

  3. High motility reduces grazing mortality of planktonic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Matz, Carsten; Jürgens, Klaus

    2005-02-01

    We tested the impact of bacterial swimming speed on the survival of planktonic bacteria in the presence of protozoan grazers. Grazing experiments with three common bacterivorous nanoflagellates revealed low clearance rates for highly motile bacteria. High-resolution video microscopy demonstrated that the number of predator-prey contacts increased with bacterial swimming speed, but ingestion rates dropped at speeds of >25 microm s(-1) as a result of handling problems with highly motile cells. Comparative studies of a moderately motile strain (<25 microm s(-1)) and a highly motile strain (>45 microm s(-1)) further revealed changes in the bacterial swimming speed distribution due to speed-selective flagellate grazing. Better long-term survival of the highly motile strain was indicated by fourfold-higher bacterial numbers in the presence of grazing compared to the moderately motile strain. Putative constraints of maintaining high swimming speeds were tested at high growth rates and under starvation with the following results: (i) for two out of three strains increased growth rate resulted in larger and slower bacterial cells, and (ii) starved cells became smaller but maintained their swimming speeds. Combined data sets for bacterial swimming speed and cell size revealed highest grazing losses for moderately motile bacteria with a cell size between 0.2 and 0.4 microm(3). Grazing mortality was lowest for cells of >0.5 microm(3) and small, highly motile bacteria. Survival efficiencies of >95% for the ultramicrobacterial isolate CP-1 (< or =0.1 microm(3), >50 microm s(-1)) illustrated the combined protective action of small cell size and high motility. Our findings suggest that motility has an important adaptive function in the survival of planktonic bacteria during protozoan grazing.

  4. Ineffective esophageal motility (IEM): the primary finding in patients with nonspecific esophageal motility disorder.

    PubMed

    Leite, L P; Johnston, B T; Barrett, J; Castell, J A; Castell, D O

    1997-09-01

    Nonspecific esophageal motility disorder (NEMD) is a vague category used to include patients with poorly defined esophageal contraction abnormalities. The criteria include "ineffective" contraction waves, ie, peristaltic waves that are either of low amplitude or are not transmitted. The aim of this study was to identify the prevalence of ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) found during manometry testing and to evaluate esophageal acid exposure and esophageal acid clearance (EAC) in patients with IEM compared to those with other motility findings. We analyzed esophageal manometric tracings from 600 consecutive patients undergoing manometry in our laboratory following a specific protocol from April 1992 through October 1994 to identify the frequency of ineffective contractions and the percentages of other motility abnormalities present in patients meeting criteria for NEMD. Comparison of acid exposure and EAC was made with 150 patients who also had both esophageal manometry and pH-metry over the same time period. Sixty-one of 600 patients (10%) met the diagnostic criteria for NEMD. Sixty of 61 (98%) of these patients had IEM, defined by at least 30% ineffective contractions out of 10 wet swallows. Thirty-five of these patients also underwent ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring. Patients with IEM demonstrated significant increases in both recumbent median percentage of time of pH <4 (4.5%) and median distal EAC (4.2 min/episode) compared to those with normal motility (0.2%, 1 min/episode), diffuse esophageal spasm (0%, 0.6 min/episode), hypertensive LES (0%, 1.8 min/episode), and nutcracker esophagus (0.4% 1.6 min/episode). Recumbent acid exposure in IEM did not differ significantly from that in patients with systemic scleroderma (SSc) for either variable (5.4%, 4.2 min/episode). We propose that IEM is a more appropriate term and should replace NEMD, giving it a more specific manometric identity. IEM patients demonstrate a distinctive recumbent reflux pattern

  5. A conserved type IV pilin signal peptide H-domain is critical for the post-translational regulation of flagella-dependent motility.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, Rianne N; Pohlschroder, Mechthild

    2014-08-01

    In many bacteria and archaea, type IV pili facilitate surface adhesion, the initial step in biofilm formation. Haloferax volcanii has a specific set of adhesion pilins (PilA1-A6) that, although diverse, contain an absolutely conserved signal peptide hydrophobic (H) domain. Data presented here demonstrate that these pilins (PilA1-A6) also play an important role in regulating flagella-dependent motility, which allows cells to rapidly transition between planktonic and sessile states. Cells lacking adhesion pilins exhibit a severe motility defect, however, expression of any one of the adhesion pilins in trans can rescue the motility and adhesion. Conversely, while deleting pilB3-C3, genes required for PilA pilus biosynthesis, results in cells lacking pili and having an adhesion defect, it does not affect motility, indicating that motility regulation requires the presence of pilins, but not assembled pili. Mutagenesis studies revealed that the pilin-dependent motility regulatory mechanism does not require the diverse C-terminal region of the PilA pilins but specifically involves the conserved H-domain. This novel post-translational regulatory mechanism, which employs components that promote biofilm formation to inhibit motility, can provide a rapid response to changing environmental conditions. A model for this regulatory mechanism, which may also be present in other prokaryotes, is discussed.

  6. Relationship Between Intestinal Motility Indexes From Internal and Surface Recordings of Electroenterogram

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    serosa for internal recording, and two monopolar Ag-AgCl contact electrodes for surface recording. Internal electrodes were placed in the duodenum , Treitz...observed. For instance, while duodenum is in phase III of the IMMC, jejunum is still in phase II. Synchronization of IMMC detected on abdominal surface...calculated CCF’s maximum coefficients (fig 4). Duodenum 0 0,2 0,4 0,6 0,8 1 Treitz angle 0 0,2 0,4 0,6 0,8 1 Jejunum 1 0 0,2 0,4 0,6 0,8 1 Jejunum 2

  7. Intestinal permeability, leaky gut, and intestinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Hollander, D

    1999-10-01

    A major task of the intestine is to form a defensive barrier to prevent absorption of damaging substances from the external environment. This protective function of the intestinal mucosa is called permeability. Clinicians can use inert, nonmetabolized sugars such as mannitol, rhamnose, or lactulose to measure the permeability barrier or the degree of leakiness of the intestinal mucosa. Ample evidence indicates that permeability is increased in most patients with Crohn's disease and in 10% to 20% of their clinically healthy relatives. The abnormal leakiness of the mucosa in Crohn's patients and their relatives can be greatly amplified by aspirin preadministration. Permeability measurements in Crohn's patients reflect the activity, extent, and distribution of the disease and may allow us to predict the likelihood of recurrence after surgery or medically induced remission. Permeability is also increased in celiac disease and by trauma, burns, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The major determinant of the rate of intestinal permeability is the opening or closure of the tight junctions between enterocytes in the paracellular space. As we broaden our understanding of the mechanisms and agents that control the degree of leakiness of the tight junctions, we will be increasingly able to use permeability measurements to study the etiology and pathogenesis of various disorders and to design or monitor therapies for their management.

  8. Subinhibitory Concentrations of Allicin Decrease Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) Biofilm Formation, Adhesion Ability, and Swimming Motility.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaolong; Sha, Kaihui; Xu, Guangya; Tian, Hanwen; Wang, Xiaoying; Chen, Shanze; Wang, Yi; Li, Jingyu; Chen, Junli; Huang, Ning

    2016-06-29

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) biofilm formation enables the organism to avoid the host immune system, resist antibiotics, and provide a reservoir for persistent infection. Once the biofilm is established, eradication of the infection becomes difficult. Therefore, strategies against UPEC biofilm are urgently required. In this study, we investigated the effect of allicin, isolated from garlic essential oil, on UPEC CFT073 and J96 biofilm formation and dispersal, along with its effect on UPEC adhesion ability and swimming motility. Sub-inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of allicin decreased UPEC biofilm formation and affected its architecture. Allicin was also capable of dispersing biofilm. Furthermore, allicin decreased the bacterial adhesion ability and swimming motility, which are important for biofilm formation. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) revealed that allicin decreased the expression of UPEC type 1 fimbriae adhesin gene fimH. Docking studies suggested that allicin was located within the binding pocket of heptyl α-d-mannopyrannoside in FimH and formed hydrogen bonds with Phe1 and Asn135. In addition, allicin decreased the expression of the two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) cognate response regulator gene uvrY and increased the expression of the RNA binding global regulatory protein gene csrA of UPEC CFT073, which is associated with UPEC biofilm. The findings suggest that sub-MICs of allicin are capable of affecting UPEC biofilm formation and dispersal, and decreasing UPEC adhesion ability and swimming motility.

  9. Subinhibitory Concentrations of Allicin Decrease Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) Biofilm Formation, Adhesion Ability, and Swimming Motility

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaolong; Sha, Kaihui; Xu, Guangya; Tian, Hanwen; Wang, Xiaoying; Chen, Shanze; Wang, Yi; Li, Jingyu; Chen, Junli; Huang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) biofilm formation enables the organism to avoid the host immune system, resist antibiotics, and provide a reservoir for persistent infection. Once the biofilm is established, eradication of the infection becomes difficult. Therefore, strategies against UPEC biofilm are urgently required. In this study, we investigated the effect of allicin, isolated from garlic essential oil, on UPEC CFT073 and J96 biofilm formation and dispersal, along with its effect on UPEC adhesion ability and swimming motility. Sub-inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of allicin decreased UPEC biofilm formation and affected its architecture. Allicin was also capable of dispersing biofilm. Furthermore, allicin decreased the bacterial adhesion ability and swimming motility, which are important for biofilm formation. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) revealed that allicin decreased the expression of UPEC type 1 fimbriae adhesin gene fimH. Docking studies suggested that allicin was located within the binding pocket of heptyl α-d-mannopyrannoside in FimH and formed hydrogen bonds with Phe1 and Asn135. In addition, allicin decreased the expression of the two-component regulatory systems (TCSs) cognate response regulator gene uvrY and increased the expression of the RNA binding global regulatory protein gene csrA of UPEC CFT073, which is associated with UPEC biofilm. The findings suggest that sub-MICs of allicin are capable of affecting UPEC biofilm formation and dispersal, and decreasing UPEC adhesion ability and swimming motility. PMID:27367677

  10. IL-17A induces hypo-contraction of intestinal smooth muscle via induction of iNOS in muscularis macrophages.

    PubMed

    Mori, Daisuke; Watanabe, Nobumasa; Kaminuma, Osamu; Murata, Takahisa; Hiroi, Takachika; Ozaki, Hiroshi; Hori, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Intestinal inflammation causes disorder in bowel motility. Th17 cytokines are involved in intestinal inflammation. To understand the role of interleukin (IL)-17 in intestinal motility, we examined effects of IL-17A on contractile activities of organ-cultured ileum. Rat ileal smooth muscle strips were organ cultured with IL-17A. Muscle contraction was measured, and cells expressing inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were identified with immunohistochemistry. Creating Th17-transferred colitis model mice, in vivo effects of IL-17 on contractile activities, and iNOS mRNA expression in colonic smooth muscle were investigated. Treatment with IL-17A for 12 h and 3 days attenuated carbachol- and membrane depolarization-induced contractions in organ-cultured rat ileum. N(G)-Nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (100 μM), a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, completely reversed the IL-17A-induced inhibition of contractile force. Ileal tissue cultured in the presence of IL-17A showed increased expression of iNOS mRNA and protein. Immunohistochemical analysis using an iNOS antibody revealed that iNOS protein was expressed on ED2-positive muscularis macrophages. The level of iNOS mRNA was also increased in inflamed colonic smooth muscle of Th17-transferred colitis model mice. In intestinal inflammation, IL-17A induces an intestinal motility disorder through iNOS expression in muscularis macrophages.

  11. Relationship between stallion sperm motility and viability as detected by two fluorescence staining techniques using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Love, C C; Thompson, J A; Brinsko, S P; Rigby, S L; Blanchard, T L; Lowry, V K; Varner, D D

    2003-10-01

    Relationships between sperm motility parameters and viability were evaluated using two fluorescent staining techniques in fresh extended semen (fresh and after 24 h storage at 5 degrees C) that had various concentrations of dead sperm added to simulate different levels of viable and nonviable sperm. Both protocols incorporated SYBR-14 and propidium iodide (PI) while the second protocol added the mitochondrial probe JC-1. The relationship between total sperm motility and percent viable sperm was high between staining protocols (r = 0.98). Time (0 h versus 24 h, P<0.0001) and treatment (0, 10, 25, 50, and 75% nonviable sperm, P<0.0001) affected percent total sperm motility and percent viable sperm for both staining protocols. Actual percent viable sperm for each time and treatment did not differ from expected values.

  12. High-Resolution Manometry Evaluation of the Pharynx and Upper Esophageal Sphincter Motility in Patients with Achalasia.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Mariano A; Herbella, Fernando A M; Patti, Marco G

    2015-10-01

    The motility of the pharynx and upper esophageal sphincter (UES) is still poorly understood. It is also unclear if the motility of this area may be compromised in patients with achalasia. This study aims to evaluate the motility of the pharynx, UES, and proximal esophagus in patients with esophageal achalasia. Sixty patients with achalasia underwent high-resolution manometry (HRM) (52 % females, mean age 54 years). Esophageal dilatation was classified according to the radiologic diameter in Type I (<4 cm): 6 %; Type II (4-7 cm): 36 %; Type III (7-10 cm): 34 %; and Type IV (>10 cm): 24 %. HRM classified 43 % of the patients as Chicago Type I and 57 % as Type II. Manometric parameters were compared to normal values obtained from a previous study in volunteers. The motility of the velopharynx showed short, premature, and hypertonic contraction. The epiglottis also showed hypertonic contraction. The UES had increased residual pressure. Chicago classification Type II patients had higher UES residual pressure (p = 0.03). The degree of esophageal dilatation did not correlate with manometric parameters. Achalasia may affect the motility of the pharyngo-upper esophageal area. The changes observed may represent functional alterations to prevent aspiration, especially in patients with Chicago classification Type II achalasia.

  13. Regulation of sperm flagellar motility activation and chemotaxis caused by egg-derived substance(s) in sea cucumber.

    PubMed

    Morita, Masaya; Kitamura, Makoto; Nakajima, Ayako; Sri Susilo, Endang; Takemura, Akihiro; Okuno, Makoto

    2009-04-01

    The sea cucumber Holothuria atra is a broadcast spawner. Among broadcast spawners, fertilization occurs by means of an egg-derived substance(s) that induces sperm flagellar motility activation and chemotaxis. Holothuria atra sperm were quiescent in seawater, but exhibited flagellar motility activation near eggs with chorion (intact eggs). In addition, they moved in a helical motion toward intact eggs as well as a capillary filled with the water layer of the egg extracts, suggesting that an egg-derived compound(s) causes motility activation and chemotaxis. Furthermore, demembranated sperm flagella were reactivated in high pH (> 7.8) solution without cAMP, and a phosphorylation assay using (gamma-32P)ATP showed that axonemal protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation also occurred in a pH-dependent manner. These results suggest that the activation of sperm motility in holothurians is controlled by pH-sensitive changes in axonemal protein phosphorylation. Ca2+ concentration affected the swimming trajectory of demembranated sperm, indicating that Ca2+-binding proteins present at the flagella may be associated with regulation of flagellar waveform. Moreover, the phosphorylation states of several axonemal proteins were Ca2+-sensitive, indicating that Ca2+ impacts both kinase and phosphatase activities. In addition, in vivo sperm protein phosphorylation occurred after treatment with a water-soluble egg extract. Our results suggest that one or more egg-derived compounds activate motility and subsequent chemotactic behavior via Ca2+-sensitive flagellar protein phosphorylation.

  14. The green tea catechin epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) blocks cell motility, chemotaxis and development in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    McQuade, Kyle J; Nakajima, Akihiko; Ilacqua, April N; Shimada, Nao; Sawai, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Catechins, flavanols found at high levels in green tea, have received significant attention due to their potential health benefits related to cancer, autoimmunity and metabolic disease, but little is known about the mechanisms by which these compounds affect cellular behavior. Here, we assess whether the model organism Dictyostelium discoideum is a useful tool with which to characterize the effects of catechins. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), the most abundant and potent catechin in green tea, has significant effects on the Dictyostelium life cycle. In the presence of EGCG aggregation is delayed, cells do not stream and development is typically stalled at the loose aggregate stage. The developmental effects very likely result from defects in motility, as EGCG reduces both random movement and chemotaxis of Dictyostelium amoebae. These results suggest that catechins and their derivatives may be useful tools with which to better understand cell motility and development in Dictyostelium and that this organism is a useful model to further characterize the activities of catechins.

  15. A low conductivity culture medium suitable for the evaluation of sperm motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Rui; Han, Chao; Sun, Zilong; Huang, Guoliang; Yu, Zhongyao; Zhou, Yuxiang; Wang, Jundong; Qiao, Jie; Cheng, Jing

    2008-12-01

    A novel culture medium of low conductivity suitable for dielectrophoretic selection of sperm was developed. Conventional IVF methods lack the capability of selecting the expected sperms and the embryonic development may be adversely affected to certain extent. Dielectrophoresis (DEP), a technique commonly applied in cell manipulation [1], may provide an alternative. However, the conventional IVF medium has a high conductivity, which may result in the unexpected heating effect during DEP causing damage to the gametes. The newly developed medium consists of sucrose, HEPES, BSA and low concentrations of ions. The conductivity of this medium is significantly lower than the conventional IVF medium. Motility and membrane integrality of the mouse sperm were tested in the low-conductivity medium, demonstrating an acceptable percent rate of motile sperm compared to the control groups.

  16. Loss of sigma factor RpoN increases intestinal colonization of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in an adult mouse model.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, W Brian; Richards, Gary P; Boyd, E Fidelma

    2014-02-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of bacterial seafood-borne gastroenteritis worldwide, yet little is known about how this pathogen colonizes the human intestine. The alternative sigma factor RpoN/sigma-54 is a global regulator that controls flagellar synthesis, as well as a wide range of nonflagellar genes. We constructed an in-frame deletion mutation in rpoN (VP2670) in V. parahaemolyticus RIMD2210633, a clinical serogroup O3:K6 isolate, and examined the effects in vivo using a streptomycin-treated mouse model of colonization. We confirmed that deletion of rpoN rendered V. parahaemolyticus nonmotile, and it caused reduced biofilm formation and an apparent defect in glutamine synthetase production. In in vivo competition assays between the rpoN mutant and a wild-type RIMD2210633 strain marked with the β-galactosidase gene lacZ (WBWlacZ), the mutant colonized significantly more proficiently. Intestinal persistence competition assays also demonstrated that the rpoN mutant had enhanced fitness and outcompeted WBWlacZ. Mutants defective in the polar flagellum biosynthesis FliAP sigma factor also outcompeted WBWlacZ but not to the same level as the rpoN mutant, which suggested that lack of motility is not the sole cause of the fitness effect. In an in vitro growth competition assay in mouse intestinal mucus, the rpoN mutant also outcompeted the wild type and exhibited faster doubling times when grown in mucus and on individual components of mucus. Genes in the pathways for the catabolism of mucus sugars also had significantly higher expression levels in a ΔrpoN mutant than in the wild type. These data suggest that in V. parahaemolyticus, RpoN plays an important role in carbon utilization regulation, which may significantly affect host colonization.

  17. Emergence and development of gut motility in the chicken embryo

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, N. R.; Fleury, V.; Dufour, S.

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract transports the food bolus by peristalsis. Gut motility starts at an early age in the developing embryo, well before it is required for nutrition of the organism. We present a comprehensive kinematic study of the emergence and physiological development of gut motility in all regions of the lower digestive tract of the chicken embryo from embryonic days E5 through E9. We characterized motility emergence time, propagation patterns, speed, frequency and amplitude of peristalsis waves. We found that the emergence of an uninterrupted circular ring of smooth muscle correlated with the appearance of propagative contractile waves, at E6 in the hindgut and midgut, and at E9 in the caecal appendix. We show that peristalsis at these stages is critically dependent on calcium and is not mediated by neurons as gut motility is insensitive to tetrodotoxin and takes place in the hindgut in the absence of neurons. We further demonstrate that motility also matures in ex-vivo organ culture. We compare our results to existing literature on zebrafish, mouse and human motility development, and discuss their chronological relationship with other major developmental events occurring in the chicken embryonic gut at these stages. Our work sets a baseline for further investigations of motility development in this important animal model. PMID:28222167

  18. Quorum sensing positively regulates flagellar motility in pathogenic Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Vibrios belonging to the Harveyi clade are among the major pathogens of aquatic organisms. Quorum sensing (QS) is essential for virulence of V. harveyi towards different hosts. However, most virulence factors reported to be controlled by QS to date are negatively regulated by QS, therefore suggesting that their impact on virulence is limited. In this study, we report that QS positively regulates flagellar motility. We found that autoinducer synthase mutants showed significantly lower swimming motility than the wild type, and the swimming motility could be restored by adding synthetic signal molecules. Further, motility of a luxO mutant with inactive QS (LuxO D47E) was significantly lower than that of the wild type and of a luxO mutant with constitutively maximal QS activity (LuxO D47A). Furthermore, we found that the expression of flagellar genes (both early, middle and late genes) was significantly lower in the luxO mutant with inactive QS when compared with wild type and the luxO mutant with maximal QS activity. Motility assays and gene expression also revealed the involvement of the quorum-sensing master regulator LuxR in the QS regulation of motility. Finally, the motility inhibitor phenamil significantly decreased the virulence of V. harveyi towards gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae.

  19. Ion channels and calcium signaling in motile cilia

    PubMed Central

    Doerner, Julia F; Delling, Markus; Clapham, David E

    2015-01-01

    The beating of motile cilia generates fluid flow over epithelia in brain ventricles, airways, and Fallopian tubes. Here, we patch clamp single motile cilia of mammalian ependymal cells and examine their potential function as a calcium signaling compartment. Resting motile cilia calcium concentration ([Ca2+] ~170 nM) is only slightly elevated over cytoplasmic [Ca2+] (~100 nM) at steady state. Ca2+ changes that arise in the cytoplasm rapidly equilibrate in motile cilia. We measured CaV1 voltage-gated calcium channels in ependymal cells, but these channels are not specifically enriched in motile cilia. Membrane depolarization increases ciliary [Ca2+], but only marginally alters cilia beating and cilia-driven fluid velocity within short (~1 min) time frames. We conclude that beating of ependymal motile cilia is not tightly regulated by voltage-gated calcium channels, unlike that of well-studied motile cilia and flagella in protists, such as Paramecia and Chlamydomonas. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11066.001 PMID:26650848

  20. Emergence and development of gut motility in the chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, N R; Fleury, V; Dufour, S; Proux-Gillardeaux, V; Asnacios, A

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal tract transports the food bolus by peristalsis. Gut motility starts at an early age in the developing embryo, well before it is required for nutrition of the organism. We present a comprehensive kinematic study of the emergence and physiological development of gut motility in all regions of the lower digestive tract of the chicken embryo from embryonic days E5 through E9. We characterized motility emergence time, propagation patterns, speed, frequency and amplitude of peristalsis waves. We found that the emergence of an uninterrupted circular ring of smooth muscle correlated with the appearance of propagative contractile waves, at E6 in the hindgut and midgut, and at E9 in the caecal appendix. We show that peristalsis at these stages is critically dependent on calcium and is not mediated by neurons as gut motility is insensitive to tetrodotoxin and takes place in the hindgut in the absence of neurons. We further demonstrate that motility also matures in ex-vivo organ culture. We compare our results to existing literature on zebrafish, mouse and human motility development, and discuss their chronological relationship with other major developmental events occurring in the chicken embryonic gut at these stages. Our work sets a baseline for further investigations of motility development in this important animal model.

  1. Biochemistry of intestinal development.

    PubMed Central

    Henning, S J

    1979-01-01

    In biochemical terms, the rat small intestine is relatively immature at birth and for the first two postnatal weeks. Then during the third week a dramatic array of enzymic changes begins, and by the end of the fourth week the intestine has the digestive and absorptive properties of the adult. Selective examples of these changes are discussed with emphasis on their implications for toxicological studies. The review also includes a detailed consideration of the roles of the dietary change of weaning and of glucocorticoid and thyroid hormones in the regulation of intestinal development. PMID:575507

  2. Effect of sorafenib on sperm count and sperm motility in male Swiss albino mice

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Surekha Devadasa; Bairy, Laxminarayana Kurady

    2015-01-01

    The issue of male germ line mutagenesis and the effects on developmental defects in the next generation has become increasingly high profile over recent years. Mutagenic substance affects germinal cells in the testis. Since the cells are undergoing different phases of cell division and maturation, it is an ideal system to study the effect of chemotherapeutic agents. There are lacunae in the literature on the effect of sorafenib on gonadal function. With background, a study was planned to evaluate the effects of sorafenib on sperm count and sperm motility in male Swiss albino mice. Male Swiss albino mice were used for the study. The animals were segregated into control, positive control (PC) and three treatment groups. PC received oral imatinib (100 mg/kg body weight) and treatment groups received 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg body weight of sorafenib orally for 7 consecutive days at intervals of 24 h between two administrations. The control group remained in the home cage for an equal duration of time to match their corresponding treatment groups. The animals were sacrificed at the end of 1st, 2nd, 4th, 5th, 7th, and 10th weeks after the last exposure to drug, respectively. Sperm suspensions were prepared and introduced into a counting chamber. Total sperm count and motility were recorded. There was a significant decrease in sperm count and sperm motility by sorafenib which was comparable with the effect of PC imatinib. Sorafenib adversely affects sperm count and sperm motility which are reversible after discontinuation of treatment. PMID:26605157

  3. Curcumin Reduces the Motility of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium by Binding to the Flagella, Thereby Leading to Flagellar Fragility and Shedding

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Arjun; Negi, Vidya Devi; Sakorey, Deepika; Chandra, Nagasuma

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT One of the important virulence properties of the pathogen is its ability to travel to a favorable environment, cross the viscous mucus barrier (intestinal barrier for enteric pathogens), and reach the epithelia to initiate pathogenesis with the help of an appendage, like flagella. Nonetheless, f